Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator: TechBook

Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator: TechBook
Storage Pool Management Feature
in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Version 4.0
• Installation and Configuration of SPM
• Detailed Use Cases
• Customer Example
Drew Tonnesen
Lee McColgan
Bill Stronge
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Part number H7095.3
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Contents
Preface
Chapter 1
Concepts
Introduction ....................................................................................... 20
Concepts ............................................................................................. 21
Storage Resource......................................................................... 21
Storage Type................................................................................21
Virtualization Domain ...............................................................22
Integration with VMware resources ........................................ 23
High-level architectural description .............................................. 25
SMC server .................................................................................. 26
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator for vSphere Client .............. 27
Plug-in management ........................................................................ 32
VSI feature management.................................................................. 33
Functional description...................................................................... 34
Roles.............................................................................................. 34
Chapter 2
Operation
Operational environment ................................................................ 38
SMC server configurations........................................................ 38
Dependencies .............................................................................. 39
Symmetrix VMAX/VMAXe configuration................................... 40
Solutions Enabler configuration ............................................... 41
Licensing ...................................................................................... 41
Local mode................................................................................... 41
Remote mode or client/server mode....................................... 42
Symmetrix Management Console configuration ......................... 45
Setup ............................................................................................. 45
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Security ........................................................................................ 45
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator...................................................... 46
VMware vSphere Client ............................................................ 46
Symmetrix Management Console ............................................ 47
EMC Solutions Enabler.............................................................. 47
PowerPath Remote Tools for Windows (optional)................ 48
Operation ........................................................................................... 49
Preparing the storage environment ......................................... 49
Setting up a virtualization domain .......................................... 51
Allocating storage to VMware resources................................ 52
Creating VMware storage ......................................................... 56
Automated functions ....................................................................... 58
Additional functionality .................................................................. 61
Detailed behavior.............................................................................. 62
LUN creation............................................................................... 62
Meta devices................................................................................ 66
FAST for virtual pools ............................................................... 66
LUN expansion ........................................................................... 66
LUN deletion............................................................................... 68
Precreation policy....................................................................... 70
SPM reservation.......................................................................... 71
Mapping and masking............................................................... 72
SPM LUNs ................................................................................... 73
Adopt LUNs ................................................................................ 73
Automated virtualization domain creation............................ 74
Storage Resources ............................................................................. 81
Thin pool as a storage resource ................................................ 81
FAST VP policy as a storage resource ..................................... 82
Security and authorization .............................................................. 87
Symmetrix authorization........................................................... 87
SMC roles..................................................................................... 88
VSI to SMC server security ....................................................... 91
vSphere permissions .................................................................. 92
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI ........................................ 94
EMC VSI global view ................................................................. 94
vCenter view ............................................................................. 112
Datacenter view ........................................................................ 115
Cluster view .............................................................................. 117
Host view................................................................................... 120
Resource Pool view .................................................................. 123
Datacenter menus..................................................................... 126
Cluster menus ........................................................................... 130
Host menus................................................................................ 139
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Contents
Resource Pool menus ...............................................................141
Virtual Machine menus............................................................144
Datastore menus .......................................................................160
Storage Viewer\LUNs menus ................................................167
Error logging.................................................................................... 174
Storage administrator...............................................................174
VMware administrator.............................................................174
Chapter 3
Use Cases
Use cases and functional details ................................................... 176
Storage administrator (SA) functions........................................... 177
Use cases.....................................................................................177
VMware administrator/user functions ....................................... 201
Use cases.....................................................................................201
Chapter 4
Customer Example
Introduction ..................................................................................... 214
The Storage administrator — Joe .................................................. 215
Initiator and port groups .........................................................215
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator export environment..........218
Storage group and masking view...........................................221
Thin pools...................................................................................223
Storage Types ............................................................................227
Authorizations...........................................................................231
Virtualization Domain — manual setup ...............................235
Virtualization Domain — automated setup..........................240
Client ID - connection...............................................................249
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack.... 252
vCenter registration with SMC for SPM................................252
vCenter assigned pools ............................................................256
Judy’s datacenter.......................................................................257
Storage resource pools .............................................................259
The BRONZE datastore............................................................269
VMware user permissions for SPM........................................276
Conclusion........................................................................................ 284
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Virtualization Domain example...................................................................
VMware Resource Pools with SPM .............................................................
Basic architecture of Storage Pool Management (SPM)............................
vSphere Client Home.....................................................................................
vSphere Client Inventory ..............................................................................
Sample VSI Wizard ........................................................................................
Recent Tasks....................................................................................................
Plug-in Manager.............................................................................................
VSI feature management ...............................................................................
Example of a VMware hierarchy for compute resources .........................
Example of a VMware hierarchy for compute and storage resources ...
Flowchart for LUN creation..........................................................................
Flowchart for LUN expansion......................................................................
Flowchart for LUN deletion .........................................................................
SPM mapping and masking .........................................................................
FAST VP Model ..............................................................................................
Virtualization Domain Setup........................................................................
Normal Permission ........................................................................................
StorageAdmin Permission ............................................................................
Virtualization Domain entry ........................................................................
Storage Group selection ................................................................................
Thin Pool selection .........................................................................................
Assign Extension Permission to a VMware user.......................................
EMC VSI default global view .......................................................................
Settings navigation panel ..............................................................................
Feature Manager.............................................................................................
Logging ............................................................................................................
Features navigation panel .............................................................................
Storage Pool Management servers...............................................................
Register with server settings dialog box .....................................................
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Register with server options.......................................................................
SPM export file .............................................................................................
Solutions Enabler Server dialog box .........................................................
Testing SE connectivity ...............................................................................
Symmetrix Arrays ........................................................................................
CLARiiON Arrays........................................................................................
Celerra Systems ............................................................................................
VPLEX Systems ............................................................................................
EMC VSI tab..................................................................................................
Assigned Pools .............................................................................................
Assigned Pools .............................................................................................
EMC VSI tab..................................................................................................
Navigation panel..........................................................................................
Storage Types................................................................................................
EMC VSI tab..................................................................................................
Navigation Panel..........................................................................................
Storage Types................................................................................................
Navigation Panel..........................................................................................
Storage Types................................................................................................
Status Panel ...................................................................................................
Storage Types................................................................................................
EMC context menu ......................................................................................
Allocate Storage............................................................................................
Allocate Storage Summary .........................................................................
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu...............................................
EMC context menu ......................................................................................
Add Datastore — Choose Storage Type ...................................................
Add Datastore — Select Capacity..............................................................
Add Datastore — Datastore Name............................................................
Add Datastore — Choose datastore formatting ......................................
Add Datastore — Summary .......................................................................
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu — Resource Pool ...............
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu — LUN................................
EMC context menu ......................................................................................
EMC context menu ......................................................................................
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu...............................................
EMC context menu ......................................................................................
Add Raw Device Mapping .........................................................................
Add Raw Device Mapping — Select Capacity ........................................
Add Raw Device Mapping — Select Datastore.......................................
Add Raw Device Mapping — Compatibility Mode ...............................
Add Raw Device Mapping — Advanced Options..................................
Add Raw Device Mapping — Summary..................................................
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Add Raw Device Mappings Batch .............................................................
Add Raw Device Mappings Batch — Select Storage Type.....................
Add Raw Device Mappings Batch — Select Capacity ............................
Add Raw Device Mappings Batch — Summary......................................
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu ...............................................
Expand Raw Device Mapping — One Moment Screen..........................
Expand Raw Device Mapping— Capacity ...............................................
Expand Raw Device Mapping — Summary.............................................
Expand Raw Device Mapping — Expansion Error .................................
Remove Raw Device Mapping ...................................................................
Confirm Remove Raw Device Mapping ...................................................
EMC context menu .......................................................................................
Expand Datastore — One Moment Screen ...............................................
Expand Datastore — Capacity....................................................................
Expand Datastore — Summary ..................................................................
Extend Datastore — Select Storage Type ..................................................
Extend Datastore — Select New Capacity ................................................
Extend Datastore — Summary ...................................................................
Remove Datastore.........................................................................................
EMC context menu .......................................................................................
Expand LUN — One Moment Screen .......................................................
Expand LUN — Insufficient capacity error ..............................................
Expand LUN — Capacity............................................................................
Expand LUN — Summary ..........................................................................
Expand LUN — Expansion error ...............................................................
Delete LUN — Warning dialog ..................................................................
Delete LUN — Non-SPM LUN error.........................................................
SMC Tasks — Manage Storage Types .......................................................
Virtualization Domain Management — Create Virtualization
Domain...........................................................................................................
Virtualization Domain dialog box .............................................................
SMC Tasks — Automated Virtualization Domain Setup .......................
Adopt LUNs Dialog .....................................................................................
Refresh Configuration in vSphere Client..................................................
SMC Tasks — Manage Launch Clients .....................................................
Manage Launch Clients ...............................................................................
SMC Tasks — Manage SPM Metadata ......................................................
SPM Metadata Maintenance .......................................................................
Storage Pool Management — Servers Configuration .............................
Storage Pool Management — Register With Server................................
Remove Raw Device Mapping or RDM....................................................
Existing port group for Judy’s VMware environment............................
Initiator group for Judy’s ESX cluster........................................................
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vSphere Client Home ..................................................................................
Storage Pool Management tab ...................................................................
Save SPM Export File...................................................................................
SPM Export File from Judy’s VMware environment..............................
SPM Storage Group .....................................................................................
Masking view for Acme’s VMware environment ...................................
FLASH thin pool with Flash disk DATA devices ...................................
FC thin pool with Fibre Channel disk DATA devices............................
SATA thin pool with SATA disk DATA devices ....................................
Manage Storage Types task ........................................................................
GOLD Storage Type for Flash disks..........................................................
SILVER Storage Type for FC disks ............................................................
BRONZE Storage Type for SATA..............................................................
Manage Roles................................................................................................
Adding the Virtualization Domain Role for the Storage Group...........
Adding the Virtualization Domain Role for Thin Pool FLASH ............
Adding the Virtualization Domain Role for the Thin Pool FC .............
Adding the Virtualization Domain Role for the Thin Pool SATA........
Virtualization Domain PARTNER.............................................................
Adding of Thin Pools to Virtualization Domain PARTNER.................
Adding Thin Pool FLASH to Virtualization Domain PARTNER .........
Adding Thin Pool FC to Virtualization Domain PARTNER .................
Adding Thin Pool SATA to Virtualization Domain PARTNER ...........
Automated Virtualization Domain Setup task ........................................
Automated Virtualization Domain Setup Wizard welcome screen .....
Automated Virtualization Domain — Symmetrix array selection .......
Automated Virtualization Domain — Virtualization Data File load ...
Automated Virtualization Domain — Storage Resource selection ......
Automated Virtualization Domain — Summary of actions ..................
Automated Virtualization Domain — Progress indicator .....................
Manage Launch Clients task ......................................................................
SPM Client-ID for vCenter Authentication ..............................................
vSphere Login...............................................................................................
SPM Registration with SMC.......................................................................
Registering SPM with SMC ........................................................................
Registration entry in SPM tab and associated task .................................
Assigned Pools and Storage Types in Judy’s vCenter PARTNER........
Refresh Configuration after SMC storage change...................................
Judy’s Datacenter, SPM...............................................................................
SPM_Cluster and associated Resource Pools...........................................
Configure Storage Allocations ...................................................................
Cluster_SPM Storage Type Allocation......................................................
Completing Storage Allocation for Cluster_SPM....................................
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Post-Storage Allocation by Judy.................................................................
Configuring the “storage pool” for the ArchiveResourcePool ..............
Allocating the BRONZE Storage Type to the ArchiveResourcePool....
Completing BRONZE allocation ................................................................
ArchiveResourcePool with BRONZE allocation......................................
Final Allocation results for the Resource Pools........................................
Add the BRONZE Datastore from the EMC menu .................................
Select from available storage in SPM_Cluster..........................................
Select Datastore size — Precreated or Custom ........................................
Select datastore name...................................................................................
Select block size for datastore .....................................................................
Complete datastore creation .......................................................................
The complete allocation of the GOLD Storage Type...............................
Add New Role SPM .....................................................................................
Add Role SPM to Jack ..................................................................................
VMUser Jack adds storage through SPM..................................................
Jack selects Storage Type GOLD ................................................................
Capacity Selection — Jack chooses Precreated.........................................
Jack completes the RDM..............................................................................
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator showing Jack’s RDM ...........................
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Create Storage Type ......................................................................................
Delete Storage Type ......................................................................................
Update Storage Type ....................................................................................
Create Virtualization Domain .....................................................................
Auto Create Virtualization Domain ...........................................................
Delete Virtualization Domain .....................................................................
Update Virtualization Domain....................................................................
Add a View to a Virtualization Domain ....................................................
Remove a View from a Virtualization Domain ........................................
Add a Storage Resource to a Virtualization Domain...............................
Remove a Storage Resource from a Virtualization Domain ...................
Update the Storage Resource Capacity in a Virtualization Domain .....
Adopt LUNs...................................................................................................
Adopt an existing configuration .................................................................
Set Client Security .........................................................................................
Back up SPM data .........................................................................................
Restore SPM data ..........................................................................................
Delete SPM data ............................................................................................
Create an SPM server connection ...............................................................
Remove an SPM Server connection ............................................................
Modify an SPM server connection..............................................................
Allocate storage for a VMware object ........................................................
Refresh cluster membership ........................................................................
Refresh configuration ...................................................................................
Create RDM for VM ......................................................................................
Remove RDM from VM ...............................................................................
Create a VMFS datastore for a cluster........................................................
Delete a VMFS datastore from a cluster.....................................................
Expand a VMFS datastore............................................................................
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Preface
As part of an effort to improve and enhance the performance and capabilities
of its product lines, EMC periodically releases revisions of its hardware and
software. Therefore, some functions described in this document may not be
supported by all versions of the software or hardware currently in use. For
the most up-to-date information on product features, refer to your product
release notes.
If a product does not function properly or does not function as described in
this document, please contact your EMC representative.
Note: This document was accurate as of the time of publication. However, as
information is added, new versions of this document may be released to the
EMC Powerlink website. Check the Powerlink website to ensure that you are
using the latest version of this document.
Purpose
Audience
This TechBook describes how the VMware vSphere products work
with EMC Symmetrix storage systems and software technologies.
This document focuses on the Storage Pool Management feature of
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator.
This document is part of the EMC Symmetrix documentation set, and
is intended for use by storage administrators, system administrators,
and VMware Infrastructure administrators.
Readers of this document are expected to be familiar with the
following topics:
◆
EMC Symmetrix system operation.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
15
Preface
◆
◆
Conventions used in
this document
EMC Solutions Enabler and EMC Symmetrix Management
Console.
VMware vSphere products and their operation.
EMC uses the following conventions for special notices.
Note: A note presents information that is important, but not hazard-related.
A caution contains information essential to avoid data loss or
damage to the system or equipment.
IMPORTANT
An important notice contains information essential to operation of
the software or hardware.
Typographical conventions
EMC uses the following type style conventions in this document:
Normal
Used in running (nonprocedural) text for:
• Names of interface elements (such as names of windows, dialog boxes, buttons,
fields, and menus)
• Names of resources, attributes, pools, Boolean expressions, buttons, DQL
statements, keywords, clauses, environment variables, functions, utilities
• URLs, pathnames, filenames, directory names, computer names, filenames, links,
groups, service keys, file systems, notifications
Bold
Used in running (nonprocedural) text for:
• Names of commands, daemons, options, programs, processes, services,
applications, utilities, kernels, notifications, system calls, man pages
Used in procedures for:
• Names of interface elements (such as names of windows, dialog boxes, buttons,
fields, and menus)
• What user specifically selects, clicks, presses, or types
16
Italic
Used in all text (including procedures) for:
• Full titles of publications referenced in text
• Emphasis (for example a new term)
• Variables
Courier
Used for:
• System output, such as an error message or script
• URLs, complete paths, filenames, prompts, and syntax when shown outside of
running text
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Preface
Courier bold
Used for:
• Specific user input (such as commands)
Courier italic
Used in procedures for:
• Variables on command line
• User input variables
<>
Angle brackets enclose parameter or variable values supplied by the user
[]
Square brackets enclose optional values
|
Vertical bar indicates alternate selections - the bar means “or”
{}
Braces indicate content that you must specify (that is, x or y or z)
...
Ellipses indicate nonessential information omitted from the example
The team that wrote this TechBook
This TechBook was authored by a team from Symmetrix Partner
Engineering based in Hopkinton, MA.
Drew Tonnesen is a Consulting Systems Integration Engineer in the
EMC Symmetrix Partner Engineering team focusing on VMware and
Cisco technologies. Before starting in his current position, Drew
worked as a Global Solutions Consultant focusing on Oracle
Technology. He has worked at EMC for 5 years in various capacities.
Drew has over 15 years of experience working in the IT industry.
Drew holds a master’s degree from the University of Connecticut.
We'd like to hear from you!
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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1
Concepts
This chapter introduces the Storage Pool Management concepts:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Introduction ........................................................................................
Concepts ..............................................................................................
High-level architectural description................................................
Plug-in management .........................................................................
VSI feature management...................................................................
Functional description.......................................................................
Concepts
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Concepts
Introduction
In virtual computing environments, IT is being offered as a service,
user requirements change dynamically and the underlying
infrastructure is transparent to the end user. For example, in a
VMware environment, virtual machines (VM™) can be provisioned
in minutes to meet the demands of the users. As such, any
underlying infrastructure, that is, storage that supports the new VM
will need to be provisioned quickly to meet the IT Service Level
Agreement of the user. With EMC Virtual Storage Integrator (VSI)
and Symmetrix Management Console (SMC), storage is managed as a
shared resource pool. When used together, VSI and SMC accelerate
storage provisioning, so the IT service is available to the end-user
faster.
Using SMC’s Storage Pool Management (SPM) feature, a storage
administrator (SA) creates a virtualization domain that corresponds
to a vCenter instance with physical pooled storage. This pooled
storage resource is made accessible through VSI that enables the
VMware administrator to allocate as needed to the VMware
resources, similar to the way that CPU and memory resources are
subdivided. With the combination of VSI and SMC, storage
resources are provisioned dynamically and the virtual administrator
is able to meet the dynamic requirements of the end users faster.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Concepts
Concepts
SPM introduces three concepts:
◆
Storage Resource1
◆
Storage Type
◆
Virtualization Domain
These concepts are critical in bringing storage provisioning to the
nonstorage savvy VMware user.
Storage Resource
Storage resources are storage-containing-objects in the Symmetrix
that contain real, physical storage. They are attached to virtualization
domains and backup the storage types shown in VSI with actual
storage. Specifically they can be either thin pools or FAST VP policies.
Storage Type
A storage type is simply a label that the VMware user utilizes to
select the storage he wants. It is defined by a storage administrator
during SPM configuration and is utilized by a VMware user when
provisioning storage. This makes it simple for a user to provision the
type of storage he wants.
The SA defines the types of storage, or storage resource, available to
the VMware user in one of two ways:
◆
Using any already defined Fully Automated Storage Tiering
(FAST) tier
◆
Creating a custom type
Custom types are created by selecting the properties of the physical
storage:
◆
Disk type (SATA, Fibre Channel (FC), Flash (EFD))
1. Storage Resources are covered more extensively in the section “Storage
Resources” on page 81 in Chapter 2. Storage Resources are introduced in
SMC 7.3.
Concepts
21
Concepts
◆
Disk speed (7200, 10,000, 15,000)
◆
RAID configuration (RAID6 14+2, RAID6 6+2, RAID5 7+1,
RAID5 3+1).
The SA can use this label to describe storage by its physical type, or
for what application it is intended, such as Exchange, or even for
what group it is intended, such as QA.
Note: A custom storage type need not have any properties associated with it.
This is always the case for a FAST VP policy.
Virtualization Domain
While SPM allows VMware users to provision storage, it recognizes
that the SA still owns and controls the array, and as such must be able
to set boundaries around what storage the users can provision. These
boundaries are defined by a virtualization domain.
The virtualization domain represents a vCenter. It contains
information about the vCenter, for example, the GUID. It also
contains other information needed to provision storage to the
vCenter, such as the masking views to use, and the physical storage
(storage resources) from which the VMware users will actually
provision their storage. Finally, the SA can attach policies to the
virtualization domain that can restrict or limit how VMware users
can provision storage. Multiple storage resources can be added to the
same virtualization domain as long as they are from the same array
and are different storage types.1 Therefore, it would be possible for a
virtualization domain to have 250 GB of gold storage, 500 GB of silver
storage, and 1000 GB of bronze storage. Figure 1 on page 23 provides
details of this example.
1. A separate storage type is required for each storage resource (thin
pools, FAST VP policy) that is added to a virtualization domain, even
if the storage resources being added have the same characteristics. For
example, a virtualization domain could have three thin pools
associated with it which are all comprised of EFD disk; however each
of those storage resources would need to be assigned a separate
storage type, despite the fact that they each have the same type of disk
backing them.
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Concepts
Figure 1
Virtualization Domain example
Integration with VMware resources
VMware manages CPU cycles and memory as resources that can be
allocated to create virtual machines. For instance, it takes the sum of
all the CPU cycles on all the processors and all the memory on all the
servers in a cluster and creates a pool of CPU and memory for the
clusters. As users create VM's they allocate CPU cycles and memory
from this pool for the individual VM. Furthermore, the cluster's pool
of CPU cycles can be broken down into subpools, called resource
pools, to provide a finer granularity of control. For example, the
business units of a company might each have their own resource pool
of CPU and memory from which to draw when creating VMs. A
VMware user in marketing, for instance, could only create a VM from
the CPU and memory resources available in the marketing resource
pool. The user would be unable to access any of the resources in the
other business units’ resource pools.
One of the great benefits of SPM is that it can be controlled and
allocated in the same way CPU and memory is in VMware, in this
case for RDMs. Those very same resource pools that are set up for
Concepts
23
Concepts
CPU and memory can also be used to allocate the storage that is
presented to VMware by using the virtualization domain. Figure 2 on
page 24 provides a high-level view of this.
Note: The Section “Allocating storage to VMware resources” on page 52
provides more detail on using resource pools with SPM.
Figure 2
24
VMware Resource Pools with SPM
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Concepts
High-level architectural description
SPM enhances and abstracts the Symmetrix array functionality in
order to integrate storage provisioning into the VMware
environment. This functionality is accomplished by adding on to the
feature sets of several, already existing components. The SMC server
is upgraded with the centralized SPM functions. The SMC GUI is
enhanced with the SPM UI functions needed for the storage
administrator, and the VMware user and administrator functions are
added to the VSI for vSphere Client plug-in.
The SPM environment is shown in Figure 3 on page 26. The
components that comprise this environment are:
◆
Symmetrix VMAX™ or VMAXe™ Array
◆
ESX Servers
◆
SAN
◆
SMC Server with SPM functionality
◆
vSphere Client with VSI
◆
Browser that runs the SMC GUI with SPM functionality
High-level architectural description
25
Concepts
Figure 3
Basic architecture of Storage Pool Management (SPM)
SMC server
The SMC server is the server component of the EMC element
manager for the Symmetrix array. It allows a storage administrator to
control one or more Symmetrix arrays through its browser-based
GUI. The SMC server stores the SPM data and performs SPM
functions as requested by the system administrator, through the SMC
GUI, and VMware users and administrators through VSI. A single
SMC server can support multiple vSphere Clients.
SMC GUI
The SMC GUI is a client front end to the SMC server.
26
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Concepts
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator for vSphere Client
Virtual Storage Integrator (VSI) for vSphere Client is a plug-in to the
VMware vSphere Client. The VSI framework is included as part of
each of the four installable features of VSI: Path Management, Storage
Pool Management, Storage Viewer, and SRA Utilities. The Storage
Pool Management (SPM) feature for VSI provides the user interface
for VMware users and administrators to interact with the SPM
functionality, allowing the user to provision storage from within the
vSphere Client. In addition, the Storage Viewer (SV) feature for VSI
provides reporting and monitoring capabilities to the user of SPM. SV
integrates with SPM so that many SPM operations, such as removing
a datastore or RDM, are available from SV views and menus.
Using SPM, a vSphere Client can talk to more than one SMC server.
Note: The VSI product guide provides more information on VSI.
vSphere Client components
The vSphere Client has a range of components that comprise its
overall graphical user interface (GUI), each of which is extensible.
Figure 4 on page 28 shows the home view of the vSphere Client. This
view contains a variety of global views, which can be grouped into
subcategories, such as inventory, administration, management, and
solutions and applications. A vSphere Client plug-in can extend this
view by creating custom global views to be included here, in any of
the available sub-categories. The EMC icon is included in the
solutions and applications group of the home view and will allow the
user to configure global settings for the plug-in throughout the
vSphere Client. The EMC global view also allows the user to discover
new storage arrays and synchronize with existing storage arrays.
High-level architectural description
27
Concepts
Figure 4
vSphere Client Home
By selecting Hosts and Clusters as shown in the Inventory section of
the home view in Figure 5 on page 29, the user is presented with a
typical vSphere Client view.
28
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Concepts
Figure 5
vSphere Client Inventory
From here, the user is presented with a tree structure of objects in the
left pane, and an array of tabs that pertain to each object in the right
pane. A vSphere Client plug-in can extend the inventory in a number
of ways including:
◆
Creation of custom menu items on the inventory objects in the left
pane.
◆
Creation of custom tabs in the right pane for each type of
inventory object.
For certain objects, VSI will create a custom EMC VSI tab in the right
pane.
High-level architectural description
29
Concepts
By selecting VMware inventory menus, the user may begin
operations which present a VMware-styled wizard. These wizards
break multistep configurations into several pages followed by a
summary of the choices made. The pages are navigable through Next
and Back buttons as well as a table of contents. Wizard page contents
are validated dynamically to disable navigation if invalid values are
entered.
For certain objects, VSI creates a custom wizard to configure complex
operations such as in Figure 6 on page 30.
Figure 6
Sample VSI Wizard
Many operations executed by vSphere are executed asynchronously
on the vCenter or ESX servers. To keep clients appraised of the recent
changes to the VMware environment, these tasks can have their
progress monitored in the Recent Tasks section of the vSphere Client.
For certain operations, VSI will create a custom task which can be
monitored in the Recent Tasks section as shown in Figure 7 on
page 31.
30
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Concepts
Figure 7
Recent Tasks
High-level architectural description
31
Concepts
Plug-in management
Once a plug-in is installed, it is enabled by default. If the user no
longer wants to use a plug-in, but does not want to uninstall it, they
can simply disable it. These operations are performed through the
following dialog box, which can be accessed through the Plug-ins
root menu item of vSphere Client. From within that menu, choose
Manage Plug-ins.
Figure 8
Plug-in Manager
This dialog box in Figure 8 on page 32 lists both the installed
plug-ins, as well as plug-ins that are available for download from the
vCenter Server. Furthermore, each installed plug-in can be enabled or
disabled by choosing the respective command after right-clicking on
the plug-in. Each plug-in includes a version and description to
identify itself.
Note: If VSI is disabled, all installed features become disabled.
32
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Concepts
VSI feature management
In addition to the top-level plug-in management, VSI may also be
enabled or disabled at the feature level. The VSI framework lists each
installed feature from the EMC global view as seen in Figure 9 on
page 33.
Figure 9
VSI feature management
From here one can disable or even uninstall a particular feature such
as Storage Pool Management without needing to disable the entire
VSI plug-in, causing all features to be disabled. Though the
individual features can be uninstalled from this screen, they cannot
be installed here. Each feature must be installed through its own
executable.
Note: The VSI plug-in as a whole can only be uninstalled through the
Add/Remove Programs in the Windows Operating System.
VSI feature management
33
Concepts
Functional description
This section provides a high level functional description of Storage
Pool Management (SPM).
The SPM functions are performed by two types of users, or roles.
These roles are listed next and are detailed in “Roles” on page 34:
◆
Storage administrator
◆
VMware administrator
The functions of SPM can be broken down into four operational
phases which are listed next and detailed in Chapter 2:
1. Preparing the storage environment
2. Setting up the virtualization domain
3. Allocating storage to VMware resources
4. Creating VMware storage
Roles
SPM recognizes three roles:
◆
Storage administrator
◆
VMware administrator
◆
VMware user
Storage administrator (SA)
The SA is responsible for:
◆
Creating the following autoprovisioning objects:
• Masking views
• Initiator groups
• Port groups
• Storage groups
34
◆
Setting up authorization on storage groups and thin pools
◆
Creating and defining storage types
◆
Creating and deleting virtualization domains
◆
Assigning thin pools to virtualization domains
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Concepts
◆
Assigning views to the virtualization domains
◆
Setting policies for virtualization domains including:
• Maximum and minimum LUN size
• Maximum number of LUNs created
• Precreation policies
Note: For all of these functions, except for the setting up the authorizations,
the SA must be logged into SMC as a user with the admin or storage admin
role. For setting up the authorizations, he must be logged in as a user with the
admin or security admin role.
VMware administrator
The VMware administrator interacts with SMC through the vSphere
Client GUI with the VSI plug-in. The VMware administrator is
responsible for:
◆
Assigning storage to VMware objects including:
• Datacenters
• Clusters
• Resource pools
◆
Creating and deleting an RDM LUN for a VM
◆
Creating and deleting a VMFS datastore for a cluster
◆
Expanding a VMFS datastore
Note: The VMware administrator is restricted to assigning storage only to
those VMware objects to which he has VMware authorization to administer.
VMware user
The VMware user interacts with SMC through the vSphere Client
GUI with the VSI plug-in. The VMware user can:
◆
Create and delete an RDM LUN for a VM
◆
Create and delete a VMFS datastore for a cluster
◆
Expanding a VMFS datastore
Note: The VMware user is restricted to provisioning storage only to those
virtual machines to which he has VMware authorization to configure:
Functional description
35
Concepts
36
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
2
Operation
This chapter discuss the operation of Storage Pool Management:
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Operational environment.................................................................. 38
Symmetrix VMAX/VMAXe configuration.................................... 40
Symmetrix Management Console configuration .......................... 45
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator ....................................................... 46
Operation ............................................................................................ 49
Automated functions......................................................................... 58
Additional functionality ................................................................... 61
Detailed behavior............................................................................... 62
Storage Resources .............................................................................. 81
Security and authorization ............................................................... 87
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI ......................................... 94
Error logging..................................................................................... 174
Operation
37
Operation
Operational environment
The following are the minimum system requirements for a Storage
Pool Management environment:
◆
Symmetrix Management Console (SMC) server
• Server 2000, SP4 +
• Server 2003
• Server 2008
• Server 2008 R2 (64-bit)
• SunOS 5.10 SPARC
• Red Hat AS/ES 4 update 3
• SUSE Linux 9 SP2
◆
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
◆
SMC GUI
• IE 6.0 through 8.0
• Firefox 1.0 through 3.0
Software versions required:
◆
Symmetrix VMAX 5874 or later; VMAXe 5875 or later
◆
vCenter and vSphere Client 4.0
◆
SYMAPI 7.1.1 or later
SMC server configurations
The following are the SMC server configurations that are supported.
Client/Server
In the client/server configuration, the SMC server resides on a
separate server from the SE server.
Local
In the local server configuration, the SMC server and the SE server
reside on the same physical server.
38
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
The SMC server on the service processor is not supported because
there is no way for the SPM metadata to be backed up. The SMC
virtual appliance is also not supported for this reason.
Dependencies
The dependencies are as follows:
◆
Minimum vCenter 4.0 and vSphere 4.0
◆
Minimum SMC 7.1.1
◆
Minimum SYMAPI 7.1.1
Operational environment
39
Operation
Symmetrix VMAX/VMAXe configuration
The following settings on the Symmetrix Fibre Channel1 ports are
essential when using the Symmetrix with VMware ESX 4.x and ESXi
5 and VSI:
◆
ACLX
◆
UWN for Unique WWN
◆
SPC-2 bit for presenting SPC-2 compliant EMC Symmetrix
devices.
Note: Please consult the EMC Support Matrix for an up-to-date listing of port
settings.
The bit settings described previously, and in the EMC Support
Matrix, are critical for proper operation of VMware virtualization
platforms and EMC software. The bit settings can be either set for
the Symmetrix FA port or per HBA. Solutions Enabler version 6.4
and later support setting of HBA port flags on a per-initiator basis.
Note: The SPC-2 bit setting is on by default in newly shipped Symmetrix
DMX arrays running 5773 and all Symmetrix VMAX/VMAXe arrays.
Note: The setting for a common serial number, C, is no longer required in
VMware environments.
The host which is going to serve as the Solutions Enabler server
(either local or remote) must have access to at least one LUN,
preferably a gatekeeper (GK) device, from each of the Symmetrix
arrays that must be resolved. If possible, have more than one LUN
accessible from each Symmetrix. Without this LUN, Solutions
Enabler will not be able to discover the array, and therefore VSI will
not be able to resolve the devices.
1. At this time SPM supports Fibre Channel and no other protocols, e.g.
iSCSI.
40
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Solutions Enabler configuration
There are various aspects to Solutions Enabler configuration that
depend on whether a local or remote Solutions Enabler database is
used. Certain Solutions Enabler configurations will require additional
work after Solutions Enabler is installed.
Licensing
Virtual Storage Integrator does not require any Solutions Enabler
licenses. All Solutions Enabler license checking will be disabled for
any operations run through VSI. This means that the user will not
need to enter any Solutions Enabler licenses on the client host where
VSI is installed or the Solutions Enabler server host (if one is used).
SMC, on the other hand, does require a license. These two products
together enable the feature of SPM.
Note: Licenses will need to be entered if the user plans to use Solutions
Enabler outside of VSI, such as through the command line interface (symcli).
Local mode
Using Solutions Enabler in local mode means that the Solutions
Enabler database will be maintained on the local host. Furthermore,
all required connections to storage arrays will need to be made from
the local host. For this reason, local mode is only supported with
server operating systems that EMC supports for connection to their
storage arrays. Client and desktop operating systems such as
Windows XP and Windows Vista are not supported in this mode.
When Solutions Enabler is being used in local mode, the Remote
Server Name text box in the Solutions Enabler Server group shown in
Figure 33 on page 103 should be empty. This implies that the local
Solutions Enabler database will be used. The Port text box will be
ignored.
Advantages
The following are the advantages of using Solutions Enabler in local
mode:
◆
Local mode is straightforward. There are no additional
configuration steps required.
Symmetrix VMAX/VMAXe configuration
41
Operation
◆
There is no need to build and maintain a secondary host, thus
reducing complexity of the solution.
Disadvantages
The following are the disadvantages of using Solutions Enabler in
local mode:
◆
Laptops, desktops, and client operating systems such as
Windows XP, are not supported in local mode because they
cannot be connected to the storage.
◆
The host must be connected to the storage arrays which could
present a security risk, and will require additional infrastructure
work such as fiber connections and zoning.
◆
VSI will be tied to this one host which prevents it from moving
with the user to other clients in the network.
Setup
In order for Solutions Enabler to perform an in-band discovery of a
storage array in local mode, at least one LUN from that storage array
must be accessible to the local host. Symmetrix arrays can only be
discovered in-band, so this means that at least one LUN must be
accessible for that Symmetrix array.
Note: If the local host is a virtual machine, then all LUNs used for in-band
discovery must be raw device mappings (RDM) LUNs in physical
compatibility mode so that they are not masked underneath VMFS.
Remote mode or client/server mode
Using Solutions Enabler in a client/server configuration means that
the Solutions Enabler database will be maintained on a remote
Solutions Enabler server. Therefore, all required connections to the
storage arrays will need to be made from that remote server. Due to
this connection requirement, remote mode is the only mode that can
be used with client and desktop operating systems such as Windows
XP and Windows Vista.
When Solutions Enabler is being used in remote mode, the Remote
Server Name text box in the Solutions Enabler Server group shown in
Figure 33 on page 103 should contain the IP address or fully resolved
host name of the Solutions Enabler server. The Port text box should
contain the port number (default 8443) where Solutions Enabler
42
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
server will be servicing requests. It is the user's responsibility to
ensure that both the server's IP address and port are accessible from
the client machine.
Advantages
The following are the advantages of using a remote Solutions Enabler
server:
◆
Since a connection to the array is not required, remote mode can
be used with all of the operating systems that are supported by
VSI.
◆
A single, centralized Solutions Enabler server (such as the
Solutions Enabler Virtual appliance) can service various clients
and applications (including VSI), thus reducing infrastructure
costs and improving security.
◆
VSI becomes portable and can move with the user to various
client machines, provided that they are running a supported
operating system.
Disadvantages
The following are the disadvantages of using a remote Solutions
Enabler server:
◆
A separate host must be configured as the Solutions Enabler
server. The Solutions Enabler Virtual Appliance can lessen this
investment cost.
◆
Additional steps must be taken on both the Solutions Enabler
server and the client machine in order to properly configure the
security relationship.
◆
Depending on the port used for the Solutions Enabler server,
additional network changes may be required to configure
firewalls, proxies, and such.
Setup
When configuring a remote Solutions Enabler server, the first step is
to install and start the Solutions Enabler Server daemon (storsrvd). If
this service was not created at the time when Solutions Enabler was
installed, then it can be created with the following Solutions Enabler
command:
stordaemon install storsrvd -autostart
Symmetrix VMAX/VMAXe configuration
43
Operation
This service can then be started with the following command:
stordaemon start storsrvd
Without this service, your client will not be able to connect to the
Solutions Enabler server.
In order for Solutions Enabler to perform an in-band discovery of a
storage array in remote mode, at least one LUN from that storage
array must be accessible to the remote Solutions Enabler server.
Symmetrix arrays can only be discovered in-band, so this means that
at least one LUN must be accessible for that Symmetrix array.
Note: If the local host is a virtual machine, then those LUNs must be raw
device mapping (RDM) LUNs in physical compatibility mode so that they are
not masked underneath VMFS.
It is possible to utilize a VMware ESX Server as the Solutions Enabler
server. The steps for installing Solutions Enabler on a VMware ESX
Server can be found in the EMC Solutions Enabler 7.1.1 Installation
Guide available on Powerlink®.
◆
The advantage to this is that the ESX Server presumably already
has access to the storage arrays, thus simplifying the setup of the
Solutions Enabler server.
◆
The disadvantage is that it does add some complexity and load to
the ESX Server.
In order for the Solutions Enabler server to communicate with clients,
the chosen port must be opened in the ESX Server's firewall. The
following command will open the 2707 port for the Solutions Enabler
server:
esxcfg-firewall -o 2707,tcp,in,SYMAPI
Security considerations
By default, all communication between VSI and the Solutions Enabler
server will be secured by using SSL. Additionally, the Solutions
Enabler server will verify the client's certificate before permitting
connection. More information regarding these security settings, as
well as others, can be found in the EMC Solutions Enabler 7.1.1
Installation Guide available on Powerlink.
44
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Symmetrix Management Console configuration
In order to provide SPM functionality in VSI, a storage administrator
must first have configured a virtualization domain in SMC.
Setup
To aid SMC administrators in configuring SMC to share storage with
a vCenter environment, a VMware administrator must provide
details about the vCenter environment to the SA. This data includes
the name of the vCenter server, a vCenter Globally Unique Identifier
(GUID), and Fibre Channel port information. To simplify this process
and enable the SA to take advantage of automated virtualization
domain creation, the VMware administrator can export a file that
contains this information and forward it to the SMC administrator.
This is done in the Storage Pool Management tab through the Export
configuration option. Figure 32 on page 102 provides an example of
this file.
Security
All communication between VSI and SMC are performed securely
over HTTPS. Clients to SMC servers must register with each server
by using a client ID and password, which is provided to them by an
SMC administrator. VSI registration is created on per user and per
host basis. So if a currently registered user attempts to communicate
with SMC from another host, or if a new user tries to communicate
with SMC from the same host, a new registration will be required
with SMC. Registration in this manner ensures trust that allows for
messages to be digitally signed by VSI.
Symmetrix Management Console configuration
45
Operation
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
The following prerequisites must be met before using SPM
functionality in VSI.
VMware vSphere Client
The Virtual Storage Integrator currently supports VMware's vSphere
Client 4.x and 5.x. VSI will not install unless the VMware vSphere
Client is already installed. Due to differences in the VMware APIs,
VSI will not operate with any earlier versions.
VSI will support any operating system supported by VMware
vSphere Client. The VMware support matrix for vSphere Client on
the VMware website can provide more details. Additionally, as long
as a local installation of Solutions Enabler is required, there will be a
requirement that the platform be supported by Solutions Enabler.
Despite being a 32-bit application, the VMware vSphere Client
supports x64 platforms by running in compatibility mode. Likewise,
the 32-bit VSI will install on x64 platforms and run in compatibility
mode.
Note: As long as the vSphere Client is connecting to a vCenter Server at
version 4.0 or higher, VSI will continue to function even if the ESX hosts
backing that vCenter are at 3.x.
Product installation
Each executable of a VSI feature will install all of the required files.
The user cannot change the install path. If vSphere Client was open
during the install of VSI, then it must be closed and reopened.
Limitations
The limitations of Storage Pool Management within VSI include:
46
◆
Custom tasks can only be enabled when the vSphere Client is
connected to a vCenter Server. Connecting directly to an ESX host
disables all SPM functionality.
◆
Custom tasks can only be enabled when the VMware
administrator (and subsequent users) is granted the following
permissions on the vCenter: Extension.Register
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Extension.Update, Extension.Unregister, Task.Create, and
Task.Update. If these permissions are not set then all VSI
functionality is disabled.
◆
The use of metavolumes is only supported when using a
VMAX/VMAXe running a minimum of Enginuity 5875 and
version 7.2 or later of SMC.
◆
The use of FAST VP policies with SPM requires version 7.3 or
later of SMC and Enginuity 5875 Q2 2011 SR or higher.
Upgrade
VSI supports upgrades from VSI version 3.0 and later. The vSphere
Client must be closed for the upgrade to complete successfully. All
settings files, option files, and log files should remain between
version upgrades. Any version earlier than 3.0 must first be
uninstalled before installing VSI 5.0.
Uninstall
The VSI product can be disabled in the vSphere Client or can be
uninstalled through the Add/Remove Programs applet in the
Windows Control Panel. When uninstalling VSI, it is important that
vSphere Client be closed to perform a clean removal of all plug-in
files.
Individual VSI features can be disabled or uninstalled in the vSphere
Client.
Symmetrix Management Console
In order to provide Storage Pool Management (SPM) functionality,
the SPM feature of VSI requires SMC 7.1.1 or later (7.2 for
metavolumes, and 7.3 for FAST VP policies) to be installed in the
storage environment and configured to communicate with VSI
clients. The SMC software is not a requirement of any other VSI
feature.
EMC Solutions Enabler
Virtual Storage Integrator for VMware vSphere version 4.x is
supported with EMC Solutions Enabler version 7.1.2 or later.
Installation of Solutions Enabler software is required for the Storage
Viewer feature to enable the browsing capabilities of Symmetrix and
device attributes.
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
47
Operation
Note: When running on an x64 platform, the x86 version of Solutions Enabler
must be installed because both the VMware vSphere Client and the VSI are
x86 applications running in compatibility mode.
PowerPath Remote Tools for Windows (optional)
In order to successfully integrate with PowerPath/VE, the PowerPath
Remote Tools for Windows Version 5.4.1 (also referred to as 5.4 SP1)
or later must be installed on the client (local host) where VSI is
running. VSI will use these binaries and libraries to communicate
with the PowerPath/VE service that runs on the ESX hosts. The
version of PowerPath/VE installed on the ESX hosts must be version
5.4 or later. The PowerPath functionality within VSI is optional. As
such, this software is not a hard requirement in order to install the
VSI features.
48
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Operation
This section describes the four operational phases of SPM. It will
include information on the integration of FAST VP with Storage Pool
Management.
Note: In order to use FAST VP policies with SPM, version 7.3 or higher of
SMC is required.
Preparing the storage environment
Preparing the storage environment is done by the storage
administrator, and involves some setup of the Symmetrix array so
that later operations, such as virtualization domain creation can be
successfully completed.
The following is a set of array operations that the SA must perform
before SPM can be used successfully. These can be completed by
using standard SMC functionality, or through the CLI for Solutions
Enabler. Some of these operations will be handled through the
automated virtualization domain creation wizard if it is employed
instead of manual setup:
1. Creation of storage resources that will later be placed into
virtualization domains.
• Thin pools
• FAST VP policies. This includes the creation of a storage group
for the policy.
2. Creation of masking views for the server clusters in the VMware
environment. For each VMware cluster that LUNs will be
provisioned to, a view must be created. Each view must have:
• A port group whose ports are in the same zone as the ports in
the VMware cluster
• An initiator group which contains all the WWNs for each port
on each server in the VMware cluster, regardless of whether
the port is in use or zoned to the array. SPM also supports
cascaded initiator groups so if the cluster server ports are in
more than one initiator group they can be cascaded into a
single initiator group.
Operation
49
Operation
• A storage group that can be an existing one, or a newly created
one. If existing it cannot be associated with a FAST VP policy.
If it is a new one, it will require at least one device which may
be adopted later by using the virtualization domain.
Alternatively, this one device could be a gatekeeper or six
cylinder device.
Note: Empty storage groups cannot be created on the Symmetrix unless
running a VMAX/VMAXe with Enginuity 5875 and higher. However, it will
not be possible to create a masking view with an empty storage group.
3. Setting up the authorizations on the Symmetrix. These
authorizations allow VMware administrators, through SMC, to
create/delete LUNs and mask them to the VMware servers. The
Section “Symmetrix authorization” on page 87 provides more
details on the Symmetrix authorizations.
If enabled, the following authorizations are needed:
• Thin pool storage resource - Authorize each vCenter server on
each thin pool that is to be assigned to it.
• FAST VP policy storage resource
– Authorize each vCenter server on all the thin pools
associated with the policy.
– Authorize each vCenter server on a storage group
associated with the policy that is not in the masking view.
• Authorize each vCenter server on each storage group in the
views in each virtualization domain assigned to the vCenter.
In addition to these array functions, the SA must ensure that the SAN
is zoned so that front-end array ports are to be used are in the same
zones as the servers in the VMware clusters.
The SPM functions that are performed in preparing the storage
environment are as follows:
50
◆
Creating the storage types.
◆
Setting up the client security. This involves the setting of a
password that authenticates the VSI clients with the SMC server.
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Setting up a virtualization domain
After the storage environment has been prepared, the storage
administrator can begin creating virtualization domains for the
vCenter. Setting up a virtualization domain involves the following
steps:
1. Creating a virtualization domain with the vCenter name,
description, and the GUID1 of the vCenter to which the
virtualization domain is assigned. The GUID and vCenter should
be copied from the exported file from VSI. The Section “Storage
Pool Management” on page 97 provides detail on exporting the
SPM configuration details from VSI.
Due to the potential of duplicate GUIDs, SPM does not support a
vCenter installed on a cloned Windows VM that has not had
sysprep run on it. Sysprep ensures that a new GUID is generated.
Each vCenter used with SPM must have a unique GUID.
2. Assigning previously created views to the virtualization domain.
There must be one, and only one, view for each VMware cluster
that the storage in the virtualization domain will service.
3. Add previously created storage resources to the virtualization
domain.
IMPORTANT
All storage resources added to the virtualization domain must come
from the same array.
When adding a storage resource to the virtualization domain the
SA has two decisions to make:
a. Storage Type — If the storage resource matches more than one
storage type, then the SA needs to choose which one to assign
to it.
1. The GUID is unique to each vCenter and is derived from the Windows
operating system.
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IMPORTANT
Each storage resource in an individual virtualization domain must
have its own storage type. Storage types cannot be shared among
different storage resources. New ones must be created for those
other storage resources.
b. Capacity to commit to the virtualization domain — Typically
all of a thin pool's available capacity is committed to the
virtualization domain as the thin pool is created specifically
for SPM, however, it is possible to commit only a portion of it.
The capacity that is committed is subscribed capacity and not
physical capacity.
4. Determine the provisioning policies. The policies that can be set
for a virtualization domain are:
a. Maximum number of devices that can be provisioned for the
virtualization domain
b. Maximum size of a device
c. Minimum size of the device
d. Only allow LUNs of sizes that match the precreated sizes to be
provisioned (enforce precreated LUNs)
5. Set any precreation policies. The Section “Precreation of thin
devices” on page 59 provides details.
The previous set of steps provides for a manual setup of a
virtualization domain. An example of this can be found in Chapter 4,
“Customer Example”. Note that all the preparing of the storage
environment and setting up the virtualization domain can all be done
automatically using the automated virtualization domain setup
wizard, provided SMC and the VMAX/VMAXe are at the previously
noted releases. An example of automated creation is also covered in
Chapter 4.
Allocating storage to VMware resources
After a virtualization domain has been created for a vCenter server
by the storage administrator, the next operational phase is for the
VMware administrator to allocate storage to VMware resources or
objects. In VMware, the highest level object is the vCenter. It is a
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centralized management server. A vCenter server can control one or
more datacenters. A datacenter is comprised of one or more clusters.
A cluster is comprised of one or more ESX servers.
CPU cycles and memory are compute resources. The sum of all the
CPU cycles and memory of the servers in the cluster determine the
cluster's compute resources. A cluster's compute resources can be
divided into resource pools. Resource pools can be further divided
into more resource pools. VM's are created from the compute
resources of a cluster or one of its child resource pools. An example is
illustrated in Figure 10 on page 53.
Figure 10
Example of a VMware hierarchy for compute resources
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After the SA creates a virtualization domain for the vCenter and the
VMware administrator registers the SMC server, the storage in the
virtualization domain is available as a storage resource to
datacenters, clusters, and resource pools managed by that vCenter. A
VMware administrator, who has the permissions necessary to set the
compute resources for a cluster or resource pool, can also set the
amount of storage available to that cluster or resource pool as well.
Figure 11 on page 55 shows an example of how the storage can be
added as a third resource to the CPU and memory resources shown
in the previous example. In this example:
1. The storage administrator has assigned a virtualization domain
with 50 GB of gold, 200 GB of silver and 500 GB of bronze storage
to the vCenter. This makes the storage in the virtualization
domain available to the vCenter.
2. A VMware administrator can now assign the storage available to
the vCenter to datacenters that are children of the vCenter. In this
example, since there is only one datacenter controlled by the
vCenter, the administrator assigns all of the storage to that
datacenter.
3. There is only one cluster in the datacenter, so the administrator
also assigns all the storage in the datacenter to the cluster. The
cluster has compute resources (CPU and memory) and the
storage assigned to the cluster becomes a third resource to the
cluster.
4. A VMware administrator who has control over the cluster can
divide the storage resources among the cluster's child resource
pools, in the same way that the CPU and memory resources were
divided.
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Figure 11
Example of a VMware hierarchy for compute and storage resources
In Figure 11 on page 55, the VMware administrator explicitly
assigned storage resources to each datacenter, cluster, and resource
pool. However, it is not necessary to do this. If storage resources are
not explicitly assigned to a VMware object, such as a resource pool,
then the object has access to all the storage resources assigned to its
parent object. If none are assigned to its parent object, then it can get
resources from its parent's parent and so on all the way up to its
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parent vCenter. Thus, if no storage resources are explicitly assigned,
each datacenter, cluster and resource pool has access to all the storage
in the virtualization domains assigned to the vCenter. However, once
storage is explicitly assigned to an object, it cannot go up to its parent
to get additional storage resources.
Creating VMware storage
The final operational phase is the actual provisioning of storage by
the VMware administrator. There are two types of VMware storage:
Raw Device Mappings or RDMs and VMFS datastores. RDMs are
LUNs that are seen by the ESX Server and passed to a VM. This
allows the VM direct access to and ownership of the LUN. VMFS
datastores are also built from LUNs. They contain numerous VMware
files, including files that represent virtual hard drives used by the
VMs. A VMware administrator can use SPM functionality to create
either one of these types of VMware storage.
To create an RDM or datastore through the vSphere Client, the
following steps will take place:
1. The administrator selects the VM for which the RDM will be
created or for a VMFS datastore this requires selecting the cluster
where the VMFS datastore will reside.
2. In either case a LUN must be created and exposed to the ESX
cluster, either the cluster the VM is running on, or the one for the
VMFS:
a. The LUN is created from the storage available to the cluster for
the VMFS, or the cluster or resource pool the VM is in for an
RDM.
3. The administrator enters a size and selects a type of storage, such
as gold or silver, from the cluster's or resource pool's available
storage.
4. This request is sent from the vSphere Client to the SPM/SMC
server which determines the correct Symmetrix thin pool to use,
creates a thin device in that pool, and then masks it to the cluster's
server ports.
5. After the LUN/thin device has been created, and mapped and
masked, the vSphere Client maps it as an RDM to the VM or
formats it as a VMFS.
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The Section “Cluster menus” on page 130 provides more detail on
creating datastores with SPM. The Section “Virtual Machine menus”
on page 144 provides more detail on creating RDMs with SPM.
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Automated functions
Storage Pool Management automates several functions that would
otherwise need to be performed by the storage administrator or
VMware administrator.
Mapping and masking
When the VMware administrator creates a LUN for an RDM or
VMFS, a thin device is created in a thin pool. This thin device must be
mapped to a set of front-end array ports and then masked to the ESX
cluster on which the LUN is needed. SPM does this by automatically
putting the device into the storage group. This storage group belongs
to the view associated with the virtualization domain. The
virtualization domain in turn has an initiator group that matches the
server ports for the VMware cluster for which the LUN is being
created. If there is no masking view associated with the virtualization
domain that has an initiator group with all the cluster ports, then the
create LUN fails. This prevents LUNs from being created that are
only masked to only some of the servers in the cluster or not masked
to all the paths to each server.
VMFS datastore creation
A VMware administrator can create a new VMFS datastore from the
EMC Storage menu. In addition to creating the LUN and masking it
to the cluster, the vSphere Client portion of SPM takes care of the
additional VMware steps that turn the LUN into a VMFS datastore.
The Section “Cluster menus” on page 130 provides details.
RDM creation
A VMware administrator can create a new RDM LUN for a VM. In
addition to creating the LUN and masking it to the cluster on which
the VM resides, the vSphere Client portion of SPM takes care of the
additional VMware steps to turn the LUN into an RDM and map it to
the VM. The Section “Virtual Machine menus” on page 144 provides
details.
Cluster server membership changes
The VMware administrator can use the vSphere Client to refresh the
server membership of a cluster. This updates SPM knowledge of
what server port WWNs comprise the clusters. Each time a LUN is
created the WWNs for the cluster are checked against the initiator
groups to ensure that the LUN is masked correctly to the cluster. If
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the server membership changes, the storage administrator must
update the initiator group for the server cluster. To refresh server
membership, simply choose Update Storage Adapters from the EMC
Storage menu at the cluster level.
Tracking of used and available storage for VMware objects
SPM automatically tracks the used and available storage for each
VMware object. For example, a resource pool has 60 GB of silver
storage, of which 10 GB is used. A VMware administrator creates a 15
GB RDM from the silver storage for a VM in that resource pool. After
the RDM creation there will be 25 GB of used and 45 GB of available
silver storage for the resource pool.
Policy enforcement
SPM enforces the provisioning policies that the storage administrator
sets on the virtualization domain. Policies include:
◆
Maximum number of LUNs provisioned
◆
Maximum LUN size
◆
Minimum LUN size
◆
Provision only precreated LUN sizes
Precreation of thin devices
VMware VMs can be created in less than a minute. However, even
with SPM's automated functionality it can still take three to six
minutes to create a new thin device and map and mask it to a cluster.
In order to bring the time it takes to provision storage more in line
with the time it takes to create a VM, SPM allows the storage
administrator the option of setting one or more thin device
precreation policies for a virtualization domain. A precreation policy
allows the SA to specify that ‘x’ thin devices of a particular size and a
particular type are precreated for the virtualization domain when all
the devices of that size are used. Thus when a VMware administrator
creates a thin device, for an RDM or VMFS, if one of the precreated
sizes is chosen, the provisioning time is reduced to the time it takes to
map and mask the device. If a size that is not precreated is chosen,
then the administrator must wait the additional time it takes to create
the thin device.
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Reservations
On each Symmetrix, a Symmetrix reservation is created for SPM.
Thin devices created by SPM, including precreated ones, are
automatically reserved under this reservation. This allows storage
administrators managing a Symmetrix to know which devices are
under the control of SPM.
IMPORTANT
Certain Symmetrix tasks may require that the SPM reservation be
released from a particular device after it has been created using
SPM. For example, in order for an SPM device to be used in an
SRDF relationship, it cannot have a reservation. Removing the
SPM reservation from a device, however, will not change how SPM
views that device. For example the device size will still count
towards capacity.
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Additional functionality
This section contains descriptions of several maintenance functions.
Details on these functions may be found in Chapter 3.
Backup/restore configuration
The SPM metadata can be backed up to an external directory. (The
metadata exists as a set of files.) The SPM configuration can be
restored from a previous backup.
Note: Best practice is for the SPM metadata to be backed up along with the
masking database.
Refresh
It is possible for the SPM configuration to get out of sync with the
VMware configuration. This is because the VMware administrator
can take actions through vSphere Client that SPM will not be aware
of. An example of this is moving a VM from one resource pool to
another. Refreshing the SPM configuration aligns it with the current
VMware configuration.
Adopt an existing configuration
The expectation is that SPM may be deployed in an existing VMware
configuration so that it can be used to handle any new storage
provisioning. This requires that SPM be able to adopt existing LUNs
and bring them under SPM control.
Note: This feature is only available for thin LUNs/devices.
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Detailed behavior
This section details some of the internal behavior of SPM.
LUN creation
LUN creation is initiated by a VMware administrator who wants to
create a LUN as an RDM for a VM, or as a VMFS datastore for a
VMware cluster. The request comes to the SMC server as a request to
create a LUN with the following parameters:
◆
Virtualization domain from which to take the storage
◆
Storage type in the virtualization domain to use
◆
Capacity or size
◆
Cluster to which the LUN will be masked
The virtualization domain and storage type are used to determine the
thin pool in which the device will be created.
Several validations are done before the device is created on the
Symmetrix. These are:
◆
The cluster is used to verify that all the server ports in the
VMware cluster are represented in an initiator group in a view
that is associated with the virtualization domain.
◆
The storage resource is examined to make sure there is enough
available capacity.
◆
The virtualization domain provisioning policies are examined to
ensure that creating this device would not violate any of the
policies, such as those for maximum or minimum size.
◆
The vCenter is authorized to perform operations. This includes:
• Verifying the authorization on the storage group in the
masking view to be used to mask the LUN to the cluster.
• Verifying the authorization the storage resource.
– For a thin pool resource this means verifying there is
authorization on the thin pool.
– For a FAST VP policy resource, this means verifying the
authorization on the thin pool associated with the policy to
be used to create the device and the storage group
associated with the policy the device will be placed in.
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After the validations are done, the virtualization domain precreation
policies are examined. If the capacity of the device to create matches
one of these policies, then the Symmetrix is searched for an unused
SPM device of that capacity. If one is found, it uses that device by:
◆
Releasing the device from the SPM reservation.
◆
Binding the device to a thin pool.
◆
Adding the device to the SPM reservation.
◆
If the storage resource is a FAST VP policy, adding the device to a
storage group associated with the policy.
Note: An SPM unused device will be reserved with the SPM reservation, but
not exist in any storage group.
If there are no unused devices of that size, or the size does not match
a precreation policy, a new device must be created from scratch.
Creating a device from scratch involves:
◆
Creating a device.
◆
Binding the device to a thin pool.
◆
Adding the device to the SPM reservation.
◆
If the storage resource is a FAST VP policy, adding the device to a
storage group associated with the policy.
If the device size matches a precreation policy and there are no
unused devices of that size remaining after the device for the LUN is
created, the precreation policy activates and ‘x’ (as defined by the
policy) the unused devices are created in the thin pool.
If the LUN size requested is larger than the maximum size of a single
Symmetrix device then a meta LUN is created. A meta LUN is LUN
created by combining several devices on the array. The algorithm for
determining what size and how many devices are combined into a
meta is:
◆
Divide the size of the LUN requested by the max size single
device. If there is any remainder add one to this number. This is
the number of devices that need to be created.
◆
Divide the size of the LUN requested by the number of devices to
be created. This is the size of each device, thus all devices are the
same size.
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If an error occurs during the creation of a LUN, an attempt will be
made to unwind the process and delete the device that was created.
Note: There are errors which make it impossible to unwind the device
creation. Examples include: a stuck configuration lock on the Symmetrix and
a loss of communication with the array.
Figure 12 on page 65 shows a flowchart of LUN creation.
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Figure 12
Flowchart for LUN creation
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Operation
Meta devices
Meta devices are supported with SPM when using version 7.2 or later
of SMC and a VMAX/VMAXe running Enginuity 5875 or later.
Devices larger than ~240 GB will be configured as a metavolume on
the Symmetrix. To determine the number of meta members, SPM will
take the requested device size, divide it by ~240GB and then add one
to it if there is a remainder. In essence, therefore, SPM rounds up to
the nearest whole number. For example if a request is made for an 800
GB device, that would be 800 divided by 240 which is 3.33 and
rounding up to the nearest whole number would mean there would
be 4 meta members, each 200 GB.
The Autometa feature is not supported with Storage Pool
Management.
FAST for virtual pools
Fully Automated Storage Tiering for virtual pools (FAST VP) is
supported with SPM when using SMC version 7.3 or higher and a
Symmetrix VMAX/VMAXe array running Enginuity release level
5875 Q2 2011 SR or higher.
LUN expansion
LUN expansion is initiated by a VMware user requesting to extend
an existing LUN as an RDM for a VM or a VMFS datastore for a
VMware cluster. The request comes to the SMC server as a request1 to
expand a LUN with the following parameters:
◆
LUN to expand
◆
Capacity to expand the LUN by, in other words the capacity of the
LUN after it has been expanded
1. VSI will query the server to make sure a LUN can be extended before
giving a user the option to do so. The server will reject a request to extend
a LUN that is not already a Meta for arrays with microcode versions less
than 5875.
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Several validations are done before the device is extended on the
Symmetrix. These are:
◆
The virtualization domain provisioning policies are examined to
make sure that expanding this device would not violate the
maximum LUN size.
◆
There is enough available storage capacity of the type from which
the original LUN was created.
◆
The vCenter is authorized to perform operations on the thin pool
After the validations are done, the number of devices that are
required for the expansion is calculated. If more than one device is
needed, then these devices are created from scratch. If only one
device is needed, then the virtualization domain precreation policies
are examined. If the expansion capacity matches one of these policies
then the Symmetrix is searched for an unused SPM device. If none is
found then a new device is created. If the current device is already a
meta then it is simply expanded with the new device(s), otherwise it
is formed into a new meta with it as the meta head.
Figure 13 on page 68 shows a flowchart of LUN expansion.
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Figure 13
Flowchart for LUN expansion
LUN deletion
LUN deletion is initiated by the VMware administrator when he
wants to delete a VMFS datastore for a cluster or an RDM for a VM.
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Before the device is deleted on the Symmetrix, it is verified that the
vCenter is authorized to perform operations on the thin pool and the
storage group the device is in.
After the validation is done, the virtualization domain precreation
policies are examined. If the capacity of the LUN matches a
precreation policy, then the device is:
◆
Released from the SPM reservation.
◆
Removed from all storage groups.
◆
Unbound from the thin pool it is bound to.
◆
Added to the SPM reservation.
If the capacity does not match a precreation policy, the device is
completely deleted by:
◆
Releasing it from the SPM reservation.
◆
Removing it from all storage groups.
◆
Unbinding it from the thin pool it is bound to.
◆
Dissolving the meta if one exists.
◆
Deleting the device(s).
There is no recovery from an error that occurs during the deletion of a
LUN. It is simply reported. Figure 14 on page 70 shows the flowchart
for LUN deletion.
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Figure 14
Flowchart for LUN deletion
Precreation policy
A precreation policy causes devices of particular sizes to be
precreated and reserved for SPM use. This is the case for both meta
and nonmeta devices. These are called SPM unused LUNs. When a
VMware administrator creates a LUN of this size, SPM will look for
an SPM unused LUN of that size. If one exists, SPM will use that LUN
instead of creating a new device. This significantly speeds up the
provisioning process as the precreated device simply has to be added
to the correct storage group to mask it to the VMware servers.
A precreation policy is defined by:
◆
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◆
Number of devices that will be precreated at one time
◆
Virtualization domain associated with the policy
◆
Storage type for the policy
The combination of the virtualization domain and the storage type
determines in which thin pool the precreated devices are created.
Precreated devices are created by:
◆
Using the storage type to determine which storage resource to
create the device in.
◆
Determining a thin pool to use in the storage resource.
◆
Creating and binding the device in the thin pool.
◆
Unbinding the device from the thin pool.
◆
Reserving the device with the SPM reservation.
After the last device of a precreated size is used, ‘x’ more devices of
that size are created in the thin pool, and added to the SPM
reservation. The ‘x’ is the number specified in the precreation policy.
New, precreated devices are not created when a new precreation
policy is set up or modified. They are created only after a LUN is
created and there are no precreated devices of that size left. Thus, the
first LUN created of a size that matches a newly set up precreation
policy will always be created. The LUN takes longer to create, but
afterwards the ‘x’ precreated devices of that size will also be created,
and the second LUN of that size will use one of those precreated
devices.
Note: Precreated meta devices cannot be used to extend and existing device.
SPM reservation
On a Symmetrix, SPM automatically creates an SPM reservation. All
devices that are under SPM control are reserved with this reservation.
This makes the storage administrators working on the Symmetrix
aware that these devices are being used by SPM.
Devices are added to the SPM reservation when:
◆
They are created by SPM.
◆
They are adopted into SPM.
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Devices are released from the SPM reservation when:
◆
They are deleted by SPM.
◆
The storage resource they are in is removed from a virtualization
domain. If a storage resource is associated with multiple
virtualization domains, then only the devices for LUNs in the
virtualization domain that the thin pool is being removed from
are released from the reservation.
Mapping and masking
After the SPM device is created, it must be masked to the servers in a
VMware cluster. Ultimately this is accomplished by putting the
device into a storage group which is in a view that has an initiator
group with all the WWNs of the HBA ports on the servers in the
cluster. Figure 15 on page 72 demonstrates the mapping and masking
steps.
Figure 15
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Note: If a storage administrator changes a view name, VM administrators
will be unable to create LUNs for the cluster the view is for. The storage
administrator must update each virtualization domain with the new view
name.
SPM LUNs
LUNs or devices that SPM controls are individually tracked by SPM
by storing metadata information about each device in its persistence
store. In addition, all the devices that SPM controls are reserved by
the SPM reservation. Each LUN or device has two states:
◆
Used — Device is being used by a VMware cluster. The device is:
• Tracked by SPM metadata.
• Reserved by the SPM reservation.
• Masked to a VMware cluster because it is in a storage group in
a view associated with a virtualization domain.
◆
Unused — Device has been precreated and is waiting to be
masked to a VMware cluster. The device is:
• Reserved by the SPM reservation.
Adopt LUNs
The adopt LUNs process is used to bring LUNs or devices, that are
not currently under SPM control, under SPM control. Adopting
LUNs is done typically to repair an SPM configuration that has been
corrupted or lost, or to put an existing VMware configuration under
SPM control. Below are the requirements for a LUN to be adoptable
into a virtualization domain:
◆
Must be in a storage group that is part of a masking view
associated with a virtualization domain. This ensures that the
LUN has been masked to one or more of the vCenter’s VMware
cluster.
◆
Not reserved, or already reserved by SPM.
◆
Come from a storage resource, thin pool, or FAST VP policy that
has been assigned to the virtualization domain.
◆
If the storage resource is a policy, then the policy’s storage group
the LUN is in must have an authorization for the vCenter.
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When a LUN is adopted the following things occur:
◆
The LUN is added to the SPM reservation, if it does not already
belong to it.
◆
The LUN’s storage capacity is added to its storage resource’s
capacity that is committed to the virtualization domain. This
keeps the virtualization domain’s available capacity from this
storage resource the same.
◆
If there is a value for the max number of LUNs in the policy of the
virtualization domain, the number of LUNs adopted is added to
it.
◆
the total capacity of the virtualization domain. The capacity of the
LUN is counted as used capacity, not available capacity.
Initially the LUN's storage is accounted for at the vCenter level. To
have its capacity be accounted for at the correct VMware object level,
a VMware administrator needs to update the VMware configuration
in the Storage Viewer by running a refresh configuration as seen in
Figure 106 on page 195 of Chapter 4. A refresh is required even if
LUNs are adopted during the creation of a virtualization domain.
Automated virtualization domain creation1
The algorithm for automatically setting up a virtualization domain
derives input from the exported vCenter XML file and from the
storage administrator. The storage administrator must run this as an
SMC user with the Admin role, as the wizard does both storage
configuration changes and authorization changes. The input data is
as follows:
1. From the vCenter XML file the following information is
automatically obtained:
a. vCenter server name
b. vCenter GUID
c. ESX clusters
– List of FC ports and their WWN's for each cluster
2. The following is entered by the Storage Administrator:
a. Existing port group per cluster to use
1. Requires a minimum of VSI 4.0, SMC 7.3, and Enginuity 5875 Q2 2011 SR.
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b. Provisioning policies for the virtualization domain:
1. Maximum number of LUNs (optional)
2. Maximum LUN size (drop-down selection or manually
enter custom size)
3. Minimum LUN size (drop-down selection or manually
enter custom size)
c. For each storage resource on the array:
1. User indicates whether the user should be added to the
virtualization domain
2. Storage type to use (select an existing storage type or enter
the name of a storage type to be created)
3. Capacity to assign from this resource to the virtualization
domain
4. Whether to adopt LUNs from this resource
With the above input, the algorithm goes through the following steps:
1. Creates the virtualization domain from the vCenter server name
and vCenter GUID
2. Sets the virtualization domain policies with the user's input
3. For each cluster, if a port group has been entered, sets up its
masking:
a. Finds, or creates a new initiator group for each ESX cluster in
the vCenter. See the section “Initiator group selection or
creation” on page 76 for details.
b. Finds, or creates a storage group. Adds an authorization if
necessary.
c. Finds, or creates a view. See the section “Masking view
selection or creation” on page 78 for details.
d. Adds the view to the virtualization domain
4. For each storage resource being added to the domain
a. If the storage resource is a thin pool:
1. Creates an authorization for the thin pool
b. If the storage resource is a FAST VP policy:
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1. Selects one of the storage groups from those associated
with the policy or creates a new one. See the section
“Storage group device creation” on page 79 for details.
2. Creates an authorization for the vCenter on the selected
storage group
3. Creates an authorization for the vCenter on each thin pool
in the policy.
c. Creates a new storage type if needed for the storage resource
d. Adds the storage resource to the virtualization domain
e. If the adopt LUNs flag is set then adopts the LUNs from that
storage resource
Initiator group selection or creation
The ideal case when creating a virtualization domain is to find or
create an initiator group for each ESX cluster that contains all the
initiator ports for that cluster. However, if only some of an ESX
cluster's ports already exist in an initiator group then cascaded
initiator groups need to be used.
The algorithm, therefore, performs the following:
1. Creates a list of all the initiator groups that contain one or more of
the cluster's initiators
2. If there is already one initiator group that contains all the cluster's
initiators then that one is used
3. If this list is empty, it creates a new initiator group containing all
of the cluster's initiators1
4. If there is one or more initiator groups that contain some but not
all the cluster's initiators:
a. Creates an initiator group containing the remaining initiators
b. Creates an initiator group and make it a parent initiator group
with all the other initiator groups as children
1. Automated virtualization domain creation cannot create multiple initiator
groups if no groups (with initiators from the cluster) currently exist, and
therefore cannot be used when a cluster has more than 32 initiators (max
per initiator group). In this case the manual virtualization domain
creation needs to be used. If the initiator groups exist already, however, it
can create a parent initiator group for the cluster which has more than 32
initiators.
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Port flags
Front end ports on the Symmetrix carry flags which determine how
they interact with server HBAs. Initiator flags can override port flags,
or add flags for particular initiators. VMware clusters have the
following flag requirements:
1. Required Port Flags - Must be set
a. UWN - Universal World Wide Name
b. ACLX - Access control logic
c. SPC-2 - Set as a port flag or an initiator group flag
2. Optional Port Flags - have no impact
a. EAN - Enable auto negotiate
b. SCSI3 - SCSI version 3
c. C - Common serial number
d. OS2007
3. Optional Initiator Flags
a. SPC-2 - Only optional if the ports already have this flag set
b. SCSI3
c. C - Common serial number
d. OS2007
e. Consistent LUN
Initiators also have disable flags which can be used to disable
undesirable flags that have been set on the ports. For example, if the
Volume Set Addressing port flag is set (invalid for a VMware
installation), the disable Volume Set Addressing flag could be set on
the initiators making it valid for a VMware environment.
If an initiator group is created for a masking view during automated
virtualization domain setup, the flags will be set using the following
rules:
1. Existing initiator group flags will not be changed.
2. The ports in the port group for the masking view must all have
the same flags set for the required port flags. Optional port flags
are ignored.
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3. If there is an already existing initiator group(s) which covers
some or all of the VMware's cluster WWN's, their flags must meet
the following requirements:
a. If there is more than one initiator group then all the initiator
groups must have the same flags set
b. The initiator group(s) may only have flags set which are
optional.
c. If the port group does not have the SPC-2 set, then the initiator
groups must have it set.
d. If the port group has any flag set that is not required or
optional then the initiator group flags must disable it.
4. If a new initiator group is created and there are already existing
initiator groups then it will have the same flags set and disabled
as the existing ones.
5. If there are no existing initiator groups then the new initiator
groups created will fulfill the requirements:
a. If the port group does not have the SPC-2 set, then the initiator
group(s) will have it set.
b. If the port group has any flag set that is not required or
optional then the initiator group(s) flags will disable it.
Masking view selection or creation1
Automated virtualization domain setup attempts to give each cluster
its own masking view, which is either an existing one, or a newly
created. The algorithm for selecting or creating a view is as follows:
1. Looks for a view that contains the initiator group for the cluster,
the port group that the user selected for the cluster, and a storage
group that is not in a policy. The initiator group for the cluster is
either found or created using the algorithm from the previous
section “Initiator group selection or creation” on page 76. If a
view is found then use it.
2. If no view is found then one must be created along with a new
storage group. The following steps are taken:
1. If a single view is required for more than one cluster, manual virtualization domain creation needs to be
used.
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a. Create a device. See the section “Storage group device
creation” on page 79 for more details.
b. Create a new storage group using that device.
c. Create a masking view with the cluster's initiator group, the
user entered port group, and the newly created storage group.
Storage group device creation
When a new storage group is created, for a FAST VP policy or a new
masking view, it must be created with a device. For a new storage
group for masking:
1. A single device will be created for all the storage groups needed
for masking.
2. The device will be created in the first storage resource that is
being assigned to the virtualization domain.
3. The device capacity will be 200 MB
4. This capacity will be subtracted from the to use capacity of the first
storage resource
5. The device will not have an SPM reservation
For a new storage group for a FAST VP policy:
1. A new device will be created for each new storage group for a
policy.
2. The device will be created in the thin pool associated with a
policy that would be selected for provisioning, see the following
section “Thin pool assignment when provisioning devices in a
FAST VP policy” on page 84.
3. The device capacity will be 200 MB
4. This capacity will be subtracted from the to use capacity of this
FAST VP policy storage resource
5. The device will not have an SPM reservation
FAST VP policy storage group selection
This algorithm is used to select the storage group associated with a
policy to add an authorization for the vCenter server. It is also the
same algorithm used to select which policy's storage group to add a
device to when doing provisioning. The algorithm is as follows:
1. Get all the storage groups associated with the policy
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2. Filter out those associated with a view
3. From the remaining storage groups select one based on the
following criteria:
a. First SPM storage group with SPM reserved devices in it.
An SPM storage group is identified by parsing its name
and looking for the SPM prefix.
b. Otherwise, the first SPM storage group
c. Otherwise the first storage group with SPM reserved
devices in it.
d. Otherwise the first storage group
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Storage Resources
Storage resources are storage-containing-objects in the Symmetrix
that contain real, physical storage. They are attached to virtualization
domains and backup the storage types shown in VSI with actual
storage. Specifically they can be either thin pools or FAST VP policies.
Thin pool as a storage resource
A thin pool can be a storage resource, as long as it does not belong to
a storage tier.
Thin pool capacity calculations
When a thin pool is added, or modified, to a virtualization domain,
the storage administrator must specify the amount of capacity from
the thin pool to assign to the virtualization domain. The amount that
is assigned is a subscribed, or virtual, capacity. Subscribed capacity is
a presented capacity and not a physical capacity. Thus, the storage
administrator can choose to oversubscribe the thin pool by assigning
more storage than is physically available. Three values guide the
storage administrator in determining how much subscribed capacity
to assign to the virtualization domains:
1. Maximum Subscribed Capacity: This value is calculated by
multiplying the maximum subscription percent (set by the
storage administrator in SMC) by the physically enabled capacity
of the thin pool. Thus this value represents the total subscribed
capacity available.
2. Current Subscription Capacity: This value is the amount of the
maximum subscribed capacity of the thin pool that has already
been promised, but not necessarily used, to other things. It is
calculated by adding up all the capacity that has been assigned to
all virtualization domains and the sum of capacities of all the thin
devices in the pool that are not managed by SPM.
3. Available Subscription Capacity: This value is the difference
between the maximum and current subscribed capacities. It
represents the maximum capacity that a storage administrator
can further assign from the thin pool.
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Note: If the storage administrator does not want to enable overprovisioning
of the thin pool, the maximum subscribed capacity should be set to 100
percent when creating the thin pool for SPM. Note that this is not the same as
leaving the field null.
FAST VP policy as a storage resource
A FAST VP policy can be a storage resource.
In VMware vSphere 5 there is a new concept called Storage
Distributed Resource Scheduler, or SDRS which operates on a new
vCenter object called a Datastore cluster. The Datastore cluster
object is created in vCenter and is comprised of a pool of
datastores. SDRS serves to balance VMs within the Datastore
cluster using algorithms based on capacity and/or IO response
times. This balancing can be achieved manually through
recommendations, or can be fully automated. When using a FAST
VP policy as a storage resource in SPM, it is important to note that
only capacity-based SDRS is supported with EMC’s FAST VP, not
performance-based SDRS.
FAST model
A FAST VP policy is composed of up to three different tiers of
storage. Each tier is composed of one or more thin pools. In addition
to the tiers of storage, a policy also includes one or more storage
groups. Thin devices that are placed in these storage groups have
their storage split between the tiers of storage based on the
parameters set in the policy.
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Figure 16
FAST VP Model
Virtualization domain setup
A virtualization domain has one or more masking views associated
with it in order to mask LUNs to the VMware clusters. Typically there
is one masking view per cluster. Each masking view has a storage
group. In addition, a FAST VP policy has one or more storage groups
where devices created for the FAST VP policy can be placed.
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Figure 17
Virtualization Domain Setup
Note: When assigning a policy to a virtualization domain, the storage type
used cannot have any properties, e.g. disk type or RAID configuration. This
is because a policy has multiples of these properties.
Thin pool assignment when provisioning devices in a FAST VP policy
When a LUN is provisioned from a FAST VP policy storage resource,
a device is created in one of the thin pools associated with the policy.
The thin pool is selected by using the following algorithm:
1. The tiers are sorted by the percent of the tier that can be used by
devices with this policy
2. Starting with the tier with the highest percent, the tier's thin pools
are examined for their unsubscribed capacity. The thin pool with
the largest amount of unsubscribed capacity that is greater than
the capacity requested is selected.
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3. If none of a tier's pools have enough unsubscribed capacity the
tier with the next highest percent is examined.
Storage group assignment when provisioning devices in a FAST VP policy
This algorithm is used to select which policy's storage group to add a
device to when doing provisioning. The algorithm is as follows:
1. Get all the storage groups associated with the policy
2. Filter out those associated with a view
3. From the remaining storage groups select one based on the
following criteria:
a. First SPM storage group with SPM reserved devices in it. An
SPM storage group is identified by parsing its name and
looking for the SPM prefix.
b. Otherwise, the first SPM storage group
c. Otherwise the first storage group with SPM reserved devices
in it.
d. Otherwise the first storage group
Calculating a FAST VP policy's capacity
Storage pool management calculates and manages subscribed
capacity. The maximum subscribed capacity of a FAST VP policy is
determined by:
1. For each thin pool in each tier of the policy, multiply the max
subscription percent by the thin pool's physical capacity. This
creates a max subscribed capacity for the thin pool.
2. Sum the max subscribed capacities for each thin pool in a tier and
then multiply by the policies percent for that tier to get the tier's
max subscribed capacity for the policy.
3. Sum the max subscribed capacities for each tier in the policy to
get the policy's max subscribed capacity.
The available capacity of a FAST VP policy is determined by:
1. For each FAST VP policy that shares thin pools with this FAST VP
policy:
a. Determine how much capacity is assigned to virtualization
domains.
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b. Determine how much of the capacity assigned to
virtualization domains can be accounted for by thin pools not
in the original policy
1. This is done by adding up the total capacity in all the thin
pools that are not used by the original policy, less any
non-SPM devices that are created in these pools.
2. The capacity assigned to virtualization domains is
subtracted from this number, if the remainder is positive
then this policy does not have to use any of the capacity in
the original policy's thin pools. If it is negative, then this
policy has already committed some of the capacity from
the original policy's thin pools.
2. The original policy's available capacity is the sum of its thin pool's
max subscribed capacities less any non-SPM devices and less any
capacities committed from those pools by other policies.
Maximum LUN Size
In release 7.2 of SMC, the maximum LUN size that can be created is
limited by the max LUN size policy for the virtualization domain or,
if smaller, the available capacity for that type of storage. In release 7.3
of SMC, another restriction to the maximum LUN size is added for
types of storage that consist of FAST VP policies. This restriction
limits the maximum LUN size to the maximum available space in the
largest thin pool under the policy. This is because a device can only be
bound to one of those thin pools, though it may eventually have data
in the other pools. For example, a “Gold” storage type is built on a
FAST VP policy containing three thin pools in a virtualization
domain that has a max LUN size policy of 1 TB. In VSI that Gold
storage shows 800 GB of total available storage. Looking at the
individual thin pools in the policy, however, it shows that there is 200
GB available in one, 400 GB in another, and 600 GB in the last.
Therefore 600 GB is the maximum LUN size because that is the most
capacity available in any of the thin pools under the policy.
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Security and authorization
This section describes the security used in SPM.
Symmetrix authorization
There are specific SYMAPI authorizations for SPM to provide
additional security within the Symmetrix:
◆
The Storage Admin — Virtualization Domain role has the ability
to perform operations on thin pools and storage groups. All
vCenter Administrators are given this role.
◆
Authorizations can be set for groups.
◆
Authorizations can be set on individual thin pools and storage
groups.
◆
An authorization on a thin pool also allows the user to:
• Create or delete a device.
• Bind a device to an authorized thin pool.
• Unbind a device from an authorized thin pool.
• Reserve a thin device that belongs to an authorized thin pool.
• Release a thin device that belongs to an authorized thin pool
from a reservation.
◆
An authorization on a storage group allows a user to put a device
into a storage group or remove a device from a storage group
These authorizations have two functions. One is to ensure that
vSphere Clients can manipulate only Symmetrix storage objects on
which they are authorized. The other is to provide some protection
from other storage administrators to the Symmetrix objects that SPM
is using.
Storage provisioning commands from the vSphere Client come with a
user ID and group ID. The user ID is the name the user used to log in
to the vCenter server. For instance, in order for a user on vCenter
server ABC to create a LUN through SPM, two privileges are required
to have been granted:
◆
The role of Storage Admin — Virtualization Domain on the thin
pool associated with the virtualization domain.
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◆
The role of Storage Admin — Virtualization Domain on the
storage group associated with the virtualization domain.
Note: The Symmetrix authorizations are automatically configured when
using the Auto
SMC roles
A choice for StorageAdmin — Virtualization Domain is available in
the Role choices specifically for SPM (Figure 19 on page 90 shows
this). This role indicates that the user is attempting to set up a
virtualization domain permission rule. When this choice is selected:
◆
The Name field will change to Virtualization Domain Name.
◆
The Component fields will become active.
◆
The Type choices for selecting user/group will change to an
uneditable WebLabel and have group selected.
The user will enter the virtualization domain name in the
Virtualization Domain Name field. Realizing that the fully qualified
name is of the form V:xxx\users, and that the V: and users portions
do not change, the user must only enter the xxx portion. This
Virtualization Domain Name will be used to construct the fully
qualified name for the user. This will help eliminate any questions
about the format of the name and reduce the possibility of the user
typing it in wrong. Should the user try to enter the fully qualified
name, then an error message will be presented:
Please enter the Virtualization Domain without V:
or \users.
The virtualization domain must be the name of the vCenter that will
be provisioning the storage. It can be obtained by exporting the
environment from the vSphere Client. The Section “Storage Pool
Management” on page 97 has more detail. When the OK button on
the Add Permission dialog box is clicked, a message that confirms the
creation of a virtualization domain rule appears to the user: A rule
will be created for V:xxx\users. This message displays the option
Don't show this confirmation dialog box again so that the user can
bypass the message.
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A selection button and dialog box help select a storage group or thin
pool. Depending on the selected type of component a dialog box
displays a table of storage groups or thin pools. Figure 21 on page 91
and Figure 22 on page 91 show this. The text box that gets populated
with the name will be editable so that the user can delete the entry.
Figure 18 on page 89, shows entries for a normal permission rule.
Figure 18
Normal Permission
When setting up permissions for SPM, select the role StorageAdmin
— Virtualization Domain. Figure 19 on page 90 and Figure 20 on
page 90 show the dialog boxes.
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Figure 19
StorageAdmin Permission
Figure 20
Virtualization Domain entry
The storage group selection is shown in Figure 21 on page 91 and in
Figure 22 on page 91.
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Figure 21
Storage Group selection
Figure 22
Thin Pool selection
VSI to SMC server security
Communication between the vSphere Client and the SMC/SPM
server uses SSL.
Trust is established between the vSphere Client and the SMC server
initially through a password. After the first login of the client to the
server by using the password, the client's certificate is stored on the
SMC server. This is used to validate any further communications
with the client.
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vSphere permissions
The VMware administrator role possesses all the permissions it
requires to use SPM. While that role is typically used in test,
development, and lab environments by all users, production
environments require tighter control. Many VMware administrators
of production environments will create specialized roles in the
vSphere Client for the users, perhaps based on the business unit, or
the user’s function. In such cases, these users may own a single VM
or even groups of VMs through resource pools. It may be desirable to
allow these users to add RDMs to their own VMs through Storage
Pool Management.
There are two sets of permissions a VMware user must have in order
to use the SPM integration: Extension and Tasks. These privileges
must be applied at the vCenter level and set to propagate through the
entire environment. In Figure 23 on page 93 the user vmwareuser is
assigned a new role called SPM which has the sets of privileges
Extension and Tasks. Note that the setting Propagate to Child Objects
in the red box is checked. If this is not checked, even a VMware user
that has administrator privileges on a VM will not be able to use SPM
to create the RDM.
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Figure 23
Assign Extension Permission to a VMware user
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SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
EMC VSI global view
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available in the EMC VSI global view. Figure 24 on page 94 shows the
default global view that is presented upon navigating through Home
> Solutions and Applications > EMC. By selection the navigation
options on the left-hand panels under Settings or Features, the
right-hand panel displays the choice.
Figure 24
EMC VSI default global view
Settings navigation panel
The settings navigation panel in Figure 25 on page 95 includes two
options: Feature Manager and Logging.
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Figure 25
Settings navigation panel
Feature Manager
By choosing Feature Manager, the default selection, one is presented
with a panel on the right displaying all current VSI features installed
along with the version and whether they are enabled or disabled.
From this panel seen in Figure 26 on page 95 one is able to disable or
uninstall individual features.
Figure 26
Feature Manager
Logging
The Logging option displays the available loggers, log files, and log
levels. There are loggers available for each installed feature. Within
the panel is an area where the current selected log entries are shown.
This is shown in Figure 27 on page 96.
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Figure 27
Logging
Each item in the Logging panel is described here:
◆
Log Files combo box — This box is used to select the log to show
in the panel. The log files themselves are available on the local
Windows client in: %APPDATA%\EMC\Virtual Storage
Integrator\vSphere4\Logs.
◆
Loggers combo box — This box is used to select the log.
◆
Log Levels combo box — This box is used to select the log level to
use for the selected log in the Loggers combo box. Possible values
are off, fatal, error, warn, info, debug, all. The default value for
each, when the plug-in is first loaded, will be info.
◆
Open folder icon — This action will open the folder
%APPDATA%\EMC\Virtual Storage
Integrator\vSphere4\Logs.
◆
Log search icon — This action allows the user to search through
the logfiles.
◆
WinZip icon - This action allows the user to export all log files
into a single zip file.
Features navigation panel
The features navigation panel in Figure 28 on page 97 includes two
features: Storage Pool Management and Storage Viewer.
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Figure 28
Features navigation panel
Storage Pool Management
The Storage Pool Management servers panel, as shown in Figure 29
on page 97, displays all of the SMC servers with which VSI is
currently registered. This list is configured by the user through
various controls in this panel.
Figure 29
Storage Pool Management servers
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Each item in this panel is described here:
◆
Register… button — This button, when clicked, opens a wizard
that allows the user to enter connection details for a new SMC
server:
• The first page, as shown in Figure 30 on page 99, accepts the
hostname or IP address of an SMC server, the secure port for
communication to SMC, a client ID, a password, and a
certificate name. The port must be the secure (HTTPS)
communication port configured for the SMC server by the SA.
Values must be in the range 1 — 65535. The client ID is
provided by an SA and may not contain the '/' character. The
password should be supplied by the SA along with the client
ID. The certificate name is used to select a certificate from the
Windows certificate store to ensure integrity of all messages
with the SMC server. The value provided is used to retrieve a
certificate from the certificate store. This certificate’s Subject
CN field contains the same value. If no certificate with this
value exists, a self-signed certificate will be generated
automatically. If a user certificate is to be used in the certificate
store, such a one that is from a trusted certificate authority
(CA), the user may input the CN value and that certificate will
be used instead of the autogenerated certificate. The certificate
name may not contain a slash (/). Figure 30 on page 99 shows
a Test Connectivity button. If the connectivity test fails, the
Next button is disabled until some of the connection settings
have been modified.
Note: The Test Connectivity button is only testing network connectivity and
is not validating the client id or whether SMC is installed.
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Figure 30
Register with server settings dialog box
• The final page, as shown in Figure 31 on page 100,
summarizes the inputs and when Finish is clicked begins an
operation to register the SPM client with the SMC server.
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Figure 31
Register with server options
• For this button to be enabled, the VMware administrator must
be granted the following permissions on the vCenter:
Task.Create and Task.Update.
◆
Edit… context menu — This menu is available when a registered
server is right-clicked. A wizard opens to enable the user to edit
connection details for the selected SMC server. The Address, Port,
Client ID, and Certificate Name fields will be prepopulated for
the selected server. Modifying these fields and completing the
wizard reregisters the client with the server utilizing the new
settings. The Password field is not populated because it is not
persisted by the client. If the populated Client ID field requires a
password, the user must enter it to reregister with the server.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
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– Task.Create
– Task.Update
◆
Remove context menu — This menu is available when registered
server is right-clicked. When remove is chosen from the menu,
the selected server is removed from the list and a warning
message is displayed to warn the user about the change.
◆
Test Connectivity… context menu — This menu is available when
registered server is right-clicked. When test connectivity is
chosen, a test connection is made to the selected server to test
connectivity to the server address. While connecting the status
bar is updated. Upon error, an indicator will display below the
server list along with a message describing the problem. The
connection made does not test the registration with the server
and is simply a test to ensure that the server is available and
listening at the address and port provided.
◆
Refresh Configuration button — This button, when clicked,
begins an operation to update each of the registered servers with
the current VMware inventory hierarchy environment.
• For this to execute, the VMware administrator must be
granted the following permissions on the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
◆
Export Environment button — This button, which clicked,
enables the export of various VMware environmental details to a
file as seen in Figure 32 on page 102. A save file dialog box
enables the user to choose where to export the file to and allows
them to select the file format (XML or text). This file can be used
by a storage administrator to acquire vCenter information and
masking details for creating virtualization domains within SMC.
This file is also required to be on the SMC server when using the
Automated Virtualization Domain Setup task in SMC.
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Figure 32
SPM export file
Storage Viewer
The Storage Viewer navigation panel has a number of selections
servers panel, as shown in Figure 28 on page 97. These are: Solutions
Enabler, Symmetrix Arrays, CLARiiON Arrays, Celerra Systems, and
VPLEX™ Systems. By choosing each of these selections, the
right-hand panel is populated with the appropriate information.
Solutions Enabler
The Solutions Enabler panel contains the settings required to use
Solutions Enabler in client/server mode. This is shown in Figure 33
on page 103.
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Figure 33
Solutions Enabler Server dialog box
If Solutions Enabler is installed, but there is no local connection to the
storage, then Solutions Enabler can be configured to use a different
server that does have a connection to the storage. That server must be
running the Solutions Enabler Server service (named storsrvd). The
user must enter the IP address and port number for that remote
server, and then hit the Save Connection button. The plug-in will then
utilize Solutions Enabler in client\server mode in order to perform
the storage mapping. The connection to the Solutions Enabler server
can be tested with the Test Connection button.
Each item in the panel is described here:
◆
Remote Server Name Box — Indicates the name or IP address of
the remote server to use for Solutions Enabler in client\server
mode.
◆
Port Box — Indicates the port number to use for communication
with a remote instance of Solutions Enabler. This port number
can be configured on the remote host before starting the Solutions
Enabler service.
◆
Local Solutions Enabler — Shows the currently installed version
of Solutions Enabler on the local host.
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Operation
Figure 34
◆
Remote Solutions Enabler — Shows the currently installed
version of the remote Solutions Enabler if configured.
◆
Test Connection button — This button, when clicked, will test
Solutions Enabler in client\server mode. The plug-in will create a
Solutions Enabler session with the remote host and gather the
version of Solutions Enabler installed there, to prove that the
connection is valid. The status of the test appears in a label below
the button, such as in Figure 34 on page 104.
Testing SE connectivity
◆
Save Connection button — Saves the settings for the remote
Solutions Enabler connection. These settings remain in a flat
configuration file and are subsequently reloaded with the
plug-in.
Symmetrix Arrays
The Symmetrix Arrays selection displays all the Symmetrix arrays
that are managed with Solutions Enabler. This is shown in Figure 35
on page 105.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 35
Symmetrix Arrays
Each item in this panel is described here:
◆
Discover New Symmetrix button — This button, when clicked,
will perform an in-band discovery of new Symmetrix storage
array. To discover a new array using this button, Solutions
Enabler (either local or remote) must have direct access to a LUN
from that storage array. If a new storage array is discovered then
it will appear in the Symmetrix Arrays panel.
◆
Refresh List button — This button, when clicked, will refresh the
list of Symmetrix storage arrays. This button will not discover
new storage arrays.
◆
Sync All Arrays button — This button, when clicked, will force
Solutions Enabler to synchronize with each of the storage arrays
in the Symmetrix Arrays panel. This operation will update
Solutions Enabler with any changes that occurred on a given
storage array, such as the addition of new disks, and the creation
of new LUNs. This operation can be time-consuming. So if you
suspect that only a single array has changed, then use the Sync
Array button instead.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
105
Operation
◆
Symmetrix Arrays list — This list shows all of the Symmetrix
arrays that Solutions Enabler has discovered. Each item in the list
should have an icon that represents the model of Symmetrix
array. And each item will have the following properties shown in
its respective columns:
• Auto Sync— This column has a checkbox for each Symmetrix
storage array. If selected every operation that requires an SE
connection for that array will run a sync.
• ID column — This column shows the serial number (or ID) of
the storage array.
• Model column — This column shows the model of the storage
array.
• Firmware column — This column shows the version of
firmware that is installed on the storage array.
• Attachment column — This column shows the attachment of
the storage array, which indicates whether the array is locally
discovered or remotely discovered (such as over an SRDF
link).
• LUNs column — This column shows the number of LUNs that
are currently configured on the storage array.
• Disks column — This column shows the number of disks that
are installed in the storage array.
• Front-End Ports column — This column shows the number of
front-end ports that exist within the storage array. These ports
are those to which a host can connect, not RA ports, DA ports,
and such.
106
◆
Sync Array button — This button, when clicked, will force
Solutions Enabler to synchronize with the currently selected
Symmetrix storage array. This button will not be enabled until a
storage array is selected. This operation will update Solutions
Enabler with any changes that occurred on the selected storage
array, such as the addition of new disks and the creation of new
LUNs. Also, the properties of the array show in the columns
should be updated after the sync is complete.
◆
Status box — This box will contain any information that may be
generated due to an action of the other buttons.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
CLARiiON Arrays
The CLARiiON Arrays selection displays all the CLARiiON arrays
that are managed with Solutions Enabler or that have been manually
discovered. This is shown in Figure 36 on page 107.
Figure 36
CLARiiON Arrays
Each item in this panel is described here:
◆
Discover New CLARiiON Array button — This button, when
clicked, will perform a discovery of new CLARiiON storage
arrays based upon the information provided in the following
fields:
• SP-A Name or IP
• SP-B Name or IP
• Scope
• Username
• Password
• Re-Type Password
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
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Operation
◆
Refresh List button — This button, when clicked, will refresh the
list of CLARiiON storage arrays. This button will not discover
new storage arrays.
◆
Sync All Arrays button — This button, when clicked, will force
Solutions Enabler to synchronize with the CLARiiON storage.
This operation will update Solutions Enabler with any changes
that occurred on a given storage array, such as the addition of
new disks, and the creation of new LUNs. This operation can be
time-consuming. So if you suspect that only a single array has
changed, then use the Sync Array button instead.
◆
CLARiiON Arrays list — This list shows all of the CLARiiON
arrays that Solutions Enabler has discovered or have been
manually discovered. Each item in the list should have an icon
that represents the model of CLARiiON array. And each item will
have the following properties shown in its respective CLARiiON:
• Auto Sync— This column has a checkbox for each Symmetrix
storage array. If selected every operation that requires an SE
connection for that array will run a sync.
• Name column — This column shows the serial number (or ID)
of the storage array. If a friendly name is configured for this
storage array then that name will be shown instead.
• Model column — This column shows the model of the storage
array.
• Firmware column — This column shows the version of
firmware that is installed on the storage array.
• Attachment column — This column shows the attachment of
the storage array, which indicates whether the array is locally
discovered or remotely discovered (such as over an SRDF
link).
• LUNs column — This column shows the number of LUNs that
are currently configured on the storage array. This value
includes snapshot LUNs. The value may differ from numbers
shown in other tools (such as symcfg list -clar).
• Disks column — This column shows the number of disks that
are installed in the storage array.
• Front-End Ports column — This column shows the number of
front-end ports that exist within the storage array. These ports
are those to which a host can connect, not RA ports, DA ports,
and such.
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◆
Sync Array button — This button, when clicked, will force
Solutions Enabler to synchronize with the currently selected
CLARiiON storage array. This button will not be enabled until a
storage array is selected. This operation will update Solutions
Enabler with any changes that occurred on the selected storage
array, such as the addition of new disks and the creation of new
LUNs. Also, the properties of the array show in the columns
should be updated after the sync is complete.
◆
Status box — This box will contain any information that may be
generated due to an action of the other buttons.
Celerra Systems1
The Celerra Systems selection displays all the Celerra systems that
have been manually discovered. This is shown in Figure 37 on
page 110.
1. In addition to Celerra there is also a VNX Systems display in VSI 4.1 which is not detailed herein. Please see
the VSI Product Guide for more information.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
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Operation
Figure 37
Celerra Systems
Each item in this panel is described here:
◆
Discover New Celerra System button — This button, when
clicked, will perform a discovery of new Celerra storage systems
based upon the information provided in the Celerra Control
Station box:
– Host Name or IP
– Username
– Password
– Re-Type Password
◆
Refresh List button — This button, when clicked, will refresh the
list of Celerra storage systems. This button will not discover new
storage systems.
◆
Celerra Systems list — This list shows all of the Celerra systems
that have been manually discovered. Each item in the list should
have an icon that represents the model of Celerra system. And
each item will have the following properties shown in its
respective Celerra:
• Name column — This column shows the IP of the Celerra
storage system.
• ID column — This column shows the serial number (or ID) of
the storage system. If a friendly name is configured for this
storage system then that name will be shown instead.
• Model column — This column shows the model of the storage
system.
• Firmware column — This column shows the version of
firmware that is installed on the storage system.
• Data Movers column — This column shows the number of
data movers in the system.
• File Systems column — This column shows the number of file
systems that are on the system.
◆
110
Status box — This box will contain any information that may be
generated due to an action of the other buttons.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
VPLEX Systems
The VPLEX Systems selection displays all the VPLEX systems that
have been manually discovered. This is shown in Figure 38 on
page 111.
Figure 38
VPLEX Systems
Each item in this panel is described here:
◆
Discover New VPLEX Systems button — This button, when
clicked, will perform a discovery of new VPLEX systems based
upon the information provided in the VPLEX Management
Station box:
– Host Name or IP
– Username
– Password
– Re-Type Password
◆
Refresh List button — This button, when clicked, will refresh the
list of VPLEX systems. This button will not discover new storage
systems.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
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Operation
◆
VPLEX Systems list — This list shows all of the VPLEX systems
that have been manually discovered. Each item in the list should
have an icon that represents the model of VPLEX system. And
each item will have the following properties shown in its
respective VPLEX:
• Name - IP Address column — This column shows the IP of the
VPLEX system.
• ID column — This column shows the serial number (or ID) of
the storage array. If a friendly name is configured for this
VPLEX system then that name will be shown instead.
• Model column — This column shows the model of the VPLEX
system.
• Firmware column — This column shows the version of
firmware that is installed on the storage array.
• Distributed Volumes column — This column shows the
number of Distributed Volumes if the VPLEX System is a
Metro Cluster.
• Local Volumes column — This column shows the number of
local volumes on the VPLEX system.
◆
Status box — This box will contain any information that may be
generated due to an action of the other buttons.
vCenter view
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available in the context of a vCenter.
EMC VSI tab
The EMC VSI tab, as shown in Figure 39 on page 113, will be
available when a vCenter is selected in the navigation tree of the
vCenter inventory.
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Figure 39
EMC VSI tab
This tab includes the following panels and views.
Features Navigation Panel
The following panel, Figure 40 on page 113, can be found along the
left side of the EMC VSI panel. This design is similar to what VMware
uses for the Configuration panel.
Figure 40
Assigned Pools
Assigned Pools View
This view is the only available one at the vCenter level. The goal of
this view is to provide details about the storage currently available
from the registered SMC servers.
The Assigned Pools view appears as shown in Figure 41 on page 114.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
113
Operation
Figure 41
Assigned Pools
Each item in the view is described here:
◆
Assigned Pools — Shows each of the SMC servers and storage
arrays the user can access:
• Refresh button — This button when clicked, will force the
Assigned Pools list to refresh its entries.
• Total Assigned Pools label — This label shows the total
number of Assigned Pools that the user has access to.
• Server column — This column shows the network address of
the SMC server providing the storage.
• Array column — This column shows the name of the storage
array providing the storage.
• Product column — This column shows the model of the
storage array providing the storage. Symmetrix, CLARiiON,
and so on.
◆
114
Storage types list — This is a list of storage types, more commonly
referred to in this document as a type list. This particular list
shows each of the storage types that are provided by the selected
assigned pool:
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
• Total Storage Types label — This label shows the total number
of storage types in the list.
• Name column — This column shows the name of the storage
type. If multiple storage types of the same name appear in this
column their names will be modified to include the ID of the
storage array that provided the storage type.
• Available column — This column shows the available capacity
of storage type.
• Capacity column — This column shows the total capacity of
the storage type.
• Description column — This column shows a description of the
storage type as defined by the storage administrator.
Datacenter view
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available in the context of a Datacenter.
EMC VSI tab
The EMC VSI tab as shown in Figure 42 on page 115, will be available
when a Datacenter is selected in the navigation tree of the vCenter
inventory.
Figure 42
EMC VSI tab
This tab includes the following panels and views.
Navigation panel
The panel in Figure 43 on page 116, can be found along the left side of
the EMC VSI panel. This design is similar to what VMware uses for
the Configuration panel.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
115
Operation
Figure 43
Navigation panel
Storage Types view
This view appears by default in this tab. The goal of this view is to
provide details about the storage currently available from the
registered SMC servers.
The storage types view appears as shown in Figure 44 on page 116.
Figure 44
Storage Types
Each item in the view is described here:
◆
116
Storage Types list — This is a list of storage types, more
commonly referred to in this document as a type list. This
particular list shows each of the storage types that are available to
the selected datacenter.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
◆
Storage Type Details panel — This panel shows additional details
about the currently selected storage type:
• Name label — This label shows the name of the selected
storage type.
• Server label — This label shows the name of the server that is
providing the selected storage type.
• Description label — This label shows the description of the
storage type.
• Capacity pie graph — This graph displays the total capacity
and usage of the storage type in text and visually
• Usage list — This list the servers two purposes: it displays all
the suballocations of the storage type to VMware entities
below the selected VMware entity, and it displays all the
LUNs provisioned from this storage type that are in use by the
selected VMware entity:
– Name column — This column shows two types of items:
suballocations and LUNs provisioned from the selected
storage type. If the item is a sub-allocation to a VMware
entity, the name of that entity is displayed along with an
icon indicating the VMware entity type. If the item is a
LUN, the array id and device name are displayed along
with an icon indicating that the item is a LUN.
– Capacity column — This column shows the capacity of the
suballocation that has been allocated to a VMware entity.
This column shows the capacity of a LUN that has been
provisioned from this storage type.
Cluster view
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available in the context of a cluster.
EMC VSI tab
The EMC VSI tab will be available when a Cluster is selected in the
navigation tree of the vCenter inventory. Figure 45 on page 118 shows
the tab.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
117
Operation
Figure 45
EMC VSI tab
This tab includes the following panels and views.
Navigation panel
The following panel can be found along the left side of the EMC VSI
panel. This design is similar to what VMware uses for the
Configuration panel. Figure 46 on page 118 shows the panel.
Figure 46
Navigation Panel
Storage Types view
This view appears by default in this tab. The goal of this view is to
provide details about the storage currently available from the
registered SMC servers.
The storage types view appears as shown in Figure 47 on page 119.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 47
Storage Types
Each item in the view is described here:
◆
Storage Types list — This is a list of storage types, more
commonly referred to in this document as a type list. This
particular list shows each of the storage types that are available to
the selected datacenter.
◆
Storage Type Details panel — This panel shows additional details
about the currently selected storage type:
• Name Label — This label shows the name of the selected
storage type.
• Server Label — This label shows the name of the server that is
providing the selected storage type.
• Description Label — This label shows the description of the
storage type.
• Capacity Pie Graph — This graph displays the total capacity
and usage of the storage type in text and visually.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
119
Operation
• Usage List — This list servers two purposes: it displays all the
sub-allocations of the storage type to VMware entities below
the selected VMware entity, and it displays all the LUNs
provisioned from this storage type that are in use by the
selected VMware entity. Note: If a VMware entity that has an
allocation on it is removed, the allocation will appear in this
list with a name of 'Unknown'. The allocation is not removed
because it is not clear if the missing entity will appear again.
– Name Column — This column shows two types of items:
sub-allocations and LUNs provisioned from the selected
storage type. If the item is a sub-allocation to a VMware
entity, the name of that entity is displayed along with an
icon indicating the VMware entity type. If the item is a
LUN, the array id and device name are displayed along
with an icon indicating that the item is a LUN.
– Capacity Column — This column shows the capacity of the
sub-allocation that has been allocated to a VMware entity.
This column shows the capacity of a LUN that has been
provisioned from this storage type.
Host view
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available in the context of an ESX host.
EMC VSI tab
The EMC VSI tab will be available when a host is selected in the
navigation tree of the vCenter inventory. Figure 42 on page 115 shows
the tab. This tab includes the following panels and views.
Navigation Panel
The following panel as seen in Figure 48 on page 121, can be found
along the left side of the EMC VSI panel. This design is similar to
what VMware uses for the Configuration panel.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 48
Navigation Panel
Each navigation link leads to a different view in the context of the
selected host. When clicked, the link’s color should change to black so
that it is obvious which link was selected. When the page first loads,
the default view should be selected. For this navigation panel, the
storage types view is the default.
Storage Types view
This view appears when the storage types link is selected. The goal of
this view is to provide details about the storage currently available
from the registered SMC servers.
Note: The empty figure below, Figure 49 on page 122, is the expected display
when the host is part of a cluster. storage types must be viewed at the cluster
level.
The storage types view appears as follows.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
121
Operation
Figure 49
Storage Types
Each item in the view is described in general here as the items are the
same as in the Datacenter and Cluster views:
◆
Storage Types list — This is a list of storage types, more
commonly referred to in this document as a type list. This
particular type list shows each of the storage types that are
available to the selected cluster.
◆
Storage Type Details panel — This panel shows additional details
about the currently selected storage type:
• Name Label — This label shows the name of the selected
storage type.
• Server Label — This label shows the name of the server that is
providing the selected storage type.
• Description Label — This label shows the description of the
storage type.
• Capacity Pie Graph — This graph displays the total capacity
and usage of the storage type in text and visually.
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• Usage List — This list servers two purposes: it displays all the
sub-allocations of the storage type to VMware entities below
the selected VMware entity, and it displays all the LUNs
provisioned from this storage type that are in use by the
selected VMware entity. Note: If a VMware entity that has an
allocation on it is removed, the allocation will appear in this
list with a name of 'Unknown'. The allocation is not removed
because it is not clear if the missing entity will appear again.
– Name Column — This column shows two types of items:
sub-allocations and LUNs provisioned from the selected
storage type. If the item is a sub-allocation to a VMware
entity, the name of that entity is displayed along with an
icon indicating the VMware entity type. If the item is a
LUN, the array id and device name are displayed along
with an icon indicating that the item is a LUN.
– Capacity Column — This column shows the capacity of the
sub-allocation that has been allocated to a VMware entity.
This column shows the capacity of a LUN that has been
provisioned from this storage type.
Status panel
The following panel can be found below the EMC VSI tab as seen in
Figure 50 on page 123. This panel is used to communicate
informational events, warnings, and failures to the user. Examples of
operations that will be logged here are Solutions Enabler failures and
successful rescans. In addition, the Status panel will also show the
version of PowerPath/VE installed (if installed) on the ESX host. The
panel can be hidden by double-clicking it.
Figure 50
Status Panel
Resource Pool view
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available in the context of a VMware resource pool.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
123
Operation
EMC VSI tab
The EMC VSI tab will be available when a resource pool is selected in
the navigation tree of the vCenter inventory. as seen in Figure 42 on
page 115. This tab includes the following panels and views.
Navigation panel
The following panel can be found along the left side of the EMC VSI
panel. This design is similar to what VMware uses for the
Configuration panel as seen in Figure 46 on page 118.
Storage Types view
This view appears when the storage types link is selected. The goal of
this view is to provide details about the storage currently available
from the registered SMC servers.
The storage types view appears as shown in Figure 51 on page 124.
Figure 51
Storage Types
Each item in the view is described in general here as the items are the
same as in the Datacenter and Cluster views:
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
◆
Storage Types list — This is a list of storage types, more
commonly referred to in this document as a type list. This
particular type list shows each of the storage types that are
available to the selected cluster.
◆
Storage Type Details panel — This panel shows additional details
about the currently selected storage type:
• Name Label — This label shows the name of the selected
storage type.
• Server Label — This label shows the name of the server that is
providing the selected storage type.
• Description Label — This label shows the description of the
storage type.
• Capacity Pie Graph — This graph displays the total capacity
and usage of the storage type in text and visually.
• Usage List — This list servers two purposes: it displays all the
sub-allocations of the storage type to VMware entities below
the selected VMware entity, and it displays all the LUNs
provisioned from this storage type that are in use by the
selected VMware entity. Note: If a VMware entity that has an
allocation on it is removed, the allocation will appear in this
list with a name of 'Unknown'. The allocation is not removed
because it is not clear if the missing entity will appear again.
– Name Column — This column shows two types of items:
sub-allocations and LUNs provisioned from the selected
storage type. If the item is a sub-allocation to a VMware
entity, the name of that entity is displayed along with an
icon indicating the VMware entity type. If the item is a
LUN, the array id and device name are displayed along
with an icon indicating that the item is a LUN.
– Capacity Column — This column shows the capacity of the
sub-allocation that has been allocated to a VMware entity.
This column shows the capacity of a LUN that has been
provisioned from this storage type.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
125
Operation
Datacenter menus1
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available when right-clicking a Datacenter.
EMC context menu
The EMC context menu, as seen in Figure 52 on page 126, will be
available when a datacenter is right-clicked in the navigation tree of
the vCenter inventory.
Figure 52
EMC context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Configure Storage Allocations Context Menu — This context
menu, when clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure the
storage types allocated to the selected datacenter.
• The first page, as shown in Figure 53 on page 127, displays all
storage types that are available to the selected VMware entity.
The storage types are set to 0 capacity by default. However, if
the entity already has been allocated a storage type the current
capacity will be populated. Capacity values are restricted to
the maximum available and to a minimum if storage is in use
by a lower item in the inventory, such as a LUN or a
1. All menus related to SPM are subject to checks for user permissions/privileges when they are accessed. If a
particular menu is grayed out (disabled) then these permissions/privileges should be checked.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
suballocation. If an invalid capacity is entered, it will be
autocorrected to the nearest valid value and display a warning
to the user.
Figure 53
Allocate Storage
• The final page seen in Figure 54 on page 128 summarizes the
changes to the allocation and when Finish is clicked an
operation to configure the allocations begins.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
127
Operation
Figure 54
Allocate Storage Summary
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the datacenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Inventory.AddStandaloneHost.
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu
The EMC context menu, as seen in Figure 55 on page 129, will be
available when a cluster or host is right-clicked in the Storage Type
Details panel.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 55
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Configure Storage Allocations Context Menu — This context
menu, when clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure the
storage types allocated to the selected Cluster or Host.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the Cluster or Host:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Inventory.EditCluster
– Host.Inventory.AddHostToCluster
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
129
Operation
Cluster menus
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available when right-clicking a cluster.
EMC context menu
The EMC context menu will be available when a cluster is
right-clicked in the navigation tree of the vCenter inventory as shown
in Figure 56 on page 130.
Figure 56
EMC context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Add Datastore… context menu — This context menu, when
clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure a new LUN to be
provisioned and mapped to the selected inventory item as a
VMFS datastore:
• The first page displays a Type List for the classes available to
the selected VMware entity. Figure 57 on page 131 is an
example of this.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 57
Add Datastore — Choose Storage Type
• The second page allows for configuring the capacity of the
LUN from the selected storage type. If precreated capacities
are defined, then an option to select precreated LUN capacities
is available on the screen. A capacity control is also available
to allow for configuring custom capacities. The capacity
control restricts capacity values based on the amount of
storage available, the maximum LUN size policy, and the
minimum LUN size policy. If an invalid capacity is entered, it
will be autocorrected to the nearest valid value and a warning
will be presented to the user. If a policy is enabled that allows
only provisioning of precreated capacities, then the custom
capacity options will be disabled. Figure 58 on page 132 is a
view of this page.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
131
Operation
Figure 58
Add Datastore — Select Capacity
• The third page contains a text box to accept the name of the
new datastore. The entered name is validated against a list of
existing datastores to ensure that it is valid. Figure 59 on
page 133 is a view of the third page.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 59
Add Datastore — Datastore Name
• The fourth page contains the option to choose the block size of
the datastore. Figure 60 on page 134 is a view of the fourth
page.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
133
Operation
Figure 60
Add Datastore — Choose datastore formatting
• The final page summarizes the selected options and when
Finish is clicked, an operation to create the datastore begins.
Figure 61 on page 135 shows the final page.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 61
Add Datastore — Summary
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the Cluster:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Inventory.EditCluster
– Host.Config.Storage (for each host that is a member of the
cluster)
◆
Update Storage Adapters context menu — This context menu,
when clicked, causes an update to the list of Fibre Channel HBA
ports in the cluster members to be sent to the SMC server.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the Cluster:
– Task.Create
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
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Operation
– Task.Update
◆
Configure Storage Allocations… context menu — This context
menu, when clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure the
storage types allocated to the selected cluster.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the Cluster:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Inventory.EditCluster
– Host.Inventory.AddHostToCluster
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu
The EMC context menu, as seen in Figure 62 on page 137 and
Figure 63 on page 138, will be available when a resource pool or LUN
is right-clicked in the Storage Type Details panel.
136
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 62
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu — Resource Pool
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Configure Storage Allocations Context Menu — This context
menu, when clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure the
storage types allocated to the selected resource pool.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the datacenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Inventory.AddStandaloneHost.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
137
Operation
Figure 63
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu — LUN
◆
Expand LUN… context menu — This context menu, when
clicked, opens the Expand LUN wizard.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage
◆
138
Delete LUN… context menu — This context menu, when clicked,
begins the process of deleting the LUN.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage (for each host that mounts the
datastore which is backed by the LUN)
Host menus
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available when right-clicking an ESX host.
EMC context menu
The EMC context menu will be available when a host is right-clicked
in the navigation tree of the vCenter inventory. The tasks will only be
available in a stand-alone host configuration. In a cluster the SPM
related menu will be grayed out as is the case in Figure 64 on
page 140.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
139
Operation
Figure 64
EMC context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Add Datastore… context menu — This context menu, when
clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure a new LUN to be
provisioned and mapped to the selected inventory item as a
VMFS datastore.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the cluster:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Inventory.EditCluster
– Host.Config.Storage
◆
140
Update Storage Adapters Context Menu — This context menu,
when clicked, causes an update to the list of Fibre Channel HBA
ports in the host to be sent to the SMC server.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware administrator
must be granted the following permissions on the Host:
Task.Create and Task.Update.
◆
Configure Storage Allocations… Context Menu — This context
menu, when clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure the
storage types allocated to the selected host.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the host:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Settings
Note: If an ESX host is a member of a cluster all SPM context menus to that
host become disabled. To add a datastore or modify storage allocations to the
host it is preferable to perform those operations on the entire cluster. This
should ensure availability of resources should a member of cluster go down.
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu
The EMC context menu for a non-clustered host will essentially be
the same as for a cluster as seen in Figure 62 on page 137 and
Figure 63 on page 138. It will be available when a resource pool is
right-clicked in the Storage Type Details panel.
Resource Pool menus
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available when right-clicking a resource pool.
EMC context menu
The EMC context menu will be available when a resource pool is
right-clicked in the navigation tree of the vCenter inventory. as
shown in Figure 65 on page 142.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
141
Operation
Figure 65
EMC context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Configure Storage Allocations… Context Menu — This context
menu, when clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure the
storage types allocated to the selected resource pool.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the resource pool:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Resource.EditPool
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu
The EMC context menu, as seen in Figure 66 on page 143, will be
available when a LUN is right-clicked in the Storage Type Details
panel when the appropriate storage type is select in the storage types
panel.
142
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 66
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Expand LUN… context menu — This context menu, when
clicked, opens the Expand LUN wizard.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage
◆
Delete LUN… context menu — This context menu, when clicked,
begins the process of deleting the LUN.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
143
Operation
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage (for each host that mounts the
datastore which is backed by the LUN)
Virtual Machine menus
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available when right-clicking a virtual machine.
EMC context menu
The EMC context menu, as seen in Figure 67 on page 144, will be
available when a virtual machine is right-clicked in the navigation
tree of the vCenter inventory.
Figure 67
EMC context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
144
Add Storage… context menu — This context menu, when clicked,
opens a wizard for the user to configure a new LUN to be
provisioned and mapped to the selected virtual machine as a
Raw Device Mapping (RDM).
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
• The first page displays a type list for the classes available to
the selected VMware entity, as shown in Figure 68 on
page 145.
Figure 68
Add Raw Device Mapping
• The second page allows for configuring the capacity of a new
LUN from the selected storage type as shown in Figure 69 on
page 146.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
145
Operation
Figure 69
Add Raw Device Mapping — Select Capacity
• The third page configures where the resulting RDM file is
stored, either with the VM (default) or on a different datastore
by selecting the datastore from a list. This is shown in
Figure 70 on page 147.
146
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 70
Add Raw Device Mapping — Select Datastore
• The fourth page configures the compatibility mode of the new
RDM as shown in Figure 71 on page 148.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
147
Operation
Figure 71
Add Raw Device Mapping — Compatibility Mode
• The fifth page, as seen in Figure 72 on page 149, is dependent
upon the previous page and configures two settings: Virtual
Device Node where the RDM is mapped to the VM; and the
mode of the RDM. SCSI device nodes may be selected for up
to four virtual SCSI controllers, and if a controller does not
exist it will be added to the VM at the same time as the RDM.
IDE device nodes may be selected as well, however, hot-add of
IDE devices is not permitted by VMware, so selection of IDE
nodes is only allowed when the VM is powered off. If physical
compatibility mode is selected on page four, mode selection is
hidden. If virtual compatibility mode is selected, page five
displays mode selection options.
148
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 72
Add Raw Device Mapping — Advanced Options
• The final page, Figure 73 on page 150, summarizes the options
selected and when Finish is clicked an operation to create the
RDM begins.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
149
Operation
Figure 73
Add Raw Device Mapping — Summary
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the virtual machine:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage (on each ESX associated with the VM)
– VirtualMachine.Config.RawDevice
◆
150
Configure Batch Storage…Context Menu — This context menu,
when clicked, opens a wizard for the user to configure a batch of
LUNs to be provisioned and mapped to the selected Virtual
Machine as RDMs. LUNs of various storage types and capacities
may be chosen and added to a 'batch', the batch LUNs are
provisioned and then mapped as RDMs. The RDM settings
chosen (such as compatibility and disk mode) are applied to all
LUNs in the batch. Virtual device nodes are automatically
assigned.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
• The wizard consist of one page with two panels. The left panel
describes the configuration of the LUNs added to the batch
with the controls to add or remove entries. The right panel
provides options similar to the Add Raw Device Mappings
wizard, used to configure RDM settings. This is shown in
Figure 74 on page 151.
Figure 74
Add Raw Device Mappings Batch
• The first page, Figure 75 on page 152, displays a list of storage
types from which to choose.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
151
Operation
Figure 75
Add Raw Device Mappings Batch — Select Storage Type
• On the second page, Figure 76 on page 153, one selects the
capacity of the LUNs — either a precreated or custom size —
and then selects the number of LUNs to create.
152
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 76
Add Raw Device Mappings Batch — Select Capacity
• On the final page one can review the LUNs that will be
created. As seen in Figure 77 on page 154, there are a total of
three RDMS that are set to be created from two different
storage types.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
153
Operation
Figure 77
Add Raw Device Mappings Batch — Summary
EMC VSI tab RDM context menu
The EMC context menu will be available when a RDM is right-clicked
within the EMC VSI tab, Raw Device Mappings panel as seen in
Figure 78 on page 155.
154
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 78
EMC VSI tab Storage Types context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Expand Raw Device Mapping… context menu — This context
menu, when clicked, opens the Expand LUN wizard for the Raw
Device Mapping wizard to configure how to increase the RDM
capacity.
• Expand LUN Wizard — This wizard launches with a wait
dialog box, as seen in Figure 79 on page 156, while
determining if the RDM can be expanded, and then allows the
user to configure a larger capacity based on the LUN's usage
and the expansion options available.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
155
Operation
Figure 79
Expand Raw Device Mapping — One Moment Screen
• After determining what type of extension is possible, if
expanding the capacity of an RDM is possible, a wizard is
launched to expand. The following conditions govern the
extension:
– The wizard supports expanding LUNs using Symmetrix
meta devices and is available on VMAX/VMAXe array
running a minimum of Enginuity 5875 and managed by an
SMC Server running a minimum version of 7.2.
– The wizard supports expanding LUNs in three states:
Standalone LUNs mapped to an ESX; LUNs mapped to a
VM as an RDM; a LUN backing a VMFS datastore which
consists of a single extent.
• The first page as seen in Figure 80 on page 157, allows for
configuring the new capacity of the RDM. The RDM will be
expanded using the same storage type from which it was
provisioned. The capacity control restricts capacity values
based on the amount available, the maximum LUN size policy,
and the maximum size of a datastore extent. If invalid
capacities are entered, it will be autocorrected to the nearest
valid value and display a warning to the user.
156
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 80
Expand Raw Device Mapping— Capacity
• The final page, Figure 81 on page 158, summarizes the options
selected and when finish is selected an operation to expand
the RDM begins.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
157
Operation
Figure 81
Expand Raw Device Mapping — Summary
• After determining what type of extension is possible, if
expanding the capacity of the RDM is not possible, an error is
displayed. This is shown in Figure 82 on page 158.
Figure 82
Expand Raw Device Mapping — Expansion Error
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the virtual machine:
158
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage (on each ESX associated with the VM)
– VirtualMachine.Config.RawDevice
◆
Remove Raw Device Mapping… context menu — This context
menu, when clicked, begins the process of removing the RDM
from the virtual machine. Figure 83 on page 159 is an example of
the dialog box. If the RDM is not provisioned from an assigned
pool, the RDM is simply removed. If the RDM is from a
provisioned pool, a second dialog box, Figure 84 on page 160,
offers to deallocate the RDM any the RDM will be unmasked,
deleted, and the used capacity will become available again in for
their storage type.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage (on each ESX associated with the VM)
– VirtualMachine.Config.RawDevice
Figure 83
Remove Raw Device Mapping
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
159
Operation
Figure 84
Confirm Remove Raw Device Mapping
Datastore menus
The following is a detailed description of the functionality that is
available when right-clicking a datastore.
EMC context menu
The EMC context menu as seen in Figure 85 on page 160, will be
available when a datastore is right-clicked in the navigation tree of
the vCenter inventory.
Figure 85
EMC context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
160
Expand Datastore… context menu — This context menu, when
clicked, opens the Expand LUN wizard for the Datastore wizard
to configure how to increase the Datastore capacity.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
• Expand LUN Wizard — This wizard launches with a wait
dialog box, while determining if the LUN backing a datastore
can be expanded, and then allows the user to configure a
larger capacity based on the LUN's usage and the expansion
options available as seen in Figure 86 on page 161.
Figure 86
Expand Datastore — One Moment Screen
• After determining what type of extension is possible, if
expanding the capacity of a LUN is possible, a wizard is
launched to expand. The following conditions govern the
extension:
– The wizard supports expanding LUNs using Symmetrix
meta devices and is available on VMAX/VMAXe array
running a minimum of Enginuity 5875 and managed by an
SMC Server running a minimum version of 7.2.
– The wizard supports expanding LUNs in three states:
Standalone LUNs mapped to an ESX; LUNs mapped to a
VM as an RDM; a LUN backing a VMFS datastore which
consists of a single extent.
• The first page as seen in Figure 87 on page 162, allows for
configuring the new capacity of the LUN. The LUN will be
expanded using the same storage type from which it was
provisioned. The capacity control restricts capacity values
based on the amount available, the maximum LUN size policy,
and the maximum size of a datastore extent. If invalid
capacities are entered, it will be autocorrected to the nearest
valid value and display a warning to the user.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
161
Operation
Figure 87
Expand Datastore — Capacity
• The final page, Figure 88 on page 163, summarizes the options
selected and when finish is selected an operation to expand
the LUN begins. When expanding a datastore extent, the
VMFS filesystem will be expanded to utilize the new capacity
of the LUN.
162
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 88
Expand Datastore — Summary
• After determining what type of extension is possible, if
expanding the capacity of the datastore extent is not possible,
a wizard will be displayed that allows the user to configure a
new LUN to use as a VMFS extent to the datastore.
• The first page displays a list of storage types to choose from as
seen in Figure 89 on page 164.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
163
Operation
Figure 89
Extend Datastore — Select Storage Type
• The second page allows for configuring the new capacity of
the selected datastore using the selected storage type. If
precreated capacities are defined, then a drop down box is
available to select precreated LUN capacities, otherwise this
drop down box is disabled. A capacity control is also available
to allow for configuring custom capacities. The capacity
control restricts capacity values based on the amount
available, the maximum LUN size policy, and the minimum
LUN size policy. If invalid capacities are entered, it will be
autocorrected to the nearest valid value and display a warning
to the user. If a policy is enabled that only allows provisioning
of precreated capacities, then the custom capacity options will
be disabled. To support extension of datastores with capacities
greater than the maximum LUN size, the user is allowed to
provide a capacity that will generate multiple LUNs and each
LUN will be used as a datastore extent as shown in Figure 90
on page 165.
164
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 90
Extend Datastore — Select New Capacity
• The final page summarizes the options selected and when
finish is selected an operation to extend the Datastore begins.
Note that the capacity value will indicate the number of LUNs
that will be provisioned if more than one is required. The final
page as seen in Figure 91 on page 166, summarizes the options
selected and when finish is selected an operation to extend the
datastore begins.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
165
Operation
Figure 91
Extend Datastore — Summary
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage (for each host that mounts the
datastore)
Note: When extending a datastore, it is not possible to select a precreated
device that is a metavolume.
◆
166
Remove Datastore… context menu — This context menu, when
clicked, begins the process of removing the datastore from all
hosts that mount it. Figure 92 on page 167 is an example of the
dialog box. If the datastore does not have any extents that are
provisioned from an assigned pool, the user is prompted to
confirm that they wish to continue. If any extents are LUNs
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
provisioned from an assigned pool they will be unmasked,
deleted, and their used capacity will become available again for
their storage type.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage (for each host that mounts the
datastore)
Figure 92
Remove Datastore
Storage Viewer\LUNs menus
The following is a description of the functionality that is available
when right-clicking LUN from within the Storage Viewer\LUNs
panel.
EMC context menu
The EMC context menu will be available when a LUN is right-clicked
within the EMC VSI tab, Storage Viewer\LUNs as seen in Figure 93
on page 168.
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
167
Operation
Figure 93
EMC context menu
This includes the following submenus:
◆
Expand LUN… context menu — This context menu, when
clicked, opens the Expand LUN wizard.
• Expand LUN Wizard — This wizard launches with a wait
dialog, as shown in Figure 94 on page 168, while determining
if the LUN can be expanded, and then allows the user to
configure a larger capacity based on the LUN's usage and the
expansion options available.
Figure 94
168
Expand LUN — One Moment Screen
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
• After determining what type of extension is possible, if
expanding the capacity of a LUN is possible, a wizard is
launched to expand. The following conditions govern the
extension:
– The wizard supports expanding LUNs using Symmetrix
meta devices and is available on VMAX/VMAXe array
running a minimum of Enginuity 5875 and managed by an
SMC Server running a minimum version of 7.2.
– The wizard supports expanding LUNs in three states:
Standalone LUNs mapped to an ESX; LUNs mapped to a
VM as an RDM; a LUN backing a VMFS datastore which
consists of a single extent.
• The first page as seen in Figure 96 on page 170, allows for
configuring the new capacity of the LUN. The LUN will be
expanded using the same storage type from which it was
provisioned. The capacity control restricts capacity values
based on the amount available, the maximum LUN size policy,
and the maximum size of a datastore extent. If invalid
capacities are entered, it will be autocorrected to the nearest
valid value and display a warning to the user. If there is not
enough capacity to expand, an error will appear as seen in
Figure 95 on page 169.
Figure 95
Expand LUN — Insufficient capacity error
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
169
Operation
Figure 96
Expand LUN — Capacity
• The final page, Figure 97 on page 171, summarizes the options
selected and when finish is selected an operation to expand
the LUN begins.
170
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 97
Expand LUN — Summary
• After determining what type of extension is possible, if
expanding the capacity of the LUN is not possible, an error
will appear as in Figure 98 on page 171.
.
Figure 98
Expand LUN — Expansion error
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
171
Operation
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage
◆
Delete LUN… context menu — This context menu, when clicked,
begins the process of deleting the LUN. See Figure 99 on page 172
for an example of the dialog box to remove the LUN. Figure 100
on page 173 shows the error the user receives if the LUN is a
non-SPM one. If there was a datastore associated with that LUN
it is also removed. The LUNs will be unmasked, deleted, and
their used capacity will become available again in for their
storage type.
• For this context menu to be enabled, the VMware
administrator must be granted the following permissions on
the vCenter:
– Task.Create
– Task.Update
– Host.Config.Storage (for each host that mounts the
datastore which is backed by the LUN)
Figure 99
172
Delete LUN — Warning dialog
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Operation
Figure 100
Delete LUN — Non-SPM LUN error
SPM views and operations in EMC VSI
173
Operation
Error logging
Each of the components that comprise the SPM functionality, SMC
and VSI, has logging capabilities. The sections are divided by role.
Storage administrator
Logs are generated for SPM operations in the SMC log. These log
entries include:
◆
All SPM operations that occur between the vSphere Client, SMC
client, and the SMC server.
◆
All array configuration and control operations that occur during
an SPM operation.
◆
Internal error conditions.
VMware administrator
SPM logs are generated in VSI. The Section “Feature Manager” on
page 95 provides more detail on log levels and log locations.
174
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
3
Use Cases
This chapter contains use cases for Storage Pool Management.
◆
◆
◆
Use cases and functional details .................................................... 176
Storage administrator (SA) functions............................................ 177
VMware administrator/user functions ........................................ 201
Use Cases
175
Use Cases
Use cases and functional details
The following chapter includes the “how-to” for the many functions
available in Storage Pool Management. Each use case has
step-by-step instructions for performing SPM tasks — from creating a
virtualization domain to deleting an RDM. Where deemed necessary,
the function is accompanied by a screenshot; however not all
functions will include one.
176
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Storage administrator (SA) functions
This section uses tables to describe common use cases and functional
details related to operations that the storage administrator (SA)
performs in Storage Pool Management including:
◆
Setting up the Storage Types
◆
Creating a virtualization domain
◆
Adding storage resources to the virtualization domain
◆
Setting policies for the storage resources
Use cases
Table 1
Create Storage Type
Use case
Create a Storage Type
Description
Storage administrator (SA) creates a storage
type from a previously defined Symmetrix tier
definition or by a set of physical storage
properties.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via
a browser.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
177
Use Cases
178
The SA performs
1. Accesses the Storage Type creation
dialog box within SMC through:
Tasks/Administration/Operations/Virtua
lization Management/Manage Storage
Types. Figure 101 on page 179 shows the
location in SMC of this task.
2. Selects Create and either selects an
existing tier or creates a custom Storage
Type.
3. Clicks the OK button.
Exception Paths
1. Storage type name already exists.
Important considerations
The following points should be considered for
this use case:
• When creating a custom storage type it is
possible to make 0, 1, or ‘x’ selections in a
category.
• If FAST tiers are used to create a storage
type then the tier name is used to create
the storage type name.
• Even if a FAST tier is used to create a
storage type, once the storage type is
created it is independent of the tier.
Changes to the tier do not affect the
storage type and the storage type itself
can be updated independent of the tier.
• Two different storage types can have
exactly the same property set.
• Storage types can be created which do not
have any settings for a particular property,
for example, Disk type. In fact, a storage
type can be created without any properties
at all. In this case it can used to describe
the storage in any storage resource.
Storage types without any properties are
are required for FAST VP policy resources.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Figure 101
SMC Tasks — Manage Storage Types
Table 2
Delete Storage Type
Use case
Delete Storage Type
Description
The storage administrator deletes a storage type through SMC.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
179
Use Cases
Table 3
180
The SA performs
1. The SA accesses the Storage Type creation dialog box within
SMC through:
Tasks/Administration/Operations/Virtualization
Management/Manage Storage Types.
2. The SA highlights the tier to delete and clicks Delete.
3. The SA presses the OK button.
Exception Paths
1. The storage type cannot be deleted if it is being used by any
storage resource.
Important
considerations
NA
Update Storage Type
Use case
Update Storage Type
Description
The storage administrator updates a storage type including its name
or description through SMC.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
The SA performs
1. SA accesses the Storage Type creation dialog box within the
SMC through:
Tasks/Administration/Operations/Virtualization
Management/Manage Storage Types. A list of storage types is
displayed.
2. The SA highlights the storage type to update and selects
Modify.
3. The SA can change the name, the description, or both.
4. The SA clicks OK.
Exception Paths
1. Updating the storage type name to one that already exists.
Important
considerations
NA
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Table 4
Create Virtualization Domain
Use case
Create a virtualization domain
Description
The storage administrator creates a virtualization domain through
SMC.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
The SA performs
1. The SA selects Create Virtualization Domain from the
Virtualization Domain Management menu as shown in
Figure 102 on page 182.
2. The SA uses a list box to choose virtualization domain name, the
vCenter GUID, the minimum LUN size desired and the maximum
LUN size. Both the minimum and maximum LUN size can be
entered in manually rather than choosing the values in the list
box. The SA also has the option of limiting the number of total
LUNs in the virtualization domain, as well as enforcing the use of
precreated LUNs. The dialog box is shown in Figure 103 on
page 183.
3. The SA selects a masking view to associate with the
virtualization domain.
4. The SA then clicks OK.
Exception Paths
1. The virtualization domain already exists.
2. There is already a virtualization domain for this array which
contains storage for the vCenter.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• A virtualization domain can contain only storage resources from
the same array.
• The virtualization domain name must be unique to the SMC
server instance.
• More than one virtualization domain can be created per array,
but they must be assigned to different vCenters.
• There is no validation of the vCenter GUID. Failure to enter the
correct value will result in the vSphere Client being unable to see
the storage.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
181
Use Cases
Figure 102
182
Virtualization Domain Management — Create Virtualization Domain
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Figure 103
Virtualization Domain dialog box
Table 5
Auto Create Virtualization Domain
Use case
Auto create a virtualization domain
Description
The storage administrator creates a virtualization domain from the
existing storage resources on an array. Auto setup the masking and
authorizations needed.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
2. The storage resources, thin pools or FAST policies, have already
been created.
3. The VMware configuration has been exported from VSI into an
XML file.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
183
Use Cases
184
The SA performs
1. The SA accesses the Automated Virtualization Domain Setup
dialog box within the SMC through:
Tasks/Operations/Virtualization Management/Automated
Virtualization Domain Setup. This is shown in Figure 104 on
page 185.
2. In the wizard the SA:
a. Browses to the exported configuration file.
b. vCenter to setup is selected (an export file can contain more
than one vCenter)
c. Once selected the vCenter name is displayed
d. A list of the clusters is show. The port group to use for
masking this cluster to the array can be selected. If no port group
is selected then no masking is created for this cluster.
e. Enters the provisioning policies for the virtualization domain.
f. A table is shown with a row for each storage resource, FAST
VP policy or thin pool.
g. For each resource the user enters/selects the storage type,
capacity and an adopt LUNs flag to use for assigning the
resource to the virtualization domain.
i. There are 2 choices for storage type: select from a list of
already created storage types or enter a new storage type
name.
ii. Capacity: This is the amount of subscribed storage from
the storage resource that is to be committed to the vCenter.
iii. Adopt LUNs flag: If set then the LUNs that can be are
adopted into SPM for this resource, if not set then no LUNs
are adopted. The default is not set.
3. The actions to be performed by the wizard are displayed.
4. The SA clicks Finish in the wizard.
5. All the actions necessary to setup and create the virtualization
domain are completed.
6. The actions that were performed are displayed, and which, if
any, failed.
Exception Paths
1. The SMC user does not have the Admin role.
2. SPM will abort the setup as soon as any error is encountered.
Any failure will be reported to the user.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• The SMC user must be an administrator since this includes
permissions to both configure the Symmetrix and set
authorizations, both of which the wizard does.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Figure 104
SMC Tasks — Automated Virtualization Domain Setup
Storage administrator (SA) functions
185
Use Cases
Table 6
Table 7
186
Delete Virtualization Domain
Use case
Delete a Virtualization Domain
Description
The storage administrator deletes a virtualization domain through
SMC.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
The SA performs
1. The SA right-clicks an existing virtualization domain and selects
Delete Virtualization Domain from the Virtualization Domain
Management menu.
2. The SA selects Yes.
Exception Paths
1. There are still storage resources assigned to the virtualization
domain. All storage resources must be removed first.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• Deleting the virtualization domain removes all storage
allocations for VMware resources that are associated with this
virtualization domain; but all LUNs are left intact and still masked
to the ESX servers.
Update Virtualization Domain
Use case
Update a Virtualization Domain
Description
Change some of the information about a virtualization domain. This
includes the name, description, and vSphere server GUID.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Table 8
The SA performs
1. The SA selects a virtualization domain in SMC, right-clicks it,
and selects Modify Virtualization Domain from the
Virtualization Domain Management menu.
2. The SA updates some or all of the virtualization domain
information.
3. The SA then clicks OK.
Exception Paths
1. The new name conflicts with the name of an already existing
virtualization domain.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• If the vSphere GUID is changed, the virtualization domain’s
storage will no longer be available to the vCenter with the
original GUID.
Add a View to a Virtualization Domain
Use case
Add a view to a Virtualization Domain
Description
The storage administrator adds a view to a virtualization domain
through SMC.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
2. The vCenter has authorizations on the storage group in the view
to be added.
The SA performs
1. The SA selects a virtualization domain in SMC, right-clicks it,
and selects Modify Virtualization Domain from the
Virtualization Domain Management menu.
2. The SA selects a view from the table on the left and clicks the
Add button to put it to the right.
Exception Paths
1. Adding a view will fail if there is already a view with the same
initiator group in it.
2. Adding a view will fail if the vCenter server does not have
authorizations on the storage group in the view.
3. The view does not exist on the array associated with the
virtualization domain
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• There can be multiple views attached to a virtualization domain.
However, there can only be one view per virtualization domain
per VMware cluster.
• A view can be attached to multiple virtualization domains.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
187
Use Cases
Table 9
Table 10
188
Remove a View from a Virtualization Domain
Use case
Remove a view from a Virtualization Domain
Description
The storage administrator removes a view from a virtualization
domain through SMC.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
The SA performs
1. The SA selects a virtualization domain in SMC, right-clicks it,
and selects Modify Virtualization Domain from the
Virtualization Domain Management menu.
2. The SA selects a view from the table on the left and clicks the
Remove button to put it to the left.
Exception Paths
NA
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• New LUNs cannot be created for the cluster serviced by the view
that was removed.
• The masking view itself is not deleted or modified, so existing
LUNs are left still masked to the cluster.
Add a Storage Resource to a Virtualization Domain
Use case
Add a storage resource to a Virtualization Domain
Description
The storage administrator adds a storage resource, thin pool, or
FAST VP policy to a virtualization domain through SMC. This makes
all or part of the storage in the thin pool available for provisioning by
VMware users.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
2. The vCenter server has been given authorizations on the
storage resources.
a. Thin pool storage resources require authorizations on
themselves.
b. FAST VP policy storage resources require authorizations
on all their associated thin pools and on a storage group
associated with the FAST VP policy.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
The SA performs
1. The SA selects a virtualization domain in SMC, right-clicks it,
and selects Add Storage Resource from the Virtualization
Domain Management menu. A list of storage resources is
shown.
2. The SA chooses a storage resource to associate with a
virtualization domain and then selects the appropriate storage
type. The SA then supplies the capacity to use and selects OK.
Exception Paths
1. No storage types match the storage resource.
2. The storage resource has no available capacity, e.g. all its
capacity has been allocated to another virtualization domain(s).
3. The storage resource matches a single storage type and another
storage resource has already been placed in the virtualization
domain using that storage type.
4. The storage resource is not on the same array as the storage
resources already in the virtualization domain.
5. The vSphere server the virtualization domain is assigned to,
does not have authorizations for this storage resource.
6. The storage resource is a FAST VP policy and it does not have
an associated storage group which is authorized to the vCenter
and not in a masking view.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• The virtualization domain can only contain storage resources
from the same array.
• For each virtualization domain, a storage type can only be used
once with a storage resource. Multiple storage resources cannot
share the same storage type.
• A storage resource can provide storage to more than one
virtualization domain.
• The amount of capacity added to a virtualization domain from a
storage resource is subscribed capacity, not physical capacity.
The total amount of subscribed capacity in a storage resource is
determined by multiplying its enabled physical capacity by the
maximum subscription percent (a thin pool property set by the
SA) minus capacity already assigned to other thin pools and to
other thin devices not in any virtualization domains.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
189
Use Cases
Table 11
Table 12
190
Remove a Storage Resource from a Virtualization Domain
Use case
Remove storage resource from Virtualization Domain
Description
The storage administrator removes a thin pool from a virtualization
domain through SMC. This dissolves the association between the
virtualization domain and the thin pool. It leaves any LUNs in the
thin pool in place, but removes the SPM reservation on them.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
The SA performs
1. The SA selects a virtualization domain and clicks the Storage
Resource tab in the right panel.
2. The SA right-clicks the storage resource to delete and selects
Remove Storage Resource from the Virtualization Domain
Management menu.
Exception Paths
NA
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• Devices provisioned from the removed storage resource will not
be deleted or have their masking changed. Only the SPM
reservation will be removed.
• Precreation policies for the virtualization domain that are for the
storage type associated with the storage resource are deleted.
• All the storage for the storage type represented by this storage
resource in the virtualization domain is removed. For example, if
this storage resource contained the gold storage for
virtualization domain A which is assigned to vCenter server
ABC, the vSphere Client will no longer have any gold storage
from virtualization domain A on vCenter server ABC.
Update the Storage Resource Capacity in a Virtualization Domain
Use case
Update the storage resource capacity in a Virtualization Domain
Description
The storage administrator changes the capacity assigned to a
virtualization domain from a storage resource through SMC.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Table 13
The SA performs
1. The SA selects a virtualization domain and clicks the Storage
Resource tab in the right panel.
2. he SA right-clicks the storage resource to delete and selects
Modify Storage Resource from the Virtualization Domain
Management menu.
3. The SA enters a new capacity to assign from the storage
resource to the virtualization domain
Exception Paths
1. The capacity allocated to the virtualization domain is reduced to
below what is already being used from the storage resource.
2. More capacity is added than is available in the storage resource.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• Adding capacity to a virtualization domain lessens the amount of
capacity that can be assigned to other virtualization domains.
Adopt LUNs
Use case
Adopt LUNs
Description
A storage resource that is being added to a virtualization domain
may already have devices in it that users want to be controlled by
the SPM. This could be because the Storage Pool Management
meta-data has been corrupted or deleted, or the user wants to bring
an existing VMware configuration under SPM control.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
191
Use Cases
192
The SA performs
1. The SA selects a virtualization domain and clicks the Storage
Resource tab in the right panel.
1. The SA right-clicks the storage resource and selects Modify
Adopt LUNs from the Virtualization Domain Management
menu.The adopt LUN dialog box is displayed and is shown in
Figure 105 on page 193. A list of the current devices in the thin
pool matching the following criteria are displayed:
a. Device is not reserved, or already reserved by SPM
b. Is in a storage group, in a view, that has an initiator group that
is in one of the views assigned to the virtualization domain.
c. If the storage resource is a thin pool:
i. The thin pool must be authorized to the vCenter
d.If the storage resource is a FAST VP policy then:
i. The device must be in a storage group associated with the
FAST VP policy
ii. The thin pool the device is in must be authorized to the
vCenter
iii. The storage group must be authorized to the vCenter
iv. The storage group must not be in a masking view
2. The SA selects which of the devices to adopt and clicks Add or
Add All to move them to the target side. The selected devices
are adopted to be managed by SPM. They are placed in the
virtualization domain, and their capacity is added to the
virtualization domain’s total capacity.
Exception Paths
NA
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• The devices are added to the SPM reservation.
• A VMware user must now run refresh which determines the VMs
each device is attached to and then straightens out the capacity
accounting.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Figure 105
Adopt LUNs Dialog
Table 14
Adopt an existing configuration
Use case
Adopt an existing VMware configuration
Description
SPM is being deployed in an environment where there is an existing
VMware configuration that already uses storage from a Symmetrix.
The existing thin pools and thin LUNs need to be brought under
SPM control.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
2. The SA has both the storage administrator and security
administrator role on the Symmetrix(es).
Storage administrator (SA) functions
193
Use Cases
194
The SA performs
1. The SA either creates new views to use to mask new LUNs to
the VMware cluster, or decides to use the existing ones. Any
newly created views use the existing initiator groups that contain
the WWNs for the VMware cluster.
2. If authorization is being used on the Symmetrix, the the SA
enters the authorizations for the vCenter on the thin pools that
contain the LUNs currently in use by the VMware cluster and for
the storage groups in the views of the previous step.
3. The SA either decides to use some existing storage types, or
create new ones. In either case there must be one per storage
resource that is going to be put into the virtualization domain.
4. The SA creates a virtualization domain as explained in Table 4
on page 181 or Table 5 on page 183.
5. The SA selects storage resources to add to the virtualization
domain as explained in Table 10 on page 188. These storage
resources already contain the devices which are mapped to the
VMware configuration.
6. The SA selects which LUNs to adopt. Table 13 on page 191 has
details of this.
7. The VMAdmin does a refresh configuration from the vSphere
Client as seen in Figure 106 on page 195.
Exception Paths
NA
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• This is only supported for thin devices.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Figure 106
Refresh Configuration in vSphere Client
Table 15
Set Client Security
Use case
Set Up Client Security
Description
The storage administrator sets the password that is used by
vSphere clients to log in the SMC server.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
195
Use Cases
Figure 107
196
The SA performs
1. The SA opens the dialog box for Manage Launch Clients in
SMC under Tasks as seen in Figure 107 on page 196.
2. The SA then either selects Edit to change the existing client-ID
or Add to create a new client-ID. Figure 108 on page 197 is an
example of this.
Exception Paths
1. Storage type name already exists.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• The VMAdmin must supply the password when the first
connection the vSphere Client to SMC. Once the first connection
is made, the password is not used.
SMC Tasks — Manage Launch Clients
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Figure 108
Manage Launch Clients
Table 16
Back up SPM data
Use case
Back up SPM data
Description
The storage administrator backs up the SPM data through SMC.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
The SA performs
1. The SA opens the dialog box for Manage SPM Metadata in
SMC under Tasks as seen in Figure 109 on page 198.
2. The SA selects Action Backup and supplies a Backup Directory
Name as seen in Figure 110 on page 199.
3. The SA clicks OK. The backup folder is created in the SMC
directory path under …\WEB-INF\SPM_META_DATA\”Backup
Directory Name.”
Exception Paths
1. The folder path does not exist or the SA does not have
permissions to write to the folder.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• If the folder does not exist, then it is created.
• If the folder does exist, the old data is deleted before the new
data is placed there.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
197
Use Cases
Figure 109
198
SMC Tasks — Manage SPM Metadata
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Figure 110
SPM Metadata Maintenance
Table 17
Restore SPM data
Use case
Restore the SPM data
Description
This restoration causes the SPM data to replaced with SPM data
that had previously been saved in a backup.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
The SA performs
1. The SA opens the dialog box for Manage SPM Metadata in
SMC under Tasks as seen in Figure 109 on page 198.
2. The SA selects Action Restore and uses the box to select the
Directory Name as seen in Figure 110 on page 199.
3. The SA clicks OK.
Exception Paths
1. The folder does not exist.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• If the restored SPM Metadata refers to Symmetrix objects that
no longer exist, the Metadata that refers to those objects is
removed.
• A VMware user should run a Refresh Configuration after the
restore as shown in Figure 106 on page 195.
Storage administrator (SA) functions
199
Use Cases
Table 18
200
Delete SPM data
Use case
Delete the SPM data
Description
This deletion causes the backed-up SPM data to be deleted.
Role
Storage administrator (SA)
Preconditions
1. The SA has access to the SMC server via a browser.
The SA performs
1. The SA opens the dialog box for Manage SPM Metadata in
SMC under Tasks as seen in Figure 109 on page 198.
2. The SA selects the Action Delete and uses the list box to select
the Directory Name as seen in Figure 110 on page 199.
3. The SA clicks OK.
Exception Paths
1. The folder does not exist.
Important
considerations
NA
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
VMware administrator/user functions
This section uses tables to describe common use cases and functional
details related to operations that the VMware administrator
(VMAdmin), or in some cases the VMware user (VMUser) performs
in Storage Pool Management including:
◆
Adding and removing SPM connections
◆
Allocating SPM storage
◆
Adding and removing RDMs
◆
Adding and removing datastores
Use cases
Table 19
Create an SPM server connection
Use case
Create an SPM server connection
Description
Registers an SPM Server with a client to perform SPM operations.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
The VMAdmin
performs
1. The user, through the vSphere Client, navigates to the EMC
icon in the Solutions and Applications section of the Home
screen. The SPM Configuration section displays a list of existing
SPM server connection information. Figure 111 on page 202 is
an example of this.
2. The user selects Register New Server.
3. The dialog box as seen in Figure 112 on page 202 asks the user
to enter information about the new Server: Hostname/IP
address, SMC Secure Port #, client ID (see Table 15 on
page 195), and password. The Certificate Name will be the
default. The user may choose to Test Connectivity at this point.
4. The user clicks Next, and if the connection appears to be
correct, clicks Finish.
Exception Paths
1. Incomplete information entered in dialog.
Important
considerations
NA
VMware administrator/user functions
201
Use Cases
202
Figure 111
Storage Pool Management — Servers Configuration
Figure 112
Storage Pool Management — Register With Server
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Table 20
Table 21
Remove an SPM Server connection
Use case
Remove an SPM server connection
Description
Unregisters an SPM Server from a client.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
The VMAdmin
performs
1. The user, through the vSphere Client, navigates to the EMC
icon in the Solutions and Applications section of the Home
screen. SPM Configuration section displays a list of existing
SPM server connection information. Figure 111 on page 202 is
an example of this.
2. User selects a connection and selects Remove from the
right-click menu.
Exception Paths
NA
Important
considerations
NA
Modify an SPM server connection
Use case
Modify an SPM server connection
Description
Modify SPM Server connection settings.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
VMware administrator/user functions
203
Use Cases
Table 22
204
The VMAdmin
performs
1. The user, through the vSphere Client, navigates to the EMC
icon in the Solutions and Applications section of the Home
screen. SPM Configuration section displays a list of existing
SPM server connection information as seen in Figure 111 on
page 202.
2. User selects a connection and selects Edit from the right-click
menu.
3. The user updates the information, clicks Next, and if the
connection appears to be correct, clicks Finish.
Exception Paths
1. Incomplete information entered in dialog.
Important
considerations
NA
Allocate storage for a VMware object
Use case
Allocate storage for VMware object
Description
After an SA assigns a virtualization domain to a vCenter server a
VMAdmin can allocate the storage in that virtualization domain to
VMware objects including datacenters, ESX Servers, clusters or
resource pools.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Table 23
The VMAdmin
performs
1. The VMAdmin selects the datacenter, ESX Server, cluster, or
resource pool to which to allocate storage to and right-clicks the
object, choosing Configure Storage Allocations from the EMC
menu.
2. The VMAdmin receives the available storage, by storage type,
from the parent of this VMware object. If the parent has not been
explicitly allocated storage, then its parent is examined and so
forth up through to the vCenter if necessary.
3. The VMAdmin enters the amount of storage he wants to allocate
for each type of storage available. The children of this object may
now allocate storage only from the amounts and types available
in this object. The children cannot allocate storage available from
parents of this object. Figure 53 on page 127 has the detail of
this.
Exception Paths
1. If a clustered ESX server is selected no allocations can be
made. Allocations can only be made to an ESX if it is not a
member of a cluster.
2. The amount of requested allocation exceeds what is available
from the parent object.
3. The amount of requested allocation is less than what is already
in use at this object.
Important
considerations
NA
Refresh cluster membership
Use case
Refresh cluster membership
Description
The server members of a VMware ESX cluster can change, or new
HBAs may be added to an ESX server. When they change, the list
of server FC ports for the cluster must be updated.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
VMware administrator/user functions
205
Use Cases
Table 24
The VMAdmin
performs
1. In the vSphere Client the VMAdmin selects the ESX server or
Cluster whose membership has changed.
2. The VMAdmin selects EMC/Configure Storage Adapters from
the right-click menu.
Exception Paths
NA
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• This action does not change the membership of any initiator
groups.
• The list of server ports recorded for that cluster is updated.
When a new LUN is created for this cluster the virtualization
domain’s views will be checked to make sure there is an initiator
group that matches the members of the cluster.
Refresh configuration
Use case
Refresh configuration
Description
Refresh configuration causes the SPM configuration data to be
aligned with the VMware configuration. The SPM configuration data
can become out of sync with the VMware configuration when
changes are made to VMware configuration, for example creating or
deleting a resource pool.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
The VMAdmin
performs
1. In the Storage Pool Management tab in the vSphere Client, the
VMAdmin selects Refresh Configuration as seen in Figure 106
on page 195.
2. SPM configuration is updated with:
a. Used and available storage for each VMware object.
b. The LUNs that are mapped to the VMs or clusters.
c. Any changes to the VMware hierarchy such as resource pool
and VM migration from one resource pool to another.
Important
considerations
206
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Table 25
Create RDM for VM
Use case
Create RDM for VM
Description
Creates a thin device and maps it as an RDM for an existing VM.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin) or VMware user (VMUser)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
3. Storage has been allocated to the VMware object or one of its
parents that the VM is a child of.
4. vCenter server has authorizations on the thin pool and storage
group that will be used.
5. SAN is zoned correctly.
The VMAdmin or
VMUser performs
1. The user does the following (this function is stepped through in
Chapter 2, under “Virtual Machine menus” on page 144):
a. Navigates in the vSphere Client.
b. Clicks the appropriate VM.
c. Selects EMC/ Add Storage or Configure Batch Storage
from the right-click menu.
2. The user selects the appropriate storage type that is available
based upon the VM’s VMware parent object, and then clicks
Next.
3. The user sets the size of the LUN by either selecting one of the
precreated sizes, or by entering a custom size. If doing a batch
add, the user selects the number of disks.
4. The RDM creation continues in typical fashion. If doing a batch
add, the user can then add more RDMs before finally selecting
OK.
Exception Paths
1. There is not enough available capacity for the storage type
selected.
2. Creating the LUN violates one of the provisioning policies put in
place on the virtualization domain by the SA, e.g. maximum
number of LUNs.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• If the SA has set the policy that indicates that only precreated
LUN sizes may be used, then the user will not be able to create
custom-sized LUNs.
• If the size selected was a precreated size, and if there is an
existing, free, thin device, then it is used. Otherwise, a new thin
device is created.
• If creating the LUN violates one of the provisioning policies put in
place on the virtualization domain by the SA such as maximum
number of LUNs, the task will fail.
VMware administrator/user functions
207
Use Cases
Table 26
208
Remove RDM from VM
Use case
Remove RDM from VM
Description
Unmaps an RDM from a VM and deletes the LUN.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin) or VMware user (VMUser)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
3. An RDM has been mapped to a VM.
4. vCenter server has authorizations on the thin pool and storage
group that will be used.
The VMAdmin or
VMUser performs
1. User selects the VM in the vSphere Client.
2. User selects the EMC VSI tab and Raw Device Mappings. A list
of existing RDMs on a VM’s EMC VSI tab appears.
3. User right-clicks an RDM and selects Remove Raw Device
Mapping to remove the RDM.
4. If the device is an SPM device, the user is asked whether to
destroy the device and return storage to the pool, or to leave the
device mapped to the cluster as seen in Figure 113 on
page 209.
5. VMware automatically updates the capacities of the objects.
Exception Paths
NA
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• If the device was a non-SPM device, the RDM is removed but the
device is still presented to the cluster.
• If the LUN is to be deleted, the capacity of the LUN is checked
against the precreation policies for the virtualization domain. If
the capacity does not match any of the policies the device is
deleted.
• If the capacity matches a policy, the device storage is reclaimed
and the device is kept for a future LUN creation of that size.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Figure 113
Remove Raw Device Mapping or RDM
Table 27
Create a VMFS datastore for a cluster
Use case
Create a VMFS datastore for a cluster
Description
Creates a thin device and formats it as a VMFS datastore.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
3. Storage has been allocated to the VMware object or one of its
parents that the VM is a child of.
4. vCenter server has authorizations on the thin pool and storage
group that will be used.
5. SAN is zoned correctly.
VMware administrator/user functions
209
Use Cases
Table 28
210
The VMAdmin
performs
1. The user does the following:
a. Navigates in the Sphere Client.
b. Right-clicks the appropriate ESX Server or Cluster.
c. Selects EMC\Add Datastore.
2. The user selects the appropriate storage type that is available
based upon the VM’s VMware parent object, and then clicks
Next.
3. The user sets the size of the LUN by either selecting one of the
precreated sizes, or by entering a custom size.
4. The user supplies a datastore name to complete the task.
Exception Paths
1. There is not enough available capacity for the storage type
selected.
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• If the SA has set the policy that indicates that only precreated
LUN sizes may be used, then the user will not be able to create
custom-sized LUNs.
• If the size selected was a precreated size, and if there is an
existing, free, thin device, then it is used. Otherwise, a new thin
device is created.
• If creating the LUN violates one of the provisioning policies put in
place on the virtualization domain by the SA such as maximum
number of LUNs, the task will fail.
Delete a VMFS datastore from a cluster
Use case
Delete a VMFS datastore from a cluster
Description
Deletes the datastore and optionally the device on which the
datastore was created.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
3. Storage has been allocated to the VMware object or one of its
parents.
4. A VMFS datastore is mapped to a cluster.
5. vCenter server has authorizations on the thin pool and storage
group that will be used.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Use Cases
Table 29
The VMAdmin
performs
1. The user selects the datastore in the vSphere Client.
2. The user right-clicks on the datastore and selects EMC\Remove
Datastore from the menu.
3. If the device is an SPM device, the user is asked whether to
destroy the device behind the datastore and return storage to the
pool, or to leave the device mapped to the cluster.
4. VMware automatically updates the capacities of the objects.
Exception Paths
1. The datastore does not contain a SPM device(s).
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• If the device was a non-SPM device, the datastore is removed
but the device is still presented to the cluster.
• If the LUN is to be deleted, the capacity of the LUN is checked
against the precreation policies for the virtualization domain. If
the capacity does not match any of the policies the device is
deleted.
• If the capacity matches a policy, the device storage is reclaimed
and the device is kept for a future LUN creation of that size.
Expand a VMFS datastore
Use case
Expand a VMFS datastore
Description
Expand or extend a VMFS datastore. This use case is valid for
VMFS datastores composed of SPM or non SPM LUNs. This is
covered extensively in Chapter 2 in the section “Datastore menus”
on page 160.
Role
VMware administrator (VMAdmin)
Preconditions
1. The SPM feature of VSI is installed on the client where the
vSphere client resides.
2. The vSphere client has access to the SPM/SMC server.
3. Storage has been allocated to the VMware object or one of its
parents.
4. A VMFS datastore is mapped to a cluster.
5. vCenter server has authorizations on the thin pool and storage
group that will be used.
VMware administrator/user functions
211
Use Cases
212
The VMAdmin
performs
1. The user right-clicks a datastore and selects EMC\Expand
Datastore from the menu.
2. After a short analysis, the user is presented with a dialog box to
either select a new size of the datastore in the existing storage
type (SPM LUN), or to select a new extent size from an available
storage type.
3. The user then follows through the appropriate wizard. A new
device will be provisioned and appended to the datastore as a
new extent or the existing SPM LUN will be converted to a meta
or have a meta member added if it is already a meta. VMware
automatically updates the capacities of the objects.
Exception Paths
NA
Important
considerations
The following points should be considered for this use case:
• The VMware LUN concatenation facility will be used to extend
the datastore as opposed to any array facility.
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
4
Customer Example
This chapter provides a walk-through of a typical setup of Storage
Pool Management in a customer environment.
◆
◆
◆
◆
Introduction ......................................................................................
The Storage administrator — Joe...................................................
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack ....
Conclusion ........................................................................................
Customer Example
214
215
252
284
213
Customer Example
Introduction
The purpose of this chapter is to guide a user through a Storage Pool
Management (SPM) setup that details the tasks appointed to the
Storage Administrator (SA) and the tasks appointed to the VMware
Administrator (VMAdmin). The use case here attempts to mimic how
a customer would approach SPM in their production environment.
This, of course, represents only a single use case of how SPM can be
configured in a VMware environment. It covers most features of SPM
and how a customer can take advantage of the benefits.
Rather than speak generically as in the other chapters, a customer
model will be used and the chapter will follow in first person plural.
Our customer is Acme with Joe as their SA, Judy as their VMAdmin,
and Jack as a VMware user in the environment. Acme’s VMAX array
is running with Enginuity 5875 and their versions of SMC and
Solutions Enabler are both 7.2. In addition, their ESX Servers,
vCenter, and vSphere Clients are all version 4.1.
Due to Acme’s current software versions, the automated
virtualization domain creation is not available. The chapter is based
upon the manual creation of the virtualization domain. An example
of what the automated setup would look like, however, is provided
so those customers who are at the appropriate level for automated
virtualization domain creation have an idea of the step-by-step
process involved.1
1. The manual process may still be used in the most current version of SMC,
7.3.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
The Storage administrator — Joe
The first part of SPM configuration is undertaken by the SA, Joe.
Initiator and port groups
Before beginning the configuration of Storage Pool Management,
there are a few required steps that Joe must perform. These tasks may
already have been completed by Joe since they relate to constructs
within the storage environment that exist with or without SPM: thin
pools, initiator, port, and storage groups, and masking views. In a
new implementation of VMware, Joe would have to start from
scratch, and work with Judy to configure these things; but Acme has
been using VMware for some time and therefore Joe can use the
existing environment if he chooses. After reviewing the SPM
documentation, Joe decides to split the difference: create some new
components but also utilize existing ones.
Let’s start, therefore, by reviewing Joe’s existing storage components
in SMC. The first stop is Auto-provisioning groups. For Judy’s
VMware environment there is currently a single masking view which
presents storage to the ESX hosts. Like all masking views, this one is
comprised of a storage group, an initiator group, and a port group.
Joe decides that rather than use this masking view, he can simply
create a new one with a new storage group that will contain the thin
devices created through SPM. Fortunately he can use the same
initiator group and port group from the other masking view since
SPM will be masked to the same ESX servers.
The Storage administrator — Joe
215
Customer Example
Joe logs in to SMC and looks at the existing port group,
dt_licof29-32_pg, in Figure 114 on page 216. Everything looks in
order so he moves on to the initiator group.
Figure 114
Existing port group for Judy’s VMware environment
He looks at the existing initiator group for Judy’s ESX cluster,
dt_licof29-30_ig. Figure 115 on page 217 is what Joe saw.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 115
Initiator group for Judy’s ESX cluster
The initiator group contains 8 initiators which represent 2 HBAs on
each ESX server, each with 2 ports. When Joe created the initiator
group he put all of the initiators into the group despite the fact that
only 2 of the ports are active on each host. Joe knows the Linux
administrator plans on cabling the other 4 ports at some point so he
wanted to have them available ahead of time. It does no harm to
include all the initiators in an initiator group. In fact it is fortunate
that Joe has configured it this way because SPM requires that all
initiators be included, even if they are inactive. If it is not configured
in this manner, then when Judy or Jack attempt to provision storage,
the operation will fail.
Before Joe creates his new masking view, however, he wants to be
sure nothing has changed in the ESX clusters since he does not
administer the hardware. Perhaps another HBA has been added, or
even one replaced. In either case he would need to modify his
initiator group which would impact both his masking views.
Normally, Joe would go directly to the Linux administrator but he is
out today. Fortunately there is another way for Joe to check on the
HBAs in the cluster: the EMC Virtual Storage Integrator (VSI). Judy
recently installed the newest version of the VSI in anticipation of
The Storage administrator — Joe
217
Customer Example
enabling SPM functionality. When Joe tells Judy he has to wait for the
Linux administrator to get back tomorrow to check on the HBAs,
Judy tells Joe that she has been reading the documentation on the
new VSI and can get the information for him. Joe readily accepts.
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator export environment
Judy returns to her desk and logs in to the vSphere Client which
attaches to her vCenter called PARTNER. The storage plug-in is
loaded as she can see the EMC VSI tab in many views. Judy then uses
the address bar to navigate to Home where she sees the icon for EMC
as in Figure 116 on page 218.
Figure 116
218
vSphere Client Home
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
She clicks it and then clicks the new tab, Storage Pool Management,
as shown in Figure 117 on page 219.
Figure 117
Storage Pool Management tab
Now Judy has read that there is functionality in this tab that enables
her to retrieve the information that Joe needs. She sees under Tasks,
Export Environment. Judy clicks this and is given the option to save
the exported information in an XML file. She instead chooses to
format it as a text file so it is easier for Joe to read. Figure 118 on
page 220 and Figure 119 on page 221 detail what Judy saw.
The Storage administrator — Joe
219
Customer Example
Figure 118
220
Save SPM Export File
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 119
SPM Export File from Judy’s VMware environment
Armed with this information, Judy sends Joe an email with the file.
Joe double-checks that initiators listed in Judy’s file match those in
the existing initiator group for the VMware environment. The values
in Figure 119 on page 221 match those in Figure 115 on page 217 and
Joe is able to move forward in the storage-side configuration for SPM.
Storage group and masking view
Having confirmed that his existing auto-provisioning components
are ready to go, Joe’s next step is to create a storage group. As he is
running the latest version of SMC, Joe can create an empty storage
group, but without a device in the group he will be unable to create a
The Storage administrator — Joe
221
Customer Example
masking view. He therefore adds a small gatekeeper device to the
storage group which will not be used. Figure 120 on page 222 is Joe’s
SPM storage group.
Figure 120
SPM Storage Group
With the new storage group, the final component is in place and Joe
can create the new masking view for SPM. Through SMC, Joe creates
a new view called SPM_mv which is made up of the storage group
dt_licof029-30_sg, the initiator group dt_licof29-30_ig, and the port
group dt_licof29-32_pg. The new masking view is shown in
Figure 121 on page 223.
222
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 121
Masking view for Acme’s VMware environment
Thin pools
With the autoprovisioning part of the SPM setup complete, Joe now
moves to thin pools. Once again, Joe takes advantage of the existing
objects in the VMware environment. There are three thin pools that
Joe set up for Judy and that she continues to require. Being practical,
Joe named the thin pools for the type of disks that support them:
FLASH, FC, and SATA. The details of these pools can be reviewed in
the following figures: Figure 122 on page 224, Figure 123 on page 225,
and Figure 124 on page 226.
The Storage administrator — Joe
223
Customer Example
Figure 122
224
FLASH thin pool with Flash disk DATA devices
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 123
FC thin pool with Fibre Channel disk DATA devices
The Storage administrator — Joe
225
Customer Example
Figure 124
SATA thin pool with SATA disk DATA devices
These thin pools can be used by Joe in the SPM configuration without
any further modification. There are two values that Joe knows are
important take note of: Free Capacity and Maximum Subscription%.
These two values will dictate how much storage is presented to
Judy’s environment. Joe knows, for instance, that though his thin
pool, FC, has 400 GB of free capacity, because the Maximum
Subscription is set to 200%, Judy will actually see and be able to
provision 800 GB of disk. Joe will need to keep an eye on the Allocated
Capacity and Allocated% since those values are based on the actual
free capacity in the thin pool. Because the VMware environments
have data that will grow over time, Joe knows that Judy will not need
226
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
all the oversubscribed disk immediately and he will have the
opportunity to add data devices when the time comes. To avoid
problems in some of Joe’s other environments for which he will create
thin pools for SPM, he can set the Maximum Subscription% to 100
which guarantees that those environments cannot use more disk
space than is actually available in the pool.
Storage Types
Storage types are something that must be configured in SMC before
Joe ties the thin pools to a virtualization domain. As Joe has three thin
pools that are in use in Judy’s VMware environment, each
representing a different tier of storage, he decides to create three
storage types that will reflect this. Joe discusses this with Judy. They
agree that this will be very beneficial for Judy and her VMware users.
Prior to SPM, Joe would create devices in one of his thin pools. He
would then inform Judy of the size and type of disk (Flash, FC,
SATA) it was so that when she rescaned the HBAs from within
vSphere, she would know what to look for in the storage screens.
Now, Joe figures that by assigning storage types that match his thin
pools, Judy will be able to know exactly what type of disk she has
access to and how much of it.
Creating storage types is done through the task of Manage Storage
Types which is shown in Figure 125 on page 228.
The Storage administrator — Joe
227
Customer Example
Figure 125
Manage Storage Types task
While Joe named his thin pools to match the type of disk in them, he
realizes it is not practical to use those same names for the storage
types. Judy might be savvy enough to understand the name FC, but
certainly her VMware users would not be. For Joe, Judy is not his
only customer. His customers are all those business units that make
up the company and each of those units pay for storage. Simply
presenting storage with names Flash, FC or SATA will not mean
much to those customers. They need to understand both the speed
and cost of the disk with which they are presented. Joe decides that if
he uses some common understanding of value, and pairs it with a
description of the type of disk, most users will be able to comprehend
what they are provisioning to their VMs. Joe settles on using types of
metal: GOLD, SILVER, and BRONZE. His storage types are shown in
Figure 126 on page 229, Figure 127 on page 230, and Figure 128 on
page 230. Inherently his customers will know gold is more valuable
than silver and that silver is more valuable than bronze. Joe is quite
sure that his users will deduce from this that the GOLD type is the
best, and hence will provide the best performance albeit at the
228
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
highest cost; while the BRONZE type is not as fast but less costly.
With the help of Judy to allocate to specific VMware resource pools,
Joe thinks he has his bases covered. He sets his storage types to match
his thin pools, for example he sets GOLD to be RAID type RAID 5,
and disk type EFD (SSD or Flash) because he knows the data devices
that are in his FLASH thin pool have this configuration. He does the
same for his SILVER and BRONZE storage types.
Figure 126
GOLD Storage Type for Flash disks
The Storage administrator — Joe
229
Customer Example
230
Figure 127
SILVER Storage Type for FC disks
Figure 128
BRONZE Storage Type for SATA
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Authorizations
When Judy first approached Joe about using Storage Pool
Management, Joe had his misgivings. After all, to hand over the
ability to allocate storage to a VMAdmin, or a VMware user, was not
a comforting thought to him. Could the VMware users provision any
type of storage in any type of amount they wanted? Could a VMware
user with only minimal access within the vCenter environment
provision storage? These questions led to Joe to ask the most
important question, How would security be handled?
After Joe read through the VSI and SMC documentation, he was
reassured that indeed there is strong security on both sides of SPM,
namely in both vCenter and in SMC. Joe learns that he will need to
set up security in SMC for the thin pools he will provide to Judy and
the storage group that will contain the thin devices created in
vSphere through SPM. Joe also reads about a password that will act
as security he must set when registering vCenter with SMC. So now
Joe needs to set up this first security. He will set up a second security
later (the Section “Client ID - connection” on page 249 covers this
topic).
The Storage administrator — Joe
231
Customer Example
Here is what Joe did. In the Tasks section of SMC, he navigated to the
Security area and clicked on Manage Roles. This action displayed a
familiar box to Joe, as shown in Figure 129 on page 232, as he had
previously set up security roles for another Symmetrix VMAX under
his administration, 000192601665:
Figure 129
Manage Roles
Per SPM instructions, Joe configures the role StorageAdmin Virtualization Domain first for the storage group, dt_licof029-30_sg
as seem in Figure 130 on page 233. Then he configures the role for all
3 thin pools which is seen in the following figures: Figure 131 on
page 233, Figure 132 on page 234, and Figure 133 on page 234. The
specialized role in every authorization requires the virtualization
domain name which must be obtained from Judy. Fortunately this
information is easily gathered by Judy because it is kept in the export
file she previously generated to show Joe the initiators as previously
shown in Figure 119 on page 221. Judy lets Joe know the name is
PARTNER. Judy also tells Joe he must use this name or she will be
unable to provision storage when everything is configured because
this name is checked against the roles he is about to create. Now that
Joe is ready he proceeds as shown in the following figures.
232
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 130
Adding the Virtualization Domain Role for the Storage Group
Figure 131
Adding the Virtualization Domain Role for Thin Pool FLASH
The Storage administrator — Joe
233
Customer Example
234
Figure 132
Adding the Virtualization Domain Role for the Thin Pool FC
Figure 133
Adding the Virtualization Domain Role for the Thin Pool SATA
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Virtualization Domain — manual setup
With storage types in place and authorizations, Joe believes he is
ready to create the container within SMC that is the driver behind
SPM: the virtualization domain. He already has the name given that
he supplied it when creating the roles. That name will be available to
him within a list box in the dialog box for the Virtualization Domain
Name field. He will take the following two steps:
1. Create the virtualization domain, attaching the new SPM view,
SPM_mv.
2. Attach each thin pool and assign the correct storage type of
GOLD, SILVER, or BRONZE.
Joe brings up the dialog box for creating a virtualization domain by
right-clicking the Virtualization Domains folder. He then enters all
the information required, using the list boxes where appropriate,
such as for the virtualization domain itself. This list box gets
pre-populated after an authorization role is setup for the vCenter, in
this case PARTNER. For the vCenter GUID, Joe would have been at a
loss, save his conversation with Judy and that she showed him the
SPM export file again (view Figure 119 on page 221 for this example).
This export file, under the heading of ID, contains the GUID. He
inputs the GUID, the name which is also in that export file, a
minimum and maximum LUN size, which are values that he and
Judy agreed upon ahead of time based on the business units’
requirements, and adds the SPM masking view he created. His values
are in Figure 134 on page 236. Note that the virtualization domain
The Storage administrator — Joe
235
Customer Example
restricts the minimum LUN size to at least 5 GB, but allows a large
maximum LUN size of 1 TB so that Judy is able to create a large
datastore if needed.
Figure 134
Virtualization Domain PARTNER
Now Joe moves to the second step, adding the thin pools. Remember
that Joe has three thin pools: FLASH, FC, and SATA. When he adds
the thin pools to the virtualization domain he will be required to
select the appropriate storage type. Joe does not need to be an expert
at SPM to do this since SMC will match his thin pools to the storage
types he created previously. And as we mentioned in Section
“Storage Types” on page 227, Joe was careful to match his storage
type configurations to his data devices that support his thin pools.
236
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 135
Adding of Thin Pools to Virtualization Domain PARTNER
Entering the menu by right-clicking on the Virtualization Domain
and choosing Add Thin Pool as inFigure 135 on page 237, Joe begins
the process. Again, he follows the order of FLASH, FC, and then
SATA. He chooses FLASH, and the storage type of GOLD
automatically fills in for him. Now, remember that on this thin pool
Joe set a maximum subscription rate of 250%. So although there is
only 100 GB of actual disk space supporting that thin pool, the
capacity available to add to the virtualization domain is 250 GB.
Figure 136 on page 238 demonstrates this.
The Storage administrator — Joe
237
Customer Example
Figure 136
Adding Thin Pool FLASH to Virtualization Domain PARTNER
Since Joe uses those three thin pools for the VMware environment
and has configured it specifically for that purpose, including the
maximum subscription, he provides all of the capacity to the
virtualization domain. Joe follows by adding the thin pools FC and
SATA in similar fashion as shown in Figure 137 on page 239 and
Figure 138 on page 239.
238
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 137
Adding Thin Pool FC to Virtualization Domain PARTNER
Figure 138
Adding Thin Pool SATA to Virtualization Domain PARTNER
The Storage administrator — Joe
239
Customer Example
Virtualization Domain — automated setup
The complexity involved in manually creating the virtualization
domain can be eliminated by using the automated process whenever
possible. To do so, Acme would require SMC version 7.3 and
Enginuity 5875 Q2 2011 SR operating environment version. What
follows is an example of the step-by-step wizard Acme would use in
such a case. The setup is also based upon their environment
presented in this chapter.
The automated setup, like the manual one, relies on some objects
already in Acme’s storage environment. Before beginning the wizard
there is a prerequisite that must be completed. In the manual setup,
Judy exported the environment to be used with SPM through the
vSphere Client, explained in the section “EMC Virtual Storage
Integrator export environment” on page 218. For the automated
wizard this environment file is critical and is also known as the
Virtualization Data File. It is what the wizard will use to generate all
the objects related to the virtualization domain. This file needs to be
copied to the SMC server and placed in a directory of the
administrator’s choosing. Joe’s SMC implementation is on Linux so
he places the spm-export.xml file in the /tmp directory as once the
wizard is complete he will no longer require the file.
The other objects that the wizard will need are storage resources (thin
pools, FAST VP policies) to assign to the virtualization domain and a
port group. While the wizard can create initiator and storage groups,
the wizard cannot determine the zoning of the servers and relies on
the administrator to provide the proper ports through the port group.
Joe will be using the existing port group seen in Figure 114 on
page 216, just as in the manual process.
Once logged into SMC, Joe navigates to the
Tasks/Operations/Automated Virtualization Domain Setup as seen
in Figure 139 on page 241.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 139
Automated Virtualization Domain Setup task
Selecting this starts the wizard with the welcome screen displayed in
Figure 140 on page 242.
The Storage administrator — Joe
241
Customer Example
Figure 140
Automated Virtualization Domain Setup Wizard welcome screen
The welcome screen provides the outline of the steps Joe will be
taking to create the virtualization domain. Joe selects “Next” and
begins the first step which is to select his Symmetrix from the list
provided. In Figure 141 on page 243 Joe sees his Symmetrix which
ends in 540. If his “spm” user had privileges on more than one
Symmetrix, they would be available for selection in the drop-down
box. Joe selects “Next” and moves along to step 3.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 141
Automated Virtualization Domain — Symmetrix array selection
In step 3, Joe will need to load the spm-export.xml file which he
copied over to his SMC server in the /tmp directory. As there is no
browse capability, Joe needs to type in the exact location of the file,
including the file name itself, and then select the “Load” button
which is highlighted in green in Figure 142 on page 244. SMC reads
the information in the file and populates the following fields:
Virtualization Management Server; Cluster/Server Name; and
Details which contain the WWNs of the HBAs of the ESX hosts in the
cluster. The only field that Joe is required to complete is the Port
Group which he can do by selecting the previously created
dt_licof029-32_pg from the drop-down box, again as in Figure 142 on
page 244.
The Storage administrator — Joe
243
Customer Example
Figure 142
Automated Virtualization Domain — Virtualization Data File load
Once the Port Group is selected, Joe chooses “Next” to move on to the
final configuration in step 4.
In step 4 Joe needs to supply the remaining configuration
components of his virtualization domain. In this screen, many of the
steps that previously were completed manually only after the
creation of the virtualization domain, are now automated - tasks such
as adding a thin pool. Joe also can take advantage of configuring
Storage Pool Management to use a FAST VP policy as a storage
resource. This will simplify the provisioning of storage for Judy, the
VMAdmin, since FAST VP will be able to make all the decisions
about where her data should be placed on the Symmetrix. A few of
Acme’s business divisions, however, require that their virtualized
applications use FC only, so Joe must take this into account when
configuring the storage resources. Because of this, he selects two
storage resources: a thin pool and a FAST VP policy. For the thin pool
he selects a Fibre Channel (FC) thin pool, and for the FAST VP policy
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he selects a previously created one that is configured with SATA and
EFD disks. As the majority of Acme’s business applications do not
have specific disk requirements, and since only a small percentage of
the data for each application is accessed with any frequency, they can
best be serviced with a mix of EFD and SATA. Joe’s FAST VP policy
calls for EFD to hold a maximum of 10% of the data while SATA is
permitted to contain all 100%. Without any user intervention, any
devices that Judy provisions from the FAST VP pool of storage will be
capable of having their data moved seamlessly between the disk tiers
as access patterns demand. This takes all the guesswork out for both
Joe and Judy.
In Figure 143 on page 246, we see that Joe checks the thin pool
resource FC, and the FAST VP policy FASTVP_for_SPM. He assigns
the storage type FC_Storage to the thin pool and the storage type
FASTVP_Storage to the FAST VP policy by simply typing in the
names. If, by chance, there were existing storage types created but not
in use, he could use the drop-down box to select one, assuming it
matched the Storage Resource. Those storage type names will be the
ones that Judy will see in the vSphere client in VSI, making it clear to
her what pool of storage is FC and what is FAST VP. Joe also assigns a
capacity for each resource. Recall that the available capacity listed is
based upon the subscription policy of the thin pool(s) and may not be
the actual amount of physical storage. Joe has not set the maximum
subscription for the thin pools in this case. For FC he presents 5 TB to
Judy and for the FAST VP policy, 10 TB.
The Storage administrator — Joe
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Customer Example
Figure 143
Automated Virtualization Domain — Storage Resource selection
Now that Joe has completed this configuration he chooses “Next”
and is brought to a summary screen which details all the steps that
SMC will take to complete the request. This will include creating any
necessary autoprovisioning objects and all necessary authorizations.
The entire list of actions is delineated in Figure 144 on page 247.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 144
Automated Virtualization Domain — Summary of actions
The Storage administrator — Joe
247
Customer Example
Joe selects “Finish” and SMC proceeds to create the virtualization
domain. The final screen will appear and will mark each successful
step with a green check mark as it completes. The three completed
steps are seen in Figure 145 on page 248. At this point Joe also has the
option of selecting the “Show Details” button which will display a
detailed explanation of all the steps taken. This is most useful when
an error has occurred since the details will show exactly on what step
the wizard failed.
Figure 145
Automated Virtualization Domain — Progress indicator
The virtualization domain is now ready for presentation to the
vCenter environment. The remaining setup of SPM proceeds just as
the manual process does, beginning with the Client ID creation in the
next section.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Note: If Joe wishes to add other storage resources to his virtualization
domain in the future, he will need to follow the manual process of setting up
an authorization and storage type for each storage resource.
Client ID - connection
Joe is ready now to undertake the last step in his part of the
configuration of Storage Pool Management and allow Judy and her
team to complete the configuration. This could be considered the
most important part of the setup, though certainly the quickest and
easiest to undertake. It answers the question How does vCenter
communicate with SMC? The answer is by registering a client-ID that
Judy will use in her configuration in vCenter. This client-ID is just a
name by which VSI performs a handshake with SMC and retrieves all
storage types information about the virtualization domain.
The Storage administrator — Joe
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Customer Example
And so Joe begins by selecting another task called Manage Launch
Clients under the Administration panel as in Figure 146 on page 250.
Figure 146
Manage Launch Clients task
Joe selects to add a client and enters in the information. He uses the
box to change the client type to SPM. He then enters in two pieces of
information, a client-ID and a password. Although Joe could use any
ID, he uses the name PARTNER to make things simple, and matches
it with the virtualization domain name. He finishes with the
password spm and confirms it before hitting OK as in Figure 147 on
page 251.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 147
SPM Client-ID for vCenter Authentication
With this complete, we see a finished configuration on the SMC side.
Joe tells Judy she now can complete her portion of the configuration
and begin taking advantage of SPM.
The Storage administrator — Joe
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Customer Example
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
We now see the configuration turned over to Judy. Judy has been
involved each step of the way. She is totally informed and ready to
begin.
vCenter registration with SMC for SPM
The first step Judy will need to take is in direct correlation with the
last step that Joe took. She needs to register the vCenter environment
with SMC and needs to do so with the client ID that Joe set up in
Section “Client ID - connection” on page 249.
Judy starts the vSphere Client in Figure 148 on page 252 and logs in
as Administrator.
Figure 148
vSphere Login
She then follows the same path she took when she presented Joe with
the SPM export file, as shown in Figure 116 on page 218. This time
instead of exporting the environment, Judy selects Register New
Server as in Figure 149 on page 253.
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Figure 149
SPM Registration with SMC
Judy is presented with the registration screen. There are five fields
that require an entry. Two of those fields, Secure Port and Certificate
Name, default automatically for Judy. The other entries are from Joe.
Just as Judy could supply Joe with initiators from the SPM export file
for his configuration portion, Joe supplies Judy the values for her
portion of the configuration: SMC IP Address, Client-ID, and
Client-ID password. She put them in the appropriate fields as in
Figure 150 on page 254.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
253
Customer Example
Figure 150
Registering SPM with SMC
After completing the dialog box, Judy sensibly chooses to test the
connectivity and finds that the information is correct and the
connection is made. A new entry is shown in the Storage Pool
Management Servers panel, as seen in Figure 151 on page 255, once
Judy clicks through the remaining screen and a task is listed for the
registration. Although only one entry is listed, Judy is aware that if
required, future registrations could be made to other Symmetrix
VMAX arrays under Joe’s administration.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 151
Registration entry in SPM tab and associated task
Note: Acme’s environment is set up so that both Judy and Jack use the same
Windows client in which to run the vSphere Client along with the Virtual
Storage Integrator plug-in. In the future, if Jack wants to run the vSphere
Client from his PC for instance, he would need to install the VSI plug-in with
the SPM feature, and ensure that Judy runs the registration steps. Joe could
also perform the steps himself. More details are provided in the Section
“vCenter registration with SMC for SPM” on page 252. However once
registered, Jack will see the same information as if he were using the
centralized vSphere Client.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
vCenter assigned pools
The registration is complete. Judy now has access to the thin pools
that Joe configured for her environment. She accesses the vCenter at
the top level, PARTNER, and thin pools are presented by the storage
types previously created by Joe as shown in Figure 152 on page 256.
Figure 152
Assigned Pools and Storage Types in Judy’s vCenter PARTNER
Note: Due to its pool size, BRONZE is displayed in TB rather than GB in
Figure 152 on page 256. Since Joe allocated 2000 GB of SATA in SMC, it does
not convert to exactly 2 TB, but rather about 1.95 TB.
Again, if another Symmetrix VMAX were configured, Judy would see
two entries in the Assigned Pools window on the right. Each
Assigned Pool represents a registration as seen in Figure 149 on
page 253, and each registration in turn may contain multiple thin
pools in the form of storage types. Judy examines the storage types
for her registration and notes that the available storage is currently
the same as the capacity. As Judy begins the allocation process, the
available capacity begins to decrease, but the overall capacity at the
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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vCenter level will remain the same. Unless Joe allocates more storage
(data devices) to one of the supporting thin pools and then adjusts
the amount available in the virtualization domain, the capacity
number will not change. Additionally, if he did make a change like
that, Judy knows she would need to issue a Refresh Configuration
from the SPM tab, as highlighted in Figure 153 on page 257. As we go
lower on the tree (datacenter, cluster, resource pool) both capacity
numbers will decrement appropriately.
Figure 153
Refresh Configuration after SMC storage change
There are any number of changes Joe that could make that would
impact the storage presented to Judy. However, Judy need only
refresh her environment to see those changes.
Judy’s datacenter
Judy is ready to begin allocating the storage available to her. In a
high-level view of her environment, as shown in Figure 154 on
page 258, Judy has a datacenter named SPM which contains a single
cluster SPM_Cluster comprised of two ESX hosts. Judy’s
environment is only partially presented. There are three resource
pools highlighted in the figure, although Judy has many more. Each
resource pool shows a single VM, while in actuality each pool has
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
257
Customer Example
tens of VMs. Fortunately the process demonstrated through Judy’s
configuration does not change whether in this pared down
environment, or in her much larger actual environment. The process
is made more clear by using a simple example. Extrapolation to a
larger environment can easily be undertaken by the reader.
Figure 154
Judy’s Datacenter, SPM
Looking deeper into the figure, the items circled in blue show us how
the display has changed by dropping down a level from the vCenter
to the datacenter. When Judy gets to the datacenter level, the storage
types, not the assigned pools now populates the upper-right panel.
The lower right-hand panel contains the detail of whatever storage
type is selected. Here the storage type is the GOLD, or the Flash disk.
The datacenter automatically inherits the allocated storage from the
vCenter. The displayed detail is always from the child of the object
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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we selected on the left. So as Judy highlights the datacenter, the
storage detail is of the cluster, SPM_Cluster. This indicates that the
capacity of the GOLD storage type is 0 for the SPM_Cluster. This
makes perfect sense since Judy has yet to allocate any storage to the
children of the datacenter. If SILVER or BRONZE were selected, 0
would appear in the bottom panel.
Storage resource pools
At the cluster level, Judy is presented with the details of her resource
tools on the bottom-right panel as seen in Figure 155 on page 259.
Once again, as she has not begun allocation of storage, the resource
pools register 0 as their capacity for the GOLD storage type.
Figure 155
SPM_Cluster and associated Resource Pools
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Now the advantages to using SPM become even more clear. Judy and
Joe have always worked closely together. Their roles absolutely
necessitated it. You see, Judy was constrained by her inability to
allocate storage herself. She relied entirely on Joe’s role as an SA to
enable her to provide storage to her customers. In turn, Judy’s
VMware users had to rely on her to get them disk for their VMs. They
could add the RDMs once she gave them the disk information, but it
was easier to let her do the whole process. It eliminated a step for
them, and got them the disk quicker. This increased Judy’s workload.
She needed to micromanage VMs when what she really needed to be
working on was virtual architectures and better ways to utilize
available resources. The constant need to request disk from Joe
caused invariable delays. She was not Joe’s only customer, and Joe
needed to balance her requests with those requests of other
customers.
Now enters Storage Pool Management. Judy is going to be able to
pool her storage resources just as she pools her CPU and memory
resources. Not only will she be able to create datastores from the disk
up, but she will be able to allow her VMware users to do the same for
RDMs on their VMs. Moreover, she can control the type of storage
available to the VMware users. No more issues where a test
environment is presented with Flash disk or a production
environment mistakenly given a SATA device. Because of how Joe set
it up, these storage types make it clear to both Judy and her users
what type of storage they are using and what performance they can
expect from it. Essentially she will have storage resource pools. And
as much as Judy likes talking to Joe, their need to communicate about
storage allocation to her VMware environment will now be just once
a month. Plus, she now has the opportunity to speak to him about
bigger virtual projects.
Storage allocations
Cluster
All things being ready, Judy starts the storage allocations. Beginning
at the Cluster level, Judy allocates storage from the storage types to
the SPM_Cluster in Figure 156 on page 261:
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 156
Configure Storage Allocations
Judy decides not to allocate all the storage available to her at this
time. She has multiple clusters and may be adding a second
datacenter and wishes to keep some storage aside. Her allocations are
in Figure 157 on page 262 and Figure 158 on page 263.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
261
Customer Example
Figure 157
262
Cluster_SPM Storage Type Allocation
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 158
Completing Storage Allocation for Cluster_SPM
When the allocation is complete, view the result from the datacenter
(SPM) level. The available capacities are decremented for the
allocations, but the capacity remains the same. If Judy highlights a
particular storage type, such as GOLD as in Figure 159 on page 264,
the bottom panel shows how much capacity is available to the cluster.
Note: Judy is showing an additional cluster, VSTORAGE here but has not
allocated any storage to it. This explains why she has reserved some capacity.
Also note that the amounts in the highlighted Capacity column have not
changed. This is due only to the fact that at this time Judy does not have a
second datacenter to which she has allocated storage.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Figure 159
Post-Storage Allocation by Judy
Resource pools
The allocations complete to the cluster, Judy can now consider her
users like Jack. As hinted at earlier (the Section “Storage resource
pools” on page 259 provides more detail), Judy wants to create pools
of storage for her users. To do this, Judy will match the pool of
storage with the resource pool. In other words, if she has a resource
pool where Jack has all his production VMs, Judy will be sure to
create pools of storage that contain storage types that meet that need:
GOLD. Similarly she can assign FC to a test/QA resource pool and
SATA to say an archive resource pool. The VMs in those resource
pools would only have access the “storage pool” allocated to them.
This solves Judy’s problem of occasional having the wrong storage go
to the wrong environment.
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Judy will also be handing over more control of her customers’ VMs to
them. Jack will now be able provision his own RDMs and make
decisions on how to use the storage allocated to him. If Jack depletes
his allocation, he can make a request to Judy to have additional
capacity added to his pool of storage. Before SPM, he would have to
ask Judy to go through the process of asking Joe for storage, then
having her discovering it in ESX Server and then presenting it to his
VM. Any of these steps were error prone or time consuming. Review
this example of allocating this “storage pool” to the
Archive_ResourcePool.
Allocating to Resource Pools
Just like the allocation to the cluster, Judy right-clicks the
ArchiveResourcePool, as in Figure 160 on page 265, and follows the
EMC menu to “Configure Storage Allocations”.
Figure 160
Configuring the “storage pool” for the ArchiveResourcePool
Judy is presented with the three storage types that she previously
allocated to the cluster. As this resource pool contains VMs that are
specifically for archiving purposes, Judy is providing capacity from
the BRONZE storage type, or SATA disk. The business owners of
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
265
Customer Example
these VMs need lots of storage at reasonable prices, but what they do
not require is performance. BRONZE is therefore the right choice
These steps are seen in Figure 161 on page 266 and Figure 162 on
page 267.
Figure 161
266
Allocating the BRONZE Storage Type to the ArchiveResourcePool
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 162
Completing BRONZE allocation
Once the allocation is complete, Judy highlights the
ArchiveResourcePool to see that indeed while 150 GB has been
allocated to the resource pool, the other storage types, GOLD and
SILVER, still register 0. Figure 163 on page 268 is what Judy sees.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
267
Customer Example
Figure 163
ArchiveResourcePool with BRONZE allocation
Judy continues to allocate the storage capacities to each of the
resource pools in turn until all of the capacity she planned on
distributing is complete. In the end Judy allocates all storage from the
storage types save 300 GB from the BRONZE storage type for a
datastore that will hold her ISO images. In Figure 164 on page 269
shows the final view. Notice that the SILVER storage type is
highlighted. It indicates 150 GB has been allocated to two different
resource pools since there are some production VMs that do not need
the level of performance that Flash offers.
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Figure 164
Final Allocation results for the Resource Pools
The previous process was quite quick and easy for Judy. What
normally would have taken days or more between her and Joe, was
completed in a very short time. Judy has a couple more tasks and
then she can return the environment to her users.
The BRONZE datastore
With the reserved 300 GB of BRONZE storage type, Judy is ready to
create an ISO datastore for the cluster environment through SPM.
While it is possible for Judy to delegate this task to one of her users,
that would require more VMware permissions on the host than Judy
is comfortable with so she has decided she will handle all datastore
creation. Now that she has all this extra time because of SPM, she is
more than willing to keep that responsibility.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Once again, Judy right-clicks the SPM_cluster but this time selects
Add Datastore from the EMC menu as seen in Figure 165 on
page 270.
Figure 165
Add the BRONZE Datastore from the EMC menu
Judy then selects from the available storage, in this case of course
there is only BRONZE to choose from, just as she planned it.
Figure 166 on page 271 shows the selection.
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Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
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Figure 166
Select from available storage in SPM_Cluster
Next Judy selects a size. She intends to use all 300 GB which will
create a metavolume on the VMAX and provide for easy expansion if
she requires it. However, notice that not only could she put in any
custom size of 50 GB or less, but that she could also select a
precreated LUN size. Figure 167 on page 272 shows the detail.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Figure 167
Select Datastore size — Precreated or Custom
The next screen requires the datastore name as seen in Figure 168 on
page 273.
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Figure 168
Select datastore name
Finally, Judy takes the default block size, Figure 169 on page 274, and
finishes the task shown in Figure 170 on page 275.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Figure 169
274
Select block size for datastore
Storage Pool Management Feature in EMC Virtual Storage Integrator
Customer Example
Figure 170
Complete datastore creation
After the datastore creation, Judy returns to the cluster view to see the
allocation of the storage. From Figure 171 on page 276 Judy is able to
see the LUN that she provisioned when creating the datastore. The
detail here goes down to the device number, 00EC. Should Joe care to
look at SPM from within vSphere, he would be able to map back that
LUN to the thin pool of the BRONZE storage type. This might be
beneficial, if say, there was a performance problem and Judy needed
Joe to investigate.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Figure 171
The complete allocation of the GOLD Storage Type
With that Judy has only one thing left to do. She needs to assign
permissions to Jack so he can provision storage to his own VMs.
VMware user permissions for SPM
By default, only VMware administrators can provision storage with
Storage Pool Management. From the start, though, Judy felt that SPM
would only be truly effective if the business users/owners of the
resource pools could provision their own RDMs. She did, however,
have many of the same types of concerns that Joe expressed in Section
“Authorizations” on page 231. Chief among these was: “How could
she grant access to her users without outright giving them
administrator privilege?” The answer is simple. There are two sets of
permissions that someone like Jack must possess to use SPM
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integration to provision storage: Extension and Tasks. These
privileges must be applied at the vCenter level (PARTNER) and set to
propagate through the entire environment.
Judy begins, therefore, by creating a role called SPM in the vSphere
Client which has all the Extension and Tasks privileges as in
Figure 172 on page 277.
Figure 172
Add New Role SPM
She then assigns the role to Jack at the vCenter level as seen in
Figure 173 on page 278.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Figure 173
Add Role SPM to Jack
Note that the setting Propagate to Child Objects in the red box is
checked. If this is not checked, even if Jack has administrator
privileges on a VM, he will not be able to use SPM to create an RDM.
Since Jack already has administrator privileges on his resource pools,
he is now ready to provision storage for his VMs. Jack needs a single
RDM added to a particular VM fairly quickly. He logs into the
vSphere Client and chooses the ProductionVM, in his
ProductionResourcePool. From the right-click menu, Figure 174 on
page 279, Jack now sees the EMC menu to Add Storage.
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Figure 174
VMUser Jack adds storage through SPM
Like Judy, Jack first chooses the type of storage to provision. In this
case he will select from the GOLD storage type seen in Figure 175 on
page 280.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
279
Customer Example
Figure 175
Jack selects Storage Type GOLD
Following this selection Jack needs a capacity for his RDM.
Figure 176 on page 281 shows this. Fortunately, Judy came to him
before Joe configured SMC for SPM and asked what size RDM disk
he used most frequently. Jack indicated that he uses many 10 GB
LUNs for his databases. Therefore Judy asked Joe to set a pre-create
policy of 10 GB on the thin pool that is associated with the GOLD
storage type. By doing this, Jack can be fairly confident that he will be
able to add the RDM quickly as most likely there will be one or more
10 GB LUNs waiting to be provisioned. So rather than waiting for the
LUN to be created, the adding of the RDM happens very quickly.
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Figure 176
Capacity Selection — Jack chooses Precreated
Jack accepts defaults on the remaining screens until he clicks Finish at
the final screen in Figure 177 on page 282.
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Figure 177
Jack completes the RDM
Jack views the RDMs associated with the VM and refreshes the screen
a few times until his LUN appears. By using VSI he can see the RDM
as in Figure 178 on page 283, and all the storage detail associated with
it, including: device ID, RAID configuration, known capacity, and
even the storage type from which the LUN was created - GOLD.
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Figure 178
EMC Virtual Storage Integrator showing Jack’s RDM
VMware administrator and VMware user — Judy and Jack
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Customer Example
Conclusion
Joe, Judy, and Jack were able to present their company, Acme, a new
paradigm of how to think about storage. By using “pools of storage”,
much like VMware uses resource pools, the team has given their
company the ability to intelligently manage storage tasks. In so
doing, they are able to free up more of their time to concentrate on the
business of the company.
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