Novell Client for Linux 1 . 1

Novell Client 1.1 for Linux Installation and Administration Guide
novdocx (ENU) 9 December 2005
Novell
Client for Linux
TM
www.novell.com
1.1
INSTALLATION AND
December 23, 2005
ADMINISTRATION GUIDE
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Contents
About This Guide
1 Understanding the Novell Client for Linux
1.1
1.2
2.4
2.5
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Novell Client Using the Installation Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Novell Client Using YaST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.1
Installing the Novell Client Using XWindows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.2
Installing the Novell Client from the Shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting or Restarting the Novell Client for Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling the Novell Client for Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.1
Uninstalling Using the YaST Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.2
Uninstalling Using the Installation Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Configuring the Novell Client for Linux
3.1
3.2
Using the Novell Client Configuration Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1
Configuring Login Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2
Configuring Protocol Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.3
Configuring Tray Application Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.4
Configuring File Browser Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.5
Configuring OpenSLP Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Configuration Files to Preconfigure the Novell Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 Managing Login
4.1
4.2
4.3
Setting Up Login Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Login Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using OpenSLP to Simplify Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.1
Setting Up SLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.2
Troubleshooting SLP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 Managing File Security
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
9
Understanding How the Novell Client for Linux Differs from Novell Client for Windows 2000/XP
9
Understanding the Novell Client for Linux Virtual File System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.2.1
Understanding When the Virtual File System Kernel Module Needs to Be Compiled 10
2 Installing the Novell Client For Linux
2.1
2.2
2.3
7
Checking File or Folder Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Trustee Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Trustee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Trustee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combining Multiple Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
13
13
14
14
15
16
16
16
17
19
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
27
27
27
28
28
29
31
31
32
33
34
34
5
A.1
A.2
Installing the Required Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
A.1.1
Installing the Required Packages from XWindows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
A.1.2
Installing the Required Packages from the Shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
A.2.1
Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module After a Kernel Update .
39
A.2.2
Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module on Workstations Running
a Custom Kernel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
B The Novell Client for Linux Commands
B.1
B.2
B.3
6
41
Shell Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
GUI Utilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Using the Novell Client for Linux Man Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
C Documentation Updates
C.1
37
45
December 23, 2005 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Novell Client 1.1 for Linux Installation and Administration Guide
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A Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module
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About This Guide
This guide describes how to install and configure the Novell® ClientTM for Linux software.
• Chapter 1, “Understanding the Novell Client for Linux,” on page 9
• Chapter 2, “Installing the Novell Client For Linux,” on page 13
• Chapter 3, “Configuring the Novell Client for Linux,” on page 19
• Chapter 4, “Managing Login,” on page 27
• Chapter 5, “Managing File Security,” on page 31
• Appendix A, “Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module,” on page 37
• Appendix B, “The Novell Client for Linux Commands,” on page 41
• Appendix C, “Documentation Updates,” on page 45
Audience
This guide is intended for network administrators.
Feedback
We want to hear your comments and suggestions about this manual and the other documentation
included with this product. Please use the User Comments feature at the bottom of each page of the
online documentation, or go to www.novell.com/documentation/feedback.html and enter your
comments there.
Documentation Updates
For the latest version of this documentation, see the Novell Client online documentation (http://
www.novell.com/documentation/linux_client/index.html) Web site.
Additional Documentation
For documentation on known issues, see the Novell Client for Linux Readme
For documentation on login scripts, see the Novell Login Scripts Guide.
For documentation on the Novell Client tray application, see the Novell Client 1.1 for Linux User
Guide.
For documentation on the command terminal utilities, see the man pages associated with these
utilities.
Documentation Conventions
In this documentation, a greater-than symbol (>) is used to separate actions within a step and items
within a cross-reference path.
A trademark symbol (®, TM, etc.) denotes a Novell trademark. An asterisk (*) denotes a third-party
trademark.
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8
Novell Client 1.1 for Linux Installation and Administration Guide
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Understanding the Novell Client
for Linux
1
1
The Novell® ClientTM for Linux software allows users of Linux workstations to access and use all of
the services available on servers running Novell eDirectoryTM. The Novell Client brings the full
power, ease of use, manageability, and security of eDirectory to Linux workstations. The Novell
Client for Linux fully supports NetWare®, OES, and eDirectory services and utilities on a Linux
workstation, including security, file, and print services through Novell iPrint.
This section contains the following information:
• Section 1.1, “Understanding How the Novell Client for Linux Differs from Novell Client for
Windows 2000/XP,” on page 9
• Section 1.2, “Understanding the Novell Client for Linux Virtual File System,” on page 10
1.1 Understanding How the Novell Client for
Linux Differs from Novell Client for Windows
2000/XP
Using the Novell Client for Linux differs in a few ways from using the Novell Client for Windows*.
For users and network administrators who are familiar with the Novell Client for Windows,
knowing these differences can help the transition to Linux run more smoothly.
Installation and Upgrades
• The Novell Client for Linux can be installed and upgraded using either YaST or an installation
script. For more information, see Chapter 2, “Installing the Novell Client For Linux,” on
page 13.
• There is no Automatic Client Upgrade available on Linux.
• The Client Configuration Wizard lets you set up a configuration file that can be used to
preconfigure workstations during installation. For more information, see Section 3.2, “Using
Configuration Files to Preconfigure the Novell Client,” on page 25.
Logging In
• The Novell Client Login is not integrated into the initial workstation login. After you log in to
the workstation, you must also log in from the Novell tray application. This means that there is
no Novell username or password synchronization with the workstation username and
password.
• When a user logs in to a local workstation and then opens a remote SSH session and logs in as
the same user, the network resources that user has rights to are available to the user.
• The Novell Client for Linux can use the NMASTM login method to authenticate. However, the
NMAS login is not integrated in to the Novell Client for Linux login screen, so the default
login sequence cannot be set in the Novell Client Login screen.
Understanding the Novell Client for Linux
9
Because Linux uses OpenSLP, the implementation is different and the user's experience is
different. For more information, see Section 4.3, “Using OpenSLP to Simplify Login,” on
page 28.
• The Novell Client for Linux does not use the Dynamic Local User or Location Profiles that are
available in Windows.
User Interface
Both a graphical user interface and command line utilities are available to complete client actions
such as mapping drives, setting trustee rights, and copying files.
Login Scripts
Novell has been able to port the vast majority of login script functionality to the Linux platform.
This means that the login scripts you create in your network work for both Windows users and
Linux users with very little difference in functionality.
Some difference do exist, however. For example, mapped drives are implemented by creating
symbolic links and search drives are not available on Linux. Other small differences are created by
the inherent difference between Windows and Linux. All the differences and issues are listed in the
Novell Login Scripts Guide.
1.2 Understanding the Novell Client for Linux
Virtual File System
The Novell Client for Linux differs from previous Novell Clients to enable it to work on the Linux
platform. In Windows, the Novell Client loads a single binary that works on multiple operating
system platforms without modifications. The Novell Client for Linux has a Virtual File System that
consists of a kernel module (novfs.ko) that runs as part of the Linux kernel and a daemon
(novfsd) that runs in the user space. Both components must be running on the workstation for the
client to connect to the network.
The daemon can run on any of the supported Linux platforms without modification. The kernel
module, however, is dependent on the kernel version and must be compiled to match the kernel on
the workstation. When the Novell Client is installed, it compiles the kernel module during the
installation process. If this process fails, the kernel module cannot load. It attempts to recompile
when the workstation is restarted.
1.2.1 Understanding When the Virtual File System Kernel
Module Needs to Be Compiled
The following is a list of the instances when you must compile the Novell Client Virtual File System
Kernel Module (novfs.ko):
• You installed the Novell Client and received an error message. This generally occurs because
all the required packages are not installed on a workstation. You must install these packages,
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• The Novell Client for Linux uses OpenSLP, whereas the Novell Client for Windows uses
Novell's implementation of SLP. The network administrator must set up OpenSLP before users
can look up trees, contexts, and servers using the Browse buttons in the Novell Client Login
window. If OpenSLP is not set up, the user must enter a username, tree, and context to connect
to the network. See Chapter 4, “Managing Login,” on page 27 for more information.
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compile the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module (novfs.ko), and restart the
workstation. See Section 2.1, “System Requirements,” on page 13 for more information.
• You have previously compiled the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module
(novfs.ko) and then made changes to the kernel.
• You have a custom kernel of any of the supported versions.
• Kernel updates are automatically pushed to the workstation via Red Carpet®.
In all of these instances, you must recompile the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module
(novfs.ko) to ensure that it is compatible with the Linux kernel version on your workstation.
However, when later shipping versions of NLD are provided by Novell, the Novell Client Virtual
File System Kernel Module (novfs.ko) is installed and you do not need to recompile it because
the module is included in the kernel.
For more information, see Appendix A, “Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel
Module,” on page 37.
NOTE: If you patch the kernel for any reason, you must make sure that you have the required
packages that correspond to the kernel patch. For a list of the required packages, see Section 2.1,
“System Requirements,” on page 13. The Novell Client for Linux then recompiles when the
workstation is restarted. Without the corresponding packages, the recompile fails.
Under certain conditions, your version of novfs.ko could be rolled back when you install a new
kernel module. For example, if you download and install a patched version of novfs.ko, and then
later install an NLD 9 SP2 update to your kernel, the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel
Module patch might be overwritten. You should then reinstall the novfs.ko patch and recompile
the kernel in order to ensure that the kernel module and the kernel are compiled.
Understanding the Novell Client for Linux
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Installing the Novell Client For
Linux
2
2
This section explains how to install the Novell® ClientTM for Linux software on a workstation and
includes the following information:
• System Requirements (page 13)
• Installing the Novell Client Using the Installation Script (page 13)
• Installing the Novell Client Using YaST (page 14)
• Starting or Restarting the Novell Client for Linux (page 16)
• Uninstalling the Novell Client for Linux (page 16)
For information on installing a preconfigured version of the Novell Client, see Section 3.2, “Using
Configuration Files to Preconfigure the Novell Client,” on page 25.
2.1 System Requirements
The Novell Client for Linux 1.1 requires workstations running Novell Linux Desktop (NLD) 9 SP3.
The following packages must be installed on the workstation before you install the Novell Client for
Linux:
• gcc
• kernel-source
• make
For information on using YaST to install these packages, see Section A.1, “Installing the Required
Packages,” on page 37.
2.2 Installing the Novell Client Using the
Installation Script
An installation script called ncl_install is provided in the Novell Client for Linux .tar.gz
file you download from Novell Downloads (http://download.novell.com). This script can be used to
install, verify installation, display information, and uninstall the Novell Client directly from a
command prompt using documented RPM commands. This same script is copied to the /opt/
novell/ncl/bin directory during the installation of the Client for later use in verifying or
uninstalling the Client.
Run these commands from the directory where you unarchived the Client download file or from /
opt/novell/ncl/bin after the initial installation. You must be logged in as root to run these
commands.
Installing the Novell Client For Linux
13
Command
Description
./ncl_install install
Installs the Novell Client for Linux.
./ncl_install force
Forces the installation of all the Novell Client for Linux
packages.
./ncl_install files
Displays a list of all files related to the packages installed with
the Novell Client for Linux.
./ncl_install information
Displays summary information for all installed Novell Client for
Linux packages.
./ncl_install verify
Verifies the installation of all installed Novell Client for Linux
packages.
./ncl_install uninstall
Uninstalls all Novell Client for Linux packages.
2.3 Installing the Novell Client Using YaST
You can install the Novell Client for Linux using YaST in either of the following ways:
• Section 2.3.1, “Installing the Novell Client Using XWindows,” on page 14
• Section 2.3.2, “Installing the Novell Client from the Shell,” on page 15
IMPORTANT: If you are updating the Novell Client software from a previous version, make sure
you uninstall the previous version before you install (see Section 2.5, “Uninstalling the Novell
Client for Linux,” on page 16). Also, make sure you have all the required packages (see Section 2.1,
“System Requirements,” on page 13).
2.3.1 Installing the Novell Client Using XWindows
Installing the Novell Client using XWindows requires that you complete the following tasks in the
order listed below:
1. Adding the Novell Client Software to YaST using XWindows (page 14).
2. Installing from XWindows (page 15).
3. Starting or Restarting the Novell Client for Linux (page 16)
Adding the Novell Client Software to YaST using XWindows
1 Launch the YaST Control Center.
NLD GNOME: Click System > Administrator Settings.
NLD KDE: Click the menu button > System > YaST.
2 If you are not logged in as root, type the root password, then click OK.
3 Click Software in the left column, then click Change Source of Installation in the right column.
4 Click Add.
5 Select the Novell Client source file location (Local Directory), specify the location, then click
OK.
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Table 2-1 ncl_install Commands
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YaST also allows you to choose other installation sources such as FTP, HTTP, Samba, NFS,
and DVD.
YaST adds the new installation source and displays it in the Software Source Media list.
6 Click Finish.
7 Continue with “Installing from XWindows” on page 15.
Installing from XWindows
1 Launch the YaST Control Center.
NLD GNOME: Click System > Administrator Settings.
NLD KDE: Click the menu button > System > YaST.
2 If you are not logged in as root, type the root password, then click OK.
3 Click Software in the left column, then click Install and Remove Software in the right column.
4 Click Selections in the Filter drop-down list.
5 Select the Novell Client for Linux check box to automatically select all of the packages for
installation.
6 Click Accept to install all of the selected packages.
The installation begins.
7 Start the Novell Client for Linux.
See Section 2.4, “Starting or Restarting the Novell Client for Linux,” on page 16.
You can customize your Novell Client Options such as the placement of the Novell Client tray
application on the Desktop or in the apps tray. This can be done from the Novell Client tray
application. See “Using the Novell Client Tray Application” in the Novell Client for Linux User
Guide.
2.3.2 Installing the Novell Client from the Shell
You can install or update the Novell Client from the shell. You must be logged in as root.
1 Launch the YaST Control Center by entering the following command in a terminal window:
/sbin/yast
2 Select Software, then select Change Source of Installation.
3 Select Add.
4 Select the Novell Client source file location (Local Directory), specify the location, then select
OK.
YaST also allows you to choose other installation sources such as FTP, HTTP, Samba, NFS,
and DVD.
YaST updates the new installation source and displays it in the Software Source Media list.
5 Select Finish, then select Install and Remove Software.
6 Select Selections in the Filter drop-down list.
7 Select Novell Client for Linux (the Plus (+) key appears next to the Novell Client for Linux
package in the list), then press Enter.
8 Select Accept to update all the selected packages.
Installing the Novell Client For Linux
15
9 After all the packages have been installed, select Quit to close the YaST Control Center.
10 Start the Novell Client for Linux.
See Section 2.4, “Starting or Restarting the Novell Client for Linux,” on page 16.
2.4 Starting or Restarting the Novell Client for
Linux
There are several ways to start or restart the Novell Client for Linux.
• Restarting the Linux Workstation: This is the best way to ensure that the Novell Client for
Linux is completely restarted.
• Manually Starting the Novell Client: Open a terminal window and log in as root. From the /
opt directory, enter one of the following commands:
• New Installations: /opt/novell/ncl/bin/ncl_control start
This command loads all Novell Client for Linux daemon modules.
• Updates: /opt/novell/ncl/bin/ncl_control restart
This command stops and then reloads all Novell Client for Linux daemon modules.
If either of these commands displays any errors, restart the Linux machine.
In addition, /opt/novell/ncl/bin/ncl_control status shows whether the NCL
drivers are loaded properly or not, and /opt/novell/ncl/bin/ncl_control stop stops
all Novell Client for Linux daemon modules.
The ncl_control restart command is run automatically at the end of the installation of the
Novell Client packages.
2.5 Uninstalling the Novell Client for Linux
You can uninstall the Novell Client for Linux using either of the following methods:
• Section 2.5.1, “Uninstalling Using the YaST Control Center,” on page 16
• Section 2.5.2, “Uninstalling Using the Installation Script,” on page 17
2.5.1 Uninstalling Using the YaST Control Center
1 Launch the YaST Control Center.
NLD GNOME: Click System > Administrator Settings.
NLD KDE: Click the menu button > System > YaST.
2 Click Software in the left column, then click Install and Remove Software in the right column.
3 Click Selections in the Filter drop-down list.
4 Select the check box to the left of Novell Client for Linux until a trash can appears.
This automatically selects all of the packages that need to be deleted.
5 Click Accept to delete all of the selected packages.
YaST displays the progress of the uninstall.
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YaST displays the progress of the package installation.
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2.5.2 Uninstalling Using the Installation Script
To uninstall the Novell Client for Linux using the installation script, enter./ncl_install
uninstall in a terminal window. You can run this command from the directory where you
unarchived the Client download file or from the /opt/novell/ncl/bin directory. You must be
logged in as root to run this command.
Installing the Novell Client For Linux
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Configuring the Novell Client for
Linux
3
3
This section explains two ways that you can configure the Novell® ClientTM for Linux settings on a
workstation. Both methods let you configure the file browser, protocol, login, tray application, and
SLP configuration settings available to Novell Client users.
• Using the Novell Client Configuration Wizard (page 19)
• Using Configuration Files to Preconfigure the Novell Client (page 25)
3.1 Using the Novell Client Configuration Wizard
The Novell Client for Linux includes a Novell Client Configuration Wizard to simplify the process
of configuring your Novell Client.
1 Launch the Novell Client Configuration Wizard using either of the following methods:
• In the Novell Client tray application, click System Settings.
• In YaST, click Network Services > Novell Client.
2 Select the Client Configuration Wizard pages that contain the settings you want to configure.
You can configure the following settings:
• Login
• Protocol
• Tray Application
Configuring the Novell Client for Linux
19
• Service Location Protocol (OpenSLP)
3 Click Start Wizard.
4 Follow the instructions in the left panel to configure Novell Client settings.
5 Click Finish.
6 Restart the workstation to ensure that the settings take effect.
7 If you made changes to the Protocol Settings page or the Service Location Protocol (OpenSLP)
Settings page, reboot the machine for those changes to take effect.
Any changes you make to the Novell Client settings are written to a set of configuration (.conf)
files in the /etc/opt/novell/ncl directory. These files are then used by the Novell Client.
IMPORTANT: When the Novell Client software is uninstalled, these settings are not saved. You
must configure the workstation again.
3.1.1 Configuring Login Settings
Use the Login Settings page in the Novell Client Configuration Wizard to configure the settings
available to users in the Novell Login dialog box.
Figure 3-1 Login Settings Page in NLD
This page contains the following options:
• Enable Advanced Button: Enables or disables the Advanced Button on the Login dialog box.
This option is selected by default.
• Enable NMAS Authentication: Enables or disables Novell Modular Authentication Services
(NMASTM) during login. NMAS authentication can add additional security to the network, but
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• File Browser
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if the network does not use NMAS, login might take additional time, so you can disable NMAS
authentication by disabling this setting. This option is selected by default.
• Default Tree: Specify the default tree that Login attempts to log in to. This setting is
overridden by the Login Dialog Tree history.
• Default Context: Specify the default context that Login attempts to log in to. This setting is
overridden by the Login Dialog Context history.
• Map Link Default Location: Specify the path to the directory where Map creates symbolic
links to network resources. A value of %HOME (the default) causes Map to create symbolic
links in the user's home directory.
• First Network Drive: Select the first letter for Map to use when creating symbolic links to
network resources. This setting is used in commands such a Map *1 or Map next.
For more information on using the Novell Login dialog box, see “Logging In to the Network” in the
Novell Client for Linux User Guide.
3.1.2 Configuring Protocol Settings
Use the Protocol Settings page in the Novell Client Configuration Wizard to determine the level of
enhanced security support and select the providers to perform name resolution.
Figure 3-2 Protocol Settings Page in NLD
This page contains the following options:
• NCP Signature Level: Specify the level of enhanced security support. Enhanced security
includes the use of a message digest algorithm and a per connection/per request session state.
The values are as follows:
0=Disabled1=Enabled but not preferred2=Preferred3=Required
Configuring the Novell Client for Linux
21
• Name Resolution Providers: Select the providers to perform name resolution. Domain Name
System also uses the /etc/hosts file. NetWare® Core ProtocolTM uses information contained in
the active NCPTM connections. Service Location Protocol queries SLP for eDirectoryTM and
Bindery names.
If you make changes to the Protocol Settings page, you must reboot the workstation for those
changes to take effect.
3.1.3 Configuring Tray Application Settings
Use the Tray Application Settings page in the Novell Client Configuration Wizard to automatically
launch the Novell Client Tray Application when the desktop starts and to determine which options
are available to users on the Tray Application menu.
Figure 3-3 Tray Application Settings Page in NLD
This page contains the following options:
• Launch Tray Application: Select this option to automatically launch the Novell Client Tray
Application.
• Tray Application Menu Options: Enables or disables the options available to users on the
Tray Application menu.
For more information, see “Using the Novell Client Tray Application” in the Novell Client.for Linux
User Guide.
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Changing the value of this setting to 2 or 3 increases security but decreases performance.
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3.1.4 Configuring File Browser Settings
Use the File Browser Settings page in the Novell Client Configuration Wizard to specify which
Novell Client options are available to users when they right-click Novell file system directories or
files in a file manager, and which tabs are available on the Novell File, Folder, and Volume
Properties pages.
Figure 3-4 File Browser Settings Page in NLD
This page contains the following options:
• Navigation Panel Icon (KDE only): Enables or disables the File Browser Navigation Panel
Icon. This icon is displayed only in KDE.
• Novell Properties: Enables or disables the Novell Properties menu option when users rightclick a Novell file system directory or file in a file manager.
• Purge Novell Files: Enables or disables the Purge Novell Files menu option when users rightclick a Novell file system directory or file in a file manager.
• Salvage Novell Files: Enables or disables the Salvage Novell Files menu option when users
right-click a Novell file system directory or file in a file manager.
• File and Folder Information: Enables or disables the File Information and Folder
Information tabs on the File and Folder Properties pages (available when users right-click a
Novell file system directory or file in a file manager and then click Novell Properties).
• Novell Rights: Enables or disables the Novell Rights tab on the File and Folder Properties
pages (available when users right-click a Novell file system directory or file in a file manager
and then click Novell Properties).
• Volume Information: Enables or disables the Volume Information tab on the Volume
Properties page (available when users right-click a Novell file system volume in a file manager
and then click Novell Properties).
Configuring the Novell Client for Linux
23
3.1.5 Configuring OpenSLP Settings
Use the Service Location Protocol (OpenSLP) Settings page in the Novell Client Configuration
Wizard to specify where and how the Client requests network services.
In an IP-only network, the Novell Client needs a way to resolve the eDirectory tree, context and
server names to an actual IP address of an eDirectory server that can provide authentication. On a
simple LAN, the client can send an IP broadcast to discover this information, but on a multisite
WAN, the SLP scope and Directory Agents must be listed.
Figure 3-5 Service Location Protocol (OpenSLP) Settings Page in NLD
This page contains the following options:
• Scope List: Specify the scopes a user agent (UA) or service agent (SA) is allowed when
making requests or registering, or the scopes a directory agent (DA) must support.
• Directory Agent List: Specify the specific DAs that UA and SA agents must use. If this
setting is not used, dynamic DA discovery is used to determine which DAs to use.
• Broadcast Only: Select this option to use broadcasting instead of multicasting. This setting is
not usually necessary because OpenSLP automatically uses broadcasting if multicasting is
unavailable.
SLP is designed to use IP multicasting; however, if any SLP Agent does not implement IP
multicasting, then all Agents must use broadcasting to reach that Agent. If a DA does not
support multicasting, we recommend using the Directory Agent List to configure that Directory
Agent rather than using this option.
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• Volume Statistics: Enables or disables the Volume Statistics tab on the Volume Properties
page (available when users right-click a Novell file system volume in a file manager and then
click Novell Properties).
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If the network does not contain a DA, IP servers must use their own SAs to specify the services
that are available. If the SA does not support multicasting and if there are any services
advertised by that SA that are needed by the UA on this machine, then use the Broadcast Only
option.
Broadcasting has the disadvantage of being limited to the local LAN segment.
• Maximum Results: Specify a 32-bit integer giving the maximum number of results to
accumulate and return for a synchronous request before the time-out, or the maximum number
of results to return through a callback if the request results are reported asynchronously.
If you make changes to the Service Location Protocol (OpenSLP) Settings page, you must reboot
the workstation for those changes to take effect.
For more information, see Section 4.3, “Using OpenSLP to Simplify Login,” on page 28, SLP
Fundamentals (http://www.novell.com/documentation/edir873/qsedir873/data/aksciti.html), and the
OpenSLP (http://www.openslp.com) Web site.
3.2 Using Configuration Files to Preconfigure
the Novell Client
The Novell Client for Linux allows you to apply preconfigured client settings contained in one or
more configuration (.conf) files. This option works similar to the unattend file that can be used to
configure the Novell Client for Windows (see Creating the Configuring File (http://
www.novell.com/documentation/noclienu/noclienu/data/bu01sei.html#hn62kppa) in the Novell
Client for Windows Installation and Administration Guide for more information).
Preconfiguring the Novell Client for Linux requires the novell-client-conf.spec file and
the make_novell-client-conf_rpm Bash script located in the /add-on/novellclient-conf subdirectory in the directory where you unarchived the Client download file.
1 Create the preconfigured settings using the Novell Client Configuration Wizard.
See Section 3.1, “Using the Novell Client Configuration Wizard,” on page 19.
2 Copy the appropriate .conf files to the /add-on/novell-client-conf directory.
Depending on the settings you preconfigured, copy one or more of the following files:
Conf File Path and Name
Configuration Settings
/etc/opt/novell/ncl/login.conf
Login settings
/etc/opt/novell/ncl/protocol.conf
Protocol settings
/etc/opt/novell/ncl/file_browser.conf
File browser settings
/etc/opt/novell/ncl/tray_app.conf
Novell Client Tray Application settings
/etc/slp.conf
SLP configuration settings
3 Run the make_novell-client-conf_rpm script to create a novell-client-confversion_number.platform.rpm file (for example, novell-client-conf1.0.0-0.i586.rpm) using all of the .conf files contained in the /add-on/novellclient-conf directory.
3a Make sure you are the root user.
3b Enter the following in a terminal window:
Configuring the Novell Client for Linux
25
4 Install the preconfigured settings contained in novell-client-confversion_number.platform.rpm using one of the following methods:
• Install manually in a terminal window: Enter rpm -i novell-client-confversion_number.platform.rpm in a terminal window.
• Install using the ncl_install script: When you launch the ncl_install script (located
in /opt/novell/ncl/bin or in the directory where you unarchived the Client
download file), it looks for novell-client-confversion_number.platform.rpm in the /add-on/novell-client-conf
directory and adds it to the list of RPMs it installs as part of the Client.
• Install with the Novell Client using YaST: Add the location of the newly created
novell-client-conf-version_number.platform.rpm to the list of
installation sources in YaST (add a local directory in the Change Source of Installation or
Installation Source option and point it to the directory containing novell-clientconf-version_number.platform.rpm). When the YaST install runs, novellclient-conf-version_number.platform.rpm is added as one of the RPMs in
the Novell Client selection.
TIP: The Novell Client configuration settings on a workstation can be updated at any time
using the YaST method.
The .conf files contained in the RPM are copied to the /etc/opt/novell/ncl
directory, overwriting the files of the same name that already exist there. The installation then
copies the slp.conf file to the /etc directory, overwriting that file as well.
TIP: Backup copies of the existing files are made in the same directory so that you can revert
to the old files if you need to.
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bash make_novell-client-conf_rpm
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4
Managing Login
4
You can customize the client login environment with the following tasks to suit your network and
have greater control over what users can access during login:
• Setting Up Login Scripts (page 27)
• Setting Up Login Restrictions (page 27)
• Using OpenSLP to Simplify Login (page 28)
For more information, see “Logging In to the Network” and “Logging Out of a Network Location
(Server or Tree)”in the Novell Client for Linux User Guide.
4.1 Setting Up Login Scripts
When a user successfully logs in to the network, one or more login scripts are executed that
automatically set up the workstation environment. Login scripts are similar to batch files and are
executed by Novell® Login. You can use login scripts to map drives to Novell file system volumes
and directories, display messages, set environment variables, and execute programs or menus.
Login scripts were originally created for use with the Novell ClientTM for Windows. However, the
Novell Client for Linux can take advantage of the majority of the functionality available in
Windows. This means that the login scripts you created for Windows workstations can also be used
with Linux workstations without modification, so you need to administer only one set of login
scripts.
Because login scripts are very flexible and dynamic, offer a high degree of customization, and are
cross-platform, you should customize the scripts to optimize workstation login to your network. For
more information on setting up login scripts, see the Novell Login Scripts Guide.
4.2 Setting Up Login Restrictions
Login restrictions are limitations on user accounts that control access to the network. These
restrictions can be set by an administrator in Novell iManager for each user's eDirectoryTM User
object and include the following:
• Requiring a password
You can specify its minimum length, whether it must be changed and how often, whether it
must be unique, and whether the user can change it.
• Setting the number of logins with an expired password and the number of incorrect login
attempts allowed
When a user violates login restrictions by entering an incorrect password or exceeding the
number of logins with an expired password, the account is disabled and no one can log in using
that username. This prevents unauthorized users from logging in.
• Setting account limits such as an account balance or expiration date
• Limiting disk space for each user by specifying the maximum blocks available for each user on
a volume
• Specifying the number of simultaneous connections a user can have
Managing Login
27
• Restricting the times when users can log in (you can assign all users the same hours or you can
restrict users individually)
For specific information on setting these restrictions, see the online help located in Novell iManager.
4.3 Using OpenSLP to Simplify Login
The service location protocol (SLP) was developed so that networking applications such as the
Novell Client for Linux could discover the existence, location, and configuration of networked
services in enterprise networks. Without SLP, users must supply the hostname or network address of
the service that they want to access.
Because SLP makes the existence, location, and configuration of certain services known to all
clients in the local network, the Novell Client for Linux can use the information distributed to
simplify login. In the case of the Novell Client, having SLP set up allows users to see the trees,
contexts, and servers available to them when they use the Novell Client for Linux Login screen.
When they click the Browse button, a list of available trees, contexts, or servers appears and they
can select the appropriate ones. For example, instead of remembering an IP address or DNS name
for a server, users can select the server's name from a list of available servers.
SLP must be activated and set up on your Novell servers in order for the Novell Client to take
advantage of it. For more information, see “SLP Services in the Network” in the SUSE LINUX
Enterprise Server 9 Administration Guide (http://www.novell.com/documentation/oes/
index.html?page=/documentation/oes/sles_admin/data/sec-net-slp.html#sec-net-slp).
SLP is not set up by default on Linux workstations. The Novell Client for Linux includes a Novell
Client Configuration Wizard to simplify the process of configuring your SLP and other Novell
Client configuration options. The Novell Client Configuration Wizard provides only basic SLP
configuration because this is all that is required by the client. However, if other applications on your
workstation require more advanced settings, you can modify the /etc/slp.conf file to set
advanced settings.
For more information on advanced SLP configuration, see the OpenSLP Web site (http://
www.openslp.org). In addition, the /usr/share/doc/packages/openslp directory
contains documentation on SLP, including a README.SuSE file containing the SUSE® LINUX
details, several RFCs, and two introductory HTML documents (An Introduction to SLP and
OpenSLP User's Guide). RFC 2609 details the syntax of the service URLs used and RFC 2610
details DHCP via SLP.
4.3.1 Setting Up SLP
1 Launch the Novell Client Configuration Wizard using either of the following methods:
• In the Novell Client tray application, click System Settings.
• In YaST, click Network Services > Novell Client.
2 Select Service Location Protocol (OpenSLP), then click Start Wizard.
3 Specify the following SLP information for your network:
• Scope List: Specify the scopes a user agent (UA) or service agent (SA) is allowed when
making requests or registering, or the scopes a directory agent (DA) must support.
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• Specifying (by node address) which workstations users can log in on
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• Directory Agent List: Specify the specific DAs that UA and SA agents must use. If this
setting is not used, dynamic DA discovery is used to determine which DAs to use.
• Broadcast Only: Select this option to use broadcasting instead of multicasting. This
setting is not usually necessary because OpenSLP automatically uses broadcasting if
multicasting is unavailable.
SLP is designed to use IP multicasting; however, if any SLP Agent does not implement IP
multicasting, then all Agents must use broadcasting to reach that Agent. If a DA does not
support multicasting, we recommend using the Directory Agent List to configure that
Directory Agent rather than using this option.
If the network does not contain a DA, IP servers must use their own SAs to specify the
services that are available. If the SA does not support multicasting and if there are any
services advertised by that SA that are needed by the UA on this machine, then use the
Broadcast Only option.
Broadcasting has the disadvantage of being limited to the local LAN segment.
• Maximum Results: Specify a 32-bit integer giving the maximum number of results to
accumulate and return for a synchronous request before the time-out, or the maximum
number of results to return through a callback if the request results are reported
asynchronously.
4 Complete the Novell Client Configuration Wizard.
5 Restart the workstation.
4.3.2 Troubleshooting SLP Configuration
If users cannot see a list of available trees, contexts, and servers when they use the Novell Client for
Linux Login screen, use slptool, located in /usr/bin, to troubleshoot your SLP configuration.
After you start slpd (located in /usr/sbin), you should be able to issue a query for SLP service
agents using the following command:
slptool findsrvs service:service-agent
This should display a list of the hosts that are running slpd, which indicates that OpenSLP is
successfully installed and working. If you do not get a list, OpenSLP is not installed correctly or is
not working. See Section 4.3.1, “Setting Up SLP,” on page 28 for more information.
Managing Login
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Novell® Open Enterprise Server (OES) and NetWare® networks restrict access to network files and
folders based on user accounts. For example, a user connected to the network using the
Administrator account can delete or rename a file that other users can only open and edit.
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Managing File Security
5
5
The Novell file system keeps track of the rights that users have to files and directories on the
network. When users try to access any file on the network, Novell File Services (NFS) either grants
access or prohibits certain things that users can do with the file.
It is important to note that Linux file rights do not correlate with NFS file rights. When you copy a
file from a Linux workstation to a Novell server, the only right that is preserved is the Read-Only
attribute. This also occurs if you copy files from one server to another using any method other than
NCOPY at the command terminal.
For more information on the specific rights on NetWare and OES servers, see “File Services” (http:/
/www.novell.com/documentation/oes/implgde/data/filesvcs.html) in the Novell OES Planning and
Implementation Guide.
For additional information on file system attributes, see the File Systems Management Guide for
OES (http://www.novell.com/documentation/oes/stor_filesys/data/hn0r5fzo.html).
Rights are granted and revoked by creating trustee assignments. For more information, see Section
5.2, “Changing Trustee Rights,” on page 32.
This section explains the following:
• Checking File or Folder Rights (page 31)
• Changing Trustee Rights (page 32)
• Combining Multiple Trustees (page 34)
5.1 Checking File or Folder Rights
1 In a file manager, right-click a Novell file system directory or file.
2 Do one of the following:
• NLD GNOME: Click Novell Properties.
• NLD KDE: Click Actions > Novell Properties.
3 Click the Novell Rights tab.
Managing File Security
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4 View the information.
The Trustees list shows the users or groups that have been granted rights to work with this file
or folder. The trustees rights to the folder also apply to all the files and subfolders it contains
unless the rights are explicitly redefined at the file or subfolder level.
The rights that each trustee has are shown by check marks under the letters. If you are viewing
the properties of multiple files, the trustees and rights shown are the combined trustees and
rights for all the files.
Effective Rights displays your rights for this file or folder. Users can receive rights in a number
of ways, such as explicit trustee assignments, inheritance, and security equivalence (see
eDirectory Rights Concepts (http://www.novell.com/documentation/edir873/edir873/data/
fbachifb.html) in the Novell eDirectory 8.7.3 Administration Guide for more information).
Rights can also be limited by Inherited Rights Filters and changed or revoked by lower trustee
assignments. The net result of all these actions—the rights a user can employ—are called
effective rights.
5 To view a list of rights and filters inherited by this file or directory, click Inherited Rights and
Filters.
All rights assignments on directories are inheritable. You can block such inheritance on
individual subordinate items so that the rights aren't effective on those items, no matter who the
trustee is. One exception is that the Supervisor right can't be blocked.
6 Click OK.
5.2 Changing Trustee Rights
The assignment of rights involves a trustee and a target object. The trustee represents the user or set
of users that are receiving the authority. The target represents those network resources the users have
authority over. You must have the Access Control right to change trustee assignments.
1 In a file manager, right-click a Novell file system directory or file.
2 Do one of the following:
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• NLD GNOME: Click Novell Properties.
• NLD KDE: Click Actions > Novell Properties.
3 Click the Novell Rights tabbed page.
4 In the Trustees list, select the trustee whose rights you want to change.
5 Select or deselect the rights you want to assign for this trustee.
For each trustee in the list, there is a set of eight check boxes, one for each right that can be
assigned. If a check box is selected, the trustee has that right. The following rights can be set
for each trustee:
• Read: For a directory, grants the right to open files in the directory and read the contents
or run the programs. For a file, grants the right to open and read the file.
• Write: For a directory, grants the right to open and change the contents of files in the
directory. For a file, grants the right to open and write to the file.
• Erase: Grants the right to delete the directory or file.
• Create: For a directory, grants the right to create new files and directories in the directory.
For a file, grants the right to create a file and to salvage a file after it has been deleted.
• Modify: Grants the right to change the attributes or name of the directory or file, but does
not grant the right to change its contents (changing the contents requires the Write right).
• File Scan: Grants the right to view directory and file names in the file system structure,
including the directory structure from that file to the root directory.
• Access Control: Grants the right to add and remove trustees for directories and files and
modify their trustee assignments and Inherited Rights Filters.
• Supervisor: Grants all rights to the directory or file and any subordinate items. The
Supervisor right can't be blocked by an Inherited Rights Filter. Users with this right can
grant or deny other users rights to the directory or file.
6 Click OK.
Trustee assignments override inherited rights. To change an Inherited Rights Filter, click Inherited
Rights and Filters.
5.3 Adding a Trustee
When you add a trustee to a Novell file system directory or file, you grant a user (the trustee) rights
to that directory or file.You must have the Access Control right to add a trustee.
1 In a file manager, right-click the Novell file or directory that you want to add a trustee to.
2 Do one of the following:
• NLD GNOME: Click Novell Properties.
• NLD KDE: Click Actions > Novell Properties.
3 Click the Novell Rights tab.
4 In the tree diagram, locate the eDirectoryTM user object that you want to add as a trustee, then
click Add.
5 Set the rights for this user by selecting the boxes under the letters on the right of the Trustees
list.
The following rights can be set for each trustee:
Managing File Security
33
• Write: For a directory, grants the right to open and change the contents of files in the
directory. For a file, grants the right to open and write to the file.
• Erase: Grants the right to delete the directory or file.
• Create: For a directory, grants the right to create new files and directories in the directory.
For a file, grants the right to create a file and to salvage a file after it has been deleted.
• Modify: Grants the right to change the attributes or name of the directory or file, but does
not grant the right to change its contents (changing the contents requires the Write right).
• File Scan: Grants the right to view directory and file names in the file system structure,
including the directory structure from that file to the root directory.
• Access Control: Grants the right to add and remove trustees for directories and files and
modify their trustee assignments and Inherited Rights Filters.
• Supervisor: Grants all rights to the directory or file and any subordinate items. The
Supervisor right can't be blocked by an Inherited Rights Filter. Users with this right can
grant or deny other users rights to the directory or file.
6 Click OK.
5.4 Removing a Trustee
When you remove a trustee of a Novell file system directory or file, you delete a user's rights to that
directory or file. You must have the Access Control right to remove a trustee.
1 In a file manager, right-click the Novell file or directory whose trustee you want to remove.
2 Do one of the following:
• NLD GNOME: Click Novell Properties.
• NLD KDE: Click Actions > Novell Properties.
3 Click the Novell Rights tab.
4 In the Trustees list, select the trustee you want to remove.
5 Click Remove, then click OK.
5.5 Combining Multiple Trustees
As an administrator, you might need to apply the same trustee assignments to a group of selected
files. You can combine trustee assignments by selecting the Combine Multiple Trustees option on
the Novell Rights page.
For example, Kim is a trustee of FILEA and FILEB. Kim has Read, File Scan, and Access Control
rights for FILEA and Read and File Scan rights for FILEB. Nancy has Read and File Scan rights for
FILEA.
If you give a new user named Michael the Read, Write, and File Scan rights for both FILEA and
FILEB and, at the same time, you want to give similar trustee rights for Kim and Nancy, you would
select Combine Multiple Trustees. The following would then be true:
• Kim has Read and File Scan rights to both FILEA and FILEB. Her Access Control right is lost
because the combined rights are based on the rights given to Michael.
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• Read: For a directory, grants the right to open files in the directory and read the contents
or run the programs. For a file, grants the right to open and read the file.
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• Nancy has Read and File Scan rights to both FILEA and FILEB. She has gained Read and File
Scan rights to FILEB because the combined rights are based on the rights given to Michael.
• Michael has Read, Write, and File Scan rights to both FILEA and FILEB.
To combine multiple trustees:
1 In a file manager, select all the Novell files or directories that you want to combine rights for.
2 Right-click the files or directories, then select one of the following:
• NLD GNOME: Click Novell Properties.
• NLD KDE: Click Actions > Novell Properties.
3 Click the Novell Rights tab.
4 Click Combine Multiple Trustees, then click OK.
Managing File Security
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Compiling the Novell Client Virtual
File System Kernel Module
A
A
If you have updated the kernel on your workstation, you must compile the Novell® ClientTM Virtual
File System Kernel Module so that it works with the updated kernel. Compiling the Novell Client
Virtual File System Module kernel requires the following steps:
1. Ensure that the right packages are installed on your workstation so that the kernel module can
be compiled.
See Section A.1, “Installing the Required Packages,” on page 37.
2. (Conditional) Install the Novell Client software so that the kernel module pieces are on the
workstation.
See “Installing the Novell Client For Linux” on page 13.
NOTE: If you installed the Novell Client for Linux and the installation failed, you do not need
to repeat this step.
3. Compile the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module.
See Section A.2, “Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module,” on
page 39.
4. Restart the workstation.
A.1 Installing the Required Packages
You can install the required packages from the YaST Control Center in either of the following ways:
• Section A.1.1, “Installing the Required Packages from XWindows,” on page 37
• Section A.1.2, “Installing the Required Packages from the Shell,” on page 38
A.1.1 Installing the Required Packages from XWindows
1 Launch the YaST Control Center.
NLD GNOME: Click System > Administrator Settings.
NLD KDE: Click the menu button > System > YaST.
2 If you are not logged in as root, type the root password, then click OK.
3 Click Software in the left column, then click Change Source of Installation in the right column:
4 Click Search in the Filter drop-down list.
5 Type gcc in the Search field, then click Search.
6 Select the gcc package for installation.
7 Type kernel-source in the Search field, then click Search.
8 Select the kernel-source package for installation.
Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module
37
9 Type make in the Search field, then click Search.
10 Select the make package for installation.
11 Click Accept to install all of the selected packages.
YaST displays the progress of the package installation.
12 (Conditional) If a message informs you that other package selection have been made to resolve
dependencies, click Continue.
13 (Conditional) If a message prompts you to insert a Novell Linux Desktop CD, put the CD in the
CD-ROM drive, then click OK.
14 After all the packages have been installed, click Close to close the YaST Control Center.
A.1.2 Installing the Required Packages from the Shell
1 Launch the YaST Control Center by entering the following command in a terminal window:
/sbin/yast
2 Select Software, then select Change Source of Installation.
3 Select Filters > Search.
4 Type gcc in the Search Phrase field, then press Enter.
5 Select the gcc package for installation, then press Enter.
The Plus (+) sign appears next to the gcc package in the list.
6 Select Filters > Search.
7 Type kernel-source in the Search Phrase field, then press Enter.
8 Select the kernel-source package for installation, then press Enter.
The Plus (+) sign appears next to the kernel-source package in the list.
WARNING: The version of the kernel-source package you select for installation must match
the version of the kernel currently installed on the Linux machine.
9 Select Filters > Search.
10 Type make in the Search Phrase field, then press Enter.
11 Select the make package for installation, then press Enter.
12 Select Accept to install all of the selected packages, then press Enter.
YaST displays the progress of the package installation.
13 (Conditional) If a message prompts you to insert the Novell Linux Desktop CD, put the CD in
the CD-ROM drive and then press Enter.
14 After all the packages have been installed, select Quit to close the YaST Control Center.
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WARNING: The version of the kernel-source package you select for installation must match
the version of the kernel currently installed on the Linux machine.
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A.2 Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File
System Kernel Module
Depending on whether or not you have a standard kernel that has been updated or a custom kernel
that needs to have the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module added, the steps for
compiling the module differ.
• Section A.2.1, “Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module After a Kernel
Update,” on page 39
• Section A.2.2, “Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module on
Workstations Running a Custom Kernel,” on page 39
A.2.1 Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel
Module After a Kernel Update
If you have updated the kernel on the workstation, you must compile the Novell Client Virtual File
System Kernel Module so that it works with the updated kernel.
1 In a terminal window, log in as root.
2 Enter the following command:
cd /opt/novell/ncl/src/novfs
3 Enter the following command:
./mk_novfs
The Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel Module is updated to match your updated kernel.
A.2.2 Compiling the Novell Client Virtual File System Kernel
Module on Workstations Running a Custom Kernel
If you have a custom kernel on the workstation, you must compile the Novell Client Virtual File
System kernel module so that it works with the custom kernel.
1 In a terminal window, log in as root.
2 Enter the following command:
cd /opt/novell/ncl/src/novfs
3 Enter the following command:
./m
The Novell Client Virtual File System Module is updated to match your custom kernel.
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B
The Novell Client for Linux
Commands
B
The Novell® ClientTM for Linux provides a set of command line utilities that let you start and stop
the Novel Client daemon, install and uninstall the Novell Client for Linux, load the Novell Client for
Linux tray application, list active connections for the currently logged-in user, copy files and
directories to and from Novell file systems, display or modify the attributes of files and directories
on Novell file systems, log a user in to or out of a Novell file server or eDirectoryTM tree, map a local
file system to a remote file system on a Novell file server, and display or modify a user’s trustee
assignments or inherited rights filter for volumes, directories, or files.
The utilities are located in the /opt/novell/ncl/bin directory, and include the following:
• Section B.1, “Shell Commands,” on page 41
• Section B.2, “GUI Utilities,” on page 42
B.1 Shell Commands
Table B-1 The Novell Client for Linux Shell Commands
Utility
Description
Syntax
ncl_tray
Loads the Novell Client for
Linux tray application and
allows customization of the
tray interface.
ncl_tray basic_options Qt_options KDE_options
Examples: ncl_tray & loads the tray application
to run in the background.
ncl_tray--config my_tray.conf loads the
tray application using a custom configuration file
called my_tray.conf.
nwconnections Lists active connections for the nwconnections [--] [-v] [-h]
currently logged-in user.
nwcopy
Copies files and directories to
and from Novell file systems.
nwcopy flags -p source_path -t target_path
The Novell Client for Linux Commands
41
Description
Syntax
nwflag
Displays or modifies the
attributes of files and
directories on Novell file
systems.
nwflag {-a|-n} {-w|-e eDir object|+|- attr modifier} [-s]
[-d|-f] [--] [-v] [-h] URI1 {URI2} {URI3} ...
Examples: nwflag -a -f -e +o //MYSERVER/
SYS/PUBLIC/TEST gives all files in the TEST
directory a read-only attribute.
nwflag -a -s -d -e +d //MYSERVER/SYS/
PUBLIC/TEST set all child directories of directory
TEST to Delete Inhibit.
nwflag -a -e +p sets the current directory to
Purge.
nwflag -a -s -f -e +a+e //MYSERVER/SYS
//MYSERVER/USER sets all files on vol SYS: and
USER: to Archive Needed and Immediate
Compress.
nwflag -n -e -s -f adam.cont.org makes
user ADAM the owner of the files in the current
directory and subdirectories.
nwflag -n -w -s -f //MYSERVER/USER |
grep -i "adam.cont.org" lists all files owned
by user ADAM on volume USER.
nwlogin
Logs a user in to a Novell file
server or an eDirectory tree.
nwlogin [-u string] [-p string] [-t string] [-c string] [-s
string] [-r] [-L path] [-P path] [-2 string] [-3 string] [-4
string] [-5 string] [--] [-v] [-h]
nwlogout
Logs the user out of a Novell
or eDirectory tree.
nwlogout {-s string|-t string} [-f] [--] [-v] [-h]
nwmap
Creates a mapping (mount)
map -d drive -s server -v volume -f filespec
from a local file system to a
remote file system on a Novell or
file server.
map options | parameters drive:=path |
local_path:=remote_path
nwrights
Displays or modifies a user’s
trustee assignments or
inherited rights filter for
volumes, directories, or files.
nwrights flags -r +|-rights_list -o
user_or_group_object -p network_path
B.2 GUI Utilities
Table B-2 The Novell Client for Linux GUI Utilities
42
Utility
Description
gnwconnections
Displays the Novell Connections dialog box, which lets you see what servers and
trees you are logged in to, refresh connections, set a specific tree as your
primary connection, or log out of a tree or server. For more information on using
this dialog box, see “Viewing Your Network Connections” in the Novell Client for
Linux User Guide.
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Utility
Description
gnwlogin
Displays the Novell Login dialog box. For more information on using this dialog
box, see “Logging In to the Network” in the Novell Client for Linux User Guide.
gnwservers
Displays a dialog box showing the servers you are logged in to
gnwtrees
Displays a dialog box showing the eDirectory trees you are logged in to.
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Utility
B.3 Using the Novell Client for Linux Man Pages
Each of the utilities has a man page associated with it that contains information on the utility, such
as a definition, usage, and samples. There is a known bug related to the manpath environment
variable on NLD. The ncl_man utility has been provided for convenience until the manpath bug is
resolved. You should use the ncl_man command (instead of the traditional man command) to view
NCL-related man pages. To do this, enter the following in a terminal window the first time you want
to view a Novell Client for Linux man page:
/opt/novell/ncl/bin/ncl_man
This modifies the MANPATH to allow the Novell Client man pages to be displayed.You can then
access the man page for a specific Novell Client for Linux utility by entering the following:
ncl_man utility_name
For example:
ncl_man ncl_tray
In the man pages, use the PgUp and PgDn keys to move up and down. Use the Home and End keys
to move between the beginning and the end of a document. To exit a man page, press q. You can
learn more about the man command by entering man man in a terminal window.
You can also enter utility_name --help in a terminal window to access a help page for the
utility.
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C
Documentation Updates
C
This section contains information on documentation content changes made in this guide since the
initial release of the Novell® ClientTM for Linux. The information will help you keep current on
updates to the documentation.
The documentation was updated on the following dates:
• Section C.1, “December 23, 2005,” on page 45
C.1 December 23, 2005
• Page design reformatted to comply with revised Novell documentation standards.
Documentation Updates
45
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Novell Client 1.1 for Linux Installation and Administration Guide
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