Statutory guidance - mobile crushing and screening

Statutory guidance - mobile crushing and screening
www.defra.gov.uk
Process Guidance Note 3/16(12)
Statutory guidance for mobile crushing and
screening
September 2012
© Crown copyright 2012
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Defra would like to acknowledge the work of the
Environment Agency‟s Local Authority Unit in the
drafting of this guidance note.
Process Guidance Note 3/16(12)
Statutory guidance for mobile crushing and
screening
Revision of the guidance
The electronic version of this publication is updated from time to time with new
or amended guidance. Table 0.1 is an index to the latest changes (minor
amendments are generally not listed).
Table 0.1 - Revision of the guidance
PG 3/16 Publication version
i
Contents
Revision of the guidance.......................................................................................................i
Contents .............................................................................................................................ii
1. Introduction .................................................................................................................1
Legal basis ....................................................................................................................1
Simplified or standard permits .......................................................................................2
Who is the guidance for?...............................................................................................2
Updating the guidance...................................................................................................2
Consultation ..................................................................................................................3
Policy and procedures ...................................................................................................3
When to use another note rather than PG3/16 ..............................................................3
2. Timetable for compliance and reviews......................................................................4
Existing processes or activities......................................................................................4
Permit Reviews .............................................................................................................5
3. Activity description .....................................................................................................6
Regulations ...................................................................................................................6
Mobile crushing .............................................................................................................7
4. Emission limits, monitoring and other provisions .................................................11
Visible Emissions.........................................................................................................11
Notifying regulator of operations..................................................................................12
Monitoring, investigating and reporting........................................................................13
Abnormal Events .........................................................................................................13
5. Control techniques....................................................................................................14
Summary of best available techniques ........................................................................14
Techniques to control emissions from contained sources ...........................................15
Process operations......................................................................................................17
Techniques to control fugitive emissions .....................................................................18
Air Quality....................................................................................................................20
Management ...............................................................................................................20
6. Summary of changes ................................................................................................23
7. Further information ...................................................................................................24
Sustainable consumption and production (SCP) .........................................................24
Health and safety.........................................................................................................24
Further advice on responding to incidents...................................................................25
Appendix 1 - Application form ........................................................................................26
Appendix 2 - Model Permit..............................................................................................33
List of Tables
Table 0.1 - Revision of the guidance .................................................................................... i
Table 2.1 - Compliance timetable ........................................................................................4
Table 3.1 - Regulations listing activities ...............................................................................6
Table 4.1 - Emission limits, monitoring and other provisions .............................................11
Table 5.1 - Summary of control techniques .......................................................................14
Table 6.1 - Summary of changes.......................................................................................23
Table 1 - Emission limits, monitoring and other provisions .............................................36
List of Figures
Figure 3.1 - Outline diagram of a mobile primary jaw crusher (wheeled type) .....................9
Figure 3.2 - Flow Diagram of Crushing and Screening Process ........................................10
PG 3/16 Publication version
ii
1.
Introduction
Legal basis
1.1
This note applies to the whole of the UK. It is issued by the Secretary of
State, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Scottish Government and
the Department of the Environment in Northern Ireland, (DoE NI), to give
guidance on the conditions appropriate for the control of emissions into
the air from mobile crushing and screening. It is published only in
electronic form and can be found on the Defra website. It supersedes
PG3/16 (04) and NIPG3/16 (Version 2).
1.2
This guidance document is compliant with the Code of Practice on
Guidance on Regulation page 6 of which contains the "golden rules of
good guidance". If you feel this guidance breaches the code or you
notice any inaccuracies within the guidance, please contact us.
1.3
This is one of a series of statutory notes1 giving guidance on the Best
Available Techniques (BAT)2. The notes are all aimed at providing a
strong framework for consistent and transparent regulation of
installations regulated under the statutory Local Air Pollution Prevention
and Control (LAPPC) regime in England and Wales, Scotland and
Northern Ireland. The note will be treated as one of the material
considerations when determining any appeals against a decision made
under this legislation.
1.4
In general terms, what is BAT for one installation in a sector is likely to be
BAT for a comparable installation. Consistency is important where
circumstances are the same. However, in each case it is, in practice, for
regulators (subject to appeal) to decide what is BAT for each individual
installation, taking into account variable factors such as the configuration,
size and other individual characteristics of the installation, as well as the
locality (e.g. proximity to particularly sensitive receptors).
1.5
The note also, where appropriate, gives details of any mandatory
requirements affecting air emissions which are in force at the time of
publication, such as those contained in Regulations or in Directions from
the Government. In the case of this note, at the time of publication there
were no such mandatory requirements.
1
this and other notes in the series are issued as statutory guidance in England and Wales under regulation
64(2) of the Environmental Permitting Regulations. The notes are also issued as statutory guidance in
Northern Ireland and as guidance in Scotland.
2
further guidance on the meaning of BAT can be found for England and Wales, Scotland, and
Northern Ireland.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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Simplified or standard permits
1.6
Most of the activities covered by this note will have essentially the same
characteristics and it is expected that the application form and model
permit in Appendices 1 and 2 will normally be used in order to simplify
for business the process of applying for a permit and to simplify for
regulators the process of issuing a permit. (See also the relevant LAPPC
charging scheme for reduced application and subsistence charges for
simplified permits).
If there are good reasons to consider diverging from normal use of the
model permit, the starting point for drafting any additional conditions
should be the arrowed bullets in the main body of this note.
Who is the guidance for?
1.7
This guidance is for:
Regulators

local authorities in England and Wales, who must
have regard to the guidance when determining applications for
permits and reviewing extant permits;

the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA)
in Scotland, and district councils or the Northern Ireland Environment
Agency, (NIEA), in Northern Ireland.
Operators who are best advised also to have regard to it when making
applications and in the subsequent operation of their installation.
Members of the public who may be interested to know what the
Government considers, in accordance with the legislation, amounts to
appropriate conditions for controlling air emissions for the generality of
installations in this particular industry sector.
Updating the guidance
1.8
The guidance is based on the state of knowledge and understanding, at
the time of writing, of what constitutes BAT for this sector. The note may
be amended from time to time to keep up with developments in BAT,
including improvements in techniques, changes to the economic
parameters, and new understanding of environmental impacts and risks.
The updated version will replace the previous version on the Defra
website and will include an index to the amendments.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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1.9
Reasonable steps will be taken to keep the guidance up-to-date to
ensure that those who need to know about changes to the guidance are
informed of any published revisions. However, because there can be
rapid changes to matters referred to in the guidance – for example to
legislation – it should not be assumed that the most recent version of this
note reflects the very latest legal requirements; these requirements
apply.
Consultation
1.10 This note has been produced in consultation with relevant trade bodies,
representatives of regulators including members of the Industrial
Pollution Liaison Committee, and other potentially-interested
organisations.
Policy and procedures
1.11 General guidance explaining LAPPC and setting out the policy and
procedures is contained in separate documents for England and Wales,
Scotland and Northern Ireland.
When to use another note rather than PG3/16
1.12 Quarry processes using mobile plant for crushing or screening should
use the requirements contained within PG3/08, unless the mobile plant
has its own separate permit, in which case the requirements of this note
PG 3/16 should be referred to.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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2.
Timetable for compliance and reviews
Existing processes or activities
2.1
This note contains all the provisions from previous editions which have
not been amended or removed. For installations in operation at the date
this note is published, the regulator should have already issued or varied
the permit having regard to the previous editions. If they have not done
so, this should now be done.
2.2
The new provisions of this note and the dates by which compliance with
these provisions is expected are listed in Table 2.1, together with the
paragraph number where the provision is to be found. Compliance with
the new provisions should normally be achieved by the dates shown.
Permits should be varied as necessary, having regard to the changes
and the timetable.
Table 2.1 - Compliance timetable
Guidance
Relevant paragraph/row in
this note
Compliance date
There are no new provisions in this note likely of themselves to result in a need
to vary existing permit conditions. For a full list of changes made by this note,
excluding very minor ones, see Table 6.1.
2.3
Replacement plant should normally be designed to meet the appropriate
standards specified for new installations/activities.
2.4
Where provisions in the preceding guidance note have been deleted or
relaxed, permits should be varied as necessary as soon as reasonably
practicable. It is expected that local authorities will aim to vary existing
permits so as to convert them into the model permit format in Appendix 2
within 12 months of the publication of this note.
2.5
For new activities, the permit should have regard to the full standards of
this guidance from the first day of operation.
2.6
For substantially changed activities, the permit should normally have
regard to the full standards of this guidance with respect to the parts of
the activity that have been substantially changed and any part of the
activity affected by the change, from the first day of operation.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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Permit Reviews
2.7
Under LAPPC, the legislation requires permits to be reviewed periodically
but does not specify a frequency. It is considered for this sector that a
frequency of once every eight years ought normally to be sufficient for
the purposes of the appropriate Regulations3. Further guidance on permit
reviews is contained in the appropriate Guidance Manual for England
and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Regulators should use any
opportunities to determine the variations to permits necessitated by
paragraph 2.2 above in conjunction with these reviews.
2.8
Conditions should also be reviewed where complaint is attributable to the
operation of the process and is, in the opinion of the regulator, justified.
3
For details see England and Wales General Guidance Manual chapter 26, Scotland, Practical
guide section 10, Northern Ireland Part B Guidance page 9, Northern Ireland Part C Guidance
chapter 17.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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3. Activity description
Regulations
3.1
This note applies to LAPPC installations for mobile crushing and
screening. The activities are listed for regulation in Table 3.1.
Table 3.1 - Regulations listing activities
LAPPC
Activity
Part A
England
and Wales
Scotland
Northern
Ireland
EPR
Schedule 1
reference
PPC
Schedule 1
reference
PPC
Schedule 1
reference
n/a
n/a
n/a
Part B
Crushing grinding or size
reduction, with machinery
designed for that purpose
of: bricks, tile or concrete or
any designated mineral:
Screening the product
Section 3.5
Part B
Section 3.5,
Part B
n/a
Part B
NI
Crushing, grinding or other
size reduction, other than
the cutting of stone, or the
grading, screening or
heating of any designated
mineral or mineral product
n/a
n/a
Section 3.5
Part B
Part C
Crushing grinding or size
reduction, with machinery
designed for that purpose of
bricks, tile or concrete:
Screening the product
n/a
n/a
Section 3.5
Part C
The links are to the original version of the regulations. A consolidated version is not
available on www.legislation.co.uk
3.2
Asbestos
It should be noted that under a different regulatory regime, demolition
contractors are required to inspect a site. Where the presence of
asbestos is suspected then hazardous waste regulations must be
complied with. Asbestos contaminated waste is required to be removed
to a site authorised to take asbestos. A waste consignment note is
required for each load and a paper trail of movements of such waste is
kept.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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3.3
Waste exemptions
In England and Wales, LAPPC permits may have conditions relating to
waste. There is guidance on waste exemptions and how they interact
with LAPPC permits in the General Guidance Manual for England and
Wales.
3.4
Triviality
There is guidance on triviality for mobile crushers in the General
Guidance Manuals for England and Wales, Northern Ireland and
Scotland.
3.5
Temporary transfers
In England, local authorities operate a system of temporary transfers for
hired plant. There is guidance in the General Guidance Manual for
England and Wales.
Mobile crushing
3.6
Crushing and Screening
This note applies to the crushing, grinding or other size reduction, with
machinery designed for that purpose, of bricks, tiles or concrete, and to
mineral products designated by regulation.
3.7
This note also applies to installations where demolition material is
screened by machine prior to crushing, and to any other pre-treatment
activity and the screening of the product. It also applies to screening
designated minerals.
3.8
(Note that screening of demolition material is not prescribed as long as it
is both carried out at a installation separate from any crushing and
carried out to material which has not been crushed.)
3.9
The construction of stockpiles of crushed and screened demolition
arisings at a recycling centre operated by the same person as the mobile
plant used at that site, should normally be regarded as part of the
process. On the other hand, the loading of crushed material into vehicles
at a demolition site when undertaken by another contractor, would not be
part of the process.
3.10 Further guidance on the authorisation of mobile plant is given in General
Guidance Manual England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.
3.11 Mobile crushing plant is commonly used on demolition sites, at recycling
facilities and at quarries.
Mobile crushing plant
3.12 Mobile crushers are often jaw crushers which have a stationary steel
jaw working with a moving jaw to crush and pulverise material.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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3.13 In mobile cone crushers, the crushing takes place between a truncated
revolving cone and an outer chamber.
3.14 In rotary impact crushers, the feedstock is struck by rapidly rotating
blowbars, and is thrown against the chamber wall
3.15 Free standing mobile crushing plants may be mounted on tracks,
although this is not always the case. They tend to be no more than 20
metres in length, so can be used in confined spaces on small sites.
These units are usually fed by rubber tyred loaders, back actors or dump
trucks. Crushed material may be screened to separate two size ranges
of particles, and then is carried from the crusher by conveyor to be
stockpiled close to the plant.
Mobile screens
3.16 The material may be further screened either from the primary conveyor
or from the stockpile; the larger material may be transferred to secondary
or tertiary crushing units, screened again and stockpiled.
3.17 The screens are large sieves. They vibrate or rotate which causes the
particles to be moved across the screen thus sorting out the particles by
size. Screens can be integrated in the mobile crushing unit or can be
free-standing mobile plant. They are commonly used to sort materials
before crushing as well as after crushing.
3.18 Mobile crushing plant can be free-standing units or attachments to be
fitted to other plant such as an excavator. The vast majority of mobile
crushers are now tracked type which means they are delivered to site via
low loader and can be put to work within half an hour of arriving on site.
Pulverisers (munchers)
3.19 Concrete crushing attachments, known as pulverisors, can be fitted to
mini excavators or large excavators and lifted high up on large buildings,
for example to aid with the processing of waste using long reach
equipment. They can also be suspended from a mobile or tower crane to
obtain a longer reach. Pulverisors can crush between 5 - 6 tonnes of
material every hour.
Demolition waste
3.20 Mobile crushing plant can be used on site to process demolition waste.
Where construction is to follow demolition on the site, concrete and steel
can be recycled. Once material has been crushed and reduced in size,
the arisings can be used on site as piling mats, backfill or for the
construction of access roads. Recycling of onsite materials reduces the
need to bring in primary aggregate for such applications and reduces the
volume of waste material taken away to landfill. However, the option of
transferring the demolition material to fixed recycling sites should be
considered with regard to the optimisation of its potential and the
environmental impact of on site activities.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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3.21 With regard to the optimisation of the resources It is not ideal to mix the
different materials as crushing a mixture results in a very low quality end
product that is suitable only for fill. Separation of the materials leads to
products suitable for much higher specification uses.
Fixed aggregate recycling sites
3.22 Fixed aggregate recycling sites may comprise a range of recycling
activities. This PG note addresses the aggregate recycling where mobile
crushers are used. Planning conditions address issues relating to traffic
flow, noise and emissions to air (including stockpiles and visual impacts).
These sites have a waste management licence or a letter of exemption
which specifies the types of material allowed on the site.
3.23 All incoming material is visually inspected before acceptance on the
recycling site. It is also inspected on tipping. In the event of unwanted
material arriving on site it would be immediately returned.
3.24 Once the material is on site it is predominantly stocked in separate
incoming stockpiles, wherever possible, to optimise quality of product,
e.g. brick, concrete, asphalt/road planings. However, a mixture stockpile
is sometimes inevitable for example, contaminated brick/concrete mix.
3.25 The material from the stockpiles will be pre-screened as necessary - then
fed to the crusher and screened as described by the flow diagram.
Crushers and screens may be moved between stockpiles on site, and
between sites (by low loader).
Figure 3.1: Outline diagram of a mobile primary jaw crusher (wheeled type)
PG 3/16 Publication version
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Figure 3.2: Flow Diagram of Crushing and Screening Process
PG 3/16 Publication version
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4. Emission limits, monitoring and other
provisions
4.1 Emissions of the substances listed in Table 4.1 below should be
controlled.
4.2 The emission limits and provisions described in this section are
achievable using the best available techniques described in
Section 5. Monitoring of emissions should be carried out according
to the method specified in this section or by an equivalent method
agreed by the regulator. Where reference is made to a British,
European, or International standard (BS, CEN or ISO) in this
section, the standards referred to are correct at the date of
publication. (Users of this note should bear in mind that the
standards are periodically amended, updated or replaced.) The
latest information regarding the monitoring standards applicable can
be found at the Source Testing Association website. Further
information on monitoring can be found in Environment Agency
publications (M1) and (M2).
4.3 All activities should comply with the emission limits and provisions
with regard to releases in Table 4.1.
Table 4.1 - Emission limits, monitoring and other provisions
Substance
Particulate
matter
Source
Whole
process
Emission
limit/
provisions
Avoidance of
visible
emissions
crossing the
(construction)
site boundary
Type of
monitoring
Recorded
operator
observations
Monitoring
frequency
On start up
and on at
least two
more
occasions
each day
Visible Emissions
4.4 The aim is to prevent an emission from the site which is harmful or
offensive. This aim includes all sites, regardless of location. Proper
site management and use of environmental controls can create a
site that is substantially free from airborne particulate emissions due
to the process.
4.5 It is expected that the process can be controlled such that, even
during minor emission incidents that might arise from time to time,
there are no visible emissions more than about 10 metres from
plant, conveyor or stockpiles.
4.6 It is expected that any emission incidents will be brought under control
as soon as they are observed and visible emissions will not be
allowed to cross the site boundary.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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4.7
It should be noted that the permit only seeks to control emissions from
the permitted process and that other operations on site, not
controlled by the operator, such as demolition for example, may be
giving rise to emissions which if unacceptable should be regulated
using the appropriate regulatory regime.
4.8 Site operations likely to be of a long duration may require monitoring
stations to be set up around the site, with the operator using
deposition gauges to demonstrate that arrestment techniques are
controlling emissions satisfactorily. This would be a site-specific
provision depending upon the nature of the contract being
undertaken.
4.9 Emissions from engines should in normal operation be free from
visible smoke.

All other releases to air, other than condensed water vapour, should
be free from persistent visible emissions.

All emissions across the construction site boundary shall be free of
droplets.
4.10 Where there are problems that, in the opinion of the regulator, may be
attributable to the installation, such as local complaints of visual
emissions or where dust from the installation is being detected
beyond the site boundary, the operator should investigate in order
to find out which part of their operation(s) is the cause.
If this inspection does not lead to correction of the problem then the
operator should inform the regulator who will determine whether ambient
air monitoring is necessary. Ambient monitoring may either be by a
British Standard method or by a method agreed with the regulator.
Whilst problems are ongoing, visual checks should be made more
frequently. The time, location and result of these checks, along with
weather conditions such as indicative wind direction and strength, should
be recorded. Once the source of the emission is known, corrective
action should be taken without delay and where appropriate the regulator
may want to vary the permit in order to add a condition requiring the
particular measure(s) to be undertaken.
Notifying regulator of operations
4.11 The regulators need to be notified of mobile crusher activities, and this
also applies when mobile plant is brought onto a quarry site.

Before operations commence, the operator should inform the
regulator in whose area the mobile plant is to be operated.
The regulator is a Pollution Control or Environmental Health Department
of the local authority in whose area the plant is operating in England or
Wales, or district council in Northern Ireland, or the local SEPA office in
Scotland.

The operator should inform the regulator who issued the permit.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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Monitoring, investigating and reporting
4.12 The operator should monitor emissions, make tests and inspections of
the activity. The need for and scope of testing, (including the
frequency and time of sampling), will depend on local
circumstances.

Monitoring to identify the origin of a visible emission should be
undertaken. 
The operator should keep records of inspections, tests and
monitoring, including all non-continuous monitoring, inspections and
visual assessments. The records should be:


kept on site;

kept by the operator for at least two years; and

made available for the regulator to examine.
If any records are kept off-site they should be made available for
inspection within one working week of any request by the regulator.
Abnormal Events
4.13 The operator should respond to problems which may have an adverse
effect on emissions to air, for example dust emissions.


In the case of abnormal emissions, malfunction or breakdown leading
to abnormal emissions the operator should:

investigate and undertake remedial action immediately;

adjust the process or activity to minimise those emissions; and

promptly record the events and actions taken;

stop operations if the water suppression fails.
The regulator should be informed without delay, whether or not there
is related monitoring showing an adverse result:

if there is an emission that is likely to have an effect on the local
community; or

in the event of the failure of key arrestment plant, for example,
water suppression or water supply
PG 3/16 Publication version
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5. Control techniques
Summary of best available techniques
5.1
Table 5.1 provides a summary of the best available techniques that can
be used to control the process in order to meet the emission limits and
provisions in Section 4. Provided that it is demonstrated to the
satisfaction of the regulator that an equivalent level of control will be
achieved, then other techniques may be used.
Table 5.1 - Summary of control techniques
Sources of dust
Loading and unloading processes
 transfer of materials
Double handling transfer points
Aggregate stockpiles
Crushing, grinding, screening and
separation
Conveyors, conveyor transfer points
Roadways including haulage roads
External operations
 conveyors
 stockpiles
 roadways
PG 3/16 Publication version
Control techniques
Containment
Suppression
Reduced drop heights
 use of variable height conveyors
 use of chutes
Appropriate siting - away from site boundary especially if
near residential or other sensitive receptors
Site and process design
Appropriate siting - away from site boundary especially if
near residential or other sensitive receptors
Wind dynamics management
 use of fencing, bunding, profiling etc
Reduced drop heights
Suppression
 water and/or suppressants
 sufficient coverage by sprays
Covering
 below ground or covered stock bins
 dust covers
 housing
Containment
Dust arrestment
Suppression
Appropriate siting - away from site boundary especially if
near residential or other sensitive receptors
Containment
 wind boards
Appropriate siting - away from site boundary especially if
near residential or other sensitive receptors
Suppression
 appropriate siting and process design
Appropriate siting - away from site boundary especially if
near residential or other sensitive receptors
Wind dynamics management
 use of fencing, bunding, profiling etc.
14
Vehicles - bodies and wheels
Wheel-wash
Exhausts that do not point vertically down
Asbestos
Exclude from feedstock
Techniques to control emissions from contained sources
5.2
The crushing, grinding and screening plant and the stockpiles of crushed
material should be designed, set up and operated in such a way that any
substances released have the minimum impact on the environment and
people. The operator should have reviewed all available techniques, and
be able to demonstrate that the selection of process equipment and dust
control strategies represent BAT. In addition to technical and
technological means the use of BAT should incorporate adequate
training of site operatives and supervision of the process.
5.3
Best available techniques are required to control dust emissions, for
example from reception and storage of potentially dusty materials,
internal transportation (whether in vehicles, front loaders or on
conveyors), size reduction operations, stockpiles, loading and unloading.
Also other potential fugitive emissions, such as roads and other surfaces,
need to be controlled. The layout, design, construction and maintenance
of the process equipment is extremely important to control of emissions
and require the attention of experienced, competent personnel.
5.4
The main principles for preventing dust emissions are containment of
dusty processes and suppression of dust using water. Suppression
techniques need to be properly designed, used and maintained, in order
to be effective. For example:,

where water is used for dust suppression, processes require an
adequate supply of water and all water suppression systems
need adequate frost protection.
For information, the Health Protection Agency recommends consultation
with the HSE where water temperatures exceed 20°C see HSE guidance
on the control of legionella bacteria in water systems..
For information, in England and Wales, discharges from the use of water
suppression will be subject to Environment Agency regulation under
goundwater provisions of the Environmental Permitting Regulations
2010.
5.5
Asbestos should not be crushed or screened.

Asbestos should not be crushed or screened
Stockpiles and ground storage
5.6 Consideration should be given to the siting of potentially dusty stockpiles,
based upon such factors as the prevailing winds, proximity of neighbours
to the site boundary and site operations. Minimisation of drop height is
very important in stockpiling to reduce wind whipping of particulates.
Wherever possible, loading/unloading should take place at sheltered
points around the stockpile to prevent entrainment of dust in the wind.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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5.7
When necessary to control dust emissions from stockpiles, methods such
as limiting the height of stockpiles or using dust suppressants may be
used. Other possible controls include wind-breaks on stock piles,
bunding or fencing around the pile and strategic arrangement of
stockpiles. Periodic conditioning with water, according to weather
conditions, may be an appropriate measure. Installation of fixed water
sprays should be considered for long term stocking areas if appropriate
given the nature of the material stored. If necessary, covers or dust
suppressants should be used.

Loading to and from stockpiles, and construction and management of
stockpiles should be carried out in such a manner as to minimise
wind-borne dust, e.g. taking place at sheltered points.

No material should be stored in the open except for:

material that has been screened to remove material 3 mm and
under;

sand;

scalpings;

material used for road sub-bases (commonly known as "MOT
material", or "type 1" or "type 2" material) that has been
conditioned before deposition;

crusher run material that has been conditioned before deposition;

material under 3 mm where the volume is in excess of the
internal storage capacity (the internal storage capacity should be
approved by the local enforcing authority).

Where the only practicable option for the storage of material under
3mm is external stockpiles, particularly careful consideration should
be given to the guidance outlined in this guidance note.

Storage areas where there is vehicular movement should either have
a consolidated surface which should be kept clean and in good
repair, or should be kept wet. Sweeping, wetting or sealing are all
techniques that may be used to reduce dust emissions from roads.
The technique that should be used depends upon the type of road
under consideration.

To control dust emissions from stockpiles, storage bays should be
used. If necessary, covers or dust suppressants should be used.

When using storage bays, storage height should be lower than
external walls of the bays unless suppression is provided to control
emissions. Stock should not be piled forward of the bay.

Where dusty materials are stored, stockpiles should be wetted where
necessary to minimise dust emissions. Fixed water sprays should be
installed for long term stocking areas if appropriate.

Conditioning with water or proprietary conditioning agents should
take place at or before the point of discharge from the conveyor.

Stockpiles should be suitably profiled and conditioned with water or
proprietary conditioning agents, according to weather conditions.
PG 3/16 Publication version
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
All processed materials that have not been screened to remove
material under 3mm should be conditioned with water or proprietary
conditioning agents at or before the point of discharge onto the
stockpile.

Storage areas should be kept in a condition that does not give rise to
visible dust emissions.

Unused stocking areas should also be controlled to prevent visible
dust emissions.
Process operations
5.8
5.9
Crusher processes
The control of dust emissions from these processes is mainly by the use
of suppression and appropriate siting of equipment. Crushers can be
inter-linked with water flow detectors so that they cannot operate unless
a water supply is operational. High pressure, low volume water sprays
over the feed area should provide adequate dust control if operated
correctly.
Where the pressure of the water on site is not adequate to maintain the
dust suppression then extra pumps can be used to increase the water
pressure. Extra pumps can sometimes be necessary both in the event
that water is delivered by bowser and where it is delivered by mains
supply. (Some sites used retired fire engines)
5.10 Material with inherent moisture greater than 3%, e.g. sand or gravel,
would not be expected to give rise to emissions of dust, so the following
controls would probably not be necessary when such materials are being
handled. In winter materials may not require the same degree of
suppression in order to achieve the emission limits.
5.11 It is unlikely that screens give rise to significant quantities of airborne
dust as the top screen handles larger material and the lower screens
handling the finer material are enclosed. Materials should be deposited
carefully onto screens to minimise dust emissions.
5.12 Total containment might be an option. Crushers should be totally
contained or fitted with a water suppression system over the crusher
aperture. In air quality management areas declared for particulate matter,
containment may be needed

Crushers should be totally contained or fitted with a water
suppression system over the crusher aperture.

Where the use of water as a method of dust suppression is
necessary in order to meet the emission limits, it should be used. In
such circumstances, if water of the required pressure is not available
for use on the suppression system, then the process should not
operate.

Where water suppression does not provide adequate dust control to
comply with the emission limits then the process should be carried
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out under cover. If necessary dust extraction and arrestment should
be employed.

If dust extraction and arrestment plant is required to meet the
emission limits then this should be operational.

The discharge from crushers and screens onto conveyors or into
other equipment should be enclosed as far as is practicable.

Deposits of dust on external parts of the plant should be cleaned off
at the end of each working day in order to minimise the potential for
wind entrainment.
Techniques to control fugitive emissions
5.13 Fugitive dust emissions should be prevented whenever practicable.
When this is not practicable emissions should be controlled at source by
measures agreed between the regulator and the operator. Examples
include correct storage of raw materials, organising the process in such a
way that spillage is avoided, and maintaining high standards of
housekeeping. Attention should be paid to preventing and cleaning up
deposits of dust on external support structures, in order to minimise wind
entrainment of deposited dust.
Conveying
5.14 All new conveyors should be designed to minimise dust emissions at
discharge points. If material has already been screened to remove
material under 3mm size then it might not be considered as dusty.
Operational experience on site would enable decisions to be made with
regard to the dustiness of conveyed material. In any case, equipment
should be available to enable operations to comply with the authorised
emission limits. Regard should be had to how material cleaned from
conveyors is dealt with.

Conveyors should be of sufficient capacity to handle maximum loads
without spillage.

Where dusty materials are conveyed, the conveyor and any transfer
points should be provided with adequate protection against wind
whipping.

The conveyors should be fitted with means for keeping the belt clean.

Where chevron belts are used, water or air scrapers should be fitted
to contain dust falling from the underside of the belt at the turning
point.

Conveyor belts should not be overloaded.

Where the design of the conveyor allows free fall of material to occur,
techniques should be used at the point of discharge to minimise this,
for example the use of a chute or similar equipment.
Where water is available it should be used at conveyor discharge
points for dust suppression. (This may not be necessary where the
material has already been screened to remove material under 3mm
size.)
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

The last metre of any final size discharge conveyor or stockpile
discharge conveyor and the first 0.5 metre of the free fall of materials
from conveyors carrying material of a consistent size and shape,
should be fitted with a full hood. (The hood ensures that the
application of water from spray bars at this point is most effective.)
Loading/unloading
5.15 The principle is that loading and unloading processes should be carried
out so as to minimise the generation of airborne dust.

Vehicles should be loaded in such a way as to minimise airborne
dust emissions, for example by loading with wet materials, or by
using a load out area protected by enclosure or a dust suppression
system.

The vehicle should be sheeted or otherwise totally enclosed as soon
as possible after loading and before leaving the site. This need not
be applied to the loading of crushed material greater than 75 mm.
Roadways and Transportation
5.16 Transport of dusty materials should be carried out so as to prevent or
minimise airborne dust emissions. When setting up on a new site,
consideration should be given to a site layout minimising vehicle
movement. It is preferable that potentially dusty material being delivered
to the site should be sheeted or held in closed containers before being
admitted to the site.
5.17 On some sites wheel-cleaning facilities may be useful to prevent dust
being carried off the site. Where necessary they should be provided and
used by vehicles before leaving the site. Where the plant is co- located
with a quarry which is not a prescribed process, it may not be
appropriate.

(Where necessary) Wheel-cleaning facilities should be provided and
used by vehicles before leaving the site.

Processed materials likely to generate dust should be conditioned
with water prior to internal transfer.

Roadways in normal use and any other area where there is regular
movement of vehicles should have a consolidated surface capable of
being cleaned. They should be kept clean in order to prevent or
minimise dust emissions. They should be kept in good repair.
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Air Quality
Ambient air quality management.
5.18 In areas where air quality standards or objectives are being breached or
are in serious risk of breach and it is clear from the detailed review and
assessment work under Local Air Quality Management that the permitted
process itself is a significant contributor to the problem, it may be
necessary to impose tighter emission. If the standard that is in danger of
being exceeded is not an EC Directive requirement, then industry is not
expected to go beyond BAT to meet it. Decisions should be taken in the
context of a local authority‟s Local Air Quality Management action plan.
For example, where a permitted process is only responsible to a very
small extent for an air quality problem, the authority should not unduly
penalise the operator of the process by requiring disproportionate
emissions reductions. Paragraph 59 of the Air Quality Strategy 2007
[Volume 1] gives the following advice:
“...In drawing up action plans, local authority environmental
health/pollution teams are expected to engage local authority officers
across different departments, particularly, land-use and transport
planners to ensure the actions are supported by all parts of the authority.
In addition, engagement with the wider panorama of relevant
stakeholders, including the public, is required to ensure action plans are
fit-for-purpose in addressing air quality issues. It is vital that all those
organisations, groups and individuals that have an impact upon local air
quality, buy-in and work towards objectives of an adopted action plan.”
5.19 In the context of this note (PG3/16) there may be cases where, for air
quality reasons, enclosure of the crushing, screening and loading of
materials is considered in a particular location to amount to BAT.
Management
Management techniques
5.20 Important elements for effective control of emissions include:

proper management, supervision and training for process
operations;

proper use of equipment;

effective preventative maintenance on all plant and equipment
concerned with the control of emissions to the air; and

ensuring that spares and consumables - in particular, those
subject to continual wear – are held on site, or available at short
notice from guaranteed local suppliers, so that plant breakdowns
can be rectified rapidly. This is important with respect to
arrestment plant and other necessary environmental controls. It
is useful to have an audited list of essential items.
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Appropriate management systems
5.21 Effective management is central to environmental performance; It is an
important component of BAT and of achieving compliance with permit
conditions. It requires a commitment to establishing objectives, setting
targets, measuring progress and revising the objectives according to
results. This includes managing risks under normal operating conditions
and in accidents and emergencies. It is therefore desirable that
installations put in place some form of structured environmental
management approach, whether by adopting published standards (ISO
14001 or the EU Eco Management and Audit Scheme [EMAS]) or by
setting up an environmental management system (EMS) tailored to the
nature and size of the particular process. Operators may also find that an
EMS will help identify business savings.
5.22 Regulators should use their discretion, in consultation with individual
operators, in agreeing the appropriate level of environmental
management. Simple systems which ensure that LAPPC considerations
are taken account of in the day-to-day running of a process may well
suffice, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. Regulators
are urged to encourage operators to have EMS for all their activities, but
it is outside the legal scope of an LAPPC permit to require an EMS for
purposes other than LAPPC compliance. For further information/advice
on EMS refer to the appropriate chapter of the appropriate Guidance
Manual England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.
Training
5.23 Staff at all levels need the necessary training and instruction in their
duties relating to control of the process and emissions to air. In order to
minimise risk of emissions, particular emphasis should be given to
control procedures during start-up, shut down and abnormal conditions.
Training may often sensibly be addressed in the EMS referred to above.


All staff whose functions could impact on air emissions from the
activity should receive appropriate training on those functions. This
should include:

awareness of their responsibilities under the permit;

steps that are necessary to minimise emissions during start-up
and shutdown;

actions to take when there are abnormal conditions, or accidents
or spillages that could, if not controlled, result in emissions.
The operator should maintain a statement of training requirements
for each post with the above mentioned functions and keep a record
of the training received by each person. These documents should be
made available to the regulator on request.
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Maintenance
5.24 Mineral dust is very abrasive, so effective preventative maintenance
plays a key part in achieving compliance with emission limits and other
provisions. In particular:

The operator should have the following available for inspection by the
regulator:

a written maintenance programme for the crusher and screens;
and

a record of maintenance that has been undertaken.
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6.
Summary of changes
The main changes to this note, with the reasons for the change, are
summarised below in Table 6.1. Minor changes that will not impact on
the permit conditions e.g. slight alterations to the Process Description
have not been recorded.
Table 6.1 - Summary of changes
Section/
paragraph/
row
Change
Reason
Comment
Introduction
Simplification of text
Make Note
clearer
Addition of links
Change to
electronic
format
Removes need for
extensive
footnotes/references
Emission limits, monitoring and other provisions
Control techniques
Air Quality
Additional text on
enclosure
may be
Unlikely even in air
needed for air quality management
quality reasons areas declared for
particulate matter
Application form and simple permit
added
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To speed
applications
and permitting
23
7.
Further information
Sustainable consumption and production (SCP)
Both business and the environment can benefit from adopting
sustainable consumption and production practices.
Estimates of potential business savings include:

£6.4 billion a year UK business savings from resource
efficiency measures that cost little or nothing

2% of annual profit lost through inefficient
management of energy, water and waste

4% of turnover is spent on waste.
When making arrangement to comply with permit conditions, operators
are strongly advised to use the opportunity to look into what other steps
they may be able to take. Regulators may be willing to provide
assistance and ideas, although cannot be expected to act as unpaid
consultants.
For the sector covered by this PG note, it is suggested that operators
look particularly at:

WRAP: Halving Waste to Landfill
Health and safety
Operators of processes and installations must protect people at work as
well as the environment:

requirements of a permit should not put at risk the health, safety or
welfare of people at work or those who may be harmed by the work
activity;

equally, the permit must not contain conditions whose only purpose
is to secure the health of people at work. That is the job of the health
and safety enforcing authorities.
Where emission limits quoted in this guidance conflict with health and
safety limits, the tighter limit should prevail because:

emission limits under the relevant environmental legislation relate to
the concentration of pollutant released into the air from prescribed
activities;

exposure limits under health and safety legislation relate to the
concentration of pollutant in the air breathed by workers;
these limits may differ since they are set according to different
criteria. It will normally be quite appropriate to have different
standards for the same pollutant, but in some cases they may be in
conflict (for example, where air discharged from a process is
breathed by workers). In such cases, the tighter limit should be
applied to prevent a relaxation of control.
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
Further advice on responding to incidents
The UK Environment Agencies have published guidance on producing an
incident response plan to deal with environmental incidents. Only those
aspects relating to air emissions can be subject to regulation via a Part B
(Part B or C in NI) permit, but regulators may nonetheless wish to
informally draw the attention of all appropriate operators to the guidance.
It is not envisaged that regulators will often want to include conditions, in
addition to those advised in this PG note, specifying particular incident
response arrangements aimed at minimising air emissions. Regulators
should decide this on a case-by-case basis. In accordance with BAT,
any such conditions should be proportionate to the risk, including the
potential for harm from air emissions if an incident were to occur.
Account should therefore be taken of matters such as the amount and
type of materials held on site which might be affected by an incident, the
likelihood of an incident occurring, the sensitivity of the location of the
installation, and the cost of producing any plans and taking any additional
measures.
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Appendix 1 - Application form
Application for a permit for crushing and screening brick tile and concrete in mobile plant
Local Authority Pollution Prevention and Control
Pollution Prevention and Control Act, 1999
Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2010
Introduction
When to use this form
Use this form if you are applying for a permit to a Local Authority to operate mobile plant crushing
and screening brick tile and concrete as defined in Schedule 1 to the Environmental Permitting
Regulations.
The appropriate fee must be enclosed with the application to enable it to be processed further.
When complete, send the form and the fee and any additional information to:
*Insert local authority address*
If you need help and advice
We have made the application form as straightforward as possible, but please get in touch with us
at the local authority address given above if you need any advice on how to set out the information
we need.
For the purposes of Section H of the form, a relevant offence is any conviction for an offence
relating to the environment or environmental regulation.
LAPPC application form: to be completed by the operator
For Local Authority use
Application reference
Officer reference
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Date received
26
A
The basics
A1
Details of any existing environmental permit or consent (for waste operations,
include planning permission for the site, plus established use certificates, a certificate
of lawful existing use, or evidence why the General Permitted Development Order
applies.
A2
Operator details (The „operator‟ = the person who it is proposed will have control
over the installation in accordance with the permit (if granted).)
Name:
Trading name, if different:
Registered office address:
Principal office address, if different:
Company registration number:
A3
Any holding company?
Is the operator a subsidiary of a holding company within the meaning of section 1159
of the Companies Act 2006? If “yes” please fill in details of the ultimate holding
company, overleaf.
No
Yes
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Name:
Trading name, if different:
Registered office address:
Principal office address, if different:
Company registration number:
A4
Who can we contact about your application? It will help to have someone who we
can contact directly with any questions about your application. The person you name
should have the authority to act on behalf of the operator - This can be an agent or
consultant.
Name and position:________________________________________________
Telephone:_______________________________________________________
Email:___________________________________________________________
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B
The mobile plant
B1
What activities are, or will be, carried on in the mobile plant? Please include
“directly associated activities” (this term is explained in Annex III in Part B of
the general guidance manual.
 crush brick tile and concrete
 screen, brick tile and concrete
B2
Why is the application being made?
 new plant
B3
Will you either:
a) list the crushers and screens applied for and give their serial numbers in this
application form?
 Yes  No
Or
b) submit a list of plant with serial numbers and notify the authority in
writing with a revised list before any different equipment is used?
 Yes  No
C
The details
Note: “dusty material” should be taken to be any material which can be wind-entrained. It
excludes, for example, >3mm material and scalpings.
C1
Is the crusher?: (tick all that apply)
[informs condition 9]
a) fitted with water sprays at the feed and the conveyor discharge 
b) is the conveyor fully-enclosed

c) other – please specify: ______________________________________________
C2
Will you wet material before it is crushed?
 Yes  No
If yes, how will you do that?
__________________________________________________________________
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C3
Which of the following methods will be used to minimise emissions at belt
conveyor transfer points, including free fall of material?
(tick all that apply)
[informs condition 9]
a) enclosed

b) enclosed and ducted to arrestment equipment

c) fitted with a chute

d) other - please specify: ______________________________________________
C4
Do you have environmental management procedures and policy?
[informs condition 14]
 Yes  No
Is the environmental system certified, (including EMAS, ISO 14001 or BS8555)
 Yes  No
D
Anything else
Please tell us anything else you would like us to take account of.
Document Reference:
E
_____________________________________
Application fee
You must enclose the relevant fee with your application.
If your application is successful you will also have to pay an annual subsistence charge, so
please say who you want invoices to be sent to.
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F
Protection of information
F1
Any confidential or national security info in your application?
If there is any information in your application you think should be kept off the public register
for confidentiality or national security reasons, please say what and why. General guidance
manual chapter 8 advises on what may be excluded. (Do not include any national security
information in your application. Send it, plus the omitted information, to the Secretary of
State or Welsh Ministers who will decide what, if anything, can be made public.)
Document Reference:
F2
_____________________________
Please note: data protection
The information you give will be used by the Council to process your application. It will be
placed on the relevant public register and used to monitor compliance with the permit
conditions. We may also use and or disclose any of the information you give us in order to:

consult with the public, public bodies and other organisations,

carry out statistical analysis, research and development on environmental issues,

provide public register information to enquirers,

make sure you keep to the conditions of your permit and deal with any matters
relating to your permit

investigate possible breaches of environmental law and take any resulting action,

prevent breaches of environmental law,

offer you documents or services relating to environmental matters,

respond to requests for information under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and
the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 (if the Data Protection Act allows)

assess customer service satisfaction and improve our service.
We may pass on the information to agents/representatives who we ask to do any of these
things on our behalf.
F3
Please note: it is an offence to provide false etc information
It is an offence under regulation 38 of the EP Regulations, for the purpose of obtaining a
permit (for yourself or anyone else), to:

make a false statement which you know to be false or misleading in a material
particular,

recklessly make a statement which is false or misleading in a material particular

intentionally to make a false entry in any record required to be kept under any
environmental permit condition

with intent to deceive, to forge or use a document issued or required for any purpose
under any environmental permit condition.
If you make a false statement

we may prosecute you, and

if you are convicted, you are liable to a fine or imprisonment (or both).
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H
Declarations A and B for signing, please
These declarations should be signed by the person listed in answer to question A3. Where more
than one person is identified as the operator, all should sign. Where a company or other body
corporate is the operator, an authorised person should sign and provide evidence of authority from
the board.
Declaration A:
I/We certify
EITHER – As evidence of my/our competence to operate this installation in accordance with the
EP Regulations, no offences have been committed in the previous five years relating to the
environment or environmental regulation.
OR- The following offences have been committed in the previous five years which may be relevant
to my/our competence to operating this installation in accordance with the regulations:
______________________________________________________________________________
Signature:
Name:
Position:
Date:
_______________________________
______
_______
Declaration B: I/We certify that the information in this application is correct. I/We apply for a
permit in respect of the particulars described in this application (including the listed supporting
documentation) I/we have supplied. (Please note that each individual operator must sign the
declaration themselves, even if an agent is acting on their behalf.)
Signature:
Name:
Position:
Date:
Signature:
Name:
Position:
Date:
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______
_______
_______________________________
______
_______
32
Appendix 2 - Model Permit
This appendix contains a model permit for mobile crushing and screening plant – see para 1.6 of
this note and para 3.6 of the General Guidance Manual on Policy and Procedures .
Notes:
 text in the model permit written in italics is advice to regulators.
 text in the model permit in square brackets offers choice to regulators or indicates where
information needs to be inserted from the application.
 text bracketed with asterisks (eg *Alarms shall be tested at least once a week*.) may be
omitted by a regulator where the past performance of the plant gives the local authority
sufficient reassurance about operator compliance – “earned recognition”.
 the model permit has been drafted for local authorities in England and Wales. Regulators
in Scotland and Northern Ireland will need to amend the legal heading and, where
appropriate, references to „Council‟

references to „installation‟ will need to be substituted with „mobile plant‟ in relevant cases,
and other amendments made accordingly
 the purpose of the activity description is to set down the main characteristics of the activity,
including any directly associated activities, so it is clear to all concerned what is being
authorised by the permit and therefore what changes would need further approval.
Regulators are advised to include a description of any key items of arrestment and
monitoring equipment the operator intends to use or is using.
 it should normally be sufficient for records relating to simplified permits to be kept for no
more than 18 months. Where, however, as a result of a „low risk‟ rating, inspections are
undertaken less often, regulators may want to specify a period which ensures the records
are available at the next inspection.
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[ ] COUNCIL
POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL ACT 1999
Environmental Permitting Regulations 2010 (as amended)
Permit ref. no:
Name and address of person (A) authorised to operate the mobile plant („the operator‟)
Registered number and office of company (if appropriate)
Activity description
Serial numbers
Plant type
The operator (A) is authorised to operate the activity4 in England and Wales, subject to the
following conditions.
Conditions
Asbestos
1.
Asbestos shall not be crushed or screened.
Notifications
2. The operator shall, before the mobile plant is operated, notify the regulator of the site where
the mobile plant is to be operated, and the regulator who issued the permit:
a. where and when the mobile plant is expected to start operating, and
b. the serial numbers of the mobile plant involved.
3. (where an operator holds a permit with a list of mobile plant that is permitted but requires
activation before items of plant are operated) The operator shall submit to the regulator who
issued the permit any changes to the list of permitted plant. The plant new to the list shall not
be used until the regulator has approved the alteration to the list of permitted plant.
Emissions and monitoring
4. No visible particulate matter shall be emitted beyond the installation boundary.
5. The emission requirements and methods and frequency of monitoring set out in Table 1 shall
be complied with.
4
listed in [
] in Part 2 of Schedule 1 to the Environmental Permitting Regulations
PG 3/16 Publication version
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6. All plant and equipment capable of causing, or preventing, emissions shall be maintained in
accordance with the manufacturer‟s instructions. *Records shall be kept of such
maintenance.*
Aggregates delivery and storage
7. Dusty materials (including dusty wastes) shall only be stored in [specify storage location] as
detailed on the plan attached to this permit and shall be subject to suppression and
management techniques to minimise dust emissions.
Crushers and screening units
8. Crushers shall be totally contained or fitted with a water suppression system over the crusher
aperture
9. Where the use of water as a method of dust suppression is necessary in order to meet the
emission limits, it shall be used. In such circumstances, if water of the required pressure is not
available for use on the suppression system, then the process shall not operate.
10. Deposits of dust on external parts of the plant shall be cleaned off at the end of each working
day in order to minimise the potential for wind entrainment.
11. Processed materials likely to generate dust shall be conditioned with water prior to internal
transfer.
Belt conveying
12. All dusty materials, including wastes, shall be conveyed using [specify conveyor, level of
enclosure and enclosure type]. All transfer points shall be fitted with [specify dust control
technique].
Loading, unloading and transport
13. No potentially dusty materials (including wastes) or finished products shall arrive on or leave
the site other than by use of [specify transport type and dust control technique].
Roadways and transportation
14. All areas where there is regular movement of vehicles shall have a consolidated surface
capable of being cleaned, and these surfaces shall be kept clean and in good repair, or shall
be kept wet. Quarry haul roads are excluded from this provision.
15. Vehicles shall not track material from the site onto the highway.
Records and training
16. Written or computer records of all tests and monitoring shall be kept by the operator for at
least [ ] months. They [and a copy of all manufacturer‟s instructions referred to in this permit]
shall be made available for examination by the Council. *Records shall be kept of operator
inspections, including those for visible emissions.*
17. Staff at all levels shall receive the necessary training and instruction to enable them to comply
with the conditions of this permit. Records shall be kept of relevant training undertaken.
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The following two conditions are not needed for PPC permits which transferred automatically into
the environmental permitting regime by virtue of regulation 69(6) of the 2007 Regulations and
regulation 108(4) of the 2010 Regulations. Where permits are issued on or after 6 April 2008 the
next two conditions will not automatically apply and need specific inclusion in the permit where
required.
Best available techniques
18. The best available techniques shall be used to prevent or, where that is not practicable,
reduce emissions from the installation in relation to any aspect of the operation of the
installation which is not regulated by any other condition of this permit.
19. If the operator proposes to make a change in operation of the installation, he must, at least 14
days before making the change, notify the regulator in writing. The notification must contain a
description of the proposed change in operation. It is not necessary to make such a
notification if an application to vary this permit has been made and the application contains a
description of the proposed change. In this condition „change in operation‟ means a change in
the nature or functioning, or an extension, of the installation, which may have consequences
for the environment.
Table 1 - Emission limits, monitoring and other provisions
Substance
Source
Emission limit/
provisions
Type of
monitoring
Monitoring
frequency
Particulate
matter
Whole
process
Avoidance of
visible emissions
crossing the
(construction)
site boundary
Recorded
operator
observations
On start up
and on at
least two
more
occasions
each day
smoke
engines
No visible smoke
during normal
operation
*Recorded
operator
observations
*On start up
and on at
least two
more
occasions
each day
Right to Appeal
You have the right of appeal against this permit within 6 months of the date of the decision. The
Council can tell you how to appeal [or supply details with the permit]. You will normally be
expected to pay your own expenses during an appeal.
You will be liable for prosecution if you fail to comply with the conditions of this permit. If found
guilty, the maximum penalty for each offence if prosecuted in a Magistrates Court is £50,000
and/or 6 months imprisonment. In a Crown Court it is an unlimited fine and/or 5 years
imprisonment.
Our enforcement of your permit will be in accordance with the Regulators‟ Compliance Code.
PG 3/16 Publication version
36
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