Academic Year 2010/11

Undergraduate
Catalog
2011-2012
Faith
Service
Leadership
2011-2012
P.O. Box 997
Boiling Springs, North Carolina 28017
Telephone (704) 406-4000
FAX (704) 406-4329
CONTENTS
3
Calendar
6
18
25
28
34
79
101
275
325
Introduction to Gardner-Webb University
History
Mission Statement
Accreditation
Campus and Buildings
Academic Program
Christian Life and Service
Student Development
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid
Expenses 2011-2012
Financial Aid
Scholarships
Assistance Programs
Academic Regulations
Degree Requirements
General Academic Regulations
Courses of Instruction
Directory and Appendices
Index
CATALOG REQUIREMENTS
The conditions and policies set forth in this catalog have binding effect upon
the University and students for the academic year in which it is in force. The
University reserves the right to make necessary changes and corrections. When
changes are made in graduation requirements, the University accepts a moral
obligation to provide students the conditions effective the year of their most
recent continuous enrollment or an alternative which would not be punitive.
Otherwise, all other requirements are effective and in force upon publication
of changes.
Gardner-Webb
Vol. 102-August 2011
Published annually at Boiling Springs, N.C. 28017.
Gardner-Webb University is committed to equality of opportunity in all areas
of education and does not practice or condone discrimination in any form
against applicants or students on the basis of race, color, national origin,
gender, age, or disability.
Book rate postage paid at Boiling Springs, N.C. 28017.
Gardner-Webb University/3
CALENDAR
FALL SEMESTER 2011
August 10 (Wednesday)
August 13 (Saturday )
August 15 (Monday)
August 16-17 (Tues-Wed)
August 17 (Wednesday)
August 17 (Wednesday)
August 18 (Thursday)
August 19 (Friday)
August 22 (Monday)
August 24 (Wednesday)
August 29 (Monday)
August 30 (Tuesday)
September 1 (Thursday)
September 5 (Monday)
September 5 (Monday)
September 9 (Friday)
September 12 (Monday)
September 21 (Wednesday)
September 21 (Wednesday)
October 1 (Saturday)
October 7-8 (Fri-Sat)
October 17 (Friday)
October 21 (Friday)
October 24-25 (Mon-Tues)
October 26 (Wednesday)
October 26 (Wednesday)
October 27 (Thursday)
October 29 (Saturday)
November 11 (Friday)
November 11 (Friday)
November 22 (Tuesday)
November 28 (Monday)
November 28 (Monday)
December 8 (Thursday)
December 9 (Friday)
December 10 (Saturday)
December 12-15 (Mon-Thurs)
December 12-17 (Mon-Sat)
RAs arrive
GOAL Faculty Orientation
New Faculty Orientation
Faculty Retreat
Big Brothers/Big Sisters Arrive
GOAL Classes Begin
New Graduate Student Orientation,
Orientation/Registration for all First-time
Freshmen (Residents and Commuters) and
New Resident Transfer Students
Check in for all Returning Students and
Re-admit Students Living in Residence Halls
Day Classes Begin; Last Day for GOAL
Registration
Graduate Classes Begin
Fall Convocation; Last Day for Late
Registration; Last Day for Schedule
Modification for Day Classes
School of Divinity New Student Orientation
Last Day for Late Registration and Schedule
Modification for Graduate School
School of Divinity Classes Begin
School of Divinity: Last Day for Late
Registration and Schedule Modification
School of Divinity Convocation
School of Divinity Last Day to Withdraw
with “W”
Last Day to Withdraw with “W”
GOAL Advising for Continuing Students
Begins for Spring 2012
Family Weekend
Graduation Applications Due for December
with Late Fee
Fall Break Begins after Classes
Fall Break - (GOAL Classes Meet on These
Dates)
Classes Resume at 8:00 a.m.
Advising/Early Registration
School of Divinity Thursday Classes Meet
Homecoming
Last Day to Withdraw with “WP/WF”
School of Divinity Last Day to Withdraw
with “WP/WF”
Thanksgiving Holidays Begin after Classes
Classes Resume at 8:00 a.m.
Graduation Applications Due for May
Last Day of Classes for Graduate and
School of Divinity
Last Day of Classes - Day Program
Last Day of Classes for GOAL
Final Exams
Final Exams for GOAL
Academic Calendar/4
December 14 (Wednesday)
December 19 (Monday)
December 19 (Monday)
Graduating Students Grades Due by
12:00 noon
Grades Due by 8:00 am
Commencement
SPRING SEMESTER 2012
January 3-20
January 3 (Tuesday)
January 6 (Friday)
January 9 (Monday)
January 9 (Monday)
January 9 (Monday)
January 9-10 (Mon-Tues)
January 11 (Wednesday)
January 16 (Monday)
January 17 (Tuesday)
January 23 (Monday)
January 26 (Thursday)
January 30-May 3
February 3 (Friday)
February 8 (Wednesday)
March 1 (Thursday)
March 9 (Friday)
March 15 (Thursday)
March 12-16 (Mon-Fri)
March 19 (Monday)
March 20 (Tuesday)
April 4 (Wednesday)
April 9 (Monday)
April 10 (Tuesday)
April 10 (Tuesday)
April 10 (Tuesday)
April 30 (Monday)
May 3 (Thursday)
May 4 (Friday)
May 4-5 (Fri-Sat.)
May 7-10 (Mon-Thurs)
May 9 (Wednesday)
May 14 (Monday)
May 14 (Monday)
School of Divinity January Term
School of Divinity Last Day to Withdraw with
“W” January Term
GOAL Weekend Classes Begin
New Student Orientation (Day Program)
Residential Students Return
GOAL Classes Begin; New Graduate Student
Orientation
Registration
Day Classes Begin at 8:00 a.m.
Graduate Classes Begin; Last Day for Late
Registration and Schedule Modification GOAL
Last Day for Late Registration; Last Day for
Schedule Modification
Last Day for Late Registration and Schedule
Modification Graduate School
School of Divinity New Student Orientation
School of Divinity Spring Term
Last Day for Late Registration and Schedule
Modification School of Divinity
Last Day to Withdraw with “W” for Day and
School of Divinity
GOAL Advising for Continuing Students
Begins for Summer 2012
Spring Vacation Begins after Classes
Graduation Application for May Deadline
With Late Fee
Spring Break
Classes Resume at 8:00 a.m.
Advising/Early Registration
Easter Vacation Begins after Classes
GOAL and School of Divinity Classes Meet
Easter Monday
Last Day to Withdraw with “WP/WF”
School of Divinity Last Day to Withdraw
with “WP/WF”
Classes Resume at 8:00 a.m.
Graduation Application for August
Last Day of Classes
Reading Day
Examinations for Weekend Classes (GOAL)
Final Exams for Weekday and Evening Classes
Graduating Students Grades Due by
12:00 noon
Final Grades Due 8:00 am
Commencement
Gardner-Webb University/5
SUMMER 2012
SCHOOL OF DIVINITY SUMMER TERMS
May 21-25
May 21
May 28-July 6
June 1
May 28-July 20
June 1
July 4
1-Week Intensive
Last Day to Withdraw with “W” for
1-Week Intensive
6 Week Term
Last Day to Withdraw with “W” for
6 Week Term
8 Week Term
Last Day to Withdraw with “W” for
8 Week Term
Classes Will Meet
FIRST TERM: (DAY, GOAL, GRAD) MAY 23 – JUNE 28
May 23 (Wednesday)
May 24 (Thursday)
May 30 (Wednesday)
June 1 (Friday)
June 13-14
June 15 (Friday)
June 25 (Monday)
June 25-26 (Mon-Tues)
June 26 (Tuesday)
June 28 (Thursday)
Day Registration (GOAL & Graduate
Classes Begin)
Day Classes Begin
Last Day to Withdraw With “W”
GOAL Advising for Continuing Students
Begins for Fall 2012
Summer Orientation
Graduation Application for August
Deadline with Late Fee
Last Day of Classes - Day Program
GOAL and Graduate Exams
Day Program Exams
Grades Due 12:00 noon
SECOND TERM: (DAY, GOAL, GRAD) JUNE 27 – JULY 31
June 27 (Wednesday)
June 28 (Thursday)
July 4
July 6 (Thursday)
July 8-9
July 30 (Monday)
July 30-31 (Mon-Tues)
July 31 (Tuesday)
August 1 (Wednesday)
August 2 (Monday)
August 6 (Monday)
Day Registration (GOAL & Graduate
Classes Begin)
Day Classes Begin
GOAL and Graduate Classes Meet, Day
Classes Do No Meet
Last Day to Withdraw with “W”
Summer Orientation
Last Day of Classes - Day Program;
Graduation Application for December
GOAL and Graduate Exams
Day Program Exams
Graduating Students Grades Due by
12:00 noon
Grades Due 8:00 am
Commencement
TEN WEEK TERM: (DAY, GOAL, GRAD) MAY 21 – JULY 24
June 6 (Wednesday)
July 16 (Monday)
August 1 (Wednesday)
August 6 (Monday)
August 6 (Monday)
Last Day to Withdraw With “W”
Last Day to Withdraw With “WP/WF”
Graduating Students Grades Due
by12:00 Noon
Grades Due 12:00 Noon
Commencement
NEW FACULTY ORIENTATION 2012
Aug 13 (Monday)
FACULTY RETREAT 2012
Aug 14-15 (Tuesday-Wednesday)
Introduction to Gardner-Webb/6
INTRODUCTION TO GARDNER-WEBB
Gardner-Webb University is a coeducational, residential, church-related
university on a beautiful campus in Boiling Springs, North Carolina. The
University derives its name from O. Max Gardner, distinguished governor of
North Carolina in the 1930s, and his wife, Fay Webb Gardner. The beauty of
the campus and the quality of the academic program owe much to their
example and leadership.
LOCATION
Gardner-Webb University is located in the Piedmont section of western
North Carolina, one of the most desirable and rapidly developing areas of our
nation. Boiling Springs is a small rural town. Nearby Shelby, a city of 21,000, is
noted for its support of the arts and as the home of state and national leaders.
Forty-five miles east of Gardner-Webb is the thriving city of Charlotte, the
largest city in the Carolinas. Less than one hour away to the south is the city of
Spartanburg, S.C. One hour to the west is the historically rich mountain city of
Asheville, N.C.
Located only three miles from U.S. 74 and thirteen miles from Interstate 85,
Gardner-Webb is easily accessible. Less than one hour from campus are the
Smoky Mountains with many recreational opportunities. Gardner-Webb
University enjoys the lifestyle of a relatively small institution, yet has the
advantage of being centrally located to major urban resources in nearby areas.
STUDENTS
Gardner-Webb University, founded by Baptists in 1905, has grown steadily to
its current enrollment of over 4,300 students. Over 2,600 undergraduates come
from 37 states and 21 foreign countries. Women compose 63% of the student
population, and the student body includes several racial and socioeconomic
groups. Gardner-Webb University admits students of any race, sex, religion, and
national or ethnic origin without discrimination. This diversity enriches the life
of the campus community and reflects the nature of American society.
PROGRAMS
Gardner-Webb University is committed to the liberal arts as the best
preparation students can have for rewarding, meaningful lives. In addition, the
University offers programs in career-oriented fields to prepare students for
specialized work. All of the programs at Gardner-Webb are evaluated
periodically by accrediting agencies to insure that standards of quality are
maintained.
Gardner-Webb provides three distinct academic programs: the traditional
undergraduate program, the GOAL program (evening classes taught in a
number of locations for graduates of two-year colleges), and graduate
programs. Gardner-Webb University has a Graduate School offering M.A.
degrees in several areas, the M.S. degree in nursing, the M.A./Ed.S. in Mental
Health Counseling, the Ed.D. degree in Educational Leadership and in
Curriculum and Instruction, and the D.N.P. (Doctor of Nursing Practice)
degree; a School of Divinity offering the M.Div. and D.Min. degrees; and a
Graduate School of Business offering the M.B.A., I.M.B.A., and M.Acc. degrees.
For additional information on the GOAL and Graduate programs, see the
bulletins for each program.
The undergraduate on-campus program is designed to help the student gain
maximum benefit by providing a balanced curriculum in general studies, a
major field, minor(s) and selected electives. Students are encouraged to
Gardner-Webb University/7
develop a proficiency in the oral and written use of the English language, an
appreciation of cultural, social and scientific achievements, and an awareness
of religion and history. The upper-level courses provide opportunities for
concentration in the areas of special interest and in professional and careeroriented fields. To meet such individual needs the academic program includes
independent study and career internships.
Complementing the academic program at Gardner-Webb University is a
broad range of student life programs and activities designed to enable students
to develop their personal identities and to create lifetime friendships.
FACULTY
Gardner-Webb University is blessed with a dedicated staff and an excellent
faculty, 80% of whom hold terminal degrees. The primary concern of the
faculty is teaching. The faculty have been chosen because of their academic
preparation, their Christian commitment, and their desire for excellence in
teaching. Many of Gardner-Webb’s faculty have honored the University with
long years of service. The faculty is large enough to provide well-rounded
academic programs. Yet a major strength of Gardner-Webb is that the
University has remained small enough so that the relationship between faculty
and students is friendly, informal and lasting. The faculty/student ratio is 1:13.
ACADEMIC CALENDAR
The University’s academic year is divided into two semesters and a summer
school. For undergraduate and most graduate students, the fall semester is a
four-month term, ending prior to Christmas holidays. Following the four-month
spring semester is a comprehensive summer school of two terms of five weeks
each or, for some courses, one ten-week term. Evening classes both on-campus
and at various off-campus locations are offered throughout the year.
Summer school serves the purposes mentioned above and also provides an
opportunity for new students or students enrolled in other colleges to
accelerate completion of degree requirements.
Various study-abroad programs complement the academic calendar.
The University offers workshops and seminars on a variety of topics and for
a variety of groups throughout the year.
HISTORY
Gardner-Webb University has experienced remarkable growth,
perseverance, and maturity. The institution began as a boarding high school
and later became a junior college. Today Gardner-Webb is a thriving university
with growing master’s and doctoral programs.
From a movement initiated by the Kings Mountain Baptist Association in
1903, and later joined by the Sandy Run Baptist Association, the Boiling Springs
High School was chartered on December 2, 1905, as an institution “where the
young...could have the best possible educational advantages under distinctive
Christian influence.” This close relationship of the institution to the area
churches continues today.
In response to the changing educational needs of the area, the institution
was transformed into the Boiling Springs Junior College in 1928. The Great
Depression created many obstacles for the College, but its survival was secured
by the sacrifices of many loyal supporters.
In 1942, Governor O. Max Gardner began devoting his energy, time, and
wealth to strengthening and guiding the College. So important was his
influence that the name of the institution was changed to Gardner-Webb
College in honor of the governor; his wife, Fay Webb Gardner; and their
families.
Introduction to Gardner-Webb/8
The decades following World War II were years of physical growth and
academic development. New buildings went up as enrollments increased. A
major step in the institution’s development was its full accreditation as a senior
college in 1971. In 1980 the institution began offering a Master of Arts degree
in education.
The institution officially became known as Gardner-Webb University in
January 1993, culminating years of preparation. In 2001, Gardner-Webb began
offering its first doctorate (Doctor of Ministry) and in 2005, GWU celebrated
100 years. Today Gardner-Webb offers thirteen distinct degree programs, has a
highly qualified faculty and a beautiful campus of over 200 acres.
Historically the University has played significant roles in teacher education
and ministerial preparation for church-related vocations. Programs of
instruction and experiences designed to prepare teachers and ministers
continue to be major objectives of the University.
Although there have been many changes over the years, Gardner-Webb
University remains closely related to the Baptist churches of North Carolina.
The University holds in high esteem its commitment to Christian principles
and values as the best foundation for the development of human personality
and social order.
PRESIDENTS
James Blaine Davis, 1928-30; Zeno Wall, 1930-32; James L. Jenkins, 1932-35;
A.C. Lovelace, 1935-36; George J. Burnette, 1936-39; J.R. Cantrell, 1939-43;
Philip Lovin Elliott, 1943-61; E. Eugene Poston, 1961-76; Craven E. Williams,
1976-86; M. Christopher White, 1986-2002; Frank R. Campbell, 2002-2005;
A. Frank Bonner, 2005-.
MISSION STATEMENT
Gardner-Webb University, a private, Christian, Baptist-related university,
provides outstanding undergraduate and graduate education that is strongly
grounded in the liberal arts while offering opportunities to prepare for various
professions. Fostering meaningful intellectual thought, critical analysis, and
spiritual challenge within a diverse community of learning, Gardner-Webb is
dedicated to higher education that integrates scholarship with Christian life. By
embracing faith and intellectual freedom, balancing conviction with
compassion, and inspiring a love of learning, service, and leadership, GardnerWebb prepares its graduates to make significant contributions for God and
humanity in an ever-changing global community.
STATEMENT OF VALUES
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE
Acknowledging One God – Creator and Sustainer of life, and Jesus Christ as
Savior and Lord; committing to self-giving service displayed in Christ-like moral
action that respects the dignity and value of every person.
BAPTIST HERITAGE
Affirming historic Baptist values such as the freedom of individual
conscience and the right of people to worship God as they choose, the
authority of Scripture in matters of faith and practice, the priesthood of every
believer, the autonomy of the local church, and the separation of church and
state.
ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE
Encouraging visible enthusiasm for knowledge, intellectual challenge,
continuous learning, and scholarly endeavors; inviting pursuit of educational
opportunities within and beyond the classroom for the joy of discovery; and
inspiring accomplishment within one’s field of study.
Gardner-Webb University/9
LIBERAL ARTS
Offering broad-based exposure to the arts, humanities and sciences and to
each field’s unique challenges, contributions, and life lessons; complementing
the acquisition of career-related knowledge and skills with well-rounded
knowledge of self, others, and society.
TEAMWORK
Working collaboratively to support and promote shared goals, assuming
responsibility willingly, meeting commitments dependably, handling
disagreement constructively, and persevering despite distraction and adversity.
STUDENT-CENTERED FOCUS
Providing students an environment that fosters intellectual and spiritual
growth; encourages physical fitness, service, social and cultural enrichment;
strengthens and develops moral character; and respects the value and
individuality of every student.
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Assisting campus, local, national, and global communities through
education, outreach, and research; fostering dialogue and action in support of
human welfare and environmental stewardship.
DIVERSITY
Studying and celebrating our world’s rich mix of cultures, ideologies, and
ethnicities; respecting and welcoming students without regard to ethnicity,
gender, religious commitment, national origin, or disability.
PRESIDENT'S COMMUNITY SERVICE HONOR ROLL
Gardner-Webb University has been named to the President's Higher
Education Community Service Honor Roll. The Honor Roll, launched in 2006,
recognizes colleges and universities nationwide that support innovative and
effective community service and service-learning programs.
TEMPLETON FOUNDATION
Gardner-Webb University is proud to have been honored by the John
Templeton Foundation as a “Character-Building College.” The Templeton
Foundation has granted this recognition to a limited number of schools which
have the building of character as a major part of their mission.
U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT
Gardner-Webb University has been consistently selected by the U.S. News
and World Report as one of America’s Best Colleges, based on a wide range of
categories, including university mission, retention, academic quality and
degree offerings.
The U.S. News and World Report each year honors choice schools meeting
select criteria.
THE CARNEGIE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT CLASSIFICATION
Gardner-Webb University was awarded the Community Engagement
Classification by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
The prestigious Classification recognizes those colleges and universities that
exhibit an institutional commitment to community engagement and service.
Introduction to Gardner-Webb/10
ACCREDITATION
Gardner-Webb University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane,
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501) to award
Associate, Baccalaureate, Master’s, and Doctoral degrees. Inquiries to the
Commission should relate only to the accreditation status of the institution and
not to general admission information. In addition several departmental
programs are accredited by the appropriate state or national agencies. The
Education program is approved by the North Carolina Department of Public
Instruction and accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of
Teacher Education (NCATE, 2010 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 500,
Washington, DC 20036, 202-466-7496). The Music and Nursing programs are
accredited, respectively, by the National Association of Schools of Music and
the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC, 3343
Peachtree Rd. NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326. Phone (404)975-5000,
www.nlnac.org). The Associate Degree Nursing program is also approved by
the North Carolina Board of Nursing. The M. Christopher White School of
Divinity is accredited by the Association of Theological Schools of the United
States and Canada. The Athletic Training Educational Program is accredited by
the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education Programs
(CAATE). The School of Business is accredited by the Association of Collegiate
Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). The Mental Health Counseling and
School Counseling graduate programs are accredited by the Council for
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The
University is authorized by the immigration authorities of the United States for
the education of foreign students.
CAMPUS AND BUILDINGS
The Gardner-Webb campus is beautiful, spacious, and rich in natural
resources. It is designed and equipped to serve its living and learning
community. Over 200 acres of rolling landscape provide more than adequate
space for buildings, playing fields and landscaped areas. Extensive building and
improvement projects have been completed in recent years. The present living
and dining facilities are designed to serve a resident student body of
approximately 1,150. Among the campus facilities and buildings are the
following:
ALUMNI HOUSE, located on Highway 150, provides offices for GardnerWebb Alumni Relations and the Bulldog Club.
THE ART CENTER is located behind the Communications Studies Hall.
This building houses classroom space for art studio, art education and
numerous art production courses.
ATHLETIC FIELDS consist of many acres of practice and playing fields,
situated around the campus, for football, baseball, soccer and softball. There is
adequate space for all sports, intramural and intercollegiate.
BLANTON HOUSE serves as a significant presence of the University in
Shelby, NC. It is listed on the National Registry of Homes. In 1981 the children
of George and Ida Wood Blanton gave their family home to Gardner-Webb
University.
Gardner-Webb University/11
BOST GYMNASIUM AND SWIMMING POOL is part of the University
Physical Development Complex. Renovated in 1999, it is named in memory of
L.C. Bost of Shelby and Jean Bost Gardner. The facility contains basketball
courts and classroom areas. The swimming pool, renovated in 1999, is heated
and enclosed for year-round use.
BROYHILL ADVENTURE COURSE was funded by the Broyhill
Foundation and constructed in 1999. The Alpine Tower, the Climbing Straight
Wall, and the Rescue Exercise provide leadership training activities for
students and other groups.
CAMPUS HOUSE was acquired in 1968, and an addition was made in 1974.
The house provides residential and study space for 31 students.
COMMUNICATION STUDIES HALL, formerly the Boiling Springs
Elementary School, was acquired in 1990. It houses the Communication
Studies department, Art department offices and Theatre department offices;
the Millennium Playhouse; and classrooms for journalism, photography,
television, radio, theatre, and art.
CRAIG HALL is named in memory of Hubert M. Craig, Sr., of Gaston
County, a former trustee of Gardner-Webb University. The building was
renovated in 1998 and houses classrooms and offices for the School of
Education and English department.
DECKER HALL, housing 134 students, was named in memory of James
Webb Decker Gardner, the son of the late Mr. and Mrs O. Max Gardner, Sr.
Built in 1948, the three-story brick structure was completely renovated in
1986.
DOVER CAMPUS CENTER, constructed in 1966, was completely
renovated in 1990 with additional renovations in 2006-07. It houses the
cafeteria, lounges, the Campus Shop, a coffee shop and grille, the financial
planning center, and the undergraduate admissions offices. The building is
named in memory of Charles I. Dover of Shelby.
DOVER MEMORIAL LIBRARY is named in memory of Mr. and Mrs. John
R. Dover, Sr., pioneer industrialists of Cleveland County. The three-story
structure, erected in 1974, is designed to provide seating for over 450
students.The library is equipped with computer technology which provides
access to libraries around the world. The holdings include several special book
collections, the most notable being the library of the local post-Civil War
author Thomas Dixon, and the diaries and scrapbooks of the late Mrs. O. Max
Gardner. The library houses the Belk-Ellis Computer Center, provided by the
William Ellis family of Shelby, N.C., and the Belk Foundation. The recently
renovated main floor showcases a modern, open floor plan with all new carpet
and furniture, as well as an upgraded vending area with hot and cold drinks,
and fresh salads and sandwiches.
Dover Memorial Library is also home to the Gardner-Webb Archives, located
on the upper level. Rare photographs, historical manuscripts and university
publications are available to all for viewing and research. These archives
represent historical perspectives of Gardner-Webb University.
Introduction to Gardner-Webb/12
DOVER MEMORIAL CHAPEL is a graceful and inspiring structure which
stands at the formal entrance to the campus. Erected in 1972, the interior
features a 336-seat auditorium. The lower level houses administrative offices
and classrooms.
ELLIOTT HALL, originally constructed in 1952, honors the memory of the
seventh president of the University. Renovated in 1985, the building houses
the School of Nursing and classrooms.
ELLIOTT HOUSE houses the University radio station, WGWG 88.3 FM, a
50,000 -watt educational station broadcasting to over 16 counties in North and
South Carolina. University Communications, the University Publications
offices, and the University Web Development offices are also located in Elliott
House.
FRANK NANNEY HALL is a 12,000-square-foot building and is home for
the Noel Program for Students with Disabilities and the Department of Social
Sciences. The building consists of classroom space, production labs, testing
centers and office space and is located near the Lake Hollifield Complex and
the Boiling Springs. The building was finished in Summer 2008 and was made
possible by many generous donations including a substantial lead gift from
Frank Nanney, a Gardner-Webb trustee from Rutherford County.
GARDNER MEMORIAL HALL, completed in 1948, was constructed and
furnished by the family of the late Governor O. Max Gardner. The building
contains a recital hall, music studios and offices, classrooms, practice rooms, a
band room and the campus computer technology offices. This building is also
home to the Music Department.
GOLF CENTER, located one mile south of the main campus, provides
office and locker facilities for the golf teams as well as a driving range for
university and public use.
GOAL HOUSE, located on Memorial Drive, houses the College of Distance
Learning and Continuing Education, including the GOAL academic offices.
GRADUATE ADMISSIONS HOUSE, located on West College Ave.,
provides offices for Gardner-Webb Graduate Admissions.
HAMRICK FIELD HOUSE, named in honor of V.F. Hamrick of Shelby,
houses the coaching offices for Soccer and Track and Field, locker rooms and
academic/athletic services.
HAMRICK HALL was built after World War I as a memorial to area
residents who gave their lives for the cause of freedom. It was destroyed by
fire and rebuilt in 1940. In 1943, the rebuilt structure was named in memory of
E.B. Hamrick. In 1982, the building was placed on the National Register of
Historic Places. In 1998, the building was completely renovated and now
houses the Godbold School of Business and the George Blanton, Jr.,
Auditorium with a seating capacity of 311.
Gardner-Webb University/13
HOEY-ANTHONY-PADGETT-YOUNG (H.A.P.Y.) HALL houses 78
students and was completely renovated in 1986. The central section of the
residence hall was constructed in 1946, and the wings were added in 1948 to
form an open quadrangle. The east wing is named in memory of the Reverend
John W. Suttle of Shelby, and the west wing is named in memory of A.W.
McMurry of Shelby. Hoey-Anthony is the first floor of the central building,
named in memory of Senator Clyde R. Hoey and his wife, Bess Gardner Hoey,
of Shelby; and in memory of J.A. Anthony and his wife, Ollie Gardner Anthony,
of Shelby. Padgett-Young is the second floor, named in memory of Tilden R.
Padgett and his wife, Cleo King Padgett, of Forest City; and in memory of Dr.
Guilford Young and his wife, Florence Jackson Young, of Forest City.
JOHN HENRY MOSS STADIUM, completed in 2010, includes a baseball
stadium seating 587. The facility is named for John Henry Moss of Kings
Mountain and the field is named in honor of Bill Masters of Shelby.
LAKE HOLLIFIELD COMPLEX is named in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Hughy
H. Hollifield, Gardner-Webb alumnus and trustee respectively. The lake is
surrounded by walking trails and a bell tower with a forty-eight-bell carillon.
LINDSAY HALL was completed in 1967 and completely renovated in 1992.
This three-story structure was named in memory of David and Winifred
Herbert Lindsay, of Rutherfordton. The building houses the M. Christopher
White School of Divinity, the Religion department, the School of Psychology
and Counseling, and classrooms.
LUTZ-YELTON CONVOCATION CENTER, completed in 1982, serves as
the center of cultural and athletic activities for the area. Included in the Center
is the 555-seat Kathleen Nolan Dover Theatre. The stage is fully equipped to
handle all types of dramatic productions and concerts. Also included in the
Center is the Paul Porter Arena, which seats approximately 3,000 for basketball
games and other events and meetings. Classrooms, offices for athletic
administration and coaches, sports information, handball courts and athletic
training facilities complete the Center.
LUTZ-YELTON HALL houses 96 students. This impressive building,
completed in 1963, is named for the former Lutz-Yelton Companies of Shelby.
MAUNEY HALL is a four-story brick structure completed in 1965. It houses
108 students and is named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. W.K. Mauney, Sr., and in
memory of Mr. and Mrs D.C. Mauney of Kings Mountain.
MYERS HALL, named in memory of Albert G. Myers, Sr., of Gastonia, was
completed in 1967. The attractive two-story brick structure houses 64
students.
NANNEY RESIDENCE HALL, completed in 1967 and renovated in 1993, is
a two-story brick structure which houses 64 students. Nanney Hall is named in
memory of C.P. and Irene B. Nanney of Gastonia.
NOEL HALL, built in 1992, is a two-story brick structure which houses the
M. Christopher White School of Divinity and academic classrooms. The hall is
named in memory of Dr. and Mrs. George T. Noel, of Kannapolis, N.C.
Introduction to Gardner-Webb/14
NOEL HOUSE was named in 1986 in memory of Dr. and Mrs. George T.
Noel, of Kannapolis, N.C., and now houses the Department of World
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.
THE PLANT OPERATIONS OFFICES are located just south of the main
campus on Highway 150.
POSTON CENTER, named for Dr. Gene Poston, Gardner-Webb’s eighth
president, contains a visitors’ center, the Gardner-Webb Police Department
offices and the Graduate School offices.
ROTC HOUSE, located on Memorial Drive, houses the Military Science
Department and the Gardner-Webb ROTC program.
ROYSTER HALL, which houses 48 students, was formerly Royster
Memorial Hospital. When the Crawley Memorial Hospital was completed in
1977, the one-story brick building was renovated for residence hall use.
SPANGLER MEMORIAL STADIUM, completed in 1966 and renovated in
2004, includes a football stadium seating 8,600, a track, and a fully equipped
field house. The facility is named in memory of Ernest W. and Verna Patrick
Spangler of Shelby. The field house is named in honor of V.F. Hamrick of
Shelby.
SPANGLER HALL was constructed in 1968 and houses 96 students. The
three-story brick building is named in memory of R. Patrick Spangler of Shelby.
SPRINGS ATHLETIC FACILITY, constructed in 2000, houses baseball and
tennis program offices as well as baseball dressing facilities. Included in the
facility is a batting tunnel for the baseball and softball teams.
STROUP HALL houses 111 students and was completely renovated in
1986. The three-story brick structure is named in memory of Mrs. Mae Cline
Stroup.
STUDIO 150, located on Memorial Drive, houses offices and studios of
music faculty.
SUTTLE HALL, the east wing of the H.A.P.Y. complex, is named in memory
of the Reverend John W. Suttle. It contains the offices of the division of
Student Development and selected faculty.
SUTTLE WELLNESS CENTER was completed in 2000 and is named in
memory of J.L. Suttle, Jr., of Shelby, N.C. Added as a wing to the University
Physical Development Complex, the Suttle Wellness Center contains a
wellness/fitness center with state-of-the-art exercise equipment as well as a
student recreation area.
UNIVERSITY COMMONS is a student apartment complex of ten buildings
located on campus on Stadium Drive. Overlooking beautiful Lake Hollifield,
the buildings were built in 1997,1999, 2004, 2009, 2010, and 2011. It offers
accommodations including private bedrooms for nearly 500 residents.
Gardner-Webb University/15
UNIVERSITY PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT COMPLEX consists of the
Suttle Wellness Center, the Bost Gymnasium and Pool, and the office suite for
the Department of Physical Education, Wellness and Sports Studies.
WASHBURN HALL was purchased and completely renovated in 1990. The
building contains the admissions offices of the College for Extended Professional
Studies (GOAL), and the Counseling and Academic Advising Centers. It is named
in honor of Dr. and Mrs. Gene Washburn of Boiling Springs, N.C.
WASHBURN MEMORIAL BUILDING is a brick structure erected in 1941
by Seaton A. Washburn in memory of the Washburn families. Originally used as
a library, the building was renovated in early 2009 and now serves as a clinical
site for the School of Psychology and Counseling.
WEBB HALL was built by the O. Max Gardner Foundation in memory of Mrs.
O. Max (Fay Webb) Gardner, her parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents.
The first wing was completed in 1960, and the second wing was added in 1973.
The building houses administrative offices, including the office of the president.
In front of Webb Hall is the Suttle-Wall Tower of Light. The tower, built in 1969,
is in memory of Joseph Linton Suttle and Dr. Zeno Wall.
WEBB TENNIS COMPLEX, constructed in 2000, is one of the premier
tennis facilities in the region. The twelve courts are ideal for intercollegiate and
recreational play. The courts are lighted for evening play.
WILLIAMS OBSERVATORY, named in honor of Gardner-Webb’s ninth
president Dr. Craven E. Williams, was built in 1990. The observatory is host to
numerous astronomy-related events throughout the year including regional
conferences and public star-gazing events.
WITHROW MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE HALL, named in memory of
A.T. Withrow of Charlotte, has facilities for mathematics, biology, chemistry,
and physics.
WRESTLING BUILDING, located south of the main campus, provides office
and practice space for the wrestling team.
Introduction to Gardner-Webb/16
VISITOR’S INFORMATION
Visitors to Gardner-Webb University are welcome at all times. The
administrative offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. Interviews and campus tours are available between the hours of 9:00
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday or by appointment with the
Admissions Office. Administrative officers and members of the faculty are
available at other times by appointment.
TRAVEL INFORMATION
Gardner-Webb University is in the town of Boiling Springs, N.C., a
community just outside Shelby. The University is only 13 miles from Interstate
85 and three miles from U.S 74. It is accessible to airline services at Charlotte,
N.C., and Greenville-Spartanburg, S.C. The telegraph address is Shelby, and the
University is served by the Shelby-Lattimore telephone exchange. The number
is (704) 406-4000. The FAX number is (704) 406-4FAX (4329) .
WEB SITE
If a personal visit to campus is not possible, the University can be
experienced on the Internet at www.gardner-webb.edu. Interested persons may
log on to the website for all the latest information about campus life, academic
programs, athletics and other events making news at GWU. Prospective
students can take a campus tour, submit questions about the university, and
even apply for admission through the web site.
Gardner-Webb University/17
Academic Program/18
ACADEMIC PROGRAM
The academic program of Gardner-Webb University is designed to prepare
graduates to go directly into such fields as business, public service, teaching and
nursing or to enter graduate and professional schools. Furthermore, the
curriculum is designed to meet the needs of a wide variety of students.
DEGREES AND MAJOR FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION
Gardner-Webb University has three graduate schools which award master’s
degrees. The Graduate School offers the Master of Arts degree in Elementary
Education (K-6), English, English Education, Mental Health Counseling, Middle
Grades Education, Executive Leadership Studies, School Counseling, and Sport
Science and Pedagogy, and the Master of Science in Nursing degree. The Graduate
School offers two doctoral degrees: The Doctor of Education degree in
Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Leadership and the Doctor of Nursing
Practice. The School of Divinity offers the Doctor of Ministry degree as well as the
Master of Divinity degree. The Graduate School of Business offers the Master of
Accountancy degree, Master of Business Administration degree, and International
Master of Business Administration degree.
For detailed information concerning graduate programs, please contact the
appropriate graduate program office of Gardner-Webb University.
The Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded in the following fields: American Sign
Language, American Sign Language with Teacher Licensure, Art, Art Education (K12), Biblical Studies, Communication Studies, Discipleship Studies, English,
English as a Second Language with Teacher Licensure, English with Teacher
Licensure, French, French with Teacher Licensure, History, Journalism,
Missiology, Philosophy and Theology, Music, Political Science, Religious Studies,
Social Sciences, Social Studies with Teacher Licensure, Sociology, Spanish,
Spanish with Teacher Licensure, Theatre Arts, Youth Discipleship, and World
Religions.
The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is awarded in Art.
The Bachelor of Music degree is awarded in the following fields: Composition,
Education, Music Business, Performance, and Sacred Music.
The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded in the following fields: Accounting,
Athletic Training, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Computer
Information Systems, Computer Science, Economics/Finance, Elementary
Education (K-6), Environmental Science, Health/Wellness, Healthcare
Management, International Business, Marketing, Mathematics, Mathematics with
Teacher Licensure, Middle Grades Education (6-9), Nursing, Physical
Education/Health Education with Teacher Licensure, Psychology, and Sport
Management.
The Associate in Arts degree is awarded in Nursing.
MINOR FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION
The following minor fields are available: American Sign Language, Art History,
Biblical Studies, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Christian History,
Classical Languages, Communication Studies, Computer Science, Criminal Justice,
Discipleship Studies, Education Studies, Electronic Publishing, English,
Environmental Science, French, General Science, Health Science, History,
Journalism, Mathematics, Military Science, Missiology, Music, Philosophy and
Ethics, Photography, Physical Science, Political Science, Professional Education
(available for areas of licensure only), Psychology, Public Relations, Recreation,
Sign Language Interpreting, Social Sciences, Sociology, Spanish, Sport
Management, Studio Art, Theater Arts, Video & Film, Wellness Promotion, World
Religions, Writing, and Youth Discipleship Studies (must major in Religious
Studies/Educational concentration).
Gardner-Webb University/19
GENERAL STUDIES
A strong emphasis on the liberal arts continues to be a significant feature of
the academic program for undergraduate students. The University seeks to
develop quality graduates who think logically, communicate clearly, and
appreciate their heritage. Therefore, every student is expected to demonstrate
competency in English, reading and mathematics. In addition, the General
Studies requirements reflect a broad and diversified curriculum designed to
prepare students for a future of continual growth.
INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH
An integral part of the academic program at Gardner-Webb University is the
opportunity to do independent study and to conduct research projects. With
the assistance of faculty members, junior and senior students are encouraged
to develop expertise in areas of interest beyond those covered in the course
offerings.
EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION
Gardner-Webb University supports programs which encourage students to
relate classroom learning to work experience. In fields such as Teacher
Education and Nursing, the experiential dimension is interwoven in the course
requirements. In other fields, such as Business, Communication Studies,
Psychology and Religious Studies, students are encouraged to participate in
internships, which are available throughout the academic year and during
summers. For additional information students should contact the dean or
department chair of the area of interest.
PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
Gardner-Webb University offers programs which prepare students for
professional studies in such fields as ministry, medicine, dentistry and law. In
addition, the University prepares students to enter any professional programs,
either at the graduate or undergraduate level, that are based on a liberal arts
education.
PREMINISTERIAL (ANY FULL-TIME CHRISTIAN VOCATION)
Traditionally a significant number of Gardner-Webb students have prepared
for a variety of Christian ministries. Although no particular major is required
for seminary or divinity school, in general, students who are interested in these
areas should expect to major either in Religious Studies or in any of the liberal
arts areas.
PREMEDICAL AND PREDENTAL
Medical and dental schools desire students who have demonstrated
academic excellence in science fields combined with the intellectual breadth
supplied by the liberal arts. Gardner-Webb graduates have experienced a high
degree of success in gaining admission to medical and dental schools. Students
interested in these professions are encouraged to major in Biology or
Chemistry. Students interested in a career in veterinary medicine, optometry
and other health professions that require graduate work generally complete
the same courses as premedical and predental students.
Academic Program/20
PRELAW
According to the Association of Law Schools, there are two objectives of
undergraduate education for prospective law students: first, the student should
learn to reason logically; second, the student should learn to write and speak
with clarity and precision. Gardner-Webb University provides a number of
majors that give students an appropriate background for admission to law
school.
ALL PREPROFESSIONAL MAJORS
Gardner-Webb University encourages students who plan to enter a
professional school for graduate work following their baccalaureate degree to
use the catalog of the professional school they wish to enter as a guide to
choosing undergraduate courses. In order to assist students, Gardner-Webb
University provides the services of faculty advisers for each preprofessional
program.
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
Gardner-Webb University offers professional programs in a number of areas,
including Accounting, Business Administration, Communication Studies,
Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Education, and Nursing.
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Gardner-Webb University offers a variety of special academic programs for
students with special needs and qualifications, including those discussed
below:
NOEL PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
The Noel Program for Students with Disabilities provides support services to
deaf, blind, learning disabled, and other students with documented disabilities.
In order to assess each student’s needs and to provide the necessary support
services, current professional documentation of a disability or disabilities must
be furnished. Upon acceptance to the University, documentation should be
sent to the Noel Program for Students with Disabilities. Documentation must
be furnished no later than three weeks prior to the beginning of services. Each
student is assigned a disability specialist who will work with the student
throughout his or her time at Gardner-Webb. Some of the
accommodations/services that may be provided if the student has supportive
documentation include notetakers, extended-time testing, materials in
alternative format, lab assistants, interpreters, orientation and mobility training
and use of adaptive technology. The student may also receive help in
developing effective study skills and organizational and test-taking strategies.
PROGRAM FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED
Through this program students who are blind or visually impaired have full
access to the educational and social opportunities of the University. Special
orientation is given to help students make the transition to the University.
Orientation and mobility training are provided and a wide variety of adaptive
equipment and software is available. In order to meet the needs of both blind
and visually impaired students, the University maintains an equipped resource
room located in the library and a technology lab in Frank Nanney Hall.
Gardner-Webb University/21
PROGRAM FOR THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING
Through this program students who are deaf or hard of hearing have full access
to the educational and social opportunities of the University. Qualified interpreters
that are RID-certified and/or state-licensed and notetakers enable these students to
attend fully integrated classes and to participate in extracurricular activities
sponsored by the University. Residence halls are equipped with visual fire alarms
and doorbell lights. Each deaf and hard of hearing student has a videophone in
his/her residence hall room. Frank Nanney Hall, the Library and Campus Security
are equipped with videophones as well. The University provides sound
amplification equipment that will aid the hard of hearing student in the classroom.
The program director and other staff members are proficient in sign language.
They are available for academic, personal, and career guidance.
LEARNING ENRICHMENT AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
The Learning Enrichment and Assistance Program (LEAP) provides assistance to
students by strengthening their academic skills. LEAP offers courses (CRLT 101,
ENGL 191, and MATH 100) that strengthen skills helpful for success in core
courses. In LEAP courses, students receive individual attention focused on their
particular needs as well as ample opportunities to practice their skills in a
supportive environment.
In addition, LEAP offers peer tutoring to Gardner-Webb students in select
subject areas. Please refer to the website for more information about available
peer tutors, tutoring schedules, and procedures for making an appointment using
an online form found through student services in MyWebb.
GOAL PROGRAM
The Greater Opportunities for Adult Learners (GOAL) program is a degree
completion program designed for students who have already entered the
workforce. Students must have completed a minimum of 60 semester hours of
transferable undergraduate credit to be considered for admission into the
program. Degree-seeking students in the traditional undergraduate program who
have withdrawn from the university and been away from studies for at least one
fall or spring semester may request transfer to the GOAL program simply by
applying for admission to GOAL.
Students who desire an immediate transfer and who are in good academic
standing may, under exceptional circumstances, appeal to the Readmission
Review Committee. Special consideration will be given to students who wish to
pursue a GOAL major not offered in the traditional program, as well as those who
have relocated from the area and desire to pursue a distance program at GardnerWebb University. Appeals will not be considered for students in the final 32 hours
of their current program except in extreme circumstances. Students considering
an appeal should contact the Advising Center for more information. Residential
housing is not available to students in the GOAL program (with the exception of
the School of Nursing’s RN to BSN program).
Additional information about the GOAL Program is located on the University
website, www.gardner-webb.edu, under Degree Completion Program, or in the
GOAL catalog. Or call 1-866-GWU-GOAL.
HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS PROGRAM
With the consent and recommendation of the high school principal, rising high
school seniors may complete their last year of high school at Gardner-Webb
University while simultaneously earning full college credit.
High school seniors and rising high school seniors may take courses at GardnerWebb University while still enrolled in high school.
College credit for work successfully completed will be granted subsequent to
high school graduation.
Academic Program/22
HONORS PROGRAM
The Honors Program provides special opportunities for academically
talented students. In addition to special honors and interdisciplinary classes, a
variety of lectures, trips and other events are planned for students. An Honors
House is available on campus for study and recreation. Application procedures
are available through the Admissions Office.
STUDY ABROAD
The Gardner-Webb University curriculum provides students with a global
understanding of the world so that they may gain the international
understanding necessary to be informed citizens. The University also
encourages students to explore the appropriateness of study abroad. This can
be an integral part of the students’ university experience, providing personal
growth, cultural understanding, an international perspective, improved foreign
language skills, and a competitive edge in the eventual job search.
Semester exchanges are currently possible at universities in England, Wales,
Malta, Spain, Sweden, and Hong Kong. Students who wish to study in
countries other than those mentioned may do so either with another university
or independently. GWU-sponsored summer study opportunities are available in
Canada (French) and Costa Rica (Spanish).
Students can also participate in mission experiences abroad. Honors
students may attend special honors programs that take place in a foreign
country. Students in the Broyhill School of Management GEM program will also
participate in specially designed international experiences. Through the Office
of International Programs students may arrange to study at foreign universities
other than those with which GWU has an exchange agreement.
During the academic year, GWU sponsors short trips to various overseas
destinations. With prior arrangement, credits may be earned for study/travel
abroad. Some financial assistance for international study/travel is available to
students who meet the necessary eligibility requirements.
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Gardner-Webb offers Army ROTC in cooperation with the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte. Military science coursework is offered on the
Gardner-Webb campus, and there are no additional tuition charges for those
participating in this program. ROTC provides world-class leadership training
opportunities applicable in corporate, executive, and government leadership
positions. Students may also elect to receive a minor in military science. There
are no military obligations for non-contracted students. Four, three, and twoyear scholarships are available to qualified students. Interested students should
contact the Military Science Department at 704-406-4427/2111.
AIR FORCE RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS (AFROTC)
Gardner-Webb University students may participate in Air Force ROTC at the
University of North Carolina at Charlotte and may be eligible for AFROTC
scholarships to apply to their Gardner-Webb tuition. Air Force ROTC courses
are held only on the UNC-Charlotte campus. Interested students should
contact the Commanding Officer, AFROTC Detachment 592, Department of
Aerospace Studies, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223, phone
number (704) 687-4540.
Gardner-Webb University/23
ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES
Gardner-Webb University recognizes the individual needs of students. In
order to maximize the student’s opportunity for success, the University places
emphasis on a variety of academic support services.
ACADEMIC ADVISING
Students are assigned a faculty advisor when they enter Gardner-Webb
University and are encouraged to view the advising relationship as a
partnership for success. First-year students who are enrolled in a First-Year
Program course will have the course instructor as their academic advisor until
they declare a major. Transfer students who do not take a First-Year Program
(UNIV 101 or UNIV 111) course will be assigned an advisor in the Academic
Advising Center. Students who have declared a major will be assigned an
advisor in the department of their chosen field of study. If they declare a
minor, students are encouraged to consult with the chair of the department of
their minor field of study for advising regarding the minor, but the primary
advising relationship remains with the advisor in the department of the
student’s major.
The Academic Advising Center provides assistance in academic advising as
well as in selecting majors and minors.
The ultimate responsibility for making decisions about educational plans, life
goals, “selection of a program of study and adherence to all published
regulations and requirements of the University, including the...requirements
for graduation” rests with the individual student.
COMPUTER FACILITIES
The Gardner-Webb student has ready access to a number of computer
facilities, including PC and Apple labs. In addition to the use of computers in
the Computer Science and Computer Information Systems programs,
computers are an integral part of programs such as Business Administration,
Communication Studies, English, Education, Learning Assistance, Mathematics,
Nursing, Psychology, and Science.
Access to the Internet is provided through computer labs and wireless
networks on the main campus as well as the Catawba, Charlotte, Iredell, and
Winston-Salem campuses.
LIBRARY
The Dover Memorial Library is an active and integral part of the University’s
academic program. The Library’s collections, available on open stacks, support
all areas of the curriculum with a total item count of approximately 850,000,
including 230,000 volumes, 600,000 microforms, and many other materials
such as videos, compact discs, and computer files. The Library has print and/or
online full-text access to more than 15,000 periodicals and is a selective
depository for federal government documents.
In addition to its collections, the library provides numerous services to
reinforce and enhance the instructional process for both on- and off-campus
students.
Academic Program/24
Professional librarians are available for individual and group instruction.
Interlibrary loan, audiovisuals, and production services (lamination, color
copies, etc.) are available. The Library’s home page, www.gardnerwebb.edu/library, provides access to the online catalog and databases as well
as information about the Library facility and the Library’s resources, services,
and policies.
UNIVERSITY WRITING CENTER
The University Writing Center, located in Craig Hall, offers free assistance to
all Gardner-Webb students on any problem related to writing. Qualified
graduate and undergraduate students, under the direction of a faculty specialist
in writing, provide individual and group tutoring and answer questions upon
request.
Gardner-Webb University/25
CHRISTIAN LIFE AND SERVICE
The Office of Christian Life and Service advances the Christian and Baptist
identity of the University and nurtures students, faculty and staff in the
development of a mature Christian faith. Varied opportunities are provided for
expressing that faith through service to God and humanity. The major areas of
focus which are part of the Office of Christian Life and Service include Student
Ministries, Pastoral Care, Dimensions, Missions, and the President’s Council on
Faith, Service, Leadership & the Spiritual Life of the University.
STUDENT MINISTRIES
Through student ministry organizations, students are encouraged and
challenged in personal discipleship, corporate worship, and life-changing
ministry and mission experiences.
Campus Ministries United (CMU) is the student ministry of Gardner-Webb
University. The CMU Council consists of the student leaders of each CMU
ministry. They work together with GWU’s ministerial staff in prayer,
discipleship, and relationship-building to promote a passionate and enduring
devotion to Christ among the student body. CMU Council members, FOCUS
team leaders, and Small Groups leaders compose the Leadership Team. These
student leaders are committed to faithfully following God’s leadership in their
positions of service. Opportunities for involvement in student ministries
include FOCUS, the Verge, Prison Fellowship, International Student Ministry,
Athletic Ministries, Small Groups, FCA and Gospel Choir.
PASTORAL CARE
While Gardner-Webb University is committed to excellence in academics, it
is equally committed to the spiritual care of students, faculty and staff. The
staff of the Office of Christian Life and Service provides pastoral ministry to the
Gardner-Webb family including the following:
• Pastoral care to students, faculty, and staff;
• Various experiences in corporate worship;
• Vocational counseling and ministry referral to students interested in
church-related vocations;
• Assistance in finding a place of worship, particularly to students as
they seek a local church with which to affiliate.
DIMENSIONS
Dimensions is a weekly series of programs designed to nurture persons
spiritually, intellectually and culturally in the context of the Christian faith and
to promote a sense of community. Consequently, the three primary objectives
are (1) to provide opportunities for spiritual growth through worship
experiences and programs of a religious nature; (2) to enhance the academic
program of the University by providing opportunities for intellectual and
cultural enrichment and to include programs of an academic nature as well as
dramatic, musical and other cultural events; and (3) to promote a sense of
community by regularly bringing together students, faculty, staff and friends of
the University.
Programs are usually held on Tuesday mornings in the Porter Arena or the
Dover Theater. Dimensions guidelines and policies are listed on page 92 in the
academic catalog.
Christian Life and Service /26
MISSIONS
The Office of Christian Life and Service has a long-standing commitment to
the global mission of God. In addition to local mission opportunities
coordinated through Student Ministries, mission trips are offered during fall,
spring and summer breaks. Furthermore, a Dimensions program in September
is devoted to missions. Upcoming mission trips are announced at this program
and applications are made available to students. Recent North American
mission trip destinations include Canada, Hawaii, Florida, Wisconsin,
California, New Mexico, and Louisiana. Recent international mission trip
destinations have included Guatemala, Honduras, Germany, Nicaragua, Russia,
Ireland and South Africa.
PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL ON FAITH, SERVICE, LEADERSHIP & THE
SPIRITUAL LIFE OF THE UNIVERSITY
The President’s Council on Faith, Service Leadership & the Spiritual Life of
the University is appointed by the President of Gardner-Webb University and
includes student, faculty, staff, and alumni representation. The Council
regularly evaluates the following strategic initiatives of the University:
• Emphasize the University’s strong Christian identity and mission;
• Provide for students and the entire University community an environment
conducive to and supportive of spiritual growth;
• Work toward greater integration of Christian commitment and academic
excellence;
• Confirm the University’s mission and values and clarify the University’s
identity with focus upon Faith, Service and Leadership.
Gardner-Webb University/27
Student Development/28
STUDENT DEVELOPMENT
Gardner-Webb University is committed to the education of the whole
person. This includes the mind, the body and the spirit. To this end, the
University considers the student’s activities outside the classroom to be just as
important as the classroom experiences. These activities help the student to
develop social and interpersonal skills, deepen spiritual commitments, explore
career opportunities, formulate a philosophy of life, develop leadership skills,
and develop sound ethical and moral principles. Experiences in residence halls,
student government, the Campus Center, service organizations, informal social
groups, the Broyhill Adventure Course, and intramural teams are important to
the student’s total development. The University supports and encourages
student involvement in a variety of activities.
The Student Development Division consists of the departments of
Counseling and Career Services, Housing and Residence Education, University
Police, Leadership Development, and Student Activities, Campus Recreation,
and New Student Orientation.
DEPARTMENT OF COUNSELING SERVICES
College is a time of change and adjustment, which may lead to anxiety,
conflict and uncertainty for many students. The University Counseling Center is
available to assist students who may be experiencing these and other feelings.
The University Counseling Center is staffed by a team of professionals,
trained in education and counseling, who want to assist students in coping
with difficulties and making the most of their opportunities for success.
The University Counseling Center adheres to the Code of Ethics of the
American Counseling Association and operates within a Christian perspective.
All services are provided to students, faculty and staff in a concerned, caring,
and confidential setting. No information will be given to others without the
consent of the individual.
Services are provided to assist students in defining and accomplishing
personal and academic goals. The services include the following:
• High quality individual and group counseling to people who may be
experiencing psychological or behavioral difficulties;
• Programming focused on the developmental needs of college students,
designed to maximize the potential of students to benefit from the
academic experience;
• Consultation to the institution to make the environment as beneficial to the
intellectual, emotional and physical development of students as possible.
Appointments may be made by contacting the Counseling Center. Referrals
to local community agencies may be made if needed.
DEPARTMENT OF CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services Office is dedicated to serving Gardner-Webb students
and alumni with an emphasis on two fundamental roles - aiding in career
exploration and self-discovery and providing a myriad of resources to aid in the
job search process. All Gardner-Webb students and alumni are eligible for the
vast array of services including use of FOCUS, a computerized guidance system,
resume writing assistance, and job listing services. The Career Services Office
also sponsors educational workshops, career planning events, and several
career fairs throughout the year, open to all current students and alumni.
Gardner-Webb University/29
The Career Services Office also administers an online resume referral and job
listing service. All students are encouraged to register with career services during
their freshman year. Registration is simple using the Bulldog Network. Students
complete a registration section and transfer their resumes to our database, after
which prospective employers can view those seeking work on the Internet. For
a complete listing of upcoming events and current job postings, visit
www.gardner-webb.edu; student life and career services. Bookmark the site
and visit often, as the contents of the site change daily.
Employers are an integral part of career services. However, the Career Services
Office reserves the right to refuse employers with discriminatory hiring
practices. The office will also make decisions regarding third-person employers
and on-campus recruitment.
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND RESIDENCE EDUCATION
The University strives to make residential living attractive, comfortable and
developmental in nature. All of the residence halls have heating and air
conditioning. The different housing options offered are single, double and triple
occupancy rooms. Students should bring linens, pillow, and other items to
personalize their room. It is strongly suggested that they consult with their
roommate about decor and items they want to bring.
Residence halls open the day before registration each semester and close after
classes at the end of the fall, spring and summer semesters. Seniors only may
remain through Commencement in fall, spring, and summer semesters.
Residence halls close during Christmas break except for international students or
those participating in University-sponsored events. Students must sign up to stay
during other breaks.
Room assignments are made through the Residence Education Office.
Incoming freshmen will be notified of their room assignment during the
summer. A letter will be sent to their permanent address with instructions as
stated below on how to check this through MyWebb.
• Go to www.gardner-webb.edu and sign in to MyWebb.
• Click on the “Student” tab.
• From here, click on the following links in this order: Academic services
(twice), Student Services & Financial Aid, and View My Housing Assignment.
• Select Fall 2011 as the term and click “Submit term.”
• Your hall, room, and roommate’s contact information will appear.
Each residence hall is staffed with a Graduate Resident Director and Resident
Advisors. The staff is available to assist students with a variety of situations and
concerns. All halls are equipped with laundry rooms and each room has cable TV
service. In addition, the campus is wired for internet use and voice mail.
The $40 (non-refundable) residence hall activity fee must be paid at check-in
annually.
More specific Residence Education policies and guidelines may be found in
The Student Handbook and in the Housing Contract. Residence Hall policies
apply 365 days a year.
RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS:
1. All single, full-time undergraduate students enrolled in the regular program
are required to live on campus. Exceptions will be considered for the following
reasons:
a. Living with parent or guardian within a 50-mile radius
b. 21 years of age or older prior to the beginning of the academic year
c. Completed 120 consecutive days of military duty
d. Lived six semesters in a university residence hall (fall or spring)
e. Achieved 90 semester hours of university credit
Student Development/30
Note: Full-time students desiring commuter status must complete and submit
a Commuter Application Contract along with a $50 Advance Deposit. New
students should submit the application and deposit upon acceptance.
Continuing students wishing to change from a resident to commuter status
must submit the application and fee no later than April 15th for the
following fall. Please note: The Housing Contract is for the full year - fall
through spring.
A student who chooses to live off campus and fails to obtain approval for
commuter status will be subject to revocation of registration, loss of
institutional financial aid, and/or fines.
2. Married or part-time students enrolled in the regular program must
complete and submit the Commuter Application Contract along with the $50
Advance Deposit.
3. All resident students are required to purchase a University meal plan.
Exemptions will be considered only for medical reasons when the University’s
food service cannot accommodate the necessary dietary requirements. Medical
exemptions must be requested in writing at least 15 days prior to registration
and be accompanied by a doctor’s statement and prescribed diet.
ROOM RESERVATION POLICY AND PROCEDURES
1. All resident students must submit a properly completed Application and
Contract for Housing and pay a $150 Room Reservation Deposit before a room
will be reserved.
2. a. New students enrolling for the fall semester should submit the Housing
Contract and $150 Room Reservation Deposit within 30 days of
acceptance or before the opening of school.
THE ROOM RESERVATION DEPOSIT IS NON-REFUNDABLE AFTER MAY 15.
b. Continuing students may reserve rooms during the spring semester.
Each student must submit to the Office of Housing & Residence
Education verification of payment of the $150 Room Reservation
Deposit and a properly completed Housing Contract.
THE ROOM RESERVATION DEPOSIT IS NON-REFUNDABLE.
DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY POLICE
The University Police Department is a multi-functional service agency whose
primary purpose is to protect the University community and enforce N.C. State
Law. Full-time officers are professionals who have been certified and sworn by
the N.C. Attorney General office. Services provided by the department include
traffic control, engraving, educational seminars, a 24-hour emergency number,
vehicle entry service for “lock-outs”, vehicle “jump-starts”, and escort service
on campus. Officers patrol the entire campus on foot, segways, and in
marked/unmarked campus police vehicles. The campus is also protected by a
camera security system. The department also employs students for job specific
responsibilities. The University Police Department is located in the Poston
Center.
Gardner-Webb University/31
DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
Three fundamental tenets of the University are FAITH, SERVICE, and
LEADERSHIP. The Office of Student Leadership Development exists to plan,
implement, and coordinate a comprehensive campus-wide student leadership
program. It promotes a study of leadership and leadership principles that
includes hands-on-training. The office works collaboratively with appropriate
campus-wide constituencies to promote a study of civic and organizational
leadership. The office seeks to incorporate leadership principles in academic
courses. This office represents a significant effort by the University to prepare
graduates for a life of leadership and civic engagement in a global society.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Representing the interest of the Gardner-Webb student body is the Student
Government Association (SGA). Projects and proposals dealing with social,
cultural, and academic life are promoted by the SGA officers and the Student
Senate. The SGA advocates on behalf of student interests, encourages
involvement in service, provides co-curricular and extracurricular activities and
fosters interaction among faculty, staff, and students. The SGA is advised by the
Director of Student Leadership Development.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Gardner-Webb University offers students opportunities to become involved
in a wide range of activities and organizations on campus. Students work with
the Student Leadership Office to assist students in forming new clubs and
organizations. Guidelines for starting new clubs/organizations are available
from the Office of Student Leadership Development.
DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES, CAMPUS RECREATION,
NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
The Office of Student Activities is responsible for the educational and
entertainment programming for the students at Gardner-Webb University. The
University offers a variety of programs to help and encourage the student to
grow socially, culturally and spiritually. All traditional and undergraduate
students are encouraged to attend all campus activities.
The department is also committed to ensuring that all programs reflect
Christian values and commitment by providing a staff of students and
professionals who are dedicated to the development of the total student. The
activities that are planned range from weekend movies, comedy acts, novelty
events, and special event dances. The Director oversees the Campus Activities
Board to provide quality entertainment.
CAMPUS RECREATION
Campus Recreation provides recreational activities that are designed to
enrich the quality of physical, mental, spiritual, and social life of University
community members. Many different fitness classes are offered throughout the
semester ranging from beginner to intermediate. Intramurals offer a variety of
individual and team sports during the fall and spring semesters to
accommodate many interests and abilities. The Suttle Wellness Center, located
in the University Physical Development Complex, is a health and wellness
educational resource center available to all Gardner-Webb University students,
faculty, staff and family members of faculty and staff.
Student Development/32
BROYHILL ADVENTURE COURSE
The Broyhill Adventure Course is a unique outdoor adventure complex that
offers a series of experiential challenges designed to enhance team building
and personal growth for Gardner-Webb University students, faculty, staff and
community groups. Using a combination of high and low ropes activities,
participants experience climbing and problem-solving as metaphors for life
whereby communication skills are improved, self-esteem is enhanced,
problem-solving techniques are applied and cooperation in group and team
situations is further developed. The Broyhill Adventure Course practices a
“Challenge by Choice” philosophy which allows participants to choose a
comfortable level of involvement. Programs are flexible and can be designed to
meet a specific group’s needs.
OFFICE OF COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
The Office of Community Engagement houses the Service Learning and
Volunteer programs in order to provide all members of the Gardner-Webb
community with meaningful service opportunities. Each year, Gardner-Webb
students, faculty and staff volunteer their time and talents to the surrounding
community through various campus wide volunteer programs. In addition to
providing campus wide service programs, the office also serves as a resource
center and clearinghouse for volunteer information. Interested individuals and
groups may visit the office or go online to receive information on various ongoing and one time service opportunities. Interested faculty members who
would like to add a Service Learning component to their syllabus should
contact the Office of Community Engagement. Service leadership
opportunities are available to students through REACH, a student organization
that promotes campus involvement in community service for individuals and
groups.
STUDENT GUIDELINES, EXPECTATIONS, AND RIGHTS
Gardner-Webb University is a community of students, faculty and staff who
are dedicated to learning and personal development in a Christian
environment. As in any community, certain standards of conduct are necessary
to protect the safety, rights, health and general well-being of all members of
the community. The University strives to promote concern for the good of the
entire group as opposed to selfish individualism. Each person, whether
student, faculty or staff, voluntarily joins the University community and thus is
expected to abide by rules and regulations that have been adopted to insure
reasonable standards of conduct. The Code of Student Conduct describes
conduct which the University does not tolerate. By enrolling in the University,
each student agrees to abide by University rules, regulations and expectations.
The Board of Trustees has approved minimum penalties for certain of the
prohibited behaviors. The University assures fundamental fairness to any
student accused of involvement in prohibited behavior. The Student Handbook
describes the Code of Student Conduct and the judicial process used in the
event a student becomes involved in prohibited behavior. The Handbook is
available online and may be accessed at http://www.gardner-webb.edu.
Click on Academics heading, then Undergraduate Student Handbook.
Portions of the Handbook (student rights, responsibilities and expectations)
will be reviewed during new student orientation. A hard copy is available upon
request at the office of the Vice President and Dean of Student Development,
Suttle Hall 101.
Gardner-Webb University/33
Gardner-Webb University supports and is fully committed to the concept of
a drug-, tobacco- and alcohol-free campus community. In order to comply with
the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, GardnerWebb publishes the following and makes it available to each student.
1. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use of
controlled substances is prohibited by students on Gardner-Webb University’s
property or as any part of the University’s activities. As a condition of
enrollment, Gardner-Webb University students will abide by these terms. The
following is a partial list of controlled substances:
Narcotics (heroin, morphine, etc.)
Cannabis (marijuana, hashish, etc.)
Stimulants (cocaine, diet pills, etc.)
Depressants (tranquilizers, etc.)
Hallucinogens (PCP, LSD, designer drugs, etc.)
Designer (MDA, MDA-known as ecstasy, ice, etc.)
Tobacco
Alcohol
2. Gardner-Webb will impose disciplinary sanctions on students who violate
the terms of paragraph 1, above. If found responsible, the appropriate
disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from the University and/or
satisfactory participation in a drug and alcohol abuse assistance or
rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by a Federal, State, or local
health, law enforcement, or other appropriate agency, will be taken. More
specific penalties are outlined in the Gardner-Webb University Student
Handbook. Violations may also be referred to the appropriate civil authorities
for prosecution under local, state, and federal law.
3. Local, state, and federal laws prohibit the possession, and distribution of
illicit drugs, alcohol and weapons. The applicable legal sanctions for various
offenses are listed in the North Carolina Criminal Law and Procedure book, a
reference copy of which is maintained by the University’s Campus Police
Department
4. Information describing the health risks associated with the illicit drugs
and abuse of alcohol is made available to all students. Additional information
and individual counseling is available through the University’s Counseling
Center. If necessary and at the student’s expense, referral can be made to an
outside agency.
5. Local, state and federal law prohibits the possession of weapons on
campus. These laws supersede any statutes which allow the possession of a
concealed weapon by permit. G.S. 14.269.2
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/34
ADMISSIONS, FINANCIAL AID, AND
FINANCES
ADMISSION PROCEDURES
Gardner-Webb University operates on the Rolling Admissions Plan.
Completed applications are acted upon and notification is made to the student
within three weeks. Gardner-Webb University maintains that minimums of 2.5
GPA, 18 ACT, and/or an 870 SAT (Critical Reading and Math) and a rank in the
top 50% of the high school graduating class are base lines for academic success.
In addition to quantitative requirements for admission, Gardner-Webb University
accepts students with strong character, leadership ability and the desire to be a
positive influence in the campus community. No single criterion will be
decisive, but each item will be considered carefully as acceptance decisions are
made. In the case of transfer students, previous college work and
recommendations will serve as the criteria for acceptance.
Although an interview is not required of all applicants for admission to
Gardner-Webb University, campus visits are encouraged. Interviews and campus
tours are available 10 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. Monday through Friday or by
appointment. Five prospective student visitation days, or DAWG Days, are
planned during the school year. Most DAWG Days are held on a Saturday or a
holiday to accommodate work schedules. Contact the Undergraduate
Admissions Office at 1-800-253-6472/704-406-4498 for further information, or
visit our website to register online.
Gardner-Webb University admission packets are available from many high
school guidance offices or directly from the Admissions Office of the University.
The completed application, along with a non-refundable $40 application fee,
transcripts of all high school credits and any college work attempted should be
returned to the Gardner-Webb University Undergraduate Admissions Office,
P.O. Box 817, Boiling Springs, NC 28017. Application for admission may also be
made online at www.gardner-webb.edu.
Applicants must meet the University’s standards as to intellectual promise and
emotional and social stability. Gardner-Webb University is committed to its
responsibility as a liberal arts university within the context of the Christian faith.
It seeks to enroll students from a variety of racial, economic, social, religious,
and geographic backgrounds.
Although a fixed pattern of high school credits is not prescribed, the
following minimum course distribution is recommended as the best preparation
for academic work at Gardner-Webb University: English, 4 units; Social Science,
2 units; Algebra, 2 units; Geometry, 2 units; Foreign Language, 2 units; Natural
Science, 2 units; plus electives.
Acceptance of students for admission to the University does not automatically
guarantee their entrance into any particular program of the University.
Departmental/School approval is necessary for entry into any
departmental/school program and/or major.
Students may enter at the beginning of any semester or summer term.
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
Applicants for admission to Gardner-Webb University are required to submit
their scores on the SAT of the College Entrance Examination Board or the ACT
of The American College Testing Program. Scores should be sent directly to
Gardner-Webb University. The SAT school code for GWU is 5242, and 3102 for
ACT.
Applications, lists of testing centers and dates, and rules on applications, fees
and other information are available in most high school guidance offices and on
the web.
Gardner-Webb University/35
CONDITIONAL ADMISSION PROCESS
Students whose academic credentials do not meet Gardner-Webb
University’s stated admission standards may be invited (by letter) to attend the
University with conditional admission status. To be considered, students must
submit two letters of reference and a hand-written essay, and complete a
personal interview with the Assistant Vice President for Undergraduate
Admissions. This designation has a limited number of freshman positions each
year.
Students admitted with conditional admission status may register for no
more than 15.5 credit hours during the first semester, as well as any
subsequent semester in which they do not meet satisfactory progress.
Satisfactory progress is determined by earning an overall G.P.A. of 2.00. If
satisfactory progress is attained, the student will be removed from conditional
status.
Students who qualify for conditional admission status are offered various
academic support services, which are voluntary, but strongly encouraged.
These support services include GWU’s Writing Center, Peer Tutoring Program,
and academic counseling. Students will be required to meet with a member of
the Retention and Student Success Team to discuss their academic progress.
Based on placement scores, some students entering with a conditional
admissions status may be required to enroll in one or more Learning Assistance
Program courses.
SPECIAL STUDENTS
Gardner-Webb University admits a limited number of special students.
They include:
1. Persons who wish only private music lessons. Such applicants are admitted if
instructors in the Department of Fine Arts are able to schedule lessons for them.
2. Persons 21 years of age or older who are not high school graduates or degree
candidates but wish to take class work. Such persons are accepted on the basis
of maturity and background sufficient to do the class work desired.
3. College graduates who are interested in further study.
4. High school students who wish to take work on the Gardner-Webb campus
prior to and during their senior year. Credit for this work is generally
transferable to other institutions.
5. High school students who wish to enter Gardner-Webb at the end of their
junior year may submit an application for consideration for early admission.
Students must obtain approval from their local school authority (i.e. school
board, principal, etc.) to count their freshman year requirements at GardnerWebb toward their graduation requirements from high school.
HOME SCHOOL STUDENTS
Home school students should submit a portfolio/transcript showing courses
taken, grades, extracurricular activities and out-of-classroom experiences. The
portfolio/transcript must indicate the program or programs used in instruction.
Home school students are required to submit their scores on the SAT of the
College Entrance Examination Board or the ACT of The American College
Testing Program. Scores should be sent directly to Gardner-Webb University. If
courses were taken at a community college, or college/university, transcripts
must be submitted.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/36
TRANSIENT STUDENTS
A student enrolled at another institution may take a course(s) at GardnerWebb University and transfer that credit to the other institution. To be
considered as a transient student at Gardner-Webb, one must apply to GardnerWebb and have written permission from the registrar of the other institution.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
In order to be considered for admission to Gardner-Webb University,
international students must follow the procedure below:
1. Submit documentation of their ability to read and write the English language.
They should do so by submitting results of the Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Test System (IELTS). If
submitting results of the TOEFL, a minimum score of 500 (paper), 173
(computer-based), or 61 (internet-based) is required. If submitting results of the
IELTS, a minimum score of 5.0 is required. They may take the SAT or ACT in
lieu of the TOEFL or IELTS. Minimum requirements must be met. Students who
fail to meet the English language requirement may enroll at an ESL Center.
Proficiency certification by ESL meets the English language requirement for
admission.
2. Submit documentation of their ability to support themselves financially while in
the United States.
3. Submit all transcripts of foreign college credits to World Education Services for
evaluation before being mailed to Gardner-Webb. An application for a WES
evaluation may be found at www.wes.org. WES may also be contacted by
calling 1-800-937-3895. This must be done prior to enrollment at GardnerWebb.
4. All high school transcripts must be translated into English. If requiring
translation, submit official transcript to World Education Service. This must
be done prior to enrollment at Gardner-Webb University.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND CREDIT
Advanced Placement Program: Students achieving a minimum score of three
on an Advanced Placement exam of the College Board will receive credit for
the specific course covered by the test as determined by the appropriate
academic department of the University. Students achieving a score of four or
five may receive additional advanced credit. AP credits are not counted toward
the senior college credit hour minimum (64).
College-Level Examination Program: Gardner-Webb accepts credit earned
through the College Level Examination Program based on exams taken prior to,
and through the end of, the student’s first semester of enrollment. CLEP credits
are not counted toward the senior college credit hour minimum (64).
Gardner-Webb University grants credit to students submitting test scores
from the College-Level Examination Program on the following basis:
General CLEP Guidelines:
1. Credit will be received on the same basis as transferred credit from accredited
institutions of higher learning.
2. Credit will not be granted in an area for which the examinee has attempted or
earned college credit.
Gardner-Webb University/37
3. Credit earned will be computed in the examinee’s academic record as “CR”
which is hours credit only.
4. Unsatisfactory scores will not become part of the examinee’s academic record.
5. A CLEP test on any subject may be submitted only one time.
General Examination Guidelines:
1. The student must submit a score at or above the minimum score set by the
American Council on Education listed for each examination.
2. The number of semester hours granted will be the total normally granted for
the area covered by the test with the following restrictions:
a. A maximum of six semester hours of credit may be granted for each
test.
b. A maximum of three semester hours of credit may be granted on the
basis of a sub-score, provided the area is appropriate.
c. Credit thus granted may be applied to the student's course of study only
as basic courses or free electives.
Subject Examination Guidelines
1. The student must submit a score at or above the minimum score set by the
American Council on Education listed for each examination.
2. The number of semester hours granted will be determined by the scope of the
material measured as indicated by the American Council on Education.
3. Credit thus granted may be applied to the student's course of study without
restriction.
A detailed list of AP and CLEP equivalencies is available online and may be
accessed as follows:
Address:
Place cursor on:
Click on:
Click on:
Access:
www.gardner-webb.edu
Academics, Academic Services, then Registrar’s Office
Transfer Credit
Credit for AP or CLEP Exams
Appropriate link within each text section
International Baccalaureate Organization: The University accepts credit
for Higher Level courses completed with scores of 5 or above. A detailed list of
IBO equivalencies is available online and may be accessed as follows:
Address: www.gardner-webb.edu
Click on: Academics, then Academic Services, then Registrar’s Office
Click on: Transfer Credit, then IBO
Armed Service-Related Programs: Veterans who have successfully
completed a course or courses under the Service School training program or
through USAFI may submit these courses for credit consideration. Credit may
be applied or University requirement satisfied depending on the student’s
specific academic program requirements.
Local Testing Program: A student who attains a satisfactory score on a
special test administered by one of the University’s academic departments may
be exempted from the related course, but will be required to take an advanced
course in the department carrying equal or greater credit. Arrangements for
advanced placement through this program require the agreement of the
appropriate Associate Provost and department chair.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/38
ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS
Requirements include a formal application for admission, an official high school
transcript and all college transcripts showing date of graduation or GED
Certification, SAT or ACT scores, and a non-refundable $40 application fee. The
high school transcript (or equivalent) and entrance test scores are not required of
applicants who have completed 15 semester hours of college credits with at least a
2.0 Grade Point Average. When calculating the admission GPA for the university,
Undergraduate Admissions takes into account all attempted college course work.
Note this GPA may vary from overall transfer GPA found on the Transcript
evaluation or on the prospective students “MyWebb” account. The overall GPA
that the student views on her/his transcript evaluation or “MyWebb” reflects only
transferable credits.
The applicant’s record is evaluated by Gardner-Webb retention standards, or the
applicant must be eligible to return to his previous college in order to be accepted.
TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY
Students transferring from accredited two-year colleges may transfer up to 64
semester hours. An additional 64 semester hours must be taken on the senior
college level, with the final 32 semester hours for graduation taken at GardnerWebb.
Community college graduates with an Associate of Arts or Associate of Sciences
degree from a North Carolina Community College should see the Comprehensive
Articulation Agreement in the General Studies Requirements section of this
catalog. See Articulation Agreement, note 11 under Bachelor’s degree
requirements.
Students transferring from accredited four-year colleges may transfer up to 96
semester hours. For a bachelor’s degree, the final 32 semester hours for graduation
must be taken at Gardner-Webb. Candidates for the associate degree must take
their final 24 hours at Gardner-Webb.
All transfer work completed at an accredited college and/or university will be
considered for transfer at full value, assuming the courses are passed with a grade
of “C” (2.0) or better provided they are comparable to Gardner-Webb University
curriculum. This work will be evaluated by the Registrar’s Office staff member
charged with this responsibility.
Courses accepted as transfer credit are recorded with grades, grade points, and
quality points. However, the grade point average for graduation is computed on
academic credit earned at Gardner-Webb University.
TRANSFER CREDIT APPEAL FOR NON-REGIONALLY ACCREDITED INSTITUTIONS
If a transfer student attended a school that is not regionally accredited, the
student will need to follow the guidelines below in order for Gardner-Webb to
consider the courses individually for transfer…
All courses reviewed for transfer must be related to general studies or the major
subject area chosen by the student. There are currently two ways in which we can
review these specific courses:
1. If any course(s) has a recommendation from an agency listed below, that
recommendation will be used to aid in the evaluation. In the event the
recommendation is vague or unsatisfactory, the Gardner-Webb faculty
department chair for the subject area of the course being evaluated will
be contacted for aid in determining the full appropriate credit to be
granted. The agencies from which we accept recommendations are:
American Council on Education, American Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions Officers, and NAFSA: Association of
International Educators.
Gardner-Webb University/39
2. For course work that does not have recommendations from the guides
listed above, the student must complete the following procedural steps
for each course he or she wishes to have transferred:
a. Produce a syllabus for the course requested for transfer.
b. Request the academic institution previously attended to submit a
record of credentials for the teaching faculty member(s) of each
course requested for transfer [a catalog showing degrees earned,
faculty vita, or a letter from the academic dean indicating graduate
level work and area of graduate work for the faculty member(s)].
These credentials will be reviewed by the Associate Provosts’ Office for
authenticity and credibility. Once approved, the Associate Provosts’ Office will
contact the Registrar’s Office to permit review of the course syllabi for possible
transfer of courses.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE
The student’s general academic performance is indicated by a Grade Point
Average. This figure is determined by dividing attempted semester hours into
earned quality points. Two Grade Point Averages are significant for each student:
the semester GPA and the cumulative GPA.
1. Both values are calculated on GWU academic work only.
2. Students must achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 to qualify for
graduation.
READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS
Students who are not in attendance for one or more semesters or who withdraw
during a semester for any reason must submit a formal application for readmission.
Students who have been out more than 24 months must meet new curricular
requirements.
Former students who have attended other institutions subsequent to their
enrollment at Gardner-Webb must provide an official transcript from each
institution attended. Those regulations concerning the advanced standing of
transfer students apply to these students.
Students who leave Gardner-Webb University while on probation may request
an evaluation of courses taken at other institutions after returning to good
academic standing. Approval must be granted by the appropriate Associate
Provost. A request may not be made for summer courses taken immediately after
being placed on probation at the end of spring semester.
Students who leave Gardner-Webb University while on suspension may request
an evaluation of courses taken at other institutions after returning to good
academic standing.
Approval must be granted by the appropriate Associate Provost. Courses taken
during the semester or semesters the students were suspended are not eligible for
evaluation. A request may not be made for summer courses taken immediately
after being placed on suspension at the end of spring semester.
ACADEMIC RENEWAL POLICY
The purpose of the academic renewal policy is to allow students who have done
poorly during past enrollment at the University to start anew and have a chance to
complete their undergraduate degree at the University. To be eligible for academic
renewal, a student must not have been enrolled at Gardner-Webb for the previous
four years prior to applying for readmission nor have received Academic Renewal
previously. For students who have attempted more than 64 semester hours of
work at Gardner-Webb, only the first 64 hours are eligible for academic renewal.
All of the eligible hours must be considered; a student may not choose the hours
to which this policy applies. Only Gardner-Webb credit hours are eligible for
academic renewal. Coursework at another institution must be treated according to
the current transfer credit policies.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid /40
A student who is accepted under the Academic Renewal provision is
considered in good academic standing and is eligible for all academic awards
and honors. All transfer work from other institutions will be considered for
credit even if the course is a repeat of a course in which the student earned a
D or F at Gardner-Webb. A student who is admitted under Academic Renewal
may have a career total of six repeat courses. This number does not include
courses repeated prior to the student’s admission under Academic Renewal for
which they do not receive credit upon their readmission to the University or
courses repeated at other institutions.
Under this policy, all eligible Gardner-Webb University hours will be treated
as transfer credit, i.e. grades of C or better will be given credit, but not
counted in the Grade Point Average (GPA). Grades below C will not be
counted as hours earned or in the GPA, with the exception of FX grades. FX
grades will remain on the student’s records and counted in the GPA. All GWU
semester hours approved for academic renewal will be treated as transfer
credit for determining academic awards.
The GWU Readmission Committee will consider a student for academic
renewal when reviewing an application for readmission. Any student, who
applies for readmission and is eligible for academic renewal, may request
consideration for such at that time. In addition, the readmission committee
may recommend a student applying for readmission for academic renewal. If
approved, the student will have the right to turn down academic renewal if it
is not desired. All previous records at GWU will be considered during the
readmission process, including academic and disciplinary actions. If a student
is accepted for readmission, nothing in these records should preclude
eligibility for academic renewal. Students may not apply for or be considered
for academic renewal after they have been readmitted and have enrolled in
their first course.
FINANCIAL AID
Gardner-Webb University makes every effort to assist students in securing
the necessary resources to afford a Gardner-Webb education. The University
provides various forms of financial aid to bridge the financial “gap” between
the cost of attendance and the amount the student and/or parents can
reasonably be expected to provide.
Gardner-Webb University admits students of any race, color, national and
ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally
accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate
on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its
educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs,
athletic and other school-administered programs.
NEED BASED FINANCIAL AID
Students seeking financial aid are required to complete the Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This application will provide the Financial
Planning Office with the amount the student and their family can contribute to
the cost of education. (The cost of education includes tuition, fees, room,
board and expenses for books, transportation and personal expenses). The
FAFSA collects the student’s and parents’ federal tax information from the
prior year as well as asset information. This information is used to calculate the
expected family contribution (EFC). (The EFC is the family’s ability to
contribute toward colleges costs). The EFC determines the amount and type(s)
of financial aid that can be awarded to each student.
Gardner-Webb University/41
There is no charge to apply and the FAFSA can be completed at the
following website: fafsa.ed.gov. The application can be done beginning
January 1 of the year the student plans to attend college. Once the FAFSA has
been submitted by the student a copy of the results are provided to each
college listed on the form. Gardner-Webb’s school code is: 002929 and the
priority deadline is March 1. GWU will receive the application electronically
and a financial aid award will be prepared once the student has been admitted
and it is March 1 or later. The student will receive an award notification e-mail
at their GWU e-mail address. The award information is provided via GWU’s
secure online portal called MYWEBB. (Each student is given a username and
password upon admission to the University). Any scholarship aid awarded to
the student from GWU will be included in the financial aid package.
FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
Any student enrolled or accepted for enrollment in an eligible program at
Gardner-Webb University may receive assistance under the Title IV Programs if
he/she:
1. is a citizen or permanent resident of the United States;
2. has met the Selective Service Requirements;
3. is maintaining satisfactory academic progress according to established
standards;
4. does not owe a refund on a grant or is not in default on a loan received at
GWU or any other post secondary institution;
5. completes the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
A list of Federal Programs available to eligible applicants is as follows:
Pell Grant
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
Work-Study
Perkins Loan
Direct Stafford Loans – Subsidized and Unsubsidized
Additional information about these programs is available in the Financial
Planning Office and on the Financial Planning web page. Please realize that not
all students are eligible for these programs due to specific criteria such as
financial need, grade point average, year in-school and availability of funds.
Federal funds are awarded on a first-come first-serve basis.
STATE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
A list of State Programs for eligible North Carolina residents (funding
contingent upon state appropriations) is as follows:
North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grant – must meet state’s definition
of resident. Award amount is $1850 for full-time undergraduate students.
*Please note: Students are ineligible to receive this grand if enrolled in a
program of study of which the objective is career preparation for a religious
vocation. This guideline impacts students majoring in any of the following
fields of study at Gardner-Webb: Discipleship Studies, Youth Discipleship
Studies, Sacred Music.
North Carolina State Contractual Scholarship – must meet state’s
definition of resident and demonstrate financial need as determined by the
results of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Award
amounts vary based on financial need and funding limits.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/42
North Carolina Education Lottery Scholarship – must meet state’s
definition of resident, demonstrate financial need as determined by the results
of the FAFSA, and expected family contribution of $5,000 or less. The award
amount for 2011-12 is $3,400 in combination with the Pell Grant. The grant is
prorated from 6 – 11 credit hours.
North Carolina Student Incentive Grant – must be identified on the
state’s roster as eligible, must have family contribution of zero and be enrolled
full time. Award amount is $700.
North Carolina does offer other sources of financial aid based on specific
criteria. The College Foundation of North Carolina’s website that can be used
to research and apply for such scholarships. The web address is as follows:
cfnc.org.
GARDNER-WEBB UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS
Gardner-Webb University is committed to offer scholarships to those
students with outstanding academic credentials. The types of scholarships are
listed below and are awarded based on the individual student’s academic
and/or performance profile.
The University will allow institutional sources of financial aid to be
combined with federal, state and outside aid up to the student’s cost of
attendance. For some students this may result in a reduction of their GWU aid.
Please contact the Financial Planning Office with specific questions.
GARDNER-WEBB SCHOLARSHIPS
The following grid provides the base amount a student may qualify for using
the grade point averages (GPA) listed below:
3.0 – 3.29
$6,000
3.30 – 3.49
$6,250
3.50 – 3.79
$6,500
3.80 – 4.0 (or above)*
$6,750
*Please note: Gardner-Webb Scholarship amount is based on student’s
GPA when admitted to the University and is not re-evaluated upon receipt
of additional transcripts. Gardner-Webb Scholarship is awarded for up to 8
consecutive semesters. Any residential student that moves off-campus will
automatically incur a reduction in their Gardner-Webb Scholarship or
Gardner-Webb Grant. Please contact the Financial Planning office with
specific questions.
ADN students transitioning into the GOAL BSN program will have any
institutional aid (i.e. Gardner-Webb Scholarship) prorated based on the
percentage of tuition which is covered by their current institutional aid. For
example:
Current Institutional Aid ÷ Undergraduate Day Tuition = % of Tuition
$8,000
÷
$22,020
=
36%
Scholarship %
36%
X
X
Goal BSN Tuition
= New Scholarship Amount
$3,780 (12 hrs. @ $315/hr.) = $1361
Each student admitted to the University is encouraged to complete a Student
Aid Profile (SAP) to receive an estimated financial aid award. This will allow
each family to better evaluate how affordable GWU can be. (Our early award
process extends until January 31 of the year the student plans to attend. After
this date all students are required to complete the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid).
Gardner-Webb University/43
Students with the following academic profile will be considered for GWU
Great Choice Scholarships. These scholarships are listed below:
NAME
VALUE
Gardner
$4,000
Elliott
$3,000
CRITERIA – GPA
SAT
ACT
3.50+
1100+
24+
3.25+
1050+
22+
Cantrell
$2,000
3.00+
1000+
21+
These scholarships are first-come first-serve and require the student to
provide a non-refundable deposit to secure the scholarship for the upcoming
year. Students must maintain a 2.8 cumulative institutional GPA and reside on
campus to have their scholarship renewed.
*Please note: If a student receiving a Great Choice Scholarship chooses to
reside off-campus, their eligibility for such scholarship will be forfeited.
Transfer students are not eligible for Great Choice Scholarships.
Competitive Scholarships
These scholarships are awarded on the basis of outstanding academic
achievement, demonstrated leadership ability, and commitment to service. To
receive a nomination for this competition you must be selected by the
University Fellows Scholarship Screening Committee and interview in the
winter months. *Please note: If a student is selected for a Presidential, Academic
or University Fellows Scholarship, any previous offer of scholarship aid is
rescinded.
Presidential Fellows
Each year five students are chosen to receive a full tuition, room and board
scholarship for 8 consecutive semesters, provided the recipient is enrolled fulltime, maintains a cumulative institutional Grade Point Average of 3.0, resides
on campus and continues to demonstrate a strong leadership ability and
commitment to service.
Academic Fellows
Each year five students are chosen to receive a full tuition scholarship for 8
consecutive semesters, provided the recipient is enrolled full-time, maintains a
cumulative institutional Grade Point Average of 3.0, resides on campus and
continues to demonstrate a strong leadership ability and commitment to
service.
University Fellows
Each year two students are chosen to receive a 80% tuition scholarship for 8
consecutive semesters, provided the recipient is enrolled full-time, maintains a
cumulative institutional Grade Point Average of 3.0, resides on campus and
continues to demonstrate a strong leadership ability and commitment to
service.
*Please note: Presidential, Academic & University Fellows Scholarships do
not apply to hours taken in excess of 18 in any semester, do not apply to
summer terms, and do not cover the expense of books, fees and/or music
lessons. Scholarships are divided equally between the fall and spring
semester when awarded.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/44
PERFORMANCE BASED SCHOLARSHIPS
Athletic Scholarships are awarded by each individual Coach and shared with
the Financial Planning Office. GWU offers scholarships for the following
sports: men’s and women’s basketball, golf, soccer, swimming, tennis, track,
men’s baseball, football, and wrestling and women’s softball and volleyball.
Any questions concerning eligibility for a scholarship should be directed to the
Coach of the sport of interest. If a student receives a financial aid award and an
athletic scholarship is not listed, please contact the Coach of the sport of
interest. It is possible your non-athletic aid will be reduced once the athletic
scholarship is added to your financial aid package.
Honors Music Scholarships are awarded based on a student’s performance
from an on campus audition. The Music faculty selects the recipients and
shares them with the Financial Planning Office. Scholarships are renewed
based on performance throughout the academic year as well as maintaining a
major in Music. Award amounts range up to $5000 and may depend on the
total amount awarded in other GWU funds.
Marching Band Scholarships are awarded by the Band Director and shared
with the Financial Planning Office. The award amount is $1000 and is based on
participation in the band. Scholarships are renewed providing participation
continues each year. Members of the Dance Team are also eligible for this
scholarship.
OTHER GARDNER-WEBB SCHOLARSHIPS
Church Matching Scholarships are awarded based on a scholarship from a
SBC Church to a student attending GWU. The scholarship will be match by
GWU up to $2,500. The application deadline is May 1. The scholarship will not
be matched if the student is receiving $8,000 or more in GWU funds. (The
application is available from the financial planning web page).
Ministerial Board of Associates Scholarships are awarded based on the
recommendation by a member of the Ministerial Board of Associates. The
application deadline is May 1, and this is for new and /or transfer students.
The award amount is $250 per year and will be renewed for three years. (The
application is available from the financial planning web page).
Minister’s Dependent Scholarships are awarded based on the dependent’s
parent being a full time minister of a SBC or CBF Church or an ordained, full
time employee of a Baptist State Convention or agency. The application
deadline is May 1, and a new application must be completed each year to
receive the scholarship. The award amount is $1,000 per year. (The
application is available from the financial planning web page).
Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Room & Board Scholarships are
available for those students receiving an Army ROTC Scholarship. GWU will
cover the cost of a standard double room and the 21 meal plan less any federal
or state grants. The scholarship will be renewed each year the student
continues to receive the ROTC Scholarship.
GWU North Carolina Army National Guard Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty
ROTC Scholarships are available for those students planning to pursue ROTC
scholarships and serve as officers in the National Guard. This is designed for
students that either missed the 4 year scholarship deadline or were unaware
that it existed. GWU will provide tuition for the first year in the form of a loan
which will be forgiven assuming the recipient meets the stated requirements.
Please contact the ROTC director at GWU for further information.
Gardner-Webb University/45
TUITION EXCHANGE
Students who wish to apply for Tuition Exchange with Gardner-Webb
University, must contact the Liaison Officer at the College or University which
their parent is employed. Scholarships are not guaranteed and only a select
number are chosen each year depending on availability. As a recipient, the
student must reside on campus, be enrolled full-time, and maintain Satisfactory
Academic Progress (SAP). Tuition Exchange is only available for traditional
undergraduate students and a maximum of four years (eight semesters).
GARDNER-WEBB UNIVERSITY POLICIES
The following policies are for all students and are monitored while students
are attending the University. A more detailed copy of each policy can be
printed from the Financial Planning web page.
SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
Students attending Gardner-Webb University are required to make
satisfactory academic progress toward degree completion. Academic progress
is reviewed each May at the end of the academic year. If a student attends
summer school his/her progress will be reviewed at the end of that term as
well. Students are required to make quantitative (complete 67% of attempted
courses) and qualitative (achieve a cumulative institutional grade point average
in accordance with GWU’s academic standards) progress. Students not
satisfying these requirements will be placed on financial aid probation for the
fall semester.They will be eligible to receive financial aid; however, if
improvement has not been attained by the end of the term, aid will be
suspended until the appropriate credits are earned and/ or cumulative grade
point average achieved. Students may submit an appeal to the Associate
Director of Financial Planning when extenuating circumstances exist.
SCHOLARSHIP MAINTENANCE
Students receiving scholarships from Gardner-Webb are expected to achieve
a minimum cumulative institutional grade point average (GPA) to retain any
scholarships. Scholarship progress is reviewed in May at the end of the
semester. Students not satisfying these requirements will be placed on
scholarship probation for the fall semester. They will be eligible to receive
their scholarship; however, if improvement has not been attained by the end
of the term, aid will be suspended. Students may submit an appeal to the
Associate Director of Financial Planning when extenuating circumstances
exist.
WITHDRAWING FROM THE UNIVERSITY
Students withdrawing from Gardner-Webb University prior to completing
60% of the semester will have their financial aid prorated. A refund/repayment
formula developed by the Federal Government is used to determine which
sources of aid may be retained by the student. The formula considers the
number of days in the semester compared to the number of days the student
attended classes. Aid is “earned” based on the number of days the student was
considered enrolled and disbursed accordingly. It is entirely possible to
withdraw and still owe GWU a balance. If this occurs an academic transcript
will not be released until the balance has been paid. If a student withdraws,
whether official or unofficial, the student will be placed on financial aid
probation for the upcoming term of attendance.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/46
LOAN REFUND POLICY
If a student is eligible to receive a refund from a loan disbursement (Direct
Stafford, Direct PLUS, or Alternative Loan), those funds should be released
within 14 days of the date the loan posts to your student account. Student’s
refund eligibility will depend on enrollment status and source(s) of aid.
Refunds from Direct Stafford and Direct PLUS loan disbursements require at
least half-time enrollment status.
*Please note: Enrollment status is verified before any funds are released to
the student. A change in enrollment status could result in becoming ineligible
to receive a refund, therefore resulting in loan funds being returned to the
lender.
GARDNER-WEBB UNIVERSITY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS
Recipients are selected based on specific criteria for the following
scholarships:
Charles S. Andrews Memorial Scholarship: Funded by family and friends of Dr.
Charles Andrews, the scholarship gives priority to students majoring in a
foreign language. Dr. Andrews served the University many years as a professor.
Clarence N. Peeler Andrews Memorial Scholarship: The late Mrs. Hattie Peeler
Self of Cherryville, NC, and her daughter and son-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. W.B.
Andrews established a trust fund in memory of Clarence N. Peeler Andrews,
grandson and son of the donors.
Ralph W. Andrews Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1997 with funds from
the R.W. Andrews estate. The Scholarship is restricted to African-American
Males. Merit will be a major criteria used by the Scholarship Committee.
Students in the School of Divinity are not eligible and the funds may also not
be used for Athletic Scholarship purposes. Assuming good academic and social
records, the Scholarship is renewable for up to four years.
Black-Bonner Scholarship: Funded by President and Mrs. Bonner in honor of
their parents, the late John B.Black, and Fannie A. Black; the late Francis W.
Bonner, and Nilaouise C. Bonner.
Lloyd C. Bost, Sr. Memorial Scholarship: Funded by friends and family of Lloyd
Bost. A resident of Shelby, N.C., Dr. Bost served Gardner-Webb University as
trustee for over thirty years.
Charles B. and Sue C. Camp Scholarship: Established in 1993 by Mr. and Mrs.
Charles B. Camp of Shelby, N.C., both alumni of Gardner-Webb.
Roberta Warlick Dixon Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was initiated in
1992 in memory of Mrs. Robbie Dixon.
Anthony F. Eastman Scholarship: Established in 1993 by Dr. and Mrs. Gene
Washburn, this scholarship honors the exceptional teaching ability and
concern for individual students exhibited by Dr. Eastman. First preference is
given to students majoring in history.
Herman P. Jarvis Memorial Scholarship: Funded by the estate of Herman
Jarvis, of Asheville, N.C., the scholarship was established in 1991.
Gardner-Webb University/47
M. Lansford Jolley Scholarship: Initiated in 1992 by the Department of Social
Sciences of Gardner-Webb University to honor Professor M. Lansford Jolley, a
faculty member at Gardner-Webb for thirty-three years.
Edna Humphries Mack Memorial Scholarship: Founded by the estate of Mrs.
Edna H. Mack of Gaffney, S.C., the scholarship was established in 1991.
Robert Earle Morgan Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 1986 by
Dr. Robert E. Morgan, professor of French and Mathematics at Gardner-Webb
from 1967-1998.
Helen Speck Memorial Scholarship: Funded by Helen Speck of Shelby, N.C.
Mae Cline Stroup Memorial Scholarship: Funded by the estate of Mrs. Mae
Stroup of Shelby, N.C., the scholarship memorializes one of Gardner-Webb’s
most significant leaders. Mrs. Stroup served as a Trustee for several terms,
holding all Board leadership positions.
Other Academic Fellows Scholarships:
Black-Bonner; Betty E. Knox; Milliken Corporation.
Athletic Endowed Scholarships
J.W. and Terry C. Abernethy III Endowed Athletic Scholarship: Funded by
Gardner-Webb alumni Mr. and Mrs. “JJ” Abernethy of Newton, N.C. Preference
is given to the women’s basketball program.
Garland H. Allen Golf Scholarship: Established by the Bulldog Club.
Justin Scot Alston Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2004 by Gloria Alston
to memorialize her son Justin Scot Alston. First preference is given to students
pursuing a career in coaching, and second preference is given to students
pursuing a career in sports management or sports medicine.
Billy Bates Athletic Scholarship: Established in 2005 by friends and former
players of Coach Bates.
Franklin V. and Mary Beam Hall of Fame Scholarship: Established in 1996 by
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Beam of Shelby, N.C., the fund provides scholarships for
student-athletes in the basketball program.
Bulldog Club Scholarship: Established in 1989 by the Bulldog Club to support
the University’s intercollegiate scholarship program. In 2009, the Scholarship
was revised to recognize those contributions of the Club’s Lifetime Members:
Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Abernethy, III, Mr. Robert C. Abernethy Mr. Hoyt Q. Bailey,
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Beam, Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Bell, Mr. and Mrs. William
R. Parker, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony N. Strange, Dr. and Mrs. H. Gene Washburn,
Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Washburn, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Watson, Jr., Mr.
and Mrs. Gary H. Smith, III, Mr. and Mrs. Chandler C. Browning, and Mr. and
Mrs. D.P. Washburn.
Thomas R. and Shirley B. Causby Men’s Basketball Scholarship: Established in
1992 by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Causby of Belmont, N.C.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/48
G. Wayne and Pauline J. DeHart Men’s Basketball Scholarship: Established in
1994 in memory of G. Wayne DeHart of Hickory, N.C. and in honor of his wife
Pauline J. DeHart.
M. Henry and Pam Garrity Athletic Scholarship: Initiated by the Board of
Advisers and funded by friends and family of Mr. and Mrs. Garrity.
Florence Hamrick and Roland M. Hamrick, Sr. Scholarship: In 1965 Roland M.
Hamrick, Jr. and Thomas B. Hamrick established this scholarship in honor of
their parents.
Thomas B. Hamrick Memorial Scholarship: Given by the Hamrick family.
Trela R. and Erline Hendrix, Sr. Men’s Basketball Scholarship: Established in
1989 by Mrs. Trela R. Hendrix, Sr. of Trinity, N.C., in memory of her husband.
Winifred Herbert Lindsay Memorial Women’s Basketball Scholarship: In 1991
Mrs. David Lindsay of Rutherford County established this athletic scholarship.
Winifred Herbert Lindsay Memorial Hall of Fame Scholarship: Funded in 1994 to
provide scholarship aid for the women’s basketball program.
Winifred Herbert Lindsay Memorial Hall of Fame Scholarship: Funded in 1995,
to provide scholarship aid for the men’s basketball program.
Roger and Denice McKee Baseball Scholarship: Established in 2007 by Roger and
Denice S. McKee to provide financial assistance to student athletes
participating in baseball.
Bettie Sprunt Morris Memorial Women’s Tennis Scholarship: Mrs. Morris, a
resident of Rutherfordton, N.C., and former trustee of Gardner-Webb, funded
this scholarship through a trust.
J.L. and Sara McFarland Suttle, Jr. Memorial Men’s Tennis Scholarship:
Established in 1989 by Mr. and Mrs. Suttle of Shelby, N.C.
Lisa Tucker Athletic Volleyball Scholarship: Established in 2006 by Lisa Tucker.
Victor Bulldog Scholarship: Funds for this scholarship were given by friends of
the University from surrounding counties.
Martin Lynn and Heather Robertson White Volleyball Scholarship: Established in
1990 by Dr. and Mrs. M. Christopher White. Dr. White was the tenth president
of Gardner-Webb University, and served in that role from 1986-2002. The
scholarship honors their son Martin (Class of 1993) and daughter-in-law
Heather (Class of 1996).
Paris Leland and Donnis Gold Yelton Memorial Golf Scholarship: Established by
Mr. and Mrs. Yelton and their sons, Robert and Don.
Other Athletic Scholarships:
Charles W. Bradburn; Charles and Drew Bridges Health Careers; Myra W.
and Ralph W. (Scoot) Dixon, Jr.; Jack Hunt; James E. and Patricia J. Putnam;
GWU Tennis Alumni; Andrew Christopher White Tennis.
Gardner-Webb University/49
Business Endowed Scholarships
BB&T Student Investment Portfolio: Established in 2000 by Branch Banking &
Trust Company to provide funds for undergraduate and graduate investment
classes to learn the principles of investing by researching, buying, and selling
real financial securities.
Belk/Ellis Business Scholarship: Given by the Belk Foundation, the Belk
Corporation of Shelby and Forest City, and the William P. Ellis family.
Alfred and Shirley Wampler Caudill Endowed Scholarship: Established in 2008
by Dr. Donald W. Caudill, the son of Alfred and Shirley Wampler Caudill.
Hampton C. and Betty C. Hager Scholarship: Funded by the Lutz Foundation of
Cliffside, N.C., the scholarship was established in 1995 to honor Hampton
Hager of Shelby, N.C. Preference is given to students who are residents of
Cleveland, Rutherford, Burke or Polk counties in North Carolina.
Donald J. Kemerait Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1992 by the family
and friends of Donald J. Kemerait, who served as a professor from 1981 until
his death in 1992. Preference is given to a senior studying in the Broyhill
Undergraduate School of Management.
Lamar Kennedy Scholarship: Established in 1999 by Tom Bell, a GardnerWebb alumnus and President of Transportation and Distribution Associates,
Inc. Mr. Kennedy was a trucking industry executive.
Ray Webb Lutz/Texaco Memorial Scholarship: Initiated by Texaco/Star
Enterprises in 1989, this scholarship honors Ray Webb Lutz, a trustee and longtime benefactor of Gardner-Webb University.
Public Service Company of North Carolina Scholarship: Initiated in 1997, the
scholarship supports full-time students who demonstrate financial need.
Clyde L. and Rufus Stutts Memorial Business Scholarship: Established by Mrs.
Stutts to provide financial assistance to citizens from North or South Carolina.
Wachovia National Bank Scholarship: Initiated by the Cleveland County
Branches of First Union National Bank of North Carolina and The First Union
Corporation of Charlotte, North Carolina.
William Y. Webb Memorial Business Scholarship: This scholarship was initiated
by Mr. and Mrs. William Y. Webb in memory of Judge Edwin Yates Webb, Sr.,
and Willie Simmons Webb.
Other Business Scholarships:
E.R. and Helen Hoffman; MBA Scholarship
John and Linda Godbold School of Business Scholars
Christian Service Organization Undergraduate Scholarship
Established over thirty years ago the Christian Service Organization of
Gardner-Webb University provides scholarships for deserving and needy
students preparing for full-time Christian vocational service. The Organization
is supported by gifts from individuals, churches and private organizations. As
part of the overall endowment corpus the following scholarships have been
funded:
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/50
Fred L. and Sallie N. Abrams Memorial Scholarship: Robert W. Abrams, W.
Glenn Abrams, Mrs. Jessie A. Roddy, and Mrs. Floyd A. Bryant, established the
fund in 1978 to honor their parents, Fred L. and Sallie N. Abrams of Gray’s
Creek Baptist Church community of Rutherford County.
Robert W. and Elva Abrams Scholarship: Established in 1995 by Donna Kay
Abrams in honor of her parents. Reverend Abrams served many years on the
staff of Gardner-Webb University.
Hoyt Q. and Meta Q. Bailey Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1990 by Mr.
and Mrs. Hoyt Q. Bailey, in memory of Mr. Bailey’s parents.
Herman A. and Ellen Baxter Beam Scholarship: This scholarship was
established in 1992 by the estate of Herman A. Beam and Ellen B. Beam of
Fallston, N.C.
Beaver Dam Baptist Church Scholarship: The Beaver Dam Baptist Church of
Shelby, N.C., established this scholarship in 1991.
Herman and Margaret Best Scholarship: Established by Mr. and Mrs. Herman
Best of Shelby, N.C., in 1989.
Bethlehem Baptist Church Scholarship: Established by the Bethlehem Baptist
Church of Kings Mountain, N.C. in 1991.
C. David and Nancy D. Boan Scholarship: Established in 2005 by Dr. and Mrs.
David Boan of Shelby, N.C.
Lloyd C. and Virginia F. Bost Scholarship: Established in 1992 by Dr. and Mrs.
Lloyd Bost of Shelby, N.C.
Dr. Frank R. Campbell Scholarship: Established in 2005 by the Board of
Trustees at Gardner-Webb University in recognition of and appreciation for the
leadership of Dr. Campbell, the eleventh president of Gardner-Webb.
Harold W. and Mary Lou Causby Scholarship: Established in 1993 by Mr. and
Mrs. Harold W. Causby of Shelby, N.C.
Kenneth Howard Cole Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1991 by Lucille
Hamner Cole of Shreveport, Louisiana, in memory of her husband. Family
members have added to the endowment corpus.
College Park Baptist Church Scholarship: This scholarship was initiated in 1999
by College Park Baptist Church of Winston-Salem, N.C., to express
commitment to Christian higher education and the values held by GardnerWebb University. First preference is given to international students.
Paul and Faye Comer Scholarship: Established in 1999 by Gardner-Webb
alumni Paul and Faye Comer.
F. Glenn and Ray Cornwell Scholarship: Initiated in 1990 by Mr. and Mrs. F.
Glenn Cornwell of Shelby, N.C.
W.D. and Ilease Cornwell Scholarship: Established in 1991 by Mr. and Mrs.
W.D. Cornwell of Charlotte, N.C.
Gardner-Webb University/51
Alice Rae Cullinan Scholarship: Established in 2004 by family and friends for
their appreciation for her many years of faithful service to Gardner-Webb
University.
John Ed and Essie D. Davis Memorial Scholarship: Established by Mr. and Mrs.
John Ed Davis of Shelby, N.C. in 1990.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Davis Scholarship: Established in 1995 by Mr. and Mrs.
Davis of Rutherford County, N.C.
Rev. L. Keith Dixon Scholarship: Established in 2003 by members of Flint Hill
Baptist Church to express their appreciation to Rev. Keith Dixon for his
pastoral leadership for eighteen years. First preference will be given to
members of Flint Hill Baptist Church.
Double Springs Baptist Church Scholarship: Established in 1991 by the Double
Springs Baptist Church of Shelby, N.C.
Charles I. Dover Memorial Scholarship: Funded by the Dover Foundation of
Shelby, N.C.
Joe and Louise Edwards Scholarship: Established in 2008 by Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Edwards of Boiling Springs, NC.
W.E. Entrekin Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1990 by the Emmanuel
Baptist Church of Charlotte, N.C., in memory of former beloved pastor, the
Reverend W. E. Entrekin.
Forrest and Jessica Feezor Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1986 by friends
of Dr. and Mrs. Feezor.
First Baptist Church of Forest City Scholarship: Established by the First Baptist
Church N.C.
Flint Hill Baptist Church Scholarship: Initiated in 1990, this scholarship was
funded by members of the Flint Hill Baptist Church of Shelby, N.C.
Freeman-Jones Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1990 by the Reverend
Charles W. “Buddy” Freeman in memory of his parents Coley and Willie Lee
Freeman and in memory of his aunt Mrs. Lillie Jones.
Robert M. Gold Memorial Scholarship: Harold W. and Mary Lou Causby of
Shelby, N.C., established this scholarship in 2001 in memory of their friend
and business associate Robert M. Gold.
R. Scott and Barbara Good Scholarship: Established in 1999 by R. Scott and
Barbara Good for international students.
L.T. Hamrick Memorial Scholarship: Initiated in 1993 by Mrs. L.T. Hamrick in
memory of her husband, a noted lawyer in Shelby.
James O. and Betty Ruth Hatter Scholarship: Established in 2001 by Dr. Ronald
W. and Mrs. Elaine Hatter Williams of Boiling Springs, N.C. in honor of Mrs.
Williams’ parents, James O. and Betty Ruth Hatter.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/52
Clara Katherine Vickers Head Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1979 by the
estate of Clara Katherine Vickers Head.
Henderson-Ledford Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2005 by Dr. and Mrs.
Rance Henderson of Morganton, N.C. in loving memory of their parents, Ray
and Lillian Camp Henderson and Irvin and Ruth Hinson Ledford.
Russell L. Hinton Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1990 by Mrs. Lillie
Hinton in memory of her husband, the late Reverend Russell L. Hinton.
Richard A. Isenhour Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1996 by the
membership of the Christian Service Organization, the scholarship
memorializes Richard Isenhour, a non-traditional ministerial student.
Carl and Tyner Ivester Memorial Scholarship: Dr. and Mrs. Ivester of Lawndale,
N.C., established this scholarship in 1990.
Dorothy B. Keeter Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1991 by H. S. Keeter, Jr.
of Shelby, N.C., in memory of his mother.
Archie and Iris Kennedy Scholarship: Established in 1994 by Archie and Iris
Kennedy to provide financial assistance to students preparing for full-time
Christian service. First priority shall be given to students from Kerr Memorial
Baptist Church, Concord North Carolina.
Ruth C. Kiser Scholarship: Established in 1991 by Miss Ruth Kiser, this
scholarship was endowed by family and friends to honor the memory of Ruth
Kiser, long-time teacher and administrator at Gardner-Webb.
J. Thurman Lewis Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1991 by Julius C. and
Laura M. Taylor of Taylors, S.C., the fund memorializes Dr. Lewis, Professor of
Biblical Languages at Gardner-Webb University. Dr. Lewis was one of the
founders of the Christian Service Organization.
Leonard and Reba Lowe Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Lowe of Rutherford
County, North Carolina established this scholarship in 1990.
Melvin R. and Joann W. Lutz, Jr. Scholarship: Established in 1996 by T. G.
Westmoreland, II and Judy Lutz Westmoreland of Shelby, N.C., in honor of her
parents who are former employees of Gardner-Webb University.
John T. and Betty Lou McCulloch Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. John McCulloch of
Charlotte, N.C., established this fund to support ministerial students. Mr.
McCulloch served as a University trustee and gave his time as architect for
many campus projects.
Carl and Martha Miller Scholarship: Established in 1999 by Bob and Carolyn
Ely of Winston-Salem, N.C., in memory of Mrs. Ely’s parents.
Robert G. and Mary Frances Moore Scholarship: Established in 1992 by Mr. and
Mrs. Robert G. Moore of Cliffside, N.C.
Robert Earle Morgan Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 1990 by
Dr. Morgan, professor of French and Mathematics from 1967-1998.
Gardner-Webb University/53
M. Vann Murrell Scholarship: Established in 1994 by friends of Dr. Murrell,
who served Gardner-Webb University from 1967 to 1995 as Professor of
Religion.
William T. and Mabel H. Nolen Scholarship: Established in 1990 by Mr. and Mrs.
Nolen of Gastonia, N.C.
Max and Mary Padgett Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. Max Padgett of Hickory, N.C.,
funded this scholarship for ministerial students.
Jack and Ruth Partain Scholarship: Established in 2000 by the University to
honor the career of Dr. Partain, Professor of Religion.
Freeman T. and Evelyn P. Perry Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1991 by
Freeman T. Perry of Kannapolis, N.C.
Bobby M. and Carolyn Harless Pettyjohn Scholarship: Established in 1995 by
Gardner-Webb alumni Mr. and Mrs. Pettyjohn in honor of their children
Robert, Max and Marcy, all Gardner-Webb alumni.
Harold and Mary Phillips Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2005 by the
children of Harold and Mary Phillips in honor of Mr. Phillips and in memory of
Mrs. Phillips.
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church Scholarship: The Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
of Shelby, N.C., established this scholarship in 1991.
R.E. and Bonnie R. Price Scholarship: Established in 1990 by Mrs. Bonnie Price
of Boiling Springs, N.C., in memory of her husband.
Race Path Baptist Church Scholarship: This scholarship is given to a deserving
student from the Race Path Baptist Church majoring in religion, religious
education or church music. If no student from Race Path qualifies, this
scholarship may be given to any other deserving student majoring in religion,
religious education or church music.
Melba S. Robbins Memorial Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. James Robbins of Forest
City, N.C., established this scholarship in 1991.
Dana Leigh Scott Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1996, by the CSO
Membership, the scholarship is in memory of Dana Scott, a Christian Service
Organization scholarship recipient, who died prior to her sophomore year.
Rev. Ed H. Sessom Scholarship: Established in 2003 by members of Flint Hill
Baptist Church to express their appreciation to Rev. Ed Sessom for his longtime support and encouragement of the Christian Service Organization at
Gardner-Webb. First preference shall be given to students from Flint Hill
Baptist Church.
Mafrey Richardson and Edward H. Sessom Scholarship: The Reverend and Mrs.
Sessom established this scholarship in 1986.
Hobart C. and Dorothy Smith Scholarship: Established in 1990 by Mr. and Mrs.
Hobart C. Smith. For over twenty years Hobart Smith served Gardner-Webb as
a Trustee, including several terms as chairman of the Board.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/54
Robert Kelly and Essie Louise C. Spake Memorial Scholarship: Initiated in 1990
by Robert V. and Elva S. Abrams, the fund honors the memory of Mrs. Abrams’
parents. Preference is given to Sacred or Church Music majors.
Ralph and Clevie Spangler Scholarship: Gardner-Webb Trustee Ralph Spangler
and his wife Clevie Spangler established this endowment fund in 1990.
Clemmie Brewer Sprinkle Memorial: Established in 2000 by Anita Sprinkle
Roberts of Shelby, N.C. to honor the memory of her mother.
J.L. and Sara McFarland Suttle, Jr. Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1991
by Mr. and Mrs. Suttle of Shelby, N.C.
Tony M. Robbins CSO Scholarship: Gardner-Webb University trustees James E.
Robbins and Thomas M. Robbins, former owners of Tri-City Concrete in Forest
City, N.C. established this scholarship in 1991.
Bennett L. Walker Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1990 by a gift from the
estate of Bennet L. Walker of Candler, N.C.
M. Christopher and Linda F. White Scholarship: Established in 1990 by Dr. and
Mrs. M. Christopher White. Dr. White was the tenth president of GardnerWebb University, having served in that role from 1986-2002.
R. Archie and Edith M. White Scholarship: Established in 1991 by Mr. and Mrs.
David W. White of Shelby, N.C. in memory of his father and in honor of his
mother, Mr. and Mrs. R. Archie White.
Other Christian Service Organization Undergraduate Scholarships: Truitt J. and
Dorothy I. Beard; Boiling Springs Florist; J.R. Cantrell Memorial; Baptist Student
Union; R. Scott and Barbara Good; Albert Hamrick Memorial; John H. and
Osteen Hendrick; Kincannon-Herndon; John W. and Janet P. Long; Pleasant
Home Baptist; Claude Lee Proctor, Sr.; Howard and Louise Whitaker; Jeremy
and Cheryl Mikell
Christian Service Organization Graduate Scholarships
In 1993 Gardner-Webb University established the M. Christopher White
School of Divinity to provide graduate level professional education for
ministers. As part of the overall endowment corpus of the Christian Service
Organization the following scholarships have been funded:
A. Donald and Hazel H. Allen Scholarship: Funded by Mr. and Mrs. Donald Allen
of Shelby, N.C., to support divinity school students.
Allen-Ginn-Elliott Scholarship: Established in 1994, this scholarship
commemorates the special relationship between the Lawson Allen family, the
Leonard Allen family, the Charles Ginn family, the Phil Elliott family and
Gardner-Webb University.
Herman A. and Ellen B. Beam Scholarship: Established in 1997 by Ellen Baxter
Beam of Fallston, N.C.
W. Anderson “Andy” and Shirley S. Blanton Scholarship: Established in 1998 by
Andy and Shirley Blanton of Forest City, N.C. to provide financial assistance to
students who are attending GWU School of Divinity and who are preparing for
full-time sacred music ministry.
Gardner-Webb University/55
C. David Boan Scholarship: Established in 2002 by Dr. David Boan, a GardnerWebb alumnus.
Cline W. and Doris Borders Scholarship: Established in 2000 by Cline and Doris
Borders. Reverend Borders served as the Director of Missions for the Kings
Mountain Baptist Association for many years prior to his retirement.
Curtis and Joyce Braswell: Established in 1999 by Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Braswell
of Columbia, S.C. Their son was one of the first graduates of the M.
Christopher White School of Divinity.
T. F. and Doris M. Bridges Scholarship: T.F. and Doris M. Bridges established
this scholarship in 1999 to express their commitment to Christian higher
education and the values held by Gardner-Webb University.
Mattie T. Christopher and Etta S. Butterworth Scholarship: Established in 1995
by A. Donald and Joyce A. Christopher of Wilmington, N.C., in honor of Mrs.
Etta S. Butterworth and in memory of Mrs. Mattie T. Christopher, mothers of
the donors.
Cleo P. and James E. Chadwell Scholarship: Established in 2000 by Mrs. Cleo
Chadwell of Shelby, N.C. in memory of her husband James.
Kenneth Howard Cole Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1996 by Lucille
Hamner Cole of Shreveport, Louisiana, in memory of her husband. Family
members have added to the endowment corpus.
Donald E. and Kaye A. Cook Scholarship: Established in 2000 by the University
to honor the retirement of Dr. Cook, Distinguished Professor of New
Testament Interpretation in the divinity school.
F. Glenn and Ray Cornwell Scholarship: Established in 2003 to provide
financial assistance to divinity students preparing for full-time Christian service.
J. Hugh and Mildred Cornwell Scholarship: Established in 1996 by Mr. and Mrs.
Hugh Cornwell of Forest City, N.C.
Ralph W. and Sybil Y. Dixon, Sr. Scholarship: Established in 1996 by Mr. and
Mrs. Ralph W. Dixon, Sr. of Fallston, N.C.
Double Shoals Baptist Church Scholarship: This scholarship was established by
the members of Double Shoals Baptist Church of Cleveland County, N.C.
Charles W. “Buddy” Freeman Scholarship: Established in 1993 by friends of
Buddy Freeman, Gardner-Webb alumnus.
Stephen Burgess Greene Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1994 by Rush and
Margaret Greene in memory of their son.
George Edgar and Jennie Lee Hampton Memorial Scholarship: Established in
2001 by Howard Glenn and Lucille Hampton Daniel of Rutherford County to
honor the memory of Dr. Daniel’s parents.
Russell L. and Lillie M. Hinton Scholarship: Established by Mrs. Lillie Hinton in
memory of her husband, a noted pastor in Cleveland County, N.C.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/56
Mildred Johnson Scholarship: Established in 2001 by First Baptist Church
Foundation of the First Baptist Church of Statesville to honor the memory of
Mildred Johnson.
H.S. and Sandra Keeter, Jr. Scholarship: Established in 1998 by Mr. Keeter, a
Gardner-Webb trustee and Mrs. Keeter, a Gardner-Webb alumna.
Bobby Joe and Betty B. Kendrick Scholarship: Established in 1995 by Mr. and
Mrs. Bobby Joe Kendrick of Shelby, N.C.
Roland and Lois Leath Scholarship: Initiated in 1997 and funded by friends of
Roland and Lois Leath of Shelby, N.C.
Robert H. and Betty Lutz Scholarship: Established in 1995 and funded by the
Lutz Foundation of Cliffside, N.C. the scholarship honors Mr. and Mrs. Robert
H. Lutz of Shelby, N.C.
Robert Harold and Betty Jolley Lutz Scholarship: Established and funded by Mr.
and Mrs. Robert H. Lutz of Shelby, N.C., longtime supporters of the Christian
Service Organization.
Thomas W. and Elene C. Martin Scholarship: Established in 1995 by Mr. and Mrs
Martin of Lattimore, N.C.
McInnis-Smith-Best Scholarship: Initiated in 1993 by Herman and Margaret
Best of Shelby, N.C. in memory of the Reverend Neill McInnis, father of Mrs.
Best, and in honor of the Reverends Rockwell Smith and David Herman Best,
brother-in-law and son of the Bests.
Roger H. and Denice S. McKee Scholarship: Established in 2001 by Roger H. and
Denice S. McKee to provide financial assistance to worthy and/or needy
students who are attending the school of divinity and who have committed
their lives to full-time Christian service.
Robert G. and Mary Francis Moore Scholarship: Established by R.G. and Mary
Francis Moore of Cliffside, N.C.
Don and Becky Morgan Memorial Scholarship: Initiated in 1998 by Dr. Robert E.
Morgan, Professor Emeritus of Gardner-Webb, in memory of his brother and
sister-in-law.
Gilbert and Sue Morgan Memorial Scholarship: Initiated in 1998 by Dr. Robert
E. Morgan, Professor Emeritus of Gardner-Webb, in memory of his father and
mother.
Rev. and Mrs. James A. Pittman Scholarship: The Reverend and Mrs. James A.
Pittman of Roanoke Rapids, N.C. established this scholarship in 1994.
Rev. Richard E. and Mary Elizabeth Plyler Scholarship: Established in 2002 by
Rev. and Mrs. Plyler for those attending the M. Christopher White School of
Divinity.
Charles H. and Jo B. Rabon Scholarship: This scholarship was initiated in 1995
by family and friends of Dr. and Mrs. Rabon in honor of their commitment to
Christian higher education.
Gardner-Webb University/57
James E. and Robin M. Robbins Scholarship: Established in 1994 by Mr. and
Mrs. James E. Robbins of Rutherford County.
Mafrey Richardson and Edward H. Sessom Scholarship: The Reverend and Mrs.
Edward H. Sessom of Cleveland County established this scholarship in 1994.
Ralph and Clevie Spangler Scholarship: Established in 1996 by Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph Spangler of Lawndale, N.C.
Addie Crotts Sparks Memorial Scholarship: Initiated in 1996 by Carl and Faye
Spangler to honor the memory of Faye’s mother, Mrs. Addie Crotts Sparks.
Foster C. “Pluto” Sprinkle Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2000 by Anita
Sprinkle Roberts of Shelby, N.C. to honor the memory of her father.
R. Wayne Stacy Scholarship: Established in 1998 by Mrs. Stuart W. Upchurch
of Raleigh, N.C., to honor her former pastor Dr. R. Wayne Stacy.
Henry C. and Neno L. Taylor Family Scholarship: The descendants of Mr. and
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor of Connelly Springs, N.C., established this scholarship in
1994 as an act of appreciation for their Christian lives.
Gene L. Watterson Scholarship: Established in 1994 by members of First Baptist
Church, Shelby, N.C., the scholarship honors their pastor, Dr. Watterson, on
his retirement for his years of ministry.
David W. and Melissa K. White Scholarship: Established in 1999 by David W.
and Melissa K. White to provide assistance to needy students attending the
School of Divinity.
M. Christopher and Linda F. White Scholarship: Established in 1993 by Dr. and
Mrs. M. Christopher White. Dr. White served as president of Gardner-Webb
University from 1986-2002.
Paul Wilson Sunday School Class: The Paul Wilson Sunday School Class of First
Baptist Church, Shelby, N.C., established this scholarship in 1995.
Other Christian Service Organization Graduate Scholarships:
W. Anderson and Shirley S. Blanton; Jack W. and Josephine S. Buchanan;
John Ed and Essie D. Davis Memorial; L. Paul and Kathryn C. Eeds; First Baptist
Church of Shelby; J. W. Gantt, Jr., and Mrs. Edna R. Gantt; William K. and Anne
T. Gary; L.T. Hamrick Memorial; George E. Hampton; James L. Jenkins
Memorial; Robert L. and Rhea Lamb; R. Thad Parsons, III; R.E. and Bonnie R.
Price; Reverend and Mrs. W. Bruce Rabon; Lester and Bertie Taylor and Carl
and Frances Shook; Roy and Joyce Wyatt.
School of Divinity Endowed Scholarships
In 1993 Gardner-Webb University established the M. Christopher White
School of Divinity to provide graduate level professional education for
ministers. As part of the overall endowment corpus the following scholarships
have been funded:
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina: Established in 1996 by action of the
Baptist State Convention, the trust provides scholarships for students in the
School of Divinity. Recipients must be residents of North Carolina and
members of Baptist churches cooperating with the Baptist State Convention.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/58
Robert H. and Karen Blalock, Jr. Scholarship: Established in 1996 by Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Blalock of Gastonia, N.C. Preference is given to students from
Gaston County, N.C.
C. David Boan Scholarship: Established in 1996 by Mrs. Helen J. Smith of
Pageland, S.C., the scholarship honors her former pastor, Dr. David Boan, an
alumnus and former administrator of Gardner-Webb University.
Lewis and Gladys Boroughs Scholarship: Established in 1997 by Mr. and Mrs.
Lewis Boroughs of Greensboro, N.C.
Dr. Robert W. Canoy Scholarship: Established in 2007 by friends and family of
Dr. Canoy to provide assistance to a Gardner-Webb School of Divinity student.
J. Harold and Peggy Craig Scholarship: Established in 1995 by the Penelope
Baptist Church of Hickory N.C. in honor of J. Harold Craig and in memory of
Mrs. Craig. The scholarship provides financial assistance to students in sacred
music.
Carl L. Crook Scholarship: Established in July 2002 by the members of the
First Baptist Church - Rutherfordton to express gratitude for the life and legacy
of Carl Crook.
Robert Z. and Jennie B. Falls Scholarship: Initiated in 1993 by Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Z. Falls of Shelby, N.C.
First Baptist Church of Lenoir: Established by the First Baptist Church of
Lenoir, N.C.
First Baptist Church of Shelby Scholarship: Established by the First Baptist
Church of Shelby, N.C.
Charles and Carolyn Horton Scholarship: Established in 1999 by family and
friends of Charles and Carolyn Horton. For many years Dr. Horton was pastor
of the College Park Baptist Church in Orlando, FL.
John and Jean Lewis Scholarship: Established in 2001 by members of First
Baptist Church of Raleigh, N.C., this scholarship honors the ministry and lives
of John and Jean Lewis.
Thomas McFarland Linnens Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was
initiated in 1993 by Boiling Springs Baptist Church of Boiling Springs, N.C., in
honor of Dr. Linnens, who was pastor of the church for many years. First
preference is given to students from Boiling Springs Baptist Church, with
second preference given to students from other churches in the Kings
Mountain Baptist Association.
Elizabeth, Pat and Tommy McClain Scholarship: Established in July 2002 by the
members of the First Baptist Church - Rutherfordton to express gratitude for
the life and legacy of Elizabeth, Pat and Tommy McClain.
Ira McCluney Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 2000
by Mrs. Jessie McCluney Wallace to honor the memory of her father, Ira
McCluney and to express her commitment to Christian theological education.
Gardner-Webb University/59
Bettie and Ray Morris Scholarship: Established in July 2002 by the members of
the First Baptist Church - Rutherfordton to express gratitude for the life and
legacy of Bettie and Ray Morris.
Frank Nanney Scholarship: Established in 2003 by Frank Nanney, a GardnerWebb Trustee, to express his commitment to Christian theological education.
William T. and Mabel Hoke Nolen Scholarship: This scholarship was established
in 2000 by Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Nolen of Gastonia, N.C.
Penelope Baptist Church Scholarships: Established in 1993 by the Penelope
Baptist Church of Hickory, N.C.
Robert E. “Zeke” and Virginia Phillips Scholarship: Established in 1998, this
scholarship was endowed by the estate of Robert E. “Zeke” Phillips in 2004 to
provide financial assistance to students in the divinity school.
Rev. and Mrs. W. Bruce Rabon CSO School of Divinity Scholarship: Established in
2005 by Mr. and Mrs. William K. Gary of Mount Holly, N.C. to express their
appreciation of William Bruce Rabon for his longtime service to the Christian
Service Organization.
Frances and Bob Riley Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 1993
by April and Garland Bolejack of Shelby, N.C. to honor April’s parents, Frances
and Bob Riley.
Wade R. and Sophia S. Shepherd Scholarship: Established in 2002 by Mr. and
Mrs. Shepherd to express their commitment to Christian theological education
and the students of the School of Divinity.
Carl M. and Fannie K. Spangler Christian Education Scholarship: This
scholarship was established in 1992 in memory of Carl M. Spangler and in
honor of Fannie K. Spangler by their children.
Springvale Baptist Church - Reverend Paul Bullington Scholarship: Initiated by
the Springvale Baptist Church of Lugoff, S.C., in 1998.
Blanche Steelman School of Divinity Scholarship: Established in 2005 by Dr.
Sanford Steelman of Hickory, N.C. in memory of his mother and to provide
financial assistance to worthy and/or students attending GWU School of
Divinity.
H. Straughan and Eloise Brown Stokes Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship
was established in 2000 by Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Stokes of Winston-Salem,
N.C., to honor the memory of H. Straughan and Eloise Brown Stokes.
Underwood-Watson Scholarship: Established in 1994 by the Reverend James A.
Pittman and his wife Ganell of Roanoke Rapids, N.C., the scholarship honors
two professors who made a lasting impression on him during his student years
at Mars Hill College. The scholarship honors Dr. Evelyn Underwood and Mrs.
Elizabeth Watson.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/60
Ed and Laura Anne Vick Travel Fund: Initiated in 2000 by Mr. and Mrs. C.E.
Vick, Jr., of Raleigh, N.C., to provide a scholarship to worthy and needy
students to participate in the Biblical Studies Travel Study Program.
Roy O. Warren and Juanita H. Warren Christian Educational Fund: Roy Warren
left the bulk of his estate to First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem, N.C., for the
purpose of establishing this fund. It was initiated in 1999 to provide assistance
for Baptist students with financial need, with preference given to students who
are members of First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem.
Joe C. and Estilla McSwain Washburn Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1993
by various descendants of Joe C. and Estilla McSwain Washburn of the Double
Springs Community of Cleveland County, North Carolina.
W. Wyan and Emily D. Washburn Scholarship: Dr. and Mrs. Wyan Washburn of
Boiling Springs, N.C., established this scholarship in 1993. Dr. Washburn
served as the University physician for many years.
M. Christopher and Linda F. White Scholarship: Established in 2003 by M.
Christopher and Linda F. White to provide financial assistance to worthy
and/or needy students attending the school of divinity.
Carlos L. and Constance C. Young Scholarship: Established in 1993 by Mr. and
Mrs. Carlos L. Young of Shelby, N.C.
H. Fields and Ruth B. Young, Jr. Scholarship: Established in 1993 by Mrs. H.
Fields Young, Jr. of Shelby, N.C., in memory of her husband.
H. Fields, III and Margaret B. Young Scholarships: Established in 1999, 2000,
and 2001 by Mr. and Mrs. Young of Shelby, N.C. Mr. Young is a trustee and
served as chair of the University’s most successful capital campaign.
Other School of Divinity Scholarships:
L. Paul and Kathryn C. Eeds CSO Divinity; Fred and Jean Mauney Church
Music; J.L. and Nettie McCluney; Nations Ford Community Church - Charlotte;
Ann King Rouse; Sophie Shell Shepherd.
Communication Studies Endowed Scholarships
Lee B. Weathers Memorial Scholarship: The fund was established by Henry Lee
and Pearl A. Weathers, children of Lee B. Weathers. Preference is given to
students who major in Journalism or Communications Studies with an interest
in broadcast and/or print journalism, public relations, or publishing. Also,
children of any employee of the Shelby Star who apply shall be given
preferential consideration if determined worthy by the University.
R. G. Puckett Scholarship: Established by Ramon A. Brittain in honor of R. G.
Puckett to assist students studying journalism.
Disabled Student Endowed Scholarships
William P. and Willene C. Davis Scholarship For Hearing Impaired Students:
Established in 1985 by William P. and Willene Davis of Southern Pines, N.C.
George T. and Marguerite Noel Memorial Fund for Visually Impaired Students:
Marguerite Warren Noel established the fund in 1983 in memory of her
husband, who was an ophthalmologist.
Gardner-Webb University/61
Marylene Noel Scholarship for Disabled Students: Established by Mrs. Marguerite
Warren Noel in 1989 in honor of her daughter Marylene. Preference is given to
students who are visually or hearing impaired.
Charles L. Sigmon Memorial Scholarship for Visually Impaired Students:
Established in 1990 by Mrs. Charles L. (Lura B.) Sigmon and son Les C. Sigmon.
Alfred L. and Mary Mayo Stancil Scholarship for Hearing Impaired Students:
Established in 1989 by the Stancil family.
Nancy Hope Willis Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1985 in honor of
Nancy Hope Willis of Greensboro, N.C., the scholarship provides financial
assistance to students with physical disabilities.
Carlos L. and Constance C. Young Scholarship: Initiated in 1993 by Mr. and Mrs.
Carlos L. Young of Shelby, N.C.
Fine and Performing Arts Endowed Scholarships
C.A. and Essie Y. Brittain Memorial Music Scholarship: Established by Mrs. C.A.
Brittain in 1977 in memory of C.A. Brittain of Casar, N.C.
George R. Cribb Music Scholarship: Funded by faculty, family, former students
and friends, this scholarship honors the contributions of Dr. George R. Cribb
to the University.
Etta M. Elliott Memorial Music Scholarship: This scholarship was established in
1981 in memory of Mrs. Etta M. Elliott, wife of the late Philip L. Elliott, former
Gardner-Webb University president.
C.A. and Annie Knotts Hoyle Memorial Music Scholarship: This scholarship was
established in 1992 by an estate gift from Annie K. Hoyle of Sylva, N.C.
Preference is given to organ majors.
W.H. Hudson Scholarship Fund: Established by Sue and Hill Hudson, Jr., in
memory of W.H. Hudson, a former Gardner-Webb University Trustee and
personal friend of the late Philip Elliott, seventh president. The fund is to
provide financial assistance to needy and worthy citizens from North and
South Carolina with first preference being given to students from Cleveland
County, studying in the field of sacred music.
Suzanne Thuot Kirby Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2004 by her estate
to provide assistance to full-time Gardner-Webb University students majoring
in piano and organ.
Madge Sperling Little Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2005 by the estate
of Lloyd Ray Little to memorialize his wife, Madge Little, who preceded him in
death to provide assistance to full-time students attending GWU majoring in
music.
John T. McCulloch Fine Arts Scholarship: This scholarship was initiated in 1998
by McCulloch England Associates Architects of Charlotte, N.C., as a memorial
tribute to John T. McCulloch, whose commitment to Gardner-Webb University
and Christian higher education was expressed through his talent as an
architect and his service as a member of the Board of Trustees.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/62
Max and Mary Padgett Music Scholarship: Established in 1990 by Mr. and Mrs.
Max Padgett of Hickory, N.C.
Robertson-Fern Scholarship Fund: Initiated in 2007 by members of the
Robertson and Fern families in remembrance of James William Robertson, father
of Linda Robertson Fern, and in recognition of the service and commitment of Dr.
Terry L. Fern, Professor of Music, Gardner-Webb University.
Dorothy Scism Seagraves Scholarship: Established in 1995 by James A. and
Dorothy Scism Seagraves of Charlotte, N.C., the scholarship provides financial
support for full-time students who are studying for a degree in music
education or sacred music.
Eloise and Evelyn Spangler Music Scholarships: The fund was named in honor
of Eloise and Evelyn Spangler of Shelby, N.C.
Other Fine and Performing Arts Scholarships:
Gardner-Webb University Music Faculty; John R. McClurd
International Student Endowed Scholarships
Beulah Rimmer Craig Memorial Scholarship: The fund was established in 1979
by Mrs. Beulah Rimmer Craig of Lincolnton, N.C. The scholarship provides
financial aid to international students or to sons or daughters of missionaries.
Clyde J. Dotson Scholarship: A pioneer missionary to Africa, the Reverend
Clyde J. Dotson was honored by the creation of the scholarship fund by his
daughter, Grace Dotson Warren and Dr. T.L. Warren of Hickory, N.C.
Mathematics and Science Endowed Scholarships
Joseph W. Geddes Memorial Engineering Scholarship: In 1971 the University
received funds from the estate of Joseph W. Geddes.
Glaxo Women in Science Scholars: Established by a gift from the Glaxo
Foundation in 1994, the scholarship is awarded to two women students each
year based on academic merit and leadership.
Paul W. Jolley Scholarship for Mathematics: This scholarship was initiated in
1996 by Dr. Paul W. Jolley and Mrs. Maxine S. Jolley to express their
commitment to Christian higher education. The scholarship is to provide
financial assistance to worthy and needy students in their Junior or Senior
years of study.
Z.W. and Carl E. Jolley Memorial Scholarship: Established by the family and
friends of Z.W. and Carl E. Jolley. The scholarship is awarded to a student who
is interested in studying mathematics or computer science.
Professor and Mrs. M.A. Moseley, Jr., Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1987
by friends and former students in memory of the Moseleys. Preference is given
to students majoring in chemistry.
Gardner-Webb University/63
Ministerial Undergraduate Endowed Scholarships
In addition to the Christian Service Organization endowed scholarships, the
following funds have been established to assist undergraduate students
preparing for a full-time Christian vocation.
Nancy and Udean Burke Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. Udean Burke of Newton,
N.C., initiated this scholarship to aid undergraduate ministerial students.
Beda Campbell Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2000 with a gift from the
estate of Beda Campbell.
Florence Baptist Church Scholarship: Established by Florence Baptist Church,
Forest City, N.C.
Gaston Memorial Education Fund: The fund was established by O’Neil and the
late W.F. Gaston of Belmont, N.C., in 1978 to honor Albert Forest Gaston and
his wife, Vera L. Gaston, and to express a commitment to Christian higher
education. Preference is given to qualified applicants from First Baptist
Church, Belmont, N.C.
Willie D. and Murleen G. Hall Ministerial Scholarship: This program was
established by Mr. and Mrs. Hall to aid deserving Christian vocational students.
Carl and Lula Hamrick Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1996 by the estate
of Lula Hamrick of Boiling Springs, N.C.
A.D. and Ruth Park Harmon Memorial Ministerial Scholarship: The fund was
established by the late Troy Harmon, an alumnus and former employee of
Gardner-Webb University, in memory of his mother and in honor of his father.
L.R. Harrill Ministerial Scholarship: Established by the late L.R. Harrill of
Raleigh, N.C., the scholarship provides financial aid for a student or students
preparing for service in the foreign mission field.
Wendy Suzanne Hazelworth Love Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was
established in 1991 by Mr. and Mrs. John B. Hazelworth and Maureen
Hazelworth Colwell in memory of their daughter and sister Wendy Suzanne
Hazelworth. The scholarship assists worthy and needy students majoring in
Religion whose goal it is to serve, after graduation, in some religious field in
the Lutheran or other Christian church.
Clyde B. and Kathryn B. Little Ministerial Scholarship: Established in 1987 by
Mr. and Mrs. Little.
Huel E. May Memorial Ministerial Scholarship: Initiated by Mrs. Billie H. May to
honor the memory of her husband, the Reverend Huel E. May.
R.L. and Dorothy B. Maynard Ministerial Scholarship: Established in 2000 by
Mr. and Mrs. R.L. Maynard of Taylorsville, N.C. Students from the Theron
Rankin Baptist Association, and in particular Highland Baptist Church of
Catawba County, will receive preference.
M.E. Shell Ministerial Scholarship: Established in 1979 by Mr. and Mrs. M.E.
Shell of Valdese, N.C., scholarships are awarded to a minimum of two
ministerial students, with preference being given to students from Burke
County, N.C.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/64
Reverend and Mrs. H.M. Stroup Memorial Ministerial Scholarship: Established by
the late Reverend and Mrs. H.M. Stroup of Spruce Pine, N.C.
Other Ministerial Undergraduate Scholarships:
Lena Niven Ayers Memorial; Hardin Memorial; William W. and Mary K.
McKinney; M.G. Martin Memorial; Elizabeth Dudley Nolan Memorial; Donald
Ervin and Betty Morris Smith.
Nursing Endowed Scholarships
C. Alonzo and Millie Hipps Brittain Scholarship: Established by Mr. and Mrs.
Ramon A. Brittain in memory of C.A. and Millie Hipps Brittain to provide
financial assistance to students in the nursing program.
Mary McGrady Burnette Nursing Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. William M.
Burnette of Columbia, S.C., established this scholarship in 1998.
Joseph H. and Carolyn C. Carroll, III Nursing Scholarship: This fund was
established in 1990 by Mr. and Mrs. Carroll in memory of their son, Joseph H.
(Joey) Carroll, IV. First preference is given to the residents of Cleveland
County, N.C.
Janice Perkins Clayton Memorial Scholarship: Initiated in 1997 by Mr. and Mrs.
John W. Perkins of Forest City, N.C. to honor their daughter Janice.
Dialysis Clinic, Inc. Scholarship: This fund was established in 2007 by the
Dialysis Clinic of Shelby, North Carolina.
W.P. and Pauline T. Ellis Nursing Scholarship: This scholarship was initiated in
1992 by Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Ellis, residents of Shelby, N.C.
Robert R. and Jessie I. Forney Nursing Scholarship: Established in 1988 by Mr.
and Mrs. Robert R. Forney of Shelby, N.C. Preference will be given to
residents of Cleveland, Rutherford and Gaston Counties who demonstrate
academic ability, need and Christian citizenship. The recipient will be
obligated to work in a hospital in Cleveland County, with preference given to
Cleveland Regional Medical Center, one year for each year the scholarshiploan was received.
Willie Odom Money Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was funded in
1995 with a gift from the estate of Willie Odom Money, a resident of Iredell
County, N.C.
John and Gerry Perkins Nursing Scholarship: Established in 2006 by John and
Gerry Perkins to provide financial assistance to students in the nursing
program.
Reagan Stewart Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1991 in memory of Dr.
Stewart, a former member of the board of Davis Hospital Foundation. The
scholarship is awarded to a student enrolled in the Davis Nursing Program in
Statesville, N. C.
Ina Rufus E. Stutts Memorial Scholarship: Established by an estate gift from
Mrs. Rufus Stutts, the scholarship provides support to nursing students with
preference given to students from Cleveland and Scotland Counties in North
Carolina and Dillon County, South Carolina.
Gardner-Webb University/65
Donald and Betty Taylor Nursing Scholarship: Established in September 2002
to support worthy and needy nursing students. Recipients will be known as
“Taylor Scholars”.
Ernest Julian Webb Memorial Nursing Scholarship: This scholarship was
initiated by Mrs. Irene B. Webb to honor the memory of her late husband, Mr.
Ernest Julian Webb.
Jean M. Young Memorial Nursing Scholarship: Established in 1994 by the family
and friends of Jean M. Young, of Shelby, N.C.
Other Nursing Endowed Scholarships:
Mattie Hoyle; Marjorie Cox Gray; Albert D. Raines; Memorial; J.L. and Nettie
McCluney; Grace L. Lee/Shirley Putman Toney; Elizabeth J. Moore Memorial.
Teacher Education Endowed Scholarships
Gladys H. Bridges Endowed Scholarship: This scholarship was established in
2009 by the family of Bob and Joy Ramsey in memory of Gladys Bridges, a
teacher at Dover Elementary School
Roberta Warlick Dixon Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was established
in memory of Mrs. Robbie Dixon, a teacher in the Shelby City Schools.
Michael J. Frost Scholarship: Funded by the Lutz Foundation of Cliffside, N.C.,
the scholarship was established in 1995 to honor Michael Frost, Petroleum
World executive. The scholarship is awarded to female students who are in the
teacher education program.
Hamrick-Perry Memorial Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. Dwight S. Perry of
Lawndale, N.C., established an endowed fund in memory of their parents, Mr.
and Mrs. William S. Perry and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hamrick.
Eugene and Betty Washburn and S.L. and Betty Johnson Endowed Scholarship:
Established in 2007 by Harry and Sherwin Washburn to provide assistance to
students pursuing a career in education.
W.F. and Mozelle Costner Parker Scholarship: Established in 2000 by Mrs. Parker
of Gibson, N.C., to provide scholarships for North Carolina students.
Sara McFarland Suttle Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1994 by Mrs.
Suttle’s children- J. Linton Suttle, Vance Suttle and Carol Suttle Arey, all of
Shelby, N C.
James Orville “Dean” and Rubye Reynolds Terrell Scholarship: This scholarship
was established in 1993 to provide financial assistance for students preparing
for teaching careers. Dr. Terrell was a history professor for twenty-seven years
at Gardner-Webb where he also served as Dean and Vice President.
Other Teacher Education Scholarships:
Proctor-Bridges; Susan Renae Cook Memorial; Joyce Harris Putnam
Memorial; Janice Phillips Freeman; GWU Teacher Education.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/66
Theater Scholarship
Barbara and John Brock Scholarship: Established in 1997 by Mr. and Mrs. John
Brock of Shelby, N.C. to provide financial aid to fulltime students who work
with the University’s theater program in either acting or technical capacity.
Merit Scholarships
James O. and Jackie Alair Memorial and Wilbrun and Marie Wellmon
Scholarship: Established in 2008 by Marie and Wilburn Wellmon.
William S. Barkley, Jr. Memorial Board of Advisors Scholarship: Funded by the
Board of Advisors of Gardner-Webb University, this scholarship was named in
April 1994 in memory of Lt. Col. William S. Barkley, Jr. Mr. Barkley was SGA
President during his student days at Gardner-Webb and was recognized as the
most outstanding male graduate.
William S. Barkley, Jr. Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1993 by family and
friends of William S. Barkley, Jr. who lost his life in service to his country.
C. L. Beam Memorial Scholarship: In 1966, Charles Grier Beam, Chairman,
Board of Directors, Carolina Freight Carriers Corporation, created a scholarship
named in honor of his mother, Mrs. Nancy Jean Beam of Lincoln County, and
in memory of his father, Charles Lester Beam.
Caroline Thayer Bland Memorial Scholarship: Established in December 2001
with funds received from the Caroline Thayer Bland Trust.
Grace Welch Blanton Scholarship: Established in 1994 by Lyn Blanton Kirkland
to honor her mother.
Nancy and George Blanton, Jr. Scholarship: Established in 1996 by Mr. and Mrs.
George Blanton, Jr. of Shelby, N.C. The scholarship provides support for
worthy yet needy full-time students from Cleveland and surrounding counties.
T.F. and Rhea Bridges Scholarship: Established in 1987 by Mr. and Mrs. T.F.
Bridges of Shelby, N. C.
George Henry and Martha Jane Brittain Memorial Scholarship: In 1965 L.H.
Brittain of Shelby, N.C., gave property to Gardner-Webb for the purpose of
endowing a scholarship in memory of his parents.
Class of 1949 Leadership Scholarship: Established in 1999 by the alumni of the
Class of 1949 as part of their fiftieth reunion celebration.
Class of 1950 Leadership Scholarship: Established in 2000 by the alumni of the
Class of 1950 as part of their fiftieth reunion celebration.
Class of 1951 Leadership Scholarship: Established in 2001 by the alumni of the
Class of 1951 as part of their fiftieth reunion celebration.
Cora C. Costner Memorial Scholarship: This fund was established in 1976 by
Mr. and Mrs. W.F. Parker, daughter and son-in-law of Mrs. Costner. Preference
is given to students from Cleveland and Rutherford counties.
Gardner-Webb University/67
J.R. Dover, Jr., Memorial Scholarship: In 1962, J.R. Dover, Jr., established an
endowed fund for scholarships.
Pamela Gail Darnell Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2005 by Ed and Betty
Darnell of Inman, S.C. and their son, Ben in loving memory of their daughter
and sister, Pamela Gail Darnell. Pam was a senior at GWU at the time of her
death in June 2005 from Lymphoma.
Duncan Family Scholarship: Established in 1993 by Grady S. and Joretta W.
Duncan of Belmont, N.C. to provide scholarships for needy but worthy fulltime students. Preference is given to students from Gaston County, N.C.
The William Arthur and Cora Honeycutt/Joyce Ann Earnhardt Endowed
Scholarship: Initiated in 2002 by Joyce A. Earnhardt in memory and
appreciation for her parents, William Arthur and Cora Honeycutt Earnhardt.
Philip Lovin Elliott Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1961 by family and
friends as a loan fund but transferred to a scholarship fund in 1997 for needy
and worthy students. The scholarship honors Dr. Elliot who served as seventh
president of Gardner-Webb for eighteen years.
Dr. and Mrs. Philip L. Elliott and Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Oakes Scholarship:
Established in 1996 by Mr. and Mrs. George A. Passes.
W.P. and Pauline T. Ellis Scholarship: In 1992 Mr. and Mrs. W.P. Ellis of Shelby,
N.C. established the scholarship.
Catherine Cline Falls and John Zimri Falls, Jr., Memorial Scholarship: Dr. and
Mrs. Ralph L. Falls and Mrs. Helen F. Miller established the fund in memory of
Catherine and John Z. Falls.
First Baptist Church of Shelby Scholarship: Established in 2003 by First Baptist
Church of Shelby, North Carolina to provide scholarship assistance to worthy
and/or needy students.
Robert and Mae L. Geouge Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2000 by a gift
from the estate of Mae L. Geouge to provide support for students with
financial need.
Earle A. and Adele G. Hamrick, Sr., Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was
established in memory of Earle A. Hamrick, Sr., by his wife. Qualified students
from the Haywood County area are given first consideration.
Julian W. Hamrick Scholarship: Established in 2006 by Sara Ellen Hamrick in
memory of her husband to provide assistance to worthy and/or needy
students.
Maxwell B. Hamrick, Sr., Ruth P. Hamrick, and O.P. Hamrick Endowed
Scholarship Fund: Established and funded by members of the Hamrick family,
the fund provides support for worthy and needy students.
S.C. and Pauline D. Harrill Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1996 through
the estate of Mrs. Harrill for students in need of financial assistance.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/68
Norman Harris Leadership Scholarship: Initiated in 2002 by the alumni of
1952 and 1953, the scholarship honors Norman Harris, a very influential
football, basketball and baseball coach and athletic director at Gardner-Webb.
W. Shirley and Gladys J. Haynie Endowed Scholarship Fund: The fund was
established in 1981 by Mrs. W. Shirley Haynie in memory of her husband to
express their commitment to Christian higher education. Preference is given to
qualified applicants from Gaston and Yadkin counties.
Sam and Rachel High Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2005 by Samala
Hocutt, Mary J. High and Sam High to memorialize their parents, Sam and
Rachel High. First preference is given to a student majoring in American Sign
Language.
James A. and Hazel B. Hodge Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1989 by Mr.
and Mrs. James Hodge of Rutherford County.
Harold and Jean Hollifield Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was
established in 2000 with a gift from the estate of Harold Hollifield. First
preference is given to a student majoring in English.
Huggins-Hamrick Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2005 by Mr. and Mrs.
James R. (Sonny) Huggins of Boiling Springs, N.C. in memory of their
grandparents, James Dwyre and Bessie Atkins Huggins, and Oliver Paul and
Jessie Pangle Hamrick.
George P. and Cordia H. Johnson Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2001 by
the estate of Cordia H. Johnson to provide scholarship aid.
Garrie L. Kendrick memorial Scholarship: Established by Mrs. Garrie L.
Kendrick in memory of her husband.
Kings Mountain/Gardner-Webb University Scholarship: Established in 1990 by
the Kings Mountain City Council and Gardner-Webb University. The
scholarship is awarded each year to a graduating senior of Kings Mountain
High School.
Harwick Wiley Kiser, Jr. Endowed Scholarship Fund: Established in 1998 by
Gardner-Webb alumnus Harwick W. Kiser, Jr. in memory of his grandfather,
Glenn E. Swaim, Sr., and in honor of his parents. Deserving students of
Hispanic origin are to receive first preference.
L.V. Lee Family Memorial Scholarship: The scholarship fund was established by
Iva Sperling (Mrs. Norman B.) Lee to honor the memory of Lawrence Victor
Lee, M.D., Susan Lattimore Lee, and Norman B. Dennett Lee.
LeGrand-Ware Memorial Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. R.T. LeGrand, Jr., of Shelby,
N.C., established this scholarship in memory of their parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Torrance LeGrand, Sr., and Mr. and Mrs. Moffatt Alexander Ware.
Nominations will be received in the spring for students entering the following
fall from each high school in Cleveland County. Applicants must demonstrate a
real interest in the free enterprise system and should show the potential for
leadership as exhibited by school activities. The award will be divided equally
over eight semesters.
Gardner-Webb University/69
David and Winifred Herbert Lindsay Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1989
by Mrs. Lindsay, a resident of Rutherford County, N.C., the fund provides
financial assistance to worthy and needy full-time students. Preference is given
to residents of Rutherford and area counties in North Carolina.
Ira and Catherine Priscilla McCluney Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship
was initiated in 2000 by Mrs. Jessie McCluney Wallace of Spartanburg, S.C., to
honor the memory of her late parents, Ira and Catherine Priscilla McCluney,
and to express her commitment to Christian higher education.
Randolph and Evangeline Martin Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was
established in 1969 by Mrs. Randolph Martin and her children, Conrad and
Julia.
Mr. and Mrs. B.S. Mauney Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was
established in 1973 by the late Mr. and Mrs. B.S. Mauney.
Daniel W. Moore, Jr. Scholarship: Established in 2003 by his wife Bettye A.
Moore in loving memory of her husband Dan, a former Trustee.
Joe T. and Ellen B. Moore, Sr. Scholarship: Established in 1989 by Mrs. Moore in
memory of Mr. Moore to express their commitment to Christian higher
education. First preference is given to members of the First Baptist Church,
Belmont, NC.
Mr. and Mrs. M.A. (Brick) Morris Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. Morris endowed
this scholarship. Students from South Carolina are considered first.
Porter Brothers, Inc., Scholarship: In 1970 a fund was established by Porter
Brothers, Inc., of Shelby, N.C., to assist needy and worthy students.
Thomas P. Pruitt, Sr., Memorial Scholarship: Mr. Pruitt was an outstanding
Christian layman known for his service to the First Baptist Church of Hickory,
N.C. He is honored through this fund by his wife, children, and friends.
Minna Lee Bowling Rice Memorial Scholarship: Established in 2003 by her
niece, Eleanor Porter, in Memory of her Aunt Minna.
William Paul Riggs, Sr. and Loudene Wright Riggs Scholarship: Established in
2003 by Betty J. and Hylton Wright to express their appreciation to the Riggs
for their commitment to Christian higher education and the values held by
Gardner-Webb University.
John E. and Helen Goodwin Roberts Scholarship: Funded in 2002 by Dr. and
Mrs. Roberts to assist two worthy and needy students, one of whom is to be
studying in the field of communications.
D.W. Royster, Sr., Memorial Scholarship: Established by the family and friends
of D.W. Royster, Sr., this fund honors his memory.
Walter Ed and Gertrude Sain Memorial Scholarship: Funded by a gift from the
estate of Walter Ed Sain of the Toluca community in northern Cleveland
County, North Carolina, the scholarship was established in 1995.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/70
Max and Dorothy Elliott Sink Scholarship: Initiated in 2001 by Dr. and Mrs.
Max Sink of High Point, N.C., the scholarship provides assistance for deserving
students who have financial need. First preference is to children of
missionaries.
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Small Academic Scholarship: This fund was established by Mr.
and Mrs. Ray Small of Lincolnton, N.C.
Elon and Etheleen M. Smawley Scholarship: Mr. and Mrs. Smawley established
this scholarship in 1985 to provide financial assistance to students.
C.R. and Elizabeth Spangler Scholarship: This scholarship is made possible by
Mr. and Mrs. C.R. Spangler and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Spangler of Cleveland
County, N.C. Preference is given to Cleveland County students.
Everett G. and Vera L. Spurling Scholarship: Established in 1971 by Mr. and
Mrs. Everett G. Spurling to provide scholarships for needy and worthy
students, with preference given to students from upper Cleveland County.
Charlene Stamey Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship was established by a
gift from the estate of Charlene Stamey of Fallston, N.C.
Marvin D. and Mary B Stinson Scholarship: Established in 1998 by Helen M.
Stinson in memory of her parents.
TDA Scholarship: Established by Mr. W. Thomas Bell of Transportation &
Distribution Associates, Inc. Mr. Bell is a 1971 alumnus and was named GWU
Alumnus of the Year in 1999.
J.P. Stevens and Company Scholarship: Established in 1965 by J.P. Stevens and
Company. Preference is given to students from Cleveland County.
Richard VanLunen Foundation Scholarship: Established in 2005 by the Trustess
of the Richard VanLunen Foundation to provide scholarships for
worthy/needy, first generation college students.
Michael Ray Wagner Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1992 by Rev. and
Mrs. Donald Wagner, this scholarship honors the memory of their son Michael
Ray Wagner. Michael was killed on September 20, 1984 in Beirut, Lebanon
while serving his country. Preference is given to basketball managers, students
in the School of Divinity, or students in the School of Nursing.
Annie Mae Walker Memorial Scholarship: Funded by a gift from the estate of
Annie Mae Walker of the Green Creek community in Polk County, N.C.
M. Christopher and Linda F. White Hart County High School Scholarship:
Established in 1995 by Dr. and Mrs. M. Christopher White. Dr. White was the
tenth president of Gardner-Webb University, having served in that role from
1986-2002. The scholarship is restricted to graduates of Hart County High
School, Hartwell, GA.
Margaret Young Memorial Scholarship: In 1966 Mr. J.F. Alexander, Mrs. Martha
Howe, and Mrs. Kathleen Alexander Carpenter, all of Salisbury, N.C., created
the scholarship as a memorial to Margaret Young.
Gardner-Webb University/71
Other Financial Need Endowed Scholarships:
Barbara Ann Allebrand; C. and O. Arrington; Anissa Bingham Memorial; Mr.
and Mrs. Howard S. Berry; Martha B. Blackburn; Roger Dale Bridges Memorial;
Ronald F. Carpenter; Mary Lide Doggett Memorial; First Baptist Church of
Shelby; W.Shirley and Gladys J. Haynie; Nancy Holbrook; Jennie King; Kings
Mountain/GWU; Frank and Barbara Mayo; William W. McKinney; Virgil M.
Hailey; Minnie Connor Poston Memorial; Thomas P. Pruitt, Sr.; S.S. Royster, Sr.
Memorial; George Edward Sweet Memorial; E. Jerome Scott Memorial;Class of
1951; Class of 1972; Class of 1973; Class of 1987; Class of 1988; Class of 1997;
Class of 1998; Class of 1999, Class of 2000, Class of 2001.
General Purpose Endowed Scholarships
George and Ida Wood Blanton Scholarship: In 1955 George Blanton and Ida
Wood Blanton of Shelby, N.C., created a trust fund for the purpose of
encouraging and promoting the education of capable and deserving young
men and women through the facilities of Gardner-Webb University.
Joseph B. Freeman Education Fund: The Joseph B. Freeman, Jr. Education
Fund was established in 1991 to provide freshman year scholarships for
promising students who do not have the financial resources to attend college.
The scholarship is limited to graduates of high schools in Cleveland County.
Further, the scholarship is intended for those few extraordinary individuals
whose academic ability and motivation are good, but whose personal
circumstances prohibit college.
Daniel W. and Bettye A. Moore, Jr., Scholarship: Established in 1990 by Mr. and
Mrs. Dan Moore, Jr. of Boiling Springs, N.C.
Earl W. and Evelyn H. Spangler Practical Leadership Development Scholarship:
The fund was established by Earl W. and Evelyn H. Spangler of Shelby, N.C., in
1979 to express a commitment to Christian higher education. The scholarship
is awarded to an entering freshman with the most clearly demonstrated record
of, and with the most predictable potential for general practical leadership.
Eloise and Pat Spangler Fund: This fund was established in 1981 by their
many friends from across the Southeastern United States as an expression of
appreciation for the Spanglers’ years of public service. The fund provides
graduate stipends for teaching assistantships.
Annual Scholarships
Alpha Epsilon Award: This $500 scholarship is given by the Alpha Epsilon
Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma, a society that promotes the professional and
personal growth of women educators and excellence in education. This annual
award is given to a female Cleveland County resident enrolled in the teacher
education program.
BB&T Merit Scholarship: Provides scholarship assistance to a worthy and
needy student. Funds are administered through the Independent College Fund
of North Carolina.
North Carolina Baptist Scholarship: Awarded to selected students who are
members of North Carolina Baptist churches cooperating with the NC Baptist
State Convention. The funds are awarded and provided by the Convention. A
separate online application (hhtps://chegrants.secureshd.com) must be
completed prior to May 1.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/72
Helen Ann Beam Nursing Scholarship: Established in July 2002 by Helen Beam
of Orlando, Florida. Her desire is for this scholarship to assist nursing students
from Cleveland, Rutherford and Polk counties in the A.D.N., B.S.N., or M.S.N.
programs.
Boiling Springs Rotary Club Scholarships: The Boiling Springs Rotary Club
raises scholarship funds for graduates of high schools in Cleveland County.
Charles and Drew Bridges Health Careers Scholarship: Established in 1996 by
Dr. Drew Bridges, class of 1967 and a member of the Athletic Hall of Fame, the
scholarship provides support for an athlete who expresses an interest in a
career in health services.
Broyhill Family Foundation Scholarship: Provides scholarship assistance to a
worthy and needy student. Funds are administered through the Independent
College Fund of North Carolina.
Mary Lou Causby Scholarship: $300 is awarded annually to a rising sophomore
nursing student. Preference is given to a former LPN or an older student who
demonstrates maturity, dedication, and commitment to the nursing profession.
Cleveland Physical Therapy Associates Scholarship: This scholarship was
established in 1999 by Cleveland Physical Therapy Associates and is awarded
to a student studying in the Athletic Training Program.
Coca-Cola “First Generation” Scholarship: This scholarship was established by
The Coca-Cola Foundation for one student at each of North Carolina’s 36
independent colleges and universities. The student must be full-time and must
be the first in his or her immediate family to attend college.
Dover Foundation Scholarships: Funds provided by the Dover Foundation of
Shelby, N.C., are given to an outstanding graduate of each of the following
high schools: Crest, Burns, Shelby, Kings Mountain. Application forms for
these competitive freshman year scholarships may be obtained from the high
school guidance counselors or Gardner-Webb’s Admissions Office.
Duke Energy Foundation Scholarship: Provides scholarship assistance to a
worthy and needy student. Funds are administered through the Independent
College Fund of North Carolina.
First Baptist Church, Shelby, North Carolina Scholarships: Funds are given to
deserving students by the First Baptist Church of Shelby, N.C.
FOCUS Scholarships: The Fellowship of Christians United in Service, a
ministry of the Gardner-Webb University Baptist Student Union, gives four, or
more, $200 scholarships each year. One scholarship is awarded to the FOCUS
coordinator-elect, and the others are awarded to students nominated by the
FOCUS ministry and approved by the Admissions and Financial Planning
Committee.
Golden LEAF Foundation Scholarship: Provides scholarship assistance to a
worthy and needy student. Funds are administered through the Independent
College Fund of North Carolina.
Gardner-Webb University/73
F. Keith Griggs Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1999, this scholarship
honors the memory of Dr. Keith Griggs, who was a professor in the Broyhill
School of Management for 34 years.
Margaret Wellmon Jarvis and Charles Jarvis Academic Scholarship: This
scholarship was established in 2000 to benefit students from the Gastonia area,
with first preference given to students from Gaston County High School.
J. Ray Lutz Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1988 by Petroleum World,
Inc. of Cliffside, North Carolina, this $2,000 scholarship is named in memory
of J. Ray Lutz of Shelby. It is awarded to an entering freshman from Cleveland,
Rutherford, Polk, McDowell, or Burke County.
Lilly Hoyle Lutz Memorial Music Scholarship: Established by Mr. and Mrs. Ray
Webb Lutz and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lutz to provide financial assistance to a
music major who participates in the Gardner-Webb University Community
Orchestra. A scholarship of $1,000 will be awarded annually on Awards Day
for the following academic year.
McCurry-Deck Scholarship: This scholarship was established by the McCurryDeck Motor Company in Forest City, N.C.
OrthoCarolina Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 1999 by Miller
Orthopedic Clinic and is awarded to a student studying in the Athletic Training
Program.
John Gene and Delores Hamrick Turner Scholarship: Established in 2004 in
honor of Mr. and Mrs. John Gene Turner, this scholarship provides funds for a
deserving female or male basketball player.
UPS Scholarship: This scholarship was established in the early 1970s by UPS
through the Foundation for Independent Higher Education and is now
facilitated through the North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities
organization.
Wachovia Foundation Scholarship: Provides scholarship assistance to a worthy
and needy student. Funds are administered through the Independent College
Fund of North Carolina.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
GENERAL INFORMATION
Gardner-Webb University will make every effort to keep operating costs low
while providing quality programs. Through the support of the Baptist State
Convention of North Carolina, the Independent College Fund of North
Carolina, private gifts from alumni, business and other friends, and endowment
earnings, Gardner-Webb is able to charge tuition which is less than the actual
cost of instruction and other services. The University, however, reserves the
right to change tuition and other charges at the beginning of any semester if
such change is necessary in the judgment of the Board of Trustees.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/74
EXPENSES FOR THE 2011-12 ACADEMIC YEAR – REGULAR PROGRAM
Item
Per Semester
Tuition (10-18 hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,560
Room: Traditional dorm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,945
Suite Style. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,260
University Commons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,097
Board: See Board Plan Options
Overload (more than 18 semester hours). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $372/hour
Residence Hall Security Deposit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75
Communication Fee (Resident Students Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $95
Student Activity Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100
*Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $200
*The cost for a student accident and health insurance plan is assessed to every fulltime student unless a waiver form is completed certifying that the student is covered
by some other insurance plan(s).
Each Student is expected to review his or her online bill at the beginning of the
semester and to make satisfactory financial arrangements no later than the end of the
first full week of classes.
BOARD PLAN OPTIONS
All resident students must participate in an eligible board plan. (Note:
Resident students must be enrolled in at least 12 semester hours during the
entire semester of their residency. Exceptions require the prior permission of
the Office of Residence Education.
Plan
Description
Meal
Opportunities
per week (1)
Flex $ Per
Semester (2)
Cost per
Semester
Value Plan
21
$190
$1,840
Choice Plan
15
$250
$1,805
Flex Plan
10
$280
$1,725
1. The week will be defined as beginning Sunday dinner and running
through Sunday lunch. Available meals for partial weeks will be prorated.
Meals cannot be carried over from week to week, nor can they be transferred to
other persons.
2. Flex dollars are available to the student based on the meal plan
selected. These dollars can be used at the student’s discretion in the
cafeteria or in the snack bar. They do not carry over from semester to
semester.
3. After the last day of drop/add, a student cannot change to a lower meal
plan; however, one may elect a higher meal plan after the semester
commences.
Gardner-Webb University/75
COMMUTER MEAL PLAN
A commuter meal plan is available for $595 to any full-time or part-time
commuter student. The commuter meal plan consists of 50 meals and $310
Flex Dollars that may be used anytime during the academic year. Any unused
meals or Flex Dollars at the end on the spring semester will be forfeited. No
refunds will be given for unused meals or Flex Dollars. The commuter meal
plan may not be purchased or substituted for a required residential meal plan.
ART STUDIO FEES
All art studio classes carry a basic fee of $50. The fee supplies the student
with a limited amount of material necessary for the class. Art students can
expect to have additional expenses for tools and materials specific to each
studio course. Art studio fees will be collected by the business office.
MUSIC FEES
Item
Per Semester
Private Lessons - Piano, Voice, Organ, Instruments
One lesson (1/2 hour) per week, 1 hr. credit
$227
Two lesson (1 hour) per week, 2 hrs. credit
$360
Students wishing to take more than two private lessons per week
will be charged an additional $100 per 1/2 hour lesson.
NURSING PROGRAM FEES
In addition to tuition, fees, books, and general college expenses, associate
degree nursing students can expect to pay $150 per course for nursing clinical
- ADN Fees and additional expenses of approximately $700 per year.
COMMUNICATION STUDIES LAB FEES
Communication Studies lab-based courses carry a basic fee of $50.
Communication Studies courses incurring a lab fee are designated with (Lab
Fee) in the department’s course description listed in the catalog. This fee helps
offset basic supplies and materials required for the course. Additionally, all
Communication Studies majors are required to purchase an external firewall
hard drive (see the department office for complete hard drive requirements)
for their project storage. The hard drive will be used throughout their
coursework in the department.
Communication Studies lab fees will be collected by the business office.
EDUCATION PROGRAM FEES
A $20 fee is charged in conjunction with EDUC 312. This fee replaces
consumable assessment materials candidates use while working with children.
A $42 fee will be charged in conjunction with EDUC 201. This fee is for
enrollment in the Task Stream data management system.
A $55 fee is charged for a background check in conjunction with EDUC 250
and EDUC 450.
NATURAL SCIENCE LAB FEES
All 100-level science classes carry a lab fee of $30 to be collected by the
business office. The lab fees cover the cost of supplies for the lab exercises.
ONLINE LEARNING TECHNOLOGY FEES
All online and blended courses will be assessed a fee of $25 per course. The
Online Learning Technology Fee will enable the University to provide students
with enhanced instructional access, resources, and support for all online and
blended course offerings. Funds from this fee are used for services that
Gardner-Webb provides for students, including student computing and
technology equipment, software, site assistance and troubleshooting, and the
support staff necessary for these functions to operate effectively. This fee is
non-refundable in the event you should withdraw from the course.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/76
PART-TIME ENROLLMENT
Tuition for day courses (no more than 9 hours per semester) $372/hour
This reduced rate is available to students who enroll in 9 hours or less.
Students who enroll for 10 or 11 hours in a semester are also considered parttime (for financial aid, residence life, and other purposes), but do not qualify
for the reduced hourly rate.
UNDERGRADUATE CONTINUING EDUCATION
Tuition per semester hour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $330
Students must hold a completed Bachelor’s degree from an
accredited/approved institution to qualify for this rate. Official transcripts
must be provided to the Registrar’s Office.
SUMMER SCHOOL 2012
Tuition per semester hour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $330
Room and Board per summer session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $735
GRADUATION FEE
Diploma, Diploma Cover, Medallion, and Processing Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $125
Late Graduation Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50
MISCELLANEOUS
Application fee (non-refundable) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40
International Student Application Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100
Auditing courses (non-refundable) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $150/course
Late payment fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50
Non- payment fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100
Transcripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10/copy
Examination for course credit (per credit hour) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100
Automobile registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100
Replace I.D. card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10
Returned check fine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30
Late application for admission to Teacher Education Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25
Late application for student teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35
Private Room (per semester when available) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $725
Replacement of room key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25
Improper residence hall check-out fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50
Prior Learning Assessment Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75
Prior Learning Course Credit Granted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75
ROOM CHARGE
Students changing rooms without permission of his/her Resident Director
are charged for both rooms.
BOARD CHARGE
Students living off campus but enrolled as full-time students may eat in the
university dining room upon payment of board fees for each semester as
determined by the Business Office, or through buying individual meals.
BOOK EXPENSES
The estimated cost of textbooks is $750 per semester, but this varies greatly
with the number and types of classes taken.
Gardner-Webb University/77
COSTS COVERED BY TUITION
Included in the tuition fees are costs of registration, use of the library,
recreation facilities, admission to home athletic events, student publications,
post office box, and 10 to 18 semester hours of work, inclusive each semester.
The tuition, fees, and estimated book expenses do not include fees for special
courses, special laboratory work, and study-travel course. Personal expenses
will vary with the individual student. For the student who must earn money
toward his or her college expenses, there are a number of opportunities for
work available through the Financial Planning Office.
SCHEDULE OF PAYMENT
ADVANCE DEPOSIT
A room reservation deposit of $150 for new resident students or an advance
deposit of $50 for new commuting students is due within 30 days of being
accepted. The room reservation deposit for new resident students or the
advance deposit for new commuter students is non-refundable after May 1 for
fall enrollment and November 1 for spring Enrollment.
Continuing resident students may reserve a room during and after the
advertised room sign-up period, by paying the $150 room reservation deposit
and completing an application and contract for housing. Continuing commuter
students should pay the $50 advance deposit to declare their intent to return.
The deposit for a continuing student is non-refundable.
Room reservation deposits will be credited toward the cost of the room. The
room reservation deposit will be forfeited if the reserved room is not utilized.
The advance deposit for commuter students will be credited toward the cost
of tuition.
BALANCE OF THE ACCOUNT
The balance of the semester’s charges is due according to the scheduled due
dates as reflected on the individual student’s online bill. Those who cannot pay
or find it necessary to finance university charges should contact the Business
Office for information regarding alternate payment plans.
CHARGE REDUCTION POLICY
Registration in the University is considered a contract binding the student
for charges for the entire semester. However, it is the policy of Gardner-Webb
University to give pro-rata charge reductions through 60% of the enrollment
period in the event a student OFFICIALLY WITHDRAWS FROM SCHOOL. Oncampus program students (Undergraduate and Divinity) must complete and
return a withdrawal form to the Registrar’s Office in order to be officially
withdrawn. GOAL and graduate program students may withdraw by
telephoning or emailing the Registrar’s Office. A confirmation will be sent
when the withdrawal is complete. The withdrawal date is the date this process
begins.
Reductions will be computed on total charges for tuition, room and board
but not on fees. Students leaving school for disciplinary reasons will not be
eligible for any reduction and will be liable for the entire semester’s charges.
Students who withdraw from individual classes after the drop/add period will
receive no charge reduction.
Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid/78
For purposes of interpreting this policy the pro-rata charge reduction
percentage is equal to the number of calendar days (includes weekends)
remaining in the semester divided by the number of calendar days in the
semester. No charge reduction will be given after the 60% period of
enrollment for the semester.
When a student’s charges are reduced, Federal, State, Institutional and Noninstitutional Aid will be adjusted in accordance with the regulations governing
the respective programs. Please contact the University Business Office for
current regulations concerning these programs. Leaving the University without
officially withdrawing may result in a student forfeiting all financial aid and,
thus, becoming responsible for the entire balance.
ROOM AND BOARD REDUCTIONS
In the event a student continues to be enrolled for classes and is approved
or required by Residence Life to move from University housing to off campus
housing during a semester there will be no charge reduction for room charges.
The student moving off campus may request to have his/her meal plan
terminated at that time and receive a limited pro-rata charge reduction for
meals. The meal plan reduction amount will equal the percentage of the
semester remaining times fifty percent times the original meal plan rate. To
have the meal plan terminated and receive this reduction the student must
contact the Business Office once they have been approved to move off
campus by the Office of Residence Life and have moved.
DELINQUENT STUDENT ACCOUNTS
Students with outstanding financial obligations may be prevented from
registering for the following semester. A student will not be allowed to
participate in commencement exercises or receive a diploma, nor will
transcripts be released, until all financial obligations are satisfied. Delinquent
accounts may be referred to collection agencies and/or credit bureaus.
Financial obligations include, but are not limited to, student account balance,
returned checks, parking, disciplinary and library fines.
Gardner-Webb University/79
ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
DEGREES AND MAJOR FIELDS
Gardner-Webb University offers the following degrees and major fields of
study:
DOCTORAL PROGRAMS
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)
Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)
Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.)
MASTER’S PROGRAMS
Master of Arts (M.A.); Master of Divinity (M.Div.); Master of Business
Administration (M.B.A.); International Master of Business Administration
(I.M.B.A.); Master of Accountancy (M.Acc.); Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.)
Areas are: Business, Divinity, Elementary Education, English, English
Education, Executive Leadership Studies, Mental Health Counseling, Middle
Grades Education, Nursing, School Counseling, and Sport Science and
Pedagogy.
See the graduate catalog for degree requirements
BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A.)
American Sign Language
American Sign Language - Teacher Licensure
(K-12)
Art
Art Education (K-12)
Biblical Studies
Communication Studies
Discipleship Studies
English
English-Teacher Licensure (9-12)
English as a Second Language
Teacher Licensure (K-12)
French
French-Teacher Licensure (K-12)
Global Studies
History
Journalism
Missiology
Music
Philosophy and Theology
Political Science
Religious Studies
Social Sciences
Social Studies-Teacher Licensure (9-12)
Sociology
Spanish
Spanish-Teacher Licensure (K-12)
Theatre Arts
World Religions
Youth Discipleship Studies
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (B.F.A.)
Art
BACHELOR OF MUSIC (B.M.)
Music Education (K-12)
Music Performance
Music with Electives in Music Business
Music Composition
Sacred Music
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.)
Accountancy
Athletic Training
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Computer Information Systems
Computer Science
Economics/Finance
Elementary Education (K-6)
Environmental Science
Health/Wellness
Healthcare Management
International Business
Marketing
Mathematics
Mathematics-Teacher Licensure (9-12)
Middle Grades Education (6-9)
Physical Education/Health EducationTeacher Licensure (K-12)
Physician Assistant Track
Psychology
Sport Management
Academic Regulations/80
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (B.S.N.)
Nursing
R.N. to B.S.N. (See GOAL Program Catalog)
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE (A.S.)
Nursing
BACHELOR’S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Gardner-Webb University offers an academic program consisting of a minimum
of 128 semester hours of credit for the bachelor’s degree. The degree consists of
a major field of concentration in the liberal arts or in a professional or
preprofessional area, a general studies program, and elective courses. Some of
the programs also require a minor field of concentration. To earn a baccalaureate
degree the student completes the academic program on the following pages.
GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS
Consistent with the best practices of the higher education community,
Gardner-Webb University’s general education curriculum includes a series of
broad and intensive learning experiences. These experiences have been carefully
designed to meet a diverse set of learning goals, which in turn have been
developed on the basis of the University’s mission and heritage. Specifically, the
faculty has identified seven major learning goals as the intended outcome of the
general education curriculum.
Students who complete their studies at Gardner-Webb University will
• Gain knowledge of the heritage within which Gardner-Webb stands and to
which it is committed—a heritage grounded in the integration of scholarship
with Christian life and ethics;
• Experience sufficient breadth and depth in the Liberal Arts to provide the
knowledge and skills necessary to make connections between and among
disciplines;
• Develop communication skills;
• Learn to think critically;
• Develop information literacy skills;
• Gain knowledge about the mental, physical, and spiritual aspects of daily
living;
• Gain knowledge about our world, including its diversity of cultures and
viewpoints, and develop the skills needed for life and the practice of their
future professions in a global community.
Gardner-Webb University/81
COMPLETION OF GENERAL STUDIES AS FOLLOWS:
BASIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS, AND
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES
Semester Hours Required
I. Dimensions of the Humanities (11-21 hours)
Composition, Literature, and Communication.............................................11-12
English Composition I (ENGL 101)*
English Composition II (ENGL 102)
Literature (one of the following: ENGL 211, 212, 231, 232, 251,252)
Oral Communication (one of the following: COMM 233, BADM 325,
THEA 330, EDUC 450, ENGL 270, RELI 354, or two semesters of
COMM 235 (debate)
Foreign Language..............................................................................................0-9
The student must complete a foreign language through the first semester
of the intermediate level (201). The number of hours required depends upon
the student’s entering competency level (either FREN 101, 102, 201;
GERM 101, 102, 201; GREK 101, 102, 201; HEBR 101, 102, 201; SPAN 101,102,
201; SGLG 101, 102, 201).
Students with two or more units of a foreign language in high school
typically begin at the 102 or 201 level; those with exceptional ability may
satisfy the requirement through testing.
*Some students, based on test scores, must take CRLT 101 & ENGL 191 as
prerequisites/corequisites for core courses in the general studies curriculum.
II. Dimensions of Faith........................................................................................................6
Old Testament (RELI 101)
New Testament (RELI 102)
III. Dimensions of Heritage (15 semester hours)
Western Heritage.................................................................................................6
Western Civilization I (HIST 101)
Western Civilization II (HIST 102)
Global Heritage: choose one of the following.....................................................3
Global Understanding (SSCI 205)
Religion and Culture in a Global Perspective (RELI 245)
American Heritage: choose two of the following................................................6
Economics and the Free Market System (ECON 203)
The American Political Process (POLS 202)
The American Century (HIST 245)
Technology and American Society (COMM 230)
IV. Dimensions of Self (10 semester hours)
Dimensions of University Life in a Global Society (UNIV 111)...........................3
Dimensions of Personal Health (HLED 221)........................................................3
Physical Dimensions of Wellness – Choose one course from one of the
following areas:....................................................................................................1
(Fitness) PHED 140-145
(Lifetime Sports) PHED 150-159
(Outdoor Adventure) PHED 160-165.
Art Survey (ARTS 225) or Music Survey (MUSC 225) or Theatre Survey (THEA 235)......3
V. Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry (8 semester hours)
Life Science (either BIOL 101, 104 or 111).........................................................4
Physical Science (either CHEM 103, 111 or 251; GEOL 101, 102, 105, or 106;
PHYS 103, 104, 201, or 203)...............................................................................4
Academic Regulations/82
VI. Dimensions of Quantitative Analysis (3-4 semester hours)........................................3-4
Choose one of the following: Fundamentals of Statistics and Probability (MATH
105), Finite Mathematics (MATH 110), Precalculus (MATH 150), Calculus
(MATH 151), Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (MATH 219)
Some students, based on test scores, must take MATH 100 as a prerequisite for
core courses in the general studies curriculum.
VII.Dimensions (DIMS 111-116, six semesters)..................................................................3
BASIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING DEGREE
Semester Hours Required
I. Dimensions of the Humanities (11-21 hours)
Composition, Literature, and Communication....................................................9
English Composition I (ENGL 101)
English Composition II (ENGL 102)
Literature (one of the following: ENGL 211, 212, 231, 232, 251,252)
Oral Communication (Competency is met by NURS 307 in the major;
no additional hours required.)
Foreign Language..............................................................................................0-6
The student must complete a foreign language through the second semester
of the elementary level (102). The number of hours required depends upon the
student’s entering competency level (either FREN 101, 102; GERM 101, 102;
GREK 101, 102; HEBR 101, 102, 201; SPAN 101,102; SGLG 101, 102).
Students with two or more units of a foreign language in high school
typically begin at the 102 level; those with exceptional ability may satisfy
the requirement through testing.
II. Dimensions of Faith........................................................................................................6
Old Testament (RELI 101)
New Testament (RELI 102)
III. Dimensions of Heritage (15 semester hours)
Western Heritage.................................................................................................6
Western Civilization I (HIST 101)
Western Civilization II (HIST 102)
Global Heritage: choose one of the following.....................................................3
Global Understanding (SSCI 205)
Religion and Culture in a Global Perspective (RELI 245)
American Heritage: choose two of the following................................................6
Economics and the Free Market System (ECON 203)
The American Political Process (POLS 202)
The American Century (HIST 245)
Technology and American Society (COMM 230)
IV. Dimensions of Self (10 semester hours)
Dimensions of University Life in a Global Society (UNIV 111)...........................3
Dimensions of Personal Health (HLED 221)........................................................3
Physical Dimensions of Wellness – Choose one course from one of the
following areas:....................................................................................................1
(Fitness) PHED 140-145
(Lifetime Sports) PHED 150-159
(Outdoor Adventure) PHED 160-165.
Art Survey (ARTS 225) or Music Survey (MUSC 225) or Theatre Survey (THEA 235)......3
V. Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry (18 semester hours)
Behavioral Science (PSYC 201, 206)....................................................................6
Life Science (BIOL 105*, 203*, 204*) .................................................................12
* Must have “C” or better
Gardner-Webb University/83
VI. Dimensions of Quantitative Analysis (3-4 semester hours)........................................3-4
Choose one of the following: Fundamentals of Statistics and Probability (MATH
105), Finite Mathematics (MATH 110), Precalculus (MATH 150), Calculus
(MATH 151), Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (MATH 219)
VII.Dimensions (DIMS 111-116, six semesters)..................................................................3
BASIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE
Semester Hours Required
I. Dimensions of the Humanities (6-15 hours)
Composition, Literature, and Communication...(6-9) 6 ED*, 6 MIBS*, 8-9 others)
ENGL 101 English Composition I ........................................................3
ENGL 102 English Composition II .......................................................3
ENGL 211, 212, 231, 232, 251, or 252 ............................................0*-3
Literature OR
COMM 233, BADM 325, THEA 330,
*EDUC 450, MIBS 490, ENGL 270, RELI 354, or
two semesters of COMM 235 Oral Communication
(*Music Education Majors meet the COMM requirement through student
teaching. Music Business students meet the COMM requirements
through their internship and required journal oral presentation. SACS
requires competency in the area of communication; therefore, B.M.
students who choose to take literature rather than communication as
part of the Dimensions of the Humanities will be required to present
either a lecture-recital or a composition lecture-presentation during their
senior year. These students will receive instruction in research and
presentation in classes and private lessons prior to the public
presentation. Additionally, all B.M. students are required to take 1 hour
of vocal instruction and/or 1 credit of choral conducting in which they
are taught proper use of the voice.)
Foreign Language ............................................................................................. 0-6
The student must complete 6 credits of foreign language study in the
same language, or students may test out of the 102 level. If a student
tests out of the foreign language requirement, the student must take 6
credits of electives in any field. Music Ed majors do not need to take
electives if they test out of foreign language.
II. Dimensions of Faith........................................................................................................6
RELI 101 Old Testament
RELI 102 New Testament
III. Dimensions of Heritage (9 ED, 9 MIBS**,12 Others +)
Western Heritage..................................................................................................6
HIST 101 Western Civilization I
HIST 102 Western Civilization II
Global Heritage – Choose one of the following: ..................................3
SSCI 205 Global Understanding
RELI 245 Religion and Culture in a Global Perspective
AND/OR
American Heritage – Choose one of the following: ............................................3
ECON 203 Economics and the Free Market System
POLS 202 The American Political Process
HIST 245 The American Century
COMM 230 Technology and American Society
**Music Ed and Music Bus. majors are to take 2 Western Heritage and 1 American Heritage
+All other B.M. majors must take 2 Western Heritage, 1 Global Heritage, and 1 American
Heritage
Academic Regulations/84
IV. Dimensions of Self (8 semester hours)
UNIV 101 First-Year Experience.................................................................1
HLED 221 Dimensions of Personal Health .................................................3
Physical Dimensions of Wellness – Choose one course from one of the
following areas:...........................................................................................1
(Fitness) PHED 140-145
(Lifetime Sports) PHED 150-159
(Outdoor Adventure) PHED 160-165
MUSC 226 Music Literature ...........................................................................................3
V. Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry (4-8* semester hours)
BIOL 101 or 104 (Life Science)....................................................................4
CHEM 103 or 111; or GEOL 101, 102, or 105..............................................4
or PHYS 103, 104, or 201 (Physical Science)
*Music Ed Students required to take 8 credits; all other music majors
required to take one lab science, 4 credits
VI. Dimensions of Quantitative Analysis (3-4 semester hours).................................3-4
Choose one of the following: MATH 105, 110, 150 or 151
VII. Dimensions ...........................................................................................................3
DIMS 111-116, six semesters
NOTES
1. Students will complete the English requirement for graduation by
registering for and earning appropriate grades in CRLT 101 (when
required), ENGL 191 (when required), ENGL 101 and ENGL 102,
beginning with their first semester of enrollment and continuing
uninterrupted until the requirements for graduation are satisfied.
Permission to withdraw from ENGL 101 or ENGL 102 will be granted
only under extraordinary circumstances. The permission of the Chair of
the English Department and the Associate Provost for Arts and Sciences
is required.
2. The following guidelines apply to the foreign language requirement:
a. Students must complete a foreign language through the first
semester of the intermediate level (201). Students may select either
from those offered by Gardner-Webb or any approved foreign
language courses transferred from an accredited institution of
higher learning. American Sign Language will be deemed a foreign
language for purposes of this requirement.
b. International students whose native language is a language other
than English will not be required to complete additional courses in
a foreign language other than English.
c. Students may receive elective credit in a foreign language.
Students receiving such credits will complete their foreign
language requirements at or above the intermediate level. Students
who place into a course above the elementary level of a particular
language (201 or higher) will receive six semester hours of elective
credit if they choose to complete six hours in that language. This
elective credit does not apply for the minor or major.
d. Deaf students who score intermediate level or higher on the SCPIASL will not be required to take additional foreign language courses.
Gardner-Webb University/85
3. Computer literacy is a graduation requirement which may be met in one
of three ways: by completing Gardner-Webb’s General Studies Curriculum
(both English courses and the mathematics course); by completing a course,
or courses, with a computer component (CSCI 160; PSYC 396; EDUC 301);
or by making a passing score on a special test for computer literacy. See
the Registrar for details.
4. Each student is required to enroll for a Dimensions course each semester
of full-time enrollment at Gardner-Webb or until a minimum of three
semester hours of credit (six semesters) has been earned. Students who
meet requirements earn 1/2 semester hour of credit each term. Part-time
students must earn 1/2 semester hour of credit for every 15 hours of
credit earned at Gardner-Webb or until a minimum of three semester
hours of credit (six semesters) has been earned. (The required
Dimensions courses are numbered 111-116; elective Dimensions courses
are numbered 117-118.) Students receiving an F in Dimensions must
repeat the course the following semester. Failure to receive a passing
grade during the semester that the course is repeated will result in the
student being placed on Dimensions probation and the student will
remain on probation until the Dimensions requirement has been fulfilled.
Students who fail Dimensions three semesters will be suspended from
the University. In order to be reinstated, the student must register for and
satisfactorily complete a Dimensions experience during any academic term.
5. The last academic year (32 semester hours or more) must be taken at
Gardner-Webb.
6. Participation in commencement exercise is required. If a student is unable
to participate in the Graduation Ceremony upon completion of degree
requirements, the student must notify the Provost’s Office.
7. Students must demonstrate competence in English, Reading and
Mathematics prior to beginning General Studies courses in those areas.
8. A minimum grade point average of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale based on the
University grading system on all work attempted at Gardner-Webb is
required for graduation.
9. The student must have a minimum grade of “C’’ (2.00) on each course
counted toward the major. A transfer student must complete at least one half
of the major at Gardner-Webb.
10. The student must also have an overall “C” (2.00) average on all work counted
toward any minor. A transfer student must complete at least nine hours of
the required minor at Gardner-Webb.
11. Any student transferring from a two-year college must complete a
minimum of 64 semester hours of subsequent study in senior colleges or
universities.
12. The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. Students who began at a
North Carolina community college in the 1997 Fall semester or later can meet
Gardner-Webb’s general core requirements by completing the General
Education Core and earning an Associate in Arts or an Associate in Science
degree. However, courses in both Old and New Testament (RELI 101/304 and
102/305) must be taken as a part of the General Education Core or as
electives at the community college, or the student will be required to take
these courses at Gardner-Webb University. Students who graduated with an
Academic Regulations/86
Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree from a North Carolina
community college prior to 1997 or students who have out-of-state
coursework accepted by a North Carolina community college will have
their coursework examined on a course-by-course basis.
The General Education Core is a 44 semester hour core including the
following areas (Grade of “C” (2.00) or better is required):
English Composition (6 semester hours)
Humanities/Fine Arts (12 semester hours)
Four courses from at least three of the following discipline areas are
required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary
humanities, literature, philosophy, and religion. At least one course must
be a literature course.
Social/Behavioral Sciences (12 semester hours)
Four courses from at least three of the following discipline areas are
required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science,
psychology, and sociology. At least one course must be a history course.
Natural Sciences (8 semester hours)
Associate in Arts: Two courses, including accompanying laboratory
work, from the biological and physical science disciplines are
required.
Associate in Science: A two-course sequence in general biology,
general chemistry, or general physics is required.
Mathematics (6 semester hours)
Associate in Arts: At least one course in introductory mathematics is
required; the other course may be selected from among other
quantitative subjects, such as computer science and statistics.
Associate in Science: At least one course in mathematics at the
precalculus algebra level or above is required; the other course may
be a higher level mathematics course or may be selected from among
other quantitative subjects, such as computer science and statistics.
Other Required Hours (20-21 semester hours)
Courses in health, physical education, college orientation, and/or study
skills may be included as other required hours. Work experience may be
included up to 1 semester hour for career exploration.
Associate in Arts: A minimum of 20 semester hours of college transfer
general education, elective, and/or pre-major courses is required.
Associate in Science: A minimum of 14 semester hours of college
transfer courses in mathematics, natural sciences, computer science,
and/or other pre-major courses is required. The remaining hours may
be selected from elective transfer courses.
Total Semester Hours Credit in Program: 64-65
Gardner-Webb University/87
All of the aforementioned stipulations must be completed PRIOR to entering
Gardner-Webb University.
Participation in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement does not preclude
or negate minimum requirements specified by individual departments at
Gardner-Webb University. Transfer students can review the departmental
requirements under Additional General Education Courses Required by Major
Department for specific courses required in the major.
12. The student is responsible for making official application for graduation
to the Registrar by the deadlines published on the Registrar’s website
www.gardner-webb.edu/registrar.
13. Students will complete the English requirement for graduation by
registering for, and earning appropriate grades in, CRLT 101 (when
required), ENGL 191 (when required), ENGL 101 and 102, beginning
with their first semester of enrollment and continuing uninterrupted until
the requirements for graduation are satisfied. English 101 is prerequisite to
English 102; English 101 and 102 are prerequisite to all other English
courses except English 204. Permission to withdraw from English 101 or
English 102 will be granted only under extraordinary circumstances. The
permission of the Chair of the English department and the Associate
Provost are required.
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
The student bears the final responsibility for the selection of a program of
study and adherence to all published regulations and requirements of the
University, including the preceding requirements for graduation.
ASSOCIATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Gardner-Webb University offers an associate degree program in Nursing which
requires a minimum of 72 semester hours for graduation. One semester hour of
Dimensions for Nursing majors is required. No student may graduate with an
associate degree with less than 64 semester hours, inclusive of specified
Dimensions credit.
The student is required to take the final 24 semester hours at Gardner-Webb.
The student must have a minimum grade of “C’’ (2.00) on each course
required in the major field. In Nursing, the student must have a minimum grade
of “C” (2.00) on each nursing course and each science course.
A minimum grade point average of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale is required for
graduation on all work attempted at Gardner-Webb.
The student bears the final responsibility for fulfilling all the requirements for
the chosen degree program. It is the student’s responsibility to be familiar with
the preceding requirements for graduation.
THE MAJOR
Each candidate for a baccalaureate degree must choose a major field of
concentration. This selection must be made before entering the junior year.
However, students in education, music, natural sciences, nursing, and world
languages should begin their major in their freshman year. Requirements for each
major are listed with the courses of instruction.
Registration of the intention to major with a particular department is required.
A request is submitted to the chair of the department. The academic advising of
all declared majors within a department is the responsibility of the chair. This
Academic Regulations/88
responsibility may be delegated to any faculty member within that department
for that period of time which best serves the interest of the student.
A student may elect to complete more than one major. To do this the
student meets the requirements of a primary major plus 30 semester hours or
more in a secondary field as approved by the departmental chair of the
secondary major. No course may be counted in both majors. A student
graduating with a double major receives only one degree, that of the primary
major. However, the transcript denotes both primary and secondary majors. A
transfer student must complete at least one half of the major(s) at GardnerWebb.
THE MINOR
Most academic programs do not require a minor. However, a student in a
program not requiring a minor may optionally pursue any minor offered by the
University. A minimum of nine hours of the minor must be taken from
Gardner-Webb University. Requirements for this minor may be fulfilled by
satisfactory completion of an interdisciplinary minor of eighteen hours with at
least nine hours in one discipline, selected by the student or recommended by
the major department. Credit hours that are used by a student to fulfill the
requirements of the university core curriculum cannot be used by that same
student to fulfill the requirements of the interdisciplinary student minor unless
approved by the Curriculum Committee. Advisement regarding minor
requirements will be the responsibility of the department of the student’s
major. Consultation with the chair of the minor is encouraged. Any deviation
from catalog course requirements of a minor must be approved in advance by
the chair or dean of the minor department or school and filed with the Degree
Evaluator.
The minor field generally consists of 15-18 semester hours of academic
work. A transfer student must complete at least nine hours of the minor at
Gardner-Webb University. Requirements for each minor field are listed with
the courses of instruction.
The following minor fields are available: American Sign Language, Art
History, Biblical Studies, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Christian
History, Classical Languages, Communications Studies, Computer Science,
Criminal Justice, Discipleship Studies, Education Studies, English,
Environmental Science, French, General Science, Global Studies, Graphic
Design, Health Science, History, Journalism, Mathematics, Military Science,
Mission Studies, Music, Philosophy and Ethics, Photography, Physical Science,
Political Science, Professional Education (available for areas of licensure only),
Psychology, Public Relations, Recreation, Sign Language Interpreting, Social
Sciences, Sociology, Spanish, Sport Management, Studio Art, Theater Arts,
Video & Film, Wellness Promotion, World Languages, World Religions,
Writing, and Youth Discipleship Studies.
LEARNING ENRICHMENT AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
The Learning Enrichment and Assistance Program (LEAP) provides peer
tutoring for students in subject areas with specific attention to courses found
in the General Studies section of the curriculum. Students can make a peer
tutoring appointment using an online form found through Student Services in
MyWebb. Students may contact the Director of LEAP to determine if other
course assistance is available by calling (704)406-4390. In addition, LEAP
sponsors learning enrichment opportunities for students throughout the year.
Gardner-Webb University/89
DIMENSIONS
Dimensions is a series of programs offered for credit each fall and spring
semester on a pass/fail basis. Dimensions supports the purpose of Gardner-Webb
University, which includes a commitment to the Christian faith, the pursuit of
intellectual and cultural fulfillment, and the fostering of a sense of community.
Consequently, the three primary objectives of the Dimensions program are:
1. To provide opportunities for spiritual growth through worship
experiences and programs of a religious nature, all in the context of
Gardner-Webb University's commitment to the Christian faith.
2. To enhance the academic program of the University by providing
opportunities for intellectual and cultural enrichment, to include
programs of an academic nature as well as dramatic, musical, and other
cultural events.
3. To promote a sense of community by regularly bringing together students,
faculty, staff, and friends of the University. While all Dimensions events
help to achieve this objective, the Fall University Convocation at the
beginning of each academic year and the Annual Academic Awards Day in
the Spring are examples of bringing the University family together for
highly meaningful events.
Students who meet requirements earn 1/2 semester hour credit each term.
Students will be administratively enrolled for the appropriate Dimensions section
during each semester of full-time enrollment until a minimum of three semester
hours of credit (six semesters) has been earned. Part-time students must earn .5
semester hour of credit for every 15 hours of credit earned at Gardner-Webb or
until a minimum of three semester hours of credit has been earned. Transfer
students must earn .5 semester hours of credit for every semester of enrollment
until a minimum of three semester hours of credit (six semesters) has been
earned or until they graduate, whichever comes first. Students receiving an "F" in
Dimensions are required to repeat the course the following semester. Students
who fail a second time will be placed on Dimensions probation and will remain
on probation until the Dimensions requirement has been fulfilled. Three grades
of "F" in Dimensions will result in suspension from the University. Any
exemption from Dimensions is determined by the Associate Provost for Arts and
Sciences.
GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS, REGISTRATION AND COURSES
CLASSIFICATION
Classifications are made at the beginning of the academic year in August or at
the time of the student’s enrollment.
A sophomore must have removed all entrance conditions and have completed
30 semester hours of work toward a degree.
A junior must have completed 60 semester hours, and a senior, 90 semester
hours of credit toward a degree.
Special students include all persons enrolled at the University who are not
seeking a degree.
COURSE LOAD
The unit of credit at Gardner-Webb University is the semester hour. A student
is considered full-time if enrolled for 12 semester hours or more. The normal load
is 16 semester hours. However, any student in good standing may take up to a
maximum of 21.5 semester hours (the approval of Educational Policies and
Standards Committee is required to exceed 21.5 semester hours). There are
additional tuition charges when exceeding more than 18 hours per semester.
Academic Regulations/90
No boarding student may be enrolled for less than 12 semester hours at any
time during a semester unless given prior permission by the Office of Residence
Life.
The normal load for each term of summer school is 6 semester hours or a 4semester-hour laboratory course plus one 3-semester-hour course.
COURSE REGISTRATION
Students register for classes online through MyWebb according to the posted
schedule on the official Academic Calendar. Before registration, each student
should consult with his or her academic adviser on course selection, General
Studies requirements, major requirements and other degree requirements.
However, it is the responsibility of the student, not the academic adviser, to
ensure that all University graduation requirements are met. A student will not
receive credit for any course for which registration has not been completed.
AUDITING COURSES
With the approval of the course professor, any Gardner-Webb University
student may audit a course for a nominal charge. An Audit form must be
completed and filed with the Registrar’s Office prior to the end of the Drop/Add
period (first week of classes). Area residents not desiring credit may audit a
course for a nominal charge provided an application is filed with the Admissions
Office.
CHANGES IN CLASS AND SCHEDULE
The University reserves the right to cancel or discontinue any course because
of insufficient enrollment or for other valid reasons. In order to assure quality
instruction, the University reserves the right to close registration when the
maximum enrollment has been reached, or to make changes in the schedule
and/or faculty when necessary.
ADDING, DROPPING, AND WITHDRAWING FROM COURSES
The student’s schedule may be adjusted by adding and dropping courses with
the approval of the academic adviser one week from the beginning of the fall or
spring semester. Check the Academic Calendar for dates. Courses that are
officially dropped by a student do not appear on a student’s transcript. If a
student does not officially drop a class but never attends the class, a grade of @W
will appear on the student’s transcript.
After the first week of classes, any official withdrawal from a class must be
done by the student through the Registrar’s office. When a student officially
withdraws from a course, a grade of “W’’ (withdrew) is recorded during the first
four weeks of the fall and spring semesters, or during the first week of a summer
term. After this period a “WP” (withdrew passing) or “WF” (withdrew failing) is
assigned by the professor based upon an assessment of the student’s work to
date in the course. No hours attempted are recorded for “W’’ and “WP” grades.
Check the Academic Calendar for dates.
The last day for withdrawing from an individual course is four weeks after
mid-term or a date not to exceed 75% of the course. Check the Academic
Calendar for dates. After this date only a complete withdrawal from school will
be processed.
Gardner-Webb University/91
INDEPENDENT STUDY
The term “independent study” is reserved for those courses specifically
designed as guided reading and/or for student-initiated research that includes a
written project/paper.
Independent study requires junior, senior, or graduate standing and the
approval of the following: the professor offering the study, the student’s major
department/school, and the appropriate Associate Provost. The student’s
proposal must be submitted and approved by the end of the semester
preceding the study. An independent study will not be used to repeat a
course and is restricted to a degree or licensure-seeking student in a GardnerWebb University program of study. No more than six hours credit in
independent study may be applied toward graduation requirements. No more
than three hours of independent study can be taken in any one semester.
COURSE BY ARRANGEMENT
A course by arrangement is restricted to a degree or licensure-seeking
student in a Gardner-Webb University program of student (i.e., is not a
transient student) and a catalog course which is not offered by the University
during a given semester or which cannot be scheduled by the student. The
course may be offered to the student on a one-to-one basis, provided the
option is limited to instances of extenuating circumstances.
Course by Arrangement requires junior, senior, or graduate standing and the
approval of the following: the professor offering the study, the student’s major
department/school, and the appropriate Associate Provost. A Course by
Arrangement must be scheduled before the end of the drop/add period of
each semester. It will not be used to repeat a course. No more than two
Courses by Arrangement may be applied toward graduation requirements. No
more than one Course by Arrangement can be taken in any one semester.
REPEAT COURSES
Only courses with a grade of “C-”, “D+”, “D”, “D-”, “F”, “@F” or “WF” may
be repeated. A student may repeat up to six courses in which a “C-”, “D+”,
“D”, “F”, “D-”, “@F”, or “WF” were earned to improve grades for GPA
purposes. Beginning with the seventh, all repeat attempts will be counted in
the GPA. Multiple repeats of the same course will count toward the six
allowed. In the repeat of the first six courses, only the higher grade will be
counted in computing the Gardner-Webb overall grade point average,
although the lower grade remains on the official transcript. Transfer credit
may not be used to repeat a “C-”, “D+”, “D”, “D-”, “F”, “@F” or “WF” earned in
a Gardner-Webb course. University policy on repeating courses is not
applicable in a situation where an “Fx” was assigned because of academic
dishonesty. An “Fx” that is assigned as a penalty for academic dishonesty will
remain a part of the academic transcript. It cannot be removed by a course
repeat and will be factored into the grade point average.
Academic Regulations/92
ATTENDANCE
CLASS ATTENDANCE
Regular class attendance is an important student obligation. Students are
responsible for all course work conducted in class meetings whether or not
they are present. Because learning is a communal experience, the physical
presence of students is required in class for at least 75% of class meetings.
Attendance is counted from the first scheduled class meeting. Failure to meet
this attendance requirement will result in loss of credit for the course and a
grade of “@F” will be recorded on a student’s transcript. Furthermore, it is the
prerogative of the professor to set a more stringent class attendance policy.
During the first week of the semester the professor will clearly state, in
writing, the attendance policy which will govern the class. Students are
responsible for knowing the number of absences that they accumulate.
Absence from class does not excuse the student from responsibility for class
work. Planned class absences for foreseeable personal circumstances or official
University business must be negotiated with the professor prior to the
absence.
ABSENCE FROM TESTS AND EXAMINATIONS
Students who miss scheduled tests and examinations without excusable
reasons may not make up such assignments. Authorization to make up tests
missed for excusable reasons is obtained from the course professor.
HONOR CODE
Gardner-Webb University students are pledged to uphold honesty, integrity,
and truthfulness in all realms of University life. The Student Government
Association requires all students to sign the Honor Code Form as they begin
their stay at Gardner-Webb. This signed form is kept in the Office of the Vice
President and Dean of Student Development.
POLICY OF ACADEMIC HONESTY
Preamble
As a community of scholars founded upon the ideals of Christianity,
Gardner-Webb University expects its students to develop and display a strong
sense of academic integrity. As in any community, this institution must be
governed by regulations; and like the laws of any community, these rules
function best when they are fully understood, accepted and cherished by each
and every individual member of the community. Therefore, all students and
faculty members are expected to be familiar with and to base their actions
upon the following statements regarding academic honesty.
Student Responsibilities
1. Students should recognize that the regulations governing academic
integrity exist for the protection of the honest and that dishonesty in an
academic setting must not be tolerated, much less condoned.
2. Students are responsible for their own work. Any assignment turned in
by a student is assumed to be the work of the student whose name
appears on the assignment.
3. Students are ultimately responsible for understanding a faculty member’s
instructions for any assignment. If instructions are not clear, students
must seek clarification from the instructor.
4. Students must understand the definitions of plagiarism and academic
dishonesty.
5. Students should familiarize themselves with the proper use of citations
and quotations in order to avoid accidentally passing someone else’s
work off as their own.
Gardner-Webb University/93
6. Students are expected to report incidence of academic dishonesty to
their professor.
7. Any student who threatens or coerces another student or faculty member
for reporting an Honor Code violation will face disciplinary action, with
expulsion being the recommended punishment.
Repeating Courses in which Academic Dishonesty Occurred:
Students are allowed to retake courses that they fail due to academic
dishonesty; however, the course hours attempted will continue to be
calculated in figuring the student’s grade point average.
* For m ore inform ation on the Academ ic H onesty Policy and Procedures,see the
currentStudentH andbook.
GRADES AND REPORTS
GRADING SYSTEM AND QUALITY POINTS
Graduation is dependent upon quality as well as upon quantity of work
done.
A student earns quality points as well as semester hours credit if the level of
performance does not fall below that of “D-”.
Letter grades are assigned. They are interpreted in the table below, with the
quality points for each hour of credit shown at the right.
Hours Attempted
Grades
Per Credit Hour
A+
1
A
1
A1
B+
1
B
1
B1
C+
1
C
1
C1
D+
1
D
1
D1
F
1
FD - Dimensions Failure
0
Fx - Failure for Academic Dishonesty 1
P - Passing
0
I - Incomplete
0
IN
0
NG - No grade was reported
0
by course professor
W - Withdrew without penalty
0
WP - Withdrew passing
0
WF - Withdrew failing
1
@W - Administrative withdrawal
0
@F - Administrative failure
1
TR - Transfer Credit
Hours Credit Only
CR - Credit
Hours Credit Only
AU - Auditor
0
**Repeated** - Repeated Course
0
E - Course Repeated
0
I - Later or Higher Attempt
0
Computed According to Grade
Quality Points
Per Credit Hour
4.00
4.00
3.67
3.33
3.00
2.67
2.33
2.00
1.67
1.33
1.00
0.67
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Hours Credit Only
Hours Credit Only
0
0
0
Multiplied by
quality points
for final grade
Academic Regulations/94
An “I” grade may be assigned only when a small amount of coursework (i.e.,
test, project, research paper, or final exam) is not complete. The reason for the
incomplete work must be of a serious nature and must be beyond the student’s
control. The assigning of an “I” grade must be accompanied by the completion
of an “I” grade contract, with one copy given to the student, one kept on file
by the professor, and one submitted to the Office of Associate Provosts within
seven days after grades are submitted. The final date for completion of
coursework and removal of an “I” grade can be no later than 90 days after the
last day of the term in which the “I” grade was assigned; otherwise the
incomplete grade will be changed to a grade of “F” by the Registrar’s Office.
An “IN” is assigned to a student involved in an internship or other multisemester course structures in which the final assessment cannot be
determined by the end point of the registered term. The student has a
maximum deadline of the end of the following semester to complete the
course work (this may vary by program in the graduate schools); otherwise the
incomplete grade will be automatically changed to an “F” by the Registrar’s
Office. While in effect, the “IN” will have no negative bearing on the student’s
semester and cumulative grade-point average.
A “W” will be assigned when a student withdraws from a course during the
first four weeks of the semester. After the first four weeks of the semester, a
“WF” or “WP” is assigned by the professor based upon the professor’s
assessment of the student’s work at the date of withdrawal.
A student who withdraws from a course after the drop/add period must
withdraw directly through the Registrar’s Office. The student is responsible for
carrying out the withdrawal and must secure written documentation of the
withdrawal. A student who calls the Registrar’s Office to withdraw from a
course should request that documentation be sent to him or her by hard copy
in the mail or by email.
The last date for withdrawing from an individual course will be four weeks
after mid-term or a date not to exceed 75% of the course (including summer
school). The only courses which will be dropped after this date are those
which a student drops when withdrawing from school.
Once a grade has been submitted to the Registrar, it cannot be changed
except in the event of a clerical error or an error in calculation, or as a result of
an academic appeal (see the section below titled “Academic Appeals”). Unless
a grade of “I” or “IN” has been assigned, a professor cannot accept coursework
from a student after a grade has been submitted.
Under no circumstances will a grade be changed, after having been reported
to the Registrar, without the approval of the appropriate Associate Provost.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE
The student’s general academic performance is indicated by both a semester
and a cumulative grade-point average. This figure is determined by dividing
attempted semester hours into earned quality points. Both values are
calculated based only on academic work completed at Gardner-Webb.
GRADE REPORTS
Each student receives a course grade at the end of the semester. Final grades
can be accessed by going online at mywebb.gardner-webb.edu.
Gardner-Webb University/95
HONORS AND AWARDS
SEMESTER HONORS
Two lists of honor students are posted each semester:
1. Dean’s List: Students enrolled for a minimum of 12 hours and
fewer than 15 must have a 4.0 Gardner-Webb Grade Point
Average, and students taking 15 hours or more must have a 3.7 or
better with no grade below “C” (2.00).
2. Honor Roll: Students enrolled for a minimum of 12 hours and
fewer than 15 must have a 3.5 Gardner-Webb Grade Point Average
with no grade below “C” (2.00), and students taking 15 or more
hours must have a 3.2 but less than a 3.7 with no grade below
“C” (2.00).
ANNUAL AWARDS
Annual awards are made to outstanding students in many individual
disciplines, and the student with the highest academic record in each of the
four classes receives an award. Senior awards are made at the Spring
Commencement. Other class awards are made at Fall Convocation.
The Most Outstanding Male Graduate Award is endowed by Dr. John
Roberts of Greenville, SC. Dr. Roberts received the award when he graduated
from Gardner-Webb in 1949. The award perpetuates the memory of Professor
J. D. Huggins, the first principal of the Boiling Springs High School. The award
recognizes scholarship and participation in University activities.
The Most Outstanding Female Graduate Award is provided by Mrs. Bonnie R.
Price in memory of Miss Etta L. Curtis. The award recognizes scholarship and
participation in University activities.
The winners of these awards are selected by the faculty.
GRADUATION HONORS
To be considered for baccalaureate honors, a graduating student must
complete a minimum of 64 hours at Gardner-Webb University, and his or her
GPA for that work taken here must merit honors. Those in the upper 12% of
the graduating class will receive honors. One-sixth of those so designated will
graduate summa cum laude; one-third will graduate magna cum laude; and onehalf will graduate cum laude. This standard will be applied to graduates in each
of the following categories: Arts/Sciences, Elementary Education, Day Business,
GOAL Arts/Sciences, and GOAL Business. This provision has applied since the
Spring 1994.
Associate degree students whose overall GPA and Gardner-Webb GPA are
3.2 or more are designated as Honor Students.
HONORS PROGRAM
Gardner-Webb University provides a comprehensive Honors Program to
nurture academically qualified students in all majors. Emphasis is placed on
Honors classes, leadership through their academic and co-curricular
accomplishments, preparation for graduate school, and special activities.
Students who participate in the Honors Program, complete a minimum of 24
semester hours of Honors courses, and receive the recommendation of the
Honors faculty will receive “Honors Program” recognition during
commencement exercises.
STUDENT ACCESS TO EDUCATIONAL RECORDS
Gardner-Webb University complies with the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. This Act is designed to protect the privacy of
educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review
their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of
inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students
Academic Regulations/96
also have the right to file complaints with The Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act Office concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with
the Act.
Institutional policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the
institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy
can be found in the Office of the Registrar. That office also maintains a
Directory of Records which lists all student educational records maintained by
this institution. Information known as Directory Information will be published
unless the student specifically requests the Registrar’s Office withhold this
information. Directory Information is defined as the following: student name,
local and permanent addresses, telephone numbers, date of birth, major(s),
dates of attendance, previous educational institutions attended, and degree and
awards received.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be
referred to the Office of the Registrar. FERPA Consent Form to Release Student
Information is available on the Registrar’s website.
Students may grant permission to University personnel to release to
specified individuals information pertaining to Academic Records, Financial
Aid, and Billing by completing the FERPA Release Form located on their
Personal Information menu on MyWebb. Using this form, students are able to
specify up to three individuals to whom information may be released.
TRANSCRIPTS OF STUDENT RECORDS
Requests for copies of a student’s record should be made to the Office of the
Registrar. All transcripts will reflect the student’s complete academic record.
No transcripts will be issued without the written authorization of the student.
No transcript will be issued for a student who has a financial obligation to the
University.
TRANSIENT CREDIT
Students who wish to insure that courses taken at other accredited
institutions during a regular term or summer session are applicable for
Gardner-Webb credit must complete a “Request to Recognize Transient Credit”
form. This form must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office no later than the
last class day of the semester prior to the requested semester of study.
Transient credit requests will be considered only for students who are in
good academic standing at the University, and thus may not be used to
improve academic standing at Gardner-Webb.
The following restrictions apply to the approval of transient credit.
Transient credit
1. will be awarded only for courses that are applicable toward graduation at
the host institution,
2. will be awarded only for courses in which a grade of “C” (2.0) or better is
earned,
3. will not be awarded for courses for which a student has previously earned
credit at Gardner-Webb,
4. may not be used to repeat a “C-”, “D+”, “D”, “D-”, or “F” earned in a
Gardner-Webb course.
5. Payment of processing fee.
Transient credit requests will not automatically be approved for students in
their final year of study at Gardner-Webb (the final 24 hours for a student
enrolled in the AS Degree in Nursing Program and the final 32 hours for a
student seeking either the BS or BA degree). Students requesting transient
Gardner-Webb University/97
credit during this time frame must have the approval of the appropriate
Associate Provost. In addition to the “Request to Recognize Transient Credit”
form, the “Request to Waive 24/32 Hour Rule” form must be submitted to the
Registrar’s Office at least two weeks before the last class day of the semester
prior to the requested semester of study.
In order to insure that transient credit is properly documented, the student
must request that an official transcript from the host institution be forwarded
to the Gardner-Webb Registrar. For a student taking transient credit during the
final semester of study, all such transcripts must be on file in the Registrar’s
Office prior to that semester’s commencement ceremonies. Transient
transcripts not received by this deadline will cause the student’s graduation
date to be delayed.
CHALLENGE EXAMINATION POLICY
A challenge examination is an in-depth and comprehensive assessment of
the student’s ability to answer questions on course content. An acceptable
grade on the examination will permit the student to receive credit for the
course.
To request the opportunity to take a challenge examination, the student
must present, in writing, justification for such an examination to the dean of
the school or chair of the department in which the course is offered.
The dean of the school or chair of the department will appoint a committee
to review the request. If the request is approved, the dean or chair will
appoint the examining professor or committee and inform the business office
that, prior to taking the exam, the student should be charged an examination
fee of $100.00 per credit hour.
Academic Regulations/98
If the examination results are acceptable, the examining professor or
committee will report the results, via the Certification of Successful Challenge
Examination form, to the dean of the school or chair of the department. That
dean or chair will send a copy of the form to the Registrar, who will credit the
student with the appropriate number of hours for the course. No grade will be
assigned or averaged into the quality point average.
ACADEMIC APPEALS
A student who has a question about an academic decision should consult the
University official responsible for the decision. If the matter is not resolved to
the student's satisfaction, the student may appeal in the following order to the
next highest level in the appropriate chain of responsibility: professor,
department chair or dean, Associate Provost, and the Educational Policies and
Standards Committee (EPSC). Decisions of the EPSC are final and cannot be
further appealed. Except for grade appeals, the student must make all appeals
in writing on his or her own behalf no more than eighteen months after the
date of the decision being appealed.
A student who has a question about a grade should consult the professor as
soon as possible. A student who believes a grade to be inaccurate or unfair
may appeal to the professor, department chair or dean, Associate Provost, and
the Educational Policies and Standards Committee, in that order. Decisions of
the EPSC are final and cannot be further appealed. The last date to initiate a
grade appeal is the end of the next fall or spring semester. Email notification of
approved and processed grade changes will be sent to the student, the
professor, and the advisor.
Academic Appeal Filing Forms may be obtained from the Office of Associate
Provosts (102 Webb Hall, Phone 704-406-3522). The appeal document should
include the student's local or permanent address, University email address,
student ID number, and a current phone number where he or she may be
reached. All appeals should be signed and dated. Appeals made on behalf of
the student by another party (e.g. faculty, official of the institution, another
student, or a parent) will be dismissed. Supporting documentation submitted
by a member of the faculty or administration to augment or clarify the
student's appeal is welcome and will be given full consideration.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND WITHDRAWAL
RETAINING MEMBERSHIP IN THE STUDENT BODY
Students once admitted to the University who meet all requirements for
continuing enrollment are considered members of the student body. However,
it is the policy of the University to require each registered student to annually
reaffirm the desire and intention to retain membership in the student body.
Completing or updating a Housing or Commuter Contract is required during
the Spring Semester. Advance deposits are required each semester as indicated
in the financial section.
RETENTION STANDARDS
Standards for acceptable academic progress at Gardner-Webb University are
set to assist students in assessing the quality of their performance. Academic
probation and suspension are used to alert students to potentially serious
academic difficulty in their progress toward degrees.
Students are placed on academic probation as a warning that their academic
performance is below the minimum level expected of students in their class. If
the student’s academic performance fails to reach the minimum standard for
continued enrollment in the ensuing semester, he/she will be suspended from
the University.
Gardner-Webb University/99
Students will be placed on probation when their Gardner-Webb grade point
average falls below the minimum standards listed below:
Freshmen 0 to 29 hours 1.5
Sophomores 30 to 59 hours 1.7
Juniors 60 to 89 hours 1.9
Seniors 90 hours and above 2.0
A student placed on academic probation remains on probation for the entire
semester and may not register for more than 15.5 credit hours during any
semester while on probation.
In order to be removed from academic probation, the student’s GardnerWebb GPA must return to the appropriate minimum standard. If the student
fails to bring the grade point average to a satisfactory level during the
probationary semester but the semester’s GPA is at or above the minimum
required, probation will be continued for another semester.
If at any time while on academic probation the student’s semester GPA and
Gardner-Webb GPA fall below the minimum requirement, the student will be
suspended for one semester. After the one-semester suspension a student
desiring readmission must submit a formal application for readmission. If
approved, the student may register for classes and will be automatically placed
on academic probation.
Should a second or third academic suspension occur (even if the first or
second suspension is waived on appeal), the student must remain out for at
least two semesters. After a two-semester suspension from the University, the
student must submit a formal application for readmission. If approved, the
student may register for classes and will be automatically placed on academic
probation.
Readmission requires the approval of the Readmission Committee. Students
suspended from the University are not automatically reinstated upon
reapplication. A student who wishes to appeal the denial of reinstatement may
do so through a written appeal to the Provost. A student who wishes to appeal
being placed on academic probation or suspension may do so through the
Office of the Provost. Suspensions that are waived on appeal are still noted on
the student’s academic transcript.
All full-time students are eligible to represent the institution in all extracurricular activities, unless prohibited for disciplinary reasons. Students on
either academic or disciplinary suspension are not allowed to participate in
dramatic, musical, athletic, or other practice sessions since they are not to
represent the University or participate in the public performance of such
events.
Summer study at Gardner-Webb University may be used to improve one’s
academic standing. A student’s academic standing can be affected as a result of
summer school enrollment. Students who are on academic probation or
suspension may not use study at another institution to improve their GardnerWebb academic standing.
See page 40 - “Readmission of Former Students” – for policies concerning
students seeking readmission after leaving Gardner-Webb University while on
probation or suspension.
Academic Regulations/100
WITHDRAWAL, SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION
Voluntary termination of enrollment during the course of a semester or
summer term is defined as withdrawal.
Dismissal from school for a specified period of time is defined as suspension,
and expulsion is dismissal for an unspecified period of time. The University
reserves the right to suspend or expel any student or students when it believes
that such action is in the best interest of the institution and/or the student(s).
This action will take place only after careful consideration and consultation
with the student or students in question and all other parties with information
pertinent to the matter at hand.
Any student leaving school before the end of a term is required to secure a
withdrawal form from the Registrar’s Office, complete it in full, and return it to
the Registrar’s Office. Honorable withdrawal is granted only if these
procedures are followed. Failure to complete this procedure will result in grades
of “@F” on all coursework.
MEDICAL WITHDRAWAL
Any registered student who experiences medical trauma or a chronic illness
that may prevent completing the semester may apply for a medical withdrawal
from the University. A medical withdrawal request must be filed with the
Registrar’s Office prior to the start of final exams and must include
documentation submitted from a physician or psychologist trained in the
diagnosis of the medical condition.
A qualifying medical condition, as determined by the physician or
psychologist, must prevent the student from participating in all classes
remaining during the current semester. A medical withdrawal is a complete
withdrawal from the University. The supporting documentation from a
physician or psychologist accompanying the medical withdrawal request must
be submitted on official letterhead from the physician or psychologist and
must be addressed to the Gardner-Webb University Registrar. The medical
documentation must also include the physician or psychologist’s name, title,
professional credentials, license and certification number, and should address
the following:
1. Specific diagnoses and findings;
2. Date the examination, assessment, or evaluation was performed;
3. In the event that the medical withdrawal is the result of an injury
or accident, the date the injury or accident occurred;
4. In the event the medical withdrawal is due to chronic illness, the
date the illness made it necessary to stop attending classes.
A student will be notified of the approval decision following a review of the
medical documentation. If the request is approved, the student will receive a
final grade of “W” for each class (except in instances of Academic Dishonesty).
Upon medical withdrawal from the University, a student must apply for
readmission to the University to continue studies. The student must provide
documentation from the same physician or psychologist, when possible,
stating the student is able to continue academic studies at the University. This
documentation should follow the same format as above.
Gardner-Webb University/101
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
The departments of instruction are organized alphabetically with the various
academic disciplines listed with the appropriate department. The departments
and disciplines are as follows:
DEPARTMENT OR PROGRAM
ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES
Broyhill School of Management
Accounting, Business Administration,
Computer Information Systems,Economics/
Finance, Healthcare Management,
International Business, Marketing
Communication Studies
Radio and Television Broadcasting,
Journalism, Public Relations, Electronic
Publishing, Film, Photography
Education
Teacher Education
English Language and Literature
English
Fine Arts
Music, Art, Theatre Arts
Mathematical Sciences
Mathematics, Computer Science
Natural Sciences
Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry,
Environmental Science, Geology, Physics
School of Nursing
Nursing (BSN and ADN)
Physical Education, Wellness,
Sport Studies
Athletic Training, Health/Wellness, Physical
Education/Health Education with Teacher
Licensure, Sport Management
Psychology and Counseling
Psychology, Counseling
Religious Studies and Philosophy Biblical Studies, Discipleship Studies,
Missiology, Philosophy and Theology,
Religion, Religious Education,
World Religions, Youth Discipleship Studies
Social Sciences
Criminal Justice, Geography, Global Studies,
History, Political Science, Social Sciences,
Sociology
World Languages, Literatures
and Cultures
American Sign Language, English as a
Second Language, French, German, Greek,
Hebrew, Spanish, Interpreter Training
Courses numbered 100-199 are on the freshman level, 200-299 on the
sophomore level and 300 and above on the junior-senior level.
After the description of each course three numbers will appear (e.g., 3-0-3).
The first digit denotes hours per week in class; the second, required laboratory
hours per week; and the third, semester hours credit.
Honors Program/102
UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM
Thomas H. Jones, Associate Dean
Gardner-Webb University provides a comprehensive Honors Program to
nurture academically qualified students in all majors. Emphasis is placed on
Honors classes, leadership through academic and co-curricular
accomplishments, preparation for graduate school, and university activities.
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Gardner-Webb University Honors Program is to nurture
academically qualified students in all majors by providing a program of
enriched learning experiences in courses taught by an Honors faculty and to
instill community pride in its members by encouraging students to become
active in service-based projects.
GOALS
To provide:
1. and encourage opportunities for student centered learning in Honors core
classes
2. opportunities for cultural enrichment.
3. opportunities and encourage student community involvement
4. enhancing extra-curricular learning opportunities
5. an opportunity for and encourage student research
6. an opportunity and encourage student involvement and participation in the
activities of the North Carolina, Southern Regional and National Honors
organizations
HONORS PROGRAM CURRICULUM
A student may be identified as an “Honors Program Graduate” after meeting
graduation requirements in an academic department of the University and
meeting the requirements of the University Honors Program.
The University Honors Program requires the completion of a minimum of
twenty-four hours of course work designated as “Honors.” A minimum of
fifteen hours of course work should be completed in the first two years of
study. Honors courses in the first two years may be selected from Honors
sections of core curriculum offerings, special courses which are offered on an
occasional basis for Honors students, or through “Honors Contracts” with
faculty teaching regular sections of the college’s overall curriculum.
All Honor students are expected to complete HONR 395, 400, and 401 in
their junior or senior years. University Honors Program students are expected
to maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average.
To receive “Honors Program” recognition during commencement exercises,
a student must meet the following requirements:
- Maintain at least a 3.0 GPA;
- Successfully complete a minimum of 27 hours in Honors courses
including HONR 395, 400, 401;
- Initiate, prepare, present and defend a senior HONORS thesis of at
least 40 pages in length;
- Complete a minimum of 80 hours of community service which
contributes to the welfare of the community; and
- Receive the recommendation of the Honors Committee.
Gardner-Webb University/103
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
HONORS PROGRAM (HONR)
320, 321 HONORS TRAVEL-STUDY 1 semester hour
These courses provide the opportunity for students to travel both within the U.S. and
abroad in order to experience different cultures, environment, social structures,
organizations and cuisine. This course is open to all students with the permission of the
Director. Lecture-Travel- 1-0-1
395, 396 HONORS SEMINAR 3 semester hours
Interdisciplinary advanced study that encourages critical thinking as students explore
specific topics. Topics vary from semester to semester, but recent topics have included:
Man and the Environment; Movers and Shakers of the Modern World; Spirituality in the
United States; Church and State; Human Rights; Death in American Culture; War, Peace,
and Culture; The Lives of Christ. Open to Junior Honors students. Students may enroll
for Honors seminar twice for credit in two different semesters. Other students may
enroll with the permission of the instructors and the Honors Committee. 3-0-3 FS.
400 HONORS RESEARCH 3 semester hours
This is the first of a two semester sequence of courses designed to culminate with the
Honors student presenting and defending a Senior Honors Thesis. Each student will
work with a mentor in his or her major area of study to develop a thesis statement, a
bibliography, preliminary research, and a prospectus for the thesis. 0-Independent Study
- 3. FS.
401 HONORS THESIS 3 semester hours
Each student will finalize and prepare a Senior Honors Thesis under the guidance of a
mentor in his or her major. The Thesis will be presented and defended by the student to
all interested members of the academic community. Students are encouraged to present
their thesis to the wider academic community at regional or national Honors meetings.
0-Independent Study-3. FS
First-Year Programs/104
FIRST -YEAR PROGRAMS
Jessica Herndon, Director
MISSION STATEMENT
Keeping with the mission of Gardner-Webb University, the First-Year
Experience course is designed to help students make a successful transition to
university life by fostering a sense of community; nurturing development of
faith; inspiring a love of learning and service-based leadership; encouraging
interdisciplinary thinking; and promoting success in academic skills.
GOALS
1. Develop in students an appreciation for and knowledge of the purpose of
a liberal arts university education.
2. Enhance students’ understanding and appreciation of the diversity of the
university community.
3. Help students understand the mission statement/purpose of GardnerWebb University.
4. Orient students to and promote involvement in co-curricular activities,
student organization and the university community in general.
5. Assist students in developing relationships within the university
environment.
6. Acquaint students with appropriate study strategies for success in college.
7. Develop habits of intentionality and a sense of personal efficacy.
8. Foster a commitment to life-long self-examination and reflection.
9. Promote character development and personal integrity.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
FIRST -YEAR PROGRAM
101 FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE 1 semester hour
First-Year Experience is a comprehensive course designed to help first-year Bachelor of
Music students develop an effective balance of academic achievement and personal
growth which will contribute to their college success. Topics include goal setting, study
skills, time management, exam preparation, and critical thinking. First-year Bachelor of
Music students must be enrolled in this course their first semester at the university.
Students who fail the course must repeat it the following semester.
111 DIMENSIONS OF UNIVERSITY LIFE 3 semester hours
This is a comprehensive course designed to help first-year students develop an effective
balance of academic achievement and personal growth which will contribute to their
college success. UNIV 111 includes the same topics as UNIV 101 with the addition of
Interdisciplinary Studies Modules which include such topics as religion, philosophy,
science, economics, culture and language and how these topics relate to the first-year
book. This course is intended for all first-year students EXCEPT Bachelor of Music
majors. First-year students must be enrolled in this course their first semester at the
university. Students who fail the course must repeat it the following semester. 3-0-3
Gardner-Webb University/105
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING
CORPS (ROTC)
Maj. Salter, Assistant Professor of Military Science
(704) 406-4427/2111
(704) 406-2112 (Fax)
Gardner-Webb offers Army ROTC in cooperation with the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte. Military science coursework is offered on the
Gardner-Webb campus and there are no additional tuition charges for those
participating in this program. ROTC provides world class leadership training
opportunities applicable in corporate, executive, and government leadership
positions. There are no military obligations for non-contracted students.
Prospective Gardner-Webb students may apply for an Army ROTC
Scholarship, which will cover all of the recipient’s tuition and fees. In addition,
Gardner-Webb University waives room and board charges for recipients of
ROTC Scholarships. Other benefits also accrue to those attending GardnerWebb on ROTC Scholarships, including monthly stipends and book allotments.
Those interested should contact the Admissions Office at Gardner-Webb
(704)406-4496, or the Gardner-Webb ROTC Office at (704) 406-4427. Students
may elect to receive a minor in military science.
MISSION STATEMENT:
The mission of GWU’s Army ROTC Program is to prepare students to become
commissioned officers and leaders in the U.S. Army, the Army National Guard
or the U.S. Army Reserve, as well as motivate young people to become better
citizens.
GOALS:
1. To provide quality instruction and training that emphasizes and
strengthens leadership, management and organizational skills.
2. To provide quality instruction and training that develops and strengthens
critical thinking, enhances problem solving skills and fosters teamwork.
3. To promote and develop good written and oral communication skills.
4. To instill and foster the army values that support teamwork, loyalty,
respect and commitment.
MINOR FIELD OF STUDY DETAIL
MSCI 311, 311L, 312, 312L, 330, 411, 411L, 412 (18 hours)
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
MILITARY SCIENCE (MSCI)
111 LEADERSHIP AND PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT 1 semester hour
Introduces cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for
effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as
critical thinking, goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management
relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. Includes instruction in map
reading, land navigation, and customs and courtesies of the Army. Co-requisite: MSCI
111L. Participation in three one-hour sessions of physical fitness is strongly encouraged
each week. Participation in one weekend of Field Training Exercise is required. There is
no military obligation to take this course, open to all GWU students. 1-4-1. (Fall)
Army ROTC/106
111L LEADERSHIP AND PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT LAB 1 semester hour
Application of Basic Leadership Skills through multiple venues including Drill and
Ceremony, Land Navigation, Weapons Familiarization, Basic Rifle Marksmanship,
Medical Tasks, Individual Movement Techniques, Employing Claymore Mines, Engaging
Targets with Hand Grenades, Introduction to the Orders Process, Understanding Army
Acronyms, Hand and Arm Signals, and Radio Protocol Procedures. Co-requisite: MSCI
111. 3-0-1 (Fall)
112 INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP 1 semester hour
Overview of leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving,
listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills.
Cadets explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the
context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Includes instruction in basic
tactics. Co-requisite: MSCI 112L. Participation in three one-hour sessions of physical
fitness is strongly encouraged each week. Participation in one weekend of Field Training
Exercise is required. There is no military obligation to take this course, open to all GWU
students. 1-4-1 (Spring)
112L INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP LAB 1 semester hour
Application of Basic Leadership Skills through multiple venues including Drill and
Ceremony, Land Navigation, Weapons Familiarization, Basic Rifle Marksmanship,
Medical Tasks, Individual Movement Techniques, Employing Claymore Mines, Engaging
Targets with Hand Grenades, Introduction to the Orders Process, Understanding Army
Acronyms, Hand and Arm Signals, and Radio Protocol Procedures. 3-0-1 (Spring)
146/PHED 146 MILITARY FITNESS 1 semester hour
Military Fitness teaches a fitness program focused on muscular strength, muscular
endurance and aerobic endurance. The weekly classes provide students with
opportunities for strenuous physical activity, and also serve as examples of exercise
routines that students can adopt as personal workout plans. Progress is graded using the
Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Students must be able to participate in a normal
college physical education program. 2-0-1 (Fall, Spring)
211 INNOVATIVE TEAM LEADERSHIP 2 semester hours
Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and
styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the
basis of the Army leadership framework (trait and behavior theories). Cadets practice
aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing,
and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. Includes instruction in
troop leading procedures, tactical movement, battle drills, and offensive and defensive
operations. Co-requisite: MSCI 211L. Participation in three one-hour sessions of physical
fitness is strongly encouraged each week. Participation in one weekend of Field Training
Exercise is required. There is no military obligation to take this course, open to all GWU
students. 2-4-2 (Fall)
211L INNOVATIVE TEAM LEADERSHIP LAB 1 semester hour
Application of Intermediate Leadership Skills through multiple venues including Leading
Drill and Ceremony, Advanced Land Navigation, Building Terrain Models, Advanced
Rifle Marksmanship, Advanced Medical Tasks, Movement Formations, Movement
Techniques, Special Teams, Writing Operations Orders, Situation Reporting, Call for
Fire, and Introduction to Battle Drills. 3-0-1 (Fall)
Gardner-Webb University/107
212 FOUNDATIONS OF TACTICAL LEADERSHIP 2 semester hours
Examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary
operating environment (COE). The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis,
patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army
leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of
military operations. Includes instruction in terrain analysis, patrolling, tactical orders,
route planning, and navigational methods. Co-requisite: MSCI 212L. Participation in
three one-hour sessions of physical fitness is strongly encouraged each week.
Participation in one weekend of Field Training Exercise is required. There is no military
obligation to take this course, open to all GWU students. 2-4-2 (Spring)
212L FOUNDATIONS OF TACTICAL LEADERSHIP LAB 1 semester hour
Application of Intermediate Leadership Skills through multiple venues including
Leading Drill and Ceremony, Advanced Land Navigation, Building Terrain Models,
Advanced Rifle Marksmanship, Advanced Medical Tasks, Movement Formations,
Movement Techniques, Special Teams, Writing Operations Orders, Situation Reporting,
Call for Fire, and Introduction to Battle Drills. 3-0-1 (Spring)
311 ADAPTIVE TACTICAL LEADERSHIP 3 semester hours
Challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are
presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Cadets
receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions.
Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, cadets continue to
develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities. Includes instruction in squad
operations, problem solving, and combat orders. Prerequisite: MSCI 211, 212 or
equivalent. Co-requisite: MSCI 311L. Participation in three one-hour sessions of physical
fitness is mandatory each week. Participation in one weekend of Field Training Exercise
is required. 3-4-3 (Fall)
311L ADAPTIVE TACTICAL LEADERSHIP LAB 1 semester hour
Leadership Lab. Practical application of the material learned in the co-requisite course.
3-0-1 (Fall)
312 LEADERSHIP IN CHANGING ENVIRONMENTS 3 semester hours
Uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and
skills in leading tactical operations up to platoon level. Cadets review aspects of
combat, stability, and support operations. They also conduct military briefings and
develop proficiency in garrison operation orders. Includes instruction in platoon
operations, stability and support operations, and garrison orders. Designed to prepare
third-year students to perform effectively at the Leadership Development and
Assessment Course (LDAC). Prerequisite: 211, 212 or equivalent. Co-requisite: MSCI
312L. Participation in three one-hour sessions of physical fitness is mandatory each
week. Participation in one weekend of Field Training Exercise is required. 3-4-3
(Spring)
312L LEADERSHIP IN CHANGING ENVIRONMENTS LAB 1 semester hour
Leadership Lab. Practical application of the material learned in the co-requisite course.
3-0-1 (Spring)
330 AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY 3 semester hours
American Military History from 1776 to the Contemporary Operating Environment.
Study of the threads of continuity throughout America’s military career with an
emphasis on leadership, technology, doctrinal changes and the formation of today’s
Army ROTC/108
professional Army. Students are required to participate in a one- to two-day Staff Ride to
an historic battlefield to demonstrate the usefulness of historical analysis to today’s
military leader. Pre-requisite: Junior Standing (Sophomores and Freshmen by exception)
(Fall, Spring) 3-0-3
411 DEVELOPING ADAPTIVE LEADERS 3 semester hours
Develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations,
functioning as a member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to
subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets.
Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare cadets to make the
transition to Army officers. Includes instruction in risk management, training
management, code of conduct, rules of engagement, counseling, and evaluations.
Prerequisite: MSCI 312. Co-requisite: MSCI 411L. Participation in three one-hour
sessions of physical fitness is mandatory each week. Participation in one weekend of
Field Training Exercise is required. 3-4-3 (Fall)
411L DEVELOPING ADAPTIVE LEADERS LAB 1 semester hour
Leadership Lab. Practical application of the material learned in the co-requisite course.
3-0-1 (Fall)
412 LEADERSHIP IN A COMPLEX WORLD 3 semester hours
Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military
operations in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Cadets examine
differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of
engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of
interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host
nation support. Includes instruction in Army organization and modularity, the platoon
command team, a battle analysis, and a staff ride. Prerequisite: MSCI 411. Co-requisite:
MSCI 412L. Participation in three one-hour sessions of physical fitness is mandatory each
week. Participation in one weekend of Field Training Exercise is required. 3-4-3 (Spring)
412L LEADERSHIP IN A COMPLEX WORLD LAB 1 semester hour
Leadership Lab. Practical application of the material learned in the co-requisite course.
3-0-1 (Spring)
Gardner-Webb University/109
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
The College of Arts and Sciences at Gardner-Webb University is composed of
those departments and academic units which are home to the liberal arts (arts,
humanities, natural and social sciences). As the intellectual heart of the
university, the College promotes interdisciplinary learning, global
understanding, communication skills and the promotion of critical thinking
and discovery, all in the context of Christian faith.
The College also seeks to create a challenging intellectual environment that
enhances individual growth, supports service and leadership, and encourages
creative endeavors that augment human knowledge and understanding.
The College is made up of the following academic units:
The School of Performing and Visual Arts
Department of Music
Department of Theatre Arts
Department of Visual Arts
Department of Communication Studies
Department of English Language and Literature
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Departmental of Natural Sciences
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, and Sport Studies
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy
Department of Social Sciences
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
School of Performing and Visual Arts/110
SCHOOL OF PERFORMING AND
VISUAL ARTS
The Music Program is accredited by the National Association of
Schools of Music (NASM)
FACULTY
Interim Dean: J. Thomas
Chair, Department of Visual Art: D. Knotts
Chair, Department of Music: P. Sparti
Chair, Department of Theatre Arts:
Professors: S. Bell, C. Billings, M. Whitfield
Associate Professors: C. Keene, P. Etter
Assistant Professors: S. Ali, N. Bottoms, P. Harrelson, J. Richmond, P. Spangler
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Department of Fine Arts is to provide the finest professional
musical, theatrical, and visual art education to GWU students, and the finest
performances and education to the community-at-large, while providing a wellrounded education that encompasses a liberal arts philosophy and Christian
values while training students in the history, performance, exhibition, teaching,
composition, business, creation and ministry of music, art, and theatre. We also
seek to stimulate interest in the arts, and strive to stimulate in our students an
interest in serving the Greater Glory of God by serving others with art and music.
GOALS
1. To provide a superior university education in art, music, and theatre;
2. To provide ample opportunities to perform and compose the finest
repertoire, both old and new, from all areas of the world, in all styles, and
to provide a creative outlet for artists to display works; and
3. To stimulate interest in the arts and to inspire our students to strive to
attain their highest potential as performers, teachers, composers, music
ministers, music executives, and visual technical artists, and to use that
potential to serve God and Humanity.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Student learning outcomes specific to each major offered by the department
are described in the appropriate sections that follow.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The Department of Fine Arts offers seven majors associated with three degree
programs:
Bachelor of Arts
Art
Art Education
Music
Theatre Arts
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Art
Bachelor of Music
Composition
Elective Studies in Music Business
Music Education
Performance
Sacred Music
Gardner-Webb University/111
Students pursuing the B.M. degree must complete the General Studies Core for
that degree. Students pursuing the B.A. in Music must complete the General Studies
Core for the B.A. Students cannot receive both degrees.
A Music Handbook and complete curriculum outlines for each major in music and
information pertaining to admission to programs, performance requirements, recital
requirements, proficiency examinations, and attendance requirements are available
in the office of the Chair, Department of Fine Arts.
A grade of “C” or better is necessary to pass each course toward the major.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Art History
Music
Studio Art
Theatre Arts
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
Students entering as music majors or minors are required to take a Music Theory
Placement Exam prior to the first week of class to gauge their level of theoretical
competence. A first-time music major will be placed either in the sequence of MUSC
105-106 (First-Year) or MUSC 103-104 (Basic Theory) according to exam results.
Transfer music major placement is based on results following an exam which covers
material from the last semester of music theory completed by the student.
Music majors who are not concentrating in piano are required to pass a piano
proficiency examination as an integral part of the overall degree requirements. Nonpiano concentrations must enroll for piano each semester until the piano
proficiency is passed. Three to four semester hours in the secondary applied have
been set aside in each Bachelor of Music curriculum (2 semester hours for the B.A.
in Music) for this purpose. Should the proficiency be passed before completion of
the 3-4 hours of piano, the non-piano concentrations may take the remaining hours
in any applied elective or performance ensemble. Piano concentrations must pass a
sophomore screening and MUSC 259, which fulfill the piano proficiency
requirement.
Each music major is required to satisfactorily participate in a major performing
group each fall and spring semester while enrolled as a full-time student, except the
student teaching semester. A student who requires more than eight semesters to
complete a program may make a written request to the Chair of the Department of
Fine Arts for exemption from participation in a performance group after ten hours
of performance organization credit have been acquired. Students must enroll in a
performance group according to their concentration with the exception of Sacred
Music: 4 hours of a major vocal performing ensemble and four hours in a major
performing ensemble according to Concentration. Transfer students must complete
a minimum of eight major performing group hours, (seven for Music Business),
either from approved transfer hours or Gardner-Webb ensembles. Additionally, all
music majors must complete a minimum of one hour in a chamber ensemble. All
ensembles may be repeated for credit.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC (49 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate with a major in Music will:
1. demonstrate technical proficiency that enables artistic creativity
and self-expression;
2. demonstrate the ability to compose and arrange music for private
and public performance; and
3. be prepared for a career in a music-related field.
School of Performing and Visual Arts/112
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MUSC 105, 106, 205, 206, 325, and 326 (20 hours)
MUSC 226 (hours counted in core)
MUSC 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 257, or 259 (1 hour)
Performance Applied (12 hours)
Secondary Applied (2 hours)
Performance Group (8 hours)
MUSC 493 and 494 or MUSC 412 plus four elective hours (6 hours)
A minor is not required with this major.
BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREES
COMPOSITION (78-80 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate with a major in Composition will:
1. demonstrate technical proficiency that enables artistic creativity and
self-expression;
2. demonstrate an understanding of how the composer functions
professionally in society;
3. demonstrate the ability to compose and arrange music for private and
public performance; and
4. be prepared for advanced professional study in music.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MUSC 105, 106, 205, 206, 247, 305, 306, 325, 326, 405, 446, and 447,
MIBS 150 (30 hours)
MUSC 226 (hours counted in core)
Primary Applied (12 hours)
Performance Group (9 hours, with a minimum of one hour being in a small
ensemble)
Secondary Applied (4-5 hours):
For Piano: Organ (2 hours); Voice (2 hours); Applied elective (1 hour)
For Organ and Vocal: Piano (4 hours); Applied elective (1 hour)
For Instrumental: Piano (4 hours)
MUSC 307, 308 405 (in addition to 305), 491, 492, and 497 (15 hours)
MUSC 245, 246, or 249 (2 hours)
Required by Concentration (6-7 hours):
For Piano: MUSC 259, 426, and 455
For Organ: MUSC 259, 427, and 459
For Instrumental: MUSC 349, 428, and 450
For Vocal: MUSC 257, 425, and 457
A minor is not required with this major.
ELECTIVE STUDIES IN MUSIC BUSINESS (87-95 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will:
1. be prepared for positions in many areas of the music business
industry including, but not limited to arts administration and
venue management;
2. demonstrate a broad knowledge of the music business industry;
and
3. possess an understanding of theoretical and historical knowledge,
listening skills, a high level of proficiency in one area of applied
performance, and basic skills in conducting, keyboard, and music
technology and production.
Gardner-Webb University/113
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MUSC 105, 106, 205, 206, 247, 305 (or 405), 325, 326, 446 or 447
(24 hours)
MUSC 226 (hours counted in core)
Primary Applied (11 hours)
Performance Group (8 hours, with a minimum of one hour being in a small
ensemble)
Secondary Applied (4 hours)
MIBS 150, 300, 410, and 490 (13-21 hours)
Business Core: The candidate must also complete the Business
Administration minor consisting of ACCT 213 and 214; CISS 160;
ECON 203 and 204; FINC 312; MGMT 316; and MRKT 300 (24 hours)
One elective selected from the following: BADM 340, COMM 313, COMM
370, MGMT 410, MGMT 485, MRKT 302, MRKT 304 or other
electives in any area selected in consultation with the advisor
(3 hours)
A minor is not required with this major; however, a built-in minor in
Business Administration will be earned if MGMT 316 is taken.
MUSIC EDUCATION (64 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate with a major in Music Education will
demonstrate:
1. the knowledge base of learning, methodologies, social content,
and professional development needed to teach in a private or
public school setting;
2. the ability to perform and utilize musical understanding in the
classroom and performance arenas; and
3. the competencies required to obtain North Carolina teacher
licensure for grades K-12 in the fields of general music,
instrumental, and vocal music.
The North Carolina State Board of Education has adopted new teacher
standards and required all teacher education programs to be revisioned. All
candidates starting their teacher education program with EDUC 250 in the fall
of 2010 must complete the new program regardless of the catalogue under
which they entered Gardner-Webb University. Candidates who are already in
teacher education can choose to complete the current program or the new
program.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MUSC 105, 106, 205, 206, 245, 246, 247, 305 (or 405), 306, 325, 326, 347,
348, 446, and 447, MIBS 150 (36 hours)
MUSC 226 (hours counted in core)
Primary Applied (12 hours)
Performance Group (9 hours, with a minimum of one hour being in a
small ensemble)
Secondary Applied (4 hours):
For Piano: Organ (2 hours); Voice (2 hours)
For Organ: Piano (2 hours); Voice (2 hours)
For Instrumental: Piano (3 hours); Voice (1 hour)
For Vocal: Piano (4 hours)
School of Performing and Visual Arts/114
Required by Concentration (3 hours):
For Piano: MUSC 259 and 455
For Organ: MUSC 259 and 459
For Instrumental: MUSC 248 and 349
For Vocal: MUSC 257 and 457
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor
consisting of Education 250, 316, 350, 440, and 450; and Psychology 303.
NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete more than 50% of the
Professional Education minor (excluding student teaching) until they are
formally admitted to the Teacher Education Program. All candidates must be
fully admitted into the Teacher Education Program a minimum of one full
semester prior to the semester in which they student teach, ideally no later than
the end of the first semester of the junior year.
Additional requirements for the candidate for teacher licensure can be found
in the School of Education’s section in this catalog.
PERFORMANCE (78 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate with a major in Music Performance will:
1. demonstrate technical proficiency in the chosen concentration
that will enable a high level of artistic self-expression in both solo
and ensemble performance;
2. demonstrate musical understanding based on knowledge of
music fundamentals and historical styles and the ability to use this
understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses;
3. develop skill in composition and improvisation; and
4. develop familiarity with technological resources so as to enhance
research, composition, teaching, or performance.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MUSC 105, 106, 205, 206, 211, 247, 305, 306, 312, 325, 326, 405, 413,
446, 447, 453, and 454, MIBS 150 (40 hours)
MUSC 226 (hours counted in core)
Primary Applied (18 hours)
Performance Group (10 hours, with a minimum of one hour in a small
ensemble)
Secondary Applied (4 hours):
For Piano: Organ (2 hours); Voice (2 hours)
For Organ, Instrumental, and Vocal: Piano (4 hours)
Required by Concentration (6 hours):
For Piano: MUSC 259, 426, and 455
For Organ: MUSC 259, 427, and 459
For Instrumental: MUSC 248, 428, and 450
For Vocal: MUSC 257, 425, and 457
A minor is not required with this major.
SACRED MUSIC (77-79 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate with a major in Sacred Music will:
1. understand the aesthetic principles found in sacred music used
for worship and Christian education;
2. demonstrate a continuing interest in the areas of music
performance, worship, leadership, choral and instrumental
conducting, and required communication skills; and
3. think independently and critically concerning music, theology,
and church music issues and their interrelationships.
Gardner-Webb University/115
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MUSC 105, 106, 205, 206, 245, 246, 247, 249, 257, 305 (or 405), 306, 325,
326, 347, 348, 446, 447, 465, 466, and 467, MIBS 150 (47 hours)
MUSC 226 (hours counted in core)
Primary Applied (12 hours)
Performance Group (9 hours, with a minimum of one hour in a small
ensemble)
Secondary Applied (7-8 hours):
For Piano: Voice (5 hours); Organ (2 hours)
For Organ: Voice (5 hours); Piano (2)
For Instrumental: Voice (4 hours); Piano (4 hours)
For Vocal: Piano (4 hours); Applied electives or Performance Groups
or a combination of the two (4 hours)
Required by Concentration (2-3 hours):
For Piano: MUSC 259 and 455
For Organ: MUSC 259 and 459
For Instrumental: MUSC 450
For Vocal: MUSC 457
A minor is not required with this major.
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE ARTS (36 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will:
1. Discuss the significant historical developments of the theater
and important movements in dramatic literature;
2. Demonstrate fundamental skills in stagecraft and theater
performance;
3. Create a theatrical event for a live audience that demonstrates
a synthesis between theory and practice.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Core requirements must be satisfied. ENGL 101 and 102
are prerequisite to all major courses unless an exception is granted by
the chair. Students must complete a 24 hour core and a 12 hour
concentration. The core is comprised of the following courses:
THEA 203 (3hrs), 222, 330, 331, 381, 382, 430, and 434
The concentration must be selected from one of the following
areas (the student may choose to combine concentrations):
PERFORMANCE (12 HOURS)
THEA 225, 325, 332, 435, 440, 441, 442, or 450
TECH/DESIGN (12 HOURS)
THEA 223, 225, 325, 390, 400, or 450
DEPARTMENT OF VISUAL ARTS
The Department offers two concentrations for Art majors matriculating in
either of its degree programs. The Two Dimensional track includes the mediums
of Drawing, Painting, Figure Drawing, and Printmaking. The Three Dimensional
track emphasizes Ceramics and Sculpture. Courses comprising each
concentration are as follows:
Two Dimensional: ART 322, 323, 341, 342, 362, 363, 382, 383, 460, 462, 484
Three Dimensional: ART 352, 353, 392, 393, 435, 455
School of Performing and Visual Arts/116
All majors are required to exhibit during the senior year an exhibition of work
that demonstrates a concentrated focus in technique, style, and content. A thesis
defending the work and a presentation of the thesis before art faculty is
required. Majors are required to engage in active exhibition of their work
including exhibiting in annual student exhibits. The formulation of a slide
portfolio, work portfolio, and resume are required. Exhibit requirements are
detailed in the exhibition handout available to art majors from their advisor.
ART - BACHELOR OF ARTS (47 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will:
1. demonstrate a broad base of technical proficiency in the studio
arts and develop a high level of artistic expression; and
2. possess the necessary background in art history and understand
the role of the artist in society.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Course requirements must be satisfied. ARTS 225 is suggested to
meet the three hour requirement in the Dimensions of Self; it cannot be used
to fulfill requirements for the major. Classes required for completing the major
are as follows:
Academic: ARTS 120, 125, 410, 413, 424, and 426 in addition to one of the
following: ARTS 140, 145, 305, or 416 (12 hours)
Foundation Studio: ARTS 200, 210, 220, 250, 260, 280, and 290 (21 hours)
Level 300: 12 elective hours at or above the 300 level. Nine of these hours
must be taken from one studio sequence.
The required minor may be selected from any offered by the University.
ART - BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (65 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will:
1. develop a portfolio suitable for making application to pursue further
study at the graduate level;
2. demonstrate a high degree of technical proficiency and artistic
expression in the chosen concentration; and
3. possess the necessary background in art history and understand the
role of the artist in society.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Course requirements must be satisfied. Classes required for
completing the major are as follows:
Art Academic: ARTS 120, 125, 410, 413, 424, and 426 in addition to two of
the following: ARTS 140, 145, 305, or 416 (15 hours)
Foundation Studio: ARTS 200, 210, 220, 250, 260, 280, 290, and 341
(these must be completed prior to or concurrently with required
300 level courses) (24 hours)
Level 300: 24 elective hours at or above the 300 level. 15 of these hours
must be taken from one studio concentration sequence and the
remaining nine hours from outside of the concentration.
A minor is not required with this major.
Gardner-Webb University/117
ART - BACHELOR OF ART EDUCATION (77 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will:
1. Demonstrate a broad base of technical proficiency in the studio.
2. Possess a broad art history background.
3. Understand the role of the artist in society.
4. Understand the role of the art educator in the community.
5. Advocate for art and art education in the schools and community.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The basis course requirements must be satisfied. ARTS 225 is suggested to
meet the three hour requirement in the Dimensions of Self in the Core; it
cannot be used to fulfill requirements for the major. Classes Required:
Academic: ARTS 120, 125, 410, 413, 424, and 426 in addition to one of the
following: ARTS 140, 145, 305, or 416 (12 hours)
FOUNDATION STUDIO: ARTS 200, 210, 220, 250, 260, 280, and 290
(21 hours)
UPPER LEVEL STUDIO: 12 hours of upper level studio courses 300 or
above. Nine of these hours must be taken from either two-dimensional or
three dimensional studio sequence.
REQUIRED MINOR
Art Education Minor of Thirty Hours: EDUC 250, 350, 316; PSYC 303: ARTS
415; EDUC 450
SENIOR PROJECT
Art Education Majors must complete an exhibition of work that
demonstrates a concentrated focus in technique, style and content. A thesis
defending the work and a presentation of the thesis before the art faculty is
required. The formulation of a slide portfolio, work portfolio of original
images, and resume are required. Exhibit requirements are detailed in the
exhibition handout available to art majors from their advisor and can be
viewed online at the art website.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
ART HISTORY (18 HOURS)
ARTS 120 and 125 (6 hours)
ARTS 200 or 210 (3 hours)
ARTS 220, 250 or 290 (3 hours)
ARTS 140, 145, 305, or 416 (6 hours)
MUSIC (18 HOURS)
MUSC 105 and 106 (8 hours)
Four semesters of a major performing organization (4 hours)
Applied music (jury required) (6 hours)
At least four of the applied music hours must be in the same area of
concentration. Recital attendance is required (one-half of the number of recitals
required for music majors) during each semester in which applied music credit
toward the minor is being earned (see departmental handbook).
STUDIO ARTS (18 HOURS)
ARTS 120 or 125 (3 hours)
ARTS 200 or 210 (3 hours)
ARTS 250 or 290 (3 hours)
ARTS 250, 260, 280, 290, 322, 341, 342, 352, 362, 382, or 392 (9 hours)
School of Performing and Visual Arts/118
The minor in studio art requires the exhibit of a body of the strongest work
that the student has produced during studio classes. Works to be exhibited
must be approved by the art faculty one semester prior to the planned exhibit.
The exhibit can be scheduled as soon as the minor is completed, or during the
senior year, whichever comes first. Refer to exhibit requirements handout for
art minors, available from faculty for required information and procedures.
THEATER ARTS (18 HOURS)
Any 18 hours of THEA courses
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
and majoring in a field of study offered by the music division must complete
MUSC 225 or 226 as part of the general education core curriculum.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
COURSE LEGENDS:
GENERAL MUSIC COURSES
The first digit denotes the level of study: 1-Freshman; 2-Sophomore; 3-Junior;
4-Senior. The second digit identifies the area of study: 0-Music Theory; 2-Music
History and Literature; 3-Small Ensembles; 4 and 5-Music Education; 6-Sacred
Music; 7 and 8-Performance Groups; 9-Independent Study.
APPLIED MUSIC COURSES
The following prefixes indicate the specified applied instrument of study:
BARI-baritone/euphonium, OBOE-oboe, TROM-trombone, BSSN-bassoon,
ORGN-organ, TRPT-trumpet, CELL-cello, PERC-percussion, TUBA-tuba, CLARclarinet, PIAN-piano, VILA-viola, FLUT-flute, SAXO-saxophone, VILN-violin,
GUIT-guitar, SBSS-string bass, VOIC-voice, HORN-horn.
The first digit designates the classification of study: 0-Community School of
Music; 1- Freshman; 2-Sophomore; 3-Junior; 4-Senior. The second digit remains
(0) zero. The third digit designates the amount of credit hours earned/number
of half-hour lessons in applied music. Example: CLAR 202 indicates applied
clarinet study, sophomore year, 2 credit hours.
NOTE: Fees are associated with all applied music study and are subject to
change. Please refer to the Admissions, Finances, and Financial Aid section of
this catalog for specific details
.
MUSIC THEORY (MUSC)
103, 104 BASIC MUSIC THEORY: 1 semester hour each semester
Introduces basic skills of making music: pitch notation, scales, intervals, note values,
time signatures, meter, sight-singing, rhythmic drills, and rudimentary keyboard skills.
Designed for those with little or no previous experience on a keyboard instrument or in
music reading skills. 1-1-1, 1-1-1.
105, 106 MUSIC THEORY I AND II 4 semester hours each semester
Introduces the elements of music, primary and secondary triads and seventh chords,
four-part writing procedures with suitable ear training, sight-singing, and keyboard
assignments. Covers various aspects of musical form, melody, rhythm, harmony, figured
bass and music analysis. Students will also learn compositional and improvisational
techniques. Computer interaction is required. Prerequisite: MUSC 104 or successful
completion of Music Theory Placement Exam. 3-2-4, 3-2-4.
Gardner-Webb University/119
205 MUSIC THEORY III 3 semester hours
The integrated study of chromatic harmony. A continuation of areas begun in first year
theory with additional emphasis on analysis: sonata-allegro, rondo, and variation forms,
and composition in smaller forms. Students will learn fundamentals of music
technology. Prerequisite: MUSC 106. 2-3-3.
206 MUSIC THEORY IV 3 semester hours
A survey of modern trends and thought from Romanticism to the present, including
modulation to all keys and electronic music. Includes ear training, analysis, and
composition in each style studied. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 (206 is a Writing Category II
course) and MUSC 205. 2-2-3. WCII.
305 COUNTERPOINT 2 semester hours
An examination of linear writing and combination of contrapuntal voices in the
Renaissance and Baroque periods. Composition and analysis are required. Fall semester
of even years. 2-0-2. Prerequisite: MUSC 205
306 ORCHESTRATION 2 semester hours
A basic course in writing and arranging for band and orchestral instruments. Includes a
study of the characteristics of most woodwind, brass, string, and percussion instruments
with an emphasis on problems for beginner and intermediate players; writing for
various combinations of instruments in family and heterogeneous groups; score writing;
and some insights into writing for full band and orchestra. Spring semester. 2-0-2.
Prerequisite MUSC 205
307, 308 COMPOSITION I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
Individual instruction in traditional and modern compositional techniques. Students will
be required to create original compositions under the guidance of the instructor. When
possible, performance of student compositions will be arranged. Prerequisite: MUSC
205. O-Tutorial-3; O-Tutorial-3.
405 FORM AND ANALYSIS 2 semester hours
A study of the forms of composition beginning with phrase and period and covering
large forms such as rondo, sonata, concerto and fugue. Prerequisite MUSC 206. Fall
semester of odd years
2-0-2.
491, 492 COMPOSITION III AND IV 3 semester hours each semester
Senior Composition project. Prerequisites: MUSC 307, 308. 0-Preparation-3,
0-Preparation-3.
497 COMPOSITION PRESENTATION 1 semester hour
Student will present a performance and defend the senior composition project in a
formal setting open to the public and the academic community. 0-Tutorial-1.
MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE (MUSC)
225 MUSIC SURVEY 3 semester hours
A survey of music for the non-music major which includes a study of music elements,
the development of music from the middle ages to the present day, and the listening
and analysis of music literature appropriate to the period studied. Some concert
attendance may be required. 3-0-3.
226 MUSIC LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Survey of music literature in various genres from the Baroque to the present, including
listening, analysis, research, and class presentations. Offered in Spring semester.
Prerequisite: MUSC 205, or permission of instructor. 3-0-3.
School of Performing and Visual Arts/120
325, 326 MUSIC HISTORY I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
An introduction to non-Western music and a study of the history of Western music, from
ancient Greek civilization to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 (325 is a Writing
Category II course) and MUSC 226. 3-0-3, 3-0-3. WCII.
425 VOCAL LITERATURE 3 semester hours
A survey of art song literature from the late Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite:
completion of at least 2 semester hours of applied voice at the 200 level. Offered as
needed. 3-0-3.
426 PIANO LITERATURE 3 semester hours
A survey of solo and ensemble clavier/ piano literature from the Renaissance to the
present. Prerequisite: completion of at least 2 semester hours of applied piano at the
200 level. Offered as needed. 3-0-3.
427 ORGAN LITERATURE 3 semester hours
A survey of organ literature from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite:
completion of at least 2 semester hours of applied organ at the 200 level. Offered as
needed. 3-0-3.
428 INSTRUMENTAL LITERATURE 3 semester hours
A survey of important solo and ensemble literature as well as method and etude books
in the student's area of instrumental concentration. Prerequisite: completion of at least 2
semester hours of applied music on the student’s instrument of concentration. Offered as
needed. 3-0-3.
493, 494 TREATISE I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
Required for B.A. in Music, Treatise Option. 0-Preparation-3, 0-Preparation-3.
MUSIC EDUCATION (MUSC)
149 GUITAR CLASS I 1 semester hour each semester
Group instruction for beginning and intermediate students of guitar. Emphasis is placed
on learning guitar techniques while learning to read music, play simple melodies and
chordal accompanying, including beginning guitar literature, popular, and worship
music. 2-0-1.
150 GUITAR CLASS II 1 semester hour each semester
Group instruction for more advanced students of guitar in a small ensemble setting.
Emphasis is placed on learning more advanced guitar techniques for the purpose of
performing guitar literature, including popular and worship music. 2-0-1.
245 BRASS AND PERCUSSION CLASS 1 semester hour
Elementary instruction in the techniques of playing instruments in the brass and
percussion families. Fall semester. 2-1-1.
246 STRINGS AND WOODWINDS CLASS 1 semester hour
Elementary instruction in the techniques of playing instruments in the string and
woodwind families. Spring semester. 2-1-1.
247 CONDUCTING FUNDAMENTALS 1 semester hour
An introduction to the fundamentals of conducting. Prerequisites: MUSC 105-106 or
equivalent. Spring semester. 1-1-1.
Gardner-Webb University/121
248 MARCHING BAND TECHNIQUES 1 semester hour
Marching styles, problems of teaching marching, plotting half-time shows, and
instruction in contest and parade participation. Fall semester of even years. 1-0-1.
249 HANDBELLS 1 semester hour
Elementary techniques of playing handbells and of conducting handbell ensembles.
Open to all students who have had one year of music theory or its equivalent. Spring
semester of even years. 2-2-1.
250 VOCAL TECHNIQUES CLASS 1 semester hour
The basics of correct vocal technique taught within a group-private lesson setting.
Students learn correct vocal technique and have lab experience teaching beginning
vocal techniques individually, in small groups, and in larger classes. This course is
designed especially for the music education major with instrumental concentration,
though others may enroll with permission of the instructor.
257 VOICE DICTION 1 semester hour
A guide to pronouncing the sounds of English, Latin, Italian, German, and French, with
emphasis on English, and the written transcription of these languages utilizing General
Phonetics and the International Phonetic Alphabet as they relate to the performance of
vocal solo and choral music. Spring semester. 2-0-1.
259 ADVANCED PIANO SKILLS 1 semester hour
Group instruction in sight-reading, harmonization of melodies, transposition, playing by
ear, open score reading, basso continuo realization, and improvisation. Fall of odd years.
Approval of instructor is required before registering. 2-0-1.
347 ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATION 2 semester hours
Materials and methods for music specialists. Teaching and supervision of music
programs for elementary schools, based on developmental knowledge of music
concepts through musical activities. Fall semester. 2-0-2.
348 SECONDARY MUSIC EDUCATION 2 semester hours
Materials and methods for the development of music programs for junior and senior
high schools, including discipline, curriculum, budgeting, techniques for general music;
instrumental and vocal classes, and job placement. Spring semester. 2-0-2.
349 INSTRUMENTAL METHODS AND LITERATURE 2 semester hours
The teaching and supervision of music as it relates to the junior and senior high school
instrumental program. Included is preparation for contests and public performances,
recruitment of instrumentalists, literature and pedagogical techniques for beginning
instrumentalists. Spring semester of odd years. 2-0-2.
446 CHORAL CONDUCTING 1 semester hour
Conducting and choral rehearsal techniques appropriate to school and church choral
groups, emphasizing student conducting experience. Prerequisite: MUSC 247. Fall
semester. 1-1-1.
447 INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING 1 semester hour
A study of instrumental conducting as it relates to the conducting of modern bands and
orchestras, including history, technique (baton and instrumental), foreign terminology,
score study and analysis. Prerequisite: MUSC 247. Spring semester. 1-1-1.
450 INSTRUMENTAL PEDAGOGY 2 semester hours
The study of methods and materials appropriate for private and group instruction for
the teaching of instrumental music from the beginner through adult learner including
the history and development of instruments. 2-1-2.
School of Performing and Visual Arts/122
455 PIANO PEDAGOGY 2 semester hours
Methods and materials appropriate for private and group instruction of children or
adults from beginners to intermediate level. Each student will teach one beginning
piano student under supervision. Fall semester of even years. 2-1/2-2.
457 VOCAL PEDAGOGY 2 semester hours
A study of methods and materials for the teaching of private and class voice. Supervision
of class participants in required teaching of private voice lessons. Fall semester of even
years. Prerequisite: Minimum 6 hrs. applied vocal study. 2-1-2.
459 ORGAN PEDAGOGY 2 semester hours
A comprehensive survey of organ literature, the history of organ construction and
development, and a study of the basic principles of private organ instruction.
Prerequisite: Minimum 6 hours applied vocal study. 2-0-2.
SACRED MUSIC (MUSC)
465 HYMNOLOGY 3 semester hours
A study of church history and congregational worship music from A.D. 700 through the
contemporary period. Offered in the fall of even years. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: MUSC 106
466 CHURCH MUSIC ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours
Practical study of organization and administration of a church music ministry
emphasizing the minister of music's role as minister, church staff member, educator,
promoter, and administrator. Offered in the fall of odd years. 3-0-3.
467 CHURCH MUSIC SEMINAR AND FIELD WORK 3 semester hours
Philosophy, observation and participation in the administration of a church music
program. May be taken only after completing Music 466. Offered in the Spring of even
years. 1-4-3.
PERFORMANCE (MUSC)
211 SOPHOMORE QUALIFYING RECITAL 1 semester hour
Presentation of at least 20 minutes of music. Required of performance majors 0performance-1.
312 JUNIOR RECITAL 2 semester hours
Presentation of at least 30 minutes of music. Required of performance majors. 0performance-2.
413 SENIOR RECITAL 3 semester hours
Presentation of at least 55 minutes of music. Required of performance majors. 0performance-3.
412 LIBERAL ARTS RECITAL 2 semester hours
Presentation of at least 30 minutes of music. Option for B.A. in Music.
453, 454 PERFORMANCE SEMINAR 1 semester hour each semester
Includes performance requirements, literature research and discussion, and writing of
program notes. Offered as needed. 1-0-1.
INDEPENDENT STUDY (MUSC)
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-3 semester hours each semester
Supervised study program in a field of special interest. Prerequisite: approval of
department chair and instructor. 0-Independent Study-3, 0-Independent Study-3.
Gardner-Webb University/123
MAJOR PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLES
(Freshmen and sophomores should register for the 100 number; juniors and seniors
should register for the 300 number.)
170, 370 CONCERT CHOIR 0-1 semester hour
A mixed touring chorus of select voices determined by auditions held in the Spring of
the preceding school year and the beginning of the Fall semester. Open to all students
of the university. 0-4-1, 0-4-1.
175, 375 CHORALE 0-1 semester hour
A large choral group which prepares programs of sacred and secular music for
presentation on campus and in area churches. Open to all students of the university
without audition. 0-2-1, 0-2-1.
178, 378 OPERA THEATRE 0-1 semester hour
Participation in operatic productions giving the singer an opportunity to perform roles
in works ranging from chamber opera to standard operatic literature. Open to all
students, the director's approval is required before registering. Offered Fall Semesters. 0Production-1.
185, 385 SYMPHONIC BAND 0-1 semester hour
The Symphonic Band is the main instrumental (wind) ensemble of the university.
Emphasis is on the performance of quality wind literature. This is the mandatory
ensemble for instrumental music majors, but non-music major participation is
encouraged. 0-2-1, 0-2-1.
186, 386 ORCHESTRA 0-1 semester hour
A semi-professional orchestra open to all students of the university as well as residents
of the community by audition. The orchestra is a member of the League of American
Orchestras. Instrumental music majors can receive their large ensemble credit through
this ensemble, but non-music major participation is also encouraged. Approval of the
director is required before registering. 0-2-1, 0-2-1.
CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (MUSC)
130 VOCAL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
A small, elective ensemble for the performance of vocal literature from all style periods.
Open to any major with permission of instructor. 0-1-1.
131 WOODWIND CHAMBER ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
A small, elective ensemble for the performance of woodwind literature. Open to any
major with permission of instructor. 0-1-1.
132 BRASS CHAMBER ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
An elective chamber ensemble for the performance of brass literature. Open to any
major with permission of instructor. 0-1-1.
133 STRINGS CHAMBER ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
An elective chamber ensemble for the performance of strings literature. Open to any
major with permission of instructor. 0-1-1.
134 PERCUSSION CHAMBER ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
An elective chamber ensemble for the performance of percussion literature. Open to
any major with permission of instructor. 0-1-1.
School of Performing and Visual Arts/124
135 KEYBOARD CHAMBER ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
An elective chamber ensemble for the performance of keyboard literature. Open to any
major with permission of instructor. 0-1-1.
136 HANDBELL ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
An elective ensemble for the performance of handbell literature. Open to experienced
handbell players of any major with permission of instructor. 0-2-1.
137 JAZZ ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
An elective chamber ensemble for the performance of jazz literature. Open to any
student with permission of instructor. 0-2-1.
138 GUITAR ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
A small ensemble dedicated to the performance of literature written for multiple guitars.
Open to any major with permission from instructor.
139 PRAISE ENSEMBLE 0-1 semester hour
A small ensemble (9-12 students: 6 Vocalists plus Percussionists, Strings, Keyboard, and
Instrumentals) which will afford students experience in organizing, planning,
rehearsing, leading, and performing Praise Music within the church worship context.
Standard and new arrangements may be utilized; some on and off campus performance
opportunities may be required. Open to all students of the university with the
permission of the instructor. 0-1-1.
187, 387 PEP BAND 0-1 semester hour each semester
The Pep Band serves the university community in a supportive capacity with
responsibilities for fostering school spirit at athletic events. The Pep Band is open to all
interested instrumentalists at the university. 0-2-1, 0-2-1.
188, 388 MARCHING BAND 0-1 semester hour each semester
The Marching Band serves the university community in a supportive capacity with
responsibilities for fostering school spirit at football games and pep rallies. 0-3-1, 0-3-1.
400 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC 1-3 semester hours (variable)
Specialized study in selected areas of music. Course content will vary and will reflect
current developments in music and respond to student interest and need.
MUSIC BUSINESS (MIBS)
150 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 3 semester hours
Theories, concepts, and terminology of music technology. Study of music notation and
sequencing software. Physical / timbral characteristics of acoustic instruments.
Technological models that imitate and expand acoustic characteristics. Basics of sound
reinforcement systems, storage systems, analog and digital sound systems. Computer
applications in sound synthesis, composition and research. 3-0-3.
410 MUSIC INDUSTRY SEMINAR 3 semester hours
This course is required for all Music Business Majors but is open to all students upon
permission of instructor. Students gain a working knowledge of the music business. (Fee
required to attend The League of American Symphony Orchestra Seminar in Arts
Management, Fundraising, and Promotion) Overview of the music business including:
Music Advertising, Music Promotion, Concert Promotion and Venue Management, Artist
Management and Representation, Musician’s Union, Web Design for Arts Organizations,
Music Retailing, Music Marketing and Merchandising, online music publishing and
aspects of Music Publishing, Job Opportunities in Music Business and Career Strategies,
Gardner-Webb University/125
American Symphony Orchestra League Seminar in Arts Management and Publicity,
Kennedy Center Internship Opportunities, Internships in Music Business, Fundraising
for Arts Organizations and non-profit, Grantwriting for arts organizations Offered as
needed, but no more than once every other year. 3-0-3.
300 MUSIC INDUSTRY BUSINESS: BUSINESS AND ENTERTAINMENT LAW
3 semester hours
A study of the legal environments of business, with the study of entertainment law for
the music industry business major. Topics which will supplement the existing BADM
300 curriculum will examine commercial law in the entertainment industry, legal
restraints on entertainment, intellectual property in entertainment assets, contractual
relations in the entertainment industry and other regulatory influences on
entertainment, including licensing, taxation and for-profit vs. not-for-profit
requirements. This covers all aspects of business law and is also specific for students
interested in music business or other types of non-profit law. Fall Semester, offered as
needed 3-0-3.
490 INTERNSHIP IN MUSIC BUSINESS 4-12 semester hours
Students will complete a 15-week Internship at a company in the music industry that
offers a varied,practical, and challenging learning experience. The internship will be
supervised by a highly-qualified sponsor from the company and the Director (advisor) of
the Music Business Program. Semester hours recommended for this course are 4-12
hours as documented; Four credits requires a 15-20-hour work week. Six credits can be
obtained with a 25-hour work week; 9 credits can be obtained with a 30 hour work
week; 12 credits can be obtained with a 40 or more hour work week. A detailed Journal,
as described in the course syllabus, under Obligations of the intern, is required. In
addition, if the student does not satisfy the communications requirement with a COMM
class, the student MUST present a lecture presentation of their journal following or at
the end of their internship. The Internship experience is an important bridge between
academic preparation and career development. At this point the student should have
completed most required courses and is expected to have developed a mature
knowledge, understanding and attitude regarding their choice of a career in music
industry. It is the goal of the Gardner-Webb University Music Business Program to have
all Seniors undertake an Internship at a professional firm involved in some facet of the
music industry. Offered as needed beginning in fall 2005. Prerequisites Senior standing,
Permission of Instructor.
THEATER ARTS (THEA)
203 APPLIED THEATER
1 semester hour
Participation in university theater production. 0-3-1.
205 SUMMER THEATER WORKSHOP 3 semester hours
Directed theater experience for five weeks each summer, available to high school and
college students. The workshop culminates in at least one production; dates and plays
are announced in the spring. 3-3-3.
222 STAGECRAFT 3 semester hours
Practical experience and instruction in fundamental technical theater production,
including standard practice, terms, methodology and materials with an historical
overview and concentration on basic modern practice. An understanding of basic
scenery, lighting and make-up design is accompanied by instruction in safe methods.
This is a participation course. 3-3-3.
School of Performing and Visual Arts/126
223 ADVANCED STAGECRAFT 3 semester hours
Advanced experience in scenic construction, lighting design and control and personnel
supervision. Includes an introduction to costuming and theater management practices.
Major production project required. Prerequisite: THEA 222. 3-3-3.
225 BEGINNING STAGE MAKE-UP 3 semester hours
An introduction to facial structure, color theory, basic make-up techniques, character makeup, fantasy make-up, and application techniques. Intensive practical application.
3-3-3.
235 THEATER SURVEY 3 semester hours
Encourages an appreciation and basic understanding of the world of live theatrical
performance. The course focuses on the artistry and mechanics of producing the modern
stage play. The knowledge, skills and talents necessary to succeed in the theater arts are
studied. Attendance at live theater performances may be required. 3-0-3.
325 ADVANCED STAGE MAKE-UP 3 semester hours
Building upon the foundation established in the prerequisite course in stage make-up, this
course introduces students to advanced make-up techniques, fantasy make-up, mask,
prosthetic techniques, and casting molds. Emphasis is placed upon the appropriateness of
designing and executing practical projects for characters from dramatic literature.
Prerequisite: THEA 225. 3-3-3.
330 ACTING I 3 semester hours
Integrated approach to acting, linking understanding with experiential knowledge of the
fundamentals of acting. Speech, movement, expression, etc. are explored with significant
emphasis on improvisation. 3-0-3.
331 ACTING II 3 semester hours
A continuation of the lessons learned in Acting I with emphasis placed on script analysis and
the special problems involved with acting in a period or classical play. Students will also be
exposed to the special problems of character acting with age, accents, and so on.
Prerequisite: THEA 330. 3-0-3.
332 STAGE COMBAT 3 semester hours
A laboratory course emphasizing the physical performance skills of stage combat, to include
sword work, quarterstaff, and unarmed combat. Nationally recognized standards for safety
are emphasized. Prerequisite: THEA 330. 3-0-3.
381 THEATER HISTORY I 3 semester hours
This course surveys the history of Western theater and dramatic literature from the
beginnings of civilization to the English Civil War. A short investigation into Oriental theater
will be made at the end of the semester. The primary objective of this course is to provide
the student with a broad-based knowledge of the personalities, literature, architectural
features, and theatrical technology found in the history of Western theater and how these
elements interact with the political, social, economic, and religious forces of their
respective periods. 3-0-3.
382 THEATER HISTORY II 3 semester hours
This course surveys the history of the theater and dramatic literature in Europe and America
beginning with the English Restoration and 17th century France, and continuing through
the end of the 19th century. The objective of the course is to provide the student with a
broad-based knowledge of the personalities, literature, architectural features, and theatrical
technology found in the history of Western theater and how these elements interact with
the political, social, economic, and religious forces of their respective periods. 3-0-3.
Gardner-Webb University/127
390 THEATER MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Organizational structures and management principles for educational, professional,
community and church-related theater programs with an emphasis on not-for-profit
organizations. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing or permission of instructor. 3-0-3.
400 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEATER 1 - 3 semester hours (variable)
Specialized study in selected areas of theater arts. Course content will vary and will
reflect current developments in the theater and respond to student interest and need.
421 ADVANCED PLAYWRITING
3 semester hours
Taught as a writing laboratory, this course introduces students to multiple models of
creativity employed in the writing process. An impulse writing technique (right brain)
will be combined with structural markers appealing to left hemisphere of the brain.
Together, these provide the basis for the writing process in this class. Students will
write 18 short projects (ten-minute plays and one-acts) during the first half of the class,
while the last half of the course will be dedicated to the writing of a full-length smallcast play as a term project. Prerequisite: COMM 310 or instructor approval. 3-0-3.
430 MODERN DRAMA 3 semester hours
A study of the development of drama from Henrik Ibsen to contemporary playwrights
such as Sam Sheppard and David Mamet. Every major movement and trend of the last
century will be explored including realism, absurdism and the social drama. Focus will
be on reading and evaluation of the plays and playwrights. 3-0-3.
434 DIRECTING I 3 semester hours
Basic principles of directing a theatrical production including script analysis, blocking,
auditioning, rehearsing and working with actors. Requires experience in at least one
theatrical production. Prerequisite: THEA 203 or instructor approval. 3-0-3.
435 DIRECTING II 3 semester hours
Students will receive hands-on training in directing their own productions. In addition
to directing several scenes in class, students will cast and direct their own one-act play
at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: THEA 434. 3-1-3.
440 ACTING III: PERIOD STYLES 3 semester hours
An advanced laboratory course exploring styles of acting for traditional and nontraditional dramatic literature. Topics studied may include styles of classical and neoclassical tragedy, 17th century comedy of manners, 18th century Italian comedy, 19th
century traditional farce, and non-realistic forms of the 20th century (the absurd, the
epic theater, mask, and theater of physical metaphor). Prerequisites: THEA 330, 331.
3-0-3.
441 ACTING IV: SHAKESPEARE 3 semester hours
Student actors will explore the challenges of acting Shakespeare by studying text,
character, and play structure. Utilizing exercises for developing breath, relaxation, vocal
energy, and creative acting choices, a series of Shakespearean scenes and monologues
will be performed. This course will build on skills learned in previous coursework.
Prerequisites: THEA 330, 331. 3-0-3.
442 ACTING FOR THE CAMERA 3 semester hours
An advanced course in acting designed to acquaint the student with changes in
technique that are necessary for performance before the film or television camera with
an emphasis on small scene performance. Students are afforded extensive scene work in
front of the camera. Prerequisites: THEA 330, 331. 3-0-3.
School of Performing and Visual Arts/128
450 THE THEATER AND CHRISTIANITY 3 semester hours
An exploration of Biblical perspectives concerning creativity and the arts with a special
emphasis on theater and the performing arts. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing or
permission of instructor. 3-0-3.
493 INTERNSHIP IN THEATER ARTS
3 semester hours
VISUAL ARTS (ARTS)
120 ART HISTORY I
A study of prehistoric, non-western, and European art from prehistoric up to the
Renaissance, 1400 A.D. The course will be conducted through slide lecture presentation.
Required for art minor, art major, art education. No prerequisite. 3-0-3.
125 ART HISTORY II
A study of Renaissance to contemporary artists. Review of Medieval Europe, Ottoman to
Gothic. Focus on European Art and art of the 20th century worldwide. No prerequisite,
however, ARTS 120 recommended to be taken first. 3-0-3.
140 19TH CENTURY ART HISTORY
The study of 19th century European, American and World Art. Lecture and slide lecture on
major artists, works of art and styles of art that shaped the period. Covers 1776-1900.
Students will supplement classroom study with museum field study. No prerequisite.
3-0-3.
145 20TH CENTURY ART HISTORY
Survey of 20th century European art, artists and art movements that shaped the period.
Students will study art within the cultural context of the time. Study of the prehistory of
modern art, Impressionism, Neo-Impressionism, Post-Impressionism. Painting and culture
in America, European influence on American art. No prerequisite. 3-0-3.
200 TWO DIMENSIONAL DESIGN
Introduction to the elements and principles of design as relates to two dimensional surface,
graphics, printmaking, painting, and photography. Includes a study of color theory and
practice. Required for art majors, minors. (Lab fee $50.00) No prerequisite. 6-0-3.
210 DRAWING 1
Introduction to the fundamentals of drawing in pencil, charcoal, and pen and ink.
Emphasis on still life and landscape with an introduction to figure. Students will study
techniques of gesture, line, value, proportion, and perspective. Methods of drawing from
observation will incorporate the elements of design and the principles of organization, into
the composition of the page. Required for art majors, minors, and preference given. (Lab
fee $50.00) No prerequisite. 6-0-3.
220 THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN –DESIGN II
Design II is an introduction to the elements and principles of design as relates to threedimensional sculpture. Students receive an introduction to color in the applied arts,
pottery, and in sculpture. Introduction to the language of art and to the tools and
techniques of working plastic media. Media used: plaster, clay, paper-mache, wire, foam.
Required for art majors, minors, and preference given. No prerequisite, however Design 1Art 200 Two Dimensional is recommended first. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
225 ART SURVEY
Introduction to major artists and styles in the history of art, emphasis on appreciating art in
its context an understanding the elements and principles of design. This is a survey class
open the entire student body. 3-0-3.
Gardner-Webb University/129
250 CERAMICS 1
Emphasis in the processes and techniques of hand building in clay. Introduction to wheelthrowing, glazing and firing methods including stoneware and Raku. Introduction to
terms and vocabulary of ceramics and to ceramics history. No prerequisite. (Lab fee
$50.00) 6-0-3.
260 PAINTING 1
Introduction to color theory and practice. This course is an overview; students will
receive instruction in the use of variety of techniques while working with acrylic,
tempera, gouache, and watercolor. Lecture and slide examples from art history will
supplement all practical experience. Required course activities include a field trip to local
museum and participation in the student art show at the end of the semester. No
Prerequisite. ARTS 200 or 210 recommended. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
280 SERIGRAPHY I
Printmaking 1 is an introductory course in technique and procedure of silkscreen
printing. Techniques of paper stencil, crayon and tusche blockout, glue block, photo
emulsion, as well as other methods will be covered. Emphasis will be on development of
personal imagery, compositional development, and understanding of color. No
Prerequisite. Art 210 or Art 200 recommended. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
290 SCULPTURE 1
Introduction to sculptural concepts and principles. Additive and subtractive processes
using plaster, modeling clay, and wood. Attention to contemporary approach to sculpture
and to artist working in the field. No Prerequisite. Art 210 or Art 220 recommended. (Lab
fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
305 CHRISTIANITY AND ART
Survey of major religious art works and their meaning and contemporary significance for
the individual and the church. No prerequisite. 3-0-3.
306 AFRICAN AMERICAN ART
The study of African American art from the late 18th century to the present,
concentrating on the 20th century. Students will examine the development of African
American art through analysis of the works, examination of political and social influences,
and study of artist’ biographies. Students will also participate in research projects, which
will include writing and/or other application of knowledge No prerequisite. 3-0-3
322 DRAWING II
Continued study in drawing in pencil, charcoal, and pen and ink, with introduction to
pastel, oil pastel and non-traditional media. Emphasis on content and meaning in
drawings. Development of drawing as a preliminary study for other media. Continued
study in techniques of gesture, line, value, proportion, and perspective. Methods of
drawing from observation incorporating the use of the elements of design, and the
principles of organization. Study of compositional style of major artists. Required for art
majors, minors, preference given. Prerequisite: Art 210 (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
323 DRAWING III
Development of an independent style in graphic media through continued studio
practice. Wide exploration of drawing media. Emphasis on the development of content
and meaning in students’ work. Concentration on study of landscape and still life.
Development of drawings as finished artistic statements. Development of student
portfolio. Study and presentation and care of drawings. Study will be supplemented by
field experiences to museums, galleries, and artist’s studios. Prerequisite: ARTS 210, 322.
(Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
School of Performing and Visual Arts/130
341 FIGURE DRAWING 1
Study of the figure through studio sessions with the model. Study of figure drawings of
master artists through slides, and field trips to museums/ galleries to examine the work.
Emphasis on proportional rendering of the figure and an understanding of the skeletal and
musculature systems of the figure. Development of graphic skills. Required for art majors,
minors. No Prerequisite. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
342 FIGURE DRAWING II
Additional study of the figure through studio sessions with the model. Study of figure
drawings of master artists through slide lecture, study trips to museums and galleries to
examine work. Additional study on proportional rendering of the figure. Development of
graphic skills. Required for students with a concentration in painting or drawing.
Recommended for all art majors. Prerequisite: ARTS 341. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
343 FIGURE DRAWING III
Additional study of the figure through studio sessions with the model. Study of figure
drawings of master artists through slides, field trips to museums, and galleries.
Development of individual portfolio in figure drawing and documentation of the work.
Required for a concentration in painting or drawing. Recommended for all art majors.
Perquisite: ARTS 342. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
344 FIGURE DRAWING IV
Additional study of the figure drawings of master artists through slides, field trips to
museums and galleries. Continued development of individual portfolio in figure drawing
and documentation of the work. Emphasis on graphic development. Recommended for
students with a concentration in painting or drawing. Recommended for all art majors.
Prerequisite: ARTS 343. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
352 CERAMICS II
Emphasis in the processes and techniques of wheel throwing. Some assignments in
handbuilding and combining wheel and hand-building techniques. Various glazing and
firing methods including stoneware, and Raku. Continued study of terms and vocabulary
of ceramics. Emphasis on current trends in ceramics. Prerequisite: ARTS 250 (Lab fee
$50.00) 6-0-3.
353 CERAMICS III
This course is an intermediate course concerned with the development of skills and
content in ceramic work. Various firing methods linked to glaze development and image
control are emphasized. Continued exploration of forming techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS
220, 250, 352. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
354 CERAMICS IV GLAZE CALCULATION/KILN CONSTRUCTION
This course is an advanced ceramic studio for the development of skills and concerns of
content in clay work. Emphasis on personal expression and development of an individual
clay portfolio. The course will focus on the development of glazes for various
temperature ranges and on the knowledge of kiln building and firing. Study will be
supplemented by field trips to museums workshops and conferences in the field, with the
opportunity to fire and build different type of kilns. Prerequisite: ARTS 353 (Lab fee
$50.00) 6-0-3.
362 PAINTING II
Continued studies in color theory and practice with emphasis on uses of acrylic media.
Study of professional uses of this media, and how it has changed painting. This course
will concentrate on the techniques of acrylic paint and mixed media. Students will learn
methods of preparing and painting surface, including stretching of canvas. Methods of
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presentation with participation in the end of semester student exhibition. Emphasis is
placed on individual instruction and independent development of student work.
Prerequisite: ARTS 260. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
363 PAINTING III
Advanced color theory and practice with emphasis on contemporary approaches. This
course will concentrate on the techniques of oil paint, oil pastel, and oil sticks. Students
will learn methods of preparing the painting surface, including stretching of canvas.
Methods of presentation with participation in end of semester student exhibition.
Emphasis is placed on individualized instruction and independent development of
student work. Prerequisite: ARTS 260. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
370 INTRODUCTION TO INTAGLIO
Arts 370 is the first class in metal plate etching and serves as introduction to the
techniques, safety procedures, history and possibilities of creating images with this
ancient art media. No prerequisites, ARTS 210 recommended. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
372 INTAGLIO II
Arts 372 is the second class in intaglio etching. Students will practice composition,
advanced imaging techniques, and safety procedures while working with traditional
etching media and methods. Students will study the history and possibilities of creating
images with intaglio methods. Prerequisite: ARTS 370. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3
373 INTAGLIO III
Arts 373 is the third class in intaglio. Students will practice composition, advanced
imaging techniques, and safety procedures while working with traditional etching
media and methods. Students will study the history and possibilities of creating images
with intaglio methods. Students will learn new non-toxic methods including uv
platemaking and computer imaging techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 372. (Lab fee
$50.00)
382 PRINTMAKING I
Printmaking II is the introductory class in relief printmaking. This course will introduce
students to relief printing using woodcuts, linocuts, and etchings. Emphasis of the class
will be learning effective techniques of the medium and compositional development of
the resulting print. No Prerequisite. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
383 PRINTINGMAKING III LITHOGRAPHY
Introductory course in lithography. Techniques of lithographic printing including use of
lithographic pencils, crayons, and tushe washes for production of black and white prints
pulled from stone, or metal plates. Emphasis on development of personal imagery and
compositional strength. No Prerequisite. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
384 RELIEF PRINTMAKING II
Arts 384 is the second class in relief printing. This class offers the student the
opportunity to practice larger scale methods of relief printmaking introduced in the
introductory class. This class will introduce multiple block, and reduction cut image
creation methods. Students of this class will be introduced to new materials, non-toxic
methods, and recent developments in the field. Prerequisite: Arts 382 Relief Printmaking
I, (Lab fee $50)
386 RELIEF PRINTMAKING III
The third class in relief printmaking offers the students the opportunity to build a
portfolio of relief prints using methods learned in 382, and 384. Students will continue
to practice multiple block color, and reduction relief methods. Students of the third
class will work extensively with new materials and methods used in contemporary
work. Prerequisite: Arts 384 Relief Printmaking II. (Lab fee $50) 6-0-3.
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388 SERIGRAPHY II
Serigraphy II is the second course of instruction in screen-printing. Students will
advance techniques of screen-printing learned in Arts 280 Serigraphy I. Students in this
class will learn new techniques of photo emulsion plate making including creating the
image using new non-toxic methods, and materials. Prerequisite: Art 280 Serigraphy I.
(Lab fee $50) 6-0-3
389 SERIGRAPHY III
Serigraphy III is advanced instruction in screen printing. Students in this class will
concentrate on computer generated imagery transferred to the screen through photo
emulsion, three color process printing, combination of methods, and self-directed study
of techniques, composition and color. Prerequisite: Art 388 (Lab fee $50)
392 SCULPTURE II STONE CARVING
Work in three-dimensional format using alabaster, soapstone, plaster, and marble.
Sculpture using the subtractive process. Attention to contemporary approach to
sculpture and to artist working in the field. Ability to learn and use safe shop procedure
is necessary. No Prerequisite. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
393 SCULPTURE III WELDED METAL SCULPTURE
Work in three-dimensional format using welded metal Attention to contemporary
approach to sculpture and to artist working in the field. Wiliness to learn and use safe
shop procedure is necessary. No Prerequisite. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
410 SENIOR SEMINAR I
The focus of this class is the preparation of the senior thesis required for all art majors.
Students of this class will concentrate on required research, development of outline, and
beginning stages of writing for the creative thesis paper that describes content and form
of their required senior exhibition work. This class will guide students in preparing their
thesis paper and slide portfolio for publication for the School of Performing and Visual
Arts. Prerequisites: senior standing. (Lab fee $50) 2-0-2 Fall.
413 SENIOR SEMINAR II
Students of Senior Seminar II will bring to a conclusion the work of writing the required
creative thesis paper that they begin in Senior Seminar I. Students of the class will select
and refine the creative thesis paper that illuminates the salient qualities of their senior
exhibit work. Students will be guided in this work by the class instructor and by a thesis
committee composed of art faculty. The work of the class will result in a published
thesis paper, and a slide portfolio of senior work that constitutes part of the library of
the visual art department. (Lab fee $50) 1-0-1 Spring.
415 ARTS METHODS
Arts Methods consists of clinical observations of the K-12 art classroom in the public
school system. This class prepares art students to teach art at the K-12 level through
preparation of unit lesson plans for K-12 students within the normal constraints of
classroom materials, equipment and time that a student teacher will encounter in the
public school system. The student learns procedures for control of the classroom, and
for working with the administration and the community to incorporate 21st century
goals in lessons provided to K-12 students. Lesson units created in ARTS 415 will be put
into practice by the art education student in EDUC 450. Admission to the Teacher
Education Program is a required prerequisite before enrolling in ARTS 415. Lab fee
required. 3-0-4
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416 TOPICS IN ART HISTORY
Specific and focused study of one time period, style, movement, subject or geographical
region of the world in relationship to art history. Specific and detailed course
description to be written and circulated by the instructor prior to offering the course.
May be used for study abroad credit upon department approval. May be repeated for
credit with change in topic and department approval. 3-0-3.
424 SENIOR EXHIBITIONS I
This course will teach students how to photograph both their two-dimensional and
three-dimensional work and how to prepare photographs and vita for successful
presentation in various electronic formats. In addition the course will teach students
how to present visual information to graduate schools and the art market through new
media. Students will prepare the poster and postcards used to notify the university
community of their senior exhibit. Art students taking this class will prepare the slide
documentation of their senior exhibit, learn how to format and enclose photographs in
the body of the thesis paper, and understand the requirements for publication of the
thesis paper. Students will prepare an artist statement, vita, slide record of senior
exhibition work and prepare for application to graduate schools, museums, and
galleries. Required for all art majors. Senior standing required. (Lab fee $50) 2-0-1 Fall
426 SENIOR EXHIBITIONS II
Students in senior exhibitions II will practice exhibition craft by assisting the gallery
director in matting and hanging the annual student undergraduate exhibit spring
semester. Students will also mat, prepare and hang the senior exhibition. Students will
develop a presentation quality traditional hard copy portfolio of images that includes
original work of at least twenty different pieces. Students will learn and practice
techniques for presentation of work including social networks and new media.
Prerequisites, senior standing. (Lab fee $50) 2-0-1 Spring
435 TOPICS IN SCULPTURE
A course offered as needed to engage students in the continuation and development of
work in sculptural methods, materials and media. Attention to contemporary approach
to sculpture and to artist working in the field. Wiliness to learn and use safe shop
procedure is necessary. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
455 TOPICS IN CERAMICS
Specific topics in ceramics. Offered as a way to narrow the focus of a semesters work to
one specific area of ceramics. Topics could be Kiln Technology, Raku Firing, Glaze
Calculation or other specific topics. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.
(Lab fee $50.00)
460 TOPICS IN PAINTING
Various specific topics in painting as defined by the individual instructor. Detailed and
specific course description to be written and circulated by the instructor prior to
offering of the course. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.(Lab fee $50.00)
6-0-3.
462 TOPICS IN WATERCOLOR PAINTING
Beginning watercolor painting emphasizing fundamentals of working with this medium.
Development of skills and technique in wet media and mixed media. Study of the
principles of pictorial organization and design. Plein-air painting when possible. An
overview of the history of watercolor and introduction to significant artists will be
presented through class lecture, slides and museum field trips. May be repeated for
credit with change in topic. 6-0-3.
School of Performing and Visual Arts/134
484 TOPICS IN PRINTMAKING
Study of specific areas and methods of printmaking as defined by the instructor.
Emphasis on development of personal imagery and compositional strength. Designed to
allow the student to develop in-depth in one or more areas of printmaking. Detailed and
specific course description to be written and circulated by the instructor prior to
offering of the course. No prerequisites. (Lab fee $50.00) 6-0-3.
495 INDEPENDENT STUDY
Individual problems in art education, studio, and art history. Subject to approval of
student advisor and supervising professor. 3-0-3.
496 INDEPENDENT STUDY
Individual problems in art education, studio, and art history. Subject to approval of
student advisor and supervising professor. 3-0-3.
Gardner-Webb University/135
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION
STUDIES
FACULTY
Chair: Associate Professor B. Carey
Professors: J. Lawrence, J. Webb
Assistant Professor: L. Luedeman
Instructor: A. Bridges
MISSION STATEMENT
In support of the university mission, the Department of Communication
Studies provides its graduates with a strong academic background in critical
thinking and basic communication skills, along with extensive experiencedbased preparation for work in media-related professions.
GOALS
To enable its graduates to:
1. demonstrate an understanding, sensitivity and competence in matters of
human exchange;
2. demonstrate competence, knowledge and skills in the application of the
principles of effective communication;
3. demonstrate practical entry-level skills appropriate to the communication
industry;
4. apply the knowledge and skills learned toward making meaningful
contributions to the global community in which we live.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Student learning outcomes specific to each major offered by the department
are described in the appropriate sections that follow.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The department offers two majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree:
Communication Studies
Journalism
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Communication Studies
Journalism
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
NOTE: The Department of Communication Studies uses the Apple Mac
platform in the computer lab and for teaching production-based courses. All
department coursework will be taught using software designed for the Mac. In
the communication industry, it is the standard computer platform, especially in
graphics, photography and video. Students, who major in Communication
Studies, are encouraged to consider purchasing a Mac for their personal
computer use. For computer recommendations, please see a Communication
Studies faculty member. Additionally, all students must purchase a 500GB or
larger, firewire hard drive for production coursework. This allows students to
protect their work from accidental loss in the computer lab and will allow
them to accumulate work that can be used in their portfolio.
Department of Communication Studies/136
MINOR REQUIREMENTS: Students majoring in Journalism are required to
complete any minor offered by the University. They may complete a minor in
English by taking an additional 15 hours in the department of English, including
English Literature 211, 212, 231, 232, or 251. In lieu of an out-of-department minor,
Journalism students may elect to minor in a discipline offered within the
department: Graphic Design, Photography, Public Relations, or Video & Film.
When the minor is to be taken from within the department, courses comprising
the minor should be selected in consultation with the student’s major advisor.
COMMUNICATION STUDIES (39 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will:
1. Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of audio,
written and visual communication;
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical foundations
of Communication;
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal and ethical
foundations of Communication;
4. Demonstrate adequate entry-level professional skills in the
chosen area of concentration;
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Core requirements must be satisfied. ENGL 101 and 102
are prerequisite to all major courses unless an exception is granted by the
chair. Students must complete a 15 hour core and a 24 hour
concentration. The core is comprised of the following courses:
COMM 220 (prerequisite for all courses), 310, 320, 380, and 480
The concentration must be selected from one of the following areas
(HONR 400 and/or HONR 401 may be used to fulfill three hours of the
concentration requirement):
GRAPHIC DESIGN (24 HOURS)
COMM 255, 370, 451, 470, 472, 479 (18 hours)
COMM 491 (3 hours)
JOUR 375 (3 hours)
PHOTOGRAPHY (24 HOURS)
COMM 255, 256, 351, 370, 459 and 491 (18 hours)
Two electives from the following: COMM 451, COMM 472,
JOUR 355, or JOUR 375 (6 hours)
PUBLIC RELATIONS (24 HOURS)
COMM 313, 314, 315, 370, 449, 491 (18 hours)
MRKT 300 (3 hours)
JOUR 375 (3 hours)
One elective from the following: COMM 233, COMM 235,
JOUR 375, BADM 325, or MRKT 304 (3 hours) NOTE:
BADM 325 and COMM 233 may not be applied to the concentration
if used to meet the university’s basic core requirements.
VIDEO AND FILM (24 HOURS)
COMM 238, 342, 360, 370, 460, and 469 (18 hours)
COMM 491 (3 hours)
Any COMM elective (3 hours)
Gardner-Webb University/137
Internships associated with the above concentrations consist of a
minimum 180 hours of off-campus, professionally supervised work.
Typically, internships are completed in businesses, government agencies or
offices, radio and television stations, networks, cable companies,
newspapers, photography studios, Internet service providers or other
professional organizations as appropriate to the student’s academic and
career goals approved in advance by the chair. Students are expected to
apply for and acquire their own internship placement. Students may and are
encouraged to take two internships towards their degree requirements.
JOURNALISM (39 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will demonstrate:
1. an understanding of the social responsibilities of a free press;
2. a full range of writing and editing processes and apply those
skills in both print and non-print media; and
3. practical skills in information gathering and reporting by
covering special events and designated news beats.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Core requirements must be satisfied. ENGL 101 and 102 are
prerequisite to all major courses unless an exception is granted by the chair.
Students must complete a 15 hour core and a 24 hour concentration. The
core is comprised of the following courses:
COMM 220 (prerequisite for all courses), 310, 320, 380, and 480
The concentration must be selected from one of the following areas
(HONR 400 and/or HONR 401 may be used to fulfill three hours of the
concentration requirement):
BROADCAST JOURNALISM (24 HOURS)
COMM 238, 360, 370, and 460 (12 hours)
JOUR 317 and 491 (6 hours)
Two electives from the following: COMM 342, 469, or
JOUR 400 (6 hours)
NEWS EDITORIAL (24 HOURS)
JOUR 201, 317, 318, and 491 (12 hours) NOTE: JOUR 201 is
a one-hour course. The student may enroll in this course as
often as is desired. However, no more that three semester
hours may be applied toward the concentration.
COMM 370 (3 hours)
ENGL 409 (3 hours)
Two electives from the following: COMM 255, JOUR 303,
375, or 403 (a minimum of 6 hours)
PHOTOJOURNALISM (24 HOURS)
COMM 255, 256, 360, and 370 (12 hours)
JOUR 355, 450, 459, and 491 (12 hours)
Internships associated with the above concentrations consist of a
minimum 180 hours of off-campus, professionally supervised work.
Typically, internships are completed in businesses, government agencies
or offices, radio and television stations, networks, cable companies,
newspapers, photography studios, Internet service providers or other
professional organizations as appropriate to the student’s academic and
Department of Communication Studies/138
career goals approved in advance by the chair. Students are expected
to apply for and acquire their own internship placement. Students
may and are encouraged to take two internships towards their degree
requirements.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAILS
COMMUNICATION STUDIES (18 HOURS)
COMM 220, 310, 480 and 9 hours of COMM electives
JOURNALISM (18 HOURS)
COMM 220, 310, 480, and 9 hours of JOUR electives
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COMM)
220 DIGITAL MEDIA CONVERGENCE 3 semester hours
Media convergence is the use of multiple mediums to create new media. This course
teaches the basics of visual literacy, digital photography, digital audio, digital video, and
design. Students learn how these basics combine to produce a multi-media production.
NOTE: This course is the prerequisite for all production classes. (Lab Fee.) 3-3-3.
230 TECHNOLOGY AND AMERICAN SOCIETY 3 semester hours
Surveys the evolution of communication and information technology from Gutenberg to
the Information Superhighway. Special emphasis is placed on the historical development
of communication media and their influence on society and culture as well as business,
economic and political systems in the western world. 3-0-3.
233 SPEECH 3 semester hours
Instruction in the art of public speaking including creation of material, safe physical
preparation and long term care of the student’s voice. This is an activity course, which
emphasizes performance. 3-0-3.
235 DEBATE 1 semester hour
Not restricted to communication majors. Training and practice in the principles of
college debate. Intercollegiate competition. 0-1-1.
238 ANNOUNCING 3 semester hours
Emphasizes vocal performance skills essential to successful communication through
electronic media. Looks into ways of conveying mood and message content effectively.
Includes guidelines for proper pronunciation, articulation, voice quality and English
usage. Also covers working with cameras in specialized announcing situations
encountered in the broadcasting industry. 3-1-3.
255 PHOTOGRAPHY 3 semester hours
Introduction to basic photography skills, including composition and techniques. Student
must provide his/her own digital media and photographic printing papers. (Additional
cost & Lab Fee.) Concurrent participation in newspaper staff is highly recommended.
Prerequisite: Comm220 or permission of instructor. 3-2-3.
256 INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY 3 semester hours
More advanced photographic work in the studio and in available light conditions. Black
and white and color photography is used to communicate ideas and concepts visually.
Intermediate Photography is the second in a series of pure photography classes designed
to prepare the student for work in the photographic industry, the formal studio, the
Gardner-Webb University/139
graphics design arena and as a freelance photographer or photojournalist. Students must
provide their own SLR camera and flash with pivoting head, as well as film and paper.
Prerequisite: COMM 255. (Additional cost & Lab Fee.) 3-3-3.
270 INTERNET SURVEY 3 semester hours
An introduction to the variety of services and resources provided by the Internet. The
use of the worldwide web as a research tool is emphasized. 3-1-3.
285 COMMUNICATION IN SPORT
3 semester hours
An examination of the interrelationship and symbiotic relationship between sports and
media in today’s society. This course will utilize various broadcast, print, and electronic
media to examine how they are vital to the success of the sport organization and how
they shape and reinforce cultural values. Cross-listed with SPMG 285. 3-0-3.
310 TECHNIQUES OF MEDIA WRITING 3 semester hours
The study and practice of writing for the media. Provides experience in writing for
newspapers, corporate publications, television, radio, film, and the Internet. 3-0-3. WC-II
313 PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 3 semester hours
An examination of theory, procedure and practice in public relations. Surveys the duties
of the PR practitioner. Provides an overview of campaign design, fund raising,
budgeting, issues management, contingency planning, problem analysis and use of
research tools. Emphasis is on the professional practices and ethical standards important
to effective communication within organizations and between organizations and their
publics. Prerequisite: COMM 220 or permission of instructor. 3-0-3.
314 PUBLIC RELATIONS COPY WRITING 3 semester hours
Fundamentals of public relations writing including preparation of press releases and
backgrounders, brochures and flyers, newsletters, press kits and news releases,
institutional advertising copy, executive speeches and annual reports. Emphasis is on the
basics of grammar, style and format. Prerequisite: COMM 220 and COMM 310. 3-0-3.
315 PUBLIC RELATIONS TECHNIQUES 3 semester hours
Techniques and skills used in preparing public relations packages for print and
electronic media. This course develops a framework for understanding how the various
tasks and concepts used in public relations work comes together to shape a campaign
that is based in theory. Prerequisite: COMM 313. 3-0-3.
320 MEDIA OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
An overview of media operations, management and personnel. Introduces the basic
aspects of media from the early years to the present. Introduction to public relations,
advertising, marketing and sales in the media. 3-0-3.
342 AUDIO PRODUCTION 3 semester hours
Recording techniques, advertising design and spot production. Includes work in vocal
delivery, microphone technique, and digital multi-track recording and mixing for audio
and video post-production. Prerequisite: Comm220 or permission of instructor.. 3-1-3.
350 FILM LITERATURE AND CRITICISM 3 semester hours
An overview of the history of cinema and the development of film conventions in visual
communication. Looks at film as an art form and a social force. 3-0-3.
Department of Communication Studies/140
351 COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 3 semester hours
Provides photographic experience representative of that typical in professional
commercial still photography. Techniques, assignments, expectations, working
conditions, types of photographic products, studio procedures, and the marketing and
management of the commercial studio will be covered. Commercial photographic
techniques will be applied in practical assignments. (Additional cost & Lab Fee.)
Prerequisite: COMM 255, COMM 256. 3-3-3.
359 TOPICS IN FILM 1 semester hour
Analysis and discussion of the cinema. Topics will be determined by the films screened
at the campus film festival. (Also offered as ENGL 379). 0-2-1.
360 INTRO TO DIGITAL VIDEO & NONLINEAR EDITING 3 semester hours
A basic course in digital videography and nonlinear computer-based video editing that
introduces students to the most basic skills and techniques of ENG field production
using digital technology. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: Comm220 or permission of instructor.
3-1-3.
370 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER GRAPHICS 3 semester hours
An introduction to computer illustration, image scanning, photographic digitizing, and
layout design basics through the use of several current software packages. The use of
the computer as a presentation organizer and primary presentation tool is also covered.
Prerequisite: COMM 220 or permission of instructor. (Lab Fee) 3-2-3.
379 INTERNET SEMINAR
1 semester hour
Advanced work with the Internet in selected areas of research, interpersonal
communication, data storage and retrieval and multimedia applications.
380 COMMUNICATION THEORY 3 semester hours
A detailed treatment of the factors involved in the exchange of ideas and information;
emphasis upon philosophical bases, types of media, and research techniques.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 3-0-3. WC-II
400 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION 1 - 3 semester hours (variable)
Specialized study in selected areas of the communication industry. Course content will
vary and will reflect current developments in the industry and respond to student
interest and need.
401 STUDENT RADIO STAFF 1 semester hour
Practical experience and instruction in all phases of radio station operations through the
facilities of WGWG-FM, the university’s radio station. Hands-on opportunities are
available in audio production, air-shift performance, and management procedures.
Prerequisites: COMM 238, COMM 320 and COMM 342 or permission of instructor. 0-3-1.
402 STUDENT TELEVISION STAFF 1 semester hour
Practical experience and instruction in writing, producing and editing television
programming for cable distribution. Prerequisites: COMM 238 and COMM 360 or
permission of instructor. 0-3-1.
449 PUBLIC RELATIONS PORTFOLIO 3 semester hours
An opportunity for the student to develop the public relations portfolio. Body of work
will encompass wide range of sample projects and areas of experience and expertise.
Prerequisites: COMM 313, 314, and 315 or consent of instructor. (Additional cost and
Lab Fee) 3-3-3.
Gardner-Webb University/141
451 IMAGING TECHNOLOGIES 3 semester hours
Image manipulation in black and white and color from original digital sources and
scanned negatives. Image work is designed to achieve visual objectives. Techniques
learned apply to the portrait studio, publishing and the Internet. Prerequisites: COMM
370. (Additional cost & Lab Fee) 3-3-3.
459 PORTFOLIO
3 semester hour
An opportunity for the student to develop the photographic portfolio. Body of work
should focus on the student’s area of interest, e.g., portraiture, product photography,
photojournalism, landscape or photographic art. Prerequisites: COMM 255, 256, 351 or
consent of instructor. (Additional cost & Lab Fee) 3-3-3.
460 INTER. DIGITAL VIDEO & NONLINEAR EDITING 3 semester hours
A more advanced course in digital videography and nonlinear computer-based video
editing in which students produce longer news, feature and/or dramatic projects.
Prerequisite: COMM 360 or equivalent. (Lab Fee) 3-1-3.
469 VIDEO AND FILM PORTFOLIO 3 semester hours
An opportunity for the student to develop the video and film portfolio. Body of work will
encompass long-form program genres such as documentaries and movies.
(Lab Fee) Prerequisite: COMM360 and COMM 460 or equivalent. 3-2-3.
470 ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS 3 semester hours
Advanced work in Adobe PhotoShop and other applications used in publication
preparation and multimedia design. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: COMM 370. 3-2-3.
472 WEB PUBLISHING 3 semester hours
Application of graphic, illustration, photographic, and word processing programs in
production of web pages on the Internet. HTML code and JAVA script is introduced.
Emphasis is placed on visual design, message effectiveness, and site efficiency. Each
student will produce his or her own web pages. (Lab Fee) Prerequisite: COMM 370. 3-1-3.
479 GRAPHIC DESIGN PORTFOLIO 3 semester hours
An opportunity for the student to develop the graphic design portfolio. Body of work will
encompass wide range of sample projects and areas of experience and expertise.
Prerequisites: COMM 370, 470, and 472 or consent of instructor. (Additional cost and Lab
Fee) 3-3-3.
480 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN MASS MEDIA 3 semester hours
Theory and practice of media law with discussion of related contemporary ethical issues.
Particular attention will be paid to ways the emergence of the world-wide-web is
challenging traditional solutions to communication problems. 3-0-3.
490 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 - 3 semester hours (variable)
Supervised study and/or advanced hands-on development of skills and techniques in one
of many disciplines offered in Communication Studies. Prerequisite: (1) Completion of
course sequence in area of interest; (2) approval of instructor and department chair.
491 AND 493 INTERNSHIPS 3 semester hours
491 is for the first internship experience and 493 is for the second internship experience.
Department of Communication Studies/142
JOURNALISM (JOUR)
201 STUDENT NEWSPAPER STAFF 1 semester hour
Experience and instruction in all phases of the production of the Gardner-Webb
University student newspaper, The Pilot. 1-1-1.
202 STUDENT PHOTO STAFF 1 semester hour
Experience and instruction in all phases of photojournalism. Students will work for
student publications, University Public Relations, and Sports Information. Prerequisites:
consent of instructor. 1-1-1.
211 STUDENT YEARBOOK STAFF 1 semester hour
Experience and instruction in all phases of the production of the Gardner-Webb
University student yearbook. 1-1-1.
303 NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL STAFF I 1 semester hour
Instruction and hands-on experience in the editing and pre-press production of the
Gardner Webb University student newspaper, The Pilot. This class is for section editors
and will introduce them to the basics of editing the student newspaper. Prerequisite:
JOUR 201 and JOUR 318 or permission of instructor. May be taken twice as elective
credit. 1-2-1.
317 REPORTING 3 semester hours
Introduction to basic journalistic skills with emphasis on methodology in interviewing,
computer assisted research, writing and reporting the news. Concurrent participation in
newspaper highly recommended. 3-0-3.
318 EDITING 3 semester hours
Advanced journalistic skills with emphasis on the methodology of editing copy for a
variety of media. Prerequisite: JOUR 317 or permission of instructor. 3-0-3.
355 PHOTOJOURNALISM 3 semester hours
Editorial photography and the challenges of available light conditions are emphasized.
Ethics and law central to a photojournalist’s activities are also covered. Concurrent
participation in newspaper staff is highly recommended. (Additional cost & Lab fee)
Prerequisite: COMM 255 or permission of instructor. 3-2-3.
375 GRAPHIC DESIGN AND PUBLICATION 3 semester hours
Publication practices and design principles common among the electronic and print
media, including the Internet, magazines, newspapers, and desktop publishers. Includes
the application of computer design and layout systems and software. Prerequisite:
COMM 370. 3-1-3. (Lab fee)
403 NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL STAFF II 2 semester hours
Advanced experience in editing and pre-press production of the Gardner-Webb
University student newspaper, The Pilot. This class is for senior editors and will immerse
them in the procedures of the Quark Publishing System allowing them to plan, edit,
design and manage the student newspaper. Prerequisite: JOUR 201, JOUR 318, and JOUR
303 and permission of instructor. May be taken twice as elective credit. 2-4-2.
Gardner-Webb University/143
450 DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY 3 semester hours
Advanced work in photojournalism. Includes in-depth photo story development and
photo editing. This course is designed to assist the student in preparing for their
portfolio class and obtaining a position as a photojournalist. (Additional cost & Lab Fee)
Prerequisite: JOUR 355 or consent of instructor. 3-3-3.
459 PORTFOLIO
3 semester hours
An opportunity for the student to develop the photographic portfolio. Body of work
should focus on the student’s area of interest, e.g., portraiture, product photography,
photojournalism, landscape or photographic art. Prerequisites: JOUR 355 or consent of
instructor. (Additional cost & Lab Fee) 3-3-3.
491 INTERNSHIP IN JOURNALISM
3 semester hours
Department of English Language and Literature/144
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE
AND LITERATURE
FACULTY
Chair: Professor J. Hobbs
Professors: F. Bonner, J. Land, G. Price, M. Theado, D. Parker
Associate Professors: C. Davis
Assistant Professors: N. Bottoms, C. Duffus, S. Stuart, S. Hartman
Instructors: J. Buckner, A. Nance
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Department of English Language and Literature is to
foster meaningful intellectual thought, critical analysis, and spiritual challenge
through the study of composition and rhetoric, literature, creative writing, and
linguistics.
GOALS
To enable students to:
1. develop intellectually,
2. think, read, and write independently and critically, and
3. communicate effectively
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
1. Communicate and compose effectively;
2. Demonstrate effective processes for reading a wide variety of texts;
3. Interpret and analyze literature and position texts in their historical and
social contexts;
4. Demonstrate information literacy skills by defining and articulating the
need for information, accessing needed information effectively and
efficiently, evaluating information and its sources critically, and using
information ethically and legally to accomplish a specific purpose;
5. Demonstrate effective navigation skills in a variety of rhetorical contexts;
6. Analyze the purposes of language in various contexts and forms: reading,
writing, speaking, listening, and viewing;
7. Demonstrate fluency with digital technologies;
8. Be well prepared for further study and a variety of professional careers.
In addition to the above, students majoring in English with Teacher
Licensure will:
1. Construct philosophical frameworks and pedagogical practices that
acknowledge the complexities of literacy in the twenty-first century;
2. Demonstrate the knowledge and use of the function, the influence, and
the diversity of language;
3. Demonstrate a commitment to reflective practices and lifelong
professional learning.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The department offers two majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree:
English
English with Teacher Licensure
Gardner-Webb University/145
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
English
Writing
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
ENGLISH (36 HOURS)
The Basic Course requirements must be satisfied. No more than nine hours of
ENGL 200-level literature survey courses may be counted toward the major. All
majors must participate in an exit interview during their last semester of English
classes. The optional minor may be selected from any offered by the University.
The student must select one of the following two options of emphasis:
PRE-PROFESSIONAL
Classes required for completing this emphasis are as follows:
ENGL 201, 391, 471, and 491 (7 hours)
A minimum of one course from each of the five literature groups
(15 hours)
ENGL electives (at least one American, one British, and one world
literature course must be included in the 300/400-level course
selections) (14 hours)
WRITING
Students choosing this option within the major will select one of three
tracks of concentration. In each, the workshop paper should focus on
some aspect of the craft of writing.
GENERAL WRITING
Classes required for completing this track are as follows:
ENGL 201, 301, 391, 491, 493, and 494 (11 hours)
ENGL 204, JOUR 201, or JOUR 303 (1 hour)
ENGL 203, 303, 305, 306, 309, 409, or COMM 310 (9 hours)
Any ENGL literature electives (15 hours)
PROFESSIONAL WRITING
Classes required for completing this track are as follows:
ENGL 201, 203, 301, 303, 391, 409, 491, 493, and 494
(20 hours)
ENGL 204, JOUR 201, or JOUR 303 (1 hour)
Any ENGL literature electives (15 hours)
CREATIVE WRITING
Classes required for completing this track are as follows:
ENGL 201, 204, 301, 305, 306, 309, 391, 471, 491, and 494
(21 hours)
Any ENGL literature electives (15 hours)
ENGLISH WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (36 HOURS)
The General Education requirements must be satisfied. The workshop paper
should focus on an area useful to one enter the teaching profession.
Classes required for completing the major are as follows:
ENGL 201, 359, 363, 364, 391, 413, 471, 475, 483, and 491 (25 hours)
One course from the literature groupings: A1, A2, B2, and W1 (251, 252, or
354). (12 hours. One 3-hour General Education literature survey may satisfy
group requirement but not count toward hours in the major.)
Department of English Language and Literature/146
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor
consisting of EDUC 250, 350, 440, 450; ENGL 481 or EDUC 432; and PSYC
303. No grade lower than a 2.0 may be counted toward meeting a statemandated competency.
NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete more than 50% of the
Professional Education minor (excluding student teaching) until they are
formally admitted to the Teacher Education Program. All candidates must be
fully admitted into and remain qualified for the Teacher Education Program a
minimum of one full semester prior to the semester in which they student
teach. For a candidate planning to student teach during the fall semester,
admission into teacher education must occur by the end of the previous fall
semester; for a candidate planning to student teach during the spring semester,
admission to the program must occur by the end of the previous spring
semester. Summer sessions do not count as a semester.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
ENGLISH (15 HOURS)
Any ENGL electives beyond the core requirements. No more than three
hours of ENGL 200-level literature survey courses may be utilized.
WRITING (15 HOURS)
ENGL 301 and 12 hours selected from the following: ENGL 201, 203, 303,
305, 306, 309, or 409.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
must complete ENGL 101 and 102; HIST 101 and 102; and a foreign language
through the Intermediate I level (201).
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
LITERATURE COURSE GROUPINGS:
A1 - EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE
231 American Literature Survey I
333 Foundations of American Culture
A2 – LATE 19TH CENTURY THROUGH MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE
232 American Literature Survey II
331 Modern British and American Literature
A1 OR A2 (DEPENDING ON CLASS FOCUS IN A PARTICULAR SEMESTER)
335
339
373
377
431
434
Faces of Southern Literature
Topics in American Literature
Studies in Folklore
Studies in the American Novel
Seminar in American Literature
African American Literature
B1 – BRITISH LITERATURE THROUGH THE RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY
211
311
312
314
413
British Literature Survey I
Medieval British Literature
British Literature from 1550 to 1660
Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature
Shakespeare
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B2 – BRITISH LITERATURE FROM THE LATE 18TH CENTURY THROUGH THE MODERN
PERIOD
212
315
316
331
British Literature Survey II
British Romanticism
Victorian Literature
Modern British and American Literature
B1 OR B2 (DEPENDING ON CLASS FOCUS IN A PARTICULAR SEMESTER)
375 Studies in the British Novel
411 Seminar in British Literature
WORLD LITERATURE
251
252
354
356
359
World Literature Survey I
World Literature Survey II
Mythology
Postcolonial Literature
Topics in World Literature
CRITICAL LITERACY (CRLT)
101 CRITICAL LITERACY 3 semester hours
A critical examination of language integrating reading and writing. Developing the ability
to become rhetorically aware of the complexity of language by reading and analyzing
challenging texts and writing informed responses. CRLT 101L is a required lab where
application of course strategies are explored through discussion seminars and writing
workshops. Students may not take CRLT 101 for credit if they already have credit for
ENGL 101 or 102. 3-1-4 (Fall, Spring)
ENGLISH (ENGL)
101 COMPOSITION I 3 semester hours
Introduction to expository writing by process method. Grammar and mechanics as
needed. Selected readings. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
102 COMPOSITION II 3 semester hours
Continuation of process writing with emphasis on argumentation, critiquing, essay
examinations and research skills. Analysis of literary and non-literary texts. Prerequisite:
English 101. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
191 COMPOSITION STYLE WORKSHOP 1 semester hour
Supplemental workshop for ENGL 101 examining stylistic choices in writing, especially as
grammar and conventions convey meaning. 1-0-1 (Fall, Spring)
201 INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH STUDIES 1 semester hour (Required of all Majors)
An introduction to the many facets of English study, including research and writing
methodologies, a working vocabulary of literary terms, stylistics and mechanics, the
nature of the discipline, and career options. Required for all English majors;
recommended for minors and students contemplating an English major or minor. Should
be taken as soon as it is offered upon declaring the major or minor. Prerequisite: English
102 1-0-1. (Spring)
203 NEWSWRITING 3 semester hours
Fundamentals of gathering and writing the news. Topics will include news values, writing
leads, story structure, conducting and using interviews, story types, effective journalistic
style, and copy editing using the Associated Press stylebook. Enrolled students will be
contributing writers for the campus newspaper. Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3. (Fall)
Department of English Language and Literature/148
204 LITERARY MAGAZINE STAFF 1 semester hour
Experience and instruction in the editing and design of literary magazines, focused on
the production of the Gardner-Webb University literary magazine, Broad River Review .
Prerequisite: English 102. 0-2-1. (Fall, Spring)
211 BRITISH LITERATURE SURVEY I 3 semester hours
Representative writers from the beginnings through the eighteenth century.
Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
212 BRITISH LITERATURE SURVEY II 3 semester hours
Representative writers from the late eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisite:
English 102 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
231 AMERICAN LITERATURE SURVEY I 3 semester hours
Representative writers from the Colonial period to Whitman. Prerequisite: English 102.
3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
232 AMERICAN LITERATURE SURVEY II 3 semester hours
Representative writers from Walt Whitman to the present. Prerequisite: English 102
3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
251 WORLD LITERATURE SURVEY I 3 semester hours
Literature from ancient times through the 16th century in Western and non-Western
cultures, excluding British and American. Prerequisite: English 102. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
252 WORLD LITERATURE SURVEY II 3 semester hours
This course is the second of the World Literature survey courses, which covers material
from 1650 through contemporary literatures. Selected works of literature from the
Middle East, Europe, Latin America, Africa, India, Asia, the Pacific Islands and Indigenous
Peoples with emphasis on non-European literatures. This course excludes literature
from the United States and England. Prerequisite: English 102. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
270 RHETORIC 3 semester hours
Development of skill in rhetoric, the ancient art or discipline that deals with the use of
discourse to inform or persuade or motivate an audience. Prerequisite: English 102.
3-0-3. (Spring)
301 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 3 semester hours
Intensive practice in and analysis of expository writing with emphasis on process,
structure, style, and maturity of expression. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: English 102 (Spring, odd
years) WC II course
303 PROFESSIONAL WRITING 3 semester hours
Study of appropriate genres and techniques of writing and editing utilized in a variety of
professional occupations: desktop publishing, advanced writing skills, articles,
brochures, presentation materials based on research, and newsletters. 3-0-3.
Prerequisite: English 102 (Spring, odd years)
305 CREATIVE WRITING 3 semester hours
Introduction to fundamental techniques of writing fiction, poetry, and drama.
Prerequisite: English 102, or permission of instructor. 3-0-3. (Spring)
306 POETRY WRITING 3 semester hours
Introduction to the conventions of poetry, in both free verse and fixed forms. Students
read and write poetry in a workshop setting using a variety of techniques. Prerequisite:
ENGL 305, or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
Gardner-Webb University/149
309 FICTION WRITING 3 semester hours
Introduction to the conventions of contemporary short fiction. Students read and write
short stories in a workshop setting using basic terminology. Prerequisite: Prerequisite:
ENGL 305, or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
311 MEDIEVAL BRITISH LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Study of Beowulf and other Anglo-Saxon achievements; medieval drama, romance,
poetry and Chaucer. Prerequisite: English 102 WCII course. 3-0-3.
312 BRITISH LITERATURE FROM 1550 TO 1660 3 semester hours
Study of poetry, drama, and selected prose from Shakespeare's contemporaries through
Milton. Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3.
314 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Selected poetry, essays and drama; includes Pope, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, others.
Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3.
315 BRITISH ROMANTICISM 3 semester hours
Major poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, others; selected
prose. Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3.
316 VICTORIAN LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Poetry of Browning, Tennyson, Arnold, others; selected prose. Prerequisite: English 102
3-0-3.
331 MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Study of representative modern writers from the beginning of the twentieth century
through WWII, such as Yeats, Woolf, Eliot, Joyce, Faulkner, Welty, and Cather.
Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3.
333 FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN CULTURE 3 semester hours
A cultural/historical study of American Renaissance writes such as Hawthorne, Emerson,
Stowe, Whitman, Thoreau, Dickinson, Melville, Southworth, Fern, Jacobs, and Douglas.
Emphasis on the philosophical underpinnings of American culture. Prerequisite: English
102. 3-0-3.
335 FACES OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Study of varying aspects of Southern Literature with focus on themes, cultural
populations, genres, or other regional traits. Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3. WCII
course.
339 TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Study by genre, ethnicity, sexuality, theme, or period of one or more of the diverse
aspects of past and present American Literature. Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3. WCII
course.
344 STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 1 semester hour
A focused and in-depth study of one contemporary author’s work. The selected author
usually will coincide with the Gardner-Webb University Visiting Writers Series. May be
repeated up to three times. Prerequisite: English 102 1-0-1. (Spring)
354 MYTHOLOGY 3 semester hours
An introductory course, emphasizing Greek mythology, but including myths of other
cultures. Students will be expected not only to know the myths, but also to examine
the role of myth in the lives of humans and human communities, past and present,
through their research and class discussion. Prerequisite: English 102. 3-0-3
Department of English Language and Literature/150
356 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE 3 semester hours
This course will examine literature influenced by the historical and / or contemporary
forces of colonization and its aftermath. This course will also provide students with an
introduction to the theoretical frameworks that inform postcolonial studies. Possible
topics and themes include colonialism/neocolonialism/postcolonialism; Diaspora;
identity, especially in regards to race, gender, and class as well as language; cultural
contact zones; and the historical and material conditions that underlie the production of
literature. Texts will be drawn mainly from writers from non-European backgrounds.
The course may be focused on a particular region, author, or theme. Prerequisite:
English 102 3-0-3
359 TOPICS IN WORLD LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Exploration of modern literary works from a global perspective. Themes, writers, and
regions represented will vary. (Opportunities will be provided for the English Education
major to examine practical applications of the course content in the secondary
classroom.) Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3 (Spring, odd years)
363 STRUCTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 3 semester hours
Study of the structure of the English language and its development. Emphasizes
grammar, but includes usage, morphology, and etymology. Prerequisite: English 102
3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
364 LANGUAGE AND LITERACY THROUGH THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
3 semester hours
An introduction to the English language beginning with its development from ProtoIndo-European and movement over the centuries to Modern English. Emphasis on the
sociotechnological landscape and the way its changing nature continually influences
language and literacy. (Opportunities will be provided for the English Education and
other teacher education majors to examine practical applications of the course content
in the classroom.) Prerequisite 102 3-0-3
373 STUDIES IN FOLKLORE 3 semester hours
An introductory course emphasizing verbal folklore such as folktales, legends and songs
in diverse cultures. Focus may be regional, general or literary as interests dictate.
Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3.
375 STUDIES IN THE BRITISH NOVEL 3 semester hours
The British novel taught by periods, themes or authors as determined by the professor.
Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3.
377 STUDIES IN THE AMERICAN NOVEL 3 semester hours
An investigation of the American novel by periods, authors, or topics as determined by
the professor. Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3. WCII course.
379 TOPICS IN FILM 1 semester hour
Ongoing discussion of cinema based on selected films. Topics will vary depending on
focus of selections. (Cross listed with Communications as COMM 359.) Prerequisite:
English 102 0-2-1.
391 WORKSHOP IN ENGLISH I 1 semester hour (required of all majors)
Studies in the exploration, research, development and presentation of a prospectus for a
major research and analytical essay on a subject appropriate to the major. May not be
taken before second semester of junior year. Prerequisites: English 201 for all students
and EDUC 250 for English Education majors. 1-1-1. (Fall, Spring) WC II course
Gardner-Webb University/151
392 LITERARY TRAVEL 1-3 semester hours
A visit of at least a week's duration focusing on places of literary significance. Requires
readings, a journal, and a paper assigned by the professor.
409 FEATURE WRITING 3 semester hours
Feature article writing for newspapers and magazines. Course emphasizes writing for
publication. Workshop format affords students opportunity to pursue special
journalistic writing interests such as sports or religious journalism. Prerequisite: English
203, or permission of instructor. 3-0-3. WCII course. (Spring, even years)
411 SEMINAR IN BRITISH LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Advanced study of a selected subject in British literature with emphasis on individual
research, reports, scholarly exchange and analytical discussion. Prerequisite: English 102
3-0-3.
413 SHAKESPEARE 3 semester hours
Study of representative plays and poetry. Prerequisite: English 102
years)
3-0-3. (Fall, odd
431 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Advanced study of a selected subject in American literature with emphasis on individual
and group research, reports, scholarly exchange and analytical discussion. Prerequisite:
English 102. 3-0-3.
434 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 semester hours
Representative African American works from the 18th Century to the present:
nonfiction, poetry, lyrics, plays, short fiction, and novels. Prerequisite: English 102.3-0-3.
471 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE 3 semester hours
A study of critical approaches to literary and other texts. Focus on contemporary
approaches – such as formalism, deconstruction, reader-response criticism, new
historicism, gender theory and others - with practical application of theories to a range
of literary texts. Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3. (Fall)
475 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 3 semester hours
This course is designed to provide opportunities for students to engage in a thorough
examination of the field of young adult literature. Opportunities will be provided for the
student to examine practical and creative applications of the course content in order to
enhance the presentation of literature in the secondary or middle grades classroom.
Prerequisite: English 102 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years)
481 METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH 3 semester hours
Instruction in the techniques of and the materials for teaching English in grades 9-12.
Supervised field experience required. Prerequisites: English 102 and EDUC 250. 3-0-3.
(Fall, even years)
483 THE TEACHING OF WRITING 3 semester hours
Theories, research, and practice in the teaching of writing. Prerequisite: English 102 and
EDUC 250. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years) WCII course.
Department of English Language and Literature/152
491 WORKSHOP IN ENGLISH II 2 semester hours
(required of all majors)
Development of a research and analytical essay/presentation on a subject appropriate to
the major. Supervised experience in the research, writing and presentation processes.
Prerequisite: English 391. 2-1-2. (Fall, Spring) WC II course
493 INTERNSHIP IN WRITING 3 semester hours
Experience involving supervised application of writing skills within an organization
outside the classroom. Prerequisite: Writing course(s) above the 200 level, approval of
department. Application deadlines: Nov. 1 for spring; April 1 for summer and fall. (Fall,
Spring, Summer)
494 WRITING PORTFOLIO 1 semester hours
Students will compile, revise, and edit a body of written work, whether it be creative,
professional, or academic. Intended for majors and minors only. To be taken during the
student’s final semester, or when all writing requirements have been satisfied. (Spring)
Gardner-Webb University/153
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICAL
SCIENCES
FACULTY
Chair: Assistant Professor T. Hoyle
Professor: R. Bass, O. Poliakova
Associate Professor: M. Mystkowski
Assistant Professors: J. Johnson, J. Willis
Instructors: T. Moore
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Department of Mathematical Sciences is to contribute to
superior undergraduate education and to prepare its graduates to make
significant contributions for God and humanity by emphasizing the
quantitative and analytical reasoning skills of a liberal arts based education in a
Christian community of faith and learning.
GOALS
1. To provide excellence in instruction with Christ-like service to our
students
2. To provide the essential computational and analytical reasoning skills of a
liberal arts education through the Basic Course requirements in
mathematics
3. To refine and expand those skills in students taking further mathematics,
assisting in the pre-professional development of teachers of mathematics
in the elementary and secondary schools
4. To prepare students for advanced studies and professions in mathematics
and engineering
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students majoring in Mathematics will:
1. become computationally proficient throughout the elements of modern
mathematics,
2. develop the use of both the discovery/inductive and axiomatic/deductive
forms of mathematical reasoning,
3. be able to relate common threads from various branches of mathematics,
and
4. be well-prepared for further study in the mathematical sciences,
engineering or other quantitative fields, or for employment in those areas.
In addition to the above, students majoring in mathematics with teacher
licensure will:
5. become proficient in the current standards of mathematical knowledge
and pedagogy for secondary schools, and
6. through instruction and practice, become effective communicators of
mathematics appropriate to the classroom setting.
Students majoring in computer science will be prepared for professions and
advanced studies in computer science, and to utilize current languages and
techniques and adapt to related advancements in programming, networking,
and hardware.
Department of Mathematical Sciences/154
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The department offers three majors leading to the Bachelor of Science degree:
Mathematics
Mathematics with Teacher Licensure
Computer Science
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Mathematics
Computer Science
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
MATHEMATICS (33 HOURS)
The Basic Course Requirements must be satisfied; the Quantitative
Dimension must be satisfied with MATH 151; A minimum grade of C is required
for MATH 151. The Dimension of Scientific Inquiry must be satisfied with PHYS
203. Classes required for completing the major are as follows:
MATH 152, 230, 251, 325, 331, 351, 404, 412, and 445 (total of 27 hours);
One course from MATH 405, 413, 421, 422, 441 (3 hours);
Any other MATH course numbered above 300 (3 hours).
Additional requirement: CISS 201
A university approved minor or additional study in an approved
concentration with the mathematical sciences is required.
Concentration Areas:
1) Pure Math: MATH 303, 332, 405, 413, 421, and 441 (18 hours);
2) Actuarial Math: MATH 421, MATH 422, FINC 320, ECON 303, and
ECON 402 (15 hours)
3) Computational Science: PHYS 204, CISS 202, MATH 332, MATH 370,
and MATH 413 (16 hours)
For each concentration area, 6 hours can be applied to elective categories in
the major.
A minimum grade of C is required for each course in a concentration area.
MATHEMATICS WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (37 HOURS)
The Basic Course Requirements must be satisfied; the Dimension of Scientific
Inquiry must be satisfied with PHYS 203. Classes required for completing the
major, with preparation for secondary (9 – 12) teacher licensure, are as follows:
MATH 151, 152, 230, 251, 331, 303, 310, 311, 325, 404, 421, and 445 (total
of 37 hours).
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor
consisting of EDUC 250, 350, 440, 450, PSYC 303, and MAED 432 (total of 29
hours)
NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete more than 50% of the
Professional Education minor (excluding student teaching) until they are
formally admitted to the Teacher Education Program. All candidates must be
fully admitted into the Teacher Education Program a minimum of one full
semester prior to the semester in which they student teach.
The North Carolina State Board of Education has adopted new teacher
standards and required all teacher education programs to be revisioned. All
candidates starting their teacher education program with EDUC 250 in the fall
of 2010 or later must complete the new program regardless of the catalogue
under which they entered Gardner-Webb University. Candidates who
are already in teacher education can choose to complete the current program
or the new program.
Gardner-Webb University/155
COMPUTER SCIENCE (36 HOURS)
The Basic Course Requirements must be satisfied; the Quantitative
Dimension must be satisfied with MATH 151. A minimum grade of C is
required for MATH 151. Chemistry or physics is recommended to satisfy the
Dimension of Scientific Inquiry. Classes required for completing the major are
as follows:
CISS 201, 202, 285, 360, 380, 423, 433, 460, and 471 (total of 27 hours);
MATH 311 (3 hours); and
Two additional courses from CISS 361, 440, 450, 480, or MATH 370
(6 hours).
A university approved minor area of study is required. A mathematics minor
is recommended.
SECOND MAJOR
Students seeking a second major in mathematics must take 30 hours
consisting of MATH 152, 230, 251, 302, 325, 351, 404, 412, 445 and any other
course numbered above MATH 300.
Students seeking a second major in computer science must take 30 hours
consisting of CISS 201, 285, 360, 361, 380, 423, 433, 460, 471, and MATH 331
or 311.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
MATHEMATICS (17 HOURS)
A minor in Mathematics requires 17 semester hours of mathematics courses,
including MATH 151 and 152, and at least one course numbered over 225.
COMPUTER SCIENCE (15 HOURS)
A minor in Computer Science requires 15 hours of CISS courses, excluding
CISS 160. Students may count MATH 370 as part of the 15 hours. Additional
Requirement: MATH 151 (may be used to satisfied the Quantitative Dimension
of the Basic Course Requirements).
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
must complete PHYS 203 as part of the general education core curriculum.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
MATHEMATICS (MATH)
100 BASIC MATHEMATICAL SKILLS 3 semester hours
A study of selected topics from algebra emphasizing the continuity from arithmetic to
algebra and examining applications as time permits. This course does not fulfill the
Quantitative Dimension of the Basic Core Requirements. A student will not receive
credit for this course after receiving credit for any higher numbered mathematics course.
3-0-3. (Fall and Spring)
105 FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY 3 semester hours
An introduction to statistical analysis with applications, hypothesis formulation and
testing, and introductory principles of probability. The purpose of this course is to
prepare the student to converse in the statistical language of business and the social
sciences. Additionally, the course is designed to give the quantitative, computational and
problem solving skills necessary for those areas, but applicable to in a wide range of life
experiences. 3-0-3. (Fall and Spring)
Department of Mathematical Sciences/156
110 FINITE MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours
A study of topics related to elementary matrix algebra, systems of equations and
inequalities, linear programming, and the mathematics of finance. The purpose of this
course is to prepare the student to converse in the language of linear mathematics and
matrices, and the mathematics of finance fundamental to the studies in business and the
social sciences. Additionally, the course is designed to give the quantitative,
computational and problem solving skills necessary for those areas, but applicable to in
a wide range of life experiences. 3-0-3. (Fall and Spring)
150 PRECALCULUS 3 semester hours
A study of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and their
applications. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the elementary
concepts of the mathematical analysis of functions foundational to studies in Calculus
and the natural sciences. Additionally, the course is designed to give the quantitative,
computational and problem solving skills necessary for those areas, but applicable to a
wide range of life experiences. 3-0-3. (Fall and Spring)
151 CALCULUS I 4 semester hours
The graphical and numerical study of the analytic operations of limiting, differentiating
and integrating functions and their symbolic application to algebraic, trigonometric,
exponential and logarithmic functions. The purpose of this course is to prepare the
student to converse in the language of the mathematical analysis of functions
fundamental to the studies in higher mathematics and the physical sciences.
Additionally, the course is designed to give the quantitative, computational and problem
solving skills necessary for those areas, but applicable to a wide range of life
experiences. 4-0-4. (Fall and Spring)
152 CALCULUS II 4 semester hours
A study of the applications and techniques of integration; infinite sequence and series of
numbers and functions. Prerequisite: Math 151. 4-0-4. (Fall and Spring)
204 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours
A study of the number systems together with their operations, connections to algebra,
the geometry of two and three dimensions and measurement. The course develops
techniques of problem solving, logical reasoning and communication by emphasizing
both a conceptual and active approach to mathematical ideas. Prerequisite: the
Quantitative Dimension of the Basic Course Requirements must be completed. 3-0-3.
(Fall)
219 CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 3 semester hours
A study of differentiation and integration with applications to business and the social
sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 150 or permission of the department chair. 3-0-3.
(on demand)
230 FOUNDATIONS OF HIGHER MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours
A survey of the concepts of symbolic logic and set theory, together with an introduction
to proof techniques. This course is designed to prepare the student for the study of
abstract mathematics. Prerequisite: Math 151. 3-0-3. (Spring)
251 CALCULUS III 4 semester hours
A study of the calculus of functions of several variables and vector-valued functions and
analytic geometry of three dimensions. Prerequisite Math 152. 4-0-4. (Fall)
Gardner-Webb University/157
303 MODERN COLLEGE GEOMETRY 3 semester hours
A study of elementary geometry from an advanced standpoint, evaluations and criticisms
of Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean and analytic geometry, and some topics in
modern geometry. Prerequisite: Math 152 and 230. 3-0-3. (Spring of even years)
310 NUMBER THEORY 3 semester hours
A study of number theory including Euclid’s algorithm, prime numbers, indeterminate
problems, and Diophantine equations, congruence, and numerical functions.
Prerequisite Mathematics 151 and 230. 3-0-3. (Spring of odd years)
311 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours
A study of elementary combinatorics, graph theory, Boolean algebra, tree building,
mathematical induction, networks, and automata. Prerequisites: Mathematics 151. 3-0-3.
(Spring of even years)
325 STATISTICS AND DATA ANALYSIS 3 semester hours
An in-depth introduction to the elements of statistics and data analysis using statistical
computing software. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151. 3-0-3. (Spring of odd years)
331 LINEAR ALGEBRA 3 semester hours
A study of vector spaces, matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, and linear
transformations in vector spaces. Prerequisite Math 151. 3-0-3. (Fall)
332 LINEAR ALGEBRA II 3 semester hours
A continuation of the study of vector spaces, inner product spaces, eigenvalues and
eigenvectors, and linear transformations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 331. 3-0-3.
(on demand)
351 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 semester hours
A study of ordinary differential equations and systems with applications. Prerequisite:
Mathematics 251. 3-0-3. (Spring of even years)
370 NUMERICAL METHODS 3 semester hours
A study of numerical methods including interpolation and extrapolation, roots of
equations, solutions of systems of equations, curve fitting and numerical integration.
Prerequisites: Computer Science 201 and Mathematics 151. 3-0-3. (On demand)
404 MODERN ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 3 semester hours
A study of algebraic structures with a focus on groups. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230
and 331. 3-0-3. (Fall of even years)
405 MODERN ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II 3 semester hours
A study of algebraic structures including groups, rings, integral domains, and fields.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 404. 3-0-3. (On demand)
412 ELEMENTARY REAL ANALYSIS 3 semester hours
A study of basic ideas and techniques of analysis for real-valued functions of an arbitrary
number of real variables. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230 and 251. 3-0-3. (Fall of odd
years)
413 ELEMENTARY REAL ANALYSIS II 3 semester hours
A continuation of the elementary concepts of the analysis of real-valued functions:
integration theory, functions of several variables, inverse and implicit functions,
sequences of functions, power series, Fourier series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 412.
3-0-3. (on demand)
Department of Mathematical Sciences/158
421 PROBABILITY THEORY 3 semester hours
A first course in the Mathematical theory of statistical application. The first course
focuses on probability theory and distributions of random variables. Prerequisite:
Mathematics 251. 3-0-3. (Fall of odd years)
422 STATISTICAL INFERENCE 3 semester hours
A second course in the Mathematical theory of statistical application. The second course
focuses on the topics of statistical inference: estimation, verification and prediction.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 421. 3-0-3. (on demand)
441 FUNCTIONS OF A COMPLEX VARIABLE 3 semester hours
A study of the geometric and analytic properties of harmonic and holomorphic
functions of a single complex variable. Prerequisite: Math 251. 3-0-3. (Spring of odd
years)
445 RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS 1 semester hour
The student will independently investigate a topic in mathematics beyond the classroom
curriculum. The results of the investigation will be demonstrated through problem
solving and writing a research paper. Prerequisites: Mathematics 230, 251, and senior
status. 1-0-1. (on demand)
480 TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours
A study of specific areas of mathematics not covered by other upper-level courses.
Course content will vary and will reflect student and faculty interest. Prerequisites:
Mathematics 230 and 251. 3-0-3. (on demand)
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours
Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair and academic dean.
MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (MAED)
432 METHODS OF TEACHING MATH (9-12) 3 semester hours
A study of the principles and objectives of secondary mathematics, general and specific
teaching techniques, organization of content material, and enrichment materials.
Supervised field experiences are required. It is recommended that this course be taken
during the semester before student teaching. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher
Education Program. 3-0-3. (On demand)
COMPUTER SCIENCE (CISS)
201 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE I 3 semester hours
A first language course in computers that introduces students to programming,
programming logic, and structured programming methods. Utilizes a language such as
Java. 3-0-3. (Spring)
202 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE II 3 semester hours
An intermediate programming course focusing on object oriented programming
concepts like classes, encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism. The class will also
include the topics of graphical user interfaces, file input/output and exception handling.
Utilizes an object oriented language like Java or similar. Prerequisite: CISS 201. 3-0-3.
(Fall)
Gardner-Webb University/159
285 C PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE 3 semester hours
An introduction to the language syntax, style, and design of C programs. Emphasizes the
use of C for low-level design and graphics, including extensions to C++. Prerequisite:
CISS 201. 3-0-3.
350 INTRODUCTION TO MULTIMEDIA PROCESSING 3 semester hours
The Study of basic topics in digital multimedia from Computer Science point of view.
The class will include introduction to image, sound and video representation in digital
form and the study of the basic algorithms for image, sound and video manipulation.
Students will need to write their own programs in Java or C/C++ to manipulate
multimedia objects. Prerequisites: CISS 201. 3-0-3
360 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING AND ARCHITECTURE 3 semester hours
Low-level programming in assembly language and an introduction to principles of
hardware design. Prerequisite: CISS 201. 3-0-3.
361 OPERATING SYSTEMS AND COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 3 semester hours
Survey operating systems and principles of operating systems. Examine principles of
LINUX design and programming. Prerequisites: CISS 360. 3-0-3.
375 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER AND NETWORK SECURITY 3 semester hours
The study of computing security vulnerabilities and techniques and tools for developing
secure applications and practicing safe computing. Prerequisites: CISS 201. 3-0-3
380 DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHM ANALYSIS 3 semester hours
A study of basic data structures, graphs, algorithm design and analysis, memory
management, and system design. Prerequisite: CISS 202. (CISS 285 is recommended for
Computer Science majors.) 3-0-3.
423 SURVEY OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 3 semester hours
Introduction to the history and design of programming languages. The applicability of
languages to special uses such as Fortran, Pascal, Ada, Oberon, Object Pascal, C++,
Smalltalk. Examination of the modern concepts of object-orientation and functional
programming. Prerequisite: CISS 201. 3-0-3.
433 DATABASE MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Apply design principles learned in Data Structures to relational and object-oriented data
base management systems. Prerequisite: CISS 380. 3-0-3.
440 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 3 semester hours
Basic concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence. Natural language, search
strategies and control, and applications. Prerequisite: CISS 380. 3-0-3.
450 COMPILER DESIGN 3 semester hours
Principles of compiler construction and the building of operating systems. Prerequisite:
CISS 380 and CISS 361. 3-0-3.
460 DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING 3 semester hours
Introduction to concepts of computer network operating systems, telephony, routing,
packets, and distributed processing. Prerequisite: CISS 380. 3-0-3.
Department of Mathematical Sciences/160
471 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 3 semester hours
The study of structured programming, systems analysis, and systems design techniques.
Topics include top-down design, software design metrics, project management,
program correctness, and the use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) and
configuration management tools. Problems of software engineering and design for
graphical user interfaces are discussed. Prerequisites: CISS 285 and CISS 433. 3-0-3.
480 TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 3 semester hours
A specialized study of various computer science developments. Topics will vary from
semester to semester. Students may take the course more than once. 3-0-3.
497, 498 INTERNSHIPS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 3 semester hours each
By special arrangement with the approval of the department chair.
Gardner-Webb University/161
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES
FACULTY
Chair: Associate Professor V. Totten
Coordinator, Physician Assistant Track: Professor T. Zehnder
Professors: T. Jones
Associate Professors: B. Brooks, S. Eddins, D. Judge, D. Olive
Assistant Professors: C. Ciesielski, J. English, S. Manahan
Instructor: J. Zimmer
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Department of Natural Sciences is to help students
develop a strong science background and critical skills through meaningful inand out-of-class experiences. The Department aims to prepare students for
productive professional careers or for entry into graduate or professional
schools. The Department of Natural Sciences strives to remain consistent with
the educational mission of Gardner-Webb University by balancing an
interdisciplinary science foundation with the Christian values of faith,
stewardship, ethics, and social responsibility.
GOALS
1. To familiarize students with the major concepts of science and the
specific vocabulary associated with each discipline;
2. To develop in students an understanding of the nature and process of
science and how science relates to their lives;
3. To present general principles of stewardship and sustainability of our
global environment;
4. To stimulate critical thinking in science;
5. To present the aesthetics of nature; and
6. To develop within the student majors a background sufficient for
employment in a science-related career, pursuance of graduate work in
science, and entrance into post-baccalaureate programs and endeavors.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
A student who chooses to major in a field of study offered by the department
will:
1. be able to identify major concepts of science and the specific vocabulary
associated with the natural sciences;
2. demonstrate research skills, critical thinking, and synthesis of complex
information in oral presentations; and
3. be prepared to continue onto graduate school, professional programs, or
begin a career in the natural sciences.
MAJORS FIELDS OF STUDY
The department offers three majors leading to the Bachelor of Science degree:
Biology
Chemistry
Environmental Science
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Biology
Chemistry
Environmental Science
General Science
Health Science
Physical Science
Department of Natural Sciences/162
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
BIOLOGY (30 HOURS)
The Basic Course requirements must be satisfied. BIOL 111 and CHEM 111
must be taken to fulfill the biological and physical science components of the
Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry. Pre-professional candidates should take PHYS
203 and 204 in preparation for professional admissions tests. Classes required for
completing the major are as follows:
Animal Science – BIOL 201, 202, or 315 (4 hours)
Plant Science – BIOL 207 or 320 (4 hours)
Molecular Science – BIOL 206, 301, 352, 411, or 422 (4 hours)
Ecology – BIOL 402 (4 hours)
Biology electives, approved by the department, at or above the 200
level (HONR 400 and/or HONR 401 may be used for three
hours of this requirement when the research and thesis
topics are appropriate) Up to 6 hours of Environmental
Biology from Envs 209 and/or 410 may count as part of the
12 hours of Biology electives (12 hours).
Seminar (Honor’s thesis is equivalent to one hour of this
requirement) (2 hours)
Additional requirements: CHEM 112, 201, 202 and MATH 151
(16 hours)
No minor is required for this major. Students who desire a minor may select
any minor offered by the University.
CHEMISTRY (34 HOURS)
The Basic Course requirements must be satisfied. CHEM 111 and either BIOL
104 or 111 should be taken to fulfill the requirements of the Dimensions of
Scientific Inquiry. Classes required for completing the major are as follows:
Organic – CHEM 201 and 202 (8 hours)
Analytical – CHEM 301 and 302 (8 hours)
Inorganic – CHEM 351 (4 hours)
Physical – CHEM 401 and 402 (8 hours)
Seminar (2 hours)
Chemistry elective – CHEM 310, 320, 405, 420, or 422 (4 hours)
Additional requirements: CHEM 112, PHYS 203-204, MATH 151 and
152. (20 hours)
No minor is required for this major. Students who desire a minor may select
any minor offered by the University.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
The major in Environmental Science offers tracks in Environmental Chemistry
with a minor in Chemistry, and Ecology with a minor in Biology. Students
planning to pursue graduate studies are encouraged to take MATH 152 and
MATH 251 in addition to the listed requirements.
ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (37 HOURS)
The Basic Course requirements must be satisfied, specifically with the
following courses: BIOL 111, CHEM 111, ECON 203, and MATH 105. Classes
required for completing the major are as follows:
CHEM 301 and 310 (8 hours)
ENVS 209, 260, 310, 320, and 420 (16 hours)
MATH 151 (4 hours)
PHYS 203 and 204 (8 hours)
CHEM 391, 392, 491, or 492 (1 hour)
Additional requirement: ECON 204 or 405 (3 hours)
The required minor in chemistry includes CHEM 112, 201, 202, and 302 is
required.
Gardner-Webb University/163
ECOLOGY (36 HOURS)
The Basic Course requirements must be satisfied, specifically with
the following courses: CHEM 111, ECON 203, and MATH 105. Classes
required for completing the major are as follows:
BIOL 201 (4 hours)
CHEM 112, 201, 202, and 310 (16 hours)
ENVS 209, 260, 310, and 410 (11 hours)
MATH 151 (4 hours)
Biology seminar (1 hour)
Additional requirements: ECON 204 or 405 and PHYS 203 (7 hours)
The required minor in biology includes BIOL 111, 202, 207, and 402 is
required.
SECOND MAJOR
A student seeking a second major in any field of study offered by the Department
of Natural Science must meet all of the criteria for the primary major.
PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT TRACK
Gardner-Webb does not offer a Physician Assistant program. However, the
university has maintained a long standing relationship with Wake Forest University
School of Medicine’s Physician Assistant Program. Gardner-Webb maintains an
affiliation with the Wake Forest program but does not guarantee acceptance into
that program. A student proposing to become a Physician Assistant should expect
to graduate from Gardner-Webb’s carefully planned Physician Assistant track with a
Biology or Chemistry major. The student will then be well prepared to apply to
Wake Forest School of Medicine’s Physician Assistant Program or any similar
program throughout the nation. Gardner-Webb works closely with the Wake Forest
Physician Assistant Staff to maintain a curriculum that will prepare students well for
application to the Master’s degree program.
Students pursuing a career as a Physician Assistant should take, in addition to the
core courses for the Bachelor of Science degree, BIOL 203, 204, 206, 301, and 422
among the 30 hours of Biology required for the major. Additionally the student
should take CHEM 111, 112, 201, and 202. MATH 105 and 150 are taken in the
core. BIOL 335 is recommended.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
BIOLOGY (16 HOURS)
BIOL 111, 402 and 8 hours selected from two of the following three categories:
Animal science - Biology 201, 202, 203, 204, or 315
Plant science - Biology 207 or 320
Cellular biology - Biology 301, 352, or 422
CHEMISTRY (16 HOURS)
CHEM 112, 201, 202 and a 4 hour CHEM elective (CHEM 301 is recommended).
CHEM 111 must be taken as part of the basic core curriculum.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (16 HOURS)
BIOL 104, GEOL 105 and 106, and CHEM 310. BIOL 111 must be taken as part
of the basic core curriculum.
GENERAL SCIENCE (20 HOURS)
CHEM 103 or higher, GEOL 101 or higher, PHYS 103 or higher, any BIOL
course 200 or higher, and a four hour elective from any course offered by
the department above the core science requirement.
Department of Natural Sciences/164
HEALTH SCIENCE (16 HOURS)
BIOL 104, 203, 204, and 310. CHEM 103 or 111 must be taken as part of
the basic core curriculum.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE (16 HOURS)
CHEM 111, GEOL 101 or 105, PHYS 203 and one of the following: CHEM
112, GEOL 102, PHYS 104, or PHYS 204
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
must complete a foreign language through the Intermediate I level (201).
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
BIOLOGY (BIOL)
101 HUMAN BIOLOGY 4 semester hours
An introduction to the biology of the human organism with emphasis on contemporary
issues in human biology as well as traditional structure and function of major body
systems. This class is NOT intended for biology majors and biology majors with teacher
licensure. It is intended for non-science majors. 3-3-4. F. S. Summers variable. (Lab Fee:
$30.00)
104 ENVIRONMENT 4 semester hours
Introduction to the principles of ecology with a primary focus on man’s direct and indirect
influences on his surroundings. Emphasis on current and local concerns. Laboratories
focus on methods of sampling, field observations, and methods of examining resource
allocation. 3-3-4. F,S,Su. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
105 MICROBIOLOGY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES 4 semester hours
A study of the biology of microorganisms with special focus on the organisms of human
disease and on the techniques of microbiology that are appropriate to the health sciences.
(Not for Biology majors.) 3-2-4. F, Summers variable. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
111 GENERAL BIOLOGY 4 semester hours
Introduction to the principles of biology including ecology, biological chemistry, cellular
biology, genetics, reproduction, and development. Laboratory investigations are designed
to supplement and enhance the classroom lecture activities. This class is NOT intended for
non-science majors. It is intended for biology majors, biology majors with teacher
licensure, and elementary education majors. 3-3-4. F, S, Summers variable. (Lab Fee:
$30.00)
201 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 4 semester hours
Phylogenetic survey of invertebrates, with emphasis on systematics, morphology, and
ecology. Field work, individual term projects. Prerequisite: Biology 111. 3-3-4. F, odd years.
202 VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 4 semester hours
Systematic study of the vertebrates with emphasis on morphology, physiology, and
ecology. Field study, laboratory exercises in morphology. Prerequisite: Biology 111. 3-3-4.
S, even years.
203 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 4 semester hours
Survey of basic structure and function of the human body. Levels of organization and
homeostatic mechanisms. Integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems covered.
Prerequisite: BIOL 101 with a grade of “C” or higher, or BIOL 111 with a grade of “C” or
Gardner-Webb University/165
higher, or SAT Critical Reading of 500 AND SAT Math of 500, or ACT Composite score of
22, ACT English Subscore of 21, ACT Math Score of 18, and ACT Reading Score of 20, or
TEAS Composite Score of 67. 3-2-4. F, S.
204 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 4 semester hours
Survey of basic structure and function of the human body. Levels of organization and
homeostatic mechanisms. Endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive,
urinary, and reproductive systems covered. Prerequisite: Biol 203 with a grade of “C” or
higher, or permission of instructor. 3-2-4. F, S.
206 GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY 4 semester hours
Introduction to microbiology and immunity. Applications in medicine, industry, and
agriculture will be included. Prerequisite: Biology 111 or permission of instructor 3-2-4. S.
207 GENERAL BOTANY 4 semester hours
An introduction to the study of plants including aspects of morphology, anatomy, cell
physiology, reproduction, growth, development, ecology, and taxonomy. Prerequisites:
Biology 111. 3-3-4. F, even years.
222 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 1 semester hour
An introduction to definitions, proper spelling, usage, and pronunciation of appropriate
terminology used in health professions. Prerequisite: Biology 203. 1-0-1. S.
301 GENETICS 4 semester hours
Study of principles of heredity (including molecular and population genetics), their
significance in human inheritance, plant and animal breeding, and evolution.
Prerequisite: Biology 111 and Chemistry 201. 3-3-4. S.
310 NUTRITION 4 semester hours
Biochemical basis of how the body uses food. Relationship of nutrition to health.
Practical aspects of obtaining, storing, and preparing food for maximum nutrition.
Nutrition through the life cycle. Diets. Prerequisites: Biology 111 and Chemistry 201 or
permission of instructor. 3-3-4. S, even years.
315 GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 4 semester hours
Survey of how animals solve fundamental physiological problems. Emphasis on
homeostatic mechanisms. Examples from molecular, cellular, systems, and organismic
levels, using both invertebrates and vertebrates. Prerequisites: Biology 111 and Chemistry
201. 3-3-4. on demand.
320 PLANT SYSTEMATICS 4 semester hours
Systematic study of vascular plants with emphasis on the seed plants. Lecture is
predominantly analyzing evolutionary morphological characteristics and classical
taxonomy. Laboratory work is field-oriented and includes collection and identification of
specimens. Prerequisite: Biology 207. 3-3-4. S, odd years.
335 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 3 semester hours
Study of alterations in normal body structure and function associated with various disease
processes. Prerequisite: Biology 203 and 204. 3-0-3. Offered on demand.
352 CELL BIOLOGY 4 semester hours
Survey of cellular structure and function with emphasis on current methods of studying
cells. Prerequisites: Biology 111 and Chemistry 201. 3-3-4. S, even years.
Department of Natural Sciences/166
385, 386 PRACTICUM IN LIFE SCIENCES 1 semester hour each semester
Practical experience in designing, setting up, and teaching laboratory. Recommended for
all biology majors, and required for those planning to teach. No more than two hours
credit may be used toward filling major requirements. Prerequisite: approval of
department chair and laboratory instructor(s). 0-6-1, 0-6-1. Offered by arrangement.
387 ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND RELIGION 3 semester hours
An interdisciplinary examination of issues which arise at the interface between science
and religion. A discussion of the nature of science and religion, ways of relating the two,
and historical background will be followed by an exploration of specific topics of
contemporary interest. 3-0-3. Spring odd years.
391, 392, 491, 492 BIOLOGY SEMINAR 1 semester hour each semester
Directed reading, study, and discussion designed to re-emphasize the fundamental
principles of biology, to correlate and summarize the course work of the major program
and related fields, to introduce new areas and ideas, and to provide experiences in
literature review and oral presentation. Juniors will enroll in 391 and 392, and seniors in 491
and 492. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in biology. 1-0-1. F, S. WLII
402 ECOLOGY 4 semester hours
Study of the interaction of organisms and their adaptations to their physical
environment. The ecosystem approach is emphasized along with population and
community ecology. Prerequisites: Biology 111 and either Biology 201, 202, 207, or 320.
3-3-4. F, S, on demand.
404 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY 4 semester hours
Study of the basic developmental processes including fertilization, differentiation,
morphogenesis, embryogenesis, growth, and aging. Selected examples drawn from
microorganisms, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Prerequisites: Chemistry 201.
3-3-4. S, odd years.
405 TOPICS IN ADVANCED BIOLOGY 1 to 4 semester hours
Study of specific areas in biology not covered by other upper-level courses. Course
content will vary and will reflect student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Biology 111
and permission of instructor. Offered on demand.
411 IMMUNOLOGY 4 semester hours
Study of mammalian immune system with emphasis on human immunology. Theoretical
and practical aspects will be considered. Diagnostic, therapeutic, and research
applications of immunology will also be included. Prerequisite: Chemistry 202. 3-2-4. S,
odd years.
422 BIOCHEMISTRY 4 semester hours
Survey of biologically important molecules; metabolism. Prerequisite: Chemistry 202
with minimum grade of C. 3-3-4. F.
493, 494 INTERNSHIP IN BIOLOGY I & II 3 semester hours
A hands-on experience to increase skills and knowledge in the student’s major area of
interest within an organization of the classroom. Prerequisite: 16 semester hours in the
major. Offered on demand.
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 to 3 semester hours each semester
Individual work planned to meet the need and interests of qualified students. Time and
credits must be arranged in semester prior to term in which work is done. Must be
arranged.
Gardner-Webb University/167
CHEMISTRY (CHEM)
103 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY 4 semester hours
Recommended for nonscience and nursing majors. Emphasis on application of the basic
principles of chemistry. Prerequisites: placement out of Mathematics 100 (or its
equivalent for transfer students) and no previous college credit for chemistry with a
grade of C or higher. 3-3-4. All. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
111 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 4 semester hours
Recommended for first-year science and mathematics majors. The first of a two-semester
comprehensive coverage of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry: history,
measurements, mathematical manipulations, dimensional analysis, formula writing and
nomenclature, thermochemistry, gas laws, quantum theory of electronic structure,
chemical bonding, and physical properties. Prerequisite: Mathematics, Advanced High
School Algebra. (This course may not be used with Chemistry 103 to meet basic science
course requirements.) 3-3-4. F. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
112 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 4 semester hours
Continuation of Chemistry 111: solutions, chemical spontaneity, equilibria, reaction
rates and kinetics, acids-base behavior, redox reactions, nuclear chemistry, and organic
or inorganic reactions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111 with minimum grade of C. 3-3-4. S.
(Lab Fee: $30.00)
201 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 4 semester hours
Basic principles of bonding, conformational analysis, and structure of simple
hydrocarbons, alcohols, and alkyl halides. Emphasis is placed on substitution,
elimination, and addition reactions. An introduction to functional group analysis of
reactivity and chemical synthesis is also included. The laboratory involves introduction
to preparatory organic chemistry with emphasis on purification and characterization
techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 112 with a minimum grade of C. 3-3-4. F.
202 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 4 semester hours
Study of the structure and reactivity of dienes, aromatic molecules, alcohols, ethers,
aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acid derivatives. Emphasis is placed on mechanistic
analysis of reactions and chemical synthesis. The laboratory involves the introduction of
spectroscopic and chromatographic methods as well as a continuation of preparatory
techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 201 with a minimum grade of C. 3-3-4. S.
301 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 4 semester hours
Introduction to modern analytical chemistry. Emphasis on theory and practice of
fundamental principles of analysis, solution equilibria, and electrochemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM201. 3-3-4. F, even years.
302 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 4 semester hours
Emphasis on spectroscopy and separation techniques, instrumentation theory,
quantitative/qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM201. 3-3-4. S, odd years.
310 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 4 semester hours
Application of the fundamental principles of chemistry and chemical thermodynamics to
understand the chemical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere.
Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a minimum grade of C. 3-3-4. S.
320 ENVIRONMENTAL FATE OF CHEMICALS 4 semester hours
This course will examine how physic-chemical processes, such as evaporation,
bioconcentration, hydrolysis, photochemical and redox changes, affect the fate and
Department of Natural Sciences/168
distribution of chemicals in the environment. This course will focus primarily on the
environmental behavior of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 201,202. 3-2-4 S,
odd years.
351 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4 semester hours
Survey of fundamental principles in inorganic chemistry. The course will focus on the
bonding, structure, and reactivity of main group and coordination compounds as well as
organometallic species of the transition metals. Aspects of bioinorganic chemistry will
also be discussed. The laboratory will provide instruction in various techniques in
preparatory inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 202. 3-3-4. S, odd
years.
385, 386 PRACTICUM IN CHEMISTRY 1 semester hour each semester
Practical experience in designing, setting up, and teaching laboratory. Recommended
for all chemistry majors, and required for those planning to teach. No more than two
hours credit may be used toward filling major requirements. Prerequisite: approval of
department chair and laboratory instructor(s). 0-6-1, 0-6-1. Offered by arrangement.
391, 392, 491, 492 CHEMISTRY SEMINAR 1 semester hour each semester
Directed reading, study, and discussion designed to re-emphasize the fundamental
principles of chemistry, to correlate and summarize the course work of the major
program and related fields, to introduce new areas and ideas, and to provide experience
in literature review and oral presentation. Juniors will enroll in 391, 392, and seniors in
491, 492. Each course 1-0-1. F, S., WLII
401 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 4 semester hours
Emphasis on fundamental laws of thermodynamics, equations of state, and phase
equilibria. Prerequisite: CHEM201, Math 151, 3-3-4. F, odd years.
402 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 4 semester hours
Emphasis on fundamentals of physical and chemical kinetics, solution equilibria, and
introduction of quantum mechanics. Prerequisite: CHEM401, 3-3-4. S even years.
405 TOPICS IN ADVANCED CHEMISTRY 1 to 4 semester hours
Study of specific areas in chemistry not covered by other upper-level courses. Course
content will vary and will reflect student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Chem 111
and permission of the instructor. 3-0-3 or 3-3-4. Offered on demand.
420 AQUATIC CHEMISTRY 4 semester hours
This course will focus on the geochemical processes that control the composition of
surface and ground waters, both in their pristine and contaminated state. It will also
familiarize the students with publicly-available computer codes which are the standard
in the environmental industry. Prerequisites: MATH 151. 3-2-4. F, odd years.
422 BIOCHEMISTRY 4 semester hours
Survey of biologically important molecules; metabolism. Prerequisite: Chemistry 202
with minimum grade of C. 3-3-4. F.
493, 494 INTERNSHIP IN CHEMISTRY I & II 3 semester hours
A hands-on experience to increase skills and knowledge in the student’s major area of
interest within an organization outside of the classroom. Offered on demand.
395, 396, 495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 to 3 semester hours each semester
Individual work designed to meet the needs and interests of exceptionally qualified
Gardner-Webb University/169
students. Juniors will enroll in 395 and/or 396, and seniors in 495 and/or 496. Time and
credits by arrangement in semester prior to term in which work is done. Offered on
demand.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ENVS)
201 EXPLORING THE SCIENTIFIC ENTERPRISE 1 semester hour
This course will introduce and examine issues that are fundamental to the process of
scientific inquiry, namely: the philosophy, process, and future of science, as well as its
current social, ethical, and professional dimensions. By reading and discussing select
materials, conducting research on assigned topics, and communicating with
professionals from various science-related fields, students will be able to formulate their
own answers to a number of questions related to the scientific enterprise. No
prerequisites. 1-0-1. Offered on demand.
209 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY 3 semester hours
An Introduction to plant and animal ecology with an emphasis on topics concerning the
environment. Topics include factors influencing the abundance and distribution of
species, competition between organisms, characteristics of communities, pollution, and
sustainability. Prerequisite: BIOL 111. 3-0-3. S, even years.
260 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND DATA ANALYSIS 3 semester hours
This course centers on three key areas of experimental science: (1) Experimental
Design, (2) Sampling and Taking Measurements, and (3) Statistical Analyses. Relevant
statistical tests used in descriptive and comparative (hypothesis-testing) statistical
analyses will be examined. From a solid purview of theory behind statistical tests, the
focus will be on application and interpretation of data and the statistical results.
Prerequisite: MATH 105. 3-0-3. S.
310 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND ETHICS 2 semester hours
An examination of how environmental information and needs enter into current and
future Federal, State, and local policy and how our ethical background affects how we
view these policies. This course will focus on case studies dealing with water
management, endangered species, land management, public transportation, air and
water pollution, energy production and utilization, and population management.
Students will form debate teams to debate many of the current issues. Prerequisite:
ECON 203. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ENVS 209 and CHEM 310.
2-0-2. S, even years.
311 RESEARCH METHODS 1 semester hours
This hands-on course will introduce the students to common professional practices and
procedures that scientists working in a variety of professional settings employ daily.
Some examples of such practices include: developing research ideas and plans, clear
and concise scientific writing, peer review, and communicating results. The course will
also provide opportunities for professional interactions with peers and professional
scientists from both on- and off-campus. Prerequisite: ENVS 260. 2-0-1. Offered on
demand.
320 ENVIRONMENTAL FATE OF CHEMICALS 4 semester hours
This course will examine how physico-chemical processes, such as evaporation,
bioconcentration, hydrolysis, photochemical and redox changes, affect the fate and
distribution of chemicals in the environment. The course will focus primarily on the
environmental behavior of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 201, 202. 3-2-4. S,
odd years.
Department of Natural Sciences/170
410 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY 3 semester hours
Conservation Biology examines biological and social background material in
conservation problems and potential solutions. Areas of focus include global
biodiversity, threats to the global flora and fauna, and solving these conservation
problems using global and local case studies. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing with
at least 16 semester hours in Environmental Science or Biology. 3-0-3. S, odd years.
420 AQUATIC CHEMISTRY 4 semester hours
This course will focus on the geochemical processes that control the composition of
surface and ground waters, both in their pristine and contaminated state. It will also
familiarize the students with publicly-available computer codes which are the standard
in the environmental industry. Prerequisites: MATH 151. 3-2-4. F, odd years.
GEOLOGY (GEOL)
101 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 4 semester hours
Survey of the distributions, processes of formation, alteration, and transportation of
materials composing the earth. The composition and basic identification of common
minerals and rocks, the use of geologic and topographic maps, and environmental issues
are considered. 3-2-4. F, S, Summers variable. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
102 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY 4 semester hours
A survey of geologic history of the earth. Emphasis on plate tectonics and the evolution
of life throughout geologic times. 3-2-4. Offered on demand. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
105 OCEANOGRAPHY AND METEOROLOGY 4 semester hours
Survey of basic concepts of physical oceanography and meteorology with emphasis on
physical and chemical bases of the disciplines. 3-2-4. F,S,Su (Lab Fee: $30.00)
106 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY 4 semester hours
Intended for non-science majors to fulfill a physical science requirement. This course
will blend basic concepts in geology and earth science with their implications in
environmental issues including soil loss, water resource depletion and contamination,
mining and petroleum issues, geological hazards, beach erosion, energy resources such
as nuclear, fossil fuels and alternative energy, etc. 3-2-4. Offered yearly. (Lab Fee:
$30.00)
405 TOPICS IN GEOLOGY 3 or 4 semester hours
Study of specific areas in geology not covered by other geology courses. Course content
will vary and will reflect student and faculty interest. 3-3-4 or 3-0-3. Offered on demand.
PHYSICS (PHYS)
103 PHYSICS IN EVERYDAY LIFE 4 semester hours
This course deals with many concepts of the classical and modern physics by examining
technologies and phenomena found in everyday life. The technologies examined are
chosen by the students and topics include basic mechanics and wave motion, atomic
and nuclear physics, in addition to Einstein’s theory of relativity. Prerequisites:
background in college algebra 3-2-4. S, Su occasionally. (Lab Fee: $30.00).
104 ASTRONOMY 4 semester hours
A survey of fundamental concepts in modern and historical astronomy and astrophysics.
Topics include the origin and nature of patterns and motions in the sky; the makeup and
dynamics of our solar system, the sun as a star, and the stellar properties and evolution
in general; astronomical instruments and techniques; and galaxies and cosmology.
Prerequisite: Background in college algebra strongly recommended. (The course will
include some night time observing.) 3-3-4. F. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
Gardner-Webb University/171
111 GENERAL PHYSICS I 4 semester hours
This is the first of a two semester general physics sequence intended for preprofessional school students and/or non-science majors. This course and PHYS 112 are
designed to be taken in order. Topics include classical mechanics and kinematics,
Newton’s Laws and forces of gravity, energy, Thermodynamics, and Einstein’s theory of
special relativity. Pre=requisite or Co-requisite: MATH 150 or higher. 3-3-4. Upon
demand in fall (Lab Fee: $30.00).
112 GENERAL PHYSICS II 4 semester hours
This course is the second semester of a two semester general physics sequence intended
to be taken after PHYS 111. Topics include electricity and magnetism, rotational
kinematics, oscillatory motion and optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 111 or permission of
instructor; MATH 150 or higher. 3-3-4 upon demand in Spring. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
203 GENERAL PHYSICS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I 4 semester hours
This course is the first of a two semester general physics sequence intended for all
science, mathematics, and computer science majors. This course and PHYS 204 are
designed to be taken in order. Topics include classical mechanics and kinematics,
Newton’s Laws and forces, gravity, energy, Einstein’s theory of special relativity, and an
introduction to electrostatics. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 151 or higher. 3-3-4.
Fall. (Lab Fee: $30.00)
204 GENERAL PHYSICS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II
4 semester hours
This course is the second of a two semester general physics sequence intended to be
taken after PHYS 203. Topics include electricity and magnetism, rotational kinematics,
oscillatory motion, thermodynamics, and optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 203 or permission
of instructor; MATH 151 or higher. 3-3-4. Spring. (Lab Fee: $30.00).
394, 495 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 to 3 semester hours
This course may be designed to meet the needs and interested of exceptionally qualified
students wishing to investigate an advanced physics topic. Juniors will enroll in 395
while seniors will enroll in 495. Topic and credits will be arranged in consultation with
an instructor prior to term in which the work is performed. Offerred on demand.
Courses identified as being offered in the summer (Su) are routinely taught during
summer school, though a specific course may not be offered each summer.
* If any prerequisites have not been met, then permission from the instructor must be
granted.
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, and Sport Studies/172
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL
EDUCATION, WELLNESS, AND SPORT
STUDIES
The Athletic Training Educational Program is accredited by the Commission
on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)
FACULTY
Chair: Professor K. Baker
Professors: F. Burch, D. Hunt, J. Tubbs
Associate Professors: D. Ware
Assistant Professors: G. Gilsdorf, J. Hartman, S. Snyder
Instructor: H. Hartsell, S. McNeely
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Department of Physical Education, Wellness, and Sport
Studies is to provide opportunities for the development of the physical,
mental, social, environmental, emotional and spiritual well-being through a
core curriculum and professional studies areas which emphasize a liberal arts
philosophy that fosters Christian values and principles.
GOALS
To produce graduates who will be:
1. (for those pursuing teacher education) professionally prepared on the
undergraduate level for teacher licensure (K-12) in physical education;
2. prepared for professional careers in health/wellness, physical education,
athletic training or sport management;
3. knowledgeable in the development of social, intellectual,
methodological, research and assessment skills to facilitate successful
functioning in professional health/wellness and physical education
careers; and
4. able to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate responsibility concerning
optimal health in the areas of physical fitness, lifetime sports skills,
personal health habits and behaviors.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Student learning outcomes specific to each major offered by the department
are described in the appropriate sections that follow.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The Department of Physical Education, Wellness, and Sport Studies offers
four majors leading to the Bachelor of Science degree:
Athletic Training
Health/Wellness
Physical Education/Health Education with Teacher Licensure
Sport Management
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Recreation
Sport Management
Wellness Promotion
Gardner-Webb University/173
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
ATHLETIC TRAINING (40 HOURS)
Gardner-Webb University athletic training educational program is fully accredited
by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).
TECHNICAL STANDARDS
The Athletic Training Educational Program at Gardner-Webb University is a
rigorous and intense, competency-based program that places specific requirements
and demands on the students enrolled in the program. These specific requirements
are determined by National Athletic Trainer’s Association-Education Council and
are identified in the document “NATA Athletic Training Education Competencies”.
An objective of this program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of
employment settings and to render care to a wide spectrum of individuals engaged
in physical activity. The technical standards set forth by the Athletic Training
Educational Program establish the essential qualities considered necessary for
students admitted to this program to achieve the knowledge, skills, and
competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer, as well as meet the expectations of
the program's accrediting agency (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic
Training Education [CAATE]). Abilities and expectations must be met by all
students admitted to the Athletic Training Educational Program. For a listing of the
specific cognitive and psychomotor skills necessary for successful completion of
the Gardner-Webb University Athletic Training Educational Program, please refer to
the Clinical Skills Manual or contact the Athletic Training Educational Program
Director.
ADMISSION
The following courses are required for admission into the Athletic Training
Educational Program (ATEP):
ATTR 101- Introduction to Athletic Training
ATTR 222- First Aid and Management of Acute Injuries and Illnesses
BIO 101- Human Biology
A grade requirement of “C” (2.00) or higher is required for BIO 101, ATTR
101 & 222.
Prospective athletic training students are encouraged to express their interest
to the Athletic Training Educational Program Director prior to, or during, the fall
semester to be advised of the necessary requirements. ATTR 101 encompasses
the Observation Period and serves as a requirement for application to the ATEP.
Observation Period: athletic training student wishing to pursue a major in
athletic training must successfully progress through a 10-week spring semester
observation in order to be eligible for admittance into the program.
Observation consists of prospective athletic training students being assigned
to on-campus approved clinical instructors allowing each student a wide range
of experience while accumulating a minimum of 60 hours of observation. The
student can obtain observation hours during morning, afternoons, evenings, or
weekends based upon the schedule of the assigned approved clinical instructor.
Application Period: At the completion of the 10-week observation period and
following the accumulation of 60 observation hours, prospective athletic
training students are eligible to apply to the ATEP. The process begins with
completing an application form that is distributed during ATTR 101. In addition,
three letters of recommendation and an essay on the observation experience are
required. Lastly, proof of immunizations, or a signed declination of
vaccination(s) must be provided. Upon receiving all of the required information,
an entrance interview will be conducted by the athletic training faculty and staff
as well as a member of the Department of Physical Education, Wellness, and
Sport Studies.
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies/174
Following the interviews, prospective candidates will be selected and offered
admission within the program contingent upon successful completion of
required courses with required grades and an overall GPA of 2.37. Students not
selected are encouraged to reapply to the program the following spring
semester. Students will then begin the admission process from the beginning
(ATTR 101)
At the discretion of the ATEP, a student may be admitted on a provisionary
basis. A set of benchmarks, based on the individual student’s situation, will be
determined and communicated to the student in writing. A meeting will be held
with the ATEP Director and student to discuss admission status and outlined
benchmarks. Signatures of involved parties will be obtained indicating
acceptance of the benchmarks set forth by the ATEP. In order to progress
within the ATEP, the student must meet agreed upon benchmarks within the
specified time frame; not doing so will result in dismissal from the program.
Students accepted into the program continue their athletic training course
work and clinical education the following fall semester.
Due to the competitive admission requirement of the program, the number of
prospective athletic training students accepted each year into the program will
vary. Total program enrollment is limited to a maximum of 36 students. The
number accepted each year will be based upon the number of vacant spots
available. Acceptance into the program is not guaranteed based upon a student
completing the observation period, but rather upon meeting all established
criteria for acceptance.
Additional Costs: All costs incurred with application and acceptance into the
program is the athletic training student’s responsibility. These costs include, but
are not limited to:
1. Uniform costs
2. Supplies: fanny pack, scissors, etc
3. Membership to athletic training organizations
4. Liability/malpractice insurance
5. Annual training/recertification fees as required by the ATEP
(i.e., CPR, Bloodborne Pathogen, etc.)
GRADE REQUIREMENTS
Athletic Training students are expected to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.50
or higher by the end of the fall semester sophomore year. In accordance with
University policy, each student must have a minimum grade of “C” (2.00) on
each course in the major field of study. Failure to make a mark of “C” (2.00) or
higher will not allow the student to take additional coursework within the
major until a satisfactory grade is completed for the course(s) involved.
Athletic training students must also have a minimum grade of “C” (2.00) in
their additional course requirements (PHED 335 and 406, HEWE 224, BIOL 203
and 204).
A cumulative GPA of 2.00 must be maintained for any minor selected by a
student.
ACADEMIC PROBATION
Any athletic training student may be placed on academic probation for
unacceptable progress in his/her clinical education or if his/her cumulative GPA
falls below 2.50 after admittance into Athletic Training Educational Program.
At the end of each semester each student’s academic performance is formally
reviewed and if necessary, the student is notified by the Athletic Training
Educational Program Director (ATEP Director) in writing of their probationary
status.
Gardner-Webb University/175
Probation may include provisions such as required study hall or alteration of
clinical educational experience time. Decisions regarding such provisions will be
determined by the ATEP Director and student’s assigned ACI/CI. If at the end of
the probation semester, the ATS has been unable to attain academic standards,
make satisfactory progress or complete provisions as outline by ATEP Director,
they will be suspended resulting in dismissal from the Athletic Training
Educational Program.
SUSPENSION
In the event that an ATS receives below a “C” (2.00) in one of his/her required
athletic training courses (this includes both the major courses and additional
requirements) he/she will be placed on suspension until the class is re-taken and
the minimum grade requirement is achieved. If an athletic training student is
suspended from the program, he/she is eligible to reapply to the program once
he/she has met ATEP standards. Reapplying consists of completing an abbreviated
application form and an interview with the ATEP Director and CEC. The athletic
training student would re-enter the program at the level last completed
successfully. ATS who are suspended can request academic assistance from the
ATEP Director.
TRANSFER STUDENTS
Any student wishing to transfer into the ATEP must submit transcripts, syllabi,
and course descriptions to the ATEP Director for all athletic training classes for
credit evaluation. All admission requirements contained within ATTR 101 must be
met for admission into the ATEP. Classes containing cognitive competencies will
be evaluated to see which, if any, fulfill the ATEP requirements. Classes
containing psychomotor competencies will require a challenge examination.
Course credit will be awarded after a student has taken the challenge examination
and demonstrated proficiency of those competencies. The student will have the
first semester of enrollment to take the challenge examination and demonstrate
proficiency of psychomotor competencies.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who successfully complete this program of study will demonstrate:
1. knowledge of all Athletic Training Educational Competencies as
outlined by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Education
Council;
2. knowledge of all Foundational Behaviors of Professional Practice as
outlined by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Education
Council; and
3. clinical proficiency in all domains of athletic training as outlined by
the Board of Certification in the Role Delineation Study.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The athletic training major requires 40 semester hours with a grade of “C”
(2.00) or higher in the following Athletic Training courses: 101, 200, 201, 222,
225, 300, 301, 324, 325, 332, 342, 400, 401, 402, 404, and 430. Additional course
requirements include: PHED 335 and 406, HEWE 224, Biology 203 and 204 (an
additional elective hour must be completed for this to be counted as an 18 hour
interdisciplinary minor).
General Studies Requirements
Each athletic training student must complete BIOL 101, COMM 233, and HLED
221 in their general studies requirements.
Additional information can be obtained from the Gardner-Webb Athletic
Training website and the Athletic Training Student Manual.
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies/176
HEALTH/WELLNESS (36 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who successfully complete this program of study will:
1. integrate health promotion awareness, knowledge, and behavior change
strategies in order to enhance quality of life for individuals and society;
2. design and implement theory-based health promotion interventions;
3. assess individual and community health education needs; and
4. demonstrate practical application of the entry-level health education
competencies described in the Competency-Based Framework for Health
Educators.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Core requirements must be satisfied; BIOL 101 is recommended as
one of the Dimension of Scientific Inquiry courses. MATH 105 is recommended
as the course selection for the Dimensions of Quantitative Analysis. Classes
required for completing the major are as follows:
HLED 323 (3 hours)
HEWE 200, 224, 300, 301, 310, 319, 432, 440, 450, and 451 (33 hours)
Additional requirements: BIOL 203 and 204 (8 hours)
NOTE: BIOL 203 has prerequisite of BIOL 101 or BIOL 111, either with
grade of “C” (2.00); or SAT Critical Reading of 500 AND SAT Math of 500; or
ACT Composite score of 22, ACT English Subscore of 21, ACT Math Score of
18, and ACT Reading Score of 20; or TEAS Composite Score of 67. Also,
BIOL 204 has prerequisite of BIOL 203 with grade of “C” (2.00) or
permission of instructor.
Though not required, the student is strongly encouraged to choose Wellness
Promotion as a minor.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH EDUCATION WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (42 HOURS)
In order to be admitted into Teacher Education, students seeking dual
licensure in Physical Education and Health Education are required to obtain
minimum scores on Praxis I. If applicable at the time of program completion,
minimum scores are required on Praxis II Subject Assessment in order to be
recommended for North Carolina teaching licensure. The candidate is referred
to the Teacher Education Handbook for additional requirements. Students will
not be permitted to register for courses in excess of 50% of the major until they
are formally admitted to the Teacher Education Program.
Enrollment in any of the department’s professional classes is limited to
students having declared the intent to major or minor in one of the
department’s courses of study. Exceptions to this policy can be granted only by
the department chair or the course professor.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate from the department’s teacher preparation program
will:
1. demonstrate knowledge and skills in physical education and related
areas;
2. understand and apply the knowledge of the nature of the learner and the
learning process;
3. possess the skills to formulate objectives, select materials, use
appropriate teaching strategies, and evaluate learning;
4. utilize effective communication skills in teaching interactions and in
consultation and collaborative relationships; and
5. understand the role of the educator as theorist and practitioner.
Gardner-Webb University/177
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Core requirements must be satisfied; BIOL 101 is recommended as
one of the Dimension of Scientific Inquiry courses. Classes required for
completing the major with K-12 certification are as follows:
PHED 211, 235, 301, 331, 335, 341, 342, 402, 406, 408, and 409 (33 hours)
HLED 320, 321, and 323 (9 hours)
Additional requirements: BIOL 203 and 204 (8 hours)
NOTE: BIOL 203 has prerequisite of BIOL 101 or BIOL 111, either with
grade of “C” (2.00); or SAT Critical Reading of 500 AND SAT Math of 500; or
ACT Composite score of 22, ACT English Subscore of 21, ACT Math Score of
18, and ACT Reading Score of 20; or TEAS Composite Score of 67. Also, BIOL
204 has prerequisite of BIOL 203 with grade of “C” (2.00) or permission of
instructor.
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor
consisting of Education 205 and 450; Psychology 303; and PHED 432 (must be
taken in the semester prior to student teaching).
NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete more than 50% of the
Professional Education minor (excluding student teaching) until they are
formally admitted to the Teacher Education Program. All candidates must be
fully admitted into the Teacher Education Program a minimum of one full
semester prior to the semester in which they student teach, ideally no later
than the end of the first semester of the junior year.
The North Carolina State Board of Education has adopted new teacher
standards and has required all teacher education programs to be revisioned. All
candidates starting their teacher education program with EDUC 250 in the fall
of 2010 must complete the new program regardless of the catalogue under
which they entered Gardner-Webb University. Candidates who are already in
teacher education can choose to complete the current program or the new
program.
SPORT MANAGEMENT (42 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who successfully complete this program of study will demonstrate:
1. a thorough understanding of technology used in the field of sport
management including computer skills including power point, video and
still picture technologies;
2. an overall knowledge of the sport management field including history,
socialization, and positions in this field;
3. an understanding of basic principles of business including accounting,
marketing, management, and human resources;
4. competencies in leadership and work ethic and other job related skills;
and
5. a thorough understanding of a sport management position of the
student’s choosing.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Core requirements must be satisfied. ECON 203 is required as one
of the Dimensions of Heritage courses; MATH 105 is recommended as the
course selection for the Dimensions of Quantitative Analysis. Classes required
for completing the major are as follows:
SPMG 218, 250, 285, 305, 310,335,345,360,410, 415, and 497 (39 hours)
ACCT 213 (3 hours)
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies/178
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
RECREATION (18 HOURS)
PHED 336, 400, and 410 (9 hours)
PHED 310, 341, or 342 (6 hours)
PHED 408 or HEWE 450 (3 hours)
SPORT MANAGEMENT (18 HOURS)
SPMG 218, 305, 345, 415 (12 hours)
Choose two:
SPMG 250, 285, 310, or 335 (6 hours)
WELLNESS PROMOTION (18 HOURS)
HLED 323 (3 hours)
HEWE 335 and 401 (6 hours)
PHED 335 and 406 (6 hours)
COMM 313, COMM 314, MGMT 316, PHED 235 or PHED 401 (3 hours)
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
must complete HLED 221 as part of the general education core curriculum.
LEADERS PROGRAM OF PROFESSIONAL EXCELLENCE
All majors within the Physical Education, Wellness, and Sport Studies
Department at Gardner-Webb University may elect to obtain a leadership
certification for the LEADERS Program of Professional Excellence. LEADERS is
an acronym used to categorize an array of academic and professional
knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA’s) in the categories of: Leadership, Ethics,
Academics and Professional Roles, Diversity, Etiquette and Professional
Disposition, Religion and Philosophy, and Service Learning and Community
Outreach.
Students who choose to attain the LEADERS certification will, over the
course of their tenure as PEWSS majors, collect evidences that demonstrate
competence in each area and compile them in the form of an electronic
portfolio.* Evidences are assigned point values.** Students must accumulate a
minimum of fourteen (14) total points for certification. A minimum of two (2)
points must be acquired for each category.
Candidate’s attainment of competencies will be assessed and approved by
full time faculty members of the PEWSS department. Each submission must
include appropriate documentation along with a written reflection.***
Students who successfully complete the LEADERS program will be awarded
a certificate of completion. They will also be recognized on awards day and
receive a designation on their official transcript.
*See the PEWSS website for representative samples of evidences and
directions for creating an electronic portfolio.
**Point values for sample evidences are outlined in the department
handbook.
***Requirements for submission are provided in detail in the department
handbook.
Gardner-Webb University/179
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
Note: For activity courses (PHED 140-165) additional fees,
equipment purchases, and/or activity-specific clothing requirements
may apply.
FITNESS (PHED)
140 LOW IMPACT AEROBICS 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
141 HIGH IMPACT AEROBICS 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
142 AEROBIC WALKING 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
143 JOGGING 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
144 AEROBIC WATER SKILLS 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
145 WEIGHT TRAINING 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
LIFETIME SPORTS (PHED)
150 TENNIS/BADMINTON 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
151 RACQUETBALL 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
152 RECREATIONAL DANCE 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
153 GOLF 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
154 GOLF AND BOWLING 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
155 SCUBA DIVING 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
156 TEAM SPORTS 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
157 SWIMMING 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
158 MARTIAL ARTS 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
159 SNOW SKIING 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
OUTDOOR ADVENTURE (PHED)
160 RAPPELLING/CLIMBING 1 semester hour
FIELD EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. 2-0-1.
161 HIKING/ORIENTEERING 1 semester hour
FIELD EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. 2-0-1.
162 CAMPING SKILLS 1 semester hour
FIELD EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. 2-0-1.
163 CANOEING/WHITE WATER RAFTING 1 semester hour
FIELD EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. 2-0-1.
164 BACKPACKING SKILLS 1 semester hour
FIELD EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. 2-0-1.
165 ALPINE TOWER CHALLENGES 1 semester hour 2-0-1.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PHED)
211 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH EDUCATION
3 semester hours
An overview of physical and health education, with emphasis placed on history,
philosophy, 21st century issues, and career opportunities. Both domestic and global
perspectives will be examined. 3-0-3 (Fall)
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies/180
213 LIFEGUARDING AND LIFEGUARDING INSTRUCTOR 3 semester hours
Emphasis on developing competencies in American Red Cross Lifeguarding skills,
including CPR and first aid, and preparation for authorization as an ARC Lifeguarding
Instructor. Students may receive certification in ARC Lifeguarding, CPR for the
Professional Rescuer, including AED training, fundamentals of Instructor Training, and
Lifeguard Instructor. Recommended for the student who is/was a certified lifeguard.
The student is required to pass a proficiency test the first week of class to remain in the
course. (Will substitute for Physical Dimensions of Wellness requirement) 3-1-3.
214 SWIMMING AND WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR 3 semester hours
Emphasis on development of swimming skills directed toward becoming an American
Red Cross Water Safety Instructor. Students may receive certifications in ARC
swimming, Fundamentals of Instructor Training, and preparation for authorization as an
ARC Water Safety Instructor. The student is required to pass a proficiency test the first
week of class to remain in the course. (Will substitute for Physical Dimensions of Wellness
requirement) 3-1-3.
235 MOTOR LEARNING 3 semester hours
A study of basic concepts applicable to motor skill acquisition, motor control and motor
development. Areas of study include variables effecting the learner (e.g., perception,
attention, memory) and the learning environment (e.g., knowledge of results, practice,
transfer of learning). 3-0-3. (Spring)
300 HEALTHFUL LIVING FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATORS 3 semester hours
The integrated study of health, safety, and physical education in the elementary
curriculum. The focus is on knowledge and application of healthful living concepts
through the development of healthy lifestyle attitudes and behaviors which address the
individual needs of students. A field experience is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 250.
3-1-3. (Spring)
301 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 semester hours
Methods, materials and techniques for instruction in recognizing, identifying, and
applying a planned, sequential program in elementary physical education. A field
experience is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 250. 3-1-3. (Fall)
303 INTRAMURALS 2 semester hours
Principles and ideas to effectively organize and administer intramural sports programs in
various school settings. A field experience is required. 2-1-2.
309 OFFICIATING 2 semester hours
Theories and techniques, both general and sport specific, designed to orient the student
to the field of sports officiating. A field experience is required. 2-1-2.
310 OUTDOOR EDUCATION 3 semester hours
Designed to provide the student with practical knowledge as it relates to camping,
hiking, backpacking and related basic wilderness survival skills. Fees may apply. A field
experience is required. 3-1-3.
331 CREATIVE MOVEMENT (K-12) 3 semester hours
Methods, materials and techniques for teaching movement and dance on the K-12 level.
Emphasis is on creativity through movement exploration and dance. 3-0-3. (Fall)
335 KINESIOLOGY 3 semester hours
An examination of both the anatomical and biomechanical factors related to human
performance. 3-0-3. (Fall)
Gardner-Webb University/181
336 THEORY AND TECHNIQUES OF COACHING 3 semester hours
An examination of issues relating to the coaching profession, including recruiting,
motivation, ethics, public relations, and administrative responsibilities. 3-0-3. (Fall, even
years)
341 THEORY AND TECHNIQUES OF TEAM SPORTS 3 semester hours
Methods, theories and techniques for teaching volleyball, softball, football, soccer and
basketball on the K-12 level. 3-0-3. (Fall)
342 THEORY AND TECHNIQUES OF INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPORTS 3 semester hours
Methods, theories and techniques for teaching developmental gymnastics, tennis, track
and field, badminton and golf on the K-12 level. 3-0-3. (Spring)
400 COMMUNITY RECREATION PROGRAMS 3 semester hours
A survey of the recreation field with respect to philosophies, practices, work settings,
trends, knowledge bases and skills and employment opportunities. 3-0-3. (Fall)
401 PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 3 semester hours
This course examines various psychological parameters which influence sport behavior
and performance. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
402 PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR DIVERSE POPULATIONS 3 semester hours
A study of the instruction of physical education and healthy activity for diverse
populations. These populations include the handicapped, the young, the elderly, the
disadvantaged, and other groups. Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDUC 250.
3-1-3 (Spring)
406 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 3 semester hours
A course designed to examine the human body’s response to exercise. Topical areas
include muscular adaptations, energy systems, environmental factors, nutritional
guidelines, and various methods of physical training. 3-0-3. (Spring)
408 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND
ATHLETICS 3 semester hours
The study and application of various administrative issues involved in the fields of
athletics and physical education. 3-0-3. (Fall)
409 TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 3 semester hours
The study of various tests and measurements used for assessment in health and physical
education programs, with special attention given to elementary statistical procedures,
test administration and principles of grading. 3-0-3. (Spring)
432 SEMINAR FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATORS AND HEALTH EDUCATORS 3 semester hours
Methods, materials, theory, practice, and program development in teaching physical and
health education on the K-12 level. (Must be taken the semester immediately prior to
student teaching.) 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-6 semester hours each semester
Designed to enable a student to undertake a specific research or intern project of
professional interest and need. Departmental approval required.
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies/182
HEALTH (HLED)
221 DIMENSIONS OF PERSONAL HEALTH 3 semester hours
The study of scientifically based, accurate, and current information relating to the
development and maintenance of a life-long plan for personal health and wellness. 3-0-3.
(Fall, Spring)
320 COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH EDUCATION 3 semester hours
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan and
implement a sequential curriculum of salient health topics for students K-12. The
purpose is to prepare students to promote the development of health knowledge,
health-related skills and behaviors, and positive health attitudes leading to improved
health status and quality of life for school aged children. Field experience required.
Prerequisite: EDUC 250. 3-1-3 (Fall)
321 TEACHING METHODS FOR HEALTH EDUCATION 3 semester hours
This course prepares students to meet competencies in methodology necessary for
teaching K-12 health. The course focuses on the coordinated school health program, the
national health education standards, health literacy, pedagogy, and student assessment
strategies. Teaching resources for the 21st Century teacher are explored. Field
experience required. 3-1-3 (Spring). Prerequisite: EDUC 250 and HLED 320 or
permission of the department.
323 FIRST AID/CPR WITH INSTRUCTOR CERTIFICATION 3 semester hours
A course designed to provide the citizen responder with knowledge and skills necessary
to help sustain life and minimize pain and the consequences of injury or sudden illness.
The course also prepares students for instructor certification. Includes American Red
Cross basic and instructor certification in First Aid/CPR/AED. Field experience required.
3-1-3 (Fall,Spring)
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-6 semester hours each semester
Designed to enable a student to undertake a specific research or intern project of
professional interest and need. Departmental approval required.
HEALTH/WELLNESS (HEWE)
200 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH/WELLNESS PROMOTION 3 semester hours
A survey of the health and wellness field of study with respect to philosophies,
practices, work settings, trends, knowledge bases and skills. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
224 NUTRITION 3 semester hours
An examination of basic nutritional concepts including a study of weight control.
Applications of nutrition in health education will be emphasized. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
300 PROGRAM PLANNING, IMPLEMENTING, AND EVALUATING OF
HEALTH/WELLNESS PROGRAMS 3 semester hours
Designed to provide an understanding and utilization of the basic theories and
guidelines for assessing individual and community health/wellness needs, as well as, for
planning, implementing, and evaluating health/wellness programs in a variety of
settings. Prerequisite: HEWE 200. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
301 HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE 3 semester hours
Designed to introduce health behavior change theories, principles, and strategies.
Emphasis is on enhancement of health and prevention of disease. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
Gardner-Webb University/183
310 PRINCIPLES OF EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION AND ASSESSMENT 3 semester hours
Designed to develop a thorough understanding of all health-related components of
fitness, to include clinical assessment techniques and health risk assessment for each
component. This course will provide the knowledge and skills necessary to design
various programs for the development and functional progression of each component.
(Guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine will be emphasized.) 3-0-3.
(Fall, Spring)
319 COMMUNITY HEALTH 3 semester hours
A course designed to study the individuals and processes involved in shaping local,
state, and national health policies, as well as the delivery, utilization, and planning of
health services in the U.S. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
335 PATHOLOGY ASSESSMENT, INJURY PREVENTION AND TREATMENT
3 semester hours
Designed to develop knowledge and skills necessary to recognize musculoskeletal and
cardiovascular systems of physically active individuals. Content will focus on assessment
techniques for common causes of injury, training programs and strategies to
minimize/prevent injuries and treatment protocols for injuries. 3-0-3. (Spring)
401 SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION 3 semester hours
A study of the sociological, psychological and physiological aspects of drug and alcohol
abuse as they impact upon the individual, family and society. 3-0-3. (Fall) WC II
432 SEMINAR IN HEALTH/WELLNESS 3 semester hours
Designed to investigate current issues and research in health/wellness promotion. A
written and oral presentation of a research project is required. Pre-requisite: HEWE 300.
3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
440 EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FACTORS 3 semester hours
Designed as an introduction to epidemiology, defined as the study of the distribution
and determinants of diseases and injuries in human populations. Emphasis will be
placed on the nation’s leading chronic diseases and to the leading work-related health
problems. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
450 ORGANIZATION/ADMINISTRATION OF HEALTH/WELLNESS PROGRAMS
3 semester hours
Designed to develop competencies in organizing and administering various health
programs, to include risk factor identification, liability management, programming,
facility design. Particular emphasis will be placed on “Guidelines from the American
College of Sports Medicine.” 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
451 INTERNSHIP IN HEALTH/WELLNESS 6 semester hours
A supervised internship in a professional work environment which will provide the
student with exposure to the job market in wellness related businesses and health
related agencies. Each student will be responsible for 300 hours of work and be
required to present detailed descriptions of work activities and experiences. Prerequisite: Senior Standing, 2.5 GPA. and/or Departmental Approval. (Fall, Spring,
Summer)
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies/184
ATHLETIC TRAINING (ATTR)
101 INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING 1 semester hour
A course designed to introduce prospective athletic training students to the profession of
athletic training, its governing organizations, daily responsibilities and occupational
opportunities. Successful completion of this course with its associated observation hours
is a requirement for application to the athletic training educational program.
1-0-1. (Spring)
200 ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL I 2 semester hours
In this course each student will demonstrate proficiency in cognitive and psychomotor
skills learned in ATTR 222. Athletic training students shall perform proficiencies in their
assigned clinical experience commensurate with their level of education, competence
and experience. Prerequisites: ATEP Admission, ATTR 101, ATTR 222. 2-0-2. (Fall)
201 ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL II 2 semester hours
In this course each student will demonstrate proficiency in cognitive and psychomotor
skills learned in ATTR 225. Athletic training students shall perform proficiencies in their
assigned clinical experience commensurate with their level of education, competence
and experience. Prerequisite: ATTR 200. 2-0-2. (Spring)
222 FIRST AID AND MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE INJURIES AND ILLNESS 3 semester hours
The intent of this course is to provide the athletic training student with the knowledge,
skills, and values they must possess to recognize, assess, and treat acute injury or illness of
athletes and other physically active individuals. 3-1-3. (Spring)
225 TECHNIQUES OF PREVENTION AND CARE 3 semester hours
The athletic training student will develop the knowledge, skills, and values to identify
injury and illness factors that may be encountered by athletes and others involved in
physical activity and to plan and implement a risk management and prevention program.
Prerequisites: ATEP Admission, ATTR 101, ATTR 222. 3-1-3. (Fall)
300 ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL III 2 semester hours
In this course each student will demonstrate proficiency in cognitive and psychomotor
skills learned in ATTR 324 and 342. Athletic training students shall perform proficiencies
in their assigned clinical experience commensurate with their level of education,
competence and experience. Prerequisite: ATTR 201. 2-0-2. (Fall)
301 ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL IV 2 semester hours
In this course each student will demonstrate proficiency in cognitive and psychomotor
skills learned in ATTR 325. Athletic training students shall perform proficiencies in their
assigned clinical experience commensurate with their level of education, competence
and experience. Prerequisite: ATTR 300. 2-0-2. (Spring)
324 EVALUATION AND RECOGNITION OF LOWER EXTREMITY INJURIES 3 semester hours
This course will concentrate on evaluation and recognition of orthopaedic
musculoskeletal injuries of the lower extremity. Prerequisite: ATTR 225. 3-1-3. (Spring)
325 EVALUATION AND RECOGNITION OF UPPER EXTREMITY INJURIES 3 semester hours
This course will concentrate on evaluation and recognition of orthopaedic
musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity. Prerequisite: ATTR 324. 3-1-3. (Fall)
Gardner-Webb University/185
332 REHABILITATION AND RECONDITIONING OF ATHLETIC INJURIES 3 semester hours
This course will provide the athletic training student with the knowledge, skills, and
values they must possess to plan, implement, document, and evaluate the efficacy of
therapeutic exercise programs for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of the injuries
and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity. Prerequisite: ATTR 325.
3-1-3. (Spring)
342 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ATHLETIC TRAINING 3 semester hours
A course designed to expose the athletic training student to the organizational and
administrative demands of the traditional and non-traditional employment settings.
Special emphasis will be placed on medical terminology used in health professions.
Prerequisite: ATTR 324. 3-0-3. (Fall)
400 ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL V 2 semester hours
In this course each student will demonstrate proficiency in cognitive and psychomotor
skills learned in ATTR 332 and 404. Athletic training students shall perform proficiencies
in their assigned clinical experience commensurate with their level of education,
competence and experience. Prerequisite: ATTR 301. 2-0-2. (Fall)
401 ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL VI 2 semester hours
In this course each student will demonstrate proficiency in cognitive and psychomotor
skills learned in ATTR 402. Athletic training students shall perform proficiencies in their
assigned clinical experience commensurate with their level of education, competence
and experience. Prerequisite: ATTR 400. 2-0-2. (Spring)
402 MEDICAL CONDITIONS AND PHARMACOLOGY 3 semester hours
To provide the student with the knowledge, skills, and values to recognize, treat, and refer,
when appropriate, general medical conditions and disabilities. An in-depth study of
pharmacologic applications, including awareness of indications, contraindications,
precautions, and interactions of medication and of the governing regulations relevant to the
treatment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity.
Prerequisite: ATTR 332. 3-1-3. (Fall)
404 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES 3 semester hours
A course to provide the athletic training student with a basic understanding of the
underlying principles supportive of the use of therapeutic modalities, including
physiological effects of different modalities and how they work as therapeutic agents.
Prerequisite: ATTR 225. 3-1-3. (Spring)
430 ATHLETIC TRAINING SEMINAR 3 semester hours
This course will summarize the experiences the student has learned and demonstrated
within the athletic training program and will serve as final preparation for the Board of
Certification Examination. Prerequisite: ATTR 404. 3-0-3. (Spring)
*All Laboratory Courses have an associated 1 hour lab scheduled at a separate time
from the course.
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies/186
SPORT MANAGEMENT (SPMG)
218 PRINCIPLES OF SPORT MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
An overview of the field of sport management with emphasis placed on history,
philosophy, ethics, program evaluation, current trends, and career opportunities. For
majors and minors only. 3-0-3. (Fall)
250 SOCIAL ISSUES IN SPORTS 3 semester hours
An introduction to the concept of sport in society. This course examines issues and
patterns of social behavior as they relate to play, games, and sport. 3-0-3 (Fall, Spring)
285 COMMUNICATION IN SPORT 3 semester hours
An examination of the interrelationship and symbiotic relationship between sports and
media in today’s society. The course will utilize various broadcasts, print, and electronic
media to examine how they are vital to the success of the sport organization and how
they shape and reinforce cultural values. 3-0-3 (Fall, Spring)
305 SPORT FACILITY DESIGN AND EVENT MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Students will study the design and construction of sport facilities. In addition, students
will study how to create, manage, and market sport events. 3-0-3 (Fall, Spring)
310 SPORT MARKETING AND PROMOTION 3 semester hours
A study of basic marketing science as it applies to all realms of the sport industry.
Special emphasis is placed on the principles, policies, and strategies utilized to market
the unique product of sport. Attention is focused on the importance of public attitudes,
opinions, and demographics as well as the design and construction of a marketing plan
and promotional proposals. 3-0-3 (Fall, Spring)
335 FINANCE & ECONOMICS OF SPORT 3 semester hours
Examines basic financial and economic relationships uniquely related to the business of
sport. Special emphasis will be upon the economic impact analysis of sport principles,
policies and plans for generating and increasing revenue streams, and controlling costs
in the sport industry. An analysis of how economic models are used to measure the
impact of sport on carious economies. 3-0-3 (Fall, Spring)
345 LEGAL ISSUES IN SPORT 3 semester hours
Students will study the topics of contract law, tort law, administrative/statutory law,
antitrust law, and collective bargaining as they apply to sport organizations. Students
will be provided with applicable knowledge of issues and strategies to manage the legal
aspects of their professional lives as sport administrators.3-0-3 (Fall, Spring)
360 INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE IN SPORT MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
This course offers a supervised observation/work experience in a sport management
setting. The course consists of 70 hours of work experience and weekly class meetings
to discuss sport management issues in relation to those experiences. In addition,
students will be trained and receive certification of proficiency in Schedule Star
Operations. Prerequisites: SPMG 218 and SPMG 305. 2-4-3 (Fall, Spring)
Gardner-Webb University/187
410 SPORT GOVERNANCE 3 semester hours
The basics of managerial activities necessary for governance and policy development in
sport organizations at the professional, collegiate, high school, and amateur level are
covered, as well as the structure and function of the various organizations. Prerequisites:
SPMG 218 or permission of instructor 3-0-3 (Fall, Spring)
415 ETHICS AND LEADERSHIP IN SPORT 3 semester hours
Analysis and application of ethical and leadership theories as applied to situations in
sport management settings. Prerequisites: SPMG 218 or permission of instructor. 3-0-3
(Fall, Spring)
497 INTERNSHIP IN SPORT MANAGEMENT 9 semester hours
This course provides the student an opportunity to experience a specific professional
interest. Prerequisites: SPMG 360 and a minimum of 27 credit hours in major, or
permission of instructor. In addition, students are required to have a minimum grade of
“C” (2.00) . (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy/188
DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS
STUDIES AND PHILOSOPHY
FACULTY
Chair: Professor K. Blevins
Professors: D. Berry, D. Bryan, B. Leslie, P. Qualls, R. Williams
Associate Professors: E. Stepp, P. Hildreth
Assistant Professors: J. Collins, C. Feemster, T. Jessup, B. Moore, S. Shauf
MISSION STATEMENT
Within the context of a Christian liberal arts tradition, our mission in both
graduate and undergraduate education is to provide an atmosphere of open
inquiry, honesty, and integrity where issues of religious understanding, faith,
practice, and philosophy can be explored. Our intention is to prepare lifelong
learners who are self-aware, critical and analytical thinkers, committed to a life
of service with and for God and humanity.
GOALS
To assist both undergraduate and graduate students in achieving:
1. An appreciation for the Judeo-Christian tradition in the context of a
liberal arts tradition;
2. A developing spiritual life that integrates the physical, mental,
psychological, and social dimensions of life;
3. An ability to think, to reason, and to communicate with critical
awareness in the context of religious studies and philosophy;
4 An ability to translate critical thinking into responsible life choices;
5. A commitment to the pursuit of life-long learning; and
6. Preparation for pursuing advanced studies and professions related to
serving God and humanity
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who choose one of the six majors offered by the Department of
Religious Studies and Philosophy will demonstrate:
1. basic skills in biblical interpretation and exegesis, and
2. skills in critical thinking, and written and oral communication.
Student learning outcomes specific to each major offered by the Department
are described in the appropriate sections that follow.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The Department offers the following majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts
degree:
Biblical Studies
Discipleship Studies
Youth Discipleship Studies
Philosophy and Theology
World Religions
Missiology
The Department also offers a second major in Religious Studies with each of
the options listed above.
Gardner-Webb University/189
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Biblical Studies
Discipleship Studies
Youth Discipleship Studies
Philosophy and Ethics
World Religions
Missiology
Christian History
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
The Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy requires 39 hours of
courses beyond core requirements.
Though not required for every major, the Department recommends that
RELI 245 be taken as part of the Global Heritage general education
requirement and that RELI 354 be taken as part of the Oral Communication
general education requirement. All majors in the Department take RELI 101
and 102 or equivalents as part of the University general education requirement.
The Department recommends that these two courses be completed before
taking upper-level courses in the Department.
The Religious Studies Association is the departmental club established to
benefit religion majors and other interested students/faculty by providing
additional opportunities for learning and service in the field of Religious
Studies. All students majoring in the Department are required to attend four of
the six yearly meetings. Students who excel in Religious Studies may be invited
to become a member of the University chapter of Theta Alpha Kappa, a
national honor society.
DEPARTMENT FOUNDATIONAL COURSES (9 HOURS)
All majors are required to take three of the following four courses:
RELI 271, RELI 321, RELI 333, PHIL 200
The nine hours of foundational courses above will be combined with six
hours of departmental electives (except for the Language option of the Biblical
Studies major, which requires three hours of departmental electives), a threehour seminar requirement, and 21 additional hours in the area of one’s
selected major for a total of 39 hours to complete the major, as outlined below:
BIBILICAL STUDIES MAJOR (39 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will demonstrate:
1. either: a) (Language option) an advanced competency in both Koine
Greek and biblical Hebrew; or b) (Non-Language option) an
intermediate competency in either Koine Greek or biblical Hebrew,
2. an in-depth understanding of the literature of the Old and New
Testaments,
3. an understanding of the cultural context from which the
languages and literature come, and
4. the ability to do critical research in Biblical Languages and
Literature and to give clear, substantive oral and written
reports of such research.
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy/190
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Department foundational courses (see above – 9 hours)
RELI 351 or RELI 352 (3)
Language or Non-Language options – choose one:
Language:
Biblical Languages (15)
Either HEBR 101, 102, 201, 202, GREK 202
(with the general education core requirement
of GREK 101, 102, 201) or GREK 101, 102,
201, 202, HEBR 202 (with the general
education core requirement of HEBR 101, 102, 201)
Biblical Studies – OT (3)
RELI 302, 303, 306, or 307 (select one)
Biblical Studies – NT (3)
RELI 311, 312, 314, 316, or 317 (select one)
Seminar – (3)
RELI 490
Departmental electives – (3)
Non-Language:
Biblical Studies – OT (6 or 9: if the biblical language is
Hebrew, only 6 OT hours are required)
RELI 302, 303, 306, 307, or HEBR 202 (select three)
Biblical Studies – NT (6 or 9: if the biblical language is
Greek, only 6 NT hours are required)
RELI 311, 312, 314, 316, 317, or GREK 202 (select
three)
Practicum / Internship (3)
RELI 358 or 397 (select one)
Seminar – (3)
RELI 490
Departmental electives – (6)
Additional requirement: students must take nine hours from a biblical language
as part of the general education language requirement.
DISCIPLESHIP STUDIES MAJOR (39 HOURS)
NOTE: Students who choose to major in Discipleship Studies will NOT be eligible
for North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grant funds.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will demonstrate:
1. an understanding of basic principles of Christian discipleship
among various age groups,
2. an understanding of leadership and administration principles
for effective discipleship processes,
3. an understanding of the various contexts in which discipleship
practices arise, and
4. critical reflection and analysis in the field of discipleship studies
and an ability to give clear, substantive oral and written reports
of said reflection and analysis.
Gardner-Webb University/191
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Department foundational courses (see above – 9 hours)
Biblical Studies – OT (3)
RELI 302, 303, 306, or 307 (select one)
Biblical Studies – NT (3)
RELI 311, 312, 314, 316, or 317 (select one)
Discipleship (12)
RELI 370
RELI 374, 375, or 377 (select two)
RELI 376 or 373 (select one)
Practicum / Internship (3)
RELI 358 or 397 (select one)
Seminar (3)
RELI 490
Departmental electives (6)
Recommended: that students take RELI 245 as part of Global Heritage
general education requirement.
YOUTH DISCIPLESHIP STUDIES MAJOR (39 HOURS)
NOTE: Students who choose to major in Youth Discipleship Studies will
NOT be eligible for North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grant funds.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will demonstrate:
1. an understanding of basic principles of youth discipleship
in a Christian context,
2. an understanding of basic principles of Christian discipleship
among other age groups,
3. an understanding of leadership and administration principles
for effective youth discipleship processes,
4. an understanding of the various contexts in which youth discipleship
practices arise, and
5. critical reflection and analysis in the field of youth discipleship studies
and an ability to give clear, substantive oral and written reports
of said reflection and analysis.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Department foundational courses (see above – 9 hours)
Biblical Studies – OT (3)
RELI 302, 303, 306, or 307 (select one)
Biblical Studies – NT (3)
RELI 311, 312, 314, 316, or 317 (select one)
Discipleship (12)
RELI 373, 374 or 377 (select one)
RELI 370, 375, and 376
Practicum / Internship (3)
RELI 358 or 397 (select one)
Seminar (3)
RELI 490
Departmental electives (6)
Recommended: that students take RELI 245 as part of Global Heritage
general education requirement.
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy/192
PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY MAJOR (39 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students should:
1. identify and develop the critical tools necessary for the
disciplined exploration of biblical studies, Christian history
and thought, religious education, and related disciplines,
2. list and discuss significant writers, literature, methodology,
and the unique shape of the various disciplines in the field of
philosophy and theology,
3. be able to do critical research in religious study and
philosophical study and to give clear, substantive oral and
written reports of such research, and
4. be able to move to advanced levels of study in the area of
religious thought and philosophy.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Department foundational courses (see above – 9 hours)
World Religions (3)
RELI 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, or 378 (select one)
Biblical Studies
RELI 352 (3)
Christian History (3)
RELI 322, 323, 324, 325, 327, or 328 (select one)
Philosophy / Ethics (9)
PHIL 201, RELI 341, PHIL 337, PHIL 338, or PHIL 380 (select three)
Theology (3)
RELI 306 or 314 (select one)
Seminar (3)
RELI 490
Departmental electives (6)
Recommended: that students take RELI 245 as part of Global Heritage
general education requirement.
WORLD RELIGIONS MAJOR (39 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students should demonstrate:
1. an understanding of the historical development of the major world
religions,
2. an understanding to the worldview of the major world religions,
3. an understanding of how the major world religions live out their faith,
4. a basic understanding of the primary sacred texts of the major world
religions, and
5. an understanding of how contemporary world events are often shaped by
religious convictions and traditions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Department foundational courses (see above – 9 hours)
PHIL 337 and RELI 328 (6)
World Religions (15)
RELI 347, 348, 349, 350, and 378
Seminar (3)
RELI 490
Departmental electives (6)
Gardner-Webb University/193
Additional requirements: students must take RELI 245 as part of Global
Heritage general education requirement and RELI 354 as part of Oral
Communication general education requirement.
MISSIOLOGY MAJOR (39 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will understand and utilize:
1. the biblical basis for Christian mission,
2. the history, heritage and theology of Christian mission,
3. contemporary world religions, political situations and world
views with which the Christian mission enterprise must relate,
4. the most current strategies/methodologies used by mission
organizations, and
5. the ability to do critical research in Christian mission and to
give clear, substantive oral and written reports on such research.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Department foundational courses (see above – 9 hours)
Missiology (12)
RELI 243, 326, 328, and 378
World Religions (3)
RELI 347, 348, 349, or 350 (select one)
Biblical Studies / Discipleship Studies (3)
RELI 302, 303, 306, 307, 311, 312, 314, 316, 317, 370, 373,
374, 375, or 377 (select one)
Seminar (3)
RELI 490
Practicum / Internship (3)
RELI 358 or 397 (select one)
Departmental electives (6)
Additional requirements: students must take RELI 245 as part of
Global Heritage general education requirement and RELI 354 as part
of Oral Communication general education requirement.
SECOND MAJOR FOR STUDENTS WHOSE FIRST MAJOR IS FROM OUTSIDE THE
DEPARTMENT (33 HOURS)
A second major for a student whose first major is in a department other than
the Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy shall meet all
requirements in the second major area except for the hours designated for
departmental electives. The total hour requirement is 33 hours, except for the
biblical studies major with language option, which requires a total of 36 hours
since it contains 3 hours rather than 6 hours of elective credit.
SECOND MAJOR WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT (30 HOURS)
A second major in the Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy for a
student whose first major is within the Department shall consist of 30 hours.
All requirements in the second major area must be met except for the
foundational course requirement of 9 hours. The seminar requirement applies
to each major; thus RELI 490 must be taken twice. In the case of two majors
that both require either a practicum or internship (RELI 358 or RELI 397), one
course will meet the requirement for both majors. The other three hours will
be substituted with an elective course (3 hours). In every case for students
with two majors within the Department, the first major will total 39 hours and
the second major will total 30 hours.
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy/194
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
The Department does not require a minor. If a major in the Department
chooses to minor within the Department, the minor must be in an area other
than that of the major.
BIBLICAL STUDIES (15 HOURS)
RELI 351 or 352, plus 3 hours of Old Testament (select one from RELI 302,
303, 306, or 307), plus 3 hours of New Testament (select one from RELI
311, 312, 314, 316, or 317), plus 6 additional hours from any of the
aforementioned courses or any HEBR or GREK courses.
DISCIPLESHIP STUDIES (15 HOURS)
Any combination of Discipleship Studies courses.
MISSIOLOGY (15 HOURS)
RELI 243, 326, 328, and 378, plus one from among RELI 347, 348, 349, or 350.
RELI 245 recommended as part of University general education requirement.
WORLD RELIGIONS (15 HOURS)
Select 9 hours from among RELI 347, 348, 349, 350, plus 6 additional
hours from among the courses offered by the Department. RELI 245
recommended as part of University general education requirement.
PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS (15 HOURS)
PHIL 200 and PHIL 201, plus 9 hours from among the following:
PHIL 337, PHIL 338, PHIL 380, RELI 341, or RELI 342
YOUTH DISCIPLESHIP (15 HOURS)
Required courses include RELI 375, 376, PSYC 302, and either PSYC 425 or
PSYC 440, plus a practicum or internship related to Youth Discipleship.
CHRISTIAN HISTORY (15 HOURS)
RELI 321, if not already taken, plus additional courses from among the
following for a total of 15 hours: RELI 322, 323, 324, 325, 327, or 328.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
must complete a foreign language through the Intermediate I level (201).
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
101 INTRODUCTION TO THE OLD TESTAMENT 3 semester hours
An introduction and survey of the Old Testament focusing upon the history, literature,
and faith of the people of Israel and its contemporary relevance. (Credit may not be
earned for both Religion 101 and Religion 304.) 3-0-3. (Offered each semester.)
102 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT 3 semester hours
An introduction and survey of the New Testament focusing upon the history, literature
and faith that gave rise to Christianity and its contemporary relevance. (Credit may not be
earned for both Religion 102 and Religion 305.) 3-0-3. (Offered each semester.)
Gardner-Webb University/195
243 GROWTH AND REVIVAL IN THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 3 semester hours
A survey of the major global movements of church growth from the New Testament
period to the present day. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
245 RELIGION AND CULTURE IN A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE 3 semester hours
The course will explore the relationship between selected cultures of the world and the
religious ideas and concepts which inform them. It will examine the impact of religion on
culture, as well as the role which culture has played in shaping religious traditions. 3-0-3.
(Offered each semester)
271 SPIRITUAL FORMATION 3 semester hours
An exploration of personal and spiritual development through self-reflection, selfawareness and theological reflection. Attention will be given to biblical foundations,
spiritual disciplines, and Christian classics. 3-0-3. (Offered each semester)
302 THE SACRED WRITINGS 3 semester hours
A study of Hebrew poetry and selections of wisdom literature with special reference to its
significance in the faith of ancient Israel. Prerequisite: RELI 101.3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
303 OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS 3 semester hours
A survey of prophecy in Israel with attention given to the historical settings of the
individual prophets and to the relevance of their message. Prerequisite: RELI 101. 3-0-3.
(Spring, even years)
306 OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY 3 semester hours
An exploration of Old Testament theological themes. Prerequisite: RELI 101. 3-0-3.
(Spring, odd years)
307 STUDIES IN THE PENTATEUCH 3 semester hours
A critical evaluation of the nature, background, structure, and message of the Pentateuch.
Prerequisite: RELI 101. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
311 SYNOPTIC GOSPELS 3 semester hours
A study of the person, work, and message of Jesus Christ as presented in the Synoptic
Gospels. Prerequisite: RELI 102. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
312 LIFE AND LETTERS OF PAUL 3 semester hours
A study of Paul’s life and thought as presented in his Epistles. Prerequisite: RELI 102.
3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
314 NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY 3 semester hours
A study of certain key concepts of the New Testament which made a contribution to the
faith of the Early Church. Prerequisite: RELI 102. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
316 THE WRITINGS OF JOHN 3 semester hours
A study of the background and interpretation of the Fourth Gospel, the Epistles of John,
and the Book of Revelation. Prerequisite: RELI 102. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
317 THE GENERAL EPISTLES AND HEBREWS 3 semester hours
A study of the background, theology, and exegesis of James, I and II Peter, Jude, and
Hebrews. Prerequisite: RELI 102. 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years)
321 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN HISTORY 3 semester hours
A study of the history of the Christian church from the first century to the present day. 30-3 (Offered each spring)
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy/196
322 EARLY AND MEDIEVAL CHRISTIANITY 3 semester hours
A survey of the most significant institutional, theological and social developments in the
history of the Christian church from the first century through the latter Middle Ages.
3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
323 MODERN CHRISTIANITY 3 semester hours
Beginning with the Reformation this course is descriptive of church history to the
present. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
324 AMERICAN CHRISTIANITY 3 semester hours
A historical survey of the American religious scene from the colonial period to the
present. Primary emphasis is given to the development of the more prominent Christian
denominations. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
325 BAPTIST HERITAGE 3 semester hours
A study of the Baptists’ story as well as those convictions and movements which have
shaped their life. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
326 INTRODUCTION TO MISSIOLOGY 3 semester hours
A wide-ranging exploration of the Christian mission, including the background and
current status of missions, the strategies and methods of cross-cultural missions and
evangelism, and key issues in missions discussion. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
327 THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 3 semester hours
An exploration of the major religious, social, intellectual and political changes in
Western Europe from the late Middle Ages to the close of the sixteenth century.
Particular emphasis is given to the relationship between Italian Humanism and the
Protestant Reformation and to the continuity of the movement for Ecclesiastical Reform
throughout the period. 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years)
328 GLOBAL CHRISTIANITY 3 semester hours
A study of the various expressions of Christianity in the 21st century. 3-0-3 (Fall, odd
years)
333 CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY 3 semester hours
An introduction to the history, methods, and principal topics of Christian theology.
3-0-3. (Offered each Spring)
341 CHRISTIAN ETHICS 3 semester hours
A systematic study of the nature of morality; a defense of “Christian’’ ethics; and
exploration of principles of Biblical ethics. Specific contemporary ethical issues provide
the backdrop for discussions. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
342 CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES TOWARD VIOLENCE 3 semester hours
The course will explore current and historical attitudes of Christians toward violence,
including biblical and theological bases for a specifically Christian response to violence.
3-0-3 (Fall, odd years)
346 WORLD RELIGIONS 3 semester hours
An introduction to Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and the religions of China and
Japan. 3-0-3. (On demand)
Gardner-Webb University/197
347 RELIGIONS OF INDIA 3 semester hours
This course will introduce the students to the historical, theological, and practical
developments of religions that emerged in India. The course will focus on important
events, movements, and figures that helped shape contemporary Hinduism and
Buddhism. Jainism and Sikhism will be addressed in the course. Students will be
challenged to explore Christian approaches to these religions. 3-0-3 (Fall, even years)
348 RELIGIONS OF CHINA AND JAPAN 3 semester hours
This course will introduce the students to the historical, theological, and practical,
developments of religions that emerged in China and Japan. The course will focus on
important events, movements, and figures that helped shape contemporary religious
traditions in China and Japan. Chinese Traditional Religion, Taoism, Confucianism,
Shinto and Buddhism will all be addressed in this course. Students will be challenged to
explore Christian approaches to these religions. 3-0-3 (Spring, odd years)
349 INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM 3 semester hours
This course will introduce the historical, theological, and practical developments in
Judaism. The course will focus on important events, movements, and figures that helped
shape contemporary Judaism. Students will be challenged to explore Christian
approaches to Judaism. 3-0-3 (Spring, even years)
350 INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM 3 semester hours
This course will introduce the students to the historical, theological, and practical
developments in Islam. The course will focus on important events, movements, and
figures that helped shape contemporary Islam. Students will be challenged to explore
Christian approaches to Islam. 3-0-3 (Fall, odd years)
351 BIBLICAL BACKGROUNDS 3 semester hours
A survey of the history and environment of the biblical world presented either as a
travel-study course to the Near East or as a regular lecture course on the campus.
Prerequisites: RELI 101 and 102. Lecture-Travel-3 or 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
352 BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION 3 semester hours
The purpose of this course is to engage students in a study of the theory and practice of
biblical interpretation throughout Christian history and in contemporary Christianity.
Students will consider traditional approaches to the study of scripture, challenges to
those approaches and alternative proposals offered since the Enlightenment, and
contemporary ways of interpreting scripture. Students will also study issues relating to
the inspiration and authority of scripture and to the contemporary use of scripture in
theology, ethics, and broader Christian living. A central aspect of the course will be
students’ own engagement with the Bible in actual exegetical practice. Prerequisites:
RELI 101 and RELI 102. 3-0-3 (Spring, even years)
354 ORAL COMMUNICATION IN A CHRISTIAN CONTEXT 3 semester hours
Guided readings and practice in the preparation and delivery of effective sermons.
Prerequisite: six hours of religious studies courses. 3-0-3. (Every fall)
358 PRACTICUM 3 semester hours
An introduction to the many facets of applying religious studies in practical settings. The
course combines reading, discussion, lectures, and reflection, as well as guided
experience in a setting approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: application to and
approval of the instructor. 2-supervised experience-3. (Offered each spring semester.)
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy/198
370 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 3 semester hours
An inquiry into the biblical, theological, philosophical, and historical foundations for the
practice of Christian education. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years.)
373 CHURCH LEADERSHIP 3 semester hours
An inquiry into the practice of leadership in Christian churches. The course will
examine the philosophy of Christian leadership, models of leadership in communities of
faith, the relationship of personal leadership styles and congregational climates, change
and conflict management, and common church leadership tasks and traps. 3-0-3.
(Offered fall, odd years.)
374 PRESCHOOL AND CHILDREN DISCIPLESHIP 3 semester hours
A study of principles and strategies of effective Christian discipleship processes with
preschoolers and children, including the study of historical, current, and emerging
models. As a part of the course, students will observe preschoolers and children and will
practically apply principles for the course in real discipleship settings. Prerequisites:
RELI 101 and RELI 102. 3-0-3 (Spring, odd years)
375 YOUTH DISCIPLESHIP 3 semester hours
This course is a basic introduction to youth ministry, including the study of current
trends in the field, characteristics of youth, methods for reaching and teaching youth.
Included will be opportunities for practical ministry experiences, observing others in
youth ministry, and studying resources, programs, and activities for effective youth
ministry. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years.)
376 ADVANCED YOUTH DISCIPLESHIP 3 semester hours
This course advances and further develops youth discipleship studies offered in RELI
375 - Youth Discipleship, integrating both academic and practical forms of discipleship.
The course investigates tools necessary to disciple youth and includes opportunities for
engaging students in their cultural settings, evaluating different denominational
approaches to youth discipleship, publishing in a professional journal, and analyzing and
studying resources in discipling youth. 3-0-3 (Spring, even years)
377 ADULT DISCIPLESHIP 3 semester hours
A study of principles and strategies of effective Christian discipleship with adults,
including the study of the historical, current, and emerging models. As a part of the
course, students will observe and participate in practical application of the course
content. Prerequisites: RELI 101 and RELI 102. 3-0-3 (Fall, even years)
378 NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS 3 semester hours
This course will introduce students to the emergent religious movements that have
made their mark on the United States and Europe since 1800. The historical foundations
and religious beliefs of selected groups will be addressed. The course will also discuss
the impact that such movements have had in the United States and Europe. 3-0-3.
(Spring, odd years)
380 SELECTED TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
1-3 semester hours (On demand)
Gardner-Webb University/199
387 ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND RELIGION 3 semester hours
An interdisciplinary examination of issues which arise at the interface between science
and religion. A discussion of the nature of science and religion, ways of relating the two,
and historical background will be followed by an exploration of specific topics of
contemporary interest. 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years)
397 INTERNSHIP 3 semester hours
A minimum of ten weeks spent in full-time (30+ hours/week) supervised service in a
setting approved by the instructor. The course combines reading, reflections, and
guided experience. Prerequisites: application to and approval of the instructor.
0-practical experience-3. (Offered each summer as a 10-week course.)
490 SENIOR SEMINAR 3 semester hours
Through directed readings, discussions, and research, the course provides an integrative
exploration of concepts or issues from various disciplines within the Department.
Senior standing required. Prerequisites: RELI 101, RELI 102, RELI 271, RELI 333, RELI
321 and PHIL 200 or equivalents. 3-0-3 (Offered each semester)
495 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours
A course consisting of guided readings, independent research, conferences with the
supervising professor, and the production of a final paper reflecting the student’s
synthesis of readings, research and conferences. The final paper shall become part of
the holdings of the Dover Library. 0-Independent Study-3. (On demand)
PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)
200 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3 semester hours
An introduction to the major types of philosophy (schools and movements) and the
principal problems and questions of human existence. 3-0-3. (Offered each fall)
201 AN INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC 3 semester hours
An introduction to classical and contemporary logic, emphasizing argumentation and
reasoning. Attention to language and its relation to philosophical problems. Examination
of the formal laws of valid thought and fallacies found in ordinary discourse. 3-0-3.
(Spring, odd years)
337 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 3 semester hours
An introduction to selected issues raised through a philosophical investigation of
religion including, but not confined to, the nature of religious language, the existence of
God, the problem of evil, fideism, revelation, and the challenge of the religions of the
world. Prerequisite: PHIL 200 or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
338 EPISTEMOLOGY 3 semester hours
Survey in the traditional problems in epistemology, including the nature of human
knowledge, the relations between knowledge and true belief, and the nature of
rationality and justification. Also includes a section on the rationality of religious belief.
Prerequisite: PHIL 200 or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3 (Spring, even years)
380 SELECTED TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY 3 semester hours (On demand)
Prerequisite: PHIL 200 or permission of the instructor.
Department of Social Sciences/200
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
FACULTY
Chair: Associate Professor T. Vanderburg
Professors: D. Ellington, R. Munoz, D. Yelton
Associate Professors: M. Kuchinsky, D. Sykes
Instructor: B. Cox
MISSION STATEMENT
In conjunction with the University's mission as an institution of Christian,
liberal arts-based higher education, the Social Sciences Department at GardnerWebb strives to facilitate student development of the intellectual skills needed
to understand and explain significant issues in the realms of politics, society,
and the human past.
GOALS
To provide for all its students, both in core and upper level courses:
1. an awareness of the major social, political, and historical contexts of
various world cultures both past and present, and
2. the intellectual skills and attitudes needed to understand and function
effectively in contemporary society.
To provide students in its major and minor programs with:
3. preparation for careers such as teaching, research, social work or
governmental service, and
4. a foundation for continued study in graduate or professional schools.
For students in the Social Studies secondary licensure program, to:
5. provide assurance that the candidate acquires an understanding of the
social, political, geographical, economic, and religious forces operating in
society;
6. provide in-depth preparation in history and the social sciences plus an
intensive study in one or more of the major disciplines;
7. provide for development of the social studies skills required in
formulating objectives, selecting content, using effective teaching
strategies and evaluating learning; and
8. instill in the candidate an awareness of the need for continuing education
and professional development.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
A student who chooses to major in a field of study offered by the
department will demonstrate:
1. a depth of content knowledge in the major discipline;
2. effective research skills relevant to the major discipline;
3. the ability to identify and analyze significant issues in the major
discipline; and
4. effective writing and oral communication skills.
Gardner-Webb University/201
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The department offers seven majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree:
Global Studies
History
History with Teacher Licensure (Secondary)
Political Science
Social Sciences
Social Sciences with Teacher Licensure (Secondary)
Sociology
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Global Studies
History
Criminal Justice
Political Science
Social Sciences
Sociology
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
NOTE: A student who elects to take HIST 245, POLS 202, or ECON 203 as
part of the American Heritage Dimension of the university’s core curriculum
may count that course(s) toward meeting relevant major requirements.
However, only three hours of credit will be awarded for each course taken.
NOTE: With prior consent of the department chair, Honors 400 (Honors
Research) and Honors 401 (Senior Honors Thesis) may by used to satisfy 6 of
the 30-33 hours required for departmental majors in History, Political Science,
Sociology, and Social Science.
NOTE: A complete description of the Global Studies program can be found
at the conclusion of the Department of Social Sciences section of the catalog.
GLOBAL STUDIES (39 HOURS, MINIMUM)
- SSCI 205
(3 hours)
- POLS 311
(3 hours)
- Language Study (Two courses of a language beyond the minimum general
education requirements for French, German, or Spanish) (6 hours)
- Concentrations (The student will select to concentrate in either “Global
Systems”, “Regional Studies”, or “Intercultural Studies”. At least three
courses will be taken in one concentration, with at least one course being
taken in the remaining concentrations. Minimum requirements fluctuate on
account of laboratory expectations in environmental science courses.
Consult with Global Studies Coordinator on applicable courses across GWU
departments.) (21 hours minimum)
- International Experience or Internship (Consult with Global Studies
Coordinator) (3 hours)
- GLST 490 (3 hours)
Department of Social Sciences/202
HISTORY (33 HOURS)
All courses selected must be at or above the 200 level and include:
HIST 200 (should be taken during the sophomore year prior to taking any
300 or 400 level course) (3 hours)
American history electives (a minimum of 9 hours)
Non-American history electives, including at least one non-Western course
(a minimum of 9 hours)
The required minor may be selected from any of the university offerings.
HISTORY WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (33 HOURS)
All courses selected must be at or above the 200 level and include:
• Minimum 9 hours US History (must include HIST 244-245: US History
Survey)
• Minimum 9 hours European History (must include one pre-19th Century
course)
• Minimum 3 hours Non-Western (POLS 311: Comparative Politics, POLS
351: Politics of Developing Areas, POLS 352: African Politics, POLS 353:
Middle Eastern Politics, POLS 355: Asian Politics, POLS 401: Comparative
Political Economy or relevant POLS 430: Special Topics, or RELI 346:
World Religions)
• 9 hours HIST electives (may include up to six hrs. of other non-Western
courses listed above)
• 3 hrs. Methods (HIST 200: Introduction to Historical Study which should
be taken during the sophomore year prior to taking any 300 or 400 level
course)
Candidates choosing the History with Teacher Licensure Major must also:
• complete a Social Sciences for Teacher Licensure Minor as described in
the following section entitled “Minor Fields of Study Detail.”
• in the Core Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry select either BIOL 104:
Environment for their Life Science course or GEOL 105: Oceanography
and Meteorology or GEOL 106: Environmental Geology for their Physical
Science course.
• produce and formally present, utilizing relevant technology, a substantial,
quality research project to demonstrate their depth of content knowledge
and their acquisition of analytical, research and communications skills.
This is a NCDPI licensure requirement.
• complete a Professional Education Minor consisting of 32 total hours
including the following courses: Education 250, 316, 350, 432, 440, 450
and Psychology 303. NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete
more than 50% of the non-Student Teaching hours in the Professional
Education minor (i.e. 10 hours) until they have been formally admitted
into the Teacher Education Program as outlined in the School of
Education’s section of this catalog (entitled “Admission to the Teacher
Education Program”). All candidates must be fully admitted in the Teacher
Education Program for a minimum of one full semester prior to the
semester in which they student teach; ideally candidates should complete
the admission process no later than the end of the first semester of the
junior year.
• make a grade of C or better in all courses counted towards meeting any
state mandated content or professional competency.
• consult the Secondary Social Studies Licensure Coordinator, Dr. David
Yelton, to stay current with licensure requirements.
Gardner-Webb University/203
POLITICAL SCIENCE (30 HOURS)
POLS 201 and 202 (6 hours)
Any POLS elective courses (24 hours)
The required minor may be selected from any of the university offerings.
SOCIAL SCIENCES (33 HOURS)
Any HIST elective courses (6 hours)
Any POLS elective courses (6 hours)
Any SOCI elective courses (6 hours)
Any ECON elective course (3 hours)
Any courses offered by the department at the 300 or 400 level (9 hours)
One methods course, e.g. HIST 200, SOCI 311 (3 hours)
The required minor may be selected from any of the university offerings.
SOCIAL SCIENCES WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (33 HOURS)
All courses selected must be at or above the 200 level and include:
• 6 hours United States History (HIST 244-245: US History Survey)
• Minimum 6 hrs. SOCI (from SOCI 201: Introduction to Sociology, SOCI
202: Social Problems, SOCI 310: Social Psychology or SOCI 400: Minority
Groups or relevant SOCI 430: Special Topics)
• Minimum 6 hours Political Science (must include POLS 202: American
Political Process, plus one additional POLS course)
• 3 hours Economics (ECON 203: Principles of Economics I)
• 9 hours Social Sciences electives (ECON 204: Principles of Economics II,
RELI 346: World Religions, any SOCI listed above or any POLS course)
• 3 hrs. Methods (HIST 200: Introduction to Historical Study which should
be taken during the sophomore year prior to taking any 300 or 400 level
course)
Candidates choosing the Social Sciences with Teacher Licensure Major must
also:
• complete a History for Teacher Licensure Minor as described in the
following section entitled “Minor Fields of Study Detail.”
• in the Core Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry select either BIOL 104:
Environment for their Life Science course or GEOL 105: Oceanography
and Meteorology or GEOL 106: Environmental Geology for their Physical
Science course.
• produce and formally present, utilizing relevant technology, a substantial,
quality research project to demonstrate their depth of content knowledge
and their acquisition of analytical, research and communications skills.
This is a NCDPI licensure requirement.
• complete a Professional Education Minor consisting of 32 total hours
including the following courses: Education 250, 316, 350, 432, 440, 450
and Psychology 303. NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete
more than 50% of the non-Student Teaching hours in the Professional
Education minor (i.e. 10 hours) until they have been formally admitted
into the Teacher Education Program as outlined in the School of
Education’s section of this catalog (entitled “Admission to the Teacher
Education Program”). All candidates must be fully admitted in the Teacher
Education Program for a minimum of one full semester prior to the
semester in which they student teach; ideally candidates should complete
the admission process no later than the end of the first semester of the
junior year.
Department of Social Sciences/204
• make a grade of C or better in all courses counted towards meeting any
state mandated content or professional competency.
• consult the Secondary Social Studies Licensure Coordinator, Dr. David
Yelton, to stay current with licensure requirements.
SOCIOLOGY (30 HOURS)
SOCI 201, 311, 330, 396 (12 hours)
Any SOCI elective courses (18 hours)
NOTE: No substitutions are allowed for SOCI/PSYC 396.
The required minor may be selected from any of the university offerings.
SECOND MAJOR
A student seeking a second major in any field of study offered by the
Department of Social Sciences must meet the criteria outlined above for each
major.
NON-WESTERN COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Currently the department offers the following
non-Western courses: POLS 311, 351, 352, 353, 355, 401 (African or Asian themed), and
POLS 430: Special Topics. Departmental approval is required to count other courses as
meeting non-Western requirements.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
NOTE: A student who elects to take HIST 245, POLS 202, or ECON 203 as
part of the American Heritage Dimension of the university’s core curriculum
may count that course(s) toward meeting relevant minor requirements.
However, only three hours of credit will be awarded for each course taken.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE (18 HOURS)
CJC 410, 420, 430, 440, 450, or 497, SOCI 313, 411, or 415,
POLS 314, MGMT 400, or HEWE 401
GLOBAL STUDIES (18 HOURS)
SSCI 205, 3 hours of additional language study beyond the General
Education Requirements, and a minimum of 12 hours (4 courses)
taken from the three concentrations in the major. POLS 311 may be
taken and used for any concentration.
HISTORY (18 HOURS)
HIST 244, 245 and 12 additional hours of HIST electives beyond core
requirements
HISTORY FOR TEACHER LICENSURE MINOR (18 HOURS)
• 3 hours United States History (may NOT include HIST 244 or 245)
• 6 hrs. Modern European History
• 3 hrs. Non-Western course (POLS 311: Comparative Politics, POLS
351: Politics of Developing Areas, POLS 352: African Politics, POLS
353: Middle Eastern Politics, POLS 355: Asian Politics, POLS 401:
Comparative Political Economy or relevant POLS 430: Special
Topics, or RELI 346: World Religions)
• 3 hrs. pre-19th Century History
• 3 hrs. HIST elective
POLITICAL SCIENCE (18 HOURS)
POLS 201, 202 and 12 additional hours of POLS electives
SOCIAL SCIENCES (18 HOURS)
HIST 244, POLS 201, SOCI 201 and nine additional elective hours of
courses offered by the department at the 300 or 400 level
Gardner-Webb University/205
SOCIAL SCIENCES FOR TEACHER LICENSURE MINOR (18 HOURS)
• Minimum 6 hours Political Science (must include POLS 202:
American Political Process, plus one additional POLS course)
• Minimum 6 hours Sociology (from SOCI 201: Introduction to
Sociology, SOCI 202: Social Problems, SOCI 310: Social
Psychology or SOCI 400: Minority Groups or relevant SOCI 430:
Special Topics)
• 3 hours Economics (ECON 203: Principles of Economics I)
• 3 hrs. elective (ECON 204: Principles of Economics II , RELI 346:
World Religions, any SOCI listed above or any POLS course other
than those counted in categories above)
SOCIOLOGY (18 HOURS)
SOCI 201 and 15 additional hours of SOCI electives
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
must complete HIST 101 and 102 (or equivalent) as part of the general
education core curriculum. Transfer students seeking Social Studies licensure
must also complete SSCI 205 or RELI 245 (or equivalent) as well as BIOL 104
or GEOL 105 or 106 (or equivalent).
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)
101 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 3 semester hours
The study of climate, vegetation, soil, water resources, mineral resources, and land form
from the geographic perspective. 3-0-3. (Offered intermittently.)
102 WORLD REGIONS 3 semester hours
The study of physical and human geography of the various world regions. 3-0-3.
(Offered intermittently.)
GLOBAL STUDIES (GLST)
430 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 semester hours
A specialized study of various developments in global studies. Topics will vary from
semester to semester. 3-0-3. (Intermittent)
450, 451 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 3 semester hours
The International Experience course provides an opportunity for the student to expand
the horizons of the course options currently listed for Global Studies and other
departments through an international study experience. The course can be taken more
than once for different international experiences.
495 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours
Open to juniors and seniors who request are given permission to do a guided reading
and/or student-initiated research course that includes a written project/paper.
Prerequisites” Approval by the professor offering the study, student’s major department,
and concurrence of the Dean. 0-Independent Study-(1-3). (Arranged)
497, 498 INTERNSHIP IN GLOBAL STUDIES 3 semester hours / semester
Three hours credit may apply to the student’s major. Prerequisite: junior standing and
departmental approval. 0-Practical Experience -3, 0-Practical Experience-3. (Arranged)
Department of Social Sciences/206
490 GLOBAL STUDIES SEMINAR 3 Semester hours
Guided Reading, group discussion, independent research offer the senior student, and if
determined by the Global Studies Coordinator to be necessary, the junior student, the
opportunity to study more deeply and comprehensively the multi-disciplinary character
of the field.
SOCIAL SCIENCE (SSCI)
205 GLOBAL UNDERSTANDING 3 semester hours
This course is an introduction to the major economic, social, political, diplomatic, and
environmental trends in the World since 1945. Geography is emphasized in this course. 30-3. (each semester).
HISTORY (HIST)
101 SURVEY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION I 3 semester hours
Beginning with earliest times, the course covers the civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia,
Greece, Rome, Medieval and Early Modern periods. Concludes with 1715. 3-0-3. (each
semester.)
102 SURVEY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION II 3 semester hours
Beginning with 1715, this course presents a perspective of the last three centuries of
western history. 3-0-3. (each semester.)
200 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL STUDY 3 semester hours
This course, required of all History and Social Sciences Majors, is intended to provide
students with a foundation for further in-depth historical study. To help students develop
such a basis, the course addresses the issue of the scope, skills and methods of historical
study and writing, including understanding basic terminology, ethics, research sources
and methodologies. 3-0-3. (Spring)
244 SURVEY OF UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877 3 semester hours
This course surveys the social, intellectual, economic, geographical and constitutional
foundations of the United States. 3-0-3. (Fall)
245 THE AMERICAN CENTURY 3 semester hours
The course surveys the impact of the U.S. on the world in the 20th Century. It covers the
development of the U.S. as it develops into a giant industrial power. 3-0-3.
(each semester)
311 MEDIEVAL EUROPE 3 semester hours
An examination of the significant social, religious and political developments in the
Medieval West from the fall of the Roman Empire through the fifteenth century. Special
emphasis is given to the synthesis of Roman, Christian and Germanic values and
institutions in the Medieval period. 3-0-3. (intermittent)
315 THE UNITED STATES DURING THE COLONIAL PERIOD 3 semester hours
The purpose of this course is to examine the settlement of the American colonies and the
development of the social, political, intellectual and international factors that formed the
foundations of American civilization. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
316 HAMILTON, JEFFERSON AND JACKSON 3 semester hours
The purpose of this course is to examine the beginnings of American Federalism and its
political, social, economic and international context. 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years)
Gardner-Webb University/207
318 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION 3 semester hours
The purpose of this course is to study and analyze the causes and events of the American
Civil War and its consequences. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
322 EARLY AND MEDIEVAL CHRISTIANITY 3 semester hours
A survey of the most significant institutional, theological and social developments in the
history of the Christian church from the first century through the latter Middle Ages. 3-0-3.
Crosslisted with RELI 322. (Fall, even years)
323 MODERN CHRISTIANITY 3 semester hours
Beginning with the Reformation this course is descriptive of church history to the present.
Prerequisite: History 101. 3-0-3. Crosslisted with RELI 323. (Intermittent)
324 AMERICAN CHRISTIANITY 3 semester hours
A historical survey of the American religious scene from the colonial period to the present.
Primary emphasis is given to the development of the more prominent Christian
denominations. 3-0-3. Crosslisted with RELI 324. (Intermittent)
325 THE HISTORY OF THE NEW SOUTH 3 semester hours
This course follows the development of the American South from Reconstruction to the
present. Race relations, culture, economics, and politics are examined in the context of
the history of this distinct region of the United States. 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years.)
327 THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 3 semester hours
An exploration of the major religious, social, intellectual and political changes in Western
Europe from the late Middle Ages to the close of the sixteenth century. Particular emphasis
is given to the relationship between Italian Humanism and the Protestant Reformation and
to the continuity of the movement for Ecclesiastical Reform throughout the period. 3-0-3.
(Spring, odd years)
331 NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE 3 semester hours
This course explores the main aspects of the political, social, cultural, economic,
intellectual, diplomatic and military events of European history from 1789 to 1914. Specific
attention will be given to the French Revolution,conservatism, liberalism, nationalism,
industrialization, imperialism and the outbreak of the First World War and the broad
impacts of these ideas and events upon European civilization. 3-0-3.
(Spring, odd years)
332 TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPE 3 semester hours
The course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the causes,
course and impacts of the World Wars, Communism, Fascism/Nazism, the Cold War, the
dream of European unity, decolonization and the emergence of an interdependent world
and the collapse of Soviet hegemony in Eastern Europe on the political, social, economic,
cultural,intellectual and diplomatic development of Europe. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
345 NORTH CAROLINA HISTORY 3 semester hours
A chronological study of the history of North Carolina from its colonial beginnings until
the present. The state’s problems and potential are carefully examined in the broader
context of U.S. history. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
380 MODERN GERMANY SINCE 1789 3 semester hours
This course is a detailed examination of the political, social, economic, cultural,
intellectual, diplomatic and military development of modern Germany. The German
Question the debate over whether the German people can exist as a unified nation
without seeking to dominate their neighbors, remains a constant theme throughout the
Department of Social Sciences/208
course. Other key topics include liberalism, nationalism, industrialization, the World
Wars, Nazism, the occupation and division of Germany, and unification and the broad
impacts of these events and ideas. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
383 THE SECOND WORLD WAR 3 semester hours
A detailed study of the origins, course and impacts of history’s largest, costliest war. The
course takes a global perspective and attempts to show the interrelatedness of the war’s
component theaters of operation and to fit the war into the broader history of the
twentieth century world. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
411 DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 3 semester hours
The purpose of this course is to examine the foreign relations of the United States from
its emergence as a nation in 1783 to its position as a leading power in the present
century. The course focuses on relations with Latin America, Europe, the Far East, and
Canada. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
414 HISTORY OF ENGLAND TO 1688 3 semester hours
Study of English history from Roman Britain to the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Special
emphasis on Anglo-Saxon England, the Norman Conquest, the Tudor Dynasty and the
constitutional conflicts of the seventeenth century. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
430 SPECIAL TOPICS: EUROPEAN HISTORY 3 semester hours
A specialized study of various historical developments in European History. Topics will
vary from semester to semester. 3-0-3. (Occasional)
431 SPECIAL TOPICS: AMERICAN HISTORY 3 semester hours
A specialized study of various historical developments in American History. Topics will
vary from semester to semester. 3-0-3. (Occasional)
450, 451 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 3 semester hours
The International Experience course provides an opportunity for the student to expand
the horizons of the course options currently listed in the catalog for History, Political
Science and Sociology through an international study experience. The course can be
taken more than once for different international experiences.
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours each semester
Open to juniors and seniors who request and are given permission to do a guided
reading and/or student-initiated research course that includes a written project/paper.
Prerequisites: Approval by the professor offering the study, student’s major department,
and concurrence of the Dean. 0-Independent Study-3, 0-Independent Study-3.
(Arranged)
497, 498 INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY 3 semester hours
Three hours credit may apply to the student’s major. Prerequisites: senior standing and
department approval. 0-Practical Experience-3. (Arranged)
POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)
201 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 3 semester hours
A basic course in political science dealing with the fundamentals of persons politically
organized. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
202 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 3 semester hours
A comprehensive presentation of the principles of American constitutional government,
and a behavioral analysis of the institutions and processes of the national and state
governments and the Federal system. 3-0-3. (Each Semester)
Gardner-Webb University/209
304 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN THE UNITED STATES 3 semester hours
A study of the problems of governmental relationships and administrative management
in state, country, and municipal government. 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years)
311 COMPARATIVE POLITICS 3 semester hours
This course is a comparison of the development and structure of political systems in
different regions of the world, including Western and Eastern Europe, sub-Saharan
Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years)
314 JUDICIAL PROCESS 3 semester hours
A study of judicial processes in the United States including pertinent court decisions and
a general review of the administration of justice in our society. 3-0-3. (Spring, odd years)
315 CIVIL LIBERTIES 3 semester hours
A study of basic freedoms such as speech, press and religion as well as emphasis on the
significance of equal protection of the law. Emphasis will be given to both court cases
and the development of concepts such as freedom of expression. 3-0-3. (Intermittent)
320 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 3 semester hours
A study of principles and leading cases with emphasis on judicial and executive
elaboration and the development of civil liberties in the United States. 3-0-3. (Spring,
even years)
321 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3 semester hours
An analysis of political behavior between and among nation-states, this course includes
case studies of conflict and cooperation, an examination of international political
economy, and the study of theoretical explanations of the international political system.
3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
323 AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES 3 semester hours
A study of the history, structure and function of parties in the American system of
government. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
325 SOUTHERN POLITICS 3 semester hours
An analysis of the nature and style of Southern politics with emphasis on the
development of two-party politics and the rise of Black political participation. 3-0-3.
(Fall, even years)
333 THE PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS 3 semester hours
A study of the executive and legislative branches of government in the U.S. with an
emphasis on their political development and interaction. 3-0-3. (Spring, even years)
351 POLITICS OF DEVELOPING AREAS 3 semester hours
A study of the dynamics of political change including the democratization of developing
nations. 3-0-3. (Fall, even years)
352 AFRICAN POLITICS 3 semester hours
A focused investigation of the comparative politics and international affairs of SubSaharan Africa. 3-0-3. (Optionally in Fall, odd years)
353 MIDDLE EAST POLITICS 3 semester hours
A focused investigation of the comparative politics and international affairs of the
Middle East and North Africa. 3-0-3. (Optionally in Fall, odd years)
Department of Social Sciences/210
354 EUROPEAN POLITICS 3 semester hours
A focused investigation of the comparative politics and international affairs of Europe,
including the politics of European integration. 3-0-3. (Offered at the discretion of the
department)
355 ASIAN POLITICS 3 semester hours
A focused investigation of the comparative politics and international affairs of Asia with
particular emphasis on East Asia and South Asia. 3-0-3. (Offered at the discretion of the
department)
356 LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS 3 semester hours
A focused investigation of the comparative politics and international affairs of Latin
America. 3-0-3 (Offered at the discretion of the department)
401 COMPARATIVE POLITICAL ECONOMY 3 semester hours
An analysis of the connections between wealth and power and how people have tried
to create both. The course examines from a theoretical perspective how societies
undergo economic change and how various types of economics function. The ideas of
noted economists will be studied. 3-0-3. (Fall, odd years)
430 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 semester hours
A specialized study of various political developments. Topics will vary from semester to
semester. 3-0-3. (Intermittent)
450, 451 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 3 semester hours
The International Experience course provides an opportunity for the student to expand
the horizons of the course options currently listed in the catalog for History, Political
Science and Sociology through an international study experience. The course can be
taken more than once for different international experiences.
495 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours
Open to juniors and seniors who request and are given permission to do a guided
reading and/or student-initiated research course that includes a written project/paper.
Prerequisites: Approval by the professor offering the study, student’s major department,
and concurrence of the Dean. 0-Independent Study-(1-3). (Arranged)
497, 498 INTERNSHIP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 3 semester hours each semester
Three hours credit may apply to the student’s major. Prerequisite: junior standing and
departmental approval. 0-Practical Experience-3, 0-Practical Experience-3. (Arranged)
Gardner-Webb University/211
SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)
201 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 3 semester hours
An introduction to sociology, providing essentials for an understanding of the forces
making for group life and for specialized study of sociological problems. 3-0-3. (Each
semester)
202 SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3 semester hours
An analysis of some of the major problems of personal and social disorganization in
contemporary society with emphasis upon causes, treatment, and prevention. 3-0-3.
(Annually)
203 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY 3 semester hours
A study of the practical problems of courtship and marriage, with emphasis on
interpersonal relationships between husband and wife, and parents and children. While
more attention is given to the American family, the family is studied in other parts of the
world including Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and Europe. 3-0-3. (Each
semester)
310 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
A study of the interaction between the individual and the group, and the influence of
each on the other. 3-0-3. (Annually)
311 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3 semester hours
The scientific method is applied to social phenomena: formulating and testing
hypotheses, techniques for collecting data, measuring social variables, interpreting
research findings. The scientific method as applied to social sciences will be explored in
the latter part of the course through student participation in the design and analysis of a
survey. Students taking this course must have completed SOCI 201 and 396 3-0-3.
(Spring)
313 SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR 3 semester hours
An introduction to the sociological study and critical analysis of theories of deviant
behavior. Descriptive and explanatory approaches to kinds and amounts of deviance in
contemporary American society; social change, anomie and social disorganization
theories; the process of stigmatization; formal and informal societal responses to
deviance and the deviant. 3-0-3. (Annually)
330 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY 3 semester hours
A study of the major systems of thought concerning society. Emphasis is given to the
philosophical and historical context of sociological theory from its classical roots to
contemporary application. Students taking this course must have completed SOCI 201
3-0-3. (Annually)
340 SOCIAL CHANGE 3 semester hours
An examination of social systems within the framework of functional and conflict theory
with particular emphasis upon the planning of social change. 3-0-3. (Annually)
356 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION 3 semester hours
Religion analyzed as a social institution, with particular reference to the relationship
between religious and non-religious spheres of society, the structure of religious
organizations, and the social-psychology of religious behavior. 3-0-3. (intermittent)
396 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 3 semester hours
(See Psychology 396.) 3-0-3. (Annually)
Department of Social Sciences/212
400 MINORITY GROUPS 3 semester hours
A study of present-day racial and cultural minorities with emphasis on scientific facts
about race and on changing attitudes and policies. In addition to studying minority
relations in the United States, attention will be given to minority relations in South
Africa, the Far East, Eastern Europe, Latin America and other parts of the world. 3-0-3.
(Annually)
410 SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER 3 semester hours
Sociological theories, concepts, and perspectives will be used to analyze the social
meaning of gender in American society. Attention will be given to gender differences
and similarities, social role expectations, and an historical survey of the changing roles
of men and women in our society. 3-0-3. (Occasional)
411 CRIMINOLOGY 3 semester hours
An analysis of the nature and extent of criminal behavior, factors which seem to be
related to such behavior, and changing attitudes toward the criminal and crime control.
3-0-3. (Annually)
415 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 3 semester hours
This course is designed to give the student a broad understanding of the topic of
juvenile delinquency in the contemporary society. This course integrates discussion of
the theory and history of juvenile delinquency with the system’s response to it and
includes the administration of justice in the Juvenile Justice System. 3-0-3. (Occasional)
421 THE COMMUNITY 3 semester hours
A study of the structure and function of rural and urban communities, their institutions
and problems. Differences between American communities and communities in other
cultures will be examined. 3-0-3. (Intermittent)
430 SPECIAL TOPICS: SOCIOLOGY 3 semester hours
A specialized study of various sociological developments. Topics will vary from semester
to semester. 3-0-3. (Occasional)
450, 451 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 3 semester hours
The International Experience course provides an opportunity for the student to expand
the horizons of the course options currently listed in the catalog for History, Political
Science and Sociology through an international study experience. The course can be
taken more than once for different international experiences.
490 SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR 3 semester hours
Independent research, guided readings and other learning experiences offers the senior
student the opportunity to study more deeply the total scope of the field of sociology.
3-0-3. (Arranged)
497, 498 INTERNSHIP 3 semester hours each semester
Three hours credit may apply to the student’s major. Prerequisites: senior standing and
departmental approval. 1-5-3, 1-5-3. (Arranged)
Gardner-Webb University/213
GLOBAL STUDIES AT GARDNER-WEBB
Global Studies Coordinator: Michael Kuchinsky
Global Studies is a multi-disciplinary major and minor program within the
Social Sciences Department that provides:
- A small number of common and integrating courses;
- Opportunities for research;
- Experiential education requirements on the student; and
- Breadth of academic inquiry.
The Global Studies Major allows the student to determine a unique
concentration that fits their vocational objectives. These concentrations would
examine global studies through:
- its systems (political, economic, or environmental);
- a regional examination that allows the student to take a focused look
at issues affecting the peoples of the Global North or Global South;
or
- intercultural exploration.
Total Hours for the Major – minimum of 39 Semester Credit Hours **
Total Hours for the Minor – minimum of 18 Semester Credit Hours **
MANDATORY INTEGRATING COURSES – 9 HOURS (3 HOURS FOR THE MINOR)
SSCI 205, Global Understanding – (mandatory for majors and minors)
POLS 311, Comparative Politics – (mandatory for majors; may be used by
minors for any concentration area)
GLST 490, Global Studies Seminar – (only for majors)
ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE COMPETENCY 6 HOURS (3 HOURS FOR THE MINOR)
Current languages available at Gardner-Webb University for the Global
Studies Major and Minor include French, German, and Spanish. Two additional
language courses beyond the General Education requirements in these
languages are required for the major, and one additional language course for
the minor. This component for the major may be accomplished in one of
several methods:
a. The student may take the same applicable language for the Global
Studies major that fulfilled their General Education Requirement
and would include the “202” intermediate language course, and
one “300” level course such as “302,” Advanced Grammar and
Composition,” or another with permission of the instructor; or
b. The student may take a second language at the 101 and 102 level,
currently French, German, or Spanish, and complete the Global
Studies Major requirement in this field; or
c. The student may take the intensive French and Spanish Language
options based currently in Quebec, Canada, and Costa Rica
respectively, for 6 semester hours.
d. The Global Studies Minor requirement may be accomplished by
taking one additional language course up to the 202 level, or
starting a second language in French, German, or Spanish.
Global Studies/214
CONTENT CONCENTRATIONS A MINIMUM OF 21 HOURS (12 HOURS FOR THE MINOR)**
Global Studies Major students will choose one concentration area from
among 1.Global Systems; 2.Regional Studies; or 3.Intercultural Studies. The
concentration will represent at least 3 courses from one concentration. The
student majoring in Global Studies will also take at least one course from the
two other concentrations, leaving the student with two additional electives
chosen from any of the concentrations. The minor will not have a
concentration but at least two courses should come from one content
concentration.
1. Global Systems (GS), a focus on global political, economic, or
environmental systems active in today’s global society,
POLS 321, International Relations
(3 hrs)
POLS 351, Politics of Developing Areas
(3 hrs)
POLS 401, Comparative Political Economy (3 hrs)
POLS 430, Special Topics (Various)
(3 hrs)
BIOL 104, Environment
(4 hrs)
ENVS 209, Environmental Biology
(3 hrs)
ENVS 310, Environmental Policy and Ethics (2 hrs)
CHEM 310, Environmental Chemistry
(4 hrs)
ECON 203, Principles of Economics 1
(3 hrs)
ECON 204, Principles of Economics 2
(3 hrs)
ECON 401, International Economics
(3 hrs)
ECON 404, Economic Development
(3 hrs)
ECON 405, Environmental and Natural
Resource Economics
(3 hrs)
BADM 360, International Business
(3 hrs)
GLST 430, Special Topics
(3 hrs)
GLST 495, Independent Study
(3 hrs)
Spring even years
Fall even years
Fall odd years
Various
Every year
Spring even years
Spring even years
Spring
Every semester
Every semester
2. Regional Studies (RS), a student may diversify or concentrate their courses
to focus on either the Global South - a focus on comparative and regional
studies in the developing and transitioning states and regions; or the
Global North – a focus on comparative and regional studies in the
developed states and regions.
POLS 321,
POLS 351,
POLS 352,
POLS 353,
POLS 354,
POLS 355,
POLS 356,
POLS 430,
POLS 495,
HIST 332,
HIST 380,
HIST 383,
HIST 411,
HIST 430,
ENGL 356,
ENGL 359,
ENGL 331,
International Relations
Politics of Developing Regions
African Politics
Middle East Politics
European Politics
Asian Politics
Latin American Politics
Special Topics
Independent Study,
Model Arab League
20th Century Europe
Modern Germany since 1789
The Second World War
Diplomatic History of the
United States
Special Topics in European
History
Postcolonial Literature
Topics in World Literature
Modern British and American
Literature
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
Spring even years
Fall even years
Fall odd years
Fall odd years
(1 hr)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
Every year
Spring even years
Fall even years
Fall odd years
(3 hrs)
Fall even years
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
Occasional
(3 hrs)
Various
Spring even years
Gardner-Webb University/215
FREN 306, Francophone Cultural History –
by permission of the department
FREN 309, Contemporary France –
by permission of the department
FREN 409, Special Topics in French Studies –
by permission of the department
GERM 409, Special Topics in German Studies –
on demand basis
GLST 430 Special Topics
GLST 495 Independent Study
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
(3 hrs)
3. Inter-Cultural Studies (IC), a focus on cultural, artistic, humanistic, and
literary dimensions of global society
POLS 430, Special Topics (a course such as “African Politics”, “Middle Eastern
Politics”, “Religion and Global Politics”, or similar as appropriate for this
concentration)
(3 hrs) one taught each fall semester
SOC 356, Sociology of Religion
(3 hrs) Intermittent
SOC 430, Special Topics
to be determined by GS Coordinator
(3 hrs)
ENGL 251, Foundations of World Literature 1
(3 hrs) Every Semester
ENGL 252, Foundations of World Literature 2
(3 hrs) Every semester
ENGL 356, Postcolonial Literature
(3 hrs)
ENGL 359, Topics in World Literature
(3 hrs)
FREN 306, Francophone Cultural History –
by permission of the department
(3 hrs)
FREN 309, Contemporary France –
by permission of the department
(3 hrs)
FREN 409, Special Topics in French Studies –
by permission of the department
(3 hrs)
GERM 409, Special Topics in German Studies –
on demand basis
(3 hrs)
RELI 245, Religion and Culture in a Global
Perspective
(3 hrs) Every semester
RELI 346, World Religions
(3 hrs) Fall even years
THEA 381, 382 Theater History 1 and 2
(no prerequisites)
(3 hrs)
ARTS 140 19th Century Art History (no prerequisite)(3 hrs)
ARTS 145 20th Century Art History (no prerequisite)(3 hrs)
ARTS 416 Topics in Art History by permission of the department
(3 hrs)
MUSC 325, 326 Music History by permission of the department
Each semester
GLST 430 Special Topics
(3 hrs)
GLST 495 Independent Study
(3 hrs)
EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION 3 HOURS
Relevant Internship or International Experience (non-mission); a student who
does a full semester abroad may have the option to substitute some of the
courses taken abroad for their major.
GLST 450, 451, International Experience, or equivalent
GLST 497, 498, Global Studies internship (three hours credit per semester may
apply to the student’s major; Prerequisite: junior standing and departmental
approval.), or equivalent though another program that includes international
content or emphasis.
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures/216
DEPARTMENT OF WORLD LANGUAGES,
LITERATURES, AND CULTURES
FACULTY
Chair: Professor U. Lahaie
Professors: T. Cox, C. Moore
Associate Professor: M. High
Assistant Professor: T. Phillips
Instructors: B. Coates, L. Dey, R. Moore
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Department of World Languages, Literatures, and
Cultures is to teach students communicative skills in a world language through
a curriculum which emphasizes a liberal arts philosophy and Christian values
and, ultimately, produces graduates who have an appreciation and knowledge
of another culture its language, and its literature.
GOALS
Within the core curriculum to:
1. provide students an opportunity to gain a basic understanding and
comprehension of the language of choice; and
2. help students understand and experience the challenges of learning a
second language and its culture.
Within the department's major and minor courses of study to:
3. produce graduates who are proficient in speaking, reading and writing
(and signing) the specific language; and
4. familiarize students with the culture, literature, and history associated
with the language of choice.
POLICIES
Students must begin their world language requirements for graduation in the
General Studies Curriculum by the 4th semester of study. This means prior to
beginning the third or Junior year. It is highly recommended to take all
language courses in a sequence without skipping a semester.
Transfer students transferring in at least 45 hours and needing this
requirement will begin foreign language study their first semester at GWU.
Requests for exceptions must go through the process for Academic Appeals.
Students who wish to prove proficiency in a language not taught by the
department should see the department chair for options proving proficiency. If
an exam is required it will be through ACFTL and the student is required to
pay the fees.
Placement tests administered in the department only indicate the
proficiency level of a student. They are not used to award course credit.
Students who wish to take a course out of sequence, without the required
prerequisites, must request permission from the department. Forms are
available from the Department Chair.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who choose to major in any field of study offered by the
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures will be proficient in
speaking, reading, writing, and, in the case of ASL, signing the target language.
Gardner-Webb University/217
In addition to the above, students majoring in either French or Spanish with
teacher licensure will:
1. become proficient in the current standards of foreign language
knowledge and pedagogy for secondary schools; and
2. through instruction and practice, become effective communicators of the
specific foreign language appropriate to the classroom setting.
Student learning outcomes specific to a major field of study offered by the
department are described in the appropriate sections that follow.
The North Carolina State Board of Education has adopted new teacher
standards and required all teacher education programs to be revisioned. All
candidates starting their teacher education program with EDUC 250 in the fall
of 2010 must complete the new program regardless of the catalogue under
which they entered Gardner-Webb University. Candidates who are already in
teacher education can choose to complete the current program or the new
program.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The department offers seven majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree:
American Sign Language (ASL)
American Sign Language with Teacher Licensure
English as a Second Language with Teacher Licensure
French
French with Teacher Licensure
Spanish
Spanish with Teacher Licensure
Students who plan to major in a world language should take 101 and 102
during their first year or study in order to stay in sequence for graduation.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
American Sign Language
Classical Languages
French
Interpreting (available only to students majoring in American Sign Language)
Spanish
World Languages
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (36 HOURS)
Classes required for completing the major are as follows:
SGLG 201, 202 (or 211), 300, 301, 302, 305, 407, 495, and 496 (total of 27
hours)
Three additional courses from SGLG 401, 402, 408, 409, or 494 (or SLIN 303
if the student is not an Interpreting minor) (9 hours)
Additionally, the student must pass the Sign Language Proficiency Interview
(SLPI) at the Intermediate level during the fourth semester of ASL study in order
to apply to major in ASL. The SLPI must be passed at the Advanced level in
order to graduate. The student should contact the Director of the ASL program
for additional information concerning this process. A $100 fee is charged for
each SLPI administration. There is no limit regarding the number of exams that
can be taken, but a six month waiting period is required between each exam.
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures/218
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (36 HOURS)
A major in ASL requires 33 hours above the elementary level. The following
courses are required: SGLG 201, 202 (or 211) 301, 302, 300, 305, 401, 402,
407, 408, and 410. Students must pass the Sign Language Proficiency Interview
(SLPI) at the Advanced level in order to graduate. Students must pass the SLPI
at the Intermediate level in their fourth semester of sign language study in
order to apply to major in ASL. Check with the ASL program for additional
requirements necessary for applying for the major and other policies in regard
to the SLPI. (There is a $100 dollar charge for each time the student takes the
SLPI.)
A student majoring in American Sign Language (ASL) with Teacher Licensure
must minor in Professional Education. This minor consists of 11 hours of
course work and 12 hours of student teaching. The required courses are:
EDUC 250, EDUC 350, EDUC 450, and PSYC 303. Additional courses necessary
for NC Teaching Licensure are: EDUC 302 and EDUC 316. The student must
also take the two methods courses in the ASL major SGLG 408 and SGLG 410.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (36 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will demonstrate:
1. advanced proficiency in English;
2. intermediate proficiency in the target language (OPI scale);
3. an understanding of all aspects of the English language well
enough to be able to explain and model the component skills for
students;
4. the ability to plan, implement, and evaluate instruction in
educationally sound ways; and
5. the ability to select and use the appropriate methodologies and
materials for students of different ages, interests, and
backgrounds.
.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Classes required for the major in English as a Second Language
Education with preparation for K-12 teacher licensure are as follows:
ESOL 332, 335, 338, and 400 (12 hours)
ENGL 363, 364, and 483 (or EDUC 316) (12 hours)
SOCI 400 (3 hours)
EDUC 302, 306, and 312 (10 hours)
Additional requirements include either FREN 202 or SPAN 202 and
one 300-level course in either French or Spanish. This requirement will be
waived by the department if the student demonstrates the required
proficiency level in the selected language.
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor
consisting of PSYC 303, and EDUC 250, 350, and 450.
NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete more than 50% of the
Professional Education minor (excluding student teaching) until they are
formally admitted into the Teacher Education program.
FRENCH (30 HOURS)
A major in French consists of 30 total credit hours above the 100-level. A
students program of study is made in consultation with the faculty advisor.
Gardner-Webb University/219
FRENCH WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (36 HOURS)
Classes required for completing the major with preparation for K-12 teacher
licensure are the same as for the French major in regards to content courses–
30 hours. Students must also take: FREN 332, 335, and 338
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor
consisting of PSYC 303, and EDUC 250, 350, and 450.
NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete more than 50% of the
Professional Education minor (excluding student teaching) until they are
formally admitted into the Teacher Education program.
At the time of graduation, students majoring in French with teacher
licensure are expected to reach a proficiency level approaching Advanced
(ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines). All students must pay for and successfully
reach a minimum level of Intermediate High on the ACTFL Proficiency exam
to prove their competencies for licensure in North Carolina.
SPANISH (30 HOURS)
A major in Spanish consists of 30 total credit hours above the 100-level. A
students program of study is made in consultation with the faculty advisor.
SPANISH WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (36 HOURS)
Classes required for completing the major with preparation for K-12 teacher
licensure are the same as for the Spanish major in regards to content courses–
30 hours. Students must also take: SPAN 332, 335, and 338
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor
consisting of PSYC 303, and EDUC 250, 350, and 450.
NOTE: Students will not be permitted to complete more than 50% of the
Professional Education minor (excluding student teaching) until they are
formally admitted into the Teacher Education program.
At the time of graduation, students majoring in Spanish with teacher
licensure are expected to reach a proficiency level approaching Advanced
(ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines). All students must pay for and successfully
reach a minimum level of Intermediate High on the ACTFL Proficiency exam
to prove their competencies for licensure in North Carolina.
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (15 HOURS)
SGLG 305 in combination with any other ASL courses
CLASSICAL LANGUAGES (15 HOURS)
Any combination of Classical Language courses
FRENCH (15 HOURS)
Any combination of French courses
INTERPRETING (18 HOURS)
SLIN 220, 303, 320, 321, 404, and 403 or 405. (Available only to ASL
majors)
SPANISH (15 HOURS)
Any combination of Spanish courses
WORLD LANGUAGE (15 HOURS)
Any combination of courses offered or approved by the department
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures/220
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
and wishing to major in American Sign Language must take the ASL entrance
examination to determine placement in the program.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (SGLG)
101 ELEMENTARY ASL I 3 semester hours each semester
A beginning course designed for students who have little or no study in ASL. The course
is designed to help students acquire basic expressive and receptive conversational skills.
Taught in ASL, one hour of lab required per week. The student will be required to
attend five hours of Deaf Events approved by the Professor. 3-1-3.
102 ELEMENTARY ASL II 3 semester hours each semester
The continuation of a beginning course designed for students who have some study and
some exposure to ASL. The course is designed to continue students’ acquisition of basic
expressive and receptive conversational skills. Taught in ASL, one hour of lab required
per week. The student will be required to attend ten hours of Deaf Events approved by
the Professor. Prerequisite: SGLG 101 or satisfactory score on placement test. 3-1-3.
201 INTERMEDIATE ASL I 3 semester hours each semester
An intermediate course designed to further expressive and receptive conversational
ability of students who have a basic command of skills taught in Elementary SGLG 101
and 102. Taught in ASL, one hour of lab required per week. The student will be required
to attend fifteen hours of Deaf Events approved by the Professor. Prerequisite: SGLG 102
or satisfactory score on placement test. 3-1-3.
202 INTERMEDIATE ASL II 3 semester hours
The continuation of an intermediate course designed with an increased emphasis on
expressive skills, linguistic knowledge and integration of cultural behaviors in
conversation. Taught in ASL, one hour of lab required per week. The student will be
required to attend fifteen to twenty hours of Deaf Events approved by the Professor.
Prerequisite: SGLG 201 with a grade of C (2.00) or better or satisfactory score on the
placement test. 3-1-3. (Spring)
211, 212 INTENSIVE ASL I AND II 6 semester hours
The course focus is on expressive and receptive work in ASL with an emphasis on
expressive signing. Prerequisite: SGLG 102 or satisfactory score on the placement test.
6-2-6, 6-2-6
300 INTRODUCTION TO THE DEAF COMMUNITY 3 semester hours
A survey course focusing on aspects of the Deaf Community including views of the
community, use of language, organizations of and for Deaf people, causes of deafness,
laws and services pertaining to the Deaf Community, hard-of-hearing individuals and
deaf-blind individuals. No prior knowledge of ASL required. 3-0-3. (Fall)
301 ADVANCED ASL I 3 semester hours
The course focus is on complex grammatical structures including but not limited to
sentence structure, classifiers, locatives, and pluralization. This course is taught in ASL.
The student will be required to attend fifteen to twenty hours of Deaf Events approved
by the Professor. Prerequisite: SGLG 202 with a grade of C (2.00) or better or
satisfactory score on the placement test. 3-0-3. (Fall)
Gardner-Webb University/221
302 ADVANCED ASL II 3 semester hours
The continuation of an advanced course designed with an increased emphasis on
complex grammatical structures. This course is taught in ASL. The student will be
required to attend fifteen to twenty hours of Deaf Events approved by the Professor.
Prerequisite: SGLG 301 with a grade of C (2.00) or better or satisfactory score on the
placement test. 3-0-3. (Spring)
305 DEAF CULTURE 3 semester hours
This course is an in-depth study of culture and the Deaf community. Topics include but
are not limited to language use, traditions, norms and values. The student will be
required to attend fifteen to twenty hours of Deaf Events approved by the professor. This
course is taught in ASL. Prerequisite: SGLG 201 with a grade of C (2.00) or better or
permission of the Dept. 3-0-3. (Spring)
320, 321 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 1-3 semester hours each semester
401 THE SOCIOLINGUISTICS OF SIGN LANGUAGE 3 semester hours
This course is a study of the effect of society on the way sign language is used. It focuses
on sign language variation between sub groups, cultural norms, register, turn-taking, high
context vs low-context cultures, mutilingualism, bilingualism, language attitudes, and
discourse analysis. The student will be required to attend fifteen to twenty hours of Deaf
Events approved by the professor. This course is taught in ASL. Prerequisite: SGLG 301
with a grade of C (2.00) or better or permission of the Dept. 3-0-3. (Spring)
402 ASL LITERATURE AND FOLKLORE 3 semester hours
This course focuses on the study of literature about Deaf people and by Deaf authors and
poets. Areas of study will include poetry, plays and folklore. Prerequisite: SGLG 301 with
a grade of C (2.00) or better or permission of the Dept. 3-0-3. (Fall)
407 LINGUISTICS OF ASL
3 semester hours
The primary goal of this course is to further develop students’ advanced knowledge of
the linguistic structure of American Sign Language. Course content includes in depth
analysis of complex linguistic structures, historical development of ASL and cultural
aspects of the use of ASL. The course is designed for advanced ASL students. Prerequisite:
SGLG 301 with a grade of C (2.00) or better or permission of the Dept. 3-0-3. (Spring)
408 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING ASL 3 semester hours
Students will be given an overview of how second languages have been traditionally
taught, what the current methods and theories are and their application to the teaching
of American Sign Language. Students will learn about development of syllabi and lesson
plans, selection of curriculum resources, class activities, evaluation techniques and
professionalism including ASLTA certification for teaching ASL. Students will be provided
opportunities to practice basic teaching techniques, select appropriate materials, design
curriculum and evaluation techniques, including how to teach fingerspelling and
numerical signs, vocabulary, grammatical features and Deaf culture in lessons.
Prerequisite: SGLG 202 with a grade of C (2.00) or better or permission of the Dept.
3-0-3. (Fall)
409 SPECIAL TOPIC 3 semester hours
The focus of this course is on specialized terminology to enhance the vocabulary of
upper level ASL majors or interpreting minors. Topics may include but are not limited to:
medical, educational, legal and scientific terminology, computer, rehabilitation,
mathematical, and religious terminology. A select number of topics will be covered
during the progression of the course. (Only available as needed.) 3-0-3.
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures/222
410 PRACTICUM IN TEACHING ASL 3 semester hours
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to work with learners in
elementary, middle and high school and to gain understanding in teaching ASL in these
three levels. The students will spend one hour per week meeting with their professor
for discussion and reports on classroom experiences and assigned readings. The student
will spend two hours per week engaged in observations and supervised experience with
each of the three age groups. Prerequisite: SGLG 408 1-2-3
494 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-3 semester hours
This course is designed to enable a junior or senior student to undertake a specific
research project of professional interest and need. Prerequisite: SGLG 202 with a grade
of C or better and permission of the Dept.
495 INTERNSHIP 3 semester hours each
This internship is designed to enable the student to receive extensive immersion in ASL
or Interpreting with members of the Deaf Community through supervised work
placement. Students will receive internship credit after the satisfactory completion of
100 hours of work placement. Prerequisite: SGLG 301, and in the case of an Internship
in Interpreting SLIN 303, and permission of the Dept.0-100-3. (Fall)
496 INTERNSHIP 3 semester hours each
This internship is designed to enable the student to receive extensive immersion in ASL
or Interpreting with members of the Deaf Community through supervised work
placement. Students will receive internship credit after the satisfactory completion of
100 hours of work placement. Prerequisite: SGLG 301, and in the case of an Internship
in Interpreting SLIN 303, and permission of the Dept. 0-100-3. (Spring)
INTERPRETING MINOR (SLIN)
220 ENGLISH PROCESSING FOR INTERPRETERS 3 semester hours
Course focus is on the development of English processing skills necessary for
interpreting. Such skills include English comprehension, memory, acuity and
discrimination, immediate repetition, delayed repetition, word level pattern inference,
phrase level pattern inference and others. Prerequisites: SGLG 102 or permission of the
Dept. All prerequisites must have been completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better.
(Fall)
303 FUNDAMENTALS AND THEORIES OF INTERPRETING 3 semester hours
Course focus is on interpreting as a profession. Topics include the history of sign
language interpreting, models of interpreting, the process of interpreting, the Code of
Professional Conduct and the business of interpreting. Application of models and
theories will be practiced in class. Prerequisite: SGLG 201 and permission of the Dept.
All prerequisites must have been completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. If the
student is an ASL major but not an Interpreting minor this one course may be taken for
major credit. (Spring)
320 INTERPRETING: VOICE TO SIGN 3 semester hours
Course focus is on the practice of interpreting from English to ASL. It will begin with
translation exercises at the sentence level and build to interpreting simultaneously with
larger texts. Prerequisites: SGLG 202, SLIN 303 or permission of the Dept. All
prerequisites must have been completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. (Fall)
Gardner-Webb University/223
321 INTERPRETING: SIGN TO VOICE 3 semester hours
Course focus is on the practice of interpreting from ASL to English. It will begin with
translation exercises at the sentence level and build to interpreting simultaneously with
larger texts. All prerequisites must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better.
Prerequisite: SGLG 202, SLIN 303 and 320 or permission of the Dept. (Spring)
403 INTERPRETING FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS 3 semester hours
Topics include interpreting for Deaf people with vision impairments, minimal
language skills (mls), developmental disabilities, physical difficulties, emotional
trauma, the terminally ill and age related issues. Prerequisites: SLIN 303, 320 and 321.
404 SIGNS IN APPLICATION 3 semester hours
Course focus is on techniques and vocabulary associated with interpreting in a variety of
settings. Topics include: medical, mental health, legal, religious, social services,
rehabilitation and others. Prerequisites: SGLG 302, SLIN 303, SLIN 320, SLIN 321. All
prerequisites must have been completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. (Fall)
405 PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETING
3 semester hours
This course is an introduction to the unique situation of educational interpreting. Topics
include elementary and secondary school interpreting, ethical applications, legal issues
and tutoring/note taking strategies. Students will learn the basics of transliterating and
have the opportunity to practice transliterating and interpreting in an educational
setting. Prerequisites: SGLG 302, SLIN 303, SLIN 320, SLIN 321, and SLIN 404. All
prerequisites must have been completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. (Spring)
BIBLICAL HEBREW (HEBR)
101, 102 ELEMENTARY HEBREW I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Hebrew as reflected in the
Old Testament. This study will include the reading of sample texts from the Hebrew Old
Testament.
3-0-3, 3-0-3.
201, 202 INTERMEDIATE HEBREW I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
The continuation of the study of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew
language as reflected in the Old Testament. This study will concentrate on the reading
of prophetic, poetic, and legal texts from the Hebrew Old Testament. Prerequisite
Hebrew 102. 3-0-3, 3-0-3.
FRENCH (FREN)
101 REAL WORLD FRENCH: GET READY! 3 semester hours
This is a beginning course for students who have had little or no study in French. It is
designed to help students acquire elementary skills in comprehension, speaking,
reading, and writing. It is taught in French with one hour of lab per week. 3-1-3.
102 REAL WORLD FRENCH: GET SET! 3 semester hours
This is the second part of the beginning course for students who have had some study
and exposure to French. It is designed to help students improve basic skills in
comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. It is taught in French with one hour of
lab per week. Prerequisite: French 101 or satisfactory score on placement test. 3-1-3.
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures/224
201 REAL WORLD FRENCH: LET’S GO! 3 semester hours
This is the first semester of the second year of French language study. Students will
increase functional knowledge of the French language. Students are expected to have a
basic command of elementary French skills. It is taught in French with one hour of lab
per week. Prerequisite French102 or satisfactory score on placement test. 3-1-3.
202 REAL WORLD FRENCH: TRANSITIONS 3 semester hours
This course serves as a bridge between basic and advanced courses in French. Its goal is
to prepare students for upper-level French conversation, culture, and literature classes.
It is taught in French with one hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: French 201 or
permission of department. 3-1-3.
301 INTENSIVE FRENCH: TEXTS AND CONTEXTS 6 semester hours
Oral and written work with emphasis on the spoken language and training in the
acquisition of an active idiomatic French vocabulary. Prerequisite: French 202 or
permission of department. 6-0-6. (Every Year)
302 ADVANCED FRENCH EXPRESSION 3 semester hours
Advanced study of the precision of spoken and written French with an introduction to
literary and cultural studies. Prerequisite: French 202 or permission of department. 3-0-3.
(Every Other Year)
305 PRODUCTS, PRACTICES, AND PERSPECTIVES OF FRANCE 3 semester hours
History and civilization of France. Prerequisite: French 301, 302 or permission of
department. 3-0-3. (On Demand)
306 PRODUCTS, PRACTICES, AND PERSPECTIVES OF THE FRANCOPHONE WORLD
3 semester hours
History and civilization of the Francophone world. Prerequisite: French 301, 302, or
permission of department. 3-0-3. (On Demand)
309 CONTEMPORARY FRANCE 3 semester hours
A study of France in the 20th and 21st centuries and its role in today’s world.
Prerequisite: French 301, 302, or permission of department. 3-0-3. (On Demand)
310 FRENCH FOR CAREERS 3 semester hours
Advanced study of the French language as needed for professional careers. Prerequisite:
French 301 and 302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3 (On Demand)
311, 312 FRENCH STUDY ABROAD 6 semester hours
Intensive language study, real-world living experience, and travel at the École
Internationale de Français in Trois-Rivières, Quebec (Canada) or in Strasbourg (France).
Lecture-Living/Travel-3, Lecture-Living/Travel-3.
315 LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION! STUDIES IN FRENCH FILM 3 semester hours
An in depth study of cinematic productions in French. Prerequisite: French 301 and 302
or permission of the department. 3-0-3 (On Demand)
320, 321 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 1-3 semester hours each semester
Students can be awarded credit of 1-3 hours for experience abroad. Semester credit
hours are decided by the Department of World Languages prior to travel.
409 SEMINAR IN FRENCH: SPECIAL TOPICS 3 semester hours
Study by genre, ethnicity, gender, theme or period of one or more of the diverse aspects
of past and/or present France and/or Francophone countries. Prerequisite: French 301
and 302, or permission of department. 3-0-3. (Can be retaken twice for a total of 9 hours
if different topics are offered)
Gardner-Webb University/225
410 VOICES THAT FORMED OUR WORLD: TEXTS OF FRANCE 3 semester hours
A chronological and/or thematic study of selected texts from France with an emphasis
on aesthetics, literary movements, milieu, and pertinent criticism. Prerequisite: FREN
301 and 302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3
420 REDISCOVERING NEW WORLDS 3 semester hours
A chronological and/or thematic study of selected texts from the Francophone world
with an emphasis on aesthetics, literary movements, milieu, and pertinent criticism.
Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3
430, 440 ADVANCED STUDIES IN FRANCOPHONE PEOPLES AND CULTURES I, II
3 semester hours each
Readings and discussions of selected texts with extensive written and oral work in
French. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3, 3-0-3
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY I AND II 1 - 3 semester hours each semester
Designed to enable a junior or senior student to undertake a specific research or intern
project of professional interest and need. Permission of department required. 0Independent Study1-3, 0-Independent Study-1-3.
GERMAN (GERM)
101 REAL WORLD GERMAN: GET READY! 3 semester hours
This is a beginning course for students who have had little or no study in German. It is
designed to help students acquire elementary skills in comprehension, speaking,
reading, and writing. It is taught in German with one hour of lab per week. 3-1-3. (Fall)
102 REAL WORLD GERMAN: GET SET! 3 semester hours
This is the second part of the beginning course for students who have some study and
exposure to German. It is designed to help students improve basic skills in
comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. It is taught in German with one hour of
lab per week. Prerequisite: German 101 or satisfactory score on placement test. 3-1-3.
(Spring)
201 REAL WORLD GERMAN: LET’S GO! 3 semester hours
This is the first semester of the second year of German study. Students will increase
functional knowledge of the German language. Students are expected to have a basic
command of elementary German skills. It is taught in German with one hour of lab per
week. Prerequisite: German 102 or satisfactory score on placement test. 3-1-3. (Fall)
202 REAL WORLD GERMAN: TRANSITIONS 3 semester hours
This course serves as a bridge between basic and advanced courses in German. Its goal
is to prepare students for upper-level German conversation, culture, and literature
classes. It is taught in German with one hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: German 201
or permission of the department. 3-1-3. (on demand)
301 INTENSIVE GERMAN: TEXTS AND CONTEXTS 6 semester hours
Oral and written work with emphasis on the spoken language and training in the
acquisition of an active idiomatic German vocabulary. Prerequisite: German 202 or
permission of the department. 6-0-6. (on demand)
302 ADVANCED GERMAN EXPRESSION 3 semester hours
Advanced study of the precision of spoken and written German with an introduction to
literary and cultural studies. Prerequisite: German 202, or permission of the department.
3-0-3. (on demand)
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures/226
315 LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION! STUDIES IN GERMAN FILM 3 semester hours
An in depth study of cinematic productions in German. Prerequisite: GERM 301 and 302
or permission of the department. 3-0-3 (On demand)
320, 321 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 1-3 semester hours
Students can be awarded credit of 1-3 hours for experience abroad. Semester credit
hours are decided by the Department of World Languages prior to travel.
409 SEMINAR IN GERMAN: SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 semester hours
A specialized study of various aspects of German literature, culture, and language.
(on demand)
GREEK (GREK)
101, 102 ELEMENTARY NEW TESTAMENT GREEK I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
A study of designated forms and basic grammatical uses of biblical Koine Greek. Basic
vocabulary development of the Greek New Testament will be included. 3-0-3, 3-0-3.
201, 202 INTERMEDIATE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
A study of the full range of syntactical functions of biblical Koine Greek and of exegetical
procedures using the Greek New Testament. Prerequisite: Greek 102. 3-0-3, 3-0-3.
495,496 GREEK EXEGESIS INDEPENDENT STUDY I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
The supervised exegesis of designated texts of the New Testament designed to further
enhance the student’s ability to interpret texts from the Greek New Testament using
more critical methodological procedures. A research paper reflecting these skills will
comprise a major portion of the course grade. Prerequisite: Greek 202. 0-Independent
Study-3, 0-Independent Study-3.
SECOND LANGUAGE EDUCATION
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESOL)
332, 333, 334 ESL METHODS/PRACTICUM K-6 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching ESL in
these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor.) 1-1-2. 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
335, 336, 337 ESL METHODS/PRACTICUM 6-9 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching ESL in
these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor.) 1-1-2. 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
338, 339, 340 ESL METHODS/ PRACTICUM 9-12 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching ESL in
these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor.) 1-1-2. 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
Gardner-Webb University/227
400 ESL SEMINAR 3 semester hours
This course is designed to provide final preparation for the ESL Education student before
beginning Student Teaching. Major topics covered will be linguistic differences in
English and other languages, literacy and diversity, ESL law, ESL assessment devises, and
how to be a resource for other disciplines. A basic knowledge of linguistics, reading
theory, and diverse populations is required. (Prerequisites: ENGL 361, 362, 363, EDUC
302, 305, SOCI 400, and ESOL 332, 335, 338, or Permission of Professor) 2-1-3.
FRENCH -
THESE
FRENCH
FRENCH LICENSURE. (FREN)
COURSES DO NOT COUNT IN THE
MINOR-THEY ARE ONLY FOR
MAJOR OR
332, 333, 334 FRENCH METHODS/PRACTICUM K-6 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching French
in these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor) 1-1-2, 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
335, 336, 337 FRENCH METHODS/PRACTICUM 6-9 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching French
in these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor) 1-1-2, 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
338, 339, 340 FRENCH METHODS/PRACTICUM 9-12 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching French
in these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor)1-1-2, 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
SPANISH -
THESE COURSES DO NOT COUNT IN THE SPANISH MAJOR OR
MINOR. THEY ARE ONLY FOR SPANISH LICENSURE. SPAN
(
)
332, 333, 334 SPANISH METHODS/PRACTICUM K-6 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching Spanish
in these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor)1-1-2, 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
335, 336, 337 SPANISH METHODS/PRACTICUM 6-9 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching Spanish
in these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor) 1-1-2, 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
338, 339, 340 SPANISH METHODS/PRACTICUM 9-12 2 semester hours each semester
Special consideration is given to methods, materials, and techniques of teaching Spanish
in these grades. Observation and practice in a public school for one hour per week, with
weekly meetings with supervising professor for discussion and reports on classroom
experiences and assigned readings. (Permission of Professor) 1-1-2, 1-1-2, 1-1-2.
Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures/228
SPANISH (SPAN)
101 REAL WORLD SPANISH: GET READY! 3 semester hours
This is a beginning course for students who have had little or no study in Spanish
grammar. The course is designed to help students acquire basic skills in comprehension,
speaking, reading, and writing. Taught in Spanish, one hour of lab required per week.
3-1-3.
102 REAL WORLD SPANISH: GET SET! 3 semester hours
This is the second part of the beginning course for students who have had some study
and exposure to Spanish grammar. The course is designed to help students improve
basic skills in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Taught in Spanish, one
hour of lab required per week. Prerequisite SPAN 101 or satisfactory score on placement
test. 3-1-3.
201 REAL WORLD SPANISH: LET’S GO! 3 semester hours
This is the first semester of the second year of Spanish grammar. Students are expected
to have a basic command of elementary Spanish skills. Taught in Spanish. One hour of
lab per week. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or satisfactory score on placement test. 3-1-3.
202 REAL WORLD SPANISH: TRANSITIONS 3 semester hours
This course serves as a bridge between basic and advanced courses in Spanish. Its goal
is to prepare students for upper-level Spanish conversation, culture, and literature
classes. It is taught in Spanish with one hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: Spanish 201.
3-1-3.
301 INTENSIVE SPANISH: TEXTS AND CONTEXTS 6 semester hours
Oral and written work with emphasis on the spoken language and training in the
acquisition of an active idiomatic Spanish vocabulary. Prerequisite: Spanish 202. 6-0-6.
(Fall)
302 ADVANCED SPANISH EXPRESSION 3 semester hours
Advanced study of the precision of spoken and written Spanish with an introduction to
literary and cultural studies. Prerequisite: Spanish 202, 301 recommended. 3-0-3. (Spring)
305 PRODUCTS, PRACTICES, AND PERSPECTIVES OF THE SPANISH-SPEAKING WORLD
3 semester hours
History and civilization of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisites: Spanish 301 and
302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3. (Spring)
310 SPANISH FOR CAREERS 3 semester hours
Advanced study of the Spanish language as needed for professional careers. Spanish 301
and 302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3 (On Demand)
311, 312 SPANISH STUDY ABROAD 6 semester hours
Intensive language study, home-stay living experience, and travel at the Instituto de
Lengua y Cultura Costarricense in Alajuela, Costa Rica (Central America) or Leon (Spain).
Lecture-Living-Travel-3, Lecture-Living-Travel-3.
315 LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION! STUDIES IN HISPANIC FILM 3 semester hours
An in depth study of cinematic productions in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 and 302
or permission of the department. 3-0-3 (On Demand)
Gardner-Webb University/229
320, 321 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 1-3 semester hours each semester
Students can be awarded credit of 1-3 hours for experience abroad. Semester credit
hours are decided by the Department of World Languages prior to travel.
409 SEMINAR IN SPANISH: SPECIAL TOPICS 3 semester hours
Study by genre, ethnicity, gender, theme or period of one or more of the diverse aspects
of past and/or present Spain and/or Spanish American countries. Prerequisite: SPAN 301
and 302, or permission of department. 3-0-3.
410 VOICES THAT FORMED OUR WORLD: TEXTS OF SPAIN 3 semester hours
A chronological and/or thematic study of selected texts from Spain with an emphasis on
aesthetics, literary movements, milieu, and pertinent criticism. Prerequisite: SPAN 301
and 302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3
420 REDISCOVERING NEW WORLDS 3 semester hours
A chronological and/or thematic study of selected texts from Spanish American with an
emphasis on aesthetics, literary movements, milieu, and pertinent criticism. Prerequisite:
SPAN 301 and 302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3
430, 440 ADVANCED STUDIES IN HISPANIC PEOPLES AND CULTURES I, II
3 semester hours each
Readings and discussions of selected texts with extensive written and oral work in
Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 and 302 or permission of the department. 3-0-3, 3-0-3
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY I AND II 3 semester hours each semester
Designed to enable a senior or junior Spanish major to undertake a specific research or
intern project of professional interest and need. 0-Independent Study 1-3, 0-Independent
Study 1-3.
Broyhill School of Management/230
THE BROYHILL SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
OF THE GODBOLD SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Nationally Accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and
Programs. Became the University’s first endowed school in 1981 with a gift from
the Broyhill Foundation of Hickory, North Carolina.
FACULTY
Dean of the School of Business, Dover Chair: Professor A. Negbenebor
Associate Dean of the School of Business: Associate Professor V. Graham
Director of Online Learning: Professor E. Godfrey
Professors: I. Bottoms, S. Camp, R. Spear
Associate Professors: S. Johnson, T. Meaders, C. Metcalf, F. Policastro
Assistant Professors: J. Nall, D. Smith, L. Xiao
Instructors: G. Dib, O. Zamora, S. Mankins
Professor and Distinguished Executive in Residence: C. Tichenor
MISSION
The Godbold School of Business provides undergraduate and graduate
professional training within the scope of a Christian-based, liberal arts university,
building on the skills in learning and critical thinking that the liberal arts foster.
VISION
The Godbold School of Business functions to support the mission of GardnerWebb University by providing both graduate and undergraduate professional
training in the business disciplines to a diverse student population. It enhances
the scope of the university by applying the learning and analytical skills fostered
by the liberal arts and the moral and ethical values of the Christian faith to the
practice of business activities in the domestic and world-wide arenas. It also
encourages both its faculty and its students to pursue life-long learning, to value
service to God and humanity, and to build character in students.
MOTTO: “For God and Humanity Through Business”
GOALS
1. To provide both undergraduate and graduate professional training in the
business disciplines to a diverse student population;
2. To enhance the scope of the University by applying the learning and
analytical skills fostered by the liberal arts and the moral and ethical
values of the Christian faith to the practice of business activities in the
workplace; and
3. To encourage both its faculty and its students to pursue life-long learning,
and to value service to God and humanity
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who choose to major in any field of study offered by the Broyhill
School of Management will:
1. adapt to professional careers in business, government, and other areas of
human endeavor where organizational, managerial, and analytical skills
are vital for success;
2. learn new managerial skills that require knowledge of computer
applications in business;
Gardner-Webb University/231
3. respond to change in a dynamic, global marketplace and demonstrate
high ethical standards in their places of work;
4. expand their knowledge base by pursuing further studies in graduate or
professional schools;
5. incorporate global and ethical perspectives across the curriculum; and
6. be able to apply quantitative techniques, computer techniques, and other
elements of critical thinking to managerial problem solving.
Student learning outcomes specific to each major offered by the school are
described in the appropriate sections that follow.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The school offers seven majors leading to the Bachelor of Science degree:
Accounting
Business Administration
Computer Information Systems
Economics/Finance
International Business
Healthcare Management
Marketing
SECOND MAJOR
A student seeking a second major in any degree offered by the Broyhill
School of Management must meet all of the requirements for the primary
degree in business. If the student seeking a second major is already a business
student in a business degree program as the primary major, the student must
complete 30 hours toward the second major, at least 21 of which must meet
the course requirements for the second major with any remaining hours
approved in a written plan by the student’s advisor.
MINOR FIELD OF STUDY FOR NON-BUSINESS MAJORS
The Broyhill School of Management recognizes that some students, who do
not major in business, may want to have an understanding of basic business
disciplines. Therefore, the Broyhill School of Management offers a minor in
business administration for students who are not majoring in business.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
The Common Professional Component (33 hours) is a set of core courses that
is required by the Broyhill School of Management for all business majors. The
following courses are required in the Common Professional Component:
ACCT 213, 214
BADM 300, 304, 305, 480
CISS 160
ECON 204
FINC 312
MGMT 316
MRKT 300
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS: All business students (including transfer
students) are expected to complete MATH 105 and either MATH 110, 151 or
219, except that Computer Information Systems majors with the Information
Technology option are expected to complete MATH 151 and either MATH 302
or 311. All business students are expected to complete ECON 203 within the
general studies core. A minimum grade of C (2.00) is required in all major
Broyhill School of Management/232
courses, the Common Professional Component, and the economics and math
courses specified as additional requirements, whether taken at Gardner-Webb or
transferred from another institution.
For cases in which a student’s primary major requires the same course as a
business secondary major or the non-business minor, the duplication will be
resolved by selecting substitute courses from the same general field of study.
ACCOUNTING (21 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will develop the accounting and analytical skills in
order to acquire entry level positions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
ACCT 313, 314, 315, 400, 425, 435, and 450
Note: At least half of the accounting courses listed above must
be taken at Gardner-Webb University.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (21 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will understand basic concepts of human relations
management, organizational behavior, and production/
operations management necessary to manage a modern
business or not-for-profit organization.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MGMT 410 and MGMT 416 and five courses selected from the
following:
BADM 325, 340, 360
MGMT 330, 400, 403, 422, 431, 435, 450, or 485
FINC 320
MRKT 466
Note: If BADM 325 is used to satisfy a general studies core
requirement, it cannot be used to satisfy a course requirement for
this major.
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (21 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will apply information technologies and business
knowledge to achieve strategic objectives in organizations.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Students completing the Computer Information Systems degree
will take the following six courses and one course from either an
Information Systems Emphasis or an Information Technology Emphasis:
CISS 300
Management Information Systems
CISS 201
Programming Language
CISS 371
Systems Analysis and Design
CISS 433
Database Management
CISS 460
Data Communications and Networking
CISS 470
Strategic Information Management (Capstone Course)
Information Systems Emphasis (Option 1), choose one course from:
ACCT 400
Accounting Information Systems
CISS 432
Information Systems Project Management
CISS 485
Topics in Computer Information Systems
Gardner-Webb University/233
Information Technology Emphasis (Option 2), choose one course from:
CISS 285
C Programming Language
CISS 352
Principles of Programming with COBOL
CISS 423
Survey of Programming Languages
CISS 471
Software Engineering
CISS 485
Topics in Computer Information Systems
(This option also requires that the student complete MATH 151 and
either MATH 302 or 311 as part of the general studies core or as
additional requirements.)
ECONOMICS/FINANCE (21 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will be able to apply and critique the financial
operations of business firms from a managerial perspective and
manage the investment resources of individuals and business
firms.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MGMT 416, FINC 313, and five courses selected from the following
(in consultation with the advisor):
ECON 302, 303, 304, 311, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, or 480
FINC 301, 320, 420, 425, 430, or 460
HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT (21 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will gain a well-rounded and thorough course of study
in the healthcare management field to position them to be
competitive in the healthcare management workforce.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
HCMG 200, 300, 303, 310, 315, 400, 420
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (21 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will be able to distinguish between domestic and
international markets and apply basic concepts of international
trade to culture, history, and politics.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
BADM 360
ECON 401
FINC 460
MRKT 466
POLS 401 (or 321 or 351)
In addition, the student must demonstrate proficiency in English
plus one foreign language at the 201 level, and must choose one of the
following options:
1. Six hours of additional foreign language above the 201 level; or
2. If the student’s native language is other than English, six hours
of business courses at or beyond the 300 level (with approval of
the student’s academic advisor).
Broyhill School of Management/234
Majors will be strongly encouraged to participate in a foreign study
program through the Council on International Educational Exchange
(CIEE) or through Gardner-Webb sponsored programs abroad. While
abroad, students will be advised to take one course from the Common
Professional Component. Students should plan their budgets
accordingly.
MARKETING (21 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will understand basic concepts of marketing,
managing and promoting sales or services for a business or notfor-profit organization.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
MGMT 416, MRKT 410 and 420 and four of the following (with
the approval of the student’s academic advisor):
MRKT 302, 304, 402, 404, 406, 408, or 466
ECON 401
BADM 360
MINOR FIELD OF STUDY FOR NON-BUSINESS MAJORS DETAIL
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (18 HOURS)
ACCT 213, ECON 204, and four courses from the Common Professional
Component (excluding BADM 480)
Note: For cases in which a major external to the Broyhill School of
Management requires ACCT 213 and the selected minor also requires ACCT 213,
ACCT 214 becomes the substitute course to fulfill the requirements of the minor.
Other duplications should be resolved by selecting substitute courses from the
same general field of study
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
must complete or transfer MATH 105 and 110 and ECON 203. Additionally, all
students transferring from a community college are strongly recommended to
take the following courses as part of their community college programs: ACCT
213, ACCT 214, ECON 203, ECON 204, and CISS 160.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS OFFERED BY THE SCHOOL
DELTA MU DELTA HONOR SOCIETY
Delta Mu Delta is the International Honor Society for Business
Administration. The purposes are to promote higher scholarship in training
for business and to recognize and reward scholastic achievement for
business majors. It is open to juniors and seniors with a GPA of 3.8 and
above and who are in the top 10% of their class.
Gardner-Webb University/235
BROYHILL SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Majors:*
Accounting
Business
Computer
Administration Info. Systems
Economics/
Finance
International
Business
Marketing
Healthcare
Management
Core:
ACCT 213
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
ACCT 214
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
BADM 300
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
BADM 304
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
BADM 305
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
BADM 480
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
CISS 160
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
ECON 204*
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
FINC 312
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
MGMT 316
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
MRKT 300
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
ACCT 313
ACCT 314
ACCT 315
ACCT 400
ACCT 425
ACCT 435
ACCT 450
MGMT 410
MGMT 416
BADM 360
ECON 401
FINC 460
MRKT 466
POLI 401 (or
321 or 351)
Option 1:
MGMT 416
MRKT 410
MRKT 420
HCMG 200
HCMG 300
HCMG 303
HCMG 310
HCMG 315
HCMG 400
HCMG 420
Total Hrs.
54
Five
C ourses:
BADM 325
BADM 340
BADM 360
FINC 320
MGMT 330
MGMT 400
MGMT 403
MGMT 422
MGMT 431
MGMT 435
MGMT 450
MGMT 485
MRKT 466
54
CISS 201
FINC 313
CISS 300
MGMT 416
CISS 371
Five
CISS 433
Courses:
CISS 460
ECON 302
CISS 470
ECON 303
and
ECON 304
Option 1:
ECON 311
One C ourse: ECON 401
CISS 432
ECON 402
CISS 485
ECON 403
or
ECON 404
Option 2:
ECON 405
One C ourse: ECON 480
CISS 285
FINC 301
CISS 423
FINC 320
CISS 471
FINC 420
CISS 485
FINC 425
FINC 430
FINC 460
54
54
for those
speaking
English
as a first
language
six hours of
foreign
language
above 201
level
Four
Courses:
BADM 360
ECON 401
MRKT 302
MRKT 304
MRKT 402
MRKT 404
MRKT 406
MRKT 408
MRKT 466
Option 2:
(for those
speaking
English
as a second
language)
Six hours of
business
courses
at 300 level
or above
54
54
54
*NOTES:
1. ECON 203 is a prerequisite for ECON 204 and should be taken within
the general studies core.
2. MATH 105 and MATH 110 are required for all majors, except for the
Computer Information Systems major with the “Option 2” emphasis,
which requires MATH 151 and either MATH 302 or MATH 311.
Broyhill School of Management/236
BROYHILL SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
TWO-YEAR COURSE ROTATION
Every
Semester
Every
Fall
Every
Spring
Odd
Fall
Even
Fall
Odd
Spring
Even
Spring
ACCT 213
ACCT 214
BADM 300
BADM 304
BADM 305
BADM 325
BADM 480
ACCT 313
ACCT 435
ACCT 314
ACCT 400
ACCT 450
ACCT 425
ACCT 315
BADM 340
CISS 423
CISS 432
CISS 471
BADM 360
ECON 311
ECON 303
ECON 302
CISS 300
CISS 371
ECON 304
ECON 402
CISS 160
ECON 203
ECON 204
FINC 312
HCMG 200
MGMT 316
MGMT 416
MRKT 300
ECON 401
HCMG 300
HCMG 420
MGMT 403
MGMT 410
MRKT 410
MRKT 466
CISS 201
CISS 433
CISS 470
FINC 313
FINC 460
FINC 420
FINC 425
FINC 301
FINC 320
MRKT 402
HCMG 315
HCMG 400
HCMG 310
MRKT 302
MGMT 450
MRKT 304
MRKT 406
HCMG 303
MGMT 400
MRKT 420/
MGMT 422
The rotation is for general information only and should not be relied on
for long-term planning. Actual course offering each semester are based on
many factors, and the schedule may vary from this rotation. Scheduling each
semester is published by the Registrar. Other catalog courses are offered
only as needed.
GRADUATES IN EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT (GEM)
The Godbold School of Business offers a program for business majors
designed to enhance their status in the hiring market as management-track
employees. The GEM program provides an added dimension to the student's
experience by having a significant portion of the coursework taught by
professors with corporate experience as chief executive officers, chief
operating officers, judges or managing partners of major business or publicsector organizations. To be eligible for a GEM certificate, business majors
must:
1. Maintain an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher
2. Complete all requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in the
Broyhill School of Management, including five courses designated as GEM
courses
3. Adhere to more stringent requirements in those courses designated as
GEM courses with respect to both workload and grading scales
4. Complete as a course of study an overseas experience approved by the
Broyhill School of Management
5. Attend annual receptions and retreats sponsored by the GEM program
6. Pay an additional fee for participation in the GEM program
Gardner-Webb University/237
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
ACCOUNTING (ACCT)
213 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I 3 semester hours
An introduction to financial accounting. Accounting transactions, the accounting cycle,
financial statement preparation. Special issues for short- and long-term assets, liabilities,
partnerships, and corporations. 3-0-3.
214 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II 3 semester hours
Continued coverage of financial accounting. Partnerships, corporations, debt and equity
financing. Cash flow and financial statement analysis. Introduction to management
accounting: job-order and process costing, budgeting and variance analysis. Prerequisite:
Accounting 213 or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
313 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I 3 semester hours
Detailed study of financial and managerial accounting concepts. Financial statement
preparation. Time value of money. Cost allocation and valuation of current and longterm assets. Prerequisite: Accounting 214 or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
314 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II 3 semester hours
Continued study of financial and managerial accounting concepts. Current and longterm debt issues, contributed and earned equity, and special treatment of leases,
pensions, and tax. Financial reporting and analysis. Prerequisite: Accounting 313 or
permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
315 COST ACCOUNTING 3 semester hours
Cost accounting measurement and classification. Job order and process costing. Budget
development using variable and fixed costs. Capital budgeting and project evaluation.
Prerequisite: Accounting 214 or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
370 GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ACCOUNTING 3 semester hours
An examination of the principles of governmental accounting and nonprofit accounting
to include classification of accounts, budgeting, and financial reporting for state and
local governments and nonprofit organization. Prerequisite: Accounting 214 or
permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
400 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 semester hours
A course designed to introduce the student to accounting systems design in a computer
environment. Prerequisites: Accounting 214 and Computer Information Systems 160 or
permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
411 ADVANCED BUSINESS LAW 3 semester hours
Legal liability of accountants. Topics include Uniform Commercial Code, commercial
paper, problems of tax practice, auditing responsibilities. Prerequisite: Business
Administration 300 or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
425 FEDERAL INCOME TAX I 3 semester hours
Examines introductory federal income tax provisions and compliance from a business
entities perspective emphasizing the multidisciplinary aspects of taxation with a focus
on the model tax curriculum of the AICPA. Prerequisite: Accounting 214 or permission
of the instructor. 3-0-3.
Broyhill School of Management/238
426 FEDERAL INCOME TAX II 3 semester hours
Examines advanced federal income tax theory, planning and research from a business
entities perspective emphasizing the multidisciplinary aspects of taxation with a focus on
the model tax curriculum focus of the AICPA, emphasizing advanced entity, jurisdictional,
tax accounting and planning issues. Prerequisite: Accounting 214 or permission of
instructor. 3-0-3.
435 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 3 semester hours
Accounting for partnerships, installment sales, insurance, corporate consolidations, and
annuities. Prerequisite: Accounting 314 or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
450 AUDITING 3 semester hours
Principles, techniques, procedures, and legal responsibility of auditors. Prerequisite:
Accounting 314 or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
470 CPA PRACTICE REVIEW 3 semester hours
Designed to study the areas of accounting that usually appear on the Practice and Theory
sections of the Certified Public Accounting examination. Special emphasis is placed on the
opinions of the Accounting Principles Board and statements of the Financial Standards
Board. Prerequisite: Student must have senior status. 3-0-3.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BADM)
115 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 3 semester hours
An introduction to accounting, marketing, finance, economics, and management.
Designed to provide non-majors and new business majors with a preview of the subject
matter and job prospects in the business field. 3-0-3.
300 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS 3 semester hours
This course is designed to cover both the public and private regulation of business. Some
of the topics covered are tort law, contract law, agency, partnerships, and corporations.
3-0-3.
304 APPLIED BUSINESS STATISTICS 3 semester hours
The course considers the use of statistics in business for better planning, control and
decision making with the focus on using computer statistical software, interpretation and
presentation of results. Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability concepts,
hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and regression analysis are covered. Prerequisites:
Mathematics 105 or equivalent, Computer Information Systems 160 or equivalent or
permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
305 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 3 semester hours
An introduction to linear programming and sensitivity analysis, decision theory, inventory
control models, waiting line theory and computer simulation to improve the planning,
control and decision making process. Prerequisites: MATH 110 or MATH 151 and BADM
304 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
325 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS APPLICATIONS 3 semester hours
A practical approach to business communications using word processing software.
Emphasis will be placed on theory, memo and letter writing, formal and informal
presentations, and the job search process. 3-0-3.
Gardner-Webb University/239
340 INTEGRATION OF FAITH, ETHICS, AND BUSINESS 3 semester hours
This elective course will explore the interplay between faith, ethics, and business.
Various models of integration at the personal and corporate level will be explored.
Students will be challenged to develop their own philosophy of how faith and ethics
make a difference in their approach to business. In addition to traditional business
ethics topics, this course will explore personal morality, the unique implications of the
Christian faith to various business disciplines, and business as service.
360 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 3 semester hours
An introduction to the unique issues associated with doing business in a global context.
Specific challenges of doing business internationally and related managerial strategies
are examined.
395 CAMPUS NEW YORK 1 semester hour
New York business/career visit enables students of business to learn how textbook
theory is put into practice through direct contact with some of the nations’ best-known
business firms. The week-long visit also provides opportunities for investigating career
possibilities. Lecture-Travel-1-0-1.
396 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE 1-3 semester hours
The course provides the student an opportunity to expand business and cultural
horizons by visiting and studying in different international sites. The course can be
taken more than once for different international experiences. Lecture-Travel-1-3
semester hours.
397 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS INTERNSHIP 3-12 semester hours
Extensive formal and informal training in a country other that the student’s country of
origin in both foreign language conversation and business practices. Prerequisite:
FREN/SPAN 211 or equivalent in another language. Lecture-Travel-Work. 3-12 semester
hours.
420 INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS 1-6 semester hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing and or by department approval. This is required of all
business majors.
480 SENIOR SEMINAR IN BUSINESS 3 semester hours
A case study approach designed to apply to areas of management, accounting, finance,
and economics to contemporary business problems. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 3-0-3.
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-6 semester hours
Supervised study program in a field of special interest. Prerequisite: Approval of
department chair and instructor.
498 PRACTICAL PROJECT EXPERIENCE 3 semester hours
This class implements service learning in a course that integrates the skills and
knowledge students have learned in previous business classes covering finance,
accounting, operations management, marketing, organizational behavior, human
resource management, information technology, and communications, while embodying
“For God and Humanity.” The class selects and performs a suitable charitable project
during the semester, including fundraising, performance of the project, public and
media relations, and creating and maintaining a project website.
Broyhill School of Management/240
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CISS)
160 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 semester hours
A general introduction to computer information systems, with an emphasis on the
application of Microsoft Office tools for business, such as spreadsheets, databases, and
web development. 3-0-3
201 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE 3 semester hours
Programming skills for business applications, including basic programming logic, typical
programming structures, object-oriented and structured methodologies. Included is an
introduction to Internet programming language such as Java. 3-0-3
285 C PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE 3 semester hours
An introduction to the language, syntax, style, and design of C programs.
Emphasizes the use of C for low-level design and graphics, including extensions to C++.
Prerequisite: CISS 201. 3-0-3
300 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 semester hours
A general introduction to management information systems theories and concepts,
including the organizational role of information systems, prevalent information and
communication technologies, and information systems development processes.
Prerequisite: CISS 160, MGMT 316. 3-0-3
352 PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING WITH COBOL 3 semester hours
Computer problem solving using COBOL as a vehicle. Prerequisite: CISS 201. 3-0-3
371 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN 3 semester hours
Study of the systems development life cycle (SDLC) with focus on the planning, analysis,
and design processes. Emphasis is placed on the design and development systems,
including the software and databases that are needed to support the business needs of
organizations. Prerequisite: CISS 300. 3-0-3
423 SURVEY OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 3 semester hours
Introduction to the history and design of programming languages. The applicability of
languages to special uses such as Fortran, Pascal, Ada, Oberon, Object Pascal, C++,
Smalltalk. Examination of the modern concepts of object-orientation and functional
programming. Prerequisite: CISS 201. 3-0-3
432 INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
This course examines the characteristics of information technology projects, especially
involving the development of software-intensive systems, and introduces the student to a
variety of project management techniques. Prerequisite: CISS 300. 3-0-3
433 DATABASE MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Beginning and intermediate topics in data modeling for relational database management
systems. Major emphasis is placed on understanding the various database management
functions and providing database support for organizations. Prerequisite: CISS 300. 3-0-3.
460 DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING 3 semester hours
Introduction to concepts of computer network operating systems, telephony, routing,
packets, and distributed processing. Prerequisite: CISS 300. 3-0-3
Gardner-Webb University/241
470 STRATEGIC INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Prepares the student to develop an understanding and appreciation for the impact of
information systems on the economy and business performance, emerging public
technology infrastructure and its role in the modern organization, electronic business
applications, and technology-driven business models and strategies (Capstone Course).
Prerequisite: senior status. 3-0-3
471 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 3 semester hours
The study of structured programming, systems analysis, and systems design techniques.
Topics include top-down design, software design metrics, project management,
program correctness, and the use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) and
configuration management tools. Problems of software engineering and design for
graphical user interfaces are discussed. (Cross-listed with Computer Science).
Prerequisites: CISS 285, CISS 433. 3-0-3
485 TOPICS IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 semester hours
A specialized study of various computer science developments. Topics will vary from
semester to semester. Students may take the course more than once. 3-0-3.
498 INTERNSHIP IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 semester hours
By special arrangement with the approval of the department chair.
ECONOMICS (ECON)
201 FREE ENTERPRISE 3 semester hours
Explores the economic implications, history, and philosophy of the free enterprise
system. For non-business and beginning business majors. 3-0-3.
203 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I
(ECONOMICS AND THE FREE MARKET SYSTEM) 3 semester hours
Explores the economic implications, history and philosophy of the free enterprise
system with special attention to national income theory; money, banking and the
Federal Reserve system; Keynesian and Classical theories and the mechanics of the
business cycle. 3-0-3.
204 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II 3 semester hours
Study of microeconomic concepts, price theory, behavior of the firm, market structure,
and income distribution. Prerequisite: Economics 203. 3-0-3.
302 MONEY AND BANKING 3 semester hours
Analysis of Federal Reserve System and monetary policy, the role of money in
determination of national income, role and development of commercial banks, and the
basic elements of international finance. 3-0-3.
303 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS I 3 semester hours
Topics include microeconomics analysis, utility and price theory, resource allocation for
optimization. Prerequisites: Economics 203 and 204. 3-0-3.
304 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS II 3 semester hours
Topics include analysis of economic aggregates, national income and production, GNP,
unemployment, and inflation, with an emphasis on economic forecasting as a basis for
business planning. Prerequisite: Economics 204. 3-0-3.
Broyhill School of Management/242
311 LABOR ECONOMICS 3 semester hours
Analysis of the labor market, unemployment, labor laws, union organization, and the
theory of wages. 3-0-3.
401 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 3 semester hours
An examination of the theory of international trade and international finance with
coverage of such topics as comparative advantage and the reasons for international trade
in products and factors of production, foreign exchange, foreign investment, balance of
payments. 3-0-3.
402 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS 3 semester hours
Economics applied to managerial decision making. Analysis of costs, production,
decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisite: Economics 303. 3-0-3.
403 NATIONAL INCOME AND EMPLOYMENT ANALYSIS 3 semester hours
Study of national income concepts, determination of national income, employment,
balance of payments. 3-0-3.
404 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 3 semester hours
A study of the process of economic development including the historical and economic
factors underlying economic development. An examination of possible strategies for
economic growth and development. 3-0-3.
405 ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS 3 semester hours
The economic theory of confrontation of pollution, resource exploitation, land use. The
emphasis is on examination of market failure and possible alternatives to markets in
solving the problems of pollution and natural resource use. 3-0-3.
480 CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC PROBLEMS 3 semester hours
A seminar reviewing basic economic principles and examining contemporary economic
problems confronting business organizations. 3-0-3.
FINANCE (FINC)
301 PERSONAL FINANCE 3 semester hours
Intended for business majors and non-majors who want to manage their personal
finances better. Course covers personal budgeting and accounting, buying on credit,
borrowing money, personal income tax returns, saving and wise investment, insurance,
home ownership, and estate planning. 3-0-3.
312 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Designed to provide students with a broad base of understanding of the principles and
concepts of corporate financial decision making. The course covers the key financial
issues of corporate ethics, time value of money, valuation of stocks and bonds, risk and
return, cost of capital, capital budgeting, leverage and capital structure, and financial
statement analysis. Prerequisites:Accounting 213 and 214, Economics 203 and 204.3-0-3.
313 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT II 3 semester hours
This course is designed to expand the student’s depth of knowledge and application of
financial management concepts and techniques learned in the principles of corporate
finance. This course will provide an in-depth study of ethics in finance, capital
budgeting, capital structure, financial statement analysis, working capital management,
financial forecasting, mergers and acquisitions, and multinational financial management.
Prerequisites: Finance 312 and Computer Information Systems 160. 3-0-3.
Gardner-Webb University/243
320 RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE 3 semester hours
This course will encompass practical issues as well as basic concepts and principles of
risk management and insurance, including personal, business, and social viewpoints in
regard to managing life, health, property, and liability risks. 3-0-3.
420 INVESTMENTS 3 semester hours
Investment goals, strategies, and policies for individual investors are examined.
Prerequisite: Finance 312 or consent of the instructor. 3-0-3.
425 INTERMEDIATE CORPORATE FINANCE 3 semester hours
Application-oriented approach to understanding the complexities of obtaining and
allocating financial resources. Cases confronting real-world financial issues will be
utilized. Prerequisite: FINC 312. 3-0-3.
430 BANK MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
An introduction to the dynamics of managing financial institutions within a competitive
and quickly changing marketplace. Prerequisite: FINC 312. 3-0-3.
460 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE 3 semester hours
Explores the role of financial institutions, markets, and strategies in the international
context. Prerequisite: FINC 312. 3-0-3.
HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT (HCMG)
200 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
This course is an introduction to the healthcare delivery system in the United States
with some comparisons to systems in other countries. Health systems at the federal,
state, and local level are discussed as well as differences between the private and public
sectors. Potential careers in healthcare management are explained. No prerequisites.
300 HEALTHCARE LAW AND ETHICS
This course provides an overview of the interrelationship of the legal system with the
structure and function of the health care system in its various forms and settings. Also
addresses ethical dilemmas relating to individual patient/client decisions. Prerequisite:
HCMG 200.
303 ECONOMICS, BUDGETING, AND FINANCE IN HEALTHCARE
This course applies accounting, finance, and economic principles to the healthcare
arena. Participants will understand the impact of economic issues on healthcare, and the
impact of healthcare on the economy. Participants will be able to apply accounting and
finance principles to healthcare in budgeting, financial statement analysis, and capital
management. Prerequisites: Acct 213, 214; Econ 203, 204; Fin 312; HCMG 200.
310 DIVERSITY AND CULTURE IN HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
This course explores the issues of diversity and culture in healthcare – in human
resources, patient’s care, and access to care. The growing diversity of communities
makes it imperative that healthcare providers understand the diversity and culture of
their community, and the cultural meanings and values of illness and disease treatments
to various groups. The course explores health and disease symptoms within a cultural
setting and the cultural relativity of illness. Prerequisite: HCMG 200.
Broyhill School of Management/244
315 HEALTHCARE QUALITY SEMINAR
This course explores quality in healthcare. Quality medical care and quality patient care
are examined. This course introduces concepts associated with quality management and
improvement in the healthcare environments, and introduces the concept of systems
thinking and dynamic complexity in healthcare organizations. Prerequisite: HCMG 200.
400 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL HEALTH
This course introduces healthcare management issues within the context of
comparative biological, social, economic, and political systems. This course examines
issues from many sectors (population, environmental health, nutrition, etc.) as well as
principles of health system structure, financing, and reform. This course includes both
national-level and international issues. The analytical frameworks are applicable to
consideration of health issues and systems in developing, emerging, and developed
economies. This course aims to build both students master of concepts and theories in
international health, as well as practical skills through diverse classroom activities.
Prerequisites: HCMG 200; BADM 304.
420 PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
The internship is based in a health services delivery setting and provides an opportunity
for the student to integrate what has been learned in courses and relate it to the
operations of a complex health services organization. The course includes at least 15
hours per week of fieldwork, preparation of a personal assessment and development
plan, a weekly seminar, readings, a project applicable to the internship organization,
and the preparation of professional executive briefings. The student works under the
collaborative guidance of a qualified professional preceptor and a faculty advisor. This
course must be taken prior to the Senior Seminar Capstone course. Prerequisites:
HCMG 200,300, 303, 310, 315, 400.
MANAGEMENT (MGMT)
316 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Explores the principles and processes of managing an organization. The functions of
planning, organizing, leading and motivating employees are applied to current business
situations. 3-0-3.
330 INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 3 semester hours
Explores the process and techniques of accomplishing organizational objectives through
others. Prerequisite: MGMT 316. 3-0-3.
400 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Principles and practices used in the recruitment, selection, training and development,
evaluation, and compensation of employees within organizations. Prerequisite: MGMT
316. 3-0-3.
403 HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS 3 semester hours
The application of human behavior principles common to many types of organizations,
with a focus on those in business and industry. Motivation, leadership, followership, and
human problems are analyzed. Cross listed as Psychology 403. 3-0-3.
410 ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 semester hours
Explores economic and managerial issues the small business manager must address.
Entrepreneurship, forms of ownership, creating a business plan, location analysis,
acquisition of capital, financial and inventory control, marketing and advertising
considerations. Prerequisite: MGMT 316. 3-0-3.
Gardner-Webb University/245
416 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
An introduction of methods and processes used by organizations in the service and
manufacturing sector to create strategic and competitive advantage. Topics include total
quality management and control, work measurement, capacity and aggregate planning,
forecasting, operations scheduling and project management. Prerequisites: Mathematics
105; Business Administration 304 or 305; MGMT 316; or permission of the instructor.
3-0-3.
422 MARKETING MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Course addresses marketing research, forecasting, and strategic decision-making. Cross
listed as Marketing 420, but not equivalent to MRKT 420. Prerequisite: MGMT 316,
MRKT 300. 3-0-3.
431 MANAGERIAL CONTROL PROCESSES 3 semester hours
Examines the use of responsibility centers, budgets, standards, feedback, and control
over the production process. Prerequisite: MGMT 316. 3-0-3.
435 MANAGERIAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 3 semester hours
Emphasis on corporate, intercultural, and crisis communication; team presentations;
technical writing and editing; presentation software; and public relations. Prerequisite:
Business Administration 325. 3-0-3.
450 LEADERSHIP 3 semester hours
Includes the definition, traits, and segmentations of leadership. Investigates character as
a foundation and similar leadership traits. Mistakes that leaders make and new demands
on future leaders are analyzed through group evaluations and discussions of currents
and historic leaders. Prerequisites: MGMT 316. 3-0-3.
485 TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
A specialized study of various managerial developments. Topics will vary from semester
to semester. Students will be allowed to take the course more than once. Prerequisite:
MGMT 316. 3-0-3.
MARKETING (MRKT)
300 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3 semester hours
A comprehensive analysis of the marketing system and the marketing process. 3-0-3.
302 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 3 semester hours
Concepts methods, and models used in understanding, explaining, and predicting
consumer motivation and behavior. This study includes the factors that influence the
decision to purchase a product or service to include both the consumer and industrial
sectors. 3-0-3, Prerequisite Marketing 300. 3-0-3.
304 ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION 3 semester hours
Detailed and systematic review of marketing communications and use of mass media to
include promotional activities, policy formulation, agency selection, control systems,
and a survey of the American advertising system. Prerequisite Marketing 300. 3-0-3.
402 RETAIL MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Analysis of the marketing activities involved in the sale of products and/or services to
the ultimate consumer for personal or household consumption with the main emphasis
on the management of store retailing. Prerequisite Marketing 300. 3-0-3.
Broyhill School of Management/246
404 SALES MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Direct and personal selling, salesmanship, and sales force management. The study
includes sales persuasion skills, theories, and simulation selling situations. Prerequisite:
Marketing 300. 3-0-3.
406 MARKETING CHANNEL MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Identification, selection, and management of marketing channels and their modification
to improve efficiency and profits. Prerequisite: Marketing 300. 3-0-3.
408 INDUSTRIAL MARKETING 3 semester hours
Application of market structure, product design, pricing strategy, logistics, promotion,
and buying behavior models to industrial and governmental markets in the context of
political, economic, technological, and ethical environments. Prerequisites: Marketing
300. 3-0-3.
410 MARKETING RESEARCH 3 semester hours
Methods for collecting and analyzing data to solve marketing problems. Topics include
research design, primary and secondary data collection, sample design, data analysis,
and marketing management applications. Qualitative, survey, and experimental research
techniques are covered. Prerequisites: Business Administration 304 or equivalent,
Marketing 300, or permission of the instructor. 3-0-3.
420 MARKETING MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
Capstone course in marketing that addresses marketing research, forecasting, and
strategic decision-making. Prerequisites: Marketing 300 and three 400-level marketing
courses. Cross-listed as Management 316. 3-0-3.
466 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING 3 semester hours
Explores the cultural, marketing, management, and environmental factors of the
multinational organization. Case analysis is utilized with emphasis directed toward
problem resolution. Prerequisite: Marketing 300. 3-0-3.
Gardner-Webb University/247
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
(NCATE) Approved by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
(NCDPI)
FACULTY
Dean: Professor D. Eury
Licensing Officer: Assistant Professor S. Ingle
Chair of Elementary Education: S. Ingle
Chair of Middle Grades Education: K. Taylor
Chair of Educational Leadership: D. Shellman
Director of Continuous Improvement: S. Ingle
Center for Innovative Leadership Development: D. Eury
Director of Elementary Education Student Teaching: S. Ingle
Director of Middle Grades and Secondary Education, Student Teaching: K. Taylor
Professors: J. Kaufold, L. McKinney, R. Nanney
Associate Professors: S. Brown, R. Mayfield, F. Rucker, D. Shellman, C. Smith,
G. Stowe, L. Wesson
Assistant Professors: J. King, A. Sanders
Instructors: D. Robertson, K. Taylor
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the School of Education is to facilitate within a Christian context
undergraduate and graduate candidates’ development of the knowledge, skills, and
dispositions needed in order to assume instructional and leadership roles in our
nation’s schools to ensure the success of all students.
GOALS
The School of Education strives to accomplish its mission through its
commitment to:
1. preparing undergraduate and graduate candidates for professional roles
and responsibilities within school settings;
2. providing rigorous programs of study which will facilitate reflective
practice within a learning environment based upon Christian principles
and values;
3. hiring faculty who fill the role of caring, patient mentors while they
model life-long learning that reflects inquiry- and problem-based decisionmaking; and
4. fostering partnerships with and providing service to public schools and
other organizations through collaborative activities such as consultation,
research, and staff development.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Student learning outcomes specific to each major offered by the school are
described in the appropriate sections that follow.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The school offers two majors leading to the Bachelor of Science degree:
Elementary Education
Middle Grades Education
MINOR FIELD OF STUDY
Professional Education
School of Education/248
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF TEACHER PREPARATION
The Professional Education Program has articulated its model for the preparation
of teachers as that of the educator as theorist & practitioner resting upon a
knowledge base that is organized around four unifying threads: the learner and
learning, social context, methodology, and professional development. The courses
offered in the Teacher Education Program are designed to foster in candidates:
1. knowledge of and skills in the subject matter in the area of specialization;
2. the ability to use the scientific method;
3. attitudes and skills to excite learners’ interest in and involvement with
subject matter;
4. knowledge of the nature of the learner and the learning process;
5. knowledge of the role of the school in a democratic society;
6. knowledge of the philosophical, social, historical, and legal contexts in
which professional educators operate;
7. knowledge of various teaching strategies, materials, instructional
technologies, and methods of classroom organization;
8. knowledge and skills to maintain a classroom environment conducive to
learning;
9. knowledge of various learning styles and the skills to vary instruction to
meet learner needs;
10. knowledge of elements of cultural diversity and their influence upon the
learner;
11. the skills to evaluate learning;
12. the skills to locate and integrate classic and contemporary scholarship
pertaining to student achievement and teacher effectiveness;
13. the ability to use effective communication skills in classroom interaction
and in consultative and collaborative relationships;
14. an understanding of the impact of family dynamics on learning
readiness;
15. knowledge of the nature of a range of exceptionalities and the skills to
begin to design and deliver appropriate instruction; and
16. an understanding of the necessity for life-long professional learning.
TEACHER EDUCATION COMMITTEE
This committee develops and implements policy, approves curricula, and
evaluates programs for the undergraduate and graduate education programs. It is
composed of faculty members from each school and department offering programs
leading to licensure, student representatives, and public school personnel.
ADMISSION TO THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
To be admitted to the Teacher Education Program, the undergraduate degree
seeking candidate must meet the following requirements:
1. File a declaration of intent to major in an area of licensure with the
Academic Advising Center.
2. Complete a minimum of 30 cumulative semester hours, with at least 12
hours earned at Gardner-Webb.
3. Complete the Application for Admission to Teacher Education.
Applications are due the first Monday in October and the first
Monday in March. (See calendar dates listed on course schedule).
4. Have a minimum 2.50 cumulative grade point average on all college or
university work.
Gardner-Webb University/249
5. Complete EDUC 250 with a grade of C or better (a C- is not acceptable).
The Teacher Education Handbook provides specific guidelines for the
pre-service candidate.
6. Obtain the minimum scores currently required by State Board of
Education on the PRAXIS I examinations or the SAT/ACT equivalents.
These scores are subject to change by the State Board of Education.
Applicants must satisfy the score requirements in effect at the
time of Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
7. Must complete MATH 204 with a “C” or better.
8. Successfully complete the Teacher Education Program Interview.
THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER
Before beginning the professional semester (which includes the 15-week student
teaching experience), the candidate must meet the following requirements:
1. Submit a completed Application for Student Teaching on or before
February 15 for teaching in a fall semester and on or before September 15
for teaching the spring semester. (See calendar dates listed on course
schedule).
2. Maintain a 2.50 cumulative grade point average.
3. Maintain a grade of C (2.0) or better (a C- is not acceptable) in all
professional education courses.
4. Complete all requirements for the selected major. Any exceptions must
be approved by the Dean of the School of Education. These requirements
are described under the appropriate department listing.
Beginning in the fall, 2003, State Board of Education policy mandates that an
undergraduate teacher education candidate be admitted into the teacher education
program at least one full semester prior to the semester in which he/she is planning
to student teach. If a candidate plans to student teach during the spring semester,
he/she must be admitted prior to the end of the previous spring semester. If a
candidate plans to student teach during the fall semester, he/she must be admitted
prior to the end of the previous fall semester. There will be no exceptions to this
policy.
STUDENT TEACHING AND RELATED FIELD EXPERIENCES
Student teaching assignments and various field experiences required throughout
the Teacher Education Program are made by the Director of Field Experiences and
Student Teaching in public schools within commuting distance from the University.
Transportation to these sites is the responsibility of the candidate.
COMPLETION OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Successful completion of the basic course and licensure requirements, all major
requirements and the Professional Education Minor, including the professional
semester, will qualify candidates for licensure in North Carolina and many other
states.
NORTH CAROLINA LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS
To be recommended for Standard Professional 1 (SP1) licensure in the state of
North Carolina, a candidate must meet the following requirements:
1. Complete an approved program of study.
2. Obtain minimum scores on the PRAXIS II Subject Assessment, if applicable.
3. Submit the completed application for licensure to the School of Education.
4. Provide official transcripts for all college and university work completed
at other institutions to the office of School of Education.
5. Remit the processing fee required by the State of North Carolina at the
time of application.
School of Education/250
LICENSURE ONLY CANDIDATES
Individuals who hold a baccalaureate degree and wish to obtain a North Carolina
Standard Professional 1 license may apply for admission to the approved program
for teacher licensure. The candidate must meet entrance and exit requirements
comparable to those required of a degree-seeking candidate in the approved
program. A minimum of 21 hours must be taken at Gardner-Webb University to be
recommended for licensure by the institution.
STUDENT APPEALS
Students not meeting requirements for admission to teacher education and/or the
professional semester (student teaching) may appeal to the Teacher Education
Committee for acceptance or continuation in the program. The process for appeal
is outlined in the Teacher Education Committee Policy Manual.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
All teacher candidates, regardless of the area of licensure, must have a
TaskStream account beginning with their first education course EDUC 250,
Teaching in 21st Century School. The fee for the first year of TaskStream will be
charged to EDUC 250. For subsequent years teacher candidates must renew their
own accounts through graduation. Teacher candidates will also be charged for two
background checks. The first will be in EDUC 250, Teaching in 21st Century
Schools, and the second will be in EDUC 450, Student Teaching.
All course work in both the education majors (middle and elementary) and in the
education minor must have a grade of “C” or better (“C-” is not acceptable).
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (31 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate from the Elementary Education program will
demonstrate proficiency in the North Carolina Professional Teaching
Standards (NCPTS) as follows:
1. Teachers demonstrate leadership.
2. Teachers establish a respectful environment for a diverse
population of students.
3. Teachers know the content they teach.
4. Teachers facilitate learning for their students.
5. Teachers reflect on their practice.
Proficiencies will be met as students exhibit competency in the
following areas:
1. knowledge across all content areas included in the breadth of
the Gardner-Webb core curriculum and enhanced by the
specialty area of the curriculum. The beginning teacher will
be broadly and liberally educated and have full command of
the content that that he or she will teach (NCPTS III);
2. knowledge of characteristics of developmental stages of
children ages 5-12 (NCPTS IV);
3. understanding of the unique learning characteristics of
children from diverse populations including socioeconomic,
linguistic, and cultural backgrounds as well as adapting for the
needs of exceptional students (NCPTS II);
4. the ability to plan, adapt, reflect on curriculum theory, and
teaching strategies to meet the needs of the K-6 learner
(NCPTS III, IV, and V);
5. the ability to organize classroom environments conducive to
facilitating and stimulating the life-long intellectual growth of
all children (NCPTS IV);
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6. interpersonal skills for the purpose of establishing effective
communication in the classroom, in the school, between the
home and school, and among the school community
(NCPTS I, V);
7. the ability to effectively assess and evaluate student learning
and to use results to establish an effective instructional
program (NCPTS IV, V);
8. understanding of the teacher’s role as a change agent and the
relevance of current issues related to teaching as a profession
and to schooling in a complex society (NCPTS I, II, IV);
9. knowledge about schools, teaching, and children that
increases through carefully planned and supervised field experiences
(NCPTS II, IV); and
10. a commitment to service within the school and global
community (NCPTS I, V).
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
EDUC 302 Literacy Foundations
EDUC 306 Literacy and the Language Arts for K-8
EDUC 311 Fine Arts Integration in 21st Century Schools
EDUC 312 Practicum in Literacy
EDUC 410 Introduction to Integrated Curriculum and Assessment
MATH 204 Math Content for Elementary Teachers
MAED 330 Math Methods in 21st Century Schools
PHED 300 Healthful Living for Elementary Education
SCED 330 Science Methods in 21st Century Schools
SSED 307 Social Studies Methods in 21st Century
Additional requirements for NC licensure (may be taken as part of the
basic core requirements): ARTS 225, BIOL 111, CHEM 103 or PHYS 103,
GEOL 105, HIST 245, MATH 105, MUSC 225, POLS 202, one American
Literature, and one British or World Literature course. (CHEM 111 and POLS
304 are acceptable substitutions for licensure requirements.)
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor.
The North Carolina State Board of Education has adopted new teacher
standards and required all teacher education programs to be revisioned. All
candidates starting their teacher education program with EDUC 250 in the fall
of 2010 must complete the new program regardless of the catalogue under
which they entered Gardner-Webb University. Candidates who are already in
teacher education can choose to complete the current program or the new
program.
It is recommended that teacher candidates take the following courses
the semester before student teaching: EDUC 435, EDUC 350, and MAED 330.
All other methods courses (except MAED 330) should be taken before or
concurrently with EDUC 410.
MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION (42-50 HOURS)
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate from the Middle Grades Education program will
demonstrate proficiency in the North Carolina Professional Teaching
Standards (NCPTS) as follows:
1. Teachers demonstrate leadership.
2. Teachers establish a respectful environment for a diverse
population of students.
3. Teachers know the content they teach.
4. Teachers facilitate learning for their students.
5. Teachers reflect on their practice.
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Proficiencies will be met as students exhibit competency in the following
areas:
1. knowledge across all content areas included in the breadth of
the Gardner-Webb core curriculum and enhanced by the
specialty area of the curriculum. The beginning teacher will be
broadly and liberally educated and have full command of the
content that that he or she will teach (NCPTS III);
2. knowledge, skills and dispositions needed to assume the role of
teacher as theorist and practitioner, as outlined in the teacher
education program’s conceptual model and in adopted state
and national standards;
3. knowledge of the characteristics of young adolescents in
contemporary society and the impacts these have on
curriculum and instruction and the ability to develop
developmentally and cognitively responsive learning models (NCPTS IV);
4. knowledge of a specialty area supported by a liberal arts
education in one of the following areas language arts,
mathematics, social studies and science (NCPTS III);
5. knowledge of the concept of developmentally responsive
models of middle level schooling (NCPTS IV);
6. knowledge of the unique learning characteristics of young
adolescents from diverse populations including socioeconomic,
linguistic, and cultural backgrounds as well as adapting for the
needs of exceptional students and the knowledge to create
responsive learning environments (NCPTS II);
7. interpersonal skills for the purpose of establishing effective
communication in the classroom, in the school, between the
home and school and among the school community (NCPTS I,V);
8. understanding of the teacher’s role as a change agent in middle
schools and the relevance of current issues related to teaching as
a profession and to schooling in a complex society and
understanding the need for life-long professional growth (NCPTS
I, II, IV, V);
9. knowledge about schools, teaching, and children that increases
through carefully planned and supervised field experiences
(NCPTS II, IV, V); and
10. a commitment to service within the school and global
community (NCPTS I,V).
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Basic Course requirements must be satisfied. The candidate will not be
permitted to complete more than 50% of the major until formally admitted into
the Teacher Education Program. The student must choose one area of
specialization (two are recommended)
SPECIALTY AREAS:
LANGUAGE ARTS (26 HOURS)
ENGL 211 or 212 British Literature (3 hours)
ENGL 231 or 232 American Literature (3 hours)
ENGL 251 Foundations of World Literature (3 hours)
EDUC 306 Literacy and Language Arts for K-8 (4 hours)
ENGL 363 Structure of the English Language (3 hours)
ENGL 391 Workshop in English 1 (1 hour) (must be taken concurrently
with EDUC 316)
ENGL 483 The Teaching of Writing (3 hours)
Literature Electives (6 hours)
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MATHEMATICS (29 HOURS)
MATH 105 Elementary Probability & Statistics (3 hours)
MATH 110 Finite Mathematics (3 hours)
MATH 150 Pre-Calculus (3 hours)
MATH 151 Calculus (4 hours)
MATH 204 Fundamental Concepts of Math (3 hours)
MATH 331 Linear Algebra (3 hours)
MAED 330 Methods of Teaching Math (3 hours)
MATH 230 Foundations of Higher Math (3 hours)
MATH 445 (1 hour)
MATH Elective (3 hours)
SOCIAL STUDIES (27 HOURS)
HIST 245 The American Century (3 hours)
HIST 332 Twentieth Century Europe (3 hours)
HIST 345 NC History (3 hours)
Non-Western History (e.g. POLS 351) (3 hours)
SSCI 205 Global Understanding (3 hours)
POLS 311 Comparative Politics (3 hours)
ECON 203 Econ & Free Market System (3 hours)
SSED 307 Social Studies Methods (3 hours)
SSED 310 Teaching Geography (3 hours)
Elective (3 hours) - Any Social Science department elective
SCIENCE (30-31 HOURS)
BIOL 111 General Biology (4 hours)
BIOL 104 Environment (4 hours)
CHEM 103 Introductory Chemistry (4 hours)
GEOL 105 Oceanography & Meteorology (4 hours)
PHYS 103 Introductory Physics (4 hours)
PHYS 104 Astronomy (4 hours)
SCED 330 Science Methods (3 hours)
Science Elective (3-4 hours) Any Natural Science
Department elective, however, BIOL 101 Human Biology is
recommended.
The candidate must also complete the Professional Education minor.
The North Carolina State Board of Education has adopted new teacher
standards and required all teacher education programs to be revisioned. All
candidates starting their teacher education program with EDUC 250 in the fall of
2010 must complete the new program regardless of the catalogue under which
they entered Gardner-Webb University. Candidates who are already in teacher
education can choose to complete the current program or the new program.
MINOR FIELD OF STUDY DETAIL
*The education minor can only be used in conjunction with majors in
which there are approved licensure programs.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION MINOR
For Elementary Education majors the following courses are required:
EDUC 250 – Teaching in the 21st Century
EDUC 350 – Diverse Populations in 21st Century Schools
EDUC 435 – Facilitating Learning in 21st Century Schools
EDUC 450 – Student Teaching
PSYC 303 – Educational Psychology
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For Middle Grades Education majors the following courses are required:
EDUC 250 – Teaching in the 21st Century
EDUC 350 – Diverse Populations in 21st Century Schools
EDUC 436 – Facilitating Learning in 21st Century Middle Schools
EDUC 450 – Student Teaching
PSYC 303 – Educational Psychology
Literacy component required for all Middle Grades Candidates (12 hrs):
EDUC 303 Literacy for the Middle Grades Candidate (4 hrs.)
EDUC 316 Reading and Writing in the Content Areas (3 hrs.)
EDUC 410 Introduction to Curriculum Integration and Assessment
(3 hrs.)
ESOL 335 Practicum and Methods (2 hrs.)
Course requirements for this minor in the areas of English, Mathematics,
Social Studies and in the special subject areas (K-12) of Music, Physical
Education, French, Spanish, English as a Second Language and Art are described
in catalogue sections under the heading of each major. EDUC 440 Classroom
Management will be offered as part of the education minor for departments that
require it.
In all cases candidates will not be permitted to complete more than 50% of
the minor until they are formally admitted into the Teacher Education program.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All elementary education students transferring under the Comprehensive
Articulation Agreement must complete ENGL 231 or 232; ENGL 211, 212 or 251;
ARTS 225; MUSC 225; POLS 201 or 202; BIOL 111; CHEM 103 or PHYS 103;
GEOL 105; MATH 105; and HIST 245.
Equivalences exist within the community college curriculum for each of the
above courses. Careful planning prior to transfer can ensure that these licensure
requirements are met within the context of the A.A. degree.
All methods courses must be taken before or in conjunction with EDUC 410.
The only exception is MAED 330.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES (EDUC)
250 TEACHING IN THE 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS 4 semester hours
A course designed to be the candidates’ first course orienting them to education as a
profession, to Gardner-Webb University's School of Education, and to the North Carolina
Professional Teaching Standards (NCPTS) and the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and
Support Consortium (INTASC) standards. Experiences include a field experience with
classroom observations, exploration of a diverse range of topics, and guided research in
their intended teaching area particularly in relation to the North Carolina Standard Course
of Study. 3-1-4 (A fee for a TaskStream account and a background check will be charged
for this class. For subsequent years teacher candidates must renew their own TaskStream
accounts in order to keep them active until they graduate. This course is a prerequisite of
all other education courses and the teacher candidate is advised to take this course in the
second semester of his/her sophomore year.) (Fall/BS and S, Spring/BS)
302 LITERACY FOUNDATIONS 3 semester hours
This course is designed with emphasis on the literacy process as a fundamental aspect of
the 21st century school curriculum. The focus is on theory, literacy development and the
methods of teaching various literacy skills. Current research and practices will be
examined and evaluated. Each student will be required to observe the teaching of literacy
in the public school classroom. 3-1-3 (Fall) IL
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303 LITERACY FOR THE MIDDLE GRADES CANDIDATE 4 semester hours
This course is a study in communication skills. During this course reading, speaking,
writing, listening (or literacy) and various other types of modern technological media
will be examined. Emphasis will be on language, no matter the media or means used, as
a tool for learning. Therefore whether language is coming through books, computers,
Nooks, iPods, iTune, Internet, or orally through family members, the crux of this course
is to understand how language is central to the life of middle level students in grades 5
through 9. (A materials fee is charged for this course.)
306 LITERACY AND LANGUAGE ARTS FOR K-8 4 semester hours
This course is designed to assist elementary and middle candidates with an awareness of
the importance of literacy and language arts in the 21st century classroom. Candidates
will be immersed in literacy and reading instruction as they develop oral and
communication skills. Literacy and children’s literature will be interwoven to ensure
that all students achieve their full literacy potential. The overarching goal will be to
examine the relationship between language arts and children’s literature as the two
processes are integrated while promoting a lifelong interest in books. Emphasis will be
placed on many genre of literature that will support the curriculum and meet
established standards. Prerequisite: EDUC 302. 3-1-4
311 FINE ARTS INTEGRATION IN 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS 3 semester hours
This course is designed to assist candidates in understanding an approach to teaching in
which students construct and demonstrate knowledge of various content areas through
art, music, and drama. Candidates will engage in a creative process which connects the
various arts forms to other subject areas and meets objectives in all areas involved.
Methods for integrating the fine arts with the elementary curriculum will be developed,
modeled, studied, and practiced. Candidates will connect the arts to basic reading skills,
literacy, writing, mathematics, cognitive skills, motivation, and social behavior through
a series of lesson plans. 3-0-3
312 PRACTICUM IN LITERACY (K-6) 3 semester hours
A course designed to provide experiences for the pre-service teacher in the teaching of
literacy and diagnosing difficulties with literacy skills on the K-6 level. Emphasis is
placed on the causes of learning disabilities that affect literacy development and
achievement, diagnostic instruments, standard and informal assessment procedures,
report writing, and materials and methods of literacy instruction. Candidates will work
with individual students and small groups in the public school classroom. Prerequisite:
EDUC 302. 3-1-3 (A materials fee will be charged for this class.)
316 TEACHING READING AND WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS 3 semester hours
A course designed to give an overview of reading and writing development; to aid in
integrating content areas with reading and writing techniques; and to explore the
implications of research for teaching at the middle and secondary levels. Middle Grade
Language Arts Candidates are required to register for ENGL 391 while taking this
course. 3-0-3 (Spring) IL
350 DIVERSE POPULATIONS IN 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS
4 semester hours
A course designed to assist developing teacher candidates with the articulation and
recognition of positive learning environments for the wide variety of diverse students
present in 21st century schools. This diversity includes cultural, socio-economic,
environmental, social, physical, academic, behavioral, and linguistic individual
differences among students. Given these individual differences, candidates’ articulations
would include high expectations for individuals, understanding of various resources for
meeting individual needs (including the use of support specialists), and understanding
strategies for enhancing communication between and among home and school
environments. Prerequisite: EDUC 250 with grade of C or better. 3-1-4
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410 INTRODUCTION TO CURRICULUM INTEGRATION AND ASSESSMENT 3 semester hours
This course will focus on understanding the various models of curriculum integration and
their implementation through interdisciplinary instructional planning. Topics will include
understanding the relationship between content and various disciplines and the use of
multiple indicators, including formative and summative assessment, to evaluate student
progress and growth as they strive to eliminate achievement gaps. Prerequisite or Corequisite for Elementary Education: SSED 307, SCED 330, EDUC 306 and 312; for Middle
Grades Education: EDUC 303, 316, and by concentration; SSED 310 and 307; SCED 330:
EDUC 306; or MAED 330. 3-1-3
432 METHODS OF TEACHING SECONDARY 3 semester hours
A study of current methods and materials for approved subject areas in secondary school.
Emphasis will be placed on planning for instruction, the selection and implementation of
appropriate teaching models, instructional materials, instructional delivery, and
evaluation techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. A background
check fee will be charged to the class in preparation of student teaching. 3-1-3 (Fall,
Spring)
435 FACILITATING LEARNING IN 21ST CENTURY ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 4 semester hours
Elementary Education candidates will build on knowledge of individual student
development gained in EDUC 350 (Diverse Populations in 21st Century Schools),
candidates will apply that knowledge as they assess particular individual student needs,
and will collaboratively plan appropriate instruction to meet those needs. Within this
course, instruction and classroom management will be interwoven into every aspect of
teaching and learning. Instructional plans will include monitoring of student
performance, utilization of a variety of planning models, methods, and materials,
exposure to various aspects of management that will be encountered during instruction,
an integration of technology and instruction that leads to application of critical thinking
and problem solving skills. This course will also address preparation for the school year,
communicating with parents/guardians, creating rules and procedures, motivating
students to learn, and responding to inappropriate behavior. Course requirements: Taken
the semester before the student teaching semester and located in a partnership school.
Prerequisite: EDUC 350. A background check fee will be charged to the calss in
preparation of student teaching. 3-1-4
436 FACILITATING LEARNING IN 21ST CENTURY MIDDLE SCHOOLS 4 semester hours
Middle School Education will build on knowledge of individual student development
gained in EDUC 350 (Diverse Populations in 21st Century Schools), apply that knowledge
as they assess particular individual student needs, and collaboratively plan appropriate
instruction to meet those needs. Within this course, instruction and classroom
management will be interwoven into every aspect of teaching and learning. Instructional
plans will include monitoring of student performance, utilization of a variety of planning
models, methods, and materials, exposure to various aspects of management that will be
encountered during instruction, an integration of technology and instruction that leads to
application of critical thinking and problem solving skills. This course will also address
preparation for the school year, communicating with parents/guardians, creating rules
and procedures, motivating students to learn, and responding to inappropriate behavior.
Course requirements: Taken the semester before the student teaching semester and
located in a partnership school. Prerequisite: EDUC 316. A background check fee will be
charged to the class in preparation of student teaching. 3-1-4
440 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours
This course focuses on various strategies for establishing the types of classroom
conditions and student behavior that provide optimal learning environments. 3-1-3. (Fall)
Gardner-Webb University/257
450 STUDENT TEACHING 12 semester hours
A fifteen-week period of full-time supervised teaching at the appropriate level.
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education (Fall, Spring)
MAED 330 MATH METHODS IN 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS 3 semester hours
Methods of teaching mathematics in elementary and middle school classrooms are
explored. Emphasis will be placed on the planning, teaching, and assessing of
mathematics in authentic settings. Teacher candidates will work with small groups in a
public school setting. Prerequisite: MATH 204. 3-1-3
SCED 330 SCIENCE METHODS IN 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS 3 semester hours
Methods of teaching science (K-8) are explored, including the planning, teaching, and
evaluating of science in elementary and middle school classrooms. Using the inquiry
approach, students will relate content knowledge and understanding of the scientific
processes as they relate to real-world application. 3-0-3
SSED 307 SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS IN 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS 3 semester hours
A study of the content, resources and strategies in social studies education (K-8). This
course includes examination of methods for planning, teaching, and evaluating history,
geography, civics, and other social studies. 3-0-3 (Springs/BS and S)
SSED 310 TEACHING GEOGRAPHY 3 semester hours
This course will develop the skills and the knowledge of world regions necessary for
understanding and teaching geographic themes and concepts to young adolescents. The
course assumes that teacher candidates bring to the class limited experience in the
formal study of geography. 3-0-3. (Fall)
School of Nursing/258
SCHOOL OF NURSING
Accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission
(NLNAC). Approved by the North Carolina Board of Nursing.
FACULTY
Dean: Professor R. Beck-Little
Professors: J. Carlton, C. Miller
Assistant Professors: M.A. Hodge, R. Serafica, V. Walker, L. Wines
Instructors: T. Arnold, S. Creed-Hall, M. Eddings, S. Lane, C. Rome,
R. Schoenfeldt, N. Waters, K. Williams
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the School of Nursing is to enhance the health status of the
global community by preparing individuals to practice holistic and professional
nursing through the provision of student centered programs of study for a
diverse population of students that promotes academic excellence within a
Christian, private, liberal arts setting utilizing teamwork and community
engagement.
GOALS
1. Establish a liberal arts educational environment based on Christian values
fostering academic excellence, integrity, and a commitment to lifelong
learning.
2. Provide student-centered programs of study based on current national
competencies of nursing practice to meet the global health care needs of
individuals, groups and communities in which holistic nursing practice,
Christian caring, critical thinking, and professionalism are modeled.
3. Engage in partnerships with community health care facilities in the
provision of service learning opportunities for students that includes
patient-centered care, evidence based practice, and interdisciplinary
collaboration.
4. Graduate a diverse population of students who are prepared to practice
patient centered nursing care that is culturally competent, holistic and
professional within the context of a global environment in a manner that
influences nursing and health care policy and practice.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who graduate from the pre-licensure Nursing Programs will:
1. Assess, analyze/diagnose, plan, implement, and evaluate nursing care to
provide for the patient’s optimum level of wellness consistent with
his/her coping abilities, teaching needs, and capacity for self-care;
2. Utilize a hierarchy of needs theory as a framework for prioritizing
psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual needs and provide individualized
nursing care for patients in various stages of the lifespan;
3. Provide holistic nursing care characterized by critical thinking, clinical
competence, utilization of therapeutic interpersonal skills, and attention
to sociocultural forces, including technology, which impact health care,
and caring which is consistent with the Christian faith;
4. Communicate with patients, their families and/or significant others, and
other care providers in the planning and delivery of health services;
5. Manage nursing care for groups of patients with health care needs in
varied settings which include hospitals, extended care facilities, and
other community health care agencies;
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6. Practice nursing according to ethical and legal standards as a contributing
member within the discipline of nursing, and assume responsibility for
his/her own practice and self-development; and
7. Utilize informatics in the participation and application of evidenced
based research and quality improvement in daily nursing practice.
Graduates of the Associate Degree Nursing Program will:
1. Recognize the theoretical underpinnings of nursing practice and research.
2. Be prepared to continue their education to achieve Baccalaureate
education.
Graduates of the Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program will:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of leadership theory and practice.
2. Utilize research methodology in the provision of evidence-based practice to
individuals, families, and populations in a variety of settings.
3. Establish partnerships with interdisciplinary teams to meet health needs of
clients in a diverse society.
4. Employ knowledge of the political system in providing direct and indirect
care to clients.
5. Apply theoretical underpinnings to nursing practice and research.
6. Be prepared to continue their education to achieve graduate education.
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY
The school offers two programs of study preparing students for licensure as a
Registered Nurse:
The Associate of Science in Nursing (ADN)
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)
MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
None offered
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
ADMISSIONS CRITERIA
The best qualified applicants are selected from those who apply to the School
of Nursing. Waiting lists for acceptance are established as necessary. The School
of Nursing Admissions Committee considers academic performance, courses
completed, and other factors in determining qualified applicants. Minimum
criteria for full admission to the ADN and BSN programs are:
• Minimum high school/transfer GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale
• Minimum SAT score of 1050 (with at least 500 in Critical Reading and 500
Math) OR
• Minimum ACT score of 22 (with at least 21 in English, 18 in Math and 20 in
Reading) OR
• Minimum TEAS score of 67 in all areas.
• CNA I - Must be completed before fall enrollment in nursing courses.
• Minimum grade of “C” (2.00) in high school or college Biology, Chemistry
and Algebra. These grades must be reflected in the transcripts you provide
with your application.
• Satisfactory Criminal Background History results for all states of residence
for the past five years.
In addition, the following criteria must be met before beginning nursing
courses:
• Satisfactory physical and mental health, immunizations required by the
University and Hepatitis B, Varicella (Chicken Pox) titer showing immunity
or documentation of Varicella immunization and Tuberculin test (PPD)
School of Nursing/260
• Any allegations or charges of a misdemeanor or felony that
occur after the Criminal Background History results have been submitted
must be reported to the School of Nursing immediately. Clinical sites have
the right to deny a student’s access based on criminal background. This
denial would result in the student’s inability to successfully complete the
nursing program.
• Satisfactory drug screening. This is a requirement for the healthcare facilities
where students complete the clinical components of the nursing program.
Clinical sites have the right to deny a student’s access based on a drug
screening.
• CPR certification.
Students transferring in any required courses are required to meet all of the
admission criteria in regard to standardized test scores and must also have a
GPA of at least a 3.0 on all previously taken college-level course work (subject
to Gardner-Webb’s transfer credit policy).
Priority admission for current Nursing Intended students enrolled at GardnerWebb University is at the discretion of the Admission Committee and based on
meeting full admission criteria and completion of recommended general
education courses. Progression criteria for currently enrolled students in the
School of Nursing are listed in the Pre-licensure Handbook.
Eligibility for licensure as a registered nurse includes clinical, mental, and
physical competence and freedom from conviction of felonious or other
serious legal acts, including substance abuse, as outlined in the North Carolina
Nursing Practice Act 2007. Note: all states have similar stipulations.
Students enrolled at Gardner-Webb University who wish to enroll in the
nursing program must apply through the Admissions Office.
Students who wish to be readmitted to the program must reapply through the
Admissions Office. Students must have a minimum 2.8 grade point average to
be considered for readmission into the pre-licensure programs.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING COURSE REQUIREMENTS
(128-133 SEMESTER HOURS)
BASIC CORE COURSE REQUIREMENTS (64-70 Depending on student’s
entering foreign language competency):
• General Education Core requirements for BSN must be satisfied.
• ENGL 101 and 102 are prerequisites to all major courses.
• A grade of “C” (2.00) or better is required for BIOL 105, 203, and 204
TEN ADDITIONAL HOURS:
• BIOL 105
• PSYC 201
• PSYC 206
NURSING CORE COURSES (63 SEMESTER HOURS)
• NURS 239 Nursing Assessment (2 SH)
• NURS 240 Nursing Assessment Lab (1 SH)
• NURS 261 Intro to Nursing (4 SH)
• NURS 262 Intro to Nursing Lab (1 SH)
• NURS 263 Intro to Nursing Practicum (1 SH)
• NURS 300 Concepts in Professional Nursing (3 SH)
• NURS 307 Communication Skills in Nursing (3SH) (fulfills the 3 SH
Oral Communication General Education Core Requirement)
• NURS 339 Pharmacology in Nursing Practice (2 SH)
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• NURS 340 Nutrition in Nursing Practice (2 SH)
• NURS 341 Adult Health I (6 SH)
• NURS 342 Adult Health I Lab (1 SH)
• NURS 343 Adult Health I Practicum (2 SH)
• NURS 361 Maternal/Child Nursing (6 SH)
• NURS 362 Maternal/Child Nursing Lab (1 SH)
• NURS 363 Maternal/Child Nursing Practicum (2 SH)
• NURS 441 Nursing Care of the Older Adult (3 SH)
• NURS 442 Nursing Trends and Issues (3 SH)
• NURS 443 Essentials of Public Health and Community Nursing (3 SH)
• NURS 444 Public Health and Community Nursing Practicum (1 SH)
• NURS 460 Essentials of Nursing Management/Leadership (3 SH)
• NURS 461 Adult Health II (6 SH)
• NURS 462 Adult Health II Lab (1 SH)
• NURS 463 Adult Health II Practicum (3 SH)
• NURS 470 Research for Evidence-Based Practice (3 SH)
ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING COURSE REQUIREMENTS
(72 SEMESTER HOURS)
BASIC CORE COURSE REQUIREMENTS (29 SEMESTER HOURS)
BIOL 105, 203 and 204 (12 SH)
PSYC 201 and 206 (6 SH)
ENGL 101 and 102 (6 SH)
RELI 101 or 102 (3 SH)
Any PHED activity course (1 SH)
DIMENSIONS (1 SH)
MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (43 SEMESTER HOURS)
NURS 106 Fundamental Concepts in Nursing (5 SH)
NURS 107 Fundamental Concepts Experiential Lab (1 SH)
NURS 108 Application of Fundamental Concepts (1 SH)
NURS 109 Basic Concepts in Health Assessment (2 SH)
NURS 110 Health Assessment Experiential Lab (1 SH)
NURS 114 Basic Concepts in Clinical Nursing (7 SH)
NURS 115 Basic Concepts Experiential Lab (1 SH)
NURS 116 Application of Basic Concepts (2 SH)
NURS 206 Nursing Concepts for Childbearing families (7 SH)
NURS 207 Childbearing families Experiential Lab (1 SH)
NURS 208 Application of Nursing for Childbearing families (2 SH)
NURS 209 Advanced Concepts in Clinical Nursing (6 SH)
NURS 210 Advanced Concepts Experiential Lab (1 SH)
NURS 211 Application of Advanced Concepts (3 SH)
NURS 290 Associate Degree Nursing Practice in Contemporary Society
(3 SH)
Enrollment in a pre-licensure program (ADN or BSN) requires a minimum grade
of “C” (2.00) in each nursing and science course for progression in the program.
No more than one nursing or one science course may be repeated. A second
grade of less than a “C” (2.00) in any nursing or science course will result in
dismissal from the respective program.
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ADVANCED PLACEMENT FOR THE ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING PROGRAM
Eligibility for advanced placement into the Associate degree nursing program
(ADN) for licensed practical nurses (LPN) includes the following:
• Current unrestricted LPN license
• Admission to Gardner-Webb University and application to the SON
• Transfer courses leading to licensure as a Practical Nurse
• Successful Completion of Human Anatomy & Physiology I (BIO 203),
General Psychology (PSY 201), Basic Concepts of Health Assessment
(NUR 109) and Health Assessment Experiential Lab (NUR 110)
• Cumulative GPA of 3.0 on all transfer courses
All Licensed Practical Nurses who meet these requirements may be accepted
into the second semester of the ADN program based on available space. The
course of study will begin with the regular nursing sequence of courses
scheduled for a second semester first year ADN student.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES (NURS)
ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING COURSES
106 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF NURSING 5 semester hours
A foundational course which introduces basic nursing concepts related to client centered
needs. Various topics such as caring, cultural competence, pharmacology and nutrition
are addressed to provide the student with a beginning foundation for practicing nursing.
An online module is incorporated to include various psychosocial concepts such as
communication and grieving, The role of the associate degree nurse as an interdisciplinary
team member and provider of care is examined. Concepts based on evidenced-based
practice and informatics fundamental to beginning nursing skills and clinical practice are
introduced. Co-requisites: NURS 107, 108, 109, 110; Pre- or Co-requisites BIOL 203, PSYC
201. 5-0-5.
107 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS EXPERIENTIAL LAB 1 semester hour
Evidenced-based practice provides the foundation to learn beginning level clinical nursing
skills used in providing client centered care for adult clients. Clinical nursing skills are
performed in a laboratory setting utilizing didactic and clinical simulation with faculty.
Fundamental nursing concepts such as cultural competence, quality improvement and use
of technology are incorporated into clinical simulations and performance of clinical
nursing skills. Co-requisites: NUR 106,108,109,110; Pre- or Co-requisites BIOL 203; PSY
201. 0-3-1.
108 APPLICATION OF FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS 1 semester hour
Concentration is on the clinical application of fundamental concepts and fundamental
clinical nursing skills for adult clients. Clinical skills are applied in an acute care setting
under the supervision of a clinical faculty member. Fundamental concepts applied during
the clinical experience include safety, nutrition, pharmacology, evidenced based practice,
informatics, client centered care, interdisciplinary teamwork, and role of the associate
degree nurse. Co-requisites: NURS 106, 107,109 110; Pre- or Co-requisites BIOL 203; PSYC
201. 0-3-1.
109 BASIC CONCEPTS OF HEALTH ASSESSMENT 2 semester hours
Provides theory for performing health assessment on healthy individuals across the adult
life span, utilizing the nursing process, adult growth and development theories, culturally
competent, client centered care and roles of the associate degree nurse. The student
assimilates knowledge for the development of beginning skills necessary for proficiency in
obtaining a client history and comprehensive assessment. Co-requisites: NURS 106, 107,
108, 110; Pre- or Co-requisites BIOL 203; PSYC 201. 2-0-2.
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110 HEALTH ASSESSMENT EXPERIENTIAL LAB 1 semester hour
Course concentration is in the development and practice of skills in health assessment.
Students perform health assessment techniques on healthy individuals across the adult
life span, utilizing the nursing process, adult growth and development theories, and
roles of the associate degree nurse. The student demonstrates beginning skills necessary
for proficiency in obtaining a client history and comprehensive assessment utilizing a
culturally competent, client centered approach. Co-requisites: NURS 106, 107, 108, 109;
Pre- or Co-requisites BIOL 203; PSYC 201. 0-3-1.
114 BASIC CONCEPTS IN CLINICAL NURSING 7 semester hours
This course provides a study of essential concepts in nursing with a focus on health care
needs of adults with problems related to homeostasis, comfort, mobility, inflammation,
elimination and cellular regulation. Mental health concepts and psychotherapeutic
modalities are a major emphasis with an online module that incorporates a focus on
pharmacology. Prerequisites: NURS 106, 107, 108; BIOL 203; PSYC 201. Pre- or corequisites: NURS 109, NURS 110, 115, 116; BIOL 204; PSYC 206. 7-0-7.
115 BASIC CONCEPTS EXPERIENTIAL LAB 1 semester hour
This course focuses on skill development related to intravenous therapy, blood
transfusions, community mental health, psychotherapeutic modalities, and therapeutic
communication. Clinical skills are applied in a laboratory setting utilizing simulation with
faculty. Continuing emphasis is placed on the knowledge base of client centered care
provided by the associate degree nurse. Prerequisites: NURS 106, 107,108; BIOL 203;
PSYC 201. Pre- or co-requisites: NURS 109, 110, 114, 116; BIOL 204; PSYC 206. 0-3-1.
116 APPLICATION OF BASIC CONCEPTS 2 semester hours
This course offers a clinical focus on adult clients experiencing physical and
psychosocial dysfunctions. Continuing emphasis is placed on evidenced based practice,
client centered care, utilization of informatics, and the role of the associate degree nurse
as member of an interdisciplinary team. Prerequisites: NURS 106, 107, 108; BIOL 203;
PSYC 201. Pre- or Co-requisites: NURS 109, 110, 114, 115; BIOL 204; PSYC 206. 0-6-2.
206 NURSING CONCEPTS FOR CHILDBEARING FAMILIES 7 semester hours
This course provides a study of the nursing concepts that focus on the childbearing
family. Specific course concepts include human growth and development from
conception through childbearing, nutrition and pharmacology, health promotion and
maintenance, evidenced based practice, and alterations in health. An online module is
incorporated which emphasizes childhood and adolescent mental health issues. Prerequisites: NURS 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 114, 115, 116; BIOL 203, 204; PSYC 201, 206.
Co-requisites: NURS 207, 208; BIOL 105. 7-0-7.
207 CHILDBEARING FAMILIES EXPERIENTIAL LAB 1 semester hour
Course concentration is on the simulated application of nursing theory addressing care
of the childbearing family. Clinical skills are applied in a laboratory setting utilizing
simulation with faculty. Specific techniques utilized during the simulation include
demonstration of clinical skills, pharmacology, problem-solving, prioritization,
delegation, and communication with an interdisciplinary team. Prerequisites: NURS 106,
107, 108, 109, 110, 114, 115, 116; BIOL 203, 204; PSYC 201, 206. Co-requisites: NURS
206, 208; BIOL 105. 0-3-1.
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208 APPLICATION OF NURSING FOR CHILDBEARING FAMILIES 2 semester hours
This course offers a clinical focus on nursing care of the childbearing family. Clinical
skills are applied to the care of children and childbearing families in a variety of
community and acute care settings. Course concepts include human growth and
development, nutrition and pharmacology, health promotion and maintenance,
evidenced based practice, client centered care, and alterations in health from
conception to childbearing. Pre-requisites: NURS 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 114, 115, 116;
BIOL 203, 204; PSYC 201, 206. Co-requisites: NURS 206, 207; BIOL 105. 0-6-2.
209 ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN CLINICAL NURSING 6 semester hours
A study of advanced concepts addressing complex and multi-system health needs of
adults. Course activities prepare the student to critically appraise and apply previous
nursing knowledge related to cultural competence, evidenced based practice, client
centered care, informatics and skills in the management of care for a group of clients
with complex health problems utilizing an interdisciplinary team approach. Prerequisites: All BIOL and PSYC courses; NURS 106, 107, 108, 109,110, 114,115, 116, 206,
207, and 208. Co-requisites: NURS 210, 211, 290. 6-0-6.
210 ADVANCED CONCEPTS EXPERIENTIAL LAB 1 semester hour
Course concentration is on the assimilation of previous knowledge addressing complex
and multi-system health needs of adults. Clinical skills are applied in a laboratory setting
utilizing clinical simulation with faculty. Specific techniques utilized during the
simulation include demonstration of clinical skills, pharmacology, problem-solving,
prioritization, delegation, and communication with an interdisciplinary team.
Prerequisites: All BIO and PSYC courses; NURS 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 114, 115, 116,
206, 207, and 208. Co-requisites: NURS 209, 211, 290. Pre- or co-requisites: All other
general education courses and Dimensions. 0-3-1.
211 APPLICATION OF ADVANCED CONCEPTS 3 semester hours
This course focuses on the clinical application of nursing theory addressing complex
and multi-system health needs of adults. Clinical skills are applied in an acute care
setting with an RN utilizing a clinical preceptorship. Specific principles applied during
the clinical experience include client centered care, cultural competence, evidenced
based practice, informatics, interdisciplinary teamwork, management, prioritization and
delegation. Pre-requisites: All BIO and PSYC courses; NURS 106, 107, 108, 109, 110,
114, 115, 116, 206, 207, and 208. Co-requisites: NURS 209, 210, 290. Pre or corequisites: All other general education courses and Dimensions. 0-9-3.
290 ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING PRACTICE IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY
3 semester hours
A study of major trends and issues, organizations, ethical, and sociopolitical influences,
opportunities, and responsibilities related to health care, the discipline of nursing and
the practice of nursing by the associate degree graduate. Pre-requisites: All required BIO
and PSYC courses; NURS 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 114, 115, 116, 206, 207, and 208. Corequisites: NURS 209, 210, 211. Pre- or co-requisites: All other general education courses
and Dimensions. 3-0-3.
295 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NURSING 1-3 semester hours
This elective course focuses on various subjects related to pre-licensure nursing.
Possible topics include transition to nursing practice, delegation, leadership, and clinical
competence. Students may participate in discussions and readings to promote critical
thinking or study a specialized clinical area in nursing. This course may be one to three
credits depending on the content and course requirements. Pre-requisites NURS 106,
107, 108, 109, 110, 114, 115, 116. Pre- or co-requisites: All other general education
courses and Dimensions. 1-3 SH.
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BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN NURSING COURSES (NURS)
NURS 239 NURSING ASSESSMENT 2 Semester Hours
This course focuses on the skills needed to perform a physical and psychosocial
assessment of individuals. An emphasis in the course is on the collection of subjective
and objective client data utilizing therapeutic communication techniques and
documentation. The use of culturally competent care and evidenced based practice are
integrated throughout the course. Prerequisites: BIOL 203; Pre- or Co-requisites: BIOL
204; Co-requisite: NURS 240 (2-0-2)
NURS 240 NURSING ASSESSMENT LAB 1 Semester Hour
This course provides the student with the opportunity to apply health assessment skills
in a laboratory setting. Students practice and demonstrate communication and health
assessment skills that are necessary for the development of an individualized plan of care.
Prerequisites: BIOL 203; Pre- or Co-requisites: BIOL 204; Co-requisites NURS 239 (0-3-1)
NURS 261 INTRODUCTION TO NURSING 4 Semester Hours
This course provides a beginning foundation for the practice of nursing. Students will
integrate concepts from the sciences, liberal arts and nursing theory. Emphasis is on
beginning nursing knowledge, caring, competence and communication for the
professional nurse. The application of the nursing process necessary to provide care for
adults within a cultural, legal and ethical framework is a major concentration.
Prerequisites: NURS 239, 240 (and all pre- and co-requisites that accompany these
courses), ENGL 101, 102, Co-requisites: NURS 262, 263; PSYC 201, 206. (4-0-4)
NURS 262 INTRODUCTION TO NURSING LAB 1 Semester Hour
Clinical nursing skills are performed in a laboratory setting utilizing didactic and clinical
simulation with faculty. Foundational nursing concepts are integrated into scenarios to
encourage the student to think critically and to apply the nursing process to a client
situation. Prerequisites: NURS 239, 240 and all pre- and co-requisites that accompany
these courses); Co-requisites: NURS 261, 263 (0-3-1)
NURS 263 INTRODUCTION TO NURSING PRACTICUM 1 Semester Hour
This course provides the student with the opportunity to apply fundamental concepts
and evidenced based clinical nursing skills to the acute care setting. Through these
clinical experiences, students learn to apply principles of safe and effective nursing care.
Prerequisites: NURS 239, 240 (and all pre- and co-requisites that accompany these
courses); Co-requisites: NURS 261, 262 (0-3-1)
NURS 300 CONCEPTS IN PROFESSIONAL NURSING 3 Semester Hours
Introductory course for transition to the role of the professional nurse. The areas covered
include evolution of nursing, professional socialization, theoretical base for practice, and
components of professional nursing. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239, 240,
261, 262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342.
NURS 307 COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN NURSING 3 Semester Hours
Introductory nursing course designed to prepare the student to demonstrate effective
written and oral/visual communication skills. Competency in basic skills of using a
personal computer as a means of communication is included. The course stresses the
importance of effective communication as well as the role of computers in health care.
Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263; Co-requisites: NURS
339, 341,342, 343, 307
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NURS 339 PHARMACOLOGY IN NURSING PRACTICE 2 Semester Hours
This foundational course provides an introduction to drug therapy. Drug classifications,
methods of administration, physiological actions, purpose, and mechanism of action,
desired and adverse effects of the drug are examined. Emphasis is placed on the nurses’
responsibility in drug administration and patient assessment of response to drug
therapy. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263; Co-requisites:
NURS 340, 341, 342, 343, 307 (2-0-2)
NURS 340 NUTRITION IN NURSING PRACTICE 2 Semester Hours
This course will provide a study of nutritional value in health promotion and disease
management. Emphasis will be placed on the human need and utilization of nutrients to
maintain optimal health status. Nutritional considerations associated with cultural
diversity, socioeconomic status, and healthy lifestyles will be examined. Prerequisites:
BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263; Co-requisites: NURS 339, 341, 342,
343, 307 (2-0-2)
NURS 341 ADULT HEALTH I 6 Semester Hours
This course is designed to prepare the student to apply the nursing process to health
care needs of adults who are experiencing common or recurrent health problems.
Concepts relating to mental health and the response to mental illness will also be
components in this course. Students will utilize concepts of caring, human needs
theory, evidenced-based practice and communication as they focus on client needs.
Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239. 240, 261, 262, 263; PSYC 201, 206; Corequisites: NURS 307, 339, 340, 342, 343 (6-0-6)
NURS 342 ADULT HEALTH I LAB 1 Semester Hour
This course provides the student with the opportunity to apply theory-based practice in
a simulation laboratory. Scenarios are utilized to encourage the student’s critical
thinking skills, interpretation of laboratory data, pharmacology, and pathophysiology,
use of informatics and demonstration of clinical skills. Students are guided in planning,
selecting and implementing therapeutic nursing interventions to meet the physical and
psychosocial needs of clients. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239, 240, 261,
262, 263; Co-requisites: NURS 307, 339, 340, 341, 343 (0-3-1)
NURS 343 ADULT HEALTH I PRACTICUM 2 Semester Hours
The course offers the student a clinical focus to care for clients experiencing physical
and mental illness. Emphasis is placed on the role of the professional nurse as a member
of the interdisciplinary team, the use of evidenced based practice and the application of
the nursing process. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263;
Co-requisites: NURS 307, 339, 340, 341, 342 (0-6-2)
NURS 361 MATERNAL/CHILD NURSING 6 Semester Hours
This course introduces nursing concepts related to pregnancy, care of the newborn and
care of children through adolescence. Concepts related to human growth and
development, health promotion and maintenance, cultural influences on the family and
women’s health issues are integrated throughout this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 105,
203, 204; NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342; Co-requisites: NURS 300,
362, 363 (6-0-6)
NURS 362 MATERNAL/CHILD NURSING LAB 1 Semester Hour
A clinical laboratory is the setting for this course with an emphasis on the nursing care
of the childbearing family. Clinical simulations provide learning opportunities for
students to practice clinical skills and promote the development of critical thinking
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skills. The use of technology, patient centered care, informatics and evidenced based
practice are integrated throughout this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS
239, 240, 261, 262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342; Co-requisites: NURS 300, 361, 363 (0-3-1)
NURS 363 MATERNAL/CHILD NURSING PRACTICUM 2 Semester Hours
A variety of community and acute care settings provide the learning environment for
students to apply concepts related to the childbearing family. In addition to the concepts
of human growth and development, concepts of prioritization and delegation are
incorporated during this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239, 240, 261,
262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342; Co-requisites: NURS 300, 361, 362 (0-6-2)
NURS 441 NURSING CARE OF THE OLDER ADULT 3 Semester Hours
Students in this course will discover valuable dimensions of caring for the older adult
with evidence-based application of knowledge. The course is related to the normal and
pathological changes of aging, commonly encountered diseases of aging, and the broad
psychosocial, cultural, and public health knowledge required to provide expert nursing
care to the older adult. The emphasis is to provide critical information needed to engage
in the nursing process of assessment, diagnosis, planning, and evaluating outcomes of
care. Credit hours: 3 Pre- or Co-requisite: Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239,
240, 261, 262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342, 300, 361, 362, 461, 462, 463; Co-requisites: NURS
442, 443, 444, 460, 470 (3-0-3)
NURS 442 NURSING TRENDS AND ISSUES 3 Semester Hours
This course is an analysis of contemporary issues related to the practice of professional
nursing as well as the historical, legal, and contemporary context of professional nursing
practice. Emphasis is on reflection of core values of professional nursing: altruism,
autonomy, human dignity, integrity, social justice as demonstrated throughout the
program. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204, NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263, 339, 340,
341, 342, 300, 361, 362, 461, 462, 463; Co-requisites: NURS 441, 443, 444, 460, 470 (3-03)
NURS 443 ESSENTIALS OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND COMMUNITY NURSING 3 Semester Hours
This course provides students with an introduction to public health and community
nursing concepts. Emphasis is focused on illness prevention, health promotion, and
health maintenance and restoration for individuals and families across the lifespan.
Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204, NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342,
300, 361, 362, 461, 462, 463; Co-requisites: NURS 441, 442, 444, 460, 470 (3-0-3)
NURS 444 PUBLIC HEALTH AND COMMUNITY NURSING PRACTICUM 1 Semester Hour
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply public health and
community nursing concepts to individuals, families and communities through faculty
and preceptor guided clinical experiences. Application of evidenced-based nursing
practice is used to apply theory to nursing practice in public health and community
settings. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204, NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263, 339, 340, 341,
342, 300, 361, 362, 461, 462, 463; Co-requisites: NURS 441, 442, 443, 460, 470 (0-3-1)
NURS 460 ESSENTIALS OF NURSING MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP 3 Semester Hours
This course introduces the student to a synthesis of leadership/management theories
within health care agencies and organizations. Emphasis is placed on the
leading/managing behaviors of the professional nurse as an individual and a group
member in a variety of settings. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204, NURS 239, 240, 261,
262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342, 300, 361, 362, 461,462, 463; Co-requisites: NURS 470, 441,
442, 443, 444 (3-0-3)
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NURS 461 ADULT HEALTH II 6 Semester Hours
Synthesize theories, concepts, research, and evidence based practice in caring for an
adult population with complex multisystem health care needs. Emphasis is on the role of
the professional nurse in health promotion and maintenance, illness and rehabilitation of
an adult population in a variety of acute care settings. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204;
NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342, 300, 361, 362; Co-requisites: NURS
462, 463 (6-0-6)
NURS 462 ADULT HEALTH II LAB 1 Semester Hour
As a continuation of skills and concepts of Adult Health II, the Adult Health II clinical
laboratory provides opportunity to practice advanced medical-surgical concepts essential
for nursing care of adults requiring intervention in relation to complex multi system
illness or injury. The clinical lab allows the application of nursing skills, knowledge, and
critical thinking necessary for safe effective nursing care within a controlled setting.
Students gain experience and confidence as they apply nursing knowledge, skills, and
critical thinking within simulated clinical situations. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204;
NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342, 300, 361, 362; Co-requisites: NURS
461, 463 (0-3-1)
NURS 463 ADULT HEALTH II PRACTICUM 3 Semester Hours
This course provides opportunity for the transition from student to professional nursing
roles through a leadership experience in a selected clinical setting that allows synthesis of
knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The goal of the course is to provide intensive hands on
experience in a concentrated clinical learning setting in a one-on-one opportunity with a
practicing clinical role model. This clinical preceptorship program will facilitate the
assumption of the role of graduate nurse in meeting the clinical leadership and
management responsibilities that will be required upon successful completion of the RN
licensing exam. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204; NURS 239, 240, 261, 262, 263, 339,
340, 341, 342, 300, 361, 362; Co-requisites: NURS 461, 462 (0-9-3)
NURS 470 RESEARCH FOR EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE 3 Semester Hours
This course introduces the student to nursing research and the role nursing research
plays in professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the nursing research
process, critiquing research, interpreting research findings and incorporating research
into evidenced-based practice. Prerequisites: BIOL 105, 203, 204, NURS 239, 240, 261,
262, 263, 339, 340, 341, 342, 300, 361, 362, 461. 462, 463; Co-requisites: NURS
441,442,443,444,460, (3-0-3)
School of Psychology/270
SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY
AND COUNSELING
FACULTY
Dean: Professor D. Carscaddon
Professors: F. Brown, L. Smith, J. Whitlow
Associate Professors: W. Fleming, L. Greene, J. Morgan
Assistant Professor: I. Naydenova, B. Thompson, S. Warden, S. Webb
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the undergraduate programs of the School of Psychology and
Counseling is to give students a broad overview of the field of psychology
within the foundation of a Christian, liberal arts institution.
GOALS
1. KNOWLEDGE BASE OF PSYCHOLOGY – Students will demonstrate
familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, philosophical
foundations, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.
2. RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY – Students will understand and
apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design,
data analysis, and interpretation.
3. CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS IN PSYCHOLOGY – Students will respect
and use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and, when
possible, the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and
mental processes.
4. APPLICATION OF PSYCHOLOGY – Students will understand and apply
psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.
5. VALUES IN PSYCHOLOGY – Students will be able to weigh evidence,
tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the
underpinnings of psychology as a discipline.
6. INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY LITERACY – Students will
demonstrate information competence and the ability to use computers
and other technology for many purposes.
7. COMMUNICATION SKILLS – Students will be able to communicate
effectively in a variety of formats.
8. SOCIOCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL AWARENESS – Students will
recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of sociocultural and
international diversity as well as the dignity and complexity of persons.
9. PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT – Students will develop insight into their own
and others’ behavior and mental processes and apply effective strategies
for self-management and self-improvement.
10. CAREER PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT – Students will emerge from
the major with realistic ideas about how to implement their
psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits in a
variety of settings.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Graduates with the Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology are expected to:
1. be able to explain and critically examine psychological theories;
2. be able to write in APA style;
3. communicate effectively in both oral and written formats.
4. understand and apply basic research methods, including research design,
data analysis, and interpretation.
5. assess psychological claims and make judgments on the basis of wellsupported reasons;
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6. apply psychological concepts, theories, and research findings as these
relate to everyday life; and
7. understand the nature of psychology as a profession, such that students
will be prepared for a career or for seeking graduate training;
MAJOR FIELD OF STUDY
Psychology
MINOR FIELD OF STUDY
Psychology
MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY DETAIL
PSYCHOLOGY (39 HOURS)
The basic core course requirements must be satisfied. Classes required for
completing the major are as follows:
PSYC 201, 206, 396, 397, 441, and 3 hours of Philosophy (PHIL 200 or 201).
(In place of the PSYC 206 requirement, majors may take two of the remaining
developmentally oriented courses: PSYC 301, 302, or 412).
Fifteen hours excluding PSYC 498 must be earned at the 400 level.
All prerequisites must be honored for PSYC 305, 396, 397, 402, 405, 444,
493, 495, 496, 497, and 498.
The minor must be selected in consultation with the faculty advisor.
PSYCHOLOGY AS A SECOND MAJOR (30 HOURS)
Students choosing Psychology as a secondary major must meet all of the
requirements of the primary major. Honors program students majoring in
Psychology may count Honors 400/401 collectively as one of the five required
400 level courses.
MINOR FIELD OF STUDY DETAIL
PSYCHOLOGY (18 HOURS)
A minor in Psychology requires 18 semester hours, including PSYC 201 and
206. Six of the additional 12 hours must be at the 400 level.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER MAJORS
All students transferring under the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement
must complete a foreign language through the Intermediate I level (201).
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES (PSYC)
201 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
A survey of psychology as the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. The
areas include learning, motivation, personality, measurement, the development process,
social adjustment and the biological bases of behavior. This course is prerequisite to all
other courses in Psychology, except PSYC 280, 206, 301, 302, 303, 310, 374, and 403.
3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
206 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
The psychological evolution of the individual through the life span and effect of the biosocial context on this evolution. Co-requisite PSYC 201. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
280 PERSONAL ASSESSMENT AND ADJUSTMENT 3 semester hours
A study of psychological processes of adjustment in the lives of university students. Corequisite PSYC 201. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
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301 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
A study of the general principles and theories of growth and development of the child
from birth to early adolescence with emphasis upon intellectual, physical, emotional,
cultural, and social development. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
302 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
The study of intellectual, emotional, physical and social maturation from puberty to
early adulthood with emphasis on socio-cultural and economic influences as well as
adjustment difficulties and communication with the adolescent. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
303 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
An analysis of the basic principles of learning theory as well as physical, social, and
moral development as they are applied to classroom learning with emphasis upon the
application of theory to practical educational situations. Basics of standardized
measurement, behavior management as applied to the classroom, and the influence of
socio-cultural forces in society on education are discussed. Educational exceptionalities
and laws related to them are also examined. 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
307 BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
An examination of the biological correlates of behavior with emphasis on the structure
and function of the nervous system, bases of perception, arousal, motivation, memory
and learning. 3-0-3. (On Demand)
310 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
A study of the interactions of persons in American society including such topics as
group dynamics and pressure, crowd behavior, social movements and change,
conformity and leadership. 3-0-3. (See Sociology 310) (Fall)
374 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION 3 semester hours
A study of the principles of psychology as related to religious experience designed to
develop insight into each student’s own spiritual life. 3-0-3. (See Religious Education
374) (Spring)
396 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 3 semester hours
An introductory approach to descriptive and inferential statistics designed to develop an
understanding of basic statistical concepts, statistical significance, statistical inference
and hypothesis testing. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 or SOCI 201. (See Sociology 396.)
(Fall)
397 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours
An introductory examination of procedures involved in selecting and stating problems,
constructing research designs, collecting and evaluating data and stating conclusions.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 396. 2-2-3. (Spring)
401 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 3 semester hours
Survey and analysis of the major mental disorders, interpretations and theories of
therapy, including the relationship of abnormal behavior to social norms. Prerequisite:
PSYC 201. 3-0-3. (Fall)
402 INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING 3 semester hours
The study of the basic theories of counseling integrated into a problem-management
model. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 401. 3-0-3. (Spring)
403 HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS 3 semester hours
The application of psychological principles to the problems of industry and business,
selection of personnel, training efficiency, job analysis, performance measurement and
human relations. See MGMT 403). 3-0-3. (Fall)
School of Psychology/274
405 PSYCHOLOGY OF THE EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT 3 semester hours
A study of a wide range of exceptionalities manifested by children and adolescents in a
school setting. Emphases are on appropriate instructional strategies and historical and
legal bases for dealing with exceptional students. Observational experiences are required.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 301 or 302. 3-0-3. (On Demand)
406 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY 3 semester hours
A survey of the major theories of personality, with particular emphasis upon experimental
studies and research procedures in the study of personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 201. 3-0-3.
(Fall)
408 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS 3 semester hours
The historical exploration of psychology as a field of scientific inquiry. The emphasis is on
the development of schools of thought, prominent figures, and key theories. Prerequisite:
PSYC 201. 3-0-3. (Variable)
412 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING 3 semester hours
An introduction to the psychological, social and biological aspects of aging. Prerequisite:
PSYC 201. 3-0-3. (Variable)
425 CRISIS INTERVENTION COUNSELING 3 semester hours
Emphases are on death and dying, divorce, suicide, chemical dependency, rape and
violence in the family. Supervised field experience is required. 3-0-3. (Variable)
440 FAMILY COMMUNICATION 3 semester hours
A study of family communication systems. Emphases are on the role of self concept,
perceptions and emotions, listening skills, nonverbal communication, conflict resolution
and building intimacy in family systems. Prerequisite: PSYC 201. 3-0-3. (Variable)
441 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING 3 semester hours
A study of the major concepts of learning, experimental methods of studying learning
phenomena and learning theory. Prerequisite: 9 hours of psychology including PSYC 201.
3-0-3. (Fall)
444 PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT AND APPRAISAL 3 semester hours
An introduction to psychological measurement, with emphasis on the measurement of
intelligence, achievement, personality, interests and special aptitudes. 3-0-3. Prerequisite:
Psychology 396. (Spring)
491, 492, 493 SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY 1, 2, or 3 semester hours
Typical seminars are Psychology and Law and the Psychology of Women. Others are
offered upon sufficient demand. Prerequisite: Junior Standing including PSYC 201. 1-0-1,
2-0-2, 3-0-3. (Fall, Spring)
495, 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours
An in-depth research study for seniors majoring in psychology working under the
guidance of the department faculty. The paper/project shall become a part of the holdings
of Dover Library at the conclusion of the course. Prerequisites: Approval of the professor,
Dean, and Associate Provost. Prerequisite: Junior Standing including PSYC 201.
0-Independent Study-3, 0-Independent Study-3. (On Demand)
497, 498 INTERNSHIP IN PSYCHOLOGY I AND II 1, 2, or 3 semester hours each semester
Internships provide an opportunity for psychology majors to intern in a professional
setting in order to integrate academic knowledge with experience in the world of work,
or to conduct applied research under the supervision of faculty and apply different
methodologies to research questions. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 396; Junior or senior
standing; Permission of instructor. 1-5-1, 1-5-2, 1-5-3. (Fall, Spring)
Summer classes include PSYC 497, 498; alternatives include PSYC 201, 301, 302, 303, 396, 401,
and 493.
Gardner-Webb University/275
DIRECTORY AND APPENDICES
OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION
C. Lorance Henderson, L.H.D., Chairman
H. Gene Washburn, M.D., ‘52, Vice Chairman
Max J. Hamrick, Secretary
Thomas E. Philson, Treasurer
A. Frank Bonner, Ph.D., President
Fred A. Flowers, J.D., Attorney
Ben C. Leslie, D. Theol., Assistant Secretary
Mike W. Hardin, ’86, ’00, Assistant Treasurer
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
TERMS EXPIRING DECEMBER 31, 2011
Robert H. Blalock, Jr., Gastonia, NC
Max J. Hamrick, Boiling Springs, NC
Nancy L. Kistler, Charlotte, NC
Maurice B. “Bobby” Morrow, III, Charlotte, NC
Frank Nanney, Rutherfordton, NC
Mailon D. Nichols, Taylorsville, NC
Thomas L. Warren, M.D., Hickory, NC
H. Gene Washburn, M.D., ‘52, Boiling Springs, NC
Marilyn W. Withrow, ‘69, ‘71, Charlotte, NC
TERMS EXPIRING DECEMBER 31, 2012
W. Thomas Bell, ‘71, Marietta, GA
William K. Gary, Mt. Holly, NC
John J. Godbold, Rock Hill, SC
Ronald W. Hawkins, ‘55, Cornelius, NC
Ryan D. Hendley, ‘71, Greenville, SC
Michael W. Kasey, ‘77, Asheville, NC
William W. Leathers, III, STD, Hickory, NC
Anthony N. Strange, ‘83, Richmond, VA
J. Linton Suttle, III, Shelby, NC
Directory and Appendices/276
TERMS EXPIRING DECEMBER 31, 2013
Franklin V. Beam, Shelby, NC
Ronald R. Beane, ’57, Lenoir, NC
Adelaide A. Craver, J.D., Shelby, NC
William M. Eubanks, M.D., Troutman, NC
George R. Gilliam, ’76, College Park, GA
C. Lorance Henderson, L.H.D., Morganton, NC
James E. Robbins, Forest City, NC
John E. Roberts, ’49, L.L.D., Litt.D, L.H.D., Greenville, SC
Wade R. Shepherd, Sr., L.H.D., Hickory, NC
Dorothy A. Spangler, ’47, Shelby, NC
Frank A. Stewart, Gastonia, NC
TERMS EXPIRING DECEMBER 31, 2014
C. Neal Alexander, Jr., ’84, Denver, NC
Candace “Candy” J. Arey, Shelby NC
Ralph L. Bentley, Statesville, NC
Billy C. Henry, Jr., Cornelius, NC
H. S. Keeter, Jr., Shelby, NC
Randall L. “Randy” Marion, Mooresville, NC
E. Harvey Rogers, Jr., ’78, Mooresville, NC
Bob D. Shepherd, D.D., Morganton, NC
Carl S. Spangler, Jr., ’52, Shelby, NC
Gardner-Webb University/277
UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY 2011-12
Janah Adams, 2011, Instructor of English Composition
A.A. Lenoir Community College; B.A., M.A., East Carolina University
Susan Ali, 2010, Assistant Professor of Music
B.M., San Diego State University; M.FA., University of California, Irvine;
Ed.D., Columbia University
Tracy Arnold, 2010, Instructor in Nursing
A.D.N, B.S.N., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University
Kathleen P. Ayotte, 2003*, Instructor in Physical Education; Assistant Athletic Trainer,
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University
R. Ken Baker, 1999, Professor of Physical Education; Chair, Department of Physical Education,
Wellness and Sport Studies
B.A., Central Wesleyan College; M.A., Furman University; Ph.D., University of Georgia
Robert J. Bass, 1995, Professor of Mathematics
B.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
Rebecca Beck-Little, 1991, Professor of Nursing; Dean, School of Nursing
A.S.N., Western Piedmont Community College; B.S.N., M.S.N., University of North
Carolina at Charlotte; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Mona C. Bell, 1998, Instructor, Associate Dean of Libraries
B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.L.I.S., University of North Carolina
at Greensboro
Susan C. Bell, 1986, Professor of Art
B.A., Mary Baldwin College; M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education;
M.A., University of South Carolina
Donald L. Berry, 1999, Professor of Religious Studies; Director of Global Missions Center
B.A., University of Kentucky; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Additional Studies: University of Louisville, University of Chicago
Carolyn A. Billings, 1979, Professor of Music
B.M., Salem College; M.M., University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana;
D.M.A., University of Missouri at Kansas City
Natalie Edwards Bishop, 2007, Instructor; Instruction Librarian
B.A., Wingate University; M.L.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Kent B. Blevins, 1998, Professor of Religious Studies; Chair, Department of Religious Studies
and Philosophy
B.A., Wake Forest University; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Additional study, The Catholic University of America
A. Frank Bonner, 1987, Professor of English; President
B.A., Furman University; M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
I. Glenn Bottoms, 1983, Professor of Economics and Management Information Systems
B.A., Emory University; M.A., University of Ottawa; Ph.D., Georgia State University;
Additional study, George Washington University
Nancy R. Bottoms, 2005, Assistant Professor of Learning Assistance Program, Art, English
B.A., Emory University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., The Union Institute and
University
Directory and Appendices/278
Kelly D. Brame, 1999, Instructor in Religion; Coordinator of Leadership and Volunteerism
B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological
Seminary
Amanda W. Bridges, 2008, Instructor of Communications Studies
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University
Benjamin C. Brooks, 2003, Associate Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Clemson University; Ph.D., University of Virginia
Frieda F. Brown, 1985, Professor of Psychology and Counseling
B.A., M. Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph. D., University of Louisville
Sydney K. Brown, 2004, Associate Professor of Education
B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Claude Douglas Bryan, 2002, Professor of Religious Studies; Assistant Provost for Academic
Services
B.A., Furman University; B.S., Howard Payne University; M.A.R.E., G.S.R.E., Ph.D.,
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Jennifer J. Buckner, 2007, Instructor of English; Director of University Writing Center
B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Charles S. Burch, 1997, Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Vice President for Athletics
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.S., Eastern Kentucky University
Frances Bailey Burch, 2001, Professor of Physical Education; Dean, Graduate School
B.S., Lock Haven University, PA; M.A., Eastern Kentucky University;
Ph.D., The University of Virginia
Sue C. Camp, 1976, Professor of Business Administration
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A.T., Winthrop University; Additional study, University
of South Carolina; Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville
Robert J. Carey, 1997, Associate Professor of Communication Studies; Chair, Department of
Communication Studies
B.A., University of Washington, Seattle; M.A., University of Memphis; Ph.D., Regent
University
Janie M. Carlton, 1982, Professor of Nursing
B.S., Lenoir-Rhyne College; M.N., Emory University; Ed.D., North Carolina State University
T. Eugene Carpenter, 1994, Professor of Human Services; Associate Dean
A.A., Brevard College; B.S., Clemson University; M.A., Appalachian State University;
Ed.D., North Carolina State University
David M. Carscaddon, 1990, Professor of Psychology; Dean, School of Psychology and
Counseling
B.A., University of North Carolina at Asheville; M.A., Morehead State University;
Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Donald W. Caudill, 2008, Professor of Marketing
B.S., Berea College; M.B.A., Morehead State University; M.S. in Marketing, Memphis State
University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Cathleen J. Ciesielski, 2008, Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., Milliken University; Ph.D., Loyola University
J. Benjamin Coates, Instructor of Spanish
B.A., Clemson University; M.A., University of Northern Iowa; M.Ed., Converse College
Mark Cole, 2011, Instructor of Music Education
B.M., University of Central Floridal M.M., Florida State University; Ph.D. (in process),
University of South Florida
Gardner-Webb University/279
Joseph W. Collins, 2005, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
B.S., M.A., East Carolina University; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Ed.D., North Carolina State University
Barbara G. Cox, 2004, Assistant Professor of Social Science, Assistant Provost for Adult and
Continuing Education
A.A., Western Piedmont Community College; B.S., Gardner-Webb University;
M.P.A., Appalachian State University
Tamara A. Cox, 1995, Professor of French
B.A., M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph. D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Sharon Creed-Hall, 2011, Instructor in Nursing
A.S.N., Patrick Henry Community College; B.S.N., Gardner-Webb University; M.S.N.,
Indiana Wesleyan University
Christopher V. Davis, 2001, Associate Professor of English
B.A., High Point University; M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University
Lynn C. Dey, 2007, Instructor of American Sign Language
B.S., Gallaudet University; M.A., Gallaudet University
Ghassan A. Dib, 2008, Instructor in Accounting
B.B.A., University of Holy Spirit-Kaslik, Lebanon; M.Acc., Gardner-Webb University
David Dunham, 2006, Instructor; Reference Librarian
B.A., M.A., Ball State University; M.L.S., Indiana University at Bloomington
Cheryl A. Duffus, 2007, Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Hollins University; M.F.A., Emerson College; Ph.D., University of Mississippi
Martha Eddings, 2011, Instructor in Nursing
A.D.N., Gaston College; B.S.N., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.S.N., (in
process), Gardner-Webb University
Stefka G. Nikolova Eddins, 2001, Associate Professor of Chemistry
M.S., Sofia University, Bulgaria; M.S., Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Sharon L. Edwards, 1999, Instructor; Reference Librarian, Gardner-Webb University at
Statesville
A.A., Wingate University; B.S., Appalachian State University; M.L.I.S., University of North
Carolina at Greensboro
Donna S. Ellington, 1988, Professor of History
B.A., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., Duke University
James J. English, 2006, Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Ph.D., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
Paul J. Etter, 2001, Associate Professor of Music
B.Mus., Southwest Baptist University; M.Mus., Southwestern Baptist Theological
Seminary; Ph.D., Texas Tech University
Allen Douglas Eury, 2001, Professor of Education; Dean, School of Education; Coordinator,
Ed.D. Program; Director, Center for Inovative Leadership Studies
B.S., Ed.S., Ed.D, Appalachian State University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at
Charlotte
Willie C. Fleming, 2006, Associate Professor of Psychology and Counseling; Coordinator of the
Statesville Mental Health and School Counseling Programs
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Ben Gaskins, 2011, Assistant Professor of Political Science
B.A., Furman University; M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., Florida State University
Directory and Appendices/280
Jerry Gilsdorf, 2010, Assistant Professor of Sports Management
B.A., Judson College; M.S., University of Illinois at Chicago; Ed.D.,United States Sports
Academy
Earl H. Godfrey, Jr., 1992, Professor of Business Administration
B.S., University of South Carolina; M.B.A., Winthrop University; D.B.A., Nova University
R. Van Graham, 1999-2002, 2005, Associate Professor of Business Law and Management;
Director of GOAL Business Programs; Associate Dean, School of Business
B.A., Asbury College; J.D., Baylor University
Linda Carol Greene, 2001, Associate Professor of Psychology
B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State
University
Patricia B. Harrelson, 1975, Assistant Professor of Music
B.M., North Carolina School of the Arts; M.M., Converse College; Additional study,
University of Florida; University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Eureka College;
Westminster Choir College; Indiana University; Cincinnati Conservatory; Florida State
University
Jeffrey M Hartman, 2005, Assistant Professor of Physical Education
B.A., Bloomsburg University; M.Ed., The University of Virginia; Ph.D. The University of
Virginia.
Shana V. Hartman, 2007, Assistant Professor of English
B.S., East Carolina University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Heather Hartsell, 2009, Instructor in Athletic Training Education
B.S., Mars Hill College; M.S., Texas A&M University
Debra Harwell-Braun, 2011, Assistant Professor of Elementary Education
B.S., Michigan State University; M.Ed., University of Houston; Ed.D., Gardner-Webb
University
Mary J. High, 2000, Associate Professor of American Sign Language, Director of the ASL
Program
B.A., Mars Hill College; M.Div., Th.M., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
T. Perry Hildreth, 2006, Associate Professor of Philosophy
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., M.Div, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
June H. Hobbs, 1994, Professor of English; Chair, Department of English Language and
Literature; Director, Undergraduate Research
B.A, Oklahoma Baptist University; M.A., University of Louisville; Ph.D., University of
Oklahoma
Mary Alice Hodge, 2004, Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director, B.S.N. Programs
A.D.N., B.S., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina
Greensboro
Tammy Campbell Hoyle, 1990, Assistant Professor of Mathematics; Chair, Department of
Mathematical Sciences
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Wake Forest University
Delores M. Hunt, 1978-80; 1982, Professor of Physical Education; Vice President and Dean of
Student Development
B.S., Auburn University; M.Ed., D.A., Middle Tennessee State University
Sheila G. Ingle, 2006, Associate Professor of Education;Chair, Elementary Education; Director,
Continuous Improvement; Teaching Licensure Officer
B.A., Sacred Heart College; M.A., Western Carolina University; Ph.D., Capella University
Gardner-Webb University/281
Tracy C. Jessup, 1994, Assistant Professor of Religion; Vice President for Christian Life and
Service
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.Div., Samford University; Ph.D, University of Nebraska Lincoln
James C. Johnson, 1990, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., Furman University; M.A.T., University of South Carolina
Steven G. Johnson, 2005, Associate Professor of Business Administration
B.S., Northwestern Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Louisiana Tech University
Kevin T. Jones, 1986, Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director of Athletic Training
B.A., Lenoir-Rhyne College; M.A., Gardner-Webb University
Thomas H. Jones, 1982, Professor of Biology; Associate Dean of the Honors Program
B.S., Methodist College, Fayetteville; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University
David N. Judge, 2001, Associate Professor of Biology
B.S., Radford University; B.S., Mt. Olive College; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute
and State University
John M. Karriker, 2005, Assistant Professor of Science; Associate Dean and Regional Director
B.A., Catawba College; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
John A. Kaufhold, 2005, Professor of Education
B.S., West Chester University at Pennsylvania; M.S., Ed.D., University of Virginia
Christopher R. Keene, 2002, Associate Professor of Theatre; Technical Director
B.A., California State University; M.F.A., North Carolina School of the Arts
Jane C. King, 2007, Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
J. Douglas Knotts, 1999, Professor of Art; Chair, Department of Art
B.F.A., Western Carolina University; B.S., Auburn University; M.F.A., East Carolina
University
Michael T. Kuchinsky, 2006, Associate Professor of Political Science
B.A., Wittenburg University; M.Div., Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago;
M.A., University of Richmond; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Ute S. Lahaie, 2003, Professor of French and German; Chair, Department of World Languages,
Literatures, and Cultures
Ph.D., Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany; additional studies at Justus-Liebig
University, Giessen, Germany; Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon, France; Elly-HeussKnapp-Gymnasium, Heilbronn, Germany
Janet S. Land, 1994, Professor of English; Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and
Learning
B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., East Carolina University;
Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Susan Lane, 2010, Instructor in Nursing
B.S.N., University of North Carolina at Wilmington; M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University
H. James Lawrence, 2001, Professor of Communication Studies
B.A., Pfeiffer University; M.Div., Duke University; M.A., California State University at
Northridge; Ph.D., Florida State University
Deidre C. Ledbetter, 1997, Instructor in Business Administration; Assistant Vice President for
Technology Services
A.A.S., Isothermal Community College; B.S., Appalachian State University;
M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University
Directory and Appendices/282
C. Earl Leininger, Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies; Associate Provost for Arts
and Sciences
B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University; B.D., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
Ben C. Leslie, 2006, Professor of Religious Studies; Provost and Executive Vice President
B.A., Samford University; M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.M., Baptist
Theological Seminary, Ruschlikon, Switzerland; Dr. Theol., University of Zurich.
Lisa C. Luedeman, 2007, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies
B.A., Winthrop University; M.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Susan H. Manahan, 1994, Assistant Professor of Biology; Coordinator, Academic Service
Learning
B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Sandra Mankins, 2010, Instructor in Accounting
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University
J. Robert Mayfield, 2008, Associate Professor of Education
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Auburn University
Lucenda M. McKinney, 1992, Professor of Education
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., Clemson University
Sara McNeely, 2010, Instructor of Health and Physical Education
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University
Thomas J. Meaders, 2002, Professor of Information Systems and Operations
B.S., M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., University of Alabama in Hunstville
Corwin M. Metcalf, 2004, Associate Professor of Business Administration
B.A., Oglethorpe University; M.B.A., University of South Carolina; J.D., Wake Forest
University
Marcia (Cindy) M. Miller, 1977-1987, 1994, Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., University of Michigan; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin
Jon T. Mitchell, 2000, Instructor in Physical Education, Assistant Athletic Trainer
B.S., Mars Hill College; M.A., Gardner-Webb University
Charles B. Moore, 1997, Professor of Spanish
B.S., University of Tennessee at Knoxville; M.A., George Mason University;
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Joseph Moore, 2011, Professor of History
B.A., Anderson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Robert N. Moore, 2006, Instructor in American Sign Language
B.S. Gallaudet University; M.Div, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary
Teralea B. Moore, 2006, Instructor in Mathematics
B.S., North Carolina State University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
James P. Morgan, Jr., 2008, Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., University of Kentucky; M.S., Ph.D., Auburn University
Robert D. Munoz, 1989, Professor of Sociology
B.S., University of Wisconsin at Madison; M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University
Miroslaw Mystkowski, 2002, Associate Professor of Computer Science
M.S., University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland; M.S., Ph.D., University of MissouriColumbia
James W. Nall, 2006, Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., East Carolina University; M.A., Webster University; M.B.A., Pepperdine University;
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Gardner-Webb University/283
Abby L. Nance, 2008, Instructor in English, Learning Assistance Program
B.A., Warren Wilson College; M.F.A., Texas State University
Ronald I. Nanney, 2000, Professor of Education
B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.S., Western Carolina University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ivelina Naydenova, 2009, Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A., Limestone College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennessee
Anthony I. Negbenebor, 1989, Professor of Economics and International Business, Dover Chair;
Dean, School of Business
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Mississippi State University
Francis L. Newton, Jr., 2000, Instructor; Catalog Librarian
B.A., Williams College; M.A., M.S.L.S, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Don H. Olive, Jr., 2006, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy
B.A., Carson-Newman; M.S., Ph.D, Vanderbilt University
David R. Parker, 1997, Professor of English
B.A, Furman University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Gregory A. Penczek, 2004, Instructor in Physical Education; Assistant Athletic Trainer
B.S., Salisbury University; M.S., Louisiana State University
Teresa R. Phillips, 2001, Assistant Professor of Spanish
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Kentucky
Olga Poliakova, 2000, Professor of Mathematics
M.S., Moscow State University; Ph.D., University of Arkansas
Felice Policastro, 2004, Associate Professor of International Business; Director of Graduate
Programs in Business
B.S., University De Oriente; M.B.A., Edgewood College; Ph.D., The University of Texas
Pan American
Gayle Bolt Price, 1991, Professor of English; Associate Provost for Professional and Graduate
Studies
B.A., M.Ed., Clemson University; Ed.D., Auburn University
Paula F. Qualls, 1999, Professor of Religious Studies
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary
Jeffery W. Richmond, 2009, Assistant Professor of Music, Director of Athletic Bands
B.M. University of South Florida; M.M., M.A., University of Nebraska
Danielle Robertson, 2010, Instructor in Education
B.A., Limestone College; M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ed.S., Converse College
Mary D. Roby, 2001, Associate Professor; Dean of Libraries
B.Mus., Union University; M.L.S., University of Alabama
Michael J. Roebuck, 2001, Instructor in Business Administration; Assistant Director of Athletics
B.A., Wofford College; M.B.A., East Carolina University
Candice Rome, 2009, Instructor in Nursing
A.D.N., Foothills Nursing Consortium; B.S.N., Winston-Salem State University;
M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University
Faye H. Rucker, 2002, Associate Professor of Education
B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Directory and Appendices/284
Anita Sanders, 2010, Assistant Professor of Education; Coordinator, Evening Undergraduate
Education Program at Boiling Springs
B.S., North Carolina Central University; M.A., Fayetteville State University;
Ed.S., South Carolina State University; Ed.D., South Carolina State University
Robin Schoenfeldt, 2010, Instructor in Nursing
A.D.N., Broward Community College; B.S.N., Florida International University;
M.S.N., Winston-Salem State University
Reimund Serafica, 2011, Assistant Professor of Nursing
A.A., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D. candidate, University of Hawaii, Manoa
R. Anthony Setzer, 1988, Instructor in Physical Education; Head Men’s Soccer Coach
B.S., Lander College; M.A., The Citadel
Kristin L. Setzer, 2000, Instructor in Business Administration; Assistant Vice-President of Graduate
Admissions
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University
Scott E. Shauf, 2009, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
B.A., University of Richmond; M.S., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill;
M.T.S., Duke University; Ph.D., Emory University
David W. Shellman, 2003, Associate Professor of Education; Chair, Educational Leadership
B.S., Appalachian State Teachers College; Master of Human Development and Learning,
Science Education, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Ed.S., Winthrop University;
Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Frances B. Sizemore, 2005, Instructor in Business; Associate Director of Human Resources
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University
E. Denise Smith, 2006, Assistant Professor of Business
B.S. Gardner-Webb University; M.B.A., Brenau University; D.H.A., Medical University of
South Carolina
James Carroll Smith, 2001, Associate Professor of Education
B.S., M.S., East Carolina University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Laura W. Smith, 2003, Professor of Psychology and Counseling; Coordinator, School Counseling
Program
A.A., Peace College; B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.Ed., University
of North Carolina at Charlotte; Ed.D., University of Virginia
Shonna Snyder,2010, Assistant Professor of Health and Wellness
B.S., Wilmington College; M.Ed., University of Cincinnati; Ph.D, Purdue University
Paula A. Spangler, 2005, Instructor in Art
B.S., Appalachian State University; B.F.A., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro;
M.F.A., East Tennessee State University
Patricia C. Sparti, 2002, Professor of Music; Chair, Department of Music
B.M., University of Miami; M.M., D.M.A., Peabody Conservatory of The Johns Hopkins
University
Robert K. Spear, 2011, Professor of Accounting
B.A., University of New Hampshire; M.B.A., The College of William and Mary; Ph.D.,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Edwin B. Stepp, 2003, Associate Professor of Religious Studies
B.A., Baylor University; M.DivBL, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Ph.D., Baylor University
Gail D. Stowe, 2002, Associate Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Master of Human Development and
Learning, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Ed.S., Winthrop College;
Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Gardner-Webb University/285
LaShea S. Stuart, 2007, Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Troy State University; M.A., Ph.D., Auburn University
Dianne Sykes, 2007, Associate Professor of Sociology
B.A., George Fox College; M.A.T., Pacific University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University
Kelly Taylor, 2010, Instructor in Education; Chair, Middle Grades Education
B.S., East Carolina University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University
Matthew D. Theado, 1995, Professor of English
B.A., M.A., James Madison University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
James W. Thomas, 2011, Professor of Theatre Arts; Interim Dean, School of Performing and
Visual Arts
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
Additional Study, University of Georgia
Brooke Thompson, 2011, Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A., University of North Carolina at Asheville; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University;
Mary S. Thompson, 1997, Instructor; Public Services Librarian
A.B., Brevard College; A.B., Pfeiffer University; M.A., Scarritt College;
M.L.S., North Carolina Central University
Charles B. Tichenor, 1997, Professor of Business Administration; Distinguished Executive in
Residence
B.S., Duke University; D.B.A., Berne University
Helen Lepke Tichenor, 1998, Professor of German; Director of International Programs
B.A., Connecticut College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Akron
Venita Laverne Totten, 2001, Associate Professor of Chemistry; Chair, Department of Natural
Sciences
B.A., Louisiana Tech University; Ph.D., Baylor University
Jeffrey L. Tubbs, 1982, Professor of Physical Education; Vice President for Planning and
Institutional Effectiveness
B.A., Bryan College; M.S., D.A., Middle Tennessee State University
Timothy W. Vanderburg, 2000, Associate Professor of History; Chair, Department of Social
Sciences
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ph.D., Mississippi State University
Vickie G. Walker, 2003, Assistant Professor of Nursing
L.P.N., Central Piedmont Community College; A.D.N., Gaston Community College;
B.S.N., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University; D.N.P., Case Western Reserve University
Shannon Warden, 2010, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Counseling
B.A., Elon College; M.A., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina
at Greensboro
Deborah M. Ware, 2005, Associate Professor of Physical Education
B.S., East Stroudsburg State College; M.A.T., Livingston University;
Ed.D., University of Central Florida
Nicole Waters, 2011, Instructor in Nursing
A.D.N., Gaston College; B.S.N., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University
Joseph M. Webb, 2007, Professor of Communication Studies
B.A., Lincoln Christian College; M.S., University of Illinois; M.T.S., Chandler School of
Theology; D.Min., The Claremont School of Theology; Ph.D., University of Illinois
Sharon Webb, Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.S., M.A./Ed.S., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D. candidate, Walden University
Directory and Appendices/286
R. Lane Wesson, 2000, Associate Professor of Education; Coordinator, Evening Undergraduate
Education Program at Statesville
B.E.E., Western Carolina University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., University of
North Carolina at Greensboro
W. Scott White, 2001, Instructor in Business Administration; Director of Human Resources
B.S., University of Tennessee; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University
J. Matt Whitfield, 1992, Professor of Music; Director of Band
B.M.E., Murray State University; M.Mus., D.M.A., University of Alabama
Jimmy D. Whitlow, 1996, Professor of Psychology and Counseling
A.A., Anderson College; B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.R.E., Th.M., Ed.D., New
Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary
Kathy Williams, 2011, Instructor in Nursing
A.A.S., Western Piedmont Community College; B.S.N., Winston-Salem State University;
M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University
Ronald W. Williams, 1998, Professor of Religious Studies
B.A., Western Kentucky University; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary
Jason A. Willis, 2007, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University
Richard M. Wince, 1990, Instructor in Physical Education; Wrestling Coach
B.A., Mt. Union College; M.A., University of Akron
Linda M. Wines, 2003, Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director, A.D.N. Program
B.S.N., East Stroudsburg University; M.S.N., University of Maryland
Li Xiao, 2007, Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems
B.E., University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, China;
Ph.D., George Washington University
David K. Yelton, 1990, Professor of History
B.A., Appalachian State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Oscar Zamora, 2008, Instructor in Business Administration and Management
B.S., M.B.A., University of Texas at Austin
Timothy J. Zehnder, 1997, Professor of Biology
B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.S., Ph.D., Wake Forest University
Jay Zimmer, 2011, Instructor of Biology
B.S., University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point; M.S., Indiana University Purdue University
PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY
Elizabeth S. Bennett, 1976, Instructor in Piano and Organ
B.C.M., Furman University; M.C.M., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
Nan F. Gregg, 1975, Instructor in Voice
B.M., Westminster Choir College; Additional study, Long Island University, Hofstra
University
Gardner-Webb University/287
ADJUNCT GOAL FACULTY
Bobby E. Adams, Religion
B.A., Northeastern Oklahoma State University; B.D., Central Baptist Theological
Seminary; Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Charles Nathan Alexander, Business
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Rex B. Anderson, Business
B.A., Eastern New Mexico University; M.S., George Washington University
Thomas Anderson, Criminal Justice
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.S., University of Cincinnati.
David W. Bain, Mathematics
B.S., University of North Carolina; M. of Mathematics, Winthrop University.
Brent W. Ballard, Music
B.A., Winthrop University; M.A., University of Akron.
Frankie Ballard, Nursing
B.S.N., North Carolina Central University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Wes W. Barkley, Criminal Justice
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; J.D., Campbell University of Law
Stephen Rory Barrington, English
B.S., Emmanuel College; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Rebeca Barzuna, Business
B.T., University of Costa Rica; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Shelby D. Bennett, Business
B.A., Elon University; M.B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro;
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Wendy Berry, Business
A.A., Richmond Community College; B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Renee B. Bethea, Human Services
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Webster University.
John H. Bevis, III, Human Services
B.A., Clemson University; M.A., Appalachian State University.
Sandy Bisese, Mathematics
B.S. College of William and Mary; M.A., UNC-Chapel Hill.
Tara L. Black, Business
B.A., Mars Hill College; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Thomas E. Blanton, Jr., Religion
A.B., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.Div., Garrett Theological Seminary;
M.A., Appalachian State University.
Nancy L. Boling, Human Services
A.A., Sandhills Community College; B.S., Pembroke State University;
M.Ed., North Carolina State University.
Directory and Appendices/288
John W. Boner, Criminal Justice
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.P.A., Appalachian State University.
Michael Bowers, Business
B.S. Appalachian State University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Paul Bowman, Music
B.M., M.M., Manhattan School of Music; D.M.A., University of California
Dustin R. Bridges, English
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University
Elizabeth Bridges, Human Resources
B.S., Wingate University; M. in Human Resources, Keene State.
F. Donald Bridges, Business/Criminal Justice
B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; J.D., Wake Forest University.
Joseph Bridges, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University
Elizabeth Brooks-Gordon, Business
B.A., Wake Forest University; J.D., Campbell University of Law.
Mark L. Brooks, Criminal Justice
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.A., Columbia Graduate School of Bible and Missions;
M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.S., ADJ, University of Louisville.
Bobby G. Brown, Criminal Justice
B.S., High Point University; M.S., East Carolina University.
Crystal Brown, Business
B.S., University of South Carolina Spartanburg; M.B.A., Winthrop University.
Joyce C. Brown, English
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi;
Additional Study, Appalachian State University.
Leslie M. Brown, Biology
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi.
Suzannah Brown, Business
B.A., High Point University, Ph.D., Mercer University.
Millicent Burke-Sinclair, Business
A.A., Gaston Community College; B.A., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Carmen M. Butler, Human Services
B.S. M.A./Ed.S., Gardner-Webb University
Jesse B. Caldwell, Business
B.A., J.D., University of North Carolina.
Richard E. Carmichael, Business
B.S., Monmouth University; M.B.A., Pace University; Ph.D., California Coast University.
Terri D. Chester, Human Services
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., Candidate, European Graduate School
Connie Christian, Business
A.A., Western Piedmont Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Gardner-Webb University/289
Gabriel P. Clevenger, Religion
B.A., M.Div., Gardner-Webb University.
Amanda B. Coates, Spanish
B.A., Clemson University; M.A., University of Northern Iowa
Denise R. Cooper, Business
A.A., Cleveland Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Randall Cooper, English
B.A., M.A., M. Div., Gardner-Webb University.
Charlotte R. Costello, Health/PE
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Homer W. Craig, Criminal Justice
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., University of Alabama.
Gary Crosby, Business B.S., University of North Carolina Chapel Hill;
M.B.A., University of North Carolina Charlotte.
David F. Crow, Criminal Justice
A.S., Lees-McRae College; B.S., Criminal Justice, University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
M.S., East Carolina University
David A. Cruise, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Kelly L. Cummings, Business
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Kelly C. Deal, Human Services
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
Sherry J. Dell-Aquila, Business
A.A.S., Catawba Valley Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Catherine DeLoach, Human Services B.S., Presbyterian College; M.A., Georgia School of
Professional Psychology.
Bruce DeMayo, Business
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.S., University of New Haven.
Kiera DesChamps, Human Services
B.S., University of West Florida; M.A., Liberty University.
Jennifer C. Dickson, Science
B.A., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic and State University.
Carolyn S. Donahue-Sears, Religion
B.A., B.S., University of Connecticut; M.Div., Gardner-Webb University.
Mona L. Dooley, Human Services
A.A., Gaston College; B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Gordon-Conwell Theological
Seminary.
Craig Douglas, Business
B.A., Oral Roberts University; M.Div., Emory University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb
University
Jon C. Drum, Business
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Directory and Appendices/290
Karma E. Edwards, Health/PE
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
Lewis W. Edwards, Social Science
B.A., Western Carolina University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Larry D. Efird, Religion
B.A., William Jennings Bryan College; M.A., Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary.
R. Dale Ellis, Business
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ed.D., Appalachian
State University.
Jesse n. English, Fine Arts
B.F.A., University of Kansas; M.F.A., University of North Texas
Brett E. Fansler, Business
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Rebecca J. Faw, Human Services
B.A., University of Akron; M.A., University of Akron.
Tadd D. Fellers, Religion
B.A., Northwestern College; M.Div., Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary.
Jeannie M. Fennell, Human Services
B.S., M.Ed., University of Georgia; M.B.A., Troy State University; Psy.D., Ryokan College.
Darrell Finney, Mathematics
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University.
James D. Fish, Criminal Justice
A.A., Western Piedmont Community College; B.S., University of North Carolina at
Charlotte;
M.A., University of South Carolina; Additional Studies in Law Enforcement Management.
Carmalita Fortenberry, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Emily W. Foss, Business
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.B.A., Western Carolina University
M. Lynne Foster, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Robert M. Foulk, Business
B.A., University of Delaware; M.B.A., Southern Illinois University.
Sarah B. Fredette, Human Services
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Winthrop University.
Gary W. Freeman, Art
A.A., Gaston College; B.S., M.A., East Carolina University.
Curtis E. Furr, Jr., Human Services
B.A., M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Steven P. Gambill, Criminal Justice
B.S., Appalachian State University; J.D., North Carolina Central University School of Law.
Gardner-Webb University/291
John L. Gray, Human Services
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.Div., Th.M., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary.
William J. Graziano, Business
A.A.S., Isothermal Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Amanda K. Green, Business
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
William I. Greenwood, Jr., Religion
B.A., University of Richmond; M.Div., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary;
D.Min., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.
David L. Grinnell, Religion
B.A., Elon University; Th.B., John Wesley Bible College; M.A., Southern Wesleyan
University; M.Div., Gardner-Webb University
John E. Gygax, Science
B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan; M.S., Marshall University.
Robert Hale, Business
B.S., University of Maryland; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
A. Michael Hall, Human Services
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Emory University; M.S.W., Virginia Commonwealth
University.
Glen A. Hall, Business
A.A.S., Community College of the Air Force; B.S., University of North Carolina at
Charlotte; M.B.A., Auburn University.
Sandra Hammett, Health/PE
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University
Crystal K. Hamrick, Business
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; C.P.A.
Ray Hardee, Psychology
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.H.D.L., University of North Carolina Charlotte.
C. Randy Hayes, Business
B.S., Baptist College of Charleston; M.S., University of LaVerne; M.S., Computer Officer
Training Course; Air University.
Emma G. Haynes, Business
A.A.S., Sandhills Community College; B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College;
M.A., University of Phoenix.
Stephen Z. Hearne, Religion
B.A., Elon University; M.Div., Th.M., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary;
D.Min., Erskine Theological Seminary; Additional Study, Yale University.
Gail W. Helton, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Avery H. Henline, Jr., Business
B.A., Lenoir-Rhyne College; M.B.A., Campbell University.
Directory and Appendices/292
Anne R. Hennis, Business
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.B.A., Ed. D., University of North Carolina at
Greensboro.
Jessica D. Herndon, Business
B.A., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
James H. Hines, Jr., Health/PE
B.S., East Tennessee State University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Ronald M. Hinson, Jr., Religion
B.S., University of Georgia; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Jill A. Hodges, Business
B.S., High Point University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Miranda B. Holiday, English
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., University of South Carolina.
Melissa Y. Holmes, Human Services
B.S., Francis Marion College; M.Ed., University of South Carolina.
Leroy Honeycutt, III, Business
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University.
Teresa Honeycutt, Religion
B.A., M.Div., Gardner-Webb University
Robert E. Hoyle, Science
B.S., Waynesburg College; M.S., West Virginia University.
Chris R. Hughes, Religion
B.A., Toccoa Falls College; M.A., Emmanuel School of Religion
Scott L. Hutchins, Business
B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Freddie L. Ingle, Business
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Clemson University.
Beverly A. Irby, Health/PE
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.Ed., College of Nursing and Health Professions.
Alissa W. Isenhour, Business
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Maxim S. Ivanov, Science
B.S., Tver State Medical Academy (M.D. equivalent).
Sherri Jackson, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Daniel C. Johnson, Jr., Religion
A.A., Lees McRae College; B.S., Carson-Newman College;
M.S., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.
E. Sandol Johnson, Science
B.S., M.S., West Texas State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.
Steven E. Jones, Criminal Justice
B.S., University of Miami; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Gardner-Webb University/293
Mandy M. Jordan, Science
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.S., Winthrop University.
Mark Kelley, Business
A.A., Caldwell Community College; B.S., Gardner-Webb University;
M.B.A., Lenoir-Rhyne College.
Barry K. Keys, Religion
B.A., Charleston Southern University; M.Div., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary;
D.Min., Drew University.
John C. Keyt, Business
B.S., M.B.A., East Tennessee State University; D.B.A., University of Tennessee.
Brett A. Kindler, Business
B.A., I.M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Samantha King, Human Services
B.A., University of Southern Maine; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
David Klass, Mathematics
B.S., M.Ed., North Carolina State University
Melissa D. Knick, Health/PE
B.S., Tennessee Temple University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
M. Deanya Lattimore, English
B.A., M.A., East Carolina University; Ph.D. Candidate, Syracuse University.
Lyn Lazar, Business
A.A., Tri County Technical College; B.S., Lander University; M.L.I.S., University of
South Carolina of Columbia.
Maureen Leary, Business
B.S., South Wesleyan College; M.S., Strayer University.
Deidre C. Ledbetter, Business
A.A.S., Isothermal Community College; B.S., Appalachian State University;
M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
M. Suzanne Levan, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Jason A. Lineberger, English
B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
M. Dane Loflin, Business
B.S., Limestone College; M.B.A., University of Phoenix.
James F. Love, III, Business
B.A., North Carolina State University; M.B.A., Wake Forest University.
Ronald H. Love, Religion
B.A., Slippery Rock University; M.Div., Wesley Theological Seminary;
D.Min., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania;
M. LIS., University of Pittsburgh; M.S.Ed., Duquesne University.
Kimberly M. Mackel, English
B.A., Westminster College; M.A., Appalachian State University.
Directory and Appendices/294
H. Courtney Madden, Social Science
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Jamie Maiella, Business
A.A., Caldwell Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Jose Manjarres, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Long Island University C.W., Post Campus.
David A. Marshall, Science
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.Ed., Gardner-Webb University.
Cindy J. H. Martin, Science
A.B., M.A.T., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
M.E., University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
Dean M. Martin, Religion
B.A., William Jewell College; B.D., Yale University Divinity School, Ph.D., Baylor
University.
Kathee L. Martin, Nursing
A.D.N., Franciscan School of Nursing; B.S.N., Alverno College; M.S.N., Gardner-Webb
University
Robert S. Mason Jr., Mathematics
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Florida.
Daffie H. Matthews, Business
B.S., M.S.B.E., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Darryl E. Maxwell, Religion
B.A., Messiah College; B.Div., M.Div., Evangelical School of Theology;
D.Min. Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Jacqueline D. Maxwell, Criminal Justice
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
William E. McCall, Religion
B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.Div., Ph.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.
Megan E. McCauley, Music
B.M., Bob Jones University; M.M., University of Illinois; D.M.A., University of Kentucky
Donna McClellan, Human Services
A.S., Western Piedmont Community College; B.S., Gardner-Webb University;
M.S.W., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Crystal G. McLendon, Human Services
A.A., Northeaster Technical College; B.S., Gardner-Webb University;
M.B.A., University of Phoenix
Sara W. McNeely, Health/PE
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Eugene B. McRae, Health/PE
B.A., Pembroke State University; B.S., Livingstone College;
M.S.W., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Marie E. McTigue, Business
A.A.S., Forsyth Technical Community College; B.S., Gardner-Webb University;
M.B.A, Appalachian State University.
Gardner-Webb University/295
Russell A. Meade, Business
B.A., Adelphi University; Ph.D., St. John's University, School of Law.
Rhonda S. Medford, Business
B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University;
M. Ed., Appalachian State University
Bob Mellbye, Business
B.S., University of Colorado; M.B.A., Wake Forest University.
Gerald T. Melton, Human Services
B.A., University of North Carolina at Pembroke; M.A. Ed, East Carolina University
Ann A. Merritt, Human Service
B.A., University of South Florida, M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Kenneth H. Miller, Business
B.S.B.A., Appalachian State University; M.B.A., Troy University
Kimberly D. Miller, English
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., Liberty University.
Roger A. Mills, Social Science
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University.
Aaron L. Misenheimer, Music
B.M., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.M., University of Nebraska
Kevin J. Misenheimer, Accounting
B.S., Pfeiffer College: M.B.A., Western Carolina University: M.S., Pfeiffer University;
M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
Pamela P. Mitchem, Science
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Appalachian State University.
Virginia D. Morgan, Mathematics/Science
B.S., M.S., State University of New York at Cortland; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University.
Van L. Morrow, Human Services
A.A., Gardner-Webb University; B.A., M.A., Appalachian State University;
Ph.D., New York University.
William R. Mullis, Business
B.A., Campbell University; M.B.A., Elon University.
George E. Muse Jr., Human Services
B.A., Catawba College; M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Georgia.
Penelope E. Nall, Business
A.S., Polk Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University;
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University.
Robert B. Nelson, Music
B.M.E., Jacksonville University; M.M., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Florida.
Robert M. Nelson, Human Services
A.A., Sandhills Community College; B.S., M.A., Liberty University.
Ronald D. Nicholson, Business
B.S., Clemson University; M.B.A., Wake Forest University.
Mickie J. Norman, Religion
Directory and Appendices/296
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.Div., Campbell University.
Robert Norman III, Religion
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Ronald J. Pallick, Human Services
B.A., State university of New York; M.S.W., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
B. Marie Parkhurst, Religion
A.A., Western Piedmont Community College; B.S., Appalachian State University;
M.Div., Gardner-Webb University.
Tim A. Patrick, Social Science
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D, Appalachian
State University.
Jane L. Pease, Human Services
B.M., Biola University; M. Ed., University of Arkansas.
Susan Pendergratt, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Jeffrey D. Penley, Business
B.A., J.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Dianne Phillips, Mathematics
B.A., Lenoir-Rhyne College; M.A., Wake Forest University.
Sandra Pierce, Mathematics
B.S., Clinch Valley College; M.S. East Tennessee State University.
Dale I. Pocock, Business
B.S., M.A., Clemson University.
Glenda S. Pope, Religion
A.A., Richmond Community College; B.A., University of North Carolina at Pembroke;
M. Div., Gardner-Webb University.
G. Jeffrey Powell, Social Science
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
Richard C. Prassel, Religion
B.A., Mississippi College; M. Div., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Joyce F. Pressley, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Danette S. Price, Business
A.A.S., Surry Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Lisa R. Queen, Health/PE
B.A., Lenoir-Rhyne College; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Jody B. Raduly, Health/PE
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Marianne L. Rogowski, Social Sciences
A.A., Mitchell Community College; B.A., M.A., Appalachian State University
S. Bobby Rauf, Business
B.S., North Carolina State University; M.B.A., Pfeiffer University.
Gardner-Webb University/297
B. Jill Ray, Science
B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
Steven L. Redden, Health/PE
B.S., Piedmont Bible College; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Rodney K. Reece, Business
B.S., B.A., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Alton A.Reeder Jr., Business
B.A., M.A., Oral Roberts University; J.D., Regent University.
Sandra J. Reid-Coffey, Human Services
B.S., M.S., Appalachian State University.
C. Eugene Richard, Business
B.S., Mars Hill College; M.B.A., Campbell University.
Chadburn E. Richard, Business
B.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.B.A.,Gardner-Webb University.
James B. Richardson, Religion
B.A., Mars Hill College; M.Div., D. Min., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Shawn Ricks, Psychology
B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University.
Joyce Rodgers, Nursing
A.D.N., Central Piedmont Community College; B.S.N., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University.
Marianne L. Rogowski, Social Sciences
A.A., Mitchell Community College; B.A., M.A., Appalachian State University
Allen J. Romeo, Human Services
B.A., Adelphi University; M.A., Ph.D., California School of Professional Psychology.
Raymond A. Roy, Business
B.S., St. Mary’s University; M.B.A., University of Massachusetts.
Gay R. Russell, English
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.A., Emory University.
Michael T. Schau, Business
A.A., Dekalb Community College; B.S., Georgia State University; M.B.A., Winthrop
University.
Elizabeth H. Schenck, Human Services
B.A., North Carolina State University; M.S.W., University of South Carolina.
Kaye H. Schenk, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Kristen L. Setzer, Business
B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Sherry Shaw, Business
B.S., M.Acc., Gardner-Webb University.
Clifford Sheaffer, Mathematics
B.A., Rutgers State University; M.A.T., Winthrop University.
Directory and Appendices/298
Don W. Sheets, Science
B.S., North Carolina State University; B.A., M.S., Central Michigan University.
Jo Ann Sherrill, Business
A.A., Catawba Valley Community College; B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
G. Brent Shook, Science
B.S., North Carolina State University; M.A., Appalachian State University.
Misti W. Silver, Human Services
B.A., University of North Carolina; M.S., University of Tennessee.
Ernest L. Simons, III, Business
B.S., Milwaukee School of Engineering; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
William L. Sims, Religion
B.S., West Virginia University; M.D., University of Kentucky School of Medicine;
M.Div., Shaw University Divinity School.
Frances Sizemore, Business
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Anna Slaughter, Business
B.S., Northwestern State University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
W. Craig Smarr, Business
B.A., Clemson University; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University
Craig W. Smith, Human Services/Psychology
B.S.W., North Carolina State University; M.S.W., University of South Carolina.
Robert D. Smith, Business
B.S., University of Tennessee; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Scott A. Smith, Human Service
B.S., Piedmont Bible College; M.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Travis K. Smith, Religion
B.A., M.Div., Gardner-Webb University
Frances Sparti, Nursing
A.D.N., Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College; B.S.N., Henderson State University;
GYN/OB/WHNP, Emory University; M.S.N., Drexel University
Ann Gore Spencer, Science
B.S., Wake Forest University; M.S., North Carolina State University.
Darin Spencer, Business
B.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.B.A., Pfeiffer University;
M.A., University of North Carolina Charlotte.
Nathan A. Stafford, Business
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.B.A., Wake Forest University.
Steven M. Staton, Religion
B.A., M.Div., Gardner-Webb University.
M. Lynn Stevens, Business
A.A., Surry Community College; B.A., M.Acc., Gardner-Webb University.
Gardner-Webb University/299
Kerry Stoots, Business
B.S., UNC-Charlotte; B.A., UNC-Charlotte; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Teresa N. Tallent, Nursing
B.S., A.D.N., B.S.N., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University
Michael B. Taub, Human Services
B.S., MA/Ed. S., Gardner-Webb University
Donald Taylor, Psychology
B.A., Cheyney State College; M.S.S.A., Case-Western Reserve University.
Dennis R. Teall-Fleming, Religion
B.A., Xavier University; M. Div., Emory University
Robert P. Teixeira, Music
B.A., Westfield State College; M.M., Florida State University.
Richard Theokas, Social Science and Business
B.A., Union College: M.A., Webster University; J.D., Mercer University.
Sarah Thomas, English
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Gary C. Tilley, Business
A.A., Surry Community College; A.B., University of North Carolina; M.S., South Dakota
State University, Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Daphney W. Torres, Health/PE
B.S., M.S., Gardner-Webb University.
Mary H. Troutman, Human Services
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.R.E., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Bill L. Tyler, Music
B.M., Memphis State University; M.M., University of Wyoming.
Kimberly M. Tyler, Music
B.M.Ed., James Madison University; M.M., University of Wyoming.
Donna L. Wallace-Miller, Human Services
A.A.S., Central Piedmont Community College; B.A., Thomas Edison State College;
M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Jeffery S. Ward, Business
B.S., University of Tennessee; M.B.A., Gardner- Webb University
Sharon H. Webb, Psychology
B.S., M.A., Ed.S., Gardner-Webb University.
Karissa Weir, Health/PE
A.A., Gaston College; B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
John W. Wester, Health/PE
B.A., Valdosta State University; M.Ed., Ed.D., The University of Southern Mississippi.
Vincent White, Business
A.A., Caldwell Community College; B.S., University of North Carolina at Asheville;
M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University
W. Scott White, Business
B.S., University of Tennessee; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Directory and Appendices/300
Geoffrey I. Whitehead, Music
B.A., M.A., University of Western Australia; Ph.D., Indiana University.
Kimberly Williams, Human Services
B.A., Hollins University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University.
L. Denise Williams, Science
B.S., Lynchburg College; M.S., Appalachian State University.
Susan S. Williamson, Science
B.S., University of Kentucky; M.S., University of California at Davis
Solomon L. Willis, Math
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Appalachian State University
Darrell G. Wilson, Business
B.S., University of Tennessee; M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University.
Sonya Wilson, Business
B.S. University of South Carolina Upstate; B.S., M.A., University of South Carolina
Columbia; M. Tx., Georgia State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Columbia.
Richard L. Wood, Religion
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.Div., Campbell University
Elzbieta Wysocka, Science
M.M.S.T., Ph.D., Medical University of Wroclaw.
Ted E. York, Religion
B.A., Wake Forest University; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.
William C. Young, Business
B.A., Appalachian State University; J.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
School of Law.
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Ken Baker, 1999, Professor of Physical Education, Wellness and Sport Studies; Coordinator,
Sport Science and Pedagogy Program; Chair, Department of Physical Education,
Wellness, Sport Studies
B.A., Central Wesleyan College; M.A., Furman University; Ph.D., University of Georgia
Robert J. Bass, 1995, Professof of Mathematics
B.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte: M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
Rebecca Beck-Little, 1991, Professor of Nursing; Dean, School of Nursing
A.S.N., Western Piedmont Community College; B.S.N., M.S.N., University of North
Carolina at Charlotte; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Donald L. Berry, 1999, Professor of World Religions; Director, Global Missions Resource
Center
B.A., University of Kentucky; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Additional studies: University of Louisville, University of Chicago
Kent B. Blevins, 1998, Professor of Religion; Chair, Department of Religious Studies
and Philosopy
B.A., Wake Forest University; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Additional Studies: The Catholic University of America
Gardner-Webb University/301
Frieda F. Brown, 1985, Professor of Psychology and Counseling
B.S., M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., University of Louisville
Sydney K. Brown, 2004, Associate Professor of Education
B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Frances B. Burch, 2001, Professor of Physical Education,Wellness and Sport Studies; Dean,
Graduate School
B.S., Lock Haven University; M.A. Eastern Kentucky University; Ph.D., University of
Virginia
Janie M. Carlton, 1982, Professor of Nursing
B.S., Lenoir-Rhyne College; M.N., Emory University; Ed.D., North Carolina State
University
David M. Carscaddon, 1990, Professor of Psychology and Counseling; Dean, School of
Psychology and Counseling
B.A., University of North Carolina at Asheville; M.A., Morehead State University;
Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Christopher V. Davis, 2001, Associate Professor of English; Director, University Writing Center
B.A., High Point University; M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University
Cheryl A. Duffus, 2007, Assistant Professor of English; Coordinator, English Program
B.A., Hollins University; M.F.A., Emerson College; Ph.D., University of Mississippi
Allen Douglas Eury, 2001, Professor of Education; Dean, School of Education, Director of
Center for Innovative Leadership Studies; Coordinator of Doctoral Studies
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.S., Ed.D., Appalachian State University
Willie C. Fleming, 2006, Associate Professor of Psychology and Counseling; Coordinator,
Mental Health and School Counseling Programs at Statesville
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Linda C. Greene, 2001, Associate Professor of Psychology and Counseling
B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State
University
Jeffrey M. Hartman, 2005, Assistant Professor of Physical Education
B.A., Bloomsburg University; M.Ed., Ph.D., The University of Virginia
Shana V. Hartman, 2007, Assistant Professor of English; Coordinator, English Education
Program B.S., East Carolina University; M.A. , Ph.D., University of North Carolina at
Charlotte
T. Perry Hildreth, 2006, Associate Professor of Philosophy
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological
Seminary; Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
June H. Hobbs, 1994, Professor of English; Chair, Department of English
B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University; M.A., University of Louisville; Ph.D., University of
Oklahoma
Mary Alice Hodge, 2004, Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director, B.S.N. Programs A.D.N.
B.S., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina Greensboro
Delores M. Hunt, 1978-80; 1982, Professor of Physical Education,Wellness and Sport Studies;
Vice President, Student Development
B.S., Auburn University; M.Ed., D.A., Middle Tennessee State University
Sheila G. Ingle, 2006, Associate Professor of Education; Chair, Elementary Education,
Licensure Officer for the School of Education
B.A., Sacred Heart College; M.A., Western Carolina University; Ph.D., Capella University
Directory and Appendices/302
John A. Kaufhold, 2005, Professor of Education
B.S., West Chester University at Pennsylvania; M.S., Ed.D., University of Virginia
Jane C. King, 2007, Assistant Professor of Education, Coordinator, Master of Arts in
Elementary Education Coordinator,
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Janet S. Land, 1994, Professor of English, Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and
Learning
B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., East Carolina University;
Ph.D., University of South Carolina
J. Robert Mayfield, 2008, Associate Professor of Education
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Auburn University
Lucenda M. McKinney, 1992, Professor of Education
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., Clemson University
Marcia M. Miller, 1977-1987; 1994, Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., University of Michigan; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
James P. Morgan, Jr., 2008, Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., University of Kentucky; M.S., Ph.D., Auburn University
Ronald I. Nanney, 2000, Professor of Education
B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.S., Western Carolina University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
David Reed Parker, 1997, Professor of English
B.A., Furman University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Gayle Bolt Price, 1991, Professor of English; Associate Provost for Schools
B.A., M.Ed., Clemson University; Ed.D., Auburn University
Paula F. Qualls, Ph.D., 1999, Professor of Religion
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary
Faye H. Rucker, 2002, Associate Professor of Education
B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.A.,University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Anita Sanders, 2010, Assistant Professor of Education; Coordinator, Evening Undergraduate
Education Program at Boiling Springs
B.S., North Carolina Central University; M.A., Fayetteville State University;
Ed.S., South Carolina State University; Ed.D., South Carolina State University
Reimund Serafica, 2011, Assistant Professor of Nursing
A.A., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D. candidate, University of Hawaii, Manoa
Scott E. Shauf, 2009, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
B.A., Univeristy of Richmond; M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
M.T.S., Duke Univeristy; Ph.D., Emory University
David W. Shellman, 2003, Associate Professor of Education; Chair, Executive Leadership
Studies (K-12) Program
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.HDL., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.S., Winthrop University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
J. Carroll Smith, 2001, Associate Professor of Education
B.S., M.S., East Carolina University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
University
Gardner-Webb University/303
Laura W. Smith, 2003, Professor of Psychology and Counseling; Coordinator, School
Counseling Program at Boiling Springs
A.A., Peace College; B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.Ed., University of
North Carolina at Charlotte; Ed.D., University of Virginia
Shonna Snyder, 2010, Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Wellness, and Sport Studies
B.S., Wilmington College; M.Ed., University of Cincinnati; Ph.D., Purdue University
Gail D. Stowe, 2002, Associate Professor of Education;
B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.HDL., University of North Carolina at
Charlotte; Ed.S., Winthrop University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
LaShea S. Stuart, 2009, Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Troy State University; M.A., Ph.D., Auburn University
Kelly Taylor, 2010, Instructor in Education; Chair, Middle Grades Education
B.S., East Carolina University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University
Matthew D. Theado, 1995, Professor of English
B.A., M.A., James Madison University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Jeffrey L. Tubbs, 1982, Professor of Physical Education, Wellness and Sport Studies; Vice
President for Planning and Institutional Effectiveness
B.A., Bryan College; M.S., D.A., Middle Tennessee State University
Vickie G. Walker, 2003, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Director of Graduates Studies
L.P.N., Central Piedmont Community College; A.D.N., Gaston Community College;
B.S.N., M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University; D.N.P., Case Western Reserve University
Shannon P. Warden, 2010, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Counseling, Coordinator,
Mental Health Counseling Program at Boiling Springs
B.A., Elon College; M.A., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at
Greensboro
Deborah M. Ware, 2005, Associate Professor of Physical Education
B.S., East Stroudsburg State College; M.A.T., Livingston University; Ed.D., University of
Central Florida
R. Lane Wesson, 2000, Associate Professor of Education; Coordinator of Teacher Education
Program at Gardner-University at Statesville
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ph.D., University of
North Carolina at Greensboro
Jimmy D. Whitlow, 1996, Professor of Psychology and Counseling
A.A., Anderson College; B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.R.E., Th.M., Ed.,D., New
Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary
Ronald W. Williams, 1998, Professor of Religion
B.A., Western Kentucky University; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary
GRADUATE SCHOOL ADJUNCT FACULTY
Joyce C. Brown, GWU Professor Emerita of English
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi
Joe M. Bullis, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A. Appalachian State University; M.A. Gardner-Webb University;
Ed.D. Gardner-Webb University
Mark W. Burcham, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Directory and Appendices/304
Ginny D. Carpenter, Adjunct Professor of Education
A.B., Pfeiffer University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., Appalachian State University
Larry W. Cartner, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Pfeiffer College; M.M.E., Ed.S., Winthrop University; Ed.D., Peabody College of
Vanderbilt University
Jeffrey R. Church, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
David C. Clarke, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.A., Winthrop University;
Ed.D. University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Rachel N. Clarke, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.M., Winthrop University; M.A., Winthrop University; Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Collette W. Deviney, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
E. Ray Dockery, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Anderson University; M.A.T., East Tennessee University;
Ed.D., University of Tennessee
Wendy Edney, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., David Lipscomb University; M.A., Western Carolina University;
Ed.D., Western Carolina University
William R. Elmore, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., M.A., East Carolina University; Ph.D., University of Georgia
Nathaniel L. Felder, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Livingstone College; M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Michigan
Gregory A. Firn, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Washington State University; M.S., United States Sports Academy;
Ed.D., Seattle Pacific University
Kelly W. Gwaltney, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Robin L. Hardy, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.Ed., University of South Carolina;
Ed.D. Nova Southeastern University
Sheila B. Huckabee, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Winthrop University; M.A., Winthrop University; Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Elaine D. Jenkins, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Ed.,Winthrop University;
Ed.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at
Charlotte
Kenneth D. Jenkins, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of Florida; M.Ed., University of Miami; Ed.D., University of Miami
Dale S. Lamb, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., North Carolina State University; M.Ed., North Carolina State University;
Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kristen C. Lanier, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., North Carolina State University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Gardner-Webb University/305
Christopher Law, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.A., Queens University and GardnerWebb University; Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Timothy Y. Lee, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., North Carolina A&T State
University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Kathy W. Lindsey, 2003, Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director, Graduate Programs in
Nursing
A.D.N., Gardner-Webb University; B.S.N., Western Carolina University;
M.S.N., Gardner-Webb University; D.N.P., Case Western Reserve University.
David A. Martin, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., University of North Carolina, Pembroke; M.Ed., University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Donald L. Martin, Jr., Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Duke University; M.A.T., Duke University; Ed.D., University of Kentucky
Johnnie C. Martin, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., M.A., Gardner-Webb College; Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University
of North Carolina at Greensboro
C.E. McCary, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Yale University; M.S., Southern Connecticut State University;
Ed.D., Harvard University
Shelly A. Meyers, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Missouri Valley College; M.S., Walden University; Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Samuel W. Misher, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State
University; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University
Richard E. Moore, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., University of North Carolina, Greensboro; M.Ed., University of North Carolina,
Greensboro; Ed.D., University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Lory D. Morrow, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina at Wilmington; M.A., Gardner-Webb University;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Patricia E. Murray, Adjunct Professor of Psychology and Counseling
B.S., Geneva College; M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Anita L. Owenby, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., East Carolina University; M.A., East Carolina University;
Ed.S., Western Carolina University; Ed.D., Western Carolina University
Denise Q. Patterson, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Ed., University of North Carolina
at Charlotte; M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Jeffrey P. Peal, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A.,West Liberty State College; M.A., Gardner-Webb University;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Stephen R. Pickard, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Campbell University; M.A., Appalachian State University;
Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Philip R. Rapp, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Wake Forest University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro;
Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Directory and Appendices/306
Kathy G. Revis, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina at Asheville; M.Ed., Western Carolina University;
Ed.S., Western Carolina University; Ed.D., Western Carolina University
John S. Reynolds, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Akron State University; M.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of
Tennessee
Jane Hill Riley, Adjunct Professor of Psychology
B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College; M.S., Winthrop College; Ph. D., University of
Georgia
Mary Beth Roth, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;
Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Tammie Sexton, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., North Carolina Central University;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Monica Shepherd, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University; Ed.D., Gardner-Webb
University
Sandra L. Sikes, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Ed., University of North Carolina
at Greensboro; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Phyllis R. Tallent, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Appalachian State University;
Ed.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., East Tennessee State University
Gregory E. Thornton, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Temple University; M.A., Salisbury State University; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern
University
Barbara R. Todd, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Ed., University of North Carolina
at Greensboro; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
F. Dennis Triplett, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.S., Winthrop
University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
David R. Walker, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Gardner-Webb University;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Anita F. Ware, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale;
Ed.D., Appalachian State University
W. Earl Watson, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., East Carolina University; M.A.,East Carolina University;
Ed.S., East Carolina University; Ed.D.,Duke University
Tanya Watson, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.A., Gardner-Webb University;
Ed.D., Gardner-Webb University
Goldie F. Wells, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University;
Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Gardner-Webb University/307
Valerie D. Williams, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.S., St. Augustine’s College; M.B.A., East Carolina University; Ed.S., East Carolina
University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Craig Witherspoon, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.M.E., Virginia Commonwealth University; M.S., Old Dominion University;
Ed.S., Ed.D., George Washington University
Barbara H. Zwadyk, Adjunct Professor of Education
B.A., Greensboro College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro;
Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
GRADUATE SCHOOL ADJUNCTIVE FACULTY FROM SCHOOL OF DIVINITY
Jimmy D. Whitlow, 1996, Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling
A.A., Anderson College; B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.R.E., Th.M., Ed.D.,
New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
I. Glenn Bottoms, 1983, Professor of Economics and Management Information Systems
B.A., Emory University; M.A., University of Ottawa; Ph.D., Georgia State University;
Post-doctoral study, George Washington University
Sue C. Camp, 1976, Professor of Business Administration;
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.A.T., Winthrop University; Ed.D., University of
Tennessee at Knoxville
Donald W. Caudill, 2008, Professor of Marketing
B.S., Berea College; M.B.A., Morehead State University; M.S. in Marketing,
Memphis State University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Earl H. Godfrey, Jr., 1992, Professor of Business Administration
B.S., University of South Carolina; M.B.A., Winthrop University;
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
R. Van Graham, 1999-2002, 2005, Associate Professor of Business Law and Management:
Associate Dean of the Godbold School of Business
B.A., Asbury College; J.D., Baylor University
Steven G. Johnson, 2005, Associate Professor of Business Administration
B.S., Northwestern Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Louisiana Tech University
Thomas J. Meaders, 2002, Associate Professor of Information Systems
B.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., University of Alabama at Huntsville
C. Mickey Metcalf, 2004, Associate Professor of Business Administration
B.A., Oglethorpe University, M.B.A., University of South Carolina, Columbia;
J.D., Wake Forest University
James W. Nall, 2006, Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., East Carolina University; M.A., Webster University; M.B.A., Pepperdine University;
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Anthony I. Negbenebor, 1989, Professor of Economics and International Business, Dover
Chair; Dean, Godbold School of Business
B.S., M.Sc., Ph.D., Mississippi State University
Felice Policastro, 2004, Associate Professor of International Business; Director, Graduate
Programs in Business
B.S., University De Oriente; M.B.A., Edgewood College; Ph.D., The University of Texas
Pan American
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E. Denise Smith, 2006, Assistant Professor of Business
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.B.A., Brenau University;
D.H.A., Medical University of South Carolina
Robert K. Spear, 2010, Professor of Accounting
B.A., University of New Hampshire; M.B.A., The College of William and Mary;
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Li Xiao, 2007, Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems
B.E., University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, China;
Ph.D., George Washington University
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADJUNCT FACULTY
Robert James Bass, Adjunct Professor of Business Administration
B.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte; M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
Emily W. Foss, Adjunct Professor of Accounting
B.S., Gardner-Webb University; M.B.A., M.Acc., Western Carolina University
Avery H. Henline, Jr., Adjunct Professor of Accounting
B.S., Lenoir Rhyne College; M.B.A., Campbell University; M.B.A., Certificate in
Accounting, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Jeffrey Douglas Penley, Adjunct Professor of Business Administration
A.B., J.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Andres E. Rivas-Chavez, Adjunct Professor of Finance
B.S., Universidad De Oriente; M.B.A., Edgewood College; Ph.D., University of Texas Pan
American
John E. Young, Adjunct Professor of Business Administration
B.S., Kent State University; M.B.A., Duke University
Oscar Zamora, Adjunct Professor of Business Administration
B.S., Ch.E., M.B.A., University of Texas, Austin
M. CHRISTOPHER WHITE SCHOOL OF DIVINITY
Sheryl Ann Dawson Adams, 1995, Professor of Theology and Church History
B.M.E., Northeast Louisiana State University; M.Ed., Louisiana State University;
M.Div., Th.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. Additional studies:
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Robert W. Canoy, 2000, Professor of Christian Theology; Dean, M. Christopher White School
of Divinity
B.A., Mississippi College; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
Additional Studies: Hebrew Union College and Jewish Institute of Religion
Tereso C. Casiño, 2010, Professor of Missiology
B.Th., Luzon Nazarene Bible College; M.Div., Asia-Pacific Nazarene Theological Seminary;
Th.D., Asia Baptist Graduate Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Asian Center for Theological
Studies and Mission
Douglas M. Dickens, 2000, W. Randall Lolley Professor of Pastoral Studies
B.A., Ouachita Baptist University; M.Div., Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological
Seminary. Additional studies: University of Arkansas College for Medical Sciences, Texas
Christian University, Baylor University Medical Center; Samara State Medical University,
Samara Russia; Harvard University
Gardner-Webb University/309
Larry D. George, 2009, Associate Professor of New Testament Interpretation
B.S., University of California at Davis; M.Div., Spring Valley Bible College and Seminary;
M.Div., San Francisco Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University
Gerald L. Keown, 1996, Professor of Old Testament Interpretation; Associate Dean,
M. Christopher White School of Divinity
B.S., University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary. Additional studies: Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, Ohio;
Goethe Institute, Rothenberg, Germany; University of Chicago
James R. McConnell, Jr., 2009, Assistant Professor of New Testament Interpretation
B.S.E.E., North Carolina State University; M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary;
Ph.D., Baylor University
Warren C. Robertson, 2007, Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies
B.A., College of Charleston; M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Th.M., Harvard University; M.Phil., Drew University; Ph.D., Drew University
Sophia Gomes Steibel, 1994, Professor of Christian Education
B.A., Gardner-Webb University; M.A., Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Danny M. West, 2002, Associate Professor of Preaching and Pastoral Studies, Executive
Director, Doctor of Ministry Program
B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.Div., Th.M., Ph.D.,The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary
Jimmy D. Whitlow, 1996, Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling
A.A., Anderson College; B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.R.E., Th.M., Ed.D.,
New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary
DIVINITY VISITING AND ADJUNCTIVE FACULTY
Bobby Ell Adams, Adjunct Professor of Christian Ethics
A.B.Ed., Northeastern Oklahoma State University; M.Div., Central Baptist Theological
Seminary; Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Lisa Wimberly Allen, Adjunct Professor
B.A., Converse College; M.Div., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Ph.D., Boston University
Steven R. Harmon, Adjunct Professor of Christian Theology
B.A., Howard Payne University; M.Div., Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological
Seminary
Jeff L. Hensley, Adjunct Professor
B.A., Mars Hill College; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary;
D.Min., Princeton Theological Seminary
B. Andrew Roby, Adjunct Professor of Religion
B.M., Union University; M.C.M., D.M.A., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
DIVINITY ADJUNCTIVE FACULTY FROM THE UNIVERSITY
Kent B. Blevins, 1998, Professor of Religion; Chair of Religious Studies and Philosophy
B.A., Wake Forest University; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Additional studies: The Catholic University of America
Claude Douglas Bryan, 2002, Professor of Religious Education; Assistant Provost for Academic
Services
B.A., Furman University; B.S., Howard Payne University; M.A.R.E., G.S.R.E., Ph.D.,
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
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Joseph W. Collins, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
B.S.,B.A., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ed.D., North Carolina State
University
Anthony I. Negbenebor, 1989, Professor of Economics and International Business, Dover Chair;
Dean, Godbold School of Business
B.S., M.Sc., Ph.D., Mississippi State University
Paula F. Qualls, 1999, Professor of Religion
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary
Edwin B. Stepp, 2003, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Philosophy
B.A., Baylor University; M.DivBL., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary;
Ph.D. Baylor University
Ronald W. Williams, 1998, Professor of Religion
B.A., Western Kentucky University; M.Div., Ph.D., The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary
FACULTY EMERITI
Garland H. Allen, 1961, Professor Emeritus of Religion and History
Robert R. Blackburn, 1958, Professor Emeritus of Health Education and Physical Education
Joyce Compton Brown, 1966, Professor Emerita of English
Leslie M. Brown, 1966, Professor Emeritus of Biology
Barbara J. Cribb, 1969, Associate Professor Emerita of Education and Art
George R. Cribb, 1969, Professor Emeritus of Music
Alice R. Cullinan, 1974, Professor Emerita of Religious Education and Religion
Robert L. Decker, 1970, Professor Emeritus of Music
M. Lansford Jolley, 1957, Professor Emeritus of Social Science
Paul W. Jolley, 1962, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Betty H. Logan, 1957, Associate Professor Emerita of Business
Robert E. Morgan, 1967, Professor Emeritus of French and Mathematics
M. Vann Murrell, 1967, Professor Emeritus of Religion
F. Thirlen Osborne, 1957, Professor Emeritus of English
C. Sherman Parrish, 1970, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
Patricia W. Partin, 1988, Professor Emerita of Psychology and Counseling
Phil D. Perrin, 1969, Professor Emeritus of Music
Launita E. Proctor, 1969, Professor Emerita of Health Education and Physical Education
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF EMERITI
James E. Crawley, 1994, Dean Emeritus, School of Business
Darlene J. Gravett, 1989, Associate Provost Emerita
Robert L. Lamb, 1962, Dean Emeritus, M. Christopher White School of Divinity
Shirley P. Toney, 1965-90, 1992, Dean Emerita, School of Nursing
Gardner-Webb University/311
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS AND STAFF
PRESIDENT
A. Frank Bonner, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., President
Glenda S. Crotts, Senior Assistant to the President
Sandra C. Earl, Secretary to President’s Senior Assistant
M. Lansford Jolley, A.A., B.A., M.A., Ed.S., L.H.D., University Historian
PROVOST
Ben C. Leslie, B.A., M.Div., Th.M., D. Theol., Provost and Executive Vice President
Rebekah L. Wright, A.A., Administrative Assistant to the Provost and Executive Vice President
C. Earl Leininger, B.A., B.D., Ph.D., Associate Provost for Arts and Sciences
Gayle B. Price, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., Associate Provost for Professional and Graduate Studies
C. Douglas Bryan, B.A., B.S., M.A.R.E., G.S.R.E., Ph.D., Associate Provost for Academic Services
Barbara G. Cox, A.A., B.S., M.P.A., Assistant Provost for Adult and Continuing Education
Mary Roby, B.Mus., M.L.S., Dean of Libraries
LouAnn Scates, B.A., Registrar
ASSOCIATE PROVOST FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES
C. Earl Leininger, B.A., B.D., Ph.D., Associate Provost for Arts and Sciences
Karen C. Ferree, A.A., Administrative Assistant to the Associate Provost for
Arts and Sciences
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
School of Performing and Visual Arts, Interim Dean, James W. Thomas
Department of Art, Chair, Doug Knotts
Department of Music, Chair, Patricia C. Sparti
Department of Theatre, Chair,
Department of Communication Studies, Chair, Robert J. Carey
Department of English Language and Literature, Chair, June H. Hobbs
Department of World Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Chair, Ute S. Lahaie
Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chair, Tammy C. Hoyle
Department of Natural Sciences, Chair, Venita L. Totten
Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies, Chair, R. Ken Baker
Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy, Chair, Kent B. Blevins
Department of Social Sciences, Chair, Timothy W. Vanderburg
DEPARTMENTAL SECRETARIES
Kim Murray, A.A., Department of Music
TBA, Department of Physical Education, Wellness, Sport Studies
Diane Guffey, Department of Math and Natural Sciences
Debbie Hill, Department of English and Department of World Languages,
Literatures, and Cultures
Annette Spurling, A.A., Department of Communication Studies and
Department of Social Sciences
Amy Sue Franklin, B.S., Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy and
School of Performing and Visual Arts
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DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
Helen L. Tichenor, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
DIRECTOR OF CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AND LEARNING
Janet S. Land, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
FACULTY CHEMICAL HYGIENE ADVISOR
Venita Laverne Totten, B.A., Ph.D.
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Maj. Jackson T. Salter, Assistant Professor of Military Science
ASSOCIATE PROVOST FOR SCHOOLS
Gayle Bolt Price, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., Associate Provost for Professional and Graduate
Studies
Karen C. Ferree, A.A., Administrative Assistant to the Associate Provost for
Professional and Graduate Studies
GRADUATE SCHOOL
Frances Bailey Burch, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
Laura R. Simmons, A.A., Office Manager
Judy Russell, Secretary
GODBOLD SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Anthony I. Negbenebor, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the Godbold School of Business
R. Van Graham, B.A., J.D., Associate Dean of the Godbold School of Business
Natetsa Lawrence, B.A., M.B.A., Administrative Assistant to the Dean
Felice Policastro, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Director of Graduate Programs in Business
SCHOOL OF DIVINITY
Robert W. Canoy, Sr., B.A., M.Div., Ph.D., Dean of the Gardner-Webb University School
of Divinity
Gerald L. Keown, B.S., M.Div., Ph.D., Associate Dean of the Gardner-Webb University
School of Divinity
Selvia Brown, Administrative Assistant
Melissa Hollifield, Secretary to D.Min Program, Pittman Center for Congregational
Enrichment, and Ministerial Referral Services
Danny M. West, B.A., M.Div., Th.M., Ph.D., Director of the D. Min. Program
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
A. Douglas Eury, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., Dean, School of Education; Coordinator,
Ed.D. Program; Director, Center for Innovative Leadership Studies
Tina Earls, Administrative Assistant to the School of Education
Barbara Goodman, Administrative Assistant to the Dean
Sheila G. Ingle, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chair, Elementary Education
David W. Shellman, B.S., MLH.D.L., Ed.S., Ed.D., Chair, Educational Leadership
Kelly Taylor, B.S., M.A., Chair, Middle Grades Education
SCHOOL OF NURSING
Rebecca Beck-Little, A.S.N., B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D., Dean, School of Nursing
Mary A. Hodge, A.D.N., B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D., Director, B.S.N., Programs
Linda M. Wines, B.S.N., M.S.N., Director, A.D.N. Program
Susan G. Jenkins, B.S., Coordinator of Undergraduate Records/Publications - School of
Nursing
Lugene Moore, Administrative Assistant
Gardner-Webb University/313
SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELING
David M. Carscaddon, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Psychology and
Counseling
Laura Williams Smith, A.A. B.A., M.Ed. Ph.D., Coordinator, School Counseling Program,
Boiling Springs Campus
Willie Fleming, B.A., M. A., Ph.D., Coordinator Mental Health and School Counseling
Programs, Statesville Campus
Shannon Warden, B.A., M. A., Ph.D., Coordinator Mental Health Program, Boiling Springs
Campus
Morgan Clay, B.A., Administrative Assistant
Susan H. Manahan, B.S., M.S., Coordinator of Academic Service Learning
COLLEGE OF ADULT AND CONTINUING EDUCATION
GOAL ADMINISTRATION
Barbara G. Cox., B.S., M.P.A., Assistant Provost for Adult and Continuing
Education
John Karriker, B.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean and Regional Director for Adult and
Continuing Education
T. Eugene Carpenter, A.A., B.S., M.A., Ed.D., Associate Dean and Regional Director
for Adult and Continuing Education
Elizabeth Pack, B.S., M.B.A., Assistant Dean and Regional Director for
Adult and Continuing Education
Debra Bridges, Office Manager
PROGRAM COORDINATORS
R. Van Graham, B.A., J.D., Associate Dean, Director of Business Programs
Mary Alice Hodge, A.D.N., B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D., Director of B.S.N. Programs
Ronald J. Williams, B.A., M.Div., Ph.D., Coordinator of Religious Studies and
Multidisciplinary Degree Studies and Academic Advisor
James P. Morgan, Jr., B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator of Human Services Program
Robert Munoz, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator of Social Science Program
REGIONS
Piedmont Region:
GWU Statesville:
John Karriker, B.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean and Regional Director for Adult and
Continuing Education
Corwin M. Metcalf, B.A., M.B.A., J.D., Godbold School of Business Liaison
Ashley Skinner, B.S., Assistant to the Dean
Judy Erikson, Adminsrative Assistant
GWU Winston-Salem:
Corwin M. Metcalf, B.A., M.B.A., J.D., Godbold School of Business Liaison
Timothy Patrick, B.S., M.A., Ed.S., Criminal Justice Coordinator
Wilkes Center - Wilkes Community College
Surry Center - Surry Community College
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Western Region:
GWU Hickory:
T. Eugene Carpenter, A.A., B.S., M.A., Ed.D., Associate Dean and Regional
Director for Adult and Continuing Education
Lance Foss, A.A., B.S., Criminal Justice Coordinator
Burke Center - Old Rock School, Valdese, NC
McDowell Center - McDowell Community College
Mayland Center - Mayland Community College
Central and Eastern Region:
GWU- Main Campus - Elizabeth Pack, B.S., M.B.A., Assistant Dean
GWU- Charlotte - Arrowridge Road
Robert Spear, Ph.D., Professor of Accounting, Godbold School of Business
Liaison
Belinda McDonald, B.S., M.S., Evening Manager
Gaston Center - Gaston College, Gastonia
Isothermal Center - Isothermal Community College, Rutherfordton
Anson Center - Anson Community College, Polkton
Richmond Center - Richmond Community College, Hamlet
Montgomery Center - Montgomery Community College, Troy
Brunswick Center - Brunswick Community College, Supply
ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT
C. Douglas Bryan, B.A., B.S., M.A.R.E., G.S.R.E., Ph.D., Associate Provost for
Academic Development
Kelly Collum, B.S., Office Manager
ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER
Carmen Butler, B.S., M.A./Ed.S., Associate Dean of Undergraduate Academic
Advising
Deidre Pettis, M.B.A., Academic Advisor
Andrew Bradshaw, B.S., M.A., Academic Advisor
Kaye Schenk, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Dean of GOAL Academic Advising
Sara Allen, B.S., GOAL Academic Advisor
Joanna Holloman, B.A., GOAL Academic Advisor
FIRST YEAR PROGRAMS
Jessica Herndon, B.S., M.A., Director
Millie Lineberry, A.A., Secretary
HONORS PROGRAM
Thomas H. Jones, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Dean of the Honors Program
LEARNING ENRICHMENT AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Bailey Holt Davis, B.A., M.A., Learning Enrichment and Assistance Program Director
WRITING CENTER
Jennifer Buckner, B.A., M.A., Director of the Writing Center
Gardner-Webb University/315
NOEL PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Cheryl J. Potter, B.S., B.S.W., M.A./Ed.S., Associate Dean of the Noel Program
Cindy Rochester, B.A., M.A./Ed.S., Assistant Dean of the Noel Program
Michelle Wallen, B.A., Disability Specialist
Sandy Hammett, B.S., M.A., Disability Specialist
Rachel Buck, B.A., Disability Specialist
Heather Morris, B.A., Sign Language Interpreter
Freida Conner, A.A., Secretary
UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
June H.Hobbs, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Undergraduate Research
LIBRARY
Mary D. Roby, B. Mus., M.L.S., Dean of Libraries
Karen F. Davis, A.A., Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Libraries
Mona C. Bell, B.S., M.L.I.S., Associate Dean of Libraries
Mary S. Thompson, A.A., A.B., M.A., M.L.S., Public Services Librarian
Frank I. Newton, Jr., B.A., M.A., M.S.L.S., Cataloging Librarian
David C. Dunham, B.S., M.A., M.L.S., Reference Librarian
Natalie Edwards Bishop, B.A., M.L.S., Instruction Librarian
Valerie Parry, B.A., M.S.L.S., Collection Development Specialist
Laurie Baumgardner, B.S., M.L.S., Acquisitions Librarian
Daniel W. Jolley, B.A., M.A., Systems Manager
Steve Harrington, B.A., Circulation Manager
Denise B. McKee, Interlibrary Loan Assistant
J. Harrison Williams, B.A., M.A., Cataloging Assistant
Margaret W. Christopher, Media Assistant
Kevin Bridges, Periodicals Assistant
Robyn Gardner, Circulation Assistant
James D. Simmons, A.A. B.A., Circulation Assistant
Lauren Heavner, B.A., Circulation Assistant
Misty West, B.S., Circulation Assistant
REGISTRAR
Lou Ann P. Scates, B.A., Registrar
Sherri D. Jackson, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Registrar
Stephen E. Sain, B.A., M.A., M.Div., Associate Registrar
TBA, Assistant Registrar
Pam Skinner, Assistant to the Registrar
Sonda M. Hamrick, Administrative Assistant
PLANNING AND INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
Jeffrey L. Tubbs, B.A., M.S., D.A., Vice President for Planning and Institutional Effectiveness
Lisa G. Kindler, Administrative Assistant for Planning and Institutional Effectiveness
Directory and Appendices/316
FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION
Mike W. Hardin, B.S., M.B.A, Vice President for Administration
Lois M. Radford, Administrative Assistant to the Vice President for Administration
FINANCIAL AFFAIRS
Robin G. Hamrick, B.S., M.B.A., Assistant Vice President for Finance and Controller
Haley A. Kendrick, B.S., B.A., M.S., Assistant Controller
Rhonda W. Cromer, Accounts Payable Accountant
Linda H. Smith, A.A.S., Financial Accountant
Roberta Parris, B.S., Senior Accountant
Sylvia A. McCurry, A.A.S., Payroll Accountant
BUSINESS SERVICES AND AUXILIARY SERVICES
Jeffery S. Ingle, B.A., B.S., Assistant Vice President for Business
Nancy M. Borders, Administrative Assistant and Summer Camp Coordinator
Becky Toney, Business Office Manager
Lisa P. McFarland, Assistant Business Office Manager
Carolyn B. McSwain, A.A.S., Staff Accountant
Jennifer B. Bowen, Student Accounts Representative
Angie R. Bridges, A.A., Student Accounts Representative
R. Wayne Merritt, B.S., Campus Shop Manager
Cary Caldwell, B.A., M.B.A., Assistant Campus Shop Manager
Leslie Humphries, Textbook Manager
Jaime Bridges, B.S., Supplies/Merchandise Manager
Rachel Butler, Post Office Associate
Justin Bridges, B.S., Post Office Associate
Lowell Hamrick, Fleet Manager
HUMAN RESOURCES
W. Scott White, B.S., M.B.A., Director of Human Resources
Frances B. Sizemore, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Director of Human Resources
Donna S. Reynolds, A.A., Secretary
PLANT OPERATION ADMINISTRATION
Wayne E. Johnson, Jr., B.A., M.Ed., Associate Vice President for Operations
Ann W. Dellinger, Director of Facility Services
Rick W. Hollifield, Director of Facilities Maintenance
David S. Wacaster, B.M., Director of Facilities for Operation and Safety
Jamie Smith, A.A.S., Director of Grounds
Fannie Brooks, Housekeeping Supervisor
Jamee Miller, B.M., Facility Services Manager/ Telecommunications Manager
Brian Speer, B.S.,M.A., Office/Budget Manager for Plant Operations
FOOD SERVICE
Suzanne Glasscock, B.S., Director of Food Services
Linda C. Klos, B.A., Office Manager
Gardner-Webb University/317
TECHNOLOGY SERVICES
Joey Bridges, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Vice President for Technology Services
Donna Filer, B.S., Database Administrator
C. Scot Hull, A.A., B.A., Network Technician
Greg Humphries, B.S., Systems Analyst
Deidre C. Ledbetter, A.A.S., B.S., M.B.A., Assistant Vice President for Technology
Services
Chris Logan, A.S., Computer/Network Technician
Cindy Moore, A.A., Operations Coordinator
Steven J. Peeler, B.A., Programmer/Analyst
Emily G. Robertson, B.A., M.A., Educational Technology Coordinator
Michael T. Schau, A.S., B.B.A., M.B.A., Systems Analyst/Programmer
Joshua Stroup, B.S., Network Administrator
Keith Thomas, A.A., Multimedia Support Technician
COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Ralph W. Dixon, Jr., B.S., Senior Vice President for Community Relations
Lisa G. Kindler, Administrative Assistant to the Senior Vice President for Community Relations
John F. Bridges, B.A., M.Div., Director of Church Relations
ADVANCEMENT
Monte K. Walker, B.S., Vice President for Advancement
M. Lynn Hicks, Administrative Assistant to the Vice President for Advancement
H. Woodrow Fish, B.S., M.Ed., Associate Vice President for Development and Athletic
Development and Alumni Relations
Katharine Shuster Correll, B.A., J.D., Assistant Vice President for Development
Sarah Currie, B.A., Director of the Bulldog Club
Meghan Dalton, B.S., Director of Alumni Affairs
Bradley Vaughn, B.A., B.S., Communications Coordinator for Alumni Affairs and Bulldog Club
Greg Poe, B.S., M.B.A., M.Div., Director of Planned Giving
Wilson Brooks, B.S., Director of Marketing
Will Mabry, B.S., Major Gift Officer
Sara L. McCall, B.A. M.B.A., Director of Advancement Services and Prospect Research
Rebecca Robbins, Assistant to the Director of Advancement Services
Dawn M. Anthony, B.S., Director of Donor Stewardship and Special Events
Rebecca Gunn, B.A., M.F.A., Associate Director of Development
Matt Renfer, B.A., Web Developer/Copy Editor
Michael Wall, A.A.S., A.A.S., A.A.S., B.S., B.S., Web Developer
Noel T. Manning, II., B.A., Director of University Communications
Paul Foster, Assistant Director of University and Media Relations
Matt Walters, B.A., M.A., Staff Writer/ Copy Editor
Katie Lovelace, B.S., Associate Director of Creative Services
Kathy E. Martin, A.A.S., Assistant Director of Graphic Design
Laura S. Mode, B.A., Graphic Designer
Ryan N. Gunter, A.A.S., B.A., Graphic Designer
Mark A. Houser, B.A., Media Convergence Specialist
Directory and Appendices/318
RADIO STATION/WGWG 88.3
Jeff Powell, B.A., M.A., Operations Manager/Program Director for WGWG
Scott Kirkland, A.A., Production Supervisor
Helen Pack, Senior Radio Announcer/Board Operator
Todd Gagner, Announcer/Board Operator
ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT
Debra Hintz, B.S., Vice President for Enrollment Management
Jennie A. Lamm, Administrative Assistant to the Vice President for Enrollment Management
Edward K. Phillips, B.S., M.B.A., Electronic Systems Analyst
Greg Humphries, B.S., Systems Analyst
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Kristen L. Setzer, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Vice President for Undergraduate Admissions
Angela F. Sundell, B.S., Senior Associate Director of Admissions
Patricia L. Robbins, Office Manager
Kristen Poarch, B.S., Admissions Counselor
Miranda Hodge, B.S., Admissions Counselor
Shane McGrath, B.A., Admissions Counselor
Deborah Knupp, B.S., M.B.A., Admissions Counselor
Benjamin Perdue, B.A., Admissions Counselor
John Blalock, B.S., Assistant Director
Robin M. Worthy, B.S., M.P.A., Admissions Counselor
Anna Lancaster, A.A., Welcome Center Coordinator
Jessica Brock, B.S., Visit Coordinator for Undergraduate Admissions
Beth Davis, B.S., Data Coordinator
ADMISSIONS - GOAL PROGRAM
Stuart E. Spires, A.A., B.S., M.A.,Assistant Vice President for GOAL Admissions
Amanda K. Smith, B.S., Associate Director of GOAL Admissions
Sandy Bailes, B.S., Assistant Director of GOAL Admissions
Reagan Clark, B.A., M.A., Assistant Director of GOAL Admissions
Audrey M. Sloan, B.A., Office Manager, GOAL Program
Margaret Harkness-Sherwood, A.A., B.A., Data Specialist
Drew Radford, B.S., Admissions Counselor
GRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Jeremy Fern, B.A., M.A., Assistant Vice President for Graduate Admissions
Claire Torrence, B.A., M. Div., Graduate Admissions Office Manager
Cheryl H. Hunt, Graduate Admissions Office Assistant
Kheresa W. Harmon, B.A., M.Div., Director of Admissions, School of Divinity
Amanda J. Chapman, B.A., M.B.A., Assistant Director of Graduate Admissions
J. Lamont Reeves, B.S., M.Div./M.B.A., Director of Admissions, Graduate School
Mischia Taylor, B.S., M.B.A./M.B.A.+, Director of Admissions, Graduate School of
Business
Christopher Newcomb, B.A., M.Div., Graduate Admissions Counselor
Brandon Beach, B.A., Graduate Admissions Counselor
Gardner-Webb University/319
FINANCIAL PLANNING
Summer G. Nance, B.S., Assistant Vice President of Financial Planning
Suzanne Bonner, B.S., Associate Director of Financial Planning
Shannon Pruett, A.A.S., B.S., Assistant Director of Financial Planning
Stephanie Baines, Assistant Director of Financial Planning
Kathy Bridges, Financial Planning Counselor
Kim Barnes, B.S., Financial Planning Office Manager
Cindy Clary, B.S., Financial Planning Counselor
TBA, Financial Planning Office Assistant
RETENTION AND STUDENT SUCCESS
Meredith Garrett, B.S., Director for Retention and Student Success
Millie Lineberry, A.A., Secretary
STUDENT DEVELOPMENT
Delores “Dee” Hunt, B.S., M.Ed., D.A., Vice President and Dean of Student Development
Vickie Webb-Morrison, A.A.S., Administrative Assistant to the Vice President and Dean of
Student Development
HOUSING AND RESIDENCE EDUCATION
Sherry Ingram, B.S., M.A., Director of Housing and Residence Education
Kristi Burch, B.S., M.A., Assistant Director of Student Conduct
Andrea Nolan, B.A., M.S., Assistant Director of Housing and Residence Education
Tyler Davis, B.S., Office Manager
COUNSELING AND CAREER SERVICES
Cindy Wallace, B.S., M.A., Director of Counseling/Career Services
Michael Taub, B.S., M.A./Ed.S., Counselor
Courtney Gantt, B.S., M.A./Ed.S., Counselor
Meagan Allen, B.A., M.Div., Coordinator of Career Services
Kelly Collum, B.S., Office Manager
TBA, Office Manager
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Karissa L. Weir, A.S., B.S., M.A., Director of Student Activities, Campus Recreation
and New Student Orientation
Kelly D. Brame, B.A., M.Div., Assistant Director of Student Activities
Brian Arnold, B.A., Assistant Director of Student Activities
Stephanie Richey, B.S., Coordinator of Community Engagement
STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
Lisa Yerrick, B.S., M.S., Director of Student Leadership Development
UNIVERSITY POLICE
Barry S. Johnson, B.S., Chief of University Police
Larry J. Thomas, B.A., Captain
Barry Lane, Lieutenant, University Police Officer
Nathan Clark, University Police Officer
Tabbatha Pearson, University Police Officer
Kenneth Phelps, University Police Officer
Jose Lopez, University Police Officer
Teresa Harp, Office Manager
Directory and Appendices/320
CHRISTIAN LIFE AND SERVICE
Tracy C. Jessup, B.A., M.Div., Ph.D., Vice President for Christian Life and Service; Senior
Minister to the University
D. Neal Payne, B.A., M.Div., Associate Minister to the University for Student Ministries
Stacy D. Mahler, B.S., M.Div., Associate Minister to the University for Pastoral Care
Teresa M. Davis, Administrative Assistant to the Office of Christian Life and Service
ATHLETICS
Charles S. Burch, B.A., M.S., Vice President for Athletics
Alison A. Kernicky, A.A., Administrative Assistant to the Vice President for Athletics
Pamela C. Scruggs, A.A., Associate Director of Athletics and SWA
Michael J. Roebuck, B.A., M.B.A., Assistant Director of Athletics for Academic
Services
Stephen T. Dolan, B.S., M.A., Assistant Director of Athletics for NCAA Compliance
Mary Beth Hamrick, B.A., Compliance Coordinator
Marcus C. Rabb, B.S., M.A., Assistant Director of Athletics for Media Relations
Kevin Davis, B.A., M.A., Assistant Director of Sports Information
Jim Corn, A.B., Assistant Director of Athletics for Student-Athlete Enrichment and
Head Women’s Tennis Coach
Teresa White, B.S., Administrative Assistant to Men’s and Women’s Basketball
Ron Dickerson, Jr., B.S., Head Football Coach
Travis Cunningham, B.S., Assistant Football Coach
Pete J. Darnell, B.S., Assistant Football Coach
Chris Foster, B.S., Assistant Football Coach
Robert J. Godinez, B.A., M.A., Assistant Football Coach
Dwayne Ledford, B.S., Assistant Football Coach
Anthony V. Pierce, B.A., M.A., Assistant Football Coach
James Seacord, III., B.S., Assistant Football Coach
Thaddaeus Ward, B.S., Assistant Football Coach
Tin Doggett, B.A., Director of Football Operations
Quadrian Banks, B.S., M.Ed, Director of Strength and Conditioning for Football
Christopher A. Holtmann, B.A., M.A., Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Jay McAuley, B.S., M.Ed., Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
Mike Netti, B.A., Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
Paul Hemrick, B.B.A., B.S., Director of Basketball Operations
Takayo Siddle, B.S., Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
Rick L. Reeves, B.S., M.Ed., Head Women’s Basketball Coach
Krystal L. Reeves-Evans, B.S., Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach
LaToya D. Carter, B.S., Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach
Brooke S. Wilkinson, B.A., M.A., Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach
J. Russell “Rusty” Stroupe, B.S., M.A., Head Baseball Coach
Kent Cox, B.A., M.A., Assistant Baseball Coach
TBA, Assistant Baseball Coach
R. Anthony Setzer, B.S., M.A., Head Men’s Soccer Coach
J. Tyler Kettering, B.S., Assistant Men’s Soccer Coach
Gardner-Webb University/321
Kevin R. Mounce, B.S., Head Women’s Soccer Coach
Christy Rife, B.A., Women’s Soccer Assistant Coach
Richard M. Wince, B.A., M.A., Head Wrestling Coach
Daniel Elliott, B.S., M.A., Assistant Wrestling Coach
Michael G. Griffith, B.A., Head Men’s Tennis Coach
Thomas L. Burton, Jr., B.S., Head Men’s and Women’s Golf Coach
Leo R. Sayles, B.A., Head Volleyball Coach
Bethany Martin, B.A., M.A., Assistant Volleyball Coach
Thomas L. Cole, III, B.S., M.S., Head Softball Coach
Stacie Reichert, B.S., M.S., Assistant Softball Coach
Diana Deal, B.S., M.A., Assistant Softball Coach
Brian D. Baker, B.A., Head Men’s and Women’s Track and Cross Country Coach
Mary Wood, B.A., M.A., Assistant Men’s and Women’s Track and Cross Country
Coach
Andy Fryman, B.S., Assistant Men’s and Women’s Track and Cross Country Coach
Michael D. Simpson, B.S., Head Swimming Coach
Ashley M. Grogan, B.S., Assistant Swimming Coach
Mike Blum, B.A., Assistant Swimming Coach
Tracy D. Sibley, B.S., Head Strength and Conditioning Coach
David Miller, B.S., M.A., Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach
Andrew Day, B.A., Head Cheerleading Coach
Kevin T. Jones, A.B., M.A., Director of Athletic Training
Jon T. Mitchell, B.S., M.A., Service Program Director for Athletic Training
Kathleen Ayotte, B.S., M.A., Assistant Athletic Trainer
Matthea S. Hungerford, B.S., M.S., Assistant Athletic Trainer
William R. Harvard, B.S., Assistant Athletic Trainer
Stephenie Stark, B.S., Assistant Athletic Trainer
Daniele M. Albert, B.S., M.S., Assistant Athletic Trainer
Justin Walker, B.S., M.S., Assistant Athletic Trainer
Directory and Appendices/322
Gardner-Webb University/323
Campus Map Directory
Athletic Facilities
Broyhill Adventure Course ................................ 49
Josh H. Cash Gate ........................................... 53
GWU Football Center ....................................... 51
Greene-Harbison Stadium ................................ 58
Hamrick Field House ........................................ 54
Coach Norman Harris Football Field ................ 55
Henderson Family Gate ................................... 56
Bill Masters Baseball Field ............................... 63
John Henry Moss Baseball Stadium ................ 64
Paul Porter Arena ............................................. 20
Practice GCCSA/ Intramural Field ................... 66
Practice Football Field ..................................... 50
Practice Soccer Field ....................................... 57,
61
Practice Soccer Field/ Intramural Field .............60
Physical Development Complex ....................... 21
Bost Gymnasium
Bost Pool
Suttle Wellness Center
Ernest W. Spangler Football Stadium .............. 52
Springs Athletic Facility .................................... 62
Softball Complex Varsity Softball Field ............ 67
Webb Tennis Complex ..................................... 65
Wrestling Facility .............................................. 71
Buildings
Alumni Affairs ................................................... 68
Art Center ......................................................... 72
Boiling Springs Family Care ............................. 46
Communication Studies Hall ............................ 70
Craig Hall ......................................................... 29
Crawley Memorial Hospital .............................. 45
Dept. of Military Science .................................. 38
Dover Campus Center (DCC) .......................... 10
Dover Memorial Chapel .................................. 5
Dover Memorial Garden .................................. 14
Dover Memorial Library ................................... 16
Dover Theatre .................................................. 20
Elliott Hall ........................................................ 6
Elliott House ..................................................... 36
WGWG Radio Station
Creative Services
University Communications
O. Max Gardner Memorial Hall ....................... 30
GOAL House ................................................... 37
Graduate Admissions Office ........................... 43
Hamrick Hall .................................................... 7
Blanton Auditorium
Tucker Library
Hollifield Carillon ............................................. 23
Lindsay Hall ................................................ 9
Lutz-Yelton Convocation Center ................. 20
Dover Theatre
Paul Porter Arena
Frank Nanney Hall ...................................... 28
Noel Hall ...................................................... 8
Noel House ................................................. 15
Post Office .................................................. 33
Poston Center ............................................. 12
Reception Area
University Police
Graduate School Office
Pottery Center and
Grounds Department ........................... 73
Springs Area ............................................... 24
Studio 150 ................................................... 39
Suttle Hall ................................................... 32
Tucker Student Center (Spring 2012) ......... 22
Washburn Hall ............................................ 34
Washburn Memorial House ........................ 17
Webb Hall ................................................... 2
Williams Observatory .................................. 59
Withrow Mathematic & Science Hall............ 27
Residence Halls
Clubhouse ................................................... 47
Decker Hall .................................................11
H.A.P.Y. Hall ................................................ 32
Honors House ............................................. 42
Lutz-Yelton Hall ........................................... 26
Mauney Hall ............................................... 25
Myers Hall ................................................... 18
Nanney Hall ................................................. 41
Royster Hall ................................................ 35
Spangler Hall ...............................................19
Stroup Hall .................................................. 31
University Commons
Student Apartments
Apartments (A -F, H) .............................. 44
Suites (G, I, J) ....................................... 48
Gates
Beason Gate (South Main St.) .................. 4
Bridges Gate (South Main St.) .................. 69
Dixon Gate (West College Ave).................. 40
Jarrell Gate (South Main St.) .....................13
Spangler Gate (South Main St /College Ave)....1
Campus Map/324
Gardner-Webb University/325
INDEX
Absence from Tests & Examinations, 92
Academic Advising, 23
Academic Appeals, 98
Academic Calendar, 3-5
Academic Honesty, 92
Academic Probation/Suspension, 99
Academic Program, 18
Academic Regulations, 79
Academic Scholarships, 42
(see Scholarships)
Accounting, 232
Accreditation, 10
Add/Drop Courses, 90
Administrative, Officers & Staff, 310
Admissions, 34
Advanced Placement, 36
Air Force ROTC, 22
American Sign Language, 217
Army ROTC, 22, 105
Art, 110
Art Studio Fees, 75
Associate Degree Program, 79, 87
Athletic Training, 173
Attendance, Class, 92
Auditing Courses, 90
Bachelor Degree Programs, 79
Bachelor Degree Requirements, 80
Biology, 162
Blind & Visually Impaired, 20
Board of Trustees, 275
Broyhill Adventure Course, 10, 32
Broyhill School of Management, 230
Accounting, 232
Business Administration, 232
Computer Information Systems, 232
Economics/Finance, 233
Healthcare Management, 233
International Business, 233
Marketing, 234
Buildings, 10-15
Business Administration, 232
Calendar, 3-5
Campus & Buildings, 10-15
Campus Map, 323
Campus Ministries, 25
Campus Visitors, 16
Career Services, 28
Carnegie Community Engagement
Classifications, 9
Challenge Examination Policy, 97
Charge Reduction Policy, 77
Chemistry, 162
Christian Life and Service, 25
Class Attendance, 92
College of Arts and Sciences, 109
Communication Studies, 136
Communication Studies, 136
Journalism, 137
Communication Studies Lab Fees, 75
Computer Facilities, 23
Computer Information Systems, 232
Conditional Admission Process, 35
Counseling Services, 28
Course by Arrangement, 91
Course Load, 89
Course Registration, 90
Courses of Instruction, 101
Deaf and Hard of Hearing, 21
Degrees Offered, 18, 79
Delinquent Student Accounts, 78
Departments
Arts, 115
Communication Studies, 135
English Language & Literature, 144
Mathematical Sciences, 153
Music, 111
Natural Sciences, 161
Physical Education, Wellness,Sport
Studies, 172
Religious Studies & Philosophy, 188
Social Sciences, 200
Theatre, 115
World Languages, Literatures, &
Cultures, 216
Dimensions, 25, 89
Disabled, Program, 20
Doctoral Degree Programs, 79
Drop Class, 90
Economics/Finance, 233
Education Program Fees, 75
Education, School of, 247
Elementary Education, 250
Middle Grades Education, 251
English Language & Literature, 144
English, 145
English with Teacher Licensure, 145
English as a Second Language, 226
Entrance Examinations, 34
Environmental Chemistry, 162
Environmental Science, 162
Evening School (GOAL), 21
Experiential Education, 19
Expulsion, 100
Faculty Emeriti, 310
Faculty, Undergraduate, 277
Index/326
GOAL, 287
Graduate, 300
Graduate School of Business, 307
Graduate School of Divinity, 308
Federal Assistance Programs, 41
Fees, 74
Financial Information, 40, 73
Scholarships, 41
Tuition and Fees, 74
Financial Assistance, 40
First Year Program, 104
French, 218
GEM Program, 236
General Studies, 19, 80
German, 225
Global Studies, 202
GOAL Program, 21
Godbold School of Business, 231
Grade Point Average, 39, 94
Grades & Reports, 93
Graduation Fees, 76
Graduation Honors, 95
Graduation Requirements, 79
Grants, 41
NC Legislative Tuition, 41
PELL (Basic Ed.), 41
Greek, 226
Hard of Hearing, 21
Hebrew, 223
High School Seniors Program, 21
History, 202
History of Gardner-Webb, 7-8
Home School Students, 35
Honor Code, 92
Honors Program, 22, 95, 102
Honors & Awards, 95
Housing, 29
Independent Study, 19, 91
International Business, 233
International Students, 36
Interpreting, 217
Journalism, 137
Learning Enrichment and Assistance
Program, 21, 88
Library, Dover Memorial, 11, 23
Loans, 41
Federal Plus
Perkins
Stafford
Major Fields, 18, 79, 87
Map, Campus, 323
Marketing, 234
Mathematical Sciences, 153
Computer Science, 155
Mathematics, 154
Mathematics with Teacher Licensure, 154
Medical Withdrawal, 100
Minor Fields, 18, 89
Mission Statement, 8
Missions, 26
Music, 111
Music Fees, 75
Natural Science, 161
Biology, 162
Chemistry, 162
Environmental Science, 163
Natural Science Lab Fee, 75
Noel Program for Students with Disabilities, 20
Nursing, 258
Associate Degree (A.D.N.), 79, 87, 261
Bachelor of Science in Nursing, 260
Nursing Program Fees, 75
Office of Community Engagement, 32
Officers of the Corporation, 275
Online Learning Technology Fees, 75
Part-time Enrollment, 76
Pastoral Care, 25
Performing and Visual Arts, 110
Art, 115
Composition, 112
Music, 111
Music Education, 113
Performance, 114
Sacred Music, 114
Theatre, 115
Visual Arts, 115
Physical Education,Wellness,Sport Studies,172
Athletic Training, 173
Health/Wellness, 176
Physical Education/Health Education with
Teacher Licensure, 176
Sport Management, 177
LEADERS Program, 178
Police, University, 30
Political Science, 203
Preprofessional Programs, 19
President’s Community Service Honor Roll, 9
President’s Council on Faith, Service, and
The Spiritual Life of the University, 26
Probation, 100
Professional Programs, 19
Psychology & Counseling, 270
Readmission of Former Students, 39
Regulations, Academic, 79
Religious Studies, 188
Biblical Studies, 189
Discipleship Studies, 190
Missiology Major, 193
Gardner-Webb University/327
Philosophy and Theology, 192
World Religions, 192
Youth Discipleship Studies, 191
Repeat Courses, 91
Residence Education, 29
Residency Requirements, 29
Retention Standards, 98
Room & Board, 74
Room & Board Reductions, 78
Room Reservation Policy, 30
ROTC, Air Force, 22
ROTC, Army, 22, 105
Sacred Music, 111
Scholarships, 42
Annual Scholarships, 71
Athletic, 44
Athletic Endowed, 47
Business Endowed, 49
Christian Service Organization, 49
Church Matching, 44
Communication Studies Endowed, 60
Disabled Student Endowed, 60
Endowed, 46
Fellows, 43
Fine & Performing Arts Endowed, 61
General Purpose Endowed, 71
Honors Music, 44
International Student Endowed, 62
Marching Band, 44
Mathematics & Science Endowed, 62
Merit Scholarship, 66
Ministerial Board of Associates, 44
Ministerial Endowed, 63
Minister’s Dependent, 44
NC Army National Guard, 44
Nursing Endowed, 64
Performance Based, 44
Presidential Fellows, 43
ROTC, 44
School of Divinity Endowed, 57
Teacher Education Endowed, 65
Theater, 66
Schools
Broyhill School of Management, 230
Divinity (see Graduate Catalog)
Education, 247
Graduate, (See Graduate Catalog)
Nursing, 258
Psychology & Counseling, 270
School of Performing and Visual Arts, 110
Science, Natural, 161
Sign Language Studies, 217
Social Sciences, 200
Global Studies, 201
History, 202
History with Teacher Licensure, 202
Political Science, 203
Social Sciences, 203
Social Sciences w/Teacher Licensure, 203
Sociology, 204
Spanish, 219
Special Academic Programs, 20
Sport Management, 177
State Assistance Programs, 41
Statement of Values, 8-9
Student Development, 28
Student Government, 31
Student Guidelines, Expectations, & Rights,
32
Student Leadership & Activities, 31
Student Ministries, 25
Student Organizations, 31
Student Records, 97
Student Teaching, 247
Study Abroad, 22
Summer School, 76
Suspension Policy, 100
Templeton Foundation, 9
Transcripts of Academic Records, 96
Transfer of Credits, 38
Transfer Students, 38
Transient Credit, 96
Transient Students, 36
Travel Information, 16
Tuition Exchange, 45
Tuition/Fees, 74
U.S. News & World Report, 9
Undergraduate Faculty, 277
Visitor’s Information, 16
Visual Arts, 115
Website, 16
Withdrawal, 45, 90, 100
Withdrawal, Medical, 100
World Languages, Literatures & Cultures, 216
American Sign Language, 217
American Sign Language w/ Teacher
Licensure, 218
English, Second Language w/ Teacher
Licensure, 218
French, 218
French with Teacher Licensure, 219
Spanish, 219
Spanish with Teacher Licensure, 219
Writing Center, 24
Learning and Leadership
in service
for God and Humanity
in a changing world.
Faith
Service
Leadership
Boiling Springs, North Carolina 28017
www.gardner-webb.edu
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