http://www.floridapsc.com/publications/consumer/brochure/WaterHouse

If you have questions, call the
Florida Public Service Commission’s
Division of Regulatory Compliance and
Consumer Assistance at
1-800-342-3552,
fax questions to
1-800-511-0809,
or contact the FPSC via e-mail:
contact@psc.state.fl.us.
See our Internet home page at
www.floridapsc.com.
SAVE
MONEY
on your
WATER
BILL
Or write:
Florida Public Service Commission
Division of Regulatory Compliance and
Consumer Assistance
2540 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0850
Sources of Additional Information
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
www.dep.state.fl.us/water
Florida’s Water Management Districts
www.myflorida.com/directory
Clean Water Action
www.cleanwateraction.org
Ground Water Protection Council
www.gwpc.org
MARCH
2008
Save Money by Conserving Water
Repair dripping faucets by replacing washers.
80
nd
sta
Retrofit faucets with low-flow aerators.
Leaky toilets can waste 200 gallons per day.
60
ou
rw
ate
y
Florida Water Facts
leaks.
30
0 2 8 3 3 2 00
GALLONS
40
50
fo r
Under
70
20
C
r use p tterns.
a
The water meter is usually housed in a box in the
ground in front of the residence.
The average Floridian uses about 175 gallons
of water per day (compared to the national
average of 110 gallons per day.)
About 90 percent of Florida’s 18 million
residents get their drinking water from public
supplies.
Each time the large arrow completes a revolution,
100 gallons have passed through the meter, and
the last digit on the right advances. The last two
zeros, showing hundreds of gallons, never change.
About 62 percent of the water used comes from
the Florida aquifer system; 17 percent comes
from the Biscayne aquifer.
Water readings are cumulative, and the meter is not
reset after each meter reading. Subtract last
month’s numbers from the current reading to show
how much water has been used.
Surface water sources include lakes,
rivers, and the managed canal systems.
Florida has a total water area of 4,308
square miles.
Insulate the water heater and water pipes.
More Tips
Inside
The small triangle is a low-flow indicator. To
check for leaks, turn off all the faucets inside
and outside the house. Inspect the water
meter. If the low-flow triangle is moving,
water is flowing through the meter,
indicating a leak in the system.
Check pipes for leaks as part of basic maintenance.
A faucet dripping at one drop per second wastes 2,700 gallons per week.
Using water wisely now means saving money on water
bills and protecting the water supply for future
generations.
10
er
Re
a
90
he
ck
d
Your Water
g
M
in
0
et
Only 2.5 percent of the world’s water is fresh water, and
less than 1 percent of the fresh water is usable.
Florida’s growing population is putting greater stress
on this essential -- and limited -- resource.
Take a
shorter
shower and
install a lowflow showerhead with a 2.5
gpm (gallons per
minute) rating.
When buying
new appliances,
consider energy
efficient models.
INDOOR
TIPS
Store drinking water
in the refrigerator
to get it cold
rather than letting
the tap run.
When washing dishes by hand,
use tubs of water instead
of running water.
Use less water for baths.
A full tub uses 35-50 gallons.
If the handle sticks in
the flush position, water
runs constantly. Replace
or adjust the handle.
Dispose
of tissue,
insects,
and other
waste in
the trash.
Wash clothes with full
loads and cold water to
save water and energy.
Use the
garbage
disposal
sparingly.
Compost
vegetable
scraps.
Install an instant
water heater on the
sink so the water
doesn’t need to run
while heating up.
Use the
dishwasher
with full
loads.
Check
tank for
leaks.
Lawns only need about a
half inch of water at a time.
In spring, water once
every 3-5 days.
In summer, water once
every 6-7 days.
In winter, water once
every 10-14 days.
Running the tap water for 2 minutes wastes 3-5 gallons of
water.
Top loading washers use about three times as much water as
front-loading washing machines.
Each toilet flush uses 5-7 gallons of water. Replace older
models with high efficiency toilets that use less than 2 gallons
per flush.
Know your local
area weather patterns.
A strong rain can
eliminate watering
needs up to
two weeks.
OUTDOOR
TIPS
Collect water from the roof into a rain barrel.
Use
rainwater
for
watering
landscape
plants
Landscape with
Florida-friendly,
drought tolerant plants,
trees, and grasses.
Watering in the morning
minimizes evaporation
and waste. Watering in
the evening is the next
best alternative.
Turn water off
at the spigot
to reduce
leaks. Place
a shut-off
nozzle on
the hose to
control flow.
Group plants
together
based on
similar
water
needs.
Avoid watering on windy
days.
Reduce fertilizer use
because fertilizers increase
the need for water.
Higher grass is more
drought resistant.
Raise the lawn mower
blades to at least three
inches.
Check sprinkler systems
regularly to make sure they
are operating correctly.
Mulch to retain moisture
Use a
sprinkler
timer.
Make sure water from the
sprinkler falls on grass and
shrubs, not on paved areas.
and reduce weeds.
Buy a rain
guage.
W
at
er
in
gw
ith a
es
hose us
Install soaker hoses or
drip irrigation for flower
beds and shrubs.
10
lons
gal
per minu
te.
A pinhole-sized
leak wastes 170
gallons a day.
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