Undergraduate Prospectus

Undergraduate Prospectus
Undergraduate Prospectus
2016 Entry
Reasons to choose
St Andrews
Reasons to choose St Andrews
Intimate Study
Environment with
180
8,000
Student Clubs
& Societies
Students
60+
Sports Clubs
saints
sport
“Coming from a big city the
intimacy of a place like
St Andrews really stands out.
Couple this with such a diverse
and sociable student body, and
you won’t find a better place to
spend your student years!”
Jean-Luc
4
Year Degree Programmes
Offering Flexibility
and Choice
(London, England)
Top 3
UK University
“I really love St Andrews’
balance between the old and
the new – it’s an eclectic
mix of ancient tradition and
cosmopolitanism.”
Airashi
(Singapore)
Cosmopolitan
Community
Return to Contents
“St Andrews has offered me a
unique learning experience with its
emphasis on social traditions to its
friendly and personable teaching
staff. It is a close-knit community
and you really feel integrated in
the history of the town.”
Emily
(New York, USA)
Reasons to choose
St Andrews
1
Top UK
university
(2014 National Student Survey)
“The degree structure is both
flexible and supportive, allowing
you to experience a wide range
of topics before developing your
own favourites. In addition, I’ve
met some wonderful, like-minded
people.”
“St Andrews really feels homely
and welcoming. This combined
with the world-class academics and
the ability to be flexible in what
you study, choosing St Andrews
was really the best decision I’ve
ever made.”
Courtney
Callum
(Prague, Czech Republic)
(Edinburgh, Scotland)
Historical
Student Traditions
“When I began to explore my
options for university, something
about St Andrews kept nagging
at me. I wanted to know why it
brought so many people from all
over to such a remote corner of
the world.”
Omar
Stunning
Coastal Location
(Cairo, Egypt)
98%
Continuation Rate
600
Over
Years of Academic
Excellence
Return to Contents
Around
1 : 12
Academic Staff : Student
Ratio
2
Contents
Contents
Discovering St Andrews
Reasons to choose St Andrews
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover & 1
Subjects available by Faculty . . . . . . . . . 3
Principal’s Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Facts and Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Student Experience
Studying at St Andrews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Faculty of Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Faculty of Divinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Faculty of Medicine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Faculty of Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Accommodation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Student life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Student activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Sport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Services and Facilities
Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
IT Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Advice when you need it . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Applying to St Andrews
Money Matters
Fees and funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Scholarships and support . . . . . . . . . . . 33
How and when to apply . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Your qualifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Faculty Entrance Requirements. . . . . . 51
Beyond St Andrews
Academic subject pages. . . . 54 - 151
Careers and employability . . . . . . . . . . 34
The St Andrews connection . . . . . . . . . 37
Travelling to
St Andrews . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover
Alternative Study Routes
Lifelong and flexible study . . . . . . . . . . 38
General degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Bachelor of Arts
(International Honours) . . . . . . . . . 43
Contact details . . . Inside Back Cover
Study Abroad opportunities . . . . 44
English Language Teaching
English Language Teaching . . . . . . . . . . 46
Pre-degree programmes for
international students . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Visiting Days ies
of opportunit
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to come and
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Subjects available by Faculty
3
(Further information is also available – see: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/courses )
Ancient History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
– Ancient History and
Archaeology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Arabic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Art History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Classical Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Classics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
–Greek. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
–Latin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Comparative Literature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
– BA (International Honours). . . . . . . 43
Film Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Greek. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
–Classics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
– Ancient History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
– BA (International Honours). . . . . . . 43
– Mediaeval History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
– Mediaeval History and
Archaeology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
– Mediaeval Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
– Middle East Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
– Modern History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
– Scottish History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
International Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
– BA (International Honours). . . . . . . 43
Italian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Latin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
–Classics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Modern Languages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Music (not a degree course). . . . . . . . 132
Persian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Russian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Social Anthropology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Spanish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Cross-Faculty subjects
Faculty of Divinity
Divinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
– Biblical Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
–Hebrew. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
– New Testament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
– Theological Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
–Theology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Faculty of Medicine
Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Faculty of Science
Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
– Behavioural Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
–Biochemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
– Biomolecular Science . . . . . . . . . . . 60
– Cell Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
– Ecology and Conservation. . . . . . . 60
– Evolutionary Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . 60
– Marine Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
– Molecular Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
–Zoology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
– Biomolecular Science . . . . . . . . . . . 64
– Chemical Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
– Materials Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Earth Sciences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
– Environmental Earth Sciences . . . 86
–Geology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Neuroscience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
–Astrophysics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
– Theoretical Physics. . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
May Dip (J Alexander s )
Return to Contents
Economics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
– Applied Economics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
– BA (International Honours). . . . . . . 43
– Financial Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
– Management Science . . . . . . . . . . 120
Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
– Applied Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . 122
– Pure Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
–Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Sustainable Development. . . . . . . . . . 150
Colour Coding in the Prospectus
General information
Faculty of Arts subjects
Faculty of Divinity subjects
Faculty of Medicine
Faculty of Science subjects
Cross-Faculty subjects
Subjects
Faculty of Arts
Principal’s Welcome
4
Welcome
We are delighted that you are exploring the opportunities available
at St Andrews. In the pages that follow we have sought to provide
you with information about course offerings, research opportunities
and life beyond the classroom that we think you will need in order to
make an informed choice about where you would like to spend your
undergraduate years.
Like other ancient Scottish universities we are committed to a broadly
based education which encourages you to experiment intellectually
before specialising in your chosen field of study.
St Andrews is a unique combination of ancient and modern, local and
global. Founded in 1413 and once the centre of Scottish political and
religious life, St Andrews retains many marvellous mediaeval buildings,
juxtaposed with modern Science and Arts facilities. The town is small –
but it has a distinctly cosmopolitan air due to the presence of students
and teachers from over a hundred countries, as well as the constant infusion of visitors coming to experience the
spectacular scenery and famous golf courses. Most people who live here believe we have the best of both worlds.
St Andrews is one of the most popular and one of the most selective universities in the UK. Perhaps our most
distinguishing feature, however, is the strong sense of community reinforced by our size, location and the many
cultural and social activities in the University.
We hope that you will choose to join us at St Andrews and that after your time here you will join the ranks of our
alumni whose aspirations have been heightened, whose minds have been broadened, whose affection for the
University is indelible and who have formed friendships that last a lifetime.
Professor Louise Richardson FRSE
Principal and Vice-Chancellor
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Facts and
Figures
Support
1,150
Academic
1,100
Student FTE (Full Time Equivalent)
as of October 2014
Undergraduates
6,654
Postgraduates 1,552
of our students continue in their
studies; one of the best rates in the
UK and the highest in Scotland.
Teaching commenced in
University established in
St Andrews weather
1410
1413
Research quality
Top in Scotland and one of the UK’s
top 20 research universities in the REF
(Research Excellence Framework) 2014
and among the most research-intensive
universities in Europe.
TOP
20
Student experience quality
St Andrews has been judged to be one of the
UK’s top multi-faculty universities in the National
Student Surveys of 2006-2014. It continues to
perform strongly in national and international HE
league tables.
in Scotland &
in Scotland &
in Scotland &
in UK
1st
3rd
in UK
in UK
Complete
University
Guide 2015
UG Students
from
the UK/EU
Town population
(including students)
Times &
Sunday Times
University
Guide 2015
31%
69%
98%
Undergraduate students in
University-maintained accommodation c. 20,000
1st
3rd
Guardian
University
Guide 2015
UG Students
from
Overseas
44%
TOP
1%
TOP
40
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5
Facts and Figures
University Staff FTE (Full Time Equivalent)
as of 31 July 2014
1st
4th
Ranked amongst the top 1% of
universities in the world (QS World
Rankings and Times Higher Education
World Rankings)
Top 40 in the world for Arts and
Humanities (Times Higher Education
World Rankings)
Student Experience
Studying at
St Andrews
6
Studying at
St Andrews
Overview
At the University of St Andrews we have four Faculties:
•
•
•
•
Faculty of Arts
Faculty of Divinity
Faculty of Medicine
Faculty of Science
What is a module?
Although you will apply for a specific degree programme, your
admission will be to one of these Faculties. You will belong
to the same Faculty throughout your university career and
most of the subjects you study will be offered by Schools or
Departments within this Faculty. See the Subjects available by
Faculty (page 3) and information on entrance requirements
(page 51).
Cross-Faculty subjects
Some subjects are offered in both the Faculties of Arts and
Science, namely:
•
Economics, Geography, Management, Mathematics,
Philosophy, Psychology and Sustainable Development.
The content of the subject is the same irrespective of Faculty.
If you wish to study these subjects in the Faculty of Science
you will be required to choose at least two modules from the
following science subjects during your first two years: Biology,
Chemistry, Computer Science, Geography, Mathematics, Physics
or Psychology.
If these science subjects do not interest you then you should
choose the MA degree in the Faculty of Arts.
About our Honours degrees
Our undergraduate degrees, like those at other Scottish
universities, are studied full time over four years.
•
In the Faculty of Arts the degree is called a Master of
Arts (MA) which is equivalent to a Bachelor of Arts (BA)
elsewhere. However we are unique in also offering a BA
(International Honours) degree. See page 43.
•
In the Faculty of Science the typical degree is a Bachelor
of Science (BSc). We also offer extended undergraduate
programmes resulting in the award of a Master in
Biochemistry (MBiochem), Master in Chemistry (MChem),
Master in Geology (MGeol), Master in Mathematics (MMath),
Master in Physics (MPhys) and Master in Science (MSci).
These degrees are referred to as Integrated Masters degrees.
•
•
In the Faculty of Divinity the typical undergraduate degree
is a Master of Theology (MTheol). We also offer Master of
Arts (MA) in several subject areas of Divinity.
In the Faculty of Medicine the degree is called a Bachelor
of Science (BSc) Medicine. The St Andrews element of this
degree is three years in length, with further clinical training
taking place elsewhere (see pages 126 - 127).
The University operates a modular degree system. Modules
are self-contained courses which usually run for one semester.
Different modules are worth different amounts of credit;
passing the module gains you the appropriate number of
credits. A student usually takes modules worth 120 credits in
each year of study. All these credits then count towards the
total required for your degree.
Can I take modules from another Faculty?
You must take the specified modules for your particular degree
programme but it is possible within your overall programme of
study to take up to 80 credits in total from another Faculty. There
are, however, sometimes restrictions for very popular subjects
because priority is always given to students already within that
Faculty.
Students who are not in the Faculty of Medicine will be unable
to study any element of the Medicine programme.
Years One and Two (Sub-honours): breadth and flexibility
Study in the first two years is reasonably flexible and gives you
a chance to enrol in other subjects in addition to the ones you
applied for. There are a few constraints on this depending on
the particular modules you are choosing, including possible
timetable clashes. Students in the Faculty of Medicine take
a fixed programme of predetermined modules both at subhonours and Honours.
We recognise that many students are at first unsure of the
degree programme to which they wish to commit themselves.
You must take the first year modules in the subject(s) for which
you have been accepted, and then you are able to choose your
other modules from a wide range. You should check in which
Faculty these subjects are offered before deciding on whether to
apply for an MA or BSc degree (see pages 8 - 14).
The broad base and flexible nature of study at St Andrews will
offer you an opportunity to discover your specific strengths and
interests in first and second year before finalising your degree
intentions for more specialist and in-depth study at Honours
level (third and fourth year).
Typically you will study (see diagrams on pages 8 - 14):
•
•
•
3 subjects in first year
2 or 3 subjects in second year (2 usually continued from
first year)
1 or 2 subjects at Honours level depending on Single/Joint
Honours decision (see opposite).
Return to Contents
Studying at
St Andrews
7
Years Three and Four (Honours): specialism and depth
At the end of your second year, if your work has reached the
required standard, you can make a final choice of Honours
programme from the second year subjects that you have
studied. It is in the final two years that you will be able to
specialise and gain an in-depth knowledge of your chosen
subject(s). Students who do not meet the Faculty threshold to
progress to an Honours degree may qualify to progress to the
MA/BSc General degree (see page 39).
Honours programmes are of different types:
•
•
•
Single Honours degrees – just one subject in the final two
years.
Joint Honours degrees – two subjects in the final two years
where the required credits are typically 50% in each subject.
“With” degrees involve the study of two subjects in the
final two years on a Major-Minor basis where most credits
are gained in one (Major) subject, and the rest in one other
(Minor) subject.
There are also some degrees such as Mediaeval Studies or
language combinations in which up to three subjects may be
taken in varying proportions.
Contact hours and semester dates
For information on time in lectures, seminars and tutorials see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/coursecatalogue
Semester 2015-2016 dates can be found at:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/semesterdates
•
•
•
Fieldwork: many subjects include compulsory or optional
fieldwork from an early stage in the vicinity of St Andrews
and elsewhere.
Audio-visual and computer-assisted learning: our stateof-the-art facilities support learning through other forms of
collaborative and independent learning.
Placements in a clinical environment for Medical students or
teaching abroad for Modern Languages students.
Honours students sometimes take part in residential reading
parties. These weekend ‘mini-conferences’ allow students and
staff to discuss their subject in an informal atmosphere and are
usually held at ‘The Burn’. This is a large country house in Angus,
set in its own beautiful grounds and used as a conference centre
by Scottish universities.
Assessment
Modules are normally assessed in the semester in which
they are taught, by examination, continuous assessment
(coursework) or, in most cases, a combination of these. You will
receive feedback on every assessment with a view to improving
your performance in the future. If you fail an assessment for
a particular module you may be offered an opportunity to be
re-assessed.
Passing a module entitles you to receive the credits for that
module. You will also receive a grade for each module taken
which will appear on a transcript available on the completion of
your studies.
Adviser of Studies
How will I be taught?
Student numbers vary from subject to subject. First and second
year classes are larger than more advanced classes in most
subjects.
• Lectures: the basic method of teaching undergraduate
students given by specialists in particular subjects, ensuring
that all students receive the same key information while
developing note taking and summarising skills.
• Tutorials and Seminars: selected topics are discussed
in smaller groups and analysed on the basis of prepared
written work and/or presentations by students; ensuring
that you develop analytical and communication skills. They
also help promote the excellent relationship between staff
and students which exists at St Andrews.
• Independent study: enables you to become increasingly
self-reliant in the way you manage your time and organise
your work, encouraging a more scholarly approach to
independent study.
• Laboratory work: advanced equipment and techniques may
be used to conduct experiments under expert supervision,
allowing you to put theoretical knowledge into practice.
All undergraduates are assigned to an Adviser of Studies whom
you must see at the start of each semester to discuss your
choices and have them approved. Advisers are also available
for consultation at other times and are always ready to discuss
any academic-related problems that may arise. The Adviser will
guide you through the complexities of the modular structure
to ensure that any desired degree pathways, or options, remain
accessible.
Refer to the Course Catalogue for the individual degree
programme requirements.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/coursecatalogue
Degree classification
Honours degrees are classified according to how well you
have performed in the final two years (or in the final three for
Integrated Masters degrees), and you are awarded with First
Class Honours, Second Class Honours (2.1 or 2.2), or Third Class
degree.
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Faculty of Arts
8
Faculties
Faculty
of Arts
The Faculty provides a variety of modular programmes leading to the degree of
Master of Arts (MA). Degrees awarded are:
MA (Master of Arts) Honours (four years) – 480 credits
BA (International Honours) (four years) – 480 credits (including College of William &
Mary equivalents). See page 43.
Student Experience
MA (Master of Arts) General (three years) – 360 credits (UCAS code Y001, see
description of General degree on page 39).
Please note the specific degree requirements in the subject pages 54 - 151.
Also see the Arts Faculty Entrance Requirements on page 51.
Modules are available in the following subject areas:
Ancient History, Arabic, Art History, Classical Studies, Comparative Literature, Divinity,
Economics, English, English Language TeachingS, Film Studies, French*, Geography,
German*, Greek*, Hebrew, Information TechnologyS, International Relations*,
Italian*, Latin*, LinguisticsS, Management, Mathematics*, Mediaeval History,
Modern History*, MusicS, PersianS, Philosophy, Psychology, Russian*, Scottish History,
Social Anthropology, Spanish*, Statistics*, Sustainable Development.
*
Certain modules have further pre-requisites – see the subject pages 54 - 151 or
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/coursecatalogue for more information.
S
These subject areas are not full degree programmes.
“The Faculty of Arts is ranked very
highly for its excellence in research and
teaching. Arts students join a scholarly
community which is conducting
innovative research and we aim to
make your experience at St Andrews
exciting and challenging. It is a chance
to develop your thinking and skills in
an atmosphere that is both supportive
and cutting edge.”
Professor Kristin De Troyer
Dean of Arts & Divinity
Possible routes to a Single or Joint MA Honours (Arts or Divinity) Degree
First and Second Years
First Year
(Study 3 subjects in each semester)
Subject A
Second Year
(Study 3 subjects
Subject A
in each semester)
+
+
+
Subject B
Subject B
OR Subject C
+
Subject C
Subject C* OR
Subject D
Third and Fourth Years (Honours)
Single Honours
(Study modules in 1 subject)
Subject A
OR
modules
Joint Honours
(Study modules in 2 subjects)
Subject A
+ Subject B
modulesmodules
(Choose three subjects from the list of modules above)
Subject A must be the degree subject for which you were offered a place.
Subject B must be the other subject if you were accepted for a Joint Honours programme.
* Subject C may only be taken once, if it is taken instead of Subject B in second year, then the third subject would be Subject D.
For an illustration of how this structure applies to an actual degree, see opposite page.
We also offer a number of Triple Honours programmes within the School of Modern Languages.
Further details can be found in the subject pages, 54 - 151.
For information on how these programmes are arranged in the Honours years, please
contact Admissions by email: [email protected]
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9
“Since I applied to do Joint Honours Economics and Modern
First Year – Semester 1
Microeconomics
The Early Modern Western World (c.1450 - c.1770)
Introduction to International Relations
Semester 2
Macroeconomics
Themes in Late Modern History (c.1776-1989) ~
Foreign Policy Analysis and International Security
Scotland, Britain and Empire (c.1500 - 2000)
Theoretical Approaches to International Relations
Old Testament 1: Torah and Prophets
Semester 2
Introduction to Middle Eastern History
History as a Discipline: Development and Key Concepts
Issues in International Relations
Third Year – Semester 1
Anglo-American Relations since 1939: The Special Relationship?
International Relations of the European Union
Semester 2
The United Nations since 1945
Fourth Year – Semester 1
Shadows in the Global Political Economy
Warmongers and Peacemakers: Religious Actors and Conflict
Whole Year
Honours Dissertation in International Relations
instead switched my third module to Divinity in Semester
1 and Middle Eastern history in Semester 2. Divinity was
very different from previous modules I had taken and
therefore proved to be challenging, but was fascinating
and actually helped prepare me for some of the material
in my Middle Eastern history module. Scotland, Britain
and Empire was an excellent module, especially since
I had very little prior knowledge of British history. This
module was highly useful for my Anglo-American
Relations course the following year.”
ones across multiple regions and themes. Within each
module, I was particularly focused on economic themes
given my economics foundation and interest in finance.
The European Union module was taught by Dr Fraser
Cameron, a former senior leader of the EU and president
of multiple Brussels-based think tanks. His knowledge
of the field made tutorials particularly engaging and
informative.”
“For my final year, I am completing a full year dissertation
Semester 2
Access to IR 1000-level modules is restricted - see page 114 for details
Date range is now (c.1776-2001)
“For my Honours modules I took a variety of different
~
“After first year, I decided to stop taking Economics and
International Political Economy
History, I took the two compulsory modules for both of
these subjects. I particularly enjoyed Macroeconomics
since it closely relates to current events and global financial
affairs. As my third subject, I took International Relations*,
which was the best decision I could have made since I
ended up loving it so much that I switched my full degree
to IR after first year. I find the subject particularly interesting
since it combines current affairs with critical thinking and
political theory.”
*
Second Year – Semester 1
Faculty of Arts
Miles, from Atlanta, Georgia, USA is in his fourth
(final) year of an MA (Hons) degree in International
Relations. He applied for Joint Honours Economics
(Subject A
) and Modern History (Subject B
).
After his first year he changed his degree intention to
MA (Hons) in International Relations (Subject C
).
He also took a Divinity module (Subject D
).
(See diagram page 8.)
on the topic of emerging markets. Since I knew both my
dissertation and Shadows in the Global Political Economy
module would concentrate on economic issues, I wanted
to spend my final semester taking a module different from
any others I have taken for Honours. Therefore, I selected
Warmongers and Peacemakers to learn more about religion
and international politics. Additionally, I was able to use
much of the insight I learned in my previous Middle Eastern
history and Divinity modules for this degree.”
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Student Experience
Faculty of Divinity
10
Faculty of Divinity
MTheol (Master of Theology) Honours – 480 credits. This degree is the most
popular Honours degree taken by Divinity undergraduates. For Entrance
Requirements – see page 78. See diagram below.
MA (Master of Arts) Honours – Biblical Studies or Theological Studies or various
Joint Honours combinations of subjects taught within the Faculty of Divinity
with other Arts subjects. The degree awarded is Master of Arts and subject to the
regulations applying to the Arts Faculty. See diagram on page 8 for the structure
of Joint Honours Degrees. For Faculty Entrance Requirements – see page 51.
Please note the specific degree requirements in the subject pages 54-151.
St Mary’s College Bursaries
You are eligible to apply if you are a Divinity student, but not if you are an Arts
student taking Divinity modules (MA Theological Studies and MA Biblical Studies
students are eligible). www.st-andrews.ac.uk/divinity/current/ug/bursaries
First & Second Year modules in Divinity
Old Testament (with optional Hebrew), New Testament (with optional Greek),
Theology (Systematic Theology and Philosophy of Religion), Church History
– Practical Theology (social and pastoral theology and ethics). Combinations
depend on your degree choice.
Modules available in the
following other subject areas:
Ancient History, Arabic, Art History,
Classical Studies, Comparative
Literature, Divinity, Economics,
English, English Language TeachingS,
Film Studies, French*, Geography,
German*, Greek*, Hebrew, Information
TechnologyS, International Relations*,
Italian*, Latin*, LinguisticsS,
Management, Mathematics*,
Mediaeval History, Modern History*,
MusicS, PersianS, Philosophy,
Psychology, Russian*, Scottish History,
Social Anthropology, Spanish*,
Statistics*, Sustainable Development.
*
Certain modules have further pre-requisites
– see the subject pages 54-151 or
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/coursecatalogue
for more information.
S
These subject areas are not full degree
programmes.
“The School of Divinity is a worldrenowned centre of excellence in research
and teaching, ranked third in the UK in
the Guardian University Guide 2015, and
a score of 100% for Student Satisfaction
in the National Student Survey. We offer
innovative programmes, outstanding
teachers, and an exceptionally close-knit
College community – all housed in unique,
historic buildings. Contact or visit us to see
just how much we have to offer!”
Professor Kristin De Troyer
Dean of Arts & Divinity
The route to an MTheol Honours Degree
First Year
Six modules each of 20 credits
Semester 1
Semester 2
Semester 1
Semester 2
Semester 1
Semester 2
Semester 1
Semester 2
DI1001
DI1003
20 credit module in any subject
20 credit module
DI1012
DI1006
in any subject
Second Year
Six modules each of 20 credits
with at least 80 credits in specified modules
(60 credits from DI2000, DI2001, DI2003, DI2006;
20 credits from one of the above or a list of other
approved modules; 40 credits free choice)
20 credit
20 credit
20 credit module required module
required module
in any subject
20 credit
20 credit
20 credit module required module
required module
in any subject
Third Year
Eight out of ten 15-credit modules must be completed
to total 120 credits
DI3701DI3702DI3711DI3712
DI3703 or
DI3714 or
DI3705
DI3713
DI3704DI3715
Fourth Year
Modules of different values at 3000 and 4000 level to total
120 credits. 60 credits in each of the two semesters. At least 90
credits taken in third and fourth years must be at 4000 level.
30 more credits
DI4499 (60 credit
year-long dissertation)
30 more credits
(See example on page 11 where module titles are included.)
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11
First Year – Semester 1
Theology: Issues and History (DI1001)
Ethical Controversies
Psychology 1
“In my first year I completed the core introductory
modules for both Theology and Psychology as I was
working towards a Joint Degree, and chose Philosophy
modules as my third subject as I had enjoyed it at
school and I wanted to see if I should continue it
throughout my degree. It is great that you can choose
such a wide range of subjects and keep your options
open in first year.”
Semester 2
Living Faith (DI1012)
Society, Authority and Freedom
Psychology 2
Second Year – Semester1
Christian Thought and Practice 1 (DI2000)
Old Testament 1: Torah and Prophets (DI1003)
Psychology 1
Faculty of Divinity
Hannah, from Oldham, Rutland, England, applied
to do an MA (Hons) Theological Studies
,
thought about Joint Honours Psychology and Theology
in second year, and then
reverted back to her original choice of
Theological Studies in third year.
Other modules in the Faculty of Arts
.
(See diagram on page 10.)
“By the beginning of second year I decided to drop
Semester 2
The Early and Mediaeval Church: History, Beliefs and
Practices (DI2006)
Psychology 2
Philosophy and focused my attention on my Joint Degree
subjects, and completed the compulsory modules in
both. For my additional credits I chose to complete a first
year module, something St Andrews allows. I studied
the Old Testament, a Biblical module, as I had no prior
experience of this area and again left my options open for
my degree. This gave me a good grounding in knowledge
of the foundations of the Bible, something that has been
invaluable to my chosen degree.”
Third Year – Semester 1
Reading in Patristic Theology (DI3701)
Reading in Mediaeval Theology (DI3702)
The Study of Theology
“In third year I decided to move to Single Honours as
Semester 2
Reading in Modern Theology (DI3705)
Reading in Reformation and Early Modern Theology (DI3703)
The Theology of the Musical
Fourth Year – Semester 1
“In my fourth year I was lucky enough to gain a place on the
Communication in Divinity
Communication and Teaching in Arts and Humanities
Semester 2
Theological Anthropology
Whole Year
I had found a love for Theology. Completing the core
reading modules provided an overview of the major
figures across history, as well as aiding my confidence
in exploring and questioning. Choosing my further
two modules was hard due to the wide range, but I
chose things that sounded interesting, and they were.
I especially enjoyed The Theology of the Musical in
Semester 2 as it was completely different, and certainly
something I will make reference to in my teaching
career.”
Honours Dissertation in Divinity: Full Year (DI4499)
teaching module the University offers, allowing me to create
a partnership with a Fife secondary school, providing me with
the opportunity to assist and lead lessons. Complimenting
this I took a module researching problems faced when
teaching RE in secondary schools. I chose my additional
Honours module based on the title; it was something
completely new to me but exciting. I also completed the yearlong dissertation, something that has its up and downs, but
allows you to truly follow your specific interests.”
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12
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Faculty of Medicine
Faculty Entrance Requirements – see page 126.
The route to a Medicine BSc Honours Degree
Semester 1
Semester 2
First Year
Two modules each of 60 credits
MD2001
Foundations of Medicine 1
MD2002
Foundations of Medicine 2
Faculty of Medicine
The Faculty provides a programme leading to an Honours degree,
BSc (Honours) Medicine, which lasts for three years and qualifies for entry
to the clinical school in the Universities of Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh,
Glasgow or Manchester.
When you register for the BSc (Honours) Medicine degree you must take the
full three-year programme. Progression to the second and third years of the
course is obtained by achieving a suitable level of pass in all modules in the
previous year.
Unlike other subjects in the University, there are no 1000-level Medicine
modules. In first year, students of Medicine begin with 2000-level modules.
See diagram below.
13
“Studying medicine at St Andrews is designed
to give an outstanding grounding in the
sciences that support medicine. In addition,
there is a significant introduction to clinical
skills. We have outstanding anatomy facilities
as well as clinical skills facilities that support
these. The course which concludes with a
dissertation in a medical subject area leads to
an Honours BSc and substantial knowledge of
medical science allowing effective learning in
later clinical years as well as facilitating lifelong learning.”
Professor David Crossman
Dean of Medicine
Second Year
Two modules each of 60 credits
Semester 1
Semester 2
Semester 1
Semester 2
MD3001
(Cardiovascular & Respiratory Systems)
MD3002
(Reproductive, Renal &
Gastrointestinal Systems)
Third Year
One module each of 60, 40 and 20 credits
MD4001
(Central Nervous System &
Endocrine System)
MD4003
MD4002
(Applied Medical
(Student Selected)
Science)
“There is a well-designed integrative approach to the teaching with
hands on dissection and an in-depth study of several aspects of
medicine, including physiology as well as the study of disease processes,
I have gained a detailed, logical understanding as to how the human
body functions.”
Connor
(Glenrothes, Fife, Scotland)
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Faculty of Science
14
Faculty of Science
The Faculty provides a variety of modular programmes leading to an Honours
degree in Science. Degrees awarded are:
BSc (Bachelor of Science) Honours lasting for four years – 480 credits
MBiochem (Master in Biochemistry) Honours lasting for five years* – 600 credits
MChem (Master in Chemistry) Honours lasting for five years* – 600 credits
Student Experience
MGeol (Master in Geology) Honours lasting for five years* – 600 credits
“If you choose to study Science at St Andrews
you will be joining a Faculty with a long
tradition of excellence in teaching and
research. Each of the seven academic Schools
– Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science,
Geography & Geosciences, Mathematics
& Statistics, Physics & Astronomy and
Psychology & Neuroscience will welcome
you into a close-knit community and ensure
a world-class learning experience.”
MMath (Master of Mathematics) Honours lasting for five years *– 600 credits
MPhys (Master in Physics) Honours lasting for five years* – 600 credits
MSci (Master in Science) Honours generally lasting for five years – 600 credits
BSc (General Bachelor of Science) lasting for three years – 360 credits
– see description of General degree on page 39
Gateway to Computer Science (see page 74)
Gateway to Physics and Engineering (see page 138)
*Five-year Integrated Masters programmes are designed for those who seek to specialise in
the subject after graduation. Most of these can be taken in four years through Direct Entry to
Second Year or entry with advanced standing. (See page 49 - Direct Entry to Second Year and
Recognition of Prior Learning.)
In first year the choice of modules (see
below) is considerable allowing you
to expand your interests by taking
new subjects, some of which require
no previous knowledge. You can
choose three different science subjects
with the possibility of pursuing any
one to Honours level. However,
some students do not want such a
broad first year and you have the
opportunity to focus your first year
studies on your primary interest.
Entry to most second year modules is
obtained by passing the appropriate
first year modules. However, suitably
well-qualified candidates with
appropriate qualifications may be
offered Direct Entry to Second Year
or entry with advanced standing (see
page 49) and thereby complete their
degree in one year less.
Modules available in the
following subject areas:
Astronomy & Astrophysics, Biology,
Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth
Sciences, Economics, Geography,
Geology, Information Technology*,
Philosophy**, Mathematics,
Neuroscience, Physics, Psychology,
Statistics, Sustainable Development.
*
Professor Alan Dearle
Dean of Science
Structure of a typical BSc Single or Joint Honours (Science)
First Year
(Study 3
subjects in
each semester)
Second Year
(Study 2
subjects in
each semester)
First and Second Years
Subject A
+
Subject A
+
Subject B
Subject B
+
Subject C
OR Subject C
Third and Fourth Years (Honours)
Single Honours
(Study modules in 1 subject)
Joint Honours
(Study modules in 2 subjects)
Subject A
Subject A
OR
+ Subject B
modules
modules modules
(Choose three subjects from the list of modules available noted on left)
Subject A must be the degree subject for which you were offered a place.
Subject B must be the other subject if you were accepted for
a Joint Honours programme.
Some subject areas offer a range of degrees with slightly different structures.
Studying three different subjects is not compulsory, depending on your degree
choice. You might do two different modules in the same area of science.
Further details and subject-specific diagrams are available for Biology (page 61),
Chemistry (page 65) and Computer Science (page 76).
Please note that Information Technology
is not a full degree programme.
** BSc Philosophy programmes are under
review.
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15
Faculty of Science
Lauren, from Dunoon, Argyll, Scotland, applied
to do a Single Honours BSc Biology degree,
but after fourth year changed to BSc Molecular
Biology.
Biology modules
Cross-Faculty modules (available in either
Arts or Science)
“In both first and second semester I studied all the core modules
First Year – Semester 1
Biology 1
Psychology 1
Management - Organisations and Society
in Biology. I also did modules in Psychology and Management.
I had never studied either of these subjects before as they were
not offered in my school. Therefore, I thought it would be a
great opportunity to try something brand new in my first year at
university.”
Semester 2
Biology 2
Psychology 2
Management- Organisations and Analysis
“In second year I decided to focus on my degree subject in
Second Year – Semester1
Biology and not continue with Psychology or Management.
This meant I could take four out of the five Biology modules in
second year and this gave me the freedom to choose any of the
modules offered in my Junior Honours year (third year). This was
particularly useful as at this point I still was not sure what area
of Biology I wanted to complete my degree in.”
Cell Structure and Function
Zoology
Semester 2
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Comparative Physiology
“I decided to change my degree from BSc in Biology to BSc
Third Year – Semester 1
Advanced Critical Analysis Reading Party
Statistical and Quantitative Skills for Biologists
Protein Structure and Function
Molecular Biology as I had been more interested in the molecular
aspects of the subject during my first two years. The switch
was extremely easy and my Adviser of Studies was very helpful.
Choosing modules for Junior Honours (third year) was difficult as
there were so many choices on offer. They ranged from modules
on whole organisms and ecosystems to those focusing on cells
and viruses. For the reading party module we spent a week at a
beautiful country estate in Perthshire learning how to critically
analyse scientific papers and getting to know other students. I
also took modules that complemented my interest in molecular
biology and biochemistry such as infection and disease and
protein structure and function.”
Gene Regulation
Semester 2
Membranes and Cell Communication
Bioenergetics
Infection and Disease
Fourth Year – Semester 1
“In fourth year I am now focusing on virology and as part of my
Molecular Virology
Bacterial Virulence Factors
Practical Skills for Moelcular Biology and Biochemistry
Communication and Teaching in Science
Semester 2
Experimental Research Project
dissertation, will be helping in a lab that is researching and
developing a vaccine for foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). The
practical skills module will help me learn and strengthen the lab
techniques I have learnt over the past three years so that I am ready
to do my project in Semester 2. In addition, in Semester 1 I am taking
three molecular modules. These are all based on our lecturer’s
current and previous research and I find it very interesting to be
taught by the people who did the research themselves. My interdisciplinary module in teaching allows me to work in a high school
in Fife for one semester and carry out a project with a class.”
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Accommodation
Accommodation
Starting university is an exciting time and finding the right
place to live is important.
Student Experience
16
The University has nearly 4,000 study bed spaces and a
fantastic variety of accommodation.
We recommend that you visit Student Accommodation
Services’ webpages for up-to-date fee information, and please
take a few moments to familiarise yourself with the full range
of facilities on offer in each residence, prior to making your
online application: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/accommodation
Our Accommodation Guarantee ensures an offer of a place in
University accommodation.
Accommodation Guarantee
The University of St Andrews guarantees an offer of our
accommodation to all UK/EU and overseas first year
undergraduate students*, provided all the following
conditions are met:
• You are applying as a single applicant.
• Your application is received by 30 June in the year of
entry.
• You have met all the offer conditions and accepted your
unconditional offer from the University/UCAS by 31
August in the year of entry.
• You have accepted your offer of accommodation within
10 days of the offer being sent to your email address.
If you are not covered by the guarantee, you are still
welcome to apply in the usual way and we will try our best
to accommodate you.
* Please note: in years of exceptionally high demand, students who
live within a reasonable commuting distance will not be offered
accommodation until a room becomes available. This may be after
the start of the semester.
Whilst a limited amount of accommodation is available to returning
undergraduate students, we cannot guarantee you a place within
University accommodation after your first year.
St Salvator’s Hall
David Russell Apartments
Accommodation choices
The residences are located throughout the town so that
everything is within walking distance and students feel very
much at the heart of the community.
Our residences range from beautiful stone built listed buildings
full of original period features, to stylish new apartments, built
to high environmental and sustainability standards. Importantly,
all of our accommodation adheres to government licencing
requirements so you can be certain that we always meet a
rigorous standard of accommodation maintenance and health
and safety criteria.
A range of catered and self-catered accommodation is available,
with a choice of standard rooms with shared bathroom facilities
or ensuite. Ensuite rooms include a toilet, sink and shower
attached to the room for the sole use of the occupant/s.
To enable as many students as possible to enjoy the character
of our historic properties, places for first year undergraduates
in these halls are on a predominantly shared room basis; whilst
individual study bedrooms are available in our modern halls. A
number of studio apartments, which include their own cooking
facilities and an ensuite bathroom, are also available.
Please note that catered residences close over the intersemester break in January, with the exception of David Russell
Apartments. Self-catered residences are open throughout the
inter-semester break, providing continuous residence for those
who need it.
“Agnes Blackadder Hall provides a homely experience whilst
still allowing you to get to know our 500+ students. Our
hall staff and student committee work hard to support you
and ensure you enjoy your downtime with sporting events,
bonfire nights, formal dinners and our Annual Hall Ball.”
Frankie (Liverpool, Merseyside, England)
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Accommodation
17
David Russell Apartments
Catered accommodation
•
•
•
•
•
Self-catered accommodation
Each of the residences has a unique dining room providing
an ideal setting for you to eat, meet new people and
socialise, without any expensive trips to the supermarket
and time spent preparing meals and having to wash up.
We have a commitment to ethically sourced quality
products, using Fairtrade tea and coffee, free range eggs
and utilising local suppliers, sourcing sustainable produce
and seasonal foods, wherever possible.
A wide range of menu items is offered daily, including a
vegetarian option and healthy alternatives endorsed by the
Healthy Living Award www.healthylivingaward.co.uk
Compact kitchens are available so you can prepare drinks
and light snacks between meals.
Options offered also include full Scottish breakfasts daily.
At lunch and dinner we provide a wide selection of hot
main meals (including a vegetarian choice) as well as soup
(vegetarian), a salad bar, deli bar rolls with a selection of
fillings (lunch only), delicious puddings as well as fresh fruit,
fruit juice and tea and coffee – it’s your choice.
•
•
•
•
What is included?
As a minimum, all accommodation includes:
•
•
•
•
Delivering a service that works around you
We know that you will be busy studying and attending classes
so we deliver a service that works around you.
•
•
Packed lunches or dinners can be provided as alternatives
in fully catered residences.
A number of catering packages are available to maximise
flexibility.
We endeavour to meet special dietary requirements, however
we are unable to provide Vegan, Halal or Kosher options and
may not be able to cater for some food allergies depending
on the severity. Therefore you may prefer our self-catered
accommodation.
All our self-catered accommodation offers you total
flexibility to cook your own meals, choosing when and
what to eat, giving you greater freedom.
Shared kitchens which include lockers for your food
storage and eating areas which are located near to study
bedrooms.
Shared kitchens are equipped with cookers, microwaves,
refrigerators, freezers, kettles, pans and cleaning
equipment.
Various food outlets are available across the University
giving you a choice of catering options for those times
when you do not feel like cooking for yourself.
a bed
a desk
a study chair
a range of storage for clothes and books.
Hall fees also include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wi-Fi internet access throughout halls of residence,
including bedrooms
Contents insurance (terms and conditions apply)
Hall committee subscriptions
Wardennial Team – Student Services
Bike storage
Launderettes with card operated washing/drying
facilities, All residences also benefit from the Laundry
View online system, which allows student to check
the availability of washing machines and driers in the
laundry from their laptop or PC, via an online portal.
For up-to-date fee information, and to view the full
range of facilities available in each residence, please refer
to our accommodation webpages:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/accommodation
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Student Experience
Accommodation
18
Accommodation
(continued)
St Salvator’s Hall
Students with disabilities and limiting long term illness
The St Andrews living experience
At St Andrews we believe that your residence is more than just
a place to stay; it is a place to live. Perhaps you dream of playing
the piano in an oak panelled library, or donning your University
gown for a top table dinner with the Warden. Maybe a cheese
and wine evening, or attending a hall ball will be what you
would like to remember from your time in halls.
The University gives all possible support to students with
disabilities and those with limiting long term illness. To enable
us to work with you to help meet your individual requirements,
it is important that you provide full information on your
application form of anything that is likely to impact on your
accommodation needs.
Alternatively, your social life may include computer gaming,
film nights, relaxing in the gardens, or a game of pool. Whatever
your interests the range of communal areas and facilities in our
residences ensures we have something to suit everyone.
The University understands that disability is not always
visible and related to physical impairments. Student Services
and Wardennial Teams can also provide support. We have
a number of adapted rooms and we encourage you to visit
the accommodation to see facilities and talk to Student
Accommodation Services before you accept a place in a
residence. If you want us to take account of your special
circumstances, please let us know as soon as possible.
There are also computer rooms, libraries and quiet study
areas available in our residences that we hope you will take
advantage of.
Families and mature students
Supporting the living experience
Your residential experience is supported by a Wardennial
Team who take responsibility for encouraging a sense of
community and are your key contacts within the residence.
They actively encourage you to join in with your fellow
residents organising games nights, activities and excursions.
The University has a small number of studio apartments
and houses specifically designed for mature students, or
those with families. Further information on how to apply is
provided on our accommodation webpages:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/accommodation
Wardennial teams will be the first point of call if a health
crisis occurs, or if you have a personal problem. They keep
order and are responsible for student discipline. Their roles
also involve mentoring, advising and providing support.
The Wardennial team work alongside the Residence
Management team who look after the fabric and
furnishings of the residence and also ensure the smooth
running of the catering and cleaning service.
Hall Committees
The students in each residence elect a Senior Student and
a Hall Committee who take on the responsibility of looking
after the social life of the residence, organising BBQs,
receptions and balls, and representing student opinion to
the Management.
The Hall Committee therefore plays an important role in
welcoming Freshers into their communities and fostering a
sense of belonging.
“McIntosh is a hall with an amazing amount of spirit.
Chattanites never forget their unique experience in this old
building or the friends that they make here. We work hard,
we play hard and we’ve got a Minotaur as a mascot. What
more could anyone want?”
Josh (Grantham, Lincolnshire, England)
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John Burnet Hall
St Regulus Hall
How and when to apply
Accommodation deadline
Once you receive and accept an offer of a place to study at the
University it is time to apply. Please do not wait for your offer
status to change, regardless of whether your offer is conditional
or unconditional. Please see the Accommodation Guarantee on
page 16.
You will need to complete an online application via our
webpages. Applications will open on 1 April in your year of entry.
Please go to the accommodation webpages for further
information and a downloadable form:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/accommodation
In order for us to be able to offer you guaranteed
accommodation, it is essential that you apply by 30 June and
accept your University place with Admissions as soon as you
receive your unconditional offer.
Further information
Student Accommodation Services
Butts Wynd, North Street
St Andrews, Fife KY16 8YL
T: +44 (0)1334 462510
E: [email protected]
Important information
Opening hours: Monday-Friday 9.30 am - 4.30 pm
To be guaranteed accommodation you must submit your
completed application form to Student Accommodation
Services before 30 June in the year of entry and have
met all the guarantee conditions.
For further information on what our residences can offer you,
including current accommodation prices and how to apply,
please visit: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/accommodation
Your choice
Please ensure you take a close look at the range of
accommodation and prices on our webpages before
submitting your online application, as you will be asked
to give four preferences of type of accommodation. You
will be allocated to one of your four preferences; it will
not necessarily be your first option. Where there are more
applicants than spaces available for a particular type of
accommodation, then the allocation will be done by ballot.
Your space
If you have requested to share a study bedroom Student
Accommodation Services will match you with a roommate
based on your accommodation preference, lifestyle,
hobbies and interests. Offers for individual study bedroom
accommodation are based on your residence preference
depending on availability. Students of the same age and year
of study are allocated rooms near to each other.
Your place
Once your offer of a University place becomes unconditional
and you have confirmed your acceptance with Admissions,
Student Accommodation Services can offer you a place in a
residence. Allocation of places to first year undergraduates
starts in July for students who have already accepted their
unconditional offers. Allocations continue until late August to
ensure applicants waiting for Higher or A-Level results have the
opportunity to secure accommodation.
“David Russell Apartments / Fife Park is the
University’s largest and most diverse hall, so it’s fitting
that living here allows residents to tailor their hall
experience to suit themselves and that there is always
something to do. Not only is there a bar, activities room,
and music room, but the dedicated Wardennial Team
and enthusiastic Student Committee regularly run a
variety of social events. These include pub quizzes, icecream parties, film nights, beer festivals, ceilidhs, and of
course the Annual Hall Ball.”
Shreya (Wokingham, Berkshire, England)
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Accommodation
19
20
“The fun traditions, beautiful setting, and genuine and friendly
community will ensure that you will soon find your place among us!”
Jack (Catterline, Aberdeenshire, Scotland)
Return to Contents
21
Raisin Monday
– for more information see page 23
Return to Contents
Student life
Student Experience
Student life
22
SEP Orientation, Societies Fayre OCT Rectorial Election
A green university
St Andrews – the town
St Andrews provides a unique location for a very special
university. Wherever you walk you are reminded of its rich and
colourful history with buildings both ancient and modern.
The beautiful unspoilt beaches with fresh clean air and wide
expanse of sky provide the perfect antidote to the classroom or
laboratory. They encourage either a quiet thoughtful stroll or a
bracing walk with a group of friends along the two unbroken
miles of the West Sands. Or you can take to the water either as
a surfer on the waves of the East Sands, or enjoy many other
water sports – such as sailing, sea kayaking, or windsurfing. You
can also experience a spectacular walk to the end of the stone
pier.
St Andrews is a small town and while undoubtedly much safer
when compared to cities, you will still need to exercise common
sense with regard to your personal physical and social safety.
The University funds a night bus which helps get you home
safely seven nights a week from 10 pm until 2 am.
Relaxing
St Andrews is the home of golf – where it was first invented
– and there are ample opportunities for the keen golfer with
seven courses locally which often host major international
tournaments.
Beyond St Andrews you can nip down to Anstruther (9 miles /
14 km away) for fish and chips at the town’s award-winning fish
bar. Dundee is only 13 miles / 21 km away and Edinburgh is an
hour by train.
There are express buses that run to major Scottish cities, almost
hourly. Naturally there are many opportunities to travel north
to the stunning Highlands and Islands for which Scotland is
world renowned.
Climate
This part of Fife, the East Neuk, enjoys a microclimate of mild
sunny summer days with contrasting blustery rain, crisp frosts
and occasional snow in winter. It is much drier than western
parts of the country with strong winds often blowing in off the
North Sea.
St Andrews – the University
The University was founded here over 600 years ago and its
buildings are still part of the fabric of the town. Yet this
university with its mediaeval origins also looks to the future
with its high-tech laboratories and redevelopments designed
to ensure that it offers excellent facilities for undergraduate
students.
The University actively implements environmental solutions and
initiatives through recycling, an energy strategy, and ensuring
ethical investment. It is aiming to achieve zero waste by 2020
and also to be the first carbon neutral university in the UK by
2016. We are working towards this through the development
of our own biomass energy centre and a University-owned
windfarm. Students are welcome to get involved with a wide
range of projects with sustainability at their heart including
helping in the organic gardens, or volunteering on practical
projects such as dune restoration or campaigning on
environmental issues.
Students’ Association
The Students’ Association is the hub of all student activity in
St Andrews. All students of the University are automatically
members. The Association (or Union, as it is better known) is
more than just a bar – it covers all areas of student life through
three core themes: events, student representation, and extracurricular activities.
The range of events and societies on offer is staggering. Most
students are involved in at least one society, many in three or
more. There are approximately 180 student societies and if you
cannot find one to suit your interests then we can help you start
one! www.yourunion.net/activities/societies The Students’ Representative Council (SRC) and the Students’
Services Council (SSC) play an active role in representing
the student body at all levels of the University. We make
sure your voice is heard, and members are elected each year
by the entire student body. A full-time education advocate
and part-time accommodation advocate are employed to
provide practical support and advice independently from the
University. There is also a network of School Presidents and
350 Class Representatives who complement the SRC at an
academic School level.
Finally, there are four ‘sabbaticals’ (sabbs) elected each
March to full-time posts within the Association and who are
dedicated to making life better
for students in St Andrews.
Feel free to come in and speak
to us when you are visiting
the University. Whatever your
interests, whether you are
Charities Campaign
looking for a good night out,
Last year the Charities
require help with studies or wish
Campaign raised
to join a particular society, we
a phenomenal
are here to make this possible,
£95,000 for good
and ensure every student of
causes
St Andrews has a fantastic time at
our university. www.yourunion.net
Return to Contents
NOV Raisin Monday
DEC Christmas Ball
In addition to these societies, the Association also helps run
several sub-committees or ‘super-societies’, of which all
students are members.
• • • • Mermaids (see page 25)
Music Is Love
Charities Campaign
SVS (volunteering)
•
•
•
Debating Society
LGBT
STAR (radio)
The Debating Society have competed in the finals of the
European Championships and the semi-finals of the World
Championships. They also hold a weekly debate for all in
Parliament Hall on topical issues – often bringing in top
quality speakers from around the country.
Media
STAR (or St Andrews Radio) broadcasts online 24/7. With
dozens of presenters and shows on each night, they have had
listeners as far away as Argentina and the Cape Verde Islands
and act as a training vehicle for future media stars.
www.standrewsradio.com
The fortnightly student newspaper, The Saint, is run
independently from the Students’ Association, but has won
many national awards and is considered one of the best student
newspaper publications in the UK. It is available online at:
www.thesaint-online.com
The Stand is an online only news service and magazine.
Regularly updated and featuring amusing insights into
everyday life at St Andrews, The Stand can be found at:
www.stand-news.co.uk
FEB Rag Week
Balls, events and fashion shows
St Andrews is also home to a vast range of annual balls, events
and fashions shows, all run by students but operating on a
professional level. From Christmas Ball to Big Top Ball, FS
Charity Fashion Show, Don’t Walk, music festivals, and many
more, rarely a week goes by without a very popular event
being held.
Traditions
As befits a 600-year-old university St Andrews has many
student traditions. The most famous of which is the red
academic gown, which you can choose to wear at formal
occasions or all the time!
Additionally, St Andrews is also the home of the Academic
Family, a spontaneous tradition where older students adopt
first year students as ‘children’ and can help guide them in a
system of mentoring. This culminates in Raisin Weekend in
November when children are entertained by their parents
and are encouraged to play pranks and silly games. On
Raisin Monday, the children are dressed in embarrassing,
flamboyant costumes, given strange objects with a traditional
Latin inscription, and are let loose in the central St Salvator’s
Quadrangle for an enormous shaving foam fight.
Another famous tradition is the May Dip (see photos on pages
3 and 25), where you plunge into a freezing North Sea at dawn
on the first of May, in memory of the student John Honey. It
is said that the Dip is the only way to avert the risk of exam
failure brought on by stepping on the PH cobbles outside
Sallies Chapel.
Evening Language classes
You can take the option of the extra-curricular Evening
Language classes catering for all levels of study from beginner
to advanced. There is a fee attached to these classes as
they are not part of any degree pathway and any credits
accumulated may not be used towards a degree programme.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/eveninglanguages
Military Service opportunities
The Royal Naval Reserve, The Tayforth Universities Officers’
Training Corps and the East of Scotland Air Squadron all offer
St Andrews students opportunities to train and participate
while studying here. For further information, contact the units
directly.
May Dip (J Alexander )
•
•
•
RNR – T: 0845 607 5555
Tayforth OTC – T: 01334 474262
East of Scotland Air Squadron – T: 01334 839471 Ext. 7718
Reeling on the Pier (Alastair Stokes s )
Return to Contents
Student life
23
Student Experience
Student activities
24
Student
activities
MAR Green Week
Music (For academic Music, see page 132)
St Andrews enjoys an exceptionally lively programme of student
music-making. The Music Centre is the focus for musical activity
in the University. Situated in the Younger Hall, the principal
auditorium in East Fife, it provides facilities for individual and
group rehearsals and tuition by highly regarded teachers in
voice and almost every instrument.
The Music Centre also mounts many events in St Andrews’
award-winning Byre Theatre, which provides a wonderful space
for opera, chamber music, folk, world music and jazz.
APR On the Rocks festival
St Andrews is the only Scottish university with a professional
Orchestra in Residence, the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, one of
the UK’s leading ensembles, performs five times each year and
gives frequent masterclasses and workshops. The Music Centre
also organises popular lunchtime and evening concerts, given
by visiting professionals from throughout the UK.
Some groups audition for places at the start of each year, while
many welcome anyone who would like to play or sing, without
audition.
Scholarships are also available for particularly promising
students in the form of free instrumental or vocal tuition. In
addition, the Hebdomadar’s Music Fund can provide financial
help for students who would otherwise find it hard to pay for
lessons.
The Younger Hall includes a music technology studio with
various composition packages, pianos, harpsichords and a good
collection of orchestral instruments, all available to students.
The University has two-manual organs in both the Younger Hall
(Harrison & Harrison) and St Leonard’s Chapel (Walker & Son),
and a fine four-manual instrument in St Salvator’s Chapel made
by the Austrian firm of Hradetsky.
“St Andrews affords innumerable opportunities for musicmaking in every genre imaginable and offers the listener
a wealth of concerts and masterclasses throughout the
year. I find it hugely rewarding to meet and collaborate
with like-minded musicians and to learn from first-rate
professionals. What is so brilliant is that there really is
something for everyone – whether you want to take up
an instrument from scratch, or perform in a 1,000-seater
concert hall, the opportunity will be there.”
Choral Scholarships
The University of St Andrews has a rich choral tradition. The
thirty-strong St Salvator’s Chapel Choir performs a repertoire
that spans the six centuries of the University’s existence. As well
as singing three services a week, choir activities also include
collaborations with leading musicians, international tours and
TV and radio broadcasts.
All members of St Salvator’s Chapel Choir benefit from a
scholarship that covers subsidised singing lessons and free
participation in the annual choir tour.
Further information (including scholarships):
Music Centre
T: +44 (0)1334 462226
E: [email protected]
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/music
Maebh (Belfast, N. Ireland)
Are you interested in . . .
You can join . . .
•
Singing?
•
St Andrews Chamber Orchestra
•
Madrigal Group
•
Chamber music?
•
St Salvator’s Chapel Choir
•
Renaissance Singers
•
Classical music?
•
St Leonard’s Chapel Choir
•
Gilbert & Sullivan Society
•
Baroque music?
•
St Andrews Opera
•
Just So Society
•
Opera?
•
The University Music Society
•
St Andrews Chorus
•
Jazz?
•
Scottish traditional?
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MAY May Dip
Student activities
25
JUN Graduation
Drama
St Andrews has a vibrant performing arts scene, and the
Mermaids Performing Arts Fund enables this. As a subcommittee of the Students’ Association, you are automatically
a member. The funding and support are available to assist
with the production of almost anything you can imagine. We
support numerous devised, published and student-written plays
and musicals – in previous years we have even helped with a
student-written opera and laid the foundations for a ballet.
Student writing also featured heavily, both in the university
and at the Edinburgh Fringe, where we sent three student
written plays this year. Every year we also run freshers’ plays
– in 2014 there were four productions in one week, where
every role both on and off stage was taken on by a new
student.
Mermaids has something for everyone to get involved in,
whether you fancy directing your own show (or producing it),
acting or singing…the list is endless!
Mermaids funds around 30 shows a year, from Shakespeare to
contemporary drama, including pieces written by students.
These have ranged from shows in our very own black box
theatre – the Barron – to a staging of Philip Ridley’s Mercury
Fur in an abandoned airfield, This year also sees the reopening
of the Byre Theatre with a production of Oscar Wilde’s The
Importance of Being Earnest.
“Mermaids has been an important part of my time at
St Andrews. I’ve had the chance to be involved with all
aspects of theatre since my first tentative steps as an actor
in freshers’ plays. I produced a show as a part of On the
Rocks, the largest student-led arts festival in Scotland,
and directed a show at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.
Not only have I developed the confidence and skills to
work in theatre, Mermaids has helped me to make great
friends and has given me fantastic memories from my
time here.”
Ben (Plymouth, Devon, England)
Are you interested in . . .
You can take part in . . .
•
Writing?
•
Over 30 shows
•
Directing?
•
Edinburgh Festival Fringe
•
Producing?
•
•
Stage managing?
Workshops e.g. audition and
lighting design
•
Acting?
•
Mermaids social events
•
Lighting?
•
On the Rocks arts festival
•
Costume design?
•
Props?
•
Set building?
Return to Contents
• Societies
– Blind Mirth improv comedy
– Gilbert & Sullivan Society
– Just So musical theatre
– A Cappella Society
– LifeSpring (creative
Christian worship)
– Inklight (creative writing)
Sport
Student Experience
Sport
26
Sport is a vibrant, exciting and dynamic part of University
life; with over 60 sports clubs and 100 competitive sports
teams. With participants ranging from complete beginners to
international athletes, Saints Sport has something for everyone.
From expert strength and conditioning coaching to an excellent
hall sport programme to international volunteer opportunities
in Zambia and South Africa, Saints Sport at all levels is buzzing.
Our pre-season and warm weather training camps have grown
tremendously along with the development of recreational
opportunities. Our sector-leading volunteer programmes,
which includes annual coaching trips to Africa continue to
flourish. Come visit us, get involved and be part of the Saints
Sport family.
Student sports clubs
The many student sports clubs are at the core of Saints
Sport. These serve a variety of different interests, from highly
competitive teams within university-level and national
league competition to recreational and social activities,
including regular trips across Scotland and further afield. All
of this activity is student-led but supported by a number of
professional staff and coaches. There is a strong programme of
training and support available for student volunteers who run
these activities as coaches, officials and administrators.
Saints Clubs
Aikido
Archery
Athletics
Badminton
Basketball
Boat
Boxing
Canoe
Cheerleading
Clay Pigeon
Cricket
Cross Country
Cycling
Dance
Fencing
Football
Golf
Gymnastics
Handball
Hockey
Ice Hockey
Ice Skating
Judo
Jujitsu
Karate
Korfball
Lacrosse
Lifesaving
Mixed Martial Arts
Mountaineering
Netball
Polo
Riding
Rifle
Rugby
Rugby League
Sailing
Shinty
Snowsports
Squash
Sub Aqua
Surfing
Swimming
Table Tennis
Taekwondo
Tennis
Trampoline
Triathlon
Ultimate Frisbee
Volleyball
Water Polo
Windsurfing
For more information on any student sport activity and for
the relevant contact details please visit the Saints Sport
webpages: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/sport
Return to Contents
Sport
27
Golf bursaries
Saints fitness classes
The Department of Sport and Exercise is proud to offer the
Saints Fitness exercise programme. This vibrant programme of
exercise classes is open to all and offers a wide variety of classes
to suit all levels and abilities. Classes include Zumba, spin,
kettlebells, cardio workshops and yoga.
Fitness services
Our team of fitness professionals are here to help, with a range
of services to suit all of your health, fitness and sporting needs:
•
•
•
•
•
Fitness consultation: for fitness advice and help planning
your exercise routine.
Personal exercise plan: custom made fitness plan, tailor
made to suit your needs.
Fitness bundle: a cost-effective solution for those on a
budget (includes fitness consultation, three person training
sessions and an exercise plan).
Personal training: for one-to-one or group sessions.
Strength and conditioning: to improve sports performance.
Applying to University
All performance athletes must achieve the Faculty and Subject
entrance requirements – no academic dispensations are given
to student athletes. However, please let us know if you are
considering coming to St Andrews or already have a place.
Debby Sargent, Projects & Partnerships Manager:
[email protected]
Performance sport
The University is committed to the pursuit of academic and
sporting excellence. We have eight Directors of Sport – Rugby,
Tennis, Volleyball, Fencing, Football, Waterpolo, Golf and
Boat, and Head Coaches in various sports such as Hockey and
Netball. Particular attention is paid to developing these sports
in the following ways:
•
The University receives an annual grant from the R&A to partfund a golf development programme for talented golfers,
which we believe is the best student golf programme in the UK,
and sees our golfers travelling all over the world to compete.
The programme is open to any matriculated student who
reaches the required standard. In 2014 we have one male and
five female Golf Bursars, with the R&A supporting the overall
University Golf Programme with a total grant of over £25K per
year.
For more information visit:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/sport/performance/individuals/r&ascholars
Improving performance: providing excellent opportunities
and support structures to allow individuals and teams to
fulfil their sporting aspirations, in particular in Scottish
Student Sport (SSS), British Universities and Colleges Sport
(BUCS) and other national and international events and
leagues.
Growing participation: providing high quality training and
competitive experiences that attract students to become
part of University sport.
For more information visit:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/sport/performance/focus
Academic flexibility
There is a University-wide agreement supporting the training
and competitive demands of athletes. This allows some
flexibility in academic arrangements so that academic and
sporting aspirations can be mutually compatible.
For more information visit: http://bit.ly/sta-acflexibility
Volunteering
The University supports talented individual student athletes
studying at St Andrews and competing on the international
stage. Typically there are five, £1,000 scholarships offered per
year.
Saints Sport prides itself in the vast array of volunteering
opportunities that are on offer to students at St Andrews. The
University is such a big part of the town that all of our sports
clubs are tasked with doing some form of outreach and giving
something back to the local community. We also offer students
the opportunity to volunteer on activities within Saints Sport.
St Andrews students have the opportunity to volunteer and
work with pre-school and primary school aged children on
the Junior Saints programme, work with the Youth Sport Trust
to learn how to run and facilitate a national conference for
sports leaders and spend six to eight weeks during the summer
coaching children from schools and townships in Zambia and
South Africa.
For more information visit:
http://bit.ly/sta-saintsscholarships
For more information visit:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/sport/volunteering
•
•
Sports scholarships
Return to Contents
28
Library
Services and Facilities
Library
Library services
The Library is central to your life as a student. We will help you
access and use information to support your study and research.
You can study the way you want to: in the café, group study
rooms, silent/individual study areas or more informal and
relaxed spaces. You can also print, photocopy and scan in the
Library. As well as lots of books, the Library provides access to a
huge number of online and specialist resources.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Main Library
The University Library’s Special Collections:
• houses around 210,000 rare printed books.
• is particularly strong in theology, classics, history, English
and Scottish literature.
• includes the University’s extensive manuscript and
photographic collections and the University archives,
which date from the early fifteenth century.
The Main University Library:
is located in the centre of town.
is open for more than 100 hours per week during the
semester, including weekends.
holds over one million volumes, a growing e-book
collection, thousands of print and electronic journals,
academic databases and an extensive collection of DVDs.
provides expert support from members of our specialist
Academic Liaison Librarian Team.
can provide help and training on finding information.
has lots of computers for you to use.
has a Short Loan Collection of heavy-demand books
recommended by lecturers.
is self-service, use the ‘borrow’ and ‘return’ machines.
offers orientation tours of the building to all new students.
In addition to the Main Library there are libraries elsewhere
in the University:
•
•
The JF Allen Library, which holds books and journals for
most science subjects, has been recently renovated to a
high specification and offers a variety of quiet individual
and group study spaces.
St Mary’s College Library for Divinity and Mediaeval
History, including the historic King James Library.
As a University of St Andrews student you have access to
these additional library spaces. There are also some smaller
class libraries throughout the University, administered by
individual Schools and open to their students.
You are also entitled to borrow from the nearby libraries of
the universities of Dundee and Abertay.
The Main Library has been fully refurbished and modernised.
It is a welcoming and flexible space where staff are always
happy to help.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/library
Twitter: @StAndrewsUniLib
Facebook: facebook.com/StAndrewsUniversityLibrary
“The library helpdesk staff are very
helpful. This library is a great
resource for students. Thanks for
all you do for us!”
(Feedback card – October 2014)
King James Library
Return to Contents
IT Services
IT is an important part of your University experience and we
offer a wide range of services to ensure you stay connected
wherever you are in the University. Information is distributed
via the University network and official communications are
routinely made by email.
We have continued to make a significant investment in
our infrastructure. This includes extensive Wi-Fi provision,
SaintMail, UniPrint, a range of software applications and an
IT Service Desk to ensure any of your IT issues are dealt with
efficiently.
Follow IT Services on twitter for the latest news
and advice. Twitter: @StAITServices
You can gain access to the University network – and the
internet – in the following ways:
• Wireless access across more than 95% of the University
buildings.
• Computer classrooms are distributed throughout the
University; many are open 24 hours a day, with over
1,000 fixed computers across the University.
• All halls of residence bedrooms have Wi-Fi access and
cabled network connections.
• Access away from the University is available through a
range of web-based services over the internet.
Further details about the IT services, including our FAQ section,
are available at: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/itsupport
Software
We currently provide Microsoft Office in all computer
classrooms. SaintMail is our web-based email service powered
by Google, so that you can access your University email from
anywhere in the world. Software is available for use on IT
Services computers, for programming, statistical analysis
and database applications. Moodle is the Virtual Learning
Environment (VLE) used by the University for online course
material.
IT Services
29
Printing
We provide a secure printing, scanning and copying facility,
that can be accessed from a wide variety of locations across the
University. You can also print from your own laptop.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/itsupport/help/printing
Registering with IT Services
In the weeks leading up to the start of the session, you should
access the University’s website and open your computer
account. As soon as you arrive, you will be able to use this
computer account to access a full range of computer services
in the University, including email, the open-access computer
rooms and UniPrint.
IT Service Desk
A wide variety of IT help can be found on our webpages, but
if you have any problems with your computer account or any
aspect of IT, you can visit us at the IT Service Desk in the Main
Library. You can also log and track your own IT Service calls 24
hours a day, 7 days a week, using IT Self Service.
We also run a chargeable PC Clinic service, where you can bring
your own equipment for support and repair.
“Excellent! Friendly, uncomplicated
and quick. Answered a number of
additional side queries too!”
(Feedback card – September 2014)
Return to Contents
Services and Facilities
Advice when
you need it
30
Advice when
you need it
Student Services
Coming to university is an exciting time, but also a very
challenging one. During the years ahead there may be times
when you need some help and advice and the University
offers an extensive range of support to ensure that, on
both an academic and personal level, your experience as an
undergraduate is successful and fulfilling.
Student Services provides support in the following ways:
• The Advice and Support Centre (ASC) – information
centre
• Disabilities team
• Personal advice and counselling
• International and immigration advising
• Finance advising
• Academic advising
• Warden residential support
The Student Experience
Student Services’ staff have a target of helping to maintain the
quality of your student experience. They will gather feedback
from you, monitor your opinions, disseminate thoughts on the
service required and try to ensure that the experience itself is
protected and enhanced and personal to each student. One
thing comes over clearly: life at this University is very different
from any other in the UK.
The Advice & Support Centre
The main front door for any query you may have is “The ASC”
(The Advice and Support Centre) at 79 North Street. Staff
will answer your query, organise administration for you, refer
you to advisers who will give further help, support, advice
and counselling. The service is made up of a team of advisers
and administrators who are there to assist you on any issue
from paying a bill, a student registry query, any university
administration issue, advising
on financial hardship,
academic problems, health
concerns, disability, and
immigration issues, as well as
more personal matters such
as relationship difficulties or
family problems.
Students with disabilities or learning difficulties
The University is committed to helping people realise their
academic potential and, in accordance with our statements and
policy documents on a range of equal opportunities issues, this
commitment extends to students with disabilities, long term
medical conditions or learning difficulties. If you have a disability
it will not stand in the way of your being offered the chance
to study here at St Andrews and recent years have seen an
expansion of our services. It is our policy to assess applications
from all students on strictly academic grounds. Other access
arrangements will be considered separately to this.
The University has students with a wide range of disabilities
and learning difficulties and we welcome the opportunity
to work with these students to meet their individual
requirements. Every student who enters this University
makes a contribution to our community, based on their
particular experiences. Students with disabilities are no
exception to this.
Within the University’s Student Services team, there are
two Disability Advisers and a Specific Learning Difficulties
Co-ordinator. They can be contacted at any stage of the
application process for information, advice or support.
Applicants are encouraged to make known their needs
on the application form and/or at interview, so that the
University can best respond in terms of appropriate support
and advice.
A visit to the University is strongly recommended. Personal
visits and telephone enquires are welcomed.
T: +44 (0)1334 462720
E: [email protected]
Academic Skills Support
The Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational
Development (CAPOD) can assist you with advice and
guidance on how to develop academic skills such as notemaking, essay writing, time management, or support with the
mathematics and statistics within your course. All students
can book a confidential appointment with a postgraduate
academic skills tutor at any time for one-to-one help. For more
information visit: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/capod
Health
The University strongly advises you to register with a National
Health (NHS) doctors’ practice based at the local Community
Hospital in St Andrews which is free to all students. You will be
given the opportunity to register at matriculation.
You are required to bring with you three things:
1. A letter of transfer from your medical practitioner at home
detailing:
a) Medical conditions experienced over the past year
b) Medical conditions from birth which could have relevance to current health
c) Any current medication and/or treatment
d) Any contra-indicators of past medication
e) Any allergies
f ) An inoculation history – please note; you should
ensure that you have received two doses of MMR
(Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccine and one
dose of Meningitis C vaccine before coming to
St Andrews.
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Advice when
you need it
31
2. At least one month’s supply of any current medication and
if you are an international student you need to check
before you come that the medication is registered and
licensed for use in the UK. Get advice from your home
physician if it is not.
3. If you are a student from the UK, you should bring your
National Health Service Medical Card.
Further information at:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/advice/health
Private health insurance is a good idea for international
students and all students have the option of paying for private
services if they so wish. A list of providers can be obtained
from Student Services or the ASC.
Counselling
The University provides a free, professional and confidential
counselling service for all its students. Counselling gives you
the opportunity to talk in confidence to someone who has
no other role in your life (someone who is not a tutor, friend
or relation). It is the chance to talk to someone who will not
judge you, criticise you or be shocked by whatever you have
to say. Counsellors will work flexibly with you to help you
develop a clearer understanding of your situation, help you
recognise your feelings, and discuss and agree strategies to
help with the difficulties you are experiencing.
Some examples of areas in which counselling can be helpful:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Depression.
Anxiety, panic and other pressure and related feelings.
Managing relationships (e.g. with friends, academic staff,
parents, partners).
Personal development and self-esteem.
Family difficulties.
Eating disorders.
University pressures (homesickness, loneliness, stress of
your studies etc.).
Abuse and harassment.
Bereavement.
Chaplaincy/Faiths
Donald MacEwan is Chaplain to the University (staff and
students) and can usually be found in the building called
Mansefield in St Mary’s Place on weekdays.
Mansefield is used by many groups, including faith societies,
for meetings, events, meals, prayer and meditation. The
Chaplain offers support and encouragement, as well as an
opportunity to talk through personal, relational and academic
problems on a confidential basis. Some students explore
personal growth and spiritual development, while others
discuss issues with no reference to faith. You are welcome,
regardless of faith or philosophy.
The Chaplaincy works closely with Student Services and plays
a full part in assisting students, particularly through illness.
The Chaplaincy also oversees an International Students
Befriending Scheme, connecting local families with students
whose first language is not English.
For information on various faiths such as Christian, Muslim,
Jewish, Baha’i, Eastern Religions, Pagan and others, on worship
in University Chapels, and on the team of Honorary Chaplains,
please view the webpage (see below).
Get in touch with the Chaplaincy
Mansefield, St Mary’s Place
T: + 44 (0)1334 462866
E: [email protected]
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/chaplaincy
Get in touch with Student Services
The ASC – Advice and Support Centre, 79 North Street
T: +44 (0)1334 462020
E: [email protected]
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studentservices
For more information about our counselling service and other
forms of personal support available please go to:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/advice/counsellingsupport
Childcare
If you require information about childcare provision in
the St Andrews area, please contact Student Services
below. We provide details of nurseries, childminders and
after-school care services at:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/advice/family/childcare
Return to Contents
Money Matters
Fees and funding
32
Fees and
funding
Applicants should note that it is a condition of their
university registration that they accept liability for their
tuition fees and that it is the applicant’s responsibility to
apply to an appropriate funding body for support with
fees. Confirmation of funding will be required prior to
matriculation at the start of each year of study.
For current information please see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/fees-and-funding
Students living in Scotland
If you are a Scottish domiciled, full-time, first degree student
you should be eligible for your tuition fees to be paid by the
Scottish Government. All such tuition fees will be paid through
the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS). Details on
how and when to apply are available from: www.saas.gov.uk
The University of St Andrews has introduced a Bursary
Scheme that supplements funding available from household
contribution and government sources in order to alleviate
the financial burden. The Bursary is awarded on the basis of
financial need. Further details are available from:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/fees-and-funding/scotland
Students living in England
Current tuition fees at the University of St Andrews for students
domiciled in England are £9,000 per annum. There are no upfront tuition fees as a first degree student, you can apply for a
government loan to cover the fees. The loan is not repayable
until after graduation. Details on how and when to apply are
available from: www.gov.uk/apply-online-for-student-finance
Current tuition fees at the University of St Andrews for students
domiciled in Northern Ireland are £9,000 per annum. There are
no up-front tuition fees as you can apply for a government
loan to cover the fees. The loan is not repayable until after
graduation. Details on how and when to apply are available
from: www.studentfinanceni.co.uk
Students living in the European Union (EU)
If you are an EU domiciled, full-time, first degree student you
could be eligible for your tuition fees to be paid by the Scottish
Government. All such tuition fees will be paid through the
Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS). Details on how
and when to apply are available from: www.saas.gov.uk
International students
Students who are classed as ‘overseas’ for tuition fee purposes
are liable to pay the overseas fee-rate appropriate to their
chosen programme of study. International students usually have
to be self-funded, however there may be funding available from
their government, independent sponsors, or from other award
paying bodies. Normally, there is an annual percentage rise in
the overseas tuition fees.
• For students from the USA:
http://bit.ly/sta-usloans
www.fafsa.ed.gov
Students living in Wales
Current tuition fees at the University of St Andrews for students
domiciled in Wales are £9,000 per annum. There are no upfront tuition fees as a first degree student, your fee is covered
in two ways. Student Finance Wales will currently provide a
tuition fee grant of £5,535 and then the remaining £3,465 can
be covered by applying for a Tuition Fee Loan through Student
Finance Wales. The Tuition Fee Loan is not repayable until after
graduation. Details on how and when to apply are available
from: www.studentfinancewales.co.uk
Students living in the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man
Current tuition fees at the University of St Andrews for students
domiciled in Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney, Sark, Herm and the
Isle of Man are £9,000 per annum. The island authorities of
Guernsey, Jersey, and the Isle of Man all offer a range of Tuition
Fees Grants and Maintenance Grants, subject to assessment.
Details on financial support and how and when to apply are
available from the relevant island authority:
Guernsey: www.education.gg/educationhome
Jersey: www.gov.je/Education
Isle of Man: www.gov.im/categories/
education-training-and-careers/student-grants
Students living in Northern Ireland
• For all other international students:
www.educationuk.org/global
Living and other costs
Tuition fees cover the cost of tuition; all other costs associated
with your studies, such as accommodation, travel and living
expenses are your own responsibility. When calculating
your budget, you should also allow for costs such as books
and equipment, field trips, stationery, printing and binding of
dissertations, photocopying and computer disposables (for
personal computers), laboratory fees, travel, laundry, and the
(optional) red undergraduate student gown. For help with
working out a living cost budget, please see:
www.studentcalculator.org.uk
You are required to pay the General Council and Graduation
Fee or Completion Fee. Payment of this fee confers upon you
life membership of the General Council of the University, a body
comprising all graduates of St Andrews and enjoying certain
statutory rights and privileges. It also contributes to the cost
of the production of the HEAR transcripts, degree certificates,
credit transfers and the different confirmation letters we
produce on behalf of our students. You pay this one-off fee at
the point of matriculation (for indicative purposes, the fee in
2014-2015 is £50).
Return to Contents
Scholarships
and support
St Andrews is committed to attracting the very best students,
regardless of financial circumstances, which is why we offer a
large number of bursaries and scholarships to undergraduate
students. These are designed to provide assistance to help
students support themselves financially during their time at
university and also aim to reward academic excellence.
What support is available?
For UK, EU and EEA students, the value of our scholarships
range from £1,000 entrant (one-off ) bursaries through to
£3,000 per annum awards for each year of study. Scholarships
for international students range from £1,000 (one-off )
bursaries to the full cost of the overseas tuition fee plus some
additional support for living costs. The number and value of
scholarships may vary from year to year.
Bursaries available to assist with fees
The University of St Andrews has introduced an Entrance
Bursary for students domiciled for fee purposes in England,
Wales or Northern Ireland. The Bursary is designed to help
those who wish to move away from home to attend the
University of St Andrews. Further details are available from:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/fees-and-funding
Scholarships
and support
33
“I was awarded the St Andrews Bursaries Scheme
scholarship. I have been able to take the award straight off
my accommodation fees, which has significantly improved
my financial situation. The University is extremely helpful
in enabling students to afford to study here.”
Elizabeth (Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland)
Other financial assistance
Travel Scholarships
Financial assistance is available if you wish to undertake
travel projects during the summer vacation. Further
information can be found at:
http://bit.ly/sta-travelscholarships
Vacation Grants
Some Schools offer Vacation Grants for the following purposes:
• Courses of study at home or abroad during vacations.
• Courses of study, away from the University, during term.
• Practical placements during term at home or abroad.
How and when to apply
The scholarship programme is open to both domestic
and overseas applicants although some scholarships have
subject or domicile restrictions attached, according to the
wishes of the donors.
The scholarships webpages hold a wealth of information
in relation to the financial support offered by the University,
statutory student support and external bodies who offer
financial assistance. Some scholarships have early deadlines
so it is well worth checking the webpages to ensure that you
apply in good time.
For our full list of awards and for more information on
application deadlines and eligibility criteria, please go to:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/fees-and-funding
Further information is available on School webpages:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/schools
Financial difficulties
Governmental Discretionary Funds are provided to support UK
students. Students funded by the Students Awards Agency for
Scotland who have registered childcare may be eligible to apply
to the Childcare Fund via Student Services.
All students encountering unforeseen financial difficulties may
be eligible to apply to the University for limited assistance.
Please contact:
The ASC (Advice & Support Centre)
E: [email protected]
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/money
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/money/timeline
Return to Contents
Careers and
employability
What the Careers Centre offers
The Careers Centre provides a wide range of resources to
help you make well-informed and timely decisions about
your future. These include:
One-to-one careers advice on working out a career
path, getting an internship, making effective CVs and job
applications, preparing for interview and applying for
postgraduate study.
• Workshops led by careers advisers and employers on
topics such as: getting started on your career planning,
making successful applications, tackling interviews and
assessment centres, presentation skills.
• Easy-to-use and comprehensive webpages:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/careers
• The Careers Centre JobsOnline and 1001 Jobs Live
databases offering hundreds of graduate jobs and
internships across the UK, and an increasing number of
international opportunities.
• Three careers fairs covering Law, Science & Technology
and Graduate Management and Finance Careers.
• Employer presentations providing an opportunity to
meet top graduate employers.
• Resources to enable you to connect with St Andrews
alumni and develop networking skills.
• An extensive range of books, career magazines and
journals.
• A ‘Job Shop’ advertising part-time jobs in the St Andrews
area.
•
Beyond St Andrews
Careers and
employability
34
Making the most of your university
There are plenty of activities to get involved with at St Andrews
which can enhance your employability. You might consider:
•
•
•
•
Undertaking a university-based internship: the
Undergraduate Research Internship Scheme (URIP) offers
you the chance to undertake a summer placement in your
academic School, and the St Andrews Summer Internship
Scheme provides opportunities to get experience in
the non-academic University units. In recent years these
have included opportunities in the Development Office,
Admissions, the Principal’s Office, the Careers Centre,
CAPOD, Finance and HR. Both schemes are funded. 45 of the
2014 graduating year undertook internships.
Becoming an Ambassador: you can get involved in
organising and running university events including Visiting
Days, or assist with a range of exciting initiatives for school
pupils.
Volunteering: the Millennium Volunteers Scheme supports
and provides certification for voluntary service and there is
an active Student Voluntary Service offering opportunities
across a range of different sectors.
Study / work abroad: you could spend part of your degree
working or studying in another country.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studyabroad
Getting involved in extra-curricular activities
Employers report that active involvement in extra-curricular
activities can set candidates apart when it comes to the job market
as it helps develop transferable skills including: leadership,
team-working, presentation skills and problem-solving.
•
At St Andrews there are approximately 160 societies, so
whether your passion is for A Cappella singing or wildlife
and conservation, you will find something to enjoy. For a list
of societies affiliated to the Students’ Association visit:
http://societies.yourunion.net
• If you win awards for any of your extra-curricular
achievements these will be listed on your Higher Education
Achievement Award (HEAR) transcript when you graduate,
providing you obtain formal recognition. Just under half
of the students who graduated in 2013 had at least one
achievement on their HEAR.
External opportunities
Most students undertake a variety of work experience
placements or internships during their time at St Andrews.
In recent years students have interned at a huge range of
organisations including Accenture, Deloitte, JP Morgan,
National Galleries of Scotland, the Naval Historical Centre
in Washington, the Whale Conservation Network and many
more.
The Careers Centre encourages you to document these
experiences to benefit your peers. To learn more about what
students have been doing during recent years visit the ‘Be
Inspired’ section of the Careers Centre webpages and take a
look at the work experience case studies:
http://bit.ly/sta-careers-beinspired
The St Andrews Award
The St Andrews Award recognises and celebrates your
development through extra-curricular and work related
activities.
•
•
•
•
•
You will get a chance to stretch yourself and try new things
you might not have considered.
The focus is on doing all you can while still at university, to be
well prepared for whatever path you follow after graduation.
Your achievement of the Award will appear on your
academic transcript.
24 of the 2014 graduating year received this award.
For more information visit: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/award
Return to Contents
Careers and
employability
35
Undergraduate first destination statistics
International opportunities
The Careers Centre provides a dedicated service and
knowledgeable staff for international students with country
specific information on jobs, internships and networks of
contacts. North America is especially well provided for with a
series of dedicated networking events in the major cities for
alumni and students. Alumni and parents provide an excellent
network of supportive well connected contacts.
3.9%
Professional Skills Curriculum
Hundreds of students engage with the University’s
Professional Skills Curriculum. Over 25 different topics on
skills employers’ value are delivered via evening lectures,
online workshops and practical skill sessions. If you complete
eight or more topics in an academic year you achieve a
certificate and recognition on your degree transcript. For
more information visit: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/capod
Further information
Careers Centre, University of St Andrews,
6 St Mary’s Place, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9UY.
T: + 44 (0)1334 462688
E:[email protected]
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/careers
January 2014
– outcomes of graduates
from summer 2013.
Gained employment
Student Enterprise
The Enterprise Adviser is available for one-to-one support and
guidance. An SIE Student Enterprise intern is responsible for
liaising with students to promote and encourage participation
in the wide range of events and activities they offer. They
also work closely with various student societies. For further
information visit: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/enterprise
47.1%
Work and further study
38.7 %
The Student Enterprise Office within the Careers Centre aims
to encourage students to build entrepreneurial skills and to
promote business start-up as a viable career choice. We run
an Ideas Competition every year, with a supporting range of
seminars on topics such as finding ideas, turning ideas into
opportunities, business planning, marketing, leadership and
intellectual property matters. Working in association with
Business Gateway, the Scottish Institute for Enterprise (SIE),
and Youth Business Scotland (part of the Prince’s Trust) there
is access to a network of support, advice and events available
from outside the University.
3.2%
Further study only
7.1 %
Seeking employment
Not available for employment or study
What employers say about St Andrews graduates
Graduates from the University of St Andrews have a good
reputation with employers who say that they are impressed
with the passion students have for their subject and the range
of extra-curricular activities they take part in:
“We want interns and graduates who are team players, problem
solvers, strong communicators with business awareness and
drive. At St Andrews, students can demonstrate these skills not
just from their course or work experience but from a whole host
of extra-curricular activities. This, coupled with expert guidance
from their Careers Centre, is sure to produce highly sought after
top graduates.”
Joan Johnstone
Senior Graduate Recruiter, Accenture
“St Andrews graduates have key strengths in a number of the
eight competencies we use to recruit our intake of over 900
graduates a year, due to the style of learning and the support
mechanism around employability, so expertly delivered by the
Careers Centre.”
James Darley
Director of Graduate Recruitment, Teach First
“Sotheby’s enjoy working with St Andrews and we are fortunate
to have a number of alumni enjoying varied and successful
careers with us. One of the key attractions of the University
is the diverse international appeal of its graduates, which
complements our global reach as an auction house.”
Justin Shreeve
Director of Human Resources, Sotheby’s
Return to Contents
Beyond St Andrews
Careers and
employability
36
Careers and
employability
(continued)
What our graduates do
St Andrews graduates have a very good first destination
record in employment, further study and training.
• They follow diverse career paths and can be found
in a wide range of organisations, regardless of their
degree discipline.
• In recent years graduates went to work for organisations
including: Thomson Reuters, Blackrock, Community
Energy Scotland, Deloitte, Teach First, Rolls-Royce,
United Biscuits, Procter and Gamble, KPMG, The
Department for International Development and
Cancer Research UK, to name but a few.
• Many alumni come back as part of their employer
recruitment teams, targeting St Andrews students
and some choose to share their career stories
on the Careers Centre webpages to support and
encourage undergraduates:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/careers/alumni/casestudies
“I studied hard at university and built up a strong academic
record which proved to my employer that I have the technical
aptitude and work ethic to be an actuary. My actuarial
internship enhanced my understanding of what actuaries do
and provided me with valuable experiences to draw upon
in my interviews. The sport I played at university and my
work experience in retail acted as evidence of my ability to
get on with others and function as part of a team.”
Tom (MSc Mathematics and Statistics (2009))
Executive, Ernst & Young LLP
Graduate quotes about the Careers Centre
“Get as much work experience as you can – show
people first hand that you are good at the job and
learn the most you can about how each agency works.
Show you care about the industry – do your research,
watch ads and get passionate about them. Apply for
everything that interests you. Yes, doing grad scheme
applications whilst also revising for exams isn’t fun but
they really help you to see if you want it enough. If
you find applying fun it’s probably a good sign.”
Rosalie (MA (Hons) Art History and Modern History (2012))
Advertising Account Executive, Grey London
“My experiences at St Andrews, in particular the
myriad of extra-curricular activities I took part in, were
invaluable in getting my early placements and jobs.
I’m not sure I noticed it at the time, but looking back,
I can see much of the skills and experience I needed to
begin my career emerging throughout my four years at
St Andrews: I was responsible for raising money for
STAR Radio through local and corporate sponsorship, I
ran a theatre company under Mermaids and had to make
funding applications to finance my productions, I had
to draw up yearly society budgets and figure out where
that money was going to come from, and I gained a huge
amount of experience in marketing, design and event
management.”
Philippa (MA Hons English (2008))
Head of Development, Classical Opera
Return to Contents
The St Andrews
connection
The St Andrews
connection
37
The University of St Andrews takes pride in its loyal alumni who,
together with their parents and families, act as some of the
University’s best ambassadors and supporters. St Andrews offers
a unique and stimulating academic environment in which to live
and study and many lifelong friendships are made here.
After you graduate
During your time at St Andrews
At St Andrews, your family is considered an integral part of
the University community and this is recognised through our
comprehensive Family Programme:
•
Parents and guardians of first-year undergraduates are
invited to attend a reception at the start of Orientation
Week, when families are welcomed to the University
community by the Principal and members of staff are on
hand to answer questions regarding all aspects of your
University life.
•
Family Programme membership enables your parents
or guardians to receive a copy of Chronicle , our annual
magazine for alumni and friends of the University, Link, the
bi-annual newsletter for parents, and a regular e-newsletter,
St Andrews in the News, keeping them up-to-date with
University news and developments throughout the year.
•
•
Members also receive a SPARC benefit card which provides
access to a range of benefits and services, including our
online Love from Home service, run in conjunction with a
local bakery, which allows families to mark special occasions
by sending cakes and gift baskets to you in St Andrews.
Families may choose to support the University in a variety
of ways, including contributing to the Library through
the Family Book Fund or volunteering as career contacts
for Saint Connect, our Careers Alumni Network, to assist
students and recent graduates.
While graduation marks the culmination of your years of
hard work, the University aims, through its Alumni Relations
programmes, to ensure that the celebratory Graduation
Ceremonies, Garden Parties and Ball do not mark the
end of the association of our graduates and their families
with the University, but rather the beginning of a lifelong
membership of our alumni community. As life members of
the General Council, a governing body which meets twice a
year, graduates have a first-hand opportunity to connect with
the achievements and aspirations of the University, while
contributing to discussions on matters of importance to its
future.
Graduates are also entitled to:
•
•
•
•
marry in either of the University’s two chapels.
apply for life membership of the Students’ Association and
the University Library.
receive the annual magazine, Chronicle, with features
about the University as well as information about clubs
and events, reunions and news from former students.
join St Andrews alumni clubs throughout the UK and
abroad, enabling you to reconnect with old friends and
find new ones amongst those who have shared the
St Andrews experience.
When you graduate you will receive a SPARC alumni card
which entitles you to a range of benefits and services,
including access to SPARC, the online community for
St Andrews alumni. Together with a dedicated email service
and our presence on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, it is
easier than ever before for our alumni and friends to keep in
touch with each other and with their alma mater.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/alumni
Return to Contents
Alternative Study Routes
Lifelong and
flexible study
38
Lifelong and
flexible study
If you are in employment, have family or caring responsibilities
or a health condition to manage, then part-time study might
be the best option for you. Part-time study can also be a
“taster” for those who are unsure about whether degree-level
study is for them, and it can also meet the needs of those
who might wish to take just a few degree-level modules in a
subject or subjects of particular interest.
We offer degree programmes in the daytime or in the
evenings.
Part-time evening study
Our evening programme is primarily designed for those who
may have missed out on higher education, but feel they can
succeed at degree level study. You may have some recent
experience of study or you may be working in a demanding
professional environment where organisational and/or
technical skills have been tested.
Evening modules have small class sizes and you will study
alongside students from a similar background. It is particularly
suitable for those who have an active interest in a range of
subject areas and do not necessarily wish to specialise in any
particular one.
The evening degree at a glance
• Study for a Master of Arts (General) degree or Bachelor of
Science (General) degree in three to nine years.
• Combine a range of modules and build up your degree
programme.
• Part-time students with incomes below £25,000, taking
more than 30 credits, may apply to SAAS (Student
Awards Agency for Scotland) for the full tuition fee.
• Credit can be given for recent previous learning at higher
education level (HNC, HND, OU, etc.)
• You can take classes on one or two evenings a week.
• September or January start.
• Subject areas can also be taken as stand-alone or as
“taster” modules.
For more information and an application form please visit:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/options/routes/part-time/
evening-degree/
Interviews will be held for all suitable applicants as part of the
decision-making process.
“I am a mature student with a husband, five children and
a mad life. The University of St Andrews has opened my
eyes to the world around me and taken my hand to help
me through this amazing experience.
The flexibility of the course helps me find a balance
between my home life and my education. The support
network available has been invaluable to me and the
recognition of the different needs of students like myself has
been amazing and very comforting at times of worry during
my time here.”
Melissa (Blairgowrie, Perthshire, Scotland)
Part-time daytime study
If you are available during the day and meet the required level
of recent qualifications, you can attend the same classes as
our full-time MA (Master of Arts) or BSc (Bachelor of Science)
students, taking one or two modules each semester instead
of the full-time three. Through daytime study you can work
towards the MA General degree or BSc General degree or work
towards an Honours degree in a named subject (or subjects).
Part-time Daytime study at a glance
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Entry qualifications need to be recent and of a similar level
to those offered by our full-time students.
The range of degree options includes Honours (typically
six to eight years of part-time study) as well as the General
degrees (four to six years part time).
Students take one or two modules per semester, and will be
studying alongside full-time students.
Help and guidance in arranging a suitable timetable are
readily available.
Part-time students with incomes below £25,000, taking more
than 30 credits, may apply to SAAS for the full tuition fee.
Generally a September start (although January may be
possible).
Subject areas can also be taken as stand-alone modules.
For more information and an application form please visit:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/options/routes/part-time/
day-study/
An interview will be held for all suitable applicants and will be
part of the decision-making process.
Return to Contents
Lifelong and
flexible study
39
Non-graduating study, “taster” study
General degree
The Master of Arts (General) degree or Bachelor of Science
(General) degree are programmes available to both full-time and
part-time students. The General degree is not open to school
leavers instead it is aimed at prospective students coming to us
through alternative routes such as access courses or HNCs, or
who are returning to study after a sustained period of time out
of education.
The General degree allows you to study a number of different
subjects without having to specialise in any particular one. It
typically extends over three years of full-time study (120 credits
per year) or up to six years of part-time study (up to 80 credits
per year). Students who initially register for a General degree
can, on occasion, go on to apply for a named Honours degree
programme at the end of their second year (of full-time study) if
they meet the requirements of the academic School(s) involved.
We welcome enquiries from prospective students who may be
thinking of trying out one or two modules on a part-time basis,
to see if they feel higher education is for them. Please contact us
on one of the emails listed below.
In most cases the same funding support is available to students
who are enrolled on a non-graduating basis as for those who are
enrolled on a part-time degree programme.
For further details on studying flexibly at the University, please
contact: [email protected]
The application process for full-time study on the General
degree is through UCAS, and all suitable applicants will be
invited to an interview as part of the decision-making process.
Application for part-time General degree study is through the
routes outlined above for the evening degree or part-time
daytime study.
“Having been away from education for over thirty years,
the idea of coming to university was quite daunting.
Although studying at St Andrews is challenging I have
found it to be very rewarding. I have received excellent
support from the staff here and it is clear that they want
you to succeed. The transition from access course to
university has been fairly smooth and the few problems I
encountered were swiftly resolved. I would particularly
recommend St Andrews to mature students.”
“It had been sixteen years since my last experience
of university education when I started the evening
programme and that was a daunting prospect. However,
the support I received from fellow students and the
Evening Degree co-ordinator allowed me to immerse
myself in my studies and flourish. The flexible structure
of the evening programme allows students to experience a
wide variety of subjects – I came for English primarily, but
also fell in love with Mediaeval History. The knowledge
and enthusiasm of the lecturers combined with the
collaborative nature of the lessons provided me with some
truly unforgettable evenings.”
Marc (Glasgow, Scotland)
Evening Degree Student of the Year 2013
David (Glenrothes, Fife, Scotland)
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Alternative Study Routes
Access
40
Access
Michele Christie - have
text but need image
The University of St Andrews is proud of its diverse and
vibrant student community, and we continue to strive towards
attracting students who have the talent and potential to
succeed, regardless of personal or social circumstances.
Access to the University of St Andrews has always, and
continues to be, at the forefront of our agenda. Our wide
range of long-established initiatives and pioneering new
projects engage with learners at every stage along their
educational journey.
The Access team at St Andrews provides tailored information,
advice and guidance to those students coming through
alternative routes or from non-traditional backgrounds.
Whether you are a school leaver, college leaver or planning
to go back to education after a significant break, we are
committed to providing you with the information you need in
order to make an informed choice about studying here. This
could include ensuring that you have the right qualifications,
support with your UCAS Personal Statement or simply
arranging to visit the University.
We have designed, and we run, a number of programmes
such as the Reach Project, Sutton Trust Summer School and
the Shadowing Day Programme to give senior school pupils
and college students a practical insight into student life at
St Andrews. Please see our webpages for more information :
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/access
“I am a mother who came back into education four years
ago. I began my education at Intermediate 1 level and
worked up to Higher SQAs then successfully entered
the University of St Andrews. On top of this I won Fife
Student of the Year 2013. Attending the University
allows me to realise my dreams and to achieve them, it has
allowed me to find my own identity. Now I am not only
‘Mum’ but a successful full time mature student.”
Michelle (Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland)
The following qualifications meet the minimum academic
requirements for entry. However, the content of each
qualification will be carefully assessed to ensure that it is
relevant to the subject or subjects for which you have applied.
•
Higher National Certificate: Applied Sciences (Pathway
to Medicine): the University has a unique partnership with
Perth College whereby each year up to five mature students
are guaranteed a place to study Medicine on successful
completion of the HNC Applied Sciences (Pathway to
Medicine) Access Course. Further information can be
obtained from Perth College Admissions on 0845 270 1177.
•
Higher National Certificate: the current minimum entry
requirement is an ‘A’ grade in the Graded Unit. Normally a
Higher National Certificate allows entry into first year only
unless you attend a college with an articulation agreement
with the University.
•
Higher National Diploma: the current minimum entry
requirement is an ‘A’ in all Graded Units. The Higher National
Diploma allows entry into various years. You should check
with Admissions before applying to ascertain which year of
entry would be the most appropriate.
•
SWAP Access Programme: the current minimum entry
requirement is an ‘A’ grade profile on your SWAP Access
Programme. It is recommended to undertake external SQA
Higher examinations where possible but this is not essential
for entry unless specifically stated.
•
Access Diploma to Higher Education: we require 60 credits
with a minimum of 45 credits at Level 3. Further to this we
would require the Level 3 credits at Distinction and Merit.
The number of credits required at Distinction or Merit along
with specific subjects will depend on the course for which
you are applying.
Care Leavers
The University of St Andrews has been awarded the Buttle
UK Quality Mark for Care Leavers in recognition of our
commitment to encouraging and supporting students who
are either currently leaving care or who have previously spent
time in care. We offer advice and guidance on the application
process, finance and accommodation as well as continued
support whilst at University.
When applying to the University
through UCAS please indicate if you
have been in care. We can then contact
you at the application stage to give
you more information about the kind
of support we can offer as well as put
you in touch with our Care Leaver
Support Co-ordinator.
UK qualifications
If you are not applying directly from school and you are studying
for one of the following qualifications, we strongly recommend
that you contact the Access team in order to seek guidance on
preparing your UCAS application.
Return to Contents
Rebecca (Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland)
Gateway programmes at St Andrews
Senior school projects
The University offers Gateway programmes for those wishing
to study Computer Science or Physics. These programmes
are designed for applicants with high academic potential
who have fallen short of the minimum entrance requirements
due to disadvantage. The programmes provide students with
enhanced academic support which aids students in their first
year to gain the skills required for entry into the second year
of the main programme. Please refer to the specific subject
pages 74 and 138 for more information.
The Access team run a number of projects and initiatives with
schools, providing help and support with the transition to
university.
•
Reach project – working with Fife secondary schools we
offer support and guidance for pupils both before and
during the UCAS application process. Reach also provides
a variety of exploratory workshops and events to help
students discover more about high demand subjects such as
Medicine and Economics.
•
Shadowing programme – invites pupils from nontraditional backgrounds to spend a day shadowing an
undergraduate student to appropriate lectures, tutorials and
seminars as well as finding out more about university life.
•
Sutton Trust Summer School – aimed at those who have
the academic potential to do well at university, but who may
not have family experience of higher education or who may
have attended a state-sector school with little experience of
sending pupils to the University of St Andrews. S5 / Year 12
pupils have the opportunity to sample student life at a free,
week-long residential summer school.
Advice and guidance
“Taking part in both the Sutton Trust Summer School
and the First Chances Project provided me with a
valuable insight into life as a student in St Andrews.
This was extremely beneficial to me, as I came from a
school with low progression rates to higher education.
The experiences I had during the projects played a large
role for my enthusiasm in coming to St Andrews and
gave me the drive to work towards securing my place
here. For this, I am deeply grateful of opportunity to
have been involved.”
Jack (Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland)
•
Working closely with schools and colleges, we actively
promote the advantages of higher education.
•
We attend HE Fairs, Careers Conventions and deliver
informative talks and presentations to schools and colleges.
•
Through conferences and information sessions, we continue
to maintain strong links with teachers and advisers.
•
Parents are welcome to contact us for advice or meet us at
any relevant HE event or school convention.
These are just some of the services offered by the Access
team. If you have any particular questions about applying to
St Andrews please contact us.
Admissions
University of St Andrews, St Katharine’s West,
16 The Scores, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9AX.
E: [email protected]
[email protected]
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/access
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41
Access
“At school, I took part in various projects with the University of
St Andrews such as Reach, Sutton Trust and shadowing days. They opened
my eyes to life at university, and played a huge part in my decision to
come to St Andrews. In particular, shadowing a student allowed to me to
experience first-hand what life at university would be like, and the lectures
I attended confirmed to me my love of my chosen subject. How amazing to
now have a school pupil shadowing me and get them excited about possibly
studying here!
42
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St Andrews – William & Mary Joint Degree
Collaborative international learning
Structure
The Bachelor of Arts (International Honours) from the
University of St Andrews and the College of William & Mary in
Virginia, USA.
This innovative collaboration between two leading universities
in the UK and USA provides a rare opportunity for today’s
students. You will receive a truly international education which
will prove a great asset in today’s global and competitive job
market. The Programme combines the depth of study for
which St Andrews is renowned and the breadth characteristic
of William & Mary’s liberal arts tradition. The Joint Degree
goes beyond the standard study abroad route in that it allows
you to spend two years at each respective institution and yet
graduate with a jointly awarded BA (International Honours)
degree carrying the insignia of both institutions.
The College of William & Mary
You will apply to the institution where you intend spending
your first year and then progress in your second year to the other
one. Thereafter you can choose how you wish to allocate
your third and fourth years of study. A dedicated adviser will
assist you throughout the duration of your degree.
From the outset you elect to specialise in one of four subject
areas: Economics, English, History (including significant study
of a second language) or International Relations. In years one
and two you have the opportunity to study from the broad
curriculum offerings of the two institutions, as well as your
chosen specialisation. The variety of subjects available can
be viewed in the respective course catalogues at each institution.
BA (International Honours) programme route example
St Andrews
Year One
William & Mary
•
Founded in 1693, William & Mary is the second oldest
college in the United States.
William & Mary
Year Two
St Andrews
•
Three former Presidents of the United States benefited
from educational programmes offered by the College:
Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe and John Tyler.
William & Mary
Year Three
St Andrews
St Andrews
Year Four
William & Mary
•
US News and World Report ranks W&M the best small
public university in the US, and the public university
with the strongest commitment to teaching.
•
Over 6,000 undergraduate students.
•
Student:faculty ratio – 12:1.
•
Nearly 400 student clubs and organisations
Would you like to know more?
For comprehensive information, including details of
the higher tuition fees for all students on this exciting
international collaboration, please visit:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/options/routes/wm/
“This programme gives me an unprecedented opportunity
which combines the breadth of an American university
education and the depth of a UK university education.
As a history student it has particularly furthered my
learning experience through my exposure to American
and European history at some of the most historic
institutions of higher learning.”
Abby (Redmond, Washington, USA)
BA (International Honours) – History, 2015
BA (International Honours)
“As a student of International Relations, I have benefited
from a transcontinental education at two of the most
venerable academic institutions in the English-speaking
world. This programme has provided me with a global
perspective on education and career paths while also
opening doors and creating opportunities that I never
thought possible.”
Andrew (Poughkeepsie, New York, USA)
BA (International Honours) – International Relations, 2015
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43
BA (International
Honours)
Bachelor of Arts (International Honours)
Alternative Study Routes
Study Abroad
44
Study Abroad
opportunities
Study Abroad in the St Andrews degree programme
Whether it is exploring Australian marine life as part of a
Biology programme at James Cook University in Queensland;
or studying Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania;
or gaining a new perspective on International Relations at
the University of Hong Kong, Study Abroad programmes
play an important role in the University’s commitment to a
learning culture that is challenging, imaginative and flexible.
The University is delighted to offer undergraduates in Arts,
Divinity and Science a number of exciting opportunities to
spend a semester or year abroad as part of a St Andrews degree
programme. We are partnered with large and small institutions,
ancient and young, across the globe. Some offer an intimate
campus experience; others are located in the heart of a major
metropolis, from Beijing to Melbourne to LA. What unites all
of our programmes is the quality of the academic provision,
ensuring that participation in a St Andrews Study Abroad
programme opens the door to a new and valuable academic
experience at another world-class institution.
Study Abroad for credit is permitted on existing Universityapproved programmes only. All of our programmes are
carefully selected and monitored. The University has good
relations with our partners overseas and works closely with
them to ensure students enjoy a successful period abroad and a
smooth return to St Andrews thereafter.
“I jumped at the opportunity to do a semester abroad on
the Erasmus programme at Paris VI, UPMC. I spent
four months on one of the marine stations of UPMC in
Villefranche-sur-mer, situated near Nice on the Côte d’Azur.
I had an invaluable learning experience at the marine station
and an amazing time experiencing a new culture, meeting likeminded people, as well as enjoying the French Riviera. I am
now moving on to do a Masters course in Marine Biodiversity
and Conservation with the Erasmus Mundus programme.”
Jennifer (Goyang, Ilsan Seu-Gu, South Korea)
Studied in France
St Andrews Abroad
•
Key information
•
•
•
•
•
•
Some programmes are available for one semester or a full
academic year, while others involve a full academic year
abroad (usually Junior Honours year).
Opportunities are available in most degree programmes in
Arts, Divinity and Science.
Some programmes are competitive and the main criterion
is a strong academic record.
Approved courses abroad will count towards your
St Andrews degree programme.
Most programmes involve payment of your normal tuition
fees to St Andrews and no tuition fee liability at the host
institution.
Several Study Abroad programmes have scholarships
attached to help you with the costs of Study Abroad.
St Andrews Abroad refers to a number of University
exchanges each of which is open to students in several
disciplines in Arts, Divinity and Science.
Country
St Andrews Abroad Partner Institutions
Australia
University of Melbourne
Canada
Queen’s University
University of Toronto
Western University
Singapore
National University of Singapore
United States
University of California
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
University of Pennsylvania
Purdue University
University of Richmond
University of Virginia
Washington College
College of William & Mary
School Study Abroad programmes
•
•
•
•
•
‘The eye of the traveller’ – Outbound Photo Contest
Winner 2010-2011, Robert
School Study Abroad programmes are programmes for
students in specific disciplines.
Several Schools have Erasmus+ links with other European
institutions.
Some European partners offer courses in English, so you
do not have to study a language to participate.
A number of Schools have established Study Abroad
programmes outside Europe, including Australia, China,
the Middle East and Uruguay.
The University has more than 40 subject-specific Study
Abroad programmes in 18 countries.
For a full list of destinations and participating Schools, please see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studyabroad/outgoingstudents
Please refer also to individual School pages 54-151.
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‘When the library’s busy’ – Outbound Photo Contest
Winner 2011-2012, Benjamin
Callum (Stocksfield, Northumberland, England)
Studied in the USA
Working abroad
Completing a work placement abroad is a good opportunity
to gain work experience in another culture or language
and to enhance valuable skillsets. As part of specific degree
programmes in Biology, in Chemistry and in Modern
Languages, you may apply to undertake a work placement
abroad for credit. For further information on MBiochem
External Placements, please refer to page 61. For further
information on Chemistry External Placements, please refer to
page 64. For further information on working abroad as part of
a Modern Languages degree, please refer to page 131.
Erasmus+
The Erasmus+ programme is a new European project run
by the European Commission, and is running from 2015 to
2020. It is intended to support activities in education, training,
youth and sport in all sectors of lifelong learning including
higher education. If you undertake study or work in another
EU country as part of your St Andrews degree programme,
you may be eligible to participate in Erasmus+. In 20142015, our Erasmus+ students received 350-500 Euros per
month during their placement abroad. You can find further
information about the
Erasmus+ scheme on the
University’s Study Abroad
webpages and at:
www.erasmusplus.org.uk
“I spent my year abroad as a marketing intern with
Siemens in Bavaria. As a German beginner, there is
nothing quite like living and working in another country
to improve your command of the language. I gained
experience of the working world and of German culture.
It was a whirlwind of a year that I will definitely miss. I
can’t recommend it enough to outgoing students!”
Charlotte (Alnwick, Northumberland, England)
Worked in Germany
Study Abroad at St Andrews
Exchange opportunities:
The University of St Andrews has partner institutions within
Europe and throughout the rest of the world. Exchange students
can spend either a semester or a full academic year at St Andrews.
International Study Abroad Programme:
A large number of Study Abroad students attend St Andrews
each year from all over the world (programme fee attached).
Inbound Exchange and Study Abroad students can choose to
study a range of subjects, at a range of levels, in the Faculties
of Arts, Divinity or Science. If you wish to study Honourslevel modules you should ensure that you have the requisite
background knowledge – for most subjects this means prior
study at university level. If you are attending St Andrews on
subject-specific exchange programmes you may be permitted
to take additional courses in other subjects.
Entrance requirements and how to apply
Entrance to the University of St Andrews is highly competitive
and applicants are expected to have a strong overall average
grade and evidence of English language proficiency. Information
regarding the current entrance requirements together with the
procedures and deadlines for application can be found on the
Collaborations & Study Abroad webpages (see below).
“My study abroad experience was nothing short of
incredible. I made new friends from all across the world,
experienced an excitingly different academic model, and
travelled throughout Scotland, the UK, and Europe.
St Andrews is truly a special place, and I’m jealous of all
the new visiting students who have a full semester to look
forward to.”
Dan (Bedford, New York, USA)
Study Abroad student from Cornell University, USA
Further information
For further information on all of our exchange and Study Abroad programmes, including details of our current partner
institutions and details of Erasmus, please check the Collaborations & Study Abroad webpages:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studyabroad and www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studyabroad/outgoingstudents/erasmus
Collaborations & Study Abroad
E: [email protected]
T: +44 (0)1334 462245
For information about the Robert T “Bobby” Jones Memorial Scholarship,
(Emory University, Atlanta), please contact Development:
E:[email protected]
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45
Study Abroad
“Studying at one of the USA’s most prestigious universities was an
outstanding opportunity to experience a different country and education
system. William & Mary exposed me to vastly different styles of teaching
– including more participatory teaching-styles; and students and teachers
work extremely closely together. The fact that many of my professors
were former State Department officials or former politicians gave me an
incredible insight into the policy side of International Relations.”
English Language
Teaching
46
English Language
Teaching
English Language Teaching is a dynamic department offering
a range of courses and programmes. These include:
•
English Language Teaching
•
•
•
•
pre-sessional language and academic skills courses for
those who have received an offer to study at St Andrews.
modules in English as a Foreign Language and Academic
English for students whose first language is not English.
modules in the Foundations of Language (Introductory
Linguistics) open to all students.
English language and academic literacy development:
workshops, tutorials and online materials.
Introductory TEFL training for students.
Pre-sessional English language and
academic skills courses
We offer two pre-sessional courses suitable for undergraduate
students – one lasts for four weeks and the other two weeks.
Running from mid-August through to Orientation Week they
offer newly-arrived international students a flying start to
their university career, providing an opportunity to develop
language and academic study skills.
If your first language is not English, we strongly recommend
one of these courses for the best possible start to your studies
in St Andrews. You will have time to find your way around
the University, improve your English and learn our academic
cultural conventions. Students with advanced levels of English
find these courses an enjoyable and useful introduction to
university study.
There is an emphasis on academic writing and the use of
sources, to ensure you are well-prepared for the kinds of
assignments you will meet on your degree programme. You
will attend an interesting series of lectures on a range of topics
across several disciplines, and learn strategies for successful
listening and note-taking. You will participate in seminars,
work in groups and receive training in making effective and
well-structured oral presentations. There are also plenty
of opportunities for socialising, including Scottish ceilidh
dancing and visits to places of interest nearby. For further
information contact Jonathan Harvey E: [email protected]
Students whose language qualifications do not satisfy the
University requirements may be asked to attend the four-week
course as a condition of entry. For further information contact
ELT E: [email protected] www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt
In-sessional English Language Service (IELS)
The University’s English language service is available to any
student who does not have English as their first language. The
Service provides a range of workshops and bookable tutorials
tailored to maximise their relevance to your individual needs.
The workshops focus on specific language levels or student
groups; the bookable tutorials are suitable for developing a
self-study plan or for receiving feedback on the structure of a
longer piece of writing.
Credit-bearing modules as part of your degree
First Year
Class sizes: typically between 12 - 24 students.
Modules are taught in a seminar/workshop format, four times
a week. You should expect to work in groups and also to
participate in a wide range of activities.
English as a Foreign Language A & B
These modules are specifically for students who use English as
a second or additional language. The syllabus for both modules
includes a combination of language-related classes together
with lectures on UK culture and society. It is designed to address
your needs, especially in speaking, listening and writing, in
both academic and non-academic contexts. You will find these
modules particularly useful if you are an undergraduate or nongraduating student who is attending the University for one year
or one semester only.
Foundations of Language 1 & 2
These modules are for all students, regardless of language
background. If you are interested in language and linguistics,
these modules will give you a real insight into how language
works. You will be introduced to key concepts relating to
grammar, word formation, how sentences are structured, how
sounds can be analysed, how language is acquired and how we
actually use language to negotiate meaning. These modules
form a useful basis for the study of modern languages or
linguistics, but also complement studies in psychology, social
anthropology, philosophy, or indeed any discipline which
explores the nature of human language and communication.
Second Year
Academic English 1 & 2
If you use English as a second or additional language, these
modules are specifically designed to help you develop your
proficiency in English in an academic context. Focusing on essay
planning, structuring and appropriate citing and referencing
skills, you will have the opportunity to apply language and skills
in a way that is both integrated with and appropriate for your
own academic discipline.
Introduction to TEFL
English Language Teaching offers short introductory TEFL
courses which provide valuable initial training if you are
considering teaching English as a foreign language. These are
particularly useful if you are planning to spend a year abroad as
part of a degree in Modern Languages. For further information
please contact Rosalind Doig E: [email protected]
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Pre-degree
programmes for
international
students
Foundation
programmes
47
The Centre for International Foundation Programmes
The Centre for International Foundation Programmes provides
well-established and widely-recognised undergraduate
pre-degree foundation programmes for international
students. These programmes are specifically designed
to bridge the gap between national school-leaving
qualifications and the demands of a degree programme at
the University of St Andrews or another UK university.
These programmes will introduce you to the more critical,
analytical approach to learning expected in UK universities. Our
programmes are not only about developing subject knowledge
and improving your English; they will enable you to develop the
academic skills you need for successful study at degree level in
another language and in a different cultural context.
Our one-year International Foundation Programmes provide an
entry route into undergraduate degree programmes across our
Faculties, and are widely recognised by other top-ranking British
universities: some of our students have gone on to do degrees
in engineering, law, pharmacy and actuarial science elsewhere.
There are four pathways, namely:
•
•
•
•
Management, Economics & Finance
Social Sciences & Humanities
Science
Medicine
“Studying with people from so many different nationalities
taught me so much more than just subject knowledge. The
foundation programme gave me confidence to face the UK
education system and it also gave me more self-confidence
in my life.”
Caio (Goiania, Brazil)
Science and Medicine
The International Foundation Programmes for Medicine and
for Science are taught in conjunction with the Schools which
constitute the Faculties of Science and Medicine. You will take
first year modules along with first year students, whilst following
a language programme which is closely integrated with your
academic subject, so that the knowledge and skills you learn in
the classroom complement and reinforce the knowledge and
skills learned in the lecture theatre and laboratory. Students
with high grades at the end of the programme may be
permitted to progress on to the second year of a degree in their
chosen science.
Entrance requirements
Learning and teaching
Our professional and experienced University teaching staff
will give you the tools to follow lectures on complex topics
in another language and to research and write essays in an
appropriately academic style. We will help you to develop the
skills you need, and teach you the techniques and strategies to
use when faced with many different types of assessment. Our
detailed feedback on your assignments will help you to make
consistent progress.
Our teaching takes place in small multinational and
multicultural groups so that you will benefit greatly from
debate with your fellow students from different countries and
cultural backgrounds, as well as with your tutors.
The International Foundation Programmes are for overseas
students with national school-leaving qualifications (rather than
international qualifications such as IB, A-Levels or APs), or for
those who need to develop additional language proficiency.
Successful completion of a foundation programme satisfies
our undergraduate entrance requirements and guarantees
progression to undergraduate level.
Entry to our Foundation Programmes requires an excellent
high school transcript from your own country, and a minimum
of IELTS 5.5 - 6.0, or equivalent, depending on the programme.
Further requirements for Medicine can be found on our
webpages and, for all programmes, you will also be interviewed,
either in your country or on Skype.
E: [email protected]
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/foundation
“When I saw the pictures of the University, I thought, ‘This is the kind
of university that I want to go to!’ CIFP helped me adjust to the British
education system, like the different methods of teaching. I personally didn’t
know the difference between tutorials, workshops and lectures!”
Jesse
(Quezon City, Philippines)
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Applying to St Andrews
How and when
to apply
48
How and when
to apply
Every year, thousands of the world’s best students apply to
study with us. We are interested in those students who will
challenge ideas, make innovative findings, use their leadership
talents in new areas, and take advantage of the breadth as well
as the flexibility of the University’s offerings.
What do we look for in an application?
Apply through UCAS
For all full-time degree courses,
applicants should apply online
through the Universities and
Colleges Admissions Service
(UCAS) where full information
on the application procedure will
be found. An application fee is
payable to UCAS when you submit
your completed application.
St Andrews
UCAS name – STA
UCAS code – S36
All applicants for a course are assessed against the same
entrance criteria. Where places are limited, we offer them to
those eligible applicants who best meet our selection criteria,
and who are judged by our academic Admissions Officers to
have the most potential to benefit from their chosen course
and to contribute to the academic School and the University.
Selection for an offer of a place will include consideration of the
following information as part of your application.
•
•
UCAS application deadlines
• 15 October – Medicine (UK/EU applicants)
• 15 January – All other UK/EU applicants
• 31 January – Medicine (International)
• 30 June – All other International applicants
All applications received before these deadlines will receive
equal consideration.
W: www.ucas.com
T: 0371 4680 468 (UK)
+44 330 3330 230 (outside the UK)
Checklist of the UCAS application process
Here is a checklist to help you with your UCAS application if
you wish to apply to the University of St Andrews.
aCheck the courses available by using our degree list or
visit the UCAS website where you may use the Course
Search facility to look for courses in your chosen subject
area.
aCheck the minimum grades and any subject specific prerequisites for the course.
aCheck the Faculty Entrance Requirements for the degree
programme.
aIf there is a choice of course between the Faculties of Arts
(MA) and Science (BSc) decide which Faculty is for you.
aDraft your UCAS personal statement carefully so that it
reflects your choice of course(s).
aSubmit your UCAS application by the appropriate
deadline.
•
•
•
•
•
Academic qualifications, both already gained and/or
predicted.
The context in which qualifications have been, or will be,
achieved.
Personal statement: this is a very important part of your
application. Most of our applicants will be well qualified
so decisions on who will receive offers will often be
determined by the quality of the Personal Statement. You
are encouraged to spend time drafting and rewriting your
statement so that it is structured and well written.
Academic references.
Where appropriate, performance at interview.
Where appropriate, relevant work or other experience.
Where appropriate, English language ability.
Academic decision making and criteria setting is at the heart of
the selection and decision making processes. All applications
are assessed by Admissions Officers within Admissions,
guided by designated staff in each academic School. Decisions
are supported by professional and experienced staff from
Admissions and Registry which includes the provision of
relevant information, management of data and processing of
applications.
Will I be interviewed?
The majority of applicants will not be required to attend an
interview as part of the application process. The exceptions to
this will be if you are applying for:
•
•
•
•
•
Medicine
Gateway to Physics
Gateway to Computer Science
Part-time study
General degree
Return to Contents
How and when
to apply
49
International students
Transferring from another university
You may only use one method of application to the University
of St Andrews: via UCAS, the Common Application or by Direct
Application. All applications are assessed on a rolling basis,
meaning that a decision will usually be communicated to you
within four weeks of receiving a completed application (with the
exception of Medicine).
•
UCAS: Please read the section opposite for further
information. www.ucas.com
•
Direct Applications: International applicants who are not
applying to any other UK university and who are liable to
pay tuition fees at the overseas rate may apply to us directly.
Direct Application forms and guidance notes are available
from: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/apply/direct
•
Common Application: Applicants from the USA and
overseas may apply using the Common Application. The
deadline for submission, including the supplement, is
1 May.
Further details on all of these application methods can be found
at: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/apply/common-application
Direct Entry into Second Year
Applications from students wishing to transfer from other
higher education institutions will be considered on an individual
basis, however you should be aware that offers to transfer are
only made in a very small number of cases to exceptionally
well qualified students. Applications to transfer must be made
through UCAS and are subject to the UCAS deadline of 15
January. You should highlight your intention to transfer clearly,
and address your reasons for wishing to move from your current
institution in your personal statement.
Recognition of Prior Learning
In some cases the University can recognise prior learning (RPL)
that the applicant has undertaken. RPL can take the form of
courses that have been obtained at college or through other
education providers. RPL can enhance an application for
admission to a degree programme and in some instances gain
the applicant entry with advanced standing, entry to second
year, or credit transfer.
Application decisions
The decision made could be:
It is possible for well-qualified school leavers to apply for
admission directly into the second year of some science
degree programmes. A BSc Honours degree may thus be
obtained in three years and an MBiochem, MChem, MGeol,
MMath, MPhys in four years rather than five.
HNC or HND students may also wish to contact academic
Schools to enquire whether you meet entrance requirements
for direct entry to second year.
You should bear in mind that direct entry into second year
may reduce the flexibility of choice which is normally found
within the Scottish four-year Honours degree. Students
entering directly into second year will also be taking Honours
entry exams in the first exam diet after they arrive. We strongly
advise applicants considering direct entry into second year to
contact the academic School to discuss this option.
Deferred applications
Applications for deferred entry will be considered on an
individual basis; however you should be aware that only a very
small number of deferred offers are made each year. Academic
Schools may vary the number of deferred offers made for their
programmes each cycle so you should check the most recent
information regarding deferrals before making an application.
1. An Unconditional Offer
This means that the academic conditions required for entry
have already been satisfied and an offer of a place has been
made.
2. A Conditional Offer
This means that the academic conditions required for entry
have not yet been satisfied and the offer is subject to these
being obtained.
3. We are unable to offer you a place
Regrettably, we receive many more applications from wellqualified applicants than we have places to offer.
Any questions?
If you have applied to St Andrews and have any questions,
please contact us:
E: [email protected]
T: +44 (0)1334 462150
F: +44 (0)1334 463330
If you have not yet applied and have any questions, please
contact us:
E: [email protected] (UK/EU)
[email protected] (Rest of the World)
Return to Contents
Applying to St Andrews
Your qualifications
50
Your qualifications
UK qualifications
Curriculum for Excellence
The University of St Andrews is committed to ensuring
that with the introduction of the Curriculum for Excellence
prospective students are well informed of any changes relating
to admissions.
For admissions in 2016 the University will use the following
grades for the new National 5 qualification.
Standard Grade
Intermediate 2
National 5
1
A
A
2
B
B
National 4 qualifications will not be accepted for selection and
admission purposes.
The University guidelines on entrance requirements in response
to the Curriculum for Excellence can be found at:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/policy/curriculum-forexcellence/
SQA Highers
For the majority of Scottish domiciled applicants Highers are the
main basis of admission into first year. Most first year applicants
will receive offers based on their Highers achieved in a single
sitting.
All subjects at Higher are acceptable for entrance to the
University of St Andrews. However, competition for certain
degree programmes is extremely high and so the relevance of
subjects to the degree programmes may be taken into account
when considering applications.
SQA Advanced Highers
Advanced Highers are not normally required for first year
university entry. They are required, however, for direct entry into
second year for subjects where that is an option.
(For Medicine S6 requirements see page 126).
Scottish Baccalaureate
The University of St Andrews will consider individual
components of the Scottish Baccalaureate in conjunction with
other Highers and Advanced Highers.
GCE A-Levels and AS-Levels
Admission is normally based on the achievement of three full
GCE A-Levels in one sitting.
We do not consider the following A-Levels during our decision
making and they will not form part of any offer that is made:
•
•
•
Citizenship Studies
Critical Thinking
General Studies
Cambridge Pre-U
Admission will be based upon three Pre-U Principal Subjects,
or a suitable combination of three Pre-U Principal Subjects and
A-Level subjects.
International Baccalaureate
The successful award of the International Baccalaureate (IB)
Diploma is the basis for admission. If you are taking individual
units of the IB Certificate qualification you will, in addition,
normally be expected to have completed a recognised national
secondary school leaving qualification and be expected to
complete a foundation year.
Welsh Baccalaureate
The Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma is acceptable in
combination with two A-Levels.
EU/EEA qualifications
The University of St Andrews welcomes applicants with national
qualifications from European Union member states. We require
applicants to meet the Faculty Entrance Requirements along
with course-specific requirements.
International qualifications
The University of St Andrews welcomes students from around
the world, and currently has undergraduates from more than
100 different countries.
All applicants must fulfil the Faculty Entrance Requirements, see
page 51. Equivalent international school-leaving certificates,
matriculation certificates, technical college diplomas, university
degrees, and other qualifications can be accepted in complete
or partial satisfaction of the Faculty Entrance Requirements.
International Baccalaureate
See above.
USA
You should have a high school transcript and provide this with
a copy of your school profile. We are looking for a minimum
grade of A- across academic subjects, or 89%+. Course selection
should be College Preparatory or Honors level.
In addition we require at least one form of standardised test:
We are unable to admit you on the basis of AS-Levels
alone; however, AS-Levels may give an indication of future
performance at A-Level. For this reason you are strongly
encouraged to take your AS-Levels and accept certification at
the end of Year 12 (Lower Sixth). Admissions decisions will also
take GCSE results into account.
SAT I: 1950+
SAT Subject Tests: 600+ (with 700+ on all pre-requisite subjects)
ACT: 28+
APs: grades of 4 or 5 (5 on any pre-requisite subject)
Canada
Canadian students from Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba,
Ontario and Quebec should have an 85%+ average on their
High School Diploma.
Return to Contents
Your qualifications
51
Other qualifications
Contact us
Not all international school-leaving certificates meet the
University’s normal entrance requirements.
Many international qualifications may also be consolidated
by completion of a pre-degree international foundation
programme at St Andrews. (See page 47.)
For information on our minimum entrance requirements across
a range of international qualifications please see
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/entrance-requirements
For the latest list of English language qualifications we can
accept, please refer to: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/entry
For further information on qualifications please contact us using
the relevant email address:
English language requirements
If you use English as a second or additional language you
will need to provide evidence that your English is proficient
enough for you to be able to study effectively and benefit from
our programmes. If you have not completed a significant part
of your education in a majority English-speaking country, we
require an English language test certificate - usually not more
than two years old. We accept a number of English language
qualifications including IELTS (Academic), CAE, CPE and the
Pearson Test of English (Academic).
EU students: [email protected]
International students: [email protected]
Foundation students: [email protected]
Faculty Entrance Requirements
Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Divinity
Specific subject entrance requirements listed on the subject
pages are in addition to the following minimum Faculty
Requirements which all applicants must possess:
SQA National 5 (A or B) or equivalent in English and
Mathematics.
• GCSE (A or B) in English and Mathematics.
• IB Standard Level (SL) or Higher Level (HL) in English
and Mathematics.
• A language other than English is desirable with the
exception of Modern Languages where the entrance
requirement is higher.
• The Dean of Faculty may grant exemption from these
conditions, under exceptional circumstances.
•
Faculty of Medicine
Please see page 126.
Faculty of Science
Specific subject entrance requirements listed on the subject pages are in addition to the following minimum Faculty
Requirements which all applicants must possess:
•
•
•
•
SQA National 5 (A or B) or equivalent in English and Mathematics AND two SQA Highers from the following science
subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology.
GCSE (A or B) in English and Mathematics AND one GCE A-Level or equivalent, in the following science subjects: Biology,
Chemistry, Computer Science, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology.
IB Standard Level (SL) or Higher Level (HL) in English and Mathematics AND one HL in the following subjects: Biology,
Chemistry, Computer Science, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology.
The Dean of Faculty may grant exemption from these conditions, under exceptional circumstances.
Return to Contents
52
“As students, we are encouraged to embark on an independent
journey of academic and self-discovery whilst having access to a
network of academic, social and welfare support.”
Francesca (Tadworth, Surrey, England)
Return to Contents
You can find more information
on the wide range of subjects we
offer on the following pages . . .
Return to Contents
53
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics
Ancient History
54
Ancient History
See also Classical Studies page 68, Classics page 70,
Greek page 102, Latin page 118, Modern Languages page 130
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
Ancient History
Ancient History and Archaeology
History
Phylokopi Project
Features
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Ancient History and one of:
Art History
Biblical Studies
Comparative Literature
Economics
Film Studies
FrenchW
GermanW
Greek
*
W
Italian
Latin
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Philosophy
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Ancient History and two Modern Languages
Any combination of Arabic, FrenchW, GermanW, ItalianW, Persian,
RussianWR, SpanishW is available.
W
R
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Combinations including Ancient History and Russian are only available
to non-beginners in Russian.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
We strongly recommend that all applicants have a qualification
in a modern or ancient foreign language at National 5 / GCSE
level, or equivalent.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
Part of the largest School in Scotland specialising in
Ancient History.
* Broad choice of periods and topics on offer, from the
archaeology of Greece to the politics of the later Roman
Empire.
* Teaching by specialists in both historical and archaeological
evidence.
* Friendly but academically challenging departmental ethos.
* Active undergraduate Archaeological Society.
* The School of Classics was rated first in Scotland and second
in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.
* Fieldwork – students are encouraged to apply for a
placement on one of our own staff’s fieldwork programmes
or on an archaeological project or at one of the British
School Summer Schools.
* Travel bursaries are available for approved programmes.
Facilities and resources
Classics is housed in Swallowgate, an attractive building
which overlooks the sea and is only a few yards away from
the University Library and the main quadrangle. There are
computing facilities in the building, seminar rooms and a wellstocked class library. Much of your work can thus be done in
one building. The School has its own Library, supplementing the
University Library’s major holdings of books and periodicals.
What will I study?
Ancient History in St Andrews comprises the study of ancient
Greece and Rome, and of neighbouring peoples such as the
Persians and Carthaginians. You study the period from the
beginning of Greek writing and urbanism in the eighth century
BCE to the collapse of the western Roman Empire during the
fifth century CE. Geographically the subject is centred on
the Mediterranean World, but at times is extended from the
Persian Gulf to the Clyde and from the Crimea to the Sahara.
Current modules include Empire in the Ancient Mediterranean,
Slavery, Alexander the Great and Death in Roman Culture. The
subject is vast and growing every day, especially through
new archaeological research and through interdisciplinary
collaborations.
Ancient History is taught by a team of internationally-acclaimed
scholars. Together we offer not just modules on Greece and
Rome but also on archaeological and literary topics. Friendly
contact is established from the start through small tutorial
groups that enable you to get to know the staff and other
students very quickly. All our Ancient History staff share the
lecturing in first year.
Return to Subjects
Caitie (Dunning, Perth and Kinross, Scotland)
Ancient History and Archaeology
If you choose this degree, we offer a wide range of modules at
Honours that are entirely or largely archaeological in content.
The core module Principles and Techniques in Archaeology is
complemented by options such as The Ancient City of Rome, The
Archaeology of Roman Britain and the module In the Footsteps
of the Ancients, which incorporates a fieldtrip to Greece. Many
students also choose to write a dissertation on a subject of
archaeological and historical interest. Candidates for this degree
often attend the Summer Schools run at the British Schools of
Athens or Rome.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
These modules assume no previous study of Ancient History
or classical languages: any student is eligible to join. The first
module traces the history of the Greek world from Archaic Greece
to Alexander the Great. The second module follows Rome from
its beginnings to the Emperor Augustus. They introduce political,
social and archaeological aspects of civilisations that contributed
much to later European culture. Lectures outline the major
themes and questions, while the tutorials allow you to study key
sources from the ancient world (in translation), so you are working
directly with the evidence right from the start. These modules
are complementary but may also be taken independently.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Two more advanced modules, again complementary but
independent: an investigation of the social, economic,
administrative and religious history of the Roman Empire from
Augustus to Constantine; and a study of the history of human
settlement in the Mediterranean throughout classical antiquity.
The rise and fall of classical civilisation is examined, with
emphasis on archaeological evidence. These modules bridge
the gap to Honours through focused assessment methods,
including deeper analysis and practical tutorials using the
University’s archaeological collections.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
There is a wide choice of modules at this stage, covering a
wide range of periods (from Minoan Crete to Government and
Society under Diocletian) and showcasing different historical
approaches: political (Alexander the Great, Ancient Empires),
military (The Roman Army), social (Roman Slavery), cultural
(Roman Death) and art-historical (Art of the Roman Empire,
Classical Temple to Christian Basilica). Honours modules in
the School carry 30 credits, so you study two modules each
semester in Honours.
Study abroad
As a student in the School of Classics you may be entitled
to apply to spend one or two semesters in the Netherlands
studying at the University of Leiden as part of our Erasmus+
exchange. You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews
Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 80 - 100, tutorials 8 - 10
Second Year: lectures 60 - 80, tutorials 8 - 10
Honours: seminars 10 - 20
In your first year, you will typically attend three lectures each
week, in addition to a seminar in some weeks. At Honours you
will learn, debate and make presentations in lively seminars.
You will spend a lot of time at all stages in reading and guided
independent study.
Assessment
Assessment throughout the degree is generally 50% assessed
coursework and 50% by examination, taken at the end of the
semester. Some Honours modules, such as In the Footsteps of
the Ancients, are an exception to this. The final class of degree is
based on marks awarded over the last two years.
All Single Honours students write a dissertation in their fourth
year and this allows them to specialise in an area of their own
key interest.
Final year students may obtain teaching experience and
mentoring from teachers in local secondary schools.
Careers
As contemporary channels of internet and television make
world events more immediate and accessible, the ancient
world is becoming ever more relevant in the lessons it has to
offer. Increasingly economists, politicians and lawmakers are
considering past histories and their relevance to future policy
and strategy. Many graduates also use their degrees more
directly in teaching, museums or archaeology.
Our Ancient History graduates can be found in a wide range of
professions, including the law, audit, accountancy and teaching.
They include administrators in the NHS and universities, civil
servants, nurses, and bankers. Some use their IT skills in schools,
some their pastoral skills in Human Resources and others
their organising skills in events and conference management.
Further training has led to curatorial posts in museums, whilst
others are continuing to pursue their academic studies in
ancient history, heritage management and archaeology.
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-classics-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
55
Ancient History
“The Ancient History Department offers students the opportunity
to study a wide range of hugely interesting topics, with plenty of
choice and flexibility. The expert tutors are open, friendly, and
genuinely invest time in ensuring you achieve the best you possibly
can. Students also have access to the incredibly well stocked Classics
Library, with breathtaking views over the North Sea; I can spend
whole afternoons there lost in a good book.”
56
Arabic
See also History – Middle East Studies page 108
See also Modern Languages page 130
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/arabic
Arabic
‘With Integrated Year Abroad Degrees’ are only available where the
WIYA is taken in another language.
Degree options
Covers of contemporary Arabic novels
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Arabic and one of:
Art History (European &
North American Art)
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
GermanW
Hebrew
International Relations
ItalianW
W
Subject enquiries
Latin
Management
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern History
Persian
Philosophy
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Ms Catherine Cobham
E: [email protected]
Features
*
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
BSc “With” Degree
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first named subject:
*
Biology with Arabic
*
MA (Honours Degrees) in:
– Arabic and two of French, German, Italian, Persian, Russian,
Spanish
– Arabic and (one of French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish)
and Comparative Literature
– Modern Languages (Arabic and [one of French, GermanB G,
Italian, Persian, RussianR E T, Spanish]) and one of Ancient
HistoryR, EnglishE, International Relations, LatinB,
ManagementT G
– Modern Languages (Arabic and [one of French, Italian,
Persian, Russian, SpanishS]) and Classical StudiesS
– Modern Languages (Arabic and Persian) and Middle East
Studies
– Mediaeval Studies
B
G
R
E
T
S
Modern Languages (French-German) and Latin is only available to
beginners in German.
Modern Languages (French-German) and Greek or Management is only
available to non-beginners in German.
Combinations including Ancient History and Russian are only available
to non-beginners in Russian.
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Combinations including Classical Studies and Spanish are only available
to beginners in Spanish.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the higher entrance
requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need knowledge of this subject? – No.
*
*
*
The Department of Arabic and Persian also offers Persian
language classes at all levels. See page 134.
You can begin the study of Arabic language with no prior
knowledge and choose how far you wish to continue
semester by semester, up to the end of second year. Many
students who take up Arabic upon arriving at St Andrews
continue the subject to degree level and beyond.
Undergraduate societies – the Middle East Society, Islamic
Society and the Middle Eastern Film Group.
Access to events in the Institute of Middle East, Central Asia
and Caucasus Studies, the Institute of Iranian Studies and
those organised by Middle Eastern Studies within the School
of History.
An annual prize is awarded to the best student in first and
second year Arabic.
The ground-breaking research project Language – Philology
– Culture. Arab Cultural Semantics in Transition is running in
the Department until 2018.
Arabic was ranked number one for student satisfaction in
the 2014 National Student Survey.
What will I study?
The modules cover the language, literature and culture of
the Arab world. The topics covered include the language of
the Arabic media, and classical and modern Arabic language
and literature. The building of a high level of competence
in language skills is a priority in all modules, and you will
be expected to write using correct spelling, grammar and
punctuation in both Arabic and English.
You may also take complementary modules in Mediaeval
History, Middle East Studies, Modern History, International
Relations and Modern Languages. After completing the first two
years, you will be able to read, write and converse in Modern
Standard Arabic.
Why is this approach important?
The Arab world is currently going through a period of radical
changes, which will continue to have widespread repercussions
for decades to come. The region includes many different
countries extending ‘from the Ocean to the Gulf’, as Arabs
traditionally refer to it. Modern Standard Arabic is arguably the
strongest link uniting countries as diverse as Iraq and Morocco.
It is the official language of the twenty-two members of the
Arab League and one of the six official languages of the UN.
Perhaps more important than all this is the fact that Arabic has
been for many centuries the language of thriving literatures
(from pre-Islamic poetry to the contemporary novel) and rich
and diverse cultures. The importance of Arabic is enhanced
Return to Subjects
“The Arabic programme at St Andrews not only exposed me to new
intellectual challenges and triumphs in the classroom, but also introduced
me to worlds previously inaccessible. From studying abroad in the
Middle East, to ultimately finding employment with an Arab cultural
organisation, studying Arabic at St Andrews has been one of my most
rewarding life experiences.”
Arabic
Michael (West Hartford, Connecticut, USA)
MA (Hons) Arabic and International Relations (2014)
Resource Development and Media – ACA, Haifa
57
by the fact that this is the language of Islam and millions
of Muslims around the world believe the holy Qur’an was
revealed in Arabic to humankind in the person of the prophet
Muhammad.
You can progress to Joint Honours in Arabic from the
sub-honours modules in Arabic with a wide range of other
subjects, including Persian, Middle East Studies, Modern History,
Mediaeval History, International Relations, Modern European
Languages, English, Mathematics.
If you intend to study Arabic language-based courses at
Honours, your sub-honours programme will include:
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Arabic for Beginners 1 and 2
These modules will enable you to read, write and converse in
simple Modern Standard Arabic. The Arabic alphabet, writing
system, and basic Arabic grammar are covered. A selection of
non-literary modern Arabic texts will be used in class as the
basis of language teaching, classroom drills, tests and written
assignments and oral class work.
Second Year ( 2 x 20-credit modules required)
Intermediate Arabic 1 and 2
These modules will enable you to read and write Modern
Standard Arabic to intermediate level with the aid of a
dictionary, and to speak in standard Arabic on appropriate
topics with a limited vocabulary. Oral work and written class
work will be based on a series of texts selected for their
relevance to the understanding of contemporary issues and
culture.
Introduction to Classical Arab Culture
This is an optional module open to any student. It is particularly
relevant for any student interested in Arabic or intending to
graduate in Arabic.
Introduction to Middle Eastern History
This is an optional module open to students who have taken at
least three Arabic modules and it is particularly relevant for any
student interested in Arabic or intending to graduate in Arabic.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(Normally 8 x 15 credit modules over two years)
At Honours, in addition to core language modules, you
can choose from a range of modern and classical topics. It
is also possible to study for a semester or, in some subject
combinations, for a year in an Arab country as part of your
degree, although Arabic study abroad programmes are subject
to modification, depending on the security situation in the
relevant country.
Study abroad
As a student of Arabic, you may apply to spend a semester
in an Arab country, currently Morocco. Study abroad
arrangements with the Lebanese American University
in Beirut, and the American University in Cairo are
temporarily suspended, but we hope to resume these
as soon as the security situation improves. Additional
programmes in Qatar may also be available. Because of the
variable security situation in the Arab world, study abroad
options are reviewed annually and students are kept
informed of any changes or cancellations of individual
programmes as early as possible.
You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews Abroad
programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 40 - 80, tutorials 10 - 15
Second Year: lectures 20 - 40, tutorials 10 - 15
Honours: classes 5 - 20, tutorials 4 - 10
Tutors advise you closely on the preparation of written
work and give individual assessments of your performance.
Classes in Arabic language will include small group intensive
classroom teaching in which students actively participate.
Most Honours classes are organised as seminars for which
you prepare literary and non-literary texts in English and
Arabic for translation, analysis and discussion.
Assessment
Assessed work may include advanced language exercises,
discursive essays in English, oral presentations in Arabic and an
Honours dissertation.
Careers
Graduates in Arabic go on to a wide range of careers for which
an arts degree is a recognised qualification. Graduates of
the Department have become academics in international
institutions, civil servants in government departments
(notably the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office and
the US State Department), human rights lawyers, journalists
and employees in non-governmental organisations and
international companies. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-modlangs-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Topics which can currently be studied in a Joint Honours Arabic
degree include: Media Arabic, Advanced Arabic Language, Exile
and Identity, Novellas, Short Stories, Classical Arabic Poetry, Key
Texts in Classical Literature and Culture.
Return to Subjects
58
Art History
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/arthistory
Art History
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Art History
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Art History and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Comparative Literature
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
Greek
Hebrew
W
School of Art History
International Relations
ItalianW
Management
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern History
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Features
*
*
*
*
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 35
*
*
*
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
*
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
*
Subject enquiries
The School enjoys an international reputation for its
teaching and research.
We were awarded the top score for a learning and teaching
review in March 2010.
The modular structure offers the possibility of combining
art-historical courses with those in a range of other subjects.
The School has a friendly face and is responsive to the needs
of individual students.
Excellent town centre location, a short distance from
the sea and coastal walks, combines classrooms,
administrative and staff offices, and an extensive Visual
Resources Collection.
The School performed well in the UK Research Excellence
Framework 2014, in which it is was ranked top in Scotland
and fourth in the UK.
The School is generally recognised as one of the leading
departments in the UK with an excellent record for both
teaching and research.
Art-historical study is visual and you will learn to look
extensively and analytically at works of art and architecture,
both in reproduction and in the original.
Most modules are complemented by visits to galleries,
monuments and other sites.
Areas of special interest include: late mediaeval art; Italian
Renaissance architecture, painting and sculpture; the
history of Scottish art, architecture and design; the history
of photography; nineteenth-century art; twentieth century
modernism.
E: [email protected]
What will I study?
Our main purpose is to provide a context in which you will gain
intellectual breadth and learn to become verbally and visually
articulate, rather than necessarily to become professional art
historians. You will learn to assess images of all kinds critically
and perceptively. We do not teach technical or practical art skills
– although previous experience in these, perhaps in the context
of a Higher or an A-Level, would certainly provide a useful
background.
We focus on the histories of the so-called ‘major arts’ (painting,
sculpture and architecture) but also encompass the applied
arts, graphic arts and photography. A wide range of factors
are considered: the analysis of style, content and meaning;
patronage and social significance; the implicit and explicit ideas
behind works; broad questions of theory and aesthetics.
Detail: Woman of the North Sea by John Bellany.
From the Boswell Collection, University of St Andrews.
Return to Subjects
Ellen (Koksijde, Belgium)
First Year (1 x 20-credit module required)
The two 1000-level modules available are The Art of Renaissance
Italy and Northern Europe, which provides a chronological
survey covering painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy and
Northern Europe 1280 - 1580; and European Art and Architecture
in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, which begins with a
study of Baroque art and architecture in Italy and then moves to
the Low Countries, Spain, France and Britain.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Current modules are The History and Theory of European Art,
Architecture and Design from the French Revolution to Vienna
1900, which focuses on the most important stylistic changes
of the period and the role that individual artists played in
encouraging new approaches; and Art, Culture and Politics
from 1900 to Now, which concentrates on expressionism and
geometrical abstraction through to post-modernism.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(1 x 30-credit core module and at least 3 x other 30-credit
modules required over 2 years)
At Honours level students choose modules from a wide range of
options, most of which correspond to the research interests of
individual members of staff. In the third year all Single Honours
students take a core module in the first semester (optional for
Joint Honours students). This is designed to further their
understanding of major art historical issues. In the fourth year
students also prepare a dissertation. Subject areas currently
available, but subject to change, include (amongst many others):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Art of the mediaeval period
Gothic Architecture
Renaissance painting, sculpture and architecture
Nineteenth-century art
The history of photography
Orientalism and art
Art Nouveau
Russian art
Aspects of Scottish Art
Twentieth-century modernism
Contemporary art
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 180 - 200, tutorials 8 - 10
Second Year: lectures 130 - 150, tutorials 8 - 10
Honours: lectures 15 - 25, seminars 7 - 12
Teaching consists both of formal lectures, illustrated by visual
presentations, and of informal, small-group seminars or tutorials.
The relatively large number of academic staff ensures that the
large lecture classes in the first and second years are offset by
small-group tutorials and also provides a wide range of options
at Honours. Visits are organised to galleries and monuments in
Scotland.
Assessment
1000- and 2000-level modules are assessed by an equal mixture
of coursework and written examinations. At Honours level some
modules are assessed entirely by coursework, while others
include written examinations weighted at 30%.
Careers
A degree in Art History from St Andrews will provide an
excellent foundation for a career in museums and galleries,
arts administration, the art trade, or teaching, as well as in
a wide range of other fields such as publishing and media,
PR and marketing, law, business and finance, retail, catering
and hospitality. A number of graduates also go on to take
postgraduate courses.
In recent years our graduates have secured employment
in a wide range of positions, including the BBC, Sotheby’s,
Christies, Legal and General, National Museums Scotland,
the British Library, Phaidon Press, Country Life magazine,
Vertigo Films, The Week magazine, Tiffany and Co, as well
as numerous regional museums and galleries. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-arthistory-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
For more detail on the Honours modules currently available see
the Course Catalogue: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/coursecatalogue
Study abroad
As a student in the School of Art History, you may apply to
spend one or two semesters in the Netherlands studying at the
University of Leiden as part of our Erasmus+ exchange. You may
also apply to the University’s St Andrews Abroad programme.
See also page 44.
Return to Subjects
59
Art History
“The chronological overview provided in first and second year
guarantees a thorough comprehension of art and architecture from
the thirteenth century up until the present day which is essential for
making an informed choice of modules at Honours level. The Art
History staff lecture with an abundance of enthusiasm and are able to
successfully project their knowledge and passion for the subject onto
their students.”
60
Biology
Degree options
http://biology.st-andrews.ac.uk/admissions
Biology
MBiochem (Integrated Masters Degree)
Biochemistry
BSc (Single Honours Degrees)
Marine Biology students study the rockpools of St Andrews Bay.
Behavioural Biology
Biochemistry
Biology
Biomolecular Science (offered by the School of Chemistry,
includes some Biology modules)
Cell Biology
Ecology and Conservation
Evolutionary Biology
Marine Biology
Molecular Biology
Neuroscience (offered by the School of Psychology & Neuroscience, includes some Biology modules)
Zoology
BSc (Joint Honours Degrees)
Biology and Economics
Biology and Geography
Biology and Geology
Biology and Philosophy*
Biology and Mathematics
Biology and Psychology
Biology and Statistics
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject?
– Yes, see previous column.
Subject enquiries
Professor Vincent Janik and Dr Stuart MacNeill
E: [email protected]
Features
*
* The title and content of BSc Philosophy combinations is under review.
*
BSc “With” Degrees
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first named subject:
*
Biology with Arabic
Biology with FrenchW
W
Psychology with Biology
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
BSc Degree
SQA Highers and GCE A-Levels should include Biology and one
other science from Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in
Biology and HL6 in one other science
First Year Entry MBiochem Degree
SQA Highers and GCE A-Levels should include Biology and
Chemistry
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in
Biology and HL6 in Chemistry
Second Year Entry MBiochem Degree
SQA Advanced Highers and GCE A-Levels should include
Biology and Chemistry
SQA Advanced Highers: AB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38 including HL6 in
Biology and HL6 in Chemistry
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
We conduct world-class research that welcomes student
participation and offers a unique learning experience.
We provide a focused and friendly learning environment
with close contact between staff and students.
Our first year programme encourages you to choose
modules from other fields including other sciences, the
humanities and the arts to provide a well-rounded and
interdisciplinary education.
Flexibility within the School allows you to change your
degree direction during your first two years.
Our final year Honours programme is based on small,
specialised modules including practical options in the
laboratory or the field.
Your Honours dissertation work enables you to conduct
and publish your own research.
Students have the opportunity to gather research
experience around the globe from the Scottish Highlands
to Indonesia and Antarctica.
In the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014, Biology
was second in the UK based on the impact of its research.
Our research specialises in structural biology, cellular
biology, molecular biology, ecology, marine biology,
plant sciences, microbiology, virology, neuroscience,
behavioural biology, conservation and evolutionary
biology.
We have a dedicated marine laboratory in St Andrews.
The Scottish Oceans Institute incorporates the largest
Sea Mammal Research Unit in the world and many other
Marine Biology research groups.
We have strong interdisciplinary links with the Schools
of Chemistry, Geography & Geosciences, Mathematics
& Statistics, Medicine, Psychology & Neuroscience and
Physics & Astronomy.
For latest news, stories and additional information for
prospective students see: http://biology.st-andrews.ac.uk
Preference will be given to candidates offering strong science
qualifications over and above the stated minimum requirements.
Return to Subjects
“The breadth and flexibility of study is what drew me to St Andrews.
You can experience different aspects of biology before specialising
in what really interests you. Learning from staff at the forefront
of their field certainly adds another dimension to your studies and
gives you the opportunity to gain experience in their labs, providing a
fascinating insight into the world of scientific research.”
61
Biology
Lynsey (Livingston, West Lothian, Scotland)
What will I study?
Structure of Biology Degrees
Biology involves the study of life at all levels of organisation
from the molecular biology of virus replication to the study of
animals and plants in their natural habitats. Biology touches
on many aspects of contemporary life, from drug design and
investigating the molecular basis of Alzheimer’s disease, to
the migration and conservation of marine mammals – all of
which can be studied at St Andrews. We teach these subjects,
and many more, to give either an overall or a specialist view of
Biology, depending on your degree course.
First and Second Year Modules in Biology
Studying Biology at St Andrews means that a final choice of
degree does not have to be made until the end of second year.
In the first year, students take two modules in Biology, together
with four modules selected from the full range of subjects
delivered by other Schools in the University. In the second year,
most students take four of the five modules available within
Biology.
In first year the modules introduce you to core material relevant
to all degree programmes in areas such as animal and plant
biology, molecular biology, cell biology and genetics. In the
second year you choose modules which will best prepare you
for your intended degree (or group of possible degrees).
New topics are introduced in some second year modules such
as evolutionary biology and ecology, whilst other modules
allow you to continue to develop your knowledge of cellular,
biochemical, molecular or organismal biology.
Single Honours Degrees (BSc) – Third and Fourth Years
The Honours programmes occupy the final two years of study
and consist of a series of modules covering more specialised
topics. The first year of Honours provides modules developing
the specific knowledge-base for the degree programme. In
the final year of Honours, half of the time is spent attending
combinations of the numerous tutorial-style modules leading
to different specialist Honours degrees. The focus of these
advanced modules is student-led, enquiry-based learning.
The other half of the fourth year is occupied by a substantial
research project. For more details of our teaching programme,
visit our School of Biology webpages.
First Year
Module from
Biology 1
another subject
Module from another subject
Module from
Biology 2
another subject
Second Year
Module from another subject
At least two, and typically four, of the following:
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
Cell Structure and Function, Comparative Physiology,
Ecology and Evolution, Zoology
Honours
Broad-based, degree specific Core Modules (year 3)
Specialised Modules and a Research Project (year 4)
(MBiochem students take a year-long research placement
in year 4 and conduct advanced studies in year 5)
Visit http://biology.st-andrews.ac.uk/undergraduate where you
can access more detailed information on the content of biology
degrees and modules.
Study abroad
At Honours you may have the opportunity to carry out some of
your studies abroad. The School of Biology conducts exchanges
with European universities under the Erasmus+ scheme.
This provides experience of scientific work in the context of
a different EU language and culture, as well as broadening
the range of project topics that we are able to offer. We also
have exchange partner institutions in North America, Asia and
Australia in our Biology Abroad Programme and the St Andrews
Abroad programme. Please also see page 44.
Integrated Masters Degree (MBiochem)
– Third, Fourth and Fifth Years
The third year of the five year MBiochem course comprises
six Biology modules focused on advanced core material
in the molecular biosciences. In the fourth year students
typically undertake a year long research placement away from
St Andrews, in a research institute or in industry, as well as an
experimental design distance learning module. The fifth and
final year of the MBiochem degree involves highly-specialised
taught courses and a substantial research project.
A postgraduate demonstrator (in blue coat) explains the use of the
microscope to a first year student.
Return to Subjects
62
Biology
http://biology.st-andrews.ac.uk/admissions
Biology
(continued)
Class sizes and teaching delivery
Integrated Masters Degree
First Year: lectures 200 - 250, practicals – 90
Second Year: lectures 100, practicals – 50
Honours Third Year: 20 - 60
Honours Fourth Year: 5 - 15
Biochemistry (MBiochem)
The new five year Integrated Masters degree in Biochemistry
(MBiochem) is designed to enhance your research experience,
preparing you for a career within the scientific sector. In the
first three years core modules in molecular and cell biology
and biochemistry cover fundamental aspects of cell function
and regulation. In the fourth year you will undertake a yearlong industrial or research placement before returning to
St Andrews for your final year, taking advanced research-led
modules in your chosen speciality and an extended laboratory
research project.
All first and second year modules involve daily lectures
(usually with one lecture slot every week being used for
tutorials or seminars instead) and also weekly practical classes.
A separate series of supporting classes develops transferable
skills such as written and oral presentation skills and data
handling.
Teaching is delivered by lectures, seminars, and tutorials with
a strong practical element at all levels. In addition, emphasis is
placed on transferable skills including IT and the presentation
of material both orally and in writing. In addition to providing
in-depth experience with laboratory or field investigation, our
substantial final-year project allows you to develop research
skills that are strongly desired by many prospective employers
and also by graduate schools offering postgraduate degrees.
These can also lead to your first publication in a scientific
journal.
Third year modules are taught by lectures, seminars and
practicals, but final (fourth) year is very different, involving a
major project that occupies between a third and half of the
year. The rest of the year consists of small focused modules
taught in small groups on the selected topics of special
interest to staff members and students.
Assessment
All of our 1000- and 2000-level modules are assessed by an
equal weighting of coursework and written examinations.
At 3000-level, most modules give a higher weighting to
examinations, and at 4000-level some modules are entirely
assessed by coursework, while others still include written
examinations in addition to coursework but they tend to be
shorter and the weighting is usually 50% or less.
Single Honours Degrees
When reading our list of degree programmes, bear in mind
that you will be able to move easily between most Biology
Honours degree intentions during your first two years of
study. Once you reach your Honours years, your programme
will include specialised modules in the subject area you have
chosen.
Behavioural Biology
Behavioural Biology covers behavioural ecology, the
mechanisms of animal behaviour, the processes of evolution
and speciation, adaptive physiology of animals and animal
cognition. An emphasis is given to current topics like cultural
learning, animal communication and molecular ecology.
Additional choices include marine biology, marine mammals,
neuroscience, biodiversity and conservation, and animal-plant
interactions.
Biochemistry (BSc)
Biochemical mechanisms are involved in all life processes, so
biochemical techniques are applied to a broad spectrum of
fields from viral replication to neurobiology. The biochemical
aspects of cell and organismal function and regulation are
covered in modules on protein function, molecular genetics,
membranes and cell communication, bioenergetics and
pharmacology as well as a final-year laboratory project with
one of the relevant research groups in the School.
Biology
This allows you to select your own route through our Honours
modules. If you have broad interests and are reluctant to
specialise and wish to take a wide variety of topics throughout
all four years, this is the degree for you. Many of our applicants
initially apply for a degree in Biology and then after they have
sampled a range of first and second year Biology modules
decide on a more specialist degree.
Biomolecular Science
(see School of Chemistry page 66)
Bottlenose dolphins leaping in St Andrews Bay where they are studied by our
Sea Mammal Research Unit.
Return to Subjects
Ethan (Monmouth, Wales)
Cell Biology
Cell Biology is related to molecular biology in that cell function
depends on molecular structures and biochemical processes.
However, cell biology is also the basis for understanding the
physiology and development of animals and plants, as well as
many aspects of pathology. The Honours programme includes
modules that emphasise structure and function in the cells of
animals, plants and microbes. It explains how cells interact as
they form tissues and embryos.
Ecology and Conservation
Topics such as global warming, environmental change and
species extinction are increasingly in the public eye. This
Honours programme deals with core aspects of modern
conservation biology and ecology. Modules cover the ecology
of terrestrial and aquatic environments, the process of
evolution and speciation, adaptive physiology of plants and
animals, population biology, molecular ecology, biodiversity,
sustainability and conservation issues, and behavioural ecology.
Evolutionary Biology
Theodosius Dobzhansky once said “Nothing in biology makes
sense except in the light of evolution”. This Honours programme
deals with the theory of evolution, evolutionary genetics,
environmental physiology, terrestrial and aquatic ecology,
evolution of behaviour, biodiversity and conservation, human
evolution, and evolutionary ecology.
Marine Biology
We are situated on the shores of the North Sea and have the
world-renowned Scottish Oceans Institute, a research institute
which incorporates the world-class Sea Mammal Research Unit.
Other active research areas include marine molecular ecology,
genomics, the ecology and development of marine invertebrates,
fish muscle physiology, the behaviour of marine animals and the
ecology of coasts and estuaries. In this programme you will explore
aquatic environments, evolutionary processes, behavioural
biology, biodiversity and biological sustainability, marine
microbiology, and marine mammal biology.
Molecular Biology
Progressing from a sub-honours foundation in molecular and
cellular biology, this Honours programme covers core topics
such as protein function, molecular genetics, membranes and
cell communication, molecular virology, structural biology,
bioinformatics and gene expression.
Neuroscience
(see School of Psychology & Neuroscience page 142)
Zoology
Zoology degrees are wide-ranging explorations of the
animal kingdom investigating the structure, development,
evolution, classification, behaviour, and distribution of all
types of animal, both living and extinct. The choice of modules
provides organismal, cellular, and molecular perspectives,
including developmental, behavioural, neurophysiological, and
environmental approaches with examples ranging from singlecelled animals to marine mammals.
Joint Honours Degrees
The following degrees allow you a balanced and logical
combination of modules with an emphasis on the areas of
Biology which combine well with the other subject.
Biology and Economics
Biology and Geography
Biology and Geology
Biology and Mathematics or Statistics
Biology and Philosophy (tbc)
Biology and Psychology
Other Honours Degrees
Biology with Arabic
Biology with French
Biology is the major component of these programmes in which
the development of written and spoken language skills is
emphasised.
Psychology with Biology
More Psychology than Biology modules are taken in order to
fulfil the requirements for accreditation in Psychology.
Careers
Biology graduates are in high demand. They are keenly sought
by many organisations including government, universities,
research institutes and major companies. There are also exciting
opportunities in a new generation of innovative grassroots
companies, some of them spin-outs of our own School. Advisers
to the developers of marine and terrestrial renewable energy
sources, for example, need biologists for assessing the impact of
novel installations. Our graduates also enter many other diverse
fields such as management, accountancy, marketing, journalism
and teaching as employers recognise the quality of our training.
Our Biology graduates have gone on to find success in a wide
variety of careers in research, industry and business including
(amongst many others):
• Professional biologists in biological research,
conservation, higher education and the pharamceutical,
biomedical and other industries
• Researchers and advisers in government
• Journalists
• Advisers, researchers and managers in the National
Health Service
• Teachers
• Forensic scientists
• Management consultants
• Marketing and advertising experts
For further examples of the careers followed by our graduates
see: http://bit.ly/sta-biology-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
63
Biology
“Teaching in the School of Biology is as diverse as the subject itself.
The tremendous flexibility in degree structure allows you to determine
your interest before choosing your final degree subject. From the
exciting new MBiochem with industrial placement to traditional
BSc Honours degrees in a range of subjects such as ecology and
conservation, biochemistry and marine biology, you will be able to
choose the right course for you based upon your experience in the first
two years.”
64
Chemistry
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/chemistry
Chemistry
Degree options
MChem (Single Honours Degrees)
Chemistry
Chemistry with External Placement
Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry and External Placement
Materials Chemistry
Materials Chemistry with External Placement
School of Chemistry
MChem “With” Degrees
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first named subject:
Professor S Ashbrook
E: [email protected]
Chemistry with French
Chemistry with French and External Placement
Chemistry with Mathematics
Subject enquiries
Features
*
MSci (Joint Honours Degree)
Chemistry and Physics
*
BSc (Single Honours Degrees)
*
Chemistry
Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry
Chemical Sciences
Biomolecular Science (with School of Biology)
Materials Chemistry
*
*
*
BSc (Joint Honours Degrees)
Chemistry and Geology
Chemistry and Mathematics
*
BSc “With” Degrees
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first named subject:
Chemistry with French
Chemistry with French (With Integrated Year Abroad)
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
First Year Entry
SQA Highers: AAAB (including A in Chemistry)
GCE A-Levels: AAB (including A in Chemistry)
International Baccalaureate Points: 35 including HL6 in
Chemistry
Second Year Entry
SQA Advanced Highers: AB (including A in Chemistry) and AB in
two other Highers
GCE A-Levels: AAA or points equivalent (including A in
Chemistry)
International Baccalaureate Points: 37 including HL6 in
Chemistry
Preference may be given to candidates offering strong science
qualifications.
Additional entrance requirements may be specified for Joint
Honours and Biomolecular Science degrees.
*
*
All laboratory classes are held in state-of-the-art facilities
opened in Summer 2010.
Students in the School thrive with 75% gaining First or 2.1
degree classifications in their final degree.
Masters courses can include one-year placements in
industry or in leading academic research laboratories in
the UK, Europe and North America.
A variety of Chemistry modules that allow you to exercise
flexibility in your course selection.
Two major degrees are offered, the BSc and the MChem,
with a final decision made upon entry into third year.
A number of Joint Degree programmes (with Mathematics,
Physics, French and Geology) are also offered, as is the
Biomolecular Science degree that combines Chemistry
and Biology.
There is an active student-based Chemical Society
which hosts guest speakers and organises social events
throughout the year.
In the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014, EaStCHEM,
the Edinburgh and St Andrews research school for
Chemistry, was ranked top in Scotland with 28% of its
output rated as ‘world leading’ (4*).
As a School we pride ourselves on our educational and
research achievements and place particular emphasis on
offering modern programmes that address the challenges
of the twenty-first century.
MChem or BSc?
We offer a range of exciting and stimulating degree
programmes that allow students to develop skills in a variety
of areas key to the future needs of society. The MChem is
the degree tailored to the intending professional chemist
who plans to enter into the chemical industry or carry out
postgraduate study, for example for a PhD, after graduation.
This degree gives you the best possible training for entering
the job market. The course lasts either four (with direct entry
to second year) or five years.
The BSc course provides a comprehensive academic and
practical training to equip graduates for a wide spectrum of
careers whether in science-based industries or other fields
such as teaching, management or finance. The course lasts
for three years (with direct entry into second year) or four
years.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – Yes, see above.
Return to Subjects
“The School of Chemistry at St Andrews provides each student with a
personal and dynamic way of learning. The small population of students
at the School means that the professors and tutors can provide guidance
and support whenever you may need it. My favourite part of the course
is lab class, the state-of-the-art facilities are exceptionally well equipped
and it gives you a chance to get your hands on some chemicals and see
for yourself how a chemical experiment works.”
Chemistry
65
Eleanor (Balfron, Stirlingshire, Scotland)
Direct Entry to Second Year
It is possible to enter directly into the second year of study,
resulting in either a four-year MChem or a three-year BSc. This
option is offered to students with excellent Advanced Higher,
A-Level or IB qualifications. For Joint Degree subjects, entry into
second year is less straightforward as requirements must be
met for all subjects involved. The Chemistry and Physics MSci
degree has no direct entry to second year due to the number
of pre-Honours modules needed in this programme as well as
timetabling issues that result. We would be delighted to discuss
the possibility of direct entry into the second year with any
prospective students.
What will I study?
Chemistry is a vibrant and exciting central science that
interfaces with biology, physics, mathematics, medicine and
geology, and we offer appropriate modules highlighting the
importance of these interfaces. It is fundamental to many
important sub-disciplines such as biochemistry, molecular
biology, nanotechnology and atmospheric science in which we
also offer specialised teaching. Everything around us involves
Chemistry, from the making of new materials to understanding
biological systems, the food that we eat, the medicines which
keep us healthy, ensuring the purity of the water we drink and
the air that we breathe. The chemical and allied industries –
fuels, pharmaceuticals and fragrances – are the most important
manufacturing industries to the UK economy, recording trade
surpluses of more than £4.8 billion each year. These industries
employ large numbers of chemists in research, development,
sales, marketing and management. The intellectual training
(i.e. numeracy and problem-solving skills, team work,
communication) obtained in studying for a degree in Chemistry
is also ideal for a career in areas outside the chemical sciences.
First Year
This consists of six modules and you will study three modules
of chemistry and three other modules, one of which may be a
further chemistry option. Modules include: Inorganic and Physical
Chemistry (CH1401 & CH1402); Organic and Biological Chemistry
(CH1601); optional module: The Impact of Chemistry (CH1301). For
the remainder you can choose modules from a wide variety of
subjects and venture into something completely new.
Second Year
Second year consists of four modules. You will take three
chemistry modules and one module from another School.
Modules include: Inorganic Chemistry (CH2501); Organic
Chemistry (CH2601); Physical Chemistry (CH2701). If you enter
directly into second year, you will also complete a short
introductory module covering essential 1000-level material and
an introduction to laboratory work.
First two years of Chemistry degrees*
First Year
Six modules each 20 credits
20-credit
CH1401
CH1301
module
in
Semester 1
(core)(optional)
any subject
20-credit
CH1402 CH1601
module in
Semester 2
(core) (core) any subject
Second Year
Four modules each of 30 credits
– three core Chemistry modules
(joint courses: two out of three required):
CH2501 Inorganic Chemistry 2
CH2601 Organic Chemistry 2
CH2701 Physical Chemistry 2
30-credit module
Semester 1CH2501 in any subject
CH2601 and CH2701
(Joint Degrees: one of CH2601 or CH2701
Semester 2
and an additional module from
another subject)
* Some joint or more specialist degree programmes
have different structures.
Honours (3rd, 4th and 5th years)
In the Honours years you will study a combination of
compulsory and optional modules, depending upon your
degree choice. For the MChem programme there is the
opportunity to go on an external placement. Both BSc
and MChem students will undertake at least two research
projects.
Sample Honours module titles:
• • • • • • • • Organometallic Chemistry
Advanced Ligand Design
Mechanism in Organic Chemistry
Carbohydrate and Nucleic Acid Chemistry
Statistical Mechanics and Computational Chemistry
Blockbuster Solids
Energy Conversion and Storage
Mini Chemistry Project
After completing the modules in first and second year you
decide on your final degree choice (e.g. MChem or BSc) and
enter the Honours class.
Return to Subjects
66
Chemistry
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/chemistry
Chemistry
(continued)
Single Honours Degrees
Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry
The MChem and BSc degrees in Chemistry with Medicinal
Chemistry focus on the important interface of chemistry with
biology. The Human Genome has recently been sequenced
and with this comes huge possibilities for new progress in
drug discovery, and the successful development of new
drugs requires a clear understanding of how to design small
molecules that interact with proteins. At St Andrews we feel it is
important to have specialist programmes in this area as industry
is increasingly aiming to recruit individuals with training both
in chemistry and in biomolecular sciences. The MChem in
Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry includes the option of a
one-year placement in the pharmaceutical or agrochemicals
industry. The programme will cover all aspects of chemistry in
the early phase of the degree but it will specialise in biomedical
topics in the final years. It is possible to enter directly into
second year for this degree.
Biomolecular Science
St Andrews has a world-class research record in working at the
interface between chemistry and biology in areas including
new treatments for flu, tropical diseases and cancer. The degree
programme was introduced as most people now agree that
future cures for disease will have to blend chemistry, medicine
and biology and this degree builds on our research strength
in this area. Its aim is to equip students with the skills required
for the modern pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.
Thus students will gain expertise in chemical synthesis, enzyme
kinetics, structural biology and molecular biology.
The BSc Biomolecular Science degree offers a unique
opportunity to blend modules from Chemistry and Biology
throughout all four years. In the first two years you study a
common core of subjects in biochemistry and chemistry. In the
third and fourth years you specialise in modules that balance
chemistry and biology. The final year research project will be
supervised by a member of staff in the Biomedical Sciences
Research Complex. Second year entry to this degree is also
possible with good qualifications in chemistry and biology.
Materials Chemistry
Materials Chemists seek to understand the interrelationships
between the composition, structure, microstructure and
properties of solids in order to design and develop new
materials with optimised performance for the key technologies
that underpin much of everyday life. Materials science is
critical to the development of advanced technologies such
as semiconductor processing and fabrication; new energy
materials; materials for information technology; biomaterials to
replace and reconstruct tissue in the body; catalyst materials;
‘smart coatings’ for self-cleaning surfaces, and materials for
nanotechnological devices.
We offer four-year BSc and five-year MChem degrees in Materials
Chemistry. The MChem is particularly appropriate for those
students wishing to enter into research in industry or university.
In the first two years, you will study Chemistry modules, and
if you wish, modules in Physics and Mathematics. In the later
years of the degree, you will study more specialist modules
on the synthesis, properties and applications of materials. For
MChem students, the fourth year can be spent on industrial
placement at a company at the forefront of materials research
and development. In the final year of both BSc and MChem
degrees, you will choose a research project in one of the many
highly-rated materials-based research groups. It is possible to
enter directly into second year for this degree.
Chemistry with French
We offer both four-year BSc and five-year MChem Chemistry
with French degrees giving you the opportunity to study
Chemistry whilst simultaneously enhancing your proficiency
with French. In each case, there is an option to spend an
integrated year in a French-speaking country (e.g. France and
parts of Belgium, Switzerland and Canada).
“The staff are all extremely friendly and approachable
and are always on hand to help. I’ve been really involved
in local outreach during my time here and getting school
children excited about chemistry is incredibly rewarding.”
Chemical Sciences
The four-year BSc Chemical Sciences degree is a chemistrybased programme that offers more flexibility to study some
modules in the Honours programme in a range of other
subjects. These can be other sciences, social science or businessrelated subjects. It is possible to enter directly into second year
for this degree.
Megan (Bolton, Lancashire, England)
Return to Subjects
“The Chemistry School’s facilities are second to none,
making laboratory sessions exciting, a world away from
high school labs. The staff are very friendly and helpful
and there are so many of them that there is no shortage
of places to go for help if you are struggling. Chemistry
at St Andrews is a challenging and rewarding experience
from the getgo.”
Chemistry
67
Bernie (Perth, Scotland)
Study outwith St Andrews
As an integrated part of the MChem course the School of
Chemistry will assist students in obtaining eight- to thirteenmonth (most commonly twelve-month) placements in industry
in leading research laboratories in the UK, Europe and North
America. Typically, you will join a research and development
group within a company and receive a salary for the duration
of your placement. It is also possible for the placement to be
carried out in an overseas academic institution. The School of
Chemistry has exchange links with the University of Bonn and
the Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Lille (ENSCL).
An alternative option is the St Andrews Abroad programme. For
more information see page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 140, labs 40, tutorials 8
Second Year: lectures 80, labs 70, tutorials 6
Honours: lectures 50, labs 50, tutorials 6
Lectures are supported by small group tutorials and students
very quickly feel that they are valued and become an integral
part of the School. All of our lecture courses have web-based
support materials and additional teaching support is given
in selected topics, for example mathematics, as we recognise
that there is a wide diversity in the background of the
students entering our chemistry programmes.
St Andrews Chemistry graduates are highly employable and
have gone on to find success in a wide variety of careers in
industry and business including (amongst many others):
• Professional chemists in the chemical and pharmaceutical
industries
• Teachers
• Forensic scientists
• Various careers in the food industry (including brewing)
• Management consultancy
• Marketing and advertising
• Patent lawyers
• Journalism and the media
• Accountants
• Investment bankers
• Armed forces
Our recent graduates are engaged in many diverse roles,
including as an intern at the European Patent Office, as a research
scientist at a company involved in enhanced oil recovery in
western Canada, as a pharmaceutical development scientist at
Reckitt-Benckiser, as an audit assistant at KPMG and as a regional
liaison officer for the Royal Society of Chemistry.
Assessment
For all our 1000- and 2000-level modules the assessment is
made up of 60-70% written examinations combined with 3040% coursework covering laboratories, tutorials and transferable
skills exercises. For 3000-, 4000- and 5000-level modules,
the assessment is either by written examination in the case
of lecture-based modules, or coursework including written
reports, oral presentations and oral examinations for laboratory,
workshop and research project modules.
RSC Accreditation
All MChem degree programmes are accredited by the Royal
Society of Chemistry (RSC), as are five of our BSc programmes:
Chemistry, Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry, Chemical
Sciences, Chemistry with French, Chemistry with French (WIYA).
Careers
Chemistry graduates have never been more in demand and
they are keenly sought by major companies but there are
also exciting opportunities in a new generation of innovative
grassroots companies. Our chemists follow a diverse range of
careers (as shown opposite), as employers recognise the quality
of the training encountered in a Chemistry degree. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-chemistry-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
“The School is friendly and helpful, with engaging lecturers,
competent lab instructors, and fantastic tutors. What is
more, you get to study Chemistry with an international
perspective, as students and professors from around
the world come together in one discipline and share
different methods of learning with each other. Coming to
study Chemistry at St Andrews is both fascinating and
rewarding; it is without a doubt the best decision I have
ever made!”
Anna (Bel Air, Maryland, USA)
Return to Subjects
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics
Classical Studies
68
Classical Studies
See also Ancient History page 54, Classics page 70,
Greek page 102, Latin page 118, Modern Languages page 130
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Classical Studies
Detail from Trajan’s Column in Rome
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Classical Studies and one of:
Art History
Biblical Studies X
Comparative Literature
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Greek
International Relations
Latin
Features
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern History X
Philosophy
Scottish History
Social Anthropology
Theological Studies
*
*
*
*
*
Classical Studies and two Modern Languages
Any combination of Arabic, FrenchW, ItalianW, Persian, RussianW,
SpanishW S is available
W
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Due to a timetable clash, students taking this degree will take Ancient
History, Latin or Greek modules in their first year, and Classical Studies in
their second. Contact the School of Classics for further information.
S
Combinations including Classical Studies and Spanish are only available
to beginners in Spanish.
X
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
*
*
Facilities and resources
Classics is housed in Swallowgate, an attractive building
which overlooks the sea and is only a few yards away from the
University Library (which houses excellent collections) and the
main quadrangle. There are computing facilities in the building,
seminar rooms and a well-stocked class library. Much of your
work can thus be done in one building.
What will I study?
We strongly recommend that all applicants have a qualification
in a modern or ancient foreign language at National 5 / GCSE
level, or equivalent.
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
*
All modules are taught in translation.
Classical Studies includes study of the following: Greek
and Roman literature, social structures, cultural history,
philosophy, religion, art, and archaeology.
Our academic staff are experts in their fields and provide you
with the latest ideas and material to research and evaluate.
The School of Classics was rated first in Scotland and second
in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.
Teaching in small groups assures close attention and
individual help.
New modules and topics include Greek religion and society,
Magic in literature and life, ancient animals, Hellenistic ethics
and the reception of the Aeneid.
The School has a lively student life including an undergraduate
Archaeological Society.
Our staff are friendly and approachable.
All of our Classical Studies modules use texts in translation
(whereas Classics modules approach them in the original
Greek and Latin). You can discover and debate the nature of
Athenian democracy, the power of Greek tragedy, the purpose
of ancient erotic fiction, the imposing beauty of Roman
sculpture, or the twists and turns of Platonic dialogue.
There is no compulsory language element to this degree
programme, although you do have the option to try some
Latin or ancient Greek at beginners’ level, and pursue the
language if you wish.
Entry to the Single Honours and Joint Honours degrees in
Classical Studies is very flexible. The most common route is to
take all four first-year and second-year modules in Classical
Studies, but other options are possible. You must take at least
four modules in the classical subjects (Ancient History, Classical
Studies, Greek and Latin), at least two of which at 2000 level,
and you must include either both 1000-level Classical Studies
modules, or both 2000-level modules; this ensures some
acquaintance with both Greece and Rome, and provides the
literary, cultural and methodological frameworks you will need
for the more specialised modules we offer at Honours.
Return to Subjects
Aedan (Culross, Fife, Scotland)
First Year Classical Studies modules (20 credits each)
First Semester: Myth and Community in Ancient Greek
Literature and Culture.
This module explores some of the most dynamic literary and
artistic achievements of archaic and classical Greek culture.
Using a twin focus on myth and on ideas of community,
the module ranges across Homeric epic, Athenian tragedy,
Aristophanic comedy, and the writings of intellectuals; it studies
the relationship between texts and images in the expression
of cultural values; and it examines a series of major themes in
Greek views of identity, morality, politics and religion.
Second Semester: Images of Augustan Rome.
This module studies a range of literary works that were written
during the lifetime of the first emperor, Augustus, and their
different reactions to the new regime that he established.
A central theme of the module is the development of the
architecture and public art of the city of Rome during this
period, and the variety of ways in which the city features in the
literature of the time.
Second Year Classical Studies modules (20 credits each)
First Semester: Culture and Thought in the Late Roman Republic.
This module addresses the intellectual life of late Republican
Rome through a range of artistic and literary sources, including
the poems of Catullus on myth, sex and politics and the great
poem by Lucretius on atomic physics and what it means for you.
Second Semester: Early Greek Poetry and Philosophy.
Early Greece is the age of beautiful poetry and cutting-edge
philosophy. This module explores the diversity of early Greek
thought at the crossroads of poetry and philosophy, starting
with Hesiod’s struggle to re-order the world of gods and
humans, before considering the exciting literary and intellectual
experiments of the successors of Hesiod and Homer, who saw
poetry as a way of writing philosophy, exploring love, and
attacking enemies.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
You choose further modules for more advanced study of ancient
texts, discourses and images. Modules reflect the research
interests of the staff who teach them, and take you straight
to the heart of current questions in our understanding of the
Greeks and Romans. Modules currently available include:
• • • • • • The Ancient and Modern Novel
Greek Theatre
Knowledge and the World in Hellenistic Philosophy
Animals in Greco-Roman Antiquity
Herodotus
Roman Praise
Study abroad
As a student in the School of Classics you may be entitled
to apply to spend one or two semesters in the Netherlands
studying at the University of Leiden as part of our Erasmus+
exchange. You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews
Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 60 - 80, tutorials 8 - 10
Second Year: lectures 60 - 80, tutorials 8 - 10
Honours: seminars 10 - 20
Friendly contact is established from the start through small
tutorial groups that enable you to get to know the staff and
other students very quickly.
At Honours you will learn, debate and make presentations in
lively seminars. All members of staff contribute to the Classical
Studies programme. Staff interests include Greek and Roman
archaeology and art, Greek and Roman literature (including
late Latin literature), ancient drama, Homer, Herodotus and
Thucydides, Roman historiography, ancient science and
philosophy, Greek rhetoric, ancient economic and social history,
ancient literacy, the Classical tradition, the representation of
foreign peoples, Athenian imperialism, and the cultural history
of the Roman Empire.
Assessment
Assessment throughout the degree is generally 50% assessed
coursework and 50% by examination, taken at the end of the
semester. The final class of degree is based on marks awarded
over the last two years.
All Single Honours students write a dissertation in their fourth
year and this allows them to specialise in an area of their own
key interest.
Final year students may obtain teaching experience and
mentoring from teachers in local secondary schools.
Careers
Recent Classical Studies graduates include librarians, journalists,
civil servants, teachers and nurses. Others hold posts in museums,
finance, and teaching English overseas. Some have embarked
on further training in classics, accountancy, law, and journalism.
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-classics-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Honours modules in the School carry 30 credits, so you study two
modules each semester in Honours. Single Honours students
write a dissertation worth 30 credits in their fourth year.
Return to Subjects
69
Classical Studies
“Modules in the first two years are excellently delivered, giving
a wide overview of the ancient world that fascinates, whatever
your interests. From philosophy to politics, poetry and plays, staff
emphasise the interdependence of different areas, bringing a clearer
understanding to our thoughts about society, ancient and modern.
Honours years offer a chance to specialise in any area, and all
academics are friendly and eager to hear your views.”
70
Classics
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics
Classics
See also Ancient History page 54, Classical Studies page 68,
Greek page 102, Latin page 118, Modern Languages page 130
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Classics
School of Classics
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Classics and one of:
Features
Comparative Literature
English
FrenchW
ItalianW
Management
Modern History
Philosophy
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
W
*
*
*
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
We strongly recommend that all applicants have a qualification
in a modern or ancient foreign language at National 5 / GCSE
level, or equivalent.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
*
*
We enjoy an international reputation for excellence in
teaching and research that has been repeatedly recognised
by independent surveys.
The School of Classics was rated first in Scotland and second
in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.
Excellent linguistic training in the skills of reading and
understanding Greek and Latin literature.
Strong grounding in the classics of Greek and Latin literature
combined with an introduction to the wider culture of the
ancient Mediterranean.
Wide choice of related subjects which may be studied as
part of the Single Honours Classics degree, including Greek
and Roman political and cultural history, ancient philosophy,
archaeology and material culture.
Wide range of complementary modules from other
departments, such as Mediaeval History, Philosophy, or
Modern Languages.
Facilities and resources
Classics is housed in Swallowgate, an attractive building
which overlooks the sea and is only a few yards away from
the University Library and the main quadrangle. There are
computing facilities in the building, seminar rooms and a wellstocked class library. Much of your work can thus be done in one
building.
What will I study?
The Classics programme in St Andrews is designed for those
who wish to study both Latin and classical Greek language and
literature to Honours, either starting from scratch or building
on previous study. At the outset, there are separate classes
for beginners and those with prior knowledge. There are
opportunities at all stages to take related and complementary
subjects, especially Ancient History and Ancient Philosophy. To
study Classics in the original languages is to engage at first hand
with the tradition which revolutionised the intellectual life of
Western Europe. It requires a combination of precise linguistic
skills, a mature sense of historical context and development, and
an openness to new ways of seeing our own world.
The first two years are spent in gaining a thorough grounding in
the language and literature of Latin and ancient Greek.
In the third and fourth year you choose modules reflecting
your own special interests. These may include the major
genres of Greek and Latin literature, such as Epic, Comedy,
or Historiography. A wide selection of other historical,
philosophical and cultural topics may also be studied, such as
Hellenistic Ethics, Government and Society under Diocletian, and
The Ancient and Modern Novel. Return to Subjects
“I have found the course here challenging and
rewarding. The flexibility and variety of modules
has really enriched my experience, giving me
the opportunity to explore the classical world
more widely. My degree has let me explore the
ancient world in ways I didn’t know I could – it
is exciting.”
Classics
71
Livvy (Blandford Forum, Dorset, England)
First Year
(4 x 20-credit modules required – 2 in each of Greek and Latin)
Whether you are a beginner in Greek and Latin, or have studied
them before, we have specially designed modules for you. As
part of the Classics programme, you will study both Greek and
Latin all year (two semester-long modules each). You will study
one further module in each semester in a subject of your
choice – either related to Classics (e.g. Ancient History or
Classical Studies) or else something completely different. Both
the beginners and advanced programmes help to develop
your skill and confidence in reading Greek and Latin texts
independently and to broaden your knowledge of classical
literature and culture.
By the end of the year all beginners will have studied some
Greek or Latin literature in the original and will have the basic
skills to translate real Greek or Latin texts.
Second Year
(4 x 20-credit modules required – 2 in each of Greek and Latin)
The needs of both ex-beginners and more advanced students
are catered for in a pair of modules which allow for convergence
between the two groups. Again both Greek and Latin are
studied all year and there are two further modules of your
choice to round out your programme. In Latin the focus is on
the literature of the Republic and the Empire. In Greek the
epic narrative and comic prose dialogue are explored in one
semester and bucolic or pastoral poetry and the romantic novel
are studied in the other.
At the end of these modules you will be familiar with Greek and
Latin literature from a wide range of genres and periods.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
You choose from a range of modules covering major genres,
such as Epic, Comedy, Satire, Rhetoric and Historical Writing in
both Greek and Latin, with an option to study Latin or Greek
Prose Composition. You will do a minimum of two modules in
Greek and two in Latin at this level, and then you can target
the rest of your Honours modules to specialise in one classical
language or the other, or balance your programme with a
mixture of both. You may also write a dissertation on a topic of
special interest.
At all levels students may combine Greek and Latin with
modules in Classical Studies and Ancient History or may choose
unrelated subjects.
Study abroad
As a student in the School of Classics you may be entitled
to apply to spend one or two semesters in the Netherlands
studying at the University of Leiden as part of our Erasmus+
exchange. You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews
Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures ~30, tutorials ~10
Second Year: ~20
Honours: seminars ~18
First Year
Three to four weekly lectures/classes and, where possible, one is
broken down into smaller groups.
Second Year
Typically three to four classes per week. Ex-beginners receive
close attention and help to meet their developing needs; they
are increasingly integrated with the advanced class over the
year. Questions and discussion are encouraged in all classes.
Honours
Honours is taught by a combination of lectures and seminars,
mostly in small groups with increasing emphasis on students’
own contribution, both in informal class discussion and in
presentations by individuals or small groups.
Assessment
Assessment throughout the degree is generally 50% assessed
coursework and 50% by examination, taken at the end of the
semester. The final class of degree is based on marks awarded
over the last two years.
All Single Honours students write a dissertation in their fourth
year and this allows them to specialise in an area of their own
key interest.
Final year students may obtain teaching experience and
mentoring from teachers in local secondary schools.
Careers
Traditional Classics courses have provided an entry to a wide
range of careers and positions since employers have placed
a premium on the combination of intellectual flexibility and
rigour of Classics graduates. Students graduating with classical
degrees typically do well in the graduate employment
market. Graduate destinations include financial services, the
law, marketing and management, civil and armed services,
journalism, museums, galleries, and libraries, teaching and
further research. Some have built on their linguistic skills to
use modern foreign languages in employment. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-classics-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
Comparative
Literature
Comparative
Literature
See also Modern Languages page 130
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/comparativeliterature
72
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Classics
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
Greek (Ancient)
Degree options
St Salvator’s Quadrangle
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Comparative Literature and one of:
Features
Hebrew
International Relations
ItalianW
Latin
Management
Mediaeval History
Modern History
PersianT
Philosophy
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
*
*
*
*
*
*
MA (Honours Degrees)
Comparative Literature and two of:
Arabic
FrenchW
GermanW
*
ItalianW
RussianW
SpanishW
*
Comparative Literature can be studied without any
previous knowledge of foreign languages.
A team of literary experts from the School of Modern
Languages – Arabic, French, German, Italian, Persian,
Russian and Spanish – and the School of English.
A wide range of literature from around the world in
English translation.
Comparisons and connections across countries, time
periods, subjects and genres.
See the world from multiple perspectives through reading
literature in English translation.
Acquire and develop analytical and critical skills that will
make you highly employable in the UK and abroad.
Optional Honours modules such as Crossing the
Mediterranean and Autobiography and the Visual Arts; and
topics such as Crime Fiction.
Flexible options for module choices and study abroad.
W
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
T
Timetable clash exists – consult Head of the Department.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the higher entrance
requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I require previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
Dr Emily Finer
E: [email protected]
What will I study?
Comparative Literature gives you the chance to consider the
ideas, human values, and historical forces that have helped
to form the world’s literatures. A focus on close reading and
an exploration into the practice of literary translation will
develop your analytical, descriptive, and evaluative skills.
You will have the opportunity to read, to discuss, to present
reasoned arguments, and to work on writing with precision
and clarity. As a graduate, your capacity to process and
assimilate complex material from a range of cultures will make
you highly employable.
First and second year modules raise awareness of different
genres and themes as they appear in a range of literatures
(Arabic, East European, French, German, Italian, Persian,
Russian, Spanish, UK, USA, Latin American) and address the
issue of how to study literature comparatively. At Honours
(third and fourth years) you will take several core modules
and make choices among others taught by specialists in the
School.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
We offer two 1000-level modules to introduce you to the study
of Comparative Literature. The Nineteenth-Century Novel and
Drama in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries: Staging the
Political will cover texts as varied as Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina;
Flaubert’s Madame Bovary; Pardo Bazán’s House of Ulloa;
Brecht’s The Measures Taken; Ionesco’s Rhinoceros; and John
Hodge’s Collaborators.
Return to Subjects
Olivia (Belfast, Northern Ireland)
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Journeys is a core module dealing with real and imaginary
travel in and across literatures. We reflect on similarities and
differences between the narrative treatment of travel in texts
of varying genres and time periods. This forms the basis for
discussion of matters of identity, nationalism and bordercrossing.
In our other core module, Good and Evil, we read a range
of literary texts in order to investigate moral principles and
behaviour; notions of individual and collective identities;
and the relationship between religion and literature. Authors
studied may include Dante, Primo Levi, Mikhail Bulgakov, and
Jonathan Safran Foer.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(4 x 15-credit core modules required and
4 other 15-credit modules required over 2 years)
Honours includes compulsory modules – Issues in Comparative
Literature; Canon Formation; Issues in Cultural Studies and Found
in Translation – to which you add optional modules, each
based on at least three national literatures. These may include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Autobiography and the Visual Arts
Illness and Literature
Classicism in European Literature
Cultural Memory and Literature
Performing Early-Modern Sexualities
Crossing the Mediterranean
Assessment
At sub-honours, Comparative Literature modules are assessed
by 50% coursework, and 50% written examination. Most
Honours level modules are assessed entirely by coursework.
Modules taken in other Schools will involve a mixture of
assessment methods.
Careers
Graduates in Comparative Literature can pursue rewarding
careers in publishing, journalism, business and commerce,
marketing, media, and the civil service. Employers value our
graduates who are sensitive to diverse cultures. Graduates may
also go into postgraduate study, either at St Andrews or to other
universities. Some graduates will follow careers in teaching in a
wide variety of school environments both at home and abroad.
Graduates of the School of Modern Languages have an
extremely good record of employment after graduating. For
more information: http://bit.ly/sta-modlangs-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
As well as topics such as Crime Fiction and Prize-winning Novels.
Study abroad
If you decide to take Comparative Literature as part of a Joint
Honours degree with a language, you have the option of
spending a year abroad after your second year of study. The
School of Modern Languages makes final decisions on study
abroad during the second year of study, when students apply
for their preferred option.
Honours degrees With Integrated Year Abroad (WIYA) in
countries in which French, German, Italian, Russian or Spanish
are spoken involve residence there for the academic session
between second and third years. Language students taking
a four-year degree may spend all or part of their Junior
Honours year as an Erasmus+ exchange student at one of our
partner universities (for arrangements for students of Arabic
and Russian see subject entry). You may also apply to the
University’s St Andrews Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 100 - 120, seminars 10 - 15
Second Year: 50 - 60, seminars 10 - 15
Honours: 8 - 10
All modules are taught by a combination of traditional lectures
and small discussion seminars.
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73
Comparative
Literature
“The Comparative Literature programme is diverse, exciting and
interesting with fantastic lectures from people all across the globe.
Learning about world cultures through their most famous literature,
and comparing these, provides a fantastic insight into the differences
of people across the world, and their views. The range of literature
and drama is wide, and the choice to focus on the books you love
provides a lot of flexibility.”
www.cs.st-andrews.ac.uk
Computer Science
74
Computer Science
Degree options
BSc (Single Honours Degree)
Computer Science
BSc (Joint Honours Degrees)
Computer Science and one of:
Economics
Philosophy*
Management
Management Science
School of Computer Science
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology
Statistics
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
* The title and content of BSc Philosophy is under review.
Features
MSci (Single Honours Degree)
Computer Science
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
First Year Entry
SQA Highers: AAAB including Mathematics
GCE A-Levels: AAB including Mathematics
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 with three HL6s,
including Mathematics, OR three HL6s AND at least SL6
in Mathematics
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Preference may be given to candidates offering strong
science qualifications.
Second Year Entry
Second-year entry is available for well-qualified applicants. An
accelerated programme with dedicated modules enables a
student to graduate with a BSc in three years, or an MSci in four
years. Applicants should have some experience in computer
programming and may be asked to demonstrate this. Please
contact the School for more information.
SQA Highers: AB at Advanced Higher in Mathematics and a
science subject plus AB at Higher in two other subjects
GCE A-Levels: AAB including Mathematics and a science subject
International Baccalaureate Points: 37 with three HL6s
including Mathematics, OR three HL6s AND at least SL6 in
Mathematics
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
See the Faculty of Science Entrance Requirements (page 51)
for the definition of a science subject. Other subjects may be
considered; please contact the School Admissions Officer for
advice.
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Computer Science (Gateway) Entry
The Computer Science (Gateway) is targeted at applicants from
Scotland who meet some or all of the University’s widening
participation criteria and have the potential to do well at
university. Typical asking rates are BBBB-AABB in SQA Highers.
Please contact the School if you are interested in this
programme.
*
*
Our student:staff ratio is excellent at 8:1.
100% of our students agreed that “Overall, I am satisfied
with the quality of the course” (National Student Survey
2014).
Almost all of our academic staff are involved in
undergraduate tutoring and teaching.
Students are actively involved in research, through
internships and project modules, and often publish in
major international conferences.
Many students spend summers as interns within
companies including Adobe, Facebook and Google.
Students are on first-name terms with staff, through small
tutorial groups and labs.
The student-run St Andrews Computing Society offers a
social group for students interested in computer science.
Social activities include the Honours Reading Party in the
Highlands, School BBQs and pizza and gaming sessions.
Students often win awards such as the TARGET IT and
Computer Science Undergraduate of the Year Award.
World-leading research in human-computer interaction,
constraint programming, cloud computing and more.
Our teaching is research-led from first year to fifth.
Facilities and resources
Practical and small-group teaching takes place within the two
Computer Science buildings, with larger lectures in dedicated
facilities in adjacent science buildings. You will have 24-hour
access to our laboratories, which were refurbished in the
summer of 2014 and are filled with up-to-date Mac, Linux and
Windows-based computers. Full wireless Internet access is
available throughout.
BSc or MSci?
If you wish to study even more advanced topics in Computer
Science, then the MSci (Honours) in Computer Science may
be for you. This integrated Masters degree takes place over
five years, with an option for direct entry into the second year.
Qualified students can therefore graduate with a Masters
degree in four years. The first three years of the MSci are
shared with the BSc programmes. In the final two years, you
can choose among modules at 4000- and 5000- (Masters)
level, enabling both breadth and depth across the discipline.
The final year is spent taking 5000-level modules as well as an
advanced project. This may take the form of a project within
the School, an industrial placement or a research internship,
enabling MSci students to build skills that are useful for both
academic and industrial careers.
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NEW PROFILE - NEED PHOTO
David (Greenock, Inverclyde, Scotland)
What will I study?
Computer Science at St Andrews allows you to study in a
friendly and intimate environment. Our excellent staff:student
ratio and small group teaching will put you on a first-name
basis with internationally-renowned researchers and teachers.
Ongoing research projects include GAP, a widely-used free
software package for applying computers to research problems
in pure mathematics. The Human-Computer Interaction group’s
work in gesture-based interactions and fonts for representing
data, have received much press interest in publications such
as New Scientist and Wired. The constraint solver Minion,
developed at St Andrews, has been used for applications as
diverse as parsing the Sanskrit language, debugging programs,
scheduling protein assay equipment, and even for setting
crosswords on the web. Research on Open Virtual Worlds
has included virtual reconstructions of St Andrews Cathedral
(pictured below right*), Linlithgow Palace and the Acropolis
Basilica in Sparta, which have been used for education and
research. This world-class research is applied to teaching at
all levels, for example, in Junior Honours projects on sensor
networks, Senior Honours projects on natural language
processing or constraint programming, or even second-year
programming exercises on analysing Twitter datasets from the
London Olympics.
science and several different programming languages, while
in two (or three) Honours years you will learn about advanced
and cutting-edge topics at the frontier of our subject. A flexible
degree structure means that it is possible to change your
degree direction during the first two years, while direct secondyear entry is also possible to any of our BSc or MSci Honours
degree programmes. Our students are universally happy with
our degree offerings, with 80% of respondents to the National
Student Survey in 2014 declaring that they were “very satisfied”
and a further 20% “satisfied”.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
First year computer scientists take two compulsory modules:
Object-Oriented Programming (CS1002), which introduces
the basics of programming and object-orientation in the
Java language, and Programming with Data (CS1003), which
introduces programming for processing data. We also offer two
optional 20-credit modules: Computer Science in Everyday Life
(CS1005), which provides a broad introduction to computer
science issues in a variety of areas ranging from digital cameras
to cloud computing, and Programming Projects (CS1006)
which gives the opportunity to build sophisticated programs
including games and some basic artificial intelligence. The School offers single-subject BSc and MSci Honours degrees
in Computer Science, plus a range of BSc Joint Honours degrees
with other subjects. You will normally take 120 credits of work
each year as part of a flexible four-year BSc Honours degree,
where you may take modules in other subjects. A five-year MSci
Honours degree in Computer Science is also available if you
wish to specialise further. Our Honours degree programmes
are designed to ground you in both the theory and practice
of computer science. You will learn how to think and solve
problems logically (“computational thinking”), understand
the fundamental principles of how computing systems work,
and be exposed to significant new technologies. In the first
two years you will learn the basic concepts behind computer
* Photographer: Kieran Baxter; 3D Modelling: Sarah Kennedy;
Image Compositing: John McCaffery
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75
Computer Science
“Studying Computer Science has provided me with numerous
opportunities, particularly as a result of the flexibility within the course
which allows me to focus my studies on areas of interest. The School
has also shown a strong commitment throughout to not only teach
theoretically, but to reinforce and develop your understanding of ideas
by applying it in regular practical coursework. The combination of
approachable staff and relaxed labs provides ample opportunities
when you need advice or help.”
Computer
Science
(continued)
Freeform gestures demonstration
www.cs.st-andrews.ac.uk
Computer Science
76
First two years of Computer Science
Semester 1
Semester 2
First Year
Six modules each of 20 credits
CS1002CS1005
20-credit module
Object-Oriented Programming
Computer Science in Everyday Life
in another subject
(core)
or something else
CS1003CS1006
20-credit module
Programming with Data
Programming Projects
in another subject
(core)
or something else
Semester 1
Semester 2
Second Year
Four modules each of 30 credits
CS2001 Foundations of Computation
(or CS2101 Foundations of Computation Accelerated for second-year entrants)
CS2003
Advanced Internet Programming
or a 30-credit module in another subject
CS2002
CS2006
Advanced Computer Science Advanced Programming Projects
(core)
or a 30-credit module in another subject
Second Year (2 x 30-credit modules required)
Second year has two core modules: Foundations of
Computation (CS2001) and Advanced Computer Science
(CS2002), which are taken by all Computer Science students.
The optional Advanced Internet Programming (CS2003)
covers the construction of networked Internet applications,
while the popular Advanced Programming Projects (CS2006)
provides a highly-practical introduction to functional and
dynamic programming in the Python and Haskell languages.
Subject to satisfactory performance in the second year,
you can progress to a single-subject BSc or MSci Honours
degree, or a joint BSc Honours degree in Computer Science
with another subject.
Honours (3rd, 4th and optionally 5th years)
The Honours degree programmes are designed with the
following aims:
• To provide you with a thorough grounding in the
theoretical and practical principles of computer science
and to show how computing techniques can be used to
analyse problems.
•
To provide you with in-depth knowledge of computer
science, as well as equipping you with a range of
transferable skills.
•
To encourage you to explore rigorously the core principles
of the subject and to give you an understanding of its
intellectual frontiers.
In the two years of the BSc Honours programme, you can choose
from a wide range of options, currently:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Artificial Intelligence
Component Technology
Computational Complexity
Computer Architecture
Computer Graphics
Computer Security
Concurrency and Multi-core Architectures
Constraint Programming
Data Communications and Networks
Data Encoding
Databases
Distributed Systems
Human-Computer Interaction
Logic and Software Verification
Multimedia
Operating Systems
Programming Language Design and Implementation
Software Engineering
Video Games
In your final BSc year, and the MSci year, you can also choose
from our wide range of Masters modules (e.g. Green Information
Technology, Mobile and Wireless Networks, and our newest
modules including Critical Systems Engineering, Language and
Computation and User-Centred Interaction Design). Other popular
Honours modules include the interdisciplinary Communication
and Teaching in Science (ID4001), where students are placed in a
local primary or secondary school to design and deliver lessons.
Return to Subjects
NEW PROFILE - NEED PHOTO
Elliot (York, England)
Projects
In the Junior Honours year, you undertake a 30-credit team
project, with the whole class divided into small co-operating
teams. In Senior Honours, you undertake a 30-credit (15 credits
for Joint Honours students) individual project with a member
of staff, based on personal or research interests. The MSci
year involves an entire semester dedicated to an advanced
individual 60-credit project, which may be taken in the School
or optionally in industry. Individual projects are of a very high
standard, often winning prizes, for instance the Lockheed Martin
Software Engineering Award in 2014.
Reading Party
All Honours students attend a Reading Party in their Junior
Honours year. This takes place in a large country house in the
Highlands, where you and the rest of the Honours class spend
three days giving presentations, taking part in outdoor and
indoor activities, and generally socialising with other students
and staff. This is a very popular event and many students choose
to attend again in their Senior Honours year.
Internships
As an Honours student you may choose to spend one, two, or
even three, of your summers in an internship. These may be in
the UK, Europe, the US or beyond. In the summers of 2013 and
2014, our students could be found at internships at Accenture,
Adobe, AIG, Credit Suisse, Facebook, Google, McLaren,
PlanForCloud, Skyscanner, Thales and elsewhere. The School
and the University also offer various paid research internships
whereby a student can work closely with a research group for
eight to ten weeks.
Careers
All of our degrees allow graduates to enter into technical,
academic, financial or commercial posts at both national and
international levels. Employers regard our Computer Science
graduates as technically and intellectually capable. A number
of employers visit us on a regular basis, including Amazon,
Apple, BT, Google, IBM, Skyscanner and Sword Ciboodle. Other
recent employers include Accenture, Adobe, CloudSoft, Deloitte,
Sky, Dresdner Kleinwort, KPMG, RBS, Thomson Reuters, Logica,
Wolfson MicroElectronics, Metaswitch Networks and the
Ministry of Defence.
Many of our students enter postgraduate study here at
St Andrews and at other universities in the UK and abroad, while
others enter careers in teaching. Several of our students have
also started their own companies. You can follow the activities of
our staff, students and alumni using our Twitter lists at:
http://twitter.com/StAndrewsCS/lists
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-compsci-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 34 - 119, labs 5 - 60, tutorials 6 - 8
Second Year: lectures 37 - 58, labs14 - 58, tutorials 6 - 7
Honours: lectures, labs and tutorials 8 - 50
We use a wide variety of teaching methods in addition to
traditional lectures, with an emphasis on personal and small
group teaching. Around 35 - 40 students graduate each year,
with the majority attaining First Class or Upper Second Class
Honours degrees.
Assessment
Most modules in the School are assessed by at least 40%
coursework (with the balance of assessment in the form of
written examinations). Project modules are assessed entirely by
coursework.
“The School of Computer Science is open and friendly.
Its relatively small size enables the students to have close
contact with staff members and be treated as an individual.
The programme is very flexible, allowing each student to
focus on areas they find most interesting. It’s a great place
to study and socialise, with the lab open 24 hours.”
Paula (Gdansk, Poland)
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77
Computer Science
“Studying in St Andrews has been more interesting and exciting
than I could possibly have imagined when I applied. It is a truly
vibrant mix of cultures, ideas and events; and editing The Saint,
the student newspaper, has really opened my eyes to just how much
goes on here. Meanwhile the School of Computer Science has proven
to be excellent, offering captivating courses taught by caring and
knowledgeable staff.”
78
Divinity – Biblical Studies,
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/divinity
Divinity
Theological Studies, Hebrew,
New Testament
Degree options
School of Divinity
MTheol (Single Honours Degree)
With options for specialising in subjects such as:
New Testament, Old Testament, Theology, Practical Theology,
Church History, or a combination of these.
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
Biblical Studies
Theological Studies
BD (Single Honours Degree)
Three years, available only to those with a previous degree
with direct entry into second year of study.
With options for specialising in subjects such as:
New Testament, Old Testament, Theology, Practical Theology,
Church History, or a combination of these.
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
*
*
*
*
FrenchW
Geography
Greek
Mathematics
Middle East Studies
*
*
*
*
*
Theological Studies and one of:
W
Mediaeval History T
Modern History
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
X
Due to a timetable clash, students taking this degree will take Ancient
History, Latin or Greek modules in their first year, and Classical Studies in
their second. Contact the School of Classics for further information.
T
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Features
New Testament and Modern History
Classical Studies
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
International Relations T
Mathematics
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Undergraduate Recruitment and Admissions Officer,
School of Divinity
E: [email protected]
GermanW T
Greek
Hebrew
International Relations
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Philosophy
Hebrew and one of:
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Comparative Literature
English
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
Subject enquiries
Biblical Studies and one of:
Ancient History
Art History
Classical StudiesX
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
The only Scottish university which focuses principally on
Christianity and the Christian tradition.
An emphasis on learning to think critically about truthclaims and how people live in the light of faith.
An exceptional range of subject combinations.
Integrated programmes that combine foundational courses
with flexibility of choice.
The opportunity to study Biblical languages in depth –
Hebrew, Greek and Aramaic.
Small-group work that is built into the style of learning.
A closely-knit community that provides a supportive context
in which to engage in stimulating theological explorations.
Staff who are acknowledged as world experts in their fields.
Personalised attention from teaching staff that benefits
students and allows letters of reference for future employers
to be more discerning and effectual.
The opportunity to undertake a placement in a local
secondary or primary school.
Students in the School of Divinity (also known as St Mary’s
College) come from diverse backgrounds and with very different
goals in mind. While some wish simply to explore questions
of worldview and consider the shape of religious belief and
practice in our society, others hold faith commitments of
many different types. You will be encouraged to express and
to develop your own ideas. A mixture of pre-suppositions,
outlooks and interests amongst both students and staff fosters
lively debate, enables you to gain respect for others and helps
you understand their views. Whatever perspective you come
from these programmes are guaranteed to encourage lively
intellectual reflection upon prior assumptions and upon
theology’s engagement with culture.
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Divinity
79
Which programme is for you?
The MTheol, our most popular degree, is the best choice if you
want to focus your university career on topics directly related
to theological and biblical studies. If you want a wider range of
options across arts subjects, but still want to give most of your
attention to divinity, then either the MA (Biblical Studies) or
the MA (Theological Studies) is the degree for you. Should you
have academic interests that straddle both divinity and another
subject area then one of the Joint Honours options would suit
you best. If you already have an undergraduate degree then
the shorter BD degree, with its focus on theological and biblical
studies would be ideal, especially if you are considering service
within a Christian denomination.
Location and resources
The School of Divinity is located in St Mary’s College, one of
the oldest and most historic parts of the University, where
theology has been taught for over 500 years. The Divinity Library
is housed in the historic King James Library and students have
their own common room in the former Principal’s House.
Study abroad
As a student of Divinity, you may be entitled to apply to spend
one or two semesters in the Netherlands studying at the
University of Leiden as part of our Erasmus+ exchange. The
School is also establishing an exchange link with the University
of Stavanger in Norway. You may also apply to the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
Bursaries
A number of bursaries are made available each year to students
within the Faculty of Divinity. The awards are competitive, and
the primary consideration is academic merit. A number of
undergraduate essays and prizes are also offered.
Careers
Graduates with qualifications in the theological and biblical
disciplines are highly attractive to potential employers looking
to fill people-oriented positions. Accordingly, employment
prospects are usually wide ranging. Recent graduates from the
School of Divinity include a quality improvement officer with
an English local council, a nursery nurse, an administrator with
the Financial Services Agency (FAS), an officer in the accounts
department of Nexus Communication, a policy officer with the
Scottish Executive, a teacher, a trainee accountant with KPMG,
an assistant minister with the Church of Scotland and a Youth
Pastor with the Free Church of Scotland.
Previous graduates have become lawyers, a corporate
banker, a marketing manager, a social worker, a language
therapist, even a wine taster, as well as vicars, chaplains and
school teachers. Graduate-level employers have included
the BBC, Royal Bank of Scotland, IBM, The Body Shop, BristolMyers Squibb Pharmaceuticals and Standard Life Assurance.
Many graduates also go on to do further study. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-divinity-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
First Year: lectures 10 - 100, tutorials 10 - 15
Second Year: lectures 10 - 50, tutorials 10 - 15
Honours: classes 5 - 35 , seminars 5 - 15
New Developments
Teaching in first and second years is mainly by lectures,
supplemented by regular small-group tutorials. At Honours level
greater emphasis is put on individual study and on students
taking a major role in preparing for, and conducting, seminars.
Assessment
All our 1000- and 2000-level modules are assessed by at least 50%
coursework, with the balance of assessment made up by written
examinations. At Honours level again at least 50% of almost all
assessed work is coursework, with some modules including no
exam element at all, depending on the subject area.
A recent review of the curriculum, which consulted current
students as well as staff, has resulted in: new-look modules
in third year for both Biblical Studies and Theology, which
should help the transition from sub-honours to Honours,
while leaving room for a number of elective Honours
modules; also a final semester dissertation, with skillsfocused preparation in the penultimate semester.
More information on the structure and details of the degrees offered
within the School of Divinity can be found on the following pages.
Dissertation
In the final year you write a dissertation on a topic of your
choice under the personal supervision of a member of staff. The
Scottish four-year Honours programme allows extra freedom to
arrange your final two years to develop broad interdisciplinary
interests and to achieve a greater depth of understanding in
your chosen subjects.
Return to Subjects
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/divinity
Divinity
(Biblical Studies)
80
Divinity – Biblical Studies
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Biblical Studies
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Biblical Studies and one of:
Ancient History
Art History
Classical Studies X
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
School of Divinity
German W T
Greek
Hebrew
International Relations
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Philosophy
What will I study?
Biblical Studies combines two major fields of study: Old
Testament (or the Scriptures of Judaism) and New
Testament.
W
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the
agreement of the Head of the Department or Head of School
concerned.
X
Due to a timetable clash, students taking this degree will take
Ancient History, Latin or Greek modules in their first year, and
Classical Studies in their second. Contact the School of Classics for
further information.
T
For Entrance Requirements – see page 78
Biblical Studies provides an opportunity to explore in depth
the profound influence that the Christian and Jewish
Scriptures have had on Western civilisation. This can be
done either by devoting the entire Honours programme to
Biblical Studies or by taking a Joint Honours programme
which combines Biblical Studies with another approved
subject in the Faculty of Arts. For example, the Joint Honours
combinations with Ancient History or Classical Studies allow
you to study important texts within the wider context of the
ancient world from which they originally stemmed.
“In Biblical Studies, I have been able to explore the areas of
history I am deeply interested in, as well as developing my
skills of critique, exegesis and analysis. The atmosphere is
one that is open, friendly, and intellectually stimulating,
allowing you to grow as a person.”
Lucy (Manchester, England)
A large number of other Jewish and Christian writings from
these periods are also included (for example the Dead Sea
Scrolls). In Old Testament the modules focus on the history,
religion and culture of Israel, incorporating a wide range
of texts from prophetic, hymnic, wisdom and apocalyptic
literature. In New Testament the modules focus on Jesus
and the Gospels and the history and theology of early
Christianity. They are designed to introduce you to methods
of New Testament study and to the context within which
Jesus and the New Testament writers lived and you will be
helped to explore the theological and ethical issues that
characterised early Christianity.
The Joint Honours combination with English opens the
door to discovering the way in which biblical ideas and
themes have found their way into so much of the literature
of the English-speaking world. The biblical texts are
normally studied in English, except when combined with a
programme in Greek or Hebrew or when these languages
are taken as an option earlier in the degree programme.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
You take two core modules:
• Old Testament 1: Torah and Prophets
• New Testment 1: Jesus and the Gospels
And either Hebrew 1: Introduction to Hebrew Language or New
Testament Greek 1
Further credits may then be chosen from additional modules
offered within Divinity. Alternatively, you may pursue broader
interests by taking a module offered by other Schools in the
Faculties of Arts or Science.
Return to Subjects
“I came to St Andrews without any basis in
Biblical Studies. Now I find myself equipped with
two biblical languages and I hope to continue my
studies following graduation. The School has also
given me the opportunity to get involved with nonacademic activities, which include the designing of
college clothing and giving Open Day tours.”
Divinity
(Biblical Studies)
81
Samuel (Newcastle Upon Tyne, England)
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Core modules:
• Old Testament 2: Wisdom, Psalms, Apocalyptic and
Apocryphal Literature
• New Testament 2: Paul and the Epistles
And follow on with your Biblical language with Hebrew 2 or
New Testament Greek 2.
You may choose other modules from an approved list of
options in Divinity, and also have the opportunity to take
modules in subjects outside Divinity.
Single Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(4 x 15-credit core taught modules, 1x 60-credit dissertation,
and 4 further 30-credit modules required over 2 years)
You choose four out of five core 15-credit modules on
advanced exegesis and hermeneutics, allowing transition to
the detailed analytical study involved in Honours study. These
modules run through the first and second semester of third
year and you choose two further 30-credit modules to take
alongside these.
Joint Honours
Combining Biblical Studies with another subject as a Joint
Honours degree is also a popular option. In the first and
second years you follow the same core modules in Biblical
Studies as single Honours students. You choose your
remaining modules according to the requirements of your
other Honours subject.
Joint Honours includes the Semester 1 core modules (Reading
in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Reading in the New
Testament) in third year, along with a further 30-credit module
in Biblical Studies. In fourth year, you take a further 60
credits in Biblical Studies, either by completing the 60-credit
dissertation on a topic of your choice or by taking a further
two 30-credit modules. A dissertation must be completed
in the final year, but this may be undertaken in either of the
Schools involved in the joint programme.
In fourth year you choose two further modules and a full-year
dissertation, under the direction of a member of staff. The
School provides significant support for the dissertation, with
a breakdown of the assessment into different stages (e.g. a
bibliography and a methodology paper) and a programme of
seminars to assist in the development of advanced research
and communication skills.
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82
Divinity – Theology
Divinity
(Theology)
Degree Option
MTheol (Single Honours Degree)
With options for specialising in subjects such as:
New Testament, Old Testament, Theology, Practical Theology,
Church History or a combination of these.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/divinity
For Entrance Requirements – see page 78
See also diagram on page 10
“Studying Theology has made me challenge and question,
but also appreciate, the complexity of the great spectrum
What will I study?
of human experience – religion, politics, science, art,
literature. Studying here also provides a wonderful
The subject is immensely varied. You will study the history of
opportunity to meet people from all sorts of different
Israel, the person of Jesus of Nazareth, Paul’s letters and the rapid
backgrounds.”
growth of the early church, and contacts between Christianity
and Greek and Roman philosophy. You will examine Christian
thought in depth, including Church History, Christian Ethics and
much more. You have the opportunity to study World Religions,
Greek, Hebrew, the Anthropology of Religion, the Dead Sea
Scrolls, Pastoral Care and Moral Reasoning, as well as modules
in Moral Philosophy, Modern History, Information Technology,
Psychology, or another subject in the Faculty of Arts or Science.
First Year (4 x 20-credit modules required)
You take four core modules:
• Old Testament 1: Torah and Prophets
• New Testament 1: Jesus and the Gospels
• Theology: Issues and History (systematic theology and
philosophy of religion)
• Living Faith (practical theology)
Remaining credits may be gained from additional modules
offered within Divinity (such as New Testament Greek or An
Introduction to World Religions). Alternatively, you may pursue
broader interests by taking a module offered by another School
in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science.
Second Year (3 x 20-credit core modules and 1 further
20-credit module in Divinity required)
You take at least three core subjects on to second year by
choosing from:
• Old Testament 2: Wisdom, Psalms, Apocalyptic and
Apocryphal Literature
• New Testament History and Theology
• Christian Thought and Practice 1
• The Early and Mediaeval Church: History, Beliefs and Practices
You choose one further module from an approved list of options
that includes Divinity modules (e.g. New Testament Greek or
Hebrew 1: Introduction to the Hebrew Language) and modules
taught in cognate subjects such as philosophy or history. Your
two remaining modules may be chosen from the approved list,
or from a module offered by another School in the Faculty of
Arts or the Faculty of Science. This gives you an opportunity
either to consolidate your Divinity interests or to develop
interdisciplinary ones. Please note that we encourage people
to take New Testament Greek and/or Hebrew but that neither
language is required for the MTheol. The 2000-level module in
Church History focuses on the Late Mediaeval and Early Modern
Church and its theology.
Alex (Manchester, England)
Honours MTheol
In third year, you will complete eight out of ten short readingcentred modules (15 credits each) intended to bring you into
close contact with the primary texts of Christian theology and
biblical studies, providing transition from the broader thematic
study of subjects at sub-honours level to the more detailed
analysis of texts and traditions typical of Honours level work.
In fourth year, you choose two further modules and a full-year
dissertation, under the direction of a member of staff. The
School provides significant support for the dissertation, with
a breakdown of the assessment into different stages (e.g. a
bibliography and a methodology paper) and a programme of
seminars to assist in the development of advanced research and
communication skills.
BD (Single Honours Degree) three years, available only
to those with a previous degree with direct entry into
second year of study.
With options for specialising in subjects such as: Old Testament,
Theology, Practical Theology, Church History or a combination
of these.
There is also a four year version of this degree for those wishing
to study biblical languages.
You follow a common structure with the MTheol for the first
two years and then in third and final year select two of the
compulsory reading-centred modules in first semester and
a further three optional modules. You also complete a single
semester dissertation, under the direction of a member of staff.
Return to Subjects
Divinity – Theological Studies
Divinity
(Theological Studies)
83
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Theological Studies
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Theological Studies and one of:
Classical Studies
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
International Relations T
Mathematics
W
T
Mediaeval History T
Modern History
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
“St Andrews is a wonderful, beautiful town with a rich
history and a warm community, and St Mary’s College
can be characterised in the same way. As a Theology
student I have been able to experience both the Theology
and Biblical Studies aspects and have found them to be
academically challenging and inspiring. I have so enjoyed
studying here and am thankful to have had the opportunity
to do so.”
Lauren (Calgary, Canada)
For Entrance Requirements – see page 78
What will I study?
Theological Studies combines two distinct but closely related
fields of study: Theology and Practical Theology.
Modules in Theology provide introductions to the rich
theological traditions of Christianity, covering the history of
Christian theology from the early church to the modern world,
and considering key topics (God, salvation, Jesus Christ, Trinity,
creation) in relation to the contexts in which they emerged
and developed. They also consider some of the distinctive
challenges to faith presented by modern secular culture (neoDarwinian evolutionary theory, atheistic existentialism, the
role of religion in the modern world, poverty, and post-modern
‘deconstructionism’).
Modules in Practical Theology explore ways in which
Christianity is being expressed and lived out today.
They include the study of worship, spirituality and the
development of the discipline of Practical Theology in the
UK and internationally. Other modules address liturgy, and
social and political engagement in Latin America and Africa.
Topics of ethical concern across contemporary cultures are
also explored (e.g. abortion, economic justice, sexuality and
technology).
First and Second Years
(4 x 20-credit modules required over the 2 years)
In your first year you take two core modules:
• Theology: Issues and History (systematic theology and
philosophy of religion)
• Living Faith (practical theology)
Further credits may be chosen from additional modules offered
within Divinity. Alternatively, you may pursue broader interests
by taking a module offered by other Schools in the Faculties of
Arts or Science.
In your second year, you also take two core modules:
• Christian Thought and Practice
• The Early and Mediaeval Church: History, Beliefs and
Practices
You may choose other modules from an approved list of options
in Divinity and you have the opportunity to take modules in
subjects outside Divinity. This gives you an opportunity to
explore cognate subjects (such as philosophy or modern history)
that allow interdisciplinary interests to develop. Within Divinity,
Biblical Greek or Hebrew are additional options in the second
year of study, but neither is a requirement for this degree
programme. The 2000-level module in Church History focuses
on the Early and Mediaeval Church.
Single Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(4 x 15-credit core taught modules, 1 x 60-credit dissertation,
and 4 further 30-credit modules required over 2 years)
You choose four out of five core 15-credit modules, which are
designed to bring students into contact with the primary texts
of Christian theology. This will allow transition to the detailed
engagement with theological writing involved in Honours study.
These modules run through the first and second semester of
third year and you choose two further 30-credit modules to take
alongside these.
In fourth year, you choose two further modules and a full-year
dissertation, under the direction of a member of staff. The
School provides significant support for the dissertation, with
a breakdown of the assessment into different stages (e.g. a
bibliography and a methodology paper) and a programme of
seminars to assist in the development of advanced research and
communication skills.
Joint Honours
Combining Theological Studies with another subject as a Joint
Honours degree is also a popular option. In the first and second
years you follow the same core modules in Theological Studies
as Single Honours students. You choose your remaining modules
according to the requirements of your other Honours subject.
Joint Honours includes the Semester 1 core modules (Reading
in Patristic Theology and Reading in Mediaeval Theology) in third
year, along with a further 30-credit module in Biblical Studies. In
fourth year, you take a further 60 credits in Biblical Studies, either
by completing the 60-credit dissertation on a topic of your choice
or by taking a further two 30-credit modules. A dissertation
must be completed in the final year, but this may be undertaken
in either of the Schools involved in the joint programme.
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84
Divinity – Hebrew
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/divinity
Divinity
(Hebrew)
Degree options
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Hebrew and one of:
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Comparative Literature
English
W
FrenchW
Geography
Greek
Mathematics
Middle East Studies
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
For Entrance Requirements – see page 78
What will I study?
Classical or Biblical Hebrew is the focus of this subject area,
though Honours options may also be taken in post-biblical
Hebrew – particularly the Dead Sea Scrolls. Modern methods
of studying languages help those who are beginners. For
those with a background in languages (for example French
and German) Hebrew would make a fascinating language to
study by way of contrast, belonging as it does to the Semitic
as opposed to the Indo-European family group. The different
language structure allows you to become attuned to the
thought patterns of a distinctive culture with access gained to
the world of Biblical literature and the extraordinary range of
writing found in the Hebrew Bible.
The St Andrews staff who teach Hebrew and Old Testament
have research expertise in Pentateuch, Prophets, Old Testament
Theology, Dead Sea Scrolls and Pseudepigrapha. As well as
having international profiles, we are also committed to ensuring
a very high quality of teaching and student involvement.
Undated scroll of the Book of Esther
“People often ask why I have chosen to study a ‘dead’
language. By reading the Hebrew Bible in its original
language, I can contemplate current issues about how
the people behind these ancient texts lived, thought and
practiced religion in the Ancient World. With the guidance
of St Mary’s scholars, learning Hebrew has enabled me to
engage fully with lively debates.”
Katie (Norden, Lancashire, England)
First and Second Year (4 x 20-credit modules over the 2 years)
These modules lay the foundations for further study in Honours.
Language modules focus on Hebrew grammar and syntax
and involve reading texts from a wide range of genres. History
modules focus on the history, religion and culture of Israel,
incorporating a wide range of texts from prophetic, hymnic,
wisdom and apocalyptic literature.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years (2 x 15-credit core taught
modules and 1 x 60-credit dissertation required and at
least 4 other 30-credit modules required over 2 years)
You may take Hebrew as part of a Joint Honours MA degree
and normally take 120 credits in Honours in the Hebrew part
of your programme. You take two core 15-credit modules
in third year (Reading the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and
Reading the New Testament) utilising your Hebrew language
skills in the first of these and learning about the importance
of the language to New Testament research in the second.
You also take a further 30-credit module with a Hebrew
component in third year.
In fourth year, you take a further 60 credits related to the study
of Hebrew, either by completing the 60-credit dissertation on
an appropriate topic of your choice or by taking a further two
30-credit modules. At St Andrews you have the opportunity to
study the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Pseudepigrapha in detail,
with leading scholars involved in research on those texts. A
dissertation must be completed in the final year, but this may
be undertaken in either of the Schools involved in the joint
programme.
“I have met and worked with the most amazing people in the
most beautiful place in the UK.”
Anna (London, England)
Return to Subjects
Divinity – New Testament
Divinity
(New Testament)
85
Degree options
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
New Testament and Modern History
For Entrance Requirements – see page 78
What will I study?
This degree programme is for those fascinated by the
New Testament and who want to study it in depth. You
will have the opportunity to learn about and explore the
theology and ethics of New Testament texts, to study the
language in which they were written, to investigate the
diverse religious, political and cultural contexts in which
they were shaped and to consider the beliefs that inspired
their authors.
The New Testament is central to the study of Christian
theology but has also been influential in literature, the arts,
ethics and a host of other disciplines. This specialised degree
programme offers you the opportunity to engage in serious
scholarly study of the early Christian writings and their world
and to think about why they had (and continue to have) such
an impact in subsequent years.
“The module that has meant the most to me has been
New Testament History and Theology because further
extending knowledge from first year has meant that I have
greater understanding of this area. For me this is vital in
comprehending how it has been used within the formation
of the early Church and of course its effect on the modern
Church in all its denominations.”
Gillian (Freuchie, Fife, Scotland)
First and Second Year (3 x 20-credit modules over 2 years)
In the first two years you are required to take two foundational
modules in New Testament. These focus on Jesus and the
Gospels and the history and theology of early Christianity.
They are designed to introduce you to methods of New
Testament study and to the social, historical and cultural
context within which Jesus and the New Testament writers
lived. They also help you explore the theological issues that
characterised the early Christian movement.
If you pursue Honours in New Testament as part of the MA
Honours degree you must study New Testament Greek in your
first or second year, unless you have previously obtained an
A-Level or Higher qualification in classical Greek or unless you
opt to study classical Greek modules in the University.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years (2 x 15-credit core
taught module and 1 x 60-credit dissertation required and
at least 4 other 30-credit modules required over 2 years)
You take two core 15-credit modules in third year (Reading the
Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Reading the New Testament).
The first of these ensures a proper grasp of the methodologies
involved in studying the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, as
background to the New Testament study undertaken in the
second. You also take a further 30-credit module in New
Testament in third year.
Professor N T Wright teaching a Senior Honours class
In fourth year, you take a further 60 credits related to the study
of the New Testament, either by completing the 60-credit
dissertation on an appropriate topic of your choice or by
taking a further two 30-credit modules. A dissertation must
be completed in the final year, but this may be undertaken in
either of the Schools involved in the joint programme.
“Every day brings with it a new, exciting experience.”
Callum (Bristol, England)
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Earth Sciences
86
Earth Sciences –
Environmental Earth Sciences,
Geology
Degree options
Second Year students on geological mapping excursion in central Spain.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/gg
MGeol (Single Honours Degrees)
Earth Sciences
Features
BSc (Single Honours Degrees)
*
Environmental Earth Sciences
Geology
*
BSc (Joint Honours Degrees)
Geology and Biology
Geology and Chemistry
*
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
*
First Year Entry
SQA Highers and GCE A-Levels should include at least two
sciences from Biology, Chemistry, Geography, Geology,
Mathematics and Physics
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including at least 2 HL6
science subjects
Preference may be given to candidates with strong science
qualifications.
Second Year Entry
SQA Advanced Highers/Highers and GCE A-Levels should
include Geology plus two sciences from Biology, Chemistry,
Mathematics and Physics
SQA Advanced Highers: AA and AA in two other Highers
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38 including at least 3
at HL7, HL6, HL6 from the following subjects: Biology,
Chemistry, Geography, Physics
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject?
– Preferable for Direct Entry into Second Year
Subject enquiries
Dr Ruth Robinson
E: [email protected]
*
*
*
*
Our programmes are ranked second and fourth in the UK
by the Guardian University Guide and the Times and Sunday
Times University Guides, respectively for 2015.
We specifically focus on skills and vocational training,
emphasising fieldwork experience in diverse geological
settings within the UK and overseas.
Field kit, such as compasses, are provided for all entering
students through industry sponsorship and about 50% of all
field training costs are paid for through alumni contributions
to our training programme.
The MGeol degree includes a three-month industry
placement.
The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees
are accredited by the Geological Society of London and the
Institution of Environmental Sciences, respectively.
Industry professionals are involved in teaching within some
of the Honours modules.
There is an active student-led Geological Society which coordinates social events and academic events.
A number of industry-sponsored bursaries and scholarships
are available each year .
Facilities and resources
The University has recently invested in several new stateof-the art laboratory facilities for Earth and Environmental
Science research for the high precision geochemical and
isotopic analysis of minerals, rocks, soils, and fluids. You
will receive hands-on training on these analytical facilities
and undergraduate experimental and analytical research is
encouraged.
What will I study?
The Geology degree provides the training to understand how
the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere
co-evolved. It emphasises the origin and chemistry of rocks
and minerals, geological mapping and the genesis of hallmark
periods of change in the development of the Earth system. The
Environmental Earth Sciences degree focuses on Earth surface
processes, the biogeochemical cycling of elements at the
surface of the Earth, and environmental change. The MGeol in
Earth Sciences is an integrated Masters degree that combines
subject knowledge across the Earth and environmental sciences
and includes an internship with industry, an extended research
project, and a major geological expedition.
The Geology degree is accredited by the Geological Society
of London and the Environmental Earth Sciences degree is
accredited through the Institution of Environmental Sciences.
Accreditation is a benchmark of quality and employability, a
professional recognition that our teaching is of the highest
standard. Both accredited degrees provide a faster track to
chartered status (CGeol and CSci, respectively).
Return to Subjects
“Studying Earth Sciences has been thoroughly rewarding. Staff are
supportive of undergraduates, generous with their time and have
given me real opportunities to pursue my interests. I have most
enjoyed the variety of work in a number of learning environments
from classroom to labs and, best of all, out into the field. It has given
me the understanding and skillset I need to approach the job market
with confidence.”
Earth Sciences
87
Mark (Lincoln, England)
MGeol or BSc?
The MGeol degree is designed to give you advanced experience
prior to undertaking full-time employment or PhD research.
MGeol students normally have a formal industrial placement
and take part in a geological expedition. Some sectors do not
require a Masters-level degree and therefore any student can
choose to graduate with a BSc degree.
The first two years of study for any degree are spent completing
the core training in Earth Sciences and accompanying subjects.
First Year (2 x 20 credit modules required)
The Earth Science modules provide the underpinning concepts
and fundamental aspects of Earth structure and Earth history,
including the key ideas regarding the origin of the planet and
its biosphere, as well as Earth materials and resources. There
are several field excursions, including the five-day residential
“Highland Fling” field course to classic Scottish geological
localities, all of which are designed to reinforce and enhance the
learning obtained in the lectures and laboratory practicals. The
geological background to natural resources is a core theme of
the excursion.
Second Year (3 x 30 credit modules required)
All students take a core Earth Science module in Semester 1
which provides basic knowledge and training in low
temperature mineralogy, sedimentary systems, palaeontology,
and geophysics. There is a dedicated module for each BSc
degree in Semester 2 and they cover deep Earth geology (BSc
Geology) and biogeochemical cycling and surface processes
(BSc Environmental Earth Sciences). MGeol students take both
Earth Science modules in Semester 2, and therefore develop the
knowledge base and skills associated with the two core modules
for Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences. There is a major
emphasis on field training in second year through several
day-long excursions in Scotland and two residential courses.
BSc Geology students undertake an eight-day geological
mapping excursion in central Spain, and the BSc Environmental
Earth Sciences students complete a five-day excursion on the
geochemistry and mineralogy of acid-mine drainage in the Rio
Tinto region in southern Spain. The aims of the field courses
are to develop the key skills required to observe, measure and
interpret geological and geochemical data, as well as to build
confidence, and encourage critical and independent thinking.
After completion of second year, you decide on your final
degree choice (e.g. MGeol or BSc) and enter the Honours class.
Honours – Third, Fourth and Fifth Years
(7 - 8 x 15-credit core modules required in third year and at
least 2 - 3 other 15-credit modules required over 2 years)
Study at Honours level is composed of core training and
optional modules in which you have the opportunity to focus on
a particular area of interest and undertake your own research.
The modules involve key skills training and the opportunity
to get first-hand experience of new research discoveries and
advances in Earth and Environmental Sciences by our staff in an
integrated lecture-lab-field forum. Some selected examples of
core modules are provided in the table below. Other modules
that are either core or optional courses depending on the
degree programme include Geodynamics, Geochronology, Global
Climate Change, and Ecosystem Modelling.
Some of the Core Modules taken in Years 3, 4 & 5
Geological Mapping BSc Geology & MGeol
Advanced Environmental Field Methods BSc Environmental
Earth Sciences
Geochemistry
All degree programmes
Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
BSc Environmental
Earth Sciences
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
BSc Environmental
Earth Sciences
Processes and Products in Sedimentary Systems
All degree
programmes
Structural Geology and Tectonics
BSc Geology & MGeol
Petroleum Exploration & Geophysics BSc Geology & MGeol
Research dissertation All degree programmes
Industry and Research Placements MGeol
In-depth training occurs in the first Honours year and
includes the statistical analysis and presentation of scientific
data. Fourth and fifth years are dedicated to further
developing critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and
to gaining industry experience. The content of each year
is dependent on degree choice (MGeol or BSc). Choosing
the BSc degree pathways require an independent research
dissertation, involving field and laboratory analyses and
research presentations. MGeol students complete a threemonth placement in industry and a field- or laboratorybased research project. The fifth year includes an extended
independent research dissertation and a project-based
geological overseas expedition to localities linked to staff
research areas. Optional Honours modules are also on
offer across a range of Earth Science topics for the Honours
years. The extensive field training combined with research and
industry experience that our degrees offer produce graduates
that successfully compete for industry jobs or the best PhD
projects.
Fourth and fifth years are dedicated to further developing
critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and to gaining
industry experience. The content of each year is dependent on
degree choice (MGeol or BSc). A two-week field course across
the western Alps begins fourth year and is designed to integrate
and put to use all the learning of the previous three years.
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88
Earth Sciences
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/gg
Earth Sciences
(continued)
Honours student conducting dissertation research in Argentina.
Fieldwork
Our graduates are valued as independent and confident
scientists in the field. This level of competence is developed
through 14-day field excursions during Years 3 and 4, weekend
and day-long field excursions associated with individual
modules, and up to four weeks of fieldwork associated with
the independent research projects. Two weeks of geological
mapping are conducted on Mull and around Ullapool during
Year 3, providing intensive training on classic Scottish geology.
Environmental Earth Sciences students have a tailored field
mapping and geochemistry course around Ullapool. A twoweek field course across the western Alps begins fourth year
and is designed to integrate all the learning of the previous
three years for all degree students. In total, students participate
in at least 70 supervised field days over the length of the degree,
and in most cases the amount of fieldwork is over 100 days with
the research project component.
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 90 - 110, tutorials 6
Second Year: 40 - 50, tutorials 6
Honours: 30 - 40
Teaching is based on semester-length modules and
hands-on practical/laboratory training. Performance is
measured through a mixture of continuous assessment
and examinations. Our degrees balance skills training,
incorporating a significant laboratory and/or field component,
with subject-based modules that deepen and broaden
theoretical knowledge. Many modules enhance problemsolving skills and involve professional Earth scientists from
industry. Field courses are fully integrated with the degree
programmes and have been conducted in Scotland, England,
Spain and the Swiss-Italian Alps in recent years. The country
and geological setting of the MGeol expeditions varies each
year, and participating students are involved in choosing the
location and planning the expedition.
Throughout each degree programme, you are encouraged
and supported to develop literacy, numeracy, computing and
presentation skills, as well as exercising critical, independent
and creative thought and judgement.
Studying ancient sedimentary rocks in Australia.
Recording mineralogy in ore-bearing dyke, Greenland.
Return to Subjects
Tanya (Stanmore, Middlesex, England)
Assessment
All our 1000- and 2000-level modules are assessed by
coursework that includes a practical examination (50%) and
a final written examination (50%) based on short answer
questions and essays. At Honours level, some modules are
assessed through coursework (50%) and a final examination
(50%), and other modules are based entirely on coursework.
The BSc Honours dissertation and MGeol Advanced Research
modules are year-long courses that are assessed through the
written dissertation, a project proposal and a presentation. The
MGeol research paper is expected to be of publishable quality.
Scholarships
Fieldwork expenses for Geology or Environmental Earth
Sciences degree students are subsidised by the Irvine Bequest
and contributions from our alumni. There are financial awards
at every level of study for students who have earned the
highest marks in fieldwork.
Visiting Days
We encourage you to participate in the official University
Visiting Days held on Wednesday afternoons throughout
the year during which an overview of the programme is
presented. We also run special Saturday Visiting Days in March
or April when you can meet staff and current students, get
a more thorough idea of our degree programme, visit our
facilities, and hear about the career pathways being taken by
some of our graduates.
Careers
The Department is proactive about developing career
opportunities, and career activities are provided for all students
(from first year onwards). There are a wide variety of career
options for Earth and Environmental Science graduates. Our
graduates now work in the energy, natural resources and
environmental sectors, as well as in wider science areas. Many
students continue with research in PhD programmes before
embarking on their professional careers. Our graduates are
recognised internationally as being highly trained, independent
thinkers with the appropriate skills required to problem solve in
a variety of research or applied areas. For both BSc and MGeol
graduates, recent employers include Chevron, Maersk Oil Ltd,
BHP Billiton, BP, Shell, the British Geological Survey, Nexen
Ltd., Norsk Hydro, Neftex, Red Rock Mining, African Mining
Corporation, Fugro, Geotechnics Ltd., Axmin Inc., Scottish
Natural Heritage, Scottish Environmental Protection Agency,
Balfour Beatty, Mouchal and Jacobs.
More information: http://bit.ly/sta-earthsci-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Geophysical research on glacial calving behaviour, Greenland.
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89
Earth Sciences
“With some of the most iconic and diverse geology right on the
doorstep, St Andrews is perfectly placed to study Earth Sciences. The
Department is full of enthusiastic and supportive staff, and there are
always opportunities for undergraduates to assist with cutting-edge
research. The extensive fieldwork on offer, high-quality teaching
and training in state-of-the-art laboratory facilities, ensure students
graduate with the very best career prospects.”
Economics & Finance
90
Economics & Finance
Degree options
MA or BSc (Single Honours Degrees)
Applied Economics
Economics
Financial Economics
School of Economics & Finance (Chris Young s )
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/economics
BA (International Honours Degree)
Features
Economics (See page 43)
MA or BSc (Joint Honours Degrees)
Economics and one of:
*
Geography
Management
Mathematics
*
Psychology
Statistics
*
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Economics and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Biblical Studies
English
Film Studies
GermanW
International Relations
ItalianW
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern History
Persian
Philosophy
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
*
*
*
BSc (Joint Honours Degrees)
Economics and one of:
Biology
Computer Science
Management Science
What will I study? – MA or BSc
MA “With” Degree
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Economics with GermanW
Economics with Russian W
Economics with Social Anthropology
Economics with SpanishW
W
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
General Enquiries
UK/EU: [email protected]
Rest of the World: [email protected]
We provide a structured, cumulative and rigorous
foundation of economic concepts, principles, analysis,
techniques and knowledge.
We have specialist strengths in macroeconomics, choice
theory, bounded rationality, game theory, expectations and
learning, competition and innovation and climate change.
More than 80% of the research output by staff in the School
has been rated as internationally excellent and / or worldleading in the recent Research Excellence framework 2014
– this was above the average for all Economics Departments
in the UK. On the basis of the quality of its research
publications the School came second in Scotland and jointtenth in the UK.
We help you develop your analytical and decision-making
abilities by providing training in quantitative and modelbased methods of analysis.
Our programmes provide you with a wide range of
transferable skills.
The students run an active Economics Society.
Economics is studied up to Honours in both the Faculty of Arts
and the Faculty of Science. Whether you study for an MA or BSc
depends on what entrance qualifications you have and which
other subjects you wish to do. The programmes you follow for
MA and BSc are exactly the same within the Economics element
of your degree. In the first two years all students follow the same
core programme in economic principles. There are no special
admission requirements for entry to the 1000-level modules.
1000-level modules provide the required general knowledge
of Economics. Study of the subject in the second year and
especially in Honours equips you with a fuller understanding
of economic relationships and with a variety of techniques
necessary for their analysis. In addition to core modules, in
Honours you select modules from a range of options on specific
topics. These provide an analytical understanding of key aspects
of business management and government policy formation.
First Year
Microeconomics is the study of how households and firms make
decisions about consumption and production and how they
interact in markets. Macroeconomics is the study of phenomena
which affect the national economy, such as unemployment,
growth and inflation.
In the first year you are introduced to the principles of
microeconomics and macroeconomics and learn how to apply
these to contemporary issues. The modules provide a basic insight
into the use of quantitative methods and an understanding of
the economic system in general, including the UK economy.
Return to Subjects
Annika (Göteborg, Sweden)
Second Year
More advanced study of consumers, firms and markets
(microeconomics) and of models and schools of thought in
modern macroeconomics is undertaken. Further quantitative
methods provide you with training in the mathematical and
statistical techniques needed for economic analysis and how to
structure and make sense of economic, financial and social data.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
Modules are divided into core modules, for example:
• Advanced Microeconomics
• Advanced Macroeconomics
• Econometrics 1
and also optional modules, for example:
• • • • • • • • • Corporate Finance
Environmental Economics
The Economics of Innovation
Labour Economics
Experiments in Economics
Development Economics
Issues in Economic Policy
Economics of Social Life
Law and Economics
If you wish to specialise in Finance you can take an additional
core material in financial economic theory and concentrate your
options in the area of finance, in order to graduate with a degree
in Financial Economics. If you wish to obtain a broader, but less
deep, knowledge of economic theory you can choose to take
fewer core modules and a larger proportion of optional modules
in order to graduate with a degree in Applied Economics. You
also have the opportunity to undertake independent study
and research in a dissertation or project. Further details of the
degree structure and a list of current Honours modules are
available here: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/coursecatalogue
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 350, tutorials ~ 17
Second Year: lectures 240, tutorials ~15
Honours: lectures 20 - 110, tutorials ~ 13
First and second year modules generally involve a series of
lectures, laboratories and tutorials, the latter in smaller groups
to facilitate effective interaction.
Single Honours students typically attend seven to eight
lectures and one to two tutorials or labs each week. Joint
Honours students typically attend three to four lectures a
week and also have tutorials in most weeks.
Assessment
Progress is monitored through tutorial assignments and
assessment is by a combination of graded work and
examinations. Almost all our modules are assessed by at least
60% written examinations, with the balance of assessment
made up by coursework.
Careers
Popular career choices amongst recent graduates include:
investment, commercial and international banking,
accountancy, consultancy, management in the industrial and
commercial sectors, organisations such as the Bank of England
and the World Bank, the Civil Service, university research and
teaching, and the media.
You will find St Andrews Economics graduates at renowned
financial institutions such as Accenture, Ernst & Young, JP
Morgan, Barclays Capital, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, HSBC and
Lloyds, to name but a few. Further information:
http://bit.ly/sta-economics-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
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91
Economics & Finance
“Studying Economics has enabled me to gain an in-depth
understanding of the foundations of economic concepts. It has
significantly enhanced my problem solving skills along with providing
me with a set of valuable transferable skills through analysing
economic principles and their applications. The module choices,
especially in Honours, were the reason why I chose the University in
the first place – and I have not regretted my decision.”
92
English
See also Modern Languages page 130
English
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
English
School of English
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english
BA (International Honours Degree)
English (See page 43)
Features
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
English and one of:
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Classics
Comparative Literature
Economics
Film Studies
FrenchW
GermanW
Greek
Hebrew
ItalianW
*
Latin
Management
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern History
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianWE
Scottish History
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Theological Studies
English and two Modern Languages W
Any combination of Arabic, French, German, Italian, Persian,
RussianE, Spanish is available (5 Modern Language modules (150
credits) and 3 English modules (90 credits) at Honours).
W
E
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
MA Mediaeval Studies
This degree (in which English modules may be taken) is
administered through the Department of Mediaeval History.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers and GCE A-Levels must include English Language,
English Literature or Drama
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38 including HL6 in English
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – Yes, see above.
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
In the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014, the School
is rated top in Scotland and sixth in the UK.
* In our most recent teaching review, the curriculum was
rated ’broad, well balanced and notable for its generous
range of options covering all periods of literary writing in
English from Anglo-Saxon times to the present. Students
benefit from engagement with enthusiastic, highly
regarded research-active staff who are also dedicated to
teaching and ensuring students have the best possible
experience at St Andrews’.
* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s
Gold Medal, the Forward Prize, the Whitbread Prize and
T S Eliot Prize for poetry, and the Jerwood Fiction Prize,
the Saltire Scottish Book of the Year Award, the Somerset
Maugham Award, and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for
fiction.
* Varied programme of published authors as visiting
speakers, giving students the chance to discuss
contemporary literature and criticism with leading modern
writers.
What will I study?
St Andrews has a long and illustrious history of teaching
literature in English. The School combines expertise in
research with a dedication to teaching in a caring and friendly
environment. Special research strengths include mediaeval
language and literature, the Renaissance, the Romantic and
Modern periods, Scottish literature, Creative Writing, and
Women’s Writing. Studying English develops techniques that
enable you to read with close attention and to consider the
ideas, human values, and historical forces that have helped
to form our literature. The opportunity to read, to discuss,
and to reflect with clarity on a wide variety of texts develops
analytical, descriptive, and evaluative skills. You learn to
communicate more fluently, lucidly, economically, and
persuasively. These skills are both intrinsically enriching and
eminently transferable.
In your first and second years the modules in English will take
up one third of your time. At Honours, in the third and fourth
years, you can do all your work in English or, if you choose
to take a Joint Honours degree, you can divide your time
between English and another subject. In all four years you will
be assessed partly on your coursework, submitted during the
semester, and partly on your performance in examinations at
the end of the semester. The emphasis in our first- and secondyear modules is on introducing texts from the full range of
English literary history and methods for interpreting them. At
Honours you are able to make choices from the wide range
of modules taught by specialists in the School, on subjects
ranging from Beowulf to science fiction.
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93
NEW PROFILE - PHOTO TO
BE ADDED
Francesca (Tadworth, Surrey, England)
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Culture and Conflict: An Introduction to Nineteenth- and
Twentieth-Century Literature explores texts in prose and
verse, ranging from Wuthering Heights and Great Expectations
to contemporary Scottish writing. Emphasis is on practical
criticism, close reading and the importance of literary/
historical contexts. Explorers and Revolutionaries: Literature
1680-1830 covers, among other works, Gulliver’s Travels,
Frankenstein, Wordsworth and Coleridge’s Lyrical Ballads, and
looks at travel, colonialism, the Gothic and the Romantic.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Mediaeval and Renaissance Texts provides an introduction to
the earliest literature in English and the language in which
it is composed. The mediaeval element draws on editions
prepared by scholars in the School of English, designed to
make early texts readily accessible. The Renaissance element
focuses on Donne’s Songs and Sonnets and Milton’s Paradise
Lost.
The second year programme concludes with Drama: Reading
and Performance, a module that concentrates on the special
characteristics of drama as an art form that crosses the
boundaries of written text and public performance. The
module includes plays by Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe,
Oscar Wilde, Tennessee Williams and Caryl Churchill.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
There is an exciting range of some 40-50 modules from
which to choose, normally including options on Chaucer,
Scottish Literature, Jane Austen, or T S Eliot, Creative Writing,
Shakespeare and Film, Beowulf and a wide variety of other
topics and approaches to the study of literature written in
English. Single Honours students normally take eight modules
in the two Honours years. You must include at least one
module on mediaeval literature, one module on early modern
literature and one other module on eighteenth-century,
Romantic or nineteenth-century literature. Joint Honours
students normally take four modules in English (including
one on pre-twentieth-century literature), and four in another
subject. The dissertation, which is compulsory for Single
Honours students, allows you to write an extended essay on a
literary topic of your own choice.
Several other modules involve creative coursework which
– as well as the traditional essay – may involve literary
journal-keeping (Literature and Ecology); writing a play review
(Twentieth-Century American Drama) ; or the opportunity to try
a bit of mediaeval forgery (Courtly Literature in Middle English).
We aim to provide a range of topics and approaches that allow
you to follow your own interests, whether towards specialising
in particular authors or periods, or towards wide-ranging
exploration in a variety of areas.
Study abroad
As a student of English, you may apply to participate in our
Erasmus+ exchange with Trinity College Dublin. You may also
apply to study abroad under the University’s St Andrews Abroad
programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures – 240, tutorials – 7
Second Year: lectures – 150, tutorials – 7
Honours: classes generally have no more than 20
Most modules at all levels are taught by a combination of
whole-class lectures and small discussion groups, either tutorials
or seminars. We aim to give all students in English the chance
to discuss their work in tutorials or seminars, since we think that
is the best way of teaching and learning. Prospective students
should note that candidates who are allowed to write their
exams on a computer are not permitted to use Spellcheck.
Assessment
Almost all our modules are assessed by a balanced mixture of
coursework and written examinations.
Extra-curricular events
The School of English also offers a lively and enriching
programme of events open to undergraduate students, ranging
from workshops, where creative writers meet to share their work
and exchange ideas, to readings and discussions with leading
poets, novelists, critics and scholars. Many students become
involved in the Literary Society, student drama, or debating.
Careers
Recent graduates in English have entered a wide variety of
professions and career paths. They have taken up internships
with the United Nations, become writers and editors for Penguin
Books, Harper Collins, The Times, Country Life magazine, and The
Field magazine. They have gone into sales in a number of spheres
such as books and music, e.g. Waterstone’s, WH Smith, and work
for charitable organisations (Save the Children), into public policy
(Scottish Executive, British Council), and into arts administration
(the Barbican Centre, Sotheby’s). A couple of graduates have
gone into the financial sector – KPMG and Abbey National, and
one is a head-hunter for a small film company.
A large number of our graduates go into postgraduate study,
some to other universities but many remaining with us in
St Andrews. A considerable number of graduates follow
careers in teaching in a wide variety of school environments.
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-english-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
English
“Having originally applied to read English Literature, the chance to
take philosophy modules at sub-honours ignited an interest in that
subject and therefore I am now studying for a joint degree. I feel
that the flexibility of the degree programmes, and the support for any
difficulties you may have along the way, is what makes a degree at
St Andrews unlike many others. Students are encouraged to embark
on an independent journey of academic and self-discovery whilst
having access to a network of academic, social and welfare support.”
94
Film Studies
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/filmstudies
Film Studies
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
Film Studies
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Film Studies and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
W
School 3 – our specially equipped auditorium
International Relations
ItalianW
Modern History
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianW
Scottish History
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Theological Studies
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
Features
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
*
*
*
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 35
*
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
*
*
The Department of Film Studies consistently receives
excellent ratings of student satisfaction in course
evaluations and national polls.
Academics at the cutting edge of their discipline introduce
you to the latest ideas and innovations in research.
You are exposed to a wide range of films from around the
world, not only Hollywood and Europe.
Based on staff expertise, modules cover key topics in film
including stardom, authorship, identity, industry, history,
politics, and technology.
You develop proficiency in oral and written communication,
critical thinking, media literacy, and other transferable skills.
We consistently maintain high standards of teaching and
student work.
Students take an active role in St Andrews’s robust film
culture, participating in and programming film series,
festivals, and other events.
Location and resources
The Department is located in two buildings on North Street near
the town’s cinema. All Film Studies modules are taught in a way
that includes the screening of selected cinematic texts, which
take place in a specially equipped auditorium. The University
Library holds an extensive collection of film and audiovisual
materials. Our vibrant research culture features many studentled initiatives, including film festivals such as the ‘60 Hour
Film Blitz’, the Reel Film Society (a student-run film series), our
postgraduate film journal, Frames; and student-led professional
conferences and symposia.
What will I study?
Film Studies at St Andrews is a dynamic and growing discipline,
drawing in students with a variety of intellectual interests. The
Film Studies degree resonates with the demands of today’s job
market, where film and media literacy is of direct relevance to a
variety of careers, from journalism and teaching to professions
in the creative industries. Our students engage with the cultural,
historical, and intellectual substance of film scholarship, and
emerge with a powerful and relevant set of analytical tools.
Film Studies at St Andrews is defined by a particular focus on
world cinemas. We critically examine the history of cinematic
art across time and cultures, looking at a diverse range of
topics from sexuality in film to activist documentary, from
early propaganda to the contemporary European crime film.
Film Studies uses a variety of critical, theoretical and historical
approaches to examine the most significant cultural form of the
20th century.
Return to Subjects
“Film Studies has been incredibly interesting for
me throughout my time here at St Andrews.
The lecturers are really knowledgeable and
enthusiastic about the subject, and the film
screenings each week expose me to so many
different films that I wouldn’t have seen
otherwise. I have enjoyed my course immensely.”
Film Studies
95
Emma (Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England)
The introductory modules at sub-honours (first and second
years) lay the foundation and provide the theoretical, cultural
and methodological frameworks you will need for the more
specialised and increasingly challenging modules offered at
Honours. The Honours syllabus reflects the research expertise
of teaching staff, who are, in many cases, pre-eminent scholars
in the field. Students work closely with the teaching staff,
developing excellent intellectual, writing and research skills that
are useful in a wide variety of professions.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
The two 1000-level modules include film form and aesthetics,
key approaches to the study of film (such as the cycle of film
production, distribution and exhibition and the analysis of
genre, narrative and stars), early cinema and the advent of
sound, classical Hollywood cinema, key aspects of European
cinema and other world cinemas. Cinema provides a rich
resource for analysing the social, cultural, and ideological crosscurrents of a particular historical moment, and the films we
teach bring these into bold relief.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
The two 2000-level modules focus on historical aspects and
technological advances in the period following World War II,
typically looking at new wave cinemas in Europe, political
movements in Latin America and Africa and contemporary
trends in Asia. Throughout these modules we introduce a variety
of methodological and theoretical frameworks for the historical
study of cinema and the visual media. Based on screenings
of a selection of cinematic texts, you are also introduced to
questions of identity and representation, and the relationship of
film, public discourse, cultural production, and cultural policy.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
Honours modules explore particular topics, such as War and
Cinema, Cinemas of India, and the European science fiction
film. Each week you will participate in seminar discussions of
advanced work in the field. The Honours programme introduces
a diverse range of film theories covering gender, national &
transnational, and philosophical approaches. In your final year
you will have the opportunity to complete a dissertation on an
advanced topic in Film Studies.
We offer a rich programme combining traditional approaches
to film study with emerging forms of critical thought. We
specialise in:
• • • • • • • •
• • • World cinemas
Film, human rights and activism
Queer theory and gender identity
Film and Politics
Film and History
War and cinema
Colonial film
Early cinema and film history
Documentary, advertising and non-theatrical film
Film and music
Film festivals
Modules available will reflect current staff specialisms and
therefore may vary year to year.
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 153, tutorials maximum 10
Second Year: lectures 75 - 153, tutorials maximum 10 (usually
fewer)
Honours: classes maximum 16
The teaching makes use of the University’s growing collection
of films on DVD, which includes films from various historical
periods and national traditions. Most teaching on film takes
place in a lecture theatre equipped for the evening film
screenings that accompany lectures. Sub-honours Film
Studies modules are taught by a combination of whole-class
lectures, screenings and seminars. Class sizes at Honours vary
between modules. We aim to give all students in Film Studies
the chance to engage in learning, debating and presenting in
lively seminars.
Assessment
All 1000- and 2000-level modules are assessed by a balance of
coursework and written examinations. At Honours level, the
modules are entirely assessed on the basis of coursework.
Careers
A degree in Film Studies from St Andrews will provide an
excellent foundation for a wide range of careers as well as
for careers directly connected with cinema (such as film
distribution and production, arts administration, cinema
management, film festivals, advertising and public relations,
journalism/media, publishing and education).
The main purpose of the programme is to provide a high quality
general education, promote independence of thought and
encourage intellectual initiative backed by a solid knowledge
of cinema’s history. We do not teach film production, although
we do host film festivals and frequently invite filmmakers to
the University as guest speakers. Film Studies graduates will be
well placed to compete in today’s job market, having gained an
extensive range of skills from written and oral communications
to archival research and visual analysis. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-filmstudies-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
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96
French
See also Modern Languages page 130
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/french
French
Degrees all available With or Without Integrated Year Abroad
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Kiosque à journaux – Paris
French
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
French and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Classics
Comparative Literature
English
Film Studies
Geography
German
Greek (Ancient)
Hebrew
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
International Relations
Italian
Latin
Management
Mediaeval History
Modern History
Persian
Philosophy
Psychology
Russian
Social Anthropology
Spanish
Theological Studies
SQA Highers: AAAB (A in French)
GCE A-Levels: AAB (A in French)
With an A in any other language(s) to be studied, unless the
applicant plans to study the other language(s) at beginners’
level.
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in French
and any other language(s) to be studied, except those to be
taken from beginners’ level.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
MA (Honours Degrees) in
– French and two of Arabic, German, Italian, Persian, Russian,
Spanish
– French and (one of Arabic, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish)
and Comparative Literature
– Modern Languages (French and [one of Arabic, GermanB G,
Italian, Persian, RussianR E T, Spanish]) and one of Ancient
HistoryR, EnglishE, International Relations, LatinB,
ManagementG T
– Modern Languages (French and [one of Arabic, Italian,
Persian, Russian, SpanishS]) and Classical StudiesS
– Modern Languages (French and [one of German, Italian,
Persian, Spanish]) and Greek (Ancient)
– Mediaeval Studies
B
G
R
E
T
S
Modern Languages (French-German) and Latin is only available to
beginners in German.
Modern Languages (French-German) and Management is only available
to non-beginners in German.
Only available to non-beginners in Russian.
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Combinations including Classical Studies and Spanish are only available
to beginners in Spanish.
BSc “With” Degree
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Biology with French
Chemistry with French
MChem “With” Degree
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Chemistry with French
Chemistry with French and External Placement
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – Yes, see above.
Subject enquiries
Dr Elodie Laügt
E: [email protected]
Features
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Academic staff are leading researchers in their fields.
The teaching team is varied and engaging. It includes four
full-time native speakers.
Acquisition of high-level skills in spoken and written French.
Honours modules in French Literature, History and Culture,
ranging from the Mediaeval period to the twenty-first
century.
Transferable skills, such as analysis, synthesis and the ability
to give public presentations, are developed throughout the
programme.
Opportunity to undertake a work placement in France as
part of a five-year degree.
Opportunity to study at a French university as an integral
part of a four-year degree.
French is ranked seventh for student satisfaction in the 2014
National Student Survey.
Resources
The Department of French is truly diverse in its outlook and
activities. Significant numbers of international students
are attracted to it within the context of our exchange and
postgraduate study programmes, making it a truly international
and francophone environment in which to pursue academic
study.
The School has a Multimedia Centre with the latest digital
technology to enhance the learning and practice of oral and
aural language skills.
Return to Subjects
Alice (Edinburgh, Scotland)
What will I study?
•
•
•
•
•
You will be given the opportunity to develop language and
communication skills to a level of high proficiency.
You will be offered a broad view of French literature, history
and culture in the first two years of study.
You will be able to shape your degree according to your
various interests in specific topics at Honours level.
You will be allowed to develop analytical and critical skills,
along with transferable skills, in English and in French.
You will be given direct access to French culture, history and
values, and to all the debates, contradictions and extraordinary
creativity that characterise contemporary France.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
The language modules, taught in French and English, are
designed to consolidate and develop skills acquired in secondary
school, and to increase fluency in the target language. Three
literature texts – encompassing prose, drama and poetry – are
studied per semester; these are read as a means of enhancing
language learning and introducing you to wider issues of French
history and cultural identity. Teaching includes two-and-a-half
hours of language per week (including one oral class with a
native speaker), plus literature lectures and seminars.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
The course diversifies, and is taught primarily in French. If you
are planning to take a Single Honours French MA or a Joint
Honours French MA you study French Studies 1 and 2, comprising
French language, history, and literature ( including texts ranging
from the Middle Ages to the contemporary period, and film).
This integrated study of French language and culture will help
you understand many of the issues you may meet during a year
in France, and allows you to make an informed choice from
among our Honours modules.
Students planning to take a three-subject MA will study French
Language and Society 1 and 2. These modules also include
French language and history, but no literature.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(normally 4 x 15-credit core modules required and at least 5
other 15-credit modules required over 2 years)
In Honours we offer four consecutive 15-credit language
modules with an emphasis on communication skills, and a
range of modules in language, literature, intellectual history and
twentieth- and twenty-first century culture, politics and society,
including:
•
•
•
•
•
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Aspects of Gender in Seventeenth-Century Theatre
From One War to Another: French Politics, Culture and Society
1914 - 1945
Modern French Thought
Music in Nineteenth-Century French Poetry
Contemporary French Crime Fiction
Translation Methodology
We also offer dissertation modules, allowing you to work on
extended personal research with a tutor to advise you.
Every year, the French Department awards the following prizes
and bursary:
•
•
•
The Dudley Morgan Prize for the best final year student(s)
Year-Abroad Project Prize
The Margaret F K Fleming Bursary to study at a French
university
Study abroad
Many students take the opportunity to spend a year working in
France, between second year and Junior Honours (third) year. UK
students often undertake teaching placements in French
schools through the British Council’s Language Assistantship
scheme. Alternatively, you may organise a work placement
with the approval of the Department. You may instead apply to
spend your Junior Honours year at one of our Erasmus partner
institutions; in these cases the work done in France replaces the
Junior Honours year in St Andrews. Our current partners include
the Sorbonne and Sciences Po in Paris, as well as the Universities
of Toulouse and Perpignan. All students are fully briefed about
the possibilities for study abroad during second and third
semesters in St Andrews. You may also apply to study abroad
under the University’s St Andrews Abroad programme. See also
page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 130 - 140, literature seminars 7 - 15,
language classes 15 - 17, oral classes 9 - 12
Second Year: lectures 80 - 100, literature seminars 10 - 17,
language classes 10 - 17, oral classes 9 - 12
Honours: 15-credit module seminars 14 - 18, language classes
12 - 18, oral classes 8 - 12
Lectures are used to provide information, to stimulate thought
and to suggest directions for further reading and personal study.
Small language classes and seminars will allow you to work
together and with your tutors, presenting papers and discussing
texts and issues relevant to the course. Specialist Honours
modules encourage you to pursue your individual interests,
to work together on texts and ideas, and develop spoken and
written communication skills.
Assessment
All our modules include at least 40% assessment by coursework
with the balance of assessment in the form of written
examinations.
Careers
Recent graduates have gone to work for the British Council,
HSBC’s executive training programme, Citibank, Christian
Salvesen, Harper Collins, Glasgow City Council and even to work
in Japan teaching English as part of the JET scheme. Many also
go on to study for postgraduate qualifications or higher degrees.
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-modlangs-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
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97
French
“St Andrews is the most wonderful place. This small town offers
an entirely unique experience: the balance between a challenging
academic environment and a seaside holiday mindset cannot be
compared to any other university. I love studying French and seeing
my level of language and appreciation for French culture improve.
Although my year abroad was truly phenomenal, I am so glad to be
back in the ‘Bubble’, with lifelong friends, fantastic societies and a
positively hectic social calendar.”
98
Geography
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/gg
Geography
See also Earth Sciences page 86 and
Sustainable Development page 150
Degree options
MA or BSc (Single Honours Degree)
Geography
Field mapping in Norway
Joint Honours Degrees
Geography and one of:
Art History (MA)
Biology (BSc)
Comparative Literature (MA)
Economics (BSc or MA)
Film Studies (MA)
French (MA)W
Hebrew (MA)
International Relations (MA)
Italian (MA)W
Management (BSc or MA)
Mathematics (BSc)
Features
Mediaeval History (MA)
Middle East Studies (MA)
Modern History (MA)
Philosophy (MA)
Psychology (MA)
Scottish History (MA)
Social Anthropology (MA)
Spanish (MA)W
Statistics (BSc)
Theological Studies (MA)
“With” Degrees
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Geography with Persian (MA)
Geography with Social Anthropology (MA)
Geography with Spanish (MA)W
Mathematics with Geography (BSc)
Psychology with Geography (MA)
Russian with Geography (MA)W
Social Anthropology with Geography (MA)
Spanish with Geography (MA)W
W
T
[If you wish to study Arts subjects in your first and second years,
apply for the MA rather than the BSc degree.]
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Subject enquiries
Dr Charles Warren
E: [email protected]
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
*
Human Geography at St Andrews: top for student
satisfaction in the UK – 2013 and 2014 National Student
Survey.
Geography at St Andrews: third in the UK – Guardian
University Guide 2015.
Geography at St Andrews: top in Scotland for student
satisfaction – Complete University Guide 2015.
The School of Geography & Geosciences was top in Scotland
in UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
Externally acclaimed skills training in quantitative and
qualitative research methods.
Wide range of module choice spanning the full range of
Geography.
Particular strengths in:
– Climate change and environmental management
– Population, development and gender studies
– Quaternary (ice age) and glacial studies
– Cities and housing
– Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
Excellent laboratory, IT and field resources.
Fieldwork opportunities in all four years, both in Scotland
and overseas.
Highly literate and numerate graduates with excellent
employment prospects.
What will I study – BSc or MA?
At St Andrews you have the choice of either a BSc or MA
Geography degree, depending on your background and what
other subjects you want to study in your first two years, but both
programmes give you access to all our option modules across
the full breadth of geography.
We explore a fascinating range of important environmental
and international phenomena. These include: glaciers and
rivers; oceans and climate; drought and flooding; population
pressure and resource depletion; urbanisation, development
and geo-political conflict; and socio-spatial inequalities
(widening gaps in wealth, health and well-being). We bring such
concerns to life through the study of – and fieldwork in – many
parts of the world, both close to home and further afield, such
as Scandinavia, the Himalayas, South America, sub-Saharan
Africa and Southeast Asia. At all stages, we emphasise the
development of both discipline-specific and transferable skills:
field, laboratory, computing, analytical and presentational skills.
Above all, our degrees provide an exciting challenge to those
who wish to think critically and creatively about the world
around them, and understand the interaction of environmental
systems and human activity.
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99
NEW PROFILE - NEED PHOTO
Alex (Woking, Surrey, England)
First Year MA and BSc (1 x 20-credit module required)
Our first-year modules – Geography: Understanding our Changing
World and A World in Crisis? – stress the value of developing
an integrated, coherent vision of the world. The topics studied
include climate change, the current energy crisis, biodiversity
loss, food and famine, environmental migration, Third World
urbanisation, geo-political strife and technological change
(especially in the generation and handling of spatial data). Such
topics are used to emphasise that the study of society cannot be
separated from that of the environment.
Second Year MA and BSc (2 x 30-credit modules required)
Our second year modules – Geographical Processes and Change
and Processes, Perspectives and Ideas in Geography – build
on first year by exploring the rich and diverse nature of the
discipline of Geography, and prepare you for Honours study.
These modules provide both a conceptual and an applied
(methods-oriented) grounding in physical geography,
environmental geography and human geography. The
modules cover: earth surface processes; environmental
hazards and environmental management; diverse topics in
human geography; and Geographic Information Science (GIS)
and spatial data analysis.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years (1 x 60-credit core taught
module and 1 x 50-credit dissertation module required and
at least 3 other 20-credit modules required over 2 years)
We offer c.20-25 specialist option modules across the full
range of geography. The ‘menu’ evolves to reflect exciting new
research trends and the expertise of staff, but current modules
include:
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
• Glaciers and Glaciation
• Long Term Perspectives on Sustainability
• Migration and Transnationalism
• Housing, Community and Social-Spatial Justice
• HIV/AIDS in Africa
• Science, Society and Resource Management
• Global Climate Change
Scholarships
The MacIver Award is offered each year to support students
carrying out Geography fieldwork (other than for their
dissertation) during the summer vacation. The Dorothy
McKinney Awards support dissertation fieldwork in human
geography.
The Geography Honours programme provides advanced
and in-depth training in the essential field, laboratory,
observational and IT skills expected of geography graduates.
Core skills are developed in ‘hands-on’ modules giving
you direct experience of state-of-the-art data collection
and methods of analysis: statistical analysis; survey and
questionnaire design; scientific sampling and dating;
qualitative research methods (such as interviewing and
participatory approaches); GIS and remote sensing; advanced
statistical analysis; and field-based skills. Fieldwork is
conducted both locally and via residential overseas courses.
Recent locations have included Norway, the Pyrenees, Iceland
and Galway. The final semester of the Honours programme
is devoted to the preparation of a 12,000-word research
dissertation in which students use the intellectual and
practical skills that they have gained to study a problem of
their choosing.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 120 - 160, seminars and practical classes
20 - 30, fieldtrip 2 days (5 - 20), tutorials 8 - 10
Second Year: lectures 80 - 100, seminars and practical classes
15 - 20, fieldtrip1 day (10 - 15), tutorials 8 - 10
Honours: lectures 10 - 50, laboratories and seminars 10 - 50,
tutorials 1 - 5, dissertation – individual supervision
Honours modules blend skills training with subject-based
themes across the broad sweep of geography. You can choose
to specialise in human, environmental or physical geography.
Many of our students prefer to engage with the full, fascinating
breadth of the discipline. Rigorous training is given in a variety
of classroom, lab-based and field techniques and skills.
Assessment
All 1000- and 2000-level modules are assessed by at least 40%
coursework (individual and some group work; essays, written
reports on field and laboratory activities, class tests, multiple
choice assignments), and with the balance of assessment in
examinations (which can take various formats). At Honours level
about half of all credits taken are assessed by 100% coursework.
Most option modules include at least 40% assessed coursework,
and there is a wide range of assessment formats (not only essays
and exams, but also oral, poster and group presentations, and
web-based assignments).
Careers
Because of the broad nature of Geography, graduates leave
St Andrews with a diverse and unique combination of skills,
putting them in a very strong position in the jobs market. While
geography is closely associated with certain particular careers
(e.g. in the environmental sphere), and some graduates pursue
these very successfully, many others find that their geographical
training equips them with a valuable array of transferable skills
which open up a rich diversity of career opportunities. Many of
our students are also successful in competing for postgraduate
opportunities, both nationally and internationally, at both
Masters and PhD level.
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-geography-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
Geography
“The staff are very supportive and knowledgeable about an array
of topics covering every subject in geography. The skills gained are
useful in research and are guaranteed to be of benefit in the future.
Geography is an incredibly social department; you will quickly
get to know a lot of people through multiple fieldtrips in first year.
St Andrews is the perfect place to grow intellectually and pursue
extra-curricular ambitions, whilst meeting some pretty amazing
people from all walks of life.”
100
German
See also Modern Languages page 130
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/german
German
Degrees all available With or Without Integrated Year Abroad
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Düsseldorf
German
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
German and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Biblical StudiesT
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
French
International Relations
Italian
ManagementG
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern History
Persian
Philosophy
Psychology
Russian
Social Anthropology
Spanish
Theological Studies
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
With an A in the language(s) to be studied, unless the
applicant plans to study the language(s) at beginners’ level
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in the
language(s) to be studied, except those to be taken from
beginners’ level.
MA “With” Degree
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Economics with German
– German and two of Arabic, French, Italian, Persian, Russian,
Spanish
– German and (one of Arabic, French, Italian, Russian, Spanish)
and Comparative Literature
– Modern Languages (German and [one of Arabic, French,
Italian, Persian, RussianR E T, Spanish]) with one of Ancient
History R, EnglishE, International Relations, LatinB,
Management G T
– Modern Languages (German and [one of French, Italian,
Persian, Spanish]) with Greek (Ancient)
– Mediaeval Studies
G
R
E
B
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
MA (Honours Degrees) in
T
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Combinations including German and Management are only available to
non-beginners in German.
This combination is only available to non-beginners in Russian due to a
timetable clash.
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
Combinations including German and Latin are only available to
beginners in German.
Dr Christopher Beedham
E: [email protected]
Features
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German at St Andrews offers the full range of German
studies from the Middle Ages to the present.
We teach linguistics and area studies as well as literature,
and have strong links with Comparative Literature.
You can combine German with one or two other languages.
Joint Honours with subjects as diverse as English, History,
Management, Theology or Psychology are possible.
The degree comprises four years of in-depth study.
Our language courses cater for beginners and
post-A-Level/Higher students.
German skills are highly sought after by employers.
Resources
The School has a Multimedia Centre with the latest electronic
technology to enhance the learning and practice of oral and
aural skills.
What will I study?
We will help you to develop your intellectual and cultural
competence and to acquire communicative skills which will
be invaluable in your future career: the ability to analyse and
discuss critically, to present a reasoned argument, to write with
correct spelling, punctuation and grammar in both German and
English, and to use Information Technology. We aim to help you
to maximise your potential in practical language skills and, if you
take German as a main subject, to provide a broad education in
the literature and culture of German-speaking societies past and
present.
Return to Subjects
Rose (Holywood, County Down, Northern Ireland)
You are able to combine German with a wide range of other
language and non-language subjects. This is especially the
case in the Honours years, when you have scope to construct
your own programme of modules and to follow particular
interests in aspects of literature, linguistics and other forms of
German culture.
Department. It is particularly important that ex-beginners take a
study abroad period before entering Honours. The third option
to spend time abroad is in the third year of the degree course
(Junior Honours) as an exchange student at a university in
Germany or Austria. Our exchange partners are Bonn, Lüneburg
and Vienna.
Working towards a high level of competence in language skills
is a top priority in all modules at all levels.
Alternatively you may apply to study abroad under the
University’s St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
The Department offers two different types of module in first
year: intensive foundation courses for beginners and students
with National 5 / GCSE German, and advanced language and
literature courses for those with higher entrance qualifications.
The advanced course combines language and literature,
developing speaking and listening, reading and writing skills.
Students are introduced to linguistics and the techniques of
textual analysis. Texts studied include German short stories,
plays and poems from the Middle Ages to the present day.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
In second year there is a range of modules. Students coming from
first year beginners’ modules have their own intensive language
courses. Non-language elements are integrated at this level:
ex-beginners and ex-advanced students jointly extend their
studies of modern literature, mediaeval literature and linguistics.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(3 or 4 x 15-credit core modules required and at least 5 other
15-credit modules required over 2 years)
All students take the same core modules in German language,
including advanced oral, writing and communication skills. You
have scope to construct the rest of your module programme
by choosing from a wide variety of modules on aspects of
German literature, linguistics and culture from earlier periods
to the present day, and on German history and thought.
These modules reflect the individual research interests of staff
members and allow you to work at the frontiers of the subject.
Current Honours modules include:
•
•
•
•
•
The Nazi Past in German Cultural Memory
Shakespeare: The German Catalyst
Mediaeval Things
Language and Ideology in the GDR and West Germany from
1949-1989
Writing Nature: German Environmental Thought (1800-2000)
A dissertation module permits you to research and write about a
topic which particularly interests you.
Study abroad
Most students take the opportunity to spend a year working in
a German-speaking country, between second year and Junior
Honours (third) year. UK students often undertake teaching
placements in schools abroad through the British Council’s
Language Assistantship scheme. If teaching is not for you,
you may organise a work placement with the approval of the
First Year: lectures 30 - 60, seminars 15 - 20
Second Year: lectures 30 - 40, seminars 10 - 15
Honours: seminars 10 - 18
Language classes are in German. We aim to keep groups as small
as possible. In first and second years, literature and linguistics
courses are usually taught by a weekly lecture as well as weekly
tutorials (small group discussions). Honours seminars are more
formal than tutorials, often with prepared presentations by
students. Some Honours seminars are held in German, others
in English depending on the lecturer’s preferences. Active
participation in tutorial and seminar discussions is expected of
students at all levels.
Assessment
Our modules at all levels are assessed by 40% coursework
and 60% end-of-semester examination, with the exception
of dissertations and project modules. End-of-semester
examinations are either entirely in written format or comprise a
written and an oral component.
Scholarships
The Department will assist you in applying for summer vacation
scholarships and grants for longer periods of study in Germany
offered by the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst.
Careers
Graduates in German successfully compete for specialist
linguist posts as well as those which are open to all graduates,
regardless of degree subject, where high-level language
skills can confer a significant advantage. Our graduates enter
careers as translators, as German or TEFL teachers in Britain and
abroad, in European business and administration, in banking
and finance, export marketing, and the Civil Service. Others
do postgraduate training, e.g. in law, or undertake academic
research.
Some of our recent graduates have been placed in Ernst &
Young, Intercontinental Hotels Group, Procter and Gamble,
Aerosystems International, Lifeline Language Services, the
Fiscal Office, and the NHS. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-modlangs-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
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101
German
“A modern languages degree from St Andrews involves so much
more than just language learning. I have broadened my interests
by studying a wide variety of cultural modules ranging from East
German Cinema to Shakespeare’s literary influence. I was also lucky
enough to be given the opportunity to study abroad at the University
of Vienna during my third year. Many of the language societies are
well integrated into the School; with both staff and students getting
involved in events, for example, Oktoberfest.”
102
Greek
See also Ancient History page 54, Classical Studies page 68,
Classics page 70, Modern Languages page 130
Greek
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics
Degree options
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Greek and one of:
Classics
Greek
Ancient History
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Comparative Literature
English
FrenchW
South West corner of the Parthenon
Features
*
Hebrew
Modern History
Philosophy
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
*
*
Greek and two Modern Languages
Any combination of FrenchW, GermanW, ItalianW, SpanishW
is available
W
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
We strongly recommend that all applicants have a qualification
in a modern or ancient foreign language at National 5 / GCSE
level, or equivalent.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
*
*
Extensive language support for ex-beginners from our fulltime senior language tutor continues into second year and
Honours.
The study of literature and language is carefully integrated
and balanced throughout the programme, and set within a
framework of wider cultural understanding.
An extensive range of major authors and literary genres is
available.
Teaching in small groups assures that you get close
attention and individual help.
The School of Classics was rated first in Scotland and second
in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.
Facilities and resources
Classics is housed in Swallowgate, an attractive building
which overlooks the sea and is only a few yards away from
the University Library and the main quadrangle. There are
computing facilities in the building, seminar rooms and a wellstocked class library. Much of your work can thus be done in one
building.
What will I study?
For all students, beginners and non-beginners, first and second
year offer a carefully integrated package of complementary
work on both literature and language, while the two years of
Honours give you the opportunity to choose from a range of
author/genre-based courses, together with linguistic options.
Highlights include: Homeric epic (the foundational works of
European literature), lyric poetry, the emotionally powerful
plays of Greek tragedy, Attic comedy (both Aristophanes and
Menander), Greek historiography (especially Herodotus and
Thucydides), Greek Philosophy (especially Plato’s Socratic
dialogues), Greek rhetoric (speeches written for important
political debates and for forensic trials), the pastoral poetry
of Theocritus, and a series of still-undervalued Greek novels,
dialogues and speeches written under the Roman Empire.
Between them, these texts display a remarkable range of both
linguistic and imaginative fertility. They continue to fascinate
modern writers, artists and readers. Studying ancient Greek
provides an opportunity to get closer to the richness of this
body of writing and to gain insights into the world from which
it emerged.
Return to Subjects
Emily (Bristol, Avon, England)
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
We offer two streams of study. For beginners and those who
have studied a little Greek, we offer specifically designed
stand-alone modules covering Greek language and literature
from scratch. For those who have studied Greek at a higher
level, we offer more advanced study in language and literature
in integrated modules working with literary texts (by Plato,
Menander and the early Greek elegists) and linguistic/
translation exercises. Both groups study a speech written for a
sensational Athenian court case.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
In second year, ex-beginners and more advanced students
are brought together. The modules extend and refine your
knowledge of Greek literature and its background, covering
both prose and poetry from the Archaic to the Imperial period,
while continuing to incorporate progressive work on the Greek
language. By the end of second year, the ex-beginners have
sufficient background to enter the Honours programme along
with those who started with more advanced knowledge. If you
take 1000-level Greek in your second year, but have taken Latin
in your first two years, you can take special modules in your
third year and still complete an Honours degree in Greek.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
You choose further modules for more advanced study of
literature and language over the two Honours years. Whether
you choose Single or Joint Honours, we have an extensive range
of modules for you to choose from. We periodically change our
Honours offerings to reflect exciting new research trends and
findings but current modules available include:
• • • • • • • Greeks on Education
Greeks and Barbarians
Lies, History and Ideology
Greek Tragedy
Violence in Early Greek Poetry
Greek Rhetoric and its Representation
Greek Prose Composition
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 20 - 30, tutorials 10 - 15
Second Year: 10 - 30 with smaller groups for the weekly
language support class
Honours: seminars 10 - 20
Teaching in first and second year is conducted in small groups
for both set-text work and language classes. A similar pattern
is maintained, at a higher level of work, in the seminars and
tutorials of Honours courses.
Assessment
Assessment throughout the degree is generally 50% assessed
coursework and 50% by examination, taken at the end of the
semester. The final class of degree is based on marks awarded
over the last two years.
All Single Honours students write a dissertation in their fourth
year and this allows them to specialise in an area of their own
key interest.
Final year students may obtain teaching experience and
mentoring from teachers in local secondary schools.
Careers
Traditional Classical Greek courses have provided an entry to
a wide range of careers and positions since employers have
placed a premium on the combination of intellectual flexibility
and rigour of Greek graduates.
Students graduating with Classical Greek degrees typically do
well in the graduate employment market. Graduate destinations
include: financial services, the law, marketing and management,
civil and armed services, journalism, museums, galleries, and
libraries, teaching and further research and study. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-classics-careers
Honours modules in the School carry 30 credits, so you study
two modules each semester in Honours. Single Honours
students write a dissertation worth 30 credits in their fourth
year.
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Study abroad
As a student in the School of Classics you may be entitled
to apply to spend one or two semesters in the Netherlands
studying at the University of Leiden as part of our Erasmus+
exchange. You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews
Abroad programme. See also page 44.
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103
Greek
“My time at St Andrews has been the best of my life and the School of
Classics has been integral to my enjoyment of university life. The School is
not the largest in the University, allowing for an intimate atmosphere where
you can truly get to know your professors; the modules are all fascinating
and taught with such enthusiasm that it is impossible not to become
immersed in the classical world. I have particularly enjoyed having the
opportunity to study Greek for beginners and from this I have gained enough
confidence to study it at Honours level alongside my Latin.”
104
History – Ancient,
History
Mediaeval, Modern, Scottish
and Middle East Studies
Degree options
School of History
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/history
MA (Single Honours Degree)
History
Features
BA (International Honours Degree)
*
History (See page 43)
(See also Ancient History page 54
History – Mediaeval History page 106
History – Middle East Studies page 108
History – Modern History page 110
History – Scottish History page 112)
What will I study?
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB (normally including History)
GCE A-Levels: AAA (normally including History)
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in History
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No, but
experience in studying history to advanced secondary school
level is normally expected for applications to study History.
Subject enquiries
Dr Christine McGladdery
E: [email protected]
The School of History is listed as the Best in Scotland in The
Times and Sunday Times University Guide 2015, the Guardian
University Guide 2015 and The Complete University Guide
2015.
The integrated Single Honours degree in History is a flexible
programme combining elements from the range available
in Middle East Studies as well as Ancient, Mediaeval, Modern
and Scottish History. It allows you to access Honours modules
in all historical eras without chronological or geographical
constraint and to draw on the expertise of the widest possible
range of teaching staff.
The study of history – the recovery and analysis of the full
range of human activity over time – is as rewarding as it
is challenging. Past cultures and civilisations are worth
studying for their own sake, yet historical awareness enriches
contemporary experience by linking the present with the past,
thus explaining the origins of many of the world’s current
problems. They also help us to recognise that our own cultural
and social values are not the only (or even most natural or just)
ones that people have lived with.
As globalisation makes the world a smaller and more
homogenous place, history remains one of the few real fields
for exploration and anthropological research – and through
the study of history you can encounter new tribes and lost
kingdoms. Discovering these alien cultures will help you to
understand your own prejudices.
The study of history, therefore, involves acquiring the
intellectual know-how to evaluate varied kinds of evidence
and the skills necessary to interpret it and communicate its
significance to others.
The School of History at St Andrews has over 50 historians
on its staff and the wealth of expertise available means that
students with wide-ranging interests can study periods and
topics ranging from democracy in ancient Greece to gender in
twentieth-century America.
In the Research Excellence Framework 2014 History were
ranked top in Scotland and twelfth in the UK.
In addition to this degree, the School of History also offers
more specialised degrees in Mediaeval, Modern and Scottish
History which are described on the following pages.
Return to Subjects
“Studying History at St Andrews has been
fantastic. The range of modules on offer in
first and second year gives you the best chance
of finding out what you’re really interested in
and would like to pursue further. I also really
appreciate the freedom afforded to students at
Honours level to focus on their interests, and the
consistently impressive teaching.”
History
105
Alan (Edinburgh, Scotland)
First and Second Year (3 x 1000-level and 3 x 2000-level
modules required)
During the first two years of the Single Honours History degree,
you normally take eight History modules from the 1000- and
2000-level modules offered in Ancient, Mediaeval, Modern and
Scottish History and four non-history modules. Entry to the
Honours programme requires you to take at least two modules
in two out of three historical periods: the period before 500 CE,
the period 500-1500 CE, and the period after 1500.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
At Honours, again subject to the constraint that you must take
options in at least two of the three designated historical periods,
you may choose modules from the full range of Honours
courses in Ancient, Mediaeval, Modern, Scottish and Middle East
History. In your final year you will also write a research-based
dissertation and take a Special Subject (which is a year-long
module) designed to make full use of original source materials.
Within these general rules, there is scope to tailor a broadlybased degree, drawing on the wealth of expertise available at
St Andrews, that permits you to range widely over historical
time and space.
Study abroad
The School of History encourages you to take part in established
exchange programmes which allow you to study abroad for a
semester or a year in third year. You may apply to participate in
History’s exchange programmes, which currently include the
American University in Cairo and Rutgers, the State University of
New Jersey, as well as Erasmus+ exchanges with the universities
of Oslo, Leiden, Koc, Strasbourg and Bonn, and Trinity College
Dublin. You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews Abroad
programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 100 - 260, tutorials 6
Second Year: between 100 - 230, and tutorials 6
Honours: classes ~13
See the entries for degree programmes in Ancient History
page 54, Mediaeval History page 106, Modern History page
110, Scottish History page 112, and for Middle East Studies
page 108.
Assessment
All 1000- and 2000-level modules in the School of History are
assessed by an equal weighting of coursework and examination.
At Honours level, the weighting shifts and varies from 40%
coursework, 60% examination, to 100% coursework only. Some
examinations are unseen, others are seen in advance but are
more challenging.
Careers
The analytical and communication skills acquired and mastered
through the study of History are highly prized by a wide
range of employers and recent History graduates have found
employment in the service industries, law, the British Army, the
financial sector (Barclays Bank, Deloitte & Touche) arts and the
media (Sky TV, Pavilion Films), teaching – primary and secondary
as well as teaching English abroad (Japan and Africa), children’s
charities and academia.
Further information: http://bit.ly/sta-history-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
“The range of modules on offer is very, very impressive. In my
own particular area of expertise, Scottish history, it is arguably
the best provision anywhere; and there is a rich and varied
diet in other aspects of mediaeval history too, which few other
institutions can match.”
David Ditchburn
(External examiner, from Trinity College, Dublin)
Return to Subjects
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/history
History (Mediaeval)
106
History –
Mediaeval History
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
Department of Mediaeval History
History
Mediaeval History
Mediaeval History and Archaeology
Mediaeval Studies
Features
*
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Mediaeval History and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
International RelationsT
*
ItalianW
Latin
Mathematics
Middle East Studies
Persian
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Theological StudiesT
*
*
*
*
W
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages
page 130.
T
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to agreement
of the Chairman of Department or Head of School concerned.
MA “With” Degree
Honours in which two–thirds of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Mediaeval History with Persian
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB (normally including History)
GCE A-Levels: AAA (normally including History)
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in History
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No, but
experience in studying history to advanced secondary
school level is normally expected for applications to study
History.
Subject enquiries
Dr Christine McGladdery
E: [email protected]
A wider variety of subjects within Mediaeval History than
is offered in any other university.
Teaching by internationally-renowned staff who carry
out important research in their specialist areas.
A friendly community where there is a high degree of
commitment by staff and students.
Access to a wide variety of different literary and material
sources through which the mediaeval past can be
constructed and reimagined.
A specially designed degree in Mediaeval History and
Archaeology.
An opportunity to spend one or two semesters of
your Honours programme abroad – see Study abroad
opposite.
Interdisciplinary degrees
For the Mediaeval History and Archaeology degree you take
the core module Principles and Techniques in Archaeology in
your third year and then a selection from a list of approved
modules in archaeology and in the history of the period of
your choice. Candidates for this degree often attend the
Summer School at the British School of Rome, to which
St Andrews has the right to nominate at least one person each
year. One popular option within this degree is the chance to
write a dissertation on some subject of archaeological and
historical interest.
Mediaeval History is also a major contributor to the
interdisciplinary Mediaeval Studies degree which allows
you to combine modules focusing on mediaeval society and
culture taught in a number of different academic Schools,
including English, Modern Languages and Art History.
What will I study?
Studying Mediaeval History at St Andrews gives you a chance
to engage with surprisingly sophisticated modes of thought
and expression across mediaeval Europe and the Middle East
and grapple with complex historical issues. This will help you
obtain a clearer understanding of the background to the
present day. Whether you are, or become, interested in early
Islamic Iran or Britons and Saxons, mediaeval political thought
or queenship, the teachers of Mediaeval History at St Andrews
are committed to opening students’ minds to its many riches.
We provide an excellent training in the collecting and
evaluating of a wide variety of information and in constructing
powerful arguments, both verbal and written. These skills, as
well as the intellectual range demonstrated by the breadth
of subject areas you can cover in your degree, offer a strong
platform for embarking on the world of analytical work after
you graduate.
Return to Subjects
Lottie (Dawlish, Devon, England)
If you enjoy the study of the past, but want to try something
different from the history you have studied at school, you will
find Mediaeval History a stimulating and refreshing change.
If you are a linguist with an interest in the development of
language, then Mediaeval History would provide a useful
and informative background subject as a first- or second-year
module and might interest you enough to form part of a Joint
Honours degree.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
1000-level modules provide an introduction to the mediaeval
world, one exploring politics and society in the early
mediaeval period (c. 500 - c. 1100) across Britain, continental
Europe and the Near East, and a second examining
developments in the British Isles between 1100 and 1500.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
2000-level modules provide an analytical survey of the
history of Mediaeval Europe and an introduction to the
Middle East as well as a grounding in the major themes and
developments of history as a scholarly discipline and the study
of historiography. The critical examination of relevant primary
sources and study skills are built into the course.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
For Single Honours in third year, you take four semester-long
option modules which offer a wide range of specialist studies
within the history of Britain and the wider mediaeval world.
Each year we normally offer about 18 different modules
across both semesters, of which the following are a sample of
modules presently being taught:
• Britons and Saxons
• Women and Gender in the Later Middle Ages
• The Reconfiguration of the Middle East in the Seventh Century
• The Rise and Fall of the Carolingian Empire 750 - 900
• Mediaeval St Andrews
In fourth year you take one more Honours option, a
dissertation on a subject of your choice and a special
subject, which is a year-long Special Subject module. The
dissertation offers the opportunity for in-depth study and
extended writing. The Special Subject is the culmination of an
undergraduate’s historical studies and involves an exploration
of a wide variety of sources on a specific topic.
A range of the choices currently offered includes the following:
England and France at War in the Fourteenth Century
The Early Mendicants: Francis Clare and Dominic
(c.1180 - c.1270)
Henry I: Perception and Practice of Anglo-Norman Kingship
Conquest and Community: the British Isles in the Age of
Edward I (1239 - 1307)
• Crusaders, Mongols and Mamluks: West and East in the
Mid-thirteenth Century
•
•
•
•
Mediaeval History also combines very well with a whole range of
other subjects in Joint Honours degrees. You could, for example,
combine it with Art History and specialise in both the history
and art history of a particular period. You might choose to study
the historical background to a period of philosophy you find
fascinating. Looking at the roots of modern society might help
put contemporary psychology into context. The flexibility of the
Joint Honours degree means that you choose fewer modules in
each subject, but are able to sample a wider range of subjects.
Study abroad
The School of History encourages you to take part in
established exchange programmes which allow you to study
abroad for a semester or a year in third year. You may apply to
participate in History’s exchange programmes, which currently
include the American University in Cairo and Rutgers, the State
University of New Jersey, as well as Erasmus+ exchanges with
the universities of Oslo and Bonn, and Trinity College Dublin.
Mediaeval History and Mediaeval History and Archaeology
students have found the exchange with the University of Oslo
at the Centre for Viking and Medieval Studies particularly
beneficial. You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews
Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 120, tutorials 6
Second Year: lectures 100 - 120, tutorials 6
Honours: classes 14 at 3000 level, 6 at 4000 level
The first and second year classes meet for three lectures per
week. Each student is assigned a tutor who will see them in
a group of six for a one-hour tutorial per week. Including the
taught element, students are expected to do approximately 15
hours work per week (for sub-honours modules). Dissertations
are supervised individually. Including the taught element,
students are expected to do approximately 25 hours work per
week for each Honours module.
Assessment
All 1000- and 2000-level modules in the School of History are
assessed by an equal weighting of coursework and examination.
At Honours level, the weighting shifts and varies from 40%
coursework, 60% examination, to 100% coursework only. Some
modules have different examination arrangements.
Careers
Recent graduates have gone on to work in a great range of
professions: Inspector of Taxes for HMRC, Marketing Assistant
at the Barbican Centre, Customer Service Officer for NatWest
Bank, Development Officer for the Royal Zoological Society of
Scotland. For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-history-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
107
History (Mediaeval)
“ I had never studied Medieval History before coming to St Andrews
and took the first module to complement my Ancient History degree,
but now Medieval is quickly becoming a favourite of mine. The
course is so broad that there is always something to interest everyone,
there’s never a boring moment! The tutors are all so helpful, and their
passion for their subjects really shines through.”
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/history
History (Middle
East Studies)
108
History –
Middle East Studies
See also Arabic page 56
Degree options
Western façade of the late sixth-century church at Avan, in modern
Yerevan, Armenia.
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Middle East Studies and one of:
Arabic
Art History (European &
North American Art)
Classical Studies
Economics
English
Geography
GermanW
Hebrew
International Relations
W
Features
Management
Mediaeval History
Modern History
Modern Languages
(Arabic-Persian)
Persian
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
*
*
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages
page 130.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the higher entrance
requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB (normally including History)
GCE A-Levels: AAA (normally including History)
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in History
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
Dr Christine McGladdery
E: [email protected]
*
*
*
No need to have prior knowledge of Middle Eastern
History or languages to engage with and enjoy the
subject.
Available as a Joint Degree in combination with one of
many disciplines.
The modules offer a wide range of Middle Eastern topics,
defined both chronologically and culturally, in which
St Andrews excels.
You are able to specialise in the mediaeval or modern
periods, as well as having access to specific International
Relations Honours modules.
The modules offer depth of knowledge and understanding
of a region of outstanding importance in world affairs.
The opportunity to study the history of the Middle East
at an undergraduate level is a distinctive aspect of the
undergraduate programme at this university.
What will I study?
When you graduate in Middle East Studies you will have
received degree-level training in the history of the Middle East
extending across as much as fifteen hundred years. The School
of History possesses a unique concentration of specialists on
the history of the Middle East, from modern Iran and Algeria
back to the Ottoman and Safavid Empires; and of the Mongols
and Seljuks back through Byzantium to early mediaeval
Armenia and Sasanian Iran. This combination lends a very
interesting complexion to the range of Honours modules
available.
You progress to Honours in Middle East Studies from sub-honours
(1000- and 2000-level) modules in Mediaeval History and
Modern History and a compulsory 2000-level module in
Middle Eastern History. For entry to International Relations
Honours modules, which are part of the Middle East Studies
degree, you must have taken and passed the four sub-honours
International Relations modules (see International Relations
on page 114).
In order to qualify for a Joint Honours degree in Middle East
Studies, you will normally take one 1000-level History module
(either Mediaeval or Modern) and two 2000-level History
modules (one of which will be the compulsory Middle Eastern
History module).
Tenth-century Church of the Holy Cross on the island of Aghtamar in
Lake Van, eastern Turkey.
Return to Subjects
“I knew I wanted to study the languages and
history of the Near East when I entered
university, and the programme at St Andrews
soared beyond my expectations. The flexibility
of my degree allowed me to focus on the areas
I really loved, especially during my third year
abroad at the American University of Cairo.”
History (Middle
East Studies)
109
Maria (Glencoe, Illinois, USA)
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
Topics from which you can currently choose at Honours
include:
• The East Roman Empire in the Reign of Justinian 527 - 565
• The Formation of Islamic Iran: from the Arab Conquests to the
Seljuq Empire, 600 - 1200
• Eastern Approaches: Early Mediaeval Armenia c.500 - 750
• From Leo VI to Basil II: Byzantium in the Tenth Century
• The Mongols and the West
• The Crusades
• The Ottoman Empire from Mediaeval Anatolia to Suleyman
the Magnificent
• Nomadic Heritage and Persianate Culture: the Iranian World
from the Timurids to the Safavids (1370-1722)
• French Algeria (1830 - 1962)
• Modern Iran since 1834: Reform and Revolution
• Britain and Iran in the Modern Era
Study abroad
The School of History encourages you to take part in established
exchange programmes which allow you to study abroad for a
semester or a year in third year. As a Middle East Studies student,
you may apply to participate in History’s exchange programmes
with the American University in Cairo and Rutgers, the State
University of New Jersey, and the Erasmus+ exchange with
Trinity College Dublin. You may also apply to the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. Also see page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 120, tutorials 6
Second Year: lectures 100 - 120, tutorials 6
Honours: seminars ~ 14, Special Subject modules 6
Tutors advise you closely on the preparation of written work and
give individual assessments of your performance. Including the
taught element, you are expected to work for approximately
15 hours per week for each sub-honours module. In most
Honours seminars students may present prepared papers and
discussion of specific themes or issues is encouraged. This
may involve exploring different theoretical or methodological
approaches. In addition to single semester Honours modules,
in fourth-year several year-long modules in Middle East Studies
are available, allowing for in-depth study through primary
sources (in translation when necessary). Finally it is possible to
undertake an Honours dissertation with a Middle Eastern focus.
Including the taught element, students are expected to work for
approximately 25 hours per week for each Honours module.
Assessment
Assessed work will always comprise essays but may include
oral presentations or class tests as well. All 1000- and 2000-level
modules in the School of History are assessed by an equal
weighting of coursework and examination. At Honours level,
the weighting shifts and varies from 40% coursework, 60%
examination, to 100% coursework only.
Careers
Graduates in Middle East Studies go on to a wide range of
careers for which an arts degree is a recognised qualification.
For those who wish to make particular use of their Middle
Eastern expertise there are opportunities for work in
the Middle East with international agencies and welfare,
educational or missionary organisations. In the UK there
are careers in the diplomatic service or other specialist
government agencies, in Middle East related journalism,
lobbying, commerce, financial services and business
consultancy. Our graduates compete successfully for the
opportunities to continue their studies at higher degree level.
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-history-careers
Interior of a seventeenth-century mosque,
the Masjed-e Shah, Isfahan, Iran.
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/history
History (Modern)
110
History –
Modern History
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
School of History
History
Modern History
Features
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Modern History and one of:
Arabic
Art History
Classical StudiesX
Classics
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
Greek
International Relations
*
ItalianW
Latin
Management
Mathematics
Middle East Studies
New Testament
Persian
Philosophy
PsychologyT
RussianW
Social AnthropologyT
SpanishWT
Theological Studies
*
*
*
*
W
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages
page 130.
T
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to agreement
of the Chairman of Department or Head of School concerned.
X Due to a timetable clash, students taking this degree will take Ancient
History, Latin or Greek modules in their first year, and Classical Studies in
their second. Contact the School of Classics for further information.
MA “With” Degree
Honours in which two–thirds of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Modern History with Persian
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB (normally including History)
GCE A-Levels: AAA (normally including History)
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in History
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I require previous knowledge of this subject? – No, but
experience in studying history to advanced secondary school
level is normally expected for applications to study History.
Subject enquiries
Dr Christine McGladdery
E: [email protected]
Small group teaching and individual attention from
historians actively engaged in research and publication.
A friendly and collegial community which makes it easy to
get to know other students and staff.
Choose from a wide variety of optional modules in your third
and fourth years: about 50 options are available each year.
Great flexibility: you can range as widely as you like, from
the fifteenth to the twenty-first century, studying British,
European, Middle Eastern, South Asian, East Asian, West
African or American history.
A variety of different approaches can be pursued: political,
military, cultural, religious, intellectual, scientific, gender,
social and economic history are all on offer.
What will I study?
History at university level is not concerned exclusively with what
happened in the past but rather with the analysis of events
from a present day context. Facts per se are elusive and open
to dispute. Historians instead collect and analyse evidence.
Because new evidence is unearthed and the interpretation
of it is determined by one’s perspective, ‘history’ is constantly
changing. Thus, the study of history reveals as much about the
present as it does about the past.
Modern historians in the School of History at St Andrews
participate in a range of teaching for undergraduate students
covering the period from the Renaissance (the mid-fifteenth
century) to the present day. A wide selection of modules is
offered at four levels. The 1000- and 2000-level modules are
designed not only to serve as an introduction to the various
areas of Modern History offered in the subsequent Honours
programme but also to cater for the needs of students who
do not intend to proceed with Modern History beyond the
first or second year. At Honours, the third and fourth years, the
emphasis is on providing you with the widest possible choice for
specialisation in terms of subject matter and geographical area.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
1000-level modules are devoted to the study of the early
modern western world from c.1450 to the present day. Their
main themes are the Reformation, the development of modern
states, war and the growth and contraction of empire, but
also intellectual, social and economic change. The critical
examination of relevant primary sources and study skills are
built into the coursework.
Return to Subjects
“The Modern History degree programme at St Andrews is truly
brilliant. Broad and thematic overviews in the first two years
provide a solid foundation for fascinating and diverse pathways of
study at Honours level. Here, you’re not just a student, learning
by rote; you’re invited to join a dynamic and fast-moving world of
historical scholarship, with some of the most distinguished – and most
welcoming – practitioners in the field today.”
History (Modern)
111
Taylor (Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex, England)
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
2000-level modules provide an analytical survey of the
history of Scotland, Britain and the British Empire as well as a
grounding in the major themes and developments of history as
a scholarly discipline and the study of historiography. The critical
examination of relevant primary sources and study skills are
built into the coursework.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
In third year, you will usually select four from 3000-level
Honours modules. The exact modules in any given year will
vary, depending on staff availability, but each year a range of
approximately 50 to 60 Honours options modules , which offer
specialised studies within the general area of British, American,
European, East Asian, South Asian and Middle Eastern history.
These may be period options: (e.g. Kaiser Wilhelm II, or Heavenly
Decade: The 1960s), or they may be thematic options (e.g.
Disease and Environment, 1500-2000, or Art and Piety in Western
Europe, 1400-1700).
In fourth year, you will take one more Honours option (a
one-semester module), a dissertation or project, and a Special
Subject (a two-semester, final year module). The dissertation
or project offers the opportunity for intensive research on a
topic of your choice. The Special Subject is the culmination
of undergraduate historical studies and involves an in-depth
exploration of documentary sources on a specific topic. A
wide range of choices is offered, from The Catholic Reformation
1414-1650 to Britain and Iran in the Modern Era.
Study abroad
The School of History encourages you to take part in
established exchange programmes which allow you to study
abroad for a semester or a year in third year. You may apply to
participate in History’s exchange programmes, which currently
include the American University in Cairo and Rutgers, the State
University of New Jersey, as well as Erasmus+ exchanges with
the universities of Leiden, Strasbourg and Bonn, and Trinity
College Dublin. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 100 - 200, tutorials 6
Second Year: lectures 100 - 200, tutorials 6
Honours: seminars ~ 13, Special Subject modules 7
Honours dissertations are supervised individually or projects
in groups of no more than seven students.
Assessment
All 1000- and 2000-level modules in the School of History
are assessed by an equal weighting of coursework and
examination. At Honours level, the weighting shifts and varies
from 40% coursework, 60% examination, to 100% coursework
only. Some examinations are unseen, others are seen in
advance but are more challenging.
Careers
The study of Modern History produces men and women
with well-trained, critical minds and good oral and written
communication skills. This makes our graduates attractive
to a wide range of employers who understand that the
St Andrews Modern History graduate is a person of unique
ability.
In the last couple of years our graduates have gone
to the Justice Department of the Scottish Executive,
Telegraph Publishing Ltd., Radio Lynx, the International
Council for Educational Exchange in New York, Goldman
Sachs, Scottish & Newcastle Brewery, the Abernethy Trust
School of Adventure Leadership, the RAF, Zenith Media, a
Magistrates Court (as employee not participant!) to name
but a few. Many of our graduates also go on to do further
research in Modern History. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-history-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
“St Andrews’ historic tradition is particularly attractive to me as I am
studying History, but it would enhance the life of any student here.”
Caroline
(Dundee, Scotland)
Return to Subjects
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/history
History (Scottish)
112
History –
Scottish History
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
St Andrews Castle
History
Scottish History
Features
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Scottish History and one of:
Classical Studies
English
Film Studies
Geography
International Relations
ItalianW
W
*
Mathematics
Philosophy
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages
page 130.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB (normally including History)
GCE A-Levels: AAA (normally including History)
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in History
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No, but
experience in studying history to advanced secondary school
level is normally expected for applications to study History.
Subject enquiries
Dr Christine McGladdery
E: [email protected]
We are a small and friendly group of Scottish historians
who publish extensively and continue to make a major
contribution to the development of Scottish History,
providing you with an intellectually rigorous environment
for study.
* Teaching in Scottish History at St Andrews encompasses
a wide chronological coverage of periods from the Dark
Ages to Modern Scotland.
* Thematic approaches include the exploration of
issues such as invasions, rivalries, lordship, tyranny,
Enlightenment, social problems and culture, past and
present.
What will I study?
St Andrews has a unique place in Scottish History. Not only is it
home to Scotland’s oldest university, founded in 1413, but it has
been a seat of learning and burial place of kings since the eighth
century. From the tenth to the seventeenth century it was also
the ecclesiastical capital of the country. Where better to study
Scottish History?
Having decided to study in Scotland, getting a grounding in
the history of the country will add breadth and depth to your
university experience, whatever degree you decide to pursue.
Studying Scottish History, even if only for a year or two, will
give you a fascinating background and context for your
studies here.
Scottish historians within the School of History run a full
degree programme that provides chronological coverage from
antiquity to the present day. The issues of nation building,
loss of sovereignty, the tensions between core and periphery,
and the reclamation of nationhood, are aspects of Scotland’s
historical development which form the core issues of relevant
sub-honours teaching.
The modules assume no prior knowledge of Scottish History
and form an ideal introduction to an understanding of
Scotland’s unique historical development and place in the
wider world. More specialist modules are available in third and
fourth years to suitably qualified students. They deal with a
wide range of periods and issues including the early relations
of the Picts and Scots, the Viking attacks and settlement, the
Wars of Independence, late mediaeval kingship, the union of
the Anglo-Scottish crowns and parliaments, Scottish soldiers
and merchants abroad, the eighteenth-century Enlightenment
and the various socio-economic problems of modern
Scotland.
St Rule’s Tower, St Andrews
Return to Subjects
James (Abington, Pennsylvania, USA)
The sub-honours modules form a clear path of historical
progression. The two modules are designed to foster the
development of critical skills and place a growing emphasis
on the interrogation of primary sources and the use of primary
sources in essays and tutorial exercises. In third and fourth
years modules are more clearly defined by the use of primary
sources both in seminars and in essay work. The requirement
to write a dissertation in fourth year (in your final year) creates
the opportunity for independent research and study.
First and Second Years (2 x 20-credit core modules
required, + 2 further 20-credit History modules)
Scottish History offers two sub-honours modules, Scotland
and the English Empire 1070 - 1500, and Scotland, Britain and
Empire, 1500 - 2000. The first of these modules examines the
development of Scotland as an independent kingdom and
nation during the Middle Ages. The second considers the
regnal and then the parliamentary unions with England,
showing how Scotland preserved its national identity while
becoming part of Great Britain. Both modules deal with a
variety of themes – economic, social and political – that
have fundamentally shaped modern Scottish society. Taken
together they provide a valuable insight into ongoing tensions
within the Union and the nature of modern Scottish identity.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
There are a variety of modules covering a wide chronological
spread, which may change according to staff availability. The
following are a representative sample of 3000-level modules:
• • • • • • • • Mediaeval St Andrews
Constructing Identities: Scottish Historians and the Past
British Culture in the Eighteenth Century
Kingship and Tyranny: Scotland in the Age of Reform
1513 - 1603
Culture and Society in Renaissance Scotland
The Castle in Mediaeval Scotland (1100 - 1500)
Age of Conquest: Edward I - Scotland and Wales (1239 - 1307)
End of the Middle Ages? Scotland and England in the
Fifteenth Century
Fourth year (4000-level) year-long modules may include:
• Work and Politics in Modern Scotland
• The Wars of the Bruces: Kings, Nobles and Communities in the
British Isles (1306-1346)
• The Scottish Enlightenment
• The Marian Moment: Politics and Ideology in
Mary Stewart’s Britain
• Chivalry and Kingship: Scotland In the Later Middle Ages
Study abroad
For information on study abroad programmes, see page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 100 - 120, tutorials 6
Second Year: lectures 100 - 120, tutorials 6
Honours Third Year: 10 - 15
Honours Fourth Year: 6
First and second year modules are taught via three weekly
lectures and a weekly tutorial meeting. For this, students
are expected to prepare for presentation and discussion
with a member of staff in groups of six. Including the taught
element, students are expected to do approximately 15
hours work per week for sub-honours modules. In Honours,
teaching is conducted in weekly two-hour seminars. These
involve students in analysis and debate based on detailed
preparation carried out prior to each meeting. Including the
taught element, students are expected to do approximately 25
hours work per week for each Honours module. Some of the
3000-level modules will involve fieldtrips.
Assessment
All 1000- and 2000-level modules in the School of History are
assessed by an equal weighting of coursework and examination.
At Honours level, the weighting normally shifts and varies from
40% coursework, 60% examination, to 100% coursework only.
Careers
Recent Scottish History graduates have found employment
in financial services, social work and education. One has
gone on to be a Monument Steward for Historic Scotland,
another to become a management trainee in the insurance
sector, and another to pursue further training in journalism.
Some have chosen to continue with vocational training
in areas such as museum and galleries studies and
librarianship, while others have pursued doctoral research in
History. The establishment of a parliament for Scotland has
enhanced employment prospects among graduates with a
degree in Scottish History. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-history-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
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113
History (Scottish)
“I was not intending to study Scottish History, but after one class I
was captivated. Nothing can compare to the experience of studying in
such a beautiful and ancient seaside town so steeped in the religious,
political and educational history of this nation. Being taught by
leading experts with such a passion for their subject – I don’t think I
could be happier studying anything else.”
114
International
Relations
International
Relations
See also Modern Languages page 130
Degree options
School of International Relations
MA (Single Honours Degree)
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/intrel
International Relations
•
BA (International Honours Degree)
Access to 1000-level modules in International Relations
is restricted. Only first year undergraduate students from
the Faculties of Arts and Divinity meeting the Faculty
Entrance Requirements as outlined on page 51 or
meeting the Entrance Requirements as outlined above
are allowed to take them. Check the International
Relations webpages for more details on overseas
entrance requirements. More information is available at
Advising.
International Relations (See page 43)
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
International Relations and one of:
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Comparative Literature
Economics
Film Studies
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
ItalianW
Management
Mathematics
Mediaeval HistoryT
Middle East Studies
Modern History
Persian
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianW
Scottish History
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Theological StudiesT
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of the subject? – No
Subject enquiries
Dr Ian Taylor
E: [email protected]
International Relations and two Modern Languages
Any combination of Arabic, FrenchW, GermanW, ItalianW,
Persian, Russian,W SpanishW is available.
Features
MA “With” Degree
Honours in which two–thirds of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
*
International Relations with Persian
W
T
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
*
*
*
*
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38
SAT1: 1950+*, SAT Subject Tests: 700+*, AP Tests: 5*
*
Our School of International Relations is the only one of
its kind in Scotland and one of the few universities in the
UK that offers a Single Honours degree in the subject.
(International Relations is usually incorporated in Schools
of Politics elsewhere.)
Our School has an established international reputation for
its high quality teaching and research.
We specialise in international security, peace and conflict
studies, terrorism studies, international institutions,
international theory and regional studies.
We provide extra-curricular opportunities including
internships in School research centres and outreach
programmes in the local community.
Prizes are awarded to outstanding graduating students
as well as for the best essay written in each year of
undergraduate study.
Our School attracts students from many countries and
backgrounds.
* For more specific detail see the International Relations webpages.
Please note:
• Obtaining these grades may not guarantee you a place.
• We consider all aspects of every application, including
the Personal Statement.
• Remember to confirm that you also meet the Faculty
Entrance Requirements. Information on these and other
qualifications on page 51.
• Each year the University receives many more
applications for a degree in International Relations
than there are places. If you wish to study International
Relations here, ensure that you indicate this on the UCAS
form.
Facilities and resources
The School is located in the historic heart of the town in a
building opened in 2006.
The School is of a size that allows us to teach the common
core of our discipline whilst offering substantial choice and
specialisation in the Honours programme. We are a large and
diverse School, but we strive to offer you the small size of
tutorial group and attention of staff which are so much part of
the St Andrews tradition.
Our School has an enviable reputation for the quality and
variety of students enrolling in its courses.
Return to Subjects
Maxime (France and South Africa)
What will I study?
The study of International Relations is theoretically challenging
whilst having a very practical purpose. How should we
understand the world and how should we act in it? Some of
the issues explored when pursuing a degree in International
Relations are raised in Higher, A-Level and other courses
particularly in Modern Studies, Politics, History and Geography.
We require students to have high academic qualifications, a firm
interest in International Relations, broad intellectual interests
in related areas (such as history, politics, moral philosophy and
modern languages), and an enthusiasm for critical engagement
with ideas old and new.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Introduction to International Relations provides you with some
of the basic theoretical approaches and concepts including
realism, liberalism, sovereignty, statehood, power, nationalism
and globalisation. These theories and concepts are related
to international conflict, attempts to create a more peaceful
international order, and the problems of a globalising world.
Foreign Policy Analysis and International Security looks at the way
states make their foreign policy and the importance of security
to this process. Factors that shape individual states’ conduct of
foreign policy are explored including the role of public opinion,
the media, culture, economics, domestic political arrangements,
constitutional structures, international law and diplomacy. Case
studies can include the US, China, UK, EU as well as countries in
the developing world.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Theoretical Approaches to International Relations provides an
overview of the main theoretical approaches in International
Relations, from liberalism and realism; through constructivism
and the English School, to radical Marxist and neo-Marxist
perspectives as well as feminism, postmodernism and
postcolonialism. The objective of the module is to critique and
compare the assumptions and values which underlie each
theory to allow you to enhance your critical understanding of
International Relations.
Issues in International Relations explores how theoretical
approaches to International Relations relate to issues that
confront those engaged in global politics. Issues covered
include terrorism and asymmetric warfare, weapons of mass
destruction, ‘new wars’, humanitarian intervention, human
rights, religion, aid and development, environmental politics
and regionalism.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
Students who successfully attain the standard required for entry
to Honours can choose from a range of modules. If you are
taking Joint Honours, you will choose four 30-credit modules
and if you are taking Single Honours, you will choose six
30-credit modules and a year-long dissertation.
Modules offered at Honours include those relating to the
following subjects:
• • • • • • • • • • • Conflict and Conflict Resolution
Human Rights
International Security
Globalisation
International Political Theory
International Law
International Organisations
Gender
Terrorism
Foreign Policy
Comparative Politics including Africa, Middle East,
China, Central and East Asia
Study abroad
We offer a variety of programmes for Honours students seeking
to spend one semester or a full year studying overseas. You
may apply to participate in the School’s exchange programmes,
which currently include the University of Hong Kong and
Renmin University of China, as well as Erasmus+ exchanges with
the universities of Hamburg, Tübingen, Iceland and Sciences Po
in Paris. You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews Abroad
programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures ~ 365, tutorials 10 - 15
Second Year: lectures ~ 280, tutorials 10 - 12
Honours: lectures 20 - 30, tutorials 8 - 12
The staff in the School of International Relations are highly
active researchers and ‘research-led teaching’ brings to the
classroom the fruits of current research. You will have three
lectures per week in first year which decreases to one lecture per
module per week at Honours. One weekly tutorial is also given
to discuss material covered in lectures.
Assessment
Almost all our modules are assessed by an equal balance of
coursework and written examinations.
Careers
Our graduates go on to a very diverse range of careers. Recent
graduates are working as a policy researcher at Reid-Howe
Associates; as journalists with The Scotsman and BBC; an intern
at the East-West Institute; a fiscal officer for the Crown Office &
Fiscal Service; the armed forces; public affairs consultant with
Fleishman-Hillard; a UNESCO researcher; project administrator
with the United Nations Association; and for the Royal Bank
of Scotland as a corporate banking graduate entrant. Many
of our graduates also continue in higher education pursuing
postgraduate and doctoral qualifications. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-ir-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
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115
International
Relations
“International Relations fascinates me and this is the case for the
majority of the student body. Learning in such a diverse environment
is invaluable. Our variety of opinions and cultural perspectives
makes studying IR very fulfilling. Also, being taught and interacting
with intellectuals who impact their field of study is fascinating
and motivating. The diversity of modules taught by those experts
continuously fuels our passion.”
116
Italian
See also Modern Languages page 130
Degrees all available With or Without Integrated Year Abroad
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/italian
Italian
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Italian
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Italian and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Classics
Comparative
Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
French
Geography
German
International Relations
Latin
Management
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Subject enquiries
Modern History
Persian
Philosophy
Psychology
Russian
Scottish History
Social Anthropology
Spanish
– Italian and two of Arabic, French, German, Persian, Russian,
Spanish
– Italian and (one of Arabic, French, German, Russian, Spanish)
and Comparative Literature
– Modern Languages (Italian and [one of Arabic, French,
GermanB G, Persian, RussianR E T, Spanish]) and one of
Ancient HistoryR, EnglishE, International Relations, LatinB,
ManagementG T
– Modern Languages (Italian and [one of Arabic, French,
Persian, Russian, SpanishS]) and Classical StudiesS
– Modern Languages (Italian and [one of French, German,
Spanish]) and Greek (Ancient)
– Mediaeval Studies
G
R
E
T
S
Combinations including German and Latin are only available to
beginners in German.
Combinations including German and Greek or Management are only
available to non-beginners in German.
This combination is only available to non-beginners in Russian due to a
timetable clash.
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Combinations including Classical Studies and Spanish are only available
to beginners in Spanish.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
With an A in the language(s) to be studied, unless the
applicant plans to study the language(s) at beginners’ level.
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in the
language(s) to be studied, except those to be taken from
beginners’ level.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Features
*
*
*
MA (Honours Degrees) in
B
Professor Derek Duncan
E: [email protected]
*
*
Strong focus on language learning at all levels of the
degree programme.
Culture courses on topics from the Middle Ages to the
present day.
Honours modules based on areas of staff research
expertise.
Enhance your skills of critical and literary analysis.
Excellent opportunities to study and work in Italy.
Facilities and resources
The School has a Multimedia Centre with the latest digital
technology to enhance the language learning experience and
to practice oral and aural skills.
What will I study?
The Italian Department in St Andrews is one of the newest
in the UK, but in a short time has gained an excellent
reputation for the quality and range of its teaching,
and the high calibre of its graduates. Other Schools and
Departments in the University have a strong interest in
Italian Art, History, Politics, and Cinema making St Andrews
an ideal place in which to develop a full understanding of
Italian culture.
We strongly believe in the value of cultural understanding and
of communication skills, and therefore foster them at every
stage of our programme. We help you achieve your potential
promoting independent thinking, cultivating analytical and
critical skills, and encouraging intellectual development. At
the same time we maintain a close focus on linguistic and
academic achievement.
The building of a high level of competence in language skills
is a priority in all modules, and you will be expected to write
using correct spelling, grammar and punctuation in both
Italian and English.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required or 4 x 10-credit
modules, depending on entry qualifications)
The majority of our students begin their study of Italian here
with no previous experience of the language. Italian has
two pathways: one for complete beginners, one for students
with some prior qualification such as a Higher or A-Level. The
modules for beginners provide an intensive language-learning
experience. The post-Higher/A-Level programme consists of
language modules, consolidating and developing your existing
knowledge, and additional modules on different aspects of
Italian culture.
Return to Subjects
Jade (Manchester, England)
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Second year brings both first-year pathways together, devoting
three hours per week to the advanced study of the language and
two hours per week to culture. You will read Dante’s Inferno, and
will explore modern Italian culture through literature and film.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
Language study continues throughout the two Honours
years, improving your language skills with an emphasis on
the production of a high level of written and spoken Italian. In
addition to the compulsory language modules, Italian Language
1 & 2 and Communication Skills 1 & 2, you will be able to build
your Honours programme by choosing from a broad range of
specialised modules on a variety of topics.
• • • • • • • • • 117
Italian
“I feel privileged to have been taught by staff who are not only experts
in their field, but are also extremely approachable. This is something
which I can’t stress enough about the Italian Department. The
curriculum is also enriching and varied. Whilst of course learning
Italian is primarily about gaining language skills, here at St Andrews,
I have also learned a lot about Italian culture, politics, history and
literature through studying the language.”
Fourteenth-Century Literature
Dante Alighieri
The Language and Literature of Renaissance Italy
Contemporary Italian Women Writers
Primo Levi
Migration and Transcultuality in New Italian Narratives
Authority and Subversion in Renaissance Italy
Fascism and Film
The Twentieth-Century Italian Novel
Assessment
We use a variety of methods of assessment to test language
skills and skills of cultural analysis. These include formal
examinations, oral presentations, and writing projects of
various sorts. All modules contain some element of assessed
coursework.
Careers
Recent graduates in Italian are now working in a variety of jobs
both in the UK and in Italy. Some are working in companies
where their role makes full use of their language skills. Some
are working as teachers of modern languages in the UK, or
English abroad. Others have taken further training or conversion
courses to prepare for careers in translating and interpreting, or
careers in law or commerce. Some are utilising their analytical
and language skills in civil service positions in the Foreign Office
and GCHQ whilst others are working in international Art Houses.
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-modlangs-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Study abroad
Many students take the opportunity to spend a year working
in an Italian-speaking country, between second year and
Junior Honours (third) year. UK students often undertake
teaching placements in schools abroad through the British
Council’s Language Assistantship scheme. Alternatively, you
may organise your own work placement with the approval of
the Department. You may also apply to spend the third year
of the degree programme (Junior Honours) as an Erasmus+
exchange student at a partner university in Italy, taking regular
courses in Italian and, as appropriate, in the other Honours
subject(s). You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews
Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures ~100, language tutorials and practical classes
in groups of 12 - 15
Second Year: lectures ~ 40, language tutorials and practical
classes in groups of 10 - 12
Honours: language tutorials and practical classes in groups
10 - 15, lectures and seminars in groups of 10 - 15
Teaching is carried out in a variety of modes, including formal
lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical oral classes, and is
supported at all levels by a range of computer- and web-based
aids and activities, some specifically developed by the Italian
Department here in St Andrews. Language teaching at all levels
in Italian takes place in relatively small groups, giving us the
opportunity to closely monitor your progress in all four key
language skills.
Venice: Erasmus+ Exchange Partner
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118
Latin
See also Ancient History page 54, Classical Studies page 68,
Classics page 70, Modern Languages page 130
Latin
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics
Degree options
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Latin and one of:
Latin
Classics
Ancient History
Arabic
Classical Studies
Comparative Literature
English
FrenchW
ItalianW
Mathematics
School of Classics
Features
*
Mediaeval History
Modern History
Philosophy
RussianW
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
*
*
*
Latin and two Modern Languages
Any combination of Arabic, FrenchW, GermanW B, ItalianW,
Persian, RussianW, SpanishW is available
W
B
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Combinations including German and Latin are only available to
beginners in German.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
We strongly recommend that all applicants have a qualification
in a modern or ancient foreign language at National 5 / GCSE
level, or equivalent.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of the subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
*
*
Excellent linguistic training in the skills of reading and
understanding Latin literature.
Extensive language support for ex-beginners provided by
our full-time senior language tutor.
Strong grounding in Latin literature combined with an
awareness of the wider cultural context.
Wide choice of subjects and approaches in Honours,
with specialist teaching by scholars with international
professional reputations.
Wide choice of complementary courses from other Schools
and Departments in the University, such as English,
Mediaeval History, Philosophy, or Modern Languages, that
may be incorporated within a Latin degree.
The School of Classics was rated first in Scotland and second
in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.
Facilities and resources
Classics is housed in Swallowgate, an attractive building
which overlooks the sea and is only a few yards away from
the University Library and the main quadrangle. There are
computing facilities in the building, seminar rooms and a wellstocked class library. Much of your work can thus be done in one
building.
What will I study?
The study of Latin language and literature is fascinating and
rewarding. The Latin-speaking world of Classical and Mediaeval
times is a significant foundation of our modern Western world
and Latin is the ancestor of French and Spanish and the other
Romance languages. Study of Latin for a long or short period
results in increased linguistic sensitivity and the ability to
process with an appropriately critical eye complex rhetorical
and figurative discourses at stake in our everyday interactions,
whether in print media, social media or live settings.
Over a third of the students enrolled in the Faculty of Arts take a
classical subject at some stage in their degree programme. You
can choose Latin in your first year as one of your three subjects,
even if you have never studied it before. Although you may
study it for just for one semester or for a year, many who did not
intend to take a degree in Latin discover its appeal and continue
through to the second year and on to Honours.
Return to Subjects
“The Latin Department is open and flexible and
the staff are always accessible and willing to
help. They allow us to study new and different
texts and ensure the classes are interesting and
involving.”
119
Latin
Hector (Burgess Hill, West Sussex, England)
Two 1000-level Latin modules are offered, one for students who
have not studied it before, or have taken it at a lower level. The
other module is for those who have studied Latin at a higher
level. In the first two years you study a wide range of Latin texts,
gaining the confidence and skills to read independently. In the
third and fourth year you choose options reflecting your own
special interests.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
With Elementary Latin 1 & 2 beginners will, by the end of the year,
have studied some Latin literature in the original and will have
the basic skills to translate real Latin texts. The World of Latin
1 & 2 modules give more advanced students the opportunity
to build their skill and confidence at reading extended Latin
texts independently and to broaden their knowledge of Latin
literature and culture. Two Latin works, one prose and one verse,
are studied in each of the two semesters, alongside an ongoing
programme of linguistic and literary critical consolidation. All
students attend language support classes offered.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
The second year is adapted to students at several levels of
attainment in Latin. Students who have progressed from the
non-beginners’ stream take modules designed to further their
ability to read and appreciate Latin texts for themselves. Texts
studied are chosen from the classical age of late Republican/
early Imperial literature but typically include authors and
genres not previously studied. The modules Latin in Progress
1 & 2 are designed to enable ex-beginners to read and
appreciate Latin at a comparable level to those who have
studied it before. Students team up with their counterparts
from the advanced 2000-level module to study a selection of
texts from the classical age of late Republican/early Imperial
literature, but continue to be given extra language support
classes in a group of their own.
If you take 1000-level Latin in your second year, but have
taken Greek in your first two years, you can take special
modules in your third year and still complete an Honours
degree in Latin.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
In Honours 30-credit options may include Roman Epic, Latin
Philosophical Writing, Latin Historical Writing, Latin Didactic
Poetry, Latin Letters, Latin Prose Composition, Roman Satire,
Senecan Tragedy and Late Latin, and others. You may offer
a 10,000-word dissertation as the equivalent of a 30-credit
module.
There is a wide choice of other modules to complement Latin
studies in all years, not only within Classics but also in other
Schools.
Study abroad
As a student in the School of Classics you may be entitled
to apply to spend one or two semesters in the Netherlands
studying at the University of Leiden as part of our Erasmus+
exchange. You may also apply to the University’s St Andrews
Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures ~30, tutorials ~10
Second Year: lectures ~25-30, tutorials ~ 8-10
Honours: seminars ~18
First Year
Beginners have four classes each week and students following
the advanced programme have two weekly lectures/classes
plus one small weekly group tutorial. There is, in addition, one
language-support tutorial per week.
Second Year
Typically two lectures/classes per week plus one tutorial.
Ex-beginners have one additional language tutorial per week.
Honours (Third and Fourth Year)
A combination of lectures, seminars, and classes, often in
small groups, with increasing emphasis on students’ own
contribution.
Assessment
Assessment throughout the degree is determined by assessed
coursework and examination, taken at the end of the semester;
splits vary between 60/40, 50/50 and 40/60. The final class of
degree is based on marks awarded over the last two years.
All Single Honours students write a dissertation in their fourth
year and this allows them to specialise in an area of their own
key interest.
Final year students may obtain teaching experience and
mentoring from teachers in local secondary schools.
Careers
Recent graduates who have studied Latin in Honours have
moved into careers in law, museums work, journalism,
teaching, finance, industry and applied computing; some
have gone on to further study of the subject. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-classics-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
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120
Management
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management
Management
See also Modern Languages page 130
Degree options
Single Honours Degrees
Management (MA or BSc)
Management Science (BSc)
The Gateway, School of Management
Joint Honours Degrees
Management and one of:
Arabic (MA)
Art History (MA)
Classics (MA)
Comparative Literature (MA)
Computer Science (BSc)
Economics (MA or BSc)
English (MA)
FrenchW (MA)
Geography (MA or BSc)
GermanW G (MA)
Features
International Relations (MA)
ItalianW (MA)
Middle East Studies (MA)
Modern History (MA)
Persian (MA)
Philosophy (MA)
Psychology (MA)
RussianW T (MA)
SpanishW (MA)
Management Science and one of:
Computer Science (BSc)
Economics (BSc)
T
G
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
This combination is only available to non-beginners in German.
[The BSc degree requires that at least 40 credits are gained in core
Science subjects in 1000- and 2000-level modules]
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
*
*
*
*
*
*
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
*
*
Mathematics (BSc)
Statistics (BSc)
Management and two Modern Languages W
Any combination of Arabic, French, GermanG , Italian, Persian,
RussianT, Spanish is available
W
*
The School of Management is listed as the Best in Scotland
in The Times and Sunday Times University Guide 2015, the
Guardian University Guide 2015 and The Complete University
Guide 2015.
We are the only University in Scotland to offer both an MA
and a BSc in Management. We also offer the broadest range
of choices for Joint Honours degrees in Management and in
Management Science.
In the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014, Management
was fourth in the UK based on the impact of its research.
The School’s teaching and research are based on the
concept of “Responsible Enterprise”, which entails an ethical
approach to managing organisations and their social and
environmental impacts.
We offer challenging courses designed to equip you with the
skills of critical thinking and self-reliance.
Our aim is to stimulate your intellectual curiosity and to
encourage you to interrogate evidence, to challenge logic,
and to question existing ways of doing things.
Our teaching is informed by cutting edge research across
the arts and the social sciences. In addition to the core
disciplines of business, members of staff have published
in the fields of sociology, economics, psychology, and
geography, among others.
Presentation skills and group working provide vocational
relevance for careers in commerce, finance, industry and
public service.
The student-run Management Society (www.mngsociety.com)
organises an innovative programme of events offering
valuable personal development and networking opportunities.
Past speakers include senior executives from Deutsche Bank,
Jack Wills, Jaguar Land Rover, Saatchi & Saatchi, and Salvatore
Ferragamo.
Facilities and resources
The School is located in the prestigious Gateway building at
the North Haugh. The Gateway has state-of-the-art lecture
and seminar facilities as well as an extensive private study area
for students which can be found at the heart of its teaching
accommodation.
The School is staffed by a team of international scholars with
wide experience of teaching and research in the areas of
Management (in all its guises), Accounting and Finance. Expertise
in these areas is brought together in degree programmes which
aim to develop critical thinking in the managers of tomorrow.
What will I study? – MA or BSc
The degree programme has been developed with an integral
core of Management subjects along with the opportunity to take
modules in allied disciplines. In addition, there are a number of
Joint Honours options which will allow you to build a degree
which suits your particular talents and aspirations.
Return to Subjects
Katie (Glagow, Scotland)
In all years, you attend seminars and workshops which provide
instruction in the use of specific management techniques as well
as developing interpersonal skills in problem solving. Honours
students have the option of submitting a research project which
may take the form of analysis of a practical aspect of business.
First Year (2 x 20-credit Management modules required)
The first year of the Management degree involves two
compulsory modules which explore the nature of the work
environment, how people approach work, the theory of
organisations and economic theories of the firm. Based on
a study of financial accounting and business statistics, the
modules also develop skills of analysis. Taken together the
modules explain why we have organisations, how they operate
in society and what information is required of them by those in
the external environment.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit Management modules required)
The two compulsory modules in the second year of the
Management degree explore the core functions of managers,
including marketing, organisational behaviour, managing in
diverse and challenging situations and the analysis of financial
data. The two years of study combine to provide a sound basis
from which to focus in the Honours years on particular aspects
of management practice.
The School of Management also offers an innovative module in
Creativity and Enterprise. This module is available to all students
across the University; it encourages you to develop creativity
and enterprise skills and to take a proactive role in managing
your learning.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years (2 x 20-credit core modules
required + at least 4 further 20-credit optional modules)
At Honours there are core modules in Organisation Studies and
Dynamic Strategic Management as well as a variety of options.
Modules available reflect the expertise of the staff in the School
of Management and include, for example:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Advertising and Marketing Communications
Behavioural Decision Making
Consuming Culture
Corporate Finance and Control
Corporate Social Responsibility, Accountability and Reporting
Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development
Financial Markets and Investments
Human Resource Management
International Banking
International Business
International Marketing
Knowledge Work: Practice and Context
Leadership Development
Management of Change
Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs)
Philanthropy and Philanthropreneurs
Scenario Thinking
Sociology of Finance
Sustainable Development and Management
These have been carefully designed to give our graduates
knowledge of international trends, well-developed interpersonal and transferable skills and an orientation towards
creativity and innovation.
The distinction between Management Science and
Management is that the former includes advanced training in
quantitative techniques (Operational Research) that are relevant
to the analysis of managerial problems. The Management
degree places more emphasis on behavioural, organisational
and strategic issues.
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 230 - 250
Second Year: lectures 130 - 150
Honours: lectures 20 - 80
Tutorials at all levels are never larger than 15 and often smaller.
Students’ progress is carefully monitored through a system
of continuous assessment and tutorials. Tutorial groups are
sufficiently small that tutors can give attention to particular
needs and are structured around material that co-ordinates with
lectures.
The overall grade for a module combines marks obtained on
both coursework and examination, while some modules are
assessed solely by coursework.
Assessment
All Management modules are assessed by at least 30%
coursework, with the balance made up of either written
examinations or more coursework.
Careers
While a degree in Management provides an excellent basis for
a career in management, it can also be used as a springboard
into a wide variety of other careers. In the past students from
the School of Management have found employment in the
fields of general management, marketing, accountancy and the
financial services industry. These roles have been undertaken
in a wide variety of organisations in the public and private
sector including: KPMG, Accenture, Barclays, the National Health
Service, J P Morgan, Deloitte, the Scottish Executive, and Warner
Music. In some instances graduates find work abroad and each
year some students will undertake further study at Masters and
Doctoral level in the UK and beyond. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-management-careers
There is a dedicated Careers Centre within the University to help
you select the future career option which is right for you. See
page 34 for details.
Return to Subjects
121
Management
“I have really enjoyed the theoretical element of studying
Management; the School is open and friendly and the course is
challenging and diverse. I’ve also complemented my studies by
taking an active role in many committees and societies which
has given me skills in events and people management which are
fundamental in real-world situations and have really helped with
situational questions in job interviews.”
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/maths
Mathematics &
Statistics
122
Mathematics &
Statistics
Degree options
MMath (Single Honours Degrees)
School of Mathematics & Statistics
Mathematics
Applied Mathematics
Pure Mathematics
Statistics
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
BSc or MA (Single Honours Degrees)
Mathematics
Statistics
[If you wish to study Arts subjects in your first and second years,
apply for the MA rather than the BSc degree.]
BSc (Joint Honours Degrees)
Mathematics and one of:
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Economics
Statistics and one of:
Biology
Computer Science
Economics
Geography
Management
Science
Philosophy*
Physics
Psychology
Geography
Management Science
Philosophy*
Psychology
* The title and content of BSc Philosophy combinations is under review.
BSc “With” Degree
Honours in which two–thirds of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Mathematics with Geography
MPhys (Joint Honours Degree)
Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
MChem (“With” Degree)
First Year Entry
(To complete an MMath in five years, or a BSc/MA in four)
SQA Highers: AAAB (A in Mathematics)
GCE A-Levels: AAA (A in Mathematics)
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in
Mathematics
Second Year Entry
(To complete an MMath in four years or a BSc in three)
SQA Advanced Highers: AA including Mathematics (in addition
to normal entrance requirements)
GCE A-Levels: AAA (A in Mathematics and Further Mathematics)
International Baccalaureate Points: 38 including HL6 in
Mathematics
For Fast Track MMath Degrees
(To complete an MMath in four years, starting with
1000-level modules)
Advanced SQA Highers: BB including Mathematics
(in addition to normal entrance requirements)
GCE A-Levels: AAA (A in Mathematics)
International Baccalaureate Points: 38 including HL6 in
Mathematics
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Chemistry with Mathematics
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Mathematics and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Economics
English
If you are accepted onto a Single Honours degree in the School
of Mathematics & Statistics, then you can change on arrival
between any of the three routes below, provided you meet the
minimum entrance requirements.
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – Yes, see above.
GermanW
Hebrew
International
Relations
ItalianW
Latin
Mediaeval History
Modern History
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianW
Scottish History
SpanishW
Theological Studies
Philosophy
Psychology
Subject enquiries
Dr Colva M Roney-Dougal
E: [email protected]
Statistics and one of:
Economics
MA “With” Degrees
Honours in which two–thirds of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Mathematics with RussianW
W
Mathematics with SpanishW
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Return to Subjects
“The academic staff in the School are always
supportive and helpful. Every lecturer has their
own unique way of teaching, making a student’s
academic life more interesting. Apart from a
strong mathematical background, the School
gave me the opportunity to discover different
analytical software, which will definitely be very
useful to me in the future.”
123
Mathematics &
Statistics
NEW Profile
PHOTO TAKEN
to be selected
Aidana (Pavlodar, Kazakhstan)
Features
What will I study?
High quality teaching: top in the UK for Mathematics in the
*
Guardian University Guide 2015.
* We offer a wide variety of ways you can study mathematics,
via first year entry, second year entry or Fast Track.
To complement this, our degrees are extremely flexible: on
*
arrival you will discuss with your Adviser of Studies which
of these three routes would suit you best.
All degrees have a flexible structure that allows you either
*
to specialise in some particular area (e.g. Pure, Applied or
Statistics) or to acquire training across a broader range of
topics.
Strong tutorial support throughout your undergraduate
*
programme with weekly, small group tutorials for all
courses in the early years.
Opportunities to work closely, and undertake project
*
work, with a research group.
First-rate facilities and environment.
*
Individual supervision of your Senior Honours Project in
*
your final year.
Fifth in the UK for the proportion of our research that
*
is world-leading or internationally excellent in the UK
Research Excellence Framework 2014.
St Andrews provides a stimulating environment in which to
pursue Mathematics or Statistics under the tutelage of world-class
researchers. Not only will you have the opportunity to pursue an
area of interest but also you will acquire the skills and attributes
sought after by graduate employers. St Andrews has first-class
researchers in the three main areas of mathematical science: Pure,
Applied and Statistics. The School of Mathematics & Statistics has
several internationally recognised centres, including the Centre
for Interdisciplinary Research in Computational Algebra, the
Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling
and the Solar and Magnetospheric MHD Theory Group. The
undergraduate courses offered reflect this diversity of interests
and provide the focus for specialisation and project work.
Understanding patterns and structure, and developing the
tools with which to analyse them, is the primary focus of
all mathematics. Whether the patterns relate to physical or
biological phenomena or to the structure of mathematics itself,
the primary aim is to describe, categorise, and understand the
processes involved. As a student of Mathematics or Statistics,
much of your time here will be concerned with developing the
analytic techniques and skills necessary to explore some of
these fascinating areas of research. Also, as a consequence of
this diversity, we offer a wide range of degrees.
“I have been able to experience both the theory and application of lots of
varied topics, which makes for interesting lectures and enjoyable study.”
Fearghas
(Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England)
Return to Subjects
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/maths
Mathematics &
Statistics
124
Mathematics &
Statistics
(continued)
Two Pure Mathematics Vacation Scholars
Degree programmes offered
These range from the advanced MMath programmes to the
more broadly based Joint Degrees with another subject. Both
Single and Joint Degrees are generally four years long, and are
based upon a flexible and innovative module structure built
around a core of essential material.
When you are applying, you may not be sure of the type of
programme that will most suit you. Mathematically wellqualified entrants can embark upon one of our MMath degrees:
Mathematics (G100), Pure Mathematics (G110), Applied
Mathematics (G120), or Statistics (G300): G100 can include
topics from Pure, Applied and Statistics.
If you expect to be well qualified in school mathematics then
you should apply for UCAS course code G100 which will give
you access to everything we offer. You will have a meeting with
your Adviser of Studies when you get to St Andrews, and they
will help you choose which programme will suit you best.
Second year entry allows you to complete the MMath in four
years by taking harder courses from the beginning of your
degree, but having only a standard workload over the remaining
years of study. In contrast, the Fast Track degrees offer an
accelerated sequence of modules in Mathematics and/ or
Statistics designed in such a way as to permit a gentle start to
first year, whilst ensuring that the advanced topics are reached
by fourth year. The course structure is unique within Scotland
and maintains the flexibility of the St Andrews structure whilst
still enabling completion of the MMath degree in four years.
The mathematical/statistical content of the BSc and MA degrees
is the same. The difference is in the other subjects available
for study alongside mathematics or statistics. Our students do
at least 20 credits of Mathematics in first year, and at least 60
credits in second year. Those on BSc degrees must take at least
60 more credits of science subjects (which can be Mathematics),
whilst those on MA degrees must take at least 60 more credits of
arts subjects (which can also be Mathematics).
Specialist modules currently on offer include:
Applied Mathematics:
• Solar Theory
• Fluid Mechanics
•
•
Computational Techniques
Analytic Techniques Pure Mathematics: • Group Theory
• Ergodic Theory
•
•
Fractal Geometry
Finite Fields
Statistics:
• Time Series Analysis
• Datamining
•
•
Bayesian Inference
Statistical Modelling
We offer a four-year BSc/MA degree in Mathematics (G101 or
G102) and Statistics (G301 or G302) for those not wishing to
take the advanced MMath route. You take a broad 1000-level
programme, which can include up to two other subjects, and
the mathematics component concentrates upon reinforcing
basic skills and ideas before embarking upon the study of Pure
Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and/or Statistics in second
year. The BSc is also available with second year entry.
The 2000-level modules comprise a central core of material that
everyone takes as part of their programme. These provide the
foundation for study in years three and four where there are
over sixty modules available for study over the two Honours
years, of which Single Honours students take roughly five
compulsory and twelve “free choice” modules (depending on
the degree programme), and Joint Honours students half of
those.
First two years of Mathematics or Statistics
At 1000-level you will study between one and three
Mathematics modules, and between three and five modules in
any other subjects. MT1002 Mathematics is our core compulsory
module, and can be studied in either semester. Students with
a strong background will take this in Semester 1, whilst those
who prefer a gentler route will take MT1001 Introductory
Mathematics in Semester 1 and MT1002 in Semester 2. We offer
three further optional 1000-level Mathematics modules.
2000-level will be your first year if you choose second year entry.
We offer eight modules across the whole range of mathematics,
of which you will take between four and eight, depending on
your intended degree. These 2000-level modules are designed
to introduce you to the study of more advanced mathematics,
opening up access to the diverse range of modules that we offer
in higher levels.
Students on the Fast Track route will take a mixture of 1000- and
2000-level modules in their first year, including a speciallydesigned module purely for Fast Track students, to help rapidly
bridge the gap between 1000-level and 2000-level mathematics.
In their second year they go on to study a mixture of 2000- and
3000-level modules, enabling completion of the MMath degree
in four years.
Study abroad
The School has a dedicated Study Abroad adviser and in their
Junior Honours year, all BSc/MA students and non-Fast Track
students on the MMath programme have the opportunity to
apply to the University’s St Andrews Abroad programme. For
further information, see page 44.
Return to Subjects
“Everyone is extremely friendly and helpful. You
will quickly get to know people through weekly
events organised by the SUMS society that has
over a hundred members. All of the things that I
liked doing before I came to St Andrews I have
continued to expand on during my time here from charity work to tutoring to sports.”
Mathematics &
Statistics
125
Lera (St Petersburg, Russia)
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 100 - 250, labs 25 - 60, tutorials 5 - 10
Second Year: lectures 100 - 200, labs 25 - 60, tutorials 8 - 12
Honours: lectures 5 - 100, tutorials 1 - 30
In the first year activities for each module centre on a daily
lecture (five per week). Small group tutorials take place once a
week for each module where you prepare solutions to exercises
on that week’s topics, which are marked by your tutor and then
discussed in class. In addition, computer labs are held once
a week for each module, to assist with both IT and problemsolving skills. In your second year you will typically be studying
four modules at once, and each fortnight each module will
typically comprise five lectures, one tutorial, one computer
lab, and one examples class. You will develop increasing
independence and initiative as you progress through your
degree programme so that by third and fourth year the average
teaching load drops to around ten hours of lectures and four of
tutorials per week, supplemented by private study. In addition,
in fourth year you carry out an extensive Senior Honours
Dissertation on a topic of your choice, for which you will receive
individual supervision throughout the year from your chosen
staff member.
Successful third year students also have the opportunity to
undertake summer project work as Vacation Scholars supervised
by staff of their choice. This enables them to establish a close
working relationship with members of a research group and
gain an appreciation of research work and what it entails.
Assessment
At 1000- and 2000-level all our modules include at least 50%
written examinations, with the balance of assessment being
made up of coursework. At Honours level the majority of our
modules are assessed solely by written examinations.
Scholarships
A number of needs-based Entrant Scholarships are awarded
each year by the University to students studying Mathematics
and/or Statistics. For further information please see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/scholarships
Careers
The demand for mathematically able graduates exceeds the
supply and the career prospects are excellent. Graduates
in Mathematics, Statistics or a Joint Degree involving these
subjects have a wide selection of opportunities. Around 30%
of graduates go on to pursue postgraduate qualifications,
either in the UK or abroad, and develop research careers. A
small number enter the teaching profession, for which there
are various financial incentives. A similar number embark
upon Teaching English as a Foreign Language in Japan or
China: an opportunity to see the world and experience a
different culture in an organised and structured way. Although
this may seem an unlikely move for a mathematical scientist it
provides a commercially valuable insight into an economically
vibrant part of the world.
Of the rest, over 50% of our graduates gain employment
with merchant banks, insurance companies, computer
consultancies, the civil service, industry, and financial
services organisations (e.g. Goldman Sachs, KPMG,
PricewaterhouseCoopers, and many more). Clear logical
thinking, deductive reasoning, confidence in data handling,
and IT skills are attributes that are highly prized by employers.
Graduate recruiters seek numerate, literate, enthusiastic and
successful graduates. A degree in Mathematics or Statistics
offers the chance to develop such a profile and, of course,
a good Mathematics/Statistics degree is recognised as a
substantial achievement in a demanding discipline. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-maths-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
126
Medicine
http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk
Medicine
Degree options
BSc (Single Honours Degree)
Medicine
Entrance Requirements
SQA Highers
AAAAB, including Chemistry (A grade) and one other of
Biology, Mathematics or Physics. These grades should normally
be obtained at the same sitting. If Mathematics, Biology and
English have not been passed at Higher Grade, each must
normally have been passed at Standard Grade Credit Level
(grade 1 or 2) or Intermediate 2 (grade A or B). or National 5
(grade A or B).
No Direct Entry from Fifth Year: If you are a Scottish candidate you
will not be admitted in the academic year immediately following
your fifth year at school. Offers made will be conditional and
based on S6 programmes of study. Applicants must be studying
three subjects in S6 and likely conditions required will be BBB in
either Advanced Highers or new Highers.
GCE Advanced (A2) Level
AAA, at the same sitting, including Chemistry and one other of
Biology, Mathematics or Physics. If Mathematics or Biology are
not being offered at Advanced (A2) level, each must normally
have been passed at GCSE grade B or better. A pass must also be
offered in GCSE English at grade B or better.
International Baccalaureate
38 points including, at Higher level, three passes at grades
7,6,6, including Chemistry (7) and one of Biology, Mathematics
or Physics and at Standard level, three passes at grade 6. If
Mathematics, Biology or English are lacking at Higher level they
must be offered at Standard level.
HNC Applied Sciences ‘Pathway to Medicine’ at Perth College
The School of Medicine has formed a partnership with Perth
College whereby a small number of students following a specified
pathway in the Higher National Certificate (HNC) Applied
Sciences at Perth College will be eligible to join the medical
programme at St Andrews. More information can be found on
the School of Medicine webpages or from Perth College
T: 0845 270 1177 or E: [email protected]
School of Medicine
Contact for prospective applicants
(including Entrance Requirements)
UK/EU: [email protected]
Rest of the World: [email protected]
http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk
Non-Academic Entrance Requirements
To be a successful applicant you must be able to show evidence
of the following:
• Personal qualities such as empathy, good communication
and listening skills, leadership skills and the ability to work in
a team.
• A well-informed understanding of what a career in Medicine
involves.
• A commitment to Medicine demonstrated by organising
work experience or shadowing. Experience of a voluntary
kind should be gained by working with ill, disabled or
disadvantaged people, but any work that improves your
communication skills will be valued.
• Commitment to academic study, staying power,
perseverance and intellectual potential.
• Positions of responsibility, organisational ability, interests
and hobbies, cultural and sporting activities and
achievements, social involvement.
In considering the commitment involved in becoming a doctor,
the following webpages provide important guidance:
General Medical Council, www.gmc-uk.org
Medical Schools Council, www.medschools.ac.uk
Scottish Doctor, www.scottishdoctor.org
Applicants presenting other qualifications are expected to have
attained these at a level which is equivalent to that expected
of applicants offering Highers, Advanced (A2) Levels or the
International Baccalaureate. Entrance requirements can be
found on the School of Medicine webpages:
http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/prospectus
UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT)
Applicants to St Andrews, including international students, are
required to sit the UK Clinical Aptitude Test. You should take
this in the summer of the year in which you apply to Medicine.
Further information is available at: www.ukcat.ac.uk and
http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/prospectus
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Return to Subjects
“The facilities in the new School of Medicine
building are second to none and really accessible
to students outside of scheduled classes. On
top of that the lecturers are approachable and
supportive and the personal tutor system means
that there is always someone to go and ask if
you’re unsure about part of the course or just
university life in general.”
Medicine
127
Abi (Ackleton, Shropshire, England)
Features
*
*
*
*
*
*
What will I study?
Students graduate after three years at St Andrews with
a BSc (Hons) degree in Medicine and then progress to a
Partner Medical School to complete their training and to
graduate with an MB ChB.
An excellent scientific foundation for clinical practice.
Early, relevant clinical experience.
A highly supportive educational environment.
Bute Medical Society – an active medical students’ society
representing medical and non-medical interests. Social
functions include the Bute Ball and Bute Dinner.
Student prizes – Heller Prize, Herring Prize and Kathleen
Macdonald Prize for top projects in MD4002 topics;
Gillingham Memorial Prize for top student in MD4003; 1972
Medical Graduation Prize for top student overall in Honours
Programme.
Facilities and resources
A £45m purpose-built Medical and Biological Sciences
building offering outstanding facilities for teaching, learning
and research; fully integrated with key University disciplines
including physics, chemistry, biology and psychology, offering
an important new dimension to medical research and the
training of new doctors.
Programme structure
Our medical degree programme is six years long; students
graduating BSc (Hons) Medicine from St Andrews will progress
to one of our Partner Medical Schools in Scotland (Aberdeen,
Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow) or England (Barts in London,
Manchester) for the final three years. Applicants who are
‘overseas’ for fee purposes will progress to Manchester. The
number of places available at each of our Partners can be
found on our webpages, as can information about how to
indicate, at the time of application, your preference for either
England or Scotland:
http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/prospectus
The School of Medicine at St Andrews offers an integrated
curriculum within a strong clinical context. In addition to
exploring the foundations of medical science, it encourages
the development of the professional attitudes, ethical
understanding and decision-making skills required by
‘Tomorrow’s Doctors’. The curriculum addresses the following
core principles:
• Competence – understanding of the scientific basis of
medicine.
• Professionalism – development of clinical skills, personal
values and ethical awareness.
• Reflection – monitoring self-awareness and decisionmaking through the completion of a portfolio.
• Independence – encouragement of self-directed learning.
The teaching is designed to encourage the application of
medical sciences to clinical problems. The clinical medical
programme spans Years 1 to 3, running throughout the entire
course. Clinical skills teaching takes place in simulated wards
and examination rooms with communication skills being taught
as an integral part of the course. Clinical experience is also
offered in the form of patient contact through primary care
initiatives in the community. Professionalism and patient safety
are key components of the entire course.
Teaching delivery
We use a wide range of teaching and assessment methods,
including lectures, laboratory-based practicals, small group
tutorials and computer-based resources. Audio-visual
technology is fully utilised, including a ‘state of the art’ video
capture system which can be used for training and feedback
purposes in the main teaching environments.
Return to Subjects
128
Medicine
http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk
Medicine
(continued)
First Year
The medical course at St Andrews takes the form of an
integrated spiral curriculum. In the first year of the course
the modules Foundations of Medicine 1 and 2 emphasise the
interrelationships between the pre-clinical sciences. During
subsequent turns of the spiral, topics will be revisited at a
more advanced level and with increasing clinical application,
including a series of core clinical cases.
Second Year
The Honours programme focuses in detail upon the normal
function and dysfunction of specific physiological and
psychological systems.
Foundations of Medicine 1
Medicine Honours 1 and 2
These modules form the second turn of the curriculum spiral
taking an integrated approach to the scientific basis of medicine
in Honours and build upon the material delivered in the first
year. The modules:
• Reviews fundamental aspects of molecular and cellular
medicine.
• Gives a general overview of the structure and functions of
the body systems from the microscopic to the macroscopic
level.
• Introduces the history and philosophy of medicine.
• Gives a preliminary introduction to medical ethics and
communication skills relevant to medicine.
• Uses clinical problems to develop an understanding of the
levels of consciousness and the assessment of health status.
• Provides opportunities to speak to patients with chronic
health problems in the Medical School environment.
• cover the structure and functions of the cardiovascular,
respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and reproductive systems.
The anatomy of the thorax and abdomen, pelvis and
perineum will be studied by dissection.
• introduce the disease mechanisms and therapy of disorders
pertinent to these body systems.
• use relevant clinical problems and clinical skills to provide a
clinical context.
• integrate the ethical, moral and behavioural aspects relevant
to these systems.
• provide a series of community attachments in primary
health care settings.
Foundations of Medicine 2
This module continues the introduction of fundamental
topics into the curriculum, including the principles of
disease mechanisms and therapy, and the development of
communication skills. The module:
• provides an in-depth study of the musculo-skeletal system,
including nerve and muscle physiology. The anatomy of the
upper and lower limbs will be studied by dissection.
• develops an understanding of principles of disease
mechanisms and therapy.
• introduces particular topics in behavioural sciences e.g.
stress, coping and pain.
• utilises clinical problems that focus on deep vein
thrombosis, trauma, carcinoma and stroke.
• reviews genetics and the effects of genes on development
and disease.
• provides further opportunities for exposure to clinical
problems relevant to the teaching.
Return to Subjects
Catriona (Glasgow, Scotland)
Third Year
Semester 1 of this year deals with the most complex integrative
physiological systems (central nervous system and endocrine
organs). During Semester 2 of this year there will also be a major
Student-Selected Component.
Medicine Honours 3
This module continues the strategy of the spiral curriculum
by revisiting foundation knowledge and progressing to more
complex systems. This module:
• provides in-depth coverage of normal structure and
function of the central nervous system and endocrine
systems. The anatomy of the head and neck will be studied
by dissection.
• introduces diseases and possible therapies pertinent to
these important control systems.
• presents case studies associated with the central nervous
system and endocrine systems to highlight appropriate
clinical skills for the identification of neurological and
endocrinological disorders.
• utilises audio-visual, literary and theoretical works to
integrate ethical issues and behavioural science with clinical
medicine.
• provides hospital attachments.
Medicine Honours 4 (Student-Selected Component)
You will undertake a Student-Selected Component (SSC) which
will enable you to pursue an area of your own particular interest
at an advanced level. SSCs will involve one of the following:
• Scientific research assessed by dissertation and oral
presentation.
• Library project assessed by dissertation and oral
presentation.
Medicine Honours 5 (Applied Medical Science)
Knowledge acquired in the earlier parts of the curriculum will
be consolidated. This course is taught primarily by clinicians
(including Honorary staff ) and case studies will be used
extensively to direct student learning. This module:
Application deadlines
UK and EU applicants must apply by 15 October and
International applicants (i.e. non-EU) by 31 January.
Selection procedures
When assessing your application we shall take into account
academic achievement (or predicted achievement), your UKCAT
result and all the other information on the UCAS form.
There is considerable competition for places and so the
academic qualifications indicated are considered to be the
minimum entrance requirements and will not automatically
guarantee the offer of a place. Further information on
competitive entry is detailed on the School of Medicine’s
webpages: http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/prospectus
Only those applicants who meet our UKCAT requirement, have
a very strong academic record and obtain a positive assessment
of their non-academic qualities and experience (see section on
page 126) will be called for interview.
Disability
A disability need not be a barrier to becoming a doctor but
those who have a disability will need to consider carefully what
effect that will have on their capacity to function as a medical
practitioner (fitness to practise).
In the first instance, if you have a disability (including dyslexia)
or relevant health concerns, you should explore what support
we can make available to you by contacting the University’s
Disabilities Adviser in Student Services before submitting your
UCAS application. See page 30.
Immunisation and other conditions of offer
For information about immunisation and other conditions of
offer, such as satisfactory criminal record screening, please see
details on the School of Medicine’s webpages:
http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/prospectus
• reviews clinical anatomy in preparation for later clinical
training.
• gives you the opportunity to significantly advance your
clinical and communication skills in terms of patient
examination techniques and associated procedures.
• provides opportunities for developing skills relevant to
problem-based learning.
Assessment
A prescribed level of performance must be achieved each
year to ensure normal progression. The award of the BSc
(Hons) Medicine degree requires that students possess a
comprehensive knowledge of basic medical science and its
clinical application, in readiness for the commencement of
training at one of our Partner Medical Schools.
Return to Subjects
129
Medicine
“Studying Medicine at St Andrews has given me the perfect balance
of scientific knowledge and clinical experience that will help me to
excel in my future career. Throughout my time here, the staff have
been exceedingly helpful; they are always willing to make time to
talk. Due to the fairly small year groups, it is really easy to get to
know everyone on the course which makes it an even more enjoyable
experience!”
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs
Modern Languages
130
Modern Languages
See also Arabic page 56, Comparative Literature page 72,
French page 96, German page 100, Italian page 116,
Persian page 134, Russian page 144, Spanish page 148
Degree options
The School of Modern Languages offers a wide range of degree
programmes in one, two or three languages, or in one or two
languages and a non-language subject or subjects. French,
German, Italian, Russian and Spanish all offer a Single Honours
degree programme, while both Arabic and Persian can be
studied as part of a two- or three-subject degree. Arabic,
German, Italian, Persian, Russian and Spanish are all available
from beginners’ level. The School also runs a well-integrated
Comparative Literature programme. Our programme structures
are amongst the most flexible in the UK.
MA (Single Honours Degrees)
FrenchW
GermanW
ItalianW
RussianW
SpanishW
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
With an A in any language(s) to be studied, unless the
applicant plans to study the language(s) at beginners’ level.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
MA Degrees
– THREE of the following Languages:
Arabic, French, German, Italian, Persian, Russian, Spanish
– TWO of the following Languages:
Arabic, French, German, Italian, Russian, Persian,
Spanish
– COMPARATIVE LITERATURE and ONE or TWO of the
following Languages: Arabic, French, German, Italian,
Russian, Spanish
– TWO of the following Languages (in most cases*):
ArabicNG, French, GermanB G, Italian, Persian, RussianR E T,
SpanishS and one of Ancient History R, Classical StudiesS,
EnglishE, Greek (Ancient)NG, International Relations, LatinB,
ManagementT G
See also the individual language pages (noted above) for details of
combinations of languages with other subjects that are possible.
W
Buchanan Building – School of Modern Languages
Available With Integrated Year Abroad
* Check the individual language pages for details of available
combinations.
NG Arabic-Greek combinations are not possible due to timetable clash.
B
Combinations including German and Latin are only available to
beginners in German.
G
Combinations including German and Management are only available to
non-beginners in German.
R
This combination is only available to non-beginners in Russian due to a
timetable clash.
E
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
S
Combinations including Classical Studies and Spanish are only available
to beginners in Spanish.
T
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject?
Only French requires previous qualifications. All other languages
may be studied without prior knowledge.
Subject enquiries
Professor Will Fowler
E: [email protected]
Features
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
We offer a broad range of subject choices and combinations.
Arabic, German, Italian, Persian, Russian and Spanish can be
taken from scratch.
French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish can be taken as
a Single Honours degree.
We offer a range of study abroad opportunities and work
placements.
Our Multimedia Centre houses a high-technology digital
language laboratory.
The School is a friendly environment with skilled and
dedicated teachers.
Our staff include a high number of native speakers.
Our staff are leading researchers with expertise in subjects
spanning the mediaeval period to the present day.
Our programmes help you develop a wide range of
transferable skills.
The study of modern languages is of critical importance in an
age of rapidly growing contacts between nations of the world.
Knowledge of another language enables the individual to
become immersed in the culture, in the broadest sense, of those
languages, the society they reflect, the history and literature
of their speakers. The resulting familiarity with other peoples
and cultures not only broadens one’s own horizons, but also
paves the way to becoming a full member of the international
community. Frequently, students also discover a love for a given
language in and of itself, and every modern language has a
rich cultural heritage through which the student can explore it
further.
Return to Subjects
Janine (Derry, Northern Ireland)
The School of Modern Languages includes the Departments
of Arabic (also the home of Persian), French, German, Italian,
Russian and Spanish. All these subjects can be studied through
to the final year for the MA Honours degree, or else for one
or two years. The detailed individual subject entries show the
various ways in which these languages can be studied, either
by themselves or in combination with other languages or
non-language subjects. There is a wide range of such subjects
available for combination with any one or two of the seven
languages within the Arts Faculty. The School of Modern
Languages is also home to a degree programme in Comparative
Literature (see page 72).
Whether Modern Language students begin studying a
language here for the first time, or come with Higher or
A-Level qualifications, programmes across the School are
designed to lead them through progressively sophisticated
stages culminating in admission, after two years of study, to
Honours. Core language programmes at 1000- and 2000-level
are structurally equivalent in all six departments but their nonlanguage course content may vary from language to language.
This might include the study of literature, history or elementary
language-specific linguistics. Students intending to study more
than one language have an evenly split programme throughout
the first two years. All language programmes place emphasis
on accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar in the target
language and in English.
Once admitted to Honours, language students continue to
follow core language modules in each language. Depending
on whether you are following a one, two or three language
programme into Honours, you will also take a variety of modules
in literature, culture or society. Further details are on the
relevant subject pages.
Facilities and resources
The School has a Multimedia Centre with the latest electronic
technology to enhance the learning and practice of oral and
aural skills. In Honours, content modules, such as literature
courses, have a seminar format in most departments.
Study abroad
Most Language students spend a year abroad after their second
year of study. How and where this time is spent will depend on
whether you are taking a four-year or five-year degree course.
The School makes final decisions on study abroad during the
second year of study, when you apply for your preferred option,
irrespective of the degree intention declared on the original
application to St Andrews.
If you opt to take Honours degrees With Integrated Year Abroad
(WIYA) in French, German, Italian, Russian or Spanish, you
will spend your third year in a country in which the relevant
language is spoken. With the help of the relevant department
UK students are usually placed in a school through the British
Council’s Language Assistantship scheme (for Russian WIYA see
page 144). You may organise an alternative work placement
with the approval of your Department. WIYA programmes are
not currently available for Arabic or Persian. If you are taking
a four-year degree, you may spend all or part of your third
year as an Erasmus+ exchange student at one of our partner
universities (for arrangements for students of Arabic, Persian and
Russian see subject entry). You may also apply to the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 20 - 120, seminars 5 - 20
Second Year: lectures 10 - 100 , seminars 5 - 20
Honours: groups of 20 or fewer
Core teaching of languages (grammar and translation) is
conducted in classes that are kept as small as possible. All
students meet with native language instructors for small oral/
conversation classes each week. Native speakers also teach core
modules in Honours as well as first and second years.
Assessment
All our modules are assessed by at least 40% coursework.
The balance is made up by further coursework or written
examinations.
Careers
Modern Languages graduates have an extremely good record
of employment after graduating. Many of our graduates find
employment as language teachers, translators or interpreters, or
in other jobs requiring advanced language skills. Their chosen
careers also extend beyond the linguistic sector, and include
banking and financial services, international development,
media, human resources and administration. For details on
careers pursued by graduates of specific languages, see the
entries elsewhere in this Prospectus. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-modlangs-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
131
Modern Languages
“Although the year abroad has been one of my highlights, St Andrews
itself is so cosmopolitan. Having the option to study classical literature,
cinema, linguistics, history, translation and more means you will end up
with a well-rounded degree that reflects your own interests. This studentbased approach is furthered by the Class Representative and School
Presidents system. As Spanish Honours Class Rep, I acted as a voice for
my class, feeding student opinion back to staff, a role I am taking to the
next level as School of Modern Languages President.”
132
Music
*
*
Do you play to a high standard?
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/music
Music
Do you want to learn more about music as an academic discipline?
St Andrews has courses that are designed to support you in
continuing studies alongside modules designed to develop
music appreciation skills.
Facilities and resources
The Department of Music draws on the expertise of
instrumental and voice tutors associated with the University’s
Music Centre, who contribute to teaching on our performance
modules. The Music Centre also has a range of practice facilities,
including practice rooms, instrument hire and an electronic
music studio with Apple iMac computers with software and
hardware available for the composition and realisation of
music. For more details, including a list of current tutors and
their areas of expertise, see the Music Centre webpages. In
addition, students on our modules enjoy lectures and seminars
from a range of outside visiting lecturers who draw on their
professional experience in music performance and related fields
to enhance the academic learning experience.
The University of St Andrews degree structure allows students
to broaden their education, particularly at first and second
year level. Within this structure, the Department of Music offers
1000- and 2000 level modules, and one limited-entry 3000-level
module, to those of you who wish to develop your interests in
music as part of your degree. Some of our modules are intended
for students who have already acquired a high degree of
competence in performance and/or reading musical notation,
while others require no prior knowledge or expertise.
“Although my Honours intentions are not in music, I am
taking academic music modules on offer at sub-honours
level. I also have a busy musical life both with the
University Symphony Orchestra and as Organ Scholar to
the St Salvator’s Chapel Choir, with weekly services and
regular concerts and tours.”
George (Richmond, North Yorkshire, England)
University Symphony Orchestra
The 3000-level module in performance is designed to
support students thinking about developing potential
careers in music, normally through further study at music
college or conservatoire; entrance to this module is limited
to those who have passed both sub-honours performance
modules with sufficiently high grades to allow progression
(see www.st-andrews.ac.uk/coursecatalogue ).
We are happy to accept students from all Faculties on all our
music modules, regardless of what other subjects they are
studying, though as with all modular choices, you will need to
obtain the approval of your Adviser of Studies.
Class sizes
First Year: lectures 30 - 60, tutorials 6 - 10
Second Year: lectures 6 - 30, tutorials 1 - 10
First Year
Understanding Music (A and B versions)
These modules aim to develop skills and knowledge that
will help you to get more out of the experience of listening
to music. Focusing particularly on classical music, both
modules include components on musical history, acoustics,
aesthetics and the history of the orchestra, and examine key
works from different genres and periods in particular detail.
You are not required to perform as part of these modules.
The two modules run in parallel, sharing lectures on music
history and set works. Students on the more advanced
module Understanding Music A, however, must have welldeveloped pre-existing skills in music literacy and analysis,
to the equivalent of ABRSM theory grade 5 +. Students on
Understanding Music B will be taught music notation and
be introduced to a range of analytical concepts that will
help them to discuss the set works precisely and accurately.
For those unsure of their entry level, an initial diagnostic
test in Week 1 will help us to place you in the strand most
appropriate to your existing knowledge level.
Making Music
This module is designed for students who have already
studied an instrument or singing and would like to continue
making music at a high level while at university. It supports
you in improving your performance skills while developing
an understanding of the historical, analytical and aesthetic
ideas related to musical performance. The module also offers
the chance to study composition and to perform as part of
an ensemble. You are required to present a short recital for
examination and to complete related written work. Entry
requires a playing/singing standard equivalent to ABRSM/
Trinity College grade 8; students not holding a grade 8
certificate will need to be auditioned prior to entry to ensure
their playing is of comparable standard.
Return to Subjects
“I have completed five music modules since
coming to St Andrews, from opera studies
to bagpipes. The Department of Music is
relatively small which is lovely as the staff
really get a chance to know you. The wide
variety of music modules on offer allows you
to hone your skills and follow your passions,
but also to try something new!”
Music
133
Maddy (Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland)
Reading Opera: Texts, Libretti and Music from Purcell to Stravinsky
This module examines a range of operas from the eighteenth
to the twentieth centuries, focusing on the transformations of
meaning and structure that take place as text is turned into
libretto, and as libretto is set to music. It will be of particular
interest to students of English Literature, Modern Languages
and Classics, but will appeal to all interested in the relationship
between text, music and drama. Though the module will
examine the operas in depth, no prior knowledge of musical
notation or operatic history will be assumed.
Second Year
Electronic Music
This is a practical module offering you the opportunity to work
in the Music Centre’s studio to create music from electronic
sources. Accompanying lectures and seminars examine the
history of electronic music, amplified music and computer music
and look at works by significant composers and innovators who
have worked in these genres, from Stockhausen to Jimi Hendrix.
The module also offers tuition in music software packages
such as Sibelius, Logic and Ableton Live. No prior experience in
electronic music is necessary in order to take the module, but
some knowledge of music notation or music theory is strongly
advised.
Advanced Performance
This module is a practical, year-long module aimed at students
who wish to develop their playing to diploma level. The
module’s primary focus is performance but you will also have
the opportunity to consider relevant music in its historical
context. Teaching consists of individual instrumental lessons,
masterclasses and tutorials while assessment is based around
the preparation and presentation of an instrumental recital.
Scottish Music
This module explores a wide range of music in Scotland,
examining Highland and Lowland folk music and more recent
pop music as well as classical music composed from the
mediaeval era onwards. In doing so, it aims to build up an
understanding of the relationship between Scottish music
and the society in which it is produced. No prior knowledge
of musical notation is necessary: this module is for all those
interested in the rich and varied musical culture of Scotland.
Third Year
Concert Performance
This module caters for students aiming to perform to a
professional level or students wishing to go on to study
performance at postgraduate level. Teaching will include
instrumental/vocal lessons at the University’s Music Centre,
masterclasses with professional musicians and weekly
performance classes. Alongside the primary focus of
performance, students will also receive teaching in careers and
enterprise skills to assist their entry into the music profession.
The marking standards for this module are similar to a
performance diploma such as LRSM (Licentiate of the Associated
Board of the Royal Schools of Music). The module may be
especially attractive to a student wishing to put themselves
forward for such a diploma.
Contact
Dr Jane Pettegree
E: [email protected]
T: +44 (0)1334 462239
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/music
Return to Subjects
134
Persian
See also History – Middle East Studies page 108
See also Modern Languages page 130
Persian
‘With Integrated Year Abroad Degrees’ are only available where the
WIYA is taken in another language.
Degree options
A calligraphic rendition of a poem by Nima Yooshij
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/persian
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Persian and one of:
Arabic
Comparative
LiteratureT
Economics
FrenchW
W
T
GermanW
International
Relations
ItalianW
Management
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern History
RussianW
SpanishW
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists – consult Head of the Department.
MA “With” Degree
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first named subject:
Geography with Persian
International Relations with Persian
Mediaeval History with Persian
Modern History with Persian
MA (Honours Degrees) in 3 subjects:
– Persian and two of Arabic, French, German, Italian, Russian,
Spanish
– Modern Languages (Persian and [one of Arabic, French,
GermanB G, Italian, RussianR E T, SpanishS]) and one of Ancient
HistoryR, Classical StudiesS, EnglishE, International Relations,
LatinB, ManagementG T
– Modern Languages (Arabic and Persian) and Middle East
Studies
B
G
R
E
T
S
Features
*
We offer the largest range of Persian degrees in Scotland,
and are the only university in Scotland to offer Persian
alongside two other subjects.
* One of only six universities in the UK to offer degrees in
Persian.
* You can begin the study of Persian language with no prior
knowledge, and choose how far you wish to continue,
semester by semester, up to the end of second year.
* Two undergraduate societies – the Middle East Society and
the Islamic Society.
* Access to events in the Institute of Middle East, Central Asia
and Caucasus Studies, the Institute of Iranian Studies and
those organised by Middle Eastern Studies within the School
of History.
* The Persian book prize (a Persian book or a book related to
Persian) is an annual prize given to the best student of each
year.
* The Interpreter magazine, produced by students in the
School of Modern Languages, has featured a couple of
articles about Persian. See:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~theinterpreter
Combinations including German and Latin are only available to
beginners in German.
Combinations including German and Management are only available to
non-beginners in German.
This combination is only available to non-beginners in Russian due to a
timetable clash.
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Combinations including Classical Studies and Spanish are only available
to beginners in Spanish.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the higher entrance
requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
Saeed Talajooy
E: [email protected]
“I have had an exemplary experience with the Persian
Department at the University of St Andrews. The work
is intensive, but you advance faster than you can imagine.
Class sizes are quite small because the programme is very
new. The staff are very passionate about Iranian culture and
are natives of Iran themselves. We celebrate Iranian holidays,
watch Iranian movies, and cook Iranian food. I feel like I’m
not only learning a language, but I’m learning a culture.
The opportunities for someone who speaks Persian after
graduation are endless in both the public and private sector.”
Erika (Minnesota, USA)
Return to Subjects
Emily (Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, England)
What will I study?
Second Year ( 2 x 20-credit modules required)
We cover the language, literature and culture of the Persianspeaking world. The topics include classical and modern Persian
language and literature, and modern media and film.
The building of a high level of competence in language skills is
a priority in all modules, and you will be expected to write using
correct spelling, grammar and punctuation in both Persian and
English.
You may also take complementary modules in Mediaeval
History, Middle East Studies, Modern History, International
Relations and Modern Languages.
After completing the first two years, you will be able to read,
write and converse in Modern Persian.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Persian for Beginners 1 and 2
You will learn the skills of reception (reading and listening) and
production (speaking and writing) in Persian. You will become
familiar with the spoken and written forms of Persian, and this
will enable you to express yourself in writing, role play and basic
dialogues, and to begin to read basic authentic texts.
Intermediate Persian 1 and 2
You will develop skills that enable you to read more sophisticated
texts and translate them into English. You will also consolidate
your understanding of Persian grammar and learn how to use it
in reading, listening, speaking and writing. You will be exposed
to some key texts of classical Persian literature.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(Normally 4 x 15 credit modules over two years)
At Honours, in addition to core language modules, you can
currently choose from a range of topics such as Key Texts in
Modern Literature, Introduction to Classical Persian Poetry,
Modernity and Iranian Drama, Modern Iran through Cinema and
Female Identity in Contemporary Iran.
Study abroad
Currently there are a number of study abroad programmes for
Persian, including University of Toronto, Canada; University of
California, USA (one semester only); University of Pennsylvania,
USA; University of Virginia, USA. For more information on these
programmes and how to apply, see the St Andrews Abroad
page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 10 - 20, tutorials 4 - 15
Second Year: lectures 10 - 20, tutorials 4 - 15
Honours: classes 5 - 10, tutorials 5 - 10
Assessment
All our 1000- and 2000-level modules are assessed by
40% coursework, 20% oral examinations, and 40% written
examinations. At Honours level the assessment pattern depends
on the module chosen, but all include at least 40% assessed
coursework.
Careers
Graduates in Persian will be well prepared for a wide range of
careers for which an arts degree is a recognised qualification, for
example: in academia, government departments (in particular
the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the US State
Department), journalism, non-governmental organisations and
international companies.
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
A second year student writing in class
Return to Subjects
135
Persian
“As St Andrews is one of the only universities in the UK to offer Persian
I immediately chose to study it here as I love foreign languages and the
culture of the Middle East. The course is fast paced and challenging yet
so gratifying once you start being able to write basic sentences within the
first few weeks.Our class is fairly small and tight-knit so everyone has
the chance to participate and practise orally. Whilst learning grammar
and vocabulary in class we are also taught about the culture of the
region, crucial when learning such a different language!”
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/philosophy
Philosophy
136
Philosophy
BSc degrees combining Philosophy with Science subjects – such as
Biology, Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics or Statistics – will
also be available, but the precise details are still under discussion.
If you are interested in doing a BSc degree, please contact our
Admissions Officer (see below) for the latest information, or consult
the University of St Andrews webpages.
Department of Philosophy (Oluwasegun Onalaja-Aliu s )
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Features
Philosophy
*
MA (Joint Honours Degree)
Philosophy and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Biblical Studies
Classical Studies
Classics
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
Greek
W
*
International Relations
ItalianW
Latin
Management
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Modern History
Psychology
RussianW
Scottish History
Social Anthropology
SpanishW
Statistics
Theological Studies
*
*
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 35
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
Dr Derek Ball
E: [email protected]
*
*
A philosophy degree from St Andrews is held in high
regard throughout the academic world.
In their final year, significant numbers of our philosophy
undergraduates secure places on graduate programmes at
Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews or at leading universities
in the United States.
Philosophy can be pursued as a Single Honours degree,
but it also combines naturally with many other subjects,
such as Classics, International Relations, Psychology,
Theology or Mathematics. It can also be combined with
various Science subjects.
Philosophy staff at St Andrews work in a broad spectrum
of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral and
legal philosophy and beyond. As a result, we offer a
wider variety of courses than you might find elsewhere,
within a flexible modular system.
There is an annual reading party in the Scottish
Highlands for final-year students and staff.
The undergraduate Philosophy Society is one of the
largest student societies in the University. It organises
many talks, debates and social events throughout the
academic year attracting internationally renowned
speakers, and it publishes its own philosophy journal,
Aporia, to which students are invited to contribute.
Philosophy was rated top in Scotland and fifth in the UK
in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
Facilities and resources
The Philosophy Departments are housed in Edgecliffe, a
nineteenth-century building with beautiful views out over St Andrews Bay. The view from the library makes it a lovely
place to work.
What will I study?
Philosophy is an exploration of some of the oldest and
most vexing questions asked by human beings. What
differentiates truth from falsehood, and reality from
appearance? How is the mind related to the body? Are
we really free in our decisions and actions, or is freedom
an illusion? Are the things we regard as valuable good in
themselves, or good only by custom and convention? Can
a work of art be immoral? What justifies some in exercising
power over others? Do we need a rational justification for
religious belief, and if so, does one exist? For over 2,500
years human beings have been trying to develop systematic
answers to these questions.
Return to Subjects
Ben (Manchester, England)
At St Andrews, we try to familiarise you with views put forward by
the principal figures of the philosophical tradition, and provide
you with the means of rationally and independently assessing
your arguments. Learning philosophy is therefore as much
about acquiring skills of criticism and analysis, clear thinking and
principled debate, as it is about learning a specific subject matter.
Training in the sort of precise and effective reading, and the
clear thinking and writing required for all philosophical study
makes a good preparation for many careers. The critical thinking
developed by the study of philosophy is highly valued by many
employers.
Staff at St Andrews are at the forefront of research in their varied
fields. This expertise and enthusiasm is conveyed at all levels of
teaching. There is a flourishing graduate programme, and a busy
schedule of conferences, symposia and special lectures with
speakers from all over the world. St Andrews is also home to one
of the most respected international philosophy journals, the
Philosophical Quarterly.
We offer a wide range of choices in every year of study.
First and Second Years
(1 x 20-credit core module + 60 credits of optional modules)
First year teaching allows you to study some of the great books
in philosophy, and introduces you to fundamental philosophical
questions discussed by philosophers from the beginnings of
Greek antiquity right up until the present day. These questions
can be abstract and theoretical, for example how to define
knowledge or how to relate the mind and the body, or practical,
for example what kinds of obligations we have to others, and
how we ought to live. There are specific subjects you have to
cover if you want to continue with philosophy, but there are
several options to choose from, even at the introductory level.
In second year, there is further opportunity to study the history
of philosophy and to learn about intermediate logic, the
philosophy of language, epistemology, moral philosophy and
aesthetics. You will be able to explore more deeply some of
the questions you will have worked on in first year, and lay the
foundation required for an Honours degree in Philosophy.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(optional modules)
At Honours, you choose from a wide variety of advanced
options, including topics in epistemology (the study of
knowledge), metaphysics, formal logic, the philosophies of logic,
mind, and language, applied ethics, ethical and political theory,
metaethics, aesthetics, and the philosophies of film, creativity,
law, and religion, as well as texts in the history of philosophy,
such as Scottish philosophy, Kant, or twentieth-century
philosophy.
Study abroad
As a student of Philosophy, you may apply to participate in our
Erasmus+ exchange with Aarhus University in Denmark, where
some classes are taught in English. You may apply to study
abroad under the University’s St Andrews Abroad programme.
See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 120 - 220, tutorials 7 - 9
Second Year: lectures 40 - 120, tutorials 7 - 9
Honours: lectures 10 - 50, seminars 10
First and second year teaching involves both formal lectures and
informal tutorials, in which you discuss your ideas, questions
and problems with your tutor and with fellow students. There
are also examples classes to support the teaching of formal
logic. In Honours, teaching is often conducted in seminars,
where you may often be asked to present and discuss your own
work.
Assessment
All 1000- and 2000-level Philosophy modules are assessed by
equal measures of coursework and written examinations. This
pattern is continued in the majority of Honours modules, with
some exceptions which are assessed solely by coursework.
Scholarships
The University awards needs-based Entrant Scholarships to
students in Philosophy. Further information at:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/scholarships
Careers
Recent graduates have found openings in local government,
television production (Sky Sports), Oddbins as a wine
adviser, as a public information intern for the United Nations
Commission for Refugees, the National Health Service, the
Co-operative Bank, insurance, the Crown Prosecution Service,
publishing, and teaching English in Japan.
It is not uncommon for St Andrews philosophy graduates
to enter the legal profession after a conversion course or a
second degree in law. A substantial proportion of philosophy
graduates choose to pursue an academic career. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-philosophy-careers
Please see page 34 for details of the University Careers Centre.
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137
Philosophy
“As a Philosophy student, you will be asked the question ‘what is
philosophy?’ on many occasions. While there is no simple answer, the
skills that you will learn and the confidence that you will develop by
considering some of life’s biggest questions is truly unique. Studying
at St Andrews will give you the opportunity to discuss your work
with leading practitioners in an environment that naturally inspires
philosophical study.”
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/physics
Physics & Astronomy
138
Physics & Astronomy
Degree options
BSc (Single Honours Degrees)
Astrophysics
Physics
School of Physics & Astronomy
MPhys (Single Honours Degrees)
Astrophysics
Physics
Theoretical Physics
Subject enquiries
Dr Kenny Wood
E: [email protected]
BSc (Joint Honours Degrees)
Physics and one of:
Computer Science
Mathematics
Philosophy *
*
Features
The title and content of BSc Philosophy combinations is under review.
MPhys (Joint Honours Degree)
*
*
Theoretical Physics and Mathematics
*
MSci (Joint Honours Degree)
*
Physics and Chemistry
*
Entrance Requirements (see BMTPpage 5)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
*
The nature of the School allows significant interaction
amongst staff and students.
The UK Research Excellence Framework 2014 has rated the
quality of the School’s research at third in the UK.
Our programmes are particularly flexible offering a choice of
entry and exit points.
Entrants with good Advanced Highers /A-Levels may attain
an Honours BSc in three years, or an MPhys in four.
Our degrees have been accredited by the Institute of
Physics.
National and international recognition of the research work
of some final year students.
First Year Entry
SQA Highers and GCE A-Levels should include Physics and
Mathematics
SQA Highers: AAAA
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38 including HL6 in
Physics AND HL6 in Mathematics
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Second Year Entry
SQA Highers/Advanced Highers and GCE A-Levels should
include Physics and Mathematics
SQA Highers: AAAA at Highers, and AA at Advanced Highers
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 38 including HL6 in
Physics AND HL6 in Mathematics
Physics and Astronomy (Gateway and International
Gateway) Entry
For UK students with high academic potential but having
experienced disadvantage, at least BBBB or ABBC at
Highers, BBB at A-Level, in all cases to include Physics and
Mathematics. Also for international students with high
academic potential but with less access to advanced level
qualifications.
Preference may be given to candidates offering strong science
qualifications.
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – Yes, see above.
Our astronomy team played a major role in the collaboration that discovered
the most earth-like planet yet found outside our solar system. This artist’s
impression is courtesy of the European Southern Observatory. This planet
was found using gravitational lensing. 116 gas-giant exoplanets have been
found using a robotic telescope to search for the dimming of a star’s light as a
planet passes in front it.
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“Coming to St Andrews to study Astrophysics has been fantastic. The
lecturers are so relaxed but everyone gets involved and has fun, and
the small tutorial classes really help give students the best learning
environment possible. Learning to use the School’s telescopes has
definitely been one of the best things I’ve had the opportunity of doing
here. Studying at St Andrews rewards you in so many ways, and gives
you lifelong skills, as well an incredible and unforgettable four years.”
Physics & Astronomy
139
Doyin (Stourbridge, West Midlands, England)
Facilities and resources
Physics is thriving at St Andrews, with major research groups
working in astronomy and astrophysics, laser physics and
optoelectronics, biophotonics, quantum optics, magnetism and
superconductivity, millimetre-wave techniques, semiconductor
physics, and theoretical physics. Healthy numbers of wellqualified students join our BSc and MPhys programmes each
year.
The strong research base in the School provides exciting
opportunities to use high specification experimental apparatus.
Almost all our teaching is done in the same building as our
research labs and offices, which helps build the student and staff
community in the School.
The University Observatory houses the largest optical research
telescope in the UK, and is an active part of the exoplanet
research programme. In 2011 undergraduate students
discovered a new planet using this telescope.
You become part of a stimulating academic community, and
can progress from the core modules of years one and two
through to modules at the end of your studies that are at the
frontiers of current knowledge. The final year project, which
is usually undertaken within one of the research groups, is
often a highlight of the degree programme. Recent projects
have involved using data on terahertz radiation obtained
from a world-class telescope to map out the surface of Pluto,
optimising magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of cardiac
disease, developing tools for probing atomic-scale properties
of materials in our ultra-low vibration research laboratories, and
modelling the interaction of photons with qubits.
In recent years there have been particularly striking
developments in astronomy. Searches for planetary systems
around stars other than the Sun are being successfully pursued.
Temperature image of a hand taken by passive
imaging at a wavelength of 3 mm. This was
developed at the School’s Photonics Innovation
Centre and has potential applications in
dermatology and skin cancer investigations.
The theory and observation of star and planet formation is
developing rapidly, as is our understanding of the galaxy
population. In cosmology ‘dark matter’, ‘dark energy’ and
alternative theories of gravity are key areas which are advancing
rapidly.
Entry and exit points
A five-level structure is used in order to provide suitable entry
points tailored to students with different backgrounds.
The final choice between BSc and the more advanced MPhys
can usually be postponed until the end of third year.
First year entry has been designed for those entering straight
from Scottish Highers, those wishing to experience the
traditional broad-based first year at a Scottish university, and
those on some Joint Honours degree programmes. If you have
good Advanced Highers or A-Levels, and you are sure that you
wish to study for a degree in physics, astrophysics, or the joint
degrees with Mathematics, you are invited to enter directly into
second year, from which point an Honours BSc degree lasts
three years and an MPhys degree four years. Currently between
a quarter and a half of our entrant students take this accelerated
route. Further information is overleaf.
We have an alternative entry route entitled Physics and
Astronomy (Gateway). This gives a specially tailored first year
with about half of the modules taken from existing physics and
maths modules, and half on new modules aimed specifically
at students who have high academic potential but who have
for various reasons not been able to demonstrate that fully in
school-level examinations. The new modules provide many
contact hours of learning a week to develop maths and physics
knowledge and associated academic skills. Success in first
year opens up progression to the second year of the degree
programmes in physics, astrophysics, maths/physics and others.
St Andrews astronomers are researching star formation
by performing numerical simulations of how gas clouds
can collapse to form collections of stars 1016 m across. In
this simulation, a low density cloud has, under the action
of gravity, increased in density by 21 orders of magnitude.
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Studying the properties of exotic magnetic
and superconducting materials at close to
absolute zero temperature.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/physics
Physics & Astronomy
140
Physics &
Astronomy
(continued)
Investigating the physics of a broadly tunable laser in the third-year photonics teaching laboratory.
What will I study?
First Year
All students take the modules Physics 1A and Physics 1B. In
addition, students aiming for the Astrophysics degree take
Astronomy and Astrophysics 1 which presents a broad outline of
the astronomical universe. You also take at least one module in
Mathematics, as well as other modules of interest to give a total
of 120 credits.
Second Year (2nd year for some, year of entry for others)
The main branches of physics are discussed in Physics 2A and
Physics 2B. The module Astronomy and Astrophysics 2 is required
for astronomers and optional for others. It is intended to introduce
you to advanced astrophysics material. Students take at least
two 2000-level Mathematics modules and other modules to give
usually a 120 credit total.
Honours (Third, Fourth and optionally Fifth Years)
In the two (BSc) or three (MPhys) Honours years the main
branches of the degree subject are covered in considerable
depth. You take some or all of the mainstream modules
in quantum mechanics, physics of atoms, nuclear and particle
physics, thermal and statistical physics, electromagnetism and
solid state physics, and take additional modules in the
appropriate specialist areas. Depending on the degree
programme, these might include Extragalactic Astronomy,
Computational Astrophysics, Physics of Electronic Devices, Signals
and Information, Laser Physics, Special Relativity and Fields, and
Fluids. In your final year, you carry out a research project which
usually involves working with one of the research groups in the
School.
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
In addition, the Robert T Jones Trust funds one year of
postgraduate Masters study at the prestigious Georgia
Institute of Technology (Atlanta) for a selected person
graduating from our School.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First and Second Year: lectures 20 - 110, tutorials 4 - 8
Honours: lectures 5 - 70, third year tutorials 5 - 9
Laboratory work is usually undertaken in pairs in first year,
individually in second year, and as a mixture of individual and
pair/team work in the Honours labs.
In first year you will typically have Physics 1A or 1B as one
third of your workload in a semester. In these modules you
typically have four lectures a week, one problem-solving
workshop, one small group (~7 students) tutorial, and
2.5 hours in the teaching laboratory. In second year you
typically have Physics 2A or 2B as one half of your workload.
In these modules you typically have five lectures a week, one
problem-solving workshop, one small group (~5 students)
tutorial, and 2.5 hours in the teaching laboratory. In the
Honours years you typically have three lectures a week for
each 15-credit lecture-based module. Laboratory modules
take two afternoons a week for students on Physics and
Astrophysics programmes. The final year projects last for a
semester, full time for most MPhys students and 20 hours a
week for most BSc students.
The optional MPhys additional year contains a number of
advanced modules chosen from topics that may include
Biophotonics, Quantum Optics, Group Theory, Contemporary
Astrophysics, Magnetofluids and Space Plasmas, as well as a major
research project.
Biophotonics research at St Andrews, in collaboration with Ninewells
Hospital in Dundee, has produced this “light emitting sticking plaster” that
is used to treat skin cancers with a photo-activated drug.
The 16 inch Meade telescope at the University Observatory is used in
teaching, and by the student Astronomical Society. The Observatory also
houses the largest optical research telescope in the UK.
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Explaining research activities in solid state physics.
Students working in the School’s group study area.
Assessment
At 1000 and 2000 level, modules are assessed by at least 50%
written examinations and a mixture of coursework (including
laboratory work). At Honours level the assessment depends on
the nature of the specific module.
Scholarships
There are several scholarships for students taking part in the
Gateway programme. There are also various scholarships
available from the University that all students may apply for, see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/physics/pandaweb/admiss/bursaries
Visiting Days
On University Visiting Days (see page 2) the School has two
slots in the afternoons. The first is intended for all potential
students, and gives an overview of courses, a tour of the
building, and discussion opportunities. The second slot is an
optional follow-on from the first session, where visitors can
tour the University Observatory. The School runs a special
Saturday Visiting Day in February, details of which are on our
webpages. www.st-andrews.ac.uk/physics
Careers
Graduates in any of these disciplines enjoy a wide range of
career options, including research and development in industry
and in Government agencies. Many find employment in fields
not directly related to their degree subject, e.g. computing,
software development, meteorology, biophysics, geophysics,
banking and commerce, where their problem-solving skills and
numeracy are in demand. Our School’s webpages includes a
number of ’graduate profiles‘ showing our graduates working
as an investment manager in Brisbane, a photonics researcher
in Japan, an “engineer in charge” on the fusion project JET,
a physics teacher in Mallaig, a patent lawyer in London, and
an accountant in Edinburgh. Other graduates are working in
high-tech companies in the USA and UK, some have started up
their own businesses in science and technology, and some are
in the University sector doing research and teaching. For more
information:
http://bit.ly/sta-physicsgrads and
http://bit.ly/sta-physics-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Second year students explore touch screens as inputs to microprocessors.
Honours laboratory investigation of the superconducting transition in a
niobium-titanium alloy. Through the use of liquid helium, students can take
samples from room temperature to four kelvin.
Undergraduate research project in optical tweezers. Kim, above, and other
students have comments linked from the Schools “Prospective UG” webpage.
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Physics & Astronomy
141
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/psychology
Psychology &
Neuroscience
142
Psychology &
Neuroscience
Degree options
MA or BSc (Single Honours Degree)
School of Psychology & Neuroscience
Psychology
BSc (Single Honours Degree)
Subject enquiries
Neuroscience (with School of Biology)
Psychology: Dr James Ainge
E: [email protected]
Joint Honours Degrees
Psychology and one of:
Art History (MA)
Biology (BSc)
Computer Science (BSc)
Economics (BSc or MA)
English (MA)
Film Studies (MA)
FrenchW (MA)
Geography (MA)
GermanW (MA)
International Relations (MA)
W
T
ItalianW (MA)
Management (MA)
Mathematics (BSc or MA)
Mediaeval History (MA)
Modern History (MA)T
Philosophy (MA)
Social Anthropology (MA)
Statistics (BSc or MA)
Theological Studies (MA)
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
“With” Degrees
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Psychology with Biology (BSc)
Psychology with Geography (MA)
[If you wish to study Arts subjects in your first and second years,
apply for the MA rather than the BSc degree.]
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
Psychology
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
Neuroscience:
Dr Wenchang Li
E: [email protected]
Features
*
An emphasis on ‘doing’ not just listening: we equip you to
ask and answer psychological questions.
* An opportunity to conduct your own research project
in well-equipped laboratories under the supervision of
leading authorities in the field.
* The opportunity to specialise in your areas of interest in
the final year and to be taught in small specialist seminars.
* Psychology achieved a strong research performance in the
UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
BSc or MA?
Such a wide ranging discipline offers opportunities for
degrees in Psychology for those who have specialised at
school in arts subjects or are trained in the physical and
biological sciences. As such, the degree is offered as both an
MA in the Faculty of Arts, and a BSc in the Faculty of Science.
The Psychology components of your degree are the same
regardless of whether you take an MA or BSc in Psychology.
The difference is in the other subjects you study in your first
and second year. If your background is scientific choose the
BSc but if your other interests are philosophical, historical or
literary, choose the MA.
What will I study?
Psychology
Psychology at St Andrews introduces you to the latest ideas
in the field of psychology. In the first three years the course
is very broadly based. You are introduced to the full range of
areas that are studied by psychologists. This provides a firm
foundation in the subject and allows you to make choices
in the final year amongst the advanced modules that are on
offer.
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No
Neuroscience
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 35
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – Students should
have taken 2 of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics at
Higher, A-Level or Higher level IB.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
However the course is not just about listening to other
people’s ideas. It is also about learning to do research yourself.
There is a strong emphasis on practical classes and on learning
research techniques right from the start. In the final year you
have the opportunity to carry out your own research project
on a topic of your choice under the individual supervision of
a staff member – all of whom are active researchers, many at
the forefront of their field. Their research has made significant
contributions to the development of psychology as an
academic discipline, and has delivered tangible benefits to
society, such as the development of a computer programme
to assist in the care of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
Return to Subjects
Mary (Düsseldorf, Germany)
Whether you are entering the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty
of Science there are 1000-level modules which give a general
introduction to psychology. A pass can lead on to the 2000-level
modules in which topics from the 1000-level are built on and
expanded in greater depth, combined with an introduction
to new areas of psychology. By the end of the second year
everyone will have the grounding for the more advanced
Honours Psychology programmes, regardless of entry route.
Honours entry is dependent on performance in the second year.
First Year MA and BSc (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Four lectures and a two-hour practical per week. These cover
an introduction to the problems and methods of psychology
including instruction in diverse areas such as the Biological
Bases of Behaviour, Cognition, Development, Social Behaviour
and Individual Differences in Behaviour. They also provide a
methodology programme which integrates the practical classes
with instruction in research design and statistics.
Second Year MA and BSc (2 x 30-credit modules required)
Four lectures and a three-hour practical per week, plus small
group tutorials. These provide a more developed treatment
of the problems and methods of psychology, covering such
topics as Social Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Physiological
Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience and Perception. The
methodology programme also continues through the second
year.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(Single Honours – full time – 60 credits per semester)
Lecture hours vary, with an increasing emphasis on library
and project research. At Junior Honours, modules provide an
advanced grounding in the core areas of psychology, including
Perception, Cognition, Social Psychology, and Evolutionary and
Comparative Psychology and Developmental Psychology. There
are also the modules Research Design and Analysis 1 & 2 and
a supervised literature review on a topic of your choice. In
the Senior Honours year, you choose from a wide range of
specialist modules, on topics such as Psychology of Dementia,
Psychology of Terrorism, Psychopathology, Psychology of Visual
Art, Cognitive Psychology and the Emotional Disorders or the
Psychology of Music. You also write a dissertation and undertake
a research project in an area of your choice.
Neuroscience
This programme is taught jointly by the School of Psychology
& Neuroscience and the School of Biology. This programme
explores the interface between psychology and neurobiology
paralleling the strength of our research activities in this exciting
area. Honours topics cover molecular, cellular and physiological
processes, cellular and applied neurobiology, pharmacology
and neurochemistry. Honours modules also cover cognitive
and behavioural neuroscience, clinical neuroscience and neural
modelling. A final research project is available in either School.
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
Class sizes vary from year to year but typical sizes based on the
previous year are as follows:
First Year: lectures 250, labs 40
Second Year: lectures 140, labs 40, tutorials 6
Junior Honours: lectures 70, labs 70, individual supervision for
literature review
Senior Honours: classes 10 - 45
Neuroscience module classes are normally smaller, 30-50 in
Junior Honours and 5-20 in Senior Honours.
Students also carry out a research project where they receive
individual supervision.
The degree programmes are taught using a wide variety of
methods, including traditional lectures, seminars, practicals,
tutorials and individual supervision. At Honours much of the
teaching is in small groups and there is a considerable amount
of one-on-one contact with staff. There is a general emphasis
on active learning, with students having the opportunity to ask
questions, participate in discussions and debate issues.
Assessment
1000- and 2000-level modules are assessed by 25% coursework
and 75% multiple choice questions or written examinations.
At Honours level the nature of assessment depends on the
individual module, some are assessed entirely by coursework, or
by examinations or by a mixture of the two.
Professional exemptions and accreditation
The Single Honours degree and the “With” degrees are recognised
by the British Psychological Society as conferring the basis for
graduate registration. That is, they are a qualification for undertaking
training in various areas of professional psychology including
clinical psychology and educational psychology. It should be
noted that both the BSc and the MA degree are acceptable
qualifications for all postgraduate courses in psychology including
clinical psychology. Postgraduate courses in psychology are
usually very competitive and if you plan to become a professional
psychologist the Single Honours degree is recommended.
However, subject to taking the necessary Honours components,
Joint Honours degrees may also gain BPS recognition.
Careers
There are a number of professions directly linked to a Psychology
degree such as Clinical Psychology, Educational Psychology,
Industrial Psychology and Forensic Psychology. It is also
associated with jobs in the welfare area and in personnel. More
generally, a good Honours degree in Psychology can give direct
entry into management training and civil service posts. Recent
graduates have secured positions in the health service, speech
therapy and banking. Many Neuroscience graduates pursue
postgraduate training and research careers in neuroscience.
For more information: http://bit.ly/sta-psychology-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
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143
Psychology &
Neuroscience
“Getting to know different areas of psychology before choosing your favourites
to immerse yourself in is great. Lecturers who are extremely passionate about
their research make this experience even better, so that I had difficulty deciding
which modules to choose. Their enthusiasm also offers early opportunities to
get involved in scientific research. As School President, I was impressed by the
School’s commitment to teaching excellence and its willingness to shape the learning
experience together with its students.”
144
Russian
See also Modern Languages page 130
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/russian
Russian
Degrees all available With or Without Integrated Year Abroad
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Department of Russian
Russian
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Russian and one of:
Arabic
Art History
Comparative
Literature
Economics
EnglishE
Film Studies
French
German
International
Relations
Italian
Latin
ManagementT
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern History
Persian
Philosophy
Scottish History
Social Anthropology
Spanish
Theological Studies
MA (Honours Degrees) in
– Russian and two of Arabic, French, German, Italian, Persian,
Spanish
– Russian and (one of Arabic, French, German, Italian,
Spanish) and Comparative Literature
– Modern Languages (Russian and [one of Arabic, French,
GermanB G, Italian, Persian, Spanish]) and one of
Ancient HistoryR, EnglishE, International Relations, LatinB,
ManagementG T
– Modern Languages (Russian and [one of Arabic, French,
Italian, Persian, SpanishS]) and Classical StudiesS
E
T
B
G
R
S
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Modern Languages (Russian-German) and Latin is only available to
beginners in German.
Combinations including German and Management are only available
to non-beginners in German.
Combinations including Russian and Ancient History are only available
to non-beginners in Russian.
Combinations including Classical Studies and Spanish are only available
to beginners in Spanish.
MA “With” Degrees
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Economics with Russian
Russian with Geography
Mathematics with Russian
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB (with an A in the language(s) to be studied,
unless the applicant plans to study the language(s) at
beginners’ level)
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in the
language(s) to be studied, except those to be taken from
beginners’ level.
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
Dr Claire Whitehead
E: [email protected]
Features
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Start your study of Russian as an absolute beginner, or
continue your studies from school.
A wide variety of degree combinations involving Russian
are on offer.
Take Russian either as Single Honours, or in combination
with one or two other subjects.
Acquire advanced skills in spoken and written Russian, for
a variety of contexts.
Choose from a wide range of modules in Russian
language, literature and cultural history.
Develop language and other skills through a prolonged
stay in Russia on a study placement.
Study in an intimate and friendly environment, in small
groups taught by research-active staff.
Facilities and resources
The School has a Multimedia Centre with the latest electronic
technology to enhance the learning and practice of oral and
aural skills.
The Department enjoys an excellent reputation nationally,
consistently being ranked amongst the top departments of
Russian in the UK. It has a proven track record of excellence in
teaching and combines this with internationally recognised
research in a range of fields. We are extremely proud of the
calibre of our graduates who are sought out each year by
a wide range of employers, including law firms, financial
institutions and NGOs, or who go on to further study.
What will I study?
At the core of our curriculum lie modules dedicated to a sound
knowledge of the language. The majority of our graduates
begin their study of Russian here with no prior knowledge
of the language. Students who already have a suitable preuniversity qualification in Russian (e.g. A-Level, Scottish Higher,
IB) follow a separate language course for the first two years,
specifically tailored to their needs and experience. All of our
language modules aim to combine modern ‘communicative’
methods with sound grammatical accuracy and a high level
Return to Subjects
“The Russian Department keep things
challenging and interesting; I have gained so
much experience and made friends from all over
the world. I also had the opportunity to spend
time studying abroad at St Petersburg State
University. I really enjoyed being able to build
upon the Russian skills I’d learnt in St Andrews
with native speakers.”
Russian
145
Caitlin (Renfrew, Scotland)
of oral aptitude. These language modules are supplemented,
most notably at Honours, by a wide range of modules
dedicated to nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature,
film, cultural history and contemporary Russian society. The
aim of such modules is to allow you a deeper and more diverse
understanding and appreciation of different aspects of Russian
culture. At the same time you will develop the ability to
analyse and discuss critically, to present a reasoned argument,
to write with correct spelling, punctuation and grammar
in both Russian and English and to use online resources in
Russian. A highly recommended part of the programme is the
period spent in Russia studying at a university or language
institute. Stays abroad can range in length from six weeks to
a full academic year and can be combined with residence in a
Russian home to maximise exposure to Russian language and
life.
Upon completion of their degrees, our students have an
excellent command of the language and have gained an
invaluable understanding and appreciation of the various
enigmas which contemporary Russia presents.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
We have modules designed to cater for students with no prior
knowledge of the language as well as modules for those who
have a school qualification. None of our modules are designed
for native or heritage speakers of Russian.
Second Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
The distinction between beginners and non-beginners is
maintained, with separate sets of modules depending on your
previous experience. For both beginners and non-beginners,
there is a range of modules available to ensure maximum
flexibility with the modules being taken in other subjects.
The basic distinction between these modules is whether the
focus falls primarily on language acquisition, or whether this
language acquisition is supplemented by the study of literature
and culture.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(4 x 15-credit core modules required and at least 4 other
15-credit modules required over 2 years)
Many students go to Russia for a year after second year. The
Junior Honours language programme which they take on
their return assumes their additional skill. Those who opt to
go straight into Junior Honours take a less advanced language
track, but most of them go to Russia for the second half of that
year. In Senior Honours all students come together for the final
lap of the language curriculum.
Apart from the core language modules, at Honours you may
choose from a variety of Russian modules in nineteenth- and
twentieth-century literature, cultural history, and a dissertation
in order to complete the required number and spread of
credits.
Modules currently available, but subject to change, include or
cover aspects of:
• • • • • • • • Russia’s Literary Easts
The Nineteenth-century Russian Novel
The Fantastic in Nineteenth-century Russian Literature
Russian Crime Fiction
The City in Soviet and Russian Cinema
Russian Modernist Fiction: 1900-1940
Issues in Russian Cultural Memory
Russian ‘Village Prose’: 1953-1980
Study abroad
Honours degrees With Integrated Year Abroad (WIYA) in Russia
involve residence there for the academic session between
second and third years. If you take the four-year degree instead,
you may apply to go to Russia for the second semester of third
year. In each case, you are placed on a university language
course under the auspices of Russian Language Undergraduate
Studies Ltd., a UK-based organisation. All arrangements are
made with considerable help, advice, and support from the
Russian Department. You may also apply to study abroad under
the University’s St Andrews Abroad programme. See page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
Language teaching: 5 - 20
First Year: lectures 50, tutorials 15
Second Year: 15 - 30
Honours: classes 5 - 15, seminars 5 - 12
Russian language teaching is conducted in classes of between
five and twenty students with small groups meeting the lectrice
for conversation classes. Literature and culture classes follow a
seminar format, and at Honours students in literature modules
give individual seminar presentations as well as writing essays.
Assessment
At all levels the assessment pattern varies depending on the
individual module, but coursework is always significant with
all module grades based on at least 40% coursework.
Careers
Russia’s political and economic significance in the world
means ever-multiplying career prospects for those who
can communicate in Russian. Graduates have gone into the
British Foreign Office and various other government bodies,
to study law, into teaching, the armed services, accountancy,
graduate entrant positions in firms like Heineken UK, and
Littlewoods. Others work as educators in Russia and Eastern
Europe or pursue graduate study. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-modlangs-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/anthropology
Social Anthropology
146
Social Anthropology
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Social Anthropology
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Social Anthropology and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Classical Studies
Classics
Comparative Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
FrenchW
Geography
GermanW
Greek
W
T
Department of Social Anthropology
International Relations
ItalianW
Latin
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern HistoryT
Philosophy
Psychology
RussianW
Scottish History
SpanishW T
Theological Studies
Features
*
*
*
Available With Integrated Year Abroad – see Modern Languages.
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
MA “With” Degrees
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Economics with Social Anthropology
Geography with Social Anthropology
Social Anthropology with Geography
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AABB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
International Baccalaureate Points: 35
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
E: [email protected]
*
*
In its report for 2014 the National Student Survey ranked
us the best department of Social Anthropology in the
UK with a student satisfaction rating of 100% for our
teaching.
1000-level modules focus on topics of popular interest,
such as economic development and the relationship
between human society and its environment. NonWestern societies conceptualise these topics in a
radically different manner from Western society.
2000-level modules provide a thorough grounding
in the discipline and – unique to St Andrews – the
opportunity to conduct an ‘ethnographic encounters’
fieldwork project.
Honours modules allow for the exploration of a variety
of important anthropological themes in depth.
Teaching at all levels is informed by the research
interests and accomplishments of lecturing staff.
Facilities and resources
The Department has grown over recent years and has built
on its particular strengths in the study of societies of the
Pacific, South America, the Caribbean, Europe and Africa.
It has increased its visual anthropology teaching and has
a very strong reputation for its work on the anthropology
of the arts. Most recently, the Centre for Pacific Studies has
been awarded major funding to assess the effects of climate
change on island communities in Oceania. As a research-led
teaching department all these developments will feed into
your experience of learning and studying in the department.
Staff specialisations
There is a very strong interest in Amazonian and Andean
anthropology in the Department, although other staff
specialisations include the anthropology of West and East
Africa and Melanesian anthropology, particularly Papua
New Guinea. Visual anthropology is a significant new
development here and staff have further regional interests
in the Caribbean. We have a very strong presence in the
anthropology of Europe.
The Department also has three research centres: Centre
for Amerindian, Latin American and Caribbean Studies,
Centre for Cosmopolitan Studies and the Centre for Pacific
Studies.
Return to Subjects
“I chose to study Social Anthropology because it
offers a unique entry point to understanding the
world we live in. I am privileged to have a place
in such a centre of learning and am hoping to
proceed from here to work with NGOs while
hopefully being able to balance this with a
continued career in academia.”
Social Anthropology
147
Tamara (Chastanier, France)
What will I study?
Class sizes and teaching delivery
Social Anthropologists explore human social organisations and
customs from a comparative cross-cultural perspective, we focus
on the experience of groups and individuals in different sociocultural settings. Social Anthropology at St Andrews deals with
the full variety of human contexts, although a chief focus is still
on societies beyond Europe and North America. The Department
concentrates on the similarities and differences between preindustrial and industrial societies, and is very much concerned
with change in our contemporary world. Anthropology
at St Andrews has a distinctive orientation that combines
interpretative, experiential, philosophical, and historical research
that is politically engaged, reflexive and critically aware. The
Department is very highly rated in national subject surveys.
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
You are introduced to the variety of societies that anthropologists
study and to some key theoretical approaches. The first module
concentrates on the increasing relevance of anthropology to
issues in the contemporary world whilst the second focuses on
the cultural aspects of social life such as cosmology, ritual and
language – including our own.
Second Year (2 x 20 credit modules required)
You are presented with the variety of perspectives for the
study of human social life, including the theories of Durkheim,
Malinowski, Evans-Pritchard, Lévi-Strauss and Geertz, and to all
the basic concepts necessary to pursue anthropological enquiry.
One module concentrates on the history of the discipline, and
another module – a St Andrews innovation – especially focuses
on how to do anthropology and includes an opportunity for you
to conduct your own ‘ethnographic encounters’ mini-fieldwork
projects.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
We look in detail at selected areas of Social Anthropology,
and provide a combination of key disciplinary and optional
modules in recognition of divergent student interests by this
stage. You will take modules in anthropological theory and
research methods in your Junior Honours year. These modules
are particularly important as preparation for the dissertation
which is completed in Senior Honours. You also choose modules
of particular interest from a range of options offered each year,
which explore societies in certain regions of the world, such
as Latin America, The Pacific, Britain and West Africa or focus
on specialist topics, such as Visual Anthropology, Language
and Culture, Anthropology and History, Sex and Gender, and
Indigenous Peoples and Resource Extraction.
Study abroad
As a student of Social Anthropology, you may apply to
participate in our Erasmus+ exchanges with the University of
Copenhagen and the University of Stockholm, both of which
offer a range of courses taught in English. You may also apply
to study abroad under the University’s St Andrews Abroad
programme. See page 44.
First Year: lectures 250, tutorials 10 - 12
Second Year: lectures 100, tutorials 10 - 12
Honours: class sizes are capped at 30, and are usually
considerably smaller
In first and second years, classes meet four times per week in a
programme of lectures, tutorials, workshops and the showing
of ethnographic films. Tutorial groups meet once a week to
discuss prepared reading. In all years assessment is through
essays, project work and examinations, and makes use of a
diversity of assessment methods such as take-home exams,
student diaries and creative writing. In Honours instruction is
predominantly through seminars which combine elements
of lectures, films, presentations and discussions. You progress
through a planned programme which draws on a variety of
module options. A student doing Single Honours can expect
to attend seminars, lectures and tutorials for at least six hours
each week. An important component of Honours is the writing
of a supervised dissertation where you can independently
explore a theme of your own choice, which can include
fieldwork in a selected community.
Assessment
At all levels, at least 40% of the grade is based on coursework.
The balance is made up of either further coursework or
examinations, depending on the individual module.
Scholarships
Junior Honours students in Social Anthropology can apply for
a Ladislav Holy Memorial Scholarship, around three of which
are awarded each year. These contribute towards travel and
subsistence costs relating to anthropological fieldwork in the
summer vacation between the Junior and Senior Honours
years.
Careers
A degree in Social Anthropology is important for any career
where knowledge of other cultures is vital, such as in overseas
development or in community relations work in Britain.
Students with degrees in Social Anthropology have also
proceeded to a wide range of careers, including the diplomatic
service, social work, law and business. Any occupation that
requires a sensitivity to different ways of life, or which demands
the manipulation of theoretical ideas and detailed empirical
data, benefits from the study of Social Anthropology. For further
information: http://bit.ly/sta-socanth-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Return to Subjects
148
Spanish
See also Modern Languages page 130
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/spanish
Spanish
Degrees all available With or Without Integrated Year Abroad
Degree options
MA (Single Honours Degree)
Cádiz Cathedral
Spanish
MA (Joint Honours Degrees)
Spanish and one of:
Ancient History
Arabic
Art History
Classics
Comparative
Literature
Economics
English
Film Studies
French
Geography
German
Greek (Ancient)
International
Relations
Italian
Latin
Management
Mathematics
Mediaeval History
Middle East Studies
Modern HistoryT
Persian
Philosophy
Russian
Scottish History
Social AnthropologyT
Theological Studies
– Spanish and two of French, German, Italian, Persian Russian
– Spanish and (one of French, German, Italian, Russian) and
Comparative Literature
– Modern Languages (Spanish and [one of French, GermanB G,
Italian, Persian, RussianR E T ])and one of Ancient HistoryR,
EnglishE, International Relations, LatinB, ManagementG T
– Modern Languages (Spanish and [one of French, Italian,
Persian, Russian]) and Classical StudiesS
– Modern Languages (Spanish and [one of French, German,
Italian]) and Greek (Ancient)
– Mediaeval Studies
B
G
R
E
S
Timetable clash exists and this combination is subject to the agreement
of the Head of the Department or Head of School concerned.
Combinations including German and Latin are only available to
beginners in German.
Combinations including German and Management are only available to
non-beginners in German.
This combination is only available to non-beginners in Russian due to a
timetable clash.
Where first-level Russian modules clash with EN1003 and/or EN1004
then CO1001 and/or CO1002 should be taken instead.
Combinations including Classical Studies and Spanish are only available
to beginners in Spanish.
MA “With” Degrees
Honours in which the majority of the course deals with the
first-named subject:
Economics with Spanish
Geography with Spanish
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Subject enquiries
Dr Catherine O’Leary
E: [email protected]
Features
MA (Honours Degrees) in
T
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Mathematics with Spanish
Spanish with Geography
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required for Single Honours are
shown below. For Joint Honours degrees the subject with the
higher entrance requirements determines the likely grades.
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAB
With an A in the language(s) to be studied, unless the
applicant plans to study the language(s) at beginners’ level.
International Baccalaureate Points: 36 including HL6 in the
language(s) to be studied, except those to be taken from
beginners’ level.
*
*
*
*
*
*
Degree programmes that engage with the language, culture
and history of over 21 countries.
A wide range of topics, from the early modern period to the
twenty-first century.
A lively and communicative approach to language teaching.
A team of high-profile, skilled and research-active
academics, with specialised language teachers.
A friendly and dynamic learning environment with an active
Student Hispanic Society.
Spanish was ranked top in Scotland and third in the UK in
the Complete University Guide 2015 (Iberian Languages).
Facilities and resources
The School has a Multimedia Centre with the latest electronic
technology to enhance the learning and practice of oral and
aural skills.
What will I study?
Spanish at St Andrews is taught as a world language and offers
a broad and diversified experience in a structured degree
programme. Together with the many transferable skills acquired
the degree will open many professional doors not limited to
the Hispanic world. The primary objective of all our courses is
knowledge and precise usage of the language, as well as to
develop intellectual and cultural competence and to acquire
communicative skills which will be valuable in any career. You
will also gain the ability to analyse and discuss critically, to
present a reasoned argument, to write accurately with correct
spelling, punctuation and grammar in both Spanish and English,
and to use Information Technology.
Spanish itself is studied in many contexts, including journalism,
history, commerce and entertainment, in addition to the rich
and interesting forms it takes in literature and cinema. Language
is, after all, a social and historical phenomenon and literature
is a sensitive and imaginative record of how meaning has been
communicated throughout Spanish-speaking communities,
both past and present. Our studies aim to explore the great
continuities and shifts within Spanish and Spanish American
culture, from its early beginnings to the Spain and Latin America
of today.
Return to Subjects
“Choosing to study Spanish is one of the best choices I’ve ever made.
The Department is open, friendly and supportive, but also gives you
the flexibility to focus on the areas of Spanish literature and history
that interest you most. I had an incredible year abroad in Madrid
and coming back to university could have been hard, but the Spanish
Department have kept lessons dynamic and interesting.”
Spanish
Alison (Gourock, Inverclyde, Scotland)
149
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
Class sizes and teaching delivery
Students with no previous knowledge of the language
We offer an intensive study of the language together with
the study of two carefully chosen texts and one film. You are
also introduced to a varied programme of language work. A
satisfactory pass in Spanish for Beginners (1) and Spanish for
Beginners (2) gives access to second year modules.
First Year: lectures 70 - 90, seminars 12 - 15, language classes
12 - 15
Second Year: as above
Honours: lectures 50 - 60, seminars 12 - 15, language classes
12 - 15
Students who have an SQA Higher pass or
GCE A-Level or GCSE (or equivalent)
Advanced students take Spanish Language and Texts (1) and
progress to Spanish Language and Texts (2) in the second semester.
The work includes comprehension, formal grammatical study,
written and spoken Spanish (with an emphasis on communicative
skills); an introduction to literature, film and history.
Second Year (at least 2 modules required)
The language element represents a progression from first year,
based on a wide variety of language exercises. Extensive use is
made of the visual and audio facilities. Modules cater for former
beginners’ special requirements. There are core modules on the
nature and methodologies of literary analysis, expression and
form in the theatre, novel, cinema and poetry, and definition of
periods (for example Renaissance, Modernism) and areas (Latin
America), using selected modern and mediaeval texts.
Many students go either to Spain or Latin America for a year
after second year – see Study abroad below.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(4 x 15-credit core language modules required and at least 8
other 15-credit modules required over 2 years)
In Honours we offer four consecutive and cumulative 15-credit
language modules. There are a variety of additional Spanish
optional modules in literature, language, linguistics, cinema and
history which vary from year to year. In Senior Honours there
is also a supervised dissertation on a topic of your personal
interest, and the possibility to take a practical broadly-based
Communication and Teaching module.
Study abroad
Students who spend a year or a semester abroad gain valuable
experience for life as well as for study, enhancing their ability
to compete effectively for employment after graduation.
Spanish Honours degrees With Integrated Year Abroad (WIYA)
involve residence in Spain or in Latin America for the academic
session between second and third years. UK students often
undertake teaching placements in schools abroad through the
British Council’s Language Assistantship scheme. Alternatively,
you may organise a work placement with the approval of the
Department. You may instead apply to spend the third year of
the degree course (Junior Honours) as an exchange student
at one of our Erasmus+ partners in Spain or at the University
of Montevideo. All of these opportunities are competitive and
are subject to successful completion of modules. You may also
apply to study abroad under the University’s St Andrews Abroad
programme. See page 44.
Both Spanish language and literature are taught through a
variety of lively and communicative methods all of which are
student-centred and which encourage student participation.
Our staff have designed most of the teaching materials,
including our Computer Assisted Learning programmes. The
literature component is taught through lectures and small
seminar groups to establish a dialogue with the historical,
political, and aesthetic preoccupations of the Spanish-speaking
world.
Assessment
All our modules are assessed by at least 40% coursework,
with the balance of assessment made up either by further
coursework, or written examinations, depending on the module.
Careers
Recent graduates have gone on to become a trainee reporter,
a tour leader for Journey Latin America, an English teacher on
the JET scheme, a chartered accountant, a sherry and wine
merchant. Others have obtained varied positions with Peace
Brigades International, John Lewis, Scottish Widows, the
British Council, an insurance assessor in Columbia as well as
many taking up postgraduate study including studying law,
publishing, teaching, and information technology. For more
information: http://bit.ly/sta-modlangs-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Scholarships
Spanish prizes include:
• Colmenaros Prize – For first or second year student
• Alex Richardson Award – For a second or third year
summer project
• Douglas Gifford Latin American Travel Bursary by
application.
• Alan Paterson Prize awarded to the most outstanding
final year student in Spanish.
• Bernard Bentley Prize awarded to the best ab initio
student in Spanish.
Return to Subjects
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/gsd/courses/ug/sd
Sustainable
Development
150
Sustainable
Development
Degree options
BSc or MA (Single Honours Degree)
Fieldwork training on the West Sands.
Sustainable Development
Contributing Schools
Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography &
Geosciences; History; International Relations; Management;
Mathematics & Statistics; Modern Languages; Philosophical,
Anthropological & Film Studies; Psychology & Neuroscience.
[The BSc degree requires that at least 40 credits are gained in
Science subjects in 1000- and 2000-level modules]
*
*
First Year Entry
SQA Highers: AAAB
GCE A-Levels: AAA
International Baccalaureate Points: 36
*
For further country-specific qualifications and pre-degree
foundation programmes see:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/international
Do I need previous knowledge of this subject? – No.
Second Year Entry
Direct entry to second year may be possible for very well
qualified applicants with an appropriate academic background.
If you are interested in direct second-year entry then contact
the Admissions Officer (see below) to discuss options. If you are most interested in arts subjects as partner subjects
within Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the
MA degree; if you are most interested in Science subjects, you
should apply for the BSc degree.
Dr Emilia Ferraro,
Department of Geography & Sustainable Development
E: [email protected]
*
*
Entrance Requirements (see also page 51)
The likely grades currently required are :
Subject enquiries
Features
*
*
Addresses pressing issues for humanity through
critical interrogation of the concept of ‘sustainable
development’.
Employs an integrated and holistic approach spanning
arts and sciences, drawing on eleven academic Schools
(see list on left).
A unique programme, designed around
interdisciplinarity.
Allows you to tailor your individual programmes of study
through selection of partner subjects.
Research-led degree orientated around problem solving,
linking theoretical and practical aspects of sustainable
development.
Set of varied assignments and experiential learning that
enhance employability.
The programme has close links with broader sustainability
initiatives, offering scope for practical involvement.
Resources
Very few universities offer undergraduate degrees in
Sustainable Development. Uniquely, our interdisciplinary
programme draws on the combined expertise of eleven
Schools across the University.
BSc or MA?
You can register for either a BSc or an MA degree in
Sustainable Development (SD), depending on your interests
and background. Because they are based in different Faculties,
the range of other subjects available to you in the first two
years is different. At each level of the degree there are specific
SD modules which are supplemented by modules taught in
the contributing Schools. To a considerable extent, therefore,
you can construct a degree pathway of your choice, matching
your interests, enthusiasms and aspirations.
What will I study?
First Year (2 x 20-credit modules required)
This comprises two modules that illustrate the breadth
of issues and the contribution of different fields of study
(e.g. economics, management, geography, history) in
understanding sustainable development. Staff from
different Schools teach, for example: history of the concept
of sustainable development, environmental protection,
international policy agreements, the geopolitics of water
use, carbon management and alternative fuels, recycling,
climate change and economic growth indicators. Assessments
include understanding the complexity of real life sustainability
problems (e.g. the vulnerability of New Orleans to hurricanes,
the impact of fair trade coffee) and designing plans for
changing behaviours to reduce carbon emissions.
A needy world – but how to meet the needs sustainably?
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“Sustainable Development gives you the
opportunity to understand current issues and the
relations between society and nature. It is very
open and you are free to choose what interests
you most and what aspect you want to explore
in depth. It is very up-to-date and challenges you
to think broadly.”
Sustainable
Development
151
Ann-Kristin (Hamburg, Germany)
Second Year (2 x 30-credit modules required)
In Semester 1, you will explore environmental and ecological
aspects of sustainable development in a module that explores
ecosystem functions and services, anthropogenic effects
on ecosystem functions and services, uses of technology
in environmental management and conservation and
protection strategies. In Semester 2, you will investigate more
social and economic aspects of sustainable development,
critically assessing the development of the sustainability
paradigm, further exploring historical contexts, then
examining methods for the measurement, management
and regulation of sustainable development, studying the
relationships between trade, business and sustainability,
probing social justice issues and finally looking at the
critical perspectives on sustainability and development
offered by anthropological approaches. You are assessed on
essays, seminars on relevant topics of your choice, a poster
presentation and a social audit.
Honours – Third and Fourth Years
(4 compulsory modules totalling 130 - 160 credits and the
balance of credits chosen in consultation with an Adviser)
At Honours level, you will choose from a range of modules
from different Schools that allow you to pursue your specific
interests and explore the practice of sustainability through
field visits. You will undertake extensive training in research,
including a residential field course where you will learn how
to do research, explore interdisciplinary research methods,
and gain statistical and qualitative analytical skills. Electives
will allow you to deepen your analytical skills and to continue
exploring your interests. Finally, the dissertation module
allows you to combine your expertise from partner disciplines
with an understanding of sustainable development in
researching a topic of your choice, with structured support
from an academic in an appropriate School.
Study abroad
You may apply to study abroad under the University’s
St Andrews Abroad programme. See also page 44.
Class sizes and teaching delivery
First Year: lectures 140 - 160, seminars 15 - 25, tutorials 8 - 12
Second Year: lectures 80 - 100, seminars 15 - 20, tutorials 8 - 10
Honours: 10 - 50, laboratories and seminars 10 - 50, tutorials
1 - 5, dissertation – individual supervision
Teaching is based on semester-length modules comprising
lectures, tutorials/seminars, laboratory classes, field
excursions, a range of assignments, investigations of case
studies and research projects. Performance is measured by
continuously assessed work, examinations and, at Honours, by
an extended critical review essay and a research dissertation.
You are encouraged throughout the programme to develop
literacy and numeracy skills and to acquire appropriate IT and
life skills.
Assessment
All the specific SD modules are assessed by at least 50%
coursework at sub-honours. The balance of the assessment is
made up either of further coursework or written examinations
depending on the specific module. At Honours levels, SDspecific modules are assessed by a variety of methods that
include coursework and examinations. Assessment patterns of
modules taken from contributing Schools vary.
Careers
St Andrews was one of the first universities to offer undergraduate
degrees in Sustainable Development. Those who graduate
from here will be highly literate and numerate, with a unique
combination of skills acquired at a prestigious university. At
a time when sustainable development is rising ever higher
up the national and international agenda, and as businesses
and organisations accept the need to adopt more sustainable
practices, graduates with a degree in Sustainable Development
are in strong demand. Graduates will be welcomed in central
and local government, NGOs, teaching, conservation and other
environmentally related areas, impact assessment, management,
strategic planning and consultancy. Many will proceed to further
training, acquiring applied skills in a sustainability-related area
or undertaking postgraduate research. For more information:
http://bit.ly/sta-susdev-careers
See also page 34 for details of the University’s Careers Centre.
Graduate comments:
“My role has been more about sustainability in its broadest
sense (balancing social, environmental and economic
factors). It is this latter understanding of SD, which I
gained in great depth from the degree, which has allowed
me to take this approach within Rydon.”
Catriona (graduated 2010)
Rydon Group (Sustainability Consultancy), Sustainability leader
“The degree gave me a great grounding in how to think
critically, and a strong background in renewable energy
systems. Most of all, the interdisciplinary nature of the
degree gave me a broad outlook, which is important
in my job – we deal with a huge range of technical,
social, environmental and political issues whilst assisting
community energy projects, so this was very useful.”
Jamie (graduated 2008)
Community Energy Scotland, Development Officer
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152
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A92
A90
Dundee
Travelling to
St Andrews
A90
Perth
F
A9
th
ir
of
T
ay
A92
Leuchars
A913
9
Bus / Coach
Ra
St Andrews bus station is very close to the centre
of town. Timetables can be accessed from:
www.travelinescotland.com
Cupar A 9 1
A91
M90
ST ANDREWS
A91
8
i lw
A915
ay
B913
A917
A915
6
A92
A977
M90
h
Rail
A92
The nearest train station is
Leuchars (5 miles from
M876
St Andrews) on the main line
from London (King’s Cross) –
Edinburgh – Aberdeen. Timetables
and an online route planner can be
found at www.travelinescotland.com
There are buses running regularly (every
15 minutes) from Leuchars train station into
St Andrews. Taxis are also available at the station.
Kincardine
on Forth
Kirkcaldy
F
A921
3
o
r
t
f
o
h
r t
F i
M9
A1
M8
A68
Edinburgh
0
A702
Road
See sketch map
(a) From south, cross Forth Road Bridge and proceed north along M90 to junction 3. Follow the A92 until just before Cupar, then join the A91 to St Andrews
or on M90 continue to junction 8, then by A91 to St Andrews.
(b) From south-west, either go east along M8 to Forth Road Bridge and then
by route (a), or by Clackmannanshire Bridge and A977 towards Kinross,
joining M90 at junction 6 and exit at junction 8 as above.
(c) From north-west leave Perth on M90 to junction 9 then by A913 to
Cupar and St Andrews.
(d) From north via Dundee, cross Tay Road Bridge on A92 and after 1 mile
via A919 to Leuchars and A91 to St Andrews.
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Specific driving directions can be obtained from:
www.maps.google.co.uk
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/HHGV
Air
The nearest airports are Edinburgh (EDI) and Dundee (DND).
More information: www.skyscanner.net
for flights and connections.
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Parking
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Free parking in St Andrews town centre is extremely limited,
however metered parking is available.
Overnight accommodation
The Tourist Information Office has lists of approved accommodation in the area.
They will be able to reserve accommodation for you as well as offering ideas of where to
go, what to see and, of course, the best ways of getting there. There are plenty of hotels,
guest houses and bed & breakfasts in the town/area to suit most tastes and budgets.
St Andrews Tourist Information Office Outwith semester-time, you may be able to stay in
70 Market Street, St Andrews
University managed accommodation. For more
information, contact Residential & Business Services
T: +44 (0)1334 472021 E: [email protected] T: +44 (0)1334 462000
W: www.standrews.co.ukW:
www.discoverstandrews.com
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10 km
Contact details
Accommodation enquiries
University main number
Student Accommodation Services:
T: +44 (0)1334 476161
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk
T: +44 (0)1334 462510
E: [email protected]
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/accommodation
Admissions Our latest online materials about studying here:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study
F: +44 (0)1334 463330
Universities & Colleges
Admissions Service (UCAS)
UCAS, Rosehill, New Barn Lane,
Cheltenham, GL52 3LZ.
Prospectus viewing and downloading
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/prospectus
Visiting St Andrews
Please book online at:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/ug/meet-us/visiting-days
Prospective student enquiries
If you have an enquiry and you have not yet applied to
study at St Andrews, please contact:
T: +44 (0)871 468 0 468
W: www.ucas.com
The editorial and design team thank all contributors,
especially the students and alumni who provided
profiles and soundbites used throughout this
prospectus.
E:[email protected] (UK/EU)
[email protected] (Rest of World)
Post-application enquiries
If you have an enquiry and you have already applied
to St Andrews, please contact:
E: [email protected]
T: +44 (0)1334 462151 or 2152
Produced by Print & Design, University of St Andrews, February 2015.
All the information in this Prospectus is correct at time of going to press.
Printed by Belmont Press on Amadeus 100% recycled paper (with recylable ECO Matt Laminate cover).
Photographs, unless otherwise indicated below, are by: broad daylight, Ben Goulter, Brian Kulik, Rhona Rutherford,
Oli Walker and Laurence Winram. Photographers with s after their names are the winners of the student/staff
photographic competition.
Other photos: Peter Adamson (p.4); andrewleephotography (p.126 top); Kim Bennett (p.73); Elliot Busby (p.1, p.24, p.89,
p.115, p.135); Nick Callaghan (p.17 top, p.18 top, p.19 top left, p.48); Peter Cawood (p.86, p.88 left); Nick Cobbing (p.89 all);
Craig Doyle (p. 26 top right, bottom – all apart from polo and cricket, p.27 middle); Environment Team (illustration p.24 top left);
Pamela Forbes (p.87, p.97, p.107, p.145); Tim Greenwood (p.108, p.109); Guthrie Aerial Photography (p.152); Emma Hunt (p.88 right);
Callum Hyland (pp. 20/21, p.31 right, p.32); Lesley Lind (p.40, p.100); Lightbox (IFC middle top, p.1, p.9, p.25 both bottom, p.43, p.111);
Neha Lutha and Sarune Savickite (illustration p.24 top right); K McKay (p.116); Clive Masson (p.128 top); Ivar Möller (p.128 bottom left);
Linda Nicolson (p.35 left); Dr S Norcross (p.75 bottom 2 photos); Umer Rashid (p.76); Chris Reekie (p.26 top left); Alan Richardson (p.4);
Stephen Salpukas (p.42); Dr Tim Stojanovic (p.150); Caroline Trotter (p.46).
This Prospectus is available in Large Print, Braille, or Audio,
on request to Print & Design: +44 (0)1334 463020
The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland, No: SC013532.
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