Certificated Employees Evaluation Document for AEA Members, Section III

Certificated Employees Evaluation Document for AEA Members, Section III
ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT
Certificated Employees Evaluation Document
for Members
of the
AEA Bargaining Unit
SECTION III
Content of this handbook reflects the agreement between the AEA and the ASD.
Updates and changes of this document will be posted on the District Connection online.
July 2015
SECTION III
Framework for Teaching Rubrics
The Anchorage School District selected Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Teaching as its model for effective instruction,
with an increased focus on professional development. Danielson’s work divides the complex activity of teaching into 22
components clustered into four domains:
1.
4.
Planning and Preparation
Professional Responsibilities.
2.
3.
Classroom Environment
Instruction/Delivery of Service
The Framework identifies those aspects of an educator’s responsibilities that have been documented through research as
promoting improved student learning. The framework aims to describe teaching in all of its complexity for both classroom
teachers and non-classroom specialists. It refers to not only what happens in the classroom, but also to what happens in
preparation and beyond the classroom walls. The framework has important implications for how educators reflect on their
practice and how they demonstrate their skills.
As part of the Framework development, tools designed to aid in the training of observers and practitioners provide accurate
and consistent information about teaching practice, preparation, and reflection. The following rubrics lay out the Framework’s
four domains of teaching responsibility along with the 22 components and multiple supporting elements. The full value of the
rubrics can be realized through professional conversations among practitioners as they seek to enhance their skill in the complex
task of teaching.
The rubric is an important element of the evaluation system.
It is a carefully designed rating chart that is established by
reference to the adopted content and Teacher Standards.
The rubric helps determine if what is expected has been
demonstrated. It is designed to provide a consistent way of
differentiating between levels of educator proficiency.
3
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
Alignment to Danielson Instructional Framework
Revised July 2015
Alaska Content and Performance Standard 2: Understands how students learn and develop
Key Word: UNDERSTAND STUDENT NEEDS
Definition: The teacher identifies the developmental abilities of students and teaches appropriately. This
includes accommodating student learning differences.
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning
Domain 3: Instruction
3a: Communicating with Students
Content and Performance Standard 3: Teaches with respect to students’ individual and cultural
characteristics
Key word: DIFFERENTIATION & CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS
Definition: Identifying and using instructional strategies that are appropriate to the individual and
special needs students, including student and local community culture.
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students
Domain 3: Instruction
3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities
4a: Reflecting on Teaching
Content and Performance Standard 4: Knows their content area and how to teach it
Key word: INSTRUCTION & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE
Definition: The teacher knows content area and uses current instructional practices to meet the needs
of all students. This includes a wide repertoire of strategies and applications and use of technology.
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy
1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes
1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources
1e: Designing Coherent Instruction
4
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
Alignment to Danielson Instructional Framework
Revised June 2015
Content and Performance Standard 5: Facilitates, monitors, and assesses student learning
Key Word: ASSESSMENT
Definition: The teacher uses multiple data elements (both formative and summative) to evaluate
student learning, and to plan, inform and adjust instruction.
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
1f: Designing Student Assessments
Domain 3: Instruction
3d: Using Assessment in Instruction
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities
4b: Maintaining Accurate Records
Content and Performance Standard 6: Creates and maintains an engaging learning environment
Key word: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
Definition: The teacher creates and maintains a learning environment in which all students are
actively engaged and contributing members. This includes creating a stimulating and safe learning
community, communicating high expectations, using a variety of classroom management techniques.
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport
2c: Managing Classroom Procedures
2d: Managing Student Behavior
2e: Organizing Physical Space
Domain 3: Instruction
3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
3c: Engaging Students in Learning
Content and Performance Standard 7: Works as a partner with parents, families, and the community
Key word: FAMILIES AND COMMUNITY
Definition: The teacher communicates regularly and collaborates with students, families and community
to promote student learning.
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities
4c: Communicating with Families
5
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
Alignment to Danielson Instructional Framework
Revised June 2015
Content and Performance Standard 8: Participates and contributes to the teaching profession
Key word: PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
Definition: Teacher maintains high standard of professional ethics by maintaining and updating
knowledge of their content area and best teaching practices. Teacher works collaboratively with
colleagues to improve instruction and ultimately impact student learning.
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities
4d: Participating in a Professional Community
4e: Growing and Developing Professionally
4f: Showing Professionalism
6
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 1 for Instructional Specialists: Planning and Preparation
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1a:Demonstrating
knowledge of
current trends in
specialty area and
professional
development plan
The Instructional Specialist
makes content errors or does
not correct errors made by
colleagues. The Instructional
Specialist displays little
understanding of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content. Teacher
displays little or no
understanding of the range of
instructional strategies.
The Instructional Specialist is
familiar with the important
concepts in the discipline but
displays lack of awareness of how
these concepts relate to one
another. The Instructional
Specialist indicates some
awareness of prerequisite learning,
although such knowledge may be
inaccurate or incomplete. Plans
and practice reflect a limited range
of instructional strategies.
The Instructional Specialist displays
solid knowledge of the important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another. Specialist
demonstrates accurate understanding
of prerequisite relationships among
topics, provides clear explanations
and feedback to further learning.
Specialist plans and practice reflect
familiarity with a wide range of
effective instructional strategies.
The Instructional Specialist displays extensive
knowledge of the important concepts in the
discipline and how these relate both to
one another and to other disciplines. The
Instructional Specialist demonstrates
understanding of prerequisite relationships
among topics and concepts and understands the
link to necessary cognitive structures that ensure
understanding. Practices reflect familiarity with a
wide range of effective instructional strategies
and the ability to anticipate misconceptions.
Critical Attributes
Instructional Specialist is
unable to identify
important concepts of the
discipline and their
relationships to one
another
● Instructional Specialist
makes errors in
explanations of content
● Instructional Specialist
answers questions
inaccurately and fails to
provide feedback
● Instructional strategies in
plans and best practices are
unsuitable to the content
Specialist teaches a model lesson
not grounded on domainspecific pedagogy and researchbased practices. Teacher and
Instructional Specialist
attempts to identify important
concepts of the discipline and
their relationships to one
another
● Instructional Specialist
provides partial explanations
of the content
● Instructional Specialist
answers questions with minor
errors and provides minimal
feedback
● Instructional strategies in
plans and best practices are
generally suitable to the
content
The instructional specialist
collaborates in the classroom, but
does not support all aspects of a
before, during, and after cycle of
Evidence:
●
Instructional Specialist identifies
important concepts of the
discipline and their relationships
to one another
● Instructional Specialist provides
clear explanations of the content
● Instructional Specialist answers
questions accurately and
provides feedback that furthers
learning
● Instructional strategies in plans
and best practices are suitable to
the content
●
●
Specialist plans with teacher to
incorporate research-based practice,
co-teachers, and models or collects
evidence based on best practice, and
7
Instructional Specialist identifies important
intra- and interdisciplinary content
relationships
● Instructional Specialist provides clear
explanations of the content and identifies
possible teacher misconceptions
● Instructional Specialist answers questions
skillfully and provides feedback that leads to
critical thinking
● Instructional strategies in plans and best
practices are entirely suitable to the content
●
Specialist creates, plans and facilitates
opportunities for peer consultation (i.e.
Instructional learning visits, PLCs, etc.) to extend
before, during, and after cycle beyond individual
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
specialist do not have a
consultation with teachers or does
conversation about lesson before not focus process on best practices
or after instruction.
in teaching and learning.
reflects with teacher about
effectiveness of best practice on
student outcomes after the lesson.
teacher and specialist to build capacity for deeper
knowledge of teaching and learning.
Specialist designs and facilitates professional
development that demonstrates extensive
Specialist plans and facilitates
knowledge of instructional effective practices
professional development (PLC
meeting, grade-level meeting, and staff and transfers ownership of professional learning
to teachers, (i.e., teachers sharing successes and
meeting) that demonstrates
strategies, discussing effectiveness of strategies,
knowledge of effective practices for
instruction and adult learning.
using shared protocols).
Guiding Question: What are the key concepts and their relationship to the session to be observed and the overall plan within which it falls?
Specialist distributes resources at
a faculty meeting with no
connection to domain-specific
pedagogy or research-based
practices.
Specialist plans and presents a
random research-based strategy to
faculty with little or no interaction
or connection with adult learners.
8
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1b: Demonstrating
knowledge of the
school’s program
and level of
teacher’s skill
The Instructional Specialist
displays minimal understanding of
how adults learn—and little
knowledge of their varied
approaches to learning, knowledge
and skills—and does not indicate
that type of knowledge is valuable.
The Instructional Specialist displays
generally accurate knowledge of how
adults learn and of their varied
approaches to learning, knowledge and
skills. Individual learning characteristics
may not be addressed.
The Instructional Specialist employs
knowledge of school’s infrastructure;
understands the nature of adult
learning, and attains information about
levels of expertise of staff.
The Instructional Specialist
understands the nature of adult
learning and acquires information
about levels of expertise. The
Instructional Specialist systematically
acquires knowledge from several
sources regarding varied approaches to
learning, knowledge and skills.
Critical Attributes
Instructional Specialist
demonstrates little or no
knowledge of school’s
infrastructure, (i.e. programs,
technology, demographics,
etc.)
● Instructional Specialist does
not understand adult learning
strategies.
● Instructional Specialist lacks
understanding of the
interests/skills of staff to
guide delivery of support
● Instructional Specialist is
unaware of the needs
represented by the building or
staff
The instructional specialist does
not question or survey staff about
professional development needs.
Evidence:
●
Instructional Specialist
demonstrates basic knowledge of
school’s infrastructure (i.e.
programs, technology,
demographics, etc.)
● Instructional Specialist attempts to
employ adult learning strategies.
● Instructional Specialist has a
minimal understanding of the
interests/skills of staff to guide
delivery of support
● Instructional Specialist is
minimally aware of the needs
represented by the building or staff
●
The instructional specialist questions or
surveys the staff to ascertain their
needs,, but does not fully integrate
results into planning for professional
support.
Instructional specialist provides
resources to staff that are unrelated
The instructional specialist presents
to the needs of students.
professional development sessions to
staff that are based on the needs of
students as evidence by data that may
9
Instructional Specialist
demonstrates thorough knowledge
of school’s infrastructure (i.e.
programs, technology,
demographics, etc.)
● Instructional Specialist employs
adult learning strategies.
● Instructional Specialist has a clear
understanding of the
interests/skills of staff to guide
delivery of support
● Instructional Specialist is aware of
the needs represented by the
building or staff
●
The instructional specialist develops
and conducts a professional
development needs survey for the staff,
and uses the results, along with
pertinent school data, to plan for
professional support.
Instructional Specialist
demonstrates a deep familiarity of
school’s infrastructure and works
to shape its future direction (i.e.
programs, technology,
demographics, etc.)
● Instructional Specialist skillfully
engages the adult learner
● Instructional Specialist actively
seeks information of the
interests/skills of staff to guide
delivery of support
● Instructional Specialist integrates
the needs represented by the
building or staff
●
The instructional specialist develops
and conducts a professional
development needs survey for the staff,
and uses the results, along with
pertinent school data, to collaboratively
plan for professional support with staff.
The instructional specialist uses current The instructional specialist works with
and relevant data (walk through, student teachers to analyze all available student
achievement, common assessments,
data in order to construct, implement
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
be outdated or irrelevant.
etc.) to plan professional development
and monitor a plan that addresses
for staff or in work with individual
student needs.
teachers.
Guiding Question: How did your awareness of staff’ interests/needs, prior knowledge, culture, and experiences impact your planning?
10
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
1c: Establishing
goals for the
instructional
support
program are
appropriate to
the setting and
the teachers
served.
Critical
Attributes
Evidence:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
The goals represent low expectations
for important learning in the
discipline. They are stated as learning
activities, rather than as goals.
Goals represent moderately high
expectations and rigor. Some reflect
important learning in the discipline and
consist of a combination of outcomes
and activities. Goals based on global
assessments of learning are partially
suitable for most staff.
Most goals represent rigorous and
important learning in the discipline and
are clear. Goals reflect several different
types of learning and opportunities for
coordination, and they are
differentiated for staff.
All goals represent high-level learning
in the discipline. They are clear and
permit viable methods of assessment.
Outcomes reflect several different
types of learning and, where
appropriate, represent both
coordination and integration.
Outcomes are differentiated for staff.
Goals represent high expectations
and rigor
● Goals are related to “big ideas” of
the discipline
● Goals are written in terms of what
staff will learn rather than do
● Goals represent a range of types of
learning opportunities
Instructional Specialist’s plans
reference curricular frameworks or
blueprints to ensure accurate
sequencing.
● Instructional Specialist connects
goals to previous and future
learning.
● The ranges of goals are
differentiated to encourage
individuals to take educational
risks and maximize learning
outcomes.
Instructional specialist and teacher
collaboratively set professional growth
goals for individual teacher growth that
are aligned with school and district
goals.
Goals lack rigor.
Goals do not represent
important learning in the
discipline.
● Goals are not suitable for many
staff.
● Goals are not clear or are stated
as activities.
●
●
The instructional specialist does not
design professional growth goals for
working with staff.
Goals represent a mixture of low
expectations and rigor.
● Some goals reflect important
learning in the discipline.
● Goals are suitable for most of the
staff.
● Goals include a few types of
learning opportunities.
●
The instructional specialist sets
professional growth goals for working
with staff that may not be consistent
with the goals of the school and district.
●
Instructional specialist works with the
administrator to set clear, focused
professional growth goals for working
with the staff that are consistent with
the goals of the school and district.
Guiding Question: How did you develop staff learning outcomes to meet the varying needs of your staff?
11
Exemplary
●
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
1d:Demonstrating
knowledge of
resources and/or
protocols, both
within and beyond
the school and
district.
The Instructional Specialist is
unaware of resources to assist in
learning and expanding of the
teacher’s professional skill.
Evidence:
The instructional specialist has little The instructional specialist uses
or no knowledge of available
outdated or irrelevant resources to
resources to support specializing
support specializing practice.
practice.
The instructional specialist provides
The instructional specialist does not resources only when teachers request
them.
provide resources for teachers.
Critical Attributes
School or District Protocols
are not followed.
● No knowledge of available
resources.
● Instructional Specialist does
not seek out resources
available to expand his/her
own skill.
●
The Instructional Specialist displays
minimal awareness of resources to
assist in learning and attempts to
extend professional skills but does not
seek to expand this knowledge.
Instructional Specialist follows
some protocols during
instruction.
● Limited knowledge of available
resources.
● Instructional Specialist uses
limited materials and resources
beyond those readily available.
●
The Instructional Specialist is fully
aware of district protocols and
resources available in the school,
district and the larger professional
community for staff to advance their
skills.
Instructional Specialist follows
most protocols and understands
educational implications.
● Instructional Specialist has clear
knowledge of available resources
is the school and district..
● Instructional Specialist
appropriately facilitates use of
materials and resources and
identifies additional support for
advancing skills.
The instructional specialist knows
where to find appropriate resources for
improving specializing practice, (i.e.
networking, professional reading,
conference participation).
●
Exemplary
The Instructional Specialist integrates
extensive knowledge of protocols and
resources available in the school, district
and the larger professional community for
staff to advance their skills.
Instructional Specialist seeks out,
understands and follows established
protocols
● Solid knowledge of available resources
for extending resources for
professional growth.
● Instructional Specialist seamlessly
integrates materials and resources
during instruction that matches
individual skill levels.
●
The instructional specialist evaluates the
appropriateness of resources based on the
needs of the school or district.
The instructional specialist evaluates the
appropriateness of available resources and
seeks additional resources to support the
school, district, or individual teacher goals.
The instructional specialist provides
available resources to teachers to
support the school, district, or
individual teacher goals.
Guiding Questions: What activities, assignments, and resources were developed and utilized that emphasizes thinking and problem-based learning, permit staff choice and
initiative, and encourage depth rather than breadth? How did you determine and expand your knowledge of resources that facilitated staff’ knowledge
12
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
1e: Planning the
instructional
support program,
integrated with the
overall school
program.
Critical Attributes
Evidence:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist has not
planned to formatively assess
and/or evaluate the effectiveness of
the program.
Instructional Specialist has a
rudimentary plan to formatively assess
and/or evaluate the effectiveness of
the program.
Instructional Specialist’s support is
based on data and needs. The support
aligns with school and district
guidelines and involves collaborative
planning. There is a plan to
formatively assess and/or evaluate the
program and is organized around clear
goals and a collection of evidence.
Instructional Specialist’s plan to
formatively assess and/or evaluate the
program is highly sophisticated, with
multiple sources of evidence and a clear
path toward improving the program on
an ongoing basis with teachers and
administrators.
No data or needs addressed
Support does not follow school
or district guidelines
● Lack of collaborative planning
●
●
The instructional specialist provides
a one-time demonstration of an
instructional strategy with no plan
for follow-up.
Support is somewhat based on
school data/needs
● Support attempts to align with
school and district guidelines.
● Support involves some
collaborative planning.
●
The instructional specialist provides
ongoing professional development
sessions to support a yearlong
instructional focus but does not
support individual teachers in
implementation.
13
Support is based on school
data/needs
● Support aligns with school and
district guidelines.
● Support involves collaborative
planning.
●
The instructional specialist collaborates
with leadership team to design a longterm instructional plan that includes
professional development sessions and
individual teacher support through the
before, during and after cycle of
consultation.
Instructional Specialists actively
seeks out data and collaboratively
determines a plan to address
support
● Alignment to school and district
guidelines are addressed through
reflective feedback
● Continuous analysis of effective
support is discussed with staff
The instructional specialist provides
opportunities to involve all stakeholders
in designing a long-term instructional
plan that includes professional
development sessions and individual
teacher support though the before,
during, and after cycle of consultation.
●
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
1f: Developing a plan to
evaluate the instructional
support program.
Critical Attributes
Evidence:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist’s has
no plan to evaluate the
program or is unclear. Few
if any goals have been
established.
Instructional Specialist’s plan
to evaluate the program is
partially organized around
goals and the collection of
some evidence to indicate if
goals have been met.
● Goals are measureable
with a rudimentary plan
● Minimal feedback from
staff
Instructional Specialist’s plan to
evaluate the program is organized
around clear goals and the collection of
evidence to indicate the degree to which
the goals have been met.
The instructional specialist
designs an end-of-session
evaluation for teachers, but
does not use this data for future
planning.
The instructional specialist has a plan in
place to implement changes for future
professional development based on
formative and end-of-session
evaluations or through one-on-one
specializing sessions.
Instructional Specialist’s plan to evaluate
the program is skillfully designed around
specific data with school needs in mind.
Goals are carefully analyzed and evaluated
in an effort to improve the program on an
ongoing basis.
● There is a well thought out plan using
multiple sources of evidence, which
includes meaning feedback from staff.
● A clear path towards improving
support program on an ongoing basis.
The instructional specialist has a plan in
place to implement changes to future
professional development based on
formative and end-of-session evaluations
or through one-on-one specializing
sessions. The specialist has a plan to
monitor implementation of new learning.
No plan to evaluate the
goals
● Lack of feedback from
staff
●
The instructional specialist
does not design any
evaluation for his or her
professional development.
The instructional specialist
shares an assessment with
the teacher without regard
to student learning
objectives, standards, or
learning outcomes.
The instructional specialist
collaborates with teachers to
develop summative assessments
with no follow-up to support
instruction.
Goals have a clear method of
assessment
● Includes feedback from staff
●
The instructional specialist collaborates
The instructional specialist collaborates
with teachers to develop a cycle of
with teachers to develop differentiated
formative and summative assessments
formative and summative assessments that
that are aligned with standards and
are aligned with standards and learning
learning outcomes and used to guide
outcomes and used to guide instruction.
instruction.
Guiding Question: How did you determine appropriate assessments, both formative and summative, and how will you use the results to plan for future program
planning?
14
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 2 for Instructional Specialist: The Classroom Environment
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Patterns of interactions between
Instructional Specialist and staff are
generally appropriate but may reflect
occasional inconsistencies, and
favoritism. Instructional Specialist
attempts to respond to unprofessional
behavior, with uneven results. The net
result of the interactions is neutral,
conveying neither warmth nor conflict.
Interactions are friendly and
demonstrate general caring and respect.
Interactions among staff are generally
professional. Instructional Specialist
responds successfully to unprofessional
behavior. The net result of the
interactions is polite, respectful, and
professional, though staff may be
somewhat cautious about taking
instructional risks.
Interactions are highly respectful,
reflecting genuine warmth and caring
and sensitivity to individuals. staff
exhibit respect for the Instructional
Specialist and contribute to high levels
of civility among all members. The net
result is an environment where all staff
feel valued and are comfortable taking
instructional risks.
2a: Creating
an
environment
of trust and
respect
Patterns of interactions
between Instructional
Specialist and staff are mostly
negative, inappropriate, or
insensitive. Instructional
Specialist does not support
collaborative interactions
between staff.
Critical
Attributes
Instructional Specialist
communication lacks respect.
● Instructional Specialist fails
to respond to unprofessional
behavior
● Instructional Specialist makes
little to no connections with
staff.
● Instructional Specialist fails
to provide a safe
environment for instructional
risk taking.
There is no evidence of teacher
and instructional specialist
working together.
Instructional specialist solicits some
teacher interactions, mostly in large
group situations.
Teachers seek interaction with the
instructional specialist as opposed to
specialist approaching teachers.
Instructional specialist does not
maintain confidentiality with
teachers or administrators.
Instructional specialist shares general
information about teacher practice to an
administrator.
Instructional specialist maintains
confidentiality and models language and
behaviors that demonstrate respect and
rapport.
Evidence:
●
Instructional Specialist
communication is generally
respectful.
● Instructional Specialist attempts to
respond to unprofessional behavior
● Instructional Specialist makes
minimal connections with staff.
● Instructional Specialist attempts to
provide a safe environment for
instructional risk taking.
●
15
Instructional Specialist
communication is uniformly
respectful
● Instructional Specialist successfully
responds to unprofessional
behavior
● Instructional Specialist makes
connections with staff.
● Instructional Specialist provides a
safe environment for instructional
risk taking.
●
Instructional Specialist
communication is highly
respectful, warm, and inviting
● Instructional Specialist encounters
no unprofessional behavior
● Instructional Specialist establishes
ongoing connections with staff.
● Instructional Specialist provides a
valued comfortable and safe
environment for instructional risk
taking.
●
As a result of working with an
instructional specialist, teachers
collaborate regularly demonstrating
shared ownership of learning.
Teachers maintain confidentiality and
replicate the language and behaviors
used by the specialist to demonstrate
respect and rapport in teacher-toteacher interactions.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Guiding Questions: How do you create an environment of respect and rapport? How do you ensure that interactions are respectful?
16
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
2b: Establishing
a culture for
ongoing
instructional
improvement
The learning environment is
characterized by a lack of
commitment to learning, and/or
little or no investment of energy in
the task at hand. Hard work is not
expected or valued. Medium to low
expectations for achievement are
the norm.
Critical
Attributes
Instructional Specialist does
not communicate the
importance of the content
● Instructional Specialist fails to
demonstrate a regard for
staffs’ abilities.
● Instructional Specialist fails to
foster an expectation of effort.
● Instructional Specialist does
not move staff to complete
work.
The instructional specialist reports
to principal about teacher
weaknesses and needs.
Evidence:
●
Basic
Proficient
The learning environment is
characterized by little commitment to
learning. staff indicate that they are
interested in the completion of a task
rather than the quality of the work.
Instructional Specialist minimally
communicates the importance of the
content
● Instructional Specialist attempts to
demonstrate a regard for staffs’
abilities.
● Instructional Specialist fosters a
moderate expectation of effort.
● Instructional Specialist cultivates
staff to complete work.
●
The instructional specialist works
confidentially with teachers but is not
viewed as a credible resource for
instructional improvement.
The instructional specialist works in
The instructional specialist makes
isolation and provides only
connections between resources and
resources with no connection to
learning goals or outcomes, but provides
learning goals or outcomes.
limited opportunities for teachers to
collaborate.
The learning environment is a place where
all, with high expectations for both learning
and hard work, values learning. Staff
understands its role as learners and
consistently expends effort to learn.
Instructional Specialist communicates
the importance of the content
● Instructional Specialist demonstrates a
high regard for staffs’ abilities.
● Instructional Specialist fosters an
expectation of high levels of effort.
● Instructional Specialist cultivates staff
to complete work of high quality
●
The instructional specialist creates a culture
where the teachers view the specialist as a
confidential and credible resource for
instructional improvement.
Exemplary
There is a shared belief in the
importance of learning. The
specialist conveys high
expectations for learning by all
staff and encourages hard work.
Staff assumes responsibility for
high quality results.
Instructional Specialist
skillfully communicates the
importance of the content
● Staff demonstrates increased
confidence in their abilities.
● Staff demonstrates a high
level of collegial effort to
improve their practice.
● Staff initiates and encourages
others in high quality work.
●
The number of teachers with
whom the instructional specialist
works continues to increase.
As a result of working with the
The instructional specialist engages teachers instructional specialist, teachers
in conversations tied to learning goals or
regularly engage in conversations
outcomes and provides a variety of
tied to their own learning goals or
opportunities for teachers to collaborate on outcomes and continually
professional growth, (e.g., book/article
collaborate to make adjustments in
study, PLC, before, during and after
instructional practice.
specializing cycles, peer collaboration, etc.)
Guiding Question: How do you develop a culture of high expectations for learning that promotes and results in high levels of staff effort?
17
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Instructional specialist has created
unlimited access to contact,
communicate and schedule with staff.
Communication is initiated reciprocally.
Staff employs multiple means to
approach the Instructional Specialist
with minimal effort.
2c: Establishing
clear procedures
for staff to gain
access to
instructional
support
Instructional specialist is not
accessible to staff. There is an
insufficient method to contact,
communicate, and employ
scheduling to meet the needs of
the staff.
Instructional specialist is accessible to
staff. There is a method to contact,
communicate, and employ scheduling
to meet the needs of the staff.
Instructional specialist is easily accessible
to all staff. A variety of flexible methods
to contact, communicate, and employ
scheduling to meet the needs of the staff,
are available.
Critical
Attributes
Instructional Specialist’s
● Instructional Specialist has
contact information is not
accessible contact information.
● Instructional Specialist has a
accessible.
● Instructional Specialist does
schedule to meet the needs of
not schedule to meet the needs
staff.
of staff.
● Instructional Specialist uses a few
● Instructional Specialist lacks
communication tools.
communication tools.
There are no protocols in place and Instructional specialist mentions
instructional specialist makes no
protocols at the beginning of a session
attempts to engage participants.
or meeting, but does not monitor the
effectiveness of the protocols.
Instructional Specialist has current
contact information that is easily
accessible.
● Instructional Specialist has flexible
scheduling to meet the needs of
staff.
● Instructional Specialist uses a variety
of communication tools.
Instructional specialist implements
protocols to effectively manage
professional development sessions or
meetings with teachers and monitors
effectiveness of the protocols.
Evidence:
●
●
Staff initiates contact reciprocally.
Staff and Instructional Specialist
work collaboratively to create a
schedule that works for all.
● Instructional Specialist excels in the
use of communication tools and
strategies.
●
●
Instructional specialist and teachers
collaboratively determine and implement
protocols to effectively manage
professional development sessions or
meetings with teachers and
collaboratively monitor the effectiveness
of the protocols.
Guiding Questions: How do you establish and promote routines and procedures that maximize accessibility for you and your department?
18
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
2d: Establishing
and maintaining
norms of
behavior for
professional
interactions.
There appear to be no established
standards of conduct. There is little
or no monitoring of negative
interactions and response to them
is repressive or disrespectful.
Standards of conduct appear to have
been established, but their
implementation is inconsistent.
Instructional Specialist tries, with
uneven results, to monitor negative
interactions and respond to
unprofessionalism.
Critical
Attributes
Instructional Specialist has not
established or implemented a
clear standard of conduct.
● Instructional Specialist does
not observe or monitor staff
interactions.
● Instructional Specialist does
not respond to staff
interactions.
● Instructional Specialist sets no
expectation for appropriate
use of technology.
There are no norms in place and
teachers are disrespectful to the
instructional specialist or one
another.
Instructional Specialist has
attempted to establish and
implement a clear standard of
conduct.
● Instructional Specialist is
inconsistent in observing and
monitoring staff interactions.
● Instructional Specialist responds
to staff interactions.
● Instructional Specialist set
expectations for appropriate use
of technology.
Instructional specialist mentions norms
at the beginning of a session or
meeting, but does not monitor that
participants adhere to them.
Evidence:
●
●
Behavior is generally appropriate.
Instructional Specialist monitors
behavior against established standards
of conduct, and responds in a positive,
consistent, proportionate, and
respectful manner. All use technology
respectfully.
Instructional Specialist has
successfully established and
implemented a clear standard of
conduct.
● Instructional Specialist observes
and monitors staff interactions.
● Instructional Specialist responds
professionally to staff interactions.
● Instructional Specialist set
respectful expectations for
appropriate use of technology.
●
Behavior is entirely appropriate. Staff
take an active role in monitoring their
own behavior and that of others.
Monitoring of behavior is subtle and
preventive. Response to
unprofessionalism is sensitive to
individual needs and respects dignity.
Staff exhibits a high level of
behavior that exceeds the standards
of conduct.
● Staff self-monitors collegial
interactions.
● Staff demonstrates positive intent
during collegial interactions
● Staff uses technology respectfully
and appropriately.
●
Instructional specialist and teachers
collaboratively establish norms to
effectively manage professional
development sessions or meetings with
teachers and hold each other accountable
for adhering to the norms.
Guiding Question: What staff behavior expectations have been implemented, how are they monitored effectively, and how do you respond to positive and negative
behavior?
19
Instructional specialist establishes norms
to effectively manage professional
development sessions or meetings with
teachers and monitors the adherence of
the norms.
Exemplary
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
2e: Organizing
physical space for
delivery of support.
Instructional Specialist does
not make good use of the
physical environment,
resulting in limited
engagement of few
participants.
Critical Attributes
Instructional Specialist
does not recognize
physical hazards in the
environment, endangering
staff safety.
● Instructional Specialist
provides an environment
where many staff cannot
see or hear.
● The Instructional
Specialist does not use
available technology.
Instructional specialist chooses
a space and/or arrangement,
which impede engagement
and/or participation in
discussions.
Evidence:
●
Teacher and specialist meet in
the hallway between classes.
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist makes modest
use of the physical environment,
resulting in engagement of some staff
in the activity.
Instructional Specialist provides an
environment that is safe and staff have
equal access to learning activities. The
Instructional Specialist ensures that the
furniture arrangement is appropriate to
the learning activities and uses physical
resources, including computer
technology effectively.
● Instructional Specialist ensures the
environment is safe and all staff is
able to see and hear.
● Instructional Specialist arranges the
environment to support the
instructional goals and learning
activities.
● The Instructional Specialist makes
appropriate use of available
technology and resources.
Instructional Specialist ensures that the
physical arrangement is appropriate to
learning activities. The staff contributes to
the use or adaptations of the physical
environment to advance learning. The
environment s safe and learning is
accessible to all staff. .
Instructional specialist chooses an
appropriate space and arranges the
environment to promote interactive
participation in the workshop or group
collaborative discussion(s).
Instructional specialist provides evidence
to document that teachers emulate the
model provided by the specialist in-group
sessions and purposefully arrange the
classroom environment to promote
student interactive participation and/or
collaborative discussion(s).
Instructional Specialist ensures the
environment is safe and most staff
is able to see and hear.
● Instructional Specialist arranges
the environment so it is not an
impediment to learning but does
not enhance it.
● The Instructional Specialist makes
limited use of available technology
and other resources.
●
Instructional specialist chooses an
appropriate space and attempts to
arrange the environment to promote
interactive participation in the
workshop or group collaborative
discussion(s) with inconsistent results.
The space selected by the specialist for
The space selected by the specialist for individual meetings with teachers is
individual meetings with teachers is
private, comfortable and has access to
randomly chosen based on availability
necessary resources.
without consideration for privacy,
comfort and/or resources.
Guiding Question: Is the physical environment safe to everyone and arranged so that learning is engaging and productive?
20
Modifications are made to the
physical environment to
accommodate staff with special
needs.
● There is total alignment between the
learning activities and the physical
environment.
● Staff takes the initiative to adjust the
physical environment.
●
The space used for individual meetings
with teachers is mutually agreed upon and
is private, comfortable and has access to
necessary resources.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 3 for Instructional Specialists: Instruction
3a:Communicating
with Staff
Critical
Attributes
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
The Instructional Specialist’s
explanation of the content contains
major errors and does not include
any explanation of strategies that
staff might use. The instructional
purpose of the lesson or
professional learning activity is
unclear, and the directions and
procedures are confusing. The
Instructional Specialist’s spoken or
written language contains errors of
grammar or syntax.
The Instructional Specialist’s
attempt to explain the
instructional purpose of the
lesson or professional learning
activity has only limited success,
and/or directions and procedures
must be clarified after initial
confusion. The explanation of
the content may contain minor
errors; some portions are clear,
others difficult to follow. The
explanation does not invite staff
to engage intellectually or to
understand strategies they might
use when working independently.
The Instructional Specialist’s
spoken language is correct but
uses vocabulary that is either
limited or not fully appropriate to
the staff’ needs or content.
● Instructional Specialist
partially states support goals.
● Instructional Specialist must
clarify the process to be
followed in the task.
● Instructional Specialist
provides information that
may contain errors.
● Instructional Specialist
struggles to elicit
participation and thinking.
● Instructional Specialist
describes
The Instructional Specialist
clearly communicates the
instructional purpose of the
lesson or professional learning
activity and, if appropriate,
both directions and
procedures are modeled. The
explanation of content is both
accurate and clear and
connects with staff’s needs
inviting participation and
intellectual engagement.
Instructional Specialist’s
spoken and written language
is clear and correct and is
suitable to the staff’s needs.
●
●
●
●
●
●
Instructional Specialist fails to
state support goals.
Staffs indicate they are
confused by the task..
Instructional Specialist makes
serious content errors.
Instructional Specialist fails to
promote participation.
Instructional Specialist is
unaware of strategies staff
might use,
Instructional Specialist
vocabulary is inappropriate for
21
●
●
●
●
●
Instructional Specialist
clearly states support
goals.
Instructional Specialist
models the process to be
followed in the task.
Instructional Specialist
provides accurate and
clear information.
Instructional Specialist
invites participation and
thinking.
Instructional Specialist
Exemplary
The Instructional Specialist links the instructional
purpose of the lesson or professional learning
activity to the larger curriculum; the directions and
procedures are clear and anticipate possible
misunderstandings. The Instructional Specialist’s
explanation of content is thorough and clear,
developing conceptual understanding through clear
scaffolding and connecting with staff’ needs. Staff
contributes to extending the content through
collaboration with peers. The Instructional
Specialist’s spoken and written language is expressive
and content enhancing.
●
●
●
●
●
●
Staff is able to clearly states support goals.
Instructional Specialist actively engages the
participants in the task.
Instructional Specialist provides a deeper
conceptual understanding and anticipates
misconceptions
Instructional Specialist invites staffs to explain
the content to their peers.
Staffs suggest other strategies they might use in
their practice.
Staffs use academic language correctly
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
the intended audience.
strategies/procedures staff
might use
● Instructional Specialist
vocabulary is too advance or
too juvenile for the intended
audience
describes specific
strategies staff might use,
inviting them to interpret
the strategies in the
context of what they’re
learning.
● Instructional Specialist
vocabulary is appropriate
for the intended
audience.
Evidence:
During a professional development During a professional
During a professional
During a professional development session and/or
session and/or co-teaching session, development session and/or codevelopment session and/-or
co-teaching session, the specialist uses a gradual
the instructional specialist uses
teaching session, the instructional co-teaching session, the
release model and shows evidence that teachers are
inaccurate instructional terminology specialist uses accurate
instructional specialist engages explaining to other teachers’ research-based
and/or supporting inappropriate
instructional terminology and/or in ongoing conversation with
instructional strategies and relevant academic
instructional strategies.
appropriate instructional strategies teachers using effective and
vocabulary.
without explaining the meaning
appropriate instructional
Specialist’s spoken or written
Specialist’s spoken or written language is clear,
and/or use.
strategies and academic
language contains errors in syntax
correct, appropriate, and expressive.
vocabulary.
and/or grammar.
There is evidence of academic vocabulary use by
Specialist’s spoken or written
Specialist’s spoken or written
teachers.
language is correct but with
language is clear and correct
limited vocabulary or not fully
and uses vocabulary
appropriate to the situation.
appropriate to the situation.
Guiding Question: How were the learning targets clearly stated, vocabulary appropriately used, and how was the staff’ background knowledge connected to the new
concepts?
22
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
3b: Using
Questions and
Discussion
Techniques
Critical
Attributes
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Interaction between Instructional
Specialist and staff is predominantly
recitation-style, with the Instructional
Specialist mediating all questions and
answers- accepting all contributions
without asking staff to justify their
reasoning. Only a few participate in
the discussion.
The Instructional Specialist attempts
to ask some questions designed to
engage staff in thinking, but only a
few are involved. The Instructional
Specialist attempts to engage all in the
discussion, to encourage them to
respond to one another, and to
explain their thinking, with uneven
results.
The Instructional Specialist creates a
genuine discussion among staff,
providing adequate time for
responding and stepping aside when
appropriate. The Instructional
Specialist challenges staff to justify
their thinking and successfully
engages most in the discussion,
employing a range of strategies to
ensure that most are heard.
The Instructional Specialist ensures that
all voices are heard through varied small
group discussions and/or individual or
small group question/response
activities. Staff formulates many
questions, initiate topics, challenge one
another’s thinking, and make
unsolicited contributions.
Instructional Specialist uses
simple questions, with single
answer.
● Instructional Specialist fails to
provide wait time.
● Instructional Specialist
dominates the discussion
● Instructional Specialist engages a
few staff in the discussion(s).
Instructional Specialist use
● Staff initiates higher order
open-ended questions, inviting
questions
● Staff benefit from effective use of
staff to think and/or offer
wait time by building on other
multiple possible answers.
● Instructional Specialist makes
responses.
effective use of wait time.
● Instructional Specialist
● Instructional Specialist
incorporates a variety of strategies
incorporates a variety of
that encourage discussion and
strategies to encourage
challenge one another’s thinking,
discussion (i.e. small-group,
(i.e. small-group, large-group,
large-group, partners, etc.)
partners, etc.)
● Instructional Specialist actively
● Instructional Specialist actively
engages staff in the
engages all staff in the
discussion(s).
discussion(s).
Evidence:
The instructional specialist only
The instructional specialist
The instructional specialist
Teachers and the instructional specialist
models the use of close ended
infrequently uses clarifying, probing, or frequently poses clarifying, probing, use clarifying, probing, or reflective
questions as a primary strategy and
reflective questions.
or reflective questions that stimulate questions during their interactions to
does not use clarifying, probing, or
teacher participation and collegial
guide inquiry about teaching practice.
The instructional specialist’s questions sharing.
reflective questions.
occasionally promote student thinking
Over time, the students initiate higherThe instructional specialist models
The instructional specialist’s questions and may only have a single answer.
level questioning and discussion
questioning and discussion
do not promote student thinking.
techniques as modeled by the
techniques to promote students’
instructional specialist.
higher order thinking.
Guiding Question: How was staff engagement facilitated through the use of questioning that promoted staff interaction and discussion?
●
Instructional Specialist uses some
open-ended questions,
occasionally inviting staff to think
and/or offer multiple possible
answers.
● Instructional Specialist makes
moderate use of wait time.
● Instructional Specialist attempts
to incorporates a variety of
strategies
● Instructional Specialist engages
some staff in the discussion(s).
●
23
●
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
3c: Engaging
staff in
learning
Critical
Attributes
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
The learning tasks/activities,
materials and, resources are
poorly aligned with the
instructional outcomes, or require
only rote responses, with only
one approach possible. The
groupings are unsuitable to the
activities. The lesson has no
clearly defined structure, or the
pace of the lesson is too slow or
rushed.
The learning tasks and activities require
only minimal thinking for staff and little
opportunity for them to explain their
thinking, allowing most to be passive or
merely compliant. The groupings are
moderately suitable to the activities. The
lesson has a recognizable structure;
however, the pacing of the lesson may not
provide the time needed to be
intellectually engaged or may be so slow
that many have a considerable amount of
“down time.”
The learning tasks and activities are
designed to challenge thinking,
inviting staff to make their thinking
visible. This technique results in
active intellectual engagement by
most with important and
challenging content. . The
groupings are suitable to the
activities. The lesson has a clearly
defined structure, and the pacing of
the lesson is appropriate, providing
most staff the time needed to be
intellectually engaged.
●
●
●
●
●
Few staff are intellectually
engaged
Learning tasks/activities and
materials require only recall
or have a single correct
response or method.
Only one type of
instructional group is used
(whole group, small groups)
when variety would promote
more engagement.
Instructional materials used
are unsuitable to the lesson
and/or the staff.
The lesson drags or is rushed.
●
●
●
●
●
●
Some staff are intellectually engaged
Learning tasks are a mix of those
requiring thinking and those requiring
recall.
Engagement with the content is
largely passive, the learning consisting
primarily of facts or procedures.
The instructional groupings used are
moderately appropriate to the
activities.
Few of the materials and resources
require thinking or ask staff to explain
their thinking.
The pacing of the lesson is uneven—
suitable in parts but rushed or
24
●
●
●
●
●
●
Most staff is intellectually
engaged.
Most learning tasks encourage
higher-order thinking.
Staff is invited to explain their
thinking as part of completing
tasks.
The groupings are suitable to
the activities.
Materials and resources
appropriately support the
content.
The structure and pacing of the
activity provides for the time
needed to be intellectually
Exemplary
Virtually all staff is intellectually
engaged in challenging content
through well-designed learning
tasks and activities that require
complex thinking on their part.
Instructional Specialist provides
suitable scaffolding and challenges
staff to explain their thinking.
There is evidence of some
initiation of inquiry and
contributions to the exploration of
important content. Staff may serve
as resources for one another. The
lesson has a clearly defined
structure, and the pacing of the
lesson provides the time needed
not only to intellectually engage
with and reflect upon their learning
but also to consolidate their
understanding.
● Virtually all staff are
intellectually engaged
● Lesson activities require highlevel thinking and
explanations/justification of
thinking.
● Staff takes initiative to improve
the lesson by
1) Modifying a learning task to
make it more meaningful or
relevant to their needs,
2) Suggesting modifications to
the grouping patterns used,
and/or
3) Suggesting modifications or
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
dragging in others.
engaged.
additions to the materials
being used.
Staff has an opportunity for
reflection and closure on the
lesson to consolidate their
understanding.
The instructional specialist provides
ongoing opportunities for teachers to
collaborate and/co-facilitate sustained
professional nearing that extends past
the professional learning session.
●
Evidence:
Instructional specialist lectures for
45 minutes during a professional
development activity using generic
strategies and resources.
The instructional specialist
provides whole or small group
professional development, but
does not work individually with
teachers.
Instructional specialist provides limited
opportunities for participation and active
engagement using strategies and resources
that are relative to content but inconsistent
with teacher needs.
The instructional specialist does not
consistently collaborate and reflect with
teachers before and after a classroom visit.
25
Instructional specialist provides
frequent opportunities for
participation and active engagement
using strategies and resources
relative to content and consistent
with teacher needs.
The instructional specialist
collaborates and reflects with
teachers before and after classroom
visits.
The teacher initiates the before,
during and after cycle with the
specialist and other teachers to plan
for and reflect on lessons.
Teachers initiate the ongoing
collaboration with the instructional
specialist before, during and after
classroom visits.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
3d: Integrating
assessment
into the
delivery of
support.
Critical
Attributes
Instructional Specialist does not
monitor the group. There is little
or no monitoring of learning;
feedback is absent or of poor
quality. Staff does not engage in
self- or peer assessment.
Instructional Specialist elicits
no evidence of understanding.
● Instructional Specialist
provides little or no feedback.
● Instructional Specialist does
not invite staff to assess their
own work
● There is no indication of what
high quality work looks like.
●
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist monitors
learning for the group as a whole.
Feedback to staff s general, and few
staff assess their own work. Staff
appears to be only partially aware of
the standards of high quality work.
The Instructional Specialist
questions and monitors groups of
learners for evidence of
understanding. Feedback to staff
is timely and specific. Staff is
encouraged to engage in selfassessment. Staff appears to be
aware of the professional
standards of high quality work.
The Instructional Specialists is constantly
monitoring the staff understanding and
makes use of strategies to elicit information
about individual understanding. Questions
and assessments are used regularly to
diagnose evidence of learning by staff. A
variety of forms of feedback, from both
Instructional Specialist and peers, is
accurate and specific and advances learning.
Staff self-assess and monitor its progress.
Instructional Specialist successfully
differentiates instruction to address
individuals’ misunderstandings.
● Instructional Specialist is constantly
“taking the pulse” of the class;
monitoring staff understanding is
continuous and makes use of strategies
to elicit information about individual
understanding.
● High-quality feedback comes from
many sources, including staff; it is
specific and focused on improvement.
● Staff monitor their own understanding,
either on their own initiative or as a
result of tasks set by the Instructional
Specialist.
● Staff indicate that they clearly
understand the characteristics of highquality work and they contribute to the
development of the criteria
● Instructional Specialist successfully
provides differentiated instruction and
anticipates misconceptions.
Instructional Specialist elicits
little evidence of
understanding.
● Instructional Specialist provide
vague feedback
● Instructional Specialist makes
only minor effort in engaging
staff to assess their own work
● There is little evidence that
staff understand the standards
of high quality work.
●
26
Instructional Specialist elicits
evidence of understanding.
● Instructional Specialist
provide specific and timely
feedback
● Instructional Specialist invites
staff to assess their own work
● There is clear evidence that
staff understand the standards
of high quality work.
●
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Evidence:
The specialist does not discuss the
use of assessment to drive
instruction.
The specialist and teacher do not
use assessments to drive classroom
practice. Feedback to students is
non-existent.
The specialist does not use a tool to
evaluate the effectiveness of a PD
session.
Teacher and instructional specialist
sporadically use formative
assessments to analyze student
learning.
The specialist and teacher use
assessments inconsistently and
ineffectively to drive classroom
practice. Feedback to student is
limited.
Teacher and instructional specialist
develop formative assessments to
consistently analyze student
learning and communicate and
share outcomes with students.
The specialist initiates dialogue in
the after session with the teacher
to reflect on effectiveness of the
assessment to drive classroom
practice.
The specialist uses a tool for
teachers to evaluate the effectiveness Students are aware of how
assessments are used to evaluate
of a PD session, but inconsistently
their work.
follows up.
The specialist uses a writing
prompt at the end of a PD session
to evaluate the effectiveness of the
PD session and uses the results to
plan next steps.
Guiding Question: How was staff assessment used to provide feedback, monitor learning, and guide future planning?
27
Instructional specialist supports teacher in
developing strategies that encourage student
self-assessment.
In collaboration with the instructional
specialist, the teacher uses information from
the assessment, e.g., exit tickets to assess,
plan and create lessons that move student
learning forward. Students own the
assessment results.
The specialist plans differentiated support
for teachers based on data from PD
sessions.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
3e: Demonstrating
flexibility and
responsiveness
Critical
Attributes
Evidence:
Unsatisfactory
Instructional Specialist
adheres rigidly to an
instruction plan in spite of
evidence of poor
understanding. Instructional
Specialist ignores signs of
misunderstandings and lacks
the initiative to offer
assistance.
Instructional Specialist
brushes aside staff
questions.
● Ignores indications of
staff boredom or lack of
understanding.
● Instructional Specialist
conveys to staff that
when they have difficulty
learning it is their fault.
● Despite evident staff
confusion, Instructional
Specialist makes no
attempt to adjust the
lesson.
Instructional specialist adheres
to his/her plan, in spite of
evidence of its inadequacy,
inappropriateness, or
irrelevancy.
●
Instructional specialist spends
much of the time in the
specializing office and
responds only when teachers
Basic
Instructional Specialist attempts to
adjust the lesson to accommodate and
respond to questions and interests with
mixed results. Instructional Specialist
accepts responsibility for the success
of all but has only a limited repertoire
of strategies to use.
Minimal attempts are made to
incorporate questions and interests
into the presentation..
● Instructional Specialist conveys to
staff a level of responsibility for
their learning but also his or her
uncertainty about how to assist
them.
● Efforts to modify the lesson are
only partially successful.
●
Instructional specialist makes modest
adjustments resulting from teacher
interactions when confronted with
evidence of the need for change.
Instructional specialist works with the
teachers but does not align the
specializing work with the individual or
school wide needs.
28
Proficient
Instructional Specialist
successfully accommodates
questions and interests, drawing
on a broad repertoire of strategies.
If impromptu meass are needed,
Instructional Specialist makes a
minor adjustment to the support
and does so smoothly.
Instructional Specialist persists in
seeking approaches for those who
have difficulty learning.
Incorporates staffs’ interests
and questions into the
support or activity.
● Differentiates support based
on the needs of staff.
● When improvising becomes
necessary, adjustments are
made to the presentation.
●
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist seizes an opportunity
to enhance learning, building on a
spontaneous event or interest, or
successfully adjusts and differentiates
instruction to address misunderstandings.
Instructional Specialist uses an extensive
repertoire of instructional strategies, solicits
additional resources from the school or
community, and persists in seeking effective
approaches.
Instructional Specialist seizes a teachable
moment to enhance a lesson.
● Instructional Specialist conveys to staff
that s/he won’t consider a lesson
“finished” until everyone understands
and that s/he has a broad range of
approaches to use
● Instructional Specialist’s adjustments to
the lesson, when needed, are designed to
assist individuals.
●
The instructional specialist
interacts regularly with teachers
and elicits suggestions via a needs
assessment and collaborative
inquiry about teacher needs and
plans accordingly for one-on-one
and small group work.
Teachers initiate collaborative conversations
with instructional specialist who welcomes,
extends, and adapts strategies to meet the
changing needs of teachers via ongoing
conversations about teacher needs and
providing differentiated support in one-one
and small group work.
Instructional specialist is cognizant
of the needs of the building,
Using core standards, the teachers and
instructional specialist work together to
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
approach with specific needs.
provides opportunities to address
identify future needs and build a professional
those needs, and offers a variety of development plan to address those needs.
instructional strategies to address
those needs.
Guiding Question: How was the session adjusted to enhance understanding, incorporate staff’ interests, and utilize a wide range of strategies?
29
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 4 for Instructional Specialists: Professional Responsibilities
Unsatisfactory
Basic
4a: Reflecting
on practice.
Instructional Specialist does not
know whether a lesson/presentation
was effective or achieved its
instructional outcomes.
Instructional Specialist has no
suggestions for improvement.
Instructional Specialist has a generally
accurate impression of a
lesson/presentation’s effectiveness
and the extent to which instructional
outcomes were met. Instructional
Specialist makes general suggestions
for improvement.
Critical
Attributes
Instructional Specialist
● Instructional Specialist has a
considers the lesson but draws
general sense of whether or not
incorrect conclusions about its
instructional practices were
effectiveness.
effective.
● Instructional Specialist makes
● Instructional Specialist offers
no suggestions for
general modifications for future
improvement.
instruction.
The instructional specialist decides to The instructional specialist has a
focus on an instructional strategy
Specific impression that all teachers
with no reflection on needs.
need more training on a specific
instructional strategy.
The specialist does not maintain
The specialist’s personal notes are
personal notes indicating reflection
inconsistent or indicate general
on his/her practice.
specializing practice improvements.
The instructional specialist does not
The instructional specialist reflects on
reflect on faculty meeting
presentations offered throughout the faculty meeting presentations
throughout the year with the
year.
Evidence:
Proficient
●
30
Instructional Specialist makes an
accurate assessment of support
effectiveness and the extent to which
it achieved its instructional outcomes
and can cite general references to
support the judgment. Instructional
Specialist makes a few specific
suggestions for improvement.
Accurately assesses the
effectiveness of instructional
activities used.
● Identifies specific ways in which
an instructional activity might be
improved.
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist makes a
thoughtful and accurate assessment of a
lesson/presentation’s effectiveness and
the extent to which it achieved its
instructional outcomes, citing many
specific examples from the
lesson/presentation and weighing the
relative strengths of each. Drawing on
an extensive repertoire of skills.
Instructional Specialists offers specific
alternative actions, complete with the
probable success of different courses of
action.
● Instructional Specialist’s assessment
of the lesson is thoughtful and
includes specific indicators of
effectiveness.
● Instructional Specialist’s
suggestions for improvement draw
on an extensive repertoire.
The instructional specialist reflects
Teachers have self-reported to the
through data analysis that most
instructional specialist that there is no
teachers are struggling with moving to independent use of a focused
independence with an instructional
instructional strategy and the specialist
strategy, and decides to use more
validates through data analysis. The
modeling of the strategy in individual
instructional specialist then collaborates
specializing interactions or larger group with teachers to problem solve and
professional development.
develop plans for regular
implementation.
The specialist’s internal reflections
The specialist reflects on his/her
indicate several personal specific
personal notes regarding specific
specializing practice improvements.
●
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
promoting of the administrator.
The instructional specialist reflects on
faculty meeting presentations offered
throughout the year and shares
reflections with his/her administrator.
Guiding Question: Upon reflection, what worked well and how might the session or activity be improved for the future?
31
specializing practice improvements
based on research, and evidence
supports a resulting change in teacher
practice.
The instructional specialist reflects on a
faculty meeting presentations offered
throughout the year and shares
reflections with his/her administrator.
The instructional specialist and
administrator use the reflections to
establish goals for future faculty
meetings.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
4b: Preparing
and maintaining
accurate
records.
Critical
Attributes
Evidence:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Instructional Specialist’s system for
maintaining information is
nonexistent or in disarray.
Instructional Specialist’s records for
non-instructional activities are in
disarray, the result being errors and
confusion.
Instructional Specialist’s system for
maintaining information is rudimentary
and only partially effective.
Instructional Specialist’s records for
non-instructional activities are adequate
but inefficient and, unless given
frequent oversight are prone to errors.
There is no system for either
instructional or noninstructional records.
● Record-keeping systems are in
disarray and provide incorrect or
confusing information.
●
The instructional specialist does not
document any work with teachers.
The instructional specialist does not
maintain a daily specializing schedule.
Proficient
Instructional Specialist has a
process for recording work
completion. However, it may be
out of date or inaccurate.
● Instructional Specialist has a
process for tracking some, but not
all, non-instructional information,
and it may contain some errors.
The instructional specialist has a system
for documenting work with teachers
but uses it inconsistently or
ineffectively.
●
Instructional Specialist’s system for
maintaining instructional and noninstructional support information is
efficient and effective.
Instructional Specialist has a
process for recording instructional
support is efficient and effective.
● Instructional Specialist has a
process for recording noninstructional information is
efficient and effective.
●
The instructional specialist has a
systematic way to keep confidential
records and log specializing interactions
with teachers.
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist’s system for
maintaining information and noninstructional records is fully effective.
Professional learning information and
activity evaluations are disaggregated
with staff input and used for future
planning and program improvement.
In addition to the characteristics
of “proficient”:
● Staff contributes to and maintains
records indicating completed and
outstanding work assignments.
● Staff contributes to and maintains
data files indicating their own
progress in learning.
The instructional specialist uses the
confidential records to identify trends
and needs of teachers which drive
professional development.
●
The instructional specialist maintains an The instructional specialist maintains an The instructional specialist maintains
incomplete or inaccurate specializing
accurate schedule and a system to
an accurate schedule and advocates
schedule.
facilitate scheduling with teachers.
ensuring staff needs remain first
priority.
Guiding Question: What is the process for efficiently and effectively maintaining records, and how are multiple sources of data utilized to analyze progress?
32
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
4c:Coordinating
work with other
instructional
specialists
Critical
Attributes
Evidence:
Instructional Specialist provides little
information to staff regarding the
program content. Instructional
Specialist does not respond, or
responds unprofessionally, to staff
concerns.
Little or no information is shared
with colleagues.
● Serious lack of collaboration or
interaction with co-workers.
● No evidence of help, aids,
documentation or data.
●
The instructional specialist does not
communicate with staff regarding
evidence-based instructional strategies.
The instructional specialist does not
communicate with administration or
communicates confidential records
with administration.
Basic
Proficient
Instructional Specialist makes sporadic
attempts at communication with staff
about the materials and information..
The communication that does take
place may not be effective.
School or district-created
materials about the program are
made available.
● Instructional Specialist gives
infrequent or incomplete
information.
● Instructional Specialist uses
documentation, help aids, and
data but does little to inform staff.
Instructional Specialist provides
frequent and appropriate information
to other instructional specialists.
Collaborates and shares
information with colleagues
and/or other departments as
needed.
● Communicates information
regarding current and/or archived
material available for use.
● Instructional Specialist utilizes
documentation, help aids, and
data to inform and advance
colleague knowledge.
The instructional specialist
The instructional specialist consistently
inconsistently communicates with some communicates with all staff regarding
staff regarding evidence-based
evidence-based instructional strategies.
instructional strategies.
The instructional specialist meets with
When the administrator initiates, the
administrators on regular basis and
specialist communicates nonshares non-confidential information.
confidential information with the
administrator.
●
●
Guiding Question: What is the process for communicating with and engaging staff in the learning process?
33
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist communicates
frequently with staff. Instructional
Specialist responds to staff’ concerns
professionally. Instructional
Specialist’s efforts to engage staff in
the learning are frequent and
successful.
Staff regularly develops materials
to inform others.
● Staff maintains accurate records
about their individual learning.
● Staff contributes to regular and
ongoing projects designed to
engage others in the learning
process.
●
The instructional specialist develops
and cultivates a system that produces a
culture of open communication and
collaboration among staff regarding
evidence-based instructional strategies.
The instructional specialist advocates
for a system of regular communication
with the administrators and assists in
implementation resulting in
achievement of school-wide goals.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
4d: Participating
in a professional
community
Critical
Attributes
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist engages in no
professional development activities
to enhance knowledge or skill.
Instructional Specialist resists
feedback on teaching performance
from either supervisors or
colleagues. Instructional Specialist
makes no effort to share knowledge
with others or to assume
professional responsibilities.
Instructional Specialist’s
relationships with colleagues are
negative or self-serving. Instructional
Specialist avoids participation in a
professional culture of inquiry,
resisting opportunities to become
involved. Instructional Specialist
avoids becoming involved in school
events or school and district projects.
Instructional Specialist participates to
a limited extent in professional
activities when they are convenient.
Instructional Specialist engages in a
limited way with colleagues and
supervisors in professional
conversation about practice, including
some feedback on teaching
performance. Instructional Specialist
finds limited ways to assist other
teachers and contribute to the
profession. Instructional Specialist
maintains cordial relationships with
colleagues to fulfill duties that the
school or district requires.
Instructional Specialist participates in
the school’s culture of professional
inquiry when invited to do so.
Instructional Specialist participates in
school events and school and district
projects when specifically asked.
Instructional Specialist actively engages
with colleagues and supervisors in
professional conversation about
practice, including feedback about
practice. Instructional Specialist
participates actively in assisting other
educators and looks for ways to
contribute to the profession.
Instructional Specialist’s relationships
with colleagues are characterized by
mutual support and cooperation.
Instructional Specialist volunteers to
participate in school events and in
school and district projects, making a
substantial contribution.
Instructional Specialist seeks out
opportunities for professional
development and makes a systematic
effort to conduct action research.
Instructional Specialist solicits
feedback on practice from both
supervisors and colleagues.
Instructional Specialist initiates
important activities to contribute to
the profession. Instructional
Specialist’s relationships with
colleagues are characterized by
mutual support and cooperation,
with Instructional Specialist taking
initiative in assuming leadership
among the faculty. Instructional
Specialist takes a leadership role in
promoting a culture of professional
inquiry. Instructional Specialist
volunteers to participate in school
events and district projects, making a
substantial contribution and
assuming a leadership role in at least
one aspect of school or district life.
Initiates engagement in
professional inquiry.
● Participate in school/district
events and/or community
projects.
● Has a supportive and collaborative
relationship with colleagues.
In addition to the characteristics of
“proficient,”
● Instructional Specialist takes a
leadership role in promoting
activities related to professional
inquiry.
● Instructional Specialist regularly
contributes to and leads events
that positively impact school
life.
● Instructional Specialist regularly
Instructional Specialist
purposefully avoids contributing
to activities promoting
professional inquiry.
● Instructional Specialist avoids
involvement in school activities
and district and community
projects.
● Instructional Specialist’s
relationships with colleagues are
characterized by negativity or
●
When invited, Instructional
Specialist participates in activities
related to professional inquiry.
● When asked, Instructional
Specialist participates in school
activities, as well as district and
community projects
● Instructional Specialist has cordial
relationships with colleagues.
●
34
●
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
combativeness.
Evidence:
The instructional specialist does not
participate on building committees
and participates in no school or
district events.
The instructional specialist attends
professional learning opportunities
without being an active participant.
A teacher reports that he/she is not
willing to work with the instructional
specialist due to their professional
relationship.
The instructional specialist attends a
school or district event.
The instructional specialist actively
participates in school or district events.
contributes to and leads
significant district and
community projects.
The instructional specialist leads a
school or district even or project.
The instructional specialist participates
in professional learning without
supporting implementation or further
research.
The instructional specialist takes a
leadership role in a PLC and supports
teachers in implementing the content
of the PLC.
The instructional specialist builds
capacity of teachers to establish and
lead their own PLC’s within the
school community.
A teacher reports that he/she is
uncomfortable working with the
instructional specialist although
complies.
Teachers voluntarily report that the
instructional specialist has established a
supportive and non-evaluative
relationship.
The instructional specialist has
established a school-wide reputation
based on respect, expertise,
dependability and trust.
35
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
4e: Growing
and developing
professionally
Critical
Attributes
Evidence:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
The instructional specialist engages in
no professional activities to enhance
knowledge or skill. There is a
resistance to feedback on job
performance from either supervisors
or more experienced colleagues. There
is no effort to share knowledge with
others or assume professional
responsibilities.
The instructional specialist participates
to a limited extent in professional
activities when they are convenient.
Engages in limited ways with
colleagues and supervisors in
professional conversation about
practice, including some feedback on
job performance. FInds limited ways
to assist other colleagues and
contribute to the profession.
The Instructional Specialist seeks out
opportunities for professional
development and makes a systematic
effort to conduct action research. The
Instructional Specialist solicits
feedback on practice from both
supervisors and colleagues. The
Instructional Specialist initiates
important activities to contribute to
the profession.
The Instructional Specialist remain
current by taking courses, reading
professional literature, and remaining
current on the evolution of thinking
regarding instruction. Instructional
specialists actively pursue networks
that provide collegial support and
feedback. Instructional specialists are
active in professional organizations in
order to enhance both their personal
practice and their ability to provide
leadership and support to colleagues
and staff.
● Seeks opportunities for
continued professional
development through courses
and professional reading. .
● Networks with colleagues and
supervisors for the purpose of
gaining insight from their
feedback.
● Actively participates in
organizations designed to
contribute to the profession.
The instructional specialist takes a
leadership role in, contributes to, or
facilitates professional learning
opportunities on a local, national
and/or statewide level.
Not involved in any activity that
might enhance knowledge or skill.
● Purposely resists discussing
performance with supervisors or
colleagues.
● Ignores invitations to join in
professional development or
attend conferences.
●
Participates in professional
development activities when they
are required or provided by the
district.
● Reluctantly accepts feedback from
colleagues and supervisors.
● Contributes in a limited fashion to
professional organizations.
●
The instructional specialist is not
interested in accessing professional
resources for personal growth such as
professional organizations, blogs, listservs, journals etc.
The instructional specialist attends a
professional learning workshop or
reads professional journals but does
not share the knowledge with
colleagues.
The instructional specialist models an
instructional strategy, but provides no
opportunities for collegial feedback and
reflection.
The instructional specialist models an
instructional strategy, then solicits
collegial feedback, but does not
consider this feedback for future
sessions.
36
Seeks opportunities for continued
professional development.
● Welcomes colleagues and
supervisors for the purpose of
gaining insight from their
feedback.
● Actively participates in
professional organizations.
●
The instructional specialist attends a
local, regional or national education
conference or workshop, reads
professional journals, and develops a
method to share knowledge with
colleagues.
The instructional specialist models an
instructional strategy and provides a
template for collegial feedback and
reflection. This feedback contributes to
the instructional specialist’s personal
The instructional specialist and a team
of teachers collaborate on a particular
instructional strategy and invite
colleagues to visit in order to provide
objective feedback and reflection.
This process contributes to the
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
professional growth.
professional growth of all involved.
Guiding Questions: How do you: a) advocate for staff; b) willingly participate in team/department decision-making; c) comply fully with school and district
regulations?
37
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
4f: Showing
professionalism
, including
integrity and
confidentiality
Critical
Attributes
Evidence:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Instructional Specialist displays
dishonesty or lack of confidentiality in
interactions with colleagues, students,
and the public. Instructional Specialist
is not alert to staff or colleagues’ needs
and contributes to school practices
that result in being ill served by the
school. Instructional Specialist makes
decisions and recommendations that
are based on self-serving interests.
Instructional Specialist does not
comply with school and district
regulations.
Instructional Specialist is honest and
confidential in interactions with
colleagues, students, and the public.
Instructional Specialist’s attempts to
serve staff and colleagues are
inconsistent. These practices could
contribute to the school community
being ill served. Instructional
Specialist’s decisions and
recommendations are based on limited
though genuine professional
considerations. Instructional Specialist
is not consistent in complying with
school and district regulations.
Willfully ignores school district
regulations.
● Rarely or does not adhere to the
Teacher’s Code of Ethics
● Poor judgment of confidentiality
●
Proficient
Attempts to comply with school
district regulations.
● Inconsistent attempt to adhere to
the Teacher’s Code of Ethics.
● Occasionally ignores confidentiality
●
The instructional specialist is not
discreet and does not maintain
confidentiality.
The instructional specialist is
inconsistently discreet and
professional.
The specialist makes decisions based
The specialist’s decisions are based on
38
Exemplary
Instructional Specialist displays high
standards of honesty, integrity, and
confidentiality in interactions with
colleagues, staff, and the public.
Instructional Specialist complies fully
with school and district regulations.
Instructional Specialist can be counted
on to hold the highest standards of
honesty, integrity, and confidentiality
and takes a leadership role with
colleagues in this area. Instructional
Specialist is highly proactive in serving
colleagues, seeking out resources
when needed. Instructional Specialist
makes a concerted effort to challenge
negative attitudes or practices to
ensure that all, particularly those
traditionally underserved, are honored
in the school. Instructional Specialist
takes a leadership role in team or
departmental decision-making and
helps ensure that such decisions are
based on the highest professional
standards. Instructional Specialist
complies fully with school and district
regulations, taking a leadership role
with colleagues.
Complies consistently with school
district regulations.
● Adheres to the Teacher’s Code of
Ethics
● Maintains confidentiality
Takes a leadership role in modeling
and promoting school and district
regulations with a high regard of
importance and professionalism
● Exudes adherence to the Teacher’s
Code of Ethics, setting an example
for all
● As a school leader sets a standard
for confidentiality
The instructional specialist is
considered to be the model for
discretion and professionalism in the
building and specialists others
regarding professional behavior.
●
The instructional specialist is
consistently discreet and professional,
maintaining the norms of
confidentiality.
●
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Instructional Specialists
Revised July 2015
on self-serving interests.
limited though genuinely professional
considerations.
The specialist takes on a leadership
role and helps to ensure that school
decisions are based on highest
professional standards.
Guiding Questions: How do you: a) advocate for staff; b) willingly participate in team/department decision-making; c) comply fully with school and district
regulations?
39
The specialist maintains an open mind
and participates in team and
departmental decision-making.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 1 for Library Media Specialists: Planning and Preparation
Unsatisfactory
1a:
Demonstrating Knowledge of
Pedagogy, Literature and
Current Trends in Library
Media Practice and
Information Technology
Critical
Attributes
Library Media Specialist
demonstrates little or no
knowledge of content-related
pedagogy, literature and current
trends in library media practice
and information technology.
 Library Media Specialist
does not identify
professional sources.
 Library Media Specialist
does not read ageappropriate literature.
 Library Media Specialist
does not use print and/or
electronic resources
addressing current trends in
practice and information
technology.
 Library Media Specialist is
unaware of student interests,
cultural backgrounds, and
special needs.
 Library Media Specialist
demonstrates little or no
knowledge of available
resources in the school,
district and community.
Basic
Library Media Specialist
demonstrates limited knowledge
of content-related pedagogy,
literature and current trends in
library media practice and
information technology.
 Library Media Specialist
seldom reads ageappropriate literature.
 Library Media Specialist
seldom uses print and/or
electronic resources
addressing current trends in
practice and information
technology.
 Library Media Specialist
responds to questions from
members of the learning
community accurately.
 Library Media Specialist
recognizes that students
have different interests,
abilities, special needs and
cultural backgrounds, but
rarely draws upon that
knowledge.
 Library Media Specialist
demonstrates some
knowledge of available
40
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist
demonstrates solid integration of
content-related pedagogy, a
thorough knowledge of literature
and of current trends in library
media practice and information
technology.
Library Media Specialist draws on
extensive professional resources
and demonstrates extensive
knowledge of content-related
pedagogy, literature and current
trends in library media practice
and information technology.
 Library Media Specialist
seeks recommendations for
exemplary literature from
professional sources.
 Library Media Specialist is
well versed in ageappropriate literature.
 Library Media Specialist
subscribes to varied print
and/or electronic resources
addressing current trends in
practice and information
technology
 Library Media Specialist
accurately responds to
questions from members of
the learning community and
provides feedback.
 Library Media Specialist
understands that students
have different interests,
abilities, special needs and
cultural backgrounds and
 Library Media Specialist is
proactive in identifying and
implementing current trends
in library media practice and
information technology.
 Library Media Specialist
reads varied and vetted
resources.
 Library Media Specialist
advocates for the use of
current trends in the school
community.
 Library Media Specialist has
an established and active
plan for providing
communication to the
learning community.
 The LMC initiates school
wide activities that meet the
needs of students.
 Library Media Specialist
actively seeks out available
resources in the school,
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
resources in the school,
district and community.
Possible Examples
 Library Media Specialist is
unprepared for classes;
lessons do not reflect any
particular standards.
 Library Media Specialist
does not share information
about new materials/book
awards/articles/websites/ap
ps.
 Library Media Specialist is
usually prepared for classes
with lessons that mostly
reflect AASL standards.
 Library Media Specialist
rarely shares information
about new materials/book
awards/articles/websites/ap
ps.
41
draws upon that knowledge.
 Library Media Specialist
demonstrates consistent
knowledge of available
resources in the school,
district and community.
 Library Media Specialist
shares requested reports
with administration that
detail improvements in the
collection.
 Library Media Specialist
lessons are age appropriate
and reflect AASL standards,
librarian seeks input from
classroom teachers on a
lesson/unit she is preparing.
 Library Media Specialist
provides samples of email to
staff and colleagues about
new materials/book
district, and community and
shares actively.
 Students suggest a unit of
interest and Library Media
Specialist responds
enthusiastically.
 Library Media Specialist
presents at district librarian
meetings and staff meetings.
 Student excitedly tells
Library Media Specialist
about a great new series that
she would like in the media
center and Library Media
Specialist responds that if it
meets the collection
development policy it will be
added.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Basic
Unsatisfactory
1b:
Demonstrating
Knowledge of the
School’s Program and
Student Information
Needs Within that
Program
Library Media Specialist
demonstrates little or no
knowledge of the school’s
curriculum and of the school
community’s needs for literacy,
technology and information skills
within the curriculum.
Critical
Attributes



Possible Examples


Library Media Specialist
demonstrates some knowledge of
the school’s curriculum and of
the s school community’s needs
for literacy, technology and
information skills within the.
Curriculum.
Library Media Specialist
cannot identify the school’s
curriculum.
Library Media Specialist
does not respond to
questions from members of
the learning community.
Library Media Specialist is
unaware of student interests,
cultural backgrounds, and
special needs.

The Library Media Specialist
is unable to adequately
respond to a science
teacher’s request to identify
the resources the library had
on hand to support the
science Common Core
curriculum.
When ordering books to
add to his/her collection,





Library Media Specialist can
identify components of the
school’s curriculum.
Library Media Specialist
responds to questions from
members of the learning
community accurately.
Library Media Specialist
recognizes that students
have different interests,
abilities, special needs and
cultural backgrounds, but
rarely draws upon that
knowledge.
The Library Media Specialist
does not consider the school
program when developing
the library collection.
The Library Media Specialist
does not consider teachers’
and students’ needs when
ordering new books.
The Library Media Specialist
can accurately respond to
42
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist
demonstrates thorough
knowledge of the school’s
curriculum and of the school
community’s needs for literacy,
technology and information skills
within the curriculum
Library Media Specialist
demonstrates thorough
knowledge of the school’s
curriculum and of the school
community’s needs for literacy,
technology and information skills
within the curriculum by taking a
leadership role to articulate and
meet those needs.




Library Media Specialist
adheres to the school’s
curriculum.
Library Media Specialist
accurately responds to
questions from members of
the learning community and
provides feedback.
Library Media Specialist
understands that students
have different interests,
abilities, special needs and
cultural backgrounds and
draws upon that knowledge.
The Library Media Specialist
collaborates with a social
studies teacher or uses the
National Council for Social
Studies list of notable trade
books for children and
orders new books for their
upcoming unit of study that
supports the Common Core
curriculum.





Library Media Specialist
anticipates and plans for the
needs of the learning
community.
Library Media Specialist has
an established and active
plan for providing
communication to the
learning community.
The LMC initiates school
wide activities that meet the
needs of all students.
The Library Media Specialist
initiates collaboration with
teachers using a new Math
program to correlate new
literature to support the
program.
After checking the school
catalogue, and determining
the desired book is not part
of his/her school collection,
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
the Library Media Specialist
purchases books that are
more appropriate for middle
and high school readers.

Revised July 2015
questions relating to the
collection development in
regards to the Common
Core curriculum for
Language Arts and Writing,
but not for the Math and
Science curriculum.
While preparing her Spring
book orders, the Library
Media Specialist does so
without obtaining any
suggestions from the
students and staff.
43

The Library Media Specialist
ensures the collection
reflects the student diversity
in regards to their special
needs and cultural
backgrounds.


a student asks the Library
Media Specialist to request
the book from another
library via the ILL
procedures
The Library Media Specialist
conducts a new teacher
orientation of available
library services.
The Library media Specialist
encourages students to
provide literature
suggestions and works with
groups of students to refine
and create a list of “Student
Choice” books that are
ordered for the library.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
1c: Establishing Goals for the
Library Media Program
Appropriate to the Setting and
the Students Served
The instructional goals represent
low expectations for students,
non-standard based learning
objectives to drive instruction,
and lack of rigor. Not all of these
goals reflect relevant learning in
the discipline. They are stated as
student activities, rather than as
outcomes for learning.
Instructional goals reflect only
one type of learning.
Revised July 2015
Basic
The instructional goals represent
some high expectations and rigor
for students and some standard
based learning outcomes to drive
instruction. Instructional goals
reflect several types of learning, but
no effort has been made at
collaboration or integration.
Instructional goals, based on
assessment of student learning, are
suitable for most students.
Critical
Attributes
 Library Media Specialist
does not have goals for the
library media instructional
program.
 Library Media Specialist
does not communicate with
members of the learning
community.
 Library Media Specialist
does not assess the
instructional outcomes.
 Library Media Specialist has
developed goals for the
library media instructional
program.
 Library Media Specialist
rarely communicates with
members of the learning
community.
 Library Media Specialist
assesses the instructional
outcomes.
Possible Examples
 The Library Media
Specialist does not have
established goals for the
 The Library Media Specialist
develops goals for the Library
based on suggestions located
44
Proficient
Exemplary
Most instructional goals
represent rigorous and relevant
learning, are clear and suggest
viable methods of assessment.
Instructional goals reflect several
different types of learning, and
opportunities for collaboration
and integration. Instructional
goals, based on assessment of
student learning are
differentiated for different
groups of students.
All instructional goals represent
high-level learning. They are clear,
are written in the form of student
learning, and permit viable
methods of assessment.
Instructional goals reflect
different types of learning, and
where appropriate, represent both
collaboration and integration.
Instructional outcomes are
differentiated in whatever way is
needed for individual students.
 Library Media Specialist has
well-developed goals for
the library media
instructional program
resulting in student
learning.
 Library Media Specialist
communicates with
members of the learning
community on a regular
basis.
 Library Media Specialist
assesses the instructional
outcomes and differentiates
for some students.
(Example: Readers’
Advisory, level of books
for book talks).
 The Library Media
Specialist uses the
established academic plan
 Library Media Specialist
seeks feedback from
members of the learning
community prior to the
development of goals.
 Library Media Specialist
communicates goals for the
library media program with
the learning community.
 Library Media Specialist
actively seeks opportunities
to collaborate with
members of the learning
community.
 Library Media Specialist
posts school library goals in
library/website and creates
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
library program
Revised July 2015
from several sources, i.e.
Internet Search, library
program book.
45
to develop the school
library program.
 The Library Media
Specialist develops goals
for the school library
program based on an
evaluation of the school
setting, demographics,
culture, and curricular
programs.
an advisory group including
a variety of participants, i.e.
students, staff, and parents
to review goals and adjust as
needed.
 The Library Media Specialist
develops a survey to collect
data regarding the current
library program, what is
working, and needs that
may not yet be met and
administers to staff and
students. This data is then
used to develop library
program goals.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
1d: Planning the Library Media
Program Integrated with the
Overall School Program
Library Media Specialist designs
and develops a library program
that is incoherent in the use of
the district curriculum standards,
curation of print and digital
resources, support for student
research and inquiry-based
learning, support for student selfselected recreational reading, and
the efficient performance of
library administrative tasks.
Library media center does not
provide equal access to resources.
Revised July 2015
Basic
Library Media Specialist designs
and develops a library program
that is minimally coherent in the
use of the district curriculum
standards, curation of print and
digital resources, support for
student research and inquiry-based
learning, support for student selfselected recreational reading, and
the efficient performance of library
administrative tasks. The library
media center generally provides
equal access to resources.
46
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist designs
and develops a library program
that is coherent in the use of the
district curriculum standards,
curation of print and digital
resources, support for student
research and inquiry-based
learning, support for student
self- selected recreational
reading, and the efficient
performance of library
administrative tasks. The library
media center consistently
provides equal access to
resources.
Library Media Specialist designs and
develops a library program that is
exceptionally coherent in the use of
the district curriculum standards,
curation of print and digital
resources, support for student
research and inquiry-based learning,
support for student self- selected
recreational reading, and the
efficient performance of library
administrative tasks. Staff and
student learning needs differentiate
the library program. All resources
are accessible to all students,
including those with special needs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Critical
Attributes
 Library Media Specialist rarely
plans a program and selects
resources to align with the
district curriculum standards.
 Library Media Specialist is
unaware of resources available
in (and beyond) the district.
 Library Media Specialist does
not analyze, evaluate, replace
or supplement items within the
collection.
 Library Media Specialist does
not consider physical layout of
the library for student access.
 Library Media Specialist has no
knowledge of library
administrative tasks (circulation
of materials, scheduling use of
library, collection of fines and
fees, etc.).
Revised July 2015
 Library Media Specialist
occasionally plans a program
and selects resources to align
with the district curriculum
standards.
 Library Media Specialist is aware
of resources available in (and
beyond) the district.
 Library Media Specialist
inconsistently analyzes,
evaluates, replaces or
supplements items within the
collection.
 Library Media Specialist
considers physical layout of the
library for student access, but
takes minimal action.
 Library Media Specialist has
minimal knowledge of library
administrative tasks (circulation
of materials, scheduling use of
library, collection of fines and
fees, etc.).
47
 Library Media Specialist
consistently plans a program
and selects resources to align
with the needs of the learning
community and the district
curriculum standards.
 Library Media Specialist
communicates information
about resources available in
(and beyond) the district to the
learning community.
 Library Media Specialist
routinely analyzes, evaluates,
replaces or supplements items
within the collection.
 Library Media Specialist
provides rationale for the
physical layout of the library
for student access.
 Library Media Specialist
demonstrates extensive
knowledge of library
administrative tasks
(circulation of materials,
scheduling use of library,
collection of fines and fees,
etc.).
 Library Media Specialist has
created a safe space for all
students and staff.
 Library Media Specialist plans for
lessons and activities that provide
opportunities for studentdirected learning.
 Library Media Specialist
maximizes current resources and
advocates for a resource- rich
environment.
 Library Media Specialist seeks
input and involvement from
members of the learning
community when selecting
materials.
 Library Media Specialist seeks
additional funding sources to
replace and supplement items
within the collection.
 Library Media Specialist seeks
input from the learning
community on the design and
safety of the physical space.
 Library Media Specialist seeks out
information and input to
differentiate for students and
staff.
 Library Media Specialist
demonstrates expertise in the
completion of library
administrative tasks (circulation
of materials, scheduling use of
library, collection of fines and
fees, etc.)
 Library Media Specialist applies,
reviews, and evaluates data to
improve the library media
program and collection.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 The Library Media
Specialist runs a stand alone
program - acquiring
resources, writing lesson
plans, hanging signage,
arranging furniture, etc.
without consideration or
recognition of the overall
school program.
Revised July 2015
 A visit to the school library
reveals an inconsistent
connection to the overall
school program, for example:
bulletin boards and book
displays change infrequently,
handouts are out of date.
 Secondary - low traffic flow.
48
 With the overall school
program in mind, the
Library Media Specialist
develops goals for the
library program that
document the desire for
quality service, resources,
technology, instructional
strategies, and facilities. As
a result, the library is a wellused and well-stocked
facility that supports the
overall school program and
meets the needs of staff
and students as seen in
increased traffic flow, and
library reports.
 Secondary: Library
scheduling calendar shows
robust use of the library by
classes.
 The Library Media Specialist
actively encourages
recommendations for library
program improvements from
the school community as seen
in email traffic and Library
Media Specialist
announcements at staff
meetings.
 Library usage, displays,
handouts, bulletin boards, and
lesson plans reveal strong
connections to the overall
school program.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
1e: Developing a Plan to
Evaluate the Library Media
Program
Revised July 2015
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist has no
plan to evaluate the program or
resists suggestions that such an
evaluation is important.
Library Media Specialist has a
rudimentary plan to evaluate the
library media program and
accepts suggestions that such an
evaluation is important.
Library Media Specialist has a
well-developed plan and
procedure to evaluate the library
media program. The plan to
evaluate the library media
program incorporates evaluation
of instruction, print and digital
library materials, usage of library
services, the state of technology,
physical space and the alignment
of the school program.
Library Media Specialist has an
exceptional plan and procedure
to evaluate the library media
program. A highly sophisticated
plan to evaluate the library
media program incorporates
evaluation of instruction, print
and digital library materials,
usage of library services, the
state of technology, physical
space and the alignment of the
school program.
Critical
Attributes
 There is no evaluation of
the library media program.
 Library Media Specialist
evaluation plan does not
address one or more of the
following components: the
evaluation of print and
digital resources, usage of
library media services, state
of the physical space and
alignment to the overall
school program.
 Library Media Specialist
plan incorporates the
evaluation of print and
digital resources, usage of
library media services, state
of the physical space,
alignment to the Standards,
etc.
 Library Media Specialist
develops quantitative and
qualitative tools to collect
data for evaluating the
library media program.
 Library Media Specialist
identifies steps to move
the library media program
forward in response to the
data collected.
 Library Media Specialist
applies evaluation of data
to improve library media
program and student
learning.
Possible Examples
 Library Media Specialist
doesn’t evaluate the library.
 Library Media Specialist
knows that the district has
an overall plan for library
collection, but doesn’t set
the goals to match those
plans. Does not ask for
input from school
 Library Media Specialist
encourages input from
students/staff which is
integrated in the reflections
and End of Year report
 Library Media Specialist
follows through on
 Library Media Specialist
has the evaluation plan
available to review when
making program decisions.
 Plan includes collection
development, traffic flow,
programs, and safety.
49
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
community.
50
suggestions from
administration and staff as
appropriate.
 Library Media Specialist
uses reflections on the
current year when planning
for the next year’s
improvements to the
library.
 Library Media Specialist
has an ongoing
consideration file for
collection development,
program planning and
curriculum.
 Library Media Specialist
has an online form to
accept recommendations
from school community
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Domain 2 for Library Media Specialists: The Environment
2a: Creating an Environment
of Respect and Rapport
Critical
Attributes
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Interactions, both between the
Library Media Specialist and
students and among students, are
negative, inappropriate, or
insensitive to students’ cultural
backgrounds and are
characterized by sarcasm, putdowns, or conflict.
Interactions, both between the
Library Media Specialist and
students and/or staff, and among
students, are generally
appropriate and free from
conflict but may be characterized
by occasional displays of
insensitivity or lack of
responsiveness to cultural or
developmental differences among
students.
Interactions, both between the
Library Media Specialist and
students and/or staff, and among
students, are polite and
respectful, reflecting general
warmth and caring, and are
appropriate to the cultural and
developmental differences among
groups of students.
Interactions among the Library
Media Specialist, individual
students, and the classroom
teachers are highly respectful,
reflecting genuine warmth and
caring and sensitivity to students’
cultures and levels of
development. Students
themselves ensure high levels of
civility among students in the
library.
 The quality of interactions
between Library Media
Specialist and students, or
among students, is uneven,
with occasional disrespect
or insensitivity.
 Library Media Specialist
unevenly responds to
disrespectful behavior
among students.
 Library Media Specialist
attempts to make
connections with individual
students, but student
reactions indicate that these
attempts are not entirely
successful.
 Talk between Library Media
Specialist and a student is
uniformly respectful.
 Library Media Specialist
successfully responds to
disrespectful behavior
among students.
 Allowing for cultural
differences, students
participate willingly but may
be somewhat hesitant to
offer their ideas.
 Library Media Specialist
makes general connections
with individual students.
 Students exhibit respect for
Library Media Specialist.
 Library Media Specialist
demonstrates knowledge
and caring about individual
students’ lives beyond the
class and school.
 Disrespectful behavior
among students is rare.
 When necessary, students
respectfully correct one
another in their conduct
towards classmates.
 Students participate without
fear of put-downs or
ridicule from either Library
Media Specialist or other
students.
 Library Media Specialist
respects and encourages
students’ efforts.
 Library Media Specialist is
disrespectful towards
students or insensitive to
students’ ages, cultural
backgrounds and
developmental levels.
 Students’ body language
indicates feelings of hurt,
discomfort, or insecurity.
 Library Media Specialist
displays no familiarity with
or caring about individual
students.
 Library Media Specialist
disregards disrespectful
interactions among
students.
51
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 Library Media violate a
student’s confidentiality
when commenting in front
of the whole class
negatively about a both the
student wants to check out.
 During reading circle time,
the Library Media Specialist
calls on students to read,
not b name, but by
description.
Examples: “The one with the
red hair,” “you with the pink
shirt on,” or “the Mexican
kid.”
Revised July 2015
 Students are very hesitant
before initiating any
conversation with the
Library Media Specialist. It
appears they would rather
struggle with a problem,
because the Library Media
Assistant is unapproachable.
 When the class arrives, the
Library Media Specialist
begins giving them
directions without taking
the time to greet the
students first.
52
 The Library Media
Specialist, is approachable;
students do not hesitate to
initiate conversations with
the Library Media Specialist
 When a class or individual
student enters the library,
the Library Media Specialist
extends a warm greeting to
them all, collectively and
individually.
 Library Media Specialist
comments on particular
student reading choices:
“Suzy, did you finish Harry
Potter yet? Is this
something you could
recommend to Bobby?”
 Library Media Specialist
warmly greets students by
name.as they enter the
library
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist, in
interactions with both students
and colleagues, conveys a
sense of the essential nature of
seeking information and
reading literature. Information
and reading literature. Students
appear to have internalized
those values.
 Library Media Specialist
directs initiatives that
promote reading school
wide and across disciplines
with input from the school
community.
 Library Media Specialist
facilitates students as they
systematically seek
information for research
and learning.
 Students are independently
using and self-selecting
quality resources for
research.
2b: Establishing a Culture for
Investigation and an
Appreciation of Learning and
Literature
Library Media Specialist
conveys a sense that the work
of seeking information and
reading literature is not worth
the tie and energy
Library Media Specialist goes
through the motions of
performing the work of the
position, but without any real
commitment to it
Library Media Specialist, in
interactions with both students
and colleagues, conveys a
sense of the importance of
seeking information and
reading literature.
Critical
Attributes
 The library media center is
not used.
 Library Media Specialist
does not promote reading.
 Library Media Specialist
conveys that there are little
or no relevant resources for
research or learning.
 The library media center is
used minimally and is not a
part of the school culture.
 Library Media Specialist
inconsistently promotes
reading.
 Library Media Specialist
communicates the
importance of seeking
information for research or
learning, but the process is
unstructured.
 Library Media Specialist
provides minimal relevant
resources for research or
learning.
 Some students self-select
pleasure reading materials
to become lifelong learners.
 The library media center is
an essential part of the
school culture.
 Library Media Specialist
directs initiatives that
promote reading.
 Library Media Specialist
communicates the
importance of systematically
seeking information for
research and learning.
 Library Media Specialist
provides a variety of
relevant resources for
research and learning.
(Books, electronic
databases, eBooks, etc.)
 Students’ self-select
pleasure reading materials.
53
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 There are no book displays.
 Secondary: Before school
and at lunch, no students
are using the library
independently.
Revised July 2015
 Book displays are not
changed.
 Book displays include only
one genre, lack decoration
or anything to draw interest.
 Secondary: Few students
come independently to the
library during lunchtime.
54
 Book display for a specific
holiday, (e.g. Valentine’s
Day), include books inn a
variety of genres and levels.
Display includes
decorations to draw
interest.
 Library Media Specialist
assists student in finding
materials relating to student
interests by guiding them in
using the PAC.
 Secondary: Before school
and at lunch, students freely
use the library for a variety
of activities
 Displays are changed
frequently and ideas for
displays and decorations are
student or staff generated.
 Displays reflect events of
interest to school
community.
 Before school and at lunch,
students use library to
pursue independent
learning, group work and
social activities that enhance
the school community.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
Revised July 2015
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
2c: Establishing Maintaining
Library Procedures
Media center routines and
procedures (for example, for
circulation of materials, working
on computers, independent
work) are either nonexistent or
inefficient, resulting in general
confusion. Library assistants are
confused as to their role.
Media center routines and
procedures (for example, for
circulation of materials, working
on computers, independent
work) have been established but
function sporadically. Efforts to
establish guidelines for library
assistants are partially successful.
Media center routines and
procedures (for example, for
circulation of materials, working
on computers, independent
work) have been established and
function smoothly. Library
assistants are clear as to their
role.
Media center routines and
procedures (for example, for
circulation of materials, working
on computers, independent
work) are seamless in their
operation, with students
assuming considerable
responsibility for their smooth
operation. Library assistants
work independently and
contribute to the success of the
media center.
Critical
Attributes
 The Library Media Center
routines and procedures are
not established.
 The Library Media Center’s
physical environment includes
no semblance of order and
has physical hazards.
 The Library Media Assistant
requires constant supervision
to function within the library
program.
 The Library Media Center
routines and procedures need
frequent reminders/ reteaching.
 The Library Media Center’s
physical environment is not
an impediment to learning,
but it does not enhance
learning.
 The Library Media Assistant
requires guidance to
contribute to the success of
the library program.
 The Library Media Center
routines and procedures
function smoothly.
 The Library Media Assistant
contributes to the success of
the library program.
 The Library Media Center
provides access to the OPAC
and other online resources.
 Members of the learning
community can independently
navigate the LMC and utilize
its resources.
 Members of the learning
community take the initiative
to ensure their time in the
LMC is used productively.
 The LMC signage reflects
current resources and
procedures.
 The Library Media Center’s
webpage provides access to
OPAC and other online
resources.
 The Library Media Assistant
takes initiative and contributes
to the success to the library
program.
55
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 Students entering the
library disperse to areas
other than the appropriate
class area.
 Students are unable to
locate resources and are
not receiving direction
from the librarian.
Revised July 2015
 When students enter the
library they require the
Librarian’s directions.
 Students require assistance
to locate resources beyond
what is age appropriate.
56
 Students demonstrate
routines by entering the
library and going to the
lesson area with minimal
direction.
 Library Media Specialists
assist students in finding
resources they need.
 Students use the PAC
independently.
 Students work
independently locating
resources, using computers,
or using the self check
computer station.
 Librarian tailors PAC to
meet student/staff needs
and support independent
work.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
2d: Managing Student
Behavior
Critical
Attributes
There appear to be no established
standards of conduct or students
challenge them. There is not
enough Library Media Specialist
monitoring of student behavior
and response to students’
misbehavior is repressive or
disrespectful of student dignity.
 The library media setting is
chaotic with no apparent
standard of conduct.
 Library Media Specialist or
staff does not monitor
student behavior.
 Some students violate
standards of conduct,
without apparent Library
Media Specialist or staff
awareness.
 When Library Media
Specialist or staff notices
student misbehavior, s/he
appears helpless to do
anything about it.
Revised July 2015
Basic
Standards of conduct appear to
have been established, but their
implementation is inconsistent.
Library Media Specialist tries, with
uneven results, to monitor student
behavior and respond to student
misbehavior.
 Standards of conduct have
been established but are not
consistently practiced.
 Library Media Specialist or
staff attempts to maintain
order in the library media
setting, but with inconsistent
success.
 Library Media Specialist or
staff inconsistently addresses
students’ behavior choices.
57
Proficient
Student behavior is generally
appropriate. Library Media
Specialist monitors student
behavior against established
standards of conduct. Library
Media Specialist response to
student misbehavior is effective,
consistent, proportionate and
respectful to students.
 Standards of conduct are
established and consistently
practiced.
 Library Media Specialist and
staff frequently monitor
student behavior.
 Library Media Specialist and
staff respond effectively to
student misbehavior.
Exemplary
Student behavior is consistently
appropriate. Students take an
active role in monitoring their own
behavior and that of other
students against standards of
conduct. Library Media Specialist
monitoring of student behavior is
subtle and preventative. Library
Media Specialist response to
student misbehavior is sensitive to
individual student needs and
respects students’ dignity.
 Library Media Specialist has
clearly communicated
expectations for student
behavior.
 Library Media Specialist and
staff silently and subtly
monitor student behavior.
 Students respectfully
intervene as appropriate with
classmates to ensure
compliance with standards of
conduct.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 Students are moving
unsafely, and the Library
Media Specialist appears
helpless to stop the
misbehavior.
 (Secondary) When a student
enters and departs the library
independently, she
repeatedly forgets to fill in
the sign-in sheet without
Library Media Specialist staff
awareness
Revised July 2015
 Some students are exhibiting
inappropriate behavior while
browsing the shelves and the
Library Media Specialist
attempts to maintain order,
but is inconsistent.
 (Secondary) When students
enter the library independent
of their classes, the Library
Media Specialist must ensure
they fill out the sign-in sheet.
58
 Before students browse the
shelves, the Library Media
Specialist reminds the
students of appropriate
behavior.
 (Secondary) Students sign in
and out of the Library Media
Specialist without being
reminded.
 Students exhibit appropriate
behavior while browsing the
shelves without redirection
from the Library Media
Specialist.
 (Secondary) Students remind
each other to sign in and sign
out upon arrival and
departure from the Library
Media Specialist
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Basic
Unsatisfactory
2e: Organizing Physical
Space to Enable Smooth
Flow
Library Media Specialist makes
poor use of physical environment,
resulting in poor traffic flow,
confusing signage, inadequate
space devoted to work areas and
computer use, and general
confusion.
Critical
Attributes





Possible Examples



Lack of organization in the
library media center creates
safety and visibility issues.
Poor organization prevents
students from consistently
accessing materials.
Signage is non-existent, not
visible, or unclear.
Lack of space devoted to
work areas and computer use
prevent library media center
from being an effective
learning environment.
Lack of organization creates
an uninviting atmosphere.
Due to poor organization of
space the library only be used
by one group at a time.
Library is lacking areas that
can be used/adapted to
individual/group needs.
Library Media Specialist
cannot supervise the space
well due to poor organization
of space.
Library Media Specialist efforts to
make use of the physical
environment are uneven, resulting
in occasional confusion





Proficient
Library Media Specialist makes
effective use of the physical
environment, resulting in good
traffic flow, clear signage and
adequate space devoted to work
areas and computer use.
Some organization in the
library media center but some
areas of safety and visibility
not addressed.
Students are able to access
materials but may have
difficulty finding them due to
lack of clear signage.
Space is devoted to work
areas and computer use but
not organized efficiently.

Some areas of the library
have signage and students are
able to work in the library.
The librarian can supervise
most areas of the library.





59
Library media center is
organized for safety, visibility,
ease of traffic flow, and
learning.
Signage is clearly visible and
easily read.
Book displays are visible and
related to student interest and
curriculum.
Students are able to use
signage to find a specific area
of the library, i.e. dinosaur
books.
Students enter the library and
locate an area to suit their
needs, i.e. a table set up for
independent study.
The Library Media Specialist
can supervise all areas of the
library; visibility is
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist makes
highly effective use of the physical
environment, resulting in clear
signage, excellent traffic flow, and
adequate space devoted to work
areas and computer use. In
addition, book displays are
attractive and inviting.
 Learning community is
actively solicited for input on
library displays and signage



Students create signage to
collaboratively organize the
library, i.e. “Student
Recommended Books.”
For example, the students
work with the Library Media
Specialist to “genrefy” the
library to better meet their
needs.
Students work with the
Library Media Specialist to
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
60
strategically planned (within
the confines/limitations of
the space).
create a space for independent
research.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 3 for Library Media Specialists: Delivery of Services
3a: Maintaining and
Extending the Library
Collection in Accordance
With the School’s Needs and
Within Budget Limitations
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist fails to
adhere to district or professional
guidelines in selecting materials
for the collection and does not
periodically inventory nor weed
the collection of outdated
material. Collection is unbalanced
among different areas.
Library Media Specialist
inconsistently adheres to district
or professional guidelines in
selecting materials for the
collection but does not
consistently inventory nor weed
the collection of outdated
material. Collection is somewhat
unbalanced among different areas.
Library Media Specialist adheres
to district or professional
guidelines in selecting materials
for the collection and routinely
performs collection development.
Collection is mostly balanced
among different areas.
Library Media Specialist adheres to
district and professional guidelines
in selecting materials for the
collection and consistently
performs in depth collection
development. The Library Media
Specialist uses circulation data and
reports to determine needs.
Collection is highly balanced and
interconnected between different
content/conceptual areas as a
result of analysis of data and
collaboration with staff.
61
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Critical Attributes
 Library Media Specialist
does not adhere to the
established collection
development plan for
evaluation, weeding,
selection, materials
processing and repairs, etc.
 Library Media Specialist
does not refer to the District
Policy and Procedure
Manual and professional
guidelines when selecting
materials.
 Library Media Specialist is
biased when selecting
resources for the collection,
which lacks appropriate
developmental materials,
cultural diversity and
curriculum.
 Library Media Specialist
does no weeding of the
collection or does not refer
to the District Policy and
Procedure Manual and
professional guidelines.
Revised July 2015
 Library Media Specialist
does not consistently adhere
to the established collection
development plan for
evaluation, weeding,
selection, materials
processing and repairs, etc.
 Library Media Specialist
inconsistently refers to the
District Policy and
Procedure Manual and
professional guidelines when
selecting materials.
 Library Media Specialist
attempts to select resources
for the collection, but does
not consistently consider
appropriate developmental
levels, cultural diversity and
curriculum.
 Library Media Specialist
inconsistently refers to the
District Policy and
Procedure Manual and
professional guidelines when
weeding materials.
62
 Library Media Specialist
adheres to the established
Collection Development
plan for evaluation, weeding,
selection, materials
processing and repairs, etc.
 Library Media Specialist
refers and adheres to the
District Policy and
Procedure Manual and
professional guidelines when
selecting materials.
 Library Media Specialist
selects resources for the
collection, with
consideration for
developmental levels,
cultural diversity and
curriculum.
 Library Media Specialist
refers and adheres to the
District Policy and
Procedure Manual and
professional guidelines when
weeding materials.
 Library Media Specialist
teaches and guides others in
using the District Policy and
Procedure Manual and
professional guidelines when
selecting materials.
 Library Media Specialist
routinely collects and
analyzes data from reports
available through the
circulation system.
 Library Media Specialist
regularly collaborates with
staff to develop collection
plan and understand needs.
 Library Media Specialist
develops and uses electronic
surveys and assessments to
determine collection needs.
 Library Media Specialist
keeps current by using
collection development tools,
such as professional journals,
webinars, list-servs, and
technology based resources.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 Library Media Specialist
purchases inappropriate
resources for the school
population. There is no
consideration for Common
Core or AASL standards
during material selection.
Revised July 2015
 Library Media Specialist
chooses books according to
personal choice without a
purposeful plan for
development. There is no
consideration for Common
Core or AASL standards.
63
 Library Media Specialist
regularly evaluates collection
for purchasing, weeding and
development according to
the school population and
district guidelines.
 Library Media Specialist uses
appropriate professional
resources for selection of
new materials for the library
collection.
 Library Media Specialist
encourages student and staff
suggestions for collection
development.
 Library Media Specialist
collaborates with staff to
supplement and understand
needs.
 Selections are made with
background knowledge
pulled from professional
journals, webinars, and
technology based resources.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Basic
Unsatisfactory
3b: Collaborating With
Teachers in the Design of
Instructional Units and
Lessons
Library Media Specialist declines
to collaborate with teachers in the
design of instructional lessons and
units. Library Media Specialist
does not include technology or
information literacy.
Critical Attributes


Library Media Specialist does
nothing to encourage
teachers to collaborate.
Library Media Specialist does
not provide training in the
use of technology.
Library media specialist
collaborates with teachers in the
design of instructional lessons and
units when specifically asked to
do so. Library Media Specialist
occasionally includes technology
and information literacy skills.


Library Media Specialist
occasionally motivates
teachers to collaborate.
Library Media Specialist is
rarely willing to co-teach units
of instruction.
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist initiates
collaboration with teachers in the
design of instructional lessons and
units, and consistently integrates
appropriate information literacy
and technology skills.
Library Media Specialist initiates
collaboration with teachers in the
design of instructional lessons and
units, ensuring the integration of
appropriate information literacy
and technology skills, and locating
additional resources from sources
outside the school. When
scheduling permits, the teacher
and Library Media Specialist coteach units of instruction.
 Library Media Specialist takes
a leadership role when
collaborating with teachers on
a regular basis.
 Library Media Specialist coteaches units of instruction.
 Library Media Specialist
integrates information literacy
skills and allows students to
assist in training.
 Library media specialist
integrates student use of
technology in library lessons.




64
Library Media Specialist
collaborates with teachers.
Library Media Specialist is
willing to co-teach units of
instruction.
Library Media Specialist
consistently integrates
information literacy skills
Library media specialist
integrates technology skills in
library lessons.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples


A visit to the school library
shows no evidence of
collaboration between the
Library Media Specialist and
classroom teachers.
Evidence might include:
email traffic, student projects,
book displays, new materials
purchases, bulletin board
displays, handouts, lesson
plans, etc.



Revised July 2015
The classroom teacher
initiates communication
regarding collaboration with
the Library Media Specialist.
The Library Media Specialist
will support teacher requests.
Evidence might include:
email traffic, student projects,
book displays, new materials
purchases, bulletin board
displays, handouts, lesson
plans, etc.
65


The Library Media Specialist
sends frequent emails
offering to share expertise;
book talks, gathering themed
books, co-teach lessons,
research orientation, new
student orientations, etc.
The Library Media Specialist
is seen working with students
and teachers on lessons and
projects related to classroom
instruction.



The Library Media Specialist
offers and delivers concrete
instructional support through
the library program.
Displays in the library reflect
learning in the classroom.
Secondary: Library Media
Specialist attends
team/departmental meetings
to gain a better understanding
of the curriculum and
classroom needs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Basic
Unsatisfactory
3c: Engaging Students in the
Appreciation of Literature
and in Learning Information
Skills
Students are not engaged in
appreciating literature and in
learning information skills
because of poor design of
activities, poor grouping
strategies, or inappropriate
materials.
Critical Attributes





Library Media Specialist does
nothing to encourage
students to read or appreciate
literature.
Few students are engaged in
learning information skills.
There is no alignment of
lesson to instructional
outcomes.
Instructional materials used
are unsuitable to the lesson
and/or the students.
The lesson drags or is rushed.
Only some students are engaged
in appreciating literature and in
learning information skills due to
uneven design of activities,
grouping strategies or partially
appropriate materials.





Library Media Specialist
occasionally encourages
students to read or appreciate
literature.
Some students are engaged in
learning information skills in
coordination with curricular
areas.
Lessons are somewhat
aligned to instructional
outcomes using goals and
objectives.
Instructional materials used
are somewhat suitable to the
lesson and/or the students.
The lesson pacing is uneven.
66
Proficient
Exemplary
Students are engaged in
appreciating literature and in
learning information skills
because of effective design of
activities, grouping strategies, and
appropriate materials.
Library Media Specialist initiates
collaboration with teachers in the
design of instructional lessons and
units, ensuring the integration of
appropriate information literacy
and technology skills, and locating
additional resources from sources
outside the school. When
scheduling permits, the teacher
and Library Media Specialist coteach units of instruction.
 Library Media Specialist takes
a leadership role when
collaborating with teachers on
a regular basis.
 Library Media Specialist coteaches units of instruction.
 Library Media Specialist
integrates information literacy
skills and allows students to
assist in training.
 Library media specialist
integrates student use of
technology in library lessons.





Library Media Specialist
encourages students to read a
variety of materials and
appreciate literature.
Most students are engaged in
learning information skills in
coordination with curricular
areas.
Lessons are aligned to
instructional outcomes using
goals and objectives and are
instructionally stimulating.
Instructional materials used
are suitable to the lesson
and/or the students.
The lesson pacing provides
students the time needed to
be intellectually engaged.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples

Library Media Specialist is
unable to answer student
requests for a “good book”.

Revised July 2015
Library Media Specialist waits
for students to ask for book
suggestions.



67
Library Media Specialist
provides book talks, reviews
and recommendations to the
learning community.
Library Media Specialist
provides opportunities to
explore websites such as
Novelist, Amazon, Barnes &
Noble.
Library Media Specialist uses
effective questioning
strategies to make
suggestions: “Johnny, what
was the last thing you read
that you liked?”



The Library Media Specialist
offers and delivers concrete
instructional support through
the library program.
Displays in the library reflect
learning in the classroom.
Secondary: Library Media
Specialist attends
team/departmental meetings
to gain a better understanding
of the curriculum and
classroom needs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
3d: Assisting Students and
Teachers in the Use of
Technology in the
Library/Media Center
Critical Attributes
Library Media Specialist declines
to assist students and teachers in
the use of technology in the
library media center.
 Library Media Specialist
makes no effort to gather
evidence of students’
effective use of technology.
 Students receive no
feedback.
 Library Media Specialist
makes no effort to assist
students and staff at the
point of need.
Revised July 2015
Basic
Library Media Specialist assists
students and teachers in the use
of technology in the library
media center when specifically
asked to do so.
 Library Media Specialist
may monitor understanding
through a single method, or
without eliciting evidence
of understanding from
students.
 Rudimentary use of
opportunities for point of
need training for students
and staff is evident.
68
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist initiates
sessions to assist students and
teachers in the use of technology
in the library media center.
Library Media Specialist is
proactive in initiating sessions to
assist students and teachers in
the use of technology in the
library media center.
 Library Media Specialist
elicits evidence of students’
effective use of technology
in the library.
 Library Media Specialist
initiates technology training
for students and staff at the
point of need.
 Library Media Specialist
regularly elicits evidence of
student understanding and
effective use of technology
and uses the evidence to
improve procedures in the
library media center.
 Assessment of the library
media program is ongoing
and based on clear goals
and objectives and the
collection of evidence.
 High-quality feedback
comes from many sources,
including students; it is
specific and focused on
improvement.
 Library Media Specialist
creates opportunities for
students and staff to take
charge of their learning.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 Library Media Specialist is
not able to recommend or
guide students to
appropriate engaging
resources.
 Expectations for students
are low.
Revised July 2015
 Library Media Specialist
sometimes recommends or
guides students to
resources that link well
with the content learning
goals, students’ interests
and which engage students.
 Library Media Specialist
expectations for students
are inconsistent.
69
 Library Media Specialist
clearly communicates
directions and procedures
and is able to recognize
when it is necessary to
repeat and clarify.
 Technology is used to
demonstrate and model
ways to use the resources
and tools in the library and
virtual environments.
 Library Media Specialist
teaches ethical and safe use
of technology.
 Library Media Specialist has
a variety of technology
tools that they teach
students to use to engage
and further students
learning.
 Library Media Specialist
anticipates possible
misunderstandings.
 Technology is used
effectively to demonstrate
and model productive ways
to use the resources and
tools in the library and in
virtual environments.
 Students model ethical and
safe use of technology.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Basic
Unsatisfactory
3e: Demonstrating Flexibility
and Responsiveness
Library Media Specialist adheres
to library media program plan, in
spite of evidence of its
inadequacy.
Critical Attributes

Possible Examples

Given negative feedback on
the library program, the
Library Media Specialist
makes no attempt to make
changes or improvements.
Library Media Specialist
responds negatively to
feedback from others. No
changes are made.
Library Media Specialist makes
modest changes in the library
media program when confronted
with evidence of the need for
change.



Proficient
Library Media Specialist makes
revisions to the library media
program when they are needed.
Given feedback on the
library program, Library
Media Specialist makes
small changes.
Library Media Specialist
does not solicit input and
greater understanding on
how to improve the
program.

Library Media Specialist
responds to feedback but
makes minimal changes to
the library program.

70


Library Media Specialist
responds positively to
feedback from students,
staff, and administration.
Library Media Specialist
regularly makes changes to
the library program.
Library Media Specialist is
open to suggestions from
students and staff.
Library Media Specialist
responds with grace to
feedback from students,
staff and administration
about library program,
changes in scheduling or
use of space. After
thoughtful consideration
appropriate changes are
made.
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist is
continually seeking ways to
improve the library media
program and makes changes as
needed in response to student,
parent, or teacher input.

Library Media Specialist
elicits input from students
and staff for the purpose of
improving the library
program.

Library Media Specialist
asks for input on ways to
improve their library
program from students,
staff and administration; for
example, after student
recommendations Library
Media Specialist generifies
areas of library, at student
request Library Media
Specialist researches new
software and implements.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 4 for Library Media Specialists: Professional Responsibilities
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4a: Reflecting on Practice
Library Media Specialist does
not reflect on practice, or the
reflections are inaccurate or selfserving.
Library Media Specialist’s
reflection on practice is
moderately accurate and
objective, without citing specific
examples and with only global
suggestions as to how it might
be improved.
Library Media Specialist’s
reflection is highly accurate and
perceptive, citing specific
examples. Library Media Specialist
draws on an extensive repertoire
to suggest alternative strategies
and their likely success.
Critical Attributes
 Library Media Specialist
draws incorrect conclusions
about the effectiveness of
their practice.
 Library Media Specialist
does not consider
suggestions to improve
practice.
 Library Media Specialist has
a general sense of whether
or not practices were
effective.
 Library Media Specialist
offers general modifications
for future actions.
Library Media Specialist’s
reflection provides an accurate
and objective description of
practice, citing specific positive
and negative characteristics.
Library Media Specialist makes
some specific suggestions as to
how the media program might
be improved.
 Library Media Specialist
accurately assesses the
effectiveness of instructional
or other library activities.
 Library Media Specialist
identifies specific ways in
which their practice might
be improved.
Possible Examples
 There is no attempt to
change lessons or
procedures. These
documents have remained
similar year after year
 Library Media Specialist has
written notes on the margins
of lessons. It is unclear if any
changes will be made for the
future.
 Library Media Specialist
frequently takes a few
minutes to make notes about
successes or how to improve
the flow of the lesson or
procedures for the future.
These notes are added to
lesson plans or procedure
manuals and the changes are
implemented in a timely
manner.
 Library Media Specialist
produces a reflection of practice
identifying successes and areas
for improvement with each
lesson or procedure. Included
are indicators for how
effectiveness was met, what
changes will be made and why.
 Based on these reflections
Library Media Specialist creates
a plan for improvements.
 Library Media Specialist solicits
advice from colleagues to
improve practice.
71
 Library Media Specialist’s
assessment of their practice is
thoughtful and includes specific
indicators of effectiveness.
 Library Media Specialist’s
suggestions for improvement
draw on an extensive repertoire.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4b: Maintaining Accurate
Records
 Library Media Specialist’s
system for maintaining
records are non-existent or in
disarray.
 Library Media Specialist’s
system for maintaining
records is rudimentary and
only partially effective.
 Library Media Specialist’s
system for maintaining
records is organized and fully
effective. Requested reports
are submitted on time.
 Library Media Specialist
anticipates teacher needs
when preparing reports,
follows established
procedures, and suggests
improvement to those
procedures. Library Media
Specialist’s system for
maintaining records is fully
effective as it analytically
supports the library program
and extends services.
Critical Attributes
 There is no system for both
instructional and noninstructional record keeping.
(Circulation data, budget
keeping, collection
development, etc.)
 There is a rudimentary
system for both instructional
and non-instructional record
keeping. (Circulation data,
budget keeping, collection
development, etc.)
 There is an effective and
efficient system for both
instructional and noninstructional record keeping
which is reported.
(Circulation data, budget
keeping, etc.)
 Library Media Specialist
anticipates the need for data
based reports and budgets.
Possible Examples
 Library Media Specialist is
unable to produce records of
circulation, budget, or space
usage.
 Secondary: There is no system
in place to track independent
student usage.
 Library Media Specialist is
able to produce some records
on request but does not have
consistent statistics.
 There is an accurate system
for both instructional and
non-instructional record
keeping. (Circulation data,
budget keeping, collection
development, etc.)
 Library Media Specialist is
able to access data to produce
accurate reports as needed.
 Library Media Specialist
maintains budgets and
collection reports at need.
 Library Media Specialist
produces reports on budget,
circulation and library usage
and communicates that
information as needed.
72
 Library Media Specialist is
able to produce reports and
anticipates the need for data
to support school initiatives.
 Library Media Specialist
produces regular summary
reports for stakeholders and
communicates that
information proactively.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Revised July 2015

Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4c: Communicating With the
Larger Community
 Library Media Specialist
makes no effort to engage in
outreach efforts to parents or
the larger community.
 Library Media Specialist
makes sporadic efforts to
engage in outreach efforts to
parents or the larger
community.
 Library Media Specialist
engages in outreach efforts to
parents and the larger
community.
 Library Media Specialist is
proactive in reaching out to
parents and establishing
contacts with outside libraries,
coordinating efforts for
mutual benefits.
Critical Attributes
 Information about the library
program is not made available
to parents or the larger
community.
 Library Media Specialist does
not respond appropriately to
parent concerns and
questions.
 Information about the library
program is available on an
inconsistent basis.
 Library Media Specialist
responds inconsistently to
parent concerns and
questions.
 Information about the library
program is available on a
regular basis.
 Library Media Specialist
responds consistently and in a
timely manner to parent
concerns and questions.
 Library Media Specialist uses a
variety of methods to
communicate with the
learning community.
 Library Media Specialist
communications are always
sensitive to the learning
communities’ cultural norms.
 Library Media Specialist
collaborates with the larger
community to provide
opportunities and resources
for students. (Public libraries,
businesses, government
leaders, etc.)
73
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 The Library Media Specialist
has no “presence” in the
community.
 The Library Media Specialist
does not initiate
communication with the
larger community.
Revised July 2015
 Occasional (semester)
submissions to the school
newsletter.
 Rare communication to staff
and colleagues.
 Replies to parent queries, but
does not initiate conversation.
74
 Regular (quarterly)
submissions to the School
newsletter.
 Frequent emails to staff,
colleagues, and parents
regarding events, programs,
new titles, apps, games,
websites and student learning
in the media center.
 Joins the PTA.
 Maintains social bookmarking
site, website, or engages in
social media such as
Facebook, Twitter, etc.
 Articles in district newsletter
and/or local newspapers.
 Parents are invited into the
library and Library Media
Specialist shows them how to
use online resources either as
a group or one-on-one as
needed.
 Joins the PTA and
participates in meetings or
events.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
Revised July 2015
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4d: Participating in a
Professional Community
Library Media Specialist’s
relationships with colleagues are
negative or self-serving, and the
specialist avoids being involved in
school and district events and
projects.
Library Media Specialist’s
relationships with colleagues are
cordial, and the specialist
participates in school and district
events and projects when
specifically requested.
Library Media Specialist
participates actively in school
and district events and projects
and maintains positive and
productive relationships with
colleagues.
Library Media Specialist makes a
substantial contribution to
school and district events and
projects and assumes leadership
with colleagues.
Critical Attributes
 Library Media Specialist’s
relationships with colleagues are
characterized by negativity or
combativeness.
 Library Media Specialist
purposefully avoids contributing
to activities promoting
professional inquiry.
 Library Media Specialist avoids
involvement in school activities, as
well as district and community
projects.
 • Library Media Specialist is not
involved in any activity that might
enhance knowledge or skill.
 Library Media Specialist
purposefully resists discussing
performance with supervisors or
colleagues.
 Library Media Specialist ignores
invitations to join professional
organizations or attend
conferences.
 Library Media Specialist has
cordial relationships with
colleagues.
 When invited, Library Media
Specialist participates in
activities related to
professional inquiry.
 When asked, Library Media
Specialist participates in
school activities, as well as
district and community
projects.
 Library Media Specialist
participates in professional
activities when they are
required or provided by the
district.
 Library Media Specialist
reluctantly accepts feedback
from supervisors and
colleagues.
 Library Media Specialist
contributes in a limited
fashion to professional
organizations.
 Library Media Specialist has
supportive and collaborative
relationships with colleagues.
 Library Media Specialist
regularly participates in
activities related to
professional inquiry.
 Library Media Specialist
participates in school events
and school district and
community projects.
 Library Media Specialist seeks
regular opportunities for
continued professional
development.
 Library Media Specialist
welcomes colleagues and
supervisors into the library
media center for the
purposes of gaining insight
from their feedback.
 Library Media Specialist
actively participates in
organizations designed to
contribute to the profession.
 Library Media Specialist takes
a leadership role in
promoting activities related
to professional inquiry.
 Library Media Specialist
regularly contributes to and
leads events that positively
impact school life.
 Library Media Specialist
significantly contributes to
district and community
projects.
 Library Media Specialist seeks
regular opportunities for
continued professional
development, including
initiating action research.
 Library Media Specialist
actively seeks feedback from
supervisors and colleagues.
 Library Media Specialist takes
an active role in professional
organizations in order to
contribute to the profession.
 Library Media Specialist takes
a leadership role in school,
district, and professional
organizations, etc.
75
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 Library Media Specialist
relationships with colleagues are
frequently negative or self-serving.
 When asked by a teacher to assist
in a lesson the Library Media
Specialist replies in an
unprofessional manner.
 Library Media Specialist avoids or
refuses to be involved in school
and district events and projects.
Revised July 2015
 Library Media Specialist
participates in school and
district events and projects
when specifically requested.
 Library Media Specialist
usually maintains a positive
collaborative relationship
with colleagues.
76
 Library Media Specialist
contributes to the school and
to the district by voluntarily
participating in school events
and serving on school and
district committees, such as
participating in a curriculum
committee.
 Support and cooperation
characterize relationships
with colleagues.
 Library Media Specialist
belongs to local, state, and/or
national professional
organizations.
 Library Media Specialist
makes substantial
contributions to the school
and to the district by
voluntarily participating in
school events, serving on
school and district
committees, and assuming an
appropriate leadership role.
 Library Media Specialist
actively participates in local
and/or national
organizations, such as
presenting at an in-service or
presenting at conferences.
 Library Media Specialist
serves on professional board
or works on a special project
for the organization.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
Revised July 2015
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4e: Engaging in Professional
Development
Library Media Specialist does
not participate in professional
development activities, even
when such activities are clearly
needed for the enhancement of
skills.
Library Media Specialist’s
participation in professional
development activities is limited
to those that are convenient or
are required.
Library Media Specialist seeks
out opportunities for
professional development based
on an individual assessment of
need.
Library Media Specialist actively
pursues professional
development opportunities and
makes substantial contributions
to the profession through such
activities as offering workshops
to colleagues.
Critical Attributes
 Library Media Specialist is
dishonest.
 Library Media Specialist does
not notice the needs of
students.
 Library Media Specialist
engages in practices that are
self-serving.
 Library Media Specialist
willfully rejects state, school
and district regulations, as an
example, violating copyright
rules.
 Library Media Specialist is
honest.
 Library Media Specialist
notices the needs of students
and staff but is inconsistent
in addressing them.
 Library Media Specialist does
not notice that some school
practices result in poor
conditions for students and
staff.
 Library Media Specialist
makes decisions
professionally, but on a
limited basis.
 Library Media Specialist
somewhat complies with
state, school and district
regulations, as an example,
posting copyright rules.
 Library Media Specialist
participates in professional
organizations at various levels
 Library Media Specialist
willingly participates in team
and departmental decisionmaking.
 Library Media Specialist fully
complies with state, school
and district regulations, as an
example, observing copyright
rules.
 Library Media Specialist is
considered a leader in terms
of honesty, integrity, and
confidentiality.
 Library Media Specialist is
highly proactive in serving
students and staff.
 Library Media Specialist
makes a concerted effort to
ensure opportunities are
available for all students and
staff to be successful.
 Library Media Specialist takes
a leadership role in team and
departmental decisionmaking.
 Library Media Specialist takes
a leadership role in
complying with state, school
and district regulations, as an
example, teaching copyright
rules.
77
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 Library Media Specialist does
not attend required
workshops/meetings or
school professional
development.
Revised July 2015
 Library Media Specialist
attends district
workshop/meetings.
 Library Media Specialist
participates in school
professional development
78
 Library Media Specialist
creates a presentation for
example: using primary
resources and speaks at a
staff meeting.
 Library Media Specialist
attends a cohort group of
fellow librarians to work
collaboratively on current
school library issues, trends,
and professional endeavors.
 Library Media Specialist
offers training to group of
4th-6th Grade teachers
regarding research resources
available for them to use with
their students.
 Library Media Specialist
attends the American
Association of School
Librarians (AASL)
conference or Alaska State
Library Conference (AKLA)
and then brings back new
knowledge to her staff during
a staff meeting.
 Experienced Library Media
Specialist mentors a new
Library Media Specialist in
the district, helping her
develop her library goals, and
collection development plans.
 Library Media Specialist leads
a cohort group of fellow
librarians to work
collaboratively on current
school library issues, trends,
and professional endeavors.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Unsatisfactory
Revised July 2015
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Library Media Specialist can be
counted on to hold the highest
standards of honesty and
integrity and takes a leadership
role with colleagues in ensuring
there is not plagiarism or
violation of copyright law.
 Library Media Specialist is
considered a leader in terms
of honesty, integrity, and
confidentiality.
 Library Media Specialist takes
a leadership role in
professional organizations at
various levels.
 Library Media Specialist
actively assist colleagues in
understanding and adhering
to all laws and ethical
guidelines (ALA/AASL)
regarding patron
confidentiality.
 Library Media Specialist takes
a leadership role in complying
with state, school and district
regulations, as an example,
teaching copyright rules.
4f: Showing Professionalism
Library Media Specialist displays
dishonesty in interactions with
colleagues, students and the
public; violates copyright laws.
Library Media Specialist is
honest in interactions with
colleagues, students, and the
public; respects copyright laws.
Library Media Specialist displays
high standards of honesty and
integrity in interactions with
colleagues, students and the
public; adheres carefully to
copyright laws.
Critical Attributes
 Library Media Specialist is
dishonest.
 Library Media Specialist fails
to adhere to laws and ethical
guidelines (ALA/AASL)
regarding patron
confidentiality.
 Library Media Specialist does
not participate in professional
organizations at any level.
 Library Media Specialist
willfully rejects state, school
and district regulations, as an
example, violating copyright
rules.
 Library Media Specialist is
honest.
 Library Media Specialist
inconsistently adheres to laws
and ethical guidelines
(ALA/AASL) regarding
patron confidentiality.
 Library Media Specialist
somewhat complies with
state, school and district
regulations, as an example,
posting copyright rules.
 Library Media Specialist
participates in professional
organizations at various levels
 Library Media Specialist
adheres to all laws and ethical
guidelines (ALA/AASL)
regarding patron
confidentiality.
 Library Media Specialist fully
complies with state, school
and district regulations, as an
example, observing copyright
rules.
 Library Media Specialist is
honest and known for having
high standards of integrity
79
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Library/Media Specialists
Possible Examples
 Library Media Specialist
provides a list of books a
student has checked out in
violation of AS 40.25.140
Confidentiality of library
records.
 Library Media Specialist
copies VHS tapes to DVD
format without copyright
permission
Revised July 2015
 Library Media Specialist does
not provide information to
students or staff on copyright.
 Library Media Specialist is
unable to clearly answer a
copyright question from a
student or staff member.
 Library Media Specialist
refuses to reveal what books a
student has checked out but is
unable to communicate the
legal and ethical reasons
80
 Library Media Specialist
develops a handout of
bibliography and/or Web
links on Library homepage of
tools for sixth graders
working on a Social Studies
research project.
 As needed, Library Media
Specialist communicates
ethical and legal behavior
regarding confidentiality and
is able to articulate the
reasons for confidentiality.
 With prompting students will
cite resources in their work.
 Students independently cite
resources in their work.
 Library Media Specialist
presents at local, state or
national conferences.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Domain 1 School Nurses: Planning and Preparation
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1a: Demonstrating Medical
Knowledge and Knowledge
of Nursing Process
Nurse demonstrates limited
understanding of medical
knowledge and nursing process.
Nurse demonstrates consistent
understanding of medical
knowledge and nursing process.
Nurse demonstrates extensive
understanding of medical knowledge,
concepts, and nursing practice. Nurse
uses professional knowledge and data
to approach and address student
health issues.
Critical Attributes
• Assessments are inaccurate.
• Assessments are basic or
• Assessments are clear and
minimal.
accurate.
• Knowledge of nursing process
• Knowledge of nursing process is • Knowledge of the nursing
is limited.
basic.
process is appropriate.
• Nurse does not communicate
• Nurse occasionally provides
• Nurse’s knowledge is current
student needs to staff.
staff with information on
and consistently reflects best
• Medical knowledge is not
• Assessments are thorough, accurate,
• Does not understand the
• Has complete, appropriate and
based on evidence-based data.
Examples
nursing process, how to
assess students, and then how
to apply it to a treatment- e.
g. does not realize that pain
in the right upper quadrant of
abdomen could be
appendicitis and needs a
referral to a parent for
medical follow-up.
Nurse demonstrates basic
understanding of medical
knowledge and nursing practice.
student need.
• Medical knowledge is basic and
may not be based on current
practice.
• Has very limited knowledge of
nursing assessment of student
upon arrival to the health office,
e.g. can assess a sore throat but
does not know what symptoms
are present for a referral for
possible strep throat.
81
practice standards.
• Has appropriate knowledge of
nursing assessment and is able
to apply it to the nursing
process, with nursing diagnosis
and treatment: e.g. accurately
assesses a student has
ringworm, follows up with
recommending a treatment for
school (covering area) and
follows up with parents as to
recommended plan based on
and utilize evidence-based
assessment techniques, instruments,
and tools.
• Knowledge of the nursing process
shows synthesis and evaluation of
information based on evidence
based data.
• Medical knowledge reflects current
best practice standards and is shared
with the educational team and
community.
detailed knowledge of nursing
assessment of the student with a
significant medical need
(abdominal pain, possible
appendicitis) upon arrival to the
health office including questions as
to past medical history and
potential contributing factors.
Follows up with parent to
recommend medical evaluation that
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
current district guidelines and
sends home those guidelines
for parents to follow.
82
day and follow up with parent the
next day. Is actively involved in
teaching other school staff findings
and follow-up for this student.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Nurse displays accurate
understanding of the typical and
atypical developmental
characteristics of the age group.
Nurse displays extensive understanding
of the typical developmental
characteristics of the age group, as well
as exceptions to the general patterns
and applies it in the planning nursing
services.
1b: Demonstrating
Knowledge of Child and
Adolescent Development
Nurse displays limited
knowledge of child and
adolescent development.
Critical Attributes
• Displays minimal knowledge • Demonstrates basic knowledge
of child and adolescent
of child and adolescent
development and rarely shares
development and occasionally
information with staff.
shares it with staff.
• Demonstrates accurate
knowledge of child and/or
adolescent development.
• Nurse consistently shares
appropriate student
information with teachers.
• The nurse is aware of the
special needs represented by
students in the class.
• The nurse is well informed
about students’ cultural
heritages and incorporates
this knowledge.
• Demonstrates extensive
understanding of the developmental
characteristics of an age group, as
well as exceptions to the general
patterns in a given population.
Incorporates cultural considerations
not planning nursing services.
Examples
• Does not assess student’s
developmental status.
• Able to utilize consistent
knowledge of the student’s
developmental status and
applies it to the nursing
assessment of the student
and shares appropriate
findings with the staff.
• Able to utilize extensive knowledge
of the student’s developmental
status and applies it to the nursing
assessment of the student and
shares appropriate information with
the staff: an updated plan of care
based on assessment of how the
developmental status is effecting
student learning.
Nurse displays basic knowledge of
child and adolescent development.
• Able to utilize only minimal
knowledge of the student’s
developmental status.
83
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1c: Establishing Goals for
the Nursing Program
Appropriate to the Setting
and the Students Served
Nurse has limited goals for
nursing practice, or they are
inappropriate to the situation,
the age, and/or the diagnosis
of the students.
Nurse’s goals for nursing practice Nurse’s goals for nursing
are basic to the situation, the age, practice are clear and appropriate
and the diagnosis of the students. to the situation, age, and
diagnosis of the students.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse is not familiar with
• Nurse has a basic
• Nurse has an accurate
• Nurse is able to anticipate the needs
• Does not set goals for the
• Sets limited goals for the
• Consistently sets goals for the
• Provides highly appropriate
the needs of the students,
staff, and parents.
• Nurse does not integrate
health goals to promote
strategies for learning.
Examples
nursing program.
understanding of the needs of
the students, staff, and parents.
• Nurse occasionally anticipates
the needs of the school
population.
• Nurse inconsistently sets health
goals to promote strategies for
learning.
nursing program and
sometimes communicate them
with staff.
84
understanding of the needs of
the students, staff, and
community.
• Nurse collaborates with staff
to determine needs for
students at various
developmental levels.
• Nurse consistently sets health
goals to reflect the needs of
the school community.
nursing program, is
communicating actively with
staff and plans some health
goals for the school.
Nurse’s goals for the nursing practice
are highly appropriate to the situation,
age, and diagnosis of the students.
Goals have been developed following
consultations with students, parents,
and colleagues.
of the students, staff, and community
based on input from others and a
health needs assessment.
• Nurse enhances school wellness
through opportunities such as classes
and health events to promote
wellness in the school.
Nurse is aware of current practice
standards in school nursing and
incorporates information gleaned
from other school nurse sources.
communication with parents and
staff members following student
interactions. Always follows up staff
requests for additional medical
information to help them with
student learning goals. Plans a
school wellness class or health
event.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
1d: Demonstrating
knowledge of Federal, State,
community and district
regulations and resources.
Nurse demonstrates limited
knowledge of the coordinated
school health
program/integrated care
delivery model and does not
effectively incorporate the use
of resources.
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Nurse displays basic awareness of
the coordinated school health
program/ integrated care delivery
model incorporating the use of
state regulations, utilization of
community resources and District
policies for students available
through the school or District.
Nurse displays solid awareness of
the coordinated school health
program/ integrated care delivery
model, as well as governmental
regulations and resources for
students available through the
school or district. Some
familiarity with resources external
to the school is evident.
Nurse’s coordinated school health
program/integrated plan of care delivery
model is highly coherent and serves to
support not only the students
individually and in groups, but also the
broader educational program utilizing a
wide variety of state regulations and
resources in the school, District, and
community.
Critical Attributes
Nurse cannot define an
integrated care delivery model.
Nurse incorrectly assesses the
utilization of the model in
individually assigned schools.
Nurse incorrectly identifies
connections in District
policies, state regulations, and
available resources and
inconsistently applies this
information in practice.
Nurse can define an integrated
care delivery model.
Nurse inconsistently assesses the
utilization of the model in
individually assigned schools.
Nurse inconsistently identifies
connections in District policies,
state regulations, and available
resources and inconsistently
applies this information in
practice.
Nurse can consistently define
an integrated care delivery
model.
Nurse assesses the utilization
of the model and can identify
recommendations for
improvement.
Nurse identifies connections in
District policies, state
regulations, and available
resources and consistently
applies this information in
practice.
Nurse can consistently define an
integrated care delivery model
providing examples and theories for
application.
Nurse assesses the utilization of the
model in individually assigned schools
and can discuss recommendations for
improvement based on comparative
data collection.
Nurse actively investigates connections
in District policies, state regulations,
and available resources and
consistently applies this information in
practice.
Examples
Does not review student
immunization records for
compliance with state
mandates.
Reviews student immunization
records but does not follow-up
with students out of
compliance.
Reviews student immunization
records, and follows-up
regularly throughout the
school year according to state
guidelines.
Follows student immunization
records, follows-up consistently
throughout the school year according
to state guidelines, and educates
parents with community resources for
immunization compliance. Follows
solid guidelines to ensure students in
the school are not out of compliance
with immunizations.
85
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1e: Designing Coherent
Service Delivery Plans
Nurse is unable to develop
plans that result in expected
outcomes for the individual.
Nurse is able to develop plans to Nurse develops plans that
attain expected outcomes some
result in expected outcomes for
individuals, including
of the time.
individuals with diverse medical
needs.
Nurse utilizes solid collaborative and
evidence-based practice to develop
exceptional plans that exceed the
expected outcomes for given
individuals.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse has limited
• Nurse has basic understanding • Nurse consistently plans and
• The program is systemically evaluated
• Does not create an
• Creates a basic emergency care • Creates a complete
• Creates a detailed emergency care plan
understanding of the
evaluation process.
• Nurse is resistant to selfreflection and program
evaluation.
Examples
emergency health care plan
for a student with lifethreatening food allergies.
of program evaluation.
• Nurse can be inconsistently
reflective.
plan for a student with lifethreatening food allergies, but
does not communicate the
plan to the student’s teacher.
86
integrates the health program
with overall school needs and
curriculum. Nurse evaluates
effectiveness of the plans.
emergency care plan for a
student with life-threatening
food allergies and
communicates the plan to the
student’s teacher and
appropriate staff members.
based on goals and outcomes in
collaboration with staff and
community members.
• Nurse maintains data to utilize in the
evaluation process.
for a student with life-threatening
food allergies and communicates the
plan to the student’s teacher and
appropriate staff member’s as well
training the staff members in the use
of an epinephrine pen and how to
recognize and respond to a lifethreatening emergency. Prepares
updated training before each field trip
and has all supplies ready to send with
field trip staff the day ahead.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Domain 2 for School Nurses: The Environment
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
2a: Creating an
Environment of Respect
and Rapport
Nurse’s interactions with
students, parents, and staff are
mostly negative, inappropriate, or
insensitive to age, cultural
backgrounds.
Nurse’s interactions with students,
staff and parents reflect occasional
inconsistencies with limited
understanding of age, culture and
developmental level.
Nurse’s interactions with students,
staff, and parents are consistently
effective, appropriate and
respectful.
Nurse demonstrates positive and
effective communication while
building and maintaining
relationships in the school and
community with students, staff,
parents, and health community.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse rarely displays the
• Nurse inconsistently displays
• Nurse effectively
• Nurse has a solid understanding
•
•
•
•
ability to communicate
effectively.
Nurse communication does
not reflect an understanding of
FERPA.
the ability to communicate
effectively.
Nurse has basic understanding
of FERPA, but inconsistently
adheres to regulations.
•
Examples
• Nurse rarely displays ability to
communicate effectively.
• Nurse usually communicates
effectively with students and
families, but occasionally has
breaches in following
confidentially guidelines.
87
•
communicates with students,
parents, and staff.
The nurse’s interactions are
consistently appropriate to
ages, cultures and
developmental levels of the
students.
The nurse follows FERPA
guidelines.
Nurse is mindful of privacy
and confidentiality guidelines,
e.g. FERPA. Nurse is sensitive
to cultural differences.
Exemplary
•
•
of the need for a variety of
styles of communication
The nurse’s interactions are
always appropriate to the ages,
cultures, and developmental
levels of the students.
Nurse consistently protects the
privacy of the students in
accordance with FERPA.
Nurse is knowledgeable and
respectful when approached
with a health or wellness issue.
Students, staff and community
find the nurse very respectful,
helpful and approachable.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
2b: Establishing a Culture for
Health and Wellness
Nurse makes no attempt to
establish a culture for health and
wellness in the school.
Nurse’s attempts to promote a
culture for health and wellness
throughout the school are
inconsistent.
Nurse makes meaningful
contributions toward the
establishment of a culture for health
and wellness. The nurse
demonstrates sensitivity to the
developmental, cultural, and
socioeconomic needs of the school
community.
Nurse makes significant
contributions toward the
establishment of a culture for health
and wellness via leadership and
collaboration with members of the
school community.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse is not sensitive to the
• Nurse works inconsistently with
• Nurse consistently works with
• Nurse collects data and examines
• Nurse is unaware of health
• Nurse has limited awareness or
• Nurse disseminates health
• Nurse plans health screening
developmental, cultural, and
socioeconomic characteristics
of the school community.
Examples
and wellness resources that
may benefit the school
population.
parents and teachers to develop a
plan that will promote positive
growth and education for the
student and school
• Nurse has limited awareness or
competence in the role of health
and safety and access to
resources.
competency in the role of health
and safety and resources that are
available.
88
parents and teachers to develop a
plan that will promote positive
growth and education for the
student and school.
• Nurse seeks resources to
complete referrals when
appropriate.
• Nurse consistently addresses
health and safety needs of the
school community.
information via newsletters,
bulletin boards and other venues.
Nurse may provide health
teachings to classes and student
body upon request.
delivery of service to enhance the
health and wellness of
environment.
• Nurse develops teaching
programs, small group programs
to promote health and wellness
or address areas of need.
• Nurse recruits resources to utilize
for screening follow-up based on
community needs.
with available outside providers,
such as flu shot and blood tests
for staff, or provides Photoscreening.
• School Nurse does safety
monitoring and provides
suggestions for improvement
based on obtained data.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
2c: Following Health
Protocols and Procedures
Nurse’s procedures for the
nursing office are nonexistent or
in disarray.
Nurse has rudimentary and
Nurse’s procedures for the nursing
partially successful procedures for office are effective.
the nursing office.
Nurse’s procedures for the nursing
office are seamless and anticipate
unexpected situations.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse is not familiar with
• Nurse has a basic
• Nurse has a thorough
• Nurse regularly reviews and
•
•
•
Examples
health protocols and District
policies.
Nurse does not follow
through with compliance
requirements for families with
complex needs and does not
communicate effectively with
the families.
• Nurse fails to meet
deadlines, or may provide
inaccurate information for
State-required reporting.
understanding of health
protocols, District policies.
Nurse inconsistently follows
through with compliance
requirements for families with
complex needs and
inconsistently communicates
effectively with the families.
• Nurse inconsistently meets
deadlines for State reports.
Has some procedures in place
for health office and record
keeping.
89
understanding of health protocols,
District policies.
Nurse consistently follows through
with compliance requirements for
families with complex needs and
consistently communicates
effectively with the families.
•
makes recommendations for
updates of protocols and
policies based on current best
practice.
Nurse actively seeks resources
for families with complex needs
and assists families in accessing
them.
• Nurse consistently has reports and • Nurse’s office procedures are
forms are turned in to meet
deadlines. Record keeping is
timely, accurate and complete.
very effective and easy for
others to follow. Nurse has
seamless procedures in place to
quickly respond to unexpected
emergency procedures and
trained and practiced these with
staff.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
2d: Supervising Health
Associates
Nurse demonstrates limited
implementation of guidelines
for delegated duties or
understanding of the guidelines
is unclear. Nurse does not
monitor associates’ activities.
Nurse’s efforts to implement
established guidelines for delegated
duties are partially successful.
Nurse inconsistently monitors
associates’ activities.
Nurse effectively implements
established guidelines for
delegated duties and monitors
associates’ activities.
Associates work independently,
indicating clear guidelines for their
work. Nurse’s supervision is
subtle and professional.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse does not understand
• Nurse has basic understanding
• Nurse has thorough
• Nurse reviews and evaluates
•
Examples
appropriate delegation under
licensure.
Nurse needs mentoring
from another experienced
nurse.
• Nurse has no procedures in
place to train other staff if
nurse is not present.
•
Proficient
of delegation under licensure.
Nurse inconsistently recognizes
the need for mentoring. Nurse
continues to need mentoring.
• Nurse inconsistently trains
other staff to give medications.
90
•
understanding of delegation
under licensure.
Nurse consistently recognizes
the need to mentor and
provides mentoring.
• Nurse consistently trains staff
the Principal has delegated in
medication administration.
Exemplary
District delegation practices
and makes suggestions to meet
student needs.
• Nurse pursues opportunities to
mentor co-workers to
empower independence and
promote safe practice.
• Nurse is exemplary at
following up with field trip
medication training as well as
following recommended
protocol in training other staff
in medication administration.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
2e: Organizing Physical
Space
Nurse’s office is in disarray or is
inappropriate to the planned
activities. Medications are not
properly stored.
Nurse’s attempts to create a wellorganized physical environment are
partially successful. Medications are
stored properly but are difficult to
find.
Nurse’s office is well organized
and is appropriate to the planned
activities. Medications are
properly stored and well
organized.
Critical Attributes
• The health office is not safe
• The health office is cluttered but • The health office is clean,
or clean and supplies are not
organized.
Examples
• Nurse’s office is cluttered
and unable to find
documents when asked.
accessible. Supplies are
somewhat organized.
• Nurse’s office is cluttered and
able to find documents when
asked.
91
•
uncluttered and easily
accessible.
Supplies are well organized.
• Nurse’s office is ordinarily
organized and has a system to
find documents.
Exemplary
Nurse’s office is efficiently
organized and is highly
appropriate to the planned
activities. Medications are
properly stored and well
organized.
• The health office is
consistently clean and well
organized.
• Supplies are well organized and
the CSN monitors for
expiration dates.
• Nurse’s office is always
organized for substitutes to
find documents.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Domain 3 for School Nurses: Delivery of Services
Unsatisfactory
Basic
3a: Assessing Student
Health Needs
Nurse rarely assesses student needs
and is not knowledgeable about
significant health needs of students
in the school.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse has a lack of understanding • Nurse has a basic
of the processes used to assess
health needs of the students.
• Nurse rarely demonstrates use of
these processes.
• Nurse is unaware of students’
absenteeism due to medical
issues.
Proficient
Nurse assesses some student
needs and is inconsistent about
knowledge of the range of
student needs in the school.
understanding of the assessing
health needs and the effect
these health needs have on
academic success.
• Nurse demonstrates
inconsistent interventions in
ensuring academic success for
students with medical needs.
• Nurse is inconsistently aware
of student’s absenteeism due to
medical issues.
92
Exemplary
Nurse assesses student needs and
knows the range of student needs in
the school. Nurse communicates
significant students health needs to
staff on a need to know basis.
Periodically collaborates with school
staff to help increase attendance of
students as it applies to their health
needs.
Nurse has exceptional assessment
skills and is able to communication
significant health needs to staff on a
need to know basis. Nurse
participates in developing goals that
are educationally relevant to an
individual’s medical needs and
collaborates with other school
personnel, parents, and students to
improve their attendance.
Collaborates with appropriate
outside community agencies to
provide necessary accommodations
in the educational setting addressing
specific health and wellness
interests.
• Nurse responds to appropriately to
• Nurse has a substantial
the health care needs, problems and
concerns of students.
• Nurse’s procedures provide
effective assessment and
intervention to ensure educational
opportunities.
• Nurse is aware of students with
high absenteeism rates and helps
with school interventions.
understanding and use of
assessment skills to facilitate
student assistance needed for
academic success.
• Nurse identifies students who
should be evaluated by the school
team.
• When appropriate, the nurse will
write goals to improve student’s
health and educational access. Has
an ongoing role in students with
attendance issues and their return
to school.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Examples
• Nurse is not aware of a student
in the school that has seizures
and has not looked through the
list of medical concerns of
students.
• Nurse has assessed a student
in the school a teacher has
referred for possible seizures
but lacks the necessary skills to
follow-up.
93
• Nurse performs accurate
assessment of a student that came
into the health office and is very
aware of changes in assessment
with each visit and communicates
with parents when changes occur,
(increasing symptoms of a
concussion when a head bump
occurred at school.)
• Nurse has accurately assessed a
student that had a head bump,
was observant of a possible
concussion, did accurate
neurological assessment of the
student and communicated with
the parent and teachers that
medical follow-up was necessary
that day. Follow-up with parent
was completed and nurse assisted
with plan of academic care for a
student with a concussion
following return to school.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
3b Medication
Administration to
Students
Nurse demonstrates a limited
knowledge of medications and side
effects. The connection to academic
progress is usually missing.
Medications are administered with
no regard to state or district policies.
Nurse demonstrates a basic
knowledge of medication and side
effects. School Nurse inconsistently
shares the impact on a child’s
academic progress. Medications are
administered by designated
individuals, but signed release forms
are not conveniently stored.
Nurse demonstrates a through knowledge
of medication and side effects. School
nurse consistently shares the impact on a
child’s academic progress. Medications
are administered by designated
individuals, and signed release forms are
conveniently stored and available when
needed.
Nurse demonstrates extensive
knowledge of medications, side
effects, and their impact on a child’s
academic progress. This
information is shared with the
educational team as appropriate.
Medications are administered by
designated individuals, and signed
release forms are conveniently
stored. Students take an active role
in medication compliance.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse does not follow the 5 Rights • Nurse inconsistently follows the 5 • Nurse follows the 5 Rights of
of Medication Administration.
• Nurse cannot identify the
relationship between medication
effect and or side effects as it
impacts academic performance.
• Nurse does not have
understanding of best practice for
medication administration and
safety.
Rights of Medication
Administration.
• Nurse has inconsistent
understanding of the relationship
between medication effect and/or
side effects as it impacts academic
performance.
• Nurse has inconsistent
understanding of best practice for
medication administration and
safety.
Medication Administration.
• Nurse identifies and trains school
individuals to administer medication.
• Nurse has thorough understanding of
the relationship between medication
effect and/or side effects as it impacts
academic performance.
• Nurse has thorough understanding of
best practice for medication
administration and safety as well as
confidentiality when discussing
students with medications.
• Nurse reflects on the relationship
• Nurse has not organized
• Nurse has basic organization of
• Nurse is proficient at administering
• Nurse demonstrates excellent
Examples
paperwork for medication
administration, resulting in errors
in correct doses given to students.
medication paperwork, but
occasional errors in
administration are made resulting
in it being very hard for other
staff to follow or delegate to.
94
medications accurately and rarely
makes errors. Paperwork is easy for
other staff to follow.
between medication use and its
impact on academic performance,
and makes appropriate
accommodations base on
individual student need.
• Nurse reviews District policies
and procedures related to
medication administration and
safety. Recommendations are
made base on best practice,
trends and patterns reflected in
district data and is always aware
of confidentiality regarding
communication of student’s
medications.
organization of medication
administration and has trained
students on identifying and
naming their medications.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
3c: Promoting Wellness
Nurse does not engage the school
community in health education and
wellness promotion.
Nurse engages the school
community in health education and
wellness promotion on a
inconsistent basis.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse is unable to demonstrate
• Nurse demonstrates inconsistent • Nurse demonstrates appropriate
understanding of appropriate
methods for engaging students in
health topics.
• Nurse rarely provides
educational materials on health
wellness, prevention or
promotion.
methods for engaging students in
health topics.
• Nurse actively promotes health
promotion and prevention
• Nurse provides educational programs
as needed or requested.
• Nurse actively implements
• Nurse does not share trusted
• Inconsistently provides
• Consistently engages the school
• Assists in promotion of/ or
appropriate methods for engaging
students in health topics. Does not
promote any wellness topics in the
school.
Examples
sources links of health information
and wellness promotion.
resources of health information
and wellness promotion.
95
Nurse consistently engages in health
promotion, which results in students
acquiring the knowledge and attitudes
that support a healthy lifestyle.
community in health and wellness
promotion, e.g.; newsletter, bulletin
board displays, wellness
announcements, and etc.
Nurse initiates effective collaboration
with district or broader community
colleagues in developing programs or
instructional lessons that include
additional resources for wellness
from outside of the school. Nurse
consistently engages in health
promotion, which results in students
acquiring the knowledge and attitudes
that support a healthy lifestyle.
strategies to promote student
engagement in health.
• Nurse consistently engages and
empowers the school community
to take individual and collective
responsibility for promoting
wellness.
• Nurse actively promotes
prevention strategies.
• Nurse promotes school and/or
community wellness activities.
provides school community with
flu shot programs, immunization
clinics, or health and wellness
fairs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
3d: Managing
Emergency Situations
Nurse has no contingency plans for
emergency situations.
Critical Attributes
Examples
Basic
Proficient
Nurse’s Plans for emergency
situations have been developed for
many situations.
Nurse’s plans for emergency
situations have been developed for
many situations. Students and
teachers have learned their
responsibilities in case of
emergencies.
• Nurse is unable to identify student • Nurse inconsistently identifies
needs or inaccurately identifies
student needs.
• Nurse has little understanding of
preparation for emergencies
student needs.
• Nurse demonstrates basic skills
in emergency preparation.
• Nurse consistently and accurately
• Nurse has developed a detailed
• Nurse does not have any
• Nurse has started to organize
• Nurse has obtained extra medical
• Nurse has trained appropriate
emergency preparation for any
special needs students or
complicated medical needs, (i.e.
plan for Epi-Pens and inhalers to
take if students need to evacuate
the building.)
Nurse’s plans for emergency
situations have been developed
for the most frequently occurring
situations but not others.
Exemplary
an emergency plan for special
needs students, but has not
put the plan in place.
96
identifies student needs.
• Nurse demonstrates effective skills
in triaging emergency situations and
preparation for them.
supplies for special needs or
complex medical students, (i.e.
three (3) days supply of meds for
diabetic students in case of
emergency or has obtained and has
a plan in place to carry inhalers and
Epi-Pens out of the building for
emergence situations.
emergency plan, shared and
implemented the plan with staff.
• Nurse collaborates with staff in
advanced planning for
emergency medical situations,
e.g. mock drills, plans for
evacuations, and etc.
staff in emergency evacuation of
special needs students or
medically complex students, (i.e.
extra wheelchair for non-mobile
intensive needs student(s) or
alternate plan for them), and has
a plan for all of the complex
medical students in case of a
building evacuation.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
3e: Demonstrating
Flexibility and
Responsiveness
Nurse adheres to the plan or
program, in spite of evidence of its
inadequacy. Nurse does not triage
students in the health office.
Nurse makes modest or
inconsistent changes in the
nursing program when
confronted with evidence of the
need for change. Nurse
inconsistently triages students in
levels of priority of care. Nurse
inconsistently manages student
health emergencies.
Nurse makes revisions in the nursing
program when they are needed.
Consistently evaluates whether the
changes were helpful. Nurse is flexible
and solid at the ability to triage
students in emergency situations.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse demonstrates resistance to
• Nurse demonstrates an
• Nurse is consistently flexible to
• Fails to adapt the plan of care
• Inconsistently adapts the plan
• Consistently adapts a plan of care
change in programming or
scheduling based on building,
department, or District needs.
• Does not demonstrate the ability
to triage students and levels of
priority for treatment.
Examples
with a student with a complex
medical need and respond
effectively to scheduled and
unscheduled changes.
inconsistent response to
requests for change in
programming or scheduling
based on building, department,
or District needs. Nurse is
able to triage groups of
students in the health office but
not in emergencies.
of care and responds
ineffectively to scheduled and
unscheduled changes thought
the school day for a student
with a chronic condition (e.g.;
Diabetic student).
97
Exemplary
Nurse consistently seeks input
from all stakeholders to guide
decision-making. Demonstrates
ongoing flexibility and
responsiveness in collaboration
with other staff. Plans ahead for
emergency situations and is very
skilled at triaging groups of
students effectively.
• Nurse demonstrates flexibility
and leadership when addressing
requests for change in programming
the need for change within and
or scheduling based on need. Is
outside of the school. Nurse
responsive in emergency situations
very flexible and skilled in being
and is able to triage emergencies.
a part of school emergency
situations and is willing be to be
a part of planning for
community emergency
situations.
for a student with a chronic
condition (e.g. Diabetic student)
and is flexible to respond to
teacher parent concerns.
• Consistently adapts a plan of
care for a student with a chronic
condition (e.g. Diabetic student)
and is flexible to both parent
concerns and classroom
accommodations needed.
Allows age appropriate student
to test blood sugar in classroom
based on doctor
recommendations and teaches
school staff and student in
proper disposal/cleaning of
diabetic supplies. Communicates
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
these changes to all the
appropriate school staff.
98
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Domain 4 for School Nurses: Professional Responsibilities
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4a: Reflecting on Nursing
Practice
Nurse minimally reflects on
nursing practice, and the
reflections are often inaccurate or
self-serving.
Nurse’s reflection on nursing
practice is moderately accurate
and objective without citing
specific examples and with only
global suggestions as to how it
might be improved.
Nurse’s reflection provides an
accurate and objective description of
nursing practice, citing specific
positive and negative characteristics.
Nurse makes some specific
suggestions as to how the nursing
program might be improved.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse does not utilize National
• Nurse inconsistently utilizes
• Nurse consistently utilizes National • Nurse has a thorough
• Does not perform After Action
• Performs an After Action
• Performs an After Action Review
Scope and Standards of Practice
to reflect on personal practice.
Examples
Review following a student
emergency.
National Scope and Standards
of Practice to reflect on
personal practice.
Review following a student
emergency, identifies change
needed but does not initiate
identified changes.
99
Scope and Standards of Practice to
reflect on practice.
following a student emergency and
then implements changes as
needed to improve future
responses.
Nurse’s reflection is highly
accurate and perceptive, citing
specific examples and evidencebased practice. Nurse utilizes an
extensive understanding of best
practice to suggest alternative
strategies.
understanding of National
Scope and Standards of
Practice, as well as National
Nursing Diagnostics and
Interventions.
• Nurse uses the above to
provide alternative strategies in
practice and collaboration.
• Performs an After Action
Review following a student
emergency and then
implements changes as needed
to improve future responses,
and educates school
community to facilitate
appropriate change in policy
and procedures.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4b: Maintaining Accurate
Health Records and
Reports
Nurse’s reports, records, and
Nurse’s reports, records, and
Nurse’s reports, records and
documentation are missing, late, or documentation are generally
documentation are accurate and are
inaccurate, resulting in confusion. accurate, but are occasionally late. submitted in a timely manner.
Nurse’s approach to record
keeping is highly systematic and
efficient and serves as a model for
colleagues across the district.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse lacks a comprehensive
• Nurse has some understanding • Nurse consistently demonstrates
• Nurse produces comprehensive
• Unsatisfactory: Does not
• Basic: Sometimes documents
• Exemplary: Consistently
understanding of requirements
for a complete documentation
and record keeping.
Examples:
document the mandated health
screenings on student records.
Does not complete the state
immunization annual reports.
of requirements for complete
documentation. Nurse lacks in
the ability to finish necessary
reports in in a timely manner.
the mandated health
screenings on student records.
Collects some of the data for
state immunization reports.
100
understanding of requirements for a
complete record review.
• Nurse has basic skills and
organization for consistently and
accurately submitting timely reports.
• Proficient: Accurately documents
the mandated health screenings on
student records. Collects data
accurately and completes the state
immunization reports.
record reviews that reflect
student need and educational
impact. Nurse interprets
medical information for
significance in educational
setting and works
collaboratively with related
service providers to provide for
individual student needs.
documents accurate
information for the mandated
health-screening program on
student records and serves as a
mentor to colleagues.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4c: Communicating With
Families
Nurse provides limited
Nurse provides basic information
information to families about
to families about District health
District health services. Nurse
services and available resources.
does not provide or
inconsistently provides resources.
Nurse provides consistent and
accurate information to families about
the district health services as a whole
and about individual students.
Nurse does a health and wellness
needs assessment and seeks
resources for the District based
on that assessment. Nurse is
proactive in providing
information to families about
health services and resources to
meet their individual needs.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse rarely provides
• Nurse provides evidence-based
• Nurse seeks resources for the
• Provides accurate evidence based
• Provides accurate evidence
information to families.
• Nurse fails to provide
resources when needed.
Examples
• Nurse inconsistently provides
information to families.
• Nurse is developing her
knowledge of available
resources to use with families.
• Provides no information to the • Provides limited information
multi-disciplinary team.
Refuses to provide referral
resource information, as
needed.
to the multi-disciplinary team.
Provides limited referral
resource information, as
needed.
101
information.
• Nurse helps families access their
needed information.
• Nurse connects families with
community resources.
information to the multidisciplinary team. Consistently
provides appropriate referral
resource information, as needed.
families based on needs
assessments.
• Nurse documents resources
provided to families.
• Nurse actively seeks to identify
families in need and actively
works to provide and connect
them with resources and
assistance.
based information to the multidisciplinary team. Assists with
the development of the
individual student plan.
Actively seeks specific referral
resource information as needed
for individual students and
families.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4d: Participating in a
Professional Community
Nurse’s relationships with
colleagues are negative or selfserving, and nurse avoids being
involved in required school and
District events and projects.
Nurse’s relationships with
Nurse participates actively in school
colleagues are cordial, participates and district events and projects and
in school and District events and maintains positive and productive
projects when specifically
relationships with colleagues.
requested.
Nurse makes a substantial
contribution to school, District,
and community events and
projects and assumes leadership
role with colleagues.
Critical Attributes
• Nurse does not pursue
• Nurse completes most of
• Nurse meets all District, state
• Nurse meets all District, state
• Does not work collaboratively
• Does not independently seek
• Works collaboratively with
• Initiates contacting community
opportunities for staff
development.
• Nurse misses the deadlines for
District mandated trainings.
• Nurse does not participate in a
professional community.
Examples
with community agencies in
planning activities or
workshops that pertain to
health, wellness and safety in
the school environment.
mandatory District trainings.
• Nurse is aware of additional
training but seldom attends
them.
• Nurse is a participating
member of a professional
community only when required
to do so.
out opportunities to work with
community agencies in
planning activities or
workshops that pertain to
health, wellness and safety in
the school environment.
102
educational endorsements, and
licensure requirements.
• Nurse belongs to at least one
professional community and
actively maintains positive and
productive relationships.
• Nurse seeks additional education or
certifications.
community agencies in planning
activities or workshops that pertain
to health, wellness and safety in the
school environment.
educational endorsement, and
licensure requirements.
• Nurse active in a professional
organization or community.
• Nurse seeks additional CEUs or
educational opportunities.
• Nurse is certified in a
professional organization (e.g.
NBCSN) or has pursued higher
education beyond requirements.
agencies in planning activities
or workshops that pertain to
health, wellness and safety in
the school environment.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4e: Engaging in
Professional Development
Nurse does not participate in
professional development
activities, even when such
activities are clearly needed for
the development of nursing skills.
Critical Attributes
• Does not belong to local, state, • Belongs to local, state, and
and national professional
organizations.
• Does not enhance professional
nursing practice or role
performance by networking
and interacting with peers and
colleagues.
national professional
organizations, but does not
participate in their activities.
• Minimally enhances
professional nursing practice or
role performance by
networking and interacting with
peers and colleagues.
• Maintains active member status in
• Belongs to and is seen as a
• Rarely participates in
• Occasionally participates in
• Is a member of local and/or state
• Regularly attends continuing
Examples
professional growth activities.
Nurse’s participation in
professional development
activities is limited to those that
are convenient or are required.
professional growth activities.
• Seeks opportunities to develop
and/or present evidence-based
content to colleagues.
103
Nurse seeks out opportunities for
Nurse actively pursues
professional development based on an professional development
opportunities and makes a
individual assessment of need.
substantial contribution to the
profession through such activities
as offering workshops to
colleagues.
local, state or national professional
organizations.
• Enhances professional nursing
practice or role performance by
networking and interacting with
peers and colleagues.
nursing association(s), attends their
meetings, and shares information
with colleagues.
leader in local, state, and
national professional
organizations.
• Enhances professional nursing
practice or role performance by
networking and interacting with
peers and colleagues.
education programs offered by
professional organizations to
keep current on emerging
health issues affecting his/her
student population and school
community and shares
information gained with
colleagues.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Nurses
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Nurse can be counted on to hold
the highest standards of honesty,
integrity, and confidentiality and
to advocate for students, taking a
leadership role with colleagues.
4f: Demonstrating
Professionalism
Nurse displays dishonesty in
interactions with colleagues,
students, and the public; violates
principles of confidentiality.
Nurse is honest in interactions
with colleagues, students, and the
public; does not violate
confidentiality.
Nurse displays high standards or
honesty, integrity, and confidentiality
in interactions with colleagues,
students, and the public; advocates for
students when needed.
Critical Attributes
• Does not educate members
• Provides minimal education
• Educates members of the school
•
Examples
of the school community
about therapeutic and
professional student-nurse
relationships and role
boundaries.
Is unaware of and does not
adhere to educational laws,
health care laws, nursing
ethics, federal or state
regulations and district
policies relating to privacy and
confidentiality.
• Nurse never follows FERPA
guidelines and inappropriately
shares students’ medical
information with staff.
•
to members of the school
community about therapeutic
and professional studentnurse relationships and role
boundaries
Is aware of educational laws,
health care laws, nursing
ethics, federal or state
regulations, and district
policies relating to privacy
and confidentiality.
• Nurse follows FERPA
guidelines most of the time
and rarely shares students’
medical information with
staff.
104
•
community about therapeutic and
professional student-nurse
relationships and role boundaries.
Adheres to educational laws,
health care laws, nursing ethics,
federal or state regulations, and
district policies relating to privacy
and confidentiality.
• Nurse follows FERPA guidelines
all of the time and shares
students’ medical information to
staff only on a need-to-know
basis.
• Educates members of the
•
school community and serves
as a role model about
therapeutic and professional
student-nurse relationships
and role boundaries.
Adheres to educational laws,
health care laws, nursing
ethics, federal or state
regulations, and district
policies relating to privacy
and confidentiality, and
educates administrators and
colleagues.
• Nurse always follows
FERPA guidelines and
teaches staff FERPA
guidelines.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Domain 1 for School Counselors: Planning and Preparation
Unsatisfactory
1a: Demonstrating
knowledge of counseling
theory and techniques
Critical Attributes:
Counselor demonstrates little
understanding of counseling
theory and techniques
 School Counselor displays
minimal understanding and
application of the
district/school programming
and counseling techniques.
 Knowledge and use of
techniques are unsuitable and
ineffective for students.
 Limited understanding of
systems theory.
Basic
Proficient
Counselor demonstrates basic
understanding of counseling
theory and techniques
 School Counselor displays
adequate understanding and
application of the
district/school
programming; techniques
utilized may be inappropriate
to the situation.
 Knowledge and use of
techniques are of moderate
value or suitability in meeting
the needs of some students.
105
Counselor demonstrates
understanding of counseling theory
and techniques
 School Counselor demonstrates
solid understanding and
application of the district/ school
programming and counseling
techniques.
 School Counselor is able to select
and employ suitable and effective
techniques to meet the needs of
most students.
Exemplary
Counselor demonstrates deep
understanding of counseling
theory and techniques
 School Counselor
demonstrates extensive
knowledge and application of
the district/school
programming and counseling
techniques.
 School Counselor shows
evidence of a continuing
search for improvement.
 Techniques are
multidimensional enough to
be able to differentiate the
style based on students
individualized needs.
 School Counselor actively
selects and employs
techniques to meet the needs
of individual students.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1b: Demonstrating knowledge of
child and adolescent
development
Counselor displays little or no
knowledge of child and adolescent
development.
Counselor displays partial
knowledge of child and adolescent
development.
Counselor displays accurate
understanding of the typical
developmental characteristics of
the age group, as well as exceptions
to the general patterns.
Critical Attributes:
 School Counselor makes little
or no attempt to acquire
knowledge of student
backgrounds, skills, or interests
and does not use such
information in communicating
with or about the student.
 School Counselor is insensitive
or unaware of the unique
characteristics of the
population.
 School Counselor's effort is
inconsistent in acquiring
knowledge about student
backgrounds, skills, or interests.
 School Counselor attempts to
use this knowledge in
communicating with or about
the student.
 School Counselor allows
inappropriate assumptions or
designations of
students/families to occur in
the school setting
 School Counselor consistently
uses student background and
experiences in practice and
decision-making.
 School Counselor can identify
discrepancies between typical
developmental attributes and
individual student development
and needs.
 School Counselor actively seeks
knowledge of student
background, including skills,
culture, language, interests, and
special needs.
In addition to accurate knowledge
of the typical developmental
characteristics of the age group and
exceptions to the general patterns,
counselor displays knowledge of
the extent to which the individual
students follow the general
patterns.
 School Counselor demonstrates
thorough knowledge of student
background, skills, and interests,
using this knowledge to
proactively communicate with
or about the student.
 School Counselor applies
understanding of developmental
attributes to individualized
practice and decision-making.
 School Counselor uses
identified discrepancies of
individual student development
to connect to
district/community resources
and services.
106
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1c: Establishing goals for the
counseling program
appropriate to the setting and
the students served.
Counselor has no clear goals for the
counseling program, or they are
inappropriate to either the situation
or the age of the student.
Counselor’s goals for the
counseling program are
rudimentary and are partially
suitable to the situation and the age
of the students.
Counselor’s goals for the counseling
program are clear and appropriate to
the situation in the school and to
the age of the students.
Critical Attributes:
 Counselor does not utilize data
when establishing program goals.
 Plan lacks connection to student
needs.
 Plan is designed without
collaboration with constituents.
 Plan has no coherent structure.
 School Counselor cannot identify
goals.
 Goals do not represent response
to the needs of the population.
 No communication or
collaboration with others in the
development of goals.
 Counselor references
school/student data, but does
not clearly connect program
goals.
 Plan displays limited connection
to student needs.
 Plan developed with
inconsistent collaboration with
constituents.
 Limited structure to the
counseling plan.
 Goals represent low
expectations.
 Goals reflect minimal
consideration of needs of
population.
 Collaboration with others is
minimal in the development of
goals.
 Counselor utilizes and can
articulate how school/student
data influences program goal
setting.
 Plan clearly connects to student
needs.
 School Counselor consistently
engages in collaborative planning
with all constituents.
 Plan has adequate structure.
 Goals represent appropriate
expectations.
 Goals reflect consistent
consideration of needs of
population.
 Goals are developing through
consistent communication and
collaboration with others.
Counselor’s goals for the
counseling program are highly
appropriate to the situation in the
school and to the age of the
student hand have been
developed following consultation
with students, parents, and
colleagues.
 Counselor’s goals for the
counseling program are data
driven, highly appropriate to
the school context, age
appropriate, and have been
developed following
consultation with stakeholders.
 School Counselor’s plan is
highly coherent, structured,
reflects input from constituents
and creatively addresses a wide
spectrum of individual, school,
and district needs.
 School Counselor actively
seeks input from multiple
stakeholders within and beyond
the district to maximize
collaborative planning process.
 Goals are carefully tailored to
meet the needs of the student
population.
 Goals are developed through
input from multiple
stakeholders in the
school/district to address
needs of the population.
107
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
1d: Demonstrating knowledge
of state and federal regulations
and of resources both within
and beyond the school and
district
Critical Attributes:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor demonstrates
little or no knowledge of
governmental regulations
and of resources for student
available through the school
or district.
Counselor displays awareness
of governmental regulations
and of resources for students
available through the school or
district, but no knowledge of
resources available more
broadly.
 The counselor is aware of
governmental regulations.
 The counselor uses
materials within the
school or district but does
not search beyond the
school or district for
resources.
 The counselor participates
in workshops offered by
the school and district but
does not pursue other
professional development.
 The counselor locates
materials and resources
for students that are
available through the
school and district but
does not pursue any other
avenues.
Counselor displays awareness
of governmental regulations
and of resources for students
available through the school or
district, and some familiarity
with resources external to the
school.
 The counselor is aware of
governmental regulations.
 Resources are at varied
levels.
 Guest speakers and field
experiences supplement
resources.
 The counselor facilitates
the use of Internet
resources.
 Resources are
multidisciplinary.
 The counselor expands
his/her knowledge
through professional
learning groups and
organizations.
 The counselor pursues
options offered by
universities.
 The counselor provides
lists of resources outside
the school.
Counselor’s knowledge of governmental regulations
and of resources for student is extensive, including
those available through the school or district and in
the community.
 The counselor has little
or no knowledge of
governmental
regulations.
 The counselor uses only
school or districtprovided materials, even
when more variety
would assist some
students.
 The counselor does not
seek out resources
available to expand
his/her own skill.
 Although the counselor
is aware of some
student needs, he/she
does not inquire about
possible resources.
108
 The counselor’s knowledge of governmental
regulations is extensive.
 The counselor has ongoing relationships with
colleges and universities.
 The counselor maintains a log of resources.
 The counselor facilitates student contact with
resources outside the school.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
1e: Planning the counseling
program, integrated with the
regular school program
Counseling program consists
of a random collection of
unrelated activities, lacking
coherence or an overall
structure.
Critical Attributes:
 There is no evidence of a
plan for the counseling
program.
 Learning activities are
unrelated and/or not well
aligned to the goals of the
counseling program.
 Materials are not engaging
or do not meet the goals
of the counseling
program.
 Instructional groups do
not support learning.
 Plans are not structured
or sequenced and are
unrealistic in their
expectations.
 There is no integration
with the regular school
program.
Counselor’s plan has a guiding
principle and includes a
number of worthwhile
activities, but some of them
don’t fit with the broader
goals.
 Guiding principle(s) exist
for the counseling program.
 Learning activities are
moderately challenging.
 Learning resources are
suitable, but there is limited
variety.
 Instructional groups are
random, or they only
partially support the goals
of the counseling program.
 Learning activities are
uneven or don’t fit with
broader goals.
 There is minimal integration
with the regular school
program
109
Exemplary
Counselor has developed a
plan that includes the
important aspects of
counseling in the setting.
Counselor’s plan is highly coherent and serves to
support not only the students individually and in
groups, but also the broader educational program.
 Plan exists that includes
important aspects of the
counseling program.
 Learning activities are
matched to the goals of the
counseling program.
 Learning activities provide
opportunity for higher-level
thinking and planning.
 Instructional student groups
are organized thoughtfully
to maximize learning and
build on students’ strengths.
 The plan for the counseling
program is well structured,
with reasonable time
allocations.
 There is some integration
with the regular school
program.
 Plan supports students individually and in groups.
 Learning activities permit student choice.
 Learning experiences and activities connect to the
broader educational program.
 The plan for the counseling program
differentiates for individual student needs.
 There is full integration with the regular school
program.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1f: Developing a plan to
evaluate the counseling
program
Counselor has no plan to
evaluate the program or
resists suggestions that such
an evaluation is important.
Counselor has a rudimentary
plan to evaluate the counseling
program.
Counselor’s evaluation plan is highly sophisticated,
with imaginative sources of evidence and a clear
path toward improving the program on an ongoing
basis.
Critical Attributes:
 Plan contains no
provisions for feedback
from constituents.
 No plan to evaluate
services exists.
 School Counselor does
not utilize
data/assessments to plan
future interventions.
 Plan contains minimal
provision for feedback from
constituents.
 Evaluation plan has limited
provision for data
collection.
 Plan doesn't reflect
consideration of program
goals. School Counselor
minimally uses
data/assessments to plan
interventions for students.
Counselor’s plan to evaluate
the program is organized
around clear goals and the
collection of evidence to
indicate the degree to which
the goals have been met.
 Plan is consistently updated
based upon feedback from
constituents.
 Plan provides for collection
of relevant data.
 Plan is consistent with
program goals.
 School Counselor
synthesizes data to plan
effective interventions for
students.
110
 Plan includes cycles for reviewing progress of the
counseling program so that formative
adjustments can be made as needed.
 School Counselor communicates with all
constituents and seeks out support and resources
to their practice and performance in order to best
serve student and needs of the community.
 School Counselor uses a variety of methods to
evaluate services.
 Organization of plan provides for changes to
assessment methods and details as dictated by
feedback from constituents and/or data
collected.
 School Counselor continually synthesizes data to
plan for effective interventions for students; and
is a monitor of progress and makes adjustments
as needed.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Domain 2: for School Counselors: The Environment
2a: Creating an environment of
respect and rapport
Critical Attributes:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Counselor’s interactions
with students are negative
or inappropriate, and the
counselor does not promote
positive interactions among
students.
 School Counselor speaks
disrespectfully to
students, parents, staff
and colleagues.
 School Counselor displays
a lack of familiarity with
or empathy for students,
parents, staff and
colleagues.
 School Counselor fails to
convey an atmosphere of
support and
encouragement.
Counselor’s interactions are a
mix of positive and negative;
the counselor’s efforts at
encouraging positive
interactions among students are
partially successful.
 Quality of interactions
between student and School
Counselor is uneven, with
occasional disrespect or
insensitivity.
 School Counselor attempts to
make connections are limited
and/or inconsistent.
 School Counselor attempts to
create an atmosphere of
support with uneven results.
111
Exemplary
Counselor’s interactions with
students are positive and
respectful, and the counselor
actively promotes positive
student-student interactions.
Students seek out the counselor, reflecting a high
degree of comfort and trust in the relationship.
Counselor teaches students how to engage in
positive interactions.
 Interactions are consistently
respectful.
 General connections are
positive.
 School Counselor
consistently creates an
atmosphere of support.
 School Counselor consistently demonstrates
knowledge and empathy.
 School Counselor treats constituents with dignity
in all situations.
 Students contribute to and maintain atmosphere
of respect and support.
 School Counselor facilitates an atmosphere for
genuine caring and respect for all.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
2b: Establishing a culture for
productive communication
Critical Attributes:
Counselor makes no
attempt to establish a
culture for productive
communication in the
school as a whole, either
among students or among
teachers, or between
students and teachers.
 School Counselor fails to
participate in or attend
meetings or discussions.
 School Counselor is
unwilling to communicate
with most stakeholders
and is unapproachable for
consultation.
 School Counselor fails to
convey purpose for
sessions or meetings.
 School Counselor conveys
a negative attitude toward
counseling work.
 School Counselor conveys
inconsistent expectations
for engagement and
participation.
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor’s attempts to
promote a culture throughout
the school for productive and
respectful communication
between and among students
and teachers are partially
successful.
Counselor promotes a culture
throughout the school for
productive and respectful
communication between and
among students and teachers.
Both teachers and students for productive and
respectful communication between and among
students and teachers is while guided by the
counselor, maintain the culture in the school.
 School Counselor participates
in meetings and discussion
regarding students.
 School Counselor
inconsistently communicates
with stakeholders.
 School Counselor displays an
inconsistent attitude toward
counseling work.
 School Counselor sets limited
expectations for engagement
and participation.
 School Counselor actively
participates in meetings.
 If unable to participate,
School Counselor provides
appropriate resources or
information regarding
students.
 School Counselor has active
communication on a regular
basis with stakeholders.
 School Counselor clearly
communicates importance
of counseling work.
 School Counselor invites
high expectations for
engagement and
participation.
 School Counselor takes a leadership role in
scheduling and planning meetings/programs.
 School Counselor engages in extensive and
appropriate means of communication.
 School Counselor's plan is thorough and includes
input from various stakeholders.
 School Counselor's communication is
consistently productive.
 School Counselor communicates the importance
of counseling work through a dynamic
environment encouraging open communication,
engagement and participation.
112
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
2c: Managing routines and
procedures
Critical Attributes:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Counselor’s routines for the
counseling center or
classroom work are
nonexistent or in disarray.
 No established procedures
or routines are established.
 Procedures are confusing
or chaotic.
 School Counselor is
unable to prioritize timesensitive tasks.
 There is no evidence of
productive preparation.
Counselor has rudimentary
and partially successful
routines for the counseling
center or classroom.
 Procedures have been
established but operation is
inconsistent.
 Routines are developing or
inconsistently organized.
 School Counselor is
inconsistent in prioritizing
tasks.
 Minimal preparation is
evident
113
Exemplary
Counselor’s routines for the
counseling center or classroom
work effectively.
Counselor’s routines for the counseling center or
classroom are seamless, and students assist to
maintain them.
 Office routines are followed
consistently.
 Established routines are clear
and supportive for student
involvement in the counseling
sessions.
 School Counselor consistently
prioritizes tasks.
 Preparation is evident.
 Office routines are seamless and ongoing.
 Students assist in the development and
maintenance of session routines.
 Counseling routines and procedures maximize
student opportunities through the School
Counselor's attention to detail and depth of
preparation.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
2d: Establishing standards of conduct
and contributing to the culture for
student behavior throughout the
school.
Counselor has established
no standards of conduct for
students during counseling
sessions and makes no
contribution to maintaining
an environment of civility in
the school.
Critical Attributes:
 School Counselor
inconsistently addresses
student conduct.
 No standards for student
conduct have been
established.
 School Counselor
disregards students'
violation of rules during
the counseling session.
Counselor’s efforts to
establish standards of conduct
for counseling sessions are
partially successful. Counselor
attempts, with limited success,
to contribute to the level of
civility in the school as a
whole.
 Standards have been
established.
 Attempts have been made
to maintain order, with
limited success.
 Response to student
misbehavior is inconsistent
during the counseling
session.
114
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor has established clear
standards of conduct for
counseling sessions and makes a
significant contribution to the
environment of civility in the
school.
Counselor has established clear
standards of conduct for counseling
sessions, and students contribute to
maintaining them. Counselor takes a
leadership role in maintaining the
environment of civility in the school.
 Standards of conduct have
been established.
 School Counselor maintains
order with overall success.
 Response to student behavior
is consistent during the
counseling session.
 Students are involved in the
development of appropriate
behavioral guidelines or norms for
the counseling session.
 Students address peer behavior based
upon established behavioral
guidelines (mediation, conflict
resolution techniques).
 School Counselor models and
promotes student ownership of
behavior.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
2e: Organizing physical space
The physical environment is
in disarray or is
inappropriate to the planned
activities.
Counselor’s attempts to create
an inviting and well-organized
physical environment are
partially successful.
Counseling center or classroom
arrangements are inviting and
conducive to the planned
activities.
Critical Attributes:
 Counseling office is
disorganized and
materials are inaccessible
to support needs of
program.
 School Counselor’s office
is not a professional
environment.
 Available technology is
not being used even if it
is available and its use
would enhance the lesson
or activity
 Counseling office has
minimal structure but lacks
easy access to materials.
 Physical environment is in
disarray or is inappropriate
to the planned activities.
 The counselor makes
limited use of available
technology and other
resources.
 Counseling office is organized
to facilitate various counseling
sessions and materials are
easily accessible.
 School Counselor attempts to
create an inviting and wellorganized physical
environment.
 The counselor makes
appropriate use of available
technology.
115
Proficient
Exemplary
Counseling center or classroom
arrangements are inviting and conducive
to the planned activities. Students have
contributed ideas to the physical
arrangement.
 School Counselor utilizes multiple
spaces within the building to
optimize implementation of
counseling program.
 The physical environment is inviting
and conducive to the planned
activities.
 Students take the initiative to adjust
the physical environment of the
counseling center or classroom. Or
they have contributed ideas to the
physical arrangement.
 The counselor can seamlessly
integrate various technology sources
into the lesson or activity.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Domain 3: for School Counselors: Delivery of Service
3a: Assessing students needs
Critical Attributes:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor does not assess
student needs, or the
assessments results in
inaccurate conclusions.
 School Counselor makes no
effort to determine that
students understand the
content of the
session/lesson.
 School Counselor has no
plan for individual
assessment.
 School Counselor uses
inappropriate assessment
techniques for the setting.
 Feedback is inaccurate, nonspecific and lacks timeliness.
Counselor’s assessments of
student needs are perfunctory.
Counselor assesses student
needs and knows the range of
student needs in the school.
Counselor regularly conducts detailed
and individual assessments of student
need to contribute to program planning.
 School Counselor displays
limited ability to interpret
student data.
 School Counselor makes
only minor attempts to
engage students in selfassessment.
 Feedback is timely, but is
non-specific and
inconsistent.
 School Counselor elicits
evidence of student
understanding.
 Assessment results provide
clear information for the
range of student needs.
 Students are invited to assess
their own needs/ progress.
 Feedback is specific, timely,
and consistent to the
counseling task.
 Assessment results are fully aligned
with program planning.
 Students indicate that they clearly
understand the assessment results and
they have helped establish the
assessment criteria.
 High quality feedback is proactive
and pertinent to the counseling task,
comes from counselor and students,
and is focused on improvement.
116
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
3b: Assisting students and teachers in
the formulation of academic,
personal/social, and career plans,
based on the knowledge of students
needs.
Critical Attributes:
Counselor’s program is
independent of identified
student needs.
 Counselor does not seek out
or develop appropriate
guidance curriculum for
needs of the school
population.
 Counselor does not utilize
appropriate techniques when
assisting students.
 Counselor does not attempt
to assist students in goal
setting and problem solving.
 Program materials,
resources, and activities used
are unsuitable to the
formulation of plans based
on knowledge of student
needs.
Basic
Counselor’s attempts to help
students and teachers
formulate academic,
personal/social, and career
plans are partially successful.
 Counselor develops basic
guidance curriculum for the
needs of the school
population.
 Counselor utilizes few
techniques when assisting
students.
 Counselor is inconsistent in
assisting students in goal
setting or problem solving.
 Program materials,
resources, and activities are
partially aligned to the
formulation of plans based
on knowledge of student
needs.
117
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor helps students and
teachers formulate academic,
personal/social, and career
plans for groups of students.
Counselor helps individual students and
teachers formulate academic,
personal/social, and career plans.
 Counselor develops a
comprehensive guidance
curriculum for the needs of
the school population.
 Counselor utilizes a variety
of techniques when assisting
students.
 Counselor consistently
assists students in goal
setting and problem solving.
 Program materials,
resources, and activities
support the formulation of
plans for groups of students
based on knowledge of
student needs and require
intellectual engagement, as
appropriate.
 Counselor develops a guidance
curriculum that is individualized and
personalized for the needs of the
school population.
 Counselor utilizes a variety of
techniques and is able to make
adjustments in all situations to meet
student needs.
 Students are actively involved in goal
setting and problem solving, and
counselor is able to facilitate the
needs of individual students.
 Program materials, resources and
activities support the formulation of
plans that provide individual students
an opportunity for reflection and
closure to consolidate their
understanding.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
3c: Using counseling techniques in
individual and classroom programs.
Critical Attributes:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor has few counseling
techniques to help students
acquire skills in decision
making and problem solving
for both interactions with
other students and future
planning.
 School Counselor’s
questions do not invite
student response.
 Questions are rapid-fire with
a single correct response.
 School Counselor does not
attempt to assist students in
goal setting or problem
solving.
 School Counselor makes
poor use of questioning
techniques, with low-level or
inappropriate questions,
limited student participation
and little true discussion.
 School Counselor provides
inaccurate information or
faulty guidance.
Counselor displays a narrow
range of counseling techniques
to help students acquire skills
in decision making and
problem solving for both
interactions with other
students and future planning.
 School Counselor invites
students to participate, but
most do not.
 School Counselor frames
some questions designed to
promote student thinking,
but many have a single
correct answer.
 School Counselor’s use of
questioning and discussion
techniques is adequate.
 School Counselor provides
accurate information.
Counselor uses a range of
counseling techniques to help
students acquire skills in
decision making and problem
solving for both interactions
with other students and future
planning.
 School Counselor uses
open- ended questions,
inviting students to think
and/or offer multiple
possible answers.
 School Counselors calls on a
variety of students, even
those who do not initially
volunteer.
 School Counselor asks
student(s) to explain their
reasoning and most
attempt(s) to do so.
 Questioning and discussion
techniques are employed
effectively, encouraging
stakeholders to comfortably
disclose information.
 School Counselor provides
accurate information and
sound guidance, shows
understanding of the impact
of purposeful
implementation of activities.
Counselor uses an extensive range of
counseling techniques to help students
acquire skills in decision making and
problem solving for both interactions
with other students and future planning.
118
 School Counselor provides
opportunities for students to use
higher order thinking skills.
 School Counselor builds on and uses
student responses to deepen student
understanding and skill building.
 Students initiate and maintain
discussion during the session;
students extend the discussion,
enriching it.
 Students initiate higher order
questions.
 School Counselor elicits disclosure of
information for collaborative
problem solving.
 School Counselor anticipates and acts
on timeliness of effective
implementation.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
3d: Brokering resources to meet needs
Counselor does not make
connections with other
programs in order to meet
student needs.
Counselor’s efforts to
coordinate services with other
programs in the school are
partially successful or limited
knowledge.
Critical Attributes:
 Counselor does not attempt
to meet individual student
needs.
 School Counselor
demonstrates little to no
advocacy and
responsiveness to students'
needs, interests and
questions.
 Counselor attempts to meet
individual student needs.
 Demonstrates moderate
advocacy and
responsiveness to students'
needs, interests and
questions.
119
Proficient
Counselor successfully
consults with other programs
and agencies both within and
beyond the school or district
to meet individual student
needs.
 School Counselor actively
seeks resources to support
success for all students.
Exemplary
Counselor successfully consults with
other programs and agencies both
within and beyond the school or district
to meet individual student needs, and
has extensive knowledge of community
agencies and resources.
 School Counselor advocates for
student interest and supports success
for all students by partnering with
other programs and community
agencies to meet student needs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
3e: Demonstrating flexibility and
responsiveness
Counselor adheres to the plan
or program, in spite of
evidence of its inadequacy.
Counselor makes revisions in
the counseling program when
they are needed.
Counselor is continually seeking ways to
improve the counseling program and
makes changes as needed in response to
student, parent, or teacher input.
Critical Attributes:
 School Counselor does not
adjust to address student
needs.
 School Counselor does not
prioritize tasks with student
or school goals in mind.
 School Counselor brushes
aside student questions
Counselor makes modest
changes in the counseling
program when confronted with
evidence of the need for
change.
 School Counselor
inconsistently recognizes
student needs and makes
adjustments accordingly.
 School Counselor attempts
to modify priorities to
address student needs.
 School Counselor
recognizes change in
student needs and makes
adjustments accordingly.
 School Counselor will
routinely modify priorities
to meet the needs of
students.
 School Counselor is exceedingly
aware of student needs and makes
adjustments.
 School Counselor actively seeks
information about educational trends
and best practices applying this
knowledge to daily practice.
 School Counselor seizes a teachable
moment to enhance a session.
120
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Domain 4: for School Counselors: Professional Responsibilities
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4a: Reflecting on practice
Counselor does not reflect
on practice, or the
reflections are inaccurate or
self-serving.
Counselor’s reflection on
practice is moderately accurate
and objective without citing
specific examples and with
only global suggestions as to
how it might be improved.
Counselor’s reflection is highly accurate and
perceptive, citing specific examples that were not
fully successful for at least some students.
Counselor draws on an extensive repertoire to
suggest alternative strategies.
Critical Attributes:
 School Counselor
considers practice but
draws incorrect
conclusions about its
effectiveness.
 School Counselor makes
no suggestions for
improvement.
 School Counselor has a
general sense of whether or
not practices were effective.
 School Counselor offers
general modifications for
future instruction
Counselor’s reflection provides an
accurate and objective description
of practice, citing specific positive
and negative characteristics.
Counselor makes some specific
suggestions as to how the
counseling program might be
improved.
 School Counselor accurately
assesses the effectiveness of
practice.
 School Counselor draws upon
appropriate resources to
suggest alternative strategies
that refine own performance.
121
 School Counselor’s assessment of practice is
thoughtful and includes specific indicators of
effectiveness.
 School Counselor’s suggestions for
improvement draw on an extensive
repertoire.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
4b: Maintaining records and
submitting them in a timely fashion
Critical Attributes:
Counselor’s reports, records,
and documentation are
missing, late, or inaccurate,
resulting in confusion.
 School Counselor has no
system for record
keeping or systems are in
disarray and provide
incorrect or confusing
information.
 School Counselor does
not maintain and submit
records/reports in a
timely manner.
 School Counselor
ignores available data
while practicing.
Basic
Counselor’s reports, records,
and documentation are
generally accurate but are
occasionally late.
 School Counselor has a
process for recording
information; however it
may be out of date,
incomplete or inaccurate.
 School Counselor
inconsistently maintains
and submits
records/reports.
 School Counselor
inconsistently uses data
while practicing.
122
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor’s reports, records, and
documentation are accurate and
are submitted in a timely manner.
Counselor’s approach to record keeping
is highly systematic and efficient and
serves as a model for colleagues in
other schools.
 School Counselor collaborates with
colleagues regarding best practice
for record keeping.
 School Counselor maintains and
submits effective and efficient
reports in a timely manner.
 School Counselor regularly reflects
on data and uses it to guide practice.
 School Counselor’s process for
record keeping is efficient and
effective.
 School Counselor maintains
and submits records/reports in
a timely manner.
 School Counselor consistently
utilizes data.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
4c: Communicating with
families
Critical Attributes:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor provides no
information to families, either
about the counseling program
as a whole or about individual
students.
 Little or no information
regarding the counseling
program is available to
families, staff or
community.
 School Counselor is not
available to students and
parents at reasonable
times.
Counselor provides limited
though accurate information
to families about the
counseling program as a whole
and about individual students.
 Information about the
counseling program is
available.
 Complies with
school/district procedures
for communicating with
families and makes an
effort to engage them.
 School Counselor is
available to students and
parents at reasonable times.
Counselor provides thorough and
accurate information to families
about the counseling program as a
whole and about individual
students.
 School Counselor regularly
makes information about the
program available.
 School Counselor
communicates frequently with
families and successfully
engages them.
Counselor is proactive in providing information
to families about the counseling program and
about individual students through a variety of
means.
123
 School Counselor provides information via
various sources
(website/newsletter/emails/etc.).
 School Counselor is also sensitive and
effective in handling parent/community
concerns.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
4d: Participating in a professional
community
Critical Attributes:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Counselor’s relationships
with colleagues are negative
or self-serving, and
counselor avoids being
involved in school and
district events and projects.
 The counselor's
relationships with
colleagues are
characterized by
negativity or
combativeness.
 The counselor
purposefully avoids
contributing to activities
promoting professional
inquiry.
 The counselor avoids
involvement in school
activities and district and
community projects.
 School Counselor's
relationships with
colleagues are negative or
self-serving.
Counselor’s relationships with
colleagues are cordial, and
counselor participates in
school and district events and
projects when specifically
requested.
 The counselor has cordial
relationships with
colleagues.
 When invited, the
counselor participates in
activities related to
professional inquiry.
 When asked, the counselor
participates in school
activities, as well as district
and community projects.
 School Counselor's
relationships with
colleagues are sometimes
cordial.
Counselor participates actively in
school and district events and
projects and maintains positive
and productive relationships with
colleagues.
Counselor makes a substantial
contribution to school and district
events and projects and assumes
leadership with colleagues.
 The counselor has supportive
and collaborative relationships
with colleagues.
 The counselor regularly
participates in activities related
to professional inquiry.
 The counselor frequently
volunteers to participate in
school events and school
district and community
projects.
 School Counselor relationships
are professional and
productive.
 The counselor takes a leadership
role in promoting activities related
to professional inquiry.
 The counselor regularly contributes
to and leads events that positively
impact school life.
 The counselor regularly contributes
to and leads significant district and
community projects.
 School Counselor actively cultivates
relationships that empower all to
succeed.
124
Exemplary
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
4e: Engaging in professional
development
Counselor does not
participate in professional
development activities when
such activities are clearly
needed for the development
of counseling skills.
Counselor’s participation in
professional development
activities is limited to those
that are convenient or are
required.
Counselor participates in
opportunities for professional
development based on an
individual assessment of need.
Critical Attributes:
 School Counselor is not
involved in any activity
that might enhance
knowledge or skills.
 School Counselor
purposefully resists
discussing performance
with supervisors or
colleagues.
 School Counselor avoids
being involved in school
activities, events and
projects.
 School Counselor
participates in professional
activities in district when
required or provided by
district.
 School Counselor
reluctantly accepts
feedback from supervisors
and colleagues.
 School Counselor will
participate in school
activities when specifically
asked.
 School Counselor seeks regular
opportunities for continued
professional development.
 School Counselor welcomes
colleague and supervisor input
for the purposes of gaining
insight from their feedback.
 School Counselor participates
actively in a variety of required
and optional professional
developmental activities and
utilizes the new skills
appropriately.
125
Exemplary
Counselors actively pursues individual
and or collaborative professional
opportunities and makes a substantial
contribution to the profession through
such activities as offering workshops to
colleagues or providing leadership in
school or district professional learning
activities. School Counselor
contributes to the collective knowledge
of colleagues and the profession.
 School Counselor researches and
implements opportunities for
continued professional
development.
 School Counselor actively seeks
feedback from supervisors and
colleagues.
 School Counselor takes an active
leadership role in professional
development.
 School Counselor fulfills
responsibilities in a manner beyond
primary assignments.
 School Counselor assists others in
implementing strategies to improve
and enhance school/district
programs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Counselors
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
4f: Showing professionalism
Counselor displays
dishonesty in interactions
with colleagues, students,
and the public; violates
principles of confidentiality.
Counselor is honest in
interactions with colleagues,
students, and the public; does
not violate confidentiality.
Critical Attributes:
 School Counselor is
dishonest;
 School Counselor does
not notice the needs of
students and families.
 School Counselor
engages in practices that
are self-serving.
 School Counselor does
not demonstrate
professional counseling
ethics.
 School Counselor
violates principles of
confidentiality.
 School Counselor does
not exhibit willingness or
skill to work
collaboratively with other
professionals.
 School Counselor
willfully rejects district
regulations
 School Counselor is honest.
 School Counselor notices
needs of students and
families but is inconsistent
in addressing them.
 School Counselor is
inconsistent in providing
opportunities for student
success.
 School Counselor
demonstrates basic
understanding and practice
of professional ethics.
 School Counselor is
inconsistent with
maintaining confidentiality.
 School Counselor
inconsistently collaborates
with other professionals.
 School Counselor complies
with district regulations
only when prompted.
126
Proficient
Exemplary
Counselor displays high standards
of honesty, integrity, and
confidentiality in interactions with
colleagues, students and the
public; advocates for students
when needed.
 School Counselor is honest
and is known for having high
standards of integrity.
 School Counselor actively
addresses student needs.
 School Counselor actively
works to provide opportunities
for student success.
 School Counselor
demonstrates solid
understanding and practice of
professional ethics.
 School Counselor is consistent
with maintaining
confidentiality.
 School Counselor participates
in ongoing collaboration with
other professionals.
 School Counselor complies
with district regulations.
Counselor can be counted on to hold the highest
standards of honesty, integrity, and
confidentiality and to advocate for students,
taking a leadership role with colleagues.
 School Counselor is considered a leader in
terms of honesty, integrity and confidentiality.
 School Counselor is highly proactive in
serving students.
 School Counselor makes a concerted effort to
ensure opportunities are available for all
students to be successful.
 School Counselor shows leadership in
understanding and practice of professional
ethics.
 School Counselor exhibits skill and leadership
in professional collaboration.
 School Counselor takes a leadership role
regarding district regulations.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Domain I for School Psychologists: Planning and Preparation
1a: Demonstrating
knowledge and skill of
comprehensive school
psychological services
Critical Attributes
Examples:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
School Psychologist is unable to
demonstrate contemporary
knowledge of theories and
foundations of school
psychology through the
implementation of best
practices at the school or
district level.
 School Psychologist is
unfamiliar with best
practices in the field.
 School Psychologist is
unaware of NASP
procedures and references
outdated research and
practices.
School Psychologist
demonstrates limited
contemporary knowledge of
theories and foundations of
school psychology through the
implementation of best
practices at the school or
district level.
 School Psychologist has
limited knowledge of
current best practices in
education and school
psychology.
 School Psychologist makes
limited reference to NASP
procedures and research or
best practices.
School Psychologist demonstrates
solid contemporary knowledge of
theories and foundations of
school psychology through the
implementation of best practices
at the school or district level.
School Psychologist consistently
demonstrates extensive contemporary
knowledge of theories and foundations
of school psychology through the
implementation of best practices at the
school or district level.
 School Psychologist initiates
personal readings that are
relevant to the needs of the
population.
 School Psychologist references
current best practices in the
field.
 School Psychologist cites
current research in education
and school psychology.
 Provides generic behavioral
strategies that lack research
support and have limited
relevance to the presenting
problem.
 Shares some behavioral
support strategies but not
in sufficient detail to
enhance knowledge and
implementation.
 School Psychologist initiates
personal readings/ research in order
to improve practices with the
current population or needs of staff.
 School Psychologist has
achieved/maintained NCSP status.
 School Psychologist pursues ongoing graduate-level coursework or
instructs at a college level.
 School Psychologist contributes to
the field of school psychology via
research, publications, or
presentations.
 Uses FBA data gathered from
multiple sources and provides team
members with positive behavioral
support strategies that enhance their
knowledge and are linked to the
127
 Shares examples of positive
behavioral support strategies
with team members to enhance
their knowledge.
 Explains big ideas in reading
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
 Displays limited/no
knowledge of the big ideas in
reading, and student
assessment results provide
little guidance for the
identification of researchbased literacy practices.
 Does not describe the
educational needs of a
student who has been
diagnosed with autism.
 Can name the big ideas in
reading but lacks sufficient
knowledge to explain these
concepts.
 Links student assessment
results to general literacy
practices with limited
research support.
 Through instructional
consultation with
teacher/parent, is emerging
in his/her ability to
describe the educational
needs of a student who has
been diagnosed with
autism.
128
and links student assessment
results to specific researchbased literacy practices.
 Through instructional
consultation with
teacher/parent, describes the
educational needs of a student
who has been diagnosed with
autism.
function of the behavior.
 Shows extensive knowledge of the
big ideas in reading and can
communicate these ideas in
understanding language. Student
assessment results are directly linked
to specific research-based literacy
practices and include guidelines for
systemic intervention
implementation.
 Through instructional consultation
with teacher/parent, describes the
educational needs of a student who
has been diagnosed with autism and
provides support in implementing
recommendations.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
1b: Demonstrates
Knowledge of Child and
Adolescent Development
and Psychopathology.
Critical Attributes
Examples:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
School Psychologist
demonstrates little to no
knowledge of child and
adolescent development,
learning theory,
psychopathology, and cultural
diversity.
 School Psychologist is
insensitive or unaware of
the unique characteristics
of the population.
 School Psychologist makes
assumptions or
designations of
students/families with
limited information.
 School Psychologist
grouping and placement of
students to provide
services is inappropriate.
School Psychologist
demonstrates some knowledge
of child and adolescent
development, learning theory,
psychopathology, and cultural
diversity.
 School Psychologist does
not share this knowledge
with colleagues through
collaboration or trainings.
 School Psychologist allows
inappropriate assumptions
or designations of
students/families to occur
in the school setting.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently groups
students or provides
services based on their
needs and characteristics.
School Psychologist
demonstrates thorough
knowledge of child and
adolescent development,
learning theory,
psychopathology, and cultural
diversity.
 School Psychologist remains
current with the latest
research in the field via DSM
updates, research articles,
attending conferences.
 School Psychologist applies
and shares the most current
knowledge with staff or
colleagues.
 Students are grouped for
services with consideration
given to their developmental
level, learning style,
disabilities, and background.
 Has limited understanding
of BICS/CALP results and
is able to partially
incorporate the
interpretation of
BICS/CALP results in
 Incorporates interpretation of
BICS/CALP results when
planning and preparing
academic interventions for an
ELL.
 Selects a nonverbal measure
 Shows little/no
understanding of BICS/
CALP assessment results
and fails to incorporate
interpretation of these
results when planning and
129
Exemplary
School Psychologist demonstrates
extensive knowledge of child and
adolescent development, learning
theory, psychopathology, and cultural
diversity.
 School Psychologist remains current
with the latest research in the field
regarding characteristics of
students/families.
 School Psychologist contributes to
the field by conducting research or
publishing articles about
characteristics of students/families.
 School Psychologist formally
presents the latest research or
information about student/family
characteristics to staff or colleagues.
 School Psychologist consistently
gives consideration to the unique
characteristics of students when they
are grouped or services are provided
and this is monitored throughout
the school year.
 Displays extensive knowledge of
BICS/ CALP concepts, assists in the
gathering and interpretation of
BICS/CALP assessment data and
integrates the results with other
assessment data to develop academic
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
preparing academic
interventions for an ELL.
 Selects the same general
cognitive measure with
little or no regard for a
student’s individual
differences or disabilities.
 Does not collaborate with
the student, parents,
teachers, and interagency
personnel to develop a
comprehensive
intervention plan for a
student with significant
behavioral difficulties.
planning and preparing
academic interventions for
an ELL
 Selects a cognitive measure
that partially assesses
nonverbal cognitive
functioning with a student
who presents with a severe
deficiency in expressive
language.
 Inconsistently collaborates
with the student, parents,
teachers, and interagency
personnel to develop a
comprehensive
intervention plan for a
student with significant
behavioral difficulties.
130
in an effort to more
accurately assess cognitive
functioning with a student
who presents with a severe
deficiency in expressive
language.
 Collaborates with the student,
parents, teachers, and
interagency personnel to
develop a comprehensive
intervention plan for a
student with significant
behavioral difficulties.
intervention recommendations for
an ELL.
 Uses the research literature to select
the most valid and reliable
nonverbal cognitive measure to use
with a student who has a severe
deficiency in expressive language in
conjunction with record review,
observations, rating scales, and
interviews with parents and teachers
to accurately assess the student’s
cognitive functioning.
 Establishes ongoing collaboration
with the student, parents, teachers,
and interagency personnel to
develop a comprehensive
intervention plan for a student with
significant behavioral difficulties.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1c: Establishing goals for
the psychology program
appropriate to the setting
and the students served.
Psychological services are
inappropriate to the needs,
developmental level, and
diversity of the student(s).
Psychological services are
rudimentary and are partially
suitable to the needs,
developmental level, and
diversity of the student(s).
Psychological services are clear
and appropriate to the needs,
developmental level, and
diversity of the student(s).
Psychological services are exceptionally
appropriate to the needs,
developmental level, and diversity of
the student(s).
Critical Attributes
 Services are not
appropriately aligned to
meet the needs of the
student population.
 School Psychologist does
not collaborate with school
or district colleagues in
order to develop goals for
services.
 IEP goals for
psychological services are
not individualized and not
observable or measureable.
 Grouping and placement
of students to provide
services is inappropriate by
not giving consideration to
their unique needs.
 ASD and AK State
regulations are not
followed
 Does not incorporate or
consider AimsWeb data
 Non-function based
behavioral intervention
plans are written that
identify inappropriate
 Services are not always
appropriately aligned to
meet the needs of the
student population.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently collaborates
with school or district
colleagues in order to
develop goals for services.
 IEP goals for psychological
services are sometimes
individualized, observable,
and measurable.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently groups
students based on their
needs and characteristics.
 Services are consistently
aligned to meet the needs of
the student population.
 School Psychologist makes an
effort to collaborate with
school or district colleagues
in order to develop goals for
services.
 IEP goals for psychological
services are individualized to
the needs of students and are
observable and measurable.
 Students are grouped with
consideration given to their
unique needs and
characteristics.
 School Psychologist initiates and
takes responsibility for meeting the
needs of the student population
through appropriate services.
 IEP goals for psychological services
are individualized observable, and
measurable.
 Consideration is consistently given
to the unique needs and
characteristics of students when they
are grouped for service.
 IEP goals are sometimes
aligned with ESER
educational needs and
sometimes backed up by
data
 Minimal understanding of
ASD and AK State
regulations, as well as
IDEA
 IEP goals are frequently
aligned with ESER
educational needs and backed
up by data
 Has a solid understanding of
ASD and AK State
regulations, as well as IDEA
 Frequently uses AimsWeb
data to guide intervention
 IEP goals are always aligned with
ESER educational needs and backed
up by data
 Clear understanding local policy and
procedure and federal and state
regulations.
 Takes an active role in analysis of
AimsWeb benchmarking data in
order to guide the Tier II and III
Examples:
131
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
needs (i.e., functions of
control and power are
mentioned)
 Behavior plans are written
without conducting FBAs
for children whose
behavior is greatly
impacted
 IEP goals are not aligned
with educational needs and
are vague
 Collaboration on behavior
interventions does not take
place (i.e., no follow up
with teachers)
 Sometimes uses AimsWeb
data to guide decision
making
 Sometimes identifies
function-based
interventions for behavior
intervention plans through
direct observations;
infrequently trains teachers
on implementation of
interventions; occasionally
checks in with teachers;
infrequently collects
integrity data; seldom
modifies interventions
when necessary
 Sometimes applies
evidence-based practices to
every day practice of
school psychology.
132
efforts
 Frequently identifies
function-based interventions
for behavior intervention
plans through direct
observations; trains teachers
on implementation; checks in
with teachers most of the
time; collects integrity data;
modifies interventions when
necessary
 Frequently graphs data for
progress monitoring
purposes
 Frequently uses evidencebased practices applied to
every day practice of school
psychology
intervention process.
 Always identifies function-based
interventions for behavior
intervention plans through direct
observations; trains teachers on
implementation; checks in with
teachers regularly; collects integrity
data; modifies interventions when
necessary and graphs PM data
 Compares ELL students to other
ELL students with the same English
proficiency level to make eligibility
decisions.
 Evidence-based practices applied to
every day practice of school
psychology.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
1d: Demonstrating
knowledge of state and
federal regulations and of
resources both within and
beyond the school
district.
Critical Attributes
Examples:
Psychologist demonstrates little
or no knowledge of
governmental regulations or of
resources for students available
through the school or district.
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Psychologist displays awareness of
governmental regulations and of
resources for students available
through the school or district, but
no knowledge of resources
available more broadly.
Psychologist displays awareness
of governmental regulations and
of resources for students
available through the school or
districts and some familiarity
with resources external to the
district.
 State level
certification/license is
maintained and current
 Speaks about regulations
as they apply to
evaluations, child find and
eligibility of students with
disabilities.
 Provides comprehensive
information about school
and district resources.
 Responds to parent
request for community
support by directing them
appropriately to helpful
resources.
 Uses assessment protocols
and adheres to policies
related to threats and/or
suicide.
 Establishes clear procedures
for gathering data from all
relevant sources as part of
the multidisciplinary
evaluation process.
Psychologist’s knowledge of
governmental regulations and of
resources for the students is extensive,
including those available through the
school or district and in the community.
 State level
certification/license is
absent, revoked or expired.
 Lacks current knowledge of
federal/state regulations and
district procedures.
 References outdated or
disproven research and
practices.
 State level
certification/license is
maintained and current
 Provides but doesn’t explain
regulatory information (e.g.,
parent rights, child find,
timelines).
 Provides accurate but
limited information
regarding available academic
or psychological supports
for students (e.g., one
resource only) with the
school and district.
 Disregards school district
policies related to threats
and/or suicide; or the policies
are known to exist, but
chooses not to familiarize self
with the policies.
 Does not gather the
information from the parties
necessary to meet the
 Is familiar with school district
policy in regard to
threat/suicide assessment but
does not follow it consistently.
 Gathers information from the
parties necessary to meet the
requirements of the regulations
as part of the multidisciplinary
process but does not do so on
133
 State level certification/license is
maintained and current.
 Has achieved or maintained
NCSP status.
 Enhances others’ knowledge
about regulations
 Actively maintains current
knowledge of resources and
services available to
students/families within and
outside of school.
 Is identifiable as a go-to person
for resources and information for
academic and psychological
supports.
 Helps to create the school district
policy on threat/suicide assessment
and/or frequently trains other staff
on policy implementation.
 Designs or follows a clear,
established procedure for accessing
information as part of the
multidisciplinary process. A written
process and non-psychological
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015




requirements of the
regulations as part of the
multidisciplinary evaluation
process.
Disregards evaluation
timelines with most or all
cases, even in cases in which
there is potential of known
litigation.
Does not have knowledge of
local behavioral health
services.
Does not have knowledge of
websites that “house”
research-based.
comprehension strategies.
Does not use a researchvalidated classroom
management tool (e.g.,
CHAMPS) to help a team
refine their ability to deliver
positive reinforcement.
a regular basis.
 Is able to adhere to timelines
associated with the
reevaluation/ evaluation
process in some cases but not
the majority.
 Has emerging knowledge of
local behavioral health services
to provide to a family of a
student who was diagnosed
with a conduct disorder.
 Shows teachers websites that
“house” comprehension
strategies that are not researchbased.
 Is emerging in knowledge of
research-validated classroom
management tools (e.g.,
CHAMPS) to help a team
refine their ability to deliver
positive reinforcement.
134
 Monitors and adheres to
reevaluation timelines.
 Shares knowledge of local
behavioral health services and
provides contacts and related
information to a family.
 Shows teachers websites that
“house” research-based
comprehension strategies
such as “reciprocal teaching”
and an implementation
checklist.
 Uses a research-validated
classroom management tool
(e.g., CHAMPS) to help a
team refine their ability to
deliver positive
reinforcement.




school staff being able to recite the
process when asked evidence this.
Adheres to the reevaluation/
evaluation timelines in ALL cases.
Compiles a list of local behavioral
health services and provides an
afterschool session to share
information with both parents and
teachers.
Provides to educators in-service
sessions, websites, books, and tools
regarding research-based
comprehension strategies and
strategies for implementation.
Has extensive knowledge of
research-validated classroom
management tools (e.g., CHAMPS)
to help a team refine their ability to
deliver positive reinforcement.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Excellent
1e: Planning the psychology
program, integrated with the
regular school program, to
meet the needs of individual
students and including
prevention.
School Psychologist’s repertoire
of academic, behavioral, and
social/emotional
interventions/supports lacks
coherence, an overall structure,
or does not meet the needs of
the student(s).
School Psychologist designs
academic, behavioral, and
social/emotional
interventions/supports, with
minimal regard for evidencebased practices that may be
effective in meeting the needs
of the target student(s).
School Psychologist designs
evidence-based academic,
behavioral, and social/emotional
interventions/supports that
effectively meet the needs of the
target student(s).
School Psychologist designs evidencebased academic, behavioral, and
social/emotional
interventions/supports that effectively
meet the needs of the target student(s)
and are connected to building,
department, and district goals.
Critical Attributes
 School Psychologist is
ignorant of evidence-based
interventions across all Tiers.
 School Psychologist does not
collaborate with school
personnel in order to identify
school-wide, at-risk, or special
education interventions.
 School Psychologist is unable
to suggest or identify
appropriate interventions that
meet the needs of students.
 School Psychologist program
includes a rudimentary plan to
evaluate the professional
goals.
 School Psychologist
demonstrates limited
knowledge of evidencebased interventions across
all Tiers.
 School Psychologist
collaborates only when
requested with school
personnel in order to
identify school-wide, atrisk, or special education
interventions.
 School Psychologist has
limited suggestions for
appropriate interventions to
meet the needs of students.
 School Psychologist
program includes a plan to
evaluate the professional
goals.
 School Psychologist
demonstrates an understanding
of the supports and
interventions that are available
to students across all Tiers.
 School Psychologist frequently
collaborates with school
personnel in order to develop a
school-wide, at-risk, or special
education interventions.
 School Psychologist regularly
suggests or identifies
appropriate interventions that
meet the needs of students.
 School Psychologist program
includes a clear and organized
plan to evaluate the
professional goals.
 School Psychologist demonstrates
an extensive understanding of the
supports and interventions that are
available to students across all Tiers.
 School Psychologist provides
leadership when collaborating with
school personnel in order to develop
school-wide, at-risk, or special
education interventions.
 School Psychologist functions
within a leadership role by
researching interventions that are
available to meet the needs of
students and soliciting the
obtainment of such materials.
 School Psychologist’s evaluation
plan is highly sophisticated, with
imaginative sources of evidence, and
a clear path towards improving the
professional goals on an ongoing
basis.
135
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Examples:
 When asked to be a part of
the school’s leadership
committee or student support
team, the School Psychologist
declines.
 The School Psychologist has
made no attempt to become
familiar with the
building/district’s technology
data maintenance sources
(e.g., Student Information
System, PULSE, ARS).
 The School Psychologist is
unable to interpret growth
data for groups of students
with reading disabilities.
 Provides little/or no
knowledge regarding how to
support general & special
education teachers in working
with a student with autism.
 The School Psychologist
provides handouts to
teachers on specific
disorders only when
requested.
 The School Psychologist
has limited knowledge
about the types of
interventions the school
and district has available
(Lexia, Math Whizz, Rocket
Math, etc.)
 The School Psychologist
serves on the school’s data
base committee but with
limited participation or
ability interpret whether
students with severe
reading or math disabilities
are responding adequately
to instruction using growth
data & other data sources.
136
 The School Psychologist
provides staff development or
presents on the difference
between interventions and
accommodations.
 The School Psychologist
provides handouts to teachers
and parents on various topics
(i.e., allowances, lying,
bedwetting, etc.)
 The School Psychologist
provides short articles
pertinent to school
psychological topics or services
for the school newsletter.
 The School Psychologist helps
general & special education
teachers align their focus of
instruction through a common,
research based intervention for
a student with autism.
 The School Psychologist works with
the school’s leadership
team/committee to develop and
implement a school-wide positive
behavior support program.
 The School Psychologist provides
staff with a university credit class on
CHAMPs over several months.
 The School Psychologist facilitates
a data analysis team and runs
statistical analyses comparing
multiple intervention groups using
growth data and other data sources
to determine efficacy of the
interventions.
 The School Psychologist consults
with speech therapist, OT and
general and sped teachers to design a
comprehensive plan for delivering
research based interventions for a
student with autism.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Domain 2 for School Psychologists: School Environment
Unsatisfactory
2a: Establishing rapport
with students. This
includes interpersonal
skills such as empathy to
establish trust and reduce
anxiety.
School Psychologist’s
interactions with students, staff,
and parents are negative or
inappropriate. Students appear
uncomfortable in the School
Psychologist’s environment.
Critical Attributes
 Parents and/or staff complain
about treatment of their
student or themselves.
 There is a lack of respect
observed in interactions with
others.
 Students refuse to speak with
psychologist.
 No effort is made towards
repairing relationships or
building rapport.
Examples:
 Is not able to establish
rapport with students, and it
is apparent that students feel
uncomfortable in the
Basic
Proficient
School Psychologist’s
interactions with students,
staff and parents are a mix of
positive and negative. School
Psychologist’s efforts at
developing rapport are
inconsistent.
 Parents and/or staff
express neutral feelings
about the treatment of their
student or themselves.
 The qualities of the
interactions with others are
inconsistent and there is
limited respect
demonstrated through
words or actions to
students, parents, and/or
school personnel.
 Some students refuse to
speak with psychologist.
 Inconsistent effort is made
towards supporting
respectful relationships and
building rapport.
 Establishes rapport with
some students but not on a
regular basis.
 Handles conflict well at
School Psychologist’s interactions
with students, staff, and parents
are positive and respectful.
Students appear comfortable in
the School Psychologist’s
environment.
Students, staff, and parents seek out the
School Psychologist, reflecting a high
degree of comfort and trust in the
relationship.
 Parents, students, and staff feel
comfortable with and seek out
the support of the
psychologist.
 There are respectful
interactions with all staff
members.
 Effort is made towards
repairing relationships and
building rapport.
 School Psychologist establishes
visibility in the school and is
approachable to all.
 School Psychologist has an
“open door” policy.
 Parents, students, and staff regularly
seek out the support of psychologist.
 Interactions with staff during
consultation are respectful and
reciprocal.
 When needed, efforts are made to
repair relationships and reestablish
rapport with all staff members.
 School Psychologist is sought out by
building/district administration to act
in a leadership role or a facilitator.
 School Psychologist establishes
visibility in the school/district and is
approachable to all.
 School Psychologist maintains an
“open door” policy.
 Rapport is easily established
with students, and students
appear comfortable when
interacting with the school
 Students actively seek out the school
psychologist for assistance and
students consider the school
psychologist to be part of their
137
Exemplary
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
presence of the school
psychologist.
 Unwillingness or inability to
resolve conflicts.
 Communicates to parents in a
confusing and unhelpful
manner, and parents
frequently refuse to meet with
the school psychologist.
times but not consistently.
 Provides relevant
information to parents, but
information is sometimes
confusing or inaccurate.
138
psychologist.
 Is able to clearly convey
information to parents that will
support positive learning
outcomes for their children.
 Maintains positive interactions
when in disagreement with
another team member.
support system, when needed.
 Is able to clearly convey information
to parents that will support positive
learning outcomes for their children,
and parents seek out the school
psychologist for counsel.
 Facilitates positive interactions in
situations involving dissent among
team members and leads the team
toward a resolution.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
2b: Establish a culture
for positive mental
health throughout the
school.
Critical Attributes
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
School Psychologist makes no
attempt to foster a culture for
positive mental health in the
school. School Psychologist
demonstrates a lack of
knowledge of and involvement
in Tier I instruction and Tier II
social/emotional and
behavioral supports and
interventions.
School Psychologist inconsistently
promotes a culture for positive
mental health in the school.
School Psychologist demonstrates
limited knowledge of and
involvement in Tier I instruction
and Tier II social/emotional and
behavioral supports and
interventions.
 School Psychologist is
unaware and not invested
in the culture and climate
of the school.
 School Psychologist does
not participate in schoolwide committees,
leadership teams, or
problem solving teams.
 School Psychologist does
not participate in nor have
knowledge of the planning
and/or implementation of
Tier I instruction and Tier
II social/emotional and
behavioral supports and
interventions.
 School Psychologist is
disengaged from and has
limited knowledge of the
culture and climate of the
school.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently participates in
school-wide committees,
leadership teams, or problem
solving teams.
 School Psychologist has
limited participation in or
demonstrates limited
knowledge of the planning
and/or implementation of
Tier I instruction and Tier II
social/emotional and
behavioral supports and
interventions.
139
School Psychologist consistently
promotes a culture for positive
mental health throughout the
school. School Psychologist
demonstrates knowledge of and
involvement in Tier I instruction
and Tier II social/emotional and
behavioral supports and
interventions.
 School Psychologist is aware
of and actively makes
attempts to enhance the
culture and climate of the
school.
 School Psychologist
participates in school-wide
committees, leadership teams,
or problem solving teams.
 School Psychologist is
involved in and demonstrates
knowledge of the planning
and implementation of Tier I
instruction and Tier II
social/emotional and
behavioral supports and
interventions.
Exemplary
School Psychologist models and
facilitates a culture for positive mental
health throughout the school. School
Psychologist demonstrates a vast
knowledge of and involvement in Tier I
instruction and Tier II social/emotional
and behavioral supports and
interventions.
 School Psychologist is invested in
establishing a positive culture and
climate throughout the school.
 School Psychologist assumes a
leadership role in school-wide
committees, leadership teams, or
problem solving teams.
 School Psychologist is actively
involved in and demonstrates a vast
knowledge of the planning and
implementation of Tier I instruction
and Tier II social/emotional and
behavioral supports and
interventions.
 School Psychologist utilizes the
information gathered from the needs
assessment in order to determine
which areas of climate and culture
need support.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Examples:
 Is not able to establish
rapport with students, and
it is very apparent that
students feel
uncomfortable in their
presence.
 Is openly disrespectful to
others when not in
agreement.
 Demonstrates an inability
or unwillingness to resolve
conflicts.
 Speaks in a manner that
completely confuses
parents to the point in
which parents frequently
seek out other staff
members for explanation.
 Does little to reinforce the
value of hard work,
persistence, and effort with
a student who suffers from
chronic underachievement.
 Does little to assist
students with personal goal
setting and reflection.
 Establishes rapport with
some students but not on a
regular basis.
 Demonstrates the ability to
handle conflicts at times but
not consistently.
 Sometimes demonstrates the
ability to speak to parents in a
manner that does not cause
confusion.
 Works with special education
teacher to develop a homeschool plan to reinforce
assignment completion with a
student; however, the
assignments are not aligned
with PA academic standards.
 Works with a team of
teachers to develop a
behavioral plan for a student.
There is positive
reinforcement for quality of
work produced but not for
effort or receptivity to adult
feedback.
140
 Establishes rapport easily
with students (e.g., students
appear comfortable with SP).
 Uses appropriate language
when speaking with parents
(does not use educational
jargon).
 Demonstrates respectful
manner when there is
disagreement.
 Promotes the belief that
students with complex
support needs can make
growth toward the PA
standards.
 Is a member of a school-wide
positive behavioral support
team to assist with antibullying strategies that are
implemented and monitored
school-wide.
 Works directly with a student
with behavioral difficulties to
develop self-regulation
strategies and reinforce the
student’s progress.
 Students often actively seek out
his/her assistance on an ongoing
basis and view the SP as part of their
support system even after the initial
reason for referral has been
completed.
 Is the orchestrator of bringing
professionals/parents of differing
opinions to a conclusion that is
acceptable to all parties?
 Speaks and acts in a manner that
quickly and easily establishes rapport
and trust with parents.
 Parents actively seek out his/her
support for assistance regarding
their children.
 Empowers a student (or group of
students) to develop goals, including
attention to detail and initiation of
improvement, which the student
meets with success.
 Is seen as a coach by students. They
share their reflections of their work
and progress with the SP and seek
constructive feedback.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
2c: Establishing and
maintaining clear
procedures for
referrals.
School Psychologist does not
follow district and building
referral procedures. School
Psychologist exercises poor
judgment in setting priorities,
resulting in confusion and missed
deadlines.
School Psychologist understands
and consistently adheres to
building and district referral
procedures. School Psychologist
effectively sets priorities,
resulting in the efficient
completion of evaluations and
other assigned job duties.
School Psychologist understands referral
procedures, consistently adheres to those
procedures, and has established himself or
herself as a resource person for others to
learn the referral procedures. School
Psychologist demonstrates excellent timemanagement skills, accomplishing all tasks in
a seamless manner.
Critical Attributes

School Psychologist
understands but does not
consistently comply with the
district and building referral
procedures. School
Psychologist’s timemanagement skills are
moderately well developed;
essential activities are carried
out, but not always in the most
efficient manner.
 Occasionally leaves
confidential materials in
view of others and
improperly disposes of
confidential materials.
 Materials are not easily
assessable and not always
secured.
 Inconsistently adheres to
copyright laws that pertain
to assessment materials.
 District procedures for
maintaining student files/
protocols are followed
inconsistently.
 Timelines are occasionally
not met by the school
psychologist.




Frequently leaves confidential
materials in view of others
and does not take proper
measures to dispose of
confidential materials.
Materials are lost, misplaced,
or unsecured.
Does not respect copyright
laws pertaining to assessment
materials
District procedures for
maintaining student files/
protocols are not followed.
Timelines are regularly not
met by the school
psychologist.
141





Confidential materials are
appropriately stored and
properly disposed (e.g.,
shredding)
Materials are readily
available and secured.
Copyright laws pertaining to
assessment instruments and
protocols are respected.
District procedures for
maintaining student
files/protocols are followed.
Timelines are met by the
school psychologist.





Specific protocols of practice are used
to ensure that materials are kept
confidential and properly disposed.
Materials are readily available and
consistently secured.
Consistently respects copyright laws
pertaining to assessment instruments
and protocols.
District procedures for maintaining
student files/protocols are consistently
followed.
School psychologist coordinates team
efforts to meet special education
timelines.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Examples:



Disregards school district
policies related to threats
and/or suicide in that there is
an outright refusal to follow
them or the policies are
known to exist but chooses
not to familiarize
himself/herself with the
policies, thereby putting the
student at risk and the school
district at risk for potential
litigation.
Does not gather the
information from the parties
necessary to meet the
requirements of the PA
regulations as part of the
multidisciplinary evaluation
process.
Disregards reevaluation/
evaluation timelines with
most or all cases even in
cases in which there is
potential or known litigation.



Is familiar with school
district policy in regard to
threat/suicide assessment
but does not follow it
consistently.
Gathers information from
the parties necessary to
meet the requirements of
the PA regulations as part
of the multidisciplinary
process but does not do so
on a regular basis.
Is able to adhere to
timelines associated with
the reevaluation/
evaluation process in some
cases but not the majority.
142



Uses assessment protocols
and adheres to policies
related to threats and/or
suicide.
Establishes clear procedures
for gathering data from all
relevant sources as part of
the multidisciplinary
evaluation process.
Monitors and adheres to
reevaluation timelines.



Helps to create the school district policy
on threat/suicide assessment and/or
frequently trains other staff on policy
implementation.
Designs or follows a clear, established
procedure for accessing information as
part of the multidisciplinary process. A
written process and non-psychological
school staff being able to recite the
process when asked evidence this.
Adheres to the reevaluation/evaluation
timelines in ALL cases.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
2d: Managing student
behavior through
collaboration,
behavioral
interventions, and
direct services
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
School Psychologist does not
participate in the implementation
and progress monitoring of
Tiered behavioral interventions.
School Psychologist fails to
collaborate with teams that
develop behavioral intervention
plans. Direct services with
students are ineffective, poorly
managed, and may exacerbate
inappropriate behaviors.
School Psychologist
inconsistently participates in the
implementation and progress
monitoring of Tiered behavioral
interventions. School
Psychologist struggles to
collaborate with teams that
develop behavioral intervention
plans. Direct work with
students is not always effective
and poorly managed. There is
no plan developed to collect
data on behavioral interventions
and services.
School Psychologist takes an
active role in the
implementation and progress
monitoring of Tiered behavioral
interventions. School
Psychologist actively
collaborates with teams that
develop behavioral intervention
plans. Direct work with
students is effective and well
managed. Behavioral
interventions and services are
developed with consideration
given to data collection and
progress monitoring.
School Psychologist takes a leadership role
in the implementation and progress
monitoring of Tiered behavioral
interventions. School Psychologist assumes
a leadership role when supporting teams
that develop behavioral intervention plans.
Direct work with students is highly effective
and well managed. All behavioral
interventions and services are developed
with consideration given to data collection
and progress monitoring.
143
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Critical Attributes
 School Psychologist does
not participate or contribute
to Problem-Solving Teams,
BSP writing, behavioral
supports, etc.
 School Psychologist does
not collaborate with school
personnel regarding student
behavior.
 Direct services provided by
the School Psychologist may
escalate or provoke students.
 The behavioral needs of
students and the required
interventions are not
communicated with staff.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently participates or
contributes to ProblemSolving Teams, BSP writing,
behavioral supports, etc.
 School Psychologist
infrequently collaborates
with school personnel
regarding student behavior.
 Direct services are
ineffective and do not
promote behavioral change.
 The behavioral needs of
students and the required
interventions are
inconsistently
communicated with staff.
Examples:
 Does not offer support to
students, staff, or the school
community in this area. For
example, does not familiarize
himself/herself with student
assistance team or FBAs.
 Does not have the
skills/knowledge to conduct
an FBA in accordance with
regulations for students who
are suspended.
 Offers some support in this
area but not on a regular
basis. For example, sits on a
student assistance team but
is not an active participant.
 Inconsistently conducts an
FBA in accordance with
regulations for students who
are suspended.
144
 School Psychologist
participates and contributes
to Problem-Solving Teams,
BIP writing, behavioral
supports, etc.
 School Psychologist
collaborates with school
personnel regarding student
behavior.
 Direct services are effective
and result in positive
behavioral change.
 School Psychologist is able
to help defuse students in
crisis (e.g.,, Suicide Risk
Assessment, Self-Injurious
Behaviors Risk
Assessment).
 School Psychologist ensures
that the behavioral needs of
students and the required
interventions are
communicated with staff.
 Conducts an FBA in
accordance with regulations
for students who are
suspended.
 Counsels students on
personal adjustment issues
and pro-social skills.
 Assists with development,
implementation, and
evaluation of a school-wide
prevention program (e.g.,
 School Psychologist assumes a
leadership role on Problem-Solving
Teams, BSP writing, behavioral
supports, etc.
 School Psychologist is sought out by
school personnel in order to address
student behavioral concerns.
 Direct services are effective and result
in positive behavioral change that is
supported by data.
 School Psychologist is frequently
sought out to defuse students in crisis
(e.g., Suicide Risk Assessment, SelfInjurious Behaviors Risk Assessment).
 School Psychologist initiates the
communication of the behavioral needs
of students and required interventions
with staff.
 Is integral in forming the student
assistance within their school(s) and
offers support with training and/or
with the implementation of the system.
 Is integral in the process or is able to
teach others on conducting a legal,
ethical FBA.
 Is an expert in a particular area of
research-based counseling such a brief
solution focused therapy. Seeks specific
training and/or credential in the field
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
suicide, substance use,
teenage pregnancy, bullying,
drop out).
145
and integrates this intervention(s) into
practice in their work setting.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
3a: Demonstrates the
Ability to Effectively
Communicate With
Students at Their
Developmental Level
Critical Attributes
Examples:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
School Psychologist does not
interact with students or engages
in inappropriate interactions.
Direct services with students are
extremely limited or the
purposes of such services are not
clearly communicated with the
student(s).
 School psychologist makes
no effort to communicate
with the student.
 Interactions with students are
inappropriate to the students’
developmental level.
 The boundaries between the
School Psychologist and
student are inappropriate.
 Services that are provided to
students are confusing or
have no purpose.
School Psychologist’s
communication with students is
not always developmentally
appropriate. The purpose of and
directions for activities are not
clearly expressed or
developmentally appropriate.
School Psychologist effectively
communicates with students
using developmentally
appropriate language. The
purpose of and directions for
activities are clearly expressed
and developmentally
appropriate.
 The school psychologist
adapts communication to
include students in
discussions about their
education.
 Expectations or
explanations of activities
are clearly communicated
to students.
 Boundaries between School
Psychologist and student
are clear and
developmentally
appropriate.
 Students participate in
direct services and are able
to explain the goals or
priorities of the process.
 Student knows who the
psychologist is and why
they are meeting.
Psychologist uses language
that is respectful of the
student’s cultural strengths,
 Does not ensure that student
feels comfortable or
supported by the
psychologist.
 Does not check with the
student for understanding of
 Communication with students
is inconsistent with limited
follow through (e.g., not
meeting with a student after
agreeing to or not acting after
meeting with student).
 School Psychologist uses
confusing or developmentally
inappropriate language when
interacting with students.
 Boundaries between School
Psychologist and student are
unclear.
 Students participate in direct
services, but are unable to
explain the goals or priorities
of the process.
 Student is aware of the School
Psychologist and that he/she
meets with him may or may
not know why.
 Provides general
recommendations for students
146
Exemplary
School Psychologist’s communication with
students is consistently effective and uses
developmentally appropriate language. The
purpose of and directions for activities are
clearly expressed, developmentally
appropriate, and generalizable to other
settings.
 Expectations and purpose of direct
services are clear to students, staff, and
parents.
 The school psychologist adapts
communication to include students in
discussions about their education and
needs.
 Boundaries between psychologist and
student are explicit and understood by
students, as well as families and staff.
 Communication with students is dynamic
and age-appropriate.
 Students actively participate in direct
services and are able to generalize the
lesson to other settings.
 Psychologist is aware of own cultural
biases and takes steps to overcome them.
 Respects the student’s cultural beliefs,
strengths, needs and overall worldview.
 Student is aware of the Psychologists role,
actively participates in meetings, and seeks
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
the purpose of their meeting.
 Disregards students’ cultural
or linguistic backgrounds.
and/or parents that do not
take into account cultural
identity, preferences and
strengths.
 Communicates with students
but sometimes uses language
that students do not
understand.
 Has a general knowledge of
community services and
periodically refers students
and families to some of these
programs.
147
needs and preferences.
 If needed, collaborates with
a behavioral consultant and
the family to develop a
behavior plan that is based
upon cultural strengths,
identity, and preferences.
 Works with staff and
parents in understanding
the continuum of student’s
needs in a clear manner
that is easily understood.
out the psychologist when needed.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
3b: Utilizes Data-Based
Decision Making and
Progress-Monitoring to
Modify Student
Instruction,
Interventions, and
Services
School Psychologist does not
use data to help make
instructional decisions nor
participates in the problemsolving process. School
Psychologist is not
knowledgeable about data
collection procedures,
instruments, and interpretation.
Critical Attributes
 School Psychologist fails to
make data based decisions
regarding instruction and
interventions (i.e., makes
subjective decisions).
 School Psychologist is not
collaborative with other staff.
Examples:
 Does not access AIMSweb
data (or any other formative
assessments) or demonstrates
ineffective analysis of data.
 Refuses to participate in data
team meetings.
 During a Student Support
Team meeting, school
psychologist’s decision to
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
School Psychologist attempts
to use data to help make
instructional decisions, but
does so incorrectly or
inaccurately. Participation in
the problem-solving process is
ineffective and efforts are
misguided. School
Psychologist has limited
knowledge of data collection
procedures, instruments, and
interpretation.
 School Psychologist has
limited knowledge of tools
and processes to effectively
collect data and monitor
progress.
 School Psychologist uses
incorrect or superfluous
data for instructional
planning or decisionmaking.
School Psychologist uses data to
help make instructional decisions.
School Psychologist participates
in the problem-solving process
and assists the educational team
as needed in determining whether
more formalized evaluations or
services are warranted.
School Psychologist consistently uses data to
help make instructional decisions. The
School Psychologist is a leader during the
problem-solving process and advises the
education team in determining whether more
formalized evaluations or services are
warranted.
 School Psychologist
consistently uses tools and
processes to effectively collect
data and implements these
processes.
 School Psychologist uses
accurate data sources to assist
with instructional planning,
progress monitoring, and
decision-making.
 Accesses AIMSweb, (or
any other formative
assessments), and
demonstrates emerging
skills in basic analysis of
data
 Is a member of a data team
but is limited in ability to
help the team to accurately
 Consistently utilizes
AIMSweb, (or any other
formative assessments), and
appropriately analyzes data at
an individual or group level to
determine effectiveness of Tier
2 or Tier 3 interventions
 Is a member of a data team
and helps the team to
 School Psychologist effectively and
consistently uses tools and processes to
collect data and monitor progress.
 School Psychologist mentors and/or
guides others in the use of tools and
process to collect data and monitor
progress.
 School Psychologist relies on a variety of
data sources to drive instructional
planning, progress monitoring, and
decision making.
 Demonstrates an extensive knowledge and
use of AIMSweb, (or any other formative
assessments), and skillfully conducts
analyses of data at an individual, group
and school level to inform instruction and
inform system level decisions
 Facilitates data meetings and is highly
capable of analyzing growth data and
other data sources to determine an
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Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
proceed or not proceed to a
special education evaluation
is based on their current
number of active referrals.
interpret whether specific
group of students (ELL,
SLD in reading) are
responding adequately to
instruction using growth
data and other data sources
 During a Student Support
Team meeting, school
psychologist attempts to
use data (i.e. percentage of
homework assignments
completed, a single R-CBM
benchmarking data point)
in determining a need for a
special education
evaluation.
149
accurately interpret whether a
specific group of students
(ELL, SLD in reading) are
responding adequately to
instruction using growth data
and other data sources.
 During a Student Support
Team meeting, school
psychologist appropriately
utilizes data from more than
one source to make informed
decisions about students’
needs.
intervention’s efficacy.
 During Student Support Team meetings,
school psychologist confidently utilizes
data collected from multiple sources and
considers ecological factors (i.e.
classroom, cultural, family) to assist teams
in designing and revising interventions in
both the general and special education
setting.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
3c: Delivery of
interventions to
maximize students’
likelihood of success.
Critical Attributes
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
School Psychologist is not
involved in consultation about
evidence-based academic, social,
behavioral, and life-skill
interventions nor provides any
direct interventions or supports
to students.
School Psychologist’s
involvement in consultation
about evidence-based
academic, social, behavioral,
and life-skill interventions is
inconsistent. The provision or
implementation of such
interventions to students is
limited.
 School Psychologist
provides limited,
meaningful contributions
to meetings in which
interventions are
developed for students.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently groups
students based on their
unique needs and
characteristics.
 Services are limited or not
individualized to meet
unique student needs.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently meets the
required minutes that are
designated in the
problem-solving
plan/504/IEP for social
work/psychology
services.
School Psychologist is actively
involved in consultation about
evidence-based academic, social,
behavioral, and life-skill
interventions. School
Psychologist regularly provides
and implements these
interventions for Tier 2 and Tier 3
students.
 School Psychologist regularly
participates in meetings in
which appropriate
interventions are developed
for students.
 Students are grouped with
consideration given to their
unique needs and
characteristics.
 Services provided to students
are evidence-based and meet
their unique needs.
 School Psychologist
consistently meets the
required minutes that are
designated in the problemsolving plan/504/IEP for
psychology services.
School Psychologist initiates and provides
consultation about evidence-based academic,
social, behavioral, and life-skill interventions.
School Psychologist facilitates the
implementation of interventions by staff.
 School Psychologist either
refuses to attend or does not
contribute in appropriate
ways to meetings in which
interventions are developed
for students.
 Grouping and placement of
students to provide services
is inappropriate.
 Services provided to
students are inappropriate
and do not address their
unique needs.
 School Psychologist does
not meet the required
minutes that are designated
in the problem-solving
plan/504/IEP for social
work/psychology services.
150
 School Psychologist provides leadership
during meetings in which appropriate
interventions are developed for students.
 Consideration is consistently given to the
unique needs and characteristics of
students when they are grouped for
direct service.
 Services provided to students are
individualized, based on thorough data
collection, and monitored throughout the
school year.
 School Psychologist always meets the
required minutes that are designated in
the IEP for psychological services.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Examples:
 Has limited or no
knowledge about evidencedbased reading
comprehension or fluency
strategies and does not
consult with teachers on
resolution of difficulties in
these areas.
 Demonstrates limited or no
knowledge of social skill
interventions for students
with Autism resulting in
limited involvement with
these students or their
teachers.
 Attends a positive behavior
support meeting for a
student but is a passive
participant and provides no
suggestions or
recommendations for
intervention strategies.
 School psychologist
provides only 15 of the 30
minutes of weekly
counseling service included
on a student’s IEP.
 Has some knowledge
about evidenced-based
reading comprehension or
fluency strategies and
periodically offers
suggestions to the gradelevel team on this
instructional target.
 Periodically consults with
teachers regarding social
skill interventions for
students with Autism.
 Attends a positive
behavior support meeting
for a student and offers
suggestions or
recommendations for
intervention strategies
that are meaningful but
limited.
 School psychologist
misses weekly counseling
services included on a
student’s IEP due to
attendance at eligibility
and IEP meetings.
151
 Demonstrates a solid
understanding of evidencedbased reading comprehension
or fluency strategies and
meets with grade level teams
to establish literacy goals and
support implementation of a
selected strategy.
 Provides a research-based
social skills training to a
group of students with
Autism.
 Attends and actively
participates in a positive
behavior support meeting for
a student where
recommendations for
targeted supports and
interventions are provided
and includes 6 weeks of
direct instruction to address
an identified skill deficit.
 School psychologist
consistently provides 30
minutes of weekly counseling
service included on a
student’s IEP and reschedules session that need to
be missed.
 Actively reviews research on reading
comprehension or fluency strategies for a
particular grade, shares the information
with the grade level team, assists with
correct implementation and provides
ongoing support or feedback on delivery
the intervention.
 Provides research-based social skills
training to a group of students with
Autism and develops a programevaluation to determine the efficacy of
the intervention.
 Provides leadership to a positive
behavior support meeting for a student
(e.g., facilitating meeting, suggesting
evidence-based practices, gathering and
managing data on behavior to determine
intervention effectiveness).
 School psychologist consistently provides
30 minutes of weekly counseling service
included on a student’s IEP during a
designated time that best fits the
student’s schedule; but school
psychologist has evidenced flexibility in
re-scheduling a session to accommodate
a special activity in the classroom.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
3d: Conducts
comprehensive
evaluations and
disseminates results
School Psychologist is unaware
of how to select and administer
assessments that are appropriate
to the student’s age, needs, and
deficits. School Psychologist
fails to interpret evaluations and
prepares inaccurate or confusing
reports. School Psychologist
does not contribute to the
determination of IEP eligibility
status.
School Psychologist selects and
administers assessments that are
appropriate to the student’s age,
needs, and deficits. School
Psychologist is able to interpret
evaluations and prepare reports
that are based on current NASP
guidelines and that are
understandable to parents and
school staff. School Psychologist
contributes to the determination
of eligibility status and the
supports that are warranted based
on the evaluation results.
School Psychologist consistently selects and
administers assessments that are appropriate
to the student’s age, needs, and deficits.
School Psychologist is able to interpret
evaluations and prepares clear and concise
reports that are based on current professional
guidelines and are understandable to parents
and school staff. The results of the
psychological evaluation meaningfully
contribute to the determination of eligibility
status and supports that are warranted.
Critical Attributes
 School Psychologist does not
participate in meetings or is
unprepared for these
meetings.
 School Psychologist does not
use appropriate assessment
materials.
 School Psychologist does not
follow standardized
procedures when evaluating.
 Reports are full of errors, are
unclear, and contain
professional jargon.
 Evaluation results do not
inform or guide
interventions, eligibility, or
School Psychologist has
limited understanding of how
to select and administer
assessments that are
appropriate to the student’s
age, needs, and deficits.
School Psychologist’s
interpretation of evaluations is
vague and reports are not
always understandable to
parents and school staff.
School Psychologist makes
minimal contributions to the
determination of IEP
eligibility status and the
supports that are warranted.
 School Psychologist has
limited participation in
meetings or is
inconsistently prepared for
meetings.
 School Psychologist has
limited knowledge about
available assessment
materials or uses
inappropriate assessments.
 School Psychologist
follows standardized
procedures for evaluation
inconsistently.
 Reports are written in a
manner that is unclear to
 School Psychologist actively
participates in meetings and
demonstrates preparedness.
 School Psychologist is
knowledgeable about available
assessments and uses the
appropriate instruments to
answer questions based upon
student characteristics.
 School Psychologist follows
standardized administration
procedures.
 Reports are written in a
manner that eases
comprehension for parents
and staff and results inform
 School Psychologist demonstrates
exceptional preparedness for meetings.
 School Psychologist is knowledgeable
about a variety of assessments and selects
the most appropriate instruments for
addressing unique student characteristics.
 School Psychologist is proficient in
assessing a variety of student needs (e.g.,
autism, nonverbal, executive functioning,
cognitive impairments).
 School Psychologist is proficient in
building rapport with students during
assessment in order to obtain valid results.
 Reports are understandable to parents and
staff and are consistently tied to student’s
educational programming.
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Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
supports.
Examples:
 School Psychologist
administer test to wrong age
 Consistently not prepared for
meetings, (testing not
completed, report not done,
late, etc.)
 Reports using incorrect
pronouns/names.
 No test interpretation in the
reports (only list scores).
 Missing necessary
components of assessment to
make eligibility
determination.
 Does not follow testing
procedures in Assessment
manuals.
 Consistently makes protocolscoring errors.





parents and staff and
results provide limited
guidance in the
development of
interventions, eligibility, or
supports.
School Psychologist uses
limited number (choices)
of assessments.
A limited amount of report
interpretation (implications
of test results for student
learning) of test results in
reports.
Says very little during
evaluation and/or IEP
meetings.
Testing done for meeting
but just describes the
student’s performance on
the test but not able to
articulate clearly what this
means for the child in daily
performance in the
classroom and/or home.
When new issues arise,
does not shift the skill set
to match the situation.
153
and guide interventions,
eligibility, and supports.
 School Psychologist presents
test results through graphs
making information easier for
parents/teacher to understand.
 Common themes or areas of
concern are reflected in
various data points.
 Multiple stake holders inform
is included in report.
 Assessment
materials/methods chosen
based upon the initial
concerns discussed.
 All stake holders contribute at
meetings & are encouraged
and questioned (prompting
input from everyone)
 Is able to provide teachers
with a list (generic) of possible
reading comprehension
strategies.
 Provides “School
Psychologist” intervention
handouts to parents/staff (at
meetings & privately) to
address specific student
concern (i.e., lying, homework,
etc.
 School Psychologist gives candy when
testing students!
 School Psychologist has enough exposure
in building to be recognized by
stakeholders (staff/parents/students).
 School Psychologist clearly communicates
(and answers question) with parents &
staff during meetings, showing respect,
active listening, and being active
participant in dialog without overpowering
the conversation or getting off topic.
 Always maintains confidentiality in
meetings and in environment.
 When testing, SP provides a visual chart of
expectations of the work to be completed
 School Psychologist clearly defines
advantages and disadvantages of
assessment materials and methods.
 School Psychologist provides training to
staff on procedures of special education
process, tests and measurement,
completing rating scales, etc.
 Researches information of effective
strategies to address specific learning (4th
grade reading comprehension) concerns.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
School Psychologist is continually seeking
ways to improve the instruction and
intervention at the systems-, group-, and
individual-level using sound data-based
decision making practices, including
consideration of social acceptability and
makes changes as needed in response to
student, parent, or teacher input. Progress
monitoring and continued modification of
interventions is evident.
 When necessary, School Psychologist
quickly makes adjustments to the services
based on data.
 School Psychologist’s knowledge of
students’ needs and interests consistently
drive services.
 School Psychologist has a multitude of
approaches within their repertoire to
address the diverse needs of students.
 During unexpected situations (e.g., crisis
response), the School Psychologist
responds flexibly with usage of their time
and adjustment of priorities and will assist
other schools and/or staff within the
district as needed.
3e: Demonstrates Flexibility
and Responsiveness
School Psychologist adheres
to existing instructional or
interventions methods, in
spite of evidence of its
inadequacy.
School Psychologist makes
modest and inconsistent
changes to instructional or
interventional methods when
confronted with evidence of
the need for change.
School Psychologist makes
revisions in instruction and
intervention at the systems,
group-, and individual-level
when it is needed, using sound
data based decision making
practices.
Critical Attributes
 When necessary, School
Psychologist is unable to
adjust the lesson.
 School Psychologist’s
knowledge of students’
needs and interests does
not drive services.
 School Psychologist has
very limited approaches
within their repertoire to
address the diverse needs
of students.
 During unexpected
situations (e.g., crisis
response), the School
Psychologist does not
assist.
 School Psychologist does
not adjust interventions
based on data as a result
of a lack of progress
 When necessary, School
Psychologist inconsistently
makes adjustments to the
services.
 School Psychologist’s
knowledge of students’
needs and interests does
not drive services; rather,
the psychologist adheres to
a pre-determined approach.
 School Psychologist has
limited approaches within
their repertoire to address
diverse needs of students.
 During unexpected
situations (e.g., crisis
response), the School
Psychologist responds only
when directed by
administration.
 School Psychologist
 When necessary, School
Psychologist makes
adjustments to the services.
 School Psychologist’s
knowledge of students’
needs and interests drive
services.
 School Psychologist has
different approaches within
their repertoire to address
the diverse needs of
students.
 During unexpected
situations (e.g., crisis
response), the School
Psychologist responds
flexibly with usage of their
time and adjustment of
priorities.
 School Psychologist adjusts
interventions based on
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Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
monitoring.
Examples:
 As part the school crisis
team, does not respond
to an emergency call due
to a student death.
 Does not identify
students who are at risk
for dropout and provides
no services to them.
continues with
interventions regardless of
information provided by
data collected.
 As part the school crisis
team, inconsistently
responds to an emergency
call due to a student death.
 Identifies students who are
at risk for dropout and
refers them for individual
counseling and mentoring.
155
ongoing and appropriate
progress monitoring
results.
 As part the school crisis
team, discontinues current
activities to respond to an
emergency call due to a
student death.
 Provides individual
counseling and mentoring
to a student who is at risk
for school dropout.
 As part the school crisis team,
discontinues current activities to respond
to an emergency call due to a student
death in another building within the
district that they do not serve.
 Investigates and designs evidence-based
counseling procedures for students who
are at risk of dropping out and provides
regular counseling and mentoring to said
students.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Domain 4 for School Psychologists: Professional Responsibilities
Unsatisfactory
Basic
4a: Reflecting on practice
School Psychologist does
not reflect on practices or
the reflections are
inaccurate.
School Psychologist’s
reflection on practices is
moderately accurate and
objective without citing
specific examples and with
only global suggestions as to
how it might be improved.
Critical Attributes
 School Psychologist does
not assess the
effectiveness of services
provided.
 School Psychologist is
unable to communicate
personal strengths and
weaknesses or ways that
services can be
improved.
 Does not respond to
requests by team
members to provide
additional support.
 Utilizes assessment tools
that are not the most
current to evaluate a
student.
 Is not willing to provide
 School Psychologist
inconsistently assesses the
effectiveness of services
provided.
 School Psychologist
ineffectively communicates
personal strengths and
weaknesses or ways that
services can be improved.
Examples:
 Sometimes responds to
feedback from colleagues
to improve their
performance.
 Utilizes a standard battery
of assessments regardless
of student needs.
 Inconsistently understands
legal guidelines.
156
Proficient
Exemplary
School Psychologist’s
reflection on practices
provides an accurate and
objective description of
practice, citing specific positive
and negative characteristics.
School Psychologist makes
some specific suggestions as to
how services might be
improved.
 School Psychologist
accurately assesses the
effectiveness of services
provided.
 School Psychologist is able
to effectively communicate
personal strengths and
weaknesses, as well as ways
that services can be
improved.
 Solicits feedback from team
members with respect to
how their services may be
utilized to address an
existing need.
 Consults with colleagues on
the issue of
disproportionate
representation of ELLs in
School Psychologist’s reflection on practices is
highly accurate and perceptive, citing specific
examples that were not fully successful for at
least some students. School Psychologist draws
on an extensive repertoire to suggest alternative
strategies.
 School Psychologist regularly and accurately
assesses the effectiveness of services
provided.
 School Psychologist engages in dialogue with
administration and/or colleagues about
personal strengths and weaknesses, as well as
ways that services can be improved.
 Solicits feedback from colleagues in regard
to their quality of service, and designs an
action plan to improve areas of need.
 Initiates participation on a mental health
committee to gain a better understanding of
how to provide effective mental health
practices in the school setting.
 Provides advisement in ethical and legal
standards to administrators.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
professional
development
opportunities.
 Intermittently provides
professional development
to other educators.
157
special education.
 Provides professional
development in the area of
value added methodologies
in order to help other
educators evaluate the
quality of core and
supplemental instruction
for students with
disabilities as it relates to
growth and achievement.
 Provides professional development at state
and national conferences.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4b: Communicates
Effectively With Parents,
School Staff, and
Community Agencies.
School Psychologist does not
communicate with parents,
staff, and community agencies
through a variety of modalities.
Communication is disrespectful
and incomprehensible to the
target audience.
Communication does not
engage stakeholders or establish
rapport.
School Psychologist ineffectively
communicates with parents, staff,
and community agencies through a
variety of modalities.
Communication is not consistently
respectful or comprehensible to the
target audience. Communication
inconsistently disseminates
information about student needs
and may not engage stakeholders or
establish rapport.
School Psychologist communicates
with parents, staff, and community
agencies through a variety of
modalities. Communication is
respectful and comprehensible to
the target audience.
Communications is used to obtain
and disseminate information about
student needs, as well as engage
stakeholders and establish rapport.
Critical Attributes

School Psychologist effectively
communicates with parents, staff, and
community agencies through a variety of
modalities. Communication is respectful
and comprehensible to the target
audience. Communications is used to
obtain and disseminate information about
student needs, as well as engage
stakeholders and establish rapport. The
School Psychologist initiates
communication and response to
stakeholders is timely.
 Information regarding students and
the services that are provided are
initiated by the psychologist and well
articulated to parents, staff, and/or
community agencies.
 Parents and staff are engaged in
conversations about student progress
and feedback is valued.
 School Psychologist is highly
knowledgeable about the services of
community agencies and makes
multiple attempts to involve and
communicate student progress with
them.
 School Psychologist initiates
communication and responds to
requests made by students, parents,
staff, and/or community agencies
within the 24 to 48 hours.
 School Psychologist facilitates




Little or no information
regarding students or the
services that are provided
are available to parents,
staff, and/or community
agencies.
Parents, staff, and/or
community agencies are
not aware of student
progress.
School Psychologist does
not respond to
communication requests
made by students, parents,
staff, and/or community
agencies.
Communication during
meetings or consultation is
ineffective or disrespectful.
School Psychologist does





Limited information regarding
students or the services that are
provided are articulated to
parents, staff, and/or
community agencies.
Parents, staff, and/or
community agencies are
minimally aware of student
progress.
School Psychologist is slow to
respond to communication
requests made by students,
parents, staff, and/or
community agencies.
Communication during
meetings or consultation can be
ineffective.
School Psychologist
inconsistently advocates for the
best interests of the student.
158





Information regarding students
and the services that are
provided are regularly
articulated to parents, staff,
and/or community agencies.
School Psychologist is
knowledgeable about the
services of community agencies
and makes attempts to involve
and communicate student
progress with them.
School Psychologist responds
to communication requests
made by students, parents, staff,
and/or community agencies in
a timely fashion.
Communication during
meetings or consultation is
effective and meaningful.
School Psychologist advocates
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
not advocate for the best
interests of the student.
Examples:




Writes reports that fail to
provide useful information
or are difficult to
understand by clients and
school personnel.
Lacks skills and knowledge
about principles of
behavior change and
consequently is not a part
of the positive behavioral
support team.
Does not invite questions
or feedback from a group
of students they are
counseling.
Does not offer
consultation with
classroom teachers
regarding classroom
management strategies
for the best interests of the
student.




Reports include
recommendations for
intervention that have marginal
utility, and/or often use
difficult-to-understand language
(e.g., professional jargon).
Occasionally involved in
positive behavior support team
meetings, infrequently
contributes.
Sometimes asks questions or
invites feedback that results in
deeper understanding.
Offers consultation with
teachers regarding classroom
management strategies, but is
ineffective; consultation does
not result in a positive change
within the classroom.
159




Writes reports and offers
recommendations that are
understood by clients and may
be implemented.
Discusses how to develop
school-wide rules during a
positive behavioral support
team meeting.
Collaborates with agency
personnel, educators, and the
student’s physician to integrate
services and develop a
comprehensive treatment plan.
Offers effective consultation
with classroom teachers
regarding evidence-based
classroom management
strategies, resulting in a positive
change within the classroom.




effective communication during
meetings or consultation.
School Psychologist always advocates
for the best interests of the student.
Writes comprehensive reports that
provide an in-depth understanding of
the student in relation to academic
and behavioral expectations and
clearly link assessments to readily
implementable interventions.
Provides leadership to the positive
behavior support team (e.g.,
facilitating meetings, suggesting
evidence-based practices, gathering
and managing data on behavior).
Is an expert in consultation regarding
evidence-based classroom
management and results in systemwide adoption of those strategies that
results in positive results for all
children.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
4c:
Maintaining Accurate
Records and
Documentation
School Psychologist’s records and
documentation do not adhere to
district and legal mandates. No
efforts are made to learn about
current district and legal mandates
regarding record keeping. Records
are not kept, referenced, or used to
guide practice.
School Psychologist’s records
and documentation adhere to
district and legal mandates.
Efforts are made to learn
about the most current district
and legal mandates regarding
record keeping. Records are
used to guide practice and
document services.
Critical Attributes
 Records are inaccurate and/or
unavailable.
 School Psychologist does not
follow procedures for obtaining
and maintaining records such as
rating scale requests, direct
service minutes, notes about
parental contact, and obtaining
parental consent.
Examples:
 Does not maintain records to
track attempts to gain
permission to evaluate.
 Does not have a system to track
and maintain timelines.
 Does not keep confidential
information in a locked cabinet.
School Psychologist’s records
and documentation
inconsistently adhere to district
and legal mandates. Minimal
efforts are made to learn about
current district and legal
mandates regarding record
keeping. Records are rarely
referenced and infrequently
used to guide practice.
 Records are somewhat
accurate and inconsistently
accessible.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently follows
procedures for obtaining
and maintaining records
such as rating scale
requests, direct service
minutes, notes about
parental contact, and
obtaining parental consent.
 Keeps a log of reports that
are due, but it is difficult
for other service providers
to understand.
 When reviewing a previous
evaluation, must search for
data in several places.
 Is not able to provide all
documentation necessary
for a family to seek outside
160
Exemplary
School Psychologist’s records and
documentation consistently adhere to district
and legal mandates. School Psychologist
demonstrates knowledge of the most current
district and legal mandates regarding record
keeping. Records are regularly used to guide
practice and document services.
 Records are accurate and
accessible when needed.
 School Psychologist
follows correct procedures
for obtaining and
maintaining records such as
rating scale requests, direct
service minutes, notes
about parental contact, and
obtaining parental consent.
 Records are always accurate and accessible
when needed.
 School Psychologist follows correct
procedures for obtaining and maintaining
records such as rating scale requests, direct
service minutes, notes about parental
contact, and obtaining parental consent and
consults with others about these
procedures.
 Through maintenance of
accurate records, ensures
SP substitute is able to
maintain role and function
for SP on leave.
 References records from 2
years ago for a student that
was referred again for an
evaluation. The student’s
records were maintained in
 Keeps in an accessible and secure location a
record of all contacts with or attempts to
contact team members, including parents,
teachers, and service providers.
 When information is requested from an
outside agency, all records and
documentation are easily accessible, but in a
secure location.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
services.
a secure place and were
updated.
 Is able to differentiate
between private notes and
official school records.
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ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
4d: Participates in a
professional community.
Critical Attributes
Examples:
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
School Psychologist’s
relationships with colleagues
are negative or self-serving,
and psychologist avoids
being involved in school and
district events, projects and
trainings.
 The School
Psychologist’s
relationships with
colleagues are
characterized by
negativity or
combativeness.
 The School Psychologist
purposefully avoids
contributing to activities
promoting professional
inquiry.
 The School Psychologist
avoids involvement in
school activities and
district and community
projects.
 Is openly disrespectful to
colleagues and
contributes negativity to
the school environment.
 Consistently skips school
district workshops and
professional learning
opportunities.
School Psychologist’s
relationships with colleagues
are cordial, and psychologist
participates in school and
district events, projects and
trainings when specifically
requested.
 The School Psychologist
has cordial relationships
with colleagues.
 When invited, the School
Psychologist participates
in activities related to
professional inquiry.
 When asked, the School
Psychologist participates
in school activities, as well
as district and community
projects.
School Psychologist participates
actively in school and district
events, projects and maintains
positive and productive
relationships with colleagues and
provides in-service training when
appropriate.
 The School Psychologist has
supportive and collaborative
relationships with colleagues.
 The School Psychologist
regularly participates in
activities related to
professional inquiry.
 The School Psychologist
frequently volunteers to
participate in school events
and school district and
community projects.
School Psychologist makes a substantial
contribution to school and district events and
projects and assumes leadership with
colleagues.



Is able to resolve
disagreement with
colleagues but not
consistently.
Participates in districtsponsored events only
when asked.
Contributes to in-service
162



Collaborates with colleagues
for multidisciplinary teaming
and follows up on
responsibilities designated to
the school psychologist.
Volunteers to participate in
district sponsored events.
Provides in-service training






The School Psychologist takes a
leadership role in promoting activities
related to professional inquiry.
The School Psychologist regularly
contributes to and leads events that
positively impact school life.
The School Psychologist regularly
contributes to and leads significant
district and community projects.
Leads professional learning communities
to enhance knowledge of social,
emotional, behavioral and learning
outcomes among colleagues.
Takes an active leadership role in district
sponsored events and community
projects.
Conducts needs assessments and
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015

Refuses to contribute to
in-service trainings when
requested.
trainings only requested
by the administrator.
163
on topics relevant to the
school population.
provides in-service training to staff based
on the information collected.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
4e: Engaging in
professional
development
School Psychologist does
not engage in individual
development,
participation in
professional trainings, and
collaboration with
colleagues. Opportunities
for learning are not
attended. School
Psychologist does not
contribute to the
collective knowledge of
colleagues.
School Psychologist participates
to a limited extent in individual
development, participation in
professional trainings, and
collaboration with colleagues.
Opportunities for learning are
inconsistently attended. School
Psychologist rarely contributes
to the collective knowledge of
colleagues.
Critical Attributes



School Psychologist
does not seek
opportunities for
continued
professional
development such as
professional readings,
attending district inservices, or on-going
dialogue with
colleagues.
School Psychologist
is averse to feedback
from colleagues and
administration.
School Psychologist
does not participate
in building-level




School Psychologist rarely
seeks opportunities for
continued professional
development such as
professional readings,
attending district inservices, or on-going
dialogue with colleagues.
School Psychologist
inconsistently accepts
feedback from colleagues
and administration.
School Psychologist
participates in buildinglevel Professional Learning
Communities, but does not
contribute.
School Psychologist
Proficient
School Psychologist improves
practices through individual
development, participation in
professional trainings, and
collaboration with colleagues.
Opportunities for learning are
regularly attended. School
Psychologist contributes to the
collective knowledge of colleagues.




164
School Psychologist seeks
opportunities for continued
professional development such as
professional readings, attending
district in-services, or on-going
dialogue with colleagues.
School Psychologist accepts
feedback from colleagues and
administration in order to
improve practice.
School Psychologist regularly
participates in building-level
Professional Learning
Communities and makes
contributions.
School Psychologist consistently
attends and participates in
department meetings and
Exemplary
School Psychologist improves practices through
individual development, participation in
professional trainings, and collaboration with
colleagues. Opportunities for learning are sought
out and regularly attended. School Psychologist
contributes to the collective knowledge of
colleagues and the profession.





School Psychologist seeks opportunities for
continued professional development such as
professional readings, attending
conferences/workshops, or on-going
dialogue with colleagues in order to improve
practices.
School Psychologist solicits feedback from
colleagues and administration in order to
improve practice.
School Psychologist assumes a leadership
role in building-level Professional Learning
Communities.
School Psychologist consistently attends and
contributes to in department meetings
mandated district trainings.
School Psychologist provides in-services or
presentations to staff, parents, department,
colleagues, or other professionals outside of
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015

Examples:




Professional Learning
Communities.
School Psychologist
does not attend
department meetings
mandated district
trainings.
Elects to skip
assigned school
district workshops
Does not attend any
professional
conferences on the
local, state, and
national level.
Makes
recommendations
that do no reflect
current research or
best practices.
Does not interact
with school-based
teams.
inconsistently attends and
rarely participates in
department meetings
mandated district trainings.





Does not hold professional
memberships (i.e., NASP,
ASPA, APA).
Is reluctant to participate in
staff meetings, in-service
trainings, etc.
Infrequently attends local,
state, or national
conferences during the
year.
Rarely provides sources of
recommendation.
Interacts with school-based
teams on an infrequent and
minimal basis.
mandated district trainings and
building-level committees.





165
Holds professional membership
in at least one organization (i.e.,
NASP, ASPA, APA).
Attends one professional
conference a year such as ASPA,
NASP, and APA
Holds leadership position at the
building level (i.e., chairs SST).
Subscribes to peer-reviewed
journals such as School
Psychology Review Communiqué.
Conducts action based research
that includes components of
program evaluation for schoolbased programs (i.e., data analysis
for RTI, PBIS, SBBS program,
SLC, etc.).







the district.
School Psychologist participates on and
contributes to district-level committees.
Holds professional memberships in more
one organization (i.e., NASP, ASPA, APA).
Attends more than one professional
conference a year such as ASPA, NASP, and
APA.
Holds leadership position at the national,
state, district, or building level (e.g. NASP
representative, ASPA executive member,
crisis team, advisory committee, chairs ST
team, community support, etc.).
Trains other school personnel on new
assessment techniques or test kits (i.e.,
WIAT, WJ-Ach).
Engages in the scientist-practitioner model;
i.e.., consumes and conducts/publishes
research in peer reviewed journals.
Actively seeks out professional development
opportunities through MLP or college
course work
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4f: Showing Professionalism.
This includes integrity,
advocacy, and maintaining
confidentiality.
School Psychologist does not
display standards of honesty,
integrity, and confidentiality
in interactions with
colleagues, students, parents,
and the public. School
Psychologist does not
comply with school, district,
and professional regulations
even when directed.
School Psychologist displays
high standards of honesty,
integrity, and confidentiality in
interactions with colleagues,
students, parents, and the
public. School Psychologist
complies with school, district,
and professional regulations.
School Psychologist displays high standards of
honesty, integrity, and confidentiality in
interactions with colleagues, students, parents,
and the public and holds colleagues to the same
standards and expectations. School Psychologist
fully complies with school, district, and
professional regulations, taking a leadership role
with colleagues.
Critical Attributes
 School Psychologist is
dishonest.
 School Psychologist does
not notice the needs of
students.
 School Psychologist
engages in practices that
are self-serving.
 School Psychologist
willfully rejects district
regulations.
 School Psychologist is not
aware of NASP’s
Principles for Professional
Ethics.
School Psychologist
inconsistently displays
standards of honesty, integrity,
and confidentiality in
interactions with colleagues,
students, parents, and the
public. School Psychologist
minimally complies or requires
prompting to comply with
school, district, and
professional regulations.
 School Psychologist is
honest.
 School Psychologist
notices the needs of
students, but is
inconsistent in addressing
them.
 School Psychologist does
not notice that practices
are ineffective or that they
result in poor outcomes for
students.
 School Psychologist
minimally complies with
district regulations or only
when prompted.
 School Psychologist
inconsistently adheres to
NASP’s Principles for
Professional Ethics.
 School Psychologist is
honest and known for
having high standards of
integrity.
 School Psychologist
actively addresses student
needs.
 School Psychologist
actively works to provide
opportunities for student
success within the
psychological practice.
 School Psychologist
complies with district
regulations.
 School Psychologist
adheres to NASP’s
Principles for Professional
Ethics.
 School Psychologist is considered a leader in
terms of honesty, integrity, and
confidentiality.
 School Psychologist proactively addresses
student needs.
 School Psychologist makes a concerted effort
to ensure opportunities are available for
student success within the psychological
practice.
 School Psychologist always adheres to
NASP’s Principles for Professional Ethics.
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Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for School Psychologists
Revised July 2015
Examples:
 Discusses individual
student concerns openly
in the teacher faculty
room during a common
lunch period.
 Manipulates data to
appease parent or teacher
concerns.
 Discusses a student’s
individual needs within
earshot of others.
 Has limited role in
resolving parent and/or
teacher dissention.
 Uses evaluation reports
that include repeated score
calculation errors
167
 Handles parent and/or
teacher dissention with
honesty, integrity, and a
willingness to work toward
resolution.
 Volunteers to mentor the
new school psychologist.
 Reviews the NASP ethical
standards when faced with
evaluating a student from a
family they know
personally.
 Provides supervision to intern and/or
practicum student with sensitivity to the
individual, professional development needs.
 Takes an active leadership role in mediating a
parent and/or teacher dissention.
 Produces evaluation reports that inform
decision-making and are considerate of all
stakeholders.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 1 for Therapeutic Specialists: Planning and Preparation
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1a Demonstrating knowledge
and skill in the specialist area.
Specialist makes significant errors
and/or does not plan to address
needs of the student in the school
environment. Specialist displays
little understanding of prerequisite
knowledge and best practices
important to enhancing student
progress and function.
Specialist is familiar with the
important concepts in the
discipline but displays lack of
awareness of how therapeutic
concepts relate to the educational
system. Specialist demonstrates an
understanding of therapeutic
discipline although knowledge is
incomplete. Specialist's plans and
practice reflect a limited range of
therapeutic approaches.
Specialist displays solid
knowledge of the important
concepts in the discipline and
how they relate to one another.
Specialist demonstrates accurate
understanding of prerequisite
relationships among therapy
concepts and educational practice.
Specialist's plans and practice
reflect familiarity with best
practice in the therapy field.
Specialist displays extensive
knowledge of the important
concepts in the discipline and
how these relate to school system
practice and the interventions
provided by other disciplines.
Specialist's plans and practice
reflect familiarity with a wide
range of research in the therapy
field and the ability to anticipate
student responses.
Critical Attributes:


OT/PT Examples


The specialist is unfamiliar
with the important concepts
in their field and how they
relate to school practice.
The specialist lacks in their
explanations of their
discipline.

Therapist does not
understand/apply knowledge
of motor skills for the
students age/grade level.
Therapist is unable to explain
their treatments or why a
particular student is receiving
therapy services.



The specialist has limited
knowledge with the
important concepts in their
field and how they relate to
school practice.
The specialist provides
inconsistent explanations of
their discipline.

Therapist understands
knowledge and skills of
PT/OT motor limitations
with students but has
difficulty relating it to school
based activities.
Therapist is inconsistent with
explaining the treatment plan

168

The specialist is familiar with
the important concepts in
their field and how they relate
to school practice.
The specialist provides clear
explanations of the content.

Therapist stays up to date
with continuing education
course and can give an
example on how they
incorporate this knowledge
into appropriate grade/age
motor skills in the school
environment.



The specialist is able to serve
as a resource to co-workers
and parent when discussing
the important concepts in
their field and how they relate
to school practice.
The specialist is sought out
for their expertise and is able
to provide evidenced-based
information regarding their
field as related to school
practice.
Therapist explores, studies,
and shares with other
therapists or work colleagues
new or improved methods
for treating students and how
it can relate to a student's
disability
Therapist is consulted when
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples


Audiology Examples

Therapist is unfamiliar with
the important concepts in the
field of speech- language
pathology and how they
relate to school practice.
Therapist is unaware of state
laws and professional
procedures governing best
practices for therapists. i.e.
rules for qualifying students
in school v. clinic.

The educational audiologist
displays minimal
understanding of hearing
loss, disorders and the
accommodations/equipment
needed to meet the
educational needs of hearing
impaired students.


Therapist has difficulty
explaining why students
should be receiving therapy
services and if the student
meets qualifications for
services in the school district.

Therapist has limited
knowledge of the important
concepts in the field of
speech-language pathology
and how they relate to school
practice.
Therapist is somewhat aware
of state laws and professional
procedures governing best
practices for therapists,. i.e.
knowing how to qualify a
student for speech in the
schools.

The educational audiologist
displays basic understanding
of hearing loss, disorders and
the accommodations /
equipment needed to meet
the educational needs of
hearing impaired students.

169


Therapist is able to answer
questions on appropriate
motor milestones for children
Therapist feels comfortable
explaining why students
should or should not receive
services and what qualifies
students for services in the
school system.
Therapist is familiar with the
important concepts in the
field of speech-language
pathology and how they
relate to school practice.
Therapist is aware of state
laws and professional
procedures governing best
practices for therapists. i.e.
Therapist should know what
sounds and language abilities
a student should have at a
certain age and how we
determine qualifications for
speech.
The educational audiologist
displays a solid understanding
of hearing loss, disorders and
the accommodations /
equipment needed to meet
the educational needs of
hearing impaired students.
there is a difficult situation
with how to address a
student's disability and is able
to explain best practice in
these challenging situations.



Therapist is able to serve as a
resource to coworkers and
parents when discussing the
important concepts in the
field of speech-language
pathology and how they
relate to school practice.
Therapist is very familiar with
state laws and professional
procedures governing best
practices for therapists. i.e.
Therapist understands
language disorder- v.language difference and how
to address and qualify and
explain to families the
differences and why we
qualify the way we do.
The educational audiologist
displays extensive knowledge
of hearing loss, disorders and
the accommodations /
equipment needed to meet
the educational needs for
hearing impaired students.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
1b Establishing goals for the
therapy program appropriate to
the setting and the students
served
The goals do not exist or are not
measurable and do not reflect
important progress in area of
student need. Goals are
inappropriate to the situation,
student age, or needs of the
student.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist does not
accurately use assessment
results and/or current available
data to formulate goals to
address individual student’s
needs.
 The specialist does not write
measurable or achievable goals.
 The Present Level do not
communicate rationale for
targeted goal areas.
OT/PT Examples
 Therapist writes goals that are
not measurable, objective,
and/or appropriate.
 Therapist does not clarify
session goals, meeting
outcomes, and/or the purposes
may be inappropriate for the
student or situation.
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Goals are rudimentary -- stated as
directions for the team or as
therapeutic activities, or based on
global assessments of student
progress rather than specific to
individual student needs. Goals are
measurable but reflect limited
suitability for the student's age,
needs and situation.
 The specialist inconsistently
uses assessment results, and/or
current available data to
formulate goals that address
individual student needs.
 The specialist writes measurable
and achievable goals that are
aligned with student’s needs.
 The Present Level is
inconsistent in communicating
rationale for targeted goal areas.
The goals are rigorous and address
specific and important student
needs. Goals are clear, measurable
and suggest viable methods of
assessment. Goals are suitable for
student's age, needs and situation,
and are applicable for integration
into the student's educational
curriculum.
 The specialist accurately uses
assessment results and/or
current available data to
formulate goals that address
individual student needs.
 The specialist writes goals that
are consistently measurable and
achievable.
 The Present Level is consistent
in communicating rationale for
targeted goal areas.
 The specialist shares
responsibility for related
academic goals.
 Therapist reassesses student’s
status and progress on a
continual basis
 Therapist establishes clear goals
appropriate to the situation
when working with or
evaluating students.
 Therapist clearly states in
advance their plan for
Goals are clear, measurable and
understood by a variety of team
members. Goals permit viable
methods of assessment and allow
for progress. The goals represent a
high-level of understanding of
educational curriculum with
multifaceted approaches that reach
across disciplines.
 The specialist uses assessment
results and/or current available
data, from all academic areas, to
formulate goals that address
individual student needs.
 The specialist writes goals that
are collaborative and integrate
across multiple disciplines.
 The specialist demonstrates and
shares with peers how to write
measurable and achievable
goals.
 Therapist writes appropriate
IEP goals based on motor
assessments but are not
measurable or appropriate in
the time frame allotted.
 Therapist establishes goals, but
they are not appropriate to
student’s age or treatment
situation.
170
 Therapist acts as a resource for
goal development for other
therapist and team members.
 Therapist encourages student
understanding of the goals and
purpose of each session or
evaluation.
 Therapy session or meeting
outcomes are clarified in
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples
 Therapist does not use
assessment results and/or
current available data to
formulate goals that address
individual student needs. For
example: Speech specialist uses
the same pull down menus for
all students without giving a
percentage for improvement, or
baselines do not state current
level of proficiency for the goal.
 Therapist does not write
measurable or achievable goals
that are aligned to the students'
academics.
 The goals do not help the
students meet goals set up by
the teachers.
 Therapist is unable to
communicate rationale for
targeted goal areas.
 Speech/language goals remain
in student’s IEP despite being
mastered.
 Therapist outcomes for the
treatment session or meetings
are vague without a plan as to
what will occur in each session.
 Therapist inconsistently uses
assessment results, and/or
current available data to
formulate goals that address
individual student needs. For
example: Therapist sometimes
creates goals that are
appropriate and other times,
uses the same goals from
student to student.
 Therapist writes measurable
and achievable goals that are
aligned to the academic goals
and objectives in a limited way.
For example: The therapist is
not working on goals necessary
to achieve classroom objectives.
 Therapist has limited
communication regarding the
rationale for targeted goal areas.
 Therapist demonstrates some
awareness of related academic
goals. For example: Therapist
is unsure of what teachers are
concerned with at a specific
grade level.
171
outcomes for the sessions or
meetings.
 Therapist uses assessment
results and/or current available
data to formulate goals that
address individual student
needs. For example: Speech
specialist is using the
assessments from the
evaluation to create goals.
 Therapist writes goals that are
consistently measurable and
achievable, as well as aligned to
academic goals. For example:
Therapist is able to
communicate to parents and/or
staff members the rationale for
the targeted goal areas given
test results and grade
expectations.
 Therapist shares responsibility
for related academic goals.
advance and participants know
what is expected of them.
 Therapist uses assessment
results and/or current available
data, along with collaboration
with staff concerns to formulate
highly effective goals that
address individual student
needs. For example: The
therapist keeps appropriate data
and uses assessments to
determine the next step for
goals and objects and clearly
states them in the baseline.
 Therapist collaborates with
team members to write
measurable and achievable
goals that are aligned to the
goals set up for the students in
academics. For example: The
therapist makes extra time to
meet with the teachers to
determine goals and objectives
to work on for the coming year.
 Therapist is able to effectively
communicate to parents,
students (as appropriate), and
related staff members the
rationale for the targeted goal
areas. i.e. Therapist can address
a chart, internet site, etc... to
explain when sounds are
supposed to develop, or Lahey's
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
chart for language abilities.
 Therapist shares responsibility
for related academic goals and
collaborates with team
members to maximize student
success.
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist
does not use assessment results
to address student's audiological
and educational needs. Poor
communication with parents,
student and teaching staff.
 The educational audiologist
inconsistently uses assessment
results to address student's
audiological and educational
needs. Limited communication
with parents, student and
teaching staff.
172
 The educational audiologist
uses assessment results to
address student's audiological
and educational needs.
Communicates regularly with
parents, student and teaching
staff in variety of ways.
 The educational audiologist
consistently uses assessment
results to address student's
audiological and educational
needs. Highly effective
communication/collaboration
with parents, student and
teaching staff.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
1c: Demonstrating knowledge
of child and adolescent
development and therapy
approach
Specialist displays minimal
understanding and little knowledge
of typical and atypical development
and how development and special
needs impact student progress —
and does not indicate that such
knowledge is valuable.
Specialist displays generally
accurate knowledge of how typical
and atypical development and
special needs impact student
progress, but may overgeneralize
this knowledge across student
groups.
Specialist understands the
individualized nature of student
progress and utilizes information
on typical and atypical
development and special needs
appropriately with students.
Specialist also purposefully acquires
knowledge from several sources
about students' development and
skills, special needs, and
performance.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist demonstrates
minimal knowledge of typical
and atypical development.
 The specialist demonstrates
minimal knowledge of
resources available concerning
developmental norms.
 The specialist demonstrates
minimal knowledge of disorders
and the impact on the
educational process.
 The specialist demonstrates
limited knowledge of typical
and atypical development.
 The specialist demonstrates
limited knowledge of resources
available concerning
developmental norms.
 The specialist demonstrates
limited knowledge of disorders
and the impact on the
educational process.
 The specialist is a respected
member of the team, providing
knowledge of typical and
atypical development that
contributes to student success.
 The specialist references several
appropriate resources
containing developmental
norms.
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist does not know the
developmental level of a
student's skill/movement.
 Therapist does not know the
resources available to find
information regarding
developmental levels.
 Therapist demonstrates limited
ability to identify the
developmental level of a
student's skill/movement.
 Therapist demonstrates limited
knowledge of available
resources regarding disorders
and their impact on motor
 Therapist identifies the
developmental level of a
student's movement/skill and
predicts the next step toward
continued development.
 Therapist references
appropriate resources
containing developmental
Specialist understands the
individualized nature of student
progress and acquires information
to address the complexity of
student needs with typical and
atypical development in mind.
Specialist also uses knowledge to
systematically problem-solve and
plan using knowledge from
research based sources that address
individual students’ development
and skills, special needs, and
performance.
 The specialist references and
shares important information
concerning developmental
norms.
 The specialist demonstrates and
shares skilled knowledge of
disorders and their impact on
student progress.
 The specialist demonstrates and
shares skilled knowledge of
disorders and their impact on
the educational process
 Therapist identifies a range of
developmental levels in a
variety of students and
identifies therapeutic activities
to promote student
developmental
movement/skills.
 Therapist references important
173
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
movement and educational
development.

Speech Examples
 Therapist demonstrates
minimal knowledge of typical
and atypical communication
development.
Therapist demonstrates
minimal knowledge of
resources available concerning
developments communication
norms.
 Therapist demonstrates
minimal knowledge of
communication disorders and
the impact on the educational
process, i.e. Therapist does not
know where to tell parents to
look to find important
milestones.
 The speech specialist has a
preschool aged student working
on use of irregular verb tense.
 Therapist demonstrates limited
knowledge of typical and
atypical communication
development.
 Therapist demonstrates limited
knowledge of resources
available concerning
developmental communication
norms.
 Therapist demonstrates limited
knowledge of communication
disorders and their impact on
the educational process
 i.e. The therapist may qualify a
student for speech, but not be
able to give the educational
impact.
 Speech specialist plans the same
articulation lesson for all ages
of students.
 Speech specialist is aware of
student’s past medical history
of a traumatic brain injury
(TBI), but does not consider
this information when
developing appropriate
instructional outcomes (e. g.,
executive functioning skills,
174





norms and applies the gained
information to their therapeutic
practice.
Therapist demonstrates
knowledge of disorders and
their impact on their
educational development.
Therapist demonstrates
knowledge of typical and
atypical communication
development.
Therapist references several
appropriate resources
containing developmental
communication norms.
Therapist demonstrates
knowledge of communication
disorders and their impact on
the educational process, i.e.
Therapist is able to find Lahey's
language chart or the Jen Taps
chart for sound production.
The speech specialist seeks
knowledge from several sources
regarding students’
backgrounds, cultures, and
skills.
Speech specialist plans a lesson
containing visual supports (i. e.,
picture communication board,
picture schedule, work system,
etc.) to promote
communication in students
diagnosed with autism
spectrum disorders (ASDs).
information and collaborates as
a knowledgeable team member
 Therapist is respected member
of team providing knowledge of
typical and atypical
communication development
that contributes to student
success.
 Therapist references and shares
important information
concerning developmental
communication norms.
 Therapist demonstrates and
shares skilled knowledge of
communication disorders and
their impact on the educational
process,.i.e. The therapist is
able to explain to parents why
he/she is working on a
particular sighting resources for
best practice that led to the
decision.
 Speech specialist administers a
preference assessment in order
to identify students’ interests
and incorporate the interests
into speech/language lessons.
 Speech specialist researches and
creates a presentation to
educate others about dialectal
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
short-term memory, etc.).
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist has
limited knowledge of child and
auditory development.
 The educational audiologist
relates general knowledge of
auditory, language and
psychosocial development.
175
and phonemic difference in a
specific student population.
 The educational audiologist
applies knowledge of the
auditory, language and
psychosocial development
factors that impact student
learning across age/grade levels.
 The educational audiologist
effectively shares knowledge to
assist others in the
understanding of the auditory,
language and psychosocial
development factors that
impact student learning.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
1d: Demonstrating knowledge
of district, state, and federal
regulations and of resources
both within and beyond the
school district
Specialist demonstrates little or no
knowledge of neither regulations
nor resources for students available
through the school or district.
Specialist demonstrates basic
knowledge of regulation and of
resources for students available
through the school or district.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist neglects or
inconsistently uses district
policy.
 The specialist is unaware of
state laws and professional
procedures governing best
practices.
 The specialist is unaware of
resources available.
 The specialist uses district
policy.
 The specialist is aware of state
laws and professional
procedures governing best
practices.
 The specialist has limited
awareness of resources.
 The specialist inconsistently
makes use of available
resources.
176
Proficient
Specialist demonstrates thorough
knowledge of regulations and
resources for students available
through the school or district and
some familiarity with resources
outside the district.
 The specialist is aware of state
laws and professional
procedures governing best
practice.
 The specialist consistently
makes appropriate use of
resources within the school and
district.
 The specialist has knowledge of
external resources
Exemplary
Specialist demonstrates extensive
knowledge of regulations and
resources for students available
through the school or district and
in the larger community.
 The specialist is a contributor
to district policy.
 The specialist makes
recommendations for resource
allocation in appropriate forum.
 The specialist is very familiar
with state laws and professional
procedures governing best
practice.
 The specialist is aware of
external resources and assists
students, families, and staff in
gaining access to outside
resources
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist disregards or has no
awareness of legal and
professional responsibilities
pertaining to education.
 Therapist does not comply with
school rules and policies and
procedures.
 Therapist is either unaware or
non-compliant of district
Special Education policies and
procedures.
 Therapist does not perform
duties as evaluator, nor adheres
to timelines required by the IEP
of each student.
 Therapist does not submit
monthly Medicaid report in
TIENET for each student.
 Therapist demonstrates a
limited understanding of their
legal and professional
responsibilities pertaining to
education.
 Therapist complies minimally
with school rules and policies
and procedures.
 Therapist somewhat follows
established district Special
Education policies and
procedures.
 Therapist occasionally performs
duties as evaluator and adheres
to some timeline required by
the IEP of each student.
 Therapist submits Medicaid
reports within the month.
Therapist develops IEP’s that
are somewhat standard-based.
177
 Therapist understands and
abides by the legal and
professional responsibilities
pertaining to education.
 Therapist complies fully with
school rules and policies and
procedures.
 Therapist consistently follows
established Special Education
policies and procedures.
 Therapist performs duties as
evaluator, adhering to timelines
required by the IEP of each
student.
 Therapist submits Medicaid
reports within 10 days of the
service rendered.
 Therapist develops standardsbased IEP goals and objectives.
 Therapist fully understands and
abides by the legal and
professional responsibilities
pertaining to education.
 Therapist consistently complies
with school rules and policies
and procedures and actively
contributes to solutions that
promote effective
implementation of policies and
procedures.
 Therapist demonstrates full
knowledge and compliance with
Special Education policies and
procedures.
 Therapist performs duties as
evaluator, holding to all
required timelines and other
requirements of the IEP’s of
each student.
 Therapist submits Medicaid
billing within the week of
services.
 Therapist develops standardsbased IEP’s. Provides
professional development
within school or district setting.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples
 Therapist does not comply with
school rules and policies and
procedures.
 Therapist is either unaware or
non-compliant of district
Special Education policies and
procedures.
 Therapist does not perform
duties as evaluator, nor adheres
to timelines required by the IEP
of each student.
 Therapist does not submit
monthly Medicaid report in
TIENET for each student.
 The therapist is unaware of the
various resources available in
the district or elsewhere to
enhance learning.
 The therapist is unaware of the
district, state, and federal
regulations necessary to do their
job.
 When asked by colleagues
and/or students’ parents about
the availability of medical
speech/language support
services, the therapist replies, “I
don’t know of any services in
this area and can’t find out.”
 Learning activities are
inconsistently suitable to aid in
goal achievement.
 Therapist uses materials that
don't enhance learning for all
students in group.
 Therapist is somewhat aware of
current best practices and
resources for use in therapy. i.e.
Therapist hasn't done anything
for a year to learn and improve
therapy setting.
 The therapist displays limited
awareness of current resources
available to enhance knowledge
and learning of district, state
and federal regulations.
178
 Therapist understands and
abides by the legal and
professional responsibilities
pertaining to education.
 Therapist complies with school
rules, policies, and procedures.
Therapist performs duties as
evaluator, adhering to timelines
required by the IEP of each
student.
 Therapist submits Medicaid
reports within 10 days of the
service rendered.
 Therapist develops standardsbased IEP goals and objectives.
 The therapist is aware of
resources available through the
school district and knows how
to gain access. i.e. knows and
utilizes STEP Center and
interschool library.
 Therapist shares effective
strategies to address stuttering
in the regular education
classroom/general education
curriculum with colleagues.
 Learning activities are
differentiated and specifically
designed to aid in goal
achievement and carry over into
all academic settings.
Therapist provides a variety of
evidence-based materials that
are differentiated for
individualized student success.
Therapist is knowledgeable of
current best practices and
resources, seamlessly integrating
them into therapy, i.e. Therapist
keeps up with CEUs and
implements new strategies
appropriately for students.
 The therapist is aware of district
as well as other community
resources for parents other
team members.
 i.e. Therapist is aware of
concerns parents will have or
should have at various age
levels and where parents can go
to get information/support
 Therapist participated in an
online course pertaining to
speech/language acquisition for
students with cochlear implants.
The therapist then used this
information to compose an inservice presentation for
colleagues.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist has
no knowledge about district,
state, and national educational
and/or audiology standards of
practice. There is no
knowledge concerning Special
Education law, IDEA, section
504 and/or RTI.
 The educational audiologist has
limited knowledge about
district, state and national
educational and/or audiology
standards of practice. There is
limited concerning Special
Education law, IDEA, 504
plans, intervention strategies
and/or RTI. The educational
audiologist occasionally adheres
to professional standards with
regard to American Speech and
Hearing Association (ASHA) ,
Educational Audiology
Association, and American
Academy of Audiology (AAA)
179
 The educational audiologist is
knowledgeable about district,
state and national educational
and/or audiology standards and
provides services to ensure that
students with hearing
difficulties are identified,
properly evaluated and
managed. The educational
audiologist is knowledgeable
about Special Education law,
IDEA, 504 plans, intervention
strategies and RTI. The
educational audiologist adheres
to professional standards with
regard to ASHA, Educational
Audiology Association and
AAA.
 The educational audiologist has
a vast knowledge and an
expertise with regard to district,
state and national educational
and/or audiology standards.
The educational audiologist
provides services to students
with hearing difficulties and
demonstrates this expertise to
educational teams and families
by sharing information
regarding Special Education
law, IDEA, 504 plans,
intervention strategies and RTI.
Also, the educational
audiologist strictly adheres to
the professional standards with
regard to ASHA, Educational
Audiology Association and
AAA.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
1e: Planning the therapy
program, integrated with
regular the school program, to
meet the needs of individual
students
Critical Attributes
Therapy program consists of a
random collection of unrelated
activities, lacking coherence or an
overall structure.
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist develops IEP’s that
are not suitable for students, or
interventions are mismatched
with the findings of the
identified needs.
 Therapist is minimally involved
in identifying and seeking
solutions to building,
professional and/or academic
issues. Solutions may even have
an adverse impact.
 Therapist demonstrates
minimal knowledge and skill in
the area of OT/PT program
 The therapy program ia not
designed to aid in goal
achievement.
 The specialist does not provide
appropriate materials.
Basic
Proficient
Specialist’s plan has a guiding
principle and includes a number of
worthwhile activities, but some of
them don't fit with the broader
goals.
 The therapy program is suitable
to aid in goal achievement.
 The specialist provides
appropriate materials.
 The specialist is somewhat
aware of current best practices
and resources for use in
therapy.
The specialist's plan includes
integrating regular school
programing to meet the student’s
individual needs.
 Therapist develops IEP’s for
individual motor needs that are
partially suitable to the situation
and to the age of the student.
Works with team to develop
intervention plans and is
gaining expertise from others in
comprehensive educational
planning for student success.
 Therapist makes limited
contributions when identifying
and seeking solutions to
effectively address building,
professional and/or academic
 Therapist consistently develops
individualized therapy plans
that include all motor needs.
Plans are clear and appropriate
to the situation in the school
and to the age of the student.
Interventions are both suitable
and aligned with identified
student needs on the IEP. Plans
are appropriate for the situation
and are geared toward
maximizing the likelihood of
student success.
 Therapist actively participates
180
 Learning activities are
differentiated and specifically
designed to aid in goal
achievement.
 The specialist provides a variety
of appropriately challenging
materials.
 The specialist is knowledgeable
of current best practices and
resources, integrating them into
therapy.
Exemplary
The specialist’s plan is highly
coherent and preventive and serves
to support students individually,
within the broader educational
program.
 Learning activities are
differentiated and specifically
designed to aid in goal
achievement and carry over into
all academic settings.
 The specialist provides a variety
of evidence-based materials that
are differentiated for
individualized student success.
 The specialist is knowledgeable
of current best practices and
resources, seamlessly integrating
them into therapy.
 Therapist thoroughly develops
customized therapy service
plans that include all motor
needs. Plans are highly
appropriate to the situation in
the school and to the age of the
student.
 Therapist considers results
from multiple assessments and
sources when developing
comprehensive student IEP’s. Therapist finds ways to
creatively meet student needs
and incorporate many related
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
development, thus planning for
service delivery results in a
random collection of unrelated
activities, lacking coherence or
an overall structure.
issues.
 Therapist demonstrates
knowledge and skill in the area
of OT/PT program
development and uses this to
guide planning of appropriate
activities.
181
to identify and seek solutions
using conflict resolution and
decision making strategies that
effectively address building,
professional or academic issues.
 Therapist incorporates
thorough knowledge and skill in
the area of OT/PT program
development resulting in
thoughtfully designed plans that
are inclusive of all-important
aspects of delivering
comprehensive services.
elements, thus maximizing the
likelihood of student success
both in and outside of the
therapy setting.
 Therapist facilitates and models
strategies for identifying and
seeking solutions to
building/district level
professional and/or academic
issues. Anticipates and diffuses
conflicts using a variety of
communication methods, as
well as conflict resolution
techniques.
 Therapist incorporates
extensive knowledge and skill in
the area of OT/PT
programming resulting in
quality comprehensive plans
that support and reinforce
students both in therapy and
within the broader educational
program.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples
 Learning activities are not
designed to aid in goal
achievement.
 Therapist does not provide
appropriate materials.
 Therapist is not aware of
current best practices and
resources for use in therapy, i.e.
Therapist does not try new
theories/methods. Therapist
uses the same strategies he/she
has been using for years.
 Therapist does not review data
to make instructional decisions
regarding the progression of
future lessons.
 Learning activities are seldom
suitable to aid in goal
achievement,.i.e. Therapist uses
the same trade reader Welcome to Mr. Rogers
Neighborhood- (copy write
1982) with all of his speech kids
from preschoolers to nonverbal autistic students (the year
is 2008).
 Therapist uses limited materials.
e.g,. Therapist plans and
prepares to use materials that
will only be experienced in the
speech therapy room and not in
any other setting.
 Therapist is somewhat aware of
current best practices and
resources for use in therapy, i.e.
Therapist hasn't taken part in
continuing education for a
couple of years to improve
practice.
 Learning activities are
differentiated and specifically
designed to aid in goal
achievement.
 Therapist provides a variety of
appropriately challenging
materials.
 Therapist is knowledgeable of
current best practices and
resources, integrating them into
therapy. Therapist reads trade
magazines and research papers.
 Therapist allots an appropriate
amount of time to address all
components of the
speech/language lesson plan,
(i.e., introduction, opportunity
for guided and independent
practice of established
speech/language support goals,
and closure).
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist has
a limited understanding
regarding evaluation
procedures.
 The educational audiologist has
an understanding of evaluation
procedures and that these
procedures are complex and
dynamic.
 The educational audiologist has
a full understanding of
evaluation procedures
complexities and can
demonstrate flexibility by
adapting accordingly.
182
 Learning activities are
differentiated and specifically
designed to aid in goal
achievement and carry over into
all academic settings.
 Therapist provides a variety of
evidence-based materials that
are differentiated for
individualized student success.
Therapist is knowledgeable of
current best practices and
resources, seamlessly integrating
them into therapy, i.e. Therapist
keep up with CEUs and
implements new strategies
appropriately for students.
 Therapist meets with classroom
teacher(s) to develop a guided
language lesson based on
reading curriculum. Therapist
then pre-teaches the lesson to
small speech group before
teaching the entire classroom
including the speech group
kids.
 The educational audiologist has
a full understanding of the
complexities of testing
procedures, demonstrate
flexibility and able to shift
priorities and activities based on
changes in the testing
environment.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Therapeutic goals can be
monitored by the therapist's
assessment plan, which reflects
student performance throughout
the school day. The assessment
plan has clear criteria for
identifying student performance
within the educational program.
Assessment methodologies have
been adapted for individual
students as needed. When
appropriate, the plan allows student
contribution or feedback as part of
the process. Data collection is
skillfully designed, includes baseline
assessment and developed in
collaboration with the team.
 The specialist uses an effective
system for assessing therapeutic
outcome across educational
settings.
 The specialist accurately collects
relevant data and shares
findings with student, as
appropriate.
 The specialist modifies goal and
objectives based on data from
multiple sources including
student feedback.
 Therapist initiates an OT/PT
program evaluation plan that is
evidence based.
Therapist actively seeks
1f: Developing a plan to
evaluate the therapy program
Assessment procedures are not
consistent with student needs and
therapeutic outcomes, and contain
no criteria by which student
performance will be assessed.
Therapist does not incorporate
baseline assessments in the therapy
plan.
Assessment procedures are
rudimentary and data collection is
inconsistent. Assessment criteria
and standards have been
developed, but they are not clear.
Baseline assessments are included
in only some of the therapeutic
outcomes.
Assessment procedures are clear
and organized to reflect individual
student growth toward identified
goals. Therapist has an established
plan to collect data to support
therapeutic services incorporating
baseline assessment.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist does not use a
system for assessing therapeutic
outcome.
 The specialist does not collect
necessary data.
 The specialist does not modify
goals and objectives based on
student progress.
 The specialist uses an
ineffective system for assessing
therapeutic outcome.
 The specialist collects minimal
or irrelevant data.
 The specialist inconsistently
modifies goals and objectives
based on student progress.
 The specialist uses an
appropriate system for assessing
therapeutic outcome.
 The specialist accurately collects
data to reflect student progress.
 The specialist modifies goals
and objectives based on student
progress.
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist has no plan to
evaluate the OT/PT program
or services and resists
suggestions that such an
 Therapist has a basic plan to
evaluate the OT/PT program
and/or effectiveness of service
delivery for individual students.
 Therapist has a plan to evaluate
the effectiveness of the OT/PT
program.
Therapist is organized around
183
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
evaluation is important.
Therapist inconsistently
implements procedures for
referrals.
 Therapist has not clarified
procedures for referrals, thus,
when someone wants to refer a
student for OT/PT services,
they are not sure how to go
about it.
Speech Examples
 Therapist does not use a system
for assessing therapeutic
outcome.
 Therapist does not collect
necessary data.
 Therapist does not modify
goals and objectives based on
student progress.
 Therapist follows established
procedures for referrals,
although details are neither
always clear nor implemented in
a timely manner.
 Therapist uses an ineffective
system for assessing therapeutic
outcome.
 Therapist collects minimal or
irrelevant data.
 Therapist inconsistently
modifies goals and objectives
based on student progress.
184
clear goals and the collection of
evidence to indicate the degree
to which the OT/PT program
goals have been met and
individual service delivery has
been effective.
 Therapist has procedures for
referrals, meetings and
consultations with parents,
teachers and others that are
clear to everyone. Pre-referral
through post conference
systems is organized and
efficient.
 Therapist uses an appropriate
system for assessing therapeutic
outcome.
 Therapist accurately collects
data to reflect student progress.
 Therapist modifies goals and
objectives based on student
progress.





multiple sources of feedback
from which to develop a clear
path toward improving the
OT/PT program and individual
service delivery on an ongoing
basis.
Therapist establishes
procedures for all aspects of
referral, gathering important
history data and previous
assessment information.
Therapist has systems in place
for consultation follow-up with
parents, educators, solution
teams and/or agencies. Prereferral through post
conference responsibilities are
well organized and seamlessly
implemented.
Therapist uses an effective
system for assessing therapeutic
outcome across educational
settings.
Therapist accurately collects
relevant data and shares
findings with student, as
appropriate.
Therapist modifies goal and
objectives based on data from
multiple sources including
student feedback, i.e. Therapist
logs level of difficulty, multiple
choice or fill in the blank and
how the student was prompted
during teaching.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist's
protocol for hearing evaluation
referrals is poor with paperwork
being misplaced/lost, which
results in students not being
scheduled. Tracking completed
hearing evaluations is poor.
 The educational audiologist's
protocol for hearing evaluation
referrals is fair with students
being scheduled but not in a
timely manner. Tracking
completed hearing evaluations
is fair.
185
 The educational audiologist's
system for maintaining
information/records and the
protocols for hearing
evaluations are fully effective.
Tracking completed hearing
evaluations is good.
 Educational audiologist's
system for maintaining
information and the referral
protocols are highly effective.
Tracking completed hearing
evaluations is excellent.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 2 for Therapeutic Specialists: The Environment
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
2a: Establishing rapport with students
Specialist’s interactions with
students are negative or
inappropriate; students appear
uncomfortable in the testing and
therapy session.
Therapist’s interactions are a mix
of positive and negative; the
therapist’s efforts at developing
rapport are partially successful.
The net result of the interactions
is neutral, conveying neither
warmth nor conflict.
Therapist’s interactions with
students are positive and
respectful; students appear
comfortable in the testing and
therapeutic environment.
Therapist attempts to facilitate
interactions among students that
are polite and respectful, though
students may be somewhat
cautious about participating in
challenging therapeutic activities.
Critical Attributes

The therapeutic environment
facilitates respect and caring.
Students seek out the specialist
reflecting a high degree of
comfort and trust in the
relationship. Interactions between
therapist and students are highly
respectful, reflecting genuine
warmth and caring and sensitivity
to students as individuals. The net
result is an environment where
students feel valued and are
comfortable participating in
challenging activities.
 Student(s) demonstrates a
high level of respect through
seeking out the specialist.
 The specialist demonstrates a
connection with individual
student that encompasses an
understanding of needs
beyond the school setting.
Students are comfortable in
taking risks in any therapy
session.
 Therapist encourages student
individuality and the dignity
of each student is
consistently maintained and
honored. Interactions
consistently demonstrate

PT/OT Examples

Communication between
specialist and student(s) is
disrespectful.
The specialist does not
demonstrate connections
with individual students.

Therapist demonstrates little
to no appreciation of the
students as individuals and,
at times, embarrasses and/or
devalues the
student/students. A clear


Communication between
specialist and student(s) is
somewhat disrespectful.
The specialist makes basic
general connections with
individual students.

Therapist shows an
awareness of student
individuality and
acknowledges students’
behaviors and responses, but
lacks skill in strongly

186

Communication between
specialist and student(s) is
respectful.
The specialist demonstrates
an established connection
with individual student,
encouraging participation in
activities.
Therapist recognizes student
individuality and the dignity
of each student is
consistently maintained.
Interactions with students
are positive and respectful.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015


lack of rapport exists
between the OT/PT and
students.
Therapist displays
interactions with students
that are negative or
inappropriate. Students
appear uncomfortable in the
evaluation and/or therapy
environment.
Therapist does not have a
system in place for students
to monitor their own
progress.


supporting and honoring
them.
Therapist efforts at
developing rapport are
partially successful.
Therapist occasionally
provides feedback to
students about their current
progress as they engage in
therapy activities.

Students appear comfortable
in the evaluation and/or
therapy environment.
Therapist establishes and
uses a system for students to
track their own progress
towards individualized goals
over time. . Provides
students with information
about their progress over
time and teaches the student
how to use the data to
improve their performance.



Speech Examples

The educational audiologist
interaction with at least some
students is negative,
demeaning, sarcastic or
inappropriate to the age or
culture of the student.
Students exhibit disrespect
for audiologist. Poor rapport
with student.

Audiology Examples

Communication between
SLP and student(s) is
disrespectful.
Therapist does not
demonstrate connections
with individual students, i.e.

The educational audiologiststudent interactions are
generally appropriate but
may reflect occasional
inconsistencies, favoritism,
or disregard for student's
cultures. Students exhibit
only minimal respect for
audiologist. Fair rapport with
student.
Communication between
therapist and student(s) is
somewhat disrespectful.
Therapist makes basic
general connections with
individual students. i.e.
187


The educational audiologiststudent interactions are
friendly and demonstrate
warmth, caring and respect.
Such interactions are
appropriate to development
and cultural norms. Students
exhibit respect for
audiologist. Good rapport
with student.
Communication between
therapist and student(s) is
uniformly respectful.
Therapist demonstrates an
established connection with
individual student,



positive and respectful
rapport.
Therapist is someone who
students seek out; reflecting a
high degree of comfort and
trust in the relationship.
Therapist establishes and
uses a system that supports
student tracking their
proficiency and monitoring
their own progress towards
individual goals over time.
The system includes students
keeping artifacts that
demonstrate achievement in
relationship to therapy goals.
Therapist helps all students
to engage in reflection about
their growth over time.
The educational audiologist
demonstrates genuine caring
and respect for individual
students. Student exhibits
respect for audiologist as an
individual, beyond that as an
audiologist role. Excellent
rapport with student.
Communication between
specialist and student(s)
demonstrates a high level of
respect.
Specialist demonstrates a
connection with individual
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015


Therapist compares student
to a "better" student.
Therapist uses sarcasm with
preschool students.
Specialist does not model
how to interact and treat one
another, and students often
talk while others are talking
or even push or take things
from one another

Therapist jokes around
"talking smack" with the
students like they do with
each other.
Specialist and students
occasionally demonstrate
politeness conventions
(“please” “thank you”).
Student looks to specialist
for reinforcement and
specialist inconsistently
responds.
188

encouraging participation in
activities. i.e. Students call
therapist Miss, Mrs.,. Mr, and
Therapist asks them about
specific classes or activities in
the student's life.
Specialist demonstrates,
discusses, and involves
students in modeling how to
be polite, take turns, show
encouragement, and respect
to one another.


student that encompasses an
understanding of needs
beyond the school setting.
Students are comfortable
participating in any school
activity, i.e. Student asks
therapist's opinion with a
difficult situation and how to
solve it.
Students routinely work
together on tasks and remark
and/or demonstrate kindness
to and acceptance of one
another (“your turn” “thank
you” “you did a great job on
that one!” “You can do it!”).
Student looks to specialist
for reinforcement and
he/she adjusts quantity and
speed of reinforcement
based upon student’s
performance.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
2b: Establishing a Therapeutic
Environment of Learning,
Participation, and
Independence
The therapeutic environment is
characterized by a lack of therapist
or student commitment to
progress, and/or little or no
investment of student energy in the
task at hand. Expectations for
student progress are low.
The therapeutic environment is
characterized by inconsistent
commitment by therapist or
students. Therapist appears to be
only “going through the motions”,
and students may not understand
their role as a participant.
The therapeutic environment is
rigorous, characterized by a shared
belief in the importance of
progress. Therapist conveys high
expectations and insists on hard
work; students assume
responsibility for learning,
participation, and independence
Critical Attributes
 The specialist does not establish
a purpose or expectations for
therapeutic activities.
 The specialist does not
recognize opportunities to
foster independence.
 The specialist inconsistently
establishes a purpose or
expectations for therapeutic
activities.
 The specialist recognizes some
opportunities to foster
independence.
The therapeutic environment is a
place where progress is valued by
all, with high expectations for both
learning and hard work being the
norm. To the best of their ability,
students understand their role and
consistently expend effort.
Interactions support a high level of
learning, participation, and
independence.
 The specialist establishes a
purpose and expectations for
therapeutic activities.
The specialist recognizes
opportunities to foster
independence.
 Students support and encourage
each other
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist does not assume
responsibility for ensuring that
sessions or meetings are both
focused and productive.
 Therapist uses a limited number
of intervention strategies for all
their students regardless of
diagnosis.
 Therapist has engaging activities
for the student to perform but
inconsistent with why they are
performing this activity and
how it relates to the students
limitations.
 Therapist uses some activities,
materials, methods and
strategies that reflect a
moderate understanding of
student needs and IEP
objectives.
 Some of the therapist's IEP
objectives are suitable to the
189
 Therapist frequently monitors
the success of the session or
meeting against the intended
outcomes. Able to facilitate
sessions or meetings that are
generally focused, productive
and encouraging of active
participation.
 Therapist implements engaging
sessions that reflect a solid
understanding of the student’s
needs, using appropriate
learning activities, strategies,
materials, resources and
 The specialist communicates
passion for their discipline and
therapy session.
 The specialist fosters a culture
for students' self-monitoring
and responsibility of progress.
 The specialist creates
opportunities to foster
independence.
 Therapist consistently seeks
input from participants when
monitoring the success of the
session or meeting and is able
to facilitate active participation
in sessions and meetings.
 Therapist presents engaging
sessions based on extensive
expertise and understanding of
students. All aspects of the
therapy plans (objectives,
strategies, learning activities,
materials, resources and
assessments) agree with the IEP
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
student and the approaches to
therapy are somewhat
appropriate to student needs. Is
supportive of students in the
school setting, but has difficulty
relating students’ therapy to the
school
environment/educational
setting.
Speech Examples
 The specialist indicates there is
little or no purpose to speech
work.
 For example: There are no
rules and regulations set for the
class.
 The students are unaware of a
reward for the class.
 The students are not
encouraged to try the objective
on their own.
 Therapist inconsistently
establishes a purpose or
expectations for therapeutic
activities. For example: SLP
does not follow rules
consistently for each student.
 Therapist uses ineffective
reinforcement system with
students. For example: SLP is
using negative reinforcement
and missing opportunities for
positive reinforcement.
 Therapist recognizes some
opportunities to foster
independence. For example:
The specialist is not giving the
student the opportunity to
initiate.
190
assessments.
 Therapist's IEP objectives are
addressed in a manner both
understandable and suitable to
the student. Works
collaboratively with school
personnel to remove barriers to
learning and student success.
 Therapist establishes a purpose
and expectations for therapeutic
activities,. i.e. Rules are
displayed, reviewed and
understood.
 Therapist uses appropriate
reinforcement system with
students, i.e. SLP is consistent
with following through with
rules.
 Therapist recognizes
opportunities to foster
independence, i.e. SLP gives
students opportunities to
initiate and generalize their new
skills.
 Students routinely can identify
or explain their individual
speech and language goals,
when given simple prompts or
questions.





and are adapted according to
student needs.
Therapist uses a variety of
methods and strategies to
creatively meet student needs
both in and outside of the
therapy setting.
Therapist is instrumental in
organizing collaborative
partnerships with school and
community personnel to
remove barriers to learning and
student success.
Therapist clearly establishes
rigorous expectations for
therapeutic activities, facilitating
student understanding of
purpose, i.e. Students are
following the rules, working
independently when
appropriate, asking questions
and practicing their new skills
consistently throughout the
therapy time.
Therapist uses highly effective
reinforcement system with
student that encourages student
self-monitoring of progress i.e,
the SLP is asking the students
how they think they did.
Therapist creates opportunities
to foster independence,. i.e.
Students take responsibility for
their own learning. Less verbal
prompting and more gestural
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
and visual prompting, when
necessary. Students'
communicative intents are
taken seriously and acted upon.
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist
inconsistently identifies barriers
to learning related to
hearing/listening.
 The educational audiologist
identifies barriers to learning
related to hearing/listening.
Limited communication with
school staff.
191
 The educational audiologist
consistently identifies barriers
to learning related to
hearing/listening and makes
recommendations for
interventions/strategies to help
student gain access to
instruction. Good collaboration
with school staff.
 The educational audiologist
consistently identifies barriers
to learning related to
hearing/listening and not only
recommends but utilizes a
variety of
interventions/strategies to
increase auditory access to
instruction. Strong
collaboration with school staff.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
2c: Managing Time and Procedures
Much instructional time is lost due
to inefficient routines and
procedures. There is little or no
evidence of therapist’s managing
student, transitions and/or
handling of materials and supplies
effectively. There is little evidence
that students know or follow
established routines. The specialist
therapy does not have a structured
therapy schedule nor are therapy
time communicated to building
staff and administration.
Some instructional time is lost due
to routines and procedures.
Therapist’s management of
student, transitions or handling of
materials and supplies are
inconsistent, leading to some
disruption. With regular guidance
and prompting, students follow
established routines. The specialist
therapy scheduled inconsistently
followed and modified when
appropriate. The schedule is
communicated to building staff
and administration.
Instructional time is maximized
due to efficient and seamless
routines and procedures. To the
best of their ability, students take
initiative in the management of
routines and transitions, and/or
the handling of materials and
supplies. The specialist has a firm
grasp regarding schedule
development and takes a
leadership role in efficient,
creative scheduling.
Critical Attributes

There is little loss of instructional
time due to effective routines and
procedures. Therapist’s
management of student,
transitions or handling of
materials and supplies, or both,
are consistently successful. With
minimal guidance and prompting,
students follow established
routines. The specialist therapy
scheduled is structured, efficient,
followed, and modified when
appropriate. The schedule is
communicated to building staff
and administration.
 Transitions and therapy
routines are smooth.
 Materials are readily available.
Resources are arranged to
support the instructional
goals and therapy session.
 The specialist has their
current schedule to the
building staff and
administration.



Transitions and student
routines are confused and
chaotic.
Materials are not readily
available.
The specialist resources are
not arranged to support the
instructional goals and
learning activities.
The specialist neglects
developing a schedule for
services.



Transitions and student
routines are awkward.
Limited materials are
available.
Therapy resources are
adequately arranged to
support instructional goals
and learning activities.
The specialist has their
schedule to the building staff
and administration, but is
inconsistent for services.
192




Transitions and session
routines are seamless with the
focus on activities.
Materials are readily
accessible and/or managed by
the student.
When able, students actively
utilize resources to support
instructional goals.
Specialist demonstrates and
shares schedule creation
guidelines and techniques.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
PT/ OT Examples



Audiology Examples

Therapist wastes too much
time getting the attention of
student to begin the session
and lacks the ability to focus
sessions on specific
objectives.
Therapy time is often filled
with activities that merely
consume time and do not
necessarily address goals.
Transitions are chaotic, with
much time lost between
activities or session segments.

The educational audiologist's
routine for handling
audiological equipment and
scheduling issues are
inefficient, resulting in a loss
of instructional/testing time.


Therapist loses some session
time engaging students in the
session upon arrival, due to
not being set up in advance
for therapy session.
Therapist provides therapy
that lacks clear focus due to
continual distractions with
other tasks and discussions.
Only some transitions are
efficient, resulting in more
loss of time for learning.
Some closure is given at end
of session.
The educational audiologist's
routines for handling
audiological equipment (ex:
hearing aids, FM systems,
troubleshooting...) and
scheduling protocols work
moderately well.
193




Therapist engages students
upon arrival to the OT/PT
setting.
Therapist focuses on clearly
defined, individual objectives.
Therapist ensures transitions
are smooth with no loss of
session time.
Therapist provides purposeful
closure to the session.

The educational audiologist's
routines for handling
audiological equipment and
scheduling protocols occur
smoothly, with little loss of
instructional/testing time.




Therapist teaches students to
engage in the session upon
arrival.
Therapist ensures the session
is focused primarily on clearly
defined objectives.
Therapy transitions are
seamless, with very little
downtime.
Therapy sessions have
purposeful closure.
The educational audiologist
demonstrates consistent and
well-established routines for
handling audiological
equipment and scheduling
protocols are seamless.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
2d: Establishing standards of
conduct in the treatment center
No standards of conduct have been
established, and specialist
disregards or fails to address
negative student behavior during
evaluation or treatment.
Standards of conduct appear to
have been established for the
testing and treatment center.
Specialist’s attempts to monitor
and correct negative student
behavior during evaluation and
treatment are partially successful.
Standards of conduct have been
established for the testing and
treatment center. Specialist
monitors student behavior against
those standards; response to
students is appropriate and
respectful.
Standards of conduct have been
established for the testing and
treatment center. Specialist’s
monitoring of students is subtle
and preventive, and students
engage in self-monitoring of
behavior.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist does not monitor
student behavior.
 The specialist does not respond
to disruptions or disrespectful
behavior among students.
 The specialist attempts to keep
track of student behavior.
 The specialist occasionally
responds to disruptive behavior
among the students.
 The specialist frequently
monitors student behavior.
 The specialist responds
appropriately to student
misbehavior.
 The specialist silently and subtly
monitors student behavior.
 The specialist responds
appropriately to misbehavior
while taking account the team's
individual plan for behavior
management.
194
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist has no standards of
conduct that have been
established and OT/PT
disregards or fails to address
negative student behavior
during evaluation and/or
therapy.
 Therapist design of session
activities lacks focus in
relationship to appropriate
interventions based on student
need. No modifications or
accommodations are evident.
Effective modeling is not
evident, nor checks for
understanding. The OT/PT’s
professional relationship with
the individual students does not
contribute to effective learning.
 Therapist establishes standards
of conduct for the evaluation
and/or therapy setting. The
OT/PT’s attempts to monitor
and correct negative student
behavior during evaluations or
therapy are partially successful.
 Therapist designs therapy
activities that are generally
focused on appropriate
interventions, but is primarily
OT/PT directed and limits
student responses and practice.
Some inconsistent
accommodations and/or
modifications are evident. Some
modeling is evident. Checks for
understanding during the
session. Occasionally noted
positive feedback and
motivation to student.
195
 Therapist has clearly defined
and posted standards of
conduct for the evaluation
and/or therapy setting. The
OT/PT monitors student
behavior against those
standards.
 Therapist responds to student's
behavior appropriately and
respectfully.
 Therapist involves students in
meaningful experiences, which
contribute to their progress.
 Therapist checks for
understanding throughout the
session by soliciting responses
from students to show they are
learning.
 OT/PT interacts in a positive
way with students, providing
support, motivation and
recognition of growth.
 Therapist has clearly defined
and posted standards of
conduct for the evaluation
and/or therapy setting.
OT/PT’s monitoring of
students is both subtle and
preventive. Students engage in
self-monitoring of their own
behavior.
 Therapist actively involves
students in meaningful session
experiences, which significantly
contribute to their continual
improvement. Representation
of therapy goals are challenging,
appropriate and links well with
students’ prior knowledge and
experiences. Continually checks
for understanding, throughout
the session, by expecting
responses from the student.
OT/PT provides motivation
and recognition resulting in
continual improvement.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples
 Therapist does not monitor
student behavior, i.e. The
students do not know the rules
and are disruptive
 Therapist does not respond to
disruptions or disrespectful
behavior among the students,.
i.e. The students are running
the class and are disrespectful.
 Therapist attempts to keep
track of student behavior, i.e.
The specialist is inconsistent
when addressing appropriate
and/or inappropriate behavior.
 Therapist occasionally responds
to disruptive or disrespectful
behavior among the students,
i.e. The specialist is giving more
attention to inappropriate
behavior and only positively
reinforcing some of the time.
 Therapist frequently monitors
student behavior,.i.e. the
specialist has a system for
rewards or praise.
 Therapist responds
appropriately to misbehavior
among the students,. i.e. the
specialist redirects when
appropriate and praises the
positive behaviors.
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist
does not monitor student's
behavior and is unaware of
what the student is doing.
 The educational audiologist has
strategies to guide student's
behavior during assessment.
 The educational audiologist has
strategies to guide a student's
behavior and structures
assessments to minimize
interruption of instructional
time.
196
 Therapist silently and subtly
monitors student behavior, i.e.
the specialist is positively
reinforcing good behavior with
praise.
 Therapist responds
appropriately to misbehavior
among the students taking into
account the team’s individual
plan for behavioral
management, i.e. the specialist
is following behavior plan or
addressing an inappropriate
behavior by ignoring, when
appropriate.
 The educational audiologist
monitoring of behavior is subtle
and preventive. Maintains a
safe and orderly environment
with assessments.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
2e: Organizing physical space
for testing of students and
providing therapy
The testing and treatment center is
disorganized and poorly suited to
working with students. Materials
are usually available.
The testing and treatment center is
moderately well organized and
moderately well suited to working
with students. Materials are
difficult to find when needed.
The testing and treatment center is
well organized; materials are
available when needed.
The testing and treatment center is
highly organized and is inviting to
students. Materials are convenient
when needed.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist’s room is not set
up for treatment sessions.
 The specialist’s room doesn't
have space for students.
 The specialist's room is
cluttered and materials are
difficult to find.
 Therapist materials and room is
not set up for treatment
sessions
 Therapist treatments are not
planned or set up with goal in
mind
 Therapist room is not adjusted
to students needs such as
decreasing clutter to allow
student to focus on one activity
at a time
 The specialist's work space is
organized, but materials are
difficult to find when needed.
 The specialist's workspace is
well organized and materials
needed are easily found.
 The room is free of clutter.
 Students’ work is on the wall,
showing pride in
accomplishments.
 Therapist materials are set up
for logical and easy access
 Therapist organized materials in
a useful manner in relation to
the student's goals
 Therapy room is organized and
cleared of clutter to allow
student to focus on the activity
 The specialist's work
environment is set up in
advance for the students, with
high interest materials and
hands on learning.
 Extra materials are easily found
to support the lesson.
 Therapy environment is set up
in advance for every session,
therapist goes above and
beyond to plan additional
activities depending on
students’ moods, interests,
goals, needs for that day or is
easy to adapt based on student
or teachers request for the day’s
treatment.
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist materials and room
are set up but unorganized for
treatment sessions.
 Therapist is inconsistent with
reasoning behind set up or
student not included in reason
for activity
197
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples
Audiology Examples
 The specialist's room is not
inviting or set up for treatment
sessions
 The specialist's treatments are
not planned or set up with goal
in mind
 The specialist's room does not
promote learning.
 Example: Therapy for
preschool students is conducted
at a table that is too big with a
chair that the student has to
kneel in to get to the table.
 The educational audiologist
does not adapt to various
evaluation techniques with
regard to the student's age,
physical limitations and ability
to understand testing
expectations. Appropriate
testing materials are not
available.
 The specialist is sometimes
organized and has materials
ready for students most of the
time.
 Example: The specialist has
students enter room and then
he/she has to go to cupboard
to grab a quick game to set up
while the kids wait. There are
no samples of student work on
the walls and no information
about the therapist in the room.
 The specialist has an organized
room and materials ready for
the students to work on.
 Example: The students have
their work displayed on a pride
wall.
 Materials are handy and
prepared when students arrive.
 The specialist has the lessons
set up in advance for every
session. Students are proud to
have their work displayed.
 Example: Visual cues for
lessons are strategically placed
to help students.
 The educational audiologist
does adapt to various
assessment techniques (visual
reinforcement audiometry,
behavioral observation
audiometry, play audiometry...)
but not in a timely manner.
Some testing materials are
available.
 The audiologist adapts the
testing techniques to obtain an
accurate assessment. Testing
materials are appropriate and
available.
 The audiologist automatically
adapts the testing techniques to
obtain an accurate assessment
of the student's hearing acuity.
Various testing materials are
readily available.
198
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 3 for Therapeutic Specialists: Delivery of Service
3a: Communicating With and
On the Behalf of Students
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
The specialist’s communication is
unclear and the directions and
procedures are confusing. Therapy
communication contains major
errors and does not include any
explanation of recommendations.
Specialist’s spoken or written
language contains errors of
grammar or syntax. Specialist’s
vocabulary is inappropriate, vague,
or used incorrectly.
The specialist’s communication has
only limited success, and/or it
must be clarified after initial
confusion. Written or spoken
communication may contain minor
errors; some portions are clear,
others difficult to follow.
Communication does not invite
students to engage, understand
strategies, or develop
independence. Specialist’s language
is correct but uses vocabulary that
is either limited or not fully
appropriate to the audience.
Specialist rarely takes opportunities
to explain discipline-specific
vocabulary.
The specialist communicates the
relationship of therapy to
educational programming;
directions and procedures are
explained thoroughly and may be
modeled. Specialist’s explanations
are scaffolded, clear, accurate, and
connect with the knowledge and
experience of the audience.
Specialists model when
appropriate. During the
explanation of content, specialist
focuses, as appropriate, on
strategies that facilitate
independence and invites students
to engage and understand
strategies. Specialist’s spoken and
written language is clear and
correct and is suitable to the
audience. Specialist’s use of
discipline-specific vocabulary is
precise and serves to extend
understanding.
The specialist communicates the
relationship of therapy to
educational programming;
directions and procedures are clear
and anticipate possible
misunderstanding. Specialist’s
explanation of content is thorough
and clear, developing conceptual
understanding through scaffolding
and modifying communication
style in response to audience.
Students are encouraged to
contribute to the therapy process.
specialist’s spoken and written
language is expressive and serves to
extend understanding.
Communication enables students
to generalize therapeutic strategies
in a variety of environments.
199
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Critical Attributes
 The specialist’s communication
is unclear and the directions
and procedures are confusing.
 Therapy communication
contains major errors and does
not include any explanation of
recommendations.
 Therapist’s spoken or written
language contains errors of
grammar or syntax.
 The specialist’s vocabulary is
inappropriate, vague, or used
incorrectly.
 Students receive no feedback,
or feedback is global, or
directed to only one student.
 The specialist’s communication
has only limited success, and/or
it must be clarified after initial
confusion.
 Written or spoken
communication may contain
minor errors; some portions are
clear, others difficult to follow.
 Communication does not invite
students to engage, understand
strategies, or develop
independence.
 The specialist’s language is
correct but uses vocabulary that
is either limited or not fully
appropriate to the audience.
 The specialist rarely takes
opportunities to explain
discipline-specific vocabulary.
 Feedback to students is vague
and not oriented toward future
improvement of responses.
200
 The specialist communicates
the relationship of therapy to
educational programming;
directions and procedures are
explained thoroughly and may
be modeled.
 The specialist’s explanations are
scaffolded, clear, accurate, and
connect with the knowledge
and experience of the audience.
The specialist models when
appropriate. During the
explanation of content,
specialist focuses, as
appropriate, on strategies that
facilitate independence and
invites students to engage and
understand strategies.
 The specialist’s spoken and
written language is clear and
correct and is suitable to the
audience.
The specialist’s use of
discipline-specific vocabulary is
precise and serves to extend
understanding.
 Feedback includes specific and
timely guidance for students
according to ability.
 The specialist communicates
the relationship of therapy to
educational programming;
directions and procedures are
clear and anticipate possible
misunderstanding.
 The specialist’s explanation of
content is thorough and clear,
developing conceptual
understanding through
scaffolding and modifying
communication style in
response to audience.
 The students are encouraged to
contribute to the therapy
process.
The specialist’s spoken and
written language is expressive
and serves to extend
understanding.
 Communication enables
students to generalize
therapeutic strategies in a
variety of environments.
 High-quality feedback is
delivered skillfully to contribute
to a high-level of student
success; it is specific and
focused on improvement.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist poorly communicates
information regarding the needs
of students or their limitations.
 Therapist written reports are
either incomplete or not
completed in a timely manner.
Does not follow-up with
parents or families regarding
recommendation regarding
their child.
 Therapist does not advocate for
the students or parents’ rights.
 Therapist does not understand
the least restrictive
environment.
 Therapist is unavailable to
participate in collaborative
meetings and does not provide
guidance regarding students’
needs
 Therapist communicates
individual needs of students to
appropriate school personnel.
 Therapist written reports meet
legal requirements.
 Therapist occasionally followsup with parents and school
personnel regarding
effectiveness of
recommendations.
 Therapist occasionally
advocates for parent and
student rights. Attempts to
support students in the least
restrictive environment.
 Therapist attends meetings but
is not an active participant,
limited feedback on students
behalf
201
 Therapist exchanges
information from evaluations in
a meaningful manner to the
IEP team, families and/or
other school personnel while
being sensitive to the needs of
students and families.
 Therapist interprets assessment
and therapy results for others.
 Therapist written reports and
documentation is both accurate
and completed in a timely
manner.
 Therapist regularly follows-up
with parents and school
personnel regarding the
effectiveness of
recommendations.
 Therapist advocates for
students and families in the
school setting and the
community at large.
Consistently places and
supports students in the least
restrictive environment.
 Therapist participates actively in
team meetings and gives
guidance to team in regards to
students needs for OT/PT
 Therapist communicates with
families and other professionals
in a manner highly sensitive to
cultural and linguistic traditions.
 Therapist is adept at
interpreting and
communicating evaluation and
therapy results to teach others
about student needs. Written
reports are accurate, well
organized and well written.
Provides consistent follow-up
with families and school
personnel to determine
effectiveness of
recommendations.
 Therapist serves as an advocate
for parent and student rights,
insuring that their rights are
respected. Offers alternatives to
more restrictive settings. Seeks
out appropriate programming
to support least restrictive
placement. Creatively balances
needs of school and needs of
student.
 Therapist provides leadership
and guidance in meetings and
serves as a collaborative
member of the team for
problem solving the student’s
needs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples
 Therapist does not convey
directions and/or information
in a clear manner for the
targeted audience. i.e., the
specialist is not speaking at the
level appropriate for their
students.
 Therapist makes errors with
content that will impact
student’s understanding and/or
future growth, i.e. the specialist
is not at the appropriate
content level of the students.
Therapist’s written
communication, in the form of
report writing, is imprecise and
includes various grammatical
errors.
 Therapist conveys directions
and/or information that is
somewhat clear or not
appropriate for the audience,
i.e. the students are not clear on
what the specialist wants to do
for the session.
 Therapist makes minor errors
regarding content, impacting
students’ understanding and/or
future growth, i.e. the specialist
is working on goals and
objectives too difficult for the
student.
 The student is wasting the
session and not learning thus
the self-esteem is being
lowered.
 Therapist’s written
communication, in the form of
report writing, is vague and
contains some errors in
information and/or grammar,
i.e. the specialist does not use
appropriate language to explain
results/observations in reports.
 Will sometimes mention
themselves in reports.
202
 Therapist conveys directions
and/or information clearly,
matching the targeted audience,
i.e., students understand what is
expected during the session
 Therapist accurately uses
content specific vocabulary to
expand on a student’s
comprehension and promotes
growth, i.e. the Specialist is
teaching to the next level of the
student, or explaining a
classroom lesson at the
students’ levels for better
understanding.
 Therapist’s written
communication, in the form of
report writing, is precise, clear
and well understood by the
audience. i.e,. the specialist
writes reports using appropriate
clinical terminology to explain
disabilities and is able to adjust
them for laypersons.
 Therapist conveys directions
and/or information in a clear,
concise manner.
 Communication matches the
targeted audience and allows
for students to demonstrate
understanding of information.
 Therapist accurately uses
content
 Specific vocabulary, anticipating
the need for clarification,
allowing for generalization of
information to other settings,.
i.e.. the specialist asks for
clarification from the class
and/or has a student
summarizes
 Therapist’s written
communication, in the form of
report writing, is well-written,
thoroughly documents relevant
information, and extends
understanding, i.e.. Therapist
works with the teaching staff to
modify assignments and make
sure the student is sitting in an
appropriate section of the room
with peer buddies when
necessary.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist
uses confusing directions and
procedures regarding
audiological evaluations to
students. Students do not
understand the purpose of the
testing.
 After initial student confusion,
the educational audiologist will
re-explain directions and the
student somewhat understands
the testing procedure. Verbal
and written information is
somewhat clear.
203
 The educational audiologist's
directions and procedures are
clear to student and containing
an appropriate level of detail.
Provides verbal and written
information that is clear and
understandable to the listener.
 The educational audiologist's
directions and procedures are
clear to students and anticipates
possible student
misunderstanding.
 Provides accurate verbal and
written information that is clear
and understandable to the
listener.
 Uses appropriate
communication support
(interpreters and translators)
when needed.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
3b: Implementing and
Adapting Specialty Services to
Maximize Students’ Success
The specialty services are not suited
to the students’ ability level and
may not be individually designed to
meet student needs. Specialist is
unaware of student needs and
responses to programming.
Specialty services may not be
provided equitably to all students.
The specialty services are not
consistently suited to the students’
ability level and may not be fully
individualized to meet student
needs. Specialist is aware of student
needs and responses to
programming, but may
inconsistently implement and adapt
services.
The specialty services are typically
suited to the students’ ability level
and are individualized to meet
student needs. Specialist is aware of
student needs and responses to
programming. Specialist
consistently implements and adapts
services in response to student
needs.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist does not use
clinical judgement when using
specialty materials.
 Materials, strategies, services are
inappropriate for age and
development.
Services do not reflect student
needs and hours as documented
in IEP.
 The specialist randomly selects
specialty materials.
 Materials, strategies, services are
sometimes appropriate for age
and development.
 The specialist uses appropriate
clinical judgement when
selecting specialty materials.
 The specialist materials,
strategies, and/or services are
appropriate for age and
development.
 Services correlate with student's
academic and functional needs,
accurately reflecting the IEP.
 The specialist provides suitable
scaffolding and challenges
students to maximize success.
The specialist uses innovative and
evidence-based treatments that are
suited to the students’ ability level
and are individualized to meet
student needs. Specialist skillfully
enables students to contribute to
decisions regarding their own
specialty program to the best of
their ability. Specialist skillfully
implements and adapts services in
response to student needs.
 The specialist demonstrates a
skillful approach to selecting
specialty materials.
 The specialist materials,
strategies, and/or services are
appropriate for age and
development, as well as
contribute to progress across
the educational setting.
 Services correlate with
academic and functional need,
include student input when
able, and adapt in response to
need, while still reflecting the
IEP.
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Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist makes no
recommendations for
interventions for students with
individual needs based on
current research.
 Therapist does not use available
technology. Unaware of how to
access or use electronic data
management systems to store
and retrieve student
information and student plans,
or generate reports.
 Therapist does not see student
for allotted time stated in the
IEP.
 Therapist makes suggestions for
interventions based on current
research. Provides minimal
monitoring and or follow-up of
interventions.
 Therapist demonstrates some
technology skills that support
service delivery. Has a working
knowledge of how to access
student information,
achievement results, student
plans and is able to generate
reports.
 Therapist documents very
minimally the time that they see
the student and inconsistently
meets time documented in the
IEP for therapy.
205
 Therapist incorporates
knowledge from current
research in the field into the
development and
implementation of
interventions that meet the
individual needs of students.
Develops and monitors
interventions. Follows-up with
appropriate school personnel
and/or others.
 Therapist uses computer
programs that assist with
effectiveness of service delivery.
 Therapist is knowledgeable
about assistive technology.
 Therapist uses district
electronic data management
tools to access student
information, student plans, and
achievement results and to
generate reports.
 Therapist is able to meet IEP
requirements for therapy time
and adequately documents
sessions.
 Therapist demonstrates
knowledge of contemporary
research in the field by
including these principles in the
development, implementation
and evaluation of interventions.
 Therapist ensures that progressmonitoring systems are in place
to determine intervention
effectiveness.
 Therapist has a system in place
to follow-up with appropriate
school personnel and/or other
regarding the results of
intervention effectiveness.
 Therapist assumes an active
leadership role by instructing
others on the use of computer
programs that promote
effectiveness and efficiency in
service delivery.
 Therapist is knowledgeable
about assistive technology or
other specialized software.
 Therapist uses district
electronic data management
tools proficiently to create
reports and analyze progressmonitoring data.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples
 Therapist does not use clinical
judgment when using therapy
materials.
 Therapy materials, strategies,
and/or services are
inappropriate for age and
development.
 Services do not reflect student
needs and IEP minute, i.e.
games and toys that are not age
appropriate.
 Therapist randomly selects
therapy materials. Therapy
materials, strategies, and/or
services are sometimes
appropriate for age and
development.
 Most services reflect student
needs and IEP minutes. i.e.,
inconsistently uses data from
past therapy sessions to plan
present and future sessions.
 Therapist uses appropriate
clinical judgment when
selecting therapy materials.
 Therapy materials, strategies,
and/or services are appropriate
for age and development.
 Services correlate with student’s
academic and functional needs,
accurately reflecting IEP
minutes. i.e. Age appropriate
and engaging games and toys.
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist
does not encourage student to
be a self-advocate and to utilize
audiological equipment.
 The educational audiologist
works with student periodically
regarding self-advocacy, talking
with teaching staff and supports
amplification use.
 The educational audiologist
encourages and reinforces
strategies for students to be a
self-advocate.
 The educational audiologist
gives information to students,
parents and teaching staff
regarding hearing loss,
amplification equipment and
educational needs.
206
 Therapist demonstrates a
skillful approach to selecting
therapy materials.
 Therapy materials, strategies,
and/or services are appropriate
to age and development, as well
as contribute to progress across
the educational setting.
 Services correlate with
academic and functional need,
include student input, and
change in response to need,
while still reflecting IEP
minutes, i.e. Therapist is using
materials and wording used in
classroom or educational games
that support the lessons in the
classroom.
 The educational audiologist
consistently encourages and
reinforces strategies for
students to be a self-advocate.
The educational audiologist
collaborates with student,
parents and teaching staff with
regard hearing loss,
amplification equipment and
educational needs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
3c: Engaging Students in the
Specialty Process
Students are unable to engage in
the specialty program because the
specialty is unsuitable to the
student’s learning style or
incompatible with the educational
environment. The specialty
program has no clearly defined
structure, or engagement is limited
by treatment pacing that is too
slow or rushed.
Therapeutic services allow most
students to be passively engaged or
merely compliant. Students are
engaged intermittently. Specialty
program has a recognizable
structure; however, the pacing of
the activities may not provide
students the time needed to be
engaged or may be so slow that
many students have a considerable
amount of “down time.”
Students are engaged in therapeutic
activities that are designed to
provide an appropriate level of
challenge. The specialty program
has a clearly defined structure, and
the pacing of activities is
appropriate, providing most
students the time needed to be
actively engaged.
Critical Attributes
 Students are unable to engage
in the specialty program
because the specialty is
unsuitable to the student’s
learning style or incompatible
with the educational
environment.
 The therapeutic services have
no clearly defined structure, or
engagement is limited by
treatment pacing that is too
slow or rushed.
 Therapeutic services allow most
students to be passively
engaged or merely compliant.
Students are engaged
intermittently.
 The therapeutic services have a
recognizable structure;
however, the pacing of the
activities may not provide
students the time needed to be
engaged or may be so slow that
many students have a
considerable amount of “down
time.”
 Students are engaged in
therapeutic activities that are
designed to provide an
appropriate level of challenge.
 The therapeutic services have a
clearly defined structure, and
the pacing of activities is
appropriate, providing most
students the time needed to be
actively engaged.
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist is unfamiliar with the
different approaches to learning
or delivers therapy with little
 Therapist displays general
understanding of the different
approaches to learning that
 Therapist displays solid
understanding of the
differentiated instructional
Students are actively engaged and
challenged through well-designed
therapeutic tasks and activities.
Specialist provides suitable
scaffolding and challenges students
to maximize engagement. There is
evidence of some student
contribution to therapeutic
programming; students may serve
as models for peers as appropriate.
The specialty program has a clearly
defined structure, and the pacing
provides students the time needed
to actively engage with other peers
and reflect upon their progress.
 Students are actively engaged
and challenged through welldesigned therapeutic tasks and
activities.
 There is evidence of some
student contribution to
therapeutic programming;
students may serve as models
for peers as appropriate.
 The specialty program has a
clearly defined structure, and
the pacing provides students
the time needed to actively
engage with other peers and
reflect upon their progress.
 Therapist provides students
with multiple avenues to
acquire information and
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Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
regard for varying styles of
learning.
 Therapy sessions are designed
with a “one size fits all”
approach.
 Therapist does not engage
students in treatment; students
do not attend to activities or
directions, students do not
demonstrate involvement.
students exhibit, however,
sessions are not designed to
meet the needs of students with
varying learning styles.
 The OT/PT may use different
strategies, but they are used
with little thought about their
effectiveness in helping
individual students improve.
 Therapist attempts to engage
students through limited means;
student respond inconsistently.




208
approaches to learning that best
meet the needs of individual
learners.
Therapist is able to differentiate
sessions by content, process or
product depending on unique
learning styles of the students.
Therapist provides a variety of
opportunities for students to
demonstrate learning through a
variety of response formats.
Therapist monitors the
effectiveness of various
approaches based on student
improvement results.
Therapist provides motivating
enthusiasm and activities;
students respond in an
interactive manner.
demonstrate skills.
 Therapist effectively
differentiates sessions by
content, process or product
depending on the unique needs
of individual learners.
 Therapist has command of a
variety of differentiated
instructional strategies; while
staying focused on therapy
goals.
 Therapist monitors the
effectiveness of various
approaches against student
improvement results.
 Therapist consistently provides
motivating cues and feedback
to enhance student
participation and motivation;
students respond
enthusiastically.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Speech Examples
 Students are not engaged in the
therapy activity and there is no
attempt by the therapist to
address their lack of
involvement, i.e. Specialist is
not giving students choices of
what to do, or honoring their
requests.
 Therapist does not facilitate the
therapy session/service in a
manner that is easily followed
by student, i.e. Students are
forgetting to practice their
sounds during their turns.
 Therapist does not use
cues/prompts/modeling to
elicit student response.
 The therapy activity drags or is
rushed, i.e. Students are rushing
through their practice to get to
the game.
 Some students are engaged in
the lesson and some attempt is
made to address students’ active
involvement, i.e. the specialist
hasn't given motivation for the
lesson, or hasn't found an age
appropriate lesson.
 Therapist struggles to facilitate
the therapy session/service in a
manner that is easily followed
by students, i.e. the student isn't
participating because the game
is too loud for the student.
 Therapist ineffectively utilizes
cues/prompts/modeling to
elicit student response, i.e. the
specialist does not distinguish
between different prompting
styles and how and when to use
them.
 The pacing of the lesson is
uneven—suitable in parts but
rushed or dragging in others,
i.e. the specialist is not
consistently challenging the
students, maintaining a step
above their level. Also, the
specialist is spending too much
time with one student to the
detriment of the others.
209
 Most students are engaged in
the therapy activities most of
the time to the best of their
ability,, i.e. the specialist has
given the group a choice of
lessons to work on and games
to engage in during the lesson.
Therapist facilitates the therapy
session/service in a manner
that is easily followed by
students, i.e. the specialist
explains at the student level
what they are to do and why.
Therapist utilizes
cues/prompts/modeling to
elicit student response, i.e. the
specialist has a clear
understanding of fading verbal
cues and gestural cues .The
pacing of the therapy activities
provide students the time
needed to be actively engaged
in the therapy process, i.e. The
specialist understands when a
student needs extra time to
answer and slows other
students down who are just
rushing to finish.
 Virtually all students are actively
engaged in the
therapy activities. Therapist
facilitates the therapy
session/service in a manner
that is easily followed by
students, modifying tasks within
the session based on
performance.
 Students use self-cueing
techniques and/or student
participates actively in services,
i.e. students are saying, "Wait, I
can do that well."
 Students have an opportunity
for reflection and closure on
the therapy activity to
consolidate
their understanding and
carryover skills learned,.i.e.
Students are filling out cards for
the session to say what they
learned and how they will use it.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist has
not engaged the student in the
hearing evaluation or effectively
explained the student's hearing
related needs.
 The educational audiologist has
somewhat engaged the student
in the hearing evaluation and
the student is aware of his/her
hearing related needs.
210
 The educational audiologist
completes a comprehensive
hearing evaluation. The
audiologist explains the
student's hearing loss and
hearing related options (ex:
hearing aids, sound fields..) and
also, partners with families and
school staff to meet student's
educational goals.
 The educational audiologist has
engaged the student in the
hearing evaluation and explains
the student's hearing loss and
options that are available in
order for the student to have
auditory access to the
curriculum. The educational
audiologist counsels student,
families and staff regarding the
educational impact of hearing
loss.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
3d: Using Assessment and
Evaluation data to Guide
Therapy
Assessment methods or tools are
administered incorrectly or are
inappropriate for student
characteristics, needs, or goals.
There is no attempt to engage the
student in the assessment process.
Specialist does not provide
feedback, feedback is of uniformly
poor quality, or is not in a timely
manner in regards to the therapy
program.
Assessment methods or tools are
appropriate, but may not be ideally
matched to student characteristics,
needs, or goals. Assessment
administration may be inefficient.
Some useful information is
gathered, but student progress is
not assessed consistently as needed
to determine success of therapy
services. Feedback is inconsistent
in quality or vague. Specialist
feedback is not always
communicated effectively to the
audience. Timeliness of feedback is
inconsistent.
Assessment methods or tools are
chosen individually for each
student/group and administered
correctly. Feedback is consistently
high quality, and communicated
effectively to the audience in a
timely manner. When appropriate,
students are given opportunity to
assess their own performance.
Information gathered is used
consistently to determine progress.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist administers
assessments with little regard
for standardized procedures.
 The specialist demonstrates no
knowledge of test purpose,
ages, assessed, and
administration techniques.
 The specialist demonstrates no
knowledge of accommodation
strategies for success in the
classroom.
 The specialist administers
assessments with basic
understanding of standardized
procedures.
 The specialist demonstrates
limited knowledge of test
purpose, ages assessed, and
administration techniques.
 The specialist demonstrates
limited knowledge of
accommodation strategies for
success in the classroom.
 The specialist administers
assessments according to
standardized procedures.
 The specialist demonstrates
knowledge of test purpose, ages
assessed, and administration
technique.
 The specialist demonstrates
knowledge of accommodation
strategies for success in the
classroom.
Specialist skillfully chooses,
designs, and administers
assessments. Feedback is
consistently high quality, and
communicated effectively to the
audience in a timely manner.
Specialist continuously assesses
student performance during
treatment. Feedback is accurate and
specific to the therapy program.
Students are given the opportunity
to self-assess and monitor their
own progress within the therapy
program when appropriate.
Specialist successfully differentiates
assessment methods to anticipate a
range of responses and plan
accordingly.
 The specialist is able to provide
information regarding the
overall objectives of tests and
subtests.
 The specialist assists team with
the development and use of
accommodations as needed for
assessment.
 The specialist assists the student
in understanding his/her
disability and necessary
accommodations when
developmentally appropriate.
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Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist does not collect
appropriate history or data to
determine needs; no
information is gathered with
which to make changes.
 Therapist does not use OT/PT
assessments, progress
monitoring systems and/or
assessment tasks are not aligned
with motor plans.
 Therapist provides summary of
OT/PT results on assessments
without additional feedback.
Progress reports generally do
not assist students in error
correction toward achievement
of goals, as it is often too little
too late.
 Therapist only collects basic
history and assessment data to
complete evaluation
requirements; therapist does
not link specific treatment
decisions to the data.
 Therapist implements OT/PT
assessments that propose to
assess some aspects of the
aligned motor plan.
 Therapist uses assessments to
measure student success at the
end of a session or reporting
period. General assessment
monitoring is used to identify
students’ status relevant to
therapy goals.
212
 Therapist collects and analyzes
data from a variety of sources
to inform decision-making.
Analysis of data is shared with
IEP team, parents and/or other
school personnel in designing
effective student plans.
 Therapist uses OT/PT
assessment results and progress
monitoring tools to keep track
of continual student
improvement toward therapy
goals. -Therapists assessment
tasks are aligned with the
demonstration of knowledge
and/or skill required within the
motor plan.
 Therapist uses progress
monitoring assessment tools
appropriately and the results are
accurately interpreted.
 Therapist's data is used when
making service delivery
decisions on an ongoing basis.
Therapist makes subtle and
important adjustments in the
therapy plans based on results
of student data.
 Therapist systematically collects
data from a variety of sources
(social history, achievement
trend data, interviews, personal
communication, rating scales,
and evaluation data) to inform
decision making when
designing comprehensive
student plans.
 Therapist draws inferences
from the data to make decisions
about future therapy sessions
and interventions; analysis of
the data makes a positive
contribution toward effectively
formulating recommendations
to the IEP team, parents
and/or other school personnel.
 Therapist uses and/or designs
assessment tasks and progress
monitoring systems. Knows in
advance how student success
toward therapy goals will be
measured. Assessments require
demonstrations of knowledge
and/or skill that are aligned to
the motor plan.
 Therapist uses ongoing
progress monitoring data to
refine and modify student
therapy goals. For students who
require particular assistance, the
frequency of progress
monitoring is increased.
Incorporates a communication
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
and feedback plan to parents
and/or others when recording
and reporting progressmonitoring results.
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Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
SLP Examples
 SLP administers assessments
with little regard for
standardized procedures.
 SLP demonstrates no
knowledge of test purpose, ages
assessed, and administration
techniques.
 Therapist demonstrates no
knowledge of accommodation
strategies for communication
success in the classroom.
Therapist doesn't check the age
groups or if the student is
bilingual. Example: SLP repeats
standardized test questions
multiple times when
instructions say to say only
once.
 Therapist administers
assessments with basic
understanding of standardized
procedures.
 Therapist demonstrates limited
knowledge of test purpose, ages
assessed, and administration
technique.
 Therapist demonstrates limited
knowledge of accommodation
strategies for communication
success in the classroom.
Therapist isn't writing goals to
fit the assessment data.
Example: SLP tests student in
all areas because he/she didn't
take the time to interview
teacher.
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist
does not utilize any source of
data to determine services.
 The educational audiologist
selects appropriate protocols
for assessment and datacollection. Utilizes multiple
sources of data including valid
informal and/or formal
assessments.
214
 Therapist administers
assessments according to
standardized procedures.
 Therapist demonstrates
knowledge of test purpose, ages
assessed, and administration
technique.
 Therapist demonstrates
knowledge of accommodation
strategies for communication
success in the classroom.
Therapist finds a quiet place
and follows the directions in
the protocols. Therapist is able
to determine which test is best
to determine if inconsistencies
that staff sees are possibly a
disorder. Example: SLP selects
tests according to teacher
documented concerns.
 The educational audiologist
selects appropriate assessments
that are targeted to address the
educational and communication
needs of student. Conducts
various levels of evaluations
such as screening, observation,
interview and/or functional
assessments.
 Therapist is able to provide
information regarding the
overall objectives of tests and
subtests.
 Therapist assists team with the
development and use of
accommodations for speechlanguage impairments.
 Therapist assists the student in
understanding his/her disability
and necessary accommodations
when developmentally
appropriate. Example: After
taking complete history and
attending team meetings, SLP is
ready to select areas to test as
well as specific tests to use.
 The educational audiologist
selects appropriate assessments
that are targeted to the
educational and communication
needs of student. Audiologist
uses, analyzes and interprets
results from a comprehensive
assortment of audiological tests,
observations, interviews and/or
functional assessments.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
3e: Demonstrating flexibility
and
responsiveness
Specialist adheres rigidly to a
therapy program in spite of
evidence of poor student response.
Specialist ignores questions; when
students have difficulty making
progress, Specialist consistently
blames them for their lack of
success.
Specialist attempts to adjust the
therapy program to accommodate
and respond to student questions
and interests meets with mixed
results. Specialist accepts
responsibility for the student
progress, but has only a limited
repertoire of strategies to use.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist ignores
indications of student boredom
or lack of understanding.
 The specialist brushes aside
student questions.
 The specialist conveys to
student(s) that when they have
difficulty learning it is their
fault.
 The specialist makes no attempt
to adjust the lesson in response
to student confusion.
 Therapist adheres to the plan or
program, in spite of evidence of
its inadequacy. Gives up or
places blame elsewhere when
student plans are not successful.
 The specialist makes cursory
attempts to incorporate
students' questions and interests
into the lesson.
 The specialist conveys to
students a level of responsibility
for their learning, but also
his/her uncertainty about how
to assist them.
 The specialist attempts to adjust
the lesson are partially
successful.
 Therapist makes modest
changes in the therapy plans
when confronted with evidence
of the need for change. Works
with others to find solutions.
PT/OT Examples
215
Proficient
Exemplary
When needed, Specialist makes a
minor adjustment to the therapy
program and does so smoothly.
Specialist successfully
accommodates student and staff
needs. Using a repertoire of
strategies, Specialist persists in
seeking approaches for students
who have difficulty making
progress toward therapy goals.
 The specialist incorporates
student interests and responses
to activities into the session
 The specialist conveys to
students that other approaches
are available when the student
experiences difficulty.
 The specialist is able to make
adjustments during the session,
as needed to improve student
participation and success.
Specialist seizes an opportunity to
enhance student performance,
building on a spontaneous event or
student interests. Using a repertoire
of therapeutic strategies and
soliciting additional resources,
Specialist persists in seeking
effective approaches for students.
 Therapist continually seeks
ways to improve the OT/PT
program for student success.
Works well with support and
educational personnel as
partners in implementing
student plans. Revises therapy
plans when it is needed.
 Therapist persists in seeking
effective ways to improve the
OT/PT program for student
success. Works collaboratively
with a wide range of support
and educational personnel as
essential partners in
implementing student plans.
Makes changes as needed in
response to student, parents,
teacher and/or other input.
 The specialist seizes teachable
moments during the session to
enhance skill
development/motor
movement.
 The specialist anticipates areas
of modification with proactive
resources to address student
needs.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
SLP Examples
 Therapy is limited to auditory
information only (no visual,
kinesthetic,...cues)
 Therapist rushes through
lessons w/o checking for
understanding.
 Student(s) not engaged off task.
i.e. students have difficulty
reading and therapist has them
read silently instead of choral
reading for comprehension
lesson.
 Therapist adjusts therapy for
one or two students, but
doesn't take into consideration
other students difficulties at the
table.
 Example: The specialist works
for 15 minutes with one student
leaving the other two (2)
students in the group to wait
doing nothing.
 The specialist can adjust the
session to make the goal easier
without the student realizing,
actually giving the student
better self-esteem. i.e. going
back to the /ar/ in a word
when they have been struggling
with the /er/.
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist
provides minimal information
to the student and/or parent
and does not respond or
responds insensitively to
parental concerns about
students.
 The educational audiologist
indifferently responds to
student and/or parental
concerns. Provides quick/basic
responses to the student and/or
parent questions.
 The educational audiologist
communicates with the student
and/or parent about testing
results and is available as
needed to respond to student
and/or parent concerns.
216
 The specialist will adjust the
lesson if a student shows an
interest in a topic discussed in
class. The specialist will modify
the topic to fit the goals and
objectives of the students to
maintain their interest and give
them a sense of power as to
how their lessons should go.
i.e. The students are hyper and
excited and need to move, so
the specialist decides to choose
an activity with movement,
instead of the lesson at the
table.
 The educational audiologist
provides information to the
student and/or parents about
testing results. Responses to
parental concerns are handled
with great sensitivity.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Domain 4 for Therapeutic Specialists: Professional Responsibilities
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Specialist’s reflection provides an
accurate and objective description
of practice, citing specific positive
and negative characteristics.
Specialist makes some specific
suggestions as to how the therapy
program might be improved.
 The specialist accurately reflects
on therapy provided reflecting
on what has been completed
and articulate the next stages.
 The specialist makes the
standards of high-quality
responses clear to students.
 The specialist elicits evidence of
student success.
 The specialist invites students
to assess their own
response/accuracy level and
make improvements.
4a: Reflecting on practice
Specialist does not reflect on
practice, or the reflections are
inaccurate or self-serving.
Specialist’s reflection on practice is
moderately accurate and objective
without citing specific examples,
and with only global suggestions as
to how it might be improved.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist gives no
indication of what appropriate
responses look like.
 The specialist makes no effort
to determine whether students
understand the content of the
therapy activity.
 There is little evidence that the
students understand how their
therapy responses will be
successful.
 Specialist monitors
understanding through a single
method, or without eliciting
evidence of success from
students. The specialist makes
only minor attempts to engage
students in self or peer
assessment.
217
Exemplary
Specialist’s reflection is highly
accurate and perceptive, citing
specific examples that were not
fully successful for specific
students. Specialist draws on an
extensive repertoire to suggest
alternative strategies.
 The specialist is consistently
monitoring student
understanding and making use
of strategies to elicit positive
student effort.
 Students monitor their own
success according to ability,
either as a result of their own
initiative or as a result of tasks
set by the Specialist.
 Students accurately reflects on
therapy provided reflecting on
what has been completed and
articulate the next stages.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist is unable to explain
why they did activities with the
student, what they were looking
for or what they would do
different, or how they could
progress the activities with the
student
 Therapist has difficulty with
explaining to student what is
expect of them or giving
feedback to the student
Therapist is only performing
one activity with student, has
difficulty coming up with
multiple treatment ideas for the
student
 Therapist able to explain what
went well in treatment sessions
and what could be improved
 Therapist able to give
appropriate feedback to the
student both verbal and
nonverbal
 Therapist uses evidence based
practice to develop treatment
sessions
SLP Examples
 The specialist does not know
whether a lesson was effective
or achieved its instructional
outcomes, or the specialist
misjudges the success of a
lesson.
 The lesson didn't go well, but
doesn't know how to change it.
 The educational audiologist is
not alert to the student's needs
and makes decisions based on
self-serving interest.
 The therapist offers general
modifications for future
instruction. The therapist says,
"I think that went ok. Maybe
I'll try _____ next time."
 The therapist accurately
assesses the effectiveness of
instructional activities used. The
teacher comes up with several
possible improvements.
 The educational audiologist is
inconsistent in servicing
students and makes decisions
based on limited professional
considerations.
 The educational audiologist is
active in servicing students and
maintains an open mind and
participates in team or
departmental decision making.
Audiology
218
 Therapist has established goals
for each treatment session and
has multiple treatment ideas to
work on goals and is able to
alter treatment based on
students engagement and
performance during the session
 Therapist uses evidence based
practice for development
treatment ideas
 Therapist progress is seen
throughout the therapy sessions
and therapist is able to explain
to student their successes or
progress
 The therapist's assessment of
the lesson is thoughtful and
includes specific indicators of
effectiveness. In a conversation
with colleagues the therapist
considers strategies for
grouping students differently to
improve a lesson.
 The educational audiologist is
highly proactive in servicing
students and seeks out
resources when necessary. The
audiologist takes on a
leadership role and helps insure
that decisions are based on
highest professional standards.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
Specialist has developed a highly
effective data-management system
for monitoring student progress
and uses it to adjust treatment
when needed. Specialist uses the
system to communicate with
teachers and parents.
 The specialist’s system for
maintaining student records of
assessment, therapy time sheets,
and data on goals is effective
and efficient.
 Students contribute to and
maintain data files indicating
their own progress.
 The specialist can state
department and legal guidelines
for record keeping.
 The specialist takes a leadership
role in supporting peers.
 Therapist’s data is organized
and documented in computer
documentation on a timely
basis and notes are able to be
replicated
 Progress is documented for
each student before progress
notes due dates.
 Other staff members frequently
come to therapist to ask for
assistance regarding
documentation and data
collection
4b: Maintaining an effective
data-management system
Specialist’s data-management
system is either nonexistent or in
disarray; it cannot be used to
monitor student progress or to
adjust treatment when needed.
Specialist has developed a
rudimentary data-management
system for monitoring student
progress and occasionally uses it to
adjust treatment when needed.
Specialist has developed an
effective data-management system
for monitoring student progress
and uses it to adjust treatment
when needed.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist does not maintain
student records of assessment,
therapy time sheets, and data on
goals.
 The specialist is not familiar
with department and legal
guidelines for record keeping.
 The specialist inconsistently
maintains student records of
assessment, therapy time sheets,
or data on goals.
 The specialist is somewhat
familiar with department and
legal guidelines for record
keeping.
 The specialist’s system for
maintaining student records of
assessment, therapy time sheets,
and data on goals is effective.
 Students are aware of their
progress on the data system
maintained by the specialist.
 The specialist is familiar with
department and legal guidelines
for record keeping.
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist has no data for
students on caseload and
treatments/consults/observatio
ns are not documented in
service capture
 The data collected is very
limited and difficult to find in
documentation
 Therapist requires assistance
frequently with documentation
and data collection.
 Therapist is not documenting in
service capture within the
required 10 days of the date of
service.
 Therapist has an organized
system and plan for collecting
data on students and has
precise notes on students’
abilities and progress made
within session and over time.
 A therapist document within
the 10 day time period into the
service capture system and has
all necessary parts required by
Medicaid.
219
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
SLP Examples
 There is no data for any of
students on caseload or not
documented, i.e. the data is
nonexistent or inconsistent.
 The specialist is unaware of
legal guidelines.
 Example: The specialist does
not keep coherent data in
service capture. Data may say
"worked on’s' 3/4 trials" does
not explain level of prompt or
isolation, syllables, position,
word, conversation...
 The data collected is very
limited and difficult to find in
documentation
 Requires assistance frequently
with documentation and data
collection. The data is not
logged into service capture in a
timely manner.
 S/L specialist has an organized
system and plan for collecting
data on students, has clear and
precise notes on students’
abilities and progress made and
is up to date and has organized
notes for each student,.i.e. data
clearly indicates level of
prompts as well as output and
level of success. Data would
say "s' sound in the initial
position of single words with a
delayed model 15/20
opportunities."
Audiology
 The educational audiologist's
records, paperwork and files are
in disarray.
 The educational audiologist's
records, paperwork and files are
adequate but there are frequent
mistakes and errors.
 The educational audiologist's
system for maintaining records,
paperwork and files is fully
effective.
220
 Data is organized and
documented in computer
documentation on a timely
basis and notes are able to be
replicated
 Progress is documented for
each student before progress
notes due dates.
 Other staff members frequently
come to therapist to ask for
assistance regarding
documentation and data
collection i.e. Data shows how
often a student can meet the
objective independently or with
what sort of prompt or
locations make a difference.
 The educational audiologist's
system for maintaining records,
paperwork and files is highly
effective.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4c: Communicating with
families
Specialist provides little
information about the therapy
program to families; Specialist’s
communication about students’
progress is minimal. Specialist does
not respond, or responds
insensitively, to parental concerns.
Specialist provides frequent and
appropriate information to families
about the therapy program and
conveys information about
individual student progress in a
culturally sensitive manner.
Specialist makes attempts to engage
families in the therapy program.
Specialist communicates
successfully and frequently with
families in a culturally sensitive
manner, with students contributing
to the communication. Specialist
responds to family concerns with
professional and cultural sensitivity.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist minimally
communicates with families
about student progress.
 The specialist ignores or is
insensitive to parental concerns.
Specialist makes sporadic attempts
at communication with families
about the therapy program and
about the progress of individual
students but does not attempt to
engage families in the therapy
program. Communication that
does take place may not be
culturally sensitive to those
families.
 The specialist infrequently
communicates with families
about student progress.
 The specialist inconsistently or
insensitively involves parents in
the therapy program.
 The specialist communicates
with families frequently and
appropriately about student
progress.
 The specialist attempts to
engage families in the therapy
program in a culturally sensitive
way.
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist inconsistently
communicates to students,
staff, families, colleagues,
administrators and the
community. Communication
neither is not accurate,
understandable nor is it sent in
a timely fashion.
 Therapist communicates
information in a timely manner
with multiple audiences
(students, families, colleagues,
administrators, community and
others) using oral, written and
electronic methods of
communication.
 Therapist consistently
communicates clear,
understandable and accurate
information in an efficient and
timely manner with multiple
audiences using a variety of
communication methods.
 The specialist frequently and
effectively communicates with
families about student progress,
involving the student in the
communication process, as
appropriate.
 The specialist successfully and
sensitively engages families in
the therapy process, utilizing
home programming when
applicable.
 Therapist effectively
communicates and collaborates
with students, families,
colleagues, administrators and
the community in a manner that
supports the welfare and
success of students and the
organization.
221
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
SLP Examples
 Therapist minimally
communicates with families
about student progress, i.e.
therapist is unavailable to
parents or does not write home
to address concerns.
 Therapist ignores or is
insensitive to parental concerns,
i.e. S/L specialist doesn't return
phone calls.
 Therapist infrequently
communicates with families
about student progress, i.e. S/L
specialist rarely calls to tell
about positive work or when
new objectives are addressed.
 Therapist inconsistently or
insensitively involves parents in
the therapy program, i.e. S/L
specialist dismisses parent
concerns and does not see them
as part of the team.
 Therapist communicates with
families frequently and
appropriately about student
progress, i.e. The S/L specialist
has a good rapport with the
parent and has an open
communication policy. S/L
specialist attempts to engage
families in the therapy program
in a culturally sensitive way, i.e.
S/L specialist is aware of
cultural differences v. language
disorders. The S/L specialist
engages the family in the
learning process utilizing what
can be done at home.
Audiology
 The educational audiologist
provides no information about
the program or testing results to
families. Does not foster an
environment that is inviting to
students and/or families.
 The educational audiologist
offers basic information to the
families. Fosters an
environment that is somewhat
inviting to students and/or
families.
 The educational audiologist
provides good information to
parents about test results and
classroom needs. The
audiologist effectively partners
with the student, their families
and teaching staff to help meet
student goals.
222
 Therapist frequently and
effectively communicates with
families about student progress,
involving the student in the
communication process, as
appropriate, i.e. the S/L
specialist will write home or
calls to let families know when
specific goals and objectives are
ready to be generalized.
 Therapist successfully and
sensitively engages families in
the therapy process, utilizing
home programming when
applicable, i.e. the S/L specialist
finds creative ways to show
parents how they can work on
goals for generalization at
home.
 The educational audiologist
provides on-going information
to parents and teaching staff
about test results and classroom
needs. The audiologist partners
with students, their families and
teachers to help meet student
goals and counsels regarding
the educational impact of
hearing loss.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Exemplary
4d: Participating in a
professional community
Specialist’s relationships with
colleagues are negative and
specialist avoids being involved in
school and district events and
projects.
Specialist’s relationships with
colleagues are cordial, and specialist
participates in school and district
events and projects when
specifically asked to do so.
Specialist participates actively in
school and district events and
projects and maintains positive and
productive relationships with
colleagues.
Specialist makes a substantial
contribution to school and district
events and projects and assumes a
leadership role with colleagues.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist relationships with
colleagues and supervisors are
characterized by negativity or
combativeness.
 The specialist avoids
contributing to activities
promoting professional inquiry.
 The specialist avoids
involvement in school activities,
district and community
projects.
 Therapist works in isolation
with little evidence of
collaboration with colleagues.
 Therapist allows others to fulfill
the goals and priorities outlined
in the District or Department.
 The specialist has cordial
relationships with colleagues.
 When invited, the specialist
participates in activities related
to professional inquiry.
 When asked, the specialist
participates in school activities,
as well as district and
community.
 The specialist has supportive
and collaborative relationships
with colleagues.
 The specialist regularly
participates in activities related
to profession inquiry.
 The specialist frequently
volunteers to participate in
school events and school,
district, and community
projects.
 Therapist actively participates in
a special education/IEP team
to analyze relevant assessment
data to remove barriers to
instruction, implement and
monitor effectiveness of
intervention strategies and
intentionally seeks to improve
the effectiveness of the team.
 Therapist fully participates in
collaboratively fulfilling the
goals and priorities outlined in
the District and department.
 The specialist takes a leadership
role in promoting activities
related to professional inquiry.
 The specialist regularly
contributes to and leads events
that positively impact school
life.
 The specialist regularly
contributes to and leads
significant district and
community projects.
 Therapist assumes a leadership
role within the community.
Demonstrates a willingness to
share best practice strategies
with others through modeling
or training. Engages in
reflective practices that result in
improvement of team
effectiveness.
 Therapist takes an active
leadership role in
collaboratively fulfilling the
goals and priorities outlined in
the District and department.
Establishes individual,
measurable goals that align with
the department action plan and
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist demonstrates some
skills in collaborating with
others to gather relevant data
design and carry out
intervention strategies. Requires
additional skill development
and practice for effectively
implementing the concepts of
team meetings.
 Therapist works collaboratively
with leadership to fulfill the
goals and priorities outlined in
the District or Department.
Develops individual.
223
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
SLP Examples
Audiology Examples
 The therapist's relationships
with colleagues are
characterized by negativity or
combativeness, i.e. the SLP
does not attend professional
development sessions.
 The S/L specialist does not
collaborate with team members.
 The S/L specialist blames other
team members for not seeing
students or not having work
done on time. Example: The
S/L specialist states, "I work
from 8:30 - 4:00 and not a
minute more."
 The S/L specialist blames the
clerical for not getting her to
look at the schedule to write her
IEP's
 The therapist has cordial
relationships with colleagues
and rarely participates in school
activities, i.e. The S/L specialist
does only what is required. The
S/L specialist listens to what
colleagues have to say regarding
communication of the student,
but does not follow through
with finding solutions.
 The educational audiologist's
relationships with colleagues are
negative or self-serving.
 The educational audiologist
maintains cordial relationships
with colleagues to fulfill the
duties that the school or district
requires.
224
 The S/L specialist’s
relationships with colleagues are
characterized by mutual support
and cooperation. The S/L
specialist actively participates in
a culture of professional
inquiry. Teacher volunteers at
school activities when asked, i.e.
the S /L specialist attends
professional development
beyond what they are asked.
 The S/L specialist accepts
feedback from supervisors and
colleagues and adjusts their
lessons.
 The S/L specialist shares
knowledge with their colleagues
and cooperates with colleagues.

 The educational audiologist's
support and cooperation
characterizes a good working
relationship with colleagues.
The educational audiologist
shares information and accepts
feedback from supervisors.




monitors own progress in
reaching these goals.
The S/L specialist’s
relationships with colleagues are
characterized by mutual
support. The SLP takes a
leadership role in promoting a
culture of professionalism. The
teacher volunteers to participate
in school events, i.e. The S/L
specialist leads professional
development classes.
The S/L specialist attends extra
professional development
because it is in the best interest
of their students.
The S/L specialist participates
in Halloween carnival and or
other school community events.
The S/L specialist collaborates,
helps, and accepts help from
supervisors and colleagues.
The educational audiologist's
support and cooperation
characterize excellent working
relationships with colleagues,
participates frequently in team
meetings and collaborates with
supervisors for feedback,
suggestions and guidance.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
4e: Engaging in professional
development
Specialist does not participate in
professional development activities,
even when such activities are
clearly needed for the development
of skills.
Specialist’s participation in
professional development activities
is limited to those that are
convenient or are required.
Specialist seeks out opportunities
for professional development
based on an individual assessment
of need.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist is not involved in
any activity that might enhance
knowledge or skills.
 The specialist purposefully
resists discussing performance
with supervisors or colleagues.
 The specialist ignores
invitations to join professional
organizations or attend
conferences.
 The specialist participates in
professional activities when
they are required or provided
by the district.
 The specialist reluctantly
accepts feedback from
supervisors or colleagues.
 The specialist contributes in a
limited fashion to professional
organizations.
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist does not engage in
professional development
activities other than for
licensure renewal. Makes no
effort to share knowledge with
others or to contribute
productively to school
outcomes.
 Therapist participates in
professional development
opportunities to gain new skills.
Seeks to improve teaching
practices. Supports others in
leadership roles.
 The specialist seeks regular
opportunities for continued
professional development.
 The specialist welcomes
colleagues and supervisors into
the workspace for the purpose
of gaining insight from their
feedback.
 The specialists actively
participate in organizations
designed to contribute to the
profession.
 Therapist seeks new
professional development
opportunities to challenge self
to grow professionally. Actively
reflects on improving teaching
practices and setting new goals.
Finds ways to share best
practice strategies with others,
may even serve as mentor.
Assumes a positive leadership
role within the school.
SLP Examples
 The SLP does not attend
professional development, or
 The S/L specialist attends all
required professional
225
Proficient
 The SLP seeks out continued
professional development,
Exemplary
Specialist actively pursues
professional development
opportunities and makes a
substantial contribution to the
profession through such activities
as offering workshops to
colleagues.
 The specialist seeks regular
opportunities for continued
professional development,
including initiating action
research.
 The specialist actively seeks
feedback from supervisors and
colleagues.
 The specialist takes an active
leadership role in professional
organizations in order to
contribute to the profession.
 Therapist is a life-long learner.
Reflects on and challenges self
to continue to grow
professionally. Shares best
practice strategies, positively
impacting the work of others
through mentorship. Assumes a
positive leadership role in
seeking more effective ways to
accomplish professional growth
goals and improve the
organization.
 The S/L specialist leads
professional development. The
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Audiology Examples
attend sessions that would
benefit their students.
 Example: SLP chooses not to
go to district mandated
professional development to
stay at his/her own site to work
on bulletin boards.
development.
 Example: Teacher attends
workshops, but does not
implement information.
 The educational audiologist
does not complete required
professional development.
 The educational audiologist
completes required professional
development. The educational
audiologist applies knowledge
and skills learned through
professional development to
audiology practice.
226
especially when receiving a
student on their caseload from
a different culture or has a
disorder they unfamiliarly with.
 The SLP welcomes colleague
and supervisor support and
insight.
 The SLP participates in
organizations that will
contribute to the profession. i.e.
S/L specialist attends a local
conference on the weekend.
 The educational audiologist
applies knowledge and a skill
learned and develops
professional goals based on the
likelihood of having a positive
impact on student's learning,
alignment with relevant
standards, current research and
student needs. Continues to
gain knowledge through
obtaining CEUs, attending
conferences, on-line courses
and maintaining
certification/licenses.
SLP attends professional
development to better
understand student cultures,
languages, and disorders
regardless on CEUs.
 The S/L specialist shares
knowledge with colleagues, i.e.
the SLP gives a lecture about
the conference he/she attended
to colleagues and supervisors.
 The educational audiologist
applies knowledge and skills
learned and develop
professional goals based on the
likelihood of having a positive
impact on student's learning,
alignment with relevant
standards, current research and
student needs. Continues to
gain knowledge through
obtaining CEUs, attending
conferences, on-line courses
and maintaining
certification/licenses. Also, the
educational audiologist
develops and follows a longterm professional development
plan by gathering data from
students, families and
colleagues to assess long-term
professional development goals
and modifies as needed.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Unsatisfactory
Basic
4f: Showing professionalism,
including integrity, advocacy,
and maintaining confidentiality
Specialist displays dishonesty in
interactions with colleagues,
students, and the public and
violates principles of
confidentiality.
Specialist is honest in interactions
with colleagues, students, and the
public, plays a moderate advocacy
role for students, and does not
violate norms of confidentiality.
Critical Attributes
 The specialist is dishonest.
 The specialist does not notice
the needs of students.
 The specialist engages in
practices that are self-servicing.
 The specialist willfully rejects
district regulations
 The specialist is honest
 The specialist notices the needs
of students but is inconsistent
in addressing them.
 The specialist does not notice
some school practices result in
poor conditions for students.
 The specialist makes decision
professionally but on a limited
basis.
 The teacher complies with
district regulations.
227
Proficient
Exemplary
Specialist displays high standards of
honesty, integrity, and
confidentiality in interactions with
colleagues, students, and the public
and advocates for students when
needed.
 The specialist is honest and
known for having high
standards of integrity
 The specialist actively addresses
student needs.
 The teacher actively works to
provide opportunities for
student success.
 The specialist willingly
participates in team and
department decision making.
 The specialist complies with
district regulations.
Specialist can be counted on to
hold the highest standards of
honesty, integrity, and
confidentiality and to advocate for
students, taking a leadership role
with colleagues.
 The specialist is considered a
leader in terms of honesty,
integrity, and confidentiality
 The specialist is highly
proactive in serving students.
 The specialist makes a
concerted effort to ensure
opportunities are available for
all students to be successful.
 The specialist takes a leadership
role in team and department
decision making.
 The specialist takes a leadership
role in regarding district
regulation.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
PT/OT Examples
 Therapist exhibits disrespectful
behavior when interacting with
students, parents, staff and/or
the community. Displays
unethical or dishonest conduct.
Loses composure or becomes
defensive when faced with a
difficult problem.
 Therapist disregards the legal
and professional aspects of
confidentiality practices.
 Therapist displays respect for
others when interacting with
students, parents, staff and the
community. Acts ethically and
honestly. Attempts to maintain
composure in the face of
conflict or difficult issues.
 Therapist seeks clarification and
an understanding of
confidentiality practices. A
desire to develop a working
knowledge of the law is
demonstrated through the
individual’s initiative to do
research, ask questions, and
communicate with colleagues
about best practice.
SLP Examples
 The S/L specialist violates
confidentiality. The S/L
specialist does not follow the
goals, objectives and
modifications set forth on the
IEP.
 S/L specialist is talking to a
parent about what a crazy kid
Johnny Doe is at the parent
teacher conferences.
 The S/L specialist does not
consistently address students'
needs. The S/L specialist
inconsistently complies with
district regulations. The SLP
does not have evaluations or
IEP work done on time.
228
 Therapist models respect for
others when interacting with
students, parents, staff and the
community. Acts ethically,
honestly and with integrity at all
times. Assumes responsibility
for maintaining professional
composure in the face of
conflict or difficult situations.
 Therapist maintains the legal
and professional aspects of
confidentiality practices. A
working knowledge of the law
is demonstrated through the
decisions made regarding how,
when, where, why, and with
whom confidential information
is shared and stored.
 The S/L specialist has high
standards for paperwork and
advocates for students without
violating confidentiality.
 Example: S/L specialist speaks
about a particular student
without using full name when
in a group setting.
 Therapist promotes a culture
focused on exemplifying
respect for others. Consistently
acts ethically, honestly and with
integrity. Is a calming presence
when faced with conflicts or
challenges.
 Therapist consistently
demonstrates respect for and
prohibits others from sharing
confidential information
inappropriately. Demonstrates a
working knowledge of the law
through the decisions made
regarding how, when, where,
why, and with whom
confidential information is
shared and stored.
 The S/L specialist is a leader in
the knowledge of rules and
regulations of the district. The
S/L specialist advocates for the
student and follows through
with colleagues to find ways to
meet their needs.
 S/L specialist speaks to another
colleague about another student
discreetly when needed.
Alaska Professional Teacher Content and Performance Standards
ASD Framework for Therapeutic Specialists
Revised July 2015
Audiology Examples
 The educational audiologist
does not maintain
confidentiality of student
records.
 The educational audiologist
maintains confidentiality of
student records as required by
law.
229
 The educational audiologist
maintains confidentiality of
student records and colleague
interactions as well as student
and personal data. Adheres to
standard of professional
practice.
 The educational audiologist
maintains confidentiality of
student records and colleague
interactions, demonstrates
ethical behavior including
honesty, integrity, fair treatment
and respect for others. Also,
encourages colleagues to
demonstrate ethical behavior by
modeling and setting
expectations for ethical
behavior for staff and/or
students.
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