8000-A2-GB29
HOTWIRE MANAGEMENT
COMMUNICATIONS
CONTROLLER (MCC) CARD
USER’S GUIDE
Document No. 8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
Copyright E 1999 Paradyne Corporation.
All rights reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
Notice
This publication is protected by federal copyright law. No part of this publication may be copied or distributed,
transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any human or computer language in any form
or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, manual or otherwise, or disclosed to third parties without the
express written permission of Paradyne Corporation, 8545 126th Ave. N., Largo, FL 33773.
Paradyne Corporation makes no representation or warranties with respect to the contents hereof and specifically
disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Further, Paradyne Corporation
reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes from time to time in the contents hereof without
obligation of Paradyne Corporation to notify any person of such revision or changes.
Changes and enhancements to the product and to the information herein will be documented and issued as a new
release to this manual.
Warranty, Sales, Service, and Training Information
Contact your local sales representative, service representative, or distributor directly for any help needed. For
additional information concerning warranty, sales, service, repair, installation, documentation, training, distributor
locations, or Paradyne worldwide office locations, use one of the following methods:
H Internet: Visit the Paradyne World Wide Web site at www.paradyne.com. (Be sure to register your warranty
there. Select Service & Support → Warranty Registration.)
H Telephone: Call our automated system to receive current information by fax or to speak with a company
representative.
— Within the U.S.A., call 1-800-870-2221
— Outside the U.S.A., call 1-727-530-2340
Document Feedback
We welcome your comments and suggestions about this document. Please mail them to Technical Publications,
Paradyne Corporation, 8545 126th Ave. N., Largo, FL 33773, or send e-mail to userdoc@paradyne.com. Include
the number and title of this document in your correspondence. Please include your name and phone number if you
are willing to provide additional clarification.
Trademarks
All products and services mentioned herein are the trademarks, service marks, registered trademarks or registered
service marks of their respective owners.
Patent Notification
Hotwire MVL products are protected by U.S. Patents: 4,669,090, 4,744,092, 5,291,521, 5,805,669, and 5,848,150.
Other U.S. and foreign patents pending.
Printed on recycled paper
A
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Contents
About This Guide
H Document Purpose and Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
H Document Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
H Product-Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
1
About the MCC Card
H Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
H Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
H Levels of Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
H Software Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
The MCC Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Monitoring the MCC Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
2
Menus and Screens
H Menu and Screen Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menu Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Screen Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H Navigation Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H Accessing the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Login Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H Hotwire Menu Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hotwire Chassis Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chassis Information Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Card Selection Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Card Selection Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Specific DSL Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hotwire – MCC Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applications Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostics Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H Exiting the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manually Logging Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-5
2-6
2-6
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-8
2-9
2-11
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-13
2-13
2-14
2-14
Automatically Logging Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
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3
Setup and Configuration
H Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
H Interface Naming Convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
H Domain Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Service Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Management Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Management Domain Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
H Accessing the System for the First Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
H Management Domain Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Task 1: Creating the Default Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Task 2: Creating SNMP Community Strings and Enabling
Authentication Failure Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Task 3: Assigning IP Addresses to the Backplane on the MCC Card 3-9
Task 4: Assigning IP Addresses to the RADSL Cards on the
MCC Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
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Configuration Menu Options
H Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
H Configuration Menu Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
H Card Status Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Entering Card Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Configuring Access to DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Setting the Time and Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Clearing NVRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Uploading and Downloading Configuration Data from a
TFTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Resetting the MCC Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Downloading Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
Applying Downloaded Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Card Status Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
H Ports Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
H Interfaces Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Obtaining Interface Information and Changing MTU Value . . . . . . . . 4-17
Configuring IP Addresses for the LAN Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18
Stopping, Starting, and Monitoring an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19
Interfaces Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20
H User Security Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22
Adding, Changing, and Deleting Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23
Enabling and Disabling RADIUS Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
User Security Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
H IP Router Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27
Adding and Deleting Static Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28
Adding and Deleting Martian Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29
Adding, Changing, and Deleting Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30
Using the ARP Submenu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31
Mapping IP Addresses and Host Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-32
IP Router Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-33
H SNMP Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38
Configuring SNMP Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38
Configuring Logical Entities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-40
Defining a Community and Enabling Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-40
SNMP Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-42
H DSL Cards Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-43
Setting IP Addresses for Each DSL Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-43
Resetting a DSL Slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-44
DSL Cards Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-45
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5
Monitoring the MCC Card
H Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
H Card Status Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Displaying General Card Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Displaying Login History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Displaying System Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
H Physical Layer Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Displaying Active Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Displaying Ethernet Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Displaying HDLC Bus Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
H Interfaces Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
Displaying Active Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
Displaying Additional Interface Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13
H Network Protocol Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Displaying Socket Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Displaying UDP Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
Displaying TCP Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18
Displaying TCP Connection Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20
Displaying IP Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22
Displaying ICMP Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-23
Displaying SNMP Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-24
Displaying SNMP Authentication Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-26
Displaying HDLC Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-27
H IP Router Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-28
Displaying Routing Table Information and Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-29
Displaying ARP Table Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-31
Displaying Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-32
6
Applications Menu Options
H Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Ping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
TraceRoute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
7
Diagnostics Menu Options
H Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Self-test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
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Troubleshooting
H Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Resetting the DSL Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Checking Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Major Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Minor Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
H Network Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
A
Firmware Upgrade
H Upgrade Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
H Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
Firmware Version Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
H Upgrade Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Download to RTU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
Download to the DSL Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
Download to MCC Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10
H Branding – Layer 3 to Layer 2 Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
B
IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets
H Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
H What is a Filter? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
H IP Filtering Configuration Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Summary: How to Define a Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Worksheet: Defining the Filter and Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Worksheet: Binding the Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7
C
Input Screens
H MCC Card Input Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
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D
Simple Network Management Protocol
H SNMP Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
SNMP Version 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
General SNMP Agent Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2
Community Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-3
H SNMP Gets and Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4
Settable Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4
H Supported Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-5
MCC Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-6
H MIB Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-7
System Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
Interfaces Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
Extension to the Interface Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
IP Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
ICMP Group, MIB II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
UDP Group, MIB II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
Transmission Group, MIB II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-8
SNMP Group, MIB II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-9
Ethernet Interface MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-9
Entity MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-9
H OpenLane Network Management Systems Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-9
Features of the DCE Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-9
Devices Supported by the DCE Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-11
H Device Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-12
H Monitoring Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-13
Using the HP OpenView Event Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-13
Using the HP OpenView Status Events Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-13
H Obtaining Identity and Status Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-14
Displaying the Identity of a Device and Device Interfaces . . . . . . . . . D-14
Displaying the Status of a Device or Device Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . D-14
H What is the OpenLane Performance Wizard? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-14
H SNMP Configuration Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-15
Summary: Configuring the SNMP Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-15
Worksheet: Defining a Community and Enabling Traps . . . . . . . . . . . D-16
Worksheet: Preventing Unauthorized Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-19
Glossary
Index
vi
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
About This Guide
Document Purpose and Intended Audience
This guide describes how to configure the MCC (MCP or MCC Plus) card,
troubleshoot, and operate the software component of the Management
Communications Controller (MCC) card. The MCC card is a single resource in
the Hotwire Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM) that provides
consolidated management access for the Rate Adaptive Hotwire Digital
Subscriber Line (RADSL) cards and Hotwire Remote Termination Units (RTUs).
Use this guide to:
H
Obtain a basic understanding of the MCC card’s functionality
H
Understand how to configure, monitor, and troubleshoot the MCC card
This guide is intended for administrators and operators who maintain the
networks that support Hotwire network operations. A basic understanding of
internetworking protocols and their features is assumed. Specifically, you should
have familiarity with Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), Network
Management Systems (NMSs), and the following internetworking concepts:
H
TCP/IP applications
H
IP and subnet addressing
H
IP routing (also referred to as IP forwarding)
It is also assumed that you have already installed either the Hotwire 8600, 8610,
8800, or 8810 DSLAM, and the MCC card. If you have not done so already, refer
to the appropriate Hotwire DSLAM installation document for DSLAM installation
instructions, and the Hotwire Management Communications Controller (MCC)
Card Installation Instructions for MCC installation and cabling information.
NOTE:
You may want to use this document in conjunction with the appropriate DSL
Card User’s Guide and/or the appropriate DSL Card Network Configuration
Guide. These documents provide information about specific RADSL, M/HDSL
and M/SDSL cards you have installed in the DSLAM. See Product-Related
Documents on page ix.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
vii
About This Guide
Document Summary
viii
Section
Description
Chapter 1
About the MCC Card. Provides an overview of the
Hotwire MCC card.
Chapter 2
Menus and Screens. Describes the operation of
menus, screens, and navigation keys. Also provides
instructions on how to log in and log out of the Hotwire
DSLAM system.
Chapter 3
Setup and Configuration. Provides instructions on how
to access the system for the first time, as well as
instructions on performing initial setup tasks.
Chapter 4
Configuration Menu Options. Provides step-by-step
instructions for each of the configuration options
available on the Configuration Menu. Use these
options to customize the MCC card.
Chapter 5
Monitoring the MCC Card. Provides step-by-step
instructions for each option on the Monitoring Menu.
Use these options to monitor the MCC card.
Chapter 6
Applications Menu Options. Provides step-by-step
instructions for each option on the Applications Menu.
Use these options to perform Ping, TraceRoute and
Telnet applications.
Chapter 7
Diagnostics Menu Options. Provides step-by-step
instructions for each option on the Diagnostics Menu.
Use these options to perform diagnostic functions.
Chapter 8
Troubleshooting. Describes Hotwire troubleshooting
solutions.
Appendix A
Firmware Upgrade. Provides firmware upgrade
procedures.
Appendix B
IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets. Provides an
overview of MCC IP filters and worksheets to help you
plan filter configuration on your network.
Appendix C
Input Screens. Provides an alphabetical list of all MCC
input screens and the menu selection sequence
required to reach each screen.
Appendix D
Simple Network Management Protocol. Summarizes
how SNMP is used with the MCC.
Glossary
Defines acronyms and terms used in this document.
Index
Lists key terms, acronyms, concepts, and sections in
alphabetical order.
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
About This Guide
Product-Related Documents
8000-A2-GB29-10
Document Number
Document Title
5020-A2-GN10
Hotwire POTS Splitter Central Office Installation
Instructions
5030-A2-GN10
Hotwire 5030 POTS Splitter Customer Premises
Installation Instructions
5038-A2-GN10
Hotwire 5038 Distributed POTS Splitter Installation
Instructions
5216-A2-GN10
Hotwire 5216 RTU Customer Premises Installation
Instructions
5246-A2-GN10
Hotwire 5246 RTU Customer Premises Installation
Instructions
5446-A2-GN10
Hotwire 5446 RTU Customer Premises Installation
Instructions
7700-A2-GB23
OpenLane DCE Manager for HP OpenView for
Windows User’s Guide
7800-A2-GB26
OpenLane DCE Manager User’s Guide
7800-A2-GB28
OpenLane Performance Wizard User’s Guide
8000-A2-GB20
Hotwire DSLAM for 8540 and 8546 RADSL Cards
User’s Guide
8000-A2-GB21
Hotwire DSLAM for 8540 and 8546 RADSL Cards
Network Configuration Guide
8000-A2-GB22
Hotwire Management Communication Controller
(MCC) Card, IP Conservative, User’s Guide
8000-A2-GB25
Hotwire 8100/8200 Interworking Packet Concentrator
(IPC) Network Configuration Guide
8000-A2-GB90
Hotwire 8100/8200 Interworking Packet Concentrator
User’s Guide (Feature No. 8200-M2-901)
8000-A2-GN11
Hotwire Management Communications Controller
(MCC) Card Installation Instructions
8540-A2-GN10
Hotwire 8540 RADSL Card Installation Instructions
8546-A2-GN10
Hotwire 8546 RADSL Card Installation Instructions
8600-A2-GN20
Hotwire 8600 Digital Subscriber Line Access
Multiplexer (DSLAM) Installation Guide
8610-A2-GN10
Hotwire 8610 DSLAM Installation Instructions
8800-A2-GN21
Hotwire 8800 Digital Subscriber Line Access
Multiplexer (DSLAM) Installation Guide
8810-A2-GN11
Hotwire 8810 DSLAM Installation Instructions
May 1999
ix
About This Guide
Contact your sales or service representative to order additional product
documentation.
Paradyne documents are also available on the World Wide Web at
www.paradyne.com. Select Library → Technical Manuals
x
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
About the MCC Card
1
Overview
The Hotwire Management Communications Controller (MCC) cards (MCC, MCC
Plus and MCP) are processor circuit cards mounted in a Hotwire Digital
Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM) chassis (8600, 8610, 8800, or
8810).
Use this MCC Card . . .
In this DSLAM Chassis . . .
MCC, MCC Plus
8600, 8800, or 8810
MCP
8610
The MCP and MCC Plus cards provide management for high-density port cards
(5 ports or more). The MCP (Management Control Processor) card can only be
installed in the 8610 chassis.
NOTE:
All references to MCC cards in this document refer to the MCC, MCP and
MCC Plus cards, unless specifically noted otherwise.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
1-1
About the MCC Card
When loaded with IP Complex software, the MCC card provides consolidated
management access for the following:
H
Hotwire 8540 and 8546 Rate Adaptive Digital Subscriber Line (RADSL) cards
H
A variety of endpoints including: 5216, 5246, and 5446
For firmware release 5.0 and above, the MCC card also provides management
access for the following:
H
Hotwire Multirate Symmetric Digital Subscriber Line (M/SDSL)
7974/7975/7976 Standalone Termination Units and 8774/8775/8776 DSL
cards
H
Hotwire Multirate High-bit-rate Digital Subscriber Line (M/HDSL)
7984/7985/7986 Standalone Termination Units, and 8784/8786 DSL cards
NOTE:
All references to DSL cards refer to RADSL, M/SDSL and M/HDSL cards,
unless specifically noted.
Paradyne’s Hotwire DSLAM products include both central office (CO) and
endpoint devices. Central office products include RADSL-based port cards that
mount in the Hotwire 8810, 8800, 8610, and 8600 central office DSLAM platform.
For information on using the MCC card with IP Conservative software, refer to the
Hotwire Management Communications Controller (MCC) Card, IP Conservative,
User’s Guide (8000-A2-GB22). For installation and cable connection information,
see the Hotwire Management Communications Controller (MCC) Card Installation
Instructions.
1-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
About the MCC Card
Features
The MCC card provides these features:
H
Alarm Indication
Activates faceplate LEDs to provide general card status and Ethernet status.
H
Asynchronous Terminal Interface (ATI)
Provides a menu-driven VT100-compatible interface for configuring and
managing the MCC card locally or remotely by Telnet session.
H
Real-Time Clock
Provides a real-time clock that keeps track of the date and time for the
DSLAM. The time function is used by the DSLAM to monitor and regulate the
time of user sessions over the DSL interfaces. The time, day, month, and
year are maintained continuously by the MCC card.
H
Diagnostics
Provides the capability to diagnose device and network problems and
perform tests, including packet echo test and power-on self test.
H
Device and Test Monitoring
Provides the capability to poll device status, activate alarm indicators and log
system errors, perform diagnostics, and measure performance capabilities.
H
Primary Network Management Support via SNMP
Provides primary network management support through an SNMP agent for
monitoring and traps.
H
Non-Volatile Database Storage
Provides non-volatile database storage to store configuration options and
host routes.
H
RADIUS Authentication
RADIUS authentication of console and Telnet user logins.
Levels of Access
There are two levels of diagnostic/administrative access:
H
Administrator
The Administrator has complete read/write access to all cards in the DSLAM.
With Administrator permission, you can set specific parameters and variables
to configure the MCC card, its ports, its interfaces, its user accounts, and
SNMP security.
H
Operator
The Operator has read-only access to all cards in the DSLAM. With Operator
permission, you can view DSLAM status, physical layer status, interfaces,
and Internet Protocol (IP) routes, and run nondisruptive tests.
Access levels are configured via the Users Account screen. The default access is
no login and no password with Administrator status. To provide login security to
the DSLAM, at least one Administrator account must be configured.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
1-3
About the MCC Card
Software Functionality
MCC card software provides all the features listed above, and allows you to
monitor the entire system and view pertinent status on every card in the chassis.
Software functionality is provided through menu selections that are summarized
below. For details on the menu hierarchy, see Hotwire – MCC Menu in Chapter 2,
Menus and Screens.
The MCC Configuration Menu
The MCC Configuration Menu provides options to:
H
Configure the MCC interfaces.
H
Set up user accounts.
H
Upload or download a copy of a card’s configuration data to or from a Trivial
File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server.
H
Download a new version of the DSLAM and RTU software.
H
Define an IP routing table.
H
Define and enable filters to prevent unauthorized network access.
H
Configure the SNMP agent to send traps to a specific SNMP NMS manager.
NOTE:
You must have Administrator permission to configure the system. For more
information about configuring the system, see Chapter 4, Configuration Menu
Options.
1-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
About the MCC Card
Monitoring the MCC Card
The MCC Monitoring Menu provides options to:
H
List the status of active ports and interfaces in a card, as well as display
statistics about other physical layers and interfaces.
H
Display network protocol statistics, such as information about an application
program assigned to a specific socket number, UDP statistics, TCP data and
connection statistics, IP statistics, ICMP packet statistics, SNMP statistics
including SNMP authentication statistics, and HDLC statistics.
H
Display information about the routing table and detailed information about
each routing entry.
H
Display the current Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) table.
H
Display information about the configured IP router filters.
Use the monitoring screens to help you gather pertinent information and isolate
potential problem areas. You can monitor the system with either Administrator or
Operator permission. For more information about monitoring the system, see
Chapter 5, Monitoring the MCC Card.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
The MCC Diagnostics Menu provides options to:
H
Display selftest results for CPU, memories, and ports.
H
Perform Ping tests and display results.
H
Show major and minor alarms.
H
Display or clear system error logs.
H
Enable or disable the A/B power supply alarm.
H
Perform a TraceRoute to an IP address to display a list of intermediate nodes
to the destination.
NOTE:
You must have Administrator permission to perform most of the
troubleshooting and diagnostic activities. However, you can run nondisruptive
tests as a user with Operator permission. For more information about
diagnostics and troubleshooting, see Chapter 8, Troubleshooting.
8000-A2-GB29-10
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1-5
About the MCC Card
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1-6
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Menus and Screens
2
Menu and Screen Formats
The MCC card software has a menu- and screen-driven user interface system
that enables you to configure and monitor the MCC card and uses an
ASCII-based text format for its menus and screens.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
2-1
Menus and Screens
Menu Components
A typical Hotwire MCC card menu format looks like this:
1
2
3
1. Menu Title is the top line of the menu window. It displays the title of the menu
or submenu.
2. Menu List (below the boxed title) displays the list of menu options. When
selected, a menu option usually displays a submenu window or screen. If no
submenu is shown, an input (or information) screen appears.
3. Letter Navigation Keys are provided within a menu list. These keys provide
a convenient way (shortcut) to select a menu item.
For example, from the Hotwire – MCC menu illustrated above, you can
simply press the A key to select the Configuration menu item. The
Configuration menu appears. You can then press the G key to select the DSL
Cards menu item. This action displays the DSL Cards menu. (You can also
use the arrow keys on your keyboard to select a menu item. See Navigation
Keys on page 2-5 for more information.)
NOTE:
To back up one menu level, press Ctrl-z. To go to the Home screen, press
Ctrl-a.
2-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Menus and Screens
Screen Components
A typical Hotwire MCC card input screen looks like this:
1
2
3
4
1. System Header Line is the top line of the screen. This line has two fields
that provide system login information.
— The first field displays the chassis or the individual card name. (Access
the System Information screen by selecting the appropriate card in the
chassis and then follow this menu sequence: Configuration → Card
Status → Card Info.) If you have not defined the system name, <no
name> appears.
— The second field displays the current login. This field will display either
L:<user_login> or R:<user_login> where L indicates a local login,
R indicates a remote login, and <user_login> is the login account of
the user currently accessing the system. For example, if a user with a
login account called admin logs into the system using the local console,
this field will display L:admin.
2. Display Area is the top portion of the screen on which pertinent DSLAM
system information is displayed. This is also the portion of the screen on
which fields requiring input are displayed. However, you cannot enter values
for the fields in this portion of the screen. You must enter field values in the
Input Line at the bottom of the screen (see number 3).
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
2-3
Menus and Screens
3. Input Line is the area of the screen where you are prompted to enter values
for the specific field that is highlighted in the Display Area.
For example, in the Configure DSL IP Addr screen above, the DSL Card
Subnet Mask field is highlighted. If you want to change the subnet mask, you
must enter the new subnet mask at the (nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn): prompt at
the bottom of the screen.
4. Status Line is the last line on the screen. This line displays status
information about the selected card.
For example, in the above illustration, the following line is displayed:
Hotwire 8800: MCC: 8000: __ __ __ X
The first field indicates the chassis type. In this case, the system in use is the
Hotwire 8800 DSLAM system. The second field indicates the card selected.
In this example, the MCC card is selected. The remaining fields indicate card
status information, such as whether or not an alarm is present and the status
of the Ethernet link. Similar information is displayed on the Card Selection
screen. For information about these fields, see Card Selection Screen on
page 2-8.
2-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Menus and Screens
Navigation Keys
The following table lists the navigation keys and their definitions. These
commands are used to move around the menus and screens.
8000-A2-GB29-10
Keys
Definition
Backspace, Del,
Ctrl-d
Erases the character to the left of the prompt.
Ctrl-c
Moves to top of current menu.
Ctrl-e
Returns to the Card Selection screen from any screen.
Ctrl-r
Resets counters (on monitoring statistics displays).
Ctrl-u
Clears the current input or prompt line.
Ctrl-v
Displays pop-up menus.
Esc h, ?
Displays the online Help screen.
Esc l, Ctrl-l
Refreshes the screen.
Esc n
Goes to the next window.
Esc p, Ctrl-z
Goes back to the previous window.
Esc t, Ctrl-a, Ctrl-t,
or Ctrl-y
Goes back to the original, top-level window.
Left arrow, Ctrl-b
Moves the cursor to the left.
Right arrow, Ctrl-f
Moves the cursor to the right.
Up arrow, Ctrl-p
Moves up to the previous menu selection or entry field.
Down arrow, Ctrl-n
Moves down or to the next selection.
Enter or Return
Accepts entry.
May 1999
2-5
Menus and Screens
Accessing the System
Access the system via the User Login screen. This screen only appears if you
have configured your DSLAM and set up accounts on the Configure Accounts
screen.
User Login Screen
You can log in to the Hotwire DSLAM system using either a local VT100compatible terminal or a remote Telnet connection.
NOTE:
The Hotwire DSLAM system accepts only one login session at a time.
At the User Login screen, enter your login ID and password.
NOTE:
The login ID and password are case-sensitive; that is, the system
distinguishes between upper- and lowercase letters.
After entering your login ID and password, there may be a delay if RADIUS
Authentication is in effect before the system displays the Hotwire Chassis Main
Menu. This delay can be up to 12 minutes, but is usually less than one minute.
The screen provides feedback of progress during the waiting period.
2-6
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Menus and Screens
Hotwire Menu Structure
This section describes the menu structure of the Hotwire user interface.
Hotwire Chassis Main Menu
The following illustration shows the Hotwire Chassis Main Menu.
Hotwire Chassis
A. Chassis Info
B. Card Selection
C. Logout
97-15566-01
From the Hotwire Chassis Main Menu, you can select:
H
A. Chassis Info to enter or display chassis information, such as the chassis
name, name of person responsible for the system, and physical location of
the chassis.
For more information, see Chassis Information Screen on page 2-8.
H
B. Card Selection to select a particular card in the chassis. This screen also
displays status information about all cards in the chassis. The card you select
determines which Hotwire menu the system will display next (either the
Hotwire – MCC menu or the Hotwire – DSL menu). From anywhere in the
system, the Card Selection screen displays when you press Ctrl-e.
For more information, see Card Selection Screen on page 2-8.
H
C. Logout to exit from the current login session on the Hotwire DSLAM.
For more information, see Exiting the System on page 2-14.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
2-7
Menus and Screens
Chassis Information Screen
Field
Input
Characters
Description
Chassis Name
16 alphanumeric
Name for the equipment.
Chassis Contact
32 alphanumeric
Name and phone number of individual
responsible for the equipment.
Chassis Location
16 alphanumeric
Physical location of the equipment.
Bay Number
16 alphanumeric
Floor and/or bay number of the equipment.
Chassis Number
16 alphanumeric
Chassis serial number (located on the
lower right side of chassis).
Chassis Model
4 alphanumeric
Chassis model number (8600, 8800, 8610,
or 8810). The MCC card fills in this field,
but you can change it.
Use care since filling in this information results in adding data in the MIB II
Systems Group.
After you have made changes, the message Configuration has been
modified. Save (yes/no)? appears. Type y or yes and press Enter to
save changes. The Hotwire Chassis Main Menu appears.
Card Selection Screen
The Card Selection screen allows you to select a specific card and establish a
connection from it to the MCC for configuring or monitoring the card.
2-8
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Menus and Screens
Accessing the Card Selection Screen
" Procedure
To access the Card Selection screen:
1. From the Hotwire Chassis Main Menu, select B. Card Selection.
The Card Selection screen appears.
2. At the Goto Card (M for MCC or slot# for DSL): prompt, type M.
The Hotwire – MCC menu appears.
From the Main Menu, select B. Card Selection to display a list of all cards present
in the chassis by type and slot number. The Card Selection screen displays
general and interface status for each card. The following shows the 8800 DSLAM
Card Selection screen.
NOTE:
The Card Selection screen for the 8600/8610 DSLAM displays the same
information, but the slot order is different.
All DSL cards that are present in the chassis and have had backplane addresses
assigned to them should appear on the Card Selection screen. However, if one or
more do not appear, go to the MCC card and follow this menu selection
sequence:
Configuration → DSL Cards →Reset Slot
Then, reset the DSL card(s). Now, all active cards should appear on the Card
Selection screen.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
2-9
Menus and Screens
The following information is displayed on the MCC Card Selection screen.
NOTE:
If an option is not active, an underscore appears in its place.
Column
Heading
Position
Slt
<slot number>
M = MCC/MCP/MCC Plus card
1–18 = slot number for DSL card
Mdl #
<card type>
First four digits of the card model number:
8540 = RADSL card
8546 = RADSL card
8000 = MCC/MCP/MCC Plus card
Stat
1
T or _
Test mode. Card currently in test mode or _ for
no active test.
2
M or _
Major alarm. Major alarm present on card or _
for no active major alarm.
3
R or _
Minor alarm. Minor alarm present on card or _
for no minor alarm active.
Eth
4
U, D, or X
Status of Ethernet link:
U=Up, D=Down, X=Disabled
WAN Lnk
For M/SDSL and M/HDSL cards. Not applicable to MCC cards.
Display
Description
For example, if you select the MCC card, the following may be displayed:
M: 8000
_ _ _
U
Position:
1 2 3
4
This display shows the following:
H
There is an MCC card in Slot 1 or Slot 19
H
Position 1 – No current test ( _ )
H
Position 2 – No alarm is present ( _ )
H
Position 3 – No minor alarm present ( _ )
H
Position 4 – Ethernet link is Up (U)
On the Card Selection screen, there is a prompt used to select a specific card in
the DSLAM chassis. When a DSL slot number is entered, you are connected to
the DSL card you selected.
2-10
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Menus and Screens
Selecting a Specific DSL Card
" Procedure
To access the Hotwire – DSL menu:
1. From the Hotwire Chassis Main Menu, select B. Card Selection.
The Card Selection screen appears.
2. Verify that the DSL card you want to access appears on the Card Selection
screen. (See Card Selection Screen on page 2-8.)
3. At the Goto Card (M for MCC or slot# for DSL): prompt, type the
number of the slot and press Enter. For example, if you want to configure the
DSL card in Slot 13, type 13.
The Hotwire – DSL menu appears. Refer to the Hotwire DSLAM for 8540 and
8546 RADSL Cards User’s Guide. Or, refer to the appropriate M/SDSL or
M/HDSL document in the Product-Related Documents section in About This
Guide.
Hotwire – MCC Menu
After selecting the MCC card from the Card Selection screen, the DSLAM system
displays the Hotwire – MCC Menu.
From this menu, you can configure, monitor, run applications, and diagnose the
MCC card.
Hotwire – MCC
A. Configuration*
B. Monitoring
C. Applications
D. Diagnostics
E. Exit
See
Configuration
Menu Below*
See
Monitoring
Menu Below
Applications
A. Ping
B. TraceRoute
C. Telnet
* The Configuration menu item appears only if you have
Administrator permission.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
Diagnostics
A. Selftest
B. Alarms
99-15557-02
2-11
Menus and Screens
Configuration Menu
The following figure illustrates the complete Configuration menu hierarchy
selected from the Hotwire – MCC menu.
NOTE:
The Configuration Menu selection only appears if you log in to the system
with a user account that has Administrator permission.
Configuration
A. Card Status
B. Ports
C. Interfaces
D. User Security
E. IP Router
F. SNMP
G. DSL Cards
(B) Ports
A. Ethernet Port
(A) Card Status
A. Card Info
B. DNS Setup
C. Time/Date
D. NVRAM Clear
E. NVRAM Cfg Loader
F. Card Reset
G. Download Code
(D) User Security
A. User Accounts
B. Radius Security
(C) Interfaces
A. General
B. IP Network
C. Control
(E) IP Router
A. Static Routes
B. Martian Networks
C. IP Router Filters
D. ARP
E. Host Table
(G) DSL Cards
A. Set IP Address
B. Reset Slot
(D) ARP
A. Parameters
B. ARP Entry
(G) Download Code
A. Download Code
B. Apply Download
2-12
(F) SNMP
A. Security
B. Communities/Traps
99-15558-04
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Menus and Screens
Monitoring Menu
The following figure illustrates the complete Monitoring Menu hierarchy from the
Hotwire – MCC Menu.
Monitoring
A. Card Status
B. Physical Layer
C. Interfaces
D. Network Protocol
E. IP Router
(A) Card Status
A. Card Info
B. Login History
C. Syslog
(C) Monitor Interfaces
A. Active List
B. Status
(B) Physical Layer
A. Active List
B. Ethernet Statistics
(E) IP Router
A. Routing Table
B. ARP Table
C. Filter Table
(D) Network Protocol
A. Socket Statistics
B. UDP Statistics
C. TCP Statistics
D. IP Statistics
E. ICMP Statistics
F. SNMP Statistics
99-15559-04
Applications Menu
The Applications menu contains three selections:
H
A. Ping
H
B. TraceRoute
H
C. Telnet
Diagnostics Menu
The Diagnostics menu contains two selections:
8000-A2-GB29-10
H
A. Selftest
H
B. Alarms
May 1999
2-13
Menus and Screens
Exiting the System
You can manually log out of the system or, after five minutes of inactivity, the
system automatically logs you out.
Manually Logging Out
" Procedure
To exit from the Hotwire DSLAM system:
1. Select Exit from either the Hotwire – MCC menu or the Hotwire – DSL menu.
The Card Selection screen appears.
2. Press Ctrl-a.
The Hotwire Chassis Main Menu appears.
3. Select C. Logout.
The system exits from the current session.
Automatically Logging Off
The DSLAM system has an automatic timeout feature that logs you out after five
minutes of inactivity. You need to log back in to continue your work.
To log back in, press Enter to display the User Login screen and log in.
2-14
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Setup and Configuration
3
Overview
This chapter explains how to access the system for the first time and perform
initial setup operations. It also summarizes the minimum MCC card configuration
tasks. To customize your application or to obtain detailed instructions for other
configuration tasks, see Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options.
NOTE:
It is highly recommended that you read the Hotwire DSLAM for 8540 and
8546 RADSL Cards Network Configuration Guide before configuring the
system.
Interface Naming Convention
The following is the naming convention used for the Hotwire DSLAM interfaces:
NOTE:
Interfaces are sometimes referred to as ports. The term ports, however,
usually is reserved for referring to the physical layer attributes of an interface.
H
e1a – Interface name of the DSLAM system 10BaseT interface on the MCC
and DSL cards.
H
s1b – Interface name of the MCC and DSL card’s interface to the DSLAM
system backplane bus.
H
s1c, s1d, s1e, and s1f – Interface names of the four DSL interfaces on a
DSL card. (These interfaces do not apply to the MCC card, but are described
here for your information only.)
NOTE:
These names are used throughout the remainder of this guide to reference
the Hotwire DSLAM interfaces. These are also the names used in the
Hotwire DSLAM software when configuring the Hotwire DSLAM system.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
3-1
Setup and Configuration
Domain Types
To monitor and control the overall system, the Hotwire Access Network should be
partitioned into two distinct domains:
H
Service domain(s)
H
Management domain
It is recommended that the management domain reside in a separate domain
from the service domain through the IPC for security purposes and to improve
download performance.
Service Domain
A service (or data) domain is comprised of all clients and servers (grouped
physically or virtually) that communicate across a common WAN or LAN
connection for Internet or intranet access. The RADSL cards and the RTUs are
the Hotwire components of this domain. The service domain also encompasses
an NSP and all end-user systems that subscribe to that NSP. A service domain
transports customer data packets between an NSP, and the DSLAM and its set of
users.
NOTE:
M/SDSL and M/HDSL products are not packet devices and are not part of the
service domain.
Management Domain
The primary function of the management domain is transporting management
data between the NAP’s management system, and the DSLAM and RTUs. The
management domain should reside in a mutually exclusive domain from that of
the service (data) domain(s) or else data-intensive management functions such
as device download may not operate efficiently. The MCC card functions as a
service router and is the primary tool for configuring and diagnosing the
management domain.
To configure the management domain, see Management Domain Configuration,
page 3-6.
3-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Setup and Configuration
Management Domain Components
The following illustrates management domain components that must be
configured, and gives examples of the various naming conventions.
DCE Manager
Server
e1a Interface IP Address (assigned on Who Am I screen)
10BaseT
DSLAM
DCE Manager
Router
135.1.2.1/
255.255.255.0
Interface Names
e1a: 135.1.2.2/
255.255.255.0
MCC Card
s1b: 135.1.3.1/
255.255.255.0
IP Address to the Backplane
(s1b) on the MCC Card
(assigned in Task 2)
IP Address to the Backplane
(s1b) on the DSL Card
(assigned in Task 3)
System Backplane
s1b: 135.1.3.2/
255.255.255.0
DSL Card
s1c
s1d
DSL Card
Interface Names
s1e
s1f
DSL
DSL
DSL
DSL
RTU
RTU
RTU
RTU
97-15803
Accessing the System for the First Time
When you power on the Hotwire DSLAM for the first time, the system displays the
Who Am I screen on the console terminal. On this screen, you must set the
management IP address and subnet mask for the MCC card. This is a mandatory
step and must be completed before proceeding. Enter this address at the local
console.
To ease configuration and reduce the number of IP addresses needed by a
DSLAM, only the MCC card is assigned a globally available, public IP address.
All of the RADSL cards, as well as the M/SDSL and M/HDSL cards, have IP
addresses for management, but they are special internal addresses and are not
reported to the network. The MCC is the address translator for all management
traffic to and from the DSLAM.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
3-3
Setup and Configuration
" Procedure
To set the MCC’s management IP address and subnet mask from the console
terminal:
1. Power up the chassis.
After the self-test completes, the Who Am I screen appears.
2. From the Who Am I screen, enter the management domain IP address of the
MCC card and press the Enter key. For example, if the IP address of the
MCC card is 198.152.110.1, type this value at the (nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn):
prompt on the Input Line at the bottom of the screen.
3-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Setup and Configuration
The system automatically calculates the subnet mask based on the IP
address you enter.
3. Do one of the following at the (nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn): prompt:
— To accept the subnet mask, press Enter.
— To enter a different subnet mask, enter a new subnet mask and press
Enter.
The system highlights the OK to restart?: prompt.
4. Type y at the yes/no: prompt to restart the card or n to decline the restart.
If you type y, the card restarts. The system displays the Hotwire Chassis
Main Menu.
NOTE:
The MCC card can now accept a Telnet session for remote configuration,
but it is recommended that you first define user accounts to provide
security to the DSLAM.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
3-5
Setup and Configuration
Management Domain Configuration
The following table lists the basic steps you need to configure the MCC card.
On the MCC Card in
the Management Domain, to . . .
See . . .
1. Create the default route.
Task 1: Creating the Default Route,
page 3-7.
2. Create SNMP Community Strings and
Set Authentication Failure Trap.
Task 2: Creating SNMP Community
Strings and Enabling Authentication
Failure Traps, page 3-8.
3. Assign IP Addresses to the backplane
(s1b) for MCC card.
Task 3: Assigning IP Addresses to the
Backplane on the MCC Card, page 3-9.
4. Assign IP Addresses to the RADSL
cards on the MCC card.
Task 4: Assigning IP Addresses to the
RADSL Cards on the MCC Card,
page 3-10.
NOTE:
It is assumed that you have read the Hotwire DSLAM for 8540 and 8546
RADSL Cards User’s Guide and the Hotwire DSLAM for 8540 and 8546
RADSL Cards Network Configuration Guide, or the appropriate M/SDSL or
M/HDSL documents. See the Product-Related Documents section in About
This Guide. Also, it is assumed that you have assigned service and
management domain IP addresses for all devices (MCC, RADSL, and RTUs).
3-6
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Setup and Configuration
Task 1: Creating the Default Route
Use this procedure to create the default route to the management domain next
hop router. This default route will be used to forward management domain traffic
from the MCC card.
" Procedure
To create the default route to direct management domain traffic to the MCC card:
1. Select Configuration → IP Router → Static Routes (A-E-A).
2. Type 0 or press Enter at the Item Number prompt.
3. Type 0.0.0.0 at the Destination (or space to delete route):
prompt.
4. Press Enter at the Subnet Mask:(nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn) prompt.
5. Type the IP address of the default route to the next hop address at the Next
Hop IP Address (nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn) prompt.
NOTE:
If you enter two consecutive dots (.) in the IP address, the system will
interpret this as dot-zero-dot (.0.).
6. Type 1 for preference at the Input Number prompt.
7. Leave default fields for S/D (Source/Destination) and PA (Proxy ARP) fields.
8. Press Ctrl-z and save the changes.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
3-7
Setup and Configuration
Task 2: Creating SNMP Community Strings and Enabling
Authentication Failure Traps
Use this procedure to configure SNMP community strings and enable the
Authentication Failure trap mechanism for all cards. These procedures provide a
minimal level of security. For additional security, ensure that source validation is
enabled.
" Procedure
1. From the MCC Main Menu, select Configuration → SNMP →
Communities/Traps (A-F-D).
2. Type the Read Only community string name(s).
3. Type the Read Write community string name(s).
4. If desired, enable the Authentication Failure Trap.
5. Type the IP address or addresses of the NMS manager(s).
NOTE:
If you enter two consecutive dots (.) in the IP address, the system will
interpret this as dot-zero-dot (.0.).
6. Press Ctrl-z and save the changes.
3-8
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Setup and Configuration
Task 3: Assigning IP Addresses to the Backplane on the MCC Card
Use this procedure to create a separate and distinct network or subnetwork for
the 8546 RADSL cards and 5446 RTUs.
NOTE:
If you enter two consecutive dots (.) in the IP address, the system will
interpret this as dot-zero-dot (.0.).
" Procedure
To assign IP addresss to the backplane:
1. From the MCC menu, select Configuration → Interfaces → IP Network
(A-C-B).
2. Enter values for the following basic fields and press Enter after each entry:
Field
Description
Input
IP Interface
Name of the interface.
s1b (backplane)
Base IP Addr
IP address of the
management domain.
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format
Base Subnet Mask
Associated subnet mask of
the base IP address.
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format
Peer IP Address
IP address used to indicate
directly connected systems.
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format *
Route to Peer
Routing method to use to get
to peer (i.e., host or net).
Net
* Enter the network/subnetwork portion of the Base IP address, with 0 for the
host portion so that the Peer is the entire subnet.
In addition, the following fields appear on the screen. These fields can be
used to customize your application.
Field
Description
Input
Input Filter
Prevents packets from
entering the DSL card
through a specified interface.
Blank to disable.
Output Filter
Prevents packets from going Blank to disable.
out of the DSL card through a
specified interface.
3. Press Ctrl-z to return to the Configuration → Interfaces menu.
4. Repeat this procedure for RADSL cards. From the DSL menu, select
Configuration → Interfaces → IP Network (A-C-B). See the Hotwire DSLAM
for 8540 and 8546 RADSL Cards User’s Guide for more information.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
3-9
Setup and Configuration
Task 4: Assigning IP Addresses to the RADSL Cards on the MCC Card
Use this procedure to define addresses within the management domain. These
are automatically assigned to the RADSL cards when they are inserted in the
chassis.
" Procedure
To assign IP addresses to the RADSL cards:
1. From the MCC menu, select Configuration → DSL Cards → Set IP Address
(A-G-A).
2. Enter values for the following fields and press Enter after each entry:
Field
Description
Input
DSL Card Subnet Mask
Subnet mask for the
backplane(s1b)
management subnet.
(This field will be
read-only in a future
release.)
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
format
Management domain
IP address for each
DSL card in the
system.
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
format. (Subnet is
predetermined – you
can enter the host
number.)
IP Address (for each DSL card)
This field will be
read-only in a future
release.
NOTE:
You must have assigned IP addresses to the backplane on the IP
Network screen for s1b before performing this procedure.
3. Press Ctrl-z to return to the Configuration → DSL Cards menu.
3-10
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
4
Overview
This chapter describes the configuration options on the MCC card. Use these
options to configure your MCC card and customize your applications.
NOTE:
You must have Administrator permission to configure the MCC card.
To access the Configuration menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Menu → Configuration (A)
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-1
Configuration Menu Options
Configuration Menu Overview
The table below summarizes the options available when you select Configuration
on the Hotwire MCC – Main Menu. The Configuration options are arranged into
functional groups.
Select . . .
To Access the . . .
To . . .
A. Card Status
Card Status Menu Options,
Table 4-1
H Configure MCC card
information
H Set up DNS servers
H Configure local time/date
H Clear NVRAM
H Upload and download
configurations (NVRAM
Cfg Loader)
H Reset the MCC card
H Download new firmware
B. Ports
Not used at this time.
Not applicable.
C. Interfaces
Interfaces Menu Options,
Table 4-2
H Configure the MTU
H Configure the s1b
address
H Configure up to 16
addresses for the e1a
port
H Control the state of the
interface
D. Users or User Security
User Security Menu
Options, Table 4-3
H Add, delete or edit a user
from a system account,
and edit user passwords
and privileges
H Enable RADIUS
Authentication for user
logins
4-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Select . . .
To Access the . . .
To . . .
E. IP Router
IP Router Menu Options,
Static Routes, Table 4-4
H Add/delete static routes
H Build list of invalid
addresses
H Set up the IP router filters
H Build name sets of filter
rules
H Configure and add
entries to the ARP cache
H Define mappings
between IP addresses
and host names
F. SNMP
SNMP Menu Options,
Table 4-6
H Enable/disable SNMP
security
H Display logical entity
information
H Set up SNMP
communities/traps
G. DSL Cards
8000-A2-GB29-10
DSL Cards Menu Options,
Table 4-7
May 1999
H Reset a port card
4-3
Configuration Menu Options
Card Status Menu
To access the Card Status menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status (A-A)
The Card Status menu provides the following selections:
H
A. Card Info – Configures MCC card information.
H
B. DNS Setup – Sets up DNS servers.
H
C. Time/Date – Configures local time and date.
H
D. NVRAM Clear – Clears non-volatile RAM.
H
E. NVRAM Cfg Loader – Uploads and downloads configurations.
H
F. Card Reset – Resets the MCC card.
H
G. Download Code – Downloads and apply new firmware.
See Table 4-1, Card Status Menu Options, for information about the options
available from the Card Status menu.
4-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Entering Card Information
Use the Card Information screen to configure basic card-level information. Fields
on this screen are null until you enter values. Allowable values are:
H
Numeric characters (0–9)
H
Upper- or lower-case alphabetic characters (A–Z)
H
Space
H
Special characters available on standard keyboards (!, @, #, $, etc.)
" Procedure
To enter card-level information:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → Card Info (A-A-A)
The System Information screen appears.
2. Type the desired value in each field and press Enter. See Table 4-1.
3. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the Card Status menu.
NOTE:
Use the left and right arrow keys to scroll through the fields.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-5
Configuration Menu Options
Configuring Access to DNS Servers
Use the Configure DNS screen to set up the access to DNS servers from which
host name to IP address translation requests are made. If you have configured a
DNS server, then you can use the host name in lieu of its IP address in the
remaining configuration.
" Procedure
To configure DNS servers:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → DNS Setup (A-A-B)
The Configure DNS screen appears.
2. Type the desired value in each field and press Enter. See Table 4-1.
3. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the Card Status menu.
Setting the Time and Date
Use the Time/Date screen to configure the local time and date on the MCC card.
The MCC’s clock can be synchronized with network time through a Network Time
Protocol (NTP) server.
" Procedure
To set the local time and date, and to configure the NTP server:
1. Select Configuration → Card Status → Time/Date (A-A-C).
The Time/Date screen appears. See Table 4-1.
2. Type the current local time and date in the Local Time/Date field.
3. Type Broadcast or Unicast in the Client Network Time Protocol
(NTP) Mode field.
4. Type the IP address of the NTP server in the NTP Server
(nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn) field.
5. Type the number of hours between synchronization (1 – 24) in the
Synchronized(hrs) field.
6. Press Ctrl-z and save the changes.
NOTE:
At system boot time, the time on the DSL card automatically
synchronizes with the MCC card. Therefore, it is usually not necessary to
use this screen on the DSL card. If there are active DHCP-leased routes
on the card, changing the local time is not recommended.
7. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the Card Status menu.
4-6
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Clearing NVRAM
Use the NVRAM Clear screen to clear out the Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM). You
may want to clear the NVRAM to reuse the MCC card or to reconfigure the
current card.
" Procedure
To clear NVRAM:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → NVRAM Clear (A-A-D)
The NVRAM Clear screen appears. See Table 4-1.
2. At the Initialize NVRAM: prompt, do one of the following:
— Type yes to clear the NVRAM and return to default values.
NOTE:
If you select yes on the NVRAM Clear screen, you will permanently
remove most of the configuration information you have stored on this
card. All IP addresses and routing tables will need to be reentered. The
system will perform a reset and return to the factory configuration.
— Type no to perform no action.
The system beeps and no action is taken.
3. Press Ctrl-z to return to the Card Status menu.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-7
Configuration Menu Options
Uploading and Downloading Configuration Data from a TFTP Server
Use the NVRAM Config Loader screen to upload configurations to and download
configurations from a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server.
" Procedure
To upload or download NVRAM configuration data:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → NVRAM Config Loader (A-A-E)
The NVRAM Config Loader screen appears. See Table 4-1.
2. Type the desired value in each field and press Enter.
When the data transfer is complete, the Transfer Status field changes to
Completed successfully. The screen also displays the following:
— Packets Sent – Number of packets sent in download.
— Packets Received – Number of packets received in download.
— Bytes Sent – Number of bytes sent in download.
— Bytes Received – Number of bytes received in download.
— Transfer Status – Status of the upload or download transfer.
3. Press Ctrl-z to return to the Card Status menu.
NOTE:
After a successful NVRAM download, the MCC card will automatically
reset.
4-8
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Resetting the MCC Card
Use the Card Reset screen to reset the MCC card. This option allows you to reset
all counters. If a new configuration or software version has been downloaded, a
card reset allows the new code to become active.
NOTE:
An MCC card reset does not interrupt user data traffic on other cards in the
DSLAM.
" Procedure
To reset the MCC card:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → Card Reset (A-A-F)
The Card Reset screen appears. See Table 4-1.
2. At the Reset Card: prompt, do one of the following:
— Type yes to reset the card.
This action disrupts operation of the MCC card for at least 10 seconds.
NOTE:
An MCC card reset logs you out of the Hotwire DSLAM. You must reenter
to continue.
— Type no to perform no action.
The system beeps and no action is taken.
3. Press Ctrl-z to return to the Card Status menu.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-9
Configuration Menu Options
Downloading Code
The Download Code menu option gives you the ability to upgrade your software
with a new version of code and then apply this code to your system. From this
menu, you can download to the MCC and DSL cards in the chassis, and to the
RTUs and M/SDSL endpoints. See Appendix A, Firmware Upgrade, for additional
information. See the appropriate document for M/SDSL and M/HDSL download
information in the Product-Related Documents section, in About This Guide.
New firmware releases are typically applied to the MCC or DSL cards, or to the
RTU(s) in your system. When a software upgrade affects both the MCC and the
DSL cards, you must download and apply a new version of code to the DSL
cards before you download and apply a new version of code into the MCC.
When you are downloading code to an endpoint, verify that your TFTP server has
the following timeout values, or your download may fail:
H
Retransmission timeout – Value not less than 10 seconds.
H
Total transmission – Value not less than three times the retransmission
timeout.
NOTE:
Before initiating a download, verify that you can Ping the TFTP server from
the MCC card. If you cannot, do not proceed with the download. Also, make
certain that the files you are going to download exist on the server.
" Procedure
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → Download Code → Download Code
(A-A-G-A)
The Download Code screen appears. See Table 4-1.
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May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Applying Downloaded Code
Apply Download applies the downloaded code and drops all connections by
performing a device reset. This screen is used to overlay the previously
downloaded image for the MCC card.
NOTE:
If you have not previously downloaded code to the MCC, then you will not be
able to access the Apply Download screen.
" Procedure
To apply the downloaded code:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → Download Code → Apply Code (A-A-G-B)
The Apply Download screen appears. See Table 4-1.
2. At the Reset System: prompt, do one of the following:
— Type yes to apply the downloaded code.
The system performs a system restart and interrupts service on the card.
For further information on this feature, see Appendix A, Firmware
Upgrade.
— Type no to perform no action.
The system beeps and no action is taken.
3. Press Ctrl-z to return to the Download Code submenu. Then, press Ctrl-z to
return to the Card Status menu.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-11
Configuration Menu Options
Card Status Menu Options
For Card Status menu options, refer to Table 4-1. To access the Card Status
menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Configuration → Card Status (A-A)
Table 4-1. Card Status Menu Options (1 of 3)
Card Info
A-A-A
Gives you the ability to configure basic card-level information.
Card Name – 16 alphanumeric characters. Name assigned to the card.
Card Contact – 32 alphanumeric characters. Name or number of party responsible for
card.
Card Location – 16 alphanumeric characters. Location assigned to the system.
Router ID – (Read-only) Displays the Management Domain IP address assigned to
card in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
Router Subnet Mask – (Read-only) Displays the subnet mask of the router in
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
Local Control Terminal Port Mode – The terminal port mode for the local or console
session: Standard or Extended (Default = Standard). Standard is for USA keyboards;
Extended is for European keyboards.
Remote Control Terminal Port Mode – The terminal port mode for the Telnet session:
Standard or Extended (Default = Standard). Standard is for USA keyboards; Extended
is for European keyboards.
Telnet daemon tcp port – The TCP port number that the Telnet daemon listens on.
0–59999 (Default = 23). If you change this field, you need to do a card reset. If you
change this value, you must also make the same change on every Access Node.
Alarm on loss of Redundant Power – Enter Y if carrier has redundant power and you
want local and remote indications of the loss of one power source. Enter N if there is
only one power source.
DNS Setup
A-A-B
Gives you the ability to configure access to DNS servers from which
name-to-IP-address translation requests are made.
DNS Servers – Three entry fields in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. Enter the primary Domain
Name System Server address.
Default Domain Name – 40 characters. Domain for queries that are not fully qualified.
For example, if the default domain name = paradyne.com and a Telnet is attempted to a
system called gemini, the card would query the DNS server for gemini.paradyne.com.
Time to wait for response (secs) – 1–300 seconds (Default = 5). Enter the time to wait
for a response.
Number of times to retry server – 1–10 times (Default = 2). Enter the number of times
to retry the server.
Time/Date
A-A-C
Gives you the ability to configure the local time and date on the DSL card with network
time and to synchronize DSLAM clock via a Network Time Protocol (NTP) server.
Timezone – Time zone location, e.g., US/Eastern. See the Help screen for valid entries.
Local Time/Date – Enter the time in hh.mm format (am or pm). Enter the date in
mm/dd/yy format. All DSLAM cards are Y2K compliant.
Client NTP Mode – Broadcast/Unicast (Default = Broadcast). Select the Client Network
Time Protocol Mode.
NTP Server – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. Enter the NTP Server IP address.
Synchronized (hrs) – 1–24 (Default = 1). Enter the hours between synchronization.
4-12
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Table 4-1. Card Status Menu Options (2 of 3)
NVRAM Clear
A-A-D
Gives you the ability to clear out the Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM) in order to reuse the
card or to reconfigure the current card.
CAUTION: If you select yes on this screen, you permanently remove most of the
configuration information and all IP addresses and routing tables will
have to be reentered. The system performs a reset and returns to the
factory configuration.
NVRAM Config Loader
A-A-E
Gives you the ability to upload or download a copy of the card’s binary configuration
data to or from a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server.
Configuration File Name – The file name may be a path name of directories separated
by a forward slash (/) ending with the file name. The total path name length must be
less than 40 characters. If the TFTP server is hosted by a DOS machine, then directory
and file names must follow the 8.3 DOS naming convention.
DOS Machine
If your server is hosted by a DOS machine, you must name the file to be uploaded
using the DOS convention 8-character length. The system automatically uploads the
configuration file and creates directories and file names as needed.
UNIX Machine
If your server is hosted by a UNIX machine, the configuration file you name is not
created on the UNIX system by the TFTP server. It is critical that you work with your
system administrator to plan naming conventions for directories, file names, and
permissions so that anyone using the system has read and write permissions. (This
is a UNIX system security feature.)
NOTE:
This must be done before you can upload files to a UNIX server.
TFTP Server IP Address – Host name (with DNS entry) or IP address
(nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn) format.
TFTP Transfer Direction – Upload/Download (Default = Upload). Select Upload to
store a copy of the card’s configuration on the server. Select Download to have the file
server send a copy of the stored configuration file to the card.
Start Transfer – Yes/No (Default = No).
Displays after transfer:
Packets Sent – Number of packets sent in download.
Packets Received – Number of packets received in download.
Bytes Sent – Number of bytes sent in download.
Bytes Received – Number of bytes received in download.
Transfer Status – Status of the upload or download transfer.
Card Reset (Reset System)
A-A-F
Gives you the ability to reset the cards. This resets all counters to zero. If a new
configuration or software version has been downloaded, the new code becomes active.
Reset Card – Enter Yes to reset card.
NOTE:
8000-A2-GB29-10
This action disrupts the data flow for at least 10 seconds.
May 1999
4-13
Configuration Menu Options
Table 4-1. Card Status Menu Options (3 of 3)
Download Code (Download Code and Apply Download)
A-A-G
Gives you the ability to download a new version of code and apply the downloaded
code. See Appendix A, Firmware Upgrade, for more information on this feature.
Download Code
A
This screen is similar to the NVRAM Config Loader screen.
Download Type – MCC, DSL, or RTU. Identifies the system to be downloaded.
DSL Card/Slot # – Number of card or slot to receive the download, 1–18
NOTE:
This field only appears if the chosen download type is DSL or RTU. Older
versions of cards may not be compatible with this download feature.
RTU Connected to Port # – Enter port number 1–4.
NOTE:
This field only appears if the download type is RTU. When you are
downloading to an RTU, service is disrupted until the download completes.
Immediate Apply – Yes/No. The field is only an option if the Download Type is MCC or
AN. This field is not an option if the Download Type is RTU. Answering yes in this field
makes the DSL card or MCC card automatically reset upon completion. Answering no
downloads new firmware to the card’s ROM, but does not reset the card. It still executes
from previous code stored in RAM.
Image File Name – The file name may be a regular path name separated by a forward
slash (/) ending with the file name. The total path name length must be less than 40
characters. If the TFTP server is hosted by a DOS machine, then directory and file
names must follow the 8.3 naming convention imposed by DOS.
TFTP Server IP Address – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
Start Transfer – Yes/No (Default = No).
Displays after transfer:
Packets Sent – Number of packets sent in download.
Packets Received – Number of packets received in download.
Bytes Sent – Number of bytes sent in download.
Bytes Received – Number of bytes received in download.
Transfer Status – Status of the download transfer.
Once the download is complete, press Ctrl-z to exit back to the Download Code
submenu and select Apply Download.
Apply Download (Reset System)
B
This selection applies the downloaded code and drops all connections by performing a
device reset to the MCC card. This screen is used to overlay the previously downloaded
image for the card. If you select yes at the Reset System prompt, the system goes
through a system restart and interrupts service on the card.
NOTE:
4-14
If you have not downloaded code or if you selected yes for Immediate
Apply, you cannot access this selection.
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Ports Menu
The ports menu has one submenu selection: A. Ethernet Port. This selection
causes the Ethernet Ports screen to appear. The Ethernet Ports screen allows
you to reset the specified Ethernet port (e1a) and to enable/disable full duplex
communication.
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4-15
Configuration Menu Options
Interfaces Menu
To access the Interfaces menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Interfaces (A-C)
The Interfaces menu provides the following selections:
H
A. General – Configures several interface parameters.
H
B. IP Network – Configures the MCC card interfaces.
H
C. Control – Monitors, stops, and restarts the MCC card interfaces.
See Table 4-2, Interfaces Menu Options, for information about the options
available from the Interfaces menu.
4-16
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Obtaining Interface Information and Changing MTU Value
Use the Interfaces screen to obtain basic information about a given interface, and
change the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) value.
" Procedure
To enter card-level information:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Interfaces → General (A-C-A)
The Interfaces screen appears. See Table 4-2.
2. Type the name of the interface at the Interface Name: prompt and press
Enter. Specify either e1a (for the Ethernet port) or s1b (backplane that
connects all the cards).
The system displays the information listed in Table 4-2.
3. For e1a, specify the desired maximum MTU value. If you change the default
value, make sure the number you specify is appropriate to your network.
NOTE:
Do not change the MTU of s1b from the default value of 1500.
4. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the Interfaces menu.
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May 1999
4-17
Configuration Menu Options
Configuring IP Addresses for the LAN Port
Use the IP Network screen to configure up to 16 IP addresses for the LAN port.
However, under normal conditions, only one IP address in the management
domain needs to be assigned.
" Procedure
To configure IP addresses for the LAN port:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Interfaces → IP Network (A-C-B)
The IP Network screen appears. See Table 4-2.
2. Type one of the following at the Interface Name: prompt and press Enter:
— e1a (Ethernet port)
— s1b (backplane that connects all the cards)
NOTE:
If you enter two consecutive dots (.) in the IP address, the system will
interpret this as dot-zero-dot (.0.).
3. Type the base subnet mask at the (nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn) prompt.
4. Type the peer IP address at the (nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn) or address pool
prompt.
5. Defaults to Net (for network routing rules) at the Route to peer
(host/net): prompt.
You can customize your application by filling in the Input Filter (prevents
packets from entering the DSL card) and Output Filter (prevents packets
coming from the DSL card) fields.
6. Enter Enable or Disable for Source Routing (leave blank to disable). Source
Routing directs data to the correct address. Set to enable for networks with
multiple ISPs. If you disable source routing for an interface, any existing
source route for that interface is removed from the active routing table.
7. Press Ctrl-z and save the changes.
NOTE:
If you have made any changes to this screen, you must do a card reset
or restart the appropriate interface (e1a or s1b).
For changes to the s1b interface, the peer IP address for each of the DSL
ports (s1c, s1d, s1e, s1f) on each DSL card must be changed and saved.
In addition, the DSL card must be reset.
4-18
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Stopping, Starting, and Monitoring an Interface
Use the Control Interface screen to restart (bring up), stop (bring down), and
monitor (test) the current state of a specific interface.
" Procedure
To stop, start, or monitor a specific interface:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Interfaces → Control Interface (A-C-C)
The Control Interface screen appears. See Table 4-2.
2. Type one of the following in the Command (Restart/Stop/Monitor):
prompt and press Enter:
— Restart – To bring up an interface.
— Stop – To bring down an interface.
— Monitor – To test the current state of an interface.
3. Type the name of a specific interface at the Interface Name: prompt and
press Enter. You can type one of the following: e1a or s1b.
The Control Interface screen is populated with information depending on your
entry in Step 2 and Step 3. For example, if you select Monitor in Step 2 and
s1b in Step 3, then the following information is displayed: Type, State, Link
Protocol, IP or Bridging State, Uptime, Inactive, Connect Time, Port, Local IP
Addr or Bridge IP Addr, and Bridge Number or Peer IP Addr. The information
displayed depends on your DSL network.
4. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the Interfaces menu.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-19
Configuration Menu Options
Interfaces Menu Options
For Interfaces menu options, refer to Table 4-2. To access the Interfaces menu,
follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Configuration → Interfaces (A-C)
Table 4-2. Interfaces Menu Options (1 of 2)
General (Interfaces)
A-C-A
Gives you the ability to configure basic information about a given interface.
Interface Name – Enter e1a for Ethernet port or s1b for the backplane.
Type – Displays Static. Line type.
Protocol – Displays Ether for Ethernet (e1a) or HDLC for proprietary protocol (s1b).
Type of protocol for an interface.
Port list – Displays e1a or s1b. The name of the port associated with the Ethernet
interface.
NOTE:
The MTU values are the only ones allowed on this screen. Make certain
that if you change a default value, the numbers are appropriate to your
network. Do a card reset or reset the interface.
MTU (max) (Maximum Transmission Unit) – The range is 64–1600 (Default = 1500).
Do not change the MTU of s1b from the default value of 1500.
4-20
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Table 4-2. Interfaces Menu Options (2 of 2)
IP Network
A-C-B
Allows you to configure up to 16 IP addresses for the LAN port. However, under normal
conditions only one IP address in the management domain needs to be assigned.
IP Interface – Name of the interface. Enter e1a for Ethernet port or s1b for the
backplane.
Base IP Addr – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. IP address for the interface.
Base Subnet Mask – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. IP address of the management domain
subnet mask.
IP Addr – IP address in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format used to multihome the e1a interface.
Appears for e1a interface only.
Subnet Mask – Subnet mask for associated multihomed IP address in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
format. Appears for e1a interface only.
Input Filter – The filter that operates on inbound packets. Default = lan1 for e1a
interface. Or leave blank to disable filtering.
Output Filter – The filter that operates on outbound packets. Or leave blank to disable
filtering.
Source Routing – Optional. (Blank to disable filtering.) Directs data to the correct
address. Set to enable for networks with multiple ISPs. If you disable source routing for
an interface, any existing source route for that interface is removed from the active
routing table. Use care when enabling source routing on the e1a interface as it can
create routing loops. Source routing should be disabled on the e1a interface for most
installations.
Peer IP Address – Specifies the IP address in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format to be assigned
to the device at the other end of the link. You can also use the address pool. Appears
for s1b interface only.
Route to Peer – Specifies the use of network routing rules (net) or host routing rules
(host).
NOTES: – If you enter and save the name of a filter, either input or output, you bind
the filter to the interface. If you delete a filter name, you delete the filter
and its rules.
– For changes to take effect, you must either restart the interface or reset
the MCC card.
– If you have made changes to this screen, you must do a card reset or
restart the appropriate interface (except for changes to filters).
Control (Control Interface)
A-C-C
Gives you the ability to restart, stop, and monitor (up, down, or testing) the current state
of an interface.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-21
Configuration Menu Options
User Security Menu
To access the User Security menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → User Security (A-D)
The User Security menu provides the following selections:
H
A. User Accounts – Configures login accounts for local terminal and Telnet
sessions. Up to 20 active users can be supported. Accounts can be added,
edited, and deleted.
H
B. Radius Security – Enables RADIUS Authentication for user logins.
See Table 4-3, User Security Menu Options, for information about options
available from the User Security menu.
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May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Adding, Changing, and Deleting Users
Use the Configure Users Account screen to add, edit, or delete a user from a
system account. Also use this screen to edit user passwords and privileges.
User accounts on the MCC card provide security to users accessing the system
from the VT100-compatible terminal interface and via Telnet over the
management domain LAN.
User account information on the MCC contains access partiions to each of the
slots in the DSLAM. The access partition determines whether a user can access
a particular MCC or DSL card in the DSLAM. Only the slots containing cards that
you are permitted to access display on the Card Selection screen.
NOTE:
It is important to set up accounts on the MCC card to prevent unauthorized
access to the DSLAM system. If no accounts are set up, then no login or
password is required to gain entry to the MCC card via the terminal interface
or Telnet. This means that anyone can access the DSLAM.
Also, if you configure an account on the MCC card, that user account will
have privileges on both the MCC and DSL cards in the DSLAM.
" Procedure
To add, change, or delete a user:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → User Security → User Accounts (A-D-A)
The Configure Account screen appears.
2. Type one of the following at the Action: prompt and press Enter:
— Add – To add a user account.
— Edit – To change an existing user account.
— Delete – To remove an existing user account.
3. Type the desired user name (up to 15 characters) at the Login ID: prompt
and press Enter.
NOTE:
At this prompt, you can use Ctrl-v to see a list of all user accounts.
4. Type the password associated with the login ID at the Password: prompt
and press Enter.
5. Retype the password at the Repeat Password: prompt and press Enter.
6. Type one of the following at the Privilege: prompt and press Enter:
— Operator – For read-only access privilege.
— Administrator – For complete system access privilege.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-23
Configuration Menu Options
7. At the Card Access: prompt, restrict access of a user to specific cards by
entering allowed slots, separated by a comma. For example, enter m, 1-6, 8
to allow access to the MCC card and cards in slots 1 through 6 and slot 8
only.
8. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the User Security menu.
Enabling and Disabling RADIUS Authentication
RADIUS Authentication allows for passwords to be centrally administered. You
must have at least one local Administrator account for RADIUS Authentication to
be configured. The addresses of up to four RADIUS servers can be configured.
The user ID and password must be entered into each of those servers.
The RADIUS server must be configured to match the RADIUS information
configured on the MCC. If the RADIUS server configuration does not match that
of the MCC, the MCC will deny the login request.
The following variables must be configured to match Table 4-3.
H
Network Access Server (NAS) IP Address – Must match the Server IP
Address.
H
NAS Port – Must match the UDP Port number.
H
Secret – Must match the Secret number.
The IP addresses of the RADIUS servers should be entered on the screen in
priority order (most important first). If the MCC fails to connect with the first
server, it tries again for the specified number of attempts. If the first server is not
reached after the specified number of attempts, the MCC tries to connect with the
second RADIUS server, then the third, then the fourth.
When you enter your user name and password, the local user account database
is checked first. If a matching account is found, you are logged in. If no matching
account is found, but the database contains no Administrator-level user accounts,
you are still logged in. RADIUS Authentication is only used if the database
contains an Administrator-level account and RADIUS Authentication has been
enabled. A RADIUS Access-Request message is then created with the user
inputs and is sent to the first of up to four configured RADIUS servers. Only the
receipt of an Access-Accept message from a RADIUS server will allow you to be
logged in. A port number is included in the Access-Request message that
indicates whether you are using the console or Telnet to gain access.
4-24
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
" Procedure
To enable RADIUS Authentication:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → User Security → RADIUS Security (A-D-B)
The RADIUS Check screen appears and the RADIUS Authentication:
field is highlighted. See Table 4-3.
2. Type one of the following at the Enable/Disable: prompt and press Enter:
— Enable – To enable RADIUS Authentication.
— Disable – To disable RADIUS Authentication.
3. Enter the Server IP address at the IP Address <nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn> or
space to delete: prompt.
4. Enter the UDP Port number at the Input Number: prompt.
5. Enter the RADIUS secret string at the Secret: prompt.
6. Enter the maximum response time of the RADIUS Server at the Timeout:
prompt.
7. Enter the number of times the system should check the local user accounts
at the Input Number: prompt.
8. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the User Security menu.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-25
Configuration Menu Options
User Security Menu Options
For User Security menu options, refer to Table 4-3. To reach the User Security
menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu →Configuration → User Security (A-D)
Table 4-3. User Security Menu Options
User Accounts
A-D-A
Gives you the ability to add, edit, or delete a user from a system account and to edit
user passwords and privileges. Up to 20 active users can be supported.
User accounts provide DSLAM security by requiring anyone trying to log on to the
system to have a valid password. User accounts on the MCC provide security to users
accessing the system from the VT100-compatible terminal interface and via Telnet over
the management domain LAN.
If no accounts are set up, then no login or password is required to gain entry to the
system via the terminal interface or Telnet.
If you configure an account on the MCC card, you have privileges on both the MCC and
DSL cards.
Action – Add/Edit/Delete.
Login ID – Enter your Login ID.
Password – Enter the password associated with the login ID (15 characters maximum).
Repeat Password – Reenter the password.
Privilege – Operator/Administrator. Enter Operator for read-only access; enter
Administrator for complete system access.
Card Access – Enter the slot number of the cards to which the user has access, 1–18
for slots, m for MCC, or all (Default = all).
NOTE:
Press Ctrl-v to see a list of all user accounts at the Login ID prompt.
RADIUS Security
A-D-B
Gives you the ability to enable RADIUS Authentication for user logins.
The DSLAM requires at least one local Administrator account for RADIUS
Authentication to be in effect. The system checks against local user accounts before it
sends the request to the RADIUS server. The RADIUS server entries should be entered
in order of priority.
RADIUS Authentication – Enabled/Disabled (Default = Disabled).
Server IP Address – Enter the RADIUS server IP address in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
Up to four server addresses can be entered.
UDP Port – Enter the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) port number used by
RADIUS – 1–65535 (Default = 1812).
Secret – Enter the RADIUS secret string (6–32 characters).
Timeout – Enter the maximum response time of the RADIUS server – 3–30 seconds
(Default = 10).
Attempts – Enter the number of times that the system checks the local user
accounts – 1–3 (Default = 3).
4-26
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
IP Router Menu
To access the IP Router menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → IP Router (A-E)
The IP Router menu provides the following selections:
H
A. Static Routes – Configures static routes to protocols and filters.
H
B. Martian Networks – (Option is not supported in this release.)
H
C. IP Router Filters – Displays an overview of the various filters that are in
the system. Then, use the IP Filter Configuration screen to add, edit, and
delete filters.
H
D. ARP – Configures general Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache
parameters, add entries into the ARP cache, and delete entries line by line in
the ARP cache.
H
E. Host Table – Defines mappings between IP addresses and host names.
See Table 4-4, IP Router Menu Options, Static Routes, for information about all
options available from the IP Router menu.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-27
Configuration Menu Options
Adding and Deleting Static Routes
Use the Static Routes screen to add or delete static routes in the system. You
can add up to 32 static routes.
" Procedure
To configure static routes:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → IP Router → Static Routes (A-E-A)
The Static Routes screen appears.
2. Press Enter or type 0 (zero) in the Item: field to add an entry.
3. Do one of the following at the Host/Net field:
NOTE:
This field is read-only for dynamic routes.
— Type the host or network address (in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format) to add an
entry.
— Type spaces to delete an entry.
4. Type the desired value in the fields and press Enter. See Table 4-4.
Changes are automatically saved.
5. Press Ctrl-z to return to the IP Router menu.
The following table lists error messages that may appear on the Static Routes
screen.
4-28
Message
Description
Routing Table: Route not added
Route was saved into NVRAM but not
added to the active routing table.
Routing Table: Route limit reached for
routing table
Route was saved into NVRAM but not
added to the active routing table because
the active routing table is full.
Routing Table: Next hop gateway currently
unreachable
Route was saved into NVRAM but not
added to the active routing table because
there is no way to reach the next hop
gateway. If an interface comes up that has
the next hop gateway, the route is added.
Routing NVRAM: Database Error
Route was not saved into NVRAM and not
added to the active table. This is a general
database error.
Routing NVRAM: Database Route Limit
Reached
Route was not saved into NVRAM and not
added to the active table because the
NVRAM is full.
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Adding and Deleting Martian Networks
Martian Networks allow you to create a list of specific IP addresses from which
the MCC card will not accept any packets from those addresses.
NOTE:
The system is shipped with default Martian Networks labeled “(fixed).” Do not
remove these Martian Networks.
" Procedure
To display Martian Networks information:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → IP Router → Martian Networks (A-E-B)
The Martian Networks screen appears. See Table 4-4.
2. Press Enter or type 0 (zero) to add an entry in the Item field. (Enter the item
number to edit or delete an entry.)
3. Enter the address of the unwanted source at the Martian Network ID at the
Martian ID (or space to delete route): prompt. (Enter a different
network ID to edit the field, enter a space to delete the field.)
4. Enter the new Martian Net Mask ID at the nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn: prompt.
(Enter a different Martian mask ID to edit the field, enter a space to delete the
field).
5. Enter yes at the yes/no prompt to save the changes.
NOTE:
The card must be reset for the changes to take effect.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-29
Configuration Menu Options
Adding, Changing, and Deleting Filters
Use the Filter Table screen to display an overview of the various filters that are in
the system. Then, use the IP Filter Configuration screen to add, edit, and delete
filters.
A filter is a rule (or set of rules) that is applied to a specific interface to indicate
whether a packet can be forwarded or discarded. You can add, edit, or delete
router filter rules within a named set. Use the IP Filter Configuration screen to
build name sets of filter rules. While in the IP Filter Configuration screen, press
Ctrl-v to view existing filter names.
A filter works by successively applying the rules to the information obtained from
the packet header until a match is found. The filter then performs the action
specified by the rule on that packet, which can be to forward, to discard, or both.
NOTES:
— Rules apply to the source and destination ports going to the end-user
system. You may have up to 33 rules per filter, but the greater number of
rules, the lesser the performance of the router.
— On the MCC card, a maximum of two filters can be configured.
" Procedure
To display filter information:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → IP Router → Filter Table (A-E-C)
The Filter Table screen appears. See Table 4-4.
2. On the bottom of this screen, at the Goto Line Number (0 to add, #
to Edit, # to Delete): prompt, do one of the following:
— Type 0 to add a new filter to existing filters and press Enter.
The Add selection takes you to the IP Filter Configuration screen. When
you exit from that screen, you return to this screen (the Filter Table
screen).
— Type the number of the line of the desired filter that you want to edit and
press Enter.
The Edit selection takes you to the IP Filter Configuration screen. When
you exit from that screen, you return to this screen (the Filter Table
screen).
— Type the number of the line of the desired filter that you want to delete
and press Enter.
The system deletes the selected filter.
3. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the IP Router menu.
NOTE:
The card must be reset for the changes to take effect.
4-30
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Configuration Menu Options
Using the ARP Submenu Options
Use the ARP submenu to configure general Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
cache parameters, add entries into the ARP cache, and delete entries line by line
in the ARP cache.
" Procedure
To configure ARP cache parameters:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → IP Router → ARP → Parameters (A-E-D-A)
The Configure ARP Parameters screen appears.
2. Type values in the following fields and press Enter. See Table 4-5.
3. Press Ctrl-z and type yes at the Save (yes/no) prompt to save the
changes and return to the ARP menu.
NOTE:
The card must be reset for the changes to take effect.
" Procedure
To add ARP cache entries:
NOTE:
Only permanent (PERM) entries are stored in NV memory. All other
information (entries) added to the ARP cache is not stored in NV memory and
will be lost when you reset the card.
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → IP Router → ARP → Add Entry (A-E-D-B)
The Add ARP Entry screen appears.
2. At the Item Number (0 to add new record): prompt, enter the value
for the desired action.
3. Type values in the fields (or accept the default values) and press Enter. See
Table 4-5.
4. When you complete your entries, the Save Changes? field is highlighted and
the yes/no prompt appears at the bottom of the screen. Type y to save the
changes, n to discard the changes.
5. The Item (0 to add new record): prompt appears. Press Ctrl-z to
return to the ARP menu.
The system displays the ARP menu.
NOTE:
The card must be reset for the changes to take effect.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
4-31
Configuration Menu Options
" Procedure
To delete entries line by line in the ARP cache:
NOTE:
Any permanent (PERM) entry deleted from the ARP cache will also be
deleted from NVRAM.
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → IP Router → ARP → Delete Entry (A-E-D-C)
The system displays the Delete ARP Entry screen. This screen displays
columns for Line, IP Address, Ethernet Address, Min, and Delete.
2. Select the line you want to delete, select Yes, and press Enter.
Mapping IP Addresses and Host Names
Use the IP Host Table screen to define mappings between IP addresses and host
names. The host table can be used to hold the host name to IP address
translation for Telnet sessions out from the card.
An alternative to populating this table is to define a DNS server. See Configuring
Access to DNS Servers on page 4-6 for more information.
" Procedure
To configure static routes host names:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → IP Router → Host Table (A-E-E)
The IP Host Table screen appears. See Table 4-5.
2. Type the IP address in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format at the IP Addr: prompt and
press Enter.
NOTE:
If you enter two consecutive dots (.) in the IP address, the system will
interpret this as dot-zero-dot (.0.).
3. Type the host name in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format at the Host Name: prompt
and press Enter.
4. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the IP Router menu.
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Configuration Menu Options
IP Router Menu Options
For IP Router menu options, refer to Tables 4-4 and 4-5. To access the IP Router
menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Configuration → IP Router (A-E)
See Appendix B, IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets, for more information.
Table 4-4. IP Router Menu Options, Static Routes (1 of 2)
Static Routes
A-E-A
Gives you the ability to add or delete static routes in the system. You can add up to 32
static routes.
Item – Press Enter or enter 0 (zero) to add entry.
Host/Net – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format or space to delete entry.
Subnet Mask – Associated subnet mask for the specified destination IP address. This
field is read-only for dynamic routes.
Next Hop – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
Pref – How preferable one route is to another, if two routes go to the same destination.
(The lower the number, the more preferable.)
S/D (Source/Destination) – Source or destination IP address of the packet.
PA (Proxy ARP) – Router answers ARP requests intended for another machine.
NOTE:
8000-A2-GB29-10
When you define a source route, the Proxy ARP field is not selectable.
May 1999
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Configuration Menu Options
Table 4-4. IP Router Menu Options, Static Routes (2 of 2)
Martian Networks
A-E-B
Gives you the ability to enter addresses that the system recognizes as invalid.
Item – Press Enter or type 0 to add entry.
Martian Net ID – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format or space to delete entry. Enter IP address of
unwanted source.
Martian Net Mask – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. Enter IP mask of unwanted source.
NOTE:
The system is shipped with default Martian Networks. It is recommended
that you do not remove entries. If you make changes to this screen, you
must do a card reset.
Filter Table
A-E-C
The IP Filter Table screen displays the following information:
Line – Enter a value from 1–8 to add, delete, or modify individual filter entries.
Filter Name – Name of the IP filter. (This field is read-only.)
# of Static Rules – Number of static rules in filter. (This field is read-only.)
# of Dynamic Rules – For future use.
Ref Cnt – Number of active interfaces using the filter. (This field is read-only.)
Def Action – Forward/Discard. Default action for the filter. (This field is read-only.)
H Select 0 (zero) to add a new filter.
H Select # (n) to edit existing filters. Example: Enter 3 to add Filter #3.
H Select -# (–n) to delete a filter. Example: Enter –6 to delete Filter #6.
The Add or Edit selection takes you to the IP Filter Configuration screen. When you exit
that screen, you return to the IP Filters screen.
NOTE:
4-34
Deleting the filter deletes all the rules associated with that filter.
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Configuration Menu Options
Table 4-5. IP Router Menu Options, IP Filter Configuration (1 of 3)
IP Filters (IP Filter Configuration screen)
A-E-C
Allows you to build multiple rules for an IP filter. A filter consists of a set of rules applied
to a specific interface to indicate whether a packet received or sent out of that interface
is forwarded or discarded. You can add, edit, or delete filter rules within a named set.
A filter works by successively applying the rules to the information obtained from the
packet header until a match is found. The filter then performs the action specified by the
rule on that packet, which forwards or discards the packet. If all the rules are searched
and no match is found, the configured default filter action is executed.
Host rules have higher precedence than network rules. Rules apply to the
source/destination IP address and source/destination port number. You can have up to
33 rules per filter. Each rule reduces the packet throughput of the DSL card.
NOTE:
8000-A2-GB29-10
There can be two filters per MCC card, one input filter and one output filter.
Once rules have been configured, you can then bind and activate the filter
on the MCC interface using the Configuration → Interfaces → IP Network
screen (A-C-B). See Table 4-2, Interfaces Menu Options.
May 1999
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Configuration Menu Options
Table 4-5. IP Router Menu Options, IP Filter Configuration (2 of 3)
IP Filters (IP Filter Configuration) continued
A-E-C
Filter Name – Up to 12 characters.
Default Filter Action – Forward (Packet)/Discard (Packet) (Default = Forward).
The Default Filter Action applies when there is no match or the filter has no rules
configured.
Rule # – Up to 33 rules can be configured for each filter. The rule number is
automatically assigned. The rules are reviewed sequentially. The most common rules
should be entered first.
# of Rules – The number of rules that apply to this port.
Source Address – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. Enter valid host or network IP address.
If 0.0.0.0 is entered, Source Comparison is ignored.
Source Address mask – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. If you specify a source subnet mask
of 0.0.0.0, the system skips the source address comparison.
Source Port No. – 0–65535 (Default = 0).
Comparison Type (for source information) (Default = Ignore). Type of comparison to be
done on the source port number specified in the packet and rule:
– Ignore – Ignore ports. Do not do a comparison.
– EQ – Equal to. Do a comparison when the port number in the rule is equal to
the port number in the packet.
– NEQ – Not Equal to. Do a comparison when the port number in the rule is not
equal to the port number in the packet.
– GT – Greater than. Do a comparison when the port number in the rule is
greater than the port number in the packet.
– LT – Less than. Do a comparison when the port number in the rule is less than
the port number in the packet.
– In_Range – Within the specified range. Do a comparison when the port number
in the packet is within the specified range.
– Out_Range – Outside of the specified range. Do a comparison when the port
number in the packet is outside the specified range.
Max. Source Port No – 0–65535. Appears only when the source comparison type is
In_Range or Out_Range.
Destination Address – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
Destination Address mask – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. If you specify a destination
subnet mask of 0.0.0.0, the system skips the destination address comparison.
Destination Port No. – 0–65535 (Default = null).
Comparison Type (for destination information) – Same values as Comparison Type for
source information (above).
Max. Destination Port No. – 2–65535. Appears only when the destination port
comparison type is In_Range or Out_Range.
Filter Action – For a rule, TCP, UDP, or ICMP traffic will be forwarded or discarded
provided other conditions have been satisfied.
Rule Type – Static or Dynamic.
Delete Rule – Yes/No (Default = No).
Go to Rule Number– Yes/No (Default = No).
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Configuration Menu Options
Table 4-5. IP Router Menu Options, IP Filter Configuration (3 of 3)
ARP (Parameters, ARP Entry)
A-E-D
Parameters (A)
Allows you to configure general Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache parameters.
Complete Entry Timeout (minutes) – 1–200,000 (Default = 20).
Incomplete Entry Timeout (minutes) – 1–200,000 (Default = 3).
Default Route Entry Timeout (minutes) – 1–20
NOTE:
If you have made changes to this screen, you must do a card reset.
Add Entry? – Enter Yes to add entry.
Add Another Entry? – Enter Yes to add another entry.
Add Entry (B)
Gives you the ability to add entries to the ARP cache.
Item – Item number.
IP Address/Host Name – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
MAC Address – xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx format.
Trailers – Control data appended to a packet. Yes/No (Default = No).
Perm – Yes/No (Default = No). If you select yes for Perm and no to proxy, the ARP
entry is saved in NVRAM (up to 32 entries; 8 for the MCC). These are loaded when the
card reboots.
Delete Entry (B)
Gives you the ability to delete entries from the ARP cache.
Line – Line number.
IP Address – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
Ethernet Address – xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx format.
Min – Number of minutes since the last entry was used.
Delete? – Yes/No (Default = No).
Host Table (IP Host Table)
A-E-E
Allows you to define mappings between IP addresses and host names. The host table
holds the host name-to-IP-address translation for Telnet sessions from the card. An
alternative to populating this table is to define a DNS server (see A-A-B).
Enter the IP Address and host name in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. Press Enter after each
entry.
NOTE:
8000-A2-GB29-10
You must confirm the save for any changes to take effect.
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Configuration Menu Options
SNMP Menu
To access the SNMP menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → SNMP (A-F)
The SNMP menu provides the following selections:screens to configure SNMP
security, logical entities, community names, and trap addresses.
H
A. Security – Enables/disables SNMP security.
H
B. Logical Entities – Displays default system information contained in the
logical table of the Entity MIB.
H
C. Logical Entities 2 – A continuation of the Logical Entities screen.
H
D. Communities/Traps – Provides an overview of the various filters in the
system. Use the IP Filter Configuration screen to add, edit, and delete filters.
See Table 4-6, SNMP Menu Options, for information about all options available
from the SNMP menu.
Configuring SNMP Security
Use the SNMP Security screen to enable SNMP security (i.e., prevent
unauthorized managers from browsing or configuring the Hotwire DSLAM
network).
4-38
H
If address security is to be activated, it should be activated on the MCC and
all DSL cards.
H
If the NSP wants to allow an ISP or customer access to a limited set of DSL
cards, that NMS’s IP address should only be entered on those DSL cards in
the limited set.
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Configuration Menu Options
Although SNMP community strings (if they are changed from the defaults)
provide a measure of security for unauthorized managers, enabling IP address
security and entering the IP address of up to five authorized SNMP managers
provides a much higher level of security.
When IP address security is enabled, the source address of any SNMP message
addressed to any of the MCC card’s IP addresses (in either the management or
service domain) will be checked against the authorized list and will be dropped if
there is no match.
To completely disable SNMP access, do one of the following:
H
Set the IP Address Security field to Enable and do not enter any IP
addresses on the screen, or
H
Set the IP Address Security field to Enable and make sure that the IP
addresses entered on the screen are set to No Access.
For information on configuring SNMP security on the DSL card, see the
appropriate DSL Card User’s Guide.
" Procedure
To configure SNMP security:
1. Follow the menu selection sequence:
Configuration → SNMP → Security (A-F-A)
The SNMP Security screen appears with the Authentication Failure
Trap: field highlighted. Your response at the prompt determines whether the
Authentication Failure Trap mechanism is enabled or disabled on the MCC.
See Table 4-6.
2. Determine whether you want to enable or disable IP address security:
— Type enable at the Enable/Disable: prompt to enable (turn on)
security.
— Type disable at the Enable/Disable: prompt to disable (turn off)
security.
3. Type the IP address of an SNMP NMS manager(s) at the IP Address
(nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn): prompt. You can enter up to five SNMP NMS
managers.
NOTE:
If you enter two consecutive dots (.) in the IP address, the system will
interpret this as dot-zero-dot (.0.).
4. Specify the access permission for each SNMP NMS manager in Step 3:
— NA – No Access,
— RO – Read Only, or
— RW – Read Write.
5. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the SNMP menu.
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Configuration Menu Options
Configuring Logical Entities
Use the SNMP Logical Entities screen to display default system information
contained in the logical table of the Entity MIB. Only the Community Name fields
can be edited; others are read only.
To display the SNMP Logical Entities screen, follow this menu sequence:
Configuration → SNMP → Logical Entities (A-F-B)
To display the SNMP Logical Entities 2 screen, which is a continuation of the
previous screen, follow this menu sequence:
Configuration → SNMP → Logical Entities 2 (A-F-C)
See Table 4-6.
Defining a Community and Enabling Traps
Use the SNMP Communities/Traps screen to define a community by specifying
the SNMP NMS manager who will receive traps. Up to three managers can be
assigned for each community. Also, on this screen, you can enable or disable the
generation of traps.
" Procedure
To define community names and enable traps:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → SNMP → Communities/Traps (A-F-D)
The SNMP Communities/Traps screen appears. See Table 4-6.
2. Determine whether you want to enable or disable Authentication Failure
traps:
— Type enable at the Enable/Disable: prompt to forward
authentication failure traps to all SNMP NMS managers assigned to a
community name.
— Type disable at the Enable/Disable: prompt to prevent the
forwarding of authentication failure traps to all SNMP NMS managers
assigned to a community name.
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Configuration Menu Options
3. Change the default community names at the Community Name: prompt if
desired. Hotwire DSLAM provides the following default community names
and permissions:
— public (RO – Read Only)
— mcc (RW – Read Write)
— nms (RW – Read Write)
— nms - 2 (RO – Read Only)
4. Change the access permission for the community names in Step 3. At the
ReadOnly (ro) /ReadWrite (rw): prompt, specify the desired
permission for each community.
NOTE:
Make sure the SNMP NMS manager knows the correct community name.
It will need the correct permission to access/browse the Hotwire DSLAM.
5. Type the IP addresses of up to three SNMP NMS managers for each
community name to receive traps:
— Type the IP addresses of the SNMP NMS managers at the
(nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn): prompt.
NOTE:
If you enter two consecutive dots (.) in the IP address, the system will
interpret this as dot-zero-dot (.0.).
— Type the port number for each SNMP NMS manager specified at the
Input Number: prompt. All traps will go to the specified port.
— Indicate whether or not you want to enable or disable the generation of
traps at the Enable/Disable: prompt. Type E to enable traps. This will
forward traps to the specified SNMP NMS manager. Type D to disable
traps. This prevents the forwarding of traps.
6. Press Ctrl-z to save the changes and return to the SNMP menu.
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Configuration Menu Options
SNMP Menu Options
For SNMP menu options, refer to Table 4-6. To access the SNMP menu, follow
this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Configuration → SNMP (A-F)
See Appendix D, Simple Network Management Protocol, for more information.
Table 4-6. SNMP Menu Options
Security (SNMP Security)
A-F-A
Lets you enable SNMP security (i.e., prevent unauthorized managers from browsing or
configuring the Hotwire DSLAM network).
IP Address Security – Enable/Disable security.
IP Address – Enter the IP address of SNMP NMS manager(s). You can enter up to five.
Access – Enter Read-Only(ro)/ReadWrite(rw)/NoAccess(na) to specify access
permission for each SNMP manager.
Logical Entities (SNMP Logical Entities)
A-F-B
Displays default system information contained in the logical table of the Entity MIB.
I – Displays the index number of the DSL cards (1–9).
T – Displays type of card (D for DSL).
Read Only Comm. and Read/Write Comm – The community strings of DSL cards
present in that slot. These fields can be edited.
Logical Entities 2 (SNMP Logical Entities 2)
A-F-C
Displays a continuation of the SNMP Logical Entities screen (for slots 10–18).
I – Displays the index number of the DSL cards (10–18).
T – Displays type of card (D for DSL).
Read Only Comm. and Read/Write Comm – The community strings of DSL cards
present in that slot. These fields can be edited.
Communities/Traps (SNMP Communities/Traps)
A-F-D
Lets you enable the Authentication Failure Trap Mechanism, store SNMP Community
string names for the DSLAM card, and store trap addresses.
It also lets you configure four communities with three trap destinations each.
Authentication Failure Trap – Enable to send a trap when the community string of an
SNMP request does not match table entry or when the password for a Telnet session or
local access is incorrect.
Community Name – 32 characters, up to four unique entries per screen. Default
names are public (ro), mcc (rw), nms (rw), nms-2 (ro).
Access – Read-Only(ro)/ReadWrite(rw)/NoAccess(na), up to four entries per screen.
IP Address – To send traps to up to three addresses per community name, use the
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format. Enter NMS system host address.
Input Number – nnn format. Enter NMS system port number.
Enable/Disable – Set to E to Enable traps to be sent to this address. Set to D to
disable.
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Configuration Menu Options
DSL Cards Menu
To access the DSL Cards menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → DSL Cards (A-G)
The DSL Cards menu provides screens to set IP addresses and reset the DSL
cards.
See Table 4-7, DSL Cards Menu Options, for information about the options
available from the DSL Card menu.
Setting IP Addresses for Each DSL Card
Use the Configure DSL IP Addr screen (A-G-A) to assign up to 18 IP addresses
in the management domain (i.e., one IP address for each slot in the DSLAM that
has a DSL card). These are addresses for the s1b backplane interface on each
DSL card and will be automatically assigned to the DSL card when it is inserted in
a slot.
NOTE:
All IP addresses must be on the same management domain subnet as the
MCC card’s s1b IP address (entered on the MCC card’s IP Network screen,
A-C-B). Also, the subnet mask entered on the Configure DSL IP Addr screen
must match the subnet mask entered for s1b.
For procedures to set IP addresses for each DSL card, see the appropriate
Hotwire DSL Card User’s Guide.
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Configuration Menu Options
Resetting a DSL Slot
Use the Reset DSL Slot screen to perform a reset of a DSL card in any DSLAM
slot. Perform a reset if a DSL card in the DSLAM does not appear on the DSLAM
Card Selection screen.
" Procedure
To reset a DSL slot:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → DSL Cards→ Reset Slot (A-G-B)
The Reset DSL Slot screen appears.
2. Type the slot number of the DSL card at the Reset Card/Slot (nn or
DSLnn): prompt.
3. Type one of the following commands:
— ForceBootP – A nondisruptive reset that only works for cards with T1
and E1 connections.
— Reset – A disruptive reset of less than 30 seconds.
4. Do one of the following at the Clear NVRAM prompt:
— Type no to perform no action on the NVRAM. This is the default.
— Type yes to clear non-volatile RAM.
If you select yes on this screen, you permanently remove configuration
information stored on this card. All IP addresses and routing tables will
need to be reentered. The system performs a card reset and returns to
factory settings.
The Send Command: field is highlighted.
5. Type yes at the yes/no: prompt to execute the reset.
NOTE:
If a DSL card has been reset, but still does not appear on the screen, its
configuration may have been corrupted. Reset the card again. This time,
however, answer yes at the Clear NVRAM prompt. If the card then appears
on the screen, it must be reconfigured. If the card does not appear on the
screen, it may need to be replaced.
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Configuration Menu Options
DSL Cards Menu Options
To access the DSL Cards menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Configuration → DSL Cards (A-G)
Table 4-7. DSL Cards Menu Options
Set IP Address (Configure DSL IP Addr)
A-G-A
Allows you to configure up to 18 IP addresses (one for each slot in the DSLAM that has
a DSL card). These are addresses for the s1b backplane interface on each DSL card
and will be automatically assigned to the DSL card when it is inserted in a slot.
All IP addresses must be on the same Management domain subnet as the MCC card’s
IP address (entered on screen A-C-B).
This screen allows you to ForceBootP (a nondisruptive reset), Reset (a minor disruption
of less than 30 seconds), or Clear NVRAM (reset card and restore factory defaults).
Slot – The DSLAM card slot number.
Host (nnn) – The s1b IP address.
Reset Slot (Reset DSL Slot)
A-G-B
Allows you to reset a DSL card in any slot. The reset should be performed if there is a
card in a slot that does not appear on the card selection screen. After entering the card
number, selecting the command that will be sent (ForceBootP or reset), and confirming
the reset, the MCC sends a reset signal via the backplane to the selected card.
This screen allows you to ForceBootP (a nondisruptive reset), Reset (a minor disruption
of less than 30 seconds), or Clear NVRAM (reset card and restore factory defaults).
DSL Card/Slot # – Virtual (as opposed to physical) slot number of the DSL card. In the
8610 DSLAM, Slot #1 contains the MCC card and appears as virtual Slot# 19. Physical
Slot #2 and #3 appear as Slots #1 and #2.
Command – ForceBootP/Reset. ForceBootP will only work for cards with T1 and E1
connections.
Clear NVRAM – Yes/No.
Send Command – Yes/No.
NOTE:
8000-A2-GB29-10
If you select yes (in the Clear NVRAM prompt), you permanently remove
most of the configuration information you have stored on this card and all
IP addresses and routing tables will need to be reentered. The system will
perform a reset and return to the factory settings.
If a DSL card has been reset, but still does not appear on the screen, its
configuration may have been corrupted and the card should be reset again.
This time answer yes at the Clear NVRAM prompt. If the card appears on
the screen, it needs to be reconfigured. If the card does not appear on the
screen, it may need to be replaced. Contact your sales representative.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
5
Overview
This chapter describes the options on the Monitoring menu of the MCC card. The
Hotwire DSLAM lets you monitor all cards in the system. You monitor DSL and
MCC card operations by selecting various options from the Monitoring menu. To
access the Monitoring menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Monitoring
The Monitoring menu contains the following selections:
H
Card Status
H
Physical Layer
H
Interfaces
H
Network Protocol
H
IP Router
This chapter presents information on how to access these menus and their
submenus, and monitor the MCC card status and performance statistics.
NOTE:
Most Monitoring menus are read-only. The information displayed is to help
you gather pertinent information and isolate potential problems. For
diagnostic tools, see Chapter 7, Diagnostics Menu Options. For hardware
and software troubleshooting techniques for the MCC card, see Chapter 8,
Troubleshooting. For information about monitoring and troubleshooting
specific DSL Cards, see the appropriate Hotwire DSL Card User’s Guide.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Card Status Menu Options
The Card Status menu looks like this:
The Card Status menu provides the following options:
5-2
H
A. Card Info – Displays general card information, such as card type, model
and serial number, firmware, and hardware version number.
H
B. Login History – Lists the 10 most recent logins.
H
C. Syslog – Displays a sequential timestamp list of system operational-type
errors, such as alarms, cards added/removed from DSLAM, and invalid IP
addresses.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying General Card Information
To display general card information, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Card Status → Card Info (B-A-A)
The General Card Information screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
General Card Information
B-A-A
Card Name – Name assigned to the card.
Card Location – Physical location of the system.
Card Contact – Name or number of the person responsible for the card.
Card Up Time – Length of time the system has been running.
Available Buffers – Number of buffers not in use.
Buffer Ram Size – Size of the Buffer Ram.
Fast Data Ram Size – Total and Available Fast Data Ram.
Card Type – Type of card (MCC, DSL).
Model Num – Model number of card.
Serial Num – Serial number of card.
Firmware – Version of firmware.
Hardware Rev – Version of hardware.
Console – Either DTR Ignore, or DTR aware. DTR Ignore means that have an older
version of modem connection hardware. If you primarily use a direct terminal connection
to the system, this may not be a problem. If you primarily use a modem to connect to the
system, call your Paradyne representative for part number information.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying Login History
To display a list of information about the 10 most recent logins, follow this menu
selection sequence:
Monitoring → Card Status → Login History (B-A-B)
The Login History screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
Login History
B-A-B
User – User ID.
Time – Time of login.
Local/Remote – Local or Remote Connection.
Number of unsuccessful Console logins – Number of console logins that were
incorrect.
Number of unsuccessful Telnet logins – Number of Telnet logins that were
unsuccessful.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying System Errors
To display system operational-errors, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Card Status → Syslog (B-A-C)
The Syslog screen appears.
The Syslog screen displays a sequential timestamped list of operational errors
(such as invalid IP addresses) by date and error (up to six pages). There is one
logged error per line in a downward scrolling list. See the Hotwire DSLAM For
8540 and 8546 RADSL Cards User’s Guide for more information about the
SYSLOG.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Physical Layer Menu Options
The Physical Layer menu provides the following options, which allow you to
display read-only system information about physical ports.
To display the status of all active ports, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Monitoring → Physical Layer
The Physical Layer menu provides the following options:
5-6
H
A. Active List – Displays the status of all active ports.
H
B. Ether Statistics – Displays Ethernet statistics on the LAN port (e1a).
H
C. HDLC Bus Stats – Displays HDLC backplane port (s1b) statistics.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying Active Ports
To display the status of all active ports, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Physical Layer → Active List (B-B-A)
The Active Ports List screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
Active Ports List
B-B-A
Num – Number of the port.
Name – Name of the port.
Description – Type of port.
MAC Address – MAC address of the active port. (Internal dummy address is used for
non-Ethernet ports.)
Status – In-use or disconnected.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying Ethernet Statistics
To display statistics of the LAN port (e1a), follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Physical Layer → Ether Statistics (B-B-B)
The Ethernet Statistics screen appears.
NOTE:
You may press Ctrl-r at any time to reset counters.
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This screen displays the following information:
Ethernet Statistics
B-B-B
Port – Name of port (e1a).
Initialized Ethernet Ports – e1a (there is only one Ethernet port on the MCC card).
LAN Address – LAN (or MAC) address of the Ethernet port.
Bytes Received – Number of bytes received by the Ethernet port (i.e., a running
account of how many bytes have been received since the last reset).
Packets Received – Running account of packets received by the Ethernet port since
the last reset and what type
H Multicasts – Single packets copied to a specific subset of network addresses.
H Broadcasts – Messages sent to all network destinations.
H Flooded – Information received, then sent out to each of the interfaces.
H Filtered – Processes or devices that screen incoming information.
H Discarded – Packets discarded.
Errors Received – Number of errors received by the Ethernet port and what type:
H Overruns – No buffer space.
H Bad CRC – Cyclic Redundancy Check.
H Framing – Receiver improperly interprets set of bits within frame.
H Jumbo-Gram – Ethernet packet too long.
H Overflow – Part of traffic that is not carried.
H Buffer – No buffer space.
Bytes Transmitted – Number of bytes transmitted by the Ethernet port.
Packets Transmitted – Number of packets transmitted by the Ethernet port and what
type (Multicasts, Broadcasts, Flooded, Local Origin, Queued).
Errors Transmitted – Number and type of errors transmitted by the Ethernet port and
what type:
H Collisions:
– M = Multi-collision frames – not counted this release and always set to 0.
– L = Late collisions – collision detected often; at least 64 bytes have been
transmitted.
– E = Excessive collisions – port tried to send a packet 15 times without success.
H Deferrals
H Carrier Loss
H Underflow
H Buffer
Disconnects – Number of disconnects on the Ethernet port and what type:
H Disable – Transmit error, timed out.
H MAU Drop – Transceivers dropped.
H Xmit Fail – Transmit fail.
Fast Restarts – Number of fast restarts and what type (RX Off, TX Off, Mem Err).
Endless Pkt – Number of endless packets received on the Ethernet port.
Startless Pkt – Number of startless packets received on the Ethernet port.
Babble – Number of garbled packets received due to crosstalk.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying HDLC Bus Statistics
To display a list of the HDLC backplane port statistics for the s1b port
(backplane), follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Physical Layer → HDLC Bus Stats (B-B-C)
The HDLC Bus Statistics screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
HDLC Bus Statistics
B-B-C
Port – Name of port (s1b).
Bytes Received – Number of bytes received on the backplane port.
Bytes Transmitted – Number of bytes transmitted on the backplane port.
Packets Received – Number of packets received on the backplane port.
Packets Transmitted – Number of packets transmitted on the backplane port.
Errors – Number of other receive errors.
Lost – Number of packets not transmitted due to internal congestion.
NOTE:
You may press Ctrl-r at any time to reset counters.
If a high number of errors have been received, the MCC card may need to be
reset.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Interfaces Menu Options
To access the Interfaces menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Monitoring → Interfaces
The Interfaces menu provides the following options:
8000-A2-GB29-10
H
A. Active List – Displays the status of all active interfaces on the card.
H
B. Status – Displays additional interface status information, such as interface
name, protocol, port, user name, interface type, and interface state.
May 1999
5-11
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying Active Interfaces
To display the status of all active interfaces, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Interfaces → Active List (B-C-A)
The Active Interfaces List screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
Active Interfaces List
B-C-A
if – Number of the interface.
name – Name of the interface.
type – Interface type (static).
link – Name of the protocol on the interface.
state – Current state of the interface.
ll-state – Not applicable.
port – Port linked to this interface.
NOTE:
The only information that changes on the Active Interfaces List screen is the
State (active or port-wait) column.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying Additional Interface Status
To display additional interface information, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Interfaces → Status (B-C-B)
The Interface Status screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
Interface Status
B-C-B
ifname – Enter the name of the desired interface (e1a, s1b).
protocol – Type of protocol for the entered interface name.
port – Port linked to this interface.
restarts – Number of times the interface has been restarted.
user – NA or none.
type – Static.
link-downs – Number of times the link has gone down.
state – Active or prtwait (port-wait).
inactivity T/O – Number of times the interface has timed out.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Network Protocol Menu Options
To access the Network Protocol menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Monitoring → Network Protocol
The Network Protocol menu provides the following options:
5-14
H
A. Socket Statistics – Displays information about active sockets, such as
socket name, socket type, input bytes and output bytes, and PDU and byte
drops.
H
B. UDP Statistics – Displays UDP statistics, such as input packets, output
packets, packets with checksum errors, and bad length packets.
H
C. TCP Statistics – Displays a summary of the TCP data activity (packets
and bytes transmitted and received) and TCP connection activity on all
interfaces on the card.
H
D. IP Statistics – Displays a summary of the IP activity on all interfaces on
the card.
H
E. ICMP Statistics – Displays a summary of ICMP activity on all interfaces
of the card.
H
F. SNMP Statistics – Displays SNMP statistics, such as number of get
requests, number of set requests, and parsing errors.
H
H. HDLC Statistics – Displays information on High-Level Data Link Control
(HDLC) statistics for the backplane bus, such as number of octets and
frames transmitted, packet receive errors, and framing errors.
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying Socket Statistics
To display information about active sockets, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → Socket Statistics (B-D-A)
The Socket Statistics screen appears.
On this screen:
1. Type a valid socket number (from the Active Socket List) at the Start
Socket: [# or <RET>]: prompt.
2. Press Enter.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
The Socket Statistics screen displays the following information:
Socket Statistics
B-D-A
Start Socket – Enter the socket number to start the active socket list.
Active Socket List – Lists the active sockets in the system.
In addition, the lower right-hand corner of the screen displays a Socket Statistics window
with detailed information about the selected socket.
Socket – Socket number.
Socket name – Internal name of the socket.
Family – Family of this socket (DARPA Internet).
Type – Socket type (stream or datagram).
Local – Port number on this card.
Remote – Port number on remote card.
State – Current state of the socket.
Input Bytes – Bytes waiting in the socket for the owning application to process (will go
to 0 when processed by the application).
Send Bytes – Bytes waiting to be sent out to the remote machine.
PDU Drops – Incoming packets dropped (usually due to a lack of space).
Byte Drops – Outgoing packets dropped (usually due to a lack of space).
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying UDP Statistics
To display information on UDP statistics, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → UDP Statistics (B-D-B)
The UDP Statistics screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
NOTE:
The counters increment in real time and you may press Ctrl-r at any time to
reset the counters.
UDP Statistics
B-D-B
Output Packets – Number of UDP packets sent out of the card.
Input Packets – Number of UDP packets coming into the card.
No Receive Port – Number of UDP packets coming into the card that had no receive
port waiting for this packet.
Unchecksummed – Number of UDP packets coming into the card that had no
checksum.
Header Error – Number of UDP packets coming into card that had an error with the
packet header.
Incorrect Checksum – Number of UDP packets coming into the card that had a bad
checksum.
Bad Length – Number of UDP packets coming into the card that are an illegal length
(too short).
Other Error – Number of UDP packets coming into the card that had an error, but not
one of the above.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying TCP Statistics
To display a summary of TCP data activity, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → TCP Statistics (B-D-C)
The TCP Data Statistics screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
NOTES:
— The left column of the TCP Statistics screen displays information for
received data and the right column displays information for transmitted
data.
— The counters increment in real time and you may press Ctrl-r at any time
to reset the counters.
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May 1999
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Monitoring the MCC Card
TCP Data Statistics
B-D-C
Left column:
Packets Received – Number of TCP packets received by the card.
acks – Number of acknowledgements received for transmitted packets. (Also shows the
number of bytes that were acknowledged as received by the remote system.)
duplicate acks – Number of duplicate acknowledgements received.
acks for unsent data – Number of acknowledgements received for data that has not
been sent yet.
pkts/bytes rcvd in sequence – Number of packets/bytes correctly received in
sequence for data that had to be split in multiple TCP packets.
dupl pkts/bytes – Number of duplicate packets/bytes received.
pkts/bytes w. some dup. data – Number of packets/bytes with some duplicated data.
(Duplicated data is discarded by TCP.)
pkts rcvd out-of-order – Packets received out of order.
pkts of data after window – Packets of data received after our receive window is full.
window probes – Packets received looking for space in our receive window.
window update pkts – Packets received from the remote system advertising a new
window size.
pkts rcvd after close – Packets received after the TCP connection is shut down.
discarded for bad checksum – Packets that were discarded because the checksum
failed.
discarded for bad header offset fields – Packets discarded because the TCP header
was corrupted.
discarded because pkt too short – Packets discarded because the packet was too
short (not a complete TCP header).
Right column:
Packets Sent – Number of TCP packets sent by the card.
data pkts/bytes – Number of the sent packets that were data packets instead of TCP
control packets.
data pkts retransmit – Number of packets/bytes that had to be transmitted.
ack-only pkts – Number of sent packets that contained only an ack of a received
packet and no additional data.
URG only pkts – Number of packets that contained only an Urgent flag and no data.
window probe pkts – Number of packets that were window probes.
window update pkts – Number of packets that were advertising our new window size.
control pkts – Number of control packets sent (SYN, FIN, or RST flag).
H SYN = synchronization packet (synchronization sequence number)
H FIN = finish packet (end of transmission)
H RST = reset packet (reset connection).
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5-19
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying TCP Connection Statistics
To display a summary of the TCP connection activity on all interfaces on the
card, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → TCP Statistics (B-D-C)
After the TCP Data Statistics screen appears, you must press Enter to access
the TCP Connection Statistics screen.
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8000-A2-GB29-10
Monitoring the MCC Card
This screen displays the following information:
TCP Connection Statistics
B-D-C
connection requests – Number of TCP connections initiated by a process on this card.
connection accepts – Number of TCP connections accepted by this card.
connections established – Number of connections established.
connections closed/dropped – Number of connections closed (normally) including
those dropped.
embryonic connections closed – Number of connections dropped before data
transfer.
segments updated rtt – Number of packets that updated the Round Trip Time and the
total number of times TCP attempted to update the RTT.
retransmit timeouts – Number of times a packet had to be transmitted because it was
not acknowledged and the number of times a connection was dropped because a
packet could not be transmitted.
connections dropped by retransmit timeout – Number of connections dropped
because the retransmit timer failed to get any responses.
persist timeouts – Number of times the TCP persistence timer went off and sent a
probe to the remote system.
keepalive timeouts – Number of times a TCP keepalive request timed out.
keepalive probes sent – Number of TCP keepalive probes sent.
connections dropped by keepalive – Number of connections dropped because the
keepalive timer failed to get any responses.
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5-21
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying IP Statistics
To display a summary of IP activity on all interfaces on the card, follow this menu
selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → IP Statistics (B-D-D)
The IP Statistics screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
IP Statistics
B-D-D
total packets received – Total number of IP packets received by this card, with errors
broken down on the right of the screen.
fragments received – Number of packet fragments received, with dropped fragments
on the right of the screen.
fragmented on transmit – Number of packets that were fragmented on transmit and
the number of fragments that were created by those packets.
packets forwarded – Number of packets that were forwarded to another system.
packets not forwardable – Number of packets that could not be forwarded. (Usually
due to packet errors or routing problems.)
packet redirects sent – Number of redirect messages sent to other systems because
they sent a packet that should not be sent to this card.
network broadcasts received for local networks – Number of network broadcasts
received for local networks.
network broadcasts forwarded by media broadcast – Number of network broadcasts
for local networks sent.
network broadcasts partially processed – Number of network broadcasts dropped
due to an error.
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8000-A2-GB29-10
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying ICMP Statistics
To display information on ICMP statistics, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → ICMP Statistics (B-D-E)
The ICMP Statistics screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
ICMP Packet Statistics
B-D-E
Displays a summary of the ICMP activity on all interfaces of the card such as echo
replies, source quench messages, and information requests with their output, input, and
status.
The columns show input and output packet counts. Note that the Status column is only
applicable for “routing redirect.”
The counters increment in real time and you may press Ctrl-r at any time to reset the
counters.
Press Enter to see the second page of ICMP Packet Statistics.
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May 1999
5-23
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying SNMP Statistics
To display information on SNMP statistics, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → SNMP Statistics (B-D-F)
The SNMP Statistics screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
NOTE:
The counters increment in real time and you may press Ctrl-r at any time to
reset the counters.
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Monitoring the MCC Card
SNMP Statistics
B-D-F
Displays information on SNMP statistics such as number of set packets, number of get
requests, and parsing errors. When you press Enter, the SNMP Authentication Statistics
screen is displayed, giving you additional Community Administration information.
The counters increment in real time and you may press Ctrl-r at any time to reset the
counters.
In Packets – Total number of SNMP Protocol Data Units (PDUs) received by the agent.
Get Requests – Total number of SNMP Get Request PDUs accepted and processed by
the SNMP agent.
Get Next Requests – Total number of SNMP Get Next PDUs accepted and processed
by the SNMP agent.
Total Requested Variables – Total number of Management Information Base (MIB)
retrieved successfully by the SNMP agent as a result of receiving valid SNMP Get
Request and Get Next PDUs.
Set Requests – Total number of SNMP Set Requests PDUs accepted and processed
by the SNMP agent.
Total Set Variables – Total number of MIB objects modified successfully by the SNMP
agent as a result of receiving valid SNMP Set Requests PDUs.
ASN.1 Parse Errors – Total number of ASN.1 or BER errors encountered when
decoding received SNMP messages.
Out Packets – Total number of SNMP PDU responses sent by the agent.
Out Too Big Errors – Total Number of SNMP PDUs generated by the SNMP agent for
which the value of error status field is too big.
Out No Such Names – Total number of SNMP PDUs generated by the SNMP agent for
which the value of error status field is “no such name.”
Out Bad Values – Total number of SNMP PDUs generated by the SNMP agent for
which the value of the error status field is bad value.
Out General Errors – Total number of SNMP PDUs generated by the SNMP agent for
which the value of error status is Gen Err.
Read-only Errors – Total number of SNMP PDUs delivered by the SNMP agent for
which the value of the error status field is read-only.
Out Get Responses – Total number of Get-Response PDUs sent out by the SNMP
agent.
Out Traps – Total number of SNMP Traps PDUs generated by the SNMP agent.
NOTE:
To display additional community administration information, press Enter and
the SNMP Authentication Statistics screen appears.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
5-25
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying SNMP Authentication Statistics
You can also access the SNMP Authentication Statistics screen by following this
menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → SNMP Statistics (B-D-F)
After the SNMP Statistics screen appears, you must press Enter to access the
SNMP Authentication Statistics screen.
This screen displays the following information:
SNMP Authentication Statistics
B-D-F
Community Administration – Number of SNMP PDUs with community-based
authentication.
Bad Versions – Total number of SNMP messages delivered to the SNMP agent for an
unsupported SNMP version.
Bad Community Name – Total number of SNMP messages delivered to the SNMP
agent that used an SNMP community name not known to the entity.
Bad Community Use – Total number of SNMP messages delivered to the SNMP agent
that represent an SNMP operation not allowed by the SNMP community named in the
message.
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May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying HDLC Statistics
To display information on HDLC statistics for the backplane (s1b), follow this
menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → Network Protocol → HDLC Stats (B-D-G)
The HDLC Statistics screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
NOTE:
The counters increment in real time and you may press Ctrl-r at any time to
reset the counters.
HDLC Statistics
B-D-G
Interface Name – Interface Name (s1b).
Totals Summary – This is the heading information for the following fields. There will not
be entries in this field.
Octets Transmitted and Received – Number of octets (8 bit bytes) transmitted and
received.
Frames Transmitted and Received – Number of frames (groups of data bits)
transmitted and received.
Alloc Failures on Send – Number of packets not transmitted because there was no
memory available to build the packet.
Output Errors – Number of other transmit errors (i.e., bad HDLC address).
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
5-27
Monitoring the MCC Card
IP Router Menu Options
To access the IP Router menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Monitoring → IP Router
The IP Router menu appears.
The IP Router menu provides the following options:
5-28
H
A. Routing Table – Displays information and statistics stored in the routing
table.
H
B. ARP Table – Displays the current Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
cache.
H
C. Filter Table – Displays the various filters that have been configured.
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying Routing Table Information and Statistics
To display routing table information and statistics, follow this menu selection
sequence:
Monitoring → IP Router → Routing Table (B-E-A)
The Routing Table screen appears.
To display information for a specific destination:
1. Type the destination IP address at the [Destination # or <RET>]:
prompt.
2. Press Enter.
The system displays the working routing table. Routes will appear only for
interfaces that are up (active). The information and statistics are listed by
route and destination number. Details for the selected destination is shown in
the lower right corner (Route Information window).
NOTE:
You may select a different destination by typing a number at [Destination
# or <RET>]: prompt. If more than one route exists for the given
destination, you may view subsequent routes by typing the number at the
Route #: prompt.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
5-29
Monitoring the MCC Card
The Routing Table screen displays the following:
Routing Table
B-E-A
The Routing Table displays the following columns of information:
Routing Table screen
# – Displays the entry number in the routing table. Use this number to specify which
entry you want to display more information.
Destination – Specifies the destination (or source) IP address of the packet.
Subnet Mask – Indicates the associated subnet mask for the specified destination IP
address.
Routes – Number of routes for Destination.
Flags – Identifies the type of route: host, sub (subnetwork), or net (network).
Route Information window
In addition, the lower right-hand corner of the screen displays a Route Information
window with detailed information about the selected destination.
Route # – Displays the number of the route for the given destination. If more than one
route exists for the given destination, you may view subsequent routes by entering the
routing entry number at the [Route # or <RET>]: prompt.
Next Hop – Indicates the IP address of the next hop device for the specified destination.
Protocol – Displays the type of routing protocol by which the route was learned (i.e.,
static or direct).
Preference – Specifies the assigned preference number to this route. If more than one
route exists for the given destination, this number is compared to the preference number
of the other routes. The route with the lowest preference number is the preferred route.
The value of 0 indicates the highest preference. The greater the number, the lower the
preference.
Flags – Indicates if a route is a Host and if the next hop is valid.
Interface – Displays the name of the interface associated with the destination address.
NOTE: 1b0 is synonymous with e1a.
State – Indicates the various state information about the route including Permanent,
Deleted, SRC, Host, Net, Subn.
Metric – Not applicable.
Age – Displays the length of time in seconds that a non-permanent route has been
active.
Revision # – Not applicable.
Max Age – Displays the maximum length of time in seconds before a non-permanent
route has been active.
Ref Count – Number of internal references for this route.
5-30
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying ARP Table Information
To display the current Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache, follow this
menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → IP Router → ARP Table (B-E-B)
The ARP Table Statistics screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
NOTE:
Permanent entries show an age of 0 (zero).
ARP Table
B-E-B
Line – Sequential number of line.
IP Address – Internet Protocol Address.
Ethernet Address – Ethernet address associated with the IP address. (An incomplete
can be shown in this column for some internal entries such as the backplane.)
Min – Number of minutes since this entry was last used.
Interface – The interface on which this ARP request was answered.
NOTE: 1b0 is synonymous with e1a.
Flags – Various flags associated with this entry.
H PERM = permanent
H PUB = publish this entry (respond for other hosts)
H PROX = proxy ARP (card performs proxy ARP for this IP address)
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May 1999
5-31
Monitoring the MCC Card
Displaying Filters
To display filters that have been configured, follow this menu selection sequence:
Monitoring → IP Router → Filter Table (B-E-C)
The Filter Table screen appears.
This screen displays the following information:
Filter Table
B-E-C
Line – Sequential number of line.
Filter Name – Name of the IP filter.
# Static Rules – Number of static routes in filter.
# Dynamic Rules – Number of dynamic routes in filters.
Ref Cnt – Number of active interfaces using the filter.
Def Action – Default action for the filter.
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May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Applications Menu Options
6
Overview
This chapter describes the options on the Applications menu of the MCC card. To
access the Applications menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Applications
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
6-1
Applications Menu Options
Ping
Ping allows you to conduct a nondisruptive packet test between the MCC and any
IP-aware device with network connectivity in the management domain.
You can Ping both upstream and downstream devices. Upstream devices include
Network Access and Service Provider routers, switches, and Network
Management System (NMS) stations. In the downstream direction, you can Ping
all DSL cards in the DSLAM over the backplane and M/SDSL Service Nodes.
" Procedure
To use the Ping function:
1. From the Hotwire – MCC menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Applications → Ping (C-A)
The Ping IP Settings screen appears.
2. Enter the desired values after each prompt and press Enter.
Destination IP Address – nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format, or !SnnPn format to
reach a DSLAM slot, where Snn is the slot number 1–18 and Pn (in the
future), will be for port numbers. For example, to Ping the card in Slot 1, enter
!S1, to Ping the card in Slot 10, enter !S10.
Packet Size – 12–1600 bytes (Default = 64).
Timeout (wait time before next try) – 1–30 seconds (Default = 5).
After the information is entered and Ping is initiated, a results screen displays
destination, length, packets sent, timeouts, packets received, the minimum,
maximum, and average round trip times of packets, and an incremented list of
timeouts after each Ping.
NOTE:
The test continues until you exit the screen by pressing Enter.
6-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Applications Menu Options
TraceRoute
TraceRoute displays trace routing information for destinations of up to 64 hops
from the MCC card.
NOTE:
You can only use TraceRoute in the upstream direction.
" Procedure
To use the TraceRoute function:
1. From the Hotwire – MCC menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Applications → TraceRoute (C-B)
The TraceRoute IP Settings screen appears.
2. Enter the desired values after each prompt and press Enter.
Destination IP Address – IP host name or address in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
format.
Packet size – Length of the packet in bytes (excluding the packet header).
12–1600 bytes (Default = 38).
MaxHops – Maximum number of hops for trace routing.
Timeout – Maximum time (in seconds) the system waits before assuming
that the packet is lost. 1–30 seconds (Default = 5).
After the above information is entered and TraceRoute is initiated, a results
screen displays. Results include destination address, maximum hops, packets
sent, timeouts, packets received and a numbered list of reporting hops, each with
a number and IP address.
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May 1999
6-3
Applications Menu Options
Telnet
Telnet gives you the ability to connect with a remote host or with specific cards in
the DSLAM chassis. You Telnet out (upstream) using IP addresses; you Telnet
downstream using slot/part numbers.
NOTE:
You cannot Telnet into the DSLAM and then Telnet back out again. Upstream
Telnet is only allowed for console access to the DSLAM.
" Procedure
To use the Telnet function:
1. From the Hotwire – MCC menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Applications → Telnet (C-C)
The Telnet (Remote Connect) screen appears.
2. Enter the desired values after the prompt and press Enter.
Host Name – IP host name.
DSL IP Address – IP address in nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn format.
6-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Diagnostics Menu Options
7
Overview
This chapter describes the options on the Diagnostics menu of the MCC card.
Use the Diagnostics menu to perform self-tests or view alarm status. To access
the Diagnostics menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
MCC Main Menu → Diagnostics
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May 1999
7-1
Diagnostics Menu Options
Self-test
" Procedure
To view self-test information:
1. From the Hotwire – MCC menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Diagnostics → Selftest (D-A)
The Selftest Results screen appears.
The screen displays the results of the last disruptive self-test of the MCC
card. This self-test is only performed on system power-up or a card reset. All
subsystems (processors, memory, and interfaces) report pass or fail. If all
subsystems pass, the card passes. If a subsystem fails, refer to Chapter 8,
Troubleshooting, for more information.
7-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Diagnostics Menu Options
Alarm
" Procedure
To view Alarm information:
1. From the Hotwire – MCC menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Diagnostics → Alarms (D-B)
The Alarms screen appears.
The screen displays all active card alarm conditions. Major alarms include
Self-test failure, Processor failure (Sanity Timer), and Ethernet failure. Minor
alarms include Config Error (configuration has been corrupted).
" Procedure
To view selftest and card alarm information:
1. From the Hotwire – MCC Menu, follow one of these menu sequences:
— Diagnostics → Selftest (D-A)
— Diagnostics → Alarms (D-B)
2. The screen displays all active card alarm conditions. Major alarms include
Selftest failure, Processor failure (Sanity Timer), and Ethernet failure. Minor
alarms include Config Error (configuration has been corrupted).
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
7-3
Diagnostics Menu Options
7-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Troubleshooting
8
Troubleshooting
The status of each card in the Hotwire DSLAM is indicated on the Card Selection
screen (see Chapter 2, Menus and Screens). Choose Card Selection from the
Hotwire Chassis Main Menu.
The status of the MCC card is indicated by codes being displayed in any of four
positions to the right of the card selected. For example:
MCC
_
M
R
D
Position: 1
2
3
4
NOTE:
If an option is not active, an underscore appears in its place.
Refer to the table on page 2-10 for an explanation of the codes by position.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
8-1
Troubleshooting
Resetting the DSL Card
All cards in the chassis appear on the Card Selection screen. If one or more do
not appear, go to the MCC card and follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → DSL Cards →Reset Slot (A-G-B)
Reset the DSL card by entering its number at the prompt.
Checking Alarms
If the Card Selection screen indicates that a major or minor alarm is on a card,
follow this menu sequence to determine the cause of the alarm:
Diagnostics → Alarms (D-B)
NOTE:
If a DSL card does not appear on the Card Selection screen because the
MCC card can no longer communicate with it, the MCC card will generate an
error message. You should go to the MCC card’s Monitor → Card Status →
Syslog (B-A-C) and view the event on its system log.
8-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Troubleshooting
Major Alarms
Use Table 8-1 to determine the appropriate action to take for each major alarm.
Table 8-1. Major Alarms
Failure Type
Action
Selftest
failure:
1. Check the Selftest Results screen by following the menu sequence:
Diagnostics → Selftest.
2. Do another Selftest (Reset) and check results.
– If the results are normal, the problem was transient. Log the
results.
– If the results are the same as the first selftest, the card should be
replaced.
Processor
failure (Sanity
timer):
1. Check the Selftest Results screen by following the menu sequence:
Diagnostics → Selftest.
Ethernet port
failure
1. Check cable connections to the DSLAM.
– If cables are terminated properly, go to Step 2.
– If cables are not terminated properly, terminate them correctly.
2. Do another Selftest (Reset) and check results.
– If the results are normal, the problem was transient. Log the
results.
– If the results are the same as the first selftest, the card should be
replaced.
2. Check cable connections to the Ethernet Hub.
– If cables are terminated properly, go to Step 3.
– If cables are not terminated properly, terminate them correctly.
3. Check the Activity/Status LED at the Ethernet Hub.
– If Activity/Status LED does not indicate a problem, go to Step 4.
– If Activity/Status LED indicates a problem, take appropriate
action.
4. Disconnect the Ethernet cable and replace it with a working cable
from a spare port on the Hub.
– If the replacement cable works, the original is bad and should be
permanently replaced.
– If the replacement cable does not work, the MCC card is
probably bad and should be replaced.
DSL card not
responding
(LEDs on card
are out or MCC
is showing an
alarm.)
8000-A2-GB29-10
Check to see if the lights are on, but not responding.
– Pull the card out and plug it in again.
– Reset the card from the MCC or DSL Main Menu.
– Go to the MCC Main Menu and clear NVRAM.
– Replace the card.
May 1999
8-3
Troubleshooting
Minor Alarms
Use Table 8-2 to determine the appropriate action to take for each Minor Alarm.
Table 8-2. Minor Alarms
Failure Type
Action
Config Error:
1. Check the Selftest Results display by following the menu sequence:
Diagnostics → Selftest.
2. Do another Selftest (Reset) and check results.
– If the results are normal, the problem was transient. Log the
results.
– If Selftest results still show configuration corruption, there is a
card problem. The card’s nonvolatile RAM should be erased and
the configuration reentered. Perform a configuration download.
– If the configuration has not been saved, use reset and erase
NVRAM to force the card to the factory default. Enter the basic
default route to the MCC and reconfigure the card manually.
8-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Troubleshooting
Network Problems
Review the following symptoms and possible solutions to help in solving any
problems you may encounter on the Hotwire DSLAM.
Table 8-3. Network Problems (1 of 4)
Problem
Action
Cannot
When you add, change, or delete addresses on a DSL card, you must
communicate
restart that interface (see Configuration → Interfaces (A-C) in
with Ethernet or Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
other interface
after adding,
changing, or
deleting IP
addresses on
DSL or MCC
card.
Cannot
establish an
SNMP session/
connection.
1. Try to Ping the MCC card and/or DSL card from the management
system.
2. If you cannot, check to see that you have entered an IP address
and subnet mask (see Who Am I screen in Chapter 3, Setup and
Configuration).
3. If there is an IP address, then check the routing tables in the MCC
card and RADSL card.
4. Check to see if the community string is correct.
5. If IP Address Security is enabled, check to see that Network
Management’s IP address has been entered correctly in the MCC
card’s and RADSL card’s permission list and that it has proper
access.
6. Check to see if you have properly configured the SNMP parameters
(see Monitoring → Network Protocol (B-D) in Chapter 5, Monitoring
the MCC Card, and Configuration → SNMP (A-F) in
Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
8-5
Troubleshooting
Table 8-3. Network Problems (2 of 4)
Problem
Action
Cannot Ping or
Telnet after
entering IP
address.
1. Restart the interface (see Configuration → Interfaces (A-C) in
Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
2. Reset or power cycle before the IP address changes take effect.
3. Check to see if you entered the correct IP address (see Who Am I
screen in Chapter 3, Setup and Configuration).
4. Check to see that the IP address is unique and matches the class
of the subnet. (For example, if using a Class B address, make sure
the first two numbers match.)
5. Check to see that the subnet mask is set correctly. If in doubt, leave
the default subnet mask (see Who Am I screen in Chapter 3, Setup
and Configuration).
6. Check to see that the IP next-hop address matches that of the
router (if communicating through IP router) (see Configuration → IP
Router (A-E) in Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
7. Verify that your address, port, or IP protocol is not being filtered
from the port or bridge. (Turn off the filters if you are not sure.)
8. Check to see that the port in question is forwarding traffic.
9. Check received packets (see Monitoring → Network Protocol (B-D)
in Chapter 5, Monitoring the MCC Card).
DSL cards do
not respond at
startup after
rebooting
chassis.
1. Reset the MCC card.
DSL cards not
using MCC
Router ID as
source address
for traps.
1. In standard configuration, MCC and DSL are in separate subnets
and Router ID is the same as IP Base Address of MCC’s LAN (e1a)
interface. Set the Router ID to the management IP address on
MCC’s LAN interface.
2. Be sure LEDs go through the reset sequence once. Then, a second
time after 15–20 seconds.
3. Reconfigure each DSL card (see Configuration → Card Status
(A-A) in Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
2. Set this as “Base IP Address” for LAN interface.
3. Reset MCC and all cards (see Configuration → DSL Cards (A-G) in
Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
Excessive
collisions on an
Ethernet port.
1. Determine if your network is too large or long (single Ethernet cable
or end-to-end cable).
2. Check to see if there are too many repeaters.
3. Check to see if there are too many users on a single Ethernet.
Filters are not
working
properly.
1. Check to see that filters have been configured properly (see
Configuration → Interfaces (A-C) in Chapter 4, Configuration Menu
Options).
2. Check to see if there is a conflict with the order of the filter tests.
They should perform in the following order: Port-to-Port (PTOP),
Host-to-Port (HTOP), Host-to-Host (HTOH), Protocol Type
(PROTOCOL), Bit Filtering.
8-6
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Troubleshooting
Table 8-3. Network Problems (3 of 4)
Problem
Action
Intranetworking
communication
problems.
1. Verify that the internetworking network cables meet IEEE standards
for local Ethernet networks.
2. Check cable connections to DSLAM and other devices in the
network.
3. Determine whether or not your system is the only one in the
network with a problem.
Performance is
slow.
1. Verify that there are enough buffers on the System Info screen and
reset the system (see Monitoring → Card Status (B-A) in Chapter 5,
Monitoring the MCC Card).
2. Check the Ethernet Statistics screen for excessive Cycle
Redundancy Check (CRC) errors, a bad connection, or a bad cable
(see Monitoring → Physical Layer (B-B) in Chapter 5, Monitoring
the MCC Card).
PPP circuit is
forwarding no
traffic.
1. Verify that the DSL link is up.
2. Go to: Configuration → Interface → Control (A-C-C) and monitor the
state of the system.
3. If the IP state is up and the local and peer IP addresses are
displayed, IPCP is completed.
4. If the IP state is missing from the screen, check that the port has an
IP address assigned.
5. If the IP state is missing from the screen, check that the port has an
IP address assigned.
Proxy ARP not
properly set for
Hotwire 5446
RTU.
1. Reconfigure DSL cards affected.
Stations cannot
communicate
through the
router.
Incorrect IP
address.
Incorrect
Subnet Mask.
1. Check to see that IP addresses have been configured correctly
(see Who Am I screen in Chapter 3, Setup and Configuration), and
Configuration → Interfaces (A-C) in Chapter 4, Configuration Menu
Options).
System does
not recognize
new DSL cards
with new
addresses
(Addresses not
preconfigured
on MCC card).
1. Configure new DSL cards from MCC screen.
TFTP server
denies write
permission
(Message is
TFTP recv
failure).
8000-A2-GB29-10
2. Set Proxy ARP only for Hotwire 5446 RTU, not entire subnet.
3. Using structured subnetting, verify proper subnetting was utilized.
2. Go to: Configuration → Interface → Control (A-C-C) and monitor the
state of the system for e1a Bridge Up (forwarding).
2. Restart s1b interface (see Configuration → DSL Cards (A-G) in
Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
3. Reset DSL card from the MCC screen (see Configuration → DSL
Cards (A-G) in Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
4. Pull the card out and push it back in.
1. Before uploading configurations, create a dummy file and give it
global Read-Write permissions.
2. Configure TFTP host to have Write permissions is specified
directory.
May 1999
8-7
Troubleshooting
Table 8-3. Network Problems (4 of 4)
8-8
Problem
Action
System does
not recognize
new DSL cards
with new
addresses
(Addresses not
pre-configured
on MCC card).
1. Configure new DSL cards from MCC screen.
2. Restart s1b interface (see Configuration → DSL Cards (A-G) in
Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
3. Reset DSL card from the MCC screen (see Configuration → DSL
Cards (A-G) in Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options).
4. Pull the card out and push it back in.
Error in setting
peer address
on s1b.
Set peer host address to 0. For example, where the MCC card’s s1b
address is 198.152.180.10 and local subnet is “180,” the peer IP
address must be set to 198.152.180.0.
On Card
Selection
screen, system
assigns a slot
number to the
MCC card
instead of
letter M.
1. Check the setting on the Stack Position switch on the base
chassis, which contains the MCC card.
2. Change the Stack Position switch setting to 1.
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Firmware Upgrade
A
Upgrade Instructions Overview
The upgrade procedures are essential because portions of new software may be
incompatible with earlier versions. If the procedures are not followed exactly, you
can permanently lose communication with the Access Nodes and endpoints and
it will be necessary to visit these locations to resolve the problem. The Access
Node and the MCC must contain the same version of code to function properly.
For M/SDSL and M/HDSL devices, refer to the appropriate device manual listed
in the Product-Related Documents section, in About This Guide.
NOTE:
The following instructions are essential to a successful upgrade. All
procedures must be followed exactly.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
A-1
Firmware Upgrade
Use the download function of the MCC card (Configuration → Card Status →
Download Code) to download version of new firmware to the components of the
DSLAM system. New firmware must be downloaded to the following in the order
listed:
1. All RTUs connected to a specific DSL card.
2. The DSL card from Step 1.
3. All DSL cards and their connected RTUs (repeat Steps 1 and 2).
4. The Management Communications Controller (MCC) card.
Service
Nodes
Access
Node
MCC
EM OK Alrm Tes
ST
SY
SN
6310
SYS
TEM
t
Port 1
Alm
TX
Test
ER
N
H
ET
OK
ET
PWR
ALM
TST
LINE
ENTH
ERNE
T
X
R
ETH
oll
C
ERN
1
Port 2
RT
PO
SN
6310
ET
TX
RX
Coll
2
3
POWER
4
A
ALARMS
PWR
ALM
TST
LINE
ENTH
B
Fan Major Minor
ERNE
T
SYS
SYS
TEM
TEM
OK
OK
Alm
Alm
Tes
t
SN
6310
Tes
t
ETH
ERN
Port 3
ETH
ET
ERN
ET
TX
TX
RX
RX
Coll
DSL
Coll
POR
T
1
2
PWR
ALM
3
TST
LINE
4
ENTH
ERNE
T
RADSL
SN
6310
MCC
Port 4
PWR
ALM
TST
LINE
MCC
ENTH
ERNE
T
-48V INPUT
SLOTS 13-18
RET (B)
FR GND
-48V (B)
RET (A)
SLOTS 1 - 6
2
4
6
8
1
3
5
7
LAN/WAN SLOT
10
14
12
16
18
15
17
20
MGT
SERIAL
LINES
-48V (A)
SLOTS 7-12
MVL
11
9
LAN/WAN SLOT
13
19
MGT
10BT
ALARM
8310
MVL Access
Node Card
8310
A-2
May 1999
MCC Card
99-16099-01
8000-A2-GB29-10
Firmware Upgrade
Firmware
The firmware of a card can be changed by using the system’s Download Code
function. For example, an 8546 or 8540 card can become an 8510. The MCC
card can be upgraded provided the hardware supports the firmware.
There are no restrictions on the number of upgrades, i.e., you can upgrade any
number of cards with one copy of the new firmware.
From some earlier versions of firmware, you must upgrade to version 1.1 before
migrating to other cards. If you do not, the following error messages can occur:
Wrong HW Platform – You have attempted to download MCC firmware to
a DSL card (or vice versa).
Wrong FW Brand (old) – You have not upgraded your firmware to at
least version 1.1.
NOTES:
— You must upgrade the firmware files on your server before beginning the
following procedures. The files are available from the Paradyne Web site.
— The affected node will be down during the download. User data
exchange will continue while downloading firmware to an MCC card.
— After successfully downloading new firmware, you may have to configure
new features. See Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options.
To copy the firmware files to your server, access www.paradyne.com and select
Service & Support → Firmware/Software Files. Download the appropriate
versions for your environment from the Hotwire DSLAM Cards listing.
Be aware that to upgrade to 8510 firmware release 2.0 from versions earlier than
8546 release 02.03, you must first upgrade to release 02.03.
NOTE:
If any download procedure fails, the message Transfer failed appears
on the screen but the values you entered for that download are saved on the
screen. The cursor is returned to the first field of the download screen. Press
Enter at each field to accept the values and try the procedures again.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
A-3
Firmware Upgrade
Firmware Version Numbers
The Hotwire Layer 3 network includes the components listed in the following
table. For proper functionality, each component must use the listed (or higher)
version of firmware. For the most up-to-date firmware version numbers, visit the
Paradyne Web site at www.paradyne.com. Select Service & Support →
Firmware/Software Files→ Hotwire DSLAM Cards.
A-4
Component
Firmware Version Number
MCC Cards
03.03.xx
DSL Cards
8540 RADSL
8546 RADSL
02.00.18
02.00.18
Endpoints
5446 RTU
5216 RTU
5246 RTU
02.00.07
02.00.07
IPC
3.2.6, 3.3.1.4b or 3.4.2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Firmware Upgrade
Upgrade Procedures
Use the Download Code screen (A-A-G-A) to download firmware. The fields of
the Download Code screen are defined in the following table.
Field
Description
Input
Download Type
Firmware to be downloaded.
MCC, DSL, or RTU
DSL Card/Slot #
Slot number of the DSL card to
which the code is downloaded.
Only appears if DSL or RTU is
entered in Download Type field.
Slot numbers 1–18.
RTU Connected to
Port #
Port number to which the RTU is
attached. Only appears if RTU is
entered in Download Type field.
Port numbers
Immediate Apply
Specifies whether the card
automatically resets upon
completion.
Yes or No
Image File Name
File to be downloaded.
Total path name
must be fewer than
40 characters
May be a path name ending with
the file name.
If the TFTP server is hosted by a
DOS machine, then directory and
file names must follow the 8.3
DOS convention.
8000-A2-GB29-10
TFTP Server IP
Address
The Host name or IP address of
the TFTP server.
Host /nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
format
Start Transfer
Specify whether you want to start
the transfer.
Yes or No
(Default = No)
May 1999
A-5
Firmware Upgrade
Download to RTU
Use this procedure to download new code to an RTU.
" Procedure
To download new firmware to the RTU from the MCC card:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → Download Code → Download Code
(A-A-G-A)
The Download Code screen appears and the Download Type: field is
highlighted.
2. At the MCC, DSL or RTU: prompt, type RTU and press Enter.
The DSL Card/Slot # field appears and is highlighted.
3. At the DSL Card/Slot #: prompt, enter the slot number of the DSL card to
which the RTU is connected and press Enter.
The RTU Connected to Port # field is highlighted.
4. At the RTU Connected to Port #: prompt, enter the port number for the
desired RTU and press Enter.
The Immediate Apply: field is automatically set to yes and the Image
File Name: field is highlighted.
5. At the Enter File Name: prompt, enter the complete path name for the
Service Node upgrade file on your server and press Enter.
NOTE:
You must have the updated files on your server. These files are available
from the Paradyne Web site.
The TFTP Server IP Address: field is highlighted.
A-6
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Firmware Upgrade
6. At the Host/nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn: prompt, enter the IP address of your
server on which the RTU upgrade file is stored and press Enter.
The Start Transfer: field is highlighted.
7. At the yes/no: prompt, type yes to begin the process.
Transfer in progress appears and the following fields begin to
increment:
Packets Sent – Number of packets sent in download.
Packets Received – Number of packets received in download.
Bytes Sent – Number of bytes sent in download.
Bytes Received – Number of bytes received in download.
When the transfer completes, the Transfer Status field changes to
Completed successfully. The RTU resets and may lose connectivity
until the DSL card is upgraded.
NOTES:
— When an RTU has completed the upgrade, communication with all of
its end users is enabled.
— The RTU resets and may lose connectivity until the DSL card is
upgraded.
8. Repeat the procedures for each RTU port.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
A-7
Firmware Upgrade
Download to the DSL Card
" Procedure
To download new firmware to the DSL card using the MCC card:
1. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → Download Code → Download Code
(A-A-G-A)
The Download Code screen appears and the Download Type: field is
highlighted.
2. At the MCC, DSL or RTU: prompt, type DSL and press Enter.
The DSL Card/Slot #: field appears and is highlighted.
3. At the DSL Card/Slot #: prompt, enter the chassis slot number of the
DSL card to which the previously upgraded RTU is connected and press
Enter.
The Immediate Apply: field is automatically set to yes.
4. At the yes/no: prompt, press Enter to accept yes.
The Image File Name: field is highlighted.
NOTE:
If you type no and press Enter, you must reset the MCC card after
completing the download procedures or use the Apply Download screen
(A-A-G-B) to apply the download.
5. At the Enter File Name: prompt, enter the complete path name for the
Access Node upgrade file on your server and press Enter.
NOTE:
You must have the updated files on your server. These files are available
from the Paradyne Web site.
The TFTP Server IP Address: field is highlighted.
A-8
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Firmware Upgrade
6. At the Host/nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn: prompt, enter the IP address of your
server on which the AN upgrade file is stored and press Enter.
The Start Transfer: field is highlighted.
7. At the yes/no: prompt, type yes to begin the process.
Transfer in progress appears and the following fields begin to
increment:
Packets Sent – Number of packets sent in download.
Packets Received – Number of packets received in download.
Bytes Sent – Number of bytes sent in download.
Bytes Received – Number of bytes received in download.
When the transfer completes, the Transfer Status field changes to
Completed successfully. The card resets and upgraded connectivity
with the RTU is established.
8. Repeat the procedures for all RTUs and DSL cards in your DSLAM system.
If you cannot communicate with an RTU after a complete upgrade of the RTU
and DSL card, verify firmware level compatibility and retry the firmware download.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
A-9
Firmware Upgrade
Download to MCC Card
" Procedure
To download new firmware to the MCC:
1. From the MCC card, follow this menu selection sequence:
Configuration → Card Status → Download Code → Download Code
(A-A-G-A)
The Download Code screen appears and the Download Type: field is
highlighted.
2. At the MCC, DSL or RTU: prompt, type MCC and press Enter.
The Immediate Apply: field is highlighted.
NOTE:
If you type no and press Enter, you must reset the card after completing
the download procedures to apply the download.
3. At the yes/no: prompt, type yes and press Enter.
The Image File Name: field is highlighted.
4. At the Enter File Name: prompt, enter the complete path name for the
MCC upgrade file on your server and press Enter.
NOTE:
You must have the updated files on your server. These files are available
from the Paradyne Web site.
The TFTP Server IP Address: field is highlighted.
5. At the Host/nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn: prompt, enter the IP address of your
server on which the MCC upgrade file is stored and press Enter.
The Start Transfer: field is highlighted.
A-10
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Firmware Upgrade
6. At the yes/no: prompt, type yes to begin the process.
Transfer in progress appears and the following fields begin to
increment:
Packets Sent – Number of packets sent in download.
Packets Received – Number of packets received in download.
Bytes Sent – Number of bytes sent in download.
Bytes Received – Number of bytes received in download.
When the transfer completes, the Transfer Status field changes to
Completed successfully. The card reboots.
You have successfully completed your upgrade.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
A-11
Firmware Upgrade
Branding – Layer 3 to Layer 2 Migration
Branding is a method of marking hardware platforms and software loads to
ensure that compatible software is loaded. For example, an 8546 or 8540 card
can become an 8510. The MCC card can be upgraded provided the hardware
supports the firmware. The upgrades are made using system’s Download Code
function.
Branding allows the firmware of a card to be changed as shown in the table
below.
Model Number (Firmware Version)
To/From Model Number (Firmware
Version)
8546 DSL card (02.03.15)
8510 DSL card (02.00.15)
8540 DSL card (02.03.12)
8510 DSL card (02.00.15)
8546 DSL card (02.03.15)
MCC Layer 3 IP Complex (02.03.15)
MCC Layer 2 IP Conservative (03.02.15)
5446* RTU (02.04.07)
5620 RTU (02.00.08)
* You must upgrade your 5446 firmware to version R2.02.07 or higher before you can
migrate to the 5620. If you do not, unexpected errors will occur.
There are no restrictions on the number of upgrades, i.e., you can upgrade any
number of cards with one copy of the new firmware.
You must upgrade your firmware to version 1.1 before migrating to other cards. If
you do not, the following error messages can occur:
Wrong HW Platform – You have attempted to download MCC firmware to
a DSL card (or vice versa).
Wrong FW Brand (old) – You have not upgraded your firmware to
version 1.1.
Use the following table to determine the files that you must download from the
Paradyne Web site at www.paradyne.com to upgrade from a Layer 3 (IP
Complex) product to a Layer 2 (IP Conservative) product.
To Go From Layer 3
Version 2.3 . . .
To Layer 2 Version 2.0 . . .
Download
File . . .
MCC Layer 3 IP Complex
MCC Layer 2 IP Conservative
mcc3mcc2.exe
8546 DSL card (02.03.12)
8510 DSL card (01.01.12)
85468510.exe
8540 DSL card (02.03.12)
8510 DSL card (01.01.12)
85408510.exe
NOTE: To upgrade to IP Conservative version 2.0 from IP Complex versions earlier than
02.03.xx, you must first upgrade to IP Conservative version 02.03.xx. For example, you
must upgrade from IP Complex version 2.2.4 to IP Complex version 2.3.15 before
changing to IP Conservative version 2.0.
A-12
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
IP Filtering Overview and
Worksheets
B
Overview
This appendix provides an overview of packet filters, and worksheets to help you
plan and record your filter configurations. All filters are set on the MCC card.
A filter is used to:
H
Secure a network by implementing security rules (policies)
H
Prevent unauthorized network access without making authorized access
difficult.
By default, filtering is not active on the Hotwire DSLAM system. However, you
can enable filtering to selectively filter source or destination packets being routed
through the MCC or DSL cards. Use the worksheets provided later in this
appendix to help you plan and record your MCC card filter configurations. For
information on how to enable filters on a DSL card, see the appropriate DSL Card
User’s Guide and/or DSL Card Network Configuration Guide.
What is a Filter?
An IP filter is a rule (or set of rules) that is applied to a specific interface to
indicate whether to forward or discard a packet.
A filter works by successively applying its rules to the information obtained from
the packet header until a match is found. (Host rules have precedence over
network rules.) The filter then performs the action specified by the rule on that
packet, which can be either to forward or discard. If the packet header
information does not match any of the rules, then the user-specified default filter
is used. The filter does not change any state or context, and the decision is made
based only on the packet contents.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
B-1
IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets
You can create the following filter types:
H
An input filter to prevent packets entering the MCC card through a specified
interface from being forwarded. You may want to set up filtering on input to
protect against address spoofing. Use the IP Network screen
(Configuration → Interfaces → IP Network) to specify binding of an input filter
to a particular interface.
H
An output filter to prevent packets from going out of the MCC card through a
specified interface. Use the IP Network screen (Configuration → Interfaces →
IP Network) to specify binding of an output filter to a particular interface.
For each filter type, you must set up one or more of the following rule types on
the IP Filter Configuration screen (Configuration → IP Router → IP Router Filters):
H
A network address rule type to discard or forward packets/traffic from a
specified network or a segment of the network. This rule type can also be
used to enhance security by allowing access only to certain networks. The IP
address and subnet mask specified in the Destination address and
Destination address mask fields, or the Source address and
Source address mask fields of the IP Filter Configuration screen are
compared to the destination/source address contained in the IP header of the
packet.
H
A host address rule type to discard or forward packets/traffic from a
specified host. This rule type can also be used to enhance security by
allowing access only to certain hosts. The IP address and subnet mask
specified in the Destination address and Destination address
mask fields, or the Source address and Source address mask fields of
the IP Filter Configuration screen are compared to the destination/source
address contained in the IP header of the packet.
NOTE:
Host address rules have precedence over network address rules. All host
address rules will be invoked sequentially before the first network
address rule is invoked.
H
A socket address rule type to limit certain applications. This rule type is
used primarily when filtering TCP or UDP packets, and may be used in
conjunction with a network address rule type or a host address rule type. The
destination (socket) port number specified in the Destination Port No.
field and source (socket) port number specified in the Source Port No.
field of the IP Filter Configuration screen are compared to the destination and
source port numbers in the TCP or UDP header of the packet.
NOTE:
If both the source and destination port numbers are 0s (zeros), the system
filters ICMP packets in addition to the packet types defined in the rule.
You can configure up to two filters on the MCC card. Also, up to 33 rules can be
configured for each filter. Keep in mind that for each filter, you will need to
configure the default filter action (either to forward or discard packets).
B-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets
For detailed information on the IP Filter Configuration screen and the IP Network
screen, see Chapter 4, Configuration Menu Options.
IP Filtering Configuration Worksheets
This section provides worksheets to assist you in creating filters for your Hotwire
DSLAM network. Use the worksheets to record filter parameters such as IP filter
types and rule types for the MCC card. Photocopy the worksheets as needed.
Summary: How to Define a Filter
To define a filter for a specific interface to indicate whether a packet can be
forwarded or discarded on that interface:
H
Go to the appropriate IP Filter Configuration screen to define a filter and set
up one or more rule types (network address rule type, host address rule type,
and/or socket address rule type) for that filter.
H
Go to the appropriate IP Network screen to bind the filter (i.e., specify the
filter type (input filter or output filter) by specifying the name of the filter in the
appropriate field and binding it to a specific interface).
NOTE:
For the MCC card, lan1 (bound to e1a) is the default filter.
When using lan1 as the input, by default, lan1 is already bound to its
corresponding interface (e1a). To use lan1 as the output filter, you must
manually bind it on the IP Network screen.
Worksheet: Defining the Filter and Rules
On the IP Filter Configuration screen, create a filter and define its rules. Complete
one worksheet for each rule.
NOTE:
In this release, up to 33 rules can be configured for each filter. If you do not
specify rules, the system will forward or discard packets based on the value
you set for the default filter action (on the Def Action field). By default, the
value of this field is set to forward.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
B-3
IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets
Select Configuration → IP Router → IP Router Filters from the Hotwire – MCC
menu to display the Filter Table screen.
Enter the line number of the desired filter name on the Filter Table screen to
display the IP Filter Configuration screen.
B-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets
IP Filter Configuration
Prompt
A-E-C
Your Configuration Setting
1. At the Action:
(Add/Delete/Edit): prompt, type
A to add a rule.
2. At the discard/forward: prompt, type
the desired filter action.
Default Filter Action =
3. Enter the name of the filter for which
you want to define rules at the Enter
Filter Name: prompt.
The DSLAM provides a default filter,
lan1, for the MCC card. lan1 is already
bound to the e1a interface.
Filter Name =
NOTE: You cannot delete the default
filter name (lan1) from the system.
However, you can specify another filter
by overwriting the existing filter name
with the name of the filter you want to
use. If you change the filter on this
screen, remember to change the name
specified in the Input Filter field
on the IP Network screen. The default
filter name is bound to the e1a
interface.
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B-5
IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets
IP Filter Configuration
A-E-C
Prompt
Your Configuration Setting
4. Depending on the rule type(s) you
want to use, do one or more of the
following:
– To define a network address rule
type, specify either an IP address or
subnet mask in the Source
Address and Source Address
mask fields, or the Destination
Address and Destination
Address mask fields.
– To define a host address rule type,
specify either an IP address or
subnet mask in the Source
Address and Source Address
mask fields, or the Destination
Address and Destination
Address mask fields.
– To define a socket address rule
type, specify the source (socket)
port number at the Source Port
No. field and the destination
(socket) port number at the
Destination Port No. field.
This rule type may be used in
conjunction with a network address
or host address rule type.
Rule # ____
Source Address =
Source Address mask =
Source Port No. =
Comparison Type =
Destination Address =
Destination Address mask =
Destination Port No. =
Comparison Type =
NOTE: Host address rules have
precedence over network address
rules. All host address rules will be
invoked sequentially before the first
network address rule.
If defining a socket address rule
type, you must also specify the
comparison type you want to
perform in the Comparison Type
field. Enter IGNORE if you do not
want to do a comparison, or one of
the following to do a comparison on
the port number specified in the
packet and the rule: EQ (equal to),
NEQ (not equal to), GT (greater
than), LT (less than), IN_RANGE
(within the specified range),
OUT_RANGE (outside of the
specified range).
5. Enter forward at the Filter
Filter Action =
Action: prompt to activate filtering for
the specified filter name, or discard to
prevent packets that match the rule(s)
from passing through.
B-6
May 1999
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IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets
Worksheet: Binding the Filter
On the IP Network screen, indicate whether you want to use the filter you have
just defined on the IP Filter Configuration screen as an input filter or an output
filter for a specific interface.
NOTE:
When using the default input filter name (lan1), you do not need to complete
a worksheet. The default filter name is already bound to its corresponding
interface (e1a), and no further action needs to be done.
However, you will need to complete the following worksheet if you:
— Changed the default input filter name on the IP Filter Configuration
screen, or
— Defined an output filter and that filter needs to be bound to a specific
interface
Select Configuration → Interfaces → IP Network from the Hotwire – MCC menu to
display the IP Network screen.
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B-7
IP Filtering Overview and Worksheets
IP Network Screen
A-C-B
Prompt
Your Configuration Setting
1. Enter the interface name at the Input
Interface Name: prompt.
IP Interface = s1b
2. Enter one of the following:
Input Filter =
– For the Input Filter field, enter the
or
desired filter name at the Filter
Output Filter =
Name (blank to disable
filtering): prompt.
NOTE: If you are using the default filter
Use an input filter to prevent packets
name as the input filter, the filter is
entering the DSL card through a
already bound to its corresponding
specified interface from being
interface.
forwarded.
– For the Output Filter field, enter the
desired filter name at the Filter
Name (blank to disable
filtering): prompt.
Use an output filter to prevent
packets from going out of the DSL
card through a specified interface.
B-8
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Input Screens
C
MCC Card Input Screens
The following table provides an alphabetical listing of all MCC screens. The
screens are listed by the name that appears in the “tab” in the upper-left corner of
the screen. The right column contains the menu selection sequence by which you
access the screen.
Table C-1. MCC Card Input Screens (1 of 2)
8000-A2-GB29-10
Screen Name
Menu Selection Sequence
Active Interfaces List
Monitoring → Interfaces → Active List (B-C-A)
Active Ports List
Monitoring → Physical Layer → Active List (B-B-A)
Add ARP Entry
Configuration → IP Router → ARP → ARP Entry (A-E-D-B)
Apply Code
Configuration → Card Status → Download Code → Apply
Code (A-A-G-B)
ARP Parameters
Configuration → IP Router → ARP → Parameters (A-E-D-A)
ARP Table
Monitoring → IP Router → ARP Table (B-E-B)
Card Alarms
Diagnostics → Alarms (D-B)
Card Information
Configuration → Card Status → Card Info (A-A-A)
Card Reset
Configuration → Card Status → Card Reset (A-A-F)
Configure DNS
Configuration → Card Status → DNS Setup (A-A-B)
Control Interfaces
Configuration → Interfaces → Control (A-C-C)
Download Code
Configuration → Card Status → Download Code →
Download Code (A-A-G-A)
Ethernet Ports
Configuration → Ports → Ethernet Ports (A-B-A)
Ethernet Statistics
Monitoring → Physical Layer → Ethernet Stats (B-B-B)
Filter Table
Configuration → IP Router → IP Router Filters (A-E-C)
Filter Table
Monitoring → IP Router → Filter Table (B-E-C)
May 1999
C-1
Input Screens
Table C-1. MCC Card Input Screens (2 of 2)
Screen Name
Menu Selection Sequence
General Card Information Monitoring → Card Status → Card Info (B-A-A)
C-2
HDLC Statistics
Monitoring → Network Protocol → HDLC Statistics (B-D-G)
ICMP Packet Statistics
Monitoring → Network Protocol → ICMP Statistics (B-D-E)
Interfaces
Configuration → Interfaces → General (A-C-A)
Interface Status
Monitoring → Interfaces → Status (B-C-B)
IP Host Table
Configuration → IP Router → Host Table (A-E-E)
IP Network
Configuration → Interfaces → IP Network (A-C-B)
IP Statistics
Monitoring → Network Protocol → IP Statistics (B-D-D)
Login History
Monitoring → Card Status → Login History (B-A-B)
Martian Networks
Configuration → IP Router → Martian Networks (A-E-B)
NVRAM Cfg Loader
Configuration → Card Status → NVRAM Cfg Loader (A-A-E)
NVRAM Clear
Configuration → Card Status → NVRAM Clear (A-A-D)
Ping IP Settings
Applications → Ping (C-A)
Radius Security
Configuration → User Security → Radius Security (A-D-B)
Reset DSL Slot
Configuration → DSL Cards → Reset Slot (A-G-B)
Remote Connect (Telnet)
Applications → Telnet (C-C)
Routing Table
Monitoring → IP Router → Routing Table (B-E-A)
Selftest Results
Diagnostics → Selftest (D-A)
Set IP Address
Configuration → DSL Cards → Reset Slot (A-G-A)
SNMP
Communities/Traps
Configuration → SNMP → Community/Traps (A-F-D)
SNMP Logical Entities
Monitoring → Network Protocol → Logical Entities (A-F-B
and A-F-C)
SNMP Security
Configuration → SNMP → Security (A-F-A)
SNMP Statistics
Configuration → SNMP → Security (B-D-F)
Socket Statistics
Monitoring → Network Protocol → Socket Statistics (B-D-A)
Static Routes
Configuration → IP Router → Static Routes (A-E-A)
Syslog
Monitoring → Card Status → Syslog (B-A-C)
TCP Data Statistics
Monitoring → Network Protocol → TCP Statistics (B-D-C)
Time/Date
Configuration → Card Status → Time/Date (A-A-C)
TraceRoute IP Settings
Applications → TraceRoute (C-B)
UDP Statistics
Monitoring → Network Protocol → UDP Statistics (B-D-B)
User Accounts
Configuration → User Security → User Accounts (A-D-A)
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Simple Network Management
Protocol
D
SNMP Overview
The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an application-level
protocol used in network management to gather information from network
devices. Each device runs an SNMP agent that collects data. A Network
Management System (NMS), such as Paradyne’s OpenLanet DCE Manager,
communicates to an SNMP agent on the DSLAM’s MCC card via SNMP to obtain
(get) specific parameters or variables.
Most communication between the DCE Manager and the MCC card originates
with a request message (Get) from the DCE Manager to the MCC card. When the
MCC card receives the SNMP Get request, the SNMP agent transmits a
response (positive or negative) to the DCE Manager. When certain significant
events occur within the SNMP agent, they can result in transmission of
unprompted SNMP trap messages to the DCE Manager.
This appendix describes what you need to know to configure the SNMP agent
within the Hotwire DSLAM. It also provides worksheets to help you plan and
record your SNMP configurations.
SNMP Version 1
The Hotwire DSLAM SNMP agent is SNMP Version 1 (V1) compliant with
community-based management. SNMP Version 1 supports the following:
8000-A2-GB29-10
H
Get Request
H
Get Next Request
H
Set Request
H
Get Response
H
Trap
May 1999
D-1
Simple Network Management Protocol
General SNMP Agent Configuration
Depending on your specific network configuration, various aspects of the SNMP
agent may need to be configured. For example, you may want to send SNMP
traps to a specific NMS manager. The system provides four default community
names (two read/write and two read-only) per MCC card. Community names are
similar to passwords.
Make sure that the SNMP NMS manager that receives SNMP trap messages
knows and uses the correct community name, as specified on the Hotwire
DSLAM. You can change default community names to match the name of the
SNMP NMS manager. Without the correct community name, the NMS manager
cannot communicate with the DSLAM.
As a minimum configuration, you must do the following on the SNMP
Communities/Traps screen so that an NMS can receive SNMP traps:
D-2
H
Assign an SNMP NMS manager’s address and community string by
specifying the SNMP NMS manager’s IP address. You can specify up to
three SNMP NMS managers for each community name.
H
Configure the generation of trap messages by specifying E (for Enable).
H
Enable/Disable the generation of authenticationFailure trap messages.
May 1999
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Simple Network Management Protocol
Community Strings
The four default community string names are:
H
public – read-only
H
mcc – read/write
H
nms – read/write
H
nms-2 – read-only
Each community string name can be assigned one of the following permissions:
8000-A2-GB29-10
H
ReadOnly
H
ReadWrite
H
NoAccess
May 1999
D-3
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNMP Gets and Sets
An SNMP “get” allows the management station to retrieve an object value from a
managed station.
To enable the “set” capability, the NMS manager needs the correct Read/Write
(R/W) community name. If security is enabled, the NMS manager’s IP address
must be specified with R/W privileges on the SNMP Security screen. This applies
only to MCC card SNMP security.
NOTE:
Before entering the IP address of the TFTP server, you must SNMP “set” the
configuration file name.
Settable Objects
Objects that can be set are listed below:
H
SNMP Authentication Failure Trap
H
All objects in ipNetToMedia Table
H
System Name, Location, and Contact in MIB II Systems Group
H
System Reset
H
Start Configuration Download
You can do an SNMP “set” for an object corresponding to the file name and
IP address of the TFTP server. If the SNMP-initiated configuration download
succeeds, the DSL card resets after the download and a CCN trap is sent. If
the SNMP-initiated configuration download fails, a failure trap is sent. These
traps are sent only if they have been configured on the SNMP
Communities/Traps screen.
D-4
H
Start Configuration Upload
H
DSL or MCC card Reset from MCC
H
Clear Statistics Registers
May 1999
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Simple Network Management Protocol
Supported Traps
SNMP defines six basic or standard traps. These messages are identified with a
value of 0 through 5 within the generic-trap field of the trap message. (Note that
the Hotwire DSLAM SNMP agent does not support trap messages with a value
of 5.) The specific-trap field of standard trap messages is set to 0 (zero). The
specific-trap field of enterprise-specific messages defines the trap.
The Hotwire DSLAM SNMP agent supports generation of the following standard
trap messages (specific-trap=0):
H
coldStart(0) – The sending SNMP agent reinitializes itself such that the
agent’s configuration may be altered.
H
warmstart(1) – The sending SNMP agent is reinitialized without altering the
agent’s configuration.
H
linkDown(2) – A link on the sending SNMP agent is no longer operational.
H
linkUp(3) – A link on the sending SNMP agent has become operational.
H
authenticationFailure(4) – The sending SNMP agent has received an
SNMP message specifying a community name which it does not recognize,
or requesting an action not permitted for the specified community.
The generation of SNMP trap messages can be selectively enabled per
configured community. Additionally, the authenticationFailure trap can be
selectively enabled for all configured communities that have traps enabled. If any
communities have the generation of trap messages enabled, then the generation
of authenticationFailure traps is determined by the state of the global
authenticationFailure switch.
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D-5
Simple Network Management Protocol
MCC Traps
Table D-1 lists some of the traps generated by the MCC card. Additional traps are
in the Paradyne DSL Enterprise MIBs. MIBs can be accessed through the
Paradyne Web site at www.paradyne.com. Select Service & Support → MIBS.
Table D-1. MCC Card Traps (1 of 2)
Event
Severity Comment
A power source
failure
minor
Power source A has failed
and the hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)tem is
now operating off one
source.
A power source
normal
normal
Power source A is now
operating normally.
Authentication
failure
minor
SNMP community string
mismatches.
4 MIB II (RFC 1213)
Authentication
failure
minor
Telnet and terminal
password mismatches.
This trap may be
overloaded for terminal
and Telnet based auth
failures. In these cases the
following is also sent with
the trap PDU:
– Access mode used
– Number of auth
failures
8 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
Trap # MIB
10 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
110 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
For SNMP-based failures,
no information is sent.
D-6
B power source
failure
minor
Power source B has failed
and the system is now
operating off one source.
B power source
normal
normal
Power source B is now
operating normally.
CCN
(Configuration
Change Notice)
warning
Configuration changed or
software upgraded.
7 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
Cold start
warning
MCC card is being
powered up.
0 MIB II (RFC 1213)
Configuration
download failure
warning
SNMP initiated TFTP
configuration download
has failed.
2 hot_diag.mib
(Enterprise MIB)
Device failure
major
—
Entity
Configuration
Change
warning
Configuration changed
due to differences
affecting Entity MIB.
1 Entity MIB
(RFC 2037)
Ethernet link
down
major
—
2 MIB II (RFC 1213)
May 1999
17 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
117 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
15 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
8000-A2-GB29-10
Simple Network Management Protocol
Table D-1. MCC Card Traps (2 of 2)
Event
Severity Comment
Trap # MIB
Ethernet link up
normal
—
3 MIB II (RFC 1213)
Fan module
failure
major
Fan module reporting
subnormal performance.
9 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
Fan module
operational
normal
Fan module back to
normal operation.
109 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
New card
detected
warning
New card detected by
MCC on slot poll.
111 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
Non-supported
MCC
warning
AN has detected MCC
firmware release too low to
support this device
20 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
Selftest failure
minor
Sent if any portion of
selftest fails.
16 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
Slot poll failure
major
No response to slot poll.
Responds to hardware
MIB query, but not general
poll.
11 hot_sys.mib
(Hotwire system)
Warm start
warning
MCC card reset.
1 MIB II (RFC 1213)
MIB Compliance
Various pieces of configuration, status, and statistical data within the Hotwire
DSLAM SNMP agent form a database of information that is accessible from the
DCE Manager. This collection of information is called a Management Information
Base (MIB). The basic definitions of the content of an SNMP agent’s MIB are
defined within various Internet Request for Comments (RFC) documents.
An HP OpenView MIB browser requires the operator to load the appropriate MIB
files into its database before it can manage the Hotwire DSLAM network. For
more information about DCE Manager, see the OpenLane DCE Manager for HP
OpenView for Windows User’s Guide or the OpenLane DCE Manager User’s
Guide.
The Hotwire DSLAM supports the following MIBs:
H
RFC 1213 – MIB II
— System Group
— ICMP Group
— UDP Group
— Transmission Group
— SNMP Group
8000-A2-GB29-10
H
RFC 1573 – Evolution of the Interfaces Group
H
RFC 2037 – Entity MIB
H
RFC 1643 – Ethernet
May 1999
D-7
Simple Network Management Protocol
System Group
The system group objects are fully supported.
Interfaces Group
The evolution of interfaces group (RFC 1573 converted to SNMP v1) consists of
an object indicating the number of interfaces supported by the unit and an
interface table containing an entry for each interface.
Extension to the Interface Table
Additional objects are supported for the interface table. They are based on
extensions to the Evolution of Interfaces Group of MIB II (RFC 1573).
IP Group
The IP group objects are supported by the MCC only, for all data paths
configured to carry IP data; namely the Ethernet and backplane interfaces of the
MCC. All objects in the IP Group are fully supported.
ICMP Group, MIB II
The ICMP Group objects are fully supported for all data paths carrying IP data;
namely the Ethernet and backplane interfaces of the MCC and the backplane
interface of each DSL card.
UDP Group, MIB II
The UDP Group objects are fully supported for all data paths carrying IP data;
namely the Ethernet and backplane interfaces of the MCC and the backplane
interface of each DSL card.
Transmission Group, MIB II
The Transmission Group objects are supported on the DSL, serial and Ethernet
ports. However, these objects are not defined with MIB II but through other
Internet-standard MIB definitions. Two Transmission Group objects are
supported:
D-8
H
enterprise (transmission 22) – The transmission object is supported on the
DSL interfaces.
H
dots (transmission 7) – This set of objects describes the Ethernet interfaces.
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNMP Group, MIB II
The SNMP Group objects that apply to a management agent are supported by
the MCC and DSL cards.
Ethernet Interface MIB
Ethernet MIB is described in RFC 1643, Managed Objects for Ethernet-like
interfaces.
The following objects of this MIB are supported for both the E1A interface and the
proxy agent for the RADSL SNs.
H
dot3StatsIndex
H
AlignmentErrors
H
FCSErrors
Entity MIB
The Entity MIB (RFC 2037) contains 5 groups.
OpenLane Network Management Systems Overview
The OpenLane Network Management products provide a method of monitoring,
analyzing, and troubleshooting DSLAM devices through graphical user interfaces.
The OpenLane products available are:
H
DCE Manager (UNIX and Windows versions)
H
Performance Wizard
Features of the DCE Manager
The OpenLane DCE Manager provides an integrated set of components used to
administer, configure, monitor and diagnose Paradyne’s Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) network access devices. It is available on HP-UX
and Solaris systems running the HP OpenView Network Node Manager or AIX
systems running NetView. The DCE Manager is integrated with HP OpenView
during the installation process. Any device that is discovered by HP OpenView
can be managed using the components of the DCE Manager.
The DSLAM uses the MCC card in conjunction with DCE Manager. The MCC
card provides the single management interface to the Hotwire DSLAM cards and
Service Nodes. The MCC card gathers operational status for each of the Hotwire
DSL cards in the DSLAM and Service Nodes, and reports events and alarms to
the DCE Manager.
This section lists only the DCE Manager features that are applicable to the
DSLAM devices. Use the DCE Manager to:
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
D-9
Simple Network Management Protocol
H
Perform administrative tasks
— Synchronize devices
— Set polling intervals or perform a demand poll
— Reset device firmware or cards
— Manage and unmanage device interfaces
— Display other submaps
— Obtain the identity of a device or device interface
H
Manage the configuration of devices and device interfaces
— Open a graphical display of the front or rear of a device
— Display and modify parameters
— Start a terminal session to perform tasks from a device’s craft interface
— Display information about Service Nodes on each DSL interface
H
Monitor and troubleshoot devices and device interfaces
— Use color-coded icons to report the status of devices and device
interfaces
— Obtain operational and administrative status on a device
— Identify the type of device, version number, release number, and more
For more information, see the OpenLane DCE Manager for HP OpenView for
Windows User’s Guide or the OpenLane DCE Manager User’s Guide.
D-10
May 1999
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Simple Network Management Protocol
Devices Supported by the DCE Manager
Table D-2 lists supported devices and major functions of the DCE Manager that
each device supports. A check mark (n) indicates that a function is supported.
Table D-2. OpenLane DCE Manager Functions
Functions
Supported
Devices
ID
Device Device
Status Display Config
5216, 5246
n
5446
n
n
n
n
7974, 7975,
7976, 7984,
7985, 7986
n
n
n
n
Tests
n
n
8100, 8200
8000-A2-GB29-10
8310, 8312,
8510
n
n
n
n
8540, 8546
n
n
n
n
8600, 8610,
8800, 8810
n
n
n
n
8774, 8775,
8776, 8784,
8786
n
n
n
n
May 1999
Trap
Device
Telnet Support Reset
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
D-11
Simple Network Management Protocol
Device Display
The OpenLane DCE Manager is integrated with HP OpenView during the
installation process. Thus, any device that is discovered by HP OpenView can be
managed using the components of the DCE Manager.
Depending on the type of operation you want to perform, some of the DCE
Manager functions are available from the HP OpenView menus. However, to use
all of the features of the DCE Manager, or to perform an action on a device
interface, you must open a Device Display. A Device Display shows a front or
rear view of a selected device and its associated interfaces.
Component
D-12
May 1999
IP Address, Host,
or Device Name
8000-A2-GB29-10
Simple Network Management Protocol
Monitoring Devices
You can both identify and obtain status of devices and device interfaces using
features of the DCE Manager. Specifically, you can:
H
Monitor devices and device interfaces through the use of color-coded icons.
H
Use the HP OpenView event log to view categories of events.
H
Obtain a description of a device or device interface.
H
Display detailed status on a device or device interface.
Using the HP OpenView Event Log
When HP OpenView is started, an Event Categories dialog is displayed. The
Event Categories dialog reads the HP OpenView Event Log and organizes all
alarms/events into groups that you can select and view through the Status Events
Browser dialog. Specifically, you can:
H
Use the HP OpenView Status Events Browser when an alarm or event is
received from a device.
H
Map DCE Manager device Alarm and Events categories to HP OpenView
Alarm and Event Categories.
H
Display SNMP traps for devices, including Event/Alarm Log formats.
H
Handle Proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) by logging and displaying
all events.
Using the HP OpenView Status Events Browser
When an alarm or event is received from a device, the HP OpenView Event Log
is updated. You can access the Event Log through the Status Events Browser,
which provides an entry for each alarm or event received.
Because devices have alarms and events that differ from those of HP OpenView,
the DCE Manager provides its own mapping for alarm and events. For additional
information, see the OpenLane DCE Manager for HP OpenView for Windows
User’s Guide or the OpenLane DCE Manager User’s Guide.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
D-13
Simple Network Management Protocol
Obtaining Identity and Status Information
Using the DCE Manager, you can obtain information that enables to you identify
and monitor devices and device interfaces. Specifically, you can:
H
Obtain a description of a device, DSL card, or the endpoint connected to the
DSL interface.
H
Obtain information on the state of a device or device interface.
Displaying the Identity of a Device and Device Interfaces
You can obtain a description of a device from within HP OpenView or a Device
Display. Likewise, you can obtain a description of a DSL card or the endpoint
connected to the DSL interface from within the Device Display only.
Displaying the Status of a Device or Device Interface
You can open a dialog, which provides you with information on the state of a
device from within HP OpenView or a Device Display. Status information on
devices interfaces is available within a Device Display only.
What is the OpenLane Performance Wizard?
The OpenLane Performance Wizardt application is used to collect and display
both real time and historical data on various network devices. Using this data, you
can monitor, analyze, and troubleshoot networks that use Frame Relay, T1, DDS,
DSL, MVL network devices, and other network devices that support MIB-2 Frame
Relay Transmission (RFC-1315), DS1 Transmission (RFC-1406), Frame Relay
Services (RFC-1604) MIB variables, and Paradyne Enterprise MIBs.
To collect information on network devices, you must use the Performance Wizard
to actively query device interfaces or DLCIs for both real time and historical data.
All data collected is compiled into reports based on report type.
Report types are grouped as follows:
H
Summary: Displays all activity on a link.
H
Integrity: Shows how well data is able to move over the link.
H
Diagnostics: Tracks the basic errors on a link that affect data movement.
H
Throughput: Indicates the flow of data that is able to travel through the
network to its destination.
H
Congestion: Specifies what in the network may be causing packets not to
arrive at the destination.
H
Analysis: Illustrates burst and end-to-end measurements.
For more information, see the OpenLane Performance Wizard User’s Guide.
D-14
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNMP Configuration Worksheets
This section provides worksheets to assist you in setting up general SNMP
configurations for the MCC card on your Hotwire DSLAM network, such as
defining communities, enabling traps, and preventing unauthorized access to the
DSLAM. Use the worksheets to record SNMP configuration parameters such as
community names and IP addresses for associated SNMP NMS managers for a
specific card. After the worksheets are completed, configure the SNMP agent via
the Hotwire DSLAM user interface.
Summary: Configuring the SNMP Agent
In summary, to configure the SNMP agent:
H
On the SNMP Communities/Traps screen, do the following:
— Assign an SNMP NMS manager to a community by specifying the SNMP
NMS manager’s IP address to a community name.
— Configure the generation of all trap messages (except for the
Authentication Failure Trap messages, which can be enabled or disabled
independently).
— Enable or disable the generation of Authentication Failure trap
messages.
H
8000-A2-GB29-10
On the SNMP Security screen, you can enter the IP addresses of specific,
approved SNMP NMS managers to prevent other managers from browsing
the Hotwire DSLAM network. Use this screen to prevent unauthorized access
to the DSLAM.
May 1999
D-15
Simple Network Management Protocol
Worksheet: Defining a Community and Enabling Traps
On the SNMP Communities/Traps screen, define a community by specifying the
SNMP NMS manager who will receive traps. Up to three managers can be
assigned for each community. Also, on this screen, you can enable or disable the
generation of traps.
D-16
Access the . . .
By . . .
SNMP Communities/Traps screen
Selecting
Configuration → SNMP → Communities/Traps
(A-F-D) from the Hotwire – MCC menu.
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNMP Communities/Traps
Prompt
Your Configuration Setting
1. Determine whether you want to enable
or disable Authentication Failure traps:
– Enter enable at the
Enable/Disable: prompt to
forward authentication failure traps
to all SNMP NMS managers
assigned to a community name.
– Enter disable at the
Enable/Disable: prompt to
prevent the forwarding of
authentication failure traps to all
SNMP NMS managers assigned to
a community name.
Authentication Failure Trap =
2. Change the default community names
at the Community Name: prompt if
desired. Hotwire DSLAM provides the
following default community names:
– public (RO – Read Only)
– mcc (RW – Read Write)
– nms (RW – Read Write)
– nms - 2 (RO – Read Only)
Record the Community Names (default or
new names) and their access permissions.
public or ____________________
Access permission =
mcc or
____________________
Access permission =
nms or
____________________
Access permission =
You can also change the access
nms – 2 or ____________________
permission for these communities. At
Access permission =
the ReadOnly (ro)/ReadWrite
(rw)/NoAccess (na): prompt,
specify the desired permission for each
community.
NOTE: Make sure the SNMP NMS
manager knows the correct community
name. It will need the correct
permission to access/browse the
Hotwire DSLAM.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
D-17
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNMP Communities/Traps
Prompt
Your Configuration Setting
3. For each community name, you can
public (RO) or ____________________:
enter IP addresses of up to three
H IP address =
SNMP NMS managers.
Port =
– At the (nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn):
Forward traps (E or D) =
prompt, enter the IP addresses of
H IP address =
the SNMP NMS managers.
Port =
NOTE: If you enter two consecutive
Forward traps (E or D) =
dots (.) in the IP address, the system
will interpret this as a dot-zero-dot (.0.). H IP address =
Port =
– At the Input Number: prompt,
Forward traps (E or D) =
enter the port number for each
SNMP NMS manager specified. All
mcc (RW) or
____________________:
traps will go to the specified port.
H IP address =
– At the Enable/Disable: prompt,
Port =
indicate whether or not you want to
Forward traps (E or D) =
enable or disable the generation of
traps. Enter E to enable traps. This
H IP address =
will forward traps to the specified
Port =
SNMP NMS manager. Enter D to
Forward traps (E or D) =
disable traps. This prevents the
forwarding of traps.
H IP address =
Port =
Forward traps (E or D) =
nms (RW) or
____________________:
H IP address =
Port =
Forward traps (E or D) =
H IP address =
Port =
Forward traps (E or D) =
H IP address =
Port =
Forward traps (E or D) =
nms – 2 (RO) or ____________________:
H IP address =
Port =
Forward traps (E or D) =
H IP address =
Port =
Forward traps (E or D) =
H IP address =
Port =
Forward traps (E or D) =
D-18
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Simple Network Management Protocol
Worksheet: Preventing Unauthorized Access
Use the SNMP Security screen to enable SNMP security (i.e., prevent
unauthorized managers from browsing or configuring the Hotwire DSLAM
network).
8000-A2-GB29-10
H
If address security is to be activated, it should be activated on the MCC and
all DSL cards.
H
If the NSP wants to allow an ISP or customer access to a limited set of DSL
cards, that NMS’s IP address should only be entered on those DSL cards in
the limited set.
Access the . . .
By . . .
SNMP Security screen
Selecting Configuration → SNMP → Security
(A-F-A) from the Hotwire – MCC menu.
May 1999
D-19
Simple Network Management Protocol
NOTE:
To completely disable SNMP access, do one of the following:
— Set the IP Address Security field to enable and do not enter any IP
addresses on the screen, or
— Set the IP Address Security field to enable and make sure that the IP
addresses entered on the screen are set to No Access.
SNMP Security
D-20
Prompt
Your Configuration Setting
1. Determine whether you want to enable
or disable IP address security:
– Enter enable at the
Enable/Disable: prompt to
enable (turn on) security.
– Enter disable at the
Enable/Disable: prompt to
disable (turn off) security.
IP Address Security =
2. At the (nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn) prompt,
enter the IP address of an SNMP NMS
manager(s).
NOTE: If you enter two consecutive
dots (.) in the IP address, the system
will interpret this as dot-zero-dot (.0.).
For each manager, specify the access
permission: NA (No Access), RO
(Read Only), or RW (Read Write).
NOTE: You can enter up to five SNMP
NMS managers.
H IP Address =
May 1999
Access =
H IP Address =
Access =
H IP Address =
Access =
H IP Address =
Access =
H IP Address =
Access =
8000-A2-GB29-10
Glossary
10BaseT
A 10-Mbps Ethernet LAN that works on twisted-pair wiring.
address
A symbol (usually numeric) that identifies the interface attached to a network.
address mask
A 32-bit mask used to identify the network and local portions of an IP address.
ARP
Address Resolution Protocol. Part of the TCP/IP suite, ARP dynamically links an IP
address with a physical hardware address.
authentication server
A server whose function is to authenticate and log an end-user’s access location.
backplane
A common bus at the rear of a nest or chassis that provides communications and power to
circuit card slots.
bandwidth
The range of frequencies that can be passed by a transmission medium, or the range of
electrical frequencies a device is capable of handling.
bit
Binary digit. The smallest unit of information, representing a choice between a one or a
zero (sometimes called mark or space).
BOOTP
Bootstrap Protocol. Described in RFCs 951 and 1084, it is used for booting diskless
nodes.
bps
Bits per second. Indicates the speed at which bits are transmitted across a data
connection.
byte
A sequence of successive bits (usually eight) handled as a unit in data transmission.
central office
CO. The PSTN facility that houses one or more switches serving local telephone
subscribers.
DCE Manager
See OpenLane DCE Manager.
default route
The address used for routing packets whose destination is not in the routing table. In
Routing Information Protocol (RIP), this is IP address 0.0.0.0.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A Microsoft protocol for dynamically allocating IP
addresses.
DHCP Relay Agent
A system that detects and forwards DHCP discover or request messages to the
appropriate DHCP server.
DHCP server
A server which uses DHCP to allocate network addresses and deliver configuration
parameters to dynamically configured hosts.
DNS
Domain Name System. An online distributed database that maps machine names into IP
addresses.
domain
A named group of machines on a network. In IP, a domain consists of a block of IP
addresses with similar prefixes.
downstream
In the direction of the customer premises.
DSL
Digital Subscriber Line. The non-loaded, local-loop copper connection between the
customer and the first node within the network.
DSLAM
Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer. A platform for DSL modems that provides
high-speed data transmission with POTS over traditional twisted-pair wiring.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
GL-1
Glossary
e1a
Interface name of the DSLAM system 10BaseT interface on the MCC and DSL cards.
Ethernet
A type of network that supports high-speed communication among systems. It is a
widely-implemented standard for LANs. All hosts are connected to a coaxial cable where
they contend for network access using a Carrier Sense, Multiple Access with Collision
Detection (CSMA/CD) paradigm.
Ethernet address
A six-part hexadecimal number in which a colon separates each part (for example,
8:0:20:1:2f:0). This number identifies the Ethernet communications board installed in a PC
and is used to identify the PC as a member of the network.
filter
A rule or set of rules applied to a specific interface to indicate whether a packet can be
forwarded or discarded.
FTP
File Transfer Protocol. A TCP/IP standard protocol that allows a user on one host to
access and transfer files to and from another host over a network, provided that the client
supplies a login identifier and password to the server.
gateway address
The subnet that the end-user system is on. This address, which is the e1a address of the
domain, is used as the return address when the authentication server responds.
HDLC
High-Level Data Link Control. A communications protocol defined by the International
Standards Organization (ISO).
ICMP
Internet Control Management Protocol. Internet protocol that allows for the generation of
error messages, tests packets, and information messages related to IP.
Internet
The worldwide internetwork, which predominantly uses the TCP/IP protocol.
intranet
A private network or internet using Internet standards and software, but protected from
public access.
IP
Internet Protocol. An open networking protocol used for internet packet delivery.
IP address
Internet Protocol address. The address assigned to an internet host.
ISN
Interservice Network.
ISP
Internet Service Provider. A vendor who provides direct access to the Internet.
LAN
Local Area Network. A privately owned and administered data communications network
limited to a small geographic area.
MAC
Media-specific Access Control. The lower of the two sublayers of the data link layer, the
MAC sublayer controls access to shared media.
MAC address
Media Access Control address. The unique fixed address of a piece of hardware, normally
set at the time of manufacture and used in LAN protocols.
GL-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Glossary
margin
The additional noise, measured in dB, that would need to be added to the existing noise on
a given DSL loop to bring the Bit Error Rate to IE–7 (107).
MCC
Management Communications Controller. The DSLAM circuit card used to configure and
monitor the DSLAM.
MIB
Management Information Base. A database of managed objects used by SNMP to provide
network management information and device control.
multiplexing
A method for interleaving several access channels onto a single circuit for transmission
over the network.
NAP
Network Access Provider. The provider of the physical network that permits connection of
service subscribers to NSPs.
NMS
Network Management System. A computer system used for monitoring and controlling
network devices.
NSP
Network Service Provider. A local telephone company or ISP that provides network
services to subscribers.
NTP
Network Time Protocol. A method for maintaining accurate local time with respect to radio
and atomic clocks on the Internet.
OpenLane DCE
Manager
A proprietary network management program used with HP OpenView that helps a network
administrator manage SNMP devices.
packet
A group of control and data characters that are switched as a unit within a communications
network.
PDU
Protocol Data Unit. A message containing protocol-specific information.
peer address
IP address used to indicate directly connected systems.
PING
Packet InterNet Groper. A program that is useful for testing and debugging networks. It
sends an Echo packet to the specified host, and waits for a response. It reports success or
failure and statistics about its operation.
POTS
Plain Old Telephone Service. Standard telephone service over the PSTN with an analog
bandwidth of less than 4 KHz.
POTS splitter
A device that filters out the DSL signal and allows POTS frequencies to pass through.
PPP
Point-to-Point Protocol. A protocol for packet transmission over serial links, specified by
Internet RFC 1661.
Proxy ARP
Proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP). A technique for using a single IP address for
multiple networks. A device responds to ARP requests with its own physical address, then
routes packets to the proper recipients.
PSTN
Public Switched Telephone Network. A network shared among many users who can use
telephones to establish connections between two points. Also known as dial network.
RADIUS
Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service. A user authentication protocol defined by
RFC 2058.
RADSL
Rate Adaptive Digital Subscriber Line. A technique for the use of an existing twisted pair
line that permits simultaneous POTS and high-speed data communication at adaptive
symmetric and asymmetric rates.
router
A device that connects LANs by dynamically routing data according to destination and
available routes.
routing table
A table used by a node to route traffic to another node in the multiplexer network.
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
GL-3
Glossary
RTU
Remote Termination Unit. A DSL device installed at the customer premises.
s1b
Interface name of the card’s interface to the DSLAM system backplane bus.
s1c
Interface name of a DSL card’s DSL port #1.
s1d
Interface name of a DSL card’s DSL port #2.
s1e
Interface name of a DSL card’s DSL port #3.
s1f
Interface name of a DSL card’s DSL port #4.
SDSL
Symmetrical Digital Subscriber Loop. A technique for the use of an existing twisted pair
line that permits high bandwidth, bidirectional transmission.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol. Protocol for open networking management.
SNMP agent
An application program that facilitates communication between an SNMP management
system and a device.
SNMP trap
A message sent to an SNMP manager to notify it of an event, such as a device being
reset.
static route
A user-specified permanent entry in a routing table that takes precedence over routes
chosen by dynamic routing protocols.
subnet mask
A number that identifies the subnet portion of a network address. The subnet mask is a
32-bit Internet address written in dotted-decimal notation with all the 1s in the network and
subnet portions of the address.
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol. An Internet standard transport layer protocol defined in
STD 7, RFC 793. It is connection-oriented and stream-oriented.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. The dominant protocol in the worldwide
Internet, TCP allows a process on one machine to send data to a process on another
machine using the IP protocol. TCP can be used as a full-duplex or one-way simplex
connection.
Telnet
Virtual terminal protocol in the Internet suite of protocols. Allows the user of one host
computer to log into a remote host computer and interact as a normal terminal user of the
remote host.
terminal emulation
Software that allows a PC to mimic the signals of a specific type of terminal, such as a
VT100 or 3270, to communicate with a device requiring that terminal interface.
TFTP
Trivial File Transfer Protocol. A standard TCP/IP protocol that allows simple file transfer to
and from a remote system without directory or file listing. TFTP is used where FTP is not
available.
TraceRoute
A program that prints the path to a destination.
upstream
In the direction of the telephone network.
XTACACS
EXtended Terminal Access Controller Access Control System. A user authentication
protocol, it is a Cisco extension of RFC 927.
GL-4
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Index
Numbers
C
10BaseT interface on the MCC and DSL cards (e1a),
3-1
Card Info screen, 4-12
card reset, 4-9, 4-13
screen, 4-9
Card Selection screen, 2-7, 2-8
Card Status Menu
Card Reset, 4-9
configuring Card Info, 4-5
description, 4-4
DNS Setup, 4-6
Download Code, 4-10
monitoring, 5-2
NVRAM Clear, 4-7
NVRAM Config Loader, 4-8
Time/Date, 4-6
changing
filters, 4-30
users, 4-23
changing MTU value, 4-17
Chassis Info, 2-7
Chassis Information screen, 2-8
checking alarms, 8-2
clearing NVRAM, 4-7
Communities/Traps screen, 4-42
community name, 4-40, 4-42
community structures, D-3
components
of a menu, 2-2
of a screen, 2-3
config error, 8-4
Configuration Menu, 2-12
Card Status, 4-4
DSL Cards, 4-43
Interfaces, 4-16
IP Router, 4-27
Ports, 4-15
SNMP, 4-38
Users/User Security, 4-22
configuration of the SNMP agent, D-2
A
access levels, 1-3, 4-23
accessing
Hotwire – DSL Menu, 2-11
Hotwire – MCC Menu, 2-9
system for the first time, 3-3
Active Interfaces List screen, 5-12
Active Ports List screen, 5-7
Active sockets, 5-15
Add ARP Entry screen, 4-31
adding
filters, 4-30
static routes, 4-28, 4-29
users, 4-23
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
adding cache parameters, 4-31
deleting cache entries, 4-32
Administrator access permission, 1-3, 4-23
alarm indication, 1-3
alarms
checking, 8-2
major, 8-3
minor, 8-4
analysis report, D-14
Apply Download screen, 4-11, 4-13
applying the download, 4-11
ARP Parameters screen, 4-37
ARP Table screen, 5-31
assigning IP addresses, 3-10
assigning s1b address, 3-9
Asynchronous Terminal Interface (ATI), 1-3
audience, vii
Authentication Failure traps, 4-40
automatically logging off, 2-14
B
basic card information, 4-5
basic configuration tasks, 3-6
binding a filter, B-7
bringing down interfaces, 4-19
bringing up interfaces, 4-19
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
IN-1
Index
configuration option tables
Card Status Menu, 4-12
DSL Cards Menu, 4-45
Interfaces Menu, 4-20
IP Router Menu, 4-33
SNMP Menu, 4-42
summary, 4-2
Users Menu, 4-26
configuration worksheets
filtering configuration, B-3
SNMP configuration, D-15
Configure Account screen, 4-23, 4-26
Configure DNS screen, 4-6, 4-12
configuring
ARP parameters, 4-31
basic card–level information, 4-5
DNS servers, 4-6
filters, 4-30
IP addresses for each DSL card, 4-43
IP addresses for the LAN port, 4-18
logical entities, 4-40
SNMP security, 4-38
static routes, 4-28, 4-29
congestion report, D-14
Control Interface screen, 4-19, 4-21
Control screen, 4-21
creating snmp community strings, 3-8
creating the default route, 3-7
D
data movement, monitoring, D-14
DCE Manager, D-1
features, D-9
supported devices, D-11
default, community names, 4-41
defining
a community, D-16
a filter, B-3
community names, 4-40
mappings between IP addresses and host names,
4-32
Delete ARP Entry screen, 4-32
deleting
filters, 4-30
static routes, 4-28, 4-29
users, 4-23
device and test monitoring, 1-3
devices, supported , D-11
diagnostic report, D-14
IN-2
diagnostics, 1-3, 1-5
disabling, Authentication Failure traps, 4-40
disabling SNMP access, 4-39
display area, 2-3
displaying
active interfaces, 5-12
active ports, 5-7
ARP table information, 5-31
additional interface status information, 5-13
Ethernet statistics, 5-8
filter information, 4-29, 4-30
filters, 5-32
general card information, 5-3
HDLC bus statistics, 5-10
HDLC statistics for the backplane (s1b), 5-27
IP statistics, 5-22
login history, 5-4
routing table statistics, 5-29
SNMP authentication statistics, 5-26
SNMP statistics, 5-24
socket statistics, 5-15
system errors, 5-5
TCP connection statistics, 5-20
TCP data statistics, 5-18
UDP statistics, 5-17
DLCIs, D-14
DNS setup, 4-6, 4-32
document summary, viii
Domain types, 3-2
Management domain, 3-2
Service domain, 3-2
Download Code screen, 4-13
Download screen, 4-10
downloading code, 4-10
downloading configuration data, 4-10
DS1 Transmission, D-14
DSL card
reset slot, 4-44
setting IP address, 4-43
DSL card not responding, 8-3
DSL Cards Menu
description, 4-43
Reset Slot, 4-44
Set IP Address, 4-43
DSL ports (s1c, s1d, s1e, and s1f), naming convention
of ports on the DSL card, 3-1
DSLAM
supported MIBs, D-7
system backplane interface (s1b), 3-1
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Index
E
H
e1a interface, 3-1
editing, filters, 4-30
editing passwords and privileges, 4-23
enabling
Authentication Failure traps, 3-8, 4-40
SNMP security, 4-38
SNMP traps, 4-40, D-16
entering card information, 4-5
Enterprise MIBs, D-14
Ethernet port failure, 8-3
Ethernet Statistics screen, 5-9
displaying LAN port statistics, 5-8
exiting from a login session, 2-7, 2-14
HDLC Bus Statistics screen, 5-10
displaying HDLC backplane port statistics, 5-10
HDLC Statistics screen, 5-27
host address rule type, B-2
Host Table screen, 4-37
Hotwire – DSL Menu, 2-11
Hotwire – MCC Menu, 2-9, 2-11
Configuration Menu, 2-12
Monitoring Menu, 2-13
Hotwire Chassis Main Menu, 2-7
F
failure
Ethernet port failure, 8-3
processor failure, 8-3
selftest failure, 8-3
use Ping screen, 8-5
use Telnet screen, 8-5
features, 1-1, 1-3
filter
binding a filter, B-7
configuration worksheets, B-3
defining a filter and rules, B-3
description, B-1
rule types, B-2
types of filters, B-2
Filter Table, configuration screen, 4-30
Filter Table screen, 5-32
filters
adding, 4-30
changing, 4-30
deleting, 4-30
displaying information, 4-29, 4-30
maximum, 4-29, 4-30
forwarding traps, 4-40
Frame Relay Transmission, D-14
G
General Card Information screen, 5-3
General screen, 4-20
8000-A2-GB29-10
I
initializing NVRAM, 4-7
input filter, B-2
input line, 2-4
integrity report, D-14
interface information, 4-17
interface naming convention, 3-1
Interface Status screen, 5-13
interfaces
bringing down, 4-19
bringing up, 4-19
testing, 4-19
Interfaces Menu
configuration, 4-16
Control Interface, 4-19
description, 4-16
General, 4-17
IP Network, 4-18
monitoring, 5-11
Interfaces screen, 4-20
intranetworking communication problems, 8-5
IP address
assigning to a DSL card, 4-43
configuring for LAN port, 4-18
in management domain, 4-18, 4-43
mapping address and host name, 4-32
IP addresses, managing, 4-32
IP Filter Configuration screen, 4-35, 4-36
IP Host Table, configuration screen, 4-32
IP Host Table screen, 4-37
IP Network screen, 4-18, 4-21
IP Router
ARP Table, 5-31
Routing Table, 5-29
IP Router Filters
configuration, 4-35
screen, 4-36
May 1999
IN-3
Index
IP Router Menu
ARP, 4-31
description, 4-27
Filter Table, 4-30, 5-32
Host Table, 4-32
Static Routes, 4-28, 4-29
IP Router screen, 5-29
routing table, 5-29
IP Statistics screen, 5-22
L
LAN port, configuring IP addresses, 4-18
letter navigation keys, 2-2
levels of diagnostic/administrative access, 1-3
local login, 2-3
logging out, 2-7, 2-14
login session, exiting, 2-7, 2-14
M
major alarms, 8-3
management domain
basic configuration, 3-6
components, 3-3
managing IP addresses and host names, 4-32
manually logging off, 2-14
Martian Networks screen, 4-34
Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU), 4-17
MCC card
entering card information, 4-5
features, 1-1, 1-3
reset, 4-9
software functionality, 1-4
summary of basic configuration, 3-6
menu
components, 2-2
format, 2-1
list, 2-2
title, 2-2
menus
a hierarchical view, 2-7
Card Status, 5-2
Card Status Menu, 4-4
DSL Cards Menu, 4-43
Interfaces, 5-11
Interfaces Menu, 4-16
IP Router, 5-28
IP Router Menu, 4-27
Network Protocol, 5-14
Physical Layer, 5-6
Ports Menu, 4-15
SNMP Menu, 4-38
Users/User Security Menu, 4-22
IN-4
MIB compliance, D-7
MIB variables, supported, D-14
minor alarms, 8-4
monitoring, device and test, 1-3
monitoring an interface, 4-19
Monitoring Menu, 2-13
Card Status, 5-2
Interfaces, 5-11
IP Router, 5-28
Network Protocol, 5-14
Physical Layer, 5-6
N
navigation keys, 2-5
network address rule type, B-2
network devices, monitoring and troubleshooting, D-14
network interface options, 4-20, 4-42
Network Management System (NMS), D-1
network problems, intranetworking communication
problems, 8-5
Network Protocol Menu, 5-14
HDLC Statistics, 5-27
IP Statistics, 5-22
SNMP Authentication Statistics, 5-26
SNMP Statistics, 5-24
Socket Statistics, 5-15
TCP Connection Statistics, 5-20
TCP Data Statistics, 5-18
UDP Statistics, 5-17
Network Protocol screen
SNMP statistics, 5-24
TCP statistics, 5-18
Network Time Protocol (NTP) server, 4-6
non–volatile database storage, 1-3
NVRAM, clear out, 4-7
NVRAM Clear screen, 4-7, 4-13
NVRAM Config Loader screen, 4-8, 4-13
O
obtain interface information, 4-17
Operator access permission, 1-3, 4-23
Operator Login screen, 2-6
organization of document, viii
output filter, B-2
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
Index
P
S
passwords
adding, 4-23
editing, 4-23
Performance Wizard, D-14
Physical Layer Menu, 5-6
port naming convention, 3-1
Ports Menu, 4-15
preventing unauthorized access, D-19
preventing unauthorized managers from browsing or
configuring, 4-38
processor failure, 8-3
product–related documents, ix
purpose of document, vii
s1b interface, 3-1
screen, components, 2-3
screen format, 2-1
Selftest screen
config error, 8-4
failure, 8-3
processor failure, 8-3
Set IP Address screen, 4-43
setting the time and date, 4-6
setup instructions, 3-1
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), D-1
community structures, D-3
configuring logical entities, 4-40
configuring security, 4-38
default community names, 4-41
enabling traps, 4-40
SNMP agent
configuration summary, D-15
defining a community, D-16
enabling traps, D-16
general configuration, D-2
overview, D-1
preventing unauthorized access, D-19
SNMP Authentication Statistics screen, 5-26
SNMP Communities/Traps screen, 4-40, 4-42
SNMP configuration worksheets, D-15
SNMP logical entities, 4-42
SNMP Logical Entities screen, 4-40
SNMP management systems, 1-3
SNMP Menu
description, 4-38
Security, 4-39
SNMP Security screen, 4-39, 4-42
SNMP Sets, D-4
SNMP statistics, 5-24
SNMP Statistics screen, 5-24
SNMP traps, D-5, D-16
socket address rule type, B-2
Socket Statistics screen, 5-15
software functionality
configuring the card, 1-4
monitoring the card, 1-5
troubleshooting and diagnostics, 1-5
starting an interface, 4-19
static route warning messages, 4-28– 4-42
R
RADIUS
Authentication, 4-24
Check screen, 4-25
Security, 4-22
real–time clock, 1-3
remote login, 2-3
Remote Termination Units (RTUs), 1-2
report types
analysis, D-14
congestion, D-14
diagnostic, D-14
integrity, D-14
summary, D-14
throughput, D-14
Reset
DSL card, 4-44, 8-2
DSL Slot screen, 4-44
MCC card, 4-9
System screen, 4-13
Reset DSL Slot screen, 4-45
restarting an interface, 4-19
Routing Table screen, 5-29
rule types
host address, B-2
network address, B-2
socket address, B-2
8000-A2-GB29-10
May 1999
IN-5
Index
static routes
adding, 4-28, 4-29
deleting, 4-28, 4-29
maximum, 4-28
Static Routes screen, 4-28, 4-29, 4-33
statistics
ARP table, 5-31
Ethernet, 5-8
HDLC, 5-27
HDLC bus, 5-10
IP , 5-22
routing table, 5-29
SNMP, 5-24
SNMP authentication, 5-26
socket, 5-15
TCP connection, 5-20
TCP data, 5-18
UDP, 5-17
status codes, 2-10
status line, 2-4
stopping an interface, 4-19
summary of
filter configuration, B-3
general SNMP agent configuration, D-15
summary of basic configuration, 3-6
summary report, D-14
supported MIBs, D-7
synchronizing the DSLAM’s clock, 4-6
syslog, 5-5, 8-2
system backplane interface (s1b), 3-1
system header line, 2-3
System Information screen, 4-5
T
TCP Connection Statistics screen, 5-20
TCP Data Statistics screen, 5-18
TCP statistics, 5-18
testing interfaces, 4-19
TFTP server
downloading from, 4-10, 4-11, A-5
uploading to, 4-8
throughput report, D-14
Time/Date screen, 4-6, 4-12
troubleshooting, 1-5
checking alarms, 8-3
configuration corruption, 8-4
DSL card not responding, 8-3
Ethernet port failure, 8-3
network problems, 8-5
processor failure, 8-3
selftest failure, 8-3
status codes, 8-1
U
UDP Statistics screen, 5-17
uploading configuration data, 4-8
User Accounts, 4-22
screen, 4-26
users
adding, 4-23
changing, 4-23
deleting, 4-23
users options, 4-26
Users/User Security Menu, description, 4-22
using, ARP submenu options, 4-31
W
warning messages for static routes, 4-28– 4-42
Who Am I screen, 3-4, 3-5
IN-6
May 1999
8000-A2-GB29-10
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