2010-2011 Catalog (3.4 Mb PDF)

SCORE MARK
TRIM MARK
COLLEGE OF MARIN
College of Marin is fully
accredited by the Accrediting
Commission for Community
and Junior Colleges of the
Western Association of
Schools and Colleges.
KENTFIELD CAMPUS
835 College Ave.
Kentfield, CA 94904
PLEASE RECYCLE WHEN FINISHED. (08/2010)
INDIAN VALLEY CAMPUS
1800 Ignacio Blvd.
Novato, CA 94949
www.marin.edu
415.457.8811
2010 – 2011 CATALOG
© 2010 College of Marin
2010 – 2011 CATALOG
C
M
Y
K
COLLEGE OF MARIN BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Trustee
Term
Diana Conti, Clerk Barbara J. Dolan, Member Carole Hayashino, Member Philip J. Kranenburg, Member Eva Long, President James S. Namnath, Vice President Wanden Treanor, Member
Nathaniel Parker, Student Trustee
To 2013 (since 2009)
To 2013 (since 1985)
To 2011 (since 2003)
To 2011 (since 2003)
To 2011 (since 1999)
To 2011 (since 2007)
To 2013 (since 1996)
To 2011 Academic Year (since 2009)
Published by College of Marin through the joint efforts of the Student Learning Department and the
Office of Communications and Community Relations.
CATALOG ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Cathy Summa-Wolfe, Director Communications and Community Relations
Cari Torres, Production Coordinator
Tom Hudgens, Lead Production and Content Coordinator
Kim O’Gara, Alganesh Hagos, James Kuromiya, Curriculum and Content Support
Dong Nguyen, Technical Support
Dave Mahoney, Graphic Design
Donna Caldwell, Production Consultant
David Paul Morris, Cover Photo Credits
Shook Chung, Web Design
Curriculum Committee Members: Maula Allen, Rebecca Beal, Becky Brown, Win Cottle, Alganesh Hagos, George Hritz,
Tom Hudgens, Kristi Kuhn, Sara McKinnon, Dong, Nguyen, Kim O’Gara, Rossana Pagani, Ron Palmer, Joanna Pinckney,
A. Joe Ritchie, Karen Robinson, Chris Schultz, Diusca Smith, Cari Torres
This catalog is in effect from fall 2010 through summer 2011. Consult other official campus publications for updates.
Kentfield Campus
835 College Avenue
Kentfield, CA 94904
Indian Valley Campus
1800 Ignacio Blvd.
Novato, CA 94949
Tel: (415) 457-8811
www.marin.edu
PRESIDENT’S
MESSAGE
Dear Students, Prospective Students and Community Members:
Welcome to College of Marin, one of California’s premier
community colleges. Founded in 1926, College of Marin has a
proud history of academic excellence and is fully accredited by
the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Inside
this catalog you will find information about the wide variety of
programs and services that College of Marin offers.
College of Marin is student-centered, affordable, and
conveniently located in Marin County. We welcome students
from all walks of life and offer excellent learning opportunities
in a supportive environment. Our outstanding faculty, small
class size, and excellent support services are a few of the many
reasons to consider enrolling at College of Marin.
Whether you plan to transfer to a four-year university, train for a
new career, earn an associate degree, learn English-as-a-Second
Language, or enrich your life, College of Marin can help you
achieve your dreams and aspirations.
I invite you to learn more about the many educational
opportunities that we offer. Enroll today and discover why our
students start here and go far! We look forward to seeing you
on campus.
Sincerely,
A. J. Harrison II
Superintendent/President
WHY ENROLL AT
COLLEGE OF MARIN?
There are a variety of reasons for attending
College of Marin:
• Transfer to a four-year college or university
by completing lower division requirements
in your major.
• Train for a new career and earn a certificate
or occupational degree offered in a variety
of fields.
• Acquire a general background in the major
areas of knowledge: the humanities, social
and behavioral sciences, and natural and
physical sciences.
• Benefit from the diverse backgrounds and
extensive experience of a faculty committed
to providing quality education.
• Receive guidance and assistance from
instructors and counselors to plan a
program that meets your individual needs.
• Upgrade skills through specific courses
offered at the college.
• Personal enrichment.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION 6
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION 1
GENERAL INFORMATION
Fall Semester 2010 Academic Calendar
Spring Semester 2011 Academic Calendar
How to Use This Catalog
About College of Marin Academic Programs
Oportunidades Educativas
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13
SECTION 2
ADMISSIONS,
REGISTRATION, AND
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Admissions Information
Fees
Refunds
Financial Aid
Probation
Advanced Placement/Academic Credit
Academic Records
16
19
20
20
25
26
29
SECTION 3
STUDENT SERVICES
Campus Services
Student Support Programs/Services
Student Activities
Standards of Conduct
Student Rights and Grievances
Additional Phone and Office Numbers
34
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40
SECTION 4
GRADUATION AND
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Catalog Rights
Graduation Requirements
General Education
Associate Degree Programs
Certificate of Achievement Programs
Skills Certificates
Table of A.S./A.A. Degrees
42
42
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44
47
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48
SECTION 5
TRANSFER INFORMATION
California State University Transfer Information 50
University of California Transfer Information
53
Administration of Justice
American Sign Language
Anthropology
Architecture
Art
Astronomy
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
Automotive Technology
Behavioral Science
Biology
Business
Business Office Systems
Chemistry
Chinese
College Skills Communications
Computer Information Systems
Computer Science
Counseling
Court Reporting
Dance
Dental Assisting: Registered
Drama
Early Childhood Education
Economics
Education
Electronics Technology
Engineering
English
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Landscaping
Ethnic Studies
Film/Video
Fire Technology
French
Geography
Geology
Health Education
History
Humanities
Independent Study
Italian
Japanese
Journalism
Library
Machine and Metals Technology
Mathematics
Medical Assisting
Multimedia Studies
Music
Nursing Education: Registered
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
60
62
62
64
67
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80
85
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92
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102
103
107
109
111
116
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125
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144
148
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156
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162
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182
186
191
203
204
209
Political Science
Psychology
Real Estate
Social Science
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Statistics
Study Skills
Work Experience Education
Noncredit Courses
210
212
215
217
217
219
221
223
223
224
225
SECTION 7
FACULTY, MANAGEMENT,
STAFF, AND MAPS
Faculty and Management
Support Staff
College of Marin Foundation
College of Marin Alumni Association
College of Marin Educational Advisory
Committee Members
Kentfield Campus Map
Indian Valley Campus Map
228
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234
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234
236
237
SECTION 1
GENERAL INFORMATION
8
Fall Semester 2010 Academic Calendar
MARIN.EDU
FALL SEMESTER 2010 ACADEMIC CALENDAR
Beginning August 16 and Ending December 17. Saturday Classes Beginning August 21 and Ending December 11.
JULY
AUGUST
SEPTEMBER
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SCHEDULE OF IMPORTANT FALL DATES
(CLASS DAYS ARE SHADED. HOLIDAYS ARE
BOLD)
August 15
California Residency Determination Date
August 16
FALL INSTRUCTION BEGINS – Day and Evening Classes
August 21
First day of Saturday classes
August 16 – September 3 in-person, September 6 on-line
Classes may be added with Add Authorization Code
(obtain from instructor)
August 30
Last day to drop or reduce course work to qualify for a
refund of enrollment fee, nonresident and international
student tuition
August 31 – October 29
File application for Fall graduation and Certificate of
Achievement
SEPTEMBER 6
Holiday (Labor Day)—no classes—COLLEGE OFFICES
CLOSED
September 21
Last day to request Pass (P) No Pass (NP) grade
January 7
Final grades available at http://mycom.marin.edu
October 15
End of midterm period
* NOTE: Deadline dates listed above apply to full-term
classes only. For short-term classes, please consult the
deadline dates on the Short-Term Classes listing in the
Schedule of Classes.
October 22
Midterm grades available at http://mycom.marin.edu
NOVEMBER 11
Holiday (Veterans Day)—no classes—COLLEGE OFFICES
CLOSED
November 12
Last day to drop a full-semester class with W grade
NOVEMBER 25 – 27
Thanksgiving break—no classes—COLLEGE OFFICES
CLOSED
November 30
Last day for accepting International Student Applications
for Spring 2010
December 10
Last day of classes before final examinations
December 11 – 17
FINAL EXAMINATIONS
September 10
Last day to drop a full-semester class without a W grade
December 17
Last day to remove an Incomplete received from the
previous semester
September 17
Last day to file a Petition to Add a Class Late
DECEMBER 20 – JANUARY 21
Winter break—no classes
Spring Semester 2011 Academic Calendar
CATALOG 2010/11
9
SPRING SEMESTER 2011 ACADEMIC CALENDAR
Beginning January 24 and Ending May 27. Saturday Classes: Beginning January 22 and Ending May 21
JANUARY
FEBRUARY
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SCHEDULE OF IMPORTANT SPRING DATES
(CLASS DAYS ARE SHADED. HOLIDAYS ARE
BOLD)
February 28
Last day to request Pass (P) No Pass (NP) grade
January 21
California Residency Determination Date
March 1
Deadline for Cal Grants, MEF Grants and COM Foundation Scholarship applications
January 22
First day of Saturday Classes
March 25
End of midterm period
January 22 – February 11 in-person, February 13 on-line
Classes may be added with Add Authorization Code
(obtain from instructor)
April 1
Midterm grades available at http://mycom.marin.edu
January 24
SPRING INSTRUCTION BEGINS – Day and Evening Classes
APRIL 11 – 17
Spring break – no classes – College offices open Monday
– Friday
February 4
Last day to drop or reduce course work to qualify for a
refund of enrollment fee, nonresident and international
student tuition
April 22
Last day to drop a full-semester class with W grade
February 7 – March 18
File an application for Spring graduation and Certificate
of Achievement
May 21 – 27
FINAL EXAMINATIONS
FEBRUARY 18 – 21
Holidays (Presidents Day weekend) – no classes – COLLEGE OFFICES CLOSED
February 22
Last day to drop a full-semester class without a W Grade
February 25
Last day to file a Petition to Add a Class Late
May 20
Last day of classes before final examinations
June 10
Final grades available at http://mycom.marin.edu
* NOTE: Deadline dates listed above apply to full-term
classes only. For short-term classes, please consult the
deadline dates on the Short-Term Classes listing in the
Schedule of Classes.
COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAM
CALENDAR
Fall Quarter Community Education Classes 2010
Fall 1: Beginning September 13 and Ending October 23
Fall 2: Beginning October 25 and Ending December 18
Winter Quarter Community Education Classes 2011
Beginning January 31 and Ending March 26
Spring Quarter Community Education Classes 2011
Beginning March 28 and Ending May 21
10
How to Use This Catalog
CHANGES MAY OCCUR WITHOUT NOTICE
Administrative Procedures and Board
Policies, regulations, courses, schedules,
described in this publication are subject to
change at any time without prior notice.
The college reserves the right to alter fees,
statements, and procedures contained
herein. Fees and procedures are subject to
change at any time by the State Legislature
and the college Board of Trustees. It is the
student’s responsibility to meet and remain
informed of college requirements. When
changes occur, they will be printed in the
next regular publication of the catalog or
class schedule.
HOW TO USE THIS
CATALOG
We have designed this catalog to give
prospective and current students, advisors,
faculty, employers, and friends of College
of Marin an accurate picture of the curriculum, faculty, environment, and related
subjects. Browse through the catalog to get
acquainted. The index will often list items by
several different names to give you a better
chance of finding what you need.
Over the course of the next year when the
catalog will be in use, there will be changes
in curriculum, faculty, and other important
areas. Information about changes will be
available in class schedule booklets, which
are issued three times each year for fall and
spring semesters, and summer sessions. All
information is current at the time of publication but is subject to change.
Visitors are welcome to the campuses.
Address all mail to College of Marin, 835
College Avenue, Kentfield, CA 94904.
College of Marin’s telephone number is
(415) 457-8811.
Web address: www.marin.edu
The amount of information in the catalog
may seem overwhelming at first and the
details of enrolling at the college may sound
complex. Take it step-by-step to make it easy.
The following guidelines will be of help in
planning a program at College of Marin.
Depending upon your reason for attending
college, refer to the following:
1. All students attending College of Marin
and completing 60 units may seek a
degree.
a. Refer to page page 42 for general education and other graduation requirements.
MARIN.EDU
b. Refer to page page 44 for a condensed
listing of Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degree requirements.
c. Make an appointment early with a
counselor to learn about prerequisites
and testing and to help you plan your
program.
2. If you are planning to enroll in one of our
two-year occupational programs or want
to complete a certificate:
a. Suggested programs can be found
fully described under each discipline
offering an occupational program beginning on page page 60. Occupational
programs are identified by the word
“Occupational” listed in the
title of the degree.
b. Look up these courses in the class
schedule that is published before each
semester and plan your time schedule.
3. If you are planning to transfer to a fouryear college or university after attending
College of Marin:
a. Refer to requirements for the majors
more fully described under each
discipline beginning on page page 42.
b. Refer to transfer information on page
page 50.
c. Contact the Transfer/Career Center
for access to college catalogs from
other schools, to investigate career
options, and for computerized career
and transfer information. Transfer
information is available online at
ASSIST (www.assist.org).
d. Contact the Counseling Department to make an appointment with
a counselor who can assist you with
selecting courses to meet specific
transfer requirements to a four-year
college or university.
4. If you are planning to enroll in courses
for self-enrichment:
a. Refer to the listing of courses in this
catalog beginning on page page 60.
b. Refer to the Community Education
schedule published quarterly.
5. If you have never attended College of
Marin, file an application for admission
in the Office of Admissions and Records.
Dates for registration are listed in the
class schedule.
ABOUT COLLEGE OF
MARIN
HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE
College of Marin has been a tradition in
Marin County since 1926. Formerly Marin
Junior College, it granted its first associate
degrees in the spring of 1929. In 1947, the
college was renamed College of Marin. In
1971, the Board of Trustees established the
second college of the district and named the
new institution Indian Valley College. The
college operated in temporary facilities at
Hamilton Air Force Base and at the Pacheco
School while new facilities were under
construction. Indian Valley College’s first
associate degrees were awarded in 1972 and
the new campus opened in the fall of 1975.
In 1985, the two colleges merged and are
now known as College of Marin. Classes are
offered on the Kentfield Campus in Kentfield
and the Indian Valley Campus in Novato.
In 2004, Marin County voters approved
a $250 million facilities improvement bond
to revitalize the aging Kentfield and Indian
Valley Campuses. Since passing the bond,
three major construction projects have been
completed or are very near completion,
including the Irwin P. Diamond Physical
Education Complex, the new Transportation
Technology Education Complex, and the
new Indian Valley Campus Main Building.
Other projects currently underway include:
the Kentfield Fine Arts Building and the new
Science, Math, and Central Plant Complex.
In spring 2010, the Irwin P. Diamond
Physical Education Center was awarded
LEED Gold by the Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED®) Building
Rating System, which was developed by the
U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).
College of Marin serves the educational
needs of the residents of Marin County.
Since its inception, the college has offered
high quality courses allowing students to
complete their freshman and sophomore
years of study and transfer to public and
private four-year universities. The college
awards associate degrees in many transfer
majors. A variety of two-year vocational
and career programs leading to an associate
degree are also offered to prepare students
for entry into specific technical or semiprofessional fields. Skills Certificates and
Certificates of Achievement are awarded in
vocational and technical programs.
College of Marin faculty members are
committed to excellence in teaching. There
Academic Programs
CATALOG 2010/11
are 112 permanent faculty, 19 educational
administrators, five classified administrators, and 207 professional, technical, clerical,
and service employees at the college. In
spring 2010, 8,025 students enrolled in the
college’s credit program. The faculty, administrators, and staff hold degrees representing
colleges and universities in some 26 states
and foreign countries. A number of faculty
members hold doctorate degrees. A faculty
and staff directory is listed in the back section of this catalog.
MISSION STATEMENT
College of Marin’s commitment to educational excellence is rooted in our mission to
provide excellent educational opportunities
for all members of our diverse community
by offering:
• preparation for transfer to four-year
schools and universities;
• workforce education;
• basic skills improvement; English as a
Second Language
• intellectual and physical development
and lifelong learning; and
• cultural enrichment.
The College of Marin is committed to
responding to community needs by offering
student-centered programs and services in a
supportive, innovative learning environment
with a strong foundation of sustainability,
which will instill environmental sensitivity
in our students.
ACCREDITATION
College of Marin is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and
Junior Colleges of the Western Association
of Schools and Colleges, 10 Commercial
Blvd., Novato, CA 94949, (415) 506-0234, an
institutional accrediting body recognized
by the Commission on Recognition of
Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S.
Department of Education.
Special programs also are accredited by
the California Board of Dental Examiners,
American Dental Association, the California
State Board of Registered Nursing Examiners, and the National League for Nursing
Accreditation Commission.
The National
League for Nursing Accreditation Commission is a resource for information on the
Nursing Program: 3343 Peachtree Road NE,
Suite 500, Atlanta, Georgia 30326. Phone:
(404) 975-5000. Visit the Web site at: www.
nlnac.org.
The college is approved for foreign
student education by the United States Immigration Services, and veterans’ education
by the California Department of Education,
Bureau of School Approvals. The University
of California, the California State University,
and other four-year colleges and universities
accept units of credit in transfer courses
completed at College of Marin.
ARNULFO CEDILLO
Director of Student Affairs and Health Center
ABOUT CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY
COLLEGES
VACANT
Director of Fiscal Services
The California Community Colleges system
is comprised of 72 districts, 112 colleges
and enrolls more than 2.9 million students.
It is the largest higher education system in
the nation. California community colleges
provide basic skills education, workforce
training and courses that prepare students
for transfer to four-year universities. The
colleges also offer opportunities for personal
enrichment and lifelong learning. To the
extent funding is provided the colleges may
conduct institutional research concerning
student learning and retention as is needed
to facilitate their educational missions.
COLLEGE ADMINISTRATORS
AL J. HARRISON II
Superintendent/ President, Interim
NICOLAR CHANG
Vice President of Student Learning
PEGGY ISOZAKI
Vice President of College Operations, Interim
LINDA BEAM
Executive Dean of Human Resources and Labor Relations
ROBERT P. BALESTRERI
Dean of Enrollment Services
NANDA SCHORSKE
Dean of Workforce Development, College and Community Partnerships
DAVID SNYDER
Dean of Arts and Humanities
JAMES ARNOLD
Dean of Math and Sciences
GRETA SIEGEL
Dean of Student Development and Special Services
DIRECTORS/CHIEF
SUSAN ANDRIEN
Director of Learning Resources
JANICE AUSTIN
Director of Community Service, Lifelong Learning, and
International Education, Interim
LYDA BEARDSLEY
Director of Childcare Programs
11
DAVID COOK
Director of Financial Aid
ROSALIND HARTMAN
Director of Health Sciences
CHIALIN HSIEH
Director of Planning, Research, and Institutional
Effectiveness
VACANT
Chief of Police/Director of Safety
MATT MARKOVICH
Director of Physical Education and Athletics
MARSHALL NORTHCOTT
Chief Information Officer
CATHY SUMMA-WOLFE
Director of Communications and Community Relations
ROBERT THOMPSON
Director of Maintenance and Operations
CARI TORRES
Director of Academic Services and Articulation
VACANT
Director of Modernization
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
College of Marin integrates its resources and
functions to serve community needs. The
academic programs are managed by experienced administrators and staff and taught by
qualified faculty. All aspects of the college’s
programs are reviewed to assure that they
meet community and student needs. Recognizing that education is a lifelong process,
the college provides educational opportunities for all age groups, including credit
programs leading to the Associate in Arts
and Associate in Science degrees, academic
programs that prepare students to transfer
to a four-year institution, and vocationaltechnical programs that prepare students
for specific fields of employment and enable
people to upgrade their work skills.
Courses are also offered to meet the
curricular needs of disabled, re-entry, and
foreign students. For students who need
remedial work, there are special programs in
English, mathematics, and study skills.
The college’s faculty includes published
authors, acknowledged scholars, performing
actors, dancers, musicians, talented studio
artists, scientists, and professional technicians. They, along with the administrative
team and support staff, are committed to
providing quality education.
12
Academic Programs
College of Marin’s reputation for
instructional innovation and quality is well
known and respected statewide. It includes
self-paced courses in many disciplines such
as English, foreign languages, and math. The
Distance Learning Program reaches beyond
the traditional classroom by offering videobased and Web-based courses. Instructional
aides and tutors are available for those who
need assistance.
Information about courses, programs,
institutional requirements, and various services is contained in the college catalog, the
college Web site www.marin.edu, the class
schedule, and a variety of special mailings.
CLASS SCHEDULE
College of Marin offers credit, noncredit,
and fee-based community education classes
at its Kentfield and Indian Valley campuses.
Credit and noncredit classes are offered
during fall and spring semesters and during
the summer session. Credit/noncredit
class schedules are available prior to each
semester including a detailed list of courses,
instructors, dates, times and locations. There
is no enrollment fee for noncredit courses
(other fees may apply), and they are offered
in the following areas: Basic Skills, Disabled
Students Programs and Services, English as
a Second Language Noncredit, Health and
Safety courses, Nursing Education Vocational, and Vocational.
COMMUNITY EDUCATION
College of Marin’s Community Education
Department offers students access to a
variety of Community Services (fee-based)
classes which can assist in achieving personal, educational, and professional goals.
These classes provide the Marin community
with lifelong learning opportunities, a place
to prepare for entering college credit and
transfer programs, and career development
classes designed to serve the working adult.
Community Services
Community Services courses offer Marin
residents of all ages a wealth of opportunities
for personal development, skills development, cultural enrichment, and recreational
enjoyment. Thousands of students enroll
each year in Community Services classes,
which are taught by some of the finest
instructors in the country. Classes cover a
broad spectrum of interests and disciplines,
including art, writing, literature, dramatic
arts, music, and much more. In order to
make offerings as convenient as possible,
classes are held on campus and off campus.
MARIN.EDU
A variety of business, professional, and
career development classes and workshops,
including introductory classes in graphics,
soft ware, and marketing, are offered for the
working population. Throughout the year,
courses meeting the continuing education
requirements for health professionals are
offered in the areas of Nursing and Dental
Assisting.
Community Services classes are selfsupporting and not funded by taxpayers’
dollars. Prices vary depending on the actual
class.
For a complete listing of Community
Services classes, including class fees, please
visit the Web site at www.marin.edu or
www.marincommunityed.org.
study plans focus on each student’s needs.
The open-entry learning lab allows students
to start at any time and improve at their
own pace. Instructors will guide students
through workbooks, computer programs,
online exercises, and other materials.
Practice testing helps assure readiness.
The Basic Skills Program is a learning
lab for community members wishing to
improve their reading, writing, and math.
This program features open-entry, flexible
scheduling, skills assessment, individual
study plans, self-paced improvement, and
personal guidance.
Check the noncredit schedule for current
hours.
There is no fee for the lab.
Department phone: (415) 485-9305
(415) 485-9363 (lab) or
(415)-485-9445 (coordinator: Michael Timmel)
Emeritus College
Designed to meet the needs of the county’s
older adult lifelong learner population,
Emeritus College (EC) is a unique program
offered as an integral part of the District’s
Community Education program. Courses
offered through EC aim to support the
principles of quality of life, lifelong learning,
and creative retirement.
Emeritus Students College of Marin
(ESCOM) was created to support and
enhance the Emeritus College program. To
achieve this goal, members participate in the
identification and development of courses,
forums, concerts, lectures, and other
activities of interest to older adult students.
ESCOM is a vital part of the College of
Marin and an advisory group to Community
Education. Members participate in the college governance system and on other college
committees and task forces.
ESCOM is organized so that its members
may learn and develop through study, clubs,
and auxiliary activities. Basic to ESCOM is
the concept of democratic decision-making
and planning, using the talents and judgment of its members to enrich their own
lives and to contribute to the college and the
community.
Emeritus College phone: (415) 485-9368
ESCOM phone:(415) 485-9652
COLLEGE SKILLS DEPARTMENT
G.E.D. Preparation/Basic Skills Programs
The G.E.D. (General Educational Development) Preparation program is a learning
lab designed to help those who have not
graduated from high school pass the G.E.D.
exams. Thorough diagnostic testing identifies strengths and weaknesses. Individual
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
ESL Noncredit
Noncredit ESL classes are designed for adults
in the community who require English
to prepare for academic courses, to get or
keep a job, or for personal growth to better
survive in an English-speaking community.
Day, evening, and Saturday classes are
available at beginning to low-intermediate
proficiency levels on both the Kentfield and
Indian Valley Campuses, as well as in San
Rafael and Novato. Students take a required
noncredit assessment test before registering.
There are no fees for these classes.
ESL Office: Harlan Center 101
(415) 485-9642
Web address: www.marincommunityed.org
ESL Credit
Credit ESL classes are offered for college credit to students at intermediate to
advanced proficiency levels. Classes at each
level focus on grammar, speaking/listening, reading/vocabulary, or writing. Early
registration is strongly advised.
To enroll in credit ESL classes, students
must take a College of Marin ESL Student
Success Workshop that includes placement
testing, counseling, and orientation before
enrolling in classes. Students may call the
ESL Office or the Counseling Office to sign
up for a workshop. Assistance in the application process is available in the Counseling
Department. See Section Six of this catalog
for course descriptions.
ESL Office: Harlan Center 101
(415) 485-9642
Web address: www.marin.edu/departments/esl
Oportunidades Educativas
CATALOG 2010/11
Intensive English Program
The Intensive English Program (IEP) is
an international community of English
language learners for international students
(F1s), aupairs (J1s), and residents preparing
to enter American colleges or universities.
The (IEP) offers two 16-week semesters
each year for F1 students. Each semester
consists of 20 hours per week total instruction time in four subject areas: grammar,
reading, writing, and speaking/listening/
pronunciation. Academic English skills,
TOEFL preparation, and cultural events and
field trips in the San Francisco Bay Area are
included. J1s may attend part-time between
five and 15 hours per week for eight- or 16week sessions. Students are placed into one
of three levels of classes (high beginning,
intermediate, advanced) depending on their
scores on the placement tests during the
first week of the semester. Students advance
through the program by completing all
assignments and scoring a minimum level
on the placement test for the next level. F1
students usually attend the IEP between one
and three semesters (depending on their skill
level upon arrival and on their TOEFL score)
before transferring to a credit program. Students who complete all of the Level 3 courses
in the IEP have their TOEFL requirement
waived for the COM credit program.
(415)-883-2211, ext. 8579
Web address: www.marincommunityed.org
OPORTUNIDADES
EDUCATIVAS
College of Marin fue fundado en 1926 y
ofrece a los estudiantes la oportunidad
de obtener el título de Asociado en Artes
(AA), de transferir créditos académicos a
las Universidades de California (UC) o a las
Universidades Estatales de California (CSU)
y también a cualquier otra universidad. El
colegio ofrece certificados vocacionales en
varios programas. College of Marin está
dispuesto a servir a todos los habitantes que
viven en el distrito del colegio.
MATRÍCULA ABIERTA PARA TODOS
Igualdad de oportunidades
El Distrito de Marin Community College se
compromete, por medio de sus normas, a no
discriminar en base a, o por la percepción de
una o más de las siguientes características:
raza, credo religioso, color, nacionalidad
de origen, ascendencia, discapacidad física
o mental, condición mental, estado mat-
rimonial, orientación sexual o condición
de veterano, en ninguno de sus programas
educacionales y de empleo y en sus actividades, prácticas y procedimientos.
Los estudiantes que creen que esta norma
ha sido violada, tienen derecho a presentar
una denuncia interna o una denuncia con la
Oficina de Derechos Civiles.
El Distrito de Marin Community College
hace todo lo posible para cumplir con los
requisitos del Título IX de la Enmienda
Educacional de 1972, el Decreto de Igualdad
de Oportunidades en el Empleo de 1972
(Título VII del Decreto de Derechos Civiles
de 1964 según enmendado), el Decreto de
Derechos Civiles de 1991, y la Sección 504
del Decreto de Rehabilitación de 1874, el
Decreto de Americanos con Discapacidades,
el Decreto de Empleo y
Vivienda Equitativos de California de
1980, las reglas y reglamentaciones de la
Comisión de Empleo y Vivienda Equitativos
de California y el Decreto de Reajuste de
Veteranos de Vietnam de 1974.
College of Marin, bajo el Decreto de
Divulgación de Equidad en el Atletismo de
1994, provee información concerniente a
la operación de su programa de atletismo
intercolegial. Un informe completo está
disponible para revisión pública en la
Oficina de Admisión, en la Biblioteca y en el
Departamento de Atletismo.
La Norma 3430 de la Junta Directiva del
College of Marin prohíbe el acoso verbal,
físico, visual y sexual de cualquier solicitante, empleado o estudiante de parte de
cualquier empleado del Distrito en base
a cualquier categoría o combinación de
categorías discriminatorias prohibidas por
ley estatal o federal. Se espera que, aunque
no sean empleados, las personas en la
propiedad del Distrito cumplan también con
estas normas.
Es además norma de este Distrito
asegurar la igualdad de oportunidades en
todos sus programas y en todos los aspectos
de empleo. La falta de destrezas en inglés
no será una barrera para la admisión y
participación en los programas de educación
vocacional.
Pueden producirse cambios sin previo
aviso
Las normas, directrices, disposiciones, procedimientos, honorarios, cursos, horarios
y servicios de los estudiantes descritos en
esta publicación están sujetos a cambio en
cualquier momento sin previo aviso. El
Colegio se reserva el derecho de modificar
los honorarios, declaraciones y procedimien-
13
tos contenidos en la presente. Los honorarios
y procedimientos están sujetos a cambio
en cualquier momento por la Legislatura
Estatal y el Consejo de Administración. Es
responsabilidad de los estudiantes cumplir
con los requistos del Colegio y mantenerse
informados de los mismos. Cuando se
produzcan cambios, los mismos estarán
incluidos en la siguiente publicación habitual
del Catálogo u Horario de Clases.
Igualdad de Oportunidad en Empleo / Oficial de
cumplimiento — Linda Beam
Decano Ejecutivo, Recursos Humanos (o designado)
Centro Administrativo, Campus Kentfield
415.485- 9504
Título IX / Sección 504 (Discapacidad) CoordinadorDirector de Asuntos Estudiantiles — Arnulfo Cedillo
Centro de Servicios Estudiantiles, Sala 251, Campus
Kentfield
415.485.9375
Género, Coordinador de Equidad — David Cook
Director de Ayuda Financiera
Centro de Servicios Estudiantiles, Sala 263, Campus
Kentfield
415.485.9409
Es la norma del College of Marin que, a
menos que sea eximido específicamente por
estatuto, cada curso, sección de curso o clase,
cuya asistencia debe ser comunicada para
ayuda estatal, estará totalmente abierto para
la matriculación y participación de cualquier
persona que haya sido admitida al College
y que satisfaga los requisitos previos que
puedan haber sido establecidos de acuerdo al
Capítulo II, División 2, Parte VI, Título 5 del
Código de California.
Números de Teléfono Importantes
Solicite una persona que hable español Ingresos y
records
457-8811, ext. 7722
Orientación psicopedagógica
485-9432
Inglés como Segunda Lengua (ESL)
485-9642
Policía (emergencia)
911
14
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MARIN.EDU
SECTION 2
ADMISSIONS, REGISTRATION,
AND ACADEMIC INFORMATION
16
Admissions Information
ADMISSIONS
INFORMATION
The College Serves Students of All Ages
ADMISSIONS POLICY
(Credit Classes)
College of Marin has an open admissions
policy. Eligibility to attend is satisfied if
you have met at least one of the following
requirements:
• You are 18 years old on or before the first
day of instruction for the term which you
are applying.
• You are a high school graduate.
• You are the equivalent of a high school
graduate, i.e., you have passed the G.E.D.
or a state’s high school proficiency
examination.
Note: The above requirements are general;
other factors may determine eligibility.
Contact the Office of Admissions and
Records at (415) 457-8811 ext. 8822 for more
information, or visit our Web site at http://
www.marin.edu.
ADMISSION AS A CONCURRENTLY
ENROLLED HIGH, MIDDLE OR
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENT
College of Marin welcomes students under
the age of 18 years and attending high school
to enroll in courses of advanced scholastic
and vocational programs. Courses which
students have elected to use as high, middle
or elementary school credit will also be
counted, where applicable, toward the Associate Degree or Certificate requirements.
For more information please contact the
Office of Admissions and Records at
(415) 457-8811 ext. 8822.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSIONS
International students seeking admissions to
College of Marin must provide the following:
1. If native language is not English, provide
evidence of English proficiency.
a. Applicants living outside the San
Francisco Bay Area must provide an
acceptable score on the TOEFL (Test
of English as a Foreign Language) of
500 on the written test, 173 on the
computer test, or 61 on the Internetbased test.
b. Students living within the San
Francisco Bay Area may take College
MARIN.EDU
of Marin’s TOEFL Test in lieu of the
official TOEFL. Please call (415) 4859469 for dates and times of testing.
(Institutional TOEFLs from other
schools will not be accepted.)
2. Verify means of adequate financial
support by completing the “Official
Certification of Personal or Family
Funds” form.
3. Submit $50 Application Processing Fee
(non-refundable). The amount must be in
U.S. dollars (no cash please). Make check
or money order payable to “College of
Marin.”
4. Provide an “Enrollment Status Form”
completed by the last school attended in
the United States.
5. Provide evidence of high school graduation and transcripts from all colleges/
universities attended in the United States.
6. Completed International Student Admissions Application.
International students are subject to
$198 per unit international student tuition
fee, an enrollment fee of $26 per unit, a $50
international student admissions application
fee, a health fee of $15 for fall and spring
semesters or $12 for the summer session, and
a $3 student representation fee. All fees must
be paid in full at the time of registration.
International student admissions applications and all other required documents will
be accepted February through the end of
July. All documents submitted after the end
of July will not be accepted.
STUDENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER
Students will be assigned a College of
Marin Identification Number. Students are
requested to disclose their Social Security
Number for purposes of printing the SSN
on their 1098 T tax credit form and their
official academic transcript. Please note;
students applying for Federal and/or state
financial assistance and students employed
by the college must report their SSN on their
Application for Admissions.
RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS
California Residence
Under the State of California Education
Code, to establish California residency, a
person must pair his or her physical presence
in California with the following provisions:
• Objective proof of physical presence one
year and one day prior to the first day of
instruction for the term for which he/she
has applied as indicated in the Schedule
of Important Dates and,
• Intent to make California the home for
other than a temporary purpose.
There are other factors to be considered
for non-resident students holding various
types of visas. These students are advised
to contact the Office of Admissions and
Records at (415) 457-8811 ext. 8822 for
clarification. Evidence of intent to make
California their home for other than a
temporary purpose could include but is
not limited to a minimum of two (2) of the
following:
• Voting in California elections.
• Obtaining a California driver’s license.
• Paying state income tax.
• Registering a motor vehicle in California.
• Maintaining continuous residence in
California.
Act of intent must be accomplished for
one full year.
College of Marin may determine at the
time of admission or at a later date that such
students may not have met the aforementioned residence requirements set forth for
all California community colleges. Such
students will subsequently be assessed and
billed the nonresident tuition fee per unit at
the current academic year rate.
Students who have not reached the age
of 18 years are regarded as minors; their
residence is that of one or both parents.
Therefore, a student who is a minor is
regarded as a resident of California only if
one or both parents couple their physical
presence in California one year and one day
prior to the first day of instruction for the
term for which the minor has applied with
the objective evidence that physical presence
is with the intent to make California the
home for other than a temporary purpose.
Special residence regulations are in
effect for married minors, for minors whose
parents are deceased, for certain military
members and their dependents, and for
various others.
Continuing nonresident students at
College of Marin (with the exception of
international students), who think that
they meet the time and intent requirements
necessary to establish California residency
must contact the Office of Admissions
and Records for residency verification and
adjustments.
Admissions Information
CATALOG 2010/11
Residency Adjustments
Residency adjustments are not automatic.
It is the student’s responsibility to initiate
a residency inquiry and to provide proof of
California residency.
Residency Appeals
Students may appeal their residency status as
determined by College of Marin through the
following procedures:
• Requests must be addressed, in writing,
to the Dean of Enrollment Services,
within two weeks of receipt of the notification.
• If further review is required, a meeting
with the Dean of Enrollment Services
may be requested.
• Students are required to provide ALL
documents required to verify their
residency status.
Nonresident Tuition Waiver under AB540
As a nonresident, you may be eligible to pay
the $26 per unit California resident enrollment fee.
What is AB540? AB540 is a state law that
exempts certain students who are not residents of California from paying non-resident
tuition at the California Community
Colleges, California State Universities and
Universities of California.
Who is eligible? Students who meet all of
the following requirements:
1. You attended a California high school for
three or more years.
2. You graduated from a California high
school or attained the equivalent of a high
school diploma from California (e.g.,
G.E.D. or California Proficiency Exam).
3. You registered in the spring of 2002 or
later.
4. You complete a California Nonresident
Tuition Exemption form.
If you have been determined to be a
nonresident of California and meet all of the
above requirements please contact the Office
of Admissions and Records and complete
the short and easy California Nonresident
Tuition Exemption form. The Admissions
and Records staff is here to assist you.
PREREQUISITES, COREQUISITES, AND
ADVISORIES
College of Marin affirms that students are
entitled to pursue intellectual, physical,
social, ethical, and career development, and
that prerequisites, corequisites, advisories,
and certain enrollment limits should be
established only on a course-by-course basis,
only where they are appropriate, and never
if they constitute unjustifiable obstacles to
student access. Therefore, College of Marin
adopts the following policy in order to
provide for the establishing, reviewing, and
challenging of these course requirements
in a manner consistent with law, safety, and
good practice.
Definitions
1. Prerequisite: A prerequisite is a condition
of enrollment that a student is required
to meet in order to demonstrate current
readiness for enrollment in a particular
course or program. Examples of courses
that may require prerequisites are:
a. Courses for which specific prerequisites have been justified by content review, the appropriate level of scrutiny
and any other validation procedures
required by law (Title 5, 55201 a-f);
17
a. Courses that require public performance or competition;
b. Blocks of courses for which enrollment is limited in order to create a
cohort of students.
The college requires students to complete
prerequisites with a grade of C or higher
prior to registering in the course requiring
the prerequisite. Likewise, students are to
register in all required corequisites as preenrollment preparation.
Note: Some prerequisites may be satisfied
by equivalent course work from an accredited institution other than College of
Marin. Please contact a counselor at
(415) 485-9432 for more information.
b. Sequential courses in a degreeapplicable program;
Students have the right to challenge
prerequisites and corequisites on certain,
specified grounds:
1. The prerequisite or corequisite has not
been established in accordance with
the district’s process for establishing
prerequisites and corequisites.
c. Courses requiring a prerequisite to
transfer to a four-year college;
2. The prerequisite or corequisite is in violation of Title 5 regulations.
d. Courses requiring preparation to
protect health and safety; and
3. The prerequisite or corequisite is either
unlawfully discriminatory or is being
applied in an unlawfully discriminatory
manner.
e. Technical or vocational courses or
programs that require special preparation.
IMPORTANT: College of Marin will
not grant credit for a prerequisite
course that was taken and passed after
the next course in a sequence of course
was taken and passed. (e.g., A student
enrolls in Spanish 101 and passes it with
a satisfactory grade after being enrolled
in Spanish 102 and passing it. Credit for
Spanish 101 will not be granted.)
2. Corequisite: A corequisite is a condition
of enrollment consisting of a course that
a student is required to take simultaneously in order to enroll in another course.
Courses that may require corequisites
include:
a. Courses that are part of a closely
related lecture-laboratory pairing
requiring concurrent enrollment.
3. Advisory: An advisory is a condition
of enrollment that a student is advised,
but not required, to meet before or in
conjunction with enrollment in a course
or educational program.
4. Limitations to Enrollment: Other limitations on enrollment may include:
4. The student has the knowledge or ability
to succeed in the course or program
despite not meeting the prerequisite or
corequisite.
5. The student will be subject to undue
delay in attaining the goal of his or her
educational plan because the prerequisite
or corequisite course has not been made
reasonably available.
Students interested in challenging a
prerequisite or corequisite course are advised
to contact the Challenge Office at
(415) 485-9431 as soon as possible for more
information about the challenge procedure
and the particular requirements of the
course being challenged.
Prerequisite/corequisite challenges
must be initiated no later than five working
days prior to the first day of classes each
semester.
Course Substitution
Substitution for any required course must
be approved through student petition to
the Academic Standards Committee. An
official transcript and catalog description
must accompany the petition. For noncomparable courses, Department Chairs will
18
Admissions Information
be consulted to determine course acceptability. Students should be encouraged to
request substitution in their first semester of
attendance.
PETITION FOR SUBSTITUTION OF
PREREQUISITE COURSES FOR COLLEGE OF
MARIN REGISTERED NURSING PROGRAM
If prerequisite courses were taken at other
colleges, College of Marin must first determine for itself whether those courses are
suitable substitutes for the College of Marin
prerequisite courses. This process requires
the student to petition the College to accept
courses taken elsewhere as satisfying
College of Marin prerequisites. Additional
time is needed for the college to make these
assessments. Therefore, students hoping to
substitute courses taken at other colleges for
College of Marin prerequisite courses must
plan for additional time to allow the college
to assess their applications.
Petitions for Substitution must be submitted before applying to the Nursing Program.
It is the student’s responsibility to request
official transcripts and course descriptions
for the year the course was completed and
attach catalog course descriptions to the p
etition. Official transcripts must be mailed
directly from the issuing college to College
of Marin, Counseling Department, Kentfield, CA 94904 between September 1 and
October 31 for admission the following fall.
Those who submit the Petition for Substitution after October 31 are not guaranteed a
decision in time for the RN application date.
The Petition for Substitution will then be
submitted and reviewed by Admissions and
Records (Academic Standards Committee).
The original approved/denied copy will be
kept in the student file in the Counseling
Office and a copy of the petition will be sent
to the student.
Students who successfully petition for
substitution must attach a copy of the approval of their petition to their Application
for the Nursing Program.
REGISTRATION
INFORMATION
REGISTRATION PRIORITY
The order of priority for registration is as
follows:
1. All continuing EOPS, DSPS, and
CalWORKs students; veteran students;
and student athletes.
MARIN.EDU
2. All continuing students who have
completed three or more semesters with
the college.
4. Students who present sufficient evidence
demonstrating that their prior learning is
equivalent to number 1 or 2 above.
3. All continuing students who have
completed two semesters with the college
and recent high school graduates.
Students not required to participate are
welcome to attend.
4. All continuing students who have completed one semester with the college.
5. New and returning students.
6. Concurrently enrolled high, middle and
elementary school students.
WHERE TO REGISTER
Students may register online at http://mycom.marin.edu, at the Offices of Admissions
and Records at the Kentfield or Indian
Valley Campuses regardless of where their
classes are held, or by fax at (415) 460-0776.
Detailed information is published in each
issue of the schedule of credit and noncredit
classes.
STUDENT SUCCESS WORKSHOP
In order to help students reach their
educational goal, College of Marin has
established an online orientation and an
on-campus Student Success Workshop. The
purpose of the orientation and workshop
is to help prepare students to be successful
at College of Marin. Students can use the
online orientation or attend the on-campus
workshop.
After completion of the online orientation or the on-campus Student Success
Workshop, students will take placement tests
and follow-up with a counseling appointment. Students can then register for classes.
Who Needs to Attend the Student Success
Workshop?
All new, returning, or transfer students
are required to participate before they can
register for classes unless they fall into one of
the following categories:
1. Students who have completed 15 or more
semester units or 22 or more quarter
units at any college.
2. Students who already have an Associate
in Arts (AA) or Associate in Science (AS)
degree or higher.
3. Students who are planning to enroll in
courses that require no reading, writing,
or math. (A list of these classes is available from the offices of Counseling or
the offices of Admissions and Records on
both campuses.)
CLASSES WITH TIME CONFLICTS
Students may not register for courses taught
at conflicting times.
ADDING AND DROPPING CLASSES
Students may add a class online at
http://mycom.marin.edu, by fax, or by
completing an Enrollment Card and filing it
in person with the Office of Admissions and
Records before classes begin.
Students who did not pre-register for
classes may attend the class of their choice
to see if space is available. Instructors may
admit students by issuing an Add Authorization Code which will be used to enroll online
or inperson.
Students may drop/withdraw online or
by completing a Drop Card and filing it with
the Office of Admissions and Records.
See Schedule of Important Dates on
pages page 8 andpage 9 for drop/withdrawal
deadline dates.
Nonattendance does not constitute an
automatic drop. If you are unable to attend
the first class meeting, you may request
that your place be held by contacting the
instructor prior to the first class meeting.
Instructors may drop/withdraw students
who have not been attending regularly by
submitting a Drop Card or by assigning an
Instructor Withdrawal at midterm. However
it is the student’s responsibility to drop/withdraw within the published deadline dates.
PETITION TO ADD A CLASS LATE
Students may petition to add a class late for
two weeks after the last day to add full-term
classes. Please see Schedule of Important
Dates on pagespage 8 andpage 9.
CANCELLATION OF PROGRAMS/CLASSES
Programs of study and/or individual classes
are subject to cancellation based on funding
considerations or enrollment levels.
UNIT LOAD
Students may not enroll in more than 18
units for fall or spring or seven units (two
classes) for summer. Students who wish
more units must submit a Petition to Carry
Extra Units by the deadline. Students on
probation, dismissal or not high school
graduates may have lower unit restrictions.
Fees
CATALOG 2010/11
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
The Marin Community College District is
committed by policy not to discriminate on
the basis of, or the perception of any one or
more of the foregoing characteristics: race,
religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability,
mental condition, marital status, sex, age,
sexual orientation, or veteran status in any
of its educational and employment programs
and activities, its practices and procedures.
Students who believe that this policy has
been violated have the right to file an
internal complaint or a complaint with the
Office of Civil Rights.
The Marin Community College District
makes every attempt to stay in compliance
with the requirements of Title IX of the 1972
Education Amendments, the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972 (Title VII of
the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended), the
Civil Rights Act of 1991, and Section 504 of
the Rehabilitation Act of 1974, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the California
Fair Employment and Housing Act of 1980,
the California Fair Employment and Housing Commission rules and regulations, and
the Vietnam Veteran’s Readjustment Act of
1974.
College of Marin, under the Equity in
Athletics Disclosure Act of 1994, provides
information concerning the operation of
its intercollegiate athletics program. A
completed report is available in the Admissions and Records Office, the Library, and
the Athletic Department for Public Review.
College of Marin Board Policy 3430
prohibits verbal, physical, visual, and sexual
harassment of any applicant, employee, or
student by any District employee on the
basis of any category or combination of
discriminatory categories prohibited by state
or federal law. Non employees while on the
District property are also expected to follow
these guidelines.
It is further the policy of this District to
ensure equal opportunity in all of its programs and in all aspects of employment. The
lack of English skills will not be a barrier to
admission to and participation in vocational
education programs.
CONTACTS
Equal Opportunity Employment/A.D.A. Compliance
Officer-Linda Beam
Executive Dean, Human Resources (or Designee)
Administrative Center, Kentfield Campus
(415) 485-9504
Title IX/Section 504 (Disability) Coordinator-Director
of Student Affairs-Arnulfo Cedillo
SS Center, Rm. 251, Kentfield Campus
(415) 485-9375
Gender, Equity Coordinator-David Cook
Director of Financial Aid
SS Center, Rm. 263, Kentfield Campus
(415) 485-9504
It is the policy of College of Marin that
unless specifically exempted by statute, every
course, course section or class, the attendance of which is to be reported for state
aid, shall be fully open to enrollment and
participation by any person who has been
admitted to the college and who meets such
prerequisites as may be established pursuant
to Chapter II, Division 2, Part VI, Title 5 of
the California Code.
FEES
FEE TYPES AND AMOUNTS
College of Marin is part of the California
Community Colleges system of the State of
California. Fees are established by the State
Legislature.
REGISTRATION FEES
Enrollment Fee
$26 per unit
Health Fee
$15, $12 summer
International Student Application Fee
(nonrefundable) $50
Materials Fee (payable when applicable at time of
registration)
Varies
Nonresident Tuition Fee (U.S. Citizen)
$194 per unit
Nonresident Tuition Fee (Non-U.S. Citizen) $198 per unit
Student Representation Fee (optional)
$1
Student Activities Fee (optional)
$8
FEES FOR OTHER SERVICES
Career Assessment Administration Fee
$40
Credit By Examination
$26 per unit
Document/Verification Fee
$6
Library Replacement Fee
$2
Parking Fee Per Semester $50/semester, $3 per day
$25 /summer
Refund Processing Fee
$10
Returned Check/Declined VISA/MasterCard Fee
$15
Rush Transcript Fee (next workday)
$15
Service Fee (for processing refunds and deferred fees for
dropped classes)
$10
Transcript Fee (first 2 copies ever ordered are free)
$6
Note: Fees are subject to change without
notice.
Student Representation Fee
Money collected for the Student Representation Fee shall be expended to provide sup-
19
port for students or representatives who may
be stating their positions and viewpoints
before city, county and district governments
and before offices and agencies of the state
and federal governments.
Student Representation Fee Waiver
Students have the right to decline to pay the
Student Representation Fee for religious,
political, moral, or financial reasons by
completing a “Student Representation Fee
Waiver” form and submitting it to the Office
of Admissions and Records within two
weeks of the start of instruction for the term.
The form may be downloaded at http://www.
marin.edu/admissions/.
Student Activities Fee
Money collected for the Student Activities
Fee will be used to sponsor educational and
social events for the campus community and
support campus activities and intercollegiate
athletics. This fee will be assessed upon
Board approval, Spring 2011.
Student Activities Fee Waiver
Students have the right to decline to pay
the Student Activities Fee by completing a
“Student Activities Fee Waiver” form and
submitting it to the Office of Admissions
and Records within two weeks of the start
of instruction for the term. The form may be
downloaded at http://ww.marin.edu/admissions/.
Payment Policy
Full Payment of Enrollment Fees, nonresident tuition, international tuition, health
fees and all other applicable fees are due at
the time of registration. Students wishing
not to pay all their fees at the time of registration must choose to participate in College
of Marin’s payment plan.
Students who have HOLDS on their records from previous terms will be restricted
from registering, adding, dropping/withdrawing from classes, accessing transcripts,
diplomas, certificates and other services. All
these privileges will be restored once all fees
are paid in full.
Payment Methods
Payments may be made with a MC/VISA
credit card or MC/VISA debit card online at
http://mycom.marin.edu or by check, cash or
cashier’s check.
20
Refunds
REFUNDS
Enrollment Fees, Nonresident and
International Student Tuition Refunds
Enrollment fees, nonresident and international student tuition may be refundable
for full-semester courses and short-term
courses. The refund policy also applies to
summer terms. Please see the Schedule of
Important Dates on pagespage 8 andpage 9
in this catalog for specific deadline dates.
A listing of short-term refund deadlines is
published in each schedule of classes.
Materials Fees
Provided that no materials have been used,
refund of materials fee will be granted
through Friday of the second week of classes
or, for short-term classes and summer session, before completion of 10 percent of the
length of the course.
Refund Procedures:
Refunds are not automatic. To obtain a
refund for courses dropped on or before the
published deadline dates, the student must
submit a completed “Refund Request” form
to the Office of Admissions and Records no
later than the last day of final examinations.
Refund procedures also apply to summer
sessions. Forms may be downloaded at
http://marin.edu/admissions/.
Parking Permit Refunds
The College of Marin upon the request of the
student will grant a parking permit refund
under the following conditions:
• The College of Marin has canceled a
course for which the student was enrolled
and the student has no other enrollment for the term in credit, noncredit,
community education or emeritus college
courses.
• The student has dropped all courses on
or before the last day to qualify for an
enrollment/tuition fee refund for fullsemester classes.
• The student has dropped all courses by 10
percent of the number of days the classes
meets for short-term classes, noncredit,
community education or emeritus college
classes.
Parking Permit Refund Requests
Students Requesting a parking permit
refund must comply with the following
procedures:
1. Complete and submit a Parking Permit
Refund Request form to the Office of
Admissions and Records.
MARIN.EDU
2. Submit the Parking Permit sticker along
with the Parking Permit Refund Request
form.
Student Health Fee Refund
The student health fee is nonrefundable
unless the college took action to cancel a
class and there is no other credit enrollment
on the student’s record for the term.
Refund Service Fee
A $10 per semester refund service fee and
any outstanding balance due the college will
be deducted from all refunds. No refund
service fee is charged if the class is cancelled
by the college.
Military Withdrawal
Upon verification that a student was a
member of an active or reserve military
service unit who received orders compelling
a withdrawal from courses, withdrawal with
no W grade will be allowed. Upon petition
by the affected student, a refund of the entire
enrollment/health fee will be authorized.
FEE WAIVERS/TAX CREDITS
Board of Governors
The California Community Colleges Board
of Governors provides a waiver of enrollment and health fees for students who meet
the State of California residency requirement
and one or more of the following criteria:
1. Student or student’s family receives
AFDC, SSI, or General Assistance
benefits.
2. 2009 income was below the following
limits (includes taxable and nontaxable
income)
a. Family size = 1/income under
$16, 245.
b. Family size = 2/income under
$21,855.
c. Add $5,610 for each additional
dependent.
3. Student files Financial Aid Application
and is determined eligible by the Financial Aid Office. Contact the Financial Aid
Office at (415) 485-9409 for additional
information.
NOTE: The above information is subject to
change in the event of new state regulations.
Veterans or Dependents of Disabled/
Deceased Veterans Educational Benefits
The VA toll-free number is 1(800) 827-1000.
Education and Benefit Services: http://www.
gibill.VA.gov
College of Marin is approved as an educational facility for veterans and their dependents. Eligible veterans and their dependents
are certified by the Designated School
Official after the student has completed and
returned the “Veteran Application Packet”
(available from the Office of Admissions and
Records) and have met with the designated
college veteran’s counselor.
Dependent of Veterans College Fee Waiver
Program (66025.3)
The State of California offers a “College
Fee Waiver Program” to children and
dependents of service-connected disabled
or service-related deceased veterans. This
program is administered by the California
Department of Veterans Affairs (listed in the
Government section of the telephone book
under County Government Offices).
Tax Credit
In accordance with federal tax credit legislation, College of Marin will mail a verification 1098T form at the end of January to
each student registered at least half time on
census day and who has paid their registration fees.
Please check with your tax preparer to determine if you are eligible to take advantage
of this credit.
If you are entitled to this deduction, it is
important that the college have your current
address. If you have moved, you need to
complete a green change form with the
Office of Admissions and Records.
The Social Security numbers of students
who have chosen an assigned identification
number will not be printed on the 1098T. If
you wish to change from an assigned identification number to your Social Security
number, you may also do this by completing
the green change form with the Office of
Admissions and Records.
FINANCIAL AID
College of Marin offers student financial
aid assistance to all students who qualify on
the basis of financial need. Eligible students
receive funds in the form of grants, scholarships, loans, and/or workstudy programs.
ELIGIBILITY
To be eligible for federal financial aid
programs, a student must:
Financial Aid
CATALOG 2010/11
1. Be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident, or
eligible noncitizen.
2. Be in compliance with U.S. Selective
Service registration regulations.
3. Have a high school diploma, G.E.D. certificate, or state equivalency credential,
pass the required Ability to Benefit test,
or have completed six units of collegelevel coursework.
4. Be enrolled in a program leading to a
degree, certificate, or transfer to a fouryear college or university.
5. Maintain satisfactory academic progress
according to the policies of the Office
of Admissions and Records and the
Financial Aid Office.
DETERMINATION OF NEED
Generally, financial need is determined
by calculating the difference between a
student’s resources and expected expenses.
For students who do not meet the criteria to
be considered independent, parents’ income
and assets are included in the calculation
of resources. Students with exceptional
circumstances should consult with the
Financial Aid Office.
Need Equals Expenses Minus Resources
EXPENSES include tuition, books, fees, and
standard allowances for transportation,
rent, food, and some other living expenses.
(Standard student budget amounts are
available from the Financial Aid Office.)
RESOURCES are defined as expected contributions from income and assets as calculated
by the federal need analysis formula.
APPLICATION PROCEDURE
The application form is the Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and is
available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Follow
the directions carefully. The Financial Aid
Office often requires additional documents
to verify or explain the information submitted on the FAFSA form. When a student’s
file is complete, it is reviewed for eligibility
for financial aid programs and an award
letter is sent to the student.
Application forms are available in
January for the following fall and spring
semesters and must be submitted by March
1 for the following programs for priority
consideration.
1. College of Marin Foundation, scholarship
application.
2. Cal Grant A, B, and C.
3. Priority filing deadline for students
transferring to four-year colleges and
universities.
4. 10,000 Degrees Grants (formerly Marin
Education Fund) deadline.
AVAILABLE PROGRAMS
Federal Grants
1. Pell Grants: Pell Grant eligibility is based
on the Student Aid Report (SAR) the
student receives after filing the FAFSA
form. Grants range from $400 - $5,550
per year and are prorated according
to the number of credits in which the
student is enrolled. (Amounts are subject
to changes in federal legislation.)
2. Supplemental Education Opportunity
Grant (SEOG): SEOG grants are awarded
to Pell Grant recipients with the least
amount of financial resources. Grants
range from $400-$2,000 per year.
State Grants
1. Extended Opportunity Programs &
Services (EOPS) Grants: The EOPS Office
offers book grants to qualified students.
Students must be full-time and qualify
for a BOGW-A or a BOGW-B fee waiver.
Information on other criteria can be
obtained from the EOPS Office.
2. Board of Governors’ Waiver (BOGW):
The State of California provides waivers
of tuition for students who are recipients
of SSI, General Relief or TANF, or meet
certain income criteria or qualify on the
basis of financial need. (See Enrollment
Fee Waivers.)
3. Cal Grants: The State of California provides grants ranging from $530 - $1550
per semester for students who qualify. Cal
Grant B provides funds to exceptionally
needy students. Cal Grant C provides
funds to students in certificate vocational
programs. Cal Grant A is designed for
students who intend to transfer and will
cover a portion of tuition and fees once
the student transfers to a four-year college
or university.
Community Grants
10,000 Degrees Grants (formerly Marin
Education Fund): The Buck Trust established
the Marin Education Fund to provide funds
for the education of Marin County residents. Grants ranging from $400 - $4,000
are awarded to students who meet county
residency requirements and financial need
criteria. The 10,000 Degrees application form
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must be filed by March 1 to be considered for
the following fall and spring semesters.
EMPLOYMENT
1. College Work-Study Program: Federally
funded part-time jobs are available on
campus and off campus for students who
have financial need and are awarded a
work-study job. Available jobs are posted
at the Financial Aid Office. Salaries range
according to the requirements of the
position.
2. Student Employment: The College Job
Placement Office maintains up-to-date
listings of jobs within the community.
Many jobs are career-related and provide
students with excellent work experience.
Salaries are determined by the employer.
STUDENT LOANS
1. Emergency Loans: The College of Marin
Foundation and the Associated Students
of the College of Marin provide Emergency Loan funds. This program provides
30-day loans of up to $100.
2. Federal Stafford Subsidized Loans
(formerly Guaranteed Student Loans)
provide deferred-payment, low-interest
loans for qualified students. Principal
and interest are deferred until six months
after the student is no longer enrolled at
least half time. Students must apply for
financial aid and qualify on the basis of
financial need. Federal Unsubsidized
Stafford Loans provide low-interest loans
for students who do not meet financial
need criteria for Federal Stafford Loans.
Principal is deferred during enrollment
as at least a half-time student. Interest
begins accruing when loan is borrowed.
Students interested in federal student
loans must make a loan counseling appointment with the Financial Aid Office.
SCHOLARSHIPS
In May, students with outstanding academic
records and financial need are awarded
scholarships from the College of Marin
Foundation and from an increasing number
of community groups. Applications are
available in January with a deadline of
March 1 and are awarded each year in May.
A free computerized scholarship search
program is available online at www.
FastWeb.com.
The Financial Aid Office maintains
information about other scholarship opportunities and helps students make proper and
22
Financial Aid
timely applications for such funds. Students
should inform their counselors of possible
financial need and review bulletin boards for
notices of scholarship announcements.
Phone: (415) 485-9409
Military Fee Exemption
Dependents of deceased/disabled veterans
(with an eligibility letter) will only be
charged materials fees.
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
MARIN.EDU
GRADING SYMBOLS, DEFINITIONS AND
GRADE POINTS
SYMBOL DEFINITION
A
Excellent
B
Good
C
Satisfactory
D
Passing, less than Satisfactory
F
Failing
P
Pass (at least satisfactory — C grade; units
awarded, but not used to calculate GPA)
NP
No Pass (less than satisfactory or failing;
used to determine progress probation and
dismissal, but not to calculate GPA)
I
Incomplete (used to determine progress
probation and dismissal, but not to calculate
GPA)
IP
In Progress (not used to determine progress
probation or dismissal, or to calculate GPA)
RD
Report Delayed (not used to determine
progress probation or dismissal, or to
calculate GPA)
W
Withdrawal (used to determine progress
probation and dismissal but not to calculate
GPA)
FW
Failing for nonattendance withdrawal (used
to determine academic probation and
dismissal)
MW
Military Withdrawal
ATTENDANCE
Regular attendance is necessary for satisfactory progress in college. Failure to attend
regularly may result in a failing grade.
Students who are late in attending the first
class meeting may lose their place to another
student on the waiting list. For any absence,
the student must make up all work missed.
Such work must be completed to the satisfaction of the instructor. It is the student’s
responsibility to check on all assignments.
Students may be dropped from classes as a
result of excessive absences.
Nonattendance does not constitute a
drop. Students must submit a drop card for
any class they do not wish to continue.
UNITS OF CREDIT
The conventional measurement of college
work is called a unit. It represents one lecture
hour per week for one semester (together
with two hours of preparation outside class)
or three hours of laboratory work per week
for one semester.
Full-time students are enrolled in at least
12 units in the spring and fall and four units
in the summer.
COURSES USED FOR HIGH, MIDDLE AND
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CREDIT
College-level course work that students have
elected to use for high, middle and elementary school credit will also be counted, when
applicable, toward the degree or certificate
requirements and will be given as college
credit.
Concurrently enrolled high, middle and
elementary school students are restricted
from physical education classes and remedial classes numbered below 100.
Grade Points
Each letter grade has the following point
assignment for each unit:
A
A-
B+
B
B-
C+
C
D+
D
D-
F+
F
FW =
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
4.0
3.7
3.3
3.0
2.7
2.3
2.0
1.3
1.0
0.7
0.3
0.0
0.0
Grade Point Average (GPA)
Divide the total grade points earned by the
number of units attempted. In calculating
GPA, do not include I, IP, W, P, NP, or nonprogress Grades (NPG) of I, NC, or W.
Consecutive Semesters
Semesters shall be considered consecutive
based on a student’s enrollment pattern.
Probation
A warning that a student’s grades do not
meet acceptable standards.
Dismissal
A student is not allowed to continue at the
college unless the student receives special
permission from the Dean of Enrollment
Services or the College Petitions Committee.
Midterm Grade
Midterm grades are available for students
online at http://mycom.marin.edu (check
calendar).
Final Grade
Enrollment, evaluation, and credit for
courses shall be entered on a student’s
official academic record in accordance with
college policy and state law. Final grades are
only available to students online at http://
mycom.marin.edu (check calendar).
Pass (P)/No Pass (NP)
Students who elect the Pass/No Pass grading
option in those courses which permit a
student to be evaluated either on a Pass/No
Pass or Letter Grade basis, must select that
option on or before 30 percent of the length
of the term for full-term and short term
courses. Check the Calendar of Important
Dates. Students may select the Pass/No Pass
grading option online at http://mycom.
marin.edu up to the first day of instruction
for the term. After the first day of instruction
for the term students must submit a Pass/
No Pass Grading Option form to the Office
of Admissions and Records. A student may
change his/her selection within this 30
percent time period. Once this time period
has expired a student may not change his/
her selection. To receive a pass grade, course
work must be C level or above. Some colleges
and universities will not grant transfer credit
for courses with Pass/No Pass grades.
Note: The Pass/No Pass grading option
is the sole responsibility of the student.
Check the Calendar of Important Dates for
the deadline for full-term classes and the
Schedule of Classes for the deadline dates
for short-term classes.
Incomplete Grades
An Incomplete grade may be assigned to a
student who cannot complete a small portion of the required academic work because
of a justifiable emergency or unforeseeable
reason at the end of the semester. The decision to give an Incomplete rests solely with
the instructor. A student who receives an
Incomplete grade must make arrangements
with the instructor and must make up the
work by the last day of final examinations
in the following semester. In extenuating
circumstances, and with the instructor’s
approval, the student may petition for an
extension of not more than one additional
semester.
The instructor for the class shall submit
a form to the Office of Admissions and
Financial Aid
CATALOG 2010/11
Records, with a copy to be mailed to the student, stating the conditions for completing
the work and the final grade to be assigned
if the work is not completed. The instructor
shall submit a change of grade form when
the work is completed. If the I is not removed
by the end of the subsequent semester, and
no extension has been granted, it shall be
changed to the grade originally assigned by
the instructor.
In Progress Grades
The IP symbol is used when a class is
open-entry or extends beyond the normal
end of an academic term. IP indicates that
work is “in progress.” The IP symbol shall
remain on the student’s permanent record.
The following semester, the appropriate
grade and unit credit shall be assigned by
the instructor when the course is completed.
An IP shall be recorded only once for any
given class. It shall not be used in calculating
grade point average or determining progress
probation. The instructor shall submit an
IP form that includes a final grade to be
posted if the student fails to re-enroll. A
student who receives an IP must re-enroll
for the course the subsequent semester and
complete the required work to achieve a
grade. If the student does not re-enroll in
the next regular semester, the student shall
receive the grade submitted on the IP form.
Students will be charged an enrollment fee
when they re-enroll.
Report Delayed Grade
The RD symbol may be assigned only by
the Office of Admissions and Records and
is used when there is a delay by the faculty
member in reporting the grade of a student.
RD shall be a temporary notation to be
replaced by a permanent symbol as soon as
possible. It shall not be used in calculating
grade point average or determining progress
probation/dismissal.
Withdrawal
Students may withdraw from classes
through the day that marks the completion
of 75 percent of the course. Students who do
not withdraw by this date will be assigned
a grade, other than W, by the instructor. It
is the student’s responsibility to withdraw
officially from a class. Students should not
assume that they will be automatically
withdrawn by an instructor.
Students who withdraw before completion of 30 percent of the course shall have no
notation made on their permanent records.
Students who withdraw between 30
percent of the course and 75 percent of the
course shall have a W recorded on their
permanent records.
In extenuating circumstances such as illness, accident, or other events outside of the
student’s control, the student may petition
the Dean of Enrollment Services for a W
grade after completion of 75 percent of the
course. After consultation with the appropriate faculty member, the Dean may authorize
withdrawal with a W grade. Should the
Dean deny the petition, the determination of
the student’s grade by the instructor shall be
final. Once a faculty member has submitted
a grade, a W cannot be assigned. Section
55760 of Title 5 of the California Code of
Regulations states that an instructor’s grade
is final in the absence of mistake, bad faith or
incompetency.
Successfully Completed
Successful completion of a course is defined
as receiving a grade of Pass (P), C or better.
NON-REPEATABLE COURSES
(SUBSTANDARD GRADES)
A student who receives a substandard grade
of D, F, FW, NP, or NC on the first attempt
of a non-repeatable course taken at College
of Marin, may repeat that course one more
time without a petition in an effort to successfully complete the course with a passing
grade.
• Upon successful completion of a repeated
course, the student may petition the
College Petitions Committee to have the
substandard grade excluded in computing the cumulative grade point average
or non-progress grades (NPG) percentage. (Refer to Course Lineout Policy for
procedure.)
After receiving two substandard grades
in a course, a student may petition the College Petitions Committee to repeat a course
for the third enrollment. For the petition to
be approved, the student is required to meet
with a counselor to complete the petition.
• With an approved petition, the student
must wait one week after the start of new
and returning student registration to
register for the course.
• Upon successful completion of the
repeated course, the student may petition
the College Petitions Committee to have
the two previous substandard grades
excluded in computing the cumulative
grade point average or non-progress
grades (NPG) percentage. (Refer to
Course Lineout Policy for procedure.)
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Courses granted Academic Renewal will
not be included for course repetition limits.
(See BP/AP 4240 titled Academic Renewal
for specific requirements)
Annotating the permanent academic
record shall be done in a manner that all
work remains legible, ensuring a true and
complete academic history.
NON-REPEATABLE COURSES
(WITHDRAWAL W SYMBOL)
Students who have received the W symbol
after withdrawing from a course may reenroll in the course without petition. After
receiving two W symbols in a given course,
a student may petition the College Petitions
Committee to repeat the course for a third
enrollment course providing verifiable documentation that extenuating circumstances
occurred. Extenuating circumstances are
verified cases of accidents, illnesses or other
circumstances beyond the control of the
student. The student is required to meet with
a counselor to complete the petition and all
supporting documents must be attached to
the petition at the time of submission.
• With an approved petition, the student
must wait one week after the start of new
and returning student registration to
register for the course.
Annotating the permanent academic
record shall be done in a manner that all
work remains legible, ensuring a true and
complete academic history
NON-REPEATABLE COURSES (ABSENT
SUBSTANDARD WORK)
Under the following circumstances, students
may repeat courses in which a C or better
grade was earned.
1. A Significant Lapse of Time: Students
may petition the College Petitions Committee to repeat a course based on one of
the following circumstances:
a. Two or more years have elapsed since
successfully completing the course.
b. Another institution of higher
education to which the student seeks
to transfer has established recency
requirements which the student will
not be able to satisfy without repeating
the course.
c. A recency prerequisite for a course or
program has been established which
the student will not be able to satisfy
without repeating the course.
24
Financial Aid
Under these provisions with an approved
petition:
d. Students must wait one week after the
start of new and returning student
registration to register for the course.
e. Student petitioning to repeat for either
(a) or (c) above are only allowed to
repeat the course one time.
f. Grades awarded shall not be counted
in a student’s grade point average.
2. Mandated Training: Students are allowed to repeat a course without petition
when repetition is necessary to enable
that student to meet a legally mandated
training requirement as a condition of
volunteer or paid employment. Students
can repeat such courses any number of
times, even if they received a grade of C
or better, however, the grade received by
the student each time will be included in
calculations of the student’s grade point
average or NPG percentage.
• Admissions and Records will maintain a list of courses that meet a legally
mandated training requirement.
Annotating the permanent academic
record shall be done in a manner that all
work remains legible, ensuring a true and
complete academic history.
REPEATABLE COURSES
1. Activity Courses: Students may repeat
courses that have been designated as
activity courses and where it is found
that the course content differs each
time it is offered to enhance the skills
and proficiency of the student. Activity
courses are defined as career-technical
courses where the content differs each
time the course is offered but the primary
educational activity remains the same.
Examples of activity courses include
physical education and courses in music,
fine arts, theater, and dance. Absent
substandard academic work, courses
may not be repeated for more than three
semesters including summers and intersessions to a maximum of four enrollments. Activity courses as listed above
may not be repeated under the significant
lapse of time provisions. Consult the
catalog to determine which courses are
designated as repeatable. Prior approval is
not required.
2. Courses for Students with Disabilities:
Students with disabilities can repeat a
special class for students with disabilities
MARIN.EDU
any number of times when an individualized determination verifies that such
repetition is required as a disabilityrelated accommodation.
Annotating the permanent academic
record shall be done in a manner that all
work remains legible, ensuring a true and
complete academic history.
BASIC SKILLS CLASSES
Students may enroll in a maximum of 30
units of Basic Skills classes (pre-collegiate
English and Mathematics) – courses
numbered 100 or lower. Students with
documented functional limitations associated with learning related disabilities, which
have shown significant measurable progress
toward appropriate skill development in
Basic Skills classes, may receive special
approval for additional enrollments but will
be limited to a specific period of time or
number of units. Students are encouraged to
contact the Disabled Students Program for
more information.
NOTE: There is no 30 unit limit for ESL
courses.
GRADE CHANGES
The instructor of a course shall determine
the grade to be awarded to each student.
The determination of the student’s grade
by the instructor is final in the absence of
mistake, fraud, bad faith or incompetency.
“Mistake” may include, but is not limited to,
errors made by an instructor in calculating
a student’s grade and clerical errors. “Fraud”
may include but is not limited to, intentional
inaccurate recording of a change of a grade
by any person who gains access to grade
records without authorization. Instructors
may choose to change a student’s grade by
submitting a Change of Grade form to the
Office of Admissions and Records stating
the reason for the change. No grade change
will be made more than two years after the
original grade was issued.
Please consult with the Dean of Student
Development and Special Services for
specific administrative procedures relating
to final grade disputes.
ACADEMIC RENEWAL
Academic Renewal provides students with
an opportunity to reverse the negative
impact of past academic failures at College of
Marin without course repetition. Academic
renewal may only be requested once at
any California Community College in
accordance with state regulation. Academic
renewal is not automatic. Academic renewal
actions are irreversible.
All course work granted academic
renewal status shall not be computed in the
student’s grade point average or non-progress grade percentage and this shall be noted
on the student’s permanent record.
All course work shall remain legible to
assure a true and complete academic history.
The Office of Admissions and Records shall
maintain a record of action taken under
academic renewal.
Academic Renewal does not guarantee
that other colleges/universities outside will
approve such action. The determination will
be made by the respective transfer institution.
Specific courses and/or categories of
course that are exempt from academic
renewal will be described the current College Catalog.
Academic Renewal procedures may
not conflict with the District’s obligation
to retain and destroy records or with the
instructor’s ability to determine a student’s
final grade.
Students may file a Petition for Academic
Renewal with the Office of Admissions and
Records under the following conditions:
1. Students must have achieved a 3.00 grade
point average (GPA) in 12 letter-graded
units or a 2.00 GPA in 24 letter-graded
units. These units must be earned
subsequent to any grade of D, F, NC or
NP. Work from other colleges with recognized accreditation may be considered.
2. A maximum of 24 units of substandard
course work may be eliminated from
consideration in the cumulative grade
point average. Substandard grades are
any grades lower than C, CR or P.
3. At least one year must have elapsed from
the time the substandard course work to
be removed was completed.
4. A student’s most recent semesters utilized
to demonstrate that the substandard work
is not a reflection of the student’s ability
must not include D, F, I or NC and NP
grades. (Semesters with lined-out D, F,
NC and NP grades do not count towards
Academic Renewal.)
5. Courses used to demonstrate improved
academic ability cannot be all physical
activity courses.
Probation
CATALOG 2010/11
EXAMINATIONS
Final examinations are held at fixed times.
Instructors are not to give examinations in
advance of the regular schedule. Any student
who is absent from any examination held at
any time during a semester thereby forfeits
any right to make up the work by re-examination. If a student is unable to be present
at an examination at the scheduled time due
to illness or some other unavoidable reason,
then the student may be permitted to take
the examination at a later date by arrangement with the instructor. The examination
must be made up by the last day of final
examinations the following semester.
HONOR LIST
Students will be placed on a semester honor
list when their semester GPA is 3.0 or higher.
These students may not be on probation or
have any I, NC, or F grades, and must be
enrolled in 12 units of letter-graded classes
at the college.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
Independent Study courses are designed for
independent motivated students to pursue
intellectual inquiry outside of regularly
scheduled course offerings. These are to be
supervised by instructors, generally involving substantial, student-instructor interaction. Each course shall be initiated on an
individual basis via an agreement between
the student and an instructor.
These courses are not designed to
substitute for other courses offered by the
academic departments.
Enrollment shall be through courses
numbered 249A (1 semester unit), 249B (2
semester units), and 249C (3 semester units).
One unit of credit requires a minimum of 48
hours of lecture, study or laboratory work
Academic Standards
Academic standards applicable to courses of
independent study shall be the same as those
applied to other credit courses as appropriate
at the District.
Procedures for Evaluation
Procedures for evaluation of student progress shall be in accordance with regulations
established by the District. A grade report by
an instructor on appropriate records bearing
the student’s name for purposes of state
apportionment shall certify the adequate
and proper progress toward accomplishment
of the course objectives is being maintained
by the student.
25
Availability of Instructor
Independent study students shall have access
to the instructor equivalent to access given
to students enrolled in course conducted by
other instructional methods, including office
hours.
Instructors are responsible for assisting
the student in developing the proposal,
granting instructor approval of the proposal,
assisting the student in the independent
study as necessary, evaluating the results of
the study, and submitting the final grade to
the Office of Admissions and Records.
Independent study courses may be
repeated more that once for credit provided
the same topic is not repeated. An independent study course cannot be used to satisfy
core requirements unless specified by the
department to a maximum of (3) units.
student’s recorded entries of W, I, NC, and
NP reaches or exceeds 50 percent of all units
in which a student has enrolled in at College
of Marin, he/she shall be placed on progress
probation at the end of the semester or
session.
At the end of the third semester in which
the student is on progress probation, a notice
that the student is subject to dismissal will
be sent to the student.
Procedures for Approval of Independent
Study
• Students must have completed 12 degree
applicable credit units.
• Students must be in good academic an
progress standing and have earned a
cumulative GPA of 2.0.
• The Independent Study Contract must be
completed by the student and approved
by the instructor and signed by the
department chairperson.
• The Independent Study Contracts must
be submitted to the Admissions and
Records Office by the add deadline.
Students are limited to one independent
study course per semester, six (6) units
of independent study per discipline, to a
maximum of twelve (12) units overall unless
specified by a department to obtain a local
certificate.
REMOVAL FROM PROBATION
STUDENT PETITIONS
Appeals and grievances in the following
areas should be submitted on a Student Petition at the Office of Admissions and Records
counter: Academic/Progress Dismissal,
Admission, Attendance, Graduation, Fee
Payment, Refund, Residence Determination,
and Student Records. All petitions are reviewed by the Dean of Enrollment Services.
PROBATION
PLACEMENT ON PROBATION
Progress Probation
After enrolling in at least 12 semester units
at College of Marin, if the percentage of a
Academic Probation
After attempting at least 12 semester units at
College of Marin, a student shall be placed
on academic probation at the end of the
semester or session in which the student’s
cumulative grade point average (GPA) falls
below 2.0 in all units enrolled in at College
of Marin.
Progress Probation
A student will be removed from progress
probation when the student’s cumulative
Non-progress Grade (NPG) drops below 50
percent.
Academic Probation
A student will be removed from academic
probation when the student’s cumulative
GPA reaches 2.0 or higher.
A student who is on academic probation
and earns a semester grade point of 1.75 or
better shall not be dismissed as long as this
minimum semester grade point average is
maintained.
Notification of Probation
Students will be notified of their probationary status prior to the start of the next
semester or session.
The notice will consist of, at the
minimum, the following: the significance
of being on probation, enrollment limits,
appeal procedures, and a description of the
support services and classes available to
prevent dismissal.
Enrollment Limits
Students on probation may not register in
more than 13 units total for that entire fall
or spring semester. For the summer session,
students may enroll in one class regardless
of the unit value or multiple classes not to
exceed 4 units.
For students who have exceeded the unit
limit and have not met the conditions to
appeal, as described in the Appeal Procedure
below, the student must drop the necessary
class(es) to comply with the notification. If
the student does not drop by the beginning
26
Advanced Placement/Academic Credit
of the semester or session, the College will
reduce the course load to meet the maximum units allowed by random selection.
Appeal Procedures
A student placed on probation may file a
petition with the Office of Admissions and
Records only if the student:
1. Believes an error has been made
2. Provides evidence of graduation or
transferring at the end of that semester.
3. Provides evidence that additional units
are needed to meet a legally mandated
training requirement.
Enrollment limits may not be appealed
beyond the College Petitions Committee.
DISMISSAL
Standards for Academic Dismissal
A student who is on academic probation
shall be subject to academic dismissal if the
student has less than a cumulative grade
point average of less than 1.75 in all units
attempted in three consecutive semesters
(not including summer).
Standards for Progress Dismissal
A student who is on progress probation
shall be subject to progress dismissal if the
percentage of units in which the student
has been enrolled for which entries of W, I,
NC or NP are recorded in three consecutive
semesters reaches or exceeds 50 percent.
Dismissal Letter
The letter notifying a student he/she is subject to academic and/or progress dismissal
will cover, at a minimum, reference to this
procedure, explanation of what academic
and progress dismissal means, procedure for
reinstatement, and procedure to appeal the
academic and progress dismissal notice.
Procedures for Filing the Petition to
Return After Dismissal
A student must file a Petition to Return
After Dismissal with the Office of Admissions and Records within two weeks of the
start of the fall and spring semester and
within one week of the start of a summer
session. As a condition to return, the student
must meet with a counselor to complete a
Student Educational Plan and all supporting
documents must accompany the Petition to
Return After Dismissal.
Standards for Evaluating the Petition to
Return After Dismissal
In considering whether or not students may
return after dismissal, the following criteria
should be considered.
• Documented extenuating circumstances.
• Marked improvement following the
semesters on which dismissal was based.
• Semesters on which dismissal action was
based were atypical of past academic
performance.
• Formal or informal educational experience since completion of semesters on
which dismissal was based.
• Improved GPA as a result of grade
changes, fulfillment of incomplete
courses, or academic renewal.
• GPA calculation error.
• Evidence that the posting of final grades
was in error which contributed tot he
academic and/or progress dismissal
action.
Within ten (10) working days from the date
the petition was submitted to Admissions
and Records for review, the student will be
notified in writing of the decision.
• If the Petition to Return After Dismissal
is approved, the student will be notified of the terms and conditions of the
petition and allowed to continue on
academic and\or progress probation for
an additional semester. At the end of that
semester, the student’s academic record
will be evaluated to determine whether
the student may be removed from
academic and\or progress probation,
should be dismissed, or should continue
on academic and/or progress probation.
• If the Petition to Return After Dismissal
is denied, the student will receive notification of the decision and procedures to
appeal the decision.
Appeal of Dismissal
The student has the right to appeal an
academic and/or progress dismissal action,
if the student can provide evidence that warrants a review do the dismissal action. The
student may appeal this decision by making
an appointment with the College Petitions
Committee within five (5) working days of
the postmark date of the notice of the denied
petition.
• If the student fails to make the appointment within the specified time, the
student waives all future rights to appeal
the dismissal action for that term.
• If the student makes an appointment, the
student will continue on academic and/
or progress dismissal until the student
meets with the College Petitions Committee. A decision to either uphold the
MARIN.EDU
original dismissal decision or approve the
appeal will be made at the conclusion of
the meeting. The decision of the College
Petitions Committee is final.
Standards for Evaluating Appeals
Dismissal appeals may be granted under the
following circumstances:
• If the dismissal determination is based
on the academic record for one semester
in which the record does not reflect the
student’s usual level of performance due
to accident, illness, or other circumstances beyond the control of the student.
Verification must be submitted with the
appeal.
• The student enrolls in a corrective
program designed to assist him/her
in improving academic skills, such as
obtaining academic counseling, and/or
limiting course load.
• Where there is evidence of significant
improvement in academic achievement.
ADVANCED
PLACEMENT/ACADEMIC
CREDIT
Advanced Placement (APT) scores
Please note that the APT scores for purposes
of transfer, specifically the IGETC, differ
from those used toward College of Marin
degree programs.
See chart on next page.
Advanced Placement/Academic Credit
CATALOG 2010/11
27
(AP) ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHART FOR COLLEGE OF MARIN CREDIT
College of Marin grants credit towards the Associate Degree with scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement Examinations offered by the
College Board. To receive credit, students must:
1. Have successfully completed 12 units of residency at College of Marin
2. Submit a Student Petition to Admissions and Records
3. Have an official copy of their College Board test scores forwarded to the Admissions and Records Office.
Credit will be awarded as shown in the chart below.
AP SUBJECT EXAMINATION
AP SCORE
COM GE AREA
UNITS
COURSE EQUIVALENT
Art History
3,4,5
Humanities
3
ART 101 or ART 102 or ART 103
Chemistry
Computer Science A/B
3
Natural Sciences
5
CHEM 114
4
Natural Sciences
5
CHEM 131
5
Natural Sciences
10
CHEM 131 and CHEM 132
3,4,5
Communication & Analytical Thinking
3
N/A
Economics
Macroeconomics
3,4,5
Social and Behavioral Sciences
3
N/A
Microeconomics
3,4,5
Social and Behavioral Sciences
3
N/A
English Language and Composition
3,4,5
Composition, Written
3
ENGL 150
SAT (old test)
600
N/A
N/A
Eligible for English 150
SAT (new test)
680
N/A
N/A
Eligible for English 150
Environmental Sciences
3,4,5
Natural Sciences
3
N/A
Government and Politics
Comparative
3,4,5
Social and Behavioral Sciences
3
N/A
Government and Politics — U.S.
3,4,5
(See Chart Note #1 below)
3
POLS 101
3,4,5
Humanities
3
N/A
Foreign Languages
Chinese
German
3,4,5
Humanities
3
N/A
Latin Literature or Latin: Virgil
3,4,5
Humanities
3
N/A
Language and Culture
French, Italian, Japanese
3
Humanities
5
FREN 102, ITAL 102, JPNS 102
French, Italian, Japanese
4
Humanities
5
FREN 203, ITAL 203, JPNS 203
French, Italian, Japanese
5
Humanities
5
FREN 204, ITAL 204, JPNS 204
Language or Literature
Spanish
3
Humanities
5
SPAN 102
Spanish
4
Humanities
5
SPAN 203
Spanish
5
Humanities
5
SPAN 204
History
European History
3,4,5
Social and Behavioral Sciences
3
N/A
United States History
3,4,5
(See Chart Note #2 below)
6
HIST 117 and 118
World History
3,4,5
Social and Behavioral Sciences
3
N/A
Human Geography
3,4,5
Social and Behavioral Sciences
3
N/A
Mathematics
Calculus AB
3
Communication and Analytical Thinking
3
Eligible for MATH 123
Calculus AB
4,5
Communication and Analytical Thinking
5
MATH 123
Calculus BC
3,4
Communication and Analytical Thinking
5
MATH 123
Calculus BC
5
Communication and Analytical Thinking
10
MATH 123 and 124
Music Theory
3,4,5
Humanities
3
N/A
Physics
Physics B
3,4,5
Natural Sciences
3
N/A
Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism
3,4,5
Natural Sciences
3
N/A
Physics C: Mechanics
3,4,5
Natural Sciences
3
N/A
Psychology
3,4,5
Social and Behavioral Sciences
3
PSY 110
Statistics
3,4,5
Communication and Analytical Thinking
4
MATH 115 or STAT 115
Please see a counselor about using AP exam scores and credits towards meeting graduation and/or transfer requirements. Chart Notes: 1) May be used to satisfy Area B (Social/Behavioral Sciences) or Area F (American
Institutions), but not both. 2) May be used to satisfy both Area B (Social/Behavioral Sciences) and Area F (American Institutions). UPDATED: ASC/Counseling Department 3/11/2010
28
Advanced Placement/Academic Credit
CLEP
After successfully completing 12 units
at College of Marin, a student may file a
student petition for 6 units of credit with a
minimum score of 500 in each of the CLEP
examinations in the areas of Social Science,
History and Natural Science. The maximum
number of CLEP units that can be awarded
is 12. Units credited appear in the memorandum section of the transcripts and are
counted towards the 60 units graduation
requirement. Transfer credits vary. See a
counselor for additional information.
The English Department does not award
CLEP units in English or Humanities to
students; however, students will be eligible
for English 150 if they score as follows:
1. 540 or more on the CLEP General
Examination in English Composition,
essay version.
2. 55 or more on the CLEP Subject Examination in Freshman College Composition, essay version.
Except as outlined above, units attained
from CLEP examinations may be used for
Social Science and Natural Science general
education and elective credit only and not
for Major course requirements.
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
After successful completion of 12 units at
College of Marin, students who have completed P.O.S.T. Basic Academy may petition
for 6-12 units of Basic Academy Credit (200
hours = 6 units, 400 hours = 8 units, 560
hours = 10 units and 800 hours = 12 units).
Students may transfer credits for other
police academy work only if the academy is
fully accredited (as listed in the ACCRAO
Guide) or if another fully accredited college
or university has granted credit for the work.
Courses must closely parallel those in the
Major requirements to be substituted.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
After successful completion of 12 units at
College of Marin, students may request a
waiver of Auto 110 by providing verification,
on a Student Petition, of completion of one
year of Auto Shop with a B or better grade
in a course meeting ATTS standards in the
Marin County High School Regional Occupations Program (R.O.P.). Upon completion
of two years of Auto Shop with a B or better
grade in a course meeting ATTS standards,
a student can receive a waiver of Auto 111 by
providing verification on a student petition
(includes San Rafael High School, Terra
Linda High School, Tamalpais High School,
San Marin High School, and Novato High
School).
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
After successful completion of 12 units at
College of Marin, students with a grade
of B or higher in Marin County Office of
Education, Regional Occupations Program
(R.O.P.) Early Childhood Occupation
Program, may either petition for credit or a
waiver of ECE 100. Units credited appear in
the memorandum section of the transcripts
and are counted towards the 60 units graduation requirement. Transfer credits vary. See
a counselor for additional information.
BUSINESS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS
The following criteria must be met in order
for a student to receive advanced placement
(a waiver of BOS 114, 115, 116, 118, 120, 140
or MMST 111) in the Business and Information Systems Department or the student
may petition for Credit by Examination.
The student shall complete articulated high
school courses in the Computer Information
Systems Program at San Rafael, Novato,
or Tamalpais District high schools with a
grade of B or better. Credit by Examination
requires that the student must first successfully complete 12 units at College of Marin.
REGISTERED NURSING
Thirty units of credit may be granted to
students who have attended unaccredited
diploma schools and graduated. The students
must have a current California nursing
license. These students must have completed
12 units in residence and secure the approval
of the Director of Health Sciences.
MARIN COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
ARTICULATION
After successful completion of 12 units at
College of Marin, students may petition to
receive Credit by Examination if they have
successfully completed the following classes
with a B or better grade.
• San Marin High School: AUTO 110, 3
units; AUTO 111, 3 units; BOS 114, 1.5
units; BOS 120, 1 unit; CIS 118, 1.5 units;
MMST 111, 3 units; ECE 114, 3 units;
ECE 115, 3 units
• San Rafael High School: AUTO 110, 3
units; AUTO 111, 3 units; BOS 114, 1.5
units; BOS 120, 1 unit; CIS 118, 1.5 units;
BUS 114, 1.5 units; CIS 113, 1.5 units
MARIN.EDU
• Sir Francis Drake High School: BOS 114,
1.5 units; BOS 120, 1 unit; CIS 118, 1.5
units; MMST 123, 3 units
• Novato High School: BOS 114, 1.5 units;
BOS 120, 1 unit; CIS 118, 1.5 units;
MMST 111, 3 units
• Redwood High School: BOS 114, 1.5
units; BOS 120, 1 unit; MMST 123, 3
units
• Regional Occupational Program: BOS
114, 1.5 units; BOS 115, 1.5 units; BOS
120, 1 unit; BOS 230, 1 unit; BUS 114, 1.5
units; CIS 113, 1.5 units; CIS 118, 1.5 units
• Tamalpais High School: AUTO 110, 3
units; AUTO 111, 3 units; BOS 114, 1.5
units; BOS 120, 1 unit; MMST 111, 3
units; MMST 123, 3 units
• Terra Linda High School: AUTO 110, 3
units; AUTO 111, 3 units; BOS 114, 1.5
units; BOS 120, 1 unit; CIS 118, 1.5 units
• Tomales High School: MACH 130, 2 units
MILITARY CREDIT
Students who have completed at least one
year of active military service may submit a
copy of their DD214 showing an honorable
discharge and receive five units of PE. These
units will appear in the memoranda section
of the grade record. Students must have
completed 12 units at College of Marin to be
eligible.
MILITARY UNITS
Military units may not be used toward a degree or certificate unless the courses are fully
accredited by the University of Maryland or
another fully accredited college or university
(as listed in the ACCRAO Guide).
CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
Credit by Examination is optional for the
faculty member and for the department.
Students must contact each department
or individual faculty member for specific
requirements and departmental policies.
There is a 12-unit limit per department
on the total number of units earned by
examination, subject to the conditions
outlined below.
1. A student must submit a Petition for
Credit by Examination, with the instructor’s approval, to the Office of Admissions and Records.
2. Re-examination for credit in a given
course will not be allowed.
3. The student may be graded on a Pass/
No Pass or letter-graded basis. The grade
Academic Records
CATALOG 2010/11
earned shall be binding and become a
permanent part of the student’s academic
record and will appear with a “Credit by
Examination” annotation indicating the
grade has been earned through Credit by
Examination.
4. If the student fails the Credit by Examination course, the student may reenroll
in the course by Census Date, with the
consent of the instructor. The failed grade
will appear on the transcript.
5. The course being challenged must be
offered in the semester in which the
examination is being taken.
6. The student will be eligible for Credit by
Examination after successfully completing 12 units at College of Marin (C grade
or better).
7. Courses completed through Credit by
Examination shall not be used toward
the 12-unit residency requirement for the
Associate Degree or Certificate.
8. Credit by Examination counts as an
enrollment for repeatability purposes.
9. Courses successfully completed through
Credit by Examination can be used
for course lineout and in determining
academic renewal eligibility.
The student’s grade shall be reported by
the instructor on the final scanner report at
the end of the term. Students may not apply
these courses toward part- or full-time status
to receive financial aid, veterans’ benefits, or
other student verifications.
ACADEMIC RECORDS
State and federal legislation permits students
to have access to their academic and educational records.
TRANSCRIPTS
A student desiring to transfer to another
school should complete a Transcript Request
Form with the Office of Admissions and
Records. Students may request two free transcripts of their records. After the first two,
there will be a fee of $6 per copy. Transcripts
to other colleges may now be ordered by Fax
(415) 884-0429. Please allow 20 working
days for processing. Priority service (next
working day) is available for $15 per copy.
College of Marin does not issue unofficial
transcripts.
Transcripts From Other Colleges
In order to apply units completed at
another institution toward a College of
Marin degree, transcripts must be mailed
from the issuing institution and arrive in
a sealed envelope. Official transcripts have
an embossed or water seal. Transcripts
should be sent via U.S. Mail to: Counseling
Department, College of Marin, Kentfield,
CA 94904. Transcripts from other colleges
received by the College of Marin will not be
copied or released to the student.
Students may only transfer degree applicable units from fully accredited colleges
or universities as listed in the AACRAO
Transfer Credit Practices of Selected Educational Institutions. Upper division units
may not be used toward an Associate degree.
Students may, however, petition for a waiver
of requirements with relevant upper division
work. The student must still have 60 lower
division units.
29
dent from attending any future credit classes
may be made in writing to the Academic
Standards Committee within ten days of the
decision of the Dean of Enrollment Services/
designee. In the event there is no approval
of the appeal and the Academic Standards
Committee upholds the determination of the
Dean of Enrollment Services/designee, the
Academic Standards Committee will then
recommend a permanent bar from attending
credit classes at the College of Marin to the
Board of Trustees. The individual will be
notified at the last known address, if available, of the decision to bar attendance.
Further, an annotation will be placed on
the student’s actual academic record, if any,
stating, “Not to be Released to Student.” In
addition, when the individual has actually
taken classes at College of Marin, future
release of a transcript will be at the sole discretion of the Dean of Enrollment Services/
designee. No transcripts will be released
directly to the student.
The college reserves the right to take all
appropriate legal action.
Foreign College Transcripts
Transcripts from foreign colleges and
universities will be accepted only when
evaluated by UC, CSU, or an evaluating
service recognized by College of Marin.
The service recommended by the college is
International Education Research Foundation, Inc., P. O. Box 66940, Los Angeles, CA
90066, telephone (310) 390-6276. Credit will
be granted when the academic level of the
course work is deemed to be comparable to
that of classes taught in fully accredited U.S.
colleges and universities.
TYPES OF RECORDS AND LOCATIONS
Forged/Altered College of Marin
Transcripts
“Furnishing false information, forgery,
falsification, alteration or misuse of college
documents, records, or identification” is a
violation of college policy. When it comes
to the attention of college personnel that a
forged or altered College of Marin transcript
has been submitted to a third party, a hold
will be immediately placed on that academic
record, if an actual record exists. An attempt
will be made to contact, by phone or mail,
the individual whose name appears on
the forged or altered transcript requiring
that individual to meet with the Dean of
Enrollment Services/designee within 10
days. If the Dean of Enrollment Services/
designee determines, after investigation, that
the individual whose name appears on the
forged or altered transcript is responsible for
preparing/submitting same, the individual
will be barred from attending any future
credit classes at College of Marin. An appeal
of the decision to permanently bar the stu-
Student Rights Related to Academic
Records
Students shall be afforded all rights and
are subject to all requirements set forth in
SB 182 (Chapter 816, Statutes of 1975 as
Forged Signatures
Students who are determined to have filed an
official form with a forged faculty member’s
signature will be subject to disciplinary
action including but not limited to at least
one full regular semester of nonattendance.
The college reserves the right to also take
appropriate legal action.
The Office of Admissions and Records will
maintain documents completed by the
student, such as applications, petitions, and
Advanced Placement and CLEP scores, for
the period of time required by law. These
records, as well as a permanent record of
all academic work completed at the college,
are maintained by the Dean of Enrollment
Services in the Office of Admissions and
Records. Students may obtain two free transcripts of their College of Marin permanent
academic record by submitting a Transcript
Request Form. A $6 charge will be made for
each subsequent copy.
Copies of transcripts from other colleges
are kept in the Counseling Office. Copies
must be requested from the issuing institution and cannot be released from College of
Marin.
30
Academic Records
amended September 28, 1976 by SB 1493), a
copy of which may be obtained in the Office
of Admissions and Records. If a violation
occurs, students have the right to file a
complaint with the Family Compliance Office, United States Department of Education,
600 Independence Avenue S.W., Washington
D.C. 20202-4605 concerning an alleged
failure by the institution to comply with
the provisions of Section 438 of the General
Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C.A.
1232G).
Review, Inspection, and Challenge of
Records
Any currently enrolled or former student
has the right of access to all of the student’s
College of Marin academic records. Students
wishing to inspect their records may obtain
forms from staff in the Office of Admissions
and Records; access shall be granted no later
than 45 days following receipt of the written
request to the Dean of Enrollment Services at College of Marin, 835 College Ave.,
Kentfield, CA 94904. The Dean of Enrollment Services will make arrangements for
access and notify the student of the time
and place where records may be inspected.
Qualified personnel will assist the students
in interpreting their records, if necessary. If
the records are not maintained by the Dean
of Enrollment Services, the student will be
advised of the correct office to which the
student’s request should be addressed.
The Dean of Enrollment Services will
provide forms for any student who wishes
to challenge the content of the student’s
records, excluding grades, if the student
believes the information to be (1) inaccurate, (2) misleading, (3) an unverifiable
personal conclusion or inference outside
of the observer’s area of competence, or (4)
not based on the personal observation of a
named person with the time and place of
the observation noted. The student should
clearly identify the part of the record the
student wants changed and specify why it
is inaccurate or misleading. If the student is
not satisfied with the results of the challenge
procedure, a written request for a formal
hearing may be filed with the College
Superintendent/President, or designee.
Within 30 days of receipt of such a request, the College Superintendent/President,
or designee, shall meet with the student and
employee who recorded the information
in question, if any, and if such employee
is presently employed by the college. The
Superintendent/President, or designee, shall
then sustain or deny the allegations in writ-
MARIN.EDU
ing. If the President, or designee, denies any
or all of the allegations and refuses to order
the correction or removal of the information, the student will be notified that the
student may, within 30 days of the refusal,
appeal the decision in writing to the College
of Marin Board of Trustees. Within 30 days
of receipt of such an appeal, the College of
Marin Board of Trustees shall, in closed
session with the student and the employee (if
presently employed by the college), determine whether to sustain or deny the allegations. If the Board of Trustees sustains the
allegations, it shall order the President, or
designee, to immediately correct or remove
and destroy the information. Additional information regarding the hearing procedure
will be provided to the student when notified
of the right for hearing.
Directory Information
Directory information includes: the student’s
name, address, telephone number, date and
place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and
sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and
awards received, most recent previous public
or private school attended, and any other
information authorized in writing by the
student to be released. Students who wish to
ensure that no information is released must
to notify the Dean of Enrollment Services in
writing.
Access to Student Records
Access will be permitted to student records
pursuant to the written request of the student or in accordance with a legal subpoena
or a judicial order. Others entitled to access
without notification of the student include:
1. Officials and employees of College of
Marin may inspect records if they have a
legitimate educational interest. A school
official is a person employed by the
college in an administrative, supervisory,
academic, research, or support staff
position (including law enforcement unit
personnel and health staff); a person
or company with whom the college has
contracted (such as an attorney, auditor,
or collection agent); a person serving
on the Board of Trustees; or a student
serving on an official committee, such as
a disciplinary or grievance committee,
or assisting other school officials in performing his or her tasks. A school official
has a legitimate educational interest if the
official needs to review an educational
record in order to fulfill his or her profes-
sional responsibility. All requests for such
access must be approved by the Dean of
Enrollment Services.
2. Authorized representatives of the
Controller General of the United States,
the Department of Health, Education and
Welfare, or the United States Office of
Civil Rights; the administrative head of
an education agency; and state education
officials or their respective designees may
have access to information necessary to
audit or evaluate a state or federally supported education program, or pursuant
to a federal or state law. When personally
identifiable information is collected, it
shall be protected in a manner that will
not permit the personal identification of
students or their parents by other than
those authorized officials. Such personally identifiable data shall be destroyed
when no longer needed for such audit,
evaluation, and enforcement of federal
legal requirements.
3. In response to an exparte order College of
Marin will release to the Attorney General (or his/her designee) the educational
records requested that are relevant to an
authorized investigation or prosecution
of an offense as listed in Section 23326
(g) (5) (B) of Title 18 United States Code
or an act of domestic or international
terrorism as defined in Section 2331 of
that title.
4. Other state and local officials or authorities may inspect records in accordance
with requirements of state law adopted
prior to November 19, 1974.
College of Marin may release information
without student consent to the following:
1. Officials of other public or private schools
or school systems with legitimate educational interests, including local county
or state correctional facilities where
educational programs are conducted and/
or where the student seeks or intends
to enroll or is directed to enroll, subject
to the rights of students as provided in
Section 54610 of Title 5 regulations on
Student Records (Chapter 6, Division 5).
2. Agencies or organizations at which a student has applied for or received financial
aid, provided that personally identifiable
information is released only as necessary
to determine the student’s eligibility for
aid, to decide on any conditions to be
imposed, or to enforce those terms or
conditions.
CATALOG 2010/11
3. Accrediting organizations carrying out
their functions.
4. Organizations conducting studies for
educational agencies or institutions for
the purpose of developing, validating
or administering predictive tests and/
or student aid programs, and improving
instruction, provided that such studies
are conducted in a manner that will
not permit the personal identification
of students or their parents by anyone
except representatives of the organization and that any personally identifiable
information be destroyed when no longer
needed for the study.
5. Appropriate persons in connection with
an emergency, if such information is
deemed necessary to protect the health
or safety of the student or other person,
or subject to such regulations as may be
issued by the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare. No one given access
to student records in such an emergency
may share information obtained with
anyone (except other persons involved
and having a legitimate interest in the
information) without written consent of
the student.
Victims of sexual assault at
College of Marin shall be provided with
information regarding disciplinary action
against the assailant within three days of
the results of any disciplinary action and
of any appeal. The victim shall keep the
results confidential.
6. The Internal Revenue Service in accordance with provisions of federal law
Record of Access
A log is maintained in the Office of Admissions and Records, as specified in Section
76222, California Education Code, for each
student’s record which lists authorized
persons, agencies or organizations requesting or receiving information from a student’s
record without a judicial order, or a legal
subpoena, or the student’s consent.

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MARIN.EDU
SECTION 3
STUDENT SERVICES
34
Campus Services
Some services are offered at both campuses.
Please refer to class schedule for specific locations and office hours.
CAMPUS SERVICES
BOOKSTORE
The Kentfield Campus Bookstore is
located on the ground floor of the Learning
Resources Center. The bookstore sells all
required texts and supplies that instructors order for their classes. In addition, the
bookstore also stocks gift items, imprinted
shirts, and art supplies.
Beginning in fall 2010, the College of
Marin Bookstore will initiate an innovative
textbook rental program that will allow
students to rent their textbooks for less than
50 percent of the cost of purchasing a new
printed textbook. This program will begin
as pilot program and will increase in size as
demand grows. As an added convenience,
students will be able to rent their books
either in the store or from the store’s Web
site.
Refund Policy
1. Please read refund policy (including
refund dates) in store for the most current
information.
2. Refunds are given only for textbooks
purchased for classes of the current
semester.
3. A CASH REGISTER RECEIPT IS ABSOLUTELY REQUIRED FOR TEXTBOOK
REFUNDS.
4. To be refunded, new texts must be in
brand new condition. If damaged or
a name is written in the text, only a
percentage of the retail value will be
refunded.
5. Refunds for supplies given only if defective at time of purchase.
Buy-back Policy
At the end of each semester, students may
sell their texts back to the bookstore for up to
50 percent of the price for which the text was
purchased provided the store needs the text.
The buy-back days and hours will be posted.
Bookstore Hours
The bookstore will have hours posted.
(415) 485-9394
Web address: http://marin.bncollege.com
MARIN.EDU
COMPUTER CENTERS
Internet Café (IVC)
The Internet Café provides students with
easy, open access to computers. In addition
to software for many classes, the computers
are networked to the Internet. The Internet
Café is open during the week to all students
at College of Marin. Please refer to posted
hours for each semester.
Indian Valley Campus
Building 17, Room 100
(415) 457-8811 ext. 8124
Science Center Computer Labs
The Science Center Computer Labs provide
students with easy, open access to computers. Although there are regularly scheduled
classes in the labs, there are plenty of opportunities during the week for individual work.
In addition to software for science, math,
and engineering classes, the computers are
networked to the Internet and have typical
word processing, spreadsheet, database, and
presentation software.
The center consists of two labs with a total
of 37 computers; one lab has an instructor
station connected to an overhead projector,
and the other lab includes five computers
connected to diagnostic physiology equipment.
The labs are open during the week to all
students at College of Marin, with extended hours at the end of the fall and spring
semesters.
Kentfield Campus
Science Center, Rooms 143 and 144
(415) 485-9540
Web address: http://www.marin.edu/student_
services/Labs
Business and Information Systems Labs
The Business and Information Systems Labs
provide Windows-based personal computers
on both campuses. The workstations have
access to laser printing, scanning, and a
variety of application software in support of
classes offered. Students enrolled in Computer Information Systems, Business Office
Systems, and Business programs have access
to the lab facilities, which are open daily and
most evenings.
The Indian Valley Campus (IVC) labs
provide a small number of Macintosh
personal computers, and are available to
any student enrolled in any program at
either campus, with particular emphasis
on specific software utilized by the Court
Reporting, Medical Assisting, and Multimedia programs. The IVC Lab is open
8:00am–7:30pm Monday through Thursday,
and 8:00am–4:00pm Friday.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resources Center, Room 35 and
Business Skills Center, Room 104
(415) 485-9603
Indian Valley Campus
Building 17, Room 100
(415) 883-2211 ext. 8231 or 8234
Multimedia Studies Labs
The Multimedia Studies Lab houses both
Macintosh and Windows-based personal
computers. Laboratory hours for multimedia
studies courses take place in these labs.
Indian Valley Campus
Pomo Building 7, Room 190, 3D Development PC Lab
Pomo Building 7, Room 192, Macintosh Lab
Kentfield Campus
Fine Arts Building, Room 225, Macintosh and PC Lab
Multimedia Studies Open Labs
There are computer labs available for
currently enrolled students to access online
course materials, e-mail, and limited assignments. Please refer to posted open lab hours
for each semester.
Indian Valley Campus
Ohlone Cluster, Room 120, Macintosh and PC Open
Lab
Pomo Building 7, Lobby, Macintosh Open Lab
Multimedia Studies Audio/Video Lab
Suites
In addition, there are two individual Lab
Suites for independent and advanced
student work. Each Lab Suite contains both
a high-end Macintosh workstation, and an
advanced Windows-based workstation. Access to these labs must be pre-arranged with
a Multimedia Studies Instructor.
Indian Valley Campus
Pomo Building 7, Room 197, Audio Lab Suite
Pomo Building 7, Room 198, Video Lab Suite
FOOD SERVICE
Campus Bistro offers a variety of food selections throughout the year on the Kentfield
Campus. Daily selections include freshly
made sandwiches, salads, soups, and hot
entrees. Coffee, tea, drinks, sandwiches,
and snacks are available in the Internet
Cafe at the Indian Valley Campus. Vending
machines are on both campuses.
Kentfield Campus
Student Services, lower level
(415) 456-7661
Student Support Programs/Services
CATALOG 2010/11
Indian Valley Campus
Internet Cafe, Building 17, Room 100
(415) 883-2211 ext. 8124
LIBRARY
Registered students and community members may apply at the Library Loan Desk
for a free library card which enables holders
to check out circulating materials and
access databases from off-campus. Students
enrolled at either campus may borrow books
and other materials from the Kentfield
Library. IVC students are encouraged to
contact the Kentfield Library Reference Desk
with any questions related to their research
needs at (415) 485-9475.
The library has over 100,000 books
available for circulation. Some books and
course materials are placed behind the loan
desk “on reserve” for limited circulation.
Hundreds of magazines, newspapers and
journals are also available in hard copy, as
well as electronically.
Wireless access is available in the library
and in other areas of the Learning Resources
Center. There are more than 20 computers
in the library for limited use by students and
visitors. These computers provide access to
the online catalog for books, to databases,
and to the Internet. Library databases make
available – even from off-campus – a variety
of reference resources as well as full-text
articles from magazines, journals, and
newspapers (www.marin.edu/lrc).
Students interested in learning more
effective research methods should consider
enrolling in Library 110, a self-directed,
research skills course (one UC transferable
unit).
For more information, please check the
library’s home page at www.marin.edu/lrc.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resources Center (2nd level)
Hours: M-R 8am-9pm; F 8am-4pm
(415) 485-9656
Web address: www.marin.edu/lrc
MEDIA COURSES (DISTANCE LEARNING)
The college offers a variety of credit courses
through television, or Web-based environments. The telecourses may be viewed on
the community access channels of Marin
County’s cable company. Distance learning
courses are self-paced and provide an excellent alternative for students who are unable
to attend classes during traditional hours, or
who would like to take additional units in a
time-efficient manner.
Additionally, some courses are offered
on DVD and are available for viewing at the
Kentfield Campus. In addition to the DVDs,
these courses often include some scheduled
on-campus meetings, readings, student
assignments, and some form of evaluation.
The videos for these courses are generally
available for checkout for viewing in the
Media Center.
The Media Center also houses a wireless
computer lab with 30 PCs and two Intel
MACs and pay-for-print. You can access all
software associated with your classes, write
a paper, research online, or even access your
foreign language lessons. Staff are available
to assist you with computer-related questions.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resource Center, Room 120
www.marin.edu/distance/media_center.htm
TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING
Transportation
Golden Gate Transit provides bus service
from all areas of Marin County to the
college. Bus schedules are available in the
Student Services areas on both campuses .
Student Parking
Student parking areas are available in
various campus locations and are designated
“STUDENT PARKING”. Please do not park
in areas posted Staff or Faculty Parking.
Infractions of parking or traffic regulations
may result in an official citation issued by the
College Police. Students are requested not
to park in adjacent areas that are for patrons
of local merchants. These merchants often
tow illegally parked vehicles at the violator’s
expense.
Motorcycle Parking
Motorcycles do not require a parking permit
if they are parked in designated motorcycle
parking areas.
Student Parking Permits
A parking permit is required at all times
except Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. A $50
(subject to change) parking permit may be
purchased for the fall or spring semester, or
a daily $3 (subject to change) parking permit
may be purchased from the parking permit
machines located in each student parking
lot. Some machines take quarters only.
Summer parking permits may be purchased
for $25. For the location to purchase parking
permits, please refer to the class schedule.
Financial aid recipients may purchase a
semester parking permit for half-price. Park-
35
ing regulations are available when purchasing parking permits, or at the District Police
Office located in TB-1.
(415) 485-9455
Disabled Parking
Parking permits are not required on vehicles
displaying a disabled placard or license
plates issued by the California Department
of Motor Vehicles to the physically disabled.
College Police do not issue disabled parking
permits.
(415) 485-9455
STUDENT SUPPORT
PROGRAMS/SERVICES
ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES (DSPS)
This program offers support services and
modified classes for students with learning,
communication, physical, and psychological
disabilities.
The program offers services to students
on both campuses. These include learning
disabilities assessment, computer-assisted
instruction for special learning needs,
and specialized academic, personal, and
vocational counseling. The college also offers
educational and mobility aids, note takers,
readers, e-text, and interpreters, as well as
liaison with instructors and other campus
services and referrals to community agencies. The Accessibility Rights Club events
and trips also offer excellent socialization
opportunities and personal support while
attending school.
Enrollment in the Disabled Students
Program requires an initial appointment
with a counselor.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resources Center 115
(415) 485-9406
CALWORKS
College of Marin, in partnership with
the County of Marin, provides education
and support services to students who are
participants in the CalWORKs program.
To participate, one must be identified and
referred by the Marin County CalWORKs
office. Special educational programs, and
internship opportunities may be available to
support student success and entry into the
workforce.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resources Center, Room 160
36
Student Support Programs/Services
Monday-Friday, 9:00am to 4:30pm
(415) 485-9605
Web address: http://www.marin.cc.ca.us/
departments/CalWORKs/Index.htm
CHILDREN’S CENTERS
The College of Marin Child Development
Program provides high quality early education for the infants, toddlers, and preschool
age children of College of Marin students,
with priority going to low-income student
families. Centers are located on the Kentfield
and Indian Valley campuses. The centers
provide part- and full-time child care during
fall and spring semesters and are open M-R,
7:45am to 5pm and F, 7:45am to 3pm.
The Infant Toddler and Preschool
Centers serve as demonstration classrooms
that provide child observation and research
opportunities, student teacher training,
and work study jobs for College of Marin
students who are taking courses in Early
Childhood Education, Pediatric Nursing,
Child Psychology/Human Development,
and related fields.
Infant Toddler Center
The Early Head Start Center on the Indian
Valley campus provides infant/toddler care
to student families with children ages birth
to three years. There is no cost to eligible
families. To apply, please call Marin Head
Start at 415-883-3791 or visit http://www.
camarin.org/headstart.html to download an
application. Please be sure to indicate on the
application that you are applying for the IVC
Early Head Start Center.
Indian Valley Campus Early Head Start Infant Toddler
Center
Building 12; 457-8811, ext. 8171
Preschool Centers
The College of Marin Children’s Centers
are a California State Preschool Program
and provide part- and full-day preschool
on both the Kentfield and Indian Valley
campuses for the preschool age children of
COM students. Children must be three years
of age by December 2 of the academic year
to be eligible for enrollment. Fees for eligible
student families are subsidized by the
California Department of Education and the
Marin Education Fund and are on a sliding
scale that ranges from no cost to full cost,
depending on family income and family
size. A limited number of full-cost slots are
available for COM faculty and staff.
Please see the Child Development Program Web site for more information and to
download a Preliminary Application for the
Children’s Centers: http://www.marin.edu/
student_services/child_care.htm. For more
information, please call the Child Development Program Office at 883-2211, ext. 8221.
Kentfield Children’s Center
Administrative Center 40, downstairs, (415) 4859468
Indian Valley Campus Children’s Center
Building 12; (415) 457-8811, ext. 8170
COLLEGE HONOR SOCIETIES
Alpha Gamma Sigma
The Alpha Sigma and Sigma Nu Chapters
at the College of Marin are affiliated with
Alpha Gamma Sigma, the Honor Society
of California Community Colleges. Alpha
Sigma at the Kentfield Campus and Sigma
Nu at the Indian Valley Campus encourage
and recognize scholarship and also promote
service to the college and to the community.
Both chapters welcome new members
who have completed at least 12 graded units
of college work with a 3.0 GPA or higher.
The chapters’ affiliation with the State
organization provides contact with community colleges throughout the State through
regional conferences and State conventions.
Its members are eligible to apply for state as
well as campus scholarships and awards.
Phi Theta Kappa
The Beta Xi Kappa chapter at College of
Marin is affiliated with Phi Theta Kappa.
Phi Theta Kappa’s mission is two-fold: (1)
to recognize and encourage the academic
achievement of two-year college students
and (2) to provide opportunities for
individual growth and development through
participation in honors, leadership, service,
and fellowship programs.
Students are encouraged to join Beta Xi
Kappa by having completed 12 graded units
of transferable college work with a 3.5 GPA
or higher. Scholarship opportunities are
available for participating members.
COUNSELING
Counseling Services are available to all
students; however, special programs such
as EOPS and DSPS will serve only those
officially identified by those programs.
Kentfield Campus
Student Services, Room 212
(415) 485-9432
Web address: http://www.marin.edu/
studentservices/counseling/
MARIN.EDU
EOPS/CARE
Extended Opportunity Programs and
Services (EOPS)/Cooperative Agencies
Resources for Education (CARE) offers assistance to students who meet the EOPS state
guidelines for eligibility. Support services
may include counseling, tutoring, book
grants, and peer advisement.
CARE is an additional support program
for EOPS eligible students who are also
CalWORKs parents. For students who
qualify, CARE grants may be available for
books, transportation and childcare.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resources Center, Room 160
(415) 485-9605
Web address: http://www.marin.edu/Student_
Services/eops.htm
G.E.D. PREPARATION/BASIC SKILLS
PROGRAMS
The G.E.D. (General Educational Development) Preparation program is a learning lab
designed to help those who have not graduated from high school to pass the G.E.D.
exams. Thorough diagnostic testing identifies strengths and weaknesses. Individual
study plans focus on each student’s needs.
The open-entry learning lab allows students
to start at any time and improve at their
own pace. Instructors will guide students
through workbooks, computer programs,
online exercises, and other materials.
Practice testing helps assure readiness.
The Basic Skills Program is a learning
lab for community members wishing to
improve their reading, writing, and math.
This program features open-entry, flexible
scheduling, skills assessment, individual
study plans, self-paced improvement, and
personal guidance.
Check the Community Education
schedule for current hours.
There is no fee for the labs.
(415) 485-9363 or
(415) 485-9445 (instructor Michael Timmel)
HEALTH SERVICES
The Health Center is available to all currently registered students. It provides first
aid, health education, care and treatment
for short-term medical concerns, OTC and
some prescription medications, immunizations, TB testing, voluntary insurance
plans, physical exams for College of Marin
programs and college entrance, flu shots,
physician appointments, and more. Personal
counseling is available through the Counsel-
Student Support Programs/Services
CATALOG 2010/11
ing Department by calling (415) 485-9432
for an appointment.
Each properly registered student has
coverage under the Marin Community
College District’s student accident insurance policy for accidents occurring on
either campus, at any site where College
of Marin courses are offered, or at other
College of Marin-sponsored and supervised
activities. Students participating in athletic
competition are insured under this accident
insurance policy.
Note: the student accident insurance policy
is supplementary to the student’s own
personal medical insurance and does not
guarantee full coverage.
Students should be aware that if they
sustain an injury while in class or participating in a school-sponsored activity, they must
report it immediately to their instructor or
supervising authority. Students must also
contact the Health Center within ten days of
the injury in order to be properly covered for
reimbursable expenses in accordance with
policy coverage.
Kentfield Campus
Health Services Portable, Parking Lot 6
(415) 485-9458
Web address: http://www.marin.edu/student_
services/health_center.htm
JOB PLACEMENT/CAREER EMPLOYMENT
The Job Placement Office helps students and
alumni find employment in the community
and the greater Bay Area. Employer files
are constantly updated, providing students
with information on hundreds of current job
openings.
The Job Placement Office works with
faculty in the workforce programs in assisting graduating students to locate positions
in their fields. On-campus career fairs and
in-class career workshops are offered in
some programs. In addition, employers are
regularly invited to the college to provide
students with the opportunity to be interviewed by prospective employers. The Job
Placement Office is located in the Student
Services Center at the Kentfield Campus.
(415) 485-9410
OUTREACH AND SCHOOL RELATIONS
The Office of Outreach and School Relations
works to develop and nurture contacts with
public high schools in and outside of Marin
County; establish contacts with community
based organizations serving prospective
COM students; network with elementary
and middle schools in Marin County to develop a pipeline of information and support
for prospective students and their parents;
sustain the Student Ambassador program
as a primary recruitment tool for COM;
develop and produce events that highlight
college programs and opportunities for
potential students, including for families
and for schools; serve as a community public
relations agent for COM; facilitate recruitment and retention programs for minority
students; and provide educational presentations to the community on issues of higher
education access, financial aid/scholarships,
advocacy, immigration, cultural sensitivity,
college life, careers, and more.
Kentfield Campus
Student Services, Room 232
(415) 485-9663
Web address: http://www.marin.edu/departments/
outreach
PUENTE PROGRAM
College of Marin has been certified to implement the Puente Project, a highly acclaimed
English and mentoring program that supports underserved students’ transferring to
four-year universities. The one-year program
is a learning community offering instruction
in English 120 in the fall along with a counseling course, and English 150 in the spring;
students are also paired with a mentor, often
from the business/professional community
in a field of interest to the student. The mission of the Puente Project is to increase the
number of educationally underrepresented
students who enroll in four-year colleges
and universities, earn degrees, and return to
their respective communities as leaders and
mentors to future generations. The first Puente Project was initiated at Chabot College
in 1981. Since then, the successful program
has been replicated at 59 community colleges
and 33 high schools in California. The UC
Regents oversee the programs. For more
information, call (415) 485-9375 or e-mail
Arnulfo Cedillo.
TESTING
The Assessment and Testing Office provides
placement testing in math, English, and
English as a Second Language (ESL). Please
see our Web page for schedules and other
information.
Kentfield Campus
Student Services, Room 238
(415) 485-9469
Web address: http://www.marin.edu/student_
services/testing.htm
37
TRANSFER/CAREER CENTER
The Transfer/Career Center provides
information and support to students
intending to transfer to four-year colleges/
universities. The center houses a reference
library of catalogs and informational materials on California schools and most national
colleges/universities. The center also has
computer programs to assist students in educational and career research. No appointment is necessary.
Kentfield Campus
Student Services, Room 202
(415) 485-9671
Web address: http://www.marin.edu/sudent_
services/transfer_center/index.htm
TUTORING AND LEARNING CENTER
The Tutoring and Learning Center offers free
drop-in peer tutoring for currently enrolled
College of Marin students in a wide range of
academic subjects. All tutors are trained and
recommended by a faculty member. This
service provides support and encouragement
for students to reach their educational goals.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resources Center, Room 160
(415) 485-9620
Web address: http://www.marin.edu/student_
services/tutoring.htm
WRITING CENTER
The Writing Center is open to all students
for support and tutoring in writing projects
and functions as the English Writing Lab for
students enrolled in English Composition
and Literature courses. The English Writing
Lab supports students by offering one-onone tutoring on their course assignments
and projects.
The Writing Center provides students
with tutoring to improve reading and
writing skills and also provides access to
computers and to the Internet for research
and writing in all disciplines. Students have
access to word processing, Web browsing,
printing, scanning, and, most importantly,
tutoring by COM instructors. Tutoring is
offered either face-to-face or online via an
online Writing Center Web site. All students
working on reading and writing projects
in any discipline are welcome. Students
enrolled in English courses have priority.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resources Center, Room 110
(415) 485-9609
38
Student Activities
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
CLUBS
Under the sponsorship of the Associated
Students (ASCOM, ESCOM, and ASIVC),
and with oversight and guidance by Student
Affairs, students may promote special
interests by joining or forming student clubs
on campus. Student clubs are an important
part of campus activities.
Eligibility to become an officer of a
student club requires that the student be in
good academic standing, meet the requirements outlined in the respective Associated
Students’ constitution, by-laws, and any
other requirements set by individual student
clubs. Each student club is required to have
a faculty advisor and to meet operating
standards set by the District Business Office
in the collection and distribution of club
funds.
ECHO TIMES, STUDENT NEWSPAPER
The College of Marin student newspaper
is the product of the journalism classes.
It is published regularly throughout the
academic year and offers opportunities to
develop skills in writing and editing, as well
as desktop publishing, advertising, graphics,
photography, and newspaper production.
Kentfield Campus
Learning Resources Center 32
(415) 485-9690
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
Eligibility for Intercollegiate Athletic
Competition is governed by the State Commission on Athletics. A student must be
continuously and actively enrolled in a
minimum of 12 credit units at his or her
community college during the season of
sport play. Of the 12 credit units, at least
nine will be in courses counting toward the
associate degree, remediation, transfer, and/
or certification as defined by the college
catalog.
A student who has previously participated at another college or university should
check with the director of athletics to clarify
eligibility to further participate at College of
Marin.
See College Health Center regarding
athletic injuries.
(415) 485-9580
MARIN.EDU
PERFORMING ARTS
The Performing Arts Department (Music,
Drama, and Dance) presents many fine
concerts, plays, and dance performances
every year for the college community and
the public. COM students are encouraged
to attend. Many events are free, but for
those with an admission charge, students
are offered discounted ticket rates. E-mail
COMmusic@marin.edu to receive announcements of music department events,
or contact the office at (415) 485-9460. For
information about drama and dance events,
call (415) 485-9555.
Even if you are not majoring in the
performing arts, participating in an artistic
production is a fun way to express yourself,
and to meet new friends. If you have a talent
in music, dance, or drama, are interested in
small paid jobs in concert or stage management or audio/video recording, or would like
to volunteer to usher for one of our productions, please call one of the above numbers
for additional information.
STUDENT AFFAIRS
Beyond the classroom, the college encourages students to initiate and join in activities
and programs that develop leadership
ability, interpersonal skills and community
involvement.
Through involvement with the Associated Students or college clubs and organizations, students may participate in a “handson” curriculum designed for personal and
professional development. Students may
learn how to run effective meetings, work
successfully with others to achieve common
goals or resolve differences, manage their
time and commitments, assume or delegate
responsibility, turn conflict into cooperation,
and gain self-confidence. Learning how to
build, develop and manage budgets, participating in special projects, and volunteering
are often highlights of the college learning
experience. This experience is fun and helps
prepare students for better success in career
planning and skill building.
Students who wish to take advantage
of this unique aspect of the college should
contact the Associated Students or Student
Affairs offices to find out more about Associated Students, Student Senate, student
appointments to college committees, clubs
and organizations, student project funding,
and special student forums and events.
For further information about activities
and organizations, students should consult
the semester credit class schedule.
Kentfield Campus
Student Affairs Office, Student Services, Room 250
(415) 485-9376
Associated Students (ASCOM), Student Services,
Room 241
(415) 485-9390
Emeritus Students (ESCOM), Student Services, Room
146
(415) 485-9652
STANDARDS OF
CONDUCT
All members of the college community are
subject to State and Federal laws, as well as
policies and procedures established by the
Board of Trustees.
An important policy that all students
should be aware of is the Student Conduct
Policy. This policy is briefly described
below. Questions regarding this policy and
procedure should be referred to the Dean of
Student Development and Special Services.
STUDENT CONDUCT
The following conduct will not be tolerated
and shall constitute good cause for discipline, including, but not limited to, removal,
suspension or expulsion of a student.
• Causing, attempting to cause, or threatening to cause physical injury to another
person.
• Abuse or assault of any District employee,
including, but not limited to, violation
of Education Code Section 87708, which
may result in criminal charges in addition to any other disciplinary action.
• Possession, sale or otherwise furnishing
any firearm, knife, explosive, or other
dangerous object, including, but not
limited to, any facsimile firearm, knife, or
explosive, unless, in the case of possession
of any object of this type, the student has
obtained written permission to possess
the item from a District employee, with
the concurrence of the Superintendent/
President.
• Unlawful possession, use, sale, offer to
sell, or furnishing, or being under the
influence of any controlled substance
listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with
Section 11053) of Division 10 of the
California Health and Safety Code, an
alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of
any kind; or unlawful possession of, or
offering, arranging, or negotiating the
sale of any drug paraphernalia, as defined
Student Rights and Grievances
CATALOG 2010/11
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
in California Health and Safety Code
Section 11014.5.
Committing or attempting to commit
robbery or extortion.
Committing or attempting to cause
damage to District property or to private
property on campus, or knowingly
receiving stolen District property or
private property on campus.
Willful or persistent smoking in any area
where smoking has been prohibited by
law or by regulation of the District.
Committing sexual harassment as
defined by law or by District policies and
procedures.
Engaging in harassing or discriminatory
behavior based on race, sex, (i.e., gender)
religion, age, national origin, disability, or
any other status protected by law.
Disruptive behavior, willful disobedience, habitual profanity or vulgarity,
or the open and persistent defiance of
the authority of, or persistent abuse of,
District personnel.
Cheating, plagiarism (including plagiarism in a student publication), or
engaging in other academic dishonesty,
including, but not limited to:
a. Copying, in part or whole, another student’s quiz or examination
answers.
b. Submitting work previously submitted
in another course, if contrary to the
rules of either course.
c. Altering or interfering with grading.
d. Using or consulting any sources
or materials, including electronic
devices, during an examination unless
expressly authorized by the instructor
or as a permitted accommodation.
e. Misrepresentation or falsification of
academic work for purposes of obtaining a higher grade.
f. Submitting a paper purchased from
a research or term paper service, or
written by another student, and falsely
representing it as one’s own work.
g. Purposely allowing another student to
copy answers during a test.
h. Knowingly providing homework, a
term paper, or other academic work
for another student.
i. Having another person submit any
work in one’s name, for purposes of
deceiving the instructor to obtain a
higher grade.
j. Lying to an instructor or District
official to obtain a higher grade.
k. Altering graded work after it has been
returned and resubmitting the work
for grading without the instructor’s
permission.
l. Removing tests or examinations from
the classroom without the permission
of the instructor.
m.Stealing tests or examinations.
• Dishonesty; forgery; alteration or
misuse of college documents, records or
identification; or knowingly furnishing
false information to the District.
• Unauthorized entry upon or use of
District facilities.
• Lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct on
District-owned or controlled property,
or at District-sponsored or supervised
functions.
• Engaging in expression which is obscene;
libelous or slanderous; or which so incites
students as to create a clear and present
danger of the commission of unlawful
acts on District premises, or the violation of lawful District administrative
procedures, or the substantial disruption
of the orderly operation of the District.
• Persistent, serious misconduct where
other means of correction have failed to
bring about proper conduct.
• Unauthorized preparation, giving, selling, transfer, distribution, or publication,
for any commercial purpose, of any contemporaneous recording of an academic
presentation in a classroom or equivalent
site of instruction, including but not limited to handwritten or typewritten class
notes, except as permitted by any District
policy or administrative procedure.
The college will provide legal defense in
any proceeding brought against an employee
for any act or omission made within the
scope of his or her employment by the
college, to the full extent provided by law,
including but not limited to Government
Code 995, et seq.
39
STUDENT RIGHTS AND
GRIEVANCES
Student grievances fall in different categories. A complaint that involves a student
and a member of the faculty can be defined
as a student academic grievance. Such a
grievance is limited to issues involved in
grading assignments and may demonstrate
mistreatment.
A complaint may be lodged by a student
against another student for actions on
campus or at a college-sponsored function.
In case of sexual harassment, the student
should report the incident immediately and
directly to the executive dean of human
resources.
Guidelines on the filing of a grievance are
available from the dean of student development and special services.
SMOKING IN DISTRICT FACILITIES
The Board of Trustees of College of Marin
recognizes that smoking presents a health
and safety hazard that can have serious
consequences. Therefore, the Board and
the California Education Code prohibits
smoking by staff, students and visitors at all
times and in all buildings of the District,
and within 10 feet of all buildings, including
covered walkways, courtyards, ramps or entrances to buildings. Violation of this policy
could lead to disciplinary action under usual
disciplinary procedures.
DRUG-FREE AND ALCOHOL-FREE CAMPUS
It is the policy of the District to maintain
a drug-free and an alcohol-free awareness
program. The program has and will continue
to include the distribution of information
on the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse,
and referral resources for counseling and
rehabilitation dealing with drug abuse
problems.
The unlawful manufacture, distribution,
dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled
substance is prohibited on any of the College
of Marin campuses. The term “controlled
substance” is defined in the Health and
Safety Code 11007.
Students who violate these prohibitions
will be subject to disciplinary action up
to suspension from college, in addition to
criminal prosecution.
40
Additional Phone and Office Numbers
SEXUAL ASSAULT AND OTHER ASSAULTS
ON CAMPUS
Any sexual assault or physical abuse,
including, but not limited to, rape, as defined
by California law, whether committed by
an employee, student or member of the
public, that occurs on District property, is a
violation of District policies and procedures,
and is subject to all applicable punishment,
including criminal procedures and employee
or student discipline procedures. Students,
faculty, and staff who may be victims of
sexual and other assaults shall be treated
with dignity and provided comprehensive
assistance.
The superintendent/president shall establish administrative procedures that ensure
that students, faculty, and staff who are
victims of sexual and other assaults receive
appropriate information and treatment,
and that educational information about
preventing sexual violence is provided and
publicized as required by law. The procedures shall meet the criteria contained in EC
67385, 67385.7 and 34 C.F.R.§ 668.46.
MARIN.EDU
INDIAN VALLEY CAMPUS (IVC)
DIRECTOR OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM,
LYDA BEARDSLEY
451-8811, EXT. 8222
COUNSELING APPOINTMENTS
485-9432
SS 212
Calls to IVC from outside the IVC or
Kentfield Campus, dial (415) 457-8811, plus
the extension
ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS
457-8811, EXT. 8822
AS 136
DEAN OF ENROLLMENT SERVICES,
ROBERT BALESTRERI 485-9414
SS 252
DEAN OF STUDENT DEVELOPMENT
AND SPECIAL SERVICES, GRETA SIEGEL
485-9619
SS 260
ASSOCIATED STUDENTS (EMERITUS)
457-8811, EXT. 8322
AS 140
SS 235
COLLEGE OPERATIONS 884-3100 AND 884-3101
AS 108
CAREER EDUCATION OFFICE
457-8811, EXT. 8200
L1 101
CHILDREN’S CENTER (PRESCHOOL)
457-8811, EXT. 8170
CS 110
DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL AID, DAVID COOK
485-9405
DIRECTOR OF STUDENT AFFAIRS,
ARNULFO CEDILLO 485-9375
SS 251
DISABLED STUDENTS PROGRAM
485-9406
LC 115
ECHO TIMES NEWSPAPER
485-9690
LC 36
ASSESSMENT AND TESTING
485-9469
KENTFIELD/SS 238
CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OFFICES OH 204 & 205
457-8811, EXT. 8221, 8222
COUNSELING APPOINTMENTS
485-9432
KENTFIELD/SS 212
EMERITUS COLLEGE
485-9368
SS 148
EMERITUS STUDENTS (ESCOM)
485-9652
SS 146
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)
485-9642
HC 123
DISABLED STUDENTS PROGRAM
485-9406
EOPS/CARE
485-9605
LC 160
EARLY HEAD START INFANT TODDLER CENTER BLDG. 12
457-8811, EXT. 8171
FINANCIAL AID OFFICE
485-9409
SS 236
ECHO TIMES NEWSPAPER
485-9690
Inside calls to Kentfield Campus from IVC
or KTD Campus, dial 7 plus the last three
digits of the direct number. For calls from
outside the Campus dial the switchboard at
(415) 457-8811 or the direct number as listed
below:
GED/BASIC SKILLS 485-9445
LC 120
EMERITUS COLLEGE
485-9368
HEALTH SCIENCES OFFICE
485-9319
ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS
457-8811, EXT. 7722
SS 254
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/COMPLIANCE OFFICER
485-9504
ALPHA GAMMA SIGMA
485-9213
ADDITIONAL PHONE
AND OFFICE NUMBERS
KENTFIELD CAMPUS (KTD)
HEALTH CENTER
485-9458
PORTABLE, LOT 6
KENTFIELD/LC 36
KENTFIELD/SS 148
AS 111
HC 111
FISCAL SERVICES
884-3160
AS 100
JOB PLACEMENT
485-9410
SS 206
AC 107
FOOD VENDING MACHINES AND POOL
LOST AND FOUND
485-9455
TB 105
SS 119
HEALTH CENTER
457-8811, EXT. 8126
MEDIA CENTER/LANGUAGE LAB
485-9645
LC 127
JOB PLACEMENT
485-9410
OUTREACH AND SCHOOL RELATIONS
485-9663
SS 232
LEARNING CENTER – ENGLISH
BLDG. 17-222
LEARNING CENTER – MATH
485-8811, EXT. 8510
BLDG. 17-100
ASSESSMENT AND TESTING
485-9469
SS 238
PARKING PERMIT PURCHASE, A/R
457-8811, EXT. 7722
ASSOCIATED STUDENTS (ASCOM)
485-9390
SS 241
POLICE, CAMPUS
485-9455
TB 105
LC DOWNSTAIRS
SWIMMING POOL
485-9587
PE
CALWORKS 485-9605
KENTFIELD/LC 115
FINANCIAL AID OFFICE
457-8811, EXT. 8118
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
485-9686
BOOKSTORE 485-9394
DEAN OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT, COLLEGE AND
COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS SITE ADMINISTRATOR,
NANDA SCHORSKE AS 135
457-8811, EXT. 8506
LC 160
CHILDREN’S CENTER (PRESCHOOL) AC 40 DOWNSTAIRS
485-9468
S 254
PM 189, OL 105, AS 130
AS 121
KENTFIELD/SS 232
LOST AND FOUND/CAMPUS POLICE 883-3179
C3 104
POLICE, CAMPUS 883-3179
C3 104
TRANSFER/CAREER CENTER
485-9671
SS 202
SWIMMING POOL
883-3473 OR 457-8811 EXT. 8262
TUTORING AND LEARNING CENTER (TLC)
485-9620
LC 160
VETERANS OFFICE
457-8811, EXT. 8822
VETERANS OFFICE
487-8811 EXT. 8822
SS 254
AS 136
SECTION 4
GRADUATION AND
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
42
Catalog Rights
CATALOG RIGHTS
The catalog sets forth graduation requirements for achieving an associate degree,
and these requirements may change from
one catalog to the next. Catalog rights mean
that those requirements stated in the current
catalog when the student enrolls will remain
in effect through the semester in which
the student completes a program. Catalog
rights are established for any semester that a
student is in attendance. The specific catalog
employed toward graduation requirements
and all implied rights cease after two
consecutive semesters of nonattendance. All
requirements must be taken from a single
catalog and those requirements begin in the
fall. State of California and federal law, as
well as College of Marin board policy, shall
take precedence over catalog rights. Students
not enrolled when applying for a degree or
Certificate of Achievement must use the
current catalog.
GRADUATION
REQUIREMENTS
The Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree or
Associate in Science (A.S.) degree will be
awarded to any student in good standing
upon satisfactory completion of all of the
following seven requirements:
Units
The Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree or the
Associate in Science (A.S.) degree require
a minimum of 60 lower division units to
include all the requirements indicated below
and any additional elective units needed
to satisfy the 60 unit minimum. Courses
numbered 0-99 are not applicable to the
associate degree.
Major Requirement
At least 18 units of study must be taken in
a single discipline or related disciplines as
indicated in this College of Marin catalog.
See the list of approved majors following this
section.
Scholarship
An overall grade point average (G.P.A.)
of 2.0 (C average) in all degree-applicable
courses (numbered 100 and above) taken at
College of Marin and in all acceptable lower
division courses transferred from other colleges. The student must be in good standing
at the college.
MARIN.EDU
Residence
Successfully complete at least 12 units in the
major requirements at the College of Marin.
Mathematics Proficiency
One of the following options:
• A satisfactory score on the Math Assessment Test, i.e. eligibility for a level beyond
Intermediate Algebra (Math 103) or
• Completion of Intermediate Algebra
(Math 103 or Math 103A plus 103B or
Math 103X plus 103Y) with a grade of C
or higher.
General Education
A minimum of 19 units of general education
is required for the A.A. or A.S. degree. See
general education categories and course
listings below.
Note: One of the general education courses
must be a cross-cultural studies course.
Most cross-cultural studies courses will
satisfy the Cross-Cultural Studies Requirement and one other general education
requirement. If a cross-cultural studies
course is not found in another general
education category, then additional units
of general education are needed to meet
the A.A. or A.S. degree. Likewise, courses
counted for two general education requirements may not be used to fulfill a major
requirement.
Application for Graduation
It is the student’s responsibility to submit
an Application for Graduation by making
an appointment with a counselor in the
Counseling Department. All official transcripts from other colleges must be available
in the Counseling Office by the application
deadline date. All petitions and waivers
must be attached to the application form by
the deadline date. (See a class schedule or
Section One of this catalog for those dates.)
AWARDING A DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE OF
ACHIEVEMENT
Upon completion of all degree or certificate
requirements as specified in this catalog,
a student may qualify for more than one
degree or certificate, provided that 12 of the
required units for the major are not applied
toward any other major and are completed at
the College of Marin.
A student who receives a Certificate of
Achievement may subsequently complete
requirements and earn a degree in the same
discipline, since the degree represents a
higher level of accomplishment. A Certificate of Achievement in a discipline will not
be granted after receipt of a degree in the
same discipline. A student, who at the time
of applying is eligible for a degree, will not be
issued a certificate. Degrees and certificates
are not awarded retroactively.
GENERAL EDUCATION
GENERAL EDUCATION PHILOSOPHY
Every College of Marin graduate will have
a broad education introducing the student
to knowledge and the means through
which human beings understand their
world. General education courses foster this
understanding by developing the student’s
ability to think, and by stressing the
interdependency of cultures and disciplines.
The courses facilitate analysis, criticism, and
synthesis, and require extensive reading,
speaking, and writing. They emphasize
participation, and encourage the student
to experiment with modern technology.
General education courses are designed to
broaden the student’s view of self, society,
and the world, and to prepare the student to
be an active, ethical participant in life.
Courses in general education will provide
the student with the opportunity to:
• Read, write, and speak competently.
• Perform proficiently in mathematics,
analytical thinking, and abstract logical
thinking.
• Acquire a general background in the
major areas of knowledge: humanities,
social and behavioral sciences, and
natural sciences.
• Promote an understanding of the
diversity and similarity of all groups
that comprise contemporary American
society.
• Understand the democratic process.
• Value physical well being through participation in physical exercise and health
education.
• Develop an awareness of the interrelationship of all living things with their
environment and the urgency of directing energies and knowledge to protect the
world.
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
One course from each category required for
graduation (19 units minimum).
A. NATURAL SCIENCES
Select one course from the following. (Three units
minimum.)
General Education
CATALOG 2010/11
Anthropology 101, 101L
Psychology 112 or Psychology 114
Astronomy 101, 105, 117F, 117L
Psychology 140 or Sociology 140
Biology 100, 101, 105, 107 108A, 109, 110, 110L, 115,
116,120, 138, 159, 162, 169A, 169B, 224, 235, 240
Psychology 205 or Sociology 205
Chemistry 105, 105L, 110, 114, 131
Geography 101, 101L, 109, 112
Geology 103, 105, 109, 110, 114, 120, 120L, 121, 138
Physical Education 107
Physics 108A, 110, 207A
NOTES
Psychology 230 or Sociology 230
43
California and the California State University. English
120SL transfers as an elective to the University of
California and California State University. English
120 transfers as an elective to the California State
University.
5. Ethnic Studies 154 may be used to satisfy Category B
or Category C, but not both
E. COMMUNICATION AND ANALYTICAL THINKING
C. HUMANITIES
Select one course from the following. (Three units
minimum.)
Select one course from the following. (Three units
minimum.)
American Sign Language 101, 102, 110, 203, 204
Computer Information Systems 215
Computer Science 130, 135, 136, 200, 230, 232
English 130, 151, 155
1. Geography 109 may be used to satisfy Category A or
Category B, but not both.
Architecture 100, 101, 102, 131
2. Natural Science credit is awarded for only one course
in each of the following groups:
Biology 145
Mathematics 103, 103A and B, 103X and Y, 104, 104X
and Y, 105, 109, 110, 114, 115, 116, 121, 122, 123, 124,
190
Chinese 101, 102
Philosophy 112
Communications 108 (three units), 109A, 109B, 110, 160
Psychology 205
Dance 108
Sociology 205
Drama 110, 116, 117, 119
Speech 110, 120, 122, 128, 130, 132
English 151, 208, 212, 214, 218, 219, 220, 221A, 221B,
222, 223, 224, 225, 230, 235, 237, 240, 242
Statistics 115
Astronomy 105 or Biology 105 or Geology 105
Astronomy 117F or Astronomy 117L
Biology 107 or Physical Education 107
Biology 138 or Geology 138
3. Biology 115 and 116 will no longer be offered after
spring 2011; Biology 112ABC replace 115 and 116.
Art 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108
Ethnic Studies 108, 154
B. SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
French 101, 102, 108A, 108B, 203, 204, 225, 226
Select one course from the following. (Three units
minimum.)
Geology 145
NOTES
1. English 151 may be used to satisfy Category C or
Category E, but not both.
Humanities 100A, 100B, 107, 108, 109A, 109B, 114, 118,
125, 242
2. Psychology 205 and Sociology 205 may be used to
satisfy Category B or Category E, but not both. Credit
is awarded for only one course.
Biology 251
Italian 101, 102, 108 (three units), 203, 204, 225, 226,
228
3. Speech 128 may be used to satisfy Category C or
Category E, but not both.
Business 101
Japanese 101, 102, 108 (three units), 203, 204
Early Childhood Education 110, 112
Journalism 110, 160
Economics 101, 102, 201
Music 101, 102, 105, 106
Ethnic Studies 110, 111, 112, 121, 151, 154, 242
Philosophy 110, 111, 117
Geography 102, 109
Health Education 142
Spanish 101, 102, 203, 203HB, 204, 225, 226, 228A,
228B, 228C, 230A, 230B, 230C
History 100, 101, 102, 103, 109, 110, 111, 112, 117, 118,
206, 211, 214, 215, 216, 238
Speech 128, 140, 141
Political Science 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 201, 203, 210,
211, 220
NOTES
1. English 151 may be used to satisfy Category C or
Category E, but not both.
Anthropology 102, 103, 110, 204, 215
Behavioral Science 103, 201
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, 120, 140, 142, 145,
204, 205, 230, 251
2. Humanities credit is awarded for only one course in
each of the following groups:
Sociology 110, 112, 114, 140, 205, 230, 250
Art 108 or Ethnic Studies 108 or Humanities 108
NOTES
Biology 145 or Geology 145
1. The following courses may be used to satisfy Category
B or Category F, but not both.
Communications 109A or Humanities 109A
Communications 109B or Humanities 109B
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151
Communications 110 or Journalism 110
History 100, 117, 118
Communications 160 or Journalism 160
Political Science 100, 101
English 242 or Humanities 242
2. Geography 109 may be used to satisfy Category A or
Category B, but not both.
3. Speech 128 may be used to satisfy Category C or
Category E, but not both.
3. Psychology 205 and Sociology 205 may be used to
satisfy Category B or Category E, but not both.
4. Ethnic Studies 154 may be used to satisfy Category C
or B, but not both.
4. Social and Behavioral Science credit is awarded for
only one course in each of the following groups:
D. COMPOSITION, WRITTEN
Behavioral Science 201 or Economics 201 or Political
Science 201
(Three units minimum.)
Biology 251 or Psychology 251
NOTE
Health Education 142 or Psychology 142
Psychology 111 or Psychology 116,
English 150 with a grade of C or higher
1. English 150 is the first level course in college freshman English that is transferable to the University of
F. AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS
Select one course from the following. (Three units
minimum.)
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151
History 100, 117, 118
Political Science 100, 101
NOTE
1. All courses listed in Category F may be used to satisfy
Category B or Category F, but not both.
G. CROSS-CULTURAL STUDIES
Select one course from the following. (Three units
minimum.)
Cross-cultural studies courses, which are listed in other
general education categories, will satisfy both the
Cross-Cultural Studies Requirement and the requirement
of one other category.
American Sign Language 110
Anthropology 204, 215
Art 108
Communications 160
English 235, 237
Ethnic Studies 108, 110, 111, 112, 121, 151, 154
History 109
Humanities 108
Journalism 160
Music 105
Psychology 120
Speech 128
44
Associate Degree Programs
H. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
(One unit minimum.)
This requirement may be satisfied by degree-applicable
activity courses in physical education or dance.
ASSOCIATE DEGREE
PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS AND ASSOCIATE IN
SCIENCE
The College of Marin offers a variety of associate degree programs. The “Major” is required for either the A.A. or A.S. degree and
is comprised of a concentration of courses
(a minimum of 18 units). Students receiving
an associate degree must complete a major
as described under each discipline in Section
Six of the catalog. Depending upon the goal,
the attainment of the associate degree may
fulfill all of the student’s educational needs.
The associate degree in transfer majors
is designed as a college/university parallel
program for the first two years of a four-year
Bachelor’s program. The purpose of the
transfer program is to prepare students for
junior standing at a college or university
that grants a bachelor’s degree (B.A., B.S.).
The transfer major contains general and
introductory or basic courses, which will be
followed by advanced courses at the upper
division level. Students who wish to follow
a transfer pattern should carefully examine
the requirements of the receiving institution.
The Associate in Science occupational
degree programs, which require a minimum
of 60 units, provide instruction in the skills
and knowledge needed to enter or progress
in an occupation. These programs are developed through the cooperation of advisory
committees composed of representatives
from specific occupational areas and the
college. These advisory committees review
course content and make recommendations
to assure that the instruction and curriculum provide current skills.
INTERDISCIPLINARY DEGREE PROGRAMS
The following is a list of interdisciplinary
degrees at College of Marin that require
a minimum of 18 degree-applicable units
to which, in addition to other graduation
requirements, only the Associate in Arts
(A.A.) degree is granted.
International Studies Degree
PREREQUISITES FOR THE DEGREE:
English 150
MARIN.EDU
Math 115 or Statistics 115
COMPLETION OF THE FOLLOWING (CORE):
Behavioral Science 201 or Economics 201 or Political
Science 201
Economics 101
Geography 102
Political Science 104
Speech 128
COMPLETION OF 10 UNITS IN THE GRAMMAR
CLASSES IN ONE OF THE MODERN LANGUAGES
DISCIPLINES OFFERED AT COM:
Spanish 101, 102, 203, 204, 225 or 226
French 101, 102, 203, 204, 225 or 226
Italian 101, 102, 203, 204, 225 or 226
Japanese 101, 102, 203 or 204
Chinese 101, 102
Note: Student can also complete the language requirement for this degree using the Credit by Exam Procedure.
SIX UNITS FROM THE FOLLOWING (ELECTIVES):
Anthropology 102, 103
Art 102, 104, 108
Biology 138
Dance 107, 108
Economics 102
English 242
Ethnic Studies 242
French 203, 204, 225, 226
Geology 138
History 101, 206, 214, 216, 238, 215
Humanities 118, 121, 125
Italian 203, 204, 225, 226
Political Science 102, 210, 220
Sociology 220
Spanish 203, 204, 225, 226
Liberal Arts Degree
The Associate degree in Liberal Arts is
designed for students who wish to have a
broad, general education, plus additional
coursework in an “Area of Emphasis.” This
degree would be an ideal choice for students
planning on transferring to the CSU or
UC campus, as students can satisfy both
general education and lower division major
requirements at these institutions. Please
consult with a counselor for information
regarding your intended major at the specific
college or university of your choice. Students
may also refer to www.ASSIST.org to get
detailed requirements for specific colleges
and universities.
To meet the requirements for the Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts, a student must
complete:
1. One of the following General Education
patterns:
• College of Marin General Education
Requirements (Minimum of 19 units), or
• CSU General Education Requirements
(CSU GE Pattern) (Maximum of 39
units), or
• Intersegmental General Education
Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern
(UC or CSU transfer 30-39 units).
For students using the College of Marin
General Education Requirements,
please note that NO General Education
units may be used to meet the Area of
Emphasis requirements. Students using
College of Marin’s General Education
Requirements may not yet be prepared
to transfer. Students should work with
a counselor to complete these requirements.
For students using the CSU GE or IGETC
options, please note that no more than
12 of the units used to meet the general
education requirements may be doublecounted as part of the Area of Emphasis.
Students should work with a counselor to
complete these requirements.
Important: For students using the CSU
GE or IGETC options, students must
meet the following College of Marin
Graduation Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
Math proficiency
Grade point average
Total units
Residency
Cross-cultural studies
These students are exempt from completing the following College of Marin
General Education requirements:
• Physical Activity
• American Institutions
2. A minimum of 18 units from one of the
following Emphasis areas with a grade of
C or higher, Pass or Credit.
• Language Arts and Humanities
• Communication Studies
• Natural Science
• Social Science and Behavioral Sciences
• Visual and Performing Arts
Emphasis in Language Arts and
Humanities
(Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts: Emphasis
in Language Arts and Humanities)
These courses emphasize the study of
cultural, literary, humanistic and artistic
expression of human beings. Students will
Associate Degree Programs
CATALOG 2010/11
evaluate and interpret the ways in which
people of different cultures, through the
ages, have responded to themselves and the
world around them in artistic and cultural
creation. Students will also learn to value
aesthetic understanding and incorporate
these concepts when constructing value
judgments.
This degree can be a good preparation for
students transferring to a four-year university with a major in Advertising, American
Studies, Comparative Literature, English,
Foreign Languages, Humanities, Journalism,
Linguistics, Philosophy, Religious Studies,
Speech, Communication, and Television and
Film, among others.
Students must successfully complete
18 units of study across 3 disciplines listed
below:
American Sign Language 101, 102, 110, 203
Architecture 100, 101, 102
Art 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 108
Chinese 101, 102
Communications 109A+, 109B++
Dance 108
Drama 110, 116, 117
English 208, 212, 214, 218, 219, 220, 221A, 221B,
222, 223, 224, 225, 230, 235, 237, 240, 242
Ethnic Studies 108, 154
French 101, 102, 108A, 108B, 203, 204, 225, 226
Humanities 100A, 100B, 107, 108, 109A+, 109B++,
114, 118, 125, 242
Italian 101, 102, 203, 204, 225, 226
Japanese 101, 102, 203, 204
Music 101, 102, 105, 106
Philosophy 110, 111, 117
Spanish 101, 102, 203, 204, 225, 226, 230A, 230B,
230C
Speech 128
Notes:
+Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
109A or Humanities 109A.
++Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
109B or Humanities 109B.
Emphasis in Communication Studies
(Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts: Emphasis
in Communication Studies)
These courses emphasize both the
content and form of communication,
while providing an understanding of the
psychological basis and social significance of
communication including the use of modern
languages. Students will be able to assess
communication as the process of human
symbolic interaction. This degree can be a
good preparation for students transferring to
a four-year university with a major in Com-
munications, English, Modern Languages,
and Speech, among others.
Students must successfully complete
18 units of study across 3 disciplines listed
below:
American Sign Language 101, 102, 203, 204
Chinese 101, 102
Communications 109A*, 109B**, 110+, 150, 160++
Computer Information Systems 110
English 202, 203
French 101, 102, 108A,108B, 203, 204, 225, 226
45
be offered after spring 2011; Biology 112ABC replace
115 and 116), 120,138+++, 142, 145, 147, 160, 162,
171, 224, 235, 240, 246, 250
Chemistry 105, 114, 115, 131, 132, 231, 232
Geography 101, 101L, 112, 125
Geology 103, 105, 109, 114, 115, 116, 120, 120L,
121,125, 126, 138+++, 142, 145, 201, 250
Math 105, 109, 114, 115*, 121, 122, 123, 124, 223,
224
Physics 108A, 108B, 110, 207A, 207B, 207C
Statistics 115*
Humanities 109A*, 109B**
Notes:
Italian 101, 102, 108, 203, 204, 225, 226
+ Credit awarded for only one course: Astronomy 105 or
Biology 105.
Journalism 110+, 160++
Japanese 101, 102, 203, 204
Spanish 101, 102, 203, 203H, 204, 225, 226, 230A,
230B, 230C
Speech 110, 120, 122, 128, 130, 132, 140, 141
Notes:
*Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
109A or Humanities 109A.
**Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
109B or Humanities 109B.
+Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
110 or Journalism 110.
++Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
160 or Journalism 160.
Emphasis in Natural Science
(Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts: Emphasis
in Natural Science)
These courses emphasize the study of
mathematical and quantitative reasoning
skills; they impart knowledge of the facts
and principles that form the foundation
of living and non-living systems. Students
recognize and appreciate the methodologies
of science as investigative tools, as well as the
limitations of scientific endeavors. This degree can be a good preparation for students
who have a general interest in science but are
majoring in areas other than science. This
degree may not adequately prepare a student
transferring in a science major. Students intending to transfer to a four-year university
with a science major in Biology, Chemistry,
Engineering, Geography, Geology, Physics,
or Pre Med., among others, should select
course work in conjunction with a counselor.
Students must successfully complete
18 units of study across 3 disciplines listed
below:
Anthropology 101, 101L
Astronomy 101, 105+, 117L
Biology 100, 105+,107++, 108 (course no longer
offered effective fall 2010), 109, 110, 110L, 115, 116
(please note that Biology 115 and 116 will no longer
++Credit awarded for only one course: Biology 107 or
Physical Education 107.
+++Credit awarded for only one course: Biology 138 or
Geology 138.
*Credit awarded for only one course: Math 115 or Statistics
115.
Emphasis in Social Science and Behavioral
Sciences
(Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts: Emphasis
in Social Science and Behavioral Sciences)
These courses emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to the understanding
and study of human behavior. Students will
explore and examine the nature and multitude of interactive relationships amongst
and between individuals and their social
environment, ranging from the development
of the individual, to the nuances of interpersonal interaction, to the dynamic structures
of national and global communities.
Students will gain a heightened awareness
of the nature of their individuality, attain a
greater understanding and appreciation of
the complexities and diversity of the world in
which they live and become better equipped
to succeed in an increasingly diverse and
complex society.
This degree can be a good preparation for
students transferring to a four-year university with a major in African-American
Studies, Anthropology, Chicano Studies,
Child Development, Cognitive Science,
Criminal Justice, Developmental Studies,
Ethnic Studies, Family and Consumer Studies, Global Studies, History, International
Relations, Legal Studies, Peace and Conflict
Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Social
Work, Social Science, and Sociology, among
others.
Students must successfully complete
18 units of study across 3 disciplines listed
below:
Administration of Justice 110, 111, 204
Anthropology 102, 103, 110, 204, 208, 215
46
Associate Degree Programs
Behavioral Science 103+, 105, 201++
Biology 108A+, 251****
Business 101
Communications 110*, 160**
Computer Information Systems 110
Counseling 114, 130
Early Childhood Education 110, 112
Economics 101, 102
Education 110, 111
Ethnic Studies 110, 111, 112, 121, 151, 154
Geography 102, 109
MARIN.EDU
Drama, Film, Graphic Communications/
Design, Multimedia Studies, and Theater,
among others.
Students must successfully complete
18 units of study across 3 disciplines listed
below:
Architecture 100, 101, 102, 110, 130
Art 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 108, 112, 113, 114,
116, 118, 130, 134, 140, 144, 146, 148, 152, 165,
170, 180, 185, 190
Communications 109A+, 109B++, 150
Health Education 130, 142
Dance 108, 119*, 121*, 122*, 130A*, 130B* 132*,
135*, 142*, 154*, 160*, 161*
History 100, 101, 102, 103, 109, 110, 111, 112, 117,
118, 206, 214, 215, 216, 238
Drama 110, 116, 117, 130, 150, 160*, 161
Journalism 110*, 160**
Humanities 109A+, 109B++
Math 115+++
Political Science 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 117,
201++, 203, 210, 215, 220
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, 120, 140, 142,
204, 205***, 230, 251****
Sociology 110, 112, 114, 140, 184, 205***, 230
Speech 128
Statistics 115+++
Notes:
+Credit awarded for only one course: Behavioral Science
103 or Biology 108A .
++Credit awarded for only one course: Behavioral Science
201 or Political Science 201.
+++Credit awarded for only one course: Math 115 or
Statistics 115.
*Credit awarded for only one course: Communications 110
or Journalism 110.
** Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
160 or Journalism 160.
*** Credit awarded for only one course: Psychology 205 or
Sociology 205.
****Credit awarded for only one course: Psychology 251
or Biology 251.
Emphasis in Visual and Performing Arts
(Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts: Emphasis
in Visual and Performing Arts)
These courses emphasize the study of
cultural activities and artistic expression
of human beings. Students evaluate and
interpret the ways in which people through
the ages in different cultures have responded
to themselves and the world around them
in artistic and cultural creation. Emphasis
is placed on appreciation of the arts, as well
as the performance of Dance, Music and
Drama and the production of various forms
of visual arts. Students are encouraged to
participate in performances, as well as create
a body of their original work.
This degree can be a good preparation
for students transferring to a four-year
university with a major in Applied Design,
Architecture, Art, Art History, Dance,
English 202, 203
Music 101, 102, 105, 106, 113, 116, 162*, 163*, 165*,
166*, 167*, 168*, 169*, 171, 173*, 174*, 175*, 177*,
178*, 180A*, 181*, 186A*, 186B*, 186C*, 191*, 193
Notes:
*All courses marked with an asterisk (*) have a limit of 3
units total, regardless of discipline.
+Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
109A/Humanities 109A.
++Credit awarded for only one course: Communications
109B/Humanities 109B.
ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE:
PHYSICAL SCIENCES
The Physical Sciences degree is designed
for students who wish to have a broad
foundation in the physical sciences and
mathematics that is ideal for building a more
advanced understanding of a particular
field of science or engineering, and to gain
experience in multiple science courses and
build math skills. Consequently, this degree
can be a good option for students planning
to transfer to a four-year university with
a major in Biology, Chemistry, Computer
Science, Engineering, Math, or Physics,
providing the knowledge and skills to make
academic success possible in these fields.
It provides the flexibility for students to
satisfy both the appropriate level of general
education and the lower division major
requirements for specific universities, while
still meeting associate degree requirements.
For more detailed information on transfer
requirements, students should speak with a
counselor to ensure courses are transferable
and refer to www.ASSIST.org.
To complete the requirements for the
Associate of Science for this major, a student
must complete:
1. One of the following General Education
patterns:
• College of Marin GE (minimum 19
units), or
• CSU GE (30-39 units), or
• IGETC (60 units), or
• The following pattern (minimum of
21 units ) that is recommended for
most science and engineering students
pursuing this degree:
• two transferable college courses
(three semester units each) in
English composition - English 150
and 151 or 155; and
• one transferable college course
(three semester units) in mathematical concepts and quantitative
reasoning (see course list for
IGETC Area 2); and
• four transferable college courses
(three semester units each) chosen
from the following three subject
areas (at least one course from
each): the arts and humanities
(see course list for IGETC Area
3, Group A or B), the social and
behavioral sciences (see course list
for IGETC Area 4), and the physical
and biological sciences (see course
list for IGETC Area 5, Group A or
B).
Important: For students using the CSU
GE or IGETC options, students must
meet the following College of Marin
Graduation Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
Math proficiency
Grade point average
Total units
Residency
Cross-cultural studies
These students are exempt from completing the following College of Marin
General Education requirements:
• Physical Activity
• American Institutions
2. A minimum of 18 units that include at
least three different disciplines from
those courses outlined below. Each course
used to meet this requirement must be
completed with a grade of C or higher,
Pass or Credit. Note that courses used to
satisfy this 18-unit major requirement
may NOT also be used to satisfy the GE
requirements above.
Biology 115, 116 (please note that Biology 115 and
116 will no longer be offered after spring 2011;
Biology 112ABC replace 115 and 116)
Skills Certificates
CATALOG 2010/11
Chemistry 131, 132, 231, 232
Computer Science 150A, 150B, 160, 220, 230, 232,
235
Engineering 110, 125, 126, 220, 235, 245
Math 116, 117, 123, 124, 223, 224
Physics 108A, 108AC, 108B, 108BC, 207A, 207B,
207C
CERTIFICATE OF
ACHIEVEMENT
PROGRAMS
A Certificate of Achievement is attainable
in occupational programs. The certificate is
widely recognized by employers as verification of job preparedness. Certificates of
Achievement prepare students to enter the
careers designated on their certificates.
These programs generally require a year or
more of study and include at least 18 units.
At least 12 of the units must be taken at
College of Marin.
It is the student’s responsibility to submit
an “Application for a Certificate of Achievement” by making an appointment with the
Counseling Department.
Certificate of Achievement programs and
requirements are listed under each discipline
in Section Six of the catalog.
Granting of Additional Certificates of
Achievement
Upon completion of all Certificates of
Achievement requirements as specified in
this catalog, a student may qualify for more
than one certificate provided that 12 of
the required units for a certificate are not
applied toward any other certificate.
Basic Skills Courses
Courses numbered below 100 are nondegree
applicable but may be used for a Certificate
of Achievement when listed as a major
requirement. Basic skills courses under 100
do not apply toward the 60 units required for
graduation, even though they may be listed
as part of a vocational program.
SKILLS CERTIFICATES
Skills certificates may be part of a “ladder”
of skills, beginning with job entry skills and
leading to a full Certificate of Achievement
or may constitute a skill set that enables
students to upgrade or advance in an
existing career. These programs are shorter
in duration and narrower in scope than the
Certificates of Achievement and consist of
fewer than 18 units.
Generally all required courses must be
completed at the College of Marin. The
appropriate Department Chair must approve
transfer work. All work must be completed
within two years.
Skills certificates and requirements are
listed under each discipline in Section Six.
Note: See table on next page.
47
48
Table of A.S./A.A. Degrees
MARIN.EDU
TABLE OF A.S./A.A. DEGREES
Ethnic Studies
X
Fire Technology; Emergency
Medical Technician
Art: Design, Applied, Occupational
Art: Design, Applied-Interior,
Occupational
X
X
Automotive Collision Repair
Technology
X
Automotive Technology
X
Behavioral Science
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Chemistry
X
X
Chinese
Communications (Film)
X
Computer Information Systems
X
Computer Science
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
International Studies
X
X
X
Japanese
X
Journalism
X
X
Education
X
Electronics Technology
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Multimedia
X
Music
X
X
X
X
X
X
Physics
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Spanish
X
X
Speech
X
X
Work Experience
X
X
X
Statistics
X
X
X
Sociology
X
X
X
X
Social Science
X
X
Physical Sciences
Real Estate
X
X
X
Medical Assisting
Study Skills
X
X
Liberal Arts
Political Science
X
X
X
Italian
Psychology
X
Economics
English
History
Physical Education
X
X
X
X
Humanities
Philosophy
X
X
X
Nursing, Registered
X
X
X
X
X
Drama
Engineering
X
X
Dance
Geology
X
X
Counseling
Early Childhood Education
X
X
X
Mathematics
X
Business Office Systems,
Occupational
X
X
Machine and Metals Technology
X
X
X
Library
X
X
X
Geography
X
Business, Management
Dental Assisting: Registered
X
X
Business, General
Court Reporting
X
X
Business Administration
Business: Applied Accounting,
Occupational
X
X
Biology: Environmental Science
X
Health Education
X
Biology: Natural History
X
French
X
Astronomy
Biology
X
X
X
Skills
Certificates
X
X
Certificates of
Achievement
Environmental Landscaping
Anthropology
X
Transfer
X
Architecture
X
English as a Second Language
American Sign Language
Art
A.A. Degree
X
PROGRAM/DISCIPLINE
A.S. Degree
X
Skills
Certificates
Certificates of
Achievement
X
Transfer
Administration of Justice
A.A. Degree
PROGRAM/DISCIPLINE
A.S. Degree
PROGRAMS, TRANSFER, CERTIFICATES OF ACHIEVEMENT, AND
SKILLS CERTIFICATES
X
X
X
SECTION 5
TRANSFER INFORMATION
50
California State University Transfer Information
Students planning to transfer from College
of Marin to another college or university
should plan their program to include both
general education requirements and the
specific major requirements of a particular
college or university. Transfer students are
advised to work closely with a counselor, in
order to make appropriate course choices
that will permit transfer to a California
public university after completing 60
transferable units at College of Marin. The
admission requirements for lower and upper
division transfer to private and out-of-state
colleges and universities vary from school
to school. Careful planning will ensure
students avoid taking classes that do not
meet requirements.
Students who intend to transfer should
consult the catalog of the institution to
which they intend to transfer. Catalogs of the
major universities and colleges are available
for reference from the Transfer and Career
Center located in the Student Services
Center and on the World Wide Web. The
earlier a student makes a decision regarding
a transfer institution, the better the possibility is for meeting all requirements in a timely
manner.
ASSIST (ONLINE STUDENT TRANSFER
INFORMATION SYSTEM)
ASSIST is a web-based student transfer
information system that can be accessed
at www.assist.org. ASSIST is the official
statewide repository of articulation for
California’s colleges and universities; the
site displays reports of how course credits
earned at a California community college
or university can be applied to transfer to a
public California university (California State
University, University of California). ASSIST
is the primary site where students can
find specific College of Marin courses that
satisfy general education, major preparation
requirements, and transferable electives for
the UCs and CSUs.
CALIFORNIA STATE
UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
INFORMATION
General Admission Information to the
California State University Campuses:
Bakersfield, Channel Islands, Chico, Dominguez Hills, East Bay, Fresno, Fullerton,
Humboldt, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Vallejo
(California Maritime Academy), Monterey
Bay, Northridge, Pomona (California State
Polytechnic), Sacramento, San Bernadino,
San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, San
Luis Obispo (California Polytechnic), San
Marcos, Sonoma, and Stanislaus.
Lower Division Transfer Admission
Requirements
Some campuses restrict enrollment of lower
division transfer students due to heavy
enrollment pressure and budget cuts. College of Marin students who are California
residents with fewer than 60 transferable
semester units are considered lower division
transfer students.
You are eligible for admission to California
State University if you:
1. Have a college grade point average of 2.00
or higher in all transferable college units
attempted.
2. Are in good standing at College of Marin,
i.e., you are eligible to re-enroll.
3. Meet the admission requirements for a
first-time freshman or have successfully
completed necessary courses to make up
the deficiencies you had in high school if
you did not complete the 15-unit pattern
of college preparatory subjects.
4. Meet the eligibility index required of a
freshman.
Some campuses may require lower
division transfer students to have completed
English composition and general education
mathematics prior to transfer. Contact your
campus of choice to determine whether
there are admissions limits on the number of
lower division transfer students.
Note: Some CSU campuses do not admit
lower-division transfer students.
Upper Division Transfer Minimum
Eligibility Requirements
College of Marin students with 60 or more
transferable semester units are considered
upper division transfer students.
You are eligible for admission to California State University if you:
1. Have a college grade point average of
2.00 or higher (2.40 for non-California
residents) in all transferable college units
attempted.
2. Are in good standing at College of Marin,
i.e., you are eligible to re-enroll.
3. Have completed or will complete prior
to transfer at least 30 semester units of
courses equivalent to general education
requirements with a grade of C or higher.
The 30 units must include all of the general education requirements in commu-
MARIN.EDU
nication in the English language (English
composition, oral communication, and
critical thinking) and at least one course
of at least three semester units required in
college level mathematics (Mathematics/
Quantitative Reasoning).
Note: Contact your campus of choice to
determine if there are admissions limits
due to completion of 39 units of general
education and major prerequisites.
Required Placement Tests
Upper division transfer students who have
completed English composition and college
level math courses with a grade of C or higher are exempt from the English Placement
Test (EPT) and the Entry Level Mathematics
Test (ELM). Upper division transfer students
must complete both English composition
and college level mathematics prior to
enrolling at a CSU campus.
Lower division transfer students will
be required to take the tests if they are not
exempt based on their SAT or ACT scores
or if they have not completed an appropriate
English composition course and a college
level math course with a grade of C or
higher.
Transcripts for California State University
Simultaneous to applying for admission,
transfer students to the California State
University must submit official transcripts
directly from all colleges or universities
previously attended even if no coursework was completed. If transferring with
fewer than 60 transferable semester units
completed, transfer applicants must also
submit high school transcripts and official
test scores. Transcripts must be received in
sealed envelopes directly from each institution attended. The first two copies of official
transcripts from College of Marin are free.
GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR
THE BACHELOR’S DEGREE AT CALIFORNIA
STATE UNIVERSITY
In addition to other requirements for graduation with a baccalaureate degree, California
State University requires preparation for
general education. Proper planning should
enable students to satisfy the state university
general education breadth requirements
concurrently with requirements for either
an Associate in Arts (A.A.) or Associate in
Science (A.S.) degree from College of Marin.
CSU General Education Certification
Approximately 124 semester units are
required for a Baccalaureate degree at a
California State University Transfer Information
CATALOG 2010/11
California State University of which 48
units must be in general education within a
prescribed pattern. Thirty-nine units may
be completed and certified in whole or in
part at College of Marin. The remaining
nine units must be taken as upper division courses after transfer to the four-year
university.
Community colleges may certify no more
than 30 units of general education from
Subject Areas B, C, and D combined. The
remaining units may be taken from Areas A
and/or E.
Completion of 39 units of general
education for the California State University
System is not a requirement for admission.
However, it is recommended that these units
be completed during the first 60 units of
college.
Students must make a request for
certification of general education prior to
attending California State University by
completing two forms:
1. A Request for Transcript, and
2. A Request for General Education
Certification.
United States History, Constitution, and
American Ideals Requirement
In addition to general education, California
State Universities also require United States
History and Constitution and American
Ideals for graduation. Courses at the College
of Marin that fulfill the two course requirement are:
1. One course in United States History to be
chosen from the following:
a. Ethnic Studies 111 or 112 or 121 or 151
b. History 100 or 117 or 118
A-3 CRITICAL THINKING
Area Notes
Economics 125*
English 130, 151, 155
(a) Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Ethnic Studies 125*
Astronomy 105 or Biology 105 or Geology 105
History 125*
Biology 107 or Physical Education 107
Philosophy 112
Biology 138 or Geology 138
Political Science 125*
Biology 160 or Environmental Landscaping 160
Social Science 125*
Computer Science 117 or Math 117
Speech 132
(b) Astronomy 105, Biology 105, or Geology 105 may be
used for B-I or B-2, but not both.
Area Notes
(a) Speech 132 may be used for A-I or A-3, but not both
(b) Credit is given for only one course in the following set:
Economics 125, Ethnic Studies 125, History 125, Political
Science 125, Social Science 125.
*Please note that these courses will be removed from A-3
effective fall 2011.
AREA B – SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY AND
QUANTITATIVE REASONING
Nine units. Select one course from B-1, B-2,
B-3, and B-4 (A laboratory course marked by
an asterisk * in B-1 and B-2 will satisfy B-3).
B-1 PHYSICAL SCIENCES
Astronomy 101, 105, 117F*, 117L*
Biology 105, 138*, 160
Chemistry 105, 105L*, 110*, 114*, 115*, 131*, 132*,
132E, 231*, 232*, 232E
Environmental Landscaping 160
Geography 101, 101L*, 112
(c) Biology 138, Geology 138 may be used for B-I or B-2,
but not both.
AREA C – ARTS AND HUMANITIES
Nine units. Select three courses to include at
least one course each from C-1 and C-2.
C-1 ARTS (ART, DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE)
Architecture 100, 101, 102
Art 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 112, 113, 114,
116, 118, 130, 134, 140, 144, 146, 148, 152, 165, 170,
180, 185, 190
Communications 109A, 109B
Dance 108, 119, 121, 122, 126, 130AB, 132, 135
Drama 110, 130, 150, 160, 161, 245, 260
Ethnic Studies 108
Humanities 108, 109A, 109B
Music 101, 102, 105, 106
C-2 HUMANITIES (LITERATURE, PHILOSOPHY, AND
FOREIGN LANGUAGE)
Geology 103, 105, 109, 110, 114, 120, 120L*, 121*, 138*,
201*
American Sign Language 101, 102, 110, 203
Physics 108A*, 108AC, 108B*, 108BC, 110, 207A*,
207B*, 207C*
Drama 116, 117
B-2 LIFE SCIENCE (BIOLOGICAL)
Anthropology 101, 101L*
Astronomy 105
Biology 105, 107, 109, 110, 110L*, 112ABC*, 115*, 116*,
120*, 138*, 162*, 224*, 235*, 240*
2. One course in Constitution and
American Ideals to be chosen from the
following:
a. Political Science 100 or 101
Geology 105, 138*
Physical Education 107
Chinese 101, 102
English 208, 212, 214, 218, 219, 220, 221A, 221B, 222,
223, 224, 225, 230, 235, 237, 240, 242
Ethnic Studies 154
French 101, 102, 108A, 108B, 203, 204, 225, 226
Humanities 100A, 100B, 107, 114, 118, 125, 242
Italian 101, 102, 203, 204, 225, 226
Japanese 101, 102, 204
Philosophy 110, 111, 117
B-3 LABORATORY ACTIVITY
Spanish 101, 102, 203, 203HB, 204, 225, 226, 230A,
230B, 230C
Anthropology 101L
Speech 140, 141
2010-2011 CSU GENERAL EDUCATION
PROGRAM
Astronomy 117F, 117L
Area Notes
AREA A - ENGLISH LANGUAGE
COMMUNICATION AND CRITICAL
THINKING
Nine units. Select one course each from A-1,
A-2, and A-3
Chemistry 105L, 110, 114, 115, 131, 132, 231, 232
A-1 ORAL COMMUNICATION
Speech 110, 120, 122, 130, 132
51
Biology 110L, 112A, 112B, 112C, 115, 116, 120, 138, 162,
224, 235, 240
Geography 101L
Geology 120L, 121, 138, 201
Physics 108A, 108B, 207A, 207B, 207C
(a) Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Art 108, Ethnic Studies 108 or Humanities 108
Communications 109A or Humanities 109A
Communications 109B or Humanities 109B
Humanities 114 or Humanities 118
B-4 MATHEMATICS/QUANTITATIVE REASONING
English 242 or Humanities 242
Computer Science 117
(b) American Sign Language 110 may be used for C-2 or
D-1, but not both
A-2 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
Math 104 or 104XY, 105, 109, 110, 114, 115, 116, 117,
121, 122, 123, 124, 223, 224
English 150
Statistics 115
AREA D – SOCIAL SCIENCES
Nine units. Select three courses from three
different groups.
52
California State University Transfer Information
D-0 SOCIOLOGY AND CRIMINOLOGY
Area Notes
Administration of Justice 204
Psychology 205
(a) Credit is given in Area D or Area E, but not both for the
following courses:
Sociology 110, 112, 184, 205, 250
Behavioral Science 103, 114
D-1 ANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHEOLOGY
American Sign Language 110
Anthropology 102, 103, 110, 204, 208, 215
Biology 108A
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 114, 140, 145
Sociology 140
D-2 ECONOMICS
(b) Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Economics 101, 102
Administration of Justice 204 or Sociology 184
D-3 ETHNIC STUDIES
Communications 160
Ethnic Studies 110, 111, 112, 121, 151
Journalism 160
D-4 GENDER STUDIES
Communications 160
History 211
Journalism 160
Political Science 211
Psychology 120
D-5 GEOGRAPHY
Geography 102, 109
D-6 HISTORY
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151
History 100, 101, 102, 109, 110, 111, 112, 117, 118, 206,
211, 214, 215, 216, 238
Political Science 211
Behavioral Science 103 or Biology 108A
Behavioral Science 201 or Economics 201 or Political
Science 201
Biology 251 or Psychology 251
Communications 110 or Journalism 110
Communications 160 or Journalism 160
Economics 201
Ethnic Studies 242
Journalism 110
Political Science 201
Psychology 140, 230
Sociology 114, 140, 230
Speech 128
D-8 POLITICAL SCIENCE, GOVERNMENT, AND LEGAL
INSTITUTIONS
History 211
Political Science 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 117, 210, 211,
220
Administration of Justice—all courses except 39
Anthropology—all courses except 39
Psychology 140 or Sociology 140
Architecture—all courses except 39
Psychology 205 or Sociology 205
Art—all courses except 39
Psychology 230 or Sociology 230
Astronomy—all courses except 39
(c) See catalog description for Psychology 112 credit
limitation
Automotive Collision Repair
(d) Courses listed in multiple groups in Area D may not be
certified in more than one group.
Automotive Technology—all courses except 39 and 95
American Sign Language 110: C-2 or D-1
Communications 160: D-3 or D-4
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151: D-3 or D-6
Journalism 160: D-3 or D-4
History 211: D-4 or D-6 or D-8
Psychology 205: D-0 or D-9
Early Childhood Education 110, 112
Courses are accepted by California State
University for credit toward the baccalaureate degree that College of Marin designates
as appropriate for baccalaureate credit.
To determine whether a course fulfills a
requirement for a major, consult the catalog
of the school to which you intend to transfer,
the World Wide Web at ASSIST (www.assist.
org), and a counselor.
American Sign Language—all courses
Behavioral Science 103, 114, 201
Communications 110
COLLEGE OF MARIN COURSES
TRANSFERABLE TOWARD BACCALAUREATE
DEGREE CREDIT AT THE CALIFORNIA STATE
UNIVERSITY
Psychology 111 or Psychology 116
Political Science 211: D-4 or D-6 or D-8
Business 101
(c) See catalog description for Psychology 114 credit
limitation
History 211 or Political Science 211
D-7 INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL OR BEHAVIORAL
SCIENCE
Biology 108A
MARIN.EDU
Psychology 120: D-4 or D-9
Sociology 205: D-0 or D-9
Technology—all courses except 39 and 95
Behavioral Science—all courses except 39
Biology—all courses except 39 and 99
Business—all courses except 39
Business Office Systems—all courses except 39 through
99
Chemistry—all courses except 39
Chinese—all courses
Communications—all courses except 39
Computer Information Systems—all courses except 39
Computer Science—all courses except 39 and 75
AREA E - LIFELONG UNDERSTANDING
AND SELF-DEVELOPMENT
Three units. Select one course.
Counseling—all courses except 39, 70, and 154
Behavioral Science 103, 114
Dental Assisting—all courses except 39 and 100
Biology 100, 108A
Counseling 130
Health Education 112, 130, 142
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 114, 140, 142, 145
Sociology 140
Court Reporting—all courses except 39 and 90
Dance—all courses except 39
Drama—all courses except 39 and 90
Early Childhood Education—all courses except 39
Economics—all courses except 39
Education—all courses except 39
Electronics Technology—all courses
Area Notes
Engineering—all courses except 39
(a) Credit is given in Area D or Area E, but not both for the
following courses:
English—all courses except 10 through 99
Behavioral Science 103, 114
Environmental Landscaping—all courses except 39
Biology 108A
Ethnic Studies—all courses except 39
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 114, 140, 145
Film/Video—all communications courses listed under
film/video, except 39
English as Second Language—English 120SL only
D-9 PSYCHOLOGY
Sociology 140
Biology 251
(b) Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Independent Study
Behavioral Science 103 or Biology 108A
French—all courses except 39
Health Education 142 or Psychology 142
Geography—all courses except 39
Psychology 140 or Sociology 140
Geology—all courses except 39 and 99
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, 120, 145, 204, 205,
251
Sociology 205
Fire Technology—all courses except 39
CATALOG 2010/11
Health Education—all courses except 39 and 100
History—all courses except 39
Humanities—all courses except 39
Independent Study—all courses
Italian—all courses except 39
Japanese—all courses except 39
Journalism—all courses except 39
Library—all courses except 39
Machine and Metals Technology—all courses except 39,
90, and 97
Mathematics—all courses except 25 through 103, 103AB,
103S, and 103XY
Medical Assisting—all courses except 39 and 100
Multimedia Studies—all courses except 39 and 90
Music—all courses except 39
Nursing Education—all courses except 39, 90, 95, and 100
Philosophy—all courses except 39
Physical Education—all courses except 39
Physics—all courses except 39
Political Science—all courses except 39
Psychology—all courses except 39
Real Estate—all courses except 39
Social Science—all courses except 39
Sociology—all courses except 39
Spanish—all courses except 39
Speech—all courses except 39
Statistics—all courses except 39
Study Skills—all courses except 39 through 78
Work Experience—all courses
UNIVERSITY OF
CALIFORNIA TRANSFER
INFORMATION
General Admission Information to the
University of California Campuses: Berkeley, Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, Merced,
Riverside, San Diego, San Francisco, Santa
Barbara, and Santa Cruz
The University considers you a transfer
applicant if you graduated from high school
and enrolled in a regular session at a college
or university. As a transfer applicant, you
may not disregard your college record and
apply as a freshman.
College of Marin transfer students should
take courses that are transferable, that satisfy
University and college requirements, and
that fulfill prerequisites in the major. Advisors in the Admissions Office at the campus
you wish to attend and College of Marin
counselors can help you with your planning.
The transfer admission requirements
described in this section represent the
University of California Transfer Information
minimum level of achievement to be eligible
for admission to the University.
If the number of applicants exceeds the
spaces available for a particular campus or
major – as is often the case – the campus
uses criteria that exceed the minimum
requirements to select students. Meeting
the minimum requirements, therefore, is
not enough to gain admission to many UC
campuses and programs.
Transfer Eligibility Requirements for
California Residents
To be eligible for admission to UC as a
transfer student, you must fulfill both of the
following criteria:
1. Complete 60 semester units of transferable college credit with a grade point
average of at least 2.4 and no more than
14 semester units may be taken Pass/Not
Pass.
2. Complete the following course pattern
requirements, earning a grade of C or
higher in each course:
• Two transferable college courses
(three semester units each) in English
composition - English 150 and 151 or
155; and
• One transferable college course (three
semester units) in mathematical
concepts and quantitative reasoning;
and
• Four transferable college courses
(three semester units each) chosen
from at least two of the following
subject areas: the arts and humanities,
the social and behavioral sciences,
and the physical and biological
sciences. Exception: University of
California, Berkeley, College of Letters
and Science requires three years of
foreign language in high school or two
semesters at College of Marin.
If you satisfy the Intersegmental General
Education Transfer Curriculum [IGETC]
prior to transferring to University of
California, you may satisfy Part 2 of the
transfer admission requirements. For more
information about the IGETC, refer to the
Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum in this section of the catalog.
Lower Division Transfer
If you were eligible for admission to the
University when you graduated from high
school – meaning you satisfied the Subject,
Scholarship and Examination requirements,
or were identified by the University during
your senior year as eligible in the local con-
53
text and completed the Subject and Examination requirements in the senior year – you
are eligible for transfer if you have a C (2.0)
average in your transferable coursework.
If you met the Scholarship Requirement in high school but did not satisfy the
15-course Subject Requirement to be eligible
to transfer, you must take transferable college courses in the missing subjects, earn a
C or better in each required course and have
an overall C (2.0) average in all transferable
coursework.
Transfer Admission Guarantees (TAGs)
The College of Marin has transfer admission guarantees with seven University
of California campuses (Please note: UC
Berkeley and UCLA do not accept transfer
admission guarantees). The TAG program
offers guaranteed admission in most majors
through a formal agreement that outlines
the courses a student must complete and
the grade point average that must be earned
before transferring. For links to the UC
TAG, visit https://uctag.universityofcalifornia.edu/. To find out specific details, criteria,
and participating universities, contact the
Transfer and Career Center or the Counseling Department.
Intersegmental General Education
Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) For
Transfer to the University of California and
California State University
The Intersegmental General Education
Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) is a program
that College of Marin transfer students can
use to fulfill lower division general education
requirements at both the University of California and the California State University.
There are other options that fulfill general
education requirements, but none of the options cover both the University of California
and California State University.
The IGETC will permit a student to
transfer from College of Marin to a campus
in either the University of California or the
California State University System without
the need, after transfer, to take additional
courses to satisfy campus lower division
general education requirements.
The IGETC is not an admission requirement to the University of California or
California State University. Existing campus
specific admission requirements for transfer
students remain unchanged.
Important: It is not advisable for all
transfer students to follow the IGETC. The
IGETC is not recommended for students
planning to major in Engineering, Biologi-
54
University of California Transfer Information
cal and Physical Sciences or majors that require extensive lower division preparation.
Contact a College of Marin counselor for
further information regarding University
of California or California State University
schools where completion of the IGETC is
not recommended.
Full IGETC Certification
It is strongly recommended that all course
work applicable to the IGETC be completed
and certified in its entirety prior to transfer
in order to be accepted by the University of
California or California State University.
Certification indicates that all lower division
general education requirements for UC or
CSU have been met. Courses certified for
IGETC must be completed with a grade of C
or higher. It shall be the student’s responsibility to request certification when requesting the last transcript from College of Marin
prior to entering the University of California
or California State University system.
Students should contact the Counseling
Department to initiate IGETC certification.
In addition to the course requirements
for each subject area, full certification for
California State University must include
completion of the Oral Communication
Requirement. For the University of California, Oral Communication is not required,
but the certification must include satisfactory completion of a Language Other Than
English Requirement.
Courses taken at other institutions may
be used to fulfill the IGETC. Students should
be aware, however, that placement of courses
within IGETC subject areas may vary from
college to college. Placement of a course will
be based on the college of attendance and its
IGETC pattern at the time the course was
completed. Please contact the Counseling
Department for more information.
Completion of the IGETC program will
be certified by the last community college
that the student attends. As a general rule,
IGETC can be certified for California
community college transfer students who
have completed transfer units at a University
of California, California State University,
or independent college provided that the
student has completed most of the transfer
units at one or more California community
colleges.
Partial IGETC Certification
Partial certification is defined as completing
all but two (2) courses on the IGETC pattern.
Partial certifications must be accompanied
by a separate IGETC certification form,
MARIN.EDU
which clearly indicates that the certification
is “partial,” and identifies which requirements remain to be completed. WARNING:
students need to meet minimum UC/CSU
transfer admission requirements. Therefore,
partial certification that acknowledges a
deficiency in IGETC Area 1 and or 2 may
also indicate that a student does not meet
minimum transfer requirements. For more
information regarding partial certification,
please contact the Counseling Department.
Determination that courses remaining have
been completed after transfer is the responsibility of the receiving UC or CSU campus.
Community colleges are not required to recertify a student who is completing IGETC
courses after transferring.
Advanced Placement
Advanced Placement Test (AP) scores can be
used to satisfy certain areas under IGETC. A
score of 3, 4, or 5 is required to grant credit
for IGETC certification. An acceptable AP
score for IGETC equates to either 3 semester
units or 4 quarter units for certification
purposes. Each AP exam may be applied
to one IGETC area as satisfying one course
requirement, with the exception of Language
other Than English (LOTE).
Advanced Placement (AP)
A score of 3, 4, or 5 is required to grant credit
for IGETC certification. An acceptable AP
score for IGETC equates to either 3 semester
or 4 quarter units for certification purposes.
Each AP exam may be applied to one IGETC
area as satisfying one course requirement,
with the exception of Language other Than
English (LOTE).
AP EXAMINATION
IGETC AREA
Art History*
3A or 3B*
Biology
5B with lab
Calculus AB
2A
Calculus BC
2A
Calculus BC/ AB subscore
2A
Chemistry
5A with lab
Chinese Language & Culture
3B and 6A
Macroeconomics
4B
Microeconomics
4B
English Language
1A
English Literature*
1A or 3B*
Environmental Science
5A with lab
European History*
3B or 4F*
French Language
3B and 6A
* AP exams may be used in either area regardless of where
the certifying CCC’s discipline is located.
French Literature
3B and 6A
German Language
3B and 6A
Comparative Government & Politics
4H
U.S. Government & Politics
4H and US 2
Human Geography
4E
Italian Language & Culture
3B and 6A
Japanese Language & Culture
3B and 6A
Latin Literature
3B and 6A
Latin: Vergil
3B and 6A
Physics B
5A with lab
Physics C mechanics
5A with lab
Physics C electricity/magnetism
5A with lab
Psychology
4I
Spanish Language
3B and 6A
Spanish Literature
3B and 6A
Statistics
2A
U.S. History*
(3B or 4F*) & US 1
World History*
3B or 4F*
* AP exams may be used in either area regardless of where
the certifying CCC’s discipline is located.
Please consult with a counselor for more information regarding AP and IGETC credit.
2010-2011 IGETC Program
Symbols:
(+) Indicates that either the University
of California or the California State
University or both will limit transfer
credit. Please refer to “Courses from
the College of Marin Acceptable at the
University of California (All Campuses)”
in this section of the catalog or consult a
counselor.
(*) Courses listed in multiple areas shall not
be certified in more than one area except
for courses in Language Other Than
English, which can be certified in both
areas 3B and 6A.
(o) Note: Courses approved for Fall 91
may be taken prior to Fall 91. Courses
approved for Fall 92 or later may not be
taken prior to Fall 92.
AREA 1 - ENGLISH COMMUNICATION
For CSU: select three courses, one each
from Group A, B, and C. For UC, select two
courses, one each from Group A and B.
GROUP A - ENGLISH COMPOSITION
English 150
GROUP B - CRITICAL THINKING/ENGLISH
COMPOSITION
English 151, 155*
University of California Transfer Information
CATALOG 2010/11
55
GROUP C - ORAL COMMUNICATION (CSU
REQUIREMENT ONLY)
Communications 110, 160
Astronomy 105 or Biology 105 or Geology 105
Early Childhood Education 110
Biology 107 or Physical Education 107
Speech 110, 120, 122, 130, 132*
Economics 101, 102, 201
Biology 138 or Geology 138
AREA 2 - MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS
AND QUANTITATIVE REASONING
Select one course, three semester units.
Ethnic Studies 110, 111, 112, 121, 151, 242
Biology 160 or Environmental Landscaping 160
Geography 102, 109
Health Education 142+
(b) Biology 138,Geology 138 may be used for 5A or 5B but
not both
Computer Science 117
History 100+, 101, 102, 109, 110, 111, 112, 117+, 118+,
206, 211, 214, 215, 216, 238
AREA 6 - LANGUAGES OTHER THAN
ENGLISH (UC Requirement only)
Math 105, 109, 114, 115+, 116, 117, 121+, 122+, 123+,
124+, 223, 224
Statistics 115+
AREA 3 - ARTS AND HUMANITIES
Select three courses, with at least one course
from Group A and one course from Group
B, nine semester units.
GROUP A – ARTS
Architecture 100+, 101+, 102+
Art 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108
Communications 109A, 109B
Journalism 110, 160
Political Science 100+, 101+, 102, 103, 104, 201, 210,
211, 220
Psychology 110, 111+, 112+, 114+, 116+, 120, 140,
142+, 204, 205, 230, 251
Sociology 110, 112, 114, 140, 205, 230
Area Notes
(a) Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Behaviorial Science 103 or Biology 108A
6A - Languages Other Than English
May be met by one of the following:
• Two years of one language other than
English in high school with a grade of “C”
or higher
• Completion of one of the following
courses:
American Sign Language 101, 102*, 203*, 204
Chinese 101, 102*
French 101, 102*, 203*, 204*, 225*, 226*
Dance 108
Behavioral Science 201 or Economics 201 or Political
Science 201
Drama 110
Biology 251 or Psychology 251
Japanese 101, 102*, 203
Ethnic Studies 108
Communications 110 or Journalism 110
Humanities 108, 109A, 109B
Communications 160 or Journalism 160
Spanish 101, 102*, 203*, 203HB*, 204*, 225*, 226*,
230C*
Music 101, 102, 105
History 211 or Political Science 211
GROUP B – HUMANITIES
American Sign Language 102*, 203*
Chinese 102*
Drama 116, 117
English 208, 212, 214, 218, 220, 221A, 221B, 222, 223,
224, 225, 230, 235, 237, 240, 242
Ethnic Studies 154
French 102*, 108A, 108B, 203*, 204*, 225*, 226*
Humanities 100A, 100B, 107, 114, 118, 125, 242
Italian 102*, 203*, 204*, 225*, 226*
Japanese 102*, 204
Philosophy 110, 111, 117
Psychology 111 or Psychology 116
Psychology 140 or Sociology 140
Psychology 205 or Sociology 205
Psychology 230 or Sociology 230
AREA 5 - PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL
SCIENCES
Select at least two courses, one course from
Group A and one course from Group B,
seven to nine semester units. At least one of
the courses selected must include a laboratory. Courses that are labs or have a lab
component are underlined.
Spanish 102*, 203*, 203HB*, 204*, 225*, 226*, 230A,
230B, 230C*
GROUP A - PHYSICAL SCIENCES
Speech 128
Biology 105, 138, 160
Area Notes
Chemistry 105+, 105L, 114+, 115+, 131, 132+, 132E+,
231, 232+
(a) Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Astronomy 101, 105, 117F, 117L
Environmental Landscaping 160
Art 108 or Ethnic Studies 108 or Humanities 108
Geography 101, 101L, 112
Communications 109A or Humanities 109A
Geology 103, 105, 109, 110+, 114, 120+, 120L, 121,
138, 201
Communications 109B or Humanities 109B
English 242 or Humanities 242
Physics 108A+, 110+, 207A+
Humanities 114 or 118
GROUP B - BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
AREA 4 - SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL
SCIENCES
Select three courses, nine semester units.
Courses must be selected from at least two
disciplines.
Anthropology 101, 101L
Anthropology 102+, 103+, 110, 204, 208, 215+
Area Notes
Behavioral Science 103, 201
Biology 108A+, 251
Biology 107, 109, 110+, 110L+, 112ABC, 115, 116, 120,
138, 162, 224, 235, 240
Geology 138
Physical Education 107
(a) Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Italian 101, 102*, 203*, 204*, 225*, 226*,
Note: Courses listed in multiple areas shall not be certified
in more than one area except for courses in Languages
Other Than English, which can be certified in both areas
3B and 6A.
• Satisfactory completion, with a “C” grade or better,
of two years of formal schooling at the sixth grade
level or higher in an institution where the language
of instruction is not English. Documentation must be
presented.
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATION REQUIREMENT IN UNITED
STATES HISTORY, CONSTITUTION AND
AMERICAN IDEALS.
(This is not a part of the IGETC, but may
be completed prior to transfer to the CSU.)
Select one course from Group A and one
course from Group B
GROUP A - UNITED STATES HISTORY
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151
History 100, 117, 118
GROUP B - CONSTITUTION AND AMERICAN IDEALS
Political Science 100, 101
COURSES FROM THE COLLEGE OF MARIN
ACCEPTABLE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF
CALIFORNIA (ALL CAMPUSES)
All of the following courses are transferable
with limitations as indicated.
To determine whether a course fulfills a
requirement for a major, you must consult
the catalog of the University of California
campus to which you plan to transfer. Please
see a counselor if you have any questions and
56
University of California Transfer Information
MARIN.EDU
for specific requirements that must be met
prior to transfer.
o No credit for 110, 110L if taken after 115 or 116
ENGINEERING
Honor Course Credit Limitation
Duplicate credit will not be awarded for
both the honors and regular versions of a
course. Credit will only be awarded to the
first course completed with a grade of C or
higher.
BUSINESS
101, 107, 112, 113
110, 110B, 125, 126, 139 (see Var. Topic), 210, 220, 220L,
235, 245, 249 (see Var. Topic)
# indicates new courses or changes for
current year
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
110, 111, 118, 204 (same as Sociology 184)
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
101*, 102, 203, 204
* Corresponds to two years of high school study.
ANTHROPOLOGY
101, 101L, 102*, 103*, 110, 139 (see Var. Topic), 204,
208, 215+, 249 (see Var. Topic)
*102 and 103 combined: maximum credit, one course.
+May be taken twice for credit (per college)
ARCHITECTURE
CHEMISTRY
105, 105L, 114*, 115+, 131, 132oo, 132Eoo, 139 (see Var.
Topic), 231, 232oo, 232Eoo, 249 (see Var. Topic)
* No credit for 114 if taken after 131
+ No credit for 115 if taken after 231
oo 132 and 132E combined: maximum credit, one course
232 and 232E combined: maximum credit, one course
CHINESE
101*, 102
ASTRONOMY
101, 105 (same as Biology 105, Geology 105), 117F (same
as Astronomy 117L), 117L, 139 (see Var. Topic), 249 (see
Var. Topic)
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
103 (same as Biology 108A), 105, 139 (see Var. Topic),
201 (same as Economics 201, Political Science 201), 249
(see Var. Topic)
139 (see Var. Topics), 154A*, 154B*, 157, 160 (same as
Biology 160), 254A*, 254B*
*154A and 154B must both be taken in order to receive
transfer credit
109A, 109B (same as Humanities 109A and 109B), 110
(same as Journalism 110), 150o, 160 (same as Journalism
160)
oAny or all of these courses combined: maximum credit,
one course
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
110, 139 (see Var. Topic), 215, 249 (see Var. Topic)
117 (same as Mathematics 117), 130, 135, 136, 139 (see
Var. Topic), 160, 190, 200, 220, 230, 232, 235, 249 (see
Var. Topic)
*190, 191, 192, and 290 combined: maximum credit, 6
units
ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPING
COMMUNICATIONS
COMPUTER SCIENCE
101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108 (same as Ethnic
Studies 108, Humanities 108), 112, 113, 129, 130, 131,
134, 135, 139 (see Var. Topic), 140, 141, 144, 145, 146,
147, 148, 152, 153, 170, 171, 175, 176, 177, 180, 181,
185, 186, 190*, 191*, 192*, 193#, 194#, 234, 235, 240,
241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 249 (see Var. Topic),
275, 276, 285, 286, 290*
*120SL and any other transferable ESL course combined:
maximum credit, 8 units
*154AB and 254AB combined: maximum credit, one
series
*100, 101, and 102 combined: maximum credit, two
courses
ART
120SL*, 130, 139 (see Var. Topic), 150, 151, 155, 202, 203,
208, 212, 214, 218, 219, 220, 221A, 221B, 222, 223, 224,
225, 230, 235, 237, 240, 242 (same as Humanities 242),
249 (see Var. Topic)
*Corresponds to two years of high school study.
100*, 101*, 102*, 110**, 130**
**Any or all of these courses combined: maximum
credit, 18 semester units per UC Berkeley’s College of
Environmental Design
ENGLISH
COUNSELING
*254A and 254B must both be taken in order to receive
transfer credit
ETHNIC STUDIES
108 (same as Art 108, Humanities 108), 110, 111, 112,
121, 125 (same as Economics 125, History 125, Political
Science 125, Social Science 125), 139 (see Var. Topic), 151,
154, 242, 249 (see Var. Topic)
FILM/VIDEO
(Please see Communications)
FIRE TECHNOLOGY
114
215# (same as Health Education 215 and Physical
Education 215)
DANCE
FRENCH
108#, 112, 115, 116, 117*, 119, 121, 122, 123, 126,
127AB, 130AB, 131AB, 132,135, 139 (see Var. Topic),
142, 143, 154, 160, 161, 170, 171, 172, 173, 175, 176,
224, 225, 228AB, 229AB, 232, 240, 241A-D, 249 (see Var.
Topic), 260ABC
101*, 102, 108A, 108B, 139 (see Var. Topic), 203, 204,
225, 226, 249 (see Var. Topic)
* Any or all of these Physical Education activity courses
combined: maximum credit, four units
101, 101L, 102, 109, 112, 125, 139 (see Var. Topic), 249
(see Var. Topic)
o 117, 118 and (*) Physical Education activity courses
combined: maximum credit, 4 units
GEOLOGY
DRAMA
110, 116, 117, 119, 124*, 125, 126, 127, 128, 130, 131,
134, 139 (see Var. Topics), 140, 144, 150#, 160, 161#,
162#, 163#, 164#,166, 217, 230, 231, 240, 245, 246, 249
(see Var. Topics), 260
*No credit for 124 if taken after 130
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
BIOLOGY
110
100, 105 (same as Astronomy 105, Geology 105),
107 (same as Physical Education 107), 108A (same as
Behavioral Science 103), 109, 110o, 110Lo, 112A#, 112B#,
112C#, 115, 116, 120, 138 (same as Geology 138), 139
(see Var. Topic), 142 (same as Geology 142), 145 (same
as Geology 145), 147, 160 (same as Environmental
Landscaping 160), 162, 171, 224, 235, 240, 246, 249
(see Var. Topic), 250 (same as Geology 250), 251 (same as
Psychology 251)
ECONOMICS
101, 102, 125 (same as Ethnic Studies 125, History 125,
Political Science 125, Social Science 125), 139 (see Var.
Topic), 201 (same as Behavioral Science 201 and Political
Science 201), 249 (see Var. Topic)
EDUCATION
110, 111
*Corresponds to two years of high school study.
GEOGRAPHY
103, 105, (same as Astronomy 105, Biology 105), 109,
110+, 114, 116, 120+, 120L, 121, 125oo, 126oo, 138
(same as Biology 138), 139 (see Var. Topic), 142 (same as
Biology 142), 145 (same as Biology 145), 201, 249 (see
Var. Topic), 250 (same as Biology 250)
+ 110 and 120 combined: maximum credit, one course
(per catalog)
oo 125 and 126 combined: maximum credit, three units
HEALTH EDUCATION
115, 130, 142++ (same as Psychology 142), 215# (Same
as Fire Technology 215 and Physical Education 215)
++ 142 and Psychology 112, 114 combined: maximum
credit, six units. Deduct credit for duplication of topics.
HISTORY
100*, 101, 102, 103, 109, 110, 111, 112, 117*, 118*, 125
(same as Economics 125, Ethnic Studies 125, Political
University of California Transfer Information
CATALOG 2010/11
Science 125, Social Science 125), 139 (see Var. Topic),
206, 211# (same as Political Science 211), 214, 215, 216,
238, 249 (see Var. Topic)
191A+, 192A+, 193A+,195A+, 195B+, 197A, 215 (same
as Fire Technology 215 and Health Education 215), 216A,
249** (see Var. Topic), 267*
*100 and 101 combined: maximum credit, one course
*Any or all of these PE Activity courses combined:
maximum credit, four units
*100, 117 and 118 combined: maximum credit, two
courses
HUMANITIES
100AB, 107, 108 (same as Art 108, Ethnic Studies 108),
109A, 109B (same as Communications 109A, 109B),
114o, 118o, 125, 139 (see Var. Topic), 242 (same as
English 242), 249 (see Var. Topic)
o 114 and 118 combined: maximum credit, one course
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(See Variable Topics Courses)
ITALIAN
101*, 102, 108Ao, 108Bo, 108Co, 108Do, 139 (see Var.
Topic), 203, 204, 225, 226, 249 (see Var. Topic)
*Corresponds to two years of high school study
o 108A, 108B, 108C, 108D must be taken for a minimum
of three units to receive transfer credit
JAPANESE
101*, 102, 139 (see Var. Topic), 203, 204, 249 (see Var.
Topic)
*Corresponds to two years of high school study.
PHYSICS
108A+, 108AC, 108B+, 108BC, 110*, 139 (see Var. Topic),
207A+, 207B+, 207C+, 249 (see Var. Topic)
+108A, 108B, and 207ABC combined: maximum credit,
one series. Deduct credit for duplication of topics.
*No credit for 110 if taken after 108A or 207A
POLITICAL SCIENCE
100*, 101*, 102, 103, 104, 117, 125 (same as Economics
125, Ethnic Studies 125, History 125, Social Science 125),
139 (see Var. Topic), 201 (same as Behavioral Science 201,
Economics 201), 203, 210, 211# (same as History 211),
220, 249 (see Var. Topic)
*100 and 101 combined: maximum credit, one course
PSYCHOLOGY
110, 111+, 112o, 114o, 116+, 120, 139 (see Var. Topic),
140 (same as Sociology 140), 142o (same as Health
Education 142), 204, 205 (same as Sociology 205), 230
(same as Sociology 230), 249 (see Var. Topic), 251 (same
as Biology 251)
+111 and 116 combined: maximum credit, one course
JOURNALISM
o112, 114, and 142 combined: maximum credit, six units.
Deduct credit for duplication of topics.
110 (same as Communications 110), 160 (same as
Communications 160)
SOCIAL SCIENCE
LIBRARY
110*, 115*
*110 and 115 combined: maximum credit, one course
MATHEMATICS
105*, 109*, 114, 115+, 116, 117 (same as Computer Science 117), 121o, 122o, 123o, 124o, 139 (see Var. Topic),
223, 224, 249 (see Var. Topic)
*105 and 109 combined: maximum credit, one course
+115 and Statistics 115 combined: maximum credit, one
course.
o121, 122 and 123, 124 combined: maximum credit, one
series
MUSIC
101, 102, 105, 106, 111, 112, 113, 121, 122, 128, 128L,
139 (see Var. Topic), 162, 163, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169,
171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 181, 182,
183, 186A, 186B, 186C, 187, 191, 193, 211, 212, 214,
221, 222, 249 (see Var. Topic), 261AB, 262AB, 271, 272,
281, 282
PHILOSOPHY
110, 111, 112, 117, 139 (see Var. Topic), 249 (see Var.
Topic)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
70 through 80*, 107 (same as Biology 107), 110*, 112#*,
117#*, 125A*, 125C*, 125D#*, 125F*, 125H*, 125K*,
126#*, 129*, 132*, 139** (see Var. Topic), 143, 146*,
147*, 150*, 155*, 156*, 160#*, 164*, 167*, 169*, 173A*,
175*, 176*, 178*, 180*, 181*, 183*, 185*, 187*, 190A+,
125 (same as Economics 125, Ethnic Studies 125, History
125, Political Science 125), 139 (see Var. Topic), 249 (see
Var. Topic)
SOCIOLOGY
110, 112, 114, 139 (see Var. Topic), 140 (same as Psychology 140), 184 (same as Administration of Justice 204),
205 (same as Psychology 205), 230 (same as Psychology
230), 249 (see Var. Topic)
SPANISH
101*, 102, 139 (see Var. Topic), 203, 203HB, 204, 225,
226, 228A, 230A, 230B, 230C, 235, 249 (see Var. Topic)
*Corresponds to two years of high school study.
SPEECH
110, 120, 122, 128, 130, 132, 139 (see Var. Topic), 140,
141, 249 (see Var. Topic)
STATISTICS
115* (meets H. S. math)
*115 combined with Math 115: maximum credit, one
course.
VARIABLE TOPICS COURSES
(Independent Study, Selected Topics, Internship,
Fieldwork, etc.)
Note: The granting of transfer credit for courses of this
kind is given only after a review of the scope and content
of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually
occurs after transfer and may require recommendations
from faculty. Information about internships may also
be presented for review, but credit for internships rarely
57
transfers to UC. UC does not grant credit for variable topics
courses in Journalism, Photography, Health, Business
Administration, Architecture, Administration of Justice
(Criminology) or Library Departments because of credit
restrictions in these areas.
58
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MARIN.EDU
SECTION 6
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
60
Administration of Justice
INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
The first part of the course description contains the course discipline
abbreviation, number, title, and the student unit value of the course.
Example: ENGL 150: Reading and Composition 1A, 3.0 Units. It also
contains prerequisites, corequisites, advisories, or other limitations,
followed by the hours required for the course.
The second part of the description is a brief explanation of the
material being covered in the course. It also contains information
regarding how many times a course may be taken and if it is offered
in a distance learning format (television, video, internet or teleconference).
The last part of the description includes Associate degree and
transfer information.
For further information regarding transfer or degree requirements, please refer to the Graduation and Degree Requirements
Section and the Transfer Information Section of this catalog.
STUDENT UNITS AND HOURS
Credit for courses offered at College of Marin is awarded in semester
units. The value of the course is computed on the basis of one unit
for each lecture hour per week for one semester (together with two
hours of preparation outside class) or three hours of laboratory work
per week for one semester. Courses meeting for less than the full
semester will require an equivalent number of hours prorated on a
per week basis.
PREREQUISITES, COREQUISITES, AND ADVISORIES
Prerequisites
A prerequisite is a condition of enrollment that a student is required
to meet in order to demonstrate current readiness for enrollment
in a particular course or program. The College requires students to
complete prerequisite courses with a grade of C, P, or higher prior to
registering in the course requiring the prerequisites.
Examples of courses that may require prerequisites:
1. Courses for which specific prerequisites have been justified by
content review, the appropriate level of scrutiny and any other
validation procedures required by law (Title 5, 55201 a-f).
2. Sequential courses in a degree-applicable program.
3. Courses requiring a prerequisite to transfer to a four-year college.
4. Courses requiring preparation to protect health and safety.
5. Technical or vocational courses or programs that require special
preparation.
Equivalent Course Work/ Prerequisite Challenges
Some prerequisites may be satisfied by equivalent course work from
an accredited institution other than College of Marin. Students also
have the right to challenge prerequisites on certain, specified grounds
and procedures. Please contact a counselor for more information.
Corequisites
A corequisite is a condition of enrollment consisting of a course
that a student is required to take simultaneously in order to enroll
in another course. Courses that require corequisites include courses
that are part of a closely related lecture-laboratory pairing; for
example, Biology 101 and Biology 101L. Students may not enroll in
one without enrolling in the other.
MARIN.EDU
Advisories
An advisory is a condition that a student is advised, but not required,
to meet before or in conjunction with enrollment in a course or
educational program.
Other Limitations
Other limitations on enrollment may include:
1. Courses that require public performance or competition.
2. Blocks of courses for which enrollment is limited in order to
create a cohort of students.
GRADING SYSTEMS
Different grading systems are used for different courses. Some will be
limited to letter grades, some will be limited to pass/no pass grading
and the remainder will be optional letter or pass/no pass grades,
upon agreement between the instructor and student. For some
disciplines, grading is indicated in the catalog before the discipline’s
course descriptions. In general, courses required for a student’s fouryear major should be taken on a letter grade basis.
COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM
Courses in this catalog and in the schedule of classes are numbered
in the following sequence:
• 0-099 Preparatory/remedial courses and courses that do not
apply to the major. Courses numbered 00-99 are not applicable to
the Associate degree.
• 100-199 Courses taken during the first year of academic work or
the first 30 units of course work. Courses numbered 100-199 are
applicable to the Associate degree.
• 200-299 Courses taken during the second year of academic work
or the second 30 units of course work. Courses numbered 200-299
are applicable to the Associate degree.
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
There are excellent and increasing opportunities for men and women
in all areas of the administration of justice field. Education and
training is becoming more important for those who seek careers in
criminal justice. This program is designed to provide a solid foundation of knowledge that will prepare the student for initial employment, advancement, or transfer to a four-year college or university.
Career Options
Border Patrol Agent, California Highway Patrol, Correctional
Counseling, County and State Park Ranger, Court Administration,
Deputy Sheriff, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Immigration and
Naturalization Service, Law, Paralegal, Police Officer, State Correctional Officer
Faculty
Sandy Boyd
Department Phone: (415) 457-8811, Ext. 8200
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
Administration of Justice
CATALOG 2010/11
A.S. in Administration of Justice, Occupational (Certificate of
Achievement also awarded)
An Associate in Science degree is awarded for satisfactory performance in major courses, as well as completion of general education
and graduation requirements. A Certificate of Achievement in
Administration of Justice is awarded for satisfactory completion of
courses required for the major.
Students wishing to earn a degree or Certificate of Achievement
in Administration of Justice should be aware that it might take longer
than two years. However, courses are offered on a twoyear cycle, and
with planning, a student can complete a degree and/or Certificate of
Achievement in a two year period.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
AJ
110
Introduction to the Administration of Justice AJ
111
Criminal Law
AJ
113
Criminal Procedures
AJ
116
Juvenile Law and Procedure
AJ
118
Community and Human Relations
AJ
204
Crime and Delinquency
Or
SOC 184
Criminology
AJ
212
Introduction to Evidence
AJ
215
Introduction to Investigation
AJ/SOC 220
Vice, Narcotics, and Organized Crime
TOTAL UNITS
UNITS
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
27
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE COURSES (AJ)
AJ 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
AJ 110: Introduction to Administration of Justice
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
The history and philosophy of justice as it evolved throughout the
world; in-depth study of the American system and the various
subsystems; roles and role expectations of criminal justice agents
in their interrelationships in society; concepts of crime causation,
punishments and rehabilitation; ethics, education, and training for
professionalism in the social system. (CSU/UC)
AJ 111: Criminal Law
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Historical development, philosophy of law and constitutional provisions; definitions, classifications of crimes and their applications to
the system of administration of justice; legal research, review of case
law, methodology, and concepts of law as a social force. Explores
crimes against persons, property, and the state as a social, religious,
and historical ideology. (CSU/UC)
AJ 113: Criminal Procedures
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Legal processes from prearrest, arrest through trial, sentencing and
correctional procedures; a review of the history of case and common
law; conceptual interpretations of law as reflected in court decisions;
61
study of case law methodology and case research as the decisions
impact the procedures of the justice system. (CSU)
AJ 116: Juvenile Law and Procedure
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Techniques of handling juvenile offenders and victims; prevention
and repression of delinquency; diagnosis and referral; organization
of community resources. Juvenile law and juvenile court procedures.
(CSU)
AJ 118: Community and Human Relations
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
The relationship of criminal justice agents and the community;
causal and symptomatic aspects of community understanding; lack
of cooperation and mistrust; study of behavioral causes; ways to
develop and maintain amicable relationships. (CSU/UC)
AJ 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
AJ 204: Crime and Delinquency
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Administration of Justice
204 or Sociology 184. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
An introduction to the major theoretical explanations of criminal
behavior; social and economic factors which contribute to crime;
major typologies of criminal behavior; criminal justice systems and
research; courts, probation and parole; police and other institutions.
The course will take a sociological perspective and integrate theories
from sociology, criminology, and criminal justice. (CSU/UC) CSU
Area D-0
AJ 212: Introduction to Evidence
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Origin, development, philosophy, and constitutional basis of
evidence; constitutional and procedural considerations affecting
arrest, search and seizures; kinds and degrees of evidence and rules
governing admissibility; judicial decisions interpreting individual
rights; and case studies viewed from a conceptual level. (CSU)
AJ 215: Introduction to Investigation
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Fundamentals of investigation; techniques of crime scene search and
recording; collection and preservation of physical evidence; modus
operandi processes; sources of information; interview and interrogation; follow-up investigation. (CSU)
AJ 220: Vice Narcotics and Organized Crime
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Administration of Justice
220 or Sociology 220. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This course examines the relationship between organized crime and
the community. It will cover the impact of organized crime, history
of organized crime, relationship to the social structure, symptoms of
organized crime (i.e., corruption, dysfunctional behavior, violence),
attempts to control organized crime, and the role of the legal system.
In addition, vice and trade in narcotics will be discussed. Modern
organized crime groups both national and international will be high-
62
American Sign Language
MARIN.EDU
lighted. Exposure to sociological theory and concepts from criminal
justice will be integrated into the course. (CSU)
ASL 110: History and Culture of Deaf People in America
AJ 249: Independent Study
This course identifies basic anthropological approaches toward the
examination and study of minority groups in general, with specific
emphasis on American Deaf culture as a minority group. There will
be an introductory comparison of the structures of visual and spoken
languages and a presentation of the normative system of laws in
America that has developed for deaf Americans. (CSU) AA/AS Areas
C and G, CSU Areas C-2 or D-1
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
American Sign Language courses are designed to meet the needs of
the deaf community of Marin County. American Sign Language is
a full natural language at the core of a new literary tradition, in both
poetry and theatre. It is an alternative language choice for students
completing general education humanities requirements at College of
Marin.
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Modern
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE COURSES (ASL)
ASL 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ASL 101: Elementary Sign Language I
5.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This is an introductory course that emphasizes visual readiness skills
for recognition and expression of appropriate facial expressions
and body movements, response to commands, and learning how to
visualize the environment. Communicative functions, vocabulary,
grammar, and cultural aspects of the deaf community will be introduced and studied. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 6: UC Language other than English
ASL 102: Elementary Sign Language II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: American Sign Language 101. Four lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course is a continuation of ASL 101; exchanging information,
identifying others, making requests, giving reasons, options, simple
directions, and asking for clarification. Discussions revolve around
classes, the campus, home, work and transportation, physical
descriptions of people and objects, general conversation skills, visual
perception and specific specialization skills, and the continuation of
the cultural study of the deaf community. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or 6A: UC Language other than
English
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
ASL 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ASL 203: Intermediate Sign Language III
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: American Sign Language 102. Four lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course is a continuation of American Sign Language 101 and
102, expands upon the conversational and grammar functions, and
delves more deeply into Deaf Culture. Skills to be learned include
locating things, asking for solutions to everyday problems, telling
about life events and personal background, making suggestions and
requests, and asking permission. Students will learn how to engage
in more sustained communication in American Sign Language,
sometimes on philosophical and cultural topics. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or 6A: UC Language other
than English
ASL 204: Intermediate Sign Language IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: American Sign Language 203. Four lecture hours
weekly.
This course strives for a higher level of conversation and narration
skills. Topics include describing problems at home, work and school,
expressing opinions and feelings and argumentation; i.e., how to
disagree with someone and potentially change that person’s mind.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, IGETC Area 6: UC Language other than
English
ASL 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
ANTHROPOLOGY
Anthropology is a scientific discipline concerned with all aspects
of humankind: human biology and genetics; ancestral fossils and
evolutionary processes; primates; cultures of the world, language and
customs; cross-cultural marriage and family processes; prehistory
and archaeology; art, healing, religion and technology. Because it
is such a diverse discipline, one may find anthropologists uncovering our early ancestors in Africa, excavating a pyramid in Central
America, studying peoples in New Guinea or in San Francisco, collecting information on orangutans in Southeast Asia, and advising
business and government on customs in India.
Career Options
Archaeologist, Consultant, Criminologist, Cultural Anthropologist,
Ethnologist, Forensic Scientist, Genetic Counselor, Governmental
Consultant, Industrial Consultant, International Business, Journal-
Anthropology
CATALOG 2010/11
ist, Linguist, Marketing Specialist, Museum Curator, Park Naturalist/Ranger, Peace Corps/Vista Worker, Physical Anthropologist,
Prehistorian, Primatologist, Public Health Worker, Researcher,
Scientific Illustrator, Social Worker, Teacher, Technical Writer, Tour
Organizer, United Nations Advisor, Zoo Curator, Zoologist
Department Phone: (415) 485-9630
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
63
ANTH 102: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Cultural anthropology is the study of human behavior from a cross
cultural perspective. An emphasis will be placed upon non Western
societies. Areas that may be covered are social organization, belief
systems and ritual behavior, socialization, psychological anthropology, economic organization, social stratification, theory, and
other selected topics. The use of films, slides, and videotapes allows
students to become acquainted with cultures and lifestyles that are
distinct from contemporary Western society. A goal of the course is
to create a greater degree of cross cultural awareness by attempting to
promote an understanding of and appreciation for the richness and
diversity of human culture. Can also be offered in a distance learning
format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES (ANTH)
ANTH 103: Globalization and Peoples and Cultures of
the World
ANTH 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
0.5-6 Units.
This course is designed to explore what is happening to cultural
groups from diverse regions around the world. The focus will be
upon cultural change, impact of technology, external and regional
pressures and how they impact local groups. The role of women,
children, ethnic/racial/religious violence, and class conflict will be
examined. Poverty, child/female trafficking, slavery, child soldiers,
disease, forced migration, famine and genocide will be covered. The
use of police, military, torture and death squads are common in
many of these areas. The roles of the World Bank, World Trade Organization, multi-national corporations, and local and regional elites
will be presented as they relate to the lives of specific ethnic groups.
Theory from ethnology and ethnography will be used as a basis for
analysis. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
ANTH 101: Introduction to Physical/Biological
Anthropology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is the study of evolutionary theory as a unifying theory
that encompasses human variation and human evolution. The course
covers modern evolutionary theory and its history, genetics, and
the human genome. Students will learn about primates, including
behavior, anatomy, and features of the skeletal system. Instructors
will cover selected topics in forensic analysis, archaeological theory
and methodology, scientific method, and an overview of the most
significant fossil sites that relate to human evolution. The field is
changing on a daily basis, with new information being uncovered
pertaining to our distant past and the progress being made in the
study of the human genome. Primates in many areas of the world
are under threat from human populations and efforts to establish
protected areas are meeting with mixed success. The department
has an extensive collection of fossil casts that allows students the
opportunity to actually see them in person rather than relying solely
upon photographs or descriptions. Some instructors may require
field trips to local zoos, museums or lectures. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
A, CSU Area B-2, IGETC Area 5B
ANTH 101L: Physical/Biological Anthropology
Laboratory
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or concurrent enrollment. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
Laboratory and related exercises selected from the fields of: genetics,
the human genome, human variability, medical genetics, nonhuman
primates, human dental and skeletal anatomy, forensics, primate behavior, reconstruction, fossil hominids, the scientific method including probability and research design. The nature of the course requires
students to solve problems, to observe, to take a hands-on approach
to the subject matter. This course is supplemental to Anthropology
101. It is designed to cover in greater detail areas which are taught
in Physical/Biological Anthropology and which require the active
participation of students in learning how to accomplish specific tasks
related to the above areas. Field trips may be included. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5B
ANTH 110: Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course includes the methods of recovery, analysis and interpretation of material culture, current research questions, current
controversies, frauds of the past, ethical problems confronting the
archaeologist and some of the spectacular discoveries. Some of the
questions to be explored include the origin of art and writing, the
evolution of tool making, how and why agriculture began, why
civilizations rose and fell, and who settled the Americas. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
ANTH 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ANTH 204: Native American Cultures
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This survey course of Native Americans will examine early examples
of the inhabitation of the western hemisphere. In addition, the
historical record will be used to illustrate contact between indigenous
peoples and the outside world and the results of that contact. The
present conditions of native peoples in the hemisphere will be illustrated. Traditional cultural systems, social organization, religious
beliefs, art, and economy will be discussed for selected cultural
groups. Contemporary issues of land rights, tribal independence,
natural resource rights, and social problems will be examined. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area B & G, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4
64
Architecture
MARIN.EDU
ANTH 205: Field Anthropology
ANTH 249: Independent Study
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One-half lecture and three laboratory hours weekly,
or variable schedule dependent on specific field trip focus.
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
Lectures about and field trips to specific locations within the Bay
Area, California, out of state, and foreign countries, the cultural and
geographical focus to be determined by each instructor. In the past,
museums, archeological sites, and cultural settings and events have
been the focus of the course. The Bay Area has numerous subcultures
with events scheduled year round, along with museums and settings
that lend themselves to field trips and observations. Subculture folk
festivals, folk arts, and ethnomusicology are examples of places that
would be suitable for a course of this nature. Archeological sites and
prehistoric art along with Native American subcultures have been
visited in prior years. (CSU)
ANTH 206: Archaeological Field and Laboratory
Methods
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to acquaint the student with archaeological field techniques, as well as the laboratory skills necessary for
interpreting and preserving the excavated material. Students will
perform experiments and exercises using the scientific method.
When available, excavation will involve threatened (salvage) sites.
Possible topics to be covered will include site survey, flintknapping,
and lithic, faunal, shell, and ceramic analysis. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU)
ANTH 208: Magic, Folklore, and Healing
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a general survey of what anthropologists have learned
about belief systems and folklore from a cross cultural perspective. It
will ask: What do we know about the origins of belief systems? Why
do people in most societies believe in unseen spirits and powers?
How do people use supernatural or special powers to gain control
over their own lives or the lives of others? What is the subdiscipline
of folklore and how does it relate to the subject matter and to anthropology as a whole? The course will use examples drawn from a wide
variety of cultural areas. (CSU/UC) CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
ANTH 215: Native Americans of California
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
The study of California Native Americans will include the prehistoric period (as seen through archaeology), contact with explorers,
the mission period, post mission, and contemporary issues. Major
linguistic groups will be discussed in terms of environmental setting,
subsistence, technology, political organization, social structure,
religion, ceremonial life, art, and mythology. May be taken twice for
credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B & G, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area
4A
ARCHITECTURE
Mankind has been designing and building permanent structures
for about twelve thousand years, and these structures have come to
dominate the environment that most people inhabit. The architect
faces an exciting challenge: to understand the sometimes competing
needs of individuals and groups, the need to protect our natural
environment, the technical requirements of buildings and structures,
the role of economics, and the importance of designing projects
that not only meet these quantifiable needs but that also inspire and
delight us.
In the twenty-first century, the value of green/sustainable design
is becoming more and more obvious and is an important part of our
curriculum. We also offer rich classes in architectural design, drafting and presentation, architecture as a profession, computer aided
design, and history of architecture.
Courses in the Architecture Department are designed to serve
students who aspire to transfer to other schools of architecture by
giving them a sound basis in critical thinking and fundamental
knowledge of the discipline, to offer a two year degree option for
those who wish to achieve a solid base of knowledge and skills for
work in architecture or related fields, and to present learning opportunities to those whose interest in architecture is directed toward
more personal rather than career goals.
Career Options
Architect, Architectural Designer, Architectural Illustrator,
Architectural Model Maker, Architectural Product Developer,
Architectural Specification Writer, Construction Manager, Director/
Administrator of Architectural Firm, Interior Architect, Landscape
Designer, Professor of Architecture, Researcher, Structural Engineer,
Theater Set Designer, Urban Planner.
Department Phone: (415) 485-9480
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.S. in Architecture
The associate degree program in Architecture is designed to prepare
students for work in architecture, architectural drafting and illustration, construction, and other fields where knowledge of architectural
history, design, and communication is useful. Some courses are
available online with no on-campus attendance required.
REQUIREMENTS
ARCH 100* History of Architecture I
ARCH 101* History of Architecture II
ARCH 102* History of Architecture III
ARCH 131
New Architecture on Campus
And each of the Following:
ARCH 110* Beginning Architectural Design
UNITS
3
3
3
3
4
Architecture
CATALOG 2010/11
ARCH 120* Beginning Architectural Drafting
ARCH 130* Introduction to Architecture and Environmental Design
ART
112* 2-D Art Fundamentals
And:
ARCH 111
Intermediate Architectural Design
Or:
ARCH 150A/B* Green/Sustainable Design
And:
ARCH 121
Intermediate Architectural Drafting
Or:
ARCH 140* 2-D Computer Graphics for Architecture
And:
ARCH 220
Advanced Architectural Drafting
Or:
ARCH 141
3-D Computer Graphics for Architecture
And:
ART
130
Drawing and Composition I
Or:
ARCH 127* Architectural Rendering: Techniques of Presentation
TOTAL UNITS
*Recommended for transfer students.
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
43
ARCHITECTURE COURSES (ARCH)
ARCH 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ARCH 100: History of Architecture I
65
working in this 21st century. We will visit inspiring examples of the
latest in architectural design in various cities such as Los Angeles,
Dallas and Berlin. We will also visit the seminal masterpieces that
lead up to these works. By actually visiting these sites, students will
gain crucial understandings of: 1. how architects approach a site,
2. how they satisfy programmatic requirements in inventive ways,
3. what forms they use and why, 4. how it feels to be in and moving
through the created spaces, 5. what are the conceptual underpinnings of projects, and 6, how the totality of design works in such
architect designed elements as furniture and landscape design. These
intensive field trips will include lectures, visits to architectural sites,
drawing, discussion, and personal exploration. (CSU)
ARCH 110: Beginning Architectural Design
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This design course explores fundamental principles and issues of
architectural design through the use of abstract design projects.
Students interested in architecture, interior design, landscape
design, engineering, building construction, gallery or theatre design,
sculpture and other fine arts create their own design solutions, moving from beginning sketches, through development, to final models.
Students learn to develop architectural vocabulary and thinking
in a group studio environment, and address formal, symbolic and
contextual concepts of architecture. (CSU/UC)
ARCH 111: Intermediate Architectural Design
4.0 Units. Prerequisites: Architecture 110 and 120. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This class traces the development of architecture and cities throughout the world from the earliest permanent settlements at the end
of the Ice Age to the 1100s C.E. Emphasis is on the evolution of
architectural ideas and the connection between architecture and
culture. Can also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
This design course explores local urban and rural architectural
design projects through the use of lectures, design projects, site visits,
individual and group critiques, model building and drawings. Human needs, social factors, public/private issues, contexture, historic
precedent, and aesthetic perception will be emphasized. Students
will learn about design methodology, site and program analysis and
presentation techniques. Students further address formal, symbolic
and contextual issues of architecture. (CSU)
ARCH 101: History of Architecture II
ARCH 120: Beginning Architectural Drafting
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This class traces the development of architecture and cities throughout the world from the 1100s C.E. to the end of the nineteenth
century. Emphasis is on the evolution of architectural ideas and the
connection between architecture and culture. Can also be offered in
a distance learning format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1,
IGETC Area 3A
This course will introduce students interested in interior design,
architecture, engineering, building construction, landscape architecture, and other design related fields to the fundamentals of architectural and freehand drawing. Students will learn hard line drafting
skills and architectural conventions. They will learn the appropriate
applications for the following architectural drawings: plan, section,
elevation, paraline, and perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the
importance of drawings in the communication between designers,
clients and builders, and on the relationship between three dimensional form and its two dimensional representation on paper. (CSU)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly
ARCH 102: History of Architecture III
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly
This class traces the development of architecture and cities throughout the world during the twentieth century. Emphasis is on the evolution of architectural ideas and the connection between architecture
and culture. Can also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ARCH 107: Cutting-Edge Architecture Field Trips
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Seven field days, 48 hours lecture. Based on initial
trip of one week per 48 hour lecture. Subsequent trips will vary.
This course is for anyone interested in cutting-edge design, and particularly for architecture, interior, landscape and set design students
ARCH 121: Intermediate Architectural Drafting
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Architecture 120. Advisories: Architecture 110 and 130.
May be taken concurrently. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A practical intermediate course in architectural drafting. Course involves applying basic drafting and lettering techniques, architectural
projections, detail and working drawings, and the basic understanding of wood frame construction to the solution of a variety of practical architectural and construction problems. Portfolio of blueprints
required at the end of the semester. (CSU)
66
Architecture
ARCH 127: Architectural Rendering: Techniques of
Presentation
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
MARIN.EDU
drawings efficiently. The class will be taught using Vectorworks
software. The basic concepts and skills apply generally to all CAD
software applications. (CSU)
Students in this course learn how to make beautiful and convincing
drawings and models of their designs for presentation to clients,
design review boards, peers, publications and competitions, among
other uses such as their own study needs. Students interested in
architecture, interior design, landscape design, engineering, building
construction, gallery and theater design and other fine arts will all
enjoy and benefit from this course. Working from their own designs
or from those of others, students will learn rendering techniques
including the use of graphite, ink, watercolor, prismacolor and computer techniques. They will study how to make presentations specifically designed for the projects they are presenting, including where to
take perspective views to best show off their projects, appropriate use
of graphics, color, layout and scale, and what type of model to present
if relevant. Students will learn how to work both individually and in
teams, simulating the office environment. (CSU)
ARCH 141: 3-D Computer Graphics for Architecture
ARCH 130: Introduction to Architecture and
Environmental Design
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course provides a foundation for future architecture, interior
design, landscape architecture, and city planning courses. It explores
the basic elements of architecture and the built environment
including form, organizational principles, context, materials, and
the sensory qualities of design. The design process and professional
practice are also addressed. Emphasis is placed on the process of
developing one’s personal approach to design, the ways in which
people experience architecture, and the relationship of architecture
to society. (CSU/UC)
ARCH 131: New Architecture on Campus
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Students in this class will learn the architectural history of the
College of Marin campus and of the current Capital Improvement
Program. They will also learn the architectural modernization
processes involved in carrying out the CIP and will follow the ongoing progress of design and construction. Emphasis will be placed
on the sometimes conflicting needs of various stakeholder groups
and the impact of these needs on the physical design of the campus.
In addition, students will research the impact of the plethora of
governmental requirements on the design and construction of new
buildings on the College of Marin campus. (CSU)
ARCH 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ARCH 140: 2-D Computer Graphics for Architecture
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Architecture 120. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
Students will learn the basic skills needed to produce 2-D presentation and construction drawings for architecture and similar disciplines using the computer. Emphasis will be placed on using software
tools to create drawings that effectively communicate the intention
of the designer to clients and builders; on organizing information
within the drawing environment to simplify the production and
revision of drawings; and on building the skills necessary to produce
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Arch 140. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Students will learn the skills needed to produce three-dimensional
design and presentation drawings for architecture and similar disciplines using the computer. Emphasis will be placed on using software
tools to create drawings that effectively communicate the intention of
the designer to clients and others, on organizing information within
the drawing environment to simplify the production and revision of
drawings, and on building the skills necessary to produce drawings
efficiently. The class will be taught using Vectorworks and other 3-D
software; however, the basic concepts and skills apply generally to all
3-D software applications. (CSU)
ARCH 150A: Green/Sustainable Architecture
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of green/
sustainable architecture. Through lectures and discussion, the class
will consider a wide range of sustainability issues including the
history of environmental degradation and the rise of sustainability
as a discipline. We will study energy conservation and generation,
reuse and recycling, renewable materials, and a range of planning
and transportation considerations in terms of their impact on the
environment. A companion class, Architecture 150B, which may
be taken concurrently, is a studio class designed to give students
hands-on experience in green/sustainable design through a series of
architectural design projects. (CSU)
ARCH 150B: Green/Sustainable Architecture
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Architecture 150A or concurrent enrollment. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
Intended as a companion course to Architecture 150A, students in
Architecture 150B will learn architectural design with an emphasis
on environmentally friendly and sustainable principles. The class will
emphasize the need to gather, analyze and prioritize the multiplicity
of needs that a successful design must meet. Students will learn techniques for creating original and thoughtful solutions to the design
problem they have defined, to refine and complete these designs and
to present their work in both written and graphic form. Teaching
will include individual one-on-one discussions with the instructors,
group critiques, and individual and group presentations. (CSU)
ARCH 220: Advanced Architectural Drafting
4.0 Units. Prerequisites: Architecture 120 and 121. Advisories: Architecture 110
and 130. May be taken concurrently. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
A practical advanced course in architectural drafting. Course
involves the design of wood frame structures and development of
working drawings. Portfolio of working drawings required at the end
of the semester. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
Art
CATALOG 2010/11
ARCH 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
ART
The study of art will enrich the student’s experience of the world,
and encourage the student to draw upon creative resources. An
education in art can lead to professional or vocational careers, as
well as enhance abilities in other fields. The Art Department offers a
foundation in theoretical and practical skills, and the opportunity to
work in a wide variety of specific art media.
Career Options
Animator, Art Appraiser, Art Critic/Writer, Art Director, Art Historian, Art Therapist, Arts Administrator, Arts and Crafts, Calligrapher, Cartoonist, Ceramist, Commercial Artist, Designer, Exhibition
Designer, Fashion Apparel, Fashion Illustrator, Floral Designer,
Furniture Designer, Graphic Designer, Industrial Color Consultant,
Interior Designer/Decorator, Jeweler, Landscape Designer, Medical/
Scientific Illustrator, Museum/Gallery Staff, Operator, Paste-Up
Copy-Camera, Photographer, Print Maker, Printer, Product Designer, Sculptor, Sign Painter, Specialist, Stage Set Designer, Textile
Designer, Typographer
Faculty
William Abright, Chester Arnold, Richard C. Hall, Emily Lazarre, Deborah H. Loft,
Polly Steinmetz, Katherine Wagner
Department Phone: (415) 485-9480
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.A. in Art
The Art Program provides transfer, professional preparation, personal development, general interest, and general education, as well as
an Associate in Arts degree. Courses are offered at both campuses.
Students may take courses at either campus to fulfill requirements for
the major.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
ART
130
Drawing and Composition I
One art history course to be chosen from the following:
ART
101
History of Ancient Art
ART
102
History of European Art
ART
103
History of Modern Art
ART
104
History of Asian Art
ART
105
Contemporary Art ART
106
History of Women Artists
ART
107
History of American Art
ART
108
Arts of the Americas (also offered as ETST 108 or HUM 108)
And 12 additional units in art from the following:
UNITS
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
ART
113
3-D Art Fundamentals
ART
114
Interior Design I
ART
116
Jewelry Design I
ART
118
Art Gallery Design and Management I
ART
129
Materials and Techniques
ART
134
Life Drawing I
ART
140
Painting I
ART
144
Watercolor I
ART
146
Life Painting I
ART
148
Color Theory
ART
152
Printmaking I
ART
154
Surface Design on Fabric
ART
165
Fiber Sculpture I
ART
170
Ceramics I
ART
175
Primitive Ceramics
ART
180
Sculpture I
ART
185
Life Sculpture I
ART
190
Black and White Photography I ART
193
Beginning Digital Imaging for the Photographer
TOTAL UNITS
67
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
23
A.S. in Design, Applied, Occupational
Courses in this program are offered at both campuses. Students
may take courses at either campus to fulfill requirements for the
major. The program offers a problem solving approach to design. The
students elect the emphasis area (either two-dimensional or threedimensional) that is most compatible with their occupational goals.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
ARCH 120
Beginning Architectural Drafting
4
ART
103
History of Modern Art
3
Or
ART
105
Contemporary Art
3
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
113
3-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
130
Drawing and Composition I
4
ART
148
Color Theory
4
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
3
TOTAL UNITS
26
In addition, applied design majors with an emphasis in two-dimensional design must
complete 16 units (four courses) from the following art studio courses:
ART
131
Drawing and Composition II
4
ART
134
Life Drawing I
4
ART
135* Life Drawing II
4
ART
140
Painting I
4
ART
141* Painting II
4
ART
144
Watercolor I
4
ART
145* Watercolor II
4
ART
152
Printmaking I
4
ART
153* Printmaking II
4
ART
190
Black and White Photography I
4
ART
191* Black and White Photography II
4
* More advanced classes offered, but major requirements must be satisfied from the courses
listed above.
Applied design majors with an emphasis in three-dimensional design must complete
16 units (four courses) from the following art studio courses:
68
Art
MARIN.EDU
ART
116
Jewelry Design I
4
ART
117* Jewelry Design II
4
ART
118
Art Gallery Design and Management I
4
ART
119* Art Gallery Design and Management II
4
ART
165
Fiber Sculpture I
4
ART
170
Ceramics I
4
ART
171* Ceramics II
4
ART
180
Sculpture I
4
ART
181* Sculpture II
4
ART
185
Life Sculpture I
4
ART
186* Life Sculpture II
4
* More advanced classes offered, but major requirements must be satisfied from the courses
listed above.
A.S. in Design, Applied — Interior, Occupational
Some courses in this program are offered at both campuses. Students
may take courses at either campus to fulfill requirements for the
major. Someone wisely said that it requires the knowledge of the historian, the connoisseur, the merchant, the engineer, the psychologist,
and the artist to be a good designer. The following program reflects
that teaching philosophy and gives the most advantageous sequence
for required and recommended classes.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
Freshman Year - First Semester
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
ART
114
Interior Design I
ART
130
Drawing and Composition I
Freshman Year – Second Semester
ARCH 120
Beginning Architecture Drafting l
ART
102
History of European Art
ART
115
Interior Design II (Fall only)
Sophomore Year - First Semester
ARCH 110
Beginning Architectural Design
ART
214
Interior Design III (Spring only)
BUS
121
New Venture Creation
Sophomore Year - Second Semester
ART
103
History of Modern Art
ARCH 140
2-D Computer Graphics for Architecture
ART
148
Color Theory
In addition:
One art studio course other than those required for the major
TOTAL UNITS
UNITS
4
4
4
4
3
4
4
4
3
3
4
4
4
49
ART 102: History of European Art
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This class surveys the visual creations of a variety of European
cultures from 1100 to the mid-nineteenth century. Emphasis will be
placed on enhancing the student’s ability to observe and describe
visual works, and to understand them in their social and historical
context. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 103: History of Modern Art
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This class is a survey of art and visual culture from the midnineteenth century to the present. (For focus on recent art, see ART
105.) Emphasis will be placed on enhancing the student’s ability to
observe and describe visual works, and to understand them in their
social and historical context. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 104: History of Asian Art
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a comparative study of art and visual culture in the
Far East, including India, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.
Visual expression will be considered in relation to its social and
religious contexts. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
ART 105: Contemporary Art
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course covers art since 1945, focusing on art of the last 30 years.
Emphasis is on new concepts and techniques by a diverse selection of
artists. The visual and social issues raised by contemporary art will
be considered. There will be several field trips to art galleries or other
points of interest. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
ART 106: History of Women Artists
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This class introduces visual work by women of diverse ethnic and
class backgrounds. A variety of media will be covered, from past
art history as well as from contemporary art. Students will become
aware of the social circumstances in which the work was produced.
The course will include field trips. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU
Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 107: History of American Art
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
ART 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
This class surveys American art and visual culture, including work
by a diverse selection of artists. Material in several media will be
presented through slides, discussion, and field trips. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
0.5-6 Units.
ART 108: Arts of the Americas
ART 101: History of Ancient Art
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Art 108, Ethnic Studies
108, or Humanities 108, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three
lecture hours weekly.
ART COURSES (ART)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This class is a survey of ancient art and visual culture, including: Prehistoric, Near Eastern, Egyptian, Aegean, Greek, Etruscan, Roman,
Early Christian, and Byzantine. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-1, IGETC Area 3A
A survey of the arts and architecture of the Americas-- North, Central, Caribbean, and South-- focusing on a selection of works from
the major Pre Columbian, Spanish Colonial, and modern cultures.
Art of the United States will focus on works from the culturally
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CATALOG 2010/11
69
diverse peoples of the Bay Area. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C & G, CSU
Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 116: Jewelry Design I
ART 109: Gallery Seminar in Art
Design and creation of jewelry utilizing basic construction and casting techniques. Emphasis is on basic skill development. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU) CSU Area C-1
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Seminar in art history based on art available in museums, galleries,
and collections. This course may be conducted at any site where
original art objects are available for study and discussion. It includes
assigned reading, lectures, and discussion trips to study art. Seminar
discussion and presentations follow field trips. Content and areas of
concentration may vary depending on locations and availability of
art. (CSU)
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
ART 117: Jewelry Design II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 116. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
ART 112: 2-D Art Fundamentals
Advanced design and creation of jewelry. Emphasis is on perfecting skills. Projects include techniques that may include hinges and
connections, advanced casting, die forming, and RT stamping. May
be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
ART 118: Art Gallery Design and Management I
An introductory level studio course that encourages students to express themselves by using and understanding the elements of 2-D art:
line, shape, texture, value, color, perspective, and space. Principles of
composition such as balance, repetition, variation, and proportion
will be explored using a wide variety of media that may include: ink,
pencil, charcoal, painting, collage, printmaking, papier-mache, and
found material mixed media. This course is required for art majors
and highly recommended for all art students. (CSU/UC) CSU Area
C-1
ART 113: 3-D Art Fundamentals
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
An introductory level studio course that encourages students to
express themselves by using and understanding the elements of 3-D
art: line, plane, volume, mass, surface treatment, light and shadow.
Principles of composition such as balance, repetition, variation, and
proportion will be explored using a wide variety of materials that
may include wire, cardboard, plaster, clay, papier-mache, and mixed
media. This course is required for art majors and highly recommended for all art students. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 114: Interior Design I
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
An introductory course in the theory and practice of interior design
to acquaint the student with contemporary design, architecture, and
furniture; color theory and application; basic residential construction
methods and materials; surface treatment (walls, floors, windows,
etc.); the use of drafting tools and methods; and learning to draw
simple plans. Classes may include field trips and guest lecturers that
relate to various aspects of interior design. May be taken three times
for credit. (CSU) CSU Area C-1
ART 115: Interior Design II
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Introduction to art gallery management to include selection of
art works, publicity for art gallery, design of gallery furniture and
exhibits, and installation of exhibits. Field trips to other educational
and commercial galleries and museums. Preparation of individual
portfolios. (CSU) CSU Area C-1
ART 119: Art Gallery Design and Management II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 118. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
An environmental design class covering materials, techniques, aims,
elements and principles of environmental display, spatial and visual
interrelationships of displayed materials, and gallery construction.
This course will cover both theory and practice at the Kentfield
Campus Fine Arts Gallery. (CSU)
ART 128: Art Field Trips
1-4 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Art 128 or Ethnic Studies
128 or Humanities 128. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Threequarter lecture and three-quarter laboratory hours weekly for one unit, one
and one-half lecture and one and one-half laboratory hours weekly for two
units, two and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter laboratory hours
weekly for three units, and three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
four units.
A complement to art history and studio art courses, this course
allows students to experience the art and architecture of sites like
New York, Mexico City, and Rome first-hand. Pre-trip lectures will
set up background for an intensive field trip(s) that may include visits
to museums, galleries, libraries, artists’ studios, and to architectural
and archeological sites where lecture, discussion, and personal
exploration will take place. May be used to bring students to a major
media-specific conference. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
ART 129: Materials and Techniques
Covers period design and decorations from the styles of antiquity
through the Victorian era. Extensive reading is required to cover the
historic evolution of interior design in the Western world. A number
of tests, as well as oral, visual, and written projects, are given. This
course may also include field trips that relate to history and interior
design. May be taken three times for credit. (CSU)
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 140. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is designed to enrich the painter’s means of expression
by expanding the potential use of both materials and techniques. Assignments will include work with collage, acrylic, oil, mixed media,
encaustic, pastels, oil stick, enamels, impasto, glazes, etc. (CSU/UC)
70
Art
ART 130: Drawing and Composition I
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Exercises in line, light and shade, texture, and perspective rendering of objects in space; development of good composition by means
of balance, repetition and variation, focal point, economy, etc. A
variety of graphic materials (pencil, charcoal, pen and ink, washes,
color, etc.) will be used for both realistic and experimental drawings.
Lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and supervision of works in
progress. A sketchbook and/or portfolio of work done in and out of
class may be required. Required of all art majors. (CSU/UC) CSU
Area C-1
ART 131: Drawing and Composition II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 130. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Prerequisite of Art 130 assumes the student is competent in the use
of line, value, texture, composition, and perspective to deal with: (1)
complexity of subject matter; (2) diversity of materials; (3) experimental media like collage and painting; (4) color (pastels, pencil,
watercolor, etc.); and (5) independent projects agreed upon contractually between student and instructor. (CSU/UC)
ART 134: Life Drawing I
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 130. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of proportion, structure, and superficial anatomy of the
human figure, combined with further study of appropriate media
and drawing techniques. Required of art majors. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 135: Life Drawing II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 134. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of proportion, structure, and superficial anatomy of the
human figure, combined with further study of appropriate media
and drawing techniques. Required of art majors. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 138: Advanced Critique
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
A monthly critique/seminar designed for intermediate to advanced
students of painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, photography, jewelry, and mixed media to have their work reviewed
and participate in the review from a variety of perspectives. NOTE:
“Advanced” means that the student has taken a number of courses in
art or is a working artist who wants feedback on his/her work. May
be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ART 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ART 140: Painting I
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 112 or 130. Three lecture and three laboratory
hours weekly.
It is especially important that students new to painting learn the
process of making paintings-- to go through the steps one by one,
MARIN.EDU
methodically covering the basics of selecting significant shapes,
balancing composition, mixing paints, perfecting techniques, and
developing skills. Four paintings are required of ALL beginning
students. Attendance for both instructional (lecture, discussion,
demonstration, “critique” sessions) and studio work is essential. Oil,
acrylic, and mixed media. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 141: Painting II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 140. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
The more advanced the student, the more a strong individual approach is encouraged. Because of the varied abilities and experience
found at this level, the semester assignments will be self-imposed but
reviewed by the instructor on the basis of scope, technical improvement, and development of concept. Attendance is essential for
instructional, studio, and “critique” sessions. Oil, acrylic, and mixed
media. (CSU/UC)
ART 144: Watercolor I
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A course designed to acquaint the beginner with the materials,
techniques, and experience of painting with watercolor. Frequent
“critique” sessions, lectures, and demonstrations will examine paper
selection and reaction to the medium, the tendency of watercolor to
flow, and its qualities of transparency and evaporation. The aim is to
thoroughly familiarize the student with the distinctive qualities of
watercolor. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 145: Watercolor II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 144. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
To some extent Watercolor II is a continuation of Watercolor I but
with emphasis on personal development and expression. Students
are encouraged to develop a visual vocabulary and way of using the
watercolor medium to express their own ideas and way of seeing
things. (CSU/UC)
ART 146: Life Painting I
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 140 and either Art 112 or Art 130. Three lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This class offers instruction in painting the human figure. Individualized instruction will allow for emphasis to be placed on either
portraiture or painting the entire figure. Concepts of color, design,
and style will be included. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 147: Life Painting II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 146. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This class offers instruction in painting the human figure. Individualized instruction will allow for emphasis to be placed on either
portraiture or painting the entire figure. Concepts of color, design,
and style will be included. (CSU/UC)
ART 148: Color Theory
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
General theory of color covering the objective and subjective aspects.
Includes color notations, terminology, visual phenomena, effects of
light, symbolism, and psychology of color. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
Art
CATALOG 2010/11
ART 152: Printmaking I
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 130. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
An introductory course in the basic concepts and techniques of
printmaking. Instruction and studio work include intaglio (etching,
drypoint, and engraving), relief (woodcut and linocut) collagraph
and monotype methods. Emphasis is on the fine arts approach to
printmaking although the relationship of these processes to the
graphic arts will be explored. Formal and individual critiques on
work. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 153: Printmaking II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 152. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
An introductory course in the basic concepts and techniques of
printmaking. Instruction and studio work include intaglio (etching,
drypoint, and engraving), relief (woodcut and linocut) collagraph
and monotype methods. Emphasis is on the fine arts approach to
printmaking although the relationship of these processes to the
graphic arts will be explored. Formal and individual critiques on
work. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 154: Surface Design on Fabric
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course explores the vast possibilities for dyeing and printing
cloth to achieve richly patterned surfaces for apparel, interiors,
theater, performance or artistic/conceptual intentions. A variety
of fabric manipulations and coloring methods are investigated to
develop design composition, repeat patterning, and personally
expressive imagery for two- and three-dimensional fabric applications. Techniques include immersion-dyeing, shibori, color removal,
painting, paste resist, block printing, burn-out, ink-jet and screen
printing. Historical and contemporary examples are examined for
technical information, inspiration and personal interpretation.
Studio work will be enhanced through slide presentations, field trips,
guest artists, individual consultations and group critiques. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ART 165: Fiber Sculpture I
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Construction processes involved with interworking of flexible
elements by such techniques as layering, bonding, plaiting, stitching,
and weaving, in a scale that may range from personal object to installation. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU) CSU Area C-1
71
become familiar with ceramic glaze materials and kiln firing. It is
expected that students will develop an awareness of ceramic design
and explore individual solutions to specific technical and conceptual
assignments. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 171: Ceramics II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 170. Advisory: Art 112 or concurrent enrollment.
Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A second semester beginning ceramics course for those who wish
to continue developing the basic techniques of wheel throwing and
slab building methods with an emphasis on increasingly advanced
projects. Direct participation in glaze preparation and kiln firing. It
is expected that students will produce work reflecting an intermediate understanding of ceramic design and explore individual project
resolutions through drawings and group discussion. Art 171 is a
continuation of Art 170. (CSU/UC)
ART 175: Primitive Ceramics
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A working, historical overview of forming and firing methods that
have been the basis of the African, Asian, American Indian, and
Pre-Columbian cultures. Locating clay deposits, preparation of clay
and colors, forming and burnishing techniques, pit firing, and Raku.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 176: Pottery on the Wheel
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisories: Art 112 or 113; and 130. Three lecture
and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will concentrate on the use of the potter’s wheel in the
creation of functional and sculptural ceramic objects. Techniques
of wheel throwing and trimming cups, bowls, vases, pitchers, lidded
forms, closed forms, tea-pots and plates will be demonstrated as well
as handle making. Students will be required to use basic design and
drawing skills in the development of their assignments. Emphasis
will be on refinement of technique rather than quantity. Covers
stoneware glaze development, kiln loading, stoneware and soda
firing. Development of post wheel-thrown projects will be demonstrated and encouraged. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/
UC)
ART 177: Hand Built Ceramics
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisories: Art 112 or 113; and 130. Three lecture
and three laboratory hours weekly.
Open to students from all art disciplines including textiles, who seek
to integrate construction with sculpture, painting, and crafts, etc.
An exploration of flexible, fragile, or fibrous materials such as cloth,
paper, plastic, reed, wire, and threads. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
This course will concentrate on the use of handbuilding in the
creation of functional ceramic ware and sculptural objects. Techniques of handbuilding cups, bowls, vases, pitchers, lidded forms,
teapots and plates will be demonstrated as well as handle making
and methods of embellishment. Students will be required to use
basic design and drawing skills in the development of their assignments. Emphasis will be on exploration and creative refinement of
technique. Covers basic clay bodies, glaze development, kiln loading,
stoneware and soda firing. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/
UC)
ART 170: Ceramics I
ART 180: Sculpture I
ART 166: Fiber Sculpture II
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Art 165. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A basic general ceramics course for those who want to survey various
techniques of wheel throwing and hand building methods, and to
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Study of form structure and its concept in relationship to self-expression. Survey of the history of sculpture as well as contemporary
movements. Instruction in basic techniques of stone and woodcarv-
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Art
ing, modeling, moldmaking, welding, and bronze casting. (CSU/UC)
CSU Area C-1
ART 181: Sculpture II
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Further exploration into materials and techniques. Welding,
moldmaking, bronze casting, steel fabrication, current and historical perspectives in sculpture, and visiting lecturers. Emphasis on
producing art works and the experience of the artist. (CSU/UC)
ART 185: Life Sculpture I
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
In this class, both a classical and contemporary approach to figure
sculpture will be studied. Working from live models, students will
learn to interpret the pose, study spatial relationship and proportion, experiment with scale and learn to compose as they examine
human form. Materials may include clay, wax, and plaster. Historical
and contemporary approaches to the figure will be studied in slide
lectures and readings. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 186: Life Sculpture II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 185. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is a continuation of Life Sculpture I. Continued exploration of development and technique with emphasis on individual
investigation of content. Students have an opportunity to move
toward abstraction to explore basic concepts of modern sculpture.
(CSU/UC)
ART 190: Black and White Photography I
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to meet the needs of art and photography
majors and those who would like an introduction to black and
white photography. The basics of camera use, film development and
darkroom printing are presented with an emphasis on balancing
technical skills with artistic expression. Group critiques and visual
slide presentations help to inform bi-weekly shooting assignments. A
basic adjustable 35mm film camera and lens are required. (CSU/UC)
CSU Area C-1
ART 191: Black and White Photography II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 190. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This darkroom-based course is designed to meet the needs of art
students, photography majors and others who qualify for an intermediate semester of black and white photography. There is an emphasis
on balancing technical skill with development of concept and artistic
expression. Some historical and contemporary photographers will
be presented through visual examples, which support assignments.
Continued discussion and analysis of student work in group and
individual critiques. Greater control over technique is developed. Assignments are presented as visual problems to be solved in different
ways. Shooting assignments outside of class time are required. (CSU/
UC)
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ART 192: Black and White Photography III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 190. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This darkroom-based course emphasizes the development of concept
including individual artistic expression. Continued development of
individual strengths and future projects will be introduced through
assignments. Basic adjustable 35mm (film) camera and lens are
required. (CSU/UC)
ART 193: Beginning Digital Photography
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
The exploration of photography as an art form using digital tools and
software. Emphasis is balanced between technical skill and the creative process. In-class exercises, out-of-class shooting assignments,
and group critiques. A basic digital camera is required. (CSU)
ART 194: Intermediate Digital Photography
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 193. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
The continued exploration and development of individual photographic digital projects. Emphasis is balanced between improving
technical skill and continuing the creative process. Continued
discussion through critique. A basic digital camera is required.
(CSU/UC)
ART 200: Portfolio Development
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Art 200 or Multimedia
Studies 200, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours
weekly.
Through lecture, research and critiques, students will develop a
professional portfolio that reflects their interests, skills and career
goals. This course is for students who have accomplished creative
skills and wish to develop strategies of self-promotion for their area
of expertise. (CSU)
ART 213: Internship for Art Careers
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 200. One lecture, one and one-half laboratory, and
four and one-half internship hours weekly.
This course bridges the gap between the classroom and the creative
industries. By providing an on-campus lecture class coupled with a
short-term internship, students gain an understanding of applying
their creative work in a real-life situation. Expectations are characterized by work-group activities, multiple projects under deadline, and
collaborative efforts. Internships are not guaranteed. Intern projects
may be suitable for students’ portfolios. (CSU)
ART 214: Interior Design III
4.0 Units. Prerequisites: Architecture 120, Art 114 and 115. Advisories: Art 112
and 130. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Emphasis in this advanced class is placed on residential interior design. Students will work with clients toward creative design solutions,
project development and communication, and presentation skills.
Space planning, furnishings/equipment selection and arrangement,
color and materials selection are covered as aspects of the residential
interior design process. Portfolios and project notebooks will include
floor plans, furnishings/equipment plans, elevations, paraline
45-45 oblique drawings, electrical plans, materials/finish schedules,
furnishings/equipment specifications, budgets and concept/sample
boards. Fall only. May be taken three times for credit. (CSU)
Art
CATALOG 2010/11
ART 216: Jewelry Design III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 117. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Advanced design and creation of jewelry. Areas explored include
techniques such as tool making, advanced hollow forming techniques, including functional, conceptual, and aesthetic aspects of
designing. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
73
ment, and development of concepts. Attendance is essential for
instructional, studio, and “critique” sessions. Oil, acrylic, and mixed
media. (CSU/UC)
ART 241: Painting IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 240. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Advanced design and creation of jewelry. Emphasis is on stone
setting, rendering, and individual projects incorporating advanced
construction skills. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
The more advanced the student, the more a strong individual approach is encouraged. Because of the varied abilities and experience
found at this level, the semester assignments will be self-imposed but
reviewed by the instructor on the basis of scope, technical improvement, and development of concepts. Attendance is essential for
instructional, studio, and “critique” sessions. Oil, acrylic, and mixed
media. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 218: Art Gallery Design and Management III
ART 242: Advanced Painting
ART 217: Jewelry Design IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 216. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 119. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Advanced course to allow students to apply practical application of
techniques, materials, aims, and principles covered in the first two
semesters. Students to plan and assume responsibilities for various
phases of proposed exhibits to be installed in the Kentfield Campus
Fine Arts Gallery. (CSU)
ART 219: Art Gallery Design and Management IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 218. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Advanced course to allow students to apply practical application of
techniques, materials, aims, and principles covered in the first three
semesters. Students will take greater responsibility for all phases of
one specific exhibit to be exhibited at the Kentfield Campus Fine Arts
Gallery. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ART 234: Life Drawing III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 135. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Lectures, demonstrations, and supervision of work in progress.
Drawing from undraped models. Classwork stresses the expressive
qualities of the figure, and drawing accurately and sensitively with
a variety of media. A sketchbook of work done outside of class is
required. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 235: Life Drawing IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 234. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Lectures, demonstrations, and supervision of work in progress.
Drawing from undraped models. Classwork stresses the expressive
qualities of the figure, and drawing accurately and sensitively with
a variety of media. A sketchbook of work done outside of class is
required. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 240: Painting III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 141. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
The more advanced the student, the more a strong individual approach is encouraged. Because of the varied abilities and experience
found at this level, the semester assignments will be self-imposed but
reviewed by the instructor on the basis of scope, technical improve-
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Art 241. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to broaden the base of opportunity for
students to develop and expand their personal artistic direction.
Technical and formal instruction will be combined with conceptual
and philosophical discussions and critiques to assist and encourage
students to better understand visual expression in the context of
current culture. Students will be required to visit several galleries and
museums in the San Francisco Bay Area and to read current fine arts
periodicals and journals as well as local art criticism (e.g. San Francisco Chronicle, Examiner, etc.). In collaboration with the instructor,
students will formulate their own direction and be responsible for
defining their own studio projects. Evaluation of student work and
progress will be ongoing through regular studio contact and through
group and individual critique. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU/UC)
ART 243: Painting in the Era of Post Modernism Concepts and Techniques
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 241. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This advanced studio painting course will explore contemporary
concepts, materials, and techniques associated with Post Modernism.
Appropriation, pop culture and imagery, new collage/assemblage
and creative re-use of images, objects, and previously established art
styles will be explored in the context of painting. Students will be
required to produce a body of work for final critique. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 244: Watercolor III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 145. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Lectures, demonstration, and works in progress based on extending students’ abilities toward advanced experimentations in the
watercolor media. Extension of palette and techniques on a larger
scale and with a greater variety. (CSU/UC)
ART 245: Watercolor IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 244. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Lectures, demonstration, and works in progress based on extending
students’ abilities toward advanced experimentations in the watercol-
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Art
or media. Extension of palette and techniques on a larger scale and
with a greater variety. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 246: Life Painting III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 147. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This class offers advanced instruction in painting the human figure.
Individualized instruction will allow for emphasis to be placed on
either portraiture or painting the entire figure. Concepts of color,
design, and style will be included for the advanced student. Experimentation in new techniques and materials will be encouraged.
(CSU/UC)
ART 247: Life Painting IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 246. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
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ART 266: Fiber Sculpture IV
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Art 265. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
Emphasis will be placed on the design process and development
of a personal strategy for problem solving. Problems pertaining to
perception, use of the imagination, and expanding imagery will be
given in areas of construction technique as well as dyeing and surface
treatment. Students will be expected to have a body of finished work
that demonstrates their explorations and conceptual approach at the
end of this class. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ART 270: Ceramics III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 171. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This class offers advanced instruction in painting the human figure.
Individualized instruction will allow for emphasis to be placed on
either portraiture or painting the entire figure. Concepts of color,
design, and style will be included for the advanced student. Experimentation in new techniques and materials will be encouraged. May
be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
Advanced and in-depth interpretation of the common class project
with greater expectations of further technical and conceptual
development. Mentoring of beginning students, lab assistance in
glaze preparation, kiln loading and firing. Advanced proficiency
with various types of clay bodies and glaze formulation, including
stoneware, porcelain, and low fire techniques. Concentration on
individual projects which illustrate more comprehensive aesthetic
understanding. (CSU)
ART 249: Independent Study
ART 271: Ceramics IV
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three laboratory hours weekly
per unit.
ART 252: Printmaking III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 153. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
An in-depth continuation of Art 152-153 including planographic
(lithography), photo etching, thermafax screens, advanced monotype/monoprinting and other experimental processes. Emphasis on
personal expression and professional presentation of work. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ART 253: Printmaking IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 252. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
An in-depth continuation of Art 152-153 including planographic
(lithography), photo etching, thermafax screens, advanced monotype/monoprinting and other experimental processes. Emphasis on
personal expression and professional presentation of work. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ART 265: Fiber Sculpture III
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Art 166. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
Experimental media in the textile construction field encourage ideas
not bound by a vast history and lend themselves to fresh and spontaneous ways of working with surface and structure. Application of
skills and personal direction to advanced level work. Emphasis on
developing individual concepts and expression. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU)
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 270. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Advanced and in-depth interpretation of the common class project
with greater expectations of further technical and conceptual
development. Mentoring of beginning students, lab assistance in
glaze preparation, kiln loading and firing. Advanced proficiency
with various types of clay bodies and glaze formulation, including
stoneware, porcelain, and low fire techniques. Concentration on
individual projects which illustrate more comprehensive aesthetic
understanding. Art 271 is a continuation of Art 270. (CSU)
ART 275: Ceramic Sculpture
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 171. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Advanced study of ceramics with a focus on the technical and
aesthetic considerations of ceramics as a sculptural medium. It is
intended for students already well grounded in forming techniques
who would benefit from a more critical assessment of their work.
This course includes group discussions that focus on career opportunities, resume development, professional organizations, and showing
work in galleries. Development of individual style and refinement
of technique will be encouraged. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU/UC)
ART 276: Advanced Wheel Thrown Ceramics
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 171. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Advanced study of ceramics with a focus on the technical and aesthetic considerations of ceramics as a functional medium. Intended
for students already well grounded in throwing and handbuilding
forming techniques who would benefit from a more critical assessment of their work. May involve field trips to artists’ studios, shows,
and conferences. Group discussions focusing on career opportunities, resume development, professional organizations, and showings
in galleries and art fairs. Development of individual style and
Astronomy
CATALOG 2010/11
75
refinement of technique will be encouraged. May be taken four times
for credit. (CSU/UC)
tigation of content. Students have an opportunity to move toward
abstraction to explore basic concepts of modern sculpture. (CSU/UC)
ART 278F: Large Scale Ceramics: Emphasis on the Figure
as Primary Subject
ART 286: Life Sculpture IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 171 or two semesters of Art 177. Advisories: Art 112,
113, 130. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is intended for the intermediate and advanced ceramics
student who is already well grounded in basic clay working skills
and glazing methods. This is an opportunity to enlarge the scale of
individual work as well as participate in the design, creation and
installation of public art. Emphasis on appropriate handbuilding
and mold-making techniques to familiarize the student with both
freestanding and wall relief construction techniques with various
clay types. Each project will require progressive technical ability and
will be assigned according to the student’s level of experience, areas
of interest and skill level. Examples of historical and contemporary
architectural and large scale ceramics will be explored through field
trips, slide lectures and visits to regional sites. (CSU)
ART 278T: Large Scale Ceramics: Emphasis on the Use of
Flat or Relief Tile and/or Murals
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 171 or two semesters of Art 177. Advisories: Art 112,
113, 130. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 285. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This is a continuation of Life Sculpture III. Continued exploration
of development and technique with emphasis on individual investigation of content. Students have an opportunity to move toward
abstraction to explore basic concepts of modern sculpture. Art 286
may be taken twice for credit. (CSU/UC)
ART 290: Black and White Photography IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 190. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
An emphasis on the development of individual artistic expression
using advanced techniques. Continued development of individual
projects working towards a portfolio. Darkroom use. A basic 35mm
(film) adjustable camera and lens are required. (CSU/UC)
ART 295: Advanced Projects in Art
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Completion of highest course level in area of study, such
as Art 131, 215, 217, 235, 241, 245, 247, 271, 281, or 290. Advisory: Art 138 and
118. Six laboratory hours weekly.
This course is intended for the intermediate and advanced ceramics
student who is already well grounded in basic clay working skills
and glazing methods. This is an opportunity to enlarge the scale of
individual work as well as participate in the design, creation and
installation of public art. Emphasis on appropriate handbuilding
and mold-making techniques to familiarize the student with both
freestanding and wall relief construction techniques with various
clay types. Each project will require progressive technical ability and
will be assigned according to the student’s level of experience, areas
of interest and skill level. Examples of historical and contemporary
architectural and large scale ceramics will be explored through field
trips, slide lectures and visits to regional sites. (CSU)
This course will provide advanced students with the opportunity
to design and implement individual creative projects under the
direction of the instructor. It will provide a forum for exploring and
testing potential project ideas that students will take from concept
to final product. Intended for students who are ready to plan, design,
and execute independent projects such as exhibitions, publications,
and installations. May be taken four times for credit with a distinctive project required each time. (CSU)
ART 280: Sculpture III
This course will provide advanced students with the opportunity to
design and implement group creative projects under the direction
of the instructor. It will provide a forum for exploring and testing
potential project ideas that students will take from concept to final
product. Intended for students who are ready to plan, design, and
execute group projects such as public installations and group exhibitions. May be taken up to four times for credit, with a distinctive
group project required each time. (CSU)
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Advanced participation in three-dimensional materials and
techniques. Casting bronze, iron and stainless steel; sheet metal
fabrication; arc, heli-arc, and torch welding techniques; ceramic shell
casting; and wood construction. Intended to encourage self-evaluation as it relates to continued expression as an artist. (CSU)
ART 281: Sculpture IV
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Advanced participation in three-dimensional materials and
techniques. Casting bronze, iron and stainless steel; sheet metal
fabrication; arc, heli-arc, and torch welding techniques; ceramic
shell casting; and wood construction. Intended to encourage selfevaluation as it relates to continued expression as an artist. May be
taken twice for credit. (CSU)
ART 285: Life Sculpture III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Art 186. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This is a continuation of Life Sculpture II. Continued exploration
of development and technique with emphasis on individual inves-
ART 296: Advanced Group Projects in Art
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Completion of highest course level in area of study, such
as Art 215, 217, 235, 241, 245, 247, 271, 281, 286, or 290. Advisory: Art 138 and
118. Six laboratory hours weekly.
ASTRONOMY
Will the universe expand forever? Is there life on other planets? How
do stars form? These are only a few of the exciting questions confronting astronomers. The development of space observatories, the
construction of large telescopes on earth, and the availability of large
computers for data analysis and theoretical calculations has been
accompanied by a rapid growth in the sophistication of this field.
Career Options
Astronomer/Astrophysicist, Astronomy Instructor, Director of
Planetarium/Science Museums, Observatory Staff Member, Technical Staff Member
76
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
Department Phone: (415) 485-9549
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
ASTRONOMY COURSES (ASTR)
ASTR 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ASTR 101: Introduction to Astronomy
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and one discussion hour weekly.
This course is a non-mathematical description of the universe
designed especially for the nonscience student. Topics include the sky
and its apparent motion, the law of gravity, the nature of light, the
solar system, stars and stellar evolution, galaxies and cosmology, and
life in the universe. Can also be offered in a distance learning format.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
ASTR 105: Cosmic Evolution
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Astronomy 105, Biology
105, or Geology 105, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three
lecture hours weekly.
This is an interdisciplinary course that explores the origins and
evolution of the cosmos from the Big Bang and the formation of the
universe and Earth, to the development of life. Students will explore
basic concepts and principles that bind all scientific disciplines, and
the nature of science and scientific inquiry. Through the study of
astronomy, chemistry, geology, and biology, students will discover
the interrelatedness of all matter, living and nonliving in the cosmos
and how physical and chemical processes eventually led to the evolution of living organisms. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or
B-2, IGETC Area 5A
ASTR 117F: Introductory Astronomy Field Lab
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Astronomy 101 or 105 or Physics 110 or concurrent
enrollment. The maximum credit allowed for Astronomy 117F and 117L is one
course. A one-week field trip consisting of fifty-two and one-half laboratory
hours.
This course will develop the student’s ability to investigate and solve
problems in astronomy. Techniques of experimentation, direct observation, data gathering, and interpretation will be employed to solve
both classical and contemporary problems in astronomy. The class
will include observations using telescopes, astrophotography, and
computer acquisition of data. This course will develop the student’s
awareness of the scientific method and how to apply it to specific
problems and their solutions. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area
B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
ASTR 117L: Introduction to Astronomy Lab
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Astronomy 101 or 105 or Physics 110 or concurrent
enrollment. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will develop the student’s ability to investigate and solve
problems in astronomy. Techniques of experimentation, direct obser-
MARIN.EDU
vation, data gathering, and interpretation will be employed to solve
both classical and contemporary problems in astronomy. The class
will include observations using telescopes, astrophotography, and
computer acquisition of data. This course will develop the student’s
awareness of the scientific method and how to apply it to specific
problems and their solutions. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area
B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
ASTR 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ASTR 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three laboratory hours weekly
per unit.
AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR
TECHNOLOGY
The Automotive Collision Repair Technology Program is designed
to prepare students for entry into one or more of the many service
branches of the expanding automotive collision repair and maintenance fields. This program will also meet the needs of those in the
adult community interested in acquiring the knowledge and skills
necessary to repair and maintain the appearance and value of their
personal vehicles.
Career Options
Auto Design Engineer, Insurance Estimator/Adjuster, Owner/Operator/Manager (Independent or Dealer), Specialist in Body Work,
Specialist in Painting, Working Foreman
Faculty
Ron Palmer
Department Phone: (415) 457-8811, Ext. 8532
A.S. in Master Collision Repair, Occupational
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded. Skills Certificates available in Mechanical and Electrical Components, Nonstructural
Damage Repair, Painting and Refinishing, and Structural Damage
Repair.)
The Automotive Collision Repair Technology Program is offered at
the Indian Valley Campus. Students who complete the requirements
for Master Collision Repair and additional general education and
graduation requirements will be awarded an Associate in Science
degree. Students who complete only the required courses for the
major will receive a Certificate of Achievement. A Skills Certificate is
earned by completion of the required courses as listed for the specific
Skills Certificate. In addition, students may be credited with up to
two years toward their apprenticeship in Marin County’s automotive
reconditioning and refinishing market.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
ACRT
95*
ACRT
167
ACRT
168
ACRT
169
Applied Automotive Math
Joining and Fastening Processes I
Joining and Fastening Processes II
Metalworking and Fundamentals I
UNITS
1
2
2
4
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
CATALOG 2010/11
ACRT
170
Metalworking and Fundamentals II
ACRT
171
Dent and Damage Repair
ACRT
176
Introduction to Plastics for Automotive Body Repair
ACRT
177
Maintenance and Detailing
ACRT
178
Introduction to Welding for Automotive Body Repair
ACRT
180
Panel Replacement
ACRT
225
Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
ACRT
249B Independent Study
Or
ACRT
160A Automotive Painting and Refinishing Repair Workshop
And
ACRT
160B Automotive Dent and Damage Repair Workshop
And
ACRT
160C Automotive Structural Repair Workshop
And
ACRT
160D Automotive Mechanical and Electrical Repair Workshop
ACRT
273
Painting and Refinishing
ACRT
274
Painting and Refinishing-- Enamels and Polyurethanes
ACRT
279
Frame Straightening and Repair
AUTO
111
Automotive Maintenance – Intermediate
Or
AUTO
118
Brakes, Alignments and Suspension
Or
AUTO
275
Automotive Brake Systems
And
AUTO
277
Alignment and Suspension
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
2,2
1
1
1
1
4
4
2
3
6
2
2
5
2½
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
Mechanical and Electrical Components Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate demonstrates competency of skills necessary
to qualify for an intermediate-level job in automotive collision repair.
Students should be prepared to take and pass the ASE Structural
Damage Repair Test Certification.
REQUIREMENTS
ACRT
95
ACRT
178
ACRT
160D
Or
ACRT
249B
AUTO
111
Or
AUTO
118
Or
AUTO
275
And
AUTO
277
AUTO
113
AUTO
235
Applied Automotive Math
Introduction to Welding for Automotive Body Repair
Automotive Mechanical and Electrical Repair Workshop
UNITS
1
2
1,1
Independent Study
Automotive Maintenance – Intermediate
2
3
Brakes, Alignments and Suspension
6
Automotive Brake Systems
2
Alignment and Suspension
Specialized Electronic Training
Automotive Air Conditioning
2
5
2½
77
Nonstructural Damage Repair Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate demonstrates competency of skills necessary
to qualify for an entry-level automotive collision repair job. Students
should be prepared to take and pass the ASE Nonstructural Damage
Repair Test Certification.
REQUIREMENTS
ACRT
160B
Or
ACRT
249B
ACRT
167
ACRT
169
ACRT
171
ACRT
176
ACRT
178
ACRT
180
Dent and Damage Repair Workshop
Independent Study
Joining and Fastening Processes I
Metalworking and Fundamentals I
Dent and Damage Repair
Introduction to Plastics for Automotive Body Repair
Introduction to Welding for Automotive Body Repair
Panel Replacement
UNITS
1, 1
2
2
4
2
2
2
2
Painting and Refinishing Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate demonstrates competency of skills necessary
to qualify for an entry-level automotive painting and refinishing
technician job. Students should be prepared to take and pass the ASE
Painting and Refinishing Test Certification.
REQUIREMENTS
ACRT
95
ACRT
160A
Or
ACRT
249B
ACRT
176
ACRT
177
ACRT
273
ACRT
274
Applied Automotive Math
Automotive Painting and Refinishing Repair Workshop
UNITS
1
1, 1
Independent Study
Introduction to Plastics for Automotive Body Repair
Maintenance and Detailing
Painting and Refinishing
Painting and Refinishing-- Enamels and Polyurethanes
2
2
2
4
4
Structural Damage Repair Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate demonstrates competency of skills necessary
to qualify for an entry-level job in automotive structural sheet metal
collision repair. Students should be prepared to take and pass the
ASE Structural Damage Repair Test Certification.
REQUIREMENTS
ACRT
95
ACRT
160C
Or
ACRT
249B
ACRT
168
ACRT
170
ACRT
279
AUTO
111
Or
AUTO
118
Or
AUTO
275
And
AUTO
277
Applied Automotive Math
Automotive Structural Repair Workshop
UNITS
1
1, 1
Independent Study
Joining and Fastening Processes II
Metalworking and Fundamentals II
Frame Straightening and Repair
Automotive Maintenance – Intermediate
2
2
4
2
3
Brakes, Alignments and Suspension
6
Automotive Brake Systems
2
Alignment and Suspension
2
78
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR TECHNOLOGY COURSES
(ACRT)
MARIN.EDU
ACRT 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
intermediate and advanced levels of auto mechanical and electrical
repair. Related aspects of the automotive collision repair field will
also be reviewed and practiced. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU)
0.5-6 Units.
ACRT 160E: Automotive Plastic Repair Workshop
ACRT 095: Applied Automotive Math
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three and one-fifth lecture hours one day a week for
five weeks. Can be taken for credit as Automotive Collision Repair Technology
095 or Automotive Technology 095. Credit will be awarded for only one course.
This course will review addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages. Also
included are ratio and proportion, the metric system, graphs and
applications specific to automotive technology. Paint mixing ratios
and writing repair orders. May be taken four times for credit.
ACRT 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
ACRT 160A: Automotive Painting and Refinishing
Repair Workshop
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed as a skill-building workshop in the area of
automotive refinishing. Students will work on projects of their choice
under the direction and supervision of the instructor. Practice will
include methods and techniques in basic, intermediate and advanced
levels of auto refinishing. Related aspects of the automotive collision
repair field will also be reviewed and practiced. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 160B: Automotive Dent and Damage Repair
Workshop
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed as a skill-building workshop in the area of
automotive dent and damage repair. Students will work on projects
of their choice under the direction and supervision of the instructor.
Practice will include methods and techniques in basic, intermediate
and advanced levels of auto non-structural repair. Related aspects
of the automotive collision repair field will also be reviewed and
practiced. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 160C: Automotive Structural Repair Workshop
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed as a skill-building workshop in the area
of automotive structural repair. Students will work on projects of
their choice under the direction and supervision of the instructor.
Practice will include methods and techniques in basic, intermediate
and advanced levels of auto structural repair. Related aspects of the
automotive collision repair field will also be reviewed and practiced.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 160D: Automotive Mechanical and Electrical
Repair Workshop
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed as a skill-building workshop in the area of
automotive mechanical and electrical repair. Students will work on
projects of their choice under the direction and supervision of the
instructor. Practice will include methods and techniques in basic,
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed as a skill-building workshop in the area of
automotive plastic repair. Students will work on projects of their
choice under the direction and supervision of the instructor. Practice
will include methods and techniques in basic, intermediate and
advanced levels of auto plastic repair. Related aspects of the automotive collision repair field will also be reviewed and practiced. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 167: Joining and Fastening Processes
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will be primarily concerned with various methods and
techniques of fastening and joining metals and various metal parts
as they relate to the vehicle body and frame. This will include plasma
arc cutting, electric spot, migwire, gas fusion, brazing, riveting,
bolting, clips, retainers, and epoxy. Through this practicum experience, students will have the opportunity to integrate their classroom
knowledge in a workplace environment. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
ACRT 168: Joining and Fastening Processes II
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will be primarily concerned with advanced methods and
techniques of fastening and joining metals and various metal parts
as they relate to the vehicle body and frame. This will include plasma
arc cutting, electric spot, migwire, gas fusion, brazing, riveting,
bolting, clips, retainers, and epoxy. Through this practicum experience, students will have the opportunity to integrate their classroom
knowledge in a workplace environment. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
ACRT 169: Metalworking and Fundamentals I
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to assist the student to successfully enter the
automotive collision repair field, and to understand metalworking
techniques for their usefulness in other applications. It will include
basic metal straightening fundamentals and will introduce the beginner to the tools, techniques, and theory of metalworking. Through
this practicum experience, students will have the opportunity to
integrate their classroom knowledge in a workplace environment.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 170: Metalworking and Fundamentals II
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to assist the student to successfully enter the
automotive collision repair field, and to understand metalworking
techniques for their usefulness in other applications. It will include
advanced metal straightening fundamentals, and will introduce the
beginner to advanced tool techniques and the theory of metalworking. This course provides the laboratory practice necessary for metal
bumping and metal finishing required for successful rebuilding of
damaged vehicle body panels and parts. In addition, it will introduce
the student to many other up-to-date timesaving metalworking tech-
CATALOG 2010/11
niques. It will cover the proper use of plastic fillers, slide-hammers,
pull rods, dozers, and powerposts. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU)
ACRT 171: Dent and Damage Repair
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed for the person whose car has everyday runof-the-mill dents, scrapes, scratches, and gouges. You can’t remember
where they all came from, but these are the ones that are usually
left unfixed or you end up paying for them out of your own pocket.
Most people simply lack the confidence to attempt their own minor
automotive body and fender repairs. Until now, basic do-it-yourself
instructions have not been available. With a surprisingly small
number of tools, anyone can make small automotive body and fender
repairs. No painting will be done in this class. Through this practicum experience, students will have the opportunity to integrate their
classroom knowledge in a workplace environment. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 176: Introduction to Plastics for Automotive Body
Repair
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Because plastic is lighter in weight than metal, it has become an important part of today’s vehicles. Plastic is synthetically compounded
from crude oil, coal, natural gas, and other natural substances.
Plastic vehicle parts include bumpers, fender extensions, fascias,
fender aprons, grille openings, stone shields, instrument panels,
trim panels, fuel lines, door panels, and engine parts. In this course,
students will be able to understand and use plastics of all types in
automotive repairs of the parts listed above. Through this practicum
experience, students will have the opportunity to integrate their
classroom knowledge in a workplace environment. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 177: Maintenance and Detailing
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course covers complete auto body care and maintenance:
buffing, rubbing, polishing, upholstery cleaning and dyeing, carpet
and mat cleaning, vinyl and convertible top maintenance and color
change, chrome parts and paint upkeep, and engine and chassis
cleaning. Through this practicum experience, students will have the
opportunity to integrate their classroom knowledge in a workplace
environment. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 178: Introduction to Welding for Automotive Body
Repair
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
With major collision repairs, many of the panels or parts on a vehicle
must be replaced and welded into place. The structural integrity of a
vehicle depends on how well the technician welds and installs panels
and parts. In this course, students will learn how to identify the three
classes of welding and the techniques used in the welding and installation of panels. The student will learn various methods of welding,
basic welding techniques, grazing and soldering, and plasma arc
cutting. Through this practicum experience, students will have the
opportunity to integrate their classroom knowledge in a workplace
environment. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
79
ACRT 180: Panel Replacement
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will cover the basic procedures involved in the removal
and replacement of quarter panels, rocker panels, door panels, and
top panels. It also includes the various methods available for splicing
damaged body panels or sections, rocker panels, floor sections,
and front and rear body clips. Through this practicum experience,
students will have the opportunity to integrate their classroom
knowledge in a workplace environment. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
ACRT 225: Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken as Automotive Collision and Repair
Technology 225 or Automotive Technology 225. Credit will be awarded for only
one course. Two and nine-tenths lecture hours weekly for 11 weeks.
This course provides training on how to write a resume, fill out a
job application, develop a portfolio, and organize and complete a
personal tax form. The course will cover work ethics and worker/
employer relations. It will address customer relations in the auto
repair industry and will include how to improve individual attitudes,
productivity, and morale in the workplace. Students will also study
methods of work and time-scheduling in independent automotive
repair dealerships, service stations and manufactures dealerships.
Speakers from the automotive industry will present their personal
career experiences. (CSU)
ACRT 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
ACRT 273: Painting and Refinishing
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed as an introduction to the highly-skilled
field of automotive spot painting and refinishing. It will include
a comprehensive study of materials, equipment, and techniques
necessary for the successful application of automotive refinishing
material. Through this practicum experience, students will have the
opportunity to integrate their classroom knowledge in a workplace
environment. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 274: Painting and Refinishing - Urethanes and
Polyurethanes
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed as an introduction to the highly-skilled field
of automotive urethanes and polyurethane refinishing. It will include
a comprehensive study of the materials, equipment, and techniques
used for the successful application of each of these widely used
automotive refinishing materials. Through this practicum experience, students will have the opportunity to integrate their classroom
knowledge in a workplace environment. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
ACRT 279: Frame Straightening and Repair
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will cover conventional and unitized constructed vehicle
frames, straightening and alignment of each type, alignment at
cross members, rear and side frame members, suspension systems,
80
Automotive Technology
and steering principles in their relationship to frame alignment.
(Study, demonstration, and practice with various types of frame
straightening machines, gauges, tools, and safety precautions, used
in the automotive collision industry, will be covered.) Through this
practicum experience, students will have the opportunity to integrate
their classroom knowledge in a workplace environment. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ACRT 290: Electric Vehicle COMvert: A Practical
Approach to Electric Vehicle Conversion
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken as Automotive Collision and Repair
Technology 290 or Electronics Technology 290, but students receive credit for
only one course. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course guides students through the complete process of converting a vehicle from a gasoline engine to an electrically-powered
engine. Students will learn the principles behind good component
layout, battery rack and box design, construction details, and
electrical wiring. Hands-on experience installing these components
is emphasized. Additionally, students will learn about AC and DC
drive systems, types of batteries, selecting the right chassis, transmission adapter housing design, and handling chargers and controllers.
(CSU)
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
The Automotive Technology Program is offered at the Indian Valley
Campus. It is designed to prepare students to enter the automotive
service repair industry. The program has been certified by Automotive Technician Training Standards (ATTS) meeting strict industry
standards in its specialty areas. While completing the program for
the Certificate of Achievement or degree, students are required to
work in the service repair industry, as well as provide their own basic
tool set. Four Certificates of Achievement are offered.
Career Options
Auto Mechanic - General, Brake Specialist, Computer Systems
Specialist, Diagnostician Specialist, Electrical Repair Specialist,
Emission Control Systems Specialist, Factory Service Representative,
Front End Specialist, Fuel Injection Specialist, Parts Salesperson,
Pre-Teacher Training, Private Business Owner, Service Manager,
Transmission Specialist, Tune-Up Specialist
Faculty
George Hritz, Ron Palmer
Department Phone: (415) 457-8811, Ext. 8531
A.S. in Automotive Technology: Chassis Repair Technician
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
An Associate of Science degree in Automotive Technology: Chassis
Repair Technician is awarded for satisfactory completion of the technical requirements, as well as the general education requirements. A
Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory performance
in required technical training.
The Chassis Repair Technician career path is designed to prepare
students to enter the automotive service repair industry at the second
year apprenticeship level or higher. The goal of this certificate is to
provide the student with both theory and manipulative skills training in engine repair, brakes, suspensions, drive trains, and heating
and air conditioning areas included in the Automotive Technician
Training Standards (ATTS). While completing the program for the
Certificate of Achievement or degree, students are required to work
MARIN.EDU
1500 hours in the service repair industry, as well as provide their own
basic tool set.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
AUTO
95*
Applied Automotive Math
AUTO
112
Automotive Engines
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
AUTO
118
Brakes, Alignment and Suspension
AUTO
225
Automotive Careers and Customer
Relations
AUTO
232
Automatic Transmission/ Transaxles
AUTO
233
Manual Drive Trains and Axles
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
AUTO
249C Independent Study (Fieldwork)
MACH 120
Machine Technology I
MACH 130
Welding I
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
UNITS
1
4
5
6
2
4
4
2½
3
3
2
A.S. in Automotive Technology: Electrical/Performance
Technician (Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
An Associate of Science degree in Automotive Technology: Electrical/Performance Technician is awarded for satisfactory completion
of the technical requirements, as well as the general education
requirements. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory performance in required technical training.
The Electrical/Performance Technician career path is designed
to prepare students to enter the automotive service repair industry
at the second year apprenticeship level or higher. The goal of this
certificate is to provide the student with both theory and manipulative skills training in electrical/performance systems area included
in the Automotive Technician Training Standards (ATTS). While
completing the program for the Certificate of Achievement or
degree, students are required to work 1000 hours in the service repair
industry, as well as provide their own basic tool set.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
Select 29½ units from the following courses:
AUTO
95*
Applied Automotive Math
1
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
5
AUTO
114
Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
4
AUTO
116
Automotive Electrical Systems
6
AUTO
225
Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
2
AUTO
228
Automotive Computer Controls
4
AUTO
229
Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting and Diagnosis
4
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
2½
AUTO
249B Independent Study (Fieldwork)
2
AUTO
281
Electrical and Electronic Systems Training - A6 Alternative
2
AUTO
283
Engine Performance Diagnosis and Repair -A8 Alternative
2
AUTO
285
Advanced Engine Performance/Emissions Systems Diagnosis and Repair - L1 Alternative
2
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
Automotive Technology
CATALOG 2010/11
A.S. in Automotive Technology: Emissions/Performance
Technician (Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
An Associate of science degree in Automotive Technology: Emission/
Performance Technician is awarded for satisfactory completion of
the technical requirements, as well as the general education requirements. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory
performance in required technical training.
The Emissions/Performance Technician career path is designed
to prepare students to enter the automotive service repair industry
at the second year apprenticeship level or higher. The goal of this
Certificate is to provide the student with both theory and manipulative skills training in Electrical/Performance Systems and Emission
Technician areas included in the Automotive Technician Training
Standards (ATTS). In addition the courses are required by the Bureau
of Automotive Repair to meet the educational requirement to be
eligible to take the test to become an Advanced Emission Specialist
Smog Technician. While completing the program for the Certificate
of Achievement or degree, students are required to work 1000 hours
in the service repair industry, as well as provide their own basic tool
set.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
AUTO
95*
Applied Automotive Math
AUTO
114
Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
AUTO
225
Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
AUTO
229
Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting and Diagnosis
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
AUTO
238
Basic Area Clean Air Car Course
AUTO
240
Enhanced Area Clean Air Car Course
AUTO
249B Independent Study – Fieldwork
AUTO
281
Electrical and Electronic System Training – A6 Alternative
AUTO
283
Engine Performance Diagnosis and Repair – A8 Alternative
AUTO
285
Advanced Engine Performance/Emissions
Systems Diagnosis and Repair – L1 Alternative
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
UNITS
1
4
2
4
2½
3½
1
2
2
2
2
A.S. in Automotive Technology: Master Repair Technician,
Occupational (Certificate of Achievement also awarded. Skills
Certificates available in Automotive Service Advisor, Brakes and
Suspension, Drive Trains, Electrical/Performance, Emissions,
Engine Repair, and Heating and Air Conditioning.)
An Associate of Science degree in Automotive Technology: Master
Repair Technician is awarded for satisfactory completion of the technical requirements, as well as the general education requirements. A
Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory performance
in required technical training. The Master Repair Technician career
path is designed to prepare students to enter the automotive service
repair industry at the third year apprenticeship level. The goal
of this Certificate is to provide the student with both theory and
manipulative skills training in Engine Repair, Brakes, Suspensions,
Drive Trains, Heating and Air Conditioning, Electrical/Performance
Systems and Emission Technician areas included in the Automotive Technician Training Standards (ATTS). While completing the
program for the Certificate of Achievement or degree, students are
required to work 2000 hours in the service repair industry, as well as
provide their own basic tool set.
81
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
AUTO
95*
Applied Automotive Math
AUTO
112
Automotive Engines
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
AUTO
114
Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
AUTO
116
Automotive Electrical Systems
AUTO
118
Brakes, Alignment and Suspension
AUTO
225
Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
AUTO
228
Automotive Computer Controls
AUTO
229
Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting and Diagnosis
AUTO
232
Automatic Transmission/ Transaxles
AUTO
233
Manual Drive Trains and Axles
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
AUTO
238
Basic Area Clean Air Car Course
AUTO
240
Enhanced Area Clean Air Car Course
AUTO
249
Independent Study (Fieldwork)
MACH 120
Machine Technology I
MACH 130
Welding I
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
UNITS
1
4
5
4
6
6
2
4
4
4
4
2½
3½
1
4
3
2
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate
of Achievement. A Skills Certificate is earned by completion of the
required courses as listed for the specific Skills Certificate.
Automotive Service Advisor Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate provides the student with the skills necessary
to qualify for an entry-level service writer/advisor.
REQUIREMENTS
AUTO
95
AUTO
110
AUTO
111
BUS
144
CIS
110
Applied Automotive Math
Introduction to Automotive Maintenance
Automotive Maintenance - Intermediate
Business Communication
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
UNITS
1
3
3
3
3
Brakes and Suspension Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate signifies to employers that the student has
completed comprehensive training in the skill area of brake and
suspension system repair and will require minimal supervision upon
employment.
REQUIREMENTS
AUTO
95
Applied Automotive Math
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
AUTO
118
Brakes, Alignment and Suspension
AUTO
249A* Independent Study (Fieldwork)
* Each section of AUTO 249A may be applied to only one Skills Certificate.
UNITS
1
5
6
1
Drive Trains Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate signifies to employers that the student has
completed comprehensive training in the skill areas of transmission/
82
Automotive Technology
MARIN.EDU
transaxle and drive train repair and will require minimal supervision upon employment.
REQUIREMENTS
AUTO
95
Applied Automotive Math
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
AUTO
232
Automatic Transmissions/ Transaxles
AUTO
233
Manual Drive Trains and Axles
AUTO
249A* Independent Study (Fieldwork)
* Each section of AUTO 249A may be applied to only one Skills Certificate.
UNITS
1
5
4
4
1
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY COURSES (AUTO)
0.5-6 Units.
AUTO 095: Applied Automotive Math
UNITS
1
5
6
4
4
1
2
2
2
Emissions Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate meets the educational requirements of the
Bureau of Automotive Repair to qualify for the examination to gain
an Advanced Emission Technician Specialist (EA) license.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
AUTO
238
Basic Area Clean Air Car Course
3½
AUTO
240
Enhanced Area Clean Air Car Course
1
AUTO
281
Electrical and Electronic Systems Training - A6 Alternative
2
AUTO
283
Engine Performance Diagnosis and Repair - A8 Alternative
2
AUTO
285
Advanced Engine Performance/Emissions - L1 Alternative
2
AUTO
249A* Independent Study (Fieldwork)
2
* Each section of AUTO 249A may be applied to only one Skills Certificate. Course must be
taken twice.
Engine Repair Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate signifies to employers that the student has
completed comprehensive training in the skill area of engine repair
and will require minimal supervision upon employment.
REQUIREMENTS
AUTO
95
Applied Automotive Math
AUTO
112
Automotive Engines
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
AUTO
249A* Independent Study (Fieldwork)
* Each section of AUTO 249A may be applied to only one Skills Certificate.
UNITS
1
5
2½
1
AUTO 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
Electrical/Performance Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate signifies to employers that the student has
completed comprehensive training in the skill areas of electrical
system and drivability repair and will require minimal supervision
upon employment.
REQUIREMENTS
Select 17 units from the following courses:
AUTO
95
Applied Automotive Math
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
AUTO
116
Automotive Electrical Systems
AUTO
228
Automotive Computer Controls
AUTO
229
Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting and Diagnosis
AUTO
249A* Independent Study (Fieldwork)
AUTO
281
Electrical and Electronic Systems Training – A6 Alternative
AUTO
283
Engine Performance Diagnosis and Repair – A8 Alternative
AUTO
285
Advanced Engine Performance/Emissions –L1 Alternative
* Each section of AUTO 249A may be applied to only one Skills Certificate.
REQUIREMENTS
AUTO
95
Applied Automotive Math
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
AUTO
249A* Independent Study (Fieldwork)
* Each section of AUTO 249A may be applied to only one Skills Certificate.
UNITS
1
4
5
1
Heating and Air Conditioning Skills Certificate
This Skills Certificate signifies to employers that the student has
completed comprehensive training in the skill area of heating and air
conditioning systems repair and will require minimal supervision
upon employment.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three and one-fifth lecture hours one day a week for
five weeks. Can be taken for credit as Automotive Collision Repair Technology
095 or Automotive Technology 095. Credit will be awarded for only one course.
This course will review addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages.
Also included are ratio and proportion; metric system; graphs and
applications specific to automotive technology. Paint mixing ratios
and writing repair orders. May be taken four times for credit.
AUTO 110: Introduction to Automotive Maintenance
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
An introductory course studying basic lab procedures, safety, service
information, oil change service, under hood inspection, under vehicle service and belts, hoses, tubing services, tire and wheel service,
and cooling system service. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
AUTO 111: Automotive Maintenance - Intermediate
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This intermediate course provides training in engine testing and
repair, engine performance, fuel and emission service, general
electrical system repair, battery service, brake service and suspension, and steering and alignment service. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
AUTO 112: Automotive Engines
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive engines used on cars, pickups, light trucks, and utility vehicles. The course covers operation and repair of automotive engines
including disassembly, testing, and reassembly. Automotive machine
shop skills are not included. This course is a skills-competency based
curriculum. In order to pass this class, each student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform skills necessary to qualify for
technician positions, which require minimum supervision upon
employment. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
AUTO 113: Specialized Electronic Training
5.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in electrical and electronic systems
used on cars, pickups, light trucks, and utility vehicles. The course
includes theory and operations of OHMS law, Digital Volt Ohm
Meters, electrical circuits, wiring diagrams, schematics, and wire
repair. This course is a skills-competency based curriculum. In order
CATALOG 2010/11
to pass this class each student must demonstrate his/her competency
to perform skills necessary to qualify for technician positions that
require minimum supervision upon employment. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU)
AUTO 114: Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive fuel systems used on cars, pickups, light trucks, and utility vehicles. The course covers operation and repair of fuel systems,
carburetors, and electronic fuel injection systems. Modern diagnostic
tools and equipment will be used. This class is a skills-competency
based curriculum. In order to pass this class each student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform skills necessary to qualify
for technician positions which require minimum supervision upon
employment. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
AUTO 116: Automotive Electrical Systems
6.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and nine laboratory hours weekly.
Automotive Technology
83
Speakers from the automotive industry will present their personal
career experiences. (CSU)
AUTO 228: Automotive Computer Controls
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive computer control systems used on cars, pickups, light
trucks and utility vehicles. The course covers operation of sensors,
actuators and control modules, and the use of modern scan tools,
Digital Storage Oscilloscopes and diagnostic tools. This class is a
skills-competency based curriculum. In order to pass this class each
student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform skills
necessary to qualify for technician positions, which require minimum supervision upon employment. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
AUTO 229: Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting and
Diagnosis
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive electrical systems used in cars, pickups, light trucks, and
utility vehicles. Emphasis is placed on developing a comprehensive
understanding of all electrical components, with special emphasis
on diagnosis, repair, and testing of electrical systems. This course is
a skills-competency based curriculum. In order to successfully pass
this class each student must demonstrate his/her competency to
perform skills necessary to qualify for technician positions, which
require minimum supervision upon employment. May be taken
twice for credit. (CSU)
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive electronic systems used on cars, pickups, light trucks,
and utility vehicles. The course covers the diagnostic thought process
used to diagnose and repair cranking, charging, ignition, air bag,
lighting systems, gauge and instrument panels, horn, wiper/washer,
and accessory systems. This class is a skills-competency based
curriculum. In order to pass this class each student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform skills necessary to qualify for
technician positions, which require a minimum of supervision upon
employment. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
AUTO 118: Brakes, Alignment and Suspension
AUTO 230: Light Duty Diesel Engine Performance and
Emissions
6.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and nine laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides training on wheel balance, wheel alignment,
brake repair, automotive suspensions, and steering systems. Students
will learn to balance wheels; operate wheel aligners including fourwheel computer aligners; repair and service disc, drum and anti-lock
brake systems, and service rack, pinion and worm gear steering
gears. Diagnosing and troubleshooting all of these systems are
included. Health and safety working with asbestos will be stressed.
May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
AUTO 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
AUTO 225: Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken as Automotive Technology 225 or
Automotive Collision and Repair Technology 225. Credit will be awarded for
only one course. Two and nine-tenths lecture hours weekly for 11 weeks.
This course provides training on how to write a resume, fill out a
job application, develop a portfolio, and organize and complete a
personal tax form. The course will cover work ethics and worker/
employer relations. It will address customer relations in the auto
repair industry and will include how to improve individual attitudes,
productivity, and morale in the workplace. Students will also study
methods of work and time-scheduling in independent automotive
repair dealerships, service stations and manufactures dealerships.
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Automotive Technology 113 and 116. One
lecture and three practicum hours weekly.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
computer-controlled light duty diesel vehicles. The course covers
diesel engine operation, fuel system delivery and operation, air
induction principles and operation, exhaust system components and
operation, and electronic controls operation and testing. Diagnostic
tools such as scan tools, digital multi-meters and digital storage
oscilloscopes will be used to diagnose vehicle faults. This course is a
skills-competency based curriculum. In order to pass this class each
student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform skills necessary to quality for technician positions, which require minimum
supervision upon employment. (CSU)
AUTO 232: Automatic Transmission/Transaxles
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive automatic transmissions and transaxles used on cars,
pickups, light trucks, and utility vehicles. The course covers construction, function, and principles of operation including planetary
gears, power flow, friction devices, and hydraulic and electrical
controls. This class is a skills-competency based curriculum. In order
to pass this class each student must demonstrate his/her competency
to perform skills necessary to qualify for technician positions, which
84
Automotive Technology
MARIN.EDU
require minimum supervision upon employment. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU)
failure base-lining techniques and the use of the BAR 97 Emission
Inspection System. (CSU)
AUTO 233: Manual Drive Trains and Axles
AUTO 241: B.A.R. 2007 Smog Check Technician Update
Training Course
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive manual transmissions and transaxles used on cars,
pickups, light trucks, and utility vehicles. The course covers construction, function, and principles of operation including clutches,
transmissions, transaxles and 4-wheel drive systems. This class is
a skills-competency based curriculum. In order to pass this class
each student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform
skills necessary to qualify for technician positions, which require
minimum supervision upon employment. May be taken four times
for credit. (CSU)
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Six lecture and six laboratory hours per semester.
AUTO 235: Automotive Air Conditioning
AUTO 242F9: B.A.R. 2009 Smog Check Technician
Update Training Course
2.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and one and one-half laboratory hours
weekly.
This course, designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive heating and air conditioning systems used on cars,
pickups, light trucks and utility vehicles. The course covers construction, function and principles of heating and air conditioning systems,
components and controls. This class is a skills-competency based
curriculum. In order to pass this class each student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform skills necessary to qualify for
technician positions, which require minimum supervision upon
employment. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
AUTO 238: Basic Area Clean Air Car Course
3.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and one and one-half laboratory
hours weekly.
This course partially satisfies the educational prerequisite to become
a “Basic Area” smog inspection technician of the Bureau of Automotive Repair (BAR). This course provides training on BAR rules and
regulations, emission control systems theory and operation, cause
and effect of mobile source air pollution, operation of the BAR 97
EIS, OBD II theory, operation, diagnosis and advanced scan tool
diagnostics. (CSU)
AUTO 239: Bureau of Automotive Repair (B.A.R.) 20112012 Update Training Course
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Ten lecture and eight laboratory hours.
This course covers proper vehicle preconditioning for ASM and TSI
tests, proper gear selection for ASM tests, the use of aftermarket
parts, catalytic converter testing, and new emission control technology. (CSU)
AUTO 240: Enhanced Area Clean Air Car Course
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Eighteen lecture hours and ten laboratory hours per
semester.
This course partially satisfies the educational prerequisite to become
an “Advanced Emission Specialist” smog inspection technician of the
Bureau of Automotive Repair. The course provides training on NOx
emission diagnostic repair procedures, the use of Digital Storage
Oscilloscopes, catalytic converter operation and testing, emission
All licensed Smog Check technicians whose licenses expire after
December 31, 2006, must complete the 2007 Update Training Course
prior to applying to renew their licenses. Individuals applying for
initial licenses (received by B.A.R.) after December 31, 2006 must
have completed this course to be eligible for the licensing examination. The course will include information on B.A.R. updates,
computer control system interactions, Controller Area Networking
(CAN), OBD II mode 6 diagnosis, Technical Service Bulletins (TSBs),
Manufacturers’ Internet sites, advanced fuel trim diagnostics and
PCM program reflashing. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Sixteen lecture hours.
All licensed Smog Check technicians whose licenses expire after
December 31, 2008 must complete the 2009 Update Training Course
prior to applying to renew their licenses. Individuals applying for
initial licenses (received by BAR) after December 31, 2008 must have
completed this course to be eligible for the licensing examination.
The course will include information on BAR Updates, Advanced
Electrical/Electronic systems diagnostic and repair procedures as
they pertain to vehicle emission failures, and practical application of
the Internet to obtain automotive and diagnostic and repair information. (CSU)
AUTO 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
AUTO 275: Automotive Brake Systems
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, or for those already working in the field who want to
update their training and learn new skills. The course provides
training in the operation and repair of brake systems used on cars,
pickups, light trucks and utility vehicles, and on the use of tools used
to diagnose and repair brake systems. In order to pass this class each
student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform skills necessary to qualify for technician positions, which require minimum
supervision upon employment. (CSU)
AUTO 277: Alignment and Suspension
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed for students with a desire to become auto
technicians, automotive collision repair technicians, or for those
working in the field who want to update their training and learn
new skills. The course provides training in the operation and repair
of suspension systems used on cars, pickups, light trucks and utility
vehicles, and on the use of modern diagnostic tools used to diagnose,
repair and align suspension systems. In order to pass this class each
student must demonstrate his/her competency to perform skills nec-
Behavioral Science
CATALOG 2010/11
essary to qualify for technician positions, which require minimum
supervision upon employment. (CSU)
AUTO 281: Electrical and Electronic Systems Training A6 Alternative
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive electrical systems used on cars, pickups, light trucks and
utility vehicles. Emphasis is placed on developing a comprehensive
understanding of all electrical components, with a special emphasis
on diagnosis, repair, and testing of vehicles with driveability and
emission faults. (CSU)
AUTO 283: Engine Performance Diagnosis and Repair A8 Alternative
2.3 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive fuel and ignition systems used on cars, pickups, light
trucks and utility vehicles. Emphasis is placed on developing a
comprehensive understanding of engine mechanical condition, fuel
management, ignition systems and computer engine controls, with
a special emphasis on diagnosis, repair and testing of vehicles with
driveability and emission faults. (CSU)
AUTO 285: Advanced Engine Performance/Emissions (L1
Alternative)
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE COURSES (BEHS)
BEHS 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
BEHS 103: Human Sexuality
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken for credit as Behavioral Science 103
or Biology 108A. Students will receive credit for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This is a survey course dealing with aspects of human sexual behavior. Topics will be considered from psychological, social, cultural,
and biological perspectives. Topics to be included are sexual anatomy
and physiology, hormones, conception and contraception, sex
research, sex and the lifespan, human sexual activities and behaviors,
sexual orientation, gender, sex and society, and contemporary sexual
issues. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7 or E, IGETC Area 4
BEHS 105: Sex Roles in Contemporary Society
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course examines the ways in which female and male roles and
sex role stereotyping influence our lives. Topics will include biological and cultural contributions to sex role-playing in interpersonal
relationships, and the impact of sex roles on personal growth.
Emphasis on the social and personal implications of moving toward
androgyny (role-free human behavior and identity). (CSU/UC)
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
BEHS 114: Chemical Dependency
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive computerized engine control systems used on cars,
pickups, light trucks and utility vehicles. Emphasis is placed on
developing a comprehensive understanding of fuel management,
ignition systems and computer engine controls, with special emphasis on diagnosis, repair and testing of vehicles with driveability and
emission faults. (CSU)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
BEHS 139: Selected Topics
Behavioral science is an interdisciplinary study of human behavior
and encompasses such disciplines as anthropology, psychology, and
sociology. The courses offered are intended to be used as a background for general education.
Faculty
Dikran Martin, Victoria Coad
Department Phone: (415) 485-9630
A.A. in Behavioral Science
In addition to other graduation requirements, completion of 18
units from any degreeapplicable courses in anthropology, behavioral
science, psychology, and sociology. (Please note: This degree must be
completed by the end of summer session 2011.)
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
85
This course examines the behavioral and psychological effects of
chemical dependency on the individual. Included is an analysis of the
effects of substance abuse on the family and the sociological conditions contributing to substance abuse. The primary focus is on the
role of the mental health professional in issues of substance abuse.
(CSU) CSU Area D-7 or E
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
BEHS 201: Understanding Globalization: The Impact of
Social, Political, and Economic Change
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Behavioral Science 201,
Economics 201, or Political Science 201, but credit will be awarded for only one
course. Three lecture hours weekly.
The world is becoming more integrated and interdependent,
heightening the need for greater understanding of the impact of
globalization on the economy, politics, and society. This interdisciplinary team-taught course explores the new wave of global political,
economic, and social change and the opportunities and challenges
it brings to states, institutions, and individuals. Focus is upon what
the individual will need to know and understand to be an effective
participant in these rapidly changing global phenomena. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7, IGETC Area 4
86
Biology
BEHS 252: Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Psychology 110 or 112 or Sociology 110.
Behavioral Science 252 and Psychology 252 are equivalent. Credit is given for
only one course. One and one-half lecture and four and one-half fieldwork
hours weekly.
This course is designed to give students meaningful participation
in a psychologically related community service agency in order to
understand the applications of psychological principles, theories, and
concepts. With the mutual consent of student and instructor each
student is placed in a school, social agency, special education program, mental health agency, or community organization and works
under the direct supervision of someone with a degree, credential,
or demonstrated expertise in psychology or sociology. The one and
one-half hour weekly seminar provides students and instructor the
opportunity to present observations, discuss perceptions, and apply
relevant theories and concepts to their fieldwork participation. May
be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
BEHS 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
BIOLOGY
Biology career options include dozens of intriguing specialties. One
can concentrate on microbiology and investigate viruses, bacteria,
or molds. One can focus on cytology and study cells or histology and
delve into the structure of animal and vegetable tissue. Ichthyology,
parasitology, embryology, genetics, ecology, and biochemistry are a
few of the other choices in the field. Emerging areas of emphasis include the concern for the environment and allied health professions.
Career Options
Agricultural Biologist, Biochemist, Biologist, Botanist, Chiropractor,
Dentist, Entomologist, Environmental Specialist, Fish and Game
Technical Aide, Fish and Game Warden, Food Technologist, Forester,
Genetic Counselor, Horticulturists, Industrial Hygienist, Inhalation
Therapist, Laboratory Technician, Marine Biologist, Medical Technologist , Microbiologist, Nuclear Medical Technician, Nutritionist,
Occupational Therapist, Orthotist-Prosthetist, Osteopath, Park
Naturalist/Ranger, Pharmacist, Pharmacologist, Physical Therapist,
Physician/Surgeon, Podiatrist, Registered Nurse, Research Assistant,
Sanitarian, Scientific Illustrator, Speech Pathologist/ Audiologist,
Teacher, Technical Writer, Veterinarian, Wildlife Specialist, X-Ray
Technician, Zoo Curator, Zoologist
Faculty
Becky Brown, Fernando Agudelo-Silva, Paul da Silva, Jamie Deneris, David Egert,
Joseph Mueller
Department Phone: (415) 485-9510
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
MARIN.EDU
A.S. in Biology
While students may take classes at both campuses, courses required
for the major are offered at the Kentfield Campus.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
BIOL
115* Principles of Biology
5
BIOL
116+ Principles of Animal and Plant Diversity
5
CHEM 115
Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
4
Or
CHEM 131
General Chemistry I
5
And
CHEM 132
General Chemistry II
5
MATH 104
Plane Trigonometry
3
PHYS
108A General Physics I
5
PHYS
108B General Physics II
5
* Prerequisites: Biology110 and Chemistry 131. Chemistry 131 may be taken concurrently
with Biology 115.
+ Prerequisites: Biology110 and Biology 110L.
Certificate of Achievement in Natural History
The Natural History Program is a field experience program based on
scientific principles and concepts for students who want to develop
a comprehensive understanding of the natural world. It is especially
designed for elementary school teachers, natural history museum
and environmental docents, and environmental educators. For
students interested in receiving an Associate in Science degree in
Biology, see requirements under that major.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree in Biology. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
BIOL
110
Introduction to Biology
BIOL
110L Introduction to Biology Lab
BIOL
161
Field Botany
BIOL
162
General Ecology
BIOL
235
General Marine Biology
BIOL
237
Marine Ecology Field Studies
Or
BIOL
247
Extended Field Studies
BIOL
245
Field Ecology of Marin
Or
BIOL
246
Field Ecology
GEOG 112
Meteorology and Climatology
GEOL
120
Physical Geology
GEOL
120L Physical Geology Lab
GEOL
125
Field Geology I
Or
GEOL
128
Geologic Studies of Marin County
In addition, complete six units from the following courses:
BIOL
143
Stewardship of Marin Parks and Open Space
BIOL
147
Food, People, and the Environment
BIOL
164
Introduction to Mammalogy
BIOL
165
The World of Insects
BIOL
167
Introduction to Herpetology
BIOL
169A Introduction to Ornithology A
BIOL
169B Introduction to Ornithology B
BIOL
170
Biology of Marine Animals
BIOL
171
Biology of Marine Mammals
UNITS
3
1
3
3
4
2
1½ -3
1
2
3
3
1
2½
1
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
Biology
CATALOG 2010/11
Skills Certificate in Environmental Science
This is the starting point for all those interested in pursuing interests
in environmental science! The program leading to this certificate
introduces students to the major areas of environmental science,
provides the basic background necessary for analysis and solution of
environmental problems, gives an overview of some of the most important problems in Marin and provides direct contact with people
solving them. It is designed to be completed in two years. It can be
added to a College of Marin A.A./A.S. degree to improve transferability to bachelor’s programs in environmental science. It can also
be earned apart from any degree to show mastery of the basics of the
field of environmental science and to increase the diversity of job
options in the field.
REQUIREMENTS
BIOL/GEOL 138 BIOL
110 CHEM 105
Or
GEOL
120
Or
GEOG 101 BIOL/GEOL 142 Or
BIOL/GEOL 145 Or
GEOG 102
BIOL/GEOL 143 Or
BIOL 147
Or
BIOL 148
UNITS
4
3
3
87
interested in careers related to health and fitness and various aspects
of food, and for anyone curious or concerned about nutrition. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area E
BIOL 101: Field Biology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This outdoor field course is designed to give nonmajors in biology an
overview of Marin’s varied plant and animal communities. Most of
Marin’s 25 biotic community types are investigated including aquatic
and terrestrial. Identification of plants, animals, and ecology are
major areas of emphasis. (CSU) AA/AS Area A
BIOL 104: The Ecology of Infectious Diseases
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Physical Geology
3
Physical Geography
Environmental Policy and Planning
3
3
This course is designed for both science and nonscience majors
interested in understanding the distribution and spread of infectious diseases. Emphasis is on the role that specific environments
play in determining where and when epidemics will occur. Topics
include the biology and ecology of microorganisms and their hosts,
geographic medicine, the impact of human activity on the incidence
and transmission of infectious diseases, and epidemics in human
history. (CSU)
Ethics in Science
3
BIOL 105: Cosmic Evolution
Humans and the Environment
Stewardship of Marin Parks & Open Space
3
3
Food, People and the Environment
3
Marin County Agriculture
3
Introduction to Environmental Science
Introduction to Biology
Chemistry in the Human Environment
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Astronomy 105, Biology
105, or Geology 105. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
0.5-6 Units.
This is an interdisciplinary course that explores the origins and
evolution of the cosmos from the Big Bang and the formation of the
universe and Earth, to the development of life. Students will explore
basic concepts and principles that bind all scientific disciplines, and
the nature of science and scientific inquiry. Through the study of
astronomy, chemistry, geology, and biology, students will discover
the interrelatedness of all matter, living and nonliving in the cosmos
and how physical and chemical processes eventually led to the evolution of living organisms. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B1 or
B2, IGETC Area 5A
BIOL 099: General Science
BIOL 107: Human Biology
BIOLOGY COURSES (BIOL)
BIOL 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Biology 99 or Geology 99,
but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed for students who have not reached the level of
success they desired in high school or college science courses and for
individuals returning to school after an extended absence. The course
covers basic scientific principles and concepts of the physical and
life sciences and prepares students to move into other science classes
with the information, understanding, and skills required to succeed. Introductory topics in biology, chemistry, geography, geology,
meteorology, and physics are discussed. This course also provides an
excellent overview of the most important topics in science today for
anyone interested in learning more about the natural world.
BIOL 100: Nutrition
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course covers the basic principles of human nutrition and their
relationship to health and wellness including energy in nutrition;
main nutrients; vitamins, minerals and water; digestion; changing
nutritional needs through life’s stages; and connections between
food and sustainability. This foundation class is designed for people
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Biology 107 or Physical
Education 107. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours
weekly.
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction
to the structure, function, and development of the human body.
The course will give students the foundational concepts to explore
personal and societal issues involving human biology as well as cover
anatomy and physiology concepts useful in preparing for careers
in wellness related fields such as personal training, group fitness
instruction, and massage therapy. Topics include an introduction to
scientific methods of investigation and some elementary chemistry
(no previous background necessary) as a basis for understanding
human functions such as movement, digestion, circulation, reproduction, and other systems. Some diseases and other causes of body
malfunction will be discussed. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-2, IGETC
Area 5B
88
Biology
MARIN.EDU
BIOL 108A: Human Sexuality
BIOL 112A: Biology for Biology Majors I
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken for credit as Biology 108A or
Behavioral Science 103. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three
lecture hours weekly.
5.0 Units. Prerequisites: Math 103, or Math 103A and 103B, or Math 103X
and 103Y. Advisory: Biology 110, Biology 110L and concurrent enrollment in
Chemistry 131. Three lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This is a survey course covering human sexuality from a cross-disciplinary approach. The course will examine sexuality from physiological, anatomical, behavioral, and cross-cultural perspectives. Among
the topics to be discussed are conception, fetal development, labor
and birth, puberty, menstruation, sexual intercourse, menopause,
sexually transmitted diseases, sexual variations, masturbation,
contraception, sexual anatomy, sex hormones, medical disorders,
pornography, relationships, and sexuality and the life cycle. A special
emphasis will be current trends in sex research and sexual behavior.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area D-7 or E, IGETC Area 4G
Designed for students considering a major in biology, this course surveys protozoa and the animal kingdom, and introduces principles of
evolution. Students investigate the structure, function and evolution
of animals using standard laboratory and field techniques. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 109: Heredity and Evolution
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This is an introductory course on the principles of genetics and
evolution. The factors that govern inheritance and natural selection
are presented, and their impact on physical and cultural evolution
discussed. Current issues surrounding genetic counseling, genetic
engineering, recombinant DNA technologies, and emerging infectious diseases are introduced. The potential impact of these developments is discussed. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B2, IGETC
Area 5B
BIOL 110: Introduction to Biology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in Biology 110L.
Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to the science of biology for nonmajors and the most basic course for biology majors. It gives a broad
overview of modern biology that should be equally useful to those
needing a foundation for later work in biology, the health sciences or
the environmental sciences, and to those simply wanting to understand and participate more intelligently in a human society more and
more influenced by biological discoveries. It presents the essentials
of most of the principal areas of biology: ecology, evolution, genetics, anatomy, physiology, cell biology and molecular biology. It also
includes discussion of how biology generates knowledge about living
things and consideration of its relationship to other sciences and to
other human activities in general. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU
Area B2, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 110L: Introduction to Biology Laboratory
1.0 Unit. Advisory: Biology 110 or concurrent enrollment. Three laboratory
hours weekly.
A hands-on course designed to develop basic laboratory skills and
techniques and to illustrate basic biological concepts and principles
for majors and non-majors. Essential skills include use of lab and
field equipment and recording and interpretation of observations.
Subjects in ecology, evolution, genetics, anatomy, physiology, cell
biology and molecular biology are investigated through observations
and experiments in the laboratory and in the field. Sequence of topics
is synchronized with that of Biology 110. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A,
CSU Area B2 or B3, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 112B: Biology for Biology Majors II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103, or Math 103A and 103B, or Math 103X and
103Y. Advisories: Biology 110 and 110L, Chemistry 131. Three lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly.
This is the second in a three-semester sequence that is the equivalent
of the majors’ biology sequences at other colleges and universities.
This semester covers basic topics in general ecology as well as fundamentals of anatomy, physiology, classification, evolution and ecology
of the major groups of algae, plants and fungi. (CSU) AA/AS Area A,
CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 112C: Biology for Biology Majors III
5.0 Units. Prerequisites: Chemistry 131 and Math 103, or Math 103A and 103B,
or Math 103X and 103Y. Advisory: Biology 110 and Biology 110L. Three lecture
and six laboratory hours weekly.
This introductory lecture/laboratory based course for biology majors
covers the fundamentals of molecular and cell biology, genetics and
molecular evolution, DNA technology, and the biology of viruses,
bacteria, and archaea. Students incorporate lecture concepts into
laboratory experiments which they design, carry out, analyze and
report. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area
5B
BIOL 115: Principles of Biology
5.0 Units. Prerequisites: Biology 110, 110L, and Chemistry 131. Three lecture
and six laboratory hours weekly.
This is an introductory course for biology majors covering the
fundamentals of molecular and cell biology, genetics, DNA technology, evolution, and ecology. It is a lecture/laboratory based course
in which students incorporate lecture concepts into laboratory
experiments that they design, carry out, analyze, and report. Please
note that Biology 115 is not a prerequisite for Biology 116. Since
Biology 115 has a Chemistry 131 prerequisite and Biology 116 does
not, students may wish to register for Biology 116 and Chemistry 131
during the same semester. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2
or B-3, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 116: Principles of Animal and Plant Diversity
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103, or 103A and B, or 103X and Y.
Advisories: Biology 110 and 110L, and concurrent enrollment in Chemistry
131. Three lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This is a course for biology majors to study the evolution of organisms from Monera to plants and animals. Emphasis will be placed
on taxonomy, comparative morphology, and ecology of plants and
animals. Please note that Biology 115 is not a prerequisite for Biology
116. Since Biology 115 has a Chemistry 131 prerequisite and Biology 116 does not, students may wish to register for Biology 116 and
Chemistry 131 during the same semester. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A,
CSU Area B2 or B3, IGETC Area 5B
Biology
CATALOG 2010/11
BIOL 120: Human Anatomy
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Biology 110 and 110L. Advisory: Completion of English
98 or equivalent. Three lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course is a study of the gross and microscopic structure of the
tissues, organs and organ systems of the human body, including
major functions. The class will make use of models, slides, prosections and dissection (including human cadavers). Includes introduction to related fields such as histology and embryology. Appropriate
for students going into allied health fields, kinesiology, anthropology
and art. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B2 or B3, IGETC Area
5B
BIOL 138: Introduction to Environmental Science
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Biology 138 or Geology
138. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This science-based course takes an interdisciplinary approach to
understanding the environmental crisis that confronts us all. Our
studies combine ideas and information from natural sciences (such
as biology, chemistry and geology) and social sciences (such as economics, politics, and ethics) to present a general idea of how nature
works and how humans and ecosystems are interconnected. It is a
study of connections in nature. Discussions will focus on understanding ecosystem services, how humans interfere with earth’s life
support systems and how to deal with the environmental problems
we face. Emphasis is placed on understanding various world views
and how they affect our values. Our field studies will include visits to
restoration projects, local ecosystem field studies and local environmental conferences. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or B-2
& B-3, IGETC Areas 5A & 5B
BIOL 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
BIOL 140: Environmental Field Techniques
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Biology 140 or Geology 140,
but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of environmental
sampling and monitoring. Topics include surveying and mapping;
data collection and management; and hydrological, geological, and
biological assessment methods. This course is field based and the
emphasis is on the mastery of practical field techniques. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU)
BIOL 142: Environmental Policy and Planning
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Biology 142 or Geology
142, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a study of federal, state, and local environmental
legislation. It is a chronology of America’s awakening to environmental issues and a study of our efforts to resolve these issues through the
planning process. An understanding of the content of this course is
vital for environmental scientists, planners, and developers. (CSU/
UC)
BIOL 143: Stewardship of Marin Parks and Open Space
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Besides making Marin a desirable place in which to live and travel,
its nonurbanized park and open space areas carry with them a great
responsibility: preservation and enhancement of their best qualities
89
for present and future generations. Fulfilling this responsibility is a
continuing process that began years ago and now involves a diverse
mix of philosophical, legislative, biological, sociological and logistical
challenges. The course includes essential background material,
interviews with current management personnel, and field visits to
parkland and open space areas of special interest. (CSU)
BIOL 145: Ethics in Science
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Biology 145 or Geology
145, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course explores some of the most pressing issues facing our
society today. It enables students to investigate and understand the
controversies surrounding current and future technologies, and
helps them make rational decisions when faced with situations in
their own lives and at the voting booth. The approach is an interdisciplinary one, combining basic science, applied research, ethics, and
decision making processes. Topics include scientific fraud, recombinant DNA technologies, the human genome project, energy and land
use, and toxic waste. This course is appropriate for both science and
nonscience majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C
BIOL 147: Food, People and the Environment
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course examines problems and solutions affecting the past, present and future of agriculture, the chief method of securing food from
the environment and the basis of human civilization. Patterns of care
and use of the major classes of agricultural resources will be surveyed, including domestication and genetic improvement of edible
plants and animals, maintenance of soil fertility through manipulation of humus and individual plant nutrients, suppression of pests
through chemical, biological and cultural techniques, and attempts
to maximize efficiency in utilization of land, water, energy, labor,
and capital. Effects of changes in demographics and socioeconomic
conditions of producers and consumers of agricultural products will
be discussed. Evolution and integration of production methods will
be emphasized, through site specific examples of functioning agricultural systems in Marin County, the rest of California, and the world.
Special attention will be paid to the concept of sustainability and to
the current debate between defenders of modern industrial agriculture and proponents of its alternatives, such as biodynamic, organic,
and low input agriculture. Includes field trips to selected agricultural
areas of interest in Northern and Central California. (CSU/UC)
BIOL 148: Marin County Agriculture
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course focuses on one of Marin County’s most significant
human activities in terms of use of land and other natural resources,
preservation of a valuable way of life, generation of economic benefits
and formation of the unique character of the local environment. The
course examines agricultural challenges and accomplishments by
production systems and locality. It offers general overview, historical
background and explanation of important biological, social and economic processes, as well as contemporary insights provided by those
currently involved in the Marin County agricultural scene. Systems
studied may include beef and dairy, poultry, shellfish, flowers, fruits
and vegetables, from planning and production through marketing
and consumption, in both East and West Marin. Includes field trips
to notable local farms. (CSU)
90
Biology
MARIN.EDU
BIOL 150: Environmental Science Seminar and Fieldwork
BIOL 163: Ecology of Estuaries
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Biology 138 or Geology 138. One lecture hour and six
fieldwork hours weekly.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to give students an overview of the career
options that exist in the area of environmental science. It introduces
them to potential employers in this field and provides them firsthand
experience of working to solve environmental problems. After receiving general career information, students will work with community
agencies or organizations according to procedures established by
mutual agreement. There are sixteen seminar hours of on-campus
meetings during the semester. Students meet in class on campus
for initial orientation, to discuss progress during the semester, and
to present results of their experiences at the end. This course is
expected to be taken after completion of other environmental science
coursework. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
Special ecological study of the greater San Francisco Bay estuary
system of rivers, Delta, sloughs/marshes, lower bays, and Tomales
Bay/Bolinas Lagoon habitats. Dynamics of natural ecology and man’s
encroachment/pollution are studied. (CSU)
BIOL 159: Introduction to Aquatic Biology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A field and hands-on laboratory course on the natural history and
ecology of both living and nonliving components of freshwater
environments. This course is designed to give the student practical
experience in the identification and interrelationships of local plant
and animal species found in freshwater ecosystems. Biology majors
gain field experience in interpreting basic concepts in ecology, biotic
zonation, and survival through adaptation and natural selection.
(CSU) AA/AS Area A
BIOL 160: Soil: Ecology and Management
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken for credit as Biology 160 or
Environmental Landscaping 160. Credit will be awarded for only one course.
Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This class explores how soil forms and develops, its physical and
biological components, and their interrelationships. Topics include:
the historical review of soil/human interactions, soil formation from
parent material, classification, physical properties such as texture and
structure, life forms found in the soil and their interrelationships,
relationships between soil properties and soil’s ability to support
plant growth, and approaches to use soil in a sustainable manner.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area B1, IGETC Area 5A
BIOL 161: Field Botany
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Introduction to the identification procedures, systematics, ecology,
and natural history of bryophytes and vascular plants. Emphasis
is on the identification and natural history of local plants native to
Marin’s 14 plant communities. Laboratory investigations include
hands-on analysis of vascular plant parts useful for identification
purposes. Field explorations are used in understanding the ecology
of local plant communities. (CSU)
BIOL 162: General Ecology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
Introduction to the ecology of organisms in their environment.
Emphasis is on the ecology of global, regional and local environmental sustainability. Field explorations are used in understanding
ecological concepts in relation to Marin’s biotic communities. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B2 or B3, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 164: Introduction to Mammalogy
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
Introduction to the natural history, ecology, and behavior of mammals. Emphasis is on the natural history of California mammals,
techniques in studying mammals, tracking, and interpretation of
mammal sign. Laboratory investigations include hands-on analysis
of mammal anatomy and physiology. Field explorations are used in
understanding mammalogy concepts in relation to their survival
strategies. (CSU)
BIOL 165: The World of Insects
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture hours weekly.
Insects are the largest group of organisms on earth today. This course
is a general introduction to these diverse and amazing creatures.
Topics to be covered include insect structure and function, history
and evolution, habitats and adaptations, and ecological relationships
with other organisms, including those of major economic importance to humans in the areas of agriculture, architecture, forestry,
animal husbandry, medicine and public health. As befits such a
hard-to-ignore group, insect roles in literature, folklore, philosophy,
painting, sculpture and other arts will not be neglected. (CSU)
BIOL 165L: Introduction to Insect Biodiversity
Laboratory
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 165. Four laboratory and two
field hours weekly.
As the largest group of animals on earth, and one that strongly
affects humans, insects invite closer study by all who are interested in
the living world. This course is designed to provide hands-on experience in learning to find insects, to identify them, and to recognize
evolutionary and ecological patterns in their sometimes bewildering
abundance and diversity. It teaches sight recognition of the major
orders and families, basic field and laboratory procedures, and use of
electronic and print media to access additional information that may
be of interest to individual students. It includes visits to a representative selection of insect habitats in Marin. (CSU)
BIOL 167: Introduction to Herpetology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
Introduction to the natural history, ecology, and behavior of reptiles
and amphibians. Emphasis is on the natural history of reptiles and
amphibians of Western North America, techniques in studying
reptiles, and field observation. Laboratory investigations include
hands-on analysis of reptile and amphibian anatomy and physiology.
Field explorations are used in understanding herpetology concepts in
relation to survival strategies. (CSU)
Biology
CATALOG 2010/11
91
BIOL 169A: Introduction to Ornithology A
BIOL 235: General Marine Biology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Biology 110. Class includes field trips. Field trips may
meet earlier and run later than scheduled to take advantage of low tides. Three
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This science-based course takes a field oriented approach to understanding the biology of birds. Subjects include bird form and
function, anatomy, physiology, flight mechanics and migration.
Our field studies will include visits to local wildlife refuges, lagoons,
lakes, shorelines and forests to learn to identify and observe migrating shorebirds and raptors and wintering waterfowl. This course is
compatible with Introduction to Ornithology B offered in the Spring
and concentrating on summer residents and nesting species. (CSU)
AA/AS Area A
BIOL 169B: Introduction to Ornithology B
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This science-based course takes a field oriented approach to understanding the biology of birds. Subjects include bird behavior, vocal
behavior, bird reproductive biology, and avian ecology. Our field
studies will include visits to local wildlife refuges, lagoons, lakes,
shorelines and forests to learn to identify and observe summer
residents and nesting birds. This course is compatible with Introduction to Ornithology A offered in the Fall and concentrating on Fall
migratory species and wintering waterfowl. (CSU) AA/AS Area A
BIOL 170: Biology of Marine Animals
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 110. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
Introduction to the natural history, ecology, and behavior of marine
animals. Emphasis is on the identification and natural history of
marine intertidal invertebrates. Various local marine habitats will
be investigated including rocky intertidal mudflats, sandflats, and
estuaries. Laboratory investigations include hands-on analysis of
invertebrate and vertebrate anatomy and physiology. Field explorations are used in understanding marine zoology in relation to their
survival strategies. (CSU)
BIOL 171: Biology of Marine Mammals
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Taking an integrated approach to the biology of marine carnivores,
cetaceans and sirenians, we use lecture, laboratory and field explorations to provide us with a framework for fundamental biological and
ecological concepts. Topics include functional morphology, sensory
systems, energetics, reproduction, communication and cognition,
behavior, distribution, population biology, and feeding ecology. We
also review the physiological adaptations that have enabled marine
mammals to exploit their aquatic environment such as diving,
thermoregulation, osmoregulation, and orientation. (CSU/UC)
BIOL 224: Human Physiology
5.0 Units. Prerequisites: Biology 110 and 110L and Chemistry 110. Students
wanting to take Chemistry 110 concurrently, please contact the instructor.
Three lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course involves the study of the structure and function of the
human body. Emphasis will be placed on the physiochemical and
homeostatic mechanisms occurring in the human body. The laboratory will introduce clinical and research techniques for studying and
measuring various physiological parameters. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
A, CSU Area B2 or B3, IGETC Area 5B
This laboratory and field course is designed to give biology majors as
well as nonmajors an overview of marine plant and animal communities. Topics investigated include fundamental physical oceanography, marine ecology, marine zoology, marine botany, and field
studies. Emphasis is on the local marine communities comprising
protected and unprotected rocky intertidal estuaries, salt marshes,
sandflats, mudflats, and floating docks. Laboratory investigations
include phytoplankton and zooplankton studies, fish identification
and internal morphology, marine invertebrate identification, and
marine algae preservation techniques. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A,
CSU Area B2 or B3, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 237: Marine Ecology Field Studies
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to the natural history and ecology of
marine plants and animals. Emphasis is on the identification, evolution, life histories, and survival strategies of intertidal and subtidal
organisms of the Pacific Northwest coast. Terrestrial systems such
as temperate rain forests and redwood plant communities will be
investigated to use as comparison with the marine systems. Field investigations include hands-on analysis of marine algae, invertebrate,
vertebrate, and nonliving interrelationships. Human disturbances of
Pacific Northwest ecosystems will be a central focus of our studies.
(CSU)
BIOL 240: Microbiology
5.0 Units. Prerequisites: Biology 110 and 110L; plus Chemistry 110 or 114.
Three lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course is primarily for biology and health science majors. It is
a lecture/laboratory based course with equal emphasis on both. The
fundamentals of microbial taxonomy, ecology, anatomy, physiology,
genetics, and biotechnology are covered. Viruses, bacteria, fungi,
protists, and helminths are discussed. Emphasis is on the role that
microorganisms play in human health and disease. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 242: Geology and Biology of the Basin and Range
and the Colorado Plateau
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Biology 242 or Geology
242, but credit will be awarded for only one course. A two week field trip
that includes seventeen and one half lecture hours and thirteen 8-hour field
experiences.
This is a two week field course through the Basin and Range and
Colorado Plateau Provinces. It includes a raft trip down the Colorado
or Green River. The geological and biological evolutions of the area
are explored through observation, experimentation, and study of
the diverse abiotic and biotic contributors to the area. Course topics
include: stratigraphy and structure; fluvial landforms and processes;
species dispersion, radiation and evolution; ecology; and the art of
fly-fishing. Through lectures and a broad range of field experiences,
students will gain an understanding of the factors that shaped and
continue to shape this unique area. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
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MARIN.EDU
BIOL 243: Natural History of Hawaii
BIOL 249: Independent Study
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Biology 110 or Geology 120. Sixteen lecture hours and
thirteen eight-hour field trips.
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
A two-week field course on the islands of Hawaii and Kauai. The geological and biological evolutions of the Hawaiian Islands are explored
through observation, experimentation, and study of the diverse
biotic and abiotic contributors to the islands. Course topics include
formation of the islands; species dispersion, radiation, and evolution; ecology; and human occupation. Through lectures and a broad
range of field experiences, students will gain an understanding of the
basic tenets of island biogeography as exemplified by the Hawaiian
Emperor Chain. May be taken three times for credit. (CSU)
BIOL 245: Field Ecology of Marin
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three all-day field trips and eight lecture hours to be
arranged.
This course is designed to give the student practical experience in
the identification and interrelationships of local plant and animal
species. Climatological and geological features of Marin are also
explored. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
BIOL 246: Field Ecology
2.0 Units. Prerequisites: Biology 101 or 115 or concurrent enrollment. Students
must complete forms expressing a desire to participate in the field trip. These
forms are available from the Life Science Department in November and must
be filed with that department by December 1. A ten-day field trip during the
spring break and twelve lecture hours to be arranged.
Observation of the characteristic plant and animal communities of
the coastal redwood forest, the San Francisco Bay salt marsh, the
Central Valley, the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, the “rain
shadow” of the Western California Cold Desert, Owens Valley, Death
Valley, and the Pacific coastal marine environment. This course
is designed to give biology majors field experience in interpreting
basic concepts of ecology, biotic succession, and survival through
adaptation and natural selection. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU/UC)
BIOL 247A: Extended Field Studies
1.5 Units. No prerequisite unless specified in the class schedule. A seven-day
field trip and eight lecture hours.
A one-week investigation of the natural history of various communities in Marin County or in another selected area of the Western
hemisphere. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
BIOL 247B: Extended Field Studies
3.0 Units. No prerequisite unless specified in the class schedule. A fourteen-day
field trip and sixteen lecture hours.
A two-week investigation of the natural history of various communities in Marin County or in another selected area of the Western
hemisphere. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
BIOL 250: Scientific Research and Reporting
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisories: Biology 110 and Geology 120. Can be
taken for credit as Biology 250 or Geology 250. Credit will be awarded for only
one course. One lecture hour weekly.
A hands-on, individualized course designed to walk learners step by
step through a scientific research project of their choice. The final report of their findings will be delivered at a professional meeting. This
course is designed for science majors who have completed the first
year of their curriculum and desire a hands-on, real world experience
in science. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
BIOL 251: Biological Psychology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken as Biology 251 or Psychology 251.
Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This class explores the basic brain processes underlying the functioning of the human mind. Among the topics to be discussed are basic
synaptic functioning, psychopharmacology, stress and the immune
system, learning and memory, sleep, mood disorders, schizophrenia,
language, motor and sensory systems, sexuality, consciousness,
endocrine function and interactions. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU
Area D-9, IGETC Area 4
BIOL 270: Practicum in Identification and Taxonomy
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Biology 161 or 165L or 169A/B or
equivalent. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides students the opportunity to increase their skills
in identification and classification of the organisms of Marin County
and the surrounding area to the levels frequently needed for biodiversity studies and environmental assessments. Students who are
already familiar with the basics of classification (and who can already
identify, on sight, families of chosen groups) will progress from this
level to the genus and species levels of identification and classification of their groups of interest. Work may include preparation of
specimens, review of pertinent literature, use of dichotomous keys,
reference to museum specimens, and use of camera and microscopes.
May be taken 4 times for credit.
BUSINESS
The business curriculum provides students with skills and knowledge for employment in a variety of business related occupations.
The program emphasizes the development of skills necessary for
entry-level employment including self-employment. The curriculum
also provides students with the foundation courses that will help
them prepare for transfer to a four-year college or university.
Career Options
Accounting Clerk, Administrative Assistant, Administrator, Analyst,
Banking Services, Bookkeeper, Claims Agent, Computer Operations,
Employment Counselor, Employment Interviewer, Entrepreneur,
Entry-level Financial Services, Franchise Business Owner, Government Service, Insurance Agent, Management Assistant, Management
Trainee, Manager, Office Clerk, Office Manager, Public Administration, Purchasing Agent/ Buyer, Real Estate, Retail/Industrial
Business
CATALOG 2010/11
Sales, Sales Representative, Securities Sales Worker, Small Business
Manager, Small Business Owner, Stockbroker, Supervisor, Transfer
to Bachelor’s Program
Faculty
Sandy Boyd, Norman Pacula, Lawrence M. Tjernell, Brian Wilson
Department Phone: (415) 485-9610
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.A. in Business Administration—Transfer
This program provides an opportunity for students to earn an
Associate in Arts degree in Business Administration while preparing to transfer as an upper division student to a four-year college or
university. For those students considering a career in business, a baccalaureate degree is necessary. However, the attainment of an A.A.
degree will demonstrate commitment to the field and the student’s
ability to complete an educational goal.
An Associate in Arts degree is awarded for satisfactory performance in major courses, as well as completion of general education
and graduation requirements.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150.
All students should consult the counselor assigned to Business and
Social Sciences.
REQUIREMENTS
BUS
101
BUS
112
CIS
110
Or
CIS
215
ECON 101
ECON 102
MATH 115
Or
STAT
115
MATH 121
Introduction to Business
Financial Accounting Introduction to Computer Information Systems
Visual BASIC Programming
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Probability and Statistics
UNITS
3
4
3
3½
3
3
4
Introduction to Statistics
Calculus I with Applications
4
3
Suggested Electives
It is recommended that business transfer students take courses that
would be beneficial in their area of specialization (major) and also
courses in modern languages and mathematics.
A.S. in Applied Accounting, Occupational (Certificate of
Achievement also awarded)
This program provides training for entry-level bookkeepers, as well
as individuals with bookkeeping experience who wish to gain a
better conceptual background in accounting and finance.
An Associate in Science degree is awarded for satisfactory completion of all requirements, as well as completion of general education
and graduation requirements. A Certificate of Achievement is
awarded for the satisfactory completion of the program.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
BUS
112
Financial Accounting BUS
113
Managerial Accounting
BUS
114
Beginning Computerized Accounting
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
CIS
128
Intermediate Spreadsheet Design
Suggested Electives
BUS
104
Introduction to Marketing
BUS
107
Business Law
BUS
108
Introduction to International Business
BUS
121
New Venture Creation
BUS
131
Supervision and Management
BUS
144
Business Communication
CIS
113
Presentations and Publications
CIS
118
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
93
UNITS
3
4
5
1½
3
1½
3
3
3
3
1½
3
1½
1½
3
3
A.S. in Business, General
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded)
The General Business Program curriculum is designed to provide
education for business careers including self-employment, professional advancement, retraining, and transfer preparation. The
program emphasizes the development of specific skills and knowledge for employment. Many courses are hands-on, skill-based, and
use current computer technology and student-based projects. The
program also provides background for students who plan to transfer
to a four-year school.
An Associate in Science degree is awarded for satisfactory completion of all requirements, as well as completion of general education
and graduation requirements. A Certificate of Achievement is
awarded for the satisfactory completion of the program. A student
may qualify for more than one degree or certificate, provided that 12
of the required units for the major are not applied toward any other
major and are completed at College of Marin.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
BUS
112
Financial Accounting BUS
121
New Venture Creation
BUS
131
Supervision and Management
BUS
144
Business Communication
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
CIS
113
Presentations and Publications
CIS
118
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
Suggested Electives
BUS
104
Introduction to Marketing
BUS
107
Business Law
BUS
108
Introduction to International Business
BUS
132
Human Resource Management
BUS
134
Human Relations
BUS
135
Managing Change and Innovation
BUS
137
Managing Groups and Teams
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
UNITS
3
4
3
1½
3
3
1½
1½
3
3
3
1½
1½
1½
1½
3
3
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MARIN.EDU
A.S. in Business, Management
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded)
The Business Management Program equips students with the basic
knowledge and skills in entrylevel management and supervision,
preparing them for employment or professional advancement. It also
prepares students to start, operate, and grow new or existing ventures
and help those who work in large organizations to become more
entrepreneurial in their outlook and performance.
An Associate in Science degree is awarded for satisfactory completion of all requirements, as well as completion of general education
and graduation requirements. A Certificate of Achievement is
awarded for the satisfactory completion of the program.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
BUS
112
Financial Accounting BUS
131
Elements of Management and Supervision
BUS
132
Human Resource Management
BUS
134
Human Relations
BUS
144
Business Communication
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
CIS
113
Presentations and Publications
CIS
118
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
Suggested Electives
BUS
104
Introduction to Marketing
BUS
107
Business Law
BUS
108
Introduction to International Business
BUS
121
New Venture Creation
BUS
127
Create a Business Plan
BUS
129
The Art of Selling
BUS
135
Managing Change and Innovation
BUS
137
Managing Groups and Teams
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
UNITS
3
4
1½
1½
1½
3
3
1½
1½
3
3
3
3
1½
1½
1½
1½
3
3
Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificates of
Achievement.
Management and Supervision Skills Certificate (any five of the
following six courses)
REQUIREMENTS
BUS
131
BUS 132
BUS
133
BUS
134
BUS
135
BUS
137
Supervision and Management
Human Resource Management
Diversity in the Workplace
Human Relations
Managing Change and Innovation
Managing Groups and Change
UNITS
1½
1½
1½
1½
1½
1½
BUSINESS COURSES (BUS)
BUS 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
BUS 101: Introduction to Business
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This survey course explores the history, environment and functional
areas of business, and analyzes the following topics: comparative economic systems focused on capitalism, globalization, ethical behavior
and social responsibility, business ownership, entrepreneurship,
marketing, accounting, finance, information technology, environmental issues, and productivity. The course includes a management/
economic computer simulation component designed to provide
students with experience operating a simulated business. Can also be
offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/UC) CSU Area D-7
BUS 104: Introduction to Marketing
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This introductory course to a vital business area is open to all
students and is especially recommended for business majors. It
is required for the general business major. Topics to be included
are: marketing’s role in society, the market structure, channels of
distribution, retail institutions, wholesale institutions, product
development, packaging, pricing, and promotion. Can also be offered
in a distance learning format. (CSU)
BUS 107: Business Law
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Designed to give the student an understanding of the basic principles
of business law and applications to typical business situations. Topics
include law of contracts, agency and employment, negotiable instruments, personal property, bailments, sales of goods, real property,
and partnerships. (CSU/UC)
BUS 108: Introduction to International Business
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course provides the basic tools and perspective necessary to
understand the international business environment. Explores the
changing nature of the primary business, economic, and political
institutions. Explains the nature of the transnational, foreign trade,
foreign exchange and world capital and money markets. Will attempt
to better understand the problems and opportunities created in a
world comprised of post-industrial, developing, and less-developed
nations. Focus is upon what the individual will need to know and
understand to be an effective learner and performer in our rapidly
developing world economy. (CSU)
BUS 112: Financial Accounting
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture hours weekly.
An introduction to accounting practice, principles, and analysis.
This course is basic for students in accounting, business administration, economics, law, and other professions. Also, it should be the
first course in accounting theory for vocational bookkeepers, as
well as small-business people needing basic accounting theory. The
course covers the accounting cycle for a service enterprise and for
a merchandising enterprise, preparation of financial statements,
internal control, valuation of receivables, depreciation and fixed asset
Business
CATALOG 2010/11
disposal, debt structure, corporate capitalization and retained earnings, and finishing with thorough discussion of financial statement
analysis. (CSU/UC)
BUS 113: Managerial Accounting
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Business 112. Five lecture hours weekly.
This course covers fund flow analysis, basic managerial cost concepts
and developments in contemporary managerial accounting, cost
accounting systems, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgetary
planning and control, responsibility accounting, performance evaluation through standard costs and incremental analysis and capital
budgeting. (CSU/UC)
BUS 114: Beginning Computer Accounting
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business 112. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
and then have an opportunity to apply these techniques in a critiqued
videotaped sales presentation. (CSU)
BUS 131: Supervision and Management
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This is an introductory course covering the core concepts and current
issues related to supervision and management. Students will learn
how to assume supervisory responsibility and how to apply management principles in today’s rapidly changing world of work. (CSU)
BUS 132: Human Resource Management
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This is an introductory course designed to give employers and
employees an overview of the various functions within the human
resource management field. (CSU)
A first course in the operation of computerized accounting software.
This course is designed for business entrepreneurs who will be using
a computerized accounting system in their business as well as students training to be professional accountants. Subjects will include
an overview of the software, setting up a company, entering, working
with lists, setting up inventory, paying bills, payroll, and preparation
of reports and graphs. (CSU)
BUS 133: Diversity in the Workplace
BUS 121: New Venture Creation
BUS 134: Human Relations
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This is an introductory course in new venture creation/entrepreneurship designed to create knowledge, skills, awareness, and involvement in the process of starting, operating, and managing a small
firm. The aim is to guide students in discovering the concepts of
entrepreneurship and the competencies, skills, know-how, experience, resources, and techniques that are necessary to achieve success.
The course deals with the driving forces of entrepreneurship, the environment and competition, physical, capital and human resources,
developing a business plan, accounting and finance for smaller firms,
market potential, how to practice marketing, management and legal
aspects. Students working in teams are required to develop and write
a business plan. (CSU)
BUS 127: Create a Business Plan
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
This course provides a hands-on approach for actively developing
an operational business plan. The process, using computer software,
involves opportunity recognition, research, analysis, and completing
each section of a business plan including the cover letter, the executive summary, company and industry overviews, market strategy and
tactics, financial analysis (profit and cash flow forecasts), location,
physical facilities, capital spending, purchasing, and promotion.
Students receive individual attention regarding their business plans.
(CSU)
BUS 129: The Art of Selling
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
Through active participation, students/entrepreneurs learn how to
gain and maintain a competitive edge by developing effective sales
strategies and techniques. The course covers all phases of the selling
process. Participants learn the “how” as well as the “why” of selling
95
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course teaches students how to manage diversity. It broadens
their viewpoints, beliefs, and attitudes; promotes an understanding
of widely varying and equally valid world views, and prepares future
leaders to effectively collaborate with the diverse groups they will
encounter in the work and marketplaces. (CSU)
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course is designed to acquaint the student with human relations
and motivation in business and the implications of business practices
as they apply to individual employees and supervisors. (CSU)
BUS 135: Managing Change and Innovation
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course is designed to develop the skills necessary to manage
change and innovation within an organization which is dynamic,
complex, and often unpredictable. Students will learn how to help
people and how organizations learn and renew themselves continuously. (CSU)
BUS 137: Managing Groups and Teams
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course is designed for anyone who wishes to learn the skills
of leading and facilitating both the interpersonal relationships and
the tasks of groups and teams. Primarily focused on the workplace,
the skills can also be used in other settings, including working with
volunteer groups. (CSU)
BUS 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
BUS 141: Intermediate Business English
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 98A and 98B. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course presents grammar, usage, punctuation, sentence rhetoric,
error recognition and editing on a professional level to business
students who are planning careers that demand precise skills
in independent writing, proofreading, and transcription of oral
language. The course emphasizes syntax, diction, structure, and editing appropriate for business communications, general and technical
96
Business Office Systems
report writing, and medical and court reporting transcriptions. It is a
required course in the Court Reporting Program. (CSU)
BUS 144: Business Communication
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: English 79. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course emphasizes the student’s ability to apply effective writing
techniques and strategies to business communication problems
found in organizations. Students will analyze cases, then organize
and prepare various business documents such as resumes, letters,
memoranda, reports, business plans, and proposals. Electronic communication tools are discussed and oral presentations are made. Can
also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU)
BUS 145: Internet Research and Presentation Skills for
Business
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 101. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course uses the Internet and Web to help students gain the
research and interpretation skills needed for problem solving in business. Class activities focus on interactive search projects, resulting in
written and oral presentations of project findings using presentation
software. (CSU)
BUS 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
BUSINESS OFFICE SYSTEMS
The business office systems curriculum is designed to develop the
knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by workers in today’s automated offices. Students can acquire the training and skills necessary
to enter the job market, update knowledge and skills to reenter the
marketplace, or retrain in order to maintain a present position or
obtain a promotion. The skills developed in this curriculum are also
useful to students who wish to enrich their business and computer
expertise for personal use.
Courses emphasize skill development in business office systems
with specialties available in the medical and office management
areas. Most courses include hands-on computer use so students learn
necessary computer skills as well as the individual course material.
Career Options
Administrative Assistant, Bank Teller, Clerical Assistant, Executive
Assistant, General Office Worker, Human Resources Assistant,
Medical Office Assistant, Medical Office Manager, Medical Receptionist, Medical Records Clerk, Medical Scheduler, Medical Secretary, Medical Transcriber, Microcomputer User, Office Assistant,
Office Manager, Payroll Assistant, Receptionist, Records Clerk,
Research Assistant, Secretary, Transcribing Machine Operator, Word
Processing Manager, Word Processing Operator
Faculty
Brian Wilson
Department Phone: (415) 485-9610
A.S. in Business Office Systems, Occupational
(Certificates of Achievement in Medical Specialty and Office Management Specialty are awarded. Skills Certificates in Administrative
Assistant and Medical Transcriber are also awarded.)
MARIN.EDU
The business office systems curriculum develops knowledge, skills,
and attitudes needed by workers who support information handling
in today’s electronic offices.
An Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements in the core program and chosen specialty, as well as
completion of general education and graduation requirements. A
Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory completion
of the core program plus the additional course requirements in each
specialty. A Skills Certificate is earned by satisfactory completion of
the required courses as listed for the specific Skills Certificate.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
CORE PROGRAM
The following courses are required of all Business Office Systems
degree students:
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
BUS
134
Human Relations
1½
BUS
144
Business Communication
3
BOS
114
Beginning Word Processing
1½
BOS
115
Intermediate Word Processing
1½
CIS
126
Introduction to Windows
1½
Also, select two units from:
BOS
44*
Skill Building for Keyboarders
1
Or
BOS
120
Computer Keyboarding
1
CIS
101
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1½
CIS
118
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
1½
W E
298AB Occupational Work Experience
1-2
The following course is highly recommended for successful completion of the Certificate of
Achievement.
BUS
141
Intermediate Business English
2
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
SPECIALTIES
In addition to the core program listed above, each Business Office
Systems degree student will complete one of the following specialties:
MEDICAL SPECIALTY
BOS
163A Professional Office Procedures
BOS
163B Records Management
BOS
163C Travel and Conference Arrangements
BOS
230AB Medical Terminology
BOS
231ABC Medical Transcription ABC
1
1
1
2
3
OFFICE MANAGEMENT SPECIALTY
BUS
112
Financial Accounting
BUS
114
Beginning Computerized Accounting
BUS
146
Business Presentation Tools
BOS
163A Professional Office Procedures
BOS
163B Records Management
BOS
163C Travel and Conference Arrangements
4
1½
1½
1
1
1
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement Program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
Business Office Systems
CATALOG 2010/11
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
Note: Before a Business Office Systems Skills Certificate is
granted, the student must demonstrate the ability to keyboard a
minimum of 35 words-a-minute with five or fewer errors.
Administrative Assistant Skills Certificate
The Administrative Assistant Certificate indicates that foundation
courses needed for entry-level employment in office support have
been successfully completed.
REQUIREMENTS
BOS
44
Or
BOS
120
BOS
76
BOS
114
CIS
101
Skill Building for Keyboarders
UNITS
1
Computer Keyboarding
Electronic 10-Key Calculating Machines
Beginning Word Processing
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1
1
1½
1½
Medical Transcriber Skills Certificate
The Medical Transcriber Certificate indicates that foundation
courses needed for entrylevel employment in medical transcription
have been successfully completed.
REQUIREMENTS
BOS
44
Or
BOS
120
BOS
76
BOS
114
BOS
230AB
BOS
231A
CIS
101
Skill Building for Keyboarders
UNITS
1
Computer Keyboarding
Electronic 10-Key Calculating Machines
Beginning Word Processing
Medical Terminology
Medical Transcription
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1
1
1½
2
1
1½
BUSINESS OFFICE SYSTEMS COURSES (BOS)
BOS 035: Web Quest: Beginning Internet Skills
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This class offers an introduction to computer and Internet vocabulary, Internet searches, and the use of e-mail, Web radio, and
word processing to enhance basic Internet research projects called
Web-quests.
BOS 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
BOS 044: Skill Building for Keyboarders
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Knowledge of keyboard and ability to type
by touch method. Three laboratory hours weekly.
In this course, students will concentrate on accuracy and speed drills
to improve keyboarding skills. Diagnostic tests are given to determine weaknesses. Timings are taken on a regular basis so progress
can be measured. May be taken four times for credit.
BOS 060A: Beginning Computer Keyboarding (ESL)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is recommended for any English as a Second Language
student needing to acquire alphabetic and numeric keyboarding
techniques for computer work. Students will learn how to keyboard
by touch at a minimum speed of 20 words-a-minute.
97
BOS 060B: Beginning Computer Keyboarding (ESL)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 60A. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course is recommended for any English as a Second Language
student needing to improve keyboarding speed and accuracy, and
wishing to learn basic letter and report formatting. Students will
learn how to keyboard by touch at a minimum speed of 25 words-aminute. Students will also learn how to set up letters and reports in
good form. Basic editing skills are practiced.
BOS 060C: Beginning Computer Keyboarding (ESL)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 60B. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course is recommended for any English as a Second Language
student needing to improve keyboarding speed and accuracy, and
wishing to learn additional letter and report formatting skills, plus
business memos. Students will learn how to keyboard by touch at a
minimum speed of 30 words-a-minute. Students will also learn how
to set up and edit letters, reports, and memos.
BOS 070A: Spelling
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
A self-paced course designed to help the business student in the
improvement of spelling problems. The programmed format allows
students to proceed at their own rate with the aid of a diagnostic test
and review tests.
BOS 070B: Vocabulary Building
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
A self-paced course designed to help the business student achieve
a command of the vocabulary needed for business courses. Covers
Latin and Greek derivatives, descriptive, and action words.
BOS 070C: Programmed Writing Skills
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This self-paced course, covering writing skills for the business writer,
stresses how to write clearly and effectively with correct mechanics.
BOS 076: Electronic 10-Key
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
Students learn the basic operation of electronic printing calculators
and how to input numbers using the ten-key touch method. Common business problems are used to train students on the efficient use
of the electronic calculator.
BOS 114: Beginning Word Processing
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Ability to keyboard by touch. Two lecture
and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This beginning course in Microsoft Word develops competency
in creating, editing, formatting, saving, and printing a variety of
business and personal-use documents. Topics include creating and
editing letters, memos, reports, tables, and mail merge. In addition,
students complete several desktop publishing assignments and use
Word to create a Web site. Students are shown how to integrate Word
documents with other office programs. (CSU)
98
Business Office Systems
MARIN.EDU
BOS 115: Intermediate Word Processing
BOS 139: Selected Topics
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 114. Two lecture
and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
This Microsoft Word course develops competency in using intermediate to advanced features of Word. Students will create, format, edit,
save, and print a variety of business and personal-use documents.
Topics covered include formatting with styles, sharing information
with other programs, working with and sharing long documents,
working with graphics, creating and modifying charts, creating and
using forms, and customizing Word with Auto Text and Macros.
Students complete several desktop publishing projects, using the
Internet to access multimedia resources. (CSU)
BOS 163A: Professional Office Procedures
BOS 120: Computer Keyboarding
BOS 163B: Records Management
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This is a short course which presents methods and techniques basic
to the efficient performance of office services, including interpersonal
communications, document preparation, mail processing, meeting
arrangements, travel, time management, and telephone communications. This course is offered through a combination of instructorassisted and self-paced, audiovisual learning methods, including a
text CD and Internet access. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is recommended for any student needing to acquire
alphabetic and numeric keyboarding skills for computer work.
Students will learn how to keyboard by touch at a minimum speed of
20 words-a-minute. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
In this self-paced course, in addition to learning basic alphabetic,
numeric, subject, and geographic filing methods on a microcomputer, students will be introduced to careers in records management.
(CSU)
BOS 122A: Machine Transcription
BOS 163C: Travel and Conference Arrangements
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisories: Touch typing and limited to the number
of transcription machines available. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to prepare students to become efficient
operators of transcribing machines and to be able to transcribe
mailable business correspondence from pre-dictated material on the
computer. Emphasis will be placed on the mechanics of letter styles,
grammar, punctuation, spelling, word division, vocabulary, and
proofreading. (CSU)
BOS 122B: Machine Transcription
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 122A and limited
to the number of transcription machines available. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is designed to further improve a student’s competency
in transcribing documents from transcription tapes while working
on the computer. Emphasis will be placed on increased transcription
speed and refinement of transcription skills. A thorough review of
punctuation rules and practice in applying those rules is included.
(CSU)
BOS 122C: Machine Transcription
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 122B and limited
to the number of transcription machines available. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is designed to further improve a student’s competency
in transcribing documents from transcription tapes while working
on the computer. Emphasis will be placed on an improvement in
transcription speed and the quality of the transcribed documents.
Grammar and punctuation rules will continue to be reinforced as
well as specialized business vocabulary. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This self-paced course is designed to enable students to become
proficient in planning and arranging business travel, and setting up
business conferences. This course develops skills in choosing airline
flights, making reservations, arranging hotel accommodations and
ground transportation, and maintaining accurate follow-up records.
(CSU)
BOS 213: Internship in Business and Information
Systems
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Business Office Systems 115. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course bridges the gap between the classroom and the business and information systems industry by providing an on-campus
lecture class coupled with a short-term internship in which students
may work at a job site such as a medical office, legal office, or general
business office. All assignments will be accomplished in a “real-life”
context characterized by workgroup activities, multiple projects
under deadline, and collaborative effort. Internships are not guaranteed. Projects may be suitable for student portfolios. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU)
BOS 230A: Medical Terminology
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
Designed for medical secretary or medical assisting students, this
course helps students become skillful in mastering word parts to
form medical terms found in basic medical terminology. Students
use a computer program to learn, analyze, and interpret most
frequently used medical terms. (CSU)
BOS 230B: Medical Terminology
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 230A. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
A continuation of Business Office Systems 230A, this course helps
students become skillful in mastering additional word parts to form
medical terms used in medical terminology. Students use a computer
Chemistry
CATALOG 2010/11
program to learn and practice applying frequently used medical
terms. (CSU)
BOS 231A: Medical Transcription
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 120 and limited
to the number of transcription machines available. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is designed to train transcriptionists to quickly and
accurately transcribe four basic report types: office visit/clinic note,
history and physical examination, discharge summary, and consultation. Students will use a transcription machine and a computer for
completing their assignments. (CSU)
BOS 231B: Medical Transcription
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 231A and limited
to the number of transcription machines available. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is designed to improve the transcriptionist’s speed and
accuracy while transcribing medical reports using a transcribing
machine and a computer. At an entry level, students will transcribe
hospital, physician office, and psychiatric facility reports. In addition,
students will continue to transcribe discharge summary reports
learned in Business Office Systems 231A. (CSU)
BOS 231C: Medical Transcription
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Business Office Systems 231B and limited
to the number of transcription machines available. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
A continuation of Business Office Systems 231A and B, this course is
designed to bring together the skills the transcriptionist has learned
and practiced in the first two units. A variety of reports in challenging formats are presented for the student to experience “real-life”
situations. (CSU)
BOS 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
CHEMISTRY
Chemistry is by far the largest field of employment in the sciences. A
wide range of opportunities awaits the chemist in business, industry,
government, and in the field of education. Approximately threefourths of all chemists are employed by private industry in such fields
as petroleum, primary metals, electrical equipment, aerospace, paper,
food, and rubber.
Career Options
Biochemist, Chemical Engineer, Dentist, Failure Analyst, Food
and Drug Officer, Food Chemist, Forensic Chemist, Hydrologist,
Industrial Chemist, Nutritionist, Oceanographer, Patent Agent,
Pharmaceutical Salesperson, Physician, Pollution Control Expert,
Process Control Worker, Product Developer, Quality Control
Worker, Quantitative Analyst, Researcher and Developer, Teacher,
Textile Chemist, Toxicologist
Faculty
Erik Dunmire, Patrick Kelly, Jennifer Loeser
Department Phone: (415) 485-9510
99
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.S. in Chemistry
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
CHEM 131
CHEM 132
CHEM 231
CHEM 232
MATH 123
MATH 124
MATH 223
PHYS
207A
PHYS
207B
PHYS
207C
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
Analytic Geometry, Vector Analysis, and Calculus III
Mechanics and Properties of Matter
Electricity and Magnetism
Heat, Light, Sound, and Modern Physics
UNITS
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
CHEMISTRY COURSES (CHEM)
CHEM 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
CHEM 103: Field Chemistry
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Geology 126 or Geology 127A or 127B or
127AB. Twenty-six and one-fourth laboratory hours during a two-week period.
An introductory chemistry course specifically designed to apply
chemical concepts and experimental techniques to Geology 126
and 127. Such chemical concepts as bonding, hydrolysis, pH, and
thermodynamics will be explored. Chemical techniques, including
instrumentation, necessary for geological fieldwork will include
qualitative analysis of water-soluble salts. May be taken three times
for credit. (CSU)
CHEM 105: Chemistry in the Human Environment
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A nonmathematical course for liberal arts and nonscience majors,
exploring chemistry in relation to society. A general introduction
and discussion of the development and manifestations of concepts
of chemistry and their applications in our environment including
living systems. Special considerations will be given to current topics,
environmental issues, energy production, nutrition, medicine,
and consumer products. Can also be offered in a distance learning
format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 105L: Chemistry in the Human Environment:
Laboratory
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Chemistry 105 or concurrent enrollment. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
An optional laboratory-demonstration course to accompany Chemistry 105. The combination of Chemistry 105 and 105L will meet
100
Chemistry
general elective requirements for a physical science with laboratory.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 110: Chemistry for Allied Health Sciences
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Completion of Math 101 with a grade of C or higher
or eligibility for Math 103 based on the Math Placement test. Note: On the
FIRST day of instruction, students are required to present to the instructor
confirmation that the prerequisite of the course has been met. Four lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This is an introductory one-semester survey of the fundamental concepts and laboratory techniques of general, organic, and biochemistry with emphasis on applications within the Health Sciences. The
student will apply the fundamental concepts of chemistry to problem
solving through analytical reasoning and by conducting scientific
investigations in a laboratory setting. The course is designed to meet
admission requirements for the A.S. degree in Registered Nursing
and other allied health sciences. It also fulfills a general elective
requirement in natural sciences. (CSU) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area
B-1 or B-3
CHEM 114: Introduction to Chemistry
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for Math 103. Note: On the FIRST day of
instruction, students are required to present to the instructor confirmation
that the prerequisite of the course has been met. Four lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course covers problem-solving techniques using dimensional
analysis, basic principles of inorganic chemistry, and elementary
qualitative and quantitative laboratory experiments. This course is
designed to prepare students for Chemistry 115 and Chemistry 131.
It satisfies a California State University general education requirement in physical sciences as well as a requirement by COM nursing
program. Chemistry 114 and Chemistry 115 represent one year of
chemistry for most baccalaureate programs in nursing, health sciences, physical therapy, laboratory and medical technology, as well as
non-science majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or B-3,
IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 115: Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Chemistry 114. Note: On the FIRST day of instruction,
students are required to present to the instructor confirmation that the
prerequisite of the course has been met. Limit to Enrollment: Not open to those
who have had Chemistry 231. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This is a one-semester survey of the classes of organic compounds
with emphasis on materials of interest to students of biological
sciences. The chemistry and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids are stressed. The laboratory covers
techniques in organic chemistry with applications to biologically
interesting compounds. This course is intended for dental hygiene,
home economics, nursing (baccalaureate program), health science,
laboratory and medical technology, preoptometry, some predental
and nonphysical science majors. Chemistry 114 and 115 represent
one year of chemistry for most baccalaureate programs in nursing,
health science, laboratory and medical technology, and nonscience
majors. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
MARIN.EDU
CHEM 131: General Chemistry I
5.0 Units. Prerequisites: Chemistry 114 or satisfactory score on chemistry
placement test and Math 103 or satisfactory score on math placement test.
Note: On the FIRST day of instruction, students are required to present to the
instructor confirmation that the prerequisite of the course has been met. Three
lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
Fundamental principles of chemistry including such topics as atomic
theory, nomenclature, thermochemistry, bonding, structure and
polarity, stoichiometry, gases, liquids and solids, intermolecular
forces, solutions, and a brief introduction to organic chemistry
and biochemistry. This is not an introductory course. Students are
assumed to have a good grasp of certain chemical and mathematical
concepts, as well as prior laboratory experience. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area A, CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 132: General Chemistry II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131. Four lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course is a continuation of Chemistry 131, emphasizing kinetics,
thermodynamics, aqueous solution equilibriums, electrochemistry,
and selected topics from: nuclear chemistry, descriptive inorganic
chemistry, materials, metals, and coordination compounds. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 132E: General Chemistry II, Lecture Only
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131. Three lecture hours weekly.
Lecture material of Chemistry 132 for those engineering and science
majors who need eight units of general chemistry with lab. Bioengineering and chemical engineering majors should enroll in Chemistry
132. Not open to those who have had Chemistry 132. (CSU/UC) CSU
Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
CHEM 231: Organic Chemistry I
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Chemistry 132. Advisory: A college-level English course.
Three lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
The first semester of the one-year organic chemistry course for chemistry, biology, biochemistry, chemical engineering, environmental
and health sciences, premedical, and predental majors. (CSU/UC)
CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 232: Organic Chemistry II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Chemistry 231. Three lecture and six laboratory hours
weekly.
The second semester of the one-year organic chemistry course
including laboratory for students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry, and most premedical and predental curricula. Students who need
only eight units of organic chemistry, see Chemistry 232E. (CSU/UC)
CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 232E: Organic Chemistry II, Lecture Only
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Chemistry 231. Three lecture hours weekly.
The second semester of the one-year organic chemistry course
without laboratory for those who need a total of eight units, such as
some biology, environmental science, health, and chemical engineering majors. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1
College Skills
CATALOG 2010/11
101
CHEM 249: Independent Study
CHIN 110: Conversational Chinese Mandarin I
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
CHINESE
A major reason for studying the Chinese language is the enrichment
of one’s intellectual growth in the context of the rest of the world. In
learning Chinese, one also learns about the culture, philosophy, and
civilization of another people, thereby broadening understanding of
the world. On the practical side, any field of specialization (journalism, medicine, law, business, teaching) is enhanced if one can speak
another language. In California, knowledge of a modern language
is now required in many jobs that deal with the public such as Civil
Service, social work, nursing, and other service-oriented fields.
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Foreign Correspondent, Foreign Service
Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business,
Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel Agent.
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Modern
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
CHINESE COURSES (CHIN)
CHIN 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
CHIN 101: Elementary Chinese Mandarin I
5.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
The primary goal of Chinese Mandarin I is to help students develop
proficiency in listening and speaking skills and a foundation in
literacy skills. At the same time, students will also gain knowledge
and appreciation of Chinese culture. The acquisition of Chinese/
Mandarin language skills and an appreciation of China’s role in the
global community are goals of the course. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 6A: UC Language other than English
CHIN 102: Elementary Chinese Mandarin II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Chinese 101. Four lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Chinese 102 is a continuation of Chinese 101, a course of elementary
Chinese Mandarin for non-native speakers. It aims at helping
students develop further communicative skills in Chinese Mandarin.
At the same time, students will gain new knowledge and appreciation
of Chinese culture, history and China’s new role in global economics
and politics. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area
3B or 6A: UC Language other than English
This class offers an intensive study of practical Chinese conversation, designed for students who wish to acquire skills of the spoken
language in modern colloquial Mandarin for travelers and those
doing business dealings in or with China. There will be oral practice
in speaking and understanding Chinese through the use of audiovisual packages related to daily working environment and life. Topics
will include: everyday conversation among in-group (husband-wife,
friend-friend, among the family), everyday conversation between
out-groups (superior-inferior, between the unknowns), non-verbal
communications and culturally correct Chinese conversation. (CSU)
CHIN 112: Conversational Chinese Mandarin II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Chinese 110. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course includes the use of modern colloquial Chinese in conversation and the study of elementary grammar, designed for students
who want to learn at a faster pace in the spoken language with a
minimum of formal grammar. Use of audio materials improves
accuracy and fluency in pronunciation. (CSU)
CHIN 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
CHIN 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
COLLEGE SKILLS
The College Skills Department consists of three pre-college programs: English Skills, Credit ESL, and Noncredit ESL. All three
programs serve students who need to develop their study and communication skills in order to succeed.
Faculty
Barbara Bonander, Sara McKinnon, Michael A. Timmel, Wendy L. Walsh
Department Phone: (415) 485-9642
NONCREDIT ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESLN)
The Noncredit ESL program primarily serves the burgeoning
immigrant population of Marin County. Through free noncredit
ESL classes, the program has helped countless Marin residents from
over 75 countries fulfill their educational, career and personal goals
to become productive members of our community. Noncredit ESL
offers multi-skill classes at the Kentfield and Indian Valley campuses
as well as at several off-campus locations. In addition, there are
pronunciation classes and vocational ESL classes. Noncredit ESL
classes are open entry and open exit.
Please see the English as a Second Language Noncredit (ESLN)
category for individual course listings.
CREDIT ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)
The credit ESL program offers instruction for non-native English
speakers with intermediate to advanced levels of English proficiency.
Our students come with a variety of goals, from transferring and
earning degrees to improving their skills for the workforce and
102
Communications
for everyday life. Our program prepares them with the academic
language and student skills they will need to succeed in their other
credit-level coursework.
The core of the Credit ESL program encompasses 4 levels in ESL
(50-60-70-80) plus two more parallel sections of the English Department’s classes (98 and 120) which prepare students for English 150
(freshman composition). At each level separate classes are offered to
cover Grammar/Writing and Reading/Vocabulary. In addition there
are pronunciation classes and listening/speaking classes.
Please see the English as a Second Language (ESL) category for
individual course listings.
ENGLISH SKILLS
The English Skills program provides English and study skills courses
to help students develop reading, writing, thinking and social skills
so that they can enroll in and profit from instruction in credit courses and/or successfully get a job and advance in that job. Students
come to English Skills classes to achieve a variety of goals: some to
get better jobs, some to move horizontally into workforce programs
such as dental assisting or metals technology, and some to succeed in
transfer-level courses. The English Skills program provides the developmental levels of College of Marin’s writing sequence. The program
consists of the developmental English courses, open-entry skills lab
classes and a GED preparation program. The majority of the courses
are conducted on the Kentfield campus; however, an open-entry lab
is offered on the Indian Valley Campus two afternoons a week. The
IVC classes mostly accommodate Court Reporting Students.
Please see the English (ENGL) category (courses numbered
062-097) for individual course listings.
COMMUNICATIONS
For additional Communications courses, please see Film and
Video.
The curriculum is designed to provide theory and skills for those
who are interested in mass media, television and films, whether
students’ goals be transfer, professional, or self-enrichment. Its
production courses are hands-on, with equal emphasis on aesthetic
principles and technology.
Career Options
Animator, Announcer, Broadcast Technician, Camera Operator,
Community Affairs Director, Disc Jockey, Engineering Technician,
Film Director, Film Editor, Freelance Film Maker, Light Technician,
News Broadcaster, News Director, Producer, Production Engineer,
Program Assistant, Promotion Sales Manager, Public Relations Representative, Reporter, Sales Account Executive, Screenwriter, Sound
Editor, Sound Recorder, Sportscaster, Studio Technician, Teacher,
Traffic Manager, Tutor, Videotape Photographer, Writer
Faculty
Michael Dougan, Bonnie Borenstein
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
MARIN.EDU
A.A. in Communications, Mass Communications Option
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
COMM 110
Introduction to Mass Communication (also offered as JOUN 110)
3
COMM 150
Introduction to Filmmaking
4
COMM 160
Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the Media (also offered as JOUN
160)
3
COMM 161
Film and Television Writing
3
One course to be chosen from the following:
COMM 109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950 (also offered as HUM 109A)
4
COMM 109B History of Film: 1950 to the Present (also offered as HUM 109B)
4
Three additional units to be selected from the following:
HIST
118
History of the United States II
3
JOUN 115
News Reporting/Writing
3
JOUN 125
Broadcast Journalism
3
SPCH
120
Interpersonal Communication
3
SPCH
122
Public Speaking
3
SPCH
155
Radio and Television Announcing and Performance
3
COMMUNICATIONS COURSES (COMM)
COMM 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
COMM 110: Introduction to Mass Communication
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Economics 125 or Ethnic Studies 125 or
History 125 or Political Science 125 or Social Science 125. Can be taken for
credit as Communications 110 or Journalism 110. Credit will be awarded for
only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
A critical history survey of mass media from a humanities and social
science perspective including print (newspapers, magazines, books),
broadcast (radio and television), film, audio recording, images, news
gathering and reporting, public relations, advertising, media rights
and responsibilities, media ethics and impact, audience and feedback, cybermedia, and global media. Students will examine form,
content, and consequences of mass media in our society. Designed
for general education, career exploration, and consumer understanding of the interaction and influences among and between media and
our culture. Can also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area D-7, IGETC Area 4G
COMM 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
COMM 160: Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the
Media
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Communications 160 or
Journalism 160. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours
weekly.
This course will address a variety of entertainment and news content
in print and electronic media. In studying the social construction of
race and gender, we will consider and investigate all sides of issues.
The focus of this course is on contemporary media texts examined
within their historical context. Students will learn methods of
media analysis and apply them to the study of various media texts.
Computer Information Systems
CATALOG 2010/11
103
Additionally, we will explore the connections among media representations of race and gender and other social constructions, which
will include class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and disability.
In covering race, the course will address the experiences of AfricanAmericans, Native Americans, Asian-Americans, Arab-Americans,
and Latinos in the United States. With regard to gender, this course
will address the social construction of femininity as well as masculinity. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C and G, CSU Area D-3 or D-4,
IGETC Area 4C and 4D
Microcomputer Manager Specialty, and Microcomputer Programmer Specialty.
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements in the core program and chosen specialty, as well as
completion of general education and graduation requirements. A
Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion of the core
program plus the additional course requirements in each specialty. A
Skills Certificate is earned by satisfactory completion of the required
courses as listed for the specific Skills Certificate.
COMM 249: Independent Study
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CORE PROGRAM
The following courses are required of all Computer Information
Systems degree students:
The Computer Information Systems curriculum is designed to
provide education for computer-related careers, professional
advancement, and transfer preparation. Courses provide “handson” computer use that emphasizes the development of the skills
necessary for employment and personal use of computers. Program
specialties include desktop network, desktop publishing, microcomputer manager, and microcomputer programmer.
REQUIREMENTS
CIS
110
CIS
113
CIS
117
CIS
118
CIS
122
CIS
126
CIS
141
Career Options
Computer Sales Representative, Computer Software Specialist,
Desktop Publishing Specialist, Hardware and Software Consultant,
Help Desk Technician, Microcomputer Applications Specialist,
Microcomputer Manager, Microcomputer Software Support Technician, Network Technician, Programmer, Systems Administrator,
Systems Integrator
SPECIALTIES
In addition to the core program listed above, each Computer
Information Systems degree student will complete one of the following specialties (An additional specialty degree or certificate can be
awarded only if twelve of the required units have not been used for
any other degree or certificate):
Faculty
John Hinds, Michael Ransom, A. Joe Ritchie, Lawrence M. Tjernell
Department Phone: (415) 485-9610
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
Repeatability Policy Statement for Computer Information Systems
Courses
Students must petition to repeat any course in Computer Information Systems for the purpose of meeting the two-year currency
requirement for a degree or skills certificate.
A.S. in Computer Information Systems, Occupational
(Certificates of Achievement in Desktop Network Specialty,
Desktop Publishing Specialty, Microcomputer Manager Specialty,
and Microcomputer Programmer Specialty are awarded. Skills
Certificates in Desktop A+ Centered, Microsoft Office Database
Specialist, Microsoft Office Specialist, Network Security, Print
Production, and Web Programming are also awarded.)
Study in the field of Computer Information Systems is designed
to prepare students for entry-level positions. Specialty programs
include Desktop Network Specialty, Desktop Publishing Specialty,
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
Presentations and Publications
Introduction to Database Design and Programming
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
Networking Essentials
Introduction to Windows
Introduction to HTML Programming
UNITS
3
1½
1½
1½
1½
1½
1½
DESKTOP NETWORK SPECIALTY
CIS
150
Personal Computer Server and Workstation Operating Systems
2
CIS
151
Implementing and Administering a Network Infrastructure for a Personal Computer Operating System
1½
CIS
153
Implementing and Administering a Directory Services
Infrastructure for a Personal Computer Server Operating System
1½
CIS
155
Designing Security for a Personal Computer Server Operating System1½
CIS
159
Network Security
1½
CIS
161
Introduction to Computer System Hardware
1½
CIS
162
Computer Operating Systems
1½
CIS
163
Computer System Peripherals
1½
CIS
164
Troubleshooting System Peripherals and Networking
1½
DESKTOP PUBLISHING SPECIALTY
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
CIS
114
Print Design and Layout
CIS
115
Print Production
CIS
213P Internship in Print Publishing
MMST 123
Introduction to Multimedia Design
4
1½
2
3
3
MICROCOMPUTER MANAGER SPECIALTY
BUS
112
Financial Accounting BUS
114
Beginning Computerized Accounting
CIS
127
Intermediate Database Design
CIS
128
Intermediate Spreadsheet Design
CIS
143
Designing Web Sites
CIS
150
Personal Computer Server and Workstation Operating Systems
4
1½
1½
1½
1½
2
104
Computer Information Systems
MICROCOMPUTER PROGRAMMER SPECIALTY
CIS
127
Intermediate Database Design
CIS
137
Advanced Database Design
CIS
142
Intermediate HTML and Scripting
CIS
150
Personal Computer Server and Workstation Operating Systems
CIS
215
Visual BASIC Programming
CIS
237
SQL Programming
MARIN.EDU
1½
1½
1½
2
3½
1½
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
DESKTOP A+ CENTERED SKILLS CERTIFICATE
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
CIS
151
Implementing and Administering a Network Infrastructure for a Personal Computer Server Operating System
1½
CIS
161
Introduction to Computer System Hardware
1½
CIS
162
Computer Operating Systems
1½
CIC
163
Computer System Peripherals
1½
CIS
164
Troubleshooting System Peripherals and Networking
1½
MICROSOFT OFFICE DATABASE SPECIALIST SKILLS CERTIFICATE
REQUIREMENTS
CIS
117
Introduction to Database Design and Programming
CIS
127
Intermediate Database Design
CIS
137
Advanced Database Design
CIS
200
Software Certification Test Preparation
CIS
237
SQL Programming
MICROSOFT OFFICE SPECIALIST SKILLS CERTIFICATE
REQUIREMENTS
BOS 114
Beginning Word Processing
CIS
117
Introduction to Database Design and Programming
CIS
118
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
One Course From:
BOS
115
Intermediate Word Processing
CIS
127
Intermediate Database Design
CIS
128
Intermediate Spreadsheet Design
UNITS
1½
1½
1½
½
1½
UNITS
1½
1½
1½
1½
1½
1½
NETWORK SECURITY SKILLS CERTIFICATE
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
CIS
150
Personal Computer Server and Workstation Operating Systems
1½
CIS
151
Implementing and Administering a Network Infrastructure for a Personal
Computer Server Operating System
1½
CIS
153
Implementing and Administering a Directory Services Infrastructure for a Personal Computer Server Operating System
1½
CIS
155
Designing Security for a Personal Computer Server Operating System1½
CIS
159
Network Security
1½
PRINT PRODUCTION SKILLS CERTIFICATE
REQUIREMENTS
CIS
113
Presentations and Publications
CIS
114
Print Design and Layout
CIS
115
Print Production
UNITS
1½
1½
2
WEB PROGRAMMING SKILLS CERTIFICATE
REQUIREMENTS
CIS
141
Introduction to HTML Programming
CIS
142
Intermediate HTML and Scripting
CIS
143
Designing Web Sites
UNITS
1½
1½
1½
MICROSOFT ACCESS DATABASE SKILLS CERTIFICATE
REQUIREMENTS
CIS
117
Introduction to Database Design and Programming
CIS
127
Intermediate Database Design
CIS
137
Advanced Database Design
UNITS
1½
1½
1½
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSES (CIS)
CIS 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
CIS 101: Introduction to Personal Computers and
Operating Systems
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
This introductory course in the operation of the personal computer
and its operating system is designed for beginning students with
very little or no previous exposure to microcomputers. Students will
be introduced to the hardware components, systems software, and
applications programs of a personal computer. Through both lecture
and laboratory experience, students will gain the skills and confidence necessary to succeed in additional application training courses
in spreadsheets, database design, word processing, and Web page
construction, as well as the transfer level comprehensive computer
concepts course, CIS 110--Introduction to Computer Information
Systems. (CSU)
CIS 110: Introduction to Computer Information Systems
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour to be
arranged weekly.
This is an introductory survey of the needs for and roles of computer
information systems within organizations. Emphasis is on computer
requirements for organizations, history, hardware, programming,
systems development, personal computers, Internet, and networks.
Students will work with personal computers using application
software for word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. Programs
will be written and run in a high level language. This course is of interest to students in social sciences, humanities, vocational technical
education, and business. Can also be offered in a distance learning
format. (CSU/UC)
CIS 113: Presentations and Publications
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 101. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course introduces the fundamental design and layout requirements for the creation of effective computer-generated presentations
and printed documents for business. The course’s lecture component
focuses on the operation of software that aids in the creation of color
presentations, business graphics, and standard printed documents
(e.g., stationery, business cards, flyers, and brochures). The lab
component allows students to learn and practice the operation of at
least one of three software packages (presentation, business graphics,
and page layout). Basic layout, composition, and issues regarding
CATALOG 2010/11
Computer Information Systems
105
typography, use of color, and choice of various output media are the
underlying and unifying topics for the course. (CSU)
boxes, folder management, Explorer, disk maintenance, and other
Windows tools. (CSU)
CIS 114: Print Design and Layout
CIS 127: Intermediate Database Design
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 113. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 117. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course introduces the student to the operation of professionallevel print design and layout software for the production of documents such as business forms, brochures, newsletters, posters, flyers,
business identity materials, and other printed pieces. The course does
not present fundamental design concepts per se; rather, it focuses
on the functions of the tools of design, such as layout software and
complementary graphics editing software. In addition, students will
learn about the print publishing cycle, its component parts and its
contributing experts. (CSU)
This is a continuation of CIS 117. Students will use the intermediate
features of database software to design and implement database
applications. Database applications will be created using development tools to integrate information from other applications, analyze
data, utilize Internet capabilities, include forms for data input and
validation, produce custom reports, and integrate databases for
workgroups. (CSU)
CIS 115: Print Production
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 114. Three lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course follows CIS 114 in a sequence leading to an internship
assignment or entry-level work in the digital print publishing industry. In this course, students use software tools (design and layout
programs, graphic editing software, text editing software) to design
and produce documents ready for the press. Students will work with
computers configured in a local area network with shared resources,
practice basic operations of vector and bitmapped graphics software,
complete production jobs using professional-level layout software,
and apply new terms and concepts of the digital publishing industry
in planning and spec-ing print production jobs. (CSU)
CIS 117: Introduction to Database Design and
Programming
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 101. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This is a first course in the design and installation of a database for
personal computers. Students will use a personal computer database
software program to create and program database applications.
(CSU)
CIS 118: Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 110 or
101. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
In this first course in the design and application of spreadsheets for
personal computers, students will use a personal computer spreadsheet software program to design, create, and use spreadsheets for
accounting, and other business applications. (CSU)
CIS 122: Networking Essentials
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 101.
Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course will cover the basic concepts of networks, including
hardware, planning, implementation, and troubleshooting through
the development of a case study. (CSU)
CIS 126: Introduction to Windows
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 101. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course provides an introduction to Windows for personal
computers. Topics include Windows environment, menus and dialog
CIS 128: Intermediate Spreadsheet Design
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 118. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This is a course that will further prepare students in their ability
to create and to use accurate electronic spreadsheets on a personal
computer. Students will learn techniques of designing businessoriented spreadsheets on a personal computer. Students will learn
how to plan, write, and execute program codes to manipulate a data
management software package to meet management, marketing, and
other business needs. (CSU)
CIS 137: Advanced Database Design
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 127. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This is a continuation of CIS 127, extending students’ database application development knowledge using Access. Students will concentrate on advanced topics and techniques such as designing complex
forms and reports, customizing the user interface, automating tasks
with macros, using and writing Visual Basic for Applications code,
and finally, managing and securing a database. (CSU)
CIS 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
CIS 141: Introduction to HTML Programming
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 110 or
101. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is the language of the World
Wide Web. In this class, students will learn how to design, code, and
implement Web pages using HTML. The focus of this beginning
class will be creating pages with textual and limited inline image data
and links for both Internet and local area network Intranet applications. (CSU)
CIS 142: Intermediate HTML and Scripting
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 141. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This class is a continuation of CIS 141. Students will build on their
knowledge of HTML and learn elementary client-side programming
in JavaScript to add animation and interactive data exchange to Web
pages. (CSU)
106
Computer Information Systems
CIS 143: Designing Web Sites
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 142. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course teaches students how to design and implement Web
sites using Microsoft FrontPage. Students who understand how to
use a simple text editor to develop source documents incorporating
HTML, JavaScript, DHTML and server-side form handlers will learn
how a Web site editor creates static and dynamic pages. Additionally,
FrontPage’s site management features will be fully explored. (CSU)
CIS 150: Personal Computer Server and Workstation
Operating Systems
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 122. Three lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
A course for students who will install, configure, and maintain
network server and workstation operating systems. Students will
configure client profiles and server roles in a network environment.
(CSU)
CIS 151: Implementing and Administering a Network
Infrastructure for a Personal Computer Server OS
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 150. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This is a course for students who will install, configure, manage,
monitor and troubleshoot a network server operating system
infrastructure. This course concentrates on the following network
services: DHCP, DNS, remote access, network protocols, IP routing
and NetBios naming conventions within a network server-based
operating environment. (CSU)
CIS 153: Implementing and Administering a Directory
Services Infrastructure for a Personal Computer Server OS
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 150. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This is a course for students who will install, configure, manage,
monitor and troubleshoot Directory Services for a network server
operating system. This course concentrates on the following: Directory Services and DNS, security and Directory Services within a
network server-based operating environment. (CSU)
CIS 155: Designing Security for a Personal Computer
Server Operating System
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 150. Advisories:
Business 101 and 112. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight
weeks.
This is a course for students who will design and implement a security system to meet the business requirements of a network server
operating system infrastructure. This course includes analysis of
security system requirements, auditing access to resources, authenticating users, and encryption. (CSU)
CIS 158: Managing a Personal Computer Network
Environment
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 122. Advisory:
Computer Information Systems 150. Two lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly for eight weeks.
This course provides students with experience managing a network
which is based on a personal computer server operating system.
MARIN.EDU
Students will develop skills necessary to manage, monitor, and
troubleshoot a personal computer network environment. Students
will develop skills in setting up file, print and Web servers. Students
will learn to manage, monitor, and troubleshoot the Active Directory structure in a network as well as explore software deployment
and group policy implementation. The process of setting up Remote
Access, VPNs and Terminal Services in a network will be developed
by hands-on practice with network server operating systems. (CSU)
CIS 159: Computer Network Security Basics
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 122. Advisory:
Computer Information Systems 153. Two lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly for eight weeks.
This course is designed to prepare the student to support, monitor,
configure, and test basic security features applied to personal computer networks. The goal of this course is to provide the student with
a fundamental understanding of network security. Students explore
principles applied in a network. They will learn how to implement a
variety of security settings for data and services. (CSU)
CIS 161: Introduction to Computer System Hardware
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
This is a course that brings students up-to-date with the latest
technology covered by the A+ exams. For the more experienced user,
the course provides a fresh review and focus on what is required to
meet the objectives of the A+ exams. (CSU)
CIS 162: Computer Operating Systems
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
This is a course that brings students up-to-date with the latest operating systems covered by the A+ exams. For the more experienced user,
the course provides a fresh review and focus on what is required to
meet the objectives of the A+ exams. (CSU)
CIS 163: Computer System Peripherals
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
This is a course that brings students up-to-date with the latest system
peripherals included in the A+ exams. The course covers the installation, testing, troubleshooting, and maintenance of devices such as
printers, disk drives, and monitors. (CSU)
CIS 164: Troubleshooting System Peripherals and
Networking
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
In this course, students develop the skills necessary to identify and
resolve computer system hardware and operating system software
problems. Included in this course are the networking concepts relating to system troubleshooting. (CSU)
CIS 200: Software Certification Test Preparation
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisories: Business Office Systems 114 or Computer
Information Systems 117 or 118. One and one half laboratory hours weekly.
In this course, students work with computer software to evaluate
skill level in selected application software and prepare for software
certification tests. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
Computer Science
CATALOG 2010/11
CIS 213N: Internship in Networking
3.0 Units. Prerequisites: Computer Information Systems 150 and 158.
Corequisites: Computer Information Systems 151 or 153 or 155. Advisories:
Computer Information Systems 161 and 162. Two lecture and three laboratory
hours weekly.
This course bridges the gap between the classroom and the networking industry by providing an on-campus lecture class coupled with
a short-term internship. Students gain an understanding of real
networking work situations and expectations in a “real-life” context
characterized by workgroup activities, multiple projects under
deadline, and collaborative effort. Internships are not guaranteed.
Projects may be suitable for students’ portfolios. (CSU)
CIS 213P: Internship in Print Publishing
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Information Systems 115. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
107
Specialist, Database Specialist, Electronics Engineer, Information Analyst, Operations Research Analyst, Programmer, Project
Engineer, Systems Designer, Systems Management Engineer, Systems
Programmer, Systems Research Manager, Systems Scientist, Teacher
Faculty
Frederick G. Schmitt
Department Phone: (415) 485-9510
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
CIS 237: Introduction to SQL Programming
A.S. in Computer Science
With the rapid growth of computer and related technologies, preparation for a career in the computer sciences involves a course of study
in the areas of basic science, mathematics and electrical engineering.
There are two educational programs available to students interested
in the computer sciences. The two areas are: (1) electrical engineering
and computer science; and, (2) information science and software
engineering. The student interested in computer architecture and
design, control systems and communication theory, should consider
electrical engineering and computer science programs (see A.S. in
Engineering description). The information science and software
engineering program will prepare those students interested in
operating system and compiler design, graphics, and theoretical
computer science, as described in the program below. Due to the
diversity among degree programs, a student who plans to obtain a
degree in computer science from a four-year college or university
should examine carefully all relevant transfer information concerning the particular program.
1.5 Units. No prerequisite: Advisory: Computer Information Systems 137. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
This course bridges the gap between the classroom and the printing
industry by providing an on-campus lecture class coupled with a
short-term internship, students gain an understanding of real print
production work situations and expectations in a “real-life” context
characterized by workgroup activities, multiple projects under
deadline, and collaborative effort. Internships are not guaranteed.
Projects may be suitable for students’ portfolios. (CSU)
CIS 215: Visual BASIC Programming
3.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 110.
Three lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
The students will plan and create their own interactive Windows applications using Visual BASIC on a personal computer. Problems will
be presented in logic and computation to develop skill in developing
interactive BASIC programs. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
This is a course extending students’ relational database application
development knowledge using SQL. Students will concentrate on
learning the SQL programming language including: single and
multiple-table queries, updating data, database administration,
reports and embedded SQL. (CSU)
CIS 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Computers play an integral role in many professional fields today:
architecture and design, graphics and animation, writing and editing, physical and social sciences, research and medicine, and many
more. In computer science classes, students learn skills and applications that prepare them to enter the field as a software or hardware
programmer, an application designer, or as an expert end-user.
Career Options
Administrator, Applications Engineer, Automation Specialist,
Computer Customer Service Representative, Computer Hardware
Specialist, Computer Sales Representative, Computer Software
REQUIREMENTS
Freshman Year
COMP 110
COMP 130
Or
COMP 135
COMP 160
MATH 115
MATH 123
MATH 124
PHYS
207A
Sophomore Year
COMP 220
COMP 117
COMP 230
MATH 116
PHYS
207B
UNITS
Introduction to Computers
Introduction to Computer Programming
1
4
Introduction to Programming in Java
Computer Organization: An Assembly Language Perspective
Probability and Statistics
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
Mechanics and Properties of Matter
4
3
4
4
4
4
Data Structures and Algorithms
Discrete Mathematics
Programming in C
Linear Algebra
Electricity and Magnetism
3
3
3
3
4
108
Computer Science
MARIN.EDU
COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES (COMP)
COMP 135: Introduction to Programming in JAVA
COMP 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or equivalent. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
0.5-6 Units.
COMP 075: Selected Applications
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Computer Science 110. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course offers experienced students the opportunity to further
explore selected application packages running on the UNIX operating system on the Science Center computer. Applications include
word processing, typesetting, the writer’s workbench, graphing with
Plot2d, the UNIX operating system, databases and others. This is a
self-paced, self-directed course. May be taken four times for credit.
COMP 110: Introduction to Computers
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One-half lecture and one and one-half laboratory
hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to the computing facilities available on
the Science Center computers. Students will learn the fundamentals
of both the DOS and UNIX operating systems; how to log on, use an
editor, manage files and send electronic mail. A brief introduction
to graphing, statistics, and programming packages is also included.
(CSU)
COMP 112: Introduction to UNIX
0.5 Unit. Prerequisite: Competence in any computer language. Two lecture
hours weekly for four weeks.
An accelerated introduction to the UNIX operating system for
experienced programmers; how to log on, use an editor, manage files,
and send electronic mail. (CSU)
COMP 115: Technical BASIC Programming
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
This course is designed to introduce technical students to computers
and computer programming using the BASIC language. (CSU)
COMP 117: Discrete Mathematics
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 121 or 123. Also offered as Math 117. Students
may receive credit for Computer Science 117 or Math 117, but not for both
courses. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a survey of topics including set theory, combinatorics,
graph theory, algorithm, logic, Boolean algebra, formal languages,
and probability theory. Recommended for mathematics majors and
students interested in engineering and applied fields. (CSU/UC) CSU
Area B4, IGETC Area 2
COMP 130: Introduction to Computer Programming
Using C++
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or equivalent. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course offers an introduction to problem-solving using a structured, object-oriented programming language in C++ for those without prior programming experience. Examples and programming
assignments are drawn from many areas, involving both numerical
and non-numerical applications. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
Introduction to computer programming using JAVA for computer
science majors and computer professionals. Course concepts include
problem-solving techniques, program design, charting, control
structures, primitive data types, array and string data structures,
operations, algorithms, reading and writing files, exception handling, and applets. Object-oriented features are introduced, including
classes, objects, inheritance, and parameter passing. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area E
COMP 136: Advanced JAVA
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Science 135 or equivalent. Three lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will cover JAVA methods for exception processing and
input/output; concurrency, networking and internationalization in
JAVA; advanced graphical user interfaces; topics from JAVA database
programming and servlets; and JavaServer pages and remote method
invocation. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
COMP 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
COMP 150: Programming in MATLAB for Engineers
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 123. May be taken for credit as Computer Science
150B or Engineering 150B, but students receive credit for only one course.
Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Designed to meet computer programming requirements for engineering transfer students. The course will utilize the MATLAB environment to provide students with a working knowledge of computerbased problem-solving methods relevant to science and engineering,
including programming and numerical analysis techniques. Students
outline, write, test, and debug computer programs to solve problems
and display results, with emphasis on proper documentation of
computer code and reports. Common examples and applications of
physics and engineering are used throughout the course. (CSU/UC)
COMP 160: Computer Organization: An Assembly
Language Perspective
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Science 130 or 135 or 150. Three lecture
hours weekly.
Computer architecture and techniques of assembly language
programming as applied with Intel microprocessors. Topics include
theory and concepts of virtual memory, pipelines, caches, and
multitasking. IA-32 hardware architecture (bus, memory, stack, I/O,
interrupts), design of structured assembly language code, arithmetic
instructions, simple data transfer, input/output and disk processing
concepts. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
COMP 190: Prolog: Logic Programming and Artificial
Intelligence
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Competence in a programming language. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to Prolog, a declarative, procedural
programming language. Applications to problems in logic, expert
systems, and artificial intelligence. Examples of windowing, graphics, and sound using Turbo Prolog. (CSU/UC)
Counseling
CATALOG 2010/11
109
COMP 200: Programming in LISP
COMP 249: Independent Study
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Science 130 or 190 or 230. Three lecture
hours weekly.
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
Fundamentals of symbolic computation using the LISP programming language, with special emphasis on the widely implemented
Franz LISP dialect. Introduction to some of the principles and programming techniques used in artificial intelligence, with elementary
applications to a wide variety of problems and areas such as heuristic
problem solving, game playing, natural language processing, knowledge representation, pattern recognition, and associative database
systems. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
COMP 220: Data Structures and Algorithms
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Science 130 or 230. Three lecture hours
weekly.
This is a second programming course emphasizing the systematic
design and implementation of larger programs, often using recursion. Topics include fundamental and self-adjusting dynamic data
structures, specifically lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, and hash
tables, with methods for their construction and maintenance; efficient algorithms for searching and sorting; string and file processing;
and elementary principles of software engineering, object-oriented
methods, and abstract data types. (CSU/UC)
COMP 230: Programming in C
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Science 130 or 140. Students without UNIX
experience may take Computer Science 110 concurrently. Three lecture hours
weekly.
An introduction to the C programming language and to some of the
advanced programming techniques it makes possible. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area E
COMP 232: Advanced Programming in JAVA
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Science 130 or 135 or 206. Three lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
JAVA programming for both computer science majors and computer
professionals. Continuation of Computer Science 135. Review of
JAVA syntax, data types, data structures, exception handling, and
object-oriented features including classes, objects, and inheritance.
The course will introduce advanced JAVA features including polymorphism, encapsulation, interfaces, abstraction, file IO, generics,
collections, multithreading, concurrency, client server and network
programming with sockets. The JAVA Application Programming
Interface will be used. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
COMP 235: Advanced Programming in C++
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Computer Science 130 or 135 or 150. Three lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This is an advanced programming course in C++. Through lectures
and hands-on lab exercises, it offers students a deeper understanding
of the language and its advanced features and techniques. Topics
include namespaces, derived classes, abstract classes, multiple
inheritance, polymorphism, compositions, template classes, containers of Standard Template Library (STL), exceptions, dynamic theory
management, and design of libraries. Some case studies will be used
to illustrate OOP techniques. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
COUNSELING
Counseling courses are designed to provide an in-depth exploration
into the process of self-knowledge. The courses are specifically intended to enhance student study habits, provide insights into career
possibilities, and establish suitable educational planning. Courses
are taught both informally and experientially in order to arrive at a
realistic view of oneself and to enable students to better assess their
potential for making informed decisions. In addition to the established offerings, special topics are offered periodically in response to
student interest.
Faculty
Rinetta Early, Robert E. Flynn, Theodora F. Fung, Bruce Furuya, Letta Hlavachek,
Alexandra Magallanes-Rivera, Bessie Ng-Jung, Karen Robinson, Joetta S. TenisonScott, Rose Thompson, Wendy Ullman, Charles E. Williams, Toni Wittenmeier
Department Phone: (415) 485-9431
Disabled Students: (415) 485-9406
COUNSELING COURSES (COUN)
COUN 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
COUN 070: Interpersonal Skills and Guidance
0.5-1 Unit. Prerequisite: Disabled student. One and one-half laboratory hours
weekly for one-half unit and three laboratory hours weekly for one unit.
A course designed to help disabled students discover avenues for
realizing their best qualities in interpersonal communication and
in life situations. Offers special guidance in learning confidence and
ways to achieve best potential. Students are encouraged to share
backgrounds, problems, and achievements with instructor and
group. May be repeated for credit.
COUN 114: College Success Investigations
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is an in-depth guide designed to introduce individuals to
the role of higher education in society and understanding their role
as students within the academic community. It will focus on the determination of personal and professional life goals using a reflective
model of decision-making that integrates theory and practice that
is applicable in a variety of situations over an individual’s lifespan.
The course focuses on academic and career planning, study skills,
team development and self-understanding. Students will function as
an interdependent group, supporting each other in a broad range of
educational and personal issues. Faculty from a variety of disciplines
will give presentations designed to assist students in their academic
and career planning. (CSU/UC) CSU Area E
COUN 115A: Planning for Success in College
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. One-half lecture hour weekly for one-half unit.
This course will focus on how to successfully prepare to transfer to
UC, CSU, and private universities and colleges. Topics will include
110
Counseling
developing an educational plan and selecting courses for transfer,
admission criteria and the review process, choosing a college major,
developing an effective personal statement, completing applications,
and use of Internet resources. (CSU)
MARIN.EDU
COUN 133A: Career Exploration
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. One-half lecture hour weekly.
COUN 115B: Planning for Success in College
This is a short course introducing self-assessment including interests,
skills, values, and personality style, as it relates to career transition
and choosing a major. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly for one unit.
COUN 133B: Career Exploration
This course will focus on how to successfully prepare to transfer to
UC, CSU, and private universities and colleges. Topics will include
developing an educational plan and selecting courses for transfer,
admission criteria and the review process, choosing a college major,
developing an effective personal statement, completing applications,
and use of Internet resources. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
COUN 125: How to Study Effectively
This course provides the student with a practical approach to making
career and educational decisions. Self-assessment inventories and
assignments will help students discover their interests, values, skills,
and personality style. Students will learn to make career decisions
that are compatible with their unique personality and interests.
(CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Sixteen lecture hours per semester.
COUN 135: Effective Job Search Strategies
This course is designed to introduce the student to proven study
techniques including assessing learning styles, time management,
stress reduction, listening and lecture note taking, efficient textbook
reading, preparing for exams, improving memory, and critical thinking and writing. (CSU)
COUN 125L: Effective Study Skills Lab
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Two laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides students the opportunity to assess their current
study skills, and in the lab setting develop and practice proven study
techniques in effective textbook reading, active listening, lecture note
taking, exam preparation, memory and concentration improvement,
and time budgeting. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUN 130: Career Life Skills Planning
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Eight lecture hours per semester.
This course provides practical step-by-step instructions for the
job search process. Emphasis will be on career testing, job hunting
methods and techniques, resume and cover letter preparation, and
interviewing and follow-up procedures. (CSU)
COUN 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
COUN 140: Effective Communication for Peer
Counselors
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
eight weeks.
A course designed to train students who will work with people to be
more effective in their interpersonal communication. (CSU)
This course focuses on the determination of personal and professional life goals using a reflective model of decision-making that
integrates theory and practice that is applicable in a variety of situations over an individual’s lifespan. Through a study of career decision
making, students explore the impact of psycho-social, physical and
affective factors on their own cognitive processes. This comprehensive approach to career planning will include exploration of interests,
personality traits, values, and motivations. Self-knowledge and
understanding of the globalization of the workforce will address
understanding workplace cultural pluralism, technological awareness, and one’s role and impact in the workforce on the environment.
Career planning will address linkages to choosing a college major,
educational planning, changing jobs and career fields. (CSU/UC)
CSU Area E
COUN 141: Peer Counseling
COUN 132: Computerized Career Planning
COUN 153A: Group Process A
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. One and one-half independent study hours weekly.
A self-directed study focusing on one’s vocational interests and
career utilizing a computerized guidance system, Eureka. Various
assessment inventories will be used in conjunction with the Eureka
Guidance System, counseling services, and current literature topics
in vocational guidance. This course is designed to aid the student in
making more effective career decisions. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Counseling 140. One lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly for eight weeks.
A course designed to train students to be effective peer counselors.
(CSU)
COUN 142: Peer Counseling Seminar and Field
Experience
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Counseling 141. One lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
During the lecture/seminar hour, emphasis will be on topics pertaining to fieldwork experience. In addition, students will work three
hours per week as peer counselors. (CSU)
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. One-quarter lecture and three-quarter laboratory
hour weekly.
This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to participate in a small group experience for the purpose of examining their
behavior and the concepts of group behavior. The group will function
as a mini-laboratory to improve self-awareness and communication
with others according to individual needs and interests. (CSU)
Court Reporting
CATALOG 2010/11
COUN 153B: Group Process B
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One-half lecture and one and one-half laboratory
hours weekly.
This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to participate in a small group experience for the purpose of examining their
behavior and the concepts of group behavior. The group will function
as a mini-laboratory to improve self-awareness and communication
with others according to individual needs and interests. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUN 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
COURT REPORTING
The Court Reporting Program is designed for students interested
in acquiring the skill necessary to secure employment as a verbatim
reporter in our courts of law and legal and business offices.
Career Options
Convention Reporter, Court Reporter, Deposition Reporter, Freelance Reporter, Hearing Reporter
Department Phone: (415) 457-8811, Ext. 8226
In order for a person to qualify from a school to take the state
licensing examination, the person shall complete a program at
a recognized school. For information concerning the minimum
requirements that a Court Reporting Program must meet in order
to be recognized, contact The Court Reporters Board of California
(information below).
Court Reporting Program options are recognized by:
The Court Reporters Board of California
2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 230
Sacramento, CA 95833
Phone: (916) 263-3660
A.S. in Court Reporting, Occupational, Machine Shorthand
Option in Legal or Medical Secretary, Scopist, Medical
Transcriptionist, or Text Entry Specialist
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded)
The Machine Shorthand Option is offered only at the Indian Valley
Campus. This curriculum offers the student an opportunity to
prepare for careers as a legal or medical secretary, scopist for court
reporters, medical transcriptionist, or text entry specialist. The
courses will also partially fulfill the Certified Shorthand Reporters
Board requirements to “qualify” to take the State Certified Shorthand
Reporters Examination. An Associate in Science degree in Court
Reporting, Machine Shorthand Option is earned by completing the
courses listed below and the College of Marin graduation requirements. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory
completion of all courses required for the major. Arrangements must
be made by the student for the rental or purchase of a shorthand
machine. The total length of time it takes to complete the machine
shorthand skill requirements varies with each student.
111
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150.
English 95, 96, 97, 98A, and 98B are required in order to “qualify”
to take the state licensing examination. All students should
consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
Students must earn a letter grade in order to progress to the next skill level. Students must also
register for eight units of skill building classes each semester to satisfy a Court Reporters Board
of California regulation.
Fall Semester
COUR 110
Theory of Machine Shorthand
8
COUR 166
Law Library Skills
1½
COUR 167
Procedures and Ethics for the Court/Deposition Reporter
1
ENGL
95*
Advanced Spelling
1
ENGL
96*
Advanced Vocabulary
1
Spring Semester
COUR 112
Beginning Machine Shorthand Workshop: Level I
4
COUR 115J Beginning Machine Shorthand Jury Charge: Level II-J
2
COUR 115T Beginning Machine Shorthand Two-Voice: Level II-T
2
COUR 169A Computer-Aided Transcription
2
COUR 170
Microtranscription
1
ENGL
98A* Grammar and Usage
1
ENGL
98B* Sentence Structure and Punctuation
1
Summer Session
COUR 115F Beginning Machine Shorthand Four-Voice: Level II-F
2
COUR 115S Beginning Machine Shorthand Literary: Level II-S
2
COUR 125J Intermediate Machine Shorthand Jury-Charge: Level III-J
2
COUR 125T Intermediate Machine Shorthand Two-Voice: Level III-T
2
Fall Semester
COUR 125F Intermediate Machine Shorthand Four Voice: Level III-F
2
COUR 125S Intermediate Machine Shorthand Literary: Level III-S
2
COUR 150J Intermediate Machine Shorthand Jury-Charge: Level IV-J
2
COUR 150T Intermediate Machine Shorthand Two Voice: Level IV-T
2
COUR 169B Transcript Preparation/Formatting
1
COUR 169C Rapid-Data Entry
½
COUR 170
Microtranscription
1
MEDA 120
Medical Terminology I
3
Spring Semester
COUR 165
Legal Terminology
3
ENGL
97*
Critical Reading 1
MEDA 121
Medical Terminology II
3
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
T
T
T
A.S. in Court Reporting, Occupational, Certified Shorthand
Reporter Option (Certificate of Achievement also awarded)
The Certified Shorthand Reporter Option is offered only at the Indian Valley Campus. This program in conjunction with the academic
courses required for the Machine Shorthand Option will fulfill the
Certified Shorthand Reporters Board requirements to “qualify”
to take the State Certified Shorthand Reporters Examination. An
Associate in Science degree in Court Reporting, Certified Shorthand
Reporters Option, is earned by completing the courses listed below,
the academic courses required for the Machine Shorthand Option,
and the College of Marin graduation requirements. A Certificate of
Achievement is awarded for satisfactory completion of all courses
required for the major. The total length of time it takes to complete
the machine shorthand skill requirements varies with each student.
112
Court Reporting
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150.
English 95, 96, 97, 98A, and 98B are required in order to “qualify”
to take the state licensing examination. All students should
consult a counselor.
PREREQUISITES
Completion of: Court Reporting 110, 112, 115FJST, 125FJST, 150JT,
165, 166, 167, 169A, 169B, 169C, 170; English 95*, 96*, 97*; 98AB*;
Medical Assisting 120, 121.
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
Students must earn a letter grade in order to progress to the next skill level. Students must
also register for eight units of skill building classes each semester to satisfy a Court Reporters
Board of California regulation.
Spring Semester
COUR 150F Intermediate Machine Shorthand Four-Voice: Level IV-F
2
COUR 150S Intermediate Machine Shorthand Literary: Level IV-S
2
COUR 175J Intermediate Machine Shorthand Jury Charge: Level V-J
2
COUR 175T Intermediate Machine Shorthand Two-Voice: Level V-T
2
Summer Session
COUR 175F Intermediate Machine Shorthand Four-Voice: Level V-F
2
COUR 175S Intermediate Machine Shorthand Literary: Level V-S
2
COUR 200J Advanced Machine Shorthand Jury Charge: Level VI-J
2
COUR 200T Advanced Machine Shorthand Two-Voice: Level VI-T
2
Fall Semester
COUR 210A Advanced Machine Shorthand 5-Minute Four-Voice: Level VII-A
8
BUS
141
Intermediate Business English
2
WE
298B Occupational Work Experience
2
Spring Semester
COUR 210B Advanced Machine Shorthand 7.5-Minute Four Voice: Level VII-B
8
COUR 282
Certified Shorthand Reporter/Registered Professional Reporters Exam Preparation
2
Summer Session
COUR 210C Advanced Machine Shorthand 10-Minute Four-Voice: Level VII-C
8
T
T
T
T
T
COURT REPORTING COURSES (COUR)
COUR 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
COUR 090: Legal Careers
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
The student will explore the profession of law and related career opportunities including the practice of law, court reporting, paralegal,
sales and marketing to the legal profession, administration of justice
(police work, etc.), fiduciary administration (estates, trusts), and legal
technology. Can also be offered in a distance learning format.
COUR 110: Theory of Machine Shorthand
8.0 Units. Prerequisite: Ability to type 30 words-a-minute. Five lecture and
nine laboratory [four unsupervised] hours weekly.
The student will study the theory and operation of the stenotype
machine. This course is designed to develop knowledge of stenotype
theory, machine dexterity, fluent reading of stenotype notes, and the
ability to take dictation between 60 and 80 wam for three minutes
with better than 98% accuracy. Students will arrange for the rental or
purchase of a stenotype machine at the student’s expense prior to the
MARIN.EDU
first class meeting. Can also be offered in a distance learning format.
(CSU)
COUR 112: Beginning Machine Shorthand Workshop:
Level I
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 110. Corequisites: Court Reporting
115J and 115T. Two and one-half lecture and four and one-half laboratory [two
unsupervised] hours weekly.
The student will complete the machine shorthand theory textbook.
This course is designed to conclude the new stenotype theory
principles; develop stenotype machine dexterity, improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; and the ability to take dictation at 75 wam on
2-minute “Mandatory, Brief, and Phrase” tests and 3-minute unfamiliar Literary material with at least 90% accuracy; and continue the
development of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, as
well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate
the role of court reporter in a variety of situations. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 115F: Beginning Machine Shorthand Four-Voice:
Level II-F
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 112. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation
at 100 wam on 4-minute 4-Voice tests with at least 90% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 115J: Beginning Machine Shorthand Jury Charge:
Level II-J
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 110. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
100 wam on 3-minute Jury Charge tests with at least 90% accuracy;
and continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events.
The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 115S: Beginning Machine Shorthand Literary:
Level II-S
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 112. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 100 wam on 4-minute Literary tests at least 92.5% accuracy;
and continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events.
The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
Court Reporting
CATALOG 2010/11
113
COUR 115T: Beginning Machine Shorthand Two-Voice:
Level II-T
COUR 125T: Intermediate Machine Shorthand TwoVoice: Level III-T
2.0 Units. Prerequisites: Court Reporting 110. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 115T. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 100 wam on 3-minute 2-Voice tests with at least 90% accuracy;
and continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events.
The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
125 wam on 5-minute 2-Voice tests with at least 98.2% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 125F: Intermediate Machine Shorthand FourVoice: Level III-F
COUR 139: Selected Topics
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 115F. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
125 wam on 5-minute 4-Voice tests with at least 97.5% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 125J: Intermediate Machine Shorthand Jury
Charge: Level III-J
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 115J. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation
at 125 wam on 5-minute Jury Charge tests with at least 95% accuracy;
and continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events.
The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 125S: Intermediate Machine Shorthand Literary:
Level III-S
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 115S. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
125 wam on 5-minute Literary tests with at least 95% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
COUR 150F: Intermediate Machine Shorthand FourVoice: Level IV-F
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 125F. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation
at 150 wam on 7.5-minute 4-Voice tests with at least 97.5% accuracy;
and continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events.
The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 150J: Intermediate Machine Shorthand Jury
Charge: Level IV-J
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 125J. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation
at 150 wam on 5-minute Jury Charge tests with at least 95% accuracy;
and continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events.
The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 150S: Intermediate Machine Shorthand Literary:
Level IV-S
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 125S. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
150 wam on 5-minute Literary tests with at least 95% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
114
Court Reporting
COUR 150T: Intermediate Shorthand Two-Voice: Level
IV-T
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 125T. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
150 wam on 5-minute 2-Voice tests with at least 98.2% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 165: Legal Terminology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
The instructor will cover the following areas: (a) the general concepts
of the law to include real and personal property, negligence and
personal injury, contracts, wills, probate and domestic relations,
corporate law, insurance, criminal law and equity; (b) procedural
law including trial procedures; subpoenas, depositions, appellate procedures, and the structure of the judicial system. Designed for either
the legal secretary or the verbatim reporter. Field trips may include
the courthouse, law library, jails and prisons. (CSU)
MARIN.EDU
COUR 169B: Transcript Preparation/Formatting
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Court Reporting 170. One lecture hour
weekly.
This course emphasizes the transcription of the verbatim record of
depositions, hearings, and judicial proceedings with word processing
and/or court reporting software. (CSU)
COUR 169C: Rapid Data Entry
0.5 Unit. Prerequisites: Court Reporting 110 and Court Reporting 169A.
Corequisite: Court Reporting 170. One lecture hour weekly for eight weeks.
Prepares the students to do computer data entry at 140 plus words-aminute. The student will develop proficiency in the use of rapid-dataentry software, using the stenotype keyboard as the input and editing
device. Instruction is a combination of lecture, demonstration on the
computer, and class discussion. (CSU)
COUR 169D: Stenocaptioning I
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 169A or 169C. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
This course will concentrate on developing the skill and knowledge
necessary to write a conflict-free stenographic reporting method to
provide instantaneous translation with at least 95% accuracy. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 166: Law Library Skills
COUR 170: Microtranscription
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Court Reporting 169A or 169B or 169C.
Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed primarily for court reporting and prelaw students and legal secretaries, but is open to all. It introduces students
to law libraries as a unique resource of our legal system. Students will
explore the basic organization and tools of a law library in the forms
of court case reports and other judicial and administrative decisions;
state, federal, and local legislation; legal encyclopedias, periodicals
and summaries; and citations, abbreviations, and terms used in
relation to these tools. The course will include field trips to the law
library, and may include field trips to courthouses, jails and prisons.
(CSU)
COUR 167: Procedures and Ethics for the Court/
Deposition/CART Reporter
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course explores the career opportunities in court, deposition,
and CART reporting, concentrating on the ethics and procedures
inherent to these careers. Field trips may include courthouses and
deposition agencies. (CSU)
COUR 169A: Computer-Aided Transcription
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 110. Corequisite: Court Reporting 170.
Two lecture hours weekly.
The student will develop knowledge and skill in the use of a computer-aided transcription system. Introduction of the computerized
stenotype machine, computer editing, printing, real-time reporting,
and multimedia technology in the court reporting industry will be
emphasized. Instruction is a combination of lecture/demonstration/
simulation on the computer, and class discussion. (CSU)
Open lab: students will complete assignments to develop their
personal stenotype-to-English translation dictionaries. Jury charge,
four-voice, question and answer, technical, and medical material will
be emphasized during the entire semester. May be taken four times
for credit. (CSU)
COUR 171: Four-Voice Speed and Accuracy Building
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 110. Three laboratory hours weekly.
These courses concentrate on developing speed and accuracy on
four-voice material through repetitive use of the videocassettes in
the Learning Center. Court Reporting 171, 172, and 173 may each
be taken a total of four times for credit, but combinations may not
exceed 12 units. (CSU)
COUR 172: Four-Voice Speed and Accuracy Building
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 110. Six laboratory hours weekly.
These courses concentrate on developing speed and accuracy on
four-voice material through repetitive use of the videocassettes in
the Learning Center. Court Reporting 171, 172, and 173 may each
be taken a total of four times for credit, but combinations may not
exceed 12 units. (CSU)
COUR 173: Four-Voice Speed and Accuracy Building
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 110. Nine laboratory hours weekly.
These courses concentrate on developing speed and accuracy on
four-voice material through repetitive use of the videocassettes in
the Learning Center. Court Reporting 171, 172, and 173 may each
be taken a total of four times for credit, but combinations may not
exceed 12 units. (CSU)
CATALOG 2010/11
Court Reporting
115
COUR 175F: Intermediate Machine Shorthand FourVoice: Level V-F
COUR 200J: Advanced Machine Shorthand Jury Charge:
Level VI-J
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 150F. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 175J. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
175 wam on 10-minute 4-Voice tests with at least 97.5% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 200 wam on 10-minute unfamiliar Jury Charge tests with
at least 95% accuracy; and continue the development of technical,
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with
current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in
a variety of situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 175J: Intermediate Machine Shorthand Jury
Charge: Level V-J
COUR 200T: Advanced Machine Shorthand Two-Voice:
Level VI-T
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 150J. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 175T. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation
at 175 wam on 5-minute Jury Charge tests with at least 95% accuracy;
and continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events.
The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 200 wam on 5-minute unfamiliar 2-Voice tests with at least
98.2% accuracy; and continue the development of technical, medical,
legal, and general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current
events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 175S: Intermediate Machine Shorthand Literary:
Level V-S
COUR 210A: Advanced Machine Shorthand Five Minute
Four-Voice: Level VII-A
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 150S. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
8.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 175F. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. Five lecture and nine laboratory [four unsupervised]
hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
175 wam on 5-minute Literary tests with at least 95% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 200 wam on 5-minute unfamiliar 4-Voice tests with at least
97.5% accuracy; and continue the development of technical, medical,
legal, and general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current
events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 175T: Intermediate Machine Shorthand TwoVoice: Level V-T
COUR 210B: Advanced Machine Shorthand Seven and
One-Half Minute Four-Voice: Level VII-B
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 150T. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. One and one-quarter lecture and two and one-quarter
laboratory [one unsupervised] hours weekly.
8.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 210A. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. Five lecture and nine laboratory [four unsupervised]
hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at
175 wam on 5-minute 2-Voice tests with at least 98.2% accuracy; and
continue the development of technical, medical, legal, and general
vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 200 wam on 7.5-minute unfamiliar 4-Voice tests with at least
97.5% accuracy; and continue the development of technical, medical,
legal, and general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current
events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
116
Dance
COUR 210C: Advanced Machine Shorthand Ten Minute
Four-Voice: Level VII-C
8.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 210B. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. Five lecture and nine laboratory [four unsupervised]
hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 200 wam on 10-minute unfamiliar 4-Voice tests with at least
97.5% accuracy; and continue the development of technical, medical,
legal, and general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current
events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 225J: Advanced Machine Shorthand Five Minute
Jury Charge: Level VIII-J
8.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 200J. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. Five lecture and nine laboratory [four unsupervised]
hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity; improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take
dictation at 225 wam on 5-minute unfamiliar Jury Charge tests with
at least 95% accuracy; and continue the development of technical,
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with
current events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in
a variety of situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 225S: Advanced Machine Shorthand Five Minute
Literary: Level VIII-S
8.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 175S. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. Five lecture and nine laboratory [four unsupervised]
hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 200 wam on 5-minute unfamiliar Literary tests with at least
95% accuracy; and continue the development of technical, medical,
legal, and general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current
events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 225T: Advanced Machine Shorthand Five Minute
Two-Voice: Level VIII-T
8.0 Units. Prerequisite: Court Reporting 200T. Total of eight units of machine
shorthand required. Five lecture and nine laboratory [four unsupervised]
hours weekly.
This course is designed to develop stenotype machine dexterity;
improve fluent reading of stenotype notes; the ability to take dictation at 225 wam on 5-minute unfamiliar 2-Voice tests with at least
95% accuracy; and continue the development of technical, medical,
legal, and general vocabulary, as well as familiarization with current
events. The student will simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
MARIN.EDU
COUR 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
COUR 282: Certified Shorthand Reporter/Registered
Professional Reporter Exam Preparation
1.0 Unit. Prerequisites: Court Reporting 175 and 175L. Two lecture hours
weekly for eight weeks.
This course is a comprehensive review of legal terminology, professional practices, and applicable code sections in preparation for
the Registered Professional Reporter and the Certified Shorthand
Reporter examinations. May be taken three times for credit. (CSU)
COUR 282A: CSR/RPR Exam Preparation - Legal
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course is a comprehensive review of legal terminology, court
structure, basic legal principles, and applicable code sections in
preparation for the Certified Shorthand Reporter and the Registered
Professional Reporter examinations. Field trips may include the
courthouse, law library, jails and prisons. (CSU)
COUR 282B: CSR/RPR Exam Preparation - Test Strategy
and Specialized Terminologies
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This course is a comprehensive review of test strategy and specialized
terminologies in preparation for the Certified Shorthand Reporter
and the Registered Professional Reporter examinations. (CSU)
DANCE
As well as developing high levels of physical and mental skills,
dance provides a means to express creatively the personal side of
our nature. Through its study students gain an understanding and
appreciation of dance as an art form whether their goal be a career in
dance or the sheer pleasure of movement.
Career Options
Choreographer, Commercial Theater Dancer, Composer, Concert
Dancer, Costumer, Dance Critic, Dance Teacher, Dance Therapist,
Night Club Entertainer, Notator, Reconstructor, Recreation Leader,
Stage/Theater Designer, Studio Worker, Television Producer
Faculty
David Jones, Kristi Kuhn, Sandi Weldon
Department Phone: (415) 485-9460
Repeatability Policy for Dance Courses
All dance courses may be taken four times for credit not to exceed
a total of 40 dance units. Exception: Dance 108 is not repeatable.
Repeatable lettered courses may be taken a total of four times,
regardless of the letter: Dance 127AB, 130AB, 131AB, 228AB, 229AB,
241ABCD, and 260ABC.
A.A. in Dance
The A.A. degree prepares students for transfer into a four-year dance
major or performing arts program. It serves as basic preparation for
professional performance and/or teaching careers, as well as being a
springboard into further study of other dance-related areas.
Dance
CATALOG 2010/11
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
Technique Courses
The following requirements are the minimum. The student is advised
to take as many technique courses as possible in order to develop the
highest skill level in any of the styles.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
Nine technique courses are required for the major, distributed as follows (minimum of 14
units).
Ballet, two courses from:
DANC 115
Modern Ballet I
1½
Or
DANC 116
Modern Ballet II
1½
DANC 126
Ballet I
1½
DANC 127A Ballet II
1½
DANC 127B Ballet II
2
DANC 175
Summer Intensive: Workshop in Classical Performance II
1½
DANC 228A Ballet III
1½
DANC 228B Ballet III
2
DANC 229A Ballet IV
1½
DANC 229B Ballet IV
2
Modern, two courses from:
DANC 130A Modern Dance I
1½
DANC 130B Modern Dance I
2
DANC 131A Modern Dance II
1½
DANC 131B Modern Dance II
2
DANC 172
Summer Intensive: Contemporary Dance Workshop I
1½
DANC 173
Summer Intensive: Contemporary Dance Workshop II
1½
DANC 232A Modern Dance III
1½
DANC 232B Modern Dance III
2
DANC 240A Modern Dance IV
1½
DANC 240B Modern Dance IV
2
Jazz, two courses from:
DANC 122
Jazz Dance I
1½
DANC 123
Jazz Dance II
1½
DANC 170
Summer Intensive: Workshop in Broadway Dance I
1½
DANC 171
Summer Intensive: Workshop in Broadway Dance II
1½
DANC 224
Jazz Dance III
1½
DANC 225
Jazz Dance IV
1½
History and Choreography, must complete the following:
DANC 108
Dance History
3
DANC 135
Choreography
3
Electives: Two additional courses from any of the above or from:
DANC 112
Dancing in America
1½
DANC 119
African Haitian Dance
1½
DANC 121
Popular Dance Styles
1½
DANC 142
Beginning Tap
1½
DANC 161
Beginning Ballroom
1½
DANC 132
Musical Theatre I
1½
Performance and Production
Students with a dance career in mind should perform as frequently as possible. Students who
wish to choreograph or teach must have knowledge, by experience, of what dancers deal with
in performance.
REQUIREMENTS
One course from:
DANC 160
Introduction to Dance Performance Skills
DANC 241A-D Dance Company
UNITS
1
3-6
DANC 139
Must complete:
DANC 154
Musical Production: Dance
Dance Production 117
1.5
1
DANCE COURSES (DANC)
DANC 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
DANC 108: Dance History: Dancing - The Pleasure,
Power, and Art of Movement
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course covers the major theatrical traditions as well as dance as a
social, cultural and religious expression. The course describes dance
history and anthropology from six continents and highlights the
important ways in which dance functions in human societies. The
course focuses on dance as an expression of social order and power,
as classical art, as a medium of cultural fusion, and as an expression
of individual artists. The primal dance in all its diversity is a thread
that connects all people. Popular dance is shown as the fusion of
African and European cultures. May also be offered in a distance
learning format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
DANC 112: Dancing in America
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
An introduction to the basic skills of a variety of dance styles indigenous to America to be selected from such forms as street dance,
ballroom, movement games, jazz, and tap. Two or three of these
forms will be selected per semester for examination of their historical
and socio-cultural backgrounds, movement theory, and execution of
technique and style. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area H
DANC 115: Modern Ballet I
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
Introduces the basics of classical ballet and how they may be
integrated with modern dance techniques to form the idiom called
modern ballet. Floor exercises, ballet barre, and center work using
the two styles. Emphasis on proper body alignment, strength, flexibility and endurance. Please refer to the dance repeatability policy
for requirements and limitations to repeat this course. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 116: Modern Ballet II
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 115. One lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly.
Furthers the student’s knowledge of the synthesis of ballet and contemporary dance techniques at the intermediate level. Performance
techniques will be introduced. Please refer to the dance repeatability
policy for requirements and limitations to repeat this course. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 117: Dancercise
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
This is a dance course designed to promote total fitness through the
use of a variety of styles of dance, rhythmic movement, aerobics,
strengthening and relaxation exercises, Yoga and Pilates. This pulse-
118
Dance
monitored program is structured to produce metabolic efficiency
and increase energy, endurance, strength and flexibility through an
introduction of a variety of dance styles including Latin, hip hop,
swing, jazz, modern and disco. Instructor supervised demonstrations and performances are designed to assist the student in reaching
a satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 119: African-Haitian Dance
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
This course will include skills in African-Haitian dance based upon
the technique of Katherine Dunham. Emphasis will be placed upon
the development of rhythmic awareness through barre and floor
progressions. Movement phases will be based upon authentic dances
from Africa and the Caribbean Islands. Participants will learn to
use their body parts polyrhythmically and in isolation. The history
and the culture of the people will also be studied. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area C-1
DANC 121: Popular Dance Styles
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture hour and two laboratory hours weekly.
This class will enhance the beginning student’s skill in mastering
popular dance styles of the twentieth century. By exploring the
technical basis of these styles, it is hoped that insights will be gained
necessary for understanding and appreciating the emergence of
popular dance in the last century. Lecture and instructor-supervised
demonstrations and performances are designed to assist the student
in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice. May
be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 122: Jazz Dance I
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
This class is primarily designed for students to develop a proficiency
in beginning jazz dance technique. Rhythmic exercises and sequences, isolations, turns, walks, combinations, and polyrhythmic
movement will be covered. Jazz choreography will also be explored.
In addition, students will be given an opportunity to learn about the
historical development of America’s self-created dance form. Lecture
and instructor-supervised demonstrations and performances are
designed to assist the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill
through repeated practice. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 123: Jazz Dance II
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 122. One lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly.
Emphasis in this class will be on the development of intermediate level jazz dance technique. Continued emphasis on rhythmic
exercises and sequences, turns, walks, isolations, and polyrhythmic
movement. Further exploration of jazz choreography will be covered,
as well as aspects of the historical development of jazz dance. Lecture
and instructor-supervised demonstrations and performances are
designed to assist the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill
through repeated practice. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area H
MARIN.EDU
DANC 126: Ballet I
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
Beginning ballet with exercises for body awareness and alignment,
flexibility, balance, strength, and stamina. Center floor work with
basic adagio and allegro movements, jumps and turns. References to
different national styles and ballet history. Lecture and instructorsupervised demonstrations and performances are designed to assist
the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated
practice. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
H
DANC 127AB: Ballet II
1.5 or 2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 126. One lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly for 1.5 units; or one lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly for 2 units.
Intermediate ballet technique. Emphasis on body alignment and
placement, foot articulation, leg rotation, port de bras. Attention to
the linkage of steps and the quality of individual movements. Introduction to principles of artistic expression. Lecture and instructorsupervised demonstrations and performances are designed to assist
the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated
practice. Combinations of Dance 127AB may be taken a total of four
times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 130AB: Modern Dance I
1.5 or 2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly
for 1.5 units; or one lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for 2 units.
Beginning modern dance technique. Explores positioning, alignment, and centering as they apply to balance, turns, elevations, and
movement in and through space. Examines a variety of movement
qualities, rhythms, and phrasing as well as space-time energy concepts. The extended hours of Dance 130B provide the opportunity to
explore and practice the materials in greater depth and progress at
a faster rate. Combinations of Dance 130AB may be taken a total of
four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area C1
DANC 131AB: Modern Dance II
1.5 or 2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 130A or 130B. One lecture
and two laboratory hours weekly for 1.5 units; or one lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly for 2 units.
Intermediate technique, adding falls and the sight reading of simple
movement phrases to skills developed in Modern I. Continued emphasis on alignment, centering, balance and sensitivity to space time
energy in movement. The extended hours of Dance 131B provide the
opportunity to explore and practice the materials in greater depth
and progress at a faster rate. Combinations of Dance 131AB may be
taken a total of four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 132: Musical Theatre
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
The study and practice of a variety of dance styles from musical
theatre such as jazz, soft shoe, vaudeville, chorus line, ethnic dance,
and ballroom dance. Explores the integration of music, dance and
acting that is characteristic of musical theatre. Students will study
Broadway musicals in groups, duets, or solos. Acting, vocal training,
audition techniques, basic dance steps and terminology, and learning
choreography are part of the study. Instructor supervised demonstrations and performances are designed to assist the student in reaching
a satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice. May be taken
Dance
CATALOG 2010/11
four times for credit. Please refer to the dance repeatability policy for
requirements and limitations to repeat this course. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area H, CSU Area C-1
DANC 135: The Art of Choreography I
2.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
The craft of choreography, its ingredients and tools. Discussion
and exploration of form, content, design, and the elements of time,
space, and energy. Examination of shapes, texture, focus, dynamics,
rhythm, and phrasing. Lecture and instructor-supervised demonstrations and performances are designed to assist the student in
reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice. May
be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 139: Selected Topics
119
in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice.
May be taken four times for credit. Please refer to dance repeatability
policy for requirements and limitations to repeat this course. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 160: Introduction to Dance Performance Skills
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One-half lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
Basic skills of rehearsal and performance. Development of projection, stage presence, mastering stage space and artistic expression.
Students perform in and/or choreograph for group, small groups,
duet or solo pieces that are presented in a studio venue. Please refer
to the dance repeatability policy for requirements and limitations to
repeat this course. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area H
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
DANC 161: Beginning Ballroom Dance
DANC 142: Tap Dance
Fundamentals of ballroom dance. Students learn the basics of such
dances as the cha cha, fox-trot, waltz, salsa, and swing. Includes
discussion of the origins and development of these dances and their
contribution to the dance world. Lecture and instructor-supervised
demonstrations and performances are designed to assist the student
in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice. May
be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
This course will familiarize the student with the theory, terminology,
history and technique of tap dancing as well as tap notation. The
course includes footwork, progressions, patterns, and movement
combinations which will be developed into dances using a variety
of tap dance styles including Latin, Rhythm Tap, Irish, Soft Shoe,
American, Buck and Wing. The history of the art of tap dancing,
significant dancers and choreographers and performances, both
live and on tape, will be examined and compared for their stylistic
contributions to the art form. The students will study the place of tap
dance in our historical, social and cultural background in American
theatre, film and dance. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 143: Tap Workshop
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
DANC 170: Summer Intensive: Workshop in Broadway
Dance I
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and six laboratory hours weekly for six
weeks during the summer.
An intensive workshop focusing on a comparative analysis of the
styles of Broadway dances from the past to the present. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 142. One-half lecture and one-half
laboratory hour weekly.
DANC 171: Summer Intensive: Workshop in Broadway
Dance II
This course will present an intensified focus and application of one
specific style of tap dancing to be chosen based on student interest
and skill level. The focus of the study will be on a class-by-class basis.
The course will familiarize the student with the theory, terminology,
history and technique of tap dancing with a focus on one particular
style to be chosen from the five styles taught in the survey course
Dance 142. The course includes footwork, progressions, patterns and
movement combinations that will be developed into dances using
one tap dance style to be determined by the instructor. The history of
the art of tap dancing, significant dancers and choreographers and
performances, both live and on tape will be examined and compared
for their stylistic contributions to the specific form of tap dancing
being studied each semester. The students will also study the place
of tap dance in our historical, social and cultural background in
American theater, film and dance. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 170. Three lecture and six
laboratory hours weekly for six weeks during the summer.
DANC 154: Dance Production
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One-half lecture and two laboratory hours weekly.
The production aspect of dance performance. Students participate in
the technical and dress rehearsals for a performance, as well as completing tasks assigned by the director in the following areas: assistant
to director, set design/construction, lighting, costuming, makeup,
sound, special effects, budget and publicity. Instructor supervised
demonstrations and performances are designed to assist the student
An intensive workshop focusing on the historical social sources
which shaped Broadway dances with emphasis on learning to utilize
these sources as a means of becoming an expressive interpreter of the
art. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 172: Summer Intensive: Contemporary Dance
Workshop I
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and six laboratory hours weekly for six
weeks during the summer.
An intensive workshop experience focusing on movement, improvisation, and composition as related to the contemporary period.
Beginning to intermediate level. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 173: Summer Intensive: Contemporary Dance
Workshop II
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 172. Three lecture and six
laboratory hours weekly for six weeks during the summer.
This course is a continuation of the skills developed in Dance 172. It
is an intensive workshop focusing on movement, improvisation, and
composition as related to the contemporary period. Intermediate to
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Dance
advanced level. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area H
DANC 175: Summer Intensive: Workshop in Classical
Performance II
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 126. Three lecture and six
laboratory hours weekly for six weeks during the summer.
This is an intermediate workshop requiring intermediate- to
advanced-level classical movement skills. Emphasizes theatrical
focus and projection as they relate to performance. Instructorsupervised demonstrations and performances are designed to assist
the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated
practice. May be taken four times for credit. Please refer to Dance
repeatability policy for requirements and limitations to repeat this
course. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 176: Summer Intensive: Workshop in
Contemporary Classical Dance I
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 126. Three lecture and six
laboratory hours weekly for six weeks during the summer.
This is an intensive workshop requiring intermediate- to advancedlevel classical movement skills. Emphasizes theatrical focus and
projection as they relate to performance. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 224: Jazz Dance III
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 123. One lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly.
Emphasis in this class will be on the development of advanced level
jazz dance technique. Continued emphasis on rhythmic exercises
and sequences, turns, walks, isolations, and polyrhythmic movement. Further exploration of jazz choreography will be covered, as
well as aspects of the historical development of jazz dance. Lecture
and instructor-supervised demonstrations and performances are
designed to assist the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill
through repeated practice. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 225: Jazz Dance IV
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 224. One lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly.
Emphasis in this class will be on the development of high level
advanced jazz dance technique. Continued emphasis on rhythmic
exercises and sequences, turns, walks, isolations, and polyrhythmic
movement. Further exploration of jazz choreography will be covered,
as well as aspects of the historical development of jazz dance. Lecture
and instructor-supervised demonstrations and performances are
designed to assist the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill
through repeated practice. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 228AB: Ballet III
1.5 or 2 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 127A or B. One lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly for 1.5 units; or one lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly for 2 units.
Principles of ballet movement covered in Dance 127 are carried
into advanced technique and vocabulary. Emphasis on fluidity of
movement and on integration of the physical, mental, and emotional
skills that create the total dancer. Lecture and instructor-supervised
MARIN.EDU
demonstrations and performances are designed to assist the student
in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice.
Combinations of Dance 228AB may be taken a total of four times for
credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 229AB: Ballet IV
1.5 or 2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 228A or 228B. One lecture
and two laboratory hours weekly for 1.5 units; or one lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly for 2.0 units.
A continuation of skills developed in Dance 228AB. Emphasis on
integrating the dancer’s physical skills of equilibrium, extension,
elevation, and endurance with the intellectual and emotional skills
that create the artistry of the advanced dancer. Lecture and instructor-supervised demonstrations and performances are designed to
assist the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through
repeated practice. Combinations of Dance 229AB may be taken a
total of four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 232AB: Modern Dance III
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 131AB. One lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly for 1.5 units; or one lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly for 2 units.
Advanced modern dance technique. Focuses on centering and
energy flow as they function in alignment, turns, falls, extensions,
elevations and movements through space. Emphasis on learning to
trust the uniqueness of one’s own movement expression. Instructor
supervised demonstrations and performances are designed to assist
the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated
practice. Combinations of Dance 232AB may be taken four times for
credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 240AB: Modern Dance IV
1.5 or 2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance 232AB. One lecture and two
laboratory hours weekly for 1.5 units; one lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly for 2 units.
A continuation of skills developed in Dance 232, with emphasis on
technical control as it relates to individual anatomical structure, and
on the student as performer. Instructor supervised demonstrations
and performances are designed to assist the student in reaching a
satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice. Combinations of
Dance 240AB may be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area H
DANC 241ABCD: Dance Company
2-5 Units. Prerequisite: Audition required. Six and one-third laboratory hours
weekly for 2 units; 8.43 laboratory hours weekly for 3 units; 10.51 laboratory
hours weekly for 4 units; or twelve and two-thirds laboratory hours weekly for
5 units.
Students rehearse and perform faculty choreography in a formal
concert (Predetermined number of scheduled performances). Focus
on technique, choreographic phrasing, artistry, and performance
presence. Lecture and instructor-supervised demonstrations and
performances are designed to assist the student in reaching a satisfactory level of skill through repeated practice. Combinations of Dance
241ABCD may be taken a total of four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area H
CATALOG 2010/11
DANC 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
DANC 260ABC: Musical Production: Dance
1-3 Units. Prerequisite: Audition. One-sixth lecture and two and one-half
laboratory hours weekly for 1 unit; one-third lecture and five laboratory hours
weekly for 2 units; or one half lecture and seven and one-half laboratory hours
weekly for 3 units.
Participation in a musical production presented by the Performing
Arts Department. Emphasis on the utilization of a synthesis of dance
techniques incorporating ballet, modern, and jazz; on learning and
memorizing choreography; on developing an aesthetic sense of how
the dance interfaces with other elements of a musical production,
and on taking direction from the choreographer, stage and musical
directors. Each may be taken a total of four times for credit, but
combinations of Dance 260ABC may not exceed 12 units. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area H
DENTAL ASSISTING: REGISTERED
This program combines the technical knowledge of skills required
to function successfully as a chairside dental assistant with the essential aspects of office procedures. The expanded functions that are
required for state licensure are taught to clinical proficiency.
Career Options
Dental Assisting in Dental Clinics, Dental Assisting in Hospitals or
Correctional Facilities, Dental Assisting in Private Dental Offices,
Dental Office Management, Dental Receptionist, Dental Insurance
Auditor, Dental Product Sales, Dental Assisting Instructor
Faculty
Grace Hom, CDA, RDAEF, MA – Program Coordinator
Department Phone: (415) 485-9319
FAX: (415) 485-9328 E-mail: grace.hom@marin.edu
Certificate of Achievement in Dental Assisting: Registered
The Registered Dental Assisting Program is offered only at the
Kentfield Campus. It is a sequential program leading to a Certificate
of Achievement.
Graduates are eligible to sit for the State Registered Dental Assistant Licensure Examinations, which requires mandatory live-scan
finger printing. Graduates are also eligible for the Dental Assisting
National Board Examination.
Students must maintain a “C” grade or higher in all courses to
earn their Certificate of Completion, a requirement of the Commission on Accreditation.
College of Marin’s courses in Registered Dental Assisting in addition to fulfilling the College of Marin graduation requirements will
award an Associate in Science degree.
These courses will transfer toward a Bachelor’s degree in Health
Science at California State Universities, (See a counselor or Director
of Dental Assisting for more details.)
Required:
1. A minimum proof of course completion of English 98 or English
98SL or completion of College-level English.
2. High School diploma or equivalent
Dental Assisting: Registered
121
3. Applicants must be 18 years or older, which is a state requirement
to operate dental radiation equipment.
Advisory:
1. English 116 or higher*
*May be taken concurrently during the program.
College of Marin’s courses in Registered Dental Assisting plus the
College of Marin graduation requirements will award an Associate in
Science degree. These courses will transfer toward a Bachelor’s degree
in Health Science at California State University, San Francisco. (See a
counselor or the Director of Dental Assisting for more details.)
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
Program Application Procedure:
1. Applicants must complete English Requirement (see above).
2. Applicants must contact the Dental Assisting Department for
availability and assistance in the selection of classes to be admitted to the program.
3. Applicants must file an application for admission with the College
of Marin Office of Admissions and Records.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
First Semester
DENT
172
Dental Science I
4
DENT
174
Dental Materials
2
DENT
174L Dental Materials Application Lab
1
DENT
176
Dental Morphology, Histology, and Recordings
2
DENT
176L Dental Morphology, Histology, and Recordings Lab
1
DENT
180
Chairside I
2
DENT
180L Chairside I Lab
1
DENT
182
Dental Radiology
1
DENT
182L Dental Radiology Lab
1
Second Semester
DENT
178
Dental Science II
3
DENT
183
Dental Specialties
1
DENT
183L Dental Specialties Lab
½
DENT
184
Chairside II
4
DENT
184L Chairside II Lab
1
DENT
186
Clinical Dental Radiology
1
DENT
186L Clinical Dental Radiology Lab
½
DENT
187
Clinical/Technique Practicum
1
DENT
188
Clinical Application: Chairside Functions and Operative Procedures 6
DENT
190
Dental Practice Management and Economics
1
DENT
190L Dental Practice Management and Economics Lab
1
Summer Session
DENT
192
Clinical Applications in Dental Offices
2¼
DENT
192A Pit and Fissure Sealants
½
DENT
192AL Pit and Fissure Sealants Lab
½
NOTE: The above courses may be taken in two years. Only those students completing all
dental assisting requirements of a semester may advance to the following semester.
NOTE: Courses must be taken in the semester as indicated in the career program section
above.
NOTE: Current CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Two out of the three Hepatitis B vaccinations, Tetanus vaccinations, and TB testing must be completed by the end of the Fall semester
prior to student participation in internships at dental Clinics or externships in dental offices.
122
Dental Assisting: Registered
MARIN.EDU
SKILLS CERTIFICATES
Skills certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational program. Skills certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning
with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement
program. Skills Certificates require less than 18 units and are shorter
in duration than the Certificate of Achievement.
The Skills Certificate provides the student with knowledge of the
fundamental language/skill necessary for dental courses.
Radiology Safety Skills Certificate
Successful completion of Dental 182, 182 L, 186 and 186 L will earn
the student a Radiology Certificate approved the Board of Dental Examiners under the Department of Consumer Affairs administered by
the Committee of Dental Auxiliaries. This certificate is a prerequisite
to be eligible to sit for the State Registered Dental Assistant licensure
examination and a copy of the certificate is issued to the Committee
on Dental Auxiliaries. Records of participants must be maintained
for five years.
This certificate allows the individual to expose dental radiographs
on patients within the private dental office or dental clinic. No individual is allowed to expose dental radiographs without this certificate
in the State of California.
REQUIREMENTS
DENT
182
DENT
182L
DENT
186
DENT
186L
Dental Radiology
Dental Radiology Lab
Clinical Dental Radiology
Clinical Dental Radiology Lab
UNITS
1
1
1
½
Coronal Polish Skills Certificates
Successful completion of the Coronal Polish Unit in Dental 183
and 183L will earn the student a certificate in coronal polish. This
course is approved by the Board of Dental Examiners under the
Department of Consumer Affairs administered by the Committee
on Dental Auxiliaries and is a pre requisite to be eligible to sit for the
State Registered Dental Assistant licensure examination. The original
certificate is issued to the Committee on Dental Auxiliaries. Records
of participants must be maintained for five years.
This certificate allows the individual to polish dentition under the
direct supervision of a dentist in the private dental office or dental
clinic.
REQUIREMENTS
DENT
183
Dental Specialties
DENT
183L Dental Specialties Lab
UNITS
1
½
Ultrasonic Scaling Skills Certificate
Successful completion of the Ultrasonic Scaling Unit in Dental 183
and 183L will earn the student a certificate in ultrasonic scaler usage
in an orthodontic setting.
This course is approved by the Board of Dental Examiners under
the Department of Consumer Affairs administered through the
Committee on Dental Auxiliaries. The original certificate is issued to
the Committee on Dental Auxiliaries. Records of participants must
be maintained for five years.
This certificate allows the individual to use an ultrasonic scaler to
remove excess supragingival cement around orthodontic bands in
a private dental office or dental clinic under direct supervision of a
dentist.
REQUIREMENTS
DENT
183
Dental Specialties
DENT
183L Dental Specialties Lab
UNITS
1
½
Pit and Fissure Sealants Skills Certificate
Successful completion of Dental 192A and 192A Lab will earn
the student a certificate in Pit and Fissure Sealants. This course is
approved by the Board of Dental Examiners under the Department
of Consumer Affairs administered by the Committee on Dental
Auxiliaries. A copy of the certificate is sent to the Committee on
Dental Auxiliaries. Records of participants must be maintained for
five years.
This certificate allows the individual to prepare the teeth by
etching and apply the sealant that protects the dentition from dental
decay in a private dental office or dental clinic under the direct
supervision of a dentist.
REQUIREMENTS
DENT
192A Pit and Fissure Sealants
DENT
192AL Pit and Fissure Sealants Lab
UNITS
½
½
Infection Control Skills Certificate
Successful completion of Dental 101 and 101 Lab will earn the
student a certificate in Dental Sterilization. This course will train the
student to decontaminate, sterilize or process dental instruments and
dental equipment to meet OSHA standards and EPA on Infection
Control. Students who complete this course can become employed in
a private dental office or clinic as a Sterilization Assistant.
REQUIREMENTS
DENT
101
Infection Control
DENT
101L Infection Control Lab
UNITS
½
½
DENTAL ASSISTING COURSES (DENT)
DENT 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
DENT 100: Introduction to Health Careers
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Dental Assisting 100,
Medical Assisting 100, or Nursing Education 100, but credit will be awarded
for only one course. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in
a health profession. It provides an overview of the current health care
delivery system, the physical, mental, and emotional demands of the
workplace and the skills needed by the healthcare worker today and
in the future. Students will learn about qualifications and professional preparation needed for various careers and analyze the roles
and responsibilities in today’s health care environment. This course
is designed to help students develop realistic career goals as well as to
give an appreciation of how the current health care delivery system is
influencing individual health professional roles and responsibilities.
DENT 101: Introduction to Dental Sterilization
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 101L. Advisory: English
98 or 98SL. Two lecture hours daily for four days.
Community dentists require sterilization assistants to be trained in
disinfection and sterilization procedures in compliance with strict
State OSHA Standards for infection control, hazardous communication and waste management. This course provides the student with
CATALOG 2010/11
Dental Assisting: Registered
123
entry-level knowledge of these standards, and also covers basic dental
terminology and dental charting. (CSU)
DENT 176L: Dental Morphology, Histology and
Recordings Lab
DENT 101L: Introduction to Dental Sterilization Lab
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 98 or 98SL. Corequisite: Dental
Assisting 176. Three laboratory hours weekly.
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 101. Six laboratory
hours daily for four days.
Community dentists require sterilization assistants to be trained in
disinfection and sterilization procedures in compliance with strict
State OSHA Standards for infection control, hazard communication
and waste management. This lab course provides the opportunity for
the student to demonstrate and practice disinfection, sterilization
procedures and dental charting. (CSU)
DENT 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
DENT 172: Dental Science I
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 98 or English 98SL.
Four lecture hours weekly.
This course will instruct the student
in human anatomy, histology and physiology as these relate to the
head, neck and body systems in dentistry. The student will study
microbiology as it relates to the control of infection and disease to
include methods of sterilization and disinfection within the dental
environment. (CSU)
DENT 174: Dental Materials: Lecture
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 98 or English 98SL; Dental
Assisting 176 may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 174L.
Two lecture hours weekly.
An introduction to the physical and chemical properties of dental
materials such as dental gypsums, alginates, cements, waxes, and
acrylic materials. The preparation, placement and removal of
provisional restorations as allowed by the State Dental Practice Act
is included. The course also covers the assistant’s role in the preparation, manipulation and delivery during composite/bonding and fixed
prosthodontic procedures. (CSU)
DENT 174L: Dental Materials Application Lab
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 98 or 98SL; Dental Assisting 176
may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 174. Three laboratory
hours weekly.
This lab covers the applications of dental materials to include placement of temporary sedative restorations and placements of cement
bases and liners. Taking, pouring, and trimming of preliminary
impression materials; fabricating temporary crowns and restorations;
preparing final impression materials; and assisting in composite/
bonding and crown/bridge dental procedures. (CSU)
DENT 176: Dental Morphology, Histology, and
Recordings
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 98 or 98SL. Corequisite: Dental
Assisting 176L. See Application Procedure. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course will instruct the student in dental terminology as it
relates to tooth morphology and histology, charting, tooth nomenclature systems, cavity classifications, patient’s vital signs, oral examination, diagnosis and treatment planning. (CSU)
The student will identify permanent and primary dentition and indicate their nomenclature, location and function. The student will differentiate normal tooth anatomy from oral lesions and demonstrate
the ability to record dental charting, perform oral examinations and
take vital signs as part of the patient’s dental record. (CSU)
DENT 178: Dental Science II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 92 or 92SL. Advisory: English 98 or 98SL. Three
lecture hours weekly.
Students will study oral pathology, preventive dentistry, nutrition,
medical emergencies, pharmacology and the special needs patient
as they relate to dentistry. Applied psychology and communication
skills with dental patients and coworkers will be explored. (CSU)
DENT 180: Chairside I
2.0 Units. Prerequisites: Dental Assisting 176 or concurrent enrollment, and
eligibility for English 98 or 98SL. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 180L. See
Application Procedure. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course covers the use and care of dental equipment; identification, application, and distribution of dental hand instruments and
rotary instruments; pre set tray set-ups and their sequence of use;
four-handed dentistry techniques; and preparation for chairside
assisting in a clinical setting. (CSU)
DENT 180L: Chairside I Lab
1.0 Unit. Prerequisites: Dental Assisting 176 or concurrent enrollment; English
98 or 98SL. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 180. Three laboratory hours weekly.
Under the direct supervision of an instructor, students will prepare
the dental operatory, prepare the pre set tray, and identify hand and
rotary instruments for given procedures. In addition, students will
demonstrate the application of rubber dams, matrix retainers, topical
anesthetic, and provisional restorations as allowed and listed in the
California State Practice Act for dental assistants and registered
dental assistants. The student will also demonstrate knowledge of the
assistant’s role in amalgam, composite, and endodontic procedures.
(CSU)
DENT 182: Dental Radiology
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 176 or concurrent enrollment;
eligibility for English 98 or 98SL. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 182L. See
Application Procedure. One lecture hour weekly.
This introductory course presents information and background
on the production and projection of dental radiographs. Lectures
will cover the properties and principles of dental radiation and
techniques, including bisecting the angle, paralleling, occlusal,
disto-oblique and distal buccal object rules. The course covers identification of normal dental anatomy, patient management, radiation
biology, protection and quality assurance. (CSU)
DENT 182L: Dental Radiology Lab
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 176 or concurrent enrollment;
eligibility for English 98 or 98SL. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 182. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides hands-on experience to expose, process, mount
and evaluate dental radiographs for diagnostic purposes. Students
124
Dental Assisting: Registered
will learn the use of dental radiology equipment, darkroom techniques, patient management, and radiographic exposure techniques
such as bisecting the angle, paralleling, occlusal, disto-oblique
and buccal-object rule. Students will employ radiographic safety
measures and proper disposal of radiographic solutions according to
EPA standards. (CSU)
DENT 183: Advanced Dental Procedures
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 180. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 183L.
One lecture hour weekly.
This course covers basic knowledge for coronal polishing, topical
fluorides, bleaching tray fabrication and ultrasonic scaler cement
removal. Upon successful completion of this course the student will
earn their State Certificate for coronal polish and ultrasonic scaler
for cement removal. (CSU)
DENT 183L: Advanced Dental Procedures Lab
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 183. Three laboratory
hours weekly.
Students will perform and evaluate a coronal polish procedure on a
teaching manikin before performing the procedure on three patients.
The final clinical patient will be evaluated by a licensed dentist or
dental hygienist. The student will apply topical fluoride on patients
and fabricate a custom bleaching tray. The course also covers the use
of ultrasonic scaler cement removal. (CSU)
DENT 184: Chairside Procedures II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 180. Corequisite: Dental Assisting
184L. Four lecture hours weekly.
This course provides entry-level knowledge of dental specialties such
as surgical endodontics, orthodontics, periodontics, oral surgery
and implants, removable prosthodontics, and pediatric dentistry.
This course also covers the role of the dental assistant with nitrous
oxide conscious sedation. Registered dental assisting legal functions
according to the State Dental Practice Act are also covered. (CSU)
DENT 184L: Chairside Procedures II Lab
1.0 Unit. Prerequisites: Dental Assisting 176 and 180. Corequisite: Dental
Assisting 184. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This lab provides students with pre-clinical, hands-on practice
of legal registered dental assisting functions in the field of sugical
endodontics, orthodontics, periodontics, oral surgery, removable
prosthetics and pediatric dentistry. The course also covers the role of
the dental assistant in nitrous oxide sedation. (CSU)
DENT 186: Clinical Dental Radiology
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 182. Students must be at least 18 years
old. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 186L. One lecture hour weekly for 4 weeks.
This course provides instruction in the method of exposure and
evaluation of diagnostic quality dental x-rays on patients. The
course provides students with the ability to recognize normal dental
anatomy and dental anomalies. The instruction includes methodology for exposing intra-oral digital and extra-oral panoramic dental
radiographs. Upon completion of this course and the lab, students
will earn their Radiation Safety Certificate for the State of California.
(CSU)
MARIN.EDU
DENT 186L: Clinical Dental Radiology Lab
0.5 Unit. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 182. Must be at least 18 years old.
Corequisite: Dental Assisting 186. Six hours weekly for four weeks.
This course provides hands-on instruction for exposing intra- and
extra-oral dental radiographs on patients. It also covers the legal
parameters with regard to the patient’s records according to HIPAA
standards. Upon completion of Dental Assisting 186 and 186L, the
student will earn their Radiation Safety Certificate for the State of
California. (CSU)
DENT 187: Clinical/Technique Practicum
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 174, 180, and 182. Three laboratory
hours weekly.
A clinical practicum to provide individual self-study practice for
specific dental assisting skills such as exposing, processing and
mounting dental radiographs, taking study model impressions,
pouring models, trimming models, taking bite registration, fabricating provisional crowns, placing temporary restorations, fabricating
bleaching trays, and fabricating mouth guards under the supervision
of an instructor. (CSU)
DENT 188: Clinical Applications: Chairside Clinical
Operative Procedures
6.0 Units. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 174 and 180. Dental Assisting students
must have CPR, Hepatitis B, tetanus vaccinations and TB testing before going
to the dental school. One weekly lecture/seminar and 448 off-campus hours.
Clinical practice utilizing Four-Handed Dentistry at chairside,
including extended functions in general dentistry delegated to the
dental assistant and Registered Dental Assistant by the State Dental
Practice Act in private dental offices and clinics. Weekly seminars are
held to discuss student progress and provide instruction and suggestions for student improvement. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
DENT 190: Dental Practice Management and Economics
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: High school diploma or equivalent. Corequisite: Dental
Assisting 190L. Advisory: Eligibility for English 98 or English 98SL. One lecture
hour weekly.
A dental office management course designed to develop basic skills
and background in all phases of dental reception functions and office
management procedures to include: computer management, oral and
written communication, bookkeeping skills, case presentation and
financial arrangements, collection techniques, insurance processing, banking procedures, computing salaries and small business tax
records, inventory control and job seeking skills. The course will also
cover legal parameters of the State Dental Practice Act with regard to
dental auxiliaries and HIPAA Patient Privacy Regulations. (CSU)
DENT 190L: Dental Practice Management and
Economics Lab
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: High school diploma or equivalent. Corequisite: Dental
Assisting 190. Advisory: Eligibility for English 98 or English 98SL. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
This lab course, designed to develop basic skills and background
in all phases of dental reception and office management, includes
computer management, oral and written communication, bookkeeping skills, case presentation and financial arrangements, collection
techniques, insurance processing, banking procedures, computing
payroll, small business tax records, inventory control and job seeking
Drama
CATALOG 2010/11
skills. The course will also cover legal parameters of the State Dental
Practice Act with regard to dental auxiliaries and HIPAA Patient
Privacy Regulations. (CSU)
DENT 192: Clinical Applications in Dental Offices
2.3 Units. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 183 and 186. Corequisite: Dental
Assisting 192A. Advisory: English 98 or English 98SL. Four lecture and twenty
four laboratory hours weekly for four weeks during the summer session.
This course is designed to give students meaningful participation in
a dental office or clinic in order to understand and apply the Dental
Assisting chairside skills needed in the dental industry under the
direct supervision of the dental staff. The one-hour weekly seminar
provides the students the opportunity to present dental office case
management journals and observations, discuss perceptions and
apply or improve assisting skills to their internship. (CSU)
DENT 192A: Pit and Fissure Sealants
0.5 Unit. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 176. Corequisite: Dental Assisting 192
and 192AL. Advisory: English 98 or English 98SL. Two lecture hours weekly for
four weeks during the summer session.
This course is designed to give students knowledge in the application
of pit and fissure sealants on patients. This course partially satisfies
the State Dental Board to earn a Certificate in Pit and Fissure Sealants. (CSU)
DENT 192AL: Pit and Fissure Sealants Lab
0.5 Unit. Prerequisite: Dental Assisting 183 and current CPR Certificate.
Corequisite: Dental Assisting 192 and 192A. Advisory: English 98 or English
98SL. Six laboratory hours weekly for four weeks during the summer session.
This course is designed to give students knowledge and meaningful
participation in the application of pit and fissure sealants on patients.
This Lab course partially satisfies the State Dental Board to earn a
Certificate in Pit and Fissure Sealants. (CSU)
DENT 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
DRAMA
The Drama Program offers a variety of major productions on the
main stage and in the studio theater. Students receive college-level
credit for participating in all aspects of production including
acting as well as the various facets of technical theater such as sets,
costumes, properties, lighting and sound. Additionally, there is a
thriving Drama Club that sponsors student productions and events
as well as an active Brown Bag Theater series that offers lunch hour
programs, including student-directed productions.
Career Options
Actor/Actress, Advertising Representative, Broadcast Technician,
Business Agent, Casting Director, Choreographer, Comedian,
Community Cultural Program Director, Costume Designer, Critic,
Director, Dramatic Coach, Extra, Fundraiser, Hair Stylist, Lighting
Operator, Makeup Artist, Mime, Playwright, Press Agent, Producer,
Prop Maker, Public Affairs Director, Radio/TV Announcer, Recreation Specialist, Sales Representative, Set Builder, Set Carpenter,
Set Designer, Set Painter, Sound Technician, Stage Manager, Stage
Technician, Stunt Performer, Teacher, Theater Business Manager
125
Faculty
William Allen Taylor
Department Phone: (415) 485-9555
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.A. in Drama
The drama major is offered only at the Kentfield Campus. The Drama
Department gives students experience in writing, performing,
designing and constructing sets, as well as in costume and makeup.
It is an interdisciplinary program involving dance, art, music, and
the English disciplines. Students in the program may transfer to fouryear institutions or go into television and professional theatre groups.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
DRAM 110
Introduction to the Theatre
DRAM 150
Introduction to Technical Theatre
DRAM 252B Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
Six units to be selected from the following:
DRAM 116
Survey of Dramatic Literature – Ancient Greek to the Present
DRAM 117
Survey of Dramatic Literature – Shakespeare and His Theatre
DRAM 119
Theatre Criticism
Six units to be selected from the following:
DRAM 160
Stage Production
DRAM 161
Production Preparation – Sets and Properties
DRAM 162
Production Preparation – Costumes
DRAM 163
Production Preparation – Lights and Sound
DRAM 164
Production Crew
DRAM 166
Stage Makeup: Theory and Practice
DRAM 168
Theatre Management
Eight units to be selected from the following:
DRAM 126
Improvisation for the Theatre
DRAM 130
Theory and Practice in Acting I
DRAM 134
Acting for Director’s Workshop
DRAM 137
Stage Combat
DRAM 237
Techniques of Audition
DRAM 240
Stage Direction
T
T
Three units to be selected from the following:
DRAM 125
Stage Movement
DRAM 129
Voice for the Stage
DANC 132
Musical Theatre Dance I
MUS
181
Voice I
UNITS
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1½
3
3
1
½
½
3
2
1
1½
2
126
Drama
DRAMA COURSES (DRAM)
DRAM 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
DRAM 090: Careers in Performing Arts
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
The student will explore various performing arts professions, including stage management, lighting, sound, set design, scenic painting,
costuming, makeup, theatre management, and performance,
through lecture, discussion, and a series of guest artist appearances.
May be taken twice for credit.
DRAM 110: Introduction to the Theatre
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A survey course designed to create an appreciation of the theatre by
the student not majoring in drama and an orientation course for the
drama major. Areas to be covered include the purpose of theatre,
significant milestones in theatre history, a behind-the-scenes look at
play production, and trends in contemporary theatre. Lectures are
combined with viewing of live and videotaped scenes representing
different types of theatre. Required for drama majors. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
DRAM 116: Survey of Dramatic Literature: Ancient
Greek to the Present
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a survey of the history of the theatre and dramatic
literature from the Greek classic period to the present. Recommended for drama majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B
DRAM 117: Survey of Dramatic Literature: Shakespeare
and His Theatre
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a study of selected plays of Shakespeare with emphasis
on the transferral of the play from the written script to the stage.
Recommended for drama majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU
Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
DRAM 119: Theatre Criticism
3.0 Units. No prerequisite: Advisory: Drama 110. Three lecture hours weekly.
Students will learn the art of criticism through attending plays and
reading theatrical literature as well as conducting an in-depth study
of theatre critics and aestheticians. After gaining a foundation in
criticism, students will go out to plays and critique them. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C
DRAM 122: Summer Theatre Outreach
6.0 Units. Prerequisite: Audition based upon a standardized level of
performance. Sixty-four lecture hours and ninety-six laboratory hours of
rehearsal and performances.
This course is an intensive drama workshop involving music, dance,
and theatre, in which students create and perform an original show.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
MARIN.EDU
DRAM 124: Acting for Anybody: Basic Acting
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A course for actors and nonactors alike, this course is designed to
help students communicate with one another, overcome shyness
and improve acting skills through the creation and performance of
original scenes. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 125: Stage Movement
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is the study and practice of the art of physical theatre. Laban, Grotowski, Suzuki and others will be explored in this movement
intensive. Actors are rarely in control of their bodies even though
they are the essential tools of the actors. This class addresses the need
for mastery over the physical realm in theatre. Recommended for all
actors and required for all theatre majors. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 126: Improvisation for the Theatre
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A participatory class in which students will practice skills necessary
to support improvised performances. Students will be engaged in
activities that will draw upon their ability to relax, to concentrate,
and to respond spontaneously and honestly. This class will call upon
and extend students’ imagination and will provide opportunities to
practice narrative skills. The class will culminate in a series of public
performances. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 127: Improvisation Performance
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 126. One lecture and four
laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed for students to rehearse as an ensemble,
develop performance skills, and perform on a bi-weekly or weekly
basis. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 128: Improvisation II
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 126. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is an intermediate improvisation class for students with
prior improv experience. We will explore ensemble performance and
become adept at different improv genres: narrative, long form, social
commentary, and dramatic improv. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 129: Voice for the Stage
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Drama 131. Two lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This class teaches students how to control the instrument that is
their voice. Students will explore various vocal techniques and look
at differences in the British and American systems of voice acting.
This class is recommended for all actors and required for all drama
majors. (CSU)
DRAM 130: Theory and Practice in Acting I
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Drama 134. Three lecture hours and
one hour by arrangement weekly.
Beginning class in acting techniques. Exercises in characterization,
pantomime, improvisation, voice projection, and body movement.
Required for drama majors. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
Drama
CATALOG 2010/11
127
DRAM 131: Theory and Practice in Acting II
DRAM 150: Introduction to Stagecraft
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 130 and 134. Three lecture hours
and one laboratory hour weekly.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 160. Three lecture hours weekly.
Emphasis is on the creation and analysis of a character through
intensive rehearsal of scenes. Recommended for drama majors.
Combinations of Drama 130, 131, and 230 may be taken a total of
four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
Theory and practice in theatre production stagecraft. A study of all
backstage principles of design, fabrication, materials and tools used
in scenery, costumes, lighting and other stage properties. Includes
vocabulary for theatrical elements allowing students to critically
evaluate any and all theatrical productions. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
DRAM 134: Acting for the Director’s Workshop
DRAM 160: Production Stagecraft
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Twenty-four laboratory hours of audition, rehearsal
and performances.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 150. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
Acting in student-directed scenes from Drama 240: Stage Direction.
Audition, rehearsal and performance in student-directed scenes.
Audition and performance time to be arranged. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU/UC)
This is a general course in the practical aspects of stagecraft and other
aspects of production support. Areas covered will be set, properties,
and costume construction and organization, theatrical lighting, stage
rigging, sound development, shop organization and production office
support. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
DRAM 137: Stage Combat
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. One and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
DRAM 161: Production Preparation - Sets and Properties
This class covers the history, theory and practice of recreating fights
for the stage. Students will learn about a controlled simulated approach to performing punches, slaps, falls and choreographed sword
work. The history of personal combat will also be covered. Recommended for drama majors. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Drama 160. Three laboratory hours weekly.
DRAM 139: Selected Topics
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Drama 160. Three laboratory hours weekly.
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
DRAM 140: Theatre Workshop
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course offers students experience in preparing for a theatrical
production. Costuming, makeup, lighting, and simple stagecraft
will be incorporated into an open-ended experimental workshop.
Students are encouraged to direct, design, produce, and perform
showcase productions. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 142: Children’s Theatre Workshop
Practical participation in the construction of scenery and properties
for a staged production. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/
UC) CSU Area C-1
DRAM 162: Production Preparation - Costumes and Hair
Practical participation in the construction, care and maintenance
of theatrical costumes as well as basic hair styling and wig care and
maintenance for departmental productions. May be taken four times
for credit. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 163: Production Preparation - Lights and Sound
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Drama 160. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This is a general course in the practical application of lighting and
sound techniques for a departmental production. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU/UC)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
DRAM 164: Production Crew
This course offers students methods for organizing, selecting, and
producing plays for children. Techniques for acting and directing
children’s theatre will be analyzed. A production will be rehearsed
and performed. The goals of this course are to give students the opportunity to perform in theatre for children. May be taken four times
for credit. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 150. One-half lecture and two and
one-half laboratory hours weekly.
DRAM 143: Storytelling and Personal Narratives
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This class gives students an opportunity to conceive and perform
original stories in a workshop setting. Good for all levels, from early
childhood educators to potential performing artists and monologists.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
DRAM 144: Comedy Theory and Technique
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic elements
of comedy in the theatre experience. Through the study, discussion,
and practice of selected comic material, both historic and modern,
students will develop a variety of comedic stage techniques. (CSU/
UC)
This course is designed to give students practical experience in being
a part of a running crew for a theatrical production. Students will be
trained for production crewing assignments such as lighting technician, sound technician, dresser, wardrobe mistress/master, backstage
crew, properties management, assistant stage manager and stage
manager. Crewing assignments will be executed in Main Stage and
Studio Theatre productions. (CSU)
DRAM 166: Stage Makeup: Theory and Practice
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
Designed for students interested in the application of stage makeup.
The course will cover basic, old age, and character makeup for
various-sized theatres. Also includes animals, fantasy, Kabuki, and
Chinese opera. Students are required to purchase makeup supplies
following instructor’s guidelines. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU/UC)
128
Early Childhood Education
MARIN.EDU
DRAM 168: Theatre Management
DRAM 245: Rehearsal and Performance
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and one and one-half laboratory hours
weekly.
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Audition based upon a standardized level of
performance for College productions. Corequisite: Drama 160 or 161 or 162 or
163 or 164. Total of 150 laboratory hours.
This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of stage
and theatrical management. This course covers theatre financing,
box office operations, stage and house management procedures,
promotion and publicity. Strongly recommended for all theatre
majors and required for theatre internship students. (CSU)
DRAM 217: Shakespearean Text Analysis for the Actor
This course gives students the opportunity to act in the scheduled
department production of a play. In addition, students are required
to participate in the technical production areas covered by any of the
corequisites, for a minimum of three weekly lab hours. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Drama 245. One lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
DRAM 246: Rehearsal and Performance of a Modern
Comedy
This class will cover the techniques necessary for the actor to analyze
the text of a play by William Shakespeare in order to prepare for the
performance of a role in a Drama Department production. The focus
will be on verse and prose speaking, discovery of character through
the language and historical stylistic approach to the performance of
Shakespeare on stage. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Audition based upon a standardized level of
performance for College productions. Corequisite: Drama 160 or 161 or 162 or
163 or 164. Total of 150 laboratory hours.
DRAM 230: Advanced Acting Techniques
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Audition based upon a standardized level of
performance. Evidence of successful completion of audition must be obtained
from the Drama Department PRIOR to registration. Three lecture hours and
one hour to be arranged weekly.
This course is designed to further the student’s practical application in role preparation and performance techniques. Emphasis on
intensive preparation and analysis of major roles in selected scenes
from plays of various types and periods. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 231: Advanced Techniques for the Rehearsal and
Performance of Contemporary Dramatic Works
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Audition based upon a standardized level of
performance for roles in College productions. One lecture and nine laboratory
hours weekly.
A concentrated laboratory workshop for the advanced acting student
in advanced techniques of rehearsal and performance of the more
demanding and less well-known works of the contemporary and
classic theatre. Students in this class will also assume the necessary
technical duties required for production. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 237: Techniques of Audition
0.5 Unit. Prerequisite: Drama 131 and audition. One and one-half laboratory
hours weekly.
This course is a workshop for acting students which covers the
techniques of the audition process and how to prepare for auditions
including memorizing monologues, cold reading from scripts,
interview techniques, resume preparation and finding a suitable
monologue. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
DRAM 240: Directing for the Stage
This course gives students the opportunity to act in the scheduled
production of a modern comedy play. In addition, students are also
required to participate in the technical production areas covered by
any of the corequisites, for a minimum of three weekly lab hours.
May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
DRAM 252ABC: Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
2, 3, or 4 Units. Prerequisite: Drama 150 or 168. One lecture and four fieldwork
hours weekly for 2 units, eight fieldwork hours weekly for 3 units, and twelve
fieldwork hours weekly for 4 units.
This course is designed to give theater students meaningful work
experience in the areas of technical theater, theater management
and acting. Each student will work in a theater, theater company or
production company under the supervision of someone employed
there. In the one-hour weekly seminar, students will evaluate their
work in the field and share their experiences of the professional world
with their peers. May be taken additional semesters, up to a course
total of eight units. (CSU)
DRAM 260: Musical Theatre Production Workshop
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Audition based upon a standardized level of
performance for roles in College productions. Corequisite: Drama 160. Total of
210 laboratory hours over nine weeks.
Supervised activity acting in the regularly scheduled production of
musical plays. A minimum of three weekly lab hours and Drama 160
are required during preproduction in one of the technical areas. This
course will cover acting, musicianship, dance and movement, voice
production, and stagecraft. It culminates with the public performance of a full-stage musical. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 110, 130, and 134. Three lecture
hours and two hours to be arranged weekly.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
This class is focused on the transference of the written script into live
action on the stage. Students will learn the fundamentals of script
analysis, design concepts, casting, composition, blocking, actorcoaching, characterization, and rehearsal techniques as they relate to
the play production process. (CSU/UC)
The Early Childhood Education Program is designed to prepare
students to become teachers or directors in children’s centers,
nursery and preschools, prekindergartens, infant-toddler programs,
employer-supported children’s centers, extended day-care or family
day-care programs.
Early Childhood Education
CATALOG 2010/11
Career Options
Teacher, Head Teacher, or Director of: Children’s Centers, EmployerSupported Children’s Centers, Extended Day Programs, Family DayCare Programs, Infant-Toddler Programs, Nursery and Preschools,
Parent Cooperative Nursery Schools, Prekindergarten Programs
Faculty
Peggy Dodge - ECE Coordinator, Shaquam Edwards
Department Phone: (415) 485-9319
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.S. in Early Childhood Education, Occupational
(Certificate of Achievement awarded. Skills Certificate in Early
Childhood Education Core also awarded.)
To obtain an Associate in Science degree with a major in Early Childhood Education, students need to complete the required courses, as
well as general education courses and graduation requirements. A
Certificate of Achievement is also awarded (see “Early Childhood
Education Certificate of Achievement Requirements”). In addition, a
Skills Certificate is earned by satisfactory completion of the required
courses. (See “Early Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate
Requirements”.)
Students who wish to enter the Early Childhood Education
Program are advised to call or contact the program coordinator. The
coordinator will discuss options for beginning the program and for
tailoring individual scheduling needs to the structure of the program. Students who are enrolling in the student teaching practicum
courses must meet with the Early Childhood Education Program
coordinator, fill out an application, and complete all forms required
by the Early Childhood Education Student Teaching Program prior
to beginning their student teaching placements.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS UNITS
Recommended Sequence
First Semester
ECE
100
Licensing and Permits: Introduction to Childcare Programs
½
ECE
114
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3
Recommended elective:
ECE 101
Introduction to Child Development
3
Second Semester
ECE
112
Child, Family, and Community
3
ECE
115
Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum
3
ECE
116
Observation and Assessment
3
Third Semester
ECE
131
Health, Safety and Nutrition Practices for Young Children
3
ECE
280
Early Childhood Education Fieldwork and Seminar I: Beginning Practicum in Student Teaching
3
ECE
110
Child Development
3
And one ECE elective (see list below)
Fourth Semester
ECE
208
Exploring Cultural Diversity in the Early Childhood Curriculum
3
129
ECE
222
Working with Special Needs Children in Early Childhood Classrooms 2
ECE
281
ECE Fieldwork and Seminar II: Advanced Practicum in Student Teaching3
PSY
114
Psychology of Human Development: Lifespan+
3
SUBTOTAL UNITS
35½
ECE Electives (must complete two electives to fulfill
requirements for AS degree)
ECE
101
Introduction to Child Development
3
ECE
133
Creative Art Curriculum for Young Children
2
ECE 135
Working with Children’s Challenging Behavior
2
ECE
137
Emergent Literacy in the Early Childhood Classroom
3
ECE
205
Continuing Experiences in Early Childhood Curriculum
3
ECE
217
Fostering Creativity in the Classroom
2
ECE
218
Caring for the Infant and Toddler
3
ECE
220A Early Childhood Administration A
3
ECE
220B Early Childhood Education Administration B
3
ECE
221
Teaching Science to Young Children
2
ECE
224
Working with Parents in Early Childhood Programs
2
ECE
225
Guidance and Limit-Setting in the Early Childhood Classroom
2
ECE
295
Supervising Adults in Early Childhood Programs
2
TOTAL UNITS
39½ - 41½
+ Also fulfills College of Marin graduation requirement and CSU transfer requirements,
Areas D-9 or E.
Early Childhood Education Certificate of Achievement
REQUIREMENTS
ECE
100
ECE
110
ECE
112
ECE
114
ECE
115
ECE
116
ECE
131
ECE
208
ECE
222
ECE
280
PSY
114
ENGL
120 Or ENGL
120SL UNITS
Licensing and Permits: Introduction to Childcare Programs
½
Child Development
3
Child, Family and Community
3
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3
Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum
3
Observation and Assessment
3
Health, Safety and Nutrition Practices for Young Children
3
Exploring Cultural Diversity in the Early Childhood Curriculum
3
Working with Special Needs Children in Early Childhood Classrooms 2
Early Childhood Education Fieldwork and Seminar I: Beginning Practicum in Student Teaching
3
Psychology of Human Development: Lifespan+
3
Introduction to College Reading and Composition II
3
Introduction to College Reading and Composition II – for Non-Native English Speakers
3
SUBTOTAL UNITS
And 10 General Education units, including: At least 3 units in Humanities or Fine Arts from the following list:
• Speech 128
• Dance 121
• Art 112
• Spanish 101, 102
• American Sign Language 101, 102
And at least 3 units in Math or Science from the following list:
• Geology 120, 120L
• Physical Education 107 or Biology 107 (cross-listed)
• Mathematics 101, 101AB, 101XY, 102G, 103, 103AB, 103S, 103XY, or 115
• Statistics 115
And at least 4 units from the following list:
• Speech 120, 128
• Dance 121
• Art 112
• Spanish 101, 102
32½
130
Early Childhood Education
• American Sign Language 101, 102
• Geology 120, 120L
• Mathematics 101, 101AB, 101XY, 102G, 103, 103AB, 103S, 103XY, or 115
• Statistics 115
• English 116, 150, 151, 155
• Physical Education 107 or Biology 107 (cross-listed)
• Political Science 100
• History 118
TOTAL UNITS FOR CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT
MARIN.EDU
Division obtain the appropriate permit from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.
1. For Child Development Assistant Teacher Permit: Six units of
early childhood education (ECE) or child development (CD)
courses. No experience requirement.
42½
2. For Child Development Associate Teacher Permit: Twelve units in
ECE/CD including the core* courses. Experience requirement: 50
days (3 or more hours per day) within 2 years.
Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
3. For Child Development Teacher Permit: Twenty-four units in
ECE/CD including the core* courses, plus 16 units in general
education**. Experience requirement: 175 days (3 or more hours
per day) within 4 years.
Early Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate
A student who has an Early Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate has completed 9-12 of the units required for the next level of
certificate, the Certificate of Achievement in Early Childhood Education. A student who has completed the required courses for the Early
Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate has met the coursework
requirements of the Department of Social Services to be a teacher in a
Title 22 preschool or children’s center. Upon completion of the Early
Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate a student would be
eligible to apply for the Associate Teacher level of the Child Development permit, issued by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing.
5. For Child Development Site Supervisor Permit: Associate degree
(or 60 units) with at least 24 units in ECE/CD including the core *
courses, plus 6 units in administration (ECE 220A, 220B), 2 units
in adult supervision (ECE 295). Experience requirement: 350 days
(3 or more hours per day) within 4 years, including at least 100
days supervising adults.
REQUIREMENTS
ECE
101
Introduction to Child Development
Or ECE
110
Child Development I
ECE
112
Child, Family, and Community
ECE
114
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
ECE
115
Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum
TOTAL UNITS
UNITS
3
3
3
3
3
12
Licensing Coursework Requirements:
The Department of Social Services requires that anyone working in
a children’s program as a teacher have at least 12 semester units of
coursework in early childhood education, with at least one course in
each of the following three subject areas:
1. Child or Human Growth and Development (ECE 101 or 110)
2. Child, Family and Community, or Child-Family Relations (ECE
112)
3. Programs and Curriculum (ECE 114*, 115*, 116, 120, 131, 132,
133, 134, 135, 137, 205, 208, 217, 218, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 280**,
281**)
4. *Recommended (Core) Courses for 12 ECE units. Only one of the
recommended courses in Child Development is necessary.
5. **ECE 280 and 281 may be counted as units in the Programs and
Curriculum category or as 96 hours of experience, but not both.
Child Development Permit Requirements:
The California Department of Education requires that anyone working in a children’s program subsidized by the Child Development
4. For Child Development Master Teacher Permit: Twenty-four units
in ECE/CD including the core* courses, plus 16 units in general
education**, plus 6 units in an ECE/CD area of specialization, plus
2 units of adult supervision (ECE 295). Experience requirement:
350 days (3 or more hours per day) within 4 years.
6. For Child Development Program Director Permit: BA/BS degree
or higher including 24 units in ECE/CD, including the core*
courses, plus 6 units in early childhood education administration
(ECE 220A, 220B), 2 units in adult supervision (ECE 295). Experience requirement: Site supervisor status and one program year of
adult supervision experience.
*Core courses for the Child Development permit include at least one
course in each of the following three subject areas:
1. Child or Human Growth and Development (ECE 101 or 110)
2. Child, Family and Community, or Child-Family Relations (ECE
112)
3. Programs and Curriculum (ECE 114, 115, 116, 120, 131, 132, 133,
134, 135, 137, 205, 208, 217, 218, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 280***,
281***)
***ECE 280 and 281 may be counted as units in the Programs and
Curriculum category or as 96 hours of experience, but not both.
**General Education units require one course in each of the four
degree-applicable general education categories: English/Language
Arts; Math or Science; Social Sciences; Humanities and/or Fine Arts.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION COURSES (ECE)
ECE 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ECE 100: Licensing and Permits: Introduction to
Childcare Programs
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. One-half lecture hour weekly.
This course provides information regarding state requirements for
being a teacher in a licensed children’s program and for obtaining
a Child Development Permit. Coursework requirements for the
Associate of Science degree and Certificate of Achievement in Early
CATALOG 2010/11
Childhood Education are reviewed. Information about setting up a
family childcare program is also included. This course is required for
both the Associate of Science degree and the Certificate of Achievement in Early Childhood Education. It is also recommended for
people wishing to learn about career options in Early Childhood
Education and for providers already working in the field. Can also be
offered in a distance learning format. (CSU)
ECE 101: Introduction to Child Development
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly
This introductory course explains the ages and stages of development
from birth through adolescence, describing physical, intellectual, social and emotional growth. Emphasis is on the practical application
of principles and the adult role in supporting optimal growth. This
course meets the Department of Social Services licensing requirements for coursework in early childhood education. It also meets
requirements for all levels of the Child Development Permit. (CSU)
ECE 110: Child Development
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is the study of the growth and development of children
from the prenatal stage through adolescence. For each stage of
development, the physical, cognitive, social and emotional aspects
of development are discussed, with attention to both typical and
atypical development. Included are the influences of culture, family,
and the environment. Implications of developmental understanding
for care-giving strategies are included, with emphasis on practices in
early childhood and early elementary education and child rearing.
This course meets Department of Social Services licensure requirements for coursework in ECE. It is also required for all levels of the
Child Development Permit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area
D-7, IGETC Area 4G
ECE 112: Child, Family, and Community
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Explores the impact of community and society on young children
and their families. Components of the course include: an overview
of different types of families and parenting styles; the influence of
media and politics on children and families; the effect of the community; current legislation, education, and public policy on children
and families; examination of values, family roles, and place in society
of diverse cultures and ethnic groups in the United States; and
problems confronting children and their families today. This course
meets requirements by the Department of Social Services to satisfy
licensure requirements for coursework in ECE. It is also required for
all levels of the Child Development Permit. (CSU) AA/AS Area B,
CSU Area D-7, IGETC Area 4B
ECE 114: Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Introduction to the best and promising teaching and care practices
as defined within the field of early care and education, including an
historic overview, range of delivery systems, program philosophies,
and ethical standards. Evaluating quality of programs, role of
play, guidance strategies and the observation-planning-evaluation
sequence are included. (CSU)
Early Childhood Education
131
ECE 115: Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education 101 or 110. Three lecture
hours weekly.
In this course, students will learn how to design and evaluate
foundational curriculum in areas such as literacy, mathematics,
science, social and emotional development, and artistic expression.
Techniques for working with children individually as well as in small
and large groups are included. Approaches for setting up classrooms,
developing anti-bias materials, and resolving conflicts. (CSU)
ECE 116: Observation and Assessment
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education 101 or 110. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This course explores an array of child observation and study
methods, providing a theoretical framework for understanding the
connection between effective observations, curriculum planning
and child guidance in early childhood education and care settings.
Advantages and disadvantages of observation techniques, observer
bias and cultural considerations are discussed. (CSU)
ECE 120: Planning and Teaching an After School
Program
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Sixteen lecture hours per semester.
This course includes age-appropriate activities for after school
programs, aspects of after school care, and strategies for working
with and understanding children in after school settings. (CSU)
ECE 131: Health, Safety and Nutrition Practices for
Young Children
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
In this course students will learn about universal health precautions,
OSHA guidelines and licensing regulations, planning nutrition
programs and other current health and safety practices to use when
working with young children. Other topics include injury prevention, emergency planning, recognizing and reporting suspected
child abuse. Certificates will be issued upon successful completion of
Pediatric CPR and First Aid training components. (CSU)
ECE 132: Planning and Leading Circle Times with Young
Children
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
Includes approaches for planning and leading circle times for
preschoolers, toddlers, school-agers and mixed age groups. Features
ideas for materials, songs and activities for circle times and strategies for managing groups and guiding young children during circle
times. This course can be applied towards licensing and Child
Development Permit coursework requirements in the subject area of
Programs and Curriculum. (CSU)
ECE 133: Creative Art Curriculum for Young Children
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
In this course students will learn how to plan, design and present a
process-oriented art curriculum for young children. Through inclass hands-on art activities students will sample a variety of media
for children. An overview of current trends in early art education is
also included. (CSU)
132
Early Childhood Education
MARIN.EDU
ECE 134: Understanding Young Children’s
Temperaments
creating culturally diverse and anti-bias curricula, materials and
environments are featured. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
ECE 217: Fostering Creativity in the Classroom
How to work with children of different temperament types; examination of the different temperament types; overview of research on
temperament and children; how to recognize the different temperamental traits, strategies and approaches for working successfully
with young children of different temperamental types in group care
and classroom settings. (CSU)
ECE 135: Working With Children’s Challenging Behavior
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
In this course students will be provided with descriptors and characteristics of challenging behavior in young children in early childhood classroom settings. Strategies and approaches for managing
children’s challenging behavior are featured. In addition methods for
working with parents when their child displays challenging behavior
and for locating outside help are also included. (CSU)
ECE 137: Emergent Literacy in the Early Childhood
Classroom
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course introduces students to the early literacy curriculum. It
includes methods for setting up a classroom and planning curriculum to foster the development of pre-reading and pre-writing skills.
Strategies for working with children who speak languages other than
English are also included. Approaches for involving families in supporting language and literacy development in children are covered.
Students will also learn about methods for assessing children’s skills
in speaking, pre-reading, and pre-writing. The curriculum for this
course is based on NAEYC’s “Heads Up! Reading” Early Literacy
Program and features videos and/or broadcasts from the NAEYC’s
“Heads Up! Reading” satellite course. (CSU)
ECE 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
ECE 205: Continuing Experiences in Early Childhood
Curriculum
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education 115; Advisory: Early
Childhood Education 114. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course provides information, ideas, and hands-on experience
in exploring a variety of innovative curriculum models such as “the
emergent curriculum,” the “Project Approach,” and the “Reggio
Emilia Approach.” Students will explore strategies and approaches
for developing long-term projects with your children. Approaches
for documenting and recording children’s experiences in long-term
projects are also included. (CSU)
ECE 208: Exploring Cultural Diversity in the Early
Childhood Classroom
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course examines societal and personal attitudes, beliefs, values,
assumptions and biases about culture, language, identity, family
structures, ability and socioeconomic status. It focuses on the concepts of cultural competency in the early childhood classroom, and
culturally sensitive/competent approaches to working with diverse
populations of children and their families. Ideas and examples for
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course offers a variety of strategies and hands-on ideas for
fostering creativity in young children. It examines aspects of creative
thinking and provides methods for planning creative activities
in all curriculum areas. This course satisfies the “Programs and
Curriculum” requirement for licensing and can be applied toward
coursework for a Child Development Permit. (CSU)
ECE 218: Caring for the Infant and Toddler
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course covers approaches, techniques, and materials to use in
caring for infants and toddlers in a program setting. Methods for developing age-appropriate curricula and setting up environments are
included. This course can be applied toward credit in infant-toddler
care required by the Department of Social Services and toward credit
for the Child Development Permits. (CSU)
ECE 220A: Early Childhood Education Administration A
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course covers information and methods for developing, teaching, and administering a preschool program. Topics include a survey
of types of preschool programs, how to staff and plan a budget for a
preschool program, the role of an administrator, setting up preschool
environments, and planning for children. This course can be applied
toward the administration course requirement for the Site Supervisor
and Program Director Child Development Permits. This course is
recommended in particular to directors and head teachers seeking
credit in early childhood education administration. (CSU)
ECE 220B: Early Childhood Education Administration B
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education 220A or concurrent
enrollment. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course provides in-depth examination of such aspects of early
childhood program administration as parent involvement, obtaining
child and family histories, implementing regulation requirements,
program evaluation procedures, child assessments, staff supervision, and nutrition programs. Administration of Title 5 childcare
programs is also examined. This course can be applied toward credit
needed for Site Supervisor and Program Director Child Development
Permits. This course is recommended in particular for directors,
head teachers, and teachers seeking an advanced early childhood
administration course. (CSU)
ECE 221: Teaching Science to Young Children
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
In this course students learn how to design and present developmentally appropriate science curricula for young children. Included are
hands-on science activities with recommended materials. Young
children’s thinking and other cognitive processes are also examined.
This course can be applied toward state licensing and Children’s
Center Permit requirements for coursework in “Programs and Curriculum.” (CSU)
CATALOG 2010/11
ECE 222: Working with Special Needs Children in Early
Childhood Classrooms
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course prepares students to work with infants, toddlers, and
preschoolers with special needs in a classroom setting. It includes
approaches for assisting special needs children in classroom routines;
assessing and identifying special needs; writing an Individual
Education Plan, and working with parents of special needs infants,
toddlers, and preschoolers. (CSU)
ECE 223: Music Activities for Young Children
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Sixteen and one-half lecture hours per semester.
Through a survey of teaching methods and hands-on music activities, this course enables students to develop a rich and enjoyable music program for young children, understand basic musical concepts,
present culturally diverse music activities, and foster reading and
math readiness through music. This course meets the Department of
Social Services’ requirement for coursework in the area of “Programs
and Curriculum.” (CSU)
Early Childhood Education
133
ECE 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
ECE 260: Marin Childcare Conference and Follow-up
One-Day Workshop
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Sixteen hours per semester.
Part I of this course is a day-long conference (eight hours) for
childcare providers and any other interested parties. Participants
may choose from mid-morning and afternoon workshops on current
issues, trends, and policies in early childhood education. A keynote
presentation is also included. This conference is held off-campus.
Part II consists of a one-day workshop (eight hours) in which the
instructor reviews and expands on topics that have been presented in
conference workshops (e.g., implementing new curriculum ideas or
new licensing policies utilizing new approaches for special education
at early childhood level). Part II of this course is held on the Kentfield
campus. (CSU)
ECE 224: Working with Parents in Early Childhood
Programs
ECE 261: Early Childhood Education Conference Course
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
In this course students learn approaches and techniques for working
with parents in infant/toddler, preschool and extended day programs. It includes strategies for planning and leading parent-teacher
conferences, effective techniques for communicating with parents,
and ideas for parent involvement in early childhood programs. (CSU)
This is a conference-format course. Topics and content will vary.
The course can also be used to meet “Professional Growth” requirements for renewal of the Teacher, Master Teacher, Site Supervisor, or
Director level of Child Development Permit issued by the California
Commission on Teacher Credentialing. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
ECE 225: Guidance and Limit-Setting in the Early
Childhood Classroom
ECE 280: Early Childhood Education Fieldwork and
Seminar I: Beginning Practicum
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
Strategies and approaches for guiding and setting limits with young
children in classroom settings are presented and explored in this
course. Guidance and limit-setting techniques for working with
toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children are included. Also
featured are methods for assisting young children in conflict resolution. (CSU)
ECE 239: Current Issues in Early Childhood Education
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Hours will vary with selected topic.
Specialized and contemporary topics in the area of early childhood
education are the focus of this course. The subject matter will vary
with the needs and interests of the students. The course content will
also be designed to meet educational requirements for Department of
Social Services licensing and Child Development Permit attainment.
The specific topic for each semester will be announced in the class
schedule. The class may be taken more than once, provided that the
topic of the course is not the same. (CSU)
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Eight and one-half lecture hours.
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education 115. Advisory: Early
Childhood Education 116. Other limitations on enrollment: evidence of
physical exam and TB test within past 6 months and up-to-date immunization
records; also must complete Criminal Record Clearance statement prior to
fieldwork placement. One seminar and six fieldwork hours weekly.
This course is designed to provide the opportunity for the student to
plan, prepare, implement and evaluate various curriculum activities
and techniques with young children in an early education and care
setting, including developing effective classroom management and
child guidance techniques. The course also includes six hours weekly
working directly with children in the campus Children’s Centers or
in California Early Childhood Mentor Program classrooms. In cases
of extreme hardship, students can petition for placement at their
early childhood workplace. Contact ECE Program Coordinator or
Health Services Department Administrative Assistant for placement
request, physical, Criminal Record Clearance, and petition forms.
(CSU)
ECE 281: Early Childhood Education Fieldwork and
Seminar II: Advanced Practicum
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education 280. Other limitations on
enrollment: student must provide evidence of physical exam and TB test from
within the past 6 months and up-to-date immunization records; also must
complete Criminal Record Clearance statement prior to fieldwork placement.
One seminar and six fieldwork hours weekly.
This course is designed to provide advanced training in planning,
preparing, implementing and evaluating various curriculum
134
Economics
activities and techniques with young children in an early education
and care setting. Integration of curriculum and documentation
of individual children’s competencies is emphasized. A seminar
is included in this course, in which students will discuss teaching
strategies and curriculum development techniques. The course also
includes six hours weekly working directly with children in the
campus Children’s Centers or in California Early Childhood Mentor
program classrooms. In cases of extreme hardship, students can
petition for placement at their early childhood workplace. Contact
ECE Program Coordinator or Health Sciences Department Administrative Assistant for placement request, physical, Criminal Record
Clearance or petition forms. (CSU)
ECE 295: Supervising Adults in Early Childhood
Programs
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course offers methods for working with, supervising, and
training staff and student teachers in a childcare setting. Topics
include an examination of effective supervisory styles, approaches
for motivating staff, perspectives on staff members as adult learners,
methods for evaluating and conferring with staff, and strategies for
assisting staff in assessing their classroom, curriculum, and interactions with children. The course is recommended for teachers, head
teachers, directors, and site supervisors who are currently supervising or wish to supervise staff or student teachers in their programs. It
is a requirement for anyone who wishes to obtain a Site Supervisor or
Program Director Child Development Permit. (CSU)
ECONOMICS
Courses in economics provide students with a foundation of preparation for careers in business and government. Economists who work
in business are expected to help their firms adapt to the changing
environment. This typically involves short- and long-term economic
forecasts of how changes in the economic environment will affect
various aspects of business, such as marketing, purchasing, industrial
relations, and finance. Most economists employed by the government are specialists in such fields as agriculture, labor, business, and
international trade.
Career Options
Actuary, Appraiser, Bank Examiner, Budget Analyst, Business
Writer/Editor, Credit Investigator, Econometrician, Economist,
Environmental Consultant, Financial Analyst, Industrial Analyst,
Insurance Underwriter, International Economist, Investment
Economist, Labor Economist, Lawyer, Management Consultant,
Management Trainee, Market Research Analyst, Mortgage/Loan
Specialist, Pension Consultant, Pricing Analyst, Research Economist,
Securities Analyst, Statistician, Stock Broker, Tax Analyst, Teacher,
Traffic Manager, Transportation Economist, Urban Planner, Wage
and Salary Specialist
Faculty
Norman Pacula
Department Phone: (415) 485-9630
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
MARIN.EDU
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
ECONOMICS COURSES (ECON)
ECON 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisories: Eligibility for English 120 and eligibility
for Math 103. Economics 102 may be taken before Economics 101. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to macroeconomic analysis, the
economy as a whole. The student will study the determinants of GDP
(gross domestic product), employment, income, savings, and investment. Emphasis is placed upon the study of government intervention
in the economy through fiscal policy and monetary policy aimed at
reducing economic fluctuations. Includes a brief history of economic
theory and an introduction to monetarism. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
B, CSU Area D-2, IGETC Area 4B
ECON 102: Principles of Microeconomics
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisories: Eligibility for English 120 and eligibility
for Math 103. Economics 101 and Economics 102 may be taken in either order.
Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to microeconomic analysis, how the
various units in the economy make decisions. The student will study
scarcity, demand, supply, equilibrium price and the allocation of
resources in market structures of pure competition, monopolistic
competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. This course includes introductory information on international economics and globalization.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-2, IGETC Area 4B
ECON 125: Research Methods and Term Papers in
Economics
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Competence in written language skills
comparable to eligibility for English 150. Students may receive credit for this
course as Economics 125, Ethnic Studies 125, History 125, Political Science
125, or Social Science 125. Credit will be awarded for only one discipline. Three
lecture hours weekly.
This course focuses on the elements of critical thinking and methods of research in the social sciences and develops skills required
to organize such thought and research into effective, college level
presentations. Various social science faculty members will offer their
expertise to students on an individual basis as they develop their
presentations. Students are encouraged to select areas of research
from other courses taken during the semester or from areas of special
interest including politics, history, economics, education, women’s
studies, ethnic studies, current issues, and issues of community
concern. (CSU/UC)
Electronics Technology
CATALOG 2010/11
ECON 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ECON 201: Understanding Globalization: The Impact of
Social, Political, and Economic Change
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Economics 201,
Behavioral Science 201 or Political Science 201, but credit will be awarded for
only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
The world is becoming more integrated and interdependent,
heightening the need for greater understanding of the impact of
globalization on the economy, politics, and society. This interdisciplinary team-taught course explores the new wave of global political,
economic, and social change and the opportunities and challenges
it brings to states, institutions, and individuals. Focus is upon what
the individual will need to know and understand to be an effective
participant in these rapidly changing global phenomena. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7, IGETC Area 4G
ECON 215: Survey of Current Issues
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Economics 215 or
Political Science 215 or Social Science 215. Credit will be awarded for only one
discipline. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is an opportunity to critically examine and discuss
significant world developments and to attempt to understand the
sources of those developments. Each student will have an opportunity to focus on issues of particular interest and to share that information with the group. When possible, informed participants in world
and national events will meet with the class to share insights. (CSU)
ECON 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
EDUCATION
Courses in this area provide students with an introduction to the
field of public education and practical experience in literacy, curriculum planning, and classroom assessment. Courses include field
placement in classrooms under the supervision of an experienced
mentor teacher.
Faculty
Sandy Boyd
Department Phone: (415) 485-9630
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificates of
Achievement.
Education Skills Certificate
The Education Certificate indicates that the student has successfully completed foundation coursework in education, teaching and
learning, and has gained experience working as a volunteer in a K-12
classroom.
REQUIREMENTS
EDUC
110
Introduction to Education
EDUC
111
Foundations of Teaching
135
UNITS
3
3
EDUCATION COURSES (EDUC)
EDUC 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
EDUC 110: Introduction to Education
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course provides a foundation for understanding the public
education system for those interested in teaching and learning. The
course includes information about school governance, the nature of
teaching as a profession, and the philosophies of education. (CSU/
UC)
EDUC 111: Foundations of Teaching
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course explores what it means to be a professional teacher in today’s high-stakes environment of education. Building upon a strong
mentoring approach, this course helps students make decisions
about their teaching future by fostering an awareness of the realities
of teaching in America today. Practical perspectives for meeting the
challenges of teaching as well as practical and foundational topics
will provide students with a well-rounded view of the teaching
profession. (CSU/UC)
EDUC 119: Effective Teaching Strategies in Wellness and
Fitness
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Physical Education 116. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This course is designed to help students become more effective
wellness and fitness professionals. Students will develop a toolbox
of practical teaching, learning, and evaluation methods to increase
their ability to convey their knowledge to others in this field and
more successfully impact their future clients, students, or athletes.
(CSU)
EDUC 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
EDUC 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY
Courses in this area provide a limited introduction to electronics
and telecommunication technology. They are designed to equip the
student with basic terminology, concepts, and some measurement
and diagnostic skills.
Career Options
Automated Test Technician, Automotive Electronics Technician,
Broadcast Technician, Communications Technician, Computer
Network Technician, Computer Systems Technician, Consumer
136
Engineering
Electronics Technician, Data Communications Technician,
Industrial Controls Technician, Medical Electronics Technician,
Network Switch Installer/Configurer, PBX Installer/Configurer,
Quality Control Technician, Robotics Technician, Satellite Systems
Technician, Telecommunication Products Technical Representative,
Telecommunications System Analyst, Telecommunications System
Consultant, Telecommunications System Sales Representative,
Telecommunications Traffic Analyst
Department Phone: (415) 457-8811, Ext. 8200
ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY COURSES (ELEC)
ELEC 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ELEC 100: Fundamentals of Electronics
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Thirty-four hours per semester.
Introduction to principles, terminology, and measurements of
electrical circuits and electronic systems. Behavior of DC and AC
circuits and electronic devices with their applications in automotive,
computer, communications, power distribution, and entertainment
systems. (CSU)
ELEC 110: Solar Installation and Integration
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Six lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This introductory course is targeted to entry-level photovoltaic
installers with the intent to provide a foundation of skills in trades
involved in solar installation. The course is separated into three
distinct areas: electrical theory and practice, photovoltaic theory, and
integration and building trade skills. (CSU)
ELEC 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
ELEC 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
ELEC 290: Electric Vehicle COMvert: A Practical
Approach to Electric Vehicle Conversion
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken for credit as Electronics Technology
290 or Automotive Collision Repair Technology 290, but students receive credit
for only one course. One lecture and three practicum hours weekly.
This course guides students through the complete process of converting a vehicle from a gasoline engine to an electrically-powered
engine. Students will learn the principles behind good component
layout, battery rack and box design, construction details, and
electrical wiring. Hands-on experience installing these components
is emphasized. Additionally, students will learn about AC and DC
drive systems, types of batteries, selecting the right chassis, transmission adapter housing design, and handling chargers and controllers.
(CSU)
MARIN.EDU
ENGINEERING
No profession has as many diverse specialties and applications as
engineering. Few other professions offer the challenge, financial
rewards, and opportunity to make a contribution to the betterment
of our environment and standard of living as engineering.
There are many specialties in engineering, and within each area
there are countless subdivisions. Our technology has grown so
pervasive and complex that each facet of an engineering problem
demands a specific type of training and expertise.
Career Options
Aerodynamicist, Agricultural Engineer, Ceramic Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Customer Service Representative,
Designer, Drafter, Electrical Engineer, Electronics Engineer, Field
Service Engineer, Industrial Engineer, Management Analyst, Marine
Engineer, Materials Scheduler, Mechanical Engineer, Metallographer, Metallurgical Engineer, Mining Engineer, Nuclear Engineer,
Operations Analyst, Petroleum Engineer, Production Manager,
Project Director, Research Scientist, Safety Engineer, Sales Engineer,
Surveyor, Systems Analyst, Technical Illustrator, Tester, Welding
Technician
Faculty
Erik Dunmire
Department Phone: (415) 485-9510
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.S. in Engineering
The Kentfield Campus offers a two-year, lower division Engineering
Core Program which, when satisfactorily completed, allows the student to transfer to an engineering program at the four-year college or
university. To provide an effective and economical program for lower
division engineering education, the State of California has adopted
the curriculum developed by the Engineering Liaison Committee of
the Articulation Counsel of California. This agreement coordinates
the transferable course offerings between community colleges and
the four-year colleges and universities in California.
After completing the lower division engineering curriculum, it is
common to complete a Bachelor’s degree in two years at the four-year
school. Due to the diverse nature of availability among engineering
programs, students are strongly advised to enroll in Engineering 110
as soon as possible.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
Freshman Year — Fall Semester
ENGG 110
Careers in Engineering and Technology
MATH 123
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
CHEM 131
General Chemistry I
COMP 110
Introduction to Computers
For Civil Engineering add:
ENGG 125
Introductory Engineering Graphics
For Mechanical Engineering add:
UNITS
1
5
5
1
4
Engineering
CATALOG 2010/11
ENGG 125
Introductory Engineering Graphics
Freshman Year — Spring Semester
COMP 140
Fundamentals of Programming in FORTRAN
MATH 124
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
PHYS
207A Mechanics and Properties of Matter
For Civil Engineering add:
CHEM 132E General Chemistry II, Lecture Only
For Mechanical Engineering add:
CHEM 132E General Chemistry II, Lecture Only
ENGG 126
Intermediate Engineering Graphics
Sophomore Year — Fall Semester
ENGG 235
Engineering Mechanics -- Statics
ENGG 245
Engineering Materials Science
MATH 223
Analytic Geometry, Vector Analysis, and Calculus III
PHYS
207B Electricity and Magnetism
Sophomore Year — Spring Semester
MATH 224
Elementary Differential Equations
PHYS
207C Heat, Light, Sound, and Modern Physics
For Civil Engineering add:
ENGG 210
Engineering Surveying
For Electrical Engineering add:
ENGG 220
Electric Circuit Analysis
For Mechanical Engineering add:
ENGG 220
Electric Circuit Analysis
4
Machine Technology I
Plane Trigonometry
ENGINEERING COURSES (ENGG)
3
ENGG 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
3
3
0.5-6 Units.
3
2
3
3
5
5
4
5
3
3
3
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
Introduction to Chemistry
Introduction to Computers
Fundamentals of Electronics
Careers in Engineering and Technology
Introductory Engineering Graphics
Intermediate Engineering Graphics
Construction Engineering: Materials and Methods I
Construction Engineering: Materials and Methods II
Practical Materials Science
Practical Plane Surveying
120
104
4
5
5
A.S. in Engineering Technology, Occupational
The engineering technician is a valuable part of the team working
together in every branch of modern industry. The work of the technician is “practical,” typically involving surveying, drafting, laboratory
testing, and equipment operation and maintenance. At the Kentfield
Campus, a core program is suggested for the student who is interested in engineering technology. The student will elect additional
courses to further prepare for some specialty such as draftsman,
surveyor, engineering maintenance specialist, salesman, shop, or
laboratory technician.
Upon completion of this program, the student may elect to
continue studies at a four-year college that will lead to a Bachelor’s
degree in engineering technology. Schools that offer such programs
include: California State Polytechnic University, Sacramento State
University, Fresno State University, Northrup Technical Institute,
and Cogswell Technical Institute.
Upon entering this program the student should seek the advice
of an instructor in engineering regarding electives, possible employment, and current demands of industry.
REQUIREMENTS
CHEM 114
COMP 110
ELEC
100
ENGG 110
ENGG 125
ENGG 126
ENGG 150
ENGG 151
ENGG 256
ENGG 257
MACH
MATH
137
UNITS
5
1
2
1
4
2
3
3
3
3
ENGG 110A: Introduction to the Engineering Profession
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This course provides an overview of the engineering profession,
including a survey of career fields and a discussion of academic
requirements at College of Marin and other institutions. The intent
of the course is to aid students in developing career goals, academic
plans, and personal success strategies. (CSU)
ENGG 110B: Introduction to Engineering Design
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Computer Science 150A. Advisories:
Engineering 110 and 125. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course introduces the student to team-oriented engineering
design and problem-solving processes, as well as the use of computers in the solution of a wide variety of engineering problems.
Students engage in hands-on design activities, covering all stages of
the design process from initial need identification through finished
product evaluation, including experimental design and data analysis
to support design efforts. Throughout the course, emphasis will be
given to technical communications, teamwork, engineering design
and problem-solving methodologies. Specific assignments and
activities within the course represent a broad range of engineering
disciplines. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 111: Computer Tools for Scientists and Engineers:
Spreadsheets
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Math 103. One lecture hour weekly.
An introduction to computer tools and techniques useful for data
analysis, problem solving, and communication in science and engineering coursework and professional activities. Students learn to use
spreadsheet software (such as Microsoft Excel) to perform routine
data analysis, including use of mathematical equations, statistical
analysis, graphing, curve fitting, and a variety of numerical problemsolving techniques. (CSU)
ENGG 125: Introductory Engineering Graphics
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course helps students develop the functional skills required
for engineering graphical communication, geometric construction,
and dimensioning in accordance with ANSI standards. It presents
engineering sketching and drawing with an introduction to CAD
systems. It also covers the fundamentals of orthographic projection
and descriptive geometry, providing applications to engineering
design. The course helps students develop their spatial reasoning
skills. This course is designed to serve a diversity of disciplines, but
with an emphasis on engineering applications. (CSU/UC)
138
English
MARIN.EDU
ENGG 126: Intermediate Engineering Graphics
ENGG 235: Engineering Mechanics: Statics
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Engineering 125. One lecture and three laboratory
hours weekly.
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Physics 207A, and Math 124 or concurrent enrollment.
Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a continuation of Engineering 125 with an emphasis
on engineering design and CAD work. Topics include limit dimensioning, geometric tolerancing, working drawings, and the design
process. (CSU/UC)
An introduction for engineering students to applied vector mechanics of rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Students will learn standard
engineering techniques for the analysis of external and internal
forces in structures, distributed force problems, friction, centroids,
and moments of inertia. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ENGG 150: Programming in MATLAB for Engineers
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 123. May be taken for credit as Engineering 150B
or Computer Science 150B, but students receive credit for only one course.
Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Designed to meet computer programming requirements for engineering transfer students. The course will utilize the MATLAB environment to provide students with a working knowledge of computerbased problem-solving methods relevant to science and engineering,
including programming and numerical analysis techniques. Students
outline, write, test, and debug computer programs to solve problems
and display results, with emphasis on proper documentation of
computer code and reports. Common examples and applications of
physics and engineering are used throughout the course. (CSU)
ENGG 210: Engineering Surveying
3.0 Units. Prerequisites: Math 121 or 123 and Engineering 125. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This course covers basic concepts and methods of surveying
fieldwork and computations for engineering and related fields. Topics
include chaining, leveling, traverses, horizontal and vertical curves,
stadia, topography, and earthwork. Machine computations, note
keeping, adjustment of instruments, and analysis and control of
random and systematic errors including least squares methods are
integral parts of the course. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 220: Electric Circuit Analysis
3.0 Units. Prerequisites: Physics 207B and Math 224. Math 224 may be taken
concurrently. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to the theory and analysis of electric
circuits, including basic quantities and analytical techniques,
network theorems and modeling, natural and forced responses of
first- and second-order RLC circuits, AC circuit analysis and power
calculations, and linear models of common devices such as transistors, operational amplifiers, and transformers. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 220L: Electric Circuits Lab
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This optional lab to accompany Engineering 220 provides students
with an introduction to electric measurements and laboratory
instrumentation, as well as a practical verification of electrical circuit
theory. Students will build and analyze a variety of circuits, including
Operational Amplifiers, and will investigate first and second order
transient response and AC steady state behavior. Students will learn
how to use oscilloscopes, multimeters, function generators, power
supplies, and computer simulation tools to study electric circuits.
(CSU/UC)
ENGG 245: Engineering Materials Science
3.0 Units. Prerequisites: Chemistry 131 and Physics 207A. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
The internal structures and resulting behaviors of materials used in
engineering applications, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and
composites, are studied with emphasis on the effects of heat, stress,
imperfections, and chemical environments. Laboratories provide
direct observations of the structures and behaviors discussed in the
course, experience with the operation of testing equipment, and the
preparation of experimental reports. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
ENGLISH
The essence of the English major involves the development of skills
and techniques such as looking at language development and literature in-depth. This elicits the ability to analyze, to ascertain assumptions, to determine values, and to make intelligent judgments and
decisions. For these reasons, a major in English would be appropriate
for the professions of law, medicine, or industry.
Career Options
Advertising Copy Writer, Bookstore Manager/Staff, Continuity
Writer, Editor, Foreign Service Officer, Freelance Writer, Fundraiser,
Grant Writer, Interviewer, Journalist, Lawyer, Legislative Assistant,
Librarian, Management Trainee, Media Specialist, News Analyst,
Newspaper Reporter, Personnel Specialist, Public Information
Officer, Publicity Director, Publishing Agent, Radio/TV Announcer,
Reader, Research Assistant, Sales Representative, Scriptwriter,
Speech Pathologist, Teacher, Technical Writer, Training Specialist
Faculty
Windee Cottle, Ingrid Kelly, John Sutherland, Michael Timmel, Blaze Woodlief
Department Phone:
Kentfield Campus: (415) 485-9348
Indian Valley Campus: (415) 883-2211, Ext. 8326
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.A. in English
The Associate in Arts in English provides students with a solid basis
for the continuing study of English, American and world literature
English
CATALOG 2010/11
and develops skills in critical thinking and writing. An English major is the foundation for careers requiring verbal proficiency, analytic
skills, literary competence, insight, and the exercise of judgment.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
Completion of:
ENGL
151
Reading and Composition (1B)
Or
ENGL
155
Critical Thinking/ Composition
ENGL
222
Survey of English Literature I
ENGL
223
Survey of English Literature II
Two courses from:
ENGL
221A Survey of American Literature I
ENGL
221B Survey of American Literature II
ENGL
224
Survey of World Literature I
ENGL
225
Survey of World Literature II
ENGL
230
Survey of Shakespeare
One course from:
Any English course numbered 200 or above
UNITS
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
ENGLISH COURSES (ENGL)
English 130, 150, 151, 155: Letter grade only.
All other courses: Letter grade or pass/no pass.
In general, courses required for a transfer student’s four-year
major should be taken on a letter grade basis.
The College of Marin offers an English assessment testing service
to provide prospective students with information with which
to make informed decisions when enrolling in English courses.
Students are provided with their test scores. Students registering for
English courses who need help in interpreting their individual placement test scores and/or in deciding whether to register for or remain
enrolled in an English course can seek assistance from a counselor or
their English instructor.
For information about the English Assessment Test, students
can call the Testing Office at (415) 4859469 (located in the Student
Services Building, Room 18, Kentfield Campus); or (415) 883-2211,
ext. 8326 (located at Indian Valley Campus).
139
ENGL 011: College Skills: Essential English for Exams
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This course will focus on the reading, thinking, and writing skills
that are necessary to pass standardized English tests like the General
Educational Development (GED) high school equivalency exam.
Students will receive instruction and practice in the four levels of
thinking skills normally tested on these exams. Also, students will
learn how to spot grammar and organizational errors in written text
and how to plan and organize a 250-word essay from a given topic
in order to pass the essay exams. Practice exams will be given for the
final. (Non-GED candidates are welcome.)
ENGL 012: College Skills: Reading and Thinking in Math
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This course is designed for those students who desire their GED
diploma or to satisfy College of Marin graduation requirements
but who have trouble in math. In this course, students will focus on
the concepts behind math and begin to analyze the language and
symbols of math, the thinking style that is required to do well in
math, the benefits of mental calculations and estimating, and start to
develop the habit of making math make sense in real life situations.
ENGL 013: College Skills: Participating in Class
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This course will give students confidence in reading aloud, understanding lectures, asking and answering questions, and expressing
themselves clearly in class.
ENGL 014: College Skills: Shaping Sentences
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This six-week course will provide extensive instruction and practice
in composing interesting, alive, and correct sentences for college papers and other writing. Students will learn how to add color, variety,
and specific detail to their sentences while applying the techniques of
sentence and idea combining. In addition, students will explore word
choice for appropriateness and punctuation for effect.
ENGL 015: College Skills: Exploring English
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
ENGLISH SKILLS COURSES
(ENGL 010 through ENGL 097)
Please see College Skills category for department information.
Each time this course is offered, it will explore a different cultural
theme (for example, famous cheaters in sports). Based on the
readings, students will apply spelling rules, build their vocabulary,
comprehend ideas, and write outlines, summaries, and responses.
ENGL 010: College Skills: Assessment and Improvement
Strategies
ENGL 016: College Skills: Perfect Punctuation
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This course will give students confidence in using punctuation
correctly in their writing. They will master the rules relating to commas, semicolons, quotes, apostrophes, hyphens, dashes, colons and
parentheses, when to put them in and when to leave them out.
This course will help students develop a comprehensive understanding of their current strengths and weaknesses in the language skills
necessary for college success. Included will be complete diagnostic
testing in reading, vocabulary, and writing. In addition, various
techniques and strategies will be introduced so that each student
knows what kind of work is necessary for improvement. Students
will have, upon completion, a list of specific skills for further study, a
realistic idea of current academic level, an understanding of campus
resources available for in-depth skills development, and a set of
strategies for continued language improvement.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
ENGL 017: College Skills: Reading Textbooks
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This course will help students become more skillful and efficient
learners. The course takes an integrated approach to understanding
texts and will include active reading strategies, note-taking, memory
techniques, and test-taking tips.
140
English
ENGL 018: College Skills: Taking Essay Tests
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This short course will provide instruction and practice in taking
essay tests. Students will learn the various types of questions along
with appropriate responses for each type. The process of writing a
short outline and draft which is edited and proofread quickly will be
modeled and practiced.
ENGL 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ENGL 062: Developmental Reading and Writing
5.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: English 62L. Five lecture hours weekly.
This course introduces the related ideas required for academic
reading and writing: main ideas, logical support, implied meanings,
relationships, patterns of organization, and vocabulary building.
Students will learn how to write complete sentences of various types,
plan before writing, and construct well organized paragraphs.
ENGL 062L: Developmental Reading and Writing Lab
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: English 62. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
This lab will reinforce and extend the reading and writing skills
learned in English 62. May be taken four times for credit.
ENGL 070-079: BASIC SKILLS OPEN LAB
1.0 Unit for each course. No prerequisite. Students are advised to meet with the
instructor to determine appropriate courses to take.
A series of minicourses designed to develop basic English language
skills. Offered on an individualized basis, each module may be
entered and completed at any time during the semester. Each module
requires approximately 48 classroom hours and may be taken four
times for credit.
ENGL 070: Phonics
ENGL 071: Spelling I
ENGL 072: Spelling II
ENGL 073: Vocabulary I
ENGL 074: Vocabulary II
MARIN.EDU
construct well-organized and developed paragraphs using correct
grammar and sentence structure.
ENGL 092L: Reading and Writing Skills Lab
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: English 92. Three laboratory hours
weekly.
In this course, students will practice and extend the reading,
grammar, and writing skills introduced in English 92. They receive
personal help with their assignments from a professional staff. May
be taken twice for credit.
ENGL 094: Reasoning and Logic
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will significantly increase students’ verbal and mathematical reasoning skills. It is an excellent preparation for courses that
meet the California State University critical thinking requirement.
ENGL 095: Advanced Spelling
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: English 71 or English 72 or 75th percentile
on pretest. Three laboratory hours weekly.
Designed primarily for students in the Court Reporting Program,
this course provides students with the skills to master English spelling at an advanced level. Students build their visual memory, study
phonetic and structural patterns, and study frequently misspelled
and misused words.
ENGL 096: Advanced Vocabulary
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: English 73 or English 74 or 75th percentile
on pretest. Three laboratory hours weekly.
Designed primarily for students in the Court Reporting Program,
this course presents strategies for building an extensive vocabulary.
Topics include the history and etymology of English, dictionary
skills, using context clues, word parts, and other word analysis skills.
ENGL 097: Critical Reading
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: English 76 or 75th percentile on pretest.
Three laboratory hours weekly.
Designed primarily for students in the Court Reporting Program,
this course significantly increases students’ reading comprehension
and critical thinking abilities. Topics include vocabulary in context,
structural analysis of difficult material, inference, and conclusion
and judgment skills.
ENGL 075: Reading Improvement
PRECOLLEGIATE LEVEL COURSES – NONTRANSFERABLE
ENGL 076: Reading Comprehension
ENGL 098: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition I
ENGL 077: Independent Reading
ENGL 078: Special Interest Workshop
ENGL 079: Grammar Review
ENGL 092: Reading and Writing Skills
5.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: English 92L. Five lecture hours weekly.
Students develop their abilities to analyze and respond to reading
material in a variety of disciplines. At the same time, they learn to
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Completion of ESL 80-level courses or English 92 or
English placement test. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
Students practice reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve
reading comprehension and to develop composing techniques for effective academic writing. This course is designed to prepare students
for success in college level academic reading and writing. Focus is
on writing fluency and familiarity with the conventions of standard
written English. Assignments show the interconnection among
readings, personal experience, observation, and class discussion.
Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in the Writing Center.
English
CATALOG 2010/11
141
This course can be offered in a distance learning, online or hybrid
format.
interconnection among readings, personal experience, observation,
and class discussion.
ENGL 098: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition I
ENGL 098B: Sentence Structure and Punctuation
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Completion of ESL 80-level courses or English 92 or
English placement test. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
Students practice reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve
reading comprehension and to develop composing techniques for effective academic writing. This course is designed to prepare students
for success in college level academic reading and writing. Focus is
on writing fluency and familiarity with the conventions of standard
written English. Assignments show the interconnection among
readings, personal experience, observation, and class discussion.
Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in the Writing Center.
This course can be offered in a distance learning, online or hybrid
format.
ENGL 098: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition I
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Completion of ESL 80-level courses or English 92 or
English placement test. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
Students practice reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve
reading comprehension and to develop composing techniques for effective academic writing. This course is designed to prepare students
for success in college level academic reading and writing. Focus is
on writing fluency and familiarity with the conventions of standard
written English. Assignments show the interconnection among
readings, personal experience, observation, and class discussion.
Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in the Writing Center.
This course can be offered in a distance learning, online or hybrid
format.
ENGL 098: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition I
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Completion of ESL 80-level courses or English 92 or
English placement test. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
Students practice reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve
reading comprehension and to develop composing techniques for effective academic writing. This course is designed to prepare students
for success in college level academic reading and writing. Focus is
on writing fluency and familiarity with the conventions of standard
written English. Assignments show the interconnection among
readings, personal experience, observation, and class discussion.
Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in the Writing Center.
This course can be offered in a distance learning, online or hybrid
format.
ENGL 098A: Grammar and Usage
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 83 or English 92 or
English placement test. One lecture and one-third laboratory hour weekly.
[NOTE: English 98A is one of three separate self-paced classes offered together as English 98.] Students practice reading, writing, and
critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop
composing techniques for effective academic writing. This course
is designed to prepare students for success in college level academic
reading and writing. Focus is on writing fluency and familiarity with
the conventions of standard written English. Assignments show the
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 83 or English 92 or
English placement test. One lecture and one-third laboratory hour weekly.
[NOTE: English 98B is one of three separate self-paced classes offered
together as English 98.] Students practice reading, writing, and
critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop
composing techniques for effective academic writing. This course
is designed to prepare students for success in college level academic
reading and writing. Focus is on writing fluency and familiarity with
the conventions of standard written English. Assignments show the
interconnection among readings, personal experience, observation,
and class discussion.
ENGL 098C: The Paragraph and Short Essay
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 83 or English 92 or
English placement test. One lecture and one-third laboratory hour weekly.
[NOTE: English 98C is one of three separate self-paced classes offered together as English 98.] Students practice reading, writing, and
critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop
composing techniques for effective academic writing. This course
is designed to prepare students for success in college level academic
reading and writing. Focus is on writing fluency and familiarity with
the conventions of standard written English. Assignments show the
interconnection among readings, personal experience, observation,
and class discussion.
ENGL 098SL: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition I - for Non-Native English Speakers
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Completion of ESL 80-level courses or English 92 or
English placement test. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course is for non-native English speakers. Students will practice
reading, writing and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and develop their academic writing skills. The course
is designed to prepare students for success in college-level reading
and writing. The focus is on writing fluency and familiarity with
the conventions of standard written English. Assignments show the
interconnection among readings, personal experience, observation,
and class discussion. Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in
the ESL Lab and/or Writing Center Lab.
ENGL 099: Intensive Grammar Review
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. One and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This is an intensive, self-paced course that reviews common problems
in grammar, punctuation, and usage. It is not intended to be an
exhaustive study of the subject, but rather a focused review of such
typical mistakes as run-ons, fragments, agreement errors, faulty
parallelism, and inappropriate punctuation. This course is designed
for students in English 150, 151, and 155, but may be taken by anyone
wanting to improve basic grammar skills. May be taken twice for
credit.
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English
COLLEGE LEVEL COURSES - TRANSFERABLE
MARIN.EDU
A course designed to strengthen students’ ability to understand
and respond to college-level readings in all disciplines. Emphasis
is on critically evaluating purpose, support, conclusions, tone, and
language. Vocabulary enhancement is included. (CSU)
found in political statements, magazine commentary, news coverage,
editorials, advertisements, and classical persuasive works. They will
develop ways to organize their ideas and express them rationally, as
well as ways to judge the quality of ideas and the purposes of various
examples ranging from propaganda to persuasion to philosophy.
This course satisfies the CSU critical thinking requirement and offers
students a chance to refine and continue developing their writing and
reading skills before transferring. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU
Area A-3
ENGL 117: Speed Reading
ENGL 139: Selected Topics
ENGL 116: College Reading
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
In this individualized course, students will learn efficient reading
techniques that will help them double or triple their present reading
rate with increased concentration, comprehension, and retention.
Developing reading flexibility will be emphasized as students learn
to vary their reading rate to suit their purpose. Skimming, scanning,
and textbook reading will also be covered. Can also be offered in a
distance learning format. (CSU)
ENGL 120: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 98 or 98SL or English Placement Test. Three
lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
Students sharpen their skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop composing
techniques for effective academic writing. This course is designed to
prepare students for success in college level academic reading and
writing, emphasis being placed upon thinking clearly and logically
and upon the construction of cogent arguments. Students also review
such matters as standard usage, appropriate diction, punctuation,
grammar, and ways to achieve variety in sentence structure within
the context of the essay. Assignments show the interconnection
among readings, personal experience, observation, and class discussion. Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in the Writing
Center. This course can be offered in a distance learning, online, or
hybrid format. (CSU) AA/AS Area D
ENGL 120SL: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition II - for Non-Native English Speakers
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 98 or 98SL or English Placement Test. Three
lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course is for non-native English speakers. Students sharpen
their skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve
reading comprehension and to develop composing techniques for effective academic writing. This course is designed to prepare students
for success in college-level academic reading and writing, emphasis
being placed upon the construction of cogent arguments. Students
also review standard usage, appropriate diction, punctuation, grammar, and ways to achieve variety in sentence structure. Assignments
show the interconnection among readings, personal experience, observation, and class discussion. Requires one hour weekly of guided
practice in the ESL Lab and/or Writing Center Lab. (CSU/UC)
ENGL 130: Critical Thinking
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to sharpen students’ abilities to reason
clearly. It is an introductory level course in the arts of rhetoric and
logic. Students will learn to recognize and analyze common fallacies
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ENGL 150: Reading and Composition (1A)
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 120 or 120SL. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is intended to develop and refine students’ writing, reading, and critical thinking abilities. Students read and discuss various
works and write expository and argumentative prose. Additionally,
English 150 emphasizes gathering, evaluating and documenting
evidence. A research paper will be required. During the course of the
semester, students are required to write numerous essays for a total
of between 8,000-10,000 words. May also be offered in a distance
learning format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area D, CSU Area A-2, IGETC
Area 1A
ENGL 151: Reading and Composition (1B)
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 150. Four lecture hours weekly.
This is a critical thinking/composition course that highlights literary
texts as material from which students will derive samples to use in
critical constructions of their own. The term “literary evidence” is
broadly defined here to include critical and argumentative essays,
biographical or historical discussions, belletristic writing, and
textual analysis, as well as poetry, drama, short stories, and novels.
Students will develop skills in analysis, interpretation, informal
logic, and expository and persuasive essay writing. They will learn
to identify arguments, both in persuasive polemical discourse
where arguments are presented and defended, and in subtler, more
emotional texts where arguments are implied or masked. They will
develop skills in recognizing and distinguishing fallacious reasoning
from cogent reasoning in a variety of formats. Student essays will
be expected to demonstrate a capacity for presenting complex ideas
(problems with ambiguous or multiple solutions, for example) in
a clear, coherent, convincing manner, with particular attention to
matters of organization and style. A minimum of eight thousand
words of writing (including two revisions) will be required. May also
be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C
or E, CSU Area A-3, IGETC Area 1B
ENGL 155: Critical Thinking and Composition
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 150. Four lecture hours weekly.
This course is intended to develop rhetorical, critical, argumentative,
and organizational skills in written composition and heightened
perceptivity in analytical reading. Extensive analysis of texts will
exercise the students’ faculties of critical and logical thinking. The
investigation and analysis of writing models will focus on deductive,
inductive and inferential reasoning, on assumptions and inferences embedded in argument, on the informal logical fallacies, on
divergent world views, and on incoherencies and biases in presentation. Student essays will be expected to demonstrate a capacity
English
CATALOG 2010/11
for presenting complex ideas in a clear, coherent, and convincing
manner, with particular attention shown to matters of organization
and style. A minimum of eight thousand words of writing will be
required of each student. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area A-3,
IGETC Area 1B
ENGL 202: Creative Writing I
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to familiarize qualified students with the
discipline and craft of fiction, poetry, or drama. Writing samples
are to be submitted within the first week of class. English 202 and
English 203 may each be taken twice for credit. (CSU/UC)
ENGL 203: Creative Writing II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to familiarize qualified students with the
discipline and craft of fiction, poetry, or drama. Writing samples
are to be submitted within the first week of class. English 202 and
English 203 may each be taken twice for credit. (CSU/UC)
ENGL 208: Short Fiction
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
In this course, students examine short stories and novellas as literary
forms. Readings include representative works by mainstream and
multicultural writers as well as classical masters. Lectures provide
historical and cultural background helpful in appreciating the literature; class discussions focus on interpretation and on the analysis of
traditional literary devices such as plot, character, point of view, and
theme. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 212: Introduction to Poetry
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This course examines poetry as a major literary genre.
Students are introduced to the special uses of language and form
found in poetry, and to the historical and cultural factors that have
influenced poetry’s stylistic developments. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 214: The Popular Novel
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three hours weekly.
This videocassette course includes twentieth-century American
literature that has been very successful in the marketplace. Some
novels, like “The Great Gatsby” and “The Old Man and the Sea”, are
now considered classics; others are minor, but well-crafted works.
Students study the novel as a literary genre and as a reflection of the
dynamics and diversity of American life. In addition to reading the
novels, students view corresponding videotapes from an outstanding
selection of films and write analytic papers. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 218: The American Short Story
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three hours weekly.
This videocassette course is based on The American Short Story
film series from PBS. It introduces students to the American literary
tradition through reading of selected short stories and related
criticism, plus the viewing of the PBS film production of each story.
Students will analyze short works of fiction for thematic content and
to express their understanding through competent writing. Authors
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include Hemingway, Twain, James, O’Connor, Fitzgerald, and others.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 219: Voices and Visions
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Eligibility for English 120. Three hours
weekly.
Based on the acclaimed PBS series, this course offers a close look at
the creative lives of 13 American poets. Beginning with precursors
Whitman and Dickinson, the programs cover the entire range of
twentieth century verse. Each writer’s work is considered within a
broad context involving literary tradition and cultural developments,
with attention to geographical locale, family background, and individual preoccupations as well. While exploring the varieties of poetic
inspiration, students gain experience in reading for comprehension
and pleasure. Programs may be viewed by cassette. Writers include
Frost, Eliot, Pound, Moore, Williams, Plath, and others. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2
ENGL 220: Detective Fiction
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three hours weekly.
Detective fiction has undergone considerable change since its
inception in the 1840s by Edgar Allan Poe. This videocassette course
will trace the development of the genre from classic mysteries to
hard-boiled detective stories to police procedurals. Students will read
representative works by such authors as Poe, Doyle, Christie, Hammett, Chandler, and MacDonald; and they will view corresponding
videotapes from an outstanding selection of film classics. Emphasis
will be on the conventions of the form, the elements of fiction, the
methods of critical thinking used in solving crimes, and the ethical
problems raised in the works under discussion. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 221A: Survey of American Literature I
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120. Three lecture hours weekly.
Students will examine representative American writings, with
emphasis shared between the “major” authors and works from
America’s “other” voices, including Native American, Chicano
and Hispanic American, and African-American authors. Lectures,
discussions and media presentations will relate the literature to
the developing social and philosophical attitudes that characterize
American civilization. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 221B: Survey of American Literature II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120 or equivalent. Three lecture
hours weekly.
Students will examine representative American writers from
the Civil War to the present, with emphasis shared between the
canonized “major” authors and works from Hispanic and AfricanAmerican authors. Lectures, discussions and media presentations
will relate the literature to the developing social and philosophical
attitudes that characterize American civilization. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 222: Survey of English Literature
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120 or equivalent. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This survey will cover major texts in English literature from its
beginnings in the Anglo-Saxon period, with Beowulf, through the
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English as a Second Language (ESL)
development of modern English in the mid-seventeenth century,
with Milton’s Paradise Lost. Lectures will provide historical and
cultural contexts and critical methods for analysis of the texts in class
discussions. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area
3B
ENGL 223: Survey of English Literature II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120. Three lecture hours weekly.
English 223 is a survey course in English literature covering important works from the Restoration through the 20th century. Lectures
supply the background necessary for appreciation of the works that
are read and suggest the wealth of literary material that is available to
the intellectually curious reader or to the student of literature. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 224: Survey of World Literature I
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course surveys the imaginative literature of the world (excluding
English and American literature) from antiquity through the Renaissance, for example, from Homer and Sophocles to Cervantes and
Rabelais. Lectures supply the background necessary for appreciation
of the works that are read. Each is viewed both as an integral work
of art and as a reflection of the values central to the narrative modes
that have evolved through the centuries. Lyric and dramatic forms
are also considered. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C2, IGETC
Area 3B
ENGL 225: Survey of World Literature II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course surveys the imaginative literature of the world (excluding
English and American literature) from early modern to post modern
times, for example from Voltaire and Goethe to Sartre and Kafka.
Lectures supply the background necessary for appreciation of the
works that are read. Each is viewed both as an integral work of art
and as a reflection of the values central to the narrative modes that
have evolved through the centuries. Lyric and dramatic forms are
also considered. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C2, IGETC
Area 3B
ENGL 230: Survey of Shakespeare
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
This survey will examine representative plays from each period in
Shakespeare’s career. It will focus on the main genres-- romance,
tragedy, comedy, and history play-- and locate the plays in their
historical context. Lectures will define critical approaches that open
discussion of the dramatic and literary qualities of Shakespeare’s
work. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 235: Women in Literature
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
The representation of the character and role of women in Western
culture from Greek tragedy through contemporary literature, with
a particular emphasis on American literature, will be examined
through the analysis of selected texts. Lectures and discussions will
concentrate on such issues as the conception of the female character,
elements of women’s language, the development of female writers,
and the relations between literary representation and social reality.
The primary focus will be on women in American literature by both
male and female authors, on the writing of minority women, and
MARIN.EDU
on the political and cultural context of literature. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 237: The Literature of American Cultures
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120. Three lecture hours weekly.
This class will explore the richness and diversity of American culture
by studying the literature of several social and ethnic groups. It will
focus on themes of identity and community in works by AfricanAmerican, Native American, Jewish American, Latino, and Asian
American writers. Close reading of representative texts will be placed
in the context of twentieth century cultural history. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 240: Classic Children’s Literature
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
An inquiry into the basic nature of children’s literature: what are
its social, philosophical, spiritual, and esthetic values? The course
will consider techniques and modern critical theories, but the focus
will be on practical criticism for the nonspecialist. Specific works
studied will be representative of several genres, cultures, and periods
of children’s literature. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 242: Global Writings
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 120. Can be taken for credit as English 242
or Humanities 242. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
The cultural diversity and complex histories of the nations composing the contemporary international world are revealed in a variety
of forms of writings from the twentieth century. Discussion and
analysis of representative texts focus on colonial exploitation, political domination, liberation, formations of racism, gender inequality,
expressions of cultural power, ethnic conflict and division, immigration and migrancy, and processes of globalization. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
(ESL)
This program, administered by the College Skills department,
consists of credit and noncredit courses, and is recommended for
nonnative speakers of English. It offers students the opportunity to
develop and practice basic English grammar, writing, and reading skills. Both credit and noncredit courses are designed to help
students improve communication by developing their listening and
speaking skills. Noncredit courses are offered from beginning to
intermediate levels. Credit courses are offered from intermediate to
advanced levels.
Please see College Skills category for department information.
Faculty (Noncredit)
Sara McKinnon
CATALOG 2010/11
English as a Second Language (ESL)
145
Faculty (Credit)
Barbara Bonander, Wendy L. Walsh, Blaze Woodlief
ESLN 020L: High Beginning ESL
Department Phone: (415) 485-9644
In this high beginning ESL course, students will learn to ask for and
give basic information about yesterday, today and tomorrow and to
express basic likes, wants, needs, abilities and obligations in conversation and in written form. They will also learn to negotiate and
interact on the telephone, at work and in the community.
The College of Marin offers an English as a Second Language
placement testing service to provide prospective students with
information with which to make informed decisions when enrolling
in English as a Second Language courses. Students are provided
with their test scores. Students registering for English as a Second
Language courses, who need help in interpreting their individual
placement test scores and/or in deciding whether to register for or remain in an English as a Second Language course, can seek assistance
from a counselor or their instructor.
For information about the English as a Second Language Placement Test, students can call the Testing Office at (415) 485-9469 (located in the Student Services building, Room 18, Kentfield Campus).
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE NONCREDIT COURSES
(ESLN)
ESLN 010: Beginning ESL
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
This course will introduce beginning English learners to basic everyday English vocabulary, expressions and instructions to describe
everyday actions, needs and abilities. Emphasis will be placed on
aural comprehension and basic survival skills.
ESLN 010A: Beginning ESL A
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
This course will introduce beginning English learners to basic everyday English vocabulary, expressions and instructions to describe
everyday actions, needs and abilities. Emphasis will be placed on
aural comprehension and basic survival skills.
ESLN 010B: Beginning ESL B
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
This course is for beginning English learners who know some basic
English vocabulary. The course will introduce students to everyday
English vocabulary, expressions and instructions to describe everyday actions, needs and abilities.
ESLN 010C: Beginning ESL C
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
This course will introduce beginning English learners to basic
everyday English vocabulary, expressions and structures to describe
everyday actions, needs and abilities. Emphasis will be on developing
confidence and understanding simple written and spoken instructions and stories.
ESLN 020: High Beginning ESL A
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
In the first part of high beginning ESL, students will learn to ask for
and give basic information about yesterday, today and tomorrow
and to express basic likes, wants, needs, abilities and obligations in
conversation and in written form.
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
ESLN 025: High Beginning ESL B
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
In the second part of high beginning ESL, students will practice
expressing basic likes, wants, needs, abilities and obligations and
talking about yesterday, today and tomorrow. They will also begin to
negotiate and interact on the telephone, at work and in the community.
ESLN 030: Low Intermediate ESL A
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
ESLN 030 students know everyday survival English, but want to
learn to talk about their experiences in life and at work. They learn to
describe how their lives were before they came to this country. The
focus is on learning more verbs and verb forms.
ESLN 035: Low Intermediate ESL B
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
ESLN 035 is the second part of the low intermediate level. Students
will review and build upon basic English skills and survival skills
covered in Levels 010-030. They may read and discuss short adapted
fiction or nonfiction in class and write about personal abilities and
experiences.
ESLN 040: Credit ESL Preparation Course
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
Students in ESLN 040 will continue to develop their intensive and
extensive reading skills, make oral presentations and use an English
dictionary, the library and the internet for simple research projects.
In preparation for transitioning to credit ESL, regular attendance,
homework and group participation are strongly encouraged.
ESLN EFCW: English as a Second Language for Childcare
Workers
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
This class is for high-beginning to low-intermediate ESL students
who need to improve their English skills to care for infants and
young children and communicate with co-workers and parents in
daycare centers and pre-schools. Students will learn vocabulary and
grammar related to child development and caregiving activities;
improve pronunciation; read books, play games and sing songs; learn
effective language to help children set limits and solve problems;
practice clarifying instructions and communicating information;
discuss health and safety; complete job-related forms; learn to describe job experience and fill out a job application; and become aware
of resources for future learning. Students may observe childcare
centers and share their findings in class.
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English as a Second Language (ESL)
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ESLN EFG: English as a Second Language for Gardeners
ESL 054: Intermediate ESL: Grammar
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Three lecture hours
and one laboratory hour weekly.
This class is for high-beginning to low-intermediate ESL students
working or planning to work in landscaping. The course goal is
twofold: it will cover basic landscaping content, and students will
learn language and cultural expectations necessary for success on the
job. Topics will include practicing the English needed to discuss plant
and pest management, common plant identification and employment issues. The class will offer hands-on experience, role plays for
language use, new vocabulary and pronunciation instruction.
ESLN NCLAB: ESL Noncredit Lab
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
The ESL Lab is a self-paced, individualized, open-entry/open-exit
course. Students will be able to use ESL software, audio tapes, videos
and reading material to develop their skills in English.
ESLN PRON: Noncredit ESL Pronunciation
0.0 Unit. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Students should be in levels 020-040
This course will provide Noncredit ESL students from ESLN Levels
020-040 with practice in English pronunciation. The primary goal
will be to help ESL students to be understood when they are speaking
English. This will include learning how to listen to English in order
to acquire better pronunciation and intonation skills. Students will
work on (a) individual sounds, (b) the sounds in context in sentences,
and (c) sentence rhythm and stress employing the same sounds.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CREDIT COURSES (ESL)
ESL 040L: Low Intermediate ESL Skills Lab
0.5-1 Unit. No prerequisite. One and one-half laboratory hours weekly for one
half student unit, and three laboratory hours weekly for one student unit.
ESL students will improve their English in this interactive computerbased multimedia course. This lab offers low intermediate students
the opportunity to practice their listening, pronunciation, speaking,
vocabulary, and grammar skills in a self-paced laboratory environment. American culture and ESL life skills will be included. May be
taken four times for credit.
ESL 050: Review of Low Intermediate ESL
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Three lecture hours
weekly.
This review course is designed for ESL students at the low intermediate level. The course will review the major points covered in ESL 54
and 56. May be taken four times for credit.
ESL 053: Intermediate ESL: Writing and Grammar
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Four lecture hours
and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course introduces the conventions of standard written English
to intermediate ESL students and reviews basic grammar structures.
Emphasis is placed on sentence structure and the correct use of
tenses.
This course will review basic grammar structures for intermediate
ESL students. Emphasis will be placed on the verb tenses.
ESL 056: Intermediate ESL: Words I (Vocabulary,
Spelling, Reading, and Discussion)
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Four lecture hours
weekly.
This course is designed to improve the reading comprehension and
vocabulary usage of non-native speakers of English. This course will
include reading skills, study skills, short stories and the reading of
short novels.
ESL 058A: Pronunciation for Non-Native English
Speakers I
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Four lecture hours
weekly for eight weeks, or two lecture hours weekly.
This course will provide ESL students the opportunity to improve
their production of standard American English. Students will
practice the sound system and the rhythm of the language to become
more intelligible and to gain understanding of spoken English.
ESL 058B: Pronunciation for Non-Native English
Speakers II
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Four lecture hours
weekly for eight weeks, or two lecture hours weekly for sixteen weeks.
This course will provide ESL students the opportunity to improve
their production of standard American English. Students will
practice stress and intonation patterns, linking, assimilation, and
prominence to become more intelligible and to gain understanding
of spoken English.
ESL 059: Review of Intermediate ESL
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Nine lecture hours
weekly for six weeks.
This review course is designed for ESL students who have completed
or are in the process of completing the ESL 50 or 60 level, or for ESL
students who, through the ESL Placement Test, have qualified for the
ESL 60 level.
ESL 060: Intermediate ESL: Listening and Speaking
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of ESL
40L. Three lecture hours weekly.
This is an intermediate course in listening and speaking communication skills recommended for students enrolled in ESL 50-level or
60-level courses. Students will be introduced to formal and informal
speaking and listening skills to provide a bridge to educational and
career opportunities.
ESL 063: High Intermediate ESL: Writing and Grammar
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of all
50-level ESL courses. Four lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course is suitable for the high intermediate student with a good
foundation in English grammar and writing. There is an emphasis on
grammatical accuracy and on writing a logical sequence of sentences
CATALOG 2010/11
English as a Second Language (ESL)
147
in organized paragraphs. Requires one hour weekly to be arranged in
the ESL Lab.
ESL 076: Low Advanced ESL: Words III (Vocabulary/
Spelling/Reading/Discussion)
ESL 064: High Intermediate ESL: Grammar
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of all
ESL 60-level courses. Four lecture hours weekly.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of all
ESL 50-level courses. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This grammar course is designed to improve the language skills of
high intermediate ESL students. Requires one hour weekly to be
arranged in the ESL Lab.
ESL 066: High Intermediate ESL: Words II (Vocabulary/
Spelling/Reading/Discussion)
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of all
50-level ESL courses. Four lecture hours weekly.
This course will provide high intermediate ESL students with practice reading stories, short novels, newspapers and other non-fiction
materials. Students will be introduced to academic reading and study
skills, and will learn to use the various resources available at the
COM Library.
ESL 068: American Topics
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course will help students understand important American
topics, past and present, through lectures, reading, and discussion.
Examples of topics include the education system, the American
Dream, and drugs and drug treatment. May be taken four times for
credit.
ESL 070: Review of Intermediate ESL
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Three lecture hours
weekly.
This review course is designed for ESL students at the intermediate
level. The course will review the major points covered in ESL 64, 65,
and 66. May be taken four times for credit.
ESL 072: Practical Writing and Reading Skills for
Intermediate to Advanced ESL Students
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of ESL
60-level courses. Four lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to help ESL students improve their reading
and writing skills in their daily and working lives. Coursework will
include information gathering, exposure to business language and
idioms, and consumer information.
ESL 073: Low Advanced ESL: Writing and Grammar
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of all
ESL 60-level courses. Four lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
In this course, low advanced ESL students review paragraph writing
and are introduced to the essay. Intermediate and advanced grammar structures and punctuation are reviewed.
ESL 074: Low Advanced ESL: Grammar
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of all
60-level ESL courses. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course is designed for low advanced ESL students who need to
refine their understanding of grammar.
This course is designed to improve the reading comprehension and
academic vocabulary of low advanced nonnative speakers of English.
This course will include reading skills, study skills, novel reading,
and library research projects.
ESL 078: ESL for CIS 101
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. One lecture hour
weekly.
This ESL course emphasizes development of the English speaking,
listening, reading and writing skills needed for students studying
Computer Information Systems 101.
ESL 079: Review of Low Advanced ESL
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Nine lecture hours
weekly for six weeks.
This review course is designed for ESL students at the low advanced
level, who have completed or are in the process of completing the ESL
70 or 80 level, or for ESL students who, through the ESL Placement
Test, have qualified for the ESL 80 level.
ESL 080: Advanced ESL: Listening and Speaking for
Social, Academic and Workplace Situations
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of all
ESL 70-level courses. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course in listening and speaking skills is recommended for
low-advanced to advanced ESL students. It will help students
improve the listening and speaking skills necessary to participate in
college, workplace and everyday life situations. Students will practice
listening and note taking skills and will conduct interviews, give
presentations and lead discussion sessions.
ESL 083: Advanced ESL: Writing and Grammar
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test and completion of all
70-level ESL courses. Four lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This ESL course is suitable for the advanced student with a strong
foundation in English grammar and writing. The course is designed
to review and build upon grammar and writing skills, enabling the
student to function in academic courses.
ESL 084: Advanced ESL: Grammar
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test and completion of all
70-level ESL courses. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course is designed for advanced ESL students who need to refine
their understanding of grammar for academic writing.
ESL 084AV: Advanced ESL: Grammar
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test and completion of all
70-level ESL courses. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly.
This course is designed for advanced ESL students who need to refine
their understanding of grammar for academic writing.
148
Environmental Landscaping
ESL 086: Advanced ESL: Vocabulary and Reading Skills
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test or completion of all
70-level ESL courses. Four lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to help advanced ESL students improve
reading comprehension and develop academic vocabulary. It will
also improve study skills for more effective reading of textbooks and
other material, including short fiction.
ESL 087A: Advanced ESL: Academic Listening and
Speaking
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test and completion of all
70-level ESL courses. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course in listening and speaking is recommended for advanced
English learners. It will help students improve their listening and
speaking with skills necessary for academic success.
ESL 088A: Introduction to Editing for ESL Students
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in ESL 83 or other
composition courses. One and one-third lecture hours weekly for twelve weeks.
This course is designed for ESL students enrolled in advanced writing
courses. Students will learn to identify and correct errors in syntax,
logic and structure in their own writings at the final draft stage.
Areas of concentration include common errors in tenses, sentence
structure and punctuation.
ESL 088B: Advanced Editing for ESL Students
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in ESL 083 or other
composition courses. One and one-third lecture hours weekly for twelve weeks.
This course is designed for ESL students enrolled in advanced writing
courses. Students will learn to identify and correct errors in syntax,
logic and structure in their own writings at the final draft stage.
Areas of concentration include common errors in shifting tenses,
punctuation, complex sentences, and use of the passive voice.
Please see English category for ENGL 098SL and 120SL listings.
ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPING
Environmental landscaping is more than making the world around
us a beautiful place. It’s about creating environments that function practically and in harmony with nature. It’s growing plants,
designing the spaces, and installing the landscapes. The courses
are designed to meet the needs of both the home gardener and the
professional gardener wanting to gain more knowledge in environmental landscaping. The field is appealing to those wanting to
work in outdoor occupations, as well as those who like to work with
high-tech equipment. This curriculum is designed so that graduates,
depending on their interest, abilities, and achievement, may qualify
for employment in a wide variety of capacities.
Career Options
Arboriculture (Tree Care), Commercial Landscape Management,
Environmental Planning, Interiorscape Design and Maintenance,
Landscape Design and Installation, Landscape Irrigation, Landscape
Salesperson, Nursery Specialist/Propagator, Park Supervision,
Residential and Estate Maintenance, Retail Nursery Sales, Wholesale
Nursery Production
MARIN.EDU
Faculty
Fernando Agudelo-Silva
Department Phone: (415) 457-8811, Ext. 8200
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.S. in Environmental Landscaping, Occupational
(Certificate of Achievement in Landscape Construction and
Design Concepts Specialty, Landscape Maintenance Specialty, and
Nursery Management Specialty also awarded)
This curriculum is designed so that graduates, depending on their
interests, abilities, and achievement, may qualify for employment in a
wide variety of capacities.
A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion of the
core program plus the additional course requirements in each
specialty. The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion
of all requirements in the core program and chosen specialty, as well
as completion of general education and graduation requirements.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150.
All students should consult a counselor. (An additional specialty
degree or certificate can be awarded only if twelve of the required
units have not been used for any other degree or certificate.)
Core Program
The following courses are required of all Environmental Landscaping
degree and/or Certificate of Achievement students.
REQUIREMENTS
ELND
110A
ELND
110B
ELND
120A*
ELND
120B*
ELND
154A
ELND
154B
ELND
210A
ELND
210B
ELND
210C
ELND
254A
ELND
254B
Introduction to Environmental Landscaping
Introduction to Environmental Landscaping
Landscape Ecology
Landscape Ecology
Plant Materials I
Plant Materials I
Integrated Pest Management
Insect Identification and Control
Integrated Pest Management of Plant Diseases and Weeds
Plant Materials II
Plant Materials II
UNITS
1½
1½
1½
1½
1½
1½
1
1
1
1½
1½
SPECIALTIES
In addition to the core program listed above, each Environmental Landscaping degree and/or
Certificate of Achievement student will complete one of the following specialties:
Landscape Construction and Design Concepts Specialty
ELND
157
Principles of Landscape Design
3
ELND
158
Landscape Materials and Construction
3
ELND
201
Special Topics in Landscape Design
3
ELND
253
Landscape Irrigation Systems
3
ELND
260
Landscape Estimating and Management
3
Landscape Maintenance Specialty
ELND
253
Landscape Irrigation Systems
3
ELND
262A Environmental Maintenance Practices
1½
ELND
262B Environmental Maintenance Practices
1½
Nursery Management Specialty
Environmental Landscaping
CATALOG 2010/11
ELND
157
Principles of Landscape Design
3
ELND
262A Environmental Maintenance Practices
1½
ELND
262B Environmental Maintenance Practices
1½
ELND
264
Landscape Nursery Practices
3
Environmental landscaping students working toward a degree may wish to consider
the following courses as electives to enhance job skills.
ARCH 120
Beginning Architectural Drafting
4
ARCH 130
Introduction to Architecture and Environmental Design
3
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
4
COMP 110
Introduction to Computers
1
ENGG 125
Introductory Engineering Graphics
4
ENGG 126
Intermediate Engineering Graphics
2
* Please note: To fulfill the Natural Sciences Requirement for graduation, environmental
landscaping students must take Biology 162, General Ecology.
Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
DESIGN SKILLS CERTIFICATE
REQUIREMENTS
ELND
120A Landscape Ecology
ELND
120B Landscape Ecology
ELND
154A Plant Materials I
ELND
154B Plant Materials I
ELND
157
Principles of Landscape Design I
ELND
253
Landscape Irrigation Systems
ELND
254A Plant Materials II
ELND
254B Plant Materials II
UNITS
1½
1½
1½
1½
3
3
1½
1½
ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPING COURSES (ELND)
for gardeners, site analysis and plant selection. The class will focus
on establishing and maintaining a sustainable farm, garden, or
landscape during the Fall. (CSU)
ELND 109S: Spring Principles and Practices of Organic
Farming and Gardening
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides academic education and hands-on training
in the basic skills and procedures of organic farming and gardening. Instruction topics include applied soil science, management of
long-term soil fertility, establishment of greenhouse systems and
applicable methods of plant propagation, a review of basic botany for
gardeners, site analysis and plant selection. The class will focus on establishing and maintaining a sustainable farm, garden, or landscape
during the Spring. (CSU)
ELND 110A: Introduction to Environmental Landscaping
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This foundation class, essential for anyone interested in plants either
as a career or a hobby, introduces students to key concepts necessary
for gardening or landscaping following environmentally sound
techniques. It covers information about career paths, plant systems,
basic plant structure, physiology and identification, principles of
soil structure and function. This short class is the first half of an
introductory course in environmental landscaping. (CSU)
ELND 110B: Introduction to Environmental Landscaping
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This short class is the second half of an introductory course in
environmental landscaping and is essential for anyone interested in
plants either as a career or a hobby. This class introduces students
to the concepts necessary for gardening or landscaping following
environmentally sound techniques. It covers information about:
establishment of gardens and landscapes, irrigation, integrated
management of insects, mites, plant diseases and weeds, pruning and
design. (CSU)
ELND 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
ELND 120A: Landscape Ecology
0.5-6 Units.
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
ELND 100: Introductory Design Principles for
Sustainable Gardening and Landscaping
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
An introductory foundation for the practices of sustainable gardening and landscaping and ecologically sound use of resources. The
course covers key concepts for designing and installing gardens or
landscapes according to principles of ecological sustainability. It
addresses design principles including site analysis, plant selection,
soils, and economic and social considerations. (CSU)
ELND 109F: Fall Principles and Practices of Organic
Farming and Gardening
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides academic education and hands-on training
in the basic skills and procedures of organic farming and gardening. Instruction topics include applied soil science, management of
long-term soil fertility, establishment of greenhouse systems and
applicable methods of plant propagation, a review of basic botany
149
This class is essential for anyone interested in ecologically sound
gardening and landscaping. The class covers evolution of ecological
concepts, structure and function of plant ecosystems, and factors
that regulate plant communities. It covers the effects of climate on
plant communities and their relevance for gardening and landscaping. This short class is the first half of a two-class sequence on plant
ecology. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
ELND 120B: Landscape Ecology
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly for eight weeks.
This class is essential for anyone interested in ecologically sound
gardening and landscaping. The class covers ecological interactions
that regulate plant communities such as biogeochemical cycles,
predation, parasitism, disease, competitions, and their relevance for
gardening and landscaping and ecological studies. This short class
is the second half of a two-class sequence on plant ecology. May be
taken twice for credit. (CSU)
150
Environmental Landscaping
MARIN.EDU
ELND 139: Selected Topics
ELND 201: Special Topics in Landscape Design
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: A drafting course or an introductory
course in landscape design. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
ELND 154A: Plant Materials I
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half
laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
Identification, habits of growth, cultural and environmental
requirements, and use of woody and herbaceous plants grown in the
landscape. Plants will be studied during the season in which they are
of significant interest in the landscape. (Covers plants that are attractive in the winter and spring.) This is a short course of eight weeks
and the first part of the spring plant identification course. (CSU/UC)
ELND 154B: Plant Materials I
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half
laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
Identification, habits of growth, cultural and environmental requirements, and the use of woody and herbaceous plants grown in the
landscape. Plants will be studied during the season in which they
are of significant interest in the landscape. (Covers plants that are
attractive in the winter and spring.) This is a short course of eight
weeks and the second part of the spring plant identification course.
(CSU/UC)
ELND 157: Principles of Landscape Design
This class explores current and specialized landscape design aspects.
Topics include current design trends in light of ecological, social,
economic and technology circumstances. Subjects covered may include new materials (plants, lights, structures, embellishments) and
techniques (hardware, software) and connections between landscape
design, ecological sustainability and health. May be taken three times
for credit. (CSU)
ELND 202: Specialized Landscape Construction Projects
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This class explores special aspects of landscape materials and construction. Topics include tools, techniques, materials and processes
necessary to build a wide variety of structures in landscapes. The
class includes projects such as working with various types of wood,
stone, brick, tile and concrete. Students will participate in class projects to build diverse structures utilized in gardens and landscapes.
May be taken three times for credit. (CSU)
ELND 210A: Integrated Pest Management
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three and one-half lecture hours weekly for five
weeks.
An introduction to landscape design, including the history and
fundamentals of the development of landscape design, basic drawing
skills and site analysis. The course also addresses principles of
sustainability in landscape design, construction and maintenance.
(CSU/UC)
This class addresses principles to establish and implement Integrated
Pest Management (IPM) strategies and tactics in gardens and
landscapes. It covers approaches for ecologically sound management
of organisms associated with plants in landscapes. Information presented includes the ecological basis for IPM, the process to establish
an IPM plan and IPM strategies and practices. This short class is the
first third of a three-class sequence of IPM classes. (CSU)
ELND 158: Landscape Materials and Construction
ELND 210B: Insect Identification and Management
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three and one-half lecture hours weekly for five
weeks.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is a survey of materials and techniques used in the construction of landscapes. Materials included will be wood, masonry,
irrigation, drainage, soil amendments and outdoor lighting. Also
covered will be the reading and interpretation of plans and specifications as well as elementary surveying and grade interpretation. This
course is designed to aid in the successful completion of the California Landscape Contractors examination. (CSU)
ELND 160: Soils: Ecology and Management
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken for credit as Environmental
Landscaping 160 or Biology 160. Credit will be awarded for only one course.
Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This class explores how soil forms and develops, its physical and
biological components and their interrelationships. Topics include:
historical review of soil/human interactions, soil formation from
parent material, classification, physical properties such as texture
and structure, life forms found in soil and their interrelationships,
relationships between soil properties and soil’s ability to support
plant growth, and approaches to use soil in a sustainable manner.
(CSU/UC)
This class addresses identification of common arthropods found in
gardens and landscapes. It also addresses ecologically sound strategies and tactics to manage arthropods on plants following Integrated
Pest Management (IPM) principles. The class covers biological,
microbiological, chemical and cultural arthropod management
methods. This short class is the second third of a three-class sequence
in IPM. (CSU)
ELND 210C: Integrated Pest Management of Plant
Diseases and Weeds
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three and one-half lecture hours weekly for five
weeks.
This class addresses strategies for ecologically sound management of
plant diseases and weeds in gardens and landscapes. It also addresses
approaches to identify common plant pathogens and the selection
and use of management options. The class covers biology and ecology
of plant pathogens and weeds, and nature and function of chemical,
biological and cultural management methods. This class is the last
third of a three-class sequence in IPM. (CSU)
Ethnic Studies
CATALOG 2010/11
151
ELND 249: Independent Study
ELND 262B: Environmental Maintenance Practices
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half
laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
ELND 251: Turfgrass Management
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A course designed to bring about an understanding of the major
turfgrasses grown in Northern California and their management. A
study of turfgrass maintenance practices such as mowing, fertilization, irrigation, and control of weeds, insects, and diseases. (CSU)
ELND 253: Landscape Irrigation Systems
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This class covers topics essential to provide water, in an ecologically
sensitive manner, to plants in gardens and landscapes. Concepts
covered include: soil /water/ plant /weather relationships, basic
hydraulics, site information, irrigation requirements, design and
installation of diverse types of irrigation systems. (CSU)
ELND 254A: Plant Materials II
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half
laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
Identification, habits of growth, culture, environmental requirements, and use of woody and herbaceous plants grown in the
landscape. Plants will be studied that exhibit late summer features
such as flowers, fruit and foliage color. This is a short course of eight
weeks to highlight late summer interest in the garden. (CSU/UC)
ELND 254B: Plant Materials II
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half
laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
Identification, habits of growth, culture, environmental requirements, and use of woody and herbaceous plants grown in the
landscape. Plants will be studied that exhibit autumn features such
as flowers, fruit, foliage coloration and deciduous appearance. This
is a short course of eight weeks to highlight autumn interest in the
garden. (CSU/UC)
ELND 260: Landscape Estimating and Management
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A study of business practices related to the construction of ornamental landscapes. Includes publications for new jobs, site evaluation,
landscape plans (design), and specifications. Office and business
practices for the landscape contracting industry. Bid document
breakdowns, price comparisons, capital expenditures, preparation of
bid documents, subcontracting, certificates of insurance, lien notices,
and as-built drawings. (CSU)
ELND 262A: Environmental Maintenance Practices
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half
laboratory hours weekly for eight weeks.
This class covers strategies and practices for ecologically sound
garden and landscape maintenance, and the relationships between
landscape/garden design and maintenance practices. Topics include
soil management and water/weed/green waste management. This is
the first half of a two-course sequence in Landscape Maintenance.
(CSU)
This class covers strategies and practices for ecologically sound
garden and landscape maintenance with emphasis on efficient use of
resources. It addresses maintenance practices such as insect, plant
disease and weed management, following Integrated Pest Management (IPM) principles. This is the second half of a two-course
sequence in Landscape Maintenance. (CSU)
ELND 264: Landscape Nursery Practices
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A course that covers the practices used in the operation of a commercial nursery including nursery structures and layout, seeding,
transplanting, balling, potting, canning, fertilizing, pest control, and
plant diseases. Propagation of plants, planting soil mixtures, their
preparation and use. Legal aspects of operating a commercial retail
nursery. Advertising and merchandising of nursery products. (CSU)
ETHNIC STUDIES
The Ethnic Studies course offerings are intended for those who
desire a deeper understanding of American minority peoples and
their communities. Students will receive a unique, interdisciplinary
educational experience with courses emphasizing the historical and
philosophical impact of the cultures of African American, Hispanic
American, Asian American, and American Indian peoples, and their
contributions to the culture of the United States.
Career Options
Art Historian, Biographer, Curriculum Developer, Education
Administrator, Environmental Studies, Global Studies, Historian,
International Affairs, Journalist, Librarian, Market Research Analyst, News Analyst, Research Specialist, Teacher, Writer
Faculty
Walter B. Turner
Department Phone: (415) 485-9630
A.A. in Ethnic Studies
The Ethnic Studies Program provides transfer, general education,
general interest courses, as well as an Associate in Arts degree. The
Associate in Arts Degree in Ethnic Studies is designed for those who
desire to gain insight into the historical and philosophical impact of
cultures and their contribution to the culture of the United States.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
Six units from:
ETST
110
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
HIST
117
History of the United States I
Or
HIST
118
History of the United States II
Nine units from:
ETST
111
History of African Americans (A)
ETST 112
History of African Americans (B)
ETST
121
History of Latinos (as) in the United States
ETST
151
Native American History
Choose three units from:
UNITS
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
152
Ethnic Studies
ETST
154
ETST 108
HIST
111
HIST 238
MUS
105
JOUN 160
SPCH
128
ECON 125 Or
ETST
125
Or
HIST
125
Or
POLS
125
Or
SSC
125
MARIN.EDU
Native American Literature
3
Art of the Americas (also offered as ART 108 or HUM 108)
3
Western Civilization II: 1350-1815
3
History of Africa
3
Rock, Pop, and Jazz
3
Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the Media
(also offered as COMM 160)
3
Intercultural Communication
3
Research Methods and Term Papers in Economics
tion. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B or F & G, CSU Area D-3 or D-6,
IGETC Area 4C, CSU US History, Constitution, and American Ideals
ETST 112: History of African Americans (B)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Ethnic Studies 111 is not a prerequisite for Ethnic
Studies 112. Three lecture hours weekly.
Research Methods and Term Papers in Ethnic Studies 3
Research Methods and Term Papers in History 3
Research Methods and Term Papers in Political Science 3
This is a historical survey of the African American experience in
the United States from the American Revolution to the twenty-first
century. The course will focus on the history, social movements, and
political aspirations of African Americans in the context of American history. Course emphasis will include the African Diaspora,
Black Nationalism, the development of independent separate institutions, and the historical background to the civil rights movement.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B or F & G, CSU Area D-3 or D-6, IGETC
Area 4C, CSU US History, Constitution, and American Ideals
Research Methods and Term Papers in Social Science 3
ETST 121: History of Latinos in the United States
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES (ETST)
ETST 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ETST 108: Arts of the Americas
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Ethnic Studies 108, Art
108, or Humanities 108, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three
lecture hours weekly.
A survey of the arts and architecture of the Americas--North,
Central, Caribbean and South Americas--focusing on a selection of
works from the major pre Columbian, Spanish Colonial, and modern
cultures. Art of the United States will focus on works from the
culturally diverse peoples of the Bay Area. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C
& G, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ETST 110: Introduction to Ethnic Studies
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A survey course designed to promote academic and professional
knowledge of, and sensitivity to, historical and cultural developments
important to ethnic groups in the United States. This is a foundation
course in which students will develop an understanding of the social,
economic, political, and cultural experiences of ethnic minorities
in America. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B & G, CSU Area D-3, IGETC
Area 4C
ETST 111: History of African Americans (A)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Ethnic Studies 111 is not a prerequisite for Ethnic
Studies 112. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a historical survey of the African/African American
experience from developments on the African continent to the
beginning of the twentieth century in American history. The course
is designed to explore the role of African beginnings, the African Diaspora, and Black Nationalism in the growth of a distinctive African
American culture in the United States. Course emphasis will include
the early development of the African continent, Nile Valley cultures,
the influences of trade and Islam, European-African interactions,
Carribean and South American developments, slavery in North
America, the expansion, the Civil War, and the era of Reconstruc-
This course is a historical survey of the Latino/Latina experience
in North America from pre-Columbian experiences through the
contemporary era. The course will focus on the development of a
distinctive Latino culture and its political, social, and economic
manifestations in the United States. The key goal is to provide students with an understanding of the diversity of the Latino experience
in the context of American history. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B or F &
G, CSU Area D3 or D6, IGETC Area 4C, CSU US History, Constitution, and American Ideals
ETST 125: Research Methods and Term Papers in Ethnic
Studies
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Competence in written language skills
comparable to eligibility for English 150. Students may receive credit for this
course as Economics 125, Ethnic Studies 125, History 125, Political Science
125, or Social Science 125. Credit will be awarded for only one discipline. Three
lecture hours weekly.
This course focuses on the elements of critical thinking and methods
of research in the social sciences and develops skills required to
organize such thought and research into effective, college-level
presentations. Various social science faculty members will offer their
expertise to students on an individual basis as they develop their
presentations. Students are encouraged to select areas of research
from other courses taken during the semester or from areas of special
interest including politics, history, economics, education, women’s
studies, ethnic studies, current issues, and issues of community
concern. (CSU/UC)
ETST 128: Art Field Trips
1-4 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Ethnic Studies 128 or
Art 128 or Humanities 128. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three
quarter lecture and three quarter laboratory hours weekly for one unit, one
and one half lecture and one and one half laboratory hours weekly for two
units, two and one quarter lecture and two and one quarter laboratory hours
weekly for three units, and three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
four units.
A complement to art history and studio art courses, this course
allows students to experience the art and architecture of sites like
New York, Mexico City, and Rome firsthand. Pretrip lectures will set
up background for an intensive field trip(s) that may include visits
to museums, galleries, libraries, artists’ studios, and to architectural
Film/Video
CATALOG 2010/11
and archeological sites where lecture, discussion, and personal
exploration will take place. May be used to bring students to a major
media specific conference. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
ETST 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ETST 151: Native American History
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
An introductory historical survey to Native American cultures of
North America from the pre-colonial period to the present. The
course will emphasize the diversity of North American Native
cultures and their social and political evolution. A key theme of the
course will be the issues of land, political and social interactions with
European cultures, and late twentieth century political and economic
developments. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B or F & G, CSU Area D-3 or
D-6, IGETC Area 4C, CSU US History, Constitution, and American
Ideals
ETST 154: Native American Literature
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a survey of Native American literature and culture. The
course will focus on the work of selected Native American authors,
both poets and fiction writers, with an emphasis on Native American
cultures and the social issues facing Native Americans. The course
will also develop students’ creative writing skills and their cultural
sensitivity. The goal of the class is to understand the Native American
experience in the context of Native American literature and the
history of this American hemisphere. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B or C
& G, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ETST 242: History and Politics of Contemporary Africa
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This one-semester course analyzes the politics of modern African
states. The course utilizes political and historical analysis to understand the growth and development of the modern African nation
state. Literature, film, periodicals, and primary source materials are
used to understand the relationships between contemporary African
challenges and longstanding economic and political relations with
Europe, Asia, and the United States. Key themes of the course include
the legacy of colonialism, nationalism, globalization, and the growth
of independence movements. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area
D-7, IGETC Area 4G
ETST 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
FILM/VIDEO
The curriculum is designed to provide theory and skills for those
who are interested in films, television and broadcast studio, whether
students’ goals be transfer, professional, or self-enrichment. The
production courses are hands-on, with equal emphasis on aesthetic
principles and technology.
153
Career Options
Animator, Announcer, Broadcast Technician, Camera Operator,
Disc Jockey, Engineering Technician, Film Director, Film Editor,
Freelance Film Maker, Light Technician, News Broadcaster, News
Director, Producer, Production Engineer, Program Assistant,
Reporter, Screenwriter, Sound Editor, Sound Recorder, Sportscaster,
Studio Technician, Teacher, Videotape Photographer, Writer
Faculty
Frank Crosby
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.A. in Communications, Filmmaking Option
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
COMM 150
Introduction to Filmmaking
4
COMM 240
Advanced Production Projects
3
COMM 170
Workshop in Cinematography
3
COMM 175
Avid Nonlinear Editing
3
Six additional units to be selected from the following:
Any advanced film production course
COMM 109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950 (also offered as HUM 109A)
4
COMM 109B History of Film: 1950 to the Present (also offered as HUM 109B)
4
COMM 110
Introduction to Mass Communication (also offered as JOUN 110)
3
COMM 160
Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the Media (also offered as JOUN 160)
3
COMM 161
Film and Television Writing
3
COMM 166
Writing Short Film and Television Productions
3
A.A. in Communications, Screenwriting Option
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
COMM 109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950 (also offered as HUM 109A)
4
COMM 109B History of Film: 1950 to the Present (also offered as HUM 109B)
4
COMM 161
Film and Television Writing
3
COMM 162
Advanced Film and Television Writing
(Must be taken twice for six units.)
6
One course to be chosen from the following:
COMM 150
Introduction to Filmmaking
4
Three additional units to be selected from the following:
COMM 110
Introduction to Mass Communication (also offered as JOUN 110)
3
COMM 160
Images of Race, Gender and Class in the Media (also offered as JOUN 160)
3
COMM 162* Advanced Film and Television Writing
3
COMM 163
Screenplay Projects
3
COMM 166
Writing Short Film and Television Productions
3
Any other film or television production course
4
* May be taken four times for credit.
154
Film/Video
FILM/VIDEO COURSES (COMM)
COMM 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
COMM 108: Film Studies/Selected Topics
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Either one evening a week for six weeks, or six threehour classes [two weeks], or seventeen and one-half hours on one weekend.
This class offers an intensive survey of a single subject of film study
such as influential director, screenwriter, cinematographer, or an influential movement in film history. Subjects of study change, but will
include such topics as the following: the Director (Hitchcock, Fellini,
Truffaut, Nicholas Ray, Frank Capra); the Screenwriter (Waldo Salt,
John Sayles, David Mamet, John Patrick Shanley); Animation (classic, Disney, Fleisher); and Focus on Film Noir, Focus on the Western,
Focus on French New Wave, Focus on Italian Neo-Realism, Japanese
Cinema, Focus on Third World. Check current schedule for particular focus offered. Communications 108 may be taken more than once
for credit provided the same topic is not repeated. (CSU) AA/AS Area
C (three units)
COMM 109A: History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Communications 109A or
Humanities 109A, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Four lecture
hours weekly.
This course offers a chronological survey of narrative film as art,
business, technology, and politics from the beginning of the movies
in the 1890s to post World War II. Periods and movements covered
will include the Silent Era, German Expressionism, Soviet Avant
Garde and editing of the 1920s, French classicism, American Studio
Period and sound, as well as the history of censorship in the United
States. Classroom screenings of representative films. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
COMM 109B: History of Film: 1950 to the Present
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Communications 109B or
Humanities 109B, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Four lecture
hours weekly.
This course offers a chronological survey of narrative film as art,
business, technology, and politics from 1950 to the present. Periods
and movements covered will include the American Studio Period,
1950s Film Noir and subversive movements, Italian Neorealism,
French Nouvelle Vague, National Cinemas of Sweden, England,
Czech Golden Age, Poland, Hungary, Japan, India, China, Iran, The
New German Film, Third World Cinemas; Australia, the Hollywood
Renaissance of the 1960s and 1970s, Dogma 95, and independent
film movements. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
COMM 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
COMM 140: Film Direction
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Functions of the director in relation to cast and crew; process
of casting, script breakdown, blocking, dramatic and cinematic
interpretation of scripted material, and practice in crew functions
following the professional model. We will explore how the director
and crew operate in a variety of genres, i.e., theatrical, documentary,
commercial, training, etc. (CSU)
MARIN.EDU
COMM 145: Developing Ideas for Film, Multimedia and
Video Projects
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
This class is appropriate for anyone who needs to learn how to
develop a concept, idea or story for short film, multimedia and video
projects. The focus of the course is to give students the skills and
practical experience necessary to create a script for a short documentary, multimedia, narrative, music, experimental, interview, personal
and promotional film and video projects. (CSU)
COMM 146: Film/Video Production
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Other limitations: Basic English Skills. One lecture
hour weekly.
This hands-on class is appropriate for anyone who needs to learn how
to complete preproduction tasks for film and video. The focus of the
course is to give students the skills and practical experience necessary to carry out preproduction duties for documentary, narrative,
music, experimental, interview, personal and promotional film and
video projects. (CSU)
COMM 150: Introduction to Filmmaking
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This hands-on class is appropriate for anyone who is considering a
career in cinema or who wants to take a filmmaking class for fun
and personal enrichment. The focus of the course is to give students
a basic set of filmmaking and visual communication skills. Using
digital video, 16mm film and computers, students, working in groups
and individually, learn and practice the fundamentals of filmmaking
without having to incur the cost of producing a complete film. (CSU/
UC)
COMM 151: Video Production: Shooting on Location
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two and one-half lecture and one and one-half
laboratory hours weekly.
This hands-on class is appropriate for anyone who needs to gain basic
video field production skills or who wants to take a video production
class for fun and personal enrichment. The focus of the course is to
give students a basic set of video production and visual communication skills. Using small and lightweight digital video equipment,
students, working in groups and individually, learn how to shoot
video on location for documentary, narrative, music, experimental,
interview, personal and promotional projects. (CSU)
COMM 161: Film and Television Writing
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to teach students the basics of dramatic
writing so that they can learn the functions of each act of a drama in
drawing sympathy for characters, creating interesting conflict, and
unifying the message. The student will analyze completed feature
films, screenplays, and television programs for their structure,
pacing, and characterization. They will create their own original
stories, both for television and for film; write several scenes in correct
format; and complete a treatment for feature film or television. (CSU)
COMM 162: Advanced Film and Television Writing
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Communications 161. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course assumes students have some experience writing in
screenplay or teleplay format and are familiar with basic structure,
Fire Technology
CATALOG 2010/11
dramatic conflict, and character development. Class is a workshop/
seminar format; students present original works-in-progress for
rewrite suggestions. Lessons in issues of subtext, dialogue, plot
motivation, development of characters’ psychological needs, and
plot tightening for pacing will be given. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
155
COMM 181: Film and Video Audio Recording Workshop
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
COMM 163: Screenplay Projects
This workshop helps students develop basic skills in location sound
recording for film and video. Topics include basic use of microphones, introduction to analog and digital sound recording, and
techniques for recording good quality sound on location. May be
taken twice for credit. (CSU)
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Communications 162. Three lecture hours weekly.
COMM 182: Sync-Sound Production Workshop
This course assumes the student has already taken five semesters
of Writing for TV and Film and is working on either a continuing
screenplay or teleplay project or is starting a new project. Class is
a workshop seminar format; students present original works in
progress for rewrite suggestions. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU)
COMM 166: Writing Short Film and Television
Productions
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Exercises to develop fluency in the language of the motion picture.
Creation of shooting scripts and/or story-boarding for short
documentary, animated, or narrative films and videos. Viewing and
analysis of representative works to examine structure and style. May
be used to develop projects for production courses. (CSU)
COMM 170: Workshop in Cinematography
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Communications 150. Two lecture and three laboratory
hours weekly.
This is an intermediate level class that teaches intermediate
techniques of cinematography and lighting through classroom
instruction, exercises, and studio and location shooting. In addition,
students will learn how to maintain camera and lighting equipment
and develop advanced skills in visual communication and the art
and craft of cinematography. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
COMM 175: Avid Nonlinear Editing Workshop
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Communications 150. Two lecture and three laboratory
hours weekly.
This course provides basic instruction in the theory and practical
application of nonlinear editing for film and video using the Avid
editing workstation. The emphasis is on developing students’ skills
through hands-on work and practice on the Avid system. May be
taken three times for credit. (CSU)
COMM 176: Advanced Avid Nonlinear Editing
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Communications 175. One lecture hour weekly.
Using lecture, demonstration, and hands-on practice this workshop
explores advanced Avid nonlinear editing techniques. It introduces
horizontal and vertical effects, nesting, keying, key frames, and
media and project management. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
COMM 177: Protools Nonlinear Audio Editing
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Basic computer skills. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
Using lecture, demonstration, and hands-on practice, this workshop
explores basic audio nonlinear editing techniques. It introduces
digital audio workstations, digital multitrack recording, and midi
and digital signal processing. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Communications 150. One lecture hour weekly.
This workshop is designed to teach students the basics of sync-sound
preproduction planning and production and prep for editing a syncsound film. Using film, cameras, and computers students working
in small groups shoot and sync a short dialogue scene. May be taken
twice for credit. (CSU)
COMM 183: Microphone Use and Technique for Film and
Video
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Other limitations: Basic English Skills. Two lecture
hours weekly.
This class is appropriate for anyone who needs to learn how microphones work, how to select the correct microphone for a project, how
and where to set up the microphone to capture the best sound and
ways to change a location or studio into a sound-friendly environment. The focus of the course is to give students the knowledge and
skills to design and create effective sound for documentary, multimedia, narrative, experimental, and promotional film and video
projects. (CSU)
COMM 240: Advanced Production Projects
3.0 Units. Prerequisites: Communications 140, 150, 166, and 170. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This class is an advanced level seminar that allows students to work
on their second-year film projects. The seminar includes a critical
and analytical evaluation of students’ films, working as crew on other
advanced level students’ projects, and completing postproduction
work. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
COMM 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
FIRE TECHNOLOGY
These courses provide occupational education and training for men
and women who wish to pursue coursework in fire technology.
Department Phone: (415) 883-2211, Ext. 8108
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
156
French
MARIN.EDU
Emergency Medical Technician Training Course Skills Certificate
The Emergency Medical Technician Training Course certificate
meets the requirements of the California Health and Safety Code for
basic EMT-1 training. The approving authority is the Marin County
Emergency Medical Service Agency. This course completion is valid
for two years from the completion date and shall be recognized
statewide. Note: This is not an EMT-1 Certificate.
Rescuer. This course is a prerequisite for the Emergency Medical
Technician Program. (CSU)
REQUIREMENTS
FIRE
112
Emergency Medical Technician-1
FIRE 255: Wildland Fire Fighting
UNITS
6
FIRE TECHNOLOGY COURSES (FIRE)
FIRE 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
FIRE 112: Emergency Medical Technician I
6.0 Units. Prerequisite: First Aid for Public Safety Personnel or equivalent and
CPR for Health Care Providers. Previous EMT-1, EMT-2, EMT-P accepted.
Five lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Plus ten additional hours to be
arranged and four hours testing.
This course provides instruction in the skills and knowledge required
for the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT1) scope of practice.
Supervised clinical experience with emergency ambulance providers
and/or hospital emergency room is included. Enrollment limited
to 30. A health clearance and a criminal background clearance are
required by clinical agencies. (CSU)
FIRE 120A: Emergency Medical Technician-1 Refresher A
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Current EMT-1 Certification. One and one-half lecture
and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This EMT-1 Refresher course is required for recertification of EMT-1
personnel. The course provides didactic and skills instruction. The
student is updated in all areas of emergency room prehospital care,
as contained in the EMT-1 scope of practice. Uniform is required.
Material fee covers student supplies. (CSU)
FIRE 120B: Emergency Medical Technician-1 Refresher B
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Current EMT-1 Certification. Three lecture hours and
one laboratory hour weekly, plus four testing hours to be arranged.
This EMT-1 Refresher course is required for recertification of EMT-1
personnel. The course provides didactic and skills instruction. The
student is updated in all areas of emergency room prehospital care, as
contained in the EMT-1 scope of practice. Material fee covers student
supplies. (CSU)
FIRE 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
FIRE 215: Advanced First Aid/First Responder
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken as Fire Technology 215, Health
Education 215 or Physical Education 215. Students receive credit for only one
course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This first responder course will teach the basics of good patient care
and the skills needed to deliver appropriate care to the victim of an
accident or sudden illness until more highly trained emergency personnel arrive. Upon successful completion of the course, certificates
will be awarded for the First Responder and CPR for the Professional
FIRE 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Sixteen lecture and twenty-four laboratory hours.
A basic course designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of wildland fire behavior, safety equipment, dozer safety,
construction of handlines, and fire control. May be taken four times
for credit. (CSU)
FRENCH
A major reason for studying the French language is the enrichment
of one’s intellectual growth in the context of the rest of the world. In
learning French one also learns about the culture, philosophy, and
civilization of another people, thereby broadening understanding of
the world. On the practical side, any field of specialization (journalism, medicine, law, business, teaching) is enhanced if one can speak
another language. In California, knowledge of a modern language
is now required in many jobs that deal with the public such as Civil
Service, social work, nursing, and other service-oriented fields.
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Foreign Correspondent, Foreign Service
Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business,
Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel Agent.
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Modern
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
A.A. in French
Students may take classes at either campus to fulfill requirements for
the major.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
FREN
101
Elementary French I
FREN
102
Elementary French II
FREN
203
Intermediate French III
UNITS
5
5
5
French
CATALOG 2010/11
In addition, completion of one course from thefollowing list:
FREN
110 Conversational French I
FREN
112 Conversational French II
FREN
114 Conversational French III
FREN
204
Intermediate French IV
FREN
225
Advanced French I
FREN
226
Advanced French II
FREN
249
Independent Study
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
FRENCH COURSES (FREN)
FREN 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
FREN 101: Elementary French I
5.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A beginning course which offers study and practice in speaking,
understanding, reading, and writing French, along with an exploration of cultural aspects of the French-speaking world. The three-hour
weekly laboratory requirement enhances the student’s verbal and
comprehension skills through the use of audiovisual materials. May
also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 6: UC Language other than English
FREN 102: Elementary French II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 101. Four lecture and 3 laboratory hours weekly.
Further emphasis is placed on the structure of the language, verbal
communication, and understanding of French culture. Continued
use of the language laboratory for further mastery of the language.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or 6: UC
Language other than English
FREN 108A: French Culture and Literature Go to the
Cinema
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to introduce students to films that were inspired by classic, significant and, in many instances, famous literary
pieces. The emphasis will be on the connection between the novel/
story and its artistic expression in the film. This course will teach the
students about traditional and modern trends in French literature
and film. It will establish a connection between literature and sociocultural and political changes in French-speaking countries, through
these two artistic and expressive means. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B
FREN 108B: French Culture and Literature Go to the
Cinema
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to introduce students to the films that were
inspired by famous cultural aspects of the twentieth century in
French society. The emphasis will be on the connection between the
French era and its artistic expression in the film. This course will
also teach the student about traditional and modern trends in French
literature. It will establish a connection between socio-cultural and
political changes in French-speaking countries, through these two
artistic and expressive means. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B
157
FREN 110: Conversational French I
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Use of modern colloquial French in conversation with elementary
grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire skills of the
spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar. Oral practice
in speaking, understanding, and correct pronunciation of French,
using audiovisual materials depicting everyday situations. Can also
be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU)
FREN 112: Conversational French II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 110. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Continued use of modern colloquial French in conversation with
elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire
skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar.
Continued oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct
pronunciation of French, using audiovisual materials depicting
everyday situations. (CSU)
FREN 114: Conversational French III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 112. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Continued use of modern colloquial French in conversation with
elementary grammar. Designed for students wishing to acquire
skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar.
Continued oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct
pronunciation of French, using audiovisual materials depicting
everyday situations. (CSU)
FREN 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
FREN 203: Intermediate French III
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 102. Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in French
114. Four lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Review and expansion of grammatical concepts with continued
emphasis on verbal communication. Introduction to literary and
journalistic readings for vocabulary and idiom expansion as well
as cultural enrichment. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B or 6: UC Language other than English
FREN 204: Intermediate French IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 203. Four lecture hours weekly.
A further study of the French language with a review of the grammar
and extensive readings from the literature and press with emphasis
on verbal communication. An exploration of the use of French and
the impact of French culture outside of France. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or 6: UC Language other
than English
FREN 225: Advanced French I
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 204. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course aims to expand the student’s knowledge of the French
language and civilization through the study of grammar, literature,
and the French press, with particular emphasis on present-day
France. Additional emphasis is placed on an advanced level of verbal
communication. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B or 6: UC Language other than English
158
Geography
FREN 226: Advanced French II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: French 225. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course aims to expand the student’s knowledge of the French
language and civilization through the study of grammar, literature,
and the French press, with particular emphasis on present-day
France. Additional emphasis is placed on an advanced level of verbal
communication. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B or 6: UC Language other than English
FREN 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
GEOGRAPHY
There is a wide diversity of careers that geography offers. Possible
avenues for specialization include business, government, teaching,
cartography, conservation, land use, photogrammetry, climatology,
soil and agriculture, urban and regional planning, resource evaluation, industrial location sites, and marketing research.
Career Options
Cartographer, City Planner, Computer Mapper, Geographic Analyst,
International Economist, Land Officer, Location Analyst, Map
Curator, Market Researcher, News and Travel Magazine Editor, Soil
Conservationist, Teacher, Transportation Planner
Faculty
Donald J. Foss
Department Phone: (415) 485-9510
MARIN.EDU
And eight additional units of degree-applicable social science courses identified as: Economics, Ethnic Studies, Geography, History, Political Science, and Social Science.
GEOGRAPHY COURSES (GEOG)
GEOG 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
GEOG 101: The Physical Environment
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Description, explanation and world distribution of the natural phenomena that constitute man’s physical environment. The phenomena
surveyed include earth-sun relationships, weather, climate, soils, and
landforms. Principles of map construction and interpretation are
also studied. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area
5A
GEOG 101L: Physical Environment Laboratory
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Geography 101 or concurrent enrollment. Three
laboratory hours weekly.
Practical observations and applications of the geographic grid,
atlases and topographic maps; rocks and tectonic activity, weather
and climate, and natural vegetation and soils. Exercises are designed
to supplement Geography 101. Classes will meet periodically at offcampus locations within Marin County and students are expected
to provide their own transportation. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU
Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
GEOG 102: The Human Environment
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A.S. in Geography
The Geography Program provides transfer, general education,
general interest courses, as well as an Associate in Science degree.
(Please note: This degree must be completed by the end of summer
session 2011.)
GEOG 109: Geography of California
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
GEOG 101
The Physical Environment
3
GEOG 101L Physical Environment Laboratory
1
GEOG 102
The Human Environment
3
Six additional units selected from the following courses:
GEOG 125
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
1½
GEOG 126
Application of Geographic Information Systems Research
1½
GEOL
103
Environment Geology
3
GEOL 109
General Oceanography
3
GEOL
110
Earth Science
3
SSC
125
Research Methods and Term Papers in the Social Sciences
(also offered as ETST 125, HIST 125, or ECON 125)
3
This course is designed to offer students an overview of the interrelationships between human societies and the environment. It includes
an examination of population distribution and growth, migrations,
environmental modifications, and the spatial distribution of phenomena such as language, religion, economic systems, and urbanization. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-5, IGETC Area 4
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
An introduction to the tools of geography, to the systems approach
to the study of the physical and biological elements of California’s
landscape, to the distribution patterns of these elements, and to the
significance of such patterns. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area
D-5, IGETC Area 4
GEOG 112: Meteorology and Climatology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This survey course in climatology and meteorology introduces the
student to the atmospheric sciences and the consequences that face
the floral and faunal assemblage of the earth as man and nature
continue to alter the atmosphere and subsequent climate. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
GEOG 116: Field Geography, Marin County
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
five weeks.
Each offering includes field exposure and experience with data collection techniques related to Marin’s bio-geographic zones, geologic
Geology
CATALOG 2010/11
bedrock and soils characteristics, hydrological, atmospheric, and
cultural geographic characteristics. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU)
GEOG 125: Introduction to Geographic Information
Systems
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Familiarity with Windows operating
system and software is highly recommended. Three lecture hours weekly.
An interdisciplinary course that explores Geographic Information
Systems (GIS) used for acquisition, storage, management, analysis,
modification, and presentation of spatial data. The course addresses
how GIS can be used as a tool for diverse academic disciplines. Using
lecture with hands-on computer time, the course will introduce the
student to GIS through the use of ArcGIS software, Google Earth,
and GPS software. The course includes a project module that stresses
accession and application of data in the student’s chosen academic
area of interest. (CSU/UC)
GEOG 126: Application of Geographic Information
Systems in Research
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Geography 125. Two lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly for eight weeks.
Geographic Information Systems use has become essential to the
effective operation of both public and private organizations. Students
will be taught how to retrieve and apply data from their area of interest using ArcGIS software. Students will develop a project related to
their area of academic interest and submit written and oral presentations of their project using GIS software and other skills developed in
this course and the prerequisite course. (CSU)
159
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities
A.S. in Geology
While students may take classes at both campuses, the majority of
courses required for the major are offered at the Kentfield Campus.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
CHEM 131
General Chemistry I
CHEM 132
General Chemistry II
GEOL
120
Physical Geology
GEOL
120L Physical Geology Lab
GEOL
121
Historical Geology
GEOL
125
Field Geology I
Or
GEOL
126
Field Geology II
GEOL
201
Elementary Mineralogy
MATH 104
Plane Trigonometry
PHYS
108A General Physics I
PHYS
108B General Physics II
UNITS
5
5
3
1
4
2½
2
4
3
5
5
GEOLOGY COURSES (GEOL)
GEOG 139: Selected Topics
GEOL 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
0.5-6 Units.
GEOG 249: Independent Study
GEOL 099: General Science
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Geology 99 or Biology 99.
Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
GEOLOGY
Geologists are curious about the world in which they live. The earth
is their laboratory. Geology is the fundamental discipline used to
explain the natural earth systems that shape our changing planet.
Today the majority of geoscientists are employed in the environmental fields, but many are also employed in the exploration for and
production of natural resources.
Career Options
Aerial Photo Interpreter, Earth Historian, Environmental Geologist,
Exploration Geophysicist, Field Geologist, Geochemist, Geological
Engineer, Geological Technician, Geology Drafter, Hydrologist,
Laboratory Research Worker, Map Editor, Meteorologist, Mining
Geologist, Oceanographer, Paleontological Assistant, Paleontologist,
Park Naturalist, Petroleum Geologist, Petrologist, Prospector, Research Scientist, Scientific Illustrator, Sedimentologist, Seismologist,
Soils Engineer, Teacher, Technical Writer, Tester, Weather Observer
Faculty
Donald J. Foss
Department Phone: (415) 485-9510
This course is designed for students who have not reached the level of
success they desired in high school or college science courses and for
individuals returning to school after an extended absence. The course
covers basic scientific principles and concepts of the physical and
life sciences and prepares students to move into other science classes
with the information, understanding, and skills required to succeed. Introductory topics in biology, chemistry, geography, geology,
meteorology, and physics are discussed. This course also provides an
excellent overview of the most important topics in science today for
anyone interested in learning more about the natural world.
GEOL 101: Geological Field Excursions to National Parks
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Geology 102. There will be three, twoday field trips.
This course provides the opportunity to see and understand more
fully the geology, landforms, and natural environment of national
parks. Three 2-day field trips will be required. This course will
normally be offered in the spring semester. Students should be aware
that minimal expenses would be incurred during the field trips. This
course is repeatable if different national parks are studied. (CSU)
160
Geology
MARIN.EDU
GEOL 102: Geologic Setting of the National Parks
GEOL 115: Volcanoes
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
Designed to enrich the student’s knowledge of the natural environments of national parks, with emphasis on parks of the western
hemisphere. (CSU)
A study of the nature and power of the major active volcanoes of the
world. (CSU/UC)
GEOL 103: Environmental Geology
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Environmental geology is the fascinating study of the interactions of
the human race and the physical environment. The course centers on
how mankind alters the physical environment in order to better suit
our immediate needs and how these alterations in turn dictate the
course of our future. The emphasis is always on the balance between
short term reward and long-term consequence. Field trips may be
offered. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 105: Cosmic Evolution
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Astronomy 105, Biology
105, or Geology 105. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This is an interdisciplinary course that explores the origins and
evolution of the cosmos from the Big Bang and the formation of the
universe and Earth, to the development of life. Students will explore
basic concepts and principles that bind all scientific disciplines, and
the nature of science and scientific inquiry. Through the study of
astronomy, chemistry, geology, and biology, students will discover
the interrelatedness of all matter, living and nonliving in the cosmos
and how physical and chemical processes eventually led to the evolution of living organisms. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or
B-2, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 107: Introduction to Rocks and Minerals
1-3 Units. No prerequisite. One-half lecture hour and one and one-half
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
A beginning course in the study and identification of common rocks
and minerals. (CSU)
GEOL 109: General Oceanography
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
GEOL 116: Volcanoes and Earthquakes
An introduction to the geological workings of Earth, focusing on
the study of the causes, processes, and products of volcanoes and
earthquakes. Great natural disasters and scientific efforts to predict
such disasters are studied. (CSU/UC)
GEOL 120: Physical Geology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is the study of the basic principles of geology and the
processes responsible for the formation of rocks, minerals, and the
natural landforms of the earth. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area
B-1, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 120L: Physical Geology Laboratory
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Geology 120 or concurrent enrollment. Three laboratory
hours weekly.
This course is a hands-on study of minerals, rocks, maps, and
geologic field problems. Students will emerge with life skills that will
enable them to interpret the geologic conditions of their surroundings. This laboratory class is field-oriented. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
A, CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 121: Historical Geology
4.0 Units. Prerequisites: Geology 120 and 120L. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
A study of Earth’s past and the evolution of landscapes and living
organisms throughout geologic time. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU
Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 125: Field Geology I
2.5 Units. Prerequisite: Geology 110 or 120 or concurrent enrollment. Seventyeight and three-fourths hours of field investigation to be arranged over three
weekends, and sixteen lecture hours to be arranged.
A general survey course in ocean science for any interested student.
Particularly important for students considering a career in marine
science or technology. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1,
IGETC Area 5A
Lecture and field trips designed to introduce geologic field studies,
and to acquaint students with the geology and geologic history of
Northern California. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
GEOL 110: Earth Science
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Geology 120. Contact instructor before enrolling. A tenday field trip during the spring break and twelve lecture hours to be arranged.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly. Not open to students
who have taken or are taking Geology 120.
Introduction to the basic principles of geology. A nonlaboratory
general education course. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1,
IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 114: Geology of California
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A study of California’s scenic landscape and geologic environments.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 126: Field Geology II
The study of geologic phenomena in selected areas of the Western
United States. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
GEOL 127A: Extended Field Studies
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Geology 120. A seven-day field trip and eight lecture
hours to be arranged.
A one-week field investigation of a selected area. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU)
Geology
CATALOG 2010/11
GEOL 127B: Extended Field Studies
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Geology 120. A fourteen-day field trip and sixteen
lecture hours to be arranged.
A two-week field investigation of a selected area. May be taken four
times for credit. (CSU)
GEOL 128: Geologic Studies of Point Reyes and the San
Andreas Fault
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. A three-hour meeting is required at the beginning
for logistics. Five eight-hour sessions.
Marin County is blessed with an extraordinary geology. This course
focuses on the Point Reyes Peninsula and its relationship to the
San Andreas Fault System. The course meets for a total of 40 hours
at geologically unique locations chosen to illustrate the geological
features and geological history of this portion of the county through
field lecture, direct observation and geological exercises. May be
taken twice for credit. (CSU)
GEOL 129: Field Studies of Marin East of the San
Andreas Fault
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. A three-hour meeting is required at the beginning
for logistics. Five eight hour sessions.
Marin County is blessed with an extraordinary geology. This course
focuses on the area east of the San Andreas Fault. The course meets
for a total of 40 hours at geologically unique locations chosen to
illustrate the geological features and geological history of this portion
of the county through field lecture, direct observation and geological
exercises. (CSU)
GEOL 138: Introduction to Environmental Sciences
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Biology 138 or Geology
138. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This science-based course takes an interdisciplinary approach to
understanding the environmental crisis that confronts us all. Our
studies combine ideas and information from natural sciences (such
as biology, chemistry and geology) and social sciences (such as economics, politics, and ethics) to present a general idea of how nature
works and how things are interconnected. It is a study of connections in nature. Discussions will focus on understanding ecosystem
services, how humans interfere with earth’s life support systems and
how to deal with the environmental problems we face. Emphasis is
placed on understanding various world views and how they affect
our values. Our field studies will include visits to restoration projects,
local ecosystem field studies and local environmental conferences.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or B-2 & B-3, IGETC Areas
5A & 5B
GEOL 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
GEOL 140: Environmental Field Techniques
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Geology 140 or Biology 140,
but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of environmental
sampling and monitoring. Topics include surveying and mapping;
data collection and management; and hydrological, geological,
and biological assessment methods. This course is field based, and
161
emphasizes the mastery of practical field techniques. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU)
GEOL 142: Environmental Policy and Planning
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Geology 142 or Biology
142, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a study of federal, state, and local environmental
legislation. It is a chronology of America’s awakening to environmental issues and a study of our efforts to resolve these issues through the
planning process. An understanding of the content of this course is
vital for environmental scientists, planners, and developers. (CSU/
UC)
GEOL 145: Ethics in Science
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Geology 145 or Biology
145, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course explores some of the most pressing issues facing our
society today. It enables students to investigate and understand the
controversies surrounding current and future technologies, and
helps them make rational decisions when faced with situations in
their own lives and at the voting booth. The approach is an interdisciplinary one, combining basic science, applied research, ethics, and
decision-making processes. Topics include scientific fraud, recombinant DNA technologies, the human genome project, energy and land
use, and toxic waste. This course is appropriate for both science and
nonscience majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C
GEOL 201: Elementary Mineralogy
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Geology 120. Three lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
An introduction to the basic principles of mineralogy including
crystallography; the basic concepts of physical, chemical, and optical
mineralogy; and the formation and occurrence of mineral deposits.
Laboratory work includes the determination of minerals by physical properties, chemical tests with the use of the blowpipe, crystal
morphology, and the study of minerals in thin section under the
polarizing microscope. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area
5A
GEOL 242: Geology and Biology of the Basin and Range
and the Colorado Plateau
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Geology 242 or Biology
242, but credit will be awarded for only one course. A two-week field trip that
includes seventeen and one-half lecture hours and thirteen, eight-hour field
experiences.
This two-week field course on the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau Provinces includes a raft trip down the Colorado or Green River.
The geological and biological evolutions of the area are explored
through observation, experimentation, and study of the diverse
abiotic and biotic contributors to the area. Course topics include:
stratigraphy and structure; fluvial landforms and processes; species
dispersion, radiation and evolution; ecology; and the art of fly fishing.
Through lectures and a broad range of field experiences, students
will gain an understanding of the factors that shaped and continue to
shape this unique area. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
162
Health Education
MARIN.EDU
GEOL 249: Independent Study
HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES (HED)
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
HED 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
GEOL 250: Scientific Research and Reporting
HED 112: Drugs and Society
0.5-6 Units.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisories: Biology 110 and Geology 120. Can be
taken for credit as Geology 250 or Biology 250, but credit will be awarded for
only one course. One lecture hour weekly.
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This hands-on, individualized course is designed to walk students
step-by-step through a scientific research project of their choice. The
final report of their findings will be delivered at a professional meeting. This course is designed for science majors that have completed
the first year of their curriculum and desire a hands-on, real world
experience in science. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
HEALTH EDUCATION
HED 115: Weight Control, Exercise and Nutrition
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
Department Phone: (415) 485-9580
Skills Certificate in Personal Fitness Trainer
The Personal Fitness Trainer Skills Certificate constitutes a skill and
knowledge set that enables students to either begin as an entry-level
Personal Fitness Trainer (PFT) or advance in their already existing
PFT careers.
Advised for the Certificate:
This course is designed to act as an educational support program
and resource center for individuals who desire to develop or desire
to help others develop a new healthier lifestyle, including weight
management, exercise, and proper nutritional behaviors. The latest
research in the wellness and fitness field will be emphasized. Can also
be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/UC)
HED 116: Career Opportunities in Wellness and Fitness
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
PE 116 - Career Opportunities in Wellness and Fitness (3 units)
REQUIREMENTS
Core 1 (choice of one of the following)
PE /BIOL 107 Human Biology PE 143 Basic Athletic Injuries Core 2 (choice of one of the following)
PE/HED 119 Effective Teaching Strategies in Wellness and Fitness
PE
120 Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology or
PSY
130
Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
Core 3 (choice of one of the following)
PE 121 Personal Trainer Certification Course PE 122 Exercise for Adults with Special Needs Core 4 (choice of one of the following)
BIOL 100 Nutrition
HED 115 Weight Control, Exercise and Nutrition Core 5
PE 215 Advanced First Aid/Emergency Response or
equivalent proof of current AED/CPR/First Aid Certifications
Electives:
BUS 135
Managing Change and Innovation (1.5 units) and
One Physical Activity course (1 unit) or
Any 2 Physical Activity courses (must be two
different courses) This course will cover the historical, sociological, physiological, pharmacological, and legal aspects of drugs. Emphasis will be placed on
the effects of tobacco, alcohol, narcotics, restricted drugs, and other
substances. Nutrition, genetics, environment, and poly-drug factors
concerning drug actions will be discussed. The various education,
prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation approaches to the problem
of drug abuse will be covered. (CSU) CSU Area E
UNITS
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1.5
1
1, 1
This course is designed to increase awareness of the various career
opportunities available in the field of wellness and fitness. Students
will learn about the different academic pathways and certifications
necessary to become a qualified professional in this field. Emphasis
will be placed on formulating a realistic career goal in wellness and
fitness. Current wellness and fitness professionals will be interactive
guest speakers to aid students in their goal process. (CSU)
HED 118: Sports Nutrition for Health and Performance
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken as Health Education 118 or Physical
Education 118, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
This course is designed for personal fitness trainers, athletes, coaches
and parents who are seeking sports-specific nutrition for aerobic,
anaerobic and speed-endurance training. Topics will include macroand micro-nutrients, energy systems, digestion, energy sources and
metabolism, efficiency of nutritional ergogenics, dietary supplements, sports nutrition products, hydration, weight management,
and sports-specific nutritional needs in order to improve athletic
performance. (CSU)
HED 119: Effective Teaching Strategies in Wellness and
Fitness
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Health Education 116 or Physical
Education 116. Can be taken for credit as Health Education 119 or Physical
Education 119. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours
weekly.
This course is designed to help students become more effective
wellness and fitness professionals. Students will develop a toolbox of
practical teaching, learning and evaluation methods to increase their
ability to convey their knowledge to others in this field and more
History
CATALOG 2010/11
successfully impact their future clients, students or athletes. Can also
be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU)
HED 130: Contemporary Health Issues
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This Web based course will include, but not be limited to, the study
of physical and psychological health, creating healthy relationships,
avoiding and overcoming harmful habits, prevention of disease and
developing healthy lifestyles. Specific topics may include managing
stress, birth control, pregnancy, childbirth, sexually transmitted
diseases including AIDS, drug, alcohol and tobacco use and abuse,
nutrition and fitness, aging, environmental health and consumerism.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area E
HED 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
HED 140: Stress Management and Health
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course will examine the theoretical framework of stress and
stress-management techniques. Areas of study will include: defining stress, understanding psychological theories of stress, causes
of stress, and health consequences of stress. Students will examine
and analyze strategies to manage and cope with stress, such as time
management, relaxation techniques, communication skills, diet and
exercise. (CSU) CSU Area E
HED 142: Growing Older: Physical, Psychological, and
Social Aspects of Aging
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Health Education 142 or
Psychology 142. However, credit will be awarded for only one course. Three
lecture hours weekly.
This course will examine the aging process in the contemporary
world. Topics explored will include physical changes, psychological changes, and social changes occurring as people age; theories
regarding why these changes occur; and how to maximize potential
in these areas. Other topics will be work and retirement, death and
bereavement, local and national resources for aging individuals, and
myths associated with aging. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area E,
IGETC Area 4
HED 215: Advanced First Aid/First Responder
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken as Health Education 215, Fire
Technology 215, or Physical Education 215. Students receive credit for only one
course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This first responder course will teach the basics of good patient care
and the skills needed to deliver appropriate care to the victim of an
accident or sudden illness until more highly trained emergency personnel arrive. Upon successful completion of the course, certificates
will be awarded for the First Responder and CPR for the Professional
Rescuer. This course is a prerequisite for the Emergency Medical
Technician Program. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
163
HED 216A: American Red Cross Lifeguard Training
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Students must be able to perform the following pretest:
[1] Tread water continuously in the diving pool for two minutes using legs only;
[2] Swim 500 yards continuously with no time limit using the following strokes:
crawl stroke, breast stroke, side stroke for at least 100 yards each; [3] Submerge
to a minimum depth of seven feet and retrieve a ten-pound object and return to
the surface with the object at no time limit. May be taken as Health Education
216A or Physical Education 216A. Students will receive credit for only one
course. One lecture hour and one and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This course is designed for those desiring to fulfill the requirements
for the American Red Cross Lifeguard Certification. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU)
HED 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
HISTORY
History is an evolving record of human emotions, human aspirations, and human successes and failures. Historians deal with goals,
fears, interests, and prejudices of people in the past and the impact of
their thoughts and actions on the people of today and tomorrow. The
study of history is a valuable adjunct for many careers both inside
and outside of the social sciences.
Career Options
Archaeologist, Archivist, Biographer, Criminologist, Documentary
Film Writer, Environmental Studies, Foreign Service Officer, Genealogist, Global Studies, Historian, Historical Archaeologist, Historical Editor, Historical Society Administrator, International Affairs,
Lawyer, Librarian, Market Research Analyst, Media Consultant,
Museum Guide, News Analyst, Paralegal Assistant, Park Naturalist/
Ranger, Patent Examiner, Peace Corps/Vista Worker, Preservationist,
Private Investigator, Research Specialist, Teacher, Writer/Journalist
Faculty
Yolanda Bellisimo, Henry D. Fearnley, Walter B. Turner
Department Phone: (415) 485-9630
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
A.A. in History
The History Program provides transfer, general education, general
interest courses, as well as an Associate in Arts degree. Courses are
offered at either campus to fulfill requirements for the degree. (Please
note: This degree must be completed by the end of summer session
2011.)
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
164
History
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
HIST
117
History of the United States I
3
HIST
118
History of the United States II
3
Six units to be selected from the following:
HIST
101
World History I: Origins of the Major Traditions
4
HIST
102
World History II: Evolution of the Modern World
4
HIST 110
Western Civilization I: to 1350
3
HIST
111
Western Civilization II: 1350 to 1815
3
HIST
112
Western Civilization III: The 19th and 20th Centuries
3
And six additional units of degree-applicable social science courses identified as:
Economics, Ethnic Studies, Geography, History, Political Science, and Social Science.
6
HISTORY COURSES (HIST)
HIST 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
HIST 100: Major Trends and Selected Topics in American
History
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
History of the United States from its Native American and colonial
background to the present. Social, economic, and political institutions and developments are examined. History 100 may fulfill the
transfer requirement for those majoring in non-social science fields.
Can also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area B or F, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4, CSU US History,
Constitution, and American Ideals
HIST 101: World History I: Origins of the Major
Traditions
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture hours weekly.
Beginning with the earliest transitions of human societies to sedentary communities, this course investigates the original river-based
civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China; the evolution
of early societies in Sub-Saharan Africa and the pre-Columbian
Americas; major Eurasian states and empires of antiquity (Hellenic,
Persian, Chinese, Indian, Roman); major pre-Columbian civilizations including Inca, Maya, and the Valley of Mexico; and the transformations of the post-classical world, with emphasis on the impacts
of the universalizing traditions of Christianity, Islam and Buddhism.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 102: World History II: Evolution of the Modern
World
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture hours weekly.
Beginning with the overseas voyages of discovery during the 15th
century C.E., this course traces the growing complexity of global
interaction associated with early modern societies in their preindustrial phases. The focus includes demographic, institutional,
cultural, material, and epidemiological aspects of trans-continental
and trans-oceanic exchanges. The second half of the course examines
societies from a global perspective as they come to be transformed
from the mid-18th century C.E. by the revolutionary forces of
industrialization and secular ideologies (e.g. liberalism, conservatism, socialism, nationalism, fascism, terrorism), producing the rise
and fall of states and empires, the unleashing of two world wars and
countless regional conflicts, and redefining the nature of a contemporary world increasingly globalized and interdependent, but fraught
MARIN.EDU
with perils and challenges. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6,
IGETC Area 4
HIST 103: Science, Technology, and Civilization
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is a nontechnical introduction to the history of science
and technology, examining their impact on civilization, including
significant social, political, religious, ethical, artistic and intellectual repercussions resulting from scientific and technological
advances. Themes and topics include (but are not limited to) the
Neolithic Revolution, ancient Greek mathematics and cosmology,
Islamic civilization, Chinese alchemy, the Copernican Revolution
and Newtonian synthesis, the industrial and biological revolutions
of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and twentieth century
transformations (relativity, the atom, genes and DNA, cyberspace,
string theory). (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B
HIST 109: History of California
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A survey of California’s past through the Native American, Spanish,
Mexican, and American periods. Among the topics covered are the
California missions, the Gold Rush era, San Francisco’s “Victorian”
era, and recent political, economic, and social developments. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Areas B & G, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 110: Western Civilization I: to 1350
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course examines Western Civilization from its Middle Eastern
origins through the classical Greek and Roman civilizations and the
Middle Ages. Note: History 110, 111, and 112 may be taken in any
sequence and require no prerequisites. They are especially recommended for students who intend to pursue their education toward a
Bachelor’s degree. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC
Area 4
HIST 111: Western Civilization II: 1350 to 1815
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course examines Western Civilization during the Renaissance,
the Enlightenment, through the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era, concluding with the Congress of Vienna. Note: History 110,
111, and 112 may be taken in any sequence and require no prerequisites. They are especially recommended for students who intend to
pursue their education toward a Bachelor’s degree. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 112: Western Civilization III: the 19th and 20th
Centuries
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A study of Western Civilization during the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries beginning with the Congress of Vienna and concluding
with the contemporary world. This course will examine issues such
as the growth of an industrial civilization, nationalism and imperialism, the interaction of the West with the non-Western world, and
idealism and realism while using the experience of Western Civilization. Analysis will involve the search for artifacts such as continuity
and change in patterns of development and motivation. Note:
History 110, 111, and 112 may be taken in any sequence and require
no prerequisites. They are especially recommended for students who
History
CATALOG 2010/11
intend to pursue their education toward a Bachelor’s degree. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 117: History of the United States I
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A survey of the economic, political, social, and cultural evolution of
the United States from its pre-Columbian beginnings through the
Civil War. History 117 and 118 are recommended (instead of History
100) or required for majors and minors in history, teaching, social
science, pre-legal, and certain other areas. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B
or F, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4, CSU US History, Constitution,
and American Ideals
HIST 118: History of the United States II
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A survey of the economic, political, social, and cultural evolution of
the United States from 1865 to the present. History 117 and 118 are
recommended (instead of History 100) or required for majors and
minors in history, teaching, social science, pre-legal, and certain
other areas. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B or F, CSU Area D-6, IGETC
Area 4, CSU US History, Constitution, and American Ideals
HIST 125: Research Methods and Term Papers in History
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Competence in written language skills
comparable to eligibility for English 150. Students may receive credit for this
course as Economics 125, Ethnic Studies 125, History 125, Political Science
125 or Social Science 125. Credit will be awarded for only one discipline. Three
lecture hours weekly.
This course focuses on the elements of critical thinking and methods
of research in the social sciences and develops skills required to
organize such thought and research into effective, college-level
presentations. Various social science faculty members will offer their
expertise to students on an individual basis as they develop their
presentations. Students are encouraged to select areas of research
from other courses taken during the semester or from areas of special
interest including politics, history, economics, education, women’s
studies, ethnic studies, current issues, and issues of community
concern. (CSU/UC)
HIST 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
HIST 206: History of Russia
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course surveys Russian history from the earliest times through
the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of its successor
states. Emphasis is on both the unique features of Russia’s past and
on the commonalities Russian history shares with the histories of
other societies and traditions. Continuities and the discontinuities
in social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual heritage are
examined, as well as “East-West” relations. Special attention is given
to the nature and demise of the Soviet Union, and to the transitional
and successor states of the late twentieth and early twenty-first
centuries. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
165
HIST 211: Women in American History and Politics
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken as History 211 or Political Science 211.
Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course offers a social and political history of women and women’s movements in American society. It examines the development
of American institutions and ideals with respect to women’s roles
and status. It analyzes women’s relationship to economic, political,
and social processes and explores cultural models of womanhood.
The class will examine how women define themselves and how they
have enacted change. The course is chronological but emphasizes
particular themes, exploring the diversity of American women, and
developing a framework for understanding gender in relation to race,
ethnicity, class, sexuality, and religion. Includes research in both
primary and secondary sources. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B, F, or G;
CSU Areas D-4, D-6 and D-8; IGETC Area 4
HIST 214: History of Latin America
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A historical survey of Latin America beginning with pre-Columbian
societies. The survey investigates European colonization, colonial
culture combined with native culture and national emergence in
the nineteenth century. It also covers the economic maturity of the
twentieth century, the emergence of indigenous culture, and Latin
America’s striving for independent identity. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 215: History of England
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This survey course covers the full sweep of English political, economic, cultural, and social history from pre-Roman times to the present
and its powerful influence on the English-speaking world. Among
the primary themes addressed are the evolution of parliamentary
democracy and constitutional monarchy, the role and significance of
religious strife, the development of the industrial revolution, and the
advent of imperial expansion and decline. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B,
CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 216: History of Mexico
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A study of Mexico beginning with the pre-Columbian societies.
This course studies the social, cultural, and political changes under
Spanish colonization led to the independence movement and a
search for national identity. The revolutionary events leading to the
Constitution of 1917 opened a new era. In the later twentieth century,
the industrialization of the country accelerated and complicated
Mexican development. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6,
IGETC Area 4
HIST 238: History of Africa
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A historical and political survey course of the African continent from
the early geographical and anthropological background to contemporary African developments in the twenty-first century. The course
is designed to provide a basis for understanding the historical background, cultural continuity, and political developments that have
shaped the various peoples, countries, and regions of Africa. The
course will focus on key themes of unity with diversity, the influences
of geography and trade, Nile Valley cultures, Africa’s contacts with
Europe and Asia, the influences of colonialism and independence,
166
Humanities
and the global realities of twenty-first century Africa. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
HUMANITIES
Courses in humanities enable students to seek an understanding of a
broad cross section of cultural experience through such disciplines as
literature, art, and other visual forms.
Career Options
Classicist, Journalist, Minister, Peace Corps Worker, Teacher
Faculty
John Marmysz
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities
A.A. in Humanities
The Humanities Program creates a broad base for the humanities
major. The program also allows liberal arts students the opportunity
to create an interdisciplinary major based on a particular interest.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
Nine units in humanities to be chosen from the following:
HUM
100A Introduction to Humanities: Ancient Greece to Medieval Period
3
HUM
100B Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance to the Modern Period
3
HUM
114
The Long Search: An Introduction to the World’s Religions
3
Or
HUM
118
Introduction to World Religion
3
HUM
125
Myth, Symbol, and the Arts
3
In addition, nine units to be chosen from the following:
(Please note: Students may not repeat courses chosen from the humanities courses listed
above.)
Architectural History
ARCH 100
History of Architecture I
3
ARCH 101
History of Architecture II
3
ARCH 102
History of Architecture III
3
Art History
ART
101
History of Ancient Art
3
ART
102
History of European Art
3
ART
103
History of Modern Art
3
ART
104
History of Asian Art
3
ART
105
History of Recent American Art
3
ART
106
History of Women Artists
3
ART
107
History of American Art
3
ART
108
Arts of the Americas (also offered as ETST 108 or HUM 108)
3
Dance History
DANC 108
Dance History: Dancing – The Pleasure, Power, and Art of Movement 3
MARIN.EDU
Film History and Criticism
HUM
109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950 (also offered as COMM 109A)
HUM
109B History of Film: 1950 to Present (also offered as COMM 109B)
History of Theatre
DRAM 110
Introduction to the Theatre
DRAM 112
Drama: Play, Performance Perception
DRAM 116
Survey of Dramatic Literature: Ancient Greek to the Present
DRAM 117
Survey of Dramatic Literature: Shakespeare and His Theatre
Humanities
HUM
100A Introduction to Humanities: Ancient Greece to Medieval Period
HUM
100B Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance to the Modern Period
HUM
107
Humanities through the Arts
HUM
114
The Long Search: An Introduction to the World’s Religions
Or
HUM
118
Introduction to World Religion
HUM
125
Myth, Symbol, and the Arts
Literature
ENGL
212
Introduction to Poetry
ENGL
218
The American Short Story
ENGL
219
Voices and Visions
ENGL
220
Detective Fiction
ENGL
221A Survey of American Literature I
ENGL
221B Survey of American Literature II
ENGL
222
Survey of English Literature I
ENGL
223
Survey of English Literature II
ENGL
224
Survey of World Literature I
ENGL
225
Survey of World Literature II
ENGL
230
Survey of Shakespeare
ENGL
235
Women in Literature
Music History
MUS
101
Introduction to Classical Music
Philosophy
PHIL
110
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL
111
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL
117
History of Philosophy: Late Modern to Contemporary
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
HUMANITIES COURSES (HUM)
HUM 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
HUM 100A: Introduction to Humanities: Ancient Greece
to the Medieval Period
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120. Three lecture hours weekly.
This humanities sequence is designed to introduce students to
Western culture. The course focuses on Greek and Roman culture:
the epics, philosophy, and architecture of these periods. Students will
study the themes and conflicts that the modern world has inherited.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 100B: Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance to
the Modern Period
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120. Three lecture hours weekly.
This humanities sequence is designed to introduce students to Western culture. This course begins in the late medieval period, focusing
on the developing Renaissance and the impact on Europe’s “rebirth”
of Asian and Arabic ideas. The scientific revolution of Shakespeare’s
England and the political revolutions of the seventeenth and
Humanities
CATALOG 2010/11
167
eighteenth centuries constitute the next third of the class. The last
section includes Romanticism, the new paradigms of Freud, Marx,
and Darwin, and concludes with the Age of Anxiety. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 114: The Long Search: An Introduction to the
World’s Religions
HUM 107: Humanities Through the Arts
Thirteen one-hour cassettes in this series trace the journey of a lone
traveling host on his global search for religious understanding. Along
the way he witnesses the modern interpretation of new and ancient
religions, studying each religion’s history as well as its relationship to
the host society. The 12 major religions are presented in a unique and
imaginative documentary style. Class meetings with the instructor
will augment the videocassette tapes with lecture and discussion.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course surveys the full range of artistic expression from ancient
times to the present, examining the relation between human creativity and the larger cultural setting. Through 15 hours of videotaped
programs hosted by poet Maya Angelou, students can observe how
various art forms--painting and music, sculpture and architecture,
drama and film--all reflect humankind’s continuing quest for dignity
and meaning. This self-paced course offers the non art specialist an
accessible introduction to the interplay of art forms evolving over the
centuries. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 108: Arts of the Americas
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Humanities 108, Art 108
or Ethnic Studies 108. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
A survey of the arts and architecture of the Americas--North,
Central, Caribbean, and South America--focusing on a selection
of works from the major pre-Columbian, Spanish Colonial, and
modern cultures. Art of the United States will focus on works from
the culturally diverse peoples of the Bay Area. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Areas C & G, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
HUM 109A: History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Humanities 109A or
Communications 109A, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Four
lecture hours weekly.
This course offers a chronological survey of narrative film as art,
business, technology, and politics from the beginning of the movies
in the 1890s to post World War II. Periods and movements covered
will include the Silent Era, German Expressionism, Soviet Avant
Garde and editing of the 1920s, French classicism, American Studio
Period and sound, as well as the history of censorship in the United
States. Classroom screenings of representative films. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
HUM 109B: History of Film: 1950 to the Present
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Humanities 109B or
Communications 109B, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Four
lecture hours weekly.
This course offers a chronological survey of narrative film as art,
business, technology, and politics from 1950 to the present. Periods
and movements covered will include the American Studio Period,
1950s Film Noir and subversive movements, Italian Neorealism,
French Nouvelle Vague, National Cinemas of Sweden, England,
Czech Golden Age, Poland, Hungary, Japan, India, China, Iran, The
New German Film, Third World Cinemas; Australia, the Hollywood
Renaissance of the 1960s and 1970s, Dogma 95, and independent
film movements. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120. Students may receive credit
for Humanities 114 or 118, but not for both courses. Three hours weekly.
HUM 118: Introduction to World Religions
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 120. Students may receive credit
for Humanities 118 or 114, but not for both courses. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to the major religious traditions of the
world and the spiritual practices of preliterate or primal religions.
The course will focus equally on East and West, principles and
practice, history and psychology. Examples of the art, music and
literature of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Chinese Religion, Judaism,
Christianity and primal religions will be presented to enhance the
experience and understanding of the religions. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 125: Myth, Symbol, and the Arts
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 150. Three lecture hours weekly.
Study of myth and folklore from a variety of cultures in order to see:
(1) the function and role of myth in culture; (2) how mythic symbols
work in literature and the arts; and, (3) how these symbols have a
psychological and cultural relevance to people today. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 128: Art Field Trips
1-4 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Humanities 128 or Art
128 or Ethnic Studies 128. Credit will be awarded for only one course. Three
quarter lecture and three quarter laboratory hours weekly for one unit, one
and one half lecture and one and one half laboratory hours weekly for two
units, two and one quarter lecture and two and one quarter laboratory hours
weekly for three units, and three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly for
four units.
A complement to art history and studio art courses, this course
allows students to experience the art and architecture of sites like
New York, Mexico City, and Rome firsthand. Pretrip lectures will set
up background for an intensive field trip(s) that may include visits
to museums, galleries, libraries, artists’ studios, and to architectural
and archeological sites where lecture, discussion, and personal
exploration will take place. May be used to bring students to a major
media specific conference. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
HUM 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
HUM 242: Global Writings
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: English 120. Can be taken for credit as Humanities 242
or English 242, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture
hours weekly.
The cultural diversity and complex histories of the nations composing the contemporary international world are revealed in a variety
168
Independent Study
of forms of writings from the twentieth century. Discussion and
analysis of representative texts focus on colonial exploitation, political domination, liberation, formations of racism, gender inequality,
expressions of cultural power, ethnic conflict and division, immigration and migrancy, and processes of globalization. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
Independent study courses are offered in most disciplines and are
designed to give students an opportunity to participate in enriched
academic experiences not covered within the scope of available
curriculum offerings. Students plan and execute a project under an
instructor’s direction.
Students interested in registering for independent study should
contact the discipline instructor to obtain an Application for
Independent Study (instructor contract). The completed Application
and an Add Card must then be submitted to the Office of Admissions
and Records.
INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES
249ABC: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Limit to Enrollment: One course in the discipline and/or
prerequisite(s) determined by the appropriate discipline. Prior arrangement
with instructor is required. Three laboratory hours weekly per unit. Students
are limited to 4 enrollments (maximum of 12 units) of independent study.
Independent study courses may be taken more than once for credit provided
the same topic is not repeated.
ITALIAN
A major reason for studying the Italian language is the enrichment
of one’s intellectual growth in the context of the rest of the world. In
learning Italian one also learns about the culture, philosophy, and
civilization of another people, thereby broadening understanding of
the world. On the practical side, any field of specialization (journalism, medicine, law, business, teaching) is enhanced if one can speak
another language. In California, knowledge of a modern language
is now required in many jobs that deal with the public such as Civil
Service, social work, nursing, and other service-oriented fields.
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Foreign Correspondent, Foreign Service
Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business,
Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel Agent
MARIN.EDU
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
ITALIAN COURSES (ITAL)
ITAL 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
ITAL 101: Elementary Italian I
5.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
For beginners and for those who have had only one year of high
school Italian. A beginning course which offers study and practice in
speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Italian. Exploration
of cultural aspects of the Italian people. The three-hour weekly laboratory requirement enhances the student’s verbal and comprehension
skills through the use of audiovisual materials. Can also be offered in
a distance learning format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 6: UC Language other than English
ITAL 102: Elementary Italian II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Italian 101. Four lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Further emphasis on the structure of the language, verbal communication, and understanding the Italian culture. Continued use of the
language laboratory for further mastery of the language. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or 6: UC Language
other than English
ITAL 108: Italian Literature in Translation: Italian
Classic Literature goes to the Movies
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. One lecture hour weekly.
This class offers an intensive study of one literary era or selected
work within Italian literature in any given semester or summer
session. The class will be offered in English translation. Subjects of
study change, but will include such topics as “The Divine Comedy”
by Dante Alighieri, and the Middle Ages; “The Prince”, by Niccolo
Machiavelli, and the High Renaissance; The Literature of the Italian
Resistance 1945-60; The Literature of Italian Feminism; and the
Literary Theater of Nobel Prize Winner Dario Fo. Check current
schedules for particular topic offered. Italian 108 may be taken more
than once for credit provided the same topic is not repeated. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area C (three units)
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
ITAL 110: Conversational Italian I
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Modern
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Use of modern colloquial Italian in conversation and the study of
elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire
skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar.
Oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct pronunciation
Japanese
CATALOG 2010/11
169
of Italian, using audiovisual materials depicting everyday situations.
Can also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or 6: UC Language
other than English
ITAL 112: Conversational Italian II
ITAL 228: Italian Conversation and Culture Through
Film
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 110. Three lecture and three laboratory
hours weekly.
Continued use of modern colloquial Italian in conversation and
the study of elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish
to acquire skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal
grammar. Continued oral practice in speaking, understanding, and
correct pronunciation of Italian, using audiovisual materials depicting everyday situations. (CSU)
ITAL 114: Conversational Italian III
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Italian 102 or 112. Three lecture and three laboratory
hours weekly.
Continued use of modern colloquial Italian in conversation and
the study of elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish
to acquire skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal
grammar. Continued oral practice in speaking, understanding, and
correct pronunciation of Italian, using audiovisual materials depicting everyday situations. (CSU)
ITAL 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
ITAL 203: Intermediate Italian III
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Italian 102. Four lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
In-depth study of the language with grammar review, composition,
and introduction to literature. The language laboratory offers the
use of audiovisual materials for improved fluency and accuracy in
pronunciation as well as the presentation of cultural and literary
topics. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or
6: UC Language other than English
ITAL 204: Intermediate Italian IV
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Italian 203. Four lecture hours weekly.
Continuation of study and practice in speaking, understanding,
reading, and writing Italian. Completion of in-depth review of Italian grammar, as well as readings in literature, history, and culture of
the Italian people. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B or 6: UC Language other than English
ITAL 225: Advanced Italian I
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Italian 204. Three lecture hours weekly for each course.
Courses aimed at expanding the student’s knowledge of the Italian language and civilization through the study of grammar and
literature. Emphasis is placed on acquiring an advanced level of
verbal expression in conversation, reading, and writing. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or 6: UC Language
other than English
ITAL 226: Advanced Italian II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Italian 204. Three lecture hours weekly for each course.
Courses aimed at expanding the student’s knowledge of the Italian language and civilization through the study of grammar and
literature. Emphasis is placed on acquiring an advanced level of
verbal expression in conversation, reading, and writing. (CSU/UC)
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Italian 102. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to introduce students to Italian cinema, culture, and language. Focus is on acquiring and improving conversational ability and cultural comprehension through the study of film.
Students will have the opportunity for extensive practice in speaking
and writing in Italian as well as building practical vocabulary with
an emphasis on comprehension and oral/written expression. The
course will examine a variety of political, historical, and social
themes, as experienced in Italian society throughout the modern
period. Strong emphasis is placed on the examination of the multiple
ways in which these themes have shaped the image of modern Italy.
(CSU) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ITAL 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
JAPANESE
A major reason for studying the Japanese language is the enrichment
of one’s intellectual growth in the context of the rest of the world. In
learning Japanese, one also learns about the culture, philosophy, and
civilization of another people, thereby broadening understanding of
the world. On the practical side, any field of specialization (journalism, medicine, law, business, teaching) is enhanced if one can speak
another language. In California, knowledge of a modern language
is now required in many jobs that deal with the public such as Civil
Service, social work, nursing, and other service-oriented fields.
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Foreign Correspondent, Foreign Service
Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business,
Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel Agent.
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Modern
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
170
Journalism
JAPANESE COURSES (JPNS)
JPNS 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
JPNS 101: Elementary Japanese I
5.0 Units. No prerequisite. Four lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A beginning course offering study and practice in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Japanese, along with an exploration of
the cultural aspects of Japan and the Japanese. The weekly laboratory
requirement enhances students’ verbal and listening comprehension
skills through use of the audiovisual materials. Can also be offered in
a distance learning format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 6: UC Language other than English
JPNS 102: Elementary Japanese II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Japanese 101. Four lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Further emphasis is placed on the structure of the language, verbal
communication, and understanding of Japanese culture. Continued
use of the language laboratory for further mastery of the language.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B or 6: UC
Language other than English
JPNS 105A: Japanese Kanji A
MARIN.EDU
such topics as the following: everyday conversation among in-groups
(husband-wife, friend-friend, among the family), everyday conversation among out-groups (superior-inferior, among the unknowns),
nonverbal communications, and culturally correct Japanese
conversation. Check current schedule for particular focus offered.
May be taken more than once for credit provided the same topic is
not repeated. (CSU) AA/AS Area C (three units)
JPNS 110: Conversational Japanese
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Use of modern colloquial Japanese in conversation and the study of
elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire
skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar.
Oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct pronunciation
of Japanese, using audiovisual materials depicting everyday situations. May also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU)
JPNS 112: Conversational Japanese II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or 110. Three lecture and three laboratory
hours weekly.
Use of modern colloquial Japanese in conversation and the study
of elementary grammar. Designed for students who want to learn
at a faster pace in the spoken language with a minimum of formal
grammar. Use of audio materials improves accuracy and fluency in
pronunciation. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Japanese 101. Sixteen lecture hours per
semester.
JPNS 139: Selected Topics
Intensive study of Kanji characters to increase competence in reading
and writing Japanese and understanding authentic materials. This
course covers characters introduced in Japanese 101. (CSU)
JPNS 203: Intermediate Japanese III
JPNS 105B: Japanese Kanji B
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Japanese 102. Four lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Intensive study of Kanji characters to increase competence in reading
and writing Japanese and understanding authentic materials. 105B
covers characters introduced in Japanese 102. (CSU)
An in-depth study of Japanese, with grammar review, oral practice,
composition, and introduction to literature. The language laboratory
offers the use of audiovisual materials for improved fluency and
accuracy in pronunciation as well as the presentation of cultural
and literary topics. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, IGETC Area 6: UC
Language other than English
JPNS 105C: Japanese Kanji C
JPNS 204: Intermediate Japanese IV
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Japanese 101. Sixteen lecture hours per
semester.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Japanese 102. Sixteen lecture hours per
semester.
Intensive study of Kanji characters to increase competence in reading
and writing Japanese and understanding authentic materials. 105C
covers characters introduced in Japanese 203. (CSU)
JPNS 105D: Japanese Kanji D
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Japanese 203. Sixteeen lecture hours per
semester.
Intensive study of Kanji characters to increase competence in reading
and writing Japanese and understanding authentic materials. 105D
covers characters introduced in Japanese 204. (CSU)
JPNS 108: Japanese Conversation through the Movies
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Japanese 101. Two and one-quarter lecture hours weekly
for eight weeks.
This class offers an intensive study of practical Japanese conversation in any given semester or summer session. The class is offered in
English and Japanese. Subjects of study will change, but will include
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Japanese 203. Four lecture hours weekly.
In-depth study of the language with grammar review, composition,
and introduction to literature. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-2, IGETC Area 3B
JPNS 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
JOURNALISM
The main goals of journalism courses are to prepare students to
become accurate and thorough researchers and precise writers. The
discipline emphasizes the need to think and write clearly and has a
two-fold purpose: to prepare students for careers in newspaper work,
television, and radio news or public relations, and to provide a study
of mass media communications for students who desire to enhance
their liberal education.
Journalism
CATALOG 2010/11
Career Options
Advertising Copywriter, Broadcaster, Feature Writer, Newspaper
Writer, Photojournalist, Print Journalist, Public Relations Worker,
Publications Editor, Publicist: Trade/Business/Labor, Writer/Editor
Faculty
Michael Dougan
Department Phone: (415) 485-9348
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
JOURNALISM COURSES (JOUN)
171
JOUN 122: Newspaper Production, Writing
2.5 Units. No prerequisite. Seven and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This laboratory course gives students an opportunity to apply their
knowledge in news writing and reporting, including qualities of
good writing, summary and special leads, organizing a news story,
quotations and attribution, interviewing, and gathering information.
It also allows students to develop their knowledge and skills in the
fundamentals of headlines, text, photos, and cutlines; story design;
page design for a tabloid format; photos and art; packaging, including flags, standing heads, logos and signs, lift-out quotes, decks,
bylines, credit lines, etc.; special effects; and infographics. Students
in this course serve as the editorial board of the student newspaper.
Together with students in Newspaper Production, they produce the
student newspaper. Combinations of Journalism 122 and 123 may be
taken a total of four times for credit. (CSU)
JOUN 123: Newspaper Production
2.5 Units. No prerequisite. Seven and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
JOUN 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
JOUN 110: Introduction to Mass Communication
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Economics 125 or Ethnic Studies 125 or
History 125 or Political Science 125 or Social Science 125. Students may receive
credit for Journalism 110 or Communications 110, but not for both courses.
Three lecture hours weekly.
A critical, historical survey of mass media from a humanities and
social science perspective including print (newspapers, magazines,
books), broadcast (radio and television), film, audio recording,
images, news gathering and reporting, public relations, advertising,
media rights and responsibilities, media ethics and impact, audience
and feedback, cybermedia, and global media. Students will examine
form, content, and consequences of mass media in our society.
Designed for general education, career exploration, and consumer
understanding of the interaction and influences among and between
media and our culture. Can also be offered in a distance learning
format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area D-7, IGETC Area 4
JOUN 115: News Reporting/Writing
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This lecture/discussion course introduces students to the modern
media, including newspapers, wire services, television, radio,
magazines, public relations, advertising, and photojournalism. The
principal focus is on writing and reporting for newspapers. Major
topics include information about the newsroom, ingredients of news,
qualities of good writing, summary and special leads, organizing
a news story, quotations and attribution, interviewing, gathering
information, features, press releases, obituaries, weather, disaster and
developing stories, press conferences and speeches, beats, advanced
assignments, and legal and ethical ramifications of reporting. Skills
in news writing and reporting are developed through writing stories
for the student newspaper or other media. The goals of the course
are to provide students with opportunities to develop knowledge
and skills in news writing and reporting, and attitudes appropriate
to news writers and reporters as well as consumers of mass media.
(CSU)
This laboratory course gives students who wish to help produce the
student newspaper, but who do not wish to be writers for the paper,
an opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills in a variety of
newspaper-related functions. These functions include: advertising,
circulation, graphics, photography, desktop publishing, and word
processing. Students may select a specialty or specialties each semester, either gaining enhanced skills in one specialty or gaining skills
in different specialties. In addition, students will acquire knowledge
and skills in newspaper design, including fundamentals of headlines,
text, photos, and cutlines; story design; page design for a tabloid
format; photos and art; packaging; special effects; and infographics.
Together with students in Newspaper Production, Writing, they
produce the student newspaper. Combinations of Journalism 122 and
123 may be taken a total of four times for credit. (CSU)
JOUN 125: Broadcast Journalism
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed to introduce beginning broadcasters to writing news for broadcast and to refresh the skills of experienced news
broadcasters who want to improve their styles. It is designed to give
students an overview of news broadcasting and to encourage them
to hone their skills and discover where they can adapt best to the
process. The course covers the skills of writing, reporting, recording,
photographing, editing, producing, and performing for broadcast. It
also covers knowledge of the laws that affect broadcast news, and the
cultivation of a sense of journalism ethics. (CSU)
JOUN 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
JOUN 160: Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the
Media
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Journalism 160 or
Communications 160, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three
lecture hours weekly.
This course will address a variety of entertainment and news content
in print and electronic media. In studying the social construction of
race and gender, we will consider and investigate all sides of issues.
The focus of this course is on contemporary media texts examined
within their historical context. Students will learn methods of
172
Library
media analysis and apply them to the study of various media texts.
Additionally, we will explore the connections among media representations of race and gender and other social constructions, which
will include class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and disability.
In covering race, the course will address the experiences of AfricanAmericans, Native Americans, Asian-Americans, Arab-Americans,
and Latinos in the United States. With regard to gender, this course
will address the social construction of femininity as well as masculinity. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C & G, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 4
JOUN 249: Independent Study
MARIN.EDU
library faculty as needed. Enrollment is open through the first half of
the semester. (CSU/UC)
LIBR 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
LIBR 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
MACHINE AND METALS
TECHNOLOGY
LIBRARY
Study in the field of machine and metals technology is designed as
preparation for entrance into metalworking occupations. Graduates
may enter the fields dealing with industrial production, prototype
construction, special die work, or research and development. The
courses in welding are designed to provide opportunity for the development of skills, knowledge, and experience for employment in the
occupation and as auxiliary experience for persons in other majors.
Learning the techniques of library research will enable students to
make use of this resource with confidence and efficiency. Library
Skills courses enable students to manage information in an era of
information explosion, whether their interests are academic, professional, or personal.
Faculty
Carl Cox, Joan C. Risch
Department Phone: (415) 485-9475
LIBRARY COURSES (LIBR)
LIBR 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
LIBR 110: Introduction to Library Resources: A SelfDirected Approach
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Self-paced. No regularly scheduled class meetings.
Completion of the course represents approximately eighteen to thirty-six hours
of academic work.
A self-paced course that facilitates the use of the library and teaches
the basic skills needed for library research. The resources studied and
the skills learned are applicable to any library - academic, public or
special. Information sources covered in this course include the card
catalog; important reference works such as encyclopedias, dictionaries, and almanacs; periodicals, periodical indexes, and book reviews.
Students may work on assignments whenever the college library is
open, consulting with the instructor and other library faculty as
needed. Enrollment is open through the first half of the semester.
Recommended especially for students working on research projects
for other classes. (CSU/UC)
LIBR 115: Library Research Methods
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Advisory: Library 110. Self-paced. Completion of the
course represents approximately eighteen to thirty-six hours of academic work.
A self-paced course in research methods and techniques for students
who have already taken the introductory library course. Practice
in the use of the more specialized reference books and periodical indexes. Concentrates on a methodology of research and on
timesaving techniques. Students may work on assignments whenever
the college library is open, consulting with the instructor and other
Career Options
Certified Welder, Lathe Operator, Machinist, Machinist Apprentice,
Mechanical Technician, Numerical Control Operator, Production
Welder, Tool and Die Maker, Tool Company Representative, Welder
Fabricator, Welding Technician
Faculty
Arthur Lutz
Department Phone: (415) 883-2211, Ext. 8108
Certificate of Achievement in Machine and Metals Technology,
Occupational
This program is offered only at the Indian Valley Campus. A
Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory completion of
all courses. To receive an Associate of Science degree, a student must
complete a total of 60 units and fulfill all major general education
and graduation requirements. Students should see a counselor to
arrange a program of study.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
First Semester
MACH 130
MACH 140
MACH 145
MACH 165
Second Semester
CIS
101
ELEC
100
MACH 97*
MACH 155
MACH 240
Third Semester
ENGG 256
MACH 131
MACH 250
UNITS
Welding I
Intermediate Machine Tool Processes
Computer Numerical Control Machining/Mill
Blueprint Reading for the Machine Trades
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
Fundamentals of Electronics
Machine Trades Math
Computer Numerical Control Machining/Lathe
Advanced Machine Tool Processes
Practical Materials Science
Welding II
Applications of Machine Tool Technology
2
4
3
2
1½
2
2
3
4
3
2
2
Machine and Metals Technology
CATALOG 2010/11
WE
298B Occupational Work Experience
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
2
173
MACH 131: Welding II
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Machine and Metals Technology 130. One lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
MACH 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
Introductory theory and application of the MIG, TIG, and Plasma
processes. Advanced stick welding on plate in all positions. May be
taken three times for credit. (CSU)
0.5-6 Units.
MACH 139: Selected Topics
MACHINE AND METALS TECHNOLOGY COURSES (MACH)
MACH 090: Machine and Metals Careers: A Hands-On
Workshop
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Two and one half lecture hours and one laboratory
hour weekly for six weeks.
A lecture/demonstration and lab workshop course designed to
acquaint students with the possibilities of the machine and metals
trade as a career choice. Students will see demonstrations of lathes,
milling machines, and assorted shop equipment, and will engage in
hands-on machining. There will be welding and computer machining demonstrations and a visit to a local manufacturing plant.
Women are especially encouraged to enroll.
MACH 097: Machine Trades Math
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
A course designed to present the mathematical principles and
operations necessary for successful involvement in the machine
tool trades. Examples and exercises are taken directly from shop
practices. May be taken three times for credit.
MACH 120: Machine Technology I
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
A survey course in the principles of general machine shop processes
utilizing lathes, milling machines, surface grinders and drilling machines; practice in general bench operations and the use of precision
measuring and machining instruments. May be taken three times for
credit. (CSU)
MACH 121: Machine Technology II
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
MACH 140: Intermediate Machine Tool Processes
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Machine and Metals Technology 120. Two
lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
This course is an intermediate level practice and theory of metal
removal and fabrication, emphasizing the use of lathes, milling
machines, grinders, and drills. Theoretical considerations include
measurement, layout and planning, cutting tool theory, feeds and
speeds, tooling, heat treatment, and numerical control overview. May
be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
MACH 145: Computer Numerical Control Machining/
Mill
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A course in the theoretical principles and practical applications of
computer numerical control with CAD-CAM applied to the milling
machine and machine centers. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
MACH 155: Computer Numerical Control Machining/
Lathe
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Machine and Metals Technology 145.
Three lecture hours weekly.
A lecture and demonstration course presenting the principles of
modern computer numerical control practice on lathes and horizontal machining centers. Students learn to program, edit, and set up
equipment. CAD-CAM software use will be covered. May be taken
three times for credit. (CSU)
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Machine and Metals Technology 120. One lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
MACH 165: Blueprint Reading for the Machine
This course builds upon the fundamentals established in Machine
and Metals Technology 120. Emphasizes the development of
advanced machining techniques utilizing lathes, milling machines,
grinders, and drilling machines. Perfecting manipulative skill,
competency, and machine tool theory is stressed. May be taken three
times for credit. (CSU)
This course provides instruction in blueprint reading for machinists
and for related mechanical trades. Course material covered will
include view visualization, dimensioning methods, terminology and
standards, and geometric tolerancing. Metrics and welding symbology will be included. (CSU)
MACH 130: Welding I
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Fundamental theory and application of welding shop tools and
power equipment. Introduction to oxy-fuel welding and cutting,
manual shielded arc (stick), and welding in the flat and horizontal
positions. Technical study and practice in the safe use of gases, grinders, torches, and arc welders. May be taken three times for credit.
(CSU)
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly.
MACH 230: Advanced Welding
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Machine and Metals Technology 131. One lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
Advanced theory and application of the MIG, TIG and Plasma
processes. Preparation for plate certifications with the MIG and stick
processes. May be taken three times for credit. (CSU)
MACH 240: Advanced Machine Tool Processes
4.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Machine and Metals Technology 140. Two
lecture and six laboratory hours weekly.
An advanced level theory and practice of metal removal and fabrication course emphasizing advanced level practice on lathes, milling
machines, surface grinders, and heat treating equipment. Theoretical
174
Mathematics
considerations include precision measurement techniques, cutting
tool technology, gearing, and nontraditional machining methods.
Computer numerical control and CAD-CAM techniques will be
discussed. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
MACH 250: Applications of Machine Tool Technology
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Six laboratory hours weekly.
Advanced laboratory practice for students pursuing certification
in machine and metals technology. Projects involve state-of-theindustry techniques. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU)
MACH 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
MATHEMATICS
The courses in mathematics provide training in both pure and
applied mathematics, leading to careers in business, research, and
government. Many majors (such as physical and biological sciences,
engineering, and business) are dependent upon the use of applied
mathematics.
Career Options
Accountant, Actuary, Appraiser/Assessor, Bookkeeper, Budget
Analyst, Buyer, Carpenter, Claims Adjuster, Computer Applications
Engineer, Cost Estimator, Credit Analyst, Demographer, Electronics
Technician, Engineering Technician, Financial Analyst, Insurance
Underwriter, Loan Officer, Manager, Information Science, Market
Research Analyst, Mathematical Technician, Mathematician, Operations Research Analyst, Programmer, Purchasing Agent, Research
Assistant, Revenue Agent, Statistician, Stockbroker, Systems Analyst,
Teacher, Teller, Wage and Salary Administrator, Weight Analyst
Faculty
Maula Allen, Joaquin Armendariz, George Golitzin, John P. Jacob, Ira Lansing,
Laurie Ordin, Irina Roderick, Frederick G. Schmitt
MARIN.EDU
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
Freshman Year
MATH 116* Linear Algebra
3
MATH 123
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
5
MATH 124
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
5
* Any one of the following courses may be substituted for Math 116: Computer Science 117 or
130 or 140 or Math 115 or 117.
Sophomore Year
MATH 223
Analytic Geometry, Vector, Analysis, and Calculus III
5
MATH 224
Elementary Differential Equations
4
MATHEMATICS COURSES (MATH)
College of Marin offers a mathematics assessment testing service to
help students make informed decisions when enrolling in mathematics courses. The students are provided with their test scores. Students
registering for mathematics courses who need help in interpreting
their placement test scores, and/or in deciding whether to register for
or remain enrolled in a mathematics course, can seek assistance from
a counselor or their mathematics instructor.
For information about the Mathematics Assessment Test, students
can call the Testing Office at (415) 485-9469 (located in the Student
Services Center, Room 238, Kentfield Campus) or (415) 883-2211, ext.
8510 (Indian Valley Campus).
All mathematics courses may be taken for a letter grade or pass-no
pass. In general, courses required for a transfer student’s four-year
major should be taken on a letter grade basis.
BASIC SKILLS MATH COURSES – NONTRANSFERABLE
MATH 025: Coping with Math Anxiety
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly for four weeks.
A four-week course designed to help all students from all areas
confront and deal with their fears and anxieties with mathematics.
MATH 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
Department Phones:
Kentfield Campus: (415) 485-9510
Indian Valley Campus: (415) 883-2211, Ext. 8510
0.5-6 Units.
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Counseling 125. Three lecture hours
weekly.
A.A. in Mathematics
0.5-1 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in any math
course. One and one-half to three laboratory hours weekly.
The Mathematics Program at the College of Marin is designed to
provide students with an excellent base for a Bachelor’s degree in
mathematics.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the Associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
MATH 085: Arithmetic Skills
This course covers the fundamentals of arithmetic with emphasis on
computational skills. Topics include addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, problem solving, applications,
and an introduction to decimals.
MATH 090: Math Skills Open Lab
A course in which students develop skills for completing assignments
from lecture or laboratory portions of such courses as Math 95,
95AB, 101, 101AB, 101XY, 102G, 103, 103XY, 115. This course develops number sense, mental arithmetic skills, emphasizing arithmetic
manipulations with fractions, and solving problems. May be taken
four times for credit.
Mathematics
CATALOG 2010/11
MATH 095: Basic and Intermediate Math Skills
COLLEGE LEVEL MATH COURSES – NONTRANSFERABLE
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 85 or sufficient score on Math Assessment Test.
Three lecture hours weekly.
MATH 101: Elementary Algebra
This course covers addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
of whole numbers, fractions, mixed numerals, and decimals; square
roots, percents, and applications of arithmetic to include ratio and
proportion; some pre-algebra topics; and measurement to include
area and volume. Can also be offered in a distance learning format.
MATH 095A: Basic Mathematics
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Math 85. Three lecture hours weekly.
Addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, square roots, prime
numbers, greatest common divisors, and least common multiples;
the arithmetic of whole numbers, fractions, mixed numerals, and
decimals will be used in applied problems. Ratio and proportions to
include applications.
MATH 095B: Intermediate Mathematics
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Math 95A or 95X. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course will cover percent; elementary statistics to include averages and graphs; measurement to include length, area and volume;
pre-algebra and applications.
MATH 095G: Medical Assisting Applications
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. An average of four hours weekly in the Math Lab for
eight weeks or until the course is completed.
The apothecary system of units, the household system, the metric
system, conversions from one system to another in the preparation
of dosages. Ratio, proportion, and percent in the preparation of
solutions. Applied problems.
MATH 095X: Basic Math Skills
175
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 95 or 95B or sufficient score on Math Assessment
Test. Five lecture hours weekly.
An introduction to elementary algebra. Topics will include linear
equations, inequalities, systems with applications, polynomials,
rational expressions, exponents, roots, radicals, and quadratic equations. Can also be offered in a distance learning format. AA/AS Math
Proficiency = Math 101A + 101B
MATH 101A: Elementary Algebra I
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Math 95 or 95B or sufficient score on Math Assessment
Test. Five lecture hours weekly.
An introduction to elementary algebra. Topics include linear equations and inequalities, slope of lines, linear graphs, and systems of
equations. Taken with Math 101B, this course is equivalent to Math
101. It is designed for the student who wishes to take more time to
learn elementary algebra. AA/AS Math Proficiency = Math 101A +
101B
MATH 101B: Elementary Algebra II
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Math 101A or 101X. Five lecture hours weekly.
A continuation of elementary algebra. Topics will include polynomials, rational expressions, exponents, roots, radicals and quadratic
equations. Taken with Math 101A, this course is equivalent to Math
101. It is designed for the student who wishes to take more time to
learn elementary algebra. AA/AS Math Proficiency = Math 101A +
101B
MATH 101P: Elementary Algebra Practicum
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Math 85. Approximately four hours weekly in the Math
Lab for eight weeks or until the course is completed.
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Math 95 or 95AB or 95XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. Corequisite: Math 101A or 101B. Two laboratory hours
weekly.
Addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, square roots, prime
numbers, greatest common divisors, least common multiples and
arithmetic of whole numbers, fractions and decimals will be used in
applied problems. Ratio and proportion to include applications.
An introduction to elementary algebra. Topics will include linear
equations, inequalities, systems with applications, polynomials,
rational expressions, exponents, roots, radicals and quadratic equations. May be taken four times for credit.
MATH 095Y: Intermediate Math Skills
MATH 101X: Elementary Algebra
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Math 95A or Math 95X. Approximately four hours
weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course is completed.
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Math 95 or 95B or 95XY or satisfactory score on Math
Assessment Test. May be enrolled concurrently with Math 101Y. An average
of six hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course is
completed.
Percent; elementary statistics to include averages and graphs;
measurement to include length, area and volume; pre-algebra and
applications.
MATH 097: Basic Math Skills for Automotive Technology
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course will include addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percent. Also
included are ratio and proportion, metric system, graphs and applications specific to automotive technology. Offered only in the spring
semester of every other year.
Algebraic notation, properties of integers and rational numbers,
operations on integers and rational numbers, solving equations and
systems, operations with polynomials, operations with fractional
expressions, applied problems, and formulas. AA/AS Math Proficiency = Math 101A + 101B
MATH 101Y: Elementary Algebra
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Math 101A or 101X or concurrent enrollment. An
average of six hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course
is completed.
Solving equations containing fractional expressions, systems of equations and graphs, inequalities, operations with radicals, quadratic
equations, and applied problems. AA/AS Math Proficiency = Math
101A + 101B
176
Mathematics
MATH 102G: Geometry
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. Three lecture hours weekly.
Methods of deductive reasoning. A study of lines, planes, triangles,
circles, polygons and polyhedrons. Includes investigation of the
Pythagorean theorem, similar triangles, and geometric solids. This
course is strongly recommended for math, science, and engineering
students planning to take trigonometry or calculus.
MATH 103: Intermediate Algebra
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. Five lecture hours weekly.
This course is an extension of many of the concepts introduced
in elementary algebra. The real number properties, polynomials,
rational expressions, first degree equations, inequalities and applications, exponents, radicals, quadratic equations and complex numbers
are treated in greater detail. In addition, functions and their graphs,
systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming,
exponential and logarithmic functions will be covered. This course
will satisfy the prerequisite for Math 121. The course will be offered
in the Math Lab (individualized mode) as well as the lecture/discussion mode. Can also be offered in a distance learning format. AA/AS
Area E
MATH 103A: Intermediate Algebra
2.5 Units. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. Five lecture hours weekly.
This course is the first part of a 2-part sequence, Math 103AB. This
two-semester sequence includes all the topics from the one-semester
course, Math 103. Math 103A topics include real number properties,
polynomials, rational expressions, first degree equations, inequalities
and applications, systems of linear equations with matrix elimination
methods, linear programming, functions and graphs. AA/AS Area E
MATH 103B: Intermediate Algebra
2.5 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103A or 103X. Five lecture hours weekly.
This course is the second part of a 2-part sequence, Math 103AB.
Quadratic, radical and quadratic form equations; relation, functions,
inverses and their graphs; graphs and equations of lines and circles;
systems of equations and inequalities; matrices and linear programming; exponential and logarithmic functions; applications. AA/AS
Area E
MATH 103S: Intermediate Algebra
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. Four lecture hours weekly.
Math 103S is designed for nonmathematics students who need only
Math 115 to fulfill their mathematics transfer requirement. Physical
science students planning on taking Math 104, 105 and one of the
calculus sequences should not take Math 103S; they must take Math
103. This course is an extension of many of the concepts introduced
in elementary algebra. The real number properties, polynomials,
rational expressions, first degree equations, inequalities and applications, exponents, radicals and quadratic equations. Functions and
their graphs (linear and quadratic), systems of equations and a light
treatment of exponential and logarithmic functions. Emphasis is on
verbal problem solving. Students who have completed Math 103 or
Math 103AB or Math 103XY will not be eligible for credit in Math
MARIN.EDU
103S. This course satisfies the prerequisite for Math 110 and Math
115.
MATH 103X: Intermediate Algebra
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. May be enrolled concurrently with Math 103Y. An
average of six hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course
is completed.
Properties of the real number system, linear equations, inequalities,
polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, exponents, radicals,
equations and applications, and complex numbers. AA/AS Area E
MATH 103Y: Intermediate Algebra
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103A or 103X or concurrent enrollment. An
average of six hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course
is completed.
Quadratic, radical and quadratic form equations; relations, functions, inverses and their graphs; graphs and equations of lines and
circles; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices and linear
programming; exponential and logarithmic functions; applications.
AA/AS Area E
COLLEGE LEVEL MATH COURSES – TRANSFERABLE
MATH 104: Plane Trigonometry
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. Three lecture hours weekly.
Trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; graphs, equations and identities involving the trigonometric functions; triangle
solutions, vector applications, and DeMoivre’s Theorem. Can also
be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU) AA/AS Area E, CSU
Area B-4
MATH 104X: Plane Trigonometry
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. An average of four hours weekly in the Math Lab for
eight weeks or until the course is completed.
Trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; graphs and identities involving the trigonometric functions; right triangle solutions.
(CSU) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4
MATH 104Y: Plane Trigonometry
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Math 104X or concurrent enrollment. An average
of four hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course is
completed.
Solving trigonometric equations, Law of Sines and Cosines to solve
triangles, vector applications, DeMoivre’s Theorem, and polar
coordinates. (CSU) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4
MATH 105: College Algebra
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. May be taken concurrently with Math 104 or 104XY.
Four lecture hours weekly.
This course includes an introduction to the elementary logic necessary for understanding mathematical proofs; emphasis on functions
and graphs (both algebraic and transcendental); polynomial equations and their roots; solutions of inequalities (including absolute
Mathematics
CATALOG 2010/11
values); introduction to sequences, series, and conic sections. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 109: Pre-Calculus College Algebra and
Trigonometry
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. Five lecture hours weekly.
This class is an intensive combined course in pre-calculus algebra
and trigonometry intended to prepare students for calculus. Topics
include: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Also, the binomial theorem, arithmetic and
geometric sequences and series, mathematical induction, trigonometric identities, polar coordinates, the conic sections, vectors and
applications of right angle trigonometry. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E,
CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 110: Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY. Three lecture hours
weekly.
An elementary introduction to mathematics based on work in
intermediate algebra and emphasizing the deductive process in
concepts of contemporary mathematics. This course is primarily for
liberal arts students. Topics may include logic, set theory, mathematics of finance, linear programming, combinatorial modeling, graph
theory, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, group theory,
and game theory. An introduction to the computer using BASIC or
Logo computer languages may also be used. This course is designed
to fulfill the intermediate algebra-based mathematics requirement
for the California State University system. (CSU) AA/AS Area E,
CSU Area B-4
MATH 114: Finite Mathematics
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test . Three lecture hours weekly.
An introduction to various mathematical models and techniques
used in business, management, and the social sciences. Topics
include matrix methods for solving systems of linear equations,
matrix algebra, linear programming, the simplex method, sets and
counting techniques, and probability theory. Applications include
the Leontief input output model, Markov chains, game theory, and
the mathematics of finance. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area
B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 115: Probability and Statistics
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test. Credit will be awarded for either Math 115 or Statistics
115, but not both courses. Four lecture hours weekly.
This course is an in-depth introduction to probability and statistics,
and is especially appropriate for students in the math and life/earth
science disciplines. Descriptive statistics, introduction to probability
theory, probability distributions, data sampling, estimation, correlation, hypothesis testing. Can also be offered in a distance learning
format. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 116: Linear Algebra
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 123. Three lecture hours weekly.
The study of systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, vector
spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues
and eigenvectors, and applications. Recommended for mathemat-
177
ics majors or students who plan to study mathematics in-depth in
association with other majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area
B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 117: Discrete Mathematics
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 121 or 123. Also offered as Computer Science 117.
Students may receive credit for Computer Science 117 or Math 117 but not for
both courses. Three lecture hours weekly.
A survey of topics including set theory, combinatorics, graph theory,
algorithms, logic, Boolean algebra, formal languages, and probability theory. Recommended for mathematics majors and students
interested in engineering and applied fields. (CSU/UC) CSU Area
B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 121: Calculus I with Applications
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on
Pre-Calculus Assessment Test. Three lecture hours weekly.
Topics will include limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Standard applications of the
derivative to drawing graphs of functions of one real variable and
to optimization problems will be included. Business applications of
profit maximization and consumer/producer surplus will be covered.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 122: Calculus II with Applications
3.0 Units. Prerequisites: Math 104 or 104XY and Math 121 or satisfactory score
on Trigonometry Placement Test. Three lecture hours weekly.
Topics will include multivariable calculus, partial derivatives, double
integrals, methods of integration, the calculus of trigonometric functions, first order ordinary differential equations, calculus applied to
probability and statistics, infinite series, and applications. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 123: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
5.0 Units. Prerequisites: Math 104 or 104XY and Math 105 or satisfactory score
on Pre-Calculus Placement Test and Trigonometry Placement Test. Five lecture
hours weekly.
Introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one
real variable. Continuous functions, limit of a function at a point,
the derivative. The differentiation formulas and rules for one variable
functions, implicit differentiation. The mean value theorem and its
application to optimization and curve sketching, linear approximation and differential notation. Introduction to the Riemann integral
and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Applications of the
Riemann integral to finding areas, volumes of solids of revolutions,
work, centroids, and total force on a plane submerged in a fluid.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 124: Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 123. Five lecture hours weekly.
A continuation of Math 123 to include the inverse function theorem
for functions of one real variable, derivatives of inverse trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic
functions. Introduction to first order ordinary differential equations, techniques of integration, improper integrals, indeterminate
forms, sequences, series, power series functions, and the calculus of
parameterized plane curves. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area
B-4, IGETC Area 2
178
Medical Assisting
MARIN.EDU
MATH 190: Mathematics for Teachers
MATH 249: Independent Study
3.0 Units. Prerequisite. Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY. Three lecture hours
weekly.
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
This is a course appropriate for students who may be considering
teaching K-12 mathematics, and anyone who may wish to benefit
from a deeper understanding of foundational topics in mathematics
and explore methods of delivery. The course content will include topics in number sense (numeral systems, history, place value, number
sets), arithmetic (focus on operation models, and order of operations
with integers and rational numbers), geometry (focus on vocabulary,
construction, Euclidean/Non-Euclidean, concept of perimeter/
area/volume as comparisons, unit conversions, properties of similar
triangles), and foundations to algebra (focus on algebraic symbols,
operations on integers, rational and complex numbers and how
they relate to algebra, history, order of operations in algebra, solving
equations and word problems, radicals, group axioms.) In addition to
exploring content depth, students will have opportunities to explore
content delivery in an English as a Second Language environment,
participate in lesson study/scripting, apply course content in developing lesson plans, and participate in cross-grade level discussions.
(CSU) AA/AS Area E
MATH 199: Seminar for Tutors
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly. Students will apply course
content as independent study in lab environment two hours weekly.
This course is designed to help student tutors develop their understanding of the principles of mathematics and of effective mathematics tutoring. Students will learn how to recognize different learning
styles so that they may better help others analyze their study habits
and problem solving skills. Students will learn how to communicate
more effectively and to provide an encouraging tutoring environment. (Please see Math Department for information on transferability of this course.)
MATH 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
MATH 223: Analytic Geometry, Vector Analysis and
Calculus III
5.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 124. Five lecture hours weekly.
A continuation of Math 124 to include solid analytic geometry,
vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and
vector analysis including Green’s, Stoke’s, and divergence theorems.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 224: Elementary Differential Equations
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Math 124. Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in Math
223 recommended. Four lecture hours weekly.
Elementary theory of differential equations including first order
equations, second and higher order linear equations, the methods
of power series, and Laplace transforms; first order linear systems,
numerical methods, partial differential equations, Fourier series, and
boundary value problems. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MEDICAL ASSISTING
This program provides the opportunity for the development of basic
entry-level skills necessary for employment in a clinical/medical office environment. In a rapidly growing profession, medical assistants
work directly with physicians and other health care personnel as
team members in providing patient services. Medical assistants
perform a variety of clinical, laboratory, and administrative functions in physicians’ offices, medical clinics, laboratories, and specific
hospital departments.
The program is offered only at the Indian Valley Campus.
Students may elect to complete an Associate in Science degree, or a
Certificate of Achievement: Administrative and Clinical, Administrative, or Clinical. Students may elect to complete a Skills Certificate
for Medical Terminology Skills, MediSoft Skills, or Phlebotomy
Skills. The Certificate of Achievement options require a minimum of
two semesters to complete. Students may take courses on a part-time
basis.
Career Options
Administrative and/or Clinical Medical Office Assistant, Clinical/
Administrative Research Assistant, Insurance Coder/Biller, Medical
Lab Assistant (Clinics, Hospitals, Private Labs), Medical Office
Manager, Phlebotomist, Veterinary Hospital Front Office Assistant
Faculty
Carol Lacy - Coordinator
Department Phone: (415) 485-9319
Medical Assisting Program Coordinator Phone: (415) 883-2211, Ext. 8536
Recency Statement
Medical Assisting courses must be completed no longer than five
years before departmental certification is awarded. Courses taken
greater than five years before certification award must be repeated, or
the student can pursue credit by examination.
A.S. in Medical Assisting: Administrative and Clinical Option
Occupational
(Certificates of Achievement also awarded. Skills Certificates in
Medical Terminology, MediSoft, and Phlebotomy are available.)
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements, as well as the completion of general education and
graduation requirements. The Certificate of Achievement is awarded
for completion of the program requirements as shown in the following list.
No program application procedure is required, however it is
advisable to see a counselor. Students may enter in the fall or spring
semester. Those currently working in the health care field may
receive consent to enroll in selected courses on a pass/no pass basis.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
Medical Assisting
CATALOG 2010/11
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
BOS
76*
Electronic Ten-Key Calculating Machines
1
BOS
120** Computer Keyboarding
1
MEDA 110
Administrative Medical Office Procedures
2
MEDA 110L Administrative Medical Office Procedures Laboratory
1
MEDA 120
Medical Terminology I
3
MEDA 121
Medical Terminology II
3
MEDA 125
Medical Financial Procedures
1
MEDA 125L Medical Financial Procedures Laboratory
1
MEDA 126
Medical Office Computers – MediSoft
2
MEDA 126L Medical Office Computers – MediSoft Laboratory
½
MEDA 135
Clinical Procedures I
2
MEDA 135L Clinical Procedures I Laboratory
1½
MEDA 136
Medical Laboratory Procedures
2½
MEDA 136L Medical Laboratory Procedures Laboratory
1
MEDA 145
Understanding Human Diseases
2
MEDA 150
Pharmacology for Medical Assistants
1½
MEDA 210L*** Clinical Externship
2½
In addition, select three units from the following list:
BOS
44+ Skill Building for Keyboarders
1
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
3
CIS
101
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1½
CIS
117
Introduction to Database Design and Programming
1½
CIS
118
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
1½
CIS
126
Introduction to Windows
1½
* This is a self-paced course that may be waived by passing a proficiency test and is applied
toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
** 40 wam proficiency required. Proof of proficiency must be submitted to the Admissions
and Records Office for graduation. Course can be taken four times.
*** Clinical Externship – prerequisites: MEDA 110, 110L, 135, 135L, and 120 or 121 must be
completed.
+ Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
A.S. in Medical Assisting:
Administrative Option, Occupational
(Certificates of Achievement also awarded.)
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements, as well as the completion of general education and
graduation requirements. The Certificate of Achievement is awarded
for completion of the program requirements as shown in the following list.
No program application procedure is required, however it is
advisable to see a counselor. Students may enter in the fall or spring
semester. Those currently working in the health care field may
receive consent to enroll in selected courses on a pass/no pass basis.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
BOS
76*
BOS
120**
MEDA 110
MEDA 110L
MEDA 120
MEDA 121
MEDA 125
MEDA 125L
MEDA 126
MEDA 126L
Electronic Ten-Key Calculating Machines
Computer Keyboarding
Administrative Medical Office Procedures
Administrative Medical Office Procedures Laboratory
Medical Terminology I
Medical Terminology II
Medical Financial Procedures
Medical Financial Procedures Laboratory
Medical Office Computers – MediSoft
Medical Office Computers - MediSoft Laboratory
UNITS
1
1
2
1
3
3
1
1
2
½
179
MEDA 210L*** Clinical Externship
2½
In addition, select three units from the following list:
BOS
44+ Skill Building for Keyboarders
1
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
3
CIS
101
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1½
CIS
117
Introduction to Database Design and Programming
1½
CIS
118
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
1½
CIS
126
Introduction to Windows
1½
* This is a self-paced course that may be waived by passing a proficiency test and is applied
toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
** 40 wam proficiency required. Proof of proficiency must be submitted to the Admissions
and Records Office for graduation. Course can be taken four times.
*** Clinical Externship – prerequisites: MEDA 110, 110L, and 120 or 121 must be completed.
+ Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
A.S. in Medical Assisting: Clinical Option
Occupational (Certificates of Achievement also awarded.)
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements, as well as the completion of general education and
graduation requirements. The Certificate of Achievement is awarded
for completion of the program requirements as shown in following
list.
No program application procedure is required; however it is
advisable to see a counselor. Students may enter in the fall or spring
semester. Those currently working in the health care field may
receive consent to enroll in selected courses on a credit/no credit
grade basis.
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
MEDA 120
Medical Terminology I
3
MEDA 121
Medical Terminology II
3
MEDA 135
Clinical Procedures I
2
MEDA 135L Clinical Procedures I Laboratory
1½
MEDA 136
Medical Laboratory Procedures
2½
MEDA 136L Medical Laboratory Procedures Laboratory
1
MEDA 145
Understanding Human Diseases
2
MEDA 150
Pharmacology for Medical Assistants
1½
MEDA 210L*** Clinical Externship
2½
In addition, select three units from the following list:
BOS
44+ Skill Building for Keyboarders
1
BOS
120
Computer Keyboarding
1
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
3
CIS
101
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1½
CIS
117
Introduction to Database Design and Programming
1½
CIS
118
Introduction to Spreadsheet Design
1½
CIS
126
Introduction to Windows
1½
MEDA 126
Medical Office Computers – MediSoft
2
MEDA 126L Medical Office Computers – MediSoft Laboratory
½
* This is a self-paced course that may be waived by passing a proficiency test and is applied
toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
** 40 wam proficiency required. Proof of proficiency must be submitted to the Admissions
and Records Office for graduation. Course can be taken four times.
*** Clinical Externship – prerequisites: MEDA 135, 135L, and 120 or 121 must be completed.
+ Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
180
Medical Assisting
MARIN.EDU
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificates of
Achievement.
Medical Terminology Skills Certificate
The certificate provides the student with knowledge of the fundamental language necessary for health courses.
REQUIREMENTS
MEDA 120
Medical Terminology I
MEDA 121
Medical Terminology II
UNITS
3
3
MediSoft Skills Certificate
The certificate is awarded to the student upon successful completion
of the three courses. The courses provide a working knowledge of
and practice with using medical office software.
REQUIREMENTS
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
MEDA 126
Medical Office Computers-MediSoft
MEDA 126L Medical Office Computers-MediSoft Laboratory
UNITS
3
2
½
Phlebotomy Skills Certificate
The phlebotomy certificate awarded upon successful completion of
MEDA 141 and MEDA 141L provides the required hours, knowledge
and skills for phlebotomy training and practice.
REQUIREMENTS
MEDA 141
Phlebotomy Techniques
MEDA 141L Phlebotomy Techniques Clinical Laboratory
UNITS
3
1
MEDA 110L: Administrative Medical Office Procedures
Laboratory
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 110. Three laboratory
hours weekly.
The student will apply theoretical concepts to practice administrative
skills commonly performed in the medical office such as telephone
techniques, appointment scheduling, office reception, etc. (CSU)
MEDA 112: Medical Transcription
2.0 Units. Prerequisites: Business Office Systems 120 and Medical Assisting 120
or 121. One lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course includes the fundamentals of medical transcription using electric typewriters and selected types of transcription machines;
ethical/legal responsibilities of the medical transcriber; continued
study and application of medical terminology; transcription of medical forms, reports, and correspondence common to various medical/
surgical specialties. (CSU)
MEDA 120: Medical Terminology I
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken before or after Medical Assisting 121.
Three lecture hours weekly.
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of medical
word analysis and word construction. Emphasis is placed upon spelling, anatomical, pathological, surgical and diagnostic terminology.
Material is presented in a systems approach with units on anatomical directional terms, integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular,
digestive, nervous, and musculoskeletal systems. Systems studied are
different than Medical Assisting 121. (CSU)
MEDA 121: Medical Terminology II
MEDICAL ASSISTING COURSES (MEDA)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. May be taken before or after Medical Assisting 120.
Three lecture hours weekly.
MEDA 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of medical
word analysis and word construction. Emphasis is placed upon spelling, anatomical, pathological, surgical and diagnostic terminology.
Material is presented in a systems approach with units on the urinary
system, male and female reproductive systems, obstetrics and
neonatology, eye and ear systems, and the endocrine system. Systems
studied are different than Medical Assisting 120. (CSU)
0.5-6 Units.
MEDA 100: Introduction to Health Careers
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Dental Assisting 100,
Medical Assisting 100, or Nursing Education 100. Credit will be awarded for
only one course. Two lecture hours weekly.
This course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in
a health profession. It provides an overview of the current health care
delivery system, the physical, mental, and emotional demands of the
workplace and the skills needed by the healthcare worker today and
in the future. Students will learn about qualifications and professional preparation needed for various careers and analyze the roles
and responsibilities in today’s health care environment. This course
is designed to help students develop realistic career goals as well as to
give an appreciation of how the current health care delivery system is
influencing individual health professional roles and responsibilities.
(CSU)
MEDA 125: Medical Financial Procedures
MEDA 110: Administrative Medical Office Procedures
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 125. Three laboratory
hours weekly.
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 110L. Two lecture
hours weekly.
This course is an introduction to the medical front office with
an emphasis on front office procedures. Topics for examination
include medical practice settings, medical law and ethics, reception,
telephone, appointments, patient records, etc. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 125L. One lecture
hour weekly.
This theory course examines the basic financial operations and
procedures of a medical office. Topics for examination include
accounting, banking, bookkeeping, current procedural terminology,
international classification of diseases, health insurance claims, managed care and government sponsored health insurance programs.
(CSU)
MEDA 125L: Medical Financial Procedures Laboratory
The student will develop skills in managing patient financial accounts in a medical office. Practice will be given to posting financial
information to a patient’s medical record, coding procedures and
diagnoses, and completing medical insurance forms. (CSU)
Medical Assisting
CATALOG 2010/11
MEDA 126: Medical Office Computers - MediSoft
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 126L. Two lecture
hours weekly.
This theory course will introduce the student to the use of computers
in the medical office. The course will focus on the basic functions
of the MediSoft program such as recording patient information to
create and update patient records, entering financial transactions,
and scheduling appointments. (CSU)
MEDA 126L: Medical Office Computers - MediSoft
Laboratory
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 126. One and one-half
laboratory hours weekly.
This laboratory class will apply theory learned in Medical Assisting
126 and provide students with practical exercises on the computer
using the MediSoft program. (CSU)
MEDA 127: Medical Office Computers - Medical Manager
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 127L. One lecture
hour weekly.
This theory course will introduce the student to the use of computers
in the medical office. The course will focus on the basic functions of
the Medical Manager software program such as recording patient
information, entering transactions, and completing insurance
claims. (CSU)
MEDA 127L: Medical Office Computers Laboratory Medical Manager
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 127. One and one half
laboratory hours weekly.
This laboratory course will provide hands-on computer experience
with the Medical Manager software program. The student will apply
theory learned in Medical Assisting 127. (CSU)
MEDA 135: Clinical Procedures I
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 135L. Two lecture
hours weekly.
This course introduces the student to clinical assisting techniques
and procedures common to primary care in a family practice
medical office: vital signs, anthropometric measurements, assisting with minor office surgery, promoting tissue healing through
selected physical therapy procedures, sterilization and disinfection of
instruments, sterile and non-sterile dressing changes, medical office
emergencies, visual screening and auditory acuity. Concentration
will be on medical asepsis and infection control during all procedures. (CSU)
MEDA 135L: Clinical Procedures I Laboratory
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 135. Four and onehalf laboratory hours weekly.
This skills lab introduces the student to clinical medical assisting
performance and skills techniques, and procedures common to
primary care in a family practice medical office: demonstrating the
taking of vital signs and anthropometric measurements, assisting
with minor office surgery, promoting tissue healing through the
performance of selected physical therapy modalities, demonstrating appropriate sterilization and disinfection procedures, safely
operating the autoclave, performing sterile and non-sterile dressing
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changes, responding to emergencies, and performing visual and
auditory irrigation, medication administration and ear acuity testing. The students will also position the patient for selected specialty
exams. The student will demonstrate appropriate hand washing at all
times. (CSU)
MEDA 136: Medical Laboratory Procedures
2.5 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 136L. Two and
one-half lecture hours weekly.
This theory course includes examination of selected, common
screening laboratory and clinical procedures performed in medical
offices. Topics for examination include EKGs, hematology, urinalysis,
collection of specimens, assisting with prenatal exams and radiology,
and diagnostic imaging. Asepsis and universal precautions will be
stressed. (CSU)
MEDA 136L: Medical Laboratory Procedures Laboratory
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 136. Three laboratory
hours weekly.
The student will develop skills in performing common laboratory
procedures and diagnostic tests required of medical assistants as
performed in a medical office or clinic (i.e. hemoglobin, hematocrit,
EKGs, urinalysis). Lab safety and universal precautions will be
stressed. (CSU)
MEDA 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
MEDA 141: Phlebotomy Techniques
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 141L. Advisory:
Medical Assisting 136. Other limitations on enrollment: High School
graduation or GED or equivalent. Five lecture hours weekly for ten weeks.
This course is designed to provide students with specific knowledge
of the role of the phlebotomist, blood collection procedures, the
proper use of equipment, and techniques necessary to perform capillary (skin) punctures and venipunctures. Basic anatomy and physiology, safety, legal, and ethical issues are discussed in detail. Students
are eligible for State and National certification as phlebotomists upon
successful completion of Medical Assisting 141 and 141L. (CSU)
MEDA 141L: Phlebotomy Techniques Practicum
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Medical Assisting 141. Advisory:
Medical Assisting 136L. Other limitations on enrollment: High School
graduation or GED or equivalent. Five laboratory hours weekly for ten weeks.
This course is designed to fulfill CCR requirements for the practical
component of phlebotomy certification as a CPT 1. Students will
perform capillary punctures and venipunctures in a clinical setting
under direct supervision of instructor and laboratory/clinic personnel. Successful completion of Medical Assisting 141 and 141L will
qualify the student for certification as a phlebotomist (CPT 1). Clinical facilities require background checks, liability insurance, lab coat,
name tag and patch, completed health clearance form, and negative
TB test. Students must purchase malpractice insurance through the
department during the first week of class, and submit a completed
Health Clearance form. (CSU)
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Multimedia Studies
MEDA 145: Understanding Human Diseases
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Medical Assisting 120 or 121. Two lecture hours weekly.
This theory course is designed to provide medical assisting students
with specific knowledge of human diseases across the lifespan with
an emphasis on anatomic terms, prevention, diagnoses, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, conditions, treatments, medical and
surgical procedures, medications and clinical and diagnostic testing
used in a variety of medical settings. Alternative treatment modalities are also briefly discussed throughout the course. Instruction
includes lecture and case studies to provide and reinforce theory and
develop critical thinking skills. (CSU)
MEDA 150: Pharmacology for Medical Assistants
1.5 Units. No prerequisite. One and one-half lecture hours weekly.
This course introduces the student to common drugs and medication, specific mathematical computations, drug indications and
contraindications, anaphylactic and other allergenic responses, care
of emergencies due to drug reactions, and responsibilities of the
medical assistant. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
MEDA 210L: Clinical Externship
2.5 Units. Prerequisites: Medical Assisting 110, 110L, 120 or 121, 135, and 135L
are prerequisites for the Clinical and Administrative Option. Medical Assisting
120 or 121, 135, and 135L are prerequisites for the Clinical Option. Medical
Assisting 110, 110L, 120 or 121 are prerequisites for the Administrative Option.
One hundred and twenty hours of externship to be arranged.
This experience extends the student’s education and preparation
from the classroom to the community clinic, office or hospital under
the direct supervision of the instructor and clinical supervisors. Students are required to have had a physical examination and received a
health clearance in addition to the required immunizations. First Aid
and CPR certificates, liability insurance, and uniform are required.
(CSU)
MEDA 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
MULTIMEDIA STUDIES
This program is designed to provide a link between content, technology and creative vision for emerging digital artists. Each course
provides hands-on experience for professional advancement, career
related training, and transfer preparation for university degrees. Each
course develops the creative process through project-based learning
that prepares students to be resourceful and independent, and to
succeed in the wide range of multimedia careers.
Career Options
Animator, Application Designer, Art Director, CGI Effects Artist,
Game Level Designer, Graphic or Production Artist, Illustrator,
Interface Designer, Project Manager, Video Editor, Video Producer,
Visual Designer, Web Designer, Web Developer
Faculty
James Gonzalez, Derek Wilson
Department Phone: (415) 457-8811, Ext. 8200
MARIN.EDU
A.S. in Multimedia Studies
This curriculum is designed to provide education for digital and
new media-related careers, professional advancement and transfer
preparation.
A Skills Certificate is earned by satisfactory completion of the
required courses as outlined for the specific Skill Certificate.
A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion of the
core program plus course requirements for each intended specialty.
An Associate in Science (A.S.) degree is awarded for completion
of all requirements in the core program and chosen specialty as well
as completion of general education and graduation requirements
Repetition Policy
Students may petition to repeat MMST courses if two years have
lapsed since they last attended said course. College of Marin petition
procedures are located in the Admissions and Records section of the
catalog.
Core Requirements
The following courses are required of all Multimedia Studies degree
and Certificate of Achievement students:
REQUIREMENTS
MMST 101
MMST 110
MMST 111
MMST 112
MMST 122
MMST 200
MMST 213
Orientation to Multimedia
Introduction to Multimedia
Multimedia Production
Fundamentals of Media Design
Introduction to Multimedia Design
Portfolio Development
Multimedia Internship
UNITS
½
3
3
3
3
3
3
Specialties
In addition to the core requirements listed above, each Multimedia
Studies degree and Certificate of Achievement student will complete
one of the following specialties:
Authoring Specialty
Provides training and experience of digital media as it applies to
website design, development, and promotion with an emphasis on
skills related to the production of interactive content for delivery over
the web.
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
CIS
142
Intermediate HTML and Scripting
1½
MMST 131A Web Design I
3
MMST 131B Web Design II
3
MMST 134A Interactive Media Design I
3
MMST 134B Interactive Media Design II
3
Sound and Video Design Specialty
Provides training and experience of digital sound and digital video as it applies to multimedia design, with emphasis on the development of skills related to the post-production of
sound and video for all interactive, time-based, and popular media.
MMST 143
Video Production for Multimedia
3
MMST 144
Audio Production for Multimedia
3
MMST 166
Digital Video Editing and Motion Graphics
3
MMST 158
Audio Design: Interactive
3
MMST 240
Advanced Sound and Video Design
3
Visual Design Specialty
Provides training and experience of illustration, layout, modeling, and photo imaging, as it
applies to visual content design, with an emphasis on the development of skills for producing
strong concepts of dynamic, interactive, and printed materials.
MMST 124
3-D Modeling and Animation
3
MMST 150
Digital Imaging Techniques with Photoshop
3
Multimedia Studies
CATALOG 2010/11
MMST 151
Illustration and Animation
MMST 163
3-D Character Animation: Lighting and Materials
MMST 183
Layout Design
Multimedia Studies Skills Certificates
Each Multimedia Studies Skills Certificate student must complete the required courses as
outlined for the specific Skills Certificate(s):
Multimedia 3-D Skills Certificate
MMST 124
3-D Modeling and Animation
MMST 163
3-D Character Animation: Complex Lighting and Materials
MMST 173
Advanced 3-D Modeling and Animation
Multimedia Foundation Skills Certificate
MMST 110
Introduction to Multimedia
MMST 111
Multimedia Production
MMST 112
Fundamentals of Multimedia Design
Multimedia Print Design Skills Certificate
MMST 150
Digital Imaging Techniques with Photoshop
MMST 160
Digital Image Calibration and Printing (Prerequisite: MMST 150)
MMST 183
Layout Design
MMST 193
Print and Packaging Design (Prerequisite: MMST 183)
Multimedia Video Production Skills Certificate
MMST 143
Video Production for Multimedia
MMST 166
Digital Video Editing and Motion Graphics
MMST 200
Portfolio Development
Multimedia Web Authoring Skills Certificate
MMST 131A Web Design I
MMST 131B Web Design II
MMST 131C Web Design III
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
MULTIMEDIA STUDIES COURSES (MMST)
MMST 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
MMST 090: Multimedia Studies Program Orientation/
Multimedia Careers
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours and one laboratory hour weekly
for four weeks.
This course will provide a general introduction and familiarization of
the COM Multimedia Studies Program and the local media industry.
Lecture and lab components will cover basic computer skills required
for entry into the Certificate of Achievement program, an orientation to the lab facilities and other program resources. It will also
cover career information including industry salaries, job titles and
requisite skills, employment trends, and other relevant occupational
information about this dynamic field.
MMST 101: Orientation to Multimedia
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. Three practicum hours weekly for eight weeks.
Digital media is becoming the predominant method for receiving news and entertainment. This course will cover the tools and
techniques needed to become literate in this new digital media
universe. Armed with the knowledge and skills learned in the course,
students will be able to safely and effectively find and consume the
tremendous amount of digital media now available in many formats
and delivery platforms. This course is offered as a self-paced Web
based course. (CSU)
183
MMST 110: Introduction to Multimedia
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course will provide an overview of the burgeoning new field of
multimedia. Through lecture and demonstration, students will learn
about basic multimedia production as well as topics that include
design, development, and marketing. Students will survey basic
concepts and applications of multimedia production. Providing an
aesthetic and historical framework, this course is the logical first step
on the path to a career in multimedia. (CSU)
MMST 111: Multimedia Production
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Computer Information Systems 110. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course is an opportunity for students to explore the different aspects and content of multimedia projects. Students will be
introduced to team development and production schedules as they
learn the basic tools and methods for developing graphics, sound,
video and authored environments that simulate real-life projects and
deadlines. Can also be offered in a distance learning format as a Web
based course. (CSU)
MMST 112: Fundamentals of Multimedia Design
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides fundamental knowledge of design as it applies
to multimedia and visual design. General topics include: composition, color, identity, packaging, illustration, imaging, and web design.
Assignments will involve the creation of original work using current
digital software tools. Design skills will be developed through
projects, research, and critiques. Can be offered as a Web Based
course. (CSU)
MMST 114: Introduction to Game Design
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours per week.
This course will introduce students to the basics of game design and
theory using analysis, research, critiques and group based projects.
Students will learn about the game industry and what is expected
to develop an interactive/video game through assignments that
simulate employment by a game developer. (CSU)
MMST 122: Design for Interactive Multimedia
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 112. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide visual design knowledge and experience as it
applies to interactive multimedia. General topics include typography,
illustration, animation, interface design, game design, and web
design. Assignments involve the creation of original work using current digital software tools. Design skills will be developed through
projects, research, and critiques. (CSU)
MMST 124: Beginning Modeling, Texturing, and
Animation in 3DS Max
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This foundation class provides working knowledge, resources, and
learning techniques for 3D software. The content presupposes no
prior experience in 3D. The class covers beginning 3D modeling
and texturing to create models appropriate for real-time and prerendered contexts. It covers animating non-character assets using
the broad toolset available to 3D animators, and character animation
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Multimedia Studies
MARIN.EDU
using simple deformations. Students will develop self-evaluation
techniques to expand the skills necessary to produce photo-real or
fantasy models. (CSU)
MMST 132: Introduction to Web Development
MMST 125: Intermediate Modeling and Texturing in 3DS
Max
This course will provide basic knowledge for creating and publishing
small sites to the World Wide Web. Assignments involve creating
and publishing small working Web sites containing a variety of
rich media such as animation, audio and video. Web pages will be designed and developed using current professional-level tools. Design
skills will be developed through projects using analysis, research, and
critiques. Offered as a Web based course. (CSU)
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 124. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course emphasizes modeling/texturing usable assets for realtime and pre-rendered contexts. Animating non-character assets,
using the broad toolset available to 3D animators, and/or character
animation using simple deformations. Modeling and texturing techniques will be reviewed and refined to build self-evaluation skills and
to produce usable photo real or fantasy models. Likewise, keyframe
and procedural animation techniques will be reviewed and refined,
with focus on control using available tools. (CSU)
MMST 131: Introduction to Web Design
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 101. Two and onehalf lecture and two and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides an introduction to the tools and practices of
modern Web site development. Students will learn the tools and
methods for creating and maintaining a small media-rich Web site.
Production skills will be developed through the research, design, and
development and testing of their own small Web site. Can also be
offered in a distance learning format as a Web based course. (CSU)
MMST 131A: Web Design I
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 101. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides an introduction to the tools and practices of
modern Web site design and development. Students will learn methods for designing and creating attractive and effective Web pages.
Production skills will be developed through the research, design,
development and testing of a small Web site. May also be offered as a
Web based course. (CSU)
MMST 131B: Web Design II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 131A. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides intermediate-level instruction on the tools and
practices of modern Web site design and development. Students will
learn methods for designing and creating Web sites that are attractive, functional, and easy to use. Production skills will be developed
through the research, design, development and testing of working
Web sites. May also be offered as a Web based course. (CSU)
MMST 131C: Web Design III
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 131B. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides advanced-level instruction in the tools and
practices of modern Web site design and development. Students will
learn methods for designing and creating Web sites that are attractive, functional, and easy to use. Production skills will be developed
through the research, design, development and testing of working
Web sites. May also be offered as a Web based course. (CSU)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 131. Two and onehalf lecture and two and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
MMST 133: Search Engine Optimization and Web
Promotion
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 131. Two and onehalf lecture and two and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
Designing and building a Web page is only part of the required effort
behind all successful Web sites. Successful sites attract and maintain
a regular flow of visitors by successfully promoting themselves
through the major search engines and directories. This course will
cover how to promote Web sites using the rapidly changing world
of Web search engines and directories. Students will learn how the
Web’s popular search systems and Directories work so they can use
them to better promote and market Web sites of all sizes, complexity,
and purpose. In this class, students will learn both how to set up cost
effective and successful paid search engine marketing campaigns
and how to design attractive sites that place well in the free search
listings. Offered as a Web based course. (CSU)
MMST 134A: Interactive Media Design I
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 101. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides an introduction to the tools and practices of
modern interactive media design and development. Design and
production skills will be developed through the research, design,
development, and debugging of interactive media for the Web and
other digital media products. May also be offered as a Web based
course. (CSU)
MMST 134B: Interactive Media Design II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 134A. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides intermediate-level instruction covering the
scripts and tools for creating interactive products for the Web and
other media. Design scripting and production skills will be developed through the research, design, development, and debugging of
interactive media for the Web and other digital media products. May
also be offered as a Web based course. (CSU)
MMST 134C: Interactive Media Design III
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 134B. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course provides advanced-level instruction covering the scripting skills and techniques required to design and create fully interactive digital media. Instruction covers modern scripting concepts
including all the fundamental components of modern scripting
languages, including variables, operators, objects, events, arrays,
custom functions, and more. May also be offered as a Web based
course. (CSU)
CATALOG 2010/11
MMST 139: Selected Topics
0.5-6 Units. (CSU w/limit)
MMST 143: Video Production for Multimedia
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide basic knowledge of video production as it
applies to multimedia including Internet and Web based applications. Emphasis will be on developing a foundation of skills covering
beginning-to-end design and production processes for videointensive multimedia. There will be broad exposure to good and bad
examples of video integration formats. (CSU)
MMST 144: Audio Production for Multimedia
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide a basic knowledge of sound production
from beginning to end. Emphasis will be on developing a foundation
of skills and broad exposure to good and bad examples of sound
integration formats. (CSU)
MMST 150: Digital Imaging Techniques with Photoshop
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 112. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide intermediate knowledge of imaging
techniques for creative results of images and artwork. It includes
intermediate creative and production techniques to prepare students
for professional projects using Photoshop and other current imaging
software. Design skills will be developed through exercises and
projects using analysis, research, and critiques. (CSU)
MMST 151: Illustration and Animation
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 112. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide increased knowledge of drawing, illustrating and animating for printed and interactive content using current
software tools. Students will develop illustration and animation skills
through hands-on instruction and practice. (CSU)
MMST 158: Audio Design for Interactive Media and
Games
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 144. Two and onehalf lecture and two and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide intermediate knowledge of generating digital audio, editing, design and effects using current digital software,
hardware and techniques. Focus is on how to make good editorial
decisions as well as the efficient use of a variety of programs. Assignments involve practice tutorials and the creation of original projects
using current digital tools. (CSU)
MMST 160: Digital Image Calibration and Printing
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 150. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide advanced knowledge of techniques and
practices for successful printing of digital images and artwork for
design and visual art. Course includes advanced creative and production techniques to prepare students for successful, professional level
projects for portfolios and display. Design and technical skills will be
developed through hands-on exercises and projects using analysis,
Multimedia Studies
185
research, and critiques. Can also be offered in a distance learning
format as a Web based course. (CSU)
MMST 161: Interactive Animation
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 151. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide increased knowledge of animation by
expanding on the dynamic capabilities of ActionScripting for
interactive content in games, websites and stand-alone applications. Advanced techniques, theories, and methods for enhanced
interactive production and design will be covered in addition to the
principles of ActionScripting. (CSU)
MMST 163: 3-D Character Animation: Complex Lighting
and Materials
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two and one-half lecture and two and one-half
laboratory hours weekly.
This class will focus on the intended purpose of 3-D lighting and
materials and how to dress it for believability, including atmospheres
and particle systems, as well as special effects such as glows, flares,
and blurs. This course will also review and extend your skills in
setting up lights, atmospheres, particle systems and cameras, in
building believable textures, and in creating environments for 3-D
animation or game play. (CSU)
MMST 166: Digital Video Editing and Motion Graphics
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 143. Two lecture and
three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide intermediate knowledge of video editing
and effects using current digital software, hardware and techniques.
Focus is on how to make good editorial decisions as well as the
efficient use of a variety of programs. Assignments involve practice
tutorials and the creation of original projects using current digital
tools. (CSU)
MMST 168: Small Recording Studio Theory and Design
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 144. Two and onehalf lecture and two and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide intermediate knowledge of how to build and
maintain a working, competitive home or small studio in an efficient
and economical way. With the ever-increasing variety of digital
audio software available, this course can help guide students towards
a standardization of home audio studio design as well as a standardization of basic audio production terms. (CSU)
MMST 173: Intermediate 3-D Modeling and Animation
(Level II)
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 163. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This class will focus on intermediate levels of animation and
modeling in 3-D as they apply to visualization, effects, games and
other applications for multimedia projects. Students will expand on
tools and techniques learned in the beginning class to create more
complex models and animated sequences. (CSU)
186
Music
MMST 183: Page Layout Design
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Multimedia Studies 150 and 151. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
MARIN.EDU
Design and visualization skills will be developed through projects
using analysis, research, and critiques. Can also be offered in a
distance learning format as a Web based course. (CSU)
This course will provide basic knowledge of layout design as it applies
to printed media and paperless publishing. Design and layout skills
will be developed through hands-on projects. (CSU)
MMST 240: Advanced Sound and Video Design
MMST 193: Print and Packaging Design
This course will provide advanced knowledge of time-based material
as it relates to sound and video design. Collaborative and crossover
skills will be developed through the creation of individual or group
projects using current digital tools in audio and video. (CSU)
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 183. Two lecture and three
laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide advanced knowledge of design as it applies
to printed media products and packaging. Assignments involve the
creation of designs involving 4/C printing, trapping, and packaging
dies. Layout design and visualization skills will be developed through
hands-on projects and full-color printed proofs. (CSU)
MMST 200: Portfolio Development
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Can be taken for credit as Multimedia Studies 200
or Art 200, but credit will be awarded for only one course. Three lecture hours
weekly.
Through lecture, research and critiques, students will develop a
professional portfolio that reflects their interests, skills, and career
goals. This course is for students that have accomplished multimedia
skills and wish to develop strategies of self-promotion for their area
of expertise. (CSU)
MMST 210: Advanced Project
0.5 Unit. No prerequisite. One and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide students with the opportunity to design and
implement group or individual creative projects containing graphics,
animation, audio, video or authoring components. This course will
provide a forum for exploring and testing potential project ideas
that students will take from concept to final product. Students will
receive guidance and support in critiquing work, forming creative
alliances, and polishing existing work. This course is for students
who are ready to plan, design and implement independent advanced
multimedia projects such as CD-ROMs, DVDs, Web sites and more.
Lab activities will involve taking a project idea, either individually
or as a group, through the following production stages: design,
preproduction, prototyping, production, testing, and delivery. May
be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
3.0 Units. No prerequisite: Advisories: Multimedia Studies 143 and 144. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
MMST 249: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Please see Independent Study category or consult with department.
Limit to Enrollment: Prior arrangement with instructor is necessary. Three
laboratory hours weekly per unit.
MUSIC
A career in music today demands from all performers and participants a sophisticated knowledge of theory, history, performance
standards, and practices in all fields whether classical, jazz, rock,
or popular. Whatever branch of the music career you may find
yourself pursuing, academic music experience is valuable in your
background.
Career Options
Agent, Arranger, Arts Administrator, Band Director, Business
Manager, Choral Leader, Composer, Concert Hall Manager, Conductor, Copyist, Disc Jockey, Electronic Writer and Computer Specialist,
Instrument Maker, Instrument Repair Technician, Instrumental
Musician, Lyricist, Music Coach, Music Critic, Music Director,
Music Editor, Music Librarian, Music Publishing Editor, Music Store
Owner/Staff, Music Therapist, Musicologist, Performer, Piano TunerTechnician, Private Instructor, Recreation Therapist, Singer, Teacher
Faculty
Douglas Delaney, Tara B. Flandreau, Paul Smith
Department Phone: (415) 485-9460
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Multimedia Studies 200. One lecture, one and one-half
laboratory, and four and one-half internship hours weekly.
Transfer
Students planning to transfer to a four-year institution should
complete the lower division major requirements and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer institution and major. Exact
major requirements for UC and CSU institutions can be found on
www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information as curriculum requirements may vary among transfer universities.
This course bridges the gap between the classroom and the multimedia industry. By providing an on-campus lecture class coupled
with a short-term internship, students gain an understanding of
applying their multimedia skills in a real-life situation. Expectations
are characterized by work-group activities, multiple projects under
deadline, and collaborative efforts. Internships are not guaranteed.
Intern projects may be suitable for student’s portfolio. (CSU)
A.A. in Music
The Music Department has several performing groups that serve the
various interests and abilities of students and the community: an
orchestra, bands, choruses, instrumental and choral ensembles, instrumental and vocal jazz ensembles. These groups present scheduled
concerts as well as perform on special occasions during the school
year. The Music Program is offered at the Kentfield Campus.
MMST 223: Print and Packaging Design
Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate
degree. Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All
students should consult a counselor.
MMST 213: Internship in Multimedia
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisories: Multimedia Studies 150 and 151. Two
lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
This course will provide a basic knowledge of design as it applies
to printed media (2D), products and packaging (3D). Assignments
involve the creation of original designs using current digital tools.
Music
CATALOG 2010/11
REQUIREMENTS
UNITS
Completion of:
Theory
MUS
111
Theory I
4
MUS
112
Theory II
4
MUS
211
Theory III
4
MUS
212
Theory IV
4
Ear Training
MUS
121
Ear Training I
2
MUS
122
Ear Training II
2
MUS
221
Ear Training III
2
MUS
222
Ear Training IV
2
Music Literature and Analysis
MUS
101
Introduction to Classical Music
3
MUS
102
Music Masterworks
3
Piano
MUS
171
Piano I
2
MUS
172
Piano II
2
MUS
271
Piano III
2
MUS 272
Piano IV
2
Plus a major performing ensemble each semester to be chosen from the following:
MUS
162
Band
1
MUS
163
College Chorus
1
MUS
165* Piano Ensemble
2
MUS
166* Piano Repertoire and Interpretation
2
MUS 167
Community Symphony Orchestra
1
MUS
168
Community Symphonic Band
1
MUS
169
Community Chorus
1
* Music majors who are pianists may satisfy two semesters of the major performing
ensemble requirements with each of these courses.
MUSIC COURSES (MUS)
MUS 039: Selected Topics (Nondegree Applicable)
0.5-6 Units.
MUS 101: Introduction to Classical Music
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
The appreciation and enjoyment of classical music through analytical
listening. The study of musical elements; the development of musical
forms and styles, vocal and instrumental media, the lives of the great
composers, and analyses of their works. Illustrated by recordings.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
MUS 102: Music Masterworks
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 106 or Music 111. Three lecture hours and one
laboratory hour weekly.
This course includes guided listening and discussions, examples in
hand, of music masterworks from the beginning of written history
to the present. Prerequisite skills required: ability to read treble and
bass clef and easy basic rhythms; understanding tonic and dominant
relationship, intervals, triads, 7th chords, major and minor scales
and key signatures. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
187
MUS 105: Rock, Pop and Jazz
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours weekly.
A multicultural study of the evolution of American musical styles
including blues, salsa, samba, rock, jazz, pop, rhythm and blues,
country and folk, with emphasis on the African American, Euro
American, and Latin American origins of these contemporary styles,
and their historical contexts. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C & G, CSU
Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
MUS 106: Music Fundamentals
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Advisory: Music 163. Three lecture hours weekly.
Designed for anyone interested in acquiring basic music skills for
performance, teaching or composition included. Music reading,
notation, terminology, piano keyboard, sight singing, ear training,
etc. Not open to students who have completed Music 111, 112, 211,
or 212. Can also be offered in a distance learning format. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1
MUS 111: Theory I
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 106. Corequisites: Music 121, 122, 221, or 222 as
determined by standardized placement examination; one major performing
ensemble: Music 162, 163, 167, 168, or 169 and class piano: Music 171, 172, 271,
or 272. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Beginning music theory. Review of scales, key signatures, time
signatures, intervals, triads, and seventh chords. Intensive study of
four part harmonic progressions including cadences, voice leading
and doubling rules, and some nonharmonic tones. (CSU/UC)
MUS 112: Theory II
4.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 111. Corequisites: Music 122, and 172, unless
previously completed, and one major performing ensemble. See Music 111 for
details of these corequisites. Three lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Continued study of harmonic progressions, focusing on secondary
triads, dominant and supertonic sevenths with inversions, modes,
counterpoints, etc. (CSU/UC)
MUS 113: Jazz Improvisation
1.5 Units. Prerequisite: Basic instrumental technique and a willingness to take
risks. Three-fifths lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
An introduction to improvisation for instrumentalists and vocalists
who wish to develop their ability to perform jazz solos. Students
will learn contemporary harmonic theory, including scales, modes,
extended and altered chords and will apply this knowledge to the
craft of improvisation. Classroom experience will include playing
with a rhythm section and the transcription of representative jazz
solos. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 116: Desktop Musician I
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.
Basic concepts of acoustics, techniques of electronic music synthesis,
digital audio, and MIDI. Emphasis on performance/application of
these techniques to portable synthesizers and computers. Course
includes fundamentals of acoustics, multichannel recording, and
editing techniques. Introduction to MIDI digital audio and its
computer usage. Supervised “hands-on” practice sessions in addition
to required individual lab time. (CSU/UC)
188
Music
MUS 117: Desktop Musician II
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 116. Two lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
Detailed study of digital recording via MIDI with emphasis on
editing, looping, generating sequences, shifting, and quantizing.
Continued study of acoustics as related to recording and synthesizer
programming included. Performance/application is a requirement.
Introduction to composer software. (CSU)
MUS 119: Media Music Composition
3.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 111. Three lecture hours weekly.
This course includes composing and arranging music for use in
media (films, videos, commercials). Four composing projects will
include woodwinds, brass, strings, and percussion. All compositions
will be played and recorded. May be taken twice for credit. (CSU)
MUS 121: Ear Training I
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 106. One lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
The ear training component of the music major package. Instruction
includes rhythmic and melodic sight reading; rhythmic, melodic,
and harmonic aural perception. Both Music 121 and 122 may be
taken twice for credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 122: Ear Training II
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 121. One lecture and three laboratory hours
weekly.
The ear training component of the music major package. Instruction
includes rhythmic and melodic sight reading; rhythmic, melodic,
and harmonic aural perception. Both Music 121 and 122 may be
taken twice for credit. (CSU/UC)
MARIN.EDU
tion in public performances is required. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 165: Piano Ensemble
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Standardized audition. Six laboratory hours weekly.
The study, rehearsal, and performance of music for piano ensemble
(one piano/four hands, two pianos/four hands, etc). Music majors
who are pianists may satisfy two semesters of the major performing
ensemble requirement with this course. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 166: Piano Repertoire and Interpretation
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 272 and standardized audition. Six laboratory
hours weekly.
A chronological survey of piano literature, stressing stylistic features.
Students will perform in class and at a final recital. Music majors
who are pianists may satisfy two semesters of the major performing
ensemble requirement with this course. May be taken four times for
credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 167: Community Symphony Orchestra
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Standardized audition. Three laboratory hours weekly.
The study, rehearsal, and performance of music composed for
chamber orchestra and full symphony orchestra from Baroque,
Classical, Romantic, and contemporary periods. Participation in
public performances is required. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU/UC)
MUS 168: Community Symphonic Band
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Standardized audition. Three laboratory hours weekly.
0.5-6 Units. (CSU/UC w/limit)
An advanced ensemble for wind and percussion players meeting in
the evening. The study, rehearsal, and performance of band literature. Participation in public performances is required. May be taken
four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 161: Youth Orchestra
MUS 169: Community Chorus
MUS 139: Selected Topics
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Standardized audition. Three laboratory hours weekly.
This orchestra is suited to the needs of the young performer, primarily at the high school level. It includes rehearsal and performance of
standard orchestra literature from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic,
and Contemporary periods. May be taken four times for credit.
(CSU)
A chorus of mixed voices for the College and the community. The
study, rehearsal, and performance of masterpieces of choral literature, usually with orchestral accompaniment. Techniques of choral
singing are emphasized. Participation in public performances is
required. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 162: Band
MUS 171: Piano I
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Music 176. Three laboratory hours weekly.
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 106. Six laboratory hours weekly.
A daytime instrumental music group for people with some skills
with traditional band instruments. Players with limited skills as well
as those with considerable experience are accepted. This course satisfies the major performing ensemble requirement for music majors
and minors. Participation in public performance is required. May be
taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
Designed to help students develop mental and physical habits that
lead to keyboard competence. Develops musicianship and sense of
musical style and provides foundation for materials being studied
in other components of the music program. May be taken twice for
credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 172: Piano II
MUS 163: College Chorus
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Music 171. Six laboratory hours weekly.
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
A chorus of mixed voices for the general college student. The
rehearsal and performance of choral music of a moderate degree of
difficulty. Techniques of choral singing are emphasized. Participa-
Designed to help students develop mental and physical habits that
lead to keyboard competence. Develops musicianship and sense of
musical style and provides foundation for materials being studied
in other components of the music program. May be taken twice for
credit. (CSU/UC)
Music
CATALOG 2010/11
189
MUS 173: Beginning Band
MUS 179: Intermediate Orchestra
1.0 Unit. No prerequisite. Three laboratory hours weekly.
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Music 178. Three laboratory hours weekly.
A beginning study of a woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument.
This course is designed for students who wish to learn a band or
orchestral instrument other than a string instrument. It is strongly
recommended for those planning to teach in the public schools and
for those who plan to arrange or compose music. May be taken four
times for credit, provided a different instrument is studied each
semester. (CSU/UC)
An orchestra primarily of string instruments designed to: (1) meet
the requirements of players not yet ready for community orchestra,
but more advanced than beginning strings, and (2) to prepare players
for community symphony orchestra. Individual and ensemble techniques will be taught. May be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 174: Class Instrument Instruction: Brass
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Ability to read simple music. Advisory: Music 106. Onehalf lecture and one and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
Beginning study of brass designed to introduce students to standard
brass instruments as partial preparation for teaching in the public
schools and for those who desire to learn a second instrument.
Also, this class is appropriate for composers desiring a first-hand
knowledge of these instruments. May be taken four times for credit,
provided a different instrument is studied each semester. (CSU/UC)
MUS 175: Class Instrument Instruction: Percussion
Technique
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Ability to read simple music. Advisory: Music 106. Onehalf lecture and one and one-half laboratory hours weekly.
Beginning study of percussion designed to introduce students to
standard percussion instruments as partial preparation for teaching in the public schools and for those who desire to learn a second
instrument. Also, this class is appropriate for composers desiring a
firsthand knowledge of these instruments. May be taken twice for
credit. (CSU/UC)
MUS 176: Intermediate Band
1.0 Unit. Prerequisite: Music 173 or 174 or 175. Three laboratory hours weekly.
MUS 180: Chamber Music Ensemble
2.0 Units. Prerequisite: Standardized audition. One and three-fifths lecture
and two laboratory hours weekly.
The study, rehearsal and performance of repertoire for small
instrumental ensembles (may include voice). Music from Baroque,
Classical, Romantic, and Modern eras may be inc