Annual Security Report

Annual Security Report
Annual
Security
&
Fire Safety Report
For CY 2014
Higher Education Opportunity Act
(Clery Act)
ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT
UNDER THE CLERY ACT
Contents
ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT
FOREWORD
CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS
CLERY GEOGRAPHY
On Campus
On Campus – in Residential Halls
Non-campus Building or Property
On Public Property
CRIMINAL OFFENSES (MAIN CAMPUS)
HIERARCHICAL OFFENSES
NON-HIERARCHICAL OFFENSES
HATE OFFENSE STATISTICS
ARRESTS
DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS/REFERRALS
CRIMINAL OFFENSES (EAST CAMPUS)
HATE OFFENSE STATISTICS
ARRESTS
DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS/REFERRALS
CLERY OFFENSES
NEW YORK STATE LAW DEFINITIONS
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DISCLOSURE OF POLICY STATEMENT
PREPARING AND REPORTING THE ANNUAL DISCLOSURE OF CRIME STATISTICS
CAMPUS LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITY AND JURISDICTION
DAILY LOGS
POLICY ON OFF-CAMPUS CRIMES
REPORTING CRIMES AND OTHER EMERGENCIES
To report a crime on the University Campus:
To report a less serious incident:
To report crimes off campus: dial 911 for local agencies
To report sexual violence on or off Campus:
Procedure after a call comes into UPD:
Reporting Missing Persons
VOLUNTARY ANONYMOUS REPORTING PROCEDURES
CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING PROCEDURES FOR CRIMES INVOLVING SEXUAL VIOLENCE
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
TIMELY WARNINGS AND EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS TO THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY
What warrants a "timely warning" or “emergency notification”?
Ways to communicate these issues:
Procedure to follow:
SUNY New York Alert
CAMPUS SECURITY AUTHORITIES
SECURITY OF CAMPUS BUILDINGS
Residence Halls
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UNDER THE CLERY ACT
Other Campus Buildings, Academic and Non-Academic
CAMPUS SECURITY PROGRAMS AND PROCEDURES
Safety Programs & Initiatives
CAMPUS DRUG POLICY
New York State Law
Marijuana
Hashish
Cocaine and Crack
Effects and Symptoms of overdose, withdrawal and misuse of alcohol and drugs
ALCOHOL POLICY AND ENFORCEMENT GUIDELINES FOR UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY OFFICIALS
General Policy for Use of Alcohol on Campus
Summary of policies governing the use of alcohol on all University at Albany Properties
Alcohol Policy Enforcement
Campus Policy for Governing the Use of Alcohol in Residence Halls
Employee Drug and Alcohol Policy
HATE OR BIAS CRIMES
SEXUAL VIOLENCE RESPONSE AND PREVENTION
Information for Students Who Have Experienced Sexual Violence
Disciplinary Action for Incidents Involving Sexual Violence
University at Albany Student’s Bill of Rights
24/7 EMERGENCY RESOURCES
ADDITIONAL CAMPUS RESOURCES
SEXUAL OFFENDER REGISTRY
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES CENTER
MAPS
MAIN CAMPUS – 1400 WASHINGTON AVENUE, ALBANY, NY 12222
ALUMNI QUADRANGLE
DOWNTOWN CAMPUS
EAST CAMPUS
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ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT
FIRE SAFETY SYSTEMS
UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY RESIDENCE HALLS
EMERGENCY EVACUATION
Procedures:
Residence Hall Emergency Evacuation Drills:
ENFORCEMENT
UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY CONTACTS FOR NOTIFICATION OF A FIRE EVENT
POLICY FOR REPORTING ON-CAMPUS FIRES
2012 FIRE INCIDENT LOG:
2013 FIRE INCIDENT LOG:
2014 FIRE INCIDENT LOG:
STATISTICS AND RELATED INFORMATION REGARDING FIRES IN RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES:
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ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE REPORT DISTRIBUTION
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ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT
UNDER THE CLERY ACT
APPENDIX A - CAMPUS-WIDE INITIATIVES TARGETED TO PROMOTE BASIC PERSONAL SAFETY AND TO
PREVENT SEXUAL ASSAULT
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CAMPUS-WIDE INITIATIVES TARGETED TO PROMOTE BASIC PERSONAL SAFETY
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AND TO PREVENT SEXUAL ASSAULT
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ESTABLISHMENT OF THE UALBANY ADVOCACY CENTER FOR SEXUAL VIOLENCE
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PRESIDENTIAL ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR THE PREVENTION OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE
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PRESIDENT’S ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON CAMPUS SECURITY
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UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY SEXUAL ASSAULT RESPONSE TEAM
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Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence
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Project SHAPE: Sexual Health and Peer Education - Sexual Health Promotion and Sexual Violence
Prevention
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Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program
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UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT
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Educational Programs
101
Neighborhood Life
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DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS
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STUDENT ASSOCIATION
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DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE
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OFFICE OF STUDENT INVOLVEMENT
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PUBLICATIONS ADDRESSING SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION
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UNIVERSITY RESOURCES FOR VICTIM’S ASSISTANCE:
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APPENDIX B - CAMPUS-WIDE INITIATIVES FOR THE PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG
ABUSE: 2014-2015 ACADEMIC YEAR
MAJOR INITIATIVES: 2014-2015
Presidential Leadership
Campus Task Force on AOD Abuse and Related Risk Behaviors
Student Involvement/Leadership
Social Norms Marketing Interventions
Campus & Community Coalitions
Restriction of Alcohol Marketing and Promotion
Alcohol-Free Options
Education
Early Intervention
Policy Evaluation and Enforcement
Parental Involvement
Treatment and Referral
Research
GRANT ACTIVITIES
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ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT
UNDER THE CLERY ACT
Annual Security Report
FOREWORD
On behalf of the University Community, welcome to the University at Albany!
At the University, our foremost concern is the safety and well-being of the students, faculty, staff
and visitors. The University Police Department (“UPD”) is dedicated to providing service in
keeping with our focus on Community Policing. We are here 24 hours a day, every day working
to maintain and improve the safety, security, and quality of life within our community.
The University at Albany has more than 17,000 undergraduate and graduate students, with
approximately 4,000 faculty and staff. There are 115 buildings and 12 miles of public roadways
within the campus boundaries. And the Campus keeps growing!
Our 400-acre uptown campus is situated on the western edge of the City of Albany; the smaller
downtown campus, with classrooms and residence halls, is situated in the middle of the city; the
East Campus is in the town of East Greenbush. The data from all campuses are included in this
report.
UPD works closely with students, faculty and staff across the campus to achieve the highest
levels of personal safety possible. UPD is staffed around the clock, 365 days a year, with 35
professional law enforcement officers and 30 security officers. These officers routinely visit
residence halls and offices to discuss safety. One campus effort, dubbed "Park, Walk and Talk,"
gets police out of their patrol cars to walk where students see them.
The University provides an extensive array of campus security programs and procedures which
are described on the following pages. Our continuing effort to improve safety has led us to
implement several initiatives – including creation of the Committee on University & Community
Relations, an uptown campus bicycle patrol, a Ride Along Program, regular foot and bicycle
patrols on the academic podium and an uptown campus shuttle, beginning in the late afternoon
and continuing until midnight. We also meet regularly with local police, government officials,
neighborhood association and community leaders, and landlords, seeking ways to make oncampus and off-campus living safer for our students. While this report is updated annually, we
encourage you to check on the University’s website for periodic updates on campus security, and
safety and victim support programs offered by UPD, Student Affairs, Residential Life, the
Counseling Center, the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence Employee Assistance Program
(“EAP”) and other campus offices and departments.
While we have developed procedures and policies to ensure that students and their possessions
are protected as much as possible, it is primarily the responsibility of the student, faculty or staff
member to provide for his or her own safety and security by taking simple, common sense
precautions, and by reporting information to UPD or other campus security authorities, including
the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Department of Residential Life and
Community Standards.
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UNDER THE CLERY ACT
All campus crime and incident reports are posted promptly on the University's website and are
distributed to the student newspaper and other offices across campus. In cases where a reported
crime appears to threaten the safety of the campus community, the University takes additional
steps, such as leaflets delivered to every student room, email notifications, telephone alerts and
television notices, to notify the campus community of what has occurred and the steps that are
being taken.
UPD provides 24-hour-a-day, 365-day-a-year mobile and foot patrol protection to all University
campus properties as well as nearby facilities rented or leased by the University.
The University and UPD strive to promote and maintain a campus environment conducive to
academic achievement. A truly safe campus can only be achieved through the cooperation of the
entire campus community. With your help and participation and our commitment, we are
confident that the time you spend with us will be safe and productive.
Sincerely,
J. Frank Wiley, Chief
Clarence McNeill, Clery Compliance Officer
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ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT
UNDER THE CLERY ACT
CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS
Under the Clery Act campuses are required to report campus crime statistics for certain offenses,
hate crimes, arrests and disciplinary referrals to the campus judicial process. The Clery Act also
requires that any incident that is Unfounded also be reported. An incident may be classified as
unfounded only after investigation by a law enforcement agency. A mere lack of evidence to
support the allegations is not sufficient to unfound a case. To classify an incident as unfounded
there must be evidence that demonstrates the offense was not committed. The number of
unfounded cases, if any, is indicated in square brackets [] for each offense and location category.
In all cases this data must be broken down according to the geographic location of the occurrence
of the offense. These locations are defined as the campus’ “Clery Geography” under the Act.
Clery Geography
On Campus
Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous
geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the
institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and
Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to paragraph (1) of this definition,
that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and
supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor).
On Campus – in Residential Halls
“Dormitories or other residential facilities for students on campus” is a subset of the on-campus
category. Institutions must disclose the total number of on-campus crimes, including those in dorms
or other residential facilities for students on campus, and must also make a separate disclosure limited
to the number of crimes occurring in student dorms or residential facilities on campus. As a subset,
the number of crimes reported for dormitories or other residential facilities must be less than or equal
to the number of reported crimes for the on-campus category.
Non-campus Building or Property
Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized
by the institution; or
Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in
relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the
same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.
On Public Property
All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within
the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.
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UNDER THE CLERY ACT
CRIMINAL OFFENSES (MAIN CAMPUS)
Hierarchical Offenses
The following criminal offenses are reportable offenses under the Clery Act for the Main
Campus (including the Downtown Campus and Alumni Quad). Hierarchical offenses are listed
a single time for each location category under the most serious offense committed. On campus
statistics include both incidents reported to police and those reported to non-police officials and
may therefore contain multiple entries for the same incident.
* - A single incident included 26 counts of burglary – an arrest was made and property recovered.
** - These offenses are reported as a Non-Hierarchical Offense beginning in 2014 (see next page).
On Campus
Criminal Offense
Non-Campus Building or Property
2012
2013
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
10[3]
9[3]
-**
0
0
-**
Robbery
1
1
3
Aggravated Assault
2
1
Burglary
17
Motor Vehicle Theft
3
Murder/Non-Negligent
Manslaughter
Negligent
Manslaughter
Forcible Sex Offenses
(including forcible
rape)
Non-Forcible Sex
Offenses
Criminal Offense
2012
2013
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-**
0
0
-**
Robbery
0
0
0
0
Aggravated Assault
0
0
0
31*
5
Burglary
0
0
0
0
3
Motor Vehicle Theft
0
0
0
2012
2013
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-**
0
0
-**
Murder/Non-Negligent
Manslaughter
Negligent
Manslaughter
Forcible Sex Offenses
(including forcible
rape)
Non-Forcible Sex
Offenses
On Campus – in Residential Halls
Criminal Offense
On Public Property
2012
2013
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
10[3]
6[3]
-**
0
0
-**
Robbery
1
0
2
Robbery
0
0
0
Aggravated Assault
1
0
0
Aggravated Assault
0
0
0
Burglary
11
31*
3
Burglary
0
0
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
0
0
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
0
0
0
Murder/Non-Negligent
Manslaughter
Negligent
Manslaughter
Forcible Sex Offenses
(including forcible
rape)
Non-Forcible Sex
Offenses
Criminal Offense
Murder/Non-Negligent
Manslaughter
Negligent
Manslaughter
Forcible Sex Offenses
(including forcible
rape)
Non-Forcible Sex
Offenses
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UNDER THE CLERY ACT
Non-Hierarchical Offenses
Non-hierarchical offenses are counted each time one of the offenses is reported for each
location category under the most serious offense committed. If a single incident
includes multiple non-hierarchical offenses the incident will be counted for each count
of each offense (and potentially once again if a hierarchical offense is also reported).
* - These incident types are new reporting categories beginning this year.
On Campus
Criminal Offense
Non-Campus Building or Property
2012
2013
2014
Arson
1
2
4
Dating Violence
-
6
Domestic Violence
-
Fondling *
Criminal Offense
2012
2013
2014
Arson
0
0
0
16
Dating Violence
-
0
0
0
1
Domestic Violence
-
0
0
-
-
1[1]
Fondling *
-
-
0
Incest *
-
-
0
Incest *
-
-
0
Rape *
-
-
4
Rape *
-
-
0
Sex Offense *
-
-
0
Sex Offense *
-
-
0
Stalking
-
5[1]
4
Stalking
-
0
0
Statutory Rape *
-
-
0
Statutory Rape *
-
-
0
2012
2013
2014
On Campus – in Residential Halls
Criminal Offense
On Public Property
2012
2013
2014
Criminal Offense
Arson
1
2
1
Arson
0
0
0
Dating Violence
-
4
14
Dating Violence
-
1
0
Domestic Violence
-
0
0
Domestic Violence
-
0
0
Fondling *
-
-
1[1]
Fondling *
-
-
0
Incest *
-
-
0
Incest *
-
-
0
Rape *
-
-
3
Rape *
-
-
0
Sex Offense *
-
-
0
Sex Offense *
-
-
0
Stalking
-
1[1]
1
Stalking
-
0
0
Statutory Rape *
-
-
0
Statutory Rape *
-
-
0
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UNDER THE CLERY ACT
Hate Offense Statistics



For Calendar Year 2012 there were seven Criminal Mischief incidents evidencing bias. Four evidenced
racial bias; all occurring on campus (not in a residential hall). Two evidenced sexual orientation bias; one
occurring on campus (not in a residential hall) and one on campus in a residential hall. One evidenced
religious bias and occurred on campus (not in a residential hall).
For Calendar Year 2013 there were no reports of hate or bias offenses.
For Calendar Year 2014 there were two reports of incidents evidencing bias. Both occurred on campus not
in a residential hall. One was a criminal mischief (graffiti) evidencing racial bias. The second was an
incident of intimidation evidencing bias regarding national origin.
Arrests
Disciplinary Actions/Referrals
On Campus
2012 2013 2014
Criminal Offense
1
0
0
Liquor Law Violations
109 87 159
Drug Law Violations
Illegal Weapons
2
2
6
Possession
On Campus
2012
Criminal Offense
287
Liquor Law Violations
171
Drug Law Violations
Illegal Weapons
5
Possession
On Campus – in Residential Halls
2012 2013 2014
Criminal Offense
0
0
0
Liquor Law Violations
80
61 113
Drug Law Violations
Illegal Weapons
2
0
5
Possession
On Campus – in Residential Halls
2012 2013 2014
Criminal Offense
277 218 242
Liquor Law Violations
151 134 233
Drug Law Violations
Illegal Weapons
3
12
4
Possession
Non-Campus Building or Property
2012 2013 2014
Criminal Offense
0
0
0
Liquor Law Violations
0
0
0
Drug Law Violations
Illegal Weapons
0
0
0
Possession
Non-Campus Building or Property
2012 2013 2014
Criminal Offense
0
0
0
Liquor Law Violations
0
0
0
Drug Law Violations
Illegal Weapons
0
0
0
Possession
On Public Property
2012 2013 2014
Criminal Offense
0
2
3
Liquor Law Violations
8
7
24
Drug Law Violations
Illegal Weapons
1
0
1
Possession
On Public Property
2012 2013 2014
Criminal Offense
0
0
0
Liquor Law Violations
0
0
3
Drug Law Violations
Illegal Weapons
0
0
0
Possession
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2013 2014
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255
158
267
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ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT
UNDER THE CLERY ACT
CRIMINAL OFFENSES (EAST CAMPUS)
The East Campus had one reported Motor Vehicle Theft in 2012 that occurred on campus (not
in a residential hall). The East Campus had no reported offenses for 2013. The East Campus
had no reported offenses for 2014.
Hate Offense Statistics
The East Campus had no reported Hate Offenses in 2012, 2013, or 2014.
Arrests
The East Campus had no reported Arrests in 2012, 2013. There was one arrest related to a Drug
offense in 2014.
Disciplinary Actions/Referrals
The East Campus had no reported Disciplinary Actions or Referrals in 2012, 2013, or 2014.
CLERY OFFENSES
(Federal Offense Definitions)
Aggravated assault: An unlawful attack by one
person upon another for the purpose of inflicting
severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of
assault usually is accompanied by the use of a
weapon or by means likely to produce death or great
bodily harm.
Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempt
to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling
house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft,
personal property of another, etc.
Forcible Sex Offenses:
 Fondling: The touching of the private body
parts of another person for the purpose of
sexual gratification, forcibly and/or against
that person’s will; or, not forcibly or against
the person’s will where the victim is
incapable of giving consent because of
his/her youth or because of his/ her
temporary or permanent mental or physical
incapacity.

Burglary: The unlawful entry into a building or other
structure with the intent to commit a felony or a theft.
Crime or a public offense: An act committed or
omitted in violation of a law forbidding or
commanding it, and to which is annexed, upon
conviction, either of the following punishments:
death; imprisonment; fine; removal from office; or
disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of
honor, trust, or profit in this State.
Rape: Penetration, no matter how slight, of
the vagina or anus with any body part or
object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of
another person, without the consent of the
victim.
Hate crime: A criminal offense committed against a
person or property which is motivated, in whole or in
part, by the offender’s bias against a race, gender,
gender identity, religion, disability, sexual
orientation, ethnicity, or national origin.
Drug abuse: Violations of laws prohibiting the
production, distribution and/or use of certain
controlled substances and the equipment or devices
utilized in their preparation and/or use.
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UNDER THE CLERY ACT
Larceny – theft: The unlawful taking, carrying,
leading, or riding away of property from the
possession or constructive possession of another.
Robbery: The taking or attempting to take anything
of value from the care, custody, or control of a person
or persons by force or threat of force or violence
and/or by putting the victim in fear.
Liquor-law violation: Violations of laws or
ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, purchase,
transportation, possession or use of alcoholic
beverages.
Vehicle theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor
vehicle.
Murder and non-negligent manslaughter: The
willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by
another.
Negligent manslaughter: The killing of another
person through gross negligence.
Domestic violence: violent misdemeanor and felony
offenses committed by the victim's current or former
spouse, current or former cohabitant, person similarly
situated under domestic or family violence law, or
anyone else protected under domestic or family
violence law.
Non-campus: Any building or property owned or
controlled by a student organization that is officially
recognized by the institution.
Non - Forcible Sex Offenses:
 Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse
between persons who are related to each
other within the degrees wherein marriage is
prohibited by law.

Statutory rape: Non-forcible sexual
intercourse with a person who is under the
statutory age of consent.
Weapons: Violations of laws or ordinances
prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase,
transportation, possession, concealment or use of
firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary
devices or other deadly weapons.
Dating violence: violence committed by a person
who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship
with the victim. Whether there was such relationship
will be gauged by its length, type, and frequency of
interaction.
Stalking: a course of conduct directed at a specific
person that would cause a reasonable person to fear
for her, his, or others' safety, or to suffer substantial
emotional distress.
Public property: All public property, including
thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking
facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately
adjacent to and accessible from the campus.
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ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT
UNDER THE CLERY ACT
NEW YORK STATE LAW DEFINITIONS
CONSENT: Lack of consent results from: forcible
compulsion; or incapacity to consent; or where the
offense charged is sexual abuse or forcible touching,
any circumstances, in addition to forcible compulsion
or incapacity to consent, in which the victim does not
expressly or impliedly acquiesce in the actor’s
conduct. Where the offense charged is rape in the
third degree, a criminal sexual act in the third degree,
or forcible compulsion in circumstances under which,
at the time of the act of intercourse, oral sexual
conduct or anal sexual conduct, the victim clearly
expressed that he or she did not consent to engage in
such act, and a reasonable person in the actor’s
situation would have understood such person’s words
and acts as an expression of lack of consent to such
act under all the circumstances. A person is incapable
of consent when he or she is: less than 17 years old;
or mentally disabled; or mentally incapacitated; or
physically helpless; or committed to the care and
custody of the state department of correctional
services, a hospital, the office of children and family
services and is in residential care, or the other person
is a resident or inpatient of a residential facility
operated by the office of mental health, the office for
people with development disabilities, or the office of
alcoholism and substance abuse services, and the
actor is an employee, not married to such person,
who knows or reasonably should know that such
person is committed to the care and custody of such
department or hospital.
CONSENT, ABBREVIATED: Clear, unambiguous,
and voluntary agreement between the participating
individualsto engage in specific sexual activity.
DATING VIOLENCE: New York State does not
specifically define “dating violence.” However, under
New York Law, intimate relationships are covered by
the definition of domestic violence when the act
constitutes a crime listed elsewhere in this document
and is committed by a person in an “intimate
relationship” with the victim. See “Family or
Household Member” for definition of “intimate
relationship.”
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: An act which would
constitute a violation of the penal law, including, but
not limited to acts constituting disorderly conduct,
harassment, aggravated harassment, sexual
misconduct, forcible touching, sexual abuse, stalking,
criminal mischief, menacing, reckless endangerment,
kidnapping, assault, attempted murder, criminal
obstruction or breaching or blood circulation, or
strangulation; and such acts have created a substantial
risk of physical or emotional harm to a person or a
person’s child. Such acts are alleged to have been
committed by a family member. The victim can be
anyone over the age of sixteen, any married person or
any parent accompanied by his or her minor child or
children in situations in which such person or such
person’s child is a victim of the act.
FAMILY OR HOUSEHOLD MEMBER: Person’s
related by consanguinity or affinity; Persons legally
married to one another; Person formerly married to
one another regardless of whether they still reside in
the same household; Persons who have a child in
common regardless of whether such persons are
married or have lived together at any time; Unrelated
persons who are continually or at regular intervals
living in the same household or who have in the past
continually or at regular intervals lived in the same
household; Persons who are not related by
consanguinity or affinity and who are or have been in
an intimate relationship regardless of whether such
persons have lived together at any time. Factors that
may be considered in determining whether a
relationship is an “intimate relationship” include, but
are not limited to: the nature or type of relationship
regardless of whether the relationship is sexual in
nature; the frequency of interaction between the
persons; and the duration of the relationship. Neither
a casual acquaintance nor ordinary fraternization
between two individuals in business or social
contexts shall be deemed to constitute an “intimate
relationship”; any other category of individuals
deemed to be a victim of domestic violence as
defined by the office of children and family services
in regulation. Intimate relationship status shall be
applied to teens, lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender,
and elderly individuals, current and formerly married
and/or dating heterosexual individuals who were, or
are in an intimate relationship.
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PARENT: means natural or adoptive parent or any
individual lawfully charged with a minor child’s care
or custody.
SEXUAL ASSAULT: New York State does not
specifically define sexual assault. However,
according to the Federal Regulations, sexual assault
includes offenses that meet the definitions of rape,
fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI’s
UCR program.
SEX OFFENSES; LACK OF CONSENT: Whether
or not specifically stated, it is an element of every
offense defined in this article that the sexual act was
committed without consent of the victim.
SEXUAL MISCONDUCT: When a person (1)
engages in sexual intercourse with another person
without such person’s consent; or (2) engages in oral
sexual conduct or anal sexual conduct without such
person’s consent; or (3) engages in sexual conduct
with an animal or a dead human body.
RAPE IN THE THIRD DEGREE: When a person
(1) engages in sexual intercourse with another person
who is incapable of consent by reason of some factor
other than being less than 17 years old; (2) Being 21
years old or more, engages in sexual intercourse with
another person less than 17 years old; or (3) engages
in sexual intercourse with another person without
such person’s consent where such lack of consent is
by reason of some factor other than incapacity to
consent.
RAPE IN THE SECOND DEGREE: When a
person (1) being 18 years old or more, engages in
sexual intercourse with another person less than 15
years old; or (2) engages in sexual intercourse with
another person who is incapable of consent by reason
of being mentally disabled or mentally incapacitated.
It is an affirmative defense to the crime of rape in the
second degree the defendant was less than four years
older than the victim at the time of the act.
RAPE IN THE FIRST DEGREE: When a person
engages in sexual intercourse with another person
(1) by forcible compulsion; or (2) Who is incapable
of consent by reason of being physically helpless; or
(3) who is less than 11 years old; or (4) who is less
than 13 years old and the actor is 18 years old or
more.
CRIMINAL SEXUAL ACT IN THE THIRD
DEGREE: When a person engages in oral or anal
sexual conduct (1) with a person who is incapable of
consent by reason of some factor other than being
less than 17 years old; (2) being 21 years old or more,
with a person less than 17 years old; (3) with another
person without such persons consent where such lack
of consent is by reason of some factor other than
incapacity to consent.
CRIMINAL SEXUAL ACT IN THE SECOND
DEGREE: When a person engages in oral or anal
sexual conducts with another person (1) and is 18
years or more and the other person is less than 15
years old; or (2) who is incapable of consent by
reason of being mentally disabled or mentally
incapacitated. It is an affirmative defense that the
defendant was less than four years older than the
victim at the time of the act.
CRIMINAL SEXUAL ACT IN THE FIRST
DEGREE: When a person engages in oral or anal
sexual conduct with another person (1) by forcible
compulsion; (2) who is incapable of consent by
reason of being physically helpless; (3) who is less
than 11 years old; or (4) who is less than 13 years old
and the actor is 18 years old or more.
FORCIBLE TOUCHING: When a person
intentionally, and for no legitimate purpose, forcibly
touches the sexual or other intimate parts of another
person for the purpose of degrading or abusing such
person; or for the purpose of gratifying the actor’s
sexual desire. It includes squeezing, grabbing, or
pinching.
PERSISTENT SEXUAL ABUSE: When a person
commits a crime of forcible touching, or second or
third degree sexual abuse within the previous ten year
period, has been convicted two or more times, in
separate criminal transactions for which a sentence
was imposed on separate occasions of one of one of
the above mentioned crimes or any offense defined in
this article, of which the commission or attempted
commissions thereof is a felony.
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SEXUAL ABUSE IN THE THIRD DEGREE:
When a person subjects another person to sexual
contact without the latter’s consent. For any
prosecution under this section, it is an affirmative
defense that (1) such other person’s lack of consent
was due solely to incapacity to consent by reason of
being less than 17 years old; and (2) such other
person was more than 14 years old and (3) the
defendant was less than five years older than such
other person.
AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ABUSE IN THE
SECOND DEGREE: When a person inserts a finger
in the vagina, urethra, penis, rectum or anus of
another person causing physical injury to such person
by (1) forcible compulsion; or (2) when the other
person is incapable of consent by reason of being
physically helpless; or (3) when the other person is
less than 11 years old.
AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ABUSE IN THE
FIRST DEGREE: When a person subjects another
person to sexual contact: (1) By forcible compulsion;
or (2) when the other person is incapable of consent
by reason of being physically helpless; or (3) when
the other person is less than eleven years old; or (4)
when the other person is less than thirteen years old
and the actor is twenty-one years old or older.
SEXUAL ABUSE IN THE SECOND DEGREE:
When a person subjects another person to sexual
contact and when such other person is (1) incapable
of consent by reason of some factor other than being
less than 17 years old; or (2) less than 14 years old.
SEXUAL ABUSE IN THE FIRST DEGREE:
When a person subjects another person to sexual
contact (1) by forcible compulsion; (2) when the
other person is incapable of consent by reason of
being physically helpless; or (3) when the other
person is less than 11 years old; or (4) when the other
person is less than 13 years old.
AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ABUSE: For the
purposes of this section, conduct performed for a
valid medical purpose does not violate the provisions
of this section.
AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ABUSE IN THE
FOURTH DEGREE: When a person inserts a (1)
foreign object in the vagina, urethra, penis or rectum
of another person and the other person is incapable of
consent by reason of some factor other than being
less than 17 years old; or (2) finger in the vagina,
urethra, penis, rectum or anus of another person
causing physical injury to such person and such
person is incapable of consent by reason of some
factor other than being less than 17 years old.
COURSE OF SEXUAL CONDUCT AGAINST A
CHILD IN THE SECOND DEGREE: When over
a period of time, not less than three months, a person:
(1) Engages in two or more acts of sexual conduct
with a child less than 11 years old; or (2) being 18
years old or more engages in two or more acts of
sexual conduct with a child less than 13 years old. A
person may not be subsequently prosecuted for any
other sexual offense involving the same victim unless
the other charges offense occurred outside of the time
period charged under this section.
COURSE OF SEXUAL CONDUCT AGAINST A
CHILD IN THE FIRST DEGREE: When a person
over a period of time, not less than three months in
duration, a person: (1) Engages in two or more acts
of sexual conduct, or aggravated sexual contact with
a child less than 11 years old; or (2) being 18 years
old or more engages in two or more acts of sexual
conduct which includes at least one act of sexual
intercourse, oral sexual conduct, anal sexual
conduct, or aggravated sexual contact with a child
less than 13 years old.
AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ABUSE IN THE
THIRD DEGREE: When a person inserts a foreign
object in the vagina, urethra, penis, rectum or anus of
another person (1)(a) by forcible compulsion; (b)
when the other person is incapable of consent by
reason of being physically helpless; or (c) when the
other person is less than 11 years old; or (2) causing
physical injury to such person and such person is
incapable of consent by reason of being mentally
disabled or mentally incapacitated.
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STALKING IN THE FOURTH DEGREE: When
a person intentionally, and for not legitimate
purpose, engages in a course of conduct directed at a
specific person, and knows or reasonably should
know that such conduct (1) is likely to cause
reasonable fear of material harm to the physical
health, safety or property of such person, a member
of such person’s immediate family or a third party
with whom such person is acquainted; or (2) causes
material harm to the mental or emotional health of
such person, where such conduct consists of
following, telephoning or initiating communication
or contact with such person, a member of such
person’s immediate family or a third party with
whom such person is acquainted, and the actor was
previously clearly informed to cease that conduct; or
(3) is likely to cause such person to reasonably fear
that his or her employment, business or career is
threatened, where such conduct consists of
appearing, telephoning or initiating communication
or contact at such person’s place of employment or
business, and the actor was previously clearly
informed to cease that conduct.
FACILITATING A SEX OFFENSE WITH A
CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE: A person is guilty
of facilitating a sex offense with a controlled
substance when he or she: (1) knowingly and
unlawfully possesses a controlled substance or any
preparation, compound, mixture or substance that
requires a prescription to obtain and administers such
substance or preparation, compound, mixture or
substance that requires a prescription to obtain to
another person without such person’s consent and
with intent to commit against such person conduct
constituting a felony defined in this article; and (2)
commits or attempts to commit such conduct
constituting a felony defined in this article.
INCEST IN THE THIRD DEGREE: A person is
guilty of incest in the third degree when he or she
marries or engages in sexual intercourse, oral sexual
conduct or anal sexual conduct with a person whom
he or she knows to be related to him or her, whether
through marriage or not, as an ancestor, descendant,
brother or sister of either the whole or the half blood,
uncle, aunt, nephew or niece.
INCEST IN THE SECOND DEGREE: A person is
guilty of incest in the second degree when he or she
commits the crime of rape in the second degree, or
criminal sexual act in the second degree, against a
person whom he or she knows to be related to him or
her, whether through marriage or not, as an ancestor,
descendant, brother or sister of either the whole or
the half blood, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece.
INCEST IN THE FIRST DEGREE: A person is
guilty of incest in the first degree when he or she
commits the crime of rape in the first degree, or
criminal sexual act in the first degree, against a
person whom he or she knows to be related to him or
her, whether through marriage or not, as an ancestor,
descendant, brother or sister of either the whole or
half blood, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece.
STALKING IN THE THIRD DEGREE: When a
person (1) Commits the crime of stalking in the
fourth degree against any person in three or more
separate transactions, for which the actor has not
been previously convicted; or (2) commits the crime
of stalking in the fourth degree against any person,
and has previously been convicted, within the
preceding ten years of a specified predicate crime
and the victim of such specified predicate crime is the
victim, or an immediate family member of the
victim, of the present offense; or (3) with an intent to
harass, annoy or alarm a specific person,
intentionally engages in a course of conduct directed
at such person which is likely to cause such person
to reasonably fear physical injury or serious physical
injury, the commission of a sex offense against, or
the kidnapping, unlawful imprisonment or death of
such person or a member of such person’s immediate
family; or (4) commits the crime or stalking in the
fourth degree and has previously been convicted
within the preceding ten years of stalking in the
fourth degree.
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STALKING IN THE SECOND DEGREE: When a
person: (1) Commits the crime of stalking in the
third degree and in the course of and furtherance of
the commission of such offense: (a) displays, or
possesses and threatens the use of, a firearm, pistol,
revolver, rifle, sword, billy, blackjack, bludgeon,
plastic knuckles, metal knuckles, chukka stick, sand
bag, sand club, slingshot, shuriken, “Kung Fu Star,”
dagger, dangerous knife, dirk, razor, stiletto,
imitation pistol, dangerous instrument, deadly
instrument or deadly weapons; or (b) displays what
appears to be a pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun,
machine gun or other firearm; or (2) commits the
crime of stalking in the third against any person, and
has previously been convicted, within the preceding
five years, of a specified predicate crime, and the
victim of such specified predicate crime is the
victim, or an immediate family member of the victim,
of the present offense; or (3) commits the crime of
stalking in the fourth degree and has previously been
convicted of stalking in the third degree; or (4) being
21 years of age or older, repeatedly follows a person
under the age of fourteen or engages in a course of
conduct or repeatedly commits acts over a period of
time intentionally placing or attempting to place
such person who is under the age of fourteen in
reasonable fear of physical injury, serious physical
injury or death; or (5) commits the crime of stalking
in the third degree, against ten or more persons, in ten
or more separate transactions, for which the actor
has not been previously convicted.
STALKING IN THE FIRST DEGREE: When a
person commits the crime of stalking in the third
degree or stalking in the second degree and, in the
course and furtherance thereof, him or her
intentionally or recklessly causes physical injury to
the victim of such crime.
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Disclosure of Policy Statement
Preparing and Reporting the Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics
UPD, in conjunction with the Office of the President, the Division of Student Affairs,,
Office of Human Resource Management, and local law enforcement agencies, prepares this report
to comply fully with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics
Act. Statistics are compiled in accordance with the Uniform Crime Reporting System of the
Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Campus crime, arrest and referral statistics include those reported to UPD, designated
campus officials (including the Title IX Coordinator, members of the division of Student Affairs,
including the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence, the Office of Residential Life, and
Community Standards, the Office of Human Resource Management and Academic Deans), and
local law enforcement entities. Crimes are reported that occur on campus, on locations that are
contiguous to the campus, and buildings or properties that are either owned or controlled by a
campus affiliated entity, including officially recognized student organizations. Please see the
University Map herein for the boundaries of crime reporting in accordance with the Clery Act.
Campus policy encourages every member of the campus community to report a crime
promptly to UPD, other campus security authorities or in the case of sexual violence, to the Title
IX Coordinator. Students are also informed of their right to obtain support services by making a
confidential report to , the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence, Counseling and Psychological
Services, Health Services or the Interfaith Center. The University’s voluntary confidential
reporting options are offered for those who may not want to pursue action either within the federal
or state criminal justice system or within the University’s discipline system, but who are in need
of support services. A procedure is in place to capture crimes statistics which are disclosed
anonymously to UPD, the Title IX Coordinator and to the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence.
Each year, an e-mail notification is made to all enrolled students, faculty and staff that
provides the web site to access this report. Copies of the report may also be obtained at the
University Police Department located at the east side of campus, just off University Drive East at
the east end of Indian Parking Lot or by calling (518) 442-3130. All prospective students may
obtain a copy by calling UPD or the Undergraduate or Graduate Admissions Office, or by visiting
the web site at http://police.albany.edu/ASR.shtml. All prospective employees may obtain a copy
by calling UPD or the Office of Human Resource Management, or by visiting the above web site.
Of note, the federal Clery Act may define a particular crime differently than that crime is
defined under the New York State Penal Code. For the purposes of this Report, the University
uses the Clery Act definitions of crimes. Please see herein for the Clery Act definitions.
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Campus Law Enforcement Authority and Jurisdiction
UPD officers have complete policing authority to apprehend and arrest anyone involved in
illegal acts on campus and areas immediately adjacent to the campus, from major offenses such as
rape, murder, aggravated assault, robbery and auto theft to more minor offenses such as traffic
violations. As part of their policing authority, they also have the authority to execute arrest
warrants and search warrants, to execute bench warrants, take into custody and transport, in
accordance with the NYS Mental Hygiene Law, a person likely to be a danger to himself or herself
or others, conduct a temporary detention and emergency search for a weapon, and accept
possession of lost property.
If minor offenses involving violations of University rules and regulations are committed,
including, but not limited to violations of the Community Rights and Responsibilities (CRR), UPD
may also refer the individual to the disciplinary office of the Division of Student Affairs or the
Office of Human Resources Management.
UPD works closely with local, state and federal police agencies, and it has direct access to
national and statewide computer data bases for accessing criminal history data, nationwide police
records, driver/vehicle identification information as well as other law enforcement information.
UPD also maintains cooperative agreements with Albany City Police and the Guilderland Police
relative to joint policing, investigations and enforcement to secure the safety of the Campus, and
the contiguous town and city. Namely, these agreements state that UPD will be primarily
responsible for the investigation of crimes occurring on campus property, and the contiguous law
enforcement agencies will be primarily responsible for the investigation of crimes occurring in
their respective jurisdictions; the departments will cooperate with each other in such investigations.
Daily Logs
UPD maintains a daily log of all department activity. The log is available for viewing at
the station upon request or at http://police.albany.edu/CandISearch.shtml.
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Policy on Off-Campus Crimes
When a University student is involved in an off-campus offense, UPD officers may assist
with the investigation in cooperation with local, state or federal law enforcement. The uptown
campus sits in part in the Town of Guilderland, but mainly in the City of Albany. The downtown
campus is in the City of Albany. The East Campus is in the Town of East Greenbush. The
University does not recognize or permit any off-campus student groups, such as fraternal groups
or sporting groups, to have official off-campus property with the exception of the Student
Association’s Dippikill camp area located in Warrensburg, New York.
UPD regularly communicates with the Albany City Police, the Town of Guilderland Police,
the Town of East Greenbush Police, Warren County Sheriff’s Office and the New York State
Police to track any crimes or incidents involving University students.
Reporting Crimes and other Emergencies
The University encourages all campus community members, students, faculty, staff and guests,
to report all crimes and public safety incidents to UPD (University Police Department) in a
timely manner.
To report a crime on the University Campus:
On campus telephones
Emergency & Blue Light Telephones
Other telephones, including cell phones
dial
911
pick up receiver/dialed automatically
dial
518-442-3131
Crimes also can be reported personally to the UPD office, 24 hours a day. The University
Police Building is located at the east side of campus, just off University Drive East at the east
end of Indian Parking Lot.
To report a less serious incident:
Community Standards
Residential Life (for incidences occurring in campus residence)
UPD
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518-442-5501
518-442-5875
518-442-3131
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To report crimes off campus:
dial 911 for local agencies
To report sexual violence on or off Campus:
For an emergency or off campus incident
To make a report to University Police
To report to the Title IX Coordinator
To make a confidential report to the
Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence
Dial 911
518-442-3131 or walk in to UPD Office
518-956-8168 or University Hall room 104
518-442-CARE (walk-ins welcome)
Procedure after a call comes into UPD:
After a call comes in, police or other University personnel, fire and/or ambulance service will be
dispatched as appropriate to the location of the call. Criminal offenses are pursued by UPD.
UPD communicates routinely with other law enforcement agencies in the area.
The UPD works in close coordination with other area police agencies including the New York
State Police, the Albany City Police, the Guilderland Police and the East Greenbush Police in the
reporting and investigation of crimes occurring on and off campus.
Reporting Missing Persons
Any incident involving a person who is believed to be missing should be reported to the
University Police Department (UPD). Any University official who becomes aware of a student
believed to be missing for 24 hours or more must notify UPD.
UPD will take the report regardless of how long the person may have been missing. There is no
requirement that the person be “missing” for 24 hours before UPD will take a report and begin
an investigation. It is the policy of the University Police Department to take immediate reports
on all persons thought to be “missing” and to immediately begin efforts to locate the person.
University students may designate a confidential contact person to be notified in the event the
student has been missing for 24 hours or more. Designation of this confidential contact person is
in addition to the designation of an “emergency contact”, although they may be the same person
if the student so chooses. Confidential contacts, as well as general emergency contacts, may be
designated through the students’ My UAlbany portal.
In the event that a student is believed to have been missing for 24 hours or more notification will
be made to the confidential contact if one has been designated. In addition if the student is under
the age of 18 and not emancipated, their custodial parent or guardian will be notified.
Note that while the above notifications are required under federal law nothing precludes
contacting these or any other persons during the investigation if doing so may further the
investigation, whether 24 hours has past or not. Appropriate to the particulars of the report other
resources may be contacted to assist with an investigation including other law enforcement
agencies.
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Voluntary Anonymous Reporting Procedures
The University encourages all members of its community to report crimes to UPD or other
Campus Security Authorities, whether he or she is a victim or a witness.
If you are a victim or a witness to a crime and you do not want to pursue action within the
University’s discipline system or the criminal justice system, you may still want to consider
making an anonymous report. UPD maintains an electronic anonymous reporting system on its
website http://police.albany.edu/crime_report.shtml. In cases involving sexual violence,
anonymous reports can also be made to the Title IX Coordinator by calling 518-956-8168 or
visiting the anonymous reporting form at http://www.albany.edu/titleIX/reporting-form/titleIXreporting-form.php.
It will not retain email addresses, IP addresses or other identifying information unless the
reporting person voluntarily includes identification information.
The purpose of an anonymous report is to comply with your wishes to keep the matter
confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With this
information, the University can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving
students, faculty and staff, determine where there is a pattern of crime relative to location, method,
and assailant and alert the campus community to potential harm. Anonymous reports are counted
and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the campus. Please understand while the crime is
counted for statistical purposes, confidential reporting of a crime may impede a speedy
investigation and/or a thorough investigation, or it may prohibit an investigation in its entirety.
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Confidential Reporting Procedures for Crimes Involving Sexual Violence
Reporting individuals have the right to confidentially disclose an incident to University at Albany officials who are
designated as confidential resources. These individuals can assist in obtaining services for reporting individuals.
Individuals who are confidential resources will not report crimes to law enforcement or college officials without
permission, except for extreme circumstances, such as a health and/or safety emergency. At the University at Albany
this includes:
The Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence
http://www.albany.edu/advocacycenter
Student Resources:
518-442-CARE
University Counseling Center
http://www.albany.edu/counseling_center
518-442-5800
University Health Center
http://www.albany.edu/health_center
518-442-5454
Interfaith Center
http://www.albanyinterfaithcenter.org
518-489-8573
Employee Assistance Program
www.albany.edu/eap
Indian Quad
Bottom of the exterior staircase between
Seneca and Onondaga Halls, Suite 009
400 Patroon Creek Blvd
Suite 104
Albany, NY
400 Patroon Creek Blvd
Suite 200
Albany, NY
1400 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY
Employee Resources:
518-442-5483
MSC Room 200
1400 Washington Ave
Albany, NY
Please note that the Advocates at the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence and the Employee Assistance
Program are required under Federal law to report only the nature, date, time, and general location of an
incident to the University's Title IX Coordinator, but will consult with reporting individuals to ensure no
personally identifying details are shared without consent.
Emergency Management
The University maintains and tests an All-Hazards Emergency Management Plan (EMP).
The EMP is also on file at SUNY System Administration.
The EMP utilizes the communications methods noted in the “Timely Warnings and
Emergency Notifications to the Campus Community” section below. The SUNY NY Alert
Emergency Notification system is a primary communications method. The system is tested at least
annually with community-wide tests having occurred on February 17 and September 21, 2014.
Prior to each annual test notification is sent to the community via email announcing when the test
will occur, delineating the parameters of the test, advising the community how to participate in the
SUNY NY Alert program and advising the community how and where to comment on the testing
process.
In addition to the test of the notification system a scenario based exercise of the EMP is
held at least annually. A tabletop exercise testing the Student Health Service’s capability to identify
and manage a person presenting with symptoms consistent with the Ebola virus was held October
28, 2014.
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Timely Warnings and Emergency Notifications to the Campus Community
What warrants a "timely warning" or “emergency notification”?
Timely Warnings shall be issued whenever a Clery Crime that is considered to represent
a serious or continuing threat to students and employees is reported to UPD or a local police
agency and has occurred within the University’s Clery Geography. Whenever a timely warning
is sent it shall be sent to the entire community.
Emergency Notifications shall be issued when a significant emergency or dangerous
situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurs on
the campus. As appropriate, emergency notifications may be targeted at only a segment or
segments of the campus community that is at risk. Emergency notifications will be issued without
delay unless doing so would compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or
otherwise mitigate the emergency.
The Vice President for Student Affairs, or in their absence a designee of the Vice President,
in conjunction with the Chief of University Police and/or other campus and non-campus officials
as appropriate, shall confirm the existence of a situation that may warrant a warning or notification
and determine if a timely warning or emergency notification is warranted and the extent of the
notification as appropriate. In addition to criminal incidents emergency notifications may be
issued in situations such as, but not limited to:
1. Safety Related Issues:
 An incident that occurs ON any of our campuses that affects the personal safety and
security of our population.
 An incident that occurs in close proximity of the University's three campuses that may
potentially affect the personal safety and security of our student, faculty and staff population.
2. Health Related Issues:
 A member of our population is diagnosed with a serious or life threatening
communicable/infectious disease.
 Evidence of bio terrorism.
The only reason an immediate notification for a confirmed emergency or dangerous
situation would not be issued is if doing so will compromise efforts to: assist a victim, contain
the emergency, respond to the emergency, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.
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Ways to communicate these issues:
For Safety Related Issues:
The following methods can be used to get the word out. Methods of communication will
be chosen based on the nature of the incident. A decision will be made on notification methods by
the VP for Student Affairs or their designee.








E-mail to all students and/or faculty/staff
Postings in campus center, residence halls, downtown and east campus as
applicable to the incident. Postings can be emailed as attachments to various
offices as indicated below
Delivery of hard copy notification to all residential suites
Albany Student Press (ASP) ad, based on timing of the incident
Posting of notification on University Police Department web site
SUNY NY Alert in the case of a critical campus wide emergency
Email to parents
Post to MyUAlbany portal
For Health Related Issues:
The following methods can be used to get the word out. Methods of communication will
be chosen based on the nature of the incident. A decision will be made on notification methods by
the VP for Student Affairs.




Letters to students and/or parents (communication to parents is extremely minimal, most
likely done in cases of measles, mumps, or rubella. Viral Meningitis would be
communicated to the parents whose students are directly affected.)
Letters to faculty and staff, if appropriate
Posting of notification on the University web-site at http://www.albany.edu
ASP ad, based on timing of the incident
Procedure to follow:
For information that is believed to be of interest or concern to the entire University population, the
Vice President for Student Affairs will typically notify the President’s Office in advance of sending
a campus wide notification.
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SUNY New York Alert
WHAT IS IT?
The University at Albany is one of many State University campuses that have adopted an
emergency messaging service offered through the State Emergency Management Office (SEMO)
and the State University of New York (SUNY).
The system will allow the University at Albany to communicate on matters of CRITICAL
EMERGENCIES with all members of the University community who sign up for this service.
The system allows e-mail, phone and text messages to be sent automatically to all members
of the campus community who have provided their contact information.
HOW TO SIGN UP
The University strongly recommends that all students, faculty and staff sign up for SUNY
NY Alert emergency messages. You can sign up for this service by logging on to MyUAlbany
and choosing “SUNY NY Alert Emergency contact Info”. Registered students and current Faculty
and Staff are eligible to sign up this way.
If you choose to receive the alerts, you must provide at least one e-mail address. You may
also provide a cell phone number and provider to receive text message alerts and a phone number,
either cell or land line, to receive voice alerts. You may list up to three phone numbers for each of
these options, but you should be aware that the alert system will attempt to contact every number
that you list until one of the phones is answered. We advise that you list your most-used number
for text messaging and/or your most-used number for voice messages.
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Campus Security Authorities
The University has designated certain administrators and staff as “campus security authorities”
(CSA). Campus Security Authorities include all members of the University Police Department,
but also all University employees who have significant responsibility for student and campus
activities in recognition that many students, faculty and staff may be hesitant about reporting
crimes to UPD, and may be more inclined to report incidents to non-law enforcement
administrators and staff instead. Examples of non-police CSAs include all coaches, Community
Standards, professional staff in Student Involvement and Residential Life, etc.
CSAs are charged with documenting the incident for inclusion in this Annual Report (only the
offense and general location information are included in the report) and to report immediately any
issue that may present a serious or continuing threat to the safety of the campus community. A
campus security authority is not responsible for determining whether a crime took place.
A CSA is required to report all allegations for inclusion in this Annual Report, even if the CSA
was told of a crime in the context of providing emotional support or health care support. The
allegations will be reported whether or not the victim chooses to file a report with law enforcement
or press charges. A CSA will also provide a victim or witness with assistance in reporting a crime
to UPD or local police if the victim or witness chooses to do so..
Pastoral counselors, professional advocates and licensed mental health counselors at the University
are not CSAs, and are therefore exempt from disclosing or reporting allegations of crimes and
incidents. However, to be exempt from the Clery Act reporting requirements, the counselor must
be acting in their professional role of pastoral or mental health counselors at the University. For
example, a Dean who has PhD in psychology is not acting in the counseling role, but rather as a
Dean; and a PhD student in psychology working in Counselling and Psychological Services as
part of his/her education and training is acting in the counseling role. Pastoral counselors,
advocates and mental health counselors are trained in the procedures for reporting crimes and the
procedures for reporting crimes confidentially. The University encourages them to inform their
clients of the procedures in accordance with their professional judgment, given the individual
victim and circumstances before them.
In addition, the Student Health Services employees, including the medical director, physicians and
nurses, and Five Quad volunteers, are not CSAs.
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The University designates the following as Campus Security Authorities:







Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
Professional staff in Student Affairs except Health Services and Counseling and
Psychological Services staff
Senior staff in the Office of Human Resource Management
Academic Advisors in Advisement Services Center Undergraduate Studies (ASC/US)
and Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)
Professional staff in Athletics, including coaches
Faculty Advisor’s to student groups
Title IX Coordinator
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Security of Campus Buildings
Residence Halls
During the past several years, the University at Albany has enacted many programs to
enhance the security of residents. These initiatives include:
 Security viewing holes on residence hall room doors.

Residence hall access doors locked 24-hours a day.

Card readers on suite doors of newly renovated buildings.

Key access to all interior bedrooms.

If keys are lost, lock changes are done and all suite members are issued new keys.

Phones in all traditional residence hall foyers for campus calls.

“Red phones” are located in all bedrooms on Freedom, Indian Alumni and Empire and
in the suites of State, Colonial and Dutch. These phones can dial on campus and 911.

Blue light phones are in all public female bathrooms.

Security patrols on all quads during evening hours.

SUNYCard ID Access, a computerized ID card system that limits building access to
residents of specific areas.

A Residence Director and Residence Assistants are on duty at all times that students
are in residence. There is always a back-up manager on duty as well.

Ten security cameras strategically placed at entrances to Alumni Quad.

Throughout the year, Residential Life staff conducts programs relating to personal
safety. Many are conducted in conjunction with the University Police. The Advisory
Committee on Campus Security meets regularly to recommend safety improvements
to University Administration. Neighborhood Life, part of the Community Standards
unit and located in the Campus Center, has information regarding personal safety for
all members of the University community.
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Other Campus Buildings, Academic and Non-Academic
Most campus facilities, with the exception of residence halls, are open to the public during
the day and evening hours when classes are in session. Residence Halls are locked twentyfour hours a day, seven days a week, with card access for residents and other authorized
individuals. The general public is encouraged to attend cultural, athletic and other activities
on campus with access limited to the facilities in which the events take place.
At night and during periods of time when classes are not in session, University buildings are
generally locked. Faculty, staff and limited numbers of students with proper identification
and appropriately issued keys and access cards are allowed access to the buildings. Campus
employees with assigned offices are issued keys. They are responsible for reporting missing
and stolen keys.
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Campus Security Programs and Procedures
Safety and security on campus is built on a strong foundation that includes:
1. Community Policing. UPD strives to develop and maintain a positive relationship
with all members of the UAlbany family with a supportive community oriented
approach to law enforcement.
2. Individual Responsibility. Every member of the university community is responsible
for his/her own safety by taking simple, common sense precautions and reporting
incidents to the police and other campus authorities.
3. Student Volunteerism. One of our most important safety programs, the Don’t Walk
Alone Safety Escort Service, is run by students who voluntarily give of their time
and energy as a positive contribution to safety efforts on campus.
Safety Programs & Initiatives
The University at Albany encourages you to take full advantage of safety programs and
initiatives designed to protect your person and your property. They include:
Operation Identification
Available through the University Police Department, this program is a nationwide system that
tracks your property in the event it is lost or stolen. A personal number and UPD’s agency
identifying number are engraved on your property.
RAD – Rape Aggression Defense
Designed to develop and enhance the options of self-defense for women who participate in
this course. RAD is a twelve-hour course taught by certified instructors and offered in threehour segments. The course is offered free of charge to members of the University community
by the University Police Department. Classes range in size from 18-20 attendants.
Don’t Walk Alone
A volunteer safety escort service provides evening escorts on the Main campus. They can be
found in the library lobby.
Park, Walk & Talk
A University Police patrol designed to establish a closer relationship to and enhance
communications with the University community by having officers park their cars, and
interact with students & staff on campus and in the residence halls.
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The University at Albany Mountain Bike Patrol
University Police bike patrol provides more effective access to residential and academic areas
of the campus and gives the community greater access to the officers.
The Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence
The Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence is a Center on campus which opened on January
22, 2014. This Center provides a safe and welcoming environment for students impacted by
sexual violence including, but not limited to sexual assault, intimate partner violence and
stalking to receive support and advocacy services to help them heal. Supportive services are
also available to students’ family members and friends. Professional advocates offer a range
of comprehensive services to student victims/survivors including consultations to discuss
students’ options for medical care, reporting, counseling, academic and residential
accommodations and student conduct and/or criminal charges. Advocacy Center staff
provide ongoing support and advocacy throughout students’ involvement with these
processes and facilitates referrals as needed.
The Advocacy Center offers sexual violence prevention and education programs and also
houses Project SHAPE: Sexual Health and Peer Education, a peer program which offers over
100 programs on sexual violence prevention and sexual health promotion through interactive
programs, exhibits and awareness events for the University community. The Advocacy
Center for Sexual Violence is also the home of Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP)
which provides training to students on how to safely intervene as an active bystander.
Emergency & Blue Light Phones
There are more than 330 emergency & blue light phones on the three campuses of the
University. These telephones connect directly to the University Police Department when
picked up, making the reporting of emergency situations, or suspicious persons instantaneous.
These phones are clearly visible, denoted by their blue lights and striped poles.
The 911 Emergency System
The 911 phone system was established to assist members of the University community in
contacting the University Police Department in case of situations such as: fires, crimes in
progress, or medical emergencies.
The Security Services Assistants (SSA)
This program involves uniformed civilian security officers assigned to key areas of the
campus to serve as observers and reporters of potential safety problems. They are utilized to
patrol the campus and assist University Police Officers at special University events.
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Residence Hall Safety Enhancements
All suite doors are equipped with viewing holes; exterior doors are locked 24 hours a day;
card access to exterior doors allows for additional security; phones are located in vestibule
areas providing free on campus calls; security patrols on quads; personal, property and fire
safety programs coordinated by residential life staff. Residence halls are locked twenty-four
hours a day, seven days a week.
Advisory Committee on Campus Safety
A group of policy level personnel, including faculty, professional staff and students that
examines and makes recommendations relative to safety conditions on the University
campus.
Lighting
UPD, the Department of Physical Plant, and the Advisory Committee on Campus Safety
annually survey lighting on campus to ensure that areas are adequately lighted. Numerous
additions have been made to lighting in the last ten years.
Anti-intrusion Alarms
Many academic and support areas of special sensitivity are protected by alarm systems which
ring in directly to a central station or UPD. Officers are dispatched to intruded areas to
evaluate the situation.
Alcohol and Other Drug Education, Prevention Services and Programs
The University offers a wide range of alcohol and drug education prevention services and
programs, including a highly visible social norms campaign targeting substance use and
widespread delivery of an empirically supported screening and brief intervention program
for at risk populations (e.g., first year students, student athletes, etc.). Additional services
include National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, facility use for Alcoholics
Anonymous meetings and peer education programs.
Current information regarding alcohol and drug prevention services and educational
programs can be found by linking to:
http://www.albany.edu/counseling_center/drugs.shtml.
Information on upcoming events can be found at the following website:
http://www.albany.edu/counseling_center/index.shtml.
Criminal Investigation Unit
UPD has a team of detectives assigned to do follow-up investigations of reported crimes.
The team is specially trained to offer programs on recognizing and protecting oneself from
on-line harassment.
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Counseling and Psychological Services
Confidential counseling, support, and services are offered for crime victims. Please see
page 58 for additional information. http://www.albany.edu/counseling_center/
Student Health Services
Confidential health services, including medical examination and treatment, are offered for
crime
victims.
Please
see
page
58
for
additional
information.
http://www.albany.edu/health_center/
Office of Community Standards (Formerly Judicial Affairs)
Hears and adjudicates referrals from students victimized by other students. Sanctions range
from warning and probation to expulsion.
Crime Prevention Pamphlets
UPD and Division of Student Affairs publish numerous pamphlets which are distributed to
students and staff to assist them in preventing victimization for specific types of crimes.
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Campus Drug Policy
The University at Albany is committed to promoting a drug-free campus environment.
Consistent with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (Public
Law 101-226), all students and employees are advised that individuals who violate Federal,
State or Local laws and campus policies are subject to University disciplinary action and
criminal prosecution. UPD has the full authority to enforce all federal and state drug laws.
The possession, use or distribution of a controlled substance or dangerous drugs, or any drug
unlawful to possess, e.g. marijuana, except as expressly permitted by law, is a violation of
law and of campus policy. Penalties may include attendance and completion of appropriate
rehabilitation programs in addition to federal, state and local sanctions.
Students should be aware there are significant psychological and physiological health risks
associated with the use of illicit drugs and alcohol. Physical addiction, loss of control and
withdrawal syndrome as well as serious damage to vital organs of the body can result from
drug and alcohol abuse.
The following resources are available for assisting those with possible problems of chemical
abuse:


Counseling and Psychological Services
Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program
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New York State Law
Articles 220 and 221 of the New York State Penal Law set criminal penalties for possession
or sale of drugs considered harmful or subject to abuse. The seriousness of the offense and
penalty imposed upon conviction depend upon the individual drug and amount held or sold.
Marijuana
New York State law classifies possession of up to 25 grams of marijuana as a violation.
Penalties range from $100 to $250 fine and/or up to 15 days in jail, depending on whether it
is a first, second or third offense. Possession of more than 25 grams but not more than eight
ounces is a misdemeanor; possession of more than eight ounces is a felony. Sale of 25 grams
or less is a misdemeanor; sale of more than 25 grams is a felony. New York State law makes
no exception for the use of marijuana for medical purposes.
Hashish
The penalties for sale or possession of hashish are more severe. Possession of any amount,
no matter how small, is a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in county jail and/or
up to $1000 fine. Possession of one-quarter ounce or more is a felony. Sale of any amount
of hashish, no matter how small, is a felony.
Cocaine and Crack
Possession of any amount, no matter how small, is the most serious class of misdemeanor
punishable by up to 12 months in a county jail. Possession of 500 milligrams or more is a
class D felony punishable by 2.3 to 7 years in a state correctional facility. Sale of any amount
is a felony.
Effects and Symptoms of overdose, withdrawal and misuse of alcohol and
drugs
A description of alcohol and drug categories, their effects, symptoms of overdose,
symptoms of withdrawal and indications of misuse can be found at:
http://ncadi.samhsa.gov/
and at the Drug Enforcement Administration of the U.S. Department of Justice website:
http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/concern/concern.htm
Federal Trafficking Penalties can be found at:
http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/agency/penalties.htm
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Alcohol Policy and Enforcement Guidelines for University at Albany
Officials
General Policy for Use of Alcohol on Campus
1. The University adheres to and enforces all federal, state and local laws concerning
alcohol. Alcohol may only be sold and served at pre-approved social functions where
the Alcohol Use Registration Form has been approved by the Alcohol Administrator
for that building.
2. Any event at which alcohol is sold or served requires a license from NYS Liquor
Authority. The sale and serving of alcoholic beverages under the terms of State law
and University policy is permitted at the licensed premises of Sodexo in the Campus
Center and by extension of that permit, temporary permits may be issued for Sodexo
catered events only. Any alcoholic beverages sold or served outside the Campus
Center require a special liquor permit from the NYS Liquor Authority. This includes
events or performances where tickets are sold and alcohol is provided free of charge
or in exchange for a purchased ticket. This permit must be secured through Sodexo
for their catered events only and arranged at least two weeks in advance in order to
allow time for the State permit to be issued to Sodexo. All outside caterers must
provide UAS with their own approved NYS Liquor Authority permit.
3. Sponsor(s) of social events where alcohol is served assume full responsibility for the
enforcement of all laws and university policies regarding the consumption of alcohol.
This includes:
o serving non-alcoholic beverages and food at events;
o double proof of age required and must be present to the designated
“responsible person” as stated on the Alcohol use registration. Acceptable
form of proof include a valid driver's license, a birth certificate or official
state or Federal ID, a passport, or a laminated ID card from another
University/College.
4. No student under the age of twenty-one may possess or consume alcoholic beverages
anywhere on campus.
5. Alcoholic beverages are not permitted in any freshman designated housing. These
areas are designated as alcohol free. See UAlbany housing for more information.
6. For students twenty-one years or older and their guests in non-freshman areas no
individual may possess more than 12, 12 oz bottles/cans of beer (or the equivalent),
or one liter of hard liquor or wine at one time.
7. The following are prohibited under the University alcohol policy: binge drinking;
driving under the influence; kegs and beer balls, whether empty or full, tapped or
untapped; spiked punch; Jell-O shots containing alcohol; drinking games or any
behavior that encourages or contributes to excess alcohol consumption; carrying
open containers in any public area of campus; possessing, consuming and storage of
alcohol are prohibited in all public areas, e.g. lounges, hallways, stairwells, common
bathrooms, or outdoor areas.
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8. The Incident Sanction Protocol found in the University alcohol policy identifies a
series of prohibited alcohol and other drug behaviors and the sanctions for first
offense and any subsequent offense.
9. Parents of students under the age of twenty-one are notified in writing of any
alcohol/drug violations by their sons or daughters.
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Summary of policies governing the use of alcohol on all University at
Albany Properties
1. No alcohol may be consumed in academic buildings, on University grounds, on the
academic podium, in the Physical Education complex, on the Downtown Campus
and the East Campus complex, except at “alcohol approved” social functions. An
alcohol approved social function is one where the Alcohol Use Registration Form is
filled out and approved by the Alcohol Administrator for that building. Events at
which alcoholic beverages are served and which are not under the jurisdiction of a
specific local alcohol policy administrator require an "Alcohol Use Registration
Form" to be filed with the Vice President for Student Affairs, University Hall 206.
2. Under New York law, only persons twenty-one (21) years of age or older are legally
entitled to purchase, be sold, given, or served alcohol. A person under 21 years of
age may not possess or consume alcoholic beverages at any time on the University
campus.
3. Under New York law, persons under the age of 21 are prohibited from possessing
any alcoholic beverages with intent to consume the beverage. Violators are subject
to a fine up to $50.00 per offense. Authorized law enforcement personnel may seize
alcoholic beverages involved in alleged violations of this law.
4. New York law further provides that any person, other than a parent or guardian, who
purchases alcohol for, procures for, or gives alcohol to anyone under 21 years of age
is guilty of a misdemeanor.
5. Under New York law, anyone under 21 years of age who uses fraudulent proof of
age to obtain alcohol is guilty of a misdemeanor. This violation is punishable by a
fine of up to $100.00 and a community service requirement of up to thirty (30) hours.
6. Under New York law, anyone who is apparently intoxicated or who is behaving in
an intoxicated manner may not be served alcohol.
7. A substantial part of the University at Albany is in the City of Albany and is subject
to its open container law. Thus no open container of an alcoholic beverage is
permitted on the campus, except at approved social functions as described in #1
above.
8. Any event at which alcoholic beverages are sold requires a license from the New
York State Liquor Authority. The sale of alcoholic beverages under the terms of State
law and University policy is permitted at the licensed premises of the Sodexo in the
Campus Center. Any alcoholic beverages sold outside the Campus Center require a
special liquor permit from the State of New York. This includes events or
performances where tickets are sold and alcohol is provided free of charge or in
exchange for a purchased ticket. This permit must be secured at least two weeks in
advance in order to allow time for the State permit to be issued.
9. Under New York law, a person under the age of 21 who presents an altered New
York State driver's license for the purpose of illegally purchasing an alcoholic
beverage may be subject to a suspension of that driver's license for up to ninety (90)
days and may also be required to apply to the Department of Motor Vehicles for a
restricted use of driver's license following the suspension.
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10. Sponsor(s) of social events at which alcohol is served assume full responsibility for
the enforcement of all federal, state and local laws and University policies with
respect to the consumption of alcohol. This responsibility includes:
o Serving appropriate amounts of non-alcoholic beverages and food at events
where alcohol is served.
o Double proof of age is required and must be presented to the appropriate
“responsible person” as designated on the Alcohol Use Registration Form at
all functions where alcoholic beverages are served and students are present.
The following are acceptable forms of proof:
1. a valid driver's license
2. a birth certificate
3. an official state or federal ID
4. a passport
5. a laminated ID card from another University/College
11. Camp Dippikill consists of 850 acres in Warrensburg, NY owned and operated by
the Student Association. Alcohol use at Camp Dippikill is subject to all federal, state
and local laws and University policies with respect to the consumption of alcohol.
Administration of this policy is the responsibility of the Director of this property. No
alcohol may be sold by any organization on this property.
12. Driving under the influence of alcohol on University property is prohibited and
violators will be subject to arrest.
13. The Vice President for Student Affairs is responsible for implementing and
interpreting the alcohol use policy. Inquiries should be directed to:
Clarence McNeill, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs | University Hall |
956-8140
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Alcohol Policy Enforcement
Example of how to implement procedures
1. ISSUE: Within University policies and regulations, the University at Albany permits
students of legal drinking age to possess and consume alcoholic beverages. However,
individuals under 21 years of age may do neither.
2. EXPECTATION: University faculty, administrators and paraprofessional staff
(herein referred to as University officials) are expected to clearly explain to students
what action will be taken in dealing with alcohol policy violations.
When encountering instances of alcohol policy violations, University officials are
expected to confront the violators. Information should be provided as to what
behavior is inappropriate and what the individual is expected to do to be in
compliance with the campus alcohol policy. If the individual is cooperative and
complies with the request, the incident may be considered resolved. If the individual
is uncooperative or refuses to comply, the local alcohol policy administrator
responsible for the building or area should be contacted. If the policy administrator
is unavailable or the individual continues to be uncooperative, the University Police
should be summoned. The University Police will formally identify the violator and
state the campus expectation for compliance with the University alcohol policy. In
such cases a standard case form will be completed by the University Police Officer
and the individual referred to the campus Judicial System. The University Police
reserve the right to arrest, or issue a summons to appear in court on appropriate
charges if such action is deemed necessary.
3. VIOLATIONS: In order to provide a common base of understanding, it is important
to define the prohibitive behaviors which the campus considers violations of the
alcohol policy. Consistent with New York law and the campus alcohol policy, the
following instances would be in violation:
o Individuals under 21 years of age possessing or consuming alcoholic
beverages.
o Individuals 21 years or older providing, directly or indirectly, alcohol to
persons under 21 years of age.
o Anyone having alcohol in public areas without an open container permit and
proper campus authorization.
o Possession and/or use of bulk containers except as allowed by provisions in
the campus alcohol policy.
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4. STAFF DIRECTIVES TO VIOLATORS: Violators are to be instructed to dispose
of the alcohol by means other than consuming it. Students may either pour the alcohol
out on their own or give it to a staff member to pour out. When students pour alcohol
out themselves, a University official should accompany the student to ensure proper
disposal. Students are not to dispose of alcohol by consuming it, throwing it in a trash
can or giving it to another person who may be 21 years of age. The University
officials should ask the students if they intend to comply with the request. If the
students are cooperative, they can proceed to dispose of the alcohol. Internal
departmental procedures for communicating and documenting such incidents should
take place. It is expected that students who violate the University alcohol policy will
have the incident referred to the campus judicial system for appropriate sanctioning.
If the students are uncooperative or refuse the official's request, the local alcohol
policy administrator or Public Safety should be summoned for assistance. Again, it
is expected such incidents will result in the preparation of a Standard Case Form and
referral of the incident to the campus judicial system for alleged violation of the
alcohol policy as well as non compliance with the University Official.
NOTE: If University officials encounter an unauthorized bulk container (e.g. beer ball, box
of wine, keg, or "bash") it should be removed to an area where it can be drained. Once it is
drained the container and tapping equipment, as appropriate, should be returned to the
students. If the students refuse to drain the bulk container, the University Police should be
summoned
Policy for Alcohol and/or Drug Use Amnesty in Sexual Misconduct Cases
The health and safety of every student at the State University of New York and
its State-operated and community colleges is of utmost importance. The
University at Albany recognizes that students who have been drinking and/or
using drugs (whether such use is voluntary or involuntary) at the time that
violence, including but not limited to domestic violence, dating violence,
stalking, or sexual assault occurs may be hesitant to report such incidents due to
fear of potential consequences for their own conduct. The University at Albany
strongly encourages students to report incidents of domestic violence, dating
violence, stalking, or sexual assault to institution officials. A bystander acting
in good faith or a reporting individual acting in good faith that discloses any
incident of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault to
University at Albany officials or law enforcement will not be subject to the
University’s code of conduct action for violations of alcohol and/or drug use
policies occurring at or near the time of the commission of the domestic
violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault.
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Campus Policy for Governing the Use of Alcohol in Residence Halls
All University at Albany students who live in residence, and their visitors/guests, are subject
to New York State Law and the University at Albany’s policy regarding possession and
consumption of alcohol, as well as specific policies governing the Residence Halls.
1. Definition of Residence Hall/University Apartment Areas
Residence Halls are defined as the quadrangles and the University Apartment complexes,
including outdoor areas. The boundaries of Indian, State, Colonial and Dutch Quadrangles
are defined by the first paved roadway or sidewalk adjacent to the quadrangle. Indian and
Dutch Quadrangles include the playing fields adjacent to the west and east respectively with
regard to the application of this policy. The boundaries of Alumni Quadrangle are defined
by the exterior city sidewalks surrounding the quad. The boundaries of Freedom Quad are
defined by the entrance road to the complex from Tricentennial Drive. The boundaries of
Empire Commons are defined by the University roadways surrounding the complex.
2. Alcohol Policy in Freshmen Designated Residence Halls
Alcoholic beverages are never permitted in freshman residence halls. This includes all
residential buildings on Indian Quad and the designated freshman buildings on State
Quad. Designated freshmen buildings on State Quad are identified on a yearly basis on the
Residential Life web site at http://www.albany.edu/housing/. Visitors or guests of students
residing in these areas are not permitted to possess or consume alcohol in these areas
regardless of whether they are of legal drinking age. These areas are designated as alcohol
free.
3. Alcohol Policy for Students Under 21 Years of Age Living in Non-Freshmen Areas
A person under 21 years of age may not possess or consume alcoholic beverages at any time
on the University at Albany campus.
No possession or consumption of alcohol is permitted by any student or guest in private
residence rooms where all the assigned residents are under 21 years of age.
Visitors or guests of students under 21 years of age are not permitted to possess or consume
alcohol in the suite or bedroom of an underage student regardless of whether they are of
legal drinking age.
Alcohol containers, including empty liquor bottles, wine bottles and/or beer cans are
prohibited.
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4. Alcohol Policy for Students Over 21 Years of Age Living in Non-Freshmen Areas
The following regulations regarding alcohol use apply to students and visitors/guests in the
non-freshmen areas who are 21 years of age or older:
No individual student may possess more than 12, 12 oz bottles/cans of beer (or the
equivalent), or one liter of hard liquor or wine at one time.
Binge drinking is defined as consuming five or more drinks on one occasion for men or
four or more drinks on one occasion for women.
(http://www.researchmatters.harvard.edu/story.php?article_id=420) Binge drinking is
strictly prohibited.
Individuals of legal drinking age may not provide alcohol to underage roommates,
suitemates, visitors or guests.
Drinking games (e.g. beer pong) and other activities that promote the irresponsible use of
alcohol are prohibited. This includes the use of alcohol paraphernalia such as funnels and
ice luges.
Kegs and beer balls, whether empty or full, tapped or untapped, are prohibited. Spiked punch
and Jell-O shots containing alcohol, regardless of alcohol content are also prohibited.
Behavior that encourages or contributes to excessive alcohol consumption by another
student is prohibited.
Carrying open containers of alcoholic beverages or consuming them in any public area of
the campus is prohibited. This includes movement between residence hall rooms or
apartments with an alcoholic beverage.
Compliance with all requests by University officials, including Residential Life staff or
University Police, for proof of 21-year-old status is required. If there is reasonable suspicion
to believe that alcohol might be in squeeze bottles, cups or other such containers, University
staff reserve the right to approach students and hold individuals accountable under the
provisions of this policy.
Possession, consumption, and storage of alcohol are prohibited in all public areas, e.g.
lounges, hallways, stairwells, common bathrooms, or outdoor areas.
Driving on University property while under the influence of alcohol is strictly prohibited and
will result in arrest, loss of driving privileges on campus, and possible suspension or
expulsion from the University. Please see the following web site for further NYS
Department of Motor Vehicles information, including FAQ’s regarding Alcohol, Drugs, and
DWI: http://www.nysgtsc.state.ny.us/alco-faq.htm
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5. Alcohol and Other Drug Education, Prevention Services and Programs
The University offers a wide range of alcohol and drug education prevention services and
programs. Current information regarding alcohol and drug prevention services and
educational programs can be found by linking to:
http://www.albany.edu/counseling_center/drugs.shtml
6. The Incident-Sanction Protocol for Alcohol & Other Drug Violations
The Sanction Guide is designed to cover a range of sanctions that would be considered
appropriate for a particular violation or behavior – including inappropriate alcohol and
other drug use. The University’s response is not restricted to those sanctions listed in the
protocol. Students are advised that illegal possession and/or use of alcohol and other drugs
are strictly prohibited at the University.
See the following link for the Sanction Guide:
http://www.albany.edu/studentconduct/assets/Sanction_Guide.pdf.
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Employee Drug and Alcohol Policy
It is a University policy that the unlawful use, possession, manufacture, dispensation or
distribution of alcohol and controlled substances* in all campus work locations is prohibited.
No employee will report for work or will work impaired by any substance, drug or alcohol,
lawful or unlawful. "Impaired" means under the influence of a substance such that the
employee's motor senses (i.e. sight, hearing, balance, reaction, or reflex) or judgment either
are or may be reasonably presumed to be affected.
Medical testing may be done if the University has a reasonable suspicion that an employee
is unable to perform job duties due to the misuse of alcohol, controlled substances, or
prescription drugs.
Employees who unlawfully manufacture, distribute, dispense, possess, or use a controlled
substance will be subject to disciplinary procedures consistent with applicable laws, rules,
regulations and collective bargaining agreements. Sanctions may include termination of
employment and referral for prosecution. Other corrective action may include satisfactory
participation in an approved drug rehabilitation program.
Employees must notify the Office of Human Resources Management of any criminal drug
statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace, or at the work site, no later than
five (5) working days after such conviction. The University will notify appropriate federal
agencies of such a conviction within 10 days of receiving notice of a conviction.
An Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is available on campus for employees who wish
to seek assistance in dealing with drug and alcohol related problems. EAP is a confidential
information, support, and referral service. Please call 442-5483 to reach the EAP
coordinator.
This policy is in compliance with the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug Free
Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989. Adherence to this policy is a condition
of employment at the University at Albany. Questions concerning this policy should be
referred to the Office of Human Resources Management at 437-4700.
*The term "controlled substance" means a controlled substance in Schedule I through
V of Section 202 of the Controlled Substance Act (21 USC812).
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Hate or Bias Crimes
The University at Albany strives to protect all members of the University at Albany
community by prosecuting bias or hate crimes that occur within the campus jurisdiction.
Hate crimes, also called bias crimes or bias-related crimes, are criminal activity motivated
by the perpetrator’s bias or attitude against an individual victim or group based on perceived
or actual personal characteristics, such as national origin, color, race, age, religion or creed,
ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, veteran status, marital status, or disability. Hate/bias
crimes are against the law and University at Albany policy. Copies of the New York Law
are available at http://assembly.state.ny.us/leg/?cl=82&a=81.
Penalties for bias-related crimes are very serious and range from fines to imprisonment for
lengthy periods, depending on the nature of the underlying criminal offense, the use of
violence or previous convictions of the offender. Perpetrators who are students will also be
subject to campus disciplinary procedures where sanctions, including dismissal, are possible.
Hate or Bias-Related Incidents
The University at Albany strives to protect all members of the University at Albany
community by prosecuting bias or hate crimes that occur within the campus jurisdiction.
In addition to preventing and prosecuting hate/bias crimes, University Police at Albany also
assist in addressing bias-related activities that do not rise to the level of a crime. These
activities, referred to as bias incidents and defined by the University as acts of bigotry,
harassment, or intimidation directed at a member or group within the University at Albany
community based on national origin, ethnicity, race, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation,
disability, veteran status, color, creed, or marital status, may be addressed through the
University at Albany’s campus code of conduct and University policy.
Procedures to Initiate a Formal Complaint
If you are a victim of or witness to a hate/bias crime or incident on campus, report it to any
or all of the following:
 University Police at (518) 442-3131
 Office of Human Resources Management at (518) 437-4702
 Office of Community Standards at (518) 442-5501
 Office of Diversity and Inclusion at (518) 956-8110
An investigation and appropriate adjudication will follow.
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Sexual Violence Response and Prevention
The University at Albany is dedicated to supporting members of the UAlbany community
who have experience sexual violence. When the University becomes aware of an incident
of sexual violence, the University at Albany’s Title IX Coordinator will promptly
coordinate a response that aims to stop the violence from occurring, to prevent it’s
recurrence, and to remedy it’s effects on the entire university community. In all cases of
sexual violence, victims will be provided with written information about their options for
medical care, advocacy, support, and university offered accommodations. Victims will
also be informed of their options for confidential disclosure and reporting to police and
University at Albany officials.
To ensure that the institutional response to sexual violence is holistic and consistent, the
University at Albany has a comprehensive set of policies and procedures in place for the
prevention of and response to sexual violence. These policies address the rights and
support services afforded to all victims of sexual violence, disciplinary processes and
procedures, and the onboarding and continuing education of our community.
Information for Students Who Have Experienced Sexual Violence
University at Albany policy requires that the information below be provided, in writing, to
students who confidentially disclose or report sexual violence.
Options for Medical Care
Individuals who have experienced a recent sexual assault or act of physical violence are
encouraged to visit a hospital, clinic, or Student Health Services1 to assess and address
their medical needs and to preserve evidence in order to assist in a future prosecution,
should the victim choose to make a report. Reporting individuals are advised that
information provided during a medical exam is confidential and will not be released or
shared without the reporting individual’s consent. Reporting individuals are also informed
that an advocate from the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence or the Albany County
Crime Victim’s and Sexual Violence Center are available to answer questions and to
accompany members of the University at Albany community to one of the region’s local
hospitals.
1
The University Health Center is for students only and does not perform emergency medical care or Sexual
Assault Forensic Examinations. However, the Health Center will provide non emergent care and medical
follow up, including attention to injuries and evaluation for STI’s and pregnancy.
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Options for Confidential Disclosing Sexual Violence
The University at Albany wants victim/survivors to get the information and support that
they need regardless of whether they would like to move forward with a report of sexual
violence to campus officials or to police. As such, reporting individuals are advised of their
right to confidentially disclose an incident to University at Albany officials who are
designated as confidential resources.
Those employees designated as confidential resources can assist in obtaining services and
accommodations for reporting individuals, regardless of whether or not a formal report is
made. In addition, these employees will maintain as confidential the accommodations or
protective measures provided, to the extent possible. Individuals who are confidential
resources will not report crimes to law enforcement or college officials without permission,
except for extreme circumstances, such as a health and/or safety emergency. Federal law
does require that the advocates at the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence report only the
nature, date, time, and general location of an incident to University's Title IX Coordinator,
but will consult with the reporting individual to ensure that no personally identifying
details are shared without thier consent. While Advocacy Center employees do not have
privilege, they are considered confidential resources as discussed above and so it is
important to understand that they will not share a victim/survivors name, or any other
identifiable information without the victim/survivors consent.
Confidential Resources for Students:
The Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence 518-442-CAREIndian Quad
http://www.albany.edu/advocacycenter
Bottom of the exterior staircase
between Seneca and Onondaga
Halls, Suite 009
Counseling and Psychological Services
518-442-5800 400 Patroon Creek Blvd
http://www.albany.edu/counseling_center
Suite 104
Albany, NY
Student Health Services
518-442-5454 400 Patroon Creek Blvd
http://www.albany.edu/health_center
Suite 200
Albany, NY
Interfaith Center
518-489-8573 1400 Washington Avenue
http://www.albanyinterfaithcenter.org
Albany, NY
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Confidential Resources for Employees:
Employee Assistance
518-442-5483
MSC Room 200
Program
1400 Washington Ave
www.albany.edu/eap
Albany, NY
Off-campus Options to Disclose Sexual Violence Confidentially
Reporting Individuals are further informed of their option to confidentially disclose the
incident and obtain services from the following off campus resources and hotlines. Please
note that the hotlines are for crisis intervention, resources, and referrals, and are not
reporting mechanisms, meaning that disclosure on a call to a hotline does not provide any
information to the campus.
Albany County Crime
Victim and Sexual Violence
Center
Equinox, Inc.
New York State Office for
the Prevention of Domestic
Violence
www.albanycounty.com/cvsvc
518-447-7716 (24 hours)
http://www.equinoxinc.org/whatwedo/dv.php
518-432-7865 (24 hours)
http://www.opdv.ny.gov/help/dvhotlines.html
1-800-942-6906
Resources for Victim/Survivors of Sexual Violence
The University at Albany provides a variety of resources to assist individuals who have
experienced sexual violence with their healing and recovery and to help determine whether
and how to make a complaint. Reporting individuals are advised of their right to
emergency access to one of the following university representatives:



Title IX Coordinator (518-956-8168)
Advocate from the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence (518-)442-CARE
University Police (available 24 hours) 518-442-3131
The above representatives are trained annually in interviewing victims of sexual violence
and will be available upon the first instance of disclosure by a reporting individual to
provide written information regarding options to proceed, and, where applicable, the
importance of preserving evidence and obtaining a sexual assault forensic or other medical
examination as soon as possible. These representatives can also provide information about
an administrative investigation by the University and the criminal justice process and will
inform the individual about the different standards of proof utilized by each process. The
above representatives will refer a reporting individual to law enforcement if there are
questions about whether a specific incident violated the law. Each representative will
inform the reporting individual whether he or she is authorized to offer the reporting
individual confidentiality or privacy.
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The Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence (Students only)
In January of 2014, the University at Albany established the Advocacy Center for Sexual
Violence to provide services to all student victim/survivors of sexual assault, intimate
partner violence and stalking. At the Advocacy Center, students receive confidential support
from a professional advocate who will take the time to listen, explain, and explore service
options with them. Professional staff at the Advocacy Center offer a wide range of services
to students who have been impacted by sexual violence, including consultations to discuss
options for medical care, reporting, counseling, academic and housing accommodations, and
student conduct complaints. Advocacy Center staff also provide ongoing support and
advocacy throughout a reporting individual’s involvement with these various processes.
Students are strongly encouraged to visit the Advocacy Center as it offers a one-stop shop
for advocacy, support, information, counseling, and accommodations, thereby eliminating
the need for reporting individuals to navigate services and referrals on their own. This
important function assists in ensuring that reporting individuals do not experience revictimization by having to repeat their personal account each time. The Advocacy Center is
located in the back of Indian Quad at the bottom of the exterior staircase between Seneca
and Onondaga Halls. The phone number is (518) 442-CARE. Office hours are MondayFriday 8:30 to 5:00.
The Employee Assistance Program (Employees Only)
The Employee Assistance Program provides faculty and staff with free, confidential
assistance from qualified professionals who can listen, be supportive, and who can
recommend additional services. The Employee Assistance Coordinator can be reached at
518-442-5483. The office is located in the Management Services Center, Room 200.
Additional effective intervention services can be accessed at Albany Medical Center and
Albany Memorial Hospital, the University Counseling Center (students only), and Albany
County Crime Victim’s and Sexual Violence Center. For information on how to contact
these resources, please see Appendix A.
Protection and Accommodations:
Individuals reporting sexual violence and individuals accused of or responding to
allegations of sexual violence are advised of their rights to request and obtain the following
protections and accommodations by the University at Albany:
 When the accused is a student, to have the college issue a “No Contact Order”. When
a No Contact order is in effect, continued contact with the protected individual is a
violation of Community Rights and Responsibilities and will result in additional
conduct charges. If the accused and a protected person observe each other in a public
place, it is the responsibility of the accused to leave the area immediately and without
directly contacting the protected person. Both the accused/respondent and reporting
individual may request a prompt review of the need for and terms of a No Contact
Order, consistent with Community Rights and Responsibilities. Parties may submit
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








evidence in support of their request.
To have assistance from the University at Albany Police or other college officials
in initiating legal proceedings in family court or civil court, including but not limited to
obtaining an Order of Protection or, if outside of New York State, an equivalent
protective or restraining order.
To receive a copy of the Order of Protection or equivalent and have an opportunity
to meet or speak with a University official who can explain the order and answer
questions about it,2 including information from the order about the accused’s
responsibility to stay away from the protected person(s); that burden does not rest on
the protected person(s).
To an explanation of the consequences for violating these orders, including but
not limited to arrest, additional conduct charges, and interim suspension.
To have assistance from University Police in effecting an arrest when an individual
violates an Order of Protection or, if outside of New York State, an equivalent
protective or restraining order within the jurisdiction of University Police or, if
outside of the jurisdiction to call on and assist local law enforcement in effecting an
arrest for violating such an order.
When the accused is a student and presents a continuing threat to the health and
safety of the community, to have the accused subject to interim suspension pending
the outcome of a conduct process. Parties may request a prompt review of the need
for and terms of an interim suspension in accordance with the procedures set forth
in Community Rights and Responsibilities.
When the accused is not a student but is a member of the college community and
presents a continuing threat to the health and safety of the community, to subject the
accused to interim measures in accordance with applicable collective bargaining
agreements, employee handbooks, and University at Albany policies and rules.
When the accused is not a member of the college community, to have assistance
from University at Albany Police or other college officials in obtaining a persona
non grata letter, subject to legal requirements and college policy.
To receive assistance from appropriate University at Albany
representatives/community partners in initiating legal proceedings in family court
or civil court.
To obtain reasonable and available interim measures and accommodations that effect
a change in academic, housing, employment, transportation, or other applicable
arrangements in order to ensure safety, prevent retaliation, and avoid an ongoing
hostile environment. Parties may request a prompt review of the need for and terms of
any interim measures and accommodations that directly affect them.
While reporting and accused/responding individuals may request accommodations
through any of the offices referenced in this section of this policy, the Title IX
Coordinator will serve as a point to assist in obtaining the above measures.
2
The Title IX Coordinator, advocates from the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence, and the University at
Albany Police are available to explain and answer questions about Orders of Protections to reporting
individuals and accused/responding individuals.
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Options for Reporting Sexual Violence
In accordance with the University at Albany’s Student’s Bill of Rights, reporting
individuals are advised that they have the right to pursue more than one of the options
below at the same time, or to choose not to participate in any of the options below.
Reporting to the University
Reporting individuals have the right to report an incident of sexual violence to college
officials who can offer privacy and can provide information about remedies,
accommodations, evidence preservation, and how to obtain resources. It is explained that
an official who can offer privacy may still be required by law and college policy to inform
one or more college officials about the incident, including but not limited to the Title IX
Coordinator. These officials will:
Provide the reporting individual with a copy of the Students’ Bill of Rights
Disclose that they are private and not confidential resources, and that they may
be required by law and University at Albany policy to inform one or more
college officials about the incident, including but not limited to the Title IX
Coordinator.
 Notify reporting individuals that the criminal justice process uses different
standards of proof and evidence than internal procedures, and questions about
the penal law or the criminal process should be directed to law enforcement or
the district attorney.


Reporting to the University through the Title IX Coordinator
The Title IX Coordinator is available to receive reports and to provide for information and
assistance regarding an instance of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence,
and/or stalking. Reports will be investigated in accordance with University at Albany
policy and a reporting individual’s identity shall remain private at all times if they wish to
maintain privacy. If a reporting individual wishes to keep his/her identity anonymous, he
or she may call the Title IX Coordinator anonymously to discuss the situation and
available options.
The Title IX Coordinator
www.albany.edu/titleIX
518-956-8168
University Hall
104 E
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Human Resources
When the accused is an employee, a reporting individual may also report the incident to the
University at Albany Office of Human Resources or may request that one of the above
referenced confidential or private employees assist in reporting to Employee Relations or
Human Resources. Disciplinary proceedings will be conducted in accordance with
applicable collective bargaining agreements. When the accused is an employee of an
affiliated entity or vendor of the college, college officials will, at the request of the
reporting party, assist in reporting to the appropriate office of the vendor or affiliated entity
and, if the response of the vendor or affiliated entity is not sufficient, assist in obtaining a
persona non grata letter, subject to legal requirements and college policy.
Human Resources
http://www.albany.edu/hr/
518-4374700
University Administration
Building
Room 300
Reporting to the Police
Reporting Individuals have the right to file a criminal complaint with the University Police
or with local law enforcement:
University Police
(available 24 hours a day)
City of Albany Police
518-442-3131
Guilderland Police
518-356-1501
East Greenbush Police
518-479-2525
New York State Police 24
hour hotline
1-800-621-HOPE
(4673) or dial 311
518-438-4000
University Police Building
1400 Washington Avenue
Center Station
536 Western Avenue
Albany, NY
5209 Western Avenue
Guilderland, NY
225 Columbia Street
Rensselaer, NY
Anonymous Reporting
Options for anonymously reporting incidents of sexual misconduct to University at Albany
officials are available here: http://www.albany.edu/titleIX/title-ix-reporting-form.php
Institutional Crime Reporting
Reporting individuals are also advised that reports of certain crimes occurring in certain
geographic locations will be included in the University at Albany’s Clery Act Annual
Security Report in an anonymized manner that neither identifies the specifics of the
crime or the identity of the reporting individual or victim/survivor.
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Disciplinary Action for Incidents Involving Sexual Violence
The University at Albany prohibits sexual violence in any form and when requested or
required, will initiate disciplinary proceedings against any member of our community who
has been accused of committing an act of sexual violence. The policies and procedures
that prohibit these acts and that guide the disciplinary process differ depending on the
institutional identity of the alleged perpetrator.
Disciplinary Policies and Procedures for Students
When the alleged perpetrator of an act of sexual violence is a student, the reporting
individual has the right to file student conduct charges against the accused. Conduct
proceedings are governed by the procedures set forth in Community Rights and
Responsibilities as well as federal and New York State Law, including the due process
provisions of the United States and New York State Constitution. For a complete
description of the Community Rights and Responsibilities can be accessed here:
http://www.albany.edu/studentconduct/community_rights_and_responsibilities.php
Disciplinary Policies and Procedures for Employees
When the accused is an employee, disciplinary proceedings will be conducted in
accordance with applicable collective bargaining agreements. When the accused is an
employee of an affiliated entity or vendor of the college, college officials will, at the
request of the reporting individual, assist in reporting to the appropriate office of the
vendor or affiliated entity and, if the response of the vendor or affiliated entity is not
sufficient, assist in obtaining a persona non grata letter, subject to legal requirements and
college policy.
Education and Prevention
New Student Onboarding
The University at Albany is committed to the training and education of the entire university
community, ie, faculty, staff, and students, on the prevention of sexual violence. All
incoming students receive, as part of their onboarding to the university, in person training
which covers the following topics related to sexual violence prevention and response:
1. The definition of sexual violence, and more specifically, the local and university
definitions of sexual harassment and assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence,
domestic violence, and stalking;
2. The definition of Affirmative Consent;
3. How to safely and confidently intervene as an active bystander;
4. Information on risk reduction
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5. Options for support services on campus and within the surrounding community;
6. Options for the confidential disclosure of sexual violence on campus;
7. Options for reporting sexual violence to law enforcement and the university,
including explaining that a student may choose one, or both, or neither option;
8. The difference between a criminal investigation and a campus adjudication
9. An explanation of the rights of victims as well as accused students, as set forth in our
Student’s Bill of Rights, see Appendix __;
10. A statement that the University prohibits sexual violence and an explanation of
sanctions for violations;
11. A description of the University’s policies and procedures for responding and
adjudicating sexual violence.
In addition, incoming students are informed of the university’s ongoing sexual violence
prevention and education efforts and are invited to participate.
Ongoing Prevention
During the 2014 calendar year, the University at Albany furthered its commitment to sexual
violence prevention by continually offering programs and other methods of education. Most
notably, under the leadership of the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence, the campus
community was offered ongoing education through more than one hundred and fifty
programs in the residence halls and for student groups, guest lectures in academic courses,
and exhibits in the campus center and dining facilities. Additionally, educational materials
were widely distributed and shared across the university community. Finally, the Advocacy
Center for Sexual Violence maintained a webpage with information about available
resources. In addition, under the leadership of the University Police, the RAD program
(Rape Aggression Defense) was routinely offered to both men and women. Finally, the
Office of Diversity and Inclusion facilitated SHARPE trainings to education the campus
community about sexual harassment prevention.
For more information complete information about ongoing prevention efforts during the
2014 calendar year, please see Appendix A.
Awareness Campaigns for Students and Employees
The University at Albany has a comprehensive sexual violence prevention program in place
to educate members of the University community. With the opening of the Advocacy Center
for Sexual Violence in January of 2014, midway through the academic year, our initial major
efforts were to inform the community that this department existed and the services it offered
the university community. To this end, we developed door hang tags with this information
that were placed on the room doors in the residence halls. We also created refrigerator
magnets with this information that were given out and are also placed on all of the
refrigerators that students rent before they do so in the fall. We also created a poster
campaign advertising this Center and its services. In an effort to reach all students in the
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community, we held exhibits in the Campus Center and dining facilities to reach commuter
students and in the campus residence dining halls during dinner lines. We participated in two
campaigns during this year, the “It’s On Us” campaign sponsored by the White House,
obtaining pledge signatures from students, faculty and staff who took the pledge which was
on display and our own “Consent is Sexy” campaign in our efforts to discuss the importance
of consent with students during programs, exhibits and trainings.
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University at Albany Student’s Bill of Rights
The University at Albany is committed to providing options, support, and assistance to
members of our community that are affected by sexual assault, sexual harassment, intimate
partner violence and stalking regardless of whether the crime or violation occurred on
campus, off campus, or while studying abroad. The rights listed below are afforded to all
students reporting sexual violence, as well as all students accused of sexual violence,
regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, creed, age, disability, sex, gender
identity or expression, sexual orientation, familial status, pregnancy, predisposing genetic
characteristics, military status, status as a domestic violence victim, or criminal conviction.
All UAlbany students have the right to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Make a report to local law enforcement or state police;
Have disclosures of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault
treated seriously;
Make a decision about whether or not to disclose a crime or violation and
participate in the judicial/conduct process or criminal justice process free from
pressure by the institution;
Participate in a process that is fair, impartial and that provides adequate notice and
a meaningful opportunity to be heard;
Be treated with dignity and to receive from the institution courteous, fair, and
respectful health care and counseling services, where available;
Be free from any suggestion that the reporting individual is at fault when these
crimes and violations are committed, or should have acted in a different manner to
avoid such crimes or violations;
Describe the incident to as few institutional representatives as practicable and not
be required to unnecessarily repeat a description of the incident;
Be protected from retaliation by the institution, any student, the
accused/respondent, and their friends, family and acquaintances that are within the
jurisdiction of the institution;
At least one level of appeal of a determination;
Be accompanied by an advisor of their choice who may assist and advise a
reporting individual, accused, or respondent throughout the judicial or conduct
process, including during all meetings and hearings related to the process; and
The exercise of civil rights and practice of religion without interference by the
investigative, criminal justice, or judicial or conduct process of the institution.
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STATUTORY MANDATES


Nothing in this Statement of Principles and Rights shall be construed to preclude
or in any way restrict the University at Albany from carrying out its duties under
law to report suspected offenses to the appropriate law enforcement authorities.
Except as required by law, the University will take care not to identify the victim.
Nothing in this Statement of Principles and Rights shall be construed to preclude
or in any way restrict the University at Albany from issuing a Community Notice
when the University is aware of a reported sexual assault incident that potentially
puts the campus community at risk. The University will take care not to identify
the victim in such notices.
Adapted from: Rutgers (c 2011), Princeton (c 2011) & Ball State Universities’ Rights
Statements
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24/7 Emergency Resources
Police or Medical Emergency
911
For campus offices/resources dial last 5 digits of the phone number if using a campus
phone, e.g. 2-5800 if calling the Counseling Center.
University Police Department
From cell/off campus phone
(518) 442-3131
Albany City Police
(518) 438-4000
East Greenbush Police
(518) 479-1212
Colonie Police .....
(518) 783-2811
Guilderland Police
(518) 356-1501
5-Quad Ambulance
(518) 442-3131
Albany Medical Center Hospital
(518) 262-3131
Albany Memorial Hospital .
(518) 271-3257
Albany County Crime Victim & Sexual Violence Center
Local 24 hr Hotline
(518) 447-7716
www.albanycounty.com/cvsvc/
RAINN (Rape Assault & Incest National Network)
National 24 hr Hotline
(800) 656-4673
www.online.rainn.org
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Additional Campus Resources
Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence
www.albany.edu/advocacycenter
(518) 442-CARE
Title IX Coordinator
www.albany.edu/titleix
(518) 956-8168
University Police Department (UPD)
police.albany.edu
(518) 442-3131
Counseling and Psychological Services
www.albany.edu/counseling_center
(518) 442-5800
Student Health Services . (518) 442-5454
www.albany.edu/health_center
Community Standards ...
www.albany.edu/studentconduct
(518) 442-5501
Middle Earth Hotline .....
(518) 442-5777
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Sexual Offender Registry
The Sex Offender Registration Act requires the Division of Criminal Justice Services
(DCJS) to maintain a Sex Offender Registry. The Registry contains information on sex
offenders classified according to their risk of re-offending: low-risk (Level 1), moderaterisk (Level 2) and high-risk (Level 3). The Act requires that the Division also maintain a
Subdirectory of Level 3 Sex Offenders. The DCJS Sex Offender Registry site may be
found on the web (See the link to the right) and contains their Subdirectory of Level 3 Sex
Offenders as well as other information regarding New York State's Sex Offender Registry.
Sex offenders registered in New York are now required to notify the Registry of any
institution of higher education at which he or she is, or expects to be, whether for
compensation or not, enrolled, attending or employed, and whether such sex offender
resides or expects to reside in a facility operated by the institution. Changes in status at the
institution of higher education must also be reported to the Registry no later than ten days
after such change.
The University at Albany maintains on the UPD website a listing of any registered sexual
offenders reported to the University as being enrolled, attending or employed at the
University. This information may be found at: http://police.albany.edu/SOR.shtml.
The Division of Criminal Justice Services’ Sex Offender Registry may be found at
www.criminaljustice.state.ny.us/nsor/.
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Student Health Services
Student Health Services provides a range of services from acute care to prevention focused
educational programs, as well as consultation services to the campus community. Student
Health Services staff are dedicated to bringing high quality care and services to our students
to maintain a healthy lifestyle during these student years, and in the years beyond.
Contact Information
Student Health Services: (518) 442-5454
Appointments: (518) 442-5229
Important Links







Immunization Requirements
Women's Health Clinic
Meningitis Information
Medical Excuse Policy
Antibiotic Policy
STD Information
MRSA Information
Counseling and Psychological Services Center
Counseling and Psychological Services Center offers a broad range of psychological
services including counseling, prevention and mental health promotion to help students
succeed and to promote their intellectual, emotional and physical development. Individual,
group and couples counseling; psychological assessment; crisis services; and consultation
are provided for all students. In addition, consultation and crisis response are provided to
manage campus crisis situations and to provide triage and emergency assistance to students
in acute psychological distress. Prevention services address a range of health and
psychological issues including alcohol and other drug prevention, suicide prevention, mental
health promotion, and positive psychology. To conduct its prevention work, Counseling and
Psychological Services implements evidence-based strategies and plays a key role in
informing the national dialogue regarding the effective and efficient delivery of behavioral
health best practices in higher education.
Each year, hundreds of University at Albany students seek help for personal and academic
concerns and thousands of students participate in our educational programs. Counseling
services are confidential and are provided by a diverse professional staff that welcomes the
rich diversity of all our students. To learn more about Counseling and Psychological Services
Center services, visit us on the web at www.albany.edu/counseling_center/.
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MAPS
Main Campus – 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222
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Alumni Quadrangle
Downtown Campus
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East Campus
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Annual Fire Safety Report
completed in compliance with 34 CFR 668.49(b)
FIRE SAFETY EDUCATION
The Office of Fire Safety employs one fire safety educator who is responsible for providing fire prevention
and life safety information to the campus community. Training is provided to all in-coming students
through the Summer Planning Conferences. Training is also given to all Resident Assistants and
Residence Directors at the beginning of the academic year. The University at Albany was pleased to host
a Fire Safety Day in the Fall 2014 semester. This involved a partnership between UAlbany, the New York
State Office of Fire Prevention and Control, and the Albany Fire Department. Live fire portable fire
extinguisher training is provided throughout the year.
FIRE SAFETY SYSTEMS
University at Albany Residence Halls
All Residence Halls are equipped with addressable fire alarm systems including smoke and heat detection
devices. Activated fire alarm systems notify building occupants with distinctive audible and visual
notification devices. All fire alarms ring into the Power Plant, which is monitored 24/7/365. EVERY
alarm of fire is reported to the municipal fire department. Evacuated buildings are not re-occupied until
the fire department has arrived on scene, investigated the alarm, and has given its approval to re-occupy
the building.
Several of the Residence Halls have full fire sprinkler systems. Partial fire sprinkler systems are also
provided in some Residence Halls to protect common areas, mechanical areas, and the means of egress.
All Residence Halls are provided with emergency illumination through emergency lighting and
illuminated exit signs.
Fire alarm systems are inspected, tested and maintained in accordance with NFPA 72 “National Fire Alarm
Code”. This work is completed by trained employees of the University at Albany.
Fire sprinkler systems, fire pumps, and fire hydrants are inspected, tested and maintained in accordance
with NFPA 25 “Standard for the Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection
Systems”. This work is completed by trained employees of the University at Albany.
Emergency illumination is inspected, tested, and maintained by trained employees of the University at
Albany.
Special hazard systems are inspected, tested, and maintained by contract with a third party. These systems
include the commercial kitchen hood fire suppression systems.
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Portable fire extinguishers are found throughout all of our residence halls. Training on the use of
portable fire extinguishers can be obtained by contacting the Office of Fire Safety. This work is
completed by trained employees of the University at Albany.
Residential Facilities
Alden Hall
Pierce Hall
Sayles Hall
Waterbury Hall
Residential Facilities
Truth Hall, A-1
Truth Hall, A-2
Truth Hall, A-3
Truth Hall, A-5
Truth Hall, A-6
Truth Hall, A-7
Stanton Hall, B-1
Stanton Hall, B-2
Stanton Hall, B-3
Stanton Hall, B-5
Stanton Hall, B-6
Stanton Hall, B-7
Northup Hall, C-1
Northup Hall, C-2
Northup Hall, C-3
Northup Hall, C-5
Northup Hall, C-6
Northup Hall, C-7
Lazarus Hall, D-1
Lazarus Hall, D-2
Lazarus Hall, D-3
Lazarus Hall, D-5
Lazarus Hall, D-6
Lazarus Hall, D-7
Smoke
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Fire Safety Systems
The University at Albany; Alumni Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Heat
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
Fire Sprinkler
Systems –
Partial
Y
Y
Y
Y
Fire Safety Systems
The University at Albany; Freedom Quad Student Apartments
Calendar Year 2014
Smoke
Heat
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Fire Sprinkler
Detection
Detection
Systems –
Partial
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
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Egress
Lighting
Y
Y
Y
Y
Egress
Lighting
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Mass
Notification
Systems
N
N
N
N
Mass
Notification
Systems
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
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Residential Facilities
Empire Commons A-1
Empire Commons A-2
Empire Commons A-3
Empire Commons B-1
Empire Commons B-2
Empire Commons B-3
Empire Commons B-4
Empire Commons B-5
Empire Commons C-1
Empire Commons C-2
Empire Commons C-3
Empire Commons C-4
Empire Commons C-5
Empire Commons D-1
Empire Commons D-2
Empire Commons D-3
Empire Commons E-1
Empire Commons E-2
Empire Commons E-3
Empire Commons F-1
Empire Commons F-2
Empire Commons F-3
Empire Commons G-1
Empire Commons G-2
Empire Commons G-3
Residential Facilities
Clinton Hall
Delancey Hall
Hamilton Hall
Herkimer Hall
Johnson Hall
Livingston Tower
Morris Hall
Paine Hall
Zenger Hall
Fire Safety Systems
The University at Albany; Empire Commons Student Apartments
Calendar Year 2014
Smoke
Heat
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Fire Sprinkler
Detection
Detection
Systems –
Partial
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Smoke
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Fire Safety Systems
The University at Albany; Colonial Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Heat
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
Y
N
Y
N
N
N
N
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Fire Sprinkler
Systems –
Partial
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Egress
Lighting
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Egress
Lighting
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Mass
Notification
Systems
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Mass
Notification
Systems
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
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Residential Facilities
Beverwyck Hall
Bleaker Hall
Ryckman Hall
Schuyler Hall
Stuyvesant Tower
Ten Broeck Hall
Ten Eyck Hall
Van Cortlandt Hall
Van Rensselaer Hall
Residential Facilities
Adirondack Hall
Cayuga Hall
Mahican Hall
Mohawk Tower
Montauk Hall
Oneida Hall
Onondaga Hall
Seneca Hall
Tuscarora Hall
Residential Facilities
Anthony Hall
Cooper Hall
Eastman Tower
Fulton Hall
Irving Hall
Melville Hall
Steinmetz Hall
Tappan Hall
Whitman Hall
Residential Facilities
Liberty Terrace North
Liberty Terrace South
Smoke
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Smoke
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Smoke
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Smoke
Detection
Y
Y
Fire Safety Systems
The University at Albany; Dutch Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Heat
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
Y
N
N
Y
N
N
Y
Fire Safety Systems
The University at Albany; Indian Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Heat
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Fire Safety Systems
The University at Albany; State Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Heat
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Fire Safety Systems
The University at Albany; Liberty Terrace
Calendar Year 2014
Heat
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Detection
Y
Y
Y
Y
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Fire Sprinkler
Systems –
Partial
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Egress
Lighting
Fire Sprinkler
Systems –
Partial
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Egress
Lighting
Fire Sprinkler
Systems –
Partial
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Fire Sprinkler
Systems –
Partial
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Egress
Lighting
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Egress
Lighting
Y
Y
Mass
Notification
Systems
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Mass
Notification
Systems
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
N
Mass
Notification
Systems
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
N
Mass
Notification
Systems
N
N
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EMERGENCY EVACUATION
Emergency evacuation procedures are posted on the back of every residential suite door.
Procedures:
In case of fire, immediately exit the building. Pull the manual pull station on the way out to notify other
building occupants of an emergency. Report to the designated Assembly Area for accountability.
In case of a fire alarm, immediately exit the building. Report to the designated Assembly Area for
accountability.
Disabled persons on other than the ground level floor should respond to a designated Area of Refuge or
fire-rated stair tower. The fire department’s first incident priority is the rescue of persons who are trapped
or cannot evacuate on their own. Persons should not use the elevator as a means of egress.
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Residence Hall Emergency Evacuation Drills:
280 emergency evacuation drills were conducted during the calendar year 2014.
Residential Facilities
Alden Hall
Pierce Hall
Sayles Hall
Waterbury Hall
Spring 2014
1
1
1
1
Summer 2014
0
0
0
0
Fall 2014
2
2
2
2
Residential Facilities
Truth Hall, A-1
Truth Hall, A-2
Truth Hall, A-3
Truth Hall, A-5
Truth Hall, A-6
Truth Hall, A-7
Stanton Hall, B-1
Stanton Hall, B-2
Stanton Hall, B-3
Stanton Hall, B-5
Stanton Hall, B-6
Stanton Hall, B-7
Northup Hall, C-1
Northup Hall, C-2
Northup Hall, C-3
Northup Hall, C-5
Northup Hall, C-6
Northup Hall, C-7
Lazarus Hall, D-1
Lazarus Hall, D-2
Lazarus Hall, D-3
Lazarus Hall, D-5
Lazarus Hall, D-6
Lazarus Hall, D-7
Spring 2014
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Summer 2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2014
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Residential Facilities
Empire Commons A-1
Empire Commons A-2
Empire Commons A-3
Empire Commons B-1
Empire Commons B-2
Empire Commons B-3
Empire Commons B-4
Empire Commons B-5
Empire Commons C-1
Empire Commons C-2
Empire Commons C-3
Empire Commons C-4
Empire Commons C-5
Empire Commons D-1
Empire Commons D-2
Empire Commons D-3
Empire Commons E-1
Empire Commons E-2
Empire Commons E-3
Empire Commons F-1
Empire Commons F-2
Empire Commons F-3
Empire Commons G-1
Spring 2014
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Summer 2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
Fall 2014
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
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Empire Commons G-2
Empire Commons G-3
1
1
0
0
2
2
Residential Facilities
Clinton Hall
Delancey Hall
Hamilton Hall
Herkimer Hall
Johnson Hall
Livingston Tower
Morris Hall
Paine Hall
Zenger Hall
Spring 2014
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Summer 2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2014
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Residential Facilities
Beverwyck Hall
Bleaker Hall
Ryckman Hall
Schuyler Hall
Stuyvesant Tower
Ten Broeck Hall
Ten Eyck Hall
Van Cortlandt Hall
Van Rensselaer Hall
Spring 2014
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Summer 2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2014
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Residential Facilities
Adirondack Hall
Cayuga Hall
Mahican Hall
Mohawk Tower
Montauk Hall
Oneida Hall
Onondaga Hall
Seneca Hall
Tuscarora Hall
Spring 2014
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Summer 2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2014
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Residential Facilities
Anthony Hall
Cooper Hall
Eastman Tower
Fulton Hall
Irving Hall
Melville Hall
Steinmetz Hall
Tappan Hall
Whitman Hall
Spring 2014
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Summer 2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2014
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
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ENFORCEMENT
This section of the University at Albany Annual Fire Report identifies laws, rules and regulations
applicable to faculty, staff and students. These laws, rules and regulations are enforced by the New York
State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services - Office of Fire Prevention and Control
(through an annual inspection process), the University Police Department (UPD), Parking and Mass
Transit Services, the UAlbany Department of Residential Life, and the UAlbany Office of Fire Safety.
Penal Law of New York State
Article 145
Criminal Tampering
145.14
Criminal Tampering in the third degree
A person is guilty of criminal tampering in the third degree when, having no right to do so
nor any reasonable ground to believe that he has such right, he tampers with property of
another person with intent to cause substantial inconvenience to such person or to a third
person. Criminal tampering in the third degree is a class “B” misdemeanor.
145.15
Criminal Tampering in the second degree
A person is guilty of criminal tampering in the second degree when, having no right to do
so nor any reasonable ground to believe that he has such right, he or she tampers or makes
connection with property of a gas, electric, sewer, stream or water-works corporation,
telephone or telegraph, corporation, common carrier, nuclear powered electric generating
facility, or public utility operated by a municipality or district; except that in any pro
section under this section, it is an affirmative defense that the defendant did not engage in
such conduct for a larcenous or otherwise unlawful or wrongful purpose. Criminal
tampering in the second degree is a class “A” misdemeanor.
145.20
Criminal Tampering in the first degree
A person is guilty of criminal tampering in the first degree when, with intent to cause a
substantial interruption or impairment of a service rendered to the public, and having no
right to do so nor any reasonable ground to believe that he or she has such right, he or she
damages or tampers with property of a gas, electric, sewer, stream or water-works
corporation, telephone or telegraph corporation, common carrier, nuclear powered electric
generating facility, or public utility operated by a municipality or district, and thereby cause
such substantial interruption or impairment of services. Criminal tampering in the first
degree is a class “D” felony.
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Article 15
Arson
150.00
Arson definitions
As used in this article,
1. “Building”, in addition to its ordinary meaning, includes any structure, vehicle or
watercraft used for the overnight lodging of persons, or used by persons for carrying
on business therein. Where a building consists of two or more units separately secured
or occupied, each unit shall not be deemed a separate building.
2. “Motor vehicle”, includes every vehicle operated or driven upon a public highway
which is propelled by any power other than muscular power, except
(a) Electrically-driven invalid chairs being operated or driven by an invalid,
(b) Vehicles which run only upon rails or tracks, and
(c) Snowmobiles as defined in article forty-seven of the vehicle and traffic law.
150.01
Arson in the fifth degree
A person is guilty of arson in the fifth degree when he or she intentionally damages property
of another without consent of the owner by intentionally starting a fire or causing an
explosion.
Arson in the fifth degree is a class A misdemeanor.
150.05
Arson in the fourth degree.
1. A person is guilty of arson in the fourth degree when he recklessly damages a building
or motor vehicle by intentionally starting a fire or causing an explosion.
2. In any prosecution under this section, it is an affirmative defense that no person other
than the defendant had a possessory or proprietary interest in the building or motor
vehicle.
Arson in the fourth degree is a class E felony.
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150.10
Arson in the third degree.
1. A person is guilty of arson in the third degree when he intentionally damages a building
or motor vehicle by starting a fire or causing and explosion.
2. In any prosecution under this section, it is an affirmative defense that
(a) no person other than the defendant had a possessory or proprietary interest in the
building or motor vehicle, or if other persons had such interest, all of them
consented to the defendant’s conduct, and
(b) the defendant’s sole intent was to destroy or damage the building or motor vehicle
for a lawful and proper purpose, and
(c) the defendant had no reasonable ground to believe that his conduct might endanger
the life or safety of another person or damage another building or motor vehicle.
Arson in the third degree is a class C felony.
150.15
Arson in the second degree.
A person is guilty of arson in the second degree when he intentionally damages a building
or motor vehicle by starting a fire, and when
(a) another person who is not a participant in the crime is present in such building or motor vehicle at the
time, and
(b) the defendant knows that fact or the circumstances are such as to render the presence
of such a person therein a reasonable possibility.
Arson in the second degree is a class B felony.
150.20
Arson in the first degree.
1. A person is guilty of arson in the first degree when he intentionally damages a building
or motor vehicle by causing an explosion or a fire and when
(a) such explosion or fire is caused by an incendiary device propelled, thrown or placed inside or near
such building or motor vehicle; or when such explosion or fire is caused by an explosive; or when
such explosion or fire either
(i)
(ii)
causes serious physical injury to another person other than the participant; or
the explosion or fire was caused with the expectation or receipt of
financial advantage or pecuniary profit by the actor; and when
(b) another person who is not a participant in the crime is present in such building or
motor vehicle at the time; and
(c) the defendant knows that fact or the circumstances are such as to render the
presence of such person therein a reasonable possibility.
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2. As used in this section, “incendiary device” means a breakable container designed to
explode or produce uncontained combustion upon impact, containing flammable liquid
and having a wick or a similar device capable of being ignited.
Arson in the first degree is a class A-I felony.
Article 240
Falsely Reporting an Incident
240.50
Falsely reporting an incident in the third degree
A person is guilty of falsely reporting an incident in the third degree when, knowing the
information reported, conveyed or circulated to be false or baseless, he:
1. Initiates or circulated a false report or warning of an alleged occurrence or impending
occurrence of a crime, catastrophe or emergency under circumstances in which it is not
unlikely that public alarm or inconvenience will result; or
2. Reports, by word or action, to an official or quasi-official agency or organization having
the function of dealing with emergencies involving danger to life or property, an alleged
occurrence or impending occurrence of a catastrophe or emergency which did not in fact
occur or does not in fact exist; or
3. Gratuitously reports to a law enforcement officer or agency (a) the alleged occurrence
of an offense or incident which did not in fact occur; or (b) an allegedly impending
occurrence of an offense or incident which in fact is not about to occur; or (c) false
information relating to an actual offense or incident or to the alleged implication of some
person, therein; or
4. Reports, by word or action, an alleged occurrence or condition of child abuse or
maltreatment which did not in fact occur or exist to;
(a) the statewide central register of child abuse and maltreatment, as defined in title six of
article six of the social services law, or
(b) any person required to report cases of suspected child abuse or maltreatment pursuant
to subdivision one of section four hundred thirteen of the social services law, knowing that
the person is required to report such cases, and with the intent that such an alleged
occurrence be reported to the statewide central register. Falsely reporting an incident in
the third degree is a class A misdemeanor.
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240.55
Falsely reporting an incident in the second degree
A person is guilty of falsely reporting an incident in the second degree when knowing the
information reported, conveyed or circulated to be false or baseless, he or she:
1. Initiates or circulates a false report or warning of an alleged occurrence or impending
occurrence of a fire, explosion, or the release of a hazardous substance under circumstances
in which it is nor unlikely that public alarm or inconvenience will result;
2. Reports by word or action, to any official or quasi-official agency or organization having
the function of dealing with emergencies involving danger to life or property, an alleged
occurrence or impending occurrence of a fire, explosion, or the release of a hazardous
substance which did not in fact occur or does not in fact exist; or
3. Knowing the information reported, conveyed or circulated to be false or baseless and
under circumstances in which it is like public alarm or inconvenience will result, he or she
initiates or circulates a report or warning of an alleged occurrence or an impending
occurrence of a fire, an explosion, or the release of a hazardous substance upon any private
premises. Falsely reporting an incident in the second degree is a class E felony.
240.60
Falsely reporting an incident in the first degree
A person is guilty of falsely reporting an incident in the first degree when he:
1. commits the crime of falsely reporting an incident in the second degree as defined in
section 240.55 of this article, and has previously been convicted of that crime; or
2. commits the crime of falsely reporting an incident in the third degree as defined
subdivisions one and two of section 240.50 of this article or falsely reporting an incident
in the second degree as defined in subdivisions one and two of section 240.55 of this article
and another person who is an employee or member of any official or quasi-official agency
having the function of dealing with emergencies involving danger to life of property; or
who is a volunteer firefighter with a fire department, fire company, or any unit thereof as
defined in the volunteer firefighters’ benefit law; or who is a volunteer ambulance worker
with a volunteer corporation pr any unit thereof as defined in the volunteer ambulance
workers’ benefit law suffers serious physical injury or is killed in the performance of his
or her official duties in traveling to or working at or returning to a firehouse, police station,
quarters or other base facility from the location identified in such report; or
3. Commits the crime of falsely reporting an incident in the third degree as defined in
subdivisions one and two of section 240.50 of this article or falsely reporting an incident
in the second degree as defined in subdivisions one and two of section 240.55 of this article
and another person suffers serious physical injury or is killed as a result of any vehicular
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or other accident involving any emergency vehicle which is responding to, operating at, or
returning from the location identified in such report.
4. An emergency vehicle as referred to in subdivision three of this section shall include
any vehicle operated by any employee or member of any official or quasi-official agency
having the function of dealing with emergencies involving danger to life or property and
shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, an emergency vehicle which is operated by
a volunteer ambulance worker with a volunteer ambulance corporation, or any unit thereof
as defined in the volunteer ambulance workers’ benefits law.
5. Knowing the information reported, conveyed or circulated to be false or baseless and
under circumstances in which it is likely public alarm or inconvenience will result, he or
she initiates or circulates a report or warning of an alleged occurrence or an impending
occurrence of a fire, an explosion, or the release of a hazardous substance upon school
grounds and it is likely that persons are present on said grounds.
6. Knowing the information reported, conveyed or circulated to be false or baseless and
under circumstances in which it is likely public alarm or inconvenience will result, he or
she initiates or circulates a report or warning of an alleged occurrence or impending
occurrence of a fire, explosion or the release of a hazardous substance in or upon a sports
stadium or arena, mass transportation facility, enclosed shopping mall, any public building
or any public place, and it is likely that persons are present. For purposes of this
subdivision, the terms “sports stadium or arena, mass transportation facility or enclosed
shopping mall” shall have their natural meaning and the term “public building” shall have
the meaning set forth in section four hundred one of the executive law. Falsely reporting
an incident in the first degree is a class D felony.
Vehicle and Traffic Law of New York State
Article 32 Stopping, Standing, and Parking
1202. Stopping, standing or parking prohibited in specified places
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Fire Code of New York State (2013 Revision Cycle)3
Chapter 1
General Requirements
Chapter 2
Definitions
Chapter 3
General Precautions Against Fire
Section 304 Combustible Waste Material
Section 308 Open Flames
Section 310 Smoking
Section 314 Indoor Displays
Chapter 4
Emergency Planning and Preparedness
Section 403 Public Assemblages and Events
Section 404 Fire Safety and Evacuation Plans
Section 405 Emergency Evacuation Drills
Table 405.2 Fire and Evacuation Drill Frequency and Participation
Section 406 Employee Training and Response Procedures
Section 407 Hazard Communication
Section 408 Use and Occupancy-related Requirements
408.3 Group B and Group R-2 College and University Facilities
Chapter 5
Fire Service Features
Chapter 6
Building Services and Systems
Section 604 Emergency and Standby Power Systems
Section 605 Electrical Equipment, Wiring and Hazards
Section 607 Elevator Recall and Maintenance
Section 610 Commercial Kitchen Hoods
Section 611 Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Chapter 7
Fire-Resistance-Rated Construction
Chapter 8
Interior Finish, Decorative Materials and Furnishings
Chapter 9
Fire Protective Systems
Section 903 Automatic Sprinkler Systems
Section 904 Alternative Automatic Fire-extinguishing Systems
Section 905 Standpipe Systems
Section 906 Portable Fire Extinguishers
Section 907 Fire Alarm and Detection Systems
Section 908 Emergency Alarm Systems
Section 913 Fire Pumps
Chapter 10
Means of Egress
Section 1004 Occupant Load
Chapter 14
Fire Safety During Construction and Demolition
Chapter 24
Tents, Canopies and Other Membrane Structures
Chapter 33
Explosives and Fireworks
3
The Fire Code of New York State is available for purchase by contacting the International Code Council, 500 New Jersey
Avenue, NW, 6th Floor, Washington D.C. 20001. 1-888-ICC-SAFE. http://www.iccsafe.org
A free on-line version of the Fire Code of New York State can be found at
http://publicecodes.citation.com/st/ny/st/b300v10/index.htm .
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Property Maintenance Code of New York State (2013 Revision Cycle)4
Chapter 7
Fire Safety Requirements
University at Albany “Community Rights and Responsibilities”
The “Community Rights and Responsibilities” is administered by the University at Albany Office of
Conflict Resolution and Civic Responsibility. Its contents describe standards for student conduct, and
identify prohibited conduct that is detrimental to the University at Albany. This report contains excerpts
from the document that address campus fire safety. Students may be arrested for violation of student
conduct standards that are also violations of state law, and/or may be referred to the campus Judicial
System for resolution of strictly campus-related violations.
VI.
Prohibited Conduct
The conduct listed in this section is in violation of Community Rights and Responsibilities.
Such conduct is expressly prohibited. This list is not exhaustive, but is intended to place
students on notice of the types of conduct that may result in disciplinary action. The
provisions of Community Rights and Responsibilities shall apply both to conduct which
occurs on campus or at University sponsored events and to conduct occurring off campus
if such off campus conduct is deemed adverse to the interests of the University community.
Prohibited conduct includes not only completed actions but also attempted violations of
Community Rights and Responsibilities. Prohibited conduct may result in referral to the
judicial system. Student groups and organizations recognized administratively or by
student government(s) and/or their officers may be charged with, and held responsible for
violations of these conduct codes. Sanctions against the student organization and its
officers may include revocation of recognition of the group, loss of permission to use
University facilities and the University name, as well as other appropriate sanctions
pursuant to Section VIII of this code. It is a violation of University policy for students to
affiliate with organizations that have had their University recognition suspended or
permanently revoked by the University. The definition of affiliation includes joining,
rushing, pledging or being involved in any activity that would normally be associated with
being a member of such organization.
1. Fire Safety
Causing or creating a fire.
Tampering with safety measures or devices, including but not limited to, alarm systems,
fire extinguishers, exit signs, emergency phone systems, smoke or heat detectors, fire
4
The Property Maintenance Code of New York State is available for purchase by contacting the International Code Council,
500 New Jersey Avenue, NW, 6th Floor, Washington D.C. 20001. 1-888-ICC-SAFE. http://www.iccsafe.org
A free on-line edition of the Property Maintenance Code of New York State can be found at
http://publicecodes.citation.com/st/ny/st/b1300v07/index.htm .
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hoses, security systems, locked exterior doors, etc.
Failing to conform to safety regulations, including but not limited to, falsely reporting an
incident, failure to evacuate facilities in a timely fashion in emergency situations or in
response to fire alarms, inappropriate use of the fire alarm system.
22. Smoking
Smoking is prohibited in all indoor University buildings, including campus residence halls.
Smoking is prohibited out of doors in the following areas: within 30 feet of exterior
ventilation intakes; within 10 feet of building entrances and open windows; and in all
exterior stairwells.
Residence Hall Regulations
8. Cooking. Cooking is permitted only in residence hall kitchenette areas. Minimal snack
preparation is permitted in student rooms. Any open flame cooking equipment, including
charcoal barbeque grills, and hibachis must be used outside and at least 30 feet from any
building.
9. Appliances. Air conditioners, ceiling fans, microwave ovens and all other cooking
appliances are prohibited. For snack preparation, the following appliances, UL approved
ONLY, are permitted: pop-up toaster, closed element popcorn popper, thermostatically
controlled hot pots and rice cookers, and percolator / coffeemaker.
14. Room decorations. Combustible materials such as posters, pictures, etc. shall be
limited to 20% of available wall space in each room. No combustible material shall be
allowed on ceilings or on the inside of any door. Fabric, including sheets, fishnet, tapestry,
etc. used as decorations are prohibited. Ceiling decorations of all types are prohibited.
Curtains must be flame resistant (per NFPA 701) as should any upholstered furniture
(labeled CAL 133).
HANDBOOK – University Apartments Office
Fire Safety
NEVER LEAVE COOKING UNATTENDED. One may so busy juggling all their
responsibilities that it is easy to forget that something is cooking on the stovetop or in the
oven. NEVER leave the kitchen area or the apartment when something is cooking, either
in the oven or on top of the stove.
There are different types of fires that can occur in the kitchen; some more serious than
others. Typically the most dangerous kitchen fire is a grease fire. A grease fire occurs
when oil, butter, or other greases are heated so highly that they ignite. This type of fire can
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cause open flames that can extend to kitchen cabinets or other items very quickly. What
should you do?
Grease fires – If a grease fire is small and ONLY if you are confident you can extinguish
it, turn off the burner and smother the fire with a pan lid. Make sure the lid will cover the
whole fire. Never, ever, use water to extinguish grease, oil or fat fires because water can
precipitate splattering that can cause burns or scalds and spread the fire. Fire extinguishers
are not recommended for this type of fire either. Do not attempt to carry the pan from a
grease fire outside. The pan will become too hot and the fire will easily spread.
If a grease fire should occur and you are not confident you can extinguish it, do not risk
getting burned even to turn off the burner. Evacuate immediately and activate the fire
alarm to notify others.
Oven fires occur inside the oven. What should you do? Close the oven door and turn off
the heat source. The oven fire usually suffocates. Do not take a burning dish out of the
oven. Keep stovetop, oven and microwave oven clean. Accumulated grease and food in
drip pans and cooking surfaces can cause smoke the next time the appliance is used.
Dry cooking fires typically occur on the stovetop if the moisture burns off the pan and the
food (or empty pan) is left to scorch and burn. This type of fire will cause a lot of heat and
can damage the surrounding area with smoke. This type of fire is prevented by never
leaving your cooking unattended and by turning off the burner when food is finished
cooking.
Microwave fires can occur when food is left to cook in the microwave for too long a period
of time. NEVER use aluminum foil or put pots and pans in the microwave. Be careful of
travel mugs – aluminum mugs cannot be heated in the microwave. Aluminum will cause
a microwave fire. In the event of a fire in a microwave, keep the door closed and unplug
or turn off the microwave. DO NOT remove a burning object from the microwave. Keep
the microwave door closed, and evacuate the building, pulling the alarm on the way out.
Always follow the following guidelines to prevent fire or burn related injury:
1. Use padded oven mitts when handling a hot pot or pan.
2. Heat oil slowly over moderate heat.
3. Never pour butter or oil on top of something cooking in the broiler. The broiler operates
at very high heat and will ignite the grease, causing a fire.
4. Unplug small appliances such as the coffeepot or toaster when they are not in use.
5. Turn off the oven or stovetop as soon as you have finished cooking.
6. Double check that the oven and stovetop are OFF before leaving your apartment.
7. Do not store outdoor barbeque items in you apartment such as grills, charcoal or lighter
fluid.
If a fire occurs that is out of your control, EVACUATE AND PULL THE ALARM. Never
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risk harm to yourself or others. The safety of your life and the lives of your fellow students
is more important than any material possessions that may be lost in a fire. Lastly, if you
hear the fire alarm, always evacuate the building immediately.
Draperies and curtains not original to the apartment should be labeled “fire resistant” under
code NFPA 701. Additionally, draperies, curtains and wall hangings of any material may
not cover more than 20% of the surface.
The use of any open-flamed devices such as candles, sternos, incense, and kerosene lamps
is prohibited. The following are also prohibited: natural trees, wreaths, paneling,
wallpaper or similar coverings, open-element or liquid fueled (kerosene, propane, gas)
space heaters, and excessive trash accumulation.
Holiday decorations: only Underwriter Laboratories approved artificial trees or wreaths
will be allowed in the University Apartments. A “University Apartment” is defined as any
indoor area within the University Apartments; e.g. student rooms / suites, any common
area, offices, and staff apartments. Only UL approved menorahs or other lights will be
allowed in University Apartments. This policy is based upon New York State Fire
Prevention Codes and the Apartments License.
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Cooking and Use of Outside Areas
The use of charcoal burners and other open-flame cooking devices shall not be operated
within 30 feet of the buildings. Residents are responsible for themselves and their guests
in ensuring any outside gathering results in an expeditious and complete clean-up of the
area. It is imperative that individuals take very safety precaution when disposing of used
charcoal. Once the charcoal is finished being used, allow it to sit in the grill for at least 24hours before placing it in the dumpster; placing used charcoal in the dumpster too soon
will likely start a fire. Violations of this section may result in loss of privileges, as well as
more severe sanctions.
Rules and Regulations
4.
Fire safety. All residents must evacuate the building when a fire alarm
Sounds and move to the opposite side of the street. Failure to cooperate or
to evacuate during a fire alarm; causing of a false fire alarm; inappropriate
behavior which results in the activation of a fire alarm; interfering with the
proper functioning of a fire alarm system; tampering with, damaging or removing
fire hoses, extinguishers, exit lights, heat / smoke sensors, extinguisher boxes or
alarm covers, or any other fire safety apparatus is strictly prohibited. The use of
any open-flamed devices such as candles, sternos, and incense and kerosene lamps
is prohibited. The following are also prohibited: natural trees, wreaths, paneling,
wall paper or similar coverings, open element or liquid fueled (kerosene, propane,
gas) space heaters, and hazardous trash accumulation.
5.
Appliances. Students are expected to use appliances furnished in their
apartment in the appropriate manner. The student takes full responsibility
for the appliances use and functioning during the course of their stay.
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UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY CONTACTS FOR NOTIFICATION OF A FIRE EVENT
*** NOTE *** Telephone numbers listed below are NON-EMERGENCY only. If you have a fire, police,
or medical emergency; please dial 911 from a campus phone, or (518) 442-3131 from a cellular phone.
UAlbany Office of Facilities Management
(518) 442-3400
University at Albany, 1400 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12222
Director
Fire Protection Manager
Campus Safety Specialist
Campus Safety Specialist
Campus Safety Specialist
Bill Dosch
Tyler Lemire
Paul Chevalier Jr.
Michael Wilson
Jay McPhail
University Police Department
University at Albany, Justice Drive, Albany, NY 12222
Chief of Police
Deputy Chief of Police - Operations
Deputy Chief of Police - Administration
Inspector
Inspector
(518) 442-3130
J. Frank Wiley
Aran Mull
Jennifer L. Fila
Paul Burlingame
Jennifer Baldwin
Five Quad Volunteer Ambulance Service
(518) 442-5555
Albany Department of Fire and Emergency Services
26 Broad Street, Albany, New York 12202
(518) 447-7879
Fire Chief
Warren W. Abriel, Jr.
McKownville Fire Department
1250 Western Avenue, Albany, NY 12203
Fire Chief
(518) 489-4340
Russ Becker
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POLICY FOR REPORTING ON-CAMPUS FIRES
A fire, for purposes of HEOA regulations, is defined as any instance of open flame or other burning in a
place not intended to contain the burning or in an uncontrolled manner.
All incidents of fire and alarms of fire on the campus of The University at Albany shall be reported to
the local fire department immediately, per the Fire Code of the State of New York. All system reports
of fire are signaled to the Uptown Power Plant. The Plant Engineer has no discretion regarding the
notification of the local fire department – all alarms of fire must be reported immediately. Reports of
fire may also be received by the campus 911 operator. The 911 operator has no discretion regarding the
notification of the local fire department – all reports of fire must be reported immediately.
The Power Plant and the University Police Department shall notify The University at Albany Office of
Fire Safety of all incidents of fire as soon as practicable. The 24/7 on-call list should be used to make
this notification.
The University at Albany Office of Fire Safety will use New York State form DOS-1660 to notify the
New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services – Office of Fire Prevention
and Control of every incident of fire on campus pursuant to Title 19 New York Codes, Rules and
Regulations Part 500 (19 NYCRR 500).
The University at Albany Office of Fire Safety will publish incidents of fire on the Fire Safety Log per
the United States Department of Education “Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting”.
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2012 FIRE INCIDENT LOG:
The University at Albany; Residence Hall Fires Summary
Date/Time Reported
Injuries
Deaths
11/7/2012 2000 hrs
Date/Time of Fire
Same
Location
Empire Commons A3-103
Nature of Fire
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
Value
$0-$99
8/15/2012 1830 hrs
Same
Empire Commons G2-101
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-$99
2/11/2012 1807 hrs
Same
Empire Commons F3-102
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$327
Injuries
Deaths
2013 FIRE INCIDENT LOG:
The University at Albany; Residence Hall Fires Summary
Date/Time Reported
Date/Time of Fire
Location
Nature of Fire
11/17/2013 0952 hrs
9/11/2013 0410 hrs
Value
Same
Fulton Hall
Incendiary-Arson
0
0
$0-99
Same
Bleeker Hall
Accidental- Electrical
0
0
$100-999
8/22/2013 0123 hrs
Same
Eastman Tower
Accidental- Electrical
0
0
$0-99
4/29/2013 2013 hrs
Same
Empire Commons B3
Accidental- Open Flames
0
0
$0-99
3/22/2013 2130 hrs
Same
Schuyler Hall
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
2/18/2013 0219 hrs
Same
Anthony Hall
Accidental- Smoking Materials
0
0
$0-99
2/8/2013 2045 hrs
Same
Cooper Hall
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
1/30/2013 2015 hrs
Same
Empire Commons A3
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
1/30/2013 1949 hrs
Same
Empire Commons A3
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
1/29/2013 1624 hrs
Same
Freedom Quad B1
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
1/20/2013 1930 hrs
Same
Tuscarora Hall
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
Injuries
Deaths
2014 FIRE INCIDENT LOG:
The University at Albany; Residence Hall Fires Summary
Date/Time Reported
Date/Time of Fire
Location
Nature of Fire
02/08/2014 1330
2/14/2014 0508
Same
Liberty Terrace North
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
Same
Delancy Hall
Incendiary- Arson
0
0
$0-99
03/14/2014 0445
Same
Onondaga Hall
Incendiary- Other
0
0
$0-99
04/30/2014 2101
Same
Empire Commons G1
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$250-500
07/13/2014 2018
Same
Empire Commons B1
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
09/13/2014 1229
Same
Empire Commons E3
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$100-500
09/16/2014 2225
Same
Empire Commons C5
Accidental- Cooking
0
0
$0-99
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Value
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STATISTICS AND RELATED INFORMATION REGARDING FIRES IN RESIDENTIAL
FACILITIES:
Residential Facilities
Alden Hall
Pierce Hall
Sayles Hall
Waterbury Hall
Residential Facilities
Truth Hall, A-1
Truth Hall, A-2
Truth Hall, A-3
Truth Hall, A-5
Truth Hall, A-6
Truth Hall, A-7
Stanton Hall, B-1
Stanton Hall, B-2
Stanton Hall, B-3
Stanton Hall, B-5
Stanton Hall, B-6
Stanton Hall, B-7
Northup Hall, C-1
Northup Hall, C-2
Northup Hall, C-3
Northup Hall, C-5
Northup Hall, C-6
Northup Hall, C-7
Lazarus Hall, D-1
Lazarus Hall, D-2
Lazarus Hall, D-3
Lazarus Hall, D-5
Lazarus Hall, D-6
Lazarus Hall, D-7
Statistics and Related Information Regarding Fires in Residential Facilities
The University at Albany; Alumni Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Total Fires in
Fire
Cause of Fire
Number of
Each Building Number
Injuries That
Required
Treatment at a
Medical
Facility
0
0
0
0
Statistics and Related Information Regarding Fires in Residential Facilities
The University at Albany; Freedom Quad Student Apartments
Calendar Year 2014
Total Fires in
Fire
Cause of Fire
Number of
Each Building Number
Injuries That
Required
Treatment at a
Medical
Facility
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Number of
Deaths
Related to a
Fire
Value of
Property
Damage
Caused by
Fire
Number of
Deaths
Related to a
Fire
Value of
Property
Damage
Caused by
Fire
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Residential Facilities
Empire Commons A-1
Empire Commons A-2
Empire Commons A-3
Empire Commons A-3
Empire Commons B-1
Empire Commons B-2
Empire Commons B-3
Empire Commons B-4
Empire Commons B-5
Empire Commons C-1
Empire Commons C-2
Empire Commons C-3
Empire Commons C-4
Empire Commons C-5
Empire Commons D-1
Empire Commons D-2
Empire Commons D-3
Empire Commons E-1
Empire Commons E-2
Empire Commons E-3
Empire Commons F-1
Empire Commons F-2
Empire Commons F-3
Empire Commons G-1
Empire Commons G-2
Empire Commons G-3
Residential Facilities
Clinton Hall
Delancey Hall
Hamilton Hall
Herkimer Hall
Johnson Hall
Livingston Tower
Morris Hall
Paine Hall
Zenger Hall
Statistics and Related Information Regarding Fires in Residential Facilities
The University at Albany; Empire Commons Student Apartments
Calendar Year 2014
Total Fires in
Fire
Cause of Fire
Number of
Each Building Number
Injuries That
Required
Treatment at a
Medical
Facility
0
0
0
0
1
5
Cooking
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
7
Cooking
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
6
Cooking
0
0
0
0
1
4
Cooking
0
0
0
Statistics and Related Information Regarding Fires in Residential Facilities
The University at Albany; Colonial Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Total Fires in
Fire
Cause of Fire
Number of
Each Building Number
Injuries That
Required
Treatment at a
Medical
Facility
0
1
2
Arson- Toilet paper roll
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Number of
Deaths
Related to a
Fire
Value of
Property
Damage
Caused by
Fire
0
$0-99
0
$0-99
0
$100-500
0
$250-500
Number of
Deaths
Related to a
Fire
0
Value of
Property
Damage
Caused by
Fire
$0-99
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Residential Facilities
Beverwyck Hall
Bleeker Hall
Ryckman Hall
Schuyler Hall
Stuyvesant Tower
Ten Broeck Hall
Ten Eyck Hall
Van Cortlandt Hall
Van Rensselaer Hall
Residential Facilities
Adirondack Hall
Cayuga Hall
Mahican Hall
Mohawk Tower
Montauk Hall
Oneida Hall
Onondaga Hall
Seneca Hall
Tuscarora Hall
Residential Facilities
Anthony Hall
Cooper Hall
Eastman Tower
Fulton Hall
Irving Hall
Melville Hall
Steinmetz Hall
Tappan Hall
Whitman Hall
Statistics and Related Information Regarding Fires in Residential Facilities
The University at Albany; Dutch Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Total Fires in
Fire
Cause of Fire
Number of
Each Building Number
Injuries That
Required
Treatment at a
Medical
Facility
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Statistics and Related Information Regarding Fires in Residential Facilities
The University at Albany; Indian Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Total Fires in
Fire
Cause of Fire
Number of
Each Building Number
Injuries That
Required
Treatment at a
Medical
Facility
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
3
Tampering with Smoke Detector
0
0
0
Statistics and Related Information Regarding Fires in Residential Facilities
The University at Albany; State Quad
Calendar Year 2014
Total Fires in
Fire
Cause of Fire
Number of
Each Building Number
Injuries That
Required
Treatment at a
Medical
Facility
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Number of
Deaths
Related to a
Fire
Value of
Property
Damage
Caused by
Fire
Number of
Deaths
Related to a
Fire
Value of
Property
Damage
Caused by
Fire
0
Number of
Deaths
Related to a
Fire
$0-99
Value of
Property
Damage
Caused by
Fire
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Residential Facilities
North
Center
South
Statistics and Related Information Regarding Fires in Residential Facilities
The University at Albany; Liberty Terrace Student Apartments
Calendar Year 2014
Total Fires in
Fire
Cause of Fire
Number of
Each Building Number
Injuries That
Required
Treatment at a
Medical
Facility
1
1
Cooking
0
0
0
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Number of
Deaths
Related to a
Fire
0
Value of
Property
Damage
Caused by
Fire
$0-99
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University at Albany
Office of Fire Safety
Service Building A
1400 Washington Avenue
Albany, New York 12222
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ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE REPORT Distribution
The information in this annual security report is made available to you in compliance with The
Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, formerly the
Student Right to Know Act of 1990. It is our hope that this information assists you in making
intelligent, informed decisions. Please read it carefully and use the information to become partners with
us in preventing crime on our campus. This Clery brochure is prepared annually in a hard copy print
version and an electronic PDF format. Following are the distribution methods for the annual security
report:
ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE REPORTS AVAILABILITY
 Email in the fall to all current students, faculty and staff
 Notice of report availability is included on undergraduate and graduate student application
packages
 Notice of report availability is included in all letters of invitation for interviews for prospective
employees and a link to the report is on the Human Resource Management website where job
postings are advertised
 Electronic PDF report posted on UPD web site at: http://police.albany.edu/ASR.shtml.
 The Fire Log can be found on the Office of Environmental Health & Safety web page at:
http://www.albany.edu/ehs/firesafety.shtml
 The Crime Log can be found on the University Police web site at:
http://police.albany.edu/CandISearch.shtml
To request a hard copy of the annual security report, please


Call the Clery Compliance Officer at (518) 956-8140, or;
Write the Clery Compliance Officer at University at Albany, UAB 206, 1400 Washington
Avenue, Albany, New York 12222
.
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APPENDIX A
Campus-Wide Initiatives Targeted
to Promote Basic Personal Safety
and to Prevent Sexual Assault
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CAMPUS-WIDE INITIATIVES TARGETED TO PROMOTE BASIC PERSONAL SAFETY
AND TO PREVENT SEXUAL ASSAULT
Establishment of the UAlbany Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence
The UAlbany Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence was established on January 22, 2014 The proposal
for a dedicated Center for sexual assault prevention, advocacy, and support was written by Joyce DeWittParker, Ph.D., Cynthis Riggi, M.B.A., Carol Stenger, M.Ed. & M.A. and Estela Rivero, Ph.D. , submitted
in Summer 2014 and approved by President Robert Jones in Fall 2014. The Advocacy Center was
established as a separate unit in the Division for Student Affairs and offers a dedicated space for
survivors, friends and family members seeking comprehensive support and advocacy related to sexual
violence, thus moving sexual assault resources from the University Counseling Center to the Advocacy
Center. The Advocacy Center also provides prevention education programing, the coordination of campus
accommodations for student survivors, as well as consultation, education, and training to faculty and staff
on a variety of sexual violence issues, and plans to recruit and train faculty/staff volunteer advocates. The
Center is staffed by Director, Carol Stenger, M.Ed., M.A., as well as an Assistant Director.
Presidential Advisory Council for the Prevention of Sexual Violence
The Presidential Advisory Council for the Prevention of Sexual Violence is charged with a number of
responsibilities. It monitors the incidence and prevalence of acquaintance rape at the University at Albany,
and evaluates and compares our rates to the national level. The council also solicits and receives
continuing input from all constituents of the University community and the surrounding communities. The
council provides continuing assessment of effective methods of prevention, education and support services
to ensure they are in keeping with nationally known best practices. The council was charged to enhance
communication about prevention and safety services offered at the University to both the University
community and to the community agencies that provide services to our students. The council makes
recommendations for long and short-term practices and policies that will enhance the academic and social
quality of the campus life, and ensure safety for all students. The council is chaired by Jeanette Altarriba,
Ph.D., Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education, Professor Departments of Psychology and
Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies and comprised of faculty, staff, community experts,
and students.
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President’s Advisory Committee on Campus Security
The President’s Advisory Committee on Campus Security is charged with reviewing campus security
procedures and making recommendations for their improvement. It works with members of the campus
community, including those who advise or supervise students, to address issues of personal safety, crime
prevention, sexual assault, reporting procedures for incidents and complaints, counseling of victims, and
appropriate responses to inquiries from concerned persons. This committee is co-chaired by Nancy
Lauricella, Director of Community Standards and Diana Mancini, Ph.D. Assistant Dean of the School of
Criminal Justice and comprises faculty, staff, and students.
University at Albany Sexual Assault Response Team
The UAlbany Sexual Violence Response Team is charged with discussing the coordination of services
and support offered to victims/survivors of sexual assault, intimate partner violence and stalking.
Representatives from Community Standards, the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence, University
Counseling Center, University Police Department, Undergraduate Studies and Residential Life comprise
the team. As the Director of the Advocacyu Centerr, Carol Stenger, M.Ed. & M.A. was the Chair of the
SART during the 2014 year. Title IX Coordinator, Chantelle Cleary, J.D. assumed the role of Chair in
January of 2015.
Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence
Programs are targeted to increase students’ awareness of sexual violence issues and to educate students
about strategies for reducing risk and preventing assault, especially in the context of sex and dating in
the college environment.
Program offerings include:

Orientations – 22 interactive programs were presented to all incoming students during Summer
Orientation and during other targeted orientation programs, such as through the Educational
Opportunity Program (EOP), the Department of Athletics, and the International Student and Scholar
Services program. The audiences included, freshmen, transfer students, and graduate students. The
program provides definitions of sexual assault, intimate partner abuse and stalking; consent, realistic
scenarios that facilitate discussions about options for prevention; and knowledge of bystander
interventions that seek to expand options for students to assist in the prevention of sexual assault,
relationship violence, and stalking in the college community. The discussion includes information
about campus and community resources and options for reporting to the criminal justice system and
the campus student conduct system.. The program also provides options for risk reduction, and a key
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selection of behaviors that support victims coming forward. Note: Several of the above topics are
included in compliance with NYS Education law and with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of
Campus Security Policy & Campus Crime Statistics Act.

Peer Educator/Leader Training Programs – presentations to Resident Assistants, Middle Earth peer
educators, Project SHAPE peers, and other student leadership groups in the context of academic creditbearing courses or workshops on the topic of sexual violence, to ensure their basic understanding of
what constitutes sexual violence including the interface with alcohol; the judicial and legal
consequences; what constitutes sexual consent; date rape drugs; factors most frequently involved in a
sexual assault (e.g., alcohol, parties acquainted); impact of sexual assault; and their role in
implementing the University’s response protocol.

Professional Staff Training Programs – presentations offered to staff in order to insure that students
have access to updated information about sexual assault response and receive timely and sensitive
victim services. Typically, the Department of Residential Life and other professional staff who have
high student contact receive training on the sexual assault protocol.
Project SHAPE: Sexual Health and Peer Education - Sexual Health Promotion and
Sexual Violence Prevention
The Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence Sexual Health Promotion and Sexual Violence Prevention
Program includes over 100 workshops and other educational activities about sexuality, sexual violence,
healthy relationships and communication. Also included is Project SHAPE, a group of 50 undergraduate
peer educators who are trained in two accredited sexuality courses that cover sexual violence and present
many of these programs. Sex Sense Week is sponsored by Project SHAPE. Programs include topics such
as sexual violence, sexual orientation and gender identity, healthy relationships, communication with a
partner, STI’s, HIV/AIDS, and contraception..
MVP : Mentors in Violence Prevention Program
The Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence houses our MVP: Mentors in Violence Prevention program.
Students can get trained through an 8 hour training program over a period of 4 weeks each semester and
learn how to safely intervene as an active bystander in situations to prevent sexual violence. Trained
students help train other students on bystander intervention.
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Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program
The Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program is staffed by undergraduate students who are trained by
professionals to provide an array of psycho-educational programs including workshops and interactive
theater presentations on , and healthy relationships through its outreach education services. In addition,
the Hotline Service is available to respond to calls from students from one to midnight Monday-Thursday,
24 hours a day on Fridays and Saturdays, when classes are in session, and one to midnight Sunday.
Psychologists from the University Counseling Center provide backup services for this hotline when it is
in operation. Students working on the Middle Earth hotline are supervised under the auspices of academic
credit-bearing courses.
Sexuality Week offers programs addressing relevant and critical issues faced by college students related
to the key themes of sexual and reproductive health, diversity in sexual orientation and gender identity,
sexual assault, intimate partner abuse and stalking, RAD workshops, and other related presentations.
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University Police Department
Educational Programs

RAD - Rape Aggression Defense: The Rape Aggression Defense System is a program of realistic,
self-defense tactics and techniques. The R.A.D. System is a comprehensive course offered separately
for women, men and children that begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance,
while progressing to basic physical self-defense training.

Orientation Program– provides general safety and security information for all incoming first year
students, transfer and international students.

Personal Safety Program – provides advice on how to make yourself a “bad victim;” risk reduction
tips to decrease the likelihood of becoming a victim of sexual assault; basic self-defense options; and
victim assistance information.

Emergency Response - UPD responds to all manner of campus emergencies including crimes in
progress and fires.

Student Escort Service - Members of the Department as well as student volunteers provide escorts
for students at night.

Community Liaison - UPD maintains close relationships with local municipalities, neighborhood
groups and police departments and provides appropriate assistance to them on request. Further, UPD
helps coordinate assistance to student victims of off-campus crimes. This includes disseminating
information to students about off-campus crime.

Blue Light Phones - UPD is the answering point for well over 300 emergency telephones on campus.
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Neighborhood Life
Neighborhood Life has implemented the following initiatives and programs to enhance safety and promote
the prevention of sexual assault:

Committee on University and Community Relations – This award winning campus–community
coalition has as one of its four major goals, the improvement of safety and security off campus for
students.

Liaison to Community Groups – For example, taking a leadership role with the Midtown
Neighborhood Watch which also distributes safety messages.

Off Campus Late Night Safety Walk and Talks: A collaborative with other community law
enforcement agencies and colleges designed to establish relationships with students by going door to
door and hand out safety information.

Light and Safety Survey: Once a year, Neighborhood Life in conjunction with other local colleges,
city entities and law enforcement agencies, conducts a light and safety survey in the Pine Hills area
designed to identify areas of low lighting to report to the City of Albany for repair/upgrade.

Resource Tabling: In conjunction with the Albany Police Department And University Police
Department, regular resource tabling occurs in areas of high student traffic on various safety related
topics and issues.

Don’t Walk Alone” this is a volunteer safety escort program operating on the uptown campus during
late night hours.
Department of Athletics

CHAMPS Life Skills Program – The Department of Athletics supports large scale campus programs
that are coordinated through the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence, While not mandated to attend
all programs, student athletes receive study hall credit through the Department of Athletics sponsored
CHAMPS Life Skills program.stud
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Student Association

Student Association’s Office of Gender and Sexuality Concerns – Co-sponsors sexual assault
awareness events, collaborates on program development through active committee work and provides
diversity in the representation of concerns that include issues related to women, men, transgender
individuals and the broad scope of the LBGTQ communities.
Department of Residential Life
Key initiatives and programs within the Department of Residential Life include:

Sponsoring a variety of educational programs and awareness campaigns, e.g those programs facilitated
by Project SHAPE in the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence.

Overseeing the Women’s Resource Center which offers educational materials and programs for
students in residence.
Office of Student Involvement

Support for the dissemination of information about sexual assault prevention, including the
announcement of student forums and educational programs, on the Office of Student Activities ENews web site.

S.T.A.H.L. News (Students Talking About Healthy Lifestyles) – Appearing on bathroom stalls in the
Campus Center, this news flyer contains useful prevention information for men and women as well as
resources for assistance.
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PUBLICATIONS ADDRESSING SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION

“University at Albany Safety and Security” information is available on-line at:
http://police.albany.edu/SRTK.asp/. Included is information about reporting a crime or other
emergency; building security; University Police Department enforcement authority; crime prevention
programs; campus crime statistics; sexual harassment, rape, and sexual assault; and campus security
programs and procedures. This document is in compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure
of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and is maintained by the University
Police Department.

“What You Can Do If You or A Friend is Raped or Sexually Assaulted” This pamphlet
provides timely and detailed information about resources and options in the wake of a sexual assault
in accord with the University’s response protocol and is distributed to all incoming first year, EOP
students, transfer students and International students. It is also available on-line at
http://www.albany.edu/advocacycenter and is widely available in many University offices. This
document is updated regularly by the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence.

Many other educational pamphlets such as “Acquaintance Rape: What Everyone Should Know,”
“Rohypnol: Facts About The Date Rape Drug,” “If You Are Raped: What Every Woman Needs
to Know”, “If She Is Raped: A Guidebook for Husbands, Fathers and Male Friends,” “If He Is
Raped: A Guidebook for Parents, Partners, Spouses, and Friends,” and “You Are Not Alone:
A Guide for Battered Women” are available through the Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence and
are distributed in educational workshops and exhibits.
UNIVERSITY RESOURCES FOR VICTIM’S ASSISTANCE:
 During the 2014 calendar year, the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs through the
Advocacy Center for Sexual Violence provided coordination of resources and information when a
student reported sexual violence. This office also oversaw the services and prevention programs
provided by departments within the Division of Student Affairs. In January of 2015, the above
responsibility shifted entirely to the newly hired full time Title IX Coordinator.
 The Counseling and Psychological Services Center’s entire professional staff offers assessment,
treatment and/or referral for students coping with the aftermath of sexual violence.
 The Middle Earth Hotline provides peer assistance and referral options for students reporting
sexual assault during the academic year. The hotline operates from one-midnight Monday-Thursday,
24 hours a day on Friday and Saturday, and 12 am to midnight on Sundays when classes are in session.
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
The University Health Center offers medical examination and treatment, including psychiatric
consultation, emergency contraception, and a full range of gynecological services.

The University Police Department investigates reports of sexual assault and other crimes occurring
on campus; they also can assist with referrals to local police agencies for off campus crimes reported
to them.

Community Standards/Neighborhood Life/Student CARE Services assists with the coordination
of resources and services for victims of crimes and often serves as a liaison with local police agencies.

Community Standards provides campus adjudication procedures for alleged violations of campus
regulations (e.g. including Sexual Assault I and II).

The Department of Residential Life and Housing is available for support and information about
options in the wake of a sexual assault. The Women’s Resource Center also maintains information
about resources pertinent to women’s concerns.

The Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies can assist with approving and arranging academic
accommodations for students who have been sexually assaulted and temporarily unable to maintain
their academic functioning.
Updated: June 30, 2015
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APPENDIX B
Campus-Wide Initiatives for the
Prevention of Alcohol and Other
Drug Abuse: 2014-2015 Academic
Year
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CAMPUS-WIDE INITIATIVES FOR THE PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL AND OTHER
DRUG ABUSE
2014-2015 Academic Year
Major Initiatives: 2014-2015
Presidential Leadership
Presidential efforts have included:

Hosting a Town Hall Meeting for the campus and community focusing on the prevention of
underage drinking held on Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Openly and publicly acknowledging that alcohol abuse and underage drinking exist

Reaching out to campus, community, state-level, and national groups to develop and implement
a comprehensive strategy for AOD abuse prevention

Taking an active stand on alcohol and other drug issues and conveying clear expectations and
standards

Serving as a role model to students, faculty, staff, and administrators on a national scale

Making alcohol and other drug prevention a priority in the strategic plan for the institution

Supporting grant projects from a variety of sources, including the National Institute for Alcohol
Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
(SAMHSA), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).
Campus Task Force on AOD Abuse and Related Risk Behaviors

Establishing as a priority the dissemination of best practices at local, state, and national
conferences
Student Involvement/Leadership

Ongoing communication between student groups and the Addictive Behaviors Specialist
concerning the nature and quality of prevention/intervention efforts on campus. (Includes several
groups recognized by the Student Association, fraternities and sororities, and student-athletes)
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
Planning and continued implementation of a major peer education program for all new students
during Summer Orientation (freshman orientation). This program was developed based on a
leading empirical model in the field of prevention. Results indicate this peer-based interactive
theater-focused strategy has been effective in decreasing reports of high-risk drinking behavior
and in increasing reports of protective behaviors among participants. A full program description
has been published in a research article and has been disseminated to Institutions of Higher
Education (IHEs) nationally

Presentation of prevention programming by the Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program within
the University community on alcohol and other drug use among students, as well as topics
related to health promotion including healthy relationships, prevention of depression and
anxiety, stress management, and multicultural values and awareness

Working with student-athletes and fraternity and sorority leadership to provide ongoing
educational and social norms programming in the area of alcohol and other drug abuse
prevention

Co-sponsorship of non-alcohol-related social and recreational activities with Campus
Recreation, Campus Center Connections, , Student Involvement, and Residential Life
Social Norms Marketing Interventions

Development, continued implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based comprehensive
campus-wide first year student, and student-athlete specific social norms media campaigns
addressing alcohol use, marijuana use, and related risk and protective behaviors
Campus & Community Coalitions

Continued implementation of a campus committee, the Committee on University and Community
Relations, to serve as a liaison with the Albany community and local tavern owners in addressing
issues related to alcohol/substance use off campus.

Implementation of a Campus Ambassador Program in the vicinity of the University at Albany
Downtown Campus
Restriction of Alcohol Marketing and Promotion

Prohibition of the marketing or advertising of alcohol by local bars on campus through University
policy

Aggressive elimination of local bar advertisement literature posted in and around University
lecture centers and on Campus Center cafeteria tables
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Alcohol-Free Options

Offering of non-alcohol-related social and recreational activities by Residential Life staff,
Student Involvement staff, the University Police Department, and Athletics staff. These include:
o
o
o
o
Programs and activities sponsored by Campus Recreation Weeknight and weekend
social events, such as “Danes after Dark”, offering live music, comedy and other
entertainment
Game show nights and Movie Nights in the residential communities
Sporting events, concerts and theater in the local community
Structured weekend trips to New York City and Boston plays, ski trips, rafting, and other
activities
Education

Ongoing educational and social norms programming in the area of alcohol and substance abuse
prevention to academic classes, residence halls, student groups, staff members, and community
members

Presentations on topics related to alcohol and substance abuse prevention at programs for
students and parents new to the University, including Summer Orientation (for all incoming
freshmen) and during Transfer Student Orientation

Collaboration with the University’s Fraternity and Sorority Affairs Coordinator on "Greek Life
101" seminars to address issues of alcohol abuse, violence, and hazing. These seminars are
presented to all new pledges

Participation in Alcohol Awareness Week programming, including workshops and exhibits. They
keynote event for the week included performances by an award-winning keynote peer theater
program presented by the Middle Earth Players

Integration of information relating to alcohol/substance abuse with other workshop topics, such as:
o
o
o
o
o
o
alcohol and sexually transmitted infections
alcohol and culture
alcohol and women
alcohol, other drug use, and relationship violence
campus drinking norms and the social climate
alcohol use and gambling issues

Implementation of social norms and social media interventions and awareness campaigns
concerning marijuana, non-medical prescription drug use (including stimulant and opioid use),
and other designer drugs

Training of peer educators, resident assistants, and undergraduate hotline and outreach peer
assistants in the area of alcohol and substance abuse prevention and education strategies
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
Training of University faculty and professional staff in the area of social norms marketing and
alcohol and drug prevention

Training of University professional staff in the area of alcohol and substance abuse

Collaboration by Residential Life l Life on major AOD prevention initiatives on campus, including
data collection and implementation of the social norms strategy to reduce excessive drinking,
sponsoring and presenting educational programming, and providing alternative events for
residents (e.g. coffee houses; poetry nights.

Development and implementation of campus-wide AOD abuse prevention initiatives by the
Addictive Behaviors Specialist based within Counseling and Psychological Services
Early Intervention
Early Intervention for At-Risk Students

The Counseling and Psychological Services STEPS Comprehensive Alcohol Screening and Brief
Intervention Program has continued its implementation this past year

The STEPS Comprehensive Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention program continues to be
listed in the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices of the Substance Abuse
and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of health and Human Services
(NREPP), a searchable online database of mental health and substance abuse interventions. All
interventions in the registry have met NREPP’s minimum requirements for review and have been
independently assessed and rated for Quality of Research and Readiness for Dissemination. The
purpose of NREPP is to help the public learn more about available evidence-based programs and
practices and determine which of these may best meet their needs. NREPP is one way that
SAMHSA is working to improve access to information on evaluated interventions and reduce the
lag time between the creation of scientific knowledge and its practical application in the field. The
NREPP listing for the STEPS program may be found at:
http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/ViewIntervention.aspx?id=292

Continued implementation and evaluation of evidence-based Screening and brief Intervention
(SBI) services provided by Counseling and Psychological Services that target a variety of high
risk behaviors often associated with drinking. These preventative interventions target first year
students, student-athletes, fraternity and sorority members, students mandated to Community
Standards for alcohol policy violations, and students who seek health-related services at the
Student Health Center. The ancillary risky behaviors addressed are linked to current alcohol use
and the potential for compromising a college student’s health and safety.

Updating of a campus-community referral network for students with alcohol/substance abuse
concerns and issues

Launching of a Collegiate Recovery Program at the University at Albany
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Interventions for Mandated Students

Implementation of an adapted BASICS intervention with students mandated for University alcohol
policy violations
Policy Evaluation and Enforcement

Continued implementation of a University at Albany Good Samaritan 911 Policy to support
students who seek assistance in the case of an alcohol-related medical emergency, either for
themselves or for other students

Consistent provision of timely and effective adjudication by the University Police Department,
Community Standards and Residential Life of alcohol related incidents among students

Referral of students who violate University alcohol or other drug policies/community standards by
Community Standards and Residential Life to the Counseling and Psychological Services STEPS
program

Referral of students who violate alcohol policies to Community Standards and/or the University
Police Department or local police agencies as appropriate

Development and dissemination of materials concerning drinking laws and the penalties
associated with fake or altered identification

Development, dissemination, evaluation and revision of alcohol policies by the Division of Student
Affairs and the Office of Human Resources

Enforcement of alcohol policies by self-regulating student groups such as the Interfraternity
Council, Pan Hellenic Association, and fraternity and sorority organizations

Establishment of quadrangle-based liaison programs with the University Police Department and
University Counseling Center

Training of University at Albany Police Department, Five Quad Ambulance Service, and Division
of Student Affairs staff members regarding heroin abuse

Training of University Police Department officers in the operation of alcohol detection equipment
and recognition of impaired operation of vehicles

Training of University staff in the recognition of and intervention for students under the influence
of alcohol or other drugs
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Parental Involvement

Enlisting parents and families in the University alcohol abuse prevention campaign through the
development and dissemination of materials describing (1) the actual alcohol use rates by students
(part of the University’s social norms campaign), and (2) how parents can play an active role in the
prevention of substance abuse

Participation by parents and families of incoming first year students in a “Transitions” orientation
program addressing accurate norms and rates of alcohol use by University at Albany students and
outlining strategies for discussing parental expectations around academic performance and
alcohol and other drug prevention
Treatment and Referral

Enhancement of a referral network for students with alcohol/substance abuse concerns and issues

Assessment, treatment, and referral of students requiring treatment for alcohol and other drug
concerns by Counseling and Psychological Services.

Scheduling and technical assistance to Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) groups on and off campus
Research

Re-administration in Spring 2015 of the UAlbany Student Health Survey. Students were
administered the survey from a stratified random sample of classrooms selected under the
guidance of the University’s Office of Institutional Research, Planning, and Effectiveness. This
research is part of a campus and national effort to assess college health factors impacting
academic performance, retention and campus life. Results of the survey are currently being
used to generate prevalence rates of student's behavior and perceptions. This data will help to
plan programs, prioritize campus needs, allocate resources, design strategies for intervention,
and identify protective and risk factors associated with academic performance.

Launching of the STEPS 2.0 program addressing alcohol use, marijuana use, non-medical
prescription drug use, and co-occurring mental health concerns

Ongoing evaluation of AOD abuse prevention initiatives, including the social norms media
campaign, campus presentations and events, and Middle Earth Players programs

Evaluation of the STEPS Comprehensive Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention Program,
including the collection of prevalence data, assessment of student AOD perceptions and attitudes,
the collection of feedback from participants regarding their experience in the program, and outcome
evaluation (including changes in substance use and decrease in the occurrence of negative
consequences associated with substance use)
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
Collaboration with faculty members in the publication of articles in professional journals targeted to
colleges and universities and the AOD abuse prevention area
Grant Activities
During the 2014-2015 academic year, Counseling and Psychological Services implemented the
following grants to address high-risk drinking and related risk behaviors in several sub-populations of
University at Albany students:

Evaluating the Effects of Screening and Brief Intervention for Cannabis and Non-Medical
Prescription Drug Use among College Students (Faculty Research Award)
The purpose of this study is to implement and evaluate a comprehensive Screening and Brief
Intervention program, based on the NIAAA Tier I Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for
College Students (BASICS) model, to meet the unique needs of students using cannabis and other
illegal drugs.
Funder: Division for Research, University at Albany, SUNY
Award Amount: $3,960
Project Dates: 5/1/12-12/30/15

Examining the Efficacy of Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention within University-based
Health Care Settings (K23 Mentored Patient -Oriented Career Development Award for Dr. M.
Dolores Cimini)
The aim of this project is to examine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the delivery of alcohol
screening and brief intervention in a variety of delivery formats in reducing alcohol use and related
negative consequences in a target population of undergraduate and graduate students seeking
services at university-based primary medical and mental health care settings. The specific aims of
this research will be accomplished in the context of a longitudinal randomized controlled trial
(RCT)using a between-group design to assess short-term and longer-term efficacy of BASICS, eChug, and personalized drinking feedback-only in reducing alcohol use and associated negative
consequences. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of moderators and mediators of
treatment efficacy, and will evaluate patterns of and changes in participant academic performance
and retention across time for study participants.
Funder: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Award Amount: $847,074
Project Dates: 10/1/10-9/30/16
The science-based interventions implemented in the above projects have been developed and
rigorously researched and designated as model strategies. For each of the above projects, a primary
goal involves the institutionalization of effective program components and dissemination of information
concerning the effective components of each project to Institutions of Higher Education at a local, state,
and national level.
Updated July 1, 2015 by M. Dolores Cimini, Ph.D.
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