Example of supporting documentation

Example of supporting documentation
Pollution Prevention and Control
(Northern Ireland) Regulations 2003
Application for a Permit
Example of Supporting
Documentation - Laying
Hens
Northern Ireland Environment Agency
Report prepared by:
M J Sharp
Senior Environmental Consultant
SAC
May 2006
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Northern Ireland example application – Example of supporting documentation for laying hens. May 2006
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CONTENTS
A4.2 Non Technical Summary................................................................................ 1
B1.3 Site Report and Site Map ............................................................................... 3
B2.1.1 Inspection and Maintenance ...................................................................... 6
B2.1.2 Details of Staff Training .............................................................................. 7
B2.2.1 Selection and Use of Raw Materials .......................................................... 7
B2.2.2 Selection and Use of Feedstuffs ................................................................ 7
B2.2.3 Optimising Water Use ................................................................................. 8
B2.3.1 Feed Delivery, Milling and Preparation ..................................................... 8
B2.3.2 Storage of Agricultural Fuel Oil, other Oils and Chemicals .................... 8
B2.3.3 Minimising Emissions from Housing ........................................................ 9
B2.3.4 Slurry, Litter and Manure Storage............................................................ 11
B2.3.5 Control of Slurry, Litter and Manure Spreading Operations ................. 11
B2.3.6 Measures for Controlling Odour .............................................................. 12
B2.4.1 Disposal or Discharge of Dangerous Substances to Land or Water.... 12
B2.5 Avoidance, recovery and disposal of waste (including carcass
disposal) ................................................................................................................. 12
B2.6 Energy Use.................................................................................................... 13
B2.7 Accident Prevention and Management ...................................................... 14
B2.8 Measures for controlling Noise and Vibration........................................... 14
B2.9 Measures for Monitoring Emissions........................................................... 15
B2.10 Closure and Decommissioning................................................................. 15
B4.1 Identifying Significant Environmental Impacts ......................................... 16
APPENDIX I Accident Management Plan ............................................................. 21
APPENDIX II Example nutrient budget................................................................. 29
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Northern Ireland example application – Example of supporting documentation for laying hens. May 2006
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A4.2
Non Technical Summary
The Farm
XYZ Poultry Farm is a privately owned site of approximately 2 hectares. The site
contains 2 poultry sheds designed for housing laying hens in enriched cages, with a
maximum stocking capacity of 140,000 birds for the farm. There is also a small egg
packing building adjacent to the first poultry shed and a shed to provide dry covered
storage for manure. The farm, which is located grid reference a nnn nnn is
surrounded by pasture land.
Poultry housing
Laying hens are kept in 2 new sheds designed to accommodate enriched cages
housing colonies of birds to the latest EU animal welfare standards. The sheds are
of steel framed construction, have polished concrete floors and insulated wall panels.
Ventilation is by an automatically controlled natural ventilation (ACNV) system
supplemented by a mechanical system in that the sheds are fitted with gable
mounted fans to provide through ‘tunnel’ ventilation when temperatures rise above
pre-set levels. The system is controlled and monitored electronically to ensure
optimum environmental and welfare conditions within the shed. Manure is collected
on belts, dried using a forced air drying system and conveyed to an enclosed manure
store to maintain dry manure at all times. The system is expected to produce
manure with a dry matter content of ca 65% - 70%. Feed is delivered to storage bins
located adjacent to the sheds. Working areas where vehicles operate and a limited
area surrounding the sheds is laid with concrete. The manure management system
is based on maintaining dry manure at all times, and all cleaning is done as a dry
operation using compressed air so there is no wash water at any time from cleaning
or manure handling operations. Never the less a small waste water tank is located
underground at the corner of the site should any contaminated run-off have to be
collected. Nipple drinkers are used in all sheds to reduce wastage of water and to
ensure there is no spillage that may compromise the dry manure system.
Production cycle
Birds are brought into the sheds when they are around 15 weeks old and remain in
the sheds for a further 60 weeks until the end of their egg producing lives. At that
stage the birds are removed off site and processed for food products. Feed from a
UFAS accredited mill is delivered in 28 tonne capacity covered lorries, consumption
is approximately 118 g of feed per bird per day. Eggs are collected from the packing
shed by lorry, and transported to a central processing and packing station. Manure
is stored in a separate enclosed store and can be removed at any time when
conditions are appropriate for land spreading. The majority of manure is utilised by
local growers but some may also be utilised for mushroom compost, and
opportunities for use on amenity land are being explored. Mortalities are removed
from the sheds daily and the numbers recorded. Carcasses are kept on-site in
covered vermin proof bins until they are collected under the National Fallen Stock
Scheme [or incinerated in a DARD approved incinerator having a secondary
combustion chamber but operating at less than 50 kg per hour].
These measures are intended to reduce the production and emission of ammonia,
odours and dust from the sheds, and prevent liquid washings escaping to the
environment. This in turn should reduce the environmental impact of the farming
activities.
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Responsibility
Primary responsibility for running the site rests with the proprietors <name>.
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B1.3
Site Report and Site Map
Site Description
Located in the County of name, the site lies adjacent to the A12 road between the
villages of Village 1 and Village 2. It comprises a rectangular shaped area of land of
approximately 2 ha, 150 m above sea level. The majority of the site area is occupied
by the sheds and surrounding concrete hard standing. An outer vegetated strip of
land has been planted with trees and shrubs to screen the sheds. At the north east
side of the sheds, a vegetated bank provides further screening. At the foot of this
bank is a swale that collects clean run-off from the concrete hard standing surfaces.
This swale is heavily vegetated and drains to a local ditch and eventually into the
Local River catchment. The area surrounding the site is pasture land located in a
typical undulating landform with gentle slopes. A plan of the site is provided with the
main application.
Land use class
Soil Survey Code SWG1ST shows that the land surrounding the farm has a land
classification value of 3A.
Soil type
Soil survey sheet nn shows that the dominant soil series in the area is a Surface
Water Gley Class 1 on Shale Till.
Water courses and groundwater vulnerability
Approximately 200 m to the east of the site a small water course flows north and
joins the Local River. Two other streams in the same catchment are located
approximately 0.5 km to the east and 0.5 km to the west of the site. These also flow
north into the Local River. Water from a vegetated ditch, or swale, located along the
east perimeter edge of the site, flows through underground drains to the watercourse
200m east of the site. A consent to discharge exists for the swale outlet.
Groundwater vulnerability maps show land at the site and in the area surrounding the
site as weakly permeable.
Site History
Prior to the building of the poultry sheds in 2004, the site was pasture land.
Construction of the poultry farm involved the removal of topsoil, and levelling using
virgin aggregates.
Operation of the site
The site is operated solely for the production of eggs. Pullets are introduced into the
sheds at point of lay (15 - 16 weeks old) and remain there producing eggs until
destocking after approximately 60 weeks of laying. The sheds are then dry cleaned
and disinfected and the next batch of birds stocked. Mortalities are removed to
sealed bins and thereafter removed by a licensed contractor in compliance with the
requirements of the Animal By-Products Regulations. Manure is dried on belts in the
poultry sheds and removed at regular intervals (every 2-3 days) to an enclosed
manure store. It can be removed from the manure store at any convenient time for
land spreading. As a dry cleaning system is used there is normally no need for
disposal of wash water as none is created. However a small wash water tank has
been installed in case there is a need to wash down hard standing areas. Feed is
stored on-site in sealed steel bins.
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Substances and emissions
Potentially polluting substances stored on site include 200 litres of diesel stored in a
bunded fuel tank, and quantities of disinfectant concentrate stored in sealed
containers. The main emissions from the site are ammonia, odours and dust. Dust
deposited on hard standing within the site is regularly swept up and disposed of in
accordance with the DARD code of good practice for prevention of pollution of water.
Previous use or activity
Diesel tank area
Disinfectant
Potentially polluting substance(s)
200 litres of diesel fuel
25 litres of concentrate
Location
Generator house
Pesticide store
History of incidents
No pollution incidents are known to have occurred at the site since construction of
the poultry sheds in 2004, and there are no known incidents preceding construction.
Potential pollution pathways
The site is relatively compact and consists mostly of the sheds and associated hard
standing areas, consequently the whole area has been considered as a single zone.
Potential pollution pathways have been identified as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Run-off from hard standing areas around the manure store if manure is
removed in wet weather having potential for contamination with nutrients of
land, water courses and groundwater. Run-off will be caught and treated by
the swale.
Contaminated run-off from apron areas, particularly if dust has been allowed
to build up, resulting in potential for contamination of land and groundwater
with nutrients, and possibly disinfectants. Run-off will be caught by the
swale, and dust is regularly swept up.
Leakage from waste water tanks that have not been well maintained.
Spillage of diesel to soil around the filling area of diesel tanks.
Ammonia and dust emitted to the atmosphere being deposited on the site and
increasing the nutrient loading on vegetation.
Potential soil contamination resulting from a build up of ash around the
incinerator [if an incinerator is used].
Site Reconnaissance
An examination of the site was undertaken to establish whether pollution has
occurred through any of the pathways above.
•
•
Leakage from hard standing areas was assessed by visually examining
vegetation and soil around the hard standing and searching for run-off
channels or other evidence of leakage. Vegetation and bare ground did not
show any obvious signs of pollution.
A similar procedure was used to assess run-off from the apron area. There
was some evidence of wet land as a result of rainwater run-off but this was
en-route to the swale. There was no evidence of any contamination from, for
example, dust or feed.
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•
•
•
•
The area around the waste water tank showed no signs of leakage and
evidence of previous leaks such as a build up of algae were not obvious.
There was no evidence of diesel spillage around an area where vehicles had
been fuelled in the past.
Vegetation around the sheds was green and lush, possibly as a result of
ammonia deposition, but there was no evidence of damage or scorching to
leaves on trees and shrubs.
[If an incinerator is used.] The area around the incinerator was inspected
visually for potential contamination such as a build up of ash. There were
areas of bare earth around the base of the unit due to activity from people
and vehicles, but no evidence of ash or carcass remains.
Statement of site condition
The area of the site comprising the poultry sheds is considered to be in a condition
commensurate with agricultural land that has been developed for intensive poultry
production. Given that this land was previously a green field area used for
agricultural production, it is considered unlikely that contamination is present. The
land surrounding the poultry sheds is still used for agricultural production and
although some manure spreading is undertaken on this land, the presence of
contaminants is considered unlikely.
[Note: If there is a possibility of contamination on any area of the site, for example
areas around old fuel tanks and incinerators, applicants are advised to adopt a risk
based approach to establish the level of contamination in defined zones of the site.
In circumstances where pollution was suspected, monitoring requirements in addition
to the inspection requirements set out in rules 2.1.1.1 to 2.1.1.3 of the Standard
Farming Installation Rules may be included in the permit. See the Site Report
Guidance 1 for further information on preparing a site report for your application
1
Preparing Site Reports for Pig and Poultry Farms: Supplementary Guidance for IPPC
Applications.
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B2.1.1 Inspection and Maintenance
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.1.1. to
2.1.1.3.
Scheduled inspections are undertaken by the farm owner (name) on a monthly basis.
The findings are recorded using the form below and any defects noted and corrective
action stated. In addition to the monthly schedule a number of daily checks are
made as part of monitoring the production process.
Farm Name:………………
Month……………20.….
If any item is marked unsatisfactory, please detail corrective action required below.
Item
Points to check:
Chemical/vet
medicine stores
Drinking water
security, bunding, stock sheets correct, only essential
items stored
meter readings, leaks, valves, condition of pipework,
frost protection, records properly made
wet manure areas, condition of walls and floors, date
store last emptied
fuel and oil leaks, exhaust leaks, condition of fuel lines
and tanks, service records, records of weekly tests
no spilled feed, impact damage, protective barriers,
integrity of structures
leakage, spent disinfectant, integrity of containers
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adequate facilities on site, secure covers in place,
appropriate for nature of waste materials, leakage,
containers clearly marked with type of waste
clean and free from dust, surface deterioration,
appropriate surface slopes for run-off, no ponding
evidence of discoloured water, flooding, integrity of
covers, colour coding of covers
overflow, leakage, date last emptied
free from slime or discolouration, adequate flow, not
stagnant, date next analytical test due?
9
signs of rodent activity, records up to date, bait
properly laid and protected, carcasses removed
signs of leaf damage, excessive dust deposits
loose or damaged panels, integrity of fan shrouds,
dust deposits on roofs, rainwater collection - gutters &
down pipes, security, water ingress etc., alarms tested
and working
Evidence of overloading, inadequate combustion, ash
properly cleaned up, site clean and tidy, no carcass
remains, monitoring equipment and data ok.
9
Manure storage
Generator
Feed bins
Disinfectant
baths
Waste skips and
bins
Hard standing
areas
Storm drain
manholes
Septic tanks
Perimeter
ditches and
swales
Pest control
Trees and crops
Buildings
Incinerators
Satisfactory
Unsatisfactory
(detail below)
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Remedial action required:
1.
Minor fuel leak from diesel pipe on generator engine. Tighten joint - replace at next engine service.
2.
Broken manhole cover at NE corner of site. Replace cover.
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Inspection conducted by:
Date:
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B2.1.2 Details of Staff Training
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.1.2.1. to
2.1.2.3.
The following staff have attended a recognised training course on prevention and
control of pollution on pig and poultry farms.
Training Records
Name
A N Other
Job Title
Proprietor
A N Other
Assistant
A N Other
Stockworker
A N Other
Stockworker
A N Other
Stockworker
Details of course and course supplier
Livestock SVQ III with prevention and control
of pollution on pig and poultry farms - National
Training Provider
Prevention and control of pollution on pig and
poultry farms - ABC Agricultural College
Prevention and control of pollution on
Company layer farms - in-house training
programme
Prevention and control of pollution on
Company layer farms - in-house training
programme
Prevention and control of pollution on
Company layer farms - in-house training
programme
Date training completed
August 2006
August 2006
October 2006
October 2006
October 2006
Note: Evidence of training must be provided, you should enclose a copy of the
course certificate awarded to successful trainees. If trainees have attended an inhouse course, please provide an outline of the course context.
B2.2.1 Selection and Use of Raw Materials
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.2.1.1 and
2.2.1.2.
All chemical and disinfectants used on site are listed in approved lists (MAFF/HSE
Reference Book 500, National Office for Animal Health (NOAH) compendium, and
DARD approved list of disinfectants). Details of the inventory are given in the Table
in Section B.2.2.1 of the main application form.
B2.2.2 Selection and Use of Feedstuffs
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.2.2.1. to
2.2.2.6.
All feed is supplied from a UFAS accredited mill. Feed is carefully formulated to
provide the necessary balance of nutrients but minimise the amount of nitrogen and
phosphorus excreted by optimising crude protein input and feed utilisation.
A total of four diets are fed over the laying cycle and digestive enzymes are used to
improve feed utilisation:
Diet 1 (crude protein = , Phosphorus = )
Diet 2 (crude protein = , Phosphorus = )
Diet 3 (crude protein = , Phosphorus = ), etc.
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[Note: give details of the diets you use and state the crude protein and phosphorus
levels.]
B2.2.3 Optimising Water Use
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.2.3.1. to
2.2.3.3.
Water is from a mains supply on the site. Average consumption is 210 litres per
1000 birds per day. The following practices ensure that water use is optimised and
waste is avoided:
• Nipple drinkers are used to minimise losses and help maintain dry manure.
• Water consumption is monitored and recorded daily from individual meters
within each shed.
Any variation from normal levels is investigated
immediately.
• Daily checks are made by staff to ensure that drinkers are functioning
correctly. These checks also allow staff to attend to problems at an early
stage, e.g. leaks in drinking lines.
• Sheds are fully insulated and provided with an efficient ventilation system to
maintain an optimum environment for birds at all times including extremes of
weather. Water consumption should not therefore increase significantly in
hot weather.
A water audit will be undertaken within 3 years of the date of issue of the permit. [A
pro-forma agricultural water audit is available from The Northern Ireland Environment
Agency i.e. “Guidance for operators on preparing an agricultural water audit for
intensive livestock IPPC installations]
B2.3.1 Feed Delivery, Milling and Preparation
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.3.1.1. to
2.3.1.5.
Most diets are pelleted and this minimises dust during delivery. Feed is delivered to
the site by lorry in covered 28 tonne loads and blown directly into sealed storage bins
that are set back from high traffic areas to minimise risks from collision. Delivery
times are restricted to between the hours of 0700 and 2200 to minimise disturbance
from noise. Lorries are modern and well maintained, and are all fitted with efficient
silencers. All drivers are equipped with empty bags shovels and brooms to clear up
any spillage should this occur when attaching blower pipes etc. Spilled feed is
attended to immediately to discourage pests and prevent risks from polluted run-off.
On rare occasions when feed has to be moved on site, this is done in one of two
ways; large quantities are moved by using a sucker/blower lorry, while smaller
quantities are placed in sealed bags and moved by tractor trailer or barrow.
B2.3.2 Storage of Agricultural Fuel Oil, other Oils and Chemicals
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.3.2.1. to
2.3.2.4.
The following facilities are used for storage of fuels and chemicals:
Product stored
Diesel
Method of storage
Bunded tank
Storage Capacity
200 litres
Location (see also site map)
Inside generator house
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Biocides
and
pesticides
Petrol
Veterinary medicines
Proprietary chemical safe
200 litre
Farm store No 1
Proprietary fuel container
Refrigerator
max 10 litres
35 litres
Farm store No 2
Farm store No.1
Diesel for auxiliary generators is stored in a bunded tank that meets the
requirements of The Control of Pollution, (Silage, Slurry and Agricultural Fuel Oil)
(Northern Ireland) Regulations 2003. Biocides and small quantities of pesticides
(e.g. rodenticides) are kept in a proprietary leak proof, fire resistant chemical safe in
a dry frost free location. No more than two gallons of petrol are kept in a fuel
container located in the farm store during the summer months for use in a
lawnmower and strimmer. Small quantities of veterinary medicines are kept in a
locked refrigerator. Records of raw materials held on site are kept in the farm office.
B2.3.3 Minimising Emissions from Housing
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.3.3.1. to
2.3.3.20.
The following measures are adopted to prevent or minimise emissions to air, water
and land.
Housing:
• Walls and roofs in sheds are insulated and have a smooth surface to aid
cleaning. Buildings are well maintained and watertight.
• Manure is rapidly dried on belts using a forced air drying system prior to
removal to an enclosed manure store. Rapidly drying and stabilising manure
also reduces flies that can create a nuisance if present in large numbers.
• Dry cleaning methods are employed throughout to keep manure dry and
eliminate wash water. Dust is blown downwards and swept up.
• Gable fans and air inlets are controlled and monitored electronically to ensure
that optimum conditions are maintained within the house. Gable fans only
operate when temperatures rise above pre-set levels (ca. 25°C).
• Fans are fitted with light filters that are also effective in filtering dust thus
minimising emissions to the environment. Filters are regularly cleaned and
dust swept up.
• Nipple drinkers are used to reduce wastage of water and maintain dry
manure, thus reducing emissions of ammonia and odours.
• An automated system dispenses feed into trough feeders to minimise feed
wastage.
• Low energy lighting is used.
•
A review of existing housing and management practises will be undertaken
within 12 months of the date of permit issue. Following the review an
improvement plan shall be implemented.
Site drainage:
• A dry cleaning regime is adopted to eliminate wash water as far as possible.
• The site is concreted to allow a high standard of cleanliness and controlled
drainage of storm run-off (including roof water).
• Clean run-off from the entire site is channelled to a swale running along the
north side of the site. This then discharges to a field ditch.
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•
•
•
Contaminated wash down water is normally prevented due to the dry cleaning
regime, but in the event of washing it is directed to an underground wash
water tank.
Valves are provided so that in the event of the hard-standing areas becoming
contaminated, for example during cleaning out periods or when cleaning up
dust, run-off from these areas can be diverted to a waste water tank rather
than the swale.
The waste water tank is emptied and disposed of in accordance with the
requirements of the DARD code of good practice for prevention of pollution of
water.
Manure utilisation:
• Most manure is land-spread on fields owned by third parties, the operation
being undertaken by a specialist contractor. Smaller quantities are spread on
land surrounding the site.
• Manure to be spread on land is kept dry and where appropriate incorporated
into the ground within 24 hours to reduce volatilisation of ammonia. It is
spread in accordance with the land owners’ manure management plans.
• Details of the land bank available for manure spreading are provided with the
manure management plan. The amount of land available at any one time
may vary depending on local cropping patterns. Manure can be safely stored
in the manure store and removed only when it is needed and weather
conditions are suitable. This minimises the use of temporary storage in
fields.
Management practices
The principal emissions from the site are ammonia, odours, dust, and at certain
times noise. Good manure quality (i.e. dry manure) is a significant factor in
minimising ammonia and odour emissions, and measures described above under
housing all help reduce these emissions. Good management practice is also
important. Causes of wet manure include sick animals, leaking equipment, poor
ventilation, and high humidity within the shed. The following management checks
are made:
•
•
•
•
daily checks of animal welfare;
daily checks and records of water consumption and equipment;
daily checks of temperature and ventilation;
regular maintenance and cleaning of fans and other equipment e.g. feeding
and drinking systems;
• site kept clean and tidy and free from sources of odour e.g. spilled feed,
uncovered bins for mortalities.
The main causes of dust are birds and feed. Excitable birds disturb manure and
generate dust. Good husbandry practice lessens the likelihood of birds becoming
stressed and thus help to reduce dusts. The colony cage system is good in this
respect. Any dust emitted is regularly swept up and removed from hard standing
areas. Landscaping with trees and shrubs can also help to minimise the impact of
dust emissions from some types of housing.
Sources of noise on poultry farms include vehicle movements, feed deliveries
(blowing into bins) and fan noise. Feed deliveries are only permitted between the
hours of 0700 and 2200 and fans are fitted within cowls to reduce noise. Gable fans
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only operate in warm weather, above 25°C and are large diameter and therefore
slower speed. This helps reduce fan noise.
B2.3.4 Slurry, Litter and Manure Storage
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.3.4.1. to
2.3.4.9.
Approximately 3,500 tonnes of manure at 65% - 70% dry matter per annum is
produced as a by-product. (Note: accurate data regarding quantities of manure from
your own farm must be provided.) All manure is dried on belts within the poultry
houses and then conveyed to an enclosed manure store located on the site. Manure
is kept dry in this store and can be removed at any convenient time when weather
conditions are suitable for the intended end use. The stabilisation obtained from
rapidly drying the manure will reduce ammonia and odour emissions and is expected
to minimise fly activity and thus reduce potential nuisance. Manure can be loaded
inside the manure store to further reduce odour and noise nuisance.
B2.3.5 Control of Slurry, Litter and Manure Spreading Operations
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.3.5.1. to
2.3.5.20
Approximately 3,500 tonnes of manure at 65% - 70% dry matter is produced each
year. All this manure is spread on land belonging to third parties. Approximately nnn
ha of land has been identified in the manure management plan as being suitable for
land spreading. Efforts are also being made to identify other utilisation routes.
Manure is expected to have the following analysis:
Example nutrient analysis of layer manure at 65% dry matter. [Note: figures will vary
with dry matter content please provide figures appropriate for your system.]
-1
Total nutrients, kg tonne
N
35
P2O5
28
K2O
20
Note: Details of your arrangements for spreading manure must be appended to this
application. For existing installations where landspreading currently takes place, the
plan should set out the nutrients generated from the installation, the capacity of the
land currently used for spreading. If the plan shows a nutrient surplus, initial
proposals for addressing these surpluses must also be submitted. An improvement
plan must be submitted within 6 months of date of the permit issue setting out
measures planned to ensure that spreading of manures will be in accordance with
crop requirements. An example of a nutrient budget for a 100,000 laying hen unit
producing 30% dry matter manure, is given in APPENDIX II
For further information on preparing a manure management plan see the NIEA
“Guidance for operators on slurry and manure management planning for IPPC
installations”.
B2.3.6 Measures for Controlling Odour
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rule 2.3.6.1.
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Buildings, land spreading of manure, feed storage and preparation, incineration of
carcasses, disinfectants, and dust can all be sources of odours. There are a small
number of local receptors (private dwellings) that could be affected by odours.
These include private dwellings located at points ‘A’ ‘B’ and ‘C’ on the site map.
Measures for controlling odours from buildings are essentially the same as those for
controlling ammonia and other emissions and are detailed in section B2.3.3 above.
The following is a summary of measures adopted:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dry manure is maintained by ensuring optimum temperature and humidity
conditions in the shed, no leaks from drinking systems, and by rapidly drying
manure on belts.
A high standard of cleanliness is maintained around the site with dust
deposits being regularly cleaned up.
Dust emissions are minimised by fitting light filters, these also filter dust to a
degree. Dust is directed on to hard standing where it is regularly swept up.
All feed storage bins are sealed.
Disinfectant baths do not leak.
Mortalities are regularly collected.
During manure removal, where possible trailers are loaded in the manure
shed or close to the doors. All loads are covered and hard standing areas are
swept clean after loading.
Weather conditions and the location of sensitive receptors are considered
when land spreading manure. The requirements of the DARD code of good
practice for prevention of pollution of air and soil are adhered to.
Note: If you have sensitive receptors (private houses, schools etc.) within 400 m or
there is a history of odour complaints an Odour Management Plan must be included.
B2.4.1 Disposal or Discharge of Dangerous Substances to Land or Water
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.4.1 and
2.4.2.
There is no disposal or discharge of dangerous (List I or List II) substances to land or
water. As a dry cleaning system is used there is usually no wash water to dispose
of.
B2.5
Avoidance, recovery and disposal of wastes (including carcass
disposal)
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.5.1. to
2.5.3.
The following waste types may arise during egg production:
• cracked or soiled eggs (melange);
• plastic waste from wrapping used on egg trays and empty detergent
containers;
• damaged egg trays;
• mortalities;
• re-usable pallets.
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With the exception of mortalities, wastes are stored in covered bins and removed to
landfill. Where possible wastes are segregated for reuse or recycling. The quantity
of waste is minimised by good management practices. Large empty plastic biocide
containers can be ‘re-cycled’ as foot dip containers or rubbish bins for store rooms.
A waste audit will be undertaken using the Defra guide ‘Opportunities for Saving
Money by Reducing Waste on Your Farm’ within 3 years of the date of issue of the
permit. Following the audit measures will be implemented to prevent or reduce
wastes generally, and specifically in any priority areas identified by the audit. Waste
residues will not be stored on site.
Wastes produced by the egg production process are described above. Mortalities
are collected daily and stored in sealed bins for collection under the National Fallen
Stock Scheme [or by burning in a small (less than 50 kg per hour) incinerator three
or four times per week as required. Temperature in the combustion chamber of the
incinerator is monitored to demonstrate that 850°C is achieved thus ensuring
complete combustion. Manufacturers operating instructions are followed to avoid
overloading and to ensure correct start-up and shut-down procedures.] Good
husbandry practice minimises mortalities.
Records of wastes produced by the activities on the site, and of wastes sent off-site,
are maintained and kept in the farm office. A waste hierarchy is adopted so that
where possible wastes are avoided, re-used or recycled with disposal as a last
option. Where appropriate, waste management licences or licence exemptions
required for on-site recovery or disposal of wastes from the installation, under the
Waste Management Regulations (NI) 2006, will be obtained from NIEA.
B2.6 Energy Use
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rule 2.6.1.
The farm has subscribed to the <Insert name> Climate Change Levy Discount
Scheme since <date>. The document reference number for the agreement is nn
nnnnnnnn. [Enclose a copy of your agreement.]
Energy efficiency measures
The following design features are incorporated in the design of sheds to reduce
energy consumption:
• A high level of insulation in walls and roofs.
• Efficient automatically controlled ventilation systems to maintain optimum
internal temperature.
• Main fans only used when temperatures rise above a pre-set level, otherwise
ventilation is by an ACNV system.
• Precise electronic control of the system maintains constant temperature
conditions thus avoiding large variations and consequent increased demands
on heating and ventilation systems.
• Low wattage lighting used throughout.
• Well maintained ventilation and feeding systems to help reduce energy
consumption (power consumption can increase as a result of increased
friction in feeding systems, or dust laden fan blades reducing efficiency).
An energy audit will be completed using the same MAFF document as the waste
audit ‘Opportunities for saving money by reducing waste on your farm’ within 3 years
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of the date of issue of the permit. Measures identified in the audit shall be
implemented.
B2.7 Accident Prevention and Management
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rule 2.7.1.
Note: A copy of the accident management plan for the installation should be
attached, an example is provided in Appendix I.
B2.8 Measures for controlling noise and vibration
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rule 2.8.1.
Noise at the site may be emitted by vehicles, machinery, fans, auxiliary generators,
and birds during emptying of sheds. There are [insert number] sensitive receptors
within a 400 metre radius of the site, and there is no history of complaints about
noise.
The highest noise levels during the production cycle usually occur during feed
deliveries when lorries blow feed into bins. To prevent nuisance at quiet times feed
deliveries are restricted to between 0700 and 2200 hours, and all vehicles are well
maintained and fitted with effective silencers.
The modern design of the sheds and the fact that
ventilation system mean that noise emissions will be
levels are likely to be higher when the gable fans are
diameter low speed fans located on the end of the
receptors.
they incorporate an ACNV
kept to a minimum. Noise
running but these are large
sheds away from sensitive
Sheds walls and roofs are of insulated panel construction. This provides an
adequate barrier for poultry and machine noise from within the shed. Staff monitor
noise and vibration from fans, augers and other machinery on a daily basis to ensure
correct operation. Broken or badly maintained machinery can generate excess noise
resulting in greater stress for birds as well as increased noise emissions.
Bird noise can increase during catching for bird de-stocking. To reduce this,
catchers try to minimise disturbance and crates into which birds are placed for
transport are fitted with side shields to quieten them during travel. Lorries are
scheduled for consecutive loading to ensure that the operation is conducted as
quickly as possible. Filling and de-stocking occurs at the beginning and end of a 60
week laying cycle.
During manure removal, trailers are filled near to doors or inside the manure store to
reduce machinery noise and are filled to capacity to reduce the volume of traffic
leaving the site.
Note: If you have sensitive receptors (private houses, schools etc.) within 400 m or
there is a history of noise complaints a Noise Management Plan must be included
with your application.
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B2.9 Measures for Monitoring Emissions
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.9.1.1 to
2.9.2.2
Emissions to air
Emissions of ammonia and dust to air are monitored using standard factors provided
in Section B3.1 of the IPPC application form. [If an incinerator is used.] In addition to
the factors in Section B3.1, a small (less than 50 kg per hour) incinerator is used for
burning carcasses. Temperature in the combustion chamber of the incinerator is
monitored to demonstrate that 850°C is achieved thus ensuring complete
combustion. A monthly check is made of the incineration site (as per the inspection
and maintenance schedule) to ensure that there is no build up of ash or other
residues, and no potential for contaminated run-off from the area. [Note: if an
incinerator is used the temperature must be monitored.]
Emissions to water
As a dry cleaning system is used this should almost eliminate contaminated run-off.
If contaminated run-off is likely, for example during cleaning out, it is channelled
directly from hard standing areas to an under ground waste water tank. The tank is
emptied and disposed of in accordance with the requirements of the DARD code of
good practice for prevention of pollution of water. Records are kept of when tanks
are checked (maintenance schedule) and when they are emptied.
Emissions to land
Emissions to land include deposition of ammonia and dust from air, and manure
spread on land. Measures for monitoring ammonia and dust are described above
under ‘Emissions to air’. Land spreading of manure is undertaken according to the
manure management plan and records of quantities and location of spreading are
kept.
B2.10 Closure and Decommissioning
Demonstrate how you meet the requirements of Standard Farming Rules 2.10.1 to
2.10.4
Note: A site closure plan is not required at application, however, within 12 months
from the date of the issue of the permit, you are required to prepare and maintain a
site closure plan which demonstrates how the activities can be decommissioned to
avoid any pollution risk and return the site of operation to a satisfactory state. A
review of this plan is required to be carried out at least every 3 years.
Buildings and equipment
After the last birds have been removed the buildings will be cleaned out and
disinfected. Yard areas will also be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected. All
salvageable equipment such as feeding, drinking, heating and ventilation systems
will be removed from the sheds. Fan and ventilation apertures will be closed,
covered and sealed to keep out pests.
Raw materials
All raw materials will be removed from the site. Feed will be transferred from bins to
an operational farm, and the bins will be cleaned, disinfected and sealed. Fuel would
be removed from tanks by the supplier and the tank then locked closed, or moved to
another operational site. All other raw materials such as disinfectants and veterinary
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medicines would be removed from store rooms to other operational farms or returned
to the suppliers.
Site facilities
All bins and receptacles (e.g. bins for mortalities, rubbish etc) would be cleaned and
removed from site, either to be reused at other sites or disposed of by a licensed
waste contractor. Any substance or article considered to have potential for
environmental pollution will be removed from site. Dirty water tanks will be emptied
and closed after all potential contaminants have been removed and the site cleaned.
Water and electricity supplies will be shut off and all houses and store rooms locked
to prevent unauthorised access.
Site inspection
A final site inspection would be conducted to ensure that all pollution risks had been
removed and that there was no potential for pollution, flooding or other mishap due to
vandalism, inclement weather or other unforeseen event. Keys for access and all
records relating to the site will stored for safe keeping.
B3.1
Emissions to air, water and land
Provide details of the nature, quantity and sources of emissions to air, water and
land from the installation.
Emissions to air
Details of emissions to air form the installation are provided in the tables in section
B3.1 of the application form.
Emissions to water
There are no emissions to water from the installation [if there are emissions to water
from the installation, please provide details].
B4.1 Identifying Significant Environmental Impacts
Provide an assessment of the potential significant environmental effects of the
foreseeable emissions from your installation
Sensitive receptors around the farm are shown on the location map submitted with
this application. In addition to the owners property there are three private houses
within 400 metres of the farm. There are no designated sites such as ASSIs within 2
km of the farm.
[Note: Identify on a map all sensitive receptors (houses, schools, businesses, etc.)
within a 400 metre radius of the site boundary. Also where known, identify any
ecologically sensitive sites with a statutory designation e.g. an ASSI within a 2km
radius of the site.]
The environmental impacts from the farm are assessed in the Table below.
For further information on carrying out an assessment of environmental impact from
your poultry farm see NIEA Guidance “Assessing environmental impacts of poultry
farms – supplementary guidance for IPPC application”
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Source of
Impact
Livestock
housing
Impact e.g.
odour, noise,
dust, ammonia,
run-off, spillage
Receptor
Air, water,
land
Humans,
plants
Description of Negative Impact
Ammonia
Air
Land
Plants
Possible direct toxic effect on trees ST
Increased acidification of soil close to
housing MT
Changes to sensitive ecosystems LT
Nature of impact i.e. short term ST,
medium MT or long term LT
Significance of
negative impacts
after mitigating
measures applied:
major +++
moderate ++
minor +
nil 0
0
+
0
Mitigation / Management Measures
e.g. site planning, technical measures
•
•
•
•
•
Odour
Humans
Nuisance ST
++
Dust
Humans
Plants
Land
Water
Air
Nuisance ST
Contributes to odours ST
Health issues - inhalation LT
Covers leaves stopping photosynthesis ST
Nutrient enrichment of water courses MT
Impacts on air quality ST
+
+
0
+
+
+
•
•
•
Humans
Nuisance ST
+
•
•
Noise
•
•
•
•
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Dry manure maintained
No sensitive woodland or other ecological
receptors close to housing
Appropriate soil pH maintained by liming
Dry manure maintained
Hard standing areas kept clean and spillages
prevented
Manure air dried to reduce odours
Gable fans fitted with cowls and light filters
Regular clearing of dust to prevent build up on
surfaces and around vents
No sensitive vegetation around sheds
Houses far enough away not to be affected
Hard standing cleaned to prevent dust being
washed into water courses
Run-off treated by swale
Feed delivery times restricted, vehicles well
silenced
Doors in housing sited away from neighbours
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Used
disinfectants
Disposal of
carcasses
Cleaning out
Water
Possible toxic effects on wildlife ST
Increased biochemical oxygen demand
(BOD) of watercourses ST
+
•
+
•
•
•
Odour
Humans
Nuisance ST
0
Disease
Humans
Health risks ST
0
Livestock
Biosecurity issues ST
+
Air
Odour nuisance ST
Emission of acid gases contributing to acid
deposition LT
+
Land
Water
Increase in nitrogen and phosphorus levels
in soil MT
Potential for increased mineral or metal
content of soils LT
Increased biochemical oxygen demand
(BOD) of watercourses ST
Nutrient leaching from soil to surface
waters and groundwater LT
Nutrient enrichment (eutrophication) of
watercourses and ground water LT
Incinerator stack
emissions (if
used)
Contaminated
run-off
+
+
+
•
•
•
•
•
+
•
++
•
++
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Spent disinfectant disposed of into dirty
water tank
Use of Defra/NOAH approved disinfectants
Good husbandry to minimise mortalities
Use of covered/sealed skips to store
carcasses
Carcasses disposed of weekly
Use of covered/sealed containers
No contact with people
Use of covered containers
Carcasses disposed of daily
Bait traps used
Incinerator fully complies with requirements
of Animal By-Products Regulations
Performance is monitored
Dry cleaning system used
Any run-off diverted to waste water tank
Hard standing has kerbing
Waste water disposed of in line with DARD
Water Code
Dirty water tank are emptied prior to clean
out
All lightly contaminated run-off treated by
swales when not cleaning out
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Noise
Humans
Nuisance ST
++
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Manure
spreading
Odour
Humans
Nuisance ST
++
Ammonia and
major nutrients
(N:P:K)
Air
Land
Plants
Contributes to climate change LT
Contributes to odours LT
Nutrient enrichment or ‘fertilising’ effect on crops,
plants and water. LT
Changes to sensitive ecosystems such as
natural woodland, heathland or peatland. LT
+
++
Nutrient enrichment of soils, particularly
phosphorus LT
Potential for increased mineral and metal
content of soils
Eutrophication caused by run-off MT
Reduced biodiversity LT
•
++
0
+
++
+
+
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Machinery operated at reasonable times,
wherever possible
Equipment maintained to optimum
standards
Need for scraping minimised due to reduced
yard area
Machinery and equipment sited as far as
possible from neighbours
Idling of machines avoided
Voices not raised unnecessarily
Roads and tracks maintained to minimise
noise produced
Cover loads
Load close to the shed door or inside
Outdoor heaps avoided
Yard areas cleaned at the end of each day
Dirty water tank emptied promptly
Manure applied in accordance with manure
management plan
Balanced diets fed to reduce N & P in
manure
Manure incorporated within 24 hours
Application in accordance with DARD codes
of good practice
Only temporary field heaps used
No ecologically sensitive receptors near the
site
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Odours
Humans
Nuisance ST
++
•
•
•
•
•
Storage of
fuel,
chemicals
etc.
Leakage
Water
Contamination of surface and
groundwaters ST
Killing of animals, plants and aquatic life ST
+
•
0
•
•
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No spreading in adverse weather conditions
No spreading at weekends or on Bank
Holidays
No spreading close to neighbours’ houses
Manure incorporated within 24 hours
Manure applied in accordance with manure
management plan
All tanks are bunded and compliant with
legislation
Use of chemicals least hazardous to the
environment
Spill kits available
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APPENDIX I
ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT PLAN
Address:
XYZ Poultry Farm
Date of Plan:
May 2006
Date for Review:
May 2007
Approved by:
……………………….
Distributed to:
……………………….
……………………….
……………………….
……………………….
……………………….
A copy of this document must be located in a prominent place near the telephone in
the farm office.
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EMERGENCY CONTACT DETAILS
Emergency Contacts
Emergency services:
Local Police:
Doctor:
NIEA
Office hours
Pollution hotline:
Out of hours
999
0800 80 70 60
District Councils:
NI Water :
Gas supplier:
Electricity supplier:
Fuel oil supplier:
Spreading contractor:
Slurry tanker operator:
Forklift operator:
Maintenance contractor:
Plumber:
Electrician:
Vet:
Proprietor:
Farm Manager:
Shed staff:
Processing company:
Processing
company
manager:
Transport manager:
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SITE DRAINAGE PLAN
Include a plan of your installation here showing the following detail:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
general layout of buildings and services;
feed bins, feed conveyors,
access routes for emergency services;
location of fire hydrants;
hard-standing areas;
surface water and foul drains (colour foul drains red and surface water drains
blue, and show the direction of flow);
swales, ponds or wetlands for treating run-off;
location of waste water tanks, septic tanks and manholes;
valves for diverting surface water to waste water tanks tanks;
ditches, field drains and watercourses;
surface water outfalls;
LPG tanks, diesel tanks, chemical stores, bunded areas;
location of incinerator or carcass disposal skips.
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ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES
The accident management procedures detailed in this document are designed to
prevent or mitigate harmful environmental impacts arising from the following:
Event
Aspects to consider
Fire:
buildings and feed storage
fuel and chemical stores
manure storage
fire water run-off
Spillage:
fuel and oil tanks
chemical and disinfectant containers and stores
wet manure (i.e. flooded shed)
feed
Unable to utilise manure:
restriction on land access i.e. bad weather, disease
restriction (e.g. AI, FMD)
Mechanical/electrical failure:
ventilation and feeding systems, incinerator
Interruption to water supply:
buildings, drinking systems
Storm damage:
buildings
feed storage systems
drainage system
flooding
Extraordinary mortalities:
carcass disposal
quarantine
Training and information
All staff and contractors working on site shall be made aware of the emergency plan,
and must be familiar with the actions stated in it. The Operator shall be responsible
for ensuring that staff are aware of their duties and the procedures to follow to
prevent pollution in the event of unforeseen circumstances.
•
The emergency plan is located in the farm office, next to the telephone.
•
The inventory of chemicals, fuel and oil and raw materials is located in the
farm office, next to the telephone.
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Responding to accidents/emergencies
Fire
In the case of an accident/emergency staff must immediately contact the fire service
giving the location and nature of the fire. Where relevant, details of hazardous
substances must be given to the fire service, and locations of fire hydrants pointed
out.
Staff must be familiar with the location and operation of fire extinguishers. Staff
should only attempt to fight fires where the risk to their own safety is low. The
location of fire extinguishers is shown on the fire safety plan located in the office.
Staff will notify nearby residents/workers and ensure affected buildings are
evacuated.
Provided personal safety is not compromised, staff shall try to ensure that run-off
such as fire fighting water and any other polluting substance is prevented from
entering drains or watercourse, by channelling to dirty water tanks; absorbing with
straw, wood shavings, soil or other absorbent material. A tanker is available at
…………………….......................................................................................................
(name, address & tel.) and must be requested to empty tanks and prevent overflow.
Injured birds must be humanely slaughtered on-site according to the instructions of
the attending veterinary officer. If numbers affected exceed the capacity of normal
mortality disposal systems, skips must be requested for interim storage. Skips are
available from:
…….............................................................................................................................
(name & tel.). Unaffected birds if below marketable age must be re-housed on
another site, or if at marketable age, sent for immediate processing.
Spillage
Minor liquid spillage, e.g. of disinfectant or fuel oil, may occur when tanks or
containers are being filled. Staff must immediately clean up such spills using
absorbent material such as granules, sawdust, wood shavings, straw or soil.
Absorbent materials and equipment for cleaning up spillage are stored at the
following locations:
Material
Location
Absorbent granules:
Wood-shavings/sawdust:
Straw/soil:
Pollution spill kits:
Brushes/shovels
Fork lift
Slurry tanker
Generator shed and chemical safe
General store
Main farm steading
South end of sheds No1 and No 2
South end of all sheds
name, address, telephone
name, address, telephone
If small containers are found to be leaking the contents must be transferred to a
sound empty container, preferably one of the same type. Spillage must be cleaned
up as per minor spills above.
If a major liquid spillage occurs, such as may happen when a fuel tank is damaged,
staff shall contact the Northern Ireland Environment Agency pollution hotline
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(0800 80 70 60). They must then try to prevent spillage entering drains or
watercourses by using sawdust, wood shavings, straw, soil, pollution spill kits or
other suitable material. The storm drainage system must be diverted to waste water
tanks to try and contain spillage and drain blockers used where appropriate. Staff
shall assist agency and emergency service personnel by making sure they are aware
of the locations of drains and by identifying the potential routes pollutants may take.
Care shall be taken when cleaning up and disposing of absorbent material that
further pollution does not occur.
Spillage of feed or manure shall be promptly swept up and removed.
Unable to utilise manure
If circumstances prevail where it is not possible to spread manure on land, or export
it to another user e.g. prolonged bad weather, access restrictions due to disease, or
similar, the following contingency plan will be implemented. Manure will be
contained in the enclosed store on the site. This is located away from field drains
and watercourses and manure is kept dry. The store can accommodate ca 10
months of manure production. This should obviate the need for emergency storage
sites, but if further storage is needed a suitable outdoor site can be identified for
emergency storage of manure on an area of flat ground well away from watercourses
and field drains.
If land spreading of dirty water is not possible arrangements must be made to have
waste tanks emptied by:
……………..................................................................................................................
(name & tel.) licensed waste disposal contractor.
\[Note; Emergency storage sites for manure must be agreed with NIEA prior to use.]
Mechanical/electrical failures
If the power fails ensure that the emergency generators have started and that all
systems are operating. Monitor fuel level, temperature and oil pressure of the
generator. Avoid spillage when filling generator fuel tanks. Contact the electricity
supply company to notify them of the fault.
If mechanical failures occur, establish what equipment or system has failed and call
the maintenance engineers. Consider the risks of bird welfare and pollution that may
arise from loss of the equipment. Arrange for appropriate repairs or alternative
equipment to be provided.
Ensure system alarms are operating correctly and are set at appropriate levels
(alarms must not disturb neighbours).
If the incinerator fails, and the repair is likely to take longer than the storage capacity
of bins used to temporarily store mortalities, skips must be obtained and disposal
arranged with:
...................................................................................................................................
(name & tel.) licensed waste disposal contractor.
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Interruption to water supply
Staff shall check immediately to ascertain the cause of interruption to the supply and
undertake a thorough inspection of the system. They must pay particular attention to
the possibility of frozen or burst pipes, and the consequences of flood damage and
the pollution this may cause.
If flood damage does occur clean up activities shall be as described in the section on
major spillage. Staff must be aware of the location of the main stopcock (shown on
the site plan) in case the supply needs to be isolated.
Call the plumber if the fault is on site. If the fault is due to a failure of the mains
supply contact the water services company, informing them that livestock are
dependant on the water supply.
Storm damage
Ensure that staff are safe and if necessary evacuated from the buildings, and that
bird welfare is maintained as far as is practicable. If welfare is compromised the
company vet must be summoned.
Conduct an initial internal and external assessment of damage, paying attention to
the overall integrity of the building, and services such as water, gas, electricity, and
fuel oil.
Assess the risk of pollution from any disruption to these services, and where
appropriate take action as described in the section on minor and major spillage. If
the building has been damaged, or flooding has occurred, assess the likelihood of
contaminated run-off from wet manure getting into watercourses.
Ensure that the drainage system is diverted to waste effluent tanks and that spillage
is mitigated as described in the section on spillage. As far as practicable, try to keep
buildings watertight.
If necessary arrange for birds to be re-housed or sent for processing.
Extraordinary mortalities
In the event of an outbreak of a notifiable disease requiring the slaughter of birds,
carcasses must be disposed of in compliance with the requirements of the State
veterinary service. Notwithstanding this, staff shall be aware of the pollution potential
of having large numbers of carcasses on the premises.
Drainage systems must be protected and all run-off diverted to the waste tanks.
Arrangements must be made for these to be emptied regularly with disposal of the
effluent undertaken in accordance with veterinary advice. Skips must be used to
contain carcasses if there is any delay in disposal.
Distribution and revision
All staff shall be provided with copies of the Accident Management plan and be
trained in the procedures contained in it. A copy shall also be held in the farm office
next to the telephone.
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The accident management plan shall be reviewed at least every 3 years or as soon
as is practicable after an accident (whichever is earlier).
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APPENDIX II
Example nutrient budget
Existing installations – off farm activity.
Table 1 Example assumptions – crop nutrient requirements
(Assume a soil P index of 2; Moderate N status)
Crop
N (kg/ha)
Grazing (28d cycle)
- Dairy
- Beef
st
Silage – 1 cut
nd
- 2 cut
rd
- 3 cut
Grass - reseed
Winter Wheat
Spring wheat
Winter barley
Spring barley
Potatoes
Forage maize
P2O5 (kg/ha)
K20 (kg/ha)
0
0
70
75
60
50
85
70
85
70
290
170
20
20
40
25
15
50
70
55
70
55
180
60
60
50
120
100
80
60 (spring)
150
120
120
100
200
40
Table 2 Existing farms – example of requirements
Reference
Area (ha)
Crop
Nitrogen (N)
Requirement
(kg)
st
nd
Farm ‘A’
100
Farm ‘B’
10
Silage (1 & 2
cuts)
Potatoes
Farm ‘C’
100
Winter wheat
Total
210
17,000
(100 x 170)
1,700
(10 x 170)
15,000
(100 x 150)
33,700
P2O5
requirement
(kg)
6,500
(100 x 65)
1,800
(10 x 180)
7,000
(100 x 70)
15,300
K2O
requirement
(kg)
14,500
(100 x 145)
2,900
(10 x 290)
8,500
(100 x 85)
25,900
Nutrient budget for above – Laying hens
100,000 laying hens producing 40 tonnes manure/1000 bird/year = 4,000 tonnes
manure. (Manure at 30% dry matter.)
Analysis showed litter contained 16kg N; 13kg P2O5; 9kg K2O
(Note: analysis for manure at 30% dry matter, provide data relevant for your system.)
4000t of Layer Manure
64,000 kg
52,000 kg
36,000 kg
Nitrogen content
Phosphorus (P2O5) content
Potassium (K2O) content
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29
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
Northern Ireland example application – Example of supporting documentation for laying hens. May 2006
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
Farm
Crop
A
Silage
2 cuts
Potatoes
Winter
wheat
B
C
Total
Area
ha
100
N reqt Kg
17000
P reqt
Kg
6500
K reqt
Kg
14500
N constraint
t Manure
1062.5
P Constraint
t Manure
500
t
Manure
used
500
10
100
1700
15000
1800
7000
2900
8500
106.3
937.5
138.5
538.5
106.3
538.5
33700
15300
25900
Total
manure 1144.7 t
utilised
Total
manure 4000 t
generated
Surplus
2855.3 t
P Surplus
37,118.8 kg
N Surplus
45,684.6kg
1144.7
Extra land required (ha)
Silage–2 cuts
571.1
268.7
W Wheat
530.3
304.6
Potatoes
206.2
253.8
Examples of additional land requirements are shown in red above ie.
= 571 ha silage(1st & 2nd cuts),or
= 530 ha winter wheat, or
= 254 ha potatoes.
(P Limiting)
(P Limiting)
(N Limiting)
Nitrate Action Programme Nitrogen limit of 170 kg N/ha = 210 ha x 170 kg = 35,700
kg N
An additional 269 ha of land will be required to meet 170 kg N/ha limit (i.e.
45,684/170) and apply organic nitrogen according to crop requirements. To meet the
170kg N/ha only, an additional 166ha of land would be required (i.e. 4000 x 16 =
64,000 – 35,700 = 28,300 / 170 = 166ha).
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30
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