PARTY SOCIAL HOW GV
GV
Ml
HOW
'
TO ENTERTAIN
54
SOCIAL PARTY
A COL-JLECTION OF
Tableaus. Games, Amusi:n-g Experimei^ts,
Diversions, Card Tricks, Parlor
Magic, Philosophical Recreatio:n"s, &c.
with
jviany illustrations.
NEW
FRANK
M.
YORK;
REED,
Publisher.
-9i'
nasi
lrt\j I
1^1 I
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HOW
TO ENTERTAIN
SOCIAL PARTY:
A COLLECTION OP
TABLEAUX, GAMES, AMUSING EXPERIMENTS, DIVEKSIONS,
CARD TRICKS, PARLOR MAGIC, PHILOSOPHICAL
RECREATIONS, ETC.
WITH MANY ILLU8TBA1IONS,
d
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M.
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anxiety, moroseness, jiU this rust of
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ought to rub himself with it.
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by every pebble over which
nity occurs, laugh
—a
which every mie
it
runs.
life,
letter tlian ewery.
is
mirth
is
ought
Every
very like a
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—
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''
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139
J^*
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io above
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^
1874,
by
(
librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.
\
J-
HOW
TO ENTERTAIN
A SOCIAL
PARTY
THE BLUE BEARD TABLEAU.
This effective tableau is very easily arranged, A room with folding
doors is the best, as the framework of the doors forms an excellent
frame for the picture. A screen of rose-colored gauze or fine pink
tarlatan is stretched very tightly across the opening, so as to subdue
and harmonize the tints of the tableau this, however, is wholly
Lights are placed so as to throw out the light and shade
optional.
of the picture colored lights, when they can be procured, add greatly
to the effect.
Two scenes, as depicted by the artist, constitute the
tableau.
The first represents Fatima, with the fatal key in her hand,
having just unlocked and opened the door of the forbidden closet. Li
an adjoining room sits Blue Beard, gloating over the success of hia
cunning stratagem, which is to add another to the list of his disobedient victims.
Both are dressed in Oriental costume. Fatima is
clutching the key to her breast, and eagerly pressing forward to
obtain a nearer view of the strange objects of which she has but a dim
glimpse, but the bare suspicion of which causes her to shrink back
with horror.
;
;
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
SOCIAL PARTY.
FISST TABLEAU.
is opened wide, and the ghastly pictnre
unvailed to the specta-tors. The heads of seven young and beautiful
women are seen suspended by the hair from the ceiling, each face
"wearing an expression of its own, which the artist has happily portrayed. The picture only shows the heads, but, as a matter of course,
in the tableau itself Fatima is seen in the foreground, cowering with
In the next tableau the door
horror.
SECOND TABLEAU.
HOW TO ENTERTAIN
A SOCI^iL PAETi.
7
The next picture shows the expedient resorted to ia order to conceal the bodies, which are supposed to be severed from the heads.
piece of white muslin is stretched across the background the heads
of the actors are thrust through this screen, and the loose htur is fixed
In this manner the bodies
to a rope suspended from hooks above.
are effectually hidden by the cloth, and the optical delusion is com-
A
;
A piano accompaniment from the opera of Barbe Bleue, may
appropriately be played during the tableau. Other scenes from the
plete.
story
may be added with good
effect.
THIED TABLEAU.
TABLEAU VIVANT, FOR ACTING.
•
DRAMATIS PERSONS.
George McDonnel, a grent catch.
James Brown, a Volunteer [/io< too wueX
Johnny Grant, an Etonian.
Mrs. Grant.
Ethel, her daur/hter,
cousin
to
George McDonnel.
Alice, a youn/j lady visitor.
Mary, a ]->oor relation who has to eaini her own living.
For this little perfoi^iame, an empty picture-frame tcill be
required
scenery otherwise can be easily changed by a mere
alteration offurniture
The
HOW TO
b
EInTEETAIN A SOOIaL PARTY.
SCENE
I.
Winter. Alice and Ethel discovered
Draiving-room^ with fire-place, c&c, d;c.
seated by the fire dressed extravagantly, in the height of the fashion.
They
each hold a novels and ajyj^ear absorbed by it. At the table Mart is seated,
—
—
icorkiiig or knitting.
Ethel. Oh, Alice ! She has actually pushed him over the chalkhe fell on the head of a gipsy
pit and killed him and imagine
sitting beneath, who was crushed by the descending body
—
;
!
!
The poor gipsy
What did she do afterwards ?
Horrid
Ethel. Oh, she went home to dinner, after gathering a bunch of
Alice.
!
!
bee-orchis flowers for a bouquet.
How intensely interesting
Alice.
What
!
your book about ? Is it as enthralling as mine ?
Well, no, I don't lancy so. You see, not understanding
Ethel.
is
Alice.
banker's business, and railways, and directors, and all that, I can't
feel so amused in reading about the swindling, but I fancy it will get
I think Delaval will be obliged to poison the
better by-and-by.
whole Board of Directors in self-defence he has forged to such an
How Mary sits plodding at that knitting.
extent [yawns'].
Ethel. Oh, you see mamma does not approve of novels for Mary
she says Mary must read heavy books. She's going to be a governess,
—
;
you know.
Alice [kindly'].
girl !— but she might read a novel at her leisHere, Mary, I will lend you mine. ^Offers the
Poor
ure, as well as knit.
hook].
Mart [smiling']. No, thank you, dear Alice, I don't care to read
about such wretched people. It would make me quite unhappy.
Alice. Ah, that's because you don't read enough novels. The first
but now the
sensation novel / read made me feel quite unhappy
most horrid things make no impression on me. I can't get them
dreadful enough.
Mart. Dear Alice, are you not afraid of growing quite unfeeling ?
One's sensibility must be.completely deadened by those books, if that
;
is
the case.
Ethel
Who
if
Well, Mary,
Sensibility!
[mockingly].
Wouldn't
sensibility nowadays ?
dreams of
he were here ?
you are amusing!
Johnny chaff you,
JoHNNT [who has entered unperceived]. No, he wouldn't, Thel.
quite a blessing to find a girl who can feel at all, nowadays.
Ethelweakness.
It is
What would you have? We have done with feminine
The women of this country, Johnny, *' nowadays," as you
elegantly say, are equal to leading a forlorn hope.
HOW
V
TO ENTERTAIN A SOCIAL PARTY.
Yes, I am quite aware of tliat fact.
Johnny [sarcastically^
Mothers and daughters do so every season. By-the-by, where is my
mother?
• ,_
^
Ethel. She has driven to the railway station, to meet and bring
mmute.
every
now
them
expect
his
and
friend.
I
George
Cousin
back
I wonder he became a volJohnny. What a muff that Brown is
unteer.
I should think he would be afraid of the sound of his own
rifle.
I can't make out why Greorge is so civil to him.
Majiy.
I heard a lady say one day that Mr. Brown is an excellent
son; and that his nervous, bashful manner hides excellent qualities.
Ethel. Johnny, tell me directly what sort of fellow Cousin G-eorge
has grown. I haven't seen him since he was a schoolboy.
Johnny [amte to Maky]. He's a great catch, you know! My mother
means Ethel to have him. [Aloud], Oh, a last man, rather. You
will just suit him, Ethel.
He likes a girl who could lead a forlorn
hope [laughing],
Ethel. I am very glad of that—I hate milksops. I like a terrible,
resolved, fearless man.
A kind of Napoleon the First.
Johnny [laughing']. That's George, exactly. But, hark! there's a
ring at the bell. Here they come.
•
.
!
Enter Mks. Geant, George, and James.
Mbs. Geant.
McDonnel.
Ethel
much
Geoege,
time
Ethel
—your Cousin George
:
Alice— my nephew Mr.
Do you find
[^They exchange the civilities of greeting^ &c.]
changed, George
Yes, indeed.
?
She was not above so high when we met
she played with a doll then, I fancy.
Oh, no, George
I never played with a doll,
except to make a hammer of one. I was never so foolish !
George [smiling]. Were you not? Well, I confess to a top and
last
Ethel
;
[eagerly'].
;
hoop myself.
Mrs. Grant.
It is so near dinner that I think you must leave the
discussion of your childish days till by-and-by. Ethel, dear, I must
ask you to take my place at the table; I am suffering from so severe a
headache that I must go and lie down. Mr. Brown and George will
excuse me.
Ethel [indifferently]. Very well, mamma ; we will take care of ourselves.
Mary.
Let
me come
vdth you, dear aunt, and make a cup of tea
for you.
George. I am very sorry for you, Aunty mine;
has not been caused by the cold air.
I
hope your pain
HOW TO ENTEKTAIN A
10
SOCIAL PABTY.
Mes. Grant. Oh, no I often suffer in the same way. Come,
Mary. I have a good little nurse in my niece.
Ethel [shrugging her shoulders]. I am sure that is lucky for me, for
You can't think what a baby I
I am utterly helpless in a sick room.
am, and how useless I feel in one. [to Geoege].
Geoege. I can believe the fact. You would doubtless be sadly out
;
of place^as a nurse.
Ethel. Oh, my place is the saddle
it is
Alice, come with me
time to dress, and I have something to tell you. Stop, mamma,
please stop.
[Speaks to her aside].
Don't keep Mary
Send her to do
my hair. No one can make it look as well as she does.
Mes. Geant. Very well, my dear.
[Exeunt],
;
!
!
SCENE
n..
the dsawing-eoom again.
Unter, after dinner^
George.
I
am
Geoege, Ethel, James, Alice, and Mart.
very sorry poor Aunt Eleanor has a headache,
Ethel.
It is the change of weather, I fancy
a convenient scapegoat the east wind is !
Ethel.
What
iiiat lias
caused
The young 'people are to stand together about the room ; James conversing in
play with Alice ; Mary with Johnny Ethel and George advance to
—
it.
bythe
front.
George. Do you ride much, Cousin Ethel ?
I hunt pretty regularly.
I can't
Ethel. Rather, I should think
think what life would be without hunting.
George. I hope to go out with you on Thursday, I think that is
the day Johnny mentioned.
Ethel. Yes you'll find this a rather stiff country for it ditches
deep and wide, but that only adds to the fun.
George. I see you are a spirited girl, as you promised to be when
you made a hammer of your doll.
Ethel. You flatter me. But oh. Cousin George, what would the
young ladies of to-day have done, had they been bom in the days
when girls had to make puddings, and sew
George. Really, I can't imagine.
Women have spirit and
Ethel. Things are so different with us
courage Cousin George, do you remember our haunted room*
George. Yes, quite well. I have played hide-and-seek in it maBy
!
.
;
;
!
!
—
EOTT TO ENTEETAIN A SOCIAL PAETY.
11
Has the apparition been making itself
times, in spite of the ghost.
unpleasant lately ?
Ethel. Well, yes that is to say, vre really want the room, and yet
mamma does not like it to be used. Johnny and I incline to think
that she believes in the ancestral ghost, she is so averse to the chamber
being occupied.
Geoege. How like you are to the portrait of your paternal ancestress hanging in that chamber, Ethel
Now, George,
ExHEii. Oh, yes so every one says who has seen it.
it shows
it is very aristocratic to have a ghost in the family, I know
one had ancestors and all that sort of thing. But I do want the room for
a charade and it came into my head just belore dinner, that if yoit
(who are so brave) would pass the night in it, the ghost story would
no longer be believed, and we might have the room. I said so to
—
;
;
;
Alice.
Geobge. My dear coz, I should have no objection to sleep there
but the room has no bed in it, has it ? It used to be qui- e unfurnished.
So it is now but we could arrange a sofa and a little furJBthel.
niture and as mamma is in bed, she would know nothing about the
matter, and could not object aud you would have laid the ghost by
;
;
;
;
to-morrow.
George
Well, I have
[laughing].
no objection
to try, if
you wish
it,
but
Ethel [eagerlg]. Alice Mary hear him. My cousin has consented to sleep to-night in the haunted chamber
[She claps her
I feel like a lady of the olden time sending her knight upon a
hands].
perilous adventure.
Johnny. What stuff! George take mv advice and don't do it.
You'll be wretchedly uncomfortable, and-^^
Ethel. Be quiet, sir
A man of spirit disdains comfort.
Brown [timidly]. But if it should be damp. Miss Grant—uninhabited rooms
Ethel [icith greit scorn]. Oh, you a-e not asked to do it, Mr.
Brown; and / don't believe in rheumatism. It's settled. You will
do it, won't you, George, for my sake? \coquettishly].
George. For your sake, my dear cousin, I would do much more.
- Ethel.
Charming
Then I shall rim away and order them to
make preparations for you there. Alice, dearest, come and help.
!
!
!
!
!
\_They leave the room].
Brown
George
is
to Johnny, hut heard by Mary].
My dear Johnny,
very delicate, and a very sensitive, imaginative fellow do
[aside
;
!
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
12
persuade
him not to
sit
up
all
!
SOCIAL PARTT.
night in a
damp room
after a long jour-
ney.
Johnny [shrugging his shoulders]. It is no concern of mine. He is
[Aloud].
eld enough to take care of himself.
I say, Brown, come
and see my retriever he beats yours out and out.
Mary, make
yourself agreeable to George while we are gone.
[Exit].
George. Cousin Mary, you are so grown that I did not recognize
you when first I amved. Ethel told me at dinner all about your
My dear little cousin, I am so sorry for you.
great sorrow.
Maet. Thank you, Mr. McDonnel.
Geokge, Why are you so formal? "Why don't you call me George?
Mart. My aunt would not like it. She says I am only connected
with you by marriage not related.
;
—
George. Nay
Mary
Please ncTer mind about it now. I have someto say to you, and I am afraid Ethel will come
[hurrimly].
thing I wish so
back.
much
What can it be ?
George [approaches the table], A secret
Mary. Only this you are to be played a practical joke to-night in
the haunted room, and I have heard my dear father say that even the
bravest people may suffer from such folly*
You are very thoughtful and kind, my dear Mary.
George.
What is the trick to b9 ? A ghost with a turnip face ?
Mary. Oh, no I should not have been afraid for you with that it
Consin Ethel and
it is a much more cunning and terrible affair.
!
;
;
!
Alice read those horrid sensation stories till they think of
Hush, [lays her finger on her lips].
here they are!
Enter Alice,
Johnny and Ethel,
laughing
—James follows
them at a
Ah
little
distance.
Ethel.
George! The housekeeper has promised
to
make your
room so comfortable.
It is all arranged delightfully, and I hope to hear toat breakfast that George has quieted the ghost, and that we
may have the room for onr Christmas charade.
power. I
to be allowed pistols, I
George. I shall do all in
Johnny.
morrow
my
am
suppose ?
Ethel. Dear me! I fear there are none in the house, unless
Johnny has a pair.
Johnny. No. I have lent mine to Tom D'Urfey.
Alice. But perhajps Mr. Brown has brought his rifle
now TO entehtaxn a
13
sociAii party,
Map.v.
Pray do not use fire-arms, Mr. McDonnel my annt wotild
be frightened into fits if she heard them at night.
Geoege. Don t be afraid I will employ more effectiTe weapons.
;
;
I have a certain charm tor laying ghosts.
Maey. But I hope you are not at all nervous. I have heard such
dreadful stories of peo|)le being frightened into idiotcv,'
Geoege. I have no fear of that. Come, Cousin Ethel, let us all
go and look at this haunted chamber, so that I may judge a little of
the trial to which I shall be exposed. Then we will return, and I
{Exeunt, ]
shall ask you for a song, in reward for my self-devotion,
SCENE
in.
THE HAUNTED CHAMBEE.
A Housemaid
arranging furnitiire
ylaced that the person lying on
—Aioilet-tahh
it
faces
on it; a sofa so
^chich tnnist he opposite to
zcith candles
a portrait^
the audience.
Unter HiTSEh and her party.
Geoege. I must allow that my chamber looks very comfortable,
and has not at all a ghostly aspect. Now, Ethel, tell me about this
fair ancestress of ours, so that if she should appear I may ask her
pertinent questions.
I never heard the legend, though I always
knew that the room was «aid to be haunted.
Ethel [solemnly]. That portrait was painted by a young Italian
artist with whom our great-great-great-great-aunt fell in love but he preferred her younger sister to herself.
However, on the day appointed
for his wedding with the latter he never appeared, and was never
heard of afterwards. He had slept the previous night in this room
but in the morning the window was open, and the bridegroom gone.
Geoege, Did he carry off any of the plate ?
Ethel. Nonsense ! Our aunt, in despair, had her picture, which
he had painted (the last souvenir of the lost one) hung in this room.
She died. The chamber has been haunted ever since.
Alice. I daresay she poisoned him.
Johnny. But then what could she have done with the body ?
;
;
Oh
Alice.
Geoege.
!
there are
many ways
You make me shudder
!
of disposing of that
Any one would think you quit©
But, Ethel, in what manner does
experienced in such performances.
the ghost appear ?
Ethel. That 3^ou will have to teU us.
Geoege, The picture looks to me as
frame,
[lie approacJies
it].
if it
were a
little
loose in the
now TO
11
ENTEPwTAIN A SOCIAL PARTY.
Ethel [Drawing him hack^ Please, dont ioucJi it. Mamma wonld be
Texed if we hurt it. And, now, George, that you have seen your
room, we will go back to the drawing-room, and have some music, if
you
please.
[Exeunt'],
[An
interval with music],
SCENE
'
IV.
THE HAUNTED EOOM.
Geoege
a table near the fire. He takes a letter fi^om his pocket].
what little Mary has to tell me. She slipped this note
into my hand when I said good-night to her.
[Opens it and reads],
*' E.
has persuaded Johnny to take the portrait from its frame ; it is loose in it
now.
At midnight she will seat herself in the frame and play Ghost, She
Let
me
[seated at
see
arranged the trick while I was in her room before dinner.
I was afraid yau^
might be alarmed, or that, perhaps (guessing it was a trick,) you would thrmo
Good little thing
something at Ethel and hurt her.''
What a trick and
cousin.
alas ! what a fast girl is
little guardian
I confess
here [touching the note] has taken
fancy.
She possesses ccanmou
!
my
Now
my
;
my
and kindness
and she looked charmingly homelike and
womanly, sitting by the fireside working in her modest dress. She
has read too, and can appreciate well-written books. Ethel would tire
one to death in a week with slang, horses and croquet. [He stirs the
A table with wine and books quite in the orthodox Udolpho
fire],
style.
Pshaw a dressed[Takes up the book and turns over a few leaves].
up Newgate Calendar! How can my aunt permit her daughter to
sense
;
!
—
!
read
it ?
lies doicn on the sofa, and appears to sleep; a curtain
tivo over the portrait, then it is gently drawn up again
twelve slowly.
George rises on his elboio and looks at the picthe hand is raised
the finger beckons.
eyes move
After reading awhile he
falls for a moment or
Clock
ture.
iitriJces
— The
—
A
—
—
—
by all
Sleeping beauty in
My dear madam [bowing profoundly] I am glad to be
a new edition
present at your awakening. Your story is of a most affecting character.
How that Italian fellow could be blind to so much beauty I can't
conceive.
Allow me to assure you that /am not. [The picture becomes
again immovable, except the eyes. ] We have long been wishing for some
sleeping princess to awake, who would bring us back the w^omanly
modesty and tender softness of the good old days once more. You,
lady, who were (if you are not slandered) more fit to be heroine of one
of your grand-niece's favorite books, have doubtless repented of your
George.
Tableau Vivant,
!
that's lovely
!
HOW TO ENTERTAIN
\
A SOCIAL PARTY.
li)
you committed any, bitterly by this time therefore, at the
your crumbling to dust in my arms, I mean to bestov/ on you
a grand-nephew's pardon and a tender embrace.
A scream is uttered^ and the inctitre-frame falls on its face
ITe rushes foncard.
erimes, if
;
Jisk of
into the room.
Geoege.
So
!
—
^jus't
aa I anticipated
SCENE
MORNING
Re-enter the performers;
—
^the
ghost
is
laid
!
[Curtain
Y.
HAUNTED CHAMBEE.
Geoege
hy
the side
of his Aunt.
am
sorry that the noise last night should have alarmed
The ghost is laid.
you, my dear aunt but you see the cause of it.
The lady has descended from her frame to return no more. The
promise of a kiss sufficed her.
Mes. Geant. What do you mean George ? What has become of the
portrait ? It is of great value. Tell me directly what all this absurdity
Geoege.
I
;
means.
Geoege.
It means, dear aunt, that you have
Ethel read nonsense and act boyishly too long.
let
my pretty cousin
But
for a friendly
warning I might have been seriously alarmed last night braver men
than I profess to be have suffered severely from the sort of ordeal to
which I should have been exposed. Or, which is quite as likely, I
might have thrown the nearest missile at hand at the head of the
Dear Ethel pray don't- play practical jokes
charming portrait.
again, even with Johnny's approval.
Ethel. Who could have told you ? And, George, if you knew w^io
it was, you were very rude indeed, and I shan't easily forgive you
Mes. Geant. I really must beg to be told what has occurred. I
fear, dear Ethel, you have been very foolish.
[Geoege takes Hs Aunt
;
!
I
the picture, and appears to he telling her of the trick. ]
Johnny. Well, the ghost is laid, and [aside to Ethel] you have not
the ghost of a chance of catching George, I can tell you
It serves
toward
!
you
right, too, I think.
Ethel. You mischievous little monster.
Johnny. It's very fine to call me a monster, but a mischievous boy
isn't one
he's only natural a fast, bold girl is.
I hope you will take
warning. From something I heard George say when I was removing
the picture for you, I am certain he will ask our mother for Mary
before Christmas is over.
So that will be the catastrophe cf your
—
Tableau Vivant.
—
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
16
SOCIAL PARTY.
MODERN POPULAR CONJURING,
The
perfection to "which the Art of Conjuring has been brought of
owing, mainly, to the inventive genius of Kobert Houdin,
the first who invoked to his aid the mysteries of Electricity, Hydrauphenomena together with the singular
lics, and other scientific
cxpertness and manipulativs skill of Frikel and Herman, the nimble
fingers of whom, too qnick for the cheated eyes of those who watched
them, apparently rendered all stage accessories useless.
The display of magical paraphernalia has no longer any charm for
the public. Let the performer possess a fair amount of skill, and
there is probably no amusement more readily patronized than that
offered by the modem Conjurer. Any one who can accomplish a tew
tricks of legerdemain successfully is naturally looked upon as a very
desirable acquisition to a small tea-party or a large party either, for
that matter.
To those who may feel disposed to enter the lists and tilt for mystic honors, the following hints are respectfully submitted
hints
which, with a little careful thought and practice, will enable the performer to interest an audience tor an hour, without necessitating the
employment of any unwieldy apparatus ; in &.ct, apparenily, without
any extraneous aid whatever.
It will be found advisable— if the performer proposes to exhibit a
series of wonders to commence with such of his repertoire as may bo
the least valuable, each succeeding effect being more and more mystifying and for this purpose the following sequence will be found
admirably arranged.
]ate years is
;
—
;
—
;
I>eteriMine tlie Article Selected l>y the Comtlie Performer Being^ Absent from tlie Room
at tlie Time of the Selection.— The effect of this trick upon
To
pany,
The performer places
the uninitiated is little short of marvelous.
three articles in a row upon the table. As, for instance, a decanter, a
glass, and a plate.
He then requests the company to determine
among themselves, in his absence, which of the articles he shall touch
on his return. He leaves the room, and is recalled when the decision
is made.
Pretending to examine the articles from various points of
view, and after an apparent mental calculation, the conjurer jDoints
out the article selected by the company.
In order to accomplish this mystery, the perfonner simply ernploys
a confederate, agreeing with him beforehand upon signs and signal j
\
17
HOY/ TO ENTEETAIN A SOCIAL PASTY.
For example, the confederate is
to denote the numbers 1, 2, and 3.
to pass his hand through his hair for number one keep his hand on
his Tvatch chain for number two, and do nothing at all for number
Let it be understood that the articles are to be known by numthres.
Thus, the
'bers, counting always from the performers left hand.
decanter is number one, the glass number two, and the plate number
three.
The articles being in joosition, the operator leaves the room.
The confederate, of course, remains with the company, who, we will
The operator is recalled and, in the
suppose, select the wineglass.
course of his examination or calculation, takes an opportunity of
stealing a glance at the confederate, who, with his hand on his watchchain, signifies number two (the glass) to be the article selected.
The
operator may then repeat the performance, varying the effect by requesting the company to place the articles in any other position they
;
;
please ; the operator
from the left hand.
and
his confederate always
remembering to count
To KnocK. e, Tiissil>9er TIii'OBflgrli a TafoSe,— This trick
very effective, and calculated to excite an immense amoiuit of curiand surprise. Take an ordinary tumbler and a nevv^spaper. Sit
on a chair behind the table, keeping the audience in front of it. Place
the tumbler on the table and cover it with the newspaper, pressing
the paper closely round, so that it gradually becomes fashioned to the
form of the glass. Then draw the paper to the edge of the table, and
drop the tumbler into your lap quickly returning the paper to the
center of the table the stiffness of the paper will still preserve the
form of the tumbler hold the form with one hand, and strike a heavy
blow upon it with the other, at the same moment drop the tumbler
from the lap to the floor and you will appear to have positively
knocked the tumbler through the colid table. Care should be taken
after the tumbler is in the lap to place the legs in such a fashion that
the glass may slide gradually toward the ankles, so that the fall may
not be sufficiently great to break the glass. Care should be also taken
to smooth out tbe paper after the blovr has been struck, to prevent
suspicion of the fact that the form of the glass was simply preserved by
the stiffness of the paper.
Never repeat this illusion.
is
osity
—
;
;
;
To Drive one
trick requires
some
Twnaabler TM'ougli Anotlier,—This
practice, or tho result is nearly certain to ba
attended with considerable destruction of glass. Select two tumblers
of exactly the same pattern, and considerably larger at the top than at
the bottom, so much so, indeed, that either tumbler will fit at least
half-way into the other. Sit on a chair, so that the Billing tumbler
little
—
EOW TO
18
may
ENTEB.T.VIN
A SOCIAL PARTY.
softly into the lap.
Hold one tumbler between the thtimb
finger of the left hand.
Then play the other tumbler
with the right hand several times in and out of the lett hand tumbler,
and during this play contrive at the same instant to retain the right
hand tumbler between the thumb and first finger of the left hand*
while the other or lower glass drops into the lap. Well done, this
trick has few superiors, and it is worth any amount of practice to
achieve it. It would be desirable to get a tinman to make a couple of
common tumbler-shaped tin cups to practice "with. It will save much
feill
and second
expense in
glass.
Tlic Restored Kaiidl£ercliief.—A hat, a newspaper, a
handkerchief, a pair of scissors, and a plate, are required to carry out
Place a hat on a table at the back of the room, that is
this illusion.
away from the Vudience, but in sight of them. Borrow a handkerchief, and dexterously substitute another in its place.
This is easy
Proceed as follows
handkerchief between the lower edge of the coat^
and waistcoat, the lower button of the coat being fastened, that the
enough
to do.
Secrete a
:
common
Having obtained a lady's handkerchief,
handkerchief may not fall.
holding it in the left hand, turn sharply round, and, in the act of
turning, dx^aw the concealed handkerchief from the coat, and pass the
borrowed handkerchief from the left to the right hand, so that the two
handkerchiefs are brought together. Pretend to look for some mark
in the borrowed handkerchief, but really be crushing the borrowed
handkerchief into small compass, and spreading out the ialse one.
Then lay it on the edge of the hat, exposing well the false article, and
dropping the real one into the hat, at the same time bidding the company observe that the handkerchief never leaves their sight. Then
Take the false handfetch a pair of scissors, or borrow a penknife.
Ask some one to hold the middle
kerchief and cut out the middle.
tightly in his hand
some one else to hold the edges in the same manner.
Leave the room to fetch a plate, taking the hat away at the
same time. Lay the real handkerchief flat between two pages of a
newspaper, fold the paper and return with both paper and plate to
the company. Now set fire to the edges of the destroyed handkerSpread the paper out
chief let the fire bum itself out in the plate.
on the table, all but the last fold which conceals the other handkerchief.
Place the cut center on the paper empty the ashes from ihe
plate upon the center fold up the paper and crush it as much as posLastly,
sible, so that the folds or creases may not betray anything.
pick the paper to pieces until the restored handkerchief is gradually
;
;
;
;
.
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
SOCIAL PARTY.
19
developed pull it out and throw the paper all into the fire. A littlo
practice will render this illusion very startling in its effect.
Care
must be taken in borrowing the handkerchief, to secure one as much
like the property Jia/idkerchief as possible.
;
—
A
Swindle. Propose to suspend any article with a single piece
of string to a chandelier, or gas bracket to cut the string and yet
leave the article suspended.
To do this, the operator has but to tie a bow knot in the string as
the article is suspended, and with a knife or pair of scissors cut
through the bow.
;
To Make a
€aiie or
—
Poker Stand
in the Middle
tlie l&ooine Get two black pins, and a piece of black silk
thread about a yard long. Tie a pin on each end, and fasten the pincj
into the cloth of the trowsers under each knee thus the walking
about is not interfered with, and the line hangs loosely between tho
knees.
Sit down at some distance from the company, and spread the
knees to tighten the silk. Take the stick or poker, and rest it against
the silk, and it will remain stationary, even at a great angle.
The
operator should pretend to make magnetic passes with the hands, as
though the effect were due to magnetic influence.
of
;
The
Danciiig* Skeleton.— This
trick is calculated to excito
much
astonishment, if well arranged beforehand.
Get a piece of board about the size of a large school-slate, and have
The paint should bo what is known as a dead color,
it painted black.
without gloss or brightness.
Sketch out the figure of a skeleton on a
piece of card-board, and arrange it after the manner of the dancing
sailors and other card-board figures exposed fcr sale in the toy shops,
so that by holding the figure by the head in one hand, and pulling a
string with the other, the figure will throw up its legs and arms in a
very ludicrous manner.
Make the connections of the arms and legs with black string, and
let the pulUng string be also black.
Tack the skeleton by the head to
the blackboard.
The figure having been cut out, is of course painted
black like the board.
Now to perform. Produce the board. Show only the side upon
which there is nothing.
Request that the lights may be reduced about half, and take position at a little distance from the company.
With a piece of chalk
make one or two attempts to draw a figure rub out your work as
being unsatisfactory turn the slate the black figure will not be perceived rapidly touch the edges of the card-board figure with chalk,
;
;
•,
;
HOW TO ENTEETAIN A
20
up
SOCLAX PAHTT.
and taking care that nothing moves
Then manipulate with the fingers
before the drawing, and request it to become animated. By pulling
the string below the figure it will, of course, kick up the legs and
throw about the arms, to the astonishment of everybody.
A little music from the piano will greatly assist the illusion.
filling
-^hile the
ribs, etc., at pleasure,
is progressing.
drawing
To Guess the Two £:iicls of a I^ine of Doiiiiiioes.
— Cause a set of dominoes to be shuffled together as much as any of
'
the company may desire. You propose to leave the room in which
the audience are assembled, and you assert that from your retreat, be
it where it may, you can see, and will be able to tell, the two numbers
forming the extremes of a line composed of the entire set, according
to the rule established /or laying one domino after another in the
draw game.
All the magic consists in taking up and carrying away, unknown to
every one, one domino (not a double) taken at hazard for the two
numbers on it musl: be the same as those on the ends of the two outer
dominoes. This experiment may be renewed Cid infinltKm by your
;
taking each time a different domino, which, cf course, changes the
numbers to be guessed.
I>oiiiiiioes Seen and Counted Tliroug^lt alA Obstacles* Lay a set of dominoes on their faces, odc beside the
Then say to the company, I will go into the
other, in one black line.
next room, with my eyes as closely covered as you may desire. In
my absence, you may take from the line the number of dominoes you
—
please, provided you take them from that end which is now at my right hand,
and place them at the opposite end, so that, except for the change in
the places of the pieces, the line is just the same as before.
eyes, I will tell you exactly
return, without unbandaging
At
the number transported from one end to the other, for I shall have
my
my
sesn everything through tiie "wall and the handkerchief which has covered my eyes, I "will do more. From the midst of these dominoes,
of which you have changed the position, I will draw one which, by
the addition of its sx)ots, will tell you exactly the number which you
took from right to left
To perform this trick, arrange the first thirteen dominoes, beginning
at the left, so that the spots on the first form the number twelve ; of the
second, eleven ; of the third, ten ; and so on, up to a double-blank, for
the thirteenth and last.
You place the other dominoes afterward in
the order in which they happen to present themselves.
If your eyes are bandaged, count with your fingers the dominoes
HOW TO
21
ENTERTAIi^ A SOCIAL PARTY.
The spots on this thirteenth
left to right, as far as the thirteenth.
will invariably represent the number of dominoes whose position has
been altered.
In performing this and many other tricks, you will employ any ruse
you can think of to puzzle those who may try to fathom them.
from
Pass T'lirougrlt a Table.—To
a
perform this feat you must have a dirm, or counter, sewn in the corner
Take it out of your pocket and request one of the
of a hankerchief.
company to lend you a dime, which you must appear to wrap carefully
up in the middle of the handkerchief instead of doing this, however,
you keep it in the palm of your hand, and in its place wrap up the
corner in which the other dime or counter is sewn in the midst of the
handkerchief, and bid the person from whom you borrowed the dime
feel that it is there.
Then lay it under a hat upon the table, take a
glass in the hand in which you have concealed the dime, and hold it
under the table then give three knocks upon the table, at the same
time crying, "Presto! come quickly!'* drop the dime into the glass,
bring the glass from under the table, and exhibit the dime. Lastly,
take the handkerchief from under the hat and shake it, taking care to
hold it by the comer in which the counter or dime is sewn. This is a
very good trick if well managed, and the dime may he marked pre-
To Make
Dime
;
;
yiou^ly.
THE PLAY ROOM.
Slind-nian^s SuflT*—Consists in one person having a handkerchief bound over his eyes so as to completely blind lifm, and
thus blindfolded trying to chase the other jDlayers, either by the sound of
their footsteps, or their subdued merriment, as they scramble away in
endeavoring to avoid being caught by him when Lo
can manage to catch one, the player caught must in turn be blinded,
and the game be begun again. In some places it is customary for on3
of the players to inquire of Buff (before the game begins), **How
many horses has your father got ?" to which inquiry he responds,
** Three."
**
What colors are they ?" *' Black, white and gray. " The
questioner theji desires Buff to "turn round three times, and catch
whom you may," which request he complies with, and then tries to
all directions,
;
—
22
HOW TO ENTEBTAIN A
SOCIAL PARTY.
capture one of the players. It is often played by merely turning the
blindfolded hero round and round without questioning him, and then
beginning. The handkerchief must be tied on fairly, so as to allow
no little Holes for Buffy to see through. In Europe they have a modified way of playing at blind-man's buff, which, though less jolly than
our American method, maybe followed with advantage on birthdays
and holidays, when boys and girls are dressed in their best, and careful parents are averse to rough clothes-tearing play.
The party are
not scattered here and there over the ground, but take hands and
form a circle. In the midst stands Mr. Buff, blindfolded, and with a
short thin stick in his hand.
The players keep running round in a
circle, generally singing, while Buff approaches gradually, guided
mostly by their voices, till he manages to touch one of the twirhng
circle with his stick.
Then the dance stops, and the dancers become
motionless and silent.
The player who has been touched must take
the end of the stick in her hand, while Buff holds the other and she
must distinctly repeat three times alter him, any word he chooses to
name— '* Good morning" or *vGcod night," for instance; of course,
disguising his or her voice as much as possible.
The blind man tries
to guess the name of his captor by the voice.
If he succeeds, the
person caught becomes blind nian if not, Buff must try his luck
;
;
(igain.
—
Ox
One Old
Opening' Oysters, This is a capital round
game, and will tax the memory and the gravity of the youngsters.
The company being seated, the fugleman says, "Owe old ox opening
oysters,'^ which each must repeat in turn with perfect gravity.
Any
one who indulges in the slightest giggle is mulcted of a forfeit forthwith.
When the first round is finished, the fugleman begins, again
** Two toadsy totally tired, trying to trot to Troy ;' and the others repeat
One old ox opening oysters ; Two toads, totally
in turiij each separately,
The third round is, *' Three tawny tigers ticUing trout,'' and
tired f" &c.
the round recommences
" One old ox, &c.
2 wo toads, totally, kc,
—
;
'
:
Three tawny
tigers,
&c."
'
—
;
;
The fourth round, and up to the twelfth and
fugleman successively, and repealed by the
given out by the
^^
other players are as follows
Four fat friars fanning a fainting fly ;
Five fair flirts flying to France for fashions Six Scotch salmon sell ng six
last,
;
;
sacks of sour-krout ; Seveyi small soldiers successfully shooting snipes ; Eight
elegant elephants embarking for Europe ; Nine nimble noblemen nibbling nonpareils; Ten tipsy tailors teasing a titmouse : Eleven early canvigs cageiiy eating
and Ihoclve twittering tomtits on the top of a tall tottering tree.'' Any
mistake in repeating this legend, or any departure from the gravity
eggs;
HOW TO ENTEKTAIN A
23
SOCIAL PAKTY.
be punished by the infliction of a forand the game has seldom been known to fail in producing a rich
Of course, a good deal depends on thef
harvest of those little pledges.
suitable to the occasion, is to
feit
;
serio-comic gravity of the fugleman.
You Oke
L.il£e it? TTIieti do
it I
t.ik.e it !— Tnis is a guessing game.
One of the company retires, while the rest fix on some article or
The person who
object for instance, light, an appl^, money, etc.
has gone out is then recalled, ^nd proceeds round the circle, asking
each player in succession, "How do you like it?" Supposing tho
thing thought of to be money, the first may answer, *'In abundance,"
The questioner tries to gain from
the second, "Ready," and so on.
the answers thus given some clue to the nature of the thing thought
The second question, " When do you like it ?" will probably help
of.
him. One of the players may reply, " When I have to pay my bills ;"
The third question
another, "When I want a new coat," and so on.
is almost certain to help a judicious questioner out of his puzzlement.
"AYhere?" "In my pocket," one of the players will reply another,
"At my banker's, " and so on. Some one is almost sure to drop a
Three guesses
hint which will set the guesser upon the right track.
If he succeeds, he must point out the player whoso
ar^ allowed him.
answer gave him the clue, and the latter pays a forfeit and goes out to
be puzzled in his turn. Failing to gueSs in three trials, the first
player must try another question.
The art of the game consists in
choosing words with more meanings than one, such as cord (chord) ;
One
for then the answers may be varied in a very puzzling manner.
another a c(h)ord in a piece of mu ic ;
will like a cord round his box
thus key {quay), bark, vessel, are good
another on the piano, etc.
Ho\v do Yoia
and Wiiere do
ITou
—
;
;
;
words to choose.
Twirling^ the Plate.— The
table covered with cloth,
players
sit
or stand around a
and one of them takes up a wooden or metal
edge, and gives it a spin.
As he does this ho
which sits on its
names some one of the players, who is obliged to catch it before it has
done spinning, or pay a forfeit. The player so called on sets tho
plate spinning in turn, calling upon some other player to stop it, and
so on around.
Cross Questions and Crooked AnsAvers.— The company sit round, and each one whispers a question to his neighbor en
the-T:ight,. and then each one whispers an answer: so that each
answers the question propounded by some other player, and of tho
purport of which ho is, of course, ignorant. Then every pbyer has to
plate,
"
HOW TO ENTEETAIN A
24
SOCIAL PAKTY.
recite the question he received from one player and the answer he got
from the other, and the ridiculous incongruity of these random cross
questions and crooked answers will frequently excite a a good deal of
sport.
One, for instance, may say, **I was asked *If I considered
dancing agreeable ?' and the answer was, 'Yesterday fortnight.'
Another may declare, 'I was asked *If I had seen the ccmetr' and
the answer was, 'Ha was married last year !"
third, "I was asked
'What I liked best fcr dinner?' ^nd the answer was, 'The Emperor of
A
China
-
i'"
Cupid's
Coinings —A letter must be taken, and the termination
•
"iDg." Say, for instance, that P is chosen. The first player .says to
the second, "Cupid's coming."
"How is he coming?" says the
second.
"Playing," rejoins the first. The second then says to the
*•
third, "Cupid's coming."
How?" "Prancing" and so the question
and reply go round, through all the words beginning with P and ending with ing— piping, pnlKng, pining, praising, preaching, etc=
Those who cannot answer the question on the spur of the moment
pay a forfeit.
—
ProverbSt One of the company who is to guess the proverb
leaves the room the remaining x^layers fix upon some proverb, such
as "All is not gold that glitters"
"
bird in the hand is worth two
in tho bush" "Birds qI" a feather flock together" "Train up a
child in the way he should go"
"Amiss is as good as a mile." A
proverb being chosen, the words are distributed in rotation through the
company, each player receiving a word which he must bring in in the
wiU suppose
answer he gives to any question avsked by the guesser.
the jjroverb, " Train up a child in the way he should go, "to have been
chosen.
The first person will receive the word "train," the second
*'np,"the third "a," the fourth "child," the fifth "in," the sixth
" the," the seventh "way," and so on. The person who has gone out
is now called in, and begins his questions with the first player, something in the following manner
§. " Have you been out to-day ?" A.
" No, I must train myself to like walking better than I do." He turns
to the second player.
Q. "Are you a member of the National
Guard?" A. "No, I gave it up some time ago." The third player
has an easy task to bring in the word a, but the fourth with the word
'?"
chila finds his work more difficult.
Q. "Are you fond of reading
A. "Any child might answer that question." Now, the guesser, if he
be a sharp reasoner, will see that this answer is evasive, and only
given to bring in the word child he will, perhaps, guess the proverb
at onc3 ; but if he is a cautious personage he will go on, and finish the
—
;
—
—
A
—
We
:
;
HOY/ TO ENTEBTAIN A SOCIAL PARTY.
25
round cf questions before committlEg himself by a guess, for Lo
is
only allowed three. If he succeeds in guessing the proverb, he h:is to
point out the person whose answer first set him on the right track,
who must then pay a forfeit, and go out in his turn to have his powers
tasted.
—
BufT* One of the players comes forward armed with a poker,
Whence come
which he taps on the floor knock, knock, knock.
*'I come from poor Buff, full ol
you?" asks one of the company.
sorrow and care." *'And what said Buff to you?" is the next question.
The
—
* *
intruder replies
*'-
Buff said
'
Baff
:'
And he gave nie
And he bade me
Till I
this staff.
not laugh
to Buff's house again."
came
And
with this he delivers the poker to his questioner, and marches
But in the meantime the spectators have been trying their
by grimaces and droll remarks, to overset the gravity of the
emissary of the respectable Buff. One says,
Just look at him he is
going to laugh!" Another, "He hasn't a staff at all it's a poker!"
*' Don't
he look as if he wanted his dinner 1" and any other facetious
remarks that may suggest themselves on the spur of the moment.
Sometimes the formula is changed, and Mr. Buff's allocution is as
out.
best,
* *
;
—
follows
*'
Buff says Buff to all his men,
I say Buff to you again
Buff he neither laughs nor smiles,
In spite of all your cimning wiles,
But keeps his face with a very good grace.
And carries his staff to the very next place."
And
and
.Earth, Air^
Water.— One of the players is furnished
with a handkerchief, which he throws suddenly and unexpectedly at
another, crying out the name of ''earth," "air," or '* water." whichever he likes, and then counting ten a 3 rapidly as he can
Before ho
has come to ten, the psrson at whom the handkerchief is thrown
must; name a creature that inhabits tho element thu3 mentioned, or,
failing to do this, pays a forfeit.
Thus, suppose tlic thrower of tho
handkerchief says, watee— one, two, three, four, five, six, seven,
eight, nine, ten, the person challenged must call the name of some
fish
if air, the name cf a bird
or, if earth, that of a quadruped.
If
the question is put very abruptly, and the number quickly counted,
the players will often be unable to get out their reply quickly enough,
.
;
;
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
26
SOCIAL PARTY.
and the forfeits come in merrily. The best way is, to look at one perand then unexpectedly throw the handkerchief at another.
son,
My
'
l^ady's Toilet—Is very like the '* family coach." Each
person represents some necessary of the toilet brush, comb, soap,
scent, brooch, jewel-case, etc., and the lady's maid stands in the middle of the circle, and calls for any article her lady is supposed to
want.
The personator of that article must then jump up, or be fined
a forfeit for negligence. Every now and then the abigail announces
that her lady wants her whole toilet, when the whole circle of players
must rise and change places. The lady's maid herself makes a bolt
—
for a chair,
lady's maid.
and
"Fes s&ncl
and the
the player
No» — One
who
is left chairless in
the scufde becomes
of the players thinks of any person or
rest sit round and ask him questions about it, which
he answers with **yes" or **no," taking care to give no other explaFrom the information thus gained, each gives a guess as to
nations.
what the thought was. If the questions are ingeniously framed, the
thing,
solution is generally discovered, unless the '* thought" be peculiarly
abstruse.
The game is a very good one, and we herewith emphatically recommend it, particularly as affording an opportunity of ** cool-
ing
down "
alter a
romp.
—
Copeiitis&g'en. First procure a long piece of tape or twine,
sufficient to go round the whole company, who must stand in a circle,
holding in each of their hands a part of the string the last takes
hold of the two ends of the tape.
One remains standing in the centre
of the circle, who is called **the Dane," and who must endeavor to
slap the hands of one of those who are holding the string, before they
can be withdrawn. Whoever is not sufficiently alert, and allows the
hands to be slapped, must take the place of the Dane, and, in his
turn, try to slap the hands of some one else.
Hunt the Hare* The company all form a circle, holding
;
—
each other's hands. One, called the hare, is left out, who runs several times round the ring, and at last stops, tapping one ot the players
on the shoulder. The one tapped quits the ring and runs alter the
The hare runs in and out in
hare, the circle again joining hands.
every direction, passing under the arms of those in the circle, until
caught by the pursuer, when he becomes hare himself. Those in the
circle must always be friends to the hare, and assist in its escape in
every way possible.
Hunt the Ring"— Is
a good substitute for the old
game
of
HOW TO EXTl^TAIN A
SOCIAL PARTY
27
''huiiG the slipper," WQicli lias become almost impracticable in these
long tape, with a ring strung on it, is held by
dsLVS of crinolme.
all the players,^ as they stand in a circle, with one in the middle.
A
They pass the ring rapidly from hand to hand, and it is the business
of the player in the midst to hunt the ring, and try to seize the hands
that hold it while the other players, on their part, make his task
more difficult by pretending to pass the ring to each other, when it
may really be in quite another part of the circle. The person in
whose hands the ring is found has to take his turn in the middle.
;
—
Transpositions. A capital game to sharpen the wits, and one
from which amusement for many hours may be extracted.
The company sit round a table, and each person is provided with a pencil and
a scrap of paper.
Each one writes on his or her scrap a name of a
city, country, river, mountain, or, if preferred, of some historical personage, transposing the letters so as to make the recognition of the
word as difficult as possible, and accompanying it with a few written
words of explanation for instance, if a town is selected, the explanation must give some particulars of situation or circumstance, to .set
the guesser upon the right track if a personage, the date at which he
flourished and the country which gave him birth ought to be given.
Then the papers are folded together and deposited in the middle of
the table and when they have been well mixed, a folded paper is
drawn by each player, and those who cannot decipher the transposition
which has fallen to their share are condemned to pay a forfeit. When
all have been read, the game begins anew.
The following transposition of words may ssrve a3 hints to those who wish to introduce thi",
very amusing pastime among their friends
Ann Filkr. The name shared by two great discoverers, one of whom
visited an unexplored region, and the other explored a region he had
;
;
;
:
—
never visited.
Simon Ficar ran, A celebrated
general of the Revolution, who
rarely commanded over fifty men, and yet was more dreaded than those
whose followers numbered thousands.
Voosarinlimb.
A soldier who gave his country a government, and
died while in arms against the government he created.
Jack Wanders ? No. A man who rose from obscurity to the highest
position in the country who became a soldier, without a military education; and received the highest degree a university could confer,
—
—
—
;
'without learning.
Xa^Zcomew; i^iver. --
A
potent sovereign,
who ruled
a nation with des-
sway and profound wisdom, advancing her glory and consohdating her power, but whose name is not recorded among her king^i.
potic
"
"
28
HOTV TO ENTERTAIN A SOCIAL PARTY.
The Interrupted Reply.— The
company place themselves
The one who commences says in a whisper to his righthand neighbor, «*0f what use is a book?" (or any other article he
in a circle.
may
select.)
** It is of no use to read," and
right-hand neighbor for instance,
His neighbor must answer, correctly,
then ask another question of
*' Of what
use is a goblet ?*'
his
—
The art in this game consists in so framing one's questions, that
they will produce answers altogether unsuited to the preceding question.
If the answer is, ** It is of use to drink from," a laughable consequence ensues for, when the round is finished, or, in other words,
when the person who has commenced the game has been questioned in
his turn, the question and answers are repeated aloud, by taking the
answer of the person on the player's right as a reply to the question of
the person on his left it follows, that to the question, " Ot what use
is a book ?" one of the company has answered. ** It is of use to drink
from ;" and so on with the rest of the questions and answers.
;
;
GAMES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.
Kin g^ of the Crows,— A
poet-laureate is chosen to lead the
stands in the middle the rest stand or sit near him.
He says, with much mock grief, in a mournful voice ** Alas, and
alack-a-day the King of the Crows is dead. Let us lament his Majesty in a funeral ode in his own language.
Here he begins, " Hee, haw Hee haw !" but the rest of the company must say, "Caw, caw" imitating the bird or animal he has
named. If any one says, ''Hee, haw," the leader immediately attacks
him or her mth some absurd speech, such as, ''Eh, sir [or madam],
is that the language of the illustrious King of the Crows ? Is he a dull
donkey browsing thistles ? No, my friends, he is a black-winged denizen of the air.
You must pay a forfeit for your ignorance of the
modern languages."
He then begins again, "Alas, and alack-a-day, the King of the Cats
is dead.
Let us lament his Majesty in a chant of his own composing
Chorus.
He
—
;
!
—
Caw, caw
The
!
rest
must
say,
**
Mew, mew
!"
if
anybody says " Caw," down
HOW TO ENTERTAni A
29
SOCIAL PARTY.
-
«
oomes the leader on him :^**Sir [or madam], is thai the language
of the illustrious King of the Cats? Is he a carrion fowl? No, my
A forfeit
friends, he is the friendly sharer of our hearths and homes.
for ignorance of modem languages !'^ Then he goes on again
*' Alas, and alack-a-day
-the King of the Frogs is dead
Let us lamew !" If
ment his ^lajesty in a song of his own language Mew
'*
"
any one says Mew, mew," the leader cries, that the language of the
illustrious King of the Frogs ? Is he a wretched gutter-climber ? No,
my friends, he is the frisky dweller in the limpid stream."
When the poet laureate has exhausted his store of nonsensical
speeches, the forfeits are collected and redeemed, or a new poet-laureate may be chosen. The more absurd and grandiloquent the speeches,
the better contrast to the mewing, and growling, and hissing, and
neighing, of the funeral odes.
:
!
I
—
!
Pussy's Peccadilloes*—A great many small
posed to have taken place.
A policeman is seat
for,
thefts are sup-
who examines
all
the rest of the company as witnesses each witness lays the blame on
** the cat"
as is usual in daily life. The policeman goes on questioning till the witness can answer no further. If the policeman begins
by asking who stole the Sugar and is answered, ** The Cat, to be sure,**
all his other questions must be answered in words beginning with ;S'.
If he asks, who stole the Butter, all the questions afterwards must bo
answered in words beginning with B, and so on of other letters. Tho
policeman goes the round of the company. Each witness must answer
as many questions as possible the number is marked down, and the
witness who answers the greatest number wins the game, and becomes
policeman next time. A good deal of ingenuity may be displayed in
both questions and answers. The policeman may name an article aa
stolen, and the witness may reply in as much nonsense as he likes.
Subjoined is an example of the dialogue intended to be employed.
When the witness is at the end of his answers, he says, doggedly,
**The cat stole .the sugar, or jam," or whatever may have bean tho ar;
—
^
;
ticle
named.
Policeman.
Who
stole the sugar ?
The cat, to be sure.
How do you know she stole the sugar ?
Witness,
P,
W.
P.
I
saw her seeking sweet sauce ?
Where was the sweet sauce ?
W. Smoking on the sill.
P.
W.
Are you sure you did not take the sweet sauce ?
Sorrow a scrap, sir.
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
so
P.
W.
P.
W.
What were you
doing,
Sleeping on the
when
SOClAL PARTY.
the cat stole the sugar ?
sofa.
your habit, Sukey, to sleep on the sofa ?
Sometimes, when sleep is stronger than Sukey.
What should you have been doing when you were sleeping on
Is it
P.
the sofa?
W. Setting the servants' supper.
P. What o'clock do the servants sup ?
W. The cat stole the sugar.
[As this answer proves the witness exhausted, the policeman marks
down six answers to Witness No. 1, and goes on to the next.]
P. Who stole the pastry ?
W. The cat, to be sure.
P. Where was the cat when she stole the pastry ?
Purring in the pantry.
TF.
P. What made her purr in the pantry ?
W, Pleasure at the Polly pirouetting on his perch.
P. Who taught the Polly to pirouette on his perch ?
Prince Peter of Prussia, w^hen a prisoner at Potsdam.
IF.
P. Did you see Prince Peter of Prussia when a prisoner at Pots-
dam?
W.
.
J.
I.'
peeping out of his
I perceived the point of his purple paletot
pony phaeton.
P.
W.
P.
Is Prince Peter of Prussia a
Pretty as a Polish popinjay.
handsome man
J.
f
a Polish popinjay hke ?
policeman.
xu i
o
not respect the law f
P. I must caU you to order why do you
W. The cat stole the pastry.
xt
o and
^ goes on
[Policeman marks down six answers to witness No. 2,
IF.
What
is
A pert
i.
;
to the next.]
Who stole th e butter ?
P.
W. The cat, to be sure.
P. Where was the butter put for safety ?
On a big board in the bed-room.
TF.
bed-room
P. Did anybody see the cat go in the
TF.
P.
TF
P.
TF
?
Billy the button boy blabbed it.
Is Billy the button-boy worthy of credit?
I believe Billy blarneys beautifully.
Where was Billy in place formerly ?
In Berkeley Buildings, with Bishop Bloomfield.
HOW TO ENTEKTAIN
A SOCIAL
ol
PAPwTY.
Where
are Berkeley Biiildings ?
In the borough of Bedford, on the boundaries of Bohemia,
and on the borders of the Boyne.
can you tell mo tho
P, I am afraid you never learned geography
P.
W.
;
situation of Madras ?
W. Built of beech boughs, on the banks of Ben Ballachul"sh,
bathed bv billows of the black Baltic,- and beautifully besprinkled
^Tith beetles, badgers, bishops, and barges.
P. What is the latitude of Ben BallachuHsh ?
The cat stole the butter.
TT.
[Policeman marks six answers io witness No. 3, and goes on. V*Tioever can give seven answers wins. ]
Bobbingr Around, or tlie g^s&iiie of Families.—To
perform this new and amusing game, purchase at a stationer's a pack
or two of small plain cards, commonly called visiting cards divido
them into fours, each four representing an entire family write on
the card. Dip, the Dyer on the second, Dip the Dyer's Wiie on the
;
;
;
;
thefourth. Dip, the Dyer's Daugheach family of four cards. According to the
number of players, so many families may be brought into requisition,
allowing one, two, or three families to each player that is, four,
eight, or twelve cards.
Shuffle the cards, and deal them out with the
names downwards. The players are then to arrange them in alphabetical order, taking care to conceal what they hold between a sheet of
folded paper or book. When all are ready, the dealer asks some ono
of the players for the member of any family he chooses for instance,
should he hold two members of a family, say Flounder, the Fishmonger, and the Fishmonger's Wife, he would ask for either their son or
their daughter, and should he succeed in obtaining what he asks for,
he will give in exchange some odd member that he wishes to part with,
but which will probably make up a *' united family" of another player
he then has the privilege of '* bobbing around" for the other
member of the family but should he fail, the last player asked will
then go *' bobbing around" for some member of a family to complete
any family he may hold and the game thus proceeds until the scattared members of every family are brought home by the players, those
securing the greatest number of families being the greatest winners.
Each person on commencing must deposit one counter for every family, that is for every four cards that are dealt to him, so that the winners will take up a counter for every family they can perlect, which
should be deposited under the right hand as soon as xoerfected. If the
third. Dip, the Dyer's
ter ; and so on with
Son
;
and on
;
;
;
;
;
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
SOCIAL PABTY.
jjlayers are few, two or three families may be dealt out, and eacli player
may deposit one counter only for all the families, and the winners
take oiie counter for the corresponding number of families they obtain ; thus, if one counter is deposited for three families, a player
must obtain three families before he can obtain a counter but this
will readily suggest itself to the players. Each player should endeavor
to recollect what members of a family have been asked for, and by
whom, and by whom refused, and then should he hold thos^ members
that have been refused by others, he can go ** bobbing around" for
them with great facility, and soon have a complete family, which will
cause much fun, and add to the amusement of the game.
In large parties, twenty or twenty-five famihes may be dealt out, for
which purpose we have subjoined a list of names and callings from
which any number to that amount may be selected. After this game
has been played round once or twice, it will be found one of the most
amusing we could present to our readers, in which both young and
old can participate at this season.
;
Name.
..the Admiral
All-dash
Aloes
Appraise
Argue
Artistic
Astute
Bacon
Bell
....
Block
Bloom
Blow
Bond
Bother'em
Brick
Bristle
Bun
Bustle
Butt
Camphor
Cask
Chii)
Cool
Comfit
Coui-age
Cream
Creed
Damask
Dip
Name.
Dose'em
Calling.
the Accountant
the Adjutant
Accurate
Active
.
. ,
the Apothecary
the Auctioneer
the Advocate
the Actor
the Attorney
the Butterman
the Brassfounder
the Barber
the Botanist
the Blacksmith
the Broker
the Barrister
the Builder
the Brush-maker
the Baker
the Boatswain
the Brewer
the Chemist
the Cooper
the Carpenter
the Commander
the Confectioner
the Captain
the Cowkeeper
the Clergyman
the Draper
the Dyer
.
Calling.
the Doctor
the Dentist
Drav,'-
Eau de Vie
Edge
Exciseman
the Engraver
the Editor
the Fruiterer
the Farrier
the Furrier
Erudite
Filbert
Fire
Fitch
Flounder
Fragrant.
. ^
Furrow
Gewgaw
Ginger
Gooseberry
Hack
Helmet
Inebriate
Jet
Justice!.'.'.
Keen
Leaf
Lease
Mainmast.
Meal
Mercy
Metal
Metronome
Money
Narcissus
Novel
;
f
the Fishmonger
the Florist
the Farmer
the Goldsmith
the Grocer
the Gardener
the Horsedealer
the Hatter
the Innkeeper
the Jeweler
the Judge
the Knife-grinder
^te Librarian
the Lawyer
the Mariner
the Miller
the Magistrate
the Miner
the Musician
the Merchant
^ the Nurseryman
the Newsman
now TO ENTEKTAIN A
Calling,
Name.
Octave
Ocular
Parnassus
Organist
the Optician
the Oilman
the Peddler
the Poet
Paste
Patchouli
Phial
Pica
Pigment*.
the Paperhanger
the Perfumer
the Physician
the Printer
the Painter
tite
Olive. .*,
Pack
.-.
.the
Pledge
Porter
Probate
Pawnbroker
the Publican
„
. the Procter
the Philosopher
the Parson
the Poulterer
*... the Plumber
the Quarryman
the Quaker
the E-efiner
the Ranger
.
Pi'ofound
Prosy
Pullet
pumiD
Quartz
Quiet
Eaw
Roebuck
as
SOCIAL PARTY,
Calling.
Name.
*'
Sable
Sage
.',*.'.*
Salve
Salver
Shrewd
Sketch
Smart
Smooth
Sole _
Splice! ',/....
Stirrup
3;^ajj]j
Tape.\V.*.*..V.*.'
Unique
Vine
Warp
Wheel
\\Tiisky ...*...'.
Wrench
Yoke.
.
.1
.Zeno.'!.
...the Sv.-eep
the Schoolmaster
the SurgeoK
the Silversmith
the Solicitor
the Surveyor
the Sergeant
the Sculptor
the Shoemaker
the Shipwright
the Saddler
the Tauner
the Tailor
.v.",
Upholsterer
the
the Vinter
the Weaver
the Watchman
the W^ine Merchant
the Wheelwright
the Yeojnan
the Zealot
:
—
LdOtOe This is a good quiet game, and one that will keep the attention alive, and qnicken the eyes of the players, if properly conThe cards and numbers used in playing lofco may be procurducted.
ed at any toy-shop. Tiete are
twenty-four of these cards in
Each card is dithe game.
vided into three rows, and each
row contains nine squares, five
numbered, and four blank.
These numbers are arranged in
columns down the card, the
containing the
first column
LOTO CASDS ANI> NUMBESS.
units, the second the tens, the
third the twenties^ and so on up to ninety, which is the highest number in the game. Thus, each card contains fifteen numbers, and each
number is contained four times in the set of cards, Besides these
cards, there are two bags ; one containing a series of numbers, from
one to ninety, on little wooden disks; the other about a couple of
hundred round counters of horn, or, better still, of glass for these
counters are used for covering the numbered squares, and the number
can be read through the circular glasses without uncovering the
Gquares.
One of the players shuffles the loto cards, mixing them
well together, and then distributes them in turn to the rest, receivin^j
QQ©^^@©@®®
;
.-5
HOW TO ENTEKTAIN A
84
SOCIAL PAKTY.
If there are twelve people to join in the game,
a share for himself.
if only eight, each may have three,
each will receive two cards
which must be placed one nnder the other, so that the player can
glance his eye rapidly down the series of tinits, tens, &c. Sometimes,
however, it is agreed that each person shall receive ocly one card,
which proceeding is said to increase the interest ol the game by protracting it. The dealer then puts his hand into the bag of wooden numbers,
and draws them out as they come, calling them aloud, and the
players cover the numbers on their cards as the names are cried.
A pool must previously be made, of nuts, cherries, sweetmeats,
ratafia cakes, or any similar agreeable offerings
the liberality of
the host or hostess has provided; sometimes a collection of marbles,
contributed by the players, is made to
answer the purpose.
The player who first covers five numbers in a row on the
same card, takes one-quarter of the pool he who covers two rows
entirely in the same vray has the second quaTter, and the fortunate
wight who has first crowned the whole series of numbered squares on
his card or cards with the little disks of glass obtains the remaining
half.
As each portion of the pool is cleared, the player who claims it
has to read out his numbers, which are verified by the wooden marks
drawn from the bag, to make sure that there are no mistakes. When
the pool is small, it is sometimes better to make no payment for the
first row, or even for the first two rows; tne whole being adjudged in
undivided splendor to the fortunate player who covers his whole card.
On the other hand, where the pool consists of a number of small objects, such as nuts, the number of prizes maybe increased, a small fee
being paid for the first two consecutive numbers covered, a larger for
the first three, another for the first four and five, and still larger premiums for one, two, and three rows. All this is to be agreed upon
before the game is commenced.
;
;
Fox
aiad
Geese.— This
is
another
quiet gams of skill and a capital preparation
for those who wish to become good draughtjDlayers, or even chess-players, some di\y, is to
render themselves thorough masters of the
mysteries of
Fox and Geese. " The form of
the board is shown in the accompanying cut.
The geese are represented by white pegs (or
by pins, if the players draw their own iDoard
on a card), and the lox by a red or black one.
The geese are seventeen in number, and are
arranged as shown in the diagram while the
The
fox stands in the centre of the board.
;
'
'
;
rOX AKD GEESE.
hot: to entertain a soclve pabty.
may
be moved along in the direction of the lines, bnt only one
Their object is to block np the fox in a comer, or to
cnrround him so that he cannot move while he, on his side, can
toike any goose which has not another in the hole behind it for proIf the fox can clear so many geese off the board that not
tection.
enough are left to block him up, he wins but if the geese are skiliiilly workeJ, they have a decided advantage over Reynard, and musfc
T7ln, by penning him into a corner, from whence he cannot extricate
himself and serve him right too.
There is another method of playing Fox and Geese on a chessboard,
namely, with four white men, representing the Geese, and one black
one representing the Fox. The Geese are ranged on the four white
squares nearest one player, and the Fox may
be placed where his owner pleases. The best
place for him is that marked in the diagram,
as he can manoeuvre in a ver>^ puzzling way.
The Gesse can only move forward, and the
Fox moves either way. The object of the
Geese is to pen up the Fox so that he cannot
move, and the Fox has to break tlirough. If
OHOESOHO
the game is properly played, the Geese must
win, the secret being to keep them all in a line
The Fox tries to prevent this plan from being
as mncli as possible.
followed up and if he can succeed in doubling the Geese or getting
one to stand hefore another, he is nearly euro to pass through them.
goo::e
hole at a time.
;
;
—
.
;
I>Oimaioes«— There are several ways of playing at dominoes.
Th6^l^?y^^4ag method, for two players, is at once the most simple, and
The dominoes are placed on the table,
the one generally pursued.
with their faces downward, and each player takes up one at hazard,
to settle which of them is to have the pose, or right of playing first.
The highest number of points decides this. The two dominoes used
in the trial are then put back among the rest the dominoes are well
shuffled together, and the two players choose seven dominoes apiece,
ranging them upright in a line on the table, with the laces toward
them, so that each may see his own hand, but not his adversaiy's.
Thus the players will have taken up fourteen out of the twenty-eight
dominoes, of which an ordinary game consists. The other lour een
;
remain on the
of the pose
it suits
now
him
presently).
table, faces do^s-nward, to fonii a reserve.
puts down on the table, face upward, the
The winner
domino that
best to play (we shall give some advice on this subject
The adversary, in his turn, places a domino of his o^tl,
86
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
•
correspondinf^ in one of
its
Thus, suppose the
versary.
SOCIAL PAETY.
numbers with
first jDlayer to
that placed
,
^-
his ad;
second may play six-four
the
first then puts six-five
the second fol^
lows it up with five-four and the first
plays the double-four the single numbers being placed lengthwise, the doubles
the
«
by
have played double-six
;
;
«|»oe I i ••»je »
*i'*^ « s. ^*_«>L^.f
I
J
—
transversely
;
;
and so the game pro-
ceeds, till the player who has won the pose has expended all his dominoes, his adversary having one domino left
say six-three. In this
case, the first player will count nine toward the game, that being the
number of points remaining in his adversary's hand. The game itself
is won by the player who first scores a hundred.
The dominoes are
then shuflBLed again, the second player having the j)ose this time, and
the game continues with a fresh deal.
—
Generally, however, things don't go so smoothly.
After two cr
three dominoes have been placed by the two players, one of them is
unable to match any of those in his hand with the numbers at each
end of the row on the table. In that case he passes, and his adversary^ plays instead of him, and continues to do so until the first player
can again make use of one of his dominoes. If both players are compelled to pass, neither of them having a domino that will suit, they
turn their hands face upward en the table, and the one who has the
smallest number of points counts all his adversary's points toward bis
own game. This is called the block game.
The general rule for the player who has the pose is to play out the
number which occurs the most frequently in your game. For
instance, if the number four occurs four times in your hand, the
chances are that your adversary will have only one, or, perhaps, none
at all of the same number, and he will thus be compelled to pass and
you will gain a turn. It is good policy, too, to get rid of the higher
numbers in your hand as soon as possible, for in case of a block, he
Get rid of the doubles
T»'ho has the lowest number of points wins.
also; for they are the hardest to place.
It will thus be seen that the game of dominoes is one of mingled
^kill and chance.
Of course, nothing can avail against a lucky hand ;
but the combinations of the game are various enough to give scope
Sometimes, with two players, the sysfor a good deal of ingenuity.
tem of *' drawing" is resorted to that is to say, when one of the
jjlayers cannot follow suit, he takes a domino at hazard, from the
reserve and if this will not ("o, a F-econd, and so on, till his purpose
is answered.
This is called th ^ drair game.
;
:
noir TO ENTERTAIN A SOCIAL PARTY.
o)
Generally the game is confined to two players but four, five, or
even six, may join in it, each playing on his own account, or divided
In the latter case, the partners sit opposite to each other,
into sides.
the players having first drawn for partners, in the same way that they
would for the pose, and the two highest playing against the two lowest.
H3 who has di'awn the highest domino has the pose. The play is
from left td right, and the side of tne first player who is out wins,
counting to its score the number of points still held by the opposite
party. In thi^ game thera may be drawing or not according to agreethe players don't draw, and on a block occurring, and the
ment.
dominoes being turned up, both sides are found to have the same
number, the deal counts for nothing.
Each
Another method of playing dominoes is called Muggins.
The highest double leads ; after
player in the game draws five pieces.
The count is made by fives. It the one
that they bad alternately.
who leads can put down any domino containing spots that amount to
;
K
five or ten, as the double-five, six-four,
five-blank, trey-deuce, etc.,
he
In matching, if a piece
counts that number to his score in the game.
can be put down so as to make Q.Ye, ten, fifteen, or twenty, by adding
the spots contained on both ends of the row, it counts to the score of
the one setting it. Thus a tray being* at one end, and a five at tho
other, the next player in order, putting down a deuce-five, would
score five; or if double tray was at one end, and a player was so sucr
cessful as to get double-deuce at the other, it would score ten for him.
double-six being at one end, and a four at the other, if the next
player set down a double-four, he counts twenty double-six=12-tdouble four=8^20.
If a player cannot match he draws from the pool, the same as in the
draw game, until he gets the piece required to match either end or
exhau ^ts the pool. As in the draw or block game, the one who plays
hii last piece first, adds to his count the spots his opponents have
and the same if ho gains them whan the game is blocked, by havin-^
t'le lowest count.
Bat the sum thus added to the score is some multiple of five, nearest the actual amount.
Thus, if his opponents have
twenty spots, and he has nineteen, he adds twenty to his score. If
they have twenty-two he adds twenty, because that is the nearest multiple of five
but if they have twenty-three he would add twenty-fivo
twenty-three being nearer that than to twenty. The number of the
game is two hundred it* two play, but one hund .ed and fifty if there be
A
—
;
—
three or
;
more
player^:;.
88
nOY,'
TO ENTERTAIN A SOCIAL PARTY,
DIVERSIONS.
The Kentucky Criant.— This is a jolly companion to the
German Dwarf, and like it, never fails to produce roars of laughter,
when performed at an evening company. It is necessary to have two
persons to represent the giant, and the method of enacting the part
is best explained by the accompanying engraving.
It will be seen
that one boy puts on a long cloak, and perches himself upon the shoul-ders of his companion, who arranges the folds of, the cloak so that
the parts shown by the dotted lines in the illustration, are entirely concealed from the eyes of the spectators.
The boy who does the head
and shoulders of the giant should carry a long staff, as a cane, and,
if he wear a stove-pipe hat, with a feather in it, it wiU greatly heighten
The giant's wife may also be reprethe effect.
sented by one person, with the assistance of a
cane and a piece of lath, the latter eighteen inches long, fastened about four inches from the
top or end of the former, thus forming a cross.
The person representing the giantess attires
himself in an old dress. A long shawl is pinned
over the lath, an old bonnet placed on the end
of the cane, and the preparations are complete.
The giantess usually walks into the room and
pretends to look for a nail in the wall (this gives
the performer an opportunity of concealing his
face), and after looking at the wall a minute or
so, he stoops down as low as he can, at the
same time being careful to lower the cane. He
then gradually rises, until he stands upon the
tips of his toes, and as he does so, he as gradually
raises the cane, with the bonnet and shawl upon
it, until he appears to touch the ceiling.
The
lath represents the shoulders of the giantess,
the bonnet her head, and the cloak covers the
whole deception. The giantess if well done,
is £ure to be {greeted with shouts of laughter.
nc
The
ro entsp-taut
JEIephaiit.— This
is
a
soci.iL party.
as comical a diyersion as eitlicr of
foregoing, and never
fails to elicit applause. Two
boys are required to perone
sonate the elephant
represents his lore, and the
The
other his hind legs.
ilia
;
two boys place themselves
as shown in the illustration
a quilt doubled over thr'ee or
;
now
placed on
four times is
the backs of the boys, which
serves to form the back of
the elephant a large blanket or traveling shawl is then
thrown over them, one end of which is twisted to represent the trunk
of the anhnal, the other end serving in a similar manner to represent
his tail.
Two paper cones enact the tusks, and the elephant is comA bright and witty boy should be selected to perform the part
X^lete.
of keeper, and he must lecture upon the prodigious strength, wonderful sagacity, and extreme docility of the animal, proving the latter
quality by lying down and permitting the elephant to walk over him.
It always amuses a company to show them ihs elephant.
;
Tlie Old
The
Man's Face
]>ecapitatioTi.
-Is also a very comical amusement,
and productive of much merriment.
The only requisite for producing it is
a person's hand, a handkerchief and
little India-Ink.
The engraving will
show the simplicity of the arrangement, and demonstrates how easy it is
to form an old man's face.
—This
is
rather a startling
rme,
and
though in the sequel it is very fanny, it should not be practiced upon
those who have very weak nerves.
The object sought to be represented is a decapitated head, and is
done in the following manner
A large table, covered with a cloth,
reaching the floor all around, is placed in the centre of the room. A
boy with sott silky hair should be selected to represent the head, and
to do this he must lie on his back under the table, with all his person
:
—
40
HOW TO
Fig.
EJsTERTAIN A EOCIaL PAKTY.
Fig.
1.
2.
concealed except a portion of the head, which should be exposed to
view from under the table-cloth, as shown in Fig. 1.
Next a companion, in collusion with him, must carefully comb the
hair to imitate the whiskers of a man (see Fig. 2).
He must also
paint false eyebrows on the under part of the eyes, and false nose,
moustache, and mouth upon the forehead (see Fig 2. ) This is easily
done with the assistance of a camel's hair brush, and a little Indiaink, and when well completed the head appeara to be entirely disconnected from the body, and has a very startling effect. The effect may
be intensified by powdering the face, to made it appear x^ale.
Hat
Measurement.—Very few
people are aware of the height of the
crown of a stove-pipe hat. A good
deal of fun may be created by testing
it in this way
Ask a person to point
out on a wall, about what he supposes to be the height of an ordinary
hat, and he will place his finger
usually at about a foot from the
ground. You then place a hat under
:
it, and to his surprise he finds that
the space indicated is more than douThe
ble the height of the hat.
height of a common flour barrel is
just the length of a horse's face, and
much fun may be derived from get-
nO-W TO ENTERTAIN A SOCIAX PAETY.
ting a company to mark the supposed height of a floiir-barrel.
nine cases out of ten they will mark many inches too high.
The
41
In
LiOSt Riiig* Fouawl.— This is a simple and a pretty
requiring little apparatus,— a piece of elastic thread and a few
Go to a jeweler's, or even to a toyrings being all that you need.
maker's, and buy a set of showy rings, all ahke. You may get them
Take a piece of elastic thread about three or
for a few cents each.
four inches in length, fasten one end to one of the rings, and the
other to the inside of your coat sleeve, taking care to have it of such a
length that it permits the ring to be placed on the finger, and that
when the ring is removed it is pulled up the sleeve so as to be concealed from every one.
Before you begin the trick, famish yourself with a few lemons, and
in each of them cut crosswise a little slit in the middle, and push one
of the rings into the slit until it lies in the very centre of the lemon.
Take care to wear one of the rings during the whole evening, and
make it as conspicuous as possible and just before commencing this
trick quietly remove the ring, and slip on your finger the one that is
attached to the elastic thread. Ask if there are any lemons in the
house, and have your own brought in a basket. Also ask for a piece
of tape and a bodkin.
Get the audience to choose a lamon, take it in your hands, and send
the rest away.
Then take a knife and cut the lemon into slices,
nearly, but not quite severing them, and hold it so that if anything
v/ere between the slices it would fall out.
Of course you take care
that the ring which you have inserted remains in the middle slice.
Xow slip the end of the tape through the eye cf the bodkin, and push
it lengthwise through the lemon, so that it passes through the ring.
Give both ends of the tape to be held, and tell the holders to stand so
as to keep the tape afc full stretch.
Now slip the ring ofT your finger and hold ifc between the forefinger
and thumb, taking care to hold it so that the s]3ectators cannot see
the thread.
Point your hand toward the lemon, suddenly spread the
fingers, and away flies the ring up your sleeve.
Look into your hand
as if surprised at the disappearance of the ring, show that it is empty,
and then go to the lemon. Separate the divisions one by one, and
push them apart. Take each outer slice alternately and pull it ofi: the
tape, keeping the central slice to the last
When you come to this,
the ring will pull against the tape you wonder what is the matter
with it you take your knife and cut the slice gradually down, taking
ciire to destroy the slit through which the ring was introduced, and
trick,
;
;
;
HOW TO ENTEETAIN A
42
SOCIAL PAETY.
continne to cut until the metal becomes visible. Then let any one
disengage the lemon from the imbedded ring, and the audience will
think that yon have flung it into the lemon and upon the tape.
Maggie J?lill£.—Lime water
common spring water but if we
is
quite transparent,
and
clear as
breathe or blow into it, the bright
liquid becomes opalescent and as white as milk.
The best way to try
this simple experiment is to put some powdered quicklime into a wine
shake them well together, now and then,
bottle full of cold water
for a day
then allow the bottle to remain quiet till the next day,
when the clear lime-water may be poured off from the sediment.
Now fill a wine glass or tumbler with the lime water thus made, and
blow through the liquid with a glass tube, a piece of new tobacco
pipe, or a clean straw, and in the course of a minute or so as the
magicians say ** tha water will be turned into milk." By means of
this pastime, **Wise Men "can ascertain which young ladies are in
With a shrewd guess they
love, and which young gentlemen are not.
present, as a test, a glass of lime-w^ater to the one, and of pure water
to the other, with unerring effect.
;
;
;
—
—
To
Ligrlit
a Candle TTithout Touchingr the
—Let a candleburn until
lVicl£.
has a good long snuff; then blow it out with
a sudden puff, a bright wreath of white smoke will curl up from the hot
wick. Now, if a flame be applied to this smoke, even at a distance of
two or three inches from the candle, the flame will run down the
To perj-moke, and rekindle the wick in a very fantastic manner.
form this experiment nicely, there must be no draught or ** banging"
doors while the mystic spell is rising.
it
NUTS TO CRACK.
When is a man like a looking-glass ? When he reflects.
Why are ships called she ? Because they always keep
man on
a
the look-out.
What
is
that which ties two persons, but only touches
W3dding-r:ng.
one?
A
43
H0V7 TO ENTERTAIN A SOCL\L TABTY.
that dog cf yourg a cross breed?" asked a gentleman of a
'*No, zjir; his mother was a very gentle and affectionate creature."
•
**Is
canine vender.
"Why is an interesting
to the very end.
What
is
that which
Because
like a toper's nose ?
book
nobody wants, and nobody
it is
read
likes to lose ?
A
*
lawsuit.
What
time by the clock
is
the
most
effective
When
?
strikes
it
**one."
Why may a barber be
up
and puts
queues,
said to fetter the alphabe!}
toupees in irons.
?
Because he
ties
Why ar3
fit
people who sit on fre3 seats not likely to derive much benefrom going to church ? Because they get good for nothing.
Why is rheumatism like a glutton? Because it attacks the joints.
Why is a lady dancing like a horse in a canter ? Because she is gal-
—
—
loping.
What
Spanish
insect
would denote that the Spanish were defeated? — The
fly.
Why
**
are billiard players like cats ?
scratches."
t
Why is an egg like a
been broken.
colt
?
—Because
Why is a lean monarch like a
thin king (thinking).
.
—Because
it is
they frequently
not
fit
to use until
mako
it
man in meditation ? —Because he
Why cannot a gentleman legally possess a short walking stick
Because it can never be lonff to him.
Why is
— Because
exhilaration hke the consequence of breaking a
it is a flow of spirits.
rum
What is the difference between a barber and a mother ?
razors to shave, and the other has shavers to raise.
What
an
has
is
a
?^
bottle?
— One
has
right have you, according to the laws of retaliation, to pick
pocket? ^Because he has picked yours (pictures).
artist's
—
speak French wonderfully," said a Frenchman to a young
sBob who was airinj? his jiccomplishments before him. **You have
not ze least accent I mean ze least Fi'ench accent."
*'YoTJ
—
When
a pier.
is
a steamboat like a witness in a trial ?
;
—When
it is
bound
to
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
^4
SOCIAL PARTY,
A GENTLEMAN traveling in California encountered a panther, of
which he subsequently wrote as follows: **I looked at him long
enough to note his brown and glossy coat, his big, glaring eyes, his
broad, well-developed muzzle, and his capacious jaws, when both of
us
left
the spot; and, I
am
X)leased to add, in opposite directions.
JWhat is the difference between a pill and a hill?— One is hard to
get up, and the other is hard to get down.
Why is hope like decayed cheese ? — Because thousands live on it.
The industrious old lady who walked all over a town
Satisfied.
out West with a can in her hand to procure a quart of the milk of
human kindness, has been more successful in getting a little jam out
of the door. She got the jam on her fingers.
—
AMUSING EXPERIMENTS.
Artificial
one end than it
L<ig^litiiiiig^«
— Provide a tin
is at the other,
and in which there are
tube that
is larger at
several holes.
with powdered resin and, when it is shaken over the
flame of a torch, the reflection will produce a capital resemblance to
Fill this tube
;
lightning.
Earthquake and
Volcano. —Grind an equal
Miniature
quantity of fresh iron fillings with pure sulphur, till the whole is reduced to a fine powder. Be careful not to let any wet come near it.
Then bury about thirty pounds of it a foot deep in the earth, and in
about six or eight hours the ground will heave and swell, and shortly
send forth smoke and flames, like a burning mountain. If che
earth is raised in a conical shape, it will be no bad miniature resemblance of a burning mountain.
after
XiUniiiLOUS Writing-.—Fix a small piece of phosphorus in a
and write wi(h it upon paper if the paper then be removed to
quill,
;
When
the writing will appear beautifully luminous.
phosphorus is used, it should be handled with great care, lest any
portion of it get under the finger-nails, a small bit of which would
occasion considerable, pain for some time.
a dark room,
HOW TO ENTEKTAIN A
r^olorcd FlaMies*— Flames
by mixing the following
—
salts
with
of various colors
spirits of wine,
Yellow Muriate of soda (common
Pale Violet— Muriate of potash.
Brick Ked- Muriate of lime.
Eed—-Muriate
SOCIAL PAETT.
and
45
may be obtained
setting fire to it;
salt.
of litbea.
—
Pale Apple Greeii Muriate of baryta.
Bluish Green— Muriate of copper.
Green—Borax.
Emerald Green— Nitrate of copper.
Orange Chloride of calcium.
I^urple Chloride of lithium.
—
—
—
The
Iflag'ic Picture. Take two pieces of glass about thrco
they must be quite level, and exactly of
inches long and four wide
the same size.
Place them one over the other, and let there be about
one twentieth part of an inch between th'em^ which you may effect by
pasting papers on their four corners. Join these two glasses together
by a luting, composed of lime slacked by lying in the air and reduced to a very fine powder, mixed with the nvhite of an egg.
Cover
all the borders of these glasses with parchment or bladder, except a
small opening left on one side, in order to introduce the following
composition:.
J
Dissolve by a slow fire six ounces of fine hog's lard, and put to it half
an ounce of white wax, and if you find it necessary to render it more
sensible to^ the heat, add an ounce, or more, of the clearest linseed oil.
This, when liquid, is to be poured between the glasses by the space
leffc in their sides, and which you are then to stop close up.
Wipe
the glasses clean and hold them before the fire, to see that the composition will not run out at any part.
Then paste a picture painted
on any thin substance, or a colored print, with its face to one of tho
glasses, and fix the whole in a frame.
The mixture between the glasses, while it is cold, will quite conceal
the picture, but becoming perfectly transparent by heat, the painting
will appear as if there was only a single glass before it.
As the composition cools, the picture will gradually disappear, and at last bo
quite invisible.
:
HOW
4.6
S:0
ENTEF-TAIN A SOCIAL PARTY.
MAGIC.
ToMalte Water Freeze
toy
the Fireside.— This
cii^
rious feat cau only be performed 'in winter.
Set a quart pot upon a
stool before the fire, throwing a little water upon the stool first.
Then put a handful of snow into the pot, having •privately conveyed
into it a handful of salt.
Stir it about for eight or nine minutes with
a short stick, and the congelation will be effected.
To SwspcBid a
^isart Pot from tlie Ceilingr, and
^tringrintiie Middle, li¥itlioiit tlie Meai^ure
Falling: to tUe <^round.—You must lay a wager upon this, and
cat
tite
then
tie the string in a loop about the centre.
Having done this, cut
the loop, and the quart pot will of course remain suspended.
Mow
Up a
a
lift
Flint Olass Bottle with
a straw which is not broken or bruised, and having
bent one end of it into a sharp angle, put this curved end into the
bottle, so that the bent part may rest against its side
you may then
take the other end, and lift up the bottle by it without breaking the
straw, and this will be the more readily accomplished as the angular
part of the straw approaches nearer to that which comes out of the
to
Straw* — Take
;
$)ottle.
To Chang^e Bird-seed
into a L.iving: Bird.— Get a
on which glue some bird-seed privately
put a bird into it, under the false lid then show it, and it will seem
Put on the true lid, and say, '* I will command
to be full of seed.
all the seed out of this box, and order a living bird to appear."
Then
take off the covers together, and the bird v/ill ba seen.
box made with a
false lid,
;
—
;
A Curious
Two
Metlao€l of Kestoringr
a Fly
to Life in
tliat lias toeeai Head Twenty-four
liours. This wonderful experiment is produced from a very simple
cause.
Take a fly, x)ut it into a glass or cup cover it so as to deprive
it of air.
When you perceive it to be quitj motionless, take it out,
and put it into a place exposed to the sun, and cover it with salt; in
two minutes it will revive and fly away.
Minutes^
—
;
To Make a
—Having a
I^oaf of
Bread Dance on the
X'atole.
quill filled with quicksilver and stopped close, you secretly thrust it into a hot roll or loaf, which will put it in motion.
H0-V7
TO EIsTESTAIN A
SOCI.iL FABTY.
4:7
CARD TRICKS.
Brawn
l>y BilfeB'esit Farties^_ after
To §Iio^v Cards
tliey liave been Thoroughly Sim meet, as ISxMhited
l>y IlerBBianii. This astonishing trick is simply the result of a good
professional memory, aided by the mathematical necessity of card-
—
combinations. The cards are first arranged as follows
ace,
Suppose the cards spread out stand in the following order
king, queen, knave, ten, nine, eight, seven of hearts ; ace, king, queen,
knave, ten, nine, eight, seven of dubs; ace, king, queen, knave, ten,
nine, eight, seven of diamonds ; ace, king, queen, knave, ten, nine,
eight, seven of spades.
Thus, the ace of hearts being at the top, and the seven of spades at
the bottom, the performer takes the pack in his left hand, and with his
right he takes the top card, then another which he places below, a
third at the top, a fourth below, and so on, with all the cards, one alternately at the top and at the bottom.
This process requires considerable dexterity but when done, it isevident to all that the cards have been thorougniy well shuffled and
yet this very shuffling puts them in the very condition to enable the
performer to know the position and name of every card in the pack
for the thirty-two cards must necessarily stand in the following order
:
:
—
;
;
;
;
Seven of spades.
Nine of spades.
3. Knave of spades.
4. King of spades
5. Seven of diamonds.
6. Nine of diamonds.
7 Knave of diamonds.
8. King of diamonds.
9. Seven of clubs.
10. Nine of clubs.
11. Knave of clubs.
12. King of clubs.
13. Seven of hearts.
14. Nine of hearts.
1.
17.
2.
18.
15.
16.
Knave of hearts.
King of hearts.
Ace of hearts.
Queen of hearts.
19.
Ten
20.
21.
Eight of hearts.
Ace of clubs.
22.
23.
Queen of clubs.
Ten of clubs,
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
of hearts.
Eight of clubs.
Ace of diamonds.
Queen of diamonds.
Ten of diamonds.
Eight of diamonds.
Ace of spades.
Queen of spades.
Ten
of spades.
Eight of spades.
—
HOW TO
40>
iiNTEBTAIK A SOCI.iL PAETT.
Now, by shtiffling the cards in like manner a second time, they
be in the following order, apparently still more complicated :
1. Eight of spades.
17. Seven of spades.
2.
Queen of spades.
18.
Knave of
3.
Eight of diamonds.
Qneen of diamonds.
Eight of clubs.
Queen. of clubs.
Eight of hearts.
19.
20.
Seven of diamonds.
Knave of diamonds.
Seven of clubs.
4.
5.
6.
78.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13,
14.
15.
16.
21.
22.
23.
24.
Queen ot hearts.
King of hearts.
25.
26.
Nine of hearts.
King of clubs.
Nine of clubs.
King of diamonds.
Nine of diamonds.
King of spades.
Nine of spades.
27.
28.
29.
SO.
31.
32.
Knave of
will
spades.
clubs.
Seven of hearts.
Knave of hearts.
Ace of hearts.
Ten of hearts.
Ace of clubs.
Ten of clubs.
Ace of diamonds.
Ten of diamonds.
Ace of spades.
Ten of spades.
Such is the combination; and it is evident that the performer has
only to count the cards, and remember the number of each, to name
them at once. By dexterously presenting two cards together, back to
back, when standing above his audience, he may pretend to be mistaken by showing the wrong card, then, giving the two a professional rattle, turn them in the act, and show the right card as cley-
—
—
performed by Hermann.
erly
Packs
Professional
of Cards.— Professional packs of
cards are variously prepared.
Some of the cards are slightly wider
others longer thap the rest and some are made narrower at one end
than the other.
All these minute peculiarities, with professional fingers, ensure their recognition.
For some tricks cards are prepared
with a thin slip of iron invisibly pasted lengthwise from lop to bottom the performer's wand is provided with a magnet, and thus he
draws either from the pack or your pocket any card he pleases, by
mrrely touching it with his magnetic wand.
The cards being arranged in an order known to the performer, the
latter pretends to shuffle them, but really leaving them in their original condition, as previously explained.
He then requests three more
persons to take a card, and as he knows the arrangement of the card;',
it is sufficient for him to know that the card drawn by the first, is the
Now
third, fcnrth, or sixth in order at cnce to know which it is.
;
;
;
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
49
SOCIAL PAP.TY.
the pack from one person to
is easier, whilst carrying
another, than to count the cards preceding or following the one
drawn by each of the parties.
If the cards are provided with the strip of iron, he may tell the parties to put them in their pockets, and then he may summon them to
appear by merely inserting his wand into their pockets.
nothing
Three Cards Callecl.—This
trick depends entirely on
pack of cards being on the table, the performer
Then
requests a party to examine it and see that it is quite correct.
he requests another to shuffle and deal it in three lots. Lastly, he
requests three other persons to take and shuffle the lots again. Ho
then says to one, '* Draw a card from your lot; it will be the ace of
" (He names the suite).
The card drawn is given to him without
being seen by the party or any one else.
He demands another card from the second party, naming it, declaring that the party could not di-aw any other card from the lot, which
he holds firmly in his hand. He does the game by the third party;
and then he shows the cards which the three parties have drawn,
each from the lot he holds, and which are really those which he first
named.
The explanation is as follows
The performer can conceal in his
sleeve any card whatever, and it is this very card which he calls for
from the first of the three spectators holding the lots. Suppose he
has in his sleeve the ace of hearts, he says to the party holding the
The party will draw a card,
first lot, *' I call for the ace of hearts."
and give it to the performer.
Now suppose this first card given to him is the king of spades,
then the performer says to the holder of the second lot, *'l call for
the king of spades.
Suppose, again, instead of the king of spades, the second holder
gives him the queen of hearts, then he says to the third holder
I
call for the queen of hearts."
And, whatever be that card handed to
him by the holder of the third lot, he will sleight it into his sleeve,
and substitute the ace of hearts, Wiiich he conceals in his sleeve.
MetaiBftorplfiOSis* The performer carefully cuts out the three
points, from a three of hearts, after thinning them down as much as
possible from the back.
He sticks these three points with a little
soap, one on an ace of diamonds, and the two others at the top and
bottom respectively, so as to make the card appear as the three of
Tlie
sleight of hand.
A
:
—
—
'
—
hearts.
tie showR to a party, requesting
him
to say
what
it
i
\
Of course
tl
o
;
HOW TO ENTEBTAIN A
50
SOCIAL PAETY.
party replies, the three of hearts. He then shows it to another— having, whilst passing to him, placed his finger on the center point, and
the second party affirms the card to be the two of hearts. He proceeds to a tnird party, having, in the meantime, slipped off the point
at the top and bottom of the card, and the third party declares it to
** Ladies (or gentleman), " he now exclaims, *' I
be the ace of hearts.
must be a great sorcerer and terrible fascinator to be able to make
you see what I have shown for this card is neither the three, nor the
two, nor the ace of hearts ^but actually the ace of diamonds which I
could not have possibly substituted tor another card, since, as you see,
I have but one in my hand!"
Whilst mystifying the audience with this talk, he slips off the heart
covering the ace of diamonds, which he triumphantly exhibits to the
astonished spectators.
When properly applied, the soap leaves no trace on the card;
besides, these tricks are never performed on a stage brilliantly lighted
whilst, moreover, the mind is distracted in various ways by the ready
talk of the performer.
—
;
To Produce a
Pack.— Take
—
FarticiBlar
Card
IrVithout Seeing
a pack of cards with the corners cut off. Place
them all one way, and ask a person to draw a card; when he has done
so, while he is looking at it, reverse the pack, so that when he returns
the card to the pack, the corner of it will project from the rest; let
him shuffle them; he will never observe the projecting card. Hold
them behind your back. You can feel the projecting card draw it
Simple as this trick is, it will excite great astonout, and show it.
ishment.
tlie
—
To
Call for a^ay
Card
m
tl\e
Pack.—This
is
a very
greatly astonish an audience to whom it is not
known. Seat yourself at a table, so as to have the vrhole of the company as much as possible in front of you and at some distance. Take
the pack of cards as it usually lies, and, in passing it under the table
or behind you, glance at the card which happens to be exposed; then,
pretending to shuffle the cards, place the one you have seen back to
back on the other side of the pack, and holding the cards firmly by
the edges, raise your hand between you and the company, and show
the card you have seen, calling out at the same time, what it is.
Observe which card is facing you, (for you have now the whole
pack facing you, except the one card which is shown to the spectators), pass them under the table again, and transfer the card you
have just seen to the ether side of the -^ack, handling the cards as if
simplo
trick,
but
v/ill
HOW
TO ENTERTAIM A SOCIAL PARTY.
01
shuffling them; again exhibit, and cry out the name of the card
turned to the company, taking care to notice the card that faces yourBy this means you may go
self, which change as before, and so on.
over the whole pack, telling each card as it is exposed, without looking at the cards, except when they are held between you and the spectators, and when they are anxiously looking at them themselves, to
see whether you arc right or not.
To
Tell
tlie
Wuauber of Cards
Take a parcel of cards
two long cards; let the
l>y
the TFeig^Iit.—
— say forty—and privately insert among
them
first be, for example, the fifteenth, and the
Seem to shuffle the cards, and
other the twenty-sixth, from the top.
cut them at the first long card; poise those you have taken off in your
**
hand, and say:
There must be fifteen cards here; then cut them at
the second long card, and say, "There are but eleven here;" and
On
poising the remainder, exclaim, '* And here are fourteen cards."
counting them, the spectators will find your calculations correct.
To
With
Tell the
Card That a Person has Touched
—
his Finger • This amusement has to be performed by
confederacy.
You previously agree with your confederate on certain
signs, by which ho is to denote the suite and the particular card of
each suite; thus: If he touch the first button of his coat, it signifies
These preliminaries being settled,
an ace; if the second, a king, elc.
you give the pack to a person who is near your confederate, and tell
him to separate any one card from the rest while you are absent, and
draw his finger once over it. He is then to return you the pack, and
while you are shuffling the cards, you carefully note the signals made
by your confederate; then turning the cards over one by one you
directly fix on the card he touched.
To Discover any Card in the Pack hy its
Weig'ht or 8nielflt — Desire any person in the company to draw
a card from the pack, and when he has looked at it, to return it with
face downwards, then pretending to weigh or smell it nicely, take
notice of any particular mark on the back of the card; which having
done, put it among the rest of the cards, and desire the person to
shuffle as he pleases; then giving you the pack, you pretend to
weigh each card as be fore, and proceed in this manner till you have
discovered the card he had. If the long card is used, you can take
the pack, shuffle ihe cards in a careless, easy manner, and without
looking at the pack, hand it to the spectators.
its
Guessing a Card Thought of.—To
do this well you
52
EOTi^
TO ENTEKTAIN A SOCIAL PARTY.
attend to the following directions: Spread out the cards on the
right hand in such a manner that, in showing them to the audience,
not a single card is wholly exposed to view, with the exception of the
king of spades, the upper part of which should be clearly seen without any obstruction, either from the fingers or the other cards.
When you have thus spread them out designedly in fact, but apparently at random show them to one of the spectators, requesting
him to think of a card, and at the same time take care to move the
hand a little, so as to describe a segment of a circle, in order that
the audience may catch sight of the king of spades, without noticing
that the other cards are all partially concealed.
Then shuffle the
cards, but in doing so you must not lose sight of the king of spades,
which you will then lay on the table face downward. You may then
tell the person who has thought of a card that the one in his mind is
on the table, and request him to name it.
Should he name the king
of spades, which he would be most likely to do, you will of course
turn it up and show it to the company, who, if they are not acquainted with the trick, will be very much astonished. If, however, be
should name some other card say the queen of clubs you must tell
him that his memory is defective, and that that card could not have
been the card he first thought of. Whilst telling him this which
you must do at as great length as you can, in order to gain timeshuffle the cards rapidly, and fipparently without nnj particular pur^
pose, until your eye catches the card he has just named (the queen of
Put it on the top of the pack, and still appearing to be
clubs).
engrossed with other thoughts, go through the first false shuffle to
make believe that you have no particular card in view. When you
have done shuffling, take care to leave the queen of clubs on the top
of the pack; then take the pack in your left hand, and the king of
spades in your right, and while dexterously exchanging the queen of
What must I do, gentlemen,
clubs for the king of spades, say,
that my trick should not be a failure ? What card should I have in
my right hand :" They will not fail to call out the queen of clubs,
upon which you will turn it up, and they will see that you have been
suc(;essfLTl.
This trick, when well executed, always has a good effect,
whether the spectator thinks of the card you extended him to think of,
or, from a desire to complicate matters, of some other.
It, however,
requires considerable presence of mind, and the power of concealing
from your audience what your real object is.
miiRfc
—
—
—
—
' *
To
Tell lioAv
Many Cards a Person Takes
of a Pack, and to Specify £ach Card.— To
out
perform
HOW TO ENTERTAIN
53
A SOCIAL PAHTY
this, you must so dispose a piquet pack of cards, that you can easi'y
remember the order in which tliey are placed. Suppose, for instance
they are placed according to the words in the following line:
Seven Aces, Eight Kings, Nine Queens, and Ten Knaves
and that ever}- card be oi a different suite, following each oiher in this
Then in the eight first
order; Spades, Clubs, Hearts, and Diamonds.
cards will be the Seven of Spades, Ace of Clubs, Eight of Hearts,
King of Diamonds, Nine of Spades, Queen of Clubs, Ten of Hearts,
and Knave of Diamonds, and so of the rest.
You show that the cards are x^l^^^d promiscuously, and you offer
them with their backs upwards to any one, that he may draw whq.t
quantity he pleases; you then dexterously look at the card that preWhen he has
cedes and that which follows those he has taken.
counted the cards, which is not to be done in your presence, (and in
order to give you time for recollection, you tell him to do it twice
over, that he may be certain), you then take them from him, mix
them with a pack, shuffle, and tell him to shuffle.
Daring all this time you recollect, by the loregoing line, all the
cards he took out; and ai you lay them down, one by one, you
name each
card.
Unless a person has a most excellent memory, he had better not attempt the performance of the above amusement, as the least forgetfulnesswill spoil the whole, and make the operator appear ridiculous.
To let Twenty Persons !>ra\v Twenty Cards, and
make each Draw the Same. -Let any person draw a card
it in the pack again, but where you know where
again shuffle the cards as before directed then let another
person draw a card, and be sure he takes the same the other did proceed in the same way with all the persons but the one who may be
last, who is to draw another card, which also return to the pack, and
shuffle till you have brought both the cards together.
Then, showing
the last card to the company, the other will show the trick.
from a pack, and put
to find
it
;
;
;
To Make a card Jump out of the Pack and run
on the Tahle. — This feat if well managed, w411 appear marvelous.
Having forced a card upon one of the company, after shuffling it up
with the rest of the pack, you will know the card by fet ling. You
then take a piece of wax and put it under the thumb nail of your
right hand, and by this wax you fasten an end of a hair to your thumb,
and the other to the chosen card spread the cards upon the table,
and make use of some magic words, when, by drawing about your
right hand, the chosen card is conducted round the table.
;
5J:
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
To Burn A
SOCIAL PARTY.
and
Afterwards Find it in
a trick out of which the professors of the art of
legerdemain make much capital. In order to carry it out successfully,
You, in the first
it is necessary to observe the following directions
place, borrow from the spectators three watches, which are placed in
boxes resembling dice-boxes, and then laid upon a table and covered
with a napkin. You then hand a pack of cards to one of the company,
'Watcllt— This
Card,
a
is
;
selects one at random, and it is thereupon entirely burnt, and
the ashes put into a l30x. Shortly afterwards the box is opened, and
the spectators are puzzled to find that the ashes are not there. The
three watches are then brought out and put on a plate, and one of the
company, at your request, selects one and opens it and the spectators perceive, with even moro astonishment than before, that a portion
of the burnt card is below the glass of the watch, and that in the
watch-case underneath the watch is a miniature fac-simile of the card
destroyed. It is time now that we instructed our readers as to the
modus operandi by which this entertaining trick is performed. Having informed your confederate for it is necessary that you should
have one of the company in your confidence of the suite and denomination of the card chosen, he stretches forward his arm and takes
one of the watches from the table, and, unobserved by the rest of the
company, deposits in it what is necessar3^ The napkin which covers
the watches must be supported by bottles or articles of a similar
shape, otherwise your confederate would not be able to take away the
watch without being detected. The ashes of the burnt card are made
to disappear from the box by having a double lid, so arranged that
when the box is closed the upper lid will fall upon the ashes and as
it fits closely to the bottom, the deceived spectator will tbink that the
ashes have really vanished, and that the remnants are in process of
being formed afresh into the miniature card which is discovered in
the watch.
and he
;
—
—
;
To
a Card
a
8eivf1
Table.— Request one of
Throug^li
the company to draw a card from the pack, examine it, and then return it. Then make the pass— or ii you cannot make the pass, make
use of the long card
and bring the card chosen to the top of the pack,
and shuffle by means of any of the false shuffles before described
without losing sight of the card. After shuffling the pack several
times, bring the card to the top again.
Then place the pack on the
table about two inches from the edge near which you are sitting,
and having previously slightly dampened the back of your right hand,
you strike the pack a sharp blow and the card will acAere to it. You
—
HOW
TO ENTERTAIN A SOCIAL PARTY.
55
then pnt yonr hand very rapidly underneath the table, and taking off
with your left hand the card which has stuck to your right hand, you
show it to your audience, who will at once recognize in it the card
You must be
that was drawn at the commencement of the trick.
careful while performing this trick not to allow any of the spectators
to get behind or at the side of the table, but keep them directly in
iront, otherwise the illusion would be discovered.
To Produce a Mouse
frou^
a Pacli of Cards.— Kave
a pack of cards fastened together at the edges, but open in the middle
like a box, a whole card being glued on as a cover, and many loose
ones placed above it, which require to be dexterously shuffled, so
The bottom must likethat the entire may seem a real pack of cards.
wise be a whole card, glued to the box on one side only, yielding immediately to exterior pressure, and serving as a door by which you
convey the mouse into the box.
Being thus prepared, and holding
the bottom tight with your hand, require one of the company to place
his open hands together, and tdl him you mean to produce somethingvery marvelous from this pack of cards place the cards then in his
hands, and while you engage his attention in conversation, take the
box in the middle, thro^ the pack aside, and the mouse will remain in
the hands of the person who held the cards.
;
To IflaRe a Card
Fac!t %vitIiout
up into tlie Air
Touched.—
§pring^
fronft
the
One of the company
beiiiij*
havifig drawn a card, the draw-card is shuffled up with the rest of
the pack. The pack is then put into a kind of square spoon placed
upright upon a bottle, which serves as a pedestal, and at the company's pleasure the card which was drawn instantly flies up in the
air.
EXPLANATION.
Having forced a card upon one of the company (see explanation
to the exchange of card), the pack must then be placed in the spoou,
so that the chosen card may lean on a pin bent in the form of a hook.
This pin is fastened to a thread, and ascending through the pack leans
upon the upper end of the spoon
then it descends under the stage
;
through the table. In this disposition the confederate cannot pull the
thread without dragging along with it the hook and card, which causes
it to be perceived as flying in the air.
The thread slides upon the
blunt edge of the spoon as easily as if it ran in a pulley. In order
to place the cards in the spoon quick enough that the company may
perceive no preparation, care must be taken that another pack is dex-
5G
HOVr TO EXTEBTAIN A SOCIAL PAETY.
terously put on the table. The chosen card in the other, with the
book and thread, must be previously prepared as described.
To Turn a €ard into a Birdo— Having a live bird in your
sleeve, take a card
in your hand, exhibit it, and then draw it into
your sleeve with your thumb and little finger, giving the aim a shake
sufficient to bring the bird into your hand, which you may then produce and let fly.
To make the Court Cards always come
—
Togetli-
er« Take the pack, and separate all the kings, queens, and kinaves.
Put these all together into any part of the pack you fancy, and inloim
one of the company that he cannot in twelve cuts distui'li their order.
The chances are 500 to 1 in your favor but with a novice the feat becomes impossible. This is a very amusing and easy trick.
This trick may also be rendered more wonderiul by placing one
half of the above number of cards at the bottom and the other at the
;
top of the pack.
ToMoldfoiflr King^s or four Keiaves inyourliand,
€haii|;^e theau ^laddenfiy into BSanSi Cards,
then iBBtO Four Aces. — You must have cards made tor the pur-
and to
—
pose of this feat half cards, as they may be properly termed that
is,
one half kings or knaves and the other h^ If aces. When ycu
lj,y the aces one over the other, nothing but the king or knaves will
be seen. Then turning the kings or knaves downwards, the four
aces will be seen.
You must have two perfect cards, one a king or
knave, to cover one of the aces, or else it will be seen
and the
other an ace to lay over the kings or knaves.
When you wish to
make them all appear blank cards, lay the cards a little lower, and by
hiding the aces they will appear white on both fides. You may then
ask the company which they choose, and exhibit the kings, aces, or
;
;
blanks, as required.
To Bring: a Card which has hcen Thrown oirt of
Pack As:ain. —After you have
the IrVindow into the
shuffled the pack and placed it upon the table, you let any person
draw forth the lowest card, of which there are two alike, at the bottom of the pack ; tear it in small pieces, and throw them oiH of the
v/indow.
You then assure the company that the pieces just thrown out will
join themselves .together again, and return as a whole card to the
pack.
You raise the window, and call come, come, ccme !" Then
'
'
HOW TO ENTERTAIN A
SOCIAL PARTY.
57
table, assuring the spectators that the mntilated card
has returned complete to its old place in the pack and let them
satisfy themselves that such is the fact.
approach the
;
in ftie Pack:, and tliroiig^li a flandkerwhatever Card a Person laas I>ra\vn.— Give
To Find
chief,
and dividing the pack in two,
the pack for a card to be drawn from it
Make the pass
desire that the chosen card be placed in the middle.
Put
at this place, and the card will nov/ be at the top of the pack.
it on the table, cover it with a rather thin handkerchief, and take the
Turn
first card under it, pretending, however, to feel about for it.
over the handkerchief, and show that this card was the one drawn.
;
To Conjure a
certain Card into your Pocket.
—You take beforehand any card from
a complete pack, say a queen
pocket, after having named the card to
your accompHce. You then Land the pack to the latter, and request
him to look at a card in the pack, to note it, and then place the pack
upon the table again. Your confederate does as he is directed. You
then ask him what was the card he selecte^l, and he will of course
"I should be much obliged to you," you
answer the queen of hearts.
reply, **if you would show me that card again." Your confederate
examines the cards, but cannot find it, and at last says that it is not
now in the pack.
You now draw the queen of hearts from your pocket, and show it
to the astonished company.
of hearts,
To
and put
it
in
y(.>ur
Queens.—
You take
Chang^e Five King^s into Five
four kings, and draw a sharp knife gently across the middle of them,
where the two busts meet. Peel the picture carefully from one-half
of the cards, and paste upon the blank part the four hair pictures of
four queens, which have been peeled off in the same manner. In
this way you have four cards, each representing both a king and a
queen.
To these prepared carrls you join an ordinary king and queen.
These cards you spread outia a fan-like shape, from the left to the
right, and in such a manner that only the kings are visible.
This is
easily done, if you keep the ordinary king at the end of the fan to
the right, and the queen concealed behind it. You show the five
kings, say that you will change them into five queens, blow upon the
cards, reverse them, placing the king behind the queen, and display
them as five queens.
58
HOY/ TO ENTEKTAIN A SOCIAL PAKTY.
To tell Throui^li a Wiiie-Glass wliat Cards have
been Turned*— The picture cards have commonly a narrow stripe
This border is usually narrower at one end of the
You place the picture cards in such a
at the other.
manner that either all the broader or all the narrower borders arc
placed uppermost. You now request a spectator to turn one of the
cards while you are absent from the room.
On your return you examine all the cards through a wine-glass, and easily discover the one
which has been turned, as its narrow border now lies on a level with
the broader borders of the other cards. If they try to mystify you by
turning none of the cards, you will easily see that this is the case.
for the border.
card than
it is
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Flower and Shell Work Antique, Grecian, and Theorem Painting
Diaphame
Specimens
Cone AVork Anglo-Japanese Work Decalcomanie
Leather Work Modelling in Clay Transferring; Crayon Drawing Photograph
Coloring, etc, etc. A very complete book, and one that no young lady having
spare time can atford to be without. Mailed for 20 cents.
;
;
:
;
;
;
;
;
;
The Dancer's Guide and Bail-Room Companion.— Including Etiquette of the Ball-Eoom. This is one of the best and most complete books
ever published, and it contains all that is requiied to know, by the most plain or
fashionable, of ball-room etiquette, behavior, manners, etc., besides containing
full and minute directions for aUof the popular and fashionable dances, with ample
explanations, calls, etc. Mailed for 25 cents.
The Magic
Dial.
—A
perfectly
new
invention,
by the use of which
It is simsecret correspondence may be carried on without the fear of detection.
ple, reliable, and can be used by any person.
By its use the postal card is made
as private as a sealed letter. It is just the thing for lovers. Mailed for 25 cenls,
or two for 40 cents.
How
to Entertain a Social Party.— A Collection of Tableaux,
Games, Amusing Experiments, Diversions. Card Tricks, Parlor Magic, PhilosophiProfusely Illustrated. This book contains chaste and enjoyable amusement and entertainment enough for a whole winter. Mailed for
cal Recreations, etc.
25 cents.
Shadow Pantomime of Mother Goose.— A miniature theatre
for the children, with stage, scenery, figures, and everything complete, to perform
the laughable Shadow Pantomime of Mother Goose. A book of explanations,
with 14 engravings, accompanies
How to Write
it.
Mailed for 30 cents.
Short-Hand.— By
the most ordinary intelligence
lectures, speeches, etc.
Every Lady Her
may
the aid of this book any person of
learn to write short-hand, and report sermons,
Mailed for 25 cents.
Own
Dressmaker.— A new book
making, Bleaching, Ironing, Renovating, Dyeing,
Address
etc.,
etc
on DressMailed for 20 cents.
FRAIVK M. RE£D,
139
Eii^litli Street,
New Tork.
;
;
Good Books Mailed on Eeceipt
of Price.
and Marriage;
or, The Mysteries of Making Love
entirely new work on i most intei*esting subject.
Contents.— First steps in courtship ; Advice to both parties at the outset ; Introduction to the lady's family; Kestrictions imposed by etiquette; What the lady
should observe in early courtship ; What the suitor should observe Etiquette as
to presents ; The proposal Mode of refusal when not approved ; Conduct to bo
observed by a rejected suitor ; Kef usal by the lady's parents or guardians ; Etiquette of an engagement ; Demeanor of the betrothed pair; Should a courtship be
long or short ; Preiicninary etiquette of a wedding ; Fixing the day ;
to be
married ; The trosseau Duties to be attended to by the bridegroom
should
be asked to the wedding ; Duties of the bridesmaids and bridegroomsmen ; Etiquette of a wedding ; Costume of bride, bridesmaids, and bridegroom Arrival at
the church The marriage ceremonial ; Eegistry of the marriage ; Return home,
and wedding breakfast Departure for the honeymoon ; Wedding cards Modem
practice of *' No Cards " E/Gception and return of wedding visits ; Practical advice
to a newly married couple. Mailed for 15 cents.
Ck>urtsllip
fully
Explained.— This
is
an
;
;
;
;
How
Who
;
;
;
;
;
——A
How
Hand-Book of Etiquette and Guide to True
to Behave.
Politeness.— Contents. Etiquette and its uses ; Introductions; Cutting acquaintances ; Letters of introduction Street etiquette Domestic etiquette and duties
The lady's toilet The gentleVisiting Receiving comi)any Evening parties
man's toilet Invitations; Etiquette of the ball-room ; General rules of conversation Bashfulness, and how to overcome it Dinner parties; Table etiquette
Travelling
Visitiug caids
Lie tter- writing
Carving
Servants
Conclusion.
This is the best book of the kind yet published, and every person wishing to be considered well-bred, who wishes to understand the customs of good society, and to
avoid incon-eet and vulgar habits, should send for a copy.
Mailed for 15
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
cents.
The Model Letter-Writer. — A
Coraprehensive
and
Complete
Guide and Assistant for those who desire to carry on epistolary correspondencecontaining instructions for writing Letters of Inti-oduction Letters on Business
Letters ot Recommendation Applicatious for Employment Letters of Congratulation ; Letters of Condolence Letters of Friendship and Relationship
Love
Letters; Notes of Invitation; Letters of Favor, of Advice, and of Eucuse, etc.^
This is an invaluable book for
etc., together with appropriate Answers to each.
those persons who have not had sufficient practice to enable thezn to write letters
without great effort. Mailed for 15 cents.
;
;
;
;
;
The Complete Fortune-Teller and Dream Book.—This
book contains a complete Dictionary of Dreams, alphabetically arranged, with a
clear interpretation of each dream, and the lucky numbers that belong to it. It
includes Palmistry, or telling fortunes by the lines of the hand ; fortune-telling by
the grounds in a tea or coffee cup ; how to read your future life by the white of an
egg ; tells how to know who your future husband will be, and how soon you will
be married ; fortune- telling by cards ; Hymen's lottery good and bad omens, etc.,
•
etc.
Mailed for 15 cents.
;
The Lover's Companion. — A
book no lover should be without.
It gives Handkerchief, Parasol, Glove and Fan Flirtations; also, Window and
Dini ng- table Signalling The Language of Flowers T^qw ti?lfifi«dpliMouHlv Love
Letters, and how to write them, with specimens; Bashfulness afiQ llmiaity, and
Low to overcome them, etc., etc. Mailed tor 25 cents.
;
Address
;
;
FRAIVK M. REEI>,
139 £is:l&tU Street,
Nei;r
Xork*
HEALTH
HINTS.
A new book showing how to Acquire and Retain Sodily Symmetry, Health, Vigor,
and Beauty. Its contents are as follows Laws of Beauty Air, Sunshine, Water,
and Food—Work and Best— Dress and Ornament—The Hair and its Management—
Skin and Complexion— the Mouth The Eyes, Ears and Nose— The Neck, Hands, and
Peet— Growth and Marks that are Enemies of Beauty— Cosmetics and Perfumery.
—
:
—
Fat People.— It
gives
made Lean, Comely and
liCau People.— It
—the Fat
ample rules how Corpulency may be Cured
Active.
also gives directions, the following of
Lean, Angular, Bony or Sharp Visaged People, to be
«ray Hair.— It
tells
w ithout the aid of Dyes,
which will enable
Plump and Eosy
how Gray Hair may be Restored
to its
Skinned.
nalurd
color
Restorers, or Pomades.
Oaldiiess.— It
as
how to
gives ample directions for Restoiing Hair on Bald Heads, as well
stop Falling of the Hair, how to Curl the Hair, etc.
Beard and ^lustaclie.—It tells
what Young
Men
should do to acquire a
Fine Silky and Handsome Beard and Mustache.
and Pimples.—
Freckles
It gives full dii-ections for the Cure of Sunburn,
Freckles, Pimples, Wrinkles, Warts, etc., so that they can be entirely
removed.
Cosmetics.— This chapter, among other things, gives an Analysis of Perry's
Moth and Freckle Lotion, Balm of White LiHes, Hagan's Magnolia Balm, Laird's
Bloom of Youth, Phalon's Enamel, Clark's Bestorative for the Hair, Chevalier's Life
for the Hair, Ayer's
Hair Vigor, Professor Wood's Hair Restorative, Hair Restorer
America, Gray's Hair Restorative, Phalon's Yitalia, Ring's Vegetable
Ambrosia,
Mi-s. Allen's World's Hair Restorer,
Hall's Vegetable SiciUan Hair Renewer, Martha
AVashmgton Hair Restorative,
etc.,
m these
etc., etc. (no room for more), showing how the lead,
mixtures cause disease and oltentimes premature death. MaUed for
60 cents.
The Manag^ement and Care
of Infants
and
Cliildrcn.-By
Geo Combe, M.D. This is the best book ever written on
the subject, and is one that
no mother of a family can afford to be without Its
usual price in the book
$1.50,
but
it
will
be mailed—^/ic
Address
latest
and most
FRANK
139
stores is
complete edition— for only 75 cents.
M. REED,
£ig:litli Street,
rVcw York.
NEW
OLD SECRETS AND
DISCOVERIES
i
Containiugr Inform ation of Rare Value for All Classes, in
all Conditions of Society^.
It tells all about Electrical Psychology showing how you can biologize any person,
and while under the influence he will do anything: you may wish him. no matter how
ridiculous it may be, and he cannot help doing it also, how to mesmerize^a, secret
that has been sold over and over again for $10 how to make a person at a distance
think of you, and how to charm those you meet and make them love you, whether
,
j
;
they will or not.
It tells how to make the wonderful Magic or Invisible Photographs and Spirit
Eggs of Pharo's Serpents, which when lighted, though but the size of
a pea, there issues from it a coiling serpent how to perform the Davenport Brothers'
" Spirit Mysteries " how to copy any kind of drawing or picture, and more wonderful still, to print pictures from the print itself how to -^ake gold and silver from
block-tin (the least said about which, the better) also, how to take impressions from
coins, and how to imitate gold and silver.
Pictures; the
;
;
:
;
It tells how to make a horse appear as though he was badly foundered to
make a horse temporarily lame how to make him stand by Lis food and not eat it
how to cure a horse from the crib or sucking wind how to put a young countenance
on the horse how to cover up the heaves how to make him appear a^ if he had the
glanders; how to make a true-pulling horse baulk; how to nerve d horse thut i3
;
;
;
;
lame,
etc., etc.
;
These horse secrets are being continually sold at one dollar each.
It fells how to make a cheap Galvanic Battery how to plate and r:ild without a
battery how to make a candle burn all night how to make a clock for £.3 c:nts
how to detect counterfeit money how to banish and prevent mosquitoes from
;
;
;
;
;
to make yellow butter in winter Circassian curling fluid Fympathetic
Writing Ink; Cologne Water; Artificial honey; Stammering how to
make large noses small ; to cure drunkenness to copy letters without a press to
obtain fresh blown flowers in winter to make a good burning candle from lard
and scores of other wonderful things for which there is no room to mention. " Old
SccreAs and New Discoveries " is worth $5 to any person, but it will be mailed to any
address on receipt of only 50 cents.
biting
;
how
;
;
or Secret
;
;
:
;
:
Addvess
FRAIVK
Ifl.
REED,
139 Si^litli
Street,
New
York,
'-p^Sy
^^^^^:^^i
*:.,^
m^^
^<a
^:i^
Pt^-Kr^^
J
^^.
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