REGULAR AGENDA REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN

REGULAR AGENDA  REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
WHITE VALLEY PARKS, RECREATION & CULTURE
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Monday, August 8, 2011
9:00 am – Lumby Municipal Hall
REGULAR AGENDA
1. APPROVAL OF AGENDA (Opportunity for Introduction of Late Items)
Recommendation No. 1
That the Agenda of the August 8, 2011 regular meeting of the White Valley, Parks,
Recreation, & Culture Advisory Committee be approved as presented.
2. MINUTES
a. Regular WVPRCAC Minutes – June 13, 2011……...............................................Page 1
Recommendation No. 2
That the minutes of the June 13, 2011 regular meeting of the White Valley Parks,
Recreation & Culture Advisory Committee be adopted as circulated.
3. PETITIONS AND DELEGATIONS
4. NEW AND UNFINISHED BUSINESS
a. Monthly Reports June & July 2011…………………………..................................Page 3
Recommendation No. 3
That the June & July 2011 White Valley Parks, Recreation, & Culture monthly reports be
received for information.
b. Okanagan Regional Library - Lease
Recommendation No. 4……………………………………………..……………………Page 11
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the Regional District renew the lease
with the Okanagan Regional Library for rental of library space in the White Valley
Community Centre for the period Jan 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014 at a rate of $6.50 sq/ft
triple net.
c. White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan………………………………………Page 29
Recommendation No. 5
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the 2011 White Valley Arts and
Culture Master Plan be adopted.
And that spending associated with the implementation of the 2011 White Valley Arts and
Culture Master Plan be contingent on funding availability.
d. Lumby Cenotaph
Verbal report from the Village Administrator
This page intentionally left blank
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 2.a
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the WHITE VALLEY PARKS, RECREATION AND
CULTURE ADVISORY COMMITTEE held in the Board Room at the Village of Lumby Municipal
Hall, Lumby, BC on Monday, June 13, 2011
Members:
Director R. Fairbairn
Councillor T. Williamson
Director E. Foisy
Paula Harned
Julie Pilon
Electoral Area “D”
Village of Lumby
Electoral Area “E”
SD#22 Trustee
Alternate Director Area “D”
(Chair)
Staff:
A. McNiven
General Manager, Parks, Recreation, & Culture
Others:
T. Nelson
R. Huston
T. Kadla
Community Development Coordinator
Public Works & Parks Superintendent,
Administrator, Village of Lumby
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The Chair called the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Moved and seconded by Councillor Williamson and Director Foisy
That the agenda of the June 13, 2011 regular meeting of the White Valley Parks, Recreation
and Culture Advisory Committee be approved as presented.
CARRIED
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Regular WVPRCAC Minutes – April 11, 2011
Moved and seconded by Director Foisy and Councillor Williamson
That the minutes of the April 11, 2011 regular meeting of the White Valley Parks, Recreation
and Culture Advisory Committee be adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
NEW AND UNFINISHED BUSINESS
Monthly Reports April 2011 and May 2011
Moved and seconded by Director Foisy and Councillor Williamson
That the April and May 2011 White Valley Parks, Recreation, & Culture monthly reports be
received for information.
CARRIED
1
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 2.a
White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-2-
June 13, 2011
Fees Imposition Bylaw No. 2383, 2009
Moved and seconded by Director Foisy and Councillor Williamson
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the “White Valley” Parks, Recreation and
Culture manual of fees and charges for the period of September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2012 as
outlined in Attachment “A” of the report from the General Manager of Parks, Recreation, and
Culture dated May 27, 2011 be approved and that staff be directed to prepare a by-law for
adoption.
CARRIED
White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan
Moved and seconded by Councillor Williamson and Director Foisy
That the White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee recommend to the
Board of Directors that the 2011 White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan be received and that
the plan be referred to the Village of Lumby Council for consideration and input.
CARRIED
Mabel Lake Hall Water Supply
The General Manager, Parks, Recreation, and Culture reported to the Committee on issues with
the water supply and the course of action that will be taken to deal with the problem.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 10:35 a.m.
Next meeting: July 11, 2011
Certified Correct:
Chair
Corporate Officer
2
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.a
3
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.a
4
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.a
5
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.a
6
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.a
7
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.a
8
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.a
9
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.a
This page intentionally left blank
10
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
11
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
12
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
13
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
14
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
15
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
16
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
17
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
18
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
19
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
20
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
21
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
22
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
23
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
24
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
25
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
26
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
27
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.b
This page intentionally left blank
28
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
29
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
30
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
31
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
This page intentionally left blank
32
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
White Valley Arts and Culture
Master Plan
April 2011
Park Gate, Norris Park, Lumby
33
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
2
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The consultants thank the Monashee Arts Council, and in particular the President, Robin LeDrew, for their sharing
of information, their support and encouragement. Also, the assistance of the Regional District of North Okanagan,
especially Tannis Nelson, Community Development Coordinator, Parks, Recreation & Culture is acknowledged.
Input from the Steering Committee was central in setting out on a clear path to the planning process, and
reflecting progress along the way.
Additionally, we recognize the numerous enthusiastic members of the communities of Lumby, Cherryville, South
Mabel Lake, and Areas D&E who assisted the consultants in gathering and analyzing information around the need
for moving forward with an arts and culture planning document.
INTRODUCTION
Arts and culture in the White Valley area is an integral component of this rural gem in British Columbia’s interior.
For as many years as there have been people living in these valleys in the shadow of the Monashee mountains,
artistic expressions of craftsmanship and reflections of the dramatic environment have been created here.
A current snapshot of the area finds three key areas, all of which are integrated one with the other: Lumby, a
town centre which is home to 1,650 residents, and a centre since the late 1800s; Cherryville, a smaller yet vital
area about a half hour to the east (population just under 1,000); and finally, the largest population, 2,800+, the
rural areas lying primarily to the north, through to the South Mabel Lake area. Population numbers are
approximate. Since the last census in 2006, economic contractions in forestry, particularly, and the closure of the
Lavington glass plant, have seen resident numbers fluctuate, and even decline slightly. The 2011 census due to
begin in May will provide much-needed new information.
This, then, is the White Valley region. The Splatsin First Nation (Spallumcheen) are recognized as the first people
who lived in this area. Gold mining, followed by farming, logging, fishing, and today, outdoor pursuits including
cross country skiing, paragliding, canoeing and hiking, as well as urban pursuits, and tourism related-industries, are
integral to the region’s economy. All this in addition to the specific economies created around arts and culture.
Although tourists visit the region, driving both through and to, the area, the economic impact of arts and cultural
growth for the next few years will be enhanced in the summertime, rather than in the winter season. In the midterm future, ski tourists could be expected to stop if there were notable arts and culture lures which were open in
the wintertime, either in studios or in an art gallery setting.
Significant barriers to communication exist in the area, primarily defined by the lack of high speed internet
connections, which have become the dominant method of reaching markets, and keeping a community in touch
with its members. There is an awareness of this barrier – but until service providers update connections, headway
on crucial infrastructure such as a retailing and collegial website for the area’s arts council, will be hard to
accomplish.
Residents have in many cases chosen to live in the area after careers elsewhere, bringing with them both
expectations and experience for more cultural enterprise than is currently available, or in some cases, than is
possible in the community. Partnerships with larger centres, such as Vernon, and other valley cities, are seen as
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
34
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
3
one way to provide more musical and theatrical events. Local performers, blended with out-of-town artists would
give greater range to local groups to produce shows which have a wider draw in some instances. Benefits would
include larger audiences, exchange of learning between artists from different locales, and the always identifiable
desire “to see something from somewhere else.”
Visual artists and artisans are a deeply entrenched and active group in the area. It is important for the purposes of
this Plan to define “artists” and “cultural” workers as correctly as possible. Questions have been raised as to “How
many artists are there in the White Valley?” Rather than interject long tables and information in this Introduction,
an appendix has been provided which gives up-to-date information on the number of people working in arts and
cultural enterprises.
At the same time, it is vital to remember that arts touches everyone in society, not just its producers. There are
few residents who let a week pass without engaging in several “cultural pastimes”: listening to music on the radio
or television or headset; who don’t watch a scripted program on television or via the internet, or in a theatre or on
a DVD; who don’t sing in a choir in their church; who admire however briefly, a framed painting or photograph
hanging on a wall; who take any opportunity to go to live theatre, dance or concerts when available.
So: who is culture for? It is for everyone. Not just the producers. The audiences. Youth. The community-at-large.
Remembering this, and being aware of the economic impact arts and culture have on a community’s economy and
the region’s tourism is an upfront fact before the findings and recommendations of this entire Plan can be
digested.
An accurate cultural inventory of artists and workers in
cultural industries will assist many aspects of future
planning. Pottery, fibre arts, painting, sculpting,
woodwork, photography, writing, theatre arts, music
and dance – and combinations thereof – can be found
in every corner of the community. Again, summertime
sees the re-opening of outdoor and specialty markets,
where artists and craftspeople sell their works. In
wintertime, studio sales and special holiday markets
provide more restricted sales opportunities. Although
good sales are evident at Christmastime markets, it is a
short, sharp spike in a long period without much
artistic community or retail activity.
Norris Park, Lumby
Importantly, what weekly or less frequent markets cannot do, is to showcase work in a more professional
environment. Markets cannot, of course, provide storage, fixed meeting space, permanent addresses for grant
applications and internet connections; nor are they able to mimic a lively, always-open gallery in the centre of
things. The site concept plan for the White Valley Recreation Complex, that was developed by MQN Architects
and adopted in April 2011 indicated that the site could accommodate an arts component. There are, however,
no plans for expansion to the White Valley Community Centre at this time.
There is no lack of awareness of need in the community for a step forward – creation of a dedicated, professionally
organized space – in order to allow arts and culture to thrive. There is no lack of desire to create change. And, no
lack of excellence in artistic production.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
35
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
4
Awareness, however, must equal action for lasting change, i.e., sustainability, to take hold.
The theatre in the Charles Bloom Secondary School is a good facility for performances, both for theatre and music;
there is a draft joint usage survey – pre-agreement – in the works through the RDNO that may remove some of the
barriers to wider community use of this venue.
Some barriers, of course, are perceived to be greater than they are. When community members have militated for
some number of years for improvements and change, even modest steps forward can demonstrate a will, a great
incentive to take additional positive steps.
Heritage and an appreciation of the pioneers who came first to the Cherry Creek gold strike in 1862, then to the
valley to farm and log, remain important today in the area. An executed mural project celebrates many of the
founders of the Village of Lumby, and provides a lens through which visitors and today’s residents can appreciate
their past. Heritage structures are cherished. The streetscape of Lumby celebrates its roots.
It is important that the historic and heritage assets of the entire area be conserved and maintained for future
residents, and provide a well-rounded view of the history of the area to visitors. While this Plan is not focused on
heritage issues, it recognizes the value of heritage, and recommends maintenance and promotion of these assets,
particularly the museum and murals in Lumby. Nearly all residents who contributed to this Plan emphasized the
importance to themselves, personally, of the salmon population, the salmon stream, the long history of these
original residents of the Monashees. Truly, the salmon are a touchstone for visual and verbal art in the region.
Issues around communicating with audiences, buying markets, insurance, funding, staffing, volunteer burn-out,
and overall management of strategies are critical to the success of implementing recommendations made in this
Plan. Residents in so many cases appear to intuitively know what is needed. Their feelings of isolation from
mainstream markets, mainstream communications, i.e., highspeed internet, and the long winters with fewer
tourist visits can be translated into a balancing enthusiasm for growth and stability in the springtime, the summer,
and the gorgeous days of late fall. With assistance from inside, and from out, White Valley residents seem poised
to move to a new plateau of awareness of the central importance of arts and culture in the lives of all residents.
Thus, the community appears keen to dedicate itself even further to accomplish its goals. Support from local
government bodies remains vital to success. The key word going forward is action.
In this report, references are made to:
RDNO - Regional District of the North Okanagan
WVPRCAC - White Valley Parks Recreation and Culture Advisory
Committee
MAC – Monashee Arts Council
RDNO Staff
Village of Lumby
Chamber of Commerce
All entities are envisioned as working together to implement this Plan.
Leadership and responsibilities are suggested in the implementation
section.
“Shuswap Cottonwoods”, Don Elzer
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
36
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
5
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2
INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
TABLE OF CONTENTS…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
STEERING COMMITTEE…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………6
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….7
STAKEHOLDER INPUT……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………11
KEY FINDINGS……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12
ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL IMPACT OF ARTS AND CULTURE IN THE WHITE VALLEY AND ELSEWHERE……………. 12
Why invest in culture?.......................................................................................................................................12
Why invest in culture locally?............................................................................................................................13
ARTS AND CULTURE AND THE OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN……………………………………………………………………….. 15
Three Goals from the OCP:…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..16
Policies from the OCP:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….16
SWOT ANALYSIS……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………18
VISION AND MISSION:…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 19
GOALS AND STRATEGIES……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 20
IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 23
RECOMMENDATIONS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25
STRUCTURING THE TASKFORCE…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….28
The appendices form a separate document
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
37
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
6
STEERING COMMITTEE
The Consultants appreciate the guidance provided by the Steering Committee for this Plan:
Robin LeDrew, Monashee Arts Council: Arts Representative
Ken Klassen, Financial Officer/Approving Officer, Village of Lumby: Municipal Representative
Tannis Nelson, Community Development Coordinator, Parks, Recreation & Culture, Regional District of North
Okanagan: Regional Representative
Paula Harned, Trustee, School District 22; Member of Recreation Coalition and Steering Committee: Education
Representative
Monique Fortin, Recreation Programmer, White Valley Community Centre: Community Representative
Doris Haas, Consultant, GDH Solutions
Christopher Miller, Consultant, Creative Outsources
Caroline Miller, Consultant, Creative Outsources
Steering Committee meetings were held November 10, 2010, and April 14, 2011.
Lumby Street Mural
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
38
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
7
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The study area is comprised of Electoral Areas D and E of North Okanagan Regional District, including South Mabel
Lake, Cherryville and the Village of Lumby, called for the purposes of this Study, White Valley.
White Valley is rural in nature, lying in the shadow of the Monashee Mountains, and enjoys four distinct seasons,
with the changes in tourist traffic which that brings. The demographic profile of White Valley has evolved over the
past decade, as industrial infrastructure has changed with an economy which has declined sharply in some sectors.
Parks and Recreation facilities are primarily managed by the RDNO by way of a contract with the Village of Lumby.
Mabel Lake and Cherryville facilities are not managed by Lumby. Cherryville programs are managed by Lumby.
The Mabel Lake Community Association manages the Mabel Lake Hall, and the Cherryville facilities (including ice
rink and hall) are operated by the Cherryville Community Club). The White Valley Parks Recreation and Culture
Advisory Committee is the Advisory Committee to the Regional District of North Okanagan. Membership consists
of RDNO Directors for Areas D and E, and a Councilor from the Village of Lumby. The Committee reviews matters
related to the delivery of parks, recreation and culture programs in the Greater Lumby area.
Sports-related recreation is popular, with winter skiing, summer paragliding, hiking and camping paramount.
Artists and artisans are well-represented throughout the area, and the creation, display and retailing of their work
is a year-round enterprise which enriches summer markets, fairs, and rubber-tire tourist trips to and through the
area. Retailing activity declines in winter, even though winter sports-related tourism demand is a factor: without a
major central arts retailing centre, sales activity remains low. Retailing efforts are currently spread out over many
small studios, homes and markets, with hours and locations that miss much potential traffic. “Saturation” of
downtown businesses with “art for sale” is not a long-term solution to a dedicated work and display space for
multiple forms of visual, performing and written arts in the area.
Theatre and music are practiced on more of a year-round basis; in summer months, outdoor performances take
precedence. In wintertime, music and theatre move indoors but lose the tourism audience for the most part.
The area population is aging somewhat, as are most populations in rural British Columbia. The birth rates among
young families have grown slightly, but families with older teenagers have displayed out-migration tendencies.
The pool of experience and stability in the aging population in White Valley can make solid contributions to the
cultural planning and implementation for the area, as was demonstrated in workshops held in Lumby over the
winter of 2011. Younger workers might return to a more vital economy in the future.
While the Plan area is somewhat vast, geographically, much of the population is clustered near the identified
centres on the map found in the appendices. The 2006 Statistics Canada census showed a combined population
for Areas D and E of 3,771. This is five per cent lower than the 1996 number of 3,969. Given the contraction of
forestry jobs, a somewhat steady departure of residents for other cities as they look for work, and an aging
populace, this is likely a reasonably accurate population number. Population numbers should be taken as
approximate in this census year. The two largest employment sectors in Area D and E are agriculture/resources
and services. The resource sectors have been negatively impacted by global recessions in the past three years and
changes in the structure of the forest industry. The community is interested in strategies to increase employment
opportunities in the Plan area.
With regard to First Nation communities, there are no reserves within or adjacent to the Plan area. The two
nearest neighbouring reserves belong to the Okanagan Indian Band and the Splatsin (Spallumcheen) Indian Band.
Key informant interviews were conducted by telephone and in person with individuals with a direct voice in arts
and culture in the area. Additionally, less formal discussions were held with key stakeholders both by telephone or
email, and in stakeholder workshops held in Lumby February 15, and April 14. A summary of comments is included
in the appendices.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
39
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
8
Goals set during the planning process include:
Goal 1:
Create a working taskforce with representatives from RDNO, MAC, Cherryville Artisans, Village of Lumby and the
Chamber of Commerce to implement the Arts and Culture Master Plan.
Goal 2:
Create or renew existing space/s for Monashee Arts Council Gallery and a Multi-Purpose Arts Space.
Goal 3:
Build critical mass for the Monashee Arts Council by expanding membership through a multi-level program to be
included in the MAC rolling three-year business plan (referenced elsewhere in this document) that includes raising
awareness, retaining a permanent part-time cultural services coordinator (multi-funded), conducting an inventory
of artists, and cementing new business, education, private and public partnerships through sustainability planning.
Goal 4:
Expand awareness of the positive impact of arts and culture in the community through innovative programs
including combining arts and recreational pursuits, including partnerships with local naturalist clubs.
Goal 5:
Develop new partnerships to achieve economic and physical improvement for artists and artisans in White Valley;
work closely on an ongoing basis with the Chamber of Commerce.
Goal 6:
Develop strategies around sustainability, both in organizational restructuring and renewal, and in creating and
improving relationships with government officials.
Goal 7:
Create new working and funding relationships with education organizations, including SD 22.
Goal 8:
Promote, expand and maintain the public art collection in order to celebrate community, grow tourism and
increase tourist stop-over time.
Goal 9:
Work shop and implement broader and more marketable branding for the area to increase tourism messaging,
revive area interest from tourists, community, businesses, collegial arts organizations, funders.
Goal 10:
Develop a program of educational and recreational arts activities that will have broad appeal to community
residents of all ages. This should be done in a manner similar to the current sports and recreation programs
sponsored by the White Valley Parks Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee.
Recommendations resulting from analysis and input are:
1.
Form a business, government and artists community taskforce which will look at all aspects of implementing
Arts and Culture Master Plan.
2.
Create draft business plan with multiple partners, which will determine need for dedicated new or suitably
renovated existing single multi-purpose space for Arts Council.
3.
Prepare and conduct an artists’ retreat with the primary deliverable of strengthening existing, and creating
new partnerships within the White Valley artist and artisan community. Ensure participation from business,
government, and a motivational speaker from an arts council which has achieved some of the goals accepted
by the MAC. Event to be annual. Full funding to be sought.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
40
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
9
4.
Prepare and conduct an annual budget and planning retreat for MAC with members of the business
community and government attending for a half-day. Present achievements, and set goals for a rolling threeyear budget and strategic plan for MAC.
5.
Review branding of Monashee Arts Council, with input from Cherryville artists and artisans and local
government. Include review of similar and of successful arts council models, including Whistler, Kicking Horse
Culture (Golden), and Lake Country. Commit to updating branding for Monashee Arts and Culture.
6.
Increase funding application activity to include wider range of grant applications, including applications
focused on youth, heritage, sustainability, and new projects. Maximize local business and community forums
to seek and establish matching funding formulae. Establish membership in Canada Helps.
7.
Increase membership in the Monashee Arts Council based on the newly-set annual budget line item – to
achieve greater awareness, critical mass, communication, income. Extend different types of membership:
business, youth, neighbouring artists or councils, tourists, visitors, educators. Utilize membership and
communication as a tool for growth in all areas of MAC endeavours. Ensure non-participating residents are
invited “in”.
8.
Interact with Regional District and Village officials, and the WVPRCAC to guarantee the White Valley Arts and
Culture Master Plan is adopted, prefatory to Plan initiatives appearing as a budget line on both Village and
RDNO annual budgets, tied to inflation. Ensure adoption equates to action.
9.
Ensure representation on the newly created taskforce and on the MAC of youth, education, First Nations and
seniors in the community. Respect each group’s needs for relevant change, programming and affordability.
10. Remove barriers to wider use by community of Charles Bloom SS once RDNO survey and draft facility use
agreement are completed. Add other SD22 spaces to venue pool for community.
11. Set up a short-term taskforce to explore the opportunities to assist not-for-profits with their insurance
coverage needs Look at other arts council models. Quantify discount benefits from utilizing same carriers
across organizations.
12. Hire and retain a half-time Cultural Services Coordinator as a permanent position (See 2005 Village of Lumby
OCP Recommendations). This position to conduct artist inventory, update MAC website, work directly with
artists to grow capacity of MAC to become a greater artistic and economic force in the district.
Responsibilities to include: liaison with government (advisory committee); education (SD 22); artists (MAC);
artisans (Public and Farmers Market and Cherryville Artisans); communication with government funding
bodies regarding grant opportunities; application for grants; liaison with tourism and business organizations
having an effect on traffic to and through the area. Position to be multi-level funded in coordination with
RDNO.
13. Expand and update the MAC website, including links to artists and artisans; tourism sites; bed and breakfast
businesses; restaurants; sports infrastructure, such as skiing and paragliding. Include an “art walk” and “art
drive” for both Lumby and Cherryville, which includes the master access list of public art, and artists’ studios
and markets. Include petitioning service providers for upgrades to area high speed infrastructure.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
41
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
10
14. Address the arts and culture-related recommendations from the Yates, Thorn White Valley Parks, Recreation
and Culture Master Plan (January 2010), and set up action timelines, and leadership. Some of these
recommendations are covered in part, by recommendations and findings elsewhere in this plan.
VISION AND MISSION
The two stakeholder workshops and the key informant interviews helped develop the Vision and the Mission
statements. Workshop participants were reminded that a mission is what an organization does, its actions. A
vision is what the organization would like to happen as a result of the action.
THE VISION:
The entire White Valley community economically and socially benefits from an emphasis on arts and culture
throughout the area, including Cherryville, and in a revitalization of the White Valley Recreation Complex in
Lumby.
THE MISSION:
To support the economic and social expansion of arts and culture in White Valley communities through new
partnerships, creative funding formulas, and support of local government offices.
Sculpture, “Little Girl 2”,
Wildcraft Forest Ecomuseum
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
42
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
11
STAKEHOLDER INPUT
The Plan Area is rich with stakeholders – community members who feel arts and culture is important to them, to
their community, and to the economy of the area.
Given the modest scope of this Plan, it was possible to communicate with a limited number of stakeholders in
depth. There was no shortage of good ideas, suggestions, and references to other planning documents which
were helpful and covered a range of issues.
A combination of telephone interviews, and one-on-one discussions around specific issues of the Plan contributed
to the findings. Two stakeholder workshops were conducted, January 18 and April 14, 2011. The first workshop
was held on the same evening as a presentation from MQN Architects (Vernon) on a reconfiguration of the
Community Centre and its grounds. This meeting propinquity allowed further input on the issue of arts and culture
planning to be gathered from those attending that Open House. Twenty-four community members participated
directly in arts and culture work groups at the first session in January. The second session was held the same
evening as an open house on a new Official Community Plan for rural Lumby. Responses to the draft Executive
Summary, the goals and recommendations were made by the attendees; 23 attendees made contributions to the
Plan.
Eleven telephone and in-person interviews were conducted; not all those invited to participate were able to
complete interviews. Interviews were completed with residents of all areas: South Mabel Lake, Cherryville and
Lumby.
Organizations and companies represented included (but given multiple hats worn by residents in smaller
communities) likely were not limited to:
•
Cherryville Artisans Shop
•
Cherryville Farmers Market
•
Landslide Studios
•
Lumby Air Force
•
Lumby and District Museum
•
Lumby Public Market
•
Mabel Lake Community Club
•
Monashee Arts Council
•
Red Dog Glass Studio
•
Regional District of North Okanagan
•
School District 22
•
Seniors Program
•
Village of Lumby
•
Wildcraft Forest Studios & Ecomuseum
•
White Valley Community Centre
•
Wild Salmon Music Festival
Collage from “Lumby Rocks”
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
43
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
12
KEY FINDINGS
Key findings of the study came out of the consultation process, including stakeholder input, consultant observation
and analysis. They are:
Need for improved electronic communication infrastructure (high speed internet)
Need for improved communications to audiences (tourists, residents) to promote area
Need for improved and speedier communications to arts and culture colleagues to increase activity levels
Need for a permanent home for the arts council including public space to achieve professionalism and growth
Need for funding stability to realize goals of the business plan
Need for paid staff to oversee cultural issues at RDNO or Village level
Need for broader awareness of the social and economic potential of arts and culture in the community
Need for new and strengthened partnerships
•
between arts organizations and government bodies
•
between arts and education [SD22; White Valley Recreation Centre; White Valley Community Resource
Centre]
•
among communities both within and outside the White Valley area
Need for removal of barriers around venue rental, including insurance & contract issues
Need for action and sustainability in arts and culture endeavours in the community-at-large
Need for preservation of heritage infrastructure and marketability of heritage
Need for new focus on marketability of arts by business organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce
ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL IMPACT OF ARTS AND CULTURE IN THE WHITE VALLEY AND ELSEWHERE
The economic impact of arts and culture is important to growing communities. The spin-off value of investing in
the arts is sound, strategic economic policy. Research by the Conference Board of Canada has shown that for
every $1 of real value-added GDP produced by Canada’s culture industries, $1.84 is added to overall real GDP. The
same research also shows that performing arts organizations generate $2.70 in revenues for every dollar they
receive from governments [Valuing Culture: Measuring and Understanding Canada’s Creative Economy 2009].
WHY INVEST IN CULTURE?
The arts and culture sector already brings economic and social benefits to residents in the White Valley area.
Meanwhile, note that nationally, the sector. . .
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
44
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
13
Boosts economic growth and development, including contributing $46 billion to Canada’s GDP, $25 billion in
taxes, and $25 billion in consumer spending. Arts and culture represents over 630,000 jobs in the Canadian
economy: in perspective, the arts and culture sectors are larger than Canada’s insurance industry and
Canada’s forest industry combined.
Builds social cohesion and intercultural understanding within increasingly diverse populations.
Responds to an enhanced demand for creativity and innovation as essential skill sets in local, national and
international labour markets.
Advances Canadian culture as a centre of excellence on the international stage.
Canadians view the arts as cornerstones of excellence, innovation, and creative leadership in Canada. They
recognize that these attributes are the contemporary building blocks of an internationally competitive society. In
fact, the arts are the driving force behind the advancement of Canada’s position in a global society that values
economic prosperity, social cohesion, creativity, innovation and excellence. Example: In a recent CBC survey of
“The 100 Greatest Canadians Ever”, 36 were artists; 17 were athletes.
Funding is a core need. It’s a core need for programs. For growth. For infrastructure. To recover from the
recession.
“Any government which says it has a plan for economic recovery and doesn’t have a plan in place for arts and
culture doesn’t have a plan for economic recovery.” [Then Federal Minister James Moore, MP, Port Moody,
Westwood, Port Coquitlam; Minister, Canadian Heritage, responsible for arts and culture. September, 2010,
Victoria, BC.]
Ongoing support and funding is critical for arts, cultural, heritage, and aboriginal groups. Raising awareness of the
importance of arts and culture as part of economic life in the White Valley is an underlying platform of an
economically viable White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan.
WHY INVEST IN CULTURE LOCALLY?
In a provincial study in 2006 [Socio-Economic Impacts of Arts and Cultural Organizations in BC: Grant Applicants to
the BC Arts Council] the return on public investment in the arts in the form of tax revenues is $1.36 for every dollar
invested.
The Monashee Arts Council is eligible for thousands of dollars in annual operating and project funding from the BC
Arts Council. Additionally, the Council can apply for funding directly to local, provincial and federal funding
agencies. The strongest possible funding profile is one in which applicants propose “matching” funding, wherein
local businesses or private foundations agree to match public funding at a formula of “dollar for dollar” or a
varying funding profile. However, without committed paid staffing or charismatic volunteers with hundreds of
unpaid hours at their disposal, grant applications often fall by the way, as they are complicated, time-consuming,
and require skilled online competencies and high-speed internet connections.
Healthy provincial revenues mean healthy returns to municipalities, and better bottom lines for artists, businesses,
municipalities and all those who live and work in a vital area which is culturally alive. The arts and cultural industry
improves the quality of life in a community, creating cornerstones that allow the collective activities of artists to
make a difference. In BC, the economy has been primarily healthy for the past decade. Outside urban centres,
however, economic vagaries have been much more apparent.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
45
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
14
Arts and culture can be a stabilizing factor in up-and-down resource-based economies, as the 2005 Village of
Lumby Official Community Plan makes clear. In BC overall, the arts and culture industry employs 80,000 people,
with $5.2 billion a year in spending. The White Valley Plan area, to
produce a balanced society among local and home-based businesses,
education, tourism, and arts and culture, must ensure that governments
and residents are well-positioned to support workers who contribute to
this vital industry, and that local educational support for arts and culture
enterprises is a cornerstone of future planning.
Students involved in the arts have better grades and lower dropout
rates; higher empathy and tolerance toward racial groups other than
their own; higher scores in creative thinking, expression of ideas, and
risk-taking in learning. Young people involved in the arts are much less
likely to become involved in gangs or drugs. An overwhelming majority
of parents want arts incorporated into their children’s lives.
Orchard House Bed & Breakfast
There is a bank of educational research that supports music education in the schools. Studies from the US
Department of Education indicate that students who are involved in the arts perform better on 8th and 10th grade
achievement tests and make up 65 to 75 percent of the top two quartiles of scores. Similar percentages are
evident in students who achieve A and B grades in English. Math scores are also positively impacted when
students are involved in the arts. And studies also show that dropout rates for students involved in music are
lower than for those who are not involved in the fine arts. [Critical Evidence: How the Arts Benefit Student
Achievement National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) in collaboration with the Arts Education
Partnership (AEP)].
Involvement in the arts is healthful. Seniors involved in the arts have significantly lower rates of doctor visits and
need for medication. Active people, the kind who participate in and attend the arts, perform better at work with
increased productivity, less absenteeism, and fewer on-the-job accidents. [The Washington DC Area Geriatric
Education Center Consortium: Learners' Explorer Creativity and Aging. Center on Aging: Studies Without Walls]
“Some of the most powerful works of art have been produced by older Americans by hands that have engaged in
years of hard work, eyes that have witnessed decades of change, and hearts that have felt a lifetime of
emotions.”—Hillary Rodham Clinton
Today’s elders are not only the healthiest, highest-educated cohort of wrinklies ever seen, but people who fit the
motivational pattern of entrepreneurs and innovators: people who’ve made their mark and gained economic
independence, enough to be motivated now by intrinsic interest and fun. [University of Missouri-Kansas City:
“What we know about creativity and older adults”]
And to further support the value of creativity and aging wellness, the ageless and elegant Sophia Loren wisely
added, “There is a fountain of youth: it is your mind, your talents, the creativity you bring to your life and the lives
of people you love. When you learn to tap this source, you will truly have defeated age.”
The arts build community pride and social cohesion – the support by White Valley residents for local and visiting
arts groups makes it clear that residents’ enthusiasm is a huge reason for their living in the White Valley area, for
working here, aging in place here. Arts and culture are part of the solution for any downturn in the economy,
current or future. Arts and culture return good value to the communities in which they thrive.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
46
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
15
ARTS AND CULTURE AND THE OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN
The economic impact of arts and culture is important to all communities. In the 2005 Village of Lumby Official
Community Plan (OCP), a range of supportive statements helps set goals for the community, and for action
implementation of specific recommendations from this White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan. In the 2011
Draft OCP for rural Lumby, Electoral areas D and E, and Cherryville, statements attesting to the importance of
culture are also included.
General Statements from the 2005 Village of Lumby OCP
•
Lumby has a rich settlement history and a desire to preserve this heritage. It also has a vibrant cultural
community. Each contributes to the unique character of Lumby. This unique character will become a greater
attraction to those seeking an alternative lifestyle, such as artists, entrepreneurs, young families and retirees.
Future development will need to acknowledge heritage and cultural considerations so that Lumby embraces
and shares its history.
•
Economic development is a key issue…. The village is supportive of new economic initiatives such as satellite
enterprises that could be attracted to Lumby’s quality of life, and tourism ventures.
•
Create a more diverse local economy that provides desirable jobs/goods/services.
•
Strengthen local business: support initiatives to identify programs, external funding sources… partner in
economic development activities with local business organizations and regional agencies.
•
Through partnerships and direct investment, focus on marketing and promotion efforts. These are to include
both general marketing and promotion of the community and events, as well as targeted marketing initiatives
toward recruitment of businesses in… tourism… to Lumby.
•
Support the needs of home based business as a means of growing the local economy.
•
Promote the village centre as the heart of the community – as the focus for commercial, civic, and cultural
facilities, as well as a place to reside.
•
Continue to invest in the downtown through preservation and restoration of historic buildings and through
improvements to the downtown streetscape.
•
Encourage and support programs to remove barriers to business and development.
•
Encourage and support the attraction of new economic opportunities to the area, including appropriate and
clean major industry.
•
Encourage and build working partnerships with other public and private sector interests to promote
sustainable growth
Image Logo “Red Dog Glass Studio”,
Cherryville
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
47
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
16
THREE GOALS FROM THE 2005 VILLAGE OF LUMBY OCP:
1.
Preserve heritage, arts and cultural resources as they are integral to a vibrant community.
2.
Recognize that cultural facilities and services contribute to a diversified economy, and contribute to
community livability and desirability.
3.
Encourage and support opportunities for learning, participation in and appreciation of arts, culture and
heritage for all residents of Lumby.
STATEMENT FROM THE DRAFT 2011 REGIONAL DISTRICT OF THE NORTH OKANAGAN ELECTORAL AREA ‘D’ (RURAL
LUMBY) AND ELECTORAL AREA ‘E’ (CHERRYVILLE) OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN
9.8 ARTS AND CULTURE POLICY
9.8.1 It is recognized that the region’s larger urban centres (e.g. Vernon) will be the focal point for regional cultural
expression and diversity but the Regional District will work with regional institutions and associations to support
cultural amenities and/or programs at the local level. Vacant classrooms, for example, may provide an opportunity
for local programs, special events, celebrations support for local artists.
Note that the use of “vacant classrooms” is not suggested as a solution for a dedicated art centre in the Village of
Lumby.
POLICIES FROM THE 2005 VILLAGE OF LUMBY OCP:
1.
Encourage the promotion and awareness of Lumby’s heritage, and the preservation of historic buildings,
structures and sites where the aesthetic appeal and or community use positively contributes to the
community.
2.
Encourage and support volunteer organizations in the identification of heritage resources, and the
establishment of a community heritage register for buildings, structures, sites or features, to be used as the
basis for the management of these heritage resources.
3.
Encourage and support the arts and cultural community, including the performing, visual, literary, historic, and
multimedia arts.
4.
Encourage the use of theatres, spaces and venues for public participation, education and enjoyment of culture
through the planning and design of buildings, open spaces and public areas, including the street environment.
5.
Encourage the development and promotion of cultural activities that generate real and valuable economic and
social benefits.
6.
Encourage the development and promotion of cultural activities and facilities which benefit tourism, and
which contribute to the social, emotional and physical well being of residents of all age and income levels.
7.
Encourage and support cultural activities that promote the growth and development of community spirit and
identity.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
48
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
17
With regard to community facilities, the 2005 Village of Lumby OCP has numerous recommendations around
broadened facility use, particularly cross-utilization of education and arts. This recommendation stands out:
“Support the development of arts and cultural organizations and activities as a means to promote cultural
development in Lumby.”
Revitalization of downtown is also a key goal of this OCP: a new facility for the Monashee Arts Council would
satisfy various goals repeated here from the Lumby OCP, such as revitalizing downtown, providing environmentally
positive work space, attracting tourists and residents, creating employment, and encouraging and developing
cultural activities, and growing tourism-related businesses. As well, a new Monashee Arts Council facility would
support the OCP statement to “Support community-driven initiatives, e.g., community recreation and culture.”
The Draft White Valley Telephone Survey indicated new programs appear welcome. This information relates to
Plan Goal 10.
Strong Interest in Possible New Programs
Lumby
Elec. Dist.
Elec.
Have
No Children
Age:
Age:
D
Dist E
children
19-34
35-59
35%
32%
58%
22%
61%
39%
Gym sports
40%
19%
30%
34%
16%
29%
25%
Art Classes
25%
21%
16%
34%
15%
36%
22%
Cooking Classes
28%
21%
15%
33#
14%
33%
24%
Pottery Classes
27%
22%
22%
29%
18%
30%
25%
Woodwork Classes
24%
18%
11%
25%
11%
26%
18%
Theatre Programs
19%
14%
18%
26%
10%
31%
15%
Metalwork Programs
19%
13%
13%
24%
8%
26%
14%
Sewing Classes
19%
Note: Columns may add to more than 100% because multiple answers would apply. *Read as: 40% of households surveyed in
Lumby were described as very likely to have someone who would be interested in gym sports.
Salmon Trail, Pencil 1, Robin LeDrew
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
49
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
Age: 60 +
13%
16%
13%
11%
12%
9%
9%
8%
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
18
SWOT ANALYSIS
Strengths
Arts and culture is deeply entrenched in the entire area as important to residents’ daily lives
The Monashee Arts Council is a registered not-for-profit and organized to play a key role
The 2005 Lumby OCP strongly supports arts and culture endeavours
Cherryville Artisans Group is well-respected and functions well in many areas
The RDNO and the Village of Lumby have committed to planning for, and funding of, arts and culture ventures
Residents who are involved in the business or pleasure of producing arts and culture are committed to growth
The area exhibits natural beauty and is a tourist draw
The area is well-served by planning procedures
Weaknesses
The economy has weakened in the area due to contraction in the forestry industry
Young singles are moving away for better education and employment opportunities
Communication is difficult and is not keeping up with national standards of internet connectivity
The Monashee Arts Council currently has limited impact in the community
Collaboration between Lumby & Cherryville artists difficult due to geography, internet, “territorial” issues
Opportunities
Young families like the area
Tourism is predicted to increase
Governments are looking for environmentally sound, culturally significant new businesses
The Monashee Arts Council could increase membership twenty-fold through introduction of mixed levels of
memberships and partnerships, and further grow from there according to its new business plan
Heritage is of growing interest to residents and tourists
Farmers and public markets are increasingly popular
Energy level of artists and artisans appears strong
Growth of awareness through improved branding and communications can grow audiences and business
Economic growth can result from increased collaboration between Cherryville and Lumby/South Mabel Lake
artists
Threats
Contraction of government support and funding
Volunteer burn-out if no professional assistance is provided
Ongoing lack of communications improvements if no action taken by Telus or others
Contraction of tourism if gasoline prices skyrocket
Lack of awareness in general community of sustainability fragility of sector
The Monashee Arts Council’s small active membership is a barrier to growth and stability
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
50
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
19
VISION AND MISSION
Stakeholders at the first workshop, and key informant interviews, provided direction for creating Vision and
Mission statements for the White Valley. Details are found in the appendices.
Background
What is a vision? What is a mission?
Good vision and mission statements provide strategic vision and direction for an organization and should not have
to be revised every few years. A vision looks forward; a mission looks at today. Goals and strategies are used to
get there.
Vision/Mission Statements incorporate the best thinking of stakeholders, and clearly state the purpose of
programs and their ongoing evolution, reflecting the needs of residents and workers in the Plan Areas, and of art &
culture service providers and educators.
Support from elected officials at Regional, Council and Mayoral level is important to ensure the Vision and Mission
are carried out effectively going forward. Such support then ensures that employees of all the region’s governing
offices have a clear sense of the goals set by both the District’s administration, and the residents, and they can
carry out their tasks, knowing that they have approvals to act on the adopted vision and mission.
This Plan’s vision and mission statements, incorporated into its White Valley Art & Culture Master Plan, as drafted:
state the obvious
reflect a range of perspectives
reflect an openness to new ideas
focus the energy and clarify the purpose of stakeholders
assist in obtaining funding (multi-level)
motivate community artists and artisans, regional and municipal staff, volunteers, stakeholders & donors
The February workshop in part, developed the Vision and the Mission statements. Participants were reminded that
a mission is what an organization does, its actions. A vision is what the organization would like to happen as a
result of the action.
THE VISION:
The entire White Valley community economically and socially benefits from an emphasis on arts and culture
throughout the area, including Cherryville, and in a revitalization of the White Valley Recreation Complex in
Lumby.
THE MISSION:
To support the economic and social expansion of arts and culture in White Valley communities through new
partnerships, creative funding formulas, and support of local government offices.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
51
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
20
GOALS AND STRATEGIES
Community stakeholders and members of the public provided input to setting goals for the White Valley Arts and
Culture Master Plan. Specific strategies were developed simultaneously to ensure the success of achieving each
goal over the ten-year window of the Plan. Measurement of the implementation was also integrated into the
stakeholder sessions. Goals and strategies were presented to the group as a whole from smaller workgroups, and
input was given and incorporated.
The workshopped material was then integrated with stakeholder interview feedback, and the consultants provided
analysis and an overall framework, which follows. Following is the resulting text of the goals, strategies and
recommendations, along with an implementation timeline, geared to achieve the mission and fulfill the vision.
Goal 1:
Create a working taskforce with representatives from RDNO, MAC, Cherryville Artisans, Village of Lumby and the
Chamber of Commerce to implement the Arts and Culture Master Plan.
Strategies:
1. Set a short timeline for set-up and measurement and report back to stakeholders.
2.
Ensure support for the taskforce for implementation by the WVPRCAC. Personnel for the taskforce to be
selected/appointed so that all stakeholders are represented.
Goal 2:
Create or renew existing space/s for Monashee Arts Council Gallery and a Multi-Purpose Arts Space.
Strategies:
1. Create draft business plan with multiple partners, which will determine need for dedicated new or suitably
renovated existing single space for Arts Council:
a.
b.
Temporary and affordable
Transitioning to more permanent, larger, multi-functional Arts Centre, including display and retail
space, plus in time:
i. Workshop space
ii. Office space
iii. Meeting space
iv. Storage
Goal 3:
Build critical mass for the Monashee Arts Council by expanding membership through a multi-level program to be
included in the MAC rolling three-year business plan (referenced elsewhere in this document) that includes raising
awareness, retaining a permanent part-time cultural services coordinator (multi-funded), conducting an inventory
of artists, and cementing new business, education, private and public partnerships through sustainability planning.
Strategies:
1. Promote expansion of internet service in communities with resident artists to assist growth of networks,
expand business opportunities, reach audiences.
2.
Once improved communication channels are in place, launch membership drive. Set goals to grow
membership to include at least 60% of artists in District population areas.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
52
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
21
3.
Set up tiered membership platforms, with differing payment levels for types of membership, including multiyear, business, sustaining, remote (tourist-based).
4.
Maximize public relations channels to maintain higher awareness of Council activities, including using social
media such as Twitter, Facebook, and multiple links that feed back to MAC website and activity updates. Link
through BC Tourism, local Chamber, District website. Utilize push email, sell advertising, maximize keyword
usage.
5.
Ensure membership growth is “organic”, i.e., an outcome of successful implementation of other Plan goals.
Goal 4:
Expand awareness of the positive impact of arts and culture in the community through innovative programs
including combining arts and recreational pursuits, including partnerships with local naturalist clubs.
Strategies:
1. Develop partnerships with recreational and sports clubs in the Village and in Cherryville, in order to crosspromote ventures, and to take advantage of community support and funding.
2.
Develop programs within the schools and community centres that offer the benefits of arts and cultural
classes to recreational and sports supporters.
Goal 5:
Develop new partnerships to achieve economic and physical improvement for artists and artisans in White Valley;
work closely on an ongoing basis with the Chamber of Commerce.
Strategies:
1. Refer to the key recommendations around community arts and culture in the 2005 Village of Lumby Official
Community Plan for direction regarding physical improvement of the economics of arts and culture in the
region. Some recommendations and policies are repeated within this Plan document. Ensure Chamber of
Commerce acts as a ‘champion of the arts’.
2.
Define, in order to recognize, “working artists”. Set parameters for income percentages earned from art.
Models can be established which are acceptable to local working artists through the taskforce.
Goal 6:
Develop strategies around sustainability, both in organizational restructuring and renewal, and in creating and
improving relationships with government officials.
Strategies:
1. The MAC taskforce to review funding and other assistance available from BC Arts Council and
ArtsBC/Assembly of BC Arts Councils, and produce a “fundability” line on annual budgets to be measured.
2.
This assistance to take the form of collegial support and funding, to improve the profile of directors,
governance, communication, and other key areas of productivity. Such sustainability programs should be
ongoing, but should be front-end loaded to give the MAC a boost in productivity, budgeting, planning and
staffing. With membership growth recommended elsewhere, the MAC could, through ongoing sustainability
exercises, greatly increase its profile in the area with residents and visitors.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
53
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
22
Goal 7:
Create new working and funding relationships with education organizations, including SD 22.
Strategies:
1. Complete a facility use agreement between SD22 and the Village of Lumby/RDNO for the community use
of the Charles Bloom SS theatre, and other appropriate spaces for arts and culture activities within area
school/s.
2.
Assign implementation of key relationships and new working contracts to the taskforce (noted above).
3.
Implement the recommendations of the White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan under the direction of
the taskforce. To help implement the key recommendations of the Plan, include representatives from the
school district and at least one teacher and one youth representative.
4.
Work with the existing Youth Advisory Council (Whitevalley Community Centre) to extend viability.
5.
The taskforce to include methodologies for increasing use of the Community Theatre at Charles Bloom
Secondary School, through signed agreements with RDNO. Increased access to this facility will have a
positive impact on a range of arts and cultural endeavours in White Valley. Plan to include innovative
insurance solutions as required, through new business partnerships.
6.
Grow overall use of area venues. Increased utilization, and cross-use of facilities, with cost being reduced
as far as feasible for rentals and services, at least in the first three years, will improve communications
and thus, attendance at and use of facilities in the area, such as the high school, the theatre, and facilities
at the Community Centre.
Goal 8:
Promote, expand and maintain the public art collection in order to celebrate community, grow tourism and
increase tourist stop-over time.
Strategies:
1. Assign responsibility for maintaining an up-to-date log of all public art in the full plan area, indoor and
outdoor. This assignment would best be taken on by the MAC, and be part of the website redesign and
maintenance project.
2.
Produce a “rubber tire” guide, electronic and print, to public art in the Lumby and Cherryville areas,
including the Salmon Trails, and ensure inclusion of local businesses and artists’ bios.
3.
The Taskforce to address the issue of expansion of public art, with the goal of widening the collection over
time. Funding, location and type of art could be addressed through a separate sub-committee; one of the
retreats for artists suggested in this report could be given over to a workshop for this purpose.
Goal 9:
Work shop and implement broader and more marketable branding for the area to increase tourism messaging,
revive area interest from tourists, community, businesses, collegial arts organizations, funders.
Strategy:
Examine models, such as Kicking Horse Culture (Golden, BC); Lake Country, BC.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
54
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
23
Goal 10:
Develop a program of educational and recreational arts activities that will have broad appeal to community
residents of all ages. This should be done in a manner similar to the current sports and recreation programs
sponsored by the White Valley Parks Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee.
Strategy:
Engage the [potentially] large and diverse segment of the local population so that they begin participating in arts
and culture programs as a primarily recreational activity. Develop programs in concert with WVPRCAC, and
educational bodies. Art as recreation to be identified as a viable long-term community value. The program would
be helpful in creating broad-based community support for arts and culture, and could be a way to address the
desire of some arts and cultural supporters to grow their audiences, while seeking future investments both in
terms of funding and community support.
IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE
Priority
Goal
Goal 1:
Create a working taskforce with
representatives from RDNO, MAC,
Cherryville Artisans, Village of Lumby and
the Chamber of Commerce to implement
the Arts and Culture Master Plan.
Goal 2:
Create or renew existing space for
Monashee Arts Council and multi-purpose
arts space. Build business plan first.
Goal 3:
Build critical mass for the Monashee Arts
Council by expanding membership
Goal 4:
Expand awareness of the positive impact
of arts and culture in the community
through innovative programs including
combining arts and recreational pursuits.
Goal 5:
Develop new partnerships to achieve
economic and physical improvement for
artists and artisans in White Valley; work
closely with the Chamber of Commerce.
Goal 6:
Develop strategies around sustainability,
both in organizational restructuring and
renewal, and in creating and improving
relationships with government officials.
Leadership
High priority: within one year
RDNO; MAC; WVPRCAC; RDNO
Staff
High priority: Find temporary
space and begin building
business plan within one year.
Dedicated space in three years.
High priority: plan to be put in
place within one year.
Membership growth plan to
take place over five years.
Continuing priority as arts and
culture plan is implemented
over life of plan.
Taskforce
Taskforce, then MAC
RDNO; MAC; WVPRCAC; RDNO
Staff; Community at large;
Chamber of Commerce
Continuing priority as arts and
culture plan is implemented and
Chamber of Commerce is
brought into taskforce.
MAC; RDNO; WVPRCAC; RDNO
Staff; Taskforce.
Continuing priority as arts and
culture plan is implemented
over life of plan.
Taskforce and MAC.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
55
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
24
Goal
Priority
Goal 7:
Create new working and funding
relationships with education
organizations, including SD 22.
Goal 8:
Promote, maintain and expand the public
art collection in order to celebrate
community, grow tourism and increase
tourist stop-over time.
Goal 9:
Work shop & implement broader & more
marketable branding for the area to grow
tourism messaging, revive area interest
from tourists, community, businesses,
collegial arts organizations, funders.
Goal 10:
Develop a program of educational and
recreational arts activities that will have
broad appeal to community residents of
all ages. This should be done in a manner
similar to the current sports and
recreation programs sponsored by the
White Valley Parks Recreation and Culture
Advisory Committee.
Leadership
Continuing priority as arts and
culture plan is implemented
over life of plan.
MAC; SD22; RDNO; WVPRCAC;
RDNO Staff
Medium priority – two years
MAC; Village of Lumby
Medium priority – three years
MAC; all levels of local
government
Medium priority – three years
WVPRCAC; SD22; Village of
Lumby; RDNO; MAC; Cherryville
Artisans
Salmon Mural, Al Haworth
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
56
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
25
RECOMMENDATIONS
The recommendations were developed as a result of input from the community: from stakeholders, local and
regional government liaison; key informants; material from previous planning documents, as well as consultant
observation and analysis.
In each case, the recommendations include suggested advocates to take leadership responsibility for development,
implementation and measurement of the recommendations.
1.
Form a business, government and artists community taskforce which will look at all aspects of implementing
Arts and Culture Master Plan.
Primary Responsibility:
Secondary Responsibility:
2.
RDNO; WVPRCAC; RDNO Staff
MAC, Cherryville Artisans
Create draft business plan with multiple partners, which will determine need for dedicated new or suitably
renovated existing single space for Arts Council:
a.
Temporary and affordable
b.
Transitioning to more permanent, larger, multi-functional Arts Centre, including display and retail
space, plus in time:
i. Workshop space
ii. Office space
iii. Meeting space
iv. Storage
Primary Responsibility:
3.
Prepare and conduct an artists’ retreat with the primary deliverable of strengthening existing, and creating
new partnerships within the White Valley artist and artisan community. Ensure participation from business,
government, and a motivational speaker from an arts council which has achieved some of the goals accepted
by the MAC. Event to be annual. Full funding to be sought.
Primary Responsibility:
4.
Community Taskforce with endorsement of WVPRCAC
MAC
Prepare and conduct an annual budget and planning retreat for MAC with members of the business
community and government attending for a half-day. Present achievements, and set goals for a rolling threeyear budget and strategic plan for MAC.
Primary Responsibility:
Secondary Responsibility:
MAC
WVPRCAC
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
57
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
26
5.
Review branding of Monashee Arts Council, with input from Cherryville artists and artisans and local
government. Include review of similar and of successful arts council models, including Whistler, Kicking Horse
Culture (Golden), and Lake Country. Commit to updating branding for Monashee Arts and Culture.
Primary Responsibility:
Secondary Responsibility:
6.
Increase funding application activity to include wider range of grant applications, including applications
focused on youth, heritage, sustainability, and new projects. Maximize local business and community forums
to seek and establish matching funding formulae. Establish membership in Canada Helps.
Primary Responsibility:
Secondary Responsibility:
7.
MAC
Interact with Regional District and Village officials, and the WVPRCAC, to guarantee the White Valley Arts and
Culture Master Plan is adopted, prefatory to Plan initiatives appearing as a budget line on both Village and
RDNO annual budgets, tied to inflation. Ensure adoption equates to action.
Primary Responsibility:
9.
MAC
WVPRCAC, with RDNO Staff
Increase membership in the Monashee Arts Council based on the newly-set annual budget line item – to
achieve greater awareness, critical mass, communication, income. Extend different types of membership:
business, youth, neighbouring artists or councils, tourists, visitors, educators. Utilize membership and
communication as a tool for growth in all areas of MAC endeavours. Ensure non-participating residents are
invited “in”.
Primary Responsibility:
8.
MAC
Chamber of Commerce; RDNO Staff; WVPRCAC
Community Taskforce
Ensure representation on the newly created taskforce and on the MAC of youth, education, First Nations and
seniors in the community. Respect each group’s needs for relevant change, programming and affordability.
Primary Responsibility:
MAC, Cherryville Artisans, and RDNO Staff
10. Remove barriers to wider use by community of Charles Bloom SS once RDNO survey and draft facility use
agreement are completed. Add other SD22 spaces to venue pool for community.
Primary Responsibility:
WVPRCAC and RDNO Staff
11. Set Up a short-term taskforce to explore the opportunities to assist not-for-profits with their insurance
coverage needs Look at other arts council models. Quantify discount benefits from utilizing same carriers
across organizations.
Primary Responsibility:
Community Taskforce
12. Hire and retain a half-time Cultural Services Coordinator as a permanent position (See 2005 Village of Lumby
OCP Recommendations). This position to conduct artist inventory, update MAC website, work directly with
artists to grow capacity of MAC to become a greater artistic and economic force in the district.
Responsibilities to include: liaison with government (advisory committee); education (SD 22); artists (MAC);
artisans (Public and Farmers Market and MAC); communication with government funding bodies regarding
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
58
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
27
grant opportunities; application for grants; liaison with tourism and business organizations having an effect on
traffic to and through the area. Position to be multi-level funded in coordination with RDNO.
Primary Responsibility:
Secondary Responsibility:
RDNO with WVPRCAC
MAC providing candidate job description
13. Expand and update the MAC website, including links to artists and artisans; tourism sites; bed and breakfast
businesses; restaurants; sports infrastructure, such as skiing and paragliding. Include an “art walk” and “art
drive” for both Lumby and Cherryville, which includes the master access list of public art, and artists’ studios
and markets. Include petitioning service providers for upgrades to area high speed infrastructure.
Primary Responsibility:
Secondary Responsibility:
Tertiary Responsibility:
WVPRCAC to assist in removing barriers with service providers (Telus)
Community Taskforce to set up website
MAC, Cherryville Artisans, to maintain once Cultural Coordinator is in place
14. Address the arts and culture-related recommendations from the Yates, Thorn White Valley Parks, Recreation
and Culture Master Plan (January 2010), and set up action timelines, and leadership. Some of these
recommendations are covered in part, by recommendations and findings elsewhere in this plan. Reference is
made to particularly:
That the White Valley Advisory Committee develop a community grants program to provide project
assistance to community organizations for both operational and capital grants. Examine other
municipalities’ arts and culture policies for guidance, for example, Port Moody, Whistler and Golden, B.C.
and Trois Rivières, Quebec.
Primary Responsibility:
WVPRCAC with Village of Lumby
That capacity building exercises – to improve governance, grow membership, raise awareness and
stabilize funding – for organizations be carried out.
Primary Responsibility: MAC
Secondary Responsibility: Community Taskforce
That the Chamber of Commerce integrate more fully their opportunities into tourism marketing
(recommendation referenced recreation, but should be expanded to include culture).
Primary Responsibility:
Community Taskforce
Lumby Street Mural
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
59
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
28
STRUCTURING THE TASKFORCE
Input from stakeholders and from the Steering Committee suggest that for optimum effectiveness, the taskforce
should be populated to have the greatest freedom to produce viable business plans, in order to move the
implementation of the White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan forward. The Committee to set its terms of
reference prior to commencing its work to put the plan into action.
Careful consideration should be given to individuals who have expressed an interest in plan implementation, as
simply appointing a representative from each government body involved in the region may not be the most
productive model.
It is suggested that at least one working representative from each of the following bodies be approached and
invited to sit on the taskforce through the implementation stages so that the Implementation Timeline can be
addressed once the Plan is adopted. Terms could be for a minimum of two years, with re-appointments and new
members on a one-year basis ensuring continuity.
School District 22
Student Representative
Member of arts faculty
RDNO
Staff Member
White Valley Parks Recreation Culture Advisory Committee
Member
Village of Lumby
Staff Member
Monashee Arts Council
President
Cherryville Artisans Group
President
Chamber of Commerce
President
Community-at-large
Two members
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
60
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan
April 2011
Appendices
61
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
2
LIST OF APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1............................................................................................................................................................... 4
Community Members and Groups
APPENDIX 2............................................................................................................................................................... 5
Funding Recommendations
APPENDIX 3............................................................................................................................................................... 6
Demographics and Plan Area
APPENDIX 4............................................................................................................................................................... 9
Workshops 1 & 2
APPENDIX 5a........................................................................................................................................................... 12
Results: White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan First Stakeholder Workshop February 15, 2011
APPENDIX 5b........................................................................................................................................................... 12
Results: White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan Second Stakeholder Workshop April 14, 2011
APPENDIX 6............................................................................................................................................................. 20
Background materials reviewed
APPENDIX 7............................................................................................................................................................. 21
Venues; Businesses & Locations for Art Displays or Meetings
APPENDIX 8............................................................................................................................................................. 22
Key Informant Phone Script
APPENDIX 9............................................................................................................................................................. 24
Summary of comments from Key Informant Interviews in White Valley
APPENDIX 10........................................................................................................................................................... 28
Additional Background Information about White Valley
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
62
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
3
APPENDIX 11………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..30
Recommendation: A Year-Round Music Academy in White Valley
APPENDIX 12……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..33
Recommendation: Monashee Creative Sector Business Incubator
APPENDIX 13……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..334
Re-branding exercise for MAC workshop
Lumby Street Banners
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
63
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
4
APPENDIX 1
COMMUNITY MEMBERS AND GROUPS
Identified in the Cultural Planning Process as Key Stakeholders and/or Key Informants. Not all responded or were
able to participate.
Allan Haworth
Lumby Air Force
Carolyn Albert
Lumby and District Museum; Lumby Historians
Cherryvillan
Lumby Days
Cherryville & Area Historical Society
Lumby Public Market
Cherryville Artisans Market
Lumby Times newspaper
Cherryville Farmers Market Association
Mel Ormel
Cherryville Quilters Guild
Michelle Nickerson
D Fortin
Monashee Arts Council
Don Albert
Monique Fortin
Don Elzer; Wildcraft Forest Studios & Ecomuseum
MQN Architects
Don Fortin
Nina Westway
Doug Jones
Nick Hodge
Ellen Ewanchuk
Okanagan Regional Library
Eugene Foisy, NORD, Cherryville
Olena Bramble
George Ewanchuk
Priscilla Judd
Ginny Souder
Randy Rauck
Gordon Judd
Red Dog Glass Studios
Heather Fleury
Regional District of North Okanagan
Helen Kovaks
Robin LeDrew
Judy McLean
SD22
Julie McLean
Seniors Centre
Karen Bright
Splatsin First Nation
Kathy Jarosinkski
Village of Lumby
Larry MacGregor, Landslide Studios
White Valley Community Centre
Lou Hammond
Wild Salmon Music Festival
Louise Smith
White Valley Community Centre
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
64
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
5
APPENDIX 2
FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS
Community Foundation of the North Okanagan, Dave Fletcher, Executive Director
www.dfno.org
[email protected]
Canada Helps
www.canadahelps.org
Monashee Arts Council to set up an account to receive donations
BC Arts Council
www.bcartscouncil.ca
ArtsBC/Assembly of BC Arts Councils
www.artsbc.com
Canada Heritage
www.pch.gc.ca
Government of BC – Gaming Branch
www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/gaming
Special provincial and federal programs and one-time project grants
Eric Foster, MLA, Vernon Monashee
Deputy Whip; Member, Environment and Land Use Committee; Former Mayor, Village of Lumby; Former Councilor
Village of Lumby; Former Director, North Okanagan Regional District.
[email protected]
Colin Mayes, MP Okanagan Shuswap
[email protected]
ArtsStarts in Schools
artstarts.com
Wildcraft Forest Ecomuseum
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
65
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
6
APPENDIX 3
DEMOGRAPHICS AND PLAN AREA
The Plan review of demographics and the social impact from change must account for the five year lapse between
measurement and re-measurement by Statistics Canada. All population numbers are currently approximate as the
2011 census gets underway in May 2011.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
66
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
7
The last official census is dated 2006. There is a Draft OCP (January 2010) which is slated for review and adoption
in 2011. If adopted, the demographic information from the OCP will then form the basis for planning and adoption
which impacts the pending cultural plan. Therefore, information is included from the Draft OCP so that the two
plans will eventually align. Information which follows here is taken from the Draft Official Community Plan,
Regional District of North Okanagan, Electoral Area ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) and Electoral Area ‘E’ (Cherryville) January
2010.
In January 2010, population in the area was:
The Village of Lumby
1,634
Electoral Area D (Mabel Lake)
2,837
Cherryville (Electoral Area E)
934
With regard to First Nation communities, there are no reserves within or adjacent to the plan area. The two
nearest neighbouring reserves belong to the Okanagan Indian Band and the Splatsin (Spallumcheen) Indian Band.
The Splatsin First Nations people reside on Indian reserve lands adjacent to the City of Enderby to the south and
across the Shuswap river to the east. Splatsin has over 700 members. The Splatsin are the most southern tribe of
the Shuswap Nation, the largest Interior Salish speaking First Nation in Canada, whose aboriginal territory
stretches from the BC/Alberta border near the Yellowhead Pass to the plateau west of the Fraser River, southeast
to the Arrow Lakes and to the upper reaches of the Columbia River.
The Splatsin or ‘Spallumcheen’, the anglisized name, are governed by an elected Chief and Council. The area of the
reserve lands are:
•
•
•
Salmon River Reserve #1:
Enderby Reserve #2:
Sicamous Reserve #3:
1,559 hectares
2,276 hectares
81 hectares
The Okanagan and Splatsin Bands have lived on the lands in their traditional territory for thousands of years. Both
Bands maintain traditional spiritual and practical interest in the lands within the plan area and have an interest in
the planning process and policies.
Growth Trends
Population growth trends from the Draft OCP are shown below.
Source: Statistics
Canada Census
1971 - 2006
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
67
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
8
Family household size is similar to the provincial average; most families are married or common-law families; and,
there is a low mobility rate (persons moving). It is significant that there is a high percentage of households with
two adults and no children. Likely these are households that have raised their children and are remaining in the
family home.
Population Characteristics
Electoral Area D
1,088
920
785
2.8
330
2,837
2,465
Private occupied dwellings
Census Families
Married
Persons in census families
Households with children
Mobility Status
Lived at same address one year ago
Electoral Area E
393
265
240
2.8
365
934
895
The area has a high percentage of single family homes; in Cherryville, particularly, housing is affordable relative to
provincial averages. There is less rental housing than provincially averaged in BC as a whole.
Distinct Characteristics:
• a higher than average number of teenagers
•
there are fewer people ages 20 to 44
•
there are a higher than average number of adults 45-64
Planning Considerations:
• Fewer young people
•
Many will continue to leave the area to find work, and to further education
•
Loss of job opportunities in traditional resource sectors
•
Older workers are retiring; some jobs not being replaced
•
Older seniors traditionally move out of the area
•
Family-friendly community requires good access to education
•
Growth predicted in Electoral Areas B &C (nearer Vernon)
•
Growth in home-based businesses
•
Heightened awareness of sustainability
•
Changes in services locally: water, electricity expected
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
68
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
9
APPENDIX 4
WORKSHOPS 1 & 2:
Handouts
Thank you for attending tonight’s session, and agreeing to provide your input into the development of the Village
of Lumby Arts and Culture Master Plan.
Along with your fellow attendees, you are helping to develop a vision for the White Valley region going forward
as you share your perspectives.
Discussion in workgroups: present and discuss after 7:00pm Master Plan presentation
1.
What is the meaning of culture? How is it relevant locally?
Is it……
Culture makes us what we are
Culture is our link to the past and our path to the future
Culture is everything we do
2.
Contribute to and develop a vision for the Arts and Culture Master Plan for the White Valley Master Plan.
Discuss:
the area’s arts & culture scene; how it can improve and grow
how local arts & cultural organizations can benefit from growth; how they can form new partnerships
ways to enhance the area’s/Village’s cultural assets and legacies
Set goals to achieve the vision:
outline resources which are necessary
how can artists & cultural providers help invite economic improvement in the area through local
initiatives, and cultural tourism
next steps
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
69
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
10
Worksheet
Please form 3-4 person groups and discuss:
1.
What is the role of the Monashee Arts Council between 2012 and 2016?
What is the role of the Council with regard to tourism versus local residents?
2.
What role do educators play in arts planning in the area?
3.
What venues are workable for the promotion and presentation of arts and culture in:
Lumby
Cherryville
Other local areas
4.
What changes in venues are absolutely required for the growth of arts and culture endeavours in
Lumby
Cherryville
Other local areas
5.
How can you increase participation in the community activities around arts and culture in the area? How
committed are you to change?
Please write down your responses to these questions and prepare to read them out to the whole group after the
architects’ presentation at 7:00 p.m. when we reconvene.
Sol Mountain Skiing, Monashees
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
70
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
11
Questionnaire
A few questions about your own interest in
Arts and Culture in the White Valley area
What role do you feel that you fill in the arts and cultural life of Lumby, Cherryville and area? Answer
any which are relevant.
I make my living in arts & cultural
endeavours:
I am an artist in the:
performing arts
visual arts
written arts
100%
50%
less than 50%
I am active in:
I work in non-arts and cultural
endeavours
arts retailing
arts displays
arts performances
arts promotion
cultural tourism
I am:
retired
partially retired
I live in:
I am interested in:
Lumby
Cherryville
South Mabel Lake
Other (which)
______________________________
an expansion of arts and cultural
businesses in the White Valley area
an expansion of arts and cultural
education in the White Valley area
I have been a resident in this White Valley area
for:
less than 5 years
5-10 years
10-15 years
Longer than 15 years
I am interested in funding changes as follows:
an increase in multi-level government
funding:
federal
provincial
regional/municipal
no change in any current government
funding levels
increase in income to businesses &
artists for arts and culture
If you’d like to make any other comments for us to read later, please include them here:
Please leave this sheet with one of the Facilitators before you leave. Thank you.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
71
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
12
APPENDIX 5A
RESULTS: WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN FIRST STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP FEBRUARY 15, 2011
Exercise 1:
What is the meaning of culture? How is it relevant locally?
A “cluster” process was used in the first workshop, to assist participants to examine their own definitions, and find
ways to communicate with other participants on meaningful definitions of culture. “Cluster analysis’” is a class of
statistical techniques that can be applied to data that exhibit “natural” groupings. Cluster analysis sorts through
the raw data and groups them into clusters. A cluster is a group of relatively homogeneous cases or observations.
Objects in a cluster are similar to each other. They are also dissimilar to objects outside the cluster, particularly
objects in other clusters. Responses below are weighted based on the relative importance participants gave each
statement, and how many responses were tabulated.
How is culture relevant locally? What is important?
Rating
Covered public market + art gallery with workshop + volunteer artist-run gallery
Museum within complex
Music in Bandstand
Music Festival
Lumby Days
Arts Council
Piano potential
Pottery
What is the meaning of culture?
12
7
6
3
2
2
2
2
Rating
Culture includes traditions
Culture is the creative expression of our community, verbal, visual, language,
sport, music, dance, food growing, worship, art in all forms
Culture is partly defined by location
Culture is beauty
Culture contains our musical history, can drive economics, tourism, the history of
our work here – unique ecological niche
Culture is language, dress, food, activities, history, good for all ages, religion
Culture is everything that we are
Culture reflects who we are, where we are, where we’ve come from (heritage),
what we need to know to live here
Culture is the sum total of a vast number of inter-linked circles of influence
Culture is a representation of society
Culture is a community that has developed from the people within it
Culture is an umbrella: not well expressed in the name Lumby
13
11
8
7
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
1
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
72
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
13
Exercise 2:
Describe your own interest in arts and culture in the White Valley Area
Weighted responses from 21 questionnaires.
I am an artist in
The visual arts
The performing arts
The written arts
13
7
2
I am active in
Arts retailing
Arts displays
Arts performances
Arts promotion
Cultural tourism
7
6
4
3
3
I live in
Lumby
Cherryville
South Mabel Lake
Other (define):
Area D
Whitevale
Lumby East
I have been a resident in this White Valley area for
Less than 5 years
5-10 years
10-15 years
Longer than 15 years
I make my living in arts & cultural endeavours
100%
50%
Less than 50%
I work in non-arts and cultural endeavours
8
3
1
4
2
1
3
3
3
10
5
1
8
5
I am
Retired
Partially retired
Working full-time
4
4
3
I am interested in
Expansion of arts & cultural businesses in the White Valley area
Expansion of arts & cultural education in the White Valley area
I am interested in funding changes as follows:
--An increase in multi-level government funding
--Federal
--Provincial
--Regional/municipal
--No change in any current government funding levels
--An increase in income to businesses and artists for arts & culture
13
10
10
4
6
7
9
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
73
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
14
Open ended responses
“If you’d like to make any other comments for us to read later, please include them here”:
Responses from 21 questionnaires.
1.
I think the name “Lumby” is a barrier to the arts and culture as outlined in the White Valley Official
Community Plan. A name like “White Valley” would be easier to brand.
2.
Art Gallery is a very important linchpin for the artist community in Monashee area.
3.
We have marvelous artists in this area; it would be marvelous if local & regional governments recognized arts
& culture is an essential line on every budget!
4.
OCP is an important document.
5.
Architecture is important.
6.
Basing funding on population is not fair (i.e., less to Cherrville than Lumby)
7.
Running a small gallery in Cherryville is a huge job. Because I am so small, I can only do so much. Money to
hire student employees, as I could use help with this, as working seven days a week at the shop is hard.
8.
I am active in artisan/crafts, and believe artisans and crafters should be included in “arts and culture.”
9.
Need a permanent home for arts in the area.
Exercise 3:
Contribute to, and develop a vision for, the Arts and Culture Master Plan (4 workgroups of 4-5)
•
Discuss how the arts and culture scene can improve and grow
•
How organizations can benefit from growth
•
How to enhance cultural assets and legacies
•
Set goals to achieve the vision
Local Initiatives
Gallery space
Land: industrial land
Grants
Traditions
Branding
Tourism
Government
Exhibitions or shows, no sales until staff available
Workshop space
Eventual exhibitions with sales which require staff
Tax deductible donations of land, capital or other resources, could
be a legacy
Mining tunnels: 2.5 miles could be used with a miniature train
Zipline: from Saddle Mountain into town
RDNO should have mandate to assist in applications
Barn raising
Website, network, congruency of messages
Destination, educational
The new Arts and Culture Master Plan should be officially
recognized and given a budget line, however small or large, on
both Village and RDNO boards
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
74
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
15
Local Economy: improving/growing
sawmill
salmon
hanggliding
snowmobiling
Need more events; more themed events
Need more and better venues
Building (White Valley) used as fully as possible but: does not meet
all needs
Management of arts
People, ideas, energy
Partnership: between arts and sports
Permanent art gallery space in advantageous location
Local space for gallery-community art centre
Change needed in
Venues
Need
The polarization in the community currently
(prison referendum): defuse it by focusing
on a sustainable creative community.
Set up
Partnerships
New amenities
Events & festivals
Art campuses: each artist in a campus
Art and Music School, i.e., Banff type and Penticton Summer
School; Valhalla; Victoria. Use existing school buildings
Create to strengthen, create sense of more community.
Improve economic climate, and culture to build support from
residents
Industry/Arts
With schools to promote arts and culture, music, art
Village Chamber of Commerce
Hotel and conference centre, rather than a prison. Back road to
Silver Star will happen after culture gets going.
to create awareness, bring more tourism; grow economy
Input to Goal Setting
Increase resources: money and volunteers. Local businesses to be asked to contribute for raffles, prizes,
advertising, signage needed
Partner with artists to attend school classes to “teach” or demonstrate a project
Salmon Festival
Springtime Walking Trail Festival
th
2012 – 50 year/anniversary Monashee Park. Spread word of video for making the park; create a celebration
Workshops like this evening to be held four times a year
Cover the Lumby Public Market
Business Management to draw up plans and find financing
Salmon Trails and partnerships, i.e., Music Festival, Village Dreamfish Ladder
Lumby is hard to brand; prefer “Monashee”
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
75
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
16
Salmon Tourism: we can be better than Adams
Create an eco-tourism bus tour, boardwalk
Wetland Rollins Lake is designated bird sanctuary. Modeled like Creston.
OCP is important; all here should read it.
Grants, grant writing: need team to create better approaches for funding
Support artists as an asset
White Vale School: is it available?
Large enough group (MAC) to be credible
Ask for help from RDNO Appointees
Film Set: Locations: could we promote to filmmakers? Lavington glass or White Vale School? Prudent to use
local connections. Get Lumby area on lists for locations, i.e., with Lions Gate, etc.
Benefits of a summer school: music – arts – film – workshops – recitals – teaching – gallery sales. Could all be
at White Vale School.
Toward creating a vision:
1. Gallery & workshop space and storage
2.
Music Room
3.
Having an actual building enables grant application eligibility
4.
Building 8 (on MQN plan) also added to side of trackside of arena for workshops, gallery, shared mechanical
5.
With a set space, you don’t get member participation, i.e., Saddle Mountain Lounge closed)
Toward creating a mission:
1. Arts facility attached to main building in new complex
2.
Larger actual Community Centre
3.
Economic improvement
4.
Having Artist Retreats
5.
Increasing corporate sponsorship
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
76
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
17
APPENDIX 5B
WORKSHOP 2: HANDOUT
April 14, 2011: White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan
Stakeholders Questionnaire
Please rate your level of support from 1 (do not support) to 10 (strongly support) for each of the statements
below by circling your response:
WORKSHOP PARTICIPATION
Were you able to participate in, and contribute to, the Arts and Culture Master Plan workshop sessions?
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
DIRECTION AND FINDINGS
Having reviewed the Executive Summary from the Draft Plan, do you generally agree with the highlights presented
at the April 14 session?
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
GOALS AND IMPLEMENTATION
There are nine goals identified in the Draft Plan, which are on display at the April 14 session. Do you generally
agree with the goals and responsibilities as outlined?
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
If not, or if you agree with some goals, and not with others, please comment:
RECOMMENDATIONS
There are 14 recommendations identified in the Draft Plan, which are on display at the April 14 session. Do you
generally agree with the recommendations as outlined?
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
If not, or if you agree with some recommendations, and not with others, please comment:
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
77
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
18
GOALS AND IMPLEMENTATION
There is an implementation timeline in the Draft Plan, which is on display at the April 14 session. Do you generally
agree with the timeline and priorities as outlined?
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
GOALS AND IMPLEMENTATION
Would you be interested in being part of a group which takes responsibility for implementing some aspects of the
Arts and Culture Master Plan, once it is finalized and accepted?
Yes
No
Don’t know
COMMENTS
We thank you for the time you have invested in helping create a new Arts and Culture Master Plan for the White
Valley Region.
If you have any other comments for us, please include them below.
Please leave your completed questionnaire with one of the facilitators at the session.
Thank you.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
78
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
19
RESULTS:
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN SECOND STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP APRIL 14, 2011
[see questionnaire above]
Question
Do Not Support
Moderate
Support
Strongly Support
Did not Respond
Did you participate in
and contribute to
workshops?
0%
25%
75%
0%
Do you generally agree
with the draft Executive
Summary?
Do you generally agree
with the draft goals?
Do you generally agree
with the draft
recommendations?
Do you generally agree
with the draft timeline
& priorities?
0%
42%
50%
8%
0%
25%
58%
17%
0%
33%
58%
9%
0%
33%
42%
25%
Would you be part of an
implementation Group?
58%
Yes
No
0%
Don’t Know
25%
Comments:
I see a strong desire to strengthen the arts community in the extended White Valley area.
Building awareness individually, by community, locally and regionally, the efforts of the arts community can be
enhanced.
Monashee Arts Council needs to expand. This should bring together all the artists in every aspect.
Well written plan; lots of good ideas.
Could plan a summer retreat at the bible camp “2VM” or “Double VM” Bible Camp Vernon Miller Jr & Sr
Good work.
Arts & Culture is very important in every community and must be noticed and supported by RDNO, etc.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
79
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
20
APPENDIX 6
BACKGROUND MATERIALS REVIEWED
Draft Official Community Plan March 2011
Regional District of the North Okanagan
Electoral Area ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) and Electoral Area ‘E” (Cherryville)
Whitevalley Community Resource Centre Annual Report: 2009-2010
Building Cultural Programming in the Monashee, Doug Jones: December 14, 2009
Supporting Art and Culture Activities for the Community: Facility and Infrastructure Needs: September 16, 2010
White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Master Plan, Yates, Thorn & Associates: January 2010
Official Community Plan November 2005
Village of Lumby
With bylaws and amendments
Lumby’s Fiscal Future: Building a Case for Change Workshop October 20, 2010
White Valley Community Centre; Alliance Communications December 2010
Lumby Days: Monashee Arts Council Program
June 12-14, 2009
Recreational and Club Directory
Lumby and District
Chamber of Commerce
2010-2011
Cultural HR Study 2010
HR Trends and Issues Report
December 2010
The Conference Board of Canada
Ottawa, ON
www.culturalhrc.ca
A Public Arts Policy for the Monashee and Sculpture
Symposium Plan, Presented as a Pilot Project
March 2001
Don Elzer
Draft Report: Telephone Survey
2011 White Valley Survey
Regional District of North Okanagan
Points of View Research & Consulting Ltd.
April 5, 2011
Nick Hodge: Camel Hump
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
80
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
21
APPENDIX 7
VENUES
Mabel Lake Community Hall; 25 years old; owned by NORD
Well maintained by volunteers: Mabel Lake Community Association
Few regular users; used for special events
Cherryville Community Hall; 25 years old
Excellent condition
Low level of use, but of critical importance to community
Used for special events; morning playgroup, seniors dinners monthly; clubs; movie night
White Valley Community Centre; 20 years old
Houses regional library; preschool; commercial kitchen; flex spaces
Wide range of programming; weekends often fully booked
Generally, facility only supports fitness, not sports
Well-used, but not to capacity
Oval Park – Used for farmers market
Focal point for Lumby
Poor street presence
Needs upgrading (see recommendations from consulting architects presented February 15, 2011)
BUSINESSES WHICH DO, OR COULD PROVIDE, LOCATIONS FOR ART DISPLAY OR MEETINGS/OTHER
Hubert’s Good Food
Monashee 50+ Club
Alice’s Restaurant
Ida’s Bakery
Monashee Arts Council
Ana’s Pizza
Jehovah’s Witness
New Image Painting
Bear Valley Highlands
Lavington Fellowship Baptist
Olena Bramble - Watercolour Painting
Blue Ox Pub
Lumby and District Chamber of Commerce
Pagoda Inn Restaurant
Catholic Church Sacred Heart
Lumby Christian Church
Queen of Peace Society
Cherryville Artisans Shop
Lumby Curling Club
Ramshorn Pub
Cherryville Community Club/Hall
Lumby Days Society
Royal Canadian Legion
Cherryville Emporium
Lumby Health Foods
Sacred Heart Church
Cherryville Gospel Church
Lumby Lions Club
Seventh Day Adventist - Silver Hills
Cherryville Seniors Society
Lumby Museum
Silver Hills SDA Church
Country Engraving
Lumby Neighbourhood Baptist Church
St James the Less Anglican Church
Creighton Valley Richlands
Lumby United Church
Lumby, Cherryville and Area Youth
Advisory Committee
Tutor-Tech Computers and Hobbies
Frieda’s Pizza
Highway 6 Studio
Whitevalley Community Centre
Whitevalley Community Resource Centre
Mabel Lake Community Club/Hall
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
81
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
22
APPENDIX 8
KEY INFORMANT PHONE SCRIPT
INTRODUCTION
Hello, my name is ________, and I am working with the Village of Lumby and GDH Consultants on an Arts and
Culture Master Plan along with assistance from the Regional District of the North Okanagan.
You’ve been identified as a key stakeholder in the cultural life of the community. I’d like to have a discussion of
what is important to you as the Village moves forward in nourishing arts and culture in the Monashees.
GETTING STARTED
Organization name or Affiliation
If organization:
Current position
How long in position
Notes on reporting structure
Annual budget of organization
If individual:
Role in local arts & cultural life
Years:
Groups you have worked with:
Number of employees
Number of volunteers
Number of visitors per event/week/month/year
Seasonality an issue?
FUNDING/INCOME SOURCES
Operating Budget annually (general) (<$25K; $25-$50K; $50-$100K; $500K; $1M+)
Funding from what sources & general scope
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Gaming
Municipality/ies; District
Province
Canada Council
Business Improvement Association/s
Fundraisers
Service Clubs
Other (describe)
Did you attend a stakeholder’s session for this Plan? For the OCP? For other community Planning? Which?
Have you read the OCP?
Are you a member of the MAC? of Cherryville Artisans?
What barriers to success (of implementing arts and culture planning/growth) in the community do you
identify?
What successes?
Inform us of your relationship/s with community government/volunteer orgs?
How many times a week/month do you attend a cultural function in your community? Which?
Outside your community? Which?
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
82
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
23
WHO DO YOU REACH/WHO WORKS WITH YOU?
Volunteer Board/Registered Charity/founding year
Age groups reached: 0-10; 10-18; 18-25; 25-55; 55+
Demographic reached (geo/gender)
First Nations components
Festival participation
Tourism components
Collegial relationships with other orgs/which
FACILITY/IES USED
Location in the community
Cost
Appropriate to needs? Discuss.
Share with?
Parking/accessibility/safety issues
Different facility needed? Discuss. Size/Type
When; Where; Why; Cost; How would a new facility change your org’s programming, planning, cost base?
How many years can you be successful without a new facility? Do you have a strategic growth plan?
Are there any heritage components in your programming?
CLOSING
Open Ended Questions
Public Art
What does the term “culture” mean to you?
What do you consider are the Lumby’s, or Cherryville’s, or the area’s, cultural assets?
What do you think your community needs to do to support and enhance its existing cultural resources?
What is your vision of the Village of Lumby as a center for innovation, creativity and artistic achievement?
What are your top three cultural priorities for the Village to work on in the next five years?
What barriers to success can you identify?
Thank you. If you have any further thoughts, please feel free to write to me at: (email)
IF ASKED
We plan to deliver a draft plan to the Lumby in April of 2011.
We are working under the direction of Tannis Nelson in the RDNO, & Robin LeDrew at the Monashee Arts Council
FOLLOW UP INVITATION TO FUTURE STAKEHOLDER SESSIONS TO COME
Next is Thursday April 14 at 7:15 p.m. in the White Valley Community Centre.
Silver Spur Wilderness Ranch
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
83
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
24
APPENDIX 9
SUMMARY OF COMMENTS FROM KEY INFORMANT INTERVIEWS IN WHITE VALLEY
Interview 1: Arts Council; overall arts and culture scene particularly in Lumby.
Volunteer with food bank, part of start up of community resource centre, chaired community health society,
chaired forestry renewal committee, late 1990s, now Treasurer for MAC (Monashee Arts Council). Have been a
number of reviews around arts and culture. Spoke of liveliness of Cherryville arts and culture, but they are
somewhat isolated from Lumby and South Mabel Lake. The Cherryville Summer Arts Festival was really excellent,
now fallen by wayside. Lumby Days: it’s time for that event to move on; it’s a hodgepodge, midway and food, gun
show, summer fair. Not really arts and culture. A separate arts and culture summer festival would be more
appropriate for tourists, local artists, and artisans. Such a festival could incorporate theatre and music, dance, a
mixture of local and professional artists would be good.
Re: markets. MAC has supported the local market, buying space for members to display work; often unused. This
is not the most appropriate venue or audience for art display and sales. Hope was that Salmon trails promotions
might help tourism visit the townsite. Wasn’t continued.
Re: funding. We apply for gaming; to the RDNO; most funding goes directly into Lumby Days, not into our own
operating or projects. A better plan for funding applications, including BC Arts Council could help. Organizational
capacity for applying for grants is a problem.
Re: membership and growth: need heightened awareness.
White Valley PRC (Parks, Recreation and Culture Commission) and NORD have not offered significant support for
arts other than to conduct studies. My concern, therefore: governments have people and infrastructure to look
after parks and recreation programs, but none to look after culture.
NORD told MAC that our programs should “self-fund.” This is completely unrealistic; look at the payment streams
for parks and rec. programming.
Agree we would like to be a line item, not re-applying every year.
Basically I think we have a cultural problem as to the awareness of local government to funding of arts and culture,
and its importance to the community. The OCP enshrines the importance of arts and culture, but governments are
not living up to their mandate.
It’s therefore chicken and egg; small number of people interested in a program, no public visibility, therefore
amount of public interest is low, so programs don’t get started, attendance remains low, we remain invisible.
Art, music, theatre at Bloom – haven’t made much of an overture to them. Nor have they to us.
The theatre at the high school is interesting, was a BC Expo Legacy grant, built and outfitted. Here’s how that grant
happened. Drama teacher put together a committee, NFP Society, built onto the high school, many usage promises
from society, not fulfilled, starting a local theatre group, didn’t materialize.
Ever after, local groups, school and school board resisted use: finally extracted a commitment, $15 usage charge,
$2million liability policy is now a barrier. Could we get someone to pay for the policy, MAC registered, tax receipts;
MAC has no directors insurance. Approach Chamber of Commerce.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
84
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
25
Bundle policies: Village of Lumby is now billing organizations that have buildings on the property. They are billing
the museum for their insurance portion. An overall assistance policy needs to be cut. (What do the sports groups
pay?)
The Village or the District should insure not-for-profits (NFPs) and community groups,
MAC has joined Chamber of Commerce. They need to take more an interest in arts and culture. Using culture
integrating with tourism, there are a lot of things that go beyond that.
Artists are a hard group to mobilize. Some on MAC have repeatedly expressed an interest in a public gallery, work
and sold, tie to tourism. It would be a good thing. We don’t have the capacity to run it even on a volunteer basis.
Hard to keep the doors open, not enough people. So we should get involved in the recreational art programs in the
community, offer in the same way as yoga, get some people involved up to their elbows.
Infrastructure – we have said over and over we need it.
Interview 2: Selling art in Cherryville
Summer is the main time; staffing is a huge issue for retailing artists; how do you produce art and keep a shop
open seven days a week? Can’t be done. Summer students through government programs help in a very minor
way, due to wages issues. Even taking the time to go to markets closes local shops, and takes time away from art
production. What a problem this is!
One fall sale and one Christmas sale. Need help promoting arts sales, as sustainable small, eco-friendly businesses.
I’m a member of the Chamber of Commerce; their website is good, helps get customers. But we need help
marketing and advertising. Print ads are too expensive; we still have dial-up, need high speed.
Interview 3: South Mabel Lake arts and culture
Greatest percentage of our residents are in agriculture; a bit of logging. Tourists and markets are the biggest part
of my arts sales.
A MAC workshop and storage, with retail sales in Lumby would be wonderful.
There has been too much talk and not enough action. I just want to spend time in my studio, let someone else
display and sell. We need to grow awareness of MAC. Lumby definitely needs an exhibition space.
I like sports, but arts and culture are equally important as sports. Sports are not the way to everything. Equal
funding is key. With a local gallery, younger artists could move back to our community. Arts sales space in a new
gallery would not be exclusive to any one artist; artists could also work parttime to help cover rent through a
barter system. We need a decent sized gallery, should be able to do two things at once, a small performing space,
functional performing, roll-in stages, office space, storage, attach the museum to it all.
Tourism is a challenge; many just roll through. Lumby needs to give tourists a chance to want to stop and stay
over. This would increase the liveliness of the town, increase sales. A good gallery would go a long way toward
doing this. Other interests would pop up, give people a reason to stay.
Consistently at night, there is not a car anywhere in Lumby. No one is downtown. We have to get Council to
recognize arts and culture are important. Could revive our town.
Lumby council: for many years, and the mayors, have had a hard time that arts and culture, a good vibrant
community centre should be going 18 hrs a day, not six; if City wants developers to build new houses, make it
more vibrant, projects don’t always fix the problem. Long term need more thoughtfulness. I’m glad the provincial
government is putting a spotlight on small communities.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
85
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
26
The 2005 OCP certainly highlights the community’s arts and culture interests, streetscapes, and encouragement to
use downtown. This is in opposition to mega projects.
Landlines would be better than cell towers, but we need better access to high speed internet. There is a petition
that’s been circulating for some years, and now filed at RDNO. We need to revive the drive to improve
communications.
Interview 4: Lumby and District Museum
Opened in 1991. Twelve active volunteers. Low membership costs: $10 family; $5 single; need a corporate
membership level that works (currently $50, no members).
Museum is about 2000 SFT, with a small outbuilding 750 SFT. Audiences include school groups, up to early
teenagers. A number of tourists visit. We have a brochure, and a government sign on the highway. We have a
number of seniors who volunteer, but the stairs inside our building (down to the Archives) are a huge problem. We
need a one-level access storage space.
We’re open seasonally, there is a lack of members to run year-round. We are fully not-for-profit. Open Victoria
Day to Labour Day. Can book school groups outside that window in late spring. Also open longer hours during
Lumby Days; other days 10-3.
We need: better archive access; get the museum out into the community; have small displays in other buildings.
Liked the MQN presentation for incorporating the Museum into the Community Centre complex. Re: arts and
culture, there is nothing here, really, just our little museum. We try to keep it in people’s minds, but they forget
us.
Interview 5: Lumby Public Market; Cherryville Farmers Market
Involved with the public market five years. Now moved to Cherryville, am past president of LPM.
Registered society, not-for-profit, with executive, all officers. Rental rates for vendors $50 year, or $5 drop-in fee.
Cherryville is not a registered society; hold market on same day (Saturday) which reduces income for artisans or
farmers who want to attend both.
Artists and artisans do well, especially summer tourist season. Their work is very well received. Attendees go for
veggies; Lumby is a public market, not a farmers market, possible to sell items that are not handmade, sell
collectibles, Lumby is one of the few that does this. Lumby used to be better for artisans, better at oval now than
the old parking lot.
For local artists, 15-20% of annual output sold at markets, including fall and Christmas.
Changes I’d like to see? A cover for the market; more access, parking, tourist traffic, farmer’s market signs on
highway, large signs, permanent, Lumby’s don’t stand out very well. Cherryville has a huge orange sign, with black
lettering, stands out, 4km to the market. Bathrooms, etc. are important.
New sandwich board signs for Lumby are being made: should work better. Another thing we need is strong
support from the Chamber of Commerce; until we moved to oval, insurance was shared; they were covered under
the chamber; coverage was not adequate; when they moved to the oval had to update. NORD has been biggest
supporter, encouraged, signed 5 year contract, $1 a year rent, waived; pamphlets in the chamber..
What vision do you have for local arts and culture? NORD does not help with insurance; they have a discretionary
fund, $1000 a year. Not count-on-able. Cherryville gets even more money from NORD, Cherryville more into
fundraising, more for activities, children’s activities, special events, music, they are more progressive. They get
good assistance from the White Valley Resource Centre..
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
86
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
27
I was excited when I saw the MQN plan; the parking, the pool, will be a draw. It will be great for the LPM.
Interview 6: Paragliding and Music
Have lived in Lumby area since 12 years old. Played in many bands, toured, recorded, want to inspire younger and
older local people to get into music. Started Wild Salmon Music Festival last year; multi-purpose, to bring
awareness to the plight of local wild salmon, they are in desperate shape, being depleted, and to rekindle the spirit
of music in the valley, hosting jams downtown every Friday night. It’s working well, getting people inspired, really
positively accepted, music is starting to come back: Lumby was once a musical center, quebecois music on every
corner, died out during the last 15 years, now starting to come back. We jam at the Blue Ox, promoted in Vernon
and Lumby papers. There is dancing, young players can come in to perform, play their own compositions,
encouraging original music.
Then there is the flight park, family farm since 1908, now the steward, organic growing, flying, teaching hang
gliding, ultralights; we have three grass strips. We have lots of tourism in the summer, known in Enderby,
Kelowna, Armstrong, hosting competitions since 1976. We’re the paragliding capital of Canada. 300-500 tourists
from all over the world every year, many from US, California, lower mainland. We host air races.
A lot of fliers like to play music. So we are cross promoting. Lumby has spirit, a real drive to create a sustainable
fun-loving community.
Seven students from the Lumby
area had their poems chosen for
publication in “Together with
the Children, The Elders Project”
published 2011.
The book is a collection of
historical poetry and
information gained through the
students listening to their
Elders’ stories of growing up.
Interview 7: Bloom Theatre
There are rental barriers (insurance), $5 million SD22, $205 premium. We need to find a model in another district
to work with RDNO on a new policy. Usage agreement: no information on this at present. The theatre got built,
but the most pressing concern now is usage.
The plan unveiled by MQN. I thought that was pretty exciting, but not integrated enough; could look like Lake
Country, more open, more display space, less like sheds, landscaping nice; however, much looks like an
afterthought, not a real plan. MQN expertise is in building arenas, not art spaces.
Huge issue at theatre is promotion. High speed internet would help, as would more awareness of arts and culture
in the community.
Interview 8: SD22 Trustee, Arts and Culture in Lumby; Recreation Coalition
Got involved in arts and culture to see what people’s visions were, look to the future. Recreation coalition was
instrumental in getting a master plan commitment, from which an arts and culture master plan. Children need
sports and arts. There is perhaps more talk than action around opening new arts and culture spaces in Lumby.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
87
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
28
Barriers to using Bloom are more perceived than real. We’re doing a survey and a facility use agreement for
Bloom, this will help identify what type of usages are needed.
First and foremost, my vision is that communities need to be able to organize themselves. This is embedded in the
master parks plan. I watch arts and culture in other centres, it works better. Artists need to see the future, and,
see the path to get there. The artists in White Valley need jumpstarting. They should all agree on something, be
more inclusive, and take responsibility to provide their own space.
APPENDIX 10
ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT WHITE VALLEY
Lumby is located on Highway 6, 35 km east of Vernon and 36 km west of Cherryville. Lumby is known as the
Gateway to the Monashees, the Mountains of Peace.
The view from Lumby is wonderful, as the picturesque Coldstream, Trinity and Creighton valleys all converge here.
The awe-inspiring Monashee Mountain range and the varied landscape of streams and lakes beckon the avid
outdoor enthusiast.
Although the village of Lumby was incorporated in 1956, its history dates back to 1893, when the forty-acre town
site was surveyed. Prior to that, the small settlement of pioneer farmers and gold miners lived in White Valley,
whose beginning commenced with the Cherry Creek gold strike in 1862.
Tourists can take a hatchery tour of the fish incubation and rearing facilities for salmon near Shuswap Falls.
Monashee Provincial Park is a wilderness area of lakes, mountains and forests, comprised of several small
watersheds with old-growth cedar, hemlock and spruce, an important habitat for grizzlies. There is a small herd of
caribou, and rare specimens of coastal plant species.
There are three golf courses in the area, as well as access to Silver Star Provincial Park and Silver Star Mountain.
Avid birdwatchers enjoy excellent viewing throughout the area. Echo Lake Provincial Park and Mabel Lake
Provincial Park also offer amenities to residents and travelers who enjoy the outdoors.
In Cherryville, workings from the California gold rush left
behind in the 1860s can still be visited.
More than thirty heritage murals are featured throughout
Lumby. Banners, sculpture and other street and public art
enliven the Lumby streetscapes and riverscapes.
Lumby Visitor Centre provides directions for a country art
drive. At Landslide Studios the pottery and clay murals of
Larry MacGregor are displayed in a forest setting on River
Road.
Lumby Visitors Centre
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
88
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
29
The forest provides raw materials for much of the art at The
Wildcraft Forest Ecomuseum and Herb Farm. Located on Highway 6
in the shadow of the Camel’s Hump, this unusual venue showcases
paintings, photography and sculpture in three studio galleries.
Artistry starts at the gate and carries on throughout the fanciful
Cherryville Artisans’ Shop, Gallery and Marketplace. The shop itself
provides the canvas for a large-scale mural and the grounds host a
sculpture garden, pond, willow gazebo and giant mushroom
umbrellas. Painters Gary Whitley, Mae Roberts, Evalynne McDougall,
Gail Short and Elizabeth Moore show at Highway 6 Studio. For a
unique artistic experience, tourists can walk along the Mystic Trail
through the forest near Mabel Lake.
Raven Air
Lumby Streetscape
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
89
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
Cherryville Artisans
Keefer Lake
Wilderness Area
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
30
APPENDIX 11
RECOMMENDATION: A YEAR-ROUND MUSIC ACADEMY IN WHITE VALLEY
Extracts from a submission from Priscilla Judd, Key Stakeholder
What does “arts and culture” mean to the White Valley region? It means people – human resources in action –
people within a backdrop of creativity.
Community vision is mentioned in all the OCPs in the White Valley region – from that, arts and culture can easily
be extracted.
In any community – arts and culture is always evolving. Arts and culture is the sum of the past that embraces the
future. New generations and changing media create the canvas for arts and culture. New ideas come from
changing needs, from interest and practice. New ideas sometimes enter a community by way of new residents,
who practice a different skill set (hence arts and culture evolve).
Lumby’s culture has for many years been “resource extraction”, so there was less need to promote an
economically diverse arts and culture community. Lumby was primarily logging, and that down-to-earth industry
left its own scars.
Pollution and scars: there is a potential economic gain from offering artists the opportunity to understand and
capture current pollution problems in Lumby, and selling their value-added artistic works.
One example is Costing the Future.org. Priscilla Judd has developed this website to promote a zero carbon
footprint pollution solution – a solution capable of being developed in Lumby. The website is an artistic platform
for attracting investors, as well as media artists, to capture cultural acceptance and rejection of non-traditional
methods of pollution remediation.
From this unusual opportunity comes the potential for holding workshops and seminars on sustainability and the
remediation of pollution, soil, salmon and water, similar to workshops on water stewardship. Such a redistribution
of political power could result in the embracing of cultural diversity.
Although Lumby was not derived from “lumber” it’s perceived as that. Moses Lumby is forgotten as a pioneer. If
logging is gone, then perhaps the name Lumby should be gone, too.
A ward system might rebrand the area as “White Valley”. This could invite economic development using a
different culture as a medium of exchange. White Valley would be more reflective of current culture and more
attractive to the future of arts.
White Valley would be easier to develop as a “brand”. Lumby does not inspire – it is reminiscent of lumber and
clear cuts. This might build on the current White Valley Community Resource Centre and Community Hall.
Tourists could travel through White Valley to Silver Star (on a new road)? Residents and visitors alike could enjoy
the White Valley Alpine Village, or White Valley Cross Country Ski Resort? They might read a newspaper named
the White Valley Times.
For example, Lake Country evolved from joining several small communities into a rural area – or district; together
local residents developed their own culture to benefit all concerned.
My vision for the White Valley Arts and Culture Master Plan is the creation of the White Valley Campus for Culture
and Arts – WCCA. There may be better names, but this is a start for a working title.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
90
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
31
Imagine the Banff School of Fine Arts – think about the Vernon Community Music School, Penticton’s Academy of
Music – Victoria Piano Summer School . This type of facility is not beyond reach for our community. Reasons?
I am part of the technical support team for the Vernon Community Music School, the RCM Music Festivals and the
College of the Rockies in Cranbrook. My husband Gordon and I provide piano services from sales to complete
rebuilding to individuals and institutions across BC. I support the Music Teachers in Vernon and the Kootenays,
driving across the province several times a year. I used to maintain all the pianos in Creston Schools and churches
and smaller venues (halls and seniors centres, too).
How can we invite economic development using culture as a medium of exchange? Having a lifetime career in
music, arts and culture, I can say that I have not personally achieved vast amounts of wealth . However, I have the
tools of my trade, and a wealth of technical expertise. Having supported many communities develop a vibrant
music culture, I have learned much, and my personal goal is to serve my community where I live. That would be
Lumby and area.
My first experience with institutional music was private lessons, then orchestra, and school band. Later (in
Penticton) the Summer School of the Arts brought top musicians together with students. Symphony players sat
with students in duos, trios and chamber groups. After three weeks, everyone performed in different recitals
throughout the community. Some recitals were free; others were ticketed. Many students from outside the
community paid to attend – local scholarships were also offered. Families took holidays while their children
attended. Dorms were created in the local school. Teachers and dorm parents were compensated. People who
built the dorms were paid. Food was prepared by groups or restaurants. I know many people donated expertise
to get it going.
Living in Lumby gave my husband (a guitar-maker, and teacher) access to wood; over the year, we have processed
20 logs for guitar, violin and piano sound boards. My husband (Gordon) built and installed numerous sound
boards in high-end pianos. One winter, he secured a contract for a year’s supply of 9ft grand sound boards for the
Falcone piano company (the most expensive piano being built in North America at that time). Few BC residents
have our experience or possess the skills to produce musical instrument wood and finished products.
I apprenticed in a piano rebuilding shop in West Van. I learned the business of reconditioning old pianos. Ten
pianos a week came through that shop (new pianos as well). That is my unique experience. I saw how it created
culture within the local community. I learned piano repair, reconditioning, rebuilding, piano tuning, sales and
teamwork. I soon realized that Gordon’s skills were far beyond what was available in any local piano shop in
Vancouver. Before long, his workshop was bursting with piano work.
Later, we had our own piano shop in the Kootenays. I do believe in mentors; Gordon and I had many, and of the
best. Apparently the Valhalla Summer Music Camp is no longer including piano. Not for lack of interest, but
because they can’t get 25 pianos. I can get 25 pianos. If I don’t buy them, I can fix donated pianos. That could be a
start for the White Valley Campus for Culture and Arts. There are people in this community with the skills to
manage funding for a project such as this.
My husband and I have a lifetime of experience in technical support for music – every music program needs piano.
Since all trained musicians must learn some piano (even singers), all teaching studios have a piano.
That’s why the piano tuner/technician is the backbone of any music program and institution. Between myself and
my husband we have the skills and tools to support a first class music institution. We are here in Lumby because of
family ties and our skills are under-utilized. We hope to stay here and work our passion for the local arts
community.
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
91
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
32
Under the right circumstances, with community support, we could build a first-class music campus dedicated to
music and the world of musical instruments. A combined summer school with a piano rebuilding shop would
create music, as well as jobs. Here are some spin-off opportunities:
•
A good rebuilding piano shop can attract piano tuners and techs for hands-on workshops – that’s
an industry.
•
People are always interested in piano workshop tours. They can be planned with a tea shop
recital afterward.
•
Musical instrument wood and parts can be manufactured from local wood. There are suppliers
and consumers looking for good quality parts.
•
There is a skill to moving pianos properly – that we can also teach.
•
The venue can be used for festivals, workshops, master classes and performance.
•
Piano sales are also possible.
•
Music is part of every cultural activity, whether it’s passive (on radio and CD), or active in the
relationship between audience and performer – student and teacher.
Setting goals with colleagues to achieve a new vision together: currently, there is a strong community interest in
creating economic development.
We need business mentors, people who can secure investments and start up capital. People who in partnership,
can help us negotiate for the use of Whitevale School. We should learn how to recruit a team of mentors and
develop capacity through strong relationships with the business community – without that, our dreams will remain
merely dreams.
Sol Mountain Touring
Monashee Provincial Park
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
92
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
33
APPENDIX 12
RECOMMENDATION: MONASHEE CREATIVE SECTOR BUSINESS INCUBATOR
A submission from Don Elzer, Wildcraft Forest Studios, and Larry MacGregor, Landslide Studios
April 28, 2011
“The Monashee has become known as an art destination; however “working artists” operating studio businesses
have been on the decline for the past 20 years. In order to address issues of attrition and lost opportunities, a
handful of remaining studios have banded together to form the Monashee Creative Sector Business Incubator. The
effort is partnered with the Cascadia Conservancy and the Okanagan Institute.
The initial focus and mandates of the incubator is as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
To support existing “working art studios” and “creative sector businesses” in the Monashee which includes the
areas of NORD Area’s D and E and the Village of Lumby and can also include the larger Highway 6 Corridor.
To develop, manage and grow a “destination art and creativity school” that is multi-campus in nature and
includes working art studios and creative sector businesses.
To develop, manage and grow events, tours and other activities that help to promote and diversify working
studios individually and/or as a group.
To enhance the value of working art studios and creative sector businesses by improving their facilities, skill
levels and revenues.
To apply destination marketing that will raise the level of prosperity for working art studios and creative sector
businesses.
To retain a level of “authenticity” in keeping with the culture of the Monashee and its natural environments.
To develop and grow business opportunities for the creative sector in the Monashee.
The Monashee Creative Sector Business Incubator expresses the need to have its focus and mandates included
within the North Okanagan Regional District Cultural Strategy so that there is recognition to support working art
studios and artists in business so that those businesses will be sustained, grow and prosper.
One of the gateways to
the Monashees
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
93
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
WVPRCAC – August 8, 2011
Regular Agenda – Item 4.c
34
APPENDIX 13
RE-BRANDING EXERCISE FOR MAC WORKSHOP
Backgrounder from BC Tourism website:
“Considered the Gateway to the Monashees. Shimmering lakes nestle in the mountains and streams and rivers
flow to the valleys. The area around Lumby is one of British Columbia’s undiscovered gems.
In Lumby one can pan for gold, stroll the historical mural walk and the Salmon Trail, go camping and hiking or
arrange to tour the old mining digs in nearby Cherryville. Lumby is the Trail Capital of Canada, and from here
visitors can get away on one of over a hundred trails that meander throughout the Monashee. The waters are
ideal for fishing and canoeing, and as the easternmost spawning point for Chinook salmon, it’s no wonder this
place begins their exciting journey.
With its small town congeniality, Lumby is a perfect place to get away from it all. There’s a feeling that is
refreshing: vacationers and travelers appreciate this colorful heritage village away from the hustle and bustle of
the city.
Shopping in Lumby includes an interesting array of businesses within the reach of a small town – and at day’s end,
visitors are able to relax on a local patio or two, before exploring local culinary specialties.”
Branding lines for consideration in future workshop:
1.
Meander through the Monashees
2.
Discover the White Valley
3.
Discover the Art of the Salmon River
4.
Linger in Lumby
5.
Rambling in the Monashees
6.
Roving in the Monashees
7.
Wander the Salmon River
8.
Monashee Thrills
9.
Arts Rides
10. Cherryville Charms
11. Monashee Mountain Gems
12. Mountain Gems
13. Monashee Gems
14. Wonderful Monashees
15. Kettle River Trails
16. Salmon River Trails
17. Salmon River Experience/s
Collage from
“Lumby Rocks”
18. Monashee Memories
WHITE VALLEY ARTS AND CULTURE MASTER PLAN, VILLAGE OF LUMBY, 2011
GDH SOLUTIONS AND CREATIVE OUTSOURCES
94
110808 WVPRCAC Regular
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement