ELED 452 – Student Teaching in Field-Based Education Programs
Spring 2015
Instructor: Kathryn Reeves, Adjunct
Office Hours: By appointment
Office Fax: 903-886-5581
University Email: Kathryn.Reeves@tamuc.edu
COURSE INFORMATION
Materials – Textbooks, Readings, Supplementary Readings:
Northeast Texas Center for Professional Development and Teaching Field Based Teacher Education Program
Handbook – Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers Today (Revised July 2013)
http://www.tamuc.edu/academics/colleges/educationHumanServices/educatorCertificationAcademicServi
ces/documents/fieldbased.pdf
Course Description: ELED 452 - Student Teaching in Field-Based Teacher Education Programs. Six semester
hours. This is a course requiring observation, participation, and direct teaching for residents enrolled in
the Center for Professional Development and Teaching (CPDT). Prerequisite: Full Admission to the
Teacher Education through placement in a NETCPDT center for Residency.
Student Learning Outcomes:
EC-12 PPR Standards
Standard I. Domain I.
The teacher designs instruction appropriate for all students that reflects an understanding of
relevant content and is based on continuous and appropriate assessment.
1.1k the intellectual, social, physical, and emotional developmental characteristics of students in
different age groups;
1.2k the implications of students’ developmental characteristics for planning appropriate
instruction;
1.3k the characteristics and instructional needs of students with varied backgrounds, skills,
interests, and learning needs;
1.4k different approaches to learning that students may exhibit and what motivates students to
become active, engaged learners;
1.5k cultural and socioeconomic differences and the significance of these differences for
instructional planning; and
1.6k appropriate strategies for instructing English language learners.
1.7k the importance of the state content and performance standards as outlined in the Texas
Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS);
1.8k relevant content of the discipline being taught, including concepts, principle relationships,
methods of inquiry, and key issues;
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1.9k the significance of the vertical alignment of content, including prerequisite knowledge and
skills;
1.10k how lesson content and skills connect with other disciplines and within the discipline;
1.11k current research on best pedagogical practices.
1.12k the importance of developing instructional goals and objectives that are clear, relevant,
meaningful, and age-appropriate;
1.13k the importance of developing instructional goals and objectives that can be assessed
1.14k the importance of developing instructional goals and objectives that are suitable for
students with varied learning needs; and
1.15k the importance of aligning instructional goals with campus and district goals.
1.16k the use of appropriate materials and resources for preparing instruction, presenting
lessons, and assessing learning;
1.17k the importance of knowing when to integrate technology into instruction and assessment;
and
1.18k the use of resources beyond the campus to help students meet academic and
nonacademic needs.
1.9k the importance of designing instruction that reflects the TEKS;
1.20k features of instruction that maximize students’ thinking skills;
1.21k the importance of planning lessons and structuring units so that activities progress in a
logical sequence;
1.22k know materials, technology, and other resources may be used to support instructional
goals and objectives and engage students in meaningful learning;
1.23k the benefits of designing instruction that integrates content across disciplines; and
1.24k the importance of engaging in continuous monitoring and self-assessment of instructional
effectiveness.
1.25k the role of assessment in guiding instructional planning;
1.26k the importance of creating assessments that are congruent with instructional goals and
objectives;
1.27k the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of various assessment method and
strategies;
1.28k the role of technology in assessing student learning;
1.29k the benefits of and strategies for promoting student self-assessment;
1.30k the connection between the Texas statewide assessment program, the TEKS,
and instruction; and
1.31k how to analyze data from local, state, and other assessments using common statistical
measures.
1.1s plan lessons that reflect an understanding of students ’development characteristics and
needs;
1.2s adapt lessons to address students’ varied backgrounds, skills, interest, and learning needs,
including the needs of English language learners,
1.3s use effective approaches to address varied student learning needs and preferences;
1.4s plan instruction that motivates students to want to learn and achieve; and
1.5s acknowledge and respect cultural and socioeconomic differences among students when
planning instruction.
1.6s use the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) to plan instruction;
1.7s exhibit appropriate knowledge of a subject to promote student learning;
1.8s demonstrate awareness of common student misconceptions or likely sources of student
error in relation to particular content;
1.9s plan instruction that reflects an understanding of important prerequisites relationships;
1.10s plan instruction that makes connections within the discipline and across disciplines, and
1.11s use a variety of pedagogical techniques to convey information and teach skills.
1.12s develop instructional goals and objectives that are clear, relevant, meaningful, and ageappropriate;
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1.13s develop instruction goals and objectives that are able to be assessed;
1.14smdevelop instructional goals and objectives that reflect students’ age, developmental
level, prior skills and knowledge, background, and interest; and
1.15s develop instructional goals and objectives that reflect different types of student learning
and skills.
1.16s use various types of materials and other resources to aid in preparing and implementing
instruction;
1.17s use technological tools to promote learning and expand instructional options; and
1.18s use resources available outside the school (e.g., museums, businesses, community
members) to enhance students’ learning opportunities
1.19s plan instructional activities that progress sequentially and support stated instructional
goals based on the TEKS
1.20s select instructional resources that support instructional goals, enhance student
achievement, and engage students in learning;
1.21s use varied activities and instructional groupings to engage students in instructional
content and meet instructional goals and objectives;
1.22s allocate time appropriately within lessons and units, including providing adequate
opportunities for students to engage in reflection and closure; and
1.23s provide students with opportunities to explore content from many perspectives
Standard II. Domain II.
The teacher creates a classroom environment of respect and rapport that fosters a positive
climate for learning, equity, and excellence.
2.1k the importance of creating a learning environment in which diversity and individual
differences are respected;
2.2k the impact of teacher-student interactions and interactions among students on classroom
climate and student learning and development; and
2.3k ways to establish a positive classroom climate that fosters active engagement in learning
among students.
2.4k the importance of communicating enthusiasm for learning; and
2.5k the necessity of communicating teacher expectations for student learning
2.6k how classroom routines and procedures affect student learning and achievement;
2.7k how to organize student groups to facilitate cooperation and productivity;
2,8k the importance of time management for effective classroom functioning;
2.9k procedures for managing transitions;
2.10k routines and procedures for managing and using materials, supplies, and technology;
2.11k non instructional duties (e.g., taking attendance) and procedures for performing these
duties effectively; and
2.12k the classroom roles of paraprofessionals, volunteers, and other professionals, including
substitute teachers, in accordance with district policies and procedures.
2.13k theories and techniques relating to managing and monitoring student behavior;;
2.14k appropriate behavior standards and expectations for students at various developmental
levels;
2.15kthe significance of district policies and procedures for manageing student behavior and
ensuring ethical behavior in the classroom.
2.16k the importance of establishing classroom standards of student conduct and clear
consequences for inappropriate behavior;
2.17k the value of encouraging students to work in an ethical manner and monitor their own
behavior; and
2.18k appropriate responses to a variety of student behavior ands and misbehaviors
2.19k features and characteristics of physical spaces that are safe and productive for learning;
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2.20k the benefits and limitations of various arrangements of furniture in the classroom;
2.21k Procedures for ensuring safety in the classroom;
2.22k physical accessibility as a potential issue in student learning; and
2.23k students’ emotional needs and ways to address needs.
2.1s interact with students in ways that reflect support and show respect for all students;
2.2s use strategies to ensure that interactions among students are polite, respectful, and
cooperative; and
2.3s use strategies to ensure that the classroom environment and interactions among
individuals and groups within the classroom promote active engagement in learning.
2.4s communicate to all students the importance of instructional content and the expectation of
high-quality work; and
2.5s ensure that instructional goals and objectives, activities, classroom interactions,
assessments, and other elements of the classroom environment convey high expectations for
student achievement.
2.6s establish classroom rules and procedures to promote an organized and productive learning
environment;
2.7s organize and manage groups to ensure that students work together cooperatively and
productively
2.8s schedule activities and manage class time in ways that maximize student learning;
2.9s manage transitions to maximize instructional time;
2.10s implement routines and procedures for the effective management of materials, supplies
and technology;
2.11s coordinate the performances of non instructional duties with instructional activities;
2.12s monitor the performance of volunteers and paraprofessionals in the classroom in
accordance with district policies and procedures; and
2.13s use volunteers and paraprofessionals to enhance and enrich instruction, and evaluate
their effectiveness.
2.14s communicate high and realistic expectations for students’ behavior and ensure that
students understand behavior expectations and consequences for misbehavior.
2.15s consistently enforce standards and expectations for student behavior and ethical work
habits;
2.16s encourage students to maintain ethical work standards and monitor their own behavior;
and
2.17s use effective methods and procedures for monitoring and responding to positive and
negative student behaviors.
2.18s organize the physical environment to facilitate learning;
2.19s create a safe and inclusive classroom environment;
2.20s use effective strategies for creating and maintaining a positive classroom environment;
and
2.21s respect students’ rights and dignity.
Standard III. Domain III.
The teacher promotes student learning by providing responsive instruction that makes use of
effective communication techniques, instructional strategies that actively engage students in the
learning process, and timely, high-quality feedback.
3.1k the importance of clear, accurate communication in the teaching and learning process;
3.2kprinciples and strategies for communicating effectively in varied teaching and learning
contexts;
3.3k spoken and written language that is appropriate to students’ age, interests, and
background; and
3.4k skills and strategies for engaging in skilled questioning and leading effective student
discussions
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3.5k criteria for selecting appropriate instructional activities and assignments for students with
varied characteristics and needs;
3.6k know to present content to students in relevant and meaningful ways;
3.7k the use of instructional materials, resources, and technologies that are appropriate and
engaging for students in varied learning situations;
3.8k the importance of promoting students’ intellectual involvement with content and their active
development of understanding;
3.9k strategies and techniques for using instructional groupings to promote student learning;
3.10k different types of motivation, factors affecting student motivation, and effective motivational
strategies in varied learning contexts; and
3.11k techniques for structuring and pacing lessons in ways that promote student engagement
and learning.
3.12k characteristics of effective feedback for students;
3.13k the role of timely feedback in the learning process; and
3.14k how to use constructive feedback to guide each student’s learning.
3.15k the significance of teacher flexibility and responsiveness in the teaching/ learning process;
and
3.16k situations in which teacher flexibility can enhance student learning.
3.1s communicate directions, explanations, and procedures clearly, accurately, and with an
appropriate level of detail, both orally and written;
3.2s use effective interpersonal skills (including both verbal and nonverbal skills) to reach
students and communicate the teacher’s comments to students:
3.3s use spoken and written language that is appropriate to students’ ages, interests, and
backgrounds;
3.4s use effective communication techniques, including questioning and discussion techniques,
to foster active student inquiry, higher-order thinking, problem solving, and productive, supportive
interactions;
3.5s use carefully framed questions to enable students to reflect on their understanding of
content and to consider new possibilities; and
3.6s apply skills for leading discussions that engage all students in exploring important questions
and that extend students’ knowledge.
3.7s create lessons with a clearly defined structure around which activities are organized;
3.8s create activities and assignments that are appropriate for students and that actively engage
them in the learning process
3.9s select and use instructional materials, resources, and technologies that are suitable for
instructional goals and that engage students cognitively;
3.10s represent content effectively and in ways that link with student’s prior knowledge and
experience;
3.11s use flexible grouping to promote productive student interactions and enhance learning;
3.12s pace lessons appropriately and flexibly in response to student needs;
3.13s engage students intellectually by teaching meaningful content in ways that promote all
students’ active and invested participation in the learning process; and
3.14s encourage students’ self-motivation and active engagement in learning.
3.15s use appropriate language and formats to provide each student with timely feedback that is
accurate, constructive, substantive, and specific;
3.16s promote students’ ability to use feedback to guide and enhance their learning; and
3.17s base feedback on high expectations for student learning.
3.18s respond flexibly to various situations, such as lack of student engagement in a learning
activity or the occurrence of an unanticipated learning opportunity;
3.19s adjust instruction based on ongoing assessment of student understanding; and
3.20s use alternative instructional approaches to ensure that all students learn and succeed.
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Standard IV. Domain IV.
The teacher fulfills professional roles and responsibilities and adheres to legal and ethical
requirements of the profession
4.1k the importance of families ’involvement in their children’s education; and
4.2k appropriate ways for working and communicating effectively with families in varied contexts.
4.3k types of interactions among professionals in a schoo9e.g. vertical teaming, horizontal
teaming, team teaching, mentoring) and the significance of these interactions
4.4k appropriate ways for working and communicating effectively with other professionals in
varied educational contexts;
4.5k the roles and responsibilities of specialists and other professionals at the building and district
levels (e.g., department chairperson, principal, board of trustees, curriculum coordinator, special
educational professional);
4.6k available educator support systems (e.g., mentors, service centers, state initiatives,
universities);
4.7k the various ways in which teachers may contribute to their school and district; and
4.8k the value of participating in school activities.
4.9k the importance of participating in professional development activities to enhance content
knowledge and pedagogical skill;
4.10k the importance of documenting self-assessments;
4.11k characteristics, goals and procedures associated with teacher appraisal; and
4.12k the importance of using reflection and ongoing self-assessment to enhance teahing
effectiveness.
4.13k legal requirements for educators (e.g., those related to special education, students’ and
families’ rights, student discipline, equity, child abuse);
4.14k ethical guidelines for educators in Texas (e.g., those related to special education,,
students’ and families’ rights, student discipline, equity, child abuse),
4.15k policies and procedures in compliance with Code of Ethics and Standards Practices for
Texas Educators as adopted by the State Board for Educator Certification;
4.16k procedures and requirements for maintaining accurate student records.
4.17k the importance of adhering to required procedures for administering state-and districtmandated assessments; and
4.18k the structure of the education system in Texas, including relationships between campus,
local, and state components.
4.1s interact appropriately with families that have diverse characteristics, backgrounds, and
needs;
4.2s apply procedures for conducting effective parent-teacher conferences;
4.3s communicate with families on a regular basis to share information about students’ progress
and respond appropriately to families’ concerns; and
4.5s maintain supportive and cooperative relationships with colleagues;
4.6s engage in collaborative decision making and problem solving with other educators in varied
context;
4.7s work productively with supervisors and mentors to address issues to enhance professional
skills and knowledge.;
4.8s communicate effectively and appropriately with other educators in varied contexts
4.9s collaborate professionally with other members of the school community to achieve school
and district goals;
4.10s participate in decision making, problem solving, and sharing ideas and expertise; and
4.11s assume professional responsibilities and duties outside the classroom, as appropriate
(e.g., serve on committees, volunteer to participate in events and projects).;
4.12s participate in various types of professional development opportunities (e.g., conferences,
workshops, work with mentors and other support systems);
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4.13s enhance content and pedagogical knowledge through a variety of activities (e.g., reading
journals, joining professional associations, attending conferences, engaging in coursework);
4.14s use evidence of self-assessment (e.g., portfolio) to identify strengths, challenges, and
potential problems; improve teaching performance; and achieve instructional goals; and
4.15s use appropriate resources and support systems inside and outside the school to address
professional development needs.
4.16s use knowledge of legal and ethical guidelines to guide behavior in education-related
situations;
4.17s serve as an advocate for students and the profession;
4.18s maintain accurate records; and
4.19s use knowledge of the structure of state and local education systems to seek information
and assistance in addressing issues.
ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF INTERNS
The purpose of the first (internship) semester of the field-based program is twofold: (1) to learn about content,
pedagogy, technology, classroom management, and assessment and evaluation through course content and
seminars; and (2) to learn about schools, students, planning, and the teaching and learning process by
working in a field-based setting with mentoring teachers. Thus, the assessment and evaluation of interns
address performance in both the field based and seminar settings.
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TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-COMMERCE FIELD BASED PROGRAM
LESSON EVALUATION FORM
This instrument helps to provide feedback to Interns/Residents as they work with individuals, a small group or the entire class.
Mentors and liaisons will utilize this instrument for lesson evaluations. Intern/Resident may choose to use it as a self-evaluation
tool.
Intern/Resident: _______________________________ Subject: ______________________ Grade: _____________
Mentor: _____________________________________ Date of Lesson/Activity: __________ Time: ______________
Rate Factors Below: 3 (Exceptional), 2 (Acceptable), 1 (Needs Improvement) N/A, (Not Applicable), N/O (Not Observed)
RATING
1. Lesson Plan: accurate, proper objectives, appropriate intro., sufficient detail,
3 2 1 N/A N/O
evaluation tied to obj., appropriate closing, able to use appropriate and effective feedback
and assessment
2. Presentation: followed plan, appropriate intro., made obj. clear, connected lesson
to past/future learning, stressed more imp. items, good closing, evidence of content
knowledge, use of lesson cycle, teaches using resourceful materials
3
2
1
N/A N/O
3. Strategies: asks questions that elicit higher order thinking, solicits responses, secures attention,
begins promptly and maintains good pacing, varies teaching and learning strategies,
provides differentiation
3
2 1
N/A N/O
4. Student Engagement/Evidence of Learning: students are actively engaged, students
demonstrates competence and/or mastery of objectives
3
2
1
N/A N/O
5. Management: students’ on-task, appropriate noise level for activities, appropriate
movement for type of lesson, appropriate reinforcement and on-task behavior, noticed &
handled problem situations appropriately
3
2
1
N/A N/O
6. Personal: evidence of poise & confidence, voice projection, proper grammar,
enunciation, eye contact, warmth & enthusiasm
3
2
1
N/A N/O
3
2
1
N/A N/O
7. Materials Used: sufficient use of manipulatives, visuals, and other materials
appropriately; accurate, useful, and relevant handouts, appropriate and timely distribution;
appropriate use of technology (computers, interactive whiteboard, video, etc.)
STRENGTHS AND CHANGES
1. Three Strengths of the Lesson:
2. Things to Consider:
_____________________________________
Evaluator Signature
Date
_______________________________________
Intern/Resident Signature
Date
□
ELED 452
Acknowledgement of lesson debriefing with liaison or ILT at
a separate time after the lesson. Time of Post-Lesson
Conference:________________________
Page 8 of 15
Intern - Evaluation of Progress
Texas A&M University-Commerce -- Teacher Education Field Based Program
Circle one:
Self or Mentor
Grade: __________
EC-6 or 4-8
CWID:
Mid-Term or Final
Campus:
Date:
Intern Name:
Instructions: Rate the indicators in the 1st column by circling the appropriate rating in the 2nd Column (3 = Exceptional; 2 =
Proficient;
1 = Needs Improvement; NA = Not applicable or not observed). Then, add Comments and/or suggestions in each main area.
Professionalism & Communication
Indicators of Meeting Proficiencies
Rating
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA










Displays a professional appearance and attitude
Uses correct grammar in writing and speaking
Follows school procedures (arrival & departure)
Meets assigned responsibilities promptly and effectively
Shows a friendly personality, sense of humor, warm and accepting attitude
Demonstrates initiative, tactfulness, and good judgment
Asks questions that demonstrate a willingness to learn
Accepts constructive criticism with a desire to improve
Exhibits flexibility with change
Attends professional meetings as appropriate & shows signs of self-evaluation and reflection
Comments/Suggestions:
Knowledge & Instruction
Indicators of Meeting Proficiencies
Rating
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
 Uses appropriate/accurate verbal and written communication
 Displays a pleasing voice level, appropriate speed, and varied intonations (voice variations…allowing for emphasis of
important points)
 Maintains eye contact and appropriate body language
 Is knowledgeable of subject matter
 Possesses enthusiasm for the content as well as students
 Organization: lesson plans, instructional materials (everything ready in advance)
Demonstrates awareness of lesson components and thoroughly plans for lessons
Comments/Suggestions:
Equity & Management
Indicators of Meeting Proficiencies
Rating
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA






Knows students’ names and classroom routines and procedures
Manages the transition of students to/from different locations (lunch, P.E., Music, etc.)
Effective teacher movement throughout the lesson
Is aware of basic rules and consequences for classroom management and the need to be consistent in enforcing them
Establishes a non-threatening learning environment
Attends to individual needs
Demonstrates appropriate behaviors toward/with students
Comments/Suggestions:
Signatures:
__________________________

Intern
Acknowledgement of feedback
ELED 452
_______________________
Mentor
_____________________________
Liaison
Date
Page 9 of 15
ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF RESIDENTS
In terms of EC-6 certification, the purpose of the second (residency) semester of the field-based program is
twofold: (1) to demonstrate knowledge about content, pedagogy, technology, classroom management,
assessment and evaluation, and the teaching and learning process; and (2) to demonstrate the ability to
work with and manage students, plan lessons, and teach students using relevant and meaningful learning
experiences in a professional manner.
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TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-COMMERCE FIELD BASED PROGRAM
LESSON EVALUATION FORM
This instrument helps to provide feedback to Interns/Residents as they work with individuals, a small group or the entire class.
Mentors and liaisons will utilize this instrument for lesson evaluations. Intern/Resident may choose to use it as a self-evaluation
tool.
Intern/Resident: _______________________________ Subject: ______________________ Grade: _____________
Mentor: _____________________________________ Date of Lesson/Activity: __________ Time: ______________
Rate Factors Below: 3 (Exceptional), 2 (Acceptable), 1 (Needs Improvement) N/A, (Not Applicable), N/O (Not Observed)
RATING
1. Lesson Plan: accurate, proper objectives, appropriate intro., sufficient detail,
3 2 1 N/A N/O
evaluation tied to obj., appropriate closing, able to use appropriate and effective feedback
and assessment
2. Presentation: followed plan, appropriate intro., made obj. clear, connected lesson
to past/future learning, stressed more imp. items, good closing, evidence of content
knowledge, use of lesson cycle, teaches using resourceful materials
3
2
1
N/A N/O
3. Strategies: asks questions that elicit higher order thinking, solicits responses, secures attention,
begins promptly and maintains good pacing, varies teaching and learning strategies,
provides differentiation
3
2 1
N/A N/O
4. Student Engagement/Evidence of Learning: students are actively engaged, students
demonstrates competence and/or mastery of objectives
3
2
1
N/A N/O
5. Management: students’ on-task, appropriate noise level for activities, appropriate
movement for type of lesson, appropriate reinforcement and on-task behavior, noticed &
handled problem situations appropriately
3
2
1
N/A N/O
6. Personal: evidence of poise & confidence, voice projection, proper grammar,
enunciation, eye contact, warmth & enthusiasm
3
2
1
N/A N/O
3
2
1
N/A N/O
7. Materials Used: sufficient use of manipulatives, visuals, and other materials
appropriately; accurate, useful, and relevant handouts, appropriate and timely distribution;
appropriate use of technology (computers, interactive whiteboard, video, etc.)
STRENGTHS AND CHANGES
1. Three Strengths of the Lesson:
2. Things to Consider:
_____________________________________
Evaluator Signature
Date
_______________________________________
Intern/Resident Signature
Date
□
ELED 452
Acknowledgement of lesson debriefing with liaison or ILT at a
separate time after the lesson. Time of Post-Lesson
Conference:________________________
Page 11 of 15
Resident - Evaluation of Progress
Texas A&M University-Commerce -- Teacher Education Field Based Program
Circle one:
Self or Mentor EC-6 or 4-8
Grade __________
CWID:
Mid-Term or Final
Campus:
Date:
Resident Name:
Instructions: Rate the indicators in the 1st column by circling the appropriate rating in the 2nd Column
(3 =
Exceptional; 2 = Proficient;
1 = Needs Improvement; NA = Not applicable or not observed). Then, add Comments and or suggestions in each main
area.
Rating
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Indicators of Meeting Proficiencies
I-1.
I-2.
I-3.
I-4.
I-5.
I-6.
I-7.
I-8.
Promotes development of positive self-concepts
Fosters climate of respect/acceptance of others’ ideas
Maintains a supportive environment
Designs and integrates learning experiences that respect student diversity
Applies or links curriculum content to the community
Models and enables students to use all learning modalities
Establishes climate in which learners work collaboratively
Demonstrates an understanding of and sensitivity to students
Comments/Suggestions:
II-1.
II-2.
II-3.
II-4.
II-5.
II-6.
II-7.
II-8.
II-9.
Demonstrates effective observation skills
Exhibits strong working knowledge of subject matter
Presents information accurately and clearly
Collaborates and shares knowledge with peers
Organizes topics for practical application
Integrates other disciplines to develop multiple perspectives
Demonstrates knowledge of instructional strategies
Maximizes time available for instruction
Integrates technological resources into instruction
Comments/Suggestions:
Equity &
Excellence for
All Learners
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
LearnerCentered
Knowledge
III – A Planning
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
ELED 452
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
III-A-1. Prepares effective lesson plans in which direct instruction, concept teacher are the primary
instructional strategies
III-A-2. Prepares effective lesson plans in which cooperative learning, inquiry, discovery, etc., are the primary
instructional strategies
III-A-3. Makes instruction relevant to student experiences
III-A-4. Incorporates technology in planning
III-B Teaching and Management
III-B-1. Able to implement lesson plan effectively
III-B-2. Uses adequate and appropriate supporting materials
III-B-3. Appropriate and motivating lesson Focus including effective linking of new information with prior
knowledge
III-B-4. Models a variety of instructional strategies
III-B-5. Models and encourages respectful behavior
III-B-6. Uses appropriate pacing, wait time, and positive reinforcement strategies
III-B-7. Manages and monitors student learning effectively and makes appropriate adjustments to plan when
needed
III-B-8. Engages all students in problem solving, critical, and creative thinking
III-B-9. Encourages self-directed learning
Page 12 of 15
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
III-B-10. Effective in establishing and maintaining routines, procedures and logical consequences
III-B-11. Is positive and proactive in redirecting off-task behavior
III-B-12. Demonstrates “withitness” i.e., handling multiple tasks and decisions while and being cognizant of the total
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
3 2 1 NA
LearnerCentered
Instruction
Part A, B, & C
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
LearnerCentered
Communication
environment.
III-B-13. Demonstrates effective classroom management skills
III-B-14. Integrates technology to enhance instruction (multiple formats)
III-C: Evaluation of Learning
III-C-1.
III-C-2.
III-C-3.
III-C-4.
Provides opportunities for student-teacher reflections
Guides learners in meaningful self-assessment
Evaluation strategies are aligned with lesson objectives
Utilizes variety of objective/subjective measures of evaluation including authentic assessment,
portfolio, and reflective inquiry
III-C-5. Uses formative assessment as a tool to direct and re-direct learning
Comments/Suggestions:
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
IV-1.
IV-2.
IV-3.
IV-4.
IV-5.
IV-6.
IV-7.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
V-1. Demonstrates professional commitment to education
V-2. Exhibits high standards of professional dress and demeanor
V-3. Models punctuality and reliability
V-4. Uses school services and community resources
V-5. Knows and respects laws/guidelines for teacher responsibilities and student rights
V-6. Makes decisions based on ethical principles
V-7. Develops positive, productive relationships with colleagues
V-8. Makes use of collaborative process to plan instruction, utilize materials and resources
V-9. Participates in collaborative decision making and/or problem solving
V-10. Seeks continual professional growth and uses reflective analysis in self-evaluation
V-11. Seeks and engages in professional development opportunities
V-12. Assumes and performs duties and responsibilities/takes initiative
V-13. Stays abreast of technology
Comments/Suggestions:
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
2 1 NA
LearnerCentered
Professional
Development
Establishes climate which supports risk taking and/or innovative problem solving
Demonstrates effective verbal communication skills
Demonstrates effective nonverbal communication skills
Incorporates questioning techniques that elicit multiple-level thinking
Uses technology for building communication skills
Communicates effectively as an advocate for each learner
Uses correct grammar in writing and speaking
Comments/Suggestions:
Additional Comments:
Signatures:
___________________________
Resident
_________________________________________________
Mentor
Liaison
Date
 Acknowledgement of feedback
ELED 452
Page 13 of 15
Grading
The assessment and evaluation of residents is twofold as it addresses performance in both field based and
seminar settings.
This includes completing all course requirements with a grade of a "C" or better in SPED 480 and ELED 447. The
resident must also successfully complete the requirements with a "C" or better for ELED 452 - Student
Teaching, prepare a satisfactory portfolio, have satisfactory ILT summative evaluations, and be
recommended for certification by the Instructional Leadership Team to be awarded credit for the above
course requirements.
TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS
The following technology is required to be successful in this face-to-face course:
Internet connection – high speed recommended for research and communicating
Word Processor (Microsoft Office Word – 2003 or 2007)
Access to University Library site
Access to an Email Account
COMMUNICATION AND SUPPORT
Interaction with Instructor Statement:
Additional contact information will be given in seminar.
UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES/POLICIES
University Specific Procedures:
Requests for Special Accommodations. Requests from students with disabilities for reasonable accommodations
must go through the Academic Support Committee. An individual instructor cannot decide to make
accommodations for you without that Committee’s approval.
Student Conduct. All students enrolled at the University shall follow the tenets of common decency and
acceptable behavior conducive to a positive learning environment. (See Code of Student Conduct from Student
Guide Handbook).
Withdrawal Policy. Every student has the right to drop the course without penalty until the drop‐date. Students
dropping the course during this period will be given a DP (drop while passing). A grade of DP is GPA neutral, but a
grade of DF counts as an F on your transcript. If you choose to stop attending class, you may be dropped from the
course due to excessive absences. If you are not satisfied with your grade in the course and wish you to drop, it is
YOUR responsibility to drop the course. Once a grade of DP or DF has been registered, I will not be able to change
it. A student may drop a course by logging into their myLEO account and clicking on the hyperlink labeled 'Drop A
Class' from among the choices found under the myLEO section of the Web page.
Academic Integrity is the pursuit of scholarly work free from fraud and deception and is an educational objective
of this institution. Texas A&M University‐Commerce has explicit rules and regulations governing academic
dishonesty and academic misconduct. The minimum penalty for an act of academic dishonesty will be the
assignment grade of 0 on the examination or homework assignment. The maximum penalty is expulsion from the
University. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, plagiarism (the appropriation or stealing of the
ideas or words of another and passing them off as one's own), cheating on exams or other course assignments,
collusion (the unauthorized collaboration with others in preparing course assignments), and abuse (destruction,
defacing, or removal) of resource material. If you are unsure what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it. Visit
the following websites:
ELED 452
Page 14 of 15
http://www.plagiarism.org/
http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/plagiarism.html
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml
ADA Statement
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil
rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with
disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities.
If you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact:
Office of Student Disability Resources and Services
Texas A&M University-Commerce
Gee Library 132
Phone (903) 886-5150 or (903) 886-5835
Fax (903) 468-8148
StudentDisabilityServices@tamu-commerce.edu
Student Disability Resources & Services
Student Conduct
All students enrolled at the University shall follow the tenets of common decency and acceptable behavior
conducive to a positive learning environment. (See Code of Student Conduct from Student Guide Handbook)
A&M-Commerce will comply in the classroom, and in online courses, with all federal and state laws
prohibiting discrimination and related retaliation on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin,
disability, age, genetic information or veteran status. Further, an environment free from discrimination on
the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression will be maintained.
COURSE OUTLINE / CALENDAR
FALL
Interns:
Report when public schools begin until regular
University class schedule begins
EC - 6th Grade and 4th - 8th Grade
no. of days
SPRING
Interns:
no. of days
5 days/week
Start of university classes until University Semester ends
1day/seminar
Report when regular
2 days /public school
University class schedule
begins until University
semester ends
2 days /public school
1 day /seminar
Residents:
Residents:
Report when regular University
5 days/week
Report when public schools begins until University
semester ends
5 days/week
class schedule begins until University
semester ends
ELED 452
Page 15 of 15
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