Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Environment
Water
Information Technology
ECP
Nanotechnology
Math and Physics
Petrochemicals
Advanced Materials
Biotechnology
Energy
Space and Aeronautics
Oil and Gas
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Ministry of Economy and Planning
http://www.mep.gov.sa
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Ministry of Economy and Planning
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Contents
Executive Summary
4
Introduction
6
Background
6
Program Scope
8
Plan Development Process
9
Strategic Context
10
Key Needs of KSA
10
Stakeholders Roles
11
Analysis of Comparable ECPP R&D Institutes
12
Findings
14
SWOT Analysis for KSA ECP Technology Program
24
Higher Strategy
26
Vision
26
Mission
26
Program Values and Culture
27
Program Strategic Goals
27
Program Initiatives and Technologies
28
Selection Criteria
28
Selected Initiatives
30
Selected Technologies
31
Operational Plans
34
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Contents
Portfolio Management
34
Technology transfer plan
34
Quality management plan
35
Human resources plan
36
Communications management plan
36
Risk management plan
37
Implementation of the Plan
38
Key Performance Indicators
39
Appendix A: Plan Development Process
42
ECP Research and Innovation National Team Members
42
International Consultants
43
ECP KACST Planning Team Members
44
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Executive summary
The
National
Science
and
the Electronics, Communications,
Technology Policy was approved
and Photonics (ECP) Technology
by the Council of Ministers in
Program.
1423 H (2002 G). Then a five year
implementation plan was developed
which encompassed eight major
programs including the strategic
technology program. The strategic
technologies
program
consists
of eleven technology programs
targeted
for
localization
and
development. This plan is for one
of these technology programs, i.e.
ECP technologies are particularly broad in scope and are used in virtually
all applications. As a result, the focus of the Electronics, Communications
and Photonics program has been narrowed to four initiatives and six special
technologies. These initiatives and technologies were selected based on the
specific needs and objectives of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The following
are the recommended initiatives and technologies:
Wireless Communications and Wireless Sensor Networks:
- RFID.
- Body Sensor Networks.
- Oil & Gas pipeline monitoring.
- Condition-Based Maintenance.
- Software Defined Radio.
- Cognitive Wireless Networks.
- UWB (Ultra Wide Band).
Information Security:
- Quantum Cryptography.
- Quantum Computing.
- Cryptography.
- Emission Control and Shielding.
Lasers and their Applications:
- Optical Memories.
- Surveillance.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Executive summary
- LIDARs (Laser Radars).
Advanced MEMS Sensors & Actuators:
- Optical MEMS.
- High Performance Actuators.
- Micro fluidics.
- Inertial Sensors.
Recommended technologies:
- Integrated circuits (ICs).
- Microwave systems.
- Reconfigurable computing.
- Printed circuit boards (PCB) Fabrication & Design.
- Electro-optics.
- Digital signal processing (DSP).
The strategic plan as presented is the result of a number of workshops conducted
in 1428H (2007G). Stakeholders from various public and private sectors with
vested interests in ECP technology development in the Kingdom participated
in the series of workshops. An important byproduct of the workshops was
the development of new partnerships between strategic stakeholders in the
Kingdom. These have positively influenced the development of the S&T ECP
plan.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Introduction
Background
policy on science and technology.
King Abdulaziz City for Science and
In July 2002, the Council of
Technology (KACST) was directed
Ministers approved the national
by its charter of 1986 to “propose a
policy for science and technology,
national policy for the development
“The Comprehensive, Long-Term,
of science and technology and
National Science and Technology
to devise the strategy and plans
Policy.”
necessary to implement them.” In
accordance with this charter, KACST
launched a comprehensive effort
in collaboration with the Ministry
of Economy and Planning (MoEP),
to develop a long-term national
KACST and MoEP, in collaboration with relevant stakeholders, developed
the national plan for science, technology and innovation (STI) under the
framework of the Comprehensive National Science and Technology Policy.
The plan outlined the focus and future direction of science, technology, and
innovation in the Kingdom, with considerations to the roles of KACST, the
universities, government, industry and the society at large.
The plan encompasses eight major programs, depicted in figure 1, as
follows:
1. Strategic and advanced technologies
2. Scientific research and technical development capabilities
3. Transfer, development and localizing technology
4. Science, technology and society
5. Scientific and technical human resources
6. Diversifying financial support resources
7. Science, technology and innovation system
8. Institutional structures for science, technology and innovation
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Introduction
Figure 1: Science and Technology Programs
Strategic
Technologies
an
Hum rce
u
Reso
Society
ial
nc ces
a
Fin sour
Re
Private Sector
Research &
Education Institutes
Re NST
gu IP
lat
ion
s
Ministries and
Government Institute
the
“Strategic
and
National
Science,
Technology, &
Innovation Plan
(NSTIP)
Advanced
R
Cap & D
abi
litie
s
Ad
m
of inis
NS tra
TI tion
P
,
ce &
ien y,
Sc olog ty
n cie
ch
Te e So
th
In
Techn
olog
Transf ies
er
&
Local
izatio
n
Technologies”
Each plan establishes a mission and a vision, identifies
program, KACST is responsible for 5-year strategic and
stakeholders and users, and establishes the kingdom’s
implementation plans for 11 technologies:
highest priority technical areas for implementation.
1. Water
2. Oil & Gas
3. Petrochemicals
4. Nanotechnology
5. Biotechnology
6. Information Technology
7. Electronics, Communication, & Photonics
8. Space and Aeronautics
9. Energy
10.Environment
11.Advanced Materials
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Introduction
Program Scope
The breadth of the Saudi Arabian National Policy for Science and Technology
spans 20 years. However, the ECP program presented here focuses on only
the first five years. The ECP program is to implement the proposed plan
through performing projects that shall deliver prototypes and/or products that
can be commercialized immediately by an appropriate private sector partner
or delivered to appropriate incubators for further industrialization efforts. The
research projects and the development of commercial applications are to
serve knowledge generation and transfer.
The principal concepts employed by the ECP program are the following:
Technology Development: involves developing new technologies that
are non-existent, or currently unavailable in the Kingdom. Technology
development may involve some basic research.
Technology Localization: involves research and education required
to strengthen the absorptive capacity of the Kingdom. It emphasizes the
development of local technical human resources and policy structures to
promote the acquisition of beneficial foreign technologies and the generation
of new technologies in the Kingdom.
Technology Transfer: involves scientific and technical support for
transferring technologies into the Kingdom. The program will emphasize
the development of local capacity to prevent a dependence on foreign
technologies.
A new Strategic Management Office (SMO) will be formed to manage the
ECP program. Stakeholders from key institutional sectors of the Kingdom
will be represented in the program. These include representatives from
industry, related engineering departments in the universities, and the related
government agencies.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Introduction
Plan Development Process
The data and discussions in this report are results of a number of workshop
sessions and studies that have all been carried out throughout the year 1428 H,
corresponding to 2007 G. In addition to KACST ECP management, stakeholders
from various public and private sectors participated in the workshops. A
strategic planning consultant was contracted to act as a facilitator to educate
the stakeholders about the main elements and mechanisms of strategic
planning. In addition to the stakeholders, several well known international
scholars and consultants were invited to the workshops. Some of the scholars
had participated in similar planning exercises in their own countries. They
contributed knowledge of the current state of the art in technology and research
in various ECP areas and provided input to forecasting future research and
market trends. Some of the consultants have also shared their insights into the
research-to-market process. An important byproduct of the workshops was
the formation of valuable partnerships among several stakeholders as well as
with international institutions.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Strategic Context
Key Needs of KSA
and Technology Policy, the broad
The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is
needs of the Kingdom are identified
not as highly ranked in electronics,
as follows:
communications,
and
photonics
technologies relative to other nations
of comparable size and wealth. In
order to improve the ranking of the
Kingdom and meet domestic needs
in these technology areas, there
must be a broad improvement in
the infrastructure and knowledge
base within the Kingdom. Under the
framework of the National Science
Self reliance: The Kingdom needs to be self reliant in certain critical
technologies as a matter of national security as well as in its ability to sustain
economic and social strength. As examples for such critical technologies are
information security and communication networks.
Economic diversification: The Kingdom needs to further develop and
diversify its economy. Domestic competence in ECP fields can lead to the
diversification in niche sectors of industries in the Kingdom.
Accelerated development: In the current global environment of increasing
networking, the Kingdom needs to close the knowledge gap between itself
and the leading developing countries. Accelerating the development of a
knowledge economy and closing the gap with other countries will strengthen
the ties between the Kingdom and the world.
10
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Strategic Context
Stakeholders Roles
research institutes, other government agencies, and
The stakeholders for the ECP Program include KACST,
private companies. Table 1 shows the roles of these
KSA universities, various independent or specialized
stakeholders in the program.
Table 1: Stakeholder Roles
Stakeholders
Role
Plan, coordinate and manage the program
Conduct applied research, technology transfer and prototype applications
development
Manage and participate in national projects
KACST
Provide support for university and industrial participation in national projects
Provide and manage national research facilities
Provide advice and services to government on science and technology.
Create new basic and applied scientific knowledge
Train students in science and engineering
Universities
Host and participate in Technology Innovation Centers
Participate in collaborative projects
Independent or Government
Specialized Research Centers
Create new applied scientific knowledge
Participate in collaborative projects
Implementation of new technologies in ECP
Identifying research themes
Contribution in developing some technologies through advanced training
Ministries and Government
Agencies
Testing of technologies to be localized and/or developed Provide input to program on government R&D needs
Reduce regulatory and procedural barriers to R&D and innovation
Support R&D in universities and industry
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
11
Strategic Context
Stakeholders
Role
• Develop and commercialize products & processes resulting from the program.
• Communicate company needs to program
• Support and participate in collaborative R&D projects.
Private Sector
• Support and participate in the Technology Innovation Centers
• Provide additional financial support
• Identifying market challenges
• Contributing with technical information
• Contributing in identifying priorities
Analysis of Comparable ECPP R&D Institutes
international research institutions related to electronics,
In 2007, KACST launched an organization-wide strategic
communication and photonics was conducted. The five
planning effort to better align its R&D priorities with
institutions examined, listed in the table 2, reflect a broad
the national needs of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
range of research activities, corresponding with KACST’s
To support this effort, an analysis of comparable
own R&D activities.
Table 2:
Selected Electronics, Communication and Photonics
Research Institutions
12
Institute
Country
Defence Science and Technology Organization (DSTO)
Australia
Communications Research Center Canada (CRC)
Canada
The Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI)
Taiwan
Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL)
United Kingdom
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Electronics and Electrical
Engineering Laboratory (EEEL)
USA
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Strategic Context
These institutes differ substantially in size and research
and microwave (MW) systems, antenna design, electro-
focus. Staff size varies significantly from more than 200
optics, digital signal processing (DSP), printed circuit
at CRC to more than 6,000 at ITRI. The research foci vary
board (PCB) fabrication and design, and reconfigurable
substantially, reflecting each institute’s mission and status
computing. KACST researchers defined these enabling
as part of a larger governmental “parent” organization or as
technologies and provided detailed lists of keyword
a relatively autonomous or free-standing institution. Two
terms that were used to query publication and patent
research organizations, Australia’s Defence Science and
databases.2 Electronics, communications & photonics
Technology Organisation (DSTO) and United Kingdom’s
is a fast moving field, so the scope of this study was
Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), are
restricted to only recent publication (2005-2007) and
housed within their national defense agencies and focus
patent (2002-2006) activity in the seven KACST defined
on R&D related to national security needs and interests.
fields.
The other three research institutions either focus on
civilian electronics, communication and photonics uses,
There is general agreement that publications and patents
or on industrial applications and requirements.
strongly correlate with scientific research capacity,
although publication and patent counts alone do not fully
A full description of these laboratories’ programs can be
represent the quality or scope of research. Nonetheless,
found in a separate document.
publication and patent activity have long been used as
Analysis of ECPP publications and patents
indicators for knowledge creation and research output.3
The overall field, “electronics, communications &
Several indicators are presented below. These include
photonics”, as well as sub-topics, were defined in
forward citations (the frequency at which publications
close consultation with KACST researchers and other
and patents are cited by others), which are a measure
KSA stakeholders. “Electronics, communications, and
of impact, and co-authoring relationships, which
photonics” is a multidisciplinary field built on several
are an indicator of scientific collaboration. Together,
key enabling technologies. The KSA electronics,
these indicators provide measures of collaboration,
communications, and photonics program identifies seven
globalization and impact of science and technology
major enabling technologies: integrated circuit (IC) design
research in fields related to the KSA electronics,
/ very large scale integration (VLSI), radiofrequency (RF)
communications & photonics program.
1
1 Strategic Review: Electronic, Communication, and Photonic Technology. Report prepared by SRI International for KACST.
2 ISI Web of Science and Delphion were queried for scientific publication and U.S. patent application data, respectively. The ISI Web of Science is a database of peerreviewed articles in major scientific journals from around the world. Delphion is a searchable database of global patent activity, including the U.S. Patent and Trademark
Office (USPTO). The USPTO is one of the world’s major granters of patents and it has been argued that the U.S. market is so large that most important inventions from
around the world are patented there.
3 Seminal research in the use of publications as a measure of scientific productivity includes A.J. Lotka, “The frequency distribution of scientific productivity,” Journal
of the Washington Academy of Sciences, vol 16 (1926); D. Price, Little Science, Big Science, (New York: Columbia university Press, 1963); J.R. Cole and S Cole, Social
Stratification in Science, (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1973); J. Gaston, The reward system in British and American science, (New York: John Wiley (1978);
and M.F. Fox, “Publication productivity among scientists: a critical review,” Social Studies of Science, vol 13, 1983.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
13
Strategic Context
Findings
The People’s Republic of China was second, producing
Global Electronics, Communications & Photonics
2,792 articles followed by Japan, Taiwan, and South
Publication Activity
Korea with 2,532, 1,831, and 1,824 articles, respectively.
Between 2005 and 2007, there were 26,251 articles
Saudi Arabia was the 46th largest producer of electronics,
published worldwide in electronics, communications &
communications and photonics publications, producing
photonics fields related to KSA research priorities The
37 articles. Figure 2 shows the number of publications
United States was the world’s largest producer of related
produced by country over this time period.5
4
articles, generating 7,290 articles over this time period.
Figure 2: ECP Publications (2006-2007)
Singapore
Italy
1176
Russia
India
Iran
UK
1414
Germany
1354
USA
7290
Belgium
Taiwan
1831
Spain
810
Australia
Japan
2532
People R. China
2792
South Korea
1824
Saudi
Arabia
Canada
1205
Brazil
France
1179
Turkey
4 Throughout this report, “electronics, communications & photonics” refers only to the subset of electronics, communications & photonics defined by the KSA research
priorities.
5 A publication is assigned to a country if any of the publication’s author’s affiliations are located in that country. Because publications often have multiple authors, a
single publication may be assigned to multiple countries. Aggregate figures, such as total global publication output, count each publication only once, but adding up
sub-totals may yield a result larger than the reported total due to multiple counting.
14
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Strategic Context
As shown in table 3, IC design / VLSI accounts for the
MW systems, antenna design, electro-optics, DSP, PCB
largest number of electronics, communications, and
fabrication and design, and reconfigurable computing.
photonics related publications, followed by RF and
Table 3: Electronics, Communications, and Photonics Sub-Topics
Sub-Topic
Publications
IC Design / VLSI
9834
RF and MW Systems
6705
Antenna Design
5004
Electro-optics
3142
DSP
1875
PCB Fabrication and Design
1213
Reconfigurable Computing
909
Benchmark Countries
Average publication impact is calculated as the number
of citations of articles from a particular country divided
by the total number of articles published by authors from
that country. For instance, a country that published 50
articles that were cited 100 times would have an average
publication impact of two. Between 2005 and 2007,
Australia had the highest average publication impact
of all countries at 2.28 followed by the United States
(2.19), Norway (2.14), and Sweden (1.76). The average
publication impact for Saudi Arabia was 0.46 with 17
citations of 37 articles. Table 4 presents publication and
citation counts for benchmark countries.6
6 Benchmark countries include global leaders in terms of total electronics, communications & photonics output in addition to a list of specific countries provided by
KACST.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
15
Strategic Context
Table 4: Benchmark Country Publication Impact (2005-2007)
Country
Publications
Total Citations
Average Publication Impact
Australia
467
1065
2.28
USA
7290
15930
2.19
Norway
80
171
2.14
Sweden
384
675
1.76
Canada
1205
1986
1.65
UAE
18
29
1.61
Ireland
141
196
1.39
6
8
1.33
Finland
307
371
1.21
Peoples R China
2792
3055
1.09
Taiwan
1831
1957
1.07
South Korea
1824
1878
1.03
Turkey
279
281
1.01
India
653
635
0.97
Egypt
95
89
0.94
Iran
205
163
0.80
Thailand
69
34
0.49
Saudi Arabia
37
17
0.46
South Africa
48
22
0.46
Malaysia
70
30
0.43
Indonesia
The most cited article with a KSA author “Optimization
and characterization of electromagnetically coupled
patch antennas using RBF neural networks,”7 which was
cited five times by other papers, was co-authored by
authors affiliated with institutions in KSA and Egypt.
7 Mohamed, MDA, Soliman, EA, El-Gamal, MA. 2006. Optimization and characterization of electromagnetically coupled patch antennas using RBF neural networks. J.
Electromagn. Waves Appl., 20 (8): 1101-1114. (RBF is radial basis function)
16
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Strategic Context
Electronics, Communications, and Photonics Research Organizations
Electronics, communications, and photonics R&D publications are
produced at several thousand research institutions in nearly 110 countries.
As shown in table 5, the three institutions producing the largest number of
publications related to electronics, communications, and photonics R&D are
the University of Texas (401), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (387), and
Tsing Hua University (332). The Chinese Academy of Sciences produces the
greatest number of both RF and MW systems and electro-optics publications.
National Chiao Tung University is the leading producer of IC design/VLSI
publications. The University of Texas produces the greatest number of DSP
articles. The City University of Hong Kong is the leading producer of antenna
design related publications. National Cheng Kung University is the leading
producer of PCB fabrication and design publications. Nanyang Technological
University produces the greatest number of reconfigurable computing related
publications.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
17
18
212
0.80
1.39
326
314
302
286
241
238
224
220
219
217
Natl Taiwan Univ
Nanyang Technol Univ
Georgia Inst Technol
Univ Tokyo
Univ Calif Los Angeles
MIT
Stanford Univ
Univ Florida
Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol
Natl Cheng Kung Univ
Indian Inst Technol
6
3
8
19
7
1
14
8
4
8
3
8
17
20
9
11
17
16
8
5
6
3
10
19
32
5
19
13
11
29
15
31
24
3
9
10
7
5
17
21
19
25
29
28
56
31
45
34
27
17
22
20
47
30
17
66
55
21
66
26
32
25
21
22
37
83
73
110
80
82
38
42
76
70
67
75
60
27
200
118
137
96
97
84
88
111
124
82
88
1.16
1.68
2.20
2.37
2.65
4.11
2.26
1.44
0.94
0.66
203
196
Natl Chiao Tung Univ
164
0.69
332
4
10
22
114
21
Tsing Hua University
145
80
1.44
387
94
15
17
PCB
Reconfigurable
Fabrication
Computing
and Design
40
Antenna
Electrooptics DSP
Design
31
Chinese Acad Sci
70
177
1.85
401
Univ Texas
RF &
MW
Systems
Average
Impact
Total
Publications
Institution
IC
Design &
VLSI
Table 5: Global Electronics, Communications, and Photonics Research Organizations (2005 – 2007)
Strategic Context
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Strategic Context
International Collaboration and Publication Impact
3 plots a country’s level of international collaboration
For countries with a similar level of publication activity,
(horizontal axis) against the average impact of its
those countries with a high level of international
publications (vertical axis). Countries such as Norway
collaboration also tend to produce publications with
and Australia which show significant international
a high level of impact. International collaboration is
collaborative activity also tend to produce papers with a
calculated as the average number of countries represented
higher average impact.
per publication, based on authors’ addresses. Figure
Figure 3: International Collaboration and Publication Impact (2005-2007)
3
USA
Peoples R. China
Taiwan
2.5
South Korea
Canada
Australia
USA
India
Norway
Australia
2
Average Impact
Sweden
Sweden
Finland
Canada
United Arab Emirates
Turkey
1.5
Ireland
Peoples R. China
Taiwan
1
Iran
Indonesia
Ireland
Finland
South Korea
Egypt
Turkey
Norway
Egypt
India
Iran
Malaysia
Thailand
Thailand
South Africa
0.5
South Africa
Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
Malaysia
United Arab Emirates
Indonesia
0
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
Average Level of International Collaboration
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
19
Strategic Context
Table 6: KSA Publication Collaborators (2005 - 2007)
Country
Number of Publications
Canada
6
Egypt
4
USA
3
Algeria
1
Belgium
1
India
1
Kuwait
1
Sudan
1
UK
1
KSA Collaboration Activity
Electronics, Communications & Photonics Journals
As shown in table 6, KSA-affiliated authors collaborated
Table 7 below presents journals with the highest number
on more than one article with authors from: Canada
of publications from 2005-2007 in the subfields of
(6 publications), Egypt (4 publications) and the United
electronics, communications, & photonics as defined for
States (3 publications). KSA authors collaborated on
this study.
one article with authors from: Algeria, Belgium, India,
Kuwait, Sudan, and the United Kingdom.
Table 7: Electronics, Communications & Photonics Journals (2005 - 2007)
Antenna Design
Journal
20
Publications
MICROWAVE AND OPTICAL TECHNOLOGY LETTERS
766
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION
691
IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS
235
ELECTRONICS LETTERS
227
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS
216
IEICE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS
169
JOURNAL OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND APPLICATIONS
135
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES
117
PROGRESS IN ELECTROMAGNETICS RESEARCH-PIER
109
IEEE ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION MAGAZINE
96
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Strategic Context
IC Design
Reconfigurable Computing
RF & MW Systems
Journal
Publications
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES
369
MICROWAVE AND OPTICAL TECHNOLOGY LETTERS
258
IEEE MICROWAVE AND WIRELESS COMPONENTS LETTERS
255
OPTICS EXPRESS
245
IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS
218
APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS
175
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION
173
IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS
131
ELECTRONICS LETTERS
121
OPTICS LETTERS
116
MICROPROCESSORS AND MICROSYSTEMS
35
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS
29
RECONFIGURABLE COMPUTING: ARCHITECTURES AND APPLICATIONS
23
JOURNAL OF VLSI SIGNAL PROCESSING SYSTEMS FOR SIGNAL IMAGE AND VIDEO
TECHNOLOGY
19
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND
SYSTEMS
15
IEICE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION AND SYSTEMS
12
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS
11
JOURNAL OF PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING
10
JOURNAL OF SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE
10
ACM TRANSACTIONS ON DESIGN AUTOMATION OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS
10
IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS
755
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS I-REGULAR PAPERS
306
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES
301
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS II-EXPRESS BRIEFS
264
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS
240
ELECTRONICS LETTERS
235
IEICE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRONICS
234
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES
227
ANALOG INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SIGNAL PROCESSING
224
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE
212
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
21
Strategic Context
DSP
Electrooptics
PCB Fabrication and Design
Journal
22
Publications
MICROWAVE AND OPTICAL TECHNOLOGY LETTERS
43
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ADVANCED PACKAGING
36
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES
35
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY
34
MICROELECTRONICS RELIABILITY
32
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION
31
IEEE MICROWAVE AND WIRELESS COMPONENTS LETTERS
27
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS AND PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES
25
IEICE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRONICS
20
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
20
APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS
162
OPTICS EXPRESS
155
IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS
136
JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY
88
JAPANESE JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS PART 1-REGULAR PAPERS BRIEF
COMMUNICATIONS & REVIEW PAPERS
81
JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS
72
PHYSICAL REVIEW B
72
OPTICS LETTERS
65
OPTICS COMMUNICATIONS
54
MOLECULAR CRYSTALS AND LIQUID CRYSTALS
41
IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS
73
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INSTRUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT
53
JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY
51
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS
46
JOURNAL OF VLSI SIGNAL PROCESSING SYSTEMS FOR SIGNAL IMAGE AND VIDEO
TECHNOLOGY
35
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE
33
EURASIP JOURNAL ON APPLIED SIGNAL PROCESSING
30
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS
28
IEE PROCEEDINGS-ELECTRIC POWER APPLICATIONS
23
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING
22
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Strategic Context
Electronics, Communications & Photonics Patent
States. Other countries with a significant number
Activity
of inventors include: Japan (2,828 applications),
Between 2002 and 2006, there were 12,947
South Korea (889 applications), and Taiwan (653
electronics, communications, and photonics-related
applications). No electronics, communications, and
patent applications filed with the United States Patent
photonics related patent applications listed an inventor
Office (USPTO). As shown in table 8, the majority of
from Saudi Arabia over this time period.
these (6,394) listed at least one inventor from the United
Table 8: Information Technology Patents (2002 - 2006)
PCB
Fabrication
& Design
IC
Design
/ VLSI
Antenna
Design
RF & MW
Systems
Reconfigurable
Computing
Electrooptics
DSP
Total
United States
216
1610
1362
1991
358
468
586
6394
Japan
45
1091
428
593
4
487
231
2828
South Korea
37
309
282
185
1
43
56
889
Taiwan
53
290
152
101
2
30
37
653
Germany
28
175
129
124
13
78
37
571
Canada
12
27
98
132
19
14
28
317
Finland
0
2
81
44
2
3
9
136
Sweden
1
9
51
51
1
2
5
117
China
7
12
27
18
1
21
7
91
Australia
3
6
21
14
1
7
10
58
India
1
21
3
10
4
0
9
47
Ireland
3
5
4
11
6
0
0
28
Malaysia
7
3
1
3
0
0
0
14
Norway
0
3
5
2
0
3
0
13
South Africa
0
1
1
7
0
1
0
10
Thailand
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
3
Turkey
0
1
2
0
0
1
0
3
Egypt
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
2
Indonesia
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
Iran
0
0
0
1
0
0
Saudi Arabia
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
UAE
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Country
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
1
23
Strategic Context
While the majority of electronics, communications,
and photonics related patent applications followed by
and photonics-related patent applications are defined
Samsung Electronics (239 applications), Seiko Epson
as individually owned patent applications (7,938
Corporation (176 applications), and NEC Corporation
applications) by the United States Patent Office,
(153 applications). The top three most cited electronics,
institutions are designated as the patent assignee on a
communications,
significant number of applications. As shown in table 9,
applications are all designated as individually owned
International Business Machines Company is listed as
patents.
and
photonics
related
the patent assignee on 243 electronics, communications,
Table 9: Leading Electronics, Communications, and Photonics Patent Assignees (2002 - 2006)
USTPO Assignee
No. of Patents Apps.
Individually Owned Patents
7938
International Business Machines Corporation
243
Samsung Electronics
239
Seiko Epson Corporation
176
NEC Corporation
153
Fujitsu Limited
104
Broadcom Corporation
102
Matsushita Electric Industrial Company
63
SWOT Analysis for KSA ECP Technology
Program
This
section
presents
the
strengths,
weaknesses,
opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of the ECP
technology program.
Strengths and weaknesses are
internal to the organization while opportunities and
threats are defined as external to the organization. For
the purpose of this analysis, the “organization” includes
KACST, universities, other government agencies, and
companies.
24
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
patent
Strategic Context
SWOT Analysis for the ECP Program
Internal
Strengths:
Weaknesses:
Availability of financial support and the
strong growth of the national GDP
Weakness of communication structures among all
beneficiaries and stakeholders
Availability of political support
Difficulties in acquiring technical support
Availability of raw materials needed for
Absence of coordination between R&D bodies
ECP industries
Weak technology development culture
Difficult patent organization and registration
Scarcity of well trained and experienced human
resources (and the difficulty of attracting them to work in
R&D fields)
Scarcity of success stories in this field
External
Opportunities:
Threats:
Abundance of electronic peripherals and
the immediate need for them in a very wide
spectrum of applications
result in loosing focus
Contradictions resulting from fuzziness of roles with
Long term benefits call for localization
and development of these technologies
Reducing dependence
Scattering the efforts in many sub-tracks, which may
on important
technologies
respect to different stakeholders
Confidentiality of some of the technologies to be
localized
The rapid global development of ECP technologies
High return of investments in ECP
technologies
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
25
Higher Strategy
This section provides the vision for
the Kingdom in ECP research and
innovation, and the mission, values,
and strategic goals for the program.
Vision
The vision for KSA ECP research and innovation is:
To be among the leading countries in the region in the fields of Electronics,
Communications and Photonics through an integrated and proactive
approach to developing the technological, knowledge-based, and managerial
infrastructure in the Kingdom.
This vision focuses on the establishment of an effective innovation system
in which research and innovation can lead to economic and social benefits
for the Kingdom. To achieve this, it is essential to have strong and mutually
beneficial linkages between universities, government, and industry.
Mission
The mission for the KSA ECP research and innovation program is:
To construct an efficient and effective system in localizing and developing
Electronics,
Communications,
and
Photonics
technologies
through
formulation of modern scientific applications and methodologies that
contribute in elevating performance, reducing costs, broadening strategic
alliances, expanding investing opportunities and empowering specialized
personnel and experts.
26
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Higher Strategy
Program Values and Culture
To achieve excellence, the program will develop an internal culture based on
the following values:
Integrity.
Sincere drive for excellence and proficiency.
Creativity and innovation.
Teamwork and collaboration.
Quality.
Loyalty.
Program Strategic Goals
The program’s strategic goals are aligned with the objectives of the National
Policy for Science and Technology and the key needs of the Kingdom. The
following are the ECP program strategic goals for the next 5 years:
Acquisition of high value added technologies.
Bridging gaps between all stakeholders and beneficiaries.
Establishing advanced labs.
Promoting research.
Updating curricula.
Qualifying of human resources.
Opening of new investment and market opportunities.
Forming new specialized employment opportunities.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
27
Program Initiatives and Technologies
The
ECP
program
categorized
many other fields and initiatives.
its activities into initiatives, and
For example, a single reconfigurable
technologies. “Initiatives” are defined
computing chip can be used to build
as application areas involving many
devices for communication, customer
technical specialties. For example, an
electronics, and all the others defined
RFID project may need researchers
above.
working in the areas of communication
systems, RF, and IC design and may
The stakeholders selected both
need DSP, PCB, IC, and RF labs and
initiatives
equipments as well. By contrast,
applying selection criteria. The
the program uses “technology” to
following section describes the
mean a single technical discipline.
selection criteria and the selected
This single discipline can serve
initiatives and technologies.
and
technologies
by
Selection Criteria
The selection criteria were based on three categories of impact -– strategic,
economic and scientific. These criteria are derived from the national policy for
science and technology (NPST). The national policy defines the general objectives
for the implementation framework and determines the evaluation criteria.
Strategic impact
Strategic impact criteria are those which help determine whether individual
technologies and initiatives have a direct impact on the Kingdom’s security
and essential infrastructures and resources. The following are the criteria
used to judge strategic impact:
Need for self-reliance.
Ability to develop / recruit human resources.
Availability / accessibility of technology.
Ability to localize / develop technology.
Long-term viability.
Breadth of application domain.
Future growth potential.
Economic diversification potential.
Business opportunities potential.
Ability to create / localize jobs.
Contribution to national image.
28
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Program Initiatives and Technologies
Economic impact
Economic impact criteria are those which help determine the degree to
which ECP technologies and initiatives contribute to and impact the growth
and diversity of the Kingdom’s economy. In addition to considerations of
contribution to the Kingdom’s economy, the criteria are designed to filter
programs that have the potential to positively affect the wealth of individual
Saudi citizens. The following are the economic impact criteria:
Breadth of application domain.
Future growth potential.
Economic diversification potential.
Availability of committed beneficiaries.
Business opportunities potential.
Ability to create / localize jobs.
Lower financial capital required.
Expected return on investment (ROI).
Scientific impact
Scientific impact criteria are those which help determine the impact of
potential ECP technologies and initiatives on the Kingdom’s scientific and
technical capability. The following are the criteria used:
Contribution to national image.
Contribution to the scientific body of knowledge.
Ability to localize / develop technology.
Future growth potential.
Long-term viability.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
29
Program Initiatives and Technologies
Selected Initiatives
to wireless communications and needs to continue to
Information Security
develop these technologies to take full advantage of the
With the growing sophistication of data communications
possibilities.
and networking, the risk of knowledge, identity, and
information thefts is increasing dramatically. Also, the
Key elements of the Wireless Communications and Wireless
global economy is transforming into a “knowledge-based
Sensor Networks initiative include:
economy.” These realities have raised the importance of
RFID.
“information security”, which is considered a national
Body sensor networks.
security matter in many countries.
Oil & gas pipeline monitoring.
Condition-based maintenance.
Improving the infrastructure for information security
Software defined radio.
and communications within the Kingdom is vital for
Cognitive wireless networks.
the continued improvement of its industrial base. ECP
UWB (Ultra Wide Band).
fields such as data encryption, intruder detection and
advanced communications technologies are necessary
Lasers and Their Applications
components for developing such an infrastructure.
Photonics, the applications of light energy whose basic unit
is the photon, involves the fields of optics, laser technology,
Key elements of the Information Security initiative include:
materials science, and information storage and processing.
Quantum cryptography.
Photonics research has migrated from being almost
Quantum computing.
exclusively associated with large research laboratories into
Cryptography.
mainstream industrial and university settings. The reduced
Emission control and shielding.
capital necessary to undertake photonics research has
lowered the barriers to entry and made it accessible to
Wireless Communications & Sensor Networks
countries, such as the Kingdom, that are developing their
The development of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs)
science and technology capacity. Research in photonics,
is a new technology platform. Recent advancements in
lasers and their applications are relevant across several
wireless communications and electronics have enabled
sectors of the economy such as information technology,
the development of low-cost WSNs. The sensor networks
healthcare, security and safety, and lighting.
can be used in critical applications such as health care,
home, security, energy, ecology and environment. Nearly
Key elements of the Lasers and Their Applications initiative
all oil and gas companies use wireless technologies for
include:
field monitoring and automation applications, such as
Optical memories.
pipeline operation and wellhead monitoring. Most of
Surveillance.
these are wireless technologies that are outdated and
LIDARs (Laser Radars).
expensive. The oil and gas industry will spend $200
30
million on WSNs over the next three years, according to
MEMS Sensors & Actuators
ON World. The Kingdom has made an early commitment
Microelectromechanical
systems
(MEMS)
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
promise
Program Initiatives and Technologies
to revolutionize many product categories by bringing together siliconbased microelectronics with micro mechanical systems, making possible
the realization of complete systems on the micro scale. There are several
applications relevant to the industrial needs of the Kingdom. It is an enabling
technology for the development of smart products that can be used, for example,
in oil and gas, petrochemical, and water research applications. Continued
development of MEMS technologies will be necessary to complement research
initiatives in other areas critical to the needs of the Kingdom.
Key elements of the Advanced MEMS Sensors & Actuators initiative include:
Optical MEMS.
High Performance Actuators.
Micro fluidics.
Inertial Sensors.
Selected Technologies
Integrated Circuits (ICs)
Miniaturizing of electronic components started changing the consumer
electronics and research domains especially after the introduction of the
planar technology. With this technology, it became possible to realize an
increasing number of electronic components on the same chip. The term
Integrated Circuit (IC) refers thus to the electronic device composed of an
electronic circuit realized by the use of planar technology on a single chip.
As a result of the aforementioned improvements the capabilities of ICs has
continued to grow while the cost is being reduced.
As is reported in several market analyses, the electronics market growth is
several times larger than the global GDP growth. As a matter of fact, the
electronics industry has reshaped the economies and societies of several
nations. In the electronics market today, there are three main categories that
electronics companies fall under: fabless companies, foundries, and integrated
device manufacturers (IDM).
Fabless companies design, produce and sell their products but they outsource
the fabrication and packaging of their products. The capital required is about
$5 million; this form is the most suitable for the Kingdom.
Pure-play semiconductor foundries provide the fabrication for fabless design
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
31
Program Initiatives and Technologies
companies. They fabricate their customers’ designs and
more power per computation because of their extra
protect their customer’s intellectual property. The typical
peripherals designed to provide flexibility. In addition, the
cost of a foundry can be more than $3 billion and the
non-recurring engineering cost invested in producing an
running and upgrade cost is in the range of several
ASIC is considerably larger than the cost of a DSP.
hundreds of millions of dollars. Success of such a model
is a function of several factors among which are the
Reconfigurable computing has emerged as a solution to
supporting policies of the nation.
bridging the flexibility, efficiency and cost gaps between
microprocessors and ASICs. Reconfigurable computing
Integrated Device Manufacturers provide the complete
is the term used to describe the set of architectures
set of functions including design, testing, fabrication and
and technologies developed to minimize the cost and
packaging of micro-electronic devices. These are the
increase the flexibility of complex computing solutions.
largest companies in terms of scale and capital.
Currently, the most successful reconfigurable computing
solutions are Filed Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs).
Microwave Systems
The FPGA market is growing steadily making it easier to
Microwave (MW) systems are those working in frequencies
realize new computing applications.
ranging from few hundred megahertz to tens of gigahertz.
Microwave systems have many applications, including
Printed Circuits Board Fabrication and Design
radar, antenna, MW imaging, and telecommunication
Electronic systems are composed of several interconnected
systems. The systems require relatively few general
components, such as analog and digital ICs, in order to
components and the scale of costs are considerably less
achieve their required functionality. The platform that is
than those associated with microelectronic devices. Given
used to realize this functionality is called a printed circuit
the array of important applications, the development of
boards (PCB). PCBs provide the physical integrity and
technical capacity in microwave systems in the Kingdom
strength the system needs, and provide the basis for the
is critical. The design and fabrication of these components
interconnections. To realize the huge amount of routing
is crucially needed in the Kingdom and their technologies
needed on a board, several layers of interconnects are
should be transferred and localized.
used. The boards are highly specialized to accommodate
the required interconnectivity at the very high frequencies
Reconfigurable Computing
at which these components operate, the different types
There are two main computational paradigms: the Von
of the signals being transmitted, and the huge number of
Neumann (microprocessor) paradigm and the ASIC
pins from the onboard components. Special design rules
paradigm. In the microprocessor computational paradigm,
and techniques are used to ensure integrity and reduce
the hardware is fixed and the function implemented varies.
the unwanted parasitic effects of electrical signals being
In ASICs, both function and hardware are fixed. ASICs are
passed between components.
well designed to very efficiently perform specific functions
32
but lack flexibility. Microprocessors exhibit very high
Electro-optics
flexibility, but they are orders of magnitude slower than
The global market for optoelectronics is growing
their ASIC counterparts. Microprocessors also consume
rapidly. This growth is driven by the enormous impact
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Program Initiatives and Technologies
optoelectronics and laser technology are having on low cost communication
technologies, high quality printing, digital audio recording, and other
applications. The optoelectronic market is expected to grow from US $16.2 B
in 2006 to US$ 19.8 B in 2009 according to the World Semiconductor Trade
Statistics.8 This typically includes all the semiconductor devices in which
optical electronic interaction takes place, especially the semiconductor lasers,
optical detectors, optoelectronic couplers, displays, Light Emitting Diodes
LED’s and so on. Given the tremendous growth in the field of optoelectronics
and the broad set of applications that are relevant to improving the quality of
daily life, developing strong capacity in optoelectronics is an important effort
for the Kingdom to undertake.
Digital Signal Processing
In the digital domain, it is possible to achieve a lot through digitally processing the
signal. Processing of digital signals can be either achieved by building dedicated
ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) or a microprocessor. Nowadays,
with the recent advancements in the electronics industry, it became possible
to digitize the signals at early stages and at higher frequencies. This makes it
possible to implement special algorithms enabling achievements that were not
possible previously. By using Digital Signal Processors, changing and upgrading
the implemented algorithm can be done with reduced time and cost.
Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) are a special family of low cost microprocessors
that are tailored to save energy and area. For efficient use of DSPs, embedded
systems design techniques are essential for realizing many applications
especially in communications and entertainment industries. The DSPs and
the DSP applications’ markets are constantly growing, covering quite a wide
spectrum of products.
Special Remark about Fabrications
In all of the above technologies, efforts should be concentrated in the design.
As market reports show, considerable gains and profit can be made on the
design level while outsourcing the manufacturing part. At later stages directing
some resources in fabrication side can be reconsidered.
8
May 30, 2007 news release.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
33
Operational Plans
Operational
plans
for
plans
governing
include
portfolio
management, technology transfer,
quality
management,
human
resources, communications and risk
management.
Portfolio Management
The ECP Research and Innovation Program will include a variety of projects
with different goals and objectives. The program will be managed to achieve a
balance across multiple objectives. Some factors to be considered include:
Short term versus long term objectives (i.e. filling immediate skill gaps
versus long term human resource development).
Meeting the needs of existing companies versus establishing new
technology-based industries in the Kingdom.
Developing a portfolio of low-risk incremental projects and high risk/high
return projects.
Balancing national needs with the individual needs of the major
stakeholders.
The program manager and advisory committee will review the program to
ensure that it maintains an appropriate balance among these factors.
Technology transfer plan
The ECP research and innovation program will follow internationally
recognized best practices in technology transfer. Key elements of the program
that are designed to facilitate technology transfer are:
Involvement of users in program design.
This occurs through user
participation in planning workshops and user involvement in the ECP advisory
committee. It is well recognized that user involvement in the research design
34
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Operational Plans
leads to research and outcomes that are more likely to meet the needs of
users, and thus are more likely to lead to successful innovation.
The use of university/industry centers as hosts to major research efforts.
Industry and university partnership in these research centers will encourage
university based basic research to be focused on user needs, increasing the
likelihood of technology transfer. These centers will also transfer knowledge
to industry though the training and graduation of students (who have been
trained on problems of interest to industry), who then take jobs in companies
or form their own companies.
Linkages to technology incubators. Linkages between the ECP program
and technology incubators will provide the structure for the transition from
research to new businesses and will connect investors with promising new
ECP business opportunities.
Quality management plan
The ECP research and innovation program will follow quality management
processes for science and technology programs.
Elements of this plan
include:
Advisory committee review of the overall program design and budget.
Competitive, peer-reviewed selection processes for university-based
research centers and projects.
Annual reviews of technology development projects to ensure that
milestones are being met.
Routine (every 5 years) ECP program evaluations conducted by a review
committee supported by an experienced evaluator.
Procedures will be developed for disclosing and managing potential conflicts
of interest among reviewers. In many cases, some international experts will be
used on review panels to reduce possible conflicts of interest and to provide
an independent external assessment.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
35
Operational Plans
Human resources plan
of ECP researchers through its emphasis on university-
As noted in the SWOT analysis, the limited technical
industry centers. These centers are designed to train new
workforce is a critical obstacle to the success of the ECP
students with research and innovation skills needed by
Technology Program. The availability of skilled workers,
research organizations and industry.
including researchers and technical managers, is likely to
limit the growth and success of KSA ECP programs. The
Communications management plan
plan will require substantial numbers of ECP professionals,
The purpose of the communications management plan
including additional researchers, technical managers,
is to provide appropriate information to the program
and technical leaders at KACST, universities, and public
participants and stakeholders.
and private organizations. A central task of the program
communications plan is to improve communication
management function will be to address this issue.
throughout the KSA ECP research and innovation
One element of the
community and to expand collaboration among members
To achieve the goals of the program, KACST will need
of the community.
Aspects of this communication
to hire or develop additional program managers with
structure include the following:
the skills to lead national programs. Universities and
The establishment of a public website with
companies will need additional researchers and engineers
information on program goals, accomplishments, funding
with the skills to develop innovative technologies. Initially,
opportunities, and other news.
KACST will have to rely on the importation of foreign
n Periodic workshops with users and stakeholders to
talents. To do this KACST will need additional flexibility
define future program needs.
with respect to international recruitment policies. As part
of the activities in this plan, the ECP program will:
Analyze ECP human resource issues and advocate
changes to improve the quality of math and science
education in primary and secondary education.
Work with the other agencies to improve the quality
of undergraduate ECP education, especially at regional
universities.
Adoption of Public announcements for requests
for proposals (for university centers, grants, and pilot
application development programs).
Sponsorship
of
workshops,
conferences,
and
professional society activities to expand communication
and networking throughout the community.
Encouragement of presentations at national and
international conferences.
Work with new universities to develop research
and education programs that meet the Kingdom’s ECP
Another element of the plan is to define appropriate
research and innovation needs.
communications within the management structure
Work to change policies to allow more international
hiring, to bring specialized expertise to the Kingdom.
Support training for researchers to become R&D
managers and leaders.
of the plan. It is especially important that information
about risks or difficulties in the program, such as delays,
lack of resources, or non-attainment of goals be rapidly
communicated to higher levels of management.
At the undergraduate and especially at the graduate
levels, this plan is designed to help increase the numbers
36
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Operational Plans
Risk management plan
The program presented here is an ambitious program that will challenge
the capabilities of the Kingdom. There are several types of risks that could
prevent attainment of program goals, including technical risks, market risks,
and financial risk.
One potential risk is the lack of adequate human resources to implement the
program. Approaches to managing this risk are:
Changing policies to attract people with the needed skills. .
Delaying or phasing in some program elements.
Expanding the pool of people with needed skills through education
and training programs, such as university ECP research centers (see human
resources plan).
Another potential risk is the adoption of overly ambitious goals.
The
approaches to addressing this potential outcome are to have an independent
review of technical goals to ensure they are feasible, and to adjust technical
goals if milestones are not being met.
Market risk is the possibility that projects, while technically successful, do not
lead to commercialization because of poorly understood or changing market
conditions. Addressing this risk involves the following:
Designing programs based on carefully considered market needs.
Continuous
monitoring
of
international
technology
and
market
developments.
Continual readjustment of plans in response to changes in the
environment.
Financial risks of insufficient funding and cost overruns are ever present,
especially in research projects. Addressing financial risks involves careful
program planning, executing due diligence and monitoring, and early
identification of possible cost overruns.
Another financial risk is due to
changes in the plan or funding due to political or policy changes. It will be
important for the ECP program management to maintain open communication
with policy leaders to ensure they are aware of the accomplishments of the
program and to get early warning of any policy changes that may affect the
program funding.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
37
Implementation of the Plan
Within KACST, the ECP program
the design and evaluation of these
manager will be responsible for the
programs rather than to manage.
overall execution of the plan. Some
portions of the plan may be managed
by other parts of KACST.
For
example, the technology innovation
centers and technology incubators
may be managed by the Technology
Development Center, which may
specialize in the management of
these kinds of programs.
In this
case, the program manager’s role
will be to provide technical input to
Many aspects of the plan represent new functions, especially in developing and
managing national technology programs that include industry and universities
and may involve international collaborations. Although it is critical to rapidly
start new research programs, it is essential to build the skills necessary to lead
and develop these programs, and to plan them carefully. As part of the initial
activities under this plan, KACST staff members will visit similar programs in
other countries to discuss their management practices and lessons learned.
The ECP Advisory Committee will oversee the implementation of the plan. It
will meet approximately four times a year and review progress in the program
based on the key performance indicators. The advisory committee will also
sponsor and oversee studies of emerging areas of ECP, to serve as the basis
for developing new program areas. This plan is intended to be a dynamic
document that will be updated at least annually and more frequently if required.
In addition to the advisory committee input, it is expected that workshops
with the research community, users, industry and other stakeholders will also
contribute to both a continual evolution of the plan as well as a stronger ECP
research and innovation network in the Kingdom.
38
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Implementation of the Plan
Key Performance Indicators
Program Infrastructure
Developing Human Resources:
- Percentage of HR Requirements Fulfillment.
- Average Job Spec and Employee Qualification Gap.
- Personnel Turnover Rate.
- Saudization Percentage.
Developing Organizational Culture:
- Values Adherence Indicator.
- Sponsorship Quality Indicator.
- Culture-building Incentives Efficiency.
- Change Management & Continuous Improvement Indicators.
Effective Financial Management:
- Program Return on Investment (incl. estimates of intangibles).
- Average Difference between Planned and Actual Projects Costs.
- Average Difference between Planned and Actual Work Processes Costs.
Developing Work Processes and Systems:
- Approval of Proper Program Administrative Charter.
- Level of Strategic Objectives Fulfillment by Projects and Work Processes.
- Results of Program International Benchmarking.
- Number of Competition Awards Granted to Program.
- Automation Level of Work Processes and Systems.
Provision of Laboratories and Equipment:
- Percentage of Available to Required Labs & Equipment.
- Quality Indicator of Lab Information Management System (LIMS).
- Lab & Equipment Operation & Maintenance Efficiency Measure.
Developing Knowledge Management System:
- Number of Knowledge Contributions by Specialists per Month.
- Size of Used Knowledge Assets (Documented and Acquired).
- Number of Monthly Activities by Communities of Practice Resulting in
Knowledge Contributions.
- Efficiency of Information System Supporting Knowledge Management.
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
39
Implementation of the Plan
Program Internal Operations
- Building Pilot Plants:
Technologies Selection:
Designed Through Applied Research.
- Level of Strategic Objectives Fulfillment by Selected
Technologies.
- Conducting Localization Research & Studies:
- Average Performance Indicator of Activated Strategic
Partnership.
of
Local
Organizations
Supporting
Program Research.
Research.
of
Patents
Obtained
by
Strategic
i. Percentage of Fundamental Research that
Supported Applied Research.
ii. Number
of
Innovations
Leading
to
New
iii.Percentage of By-Product Technologies Resulting
iv. Number & Quality Indicator of Papers & Graduate
v. Number of Patents Obtained through Localization
vi.Quality Indicator of Confidential Localization
- Building Localization Pilot Plants:
ii. Percentage of Localization Pilot Plants Leading to
Production Line or Solution.
iv. Number of Patents Obtained through Fundamental
Research.
i. Percentage of Implemented Pilot Plants to Total
Designed Through Localization Research.
iii.Number & Quality Indicator of Papers & Graduate
Degrees through Fundamental Research.
iii.Number of Patents Obtained through Localization
Pilot Plants.
v. Quality Indicator of Confidential Fundamental
Research (prevented from publishing).
Technology Transfer:
- Conducting Applied Research:
- Evaluation of ready technologies:
i. Percentage of Applied Research Resulting in
Prototypes, Pilot Plants or Applied Solutions.
ii. Number & Quality Indicator of Papers & Graduate
iii.Number of Patents Obtained through Applied
Research.
i. Percentage of ready technologies leading to
production lines or solutions.
Degrees through Applied Research.
ii. Number of ready technologies passed on to
localization and development.
iii.Average efficiency of products resulting from
transferred technologies.
iv. Quality Indicator of Confidential Applied
Research.
40
Localized
Research.
Applications through Fundamental Research.
of
Research.
- Conducting Fundamental Research:
Indicator
Degrees through Localization Research.
Technology Development:
Efficiency
from Localized Technologies.
Partnerships.
ii. Average
Technologies Compared to Original Technologies.
- Percentage of Investment by Beneficiaries in Program
i. Percentage of Applied Research Resulting in
Localized Technologies.
- Percentage
- Number
iii.Number of Patents Obtained through Pilot Plants.
Technology Localization:
- Percentage of Activated Strategic Partnerships to Total
Required.
ii. Percentage of Pilot Plants Leading to Production
Line or Solution.
- Rate of Project Cancellation in Projects Portfolio.
Establishing Strategic Partnerships:
i. Percentage of Implemented Pilot Plants to Total
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Implementation of the Plan
Program National Operations
Working with the Incubators:
- Percentage of Technologies, Prototypes and Pilot Plants Adopted by
Incubators from Total Offered.
- Percentage of Financial Return from Program Products to Total Incubators
Return.
Working with the Technology Innovation Centers (TIC’s):
- Percentage of Pre-Incubation and Production Prototypes Developed with
TIC’s to Total Offered.
Working with the Program Beneficiaries
(This domain is out of direct Program operations. Performance Indicators
will be developed with Beneficiaries participation during Program
execution).
Supporting National Goals
(This domain is out of direct Program operations. Performance Indicators
will be developed with concerned authorities’ participation during
Program execution).
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
41
Appendix A: Plan Development Process
The process of developing this plan
included three two-day general
workshops and several extensive
meetings of the national team
members that focused on ECP
innovation needs in the Kingdom
and on defining programs to meet
those needs.
The following are the national team members and their affiliations.
ECP Research and Innovation National Team Members
42
Name
Organization
Dr. Abdulhameed Al-Sanee
King Saud University
Dr. Abdullah Al-Zeer
King Saud University
Dr. Salam Zumo
King Fahd University for Petroleum and Minerals
Dr. Saad Al-Shahrani
King Fahd University for Petroleum and Minerals
Dr. Rabah Al-Dhaheri
King Abdulaziz University
Dr. Khalid Al-Nabulsi
King Abdulaziz University
Dr. Montasir Sheikh
King Abdulaziz University
Dr. Majeed Al-Kanhal
CITC
Dr. Abdulrahman Al-Oraini
Saudi Telecomm
Dr. Abdulrahman Al-Oraini
Saudi government
Dr. Hassan Al-Shahrani
Saudi government
Eng. Awad Al-Juhani
Saudi government
Eng. Abdulaziz Al-Tuwaijiri
Saudi government
Eng. Faihan Al-Otaibi
Saudi government
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
Appendix A: Plan Development Process
Name
Organization
Eng. Saleh Al-Kuraidees
Saudi government
Eng. Saleh Al-Rusayes
Saudi government
Eng. Jamaan Al-Zahrani
Saudi government
Eng. Mohammad Al-Hazani
Saudi government
Dr. Abdullah Al-Musa
Saudi Telecomm Co.
Mr. Saad Al-Mazrou
Saudi Telecomm Co.
Eng. Sulaiman Al-Wulaii
Saudi Aramco Co.
Eng. Ahmad AL-Damigh
Saudi Aramco Co.
Dr. Khalid Al-Bayari
Advanced Electronics Co.
Dr. Khalid Al-Ma’shouq
ACES Co.
ECPP faculty
King Abdulaziz City for Science & Technology
International Consultants
Name
Organization
Prof. Mohammad Wahiddin
Malaysian Institute of Microelectronic Systems
(MIMOS) & International Islamic Malaysian University
Prof. Abdulrasheed Monir
ICMic
Prof. Samir Al-Bader
Imperial College of Science , Technology, and
Medicine
Dr. Na’eem Dahnoun
University of Bristol
Prof. Manfred Gleisner
Darmstat University of Technology
Dr. Thomas Hollstein
Darmstat University of Technology
Dr. Tudor Morgan
Darmstat University of Technology
Prof. Hisham Haddarah
Si-Ware Systems
Prof. Ridha Khalil
Si-Ware Systems
Dr. Bassam Sa’adani
Si-Ware Systems
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
43
Appendix A: Plan Development Process
ECP KACST Planning Team Members
Name
Dr. Atteih Al-Ghamdi
Dr. Abdulfattah Obied
Dr. Fahhad Alharbi
Dr. Sami Alhumaidi
Dr. Ahmad Al-Amoudi
Dr. Hatim Behairy
Dr. Mohammad Al-Amri
Saeed Alamri
Fahad Al-Shaman
Amro Al-As’ad
44
Strategic Priorities for Electronics, Communications and Photonics Technology Program
www.kacst.edu.sa
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Doc. No. 18P0001-PLN-0001-ER01
DAKKIN 01 478 8584
Tel 488 3555 - 488 3444
Fax 488 3756
P.O. Box 6086 Riyadh 11442
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
www.kacst.edu.sa
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