Proxim Antenna Tsunami MP.11 Specifications

Proxim Antenna Tsunami MP.11 Specifications
Tsunami MP.11
Model 5054-R and 2454-R
Installation and Management
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
IMPORTANT!
Before installing and using this product, see the
Safety and Regulatory Compliance Guide located on the product CD.
Copyright
©2006 Proxim Wireless Corporation, San Jose, CA. All rights reserved. Covered by one or more of the following U.S. patents: 5,231,634;
5,875,179; 6,006,090; 5,809,060; 6,075,812; 5,077,753. This manual and the software described herein are copyrighted with all rights
reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language
in any form by any means without the written permission of Proxim Wireless Corporation.
Trademarks
Tsunami, Proxim, and the Proxim logo are trademarks of Proxim Wireless Corporation. All other trademarks mentioned herein are the property
of their respective owners.
Tsunami MP.11 2454-R and 5054-R Installation and Management Guide
P/N 73080/1 August 2006
2
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Contents
1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Reference Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Wireless Network Topologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Point-to-Point Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Point-to-Multipoint Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Power-over-Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Management and Monitoring Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Web Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Command Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
SNMP Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2
Installation and Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Hardware Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Power and Ethernet Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Serial Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
External Antenna Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Product Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Step 1: Choose a Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Step 2: Pre-Assemble the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Step 3: Connect the Cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Step 4: Power on the Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Step 5: View LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Step 6: Mount the Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Step 7: Align the Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Step 8: Complete Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Step 9: Install Documentation and Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
ScanTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Setting the IP Address with ScanTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Logging in to the Web Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3
System Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Changing Basic Configuration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Country and Related Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Transmit Power Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
SU Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Dynamic Data Rate Selection (DDRS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
3
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Quality of Service (QoS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Concepts and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4
Basic Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Rebooting and Resetting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Rebooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Resetting Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Soft Reset to Factory Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
General Configuration Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Monitoring Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Passwords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Default Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Upgrading the Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
5
System Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
System Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
System Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Systems Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Event Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
6
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Bridge and Routing Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Network Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Change IP Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Configure Spanning Tree Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Enable or Disable Roaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Enable and Configure the DHCP Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Enable the DHCP Relay Agent (Routing Mode Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Interface Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Configure the Wireless Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Configure the Ethernet Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
SNMP Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Add Entries to the Trap Host Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Edit/Delete Entries to the Trap Host Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
RIP Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
RIP Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
4
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
RIP Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Management Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Configure Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Configure Service Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Security Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Configure MAC Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Configure Encryption Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Configure RADIUS Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Filtering Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Configure Ethernet Protocol Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Configure Static MAC Pair Filtering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Configure Storm Threshold Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Configure Broadcast Protocol Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Configure IP Access Table Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Intra-Cell Blocking (Base Station Unit only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Enable Intra-Cell Blocking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Assign MAC Addresses (MAC Table) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Block Traffic Between SUs (Security Gateway) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
VLAN Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
BSU VLAN Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
SU VLAN Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
QoS (Quality of Service) Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
QoS PIR Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
QoS SFC Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
QoS Class Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
QoS SU Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
SU Access to the Public Network (NAT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Supported Session Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
7
Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Monitor the Wireless Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
General Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
WORP Interface Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
View Number of ICMP Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
View Per Station Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
View Features Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Test Link Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Monitor Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
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View the Mapping of IP and MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
View Active IP Routes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
View All Detected MAC Addresses (Learn Table). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
View RIP Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
View RADIUS Traffic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
View Quality of Service (QoS) Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
View Temperature Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
8
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Download Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Upload Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Reboot the Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Reset the Unit to Factory Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Set the Help Link Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Downgrade to Previous Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
9
Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
TFTP Server Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Web Interface Image File Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Configuration Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Configuration Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Soft Reset to Factory Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Hard Reset to Factory Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Forced Reload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Image File Download with the Bootloader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Download with ScanTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Download with CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
10 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Connectivity Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Unit Does Not Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Serial Link Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
HyperTerminal Connection Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Ethernet Link Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Cannot Use the Web Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Communication Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Two Units Are Unable to Communicate Wirelessly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Setup and Configuration Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Lost Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
The Unit Responds Slowly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
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Web Interface Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Command Line Interface Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
TFTP Server Does Not Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Online Help Is Not Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Changes Do Not Take Effect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
VLAN Operation Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Link Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
General Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Statistics Check. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Analyzing the Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Avoiding Interference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
A Country Codes and Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Model 2454-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
B Technical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
North America Region. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Europe and Middle East Regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Asia Pacific Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Caribbean and Latin America Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Universal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Regulatory Approvals and Frequency Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Model 2454-R Regulatory Approval and Frequency Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Model 5054-R Regulatory Approval and Frequency Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Integrated Antenna Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Model 2454-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Model 5054-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
RF Modulation and Over-the-Air Rates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Model 2454-R and 5054-R OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Wireless Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Device Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Network Architecture Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Receive Sensitivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
2454-R/5054-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Maximum Throughput . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
2454-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
5054-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Latency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
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Transmit Power Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Model 2454-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Model 5054-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Range Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Model 2454-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Model 5054-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
System Processor and Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Software Specification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Base Station and Subscriber Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Base Station Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Subscriber Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Antenna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Local Configuration Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Compliance and Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Radio Approvals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
EMI and Susceptibility (Class B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Water and Dust Proof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Electrical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
5054-R / 2454-R POE Power Injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
5054-R / 2454-R Outdoor Radio Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Base Station and Subscriber Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Base Station and Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Weight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Base Station and Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi or 16-dBi Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Operating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Packaging Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
MTBF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
C Lightning Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
8
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
D Technical Services and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Obtaining Technical Services and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Support Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Proxim eService Web Site Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Telephone Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
ServPak Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
E
Statement of Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Warranty Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Repair or Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Limitations of Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Support Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Other Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Search Knowledgebase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Ask a Question or Open an Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Other Adapter Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
9
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Introduction
1
The Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R (hereinafter referred to as the 5054-R) and the Model 2454-R (hereinafter referred to
as the 2454-R) are flexible wireless outdoor routers that let you design solutions for point-to-point links and point-tomultipoint networks.
The 5054-R and 2454-R are both part of the Tsunami MP.11 product family, which is comprised of several additional
products, including the 5054 Base Station (BSU), the 5054 Subscriber Unit (SU), and the 5012-SUI for indoor
installation. Some of the key features of the product family are:
Some of the key features of the units are:
•
The use of a highly optimized protocol for outdoor applications
•
Routing and bridging capability
•
Asymmetric bandwidth management
•
Management through a Web Interface, a Command Line Interface (CLI), or Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP)
•
Software and configuration upgrade through file transfer (TFTP)
•
Outdoor placement, close to the antenna, for significantly improved range and ease of installation
•
Optional integrated antenna
•
VLAN support
About This Book
Before installing and using the unit, Proxim recommends you review the following chapters of this manual:
•
Chapter 1 “Introduction” (this chapter): Provides an overview of the content of this manual as well as wireless
network topologies and combinations that can be built with the unit.
•
Chapter 2 “Installation and Intialization”: Provides detailed installation instructions and explains how to access the
unit for configuration and maintenance.
•
Chapter 3 “System Overview”: Provides a high-level overview of configuration processes and features.
•
Chapter 4 “Basic Management”: Explains the most common settings used to manage the unit.
•
Chapter 5 “System Status”: Depicts the Web Interface’s “Status” options, including System Status and Event Logs.
•
Chapter 6 “Configuration”: Depicts the Web Interface’s “Configure” options in a hierarchical manner, so you can
easily find details about each item.
•
Chapter 7 “Monitoring”: Depicts the Web Interface’s “Monitor” options in a hierarchical manner, so you can easily
find details about each item
•
Chapter 8 “Commands”: Depicts the Web Interface’s “Commands” options in a hierarchical manner, so you can
easily find details about each item
•
Chapter 9 “Procedures”: Provides a set of procedures, including TFTP Server Setup, Configuration Backup,
Restore, and Download, Forced Reload, and Reset to Factory Defaults.
•
Chapter 10 “Troubleshooting”: Helps you to isolate and solve problems with your radio unit.
The appendixes contain supplementary information you may not need immediately, including Country Code Tables and
Technical Support information.
NOTE: If you are already familiar with this type of product, you can use the Quick Install Guide to install the unit.
10
Introduction
About This Book
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Reference Manual
As a companion to the Installation and Management manual, the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual provides the
following supplemental information:
•
Command Line Interface: Documents the text-based configuration utility’s keyboard commands and parameters.
•
Event Log Error Messages: Documents the error messages that you may see in your Event Log.
•
Alarm Traps: Documents the alarm traps that can be set.
•
Microsoft Windows IAS Radius Server Configuration: Provides information to assist you in setting up the IAS
Radius Server.
•
Addition of Units to a Routed Network: Describes how to add more units to your routed network.
•
Glossary: Describes terms used in the Tsunami MP.11 documentation and in the wireless industry.
11
Introduction
Wireless Network Topologies
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Wireless Network Topologies
The unit can be used in various network topologies and combinations. The required equipment depends upon the
wireless network topology you want to build. Make sure all required equipment is available before installing the unit.
The 5054-R and 2454-R are designed for outdoor placement. One model of the SU is equipped with an integrated
antenna. For all other models, you can connect the unit to an outdoor antenna. See the Tsunami MP.11 Antenna
Installation Guide for details.
WARNING: To connect the unit to an outdoor antenna, consult the appropriate manufacturers’ documentation
for additional regulatory information, safety instructions, and installation requirements.
You can set up the following types of topologies:
•
Point-to-Point Link
•
Point-to-Multipoint Network
Each unit is set up as either a Base Station Unit (BSU) or a Subscriber Unit (SU). A link between two locations always
consists of a BSU and an SU. A BSU can, depending upon its configuration, connect to one or more SUs. An SU,
however, can connect only to one BSU.
Point-to-Point Link
With a BSU and an SU, it is easy to set up a wireless point-to-point link as depicted in the following figure.
A point-to-point link lets you set up a connection between two locations as an alternative to:
•
Leased lines in building-to-building connections
•
Wired Ethernet backbones between wireless access points in difficult-to-wire environments
Point-to-Multipoint Network
If you want to connect more than two buildings, you can set up a single point-to-multipoint network with a single BSU and
multiple SUs, as depicted in the following figure.
12
Introduction
Wireless Network Topologies
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Up to 250 SUs can be connected to a BSU. If a BSU already has 250 SU, a new SU cannot be connected to the BSU. In
this figure, the system is designed as follows:
•
The central building B is equipped with a BSU, connected to either an omni-directional, or a wide angle antenna.
•
The two other buildings A and C are both equipped with an SU connected to a directional antenna.
13
Introduction
Power-over-Ethernet
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Power-over-Ethernet
The unit is equipped with an Active Ethernet module. Using Power-over-Ethernet (PoE), you can provide electricity and
wired connectivity to the unit over a single Category 5 cable. Although the power injector that is supplied with the unit is
802.3af-compatible, standard 802.3af-compliant power modules will not properly power the units. Always use the
supplied power injector.
•
The Active Ethernet integrated module provides –48 VDC over a standard Cat5 Ethernet cable.
•
Maximum power supplied to the unit is 20 Watts (when the unit is heating or cooling); the units typically draw less than
7.5 Watts.
•
The unit only accepts power on the “extra pairs”, not on the data pairs according the configuration for “midspan” power
injection, see the IEEE 802.3af standard.
Heating or cooling discussion: Between 0 and 55° Celsius internal temperature, the unit does not need to regulate its
temperature, so the power draw is generally lower in this temperature range. When the internal temperature gets close
to the limits, the unit starts to heat/cool itself and the power draw increases. Powering while cold triggers a special selfheat mode where the unit is inoperable until the temperature is above 0° deg Celsius. This is signaled by a solid red
LED on the Ethernet connector. Once the internal temperature is above 0 degrees Celsius, the unit boots normally.
Management and Monitoring Capabilities
There are several management and monitoring interfaces available to the network administrator to configure and
manage the unit:
•
Web Interface
•
Command Line Interface
•
SNMP Management
Web Interface
The Web interface (HTTP) provides easy access to configuration settings and network statistics from any computer on
the network. You can access the Web interface over your network, over the Internet, or with a crossover Ethernet cable
connected directly to your computer’s Ethernet port. See Logging in to the Web Interface.
Command Line Interface
The Command Line Interface (CLI) is a text-based configuration utility that supports a set of keyboard commands and
parameters to configure and manage the unit. You enter command statements, composed of CLI commands and their
associated parameters. You can issue commands from the keyboard for real-time control or from scripts that automate
configuration. See the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual for more information about the Command Line Interface.
SNMP Management
In addition to the Web interface and the CLI, you also can manage and configure your unit using the Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP). Note that this requires an SNMP manager program (sometimes called MIB browser) or a
Network Manager program using SNMP, such as HP OpenView or Castelrock’s SNMPc. The units support several
Management Information Base (MIB) files that describe the parameters that can be viewed and configured using SNMP:
•
mib802.mib
•
orinoco.mib
•
rfc1213.mib
•
rfc1493.mib
•
rfc1643.mib
14
Introduction
Management and Monitoring Capabilities
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Proxim provides these MIB files on the CD included with your unit. You must compile one or more of these MIB files into
your SNMP program’s database before you can manage your unit using SNMP. See the documentation that came with
your SNMP manager for instructions about how to compile MIBs.
NOTE: When you update the software in the unit, you must also update the MIBs to the same release. Because the
parameters in the MIB may have changed, you will not otherwise have full control over the features in the new
release.
The enterprise MIB (orinoco.mib) defines the read and read/write objects you can view or configure using SNMP. These
objects correspond to most of the settings and statistics that are available with the other management interfaces. See
the enterprise MIB for more information; the MIB can be opened with any text editor, such as Microsoft Word, Notepad,
and WordPad. See SNMP Parameters.
IMPORTANT!
Using a serial connection, you can access the unit through a terminal emulation program such as
HyperTerminal. (See “HyperTerminal Connection Properties” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual.)
For all other modes of connection, you will need the IP address of the unit in order to use the Web Interface,
SNMP, or the CLI. See Setting the IP Address with ScanTool for more information.
15
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Installation and Initialization
2
This chapter describes the steps required to install and mount the unit, and to align the antenna. An antenna cable is
required only when you use the external antenna option. Note that the unit must have either the integrated antenna or
must be connected to an external antenna for its operation. The installation procedure does not include the mounting
and connection of antennas. See the Tsunami MP.11 Antenna Installation Guide for this information.
If you are already familiar with this type of product, you can use the Quick Install Guide for streamlined installation
procedures.
See the following sections:
•
Hardware Overview
•
Product Package
•
Installation Procedure
•
•
–
Step 1: Choose a Location
–
Step 2: Pre-Assemble the Hardware
–
Step 3: Connect the Cables
–
Step 4: Power on the Unit
–
Step 5: View LEDs
–
Step 6: Mount the Unit
–
Step 7: Align the Antenna
–
Step 8: Complete Installation
–
Step 9: Install Documentation and Software
Initialization
–
ScanTool
–
Setting the IP Address with ScanTool
Logging in to the Web Interface
16
Installation and Initialization
Hardware Overview
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Hardware Overview
The 5054-R and 2454-R units contain a state-of-the-art wireless radio, an optional high-gain performance flat-panel
antenna, and Power-over-Ethernet (the sole means of power for the unit). For further protection, the unit has internal,
built-in surge protection.
Power and Ethernet Connection
Recommended Cable
Function
Power (DC) and Ethernet connection
Type
Cat5, UV-shielded and outdoor-rated
Impedance
100 ohms
Recommended cables
4 UTP, 24 AWG, UL rated
Maximum Distance
330 feet / 100 meters
Connector type, unit end
RJ45 female, weatherized using weatherproof connector
Connector type, power & Ethernet adapter RJ45
end
Serial Connection
The serial connection is made with an RJ11 to DB9 connector (also referred to as a “dongle”). Connect the RJ11 end to
the unit and connect the serial (DB9) end to your PC to assist you in aligning the antenna and to issue CLI commands.
See the following figure:
\
Figure 2-1 Serial Dongle Diagram
The connections are as follows:
D-Shell
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
RJ11
NC
2
4
NC
1+3+5
6
NC
NC
NC
17
Installation and Initialization
Hardware Overview
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
External Antenna Connection
One model of the SU has an integrated antenna; all other models have an external antenna connector (N-type) and no
integrated antenna. For more information about external antennas, see the Antenna Installation Guide.
18
Installation and Initialization
Product Package
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Product Package
Each shipment includes the items in the following table. Verify that you have received all parts of the shipment.
NOTE: Unless noted in this table, cables are not supplied with the unit.
SU with Integrated Antenna or
BSU / SU with external antenna
connector
RJ11 to DB9 Serial Connector
(supplied with BSU only)
Installation CD
Power Injector and Cord
Cable Termination Kit
Kit includes the following:
a
b
c
d
e
a. RJ45 connectors (2)
b. Sealing caps (2)
c. Sealing nut
d. Lock nut
e. Grounding screws
Mounting Kit
Kit includes the following:
a
b
c
d
a. Mounting clamp for wall/pole
b. Extension arm
c. Mounting plate to enclosure
d. Mounting clamp for pole mounting
19
Installation and Initialization
Product Package
Mounting Hardware
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
The following mounting hardware, included with the mounting kit:
Quantity Description
6 ea.
Plain washer #5/16
2 ea.
Hex Cap Screw NC 5/16-18 x 35
2 ea.
Nut NC 5/16-18
4 ea.
Helical Spring Lock Washer #1/4
4 ea.
Helical Spring Lock Washer #1/16
2 ea.
Hex Cap Screw NC 5/16-18 x 80
4 ea.
68764, Screw, Machine, Pan,
Philips, 1/4"-20, 5/8"L
20
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Installation Procedure
IMPORTANT:
Before installing and using this product, see Safety and Regulatory Compliance Information on the
product CD.
WARNING:
To ensure proper grounding, use the hole at the bottom point on the back of each unit and the provided
grounding screws to attach a ground wire of at least 10 AWG stranded to each unit. Use proper wire
grounding techniques in accordance with local electric codes.
NOTES:
• The Configure System window provides a selectable Country field that automatically provides the allowed
bandwidth and frequencies for the selected country as well as, where applicable, Dynamic Frequency Selection
(DFS) and Transmit Power Control (TPC).
• Non-US installers should not add an antenna system until the Country is selected, the unit is rebooted, and the
proper power level is configured. The output power level of the final channel selected by DFS scan can be
found in the Event Log.
• Be sure to read the Release Notes file on the product CD as it contains software version and driver information
that may not have been available when this document was produced.
• Equipment is to be used with, and powered by, the power injector provided or by a power injector that meets
these requirements:
– UL-Listed/ITE (NWGQ)
– Limited Power Source Output per UL/IEC 60950
– CE-marked
– Approved for Power-over-Ethernet
– Rated output, 48 Vdc/0.42 A
– Pinout follows 802.3af standard for mid-span devices
21
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Step 1: Choose a Location
To make optimal use of the unit, you must find a suitable location for the hardware. The range of the unit largely depends
upon the position of the antenna. Proxim recommends you do a site survey, observing the following requirements, before
mounting the hardware.
•
The location must allow easy disconnection of the unit from the power outlet if necessary.
•
The unit must not be covered and the air must be able to flow freely around the unit.
•
The unit must be kept away from vibration, excessive heat, and humidity, and kept free from dust buildup.
•
The installation must conform to local regulations at all times.
The units are designed to directly mount to a pole or wall. Using the supplied brackets and hardware, you can mount
them to a 1.25 inch to 4.5-inch pole (outside diameter). Using just one of the mounting brackets, you can mount the units
to a wall or other flat surface.
CAUTION: Proxim recommends the use of a lightning arrestor at the building ingress point. You can purchase the
Proxim Lightning Protector MP.11/QB.11 (70251); see the documentation that comes with the unit for more
information and installation instructions.
22
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Step 2: Pre-Assemble the Hardware
1. Unpack the unit and accessories from the shipping box.
2. Note the Ethernet and MAC addresses of the SU, as well as the serial number; these addresses may be used when
configuring the BSU.
NOTE: The serial number is required to obtain support from Proxim. Keep this information in a safe place.
3. You will be attaching an outdoor-rated 24 AWG CAT5 cable (diameter .114 to .250 inches/2.9 to 6.4 mm) (not
provided) to the Power-over-Ethernet port on the back of the unit later in the installation procedure. First, you must
construct the cable and assemble the waterproofing cable covers as described in the following steps:
i.
Slide the sealing nut (A) over the bare end of the CAT5 cable.
ii. Slide the lock nut (B) over the bare end of the CAT5 cable.
iii. Slide the RJ45 sealing cap (C) over the bare end of the CAT5 cable.
iv. Terminate the RJ45 connector to the CAT5 cable. Insert into the mating RJ45 connector (D).
v. Slide the RJ45 sealing cap (C) over the RJ45 connector and thread onto enclosure. Hand tighten.
vi. Thread the lock nut (B) onto sealing cap (C), and hand tighten.
vii. Thread the sealing nut (A) onto the lock nut (B), and hand tighten.
CAUTION: Hand-tighten only. Torque values for final installation are provided in Step 8: Complete Installation.
C
B
A
D
CAUTION: The sealing nut (A) must not be tightened until the sealing cap (C) over the RJ45 connector has been
tightened to the unit during final installation; otherwise, the Ethernet cable may twist and damage.
NOTES:
• The cable must feed through all parts of the weatherproof cap before the RJ45 is crimped on the outdoor
Ethernet a cable.
• The cable between the power injector and the unit must be a straight-through Ethernet cable (without
crossover).
• Due to variance in CAT5 cable diameter, termination techniques of the installer, and the application of
proper tightness of the connectors, it is strongly recommended that the CAT5 cable connector and the
serial connector cap are further secured by external weatherproofing (in addition to the antenna N
connector, where applicable). Butyl weatherproofing tape is the preferred material for securing any external
connector.
4. Locate the arrow on the back of the unit and determine your desired mounting orientation. For vertical polarization
using the integrated antenna, the arrow should be pointing up (perpendicular to the ground). For horizontal
polarization using the integral antenna, the arrow should be horizontal (parallel to the ground).
23
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Vertical Polarization
Horizontal Polarization
5. Attach the mounting plate (A) using the provided screws and washers (Torque 9 N.m/75 in-lbs), such that the unit’s
antenna will be vertically or horizontally polarized when mounted.
A
Torque 9 N.m/75 in-lbs
6. Attach the extension arm (B) to mounting piece (A) with the screw, nut, and washers provided, as shown below. The
extension arm gives the unit more possible tilt, letting you adjust for azimuth or elevation over a larger angle.
A
B
7. Attach the mounting bracket (C) to extension arm (B) with the screw, nut, and washers provided.
C
B
8. Tighten assembly (Torque 15 N.m/130 in-lbs).
24
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Torque 15 N.m/130 in-lbs
The following figure shows the full assembly attached to the unit:
25
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Step 3: Connect the Cables
1. If you have not already done so, connect the normal RJ45 connector on an outdoor-rated CAT5 cable to the “Data and
Power Out” port on the power injector.
2. Attach the other end of the CAT5 cable with RJ45 connector to the Power and Ethernet port on the back of the unit
(see the following figure). Note that the first attachment of this cable is meant to verify operation and configure the
unit; the final attachment (with proper torque) and weatherproofing are to be done after the unit has been installed in
the location at which it will operate (Step 8: Complete Installation)
CAUTION: Do not over-tighten the connector nuts; do not use a wrench to tighten the connectors!
3. To connect the unit through a hub or a switch to a PC, use a straight-through Ethernet cable between the network
interface card in the PC and the hub, and between the hub and the RJ45 “Data In” port on the power injector.
If you are connecting the PC directly to the unit, use a crossover Ethernet cable between the network interface card
in the PC and the RJ45 “Data In” port on the power injector.
26
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Step 4: Power on the Unit
Once you have connected the power injector to the Ethernet cabling and plugged the power injector cord into an AC
outlet, the unit is powered on. There is no ON/OFF switch on the unit. To remove power, unplug the AC cord from the AC
outlet or disconnect the RJ45 connector from the “Data and Power Out” port on the power injector.
CAUTION: Proxim recommends the use of a lightning arrestor at the building ingress point. You can purchase the
Proxim Lightning Protector MP.11/QB.11 (70251); see the documentation that comes with the unit for more
information and installation instructions.
Step 5: View LEDs
When the unit is powered on, it performs startup diagnostics. When startup is complete, the LEDs show the unit’s
operational state. The LEDs are present at the unit’s Ethernet connector; unscrew the watertight cap if necessary to view
the LEDs.
NOTE: Make sure the domed sealing nut is loose before unscrewing the cap or the Ethernet cable may be twisted and
become damaged.
Radio
LED
Power/Ethernet
LED
Figure 2-2 LED Indicators on Ethernet Connector
During bootup, all LEDs are blinking. Blinking can continue for up to four minutes (when DFS is enabled, for example);
however, if the LEDs are still blinking for over four minutes, you should check your installation and proper operation of the
Ethernet and wireless links to other units. If they are correct, contact Technical Support; there could be a problem with
your hardware.
NOTE: When powering the unit in below freezing temperatures, the unit must self-heat before booting. This is indicated
by a solid red LED. This state can take up to 30 minutes, depending upon the ambient temperature.
LEDs exhibit the following behavior:
LED State
Radio LED
Power/Ethernet LED
Red
Power is on; unit is self-heating.
—
Flashing Green
Wireless link is being established.
Power is on, Ethernet link is down.
Solid Green
Wireless link has been established.
Power is on, Ethernet link is up.
27
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Step 6: Mount the Unit
CAUTION: To ensure that water does not gather around the antenna connectors, mount the unit with the antenna
connectors facing downward
1. To pole-mount, insert screws through bracket F and fasten around pole to bracket E and secure (Torque 11 N.m/100
in-lbs).
F
Torque 11 N.m/100 in-lbs
2 screws
E
F
2. To wall-mount the unit, mount bracket (E) to wall using 4 screws (not provided), as shown:
28
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Step 7: Align the Antenna
Antenna alignment is the process of physically aligning the antenna of the radio receiver and transmitter to have the best
possible link established between them. The antenna alignment process is usually performed during installation and after
major repairs.
The unit has an audible antenna alignment tool that can be activated by plugging in the supplied serial dongle (supplied
with the BSU) or by issuing the CLI command for antenna alignment. The CLI command causes both audible and
numerical feedback as the CLI shows the running Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) values twice a second.
The output from the beeper for antenna alignment consists of short beeps with a variable interval. The interval changes
with the SNR level to assist in correctly aligning the antenna. An increase in signal level is indicated by a shorter interval
between beeps; a reduction in signal level results in beeps longer apart.
To allow for precise antenna alignment, small changes in SNR result in large changes in the beep period. The alignment
process averages the SNR, which is represented by an average length beep. When a higher SNR is received, the beep
period is made shorter, dependent upon the difference to the average. A lower SNR results in a longer period between
beeps.
The first five steps around the average are represented by a large change and all following steps are a small change.
This acts as if a magnifying glass is centered around the average SNR and the values next to the average are
significantly different.
Figure 2-3 SNR and Beep Interval
When the antenna is aimed, the beep intuitively represents whether the SNR is rising or falling: the higher the SNR rises,
the shorter the period the beep is heard and the higher the frequency of the beep.
After the position of the antenna has been changed, SNR averaging settles at the new value and the beeping returns to
the average length so the antenna can again be aimed for rising SNR.
Aiming is complete if moving in any direction results in a falling SNR value (which can be heard as longer periods
between beeps).
NOTES:
• Antenna alignment for the Base Station is useful only for a point-to-point link.
• The range of the average SNR has been limited to values from 5 to 43; therefore, anything over 43 always
results in a short period between beeps and values below 5 always have a long period.
29
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
• The Antenna Alignment Display (AAD) CLI command is disabled automatically 30 minutes after it is enabled to
remove the load of extra messages on the wireless interface. The default telnet timeout is 900 seconds (15
minutes). If AAD must run for the entire 30 minutes, change the default telnet timeout value to a value greater
than 30 minutes (greater than 1800 seconds). This restriction is for telnet connections only and not for the serial
interface. The serial interface never times out; however, the AAD command does still time out.
Antenna Alignment Commands
•
set aad enable local: Enables display of the local SNR. Local SNR is the SNR measured by the receiver at the
near end.
•
set aad enable remote: Enables display of the remote SNR. Remote SNR is the SNR as measured by the
receiver at the far end.
•
set aad enable average: Enables display of the average SNR. The average SNR is the average of the local and
remote SNR.
•
set aad disable: Disables Antenna Alignment Display (Ctrl-C also disables AAD).
30
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Step 8: Complete Installation
1. Tighten the sealing nut (Torque 3 N.m/25 in-lbs) and lock nut (Torque 4 N.m/35 in-lbs).
CAUTION: Do not over-tighten. Over-tightening can cause the CAT5 cable to crush and can subsequently damage
the power injector or the unit.
Torque 3 N.m/25 in-lbs
Torque 4 N.m/35 in-lbs
2. Tighten the RJ45 sealing cap.
CAUTION: Be sure you have re-installed the waterproof caps on the serial and Ethernet port connections. It is also good
installation practice to use Butyl weatherproofing tape to seal the caps, as this adds an extra layer of
protection.
31
Installation and Initialization
Installation Procedure
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Step 9: Install Documentation and Software
To install the documentation and software on a computer or network:
1. Place the CD in a CD-ROM drive. The installer normally starts automatically. (If the installation program does not
start automatically, click setup.exe on the installation CD.)
2. Click the Install Software and Documentation button and follow the instructions displayed on the installer windows.
The following documentation and software products are installed:
–
Available from Start > All Programs > Tsunami > MP.11 5054R-2454R:
•
Documentation (in Docs subdirectory):
–
Installation and Management Guide
–
Quick Installation Guide
–
Reference Manual
–
Safety and Regulatory Guide
–
Recommended Antenna Guide
–
Antenna Installation Guide
–
Release Notes
•
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Online Help
•
Scan Tool (in Scan Tool subdirectory)
•
TFTP Server (in TFTP Server subdirectory)
NOTE: All of these items are slso Available from C:\Program Files\Tsunami\MP.11 5054R-2454R.
–
Available from C:\Program Files\Tsunami\MP.11 5054R-2454R:
•
Scan Tool program
•
Documentation (in Docs folder): See list above
•
Help files (in Help folder; click on index.htm to access)
•
Extras folder containing TFTP Server and Scan Tool program
•
MIBs (in MIBs folder)
•
Firmware (in Firmware folder)
32
Installation and Initialization
Initialization
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Initialization
Connecting to the unit requires either:
•
A direct physical connection with an Ethernet cross-over cable or with a serial RS232C cable
•
A network connection
Connecting with a serial connection, allows you to configure and manage the unit with the CLI. Connecting with the other
connections allows you to use of the Web Interface and SNMP in addition to the CLI.
Using a serial connection, you can access the unit through a terminal emulation program such as HyperTerminal. (See
“HyperTerminal Connection Properties” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual.)
For all other modes of connection, you will need the IP address of the unit in order to use the Web Interface, SNMP, or the
CLI. Because each network is different, an IP address suitable for your network must be assigned to the unit. You must
know this IP address to configure and manage the unit through its Web Interface, SNMP, or the CLI. The unit can use
either a static or dynamic IP address. The unit either obtains its IP address automatically through DHCP (dynamic IP
address) or it must be set manually (static IP address).
ScanTool
With ScanTool (a software utility that is included on the product installation CD), you can find out the current IP address of
the unit and, if necessary, change it so that is appropriate for your network. The units are shipped with the static IP
address 10.0.0.1 configured.
ScanTool lets you find the IP address of a Tsunami MP.11 5054-R or 2454-R by referencing the MAC address in a Scan
List, or to assign an IP address if the correct one has not been assigned. The tool automatically detects the units
installed on your network segment, regardless of IP address, and lets you configure each unit’s IP settings. In addition,
you can use ScanTool to download new software to a unit that does not have a valid software image installed.
Setting the IP Address with ScanTool
To discover and set/change the IP address of the unit:
1. Run ScanTool on a computer connected to the same LAN subnet as the unit, or a computer directly connected to the
unit with a cross-over Ethernet cable. Double-click the ScanTool icon on the Windows desktop to launch the
program. If the icon is not on your desktop, click Start > All Programs > Tsunami > MP.11 5054R-2454R > Scan
Tool.
ScanTool scans the subnet for 5054-R and 2454-R units and displays a list of the units it finds in the Scan List window
(shown below). If necessary, click Rescan to re-scan the subnet and update the display.
Figure 2-4 Scan List
You can assign a new IP address to one unit, even if more than one unit has the same (default) IP address 10.0.0.1,
but the new IP address must be unique to allow use of the management interfaces.
33
Installation and Initialization
Initialization
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
2. Select the unit for which you want to set the IP address and click Change. The Change dialog window is displayed,
as shown below.
Figure 2-5 Change Window
3. To set the IP address manually, ensure that Static is selected as the IP Address Type and fill in the IP Address and
Subnet Mask suitable for the LAN subnet to which the unit is connected.
To set the IP address dynamically, ensure that Dynamic is selected as the IP Address Type. The unit will request
its IP address from a DHCP server on your network.
4. Enter the Read/Write Password (the default value is public) and click OK to confirm your changes. The respective
unit reboots to make the changes effective.
NOTE: The number of asterisks displayed after you enter the password does not necessarily equal the number of
characters in the actual password string. This is done for added security.
34
Installation and Initialization
Logging in to the Web Interface
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Logging in to the Web Interface
The Web Interface provides a graphical user interface through which you can easily configure and manage the unit. This
section describes only how to access the Web Interface.
To use the Web Interface, you need only the IP address of the unit. (See Setting the IP Address with ScanTool for
details).
NOTE: If the connection is slow or you are not able to connect, use the Internet Explorer Tools option to ensure you are
not using a proxy server for the connection with your Web browser.
To access the unit with a Web browser, start your Web browser and enter the IP address of the unit. The Web address
must appear as http://<ip address> (for example, http://10.0.0.1). A window such as the following is displayed.
Figure 2-6 Login Window
Do not fill in the User Name, enter only the password and click OK. The default password is public.
The System Status window is displayed. To find out more about the information presented in this window, see System
Status.
Figure 2-7 System Status
35
Installation and Initialization
Logging in to the Web Interface
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
You now have access to the unit’s Web Interface. The remainder of this manual describes configuring and monitoring the
unit using this interface.
36
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
System Overview
3
This chapter provides an overview of the system. See the following sections:
•
Changing Basic Configuration Information
•
SU Registration
•
Dynamic Data Rate Selection (DDRS)
•
Quality of Service (QoS)
Changing Basic Configuration Information
To view or change basic system information, click the Configure button on the left side of the Web interface window,
then click the System tab. See System Parameters for detailed information about the fields and selections in this
window.
NOTE: System Name by default contains the actual model number. The following screenshot is for information only.
Country and Related Settings
The unit’s Configure System window provides a selectable Country field that automatically provides the allowed
bandwidth and frequencies for the selected country.
Units sold in the United States are pre-configured to scan and display only the outdoor frequencies permitted by the
FCC. No other Country can be configured. Units sold outside of the United States support the selection of a Country
by the professional installer.
NOTE: Non-US installers should not add an antenna system until the Country is selected, the unit is rebooted, and the
proper power level is configured. The output power level of the final channel selected by DFS scan can be found
in the Event Log.
The Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) feature is enabled automatically when you choose a country with a regulatory
domain that requires it. The Transmit Power Control (TPC) feature is always available.
37
System Overview
Changing Basic Configuration Information
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Click the Configure button and the System tab; then select the appropriate country for your regulatory domain from the
Country drop-down box.
Continue configuring settings as desired; then click the Commands button and the Reboot tab to save and activate the
settings. Alternatively, if you want to save the configuration settings to the flash memory but not activate the settings, use
the save config CLI command.
Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS)
The Tsunami MP.11 5054-R supports Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) for European Telecommunications Standard
Institute (ETSI) domains per EN 301-893 regulations. The ETSI requires that 802.11a devices use DFS to prevent
interference with radar systems and other devices that already occupy the 5 GHz band.
During boot-up, the unit scans the available frequency and selects a channel that is quiet and free of radar interference. If
the unit subsequently detects radar interference on its channel, it rescans to find a better channel. Upon finding a new
channel, the unit waits 60 seconds to detect radar interference; if it finds no interference, it switches to the new channel.
If you are using a 5054-R unit in Europe or other applicable countries, keep in mind the following:
•
DFS is not a configurable parameter; it is always enabled and cannot be disabled.
•
You cannot manually select the device’s operating channel; you must let the unit select the channel. However, you can
specify a particular “preferred” channel that you want to scan first whenever the DFS process starts. You may also
make channels unavailable by manually “blacklist” them and prevent those channels to be scanned, as well as display
the Channel Blacklist Table.
•
You cannot configure the Auto Channel Select option. Within the HTTP or CLI interface, this option always appears
enabled.
With 5054-R units, Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) is enabled automatically based upon the country you select.
You can tell DFS is in use because the frequency selection field displays only the DFS-selected frequency. DFS scans all
available frequencies, starting with the DFS preferred channel and skipping blacklisted channels, to select the operating
frequency automatically.
A country selection with DFS enabled causes the Base Station to come up in scan mode. It scans the available
frequencies and channels to avoid radar and selects a channel with the least interference.
NOTE: Scanning is performed only on the frequencies allowed in the regulatory domain of the country selected when it is
required for radar detection and avoidance.
To comply with your country’s regulations, change the DFS selection to specify your country. You can do this by logging
into the unit, clicking the Configure button and selecting the System tab. There is a drop-down box labeled Country
with all available countries from which to select. Choose your country, configure the unit as required, and reboot for the
settings to take effect.
The SU also comes up in scan mode to scan all available frequencies to find a BSU with which it can register. Scanning
may take several minutes. After establishing a wireless link, the wireless LED stops flashing and continues to shine
green.
NOTE: Because DFS may need to scan for radar on multiple channels, you must allow a sufficient amount of time for the
units to start up. This is considerably longer than when the unit is not using DFS. This is expected behavior.
Startup time is within four minutes if no radar is detected, but up to one minute is added for every selected
channel that results in radar detection.
DFS is required for two purposes:
1. Radar avoidance both at startup and while operational. To meet these requirements, the BSU scans available
frequencies at startup for the presence of a radar signal on all available frequencies. If a radar signal is detected on
any DFS enabled channel, the system will blacklist the channel for a period of 30 minutes in accordance to EN301-
38
System Overview
Changing Basic Configuration Information
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
893. Once fully operational on a frequency, the BSU actively monitors the occupied frequency for radar interference.
If radar interference is detected, the BSU blacklists the channel, logs a message and rescans to find a new frequency
free of radar interference.
Radar detection is performed only by the BSU and not by the SU. When an SU is set to a country in which DFS is
used, it scans all available channels upon startup looking for a BSU that best matches its connection criteria (such as
Base Station System Name, Network Name, and Shared Secret). The SU connects to the BSU automatically on
whatever frequency the BSU has selected. Because of this procedure, it is best to set up the BSU and have it fully
operational before installing the SU, although this is not required. If a BSU rescans because of radar interference, the
SU loses its wireless link. The SU waits 30 seconds (when the Mobility feature is enabled, the SU starts scanning for
a BSU instantly rather than waiting 30 seconds); if it finds that it could not receive the BSU in this amount of time, it
rescans the available frequencies for an active BSU.
2. Guarantee the efficient use of available frequencies by all devices in a certain area. To meet this requirement, the
BSU scans each available frequency upon startup and selects a frequency based upon the least amount of noise and
interference detected. This lets multiple devices operate in the same area with limited interference. This procedure is
done only at startup; if another non-radar device comes up on the same frequency, the BSU does not detect this or
rescan because of it. It is expected that other devices using these frequencies also are in compliance with country
regulations, so this should not happen.
Transmit Power Control
Transmit Power Control is a manual configuration selection to reduce the unit’s output power. The maximum output
power level for the operating frequency can be found in the event log of the unit’s embedded software.
By default, the unit lets you transmit at the maximum output power that the radio can sustain for data rate and frequency
selected. However, with Transmit Power Control (TPC), you can adjust the output power of the unit to a lower level in
order to reduce interference to neighboring devices or to use a higher gain antenna without violating the maximum
radiated output power allowed for your country. Also, most countries in the ETSI regulatory domain require the transmit
power to be set to a 6 dB lower value than the maximum allowed EIRP when link quality permits, as part of the DFS
requirements.
You can see your unit’s current output power for the selected frequency in the event log. The event log shows the
selected power for all data rates, so you must look up the relevant data rate to determine the actual power level.
NOTE: This feature only lets you decrease your output power; you cannot increase your output power beyond the
maximum the radio allows for your frequency and data rate.
See System Status to configure Country. See Configure the Wireless Interface to configure Transmit Power Control.
39
System Overview
SU Registration
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
SU Registration
The list of parameters you must configure for registration of the SU on a BSU are:
•
Network Name
•
Base Station System Name (when used; otherwise, leave blank)
•
Network Secret
•
Encryption (when used)
•
Frequency Channel (or Roaming, or DFS)
See System Parameters to see the description of these fields and to configure them.
NOTES:
• The frequency channel must be the same for the BSU and the SU in order to register the SU when roaming is
not enabled and DFS is not required.
• Channel Bandwidth and Turbo mode must be the same for the BSU and SU in order to register the SU.
• Roaming will automatically select a channel on the SU corresponding to the BSU channel. Roaming is the
procedure in which an SU terminates the session with the current BSU and starts the registration procedure with
another BSU when it finds the quality of the other BSU to be better.
40
System Overview
Dynamic Data Rate Selection (DDRS)
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Dynamic Data Rate Selection (DDRS)
The WORP Dynamic Data Rate Selection (DDRS) lets the BSU and SUs monitor and calculate the remote average
signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and adjust the transmission data rate to an optimal value to provide the best possible
throughput according to the current communication conditions and link quality during run-time.
Each frame received in the WORP protocol reports the signal and noise level in dBm at which the sender received the
previous frame from the receiver, and provides the values to calculate the SNR in dB. SNR is calculated according to this
formula then averaged:
SNR [dB] = signal level [dBm] – noise level [dBm]
Both the BSU and the SUs monitor the remote SNR. The BSU monitors and calculates the average remote SNR for each
SU that is registered. An SU monitors and calculates the average remote SNR for the BSU.
DDRS is enabled or disabled on the BSU only. This operation requires the BSU to be rebooted. After rebooting, the BSU
sends a multicast announcement to all SUs to begin the registration process. During registration, an SU is informed by
the BSU whether DDRS is enabled or disabled and it sets its DDRS status accordingly.
There are two DDRS data rates that need to be configured when DDRS is enabled:
•
Default DDRS Data Rate (ddrsdefdatarate): The data rate at which the BSU starts communication with all SUs to
begin the registration process (the default is 6 Mbps).
•
Maximum DDRS Data Rate (ddrsmaxdatarate): The maximum data rate at which the device (BSU or SU) can
operate (the default is 54 Mbps).
NOTE: The default (BSU only) and maximum (BSU and SU) DDRS data rate values must be configured in the BSU and
SUs separately through the CLI or the SNMP interface.
41
System Overview
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs)
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs)
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) are logical groupings of network hosts. Defined by software settings, other VLAN
members or resources appear (to connected hosts) to be on the same physical segment, no matter where they are
attached on the logical LAN or WAN segment. They simplify allowing traffic to flow between hosts and their frequentlyused or restricted resources according to the VLAN configuration.
Tsunami MP.11 5054-R and 2454-R units are fully VLAN-ready; however, by default, VLAN support is disabled. Before
enabling VLAN support (by assigning a VLAN Management ID), certain network settings should be configured and
network resources such as VLAN-aware switches should be available, dependent upon the type of configuration.
VLANs are used to conveniently, efficiently, and easily manage your network in the following ways:
•
Manage VLAN configuration from a single window
•
Define groups
•
Reduce broadcast and multicast traffic to unnecessary destinations
–
•
Improve network performance and reduce latency
Increase security
–
Secure network restricts members to resources on their own VLAN
VLAN tagged data is collected and distributed through a unit’s Ethernet interface. The units can communicate across a
VLAN-capable switch that analyzes VLAN-tagged packet headers and directs traffic to the appropriate ports when the
units are working in their Transparent mode.
VLAN features can be managed via:
•
The BSU’s Web interface
•
The Command Line Interface (see “Command Line Interface” in the Reference Manual)
•
SNMP (see the MIBs provided on the product CD)
For more information about VLAN configuration, see VLAN Parameters.
42
System Overview
Quality of Service (QoS)
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Quality of Service (QoS)
The Quality of Service (QoS) feature is based on the 802.16 standard and defines the classes, service flows, and packet
identification rules for specific types of traffic. QoS main priority is to guarantee a reliable and adequate transmission
quality for all types of traffic under conditions of high congestion and bandwidth over-subscription.
Concepts and Definitions
The software supports QoS provisioning from the BSU only. You may define different classes of service on a BSU that
can then be assigned to the SUs that are associated, or that may get associated, with that BSU.
The software provides the ability to create, edit, and delete classes of service that are specified by the following hierarchy
of parameters:
•
Packet Identification Rule (PIR) – up to 64 rules, including 17 predefined rules
•
Service Flow class (SFC) – up to 32 SFs, including 7 predefined SFCs; up to 8 PIRs may be associated per SFC
•
Priority for each rule within each SF class – 0 to 255, with 0 being lowest priority
•
QoS class – up to 8 QoS classes, including 4 predefined classes; up to 4 SFCs may be associated per QoS class
Packet Identification Rule (PIR)
A Packet Identification Rule is a combination of parameters that specifies what type of traffic is allowed or disallowed.
The software allows to create up to 64 different PIRs, including 17 predefined PIRs. It provides the ability to create, edit,
and delete PIRs that contain none, one, or more of the following classification fields:
•
Rule Name
•
IP ToS (Layer 3 QoS identification)
•
IP Protocol List containing up to 4 IP protocols
•
802.1p tag (layer 2 QoS identification)
•
Up to 4 pairs of Source IP address + Mask
•
Up to 4 pairs of Destination IP address + Mask
•
Up to 4 source TCP/UDP port ranges
•
Up to 4 destination TCP/UDP port ranges
•
Up to 4 source MAC addresses
•
Up to 4 destination MAC addresses
•
VLAN ID
•
Ether type (Ethernet protocol identification)
A good example is provided by the 17 predefined PIRs. Note that these rules help to identify specific traffic types:
1. All – No classification fields, all traffic matches
2. Cisco VoIP UL
a. Protocol Source Port Range (16,000-32,000)
b. IP Protocol List (17 = UDP)
3. Vonage VoIP UL
a. Protocol Source Port Range (8000-8001, 10000-20000)
b. IP Protocol List (17 = UDP)
4. Cisco VoIP DL
a. Protocol Destination Port Range (16,000-32,000)
b. IP Protocol List (17 = UDP)
5. Vonage VoIP DL
43
System Overview
Quality of Service (QoS)
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
a. Protocol Destination Port Range (8000-8001, 10000-20000)
b. IP Protocol List (17 = UDP)
6. TCP
a. IP Protocol List (6)
7. UDP
a. IP Protocol List (17)
8. PPPoE Control
a. Ethertype (type 1, 0x8863)
9. PPPoE Data
a. Ethertype (type 1, 0x8864)
10.IP
a. Ethertype (type 1, 0x800)
11. ARP
a. Ethertype (type 1, 0x806)
12.Expedited Forwarding
a. IP TOS/DSCP (low=0x2D, high=0x2D, mask = 0x3F)
13.Streaming Video (IP/TV)
a. IP TOS/DSCP (low=0x0D, high=0x0D, mask = 0x3F)
14.802.1p BE
a. Ethernet Priority (low=0, high=0) (this is the equivalent of the User Priority value in the TCI (Tag Control
Information) field of a VLAN tag)
15.802.1p Voice
a. Ethernet Priority (low=6, high=6) (this is the equivalent of the User Priority value in the TCI (Tag Control
Information) field of a VLAN tag)
16.802.1p Video
a. Ethernet Priority (low=5, high=5) (this is the equivalent of the User Priority value in the TCI (Tag Control
Information) field of a VLAN tag)
17.L2 Broadcast/Multicast
a. Ethernet Destination (dest = 0x80000000, mask = 0x80000000)
Two different VoIP rule names have been defined for each direction of traffic, Uplink (UL) and Downlink (DL), (index
numbers 2 to 5). This has been done to distinguish the proprietary nature of the Cisco VoIP implementation as opposed
to the more standard Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) signaling found, for example, in the Vonage-type VoIP service.
Service Flow Class (SFC)
A Service Flow class defines a set of parameters that determines how a stream of application data that matches a certain
classification profile will be handled. The software allows to create up to 32 different SFs, including seven predefined
SFs. The software provides the ability to create, edit, and delete SFs that contain the following parameters and values:
•
Service flow name
•
Scheduling type – Best Effort (BE); Real-Time Polling Service (RtPS)
•
Service Flow Direction – Downlink (DL: traffic from BSU to SU); Uplink (UL: traffic from SU to BSU)
•
Maximum sustained data rate (or Maximum Information Rate, MIR) – specified in units of 1 Kbps from 8 Kbps up to he
maximum rate of 108000 Kbps per SU
•
Minimum reserved traffic rate (or Committed Information Rate, CIR) – specified in units of 1 Kbps from 0 Kbps up to
the maximum rate of 10000 Kbps per SU
44
System Overview
Quality of Service (QoS)
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
•
Maximum Latency – specified in increments of 5 ms steps from a minimum of 5 ms up to a maximum of 100 ms
•
Tolerable Jitter – specified in increments of 5 ms steps from a minimum of 0 ms up to the Maximum Latency (in ms)
•
Traffic priority – zero (0) to seven (7), 0 being the lowest, 7 being the highest
•
Maximum number of data messages in a burst – one (1) to four (4), which affects the percentage of the maximum
throughput of the system
•
Activation state – Active; Inactive
Note that traffic priority refers to the prioritization of this specific Service Flow.
The software tries to deliver the packets within the specified latency and jitter requirements, relative to the moment of
receiving the packets in the unit. For delay-sensitive traffic the jitter must be equal to or less than the latency. A packet is
buffered until an interval of time equal to the difference between Latency and Jitter (Latency – Jitter) has elapsed. The
software will attempt to deliver the packet within a time window starting at (Latency – Jitter) until the maximum Latency
time is reached. If the SFC’s scheduling type is real-time polling (rtPS), and the packet is not delivered by that time, it will
be discarded. This can lead to loss of packets without reaching the maximum throughput of the wireless link. For
example, when the packets arrive in bursts on the Ethernet interface and the wireless interface is momentarily maxed
out, then the packets at the “end” of the burst may be timed out before they can be sent.
Users are able to set up their own traffic characteristics (MIR, CIR, latency, jitter, etc.) per service flow class to meet their
unique requirements. A good example is provided by the seven predefined SFCs:
1. UL-Unlimited BE
a. Scheduling Type = Best Effort
b. Service Flow Direction = Uplink
c. Initialization State = Active
d. Maximum Sustained Data Rate = 20 Mbps
e. Traffic Priority = 0
2. DL-Unlimited BE (same as UL-Unlimited BE, except Service Flow Direction = Downlink)
3. UL-G711 20 ms VoIP rtPS
a. Schedule type = Real time Polling
b. Service Flow Direction = Uplink
c. Initialization State = Active
d. Maximum Sustained Data Rate = 88 Kbps
e. Minimum Reserved Traffic Rate = 88 Kbps
f.
Maximum Latency = 20 milliseconds
g. Traffic Priority = 1
4. DL-G711 20 ms VoIP rtPS (same as UL-G711 20ms VoIP rtPS, except Service Flow Direction = Downlink)
5. UL-G729 20 ms VoIP rtPS (same as UL-G711 20ms VoIP rtPS, except Maximum Sustained Data Rate and Maximum
Reserved Traffic Rate = 64 Kbps)
6. DL-G729 20 ms VoIP rtPS (same as UL-G729 20ms VoIP rtPS, except Service Flow Direction = Downlink)
7. DL-2Mbps Video
a. Schedule type = Real time Polling
b. Service Flow Direction = Downlink
c. Initialization State = Active
d. Maximum Sustained Data Rate = 2 Mbps
e. Minimum Reserved Traffic Rate = 2 Mbps
f.
Maximum Latency = 20 milliseconds
g. Traffic Priority = 1
45
System Overview
Quality of Service (QoS)
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Two different VoIP Service Flow classes for each direction of traffic have been defined (index numbers 3 to 6) which
follow the ITU-T standard nomenclatures: G.711 refers to a type of audio companding and encoding that produces a
64 Kbps bitstream, suitable for all types of audio signals. G.729 is appropriate for voice and VoIP applications, but cannot
transport music or fax tones reliably. This type of companding and encoding produces a bitstream between 6.4 and 11.8
Kbps (typically 8 Kbps) according to the quality of voice transport that is desired.
QoS Class
A QoS class is defined by a set of parameters that includes the PIRs and SFCs that were previously configured. The
software allows creating up to eight different QoS classes, including four predefined QoS classes. Up to four SF classes
can be associated to each QoS class, and up to eight PIRs can be associated to each SF class. For example, a QoS
class called “G711 VoIP” may include the following SFCs: “UL-G711 20 ms VoIP rtPS” and “DL-G711 20 ms VoIP rtPS”.
In turn, the SFC named “UL-G711 20 ms VoIP rtPS” may include the following rules: “Cisco VoIP UL” and “Vonage VoIP
UL”.
The software provides the ability to create, edit, and delete QoS classes that contain the following parameters:
•
QoS class name
•
Service Flow (SF) class name list per QoS class (up to four SF classes can be associated to each QoS class)
•
Packet Identification Rule (PIR) list per SF class (up to eight PIRs can be associated to each SF class)
•
Priority per rule which defines the order of execution of PIRs during packet identification process. The PIR priority is a
number in the range 0-63, with priority 63 being executed first, and priority 0 being executed last. The PIR priority is
defined within a QoS class, and can be different for the same PIR in some other QoS class. If all PIRs within one QoS
class have the same priority, the order of execution of PIR rules will be defined by the order of definition of SFCs, and
by the order of definition of PIRs in each SFC, within that QoS class.
A good example of this hierarchy is provided by the four predefined QoS classes:
1. Unlimited Best Effort
a. SF class: UL-Unlimited BE
PIR: All; PIR Priority: 0
b. SF class: DL-Unlimited BE
PIR: All; PIR Priority: 0
2. G711 VoIP
a. SF class: UL-G711 20 ms VoIP rtPS
PIR: Vonage VoIP UL; PIR Priority: 1
PIR: Cisco VoIP UL; PIR Priority: 1
b. SF class: DL-G711 20 ms VoIP rtPS
PIR: Vonage VoIP DL; PIR Priority: 1
PIR: Cisco VoIP DL; PIR Priority: 1
3. G729 VoIP
a. SF class: UL-G729 20 ms VoIP rtPS
PIR: Vonage VoIP UL; PIR Priority: 1
PIR: Cisco VoIP UL; PIR Priority: 1
b. SF class: DL-G729 20 ms VoIP rtPS
PIR: Vonage VoIP DL; PIR Priority: 1
PIR: Cisco VoIP DL; PIR Priority: 1
4. 2Mbps Video
a. SF class: DL-2Mbps Video
PIR: Streaming Video (IP/TV); PIR Priority: 1
46
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Basic Management
4
This chapter describes basic features and functionality of the unit. In most cases, configuring these basic features is
sufficient. The “Glossary” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual provides a brief explanation of the terms used. For
CLI commands you can use for basic management, see “Command Line Interface” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference
Manual.
The following topics are discussed in this chapter:
•
Navigation
•
Rebooting and Resetting
•
General Configuration Settings
•
Monitoring Settings
•
Security Settings
•
Default Settings
•
Upgrading the Unit
Navigation
To use the Web Interface for configuration and management, you must access the unit. With ScanTool you can
determine the unit’s current IP address. Then enter http://<ip address> in your Web browser (for example http://
10.0.0.1). See Setting the IP Address with ScanTool for details.
NOTE: If you have your Security Internet Options set to High, you may not be able to access the Web interface
successfully; a high security setting disables JavaScript, which is required for running Proxim’s Web browser
interface. Adding the radio’s IP address as a Trusted site should fix this problem.
The Web Interface consists of Web page buttons and tabs. A tab can also contain sub-tabs. The following figure shows
the convention used to guide you to the correct tab or sub-tab.
The Web Interface also provides online help, which is stored on your computer (see Step 9: Install Documentation and
Software for details).
47
Basic Management
Rebooting and Resetting
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Rebooting and Resetting
All configuration changes require a restart unless otherwise stated. You can restart the unit with the Reboot command;
see Rebooting, below).
Most changes you make become effective only when the unit is rebooted. A reboot stores configuration information in
non-volatile memory and then restarts the unit with the new values (see Soft Reset to Factory Default).
In some cases, the unit reminds you that a reboot is required for a change to take effect. You need not reboot
immediately; you can reboot after you have made all your changes.
NOTE: Saving of the unit’s configuration occurs only during a controlled reboot or by specifically issuing the CLI Save
command. If you make changes to settings without a controlled reboot (command) and you have not issued the
Save command, a power outage would wipe out all changes since the last reboot. For example, entering static
routes takes effect immediately; however, the routes are not saved until the unit has gone through a controlled
reboot. Proxim strongly recommends saving your settings immediately when you finish making changes.
Rebooting
When you reboot, the changes you have made become effective and the unit is restarted. The changes are saved
automatically in non-volatile memory before the actual reboot takes place.
To reboot, click Commands > Reboot > Reboot. The unit restarts the embedded software. During reboot, you are
redirected to a page showing a countdown timer, and you are redirected to the Status page after the timer counts down
to 0 (zero). The CLI is disconnected during reboot. This means that a new telnet session must be started.
Resetting Hardware
If the unit does not respond for some reason and you are not able to reboot, you can restart by means of a hardware
reset. This restarts the hardware and embedded software. The last saved configuration is used. Any changes that you
have made since then are lost.
To reset the hardware, unplug the unit’s power supply and then reconnect power to the unit.
Soft Reset to Factory Default
If necessary, you can reset the unit to the factory default settings. This should be done only when you are experiencing
problems. Resetting to the default settings requires you to reconfigure the unit.
To reset to factory default settings:
1. Click Commands > Reset.
2. Click the Reset to Factory Default button. The device configuration parameter values are reset to their factory
default values.
48
Basic Management
Rebooting and Resetting
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
If you do not have access to the unit, you can use the procedure described in Hard Reset to Factory Default as an
alternative.
49
Basic Management
General Configuration Settings
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
General Configuration Settings
•
System Status: The Status tab showing the system status is displayed automatically when you log into the Web
interface. It is also the default window displayed when you click the Status button on the left side of the window. See
System Status for more information.
•
System Configuration: The System Configuration window lets you change the unit’s country, system name, location
name, and so on (see the window to the right). The Country selection is required to enable the correct radio
parameters. The other details help distinguish this unit from other routers, and let you know whom to contact in case
of problems. See System Parameters for more information.
•
IP Configuration: The IP Configuration window lets you change the unit’s IP parameters. These settings differ
between Routing and Bridge mode. See Network Parameters for more information.
•
Interface Configuration: The Interface configuration pages let you change the Ethernet and Wireless parameters.
The Wireless tab is displayed by default when you click the Interfaces tab.
•
–
Ethernet: To configure the Ethernet interface, click Configure > Interfaces > Ethernet. You can set the
Configuration parameter from this tab for the type of Ethernet transmission. The recommended setting is
auto-speed auto-duplex. See Configure the Ethernet Interface for more information.
–
Wireless: To configure the wireless interface, click Configure > Interfaces > Wireless. For BSUs, the wireless
interface can be placed in either WORP Base or WORP Satellite mode (selected from the Interface Type dropdown box). SUs can be placed only in WORP Satellite mode. (See Interface Parameters for more information.)
VLAN Configuration: To configure BSU VLAN parameters, click the Configure button followed by the VLAN tab; the
BSU Table tab is displayed. Click the SUs’ Table tab to configure SU VLAN parameters. Virtual LAN (VLAN)
implementation in the Tsunami MP.11 products lets the BSU and SU be used in a VLAN-aware network and processes
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN-tagged packets. Network resources behind the BSU and SU can be assigned to logical groups.
See VLAN Parameters for more information.
50
Basic Management
Monitoring Settings
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Monitoring Settings
The unit offers various facilities to monitor its operation and interfaces. Only the most significant monitoring categories
are mentioned here.
•
Wireless: To monitor the wireless interfaces, click Monitor > Wireless. This tab lets you monitor the general
performance of the radio and the performance of the WORP Base or WORP Satellite interfaces.
•
Interfaces: To monitor transmission details, click Monitor > Interfaces. The Interfaces tab provides detailed
information about the MAC-layer performance of the wireless network and Ethernet interfaces.
•
Per Station: Click Monitor > Per Station to view Station Statistics. On the SU, the Per Station page shows
statistics of the BSU to which the SU is registered. On the BSU, it shows statistics of all the SU’s connected to the
BSU. The page’s statistics refresh every 4 seconds.
51
Basic Management
Security Settings
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Security Settings
To prevent misuse, the 5054-R and 2454-R provide wireless data encryption and password-protected access. Be sure to
set the encryption parameters and change the default passwords.
In addition to Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), the units support Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) 128-bit
encryption. Two types of the AES encryption are available. Previous releases supported only the AEC-OCB; the AES
CCM protocol is now also supported.
Proxim highly recommends you change the Network Name, Encryption Key, and Shared Secret as soon as possible.
To do so, click Configure > Interfaces > Wireless. The encryption key is set using the Security tab. For systems that
will use roaming features, the Network Name, Encryption Key, and the Shared Secret should each be the same for all
SUs that are allowed to roam as well as for all BSUs to which these SUs are allowed to roam.
Encryption
You can protect the wireless data link by using encryption. Encryption keys can be 5 (64-bit), 13 (WEP 128-bit), or 16
(AES 128-bit) characters in length. Both ends of the wireless data link must use the same parameter values.
To set the encryption parameters, click Configure > Security > Encryption. See Configure Encryption Parameters.
Passwords
Access to the units are protected with passwords. The default password is public. For better security it is recommended
to change the default passwords to a value (6-32 characters) known only to you.
To change the unit’s HTTP, Telnet, or SNMP passwords, click Configure > Management > Password. See Configure
Passwords.
52
Basic Management
Default Settings
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Default Settings
Feature
System Name
Mode of Operation
Routing
IP Address Assignment Type
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Router IP Address
Default TTL
RIPv2
Base Station System Name
Network Name
Frequency Channel
Transmit Power Control
Data Rate
Registration Timeout
Network Secret
Turbo Mode
Channel Bandwidth
Input bandwidth limit
(in Kbps)
Output bandwidth limit
(in Kbps)
Ethernet Configuration
Serial port Baud Rate
SNMP Management Interface
Telnet Management Interface
HTTP Management Interface
HTTP Port
Telnet Port
Telnet Login Timeout
Telnet Session Timeout
Password
Maximum Satellites (per BSU)
MAC Authentication
Radius Authentication
Encryption
Static MAC Address Filter
Ethernet Protocol Filtering
DFS Priority Frequency Channel
Announcement Period (when
roaming enabled)
Model
5054-R
Tsunami MP.11 5054-R
Bridge
Disabled
Static
10.0.0.1
255.255.255.0
10.0.0.1
64
Enabled when in Routing Mode
<blank>
OR_WORP
Channel 149, Frequency 5.745 GHz
(FCC Only devices)
DFS Enabled (World Mode devices)
0 dB
36 Mbps
5
public
Disabled
20 MHz
36032
2454-R
Tsunami MP.11 2454-R
Bridge
Disabled
Static
10.0.0.1
255.255.255.0
10.0.0.1
64
Enabled when in Routing Mode
<blank>
OR_WORP
Channel 10 (2.412 – 2.462 GHz)
36032
36032
Auto-Speed Auto-Duplex
9600
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
80
23
30
900
public
250
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled / No Entries
All Filters Disabled
Disabled
100 ms
Auto-Speed Auto-Duplex
9600
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
80
23
30
900
public
250
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled / No Entries
All Filters Disabled
N/A
100 ms
0 dB
36 Mbps
5
public
Not applicable
20 MHz
36032
53
Basic Management
Default Settings
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Feature
Model
5054-R
Multi-Frame Bursting
Storm Threshold
Broadcast Protocol Filtering
Dynamic Data Rate Selection
Roaming
NAT
Intra-Cell Blocking
Antenna Alignment
Country Selection
DHCP Server
DHCP Relay
Spanning Tree Protocol
Antenna Gain (For DFS
Threshold compensation)
Satellite Density
Temperature Logging
Temperature Logging Interval
VLAN Mode
Access VLAN ID
Access VLAN Priority
Management VLAN ID
Management VLAN Priority
VLAN ID in Trunk VLAN Table
Enabled
Broadcast/Multicast Unlimited
All Protocols Allowed
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
US-only device – US
World device – GB
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
0
2454-R
Enabled
Broadcast/Multicast Unlimited
All Protocols Allowed
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
US-only device – US
World device – GB
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
0
Large
Large
Enabled
Enabled
60 minutes
60 minutes
BSU: Transparent Mode
SU: Transparent mode when BSU in transparent mode; Trunk mode when BSU
in Trunk mode
BSU: N/A; SU: 1
BSU: N/A; SU: 0
BSU: -1; SU: -1
BSU: 0; SU: 0
BSU: N/A; SU: 1
54
Basic Management
Upgrading the Unit
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Upgrading the Unit
The units are equipped with embedded software that can be updated when new versions are released. Updating the
embedded software is described in Web Interface Image File Download. A TFTP server is provided on the
Documentation and Software CD; the server is required to transfer the downloaded file to the unit. See TFTP Server
Setup.
To access all resolved problems in our solution database, or to search by product, category, keywords, or phrases, go to
http://support.proxim.com. You can also find links to drivers, documentation, and downloads at this link.
55
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
System Status
5
This chapter describes viewing system status and event log information from the unit’s Web Interface.
Click on the Status button to access system and event log information. See the following sections:
•
System Status
•
Event Log
Help and Exit buttons also appear on each page of the Web interface; click the Help button to access online help; click
the Exit button to exit the application.
For an introduction to the basics of management, see Basic Management.
System Status
The Status tab showing the system status is displayed automatically when you log into the Web Interface. It also is the
default window displayed when you click the Status button on the left side of the window.
The Status tab shows the System Status and the System Traps.
System Status
The basic system status is shown in this section, including the version number of the embedded software.
Systems Traps
The status of system traps is shown in this section. System traps occur when the unit encounters irregularities. Deleting
system traps has no effect on the operation of the unit. System traps also are sent to an SNMP manager station (if so
configured). See “Alarm Traps” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual for a list and description of the traps.
56
System Status
Event Log
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Event Log
Click the Status button and the Event Log tab to view the contents of your Event Log. The Event Log keeps track of
events that occur during the operation of the unit. The Event Log displays messages that may not be captured by
System Traps, such as the Transmit Power for the Frequency Channel selected.
See “Event Log Error Messages” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual for an explanation of messages that can
appear in the Event Log.
57
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Configuration
6
This chapter describes configuring the unit’s settings using the unit’s Web Interface.
Click the Configure button to access configuration settings.
The following topics are discussed in this section:
•
System Parameters
•
Network Parameters
•
Interface Parameters
•
SNMP Parameters
•
RIP Parameters
•
Management Parameters
•
Security Parameters
•
Filtering Parameters
•
Intra-Cell Blocking (Base Station Unit only)
•
VLAN Parameters
•
QoS (Quality of Service) Parameters
•
SU Access to the Public Network (NAT)
Help and Exit buttons also appear on each page of the Web interface; click the Help button to access online help; click
the Exit button to exit the application.
For an introduction to the basics of management, see Basic Management.
System Parameters
The System configuration page lets you change the unit’s System Name, Location, Mode of Operation, and so on.
These details help you to distinguish the unit from other routers and let you know whom to contact in case you
experience problems.
Click the Configure button and the System tab; the following window is displayed.
58
Configuration
System Parameters
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
You can enter the following details:
•
System Name: This is the system name for easy identification of the BSU or SU. The System Name field is limited to
a length of 32 bytes. Use the system name of a BSU to configure the Base Station System Name parameter on an SU
if you want the SU to register only with this BSU. If the Base Station System Name is left blank on the SU, it can
register with any Base Station that has a matching Network Name and Network Secret.
•
Country: The Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) is enabled automatically when you choose a country with a
regulatory domain that requires it. The Country selection pre-selects and displays only the allowed frequencies for the
selected country.
Click Configure > Interfaces > Wireless to see the channel/frequency list for the selected Country.
NOTE: Units sold in the United States are pre-configured to scan and display only the outdoor frequencies permitted
by the FCC. No other Country selections, channels, or frequencies can be configured. Units sold outside of
the United States and Canada support the selection of a Country by the professional installer. If you change
the Country, a reboot of the unit is necessary for the upgrade to take place.
Dynamic Frequency Selection is not supported in 2.4 GHz operational mode; it is supported on Model 5054-R units
only.
Support for the 5.25 – 5.35 GHz and 5.725 – 5.825 GHz frequency bands is provided with a single country selection,
UNITED STATES (US), which does not provide DFS capability in these frequency bands.
For a non US-only device, the default country selected is United Kingdom (GB).
Note the following:
–
The channel center frequencies are not regulated; only the band edge frequencies are regulated.
–
If, before upgrade, US was selected as a country for a non US-Only device (which is an incorrect configuration),
the country is changed automatically to United Kingdom upon upgrade.
See Country Codes and Channels for a list of country codes.
•
Location: This field can be used to describe the location of the unit, for example “Main Lobby.”
•
Contact Name, Contact Email, and Contact Phone: In these fields, you can enter the details of the person to
contact.
•
Mode of Operation: This field sets the unit as bridge (layer 2) or as router (layer 3). See Bridge and Routing Modes
for more information.
The static fields on this window are described as follows:
59
Configuration
System Parameters
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
•
ObjectID: This field shows the OID of the product name in the MIB.
•
Ethernet MAC Address: The MAC address of the Ethernet interface of the device.
•
Descriptor: Shows the product name and firmware build version.
•
Up Time: The length of time the device has been up and running since the last reboot.
Bridge and Routing Modes
Bridge Mode
A bridge is a product that connects a local area network (LAN) to another local area network that uses the same protocol
(for example, Ethernet). You can envision a bridge as being a device that decides whether a message from you to
someone else is going to the local area network in your building or to someone on the local area network in the building
across the street. A bridge examines each message on a LAN, passing those known to be within the same LAN, and
forwarding those known to be on the other interconnected LAN (or LANs).
In bridging networks, computer or node addresses have no specific relationship to location. For this reason, messages
are sent out to every address on the network and accepted only by the intended destination node. Bridges learn which
addresses are on which network and develop a learning table so that subsequent messages can be forwarded to the
correct network.
Bridging networks are generally always interconnected LANs since broadcasting every message to all possible
destination would flood a larger network with unnecessary traffic. For this reason, router networks such as the Internet
use a scheme that assigns addresses to nodes so that a message or packet can be forwarded only in one general
direction rather than forwarded in all directions.
A bridge works at the data-link (physical) layer of a network, copying a data packet from one network to the next network
along the communications path.
The default Bridging Mode is Transparent Bridging.
This mode works if you do not use source routing in your network. If your network is configured to use source routing,
then you should use either Multi-Ring SRTB or Single-Ring SRTB mode.
In Multi-Ring SRTB mode, each unit must be configured with the Bridge number, Radio Ring number, and Token Ring
number. The Radio Ring number is unique for each Token Ring Access Point and the Bridge number is unique for each
Token Ring Access Point on the same Token Ring segment.
Alternatively, you may use the Single-Ring SRTB mode. In this mode, only the Token Ring number is required for
configuration.
Routing Mode
Routing mode can be used by customers seeking to segment their outdoor wireless network using routers instead of
keeping a transparent or bridged network. By default the unit is configured as a bridge device, which means traffic
between different outdoor locations can be seen from any point on the network.
By switching to routing mode, your network now is segmented by a layer 3 (IP) device. By using Routing mode, each
network behind the BSU and SUs can be considered a separate network with access to each controlled through routing
tables.
The use of a router on your network also blocks the retransmission of broadcast and multicast packets on your networks,
which can help to improve the performance on your outdoor network in larger installations.
The use of Routing mode requires more attention to the configuration of the unit and thorough planning of the network
topology of your outdoor network. The unit can use Routing mode in any combination of BSU and SUs. For example,
you may have the BSU in Routing mode and the SU in Bridge mode, or vice versa.
When using Routing mode, pay close attention to the configuration of the default gateway both on your unit and on your
PCs and servers. The default gateway controls where packets with unknown destinations (Internet) should be sent. Be
60
Configuration
System Parameters
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
sure that each device is configured with the correct default gateway for the next hop router. Usually this is the next router
on the way to your connection to the Internet. You can configure routes to other networks on your Intranet through the
addition of static routes in your router’s routing table.
Key Reasons to Use Routing Mode
One key reason why customers would use Routing mode is to implement virtual private networks (VPNs) or to let nodes
behind two different SUs communicate with each other. Many customers do this same thing in Bridging mode by using
secondary interfaces on the router at the BSU or virtual interfaces at the BSU in VLAN mode to avoid some of the
drawbacks of IP Routing mode.
Routing mode prevents the transport of non-IP protocols, which may be desirable for Service Providers.
Routing mode is usually more efficient because Ethernet headers are not transported and non-IP traffic is blocked.
Benefits of using Routing Mode
•
Enabling RIP makes the unit easier to manage for a Service Provider that uses RIP to dynamically manage routes.
RIP is no longer very common for Service Providers or Enterprise customers and an implementation of a more
popular routing protocol like OSPF would be desirable.
•
Routing mode saves bandwidth by not transporting non-IP protocols users might have enabled, like NetBEUI or IPX/
SPX, which eliminates the transmission of broadcasts and multicasts.
–
The MAC header is:
•
Destination MAC: 6 bytes
•
Source MAC: 6 bytes
•
Ethernet Type: 2 bytes
If the average packet size is 1000 bytes, the overhead saved is 1.5%; With a frame size of 64 bytes, the overhead saved
is 20%; and for frame sizes of 128 bytes, the saving is 10%. Network researches claim that most network traffic consists
of frames smaller than 100 bytes.
In order to support routers behind the SUs with multiple subnets and prevent routing loops, you want individual routes
(and more than one) per SU.
Routing Mode Examples
In the first example, both the BSU and the SUs are configured for Routing mode. This example is appropriate for
businesses connecting remote offices that have different networks.
In example 2, the BSU is in Routing mode and the SUs are in Bridge mode. Notice the PCs behind the SUs must
configure their default gateways to point to the BSU, not the SU.
61
Configuration
System Parameters
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Notes:
•
One of the most important details to pay attention to in Routing mode are the unit’s and the PC’s default gateways. It
is a common mistake to set up the PC’s gateway to point to the SU when the SU is in Bridge mode and the BSU is in
Routing mode. Always check to make sure the PCs on your network are configured to send their IP traffic to the
correct default gateway.
•
Be sure to reboot the unit to permanently save static routes. New routes take effect immediately without a reboot, but
are not permanently saved with your configuration until you do reboot the device. An unexpected power outage could
cause static routes you entered to “disappear” when the unit reboots if they have not been saved. You also should
save a copy of your unit’s configuration file in case the unit must be reloaded. This saves you from being required to
re-enter numerous static routes in a large network.
•
The routing table supports up to 500 static routes.
62
Configuration
Network Parameters
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Network Parameters
Change IP Parameters
The IP Configuration window lets you change the IP parameters. These settings differ when the unit is in Routing mode.
Click Configure > Network > IP Configuration to view and configure local IP address information. See Setting the IP
Address with ScanTool for more information.
If the device is configured in Bridge mode, you can set the IP Address Assignment Type parameter:
•
Select Static if you want to assign a static IP address to the unit.
•
Select Dynamic to have the device run in DHCP client mode, which gets an IP address automatically from a DHCP
server over the network.
If you do not have a DHCP server or if you want to manually configure the IP settings, set this parameter to Static.
When the unit is in Bridge mode, only one IP address is required. This IP address also can be changed with ScanTool
(see Setting the IP Address with ScanTool). In Routing mode, both Ethernet and Wireless interfaces require an IP
address.
You can set the following remaining parameters only when the IP Address Assignment Type is set to Static.
•
IP Address: The unit’s static IP address (default IP address is 10.0.0.1).
•
Subnet Mask: The mask of the subnet to which the unit is connected (the default subnet mask is 255.255.255.0).
•
Default Router IP Address: The IP address of the default gateway.
•
Default TTL: The default time-to-live value.
Configure Spanning Tree Options
This protocol is executed between the bridges to detect and logically remove redundant paths from the network.
Spanning Tree can be used to prevent link-layer loops (broadcast is forwarded to all port where another device may
forward it and, finally, it gets back to this unit; therefore, it is looping). Spanning Tree can also be used to create redundant
links and operates by disabling links: hot standby customer is creating a redundant link without routing function.
If your network does not support Spanning Tree, be careful to avoid creating network loops between radios. For example,
creating a WDS link between two units connected to the same Ethernet network creates a network loop (if spanning tree
is disabled).
The Spanning Tree configuration options are advanced settings. Proxim recommends that you leave these parameters at
their default values unless you are familiar with the Spanning Tree protocol.
Click the Spanning Tree tab to change Spanning Tree values.
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Click Edit Table Entries to make changes; enter your changes and click OK.
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Configure IP Routes (Routing Mode only)
Click Configure > Network > IP Routes to configure IP routes. You cannot configure IP Routes in Bridge mode. In
Routing mode, the Add Table Entries and Edit/Delete Table Entries buttons are enabled.
Click the Add button to add entries; a window such as the following is displayed:
Enter the route information and click Add. The IP Address and Subnet Mask combination is validated for a proper
combination.
NOTE: When adding a new entry, the IP address of the Route Destination must be in either the Ethernet subnet or in the
wireless subnet of the unit.
Click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button to make changes to or delete existing entries.
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Edit the route information and click OK. The IP address and subnet mask combination is validated for a proper
combination.
Enable or Disable Roaming
Roaming Overview
Roaming is a feature by which an SU terminates the session with the current BSU and starts the registration procedure
with another BSU when it finds the quality of the other BSU to be better. Roaming provides MAC level connectivity to the
SU that roams from one BSU to another. Roaming takes place across the range of frequencies and channel bandwidths
(5, 10, or 20 MHz) that are available per configuration. The current release offers handoff times of up to a maximum of
80 ms. This is fast enough to allow the SU to seamlessly roam from one BSU to the other therefore supporting session
persistence for delay-sensitive applications. The feature also functions as BSU backup in case the current BSU fails or
becomes unavailable.
The Roaming feature lets the SU monitor local SNR and data rate for all frames received from the current BSU. As long
as the average local SNR for the current BSU is greater than the slow scanning threshold, and the number of
retransmitted frames is greater than the slow scanning threshold given in percentage, the SU does not scan other
channels for a better BSU.
•
The normal scanning procedure starts when the average local SNR for the current BSU is less than or equal to the
slow scanning threshold and the number of retransmitted frames is greater than the slow scanning threshold given in
percentage. During the normal scanning procedure the SU scans the whole list of active channels while maintaining
the current session uninterrupted.
•
Fast scanning is the scanning procedure performed when the average local SNR for the current BSU is very low
(below the fast scanning threshold) and the number of retransmitted frames is greater than the fast scanning
retransmission threshold given in %, so that the current session should terminate as soon as possible. During this
procedure, the SU scans other active channels as fast as possible.
Roaming can only occur if the normal scanning or fast scanning procedure is started under the following conditions:
1. If the roaming is started from the normal scanning procedure (after the SU scans all the active channels), the SU
selects the BSU with the best SNR value on all available channels. The SU roams to the best BSU only if the SNR
value for the current BSU is still below the slow scanning SNR threshold, and best BSU offers a better SNR value for
at least roaming threshold than the current BSU. The SU starts a new registration procedure with the best BSU
without ending the current session.
2. If the roaming is started from the fast scanning procedure, the SU selects the first BSU that offers better SNR than the
current BSU, and starts a new registration procedure with the better BSU without ending the current session.
Roaming with Dynamic Data Rate Selection (DDRS) Enabled
When an SU roams from BSU-1 to BSU-2 and DDRS is enabled, the data rate at which the SU connects to BSU-2 is the
default DDRS data rate. If this remains at the factory default of 6 Mbps, there can be issues with the application if it
requires more then 6 Mbps (for example multiple video streams).
Applications requiring a higher data rate could experience a slight data loss during the roaming process while DDRS
selects a higher rate (based upon link conditions).
When the applications re-transmit at a possibly slower rate, the WORP protocol initially services the data at 6 Mbps and
increases the data rate up to the "Maximum DDRS Data Rate" (ddrsmaxdatarate) one step at a time. Because the
applications are not being serviced at the best possible rate, they further slow down the rate of data send.
The DDRS algorithm requires data traffic (a minimum of 128 frames) to raise the rate to a higher value. Although roaming
occurs successfully, the previous scenario causes applications to drop their sessions; hence session persistence is not
maintained.
For a discussion on how to configure DDRS, see Dynamic Data Rate Selection (DDRS).
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NOTE: You must know the data rate required for the applications running and you must ensure (during network
deployment) that the ranges and RF links can support the necessary data rate. You also must set the default
DDRS data rate at the capacity necessary for the application so that it connects to the next Base Station at the
required capacity if roaming occurs. Set the “Default DDRS Data Rate” (ddrsdefdatarate) to a greater value (24,
36, 48 or 54 Mbps, for example) for applications requiring session persistence when roaming occurs.
Configuring Roaming
Click Configure > Network > Roaming to configure Roaming. The screen differs depending on whether the unit is
configured as a BSU or as an SU.
BSU Screen
Enable or disable the Roaming feature by selecting the Enable Roaming Status check box. The default value is
disabled (clear). If you enable roaming, you may set the Announcement Period (from 25 to 100 ms, default is 100 ms).
On this screen you may also enable or disable the Multi-Frame Bursting (default value is enabled).
An SU scans all available channels for a given bandwidth during roaming. In order to reduce the number of channels an
SU has to scan and thus decrease the roaming time, a channel priority list that tells the SU what channels to scan is
implemented. Each channel in the channel priority list is specified with its corresponding bandwidth and the priority with
which it should be scanned, either “Active” (standard priority), “Active High” (high priority), or “Inactive”.
An SU will scan all channels indicated as “Active” during roaming. However, it will scan active channels indicated as
“High Priority” before scanning active channels indicated as standard priority. Channels that are not going to be used in
the wireless network should be configured as “Inactive” so that the SU can skip over those channels during scanning
saving this way time.
A BSU broadcasts the channel priority list to all valid authenticated SUs in its sector. It re-broadcasts the channel priority
list to all SUs every time the list is updated on the BSU.
Click Edit Table Entries to make changes; enter your changes and click OK.
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Note that an SU may roam from one BSU with a bandwidth setting to another BSU with a different bandwidth setting.
Since in this case more channels need to be scanned than with only one channel bandwidth setting, it is important that
the channel priority list mentioned above is properly used to limit scanning time.
When Scanning Across Bandwidth on the SU is enabled (see Interface Parameters), the SU supports bandwidth
selection of the communications channel of either 20 MHz, 10 MHz, or 5 MHz. This allows the BSUs in the network to be
set to different bandwidths while an SU can still roam from one BSU to the next, because it will not only scan other
frequencies (when the signal level or quality are lower than the threshold) but it will also switch to other bandwidths to find
a BSU that may be on another bandwidth than its current one.
During roaming, the SU will start scanning first the channels on its current bandwidth from the “Active” channel list
provided by the BSU in order to find a BSU to register, since that is the most likely setting for other BSUs in the network.
If the SU cannot find an acceptable roaming candidate, it will switch bandwidth and start scanning channels on that
corresponding bandwidth from the “Active” channel list provided by the BSU. The process is repeated until the SU finds
an appropriate BSU to register.
In the example above, an SU whose current bandwidth is 20 MHz will start scanning all active channels within the
bandwidth of 20 MHz. If it cannot find a suitable BSU, it will switch to a 10 MHz bandwidth and start scanning all active
channels within that bandwidth, in this case channel 56 first since it is configured as high priority and channel 60 next. No
channels will be scanned on the 5 MHz bandwidth since all those channels are configured as inactive.
SU Screen
Enable or disable the Roaming feature in the Roaming Status drop-down box. The default value is disabled.
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NOTE: To enable roaming, you must enable Roaming Status on both the BSU and the SU.
Enable and Configure the DHCP Server
Click Configure > Network > DHCP Server to enable the unit on a DHCP Server. The Gateway IP Address and
Primary DNS IP Address must be entered, there must be at least one entry in the DHCP Server IP Pool Table, and the
DHCP Relay Agent must be disabled, in order to enable the DHCP Server.
When enabled, the DHCP server allows allocation of IP addresses to hosts on the Ethernet side of the SU or BSU.
Specifically, the DHCP Server feature lets the SU or BSU respond to DHCP requests from Ethernet hosts with the
following information:
•
Host IP address
•
Gateway IP address
•
Subnet Mask
•
DNS Primary Server IP address
•
DNS Secondary Server IP
The following parameters are configurable:
•
DHCP Server Status: Verify that DHCP Relay Agent is disabled. After you have made at least one entry in the DHCP
server IP Pool Table, enable DHCP Server by selecting “Enable” from the DHCP Server Status pull-down menu.
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NOTE: There must be at least one entry in the DHCP server IP Pool Table to enable DHCP server. Also, DHCP
server cannot be enabled if DHCP Relay Agent is enabled.
•
Subnet Mask: The unit supplies this subnet mask in its DHCP response to a DHCP request from an Ethernet host.
Indicates the IP subnet mask assigned to hosts on the Ethernet side using DHCP.
•
Gateway IP Address: The unit supplies this gateway IP address in the DHCP response. Indicates the IP address of a
router assigned as the default gateway for hosts on the Ethernet side.
•
Primary DNS IP Address: The unit supplies this primary DNS IP address in the DHCP response. Indicates the IP
address of the primary DNS server that hosts on the Ethernet side uses to resolve Internet host names to IP
addresses
•
Secondary DNS IP Address: The unit supplies this secondary DNS IP address in the DHCP response.
•
Number of IP Pool Table Entries: The number of IP pool table entries is a read-only field that indicates the total
number of entries in the DHCP server IP Pool Table. See Add Entries to the DHCP Server IP Pool Table.
Add Entries to the DHCP Server IP Pool Table
You can add up to 20 entries in the IP Pool Table. An IP address can be added if the entry’s network ID is the same as the
network ID of the device. To add an entry click Add Table Entries.
Enter the following parameters and click Add:
NOTE: After adding entries, you must reboot the unit before the values take effect.
•
Start IP Address: Indicates the starting IP address that is used for assigning address to hosts on the Ethernet side in
the configured subnet.
•
End IP Address: Indicates the ending IP address that is used for assigning address to hosts on the Ethernet side in
the configured subnet.
•
Default Lease Time: Specifies the default lease time for IP addresses in the address pool. The value is 3600-86400
seconds.
•
Max Lease Time: The maximum lease time for IP addresses in the address pool. The value is 3600-86400 seconds.
•
Comment: The comment field is a descriptive field of up to 255 characters.
Edit/Delete Entries to the DHCP Server IP Pool Table Entries
Click Edit/Delete Table Entries to make changes; enter your changes and click OK.
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Enable the DHCP Relay Agent (Routing Mode Only)
Click Configure > Network > DHCP RA to enable the unit’s DHCP Relay Agent. When enabled, the DHCP relay agent
forwards DHCP requests to the set DHCP server. There must be at least one entry in the corresponding Server IP
Address table in order to enable the DHCP Relay Agent.
Note that DHCP Relay Agent parameters are configurable only in Routing mode. It cannot be enabled when NAT or
DHCP Server is enabled.
Add Entries to the DHCP Relay Agent Table
To add entries to the table of DHCP Relay Agents, click Add Table Entries; the following window is displayed:
Enter the Server IP Address and any optional comments; click Add.
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Edit/Delete Entries to the DHCP Relay Agent Table
Click Edit/Delete Table Entries to make changes; enter your changes and click OK.
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Interface Parameters
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Interface Parameters
Configure the Wireless Interface
To configure the wireless interface, click Configure > Interfaces > Wireless.
For Base Station units, the wireless interface can be placed in either WORP Base or WORP Satellite mode (selected
from the Interface Type drop-down box). SUs can be placed only in WORP Satellite mode. The wireless interface
settings depend upon whether the mode is Base or Satellite.
The Wireless Outdoor Router Protocol (WORP) is a polling algorithm designed for wireless outdoor networks. WORP
takes care of the performance degradation incurred by the so-called “hidden-node” problem, which can occur when
wireless LAN technology is used for outdoor building-to-building connectivity. In this situation, when multiple radios send
an RTS, if another radio is transmitting, it corrupts all data being sent, degrading overall performance. The WORP polling
algorithm ensures that these collisions cannot occur, which increases the performance of the overall network significantly.
WORP dynamically adapts to the number of SUs that are active on the network and the amount of data they have
queued to send.
The following are examples of the Wireless window when the country selected is US, and for countries different than the
US:
Base Mode – US Country
The following parameters may be configured or viewed:
•
Interface Type: The interface type can be WORP Satellite or WORP Base.
•
MAC Address: The factory-assigned MAC address of the unit. This is a read-only field.
•
Network Name: A Network Name is a name given to a network so that multiple networks can reuse the same
frequency without problems. An SU can only register to its base if it has the same Network Name. The Network Name
is one of the parameters that allow a Subscriber Unit to register on a Base Station. The Base Station System Name
and Frequency Channel also are parameters to guide the SU to the proper BSU on the network, but they provide no
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security. Basic security is provided through encryption, as it causes none of the messages to be sent in the clear.
Further security is provided by mutual authentication of the BSU and SU using the Network Secret. The Network
Name can be 2 to 32 characters in length.
•
Operational Mode: This field indicates the operational mode of the unit – 11a, 11b, or 11g – depending upon the
specific Tsunami MP.11. This operational mode cannot be changed as it is based upon a license file.
•
Dynamic Data Rate Selection (DDRS) Status: The DDRS Status is configurable only for the WORP Base Mode.
For WORP Base Mode, select the DDRS Status “Enable” or “Disable” from the drop-down box provided.
For the WORP Satellite Mode, DDRS Status is read-only parameter and its value is based upon the WORP Base to
which this SU is associated.
When you enable or disable DDRS on the BSU, the BSU sends an announcement to the SUs and the SUs enable or
disable DDRS automatically.
•
Transmit Power Control (TPC): By default, the unit lets you transmit at the maximum output power for the country or
regulatory domain and frequency selected. However, with Transmit Power Control (TPC), you can adjust the output
power of the unit to a lower level in order to reduce interference to neighboring devices or to use a higher gain
antenna without violating the maximum radiated output power allowed for your country. Also, most countries in the
ETSI regulatory domain require the transmit power to be set to a 6 dB lower value than the maximum allowed EIRP
when link quality permits. You can see your unit’s current output power for the selected frequency in the event log.
The event log shows the selected power for all data rates, so you must look up the proper data rate to determine the
actual power level.
NOTE: This feature only lets you decrease your output power; it does not let you increase your output power beyond
the maximum allowed defaults for your frequency and country.
Select one of the following options and click OK at the bottom of the window. Your original output power is adjusted
relative to the value selected. The new setting takes effect immediately without rebooting:
TPC Selection (dB)
0 (default)
-3
-6
-9
-12
-15
-18 (minimum TPC level)
Maximum TX Power (dBm)
16
13
10
7
4
1
0
NOTE: 24 Mbps and lower modulation have maximum +16 dBm TX power, 36 Mbps has maximum +13 dBm TX
power, 48 Mbps has maximum +12 dBm TX power, and 54 Mbps has maximum +11 dBm TX power. Because
higher modulation has a lower maximum TX power, the total TPC range is smaller at a higher data rate.
Because the minimum TX power is equal for all data rates, each TPC selection has constant TX power for all
data rates except where the maximum TX power is limited.
•
Enable Turbo Mode: Check this box to enable Turbo Mode. Turbo Mode is supported only in the United States, and
only for the 5054-R.
Enabling turbo mode, in its current implementation, allows the unit to use two adjacent frequency channels to transmit
and receive a signal. By enabling turbo mode, the receive sensitivity improves by 4 dB for the 36 Mbps data rate and
by 2 dB for the 24 Mbps data rate.
NOTE: The additional sensitivity is provided with the impact of using twice as much spectrum and thus increasing the
opportunity of interference and decreased ability for system collocation. Generally, Turbo mode is not
recommended except when the extra sensitivity is absolutely required.
•
Frequency Channel: The frequency channel indicates the band center frequency the unit uses for communicating
with peers. This frequency channel can be set in several ranges, depending upon regulatory domain. Refer to
Country Codes and Channels for channelization information.
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For countries in which DFS is not enabled, the Frequency Channel list displays only the channels and frequencies
allowed for the selected country.
•
Multicast Rate: The rate at which data is to be transferred. This drop down box is unavailable when DDRS is
enabled.
The default multicast rate for the unit is 36 Mbps. The SU must never be set to a lower data rate than the BSU
because timeouts will occur at the BSU and communication will fail.
Selections for multicast rate for 5, 10, and 20 MHz channel bandwidths are shown in the following table:
5 MHz
1.5
2.25
3
4.5
6
9
12
13.5
•
10 MHz
3
4.5
6
9
12
18
24
27
20 MHz
6
9
12
18
24
36
48
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Antenna Gain (BSU only): You can modify the sensitivity of the radio card when detecting radar signals in
accordance with ETSI and FCC Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) requirements. Given the radar detection
threshold is fixed by ETSI and the FCC and that a variety of antennas with different gains may be attached to the unit,
you must adjust this threshold to account for higher than expected antenna gains and avoid false radar detection
events. This can result in the units constantly changing frequency channels.
You can configure the threshold for radar detection at the radio card to compensate for increased external antenna
gains.
The Antenna Gain value ranges from 0 to 35. The default value is 0.
•
Satellite Density: The Satellite Density setting is a valuable feature for achieving maximum bandwidth in a wireless
network. It influences the receive sensitivity of the radio interface and improves operation in environments with a high
noise level. Reducing the sensitivity of the unit enables unwanted “noise” to be filtered out (it disappears under the
threshold).
You can configure the Satellite Density to be Large, Medium, Small, Mini, or Micro. The default value for this
setting is Large. The smaller settings are appropriate for high noise environments; a setting of Large would be for a
low noise environment.
A long distance link may have difficulty maintaining a connection with a small density setting because the wanted
signal can disappear under the threshold. Consider both noise level and distance between the peers in a link when
configuring this setting. The threshold should be chosen higher than the noise level, but sufficiently below the signal
level. A safe value is 10 dB below the present signal strength.
If the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is not sufficient, you may need to set a lower data rate or use antennas with higher
gain to increase the margin between wanted and unwanted signals. In a point-to-multipoint configuration, the BSU
should have a density setting suitable for all of its registered SUs, especially the ones with the lowest signal levels
(longest links).
Take care when configuring a remote interface; check the available signal level first, using Remote Link Test.
WARNING: When the remote interface accidentally is set at too small a value and communication is lost, it
cannot be reconfigured remotely and a local action is required to bring the communication back.
Therefore, the best place to experiment with the level is at the unit that can be managed without
going through the link; if the link is lost, the setting can be adjusted to the correct level to bring
the link back.
To set the Satellite Density, click the Configure button, then the Interfaces tab and the Wireless sub-tab. Make
your density selection from the drop-down menu. This setting requires a reboot of the unit.
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Sensitivity threshold settings related to the density settings for the unit are:
Set Satellite Density to:
Large
Medium
Small
Mini
Micro
For a Receive Sensitivity Threshold of:
-95 dBm
-86 dBm
-78 dBm
-70 dBm
-62 dBm
And a Defer Threshold of:
-62 dBm
-62 dBm
-52 dBm
-42 dBm
-36 dBm
•
Maximum Satellites (BSU only): You can specify a maximum value of 250 in this field, because up to 250 SUs can
be connected to a BSU. If a BSU already has as many SUs as specified in this field, a new SU cannot connect to the
BSU.
•
No-Sleep Mode (BSU only): No-Sleep Mode was a feature used to control jitter in Tsunami MP.11 products running
2.2.6, and earlier, versions of software. The introduction of QoS and the new WORP resource scheduling mechanism
have eliminated the need for No-Sleep Mode. Furthermore, QoS provides better control over jitter and latencysensitive applications (see QoS (Quality of Service) Parameters for details on configuration). This field is inactive and
makes no difference whether is enabled or disabled.
•
Automatic Multi-Frame Bursting (BSU only): In order to achieve higher throughput, WORP protocol allows each
side (BSU or SU) to send a burst of up to 4 data messages instead of a single data message. The sole criteria for
sending a burst is enough traffic to be sent out. This feature is called Multi-Frame Bursting support.
Automatic Multi-Frame bursting optimizes multi-burst performance when configuring QoS high-priority Service Flows.
Three scenarios may be defined:
–
No Multi-Frame Burst Support –To disable Multi-Frame burst support, click Configure > Network > Roaming,
and select “Disable” on the drop-down box (see BSU Screen). In this case, each active SFC is limited to send a
single data message. Total throughput available to remaining best effort traffic is around 76% of the maximum
available throughput.
Multi-Frame Burst Support – The system will enable Multi-Frame burst for all SFCs, but the maximum number of
data messages sent in a burst will be defined by the parameter “Number of data messages in a burst” for each of
the SFCs (see Service Flow Class (SFC). This scenario is set by clicking Configure > Network > Roaming and
enabling Multi-Frame burst on the drop-down box (see BSU Screen), and disabling Automatic Multi-Frame
Bursting (this parameter).
The maximum number of data messages in a burst directly influences the total throughput of the system. Typical
values are:
No. of messages in a burst:
4
3
2
1
–
% of the maximum throughput:
100%
97.6%
92.9%
76.2%
Automatic Multi-Frame Burst Support – The system will continuously be monitoring which of the active SFCs has
the highest priority and dynamically enable Multi-Frame burst for the highest priority SFC only, keeping all the
lower priority SFCs with Multi-Frame burst disabled. If there are multiple SFCs having the same, highest priority,
all of them will have Multi-Frame burst enabled. The maximum number of data messages sent in a burst is defined
by the parameter “Number of data messages in a burst” and it can be different for each SFC (see Service Flow
Class (SFC)). This scenario is set by clicking Configure > Network > Roaming and enabling Multi-Frame burst
on the drop-down box (see BSU Screen), and enabling Automatic Multi-Frame Bursting (this parameter). In this
case, even the lowest priority SFC will have Multi-Frame burst dynamically enabled as long as it is the only SFC in
the system that has traffic. By default, configuring even a single high priority SFC with automatic multi-frame
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bursting enabled will decrease throughput of low priority best-effort traffic to approximately 76% of maximum
available throughput, because low priority traffic will have Multi-Frame burst disabled to optimize bandwidth for the
high priority traffic.
•
Registration Timeout: This is the registration process time-out of an SU on a BSU. Default is 5 seconds.
•
Network Secret: A network secret is a secret password given to all nodes of a network. An SU can only register to a
BSU if it has the same Network Secret. The Network Secret is sent encrypted and can be used as a security option.
•
Input / Output Bandwidth Limit: These parameters limit the data traffic received on the wireless interface and
transmitted to the wireless interface, respectively. Selections are in steps of 64 Kbps from 64 Kbps to 108,064 Kbps.
Satellite Mode – US Country
All the fields that are common to both the BSU and the SU are applicable here. The SU features two additional fields:
•
Base Station System Name (SU only): The name found on the system page of the BSU to which this SU is
connecting. This parameter can be used as an added security measure, and when there are multiple BSUs in the
network and you want an SU to register with only one when it may actually have adequate signal strength for either.
The System Name field is limited to a length of 32 bytes.
If the Base Station System Name is left blank on the SU, it can register with any BSU with a matching Network Name
and Network Secret.
•
Scanning Across Bandwidth (SU only): Enable this field if you want the SU to scan across the whole range of
channel bandwidths (5, 10, or 20 MHz) with or without roaming enabled. Disable this field if you wish the SU to scan
only across its configured channel bandwidth.
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Base Mode – Non-US Country
The differences between the BSU Wireless interface screen for a non-US country and the equivalent screen for the US
are:
•
There is no Turbo Mode.
•
Frequency Channel is not configurable. Instead the channel is auto-selected by the DFS process.
For descriptions of all the other fields that appear in both the US and non-US screen for the BSU, see Base Mode – US
Country. In addition, the BSU screen for non-US countries contains these additional fields:
•
DFS Preferred Channel: A single DFS preferred frequency channel on the BSU is provided so that when the DFS
process starts the BSU will first try the DFS preferred channel before scanning all the other active channels in the DFS
channel list. The DFS preferred channel must be selected from those channels indicated as “Disable” in the DFS
channel blacklist list. It is not possible to select the DFS preferred channel from those channels in the DFS channel
blacklist list indicated as “Enable”.
•
Channel Blacklist Table: The DFS channel blacklist table shows all the channels in the current bandwidth and
specifies the blacklist status of each channel as one of the following:
–
Enable – Channels that are made unavailable either for a certain period of time upon detection of a radar signal,
or permanently because the operator has configured them as blacklisted. These channels are skipped over during
DFS channel selection.
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Disable – Channels that are to be scanned during DFS.
Edit Entries to the Channel Blacklist Table
In accordance to the EN301-893 non-occupancy rule, when a radar signal is detected on any active channel, the
blacklist status of that channel will change to “Enable” and the Radar Detected status will change to TRUE (see
previous figure). The channel will not be used for a period of 30 minutes after the radar signal has been detected. The
elapsed time is also shown in the DFS channel blacklist table. When the elapsed time for a channel in the blacklist is
greater than or equal to 30 minutes, the blacklist status of the channel will change to Disable and the Radar Detected
and Elapsed Time fields will change accordingly.
If an operator knows in advance on which channels a radar signal is likely to exist, those channels can be blacklisted
and hence they will be skipped during DFS. Similarly, if the operator knows of channels where a radar signal is
unlikely to be detected, those channels can be defined as active and hence they will be scanned during DFS. This
makes the whole process more efficient.
When you click Edit, the channel blacklist table screen appears. Here you can manually configure each channel as
“active” (Blacklist Status = Disable) or “blacklisted” (Blacklist Status = Enable). Enter your changes and click OK. To
go back, click on the arrow button.
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Satellite Mode – Non-US Country
The differences between the SU Wireless interface screen for a non-US country and the equivalent screen for the US
are:
•
There is no Turbo Mode.
•
Frequency Channel is not configurable. Instead the channel is auto-selected by the DFS process.
For descriptions of all other fields on this screen, see Satellite Mode – US Country.
Notes:
•
Turbo mode is available only when the specified Country is US and only for the 5054.
•
The list of parameters to configure for registration of the SU on a Base Station are:
–
Network Name
–
Base Station System Name (when used)
–
Channel Frequency
–
Encryption (when used)
–
Network Secret
Configure the Ethernet Interface
To set the Ethernet speed, duplex mode, and input and output bandwidth limits, click Configure > Interfaces > Ethernet.
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You can set the desired speed and transmission mode by clicking on Configuration. Select from these settings for the
type of Ethernet transmission:
•
Half-duplex means that only one side can transmit at a time.
•
Full-duplex lets both sides transmit.
•
Auto-duplex selects the best transmission mode available when both sides are set to auto-select.
The recommended setting is auto-speed-auto-duplex.
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SNMP Parameters
Click Configure > SNMP to enable or disable trap groups, and to configure the SNMP management stations to which the
unit sends system traps. See “Trap Groups” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual for a list of the system traps.
•
Trap Groups: You can enable or disable different types of traps in the system. By default, all traps are enabled.
•
Trap Host Table: This table shows the SNMP management stations to which the unit sends system traps.
Add Entries to the Trap Host Table
Click the Add Table Entries button to add entries to the Trap Host Table.
Edit/Delete Entries to the Trap Host Table
Click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button to make changes to or delete existing entries.
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RIP Parameters
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RIP Parameters
Routing Internet Protocol (RIP) is a dynamic routing protocol you can use to help automatically propagate routing table
information between routers. The unit can be configured as RIPv1, RIPv2, RIPv1 Compatible, or a combination of the
three versions while operating in Routing mode. In general, the unit’s RIP module is based upon RFC 1389.
NOTE: RIP does not work when Network Address Translation (NAT) is enabled.
Note the following:
•
RIPv2 is enabled by default when routing mode is selected.
•
You may turn RIP off by clearing the Enable RIP Interface check box for the Ethernet or the wireless interface. Any
RIP advertisements that are received on the designated interface are ignored. All other options on the page are
dimmed.
•
If the Enable RIP Interface check box is selected, the unit sends RIP requests and “listens” for RIP updates coming
from RIP-enabled devices advertising on the network. You may configure the Receive field for RIPv1, RIPv2, or a
combination of both. Although the unit receives and processes these updates, it does not further propagate these
updates unless configured to advertise RIP. Again, you may configure the Advertize field for RIPv1, RIPv2, or a
combination of both.
•
The ability to enable or disable default route propagation is not user configurable. Once initialized, the unit uses its
static default route and does not advertise this route in RIP updates. If another router on your network is configured to
advertise its default route, this route overwrites the static default route configured on the unit. The unit then also
propagates the new dynamic default route throughout the network.
Be aware that, once a dynamic default route is learned, it behaves just as any other dynamic route learned through RIP.
This means if the device sending the default route stops sending RIP updates, the default route times out and the unit
has no default route to the network. Workarounds for this condition include rebooting or re-entering a static default route.
In general, the best approach is to disable the propagation of default routes on the other routers in your network unless
you understand the risks.
The following table describes the properties and features of each version of RIP supported.
Properties and Features of Supported RIP Versions
RIPv2
RIPv1 Compatible
Broadcast
Multicast
Broadcast
No Authentication
Authentication
Authentication
Class routing
Classless routing (VLSM)
Classless routing (VLSM)
Distance-vector protocol
Distance-vector protocol
Distance-vector protocol
RIPv1
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RIPv1
Metric-Hops
Maximum Distance 15
IGP
Properties and Features of Supported RIP Versions
RIPv2
RIPv1 Compatible
Metric-Hops
Metric-Hops
Maximum Distance 15
Maximum Distance 15
IGP
IGP
RIP Example
In the following example, assume that both the BSU and the SUs all are configured in Routing mode with RIP enabled to
send and receive on both the Ethernet and Wireless interfaces. The network converges through updates until each unit
has the following routing table:
RIP Notes
•
Ensure that routers on the same physical network are configured to use the same version of RIP.
•
Routing updates occur every 30 seconds. It may take up to 3 minutes for a route that has gone down to timeout in a
routing table.
•
RIP is limited to networks with 15 or fewer hops.
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Management Parameters
When you click the Management button, Passwords is displayed automatically. The other tab under Management is the
Services tab.
Configure Passwords
The Password tab lets you configure the SNMP, Telnet, and HTTP (Web Interface) passwords.
For all password fields, the passwords must be between 6 and 32 characters. Changes take effect immediately after you
click OK. The following passwords are configurable:
•
SNMP Read Community Password: The password for read access using SNMP. Enter a password in both the
Password field and the Confirm field. The default password is public.
•
SNMP Read/Write Community Password: The password for read and write access using SNMP. Enter a password
in both the Password field and the Confirm field. The default password is public.
•
Telnet (CLI) Password: The password for the CLI interface. Enter a password in both the Password field and the
Confirm field. The default password is public.
•
HTTP (Web) Password: The password for the Web browser HTTP interface. Enter a password in both the Password
field and the Confirm field. The default password is public.
Configure Service Parameters
The Services tab lets you configure the SNMP, Telnet, and HTTP (Web Interface) parameters. Changes to these
parameters require a reboot to take effect.
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SNMP Configuration Settings
•
SNMP Interface Bitmask: Configure the interface or interfaces (Ethernet, Wireless, All Interfaces) from which you
will manage the unit using SNMP. You also can select Disabled to prevent a user from accessing the unit through
SNMP.
HTTP Configuration Settings
•
HTTP Interface Bitmask: Configure the interface or interfaces (Ethernet, Wireless, All Interfaces) from which you
will manage the unit through the Web interface. For example, to allow Web configuration through the Ethernet network
only, set HTTP Interface Bitmask to Ethernet. You can also select Disabled to prevent a user from accessing the
unit from the Web interface.
•
HTTP Port: Configure the HTTP port from which you will manage the unit through the Web interface. By default, the
HTTP port is 80.
Telnet Configuration Settings
NOTE: To use HyperTerminal for CLI access, make sure to check “Send line ends with line feeds” in the ASCII Setup
window (in the HyperTerminal window, click Properties; then select Setup > ASCII Setup. See “HyperTerminal
Connection Properties” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual for more information).
•
Telnet Interface Bitmask: Select the interface (Ethernet, Wireless, All Interfaces) from which you can manage the
unit through telnet. This parameter can also be used to disable telnet management.
•
Telnet Port Number: The default port number for Telnet applications is 23. However, you can use this field if you want
to change the Telnet port for security reasons (but your Telnet application also must support the new port number you
select).
•
Telnet Login Timeout (seconds): Enter the number of seconds the system is to wait for a login attempt. The unit
terminates the session when it times out. The range is 1 to 300 seconds; the default is 30 seconds.
•
Telnet Session Timeout (seconds): Enter the number of seconds the system is to wait during a session while there is
no activity. The unit ends the session upon timeout. The range is 1 to 36000 seconds; the default is 900 seconds.
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Serial Configuration Settings
The serial port interface on the unit is enabled at all times. See “Serial Port” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual for
information about how to access the CLI interface through the serial port. You can configure and view following
parameters:
•
Serial Baud Rate: Select the serial port speed (bits per second). Choose between 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400,
or 57600; the default Baud Rate is 9600.
•
Serial Flow Control: Select either None (default) or Xon/Xoff (software controlled) data flow control. To avoid
potential problems when communicating with the unit through the serial port, Proxim recommends that you leave the
Flow Control setting at None (the default value).
•
Serial Data Bits: This is a read-only field and displays the number of data bits used in serial communication (8 data
bits by default).
•
Serial Parity: This is a read-only field and displays the number of parity bits used in serial communication (no parity
bits by default).
•
Serial Stop Bits: This is a read-only field that displays the number of stop bits used in serial communication (1 stop
bit by default).
The serial port bit configuration is commonly referred to as 8N1.
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Security Parameters
Configure MAC Authentication
Click Configure > Security > MAC Auth to build a list of authorized wireless stations that can register at the unit and
access the network.
MAC authentication is available only for BSUs.
This feature is supported on the wireless interface and only wireless MAC addresses should be entered in the list. For
example, build a list of wireless MAC addresses on the BSU for the authorized SUs.
To add table entries, click the Add Table Entries button; a window such as the following is displayed:
Enter the MAC address and any comment, then click Add. The maximum number of MAC addresses that can be entered
is 250.
To edit or delete table entries, click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button; make your corrections in the window displayed
and click OK.
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Configure Encryption Parameters
NOTE: Be sure to set the encryption parameters and change the default passwords.
You can protect the wireless data link by using encryption. Encryption keys can be 5 (64-bit), 13 (WEP 128-bit), or 16
(AES 128-bit) characters in length. Both ends of the wireless data link must use the same parameter values.
In addition to Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) and Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), the unit supports Advanced
Encryption Standard (AES) 128-bit encryption. To provide even stronger encryption, the AES CCM Protocol is also
supported.
Click Configure > Security > Encryption to set encryption keys for the data transmitted and received by the unit. Note
that all devices in one network must use the same encryption parameters to communicate to each other.
Configure RADIUS Authentication
Click Configure > Security > Radius Auth to set the IP address of the RADIUS server containing the central list of MAC
addresses that are allowed to access the network. The RADIUS parameters let you enable HTTP or Telnet RADIUS
management access to configure a RADIUS Profile for management access control, to enable or disable local user
access, and to configure the local password.
RADIUS authentication is available only for BSUs.
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In large networks with multiple units, you can maintain a list of MAC addresses on a centralized location using a RADIUS
authentication server that grants or denies access. If you use this kind of authentication, you must specify at least the
primary RADIUS server. The backup RADIUS server is optional.
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Filtering Parameters
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Filtering Parameters
Click Configure > Filtering to configure packet filtering. Packet filtering can be used to control and optimize network
performance.
Overview
The Filtering feature can selectively filter specific packets based upon their Ethernet protocol type. Protocol filtering is
done at the Bridge layer.
Protocol filters are useful for preventing bridging of selected protocol traffic from one segment of a network to other
segments (or subnets). You can use this feature both to increase the amount of bandwidth available on your network and
to increase network security.
Increasing Available Bandwidth
It may be unnecessary to bridge traffic from a subnet using IPX/SPX or AppleTalk to a segment of the network with UNIX
workstations. By denying the IPX/SPX AppleTalk traffic from being bridged to the UNIX subnet, the UNIX subnet is free
of this unnecessary traffic.
Increasing Network Security
By bridging IP and IP/ARP traffic and blocking LAN protocols used by Windows, Novell, and Macintosh servers, you can
protect servers and client systems on the private local LAN from outside attacks that use those LAN protocols. This type
of filtering also prevents private LAN data from being bridged to an untrusted remote network or the Internet.
To prevent blocking your own access (administrator) to the unit, Proxim recommends that IP (0x800) and ARP (0x806)
protocols are always passed through.
Sample Use and Validation
Configure the protocol filter to let only IP and ARP traffic pass through the unit (bridge) from one network segment to
another. Then, attempt to use Windows file sharing across the bridge. The file should not allow sharing; the packets are
discarded by the bridge.
Setting the ARP Filter
There may be times when you need to set the ARP or Multicast. Usually, this is required when there are many nodes on
the wired network that are sending ARP broadcast messages or multicast packets that unnecessarily consume the
wireless bandwidth. The goal of these filters is to allow only necessary ARP and multicast traffic through the 1.6 Mbps
wireless pipe.
The TCP/IP Internet Protocol Suite uses a method known as ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) to match a device's
MAC (Media Access Control) address with its assigned IP address. The MAC address is a unique 48-bit identifier
assigned to each hardware device at the factory by the manufacturer. The MAC address is commonly represented as 6
pairs of hexadecimal digits separated by colons. For example, a device may have the MAC address of
00:20:A6:33:ED:45.
When devices send data over the network (Ethernet, Token Ring, or wireless), they use the MAC address to identify a
packet's source and destination. Therefore, an IP address must be mapped to a MAC address in order for a device to
send a packet to particular IP address. In order to resolve a remote node's IP address with its MAC address, a device
sends out a broadcast packet to all nodes on the network. This packet is known as an ARP request or ARP broadcast
and requests that the device assigned a particular IP address respond to the sender with its MAC address.
Because ARP requests are broadcast packets, these packets are forwarded to wireless nodes by default, even if the
packet is not meant for a wireless node. As the number of nodes on a network backbone increases, so does the number
of ARP broadcasts that are forwarded to the wireless nodes. Many of these ARP broadcasts are unnecessary and can
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consume valuable wireless bandwidth. On some networks, there are so many ARP broadcasts that the performance of
the wireless network will degrade due to the amount of bandwidth being consumed by these messages.
To reduce the number of ARP broadcasts that are forwarded to the wireless nodes, you can enable ARP filtering. When
enabled, the ARP Filter allows the unit to forward only those ARP broadcasts destined for an IP address that falls within
the range specified by the ARP Filter Network Address and the ARP Filter Subnet Mask. The ARP Filter performs a
logical AND function (essentially keeping what is the same and discarding what is different) on the IP address of the ARP
request and the ARP Filter Subnet Mask. It then compares the result of the logical AND to the ARP Filter Network
Address. If the two values match, the ARP broadcast is forwarded to the wireless network by the unit.
Configure Ethernet Protocol Filtering
The Ethernet Protocol filter blocks or forwards packets based upon the Ethernet protocols they support. Click Configure
> Filtering > Ethernet Protocol to enable or disable certain protocols in the table. Entries can be selected from a dropdown box.
Follow these steps to configure the Ethernet Protocol Filter:
1. Select the interfaces that will implement the filter from the Ethernet Protocol Filtering drop-down menu.
•
Ethernet: Packets are examined at the Ethernet interface
•
Wireless-Slot A or Wireless-Slot B: Packets are examined at the Wireless A or B interfaces
•
All Interfaces: Packets are examined at both interfaces
•
Disabled: The filter is not used
2. Select the Filter Operation Type.
•
If set to Block, the bridge blocks enabled Ethernet Protocols listed in the Filter Table.
•
If set to Passthru, only the enabled Ethernet Protocols listed in the Filter Table pass through the bridge.
3. Configure the Filter Table.
•
To add an entry, click Add Table Entries. You may add one of the supplied Ethernet Protocol Filters, or you may
enter additional filters by specifying the appropriate parameters:
– To add one of the supplied Ethernet Protocol Filters to the filter table:
• Select the appropriate filter from the Specify Common Protocol drop-down menu. Protocol Name and
Protocol Number fields will be filled in automatically.
• Click Add
– To add a new filter to the filter table:
• Enter the Protocol Number. See http://www.iana.org/assignments/ethernet-numbers for a list of protocol
numbers.
• Enter the Protocol Name.
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• Click Add.
•
To edit or delete an entry, click Edit and change the information, or select Enable, Disable, or Delete from the
Status drop-down menu.
NOTE: Entries must be enabled in order to be subject to the filter.
Configure Static MAC Pair Filtering
The Static MAC Address filter optimizes the performance of a wireless (and wired) network. When this feature is
configured properly, the unit can block traffic between wired devices on the wired (Ethernet) interface and devices on the
wireless interface based upon MAC address.
NOTE: The device on the wireless interface can be any device connected through the link, it can be directly connected to
the Ethernet interface of the peer unit, or it can be attached through multiple hops. The MAC address in the
packets arriving at the wireless interface is the important element.
The filter is an advanced feature that lets you limit the data traffic between two specific devices (or between groups of
devices based upon MAC addresses and masks) through the unit’s wireless interface. For example, if you have a server
on your network with which you do not want wireless clients to communicate, you can set up a static MAC filter to block
traffic between these devices. The Static MAC Filter Table performs bi-directional filtering. However, note that this is an
advanced filter and it may be easier to control wireless traffic through other filter options, such as Protocol Filtering.
Click Configure > Filtering > Static MAC to access the Static MAC Address filter.
Each MAC address or mask is comprised of 12 hexadecimal digits (0-9 and A-F) that correspond to a 48-bit identifier.
(Each hexadecimal digit represents 4 bits (0 or 1).
Taken together, a MAC address/mask pair specifies an address or a range of MAC addresses that the unit looks for when
examining packets. The unit uses Boolean logic to perform an “and” operation between the MAC address and the mask
at the bit level. However, for most users, you do not need to think in terms of bits. It should be sufficient to create a filter
using only the hexadecimal digits 0 and F in the mask (where 0 is any value and F is the value specified in the MAC
address). A mask of 00:00:00:00:00:00 corresponds to all MAC addresses, and a mask of FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF
applies only to the specified MAC address.
For example, if the MAC address is 00:20:A6:12:54:C3 and the mask is FF;FF;FF;00:00:00, the unit examines the source
and destination addresses of each packet looking for any MAC address starting with 00:20:A6. If the mask is
FF;FF;FF;FF;FF;FF, the unit looks only for the specific MAC address (in this case, 00:20:A6:12:54:C3).
When creating a filter, you can configure the Wired parameters only, the Wireless parameters only, or both sets of
parameters. Which parameters to configure depends upon the traffic that you want to block:
•
To prevent all traffic from a specific wired MAC address from being forwarded to the wireless network, configure only
the Wired MAC address and Wired mask (leave the Wireless MAC and Wireless mask set to all zeros).
•
To prevent all traffic from a specific wireless MAC address from being forwarded to the wired network, configure only
the Wireless MAC and Wireless mask (leave the Wired MAC address and Wired mask set to all zeros).
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•
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To block traffic between a specific wired MAC address and a specific wireless MAC address, configure all four
parameters.
See Static MAC Filter Examples for more detailed examples.
Add Entries to the Static MAC Filter Table
To add the entries to Filter table, click the Add Table Entries button.
After entering the data, click the Add button. The entry is enabled automatically when saved.
To edit an entry, click Edit. To disable or remove an entry, click Edit and change the Status field from Enable to Disable
or Delete.
The following fields are may be configured or viewed:
•
Wired MAC Address: Enter the MAC address of the device on the Ethernet network that you want to prevent from
communicating with a device on the wireless network.
•
Wired Mask: Enter the appropriate bit mask to specify the range of MAC addresses to which this filter is to apply. To
specify only the single MAC address you entered in the Wired MAC Address field, enter 00:00:00:00:00:00 (all
zeroes).
•
Wireless MAC Address: Enter the MAC address of the wireless device on the wireless interface that you want to
prevent from communicating with a device on the wired network.
•
Wireless Mask: Enter the appropriate bit mask to specify the range of MAC addresses to which this filter is to apply.
To specify only the single MAC address you entered in the Wireless MAC Address field, enter 00:00:00:00:00:00 (all
zeroes).
•
Comment: Enter related information.
•
Status: The Status field can show Enable, Disable, or Delete.
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Static MAC Filter Examples
Consider a network that contains a wired server and three wireless clients. The MAC address for each unit is as follows:
•
Wired Server: 00:40:F4:1C:DB:6A
•
Wireless Client 1: 00:02:2D:51:94:E4
•
Wireless Client 2: 00:02:2D:51:32:12
•
Wireless Client 3: 00:20:A6:12:4E:38
Prevent two specific devices from communicating:
Configure the following settings to prevent the Wired Server and Wireless Client 1 from communicating:
•
Wired MAC Address: 00:40:F4:1C:DB:6A
•
Wired Mask: FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF
•
Wireless MAC Address: 00:02:2D:51:94:E4
•
Wireless Mask: FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF
Result: Traffic between the Wired Server and Wireless Client 1 is blocked. Wireless Clients 2 and 3 still can
communicate with the Wired Server.
Prevent Multiple Wireless Devices From Communicating With a Single Wired Device
Configure the following settings to prevent Wireless Clients 1 and 2 from communicating with the Wired Server:
•
Wired MAC Address: 00:40:F4:1C:DB:6A
•
Wired Mask: FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF
•
Wireless MAC Address: 00:02:2D:51:94:E4
•
Wireless Mask: FF:FF:FF:00:00:00
Result: When a logical “AND” is performed on the Wireless MAC Address and Wireless Mask, the result corresponds to
any MAC address beginning with the 00:20:2D prefix. Since Wireless Client 1 and Wireless Client 2 share the same
prefix (00:02:2D), traffic between the Wired Server and Wireless Clients 1 and 2 is blocked. Wireless Client 3 can still
communicate with the Wired Server since it has a different prefix (00:20:A6).
Prevent All Wireless Devices From Communicating With a Single Wired Device
Configure the following settings to prevent all three Wireless Clients from communicating with Wired Server:
•
Wired MAC Address: 00:40:F4:1C:DB:6A
•
Wired Mask: FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF
•
Wireless MAC Address: 00:00:00:00:00:00
•
Wireless Mask: 00:00:00:00:00:00
Result: The unit blocks all traffic between the Wired Server and all wireless clients.
Prevent A Wireless Device From Communicating With the Wired Network
Configure the following settings to prevent Wireless Client 3 from communicating with any device on the Ethernet:
•
Wired MAC Address: 00:00:00:00:00:00
•
Wired Mask: 00:00:00:00:00:00
•
Wireless MAC Address: 00:20:A6:12:4E:38
•
Wireless Mask: FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF
Result: The unit blocks all traffic between Wireless Client 3 and the Ethernet network.
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Prevent Messages Destined for a Specific Multicast Group from Being Forwarded to the Wireless LAN
If devices on your Ethernet network use multicast packets to communicate and these packets are not required by your
wireless clients, you can set up a Static MAC filter to preserve wireless bandwidth. For example, if routers on your
network use a specific multicast address (such as 01:00:5E:00:32:4B) to exchange information, you can set up a filter to
prevent these multicast packets from being forwarded to the wireless network:
•
Wired MAC Address: 01:00:5E:00:32:4B
•
Wired Mask: FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF
•
Wireless MAC Address: 00:00:00:00:00:00
•
Wireless Mask: 00:00:00:00:00:00
Result: The unit does not forward any packets that have a destination address of 01:00:5E:00:32:4B to the wireless
network.
Configure Storm Threshold Filtering
Click Configure > Filtering > Storm Threshold to use threshold limits to prevent broadcast/multicast overload.
Storm Threshold is an advanced Bridge setup option that you can use to protect the network against data overload by
specifying:
•
A maximum number of frames per second as received from a single network device (identified by its MAC address).
•
An absolute maximum number of messages per port.
The Storm Threshold parameters let you specify a set of thresholds for each port of the unit, identifying separate values
for the number of broadcast messages per second and multicast messages per second.
When the number of frames for a port or identified station exceeds the maximum value per second, the unit ignores all
subsequent messages issued by the particular network device, or ignores all messages of that type.
The following parameters are configurable:
•
Per Address Threshold: Enter the maximum allowed number of packets per second.
•
Ethernet Threshold: Enter the maximum allowed number of packets per second.
•
Wireless Threshold: Enter the maximum allowed number of packets per second.
Configure Broadcast Protocol Filtering
Click Configure > Filtering > Broadcast Protocol to deny specific IP broadcast, IPX broadcast, and multicast traffic.
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Click the Edit Table Entries button to display an editable window such as the following. You can configure whether this
traffic must be blocked for Ethernet to wireless, wireless to Ethernet, or both.
Configure IP Access Table Filtering
Click Configure > Filtering > IP Access Table to limit in-band management access to the IP addresses or range of IP
addresses specified in the table. This feature applies to all management services (SNMP, HTTP, and CLI), except for CLI
management over the serial port.
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To add an entry, click the Add Table Entries button, specify the IP address and mask of the wireless stations to which
you want to grant access, and click Add.
To edit or delete table entries, click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button, make your changes, and click OK.
For example, 172.17.23.0/255.255.255.0 allows access from all wireless stations with an IP address in the 172.17.23.xxx
range.
Ensure that the IP address of the management PC you use is within the first entry in the table, as this filter takes effect
immediately. Otherwise, you have locked yourself out.
When you do lock yourself out, you may try to give the PC the correct IP address; otherwise you must reset the unit.
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Intra-Cell Blocking (Base Station Unit only)
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Intra-Cell Blocking (Base Station Unit only)
Overview
The Intra-Cell Blocking feature lets traffic be blocked between two SUs registered to the same Base Station. There are
two potential reasons to isolate traffic among wireless subscribers:
•
To provide better security to the subscribers by isolating the traffic from one subscriber to another in a public space.
•
To block unwanted traffic between subscribers to prevent this traffic from using bandwidth.
You can form groups of SUs at the Base Station, which define the filtering criteria. All data to or from SUs belonging to the
same group are bridged. All other data from SUs that do not belong to a particular group are automatically forwarded
through the Ethernet interface of the Base Station. If an SU does not belong to any group, the Base Station discards the
data.
You can also configure a Security Gateway to block traffic between SUs connected to different BSUs. All packets
destined for SUs not connected to the same Base Station are forwarded to the Security Gateway MAC address
(configured in the Security Gateway tab).
When you change the device from Bridge to Routing mode, Intra-Cell Blocking stops working with or without a reboot.
When you change the device from Routing to Bridge mode, Intra-Cell Blocking starts working with or without a reboot.
Intra-Cell Blocking Group Rules
The following rules apply to Intra-Cell Blocking Groups:
•
One SU can be assigned to more than one group.
•
An SU that has not been assigned to any group cannot communicate to any other SU connected to the same or
different BSU.
Example of Intra-Cell Blocking Groups
Assume that four Intra-Cell Blocking Groups have been configured on one BSU. SUs 1 through 6 are registered to BSU
1. SUs 7 through 9 are registered to BSU 2.
Group 1
SU 1
SU 4
SU 5
Intra-Cell Blocking Group Example
Group 2
Group 3
SU 2
SU 6
SU 3
SU 1
SU 8
SU 3
Group 4
SU 8
SU 9
SU 2
In this example, SU 1 belongs to two groups, Group 1 and Group 3. Therefore, packets from SU 1 destined to SU 4, SU
5, SU 6, and SU 3 are not blocked. However, SU 9 belongs to group 4 only and packets from SU 9 are blocked unless
sent to SU 8 or SU 2.
Achieving Communication Between Two SUs
In a multipoint configuration, an SU can communicate with another SU through the BSU when in Bridge mode by default.
Use the intra-cell blocking feature if this is not desired. In a routing configuration, each of the SUs must have a different
subnet on their Ethernet port to distinguish traffic for each SU, and each subnet must be entered into a routing rule in the
BSU as well as into an upstream router. The wireless side of all SUs must share the same subnet with the BSU wireless
interface. These IP addresses must be used as next hop when creating the routes for the SU subnets.
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MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Enable Intra-Cell Blocking
Click Configure > Intra-Cell Blocking > Group Table to enable the Intra-Cell Blocking feature and to configure IntraCell Blocking Groups.
The following items are configurable:
•
Intra-Cell Blocking Status: Enables or disables the Intra-Cell Blocking feature.
•
Group Table: Entries in this table show the Intra-Cell Blocking filter groups that have been configured. When IntraCell Blocking is enabled, the Base Station Unit discards all packets coming from one SU to another SU, if both SUs do
not belong to the same filter group.
Configure Intra-Cell Blocking Groups
Click the Add Table Entries button to add groups to the Group Table.
Enter the group name, and click Add. The group is assigned an Index and appears in the Group Table. Up to 16 groups
can be configured per Base Station.
You can enable, disable or delete an existing filter group by using the Edit/Delete Table Entries button.
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Assign MAC Addresses (MAC Table)
After configuring the Intra-Cell Blocking Groups on the Group Table tab, use the MAC Table tab to assign specific MAC
addresses to an Intra-Cell Blocking Group.
Adding Entries
Click the Add Table Entries button.
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Enter the MAC address of the SU. Select Enable from the drop-down menu for the Group Index
Click Add. The MAC address is assigned to the groups. Additions to the MAC Table take effect immediately after clicking
the Add button.
You can Enable, Disable, Delete, or Reassign the groups for a MAC address by using the Edit/Delete Table Entries
button. A maximum of 250 MAC addresses can be added among all filter groups.
Block Traffic Between SUs (Security Gateway)
You can configure a Security Gateway to block traffic between SUs connected to different BSUs. Verify that Intra-Cell
Blocking has been enabled on the Group Table tab before configuring the Security Gateway.
•
Security Gateway Status: Enables or disables packet forwarding to the external Security Gateway.
•
Security Gateway MAC Address: Lets you configure the MAC address of the external Security Gateway.
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VLAN Parameters
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VLAN Parameters
Virtual LAN (VLAN) implementation in the Tsunami products:
•
Lets the BSU and SU be used in a VLAN-aware network.
•
Processes IEEE 802.1Q VLAN-tagged packets.
Network resources behind the BSU and SU can be assigned to logical groups.
Overview
VLAN Modes
Transparent Mode
Transparent mode is available on both the SU and the BSU. This mode is equivalent to NO VLAN support and is the
default mode. It is used when the devices behind the SU and BSU are both VLAN aware and unaware. The SU/BSU
transfers both tagged and untagged frames received on the Ethernet or WORP interface. Both tagged and untagged
management frames can access the device.
Trunk Mode
Trunk mode VLAN is available on both the SU and the BSU. It is used when all devices behind the SU and BSU are
VLAN aware. The SU and BSU transfer only tagged frames received on the Ethernet or WORP interface. Both tagged
and untagged management frames can access the device.
Access Mode
Access mode is available only on the SU. It is used when the devices behind the SU are VLAN unaware. Frames to and
from the Ethernet interface behind the SU map into only one VLAN segment.
Frames received on the Ethernet interface are tagged with the configured Access VLAN ID before forwarding them to the
WORP interface. Both tagged and untagged management frames can access the device from the WORP interface.
However, only untagged management frames can access the device from the Ethernet Interface.
VLAN Forwarding
The VLAN Trunk mode provides a means to configure a list of VLAN IDs in a Trunk VLAN Table. The SU and BSU only
forward frames (between Ethernet and WORP interface) tagged with the VLAN IDs configured in the Trunk VLAN Table.
Up to 256 VLAN IDs can be configured for the BSU and up to 16 VLAN IDs can be configured for the SU (depending
upon the capabilities of your switching equipment).
VLAN Relaying
The VLAN Trunk mode for BSU operation provides an option to enable and disable a VLAN relaying flag; when enabled,
the BSU shall relay frames between SUs on the same BSU having the same VLAN ID.
Management VLAN
The BSU and SU allow the configuration of a separate VLAN ID and priority for SNMP, ICMP, Telnet, and TFTP
management frames for device access.
The management VLAN ID and management VLAN priority may be applied in any mode. The management stations tag
the management frames they send to the BSU or SU with the management VLAN ID configured in the device. The BSU
and SU tag all the management frames from the device with the configured management VLAN and priority.
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BSU and SU in Transparent Mode
When the BSU is in Transparent mode, all associated SUs must be in Transparent mode.
How the BSU and SUs function in Transparent mode is described in the following table.
BSU Function – Transparent Mode
SU Function – Transparent Mode
• SU forwards both tagged and untagged frames
• BSU forwards both tagged and untagged
received from the Ethernet interface or from
frames received from the Ethernet interface or
the BSU.
from any of the associated SUs.
• If a valid management VLAN ID is configured, • If a valid management VLAN ID is configured,
SU allows only management frames tagged
BSU allows only management frames tagged
with the configured management VLAN ID to
with the configured management VLAN ID to
access it.
access it.
• If a valid management VLAN ID is configured, • If a valid management VLAN ID is configured,
SU tags all management frames generated by
BSU tags all management frames generated
the SU with the configured management VLAN
by the BSU with the configured management
ID and priority.
VLAN ID and priority.
• If the management VLAN ID is configured as - • If the management VLAN ID is configured as 1 (untagged), SU allows only untagged
1 (untagged), BSU allows only untagged
management frames to access them.
management frames to access it.
BSU in Trunk Mode and SU in Trunk/Access Mode
When the BSU is in Trunk mode, the associated SUs must be in either Trunk mode or Access mode. When an SU
associates to a BSU that is in Trunk mode, it gets the VLAN mode from the BSU.
How the BSU and SU function in Trunk mode, and the SU in Access mode, is described in the following table.
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BSU Function – Trunk Mode
• Up to 256 VLAN IDs can be
configured on a BSU.
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SU Function – Trunk Mode
• Up to 16 VLAN IDs can be
configured on an SU.
SU Function – Access Mode
• SU discards all tagged frames received
from the Ethernet interface and all
untagged frames received from the
• SU discards all untagged frames
• BSU discards all untagged
BSU (unexpected).
received from the Ethernet
frames received from the
• SU tags all untagged frames received
interface or from the BSU
Ethernet interface or from any of
from the Ethernet interface with the
(unexpected).
the associated SUs
configured Access VLAN ID and
(unexpected).
• If a valid VLAN ID is configured,
forwards them to the BSU.
SU forwards only VLAN-tagged
• If a valid VLAN ID is configured,
• SU untags all tagged frames received
frames received from the
BSU forwards only VLAN-tagged
from the BSU that are tagged with the
Ethernet interface or from the
frames received from the
configured Access VLAN ID and
BSU that are tagged with the
Ethernet interface or from any of
forwards them to the Ethernet
configured VLAN IDs; it discards
the associated SUs that are
interface; it discards all other tagged
all other tagged frames.
tagged with the configured VLAN
frames from the BSU.
IDs; it discards all other tagged
• If a valid management VLAN ID is
frames.
• If a valid management VLAN ID is
configured, SU allows only
configured, SU allows only
management frames tagged with
• If a valid management VLAN ID is
management frames tagged with the
the configured management
configured, BSU allows only
configured management VLAN ID to
VLAN ID to access it.
management frames tagged with
access it from the BSU.
the configured management
• If a valid management VLAN ID is
VLAN ID to access it.
• If a valid management VLAN ID is
configured, SU tags all
configured, SU tags all management
management frames generated
• If a valid management VLAN ID is
frames generated by the SU with the
by the SU with the configured
configured, BSU tags all
configured management VLAN ID and
management VLAN ID and
management frames generated
priority and forwards them to the BSU.
priority.
by the BSU with the configured
management VLAN ID and
• If the management VLAN ID is
• If the management VLAN ID is
priority.
configured as -1 (untagged), SU allows
configured as -1 (untagged), SU
only untagged management frames to
allows only untagged
• If the management VLAN ID is
access it from the BSU.
management frames to access it.
configured as -1 (untagged), BSU
allows only untagged
• SU allows only untagged management
management frames to access it.
frames to access it from the Ethernet
interface, regardless of the value of the
management VLAN ID.
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BSU VLAN Configuration
The HTTP Interface to configure BSU VLAN parameters is shown in the following figure.
The following parameters are configurable:
•
BSU VLAN Mode: The BSU VLAN mode can be either Transparent or Trunk. By default, the BSU is in Transparent
mode.
•
Management VLAN ID: The Management VLAN ID is configurable in any mode. The management VLAN ID has a
default value of untagged and may be configured with a value in the range of 1 to 4095.
•
Management VLAN Priority: The Management VLAN priority values range from 0 to 7 and the default priority is 0
(zero).
•
Relaying Flag: When this flag is enabled, the BSU relays frames between SUs on the same BSU.
•
BSU VLAN Table: The BSU VLAN Table is configurable in both Transparent and Trunk mode, but applies only when
the BSU is in Trunk mode. The VLAN ID values for the BSU VLAN Table range from 1 to 4095. The maximum
number of VLAN IDs that can be configured in the BSU VLAN Table is 256. An SU in Trunk mode is assigned VLAN
IDs from this table.
Add BSU VLAN Table Entries
To add entries to the BSU VLAN table, click the Add Table Entries button. Enter a VLAN ID and select a Status, then
click Add to add your entry to the table.
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Edit or Delete BSU VLAN Table Entries
To edit or delete entries in the BSU VLAN Table, click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button, make your changes, then
click OK for your changes to take effect.
Restricting Unit Management
Management access to the unit can be easily secured by making management stations or hosts and the unit itself
members of a common VLAN. Simply configure a non-zero management VLAN ID: management of the unit will be
restricted to members of the same VLAN.
CAUTION: If a non-zero management VLAN ID is configured, management access to the unit is restricted to hosts that
are members of the same VLAN. Ensure your management platform or host is a member of the same VLAN
before attempting to manage the unit or you will lose access to the unit.
Providing Access to Hosts in the Same VLAN
The VLAN feature lets hosts manage the unit. If the Management VLAN ID matches a VLAN User ID, those hosts who
are members of that VLAN will have management access to the unit.
CAUTION: Once a VLAN Management ID is configured and is equivalent to one of the VLAN User IDs, all members of
that VLAN will have management access to the unit. Be careful to restrict VLAN membership to those with
legitimate access to the unit.
SU VLAN Configuration
The HTTP Interface to configure SU VLAN parameters is shown in the following figure.
Add SU Table Entries
To add entries to the SU VLAN Table, click the Add Table Entries button. Enter the desired parameters in the
corresponding fields, then click Add to add and save the entry.
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The following parameters are configurable:
•
MAC: Enter the MAC address of the SU to be configured.
•
SU VLAN Mode: The SU VLAN mode can be either Transparent, Trunk, or Access (by default, the BSU is in
Transparent mode).
–
When the BSU is in Transparent mode, the SU must be in Transparent mode.
–
When the BSU is in Trunk mode, the SU must be in either Access mode or Trunk mode.
–
When the BSU is changed from Transparent mode to Trunk mode, all the configured SUs are changed to Trunk
mode by default.
•
Access VLAN ID: The Access VLAN ID is configurable in any mode, but applies only when the SU is in Access
mode. The Access VLAN ID values range from 1 to 4095; the default value is 1.
•
Access VLAN Priority: The Access VLAN Priority is configurable in any mode, but applies only when the SU is in
Access mode. The Access VLAN priority values range from 0 to 7; the default priority is 0. For voice frames, the
priority field is set to the VoIP configured value (5 according to latest IETF draft, or 6 according to IEEE 802.1D)
regardless of the priority value configured.
•
Management VLAN ID: The management VLAN ID is configurable in any mode. The management VLAN ID has a
default value of untagged (-1) and may be configured with a value in the range of 1 to 4095.
•
Management Priority: The Management VLAN priority values range from 0 to 7 and the default priority is 0 (zero).
•
VLAN 1-16: The VLAN IDs are configurable in any mode, but apply only when the SU is in Trunk mode. The VLAN ID
values range from 1 to 4095; the default value is untagged (-1). The maximum number of VLAN IDs that can be
configured in the SU VLAN Table is 16 for each SU. The SU VLAN IDs must be in the BSU VLAN Table that
corresponds to the BSU.
Edit SU Table Entries
To edit SU table entries, click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button; make your changes on the window displayed, then
click OK to save your changes.
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Typical User VLAN Configurations
VLANs segment network traffic into groups, which lets you limit broadcast and multicast traffic. These groups enable
hosts from different VLANs to access different resources using the same network infrastructure. Hosts using the same
physical network are limited to those resources available to their workgroup.
The unit can segment users into a maximum of 16 different VLANs per unit, based upon a VLAN ID.
The primary scenarios for using VLAN workgroups are as follows:
•
VLAN disabled: Your network does not use VLANs.
•
VLAN enabled: Each VLAN workgroup uses a different VLAN ID Tag. A mixture of Tagged and Untagged workgroups
may be supported.
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QoS (Quality of Service) Parameters
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
QoS (Quality of Service) Parameters
The Quality of Service (QoS) feature is based on 802.16 standard and defines the classes, service flows (SFCs), and
packet identification rules (PIRs) for specific types of traffic. The main priority of QoS is to guarantee a reliable and
adequate transmission quality for all traffic types under conditions of high congestion and bandwidth over-subscription
(for a complete discussion on QoS see Quality of Service (QoS).
There are already several pre-defined QoS classes, SFCs and PIRs available that you may choose from which cover the
most common types of traffic. If you want to configure something else, you start building the hierarchy of a QoS class by
defining PIRs; then you associate some of those PIRs to specific Service Flow classes (SFCs); you assign priorities to
each PIR within each SFC; and finally you define the QoS class by associating relevant SFCs to each QoS class.
QoS PIR Configuration
Click Configure > QoS > QoS PIR Table. The 17 predefined PIRs are shown.
To view/edit the parameters of each PIR click on its Details button. You may enable, disable or delete any PIR entry by
clicking on the Status drop-down box and then clicking OK.
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To add entries to the PIR Table, click the Add Table Entries button. Enter the Rule Name and select Enable or Disable
from the Entry Status drop-down box, then click Add to add the entry. Once the new entry appears on the screen (as
shown below), click its Details button to view/edit its parameters.
QoS SFC Configuration
Click Configure > QoS > QoS SF Class. The 7 predefined SFCs are shown.
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To add entries to the SFC Table, click the Add Table Entries button.
The following parameters are configurable:
•
SF Name: Enter the name of the SF class you want to add.
•
SF Schd Type: This field can be set to BE (Best Effort) or RtPS (Real-Time Polling Service).
•
SF Direction: This field can be set to Downlink (traffic from BSU to SU) or Uplink (traffic from SU to BSU).
•
MIR (Maximum Information Rate): The maximum sustained data rate specified in units of 1 Kbps from 8 Kbps up to
the maximum rate of 108000 Kbps per SU.
•
CIR (Committed Information Rate): The minimum reserved traffic rate specified in units of 1 Kbps from 0 Kbps up to
the maximum rate of 10000 Kbps per SU.
•
Latency: The maximum allowed latency specified in increments of 5 ms steps from a minimum of 5 ms up to a
maximum of 100 ms.
•
Jitter: The maximum tolerable jitter specified in increments of 5 ms steps from a minimum of 0 ms up to the Maximum
Latency (in ms).
•
Priority: The priority of this SFC from zero (0) to seven (7), 0 being the lowest, 7 being the highest.
•
Number of Frames per Burst: The Maximum number of data messages in a Multi-Frame burst from one (1) to four
(4), which affects the percentage of the maximum throughput of the system according to following table.
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No. of messages in a burst:
4
3
2
1
•
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
% of the maximum throughput:
100 %
97.6 %
92.9 %
76.2%
SF Entry State: This field can be set to Enable, Disable, or Delete.
Click Add to add the entry. The new entry will appear on the screen, taking up the next sequential index entry.
To make changes to the entries of the SFC Table, click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button.
Enter your changes and click OK. To delete an entry, click the Status drop-down box and select Delete, then click OK.
QoS Class Configuration
Click Configure > QoS > QoS Class. The 4 predefined QoS classes are shown.
To view/edit a QoS Class click on its Details button. You may enable, disable or delete this QoS Class entry by clicking
on the Status drop-down box and then clicking OK. You may also edit an existing SFC associated to this QoS class, or
add a new SFC.
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To edit an existing SFC associated to this QoS Class click its Details button. You may enable, disable or delete this SFC
entry by clicking on the Status drop-down box and then clicking OK. You may also delete a PIR associated to this SFC by
clicking on the Status drop-down box and then clicking OK, or add a new PIR to this SFC.
To add more PIRs to this SFC click the Add Table Entries button.
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The following parameters are configurable:
•
PIR Table Reference Index: Select one of the possible PIRs that have been previously configured from the dropdown box.
•
PIR Priority: This priority per rule defines the order of execution of PIRs during packet identification process. The PIR
priority is a number in the range 0-63, with priority 63 being executed first, and priority 0 being executed last. The PIR
priority is defined within a QoS class, and can be different for the same PIR in some other QoS class. If all PIRs within
one QoS class have the same priority, the order of execution of PIR rules will be defined by the order of definition of
SFCs, and by the order of definition of PIRs in each SFC, within that QoS class.
•
Entry Status: This field is always set to Enable.
Click Add to add the entry. The new entry will show up on the screen taking up the next sequential index entry. You may
delete any PIR entry by clicking on the Status drop-down box.
Back on the QoS Class screen, click the Add Table Entries button to add a new SFC and associate it to this QoS Class.
The following parameters are configurable:
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•
SF Table Reference Index: Select one of the possible SFCs that have been previously configured from the dropdown box to associate to this QoS Class.
•
PIR Table Reference Index: Select one of the possible PIRs that have been previously configured from the dropdown box to associate to this SFC.
•
PIR Priority: This priority per rule defines the order of execution of PIRs during packet identification process. The PIR
priority is a number in the range 0-63, with priority 63 being executed first, and priority 0 being executed last. The PIR
priority is defined within a QoS class, and can be different for the same PIR in some other QoS class. If all PIRs within
one QoS class have the same priority, the order of execution of PIR rules will be defined by the order of definition of
SFCs, and by the order of definition of PIRs in each SFC, within that QoS class.
•
Entry Status: This field is always set to Enable.
Click Add to add the entry. The new entry will show up on the screen taking up the next sequential index entry.
From this screen you may also edit an existing SFC by clicking on its Details button. This will take you back to the QoS
Class SF Class Entry Details.
Finally, to add a new QoS Class click the Add Table Entries button on the screen.
The following parameters are configurable:
•
Class Name: Enter the name of the QoS class you want to add.
•
SF Table Reference Index: Select one of the possible SFCs that have been previously configured from the dropdown box to associate to this QoS Class.
•
PIR Table Reference Index: Select one of the possible PIRs that have been previously configured from the dropdown box to associate to this SFC.
•
PIR Priority: This priority per rule defines the order of execution of PIRs during packet identification process. The PIR
priority is a number in the range 0-63, with priority 63 being executed first, and priority 0 being executed last. The PIR
priority is defined within a QoS class, and can be different for the same PIR in some other QoS class. If all PIRs within
one QoS class have the same priority, the order of execution of PIR rules will be defined by the order of definition of
SFCs, and by the order of definition of PIRs in each SFC, within that QoS class.
•
Entry Status: This field is always set to Enable.
Click Add to add the entry. The new entry will show up on the screen taking up the next sequential index entry.
From this screen you may also edit an existing QoS Class by clicking on its Details button. This will take you to the QoS
Class Entry View/Edit screen.
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QoS SU Configuration
Click Configure > QoS > QoS SU.
This screen defines which QoS Classes will be associated to which given SUs by using their MAC addresses.
To add entries to the QoS SU Table, click the Add Table Entries button.
The following parameters are configurable:
•
SU MAC Address: The MAC Address of the SU you want to associate to a specific QoS Class.
•
SU QOSC Index: Select one of the possible QoS Classes that have been previously configured from the drop-down
box to associate to this SU.
•
SU QOSC State: This field can be set to Enable, Disable, or Delete.
Click Add to add the entry. The new entry will show up on the screen taking up the next sequential index entry.
To make changes to QoS SU Table, click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button.
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Enter your changes and click OK. To delete an entry, click the Status drop-down box and select Delete, then click OK.
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SU Access to the Public Network (NAT)
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
SU Access to the Public Network (NAT)
The NAT (Network Address Translation) feature lets hosts on the Ethernet side of the SU transparently access the public
network through the BSU. All hosts in the private network can have simultaneous access to the public network.
NOTE: The NAT tab is available for SUs in Routing mode only. The SU supports NAPT (Network Address Port
Translation) where all private IP addresses are mapped to a single public IP address, and does not support Basic
NAT (where private IP addresses are mapped to a pool of public IP addresses).
Both dynamic mapping (allowing private hosts to access hosts in the public network) and static mapping (allowing
public hosts to access hosts in the private network) are supported:
•
In dynamic mapping, the SU maps the private IP addresses and its transport identifiers to transport identifiers of a
single Public IP address as they originate sessions to the public network. This is used only for outbound access.
•
Static mapping is used to provide inbound access. The SU maps a private IP address and its local port to a fixed
public port of the global IP address. This is used to provide inbound access to a local server for hosts in the public
network. Static port mapping allows only one server of a particular type. Up to 1000 ports (500 UDP and 500 TCP) are
supported.
The following parameters are configurable:
NOTE: Changes to NAT parameters, including the NAT Static Port Mapping Table, require a reboot to take effect.
NOTE: When NAT is enabled, the DHCP Relay Agent feature is not supported (DHCP Relay Agent must be disabled
before NAT is enabled) and RIP updates are not sent or received. You can configure a DHCP server to allocate
IP addresses to hosts on the Ethernet side of the SU/ BSU (see Enable and Configure the DHCP Server).
•
NAT Status: Enables or disables the NAT feature. NAT can be enabled only for SUs in Routing mode. The default is
disabled.
•
NAT Static Bind Status: Enables or disables the NAT Static Bind status (static mapping) allowing public hosts to
access hosts in a private network. The default is disabled.
•
Public IP Address: The NAT Public IP address is the wireless interface IP address.
NAT Static Port Mapping Table
Adding entries to the NAT Static Mapping Table lets configured hosts in a private address realm on the Ethernet side of
the SU access hosts in the public network using Network Address Port Translation (NAPT). Up to 1000 entries can be
configured (500 UDP ports and 500 TCP ports).
Adding Entries
To add an entry:
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1. Click the Add Table Entries button.
2. Enter the Local IP Address of the host on the Ethernet side of the SU.
3. Select the Port Type: TCP, UDP, or Both.
4. Enter the Start Port and End Port.
5. Click Add.
Editing Entries
To make changes to an entry:
1. Click the Edit/Delete Table Entries button.
2. Enter your changes. To delete an entry, click the Status drop-down box and select Delete
3. Click OK.
Supported Session Protocols
The NAT feature supports the following session protocols for both inbound and outbound access with the required
support, applications, and limitations given in the following table.
Certain Internet applications require an Application Level Gateway (ALG) to provide the required transparency for an
application running on a host in a private network to connect to its counterpart running on a host in the public network. An
ALG may interact with NAT to set up state information, use NAT state information, modify application specific payload and
perform the tasks necessary to get the application running across address realms.
No more than one server of a particular type is supported within the private network behind the SU.
These VPN protocols are supported with their corresponding ALGs: IPsec, PPTP, L2TP.
Protocol
ICMP
Support
ICMP ALG
Supported Session Protocols
Applications
Ping
Limitations
121
Configuration
SU Access to the Public Network (NAT)
Protocol
FTP
H.323
HTTP
TFTP
Telnet
CUSeeMe
IMAP
PNM
POP3
SMTP
RTSP
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Supported Session Protocols
Applications
FTP ALG
File transfer
H.323 ALG
Multimedia conferencing
Port mapping for inbound
Web browser
connection.
Port mapping for inbound
File transfer
connection.
Port mapping for inbound
Remote login
connection.
Port mapping for inbound and Video conferencing
outbound connection.
Port mapping for inbound
Mail
connection.
Port mapping for inbound
Streaming media with
connection.
Real Player
Port mapping for inbound
E-mail
connection.
Port mapping for inbound
E-mail
connection.
Support
Limitations
One user is allowed for video
conferencing
Mails with IP addresses of MTAs or
using IP addresses in place of FQDN
are not supported (requires SMTP
ALG).
Port mapping for inbound
connection.
Streaming audio/video
with Quick Time and Real
Player
ICQ
Port mapping for inbound
Chat and file transfer
Each host using ICQ needs to be
connection.
mapped for different ports.
IRC
Port mapping for inbound
Chat and file transfer
Each host using IRC needs to be
connection.
mapped for different ports.
MSN
Port mapping for inbound and Conference and Share
Only one user is allowed for net
Messenger
outbound connection.
files with Net meeting
meeting.
Net2Phone
Port mapping for inbound and Voice communication
outbound connection.
IP Multicast
Pass Through
Multicasting
Stream works Port mapping for inbound
Streaming video
connection.
Quake
Port mapping for inbound
Games
When a Quake server is configured
connection.
within the private network behind a
SU, the SU cannot provide information
about that server on the public
network.
Also, certain Quake servers do not let
multiple users log in using the same IP
address, in which case only one
Quake user is allowed.
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Monitoring
7
This chapter describes using the Web interface to obtain detailed information about the settings and performance of the
unit.
Click the Monitor button to access this information.
The following tabs appear in the Monitor section:
•
Wireless (see Monitor the Wireless Settings)
•
ICMP (see View Number of ICMP Messages)
•
Per Station (see View Per Station Statistics)
•
Features (see View Features Supported)
•
Link Test (see Test Link Quality)
•
Interfaces (see Monitor Interfaces)
•
IP ARP Table (see View the Mapping of IP and MAC Addresses)
•
IP Routes (see View Active IP Routes)
•
Learn Table (see View All Detected MAC Addresses (Learn Table))
•
RIP (see View RIP Data)
•
Radius (see View RADIUS Traffic Information)
•
QoS (see View Quality of Service (QoS) Information)
•
Temperature (see View Temperature Log)
NOTE: The Radius tab is available on BSUs only. The RIP tab is relevant only in Routing mode.
Help and Exit buttons also appear on each page of the Web interface; click the Help button to access online help; click
the Exit button to exit the application.
For an introduction to the basics of management, see Basic Management.
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Monitoring
Monitor the Wireless Settings
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Monitor the Wireless Settings
General Performance
Click Monitor > Wireless > General to monitor the general performance of the wireless interface.
WORP Interface Performance
Click Monitor > Wireless > WORP tab to monitor the performance of the WORP Base or WORP SU interfaces.
The Registration Last Reason field indicates either a successful registration (a value of 1) or it indicates the reason why
the last registration failed. Possible values for the Registration Last Reason field are as follows:
•
1 = None (successful registration)
•
2 = Maximum number of SUs reached
•
3 = Authentication failure
•
4 = Roaming
•
5 = No response from SU within the Registration Timeout Period
•
6 = Low Signal Quality
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Monitoring
View Number of ICMP Messages
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View Number of ICMP Messages
Click Monitor > ICMP to view the number of ICMP messages sent and received by the unit. It includes ping, route, and
host unreachable messages.
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Monitoring
View Per Station Statistics
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
View Per Station Statistics
Click Monitor > Per Station to view Station Statistics. On the SU, the “Per Station” page shows statistics of the BSU to
which the SU is registered. On the BSU, it shows statistics of all the SU’s connected to the BSU.
The page’s statistics refresh every 4 seconds.
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Monitoring
View Features Supported
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View Features Supported
Click Monitor > Features to view the following information.
NOTE: A BSU shows how many WORP SUs it can support; the SU shows how many Ethernet hosts it supports on its
Ethernet port as the “Max Users on Satellite” parameter.
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Monitoring
Test Link Quality
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Test Link Quality
Click Monitor > Link Test to find out which wireless stations are in range and to check their link quality.
NOTE: Link Test requires Internet Explorer version 6.0 or later. Earlier versions do not support Link Test.
Link Test for the unit reports the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) value in dB; the higher this number, the better the signal
quality. Furthermore, it reports the signal level and noise level in dBm. The latter two are approximations of the level at
which the unit receives the signal of the peer unit and the background noise.
•
Clicking Explore from a BSU displays all its registered SUs.
•
Clicking Explore from an SU displays only the BSU with which it is registered.
All stations displayed after “Explore” come up “Disabled.” Select a station by changing Disabled to Start and click the
Link Test button. You can change multiple stations to Start, but only the last station in the list is displayed as the remote
partner when you click the Link Test button.
The Link Test provides SNR, Signal, and Noise information for both, the local and the remote unit’s levels. Link Test
stops when you close the Link Test page.
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Monitoring
Monitor Interfaces
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Monitor Interfaces
Click Monitor > Interfaces to view detailed information about the IP-layer performance of the unit’s interfaces. There are
two sub-tabs: Wireless and Ethernet. The following figures show both interfaces.
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Monitoring
View the Mapping of IP and MAC Addresses
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
View the Mapping of IP and MAC Addresses
Click Monitor > IP ARP Table to view the mapping of the IP and MAC addresses of all radios registered at the BSU.
This information is based upon the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP).
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Monitoring
View Active IP Routes
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
View Active IP Routes
Click Monitor > IP Routes to view all active IP routes of the unit. These can be either static or dynamic (obtained
through RIP). This tab is available only in Routing mode, and you can add routes only when in Routing mode.
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Monitoring
View All Detected MAC Addresses (Learn Table)
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
View All Detected MAC Addresses (Learn Table)
Click Monitor > Learn Table to view all MAC addresses the unit has detected on an interface. The Learn Table displays
information relating to network bridging. It reports the MAC address for each node that the device has learned is on the
network and the interface on which the node was detected. There can be up to 10,000 entries in the Learn Table. This
tab is only available in Bridge mode.
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Monitoring
View RIP Data
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View RIP Data
Click Monitor > RIP to view Routing Internet Protocol data for the Ethernet and Wireless interfaces.
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Monitoring
View RADIUS Traffic Information
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View RADIUS Traffic Information
Click Monitor > Radius to view information about the traffic exchanged with a RADIUS server.
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Monitoring
View Quality of Service (QoS) Information
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
View Quality of Service (QoS) Information
Click the Monitor button and the QoS tab to view summary information about the Quality of Service per BSU and for
each SU registered with that BSU.
This tab is available only on the BSU.
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Monitoring
View Temperature Log
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
View Temperature Log
The feature for reporting and logging internal unit temperature observes and reports the internal temperature of the unit.
Temperature is logged and an SNMP trap sent when the internal temperature crosses the limit of 0ºC to 55ºC (at 5
degrees before the limit, the unit issues a warning trap).
You can select a recording interval from one to sixty minutes, in 5-minute increments on the Configure: System tab. A
log file holds the recorded data. The log can hold at least 576 entries (two days with the refresh time of 5 minutes). For
further analysis, the log can be exported to a text file with a new line feed as a line separator.
The Temperature Log contains two sub-tabs:
•
The Current Temperature tab indicates the unit’s current temperature. The current temperature value is refreshed
every 4 seconds.
•
The Log tab keeps track of the temperature recorded at the end of each configured logging interval. You can reset or
refresh the log using the Reset and Refresh buttons.
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Commands
8
This chapter describes the commands that you can issue with the Web Interface.
Click the Commands button to access available commands. See the following:
•
Download (see Download Files)
•
Upload (see Upload Files)
•
Downgrade (see Downgrade to Previous Release)
•
Reboot (see Reboot the Unit)
•
Reset (see Reset the Unit to Factory Default)
•
Help Link (see Set the Help Link Location)
Help and Exit buttons also appear on each page of the Web interface; click the Help button to access online help; click
the Exit button to exit the application.
For an introduction to the basics of management, see Basic Management.
Download Files
Click Commands > Download tab to download configuration, image and license files to the unit via a TFTP server (see
TFTP Server Setup for information about the SolarWinds TFTP server software located on your product installation CD).
The following parameters may be configured or viewed:
•
Server IP address: Enter the TFTP Server IP address.
•
File Name: Enter the name of the file to be downloaded. If you are using the SolarWinds TFTP server software
located on your product installation CD, the default directory for downloading files is C:\TFTP-Root.
•
File Type: Choose either Config, image, BspBl, or license.
•
File Operation: Choose either Download or Download and Reboot.
Click OK to start the download.
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Commands
Upload Files
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Upload Files
Click Commands > Upload to upload a configuration or log file from the unit to a TFTP server (see TFTP Server Setup
for information about the SolarWinds TFTP server software located on your product installation CD).
The following parameters may be configured or viewed:
•
Server IP address: Enter the TFTP Server IP address.
•
File Name: Enter the name of the file to be uploaded. If you are using the SolarWinds TFTP server software located
on your product installation CD, the default directory for uploading files is C:\TFTP-Root.
•
File Type: Choose either Config, Templog, or Eventlog.
Click OK to start the upload.
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Commands
Reboot the Unit
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Reboot the Unit
Click Commands > Reboot to reboot the unit’s embedded software. Configuration changes are saved and the unit is
reset.
CAUTION: Rebooting the unit causes all users currently connected to lose their connection to the network until the unit
has completed the reboot process and resumed operation.
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Commands
Reset the Unit to Factory Default
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Reset the Unit to Factory Default
Click Commands > Reset to restore the configuration of the unit to the factory default values.
You can also reset the unit by pressing the RELOAD button located on the side of the power brick. See Hard Reset to
Factory Default for more information.
CAUTION: Resetting the unit to its factory default configuration permanently overwrites all changes made to the unit.
The unit reboots automatically after this command has been issued.
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Commands
Set the Help Link Location
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Set the Help Link Location
Click Commands > Help Link to set the location of the help files of the Web Interface. Upon installation, the help files
are installed in the C:\Program Files\Tsunami\MP.11 [Product Name]\Help folder.
If you want to place these files on a shared drive, copy the Help folder to the new location and specify the new path in the
Help Link box.
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Commands
Downgrade to Previous Release
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Downgrade to Previous Release
Click Commands > Downgrade tab to downgrade to a previous release. Downgrade currently is supported only to
release 2.0.1 and later. Once you enter this command, the unit is downgraded to the specified release and is
automatically rebooted. The filename specified and the filename of the image selected for downgrade must be the same
version. The unit will download the file, re-format the configuration to match the version, and reboot to put the image into
effect.
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Procedures
9
This chapter describes the following procedures:
•
TFTP Server Setup: Prepares the TFTP server for transferring files to and from the unit. This procedure is used by
the other procedures that transfer files.
•
Web Interface Image File Download: Upgrades the embedded software.
•
Configuration Backup: Saves the configuration of the unit.
•
Configuration Restore: Restores a previous configuration through configuration file download.
•
Soft Reset to Factory Default: Resets the unit to the factory default settings through the Web or Command Line
Interface.
•
Hard Reset to Factory Default: In some cases, it may be necessary to revert to the factory default settings (for
example, if you cannot access the unit or you lost the password for the Web Interface).
•
Forced Reload: Completely resets the unit and erases the embedded software. Use this procedure only as a last
resort if the unit does not boot and the “Hard Reset to Factory Default” procedure did not help. If you perform a
Forced Reload, you must download a new image file as described in Image File Download with the Bootloader.
•
Image File Download with the Bootloader: If the unit does not contain embedded software, or the embedded software
is corrupt, you can use this procedure to download a new image file.
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Procedures
TFTP Server Setup
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
TFTP Server Setup
A Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server lets you transfer files across a network. You can upload files from the unit
for backup or copying, and you can download the files for configuration and image upgrades. The SolarWinds TFTP
server software is located on the product installation CD, or can be downloaded from http://support.proxim.com. You can
also download the latest TFTP software from SolarWind’s Web site at http://www.solarwinds.net. The instructions that
follow assume that you are using the SolarWinds TFTP server software; other TFTP servers may require different
configurations.
NOTE: If a TFTP server is not available in the network, you can perform similar file transfer operations using the HTTP
interface.
To download or upload a file, you must connect to the computer with the TFTP server through the unit’s Ethernet port.
This can be any computer in the network or a computer connected to the unit with a cross-over Ethernet cable. For
information about installing the TFTP server, see Step 9: Install Documentation and Software.
Ensure that:
1. The upload or download directory is correctly set (the default directory is C:\TFTP-Root).
2. The required image file is present in the directory.
3. The TFTP server is running. The TFTP server must be running only during file upload and download. You can
check the connectivity between the unit and the TFTP server by pinging the unit from the computer that hosts the
TFTP server. The ping program should show replies from the unit.
4. The TFTP server is configured to both Transmit and Receive files (on the Security tab under File > Configure), with
no automatic shutdown or time-out (on the Auto-Close tab).
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Web Interface Image File Download
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Web Interface Image File Download
In some cases, it may be necessary to upgrade the embedded software of the unit by downloading an image file. To
download an image file through the Web Interface:
1. Set up the TFTP server as described in TFTP Server Setup.
2. Access the unit as described in Logging in to the Web Interface.
3. Click Commands > Download tab.
4. Fill in the following details:
•
Server IP Address <IP address TFTP server>
•
File Name <image file name>
•
File Type Image
•
File Operation Download
5. Click OK to start the file transfer.
The unit downloads the image file. The TFTP server program should show download activity after a few seconds. When
the download is complete, the unit is ready to start the embedded software upon reboot.
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Procedures
Configuration Backup
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Configuration Backup
You can back up the unit’s configuration by uploading the configuration file. You can use this file to restore the
configuration or to configure another unit (see Configuration Restore).
To upload a configuration file through the Web Interface:
1. Set up the TFTP server as described in TFTP Server Setup.
2. Access the unit as described in Logging in to the Web Interface.
3. Click Commands > Upload.
4. Fill in the following details:
•
Server IP Address <IP address TFTP server>
•
File Name <configuration file name>
•
File Type Config
•
File Operation Upload
5. Click OK to start the file transfer.
The unit uploads the configuration file. The TFTP server program should show upload activity after a few seconds. When
the upload is complete, the configuration is backed up.
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Procedures
Configuration Restore
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Configuration Restore
You can restore the configuration of the unit by downloading a configuration file. The configuration file contains the
configuration information of a unit.
To download a configuration file through the Web Interface:
1. Set up the TFTP server as described in TFTP Server Setup.
2. Access the unit as described in Logging in to the Web Interface.
3. Click Commands > Download tab.
4. Fill in the following details:
•
Server IP Address <IP address TFTP server>
•
File Name <configuration file name>
•
File Type Config
•
File Operation Download
5. Click OK to start the file transfer.
The unit downloads the configuration file. The TFTP server program should show download activity after a few seconds.
When the download is complete and the system rebooted, the configuration is restored.
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Procedures
Soft Reset to Factory Default
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Soft Reset to Factory Default
If necessary, you can reset the unit to the factory default settings. Resetting to default settings means that you must
configure the unit anew.
To reset to factory default settings using the Web Interface:
1. Click the Commands button and the Reset tab.
2. Click the Reset to Factory Default button.
The device configuration parameter values are reset to their factory default values.
If you do not have access to the unit, you can use the procedure described in “Hard Reset to Factory Default” below as
an alternative.
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Procedures
Hard Reset to Factory Default
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Hard Reset to Factory Default
If you cannot access the unit or you have lost its password, you can reset the unit to the factory default settings.
Resetting to default settings means you must configure the unit anew.
To reset to factory default settings, press and hold the RELOAD button on the side of the unit’s power supply for a
minimum of 5 seconds but no more than 10 seconds. The configuration is deleted from the unit and the unit reboots,
writing and using a default configuration.
CAUTION: It you hold the RELOAD button for longer than 20 seconds, you may go into Forced Reload mode, which
erases the unit’s embedded software. This software image must be reloaded through an Ethernet
connection with a TFTP server. The image filename to be downloaded can be configured with either
ScanTool through the Ethernet interface or with the Boot Loader CLI through the serial port to make the unit
functional again.
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Procedures
Forced Reload
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Forced Reload
With Forced Reload, you erase the embedded software. Use this procedure only as a last resort if the unit does not boot
and the “Reset to Factory Defaults” procedure did not help. If you perform a Forced Reload, you must download a new
image file with the Boot Loader (see “Image File Download with the Boot Loader” below).
CAUTION: The following procedure erases the embedded software of the unit. This software image must be reloaded
through an Ethernet connection with a TFTP server. The image filename to be downloaded can be
configured with ScanTool through the Ethernet interface to make the unit functional again.
To do a forced reload:
1. Disconnect and reconnect power to the unit; the unit resets and the LEDs flash.
2. Immediately press and hold the RELOAD button on the side of the unit’s power supply for about 20 seconds. The
software image and configuration are deleted from the unit.
3. Follow the Image File Download with the Bootloader procedure to download an image file.
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Procedures
Image File Download with the Bootloader
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Image File Download with the Bootloader
The following procedures download an image file to the unit after the embedded software has been erased with Forced
Reload or when the embedded software cannot be started by the Bootloader. A new image file can be downloaded to the
unit with ScanTool, or the Command Line Interface through the unit’s serial port. In both cases, the file is transferred
through Ethernet with TFTP. Because the CLI serial port option requires a serial RS-232C cable, Proxim recommends
the ScanTool option.
Download with ScanTool
To download an image file with the ScanTool:
1. Set up the TFTP server as described in TFTP Server Setup.
2. Run ScanTool on a computer that is connected to the same LAN subnet as the unit. ScanTool scans the subnet for
units and displays the found units in the main window. If in Forced Reload, ScanTool does not find the device until the
unit Bootloader times out from its default operation to download an image. Click Rescan to re-scan the subnet and
update the display until the unit shows up in Bootloader mode.
3. Select the unit to which you want to download an image file and click Change.
4. Ensure that IP Address Type Static is selected and fill in the following details:
•
Password
•
IP Address and Subnet Mask of the unit.
•
TFTP Server IP Address and, if necessary, the Gateway IP Address of the TFTP server.
•
Image File Name of the file with the new image.
5. Click OK to start the file transfer.
The unit downloads the image file. The TFTP server program should show download activity after a few seconds. When
the download is complete, the LED pattern should return to reboot state. The unit is ready to start the embedded
software.
After a Forced Reload procedure, the unit returns to factory default settings and must be reconfigured. ScanTool can be
used to set the system name and IP address.
To access the unit, see Logging in to the Web Interface.
Download with CLI
To use the CLI through the serial port of the unit, you need a connector cable with a male RJ11 and a female DB9
connector (included with the unit) and an ASCII terminal program such as HyperTerminal. Proxim recommends you
switch off the unit and the computer before connecting or disconnecting the serial RS-232C cable.
To download an image file:
1. Set up the TFTP server as described in TFTP Server Setup.
2. Start the terminal program (such as HyperTerminal), set the following connection properties, and then connect:
•
COM port: for example, COM1 or COM2 to which the unit serial port is connected)
•
Bits per second: 9600
•
Data bits 8
•
Stop bits: 1
•
Flow control: None
•
Parity: None
3. Disconnect and reconnect power to reset the unit; the terminal program displays Power On Self Test (POST)
messages.
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Procedures
Image File Download with the Bootloader
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
4. When the “Sending Traps to SNMP manager periodically” message is displayed (after about 30 seconds), press
the ENTER key.
5. The command prompt is displayed; enter the following commands:
set ipaddr <IP address nit>
set ipsubmask <subnet mask>
set ipaddrtype static
set tftpipaddr <IP address TFTP server>
set tftpfilename <image file name>
set ipgw <gateway IP address>
reboot
For example:
set ipaddr 10.0.0.12
set ipsubmask 255.255.255.0
set ipaddrtype static
set tftpipaddr 10.0.0.20
set tftpfilename image.bin
set ipgw 10.0.0.30
reboot
The unit reboots and downloads the image file. The TFTP server program should show download activity after a few
seconds. When the download is complete, the unit is ready for configuration.
To access the unit, see Logging in to the Web Interface. Note that the IP configuration in normal operation differs from the
IP configuration of the Boot Loader.
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Troubleshooting
10
This chapter helps you to isolate and solve problems with your unit. In the event this chapter does not provide a solution,
or the solution does not solve your problem, check our support website at http://support.proxim.com.
Before you start troubleshooting, it is important that you have checked the details in the product documentation. For
details about RADIUS, TFTP, terminal and telnet programs, and Web browsers, refer to their appropriate documentation.
In some cases, rebooting the unit clears the problem. If nothing else helps, consider a Soft Reset to Factory Default or a
Forced Reload. The Forced Reload option requires you to download a new image file to the unit.
See the following:
•
Connectivity Issues
•
Communication Issues
•
Setup and Configuration Issues
•
VLAN Operation Issues
•
Link Problems
Connectivity Issues
The issues described in this section relate to the connections of the unit.
Unit Does Not Boot
The unit shows no activity (the power LED is off).
1. Ensure that the power supply is properly working and correctly connected.
2. Ensure that all cables are correctly connected.
3. Check the power source.
4. If you are using an Active Ethernet splitter, ensure that the voltage is correct.
Serial Link Does Not Work
The unit cannot be reached through the serial port.
1. Check the cable connection between the unit and the computer.
2. Ensure that the correct COM port is used.
3. Start the terminal program; set the following connection properties (also see “HyperTerminal Connection Properties”
in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual), and then connect.
•
COM port: for example, COM1 or COM2 to which the unit serial port is connected)
•
Bits per second: 9600
•
Data bits 8
•
Stop bits: 1
•
Flow control: None
•
Parity: None
4. Ensure that the unit and the computer use the same serial port configuration parameters.
5. Disconnect and reconnect power to reset the unit. The terminal program displays Power On Self Tests (POST)
messages and displays the following after approximately 90 seconds: Please enter password:
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Troubleshooting
Connectivity Issues
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
HyperTerminal Connection Problems
The serial connection properties can be found in HyperTerminal as follows:
1. Start HyperTerminal and select Properties from the File menu.
2. Select Direct to Com 1 in the Connect using: drop-down list (depending upon the COM port you use); then click
Configure. A window such as the following is displayed:
3. Enter or edit the information as follows, and click OK.
•
Bits per second: 9600
•
Data bits 8
•
Parity: None
•
Stop bits: 1
•
Flow control: None
4. Click the Settings tab and then click ASCII Setup…. A window similar to the following is displayed:
5. Ensure that Send line ends with line feeds is selected and click OK twice. HyperTerminal is now correctly configured.
Ethernet Link Does Not Work
1. First check the Ethernet LED:
•
Solid Green: Power is on, the radio is up, and the Ethernet link is also up.
•
Blinking Green: Power is on, the radio is coming up and the Ethernet is down.
2. Verify pass-through versus cross-over cable.
Cannot Use the Web Interface
1. Open a command prompt window and enter ping <ip address unit> (for example ping 10.0.0.1). If the
unit does not respond, make sure that you have the correct IP address.
If the unit responds, the Ethernet connection is working properly, continue with this procedure.
2. Ensure that you are using one of the following Web browsers:
•
Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.0 or later (Version 6.0 or later recommended)
•
Netscape version 6.0 or later.
3. Ensure that you are not using a proxy server for the connection with your Web browser.
4. Ensure that you have not exceeded the maximum number of Web Interface or CLI sessions.
5. Double-check the physical network connections. Use a well-known unit to ensure the network connection is properly
functioning.
6. Perform network infrastructure troubleshooting (check switches, routers, and so on).
154
Troubleshooting
Communication Issues
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Communication Issues
Two Units Are Unable to Communicate Wirelessly
If a wireless link is possible after testing two units within close distance of each other, then there are two possible reasons
why wireless connectivity is not possible while the MP.11 units are at their desired locations:
1. There may be a problem in the RF path, for example, a bad connector attachment (this is the most common problem
in installations) or a bad cable (water ingress).
NOTE: The cables can be swapped with known good ones as a temporary solution to verify cable quality.
2. Another reason may be related to an interference problem caused by a high signal level from another radio. This can
be checked by changing the frequency and then verifying whether another channel works better or by changing the
polarization as a way of avoiding the interfering signal. To know in advance how much interference is present in a
given environment, a Spectrum Analyzer can be attached to a (temporary) antenna for measuring the signal levels on
all available Channels.
NOTE: The antennas are usually not the problem, unless mounted upside down causing the drain hole to be quickly
filled with radome.
If a wireless link is not possible after testing two units within close distance of each other, then the problem is either
hardware or configuration related, such as a wrong Network name, Encryption key, Network Secret or Base Station
Name. To eliminate these issues from being a factor, resetting the both units to factory defaults is the recommended
solution.
If a wireless link is not possible after resetting the units and verifying that one unit is a BSU with WORP Base interface
configured and the other is a Satellite, then the problem is not configuration related and the only remaining reason is a
possible hardware problem. Acquiring a third unit and then testing it amongst the existing units will help pinpoint the
broken unit.
155
Troubleshooting
Setup and Configuration Issues
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Setup and Configuration Issues
The following issues relate to setup and configuration problems.
Lost Password
If you lost your password, you must reset the unit to the default settings. See Hard Reset to Factory Default. The default
password is public.
If you record your password, keep it in a safe place.
The Unit Responds Slowly
If the unit takes a long time to become available, it could mean that:
•
No DHCP server is available.
•
The IP address of the unit is already in use.
Verify that the IP address is assigned only to the unit. Do this by switching off the unit and then pinging the IP
address. If there is a response to the ping, another device in the network is using the same IP address. If the unit
uses a static IP address, switching to DHCP mode could remedy this problem. Also see Setting the IP Address with
ScanTool.
•
There is too much network traffic.
Web Interface Does Not Work
If you cannot connect to the unit Web server through the network:
1. Connect a computer to the serial port of the unit and check the HTTP status. The HTTP status can restrict HTTP
access at different interfaces. For more information, see “Serial Port” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual.
2. Open a command prompt window and enter: ping <ip address unit> (for example ping 10.0.0.1)
•
If the unit does not respond, ensure that you have the correct IP address.
•
If the unit responds, the Ethernet connection is working properly; continue with this procedure.
3. Ensure that you are using one of the following Web browsers:
•
Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.0 or later (Version 6.0 or later recommended)
•
Netscape version 6.0 or later
4. Ensure that you are not using a proxy server for the connection with your Web browser.
5. Ensure that you have not exceeded the maximum number of Web Interface sessions.
Command Line Interface Does Not Work
If you cannot connect to the unit through the network:
1. Connect a computer to the serial port of the unit and check the SNMP table. The SNMP table can restrict telnet or
HTTP access. For more information, see “Serial Port” in the Tsunami MP.11 Reference Manual.
2. Open a command prompt window and enter: ping <ip address unit> (for example ping 10.0.0.1).
•
If the unit does not respond, ensure that you have the correct IP address.
•
If the unit responds, the Ethernet connection is working properly; continue with this procedure.
3. Ensure that you have not exceeded the maximum number of CLI sessions.
TFTP Server Does Not Work
With TFTP, you can transfer files to and from the unit. Also see TFTP Server Setup. If a TFTP server is not properly
configured and running, you cannot upload and download files. The TFTP server:
156
Troubleshooting
Setup and Configuration Issues
•
Can be situated either local or remote
•
Must have a valid IP address
•
Must be set for send and receive without time-out
•
Must be running only during file upload and download
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
If the TFTP server does not upload or download files, it could mean:
•
The TFTP server is not running
•
The IP address of the TFTP server is invalid
•
The upload or download directory is not correctly set
•
The file name is not correct
Online Help Is Not Available
Online help is not available:
1. Make sure that the Help files are installed on your computer or server. Also see Step 9: Install Documentation and
Software.
2. Verify whether the path of the help files in the Web Interface refers to the correct directory. See Set the Help Link
Location.
Changes Do Not Take Effect
Changes made in the Web Interface do not take effect:
1. Restart your Web browser.
2. Log into the radio unit again and make changes.
3. Reboot the radio unit when prompted to do so.
Wait until the reboot is completed before accessing the unit again.
157
Troubleshooting
VLAN Operation Issues
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
VLAN Operation Issues
The correct VLAN configuration can be verified by “pinging” wired hosts from both sides of the device and the network
switch. Traffic can be “sniffed” on the wired (Ethernet) network. Packets generated by hosts and viewed on one of the
backbones should contain IEEE 802.1Q compliant VLAN headers when in Transparent mode. The VLAN ID in the
headers should correspond to one of the VLAN Management IDs configured for the unit in Trunk mode.
The correct VLAN assignment can be verified by pinging:
•
The unit to ensure connectivity
•
The switch to ensure VLAN properties
•
Hosts past the switch to confirm the switch is functional
Ultimately, traffic can be “sniffed” on the Ethernet interface using third-party packages. Most problems can be avoided by
ensuring that 802.1Q compliant VLAN tags containing the proper VLAN ID have been inserted in the bridged frames. The
VLAN ID in the header should correspond to the assigned VLAN.
What if network traffic is being directed to a nonexistent host?
•
All sessions are disconnected, traffic is lost, and a manual override is necessary.
•
Workaround: You can configure the switch to mimic the nonexistent host.
158
Troubleshooting
Link Problems
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Link Problems
While wireless networking emerges more and more, the number of wireless connections to networks grows every day.
The Tsunami MP.11 unit is one of the successful product families used by customers today who enjoy the day after day
high-speed, cost-effective connections. To successfully use the connections, technicians must be able to troubleshoot
the system effectively. This section gives hints on how a unit network could be analyzed in the case of “no link,” a
situation in which the customer thinks that the link is down because there is no traffic being passed.
The four general reasons that a wireless link may not work are related to:
•
Hardware
•
Configuration
•
Path issues (such as distance, cable loss, obstacles)
•
Environment (anything that is outside the equipment and not part of the path itself)
You have tested the equipment in the office and have verified that the hardware and configurations are sound. The path
calculation has been reviewed, and the path has been double-checked for obstacles and canceling reflections. Still, the
user reports that the link does not work.
Most likely, the problem reported is caused by the environment or by improper tests to verify the connection. This article
assumes that the test method, cabling, antennas, and antenna alignment have been checked. Always do this before
checking the environment.
General Check
Two general checks are recommended before taking any action:
•
Check whether the software version at both sides is the most current
•
Check for any reported alarm messages in the Event Log
Statistics Check
Interference and other negative environment factors always have an impact on the number of correctly received frames.
The Tsunami MP.11 models give detailed information about transmission errors in the Web interface, under Monitor.
The windows that are important for validating the health of the link are:
•
Monitor / Wireless / General (Lowest level of the wireless network): Check FCS errors: Rising FCS errors
indicate interference or low fade margin. So does Failed count. If only one of those is high, this indicates that a
source of interference is significant near one end of the link.
•
Monitor / Interfaces / Wireless (One level higher than Wireless / General): The information is given after the
wireless Ethernet frame is converted into a normal Ethernet frame. The parameters shown are part of the MIB-II.
•
–
Both operational and admin status should be up. An admin status of down indicates that the interface is
configured to be down.
–
In Discards and Out Discards indicate overload of the buffers, likely caused by network traffic, which is too
heavy.
–
In Errors and Out Errors should never happen; however, it might happen if a frame’s FCS was correct while the
content was still invalid.
Monitor / Wireless / WORP (Statistics on WORP): WORP runs on top of normal Ethernet, which means that the
WORP frame is in fact the data field of the Ethernet frame. Send Failure or Send Retries must be low in comparison
to Send Success. Low is about 1%. The same applies for Receive Success versus Receive Retries and Receive
Failures. Note that the Receive Failures and Retries can be inaccurate. A frame from the remote site might have
been transmitted without even being received; therefore, the count of that frame might not have been added to the
statistics and the receiver simply could not know that there was a frame.
159
Troubleshooting
Link Problems
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
–
Remote Partners indicates how many SUs are connected (in case of a BSU) or whether a Base is connected (in
case of a Subscriber).
–
Base Announces should increase continuously.
–
Registration Requests and Authentication Requests should be divisible by 3. WORP is designed in a way that
each registration sequence starts with 3 identical requests. It is not a problem if, once in a while, one of those
requests is missing. Missing requests frequently is to be avoided.
•
Monitor / Per Station (Information per connected remote partner): Check that the received signal level (RSL) is
the same on both sides; this should be the case if output power is the same. Two different RSLs indicate a broken
transmitter or receiver. A significant difference between Local Noise and Remote Noise could indicate a source of
interference near the site with the highest noise. Normally, noise is about –80 dBm at 36 Mbps. This number can vary
from situation to situation, of course, also in a healthy environment.
•
Monitor / Link Test (Information used by Administrators for on-the-spot checking): Check the received signal
level (RSL) and noise level. Compare the RSL with the values from path analysis. If the figures differ significantly
from the values recorded at the Per Station window, check for environment conditions that change over time.
Analyzing the Spectrum
The ultimate way to discover whether there is a source of interference is to use a spectrum analyzer. Usually, the antenna
is connected to the analyzer when measuring. By turning the antenna 360 degrees, one can check from which direction
the interference is coming. The analyzer will also display the frequencies and the level of signal is detected.
Proxim recommends performing the test at various locations to find the most ideal location for the equipment.
Avoiding Interference
When a source of interference is identified and when the level and frequencies are known, the next step is to avoid the
interference. Some of the following actions can be tried:
•
Changing the channel to a frequency away from the interference is the first step in avoiding interference. For countries
that require DFS, it might be not possible to manually select a different frequency.
•
Each antenna has a polarization; try to change to a polarization different from the interferer.
•
A small beam antenna looks only in one particular direction. Because of the higher gain of such an antenna, lowering
the output power or adding extra attenuation might be required to stay legal. This solution cannot help when the
source of interference is right behind the remote site.
•
Lowering the antennas can help avoid seeing interference from far away.
Move the antennas to a different location on the premises. This causes the devices to look from a different angle, causing
a different pattern in the reception of the signals. Use obstructions such as buildings, when possible, to shield from the
interference.
Conclusion
A spectrum analyzer can be a great help to identify whether interference might be causing link problems on Tsunami
MP.11 systems.
Before checking for interference, the link should be verified by testing in an isolated environment, to make sure that
hardware works and your configurations are correct. The path analysis, cabling and antennas should be checked as well.
Statistics in the web interface under Monitor tell if there is a link, if the link is healthy, and a continuous test can be done
using the Link Test.
160
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
A
Country Codes and Channels
In the CLI and MIB browser, the country code is set using the string code, as shown in the following example.
Example: To set Taiwan as the country:
set syscountrycode tw
The following tables contain information on frequency band availability, DFS requirements (802.11a only), and allowed
channels/center frequencies for specific countries. Transmit Power Control is available for all countries. See the
following tables:
•
Model 2454-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
•
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Model 2454-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country Code
Frequency Band
Allowed Channels (Center Frequency)
for 5 MHz, 10 MHz, and 20 MHz
Albenia (AL)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Algeria (DZ)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Argentina (AR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Armenia (AM)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Australia (AU)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Austria (AT)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Azerbaijan (AZ)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Bahrain (BH)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Belarus (BY)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Belgium (BE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Belize (BZ)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Bolivia (BO)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Brazil (BR),
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Brunei Darussalam (BN)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Bulgaria (BG)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Canada (CA)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462)
China (CN)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Colombia (CO)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462)
161
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 2454-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country Code
Frequency Band
Allowed Channels (Center Frequency)
for 5 MHz, 10 MHz, and 20 MHz
Costa Rica (CR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Croatia (HR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Cyprus (CY)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Denmark (DK)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Dominican Republic (DO)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462)
Egypt (EG)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
El Salvador (SV)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Estonia (EE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Finland (FI)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
France (FR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Georgia (GE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Germany (DE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Greece (GR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Guatemala (GT)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462)
Honduras (HN)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Hong Kong (HK)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Hungary (HU)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Iceland (IS)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
India (IN)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Indonesia (ID)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Iran (IR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Ireland (IE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Israel (IL)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Italy (IT)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Japan (JP)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Jordon (JO)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Kazakhstan (KZ)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Korea Republic (KR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Kuwait (KW)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
162
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 2454-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country Code
Frequency Band
Allowed Channels (Center Frequency)
for 5 MHz, 10 MHz, and 20 MHz
Latvia (LV)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Lebanon (LB)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Liechtenstein (LI)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Lithuania (LT)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Luxembourg (LU)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Macau (MO)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Macedonia (MK)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Malaysia (MY)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Malta (MT)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Mexico (MX)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462)
Monaco (MC)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Morocco (MA)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Netherlands (NL)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
New Zealand (NZ)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
North Korea (KP)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Norway (NO)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Oman (OM)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Pakistan (PK)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Panama (PA)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462)
Peru (PE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Philippines (PH)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Poland (PL)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Portugal (PT)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Puerto Rico (PR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462)
Quatar (QA)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Romania (RO)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Russia (RU)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Saudia Arabia (SA)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Singapore (SG)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
163
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country Code
Frequency Band
Allowed Channels (Center Frequency)
for 5 MHz, 10 MHz, and 20 MHz
Slovak Republic (SK)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Slovenia (SI)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
South Africa (ZA)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Spain (ES)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Sweden (SE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Switzerland (CH)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Syria (SY)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Taiwan (TW)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Thailand (TH)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Trinidad and Tobago (TT)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Tunisia (TN)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Turkey (TR)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Ukraine (UA)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Ukraine (UA)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
United Arab Emirates (AE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
United Kingdom (GB)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Uruguay (UY)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
USA (US)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462)
Uzbekistan (UZ)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Vietnam (VN)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Yemen (YE)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Zimbabwe (ZW)
2.4 GHz
1 (2412), 2 (2417), 3 (2422), 4 (2427), 5 (2432), 6 (2437), 7 (2442), 8 (2447), 9 (2452),
10 (2457), 11 (2462), 12 (2467), 13 (2472)
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Argentina (AR)
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
20 MHz
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
56 (5280), 58 (5290),
56 (5280), 57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
60 (5300), 62 (5310),
60 (5300), 61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
64 (5320), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
161 (5805)
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
159 (5795), 161 (5805)
160 (5800), 161 (5805)
164
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Australia (AU)
Austria (AT)
Belgium (BE)
Belize (BZ)
Bolivia (BO)
Brazil (BR)
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
20 MHz
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
10 MHz
5 MHz
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
165 (5825)
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815), 165 (5825),
163 (5815), 164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830),
167 (5835)
167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780),
165 (5825)
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795), 160 (5800),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815), 164 (5820),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780),
165 (5825)
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795), 160 (5800),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815), 164 (5820),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
165
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Brazil1 (BR1)
Brunei
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
20 MHz
No
No
Darussalam (BN)
Bulgaria (BG)
Canada (CA)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
Yes
No
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
China (CN)
Colombia (CO)
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
No
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780),
165 (5825)
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795), 160 (5800),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815), 164 (5820),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780),
165 (5825)
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795), 160 (5800),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815), 164 (5820),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780),
165 (5825)
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795), 160 (5800),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815), 164 (5820),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
166
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Cyprus (CY)
Denmark (DK)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
Dominican
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
Republic (DO)
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Estonia (EE)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
20 MHz
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
10 MHz
5 MHz
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
167
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Finland (FI)
France (FR)
Germany (DE)
Greece (GR)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
20 MHz
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
10 MHz
5 MHz
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
168
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Guatemala (GT)
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
20 MHz
No
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Hong Kong (HK)
Hungary (HU)
Iceland (IS)
India (IN)
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.15 - 5.35 GHz and
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
No
Yes
Yes
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
165 (5825)
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815), 165 (5825),
163 (5815), 164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830),
167 (5835)
167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
36 (5180), 40 (5200),
36 (5180), 38 (5190),
36 (5180), 37 (5185), 38 (5190), 39 (5195),
44 (5220), 48 (5240),
40 (5200), 42 (5210),
40 (5200), 41 (5205), 42 (5210), 43 (5215),
52 (5260), 56 (5280),
44 (5220), 46 (5230),
44 (5220), 45 (5225), 46 (5230), 47 (5235),
60 (5300), 64 (5320),
48 (5240), 50 (5250),
48 (5240), 49 (5245), 50 (5250), 51 (5255),
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
52 (5260), 54 (5270),
52 (5260), 53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275),
157 (5785), 161 (5805)
56 (5280), 58 (5290),
56 (5280), 57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295),
60 (5300), 62 (5310),
60 (5300), 61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315),
64 (5320), 66 (5330),
64 (5320), 65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815)
163 (5815)
169
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Iran (IR)
Ireland (IE)
Ireland 5.8
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
20 MHz
No
Yes
Yes
GHz (IE1)
Italy (IT)
Japan (JP)
Japan1 (JP1)
Japan2 (JP2)
5.47 GHz
5.25 - 5.35 GHz
5.15 - 5.25 GHz
5.25 - 5.35 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
Yes
Yes
No
No
Republic (KR)
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
No
5 MHz
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780),
165 (5825)
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795), 160 (5800),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815), 164 (5820),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
147 (5735), 151 (5755),
145 (5725), 147 (5735),
145 (5725), 146 (5730), 147 (5735), 148 (5740),
155 (5775), 167 (5835)
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780),
157 (5785), 163 (5815),
157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835),
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835),
169 (5845)
168 (5840), 169 (5845), 170 (5850)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320)
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
66 (5330)
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335)
36 (5180), 40 (5200),
36 (5180), 38 (5190),
36 (5180), 37 (5185), 38 (5190), 39 (5195),
44 (5220), 48 (5240)
40 (5200), 42 (5210),
40 (5200), 41 (5205), 42 (5210), 43 (5215),
44 (5220), 46 (5230),
44 (5220), 45 (5225), 46 (5230), 47 (5235),
36 (5180), 40 (5200),
44 (5220), 48 (5240)
Korea
10 MHz
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
48 (5240)
48 (5240)
36 (5180), 38 (5190),
36 (5180), 37 (5185), 38 (5190), 39 (5195),
40 (5200), 42 (5210),
40 (5200), 41 (5205), 42 (5210), 43 (5215),
44 (5220), 46 (5230),
44 (5220), 45 (5225), 46 (5230), 47 (5235),
48 (5240)
48 (5240)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805)
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815)
163 (5815)
170
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Korea
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
20 MHz
No
Republic2 (KR2)
Latvia (LV)
Liechtenstein (LI)
Lithuania (LT)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
Yes
Yes
Yes
10 MHz
5 MHz
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805)
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815)
163 (5815)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
171
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Luxembourg (LU)
Macau (MO)
Malaysia (MY)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
20 MHz
Yes
No
No
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Malta (MT)
Mexico (MX)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
Yes
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
165 (5825)
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815), 165 (5825),
163 (5815), 164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830),
167 (5835)
167 (5835)
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
165 (5825)
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815), 165 (5825),
163 (5815), 164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830),
167 (5835)
167 (5835)
172
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Netherlands (NL)
New Zealand (NZ)
North Korea (KP)
Norway (NO)
Panama (PA)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
20 MHz
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
165 (5825)
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815), 165 (5825),
163 (5815), 164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830),
167 (5835)
167 (5835)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805)
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815)
163 (5815)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
173
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Philippines (PH)
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
20 MHz
No
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Poland (PL)
Portugal (PT)
Puerto Rico (PR)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
Yes
Yes
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
174
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Russia (RU)
Saudi Arabia (SA)
5.15 - 5.85 GHz
5.15 - 5.35 GHz and
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
20 MHz
No
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
30 (5150), 34 (5170),
30 (5150), 32 (5160),
30 (5150), 31 (5155), 32 (5160), 33 (5165),
38 (5190), 42 (5210),
34 (5170), 36 (5180)
34 (5170), 35 (5175), 36 (5180), 37 (5185),
46 (5230), 50 (5250),
38 (5190), 40 (5200),
38 (5190), 39 (5195), 40 (5200), 41 (5205),
54 (5270), 58 (5290),
42 (5210), 44 (5220),
42 (5210), 43 (5215), 44 (5220), 45 (5225),
62 (5310), 66 (5330),
46 (5230), 48 (5240),
46 (5230), 47 (5235), 48 (5240), 49 (5245),
70 (5350), 74 (5370),
50 (5250), 52 (5260),
50 (5250), 51 (5255), 52 (5260), 53 (5265),
78 (5390), 82 (5410),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280), 57 (5285),
86 (5430), 90 (5450),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300), 61 (5305),
94 (5470), 98 (5490),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320), 65 (5325),
102 (5510), 106 (5530),
66 (5330), 68 (5340),
66 (5330), 67 (5335), 68 (5340), 69 (5345),
110 (5550), 114 (5570),
70 (5350), 72 (5360),
70 (5350), 71 (5355), 72 (5360), 73 (5365),
118 (5590), 122 (5610),
74 (5370), 76 (5380),
74 (5370), 75 (5375), 76 (5380), 77 (5385),
126 (5630), 130 (5650),
78 (5390), 80 (5400),
78 (5390), 79 (5395), 80 (5400), 81 (5405),
134 (5670), 138 (5690),
82 (5410), 84 (5420),
82 (5410), 83 (5415), 84 (5420), 85 (5425),
142 (5710), 146 (5730),
86 (5430), 88 (5440),
86 (5430), 87 (5435), 88 (5440), 89 (5445),
150 (5750), 154 (5770),
90 (5450), 92 (5460),
90 (5450), 91 (5455), 92 (5460), 93 (5465),
158 (5790), 162 (5810),
94 (5470), 96 (5480),
94 (5470), 95 (5475), 96 (5480), 97 (5485),
166 (5830), 170 (5850)
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500), 101 (5505),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520), 105 (5525),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540), 109 (5545),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560), 113 (5565),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580), 117 (5585),
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600), 121 (5605),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620), 125 (5625),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640), 129 (5645),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660), 133 (5665),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680), 137 (5685),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700), 141 (5705),
142 (5710), 144 (5720),
142 (5710), 143 (5715), 144 (5720), 145 (5725),
146 (5730), 148 (5740),
146 (5730), 147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745),
150 (5750), 152 (5760),
150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765),
154 (5770), 156 (5780),
154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785),
158 (5790), 160 (5800),
158 (5790), 159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805),
162 (5810), 164 (5820),
162 (5810), 163 (5815), 164 (5820), 165 (5825),
166 (5830), 168 (5840),
166 (5830), 167 (5835), 168 (5840), 169 (5845),
170 (5850)
170 (5850)
36 (5180), 40 (5200),
36 (5180), 38 (5190),
36 (5180), 37 (5185), 38 (5190), 39 (5195),
44 (5220), 48 (5240),
40 (5200), 42 (5210),
40 (5200), 41 (5205), 42 (5210), 43 (5215),
52 (5260), 56 (5280),
44 (5220), 46 (5230),
44 (5220), 45 (5225), 46 (5230), 47 (5235),
60 (5300), 64 (5320),
48 (5240), 50 (5250),
48 (5240), 49 (5245), 50 (5250), 51 (5255),
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
52 (5260), 54 (5270),
52 (5260), 53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275),
157 (5785), 161 (5805)
56 (5280), 58 (5290),
56 (5280), 57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295),
60 (5300), 62 (5310),
60 (5300), 61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315),
64 (5320), 66 (5330),
64 (5320), 65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815)
163 (5815)
175
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Singapore (SG)
5.15 - 5.25 GHz and
20 MHz
No
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Slovak
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
Yes
Republic (SK)
Slovenia (SI)
South Africa (ZA)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
Yes
Yes
10 MHz
5 MHz
36 (5180), 40 (5200),
36 (5180), 38 (5190),
36 (5180), 37 (5185), 38 (5190), 39 (5195),
44 (5220), 48 (5240),
40 (5200), 42 (5210),
40 (5200), 41 (5205), 42 (5210), 43 (5215),
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
44 (5220), 46 (5230),
44 (5220), 45 (5225), 46 (5230), 47 (5235),
157 (5785), 161 (5805),
48 (5240), 147 (5735),
48 (5240), 147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745),
165 (5825)
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
158 (5790), 159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
162 (5810), 163 (5815), 164 (5820), 165 (5825),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
166 (5830), 167 (5835)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
176
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
Spain (ES)
Sweden (SE)
Switzerland (CH)
Taiwan (158)
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
20 MHz
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
Thailand (TH)
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
161 (5805), 163 (5815)
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805)
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815)
163 (5815)
177
Country Codes and Channels
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R (2.4 GHz) Channels/Frequencies by Country
Country (Code)
Frequency
Bands
United
5.47 - 5.725 GHz
20 MHz
Yes
Kingdom (GB)
United Kingdom 5.8 5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Yes
GHz (GB1)
United States (US)
5.25 - 5.35 GHz and
No
5.725 - 5.85 GHz
Uruguay (UY)
Venezuela (VE)
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
5.725 - 5.825 GHz
Allowed Channels (Center Freq)
DFS
No
No
10 MHz
5 MHz
100 (5500), 104 (5520),
98 (5490), 100 (5500),
97 (5485), 98 (5490), 99 (5495), 100 (5500),
108 (5540), 112 (5560),
102 (5510), 104 (5520),
101 (5505), 102 (5510), 103 (5515), 104 (5520),
116 (5580), 120 (5600),
106 (5530), 108 (5540),
105 (5525), 106 (5530), 107 (5535), 108 (5540),
124 (5620), 128 (5640),
110 (5550), 112 (5560),
109 (5545), 110 (5550), 111 (5555), 112 (5560),
132 (5660), 136 (5680),
114 (5570), 116 (5580),
113 (5565), 114 (5570), 115 (5575), 116 (5580),
140 (5700)
118 (5590), 120 (5600),
117 (5585), 118 (5590), 119 (5595), 120 (5600),
122 (5610), 124 (5620),
121 (5605), 122 (5610), 123 (5615), 124 (5620),
126 (5630), 128 (5640),
125 (5625), 126 (5630), 127 (5635), 128 (5640),
130 (5650), 132 (5660),
129 (5645), 130 (5650), 131 (5655), 132 (5660),
134 (5670), 136 (5680),
133 (5665), 134 (5670), 135 (5675), 136 (5680),
138 (5690), 140 (5700),
137 (5685), 138 (5690), 139 (5695), 140 (5700),
142 (5710)
141 (5705), 142 (5710)
147 (5735), 151 (5755),
145 (5725), 147 (5735),
145 (5725), 146 (5730), 147 (5735), 148 (5740),
155 (5775), 167 (5835)
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755), 152 (5760),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775), 156 (5780),
157 (5785), 163 (5815),
157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835),
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835),
169 (5845)
168 (5840), 169 (5845), 170 (5850)
56 (5280), 60 (5300),
54 (5270), 56 (5280),
53 (5265), 54 (5270), 55 (5275), 56 (5280),
64 (5320), 149 (5745),
58 (5290), 60 (5300),
57 (5285), 58 (5290), 59 (5295), 60 (5300),
153 (5765), 157 (5785),
62 (5310), 64 (5320),
61 (5305), 62 (5310), 63 (5315), 64 (5320),
161 (5805), 165 (5825)
66 (5330), 147 (5735),
65 (5325), 66 (5330), 67 (5335), 147 (5735),
149 (5745), 151 (5755),
148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750), 151 (5755),
153 (5765), 155 (5775),
152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770), 155 (5775),
157 (5785), 159 (5795),
156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790), 159 (5795),
161 (5805), 163 (5815),
160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810), 163 (5815),
165 (5825), 167 (5835)
164 (5820), 165 (5825), 166 (5830), 167 (5835)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805)
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815)
163 (5815)
149 (5745), 153 (5765),
147 (5735), 149 (5745),
147 (5735), 148 (5740), 149 (5745), 150 (5750),
157 (5785), 161 (5805)
151 (5755), 153 (5765),
151 (5755), 152 (5760), 153 (5765), 154 (5770),
155 (5775), 157 (5785),
155 (5775), 156 (5780), 157 (5785), 158 (5790),
159 (5795), 161 (5805),
159 (5795), 160 (5800), 161 (5805), 162 (5810),
163 (5815)
163 (5815)
178
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Technical Specifications
B
Please see the following sections:
•
Part Numbers
•
Regulatory Approvals and Frequency Ranges
•
Integrated Antenna Specification
•
RF Modulation and Over-the-Air Rates
•
Wireless Protocol
•
Device Interface
•
Network Architecture Type
•
Receive Sensitivity
•
Maximum Throughput
•
Latency
•
Transmit Power Settings
•
Range Information
•
System Processor and Memory
•
Software Specification
•
Security
•
Management
•
Antenna
•
Status LEDs
•
Local Configuration Support
•
Compliance and Standards
•
Electrical
•
Dimensions
•
Weight
•
Environmental
•
Packaging Contents
•
MTBF
•
Warranty
179
Technical Specifications
Part Numbers
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Part Numbers
North America Region
Model 2454-R
Base Station Unit
Part Number
Description
2454-BSUR-US-WORLD Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU -WORLD
Subscriber Unit
Part Number
2454-SUA-US-WORLD
2454-SUR-US-WORLD
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU -WORLD
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna – US PSU WORLD
Model 5054-R
Base Station Unit
Part Number
5054-BSUR-US
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Subscriber Unit
Part Number
5054-SUA-US
5054-SUR-US
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna – US PSU
Europe and Middle East Regions
Model 2454-R
Base Station Unit
Part Number
2454-BSUR-EU
2454-BSUR-UK
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – Europe PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – UK PSU
Subscriber Unit
Part Number
2454-SUA-EU
2454-SUA-UK
2454-SUR-EU
2454-SUR-UK
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – Europe PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – UK PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna – Europe
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna – UK PSU
180
Technical Specifications
Part Numbers
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R
Base Station Unit
Part Number
5054-BSUR-EU
5054-BSUR-UK
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – Europe
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – UK PSU
Subscriber Unit
Part Number
5054-SUA-EU
5054-SUA-UK
5054-SUR-EU
5054-SUR-UK
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – Europe PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – UK PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna –
Europe PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna – UK
PSU
Asia Pacific Region
Model 2454-R
Base Station Unit
Part Number
2454-BSUR-AU
2454-BSUR-UK
2454-BSUR-US
2454-BSUR-EU
2454-BSUR-CN
2454-BSUR-SK
2454-BSUR-US-WORLD
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – Australia
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – UK PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – Europe
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – China PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – South
Korea PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – US/CAN
PSU – WORLD
Subscriber Unit
Part Number
2454-SUA-AU
2454-SUA-UK
2454-SUA-US
2454-SUA-EU
2454-SUA-CN
2454-SUA-SK
2454-SUA-US WORLD
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – Australia
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – UK PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – EU PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – China PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – South Korea
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – US/CAN
PSU – WORLD
181
Technical Specifications
Part Numbers
Part Number
2454-SUR-AU
2454-SUR-UK
2454-SUR-US
2454-SUR-EU
2454-SUR-CN
2454-SUR-SK
2454-SUR-US-WORLD
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna –
Australia PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna – UK
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna – US
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna – EU
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna –
China PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna –
South Korea PS
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna – US/
CAN PSU - WORLD
Model 5054-R
Base Station Unit
Part Number
5054-BSUR-AU
5054-BSUR-UK
5054-BSUR-US
5054-BSUR-EU
5054-BSUR-US-WORLD
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – Australia
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – UK PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – Europe
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – US/CAN
PSU - WORLD
Subscriber Unit
Part Number
5054-SUA-AU
5054-SUA-UK
5054-SUA-US
5054-SUA-EU
5054-SUA-US-WORLD
5054-SUR-AU
5054-SUR-UK
5054-SUR-US
5054-SUR-EU
5054-SUR-US-WORLD
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – Australia
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – UK PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – EU PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – US/CAN
PSU - WORLD
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna –
Australia PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna – UK
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna – US
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna – EU
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna – US/
CAN PSU - WORLD
182
Technical Specifications
Part Numbers
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Caribbean and Latin America Region
Model 2454-R
Base Station Unit
Part Number
2454-BSUR-US
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Subscriber Unit
Part Number
2454-SUA-US
2454-SUR-US
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna – US
PSU
Model 5054-R
Base Station Unit
Part Number
5054-BSUR-US
5054-BSUR-BR
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Base Station Unit with Type-N Connector – Brazil PSU
Subscriber Unit
Part Number
5054-SUA-US
5054-SUA-BR
5054-SUR-US
5054-SUR-BR
Description
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – US PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector – Brazil PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna – US
PSU
Tsunami MP.11 Model 5054-R Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna –
Brazil PSU
Universal
Accessories
Part Number
848 274 163
5054-SURGE
848 274 171
848 332 789
848 274 197
848 274 205
69828
5054-LMR600-50
70251
Description
Surge Arrestor 0-3 GHz - Standard-N Female to Female
Surge Arrestor 5 GHz - Standard-N Female to Female
20 ft Low Loss Antenna Cable St-N - Male-Male LMR 200
20 ft Low Loss Antenna Cable St-N - Male-Male LMR 400
50 ft Low Loss Antenna Cable St-N - Male-Male LMR 400
75 ft Low Loss Antenna Cable St-N - Male-Male LMR 400
6 ft Low Loss Antenna Cable St-N - Male-Male LMR 600
50 ft Low Loss Antenna Cable St-N - Male-Male LMR 600
PoE (Power over Ethernet) Surge Arrestor for Tsunami MP.11 and QuickBridge.11
183
Technical Specifications
Part Numbers
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Outdoor Ethernet Cables
Part Number
69819
69820
69821
Description
25m outdoor, terminated CAT5 cable for Tsunami MP.11 or QB.11 with three RJ-45
and one weather-proof Ethernet port cap
50m outdoor, terminated CAT5 cable for Tsunami MP.11 or QB.11 with three RJ-45
and one weather-proof Ethernet port cap
75m outdoor, terminated CAT5 cable for Tsunami MP.11 or QB.11 with three RJ-45
and one weather-proof Ethernet port cap
Power Injector
Part Number
69823
Description
Spare Power DC Injector for Tsunami MP.11 or QB.11 (-R model ONLY)
2.4 GHz Antennas
Part Number
848 515 722
848 312 591
848 515 698
848 515 706
2411WA12-STN
848 515 714
2400-SA60-14
Description
5 dBi Omni-Directional Vehicle Antenna w/Integrated 250 cm cable
7 dBi Omni-Directional Base Station Antenna - St-N Female
10 dBi Omni-Directional Base Station Antenna - St-N Female
12 dBi Directional Wide Angle Antenna (120 degrees) - St-N Female
12 dBi Wide Angle Antenna with Integrated 2 m cable (st-N) Mountable on Window or
Flat Surface
24 dBi Directional Antenna (Parabolic Grid) - St-N Female
14dBi Directional sector antenna (60 degrees) 2.4GHz St-N Female
5 GHz Antennas
Part Number
5054-PA-18
5054-PA-23
5054-OA-8
5054-OA-10
5054-SA120-14
5054-SA60-17
Description
18 dBi Panel Antenna - St-N Female - 5.25 - 5.875 GHz
23 dBi Panel Antenna - St-N Female - 5.725 - 5.875 GHz
8 dBi Omni Directional Antenna - St-N Female - 5.47-5.850 GHz
10 dBi Omni Directional Antenna - St-N Female - 5.47-5.850 GHz
14 dBi Sector Antenna - St-N Female - 5.25-5.850 GHz - 120 degrees
17 dBi Sector Antenna - St-N Female - 5.25-5.850 GHz - 60 degrees
184
Technical Specifications
Regulatory Approvals and Frequency Ranges
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Regulatory Approvals and Frequency Ranges
Model 2454-R Regulatory Approval and Frequency Ranges
Region/Country
North America
Country
USA
Canada
Mexico
EU Countries
Other European
Countries
South America
Austria
Belgium
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Luxemburg
Lithuania
Malta
Netherlands
Poland
Portugal
Spain
Sweden
Slovakia
Slovenia
United Kingdom
Iceland
Liechtenstein
Norway
Switzerland
Brazil
GHz
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.472
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.472
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.472
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
Number of Channels
5 MHz
10 MHz
20 MHz
11
Up to 11
Up to 11
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
11
Up to 11
Up to 11
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
11
Up to 11
Up to 11
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
Certification
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
In Process
185
Technical Specifications
Regulatory Approvals and Frequency Ranges
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 2454-R Regulatory Approval and Frequency Ranges (continued)
Region/Country
APAC
Country
New Zealand
Japan
Hong Kong
S. Korea
China
Taiwan
GHz
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
2.40 - 2.4835
Number of Channels
5 MHz
10 MHz
20 MHz
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
13
Up to 13
Up to 13
Certification
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
186
Technical Specifications
Regulatory Approvals and Frequency Ranges
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R Regulatory Approval and Frequency Ranges
Region/Country
North America
Country
USA
Canada
EU Countries
Mexico
Austria
Belgium
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxemburg
Malta
Netherlands
Poland
Portugal
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom
Other European
Countries
Iceland
Liechtenstein
Norway
Russia
Switzerland
GHz
5.25 - 5.35
5.725 - 5.85
5.25 - 5.35
5.725 - 5.85
5.725 - 5.85
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.725 - 5.85
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.725 - 5.85
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.47 - 5.70
5.15 - 5.85
5.47 - 5.70
Number of Channels
5 MHz
10 MHz
20 MHz
Up to 15
Up to 7
Up to 3
Up to 21
Up to 11
Up to 5
Up to 15
Up to 7
Up to 3
Up to 21
Up to 11
Up to 5
Up to 21
Up to 11
Up to 5
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 4
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 4
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 141 Up to 71
Up to 36
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Certification
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
In Process
Yes
187
Technical Specifications
Regulatory Approvals and Frequency Ranges
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Model 5054-R Regulatory Approval and Frequency Ranges (continued)
Region/Country
South America
Country
Argentina
Brazil
Colombia
APAC
Australia
China
Hong Kong
India
New Zealand
S. Korea
Singapore
Taiwan
GHz
5.25 - 5.35
5.725 - 5.85
5.47 - 5.70
5.725 - 5.85
5.25 - 5.35
5.725 - 5.85
5.725 - 5.85
5.725 - 5.85
5.725 - 5.85
5.15 - 5.35
5.725 - 5.85
5.725 - 5.85
5.725 - 5.85
5.15 - 5.25
5.725 - 5.85
5.25 - 5.35
5.725 - 5.85
Number of Channels
5 MHz
10 MHz
20 MHz
Up to 9
Up to 5
Up to 3
Up to 19
Up to 10
Up to 5
Up to 46
Up to 23
Up to 11
Up to 19
Up to 10
Up to 5
Up to 15
Up to 7
Up to 3
Up to 21
Up to 11
Up to 5
Up to 21
Up to 11
Up to 5
Up to 17
Up to 9
Up to 5
Up to 21
Up to 11
Up to 5
Up to 32
Up to 16
Up to 7
Up to 17
Up to 9
Up to 5
Up to 21
Up to 11
Up to 5
Up to 17
Up to 9
Up to 5
Up to 13
Up to 7
Up to 4
Up to 17
Up to 9
Up to 5
Up to 15
Up to 7
Up to 3
Up to 17
Up to 9
Up to 5
Certification
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
In Process
Yes
Yes
In Process
Yes
188
Technical Specifications
Integrated Antenna Specification
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Integrated Antenna Specification
Model 2454-R
Subscriber Unit with Integrated 16-dBi Antenna
Feature
Part Number
Frequency range
Nominal Impedance
Gain
Front-to-Back Ratio
HPBW/vertical
HPBW/horizontal
Cross Polarization
Power handling
VSWR
Specification
2454-SUR-xx
2.4 to 2.5 GHz
50 Ohms
16 dBi
25 dB
22 degrees
15 degrees
20 dB
1W
1.5 : 1 Max
Model 5054-R
Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna
Feature
Part Number
Frequency range
Nominal Impedance
Gain
Front-to-Back Ratio
HPBW/vertical
HPBW/horizontal
Cross Polarization
Power handling
VSWR
Specification
5054-SUR-xx
5250 - 5875 MHz
50 ohms
23 dBi
35 dB
9 degrees
9 degrees
23 dB
1 W (cw)
2.0 : 1 Max
189
Technical Specifications
RF Modulation and Over-the-Air Rates
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
RF Modulation and Over-the-Air Rates
Model 2454-R and 5054-R OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing)
•
Maximum Packet Size 1522 Bytes
•
Modulation Rates:
Modulation
BPSK
QPSK
16-QAM
20 MHz Channels
6 and 9 Mbps
12 and 18 Mbps
24 and 36 Mbps
Rate
10 MHz Channels
3 and 4.5 Mbps
6 and 9 Mbps
12 and 18 Mbps
5 MHz Channels
2.25 and 1.5 Mbps
3 and 4.5 Mbps
6 and 9 Mbps
Wireless Protocol
•
Worp (Wireless Outdoor Router Protocol)
Device Interface
•
Ethernet: Auto-sensing 10/100BASE-TX Ethernet
•
Antenna Connector for BSU and SU with Type-N Connector: Standard Type-N Female
Network Architecture Type
•
Infrastructure
Receive Sensitivity
•
BER=10-6
2454-R/5054-R
Modulation
64QAM ¾
64QAM ½
16QAM ¾
16QAM ½
QPSK ¾
QPSK ½
BPSK ¾
BPSK ½
40 MHz Channels
Turbo Mode
(US only)
-66 dBm @108Mbps
-68 dBm @96Mbps
-75dBm @72Mbps
-78dBm @48Mbps
-81dBm @36Mbps
-83 dBm @24Mbps
-84 dBm @18Mbps
-85 dBm @12Mbps
20 MHz Channels
Standard Mode
-69 dBm @54Mbps
-72 dBm @48Mbps
-77 dBm @36Mbps
-80 dBm @24Mbps
-83 dBm @18Mbps
-86 dBm @12Mbps
-87 dBm @9Mbps
-88 dBm @6Mbps
10 MHz Channels
Standard Mode
-72 dBm @36Mbps
-75 dBm @24Mbps
-80 dBm @18Mbps
-83 dBm @12Mbps
-86 dBm @9Mbps
-89 dBm @6Mbps
-90 dBm @4.5Mbps
-91 dBm @3Mbps
5 MHz Channels
Standard Mode
-75 dBm @18Mbps
-78 dBm @12Mbps
-83 dBm @9Mbps
-86 dBm @6Mbps
-89 dBm @4.5Mbps
92 dBm @3Mbps
-93 dBm @2.25Mbps
-94 dBm @1.5Mbps
190
Technical Specifications
Maximum Throughput
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Maximum Throughput
2454-R
Data Rate
54 Mbps
48 Mbps
36 Mbps
24 Mbps
18 Mbps
12 Mbps
9 Mbps
6 Mbps
4.5 Mbps
3 Mbps
2.25 Mbps
1 Mbps
Note:
20 MHz Channels
30 Mbps
28 Mbps
18 Mbps
14 Mbps
12 Mbps
9 Mbps
7 Mbps
5 Mbps
10 MHz Channels
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
12 Mbps
9 Mbps
7 Mbps
5 Mbps
4 Mbps
2 Mbps
—
—
5 MHz Channels
Standard Mode
—
—
—
—
—
—
6.8 Mbps
5 Mbps
4 Mbps
2.7 Mbps
2 Mbps
1.4 Mbps
Maximum-throughput data with release 2.3, as measured with test equipment under controlled lab conditions and best performing packet size. In some instances, data compression yields throughput equal to the
configured data rate. Actual throughput performance in the field may vary.
5054-R
Data Rate
108 Mbps
Turbo 54
96 Mbps
Turbo 48
72 Mbps
Turbo 36
48 Mbps
Turbo 24
36 Mbps
Turbo 18
24 Mbps
Turbo 12
54 Mbps
48 Mbps
36 Mbps
24 Mbps
18 Mbps
12 Mbps
9 Mbps
6 Mbps
4.5 Mbps
3 Mbps
40 MHz Channels
(US Only)
31 Mbps
20 MHz Channels
10 MHz Channels
—
—
5 MHz Channels
Standard Mode
—
28 Mbps
—
—
—
28 Mbps
—
—
—
28 Mbps
—
—
—
24 Mbps
—
—
—
19 Mbps
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
29 Mbps
27 Mbps
22 Mbps
16 Mbps
13 Mbps
9 Mbps
7 Mbps
5 Mbps
—
—
16 Mbps
13 Mbps
9 Mbps
7 Mbps
5 Mbps
3.6 Mbps
2.4 Mbps
7 Mbps
4.7 Mbps
3.8 Mbps
2.7 Mbps
191
Technical Specifications
Latency
Data Rate
2.25 Mbps
1 Mbps
Note:
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
40 MHz Channels
(US Only)
—
—
20 MHz Channels
10 MHz Channels
—
—
—
—
5 MHz Channels
Standard Mode
2 Mbps
1.2 Mbps
Maximum-throughput data with release 2.3, as measured with test equipment under controlled lab conditions and best performing packet size. In some instances, data compression yields throughput equal to the
configured data rate. Actual throughput performance in the field may vary.
Latency
•
< 10ms typical at maximum throughput (as measured with test equipment under controlled lab conditions and best
performing packet size)
Transmit Power Settings
Model 2454-R
•
Output Power Attenuation: 0 - 18dB, in 3dB steps
•
Output Power Values will have a tolerance of +- 1.5 dB
Frequency
2.400-2.483 GHz
6-24 Mbps @ 20 MHz 36 Mbps @ 20 MHz
16QAM ¾
16QAM ½; QPSK ¾;
QPSK ½; BPSK ¾;
BPSK ½
16 dBm
16 dBm
48 Mbps @ 20 MHz
64QAM ½
14 dBm
54 Mbps @ 20 MHz
64QAM ¾
13 dBm
Model 5054-R
•
Output Power Attenuation: 0 - 18dB, in 3dB steps
•
Output Power Values will have a tolerance of +- 1.5 dB
Frequency
5.15-5.35 GHz
5.47-5.725 GHz
5.725-5.850 GHz
6-24 Mbps @ 20 MHz 36 Mbps @ 20 MHz
16QAM ¾
16QAM ½; QPSK ¾;
QPSK ½; BPSK ¾;
BPSK ½
15 dBm
13 dBm
16 dBm
13 dBm
16 dBm
13 dBm
48 Mbps @ 20 MHz
64QAM ½
12 dBm
12 dBm
12 dBm
54 Mbps @ 20 MHz
64QAM ¾
11 dBm
11 dBm
11 dBm
192
Technical Specifications
Range Information
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Range Information
Model 2454-R
Integrated Antenna
Frequency
2.4-2.4835GHz (US)
2.4-2.8 GHz (ETSI)
36 Mbps
2.1mi/3.4km
0.7mi/1.1km
6 Mbps
6.9mi/11.1km
2.6mi/4.2km
36 Mbps
3.4mi/5.5km
0.7mi/1.1km
6 Mbps
11.4mi/18.3km
2.6mi/4.2km
External Antenna
Frequency
2.4-2.4835GHz (US)
2.4-2.8 GHz (ETSI)
Model 5054-R
Integrated Antenna
Frequency
36 Mbps
5.15-5.35 GHz (US) 1.2mi/2.0km
5.47-5.7GHz (ETSI) 1.1mi/1.8km
5.725-5.850 (US)
2.1mi/3.8km
6 Mbps
3.0mi/4.8km
3.1mi/5.0km
6.4mi/10.3km
External Antenna
Frequency
36 Mbps
5.15-5.35 GHz (US) 1.2mi/2.0km
5.47-5.7GHz (ETSI) 1.1mi/1.8km
5.725-5.850 (US)
4.1mi/6.6km
6 Mbps
3.2mi/5.1km
3.1mi/5.0km
12.5mi/20.1km
Notes
Note the following:
•
PMP configuration using USA regulations for L and U bands, ETSI regulations for M bands
•
Clear LOS
•
99.995% availability
•
Sector antenna (17dBi, 60-degrees) at BSU with short 1dB jumper cable
•
Fade margin minimum of 10dB to 2 miles, 0.2dB additional fade margin for every 0.1 mile to 15dB
•
Predicted availability >99.990% (one-way) for all configurations
•
Distance calculations for 5 and 10 MHz channels are comparable for ETSI regulatory domains. Proper TPC settings
(3 and 6dB) respectively, should be set to meet power density rules. Increased distances are possible in the US with
proper link engineering.
System Processor and Memory
•
166MHz Motorola 8241 processor
•
16 Mbytes RAM
193
Technical Specifications
Software Specification
•
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
8 Mbytes FLASH
Software Specification
Base Station and Subscriber Units
•
•
Miscellaneous
–
WORP protocol
–
Dynamic Data Rate Selection
–
Transmit Power Control
–
Antenna Alignment
–
Integrity Check for Software Upload
–
5, 10, and 20MHz channels
Satellite Density
–
Dynamic Frequency Selection
•
Redundancy
•
Bridging and Routing
–
•
•
Spanning Tree (802.1D)
–
Bridge (802.1d)
–
IP/ RIPv1 (RFC 1058)
–
IP/ RIPv2 (RFC 1388)
–
CIDR (RFC 1519)
–
ICMP (RFC 792)
–
IP (RFC 791)
–
ARP (RFC 826)
Filtering
–
Ethernet protocol (Ethertype)
–
Static MAC
–
Storm threshold
–
IP address
–
Broadcast protocol
Services
–
DHCP Server (RFC 2131)
–
DHCP Client (RFC 2131)
–
Bi-Directional Bandwidth Control
•
VLAN
•
Security Features
–
•
802.1Q
–
MAC Authentication
–
Radius MAC Access Control
–
WEP/AES-OCB encryption
–
RADIUS (RFC 2138)
Mobility
–
Subscriber Unit Roaming
194
Technical Specifications
Security
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Base Station Unit
•
Filtering
–
Intra Cell Blocking
Subscriber Units
•
Services
–
NAT (RFC 3022)
–
DHCP Relay (RFC 2131)
Security
•
WORP provides critical feature support for secure long-range wireless deployments in unlicensed frequency
spectrum.
•
MD5 (embedded in WORP) authentication between BSU and SU.
•
Filter based on packet information such as unicast/multicast/ broadcast MAC or IP.
•
Secure “over the air encryption” with WEP, WEP+, and AES, and AES-CCB.
•
Authentication via Radius
•
Intracell blocking allows the BSU to act as the central policy enforcer for SU to SU communications.
Management
•
SU/BSU statistics
•
Link Test
•
Temperature logging
•
SNMPv1/v2 RFC 1157
•
SNMP v2c (RFC 1907)
•
HTTP Server (RFC 2616)
•
Telnet (RFC 855)
•
TFTP client (RFC 783)
•
CLI
•
MIB-II (RFC 1213)
•
Ethernet-like MIB (RFC 1643)
•
Bridge MIB (RFC 1493)
•
802.3MAU (RFC 2668)
•
802.11 MIB
•
Remote reboot (reload) or reset to factory default via power injector
•
Private MIB
•
Orinoco MIB
Antenna
•
Audible tone
•
CLI output
195
Technical Specifications
Status LEDs
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Status LEDs
•
Two indicators on the RJ-45 connector to indicate power, wireless traffic, and Ethernet traffic
Local Configuration Support
•
RS-232 Serial port
–
RJ11 port built-into the unit
–
DB9 Female via a converter (included)
Compliance and Standards
Safety
•
UL: 60950, UL50
•
CSA: 22.2 No. 60950-00
•
IEC: 60950 3rd Ed (1999)
Radio Approvals
•
USA: FCC 15.107, 15-109; 15-203-15.205, 15.207, 15.209; 15.247; 15.401-15.407
•
Canada: RSS-102; RSS-210; ICES-003
•
Europe (ETSI): EN 301.893; EN 300.328; EN 301.489-1; EN 301.489-17; EN 300-440; EN50371
•
ARIB: STD-T71, STD 33, STD 66
EMI and Susceptibility (Class B)
•
USA: FCC Part 15.107
•
Canada: ICES-003
Water and Dust Proof
•
NEMA4/IP56
Electrical
5054-R / 2454-R POE Power Injector
•
Custom Power over Ethernet (802.3af compatible)
•
Input: Voltage 110 to 250 VAC (47-63Hz)
•
Output: 48V @ 420mA MAX (injected into the Cat-5 Cable)
•
Pin for Remote reboot (reload) or reset to factory default
5054-R / 2454-R Outdoor Radio Unit
•
Power Consumption: 7.5W typical. Up to 20 Watts across full operating temperature range.
•
Input: Voltage 42 to 60 VDC
196
Technical Specifications
Dimensions
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
Dimensions
Base Station and Subscriber Unit
•
Packaged: 14.57 in x 13.70 in x 8.19 in (370 mm x 348 mm x 208 mm)
Base Station and Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector
•
Unpackaged: 10.5 in x 10.5 in x 3.25 in (267 mm x 267 mm x 83 mm)
Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi Antenna
•
Unpackaged: 12.60 in x 12.60 in x 3.50 in (320 mm x 320 mm x 89 mm)
Weight
Base Station and Subscriber Unit with Type-N Connector
•
Packaged weight: 9.2 lbs (4.2 kg)
•
Unpackaged weight: 5.5 lbs (2.49 kg) Unit-only, .45 lbs (.20 kg) for power supply
Subscriber Unit with Integrated 23-dBi or 16-dBi Antenna
•
Packaged weight: 10.1 lbs (4.6 kg)
•
Unpackaged weight: 6.0 lbs (2.72 kg) Unit-only, .45 lbs (.20 kg) for power supply
Environmental
Operating
•
-33º to 60ºC (-27.5º to 140º Fahrenheit)
•
100% humidity
•
Wind loading: 125 mph
Storage
•
-55º to 80ºC (-41º to 176º Fahrenheit)
•
100% humidity
Packaging Contents
•
One Tsunami MP.11 Model 2454-R or 5054-R Base Station or Subscriber Unit
•
One wall/ pole mounting bracket
•
One Power-Over-Ethernet injector for Model 2454-R or 5054-R
•
One country specific power cord
•
One Ethernet cable weather-proof plug
•
One Documentation and Software CD-ROM
197
Technical Specifications
MTBF
MP.11 5054-R/2454-R Installation and Management
MTBF
•
100,000 hours
Warranty
•
One year
198
Tsunami MP.11 5012-SUI Installation and Management
Lightning Protection
C
Lightning protection is used to maximize the reliability of communications equipment by safely re-directing current from a
lightning strike or a power surge traveling along the Cat 5 Ethernet cabling to ground using the shortest path possible.
Designing a proper grounding system prior to installing any communications equipment is critical to minimize the
possibility of equipment damage, void warranties, and cause serious injury.
The surge arrestor (sometimes referred to as a lightning protector) can protect your sensitive electronic equipment from
high-voltage surges caused by discharges and transients at the PoE.
Proxim Wireless offers superior lightning and surge protection for Tsunami MP.11 and Tsunami QuickBridge.11 products.
Contact your reseller or distributor for more information.
199
Tsunami MP.11 5012-SUI Installation and Management
Technical Services and Support
D
Obtaining Technical Services and Support
If you are having trouble utilizing your Proxim product, please review this manual and the additional documentation
provided with your product.
If you require additional support and would like to use Proxim’s free Technical Service to help resolve your issue, please
be ready to provide the following information before you contact Proxim’s Technical Services:
•
•
•
Product information:
–
Part number of suspected faulty unit
–
Serial number of suspected faulty unit
Trouble/error information:
–
Trouble/symptom being experienced
–
Activities completed to confirm fault
–
Network information (what kind of network are you using?)
–
Circumstances that preceded or led up to the error
–
Message or alarms viewed
–
Steps taken to reproduce the problem
Servpak information (if a Servpak customer):
–
•
Servpak account number
Registration information:
–
If the product is not registered, date when you purchased the product
–
If the product is not registered, location where you purchased the product
NOTE: If you would like to register your product now, visit the Proxim eService Web Site at
http://support.proxim.com and click on New Product Registration.
200
Technical Services and Support
Support Options
Tsunami MP.11 5012-SUI Installation and Management
Support Options
Proxim eService Web Site Support
The Proxim eService Web site is available 7x24x365 at http://support.proxim.com.
On the Proxim eService Web Site, you can access the following services:
•
New Product Registration: Register your product for free support.
•
Open a Ticket or RMA: Open a ticket or RMA and receive an immediate reply.
•
Search Knowledgebase: Locate white papers, software upgrades, and technical information.
•
ServPak (Service Packages): Receive Advanced Replacement, Extended Warranty, 7x24x365 Technical Support,
Priority Queuing, and On-Site Support.
•
Your Stuff: Track status of your tickets or RMAs and receive product update notifications.
•
Provide Feedback: Submit suggestions or other types of feedback.
•
Customer Survey: Submit an On-Line Customer Survey response.
•
Repair Tune-Up: Have your existing Proxim equipment inspected, tested, and upgraded to current S/W and H/W
revisions, and extend your warranty for another year.
Telephone Support
Contact technical support via telephone as follows:
•
Domestic: 866-674-6626
•
International: +1-408-542-5390
Hours of Operation
•
North America: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST, Monday through Friday
•
EMEA: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. GMT, Monday through Friday
ServPak Support
Proxim understands that service and support requirements vary from customer to customer. It is our mission to offer
service and support options that go above-and-beyond normal warranties to allow you the flexibility to provide the quality
of service that your networks demand.
In recognition of these varying requirements we have developed a support program called ServPak. ServPak is a
program of Enhanced Service Options that can be purchased individually or in combinations to meet your needs.
•
Advanced Replacement: This service offers customers an advance replacement of refurbished or new hardware.
(Available in the U.S., Canada, and select countries. Please inquire with your authorized Proxim distributor for
availability in your country.)
•
Extended Warranty: This service provides unlimited repair of your Proxim hardware for the life of the service
contract.
•
7x24x365 Technical Support: This service provides unlimited, direct access to Proxim’s world-class technical
support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.
•
Priority Queuing: This service allows your product issue to be routed to the next available Customer Service
Engineer.
To purchase ServPak support services, please contact your authorized Proxim distributor. To receive more information
or for questions on any of the available ServPak support options, please call Proxim Support at +1-408-542-5390 or send
an email to [email protected]
201
Tsunami MP.11 5012-SUI Installation and Management
Statement of Warranty
E
Warranty Coverage
Proxim Wireless Corporation warrants that its Products are manufactured solely from new parts, conform substantially to
specifications, and will be free of defects in material and workmanship for a Warranty Period of 1 year from the date of
purchase.
Repair or Replacement
In the event a Product fails to perform in accordance with its specification during the Warranty Period, Proxim offers
return-to-factory repair or replacement, with a thirty (30) business-day turnaround from the date of receipt of the
defective Product at a Proxim Wireless Corporation Repair Center. When Proxim Wireless has reasonably determined
that a returned Product is defective and is still under Warranty, Proxim Wireless shall, at its option, either: (a) repair the
defective Product; (b) replace the defective Product with a refurbished Product that is equivalent to the original; or (c)
where repair or replacement cannot be accomplished, refund the price paid for the defective Product. The Warranty
Period for repaired or replacement Products shall be ninety (90) days or the remainder of the original Warranty Period,
whichever is longer. This constitutes Buyer’s sole and exclusive remedy and Proxim Wireless’s sole and exclusive
liability under this Warranty.
Limitations of Warranty
The express warranties set forth in this Agreement will not apply to defects in a Product caused; (i) through no fault of
Proxim Wireless during shipment to or from Buyer, (ii) by the use of software other than that provided with or installed in
the Product, (iii) by the use or operation of the Product in an application or environment other than that intended or
recommended by Proxim Wireless, (iv) by modifications, alterations, or repairs made to the Product by any party other
than Proxim Wireless or Proxim Wireless’s authorized repair partners, (v) by the Product being subjected to unusual
physical or electrical stress, or (vii) by failure of Buyer to comply with any of the return procedures specified in this
Statement of Warranty.
Support Procedures
Buyer should return defective LAN1 Products within the first 30 days to the merchant from which the Products were
purchased. Buyer can contact a Proxim Wireless Customer Service Center either by telephone or via web. Calls for
support for Products that are near the end of their warranty period should be made not longer than seven (7) days after
expiration of warranty. Repair of Products that are out of warranty will be subject to a repair fee. Contact information is
shown below. Additional support information can be found at Proxim Wireless’s web site at http://support.proxim.com.
•
Domestic: 866-674-6626
•
International: +1-408-542-5390
Hours of Operation
•
North America: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST, Monday through Friday
•
EMEA: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. GMT, Monday through Friday
When contacting the Customer Service for support, Buyer should be prepared to provide the Product description and
serial number and a description of the problem. The serial number should be on the product.
In the event the Customer Service Center determines that the problem can be corrected with a software update, Buyer
might be instructed to download the update from Proxim Wireless’s web site or, if that’s not possible, the update will be
sent to Buyer. In the event the Customer Service Center instructs Buyer to return the Product to Proxim Wireless for
1. LAN products include: ORiNOCO™
202
Statement of Warranty
Other Information
Tsunami MP.11 5012-SUI Installation and Management
repair or replacement, the Customer Service Center will provide Buyer a Return Material Authorization (“RMA”) number
and shipping instructions. Buyer must return the defective Product to Proxim Wireless, properly packaged to prevent
damage, shipping prepaid, with the RMA number prominently displayed on the outside of the container.
Calls to the Customer Service Center for reasons other than Product failure will not be accepted unless Buyer has
purchased a Proxim Wireless Service Contract or the call is made within the first thirty (30) days of the Product’s invoice
date. Calls that are outside of the 30-day free support time will be charged a fee of $25.00 (US Dollars) per Support Call.
If Proxim Wireless reasonably determines that a returned Product is not defective or is not covered by the terms
of this Warranty, Buyer shall be charged a service charge and return shipping charges.
Other Information
Search Knowledgebase
Proxim Wireless stores all resolved problems in a solution database at the following URL: http://support.proxim.com.
Ask a Question or Open an Issue
Submit a question or open an issue to Proxim Wireless technical support staff at the following URL: http://
support.proxim.com/cgi-bin/proxim.cfg/php/enduser/ask.php.
Other Adapter Cards
Proxim Wireless does not support internal mini-PCI devices that are built into laptop computers, even if identified as
"ORiNOCO" devices. Customers having such devices should contact the laptop vendor's technical support for
assistance.
For support for a PCMCIA card carrying a brand name other than Proxim, ORiNOCO, Lucent, Wavelan, or Skyline,
Customer should contact the brand vendor's technical support for assistance.
203
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