VAXft Systems Site Preparation and Installation Guide EK–VXFT1–IN.004 Digital Equipment Corporation

VAXft Systems Site Preparation and Installation Guide EK–VXFT1–IN.004 Digital Equipment Corporation
VAXft Systems Site Preparation and
Installation Guide
EK–VXFT1–IN.004
Digital Equipment Corporation
December, 1991
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not
be construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation. Digital Equipment
Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
Possession, use, duplication, or dissemination of the software described in this
documentation is authorized only pursuant to a valid written license from Digital or
the third-party owner of the software copyright.
No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on equipment that is not
supplied by Digital Equipment Corporation.
Copyright © Digital Equipment Corporation 1991
All Rights Reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: CompacTape, DEC, DSSI,
MicroVAX, RT, ThinWire, TK, VAX, VAXcluster, VAXft, VMS, and the DIGITAL logo.
FCC NOTICE: This equipment generates, uses, and may emit radio frequency energy.
It has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device
pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC rules for operation in a commercial environment.
This equipment, when operated in a residential area, may cause interference to radio/TV
communications. In such event the user (owner), at his own expense, may be required to
take corrective measures.
VAXft Systems Documentation Road Map
Overview
Information
(VAXft Systems)
Hardware
Information
(VAXft Systems)
Operating System
(VMS)
Software
Information
(VAXft System Services)
Customer Letter
Site Prep and
Installation Guide
VMS Upgrade and
Installation Manual
Using Factory−Installed Software
with VAXft Systems
Owner’s Manual
VMS Upgrade and
Installation Supplement:
VAXft Systems
Software Product
Description
VAXft Systems
Configuration Guide
Mini−Reference
Guide
Release Notes
VAX Wide Area Network
Device Drivers
Installation
Guide
Manager’s
Guide
Release Notes
VMS Volume
Shadowing Manual
Reference
Manual
= Book
= Online
Online Help
= Tape
Error Message
Manual
= Bookreader
Master Index
MR−5490−RA
Contents
xv
About This Guide
Part 1
1
Site Preparation
1.1
1.1.1
1.1.2
1.1.3
1.1.4
1.2
1.2.1
1.2.2
1.2.3
1.2.4
1.3
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.4
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.4.3
1.4.4
Site Planning Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire and Safety Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Computer Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Communications . . . . . . . . . . . .
Floor Space Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing for Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Raised Floor Environment . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature and Humidity . . . . . . . . . .
Air Filtration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shock and Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feed Line Capacity/Circuit Breaker Size
AC Power Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1–2
1–2
1–3
1–3
1–3
1–4
1–15
1–15
1–16
1–20
1–20
1–20
1–25
1–25
1–26
1–27
1–34
1–35
1–36
iii
iv Contents
Part 2
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 110 System
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2–1
2–2
2–2
2–4
3.1
Hardware Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1
Removing the Base Cap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2
Ensuring Correct AC Operating Voltage . . . . . . . . .
3.1.3
Checking the Logic Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.3.1
Module Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.3.2
System I/O Controller Module Settings . . . . . . . .
3.1.4
Installing Module Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.5
Installing the Cross-Link Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.6
Connecting the System to Facility Power . . . . . . . . .
3.1.6.1
Connecting the Cabinet Power Cords . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.6.2
Connecting Interface Cables and Power Cords for
Terminals and Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.6.3
Setting the Terminal Baud Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.7
Applying Power to the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2
Power-On Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3
Final System Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4
Installing the Front Cover and Base Cap . . . . . . . . . . .
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3–1
3–2
3–2
3–3
3–6
3–6
3–7
3–7
3–9
3–9
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3–11
3–11
3–13
3–15
3–15
3–16
3
Inspecting the Shipment . . . . .
Unpacking the Options . . . . . .
Opening the Shipping Cartons
Unpacking the Cabinet . . . . . .
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Installing the Model 110 System
Part 3
Contents v
4
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 310 and 410 System
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
5
Inspecting the Shipment . . . . .
Unpacking the Options . . . . . .
Opening the Shipping Cartons
Unpacking the Cabinets . . . . .
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
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4–1
4–2
4–2
4–4
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.1
5.1.1
5.1.2
5.1.3
5.2
5.2.1
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.4
6
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Opening the Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Doors and Base Caps . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expander Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the AC Voltage Selector Switches . . . . . . . . .
Removing the AC Power Input Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Battery Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the Voltage Selector Switch Setting . . . . . .
Replacing the Battery Pack and AC Power Input Box
Checking the Logic Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System I/O Controller Module Settings . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Module Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5–2
5–4
5–6
5–8
5–10
5–10
5–12
5–14
5–14
5–16
5–16
5–18
5–18
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6–2
6–4
6–6
6–7
6–8
6–9
Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
Routing the Cross-Link Cables . .
Routing the DSSI Cables . . . . . .
Installing the PCIM Cables . . . .
Connecting the Cross-Link Cables
Connecting the DSSI Cables . . . .
Installing the Ground Straps . . .
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vi Contents
7
Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7.1
7.1.1
7.1.2
7.1.3
7.2
7.2.1
7.2.2
7.3
7.4
Connecting the System to Facility Power
Connecting the Cabinet Power Cords . .
Connecting the Terminals and Modems
Setting the Terminal Baud Rates . . . . .
Applying Power to the System . . . . . . . .
System Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expander Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-On Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Final System Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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. 7–2
. 7–4
. 7–5
. 7–5
. 7–6
. 7–6
. 7–10
. 7–12
. 7–12
Part 4
8
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610 and 612 System
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
9
Inspecting the Shipment . . . . .
Unpacking the Options . . . . . .
Opening the Shipping Cartons .
Unpacking the Cabinets . . . . . .
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8–1
8–3
8–4
8–6
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9–2
9–4
9–6
9–8
9–8
9–8
9–10
9–10
9–12
9–12
9–14
9–14
9–15
9–17
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9.1
9.1.1
9.1.2
9.2
9.2.1
9.2.2
9.2.3
9.2.4
9.3
9.3.1
9.3.2
9.4
9.5
9.6
Opening the Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expander Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the AC Voltage Selector Switches . . . . . . . . .
Removing the AC Power Input Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Battery Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the Voltage Selector Switch Setting . . . . . .
Replacing the Battery Pack and AC Power Input Box
Checking the Logic Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System I/O Controller Module Settings . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Module Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bolting the Cabinets Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leveling the Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Contents vii
10
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
10.1 Installing the System Cables in a Model 610 Base System
10.1.1 Cross-Link Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.2 Power Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.3 DSSI Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2 Installing the System Cables in a Model 610 System with
One Expander Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.1 Power Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.2 PCIM Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.3 DSSI Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3 Installing the System Cables in a Model 610 System with
Two Expander Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3.1 Power Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3.2 PCIM Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3.3 DSSI Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3.4 Expander Cabinet Summary Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.4 Installing the System Cables in a Model 612 Base System
10.4.1 Power Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.4.2 PCIM Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.4.3 DSSI Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.5 Installing the System Cables in a Model 612 System with
Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.5.1 Power Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.5.2 PCIM Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.5.3 DSSI Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
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10–2
10–6
10–6
10–7
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10–7
10–9
10–9
10–10
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10–11
10–11
10–13
10–14
10–15
10–16
10–16
10–18
10–19
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10–20
10–20
10–23
10–23
Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
11.1 Connecting the System to Facility Power .
11.1.1 Connecting the Cabinet Power Cords . .
11.1.2 Connecting the Terminals and Modems
11.1.3 Setting the Terminal Baud Rates . . . . .
11.2 Applying Power to the System . . . . . . . . .
11.2.1 System Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.2 Expander Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.3 Power-On Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.4 Final System Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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11–1
11–3
11–3
11–4
11–4
11–4
11–8
11–10
11–10
viii Contents
A
A.1
A.2
A.3
B
Module Handling, Removal, and
Installation/Replacement Procedures
Module Handling and ESD Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing/Replacing a Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
B.1 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.1
Minimum Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.2
Supported Layered Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.3
Cable Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.4
Recommended Spares List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.5
Troubleshooting Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.6
Redundant Communications Using the WAN Module
B.1.7
Recommended Configurations and Restrictions . . . . .
B.1.8
Physical Device Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.9
Managing Failover Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.1
Y-Box Mounting Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.2
Y-Box Cable Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.3
WAN Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.3.1
With System Running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.3.2
With Both Zones Shut Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.4
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.5
Troubleshooting with FSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C
C.1
C.2
C.3
C.4
A–2
A–4
A–5
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B–1
B–1
B–1
B–2
B–4
B–4
B–5
B–6
B–7
B–8
B–9
B–9
B–9
B–11
B–11
B–12
B–13
B–19
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C–2
C–5
C–5
C–6
System Drive Removal and Replacement
Removing a System Drive . . . .
Replacing or Installing a Drive
Power-On Procedures . . . . . . .
Using the Server Setup Switch
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Contents ix
D
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation
and Installation
D.1 Design Concerns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.1
Unit Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.2
Unit Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.3
Center of Gravity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.4
Rack Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.5
Heat and Airflow Management . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.5.1
Internal Btus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.5.2
Air Vents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.6
Data Cable Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.7
Grounding Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.8
Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2 Optional H407-B DC Power Supply Connections
D.3 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E
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D–2
D–2
D–3
D–3
D–10
D–12
D–13
D–13
D–13
D–15
D–15
D–16
D–19
Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and
Installation
E.1 Design Concerns . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.1.1
Unit Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.1.2
Unit Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . .
E.1.3
Center of Gravity . . . . . . . . . . .
E.1.4
Rack Construction . . . . . . . . . .
E.1.5
Heat and Airflow Management
E.1.5.1
Air Vents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.1.6
Data Cable Management . . . . .
E.1.7
Grounding Considerations . . . .
E.1.8
Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . .
E.2 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index
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E–2
E–2
E–3
E–3
E–9
E–10
E–11
E–11
E–13
E–13
E–14
x Contents
Figures
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
1–5
1–6
1–7
1–8
1–9
1–10
1–11
1–12
1–13
1–14
1–15
1–16
1–17
2–1
2–2
3–1
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–6
3–7
3–8
3–9
3–10
4–1
4–2
5–1
5–2
Model 110 Pedestal System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 System with Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 System with One Expander Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 System with Two Expander Cabinets . . . . . . . . . .
Model 612 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 612 System with Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Pedestal Cabinet Airflow Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Cabinet Airflow Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 Cabinet Airflow Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Psychrometric Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Air Contaminants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110, 310, and 410 System Power Distribution . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 System Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110, 310, and 410 AC Power Connectors . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 AC Power Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening the Model 110 System Cabinet Shipping Carton . . .
Unpacking a Model 110 System Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Base Cap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Logic Module Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 System I/O Controller Module Settings . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Cross-Link Cable Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Power Cord Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Terminal and Modem Connections . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Switches and MFIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unlocking and Positioning the Front Cover (Pedestal Model)
Locking the Front Cover (Pedestal Model) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Base Cap (Pedestal Model) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet Shipping
Carton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unpacking a Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet . . . . . . . . .
Front View of a Model 310 or 410 System Cabinet . . . . . . . .
Removing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet Doors and
Base Cap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–5
1–6
1–7
1–9
1–10
1–11
1–12
1–13
1–17
1–18
1–19
1–21
1–26
1–28
1–31
1–36
1–37
2–3
2–5
3–2
3–4
3–5
3–8
3–10
3–12
3–14
3–17
3–18
3–19
4–3
4–5
5–3
5–5
Contents xi
5–3
5–4
5–5
5–6
5–7
5–8
5–9
6–1
6–2
6–3
6–4
6–5
7–1
7–2
7–3
7–4
8–1
8–2
8–3
9–1
9–2
9–3
9–4
9–5
9–6
9–7
9–8
10–1
10–2
10–3
10–4
10–5
10–6
10–7
Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet Layout, Front View . . .
Model 310 and 410 Expander Cabinet Layout, Front View .
Removing the Model 310 and 410 AC Power Input Box . . .
Model 310 and 410 Battery Pack Safety Catch . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 AC Voltage Selector Switch Settings . .
Model 310 and 410 Logic Module Placement . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 System I/O Controller Module Settings
Model 310 and 410 Cross-Link Cable Connections . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 DSSI Cable Connections . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 PCIM Cable Connections . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Ground Strap Location . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Ground Strap Installation . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Terminal, Modem, and Power Cord
Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet Switches and MFIs . . .
Model 310 and 410 Logic Module LED Indicators and MFIs
Model 310 and 410 Expander Cabinet Switches and MFIs .
Model 610 and 612 System Cabinet Shipping Carton . . . . .
Opening the Model 610 and 612 System Shipping Cartons .
Unpacking a Model 610 and 612 System Cabinet . . . . . . . .
Front View of a Model 610 or 612 System Cabinet . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 System Cabinet Layout, Front View . . .
Model 610 and 612 Expander Cabinet Layout, Front View .
Model 610 and 612 Battery Pack Safety Catch . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 AC Voltage Selector Switch Settings . .
Model 610 and 612 Logic Module Placement . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 System I/O Controller Module Settings
Bolting the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 CPU Cabinet Cable Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 Expander Cabinet Cable Routing . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Connections in a Model 610 Base System . . . . . . . . .
Cable Connections in a Model 610 System with One
Expander Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Connections in a Model 610 System with Two
Expander Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Connections in a Model 612 Base System . . . . . . . . .
Cable Connections in a Model 612 System with Expansion .
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5–7
5–9
5–11
5–13
5–15
5–17
5–19
6–3
6–5
6–6
6–9
6–10
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7–3
7–7
7–9
7–11
8–2
8–5
8–7
9–3
9–5
9–7
9–9
9–11
9–13
9–15
9–17
10–3
10–4
10–5
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. 10–8
. 10–12
. 10–17
. 10–21
xii Contents
11–1 Model 610 and 612 Terminal, Modem, and Power Cord
Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11–2 Model 610 and 612 System Cabinet Switches and MFIs . . .
11–3 Model 610 and 612 Logic Module LED Indicators and MFIs
11–4 Model 610 and 612 Expander Cabinet Switches and MFIs .
B–1 Typical WAN Module Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–2 WAN Module Physical Device Names and Related Slot
Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–3 Y-Box Mounting Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C–1 Cannister Drive Controls and Drive Latch . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C–2 Carrier Drive Controls and Captive Thumb Screw . . . . . . .
D–1 Model 310 and 410 BA22A Box, Front View . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–2 Model 310 and 410 BA22B Box, Front View . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–3 Model 310 and 410 Flange Mounting Holes . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–4 Model 310 and 410 BA22 Box, Side View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–5 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount Example, Front View . . . . .
D–6 Rackmount Example, Side View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–7 Traditional Rackmount, Side View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–8 Model 310 and 410 Cable Routing, Front View . . . . . . . . . .
D–9 H407-B DC Power Supply Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–1 Model 110 BA22A Box, Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–2 Model 110 Flange Mounting Holes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–3 Model 110 BA22 Box, Side View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–4 Model 110 Rackmount Example, Front View . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–5 Rackmount Example, Side View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–6 Traditional Rackmount, Side View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–7 Model 110 Cable Routing, Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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11–2
11–5
11–7
11–9
B–3
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B–7
B–10
C–3
C–4
D–4
D–5
D–6
D–7
D–8
D–9
D–11
D–14
D–18
E–4
E–5
E–6
E–7
E–8
E–9
E–12
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1–4
1–8
1–14
1–22
1–23
1–24
1–29
Tables
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
1–5
1–6
1–7
Model
Model
Model
Model
Model
Model
Model
110 Pedestal Cabinet Dimensions and Weights
310 and 410 Cabinet Dimensions and Weights
610 and 612 Cabinet Dimensions and Weights
110 Environmental Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
310 and 410 Environmental Limits . . . . . . . . .
610 and 612 Environmental Limits . . . . . . . . .
110 Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Contents xiii
1–8
1–9
1–10
3–1
5–1
9–1
B–1
B–2
B–3
D–1
D–2
Model 310 and 410 Power Requirements . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 Power Requirements . . . . . . .
Recommended Circuit Breaker Trip Delay Times
Model 110 Logic Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Logic Modules . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 Logic Modules . . . . . . . . . . .
Adapter, Extension, and Loopback Cables . . . . . .
Redundant Failover Set Configurations . . . . . . . .
Nonpaged Pool Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H407-B DC Input Power Requirements . . . . . . . .
H407-B DC Output Power Requirements . . . . . . .
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1–30
1–32
1–35
3–6
5–16
9–12
B–2
B–6
B–13
D–16
D–16
About This Guide
Intended Audience
This manual is intended for use by Digital Customer Services and other
personnel responsible for planning, preparing, and installing a faulttolerant VAXft system.
Document Structure
Part 1 of this manual provides the requirements and guidelines for
planning and preparing the computer facility. It includes one chapter:
•
Chapter 1, Site Preparation — Provides guidelines for preparing
the computer facility. Describes the system space, environmental, and
power requirements.
Part 2 of this manual contains procedures for installing the model 110
VAXft system.
•
Chapter 2, Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 110 System
— Provides guidelines for unpacking and inspecting the model 110
system components and explains what to do if there is a problem.
•
Chapter 3, Installing the Model 110 System — Describes how to
install, power up, and verify the operation of the VAXft 110 system
Part 3 of this manual contains procedures for installing the model 310
and 410 VAXft systems.
•
Chapter 4, Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 310 and 410
System — Provides guidelines for unpacking and inspecting the
model 310 and 410 system components and explains what to do if
there is a problem.
•
Chapter 5, Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
— Describes how to open the model 310 and 410 cabinets, prepare
the equipment for installation, and how to position the cabinets in the
installation area.
•
Chapter 6, Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables —
Describes how to route and connect the system cables in a model 310
and 410 base system or system with expansion.
xv
xvi About This Guide
•
Chapter 7, Completing the Model 310 and 410 System
Installation — Describes how to connect the system to facility power,
connect the terminals and modems, and start up the system.
Part 4 of this manual contains procedures for installing the model 610
and 612 VAXft systems.
•
Chapter 8, Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610 and 612
System — Provides guidelines for unpacking and inspecting the
model 610 and 612 system components and explains what to do if
there is a problem.
•
Chapter 9, Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
— Describes how to open the model 610 and 612 cabinets, prepare
the equipment for installation, and how to position the cabinets in the
installation area.
•
Chapter 10, Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables —
Describes how to route and connect the system cables in a model 610
and 612 base system or system with expansion.
•
Chapter 11, Completing the Model 610 and 612 System
Installation — Describes how to connect the system to facility power,
connect the terminals and modems, and start up the system.
This manual also contains the following appendixes:
•
Appendix A, Module Handling, Removal, and Installation
/Replacement Procedures — Describes how to remove, replace, or
install a logic module in the system backplanes.
•
Appendix B, DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and
Installation — Describes how to install the WAN communications
adapter modules and Y-boxes.
•
Appendix C, System Drive Removal and Replacement —
Describes how to remove, replace, or install system storage media.
•
Appendix D, Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site
Preparation and Installation — Describes how to prepare the
facility and install the model 310 and 410 OEM rackmount systems.
•
Appendix E, Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation
and Installation — Describes how to prepare the facility and install
the model 110 OEM rackmount systems.
About This Guide xvii
Related Documentation
The VAXft documentation set includes the following manuals:
•
VAXft Systems Site Preparation and Installation Guide (EK-VXFT1IN) — Provides site preparation guidelines and system specifications.
Describes how to install, boot, and verify the system. Provides
procedures for removing, handling, and replacing the logic modules,
and for removing and replacing the system drives.
•
VAXft Systems Owner’s Manual (EK-VXFT1-OM) — Provides a
functional description of the VAXft system. Describes the system
controls and indicators, console commands, bootstrap functions, and
tape drive operation. Provides procedures for removing and replacing
the system drives and for removing, handling, and replacing the logic
modules.
•
VAXft Systems Mini-Reference Guide (EK-VXFT1-HR) — Provides
summaries of the system controls and indicators, console operation,
console commands, bootstrap functions, and system registers.
Additional Documentation
Other documents related to the VAXft system include:
•
VAXft Systems Configuration Guide — Describes the VAXft system
and describes fault tolerant computing.
•
VAX Wide Area Network Device Drivers — Describes the software
utilities used in wide area network communications.
•
VAXft System Services Installation Guide — Provides step-by-step
procedures for installing the VAXft system services software on your
VAXft system.
•
VAXft System Services Manager’s Guide — Describes the VAXft
system and the VAXft system services software. Provides information
on managing a fault tolerant system running VAXft system services
software.
•
VAXft System Services Release Notes — Provides information related
to the current version of VAXft system services. Provides additional
information for installing and maintaining your VAXft system.
•
VAXft System Services Reference Manual — Provides reference
information on VAXft system services operation. Describes the DCL
commands used on a VAXft system.
xviii About This Guide
•
VAXft System Services Online Help — Provides information about
using the VAXft system services specific information and the DCL
commands used on a VAXft system.
•
VAXft System Services Error Message Manual — Provides descriptions
of error messages that may be encountered in using VAXft system
services. Provides a reference for fault tolerant and system error
messages.
•
VAXft System Services Master Index — Provides a complete index for
the software documentation set.
•
VMS Upgrade and Installation Manual — Describes the installation
and upgrade procedures for the current release of the VMS operating
system. Provides information on the user environmental test package
(UETP).
•
VMS Upgrade and Installation Supplement: VAXft Systems —
Supplements the VMS Upgrade and Installation Manual with
information specific to the VAXft computer including startup,
shutdown, and backup procedures.
•
VMS Release Notes — Provides notes on various aspects of the VMS
operating system.
•
VMS Volume Shadowing Manual — Provides an in-depth discussion
of volume shadowing (phase II), shadow sets, mount utility, and DCL
commands used to mount, monitor, and dismount volume shadow sets.
Part 1
1
Site Preparation
This chapter provides guidelines for preparing a computer facility for the
VAXft system.
This chapter provides electrical and environmental specifications that
must be observed for optimum performance and are required if the system
is maintained under a Digital Equipment Corporation maintenance
agreement.
The Site Environmental Preparation Guide (EK-CSEPG-MA) provides
further information on site planning and computer room environments.
This chapter includes:
•
Site planning guidelines
•
Floor space requirements
•
Environmental limits
•
Power requirements
1–1
1–2 Site Preparation
1.1 Site Planning Guidelines
When planning a computer facility, the recommended guidelines are to:
1. Identify space, environmental, and power requirements.
2. Determine whether the computer facility meets the requirements and
list necessary enhancements or changes.
3. Prepare the computer facility accordingly. The following steps are
recommended:
a. Prepare a layout diagram of the installation area. Section 1.2 lists
the system dimensions and weights.
b. Determine the air quality and cooling capabilities of the
installation area. Section 1.3 lists the system temperature and
humidity requirements.
c.
Determine the required number, type, and location of ac power
receptacles and circuit breakers. Section 1.4 lists the system
power requirements.
1.1.1 Fire and Safety Codes
The computer facility should conform to local fire and safety codes. The
power distribution panel and master circuit breaker or switch must be
easily accessible.
For further information on fire and safety codes and practices, refer to
the following U.S. National Fire Protection Association publications or to
equivalent associations and codes:
•
Standard for the Protection of Electronic Computer/Data Processing
Equipment (NFPA 75)
•
National Electrical Code (NFPA 70)
Site Preparation 1–3
1.1.2 Computer Security
Computer security can be important even where confidential work is
not common practice. It is advisable to provide a separate computer
room or facility, or to improve or extend the existing building security
practices. The goal is to provide protection for the computer area against
potential damage to the equipment or its programs through carelessness,
vandalism, or unauthorized operation.
1.1.3 Data Protection
Consider the security of the system media, programs, and databases.
Personnel, medical, financial, research, and other sensitive information
should be safeguarded from unauthorized access, tampering, or disclosure.
Special safeguards should be considered for protecting vital data such as
business records or information that is expensive or difficult to duplicate.
Important data should be ‘‘backed up’’ (copied onto removable media) on
a regular basis and stored away from the computer area, preferably in a
fireproof storage vault.
1.1.4 Remote Communications
The VAXft system supports connections for remote services and facilities.
The system provides dial-out capabilities for system-generated service
requests and dial-in capabilities for remote users. The customer must
provide the necessary number of dedicated telephone lines.
NOTE
Direct dialing must be used. The telephone lines must not be
‘‘party’’ lines (having other users). The telephone lines must not
be routed through a switchboard that allows outside interference
or could be shut down during hours of computer operation or
maintenance.
1–4 Site Preparation
1.2 Floor Space Requirements
This section describes the top, front, and rear clearances needed for the
installation, operation and maintenance of the VAXft systems. Figure
1–1 shows the footprint of the VAXft model 110 pedestal system. The
rackmount system can be installed in a standard 19-inch RETMA rack
cabinet. The clearances for the rackmount system are not addressed
because they are specific to the rack in which it is mounted. Dimensions
and weights for the rackmount system are given in Appendix E.
Table 1–1 lists the model 110 cabinet dimensions and weights. Figures
1–2 and 1–3 show the footprints of the model 310 and 410 systems. Table
1–2 lists the model 310 and 410 cabinet dimensions and weights. Figures
1–4 through 1–8 show the footprints of the model 610 and 612 systems.
Table 1–3 lists the model 610 and 612 cabinet dimensions and weights.
Table 1–1 Model 110 Pedestal Cabinet Dimensions and Weights
Specification
Value
Skid and packaging removed:
Height
68.6 cm (27.0 in)
Width
53.3 cm (21.0 in)
Depth
44.5 cm (17.5 in)
System cabinet weight
68.5 kg (151 lb), maximum
Skid and packaging intact:
Height
75.3 cm (29.6 in)
Width
58.4 cm (23.0 in)
Depth
85.7 cm (33.3 in)
System cabinet weight
87.1 kg (192 lb), maximum
Site Preparation 1–5
Figure 1–1 Model 110 Pedestal System
1–6 Site Preparation
Figure 1–2 Model 310 and 410 Base System
TOP CLEARANCE
61 cm
(24 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
53 cm
(21 in)
53 cm
(21 in)
HEIGHT
69 cm
(27 in)
REAR
CLEARANCE
61 cm
(24 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
45 cm
(17.8 in)
DEPTH
206 cm
(81.2 in)
WIDTH
109 cm (43 in)
FRONT
CLEARANCE
100 cm
(39.4 in)
= CABLE ACCESS HOLE IN CABINET BASE.
HOLE SIZE IS 18.7 cm (7.38 in) BY 6 cm (2.38 in).
MR-0045-90.DG
Site Preparation 1–7
Figure 1–3 Model 310 and 410 System with Expansion
TOP CLEARANCE
61 cm
(24 in)
EXPANDER
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
EXPANDER
CABINET
53 cm
(21 in)
53 cm
(21 in)
53 cm
(21 in)
53 cm
(21 in)
HEIGHT
69 cm
(27 in)
REAR
CLEARANCE
61 cm
(24 in)
EXPANDER
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
EXPANDER
CABINET
45 cm
(17.8 in)
DEPTH
206 cm
(81.2 in)
WIDTH
222 cm (87 in)
FRONT
CLEARANCE
100 cm
(39.4 in)
= CABLE ACCESS HOLE IN CABINET BASE.
HOLE SIZE IS 18.7 cm (7.38 in) BY 6 cm (2.38 in).
MR_X1406_89.DG
1–8 Site Preparation
Table 1–2 Model 310 and 410 Cabinet Dimensions and Weights
Specification
Value
Skid and packaging removed:
Height
68.6 cm (27.0 in)
Width
53.3 cm (21.0 in)
Depth
45.2 cm (17.8 in)
System cabinet weight
100 kg (220 lb), maximum
Expander cabinet weight
118 kg (260 lb), maximum
Skid and packaging intact:
Height
114.3 cm (45.0 in)
Width
78.7 cm (31.0 in)
Depth
60.7 cm (23.9 in)
System cabinet weight
118 kg (260 lb), maximum
Expander cabinet weight
137 kg (302 lb), maximum
Site Preparation 1–9
Figure 1–4 Model 610 Base System
SYSTEM
CABINET
HEIGHT
152.4 cm
(60 in)
91.4 cm
(36 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
76.2 cm
(30 in)
WIDTH
91.4 cm
(36 in)
ZKO-050-000079-19-DG
1–10 Site Preparation
Figure 1–5 Model 610 System with One Expander Cabinet
EXPANDER
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
HEIGHT
152.4 cm
(60 in)
91.4 cm
(36 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
60.9 cm
(24 in)
EXPANDER
CABINET
76.2 cm
(30 in)
WIDTH
154.8 cm
(61 in)
ZKO-050-000079-22-DG
Site Preparation 1–11
Figure 1–6 Model 610 System with Two Expander Cabinets
EXPANDER
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
EXPANDER
CABINET
HEIGHT
152.4 cm
(60 in)
60.9 cm
(24 in)
EXPANDER
CABINET
91.4 cm
(36 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
60.9 cm
(24 in)
EXPANDER
CABINET
76.2 cm
(30 in)
WIDTH
218.2 cm
(116 in)
ZKO-050-000079-23-DG
1–12 Site Preparation
Figure 1–7 Model 612 Base System
SYSTEM
CABINET
EXPANDER
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
HEIGHT
152.4 cm
(60 in)
91.4 cm
(36 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
60.9 cm
(24 in)
EXPANDER
CABINET
91.4 cm
(36 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
76.2 cm
(30 in)
WIDTH
218.2 cm
(98 in)
ZKO-050-000079-24-DG
Site Preparation 1–13
Figure 1–8 Model 612 System with Expansion
SYSTEM
CABINET
EXPANDER EXPANDER
CABINET
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
HEIGHT
152.4 cm
(60 in)
91.4 cm
(36 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
60.9 cm
(24 in)
60.9 cm
(24 in)
EXPANDER EXPANDER
CABINET
CABINET
91.4 cm
(36 in)
SYSTEM
CABINET
76.2 cm
(30 in)
WIDTH
312.1 cm
(126 in)
ZKO-050-000079-25-DG
1–14 Site Preparation
Table 1–3 Model 610 and 612 Cabinet Dimensions and Weights
Specification
Value
Skid and packaging removed:
System cabinet
Height
152.4 cm (60.0 in)
Width
91.4 cm (36.0 in)
Depth
76.2 cm (30.0 in)
System cabinet weight
433 kg (956 lb), maximum
Expander cabinet
Height
152.4 cm (60.0 in)
Width
60.9 cm (24.0 in)
Depth
76.2 cm (30.0 in)
Expander cabinet weight
309.9 kg (684 lb), maximum
Skid and packaging intact:
System cabinet
Height
191.1 cm (75.25 in)
Width
106.7 cm (34.0 in)
Depth
109.9 cm (43.25 in)
System cabinet weight
475.7 kg (1050 lb), maximum
Expander cabinet
Height
191.1 cm (75.25 in)
Width
86.4 cm (34.0 in)
Depth
112.4 cm (44.25 in)
Expander cabinet weight
385 kg (850 lb), maximum
Site Preparation 1–15
1.2.1 Preparing for Delivery
In advance, review the route over which the equipment will be moved
after delivery. Factors to consider are availability of an elevator, width
and location of doors and aisles along the route, hallway restrictions
(bends, slopes, or obstructions), and floor surfaces/protection.
If problems require the equipment to be unpacked and removed from the
skids, remember that a cabinet is too heavy to be handled by one person.
Doors along the route should allow passage for the equipment and be
without saddles or sills to allow for the movement of dollies.
To protect against marring of the floor surface, a suitable material such
as 0.64 cm (0.25 in) plywood should be used to cover the floor along the
route.
1.2.2 Layout
In advance, prepare the layout of the computer facility to determine the
area required for the complete system configuration plus airflow and
service access areas. Allow enough space for two console terminals with
printers (if so equipped), and for operating access.
Remember to consider human factors in the layout. The relationship of
the computer system to high-traffic areas or quiet areas, for example, is
important.
Figures 1–2 through 1–8 show the minimum space requirements for
cooling airflow and service access to the system. Figures 1–2 and 1–3 also
show the location of the cable access hole (model 310 and 410 only) under
the base frame of each cabinet. (Each cabinet uses a separate power cord.)
In a raised floor environment, cutouts may be provided in the floor tiles
for routing power cords and communication cables. The cutouts need
to be large enough to allow the connectors to pass through them. The
cutouts should be rounded or have molding to prevent cuts or damage to
the cables.
1–16 Site Preparation
Important factors to consider include:
•
System access clearances — A minimum of 100 cm (39.4 in) is
required in front of the cabinets for service and operating access.
•
Cooling airflow clearances — A minimum of 61 cm (24 in) is
required above and behind the cabinets for cooling intake airflow.
NOTE
If the system is to be installed in an enclosed space, additional
air cooling equipment may be required.
•
Floor requirements — The system must rest on a firm surface to
allow full exhaust airflow from the bottom. Soft surfaces, such as
shag or deep-pile carpeting, must be avoided unless a firm surface
(like floor tile) is installed on top of the carpeting. The floor should be
made of a material that minimizes static electricity, which can cause
computer failures or media damage.
•
Storage area — A safe storage area should be provided for magnetic
computer media, supplies, documents, spare parts, and maintenance
tools.
CAUTION
Do not place food, beverages, office supplies, or other
materials on top of the cabinets. Areas around the system
should not be used for storage.
1.2.3 Airflow
Figure 1–9 shows the cabinet airflow pattern for the VAXft model
110 pedestal system. Cool air enters through the upper areas of the
cabinet and warm air exits from the bottom. The airflow pattern for the
rackmount system is not addressed because they are specific to the rack
in which it is mounted. Figure 1–10 shows the cabinet airflow pattern for
the model 310 and 410 systems. Cool air enters through the upper areas
of the cabinets and warm air exits from the bottom. Figure 1–11 shows
the cabinet airflow pattern for the model 610 and 612 systems. Cool air
enters through the upper and lower vent areas of the cabinets and warm
air exits from the rear.
The system layout must allow enough cool air to be delivered to the
cabinet(s). Position the cabinet(s) so the heated air from one system is not
directed into the intake airflow of other systems.
Site Preparation 1–17
Figure 1–9 Model 110 Pedestal Cabinet Airflow Pattern
INTAKE AIRFLOW
TM
EXHAUST AIRFLOW
53%
MR-0640-91DG
1–18 Site Preparation
Figure 1–10 Model 310 and 410 Cabinet Airflow Pattern
INTAKE AIRFLOW
TM
EXHAUST AIRFLOW
53%
MR_X1407_89.DG
Site Preparation 1–19
Figure 1–11 Model 610 and 612 Cabinet Airflow Pattern
sys
VA
tem
s
X ft
INTAKE AIRFLOW
ZKO-050-000079-18-DG
1–20 Site Preparation
1.2.4 Raised Floor Environment
Raised flooring is frequently used in an air-conditioned computer facility.
A raised floor provides optimum cooling, and reduces hazards and
obstructions caused by power cords and cabling at computer installations.
The cutouts in the floor tiles must be large enough to allow the connectors
to pass through them and should be rounded to protect the cables. Do not
position the system directly over cool air outlets, perforations, or grills.
1.3 Environmental Limits
The limits described in this section must be observed for maximum
availability.
The VAXft system is designed and tested for operation within the
environmental limits shown in Tables 1–4, 1–5, and 1–6. Figure 1–12
shows the overall environmental test limits for VAXft systems.
1.3.1 Temperature and Humidity
A computer system may generate heat that cannot be dissipated without
the use of air cooling equipment. The ideal computer room is capable of:
•
Heating the room with all equipment off
•
Cooling all equipment with all the equipment operating at maximum
capacity on the warmest day
•
Humidifying/dehumidifying the room within predetermined limits
under all anticipated weather conditions
Low humidity allows static electricity to build up, while high humidity
promotes corrosion. Both can affect storage media and should be avoided
(Figure 1–12).
Temperature and humidity should be monitored and recorded at all times.
The relative humidity may be increased or decreased, as necessary, using
humidification/dehumidification equipment.
Site Preparation 1–21
Figure 1–12 Psychrometric Chart
90
RECOMMENDED
SYSTEM
=
ENVIRONMENT
90
.030
85
85
.026
%
.024
90
80
.022
80
.020
%
75
F
W
70
75
DEW-POINT TEMPERATURE
80
%
DIGITAL
ENVIRONMENTAL
TEST LIMITS
ET
70
.018
UL
B
60
%
70
-B
TE
.016
M
P
%
.014
65
50
65
.012
60
60
55
50
45
40
35
4
0%
.010
55
30
50
45
20
40
%
.008
.006
%
.004
35
10%
A
REL
TIV
U
E H
M
Y
IDIT
HUMIDITY RATIO (W) POUNDS MOISTURE PER POUND DRY AIR
.028
RECOMMENDED
CONTROL
=
TOLERANCE
.002
.0
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
100 105
AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (DRY BULB) F
MR_X1410_89.DG
1–22 Site Preparation
Table 1–4 Model 110 Environmental Limits
Specification
Value
Temperature:
Operating, test1
10°C to 40°C (50°F to 104°F)
2
Operating, nominal
18.3°C to 24.0°C (65°F to 75°F)
Nonoperating
-40°C to 66°C (-40°F to 151°F)
Relative humidity:
Operating, test1
10% to 90% (noncondensing)
2
Operating, nominal
40% to 90% (noncondensing)
Nonoperating
10% to 95% (noncondensing)
Maximum wet-bulb
temperature
28°C (82°F)
Minimum dew point
temperature
2°C (36°F)
Heat dissipation
1075 Btu typical per cabinet per hour
Shock:
Operating
7.5 g vertical for 10 milliseconds
Nonoperating
8 in at 20.32 cm vertical for 1.01 milliseconds
Vibration:
Operating
5.25 g at 500 Hz maximum
Nonoperating
1.19 g rms at 5 Hz to 300 Hz vertical; 5 Hz to 200
Hz longitudinal
Operating altitude3
Sea level to 2.4 km (8000 ft)
1 These limits indicate the broad range of conditions under which Digital Equipment
Corporation devices are tested and are not to be construed as the recommended operating
or storage environments.
2 Recommended
3 If
operating limits.
operation is above 2.4 km, decrease the operating temperature by 1.8°C per additional
1000 m (1°F per additional 1000 ft) above sea level.
Site Preparation 1–23
Table 1–5 Model 310 and 410 Environmental Limits
Specification
Value
Temperature:
Operating, test1
10°C to 40°C (50°F to 104°F)
2
Operating, nominal
18.3°C to 24.0°C (65°F to 75°F)
Nonoperating
-40°C to 66°C (-40°F to 151°F)
Relative humidity:
Operating, test1
10% to 90% (noncondensing)
2
Operating, nominal
40% to 60% (noncondensing)
Nonoperating
10% to 95% (noncondensing)
Maximum wet-bulb
temperature
28°C (82°F)
Minimum dew point
temperature
2°C (36°F)
Heat dissipation
2561 Btu maximum per cabinet per hour
Shock:
Operating
10 g vertical for 10 milliseconds
Nonoperating
20 g vertical for 10 milliseconds
Vibration:
Operating
0.254 mm (0.010 in) double amplitude at 5 to 30
Hz; 0.5 g at 30 to 500 Hz
Nonoperating
1.4 g rms at 10 to 300 Hz vertical; 0.687 g rms at
10 to 200 Hz horizontal and lateral
Operating altitude3
Sea level to 2.4 km (8000 ft)
1 These limits indicate the broad range of conditions under which Digital Equipment
Corporation devices are tested and are not to be construed as the recommended operating
or storage environments.
2 Recommended
3 If
operating limits.
operation is above 2.4 km, decrease the operating temperature by 1.8°C per additional
1000 m (1°F per additional 1000 ft) above sea level.
1–24 Site Preparation
Table 1–6 Model 610 and 612 Environmental Limits
Specification
Value
Temperature:
Operating, test1
10°C to 40°C (50°F to 104°F)
2
Operating, nominal
18.3°C to 24.0°C (65° to 75°F)
Nonoperating
-40°C to 66°C (-40°F to 151°F)
Relative humidity:
Operating, test1
10% to 90% (noncondensing)
2
Operating, nominal
40% to 60% (noncondensing)
Nonoperating
10% to 95% (noncondensing)
Maximum wet-bulb
temperature
28°C (82°F)
Minimum dew point
temperature
2°C (36°F)
Heat dissipation
2561 Btu maximum per cabinet per hour
CPU cabinet
6826 Btu per hour per cabinet
Expander cabinet
3413 Btu per hour per cabinet
Shock:
Operating
10 g vertical for 10 milliseconds
Nonoperating
Incline impact on four sides for 1 millisecond
(3.25 feet per second)
Two tilt drops of 20.3 cm (8.0 in)
Vibration:
Operating
0.254 mm (0.010 in) double amplitude at 5 to 22
Hz; 0.5 g at 22 to 500 Hz
1 These limits indicate the broad range of conditions under which Digital Equipment
Corporation devices are tested and are not to be construed as the recommended operating
or storage environments.
2 Recommended
operating limits.
Site Preparation 1–25
Table 1–6 (Continued) Model 610 and 612 Environmental Limits
Specification
Nonoperating
Value
1.4 g rms at 10 to 300 Hz vertical; power spectral
density 0.029 Hz2 from 10 to 50 Hz with 8 dB
octave rolloff from 50 to 300 Hz
0.687 g rms at 10 to 200 Hz longitudinal and
lateral; power spectral density 0.007 Hz2 from 10
to 50 Hz with 8 dB octave rolloff from 50 to 200
Hz
Operating altitude3
Sea level to 2.4 km (8,000 ft)
3 If operation is above 2.4 km, decrease the operating temperature by 1.8°C per additional
1000 m (1°F per additional 1000 ft) above sea level.
1.3.2 Air Filtration
Air cleanliness is important for the reliability of the disk drives and
computer logic. The air conditioning system should filter the air to
minimize dust, pollen, and other air contaminants. If salt air, corrosive
gases, or other pollutants are present, special chemical filtering may
be required. In this case, consult a specialist in air conditioning and
electronic corrosion. Figure 1–13 shows some common air contaminants
in relation to a typical disk head.
1.3.3 Shock and Vibration
The VAXft system is constructed to withstand normal intermittent
building vibrations (Tables 1–5 and 1–6). However, it is impossible
to anticipate all vibration conditions that might be encountered at all
computer facilities. If shock and vibration levels at the site are severe
or continuous, they should be measured and discussed with a Digital
environmental support engineer and/or an engineering consultant in this
field.
1–26 Site Preparation
Figure 1–13 Common Air Contaminants
CERAMIC HEAD
HUMAN HAIR
.004 in
FINGERPRINT
SMUDGE
ACTUAL
FLYING
HEIGHT
20−100 µ in
LINT AND
DUST
SMOKE
PARTICLE
250 µ in
UP TO 140 MILES PER HR.
200 µ in
MAGNETIC
RECORDING
SURFACE
DISK
GSF_1918_89.RAGS
1.4 Power Requirements
The model 110, 310, and 410 systems are designed to operate on either of
two types of single-phase ac power at 47 to 63 Hz:
•
120 Vac (nominal)
•
220 or 240 Vac (nominal)
The model 610 and 612 systems are designed to run on three-phase ac
power at 49 to 61 Hz:
•
120 Vac (nominal)
•
220 or 240 Vac (nominal)
Site Preparation 1–27
1.4.1 Power Distribution
To maintain hardware redundancy, a separate, dedicated circuit is
required for each zone (Figures 1–14 and 1–15). Table 1–7 lists the ac
power requirements of the model 110 cabinet. Table 1–8 lists the ac
power requirements of the model 310 and 410 cabinets. Table 1–9 lists
the ac power requirements of the model 610 and 612 cabinets.
The recommended power source includes three additional, unused circuits
for future equipment expansion. The electrical system must also conform
to applicable national and local codes and ordinances.
Convenience outlets are not provided in the cabinets. Separate circuits
are required for each terminal, modem, printer, or any other additional
piece of equipment connected to the system.
An independent, uninteruptable, auxiliary power source should be
considered for one of the following circumstances:
•
Console terminals and modems to provide console support during
temporary power outages
•
Entire system as a safeguard against prolonged power failures
During a total power failure, the battery backup in the model 310, 410,
610, and 612 cabinets supports all internal components (including logic
modules and drives) for a minimum of 30 minutes. (The model 110
system does not have a battery backup.) Battery backups do not support
any external devices such as console terminals, user terminals, modems,
or printers.
The VAXft system design ensures satisfactory operation on the line power
supplied by most power companies. However, there are many outside
variables over which neither Digital Equipment Corporation nor the
power companies have any control.
1–28 Site Preparation
Figure 1–14 Model 110, 310, and 410 System Power Distribution
BULK DISTRIBUTION OR
AUXILIARY POWER PANEL
CB
CB
G
CB
G
W
G
G
W
EXPANDER
CABINET
(OPTIONAL)
CB
G
W
CB
G
G
W
W
W
EXPANDER
CABINET
(OPTIONAL)
SYSTEM
CABINET
MODEM
CB
CB
G
W
SYSTEM
CABINET
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
CB
G
W
W
CB
MODEM
(OPTIONAL)
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
= CIRCUIT BREAKER: 20 A @ 120 Vac OR 10 A @ 240 Vac
= POWER RECEPTACLE:
NOTE: ALL OUTLETS TO THE SYSTEM COMPONENTS MUST BE
CONNECTED TO THE SAME GROUND REFERENCE
(GREEN OR GREEN-YELLOW WIRE) IN THE
AC DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM.
MR-0639-91DG
Site Preparation 1–29
Table 1–7 Model 110 Power Requirements
Specification
Value
120 Vac installations:
Voltage range
88 to 132 Vac (rms)
Frequency
47 to 63 Hz
Phase type
Single-phase
Power dissipation
730 W maximum per cabinet
315 W typical per cabinet
Heat dissipation
315 Btu typical per cabinet per hour
2500 Btu maximum per cabinet per hour
Steady state current
5.4 A (rms) at 120 Vac
Power cord
3-wire
Power connector
NEMA no. 5-15P
220 or 240 Vac installations:
Voltage range
190 to 256 Vac (rms)
Frequency
47 to 63 Hz
Phase type
Single-phase
Power dissipation
730 W maximum per cabinet
315 W typical per cabinet
Heat dissipation
315 Btu typical per cabinet per hour
2500 Btu maximum per cabinet per hour
Steady state current
2.0 A (rms) at 240 Vac
Power cord
3-wire
Power connector
NEMA no. 6-15P
1–30 Site Preparation
Table 1–8 Model 310 and 410 Power Requirements
Specification
Value
120 Vac installations:
Voltage range
90 to 128 Vac (rms)
Frequency
47 to 63 Hz
Phase type
Single-phase
Power dissipation
750 W maximum per cabinet
375 W typical per cabinet
Heat dissipation
2561 Btu maximum per cabinet per hour
Steady state current
8.9 A (rms) at 120 Vac
Power cord
3-wire
Power connector
NEMA no. 5-15P
220 or 240 Vac installations:
Voltage range
190 to 256 Vac (rms)
Frequency
47 to 63 Hz
Phase type
Single-phase
Power dissipation
750 W maximum per cabinet
375 W typical per cabinet
Heat dissipation
2561 Btu maximum per cabinet per hour
Steady state current
4.9 A (rms) at 240 Vac
Power cord
3-wire
Power connector
NEMA no. 6-15P
Site Preparation 1–31
Figure 1–15 Model 610 and 612 System Power Distribution
BULK DISTRIBUTION
OR AUXILIARY
POWER PANEL
CBI
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
CB2
CBI
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
CB2
CPU
AC
DISTRIBUTION
CB2
TAPE
EXP
EXP
OPTIONAL
CPU
AC
DISTRIBUTION
EXP
CB2
TAPE
EXP
EXPANDER
CAB
OPTIONAL
CBI
CIRCUIT BREAKER
30 120 V @ 20 A OR 25 A
OR
30 240 V @ 12.5 A
CB2
CIRCUIT BREAKER
120 V @ 4 A
OR
240 V @ 4 A
CPU CAB
EXPANDER
CAB
OPTIONAL
RECEPTACLE
SEE FIGURE
ZKO−050−000079−15−RGS
1–32 Site Preparation
Table 1–9 Model 610 and 612 Power Requirements
Specification
Value
120 Vac installations:
Voltage range
90 to 128 Vac (rms)
Frequency
49 to 61 Hz
Phase type
3-phase wye, 5-wire with neutral and
ground
Power dissipation
2000 W maximum per system cabinet
with two zones; includes power losses
from two console terminals
1000 W per expander cabinet
Heat dissipation
6826 Btu maximum per system cabinet
per hour
3413 Btu per expander cabinet per hour
Steady state current at 120 Vac:
Phase A
10 A
Phase B
10 A
Phase C
10 A
Neutral
17.3 A
Power cord
5-wire, 10 awg
Power connector
NEMA no. L21-30P plug, NEMA no.
L21-30R receptacle
220 or 240 Vac installations:
Voltage range
190 to 250 Vac (rms)
Frequency
49 to 61 Hz
Phase type
3-phase wye, 5-wire with neutral and
ground
Power dissipation
2000 W maximum per system cabinet
with two zones; includes power losses
from two console terminals
1000 W per expander cabinet
Site Preparation 1–33
Table 1–9 (Continued) Model 610 and 612 Power Requirements
Specification
Heat dissipation
Value
6826 Btu maximum per system cabinet
per hour
3413 Btu per expander cabinet per hour
Steady state current at 120 Vac:
Phase A
5A
Phase B
5A
Phase C
5A
Neutral
8.7 A
Power cord
5-wire, 12 awg
Power connector
Hubbel 516P6W plug, Hubbel 516R6W
receptacle
Receptacles and circuit breakers should be installed and tested by a
licensed electrician prior to the delivery of the system to the computer
facility. To guard against possible malfunctions from externally radiated
or conducted transient voltages, or from electrical signals superimposed
on the power lines, power distribution within the facility should comply
with the following requirements:
•
Each piece of equipment must receive single-phase ac power through
a single, dedicated power receptacle and circuit breaker of the
recommended value (Figures 1–14 and 1–15). No other equipment
or loads may be connected to these circuits.
•
All ac power must come from the same bulk distribution panel to
ensure reliable operation. If the building has dedicated lines for
auxiliary power or a backup generator, the power should come from
that source.
•
The same ground point must be used in all circuits to the system and
to any equipment connected to it. This ensures the ground (earth)
references for all equipment are at the same potential. For 120 Vac
installations, the potential between neutral and ground (earth) should
be no greater than 1 Vac at each receptacle. In Europe, apply local
standards and codes.
If circuit problems exist, rewiring or rerouting of the circuits may be
necessary.
1–34 Site Preparation
1.4.2 Electrical System
The electrical system within the facility should comply with the following
requirements:
•
The power distribution panel must be easily accessible, or a master
switch or circuit breaker provided, to remove all power to the
computer facility in the event of an emergency.
CAUTION
Turning off the master switch or circuit breaker on a model
310, 410, 610, and 612 does not immediately shut down the
VAXft system. The system is designed to continue normal
operation on battery power for a minimum of 30 minutes.
The circuit breaker to each zone in the VAXft configuration
must be placed in the off (down) position to remove battery
power within the zone.
•
The electrical system must be stable and free from electrical noise
and transients. Do not connect electric motors, air conditioners, office
copiers, or convenience outlets to the same circuits or panels where
the system components are connected. If power disturbances cannot
be avoided, power conditioning equipment may be required.
•
Single-point grounding is required. This is important if the building
power supplies heavy-duty electrical equipment or machinery. The
ground terminals from the receptacles shown in Figures 1–14
and 1–15 must be connected to the building ground only at the
distribution panel. No equipment connected to the VAXft system
should be connected to any other electrical box, conduit, or water pipe
that could cause heavy ground currents to flow during an electrical
malfunction in another part of the building.
Site Preparation 1–35
1.4.3 Feed Line Capacity/Circuit Breaker Size
Figure 1–14 shows the recommended power distribution method from the
bulk distribution panel for the model 110, 310, and 410 systems. Each
feed line must supply the following single-phase currents through a circuit
breaker of the same rating:
•
120 Vac lines: one 15 A circuit with a 15 A breaker for each model
110 device
•
120 Vac lines: one 20 A circuit with a 20 A breaker for each model
310 and 410 device
•
240 Vac lines: one 10 A circuit with a 10 A breaker for each device
Figure 1–15 shows the recommended power distribution method from the
bulk distribution panel for the model 610 and 612 systems. Each feed line
must supply the following 3-phase currents through a circuit breaker of
the same rating:
•
120 Vac lines: one 20 or 25 A circuit with a 20 or 25 A breaker for
each ac distribution box
•
240 Vac lines: one 12.5 A circuit with a 12.5 A breaker for each ac
distribution box
When selecting circuit breakers, use the guidelines listed in Table 1–10 to
allow for power-on surge and stabilization.
Table 1–10 Recommended Circuit Breaker Trip Delay Times
Percent of Rated Current
Minimum Time to Trip (Seconds)
125
13.0
150
6.0
200
2.1
400
0.46
600
0.03
800
0.013
1000
0.01
1–36 Site Preparation
1.4.4 AC Power Connectors
Figure 1–16 shows the single-phase plug and receptacle configurations
for the power cords provided with the model 110, 310, and 410 systems.
Figure 1–17 shows the 3-phase plug and receptacle configurations for the
power cords provided with the model 610 and 612 systems. Digital does
not supply circuit breakers, power receptacles, or other items that may be
purchased locally.
Figure 1–16 Model 110, 310, and 410 AC Power Connectors
SOURCE
PLUG
RECEPTACLE
G
120 V
15 A
1-PHASE
G
W
W
HUBBEL
#6255-C
NEMA #5-15P
DEC #90-08938
#5262
5-15R
12-05351
G
240 V
15 A
1-PHASE
NEMA #6-15P
DEC #90-08853
G
6-15R
12-11204
MR_X1409_89.DG
CAUTION
To install a Hubbel #2811 plug into a Hubbel #2810 receptacle,
push them together and twist the receptacle to the right until it
locks. This prevents inadvertent disconnection.
To install a Hubbel #516P6W plug into a Hubbel #516R6W
receptacle, push them together, and then push the receptacle’s
locking sleeve up and to the right until it locks. This prevents
inadvertent disconnection.
Other outlet types or configurations are available with country kits.
Site Preparation 1–37
Figure 1–17 Model 610 and 612 AC Power Connectors
RATING
120 V / 208 V
30 A
3-PHASE
5 WIRE
240 V / 415 V
16 A
3-PHASE
5 WIRE
PLUG
RECEPTACLE
HUBBEL #2811
5 PIN NEMA #L21-30P
TWIST LOCK 30 A
DEC #12-12314-00
HUBBLE #2810
NEMA L21-30R
TWIST LOCK
DEC #12-12315-01
HUBBLE #516P6W
IEC 389
DEC #12-14379-04
HUBBLE #516R6W
IEC 309
DEC #12-14378-04
ZKO-050-000079-16-DG
Part 2
2
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 110
System
This chapter describes how to unpack and inspect the model 110 cabinet
and options and explains what to do if there is a problem. This chapter
includes:
•
Inspecting the shipment
•
Unpacking the options
•
Opening the shipping cartons
•
Unpacking the cabinets
2.1 Inspecting the Shipment
The computer cabinet and all items included with the shipment should be
moved to the installation area before you start unpacking. Make sure the
installation area provides a firm surface for the system to rest on. The
floor must allow full exhaust airflow from the bottom of the cabinets. Soft
surfaces such as shag or deep-pile carpeting must be avoided unless a
firm surface (like floor tiles) is installed on top of the carpeting.
Be sure you have everything before you begin to unpack any equipment:
1. Refer to the product delivery document to make sure you received the
correct number of shipping cartons.
2. If any cabinet or option is missing or damaged, report it on the labor
activity reporting system (LARS). Include a note to clarify the extent
of the problem. Then notify the customer and responsible Customer
Services manager.
2–1
2–2 Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 110 System
NOTE
If there is a problem, stop the installation until the customer
notifies the carrier or insurance company and gives you
permission to continue.
2.2 Unpacking the Options
1. Check each carton for external damage (dents, holes, crushed corners,
water marks).
2. Open each carton. Compare the contents of the carton to the items
listed on the side of the carton (including power cord, interface cable,
and documentation). If any item is missing, report it on LARS. Then
notify the customer and responsible Customer Services manager.
3. Look for damaged items. If you notice any damage, report it on LARS.
Include a note to clarify the extent of the problem. Then notify the
customer and responsible Customer Services manager.
NOTE
If there is a problem, stop the installation until the customer
notifies the carrier or insurance company and gives you
permission to continue. Save the cartons and packing material
in case you need to return an item.
2.3 Opening the Shipping Cartons
Open the shipping carton for each of the computer cabinets:
1. Check each carton for external damage (dents, holes, crushed corners,
water marks).
2. See Figure 2–1. Open the top of the shipping carton by cutting the
shipping straps and the tape holding the carton flaps.
3. Remove the accessories tray and all of the accessories. Compare the
contents of each carton to the items listed on the side of the carton. If
any item is missing, report it on LARS. Then notify the customer and
responsible Customer Services manager.
4. Remove both top cushions. Then remove the shipping carton by lifting
it up and over the cabinet.
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 110 System 2–3
Figure 2–1 Opening the Model 110 System Cabinet Shipping Carton
Accessories
Tray
Shipping
Carton
Bar Code
Labels
Top
Cushions
Unloading
Ramp
Door
(Pedestal
Only)
Bottom
Cushions
Shipping
Straps
MR-0654-91DG
2–4 Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 110 System
2.4 Unpacking the Cabinet
Remove each computer cabinet from its shipping skid:
1. See Figure 2–2. The unloading ramp is attached by hinges to the
top platform on the skid. Grasp the ramp and lower it to the floor
(unloading position).
2. Remove the packing materials from around the base and the plastic
bag that covers the cabinet.
3. Look for cabinet damage. If you notice any damage, report it on
LARS. Include a note to clarify the extent of the problem. Then notify
the customer and responsible Customer Services manager.
NOTE
If there is a problem, stop the installation until the customer
notifies the carrier or insurance company and gives you
permission to continue. Save the cartons and packing material
in case you need to return a cabinet.
4. Carefully guide the cabinet down the ramp.
WARNING
A fully loaded pedestal system may weigh as much as 69 kg
(151 lb). A rackmount system may weigh as much as 61 kg (135
lb). These systems are too heavy to be handled by one person.
At least two two people are required to move a cabinet. Do not
allow the cabinet to roll uncontrolled down the ramp.
5. See Figure 1–1. Place the system cabinet in the center of the
installation area.
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 110 System 2–5
Figure 2–2 Unpacking a Model 110 System Cabinet
Unloading
Ramp
Packing
Material
MR-0655-91DG
3
Installing the Model 110 System
This chapter describes how to install, power up, and verify the operation
of the VAXft model 110 system.
CAUTION
To avoid damage to the system, do not plug it into a power source
until instructed to do so.
NOTE
These installation procedures apply to the VAXft model 110
pedestal system. Appendix E provides the installation procedures
for the rackmount system.
3.1 Hardware Installation
After you verify the installation site and unpack the system, install the
VAXft model 110 system hardware. Follow this sequence:
•
Section 3.1.1, Removing the Base Cap
•
Section 3.1.2, Ensuring Correct AC Operating Voltage
•
Section 3.1.3, Checking the Logic Modules
•
Section 3.1.4, Installing Module Options
•
Section 3.1.5, Installing the Cross-Link Cables
•
Section 3.1.6, Connecting the System to Facility Power
•
Section 3.1.7, Applying Power to the System
3–1
3–2 Installing the Model 110 System
3.1.1 Removing the Base Cap
The base cap is located on the front of the base and is held in place by
spring latches. To remove the base cap, steady the system with one hand,
grasp the center of the base cap, and pull it straight out from the base
(Figure 3–1). Removing the base cap makes installing the cabling easier.
Figure 3–1 Removing the Base Cap
3.1.2 Ensuring Correct AC Operating Voltage
The model 110 system is shipped as a 120 Vac or 240 Vac system. The 120
Vac system has a fan assembly and power supply (PN H7868-A) suitable
for 120 Vac operation. The 240 Vac system has a fan assembly and power
supply (PN H7868-B) suitable for 240 Vac operation.
The label covering the ac power receptacle specifies the ac operating
voltage (120 Vac or 240 Vac). Make sure that the operating voltage on the
label matches the operating voltage available at the installation site.
Installing the Model 110 System 3–3
3.1.3 Checking the Logic Modules
Check the placement of the logic modules in the system. Also check the
settings on the system I/O controller modules (Figures 3–2 and 3–3).
If you remove any modules, use the module removal and replacement
procedure in Appendix A.
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap must be worn during the following
procedures. Appendix A provides module handling, removal,
and installation/replacement procedures.
3–4 Installing the Model 110 System
Figure 3–2 Model 110 Logic Module Placement
Installing the Model 110 System 3–5
Figure 3–3 Model 110 System I/O Controller Module Settings
DSSI
JUMPER
PLUGS
DSSI
TERMINATOR
PLUG
THICKWIRE
CONNECTOR
1
THICKWIRE
2
ThinWire
Ethernet
SWITCH
ThinWire
CONNECTOR
MR-0174-90.DG
3–6 Installing the Model 110 System
3.1.3.1 Module Placement
Table 3–1 describes the logic modules and their locations in the system
backplanes. The types and complements of memory modules must be
the same in both zones of the cabinet. Figure 3–2 shows the correct
placement of the logic modules in the system backplane of each zone.
Table 3–1 Model 110 Logic Modules
Slot
Module
1
T3001
2
Description
1
T3005-BA
Primary KFE52 system I/O controller module
1
1
KA510 processor module
3
T3003
4
T3003 or T3004
Second MS520 memory module (optional) or wide
area network (WAN) module (optional)
5
T3003 or T3004
Third MS520 memory module (optional) or WAN
module (optional)
First MS520 memory module
1 Slots 1, 2, and 3 contain the primary system I/O controller module, a processor module,
and a memory module. This is the minimum required for operation.
NOTE
Unused module slots require a T3999 filler module to maintain
cooling airflow. The module handles also maintain ground
continuity to meet FCC regulations and provide electrostatic
discharge (ESD) protection.
3.1.3.2 System I/O Controller Module Settings
System I/O controller modules are shipped with the correct DSSI jumper
plug states (installed or removed) for the system. The Ethernet switch
is set to the traditional (thickwire) position. Use the procedures in this
section to check or change the DSSI jumper plugs or the Ethernet switch.
Figure 3–3 identifies the DSSI terminator, DSSI jumper plugs, and
Ethernet switch on the system I/O controller module. A primary system
I/O controller module is located in slot 1 in each zone of the VAXft model
110 cabinet.
•
The DSSI terminator and two DSSI jumper plugs must be:
— In place on the system I/O controller in slot 1 to enable the
internal DSSI bus
Installing the Model 110 System 3–7
•
If the module is to be connected to an Ethernet, set the Ethernet
switch as follows:
— Position 2 (down) for ThinWire applications
— Position 1 (up) for traditional (thickwire) applications (factory
default setting)
3.1.4 Installing Module Options
If you are installing any module at this time (T3003 expanded memory),
use the module removal and replacement procedure described in
Appendix A.
If you are installing the wide area network (WAN) module option, refer
to Appendix B for the DEC WANcontroller 620 installation procedure and
Y-box connections.
3.1.5 Installing the Cross-Link Cables
The cross-link cables connect between the processor modules in slot 2 of
zone A and slot 2 of zone B in the cabinet.
NOTE
The upper and lower connectors on the processor modules are
arranged so that the cables cannot be installed incorrectly. The
connectors must be plugged in with the cable routed downward
as shown in Figure 3–4.
Locate the two cross-link cables (PN 17-02194-01). Then refer to
Figure 3–4 and connect the cables as follows:
Plug one end of the cross-link cable into the lower connector of the
processor in zone A (slot 2) and secure the spring clips. Do not
connect the other end of the cable at this time.
Plug one end of the second cross-link cable into the lower connector of
the processor in zone B (slot 2) and secure the spring clips.
Plug the other end of the cable into the upper connector of the
processor in zone A and secure the spring clips.
Plug the other end of the first cable into the upper connector of the
processor in zone B and secure the spring clips.
3–8 Installing the Model 110 System
Figure 3–4 Model 110 Cross-Link Cable Connections
Installing the Model 110 System 3–9
3.1.6 Connecting the System to Facility Power
Every terminal, modem, and printer, and any other piece of equipment
connected to the system requires a dedicated power receptacle and circuit
breaker. Before connecting to facility power, check the following:
•
Make sure the circuit breakers for all dedicated power receptacles are
set to the ON position.
•
If a separate power source is provided (such as auxiliary power for
the console terminals), make sure the circuit panels, breakers, and
receptacles are labeled accordingly.
3.1.6.1 Connecting the Cabinet Power Cords
Refer to Figure 3–5 and connect the power cords to each zone of the model
110 system as follows:
NOTE
Before performing the first step, make sure that the power
switch in each zone of the model 110 system is set to off (0).
1. Locate the label covering the ac power receptacle in each zone of the
model 110 system. The labels specify the ac operating voltage needed
for the system.
2. Remove and save the power cord retainer plates and attaching
hardware.
3. Locate the two power cords shipped with the system. Plug the
connectors into the power receptacles (one in each zone).
4. Install the two power cord retainer plates and attaching hardware you
removed in step 2.
CAUTION
Before performing the next step, make sure that the electrical
outlet provides the same voltage as indicated on the label
covering the ac power receptacle. Also, make sure that the
model 110 power switches are set to off (0).
5. Plug the pronged connector of each power cord into a dedicated power
receptacle.
3–10 Installing the Model 110 System
Figure 3–5 Model 110 Power Cord Connections
Installing the Model 110 System 3–11
3.1.6.2 Connecting Interface Cables and Power Cords for Terminals and
Modems
Connect the interface cables and power cords for the terminals and
modems as follows:
1. Assemble the terminals and modems according to the documentation
supplied with them.
2. Make sure the voltage selector switch is set to the correct voltage
range (120 Vac or 240 Vac).
3. Make sure the power switch is set to the off (0) position.
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap must be worn while connecting the
interface cables.
4. Refer to Figure 3–6 and connect the terminal and modem interface
cables to each zone of the model 110 system as follows:
a. Route the interface cables from one terminal and modem to each
zone of the VAXft 110.
b. Plug the interface cable from the terminal into the local console
terminal connector through an H8571-A passive adapter.
c.
Plug the interface cable from the modem into the remote console
terminal connector.
d. Repeat steps a. through c. to connect the interface cables going to
the other zone.
5. Remove the ESD wrist strap. Plug the power cord from each console
terminal and modem into a dedicated power receptacle.
6. Set the power switch on each console terminal and modem to the on
(1) position.
3.1.6.3 Setting the Terminal Baud Rates
The factory default baud rate is 9600 for the local and remote terminal
ports in both zones of the model 110 system. Refer to the documentation
provided with the terminals for how to set the baud rates.
The available model 110 system baud rates are: 300, 600, 1200, 2400,
4800, 9600, and 19200.
3–12 Installing the Model 110 System
Figure 3–6 Model 110 Terminal and Modem Connections
Installing the Model 110 System 3–13
3.1.7 Applying Power to the System
Figure 3–7 identifies the ac power switches, magnetic fault indicators
(MFIs), and LEDs in each zone.
1. Set the ac switches in zone A and zone B to on (1).
2. At the end of the power-on sequence, check all the indicators as
follows:
a. Disk drives — When the power-on sequence is successful, the
DRIVE READY indicators of all active disk drives are lit (green)
and the DC OK led is lit (green). If an error is detected within a
drive, the associated DRIVE FAULT indicator is lit (red). Repair
or replace the faulty drive as required.
b. TK70 tape drive — When the power-on sequence is successful,
the green indicator is lit (steady). If the drive fails the power-on
sequence, its orange, yellow and green indicators will identify the
fault. Repair or replace the faulty drive as required.
c.
H7868 power supply — When the power-on sequence is
successful, the DC OK LED located at the top of each power
supply is lit (green). If a power supply fails the power-on
sequence, its DC OK LED is not lit. Repair or replace the faulty
power supply as required.
d. Logic modules — When the power-on sequence is successful,
the MFIs (see Figure 3–7) are not lit. When an MFI is yellow, the
module has a fault and must be replaced. For more information
about the power-on tests, see Section 3.2. For information about
module handling and removal, see Appendix A.
e.
System I/O controller modules — The LED indicator must
be off if the two DSSI jumper plugs are installed correctly on a
primary system I/O controller module in slot 1 of a base system.
If the LED indicator is on, check the jumpers.
3–14 Installing the Model 110 System
Figure 3–7 Model 110 Switches and MFIs
Installing the Model 110 System 3–15
3.2 Power-On Tests
In each zone of the model 110 system, the processor, system I/O controller,
and WAN modules each contain a set of ROM-based diagnostic (RBD)
tests that are invoked during a power-on sequence. The processor
diagnostics test the CPU, as well as the memory, zone, and system.
When a failure is detected in any module, the number of the test and
a brief explanation of the failure are reported to the respective console
terminal.
If all tests on the processor, system I/O controller, and WAN modules
are successful, each processor module performs a series of zone tests
that include internal memory and I/O functions. If the zone tests are
successful (no detected errors), each processor module enters a restart
procedure that initializes the zone.
3.3 Final System Tests
All of the diagnostic software required by the system is provided in the
RBD tests described in Section 3.2.
The RBD command description in Chapter 6 of the VAXft Systems Owner’s
Manual (EK-VAXFT1-OM) provides information and guidelines for writing
DSSI parameters to the storage devices under the diagnostic/utility
protocol (DUP) facility.
Run the user environmental test package (UETP) as a final check. Refer
to the VMS Upgrade and Installation Supplement: VAXft Systems for
more information on installing and booting the VMS operating system.
The VAX/VMS UETP User’s Guide describes how to log in and run UETP.
CAUTION
UETP can be configured to run write/read tests on the RF-series
disks. UETP should be run only at the completion of a system
installation because of the risk of corrupting data on shadowed
disks. Do not run UETP without contacting the responsible
customer representative or application manager.
When you are satisfied the system is operating correctly, turn it over to
the responsible customer representative for installation and testing of the
application software.
3–16 Installing the Model 110 System
3.4 Installing the Front Cover and Base Cap
After you connect the cables and apply power to the pedestal system,
install the front cover and base cap:
1. Refer to Figure 3–8. Insert the antistatic key (supplied with each
cabinet) in the keyhole on the front cover. Turn the key to the right
until it stops.
2. Position the front cover so that its brackets slide into, and rest in, the
notches in the frame.
3. Push in the release latch.
4. Slide the front cover window up (see Figure 3–9).
5. To lock the cover in place, turn the key to the left until it stops.
CAUTION
Before performing steps 6 and 7, make sure that the power
cords and module, interface, and cross-link cables are
positioned so that they are not pinched between the base
and base cap when the base cap is installed.
6. Align the locating pins of the base cap with the locating holes in the
base (see Figure 3–10).
7. Push the base cap straight into the base until it snaps in place.
Installing the Model 110 System 3–17
Figure 3–8 Unlocking and Positioning the Front Cover (Pedestal Model)
3–18 Installing the Model 110 System
Figure 3–9 Locking the Front Cover (Pedestal Model)
Installing the Model 110 System 3–19
Figure 3–10 Installing the Base Cap (Pedestal Model)
Part 3
4
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 310
and 410 System
This chapter describes how to unpack and inspect the VAXft cabinets
and options and explains what to do if there is a problem. This chapter
includes:
•
Inspecting the shipment
•
Unpacking the options
•
Opening the shipping cartons
•
Unpacking the cabinets
4.1 Inspecting the Shipment
The computer cabinets and all items included with the shipment should
be moved to the installation area before you start unpacking. Make sure
the installation area provides a firm surface for the system to rest on.
The floor must allow full exhaust airflow from the bottom of the cabinets.
Soft surfaces such as shag or deep-pile carpeting must be avoided unless
a firm surface (like floor tiles) is installed on top of the carpeting.
Be sure you have everything before you begin to unpack any equipment:
1. Refer to the product delivery document to make sure you received the
correct number of shipping cartons.
2. If any cabinet or option is missing or damaged, report it on the labor
activity reporting system (LARS). Include a note to clarify the extent
of the problem. Then notify the customer and responsible Customer
Services manager.
4–1
4–2 Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 310 and 410 System
NOTE
If there is a problem, stop the installation until the customer
notifies the carrier or insurance company and gives you
permission to continue.
4.2 Unpacking the Options
1. Check each carton for external damage (dents, holes, crushed corners,
water marks).
2. Open each carton. Compare the contents of the carton to the items
listed on the side of the carton (including power cord, interface cable,
and documentation). If any item is missing, report it on LARS. Then
notify the customer and responsible Customer Services manager.
3. Look for damaged items. If you notice any damage, report it on LARS.
Include a note to clarify the extent of the problem. Then notify the
customer and responsible Customer Services manager.
NOTE
If there is a problem, stop the installation until the customer
notifies the carrier or insurance company and gives you
permission to continue. Save the cartons and packing material
in case you need to return an item.
4.3 Opening the Shipping Cartons
Open the shipping carton for each of the computer cabinets:
1. Check each carton for external damage (dents, holes, crushed corners,
water marks).
2. See Figure 4–1. Open the top of the shipping carton by cutting the
shipping straps and the tape holding the carton flaps.
3. Remove the accessories tray and all of the accessories. Compare the
contents of each carton to the items listed on the side of the carton. If
any item is missing, report it on LARS. Then notify the customer and
responsible Customer Services manager.
4. Remove both top cushions. Then remove the shipping carton by lifting
it up and over the cabinet.
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 310 and 410 System 4–3
Figure 4–1 Opening the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet Shipping
Carton
SHIPPING
STRAPS
ACCESSORIES
TRAY
TOP
CUSHIONS
BAR CODE
LABELS
SHIPPING
CARTON
MR_X1412_89.DG
4–4 Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 310 and 410 System
4.4 Unpacking the Cabinets
Remove each computer cabinet from its shipping skid:
1. See Figure 4–2. The unloading ramp is attached by hinges to the
top platform on the skid. Grasp the ramp and lower it to the floor
(unloading position).
2. Remove the packing materials from around the base and the plastic
bag that covers the cabinet.
3. Look for cabinet damage. If you notice any damage, report it on
LARS. Include a note to clarify the extent of the problem. Then notify
the customer and responsible Customer Services manager.
NOTE
If there is a problem, stop the installation until the customer
notifies the carrier or insurance company and gives you
permission to continue. Save the cartons and packing material
in case you need to return a cabinet.
4. Carefully guide the cabinet down the ramp.
WARNING
A cabinet may weigh as much as 118 kg (260 lb) and is too
heavy to be handled by one person. At least two two people
are required to move a cabinet. Do not allow the cabinet to
roll uncontrolled down the ramp.
5. See Figures 1–2 and 1–3. Place the system cabinets in the center of
the installation area. If expander cabinets are part of this installation,
place one on each side of the system cabinets as shown in Figure 1–3.
In Chapter 5, Figures 5–3 and 5–4 show the layout of the system and
expander cabinets. The preferred configuration places the cabinet
containing the TF70 tape drive on the left.
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 310 and 410 System 4–5
Figure 4–2 Unpacking a Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet
PLASTIC
BAG
TM
UNLOADING
RAMP
PACKING
MATERIAL
48%
MR_X1413_89.DG
5
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System
Cabinets
This chapter describes how to the open model 310 and 410 system
cabinets and prepare for installation of a base system or system with
expansion. This chapter includes:
•
Opening the cabinets
•
Checking the ac voltage selector switches
•
Checking the logic modules
•
Installing module options
5–1
5–2 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.1 Opening the Cabinets
Figure 5–1 identifies the front doors and base cap on the computer
cabinets. It also shows the front panel latch and its functions. (The upper
door may be opened by itself or both doors may be opened together.) A
key (supplied with each cabinet) must be used to turn the latch.
All operating and service access takes place from the front of the system:
•
The upper door provides access to the summary panel and cannister
drives.
•
The lower door is opened only for maintenance purposes. The lower
door provides access to the cables and main circuit breaker in each
cabinet, logic modules in the system cabinets, and carrier disk drives
in the expander cabinets.
CAUTION
Installation and maintenance procedures may be performed
only by qualified personnel. They must be familiar with
the electrostatic discharge (ESD) procedures and power
procedures for the VAXft system.
•
The base cap provides additional access for routing and installing
cables.
WARNING
A cabinet may weigh as much as 118 kg (260 lb) and is too heavy
to be handled by one person. At least two people are required to
move a cabinet.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
Figure 5–1 Front View of a Model 310 or 410 System Cabinet
UPPER
DOOR
OPEN UPPER DOOR
TM
VAXft systems
DOORS LOCKED
OPEN BOTH DOORS
LOWER
DOOR
BASE
CAP
MR_X1414_89.DG
5–3
5–4 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.1.1 Removing the Doors and Base Caps
Removing the base cap provides access for routing and connecting the
system cables as described in Chapter 6. The doors may also be removed
if desired. Figure 5–2 numbers the steps used to remove the doors and
base caps. The removal steps follow:
Remove the upper door. Using the key, turn the latch to the left (up)
and open the door. Lift the door from its hinges. Move it away from
the work area to prevent damage to the finish.
Remove the lower door. Using the key, turn the latch to the right
(down) and open the door. Remove the grounded wrist strap and
module box straps from the storage pocket and leave the cord attached
to the cabinet frame. Lift the door from its hinges. Move it away from
the work area to prevent damage to the finish.
The base cap is held in place by two spring latches. Pull the base
cap straight out from the base. Move it away from the work area to
prevent damage to the finish.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5–5
Figure 5–2 Removing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet Doors
and Base Cap
SOURCEFILE: MR_0172_90_BASEART.DG
SCALE: SC,F,.10
GROUND STRAPS *
1
REMOVE UPPER
DOOR
2
REMOVE LOWER
DOOR
3
REMOVE
BASE CAP
* NA OT TTAEC: HL EEADVTEOGCRAOBUI NN EDTSFTRRAAMP SE .
MR-0172-90.DG
5–6 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.1.2 System Cabinet Layout
Figure 5–3 shows the layout of a system cabinet and identifies the
components:
•
Summary panel with control switches and indicators
•
Removable TF70 cannister tape drive or removable RF-series
cannister disk drive on the left side in unit 5 (DSSI node ID 5)
•
Removable RF-series cannister disk drive on the right side in unit 7
(DSSI node ID 7)
•
System logic modules (slots 1 through 7)
•
Power modules (ac power input box, dc power supply, and battery
pack)
In a base system, both system cabinets contain an RF-series cannister
disk drive in unit 7. Unit 7 drives serve as the system operating media.
One system cabinet contains a TF70 cannister tape drive in unit 5. This
is the system backup and software load device. The other system cabinet
may contain a TF70 or RF-series option, or blank cannister module in
unit 5.
In a system with expansion, the system cabinets do not contain any
drives. The unused drive slots must contain blank cannister modules to
maintain cooling airflow.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5–7
Figure 5–3 Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet Layout, Front View
TF70 CANNISTER
TAPE DRIVE
SUMMARY
PANEL
DSSI NODE ID
5
RF SERIES CANNISTER
DISK DRIVE
7
DSSI
NODE ID
DC POWER
SUPPLY
WITH FAN
BATTERY PACK
LOGIC
MODULES
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
AC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
FAN
MR−0156−90.RAGS
5–8 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.1.3 Expander Cabinet Layout
If you are installing a system with expansion, make sure the system
cabinets are in the center of the installation area as shown in Figure 1–3.
The expander cabinets must be placed on each side of the system cabinets.
Figure 5–4 shows the layout of an expander cabinet and identifies the
components:
•
Summary panel with control switches and indicators
•
Removable TF70 cannister tape drive or removable RF-series
cannister disk drive on the left side in unit 5 (DSSI node ID 5)
•
One to five nonremovable RF-series carrier disk drives on the right
side in units 0 to 4 (DSSI node IDs 0 to 4)
•
Power modules (ac power input box, dc power supply, and battery
pack)
In a system with expansion, all the drives are in the expander cabinets.
Each expander cabinet may contain up to six drives.
One expander cabinet contains a TF70 cannister tape drive in unit 5 as
shown in Figure 5–4. This is the system backup and software load device.
The other expander cabinet may contain a TF70 or RF-series option,
or blank cannister module in the cannister slot for unit 5. It may also
contain an RF-series carrier drive in the carrier slot for unit 5. However,
it cannot contain drives in both slots because the two slots share the same
DSSI node ID (5).
Unused drive slots must contain a blank carrier or cannister module to
maintain cooling airflow.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5–9
Figure 5–4 Model 310 and 410 Expander Cabinet Layout, Front View
TF70
CANNISTER
TAPE DIVE
X 0 1 2 3 4 5
SUMMARY
PANEL
X
(5)
DC POWER
SUPPLY
WITH FAN
5
4
3
2
DSSI NODE ID
RF SERIES
CARRIER
DISK
DRIVES
BATTERY
PACK
1
0
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
AC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
FAN
MR−0157−90.RAGS
5–10 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.2 Checking the AC Voltage Selector Switches
Use the procedures in this section to check or change the ac voltage
selector switch setting in any of the cabinets.
Figure 5–5 identifies the power modules, which are accessed from the
front of the cabinets. The power transformer and voltage selector switch
are located behind the ac power input box and battery pack. To access the
switch, remove the ac power input box and the battery pack.
5.2.1 Removing the AC Power Input Box
Remove the ac power input box as follows:
1. See Figure 5–5. Remove the power cord from the ac power input box.
2. Loosen the two captive screws holding the ac power input box in place.
3. Grasp the handle and pull the box straight out. Put it where no one
can trip over it or damage it.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5–11
Figure 5–5 Removing the Model 310 and 410 AC Power Input Box
2
BATTERY
PACK
CAPTIVE
SCREW (1)
CAPTIVE
SCREWS (2)
FAN
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
AC POWER
TRANSFORMER
AC POWER CORD
MR−0158−90.RAGS
5–12 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.2.2 Removing the Battery Pack
Remove the battery pack as follows:
1. Remove the panel or label cover from the top of the battery pack.
2. See Figure 5–5. Loosen the captive thumbscrew holding the top of the
battery pack.
3. See Figure 5–6. Grasp the front handle and slowly pull the battery
pack until the safety catch on the top handle contacts the chassis.
WARNING
The battery pack weighs 17.3 kg (38 lb). Use care when
removing, handling, and inserting the battery pack.
4. Support the battery pack with one hand as you raise the top handle.
This lowers the safety catch to clear the chassis.
5. Lift the battery pack and pull it straight out of the chassis. Put it
where no one can trip over it or damage it.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
Figure 5–6 Model 310 and 410 Battery Pack Safety Catch
WARNING
THE BATTERY PACK
WEIGHS 17.3 kg (38 lb).
USE CARE WHEN REMOVING,
HANDLING, AND INSERTING
THE BATTERY PACK.
HANDLE UP,
SAFETY CATCH
DOWN
HANDLE DOWN,
SAFETY CATCH UP
THUMBSCREW
29%
MR-0047-90.DG
5–13
5–14 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.2.3 Checking the Voltage Selector Switch Setting
Figure 5–7 shows the location of the voltage selector switch on the power
transformer chassis. Make sure the switch is in the correct position for
the ac power supplied by the facility (115 V or 230 V).
NOTE
The voltage selector switch is factory set to 115 V. You may need
to change the switch position.
To change the switch position, use a ballpoint pen or a small, slotted
screwdriver to move it to the correct position.
5.2.4 Replacing the Battery Pack and AC Power Input Box
Replace the battery pack and ac power input box as follows:
1. Lift the battery pack and place it in the chassis.
a. Raise the top handle and push the battery pack in until the top
handle contacts the chassis.
b. Support the battery pack with one hand as you lower the top
handle to clear the chassis. Push the battery pack straight in and
seat it firmly.
c.
Replace the holding screw and summary panel logo.
2. Place the ac power input box in the chassis.
a. Push the box straight in and seat it firmly.
b. Replace and tighten the two captive screws.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5–15
Figure 5–7 Model 310 and 410 AC Voltage Selector Switch Settings
115
115 V
230 V
230
115
230
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
CONNECTORS
POWER INPUT
TRANSFORMER
MR-0048-90.DG
5–16 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.3 Checking the Logic Modules
Check the placement of the logic modules in the system cabinets. Also
check the settings on the system I/O controller modules (Figures 5–8 and
5–9).
If you remove any modules, use the module removal and replacement
procedure in Appendix A.
5.3.1 Module Placement
Table 5–1 describes the logic modules and their locations in the system
backplanes. The type and complement of memory modules must be the
same in both system cabinets. Figure 5–8 shows the correct placement of
the logic modules in the system backplane.
Table 5–1 Model 310 and 410 Logic Modules
Slot
Module
Description
1
T3001 or T3004
Secondary KFE52 system I/O controller module or
WAN module
21
T30012
3
Primary KFE52 system I/O controller module
T3005 or T3007
2
2
KA520 or KA550 processor module, respectively
4
T3003
5
T3003 or T3004
First MS520 memory module
Second MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
6
T3003 or T3004
Third MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
7
T3003 or T3004
Fourth MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
1 Slot 2 contains the primary system I/O controller module, which supports console
functions.
2 Slots 1, 2, and 3 contain the primary system I/O controller module, a processor module,
and a memory module. This is the minimum required for operation.
NOTE
Unused module slots require a T3999 filler module to maintain
cooling airflow. The module handles also maintain ground
continuity to meet FCC regulations and provide electrostatic
discharge (ESD) protection.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
Figure 5–8 Model 310 and 410 Logic Module Placement
PROCESSOR
MODULE
1/4 − TURN
FASTENERS
PRIMARY SYSTEM I/O
CONTROLLER MODULE
ASSIST
LEVERS
MEMORY MODULE 1
MEMORY MODULE 2
OR WAN MODULE
SECONDARY SYSTEM I/O
CONTROLLER MODULE OR
WAN MODULE
MEMORY MODULE 3
OR WAN MODULE
MEMORY MODULE 4
OR WAN MODULE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
MR−0159−90.RAGS
5–17
5–18 Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5.3.2 System I/O Controller Module Settings
System I/O controller modules are shipped with the correct DSSI jumper
plug states (installed or removed) for the system. The Ethernet switch
is set to the traditional (thickwire) position. Use the procedures in this
section to check or change the DSSI jumper plugs or the Ethernet switch.
Figure 5–9 identifies the DSSI terminator, DSSI jumper plugs, and
Ethernet switch on the system I/O controller module. A primary system
I/O controller module is located in slot 2 of both system cabinets. In
a system with expansion, a secondary system I/O controller module is
located in slot 1 of both system cabinets.
•
The DSSI terminator and two DSSI jumper plugs must be:
— In place on the primary system I/O controller module in slot 2 for
a base system.
— Removed from all system I/O controller modules in a system with
expansion. (All drives are mounted in the expander cabinets of a
system with expansion.)
•
If the module is to be connected to an Ethernet, set the Ethernet
switch as follows:
— Position 2 (down) for ThinWire applications.
— Position 1 (up) for traditional (thickwire) applications (factory
default setting).
5.4 Installing Module Options
If you are installing any module options at this time (T3003 expanded
memory or secondary T3001 system I/O controller modules), use the
module removal and replacement procedure in Appendix A.
If you are installing the wide area network (WAN) module option, refer
to Appendix B for the DEC WANcontroller 620 installation procedure and
Y-box connections.
Preparing the Model 310 and 410 System Cabinets
5–19
Figure 5–9 Model 310 and 410 System I/O Controller Module Settings
DSSI
JUMPER
PLUGS
DSSI
TERMINATOR
PLUG
THICKWIRE
CONNECTOR
1
THICKWIRE
2
ThinWire
Ethernet
SWITCH
ThinWire
CONNECTOR
MR-0174-90.DG
6
Installing the Model 310 and 410 System
Cables
This chapter describes how to route and connect the cables in a base
system or system with expansion. It also describes how to install the
ground straps between the cabinets. This chapter includes:
•
Routing the cross-link cables
•
Routing the DSSI cables
•
Installing the PCIM cables
•
Connecting the cross-link cables
•
Connecting the DSSI cables
•
Installing the ground straps
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap must be worn during the following procedures
until all cables are connected and secured to the module handles.
6–1
6–2 Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
6.1 Routing the Cross-Link Cables
All cables should be routed under the cabinets before making any of the
connections. This makes it easier to handle and position the cables within
the limited access space. The connections may be made when all of the
cables are in place.
Figure 6–1 numbers the steps used to connect the cross-link cables
between the processor modules in slot 3 of the system cabinets. (The
lower connectors cannot be plugged in with the upper connectors in
place.)
NOTE
The upper and lower connectors on the processor modules are
arranged so the cables cannot be installed incorrectly. The
connectors must be plugged in with the cable routed downward
as shown in Figure 6–1.
Locate the two cross-link cables (PN 17-02194-01). Route each cable
between the system cabinets, behind the front wheels, and on top of the
floor surface. Do not bring the cables up through the cabinet front at this
time.
System with expansion: If you are installing a system with expansion,
skip the following steps and proceed to Section 6.2.
Base system: If you are installing a base system, connect the cross-link
cables as follows:
In the left system cabinet, bring the lower processor module connector
up through the cabinet access hole.
Plug the cable into the lower connector and secure the spring clips.
Do not connect the other end of the cable at this time.
In the right system cabinet, bring the lower processor module
connector up through the cabinet access hole.
Plug the cable into the lower connector and secure the spring clips.
Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
6–3
In the right system cabinet, bring the upper processor module
connector up through the cabinet access hole.
Plug the cable into the upper connector and secure the spring clips.
In the left system cabinet, bring the upper processor module connector
up through the cabinet access hole.
Plug the cable into the upper connector and secure the spring clips.
Proceed to Section 6.6 and complete the installation.
Figure 6–1 Model 310 and 410 Cross-Link Cable Connections
LEFT SYSTEM CABINET
UNIT 5
RIGHT SYSTEM CABINET
UNIT 5
UNIT 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
AC
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
4
CB
UNIT 7
AC
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
3
CB
CROSS-LINK CABLE
1
2
CROSS-LINK CABLE
NOTE:
IN AN EXPANDED SYSTEM THE SYSTEM CABINETS DO NOT
CONTAIN ANY DRIVES. THE DRIVE SLOTS CONTAIN BLANK
CANNISTER MODULES TO MAINTAIN COOLING AIRFLOW.
MR_X1416_89.DG
6–4 Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
6.2 Routing the DSSI Cables
Locate the two short DSSI cables (PN 17-02245-01). The short cables
are 92 cm (36 in) in length. Also locate the two long DSSI cables (PN
17-02245-02). The long cables are 153 cm (60 in) in length.
Figure 6–2 shows how to connect the DSSI cables between the expander
cabinets and system cabinets.
NOTE
The connectors on the system I/O controller module end of the
cables must be plugged in with the cables routed downward as
shown in Figure 6–2. The T-shaped connectors must be plugged in
to the expander cabinets.
Route each DSSI cable between the system cabinets, behind the front
wheels, and on top of the floor surface as follows. Do not bring the cables
up through the cabinet access holes at this time:
1. Route a short DSSI cable from the left (adjoining) expander cabinet to
the left system cabinet.
2. Route a short DSSI cable from the right (adjoining) expander cabinet
to the right system cabinet.
3. Route a long DSSI cable from the left expander cabinet to the right
system cabinet.
4. Route a long DSSI cable from the right expander cabinet to the left
system cabinet.
Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
6–5
Figure 6–2 Model 310 and 410 DSSI Cable Connections
LEFT
EXPANDER
CABINET
LEFT
SYSTEM
CABINET
RIGHT
EXPANDER
CABINET
RIGHT
SYSTEM
CABINET
UNIT 5
UNIT 5
SHORT DSSI
CABLE
SHORT DSSI
CABLE
LONG DSSI CABLE
LONG DSSI CABLE
NOTE: SYSTEM CABINET DRIVES ARE NOT PRESENT IN THIS CONFIGURATION.
DASHED LINES INDICATE THE INTERNAL DSSI BUS PATHS.
MR_X1418_89.DG
6–6 Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
6.3 Installing the PCIM Cables
Locate the two PCIM cables (PN 17-02285-02).
Figure 6–3 shows how to connect the PCIM cables between the expander
cabinets and system cabinets.
Route and connect one PCIM cable from the dc power supply in each
expander cabinet to the dc power supply in the adjoining system cabinet
as shown in Figure 6–3.
Figure 6–3 Model 310 and 410 PCIM Cable Connections
LEFT
EXPANDER
CABINET
LEFT
SYSTEM
CABINET
RIGHT
EXPANDER
CABINET
RIGHT
SYSTEM
CABINET
UNIT
5
H7233-AB
UNIT
5
H7233-AA
PCIM
CABLE
H7233-AA
H7233-AB
PCIM
CABLE
MR_X1419_89.DG
Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
6–7
6.4 Connecting the Cross-Link Cables
Refer to Figure 6–1 as you connect the cross-link cables between the
processor modules in slot 3 of the system cabinets:
In the left system cabinet, bring the lower processor module connector
up through the cabinet access hole.
Plug the cable into the lower connector and secure the spring clips.
Do not connect the other end of the cable at this time.
In the right system cabinet, bring the lower processor module
connector up through the cabinet access hole.
Plug the cable into the lower connector and secure the spring clips.
In the right system cabinet, bring the upper processor module
connector up through the cabinet access hole.
Plug the cable into the upper connector and secure the spring clips.
In the left system cabinet, bring the upper processor module connector
up through the cabinet access hole.
Plug the cable into the upper connector and secure the spring clips.
6–8 Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
6.5 Connecting the DSSI Cables
Refer to Figure 6–2 as you connect the DSSI cables between the system
cabinets and expander cabinets.
First connect the short DSSI cables:
1. In the left system cabinet, bring the short DSSI cable connector up
through the access hole. Plug the connector into the primary system
I/O controller module in slot 2 and secure the captive screws.
2. In the left (adjoining) expander cabinet, bring the short DSSI cable
connector up through the access hole. Plug the T-shaped connector
into the lower DSSI connector (DSSI 2) and secure the captive screws.
3. In the right system cabinet, bring the short DSSI cable connector up
through the access hole. Plug the connector into the primary system
I/O controller module in slot 2 and secure the captive screws.
4. In the right (adjoining) expander cabinet, bring the short DSSI cable
connector up through the access hole. Plug the T-shaped connector
into the lower DSSI connector (DSSI 2) and secure the captive screws.
Now connect the long DSSI cables:
1. In the left system cabinet, bring the long DSSI cable connector up
through the access hole. Plug the connector into the secondary system
I/O controller module in slot 1 and secure the captive screws.
2. In the right expander cabinet, bring the long DSSI cable connector up
through the access hole. Plug the T-shaped connector into the upper
DSSI connector (DSSI 1) and secure the captive screws.
3. In the right system cabinet, bring the long DSSI cable connector up
through the access hole. Plug the connector into the secondary system
I/O controller module in slot 1 and secure the captive screws.
4. In the left expander cabinet, bring the long DSSI cable connector up
through the access hole. Plug the T-shaped connector into the upper
DSSI connector (DSSI 1) and secure the captive screws.
Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
6.6 Installing the Ground Straps
The cabinets must be connected together at the front corners with a
ground strap (PN 17-02702-01) as shown in Figure 6–4.
Figure 6–4 Model 310 and 410 Ground Strap Location
TM
VA
Xf
t s
y
st
em
s
TM
VA
Xf
t s
y
st
em
s
GROUND
STRAP
MR-0173-90.DG
6–9
6–10 Installing the Model 310 and 410 System Cables
Figure 6–5 shows how the ground strap is installed between each pair of
adjoining cabinets.
1. Place a ground strap under the front corners of the cabinets as shown
with the painted side up. Make sure the ground strap contacts the
cabinet bases.
2. Insert four screws through the holes in the adjoining bases and into
the ground strap. Adjust the space between the bases as necessary,
and make sure the cabinets are straight.
3. Tighten all four screws.
CAUTION
The system must not be moved as a unit with the ground straps
in place. Each cabinet must be moved separately or damage to
the base frames could result. The ground straps are the only
mechanical connection between the cabinets.
Figure 6–5 Model 310 and 410 Ground Strap Installation
SCREWS (4)
FRONT CORNERS
OF BASE FRAMES
BARE METAL
SIDE UP
GROUND
STRAP
THREADED
INSERTS (4)
MR_X1415_89.DG
7
Completing the Model 310 and 410
System Installation
This chapter describes how to complete the installation and start up the
VAXft system. This chapter includes:
•
Connecting the system to facility power
•
Applying power to the system
•
Power-on tests
•
Final system tests
7–1
7–2 Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7.1 Connecting the System to Facility Power
The VAXft system cabinets do not provide convenience outlets. Every
terminal, modem, printer, and any other piece of equipment connected to
the system requires a dedicated power receptacle and circuit breaker as
described in Chapter 1.
•
Make sure the circuit breakers for all dedicated power receptacles are
set to the ON position.
•
If a separate power source is provided (such as auxiliary power for
the console terminals), make sure the circuit panels, breakers, and
receptacles are labeled accordingly.
Refer to Figure 7–1 during the following procedures. The figure shows
the location of the male receptacle in the ac power input box in each of
the cabinets. (The lower right corner of a system cabinet is shown.) The
figure also shows the location of the local console terminal and remote
modem connectors.
Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
Figure 7–1 Model 310 and 410 Terminal, Modem, and Power Cord
Connectors
BATTERY
PACK
LOGIC MODULES
SLOT 1 SLOT 2 SLOT 3 SLOT 4 SLOT 5 SLOT 6 SLOT 7
AC POWER CORD
RECEPTACLE
REMOTE CONSOLE
TERMINAL CONNECTOR
LOCAL CONSOLE
TERMINAL CONNECTOR
AC POWER CORD
MR_X1417_89.DG
7–3
7–4 Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7.1.1 Connecting the Cabinet Power Cords
Connect the power cord for each cabinet as follows:
1. Make sure the cabinet ac circuit breaker is set to the OFF (down)
position. Locate the power cord.
2. See Figure 7–1. Route the female connector under the base frame
and up through the base frame cutout. Plug the connector into the
receptacle on the side of the ac power input box as shown.
3. Plug the male end of the power cord into one of the dedicated power
receptacles.
4. Do not set the cabinet ac circuit breaker to ON (up) at this time.
Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7–5
7.1.2 Connecting the Terminals and Modems
Connect the interface cables and power cords for the terminals and
modems as follows:
1. Assemble each unit using the documentation supplied with it.
2. Make sure the voltage selector switch is set to the correct voltage
range (115 V or 230 V).
3. Make sure the power switch is set to the off (0) position.
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap must be worn while connecting the
interface cables to the system cabinets.
4. See Figure 7–1. Route the interface cable from one console terminal
and modem under the base frame of one system cabinet. Bring the
connectors up through the base frame cutout and connect as follows:
a. Plug the interface cable from the terminal into the local console
terminal connector.
b. Plug the interface cable from the modem into the remote console
terminal connector.
c.
Repeat steps a and b for the other system cabinet.
5. Remove the ESD wrist strap. Plug the power cord from each unit into
one of the dedicated power receptacles.
6. Set the power switches on the terminals and modems to the on (1)
position.
7.1.3 Setting the Terminal Baud Rates
The factory default baud rate is 9600 for the local and remote terminal
ports in both system cabinets. Refer to the documentation provided with
the terminals for how to set the baud rates.
The VAXft Systems Owner’s Manual describes how to set the system baud
rates using the SET PORT and SET REMOTE commands. The available
system baud rates are: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, and 19200.
7–6 Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7.2 Applying Power to the System
If you are installing a system with expansion, power on the expander
cabinets first as described in Section 7.2.2.
7.2.1 System Cabinets
Figure 7–2 identifies the drive power switches and magnetic fault
indicators (MFIs) in the system cabinets.
1. In both system cabinets (in a base system), make sure the power
switches for all drives are set to the on (1) position.
NOTE
In a system with expansion, the system cabinets do not contain
any drives. The drive slots contain blank cannister modules to
maintain cooling airflow.
2. Power on the system cabinets by setting the ac circuit breakers to the
ON (up) position.
NOTE
All MFIs are set to the fault state (yellow) at the beginning of
the cabinet power sequence and reset during the sequence.
3. When the cabinet power sequence completes (less than a minute),
check the MFIs in all drive units and power modules. Any MFI that
shows yellow indicates a problem in the unit.
a. Tape or disk drives — If a problem is indicated in a tape or
disk drive, you do not need to power off the cabinet. Set the
power switch of the faulty drive to off (0) and repair or replace
as required. Appendix C provides removal and replacement
procedures for the cannister drives. (Refer to the VAXft Systems
Maintenance Guide for the repair procedures.)
b. Power modules and fans — If a problem is indicated in a power
module or fan, set the cabinet ac circuit breaker to OFF (down),
and repair or replace the faulty component. (Refer to the VAXft
Systems Maintenance Guide for the repair procedures.)
Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
Figure 7–2 Model 310 and 410 System Cabinet Switches and MFIs
TF70
CANNISTER
TAPE DRIVE
RF SERIES
CANNISTER
DISK DRIVE
5
7
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCHES
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCH
MFI
MFIs
MFI
AC
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
MFI
MR−0161−90.RAGS
7–7
7–8 Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
4. See Figure 7–3. Check the LED indicators and magnetic fault
indicators (MFIs) on the system logic modules.
a. Logic modules — The MFIs should not be yellow when the
power-on tests are completed (Section 7.3). When an MFI is
yellow, the module has a fault and must be replaced.
b. System I/O controller modules — The LED indicator must be:
1. Off if the two DSSI jumper plugs are installed correctly on
the primary system I/O controller module in slot 2 of a base
system (drives are present in the system cabinets).
2. On if both DSSI jumper plugs are removed from slots 1 and
2 of a system with expansion (drives are not present in the
system cabinets).
Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7–9
Figure 7–3 Model 310 and 410 Logic Module LED Indicators and MFIs
PROCESSOR
SYSTEM I/O MODULE
CONTROLLER
MODULES
MEMORY
MODULES
WAN
MODULES
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
LED
INDICATORS
= HOLE IN MODULE HANDLE
FOR VIEWING INDICATOR
MR−0162−90.RAGS
7–10 Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7.2.2 Expander Cabinets
Figure 7–4 identifies the drive power switches and magnetic fault
indicators (MFIs) in the expander cabinets.
1. In both expander cabinets, make sure the power switches for all drives
are set to the on (1) position.
2. Power on the expander cabinets by setting the ac circuit breakers to
the ON (up) position.
NOTE
All MFIs are set to the fault state (yellow) at the beginning of
the cabinet power sequence and reset during the sequence.
3. When the cabinet power sequence completes (less than a minute),
check the magnetic fault indicators (MFIs) in all drive units and
power modules. Any MFI that shows yellow indicates a problem in
the unit.
CAUTION
To prevent a system fault, you must set the expander cabinet
circuit breaker to OFF (down) whenever all the expander
cabinet disks are powered off.
a. Tape or disk drives — If a problem is indicated in a tape or
disk drive, you do not need to power off the cabinet. Set the
power switch of the faulty drive to off (0) and repair or replace
as required. Appendix C provides removal and replacement
procedures for the cannister and carrier drives. (Refer to the
VAXft Systems Maintenance Guide for the repair procedures.)
b. Power modules and fans — If a problem is indicated in a power
module or fan, set the cabinet ac circuit breaker to OFF (down),
and repair or replace the faulty component. (Refer to the VAXft
Systems Maintenance Guide for the repair procedures.)
Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7–11
Figure 7–4 Model 310 and 410 Expander Cabinet Switches and MFIs
TF70
CANNISTER
TAPE DRIVE
RF SERIES CARRIER DISK DRIVES
X
(5)
5
4
3
2
1
0
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCHES
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCH
MFI
MFIs
MFI
MFIs
AC
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
MFI
MR−0160−90.RAGS
7–12 Completing the Model 310 and 410 System Installation
7.3 Power-On Tests
The processor, system I/O controller, and WAN modules each contain a
set of ROM-based diagnostic (RBD) tests invoked on a power-on sequence.
The processor diagnostics test the CPU, as well as the memory, zone, and
system. When a failure is detected in any module, the number of the test
and a brief explanation of the failure are reported to the console terminal.
If all tests on the processor, system I/O controller, and WAN modules
are successful, each processor module performs a series of zone tests
that include internal memory and I/O functions. If the zone tests are
successful (no detected errors), each processor module enters a restart
procedure that initializes the zone.
7.4 Final System Tests
All of the diagnostic software required by the system is provided in the
RBD tests described in Section 7.3.
NOTE
It is not necessary to run the diagnostics manually if the system
has passed the power-on tests.
The RBD command description in Chapter 6 of the VAXft Systems Owner’s
Manual (EK-VXFT1-OM) provides information and guidelines for writing
DSSI parameters to the storage devices under the DUP facility.
Run the user environment test package (UETP) as a final check. Refer to
the VMS Upgrade and Installation Supplement: VAXft Systems for more
information on installing and booting the VMS operating system. The
VAX/VMS UETP User’s Guide describes how to log in and run UETP.
CAUTION
UETP can be configured to run write/read tests on the RF-series
disks. UETP should be run only at the completion of a system
installation because of the risk of corrupting data on shadowed
disks. Do not run UETP without contacting the responsible
customer representative or application manager.
When you are satisfied the system is operating correctly, turn it over to
the responsible customer representative for installation and testing of the
application software.
Part 4
8
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610
and 612 System
This chapter describes how to unpack and inspect the VAXft cabinets
and options and explains what to do if there is a problem. This chapter
includes:
•
Inspecting the shipment
•
Unpacking the options
•
Opening the shipping cartons
•
Unpacking the cabinets
8.1 Inspecting the Shipment
Model 610 and 612 systems are shipped in cartons on skids. Figure 8–1
shows a model 610 and 612 cabinet shipping carton.
The computer cabinets and all items included with the shipment should
be moved to the installation area before you start unpacking. Make sure
the installation area provides a firm surface for the system to rest on. The
installation area must also allow full exhaust airflow from the rear of the
cabinets. Soft surface such as shag or deep-pile carpeting must be avoided
unless a firm surface (like floor tiles) is installed on top of the carpeting.
Be sure you have everything before you begin to unpack any equipment.
1. Refer to the product delivery document to make sure you received the
correct number of shipping cartons.
8–1
8–2 Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610 and 612 System
Figure 8–1 Model 610 and 612 System Cabinet Shipping Carton
OUTER
SHIPPING
CAP
SHIPPING
BANDS
METAL
CLOSURES
MR_X0725_90
2. If any cabinet or option is missing or damaged, report it on the labor
activity reporting system (LARS). Include a note to clarify the extent
of the problem. Then notify the customer and responsible Customer
Services manager.
NOTE
If there is a problem, stop the installation until the customer
notifies the carrier or insurance company and gives you
permission to continue.
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610 and 612 System 8–3
8.2 Unpacking the Options
Unpack the console terminals and other system options (terminal stands,
modems) included with the shipment:
1. Check each carton for external damage (dents, holes, crushed corners,
water marks).
2. Open each carton. Compare the contents of the carton to the items
listed on the side of the carton (including power cord, interface cable,
and documentation). If any item is missing, report it on LARS. Then
notify the customer and responsible Customer Services manager.
3. Look for damaged items. If you notice any damage, report it on LARS.
Include a note to clarify the extent of the problem. Then notify the
customer and responsible Customer Services manager.
NOTE
If there is a problem, stop the installation until the customer
notifies the carrier or insurance company and gives you
permission to continue. Save the cartons and packing material
in case you need to return an item.
8–4 Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610 and 612 System
8.3 Opening the Shipping Cartons
1. Check each carton for external damage (dents, holes, crushed corners,
water marks).
2. Remove the shipping/accessory list from the Customer Services box
and check the contents of the boxes against the shipping list. This
Customer Services box is identified by the international information
symbol — a blue circle containing the letter i. Notify the branch
manager or branch supervisor of any missing, incorrect, or damaged
items. Advise the customer to contact the carrier about any missing
items.
NOTE
Look at the unpacking illustrations on the shipping cartons.
3. See Figure 8–1. Remove all shipping bands.
4. Remove the outer shipping cap.
5. Use a 7/16-inch wrench to remove the machine screws and metal
closures that secure the short carton flaps over the front and back
sides of the cabinet. There are four metal closures, two on the front
side of the carton and two on the back side of the carton.
6. Remove the shipping carton.
7. See Figure 8–2. Remove the deskidding ramps box from the side of
the cabinet.
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610 and 612 System 8–5
Figure 8–2 Opening the Model 610 and 612 System Shipping Cartons
INNER
SHIPPING CAP
BASE
PACKING
BASE
PACKING
DESKIDDING
RAMPS
RAMP
HOLES
ZKO-050-000079-26-DG
8–6 Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610 and 612 System
8.4 Unpacking the Cabinets
Remove each computer cabinet from its shipping skid:
1. Remove the inner shipping cap.
CAUTION
For cold weather installations, all cabinets are shipped in
vapor barrier bags. To avoid condensation on the cabinets,
allow the cabinets to warm to the temperature of the computer
room. Then cut the vapor barrier bag.
2. System cabinets are shipped in vapor barrier bags. Cut the bag at
the base of the cabinet and lift it up and off the cabinet. Expander
cabinets are shipped in polyethylene bags. Lift the bag up and off the
cabinet.
3. Remove the desiccant bags from the shipping pallet.
4. Remove the wheel stops on the pallet with a Phillips screwdriver.
5. Open the deskidding ramps box. Remove the contents of the box.
6. See Figure 8–3. Match the arrows on the ramp with the arrows on
the skid. Install the brackets on the edge of the skid, with the tabs in
the skid holes.
7. Use a 9/16-inch wrench to remove the four shipping brackets from the
cabinet’s leveling feet.
8. Use the wrench part of the shipping bracket to fully retract the
leveling feet.
WARNING
Four people are required to deskid a system cabinet. Two
people are required to deskid an expander cabinet. Do not
allow a cabinet to roll uncontrolled down the ramps.
9. Carefully guide the cabinet down the ramp.
Unpacking and Inspecting the Model 610 and 612 System 8–7
Figure 8–3 Unpacking a Model 610 and 612 System Cabinet
RAMP
GUARD
RAILS
MR_X0750_90
9
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System
Cabinets
This chapter describes how to open the model 610 and 612 system
cabinets and prepare for installation of a base system or system with
expansion. This chapter includes:
•
Opening the cabinets
•
Checking the ac voltage selector switches
•
Checking the logic modules
•
Installing module options
•
Bolting the cabinets together
•
Leveling the cabinets
9–1
9–2 Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9.1 Opening the Cabinets
Figure 9–1 identifies the front doors on the computer cabinets. A key
(supplied with the system) must be used to turn the latch.
All operating and service access takes place from the front of the system:
•
The upper door provides access to zone A of the system or expander
cabinet.
•
The lower door provides access to zone B of the the system or
expander cabinet.
CAUTION
Installation and maintenance procedures may be performed
only by qualified personnel. They must be familiar with
the electrostatic discharge (ESD) procedures and power
procedures for the VAXft system.
WARNING
A cabinet may weigh as much as 433 kg (956 lb) and is too
heavy to be handled by one person. At least two people are
required to move a cabinet.
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
Figure 9–1 Front View of a Model 610 or 612 System Cabinet
sys
VA
tem
s
X ft
MR-0423-91DG
9–3
9–4 Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9.1.1 System Cabinet Layout
Figure 9–2 shows the layout of a system cabinet (zone A and B) and
identifies the components:
•
Summary panel with control switches and indicators
•
Removable TF70 cannister tape drive or removable TF857 tape
subsystem
•
One or two removable RF-series cannister disk drives
•
System logic modules (slots 1 through 7)
•
Power modules (ac power input box, dc power supply, and battery
pack)
In a base system, the system cabinet contains an RF-series cannister disk
drive in unit 7. Unit 7 drives serve as the system operating media.
In a system with expansion, the system cabinets do not contain any
drives. The unused drive slots must contain blank cannister modules to
maintain cooling airflow.
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
Figure 9–2 Model 610 and 612 System Cabinet Layout, Front View
VAXft Model 610
CAPTIVE
SCREW
BBU
SUMMARY
PANEL
ZONE A
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
TFxx
CANNISTER
TAPE DRIVE
J5
1 234 56 7
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
J6
TERMINATOR
ZONE A
AC BOX
AC POWER
TRANSFORMER
AC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
FAN
ZONE B
AC
POWER
CORD
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
SUMMARY
PANEL
TAPE
LOADER
J5
1 234 56 7
J6
TERMINATOR
ZONE B
AC BOX
CAPTIVE
SCREWS
AC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
BBU
AC POWER
TRANSFORMER
AC
POWER
CORD
LOGIC FAN
MODULES
ZKO−050−000079−08−RGS
9–5
9–6 Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9.1.2 Expander Cabinet Layout
If you are installing a system with expansion, make sure the system
cabinets are in the center of the installation area. The expander cabinets
may be placed on either side of the system cabinets, depending on the
configuration.
Figure 9–3 shows the layout of an expander cabinet and identifies the
components:
•
Summary panel with control switches and indicators
•
Removable TF70 cannister tape drive or removable RF-series
cannister disk drive
•
One to five nonremovable RF-series carrier disk drives
•
Power modules (ac power input box, dc power supply, and battery
pack)
In a system with expansion, all the drives are in the expander cabinets.
Each expander cabinet may contain up to six drives.
One expander cabinet contains a TF70 cannister tape drive in unit 5.
This is the system backup and software load device. The other expander
cabinet may contain a TF70 or RF-series option, or blank cannister
module in the cannister slot for unit 5. It may also contain an RF-series
carrier drive in the carrier slot for unit 5. However, it cannot contain
drives in both slots because the two slots share the same DSSI node ID
(5).
Unused drive slots must contain a blank carrier or cannister module to
maintain proper airflow.
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9–7
Figure 9–3 Model 610 and 612 Expander Cabinet Layout, Front View
RFxx
SERIES CARRIER
DISK DRIVES
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
J6
EXPANDER
SUMMARY
PANEL
AC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
EXPANDER
SUMMARY
PANEL
J5
J6
AC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
RFxx
SERIES CARRIER
DISK DRIVES
ZKO−050−000079−13−RGS
9–8 Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9.2 Checking the AC Voltage Selector Switches
Use the procedures in this section to check or change the ac voltage
selector switch setting in any of the cabinets.
Figure 9–2 identifies the power modules, all of which are accessed from
the front of the cabinets. The power transformer and voltage selector
switch are located behind the ac power input box and battery pack. To
access the switch, remove the ac power input box and the battery pack.
9.2.1 Removing the AC Power Input Box
Remove the ac power input box as follows:
1. See Figure 9–2. Remove the power cord from the ac power input box.
2. Loosen the two captive screws holding the ac power input box in place.
3. Grasp the handle and pull the box straight out. Put it where no one
can trip over it or damage it.
9.2.2 Removing the Battery Pack
Remove the battery pack as follows:
1. Remove the panel or label cover from the top of the battery pack.
2. See Figure 9–2. Loosen the captive thumbscrew holding the top of the
battery pack.
3. See Figure 9–4. Grasp the front handle and slowly pull the battery
pack until the safety catch on the top handle contacts the chassis.
WARNING
The battery pack weighs 17.3 kg (38 lb). Use care when
removing, handling, and inserting the battery pack.
4. Support the battery pack with one hand as you raise the top handle.
This lowers the safety catch to clear the chassis.
5. Lift the battery pack and pull it straight out of the chassis. Put it
where no one can trip over it or damage it.
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
Figure 9–4 Model 610 and 612 Battery Pack Safety Catch
WARNING
THE BATTERY PACK
WEIGHS 17.3 kg (38 lb).
USE CARE WHEN REMOVING,
HANDLING, AND INSERTING
THE BATTERY PACK.
HANDLE UP,
SAFETY CATCH
DOWN
HANDLE DOWN,
SAFETY CATCH UP
THUMBSCREW
29%
MR-0047-90.DG
9–9
9–10 Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9.2.3 Checking the Voltage Selector Switch Setting
Figure 9–5 shows the location of the voltage selector switch on the power
transformer chassis. Make sure the switch is in the correct position for
the ac power supplied by the facility (115 V or 230 V).
NOTE
The voltage selector switch is factory set to 115 V. You may need
to change the switch position.
To change the switch position, use a ballpoint pen or a small, slotted
screwdriver to move it to the correct position.
9.2.4 Replacing the Battery Pack and AC Power Input Box
Replace the battery pack and ac power input box as follows:
1. Lift the battery pack and place it in the chassis.
a. Raise the top handle and push the battery pack in until the top
handle contacts the chassis.
b. Support the battery pack with one hand as you lower the top
handle to clear the chassis. Push the battery pack straight in and
seat it firmly.
c.
Replace the holding screw and summary panel logo.
2. Place the ac power input box in the chassis.
a. Push the box straight in and seat it firmly.
b. Replace and tighten the two captive screws.
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
Figure 9–5 Model 610 and 612 AC Voltage Selector Switch Settings
115
115 V
230 V
230
115
230
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
CONNECTORS
POWER INPUT
TRANSFORMER
MR-0048-90.DG
9–11
9–12 Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9.3 Checking the Logic Modules
Check the placement of the logic modules in the system cabinets. Also
check the settings on the system I/O controller modules (Figures 9–6 and
9–7).
If you remove any modules, use the module removal and replacement
procedure in Appendix A.
9.3.1 Module Placement
Table 9–1 describes the logic modules and their locations in the system
backplanes. The type and complement of memory modules must be the
same in both system cabinets. Figure 9–6 shows the correct placement of
the logic modules in the system backplane.
Table 9–1 Model 610 and 612 Logic Modules
Slot
Module
Description
1
T3001 or T3004
Secondary KFE52 system I/O controller module or
WAN module
21
T30012
3
Primary KFE52 system I/O controller module
T3005 or T3007
2
2
KA520 or KA550 processor module, respectively
4
T3003
5
T3003 or T3004
First MS520 memory module
Second MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
6
T3003 or T3004
Third MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
7
T3003 or T3004
Fourth MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
1 Slot 2 contains the primary system I/O controller module, which supports console
functions.
2 Slots 1, 2, and 3 contain the primary system I/O controller module, a processor module,
and a memory module. This is the minimum required for operation.
NOTE
Unused module slots require a T3999 filler module to maintain
cooling airflow. The module handles also maintain ground
continuity to meet FCC regulations and provide electrostatic
discharge (ESD) protection.
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
Figure 9–6 Model 610 and 612 Logic Module Placement
PROCESSOR
MODULE
1/4 − TURN
FASTENERS
PRIMARY SYSTEM I/O
CONTROLLER MODULE
ASSIST
LEVERS
MEMORY MODULE 1
MEMORY MODULE 2
OR WAN MODULE
SECONDARY SYSTEM I/O
CONTROLLER MODULE OR
WAN MODULE
MEMORY MODULE 3
OR WAN MODULE
MEMORY MODULE 4
OR WAN MODULE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
MR−0159−90.RAGS
9–13
9–14 Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9.3.2 System I/O Controller Module Settings
System I/O controller modules are shipped with the correct DSSI jumper
plug states (installed or removed) for the system. The Ethernet switch
is set to the traditional (thickwire) position. Use the procedures in this
section to check or change the DSSI jumper plugs or the Ethernet switch.
Figure 9–7 identifies the DSSI terminator, DSSI jumper plugs, and
Ethernet switch on the system I/O controller module. A primary system
I/O controller module is located in slot 2 of both system cabinets. In an
expanded system, a secondary system I/O controller module is located in
slot 1 of both system cabinets.
•
The DSSI terminator and two DSSI jumper plugs must be:
— In place on the primary system I/O controller module in slot 2 for
a base system.
— Removed from all system I/O controller modules in a system with
expansion. (All drives are mounted in the expander cabinets of a
system with expansion.)
•
If the module is to be connected to an Ethernet, set the Ethernet
switch as follows:
— Position 2 (down) for ThinWire applications.
— Position 1 (up) for traditional (thickwire) applications (factory
default setting).
9.4 Installing Module Options
If you are installing any module options at this time (T3003 expanded
memory or secondary T3001 system I/O controller modules), use the
module removal and replacement procedure in Appendix A.
If you are installing the wide area network (WAN) module option, refer
to Appendix B for the DEC WANcontroller 620 installation procedure and
Y-box connections.
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
9–15
Figure 9–7 Model 610 and 612 System I/O Controller Module Settings
DSSI
JUMPER
PLUGS
DSSI
TERMINATOR
PLUG
THICKWIRE
CONNECTOR
1
THICKWIRE
2
ThinWire
Ethernet
SWITCH
ThinWire
CONNECTOR
MR-0174-90.DG
9.5 Bolting the Cabinets Together
The cabinets are positioned according to the floor plan of an installation
area. Move the CPU system cabinet(s) into position first, and then move
the expander cabinet(s).
Each expander cabinet comes with a joiner panel (Figure 9–8) attached to
the left side. Depending on your configuration, you may need to remove
the joiner panel from the left side of the expander cabinet and install it
on the right side of the expander cabinet.
In a model 610 with one expander cabinet, the joiner panel remains on
the left side of the expander cabinet. The right side panel of the CPU
cabinet is moved to the right side of the expander cabinet.
9–16 Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
In a model 610 with two expander cabinets, the joiner panel remains on
the left side of the right expander cabinet (EXP 1). The right side panel
of the CPU cabinet is moved to the right side of EXP 1. The joiner panel
on the left expander cabinet (EXP 2) is moved to the right side of EXP 2.
The left side panel of the CPU cabinet is moved to the left side of EXP 2.
In both model 612 systems (base system and system with expansion), an
additional joiner panel is required. The joiner panels on the left side of
EXP 1 and EXP 2 remain in place. The additional joiner panel is installed
on the right side of EXP 2. The right side panel of the left CPU cabinet
(CPU 1) is removed, as is the left side panel of the right CPU cabinet
(CPU 2). These side panels are not used.
CAUTION
When you move the cabinets together, do not pinch the cables or
their connectors between the frames.
Repeat the following steps until all cabinets are bolted together. See
Figure 9–8.
1. Remove the intercabinet hardware consisting of 12 sets of: spacer
nuts (PN 74-41149-01), flat washers (PN 90-06646-00), lock washers
(PN 90-07797-00), and 1/4 20 machine hex screws (PN 90-06245-09).
NOTE
When the floor is not level, the following hints may help:
•
If the bottom edges of the cabinet are closer together than
the top edges, bolt from the bottom up.
•
Be careful if you use a screwdriver to help align the
mounting holes. Do not damage the holes.
2. Using the top two screws as guide pins, carefully slide the two
cabinets together and install the spacer nuts, washers, and lock
washers on the screws. Do not tighten them yet.
3. Working from the top down, install all remaining screws, flat washers,
lock washers, and spacer nuts.
4. Use a 7/16-inch wrench to tighten all 12 sets of screws, flat washers,
lock washers, and spacer nuts.
Preparing the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
Figure 9–8 Bolting the Model 610 and 612 System Cabinets
CPU
JOINER PANEL
EXPANDER
CABINET
HEX SCREW (12)
LOCK WASHER (12)
FLAT WASHER (12)
SPACER (12)
CPU SIDE PANEL
MR−0496−91RAGS
9.6 Leveling the Cabinets
Use a 9/16-inch wrench to level each cabinet. Lower each of the four
cabinet leveling feet.
9–17
10
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System
Cables
This chapter describes how to install the cross-link, power, PCIM, and
DSSI cables in the following VAXft systems:
•
Model 610 base system
•
Model 610 system with one expander cabinet
•
Model 610 system with two expander cabinets
•
Model 612 base system
•
Model 612 system with expansion
NOTE
Refer to Appendix B for instructions on how to install a DEC
WANcontroller 620 module in a VAXft system.
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap must be worn during the following procedures
until all cables are connected and secured to the module handles.
10–1
10–2 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
10.1 Installing the System Cables in a Model 610
Base System
This section describes how to install the system cables in a model 610
base system. Before you begin, review the following guidelines and refer
to Figures 10–1 and 10–2.
•
When routing cables between cabinets, place the cables in the cable
tray at the bottom of each zone and feed them through the access
holes in the vertical rails.
•
When routing cables within a system cabinet (CPU 1 or CPU 2), route
the cables along the middle vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet one (EXP 1), route the
cables along the left vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet two (EXP 2), route the
cables along the right vertical rail.
•
After routing, secure the cables with cable clamps.
•
Route console A and B cables to the consoles from the rear of the CPU
cabinets.
•
One terminator connector is provided with each CIO modules kit.
NOTE
The system cables in the model 610 base system are connected
at the factory. If any of the cables have been disconnected, refer
to Figure 10–3 and follow the steps in Sections 10.1.1 through
Section 10.1.3.
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–3
Figure 10–1 Model 610 CPU Cabinet Cable Routing
ACCESS
HOLES
CABLE
TRAYS
CABLE
CLAMPS
POWER
CABLE
CLAMPS
CABLE
CLAMPS
CABLE
TRAYS
MR−0495−91RAGS
10–4 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
Figure 10–2 Model 610 Expander Cabinet Cable Routing
ACCESS
HOLES
CABLE
TRAY
CABLE
CLAMPS
POWER
CABLE
CLAMPS
CABLE
CLAMPS
CABLE
TRAY
MR−0497−91RAGS
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–5
Figure 10–3 Cable Connections in a Model 610 Base System
VAXft Model 610
CPU 1
ZONE A
DSSI
CABLE
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
1 234 56 7
TF70
OR
TF857
TERMINATOR
DSSI
1
2
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
TAPE
POWER
CABLE
CPU EXP2
TAPE
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
CPU
POWER
CABLE
TO
CONSOLE A
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
ZONE B
CROSS−LINK
CABLES
DSSI
CABLE
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
1 234 56 7
TF70
OR
TF857
TERMINATOR
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
CPU
POWER
CABLE
DSSI
1
2
TAPE
POWER
CABLE
CPU EXP2
TAPE
EXP1 AC DIST
TO
CONSOLE B
CONSOLE POWER CABLE
MR−0490−91RAGS
10–6 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
10.1.1 Cross-Link Cables
The following steps apply to all configurations. Refer to Figure 10–3 as
you install the cross-link cables in the CPU cabinets.
1. Plug one end of a cross-link cable (PN 17-02194-01) into the lower
connector of the processor module in slot 3 of zone A. Secure the
spring clips.
2. Plug the other end of the same cross-link cable into the lower
connector of the processor module in slot 3 of zone B. Secure the
spring clips.
3. Plug one end of a cross-link cable (PN 17-02194-01) into the upper
connector of the processor module in slot 3 of zone A. Secure the
spring clips.
4. Plug the other end of the same cross-link cable into the upper
connector of the processor module in slot 3 of zone B. Secure the
spring clips.
10.1.2 Power Cables
Refer to Figure 10–3 as you install the power cables.
1. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone A of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console A.
2. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone B of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console B.
3. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the input plug
of the ac power supply in zone A of CPU 1. Connect the other end of
the same power cable to the CPU plug of the ac distribution box in
zone A of CPU 1.
4. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the input plug
of the ac power supply in zone B of CPU 1. Connect the other end of
the same power cable to the CPU plug of the ac distribution box in
zone B of CPU 1.
5. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone A of CPU 1.
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–7
6. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone B of CPU 1.
10.1.3 DSSI Cables
Refer to Figure 10–3 as you install the DSSI cables in any zone in which
a TF-series storage device is present.
1. Connect one end of the DSSI cable (PN 17-02420-01) to the KFE52 I/O
module in slot 2. Secure the screws.
2. Connect the other end of the DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector.
Secure the screws.
3. Install a terminator (PN 12-29258-01) at the DSSI 2 connector.
NOTE
If you do not install a terminator, the DSSI cable does not
function correctly.
10.2 Installing the System Cables in a Model 610
System with One Expander Cabinet
This section describes how to install the system cables in a model 610
system with one expander cabinet. Before you begin, review the following
guidelines and refer to Figure 10–4.
•
When routing cables between cabinets, place the cables in the cable
tray at the bottom of each zone and feed them through the access
holes in the vertical rails.
•
When routing cables within a system cabinet (CPU 1 or CPU 2), route
the cables along the middle vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet one (EXP 1), route the
cables along the left vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet two (EXP 2), route the
cables along the right vertical rail.
•
After routing, secure the cables with cable clamps.
•
Route console A and B cables to the consoles from the rear of the CPU
cabinets.
10–8 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
•
One terminator connector is provided with each CIO modules kit.
Figure 10–4 Cable Connections in a Model 610 System with One
Expander Cabinet
VAXft Model 610
EXP 1
CPU 1
Zone A
PCIM
CABLE
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
1 234 56 7
DSSI
1
2
J6
CPU
POWER
CABLE
TF70
OR
TF857
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
CPU EXP2
TAPE
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
J5
J6
CPU
POWER
CABLE
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
DSSI1 DSSI2
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
TO
CONSOLE A
DSSI
CABLES
Zone B
PCIM
CABLE
CROSS−LINK
CABLES
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
CPU
POWER
CABLE
TO
CONSOLE B
CONSOLE POWER CABLE
1 234 56 7
TF70
OR
TF857
J5
DSSI
1
2
J6
CPU EXP2
TAPE
EXP1 AC DIST
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
CPU
POWER
CABLE
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
DSSI1 DSSI2
DSSI
CABLES
MR−0491−91RAGS
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–9
•
Verify that the cross-link cables are installed correctly. See
Section 10.1.1.
10.2.1 Power Cables
Refer to Figure 10–4 as you install the power cables.
1. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone A of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console A.
2. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone B of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console B.
3. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone A of EXP 1.
4. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone B of EXP 1.
5. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone A of CPU 1.
6. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone B of CPU 1.
10.2.2 PCIM Cables
Refer to Figure 10–4 as you install the PCIM cables.
1. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone A of EXP 1. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of EXP 1.
2. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone B of EXP 1. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of EXP 1.
10–10 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
10.2.3 DSSI Cables
Refer to Figure 10–4 as you install the DSSI cables.
If a TF-series storage device is present in zone A or B:
1. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code)
to the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone A in CPU 1. Connect the
other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of
CPU 1.
2. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-03023-01) to the DSSI 2
connector in zone A of CPU 1. Route the DSSI cable into zone A of
EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1
connector in zone A of EXP 1.
3. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code)
to the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone B in CPU 1. Connect the
other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of
CPU 1.
4. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-03023-01) to the DSSI 2
connector in zone B of CPU 1. Route the DSSI cable into zone B of
EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1
connector in zone B of EXP 1.
If no TF-series storage device is present:
1. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of EXP 1.
2. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of EXP 1.
3. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-03, green color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 1 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone B of EXP 1.
4. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-03, green color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 1 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone A of EXP 1.
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–11
10.3 Installing the System Cables in a Model 610
System with Two Expander Cabinets
This section describes how to install the system cables in a model 610
system with two expander cabinets. It also explains how to set the
summary panel switches in the second expander cabinet. Before you
begin, review the following guidelines and refer to Figure 10–5.
•
When routing cables between cabinets, place the cables in the cable
tray at the bottom of each zone and feed them through the access
holes in the vertical rails.
•
When routing cables within a system cabinet (CPU 1 or CPU 2), route
the cables along the middle vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet one (EXP 1), route the
cables along the left vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet two (EXP 2), route the
cables along the right vertical rail.
•
After routing, secure the cables with cable clamps.
•
Route console A and B cables to the consoles from the rear of the CPU
cabinets.
•
One terminator connector is provided with each CIO modules kit.
•
Verify that the cross-link cables are installed correctly. See
Section 10.1.1.
10.3.1 Power Cables
Refer to Figure 10–5 as you install the power cables.
1. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone A of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console A.
2. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone B of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console B.
10–12 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
Figure 10–5 Cable Connections in a Model 610 System with Two
Expander Cabinets
VAXft Model 610
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
PCIM
CABLES
CPU 1
EXP 2
EXP 1
Zone A
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
J5
J6
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
DSSI1 DSSI2
1 234 56 7
TF70
OR
TF857
J5
DSSI
1
2
J6
CPU EXP2
TAPE
INP
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
DSSI1 DSSI2
DSSI
CABLES
TO
CONSOLE A
Zone B
CROSS−LINK
CABLES
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
CPU
POWER
CABLE
J5
PCIM
CABLES
DSSI
CABLES
J5
J6
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
DSSI1 DSSI2
1 234 56 7
INP
TF70
OR
TF857
J5
DSSI
1
2
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J6
CPU EXP2
TAPE
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
DSSI
CABLES
DSSI1 DSSI2
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
TO
CONSOLE B
CPU POWER CABLES
DSSI CABLES
MR−0492−91RAGS
3. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone A of EXP 1.
4. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone B of EXP 1.
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–13
5. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone A of CPU 1.
6. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone B of CPU 1.
7. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the EXP 2 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone A of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone A of EXP 2.
8. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the EXP 2 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone B of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone B of EXP 2.
10.3.2 PCIM Cables
Refer to Figure 10–5 as you install the PCIM cables.
1. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J6 of the dc power supply in zone
A of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone A of EXP 1. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J6 of the dc power supply in zone
A of EXP 1.
2. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone A of EXP 2. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of EXP 2.
3. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J6 of the dc power supply in zone
B of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone B of EXP 1. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J6 of the dc power supply in zone
B of EXP 1.
4. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone B of EXP 2. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of EXP 2.
10–14 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
10.3.3 DSSI Cables
Refer to Figure 10–5 as you install the DSSI cables.
If a TF-series storage device is present in zone A or B:
1. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code)
to the KFE52 I/O module in slot 7 of zone A in CPU 1. Connect the
other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of
CPU 1.
2. Connect one end of a DSSI connector (PN 17-03023-01) to the DSSI
2 connector in zone A of CPU 1. Route the DSSI cable into zone A of
EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1
connector in zone A of EXP 1.
3. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code)
to the KFE52 I/O module in slot 7 of zone B in CPU 1. Connect the
other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of
CPU 1.
4. Connect one end of a DSSI connector (PN 17-03023-01) to the DSSI
2 connector in zone B of CPU 1. Route the DSSI cable into zone B of
EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1
connector in zone B of EXP 1.
If no TF-series storage device is present:
1. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 7 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the DSSI cable
to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of CPU 1.
2. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 7 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the DSSI cable
to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of CPU 1.
3. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the cable
into zone A of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable
to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of EXP 2.
4. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the cable
into zone B of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable
to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of EXP 2.
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–15
5. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 1 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone B of EXP 2.
6. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 1 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone A of EXP 2.
7. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-03, green color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 6 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone B of EXP 1.
8. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-03, green color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 6 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone A of EXP 1.
10.3.4 Expander Cabinet Summary Panel
When you add a second expander cabinet to a model 610 system, you
must set the summary panel switches in the second expander cabinet.
Use the following steps.
1. In zone A of EXP 2, loosen the four screws that hold the summary
panel in place.
2. Gently pull the summary panel toward you until you can reach the
eight switches with a screwdriver. Do not disconnect the summary
panel from its cables.
3. Use a flat-blade screwdriver (or similar tool) to set the switches as
follows:
•
SW1 = on
•
SW2 = off
•
SW3 = on
•
SW4 to SW8 = off
4. Replace the summary panel.
5. Secure the four screws you loosened in step 1.
6. Repeat steps 1 to 5 for the summary panel in zone B of EXP 2.
10–16 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
10.4 Installing the System Cables in a Model 612
Base System
This section describes how to install the system cables in a model 612
base system. Before you begin, review the following guidelines and refer
to Figure 10–6.
•
When routing cables between cabinets, place the cables in the cable
tray at the bottom of each zone and feed them through the access
holes in the vertical rails.
•
When routing cables within a system cabinet (CPU 1 or CPU 2), route
the cables along the middle vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet one (EXP 1), route the
cables along the left vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet two (EXP 2), route the
cables along the right vertical rail.
•
After routing, secure the cables with cable clamps.
•
Route console A and B cables to the consoles from the rear of the CPU
cabinets.
•
One terminator connector is provided with each CIO modules kit.
•
Verify that the cross-link cables are installed correctly. See
Section 10.1.1.
10.4.1 Power Cables
Refer to Figure 10–6 as you install the power cables.
1. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone A of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console A
of CPU 1.
2. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone B of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console B
of CPU 1.
TERMINATOR
CPU 1
EXP 1
CPU 2
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
Zone A
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
TF70
OR
TF857
1 234 56 7
DSSI
1 2
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
CPU EXP2
TAPE
INP
CPU
POWER
CABLES
EXP1 AC DIST
J5
J5
J6
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
DSSI1 DSSI2
1 234 56 7
CPU EXP2
TAPE
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
TO
CONSOLE A
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
DSSI
CABLE
CROSS−LINK
CABLES
J5
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
PCIM
CABLE
1 234 56 7
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
TF70
OR
TF857
DSSI
1 2
CPU EXP2
TAPE
EXP1 AC DIST
CONSOLE
POWER CABLE
TO
CONSOLE B
TO
CONSOLE A
CPU
POWER
CABLE
Zone B
Zone B
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
CPU POWER CABLES
TERMINATOR
J5
J5
J6
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
DSSI1 DSSI2
DSSI
CABLES
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
INP
CROSS−LINK
CABLES
1 234 56 7
CPU EXP2
TAPE
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
TO
EXP1 AC DIST
CONSOLE B
CPU
POWER
CABLE
MR−0493−91RAGS
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–17
J6
PCIM
CABLE
Zone A
Figure 10–6 Cable Connections in a Model 612 Base System
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
VAXft Model 612
10–18 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
3. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone A of the system cabinet
(CPU 2). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console A
of CPU 2.
4. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone B of the system cabinet
(CPU 2). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console B
of CPU 2.
5. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone A of EXP 1.
6. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone B of EXP 1.
7. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone A of CPU 1.
8. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone B of CPU 1.
10.4.2 PCIM Cables
Refer to Figure 10–6 as you install the PCIM cables.
1. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone A of EXP 1. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of EXP 1.
2. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone B of EXP 1. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of EXP 1.
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–19
10.4.3 DSSI Cables
Refer to Figure 10–6 as you install the DSSI cables.
If a TF-series storage device is present in zone A or B:
1. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code)
to the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone A in CPU 1. Connect the
other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of
CPU 1.
2. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code)
to the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone B in CPU 1. Connect the
other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of
CPU 1.
3. Connect a terminator (PN 12-29258-01) to the DSSI 2 connector in
zone A of CPU 1.
4. Connect a terminator (PN 12-29258-01) to the DSSI 2 connector in
zone B of CPU 1.
5. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone A in CPU 2. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone A of EXP 1.
6. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone B in CPU 2. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone B of EXP 1.
7. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02) to the KFE52 I/O
module in slot 1 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the DSSI cable into zone
A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable to the
DSSI 1 connector in zone A of EXP 1.
8. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02) to the KFE52 I/O
module in slot 1 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the DSSI cable into zone
B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable to the
DSSI 1 connector in zone B of EXP 1.
10–20 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
10.5 Installing the System Cables in a Model 612
System with Expansion
This section describes how to install the system cables in a model 612
system with expansion. Before you begin, review the following guidelines
and refer to Figure 10–7.
•
When routing cables between cabinets, place the cables in the cable
tray at the bottom of each zone and feed them through the access
holes in the vertical rails.
•
When routing cables within a system cabinet (CPU 1 or CPU 2), route
the cables along the middle vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet one (EXP 1), route the
cables along the left vertical rail.
•
When routing cables within expander cabinet two (EXP 2), route the
cables along the right vertical rail.
•
After routing, secure the cables with cable clamps.
•
Route console A and B cables to the consoles from the rear of the CPU
cabinets.
•
One terminator connector is provided with each CIO modules kit.
•
Verify that the cross-link cables are installed correctly. See
Section 10.1.1.
10.5.1 Power Cables
Refer to Figure 10–7 as you install the power cables.
1. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone A of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console A
of CPU 1.
2. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone B of the system cabinet
(CPU 1). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console B
of CPU 1.
CPU 1
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
PCIM
CABLE
EXP 1
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
DSSI
CABLES
PCIM
CABLE
CPU
POWER
CABLE
EXP 2
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
CPU 2
Zone A
Zone A
J5
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
J5
J5
DSSI
J6
J6
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
1 234 56 7
J6
1
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
CPU
POWER
CABLE
CPU EXP2
TAPE
INP
TO
CONSOLE A
2
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
INP
DSSI1 DSSI2
DSSI1 DSSI2
1 234 56 7
CPU EXP2
TAPE
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
Zone B
Zone B
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
TF70
OR
TF857
1 234 56 7
J6
PCIM
CABLE
CPU
POWER
CABLE
INP
J5
J5
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
1 234 56 7
J6
J6
J6
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
CPU EXP2
TAPE
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
CPU
POWER
CABLE
CPU
POWER
CABLES
DSSI
1
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
J5
TO
CONSOLE A
CROSS−LINK
CABLES
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
CROSS−LINK
CABLES
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
2
EXP2
TAPE
INP
EXP1 AC DIST
CONSOLE POWER CABLE
TO
CONSOLE B
DSSI
CABLE
CPU
POWER
CABLE
INP
DSSI1 DSSI2
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
DSSI
CABLES
DSSI1 DSSI2
PCIM
CABLE
CONSOLE
POWER
CABLE
TO
CONSOLE B
MR−0494−91RAGS
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–21
TF70
OR
TF857
Figure 10–7 Cable Connections in a Model 612 System with Expansion
CPU
POWER
CABLE
VAXft Model 612
10–22 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
3. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone A of the system cabinet
(CPU 2). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console A
of CPU 2.
4. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-17) to the console plug
at the rear of the ac distribution box in zone B of the system cabinet
(CPU 2). Connect the other end of the same power cable to console B
of CPU 2.
5. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone A of EXP 1.
6. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00442-38) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Route the power cable
into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone B of EXP 1.
7. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone A of CPU 1.
8. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the tape plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 1. Connect the other end
of the same power cable to the power plug at the rear of the TF-series
storage device in zone B of CPU 1.
9. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone A of CPU 2. Route the power cable
into zone A of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone A of EXP 2.
10. Connect one end of a power cable (PN 17-00422-39) to the EXP 1 plug
of the ac distribution box in zone B of CPU 2. Route the power cable
into zone B of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same power cable
to the input plug of the ac power supply in zone B of EXP 2.
Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables 10–23
10.5.2 PCIM Cables
Refer to Figure 10–7 as you install the PCIM cables.
1. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone A of EXP 1. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of EXP 1.
2. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of CPU 2. Route the PCIM cable to zone A of EXP 2. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
A of EXP 2.
3. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of CPU 1. Route the PCIM cable to zone B of EXP 1. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of EXP 1.
4. Connect one end of a PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of CPU 2. Route the PCIM cable to zone B of EXP 2. Connect the
other end of the same PCIM cable to J5 of the dc power supply in zone
B of EXP 2.
10.5.3 DSSI Cables
Refer to Figure 10–7 as you install the DSSI cables.
If a TF-series storage device is present in zone A or B:
1. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code)
to the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone A in CPU 1. Connect the
other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of
CPU 1.
2. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-03023-01) to the DSSI 2
connector in zone A of CPU 1. Route the DSSI cable into zone A of
EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1
connector in zone A of EXP 1.
3. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code)
to the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone B in CPU 1. Connect the
other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of
CPU 1.
4. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-03023-01) to the DSSI 2
connector in zone B of CPU 1. Route the DSSI cable into zone B of
EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI cable to the DSSI 1
connector in zone B of EXP 1.
10–24 Installing the Model 610 and 612 System Cables
If no TF-series storage device is present:
1. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of EXP 1.
2. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of EXP 1.
3. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone A in CPU 2. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone A of EXP 2.
4. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-01, red color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 2 of zone B in CPU 2. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone B of EXP 2.
5. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 1 of zone A in CPU 2. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone A of EXP 1.
6. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-02, blue color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 1 of zone B in CPU 2. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 1. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 2 connector in zone B of EXP 1.
7. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-03, green color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 1 of zone A in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone A of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone A of EXP 2.
8. Connect one end of a DSSI cable (PN 17-02245-03, green color code) to
the KFE52 I/O module in slot 1 of zone B in CPU 1. Route the DSSI
cable into zone B of EXP 2. Connect the other end of the same DSSI
cable to the DSSI 1 connector in zone B of EXP 2.
11
Completing the Model 610 and 612
System Installation
This chapter describes how to complete the installation and start up the
VAXft system. This chapter includes:
•
Connecting the system to facility power
•
Applying power to the system
•
Power-on tests
•
Final system tests
11.1 Connecting the System to Facility Power
The VAXft system cabinets do not provide convenience outlets. Every
terminal, modem, and printer, and any other piece of equipment connected
to the system requires a dedicated power receptacle and circuit breaker.
•
Make sure that the circuit breakers for all dedicated power receptacles
are set to the ON position.
•
If a separate power source is provided (such as auxiliary power for the
console terminals), make sure that the circuit panels, breakers, and
receptacles are labeled accordingly.
Refer to Figure 11–1 during the following procedures. It shows the
location of the local console terminal and remote modem connectors.
11–1
11–2 Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
Figure 11–1 Model 610 and 612 Terminal, Modem, and Power Cord
Connectors
ZONE A
REMOTE
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
CONNECTOR
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
CONNECTOR
AC
POWER
CORD
ZONE B
REMOTE
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
CONNECTOR
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
CONNECTOR
AC
POWER
CORD
mr−0500−91RAGS
Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
11–3
11.1.1 Connecting the Cabinet Power Cords
Connect the power cord for each CPU cabinet as follows:
1. Make sure that the cabinet ac circuit breaker is set to the OFF (down)
position. Locate the power cord.
2. Plug each power cord into a dedicated power receptacle.
3. Do not set the cabinet ac circuit breaker to ON (up) at this time.
11.1.2 Connecting the Terminals and Modems
Connect the interface cables and power cords for the terminals and
modems as follows:
1. Assemble each unit using the documentation supplied with it.
2. Make sure that the voltage selector switch is set to the correct voltage
range (115 V or 230 V).
3. Make sure that the power switch is set to the off (0) position.
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap must be worn while connecting the
interface cables to the system cabinets.
4. See Figure 11–1. Connect the interface cables as follows:
a. Plug the interface cable from the terminal into the local console
terminal connector.
b. Plug the interface cable from the modem into the remote console
terminal connector.
c.
Repeat steps a. and b. for the other system cabinet.
5. Remove the ESD wrist strap. Plug the power cord from each unit into
one of the dedicated power receptacles.
6. Set the power switches on the terminals and modems to the on (1)
position.
11–4 Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
11.1.3 Setting the Terminal Baud Rates
The factory default baud rate is 9600 for the local and remote terminal
ports in both system cabinets. Refer to the documentation provided with
the terminals for how to set the baud rates.
The VAXft Systems Owner’s Manual describes how to set the system baud
rates using the SET PORT and SET REMOTE commands. The available
system baud rates are: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, and 19200.
11.2 Applying Power to the System
If you are installing a system with expansion, power on the expander
cabinets first as described in Section 11.2.2.
11.2.1 System Cabinets
Figure 11–2 identifies the magnetic fault indicators (MFIs) and circuit
breakers in the CPU cabinet.
1. In both system cabinets (in a base system), make sure that the power
switches for all drives are set to the on (1) position.
NOTE
In a system with expansion, the system cabinets do not contain
any drives. The drive slots contain blank cannister modules to
maintain cooling airflow.
2. Power on the system cabinets by setting the ac circuit breakers to the
ON (up) position.
NOTE
All MFIs are set to the fault state (yellow) at the beginning of
the cabinet power sequence and are reset during the sequence.
Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
11–5
Figure 11–2 Model 610 and 612 System Cabinet Switches and MFIs
ZONE A
MFI
J5
1 234 56 7
J6
MFI
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
ZONE B
MFI
J5
1 234 56 7
J6
MFI
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
mr−0499−91RAGS
11–6 Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
3. When the cabinet power sequence completes (less than a minute),
check the MFIs in all drive units and power modules. Any MFI that
shows yellow indicates a problem in the unit.
a. Tape or disk drives — If a problem is indicated in a tape or
disk drive, you do not need to power off the cabinet. Set the
power switch of the faulty drive to off (0), and repair or replace
as required. Appendix C provides removal and replacement
procedures for the cannister drives. (Refer to the VAXft Systems
Maintenance Guide for the repair procedures.)
b. Power modules and fans — If a problem is indicated in a power
module or fan, set the cabinet ac circuit breaker to OFF (down),
and repair or replace the faulty component. (Refer to the VAXft
Systems Maintenance Guide for the repair procedures.)
4. See Figure 11–3. Check the LED indicators and magnetic fault
indicators (MFIs) on the system logic modules.
a. Logic modules — The MFIs should not be yellow when the
power-on tests are completed (see Section 11.3). When an MFI is
yellow, the module has a fault and must be replaced.
b. System I/O controller modules — The LED indicator must be:
— Off if the two DSSI jumper plugs are installed correctly on
the primary system I/O controller module in slot 2 of a base
system (drives are present in the system cabinets).
— On if both DSSI jumper plugs are removed from slots 1 and
2 of a system with expansion (drives are not present in the
system cabinets).
Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
11–7
Figure 11–3 Model 610 and 612 Logic Module LED Indicators and MFIs
PROCESSOR
SYSTEM I/O MODULE
CONTROLLER
MODULES
MEMORY
MODULES
WAN
MODULES
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
LED
INDICATORS
= HOLE IN MODULE HANDLE
FOR VIEWING INDICATOR
MR−0162−90.RAGS
11–8 Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
11.2.2 Expander Cabinets
Figure 11–4 identifies the drive power switches, magnetic fault indicators
(MFIs), and circuit breakers in an expander cabinet.
1. In both expander cabinets, make sure that the power switches for all
drives are set to the on (1) position.
2. Power on the expander cabinets by setting the ac circuit breakers to
the ON (up) position.
NOTE
All MFIs are set to the fault state (yellow) at the beginning of
the cabinet power sequence and are reset during the sequence.
3. When the cabinet power sequence completes (less than a minute),
check the magnetic fault indicators (MFIs) in all drive units and
power modules. Any MFI that shows yellow indicates a problem in
the unit.
CAUTION
To prevent a system fault, you must set the expander cabinet
circuit breaker to OFF (down) whenever all the expander
cabinet disks are powered off.
a. Tape or disk drives — If a problem is indicated in a tape or
disk drive, you do not need to power off the cabinet. Set the
power switch of the faulty drive to off (0), and repair or replace
as required. Appendix C provides removal and replacement
procedures for the cannister and carrier drives. (Refer to the
VAXft Systems Maintenance Guide for the repair procedures.)
b. Power modules and fans — If a problem is indicated in a power
module or fan, set the cabinet ac circuit breaker to OFF (down),
and repair or replace the faulty component. (Refer to the VAXft
Systems Maintenance Guide for the repair procedures.)
Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
11–9
Figure 11–4 Model 610 and 612 Expander Cabinet Switches and MFIs
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCH
MFI
MFI
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCH
J5
J6
MFI
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCHES
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
MFI
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCHES
MFI
MFI
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCHES
J5
J6
MFI
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCHES
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
MFI
DRIVE
POWER
SWITCHES
MR−0498−91RAGS
11–10 Completing the Model 610 and 612 System Installation
11.3 Power-On Tests
The processor, system I/O controller, and WAN modules each contain a
set of ROM-based diagnostic (RBD) tests that are invoked on a power-on
sequence. The processor diagnostics test the CPU, as well as memory,
the zone, and the system. When a failure is detected in any module, the
number of the test and a brief explanation of the failure are reported to
the console terminal.
If all tests on the processor, system I/O controller, and WAN modules
are successful, each processor module performs a series of zone tests
that include internal memory and I/O functions. If the zone tests are
successful (no detected errors), each processor module enters a restart
procedure that initializes the zone.
11.4 Final System Tests
All of the diagnostic software required by the system is provided in the
RBD tests described in Section 11.3.
The RBD command description in Chapter 6 of the VAXft Systems Owner’s
Manual (EK-VXFT1-OM) provides information and guidelines for writing
DSSI parameters to the storage devices under the DUP facility.
You may then want to run the user environment test package (UETP) as
a final check. Refer to the VMS Upgrade and Installation Supplement:
VAXft Systems for more information on installing and booting the VMS
operating system. The VAX/VMS UETP User’s Guide describes how to
log in and run UETP.
CAUTION
UETP can be configured to run write/read tests on the RF-series
disks. UETP should be run only at the completion of a system
installation because of the risk of corrupting data on shadowed
disks. Do not run UETP without contacting the responsible
customer representative or application manager.
When you are satisfied that the system is operating correctly, turn it over
to the responsible customer representative for installation and testing of
the application software.
A
Module Handling, Removal, and
Installation/Replacement Procedures
This appendix describes how to remove or install a logic module in a
system cabinet. This appendix includes:
•
Module handling and ESD procedures
•
Removing a module
•
Installing/replacing a module
NOTE
The following procedures are intended for use during system
installation. Before using any of these procedures on a system
that is running, you must first contact the responsible customer
representative, system manager, or application manager to shut
down the zone and power off the system cabinet.
A–1
A–2 Module Handling, Removal, and Installation/Replacement Procedures
Observe the module handling and ESD procedures (Section A.1) whenever
you need to remove, install, or replace a logic module in a system cabinet.
Refer to Chapter 5, Section 5.3.1 for module placement information.
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap, ground clip, and grounded ESD workmat
must be used as described in Section A.1 whenever you handle the
logic modules.
If you must use any of these procedures on a system that is running,
first contact the responsible customer representative, system manager,
or application manager to shut down the zone and power off the system
cabinet. The VAXft System Services Manager’s Guide (AA-NL35A-TE)
describes how to shut down the zone and power off the system cabinet
from the console.
A.1 Module Handling and ESD Procedures
Two grounding cords are stored in the lower front door of the system
cabinet (Figure 5–2) in the model 310, 410, 610, and 612 systems. (No
wrist strap is supplied with a model 110 rackmount system.) One cord
is connected to a wrist strap. The other cord is connected to a grounding
clip for attaching to an antistatic ESD box. When the wrist strap is in
place, there must be no more than 10 M through the grounding cord,
wrist strap, and your wrist.
T3000-series modules are very fragile and static sensitive. Use the
grounding cords and observe the following precautions when handling
logic modules.
•
Always put on a grounded wrist strap before handling a logic module.
•
Be sure that nothing touches the module or the components on the
module because leads can be damaged. Avoid contact with the wrist
strap, grounding cord, clothing, jewelry, cables, or other modules.
•
Minimize any potential for physical or ESD damage as follows:
— Remove all unnecessary materials in the service area (tools,
documents, paper, plastics, polystyrene).
— Avoid clothing that contains more than 80% nonconductive
materials (silk or synthetic fiber).
— Do not wear a jacket. Wear a short-sleeve shirt or roll up the
sleeves on a long-sleeve shirt.
— Do not wear jewelry.
Module Handling, Removal, and Installation/Replacement Procedures A–3
— Loose clothing, such as a necktie, must be fastened in place.
•
Before removing a module from an ESD box, place the box on a clean
surface. Do not allow the box to fall.
NOTE
Never place an ESD box on the floor.
•
Keep the module in the antistatic ESD box until you are ready to
install it.
•
Before removing a module from an ESD box, attach the grounding clip
to the ESD box.
•
If you are replacing a module, put the module you just removed on a
grounded ESD workmat on a clean surface in the service area. Put
the module side 2 down on the ESD workmat.
•
Save the ESD box for future use. Store a module in the ESD box until
you are ready to install it.
•
When removing or installing a module, be sure the module does not
come into contact with a cable or another module. And be sure that
nothing else touches the module or any module components.
•
Hold a module only by the handle or by the edges with your hands
flat and perpendicular to the circuit board. Do not touch the etch
circuit or any components, leads, or connector pins. Do not bend the
module.
•
Do not slide the module across any surface because the leads are
fragile and can be damaged.
•
An ESD sensitive module may come into contact with the following
items only:
— An approved ESD workmat
— Antistatic packaging on the ESD workmat
— Tools and test equipment on the ESD workmat
— The chassis being serviced
— The hands of someone wearing an ESD wrist strap
A–4 Module Handling, Removal, and Installation/Replacement Procedures
A.2 Removing a Module
To remove a module (or a T3999 blank module) from a system backplane:
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap, ground clip, and grounded ESD workmat
must be used as described in Section A.1 whenever you handle the
logic modules.
1. Locate the module to be removed. Attach the grounded wrist strap to
your wrist.
2. If the module has cables attached, remove the cables.
3. Release the fasteners at the top and bottom of the module handle.
Push in each fastener and turn it one quarter turn to the left.
4. Use both hands to remove the module. Pull the module levers to
disengage the backplane connector. You may hear a ‘‘snap’’ when the
connector disengages.
5. Grasp the module handle. Slide the module out of the card cage slot.
6. Put the module in an ESD box or grounded ESD workmat.
Module Handling, Removal, and Installation/Replacement Procedures A–5
A.3 Installing/Replacing a Module
To install/replace a module in the system backplane:
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap, ground clip, and grounded ESD workmat
must be used as described in Section A.1 whenever you handle the
logic modules.
1. Before removing the module from the ESD box, attach a grounding
clip to the ESD box.
2. Holding the module only by the handle, remove it from the ESD box.
Hold the module vertically with the backplane connector on the right.
3. Guide the edges of the module into the upper and lower tracks of
the card cage slot. Gently push the center of the module (near the
handle). Slide the module all the way into position.
4. Use both hands to seat the module. Press the module levers at the
top and bottom with equal force, starting with the bottom lever. You
may hear a ‘‘snap’’ when the module is fully seated.
5. Secure the fasteners at the top and bottom of the module handle.
Push in each fastener and turn it one quarter turn to the right.
6. Attach any cables that must be connected.
7. Make sure that the cables are connected correctly and verify your
installation procedures.
8. Contact the responsible customer representative, system manager, or
application manager before you power on the system cabinet.
9. When you are ready, power on the system cabinet by turning the ac
circuit breaker to the ON position.
B
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration
and Installation
This appendix describes the configuration requirements and explains how
to install a DEC WANcontroller 620 (WAN) module in a VAXft system.
B.1 Configuration
This section describes the configuration requirements.
B.1.1 Minimum Revisions
Before installing a WAN module into a VAXft system, the following
revision requirements must be met:
•
VMS 5.4-1 or later
•
FTSS V1.1 or later
•
WANDD 1.1B or later
•
T3004 N04 or later
B.1.2 Supported Layered Products
The following are the supported layered products:
•
VAX PSI
•
VAX 2780/3780
•
VMS SNA
•
DECnet Phase IV
B–1
B–2 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
B.1.3 Cable Requirements
Specific cables and loopbacks are required for different protocols. Refer
to Table B–1 to select the correct adapter cables, extension cables, and
loopbacks to support your protocol.
NOTE
To ensure compliance with British and European
telecommunications standards, each 100-pin connector on the
Y-box must be cabled to a T3004 module or terminated with a
100-pin terminator.
Table B–1 Adapter, Extension, and Loopback Cables
Protocol
Adapter
Cable
Extension
Cables
Length
(feet)
Loopbacks
RS422, V.11
BC19B-02
BC55D-XX
10, 25
H3198
RS232, V.24
BC19D-02
BC22F-XX
10, 25
H3248
RS423, V.10
BC19E-02
BC55D-XX
10, 25
H3198
V.35
BC19F-02
BC19L-XX
25
H3250
Figure B–1 illustrates how the cables are connected in a typical
configuration.
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–3
Figure B–1 Typical WAN Module Cabling
DSF32-AA OPTION KIT
DSF32-AB OPTION KIT
MI
BUS
MI
BUS
20-PIN
MONITOR
CABLE
WAN
MODULE
WAN
MODULE
LEFT
SYSTEM
CABINET
RIGHT
SYSTEM
CABINET
100-PIN
COMMUNICATIONS
CABLE (TWO)
COMM LINES)
100-PIN
COMMUNICATIONS
CABLE (TWO)
COMM LINES)
Y-BOX
TWO 50-PIN
DATA
INTERFACE
CABLES (TWO
COMM LINES)
TWO 50-PIN
EXTENSION
CABLES
MODEM
MODEM
MR_X1423_89.DG
B–4 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
B.1.4 Recommended Spares List
Recommended WAN module spare parts follow:
Description
Pins
Part No.
WAN module
T3004-AA
Y-box
70-27483-01
100-pin terminator
12-33191-01
100-pin cable
17-02390-01
20-pin cable
17-02740-01
BC19B — Personality cable RS422, V.11
50 to 37
17-01108-01
BC19D — Personality cable RS232, V.24
50 to 27
17-01110-01
BC19E — Personality cable RS423, V.10
50 to 34
17-01111-01
BC19F — Personality cable V.35
50 to 25
17-01112-01
B.1.5 Troubleshooting Tools
WAN module troubleshooting tools follow:
Description
Part No.
100-pin loopback connector
12-33192-011
20-pin loopback connector
12-33193-011
Universal loopback
12-25852-01 (H3199)
Personality loopback V.35
H3250
Personality loopback RS232, V24
H3248
Personality loopback RS422, 423, 449, V.11
12-26259-01 (H3198)
Personality loopback X.21
12-26811-01 (H3047)
1A
100-pin and 20-pin loopback ships with every WAN module.
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–5
B.1.6 Redundant Communications Using the WAN Module
The WAN module hardware and driver software provide synchronous
communications facilities for the VAXft systems. Use the Wide
Area Network Device Driver Failover Set Manager (WANDD$FSM)
software described in this manual to create and manage a WAN module
configuration that provides a redundant communications link.
Unlike the VAXft system Ethernet driver, the WAN module driver
does not automatically configure failover sets to provide a redundant
communications link. For the WAN module, use the WANDD$FSM
software to pair WAN modules and form the failover set. In a failover
set, one WAN module handles current network traffic and the second
WAN module remains in standby mode. If the first WAN module fails,
the software automatically attempts to switch to the second WAN module.
This switch is transparent to the operator, though system operators are
notified by OPCOM messages.
Once the failover sets are created and the system is started, enter the
DCL command:
$ SHOW DEVICES
Note that:
•
Each failover set has a device name of the form SFx (where x is a
single character)
•
Each physical WAN module has a device name of the form SMx (where
x is a single character)
For fault-tolerant purposes, the communications link is defined as coming
through the logical device (SFx), rather than through the specific physical
device (SMx).
Pair SMx devices with an SFx device to form the failover set. This can
be done by executing WANDD$FSM commands at system startup or by
entering WANDD$FSM commands later. Failover sets can have one of
three configurations:
•
Empty — failover set contains no WAN modules
•
Single — failover set contains one WAN module
•
Partnered — failover set contains two WAN modules
B–6 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
A failover set with only one WAN module is not fault tolerant. However,
failover sets can be created with only one WAN module to have separate
communications links, rather than occupying both WAN modules on just
one redundant link.
NOTE
Two WAN modules from the same zone cannot be configured in
the same failover set.
The failover set driver software constructs failover sets according to the
configuration received by the WANDD$FSM utility. This configuration
takes precedence over the physical cable configuration. When the
driver discovers the physical cable configuration does not match the
configuration given by WANDD$FSM, an error is reported through
OPCOM messages.
B.1.7 Recommended Configurations and Restrictions
The recommended configurations are based on the following principles:
•
Single failover sets have the same SF and SM controller letters in the
set (SMB, SFB).
•
Partnered failover sets have the SF controller letters based on the
zone A controller (SMB + SMG SFB).
•
Partnered failover sets have WAN modules located in the same slot in
each zone. See Figure B–2.
Table B–2 lists the recommended configurations.
Table B–2 Redundant Failover Set Configurations
Partnered SMs
Single SMs
SF Controller
Zone
SMB + SMG
SMB
SFB
A
SMC + SMH
SMC
SFC
A
SMD + SMI
SMD
SFD
A
SME + SMJ
SME
SFE
A
SMG
SFG
B
SMH
SFH
B
SMI
SFI
B
SMJ
SFJ
B
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–7
B.1.8 Physical Device Names
Figure B–2 shows how the WAN module physical device names relate to
the slots in the VAXft system backplane.
Figure B–2 WAN Module Physical Device Names and Related Slot
Assignments
ZONE A
ZONE B
MODULE SLOTS VAXft BACKPLANE
1
2
I/O
OR
SMB
I/O
3
CPU
4
5
MEM
MEM
OR
SME
6
MEM
OR
SMD
MODULE SLOTS VAXft BACKPLANE
7
1
2
3
MEM
OR
SMC
I/O
OR
SMG
I/O
CPU
4
5
6
7
MEM
MEM
OR
SMJ
MEM
OR
SMI
MEM
OR
SMH
20−PIN CABLE
100−PIN CABLE
100−PIN CABLE
Y−BOX
ZKO−050−000079−02−RGS
The external cabling between the WAN modules and respective Yboxes must match the configuration established by the failover set
manager (FSM). A failover set represents how the logical (SF) devices
are associated with the physical (SM) devices. In Figure B–2, SFC is
made up of SMC and SMH. See Table B–2.
B–8 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
B.1.9 Managing Failover Sets
WANDD$FSM provides four basic commands for managing failover sets:
•
ADD
•
REMOVE
•
MODIFY
•
SHOW
NOTE
To use the ADD, REMOVE, and MODIFY commands, you must
have OPER privilege. The supplied startup procedure installs
WANDD$FSM with SHARE privilege, which is also required to use
WANDD$FSM commands.
WANDD$FSM is used to:
•
Create the initial failover set configurations for a VAXft system
•
Reconfigure a failover set if a zone must be stopped for repairs
•
Reconfigure a failover set if both the WAN modules fail
•
Reassign failover set membership to take advantage of unused WAN
modules
•
Obtain information on failover set membership and status
WANDD$FSM commands are used in system startup procedures to
configure communication link failover sets. However, WANDD$FSM can
also be used interactively when the system is live.
To start WANDD$FSM, enter the command:
$ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:WANDD$FSM
WANDD$FSM>
To stop WANDD$FSM, enter the command:
WANDD$FSM> EXIT
$
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–9
WANDD$FSM can also be executed as a foreign command. To use the
foreign command line interface, use this DCL code:
$
$
$
$
$
! Define a symbol to be the name and location of the
! image - NOTE the preceding $
FSM = "$SYS$SYSTEM:WANDD$FSM"
! Now enter the Failover Set Management command as follows
FSM SHOW/ALL
.
.
.
$ ! Immediately returned to the $ prompt
This may be useful if you write DCL command procedures that invoke
WANDD$FSM.
B.2 Installation
This section describes how to install a DEC WANcontroller 620 (WAN)
module in a VAXft system.
B.2.1 Y-Box Mounting Methods
Figure B–3 shows Y-box mounting methods using the mounting bracket.
The mounting bracket kits (PN H043A) include screws to attach the first
Y-box. The Y-box housings have clips that allow two or more Y-boxes to be
mounted together on one bracket.
The top brackets are used for mounting on an office partition and are
removed for wall, floor, or cabinet mounting. Two loop/hook straps are
included with each kit for mounting on a pole. One or two straps may be
required, depending on the size of the pole.
B.2.2 Y-Box Cable Connections
Open the WAN module option kits and remove the 100-pin, 3.05-meter
(10-foot) cables. Carefully unroll each cable and mark both ends for zone
A or zone B.
Referring to Figure B–1, connect one end of each cable to the appropriate
Y-box connector. For nonredundant configurations, install the 100-pin
terminator on the unused Y-box connectors.
B–10 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
Route each cable under the base frame of a system cabinet. Bring the end
of each cable up through the access hole in the base frame.
Figure B–3 Y-Box Mounting Methods
POLE MOUNT
PARTITION MOUNT
HANGER BRACKET (1)
74-40553-01
6-32 FLAT-HEAD SCREWS (2)
90-06020-02
Y-BOX ASSEMBLY
BLY TO
* BT RO AACTKTEATC, HU SY E- B 6O-X1 9A PS AS NE M
-HEAD SCREWS
HOOK AND LOOP BELT
12-32660-01
*
(2)
ON UNDERSIDE OF UNIT.
CABINET MOUNT
J-NUTS (3)
90-06586-00
BRACKET (1)
74-40552-01
WALL OR FLOOR MOUNT
10-32 PAN-HEAD SCREWS (3)
90-06071-2
MR-0175-90.DG
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–11
B.2.3 WAN Module Installation
Section B.2.3.1 describes how to install the WAN module with the system
running. Section B.2.3.2 describes how to install the WAN module with
both zones shut down.
B.2.3.1 With System Running
Perform the following procedure:
1. Install the WAN DRIVERS V1.1B or later kit, ensuring a product
authorization key (PAK) is available.
2. Select the WAN module slots. Remember the recommended slot
partnership scheme. See Table B–2 and Figure B–2.
3. Enter the STOP/ZONE A (or targeted zone) command at the system
prompt.
4. Remove power.
5. Install the WAN modules into the selected slots in zone A. See
Table B–2 and Figure B–2.
6. Power up the system.
7. Enter the START/ZONE A command at the system prompt.
8. Wait for both zones to synchronize.
9. Enter the STOP/ZONE B command at the system prompt.
10. Remove power.
11. Install the WAN modules into the selected slots in zone B.
12. Connect the partnered WAN modules together with the 20-pin monitor
cable. See Figures B–1 and B–2.
13. Connect each WAN module in a partnered pair to the Y-box using two
100-pin cables.
B–12 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
14. Enter the START/ZONE B command at the system prompt.
15. Enter the SHOW DEV SM command to DCL to reveal the SM devices.
16. Edit SYS$STARTUP:SF$STARTUP to configure the failover sets. See
the example in Section B.2.4.
17. Enter the @SYS$STARTUP:SF$STARTUP command.
B.2.3.2 With Both Zones Shut Down
Perform the following procedure:
1. Install the WAN DRIVERS V1.1B or later kit, ensuring a PAK is
available.
2. Select the WAN module slots. Remember the recommended slot
partnership scheme. See Table B–2 and Figure B–2.
3. Shut down the system by entering the @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
command.
4. Remove power.
5. Install the WAN modules into the selected slots in zone A and zone B.
6. Power up the system.
7. Reboot the system.
8. Enter the SHOW DEV SM command to DCL to reveal the SM devices.
9. Connect the partnered pairs of WAN modules together with the 20-pin
monitor cable.
10. Connect each WAN module in a partnered pair to the Y-box using two
100-pin cables.
11. Edit SYS$STARTUP:SF$STARTUP to configure the failover sets. See
the example in Section B.2.4.
12. Enter the @SYS$STARTUP:SF$STARTUP command.
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–13
B.2.4 Example
This section provides an example of a WAN module installation.
Table B–3 describes the nonpaged pool requirements.
Table B–3 Nonpaged Pool Requirements
Module
Kbyte Requirements
SMdriver
1 Kbyte
# DSF modules
1 Kbyte =
SFdriver
# configured SF units
64 Kbytes
3.5 Kbyte =
Total nonpaged pool =
The installation requires 2200 free disk blocks. After the installation,
10,000 disk blocks are used for the files.
The following steps contain an example of a WAN module installation:
1. Insert a tape.
2. Enter @SYS$UPDATE:VMSINSTAL SYNC011 TAPE$MIA0: at the
system prompt.
B–14 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
3. Create the failover set for the WAN modules by performing the
following steps:
•
Ensure the VAX Wide Area Network Device Drivers software has
been installed.
•
Issue the DCL command:
$ SHOW DEVICES SM
This lists the WAN module devices installed on the system.
•
Decide which WAN modules are to be paired, remembering they
should be from different zones within the VAXft system. (The
system installation engineer can advise you on which devices are
in each zone.)
•
Edit the SF$STARTUP.COM file (found in SYS$STARTUP) to
include the WANDD$FSM ADD commands that create the failover
set at system startup.
The SF$STARTUP.COM file already contains an example template
of WANDD$FSM commands commented out. Enter your own
commands in place of, or following, the template commands.
DO NOT edit the rest of the procedure. This may cause the
configuration of the system to be incomplete.
•
The SYS$STARTUP.SF$STARTUP.COM should now look like the
following:
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–15
$ saved_verify = f$verify(0)
$ ! ****************************************************************************
$ ! *
*
$ ! * COPYRIGHT (c) 1990 BY
*
$ ! * DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION, MAYNARD, MASSACHUSETTS.
*
$ ! * ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
*
$ ! *
*
$ ! * THIS SOFTWARE IS FURNISHED UNDER A LICENSE AND MAY BE USED AND COPIED
*
$ ! * ONLY IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE TERMS OF SUCH LICENSE AND WITH THE
*
$ ! * INCLUSION OF THE ABOVE COPYRIGHT NOTICE. THIS SOFTWARE OR ANY OTHER
*
$ ! * COPIES THEREOF MAY NOT BE PROVIDED OR OTHERWISE MADE AVAILABLE TO ANY
*
$ ! * OTHER PERSON. NO TITLE TO AND OWNERSHIP OF THE SOFTWARE IS HEREBY
*
$ ! * TRANSFERRED.
*
$ ! *
*
$ ! * THE INFORMATION IN THIS SOFTWARE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
*
$ ! * AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED AS A COMMITMENT BY DIGITAL EQUIPMENT
*
$ ! * CORPORATION.
*
$ ! *
*
$ ! * DIGITAL ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE USE OR RELIABILITY OF ITS
*
$ ! * SOFTWARE ON EQUIPMENT WHICH IS NOT SUPPLIED BY DIGITAL.
*
$ ! *
*
$ ! ****************************************************************************
$ !
$ !
$ !
$ ! SF$STARTUP.COM - Load the DSF32 driver software for the VAXft 3000
$ ! This procedure should be invoked from SYS$MANAGER:SYCONFIG.COM by inserting
$ ! the line @SYS$STARTUP:SF$STARTUP.COM.
$ !
$ !
$ ! Set up some error handling
$ !
$ on error then goto errexit
$ on warning then goto errexit
$ on control_y then continue
$
$ !
$ ! useful symbols
$ !
$
$ ss$_duplnam = 148
$ sysgen = "$sys$system:sysgen"
$
$!
$! check that there are enough contiguous SPTEs for WANDD
$! and LES NETMAN
$!
$
operation = "findptmax"
$
run sys$system:les$findptmax
$
status = $status
$
if .not. status then goto errexit
$
spte_count = status/2
$
if spte_count .lt. 560
$
then
$ write sys$output "%WANDD-E-INSFPTS, Insufficient SPTEs to map WANDD
$
Exec extensions"
$ write sys$output "_
560 required, only ’’spte_count’ contiguous
$
SPTEs available."
$ write sys$output ""
$ write sys$output "Increase SYSGEN parameter SPTREQ to resolve this
$
problem."
$ write sys$output ""
$ goto errexit
B–16 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
endif
!
! Load microcode into non paged pool and point the SM driver DPT to it.
!
operation = "load firmware"
run sys$system:wandd$dsf$fw_load
!
! Load the WANDD support module.
!
load_support_module:
operation = "load support module"
run sys$system:wandd$services_load
!
! Create some SF devices
!
create_sf_devices:
device_string:==ABCDEFGHIJ
i=0
40$:
controller_letter = f$extract ( i, 1, device_string )
controller = "SM" + controller_letter
sf_controller = "SF" + controller_letter
if f$getdvi(controller,"exists") then call create_failover_set
’controller_letter
if controller .eqs. "SMJ" then goto 50$
i = i + 1
goto 40$
50$:
!
! Install WANDD$FSM.EXE with SHARE privilege
!
if .not. f$file("sys$system:wandd$fsm.exe", "known") then install add sys$system:wandd$fsm /priv=share/log
!
! The next section of this procedure contains template commands for setting up
! the failover sets for your system. You should add commands to this
! procedure to create the appropriate failover sets for your system.
!
! See the Failover Set Management Utility Reference Manual for more
! information
!
Fsm = "$sys$system:wandd$fsm"1
1 See Table B-2 for the redundant failover set configurations.
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–17
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
! 2 Non-fault tolerant lines : SFB0,SFB1
FSM ADD SMB SFB
! 4 Fault tolerant lines : SFC0,SFC1,SFD0,SFD1
FSM ADD SMC,SMH SFC
FSM ADD SMD,SMI SFD
! displays all configured failover sets
FSM SHOW/ALL/FULL
!
temp = f$verify(’saved_verify’)
exit
!
! Subroutine to sysgen connect to SF units for an SM device
!
create_failover_set: Subroutine
sfdevice = "SF" + p1 + "0"
smdevice = "SM" + p1 + "0"
if (f$getdvi(smdevice,"sts") .eq. 0)
then
write sys$output "’’smdevice’ paired with ’’sfdevice’"
sysgen conn ’sfdevice/noada
endif
sfdevice = "SF" + p1 + "1"
smdevice = "SM" + p1 + "1"
if (f$getdvi(smdevice,"sts") .eq. 0)
then
write sys$output "’’smdevice’ paired with ’’sfdevice’"
sysgen connect ’sfdevice/noadap
endif
exit
Endsubroutine
!
! Error handler
!
errexit:
!
! Anything but ss$_duplnam bad news
!
if $status .ne. ss$_duplnam
then
write sys$output "Failed to start up SF devices"
exit $status
else
!
! Re-establish error handler
!
on error then goto errexit
on warning then goto errexit
!
! Resume processing at correct place
!
if operation .eqs. "load firmware"
then
goto load_support_module
else
goto create_sf_devices
endif
endif
B–18 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
4. Edit the SYSTARTUP_V5.COM file (found in SYS$STARTUP) and
include the line:
@SYS$STARTUP:SF$STARTUP.COM
The WANDD$FSM commands execute at system reboot (unless
autoconfiguration of the system is prohibited) or when the
SF$STARTUP.COM is run interactively. (For more information on
prohibiting autoconfiguration, see the Guide to Setting Up a VMS
System.) The WANDD$FSM commands create the failover set and
complete the configuration of the fault-tolerant communications link.
5. Enter the @SYS$STARTUP:SF$STARTUP command.
6. Run FSM. See Section B.1.9.
7. Use the following command to show the failover sets:
WANDD$FSM> SHOW SFE
Failover set SFE contains two devices in different zones.
Cable state is bad.
Physical
Adapter
-------SME
SMC
Adapter
State
------Current
Standby
Device
State
-----Initialized
Initialized
Cable Partner
20 Pin /100 Pin
--------------None
None
None
None
8. Force failover by issuing a STOP/ZONE command to the current
physical adapter. This causes the standby adapter to become current.
DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation B–19
B.2.5 Troubleshooting with FSM
This section describes how to use the FSM SHOW command to determine
cable states, adapter states, device states, and partnered failover sets.
SHOW
[logical-adapter]
WANDD$FSM> SHOW/FULL SFB
Failover set SFB contains two devices in the same zone.
Cable state is good.
Physical
Adapter
-------SMD
SMB
Adapter
State
------Current
Standby
Device
State
-----Initialized
Initialized
Cable Partner
20 Pin /100 Pin
--------------SMB
SMB
SMD
SMD
The FSM SHOW fields may contain the following information:
•
The name of the failover set. This is a device name beginning with
the letters SF.
•
The number of WAN modules in the failover set with additional
information for partnered configurations. The information displayed
can include the following configuration details:
— Empty — failover set does not contain any WAN modules.
— One device — failover set contains one WAN module.
— Two devices in the same zone — failover set contains two WAN
modules. Both WAN modules are installed in the same zone.
— Two devices in different zones — failover set contains two WAN
modules. The WAN modules are in different zones. This is the
ideal configuration for fault-tolerant operation.
•
For partnered configurations, a cable configuration diagnostic is
displayed. The information displayed can include the following
information:
— Cable state is good — WAN modules in the failover set are
physically partnered to each other through the 20-pin and 100-pin
connections.
— Cable state is bad — WAN modules in the failover set are not
cabled to each other. The cable partner column in the /FULL
display details the cabling arrangement of the failover set
members. This message also sounds the terminal bell to warn
of the incorrect cabling.
B–20 DEC WANcontroller 620 Configuration and Installation
— Cable state is indeterminate — software drivers cannot determine
how the WAN modules are cabled. This situation can arise, for
example, if one of the zones containing a failover set member loses
power.
•
Physical adapter — physical adapter field lists each of the WAN
modules currently in the failover set. WAN module membership is
defined by WANDD$FSM.
•
Adapter state — adapter state field informs the system manager
about the current state of WAN modules in the failover set. The
information displayed can include the following states:
— Current — this WAN module is the currently active WAN module
for this failover set.
— Standby — this WAN module is currently in the standby state.
It is made current if the ‘‘Current’’ WAN module fails or if the
MODIFY command is issued for this failover set.
— Failed — this WAN module has been failed by software. The
cause of the failure is usually related to a WAN module hardware
problem.
•
Device state — device state field displays the current state of the
WAN module hardware in the failover set. The information displayed
can include the following states:
— Initialized — WAN module hardware and microcode have passed
device initialization tests.
— Not initialized — WAN module hardware and microcode failed to
initialize correctly.
•
Cable partner — cable partner field displays the name of the other
WAN module to which a WAN module is connected. A WAN module
is connected to another WAN module by a 20-pin cable and a 100-pin
cable. The information displayed can include the following:
— SMx — name of the WAN module to which this WAN module is
paired. The display includes the 20-pin and 100-pin partner, and
these two should be the same.
— None — displayed if the 20-pin or 100-pin cable is not currently
connected to another WAN module.
— Unknown — displayed if the cable configuration cannot be
determined; for example, if the zone containing one of the WAN
modules is currently stopped.
C
System Drive Removal and Replacement
This appendix describes how to remove or insert system storage devices.
This appendix includes:
•
Removing a system drive
•
Replacing or installing a drive
•
Power-on procedures
•
Using the server setup switch
NOTE
The model 110 system drives are installed internally. Refer to the
VAXft Systems Maintenance Guide for removal and replacement
procedures.
C–1
C–2 System Drive Removal and Replacement
C.1 Removing a System Drive
You do not need to power off the cabinet to remove a system drive. To
remove a cannister or carrier drive from the system backplane:
1. Write protect a disk drive by pressing the summary panel Write
Protect switch in. The Write Protect indicator should be on.
Then take the disk drive off-line by pressing the summary panel On
Line switch in.
The summary panel switches have no effect on the cannister tape
drives. Tape may be write protected by setting the Write Protect
switch on the TK cartridge.
2. Set the drive power switch to off (0). Wait 15 to 20 seconds (for disk
drive to stop spinning and interlock solenoid to release).
3. Attach the grounded wrist strap to your wrist.
CAUTION
Use great care when removing, replacing, or transporting a
drive. Do not drop the drive or allow it to come into contact
with any object while you carry it.
Always wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove or
replace a tape or disk drive.
4. If you are removing a cannister drive, see Figure C–1. Push the drive
latch down and pull the drive straight out of the slot.
If you are removing a carrier drive, see Figure C–2. Release the
captive thumb screw. Then pull the drive straight out of the slot.
5. If you are not replacing the drive with another, a blank cannister or
carrier module must be inserted in the slot to maintain cooling airflow.
System Drive Removal and Replacement
Figure C–1 Cannister Drive Controls and Drive Latch
10%
CANNISTER DRIVE
POWER
SWITCH
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
SU
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
DRIVE
LATCH
MR-0183-90.DG
C–3
C–4 System Drive Removal and Replacement
Figure C–2 Carrier Drive Controls and Captive Thumb Screw
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
SU
CAPTIVE
THUMB
SCREW
POWER
SWITCH
MR-0184-90.DG
System Drive Removal and Replacement
C–5
C.2 Replacing or Installing a Drive
To insert a cannister or carrier drive in the system backplane:
1. If you are installing a drive, first remove the cannister or carrier
module that occupies the slot.
2. Attach the grounded wrist strap to your wrist.
CAUTION
Carrier drives must not be removed, except by qualified
maintenance personnel.
Always wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove or
replace a tape or disk drive.
3. Insert the drive in the slot. Push the drive straight in and seat it
firmly.
4. A cannister drive must have the drive latch secured as shown in
Figure C–1.
A carrier drive must be secured with the captive thumb screw shown
in Figure C–2.
C.3 Power-On Procedures
When you remove a disk or tape drive and then replace it in the same
slot, the drive keeps the same unit number and DSSI node address.
Power on the drive as follows:
1. Set the drive power switch to on (1). Wait 15 to 20 seconds (for disk
drive to come up to speed and Ready indicator to turn on).
2. Write protect the drive, if necessary. Then bring the drive on-line by
releasing the On Line switch (button out).
The summary panel switches have no effect on the cannister tape
drives. Tape is write protected by setting the Write Protect switch on
the TK cartridge.
C–6 System Drive Removal and Replacement
C.4 Using the Server Setup Switch
The server setup (SU) switch is provided for use on a running system and
has no effect when the system is halted.
CAUTION
The server setup switch must only be used during maintenance
procedures.
Using the server setup switch when you power on a drive inhibits the
drive from joining the DSSI cluster. This allows the console operator to
set host from DCL and write DSSI parameters to the drive under the
diagnostic/utility protocol (DUP) facility without halting the system.
DSSI parameters must be set whenever you install a tape or disk drive
with unknown parameters. Placing a drive in service without first writing
the parameters could cause irretrievable loss of data. You must write
DSSI parameters if the drive you are installing or replacing is:
•
A new drive with factory-set parameters.
•
An existing drive with a new DSSI controller/interface module.
The diagnostics chapter of the VAXft Systems Maintenance Guide (EKVXFT1-MG) provides information on setting host from DCL. The RBD
command description in Chapter 6 of the VAXft Systems Owner’s Manual
(EK-VXFT1-OM) provides information and guidelines for writing DSSI
parameters to the storage devices under the DUP facility.
If you are going to set drive parameters on a running system, power on
the drive as follows:
1. Press and hold the server setup switch.
2. Set the power switch to on (1).
3. Release the server setup switch.
It takes 15 to 20 seconds for a disk drive to come up to speed and the
Ready light to turn on (light). Then set the drive switches as follows:
1. Place a disk drive on-line by releasing the summary panel On-Line
button to the out position.
2. Write-enable a disk drive by releasing the summary panel Write
Protect button to the out position.
3. The summary panel switches and indicators have no effect on a tape
drive.
System Drive Removal and Replacement
C–7
When you have set host and written the DSSI parameters, place the drive
in service as follows:
1. Set the drive power switch to off (0).
2. Wait a few seconds for the drive power to bleed off. Wait 15 to 20
seconds for a disk drive to stop spinning.
3. Set the drive power switch to on (1). Wait 15 to 20 seconds for a disk
drive to come up to speed and the Ready indicator to turn on (light).
4. Set the Write Protect switch to the desired state and add the drive
into the system configuration.
D
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System
Site Preparation and Installation
This appendix describes the procedure for OEM customers to mount
model 310 and 410 BA22 boxes into custom 19-inch cabinets.
The VAXft system is offered in two basic mounting styles: office pedestal
and OEM rackmount. The processor and mass storage expanders are
contained in BA22-style equipment boxes.
The office pedestal is designed to operate in office or computer room
environments and has the following features:
•
Enclosure skins and covers
•
Split-entry front door
•
Base casters
The OEM rackmount box version differs from the office pedestal version:
•
No skins or covers
•
Rackmount base instead of base casters
•
Operates with ac power or optional H407-B dc front-end module
The rackmount base ensures support for the transformer and allows
spacing for required airflow. The rackmount base provides:
•
Separate air paths between the units
•
Mounting support for a lifting device, such as a forklift
D–1
D–2 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
The rackmount option consists of:
•
Attached rackmount assembly
•
Front cover
•
Instructions
D.1 Design Concerns
The design concerns for rackmount installation into a custom cabinet are:
•
Unit weight
•
Unit dimensions
•
Center of gravity
•
Rack construction
•
Heat and airflow management
•
Data cable management
•
Grounding considerations
•
Power distribution
D.1.1 Unit Weight
Each model 310 and 410 BA22 box can weigh up to 108 kg (240 lb)
for the processor box and up to 122 kg (270 lb) for the mass storage
expander box. Therefore, the cabinet’s 19-inch Radio-ElectronicsTelevision Manufacturers Association (RETMA) rail system must be
designed to handle a hang weight of 231 kg (510 lb) (one BA22 processor
and one BA22 expander box mounted on a one rail system), plus a safety
margin. It is recommended the final rail assembly with two BA22 boxes
be designed to withstand a 10 gravity peak, 10-ms shock pulse in the
vertical plane.
Another concern while handling the BA22 boxes is safety. When rack
mounting the BA22 boxes into the cabinet, use a lifting device. The
suggested lifting device is a flat-blade forklift.
CAUTION
The BA22 boxes must be picked up from the bottom. Never use
any sort of hook or try to lift the unit by its skins.
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–3
D.1.2 Unit Dimensions
The VAXft system BA22 boxes are designed to be mounted into 19-inch
RETMA rail cabinets. If your cabinet does not have a 19-inch RETMA rail
system, design a conversion bracket. For example, many phone company
racks are based on a 1-inch center hole pattern, so conversion brackets
have to be custom made.
The dimensions for the model 310 and 410 BA22 boxes are:
•
60.96 cm (24.0 in) height of main box
•
66.14 cm (26.04 in) height of main box plus rackmount base
•
44.55 cm (17.54 in) width of main box (inside of rails)
•
46.78 cm (18.42 in) width of main box (flange to flange)
•
29.90 cm (11.77 in) depth plus 10.16 cm (4.0 in) for the rackmount
base extension in the rear
See Figures D–1 and D–2 for front views. See Figure D–3 for the rail hole
pattern. See Figure D–4 for a side view.
D.1.3 Center of Gravity
As seen in Figures D–1 and D–2, the BA22 boxes are 29.90 cm (11.77
in) deep. Therefore, much of the center of gravity is toward the front
rail system. If your cabinet is, for example, 121.9 cm (48.0 in) deep, the
center of gravity is in the front quarter of the cabinet, causing a possible
tip hazard. If you use a cabinet 76.2 cm (30.0 in) wide by 152.4 cm (60.0
in) high by 66.14 cm (26.04 in) deep, the center of gravity is acceptable
at approximately 35.56 cm (14.0 in) from the front of the cabinet. See
Figures D–5 and D–6.
If deep cabinets (for example, 121.9 cm (48.0 in)) are used, and if
no equipment is going to be mounted on the cabinet’s rear rails to
counterbalance the front load of the BA22 boxes, an anti-tip front foot
plate must be used if the cabinet is mounted on casters. If the cabinet is
bolted to the floor, an anti-tip plate can be omitted. In either case, the
shipping skid must be designed to handle the cabinet’s center of gravity
correctly and not accidentally tip while being moved.
D–4 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure D–1 Model 310 and 410 BA22A Box, Front View
44.55 cm
(17.54 in)
TOP VIEW
29.89 cm
(11.77 in)
46.78 cm
(18.42 in)
46.51 cm
(18.31 in)
STANDARD 19-INCH RACKMOUNT
EIA MOUNTING HOLES
CENTER TO CENTER
MOUNTING
FLANGE
66.14 cm
(26.04 in)
5.08 cm
(2.0 in)
RACKMOUNT
BASE
44.55 cm
(17.54 in)
MR_0539_90.DG
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–5
Figure D–2 Model 310 and 410 BA22B Box, Front View
44.55 cm
(17.54 in)
TOP VIEW
29.89 cm
(11.77 in)
46.78 cm
(18.42 in)
46.51 cm
(18.31 in)
EIA MOUNTING HOLES CENTER TO CENTER
60.96 cm
(24.0 in)
RACKMOUNT
BASE
5.08 cm
(2.0 in)
FRONT VIEW
EXPANDER BOX
MR−0544−90.RAGS
D–6 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure D–3 Model 310 and 410 Flange Mounting Holes
MOUNTING FLANGE
TOP
46.51 cm
(18.31 in)
EIA MOUNTING HOLES CENTER TO CENTER
3.33 cm
(1.31 in)
TAPE OR
DISK
8.89 cm
(3.50 in)
21.91 cm
(8.63 in)
40.96 cm
(16.13 in)
DC BOX
49.85 cm
(19.63 in)
60.96 cm
(24.00 in)
5.08 cm
( 2.00 in)
AC BOX
SUPPORT
BRACKET
BOTTOM
RACKMOUNT BASE
FLANGE MOUNTING HOLES
2.86 cm
(1.12 in)
MAX
MR−0546−90.RAGS
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–7
Figure D–4 Model 310 and 410 BA22 Box, Side View
10.16 cm
(4.0 in)
30.12 cm
(11.86 in)
REAR
FRONT
66.14 cm
(26.04 in)
RACKMOUNT BASE
SIDE VIEW
5.08 cm
(2.0 in)
MR−0545−90.RAGS
D–8 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure D–5 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount Example, Front View
70-24742-02 FRAME
46.51 cm
(18.31 in)
CABLE
AREA
CABLE
TO
RIGHT
HOLE 54
.64 cm
(.25 in)
152.4 cm
(60.0 in) MUST SIT ON
MOUNTING
ANGLE BRACKETS
SHELF CAN BE
AN L BRACKET
TO REAR RAILS.
REQUIRED
MINIMUM SPACE
FOR AIR
CIRCULATION
CABLE
TO
RIGHT
HOLE 9
BASE COVER
(AIR PLENUM)
MR_0542_90.DG
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–9
Figure D–6 Rackmount Example, Side View
TOP
FRONT RAIL
VAXft 3000
BA22 BOX
RACKMOUNT BASE
OEM DESIGNED
SUPPORT
ANGLE BRACKETS
FRONT
REAR
INDENT FRONT RAILS
SO THAT DOOR CAN
OPERATE
(IF THERE IS A
FRONT RACK DOOR).
REAR RAIL
BOTTOM
PLACE CENTER OF
GRAVITY NEAR CABINET
CENTER OF GRAVITY.
MR_0541_90.DG
D–10 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
D.1.4 Rack Construction
Many 19-inch RETMA rail racks are not designed to support a heavy
weight on the front rail system alone. Such racks are designed to hold
front to back equipment boxes where the box weight is distributed
between the front and rear rails. See Figure D–7. This distribution
makes sure the cabinet does not flex.
The VAXft system BA22 boxes are designed to be mounted on the front
and rear rail system. See Figures D–4, D–6, and D–7. The front flanges
are designed for a RETMA hole pattern. The unit sits on an integral
rackmount base assembly that extends 10.16 cm (4.0 in) beyond the
rear of the box (Figure D–4). The BA22 boxes must be supported by a
customer-designed right angle bracket that connects to the front and rear
mounting rack rails (Figure D–6).
CAUTION
Never mount the BA22 boxes by the front mounting flanges only.
Always include supporting angle brackets so that the weight can
be distributed to the rear rail system. The front mounting flanges
can be damaged without the use of the angle brackets.
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–11
Figure D–7 Traditional Rackmount, Side View
TOP
REAR RAIL
FRONT RAIL
SLIDES
REAR
FRONT
TYPICAL 48.26 cm (19.0 in)
RACKMOUNT FOR
CONVENTIONAL BOX-MOUNTED
EQUIPMENT ON SLIDES.
BOTTOM
MR_0540_90.DG
D–12 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
D.1.5 Heat and Airflow Management
The maximum power for each model 310 and 410 BA22 box is 750
W, or 2557 Btus. It is recommended that the cabinet be designed for
the maximum configuration per the user’s environment (temperature,
humidity).
The tested operating ranges for the VAXft system are:
•
10°C to 40°C (50°F to 104°F)
•
10% to 90% RH noncondensing
•
28°C (82°F) maximum wet-bulb temperature
•
2°C (36°F) minimum dew point
It is recommended that the rack environment be near the middle of the
tested operating ranges. This would be in the area of 40% to 60% RH,
and 18.3°C to 23.8°C (75°F to 65°F).
The rackmount system BA22 boxes come with a rackmount base. The
base adds 5.08 cm (2.0 in) to the overall height of the unit and 10.16 cm
(4.0 in) to the overall depth (Figures D–1 through D–4). The rackmount
base adds the 10.16 cm (4.0 in) so air can be baffled correctly. If the rack
has enough free airspace surrounding the BA22 boxes, a flushing fan is
not needed inside the rack.1
Initial tests of two boxes mounted in a one and one-half bay cabinet with
dimensions of 152.4 cm (60.0 in) height, 76.2 cm (30.0 in) width, and 66.04
cm (26.0 in) depth showed a flushing fan is not needed provided that the
ambient temperature is held below 40°C (104°F). If the rack has smaller
dimensions, some sort of blower, heat exchanger, or active cooling (air
conditioner) needs to be considered.
The cabinet rackmount and airflow design depends on the following
factors:
•
Internal Btus generated in the cabinet
•
Temperature differential between the inside of the cabinet and outside
of the cabinet
•
Surface area of all the outside walls of the cabinet
•
Whether cabinet rack walls are insulated or not insulated
•
Mounting configuration of the BA22 boxes within the cabinet
1
If a flushing fan is used, the BA22 airflow is from top to bottom.
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–13
•
Airspace within the cabinet
•
Air vents on the front and rear doors or panels
D.1.5.1 Internal Btus
The internal Btus generated by a dual zone VAXft system mounted in a
single cabinet would be a maximum of 750 W 2 zones 3.41 equals
5115 Btus. A 20 percent safety factor should be added to this.
Therefore, a maximum system cabinet should be designed to remove 6138
Btus of heat (one cabinet with two processor cabinets or one cabinet with
a processor and expander cabinet).
D.1.5.2 Air Vents
The air intake slots in the front rack door should be a minimum of 225.82
cm (35.0 sq in) to allow for adequate intake airflow. This is also true for
the rear cabinet exhaust panel or door.
D.1.6 Data Cable Management
All cables connect to the VAXft system BA22 boxes by means of the front
module panels, DSSI cable bulkheads, and console bulkheads. This means
all cable routing must be addressed from the front of the units.
Figure D–8 shows the recommended cable routing.
If the BA22 boxes are mounted in a 152.4 cm (60.0 in) high rack, there
is no room between the BA22 boxes for the routing of cables. All I/O
cables must be routed to the right or left sides. Cross-link cables must be
mounted vertically.
If the BA22 boxes are mounted in a 165.1 cm (65.0 in) or higher rack,
cables may be routed between the BA22 boxes.
D–14 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure D–8 Model 310 and 410 Cable Routing, Front View
FRONT VIEW
IF CABINET IS
165.1 cm (65.0 in)
OR TALLER,
CABLE UP/DOWN.
BASE COVER
(AIR PLENUM)
LEAVE OPENING
BETWEEN UNITS
FOR CABLING.
BASE COVER
(AIR PLENUM)
MR_0543_90.DG
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–15
D.1.7 Grounding Considerations
It is important to have a common ground for both of the BA22 boxes
mounted in a rack assembly. The following rules apply:
•
Mounting rails should be conductive, so there is ground contact
between the upper BA22 front mounting rails and the bottom BA22
front mounting rails.
•
If the rails are to be painted, consult with Digital Equipment
Corporation.
•
The mounting rails should be connected to a cabinet ground.
•
In multiple cabinet systems, all cabinet grounds must be tied together.
D.1.8 Power Distribution
The VAXft system BA22 box is designed to operate on 120 Vac or 240 Vac,
or on a 48 Vdc bus.
Each model 310 and 410 BA22 box has its own power cord. Each cord is
rated for a 12 A, 120 Vac outlet or 6 A, 240 Vac outlet, maximum. These
are standard wall outlets.
The one major concern when adding power controllers to a cabinet or rack
is that a single point of failure should be avoided. For example, it would
be easy to add a 30 A, 120 Vac rated power controller to the cabinet for
120 Vac systems and plug both BA22 boxes into the one power controller.
This is fine, but by doing this, a single point of failure is introduced — the
power controller. If the relays or EMI/RFI filter fail, both BA22 boxes go
down.
D–16 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
D.2 Optional H407-B DC Power Supply Connections
Tables D–1 and D–2 list the dc power requirements for the H407-B dc
power supply.
Table D–1 H407-B DC Input Power Requirements
Input Operating Voltage
Minimum
40 Vdc
Maximum
75 Vdc
Input Transient Voltage
200 V
For 1 µs
Input Undervoltage
0 to 40 Vdc
With no system damage
Table D–2 H407-B DC Output Power Requirements
Output Operating Voltage
Minimum
38 Vdc at minimum input operating voltage
Maximum
75 Vdc at maximum input operating voltage
Output Operating Currents
Output voltage
Output Current (Maximum)
38 Vdc
15 A
48 Vdc
12.5 A
60 Vdc
10 A
73 Vdc
8A
Auxiliary Bias Outputs
Specification
Value
Minimum +5 V output
voltage
4.75 Vdc at full input operating voltage and full
output current
Maximum +5 V output
voltage
5.25 Vdc at full input operating voltage and full
output current
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–17
Table D–2 (Continued) H407-B DC Output Power Requirements
Minimum +5 V output
current
0A
Maximum +5 V output
current
1.5 A
Minimum +12 V output
voltage
11.4 Vdc at full input operating voltage and full
output current
Maximum +12 V output
voltage
12.6 Vdc at full input operating voltage and full
output current
Minimum +12 V output
current
0A
Maximum +12 V output
current
0.4 A
NOTE
The H407-B dc power cable has a connector on one end that
attaches to the H407-B dc power supply on the VAXft system. The
other end of the dc power cable does not have connectors. The
outer jacket of the cable at the nonconnector end has been cut
back to expose three color-coded wire leads (brown, blue, and
green).
Perform the following procedure to install the H407-B dc power cable:
1. Attach the connector end of the dc cable (PN 17-03129-01) to the dc
connector on the H407-B dc power supply. See Figure D–9.
2. Attach the color-coded wire leads at the other end of the dc cable to a
48 Vdc source as follows:
•
Brown — to 48 Vdc source
•
Blue — to return
•
Green — to ground
D–18 Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure D–9 H407-B DC Power Supply Connections
48 Vdc
BOX
GREEN
BROWN
CONNECTOR
DC CABLE
BLUE
MR−0394−91RAGS
Model 310 and 410 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation D–19
D.3 Summary
The OEM designer should use the following guidelines when designing a
19-inch cabinet rack for the model 310 and 410 systems:
•
Use the rackmount version of the VAXft system. Do not try to convert
an office version, since the office version is not supplied with the
appropriate rackmount base.
•
Two BA22 boxes weigh up to 108 kg (240 lb) for the processor BA22,
plus 122 kg (270 lb) for the expander BA22, for a total of 231 kg
(510 lb). The cabinet and rail system must be designed to support
this weight plus a safety margin. Both the front and rear rails must
be used to distribute the weight. A custom mounting shelf or angle
brackets must be designed by the OEM customer to do this.
•
The BA22 boxes are shallow (29.89 cm or 11.77 in). Consider the
cabinet’s center of gravity, especially during transportation.
•
The maximum heat generated by a single BA22 box is 2557 Btus.
A single 60-inch cabinet could be designed to hold two BA22 boxes,
therefore generating 5115 Btus. It is suggested a 20 percent safety
factor be added to this resulting in a 6138 Btu design center,
maximum.
•
A minimum of 225.82 sq cm (35.0 sq in) must be allowed for air intake
vent open area (total slot size open area). The same is true for the
exhaust area.
•
If the air temperature outside of the cabinet is expected to be above
the range of 18.3°C to 23.8°C (65°F to 75°F), active cooling such as
industrial cabinet air conditioners should be investigated.
•
Airflow in the BA22 boxes is from top to bottom. If cabinet flushing
fans are needed as a result of airflow studies, the flushing fans should
not work against the BA22 airflow.
•
The use of a single power controller for two BA22s within the same
19-inch cabinet can introduce a single point of failure.
•
Grounding is very important. Use conductive mounting rails.
E
Model 110 Rackmount System Site
Preparation and Installation
This appendix describes the procedure for OEM customers to mount
model 110 BA22 boxes into custom 19-inch cabinets.
The VAXft system is offered in two basic mounting styles: office pedestal
and OEM rackmount. The processor and mass storage expanders are
contained in BA22-style equipment boxes.
The office pedestal is designed to operate in office or computer room
environments and has the following features:
•
Enclosure skins and covers
•
Base casters
The OEM rackmount box version differs from the office pedestal version:
•
No skins or covers
•
Rackmount chassis
The rackmount option consists of:
•
Attached rackmount assembly
•
Instructions
E–1
E–2 Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
E.1 Design Concerns
The design concerns for rackmount installation into a custom cabinet are:
•
Unit weight
•
Unit dimensions
•
Center of gravity
•
Rack construction
•
Heat and airflow management
•
Data cable management
•
Grounding considerations
•
Power distribution
E.1.1 Unit Weight
Each model 110 BA22 box can weigh up to 68 kg (151 lb) for the processor
box. Therefore, the cabinet’s 19-inch Radio-Electronics-Television
Manufacturers Association (RETMA) rail system must be designed to
handle a hang weight of 136 kg (302 lb) (two BA22 processors on a one
rail system), plus a safety margin. It is recommended the final rail
assembly with two BA22 boxes be designed to withstand a 10 gravity
peak, 10-ms shock pulse in the vertical plane.
Another concern while handling the BA22 boxes is safety. When rack
mounting the BA22 boxes into the cabinet, use a lifting device. The
suggested lifting device is a flat-blade forklift.
CAUTION
The BA22 boxes must be picked up from the bottom. Never use
any sort of hook or try to lift the unit by its skins.
Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation E–3
E.1.2 Unit Dimensions
The VAXft system BA22 boxes are designed to be mounted into 19-inch
RETMA rail cabinets. If your cabinet does not have a 19-inch RETMA rail
system, design a conversion bracket. For example, many phone company
racks are based on a 1-inch center hole pattern, so conversion brackets
have to be custom made.
The dimensions for the model 110 BA22 boxes are:
•
63.83 cm (25.13 in) height of main box
•
44.55 cm (17.54 in) width of main box (inside of rails)
•
47.78 cm (18.81 in) width of main box (flange to flange)
•
30.48 cm (12.00 in) depth plus 10.16 cm (4.0 in) for the rackmount
base extension in the rear
See Figure E–1 for a front view. See Figure E–2 for the rail hole pattern.
See Figure E–3 for a side view.
E.1.3 Center of Gravity
As seen in Figure E–1, the BA22 box is 30.48 cm (12.00 in) deep.
Therefore, much of the center of gravity is toward the front rail system. If
your cabinet is, for example, 121.9 cm (48.0 in) deep, the center of gravity
is in the front quarter of the cabinet, causing a possible tip hazard. If you
use a cabinet 76.2 cm (30.0 in) wide by 152.4 cm (60.0 in) high by 66.14
cm (26.04 in) deep, the center of gravity is acceptable at approximately
35.56 cm (14.0 in) from the front of the cabinet. See Figures E–4 and E–5.
If deep cabinets (for example, 121.9 cm (48.0 in)) are used, and if
no equipment is going to be mounted on the cabinet’s rear rails to
counterbalance the front load of the BA22 boxes, an anti-tip front foot
plate must be used if the cabinet is mounted on casters. If the cabinet is
bolted to the floor, an anti-tip plate can be omitted. In either case, the
shipping skid must be designed to handle the cabinet’s center of gravity
correctly and not accidentally tip while being moved.
E–4 Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure E–1 Model 110 BA22A Box, Front View
TOP VIEW
30.48 cm
(12.00 in)
46.78 cm
(18.42 in)
46.51 cm
(18.31 in)
STANDARD 19-INCH RACKMOUNT
EIA MOUNTING HOLES
CENTER TO CENTER
62.89 CM
(24.79 IN)
MOUNTING
FLANGE
44.55 CM
(17.54 IN)
MR-0651-91DG
Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation E–5
Figure E–2 Model 110 Flange Mounting Holes
TOP
MOUNTING FLANGE
46.51 cm
(18.31 in)
EIA MOUNTING HOLES CENTER TO CENTER
3.33 cm
(1.31 in)
8.89 cm
(3.50 in)
21.91 cm
(8.75 in)
41.28 cm
(16.25 in)
AC BOX
50.17 cm
(19.75 in)
62.89 cm
(24.79 in)
FLANGE MOUNTING HOLES
BOTTOM
MR-0643-91DG
E–6 Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure E–3 Model 110 BA22 Box, Side View
30.48 cm
(12.00 in)
FRONT
REAR
62.89 cm
(24.79 in)
SIDE VIEW
MR-0644-91DG
Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation E–7
Figure E–4 Model 110 Rackmount Example, Front View
46.51 cm
(18.31 in)
CABLE
AREA
CABLE
TO
RIGHT
HOLE 54
152.4 CM
(60.0 in)
MUST SIT ON
MOUNTING
ANGLE BRACKETS
SHELF CAN BE
AN L BRACKET
TO REAR RAILS.
CABLE
TO
RIGHT
HOLE 9
70-24742-02 FRAME
90%
MR-0653-91DG
E–8 Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure E–5 Rackmount Example, Side View
TOP
FRONT RAIL
VAXft 3000
BA22 BOX
RACKMOUNT BASE
OEM DESIGNED
SUPPORT
ANGLE BRACKETS
FRONT
REAR
INDENT FRONT RAILS
SO THAT DOOR CAN
OPERATE
(IF THERE IS A
FRONT RACK DOOR).
REAR RAIL
BOTTOM
PLACE CENTER OF
GRAVITY NEAR CABINET
CENTER OF GRAVITY.
MR_0541_90.DG
Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation E–9
E.1.4 Rack Construction
Many 19-inch RETMA rail racks are not designed to support a heavy
weight on the front rail system alone. Such racks are designed to hold
front to back equipment boxes where the box weight is distributed
between the front and rear rails. See Figure E–6. This distribution
makes sure the cabinet does not flex.
The VAXft system BA22 boxes are designed to be mounted on the front
and rear rail system. See Figures E–3, E–5, and E–6. The front flanges
are designed for a RETMA hole pattern. The BA22 boxes must be
supported by a customer-designed right angle bracket that connects to
the front and rear mounting rack rails (Figure E–5).
CAUTION
Never mount the BA22 boxes by the front mounting flanges only.
Always include supporting angle brackets so that the weight can
be distributed to the rear rail system. The front mounting flanges
can be damaged without the use of the angle brackets.
Figure E–6 Traditional Rackmount, Side View
TOP
REAR RAIL
FRONT RAIL
SLIDES
REAR
FRONT
TYPICAL 48.26 cm (19.0 in)
RACKMOUNT FOR
CONVENTIONAL BOX-MOUNTED
EQUIPMENT ON SLIDES.
BOTTOM
MR_0540_90.DG
E–10 Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
E.1.5 Heat and Airflow Management
The maximum power for each BA22 box is 730 W, or 2500 Btus. It is
recommended that the cabinet be designed for the maximum configuration
per the user’s environment (temperature, humidity).
The tested operating ranges for the VAXft system are:
•
10°C to 40°C (50°F to 104°F)
•
10% to 90% RH noncondensing
•
28°C (82°F) maximum wet-bulb temperature
•
2°C (36°F) minimum dew point
It is recommended that the rack environment be near the middle of the
tested operating ranges. This would be in the area of 40% to 60% RH,
and 18.3°C to 23.8°C (65°F to 75°F).
If the rack has enough free airspace surrounding the BA22 boxes, a
flushing fan is not needed inside the rack.1
Initial tests of two boxes mounted in a one and one-half bay cabinet with
dimensions of 152.4 cm (60.0 in) height, 76.2 cm (30.0 in) width, and 66.04
cm (26.0 in) depth showed a flushing fan is not needed provided that the
ambient temperature is held below 40°C (104°F). If the rack has smaller
dimensions, some sort of blower, heat exchanger, or active cooling (air
conditioner) needs to be considered.
1
If a flushing fan is used, the BA22 airflow is from top to bottom.
Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation E–11
The cabinet rackmount and airflow design depends on the following
factors:
•
Internal Btus generated in the cabinet
•
Temperature differential between the inside of the cabinet and outside
of the cabinet
•
Surface area of all the outside walls of the cabinet
•
Whether cabinet rack walls are insulated or not insulated
•
Mounting configuration of the BA22 boxes within the cabinet
•
Airspace within the cabinet
•
Air vents on the front and rear doors or panels
E.1.5.1 Air Vents
The air intake slots in the front rack door should be a minimum of 225.82
cm (35.0 sq in) to allow for adequate intake airflow. This is also true for
the rear cabinet exhaust panel or door.
E.1.6 Data Cable Management
All cables connect to the VAXft system BA22 boxes by means of the front
module panels, DSSI cable bulkheads, and console bulkheads. This means
all cable routing must be addressed from the front of the units.
Figure E–7 shows the recommended cable routing.
If the BA22 boxes are mounted in a 152.4 cm (60.0 in) high rack, there
is no room between the BA22 boxes for the routing of cables. All I/O
cables must be routed to the right or left sides. Cross-link cables must be
mounted vertically.
If the BA22 boxes are mounted in a 165.1 cm (65.0 in) or higher rack,
cables may be routed between the BA22 boxes.
E–12 Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
Figure E–7 Model 110 Cable Routing, Front View
IF CABINET IS
165.1 CM (65.00 IN)
OR TALLER,
CABLE UP/DOWN.
LEAVE OPENING
BETWEEN UNITS
FOR CABLING.
FRONT VIEW
MR-0652-91DG
Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation E–13
E.1.7 Grounding Considerations
It is important to have a common ground when two BA22 boxes are
mounted in a rack assembly. The following rules apply:
•
Mounting rails should be conductive, so there is ground contact
between the upper BA22 front mounting rails and the bottom BA22
front mounting rails.
•
If the rails are to be painted, consult with Digital Equipment
Corporation.
•
The mounting rails should be connected to a cabinet ground.
•
In multiple cabinet systems, all cabinet grounds must be tied together.
E.1.8 Power Distribution
The VAXft system BA22 box is designed to operate on 120 Vac or 240 Vac.
Each model 110 BA22 box has two power cords. Each cord is rated for a
15 A, 120 Vac outlet or 6 A, 240 Vac outlet, maximum. These are standard
wall outlets.
The one major concern when adding power controllers to a cabinet or rack
is that a single point of failure should be avoided. For example, it would
be easy to add a 30 A, 120 Vac rated power controller to the cabinet for
120 Vac systems and plug both BA22 boxes into the one power controller.
This is fine, but by doing this, a single point of failure is introduced — the
power controller. If the relays or EMI/RFI filter fail, both BA22 boxes go
down.
E–14 Model 110 Rackmount System Site Preparation and Installation
E.2 Summary
The OEM designer should use the following guidelines when designing a
19-inch cabinet rack for the model 110 systems:
•
Two BA22 boxes weigh up to 136 kg (302 lb). The cabinet and rail
system must be designed to support this weight plus a safety margin.
Both the front and rear rails must be used to distribute the weight.
Custom mounting angle brackets must be designed by the OEM
customer to do this.
•
The BA22 boxes are shallow (30.48 cm or 12.00 in). Consider the
cabinet’s center of gravity, especially during transportation.
•
The maximum heat generated by a single BA22 box is 2500 Btus.
A single 60-inch cabinet could be designed to hold two BA22 boxes,
therefore generating 5000 Btus. It is suggested a 20 percent safety
factor be added to this resulting in a 6000 Btu design center,
maximum.
•
A minimum of 225.82 sq cm (35.0 sq in) must be allowed for air intake
vent open area (total slot size open area). The same is true for the
exhaust area.
•
If the air temperature outside of the cabinet is expected to be above
the range of 18.3°C to 23.8°C (65°F to 75°F), active cooling such as
industrial cabinet air conditioners should be investigated.
•
Airflow in the BA22 boxes is from top to bottom. If cabinet flushing
fans are needed as a result of airflow studies, the flushing fans should
not work against the BA22 airflow.
•
The use of a single power controller for two BA22s within the same
19-inch cabinet can introduce a single point of failure.
•
Grounding is very important. Use conductive mounting rails.
Index
A
AC power
See Power
Air quality
air conditioning, 1–20
filtration, 1–25, 1–26
humidity, 1–20
monitoring, 1–20
temperature, 1–20
Airflow
clearances, 1–16
orientation, 1–16
pattern, 1–17, 1–18, 1–19
B
Baud rates, setting terminal, 7–5,
11–4
Blank cannister module, 5–8, 9–6
Blank carrier module, 5–8, 9–6
C
Cabinet
airflow, 1–17, 1–18, 1–19
airflow orientation, 1–16
clearances, 1–15
dimensions, 1–4, 1–8, 1–14
ground straps, 6–9, 6–10
layouts, 5–6 to 5–9, 9–4 to 9–7
placement, 1–16
removing from skid, 2–4, 4–4
unpacking and inspecting, 2–2 to
2–5, 4–2 to 4–5
weights, 1–4, 1–8, 1–14
Cable routing, 10–2
Cables
612
Cables
612 (cont’d)
DSSI, 10–19
PCIM, 10–18
610 base, 10–2
cross-link, 10–6
DSSI, 10–7
power, 10–6
612, base
power, 10–16
612 base system, 10–16
DSSI, 6–4
management, 6–2
modem interface, 7–3, 11–2
610, one expander cabinet, 10–7,
10–8
DSSI, 10–10
PCIM, 10–9
power, 10–9
PCIM, 6–6
routing, 1–15, 1–20, 6–2, 6–4
system installation, 6–1 to 6–6,
10–1 to 10–24
612 system with expansion,
10–20
DSSI, 10–23
PCIM, 10–23
power, 10–20
terminal interface, 7–3, 11–2
610, two expander cabinets,
10–11
DSSI, 10–14
PCIM, 10–13
power, 10–11
Circuit breaker size, 1–35
Circuit breakers, 1–33
Clearances, airflow, 1–16
Completing the installation, 7–1 to
7–12, 11–1 to 11–10
Index 1
2 Index
Computer security, 1–3
Connecting cabinet power cords,
7–4, 11–3
Console
modem connections, 7–5, 11–3
terminal connections, 7–5, 11–3
Cooling airflow
See Airflow
Cross-link cables, 6–2, 6–3, 6–7,
10–2, 10–8, 10–11, 10–16,
10–20
D
Data protection, 1–3
Delivery planning, 1–15
Dial-out, dial-in, 1–3
Dimensions, 1–4, 1–8, 1–14
Documentation road map, iii
Drive removal and insertion, C–1 to
C–5
Drive unit numbers, 5–6 to 5–9, 9–4
to 9–7
DSSI cables, 6–4, 6–8, 10–8, 10–11,
10–16, 10–20
E
Electrical noise, 1–34
Environmental limits, 1–20 to 1–25
Equipment security, 1–3
ESD procedures, 5–2, 9–2
Expander cabinet drives, 7–10, 7–11,
11–8, 11–9
Expander cabinet layout, 5–8, 5–9,
9–6, 9–7
Expander cabinet MFIs, 7–10, 7–11,
11–8, 11–9
Expander cabinet summary panel,
switch setting, 10–15
Expander cables, 6–4 to 6–6
F
Facility power connections, 7–2 to
7–5, 11–1 to 11–3
Final system tests, 3–15, 7–12,
11–10
Fire and safety codes, 1–2
Floor
space requirements, 1–4 to 1–7,
1–15
surface requirements, 1–16
surface/protection, 1–15
G
Ground straps, 6–9, 6–10
Grounding, 1–33, 1–34
Grounding procedures (ESD), 5–2,
9–2
H
Humidity, 1–20
I
I/O module settings, 5–18, 5–19,
9–14, 9–15
Input voltage selector switch
settings, 5–10 to 5–14, 9–8
to 9–10
Inspecting the shipment, 2–1, 4–1
Installing module options, 5–18,
9–14
Installing the front cover and base
cap, 3–16 to 3–19
Installing the model 110 system, 3–1
to 3–19
Installing the model 310 and 410
system cables, 6–1 to 6–10
Installing the model 610 and 612
system cables, 10–1 to 10–24
Index 3
L
Labor activity reporting system
(LARS), 2–1, 4–1
Layout area, 1–15
Logic module placement, 5–16, 5–17,
9–12, 9–13
Logic module removal and
replacement, A–1 to A–5
M
Master breaker, 1–2, 1–34
Model 110 rackmount site
preparation and installation,
E–1 to E–14
Model 310 and 410 rackmount site
preparation and installation,
D–1 to D–19
Modem connections, 7–5, 11–3
Module handling and ESD
procedures, A–2
Module options, 5–18, 9–14
Module placement, 5–16, 5–17,
9–12, 9–13
Module removal and replacement,
A–1 to A–5
O
OEM rackmount
design concerns, D–2, E–2
air vents, D–13, E–11
Btus, D–13
cable management, D–13,
E–11
center of gravity, D–3, E–3
dc power supply connections,
D–16
dimensions, D–3, E–3
grounding, D–15, E–13
heat and airflow, D–12, E–10
power distribution, D–15,
E–13
OEM rackmount
design concerns (cont’d)
rack construction, D–10, E–9
weight, D–2, E–2
Opening the cabinets, 5–2 to 5–5,
9–2
Opening the shipping cartons, 2–2,
2–3, 4–2, 4–3
Options, unpacking, 2–2, 4–2, 8–3
P
PCIM cables, 6–6, 10–8, 10–11,
10–16, 10–20
Peripherals, unpacking, 2–2, 4–2,
8–3
Physical weights and dimensions,
1–4, 1–8, 1–14
Planning for delivery, 1–15
Plugs and receptacles, 1–36, 1–37
Power
circuit breaker size, 1–35
circuit breakers, 1–33
circuit routing, 1–33
connectors, 1–36, 1–37
distribution, 1–27, 1–28, 1–31
distribution panel, 1–2
electrical noise, 1–34
grounding, 1–33, 1–34
master breaker, 1–34
requirements, 1–26 to 1–37
single-point grounding, 1–34
Power cables, 10–11
Power cords, connecting, 7–4, 11–3
Power-on tests, 3–15, 7–12, 11–10
Power-on, system, 7–6 to 7–9, 11–4
to 11–7
Preparing for delivery, 1–15
Preparing the model 310 and 410
cabinets, 5–1 to 5–19
Preparing the model 610 and 612
cabinets, 9–1 to 9–17
4 Index
R
Raised flooring, 1–20
Remote communications, 1–3
Removing cabinet from skid, 2–4,
4–4
ROM-based diagnostic (RBD) tests,
7–12, 11–10
Routing power circuits, 1–33
Routing system cables, 1–15, 1–20
S
Security, 1–3
Setting terminal baud rates, 7–5,
11–4
Shock, 1–25
Single-point grounding, 1–34
Site
planning, 1–2 to 1–3
preparation, 1–1 to 1–37
security, 1–3
Switch setting, expander cabinet,
10–15
System
cables, 1–15
clearances, 1–4 to 1–7, 1–15
dimensions, 1–4, 1–8, 1–14
facility power connections, 7–2 to
7–5, 11–1 to 11–3
final tests, 7–12, 11–10
master breaker, 1–2
power panel, 1–2
power-on, 7–6 to 7–9, 11–4 to
11–7
space requirements, 1–4 to 1–7,
1–15
unpacking and inspection, 2–1 to
2–5, 4–1 to 4–5
weights, 1–4, 1–8, 1–14
System cabinet drives, 7–6, 7–7,
11–4, 11–5
System cabinet layout, 5–6, 5–7,
9–4, 9–5
System cabinet MFIs, 7–6, 7–7,
11–4, 11–5
System drive removal and insertion,
C–1 to C–5
System module LEDs, 7–8, 7–9,
11–6, 11–7
System module MFIs, 7–8, 7–9,
11–6, 11–7
T
Telephone lines, 1–3
Temperature, 1–20
Terminal baud rates, 7–5, 11–4
Terminal connections, 7–5, 11–3
U
Unpacking and inspection, 2–1 to
2–5, 4–1 to 4–5
Unpacking peripherals and options,
2–2, 4–2, 8–3
Unpacking the cabinets, 2–4, 2–5,
4–4, 4–5
V
Vibration, 1–25
Voltage selector switch settings,
5–10 to 5–14, 9–8 to 9–10
W
WAN module
cable requirements, B–2
configuration recommendations
and restrictions, B–6
managing failover sets, B–8
minimum revisions, B–1
physical device name, B–7
recommended spares list, B–4
redundant communications, B–5
Index 5
WAN module (cont’d)
supported layered products, B–1
troubleshooting tools, B–4
WAN module configuration, B–1 to
B–9
WAN module installation, B–9 to
B–20
device driver installation, B–13
module installation, B–11
troubleshooting, B–19
Y-box cable connections, B–9
Y-box mounting methods, B–9
Weights, 1–4, 1–8, 1–14
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