2014-2015 College Catalog

2014-2015 College Catalog
MiraCosta College
2014–2015 Catalog
General Information
Degrees & Certificates
Credit & Noncredit Courses
Standards & Policies
miracosta.edu
MiraCosta College
2014–2015 Catalog
General Information
Degrees & Certificates
Credit & Noncredit Courses
Standards & Policies
miracosta.edu
O n t h e C ov e r :
LEFT, Antoine StevensPhillips, political science
major. Read his MiraCosta
College story at
miracosta.edu/antoine;
R IGHT, Lauren Flaherty,
nursing major. Read her
MiraCosta College story at
miracosta.edu/lauren
M i r a C osta C ollege
2014–2015 C atalog
MiraCosta College publishes a new catalog every
year. The information published in the catalog is
effective for the academic year beginning with
the fall semester and concluding with the summer
intersession. This catalog is effective fall 2014
through summer 2015.
C atalog R ights
The requirements for degrees, certificates, and
general education may change during the time
a student attends MiraCosta College, and these
changes are reflected in the catalog. Catalog
rights are established when a student first takes
classes at MiraCosta College and are maintained
through continual enrollment at the college. These
rights protect students from being held responsible
for changes made to their academic programs in
the years that follow their initial enrollment.
The catalog used to determine graduation
eligibility is the catalog operating at the time the
student began continual enrollment at MiraCosta
College unless the student’s petition requests a
different catalog. The other catalogs that can
be used to determine eligibility are catalogs in
effect during the time the student has maintained
continual enrollment at MiraCosta College or
the catalog in effect at the time the student files
his or her petition to graduate. Students who
need 6 or fewer units in order to satisfy all degree
requirements may be evaluated under the original
catalog that applied.
S tatem ent of A ssu r ance
Every effort is made to ensure that the course
information, applicable policies, and other
materials presented in the MiraCosta College
Catalog are accurate and current. In the event
a correction or update is warranted, a catalog
addendum will be published electronically and
will be available for download as a Portable
Document Format (PDF) file from the catalog
website at catalog.miracosta.edu.
MiraCosta College
2014-2015 Catalog
Table of Contents
Academic Calendar
4
President's Welcome
5
About MiraCosta College
7
Admissions & Enrollment
13
Student Support Programs & Services
31
Academic Programs
45
Associate Degrees & Certificates
51
Transferring Course Work
65
Areas of Study & Courses
81
Continuing Education
289
Academic Standards & Policies
303
Full-Time Faculty & Administrators
326
Glossary
332
A-Z Directory
335
Published by the MiraCosta Community College District
DISTRICT OFFICE:
Oceanside Campus
1 Barnard Drive
Oceanside, CA 92056-3820
760.757.2121
San Elijo Campus
3333 Manchester Avenue
Cardiff, CA 92007-1516
760.944.4449
Community Learning Center
1831 Mission Avenue
Oceanside, CA 92058-7104
760.795.8710
Outside the 760 area code, call us toll-free: 888.201.8480
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 3
Accreditation
MiraCosta College is accredited by the Accrediting
Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) of
the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), 10
Commercial Boulevard,
Suite 204, Novato, CA, 94949, (415) 506-0234. ACCJC is an
institutional accrediting body recognized by the Commission
on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S.
Department of Education and approved by the California
State Department of Education Office of Private Post-Secondary
Education for training veterans and other eligible persons under
the provisions of the GI Bill. The University of California, California
State Universities, and private universities of high rank give credit
for transfer courses completed at MiraCosta College.
MiraCosta College is approved by the following:
Association of Surgical Technologists
California Board of Registered Nursing
California State Colleges and Universities
California State Department of Education
Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training
State Board of Vocational Nurse and Psychiatric Technician
Examiners
University of California
To learn more about MiraCosta College’s accreditation, please
visit www.miracosta.edu/accreditation.
Academic Calendar
2014-2015
Fall Semester 2014
August 18
First day of fall semester classes
September 1
Labor Day (college closed)
September 22
Deadline to file a petition for degree/certificate
for fall
September 22
Deadline to petition for pass/no pass grade
November 11
Veterans Day (college closed)
November
27-29
Thanksgiving (college closed)
December 8-13 Final examinations--day and evening
December 13
End of fall semester
December 15- Semester break
January 19
December 24- College closed
January 1
Spring Semester 2015
January 19
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (college closed)
January 20
First day of spring semester classes
February 13-16 Lincoln’s & Washington’s Birthday observed
(college closed)
February 20
Deadline to file a petition for degree/certificate
for spring
February 20
Deadline to file a petition for pass/no pass
grade
March 16-21
Spring break
March 20
College closed
May 16-22
Final examinations--day and evening
May 22
End of spring semester
May 22
Commencement
May 25
Memorial Day (college closed)
Summer Intersession 2015
Dates not available at time of publication. See Summer 2015
Credit Course Schedule at www.miracosta.edu.
For application and enrollment dates and deadlines, consult
the schedule of credit courses or the Community Education
Bulletin for each semester. Current information is also available
on the college website: www.miracosta.edu.
4 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
President's Welcome
President's Welcome
Welcome MiraCosta College Students
The college also provides a wide array of support services
to help students to be successful. Students benefit from
counseling, financial aid, health services, disabled student
services, tutoring, veterans services, testing services, a
service learning program, student government and student
organizations, an international student program, an
intramural and intercollegiate athletic program, an Extended
Opportunities Programs and Services department, a career
center, admissions services, an outreach and recruitment
program, an inviting library, and a child development center.
MiraCosta College also has an excellent police department,
and students have indicated that they feel safe at all of our
sites.
MiraCosta College serves its community by helping students
reach their academic and career goals. The college provides
an aesthetically pleasing and student-centered environment.
The faculty, staff, and administration welcome a diverse and
talented student body every year. Readers of this catalog are
encouraged to be among them.
I hope you find success at MiraCosta College this year, and
that you to take advantage of the wonderful services available
to you.
Richard Robertson, Ph.D.
Interim Superintendent/President
Welcome to MiraCosta College!
MiraCosta College is a great place to begin a higher education
adventure! The college offers associate degrees, preparation
for university transfer, career and workforce training, basic
skills, a high school diploma program, and a wide variety of
community services educational opportunities.
MiraCosta College is particularly proud of our outstanding
faculty. Both full-time and associate faculty members are
academic discipline experts, and they are dedicated to
providing individual attention to their students. This dedication
is evident in the successes of MiraCosta’s transfer students,
who move on to four-year institutions and are often more
academically successful than students who begin their
college careers at those institutions. Meanwhile, MiraCosta’s
Honors Scholars Program helps students prepare for transfer to
prestigious universities and for success once they are there.
Many students begin their search for job skills, new careers, and
workforce training through MiraCosta’s Career and Technical
Education and community education programs. MiraCosta
has strong partnerships with local business and industry, and
our students benefit from participation in work experience and
internship opportunities.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 5
About MiraCosta College
About MiraCosta College
Mission & Institutional
Goals
Communicate appropriately for the context
Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
Define and analyze problems clearly
Mission
Think independently, creatively, logically, and effectively
The MiraCosta Community College District mission is to provide
superior educational opportunities and student-support
services to a diverse population of learners with a focus on their
success. MiraCosta offers associate degrees, university-transfer
courses, career-and-technical education, certificate programs,
basic-skills education, and lifelong-learning opportunities that
strengthen the economic, cultural, social, and educational wellbeing of the communities it serves.
Apply appropriate problem solving methods
Institutional Goals
Goal I. MiraCosta Community College District will become a
vanguard educational institution committed to innovation and
researched best practices, broad access to higher education,
and environmental sustainability.
Goal II. MiraCosta Community College District will become
the institution where each student has a high probability of
achieving academic success.
Goal III. MiraCosta Community College District will
institutionalize effective planning processes through the
systematic use of data to make decisions.
Goal IV. MiraCosta Community College District will demonstrate
high standards of stewardship and fiscal prudence.
Goal V. MiraCosta Community College District will be a
conscientious community partner.
Student Learning
Outcomes
Student learning outcomes (SLOs) identify the knowledge, skills,
abilities, and attitudes that students will be able to demonstrate
as a result of their engagement in a particular course, program,
or collegiate experience. These learning outcomes are the
larger lessons that students take from their educational
experiences at MiraCosta College and apply to their courses,
their careers, and their lives. Together, institutional, general
education p. 52, program, and course-level student learning
outcomes represent a common set of expectations around
which the college’s core offerings are organized. Program-level
SLOs are listed under Areas of Study in the catalog; course-level
SLOs are available to students in their course syllabi and in the
official course outlines.
Institutional Student Learning Outcomes
Effective Communication
Write, speak, read, listen, and otherwise communicate
Communicate clearly, accurately, and logically
Analyze and synthesize information from multiple
perspectives
Professional & Ethical Behavior
Demonstrate responsible and professional conduct, in the
classroom, workplace, and community
Demonstrate the ability to work independently and
collaboratively
Information Literacy
Identify information needed
Collect information effectively and efficiently
Evaluate and analyze information
Use and apply information accurately and appropriately
Global Awareness
Demonstrate respect for diversity and multiple perspectives
Value his/her place and role in an increasingly
interconnected global community
Demonstrate cultural and environmental awareness
District & Campus
Information
District Information
The MiraCosta Community College District includes Oceanside,
Carlsbad, La Costa, Encinitas, Olivenhain, Rancho Santa Fe,
Cardiff by the Sea, Solana Beach, Del Mar, and Carmel Valley.
With its coastal location, beautiful campuses, and strong
academic programs, MiraCosta College attracts students from
throughout San Diego County, the state, and the country as
well as from abroad.
The student population in the credit program is approximately
14,600. Students take credit courses at the Oceanside Campus,
at the San Elijo Campus in Cardiff, at several off-campus
locations, such as Sage Creek High School in Carlsbad, and
online. A small number of credit courses are also available at
the college’s Community Learning Center, which also serves
about 2,500 students in noncredit programs. An additional
2,000 students are enrolled in fee-based programs.
MiraCosta College has a comprehensive program of student
services. All services are provided to full- and part-time students
8 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
About MiraCosta College
on the Oceanside Campus. Many services are also available at
the San Elijo Campus and at the Community Learning Center,
and all services offered may be made available to students
upon request. Students are encouraged to take advantage of
the opportunity to receive assistance and services throughout
their educational experiences at the college.
MiraCosta College Campuses
Oceanside Campus
For detailed information on the college’s programs and classes,
call the Public Information Office at 760.795.6613. You can
request a credit or noncredit course schedule by calling
760.795.6615. Call toll-free from outside the 760 area code:
888.201.8480, x6612 or x6615. Schedules may also be viewed on
the college website at www.miracosta.edu/schedules.
Equal Access
The MiraCosta Community College District shall provide access
to its services, classes, and programs without regard to age,
ancestry, color, gender, gender identity, gender expression,
genetic information, marital status, medical condition, national
origin, physical or mental disability, pregnancy, race or
ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation or veteran status, or
because he or she is perceived to have one or more of the
foregoing characteristics, or based on association with a
person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived
characteristics.
In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
of 1974, MiraCosta College has designated Connie Wilbur
[email protected] as its Section 504 coordinator. Students
or community members with verified disabilities may be entitled
to appropriate accommodations. A variety of alternative
formats are readily available; others may require additional
time to provide. Questions regarding access of students
with disabilities to any college program or service may be
directed to the Disabled Student Programs and Services Office,
760.795.6658.
MiraCosta College invites individuals with disabilities who
plan on attending college events to contact Joe Mazza
[email protected], the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) coordinator at 760.795.6866, regarding any special
accommodation needs. It is requested that individuals
requiring auxiliary aids, such as sign language interpreters and
alternative format materials, provide notification at least ten
business days in advance of the event. Every equitable effort
will be made to provide reasonable accommodations in an
effective and timely manner.
1 Barnard Drive
Oceanside, CA 92056-3820
760.757.2121
Outside the 760 area code, call toll-free: 888.201.8480
The Oceanside Campus (see map) has grown and changed
during the decades, and plans for growth continue. Projects
recently completed include a concert hall and two creative
arts buildings with classrooms, labs, studios, and rehearsal/
performance spaces for music and art; a student services
building that houses Counseling and the Transfer and Career
Centers; and a new, high-tech science building.
You can take a virtual tour of the Oceanside Campus or
request an in-person tour.
Locations of Special Interest at This Campus
The newest addition to the Oceanside Campus is a new, hightech science building. The fully sustainable building, known as
Building 4900, houses two state-of-the-art biology laboratories.
This campus also boasts a 430-seat Concert Hall and a
classroom building for art/music history and new genre arts.
These two buildings complete the Creative Arts Complex,
which also includes the 240-seat College Theatre; a three-level
building completed in 2009 that houses studios, classrooms,
and rehearsal spaces for art and music; and an art building
that houses ceramics and sculpture studios and a photography
lab.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 9
About MiraCosta College
The Student Center houses the campus bookstore; the Kruglak
Art Gallery, which showcases works by visiting artists, faculty,
and students; club offices, conference rooms, and student
government offices; and the cafeteria. The center’s dining
areas feature indoor and outdoor tables with great views of the
coast.
Community Learning Center
Completed in fall 2007, the Horticulture Complex includes a
classroom building featuring specialized labs and classrooms
for the program’s diverse offerings as well as greenhouses,
areas for plant stock, a vineyard, and a plant sales area.
The Child Development Center, located on the northwest
corner of campus, serves the dual purpose of educating
MiraCosta College’s child development majors and providing
affordable child care for students, faculty, staff, and community
members.
In addition to traditional books and reference materials, the
Library and Information Hub also houses a tutoring center,
math lab, and more than 200 computers for student use.
San Elijo Campus
1831 Mission Avenue
Oceanside, CA 92058-7104
760.795.8710
MiraCosta’s Community Learning Center (see map), located
one mile east of I-5 in Oceanside, hosts a wide variety of
noncredit courses at more than 30 district locations. The center
offers courses in each of the following authorized noncredit
categories: elementary and secondary basic skills, English as
a Second Language (ESL) and citizenship, health and safety,
older adults, parenting, special education for adults, and shortterm vocational. The center also houses the Cisco Networking
Academy, which offers classes that prepare students for
computer industry certifications.
North San Diego Small Business Development
Center
3333 Manchester Avenue
Cardiff, CA 92007-1516
760.944.4449
The San Elijo Campus of MiraCosta College (see map)
opened in 1988 and is situated on 42 acres facing the San
Elijo Lagoon in Cardiff. The campus offers a general education
credit program and a broad range of noncredit, fee-based
Community Services classes and workshops.
Student services at the San Elijo Campus include Admissions
and Records, Counseling, Tutoring, Testing, and Student
Activities. The recently expanded and remodeled Student
Center houses the campus bookstore, cafeteria, Student
Services Office, and Health Services. The Library and
Information Hub houses computer labs as well as the campus
math and writing centers. A new science facility is currently
under construction and is set to open for classes in fall semester
2014.
Students may schedule appointments for financial aid, disabled
student assistance, job placement, Transfer Center counseling,
and Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS).
You can take a virtual tour of the San Elijo Campus or request
an in-person tour.
10 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
The North San Diego Small Business Development Center
(SBDC), hosted by MiraCosta College and located in the
Community Learning Center complex, is a partnership program
with the U.S. Small Business Administration and the California
Community College Chancellor’s Office. The SBDC provides
services to meet the needs of entrepreneurs throughout North
San Diego County. These services are free or inexpensive and
include one-on-one counseling and workshops.
College Foundation
foundation.miracosta.edu
The vision of the MiraCosta College Foundation is to ensure
that no one is denied access to education because of
financial need and that resources are available to enrich
the college experience for all students. The Foundation is
a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation governed by a volunteer
board of community leaders and administered by the Office of
Development and College Foundation. Over the past 5 years,
the Foundation has more than doubled contributions to the
college, which has tripled the number of students receiving
scholarships and doubled private resources that support
campus programs. In addition, the Foundation is facilitating or
funding programs that put free computers and textbooks in the
hands of students.
About MiraCosta College
Individuals, corporations, and civic groups work with the
MiraCosta College Foundation to achieve their philanthropic
goals in a variety of ways. Some choose to fund scholarships
while others support the enhancement of academic programs
and facilities. One of the Foundation’s most popular giving
groups is the President’s Circle. Benefactors contribute
between $1,000 and $10,000 annually and support a variety of
needs at the college, including student scholarships, capital
projects, program enhancement grants, and educational
equipment. President’s Circle members are invited to meet with
MiraCosta’s president to learn about the college and its role
in the community and to share their ideas, thereby creating
a valuable link between the college and the communities it
serves.
For more information about the MiraCosta College Foundation
and how you can be a part of transforming lives, please
contact the Development and College Foundation Office at
760.795.6777.
College Leadership
Board of Trustees
President, Trustee Area 6 (Northwest Oceanside) - David
Broad, Ph.D.
Vice President, Trustee Area 3 (Encinitas, La Costa) Jacqueline Simon, M.A.
Trustee Area 7 (Northeast Oceanside) - William C. Fischer,
Ph.D.
Dean, Admissions, Assessment, and Student Aid
Programs - Alketa Wojcik, Ed.D.
Dean, Letters and Communication Studies and San Elijo
Campus Site Administrator - Dana Smith, M.A.
Dean, Arts and International Languages - Jonathan
Fohrman, M.A.
Interim Dean, Behavioral Science, History, and
Community Education - Nikki Schaper, Ed.D.
Dean, Career and Technical Education - Albert Taccone,
Ph.D.
Interim Dean, Counseling and Student Development Freddy Ramirez, Ed.D.
Dean, Office of Institutional Effectiveness - Robert
Pacheco, Ed.D.
Dean, Math and Sciences- Carlos Lopez, M.S.
Associate Dean, Nursing and Allied Health - Sandy
Comstock, M.S.N.
Interim Associate Dean, San Elijo Campus - To be
determined.
Department Chairs
Administration of Justice - Pat Connolly, J.D.
Adult High School Diploma Program - Denise Plante
Art - Gilbert Neri
Trustee Area 5 (South Oceanside) - George McNeil, M.A.
Automotive Technology - Steve Vail
Trustee Area 4 (Carlsbad) - Leon Page, J.D.
Biological Sciences - Jeanine Sepulveda, Ph.D.
Trustee Area 2 (Cardiff, Rancho Santa Fe) - Ron Rudd,
J.D.
Biotechnology - Mike Fino
Trustee Area 1 (Solana Beach, Del Mar) - Jeanne
Shannon, M.S.
Business - Thomas Severance, J.D.
Business and Medical Office Technology - Kathryn
Striebel
Secretary, Interim Superintendent/President - Richard
Robertson, Ph.D.
Career Studies and Services - Donna Davis
Student Trustee - Antoine Stevens-Phillips
Chemistry - Pierre Goueth, Ph.D.
Administrative Officers
Interim Superintendent/President - Richard Robertson,
Ph.D.
Vice President, Business and Administrative Services Charlie Ng, M.B.A.
Vice President, Instructional Services - Mary Benard, Ed.D.
Interim Vice President, Student Services - Wendy Stewart,
Ed.D.
Dean, Academic Information Services - Mario Valente,
Ed.D.
Child Development - Penny Skemp
Communication Studies - Sam Arenivar
Computer Science - June Porto
Computer Studies and Information Technology - Steve
Isachsen
Counseling - Luke Lara
Dance - Dave Massey
Design - David Parker
English as a Second Language - Melissa Lloyd-Jones (Fall
2014) and Mary Gross (Spring 2015)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 11
About MiraCosta College
History - Brad Byrom, Ph.D.
Treasurer - Melanie Haynie
Horticulture and Hospitality - Karen Smith, Ph.D.
Secretary - Lisa Level
International Languages - Andrea Petri
Senator - Manuel Acero
Kinesiology, Health, and Nutrition - Robert Fulbright, Ph.D.
Senator - Dixie Maroney
Letters, Pre-Transfer - Kelly Hagen
Senator - Debi Lambert
Letters, Transfer - John Kirwan, Ph.D.
Senator - Pamela LeBlanc
Library Science - Jennifer Paris
Senator - Emilio Mejares
Mathematics - Beth Powell
Senator - Daria Davis
Media Arts and Technologies - Jill Malone (Fall 2014) and
Karl Cleveland (Spring 2015)
Senator - Erich Donze
Music - Steve Torok
Noncredit English as a Second Language - Ruth Gay
Nursing and Allied Health - Julie Vignato
Philosophy - Isabel Luengo, Ph.D.
Physical Sciences - Chris Metzler, Ph.D.
Psychology - Robert Kelley, Ph.D.
Social Science - Lynne Miller, Ph.D. (Fall 2014) and
Herschel Stern, Ph.D. (Spring 2015)
Sociology - Bruce Hoskins, Ph.D.
Theatre and Film - Tracy Williams
Academic Senate
President - Mike Fino
Vice President - Thao Ha, Ph.D.
Member - Joanne Benschop
Member - Theresa Bolaños, Ph.D.
Member - Susan Herrmann
Member - Luke Lara
Member - Dara Perales
Member - Freddy Ramirez, Ed.D.
Member - Jeff Uhlik
Associate Member (1) - Joe Chirra, J.D.
Associate Member (2) - Laura Carlsson
Associate Member (3) - Krista Warren
Ex-Officio Member - Richard Robertson, Ph.D.
Classified Senate Council
President - Catherine Halmay
Vice President - Heidi Willis
12 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Senator - Kathy Thiele
Ex-Officio Member - Richard Robertson, Ph.D.
Ex-Officio Member - Sheri Wright
Admissions & Enrollment
Admissions & Enrollment
Matriculation:
Orientation &
Advisement
The Matriculation Process
The matriculation process (application, assessment, orientation,
advisement, and development of an education plan) starts
students on the right path by assisting them in choosing,
planning, and achieving their educational goals.
The process also provides essential information for planning a
successful college experience. New students enrolling in the fall
must complete at least an abbreviated education plan to earn
priority enrollment, and they must complete a comprehensive
education plan within two semesters to maintain priority.
All matriculation services are free for MiraCosta College
students. Students who are new to college and plan to transfer,
earn an associate degree or a vocational certificate, or
improve basic skills, or who are undecided about their goal,
should follow this process.
Students new to college (first-time freshmen) or new to
MiraCosta College should complete the matriculation process
when they apply or as soon as possible thereafter. Students
who matriculate may enroll earlier than non-matriculated
students (this does not apply to concurrently enrolled high
school students).
Although all students should matriculate, any applicant to the
college may expressly refuse to participate in any matriculation
service. Those who refuse, however, are not entitled to early
enrollment privileges.
Important!
Students must have an Application for Admission on file
before taking the assessments unless they are testing for
another college. (A fee is charged if testing for another
college.)
Appropriate photo ID is required to take the assessment(s)
and to pick up assessment scores.
English/ESL and/or mathematics assessments do not require
an appointment.
Steps to Becoming a Matriculated Student
Step 1: Application
Students complete and submit an online Application for
Admission or a paper application, which is available in the
Admissions and Records Office. After their application is
processed, students are assigned a SURF ID number that they
will use the entire time they attend MiraCosta.
SURF is an online enrollment and student information system
that allows students to manage their school-related activities.
To access SURF, students use their SURF ID and a self-created
password.
14 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Step 2: Assessment (Testing)
Review Before You Take the English/ESL and/or
Mathematics Assessments (optional)
The English/ESL and mathematics faculty of MiraCosta College
strongly encourage students to review before they take
the English/ESL and/or mathematics assessment. Students
choosing to brush up on math can review for the Algebra
Readiness, Elementary Algebra, Intermediate Algebra and PreCalculus assessments online at http://www.miracosta.edu/
studentservices/testing/brushup.html. Review packets for
mathematics assessments may also be purchased in the
college bookstores. English and ESL assessment sample
questions and answers may be viewed on the Testing Services
webpage.
About the English/ESL and Mathematics Assessments
English and ESL assessments are offered on a drop-in basis
at the Oceanside and San Elijo campuses and at scheduled
sessions at the Community Learning Center. In order to have
sufficient time to complete the assessments, students should
arrive as early as possible. Students with a disability who
need an accommodation should arrive in the morning to
maximize the time available to them; an extended-time referral
is not required as there is no time limit for the English or ESL
assessments.
Students will be asked to select one of the following
assessments to determine their English or ESL course eligibility:
1. English Assessment: This assessment measures reading
and writing skills of native speakers of English. This is the
assessment to take if English is the student’s first (native)
language. This includes:
Students who have grown up in an English-speaking
home.
Students who have been educated in all-English
schools from elementary through high school.
2. ESL Assessment: This assessment measures reading,
writing, and listening skills of non-native speakers of
English. This is the assessment to take if the student’s first
(native) language is NOT English. This includes:
Students who have grown up in a home in which
English was NOT the primary (main) language.
Students enrolled in the International Student Program
(IIP), or students who have completed Noncredit
ESL (continuing education) or English Language
Development (ELD) classes in high school.
The mathematics assessment must be completed within the
75-minute time allotment. Students will choose one of four
computerized multiple-choice assessments to demonstrate their
skills in pre-algebra, elementary algebra, intermediate algebra
or pre-calculus. Students may take just one level on a given
day; they may re-test or take another math assessment level on
another day if they wish. (See re-test policies.)
Guidelines to help decide which math assessment to take
are available in the Testing Office in Bldg. 3300 on the
Oceanside Campus, in the Testing Center in Room 101 on
the San Elijo Campus, or on the Testing Services webpage at
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/testing. The mathematics
assessment is offered on a drop-in basis at the Oceanside
and San Elijo campuses and at scheduled sessions at the
Admissions & Enrollment
Community Learning Center. Students will be served on a
space-available basis.
Students should allow at least 1.5 hours to complete the
math assessment process. Referrals from Disabled Students
Programs and Services are necessary for students with a
disability needing an accommodation. ESL students may
request extended time for the math assessment from testing
staff. Contact the Testing Office, 760.795.6685, for information.
Students who have extended time authorization should arrive
before 2 p.m.
Obtaining the Assessment Score Report
Students will receive an assessment score report immediately
after they complete the assessment. Additional assessment
score reports are released to the examinee only—photo
identification is required. Included with the assessment score
report is a placement recommendation for English, ESL, and/
or math. The recommendation will be entered into SURF on
a nightly basis, allowing students to enroll in the appropriate
class.
Students who have questions about their placement after
advisement and/or retesting should see a counselor.
Counseling offices are located in Bldg. 3700 on the Oceanside
Campus, 760.795.6670 and in the Administration Building on the
San Elijo Campus, 760.944.4449, x6670.
Retesting & Assessment Fee Policies
MiraCosta College students may take the English, ESL, or any
of the four mathematics assessments only two times. Once
this maximum is reached, students will not have the option of
further retesting. (Tests given through MiraCosta’s high school
outreach testing program will not be counted toward the
maximum.)
For English, ESL, and mathematics assessments, students must
wait at least 24 hours before retesting. Students who do not
intend to enroll at MiraCosta College but wish to take an English
or ESL assessment or any of the four mathematics assessments
will be charged $30.
Alternatives to Taking MiraCosta College’s
Assessments
1. Take your transcript from another college showing
completion with a grade of “C” or better in a prerequisite
English/math class to the Admissions and Records Office;
or
2. Take your English/math assessment results from another
California community college to the Admissions and
Records Office and submit with a “Matriculation:
Alternatives to Assessment” form (available in the
Admissions and Records Office or at miracosta.edu/
forms). Your document must state the course in which you
are eligible to enroll. A score alone is not sufficient; or
3. Take the transcript or diploma of your bachelor’s degree
to the Admissions and Records Office for English course
placement at the 200 level and math course placement
at the 30 level; or
4. If you have achieved one of the following minimum
scores, take documentation to the Testing Office and
fill out an “Alternate Tests Review Request” form. The
documentation, along with other factors, will be reviewed
to determine placement.
English
Advanced Placement (AP) Program English (language or
literature) test with a score of three or higher.
International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher Level English
Examination with a score of five or higher.
California State University system Early Assessment Program
(EAP) result stating: “Ready for CSU or participating CCC
college-level English courses.”
California State University system English Placement Test (EPT)
with a score of 151 or higher.
Passing score on the UC Analytical Writing Placement
Examination.
Math
Advanced Placement Program calculus test (AB or BC) with
a score of three or higher.
College Level Examination Program examination in
mathematics with a score of 50 or higher.
California State University system Early Assessment Program
(EAP) result stating: “Ready for CSU or participating CCC
college-level mathematics courses.”
California State University system Entry Level Mathematics
(ELM) test with a score of 50 or higher.
NOTE: Classes in other subject areas may also require English
and math competencies.
For further information about testing, students may
call 760.795.6685 or visit the department’s website:
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/testing.
Step 3: Orientation
Students who have a SURF ID and password complete an online
orientation that introduces them to MiraCosta’s academic
programs and student services. It also provides an overview
of how to enroll in classes and tips for a successful college
experience.
At the end of the online orientation, students take a quiz to test
their understanding of the material. When students pass the
quiz, their records are automatically updated, usually within
24 hours, to show completion of the orientation component of
matriculation.
Step 4: Advisement
Students who have a SURF ID and password complete online
academic advisement, which has two presentation options:
Transfer Advisement or Associate Degree & Career and
Technical Education Advisement. Both presentations cover
educational planning and class scheduling, and both provide
suggestions for those who are undecided about their goals.
(Students may complete both presentations, but only one is
needed to satisfy the matriculation requirement.)
Students will use their English and math placement results
as a reference when completing either presentation. At the
end of the presentation, students take a quiz to test their
understanding of the material covered. When students pass
the quiz, their records are automatically updated, usually within
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 15
Admissions & Enrollment
24 hours, to show completion of the advisement component of
matriculation.
For further information about orientation, advisement,
or follow-up opportunities with a counselor, students
may call 760.795.6670 or visit the department’s website:
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/counseling.
Step 5: Education Plan
One of the best ways students can keep their education and
career goals on track is to create an education plan with their
counselor. An “ed plan” gives students a roadmap for how to
achieve their academic goal, including a list of courses and
requirements, important dates and deadlines, and relevant
transfer and career information.
Beginning fall 2014, new to MiraCosta College students are
required to complete an education plan to earn and maintain
enrollment priority. Students will complete an abbreviated (one
or two semester) education plan when they complete online
advising.
Students are encouraged to develop a comprehensive (four
or more semester) education plan with a counselor as soon as
possible but no later than the end of their second semester at
MiraCosta to maintain their priority enrollment. New students
who matriculate may be eligible to receive an early counseling
appointment time to develop a comprehensive education
plan.
Step 6: Enrollment
Upon completion of the above steps—application, English
and mathematics assessment, orientation, advisement, and
education plan—students receive a priority enrollment date
and time. Concurrently enrolled high school students may enroll
two weeks prior to the start of the fall or spring terms and one
week prior to the primary summer term.
Exemption from the Matriculation Process
To be exempt from the matriculation process at MiraCosta, a
student must meet one of the following conditions:
1. The student was exempt during a previous semester, or
2. The student has earned an associate or higher degree
from an accredited institution, or
3. The student has previously attended another college and
has indicated one of the following as an educational
goal:
Discover or formulate career interest, plans, goals
Prepare for a new career (acquire job skills)
Advance further in current job or career (update job
skills)
Maintain a certification or license (e.g., nursing, real
estate)
Personal interest; no intention to use credit for
certificate, degree, or transfer
Complete credits for high school diploma or GED.
Exemption from Assessment (Testing) Only
To be exempt from the assessment component of matriculation,
a student must meet one of the following conditions:
16 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
1. The student has completed the prerequisite course with
a grade of "C" or higher at another college for any math
or English course(s) in which he or she wishes to enroll
(transcript or grade report required).
2. The student has taken an approved assessment test at
another California community college that can be used to
meet the prerequisite for the math or English course(s) in
which he or she wishes to enroll.
Exemption from assessment and/or matriculation does not
automatically give students priority enrollment privileges.
Exempted students who want priority enrollment are
encouraged to participate in the matriculation and/or
assessment process.
Student Rights & Responsibilities
Students have the right to challenge or appeal any step in the
matriculation process by contacting the dean of Counseling
and Student Development at 760.795.6892. To challenge a
course prerequisite or corequisite, students must contact the
Admissions and Records Office on either campus.
Students may refuse to participate in any matriculation service;
however, refusal will not entitle students to early-enrollment
privileges or to waive course prerequisites or corequisites.
Students are responsible for expressing broad educational
intent upon admission and for declaring a specific educational
goal by the time they have completed their second semester.
Students are also responsible for attending class, completing
assignments, arranging counseling appointments, and
maintaining progress toward their educational goal.
(Sources: Title 5 §55530; MCCCD Board Policy/Administrative
Procedure 5050. All MiraCosta College board policies and
administrative procedures are located on the Board of Trustees
webpage.)
Admissions Information
Admissions & Records Office
Oceanside, Building 3300: 760.795.6620
San Elijo, Administration Building: 760.634.7870
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/admissions
Eligibility for Admission
To attend MiraCosta College, a student must be one of the
following:
Eighteen years of age or older and able to benefit from
instruction
A high school graduate or equivalent
A sophomore, junior, or senior in high school with a
Concurrent Enrollment Permit signed by the high school
principal and parent. This form is available at high school
counseling offices and Admissions and Records at both
MiraCosta campuses. Students under 18 years of age who
have not completed high school and are not pursuing the
equivalent of a high school education should contact the
Admissions and Records Office for more information.
Admissions & Enrollment
Residency Requirements
Information for Veterans
The residency rules as established by Title 5 of the California
Code of Regulations require one year of physical presence in
the state of California prior to the first day of the academic term
combined with one year of evidence of intent and ability to
establish residency in California. Exceptions and limitations exist.
Students may be required to present evidence regarding their
residency.
Oceanside, Building 3300: 760.757.2121, x6285
Once students complete and submit the Application for
Admission, the Admissions and Records Office will determine
their residency status. Students should contact Admissions
and Records for further information regarding residency
requirements.
Admission of International Students
Oceanside: 760.795.6897
www.miracosta.edu/iip
As part of its educational program, MiraCosta promotes the
internationalization of its college community by attracting
capable international students. MiraCosta is authorized under
federal law to enroll nonimmigrant F-1 visa students.
The college’s Institute for International Perspectives (IIP)
processes international student admissions and provides
support services for F-1 students attending MiraCosta College.
Prospective international students can be considered for
admission to MiraCosta after submitting in writing to the IIP
all required application materials as outlined by MCCCD
Administrative Procedure 5012 including the following:
Official high school (secondary school) transcript translated
to English
Official transcripts in English from all colleges and universities
attended
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score or other
proof of English proficiency
Proof of financial certification for all educational and
personal expenses while attending college as an F-1 visa
student.
All F-1 visa students must contact the IIP prior to enrolling at
MiraCosta. The priority deadline to submit an application for fall
semester is July 1 of the application year; the priority deadline
to submit an application for spring semester (which begins in
January) is November 15 of the previous year.
International students who do not meet the college’s English
language proficiency requirement and/or wish to improve their
English skills can apply for full-time English language training
offered by the college’s Community Services program English
Language Institute.
Applications for admission and details regarding MiraCosta’s
international student programs are available at the IIP (located
on the Oceanside Campus) or on the institute’s website.
Special Admission: Nursing
Nursing students have special application and registration
procedures. They should contact the Admissions and Records
Office at either campus for specific details.
Students receiving GI Bill educational benefits are subject to the
following general policies:
Students must declare a major and enroll in classes required
for their major
Students must have ALL prior college and military credit
evaluated
Transcripts must be received by the college before the end of
their first semester
Students must meet with a MiraCosta academic counselor to
obtain an educational plan during their first semester
Students must be making satisfactory progress toward their
educational goals
Students must report all changes in their educational status,
including adds and drops in class schedule, education
plans, or Transfer Admission Guarantee (TAG) agreements,
to MiraCosta’s Veterans Education Office.
Continuing students should notify the appropriate staff member
of their intention to continue the GI Bill prior to the end of each
term to prevent interruption. Because not all classes are VA
approved, students should have their classes reviewed by a
counselor.
Students changing their major must file the necessary
paperwork and make a counseling appointment to update
their education plan. It takes approximately 6 to 8 weeks to
process a VA Education Claim.
Early Military Discharge
Military service personnel who plan to request an early
discharge in order to attend MiraCosta College should
complete an Application for Admission and request
confirmation from the Admissions and Records Office.
Full/Part-Time Student Status
Full-time status is required for certain programs, including the
following:
Intercollegiate sports: Students must be actively enrolled in
at least 12 units.
Veterans: Students must be enrolled in at least 12 units.
Reduced benefits are available for students taking at least 6
units.
Financial aid: Most programs require at least half-time
enrollment, which is 6 units.
EOPS: Students must be enrolled in at least 12 units or 14
contact hours per week.
Enrolling in Courses
Students may enroll online using the SURF online enrollment
system with certain exceptions (e.g., challenging a prerequisite
or time conflict). All enrollment instructions, important dates
and times, and online restrictions are described in each
semester’s class schedule.
The college provides early enrollment dates for matriculated
students (see Matriculation p. 14), students participating
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 17
Admissions & Enrollment
in Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) or
Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS), foster youth
and former foster youth (up to and including the age of 24),
and active duty or recently discharged military personnel.
(Contact Admissions and Records, DSPS, EOPS, or the Veterans
Education Office for more information.) Note: Priority enrollment
may not apply to enrollment in certain vocational or allied
health programs that require a separate application process.
ALERT: Changes to Priority
Registration—Effective Fall 2014
The California Community Colleges Board of Governors
approved changes that will establish system-wide enrollment
priorities designed to ensure classes are available for students
seeking job training, degree attainment, or transfer and to
reward students who make progress toward their educational
goals.
New students who have completed college orientation and
assessment and have developed educational plans as well
as continuing students in good academic standing who
have not exceeded 90 units (not including units in basic
English, math, or English as a Second Language) will have
priority over students who do not meet these criteria.
Active duty military and recently discharged veterans,
current and former foster youth, followed by students in
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services and Disabled
Student Programs and Services will continue to have the
earliest priority for registration if they meet the same criteria
listed above.
The regulations, unanimously approved by the Board of
Governors, will be implemented in fall 2014. We encourage
students on probation to seek help to improve their
academic standing. Students nearing 90 units should
carefully plan their remaining courses.
Credit Courses
Most MiraCosta College courses are offered for credit. That
means they are taught by credentialed faculty who meet
with students at regularly scheduled times or in self-paced or
online formats, and they offer graded instructional experiences
that require preparation averaging two hours of additional
study for every hour of instruction (lecture). Credit courses are
offered to meet requirements for two- and four-year degrees,
job preparation or advancement, and basic skills.
Courses numbered from 0 to 49 are basic skills or college
preparatory courses. Credit from these courses does not apply
toward the associate degree and is not intended for transfer to
a four-year college or university.
Students may take a maximum of 30 units of such courses;
however, an exception is made for students enrolled in one
or more courses of English as a Second Language (ESL)
and students identified as having a learning disability. (For
more information, see Non-Degree Applicable Courses in
the Academic Standards & Policies p. 317 section of the
catalog.)
18 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Courses numbered from 50 to 99 provide credit toward the
associate degree, but this credit is not intended for transfer to a
four-year college or university. However, the final determination
for credit rests with the transfer institution.
Courses numbered from 100 to 199 represent introductory
material and expectations for vocational or academic
programs. These courses provide credit toward the associate
degree, and this credit is intended for transfer to a four-year
college or university. However, some courses that fall within this
numbering system may be associate-degree-applicable only,
and the final determination regarding the transfer of credit rests
with the receiving institution.
Courses that at minimum transfer to the California State
University (CSU) or University of California (UC) as elective credit
identify their transfer status in the "acceptable for credit" section
of their course descriptions.
Students are encouraged to meet with a MiraCosta College
counselor and refer to www.assist.org to determine if a course
also meets a specific major-preparation requirement. Courses
approved for the CSU (Plan B) and UC (Plan C) general
education patterns are identified in the Transferring Course
Work section of the catalog.
Courses numbered from 200 to 299 often assume skills and
knowledge acquired in previous courses. Like the 100-level
courses, they provide credit toward the associate degree,
and this credit is intended for transfer to a four-year university.
However, some courses that fall within this numbering system
may be associate-degree-applicable only, and the final
determination regarding the transfer of credit rests with the
receiving institution.
Courses that at minimum transfer to the California State
University (CSU) or University of California (UC) as elective credit
identify their transfer status in the "acceptable for credit" section
of their course descriptions.
Students are encouraged to meet with a MiraCosta College
counselor and refer to www.assist.org to determine if a course
also meets a specific major-preparation requirement. Courses
approved for the CSU (Plan B) and UC (Plan C) general
education patterns are identified in the Transferring Course
Work section of the catalog.
Courses numbered from 900 to 999 do not fall in any of the
above categories but are, for the most part, specialized or
advanced. Credit from these courses cannot be applied
toward an associate degree.
Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID)
The Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID) is a
statewide numbering system independent from the course
numbers assigned by local California community colleges. The
purpose of a C-ID designation is to identify comparable courses
within the California community college system.
When a C-ID number is listed in the catalog or schedule at
the end of a MiraCosta course description (e.g., C-ID AJ120),
students can be assured that it will be accepted in lieu of
a course bearing the same C-ID designation at another
community college.
Admissions & Enrollment
However, many universities, including the University of California
(UC), do not participate in the C-ID numbering system.
Therefore, students should always go to www.assist.org
to confirm how each community college’s course will be
accepted at a specific four-year college or university for transfer
credit.
prerequisites unless the prerequisite listed in the course
description specifically allows for it.
Course Outlines
All prerequisites need to be cleared before students can enroll
online. Students who are enrolled in a requisite course can
enroll in a course that requires the prerequisite for the following
semester pending proof of the requisite course’s satisfactory
completion. If a student does not pass the requisite course with
a "C" or better, he or she will be involuntarily withdrawn from the
course and refunded applicable fees.
Students wishing detailed information about courses, such as
minimum standards in terms of learning objectives, types of
assignments, and level of difficulty involved, may access course
outlines on the Courses and Programs webpage.
Course Selection
Course selection is generally the student’s responsibility and is
based on the student’s education plan and previous academic
record. Enrollment in English and math courses may require
placement testing, which is described under "Assessment" in
the Matriculation section of the catalog (see Matriculation p.
14). Members of the counseling staff are available to assist
students in evaluating their academic potential and in making
proper class selections.
Requisites & Other Enrollment Limitations
Prerequisites and corequisites are conditions of enrollment
that students have to meet in order to register in a specific
course. A prerequisite is a course that must be completed
with a "C" or better prior to registration in the specific course;
a corequisite is a course that is required to be taken the same
semester as another course. Prerequisites and corequisites may
be established for any of the following reasons:
They ensure students have the knowledge and skills that are
necessary for success in a specific course.
They are required by a four-year public institution.
They are part of a closely related lecture/lab pairing within a
discipline.
They are required by statute or regulation.
They are necessary to protect the health or safety of the
student or others.
Other enrollment limitations are established to prevent students
from duplicating course work or from enrolling in two sections
of the same course at the same time. In addition, some
intercollegiate competition and public performance courses
have auditions or try-outs that restrict enrollment to those
students judged most qualified.
Meeting & Clearing Prerequisites
Students may meet prerequisite requirements through
satisfactory completion of designated MiraCosta courses or
by completing course work from other United States regionally
accredited post-secondary institutions.
To clear prerequisites taken at another institution, students
need to provide a transcript or other evidence, such as a grade
report, to the Admissions and Records Office along with a
Requisite Review form. The office reviews the transcript or other
evidence to determine applicability.
Additionally, students may meet prerequisites by qualifying
through appropriate MiraCosta competency or other approved
exams. High school course work may not be used to clear
Only grades of "C" or higher (2.0 grade points based on a 4.0
scale or the equivalent) may be used to clear a prerequisite
unless the course description states otherwise.
Challenging Requisites & Other Enrollment
Limitations
A student may challenge any prerequisite, corequisite, or
other enrollment limitation by submitting a MiraCosta College
Challenge form at the time of registration to the Admissions and
Records Office. The student will be enrolled in the requested
class if space is available.
The department whose course requisite or enrollment limitation
is being challenged will review the challenge and notify the
student of the department’s decision within five instructional
days (excluding weekends and holidays). If the challenge is
upheld, the student may remain in the course; if it is denied,
the student will be dropped from the class and refunded all
applicable fees.
The only grounds for challenging a prerequisite or corequisite
are as follows:
It has not been established in accordance with the district’s
process for establishing prerequisites and corequisites.
It is in violation of Title 5.
It is either unlawfully discriminatory or is being applied in an
unlawfully discriminatory manner.
The student has the knowledge or ability to succeed in the
course despite not meeting the prerequisite or corequisite.
The student will be subject to undue delay in attaining
the goal of his or her student educational plan because
the prerequisite or corequisite course has not been made
reasonably available.
The only grounds for challenging an enrollment limitation are as
follows:
It is either unlawfully discriminatory or is being applied in an
unlawfully discriminatory manner.
The district is not following its enrollment procedures.
The basis for the limitation does not in fact exist.
Multiple & Overlapping Enrollments
Students may not enroll in two or more sections of the same
credit course during the same term unless the length of the
courses allows enrollment without the student being enrolled in
more than one section at any given time.
Enrollment in two or more courses that have overlapping
meeting times is not allowed except in special circumstances.
To request approval for such an exception, the student needs
to submit a Time Conflict Approval form. If the student is
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 19
Admissions & Enrollment
allowed to enroll in overlapping classes, then for attendance
accounting purposes, he or she must satisfy all of the following
requirements:
The student provides sound justification other than
scheduling convenience.
The director of Admissions and Records approves the
schedule.
MiraCosta maintains documentation describing the
justification and showing the student made up the hours
of overlap during the same week under the instructor’s
supervision.
Adding Classes
Full-semester-length and 15-week classes may be added
through the first week of the semester (or session) or, at the
instructor’s discretion, through the second week. If a student
wishes to add a class that is closed (full), he or she may attend
the first class meeting and request a permission number from
the instructor if room becomes available.
A student has not successfully added a class until he or she has
officially enrolled and paid the appropriate fees. The instructor
will ask the student to verify enrollment with the receipt obtained
from SURF or the Admissions and Records Office/Student
Accounts.
A student may not add a class after the deadline listed in the
class schedule. Students who believe they have extenuating
circumstances for adding late may petition the instructor and
appropriate dean. Deadlines for short-term, late-start, and
open-entry classes are available in the Admissions and Records
Office.
Dropping Classes
Students are responsible for dropping their own unwanted
classes; however, instructors may drop students who are absent
for the first class meeting or who have excessive absences
thereafter. In addition, students may be dropped for nonpayment, for failing to meet prerequisites, or as a result of
disciplinary action.
To avoid receiving a failing grade, a student must officially drop
a class either by using the online SURF system or by submitting
a Drop Card to the Admissions and Records Office by the
appropriate deadline. The instructor’s signature is not required
on the Drop Card.
Three deadlines pertain to dropping a class:
The first entitles the student to a refund and no record on his
or her transcript.
The second deadline results in a "W" (withdrawal) rather than
an evaluative grade and no refund.
The third deadline is the 60 percent withdrawal date for
calculating return of Title 5 funds for financial aid purposes.
Each semester’s class schedule lists the deadlines for dropping
standard full-semester and short-term classes.
Wait List for Full Classes
Some classes fill quickly. Prior to the start of the class, students
have the option to be placed on a wait list for full sections.
Throughout registration before the first class meeting, a nightly
20 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
process will attempt to auto enroll students into any available
seats. Information regarding success, payment required, and
problems will be communicated to students via email.
If not auto-enrolled, wait list students (along with all enrolled
students) are required to attend the first meeting of the class.
If enrolled students are not present or other students decide
to withdraw from the class, the instructor may allow students
from the wait list to enroll. The instructor issues those students a
permission number to use for adding the class on SURF.
Students who wish to waitlist online courses should select wait
list and contact the instructor via email once the class begins to
inquire about possible openings.
Classes for which a student is waitlisted do not count as
official enrollment and may not be used to fulfill enrollment
requirements toward financial aid or verifications of enrollment.
Fees
MiraCosta College is required by state law to charge each
student a per-unit enrollment fee for credit classes. This fee is
subject to change as directed by the California Legislature.
All other fees are subject to change as directed either by the
California Legislature or by the MiraCosta College Board of
Trustees in accordance with Title 5 of the California Code of
Regulations.
Detailed information about fees, financial aid, and scholarships
can be found in each semester’s class schedule, in the
Financial Aid Office (located in Building 3000 of the Oceanside
Campus), and at www.miracosta.edu/studentservices.
Fees are due at the time of enrollment. Any debt will result
in denial of further enrollment privileges and withholding
of services, such as transcript requests and enrollment
verifications.
Non-Resident Tuition
International students and non-California residents pay a perunit non-resident fee. A student classified as a non-resident is
required, except as otherwise provided, to pay a non-resident
fee per unit in addition to the regular enrollment fee.
Cost of Textbooks
Most credit courses require students to provide their own
textbooks, lab manuals, workbooks, and supplies. Course
materials such as these can be purchased new or used from
the college bookstore.
Because textbooks are often more expensive than the
enrollment fee, students are encouraged to participate in the
bookstore’s textbook rental, used book, and book buy-back
programs. Students who need assistance paying for books
should contact the Financial Aid Office to determine their
eligibility for financial aid, book grants, or book loans.
Books for classes taught at the Oceanside Campus and all
online courses must be purchased or rented at the Oceanside
Spartan Bookstore or the Oceanside website; books for classes
taught at the San Elijo Campus must be purchased or rented
Admissions & Enrollment
at the San Elijo bookstore or the San Elijo website; books for
classes taught at the Community Learning Center (CLC) must
be purchased or rented at the CLC bookstore.
Health Services Fee
All students enrolled in credit courses and taking any number
of units at the Oceanside Campus, San Elijo Campus, or
Community Learning Center are required to pay a health
services fee as prescribed by the MiraCosta College Board of
Trustees.
Students enrolled in credit courses conducted at other
locations must also pay the health services fee. However,
companies or school districts that arrange for MiraCosta to
conduct classes at off-site locations may request a waiver of the
health services fee by providing proof of accident insurance.
Arrangements for a fee waiver need to be made with the Office
of Instruction when off-site class negotiations are conducted.
The following students are not required to pay the health
services fee:
Those who are enrolled in noncredit courses. (They may
choose to pay the fee if they want to use and benefit from
the health and medical services that the Health Services
Office provides.)
Those who depend exclusively upon prayer for healing in
accordance with the teachings of a bona fide religious sect,
denomination, or organization. (These students must present
documentary evidence of their affiliation with a bona fide
religious sect, denomination, or organization.)
Instructional Material Fees
Some courses have a "required instructional and other
materials" fee, which means students must purchase certain
materials as a condition of their registration, enrollment, or entry
into a class. These materials must be necessary for the student
to achieve the respective course’s objectives, and they must
be of continuing value to the student outside of the classroom
setting (per Title 5 §59402). Examples of these materials include,
but are not limited to, tools, equipment, and clothing that are
necessary for a student’s vocational training and employment.
Parking Fees
All student vehicles parked on campus must be registered with
the Parking/Campus Police Office, which is located in Parking
Lot 1A on the Oceanside Campus and on the east side of the
entrance to the San Elijo Campus. Upon request, the office will
provide a copy of all the rules and regulations that pertain to
parking on campus.
A parking fee is charged for registration of each vehicle each
semester with some exceptions, which are listed in the class
schedule, and the fee varies with the type of vehicle. Students
receive a parking decal when they register their vehicle, and it
needs to be affixed properly to the registered vehicle. Students
who violate the college’s parking rules and regulations are
subject to citations and fines.
Student Center Fee
to students enrolled in on-campus credit classes at the San
Elijo or Oceanside Campus. This fee is waived for students who
provide the Financial Aid Office with documentation of their
participation in AFDC/TANF, SSI, or General Relief.
Student Identification Card Fee (optional)
The student identification (ID) card supports a variety of college
services, such as using computer and language labs and
writing checks in the college bookstore. The student ID card
also serves as the college library card, expediting access
to the library circulating collection and academic reserve
collections. Students without a valid MiraCosta student ID card
must provide proof of current semester registration along with
a government-issued photo ID and proof of current address to
access these library services.
Another advantage of having a student ID card is the
cardholder discount students receive at various North County
businesses, such as at participating copy centers, theatres,
restaurants, clubs, museums, and sports events. In addition,
ID card fees help fund a number of student activities and
campus events as well as the publication of the Chariot student
newspaper.
To obtain a card, students need to pay the fee at enrollment
and bring their receipt of purchase and a picture ID to the
Student Activities Office at either campus.
Transcript Fees
Two transcripts are provided to each student without cost.
Additional copies cost $5 each. An additional $2 processing fee
is charged for transcripts ordered online.
California Veteran Dependent Exemption
The basic benefit is the waiver of tuition and required incidental
fees at a California community college, California State
University, or University of California. Dependents who may be
eligible for this benefit include the following:
A child or surviving spouse of a veteran who died in the line
of duty or as a result of a service-connected disability
A child or spouse of a totally disabled, service-connected
veteran
A child of a veteran who has applied for a service-connected
disability, has received a rating of zero or more percent, and
falls within the income guidelines.
Contact the MiraCosta College Veterans Education Office
(760.757.2121 x6285), the California Association of County
Veterans Service Officers, or the California Department of
Veterans Affairs (916.503.8397) for information about how to
apply for this college fee waiver.
Penalty for Dishonored Checks
A $10 penalty is levied for every check dishonored by the bank
and returned to the college. This penalty is in addition to any
and all other fees, fines, and charges.
A $10 processing fee is charged for a clearance of a HOLD that
has been put on a student’s record.
A Student Center fee of $1 per credit unit with a maximum of
$10 per academic year (summer through spring) is charged
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 21
Admissions & Enrollment
Delinquent Debt Collection Charge
Each student is responsible for paying all fees for a term or
session. When classes remain on or are added to a student’s
schedule and fees are not paid, the fees owed are past due
and subject to the collections process. If a delinquent debt is
sent to the State Chancellor’s Office Tax Offset Program, a 25
percent penalty charge may be added to the balance owed.
Refunds
Student Eligibility for Refund
Refunds of enrollment, non-resident, Student Center, health
services, and materials fees are given to the following students:
Those whose classes have been canceled by the district
Those who have officially dropped from classes (they have
dropped online using SURF or turned in a Drop Card to the
Admissions and Records Office) during the first two weeks of
a full-semester class (or by 10 percent of a short-term class)
Those who are members of an active or reserve military
service who receive orders compelling a withdrawal from
courses at any time during the semester.
Processing of Refunds
Refunds are automatically mailed or credited to the student’s
credit card throughout the semester. Students who have not
received their refund by the sixth week of classes should call the
Student Accounts Office at 760.795.6835.
Students who receive federal financial aid funds and totally
withdraw before the 60 percent date of the term require a
refund and repayment calculation to determine funds owed
back to the various federal aid programs by both the college
and the student. Unofficial withdrawals (grades of all Fs and/or
Ws) also require a refund and repayment calculation. Refunds
of federal aid programs are made according to a formula
established by the U.S. Department of Education. Additional
information is available in the Financial Aid Office.
Alternative Sources of
Credit
Students may use nontraditional credit to satisfy general
education, elective, or major course requirements, but it cannot
be granted for non-degree-applicable classes. MiraCosta
College grants nontraditional vocational credit only for
vocational subjects that MiraCosta offers.
Credit from Other Colleges
MiraCosta grants credit for most courses taken at United
States regionally accredited institutions of higher learning
(Associations of Colleges and Schools), but MiraCosta reserves
the right to evaluate work completed at other colleges. Credit
earned at a time when an institution was a candidate for
accreditation may be accepted for credit.
Courses completed at another California community college
that were approved for a general education category as
22 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
outlined in Title 5 will be applied to the same general education
category at MiraCosta and can be used to satisfy associate
degree requirements.
Transfer credits from institutions using the quarter system will
be evaluated as follows: each unit of work for a quarter is
equivalent to two-thirds of a unit of work for a semester (e.g., 3
quarter units = 2 semester units).
International Course Work
International course work must be evaluated by an accredited
and approved evaluation service. Courses may be used to fulfill
prerequisite, major, general education, or math competency
requirements only if course descriptions in English are submitted
for review along with the evaluated foreign transcript. Course
descriptions reviewed for the English competency and/or
general education requirements will be considered only if the
the language of instruction was English. MiraCosta College
will not determine course transferability to other colleges and
universities.
Advanced Placement (AP) Examination
Program
MiraCosta grants advanced placement and advanced credit
toward its associate degree to high school students who attain
scores of 3, 4, or 5 on AP exams administered by the College
Entrance Examination Board.
Students may earn a minimum of 3 semester units of credit
toward their associate degree at MiraCosta for each AP exam
satisfactorily passed while in high school. AP credit can also
be used to satisfy California State University and University of
California transfer admission requirements. The Advanced
Placement Guide p. 24 identifies how specific AP exams can
be used for these purposes.
High school students who intend to participate in this program
should make the necessary arrangements with their high
schools and should request when they take the AP exams that
their test scores be sent to the Counseling Office. To obtain
credit for advanced placement at MiraCosta, students should
make an appointment to see a counselor. In addition, students
intending to transfer to four-year institutions should consult a
MiraCosta counselor or the individual university regarding AP
credit policies.
International Baccalaureate (IB)
Examination Program
MiraCosta grants credit toward the associate degree for most
higher level exams passed with a minimum score of 5. However,
individual departments have the right to set scoring standards
and to determine course equivalency. Students intending
to transfer to four-year institutions should consult with the
individual university regarding its credit policy. The International
Baccalaureate Guide p. 27 identifies how specific exams
can be used for these purposes.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
MiraCosta may award credit for successful completion of
certain CLEP general examinations and subject examinations.
These examinations are especially valuable for people whose
learning experiences have taken place primarily outside formal
Admissions & Enrollment
classrooms. The CLEP Guide p. 28 identifies how specific
exams can be used for these purposes.
Units earned under credit by examination provisions do not
count in the12 units in residence required for graduation.
Military Service Schools
To receive credit by institutional examination, a student must
be in good standing and must complete (with a grade other
than "W") at least 3 units of work at MiraCosta College during
the semester, other than those units that are earned through
institutional examination.
MiraCosta College grants experience credit of 3 elective units
for submission of any DD214, 295, or other military transcript.
Additionally, active duty military personnel and U.S. military
veterans may satisfy Area E2 Self-Development of MiraCosta
College’s general education pattern (Plan A p. 55) or
Area E-Self-Development on the California State University
general education pattern (CSU-GE, Plan B p. 72) through
submission of a military transcript.
Military service school training will be evaluated and
awarded associate degree credit in accordance with the
recommendations contained in the American Council on
Education (ACE) Guide to the Evaluation of Educational
Experiences in the Armed Forces. In most circumstances, the
units awarded will be elective credit. Students may also receive
credit for USAFI/Dantes subject standardized tests and USAFI
courses by submitting an official transcript to the Admissions
and Records Office. Students should submit a verified copy of
their DD214/military transcript to the Admissions and Records
Office for evaluation.
CTE Transitions—College Credit for High
School Classes
Oceanside, Building 3700: 760.757.2121, x6578
www.miracosta.edu/instruction/ctetransitions
The CTE Transitions program awards college credit to
high school students who earn an A or B in career-related
"articulated" high school courses. An articulated course is one
in which the high school teacher and MiraCosta College faculty
have formally agreed that the high school course’s outline,
syllabus, textbook, and final exam are comparable to those in a
course of the same subject at MiraCosta. More than 40 different
high school courses have been articulated in the following
subjects: accounting, architecture, automotive technology,
business administration, business office technology, child
development, design drafting technology, engineering,
horticulture, medical assisting, and nursing. Students who are
taking courses in these subjects at area high schools may be
eligible for CTE Transitions credit. To find out which high school
courses offer articulated MiraCosta College credit, students
should visit the CTE Transitions website.
Credit by Examination
Credit by institutional examination is available only under the
following conditions:
A departmental or program credit by institutional
examination policy is on file with Student Services.
An instructor who has been designated by departmental
statement as eligible to give credit by institutional
examination in the course agrees that such credit by
institutional examination is appropriate. This instructor is
also responsible for writing, selecting, and administering the
exam.
Credit by institutional examination is limited to those courses
in the MiraCosta College catalog current for the period of
evaluation.
An examination may be taken only one time for a specific
subject and will not be given in a subject previously
completed unsatisfactorily (D, F, or NP).
The deadline for returning the completed petition for
credit by institutional examination to the Admissions and
Records Office is Friday of the sixth week of classes during a
regular semester or the third week of classes during summer
intersession.
All examinations will be given during the period reserved for
"day class" final examinations each regular semester, unless
special permission is secured from the examining instructor.
All examinations will be graded using the full range of grades
available for any class.
Credit by institutional examination will generally not be
offered for a course that is a prerequisite to a course for
which the student has already received college credit in a
previous semester.
A maximum of 15 units will be granted as credit by
institutional examination at MiraCosta College. Note: This
number does not include Advanced Placement, CLEP, or
other similar standardized tests.
Credit by institutional examination in a course will be noted
on the student’s permanent record by a notation next to the
course.
Credit by institutional examination will be recorded on
the student’s permanent record only if department and
institutional policy has been followed.
Charges will be assessed for credit by institutional
examination. Units earned through credit by institutional
exam cannot be counted for federal financial aid payment
purposes.
Credits acquired by examination are not applicable to
meeting of such unit-load requirements as Selective Service
deferment, veteran’s, or Social Security benefits.
Credit by institutional exam is covered by the Board of
Governors Fee Waiver Program, if eligible.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 23
Admissions & Enrollment
Advanced Placement Guide
Advanced Placement (AP) exams with a minimum score of 3 can be used toward associate degree requirements, CSU admission
and GE certification requirements, and UC admission and IGETC certification requirements.
Advanced
MCC Course(s)
Placement Exam Maximum
AA/AS Units*
MiraCosta
GE Area
CSU
GE Certification
Area/Semester
Units**
CSU
Minimum
Admission
Semester Units**
IGETC
Certification
Area/Semester
Units***
UC
Admission
Semester
Units***
Art History
ART 258 and
ART 259
6 units
Area C
3 units
Area C1 or C2
3 units
6 units
Area 3A or 3B
3 units
5.3 units
Studio Art (any
exam)
N/A
3 units
No GE
N/A
3 units
per exam
N/A
5.3 units (max
credit for Studio
Art AP exams)
Biology
BIO 100 or BIO 101 Area B
and BIO 101L
4 units
6 units
Areas B2 and B3
4 units
6 units
Area 5B (with lab) 5.3 units
4 units
Calculus AB
MATH 150/
MATH 150H
3 units
Area A2
Area B4
3 units
3 units (only
one Calculus AP
exam applied to
degree)
Area 2A
3 units
2.7 units (5.3
units max credit
for Calculus AP
exams)
Calculus BC
MATH 150/
MATH 150H and
MATH 155
6 units
Area A2
3 units
Area B4
3 units
6 units (only
one Calculus AP
exam applied to
degree)
Area 2A
3 units
5.3 units (max
credit for Calculus
AP exams)
Calculus AB
Subscore
N/A
N/A
Area B4
3 units
3 units (only
one Calculus AP
exam applied to
degree)
Area 2A
3 units
2.7 units (5.3
unit max credit
for Calculus AP
exams)
Chemistry
CHEM 110 (only if Area B
score of 4 or 5)
4 units
6 units
Areas B1 and B3
4 units
6 units
Area 5A (with lab) 5.3 units
4 units
Chinese
Language &
Culture
N/A
6 units
Area C
4 units
Area C2
3 units
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
5.3 units
Computer
Science A
CS 111
3 units
No GE
N/A
3 units (only
one CS AP
exam applied to
degree)
N/A
1.3 units
Computer
Science AB
(discontinued
after May 2009)
N/A
6 units
No GE
N/A
6 units (only
one CS AP
exam applied to
degree)
N/A
2.7 units (max
credit for both CS
AP exams)
Economics:
ECON 101
Macroeconomics 3 units
Area D
Area D2
3 units
3 units
Area 4
3 units
2.7 units
Economics:
Microeconomics
ECON 102
3 units
Area D
Area D2
3 units
3 units
Area 4
3 units
2.7 units
English:
Language &
Composition
ENGL 100
6 units
Area A1
3 units
Area A2
3 units
6 units
Area 1A
3 units
5.3 units (max
credit for English
AP exams)
5.3 units (max
credit for English
AP exams)
English: Literature ENGL 100 and LIT Area A1
& Composition
elective
3 units
6 units
Area C
3 units
Areas A2 and C2 6 units
6 units
Area 1A or 3B
3 units
Environmental
Science
Areas B1 and B3
4 units
Area 5A (with lab) 2.7 units
3 units
24 N/A
4 units
Area B
4 units
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
4 units
Admissions & Enrollment
French Language FREN 201
6 units
Area C
4 units
Area C2
3 units
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
5.3 units
French Literature
FREN 202
6 units
Area C
N/A
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
5.3 units
German
Language
GERM 201
6 units
Area C
4 units
Area C2
3 units
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
5.3 units
Geography
(Human)
GEOG 102
3 units
Area D
Area D5
3 units
3 units
Area 4
3 units
2.7 units
Government
& Politics:
Comparative
PLSC 103
3 units
Area D
Area D8
3 units
3 units
Area 4
3 units
2.7 units
Government &
Politics: United
States+
PLSC 102
3 units
Areas D, F, G
Max 3 units
Areas D8 and
US-2
CSU AI
requirement
3 units
3 units
Area 4
3 units
2.7 units
History: European HIST 104/
HIST 104H
6 units
Areas C, F
Max 3 units
Area C2 or D6
3 units
6 units
Area 3B or 4
3 units
5.3 units
History: United
States+
HIST 110/
HIST 110H
3 units
Areas D, F, G
Max 3 units
Area C2 or D6
and US-1 CSU AI
requirement
3 units
6 units
Area 3B or 4
3 units
5.3 units
History: World
HIST 100/
HIST 100H
and HIST 101/
HIST 101H
6 units
Areas D, F
Max 3 units
Area C2 or D6
3 units
6 units
Area 3B or 4
3 units
5.3 units
Italian Language ITAL 201
& Culture
6 units
Area C
4 units
N/A
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
5.3 units
Japanese
Language &
Culture
JAPN 201
6 units
Area C
4 units
Area C2
3 units
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
5.3 units
Latin: Literature
(discontinued
after May 2009)
N/A
6 units
Area C
3 units
N/A
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
2.7 units
Latin: Vergil
N/A
3 units
Area C
Area C2
3 units
3 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
2.7 units
Music Theory
MUS 101
6 units
No GE
N/A
6 units
N/A
5.3 units
Physics B
PHYS 111 and
PHYS 112
6 units
Area B
Areas B1 and B3
4 units (until fall
’15)
6 units
Area 5A (with lab) 5.3 units (max
4 units
credit for Physics
AP exams)
Physics C:
Electricity &
Magnetism
PHYS 152
4 units
Area B
Areas B1 and B3
4 units
4 units
Area 5A (with lab) 2.7 units (5.3 units
3 units
max credit for
Physics AP exams)
Physics C:
Mechanics
PHYS 151
4 units
Area B
Areas B1 and B3
4 units
4 units
Area 5A (with lab) 2.7 units (5.3 units
3 units
max credit for
Physics AP exams)
Physics 1
PHYS 111
4 units
Area B
Areas B1 and B3
4 units (maximum
GE credit for
Physics AP exams)
4 units (6 units
maximum credit
for Physics AP
exams)
N/A
N/A
Physics 2
PHYS 112
4 units
Area B
Areas B1 and B3
4 units
(maximum GE
credit for Physics
AP exams)
4 units
N/A
(6 units maximum
credit for Physics
AP exams)
N/A
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 25
Admissions & Enrollment
Psychology
PSYC 101/
PSYC 101H
3 units
Area D
Area D9
3 units
3 units
Area 4
3 units
2.7 units
Spanish
Language
SPAN 201
6 units
Areas C, F
4 units
Area C2
3 units
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
5.3 units
Spanish Literature SPAN 202
6 units
Area C
4 units
Area C2
3 units
6 units
Areas 3B and 6
3 units
5.3 units
Statistics
Area A2
Area B4
3 units
3 units
Area 2A
3 units
2.7 units
MATH 103
4 units
*
MCC Advanced Placement Policies
The AP exams listed above may be applied for course and unit credit toward the MiraCosta College associate degree
requirements.
**
CSU Advanced Placement Policies
The AP exams listed above may be incorporated into certification of CSU General Education-breadth requirements. All CSU
campuses will accept the minimum units shown if the examination is included in full or subject area certification; individual
CSU campuses may choose to accept more units than those specified towards completion of general education breadth
requirements. The CSU Minimum Admission Semester Units column reflects the minimum number of units all CSU campuses
will accept toward CSU admission.
***
UC Advanced Placement Policies
Each AP exam may be applied to one IGETC area as satisfying one course requirement, with the exception of Language
Other Than English (LOTE). The last column reflects the minimum number of units all University of California campuses will
accept toward UC admission.
+
This examination only partially fulfills the CSU American Institutions graduation requirement but can be used toward the
requirement.
26 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Admissions & Enrollment
International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit Guide for
General Education (GE)
IB Exam
MiraCosta GE Area/ CSU-GE Certification CSU Minimum
IGETC Certification UC Minimum
Semester Units
Area/Semester Units Admission Semester Area/Semester Units Admission Semester
Units
Units
Biology HL
Area B/3 units
Area B2 (w/out
lab)/3 units
6 units
Area 5B (w/out
lab)/3 units
5.3 units
Chemistry HL
Area B/3 units
Area B1 (w/out
lab)/3 units
6 units
Area 5A (w/out
lab)/3 units
5.3 units
Economics HL
Area D/3 units
Area D2/3 units
6 units
Area 4/3 units
5.3 units
Geography HL
Area D/3 units
Area D5/3 units
6 units
Area 4/3 units
5.3 units
History HL (any
region)
Area D/3 units
Area C2 or D6/3 units 6 units
Area 3B or 4/ 3 units 5.3 units
Language A1 HL
(any language)*
Area C/3 units
Area C2/3 units (until 6 units
fall ’13)
Area 3B/3 units
5.3 units
Language A2 HL
(any language) *
Area C/3 units
Area C2/3 units (until 6 units
fall ’13)
Area 3B/3 units
5.3 units
Language A
Literature HL
Area C/3 units
Area C2/3 units
6 units
Area 3B/3 units
5.3 units
Language A
Language and
Literature HL
Area C/3 units
Area C2/3 units
6 units
Area 3B/3 units
5.3 units
Language B HL (any Area C/3 units
language) *
N/A
6 units
Area 6/3 units
5.3 units
Mathematics HL*
Area A2/3 units
Area B4/3 units
6 units
Area 2/3 units
5.3 units
Physics HL
Area B/3 units
Area B1 (w/out
lab)/3 units
6 units
Area 5A (w/out
lab)/3 units
5.3 units
Psychology HL
Area D/3 units
Area D9/3 units
3 units
Area 4/3 units
5.3 units
Theatre HL*
Area C/3 units
Area C1/3 units
6 units
Area 3A/3 units
5.3 units
NOTE: Each CSU and UC campus determines how it will apply external examinations toward credit in the major. Students who have
earned credit from an IB exam should not take a comparable college course because transfer credit will not be granted for both.
* A minimum score of 5 for all exams is required by the University of California (UC). California State University (CSU) requires a
minimum score of 5, except for Mathematics, Language, and Theatre exams, which require a score of 4. MiraCosta requires a score
of 5 for all exams except Mathematics, which requires a minimum score of 4.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 27
Admissions & Enrollment
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) for
MiraCosta College and California State University
(CSU)
CLEP tests with a minimum score of 50 can be used toward associate degree general education and elective requirements as well
as CSU admission and general education certification requirements.
CLEP Exam
MiraCosta GE Area/
Semester Units
MiraCosta Associate
Degree Semester Units
CSU GE Certification
Area/Semester Units
CSU Minimum Admission
Semester Units
American Government
Area D/3 units
3 units
Area D8/3 units
3 units
American Literature
Area C/3 units
3 units
Area C2/3 units
3 units
Analyzing and
Interpreting Literature
Area C/3 units
3 units
Area C2/3 units
3 units
Biology
Area B/3 units
3 units
Area B2/3 units
3 units
Calculus*
Area A2/3 units
3 units
Area B4/3 units
3 units
Chemistry
Area B/3 units
3 units
Area B1/3 units
3 units
College Algebra*
Area A2/3 units
3 units
Area B4/3 units
3 units
College AlgebraArea A2/3 units
Trigonometry* (no longer
offered)
3 units
Area B4/3 units
3 units
College Mathematics
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
English Composition no
essay (not offered after
7/1/10)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
English Composition with N/A
essay (not offered after
7/1/10)
N/A
N/A
N/A
English Literature
Area C/3 units
3 units
Area C2/3 units
3 units
Financial Accounting
N/A
3 units
N/A
3 units
French Level I (score of
50) +
N/A
6 units
N/A
6 units
French Level II (score of
59) +
Area C/3 units
12 units
Area C2/3 units
12 units
Freshman College
N/A
Composition (not offered
after 7/1/10)
N/A
N/A
N/A
German Level I (score of
50) +
6 units
N/A
6 units
German Level II (score of Area C/3 units
60) +
12 units
Area C2/3 units
12 units
History, U.S. I ++
Area D and AI
Requirement/ 3 units
3 units
Area D6 and US-1 AI
Requirement/ 3 units
3 units
History, U.S. II ++
Area D and AI
Requirement/ 3 units
3 units
Area D6 and US-1 AI
Requirement/ 3 units
3 units
Human Growth and
Development
N/A
3 units
Area E/3 units
3 units
Humanities
Area C/3 units
N/A
3 units
Area C2/3 units
3 units
Information Systems and N/A
Computer Applications
3 units
N/A
3 units
Introduction to
Educational Psychology
N/A
3 units
N/A
3 units
Introductory Business Law N/A
3 units
N/A
3 units
Introductory Psychology
3 units
Area D9/3 units
3 units
28 Area D/3 units
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Admissions & Enrollment
Introductory Sociology
Area D/3 units
3 units
Area D10/3 units
3 units
Natural Sciences
Area B/3 units
3 units
Area B1 or B2/3 units
3 units
Pre-Calculus*
Area A2/3 units
3 units
Area B4/3 units
3 units
Principles of Accounting
N/A
3 units
N/A
3 units
Principles of
Macroeconomics
Area D/3 units
3 units
Area D2/3 units
3 units
Principles of
Management
N/A
3 units
N/A
3 units
Principles of Marketing
N/A
3 units
N/A
3 units
Principles of
Microeconomics
Area D/3 units
3 units
Area D2/3 units
3 units
Social Sciences and
History
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Spanish Level I (score of
50) +
N/A
6 units
N/A
6 units
Spanish Level II (score of
63) +
Area C/3 units
12 units
Area C2/3 units
12 units
Trigonometry* (no longer Area A2/3 units
offered)
3 units
Area B4/3 units
3 units
Western Civilization I
Area D/3 units
3 units
Area C2 or D6/ 3 units
3 units
Western Civilization II
Area D/3 units
3 units
Area D6/3 units
3 units
MiraCosta CLEP Policies: All CLEP exams may be applied for unit credit toward the satisfaction of a GE category or as elective units
toward the MiraCosta College associate degree.
* Satisfies MiraCosta Mathematics Competency requirement.
+ If a student passes more than one CLEP exam in the same language other than English (French, German, and Spanish),
only one examination may be applied to the associate degree. For each of these tests, a passing score of 50 earns 6 units of
elective credit; higher scores earn more units and placement in Area C of general education.
CSU CLEP Policies: All CLEP exams may be incorporated into certification of CSU GE-breadth requirements. All CSU campuses
will accept the minimum units shown if the examination is included in full or subject area certification; individual CSU campuses
may choose to accept more units than those specified towards completion of general education breadth requirements. The
CSU Minimum Admission Semester Units column reflects the minimum number of units all CSU campuses will accept toward CSU
admission. The CSU has grandfathered in this policy to guide CLEP submissions for any year the CLEP exam was taken.
+ If a student passes more than one CLEP exam in the same language other than English (French, German, and Spanish),
only one examination may be applied to the bachelor’s degree. For each of these tests, a passing score of 50 earns 6 units of
admissions credit; higher scores earn more units and placement in Area C2 of CSU-GE breadth.
++ This examination only partially fulfills the CSU American Institutions graduation requirement but can be used toward the
requirement.
UC CLEP Policies: The University of California currently does not accept CLEP examinations.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 29
Student Support Programs & Services
Student Support Programs & Services
Academic Services &
Tutoring
Writing Center
Oceanside, Building 1200 (first floor)
San Elijo, Room 105 (first floor)
760.795.6861
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/writingcenter/
Tutoring & Academic Support Center
(TASC)
Oceanside, Building 1200: 760.795.6682
San Elijo, Room 105: 760.944.4449, x7748
Community Learning Center, Academic Support Center:
760.795.8724
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/tutoring/
The Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC) is
committed to enhancing student retention and success by
providing assistance to students through innovative academic
support services. Full- and part-time students enrolled at
MiraCosta College are eligible to use these services free of
charge.
TASC assists students by providing individual and group
tutoring, supplemental learning assistance, self-help materials,
and student success workshops on a variety of subjects.
Services are available during day and evening hours at the
Community Learning Center and the San Elijo and Oceanside
campuses.
The Writing Center is for all writers and readers, whether
you’re an advanced writer looking for a second opinion or
a beginning writer just developing your skills. Perhaps you’re
plagued by grammar issues or have trouble with assigned
reading. Whatever your writing and reading goals, the Writing
Center is the place for you!
We offer 30-minute, same-day appointments, or appointments
up to two weeks in advance. We help with writing, reading,
transfer and scholarship essays, and parts of speech. Even
better, our services are free of charge! Stop by today and get to
know us.
Admissions & Records
Office
Oceanside, Building 3300: 760.795.6620
San Elijo, Administration Building: 760.634.7870
Community Learning Center, Building A: 760.795.8710
Math Learning Center (MLC)
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/admissions
Oceanside, Building 1200: 760.757.2121, x6398
San Elijo, Room 103: 760.944.4449, x7751
The Admissions and Records Office is responsible for processing
applications, enrolling students in credit and noncredit
community education classes, processing grades, maintaining
academic records, sending transcripts to other schools,
evaluating records for graduation, and enforcing academic
regulations. The function of Admissions and Records is handled
in three locations: the Oceanside Campus, the San Elijo
Campus, and the Community Learning Center (Adult High
School Diploma Program and noncredit classes).
www.miracosta.edu/instruction/mathematics/
mathlearningcenter
The Math Learning Center (MLC) provides assistance to
MiraCosta math students through a variety of services. Services
are free of charge and include drop-in tutoring; help with
homework for individuals or groups; self-help materials, such
as video lectures; textbook checkout (for use only in the MLC);
and testing services. MLC services are available during day and
evening hours at both the Oceanside and San Elijo campus
libraries. (Note: The San Elijo MLC may not be open during the
summer session.)
32 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Student Support Programs & Services
Athletics
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/athletics
Intercollegiate Athletics--MiraCosta College
Spartans
participating in a variety of one-day sports tournaments. Sports
include soccer, beach soccer, basketball, dodgeball, flag
football, volleyball, sand volleyball, ultimate frisbee, kayaking,
hiking, and ping pong. Tournaments are for both men and
women, and all skill-levels are welcome to participate.
Intramural Director: Pat Conahan, 760.757.2121, x6242
Bookstores
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.795.6630
San Elijo, Room 307: 760.634.7830
Community Learning Center: 760.795.8708
The Spartan Bookstores are operated by Follett, Inc. The
Oceanside Campus bookstore is located in the Student Center;
the San Elijo Campus bookstore is located in Building 300.
Everything the bookstores offer may also be ordered through
www.efollett.com.
The MiraCosta College Intercollegiate Athletic Department
takes equal pride in academic and athletic achievements;
GPA and transfer rates matter just as much as wins and
losses. MiraCosta fields intercollegiate teams in men’s soccer,
women’s soccer, men’s basketball, women’s basketball,
women’s volleyball, and women’s sand volleyball.
The bookstores have textbooks and school supplies that are
needed for MiraCosta College classes as well as discounted
computer software, art supplies, calculators, tape recorders,
batteries, backpacks, clothing, snacks, greeting cards, gifts,
and sundries.
MiraCosta College participates in the California Community
College Athletic Association (CCCAA), along with more
than 100 California community colleges, and is a member
of the Pacific Coast Athletic Conference, which includes the
eight community colleges in San Diego County and Mt. San
Jacinto College (Hemet, California.) MiraCosta also has a surf
team that competes in the collegiate division of the National
Scholastic Surfing Association.
To participate in intercollegiate athletics, a student must
be admitted to the college, be enrolled full time, and meet
eligibility requirements of the CCCAA. Students who have not
played any college sports are immediately eligible in their first
semester.
Special rules apply to transfer students. Students wishing to
determine eligibility status should contact the athletic director.
Athletic Director: Pat Conahan, 760.757.2121, x6242
Intramural Sports
The Intramural Sports program is open to all students free
of charge and provides a safe, fun atmosphere where
students can meet new people and enjoy physical activity by
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 33
Student Support Programs & Services
College Police & Lost
and Found
College Police
Oceanside, Building 1100: 760.795.6640
San Elijo, Parking/Police Kiosk: 760.795.6640
Community Learning Center: 760.795.6640
Parking Information Line: 760.795.6674
On Campus Emergency: x6911
www.miracosta.edu/police
defense program. College Police also coordinates the district’s
Emergency Preparedness Program.
A copy of MiraCosta College’s annual Safety & Security Report
(in accordance with the Uniform Crime Reporting Procedures
and the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police
and Campus Crime Statistics Act) is available to students
and prospective students. This report includes statistics for the
previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred
on campus, in certain off-campus buildings or property owned
or controlled by the college, and on public property within or
immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. The
report also includes institutional policies concerning campus
security, such as policies concerning sexual assault. You can
obtain a copy of this report by contacting College Police or
through the College Police website.
Hours of the College Police Office at each campus are as
follows:
Oceanside Campus:
Monday–Friday, 7 a.m.–11 p.m.
Saturday, 7 a.m.–3 p.m.
San Elijo Campus:
Monday–Friday, 7 a.m.–10 p.m.
Saturday, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.
College Police is responsible for ensuring the general safety
and security of students, faculty, and staff as well as operating
parking on college properties. Students are required to
purchase and display a daily parking permit or new parking
permit for each semester (fall, spring, and summer) and may
park at the Oceanside Campus in marked stalls in student
lots 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 3C, 4C, 5A, or 5B and in marked
spaces along Barnard Drive. Additionally, after 6 p.m. students
with valid student permits may park in staff spaces on the
Oceanside Campus in Parking Lots 1C, 3C, and 5A only.
At the San Elijo Campus and Community Learning Center,
students may park in marked spaces in student lots. Parking
permits are required at all times while school is in session. Daily
parking permits may be purchased at all three campuses. The
district accepts no responsibility for damage to vehicles or their
contents while parked on district property. (Source: MCCCD
Board Policy/Administrative Procedure 6750.)
Disabled students who require special parking must have a
Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) placard or plate, which
can be obtained at the local DMV office. Students who have
a valid disabled placard or plate must still register their vehicle
with College Police but do not need to purchase a parking
permit. Disabled placards will be honored in lieu of a parking
permit. Temporary parking arrangements can be made for
students who sustain a temporary injury; these permits are
available at the Disabled Students Programs and Services
Office. MiraCosta College Parking Guidelines are available at
College Police offices and on the College Police website.
Students, staff, faculty, and campus guests may request an
escort from College Police. The service is provided during
regular office hours at each campus location. College Police
assists with vehicle lock outs, jump starts, and traffic control,
and it hosts community policing events and a women’s self-
34 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Community Learning Center:
Monday–Thursday, 7 a.m.–9:30 p.m.
Friday–Saturday, 7 a.m.–3 p.m.
Lost & Found
Oceanside, Building 1100: 760.795.6640
San Elijo, Administration Building: 760.634.7870
www.miracosta.edu/police
Lost & Found is located at the College Police Office at the
Oceanside Campus and in the Administration Building at the
San Elijo Campus.
Student Support Programs & Services
Career Studies &
Services
Oceanside, Building 3700: 760.795.6772
www.miracosta.edu/careers
To empower students to make informed, intentional career
decisions is the mission of Career Studies & Services, also known
as the Career Center. At the Career Center, students find the
instruction, guidance, and resources they need to prepare
to successfully transition from an academic environment to
a professional workplace environment. In addition to courses
in career and life planning, internships, and cooperative
work experience education, the Career Center offers career
counseling, assessment, exploration, and workshops. The
Career Center also assists students with developing the skills
they need to successfully conduct job and internship searches.
The Career Center’s website offers 1-3 minute videos about how
to prepare for obtaining professional employment, an online
resume and cover letter workshop, and information about how
to leverage your networks to discover potential opportunities
through our online job search boot camp. At our campus
location, students may access the computers in our lab and
the resources in our library. The lab is equipped with up-to-date
career and employability skills software and access to relevant
Internet sites. The library’s resources include a collection of
print materials and DVDs on a variety of careers, labor market
forecasts, and all aspects of preparing for an employment
search.
The Career Center’s services are offered through individual
sessions and group workshops on either a walk-in or byappointment basis. More information is available at the Career
Center’s website.
MiraCosta College’s Child Development Center serves as
a campus laboratory school, providing both academic
instruction to college students enrolled in child development
courses and early care and education to children of
student, staff, and community families. The Center provides
developmentally appropriate, play-based, and inclusive
programming for children between the ages of 18 months and
5 1/2 years.
Located on the Oceanside Campus, the Child Development
Center is open weekdays from 7:30 a.m.–4:45 p.m. throughout
the academic year. Either half-day or full-day classroom options
are available. MiraCosta’s student families receive priority
enrollment as well as reduced tuition.
Applications for enrollment are available online each semester
at the Center’s website. Registration for the fall semester
begins early May, and registration for the spring semester
begins early November. Classes fill quickly and families are
encouraged to apply early. For additional information and
program requirements, interested families should visit the Child
Development Center website or call 760.795.6656.
Child Development
Center
Oceanside, Building 8000: 760.795.6656
www.miracosta.edu/childdev
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 35
Student Support Programs & Services
Counseling Services
Oceanside, Building 3700: 760.795.6670
San Elijo, Administration Building: 760.944.4449, x6670
Hours: Monday–Thursday, 8 a.m.–7 p.m.; Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30
p.m.
www.miracosta.edu/counseling
The Counseling Center offers individualized academic,
career, and personal counseling to assist both prospective
and current students in developing their educational
programs, coordinating their career and academic goals,
and understanding graduation, major, certificate, and transfer
requirements.
Students can visit or call the office for appointments or dropin times. For more information and online advising, students
should go to the Counseling Services website.
Disabled Students
Programs & Services
(DSPS)
Oceanside, Building 3000: 760.795.6658
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/dsps
MiraCosta is committed to ensuring that students
with disabilities receive appropriate and reasonable
accommodations in instructional activities as mandated by
federal and state law and by college/district policy. A student
seeking an academic accommodation due to a documented
disability should request assistance from Disabled Students
Programs and Services (DSPS). The student must present
verifying documentation of his or her disability from a qualified
professional as determined by DSPS.
Accommodations may include interpreters or real-time
captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing, alternate
format materials (such as Braille, large print, or e-text), test
accommodations, note takers, equipment loan, and priority
enrollment. In addition, the department offers an Assistive
Computer Lab, learning strategies classes designed for students
with learning disabilities, and special noncredit classes for the
developmentally delayed learner. All services are designed to
help students participate fully in the regular college program.
Extended Opportunity
Programs & Services
(EOPS)
Oceanside, Building 3000: 760.795.6680
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/eops
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) is a statewide outreach and special assistance program that provides
a unique educational support system for individuals from
educationally and financially disadvantaged backgrounds.
EOPS participants receive advising, special financial aid
information and assistance, and a wide variety of other
services. For former and current foster youth, EOPS has a
new component of specialized services. Resources and
Assistance for Former Foster Youth (RAFFY) is designed to help
emancipated minors and former foster youth with the transition
to college and independent living.
CalWORKs services are available through the MiraCosta
CalWORKs program located in EOPS.
To apply, students must complete the following:
1. Board of Governors Fee Waiver application (available in
the Financial Aid Office)
2. MiraCosta College enrollment application (available at
the Admissions and Records Office)
3. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and
all necessary documents (available in the Financial Aid
Office).
To qualify, students must be:
1. Disadvantaged according to criteria established by state
regulations
2. Enrolled in a minimum of 12 units.
EOPS works to foster pride and dignity in students, thereby
increasing self-esteem and motivation to make education
accessible.
Financial Aid Office
DSPS will assess and document the extent of the student’s
educational functional limitations. Depending on the
educational functional limitations and severity of the disability,
DSPS will recommend appropriate accommodations while
maintaining academic integrity.
36 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Oceanside, Building 3000: 760.795.6711
Student Support Programs & Services
2. Possess a high school diploma (or its equivalent) or be at
least 18 years of age and able to demonstrate an ability
to benefit from college-level instruction if enrolled in an
eligible program prior to July 1, 2012. If the student enrolls
for the first time after July 1, 2012, he or she must have a
high school diploma or its equivalent.
3. Be enrolled in an eligible program leading to a certificate,
a degree, or transfer.
4. Maintain financial aid Satisfactory Academic Progress
(SAP).
5. Not be in default on a federal student loan or owe a
repayment of federal grant funds.
Students enrolled less than half-time are not eligible for student
loan programs, FSEOG, or FWS.
www.miracosta.edu/financialaid
Financial aid includes a variety of federal and state programs
designed to provide financial support toward a student’s
successful completion of academic goals. The purpose is to
bridge the gap between educational costs and available
resources.
Application processing, from filing to eligibility for disbursement,
may take up to 12 weeks. The Financial Aid Office (FAO)
recommends applying early. Because of the lengthy processing
time required, students should be prepared to pay their initial
school expenses, for which they will be reimbursed once
financial aid funds are disbursed.
Financial aid programs available at MiraCosta College include
the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Federal Work-Study (FWS), and
Federal Direct Student Loans. State programs include the
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS), the Board
of Governors (BOG) Fee Waiver that covers enrollment fees,
Cal Grant B or C, and the Chafee Grant, which is designed
specifically for foster youth.
Students should file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) electronically at www.fafsa.gov. To be considered for
FSEOG, FWS, or the Cal Grant programs, students must file the
FAFSA by March 2 of each year, preceding the school year for
which the student plans to attend and receive financial aid.
Though March 2 is a requirement for the programs listed above,
all students are encouraged to apply by this date to ensure
timely file processing for all financial aid programs. Students
who wish to borrow under the Direct Loan program must
complete their file, including all necessary documentation, in
time for the FAO to complete a loan origination prior to the end
of the term of enrollment.
The FAFSA also serves as the application for the BOG Fee
Waiver. In the rare case that an applicant may not be
completing a FAFSA, a separate BOG Fee Waiver application
will be available from the FAO.
Minimum eligibility requirements for federal aid programs
include the following:
1. Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen as defined on the
FAFSA.
Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic
Progress (SAP)
In accordance with federal regulations, Satisfactory Academic
Progress (SAP) is reviewed using maximum time frame/pace of
progression (quantitative) and GPA (qualitative) criteria at the
end of each academic year. Standards apply to all students
regardless of previous financial aid history. These standards
must be met to be eligible for financial aid initially and year
to year. SAP covers all federal programs, including Pell Grant,
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG),
Work Study (FWS), and Direct Loans. The SAP policy also applies
to the state Cal Grant program.
The complete Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress
policy is available on the Financial Aid Office website.
Refunds
Students who receive federal financial aid funds and who totally
withdraw before the 60 percent date of the semester require a
refund and repayment calculation to determine funds owed
back to the various federal aid programs by both the school
and the student. Refunds of the federal aid programs are made
according to the formula established by the U.S. Department
of Education and State of California Title V grading regulations.
Additional information is available at the Financial Aid Office.
Ineligible Programs/Courses for Federal
Financial Aid
Eligible programs must be a minimum of 15 weeks in length
and require at least 16 semester units. When used as the major
for an associate degree, a program that is not eligible as a
certificate program may be eligible as a degree program.
(Certificate programs are described under Areas of Study &
Courses.)
Any pre-collegiate courses taken to meet high school
requirements are ineligible, even if they can also be used
toward a degree program.
Credit by Exam: Courses taken in this manner cannot be
considered in determining financial aid eligibility.
Repeated Courses: A student may be awarded federal
aid funds when repeating, for the first time only (i.e., one
repetition per class), a previously passed course in a termbased program. Previously passed means the student obtained
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 37
Student Support Programs & Services
a grade higher than "F." Students enrolled in non-term-based
programs may not receive credit for retaking course work.
Facebook: Link from our website or search MiraCosta College
Student Health Services
Remedial Course Work: Once a student has attempted 30
units of remedial course work (whether successfully completed
or not), no additional remedial courses can be included
when determining enrollment status for federal financial aid
programs.
Food Pantry
The Food Pantry provides emergency food assistance to
students in need. Any student who is currently enrolled at
MiraCosta qualifies for support. The program provides shortterm relief and offers referrals for additional community
resources. All services are confidential. Food distribution is
handled by the following Student Services offices:
Service Learning
Oceanside Campus, Building 3300, 760.795.6616
Health Services
Oceanside Campus, Building 3300, 760.795.6675
Student Activities
San Elijo Campus Student Center, 760.944.4449, x7782
Food Services
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.795.6886
San Elijo, Student Building: 760.634.7886
The Oceanside Campus food service, located on the upper
level of the Student Center, is open for breakfast, morning
breaks, lunch, and dinner during the school year and for
morning breaks and lunch during the summer. Daily lunch
specials, homemade soups, sandwiches, hamburgers, fries,
salads, fruits, vegetarian foods, desserts, and hot and cold
drinks are available Monday–Thursday, 7 a.m.–8 p.m., and
Friday, 7 a.m.–2 p.m. Students can enjoy their meals in the
dining room with an ocean view or in one of the patio areas.
The San Elijo Campus has daily lunch specials, soups, pizzas,
wraps, sandwiches, fruit, pastries, and many more daily
menu items. The café is open for the fall and spring semesters
Monday–Thursday. Grab & Go is available from 7:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Breakfast is served from 8:30–10:30 a.m., lunch from 10:30 a.m.–
2 p.m. Friday is Grab & Go only from 8:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Both campuses have vending machines stocked with hot and
cold beverages, candy, chips, and other snack foods.
Health Services
Oceanside, Building 3300, Room 3326: 760.795.6675
San Elijo, Student Center, Room 922: 760.944.4449, x7747
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/healthservices
Email: [email protected]
38 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Student Health Services Program helps students achieve their
desired educational objectives through the maintenance of
optimal physical, mental, and emotional health. The health
services fee all students pay when they enroll covers the cost
of secondary student accident insurance and helps fund the
operational expense of Health Services.
Most health and medical services are provided without
additional charges to students.
The Student Health Services centers are staffed by registered
nurses who are trained to assist students who have medical
and health problems. Health Services focuses its services and
programs in the following areas:
Nursing services provided by registered nurses
Health education and promotional events
Health assessment, intervention, and referrals as needed
Sexually transmitted disease testing information and referral
Medical services by physician and nurse practitioner
Personal counseling through the marriage and family
therapy intern program
Community resources listing and referral
Communicable disease control
Service learning opportunities.
International Students &
Study Abroad
Institute for International Perspectives (IIP)
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.795.6897
www.miracosta.edu/iip
Student Support Programs & Services
The Institute for International Perspectives (IIP) endeavors to
internationalize MiraCosta College by supporting international
students, administering study abroad programs, and promoting
international cultural activities. The IIP supports international
students enrolled on an F-1 visa in the college’s academic
programs and the full-time intensive English Language
Institute (ELI) program offered through Community Services.
International students with an F-1 or M-1 visa must contact the
IIP and review the admission requirements found under the
Admissions & Enrollment section of this catalog.
The IIP also offers international study programs. Current
study abroad programs are semester-long requiring fulltime enrollment. Study abroad programs offer only courses
approved in accordance with Title 5 of the California Code
of Regulations and taught by faculty meeting the minimum
qualifications for providing instruction.
Library & Information
Hub
Oceanside, Building 1200: 760.795.6715
San Elijo, Building 100: 760.634.7850
Community Learning Center, Academic Support Center,
Building A: 760.795.8733
library.miracosta.edu
Printing, photocopying, and scanning equipment.
Information and instructional services include the following:
Research assistance available in-person and by email, online
chat, text, and phone
Library instruction geared to the needs of specific classes
upon request
Library research workshops offered on-ground and online
Online Library Science credit courses (LIBR 101, LIBR 201) that
are UC/CSU transferable
Reciprocal borrowing privileges with the Palomar College
and Cal State San Marcos libraries
Group study rooms
Academic reserve collections in a variety of print, audiovisual, and digital formats
Instructional exhibits and displays of student projects
Intralibrary loans between the three MiraCosta College
campuses
Interlibrary loan for books and periodical articles
Library resources access via mobile devices.
Library and Information Hubs at both Oceanside and San Elijo
campuses are open the following days and times:
Monday–Thursday, 8 a.m.–9:30 p.m.
Friday, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
Library hours at the Community Learning Center vary according
to student demand.
MiraCosta’s libraries provide extensive resources and services
for students, faculty, and staff. Information resources include
the following:
On legal or administrative holidays and during semester breaks,
the libraries may be closed or on a special schedule. Changes
in hours are posted on the library webpage and in each library
as necessary, and they are also recorded at 760.795.6717.
More than 69,000 books, 184,000 e-books, 7,300 DVDs/
videos, 20,000 online videos, and 3,000 CDs
Scholarships
Over 90 online reference databases covering a variety
of disciplines, such as science, literature, health, social
sciences, and the humanities
Oceanside, Building 3000: 760.795.6751
Access to more than 34,000 periodical titles through full-text
online databases, such as EBSCOhost and JSTOR
www.miracosta.edu/scholarships
Remote access for students, staff, and faculty to all library
databases (requires SURF ID and password)
CD, DVD, video, and cassette players as well as adaptive
technology devices
Hundreds of computers featuring a range of software
applications that support college courses
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 39
Student Support Programs & Services
Represent MiraCosta and promote the college in the
community.
Provide campus tours.
Student Ambassador Program
Oceanside, Building 3400, Room 3435: 760.795.6894
San Elijo, Student Center: 760.944.4449, x7768
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/ambassadors/
studentambassadors.html
Student ambassadors are MiraCosta students hired by the
School Relations/Diversity Outreach Department. Ambassadors
serve as peer advisers to high school students in district schools,
develop workshops for elementary and junior high school
students, provide information at community events, provide
on-campus tours, and perform a variety of other high-profile
assignments. Ambassadors must be enrolled in at least six units,
maintain a 2.5 grade point average, and be available to work
between 5 and 15 hours per week. Applications are available at
the Student Ambassador’s website.
Continuing MiraCosta College students, graduating high
school seniors planning to attend MiraCosta, and MiraCosta
students transferring to a four-year college may apply for a
MiraCosta College Foundation scholarship. Scholarships are
funded by the MiraCosta College Foundation, local service
organizations, businesses, and individuals. General scholarships
are also available as well as scholarships for students pursuing
specific academic fields.
School Relations/
Outreach
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.795.6894
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/ambassadors
The MiraCosta College Office of School Relations/Diversity
Outreach serves as a resource for students, parents, faculty,
and staff from schools in the college service area, and it is
responsible for implementing student outreach services to
encourage diversity in the student body. The program’s general
goals are as follows:
Encourage all students to prepare for and pursue a college
education by providing college workshops and preenrollment advising services
Provide target outreach services for under-represented and
educationally disadvantaged students in order to encourage
their enrollment in college
Assist students with their transition into college by providing
them with matriculation and admissions-related services
Establish partnerships and maintain positive relations with the
administration, faculty, and staff of district K-12 schools
Student Accounts
Office/Cashier
Oceanside, Building 3200: 760.795.6835
San Elijo, Administration Building: 760.634.7762
The Student Accounts Office processes all student payments,
tuition assistance forms, deferment forms, and refunds. It is
where eligible students may pick up their emergency loan and
scholarship checks. The office accepts cash, checks, money
orders, and Visa, Mastercard, and Discover credit cards for
payments; however, office staff cannot cash personal or payroll
checks.
Students may also pay enrollment and related fees online at
surf.miracosta.edu.
Student Activities Office
Oceanside, Building 3400, Room 3435: 760.795.6890
San Elijo, Student Center: 760.634.7806
The Student Activities Office is rich with activities, events,
information, and resources, and it acts as a focal point for
40 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Student Support Programs & Services
service and leadership-development programs, such as the
following:
Support for the Associated Students of MiraCosta College
Support for campus clubs
Support for The Chariot student newspaper
Campus Information Center, including posting approval and
literature distribution
Campus social, recreational, cultural, and educational
programming
Community service and volunteer activities
Emerging Leaders Institute
Housing referrals
On-campus events.
These services enhance the student’s educational experience
and foster his or her social and intellectual development.
The staff is firmly committed to actively promoting student
involvement and development.
Oceanside Campus office hours:
Monday–Thursday, 8 a.m.–7 p.m.
Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
San Elijo Campus office hours:
Monday–Thursday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Associated Students of MiraCosta College
to campuswide committees, sharing governance in the
development of college policies and annual budget, adopting
and overseeing use of an annual ASG budget, allocating
funds for new programs/projects, granting club charters,
and providing and administering a program of activities and
services for students.
Any interested student with a 2.0 grade point average or above
and enrolled in at least five units each semester is eligible to
seek an ASG office. The weekly meetings of ASG are called the
Student Senate and are open to all MiraCostans. Meeting times
are available in the Student Activities Office.
Student Senate Positions
Students who manage the business of the Student Senate
represent a variety of ages, interests, and academic majors.
Some have prior experience in student government, but
others are simply interested in discovering their leadership
potential through participation. Each member gains valuable
experience through exposure to the variety of requests and
programs addressed by the Student Senate. The following
officers compose the Student Senate: president, student
trustee, executive vice president, and vice president of the
San Elijo Campus. Appointed positions are vice president
of programming, Oceanside Campus; vice president of the
Community Learning Center; vice president of programming,
San Elijo Campus; vice president of public relations; chair of the
Inter-Organizations Council; and 22 senators.
Campus Clubs & Organizations
Joining a campus club is a great way for students to enrich
their academic experience at MiraCosta. The college’s wide
variety of clubs changes periodically with the changing
interests of the student body.
All club members have a voice through the Inter-Club Council
(ICC), to which each club sends a representative. ICC develops
effective, organized, and fair policies so all clubs will thrive.
The fall and spring semester ICC-sponsored "Club Recruitment
Day" gives interested students an opportunity to learn about
the various clubs on campus and allows clubs to increase their
membership.
Students who wish to start a club begin by filing a petition for
a charter that includes a list of 10 credit students and a fulltime staff/faculty adviser. They attach a proposed constitution
and submit the petition to the Student Activities Office. For more
information, students should contact either the ICC chair in
the Associated Student Office, 760.795.6891, or the Student
Activities Office, 760.795.6890.
Chartered clubs at MiraCosta are listed below, but not all are
currently active. Interested students should check with the
Student Activities Office for more information.
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.795.6891
San Elijo, Student Center: 760.944.4449, x7782
All students are members of the Associated Students of
MiraCosta College (ASMCC). The organization that represents
the ASMCC is the Associated Student Government (ASG). The
goal of the ASG is to give a voice to all MiraCosta students,
enabling them to become part of the college community.
ASG’s major responsibilities include appointing students
Honors Organizations
Phi Theta Kappa Club
Co-Curricular
Allied Health Occupations Club
Backstage Players
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 41
Student Support Programs & Services
Business Club
Horticulture Club
The Chariot, MiraCosta’s official student newspaper, serves the
college by covering campus news and features as well as by
offering opinion pieces, community information, and student
activity announcements. In the process, Chariot staffers have
the opportunity to gain practical experience in all aspects
of newspaper production. Published every week during the
regular school year, The Chariot is distributed free of charge to
students, faculty, and staff.
Finance & Investment Club
College Hour
Math Club
College Hour is a program of student events and activities
between 12:15–1:15 p.m. on given Thursdays during fall and
spring semesters. Since some classes are scheduled during
this time, students who wish to be involved should arrange their
schedules to keep the time slot free.
Club Biomed
Communications Club
Engineering Club
Natural Science Club
Physics Club
Puente Club
Spanish Club
Multicultural/Ethnic
College Hour events include concerts, meetings, performances,
games, interactive workshops, club activities, and lectures.
Housing Referral
Ballet Folklorico Xochiquetzal
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.795.6890
San Elijo, Student Center: 760.944.4449, x7782
Barrio Arte
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/housing
Black Student Union
International Club
The Student Activities Office maintains a webpage for students
who need housing or a roommate. Arrangements may include
rooms, apartments, houses to rent/share, or room and board in
exchange for work.
Japanese Club
ID Cards
Japanese Animation Club
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.795.6890
San Elijo, Student Center: 760.944.4449, x7782
Chinese Club
Latina Leadership Network
MEChA
Special Interest
Anime & Manga
Dance Club
Encuentros
The MiraCosta student ID card is helpful when checking out
library materials (including reserved materials), using the
computer labs, writing checks in the college bookstores,
providing identification for test-taking, and using certain college
facilities. Additionally, the card may be used for off-campus
discounts at participating copy centers, theatres, restaurants,
clubs, museums, and sports events, just to name a few. With the
discount on just two movie tickets, a cardholder will save more
than the cost of the ID card.
InterVarsity Christian Fellowship
Student ID card fees help support MiraCosta’s student
government, including Associated Student elections; campus
clubs; community events; cultural celebrations, such as AfricanAmerican History Month, Asian Pacific events, and Cinco de
Mayo; and The Chariot student newspaper.
Non-Partisan Political Discussion Group
To get an ID card, students need to do the following:
Friends of EOPS
Gay Straight Alliance
Outdoors Club
Pay their fees at enrollment
Parents on Campus
Bring their receipt to the Student Activities Office, located
in the Student Center of the Oceanside and San Elijo
campuses, along with one of the following valid forms of
identification:
Producers Club
Soccer Club
The Chariot—Student Newspaper
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.757.2121, x6254
42 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Driver’s license containing a photograph
Temporary California driver’s license containing a
photograph
Student Support Programs & Services
State-issued identification card containing a photograph
U.S. military ID card (active duty, reserve, or dependent)
Driver’s license issued by a Canadian government
authority
Driver’s license issued by the District of Columbia,
American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, or Virgin Islands
U.S. passport
Foreign passport
Alien Registration Card ("Green Card")
California Department of Corrections Privilege card [CDC
130-A(7-88)]
Matrícula Consular card.
Have their picture taken and the card made while they wait
Make sure they have a current sticker on the card.
Information Center
Oceanside, Building 3400: 760.795.6890
Individuals who have news or information to distribute can bring
a copy to the Student Activities Office and it will be displayed at
the Information Center.
Posting/Publicity Regulations
All items posted on campus must be approved by the Student
Activities Office. The posting of all approved flyers, posters, and
banners is allowed only on designated bulletin boards. Because
items can be posted for no more than two weeks, the office
date-stamps each one. More specific information on posting
regulations is available at the Student Activities Office in the
Student Center.
Campus’s Testing Center, and the Community Learning Center.
Students are allowed to take the English or ESL Assessment, or
any of the four mathematics tests twice. Tests given through
MiraCosta’s high school outreach testing program will not be
counted toward this maximum. Students must wait at least 24
hours after their initial test before retesting.
The course placement tests are open to students who have
submitted an application for admission or who are currently
enrolled. Acceptable photo identification is required. Individuals
who do not intend to enroll at MiraCosta but wish to take the
English or ESL Assessment or any of the four mathematics tests
are charged a fee.
Adaptive testing is available to students referred by Disabled
Students Programs and Services (DSPS), and extended time on
the math test is offered to students who are non-native speakers
of English. Scores may be used to meet various academic
requirements. Questions concerning the accuracy of scores
must be addressed to Testing Services within six weeks of test
completion.
Academic Proctoring Center
The Academic Proctoring Center (APC) provides a proctored
test site for students enrolled in online courses at MiraCosta
that have an on-campus testing requirement. In addition, the
center proctors instructor-authorized makeup exams for special
student circumstances. Students referred by DSPS for testing
with extended time may also utilize this service. By individual
arrangement, the Academic Proctoring Center also administers
external examinations. Photo identification is required for all
testing in the APC.
Transfer Center
Oceanside, Building 3700: 760.795.6880
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/transfercenter
Testing Services
Oceanside, Building 3300: 760.795.6685
San Elijo, Building 100: 760.944.4449, x7752
Testing Services administers tests for course placement and
serves as a test center for the American College Testing
Program (ACT). MiraCosta’s course placement tests (English
Assessment, ESL Assessment, and Math Competency Exam)
are offered free of charge to MiraCosta students. All other tests
require payment of fees at the time of application. Fees vary,
and in most cases they are nonrefundable.
The Transfer Center provides services that directly assist
potential transfer students preparing for upper-division work
at a four-year college or university. The center attempts
to identify and encourage students who choose transfer
as their educational goal. Advising sessions with university
representatives and transfer workshops are among the services
the center provides. (For transfer recommendations and
important dates, see Transfer Center Services p. 71 in the
Transferring Course Work section of the catalog.)
Transfer Center staff coordinate all University of California
transfer admission guarantee programs, which are described
in the Transferring Course Work p. 68 section of the catalog.
Counselors are available for all students who wish to have an
individual student educational plan tailored to their personal
goals. In addition, the center provides advising for special
programs, such as UniversityLink and the Honors Scholar
Program.
Computerized English and math placement testing is done at
the Oceanside Campus’s Testing Services Lab, the San Elijo
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 43
Student Support Programs & Services
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/veteransinfocenter/
The Veterans Information Center is located on the Oceanside
campus. The center provides information about campus and
community resources as well as a place to study, use the
computer lab, do homework, or just relax.
The center is staffed by peer advisors who are veterans
themselves and understand the challenges other veteran
students face. They can provide veteran students with
information related to enrollment, academic success, financial
aid, health services, counseling, and more.
Veterans Education
Office
Oceanside, Building 3300: 760.757.2121, x6285
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/veteransservices
The Veterans Education Office provides assistance to veterans
and their dependents who may be eligible for various
educational benefits. General information about these benefits
can be found on the Student Services website.
Veterans Information
Center
Oceanside, Building 3000: 760.757.2121, x6222
44 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Academic Programs
Academic Programs
Academic Awards
President’s List
The President’s List honors students in good standing who
achieve a high level of academic success at MiraCosta
College. Students are eligible when they accomplish the
following:
Complete a minimum of 12 total graded units within a single
regular semester
Earn a GPA of at least 3.5 in the courses taken within the
single regular semester.
President’s Permanent Honor Roll
Students in good standing are eligible for the President’s
Permanent Honor Roll when they accomplish the following:
Complete a minimum of 60 degree-applicable units at
MiraCosta College
Qualify for placement on the President’s List at least three
semesters with a minimum cumulative MiraCosta College
GPA of 3.5
Receive no grade lower than a "C" or "P." Courses repeated
by academic renewal or course repetition are not excluded.
Medal of Honor
The Medal of Honor for Academic Excellence is awarded each
year to five students nominated by the faculty. Sponsored by
the MiraCosta College Foundation, it is the college’s highest
academic honor. Eligibility information may be obtained by
contacting the Office of the Vice President of Student Services
at 760.795.6895.
Cooperative Work
Experience Education
(Co-op)
Oceanside, Building 3700: 760.795.6772
www.miracosta.edu/careers
Co-ops are designed to help students develop and improve
their workplace competencies while undertaking expanded
responsibilities and learning new skills at work. Students learn
how to establish and achieve workplace goals and to assess
how their goals and behaviors contribute to their development
as professionals.
Students working in jobs related to their major should enroll in
Occupational Cooperative Work Experience Education courses,
which are the courses numbered 299 in a variety of career and
technical education disciplines. Students who are undecided
about their major or who are working in a field unrelated to
their major should enroll in the General Cooperative Work
Experience Education course, WKEX 233. Both types of co-op
courses help students learn how to achieve the knowledge,
skills, and attitudes they need for career success. Students
studying under the GI Bill receive benefits only for enrollment in
occupational work experience education courses.
Students enrolled in any cooperative work experience
education course are required to do the following:
Meet with the instructor at least twice at the worksite during
the semester
Work a minimum of 60 non-paid hours per unit or 75 paid
hours per unit, for a maximum of 4 units per semester
(occupational co-op only; 3 units is the maximum for general
co-op)
Develop and meet learning objectives, complete
assignments, and document monthly hours worked.
Specific information about the Co-op Program is available on
the Career Center website.
Directed Study
Admissions & Records Office
Oceanside: 760.795.6620 • San Elijo: 760.634.7870
2014 Medal of Honor Recipients: Richard
Huizar, Alexandra Slowik, Travis Williamson,
Ariella Sosis and Angela Yoo
Directed Study courses provide an opportunity for students
to pursue a special area of interest in order to achieve
specific goals beyond the scope of existing courses offered
at MiraCosta College. Directed Study courses are available
in many disciplines and are identified with 298 as their course
number.
Students enrolled in a Directed Study course work
independently and interact directly with an instructor on
an individual basis and as prescribed by the Directed
Study Agreement, which is a learning contract developed
collaboratively with the instructor, approved by the department
46 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Academic Programs
chair, instructional dean and instructor, and submitted to
the Admissions and Records Office by the add deadline for
semester-long length courses. Three units is the maximum
Directed Study credit that may be applied toward a degree.
To enroll in a Directed Study course, students must have
successfully completed 12 units of college work with at least a
3.0 grade-point average. Directed Study Agreement forms are
available from Admissions and Records.
Honors Scholar Program
Oceanside, Student Center: 760.795.6878
academic work at undergraduate research conferences in
California.
The Honors Scholar Program at MiraCosta College is a
certified member of the UCLA Transfer Alliance Program (TAP),
closely coordinating its program outcomes with admission
requirements for UCLA’s College of Letters and Science. The
program is also an active participating member of the Honors
Transfer Council of California, the Western Regional Honors
Conference, and the National Honors Collegiate Council.
Honors students interested in leadership development may
also apply to become an Honors Navigator. Students carefully
selected for this role serve as peer mentors or project leaders
and participate in outreach efforts for the Honors Scholar
Program.
Current Honors Curriculum
While HSP students in good standing have first access to the
honors courses, any student may enroll in an honors course;
acceptance to the Honors Scholar Program is not required for
enrollment.
Complete five from the following:
www.miracosta.edu/honors
The Honors Scholar Program (HSP) provides highly motivated
students enriched academic experiences as well as
opportunities for civic engagement. Successful completion of
the program may give honors students a competitive edge in
consideration for transfer admission to some four-year colleges
and universities.
Students interested in virtually every major can participate in
the Honors Scholar Program while making continuous progress
toward graduation from MiraCosta College and transfer to a
four-year institution. Honors students are guided by a Transfer
Center counselor to establish an individualized educational
plan that best suits their particular educational goals.
Additionally, the Honors Scholar Program cultivates a
heightened sense of community for its members by actively
supporting social activities and cultural outings that build
camaraderie and public service. Honors Lounges located
at both the Oceanside and San Elijo campuses provide
communal space for honors students to study, socialize, and
collaborate.
Honors courses are designed to develop exceptional academic
ability by providing challenging course work through intensive
instruction from outstanding faculty in small classes. These
courses fulfill IGETC and CSU general education requirements
and are offered at both the Oceanside and San Elijo
campuses.
Of special note, exemplary students in the Honors Scholar
Program have opportunities to present and publish their
ADM 100H
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice (Honors)
ANTH 101H
Biological Anthropology (Honors)
ANTH 102H
Cultural Anthropology (Honors)
ART 260H
History of Modern Art (Honors)
BUS 140H
Legal Environment of Business (Honors)
BUS 290H
Business Communication (Honors)
ENGL 201H
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature (Honors)
ENGL 202H
Critical Thinking and Composition
(Honors)
FILM 101H
Introduction to Film (Honors)
GEOL 101H
Physical Geology (Honors)
GEOL 101LH Physical Geology Laboratory (Honors)
HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors)
HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors)
HIST 103H
Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
HIST 105H
History of England (Honors)
HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
HIST 113H
American Military History (Honors)
HUMN 101H Introduction to the Arts (Honors)
LIT 265H
Shakespeare Studies (Honors)
MATH 150H
Calculus and Analytic Geometry
(Honors)
MUS 119H
Jazz History (Honors)
OCEA 101H Introduction to Oceanography (Honors)
PHSN 108H
Introduction to Climate Change
(Honors)
PSYC 101H
General Psychology (Honors)
PSYC 104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
SOC 101H
Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 47
Academic Programs
SOC 104H
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
(Honors)
Program Admission Requirements
Have a cumulative GPA of 3.50 in high school or 3.25 in 12
units of college-degree applicable course work
Be eligible for English 100, as established by an assessment
test or equivalent
Complete the honors application, including application
form, statement of purpose, two letters of recommendation,
unofficial transcripts, and signed Statement of Academic
Integrity
Complete the matriculation p. 14 process (orientation,
testing, and advisement).
Students who do not meet admission requirements directly
may submit an Appeal for Admission, which is reviewed on a
case-by-case basis by an ad hoc committee organized by the
Honors Coordinator.
Application instructions and forms are available online at
www.miracosta.edu/honors.
Program Completion Requirements
Responsible and ethical behavior upheld, as outlined in the
Statement of Academic Integrity and MiraCosta College
Standards of Student Conduct.
For a complete description of requirements for program
admission, good standing, and program completion, contact
the MiraCosta College Honors Office or visit the website.
Internship Studies
Program
Oceanside, Building 3700: 760.795.6772
www.miracosta.edu/careers
Internships are designed to provide MiraCosta College students
with workplace experience and new skills. The Internship
Studies Program benefits students, faculty, and the academic
disciplines by linking classroom learning to the work world,
promoting the development of professional relationships,
and adding significant work experience to students’ resumes.
The program offers business, industry, and organizations the
talents and energy of students who not only contribute to
workforce development but also strengthen the link between
the educational and business communities. Students who
intend to transfer are advised to enroll in Internship Studies for
no more than 6 units during community college attendance.
Interns are required to obtain a recommendation from a
faculty member in the discipline in which they are seeking
the internship. Interns must have been enrolled in the faculty
member’s class and must have performed well. Guidelines for
obtaining faculty recommendations vary by discipline and are
available in the Career Center.
Once students obtain an internship placement, they are
required to do the following:
For MiraCosta College Honors Scholars
Minimum degree applicable GPA of 3.50 in college course
work
Completion of five honors courses
Active involvement in HSP at MiraCosta College for a
minimum of two semesters
Participation in 20 verified hours of honors activities
Responsible and ethical behavior upheld, as outlined in the
Statement of Academic Integrity and MiraCosta College
Standards of Student Conduct.
For UCLA TAP Certification
Minimum degree applicable cumulative GPA of 3.50 in
college course work
Completion of five honors courses representing at least 15
units of honors coursework
Enrollment in honors courses for two semesters at MiraCosta
College
Education Plan established with the MiraCosta College
Transfer Center
48 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Meet with the instructor at least twice at the worksite during
the semester
Work a minimum of 60 non-paid hours per unit or 75 paid
hours per unit, for a maximum of 3 units per semester
Develop and meet learning objectives, complete
assignments, and document monthly hours worked.
Internships are available in many disciplines and are identified
with 292 as their course number.
Phi Theta Kappa Honor
Society
Oceanside: 760.757.2121, x6895 or x7792
The Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society was established in 1929
to acknowledge and promote the academic achievements
of two-year college students. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa
provides opportunities for individual growth and development
through participation in honors, leadership, service, and
fellowship programming. With a membership of more than
one million students throughout 1,100 worldwide chapters, Phi
Academic Programs
Theta Kappa is the largest honor society in American higher
education.
Each year Phi Theta Kappa selects a study topic intended
to unite faculty and students across disciplines. The theme
provides a focal point for academic work and service activities.
Membership benefits include the Phi Theta Kappa diploma
seal, the privilege of wearing the honors stole and tassel at
graduation, a myriad of scholarships (more than $87 million),
the opportunity to travel to academic conferences throughout
the year, and the honor of becoming an alumni member after
graduation. Transcripts sent to four-year institutions will identify
the student as a member of Phi Theta Kappa.
Through these community placements, students apply
classroom knowledge to everyday situations and real problems.
They gain practical experience that can help them explore or
confirm possible career choices while earning documented
work experience. In addition, students who participate in
service learning discover the value of contributing to their
community. For more information about the program, including
its courses and community partners, students should visit the
program’s website.
To qualify for membership, students must have the following:
Current enrollment at MiraCosta at the time they apply
Successful completion of 12 or more units at MiraCosta
A GPA at MiraCosta of at least 3.5.
Puente Project
Oceanside, Building 3700: 760.757.2121, x6296
www.miracosta.edu/puente
The Puente Program was originally created to increase the
number of Mexican-American/Latino students transferring to
four-year colleges and universities. It is now open to all students
who want to succeed academically, gain recognition as
leaders, and graduate from four-year universities.
Puente is a year-long program that includes intensive writing
instruction, one-on-one work with a counselor to develop an
educational plan, work with community-based mentors, and
educational and cultural enrichment activities. Puente scholars
enroll in designated sections of ENGL 50 and COUN 110 in the
fall and ENGL 100 and COUN 105 in the spring. Puente scholars
remain fully supported by the program until they successfully
transfer to a four-year university or college.
Service Learning
Program
Oceanside, Building 3300: 760.795.6616
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/servicelearning
The Service Learning Program partners academic instruction
with community service. Each semester approximately 60
courses at MiraCosta offer a service component. Students
work with their instructors and the Service Learning and
Volunteer Center to find meaningful service opportunities in
the community that relate to what they are learning in the
classroom. MiraCosta’s community service placements include
youth programs, conservation efforts, homeless and hunger
programs, senior services, and literacy programs as well as
opportunities within public schools.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 49
Associate Degrees & Certificates
Associate Degrees & Certificates
Instructional Services
Oceanside, Building 4700: 760.795.6812
www.miracosta.edu/instruction
Instructional Services is responsible for the administration
of the various educational programs offered by MiraCosta
College. With the assistance of department chairs, deans, and
faculty, the college’s instructional programs are proposed,
developed, and implemented for the primary purpose of
providing opportunities for students to reach their desired
educational goals. Such goals include associate degrees,
certificates of achievement and proficiency in many career and
technical education areas, and diplomas and certificates in
the noncredit program for adults seeking to finish basic or high
school education.
Associate Degrees
MiraCosta College offers the following degrees: Associate in
Arts (A.A.), Associate in Science (A.S.), Associate in Arts for
Transfer (A.A.-T), and Associate in Science for Transfer (A.S.-T).
The awarding of an associate degree at MiraCosta represents
more than an accumulation of units. It also symbolizes a
successful attempt on the part of the college to lead students
through patterns of learning experiences designed to develop
certain capabilities and insights. Students who graduate with
an associate degree from MiraCosta possess sufficient depth
in some field of knowledge to contribute to lifetime interest and
career pursuit.
The associate degree is designed to prepare students either
for transfer to a four-year college or university or for immediate
employment. The academic disciplines as well as the career
and technical disciplines for which MiraCosta offers an
associate degree are identified on the Associate Degrees &
Certificate Programs table p. 61.
Although the associate degree recognizes the completion
of lower-division course requirements, it does not guarantee
admission to a four-year college or university.
Associate in Arts (A.A.) and Associate in
Science (A.S.) Requirements
Students who wish to earn an associate degree from MiraCosta
must meet the following requirements (per MCCCD Board
Policy/Administrative Procedure 4100).
Major & Grades
Students must complete a minimum of 18 units in a chosen
major or area of emphasis and complete each course with
a "C" or better (or a "P" if the course is taken on a "pass/no
pass" basis). Students may use courses to satisfy both a general
education and a major requirement.
General Education
Students have three general education patterns from which
to choose but are strongly encouraged to consult with a
MiraCosta counselor for assistance in selecting the general
52 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
education pattern that is most appropriate for their educational
goal.
Plan A: Completion of MiraCosta College General Education
Requirements (Plan A p. 55)*
Plan B: Completion and certification of California State
University General Education (CSU GE) Breadth (Plan B p.
72)
Plan C: Completion and certification of University of
California/California State University Intersegmental General
Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC; Plan C p. 76).
While a course might satisfy more than one general education
requirement, it may not be counted more than once for these
purposes. However, courses may be used to satisfy both a
general education and a major requirement.
*The Plan A general education requirement may be met by
submitting a transcript verifying completion of a bachelor’s
degree from a United States regionally accredited college or
university.
MiraCosta College General Education Outcomes
General education outcomes identify the knowledge, skills,
and abilities that students will be able to demonstrate after
completing MiraCosta’s general education program.
Outcome
Outcome Description
Effective Communication
Write, speak, read, and
otherwise communicate
accurately within a specified
domain
to a variety of contexts,
audiences, and purposes
with clarity of expression
logically in both content and
organization
correctly (e.g., grammar,
syntax, punctuation)
in a mature style
Critical Thinking
Define and analyze
problems clearly
Think independently,
creatively, and logically
Reason
Apply appropriate problem
solving methods
Combine evidence
to support a theory or
argument
Analyze and synthesize
multiple types of information
from multiple perspectives
Display skeptical inquiry
Associate Degrees & Certificates
Global Awareness (and
Responsible Citizenship)
Information Literacy
Productive Work Habits
Display awareness of logical
and global issues
Value and respect diversity
Value and respect multiple
perspectives
Value his or her place and
role in a global community
Make informed decisions
Recognize the ethical
implications of personal
behavior
Recognize the ethical
implications of political,
social, and economic
institutions
Demonstrate good
citizenship in the classroom,
workplace, and community
Assess an information need
and develop an effective
search strategy
Locate and gather relevant
information resources using
appropriate technologies
Critically evaluate
information and information
sources
Organize and/or synthesize
information
Effectively communicate
information using
appropriate technologies
Recognize ethical and legal
issues surrounding the use of
information
Display ethical behavior in
the use of information
Display intellectual curiousity
Demonstrate the ability to
work independently and
collaboratively
Display strong work ethics
and responsibility
Participate in activities in the
classroom, workplaces, and
community
Display strong academic
and workplace ethics,
such as good study
habits, time management,
organizational skills, and
efficient and appropriate
use of campus resources
Aesthetic Literacy and
Appreciation
Recognize diverse elements
of beauty and form
Identify and differentiate
artistic elements and
techniques
Recognize the value of
artistic expression in visual
and performing arts,
literature, and language
Appraise artistic experiences
with informed sensitivity
Units
Students must complete a minimum of 60 degree-applicable
units of credit.
Grade Point Average (GPA)
Students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.0
in all units attempted at MiraCosta and a combined 2.0 grade
point average, including all work transferred to the college that
is to be included in the degree evaluation. A grade of "A," "B,"
"C," or "P" is required for all courses to be counted toward an
associate degree major or area of emphasis.
Students may need a higher GPA for admission to a University
of California campus or to UC/CSU impacted programs and
majors than is required for MiraCosta’s associate degree.
Residency
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College, with at least 6 of those 12 in the major or area of
emphasis.
Competencies
All students seeking an associate degree must demonstrate
competence in reading, written expression, and mathematics.
However, achievement of minimum competency does not
mean students have met course-work requirements for the
associate degree.
Note: These competencies are met when students complete
either the CSU GE-Breadth (Plan B) or IGETC (Plan C) general
education pattern or submit an official transcript verifying
completion of a bachelor’s degree from a United States
regionally accredited college or university.
Reading: Reading competency must be demonstrated by
completing one of the following options:
Achieve a qualifying score on the reading component of
the MiraCosta College English Assessment that gives a
recommendation for READ 100 p. 52
Present proof of achieving one of the following minimum test
scores:
A passing score on the CSU English Placement Exam
A score of 3, 4, or 5 on a College Board Advanced
Placement English Examination
A score of 5 or better on the International Baccalaureate
Higher Level English Test.
Complete one of the following with a minimum grade of "C"
or "P": READ 100, READ 101; ENGL 100, ENGL 201, ENGL 201H,
ENGL 202, ENGL 202H; or equivalent.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 53
Associate Degrees & Certificates
Writing: Writing competency must be demonstrated by
completing one of the following options:
Achieve a qualifying multimeasure score on the MiraCosta
College English Assessment that gives placement into ENGL
100 p. 52
Present proof of achieving one of the following minimum test
scores:
A passing score on the CSU English Placement Exam
A score of 3, 4, or 5 on a College Board Advanced
Placement English Examination
A score of 5 or better on the International Baccalaureate
English Language A1 Higher Level Examination.
Complete one of the following with a minimum grade
of "C" or "P" at MiraCosta or an equivalent course at
another regionally accredited college: ENGL 100, ENGL 201,
ENGL 201H, ENGL 202, ENGL 202H.
Mathematics: Math competency must be demonstrated by
completing one of the following options:
Pass a MiraCosta mathematics course numbered 64 through
270 or equivalent with a minimum grade of "C" or "P"
Achieve a qualifying score on the MiraCosta College
Mathematics Competency Examination that gives clear
placement into a math course numbered 103 through 150
Present proof of achieving one of the following minimum test
scores:
A passing score on the College Board Mathematics
Achievement Test (500 Level I; 600 Level II)
A score of 3, 4, or 5 on a College Board Advanced
Placement Math Examination
A minimum score of 50 on a College-Level Examination
Program Subject Exam (College Algebra, Pre-calculus, or
Calculus)
A score of 4 or better on an International Baccalaureate
Mathematics Examination.
Associate in Arts for Transfer (A.A.-T),
Associate in Science for Transfer (A.S.-T)
Requirements
MiraCosta College offers associate degrees for transfer to the
California State University (CSU). These degrees have been
developed as a result of the Student Transfer Achievement
Reform (STAR) Act and are designed to provide a clear
pathway to a CSU major and baccalaureate degree.
A.A.-T and A.S.-T degree requirements are as follows:
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) CSU transferable units
Complete all courses required in the major with a “C” or
better
Complete the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general education
pattern
Achieve a minimum CSU transferable GPA of 2.0
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College.
California Community College students who are awarded an
A.A.-T or A.S.-T degree are guaranteed priority admission with
junior status to a participating CSU campus and given priority
admission to their local CSU campus.
54 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This priority does not guarantee admission to a specific major.
Participating CSU campuses determine that the degree
awarded by MiraCosta is similar to a degree that can be
awarded at that campus. This may include an emphasis
or option within the degree or another degree program.
Once admitted, the student will be required to complete
only 60 additional prescribed units to qualify for the similar
baccalaureate degree. MiraCosta students earning an A.A.-T or
A.S.-T degree or completing traditional admission requirements
have local priority admission to California State University San
Marcos.
At the time of this publication, MiraCosta offers an A.A.-T in
communication studies, history, psychology, sociology, studio
arts, and theater arts and an A.S.-T in administration of justice,
business administration, and mathematics.To view which CSU
campuses accept these degrees, please visit www.sb1440.org.
Students are encouraged to consult with a MiraCosta counselor
to determine which CSU campuses are participating in this
program and which degrees are considered similar on those
campuses.
An Associate in Arts or Associate in Science for Transfer degree
may not be the best option for students intending to transfer
to a particular CSU campus, the University of California, or a
private or out-of-state university.
Students are encouraged to consult with a MiraCosta counselor
for further information regarding the most efficient pathway to
transfer and to develop an educational plan designed to meet
their educational goals.
Applying for the Associate Degree
Students who expect to receive an associate degree must
file a petition by the 30 percent deadline of the final semester
leading to their graduation. (Students intending to graduate
during the summer intersession may petition during the spring
semester.) Final dates to file a petition are as follows:
Fall 2014: September 22, 2014
Spring 2015: February 20, 2015
Official transcripts from all colleges attended (or concurrently
attending), approved substitutions and waivers, educational
plans, and any other necessary documents must be on file
in the Counseling Office before a student submits a petition
to graduate. Petitions submitted after the deadline are
automatically processed in the subsequent semester.
Multiple Degrees
Students who are in progress to complete or who have
previously been awarded a MiraCosta associate degree may
be qualified for an additional associate degree under the
following circumstances:
The additional degree represents a new major.
Each degree has at least 12 mutually exclusive major units.
All degree requirements have been met, with at least 12 units
in residence completed in the additional major at MiraCosta
College.
(Source: MCCCD Administrative Procedure 4100.)
Associate Degrees & Certificates
Commencement
ENGL 201
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature
ENGL 201H
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature (Honors)
Critical Thinking and Composition
ENGL 202H
Critical Thinking and Composition
(Honors)
Intermediate Algebra
Plan A will satisfy general education requirements at MiraCosta
College but will not satisfy all general education requirements
for transfer to a CSU or UC campus and is not intended for
students transferring to a four-year institution.
AREA A—Language & Reasoning
These courses develop the principles and applications of
language toward
Statistics
MATH 105
Concepts and Structures of Elementary
3
*
Concepts and Structures of Elementary
3
*
MATH 115
Calculus with Applications
4
MATH 126
Pre-Calculus I: College Algebra
4
MATH 131
Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry and
Analytic Geometry
4
MATH 135
Pre-Calculus Mathematics
*
5
*
MATH 150
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 150H
Calculus and Analytic Geometry
(Honors)
MATH 155
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
*
4
MATH 260
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
*
4
PHIL 100
Informal Logic and Critical Thinking
3
PSYC 104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
4
PSYC 104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
4
READ 100
Critical Reading and Thinking
READ 101
Reading for College Success
5
*
5
3
*
3
*
SOC 104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
4
SOC 104H
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
(Honors)
4
These courses examine the physical universe, its life forms, and
its natural phenomena. These courses will
Help the student develop an appreciation and
understanding of the scientific method
Encourage an understanding of the relationships between
science and other human activities.
A1. English Composition
A minimum of 3 semester units is required.
Required courses:
Composition and Reading
4
AREA B—Natural Sciences
Logical thought
Clear and precise expression
Critical evaluation of communication.
ENGL 100
4
*
Mathematics II
MiraCosta College General Education
Requirements 2014–2015
4
MATH 103
MATH 106
Plan A
4
*
*
Mathematics I
The MiraCosta College commencement ceremony is held
once a year in May at the end of the spring semester. Students
who submit a petition for an associate degree or certificate
of achievement are eligible to attend the commencement
ceremony provided they meet the requirements for the degree
or certificate. Students who are eligible to attend the ceremony
will receive information about participating in the ceremony
from the Student Activities Office prior to the ceremony.
4
*
ENGL 202
MATH 64
4
*
4
*
A2. Communication & Analytical Thinking
Required courses:
A minimum of 3 semester units is required. Select one course
from any discipline.
Required courses:
A minimum of 4 semester units is required. Courses with a
laboratory component are defined with a #.
ANTH 101
Biological Anthropology
3
ANTH 101H
Biological Anthropology (Honors)
3
ANTH 101L
Biological Anthropology Laboratory
#
1
BIO 180
Biostatistics
4
ANTH 190
Primate Behavior and Ecology
BTEC 180
Biostatistics
4
ASTR 101
Descriptive Astronomy
COMM 101
Public Speaking
3
ASTR 101L
COMM 106
Group Communication
3
Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory
COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
3
ASTR 120
Life in the Universe
3
COMM 212
Argumentation
3
ASTR 201
Introductory Astronomy
3
3
3
#
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 1
55
Associate Degrees & Certificates
BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
BIO 101
General Biology
BIO 101L
General Biology Laboratory
#
4
AREA C—Humanities
3
These courses study the cultural activities and artistic
expressions of human beings. These courses will develop
1
#
BIO 102
Ecology and Environmental Biology
BIO 103
Animal Diversity
BIO 105
Genes and Technology in Society
3
BIO 150
General Botany
#
4
BIO 170
Marine Biology
BIO 172
Marine Ecology
BIO 202
Foundations of Biology: Evolution,
3
4
#
3
Biodiversity, and Organismal Biology
BIO 204
4
#
4
#
Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry,
Cell Biology, Genetics, and Molecular
Biology
4
#
BIO 220
Human Physiology
CHEM 100
Introductory Chemistry
CHEM 102
Introduction to Organic and Biological
Chemistry
CHEM 104
4
#
An awareness of the ways in which people throughout the
ages and in different cultures have responded to themselves
and the world around them in artistic and cultural creation
An aesthetic understanding
An ability to make value judgments.
A minimum of 3 semester units is required. Select one course
from any discipline.
Required courses:
Drawing and Composition
3
ART 101
Design and Color
3
ART 103
3D Design
3
ART 157
Art Orientation
3
ART 158
Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and
the Americas
3
ART 177
Art in the Elementary Schools
3
ART 201
Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art
3
4
#
4
#
Chemistry of Living Things (Introduction
to General, Organic, and Biochemistry)
5
#
ART 230
Introduction to Sculptural Installation
3
ART 244
Digital Media for the Visual Artist
3
ART 254
Understanding and Appreciating the
Photographic Image
3
ART 258
Ancient to Gothic Art
3
ART 259
History of Renaissance to Modern Art
3
CHEM 108
Preparatory Chemistry
CHEM 110
General Chemistry
#
5
CHEM 111
General Chemistry
#
5
EART 106
Earth and Space Science
3
ART 260
History of Modern Art
3
GEOG 101
Physical Geography
3
ART 260H
History of Modern Art (Honors)
3
GEOG 101L
Physical Geography Laboratory
1
ART 290
Landmarks of Art
3
3
CHNS 101
Elementary Chinese (First Semester)
4
3
CHNS 102
Elementary Chinese (Second Semester)
4
1
CHNS 201
Intermediate Chinese (Third Semester)
4
COMM 111
Oral Interpretation of Literature
3
COMM 215
Intercultural Communication
3
DESN 107
History of Western Architecture -A
Sustainable Perspective
3
GEOL 101
Physical Geology
GEOL 101H
Physical Geology (Honors)
GEOL 101L
Physical Geology Laboratory
3
ART 100
#
#
GEOL 101LH
Physical Geology Laboratory (Honors)
GEOL 120
Environmental Geology: Earth Hazards
and Humanity
HORT 116
Plant Science
DNCE 100
Dance Appreciation
3
OCEA 101
Introduction to Oceanography
3
DNCE 101
Dance History
3
OCEA 101H
Introduction to Oceanography (Honors)
3
DNCE 105
Dance Cultures of the World
3
OCEA 101L
Introductory Oceanography Laboratory
1
DRAM 105
Introduction to Theatre
3
PHSN 101
Fundamentals of Physical Science
3
DRAM 120
Energy, Motion, and Matter: An
Introduction to Physics and Chemistry
3
Dramatic Literature (Ancient Greeks to
Shakespeare)
3
PHSN 106
DRAM 121
Introduction to Climate Change
3
Dramatic Literature (Restoration to
Present)
3
PHSN 108
PHSN 108H
Introduction to Climate Change
(Honors)
3
PHYS 111
1
#
3
4
#
#
Introductory Physics I
#
DRAM 130
Acting I
3
FILM 101
Introduction to Film
3
4
FILM 101H
Introduction to Film (Honors)
3
4
FILM 106
Study of Filmed Plays
3
PHYS 112
Introductory Physics II
PHYS 151
Principles of Physics I
#
4
PHYS 152
Principles of Physics II
#
4
PHYS 253
Principles of Physics III
#
4
PSYC 260
Physiological Psychology
56 #
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
3
FILM 110
Film History
3
FREN 101
Elementary French (First Semester)
4
FREN 102
Elementary French (Second Semester)
4
FREN 201
Intermediate French (Third Semester)
4
FREN 202
Intermediate French (Fourth Semester)
4
GRMN 101
Elementary German (First Semester)
4
Associate Degrees & Certificates
GRMN 102
Elementary German (Second Semester)
4
SPAN 202
Intermediate Spanish (Fourth Semester)
4
GRMN 201
Intermediate German (Third Semester)
4
SPAN 203
Spanish for Native Speakers
4
HIST 103
Western Civilization to 1648
3
SPAN 205
3
HIST 103H
Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
3
Hispanic Film, Literature, and
Composition
HIST 104
Western Civilization Since 1648
3
HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
3
HUMN 101
Introduction to the Arts
3
HUMN 101H
Introduction to the Arts (Honors)
3
HUMN 250
American Studies: First Contact Through
the Civil War
3
HUMN 251
American Studies: 1870s to the Present
3
ITAL 101
Elementary Italian (First Semester)
4
ITAL 102
Elementary Italian (Second Semester)
4
ITAL 121
Introduction to Italian Culture
3
ITAL 201
Intermediate Italian (Third Semester)
4
ITAL 202
Intermediate Italian (Fourth Semester)
4
ITAL 210
Intermediate Italian Conversation and
Reading
3
ADM 100
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice
3
ADM 100H
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice (Honors)
3
Area D—Social & Behavioral Sciences
These courses focus on people as members of society. These
courses will
Develop an awareness of the method of inquiry used by the
social and behavioral sciences
Stimulate critical thinking about the ways people act and
have acted in response to their societies
Promote appreciation of how societies and social subgroups
operate.
A minimum of 3 semester units is required. Select one course
from any discipline.
JAPN 101
Elementary Japanese (First Semester)
4
JAPN 102
Elementary Japanese (Second
Semester)
4
ADM 200
Concepts of Criminal Law
3
JAPN 201
Intermediate Japanese (Third Semester)
4
ANTH 102
Cultural Anthropology
3
JAPN 202
Intermediate Japanese (Fourth
Semester)
4
ANTH 102H
Cultural Anthropology (Honors)
3
ANTH 103
Introduction to Archaeology
3
LIT 120
Introduction to Literature
3
ANTH 104
Native American Cultures
3
LIT 250
American Literature: First Contact
Through the Civil War
3
ANTH 190
Primate Behavior and Ecology
3
LIT 251
American Literature: Mid-1800s to the
Present
3
CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
3
LIT 260
English Literature Through the 18th
Century
3
LIT 261
English Literature: Romantic to
Contemporary
3
LIT 265
Shakespeare Studies
3
LIT 265H
Shakespeare Studies (Honors)
3
LIT 270
World Literature to 1600
3
LIT 271
World Literature Since 1600
3
MUS 100
Introduction to Music Theory
3
MUS 113
Multicultural Roots of American Music
3
MUS 114
History of Rock and Roll
3
MUS 115
History and Appreciation of Western
Music
3
MUS 116
MUS 119
A Survey of World Music
Jazz History
Principles of Human Communication
3
Gender Studies in Communication
3
COMM 220
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
CSIT 160
Technology, the Individual, and Society
3
ECON 100
Survey of Economics
3
ECON 101
Principles of Economics: MACRO
3
ECON 102
Principles of Economics: MICRO
3
GEOG 102
Cultural Geography
3
GEOG 104
World Geography
3
GEOG 108
Environmental Sustainability and Society
3
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
3
GERO 250
Intergenerational Issues
3
HIST 100
World History to 1500
3
3
HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors)
3
3
HIST 101
World History Since 1500
3
HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors)
3
MUS 119H
Jazz History (Honors)
3
PHIL 101
Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge
and Reality
3
Contemporary Moral Problems
PHIL 102
COMM 120
COMM 135
HIST 105
History of England
3
HIST 105H
History of England (Honors)
3
3
HIST 107
East Asian Societies
3
HIST 109
History of the Middle East
3
PHIL 221
Philosophy of Religion
3
RELG 101
World Religions
3
HIST 110
United States History to 1877
3
RELG 105
Eastern Religions
3
HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
3
SPAN 101
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
4
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
3
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
3
American Military History
3
SPAN 102
Elementary Spanish (Second Semester)
4
HIST 111H
SPAN 201
Intermediate Spanish (Third Semester)
4
HIST 113
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 57
Associate Degrees & Certificates
HIST 113H
American Military History (Honors)
3
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
3
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
3
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
MAT 165
Web Design 2: Tools and Techniques
3
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
3
HIST 165
California History
3
PLSC 101
Introduction to Political Science
3
PLSC 102
American Institutions and History
4
PLSC 103
Comparative Government
3
PLSC 150
Introduction to International Relations
3
PSYC 100
Psychology of Personal Growth
3
PSYC 101
General Psychology
3
PSYC 101H
General Psychology (Honors)
3
PSYC 103
Social Psychology
3
PSYC 121
Human Development
3
PSYC 170
Psychology of Aging: Adult Development
and Aging
3
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
3
SOC 101H
Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
3
SOC 102
Contemporary Social Problems
3
SOC 103
Social Psychology
3
SOC 105
Introduction to Justice Studies
3
SOC 110
Comparative Cultures
3
SOC 120
Introduction to Women’s Studies
3
Area E—Lifelong Learning
Courses in this category equip student learners for lifelong
understanding and development of themselves as integrated
physiological, social, and psychological beings. Technology
and information-fluency courses develop the students’ ability to
skillfully and effectively make use of two or more technological
tools to access, evaluate, analyze, integrate, and utilize
information in a variety of contexts in order to apply it to
decision making, critical thinking, and problem solving in
their lives. Self-development courses encourage attentiveness
to health and well-being and to the practical aspects of
managing and improving students’ lives.
E2. Self-Development***
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
3
BUS 147
Personal Finance
3
CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
3
COUN 100
Career and Life Planning
3
COUN 110
College Success Skills
3
CRLP 100
Career and Life Planning
3
CSIT 165
Living in an Online World
3
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
3
GERO 250
Intergenerational Issues
3
HEAL 101
Principles of Health
3
INTR 100
Foundation Skills for the College
Experience
4
NURS 283
Medical Surgical Nursing IV
6
NUTR 100
Nutrition Today
3
NUTR 105
Human Performance and Sports Nutrition
3
NUTR 125
Nutrition and Aging
3
PSYC 121
Human Development
3
PSYC 145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
3
PSYC 170
Psychology of Aging: Adult Development
and Aging
3
SOC 145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
3
Area F—Cultural Diversity**
Courses in this category demonstrate sensitivity to and
promote a climate of cultural diversity. They focus specifically
on a multicultural and global perspective and foster an
understanding of the student’s role in a global community.
Courses that fulfill this requirement introduce and examine
the intersection of ethnicity, language, or culture with gender,
sexuality, class, or other important social categories, such as
religion.
A minimum of 3 semester units is required.
ADM 230
Policing in a Diverse and Multicultural
Society
3
A minimum of 3 semester units is required. Select one course
from either group.
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
3
BUS 160
International Business
3
E1. Technology & Information Fluency
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
3
4
COMM 215
Intercultural Communication
3
4
DNCE 105
Dance Cultures of the World
3
3
DNCE 169
Introduction to World Dance Forms
1
Selected World Dance
1
ACCT 101
ACCT 145
BUS 133
Practical Accounting
Individual Income Tax
Project Management
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
DNCE 171
CSIT 120
Fundamentals of Computer Information
Systems
3
GEOG 102
Cultural Geography
3
GEOG 104
World Geography
3
Google Apps for Business
3
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
3
Social Media for Business
3
GERO 130
Caregiving: Techniques for Working with
the Frail Elderly
3
CSIT 137
CSIT 155
LIBR 101
College Research Skills
1
LIBR 201
Research in the Digital Age
3
HIST 100
World History to 1500
3
MAT 120
Media Design 1: Production
3
HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors)
3
58 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Associate Degrees & Certificates
HIST 101
World History Since 1500
3
HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors)
3
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
HIST 103
Western Civilization to 1648
3
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
HIST 103H
Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
3
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
3
HIST 104
Western Civilization Since 1648
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
3
HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877
3
HIST 105
History of England
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
3
HIST 105H
History of England (Honors)
3
HIST 165
California History
3
HIST 110
United States History to 1877
3
PLSC 102
American Institutions and History
4
HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
3
HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 113
American Military History
3
HIST 113H
American Military History (Honors)
3
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
3
Important Information & Footnotes
This general education pattern is subject to change year by
year, but students are assured that courses taken to meet
this requirement will be honored if they are approved for the
academic year that the course is completed.
Credit will not be awarded for both the honors and the nonhonors version of a course.
Courses may be used to satisfy a general education and a
major requirement.
Courses listed in two different areas may be used in either area
but not both.
LIT 270
World Literature to 1600
3
LIT 271
World Literature Since 1600
3
MUS 116
A Survey of World Music
3
MUS 119
Jazz History
3
MUS 119H
Jazz History (Honors)
3
NUTR 108
Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition
3
PLSC 102
American Institutions and History
4
PSYC 121
Human Development
3
RELG 101
World Religions
3
#
RELG 105
Eastern Religions
3
SOC 110
Comparative Cultures
3
SOC 120
Introduction to Women’s Studies
3
Certificates
SOC 207
Race and Ethnic Relations
3
SOC 230
Introduction to Chicana/o Studies
3
SOC 240
Introduction to Black Studies
3
SPAN 101
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
4
SPAN 102
Elementary Spanish (Second Semester)
4
SPAN 201
Intermediate Spanish (Third Semester)
4
SPAN 203
Spanish for Native Speakers
4
SPAN 205
Hispanic Film, Literature, and
Composition
3
Area G—American Institutions & History**
Courses in this category develop the knowledge and skills
necessary for intelligent citizenship. They focus on the major
events and issues in U.S. history and the political processes used
in the United States.
A minimum of 3 semester units is required.
Required courses:
HIST 110
United States History to 1877
3
HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
3
*
Courses completed with a "C" or "P" can be used to meet
the graduation competency requirements.
** Courses completed in these categories may also satisfy
other general education requirements.
***Active duty military personnel and U.S. military veterans may
satisfy E-2 through submission of a military transcript that
demonstrates the completion of Basic Training or Recruit
Training (DD214, DD295, or other military transcript). Laboratory course.
Certificates of Achievement
Certificates of achievement are designed to prepare students
for employment in specific career areas. The total units required
for a certificate of achievement varies with each discipline.
In developing certificates, MiraCosta faculty collaborate
with employers who describe the knowledge, skills, and
competencies needed for success in all aspects of a trade or
occupation. Students should have basic knowledge in reading,
writing, and math to master the work and to advance in the
occupation they select. MiraCosta’s certificates of achievement
are identified on the Associate Degrees & Certificate Programs
p. 61 table. Course requirements for specific certificates are
listed alphabetically by subject under Areas of Study & Courses.
Many certificates of achievement can be used to satisfy
associate degree major requirements. Interested students
should review the degree requirements and supplement
certificate courses with appropriate general education courses.
To obtain a certificate of achievement, students must earn a
minimum grade of "C" or "P" in each course counted toward
the certificate and complete 6 of the last 12 certificate units
in residence at MiraCosta College. Students are eligible to
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 59
Associate Degrees & Certificates
receive certificates of achievement with honors if they earn a
grade point average of 3.00-3.45. Certificates of achievement
with highest honors are awarded to students with grade point
averages of 3.50-4.00.
Commencement
Certificate programs that are taken as part of and prior to an
associate degree are approved for veterans’ benefits.
Applying for a Certificate of Achievement
Students who expect to receive a certificate of achievement
must file a petition by the 30 percent deadline of the final
semester leading to their graduation. (Students intending to
graduate during the summer intersession may petition during
the spring semester.) Final dates to file a petition are as follows:
Fall 2014: September 22, 2014
Spring 2015: February 20, 2015
Official transcripts from all colleges attended (or concurrently
attending), approved substitutions and waivers, educational
plans, and any other necessary documents must be on file
in the Counseling Office before a student submits a petition
to graduate. Petitions submitted after the deadline are
automatically processed in the subsequent semester.
Certificates of Proficiency
Certificates of proficiency are short-term certificates, typically
requiring fewer than 18 units of course work, that introduce
students to one aspect of a trade or occupation. A certificate
of proficiency is a good choice for students who wish to test a
potential career area, who want to be competitive for entrylevel jobs in one part of an industry, or who prefer to enter the
industry and pursue further education in that field after they
start working.
Certificates of proficiency are designed to prepare students
for the first step in a career ladder. In some cases, the courses
completed for these certificates can also be applied toward a
certificate of achievement and/or an associate degree.
MiraCosta’s certificates of proficiency are identified on the
Associate Degrees & Certificate Programs p. 61 table.
Course requirements for specific certificates are listed
alphabetically by subject under Areas of Study & Courses.
Eligibility for certificates of proficiency includes earning a
minimum grade of "C" or "P" in every course. Additionally, at
least 6 units or the maximum number of units required for the
certificate, whichever is less, must be completed in residence at
MiraCosta College.
Certificate programs that are taken as part of and prior to an
associate degree are approved for veterans’ benefits.
Applying for a Certificate of Proficiency
Certificates of proficiency are not noted on student transcripts.
To apply for a certificate of proficiency, students should obtain
the appropriate form online or from the Instructional Services
Office.
60 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
The MiraCosta College commencement ceremony is held
once a year in May at the end of the spring semester. Students
who submit a petition for an associate degree or certificate
of achievement are eligible to attend the commencement
ceremony provided they meet the requirements for the degree
or certificate. Students who are eligible to attend the ceremony
will receive a packet of information about participating in
the ceremony from the Student Activities Office prior to the
ceremony.
Associate Degrees & Certificates
Associate Degrees & Certificate Programs
Major Area
Certificate of Proficiency
Accounting (ACCT) p. 82
Billing, Cost, and Accounting Assistant
Associate Degree
•
•
•
•
•
Bookkeeping
Income Tax Preparer
Certificate of Achievement
•
Administration of Justice (ADM) p. 85
Administration of Justice for Transfer
•
Law Enforcement
•
•
•
•
Art (ART) p. 92
Digital Photography
Studio Art for Transfer
•
Automotive Technology (AUTO) p. 103
•
Automotive Alignment, Brakes, and Suspension
•
Automotive Electronics
•
Automotive Electronics, Computers, and Emissions
and/or HVAC
•
•
Automotive Quick Service Assistant
•
Automotive Repair: Drive-Train Specialist
•
Basic Engine Performance
•
California Smog Check Technician
•
Biotechnology (BTEC) p. 112
Bioprocess Technology
Laboratory Skills
•
•
Research and Development
•
•
Business Administration (BUS) p. 116
Business Administration for Transfer
Business Fundamentals
•
•
Entrepreneurship
•
•
Management
•
•
Marketing
•
•
Retail Management
•
•
Social Media for Business
•
Entrepreneurship Fundamentals
•
Project Management
•
Retail Assistant
•
Business Office Technology (BOT) p. 123
Administrative Professional
•
•
Office Manager
•
•
California State University General Education (CSU
GE)
•
Office Assistant
•
Child Development (CHLD) p. 129
Assistant Teacher
•
Associate Teacher
•
Early Intervention and Inclusion
•
•
Master Teacher
•
•
Site Supervisor
•
•
Teacher
•
•
Communication (COMM) p. 137
Communication Studies for Transfer
•
Computer Science (CS) p. 140
Computer Programming Fundamentals
•
•
•
Computer Studies & Information Technology (CSIT)
p. 143
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 61
Associate Degrees & Certificates
Certified Computer Desktop Support Specialist
•
Computer Applications Professional for Business
•
•
Computer Studies
•
•
E-Commerce
•
Computer Applications User
•
Computer Competencies for the Workplace
•
Emerging Technologies in Computer Studies
•
Microsoft Certified Application Specialist for
Business
•
Network and Desktop Systems Administration
•
Dance (DNCE) p. 152
•
•
Dance Instructor
•
Pilates Instructor
•
Design (DESN) p. 160
3D Modeling and Prototyping
•
Applied Design
•
Architectural Design
•
•
Computer-Aided Drafting
•
•
Computer-Aided Drafting and Design
•
•
•
•
Construction Management
•
Drafting Fundamentals
•
Engineering Design Graphics
•
Mechanical Design
Dramatic Arts (DRAM) p. 166
•
Design and Technology
•
Theatre Arts for Transfer
•
Gerontology (GERO) p. 183
Optimal Aging and Older Adulthood
•
•
•
History (HIST) p. 186
History for Transfer
•
Horticulture (HORT) p. 191
Irrigation Technology
•
Landscape Architecture
•
•
Landscape Management
•
•
Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wine and Viticulture Technology
•
Hospitality (HOSP) p. 197
Catering Operations
•
Dining Room Operations
•
Food Service Operations
•
Front Office Operations
•
Hospitality Management
Meeting and Event Management
•
Restaurant Management
Rooms Division Management
Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum ( IGETC )
•
•
Italian (ITAL) p. 202
•
Kinesiology (KINE) p. 206
Personal Fitness Trainer
•
Yoga Instructor
•
Liberal Arts p. 211
Applied Health, Nutrition and Kinesiology
•
Arts and Humanities
•
Business and Technology
•
Creative and Applied Arts
•
Mathematics and Sciences
•
Multicultural Studies
•
62 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Associate Degrees & Certificates
Social and Behavioral Sciences
•
Massage (MASG) p. 224
Holistic Health Practitioner (1,000 Hours)
•
Massage Therapist (500 Hours)
•
Mathematics (MATH) p. 226
Mathematics for Transfer
•
Media Arts & Technologies (MAT) p. 229
Digital and Print Publishing
•
Graphic Communication
•
Graphic Design
Video and Animation
•
Video and Media Design
Web Design
•
•
•
•
Web Development and Design
•
•
•
•
Medical Administrative Professional (MAP) p. 236
Medical Insurance and Coding Specialist
•
Medical Office Professional
Medical Office Specialist
•
Music (MUS) p. 238
Music Performance
Music Technology (MTEC) p. 246
•
•
Audio Recording Production
•
Business of Music
•
Digital Audio
•
Live Performance Audio
Performance Technician
•
•
•
Nursing (NURS) p. 251
Certified Nursing Assistant
•
Home Health Aide
•
Licensed Vocational Nursing
•
•
Registered Nursing (ADN)
•
Registered Nursing (LVN-to-RN)
•
Nutrition (NUTR) p. 257
Fitness Nutrition Specialist
•
Psychology (PSYC) p. 266
•
Human Development
•
Psychology for Transfer
•
Research Fundamentals
•
Volunteer Services
•
Real Estate (REAL) p. 273
Assistant
•
•
•
•
•
Entrepreneurship
Finance
•
Property Management
•
Sales
•
Sociology (SOC) p. 278
Research Fundamentals
•
Sociology for Transfer
Volunteer Services
•
•
Spanish (SPAN) p. 283
Career Spanish for Medical Personnel
Surgical Technology (SURG) p. 285
•
•
•
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 63
Transferring Course Work
Transferring Course Work
Transfer Options
community college. Information about which courses transfer to
the CSU is included in the catalog course descriptions (see How
to Read Course Descriptions p. 82). This information can also
be found at www.assist.org.
Minimum Transfer Requirements
The CSU will consider a student a transfer applicant if he or
she enrolled in a regular session at a college or university
(excluding summer session or intersession) immediately
following high school. The vast majority of community college
students enter the CSU as upper-division transfer students. In
order to be eligible to transfer to the CSU, students must meet
the minimum requirements described below.
Upper-Division Transfer Minimum Eligibility
Requirements
Transfer students are eligible for admission with junior status with
60 or more transferable semester units or 90 quarter units if they
satisfy the following requirements:
Maintain a minimum college GPA of 2.00 or better in all
transferable college units attempted
MiraCosta College students have the opportunity to transfer
to a variety of public and private/independent colleges and
universities. In California, students may transfer to a college or
university in the University of California (UC) system, California
State University (CSU) system, or various private/independent
universities and colleges. Transfer students should be aware
of both the entrance and graduation requirements of the
university or college they wish to attend. MiraCosta’s curriculum
is designed to prepare students to transfer to four-year colleges
or universities by providing instruction in general education
course work and preparatory courses for specific majors.
Students should work closely with a counselor to develop an
educational plan that is based on completing articulated
courses, which are courses that can be used to satisfy general
education and major-preparation requirements at specific
transfer universities. MiraCosta’s articulation agreements with
the public universities in California can be found online at
www.assist.org.
Complete the four basic subjects in written communication,
oral communication, critical thinking, and mathematics/
quantitative reasoning, which are part of the overall general
education requirements
Complete additional general education units that comprise
the total CSU general education pattern of 39 units
Are in good standing at the last college or university
attended (i.e., are eligible to re-enroll).
Lower-Division Transfer Minimum Eligibility
Requirements
Due to enrollment demands, most CSU campuses restrict or
prohibit the admission of lower-division transfer students who
have earned fewer than 60 transferable semester units (90
quarter units). However, campuses may accept applications
from lower-division students who are applying to science,
technology, engineering, or mathematics majors if they satisfy
the following requirements:
As soon as possible after enrolling at MiraCosta, students
should choose the specific major area they wish to pursue
and the four-year college or university they wish to attend. The
counseling staff is available to assist students in making these
important decisions.
Have a college grade point average of 2.00 or better in all
transferable college units attempted
CSU Transfer
Meet the eligibility index required of a first-time freshman
The California State University (CSU) system has 23 campuses
across the state. The CSU offers students the choice of more
than 1,800 bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in 240
subject areas.
To obtain a bachelor’s degree from a CSU campus, students
must complete a minimum of 120 semester units (180 quarter
units). A maximum of 70 units of transferable credit will be
accepted for courses completed at MiraCosta or any California
66 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Are in good standing at the last college or university
attended (i.e., are eligible to re-enroll)
Meet the college-preparatory course requirements for a firsttime freshman or have successfully completed necessary
courses to make up any deficiencies in their high school
records.
Note: Most CSU campuses will not accept lower-division transfer
students.
Transferring Course Work
Associate in Arts for Transfer (A.A.-T ) or
Associate in Science for Transfer (A.S.-T) to the
California State University
A California community college student who has earned the
Associate in Arts for Transfer (A.A.-T) degree or the Associate
in Science for Transfer (A.S.-T) degree will be granted priority
admission to the CSU into a similar baccalaureate degree
program with a guarantee of junior standing as long as
the student meets all prescribed admission requirements.
(See the Associate Degrees section of the catalog for
specific requirements to complete this type of degree.) Once
admitted, the student will be required to complete no more
than 60 additional prescribed units to qualify for the similar
baccalaureate degree.
An A.A.-T or A.S.-T degree does not guarantee a student
admission for a specified major or campus, but it does require
the CSU to grant a student priority-admission consideration
to the local CSU campus and to a program or major that
is deemed similar to the transfer A.A.-T or A.S.-T degree as
determined by the CSU. The local CSU campus for MiraCosta
students is California State University San Marcos (CSUSM).
Associate degrees for transfer to the CSU offered by MiraCosta
are listed both in this catalog under the discipline offering the
degree and on the MiraCosta College articulation website at
www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/articulation. At the time of
this publication, MiraCosta offers an A.A.-T in communication
studies, history, psychology, sociology, studio arts, and
theater arts and an A.S.-T in administration of justice, business
administration, and mathematics.
A list of Associate in Arts and Asssociate in Science for Transfer
degrees offered at all community colleges and a listing of
participating CSU campuses accepting those degrees can be
found at www.sb1440.org.Students are encouraged to consult
with a MiraCosta counselor to determine the most appropriate
and efficient path for transfer to the CSU.
Advanced Placement, International
Baccalaureate, & College Level Examination
Program Credit
Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB),
and College Level Examination Program (CLEP) credit can be
used to satisfy the required 60 transferable units. The Advanced
Placement Guide p. 24, International Baccalaureate Guide p.
27, and College Level Examination Program Guide p. 28 identify
which exams can be used for general education credit and
CSU admission units.
Impacted Programs
An undergraduate major, program, or campus is designated
as impacted when there are more eligible applicants than
there are available spaces. Impacted majors, programs, or
campuses are authorized to use supplementary admissions
criteria to screen applicants, such as the following:
Completing specific courses
Accumulating a specific number of college units
Earning a specific grade point average
Meeting advance application deadlines
Participating in interviews or special evaluations.
The list of impacted programs may vary from year to year,
as majors are added and deleted frequently. Also, a major
impacted at one campus may be open at another; therefore,
students should consult www.assist.org, a MiraCosta counselor,
or a representative at their intended transfer campus to receive
updated information about impacted majors.
Transfer Planning
Students are strongly encouraged to meet with a MiraCosta
College counselor to develop an appropriate transfer plan.
A transfer plan consists of general education courses, major
preparation courses, and, if additional units are required,
transferable elective courses. The counselors ensure students
are aware of CSU application deadlines and all necessary
transfer requirements.
General Education Requirements: CSU-GE (Plan
B)
All students obtaining a bachelor’s degree from a CSU campus
must satisfy general education (GE) requirements. A minimum
of 48 semester units is required for GE-Breadth: 39 units of lowerdivision and 9 units of upper-division courses. All of the lowerdivision courses for GE-Breadth may be completed at MiraCosta
before students transfer to a CSU campus. To satisfy the GEBreadth requirements, students must take specified courses in
the following areas:
Area A — English Language Communication and Critical
Thinking
Area B — Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning
Area C — Arts and Humanities
Area D — Social Sciences
Area E — Lifelong Learning and Self-Development.
This pattern of courses, called CSU-GE-Breadth, is illustrated
on Plan B p. 72. Students may also choose to complete
the CSU-UC IGETC pattern, illustrated on Plan C p. 76, to
complete the CSU general education requirements.
Major Preparation
Students need to identify a major and complete the required
admission courses for that major. MiraCosta has articulation
agreements with most CSU campuses. These agreements,
which can be viewed at www.assist.org, tell students which
courses at MiraCosta can satisfy a major requirement at a CSU
campus.
At some CSU campuses, the required GPA in these major
preparation courses may be higher than the admission criteria
GPA. And at some CSU campuses, completion of all major
preparation courses will make an applicant much more
competitive in the admission’s process.
Transferable Electives
If additional units are needed to meet the 60-unit admission
requirement, students can complete transferable elective
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 67
Transferring Course Work
courses. Students may explore areas of interest through any
course work at MiraCosta as long as the course is designated
as CSU transferable. The course descriptions in the college
catalog and schedule of classes indicate this designation
where it applies.
History, Constitution, and American Ideals
All CSU campuses have a graduation requirement known
as History, Constitution, and American Ideals. Students may
be certified as completing this requirement at MiraCosta by
completing one of the five groups of classes listed on Plan B p.
72.
CSU-GE-Breadth Certification
MiraCosta is authorized to certify up to 39 lower-division GEBreadth units. Certification means that the CSU will accept the
courses approved to meet the CSU-GE-Breadth areas on Plan
B p. 72. Students should request certification of course work
that meets CSU-GE-Breadth requirements because certification
ensures students will not be asked to complete additional lowerdivision general education courses after they transfer.
MiraCosta can certify each subject area (Area A, B, C, D, or
E) or the whole pattern. Students may apply for full or partial
certification at the MiraCosta Admissions and Records Office at
the time they request a transcript be sent to a CSU campus. The
specific rules that apply for CSU-GE-Breadth Certification are as
follows:
All courses taken in Areas A and B4 must be completed with
a grade of "C" or better. A grade of "P" (Pass) is acceptable
if it is equivalent to a grade of "C" or higher at the institution
where the work was completed.
Courses taken at another California community college will
be applied to the subject areas in which they are listed at the
institution where the work was completed.
A course taken at a United States regionally accredited
institution (which does not maintain a CSU-GE-Breadth
certification list) may be approved for certification if that
course is equivalent to a MiraCosta College course or it has
been approved for general education in a comparable
category at the institution where the work was completed.
Courses completed at foreign institutions are not acceptable
for CSU-GE-Breadth certification.
After transfer to a CSU campus, students will need to complete
the nine additional general education units that are taught at
the upper-division level.
Certificate of Achievement in CSU General
Education
Students who complete the entire CSU General Education
Breadth certification pattern of courses are eligible to receive
a Certificate of Achievement in CSU General Education.
These courses, which satisfy lower-division general education
requirements to any CSU campus, are listed on Plan B p. 72.
(Note: This program may not be appropriate for some majors,
so students should consult with a MiraCosta College counselor
68 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
to develop an appropriate educational plan for their intended
major and CSU campus.)
UC Transfer
The University of California (UC) system includes nine
undergraduate campuses across California. They are located
in the following areas: Berkeley, Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles,
Merced, Riverside, San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Santa Cruz.
To obtain a bachelor’s degree from the UC, a student must
complete a minimum of 120 semester units (180 quarter
units). A maximum of 70 units of transferable credit toward a
bachelor’s degree will be accepted for courses completed at
any or all California community colleges. The UC may limit the
amount of credit received for some courses. For example, no
credit will be given for an introductory course if it is taken after a
more advanced course, credit may be limited for courses with
overlapping content, and duplicate credit will not be awarded
for both the honors and non-honors version of a course. The UC
credit limitations that apply to MiraCosta College courses are
identified in the catalog course descriptions.
Priority Eligibility for Transfer Students
The UC will consider a student a transfer applicant if he or she
enrolled in a regular session at a college or university, except
while in high school or summer session, immediately following
high school.
Students who transfer to a UC campus from MiraCosta or
any California community college with 60 transferable units
are given priority over all other transfer applicants, including
those from four-year institutions, if they meet all of the following
criteria:
They were enrolled at one or more of the California
community colleges for at least two terms (excluding
summer session).
The last college they attended prior to enrollment at a UC
campus was a California community college (excluding
summer session).
They have at least 30 semester UC transferable units at one
or more community colleges.
Upper-Division Transfer Admission
The vast majority of students transfer to the UC as upper-division
transfer students. Students must fullfill both of the following
criteria for upper-division transfer eligibility:
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) units of transferable
college credit with at least a 2.4 GPA. No more than 14
semester (21 quarter) units may be taken "P/NP" (Pass/No
Pass).*
Complete the following requirements, earning a grade of "C"
or better in each course:
Two transferable college courses (3 semester or 4–5
quarter units each) in English composition
Transferring Course Work
One transferable college course (3 semester or 4–5
quarter units) in mathematical concepts and quantitative
reasoning
Four transferable college courses (3 semester or 4–
5 quarter units each) chosen from at least two of the
following subject areas: arts and humanities, social
and behavioral sciences, and physical and biological
sciences.
Note: Students who complete 60 transferable units that include
the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) will meet the minimum admission requirements
described above.
*Meeting the minimum transfer admissions eligibility
requirements does not guarantee a student’s admission
to the major and UC campus of his or her choice. Most UC
campuses require a higher GPA for admission and for majorpreparation courses. In cases where there are more eligible
applicants than transfer openings, applicants with the strongest
academic preparation are given priority. To learn more about
requirements that can be met to make an applicant more
competitive for admission to a specific UC campus as well as
important application deadlines, students should meet with a
MiraCosta College counselor, visit the Transfer Center, or review
information available online at www.universityofcalifornia.edu/
admissions.
Lower-Division Transfer Admission
Students may be eligible for lower-division transfer if they
were eligible for UC admission as freshmen upon high school
graduation and had a 2.0 GPA in their transferable college
course work.
Students who met the Scholarship Requirement in high school
but did not satisfy the a-g Subject Requirement may become
eligible to transfer by taking transferable college courses in
the subjects they are missing, earning a minimum grade
of "C" in each of these required courses, and earning an
overall "C" (2.0) average in all transferable college course
work. Students can find more information about the Subject,
Scholarship, and Examination requirements on the UC
Admissions website: www.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions.
Note: Most UC campuses will not admit transfer students who
have fewer than 60 transferable units completed even if they
were eligible out of high school.
Advanced Placement & International
Baccalaureate Credit
Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate
(IB) credit can also be used to satisfy the 60 transferable units.
The Advanced Placement Guide p. 24 and the International
Baccalaureate Guide p. 27 identify which exams can be used
for general education credit and UC admission units.
Impacted Programs
An undergraduate major, program, or campus is designated
as impacted when there are more eligible applicants than
spaces available at a campus. Such majors, programs, or
campuses are authorized to use supplementary admissions
criteria to screen applicants. This criteria may include the
following:
Completing specific courses
Accumulating a specific number of college units
Earning a specific grade point average
Meeting advance application deadlines
Participating in interviews or special evaluations.
Impacted programs vary from year to year, depending on
the number of applicants to the program. A major impacted
at one campus may be open at another; therefore, students
should consult www.assist.org, a MiraCosta counselor, or a
representative at their intended transfer campus to obtain
updated information about impacted majors.
Transfer Planning
Students are strongly encouraged to meet with a MiraCosta
College counselor to develop an appropriate transfer plan.
A transfer plan consists of general education courses, major
preparation courses, and, if additional units are required,
transferable elective courses. MiraCosta’s counselors ensure
students are aware of UC application deadlines and all
necessary transfer requirements.
General Education Requirements: IGETC (Plan
C)
To earn a bachelor’s degree from a UC, students must
complete a program of general education (GE). They have
the option of completing either the Intersegmental General
Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern (Plan C p. 76)
or a campus-specific lower-division GE pattern. The UC campusspecific GE patterns mirror the GE requirements of students who
enrolled at UC as freshmen. Students who follow a campusspecific GE pattern must complete the MiraCosta courses that
are specified in the GE articulation agreement, which can be
found at www.assist.org.
IGETC is most helpful to students who want to keep their options
open, such as those who know they want to transfer but have
not yet decided upon a particular campus or major. Students
are strongly encouraged to complete IGETC prior to transfer
as doing so can be advantageous in the admission’s process
for many majors on most UC campuses. However, students
who intend to transfer into majors that require extensive lowerdivision preparation, such as engineering or the physical
and natural sciences, should concentrate on completing
the many prerequisite courses for the major that the college
screens to determine eligibility for admission. All students are
strongly advised to work with a MiraCosta College counselor
to determine which option for completing general education is
most appropriate for their educational goal.
Note: California community college transfer students may
complete the IGETC pattern to satisfy the lower-division GE
requirements at both the UC and CSU. Students who began
college at a UC campus and who intend to transfer back to
that campus cannot use IGETC. However, students who began
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 69
Transferring Course Work
college at a UC campus and intend to transfer to a different UC
campus may use IGETC.
Major Preparation
Students need to identify a major and complete the required
admission courses for that major. MiraCosta has articulation
agreements with all UC campuses. These agreements, which
can be viewed at www.assist.org, tell students which courses
at MiraCosta can satisfy a major requirement at a UC campus.
At some UC campuses, the required GPA in these majorpreparation courses may be higher than the admission criteria
GPA. Students should choose their major as early as possible for
the following reasons:
UC campuses admit transfer students to specific majors.
Admission to most majors and campuses is competitive,
and being fully prepared for a major improves the student’s
chance of admission.
Choosing a major early allows the student to stay focused on
completing requirements before he or she transfers.
Changing majors is difficult after the student is admitted and
usually delays graduation.
Transferable Electives
Students who have completed all requirements for their
major and have selected courses appropriate for the general
education pattern at a UC campus may need to complete
additional UC transferable courses to earn the required 60
transferable units. These courses are often referred to as
electives. The course descriptions in the college catalog and
schedule of classes indicate when a course is UC transferable.
University of California Transfer Admission
Programs
Many UC campuses offer guaranteed admission to California
community college students who meet specific requirements.
Transfer Admission Guarantee (TAG)
Some UC campuses offer a Transfer Admission Guarantee
(TAG) program. By participating in a TAG, students receive
early review of their academic records, early admission
notification, and specific guidance about major preparation
and general education course work. For complete information
about TAGs offered at participating UC campuses, students
should see a MiraCosta College counselor, visit the Transfer
Center, or locate information at the following website:
www.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions/transfer/guarantee/
index.html
UC Los Angeles (UCLA) Transfer Alliance
Program (TAP)
The Transfer Alliance Program (TAP) is a collaboration
between the MiraCosta College Honors Scholar Program
and UCLA College of Letters and Sciences in conjunction
with Undergraduate Admissions and Relations with Schools.
The program is designed to foster academic excellence at
MiraCosta and other participating community colleges and to
promote diversity and retention in the UCLA transfer population.
70 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Students wishing to participate in this program must meet the
following criteria:
Enroll in and complete MiraCosta’s Honors Scholar Program
p. 47
Complete a minimum of 60 transferable units, including five
honors classes, with a competitive GPA.
Students who complete MiraCosta’s Honors Scholar Program p.
47 receive priority consideration for admission to many majors
within UCLA’s College of Letters and Sciences. Admitted TAP
students are also eligible to apply for TAP scholarships.
UC Irvine (UCI) Community College Honors
Transfer Program
The UCI Community College Honors Transfer Program offers
transfer students priority consideration for admission to UCI
and provides them with library privileges and opportunities to
participate in cultural activities on the UCI campus. Students
wishing to participate in this program must be enrolled in and
complete MiraCosta College’s Honors Scholar Program p. 47.
UC San Diego (UCSD) University Link Program
This program is designed for freshmen, active duty military
and veterans, current/former foster youth, and for students
whose family income is no more than $40,000 per year. This
program represents a partnership among UCSD, MiraCosta
College, and local high schools. It guarantees admission
to UCSD if the student completes his or her first two years of
college course work at MiraCosta, and meets specific UCSD
admission and GPA requirements. Students in the program
receive individual academic advisement and counseling,
informational workshops and tours, invitations to special events
at UCSD, and contact with current UCSD students.
UCSD recommends that students in the program complete a
college success course at MiraCosta. These courses include
COUN 100, COUN 105, COUN 110, and INTR 100.
Students must sign and submit the University Link agreement
form no later than by the end of their first year of enrollment at
MiraCosta.More information about this program can be found
at: https://admissions.ucsd.edu/transfers/prep-programs/
university-link.html.
IGETC Certification
Prior to transfer from MiraCosta, students can request
certification of the IGETC pattern (Plan C p. 76). Certification
ensures students will not be asked to complete additional lowerdivision general education courses after they transfer. The
following rules apply to IGETC Certification:
All courses must be completed with a "C" or better. A grade
of "P" (Pass) is acceptable if it is equivalent to a grade of "C"
or higher at the institution where the work was completed.
Courses taken at another California community college will
be applied to the subject areas in which they are listed at the
institution where the work was completed.
A course taken at a United States regionally accredited
private institution will be placed in the subject area for which
Transferring Course Work
MiraCosta College or another community college has an
equivalent course.
Courses completed at foreign institutions are not acceptable
for IGETC except for certification of language proficiency
(Area 6).
Partial IGETC Certification
Students who have completed all but two courses on the
IGETC pattern may apply for partial certification. Each CSU/UC
campus will inform students who submit partially certified IGETC
of the specific timelines and courses needed to complete the
IGETC after transfer. Once a student has transferred, it is the
transfer institution’s responsibility to verify that the missing IGETC
course work has been completed. Students can request IGETC
Certification from the MiraCosta Admissions and Records Office
when they request transcripts be sent to their intended transfer
institution.
Certificate of Achievement in IGETC
Students who complete the entire IGETC certification pattern of
courses are eligible to receive a Certificate of Achievement in
IGETC. These courses satisfy lower-division general education
requirements at California State University and University
of California campuses. (Note: This program may not be
appropriate for some majors, so students should consult with
a MiraCosta College counselor to develop an appropriate
educational plan for their intended major and UC campus.)
Private College/Out-ofState UniversityTransfer
MiraCosta College also has agreements with many private
colleges and universities wtihin California and agreements
with some out-of-state universities. Most of these universities will
accept all courses designated as UC transferable, and many
will accept completion of CSU GE-Breadth (Plan B p. 72) or
IGETC (Plan C p. 76) in lieu of their own general education
requirements. However, graduation requirements and course
work used to complete a major may vary significantly with
requirements at the California State University (CSU) or the
University of California (UC) systems.
To find out more about accredited private colleges in
California, students should visit www.californiacolleges.edu. For
specific information about private and out-of-state universities,
students should visit the Transfer Center or the specific
college’s website or make an appointment with a MiraCosta
College counselor. MiraCosta lists agreements with many
private California and out-of-state universities on the college’s
articulation webpage: www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/
articulation/index.html.
Transfer Center Services
Oceanside, Building 3700: 760.795.6880
www.miracosta.edu/transfer
Recommendations for Transfer Students
The MiraCosta College Transfer Center provides students with
all of the tools they need to navigate the transfer process.
This process can sometimes seem complex because the
requirements and application timelines can differ depending
on where a student chooses to transfer and the major he or she
decides on.
The Transfer Center offers workshops and provides
appointments with university representatives. For the most
comprehensive assistance, the Transfer Center encourages
students to develop an educational plan with a counselor and
to monitor that plan with their counselor as they move toward
their transfer goal.
Students interested in attending graduate school to pursue
a post-bachelor’s degree can find important resources in
the Transfer Center to assist them with their goals. These
students should visit the website and select Graduate School
Information. Transfer Center counselors are available to assist
students individually by appointment. The counselors will review
graduate school admission requirements and discuss how to
prepare while still at the community college level.
Students considering a transfer path should take the following
steps:
Complete required math and English courses as soon as
possible, especially if skill development is needed prior to
eligibility for transfer-level courses.
See a counselor within the first semester at MiraCosta to
make sure necessary preparation-for-the-major, general
education, and admission requirements are understood.
Request a written educational plan. Counseling faculty are
available to assist students who need help selecting a major
and/or a transfer university.
Select a major-preparation course over a general education
course when there is a conflict in scheduling. Many majorpreparation courses are part of a sequence and may not
be offered every semester, whereas general education
courses are frequently offered each semester and during the
summer.
Visit the intended transfer college’s website to research major
and other transfer opportunities.
Attend a campus tour and orientation session at the transfer
university. Tours and orientation sessions provide a great
way to learn about different campuses and to meet with
department advisers.
Submit applications to more than one college or university
(unless the student is participating in a transfer admission
guarantee program). Be aware of admission application
filing dates. Visit the application website for information:
UC online application website:
www.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions
CSU online application website: www.csumentor.edu
Check application status at the transfer school’s website
to ensure application materials have been received; follow
up if any problems are detected. Respond immediately if
contacted with any questions.
If eligible, apply for an associate degree within the first
6 weeks of the student’s last semester at MiraCosta (for
eligibility requirements, see Associate Degrees p. 52).
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 71
Transferring Course Work
2014 Transfer Center Calendar
July 1-31
AREA B—Scientific Inquiry & Quantitative
Reasoning
Admission Application Filing Period for UC
Winter Quarter
Three courses and a minimum of 9 semester units are required.
Select one course from each group below. One course must
include a corresponding laboratory from group B1 or B2. (Lab
courses are noted with the # symbol.)
(if UC campus is accepting applications)
Aug. 1-31
Sept. 1-30
Admission Application Filing Period for CSU
Spring Semester
(if CSU campus is accepting applications)
B1. Physical Science
UC Transfer Admission Guarantee (TAG) filing
period
Required courses:
ASTR 101
Oct. 1-Nov. 30 CSU and UC Application Workshops
(Contact the Transfer Center for dates and
times)
Oct. 1-Nov. 30 Admission Application Filing Period for CSU
(Fall Semester/Quarter)
Nov. 1-30
Admission Application Filing Period for UC
Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory
Life in the Universe
ASTR 201
Introductory Astronomy
CSU General Education-Breadth Courses
2014–2015
AREA A—English Language Communication &
Critical Thinking
Three courses and a minimum of 9 semester units are required.
Select one course from each group below.
A1.* Oral Communication
1
#
3
3
CHEM 100
Introductory Chemistry
CHEM 102
Introduction to Organic and Biological
Chemistry
Plan B
3
ASTR 120
CHEM 104
Required courses:
Descriptive Astronomy
ASTR 101L
(Fall Semester/Quarter)
All dates above are subject to change. Information is based on
data available as of May 2014.
4
#
Chemistry of Living Things (Introduction
to General, Organic, and Biochemistry)
CHEM 108
CHEM 110
4
#
5
#
Preparatory Chemistry
3
General Chemistry
#
5
CHEM 111
General Chemistry
#
5
EART 106
Earth and Space Science
GEOG 101
Physical Geography
3
3
GEOG 101L
Physical Geography Laboratory
GEOL 101
Physical Geology
GEOL 101H
Physical Geology (Honors)
GEOL 101L
1
#
3
Physical Geology Laboratory
3
1
#
GEOL 101LH
Physical Geology Laboratory (Honors)
GEOL 120
Environmental Geology: Earth Hazards
and Humanity
3
3
COMM 101
Public Speaking
3
OCEA 101
Introduction to Oceanography
COMM 106
Group Communication
3
OCEA 101H
Introduction to Oceanography (Honors)
COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
3
OCEA 101L
A2.* Written Communication
Required courses:
ENGL 100
Composition and Reading
4
A3.* Critical Thinking
Required courses:
1
#
Introductory Oceanography Laboratory
3
1
#
PHSN 101
Fundamentals of Physical Science
3
PHSN 106
Energy, Motion, and Matter: An
Introduction to Physics and Chemistry
3
PHSN 108
Introduction to Climate Change
3
PHSN 108H
Introduction to Climate Change
(Honors)
3
Introductory Physics I
#
4
Introductory Physics II
#
4
COMM 212
Argumentation
3
PHYS 111
ENGL 201
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature
4
PHYS 112
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature (Honors)
4
ENGL 202
Critical Thinking and Composition
4
ENGL 202H
Critical Thinking and Composition
(Honors)
4
PHIL 100
Informal Logic and Critical Thinking
3
Required courses:
READ 100
Critical Reading and Thinking
3
ANTH 101
Biological Anthropology
3
ANTH 101H
Biological Anthropology (Honors)
3
ANTH 101L
Biological Anthropology Laboratory
ANTH 190
Primate Behavior and Ecology
ENGL 201H
72 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
PHYS 151
PHYS 152
PHYS 253
4
Principles of Physics I
#
Principles of Physics II
#
4
Principles of Physics III
#
4
B2. Life Science
#
1
3
Transferring Course Work
BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
BIO 101
General Biology
BIO 101L
General Biology Laboratory
#
#
4
C1. Arts
3
ART 100
Drawing and Composition
3
1
ART 101
Design and Color
3
ART 103
3D Design
3
ART 157
Art Orientation
3
ART 158
Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and
the Americas
3
BIO 102
Ecology and Environmental Biology
4
BIO 103
Animal Diversity
3
BIO 105
Genes and Technology in Society
3
BIO 150
General Botany
#
4
ART 201
Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art
3
4
ART 254
Understanding and Appreciating the
Photographic Image
3
ART 258
Ancient to Gothic Art
3
ART 259
History of Renaissance to Modern Art
3
#
BIO 170
Marine Biology
BIO 172
Marine Ecology
3
BIO 202
Foundations of Biology: Evolution,
4
#
Biodiversity, and Organismal Biology
BIO 204
#
Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry,
Cell Biology, Genetics, and Molecular
Biology
ART 260
History of Modern Art
3
ART 260H
History of Modern Art (Honors)
3
ART 290
Landmarks of Art
3
COMM 111
Oral Interpretation of Literature
3
DESN 107
History of Western Architecture -A
Sustainable Perspective
3
DNCE 100
Dance Appreciation
3
DNCE 101
Dance History
3
DNCE 105
Dance Cultures of the World
3
DRAM 105
Introduction to Theatre
3
DRAM 120
Dramatic Literature (Ancient Greeks to
Shakespeare)
3
DRAM 121
Dramatic Literature (Restoration to
Present)
3
4
DRAM 130
Acting I
3
4
FILM 101
Introduction to Film (F’10)
3
4
FILM 101H
Introduction to Film (Honors)
3
FILM 106
Study of Filmed Plays
3
MUS 113
Multicultural Roots of American Music
3
MUS 114
History of Rock and Roll
3
MUS 115
History and Appreciation of Western
Music
3
4
#
BIO 220
Human Physiology
HORT 116
Plant Science
PSYC 260
Physiological Psychology
4
#
4
#
3
B3. Laboratory Activity: This requirement may be
met by the completion of any lab course that
corresponds to a lecture course found above in B1 or
B2 (noted by the # symbol).
B4.* Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning: A
minimum of 3 semester units is required.
Required courses:
BIO 180
BTEC 180
MATH 103
Biostatistics
Biostatistics
Statistics
MATH 105
Concepts and Structures of Elementary
Mathematics I
3
MATH 106
Concepts and Structures of Elementary
Mathematics II
3
MATH 115
Calculus with Applications
4
MATH 126
Pre-Calculus I: College Algebra
4
MUS 116
A Survey of World Music
3
MUS 119
Jazz History
3
MUS 119H
Jazz History (Honors)
3
MATH 131
Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry and
Analytic Geometry
4
MATH 135
Pre-Calculus Mathematics
5
MATH 150
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
5
MATH 150H
Calculus and Analytic Geometry
(Honors)
5
C2. Humanities
CHNS 101
Elementary Chinese (First Semester)
4
CHNS 102
Elementary Chinese (Second Semester)
4
CHNS 201
Intermediate Chinese (Third Semester)
4
MATH 155
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4
MATH 260
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
4
COMM 215
Intercultural Communication
3
4
FILM 110
Film History
3
4
FREN 101
Elementary French (First Semester)
4
FREN 102
Elementary French (Second Semester)
4
PSYC 104
PSYC 104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
SOC 104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
4
SOC 104H
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
(Honors)
4
AREA C—Arts & Humanities
Select one course from C1 and one course from C2. Select a
third course from either C1 or C2. A minimum of 9 semester
units is required.
FREN 201
Intermediate French (Third Semester)
4
FREN 202
Intermediate French (Fourth Semester)
4
GRMN 101
Elementary German (First Semester)
4
GRMN 102
Elementary German (Second Semester)
4
GRMN 201
Intermediate German (Third Semester)
4
HIST 100
World History to 1500 (F’11)
3
HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors) (F’11)
3
HIST 101
World History Since 1500 (F’11)
3
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 73
Transferring Course Work
HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors) (F’11)
3
HIST 103
Western Civilization to 1648
3
one group requirement may not be used to meet another
group requirement.
HIST 103H
Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
3
HIST 104
Western Civilization Since 1648
3
D1. Anthropology and Archaeology
HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
3
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
HUMN 101
Introduction to the Arts
3
HUMN 101H
Introduction to the Arts (Honors)
3
HUMN 250
American Studies: First Contact Through
the Civil War
3
HUMN 251
American Studies: 1870s to the Present
3
ECON 100
Survey of Economics
3
ITAL 101
Elementary Italian (First Semester)
4
ECON 101
Principles of Economics: MACRO
3
ITAL 102
Elementary Italian (Second Semester)
4
ECON 102
Principles of Economics: MICRO
3
ITAL 121
Introduction to Italian Culture
3
ITAL 201
Intermediate Italian (Third Semester)
4
ITAL 202
Intermediate Italian (Fourth Semester)
4
ITAL 210
Intermediate Italian Conversation and
Reading
3
JAPN 101
Elementary Japanese (First Semester)
4
JAPN 102
Elementary Japanese (Second
Semester)
4
JAPN 201
Intermediate Japanese (Third Semester)
4
JAPN 202
Intermediate Japanese (Fourth
Semester)
4
LIT 120
Introduction to Literature
3
LIT 250
American Literature: First Contact
Through the Civil War
3
LIT 251
American Literature: Mid-1800s to the
Present
3
LIT 260
English Literature Through the 18th
Century
3
LIT 261
English Literature: Romantic to
Contemporary
3
LIT 265
Shakespeare Studies
3
LIT 265H
Shakespeare Studies (Honors)
3
LIT 270
World Literature to 1600
3
LIT 271
World Literature Since 1600
3
PHIL 101
Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge
and Reality
3
PHIL 102
Contemporary Moral Problems
3
PHIL 221
Philosophy of Religion
3
RELG 101
World Religions
RELG 105
ANTH 102
Cultural Anthropology
3
ANTH 102H
Cultural Anthropology (Honors)
3
ANTH 103
Introduction to Archaeology
3
ANTH 104
Native American Cultures
3
ANTH 190
Primate Behavior and Ecology
3
D2. Economics
D3. Ethnic Studies
ANTH 104
Native American Cultures
3
HIST 107
East Asian Societies
3
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
(F’10)
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
(F’10)
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877 (F’10)
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
(F’10)
3
SOC 207
Race and Ethnic Relations (F’10)
3
SOC 110
Comparative Cultures
3
SOC 230
Introduction to Chicana/o Studies
3
SOC 240
Introduction to Black Studies
3
D4. Gender Studies
COMM 135
Gender Studies in Communication
3
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
SOC 120
Introduction to Women’s Studies
3
D5. Geography
GEOG 102
Cultural Geography
3
GEOG 104
World Geography
3
GEOG 108
Environmental Sustainability and Society
3
HIST 100
World History to 1500
3
HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors)
3
3
HIST 101
World History Since 1500
3
Eastern Religions
3
HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors)
3
SPAN 101
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
4
HIST 105
History of England
3
SPAN 102
Elementary Spanish (Second Semester)
4
HIST 105H
History of England (Honors)
3
SPAN 201
Intermediate Spanish (Third Semester)
4
HIST 107
East Asian Societies
3
SPAN 202
Intermediate Spanish (Fourth Semester)
4
HIST 109
History of the Middle East
3
SPAN 203
Spanish for Native Speakers
4
HIST 110
United States History to 1877
3
SPAN 205
Hispanic Film, Literature, and
Composition
3
HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
3
HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 113
American Military History
3
HIST 113H
American Military History (Honors)
3
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
D6. History
AREA D—Social Sciences
Select three courses from at least two different groups. A
minimum of 9 semester units is required. A course used to meet
74 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Transferring Course Work
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
(F’10)
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
(F’10)
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877 (F’10)
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
(F’10)
3
HIST 165
California History
3
D7. Interdisciplinary, Social or Behavioral Science
CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development (F’11)
3
COMM 120
Principles of Human Communication
3
COMM 220
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
CSIT 160
Technology, the Individual, and Society
3
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
3
GERO 250
Intergenerational Issues
3
NUTR 108
Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition
3
PSYC 115
Human Sexuality (F’12)
3
SOC 105
Introduction to Justice Studies
3
D8. Political Science, Government and Legal
Institutions
ADM 200
History, Constitution and American Ideals
Requirement
All CSU campuses have a graduation requirement in History,
Constitution and American Ideals. Students may be certified as
completing this requirement by completing one course from
Group I and one course from Group II; or by completing the
course in Group III.
Group I
HIST 110
United States History to 1877 (or 110H)
3
HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors) (or
110)
3
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877
3
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
3
HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
3
HIST 165
California History
3
American Institutions and History
4
Group II
Group III
Concepts of Criminal Law (F’11)
3
PLSC 101
Introduction to Political Science
3
PLSC 102
American Institutions and History (F’09)
4
PLSC 103
Comparative Government
3
PLSC 150
Introduction to International Relations
3
D9. Psychology
PSYC 100
Psychology of Personal Growth
3
PSYC 101
General Psychology
3
PSYC 101H
General Psychology (Honors)
3
PLSC 102
These courses may be used to partially satisfy the Area D
requirement.
AREA E—Lifelong Learning & Self-Development
Select one course. A minimum of 3 units is required.
BUS 147
Personal Finance (F’10)
3
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business (F’13)
3
CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development (F’11)
3
PSYC 103
Social Psychology
3
CHLD 205
Health, Safety, and Nutrition (F’11)
3
PSYC 121
Human Development
3
COUN 100
Career and Life Planning
3
PSYC 170
Psychology of Aging: Adult Development
and Aging
3
COUN 110
College Success Skills
3
CRLP 100
Career and Life Planning
3
CSIT 165
Living in an Online World
3
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging (F’11)
3
HEAL 101
Principles of Health
3
INTR 100
Foundation Skills for the College
Experience
4
NUTR 100
Nutrition Today
3
NUTR 105
Human Performance and Sports Nutrition
3
D10. Sociology and Criminology
Required courses:
ADM 100
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice
3
ADM 100H
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice (Honors)
3
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community (F’11)
3
PSYC 145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
(F’11)
3
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
SOC 101H
PSYC 100
Psychology of Personal Growth (F’11)
3
PSYC 115
Human Sexuality
3
3
PSYC 121
Human Development (F’11)
3
Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
3
PSYC 145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
3
SOC 102
Contemporary Social Problems
3
PSYC 170
Social Psychology
3
Psychology of Aging: Adult Development
and Aging
3
SOC 103
SOC 145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
(F’11)
3
SOC 145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
3
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 75
Transferring Course Work
Important Information & Footnotes
This general education certification pattern can be subject to
change year by year, but students are assured that courses
taken to meet this pattern will be honored if they are approved
for the academic year that the course is completed. Courses
on this list are approved effective Fall 2013 and are valid
through Summer 2014.
Certification of this general education pattern is not a CSU
admission requirement. Students should work with a MiraCosta
College counselor to develop an educational plan that
includes general education and major preparation course
work.
Credit will not be awarded for both the honors and non-honors
version of a course.
Courses listed in two different areas may be used in either area
but not both.
*
MiraCosta College will not certify courses in Area A or B4
that have not been completed with a minimum grade of
"C" or "P."
() Course approved beginning semester and year indicated.
Course taught on campus prior to CSU GE approval.
#
AREA 2A—Mathematical Concepts &
Quantitative Reasoning
One course and a minimum of 3 semester units are required.
Select one of the following courses:
BIO 180
Biostatistics
4
BTEC 180
Biostatistics
4
MATH 103
Statistics
4
MATH 115
Calculus with Applications
4
MATH 126
Pre-Calculus I: College Algebra
4
MATH 131
Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry and
Analytic Geometry
4
MATH 135
Pre-Calculus Mathematics
5
MATH 150
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
5
MATH 150H
Calculus and Analytic Geometry
(Honors)
5
MATH 155
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4
MATH 260
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
4
PSYC 104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
4
PSYC 104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
4
SOC 104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
4
SOC 104H
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
(Honors)
4
Laboratory course.
Plan C
AREA 3—Arts & Humanities
Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) for CSU and UC 2014–
2015
3A. Arts
Three courses and a minimum of 9 semester units are required.
Select one course from group 3A and one course from group
3B. Select a third course from either group 3A or 3B.
ART 157
Art Orientation
3
AREA 1—English Composition
ART 158
3
UC: Two courses are required. Select one course from Group 1A
and one course from Group 1B.
Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and
the Americas
ART 201
Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art
3
ART 254
Understanding and Appreciating the
Photographic Image
3
ART 258
Ancient to Gothic Art
3
ART 259
History of Renaissance to Modern Art
3
ART 260
History of Modern Art
3
ART 260H
History of Modern Art (Honors) (F’13)
3
ART 290
Landmarks of Art (F’13)
3
DESN 107
History of Western Architecture -A
Sustainable Perspective
3
DNCE 100
Dance Appreciation
3
CSU: Three courses are required. Select one course from each
group (1A, 1B, and 1C).
1A. English Composition (a minimum of 3 semester
units)
ENGL 100
Composition and Reading
4
1B. Critical Thinking—English Composition (a
minimum of 3 semester units)
ENGL 201
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature
4
ENGL 201H
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature (Honors)
4
ENGL 202
Critical Thinking and Composition
4
ENGL 202H
Critical Thinking and Composition
(Honors)
4
1C. Oral Communication—CSU ONLY (a minimum of
3 semester units)
DNCE 101
Dance History
3
DNCE 105
Dance Cultures of the World
3
DRAM 105
Introduction to Theatre
3
DRAM 120
Dramatic Literature (Ancient Greeks to
Shakespeare)
3
DRAM 121
Dramatic Literature (Restoration to
Present)
3
FILM 101
Introduction to Film (F’10)
3
COMM 101
Public Speaking
3
FILM 101H
Introduction to Film (Honors)
3
COMM 106
Group Communication
3
FILM 106
Study of Filmed Plays
3
COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication (F’10)
3
MUS 113
Multicultural Roots of American Music
3
MUS 114
History of Rock and Roll (F’09)
3
76 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Transferring Course Work
MUS 115
History and Appreciation of Western
Music
3
MUS 116
A Survey of World Music
3
MUS 119
Jazz History
3
MUS 119H
Jazz History (Honors)
3
3B. Humanities
CHNS 201
Intermediate Chinese (Third Semester)
4
SPAN 205
Hispanic Film, Literature, and
Composition
3
AREA 4—Social & Behavioral Sciences
Three courses and a minimum of 9 semester units are required.
Select three courses from at least two disciplines.
ADM 100
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice
3
ADM 100H
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice (Honors)
3
COMM 215
Intercultural Communication
3
FILM 110
Film History
3
FREN 201
Intermediate French (Third Semester)
4
ADM 200
Concepts of Criminal Law (F’11)
3
FREN 202
Intermediate French (Fourth Semester)
4
ANTH 102
Cultural Anthropology
3
GRMN 201
Intermediate German (Third Semester)
4
ANTH 102H
Cultural Anthropology (Honors)
3
HIST 100
World History to 1500 (F’11)
3
ANTH 104
Native American Cultures
3
HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors) (F’11)
3
ANTH 190
Primate Behavior and Ecology
3
HIST 101
World History Since 1500 (F’11)
3
CHLD 113
3
HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors) (F’11)
3
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development (F’11)
HIST 103
Western Civilization to 1648
3
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community (F’11)
3
HIST 103H
Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
3
COMM 120
Principles of Human Communication
3
Western Civilization Since 1648
3
COMM 135
Gender Studies in Communication
3
HIST 104
HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
3
COMM 220
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
HUMN 101
Introduction to the Arts
3
CSIT 160
Technology, the Individual, and Society
3
HUMN 101H
Introduction to the Arts (Honors)
3
CSIT 165
Living in an Online World
3
Survey of Economics
3
HUMN 250
American Studies: First Contact Through
the Civil War
3
ECON 100
ECON 101
Principles of Economics: MACRO
3
HUMN 251
American Studies: 1870s to the Present
3
ECON 102
Principles of Economics: MICRO
3
ITAL 121
Introduction to Italian Culture
3
GEOG 102
Cultural Geography
3
ITAL 201
Intermediate Italian (Third Semester)
4
GEOG 104
World Geography
3
ITAL 202
Intermediate Italian (Fourth Semester)
4
GEOG 108
Environmental Sustainability and Society
3
JAPN 201
Intermediate Japanese (Third Semester)
4
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
3
JAPN 202
Intermediate Japanese (Fourth
Semester)
4
GERO 250
Intergenerational Issues
3
HIST 100
World History to 1500
3
LIT 120
Introduction to Literature
3
HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors)
3
LIT 250
American Literature: First Contact
Through the Civil War
3
HIST 101
World History Since 1500
3
LIT 251
American Literature: Mid-1800s to the
Present
3
HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors)
3
HIST 105
History of England
3
LIT 260
English Literature Through the 18th
Century
3
LIT 261
English Literature: Romantic to
Contemporary
3
LIT 265
Shakespeare Studies
3
LIT 265H
Shakespeare Studies (Honors)
3
LIT 270
World Literature to 1600
HIST 105H
History of England (Honors)
3
HIST 107
East Asian Societies
3
HIST 109
History of the Middle East
3
HIST 110
United States History to 1877
3
HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
3
3
HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 113
American Military History
3
LIT 271
World Literature Since 1600
3
PHIL 101
Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge
and Reality
3
PHIL 102
Contemporary Moral Problems
PHIL 221
HIST 113H
American Military History (Honors)
3
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
3
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
Philosophy of Religion
3
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
RELG 101
World Religions
3
HIST 141
Eastern Religions
3
Mexican American History Through 1877
(F’10)
3
RELG 105
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
(F’10)
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877 (F’10)
3
SPAN 201
Intermediate Spanish (Third Semester)
4
SPAN 202
Intermediate Spanish (Fourth Semester)
4
SPAN 203
Spanish for Native Speakers (F’09)
4
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 77
Transferring Course Work
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
(F’10)
3
HIST 165
California History
3
NUTR 108
Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition
3
PLSC 101
Introduction to Political Science
3
PLSC 102
American Institutions and History (F’09)
4
PLSC 103
Comparative Government
3
PLSC 150
Introduction to International Relations
3
PSYC 100
Psychology of Personal Growth
3
PSYC 101
General Psychology
3
PSYC 101H
General Psychology (Honors)
3
PSYC 103
Social Psychology
3
PSYC 115
Human Sexuality (F’12)
3
PSYC 121
Human Development
3
PSYC 145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
(F’11)
3
PSYC 170
GEOL 101L
Psychology of Aging: Adult Development
and Aging
3
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
3
SOC 101H
Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
3
SOC 102
Contemporary Social Problems
3
SOC 103
Social Psychology
3
SOC 105
Introduction to Justice Studies
3
SOC 110
Comparative Cultures
3
SOC 120
Introduction to Women’s Studies (F’10)
3
SOC 145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
(F’11)
3
Race and Ethnic Relations (F’10)
SOC 207
GEOL 101H
Physical Geology (Honors)
3
Physical Geology Laboratory
1
#
GEOL 101LH
Physical Geology Laboratory (Honors)
GEOL 120
Environmental Geology: Earth Hazards
and Humanity
3
OCEA 101
Introduction to Oceanography
3
OCEA 101H
Introduction to Oceanography (Honors)
OCEA 101L
1
#
Introductory Oceanography Laboratory
3
#
1
PHSN 101
Fundamentals of Physical Science
3
PHSN 106
Energy, Motion, and Matter: An
Introduction to Physics and Chemistry
3
PHSN 108
Introduction to Climate Change
3
PHSN 108H
Introduction to Climate Change
(Honors)
3
PHYS 111
Introductory Physics I
#
4
Introductory Physics II
#
4
PHYS 112
PHYS 151
PHYS 152
PHYS 253
4
Principles of Physics I
#
Principles of Physics II
#
4
Principles of Physics III
#
4
5B. Biological Science
ANTH 101
Biological Anthropology
ANTH 101H
Biological Anthropology (Honors)
3
3
ANTH 101L
Biological Anthropology Laboratory
BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
3
BIO 101
General Biology
General Biology Laboratory
#
1
4
#
3
SOC 230
Introduction to Chicana/o Studies
3
BIO 101L
SOC 240
Introduction to Black Studies
3
BIO 102
Ecology and Environmental Biology
AREA 5—Physical & Biological Sciences
BIO 103
Animal Diversity
Two courses and a minimum of 7 semester units are required.
Select one course from group A and one course from group
B. One course must include a corresponding laboratory. (Lab
courses are noted with the # symbol.)
BIO 105
Genes and Technology in Society
3
BIO 150
General Botany
#
4
BIO 170
Marine Biology
5A. Physical Science
4
#
3
4
#
BIO 172
Marine Ecology
BIO 202
Foundations of Biology: Evolution,
3
4
ASTR 101
Descriptive Astronomy
ASTR 101L
Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory
ASTR 120
Life in the Universe (F’13)
3
Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry,
Cell Biology, Genetics, and Molecular
ASTR 201
Introductory Astronomy
3
Biology
CHEM 100
Introductory Chemistry
CHEM 102
Introduction to Organic and Biological
Chemistry
CHEM 104
3
1
#
#
Chemistry of Living Things (Introduction
CHEM 108
Preparatory Chemistry
Human Physiology
4
HORT 116
Plant Science (F’10)
PSYC 260
Physiological Psychology
5
#
3
General Chemistry
5
CHEM 111
General Chemistry
#
5
EART 106
Earth and Space Science
3
GEOG 101
Physical Geography
3
GEOG 101L
Physical Geography Laboratory
GEOL 101
Physical Geology
78 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
1
3
4
#
BIO 220
#
#
Biodiversity, and Organismal Biology
BIO 204
4
#
to General, Organic, and Biochemistry)
CHEM 110
1
#
#
4
#
*
5C. Laboratory Activity: This requirement may
be met by the completion of any lab course that
corresponds to a lecture course found above in 5A
or 5B (noted by the # symbol).
AREA 6—Language Other Than English (UC
only)
This proficiency may be met by having completed two years of
high school course work in a language other than English with
a "C-"* or better or by selecting one of the following courses:
4
3
Transferring Course Work
FREN 101
Elementary French (First Semester)
4
that includes general education and major preparation course
work specific to the intended UC campus.
GRMN 101
Elementary German (First Semester)
4
*
ITAL 101
Elementary Italian (First Semester)
4
Grades of C- are not acceptable except for high school
language courses.
JAPN 101
Elementary Japanese (First Semester)
4
() Course approved beginning semester and year indicated.
SPAN 101
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
4
CHNS 101
Elementary Chinese (First Semester)
4
Course taught on campus prior to IGETC approval.
#
CSU Graduation Requirement in History,
Constitution and American Ideals
Laboratory course.
All CSU campuses have a graduation requirement in History,
Constitution and American Ideals. Students may be certified as
completing this requirement by completing one course from
Group I and one course from Group II; or by completing the
course from Group III.
Group I
HIST 110
United States History to 1877 (or 110H)
3
HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors) (or
110)
3
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877
3
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
3
HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
3
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
3
HIST 165
California History
3
American Institutions and History
4
Group II
Group III
PLSC 102
These courses may be used to partially satisfy the Area 4
requirement.
Important Information & Footnotes
This general education certification pattern can be subject to
change year by year, but students are assured that courses
taken to meet this pattern will be honored if they are approved
for the academic year that the course is completed. Courses
on this list are approved effective Fall 2013 and are valid
through Summer 2014.
All courses on IGETC must be completed with a "C" or better.
A "P" (Pass) is acceptable, but UC permits no more than 14
semester transferable units to be completed on a pass/no pass
basis.
UC credit may be limited for some courses. For example, no
credit is given for an introductory course if it is taken after a
more advanced college course. Credit may also be limited for
courses with overlapping content. In addition, duplicate credit
will not be awarded for the honors and non-honors versions of
a course. UC credit limitations are noted on the catalog course
descriptions.
IGETC is not a UC admission requirement but is advantageous
to many but not all transfer students. Students should work with
a MiraCosta College counselor to develop an educational plan
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 79
Areas of Study & Courses
Areas of Study & Courses
How to Read Course
Descriptions
Accounting
How to Read Course Descriptions
Courses listed in this catalog apply to the fall 2014, spring 2015,
and summer 2015 terms. Courses are numbered numerically
within alphabetically arranged subject areas.
The bolded first line begins with a capitalized abbreviation
that designates the subject area. This subject-area designator
is followed by the official course number and a descriptive title.
The next lines indicate the course’s unit value; prerequisites,
corequisites, advisories, and limitations on enrollment if
they exist; repeatability rule, if the course has one; CSU/UC
credit acceptance; and lecture and lab hours followed by a
Taxonomy of Program number in parentheses.
Prerequisites: This is a requirement that must be met before a
student can enroll in the course.
Corequisites: This is a course the student must take in the
same semester.
Advisories: This is recommended preparation the student is
advised but not required to have before or in conjunction
with the course.
Enrollment Limitations: Some courses place restrictions
on enrollment. Most of these restrictions prevent students
from duplicating course work. Others specify something
the student must do prior to enrolling in a course, such
as audition or obtain special approval. Some enrollment
limitations restrict the number of units a student can earn or
the number of courses a student can take within a group of
courses that share a similar primary educational objective.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU means the course is accepted
for transfer at any California State University (CSU) campus;
UC means it is accepted for transfer at any University of
California (UC) campus. Some courses can be used to
satisfy general education or major requirements while
others transfer as elective credit. UC Credit Limitation means
credit for the course may have UC transfer restrictions; these
restrictions are identified at the end of the course description.
Lecture and Lab Hours: These are the number of hours the
course meets for lecture and/or lab per week.
Taxonomy of Program (TOP) Number: The TOP number is
identified in parentheses after the lecture and lab hours.
This number serves an administrative purpose and is not
intended for student use.
The course description summarizes the purpose and key topical
areas of the course, and it includes special requirements if any
exist. Some course descriptions end with information about
whether the course was "formerly" another course, how many
times the course may be repeated, if the course is offered pass/
no pass, or what the UC credit limitation is.
Some course descriptions are followed by a C-ID number. The
purpose of C-ID numbers is to identify comparable courses
within the California community college system. When a course
has a C-ID number, students can be assured the course will be
accepted in lieu of a course bearing the same C-ID designation
at another community college.
82 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Accounting offers theoretical and practical courses for
students planning to transfer as accounting majors, career
and technical courses that lead to certificates of proficiency
and achievement, and professional development courses
designed to improve workplace skills. Career options in
accounting include positions in the private and public sectors,
tax preparation, finance and banking, business ownership, and
management.
Contact Information
Chair: Tom Severance
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ACCT
Department: Business
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Eric Carstensen
Michael Deschamps
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Accounting Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to successfully construct and analyze accounting information
for the purposes of making business decisions.
Bookkeeping Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of the this program, the student will be
able to analyze and record business transactions using doubleentry accounting as well as construct and interpret required
financial statements.
Areas of Study & Courses
Associate Degrees
includes accounting, business mathematics, and computer
office skills.
Associate in Arts Degrees
Accounting
Bookkeeping
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Required courses:
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
4
ACCT 148
Computer Accounting
3
ACCT 158
Business Mathematics
3
ACCT 201
Financial Accounting
4
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
3
Total Units
Accounting
20
Certificate of Proficiency
Students interested in accounting-related careers may choose
the Accounting or Bookkeeping Certificate Program.
Billing, Cost, and Accounting Assistant
An accountant generally works without continuous supervision.
He/she has full responsibility for entries to general journals,
posting to general ledgers, year-end adjustments, and financial
statements. An accountant often supervises one or more
bookkeepers and is the primary accounting specialist in
a small business. In addition to the training needed by a
bookkeeper, an accountant needs extra accounting, business
communication, law, income tax, and management training.
This certificate introduces students to the basic components
of billing, cost, and accounting functions. Most of the courses
in this certificate can be applied to the Accounting and
Bookkeeping Certificates of Achievement.
Required courses:
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
4
ACCT 158
Business Mathematics
3
One of the following:
A strong demand by the community for accounting specialists
provides opportunities within this field. The following courses
may be taken in any sequence as long as all prerequisites are
met.
Required courses:
A strong demand by the community for bookkeepers assures
opportunities within this field. The following courses may be
taken in any sequence as long as all prerequisites are met.
3
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
CSIT 100
Computer Basics I
& CSIT 105 and Computer Basics II
Total Units
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
4
ACCT 145
Individual Income Tax
or ACCT 146
Taxation of Corporations, Partnerships, Estates,
and Trusts
ACCT 148
Computer Accounting
3
3-4
10
Certificate of Proficiency
Income Tax Preparer
The Income Tax Preparer Certificate trains students to work in an
entry-level assistant position with an experienced tax preparer
or a commercial tax preparation service.
ACCT 158
Business Mathematics
3
ACCT 201
Financial Accounting
4
Required courses:
ACCT 202
Managerial Accounting
4
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
BUS 120
Introduction to Business
3
or ACCT 201
Financial Accounting
or BUS 130
Small Business Management
ACCT 145
Individual Income Tax
4
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
3
ACCT 146
3
or BUS 140
Legal Environment of Business
Taxation of Corporations, Partnerships,
Estates, and Trusts
or BUS 140H
Legal Environment of Business (Honors)
ACCT 148
Computer Accounting
3
BUS 290
Business Communication
or CSIT 110
Computer Applications
or BUS 290H
Business Communication (Honors)
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
3
Total Units
3
Total Units
4
14
36-37
Certificate of Achievement
Bookkeeping
A bookkeeper generally works under supervision. He/she
makes entries in special journals, posts to subsidiary ledgers,
and verifies and files source documents. Appropriate training
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 83
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
ACCT 101: Practical Accounting
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0502.00)
This course introduces students to the field of accounting.
Topics include recordkeeping for sole proprietorships in service
and merchandising businesses, end-of-period adjustments
and the worksheet, preparation of financial statements, and
the closing process. The course also covers cash receipts,
disbursements and control, and payroll while emphasizing
practical problems. Students are required to complete a
comprehensive manual accounting simulation.
ACCT 145: Individual Income Tax
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0502.10)
This course covers federal and California individual income
tax preparation and planning. Topics include filing status,
exemptions, income and exclusions, business expenses,
itemized deductions, credits, capital gains, depreciation, tax
payments, California tax, IRS and FTB, and audits. This California
Tax Education Council (CTEC) approved course fulfills the
60-hour qualifying education requirement for California tax
preparers and prepares students to meet the federal guidelines
for paid tax preparers.
ACCT 146: Taxation of Corporations, Partnerships, Estates,
and Trusts
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0502.10)
This course introduces the tax issues facing corporations,
partnerships, estates, and trusts. It emphasizes the U.S. tax code
and regulations that relate to these entities, and it examines
the transactions that most commonly affect them. This course
assists students in preparing to sit for the IRS Enrolled Agent
exam.
ACCT 148: Computer Accounting
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ACCT 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0502.00)
This course teaches students how to apply fundamental
accounting concepts and principles and analyze business
events using commercial business accounting software.
Students enter accounting transactions, make adjustments
and corrections, create and analyze financial reports, produce
and compare financial statements, create a company file,
calculate payroll, use advanced software features for loan and
asset tracking, and make end-of-year adjustments.
84 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
ACCT 158: Business Mathematics
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0502.00)
This course meets the needs of business students who wish
to gain proficiency in mathematical applications used in the
business world. It prepares students for the study of accounting
as well as for pre-employment mathematics tests common
to office employment. Applications include trade and cash
discounts, markups, depreciation, interest, and trend analysis.
ACCT 201: Financial Accounting
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ACCT 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (0502.00)
This course explores what financial accounting is, why it is
important, and how it is used by investors and creditors to make
decisions. It covers the accounting information system and
the recording and reporting of business transactions with a
focus on the accounting cycle, the application of generally
accepted accounting principles, the classified financial
statements, and statement analysis. Topics include issues
relating to asset, liability, and equity valuation, revenue and
expense recognition, cash flow, internal controls, and ethics. CID ACCT-110.
ACCT 202: Managerial Accounting
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ACCT 201.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (0502.00)
This course examines how managers use accounting
information in decision-making, planning, directing operations,
and controlling. It focuses on cost terms and concepts, cost
behavior, cost structure, and cost-volume-profit analysis.
Topics include profit planning, standard costs, operations and
capital budgeting, cost control, and accounting for costs in
manufacturing organizations. C-ID ACCT-120.
Areas of Study & Courses
ACCT 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
ACCT 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Administration of Justice
The Administration of Justice discipline examines the structure,
functions, laws and procedures, and decision-making
processes of agencies that deal with crime management,
such as police, prosecutors, courts, and correctional facilities.
Students take administration of justice courses to prepare for
a criminal justice, criminology, or law enforcement major,
to fulfill general education requirements, or for professional
development. Career options include work in federal, state, and
local law enforcement agencies, correctional agencies and
institutions, and private security agencies.
Contact Information
Chair: Patrick Connolly
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ADM
Department: Administration of
Justice
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Patrick Connolly
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Associate in Science in Administration of
Justice for Transfer Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
prepared for further study and/or employment in entry-level
positions in the criminal justice system.
Law Enforcement Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
prepared for further study and/or employment in entry-level
positions in the criminal justice system.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 85
Areas of Study & Courses
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degree
Law Enforcement
Complete the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general education
pattern
Achieve a minimum CSU transferable GPA of 2.0
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College.
Required Core (6 units):
ADM 100
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice
3
*
or ADM 100H
Introduction to the Administration of Justice
(Honors)
ADM 200
Concepts of Criminal Law
3
*
List A: 6 Units. Select two courses. (It is recommended
you select courses that meet lower-division major
preparation requirements at your intended transfer
university.)
ADM 210
Criminal Procedures
ADM 220
Criminal Evidence
ADM 230
Policing in a Diverse and Multicultural
Society
ADM 270
Crime and Delinquency
ADM 280
Criminal Investigation
6
List B: 7 units. Select two courses.
SOC 101
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Associate in Science Degree
Associate in Science in Administration of Justice for
Transfer Degree
Students completing this associate degree will have completed
lower-division major preparation requirements for a criminal
justice/criminology degree, an emphasis or option within a
criminal justice/criminology degree, or a degree considered
similar to criminal justice/criminology at a participating
California State University (CSU) campus. Following transfer
to a participating CSU campus, students will be required to
complete no more than 60 units to obtain a bachelor’s degree;
however, some CSU campuses accepting this degree may
require additional lower-division major preparation. This degree
may not be appropriate preparation for students transferring
to a CSU campus not accepting this degree or to a university
or college that is not part of the CSU system. Students should
consult with a MiraCosta counselor for further information
regarding the most efficient pathway to transfer as a criminal
justice major and to determine which CSU campuses are
participating in this program.
To complete the degree, students must fulfill the following
requirements:
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) CSU transferable units
Complete all courses required in the major with a “C” or
better
86 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Introduction to Sociology
7
*
or SOC 101H Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
PSYC/SOC
104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
*
or PSYC 104H Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
or SOC 104H Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (Honors)
or MATH 103 Statistics
Total Units
19
* To insure this degree is completed with no more than 60 units,
students should select courses that double count with the CSUGE or CSU-IGETC general education pattern. These courses
are noted with an asterisk above. Students are also strongly
advised to complete the History, Constitution, and American
Ideals requirement prior to transfer.
Certificate
Certificate of Achievement
Law Enforcement
As the criminal justice system responds to the increasing
complexities of our society, education becomes even more
essential for those seeking careers as peace officers as well as
for law enforcement personnel seeking advancement within
the field. The law enforcement certificate includes courses
covering the most significant knowledge, skills, and abilities
that better facilitate a student’s success in acquiring and
being successful in law-enforcement related jobs. In addition,
successful completion of the certificate requirements provides
an excellent foundation for transfer and the pursuit of higher
degrees in law-enforcement related fields.
Required courses:
ADM 100
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice
3
Areas of Study & Courses
or ADM 100H
Introduction to the Administration of Justice
(Honors)
ADM 200
Concepts of Criminal Law
3
ADM 210
Criminal Procedures
3
ADM 220
Criminal Evidence
3
ADM 230
Policing in a Diverse and Multicultural
Society
3
ADM 240
Written and Oral Communication in the
Administration of Justice
3
Select at least 9 elective units from the following:
ADM 107
Introduction to Computer/Digital
Forensics
ADM 250
Police Field Operations
ADM 260
Organized Crime, Gangs, and Terrorism
ADM 270
Crime and Delinquency
ADM 280
Criminal Investigation
SOC 105
Introduction to Justice Studies
Total Units
9
27
Courses
ADM 100: Introduction to the Administration of Justice
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ADM 100H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course explores the roots of our current justice system and
the interaction of its various subsystems (law enforcement/
prosecution, judicial, and corrections). It emphasizes the
organizational structure and legal consideration relevant to
each subsystem. Topics include the origin of law, theories
of crime causation, criminal procedure, and sentencing
philosophies and alternatives. The course also introduces
students to sources of criminal justice information and statistics.
UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for ADM 100, ADM 101H, or
SOC 105.
ADM 100H: Introduction to the Administration of Justice
(Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ADM 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course explores the roots of our current justice system and
the interaction of its various subsystems (law enforcement/
prosecution, judicial, and corrections) to each other and to
the overall social system. It emphasizes the organizational
structure and legal consideration relevant to each subsystem.
Topics include the origin of law, theories of crime causation,
criminal law, criminal procedure, and sentencing philosophies
and alternatives. The course also introduces students to the
research methodology and sources of information/statistics
relevant to the discipline. As an honors course, it provides a
rigorous and enriched opportunity for highly motivated students
to lead seminar-like discussions and to conduct in-depth
research and interviews about criminal-justice-related issues. UC
CREDIT LIMIATION: Credit for ADM 100/ADM 100H or SOC 105. CID AJ-110.
ADM 107: Introduction to Computer/Digital Forensics
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course introduces students to computer/digital crime and
abuse and the methods used to properly conduct a computer/
digital forensics investigation. Designed for law enforcement
investigators, corporate security officials, and network and
computer security administrators, the course includes an
overview of computer/digital forensics as a profession; the
computer investigation process and related legal issues; the
type and frequency of computer/digital-related crime; a basic
overview of the Internet, networks, and network infrastructure
protection; operating systems, data and disk structures, data
acquisition and analysis, and technical writing; and a survey of
computer/digital forensics tools.
ADM 200: Concepts of Criminal Law
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
The course explores the basic concepts of criminal law,
including its philosophy and development, relationship to the
U.S. government’s structure, elements of a crime, inchoate
offenses, and capacities and defenses. The course covers
specific violations and legal issues related to crimes against
persons, property crimes, organized crime, white collar crime,
environmental crime, public safety and terrorism offenses,
alcohol and drug offenses, and offenses against justice and
public administration. C-ID AJ-120.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 87
Areas of Study & Courses
ADM 210: Criminal Procedures
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
ADM 250: Police Field Operations
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
The course explores the basic concepts of criminal procedure
with special emphasis on constitutional principles that apply to
investigative techniques involving search and seizure, electronic
surveillance, temporary detention, arrest, identification
procedures, and interrogation. The course also covers legal
issues that relate to initial entry into the judicial system, pretrial, trial, sentencing, punishment, appeal, and post conviction
relief. C-ID AJ-122.
This course focuses on the duties, responsibilities, and ethical
considerations of patrol officers during field operations. It
emphasizes the different types of patrol and investigations,
commonly encountered situations, techniques employed to
address those situations, and the legal authorities related to
such actions. Topics include written and oral communication
skills, interview/interrogation, report writing, use of force, trial
preparation and testimony, and the officer’s role in community
policing practices and the criminal justice system in general.
ADM 220: Criminal Evidence
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course focuses on the various types of evidence and the
rules governing admissibility in criminal proceedings with an
emphasis on the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California
Evidence Code. Topics include relevance, materiality, witness
testimony, hearsay, impeachment, competence, chain of
custody, and privileges. The course also addresses admissibility
of evidence related to confessions, searches, in/out of court
identifications, and other investigative techniques, including
the criminal processes where admissibility is determined. C-ID
AJ-124.
ADM 230: Policing in a Diverse and Multicultural Society
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course examines how diverse populations and multicultural
communities affect the organization of law enforcement
agencies and the relationships between police and the
communities they serve. It emphasizes the history, issues, and
challenges associated with policing in communities of diverse
and multicultural populations, considering such factors as race,
ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, social class,
and culture. The course also explores strategies for improving
communication skills and relationships between police and the
community.
ADM 240: Written and Oral Communication in the
Administration of Justice
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course focuses on the written and oral communication skills
necessary for success in the criminal justice system to include
the application of relevant legal considerations. It emphasizes
incident report writing, interview/interrogation documentation,
and note-taking. The course also identifies and develops oral
communication skills related to voluntary citizen contact, crisis
intervention, custodial situations, and testimony.
88 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
ADM 260: Organized Crime, Gangs, and Terrorism
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course traces the origins and evolution of domestic and
transnational organized criminal and terrorist enterprises. It
emphasizes their illicit activities, including drug trafficking, vices,
gangs, and international and domestic terrorism. The course
explores the impact such activities and enterprises have had
on society, law enforcement, homeland security, and U.S.
transnational relations.
ADM 270: Crime and Delinquency
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course focuses on the nature and extent of the most
significant types of criminal and delinquent behavior of juvenile
offenders as well as the major theories and factors that may
explain such behavior. The course also explores the origin and
development of the juvenile justice system and examines the
relevant crime control strategies, treatment and rehabilitation
programs, and the criminal justice processes applicable to
juvenile procedures. C-ID AJ-220.
ADM 280: Criminal Investigation
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of criminal
investigations, including investigative techniques relevant to
particular types of crime (e.g., fingerprint/DNA collection, other
scientific evidence, surveillances, eyewitness identification,
interviews, interrogations, and searches) and the relevant legal
and ethical considerations related to such techniques. The
course reviews crime scene management and processing,
including chain of custody issues and available scientific tests,
with an emphasis on recording, collecting, and preserving
physical evidence. Students also learn the importance of
documentation and preparation for testimony at various legal
proceedings. C-ID AJ-140.
Areas of Study & Courses
ADM 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
ADM 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
ADM 296: Topics in Administration of Justice
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Administration of Justice that are not included in regular course
offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described, and
given its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
ADM 298: Directed Study in Administration of Justice
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (2105.00)
This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue
a special area of interest in order to achieve specific goals
beyond the scope of existing courses within the discipline.
Students work independently and interact directly with an
instructor on an individual basis and as prescribed by the
Directed Study Agreement.
American College
English
The American College English (ACE) area of study provides
English language instruction to bilingual or multilingual students
who want to develop stronger academic writing, reading,
vocabulary, and oral communication skills for success in
college courses. ACE courses emphasize critical thinking and
clear communication, and those numbered 50 and higher
are associate-degree applicable. The ACE program also
offers specialty support courses in psychology, sociology, and
nursing.
Contact Information
Chairs: Melissa Lloyd-Jones
[email protected]
(Fall 2014), Mary Gross
[email protected] (Spring
2015)
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ESL
Department: English as a
Second Language
Office: Building SAN Admin,
760.634.7876
Full-Time Faculty
Mary Gross
Melissa Lloyd-Jones
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 89
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
ACE 49: Introduction to Academic Writing for Students from
Multilingual Backgrounds
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ENGL 49 or ESL 49.
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (4930.84)
This course is designed for students from diverse language
backgrounds who are making a transition to the use of
academic English and who require the development of writing
skills. The course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and
writing. It provides practice in gathering, organizing, and
communicating information and in applying the principles
and conventions of standard edited American English. Offered
pass/no pass only.
ACE 50: Introduction to College Composition for Students
from Multilingual Backgrounds
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ACE 49, ENGL 49, or ESL 49 or eligibility determined
by the English placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ENGL 50, ENGL 803, ESL 50, or ESL 803.
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (4930.84)
This course, designed for students from diverse language
backgrounds, offers intensive practice in the writing process,
critical reading, and critical thinking. It also provides practice in
acquiring, synthesizing, and communicating information and
in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited
American English.
ACE 90: English Support for Psychology
Units: 1
Prerequisites: ACE 49, ENGL 49 or ESL 49 or eligibility determined
by the English placement process.
Lecture 1 hour. (4930.84)
This accelerated integrated skills course is designed for students
enrolled in psychology courses. It offers training in the writing
of summaries, reading responses, analytical paragraphs and
essays, and research papers, the reading of textbooks and
articles, and vocabulary enrichment in the field of psychology.
Taking this course simultaneously with a psychology course will
increase opportunities for success in both courses.
ACE 91: English Support for Nursing
Units: 1
Prerequisites: ACE 49, ESL 49 or ENGL 49 or eligibility determined
by the English placement process.
Lecture 1 hour. (4930.84)
This accelerated integrated skills course is designed for students
enrolled in nursing courses. It offers training in the reading of
textbooks and newspaper, magazine, and journal articles
on topics in health and nursing. Instruction also focuses on
the writing of answers to discussion questions, responses to
readings, summaries, reports, and analytical paragraphs,
as well as listening and speaking strategies and vocabularybuilding skills.
90 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
ACE 92: English Support for Sociology
Units: 1
Prerequisites: ACE 49, ENGL 49, or ESL 49 or eligibility determined
by the English placement process.
Lecture 1 hour. (4930.84)
This accelerated integrated skills course is designed for students
enrolled in sociology courses. It offers training in the writing of
summaries, reading responses, analytical paragraphs and
essays, and research papers; the reading of textbooks and
articles; and academic vocabulary enrichment in the field of
sociology. Taking this course simultaneously with a sociology
course will increase opportunities for success in both courses.
ACE 296: Topics in American College English
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1501.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
American College English that are not included in regular
course offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described,
and given its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
Anthropology
Anthropologists study human behavior from a biological,
historical, cultural, and social perspective. Students take
anthropology courses to prepare for a major or to fulfill general
education requirements. A bachelor’s degree in anthropology
can lead to a career in data analysis, social services,
education, journalism, advertising, international relations,
government service, field research, contract archaeology,
museums, zoological parks, and nonprofit organizations.
Contact Information
Chairs: Lynne Miller
Department: Social Science
[email protected]
Office: Building OC3600,
(Fall 2014), Herschel Stern
760.795.6648
[email protected] (Spring
2015)
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ANTH
Full-Time Faculty
Lynne Miller
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
ANTH 101: Biological Anthropology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ANTH 101H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00)
This course examines the biological basis for animal forms
and behaviors, including basic genetics and evolution theory;
primate classification, ecology, and social behavior; the fossil
and archaeological evidence for early human life; and the
evolutionary basis for modern human variation in appearance
and behavior.
ANTH 101H: Biological Anthropology (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ANTH 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00)
This course examines the biological basis for animal forms
and behaviors, including basic genetics and evolution theory;
primate classification, ecology, and social behavior; the fossil
and archaeological evidence for early human lifeways; and the
evolutionary basis for modern human variation in appearance
and behavior. As an honors course, it offers expanded analysis
of lecture materials, increased dependence upon student
participation on a daily basis, and the opportunity for students
to conduct research in relevant areas of interest, and thus
targets highly motivated students who are looking for a more
challenging academic experience. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for ANTH 101 or ANTH 101H.
ANTH 101L: Biological Anthropology Laboratory
Units: 1
Prerequisites: ANTH 101 or ANTH 101H.
Corequisite: ANTH 101 or ANTH 101H if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (2202.00)
Designed to accompany Anthropology 101, this laboratory
allows students to garner practical, hands-on experience
with the scientific method, genetic models, simulations of
evolutionary processes, primate skeletal anatomy, primate
behavior and ecology, human osteology, and casts and tools
representing selected stages in human evolution.
ANTH 102: Cultural Anthropology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ANTH 102H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00)
ANTH 102H: Cultural Anthropology (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ANTH 102.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00)
This honors course offers highly motivated students an
advanced introduction to the study of human culture, including
its structure, function, and means of change; the science
and practical applications of studying human culture; and
human cultural variation in major topics, such as mode of
subsistence, gender roles, language, kinship structures, political
organizations, art, and ritual. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
ANTH 102 or ANTH 102H.
ANTH 103: Introduction to Archaeology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2202.20)
This course explores archaeological theory and method,
including techniques of field excavations and laboratory
research. It also uses archaeological data to understand
cultures of the past, including Stone Age lifeways, early farming
cultures, and emergent civilizations around the world, such as
the ancient Egyptians, Maya, and Inca.
ANTH 104: Native American Cultures
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00)
This course explores the diversity of Native American cultures,
including paleoindians (known largely from archaeological
evidence) and more recent groups (known from ethnographic
accounts). The course employs the perspective of cultural
ecology to investigate how environments influence many facets
of human culture, including economic systems, social systems,
family structure, and art and ritual.
ANTH 190: Primate Behavior and Ecology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00)
This course explores principles of animal behavior and ecology
from an evolutionary perspective. Topics include predator
avoidance, foraging strategies, mating behaviors, mother-infant
bonding, the development of social groups, and cognition. The
course also addresses research methodology and requires an
observational project of primates at the San Diego Zoo and/or
San Diego Zoo Safari Park.
This course explores the fundamental characteristics of culture,
including its structure, function, and means of change; the
science of studying human culture; and human cultural
variation in major topics, such as mode of subsistence, gender
roles, kinship structures, political organizations, art, ritual, and
celebrations of the human life cycle.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 91
Areas of Study & Courses
ANTH 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
ANTH 296: Topics in Anthropology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Anthropology that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
ANTH 298: Directed Study in Anthropology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (2202.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Art
The Art Department offers theoretical and practical courses
in the traditional disciplines of art and art history as well
as in new genre and photographic arts. Students take art
courses to prepare for a major in art or art history, to meet
general education requirements, or for personal growth.
Career paths include working artist, teacher, graphic designer,
photographer, sculptor, curator in a museum or gallery,
conservator, appraiser, and work in related fields, such as
marketing and advertising.
Contact Information
Chair: Gilbert Neri
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ART
Department: Art
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Full-Time Faculty
Leah Cluff
Yoshimi Hayashi
Peggy Jones
Leslie Nemour
Gilbert Neri
Anna O’Cain
Dean Ramos
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Digital Photography Associate in Arts Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to identify major movements, artwork, and artists in
historical and contemporary photography, and demonstrate
an understanding of different photo techniques.
Digital Photography Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will possess
photographic and digital imaging knowledge and be able to
identify fine art and commercial career pathways and apply
92 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
current, photographic technology using professional and
industry standards.
ART 259
History of Renaissance to Modern Art
3
**
List A (select one course):
Associate in Arts in Studio Arts for Transfer
Degree
ART 158
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will possess
knowledge and mastery of a variety of art making skills and be
able to identify major movements in art and architecture and
convey ideas and concepts about artwork.
ART 254
the Americas
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degree
3
Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and
**
Understanding and Appreciating the
Photographic Image
**
ART 258
Ancient to Gothic Art
**
ART 260
History of Modern Art
**
ART 260H
History of Modern Art (Honors)
**
List B (select three courses):
Associate in Arts in Studio Arts for Transfer Degree
ART 102
Drawing and Composition II
ART 201
Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art
9
**
Students completing this associate degree will have completed
lower-division major preparation requirements for a studio arts
degree, an emphasis or option within a studio arts degree, or
a degree considered similar to studio arts at a participating
California State University (CSU) campus. Following transfer
to a participating CSU campus, students will be required to
complete no more than 60 units to obtain a bachelor’s degree;
however, some CSU campuses accepting this degree may
require additional lower-division major preparation. This degree
may not be appropriate preparation for students transferring
to a non-participating CSU campus or to a university or college
that is not part of the CSU system. Students should consult with
a MiraCosta counselor for further information regarding the
most efficient pathway to transfer as a studio arts major and
to determine which CSU campuses are participating in this
program.
ART 101
Design and Color
ART 103
3D Design
*
*
*
Life Drawing I
ART 204
Painting I: Oils
ART 205
Painting: Watercolor
ART 206
Mixed Media Figure Studies I
ART 207
Beginning Photography
ART 210
Printmaking
ART 216
Sculpture
ART 217
Figure Sculpture
ART 223
Woodworking and Furniture Design I
ART 225
Ceramics I
ART 230
Introduction to Sculptural Installation
ART 231
Introduction to Video and Performance
Art
ART 244
Digital Media for the Visual Artist
ART 245
Introduction to Media Culture
ART 251
Digital Photography
24
To insure this degree is completed with no more than 60
units, students should select six units that will also satisfy a
general education requirement on the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC
general education pattern. Students are also strongly advised
to complete the History, Constitution, and American Ideals
requirement prior to transfer.
Course approved for the CSU-GE general education
pattern.
education pattern.
Associate in Arts Degree
Digital Photography
Required Core (12 units):
Drawing and Composition
ART 203
** Course approved for the CSU-GE and CSU-IGETC general
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) CSU transferable units
Complete all courses required in the major with a “C” or
better
Complete the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general education
pattern
Achieve a minimum CSU transferable GPA of 2.0
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College.
ART 100
Painting: Acrylic
Total Units
*
To complete the degree, students must fulfill the following
requirements:
ART 202
3
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
3
3
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 93
Areas of Study & Courses
Certificate
ART 230
Introduction to Sculptural Installation
Certificate of Achievement
ART 231
Introduction to Video and Performance
Art
Digital Photography
The Digital Photography certificate offers education and
training in the use of digital cameras, related equipment,
and editing tools and techniques for creating photographic
portfolios, websites, and multimedia projects. Students produce
a professional-quality printed portfolio. The program’s emphasis
may be in fine art or commercial photography.
Required courses:
ART 207
Beginning Photography
3
Painting: Oil Based Media CRC
ART 204
Painting I: Oils
ART 214
Painting II: Oils
Painting: Water Based Media CRC
ART 202
Painting: Acrylic
ART 205
Painting: Watercolor
ART 212
Painting II: Acrylics
ART 215
Painting II: Watercolor
Photography CRC
ART 244
Digital Media for the Visual Artist
3
ART 251
Digital Photography
3
ART 207
Beginning Photography
3
ART 208
Advanced Photography
6
ART 251
Digital Photography
ART 253
Applied Digital Photography
ART 253
Applied Digital Photography
Select at least 6 units from the following:
ART 208
Advanced Photography
ART 245
Introduction to Media Culture
ART 254
Understanding and Appreciating the
Photographic Image
BUS 130
Small Business Management
or BUS 170
& BUS 171
Entrepreneur I
and Entrepreneur II
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
MAT 210
Digital Imaging 3: Advanced Photoshop
ART 292
Internship Studies
Total Units
Printmaking CRC
ART 210
Printmaking
ART 218
Printmaking II
Sculpture CRC
ART 103
3D Design
ART 216
Sculpture
ART 217
Figure Sculpture
Woodworking CRC
18
ART 223
Woodworking and Furniture Design I
ART 224
Woodworking and Furniture Design II
Courses Related in Content (CRC)
Courses
Active participatory art courses that are related in content
are grouped together. Students are allowed four enrollments
within each CRC group, but each course may be taken only
once unless its catalog description indicates it is repeatable.
Enrollments include any combination of course completions
(with an evaluative or nonevaluative symbol recorded on the
student’s transcript), withdrawals, and repetition.
ART 100: Drawing and Composition
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
Ceramics CRC
ART 225
Ceramics I
ART 226
Ceramics II
Design CRC
ART 101
Design and Color
ART 201
Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art
Digital CRC
ART 244
Digital Media for the Visual Artist
ART 245
Introduction to Media Culture
Drawing CRC
ART 100
Drawing and Composition
ART 102
Drawing and Composition II
ART 203
Life Drawing I
ART 213
Life Drawing II
Mixed Media Representation CRC
ART 206
Mixed Media Figure Studies I
ART 211
Mixed Media Figure Studies II
New Genre CRC
94 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This beginning course develops basic drawing skills. Students
explore a variety of media and creative approaches, and they
improve their perceptual abilities and personal expression. The
course covers problems of value, structure, and composition
using a variety of themes. It also integrates art history, theory,
and criticism. C-ID ARTS-110.
ART 101: Design and Color
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
Students explore and learn the language of design principles
and color theory through visual problem solving. They create
design projects using acrylic paint, ink, drawing, and mixed
media on paper and other support surfaces. They also
research, analyze, and evaluate elements of design and color
in a range of art disciplines, including painting and drawing,
graphic design, print and digital media, sculpture and public
art, video and performance, architecture, and other popular
arts. Students are required to attend field trips.
Areas of Study & Courses
ART 102: Drawing and Composition II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
ART 177: Art in the Elementary Schools
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1002.00)
This course provides for the continued development of basic
drawing skills introduced in ART 100. It emphasizes a creative
approach using black and white and color media while
exposing students to a variety of contemporary approaches
toward space, scale, and content. The course also encourages
students to develop personal expression through the combined
manipulations of subject matter and materials.
This course focuses on practical methods of teaching art
to elementary school students. It examines art historical
movements, theories, and criticism from both Western and
non-Western cultures and relates these to the development
and instruction of art. Topics include concepts and techniques
of creating drawings, paintings, and sculptures to inform
classroom instruction with children.
ART 103: 3D Design
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.20)
ART 201: Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.00)
In this sculpture course, students examine the language of
three-dimensional form, structure, and space. The course
develops personal expression, using a variety of themes and
subject matter by ordering three-dimensional space through
basic materials, such as clay, plaster, metal, and wood. It
offers experiences with differing approaches within cultural
contexts and integrates history, theory, and criticism, showing
the interrelationship of the creative arts, humanities, and the self
in western and non-western cultures. C-ID ARTS-101.
This course examines the ideas, concepts, and processes in
contemporary art through presentations of vanguard artwork of
the twenty-first century. Topics include the historical and cultural
contexts of contemporary art and artists in western and nonwestern cultures. Students create three-dimensional art projects
using unconventional materials in tandem with traditional
materials and methods. Students are required to attend field
trips.
ART 157: Art Orientation
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1002.00)
This basic art appreciation course introduces world art forms,
techniques, traditions, and aesthetics. It emphasizes both
western and world art in historical and cultural contexts.
Students examine visual artworks related to mortality and
immortality, sustenance and survival, sexuality and gender,
power and politics, and race and class. Students are required
to visit a local public artwork or museum/gallery.
ART 158: Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1002.00)
This course introduces the non-Western arts of Africa, Oceania,
and the Americas. It explores methodology and materials in
diverse media as they reflect various cultures from ancient to
contemporary periods. Museum visits are required.
ART 202: Painting: Acrylic
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ART 100 or ART 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
This course covers composition, techniques, and theory of
painting using acrylic paint. Students investigate various acrylic
painting techniques, art historical traditions, and theoretical
positions. Course work includes lecture, lab, critique, and
independent projects. Students may be required to attend field
trips to art exhibitions.
ART 203: Life Drawing I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ART 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
This beginning life drawing course focuses on representation
of the human figure. Students work from a nude model using
materials such as charcoal, pencil, ink, and pastels. They
learn how to depict action in quick gesture drawings as well
as produce more complex tonal drawings with emphasis on
composition and expression. Topics include basic anatomy,
structure, and proportion with equal emphasis placed on line
quality, value, and media control.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 95
Areas of Study & Courses
ART 204: Painting I: Oils
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ART 100 or ART 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
Students study past and present practices in painting and
work from various subjects, including still life, landscape,
figures, portraits, or mixed imagery, either from life or twodimensional references. Learning to be creative and analytical
in painting images and forms, students develop skills in painting
techniques, color mixing, composition, design, and personal
concepts using traditional or water soluble oils.
ART 205: Painting: Watercolor
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ART 100 or ART 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
This course investigates and experiences the unique
characteristics of watercolor painting. Course topics explore
compositional strategies, practical techniques, and theoretical
concepts of painting using watercolor. Students study and
apply various painting techniques, art historical traditions, and
theoretical positions. Course work includes lecture, lab, critique,
and independent projects.
ART 206: Mixed Media Figure Studies I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ART 100 or ART 104.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
Working from a posed model, students explore various
approaches to representing the human figure using a choice
of media, including oils, acrylics, ink, or pastels. Students study
form and structure, inspired by the rich world traditions of art
history, contemporary art practices, and individual creativity.
ART 207: Beginning Photography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1011.00)
This course provides an in-depth study of the camera, blackand-white film processing and darkroom printing, lighting
techniques, presentation, and exhibition. It emphasizes
controlling fundamental materials and processes and choosing
appropriate subject matter.
96 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
ART 208: Advanced Photography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 207.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1011.00)
This course builds upon skills learned in Beginning Photography
(ART 207). Topics include intermediate and advanced
techniques in black and white photography, including camera
use, film handling, and printing in the darkroom. Students
explore photography as a means of visual communication and
creative expression. The course culminates with a professional
portfolio of finished work.
ART 210: Printmaking
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.00)
This course introduces woodcut, etching, lithography,
and contemporary printmaking techniques. It emphasizes
craftsmanship and individual expression and encourages
experimentation in the use of materials.
ART 211: Mixed Media Figure Studies II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 206.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
This course provides students an opportunity to further their
investigation of the human figure in contemporary painting.
Objectives include the development of personal vision and
alternative venues of expression. Students study twentieth and
twenty-first century figurative artists, and they work from both live
models and photographic references using a variety of mixed
media, including oil or acrylic paint.
ART 212: Painting II: Acrylics
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
This course emphasizes intermediate practices in acrylic
painting. Students develop an acrylic painting portfolio
by creating a variety of expressive works using a variety of
techniques and materials unique to acrylics. Students study
historic and current painters and contemporary painting trends.
The course utilizes digital technology for artistic research and
development.
Areas of Study & Courses
ART 213: Life Drawing II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 203.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
ART 217: Figure Sculpture
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.20)
Students in this intermediate course create figurative drawings
from observation, promoting visual acuity while exploring
expressive drawing techniques and concepts in contemporary
studio practice. The visual forms of the figure are strengthened
through continued applications of two-dimensional drawing
methods and practice. Figurative subjects are derived from
nude models in the classroom and other assigned reference
sources.
This introductory sculpture course uses the human figure as its
subject matter. Students work from the nude model, photos,
and other sources to develop their skills, and they work with a
variety of materials, such as clay, plaster, metal, and wood.
ART 214: Painting II: Oils
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 204.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
This course emphasizes intermediate practices in oil painting to
create artwork in a context of personal meaning, narrative, and
relevance for portfolio development. Students study artworks
specific to the history of oil painting and contemporary practice
while building technical skill and exploring alternative methods
and materials. The course introduces digital technology as a
preparatory tool for artists.
ART 215: Painting II: Watercolor
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 205.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.10)
This course emphasizes intermediate practices in watercolor
painting. Students develop a watercolor painting portfolio
by creating a variety of expressive works using a variety of
techniques and materials unique to watercolor. Students study
historic and current painters and contemporary painting trends.
The course utilizes digital and traditional technology for artistic
research and development.
ART 216: Sculpture
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 103.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.20)
This course concentrates on the exploration and refinement
of a wide range of sculptural techniques and strategies, and
it includes three-dimensional art theory. Students work with
traditional mediums, such as clay, wood, and metal. The
course also introduces students to installation and public works
as well as time-based and kinetic art. Students are required to
pay a materials fee.
ART 218: Printmaking II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours.
Students study past and present practices in printmaking and
a variety of techniques to further their skills in the medium.
This course furthers students’ knowledge of woodcut, etching,
lithography, and contemporary printmaking techniques.
It emphasizes print studio operations, particularly press
maintenance and the formulation of wet materials.
ART 223: Woodworking and Furniture Design I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1001.00)
This course teaches woodworking skills and covers the nature
of hardwoods and softwoods, the mechanics of shaping/
joining, and the proper and safe use of hand and power
tools. It examines both traditional and contemporary work and
emphasizes the creation of individual, unique designs. Students
are required to pay a materials fee.
ART 224: Woodworking and Furniture Design II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 223.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.20)
Students continue developing their woodworking skills by
examining traditional and contemporary woodworking designs
and practices and by learning intermediate-level hand
and power tool techniques. The course emphasizes studio
operations, particularly safety and electric and hand operated
machine maintenance. It requires students to express concepts
and ideas through the wood medium. Students are required to
pay a materials fee.
ART 225: Ceramics I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.30)
This introductory ceramics course explores techniques,
materials, and traditions of pottery. It emphasizes hand building
and/or use of the potter’s wheel and encourages the creative
use of clay, glaze, technique, and kiln firing. Students are
required to pay a materials fee.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 97
Areas of Study & Courses
ART 226: Ceramics II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 225
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.30)
ART 245: Introduction to Media Culture
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1030.00)
Students study past and present practices in ceramics with a
variety of techniques and clay bodies to further their skills in the
medium. The course places a strong emphasis on ceramics
studio operations, particularly the formulation of clay bodies
and glazes. Topics include firing and construction of kilns. The
course emphasizes combining hand building and throwing
techniques to produce artworks.
This course provides an introduction to the historical and
theoretical foundations of digital art as well as hands-on
production of digital art using broad range of applications
and computer hardware. The course introduces students to
raster, vector, Web, and time-based applications that allow
them to learn the fundamentals of visual communication,
website production, manipulation of images, design elements,
animation, sound, video and the production of multimedia
artworks. Students create digital projects that fuse the
theoretical, historical, and cultural aspects of digitally based art
through the practical application of computer-based skills.
ART 230: Introduction to Sculptural Installation
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1001.00)
In this in-depth study of installation, interactive, and sitespecific art, students study and research the historical and
theoretical development of contemporary art practices, such
as installation, hybrid-media environments, land art, and
traditional art media used in conjunction with photography,
video, computing, and/or performance. Students also
conceptualize and produce installation, interactive, and sitespecific artworks.
ART 231: Introduction to Video and Performance Art
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1001.00)
This foundation-level course explores the historical and creative
dimensions of performance, sound, and digital video in art. It
brings together a number of expressive strategies present in
contemporary art and focuses on the theoretical, creative, and
historical contexts of these time-based forms. Students integrate
these theoretical contexts to create their own projects and
performances. Topics include Happenings, Fluxsus, personal
narrative, digital storytelling, sound, and video.
ART 244: Digital Media for the Visual Artist
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1030.00)
This studio art course investigates the intersection of visual
representation, contemporary art, and two-dimensional
digital imaging from an aesthetic, historical, and artistic
perspective for the contemporary artist. Technical instruction
in the course, through the use of digital imaging software such
as Adobe Photoshop, globally supports the study of artistic
and theoretical principles. Students develop problem solving
and visual strategies that deepen their understanding of the
connection among technology, personal expression, and the
universal language of art. Projects emphasize the creation of
original artwork with current software and hardware solutions.
98 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
ART 251: Digital Photography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1030.00)
This course uses digital cameras and the computer as tools
to create photographic imagery. Students explore camera
controls, principles of composition, and photographic theory
and techniques using state-of-the-art hardware and programs.
Students learn editing techniques appropriate for print and
electronic presentations. The course addresses ethical
considerations regarding image manipulation and ownership.
Students may use digital camera images, scanned negatives,
or slides to produce a final print portfolio.
ART 253: Applied Digital Photography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ART 251.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1012.00)
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply skills
acquired in ART 251 while developing a personal style. It offers a
continued study of photographic theory, composition, content
development, digital camera/hardware handling, studio
lighting, and industry standards for color management and
printing techniques. Students explore photography as a visual
language and expressive medium, and they observe industry
practices through onsite visits to local business, galleries, and
service bureaus. The course culminates with the creation and
production of a professional portfolio of photographs.
Areas of Study & Courses
ART 254: Understanding and Appreciating the Photographic
Image
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1002.00)
This course surveys the history of still photography from the
discipline’s inception to the present digital age. It explores the
medium of photography as a form of visual communication in
historical, socio-political, and cultural contexts. Topics include
the evolution of photographic images, process, delivery, and
meaning. Students develop visual literacy through verbal and
written analyses.
ART 258: Ancient to Gothic Art
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00)
This course surveys Western art from antiquity through the
Gothic period. It emphasizes the content and stylistic aspects
of major art works in painting, sculpture, architecture, and craft
media.
ART 259: History of Renaissance to Modern Art
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00)
This course surveys Western art history from the Renaissance to
the twentieth century. Students examine how religious, cultural,
and philosophical aspects of European and American society
impacted and were influenced by art and architecture during
this time.
ART 260: History of Modern Art
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ART 260H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00)
This course covers European and American art forms, primarily
painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the beginning
of modernism in the mid-19th century to contemporary art
in the late 20th century. Students learn to delineate themes,
styles, and techniques indicative of various time periods and to
differentiate among 20th century art movements.
ART 260H: History of Modern Art (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ART 260.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00)
This honors course introduces highly motivated students to
European and American art forms, primarily painting, sculpture,
and architecture, from the beginning of modernism in the
mid-19th century to contemporary art in the late 20th century.
Students learn to delineate themes, styles, and techniques
indicative of various time periods and to differentiate among
20th century art movements. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
ART 260 or ART 260H.
ART 270: History and Theory of Museum and Gallery Exhibition
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00)
This course introduces students to the history of museum
and gallery exhibitions as well as to the theories behind
historical and contemporary museum and gallery exhibition
design. It relates these ideas to art exhibitions and to those in
anthropological and science collections. Topics include the
history of exhibition and display, exhibition design and layout,
collections management, and publicity.
ART 271: Practical Museum and Gallery Exhibition and
Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1001.00)
This course introduces students to the practical requirements of
operating a museum or gallery. It provides detailed information
about museum and gallery departments and roles as well
as hands-on practice planning, designing, installing, and
publicizing exhibitions.
ART 290: Landmarks of Art
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00)
This course examines art and architecture on-site within cultural
and historical contexts. It surveys selected periods of Western
and non-Western traditions and emphasizes understanding the
visual arts representing the tradition and evolution of a culture,
from ancient to contemporary periods. The course incorporates
field trips to local artistic landmarks and emphasizes art
appreciation in travel experiences. The course includes
preparatory lectures and on-site discussions. Students are
required to attend several fieldtrips and provide their own
transportation to each site. Field trip dates and locations will be
announced on the first class meeting.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 99
Areas of Study & Courses
ART 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
ART 295: Visual Art/Professional Practice
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1002.00)
Designed for the student artist, this course examines
professional practices, career goals, and educational choices
in the visual arts. Students produce a professional portfolio
that includes documentation of artwork, resume, an artist
statement and biography, digital image files, and printed
images. Students also collaboratively organize, prepare, and
produce an exhibition in a gallery setting. The course includes
visits to museums, galleries, college art programs, artists’
lectures and/or design businesses.
ART 296: Topics in Art
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1002.00)
ART 298: Directed Study in Art
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1002.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
ART 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Astronomy
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in Art
that are not included in regular course offerings. Each Topics
course is announced, described, and given its own title and
296 number designation in the class schedule.
Astronomy, the oldest of all scientific studies, has played a vital
role in the development of modern science. Astronomers study
the formation, composition, and evolution of various objects,
such as planets, stars, galaxies, nebulae, black holes, and the
Universe itself. Students take astronomy courses to prepare for a
100 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
major in astronomy or to fulfill general education requirements.
Graduates with a bachelor’s degree in astronomy pursue
careers as museum and planetarium directors, astronomers/
astrophysicists, space scientists, mission data analysts,
spacecraft and instrument designers, teachers, observatory
technicians, telescope operators, optics or electronics
technicians, computer programmers, and mathematicians.
Contact Information
Chair: Chris Metzler
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ASTR
Department: Physical Sciences
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Full-Time Faculty
Rica Sirbaugh French
Courses
ASTR 101: Descriptive Astronomy
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1911.00)
This introductory course surveys the entire Universe while
emphasizing the nature and process of physical science.
Topics include the Earth-Sun-Moon system and night sky;
Newton’s laws of motion and gravitation; historical astronomy;
electromagnetic radiation; spectroscopy; optics and
telescopes; the formation and evolution of stars, planets,
nebulae, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole; the Big Bang;
and astrobiology. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: No credit if taken after
ASTR 201.
ASTR 101L: Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory
Units: 1
Prerequisites: ASTR 101 or ASTR 201.
Corequisite: ASTR 101 or ASTR 201 if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1911.00)
This course provides a hands-on introduction to the methods
and techniques of observational astronomy and data/error
analysis. It emphasizes the collection, presentation, and
interpretation of astronomical observations. Students learn
to use a planisphere, read star charts, and operate small
telescopes. Through indoor activities and by making nakedeye, binocular, and telescopic observations, students explore
such topics as seasons, lunar phases, rotation of the Earth,
optics, light and spectroscopy, planets, stars, galaxies, and
cosmology.
ASTR 120: Life in the Universe
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1911.00)
This introductory course surveys the study for life in the
universe from the Big Bang to implications of contact with an
extraterrestrial civilization while emphasizing the nature and
process of physical science. Topics include the formation
and evolution of the universe; origin, evolution, and nature
of life on Earth; the definitions of “life” and “habitability”;
potential in our solar system and beyond; methods of interstellar
communication and travel; implications of contact; science vs.
pseudoscience; and the status of the search to-date.
ASTR 201: Introductory Astronomy
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Advisory: MATH 135.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1911.00)
This introductory course surveys the entire Universe with an
emphasis on analytical, mathematical, and problem-solving
skills. Topics include celestial mechanics, electromagnetic
radiation and atomic physics, relativity, stellar structure and
evolution, black holes, formation and evolution of planetary
systems, galaxies, and cosmology. The course is directed
towards students with a strong preparation and interest in
science and mathematics.
ASTR 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 101
Areas of Study & Courses
Athletics
ATHL 102: Intercollegiate Volleyball, Women
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 10 hours. (0835.00)
This class emphasizes advanced-level instruction and training in
volleyball skills, techniques, strategies, and leadership. Students
develop team-playing skills by interacting with opponents,
teammates, coaches, and officials. (May be repeated three
times.) UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses,
maximum credit, 4 units.
ATHL 117: Basketball Competition
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
Athletics courses emphasize advanced-level instruction
and training in skills, techniques, strategies, and leadership
necessary to participate in intercollegiate athletics.
Contact Information
Chair: Robert Fulbright
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/
studentservices/athletics/
Department: Kinesiology,
Health and Nutrition
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Courses
ATHL 100: Volleyball Techniques
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This activity class integrates volleyball theory with practice
in game situations. Topics include volleyball techniques,
strategies, and rules. (May be repeated three times.) UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
ATHL 101: Volleyball Competition
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This class emphasizes advanced-level instruction and training
in volleyball skills, techniques, strategies, and leadership.
Students apply volleyball rules to game situations and integrate
strategies into competition and team play. (May be repeated
three times.) UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses,
maximum credit, 4 units.
102 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This class emphasizes advanced-level instruction and training
in basketball skills, techniques, strategies, and leadership.
Students apply basketball rules to game situations and
integrate strategies into competition and team play. Students
develop increased proficiency and skill development with
each repetition. (May be repeated three times.) UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
ATHL 118: Basketball Techniques
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This activity class integrates basketball theory with practice
in game situations. Topics include basketball techniques,
strategies, and rules. Students develop increased proficiency
and skill development with each repetition. (May be repeated
three times.) UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses,
maximum credit, 4 units.
ATHL 134: Soccer
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This soccer class emphasizes basic fundamentals of individual
play such as ball control, dribbling, trapping, shooting, and
passing. The course exposes students to the basic rudiments of
offensive and defensive tactics through participation in game
situations, often using modified rules to emphasize specific skills,
and it introduces and reviews the rules of the game in context.
Students develop increased proficiency and skill attainment
with each repetition. (May be repeated three times.) UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
Areas of Study & Courses
ATHL 171: Intercollegiate Basketball, Men/Women
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 10 hours. (0835.50)
This class emphasizes advanced level of instruction and training
in basketball skills, techniques, strategies, and leadership.
Students develop team-playing skills by interacting with
opponents, teammates, coaches, and officials. Students
develop increased proficiency and skill development with
each repetition. (May be repeated three times.) UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
ATHL 188: Intercollegiate Soccer, Men/Women
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 10 hours. (0835.50)
This class emphasizes an advanced level of instruction and
training in soccer skills, techniques, and strategies. Students
demonstrate increased proficiency and skill attainment with
each repetition. (May be repeated three times.) UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
Automotive Technology
Contact Information
Chair: Steve Vail
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/AUTO
Department: Automotive
Technology
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Paul Katson
Steve Vail
Arnoldo Williams
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Automotive Technology Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, students will possess
the knowledge and skills necessary to perform brake,
suspension, engine, and electrical repair, service, and
diagnostic procedures as an entry-level automotive technician.
Automotive Electronics, Computers, and
Emissions and/or HVAC Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, students will be able
to synthesize knowledge of electrical systems and computer
technology to diagnose, service, and repair electrical and
computer communication circuits as they relate to automotive
drive-train and accessory systems, with an emphasis in
emissions and/or heating, ventilation, and air conditioning.
California Smog Check Technician Certificate
of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, students will possess
the knowledge necessary to sit for the State of California Smog
Technicians Examination and the skills necessary for entry-level
employment as a smog technician in a state- approved smog
test only or smog test and repair facility.
Associate Degree
The Automotive Technology program prepares students for
entry-level automotive mechanic positions and provides
training for persons already employed in the industry. Courses
also prepare students for various state licenses and national
certifications, including tests administered by Automotive
Service Excellence (ASE). Career options include auto
mechanic/repair technician, service manager, and parts
specialist. Potential employers include automotive dealerships
and independent repair facilities.
Associate in Arts Degree
Automotive Technology
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 103
Areas of Study & Courses
Certificates
Required courses:
Certificate of Achievement
AUTO 135
Auto Electronic Fundamentals
4
AUTO 140
Automotive Engine Technology
4
AUTO 141
Automotive Engine Performance and
Drivability
4
AUTO 160
Automotive Suspension, Steering, and
Alignment
4
AUTO 161
Automotive Brake Service and Repair
4
AUTO 200
Automotive Hybrid and Alternative Fuel
Vehicles
4
Automotive Electronics, Computers, and Emissions
and/or HVAC
Total Units
24
Certificate of Achievement
California Smog Check Technician
The California Smog Check Technician certificate prepares
students for the California Smog Technician Licensing
Examination and entry-level positions as smog check
technicians.
Required courses:
The Automotive Electronics, Computers, Emissions/HVAC
Program includes course work in the theory and function of
automotive electronics and computer systems. It emphasizes
basic automotive electronics, diagnostics, drivability, heating,
ventilation, and air conditioning and/or emission controls,
including smog-check procedures.
Required courses:
Basic Automotive Tune-Up
2
AUTO 135
Auto Electronic Fundamentals
4
AUTO 235
Advanced Electronics and Electronic
Engine Control Systems
4
3-6
AUTO 125
CA Smog Technician Engine and
& AUTO 225 Emission Control - Level 1
and Smog Check Training Inspection
Procedures - Level 2
AUTO 220
HVAC Heating, Ventilation, and Air
Conditioning
Total Units
13-16
Automotive Technology
This certificate is designed to prepare students for entrylevel auto mechanic positions at local dealerships and
independent repair facilities. Courses are designed to prepare
students for various state licenses and national certification.
After completion of these courses, students are qualified
to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) tests in
engine performance, engine repair, brakes, and steering and
suspension, and they will possess entry-level service and repair
skills on hybrid and alternative-fuel powered vehicles. Students
interested in the ASE Certificate as a Master Automobile
Technician need to complete other specific courses listed in the
catalog to prepare for the additional test areas. Students may
earn the Automotive Technology Certificate by completing the
following courses.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
4
AUTO 125
CA Smog Technician Engine and
Emission Control - Level 1
4
AUTO 225
Smog Check Training Inspection
Procedures - Level 2
2
AUTO 105
3
Automotive Reconditioning and
Detailing
AUTO 251
ASE A6 Alternative Course Electrical and
& AUTO 252 Electronic Systems
& AUTO 253 and ASE A8 Alternative Course Engine
Performance
and ASE L1 Alternative Course
Advanced Engine Performance
BUS 135
Personal Selling
BUS 137
Customer Service
Total Units
Certificate of Achievement
104 Preventive Maintenance and Engine
Performance
Select 3 units from the following:
AUTO 130
Select one of the following:
AUTO 102
13
Certificate of Proficiency
Automotive Electronics
This certificate prepares students for the Automotive Service
Excellence (ASE) Electrical/Electronic Systems (A6) examination
as well as for entry-level employment in electrical and electronic
areas of the automotive service industry.
Required courses:
AUTO 135
Auto Electronic Fundamentals
4
AUTO 235
Advanced Electronics and Electronic
Engine Control Systems
4
Total Units
Certificate of Proficiency
Automotive Quick Service Assistant
This certificate offers training in basic automotive service
and maintenance along with the sales training needed for
employment as a quick service technician.
8
Areas of Study & Courses
Required courses:
Courses
AUTO 102
Preventive Maintenance and Engine
Performance
4
BUS 135
Personal Selling
3
or BUS 137
Customer Service
Total Units
7
Certificate of Proficiency
Automotive Repair: Drive-Train Specialist
This certificate prepares students for entry-level auto mechanic
positions at local dealerships and independent repair facilities.
The program focuses on diagnosis and repair of internal engine
components for domestic and import vehicles. Students take
apart engines and transmissions and put them back together
from the ground up. This certificate prepares students for the
Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) examinations for engine
repair and automatic and manual transmissions.
Required courses:
AUTO 140
Automotive Engine Technology
4
AUTO 141
Automotive Engine Performance and
Drivability
4
AUTO 155
Manual Transmissions and Transaxles
4
AUTO 156
Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles
4
Total Units
16
Certificate of Proficiency
Automotive Alignment, Brakes, and Suspension
This certificate prepares students for the Automotive Service
Excellence (ASE) Suspension and Steering (A4) and Brakes (A5)
examinations and for entry-level employment in the suspension
and brake areas of the automotive service industry.
Required courses:
AUTO 160
Automotive Suspension, Steering, and
Alignment
4
AUTO 161
Automotive Brake Service and Repair
4
Total Units
8
Certificate of Proficiency
Basic Engine Performance
This certificate prepares students for the Automotive Service
Excellence (ASE) Engine Performance (A8) examination and for
entry-level employment in the engine performance area of the
automotive service industry.
Required courses:
AUTO 140
Automotive Engine Technology
4
AUTO 141
Automotive Engine Performance and
Drivability
4
Total Units
8
AUTO 100: Small Engine Repair
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.30)
This introductory course combines theory with practical
experience to provide students with the necessary skills to
perform maintenance, tune-up, and repair of two- and fourcycle engines. Topics include the safety, care, and use of
specialized tools; fuel and ignition system fundamentals
and service; and small engine inspection, disassembly, and
reconditioning. The course is designed for students without
small engine experience.
AUTO 102: Preventive Maintenance and Engine Performance
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
Designed to develop an understanding of the operation,
care, and preventive maintenance of the automobile,
this course covers the overall theory of the automobile,
including maintenance of tires, wheels, brakes, suspensions;
characteristics of fuels, oil and lubricants; maintenance of
smog devices; basic engine performance and automotive
electronics procedures; and safety factors.
AUTO 105: Automotive Reconditioning and Detailing
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course covers bumper-to-bumper vehicle inspections for
mechanical and cosmetic condition, roadworthiness, emission
controls, and safety. It includes specific mechanical vehicle
systems and condition assessment, including an overview of
the retail certification processes for used vehicles prior to sale.
Topics include interior and exterior cosmetic reconditioning
processes, including identification of paint condition and types,
use of car-care chemicals, maintenance of the paint surface,
and customer communication. Students are required to attend
a local Concours-quality auto show.
AUTO 125: CA Smog Technician Engine and Emission Control
- Level 1
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in AUTO
150.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course (plus other requirements and course work) prepares
students to qualify for the California Smog Check Technician
Examination using Nissan and other Asian manufacturerspecific and standard Bureau of Automotive Repair (BAR)
materials. The course covers the following BAR-certified course:
Engine and Emission Control Training Level 1 (formerly known as
the Clean Air Car course).
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 105
Areas of Study & Courses
AUTO 130: Basic Automotive Tune-Up
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0948.00)
This course introduces students to the theory and operation
of the internal combustion engine. Topics include cooling,
lubrication, ignition, carburetion, fuel injection, and emission
control systems as well as maintenance and servicing
procedures. It also introduces students to hybrid technology
and computerized systems, and it prepares them for the study
of automotive tune-up and diagnosis.
AUTO 135: Auto Electronic Fundamentals
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course prepares students for the study of automotive
electrical and electronic computer control systems,
covering the fundamentals of electricity, electromagnetism,
electromagnetic induction, electronics, and D/C and A/
C current theory. It provides in-depth coverage of voltage,
amperage, resistance, and Ohm’s Law, and it emphasizes
electronic principles and proper use of a Digital Volt Ohm Meter
(DVOM). Topics include the overall theory, service, and testing
of the battery, charging system, starter, and ignition. This class
prepares students for the ASE A6 Exam and California State
Headlight Adjusters license.
AUTO 140: Automotive Engine Technology
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in AUTO
151.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course introduces students to automotive engine
mechanical theory and repair. Topics include four-cycle engine
theory and operation, lubrication and cooling system service
and repair, and engine removal and installation. Students
disassemble, inspect, and assemble engine blocks and cylinder
heads to factory specifications. This course prepares students
for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A1 Engine Repair
examination.
AUTO 141: Automotive Engine Performance and Drivability
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: AUTO 130 or equivalent.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in AUTO
151 or AUTO 230.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This engine performance course covers diagnostics, service,
and repair of fuel, ignition, starting, charging, emission, and
computer systems. Students use state-of-the-art equipment to
diagnose and repair problems using proper repair techniques,
automotive safety, and service protocol. This course helps
prepare students for the Automotive Service Excellence
(ASE) A8 Engine Performance examination and entry-level
employment as engine performance technicians.
AUTO 155: Manual Transmissions and Transaxles
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course introduces the theory, service, and repair of
manual transmissions (RWD) and manual transaxles (FWD).
Students learn to identify, evaluate, service, remove, and
replace transmissions and transaxles. Topics include theory,
service, and repair of manual and hydraulic clutch systems
and driveline components. The course helps students prepare
for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A3 Manual
Transmission examination.
AUTO 156: Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course introduces the theory, service, and repair of
automatic transmissions (RWD) and automatic transaxles
(FWD). Students learn to identify, evaluate, service, remove, and
replace transmissions and transaxles. Topics include theory,
service, and repair of electronic assist automatic transmission
components and related driveline components. The course
helps prepare students for the Automotive Service Excellence
(ASE) A2 Automatic Transmission examination.
AUTO 160: Automotive Suspension, Steering, and Alignment
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in AUTO
122 or AUTO 152.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course covers automotive passenger car and light truck
alignment, steering, and suspension systems. It emphasizes
the theory and function of modern front- and rear-wheel drive
suspension systems and equipment, safety procedures, proper
service techniques, component failure analysis, and repair.
Students practice alignment procedures on state-of-the-art
alignment equipment. This course prepares students for the
Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A4 Suspension and
Steering examination.
106 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
AUTO 161: Automotive Brake Service and Repair
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in AUTO
120 or AUTO 152.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course covers the theory, service, and repair of hydraulic
brake, antilock brake, and traction control systems. It
emphasizes machining brake rotors and drums to factory
specifications using safety protocols, diagnostics, and repair
strategies. Students practice disc rotor and drum brake
machining techniques on state-of-the-art stationary and
on-the-car brake lathe equipment. This course prepares
students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A5 Brakes
examination.
AUTO 200: Automotive Hybrid and Alternative Fuel Vehicles
Units: 4
Prerequisites: AUTO 135.
Advisory: AUTO 102 or AUTO 130.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0948.00)
This course covers the theory, service, safety procedures, and
repair of automotive hybrid and alternative-fuel powered
vehicles. It emphasizes specialized tools, equipment, and
component failure analysis. Students learn the complex
theories of high voltage DC electrical systems, regenerative
braking, biodiesel, natural gas, propane, alcohol, hydrogen,
and algea-based alternative fuel systems, coupled with
manufacturer-specific service and repair protocol. This course
prepares students for entry-level employment as hybrid vehicle
technicians and introduces them to existing and future
alternative fuel technologies. (Formerly AUTO 296-1.)
AUTO 235: Advanced Electronics and Electronic Engine
Control Systems
Units: 4
Prerequisites: AUTO 135.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course covers advanced automotive electrical systems
and computerized engine control systems as they relate to fuel/
air management, ignition, emission controls, and accessory
electronics. The course provides in-depth coverage of engine
management sensors, actuators, idle speed, and transaxle
electronic controls, and it emphasizes OBD II systems and
computerized CAN BUS communications. This course prepares
students for the ASE A6 certification exam in automotive
electrical and electronic systems.
AUTO 251: ASE A6 Alternative Course Electrical and Electronic
Systems
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0948.00)
This course supplants the ASE A6 examination required to sit
for the California Smog Check Technician examination. It offers
theory and hands on training with automotive electrical and
electronic systems. Students must pass the course with a grade
of 70% or higher. This course meets or exceeds 20 hours of
classroom instruction mandated by the State of California.
AUTO 252: ASE A8 Alternative Course Engine Performance
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0948.00)
AUTO 220: HVAC Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (0948.00)
This course supplants the ASE A8 examination required to
sit for the California Smog Check Technician examination.
It offers theory and hands-on training in automotive engine
performance. Students must pass the course with a grade
of 70% or higher. This course meets or exceeds 24 hours of
classroom instruction mandated by the State of California.
This course covers the fundamental theories, diagnosis, service,
and repair practices of automotive air conditioning and
heating systems. Topics include the procedures of recovering
the refrigerant, replacing parts, evacuating, charging the air
conditioning units, retrofitting, and computer-controlled climate
control systems. This course helps prepare students to pass the
Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) heating, ventilation, and
air conditioning test.
AUTO 253: ASE L1 Alternative Course Advanced Engine
Performance
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0948.00)
AUTO 225: Smog Check Training Inspection Procedures - Level
2
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0948.00)
This course supplants the ASE L1 examination required to
sit for the California Smog Check Technician examination.
It offers theory and hands-on training in advanced engine
performance. Students must pass the course with a grade
of 70% or higher. This course meets or exceeds 28 hours of
classroom instruction mandated by the State of California.
This course (plus other requirements and course work) prepares
students to qualify for the California Smog Check Technician
Examination using Nissan and other Asian manufacturerspecific and standard Bureau of Automotive Repair (BAR)
materials. The course covers the Smog Check Training
Inspection Procedures Level 2 BAR-certified course.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 107
Areas of Study & Courses
AUTO 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Biology
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
AUTO 296: Topics in Automotive Technology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Each Topics course will be announced and described
with its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour or Laboratory 3 hours.
Lecture 2 hours or Lecture 1 hours, Laboratory 3 hours.
Lecture 3 hours or Lecture 2 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in Art
that are not included in regular course offerings. Each Topics
course is announced, described, and given its own title and
296 number designation in the class schedule.
AUTO 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
108 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Biology is the science of life and living organisms, including their
structure, function, growth, origin, evolution, and distribution.
Students take biology courses to prepare for a biology
major, to fulfill general education requirements, and to meet
prerequisites for related courses. A bachelor’s degree in biology
can lead to careers in health care, biotechnology, medical
research, wildlife conservation, marine science, and education.
Contact Information
Chair: Jeanine Sepulveda
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/BIO
Department: Biological
Sciences
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Full-Time Faculty
Suzie Bailey
Gail Baughman
Keith Cunningham
Julie Haugsness-White
Stacey Hull
Jeff Ihara
Himgauri Kulkarni
Jeanine Sepulveda
John Thomford
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
BIO 100: General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100 and MATH 64.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in BIO 101
and BIO 101L.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00)
This entry-level course provides a broad perspective of
biological concepts and principles. Topics include the
process of scientific inquiry, the biochemistry of biomolecules,
metabolism and manipulation of energy by plants and animals,
cell division, classical and molecular genetics, development,
systems biology, and the evolution and adaptation of living
organisms. The laboratory component of this course provides
direct participation in experiments, demonstrations, and
discussions related to fundamental concepts in biology. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for BIO 100, BIO 101, BIO 103, or
BIO 105.
BIO 101: General Biology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100 and MATH 64.
Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in BIO 101L is strongly
recommended.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BIO 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00)
This entry-level course provides a broad perspective of
biological concepts and principles. Topics include the
process of scientific inquiry, the biochemistry of biomolecules,
metabolism and manipulation of energy by plants and animals,
cell division, classical and molecular genetics, development,
systems biology, and the evolution and adaptation of living
organisms. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for BIO 100, BIO 101,
BIO 103, or BIO 105.
BIO 101L: General Biology Laboratory
Units: 1
Prerequisites: BIO 101 and eligibility for MATH 64.
Corequisite: BIO 101 if prerequisite not met.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BIO 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00)
This laboratory accompaniment to BIO 101 provides direct
participation in experiments, demonstrations, and discussions
related to fundamental concepts in biology. This course further
develops the student’s understanding of topics introduced in
the lecture.
BIO 101S: Learning Assistance for General Biology
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
This optional learning assistance course provides students
enrolled in BIO 100 or BIO 101 extended opportunities to
develop their fundamental understanding and mastery of
biological concepts and principles that will be directly applied
toward success in BIO 100 and BIO 101.
BIO 102: Ecology and Environmental Biology
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0301.00)
This general education life science course is intended for nonscience track students. It uses an interdisciplinary approach
to explore the science of ecology and address contemporary
environmental issues seeking sustainable solutions. Combining
classroom investigation with field exploration, the lab
component includes several field trips to local environmental
resources.
BIO 103: Animal Diversity
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BIO 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00)
This life sciences course challenges students to think critically
and demonstrate hypothetico-deductive reasoning within basic
biological concepts, such as evolution, ecology, behavior,
physiology, and development, while focusing on diversity within
the animal kingdom. This course is intended for non-science
majors. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for BIO 100, BIO 101,
BIO 103, or BIO 105.
BIO 105: Genes and Technology in Society
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours.
This introductory course relates basic biology to the emerging
field of biotechnology. Topics include fundamental chemical
processes common to all cells, biomolecular chemistry, cellular
and molecular biology, classical and molecular genetics, and
the molecular basis of immunology and cancer. The course
highlights current advances in biotechnology, such as cloning,
recombinant DNA technology, and gene therapy as well as the
applications, social consequences, and ethical implications
of biology and biotechnology in medicine and agriculture.
UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for BIO 100, BIO 101, BIO 103, or
BIO 105.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 109
Areas of Study & Courses
BIO 150: General Botany
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00)
This introductory course examines plant anatomy, physiology,
and classification. It provides a broad perspective of biological
concepts and principles and covers both unicellular and
multicellular systems. Topics include structure and function
of life, metabolism and manipulation of energy, cell division,
genetics, taxonomy, and the evolution and adaptation of living
organisms. Field trips may be required.
BIO 170: Marine Biology
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00)
This general education life science course introduces basic
biological concepts, offering students a broad perspective of
biological systems. The course emphasizes the diversity of life in
the ocean, how physical factors of the environment influence
the biology of marine species, and anthropogenic impacts on
the marine environment. The laboratory portion of the course
combines classroom investigation with field exploration and
emphasizes the scientific method, current research in the field
of marine biology, and the development of field sampling
techniques. Students are required to attend local field trips.
BIO 172: Marine Ecology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00)
This general education life science course takes an ecological
approach to the study of the marine environment. Topics
include the interactions between organisms and their
environment, the flow of energy through food webs, the
structure of marine communities, and marine environmental
sustainability. This course also examines past and present
anthropogenic impacts on marine ecosystems.
BIO 180: Biostatistics
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Advisory: BIO 101 or BIO 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BTEC 180, PSYC 104, PSYC 104H, SOC 104, or SOC 104H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00)
This introductory statistics course covers the principles
and practice of statistical design and analysis for scientific
experimentation. Topics include hypothesis formation,
experimental design and execution, data analysis, and
communication with application to scientific fields, such
as the biological and health sciences. The course includes
laboratory application with extensive use of computer software
for statistical analysis and simulation. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for BIO 180/BTEC 180, MATH 103, PSYC 104/SOC 104, or
PSYC 104H/SOC 104H.
110 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
BIO 190: Survey of Human Musculoskeletal System
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BIO 210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour. (0401.00)
This course examines the anatomy and physiology of the
human musculoskeletal system. Upon successful completion,
students will be able to demonstrate locations, actions,
and roles of skeletal muscles and their associated skeletal
attachments. Students study the gross and microscopic
anatomy of bones, skeletal muscles, and joints in the human
body in health and in disease states through work with human
skeletons and models. This course is designed for students
enrolled in selected occupational health programs.
BIO 202: Foundations of Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity, and
Organismal Biology
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00)
This course surveys the organismal/meta-organismal half
of biological disciplines. Topics include the taxonomy
and physiology of prokaryotes and basal eukaryotes; the
taxonomy, developmental biology, and physiology of plants
and animals; and single-species population dynamics and
interspecies interactions in communities. The laboratory
emphasizes evolutionary process and mechanism, phylogeny
reconstruction, comparative anatomy/physiology/survey of
plants and animals, and life history evolution.
BIO 204: Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry, Cell Biology,
Genetics, and Molecular Biology
Units: 4
Prerequisites: CHEM 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours.
This course surveys the molecular half of biological disciplines.
Topics include biological molecules, metabolic biochemistry,
cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics. The laboratory
emphasizes modern methods in cell and molecular biology,
classical genetics, and experimental design.
BIO 210: Human Anatomy
Units: 4
Prerequisites: BIO 100, BIO 101, or a minimum 3-unit course in
biology that presents principles of cellular life in its curriculum.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (0410.00)
This course follows a systemic approach by combining
microscopic studies of tissues (histology) and organs
along with gross/visual anatomical studies of the human
body. Students learn dissection techniques by working with
preserved mammalian specimens, including human cadavers.
Because the course presents applied clinical situations, it is
recommended for students majoring in the allied health field,
massage therapy, kinesiology, and physical education.
Areas of Study & Courses
BIO 220: Human Physiology
Units: 4
Prerequisites: BIO 100, BIO 101, BIO 204, or BIO 210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0410.00)
This course presents the interrelationships of the various organ
systems, based upon the molecular and cellular activities
of the organs that comprise those systems. It emphasizes
the integration of body systems for maintaining homeostasis
through regulated metabolism and coordinated flow of
information. This course is designed for students majoring in
pre-medicine, pre-nursing, allied health fields, and physical
education.
BIO 230: Fundamentals of Microbiology
Units: 5
Prerequisites: BIO 220, CHEM 100, CHEM 104, CHEM 108, or
CHEM 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (0403.00)
This course examines the fundamental concepts of life to
provide students, especially those majoring in a medical/
biotechnical field, with a working knowledge of microbiology
and its special techniques. Students learn about bacteria,
fungi, protists, and viruses as well as pathogenicity and
immunology of important medical organisms. Topics include
the history, morphology, and physiology of microbes and
techniques for isolating, culturing, identifying, and controlling
bacteria.
BIO 290: Human Dissection Laboratory
Units: 1
Prerequisites: BIO 210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00)
This supervised study of human dissection techniques
includes a review of dissection procedures as well as practical
experience with human cadavers. The course follows a regional
approach to human anatomy and covers all major muscle
groups, organs, nerves, and blood vessels of the body. It is
intended for students who are interested in medical careers,
pathology, and normal anatomy of the human body.
BIO 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
BIO 296: Topics in Biology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Biology that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
BIO 298: Directed Study in Biology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (0401.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 111
Areas of Study & Courses
BIO 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Biotechnology
Contact Information
Chair: Michael Fino
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/BTEC
Department: Biotechnology
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Full-Time Faculty
Gail Baughman
Michael Fino
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Research and Development Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of the program, students will report that
they were sufficiently developed to meet employer expectations
for entry-level performance in a technical laboratory.
Bioprocess Technology Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of the program, students will be able to
successfully perform a technical laboratory task by employing
the appropriate equipment and tools, safely and effectively.
Associate Degree
Associate in Arts Degree
Research and Development
The expanding field of biotechnology devotes itself to improving
human health through the research, development, testing,
manufacturing, and marketing of products related to the
biomedical and agricultural industries. The Biotechnology
program provides both the theoretical background and
practical experience necessary to gain employment in the
biotechnology industry. Career paths include research,
development, quality control and assurance, manufacturing,
analytical testing, and lab technician work.
112 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Areas of Study & Courses
Certificates
and implement laboratory procedures and use specialized
laboratory equipment. Competency in organizational,
computational and communication skills is required. This threesemester program is designed to give students the theoretical
background and practical experience necessary to be an
effective laboratory technician as well as to prepare them for
upper division course work in the biosciences. Graduates of
this biotechnology program can expect to be employed in
various capacities, including quality control, quality assurance,
production, applied research, product development, analytical
testing, and academic (basic) research.
Certificate of Achievement
Bioprocess Technology
Required courses:
This certificate provides a foundation in, and practical
application of, the technologies employed by biotechnology
companies engaged in the production of cell-derived products
from small to large scales. Through a combination of applied
lecture and hands-on laboratory instruction, students acquire
the confidence, competence, and compliance for technical
work in a regulated environment. Bioprocess technologies
encompass the operation of specialized equipment and
instrumentation used to produce biopharmaceuticals or
reagents utilized by biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and
academic research labs. Students learn to grow a variety
of cells, express a biomolecule of interest, and recover the
desired biomolecule through a series of purification steps. They
learn to follow good manufacturing practices by maintaining
records in order to comply with quality system requirements
and government regulations. This certificate is designed for
bioprocess-technician skill development as well as professional
development for those already employed in the industry.
Required courses:
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
or BIO 101
General Biology
Basic Techniques in Biotechnology
4
BTEC 120
Business and Regulatory Practices in
Biotechnology
3
BTEC 211
Technical Writing for Regulated
Environments
1
or BIO 105
Genes and Technology in Society
Basic Techniques in Biotechnology
4
BTEC 120
Business and Regulatory Practices in
Biotechnology
3
BTEC/BIO 180
Biostatistics
4
CHEM 108
Preparatory Chemistry
3
5
CHEM 110
General Chemistry
CHEM 111
General Chemistry
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
or CSIT 115
Intermediate Computer Applications
or CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
or BTEC 210
Data Analysis with Excel
ENGL 100
Composition and Reading
4
MATH 64
Intermediate Algebra
4
Select at least 4 electives from below:
4-5
BTEC 201
Advanced Cell Culture
BTEC 203
Techniques in DNA Amplification
BTEC 204
Recombinant DNA
BTEC 206
Principles of Separation and HPLC
BTEC 207
Techniques in Immunochemistry and
ELISA
BTEC 211
Technical Writing for Regulated
Environments
BTEC 221
Bioprocessing: Cell Culture and Scale-up
BTEC 222
Bioprocessing: Large Scale Purification
BTEC 230
Techniques in Biofuels Production and
Analysis
BTEC 221
Bioprocessing: Cell Culture and Scale-up
1.5
BTEC 222
Bioprocessing: Large Scale Purification
1.5
BTEC 292
Internship Studies
1
BTEC 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
Select at least one course from the following:
BTEC 210
Data Analysis with Excel
BTEC 292
Internship Studies
Total Units
BTEC 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
Certificate of Proficiency
Total Units
12
Certificate of Achievement
Research and Development
The Research and Development certificate is designed to meet
the increasing need for entry-level laboratory technicians,
especially in the field of research and development.
Technicians in this field must be proficient in the application
of scientific methodology to solve problems. They must learn
3-4
BTEC 110
BTEC 110
BIO 100
5
1-3
40-44
Laboratory Skills
This certificate is designed to meet the increasing need for
trained and competent associates in laboratory environments.
The required courses provide students with fundamental
laboratory skills to start or enhance a career in the biosciences.
Students completing this certificate can expect employment
utilizing their technical skills in the performance of tests
and routine tasks inherent to a wide range of laboratory
environments. This certificate is intended for the development of
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 113
Areas of Study & Courses
general laboratory skills as well as professional growth for those
already employed in the industry.
Required courses:
BTEC 110
Basic Techniques in Biotechnology
4
BTEC 120
Business and Regulatory Practices in
Biotechnology
3
Select at least four courses from the following:
BTEC 201
Advanced Cell Culture
BTEC 203
Techniques in DNA Amplification
BTEC 204
Recombinant DNA
BTEC 206
Principles of Separation and HPLC
BTEC 207
Techniques in Immunochemistry and
ELISA
BTEC 210
Data Analysis with Excel
BTEC 211
Technical Writing for Regulated
Environments
BTEC 221
Bioprocessing: Cell Culture and Scale-up
BTEC 222
Bioprocessing: Large Scale Purification
BTEC 230
Techniques in Biofuels Production and
Analysis
BTEC 292
Internship Studies
BTEC 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
Total Units
4-5
This introductory statistics course covers the principles
and practice of statistical design and analysis for scientific
experimentation. Topics include hypothesis formation,
experimental design and execution, data analysis, and
communication with application to scientific fields, such
as the biological and health sciences. The course includes
laboratory application with extensive use of computer software
for statistical analysis and simulation. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for BIO 180/BTEC 180, MATH 103, PSYC 104/SOC 104 or
PSYC 104H/SOC 104H.
BTEC 201: Advanced Cell Culture
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BTEC 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0430.00)
11-12
Courses
BTEC 110: Basic Techniques in Biotechnology
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100; MATH 64; CHEM 108; and
BIO 100 or BIO 101 or BIO 105.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (0430.00)
This course focuses on the basic laboratory skills needed for
employment in the bioscience/biotechnology industry. Students
learn laboratory safety and documentation while acquiring skills
in the maintenance and calibration of basic lab equipment,
calculation and preparation of lab solutions and media, and
routine handling of both bacterial and mammalian cell cultures
(tissue culture). Students also develop fundamental skills in
spectroscopy, centrifugation, performance of assays, gel
electrophoresis, and the purification and handling of biological
molecules, such as proteins and DNA.
BTEC 120: Business and Regulatory Practices in Biotechnology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0430.00)
This course examines basic business principles and practices
utilized in the discovery, development, and production
phases of new product development. It explores the role of
governmental oversight and regulation in assuring the safety,
efficacy, and quality of a biotechnology product.
114 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
BTEC 180: Biostatistics
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Advisory: BIO 100 or BIO 101.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BIO 180, PSYC 104, PSYC 104H, SOC 104, or SOC 104H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0430.00)
This advanced course teaches skills in the proper handling
of cells from higher organisms, such as plants, mammals,
and insects, that are routinely maintained in culture in the
biotechnology laboratory. Instruction focuses on growth and
manipulation techniques and long-term maintenance of
various laboratory cell cultures that may include anchoragedependent and suspension cell lines as well as stem cell
cultures.
BTEC 203: Techniques in DNA Amplification
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BTEC 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.75 hour, laboratory 0.75 hour.
This advanced course provides skills in the performance of the
polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a technique commonly used
to amplify DNA in forensics and the biotechnology laboratory.
Instruction focuses on understanding the process; potential
applications of DNA amplification; and the skills related to
the set up, performance, and evaluation of the outcome of
the technique. The course assumes some prior knowledge of
solution preparation and gel electrophoresis.
Areas of Study & Courses
BTEC 204: Recombinant DNA
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BTEC 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.75 hour, laboratory 0.75 hour. (0430.00)
BTEC 211: Technical Writing for Regulated Environments
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
This advanced course provides skills in recombinant DNA
technology used to analyze and manipulate DNA in the
biotechnology laboratory. Students learn about the process
of cloning DNA and acquire the skills necessary to cut, piece
together, and introduce new DNA molecules into prepared host
bacterial cells.
This course provides the requisite tools to understand
why technical writing exists and how that writing works in
conjunction with the many types of documents found in
regulated environments. It also develops the techniques
needed to deliver clear and complete passages with precise
language. Students apply best practices for technical writing to
a variety of documents, including reports, standard operating
procedures (SOP), and investigations.
BTEC 206: Principles of Separation and HPLC
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BTEC 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.75 hour, laboratory 0.75 hour.
This advanced course provides skills in the separation of
biomolecules from complex mixtures using high performance
liquid chromatography (HPLC). Instruction focuses on
understanding the principles of separation, acquiring skills
in the separation of various biomolecules, and analyzing the
outcome for the purpose of determining system performance
and biomolecular purification. The course assumes some prior
knowledge of solution preparation, assays, and spectroscopy.
BTEC 207: Techniques in Immunochemistry and ELISA
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BTEC 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.75 hour, laboratory 0.75 hour. (0430.00)
This advanced course provides skills in the use of antibody
reagents as a tool in the biotechnology laboratory. It focuses
on the nature and specificity of antibody reagents for the
identification and quantification of biological molecules.
Students learn how to set up, perform, and analyze techniques
utilizing antibodies, such as Westerns and ELISAs.
BTEC 210: Data Analysis with Excel
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.75 hour, laboratory 0.75 hour.
This course teaches how modern spreadsheet programs
can be used to collect and organize data for subsequent
tabulation, summarization, and graphical display. It utilizes
various forms of scientific data to teach the techniques and
skill that facilitate the capture, analysis, and management of
data. Topics include importing and organizing data, filtering
and sorting, graphing, and statistical analysis functions.
BTEC 221: Bioprocessing: Cell Culture and Scale-up
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BTEC 110, BTEC 120
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.75 hour, laboratory 2.25 hours.
This laboratory course develops the skills and knowledge
related to the culture of cells in increasingly larger scales for the
production of biological molecules. Students grow and monitor
a variety of cells (bacterial, yeast, and/or mammalian) on a
laboratory scale that emulates the large-scale production used
in industry. They become familiar with the cleaning, sterilization,
aseptic inoculation, operation, and monitoring of fermenters
and bioreactors. The course emphasizes the use of current
Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) and process control
strategies, and students gain experience following Standard
Operating Procedures (SOPs).
BTEC 222: Bioprocessing: Large Scale Purification
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BTEC 110; BTEC 120.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.75 hour, laboratory 2.25 hours. (0430.00)
This laboratory course develops the skills and knowledge
related to purification of biological molecules produced on
a large scale. Students utilize the most common types of
separation equipment, including tangential flow filtration,
centrifugation, and column chromatography. They become
familiar with the cleaning, sanitization, calibration, operation,
and monitoring of large-scale purification equipment. The
course emphasizes the use of current Good Manufacturing
Practices (cGMPs) and process control strategies, and students
gain experience following Standard Operating Procedures
(SOPs).
BTEC 230: Techniques in Biofuels Production and Analysis
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BTEC 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.75 hour, laboratory 0.75 hour. (0430.00)
This advanced course introduces students to the rapidly
developing field of renewable energy and, specifically, biofuels
production through a combination of lecture and applied
laboratory techniques.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 115
Areas of Study & Courses
BTEC 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Business Administration
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
BTEC 296: Topics in Biotechnology
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours.
Lecture 4 hours. (0430.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Biotechnology that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
BTEC 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-6
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
The Business Department offers theoretical and practical
courses for students planning to transfer as business majors,
career and technical courses that lead to certificates
of proficiency and achievement, and courses designed
to improve workplace skills. Career opportunities in
business include accounting, marketing, finance, small
business development, and management in retail, service,
manufacturing, government, and nonprofit organizations.
Contact Information
Chair: Tom Severance
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/BUS
Department: Business
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Christina Hata
Tom Severance
Rita Soza
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
116 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
To complete the degree, students must fulfill the following
requirements:
Associate in Science in Business Administration
for Transfer Degree
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) CSU transferable units
Complete all courses required in the major with a "C" or
better
Complete the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general education
pattern
Achieve a minimum CSU transferable GPA of 2.0
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to interpret and analyze the Income Statement, Balance
Sheet, and Statement of Cash Flows for the purpose of making
business decisions.
Entrepreneurship Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to select a target market and develop the marketing mix for a
specific product or service.
Management Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to identify, compare, and contrast communication styles to
improve personal effectiveness.
Marketing Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to select a target market and develop the marketing mix for a
specific product or service.
Retail Management Associate in Arts Degree
and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to evaluate a potential layout analysis for a proposed retail
business.
Required Core: (17 units)
ACCT 201
Financial Accounting
ACCT 202
Managerial Accounting
ECON 101
Principles of Economics: MACRO
ECON 102
Principles of Economics: MICRO
BUS 140
Legal Environment of Business
or BUS 140H
Legal Environment of Business (Honors)
Associate in Science in Business Administration for
Transfer Degree
Students completing this associate degree will have completed
lower-division major preparation requirements for a business
administration degree, an emphasis or option within a business
administration degree, or a degree considered similar to
business administration at a participating California State
University (CSU) campus. Following transfer to a participating
CSU campus, students will be required to complete no more
than 60 units to obtain a bachelor’s degree; however, some
CSU campuses accepting this degree may require additional
lower-division major preparation. This degree may not be
appropriate preparation for students transferring to a CSU
campus not accepting this degree or to a university or college
that is not part of the CSU system. Students should consult with
a MiraCosta counselor for further information regarding the
most efficient pathway to transfer as a business administration
major and to determine which CSU campuses are participating
in this program.
3
*
3
*
3
*
MATH 103
Statistics
MATH 115
Calculus with Applications
4
*
List B: 6-7 Units. Select two courses. (It is recommended
that you select courses that meet lower-division major
preparation requirements at your intended transfer
university.)
6-7
Any course from List A not already used.
BUS 120
Introduction to Business
BUS 290
Business Communication
*
or BUS 290H Business Communication (Honors)
PSLO: Upon completion of this progam, the student will be
able to develop a social media marketing plan using multiple
platforms to reach his/her audience.
Associate in Science Degree
4
*
List A: 4 Units. Select one course. (It is recommended
that you select courses that meet lower-division major
preparation requirements at your intended transfer
university.)
Social Media for Business Certificate of
Achievement
Associate Degrees
4
*
CSIT 120
Fundamentals of Computer Information
Systems
Total Units
*
27-28
Courses required for business administration major
preparation at CSUSM. At the time of this publication, CSU
San Marcos (CSUSM) is not a participating campus.
NOTE: To insure this degree is completed with no more than 60
units, students should select courses that also satisfy a general
education requirement on the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general
education pattern: ECON 101 and ECON 102, MATH 103 or
MATH 115.
Students are strongly advised to complete the History,
Constitution, and American Ideals requirement prior to transfer.
Associate in Arts Degrees
Entrepreneurship
Management
Marketing
Retail Management
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 117
Areas of Study & Courses
Certificate of Achievement
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Management
The Management Certificate benefits students who are trying to
keep pace with an increasingly turbulent working environment.
It is particularly appropriate for manufacturing firms facing
strong international competition and for all service industries.
Completion of the certificate gives students a solid introduction
to various management philosophies and skills and is a
valuable addition to their resume. Students choose from a
variety of electives, emphasizing either selected skills or industryspecific expertise. Students may take courses in any sequence.
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Entrepreneurship
Required courses:
BUS 117
Human Resources Management
3
BUS 131
Management Principles
3
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
3
BUS 290
Business Communication
3
or BUS 290H
Business Communication (Honors)
Select at least 9 units from the following:
BUS 130
Small Business Management
BUS 133
Project Management
BUS 134
Retail Management
Students who start and run their own businesses enjoy the
freedom of being their own boss with unlimited earning
potential. This certificate program is for both current and
prospective entrepreneurs. It assists students in learning and
applying the traits and skills necessary to start, operate, and
maintain a successful business. Students choose from a variety
of electives, emphasizing either selected business skills or
industry-specific expertise. Students may take courses in any
sequence.
BUS 137
Customer Service
BUS 140
Legal Environment of Business
Required courses:
BUS 132
Marketing
3
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
3
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
4
or ACCT 201
Financial Accounting
Including one of the following:
BUS 130
Small Business Management
BUS 170
& BUS 171
Entrepreneur I
and Entrepreneur II
Select at least 9 elective units from the following:
BUS 134
Retail Management
BUS 135
Personal Selling
BUS 137
Customer Service
BUS 138
Advertising and Promotion
BUS 147
Personal Finance
BUS 160
International Business
BUS 292
Internship Studies
CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
HOSP 100
Introduction to Hospitality Management
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
MTEC 160
Business of Music I
Total Units
118 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
3
9
or BUS 140H Legal Environment of Business (Honors)
BUS 292
Internship Studies
ACCT 202
Managerial Accounting
COMM 101
Public Speaking
COMM 106
Group Communication
HOSP 100
Introduction to Hospitality Management
MATH 103
Statistics
PSYC/SOC
104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
PSYC/SOC
104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
Total Units
21
Certificate of Achievement
Marketing
9
Marketing is the process of planning and executing the
conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas,
goods, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual
and organizational objectives. It is critical to all business
success. This certificate program is for the student currently
in or hoping to enter the marketing field. Students learn how
products and services are developed, priced, promoted, and
distributed; they also learn and practice marketing skills needed
in the job market. Students may take courses in any sequence.
Students are encouraged to choose a variety of electives that
best increase their skill set.
Required courses:
22
BUS 132
Marketing
3
BUS 135
Personal Selling
3
BUS 138
Advertising and Promotion
3
BUS 290
Business Communication
3
or BUS 290H
Business Communication (Honors)
Areas of Study & Courses
Select at least 9 elective units from the following:
BUS 134
Retail Management
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
BUS 137
Customer Service
BUS 160
International Business
BUS 292
Internship Studies
CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
MATH 103
Statistics
PSYC/SOC
104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
PSYC/SOC
104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
9
Required courses:
BUS 132
Marketing
3
BUS 138
Advertising and Promotion
3
CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
3
CSIT 155
Social Media for Business
3
Select a minimum of six units from the courses below:
Total Units
21
Certificate of Achievement
Retail Management
Retail management is an expanding career path supported
by many industry sectors. Strong retail managers are
essential to business success in electronics, clothing, food,
entertainment, home furnishings, cosmetics, gifts, athletic
equipment, pet supplies, and just about every other imaginable
consumer product and service. This certificate, designed
in collaboration with industry leaders, provides the student
with many of the competencies required for success at the
management level within the vast retail industry. The program
encompasses business essentials, such as accounting and
marketing, and emphasizes the "soft skills" of management and
communication required for career success. This certificate has
been endorsed by the Western Association of Food Chains and
its member companies.
Required courses:
should consider electives based on their need for building more
skills with service and communication (BUS 137 and BUS 290),
technical skills and software (CSIT 120 and CSIT 137), or web
and graphic design (MAT 110 and MAT 125). Students can also
gain real-world practical experience through internships (BUS/
CSIT/MAT 292) and work experience (BUS/CSIT/MAT 299).
BUS 137
Customer Service
BUS 290
Business Communication
6
or BUS 290H Business Communication (Honors)
BUS 292
Internship Studies
BUS 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
*
*
CSIT 120
Fundamentals of Computer Information
Systems
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
CSIT 292
Internship Studies
CSIT 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
*
*
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
MAT 292
Internship Studies
MAT 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
*
*
Total Units
18
BUS 117
Human Resources Management
3
BUS 131
Management Principles
3
BUS 132
Marketing
3
BUS 134
Retail Management
3
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
3
BUS 290
Business Communication
3
or BUS 290H
Business Communication (Honors)
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
or ACCT 201
Financial Accounting
ACCT 158
Business Mathematics
3
This certificate introduces and provides an overview of the
issues and skills involved in business education and/or
careers in business. An introductory business course covering
marketing, management, and finance is combined with
a communications course and a computer skills course.
Together, these courses provide a foundation for work and/or
study related to business.
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
Required courses:
COMM 101
Public Speaking
3
BUS 120
Introduction to Business
3
31
BUS 290
Business Communication
3
or BUS 290H
Business Communication (Honors)
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
Total Units
4
Certificate of Achievement
Social Media for Business
This program combines business skills in marketing, advertising,
and communication with technical skills in social media and ecommerce. Students gain a working knowledge of techniques
to increase and optimize business-oriented web traffic in various
social media venues, including Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter,
and other emerging social media and e-commerce platforms.
Students achieve focus through elective selections. Students
*Students can take 1-3 units of the 292 and 299 courses.
Certificate of Proficiency
Business Fundamentals
3
Total Units
9
Certificate of Proficiency
Entrepreneurship Fundamentals
This certificate gives students planning their own business a
great start by introducing classes and topics dealing with
the three fundamental concerns of all business: money and
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 119
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
finance (accounting), pursuing creative ideas and selling
(marketing), and hiring, working with, and developing people
(human relations). Students who complete this certificate are
encouraged to then pursue the Entrepreneurship Certificate of
Achievement.
Required courses:
BUS 117: Human Resources Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
4
BUS 132
Marketing
3
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
3
Including one of the following:
BUS 130
Small Business Management
BUS 170
& BUS 171
Entrepreneur I
and Entrepreneur II
3
Total Units
13
Certificate of Proficiency
Project Management
Project management careers include positions in diverse areas
of business, such as construction, engineering, information
technology, telecommunications, software development, and
health care. This certificate focuses on both the development
of knowledge and professional skills to become a project
manager by developing job-related skills in the field and
preparation for the professional certification exam. Coursework
topics include principles of project management, computer
applications, communication, and management.
Required courses:
BUS 131
Management Principles
3
BUS 133
Project Management
3
BUS 290
Business Communication
3
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
Select one course from the following:
BUS 130
Small Business Management
CSIT 120
Fundamentals of Computer Information
Systems
DESN 204
Advanced 3D Modeling and Prototyping
MAT 120
Media Design 1: Production
3
Total Units
15
Certificate of Proficiency
Retail Assistant
This certificate covers topics essential to the retail workplace
and addresses basic skills required for success in that setting.
Required courses:
BUS 132
Marketing
3
BUS 137
Customer Service
3
ACCT 158
Business Mathematics
3
Total Units
120 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
9
This course introduces human resource management in
business. Topics include the scope of human resource
management, employee advocacy, employment law,
recruiting, training, employee development, performance
management, compensation and benefits programs,
managing diversity and global operations, collective
bargaining, and using human resources as a competitive
advantage.
BUS 120: Introduction to Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
This course introduces the trends and opportunities in today’s
dynamic business environment as they relate to economics,
global markets, ethics and social responsibility, business
ownership forms, entrepreneurship, management responsibility,
human resources management, marketing, operations,
accounting, and financial management. Students gain
important business context and discover many business career
and educational opportunities.
BUS 130: Small Business Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.40)
In this business start-up and management course, students
learn about conducting preliminary research, analyzing trends
and competition, buying and starting a business or franchise,
developing a business plan, considering legal issues, target
marketing, accounting, managing personnel, and responsible
business practices.
BUS 131: Management Principles
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
This course explores contemporary management application
issues. Topics include management theories, finding and
developing leaders, measuring and improving customer and
employee satisfaction, strategic planning, hiring and training
employees, developing workplace teams, choosing and
evaluating suppliers, and labor and legal issues.
Areas of Study & Courses
BUS 132: Marketing
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0509.00)
BUS 136: Human Relations in Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
This course introduces students to the principles of marketing.
Topics include segmenting, targeting, market research,
buyer behavior, distribution, retailing, advertising, selling, and
international issues. Students gain an understanding of the
marketing mix (product, distribution, promotion, and price) for
a defined target market.
This course covers the major themes of human relations,
including self-awareness, communication, motivation, and
conflict resolution, from psychological, sociological, and
physiological perspectives. It emphasizes interpersonal skills
that promote personal and professional success in a culturally
diverse, global, and high-tech business environment. Topics
include the identification of values, ethics, teamwork, and
leadership-skill development. The course also examines
strategies that can be utilized to attain physical and emotional
well-being with the workplace.
BUS 133: Project Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
This course introduces students with varying backgrounds to the
fundamental principles of contemporary project management
in personal and professional environments. The course covers
the principles and methods necessary to create an effective
plan and schedule for a project; the techniques to monitor,
control, and measure performance of the project once it is
underway; and the competing demands of time, scope, and
resources. Topics also include project management software,
communication, Web resources, certifications, and lifelong
learning.
BUS 137: Customer Service
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
This course presents a practical approach to understanding
and implementing the principles of customer service within
an organization. Topics include verbal and nonverbal
communication, how to create a culture of service and build
customer loyalty, and the role and use of technology in the
service industry.
BUS 134: Retail Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
BUS 138: Advertising and Promotion
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0509.00)
This course introduces the principles and practices used in
managing retail businesses. Topics include site selection,
layout, organization, staffing, positioning, customer service,
promotional techniques, and all aspects of the critical buying
function.
This course provides students with an overview of advertising
and promotion. Topics include strategic planning, branding,
budgeting, message selection and media, the creative process
of ad development, and public relations.
BUS 135: Personal Selling
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0509.40)
This course covers professional selling techniques. Topics
include finding career opportunities, motivating, persuading,
prospecting, interviewing, handling buyer concerns,
negotiating, closing the transaction, obtaining referrals,
telemarketing, and addressing legal and ethical concerns.
BUS 140: Legal Environment of Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BUS 140H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0505.00)
This course introduces business-related law, ethics, social
responsibility, and government regulations. Topics include
dispute resolution, legal system and laws, torts, crimes,
contracts, sales, warranties, negotiable instruments, secured
transactions, bankruptcy, agency, employment, business
entities, real and personal property, cyberlaw, and intellectual
property. C-ID BUS-120.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 121
Areas of Study & Courses
BUS 140H: Legal Environment of Business (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BUS 140.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0505.00)
This course offers highly motivated students an introduction
to business-related law, ethics, social responsibility, and
government regulations. Topics include dispute resolution, legal
system and laws, torts, crimes, contracts, sales, warranties,
negotiable instruments, secured transactions, bankruptcy,
agency, employment, business entities, real and personal
property, cyberlaw, and intellectual property. As an honors
course, it provides students the opportunity to conduct legal
research, participate in moot-court simulations, and lead and
participate in seminar-like discussions. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for BUS 140 or BUS 140H. C-ID BUS-120.
BUS 147: Personal Finance
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0502.00)
BUS 171: Entrepreneur II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours. (0506.40)
This course continues the introduction to starting a small
business begun in BUS 170. It covers business marketing,
finance, management, and organization. Topics include
distribution, location, accounting, debt, equity, cash
management, inventory, risk management, legal issues, human
resource management, and business success factors.
BUS 290: Business Communication
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Advisory: ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BUS 290H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
This course focuses on the principles of effective written, oral,
and electronic communication. It emphasizes solving problems
and eliciting positive response through carefully organized and
designed memos, letters, reports, and presentations.
This course assists students in gaining the knowledge, tools,
attitude, and skills needed to make informed lifelong financial
decisions that will empower their lives. Students explore the
social, psychological, and physiological issues related to
planning and managing a personal financial plan. Topics
include goal setting, budgeting, money management, taxes,
savings, consumer credit, automobiles, housing, insurance,
investment vehicles, retirement and estate planning, and the
financial impact of marriage and divorce.
BUS 290H: Business Communication (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Advisory: ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
BUS 290.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00)
BUS 160: International Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0508.00)
This course offers highly motivated students an enriched
academic approach to the principles of effective written, oral,
and electronic communication. The course emphasizes solving
real-world problems and eliciting positive responses through
carefully planned, organized, and designed memos, letters,
reports, and presentations.
This course covers international business, trade, and
globalization. Topics include politics, laws, economics, cultures,
ethics, foreign trade/investment/exchange, internationalizing a
business, entering foreign markets, strategizing, structuring, and
managing in a global economy with social responsibility.
BUS 170: Entrepreneur I
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours. (0506.40)
This course covers business ideas, paths to entrepreneurship,
and marketing. Topics include small business opportunities/
rewards, entrepreneur characteristics/competencies, idea
creation/feasibility, full/part-time opportunities, business plans,
and marketing strategies.
122 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
BUS 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
BUS 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
BUS 296: Topics in Business Administration
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0501.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Business Administration that are not included in regular course
offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described, and
given its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
BUS 298: Directed Study in Business
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (0506.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Business Office
Technology
The Business Office Technology (BOT) program offers career
and technical education courses for students and working
professionals who want to learn or update specific job skills
or obtain specialized certificates in the office/administrative
assistant skill area. Career fields include general administrative
support, secretarial, clerical, office assistant, executive assistant,
office management, and customer service.
Contact Information
Chair: Kathryn Striebel
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/BOT
Department: Business and
Medical Office Technologies
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Kathryn Striebel
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Administrative Professional Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to create and format written communications choosing the
medium for a given scenario.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 123
Areas of Study & Courses
Office Manager Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to create an office procedures manual for training of
administrative office staff.
This certificate is designed for individuals who want to assume
management functions in a business office. Supervisors perform
administrative tasks to ensure their staff can work efficiently.
Planning work and supervising staff are the key elements of
this job. To do these effectively, the supervisor must know the
strengths and weaknesses of each member of the staff as
well as the results required from and time allotted to each
job. Persons interested in this certificate might include those
who have completed the Secretary/Administrative Assistant
Certificate of Achievement or a comparable program, those
who have at least one year of full-time work experience in an
office position, and/or those who intend to pursue an Associate
in Arts and/or Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.
Students interested in a bachelor’s degree should consult the
articulation agreement between MiraCosta College and their
transfer university for major preparation and general education
requirements. Courses in this certificate program are offered on
campus and online.
Office Manager
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degrees
Administrative Professional
Office Manager
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Required courses:
Administrative Professional
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
or ACCT 201
Financial Accounting
4
This certificate program provides students with foundation
skills in basic office procedures, quality document production,
communication technology in software and equipment,
Internet research, and basic computer skills, all of which
are needed for entry-level administrative support positions.
Administrative professionals train staff, conduct research,
operate and troubleshoot new office technologies, coordinate
office administrative activities, and store, retrieve, and integrate
information for dissemination to staff and clients.
BOT 100
Beginning Keyboarding (Typing Test @ 40
wpm)
1
BOT 110
Word Processing
3
BOT 116
Office Systems and Procedures
3
BOT 117
Management Office Skills
1
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
3
BUS 140
Legal Environment of Business
3
Required courses:
or BUS 140H
Legal Environment of Business (Honors)
BUS 290
Business Communication
or BUS 290H
Business Communication (Honors)
BOT 100
Beginning Keyboarding (or Typing Test @
40 wpm)
1
BOT 102
10-Key
1
BOT 110
Word Processing
3
ACCT 148
Computer Accounting
BOT 113
Basic Office Skills
1
BUS 130
Small Business Management
BOT 116
Office Systems and Procedures
3
BUS 137
Customer Service
BOT 117
Management Office Skills
1
BUS 292
Internship Studies (minimum of 1 unit)
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
7
CSIT 125
Microsoft Word for Business
Select at least 7 elective units from the following:
Select three elective units from this list:
BOT 101
Advanced Keyboarding
CSIT 134
Microsoft PowerPoint for Business
BOT 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
ENGL 100
Composition and Reading
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
BUS 137
Customer Service
BUS 290
Business Communication
Total Units
3
3
24
or BUS 290H Business Communication (Honors)
Certificate of Proficiency
BUS 292
Internship Studies (minimum 1 unit)
Office Assistant
CSIT 115
Intermediate Computer Applications
CSIT 125
Microsoft Word for Business
CSIT 134
Microsoft PowerPoint for Business
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
This certificate is designed for those who wish to obtain an entrylevel support position in an office environment. Office assistants
are usually under the supervision of a secretary/administrative
assistant or office manager. Job tasks are delegated to an
office assistant in specific areas, such as data entry, filing,
typing, payroll, mail processing, and copying. This position
requires accurate keyboarding speed, computer proficiency,
customer service skills, and basic business procedures. Students
who complete this certificate may be interested in taking
additional courses to earn the Secretary/Administrative
Total Units
124 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
20
Areas of Study & Courses
Assistant Certificate of Achievement. All of the required courses
and most of the elective courses within this certificate are
offered online. With good study skills and commitment, a
student can complete this certificate in one semester.
Required courses:
BOT 100
Beginning Keyboarding (or Typing Test @
40 wpm)
1
BOT 102
10-Key
1
BOT 110
Word Processing
3
BOT 113
Basic Office Skills
1
Select 7 elective units from the following:
BOT 101
Advanced Keyboarding (or Typing Test
@ 40 wpm)
BOT 116
Office Systems and Procedures
BOT 117
Management Office Skills
BOT 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
BUS 137
Customer Service
BUS 292
Internship Studies (minimum of 1 unit)
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
Total Units
7
BOT 110: Word Processing
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BOT 100 or at least 25 wpm keyboarding speed.
Lecture 3 hours. (0514.00)
In this course, students practice basic operations of a word
processing application while creating business documents.
Assignments include letters, memos, reports, tables,
announcements, newsletters, mail merge, graphics, electronic
messaging, Internet research, and projects designed to provide
workplace simulation experiences.
BOT 113: Basic Office Skills
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 1 hour. (0514.00)
This course emphasizes practical applications needed for
working in a business office. It includes information and
practice with business communication, telephone techniques,
filing, proofreading, office equipment, mailing procedures,
conflict resolution, and teamwork. Assignments also include
people skills and teamwork applications.
13
Courses
BOT 100: Beginning Keyboarding
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 1 hour. (0514.00)
This beginning keyboarding course focuses on correct finger
placement and technique. Students use a guided online
software program to learn proper typing posture and finger
placement, to practice the alphabetic keyboard, and to
accomplish a speed of approximately 25 wpm. Offered pass/
no pass only.
BOT 101: Advanced Keyboarding
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 1 hour. (0514.00)
This advanced keyboarding course focuses on increasing
speed and accuracy for students who know the alphabetic
keyboard. Students use a guided software program to plan a
strategy for skillbuilding drills and techniques. Offered pass/no
pass only.
BOT 116: Office Systems and Procedures
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: BOT 100, BOT 110, or CSIT 110.
Lecture 3 hours. (0514.00)
This course provides the administrative skills and knowledge
needed to be successful in the twenty-first century workplace
environment of changing technology and procedures. Students
simulate the daily tasks of an administrative assistant working
for a multinational corporation’s chief operating officer.
Assignments include tasks using computer applications, office
procedures, conflict resolution, time management, meeting
and conference planning, office ethics, personal development
and growth, office protocol, and other pertinent topics.
BOT 117: Management Office Skills
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 1 hour. (0514.00)
This course presents information and applications for those
seeking management office skills. Workplace applications
and assignments present scenarios and case studies that
emphasize supervisory office skills, such as communication,
leadership, teamwork, evaluation, conflict resolution, training,
decision-making, and scheduling.
BOT 102: 10-Key
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 1 hour. (0514.00)
This course is for those who wish to learn the numeric ten-key
pad. Students use a guided software program to practice
skillbuilding drills and techniques to increase keyboarding
speed and accuracy. Offered pass/no pass only.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 125
Areas of Study & Courses
BOT 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance
BOT 298: Directed Study in Business Office Technology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (0514.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
BOT 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
126 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Career & Life Planning
Career and life planning courses help students make effective
decisions regarding their career and life choices, and they
provide the tools and techniques for developing a balanced,
integrated lifestyle. Students gain self-understanding and
develop techniques for successful career development and
employment searches. The courses emphasize increasing
self-knowledge, exploring potential majors and career paths,
organizing successful job searches, and developing effective
workplace behaviors and attitudes.
Contact Information
Chair: Donna Davis
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/careers
Full-Time Faculty
Robbi Rosen
Department: Career Studies &
Services
Office: Building OC3700,
760.795.6772
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
CRLP 100: Career and Life Planning
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
COUN 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.12)
Chemistry
This course assists students in successfully establishing
and achieving education, career, and life goals through a
comprehensive approach to effective planning. Students relate
their interests, personality, learning style, transferable skills, and
work values to academic major and career options. They also
examine the stages of career development, tasks appropriate
to each stage, and subsequent implications for education
and career choice over the lifespan. Topics include decisionmaking and goal-setting strategies, preparing effectively for
work and lifelong learning in a global economy, and jobsearch skills, including developing a resume, a cover letter, and
interviewing skills. The course emphasizes the importance of
taking personal responsibility for one’s educational, career, and
personal decisions to achieve satisfaction through work and life
balance. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for CRLP 100, COUN 100,
COUN 105, COUN 110, or INTR 100.
CRLP 101: Introduction to Career Planning
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour. (4930.12)
This course introduces students to the career planning process.
It explores the student’s interests, values, skills, and personality
preferences as they relate to potential career options. Topics
include career research, decision-making styles, and job search
strategies. The course emphasizes the process for actively
managing one’s own career. Offered pass/no pass only.
Chemistry is the science of the composition, structure,
properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic
and molecular systems. Students take chemistry courses to
prepare for the major, to fulfill general education requirements,
and to meet prerequisites for related courses and programs.
A bachelor’s degree in chemistry can lead to a career
in medicine, health, engineering, industry, government,
environmental science, and teaching.
Contact Information
Chair: Pierre Goueth
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/CHEM
Department: Chemistry
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Full-Time Faculty
Theresa Bolaños
Pierre Goueth
Nancy Lee
Kent McCorkle
Donald Robertson
Mark Yeager
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 127
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
CHEM 100: Introductory Chemistry
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
CHEM 108 or CHEM 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1905.00)
This introductory course for non-chemistry majors teaches
students the language, materials, mathematics, and principles
of chemistry. It covers properties of matter, atomic theory, use
of the periodic table of the elements, naming of compounds,
formulas and equations, metric measurement, physical states
of matter, chemistry of solutions, acids and bases, and organic
and nuclear chemistry. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
CHEM 100 or CHEM 108. No credit if taken after CHEM 110.
CHEM 102: Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
Units: 4
Prerequisites: CHEM 100 or CHEM 108.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
CHEM 210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1905.00)
This course introduces organic chemistry and is designed
for students pursuing health professions. Topics include
nomenclature, bonding, isomerization, reaction mechanisms,
and instrumental methods of interpreting aliphatic and
aromatic compounds as well as the structure and reactions of
carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, enzymes, and
metabolic functions. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: No credit if taken
after CHEM 210.
CHEM 104: Chemistry of Living Things (Introduction to
General, Organic, and Biochemistry)
Units: 5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MATH 20
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
CHEM 102.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00)
This course surveys concepts and skills of the chemistry of
living organisms with an emphasis on the human body. Topics
include the structure of the atom, chemical bonding, chemical
reactions, the structure and reactions of organic compounds,
carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins, nucleic acids,
and metabolism, with applications in the physiology, nutrition,
and pharmacology of the human body. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
No credit if taken after CHEM 102.
128 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
CHEM 108: Preparatory Chemistry
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Corequisite: MATH 64 if prerequisite not met.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
CHEM 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1905.00)
This introductory chemistry course focuses on developing
problem-solving skills needed for success in CHEM 110.
It emphasizes the application of the scientific method,
modern ideas concerning atomic structure and chemical
bonding, the periodic table and its relationship to chemical
properties, principles of stoichiometry including chemical
ratio calculations, chemical nomenclature, properties of the
states of matter, and chemical reaction principles. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for CHEM 100 or CHEM 108; No credit if taken
after CHEM 110.
CHEM 110: General Chemistry
Units: 5
Prerequisites: CHEM 108 or one year of high school chemistry or
qualification through a chemistry placement exam; MATH 64 or
eligibility determined by the math placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00)
This first semester of a one-year general chemistry sequence
focuses on the fundamental principles of chemistry. Students
learn the application of these principles with special
significance placed on chemical computation. Topics include
atomic structure, bonding, the periodic table, nomenclature,
chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and
bonding. The course emphasizes critical thinking, writing,
problem solving, and analysis skills, and it meets requirements
of chemistry, biochemistry, biology, physics, pre-dental, premedical, and pre-engineering majors. C-ID CHEM-120S and C-ID
CHEM-110.
CHEM 111: General Chemistry
Units: 5
Prerequisites: CHEM 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00)
This continuation of Chemistry 110 studies the fundamental
principles of chemistry and their applications. Topics include
solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, aqueous
ionic equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear
chemistry, and organic chemistry. The laboratory includes a
variety of experiments to supplement and reinforce the class
work. It also includes a section on qualitative analysis. C-ID
CHEM-120S.
Areas of Study & Courses
CHEM 210: Organic Chemistry I
Units: 5
Prerequisites: CHEM 110.
Advisory: CHEM 111.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00)
This course is the first semester in a standard one-year organic
chemistry sequence for students majoring in chemistry
and other sciences. Topics covered include the structure
and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides,
alcohols, ethers, and dienes; determination of structure by
physical and chemical methods; and organic chemistry lab
techniques. Students discuss aromatic compounds, structure,
nomenclature, and reactions. The course emphasizes reaction
mechanisms of organic chemical reactions and predicting
products.
CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry II
Units: 5
Prerequisites: CHEM 210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00)
CHEM 298: Directed Study in Chemistry
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1905.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Child Development
This course continues the one-year organic chemistry sequence
begun in CHEM 210. Topics covered include the structure and
reactivity of alcohols, aldehydes and ketons, organometalic
compounds, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines and
other nitrogen functions, aromatic compounds, sulfur-,
phosphorus-, and silicon-containing compounds, heterocyclic
compounds, and di- and polyfunctional compounds;
conjugation and aromaticity; multistep organic synthesis; and
biological chemistry. The course emphasizes the application of
organic chemistry reaction mechanisms learned in Chemistry
210 to other compounds. It examines new reactions specific for
different functional groups, including alcohols, thiols, aldehydes
and ketones, carboxylic acid derivative, aryl halides, and
biochemistry-related organic chemistry molecules.
CHEM 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
The Child Development program explores the social/emotional,
cognitive/language, and physical/motor growth and
development skills of children from conception through
adolescence. Students take child development courses to
obtain a certificate or permit, to earn an Associate in Arts
degree, to prepare for university transfer, or for professional
enrichment. Career options include a variety of professions
that serve children and their families, such as infant/toddler
care, preschool teaching (including Head Start), elementary
and secondary education, early childhood special education,
program administration, school counseling, child psychology,
child advocacy, social work, and community services.
Contact Information
Chair: Penny Skemp
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/CHLD
Department: Child
Development
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 129
Areas of Study & Courses
Full-Time Faculty
Estrellita Moore
Penny Skemp
Mark Whitney
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Child Development Associate Teacher
Associate in Arts Degree and Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to design and implement curriculum based on observation and
assessment of young children to to support play and learning.
Child Development Master Teacher Associate in
Arts Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to design, implement, and evaluate effective program
practices to successfully manage an early childhood
classroom.
Child Development Site Supervisor Associate in
Arts Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to design, implement, and evaluate effective program
practices to successfully manage an early childhood
classroom.
Child Development Teacher Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to design, implement, and evaluate effective program
practices to successfully manage an early childhood
classroom.
Early Intervention and Inclusion Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to adapt early learning activities and classroom strategies that
meet the individual needs of young children.
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degrees
Child
Child
Child
Child
Development
Development
Development
Development
Associate Teacher
Master Teacher
Site Supervisor
Teacher
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Certificates
The Child Development program certificates are designed to
prepare students for employment as teachers, aides, directors,
and entrepreneurs in preschools, child care centers (including
infant/toddler facilities), and family child care programs.
Courses are also appropriate for parents, nannies, camp
counselors, recreation leaders, elementary school teaching
assistants, social service and health care practitioners,
administrators, and others working with children.
Certificates meet the course requirements for teachers and
directors of private child care programs licensed by the
California State Department of Social Services (Title 22),
130 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
Community Care Licensing. The program also meets the course
work requirements for the Child Development Permit issued by
the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Child
development programs that are state or federally funded (Title
5 programs, such as Head Start and state preschools) follow the
Child Development Permit matrix.
The Child Development program offers six certificates to meet
the individual student’s needs. Because the certificates follow
the Child Development Permit matrix and are sequential,
students can continue to earn additional certificates. Course
work completed for the Assistant and Associate Teacher
certificates provides the foundation for more specialized
courses and a wider range of career options with the Teacher,
Master Teacher, Site Supervisor, Entrepreneurship, and Early
Intervention and Inclusion certificates.
Certificate of Achievement
Child Development Associate Teacher
This certificate exceeds the minimum teaching requirements
for centers regulated by Title 22. It also meets the Associate
Teacher Permit requirements for provision of instruction and
supervision of assistant teacher-level staff in Title 5 schools.
Required courses:
Programs and Curriculum in Early
Childhood Education
3
CHLD 112
Child Growth and Development
3
or CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
Health, Safety, and Nutrition
3
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
3
Select at least 6 elective units from the following:
CHLD 109
Child Behavior and Guidance
CHLD 111
Programs for Infants and Toddlers
CHLD 130
Science and Math for Young Children
CHLD 140
Language and Literacy in Early
Childhood
CHLD 150
Art for Young Children
CHLD 160
Music and Movement for Young
Children
CHLD 200
Observation & Assessment in Early
Childhood
CHLD 230
Parent /Teacher Partnerships
CHLD 240
Children with Special Learning Needs
Total Units
Required courses:
CHLD 105
Programs and Curriculum in Early
Childhood Education
3
CHLD 106
Introduction to Curriculum in Early
Childhood
3
CHLD 109
Child Behavior and Guidance
3
CHLD 112
Child Growth and Development
3
or CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
CHLD 200
Observation & Assessment in Early
Childhood
3
CHLD 205
Health, Safety, and Nutrition
3
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
3
CHLD 245
Adult Supervision/Mentor Teacher
3
CHLD 270
Preschool Teacher Internship
3
CHLD 130
Science and Math for Young Children
CHLD 140
Language and Literacy in Early
Childhood
3
Select at least 6 units from one area of specialization :
CHLD 205
Introduction to Curriculum in Early
Childhood
See notation for 16-unit general education requirement.
Select at least 3 units from the following:
CHLD 105
CHLD 106
teachers, and teacher-level staff, and serving as coordinator of
curriculum and staff development.
6
6
Infant/Toddler
CHLD 111
Programs for Infants and Toddlers
CHLD 212
Advanced Issues in Infant-Toddler Care
Creative Arts
CHLD 150
Art for Young Children
CHLD 160
Music and Movement for Young
Children
Special Needs
CHLD 230
Parent /Teacher Partnerships
CHLD 240
Children with Special Learning Needs
Consult faculty for other specialization options.
Select at least 16 units in general education.
16
Include at least one course in each of the following:
Humanities, Social Sciences, Math and/or Science,
English.
Total Units
18
Note: To be eligible for the State of California Child
Development Permit—Associate Teacher, students must also
complete an experience requirement of 50 days of 3 or more
hours per day within 2 years.
Certificate of Achievement
Child Development Master Teacher
This certificate exceeds the minimum teaching requirements
for Title 22 schools. It is designed to meet the Master Teacher
requirements for Title 5 child development programs. This
includes providing instruction, supervising assistants, associate
52
Note: To be eligible for the State of California Child
Development Permit—Master Teacher, students must also
complete an experience requirement of 350 days of 3 or more
hours per day within 4 years.
Certificate of Achievement
Child Development Site Supervisor
This certificate is designed for students who will be single-site
supervisors under Title 5 or center directors under Title 22. It
allows holders to supervise master teachers, teachers, associate
teachers, and assistants as well as to manage single-site
programs, provide instruction, and serve as coordinators of
curriculum and staff development.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 131
Areas of Study & Courses
Required courses:
CHLD 130
Science and Math for Young Children
CHLD 105
Programs and Curriculum in Early
Childhood Education
3
CHLD 140
Language and Literacy in Early
Childhood
CHLD 106
Introduction to Curriculum in Early
Childhood
3
CHLD 150
Art for Young Children
CHLD 160
CHLD 109
Child Behavior and Guidance
3
Music and Movement for Young
Children
CHLD 112
Child Growth and Development
3
CHLD 230
Parent /Teacher Partnerships
or CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
CHLD 240
Children with Special Learning Needs
CHLD 200
Observation & Assessment in Early
Childhood
3
CHLD 205
Health, Safety, and Nutrition
3
Include at least one course in each of the following:
Humanities, Social Sciences, Math and/or Science,
English.
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
3
Total Units
CHLD 245
Adult Supervision/Mentor Teacher
3
CHLD 250
Administration of Child Development
Programs
3
CHLD 251
Supervision of Child Development
Programs
3
CHLD 270
Preschool Teacher Internship
3
Certificate of Achievement
3
Early Intervention and Inclusion
Select at least 16 units in general education.
Select at least 3 elective units from the following:
CHLD 111
Programs for Infants and Toddlers
CHLD 230
Parent /Teacher Partnerships
CHLD 240
Children with Special Learning Needs
Total Units
36
Note: To be eligible for the State of California Child
Development Permit—Site Supervisor, students must also
complete an Associate in Arts degree and an experience
requirement of 350 days of 3 or more hours per day within 4
years, including at least 100 days of supervising adults.
16
43
Note: To be eligible for the State of California Child
Development Permit—Teacher, students must also complete an
experience requirement of 175 days of 3 or more hours per day
within 4 years.
This certificate is designed to train students to work with
young children with special needs (birth to 8 years of age),
with those who may be at risk for developmental delays and
disabilities, and with their families. This certificate is appropriate
for students working as an assistant or a paraprofessional in
early intervention or early childhood special education, or as a
teacher in an inclusive early childhood program.
Required courses:
CHLD 105
Programs and Curriculum in Early
Childhood Education
3
Certificate of Achievement
CHLD 109
Child Behavior and Guidance
3
Child Development Teacher
CHLD 205
Health, Safety, and Nutrition
3
This certificate exceeds the minimum teaching requirements for
centers regulated by Title 22. It also meets the Teacher Permit
requirements for provision of instruction and supervision of
assistant or associate teacher-level staff in a Title 5 (state or
federally funded) child development program.
CHLD 230
Parent /Teacher Partnerships
3
CHLD 240
Children with Special Learning Needs
3
CHLD 270
Preschool Teacher Internship
3
CHLD 111
Programs for Infants and Toddlers
3
or CHLD 212
Advanced Issues in Infant-Toddler Care
CHLD 112
Child Growth and Development
or CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
See notation for 16-unit general education requirement.
Required courses:
CHLD 105
Programs and Curriculum in Early
Childhood Education
3
CHLD 106
Introduction to Curriculum in Early
Childhood
3
CHLD 109
Child Behavior and Guidance
3
CHLD 112
Child Growth and Development
3
or CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
CHLD 200
Observation & Assessment in Early
Childhood
3
CHLD 205
Health, Safety, and Nutrition
3
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
3
CHLD 270
Preschool Teacher Internship
3
Select at least 3 elective units from the following:
CHLD 111
132 Programs for Infants and Toddlers
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
3
3
3
Total Units
27
Certificate of Proficiency
Child Development Assistant Teacher
This certificate meets the minimum teaching requirements
for private child care centers regulated by Title 22. It also
allows students to assist in the instruction of children under the
supervision of an associate teacher-level or above in a Title 5
child development program.
Required courses:
CHLD 112
Child Growth and Development
or CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
3
3
Areas of Study & Courses
Select at least 6 elective units from the following:
CHLD 105
Programs and Curriculum in Early
Childhood Education
CHLD 106
Introduction to Curriculum in Early
Childhood
CHLD 109
Child Behavior and Guidance
CHLD 111
Programs for Infants and Toddlers
CHLD 130
Science and Math for Young Children
CHLD 140
Language and Literacy in Early
Childhood
CHLD 150
Art for Young Children
CHLD 160
Music and Movement for Young
Children
CHLD 205
Health, Safety, and Nutrition
Total Units
6
12
Courses
CHLD 105: Programs and Curriculum in Early Childhood
Education
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80)
This course examines the theories and principles of
developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood
programs and environments. It emphasizes relationships,
constructive adult-child interactions, curriculum models, and
program planning with effective teaching strategies. Topics
include the historical roots of early childhood programs and the
evolution of professional practices promoting advocacy, ethics,
and professional identity. C-ID ECE-120.
CHLD 106: Introduction to Curriculum in Early Childhood
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course introduces teachers of young children to designing
early learning environments and planning curriculum in early
care and education settings. It covers the relationship of
theory and practice, the contributions of current research,
the influence of different curriculum models and approaches,
the role of observation, documentation and assessment in
the curriculum planning process, and the incorporation of
reflective teaching practices across the curriculum to meet
the needs of all learners. Students will examine the teacher’s
role in supporting development and engagement for all young
children. C-ID ECE-130.
CHLD 109: Child Behavior and Guidance
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course examines the reasons for children’s behavior in
relation to appropriate teaching strategies and interventions.
It explores effective techniques for dealing with children,
including those with special needs. It addresses issues such
as separation from parents, new experiences, routines, rules,
regulations, peer interaction, fears, frustrations, and aggression.
The course emphasizes how parents and teachers can provide
children with guidance and discipline that promote self-control,
feelings of security, competency, and self-esteem. Students
learn how to access community agencies and family services to
provide specialized support.
CHLD 111: Programs for Infants and Toddlers
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.90)
This course is specifically designed for caregivers of infants and
toddlers. The class focuses on the growth and development
of the child, birth through three years of age, within various
social contexts. Topics include fostering relationships,
implementing health and safety practices, designing early
learning environments and activities, accommodating
individual differences, and creating partnerships with parents
and families. This course meets state licensing requirements for
child care providers.
CHLD 112: Child Growth and Development
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course covers the psychological and physical development
of children from conception through age six. It relates major
theories of physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional
development to the prenatal, infant, and preschool periods
within cultural and family contexts. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for CHLD 112, CHLD 113, or PSYC 121.
CHLD 113: Child and Adolescent Growth and Development
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course examines the major physical, cognitive, language,
and psychosocial developmental milestones for children, both
typical and atypical, from conception through adolescence.
It emphasizes interactions between maturational processes
and environmental factors. While studying developmental
theory and research methodologies, students observe children,
evaluate individual differences, and analyze characteristics of
development at various stages. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit
for CHLD 112, CHLD 113, or PSYC 121. C-ID CDEV-100.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 133
Areas of Study & Courses
CHLD 130: Science and Math for Young Children
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
CHLD 160: Music and Movement for Young Children
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course provides teachers with knowledge and skills related
to science and mathematics curriculum in early care and
education settings. It focuses on understanding the ways in
which children learn science and mathematics, the stages
of children’s cognitive development, the scientific process,
content and standards of science and mathematics education,
the teacher’s role in the scientific process, and ways in which
science and mathematics can be integrated across the early
childhood curriculum.
This course provides teachers of young children with the
skills and knowledge needed to use music and movement
experiences in the early childhood classroom to inspire
creative expression. Topics include how our image of the
child reflects the methods and materials provided for music
and creative movement; the developmental stages of
children’s creative expression; the design of developmentally
appropriate, culturally sensitive, and individually adapted music
and movement experiences; planning, documenting, and
performing children’s music and movement; the teacher’s
role in creative process; and the ways in which music and
movement can be integrated across the early childhood
curriculum.
CHLD 140: Language and Literacy in Early Childhood
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
Development of early childhood language and communication
skills and examination of emerging literacy and learning in
early childhood. Creating, implementing, and evaluating an
early literacy, language arts, and literature curriculum for the
young child consistent with the CDE/CDD Preschool Learning
Foundations for Language and Literacy and English-Language
Development. Implications for home/school communication
and effective parent/teacher partnerships.
CHLD 150: Art for Young Children
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course provides teachers of young children with the skills
and knowledge needed to develop aesthetic and perceptual
awareness in the young child through exploration of various
art media and developmentally appropriate activities and
experiences. Topics include how our image of the child reflects
the methods and materials provided for creative expression; the
developmental stages of children’s art and creative expression;
studio and art center design; planning, documenting, and
exhibiting children’s art work; the teacher’s role in the creative
process; and how to integrate art and aesthetics across early
childhood curriculum.
134 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
CHLD 200: Observation & Assessment in Early Childhood
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course focuses on the appropriate use of observation
and assessment strategies to document child growth and
development, appraise child behavior, and plan for learning
in quality early childhood programs. The course also explores
recording strategies, rating systems, portfolios, documentation,
and various assessment methods. Students conduct and
analyze child observations. C-ID ECE-200.
CHLD 205: Health, Safety, and Nutrition
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course provides those who care for children an overview
of health, safety, and nutrition issues. Students develop skills
and techniques in ways to promote physical and mental
health, identification and management of common childhood
illnesses, menu planning and nutritional analysis, safety
management and injury prevention, child abuse identification
and prevention, and program planning. Topics also include
culturally and developmentally appropriate practice,
collaboration with families and health professionals, policies
and regulations, children with special needs, and current
issues. C-ID ECE-220.
Areas of Study & Courses
CHLD 210: Child, Family, and Community
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in SOC
210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course examines the developing child in a societal context
and focuses on the interrelationships of family, school, and
community as agents of socialization from historical, sociocultural, and contemporary perspectives. The course highlights
the processes of socialization and identity development,
demonstrating the importance of respectful, reciprocal
relationships that support and empower families in a culturally
diverse society. C-ID CDEV-110.
CHLD 212: Advanced Issues in Infant-Toddler Care
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CHLD 111.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.90)
This course helps infant and toddler caregivers and directors
interpret and apply the guidelines for quality care for children
birth through three years of age. Topics include the role
of the infant care teacher, new insights into early learning
and development, the central role of families, guidelines for
operating quality infant/toddler programs and facilitating
learning and development with infants and toddlers as well
as program leadership and policies. This course meets state
licensing requirements for child care providers and is aligned
with the California Infant/Toddler Learning and Development
Program Guidelines and Curriculum Framework, and it can be
combined with CHLD 111 as an area of specialization for the
Master Teacher Permit/Certificate.
CHLD 230: Parent /Teacher Partnerships
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course examines the role of preschool teachers and
administrators in establishing effective partnerships with parents
in the school setting. Students develop skills and techniques in
parent-teacher conferencing, home-school communication,
parent education, group contacts with parents, and parent
involvement in early childhood education. Topics include
parenting styles, cultural and developmental diversity, family
dynamics, and community resources and support systems.
CHLD 240: Children with Special Learning Needs
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.20)
This course focuses on learning to work with children with
disabilities, challenging behaviors, and other special learning
needs in inclusive early childhood settings. Topics include how
individual child needs are assessed, how they impact families,
and how programming and curriculum can be adapted to
meet the needs of all young children, including those from
culturally diverse backgrounds.
CHLD 245: Adult Supervision/Mentor Teacher
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80)
This course offers a study of the methods and principles of
supervising and mentoring teachers, assistant teachers,
student teachers, parents and volunteers in early childhood
classrooms. Emphasis is given to the knowledge, skills and
competencies of classroom teachers who must function not
only as mentors to new teachers, but also address the needs of
children, parents, and other staff. Attention is given to methods
of effective communication, problem-solving, and negotiation
in establishing positive interpersonal relations.
CHLD 250: Administration of Child Development Programs
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80)
This course is designed for directors of early childhood
programs and focuses on the administrative tools needed to
manage a child development facility. Topics include licensing
and state regulations, policy development, working with diverse
populations, budgets, funding, health and safety guidelines,
program planning and evaluation, and planning of new early
childhood programs.
CHLD 251: Supervision of Child Development Programs
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80)
An advanced course in the design, coordination, and
evaluation of early childhood settings to include program
organization, personnel management, leadership, professional
development, in-service training, and effective staff supervision.
Additional focus includes strategies for partnering with parents,
motivating staff, and fostering effective community relations
within diverse cultural contexts.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 135
Areas of Study & Courses
CHLD 270: Preschool Teacher Internship
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Must complete 120 hours of non-paid work.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 6 hours. (1305.80)
Students demonstrate early childhood teaching competencies
under guided supervision in the campus Child Development
Center or with a designated Mentor Teacher in the community
to make connections between theory and practice
and developing professional behaviors. Students apply
comprehensive understanding of children and families;
developmentally appropriate, child-centered, play-oriented
approaches to teaching and learning; and knowledge
of curriculum content areas. They design, implement and
evaluate experiences that promote positive development and
learning for all young children. Students become informed
advocates for high quality and appropriate educational
practices and policies.
CHLD 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
CHLD 298: Directed Study in Child Development
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1305.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
CHLD 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Chinese
CHLD 296: Topics in Child Development
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Child Development that are not included in regular course
offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described, and
given its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
The International Languages Department offers courses that
provide the foundation for Chinese language study. They
also satisfy either the humanities requirement for general
education or the proficiency requirement in an international
language when required for transfer. A bachelor’s degree in an
136 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
international language such as Chinese can lead to a career
in advertising, broadcasting, consulting, translating, teaching,
international service, public relations, social work, and sales.
Note: Students educated in a non-English speaking country
through high school or equivalent will generally not earn lowerdivision transfer credit in their language at most universities.
Students who might be affected by this rule should consult a
counselor and/or the International Languages Department
Chair before enrolling in the courses described below.
Contact Information
Chair: Andrea Petri
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/CHNS
Department: International
Languages
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Courses
CHNS 101: Elementary Chinese (First Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
CHNS 102 or CHNS 201.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1107.00)
This course introduces contemporary Chinese and emphasizes
the development of oral proficiency (listening and speaking).
Topics include basic pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and
reading and writing systems as well as the history, geography,
and culture of Chinese-speaking societies. This course
corresponds to the first two years of high school Chinese.
CHNS 102: Elementary Chinese (Second Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: CHNS 101 or two years of high school Chinese with
a C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
CHNS 201.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1107.00)
This course continues to develop Chinese language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews
(recycles) first semester Chinese vocabulary and grammar, and
it develops the student’s ability to read, interpret, and discuss
Chinese-language narratives about cultural aspects of the
Chinese-speaking world. This course corresponds to the third
year of high school Chinese.
CHNS 201: Intermediate Chinese (Third Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: CHNS 102 or third year of high school Chinese with
a C or better.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1107.00)
This course continues to develop Chinese language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in CHNS 101 and CHNS 102, and it develops the
student’s ability to engage in casual conversation, express
opinions, and make suggestions in Chinese. The course
also provides an increased awareness of the Chinesespeaking world’s history, geography, and customs, including
its socio-political practices and cultural artifacts. This course
corresponds to the fourth year of high school Chinese.
CHNS 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
Communication
The Communication Studies program provides students with
a theoretical and methodological foundation of the nature
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 137
Areas of Study & Courses
of communication in its various forms and contexts as well
as the uses, effects, and relevancy of communication in
their own lives. Students take communication courses to
prepare to transfer with a major in communication or to
meet general education requirements. A bachelor’s degree
in communication can lead to a career in advertising,
broadcasting, community relations, consulting, counseling,
education, film, foreign service, fundraising, human resources,
journalism, international relations, law, management,
marketing, mediation, ministry, politics, public relations, sales,
speech writing, and social work.
for further information regarding the most efficient pathway to
transfer as a communications major and to determine which
CSU campuses are participating in this program.
To complete the degree, students must fulfill the following
requirements:
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) CSU transferable units
Complete all courses required in the major with a “C” or
better
Complete the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general education
pattern
Achieve a minimum CSU transferable GPA of 2.0
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College.
Contact Information
Chair: Sam Arenivar
[email protected]
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/COMM
Department: Communication
Studies
Office: Building San Admin,
760.634.7876
Required Core:
COMM 101
List A: 6 Units. Select two courses.
Full-Time Faculty
Sam Arenivar
Leola McClure
Neil Moura
Public Speaking
Anthony Ongyod
Eric Robertson
6
COMM 106
Group Communication
COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
COMM 212
Argumentation
List B: 6 Units. Select two courses.
6
*
Any course from List A not already used.
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
3
*
COMM 111
Oral Interpretation of Literature
COMM 120
Principles of Human Communication
COMM 215
Intercultural Communication
List C: 3-4 Units. Select one course.
*
ANTH 102
Associate in Arts in Communication Studies for
Transfer Degree
Cultural Anthropology
or ANTH 102HCultural Anthropology (Honors)
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will have
developed the ability to present clear and effective messages.
COMM 135
Gender Studies in Communication
COMM 220
Introduction to Mass Communication
DRAM 110
Voice and Diction
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will
understand the relavance of the theories and methods of
communication.
PSYC 100
Psychology of Personal Growth
PSYC/SOC
104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
prepared for transfer to a communication studies program in a
California State University.
or PSYC/
SOC 104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
Associate Degree
Associate in Arts Degree
Associate in Arts in Communication Studies for
Transfer Degree
Students completing this associate degree will have
completed lower-division major preparation requirements for
a communications degree, an emphasis or option within a
communications degree, or a degree considered similar to
communications at a participating California State University
(CSU) campus. Following transfer to a participating CSU
campus, students will be required to complete no more
than 60 units to obtain a bachelor’s degree; however, some
CSU campuses may require additional lower-division major
preparation. This degree may not be appropriate preparation
for students transferring to a CSU campus not accepting this
degree or to a university or college that is not part of the CSU
system. Students should consult with a MiraCosta counselor
138 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
3-4
Any course from List A or B not already used.
or SOC 101H Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
Total Units
18-19
To insure this degree is completed with no more than 60
units, students should select courses that will also satisfy a
general education requirement on the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC
general education pattern. Students are also strongly advised
to complete the History, Constitution, and American Ideals
requirement prior to transfer.
*
It is recommended that you select courses that meet lowerdivision major preparation requirements at your intended
transfer university.
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
COMM 101: Public Speaking
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course provides training in the basic principles of oral
expression. Students learn how to select and research subjects,
organize and support ideas, and prepare and deliver various
forms of speeches.
COMM 106: Group Communication
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course introduces students to group communication
processes and principles and the necessary role of discussion in
society. While addressing current topics of controversy, students
learn and apply theories of group problem-solving, roles,
conflict resolution, leadership, ethics, and decision-making.
Students develop group communication skills in verbal and
nonverbal interaction, participation, organization, and cultural
diversity. C-ID COMM-140.
COMM 111: Oral Interpretation of Literature
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in DRAM
111.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course introduces the oral interpretation and analysis
of literary works of art in their intellectual, emotional, and
aesthetic forms. Class readings include prose, poetry, and
drama. Students develop vocal and physical expressiveness,
variety, and flexibility through oral presentations of literature. CID COMM-170.
COMM 120: Principles of Human Communication
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course introduces human communication concepts
and theories. It focuses on the role and significance of
communication in and across different contexts, and it covers
the basic structures and processes of communication. Topics
include message production, message reception, and varying
influences on human communication, such as interpersonal,
intercultural, and mediated contexts.
COMM 135: Gender Studies in Communication
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course examines the communication patterns typically
exhibited by men and women. It studies differences and
similarities in verbal and nonverbal behaviors, perception,
conflict, leadership, and interpersonal relationships. Students
develop an awareness and appreciation of gender as an
important variable in human communication, in both public
and private settings.
COMM 207: Interpersonal Communication
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course provides for the study of communication
within an interpersonal context. It includes the study of
the communication process, perception, the symbolic
nature of language, nonverbal codes, principles of effective
communication, and the effects of communication on people
in society. C-ID COMM-130.
COMM 212: Argumentation
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course examines the psychological and logical basis of
argument and principles of effective organization. It teaches
the development and application of critical thinking skills as
well as the practice of creating and evaluating arguments so
students can become more skilled and responsible advocates.
C-ID COMM-120.
COMM 215: Intercultural Communication
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course analyzes the cultural factors and variables that
influence human-communication choices and actions. It
focuses on perception, language, reasoning, nonverbal
messages, values, beliefs, attitudes, and rules. Students learn to
identify the cultural principles and variables of communication
so as to act effectively and responsibly when interacting with
diverse persons in various contexts. C-ID COMM-150.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 139
Areas of Study & Courses
COMM 220: Introduction to Mass Communication
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course covers the history, role, and impact of mass media
in the United States. It demonstrates various media operations
in the U.S. and their societal and cultural effects. The course
enables students to be informed, critical consumers of mass
media, and to understand how the media influence attitudes,
values, beliefs, and perceptions.
COMM 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
COMM 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Computer Science
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
COMM 296: Topics in Communication
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Communications that are not included in regular course
offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described, and
given its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
140 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
(See also: Computer Studies & Information Technology)
Computer science is the study of computers and their
applications. This discipline includes a variety of specialties,
such as systems programming, artificial intelligence, robotics,
networking, and graphics. In preparation for transfer into
more advanced fundamental and specialized areas, students
learn basic programming, data structures, and architecture.
Computer science majors will also need two or three semesters
of calculus and discrete mathematics, depending on their
choice of transfer institution. Career options in computer
science include software engineer, computer engineer,
systems analyst, database administrator, and software project
manager.
Areas of Study & Courses
Contact Information
Chair: June Porto
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/CS
Department: Computer
Science
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Nery Chapeton-Lamas
June Porto
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Computer Science Associate in Arts Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to analyze, design, and generate mature software solutions
to complex and abstract proogramming problems utilizing
efficient and appropriate algorithms while working alone or
cooperatively in a team. Students will also be to competently
explain and present the code and the results both verbally and
in writing.
Computer Programming Fundamentals
Associate in Arts Degree and Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to analyze, design, and generate mature software solutions
to complex and abstract proogramming problems utilizing
efficient and appropriate algorithms while working alone or
cooperatively in a team. Students will also be to competently
explain and present the code and the results both verbally and
in writing.
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degree
Computer Science
a bachelor’s degree in computer science. Students planning
to transfer and/or earn this associate degree may also need
to complete additional requirements or electives required by
the transfer institution, as many CSUs and UCs have unique
admissions and preparation-for-the-major requirements.
Students should meet with a MiraCosta College counselor to
identify required courses and to develop a written plan for their
targeted university.
Required courses:
CS 111
Introduction to Computer Science I:
Java
3
CS 112
Introduction to Computer Science II:
Java
3
CS 113
Basic Data Structures and Algorithms
3
CS 220
Computer Architecture and Assembly
Language
3
MATH 150
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
5
or MATH 150H
Calculus and Analytic Geometry (Honors)
MATH 155
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4
Total Units
21
Some of the following courses may also be required as
preparation for the computer science major at a four-year
university.
MATH 260
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
4
MATH 226
Discrete Mathematics
4
MATH 265
Differential Equations
4
PHYS 151
Principles of Physics I
4
PHYS 152
Principles of Physics II
4
PHYS 253
Principles of Physics III
4
Associate in Arts Degree
Computer Programming Fundamentals
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta’s Associate in Arts
degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should meet
with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and to
develop a written educational plan for the specific degree or
certificate they wish to earn.
Certificate
Certificate of Achievement
Computer Programming Fundamentals
This certificate provides a strong foundation for knowledge
of basic object-oriented programming (OOP) techniques
and data structures used in computer science. Students gain
experience in several OOP programming languages and in
analyzing and assessing problems and formulating appropriate
solutions. Completing this certificate will help students advance
in their careers as computer programming professionals and
solidify the foundation of their computer science skills.
Required courses:
CS 111
The Computer Science program offers lower-division
preparation for students who plan on transferring to pursue
Introduction to Computer Science I:
Java
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 3
141
Areas of Study & Courses
CS 112
Introduction to Computer Science II:
Java
3
CS 113
Basic Data Structures and Algorithms
3
CS 150
C++ Programming
3
CS 151
Advanced C++ Programming
3
CS 220
Computer Architecture and Assembly
Language
3
Select at least 6 elective units from the following:
CS 107
Introduction to Object-Oriented
Programming
CS 130
Fundamentals of Scripting Languages
CS 134
Mobile Device Application Development
CS 138
Programming with Python
MATH 226
Discrete Mathematics
Total Units
6
24
Courses
CS 107: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
In this introductory computer programming course, students
use pre-built objects to create animated storyboards in
3-D virtual worlds while learning the concepts of objectoriented programming (OOP). Using two abstracted high-level
languages, such as Alice and Java, students experiment with
drag-and-drop coding (Alice) and write code (Java). This
course is highly recommended for beginning programming
students prior to taking a code-writing class, such as Java or C+
+. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: No credit if taken after CS 111.
CS 111: Introduction to Computer Science I: Java
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MATH 64.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course provides an introduction to computer science
and programming using an object-oriented language. It
is designed primarily for students majoring in computer
science and engineering. The course explores language
basics, including control structures, data types, input/output,
operators, classes, methods and parameters, basic inheritance,
and documentation practices as well as testing and verification
techniques. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: No credit if taken after
CS 112.
CS 112: Introduction to Computer Science II: Java
Units: 3
Prerequisites: CS 111.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course develops advanced object-oriented programming
concepts and refines the concepts of inheritance,
polymorphism, and encapsulation. Topics include various
data structures and their usage, recursion, modularity and
abstraction, including generics, event-driven programming,
graphical user interfaces, applets, and exception handling.
142 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
CS 113: Basic Data Structures and Algorithms
Units: 3
Prerequisites: CS 112.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course introduces the software development process using
efficient algorithms and properly designed data structures to
develop effective solutions to common programming problems.
Topics include searching, sorting, hashing, algorithm analysis,
object-oriented design, collections, lists, stacks, queues, trees,
sets, dictionaries, and graphs.
CS 130: Fundamentals of Scripting Languages
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course introduces students to scripting language(s)
and webpage programming. Students develop, debug,
implement, and integrate client-side scripts using automated
tasking. Comparisons may be made among common scripting
languages, such as JavaScript, PHP, Perl, and CGI.
CS 134: Mobile Device Application Development
Units: 3
Prerequisites: CS 112
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course covers the essential steps of writing applications
for a mobile device. Discussions include the application lifecycle, the necessary source and resources files as well as
performance criteria and objectives. At the end of the course,
students will be able to create basic applications for a specified
mobile device. This course is designed for students who have
little or no experience programming mobile devices but have
some experience with Java and/or C++.
CS 138: Programming with Python
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course introduces the Python programming language and
its features. Python is a dynamic, object-oriented, extensible
language that is perfect for the beginner and also meets
industry needs. Python is well-suited for large, complex
applications as well as website development and systems
administration.
CS 150: C++ Programming
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MATH 64.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
Using an object-oriented (OOP) approach to design and
programming in the C++ language, this course covers data
input/output, data types, control structures, operators,
functions, and the operating environment. Upon successful
completion of the course, students are able to construct
moderately complex programs in C++.
Areas of Study & Courses
CS 151: Advanced C++ Programming
Units: 3
Prerequisites: CS 150.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
In this advanced programming course, students design and
implement increasingly difficult C++ programs that build upon
skills acquired in C++ Programming (CS 150). They also develop
appropriate and efficient methods to test their programs. Topics
include polymorphism, inheritance, class libraries, the standard
template library, advanced file input/output operations,
recursion, virtual functions, exception handling, and data
structures, such as linked lists, stacks, queues, and binary trees.
CS 220: Computer Architecture and Assembly Language
Units: 3
Prerequisites: CS 112.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course introduces the fundamental physical and structural
concepts of assembly language programming. Topics include
machine architecture, memory addressing, input/output,
interrupts, control structures, compiling, and linking.
CS 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
CS 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Computer Studies &
Information Technology
The Computer Studies & Information Technology Department
serves students with computer-related courses in basic skills,
transfer, and career and technical education.
Composed of curriculum focused in the areas of computer
applications, information technology, and networking, the
CSIT program provides students with theoretical and handson experience in using the power of computing to critically
evaluate and solve business, network, and security problems.
Among the career options available through certificate
attainment or transfer and bachelor’s degree achievement
include computer applications professional, computer desktop
support specialist, information technology specialist, business
information systems analyst, e-commerce specialist, and
network administrator. Certain computer application and
networking courses provide preparatory training for various
professional industry certifications from Microsoft, CompTIA, and
Red Hat.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 143
Areas of Study & Courses
Associate Degrees
Contact Information
Chair: Steve Isachsen
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/
computerstudies
Department: Computer Studies
& Information Technology
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Associate in Arts Degrees
Computer Applications Professional for Business
Computer Studies
Network and Desktop Systems Administration
Full-Time Faculty
Steve Isachsen
Martin Parks
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Computer Applications Professional for Business
Associate in Arts Degree and Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to successfully use a range of business productivity computer
applications to solve business problems.
Computer Studies Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to successfully articulate and demonstrate a wide range of
fundamental theory and skills in the areas of computers and
information technology.
E-Commerce Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to successfully perform the basic tasks associated with analysis,
creation, evaluation, and maintenance of an e-business and/or
Web presence.
Microsoft Certified Application Specialist for
Business Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to use Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint
at a comprehensive level to solve problems in a business
environment.
Network and Desktop Administration Associate
in Arts Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to successfully perform the basic tasks associated with the
administration of servers, networks, and desktop computers.
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Certified Computer Desktop Support Specialist
This certificate is designed to meet the demand in industry for
individuals trained to support desktop computer users. Training
includes support for application software, operating systems,
local area networks, desktop support, and customer service.
Individuals can successfully answer, or escalate, calls and
inquiries from end users and may seek employment as a help
desk technician, customer support representative, computer
support specialist, technical support representative, and
technical support specialist. In addition, certificate completion
helps prepare individuals for the Microsoft Certified Desktop
Support Technician (MCDST) certification exams.
Required courses:
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
CSIT 149
Microsoft Windows
3
CSIT 171
Fundamentals of Computer Networks
and Security
4
CSIT 173
Desktop Support
4
BUS 137
Customer Service
3
Select at least 6 elective units from the following courses:
144 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
CSIT 115
Intermediate Computer Applications
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
CSIT 155
Social Media for Business
CS 107
Introduction to Object-Oriented
Programming
6
Areas of Study & Courses
BUS 290
Business Communication
CSIT 120
Fundamentals of Computer Information
Systems
3
CSIT 125
Microsoft Word for Business
3
or CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
or BUS 290H Business Communication (Honors)
Total Units
23
Certificate of Achievement
or CSIT 131
Microsoft Access for Business
Computer Applications Professional for Business
or CSIT 134
Microsoft PowerPoint for Business
This certificate is designed to meet demand in the business
community for individuals who are trained in the professionallevel use of computers and business productivity computer
applications. Specific areas of emphasis include word
processing, spreadsheets, database management, electronic
presentations, digital imaging, Windows, and Internet
applications. Learning to use, integrate, and collaborate
effectively with these powerful business productivity tools is
essential for those preparing for jobs or wishing to advance in
their current job in today’s technological workplace.
or CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
or CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
or CSIT 149
Microsoft Windows
CSIT 155
Social Media for Business
3
Required courses:
Microsoft Word for Business
3
CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
3
CSIT 131
Microsoft Access for Business
3
CSIT 134
Microsoft PowerPoint for Business
3
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
3
CSIT 149
Microsoft Windows
3
CSIT 195
Computer Studies Portfolio Development
1
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
3
BUS 120
Introduction to Business
BUS 133
Project Management
CRLP 101
Introduction to Career Planning
CSIT 100
Computer Basics I
CSIT 105
Computer Basics II
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
CSIT 115
Intermediate Computer Applications
CSIT 155
Social Media for Business
CSIT 160
Technology, the Individual, and Society
CSIT 165
Living in an Online World
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
MAT 150
MAT 170
MAT 180
Technology, the Individual, and Society
3
Living in an Online World
3
CSIT 171
Fundamentals of Computer Networks
and Security
4
CSIT 195
Computer Studies Portfolio Development
1
Total Units
CSIT 125
Select at least 6 elective units from the following courses:
CSIT 160
CSIT 165
6
26
Certificate of Achievement
E-Commerce
The E-Commerce Certificate is designed for individuals
interested in exploring the process of conducting business on
the Internet and related design and technical considerations.
Students are advised to enroll in CSIT 146 prior to selecting
electives.
Required courses:
CSIT 120
Fundamentals of Computer Information
Systems
3
CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
3
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
3
MAT 165
Web Design 2: Tools and Techniques
3
BUS 132
Marketing
3
Select courses from below for a minimum of 6 units:
BUS 170
Entrepreneur I
BUS 171
Entrepreneur II
CSIT 155
Social Media for Business
CSIT 171
Fundamentals of Computer Networks
and Security
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
CSIT 174
TCP/IP and Network Infrastructure
Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator
MAT 225
Web Design: PHP and WordPress
Publishing 1: Adobe InDesign
MAT 235
Web Design 3: Site Design and
Architecture
Total Units
28
Total Units
Certificate of Achievement
6-8
21-23
Computer Studies
Certificate of Achievement
This certificate provides students with a broad foundation in
computer theory and skills. These courses expose students to
a wide range of fundamentals across each of the Computer
Studies Department’s disciplines. Completing this certificate will
prepare individuals to launch or further advance their careers
as computer, information technology, or related professionals in
a variety of industry sectors.
Microsoft Certified Application Specialist for Business
Required courses:
CS 107
Introduction to Object-Oriented
Programming
3
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
The Microsoft Certified Application Specialist for Business
certificate is designed for individuals who will work or currently
work in a business setting using Microsoft Office business
productivity applications as a vital part of their job functions.
This certificate will enhance career prospects in a competitive
job market by enabling the student to demonstrate proficiency
(based on globally recognized Microsoft standards) in the
world’s foremost desktop computing applications for business.
Each course in this certificate offers a comprehensive overview,
starting with fundamentals and finishing with advanced
features. In addition, certificate completion helps prepare
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 145
Areas of Study & Courses
individuals for the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist
certification exams.
Required courses:
CSIT 125
Microsoft Word for Business
3
CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
3
CSIT 131
Microsoft Access for Business
3
CSIT 134
Microsoft PowerPoint for Business
3
Total Units
12
Certificate of Achievement
Network and Desktop Systems Administration
This certificate is designed to meet the demand in the business
community for individuals trained in computer networking,
network administration, Enterprise networking, and Internet or
intranet administration.
Required courses:
CSIT 171
Fundamentals of Computer Networks
and Security
4
or for those who are transitioning to a computer-based work
environment. The skills and competencies practiced in this
certificate will provide computer knowledge and hands-on
workplace experiences using computer application software
and hardware.
Required courses:
BOT 100
Beginning Keyboarding
1
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
CSIT 120
Fundamentals of Computer Information
Systems
3
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
3
Select at least 5 elective units from the following courses:
5
BOT 102
10-Key
BOT 110
Word Processing
BOT 113
Basic Office Skills
CSIT 100
Computer Basics I
CSIT 105
Computer Basics II
CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
CSIT 172
Windows Networking Environment
4
Total Units
CSIT 173
Desktop Support
4
CSIT 174
TCP/IP and Network Infrastructure
4
Certificate of Proficiency
Select one course from below:
CSIT 175
Linux Networking Environment
CSIT 177
System Integration - Small Business Server
4
Total Units
20
Certificate of Proficiency
Computer Applications User
Required courses:
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
3
CSIT 115
Intermediate Computer Applications
3
CSIT 100
Computer Basics I
CSIT 105
Computer Basics II
CSIT 125
Microsoft Word for Business
CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
CSIT 131
Microsoft Access for Business
CSIT 134
Microsoft PowerPoint for Business
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
CSIT 149
Microsoft Windows
CSIT 155
Social Media for Business
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
Total Units
Certificate of Proficiency
Computer Competencies for the Workplace
This certificate is designed for those who need foundation
computer competencies for entry-level jobs in the workplace
146 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Emerging Technologies in Computer Studies
This certificate provides students with the opportunity to explore
emerging technologies in computer studies to enhance their
future or current work perspectives. Emphasis is placed on
the changing landscape of computers, information, and
technology and understanding how trends in these areas may
impact current and future business and industry.
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
3
CSIT 155
Social Media for Business
3
CSIT 160
Technology, the Individual, and Society
3
CSIT 165
Living in an Online World
3
Total Units
Select at least 3 elective units from the following courses:
15
Required courses:
This certificate is designed to provide individuals with basic
computer applications skills and techniques for jobs in any
industry. Together, these courses provide a foundation for
working with computer applications to perform essential job
functions proficiently.
3
Courses
CSIT 100: Computer Basics I
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours. (0701.00)
This first in a two-course sequence is intended for students
wishing to develop or strengthen their basic computer skills.
Topics include basic computer techniques and literacy in
computer concepts, Windows, working with files and folders,
word processing, browsing and searching the Web, sending
and receiving email, and academic computing course
management systems, such as Blackboard. Upon successful
completion of the course, students will be prepared for
CSIT 105, Computer Basics II.
9
12
Areas of Study & Courses
CSIT 105: Computer Basics II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours. (0701.00)
This second in a two-course sequence is intended for students
wishing to develop or strengthen their basic computer skills.
Picking up where CSIT 100 leaves off, this course includes
new and expanded study in the areas of basic computer
techniques and literacy in computer concepts. Topics include
Windows, hierarchical file and folder management, multitasking, word processing, safe and ethical Internet practices,
email, spreadsheet creation, computer maintenance, security,
and purchasing a computer.
CSIT 110: Computer Applications
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 105.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
This course provides an in-depth, hands-on introduction to
computer applications and fundamentals. Topics include
computer concepts, the operating system, and word
processing, spreadsheet, presentation, database, and Web
browser applications. The course emphasizes applied computer
applications skills and techniques, computer concepts and
ethical considerations, and the use of computer applications
as integrated tools to perform professional-level analyses. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for CSIT 110 or CSIT 120.
CSIT 115: Intermediate Computer Applications
Units: 3
Prerequisites: CSIT 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
Picking up where CSIT 110 leaves off, this course features
the use and integration of computer applications at the
intermediate level. Topics include further development
of concepts, skills, and techniques in word processing,
spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications.
CSIT 120: Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0701.00)
This course covers the concepts of information systems
in business, which include the integration of information
technology, e-commerce, systems analysis, data storage,
data processing, security, and communications. The course
applies information system concepts by developing solutions
to business problems using financial analysis and database
management tools, such as Microsoft Excel and Access.
This course is intended for students majoring in Business and
Information Systems. (Formerly CIS 101.) UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for CSIT 110 or CSIT 120.
CSIT 125: Microsoft Word for Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 105
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in CIS
151.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
Students learn how to use Microsoft Word, the industrystandard tool for word processing in business environments.
This comprehensive course includes fundamentals, such as
document design, section breaks, table of contents, graphics,
columns, and tables, as well as more advanced features,
such as document collaboration, workgroup tools, template
customization, mail merge, object linking, forms, security,
and Web enabling. This course helps prepare students for the
Microsoft Certification Exam.
CSIT 128: Microsoft Excel for Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 105.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in CIS
154.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
Students learn how to use Microsoft Excel, the industry
standard tool for spreadsheet and chart creation in a
business environment. This comprehensive course includes
fundamentals, such as workbook and worksheet design,
formulas, functions, and charts, as well as more advanced
features, such as pivot tables, what-if analysis, threedimensional worksheets, goal seek, and collaboration tools.
This course helps prepare students for the Microsoft Certification
Exam.
CSIT 131: Microsoft Access for Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 105.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in CIS
165.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
Students learn how to use Microsoft Access, the industry
standard tool for database creation in a business environment.
This comprehensive course includes fundamentals, such as
relational database design theory, tables, queries, reports,
and forms, as well as more advanced features, such as
complex validation rules, action queries, report controls, form
automation, database customization, and data integration
tools. This course helps prepare students for the Microsoft
Certification Exam.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 147
Areas of Study & Courses
CSIT 134: Microsoft PowerPoint for Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 105.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
Students learn how to use Microsoft PowerPoint, the industry
standard tool for creating electronic presentations in
business environments. This comprehensive course includes
fundamentals, such as electronic presentation design and
delivery concepts, slide layout, graphics, diagrams, charts,
and sound, as well as more advanced features, such as
complex animation, transitions, action buttons, video, custom
backgrounds, and collaboration tools. This course helps
prepare students for the Microsoft Certification Exam.
CSIT 137: Google Apps for Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 105.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
In this course, students learn how to use Google Apps, a
collection of free Web-based productivity tools, in a business
environment. Topics include Google Search, Gmail, Google
Calendar, Google Docs, Google Spreadsheets, Google
Presentations, and emerging trends in Google Apps. Students
use the Internet to access their files and the tools to manipulate
and collaborate with them.
CSIT 146: E-Commerce and Web Presence
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0709.10)
This course teaches the principles and technologies involved
in E-Commerce and creating a Web presence for a small
or medium-sized business (SMB). It addresses the needs of
both online and traditional brick and mortar businesses and
provides students with a basic working knowledge of how to sell
products and services on the Web. It covers aspects of business
and marketing planning, a survey of Web technologies, such as
HTML, XHTML, HTML5 and CSS, use of digital media, building an
online store, e-commerce security, electronic payment systems,
international and legal issues, Search Engine Optimization
(SEO), and current marketing trends. Students create a starter
e-business Web site or improve an existing site that can be used
for their business or to help them get a job in the field.
148 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
CSIT 149: Microsoft Windows
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
This course introduces students to the current Microsoft
Windows operating system. Students learn how to install the
operating system, create and manage user accounts, view
system components and properties, install applications, switch
between different application windows, manage files and
folders, and customize the Windows environment. The course
also covers networking, file and folder sharing, computer
security, malware, and safe Internet use.
CSIT 155: Social Media for Business
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 105.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10)
This course explores social media use from a business
perspective. Students learn how to develop a social media
strategy to promote business, build stronger customer relations,
target a broad base or niche audience, and develop effective
marketing and advertising techniques that enhance Web
presence and coordinate a common message across multiple
channels. Students explore historical development as well as
emerging trends in Web applications and services that facilitate
creativity, collaboration, and information sharing among users
and business.
CSIT 160: Technology, the Individual, and Society
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0701.00)
This course critically examines the interrelationships among
technology, the individual, and society. Students investigate
the historical, political, and economic factors that influence
the growth and development of technology and assess
how individuals and society respond to the challenges and
consequences of the technology revolution. Appropriate
for both technical and non-technical majors, students
explore principles, methodologies, and value systems from a
technology and social science interdisciplinary perspective. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for CSIT 160 or CSIT 165.
Areas of Study & Courses
CSIT 165: Living in an Online World
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours.
This course considers human behavior in relation to the
challenges and opportunities presented by an increasingly
online society. It places special emphasis on critically
evaluating and managing one’s online presence within this
environment in a healthy way throughout various life stages.
Appropriate for both technical and non-technical majors,
this course explores the psychological, sociological, and
physiological consequences for individuals and societies that
result from the global use of the Internet in everyday life. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for CSIT 160 or CSIT 165.
CSIT 173: Desktop Support
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in CIS 193
and CIS 208.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0708.00)
This course prepares students to support desktop users. It covers
desktop operating system and computer implementation
and support and emphasizes workstation integration in the
network environment. Topics include installation and upgrades,
configuration, management, operation, optimization, and
troubleshooting of desktop operating systems and applications.
Students diagnose problems in connectivity, manage security
settings, troubleshoot hardware and software issues, and
optimize system performance.
CSIT 171: Fundamentals of Computer Networks and Security
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in CIS 187
and CIS 195.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0702.00)
CSIT 174: TCP/IP and Network Infrastructure
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in CIS 198
and CIS 201.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0708.00)
This course presents an overview and introduction to computer
networking components, network design, operation, protocols,
network operating systems, and computer and network
security. Students learn the fundamentals of configuring and
using secure network resources, such as file servers, printers,
e-mail, the Internet, and networked applications. This course
prepares students for the CompTIA Network+ and Security+
certification exams.
This course introduces students to the theory and application
of the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
upon which the Internet is based. Students learn the layered
functions of the TCP/IP stack and how they relate to Internet
architecture. Topics include TCP/IP addressing, subnetting,
host and domain name resolution, routing considerations,
and practical management of TCP/IP protocols and services.
Students install, configure, manage, and troubleshoot network
servers and services in a domain environment. The course
emphasizes directory service and domain name system (DNS)
administration.
CSIT 172: Windows Networking Environment
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in CIS 188
and CIS 200.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0708.00)
This course provides students with a broad understanding of
Microsoft Windows Server and prepares them for network server
administration and Windows certification exams. The course
focuses on administrative tasks; operating-system selection,
installation, and configuration; Active Directory design and
implementation; user management; group policy; printers;
network services, especially Domain Name System (DNS); and
system security, monitoring, and optimization. Students develop
skill and apply their knowledge through hands-on projects and
case-study assignments.
CSIT 175: Linux Networking Environment
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in CIS 199
and CIS 203.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0708.00)
This course covers the installation, configuration, management,
and troubleshooting of the Linux operating system. It includes
basic topics related to the administration of Linux systems, basic
scripting, system performance and tuning, troubleshooting,
system security, package installation and removal, logging,
scheduling, and Linux tools. The course also introduces Web
servers, mail servers, and internetworking with other networkoperating systems.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 149
Areas of Study & Courses
CSIT 177: System Integration - Small Business Server
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: CSIT 171, CSIT 172 or CSIT 176.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0702.00)
This course covers server integration and troubleshooting
based on Microsoft Small Business Server or an Open
Source equivalent. It challenges students to use server
virtualization and integrate Windows Server in an Active
Directory environment with Exchange Server, Structured Query
Language (SQL) Server, Share Point Server and Web Services,
and Internet Security and Acceleration Server (Web Caching
and Firewall). Students install and configure the servers, create
accounts, and maintain security and functionality on systems
connected to the Internet. They also troubleshoot problems
and update, manage, and protect their systems from Internet
intrusions and other challenges. (Formerly CIS 204.)
CSIT 195: Computer Studies Portfolio Development
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour. (0702.00)
This course teaches students how to create a portfolio to
professionally display their best work and to increase job
opportunities. Topics include defining an audience, organizing
and adapting a body of work, and formatting and creating
a finished portfolio designed to reflect the student’s vision
and highlight the quality of his or her accomplishments. Note:
Students should complete most courses within their chosen
Computer Studies certificate program before enrolling in
CSIT 195.
CSIT 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
150 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
CSIT 296: Topics in Computer Studies and Information
Technology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1701.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Computer Studies and Information Technology that are not
included in regular course offerings. Each Topics course is
announced, described, and given its own title and 296 number
designation in the class schedule.
CSIT 298: Directed Study in Computer Studies and Information
Technology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (0701.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
CSIT 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Counseling
The Counseling Department offers courses that help students
develop the skills they need to succeed in college and make
effective career and life choices. The department also offers
Special Topics courses related to various areas of academic,
career, and personal development.
Areas of Study & Courses
Contact Information
Chair: Luke Lara
[email protected]
Dean: Freddy Ramirez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/COUN
Department: Counseling
Office: Building OC3700,
760.795.6670
Full-Time Faculty
Adrean Askerneese
Michael Deaton
Hilda Gomez-Zinn
Wendy Horton
Melissa Hughes
Luke Lara
Marjorie Lee
Freddy Ramirez
Courses
COUN 100: Career and Life Planning
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
CRLP 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.12)
This course assists students in successfully establishing
and achieving education, career, and life goals through a
comprehensive approach to effective planning. Students relate
their interests, personality, learning style, transferable skills, and
work values to academic major and career options. They also
examine the stages of career development, tasks appropriate
to each stage, and subsequent implications for education
and career choice over the lifespan. Topics include decisionmaking and goal-setting strategies, preparing effectively for
work and lifelong learning in a global economy, and jobsearch skills, including developing a resume, a cover letter, and
interviewing skills. The course emphasizes the importance of
taking personal responsibility for one’s educational, career, and
personal decisions to achieve satisfaction through work and life
balance. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for CRLP 100, COUN 100,
COUN 105, COUN 110, or INTR 100.
COUN 101: Orientation to College
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour. (4930.13)
COUN 103: Math Success Strategies
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MATH 20, MATH 30, OR MATH 64.
Lecture 1 hour. (4930.10)
This course is designed to be taken with a basic math course,
such as MATH 20, 30, or 64. It emphasizes the exploration
and application of different learning styles in learning math,
mastering common math vocabulary and concepts, and
improving study strategies for successful completion of basic
math classes. As a secondary emphasis, the course examines
how to improve math-specific performance. Taking this course
simultaneously with a basic math course allows for meaningful
practice and mastery of material taught in both courses.
COUN 105: Transfer Success
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 1 hour. (4930.13)
This course promotes academic success by providing students
with information that will clarify the transfer process, identify
support services on campus, and assist them in developing
a comprehensive transfer plan. Topics include a review of
higher education options, the process for determining a
major, applications and admissions timelines, and criteria for
establishing educational goals. Offered pass/no pass only. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for CRLP 100, COUN 100, COUN 105,
COUN 110, or INTR 100.
COUN 110: College Success Skills
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.13)
This course promotes academic success by providing
information, tools, and resources that students can use to
establish and achieve educational goals. Students explore
higher education opportunites and potential career interests
while focusing on educational planning. Students conduct
personal self-assessments and examine socioeconomic
and cultural influences that affect their education and
career decisions. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for CRLP 100,
COUN 100, COUN 105, COUN 110, or INTR 100.
This course focuses on the practical tools, information,
strategies, and skills development necessary for academic
success during students’ first year in college. It emphasizes
the function of higher education, study skills, introduction
and application of academic support services, and personal
development skills. This course is recommended for first year
college students or re-entry students.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 151
Areas of Study & Courses
COUN 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Dance
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
COUN 296: Topics in Counseling
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.13)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Counseling that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
The mission of the MiraCosta dance department is to create
artistic and academic excellence by engaging students in a
diversity of dance techniques, choreography, performance,
and scholarly practices. The department fosters student
engagement through creative and critical thinking and values
artistic exploration that enriches the individual, classroom, and
community.
Students take dance courses to prepare for a major, to
fulfill general education requirements, and for personal and
professional enrichment. The department offers performance
opportunities to both majors and non-majors. Career options
include professional performance or choreography, dance
studio or company management, child development, dance
therapy, movement analysis, dance ethnology, dance criticism,
dance science, academic research, and teaching.
Contact Information
Chair: Dave Massey
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/DNCE
152 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Department: Dance
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Areas of Study & Courses
Full-Time Faculty
Associate Degree
Trisha Hanada-Rogers
Dave Massey
Associate in Arts Degree
Dance
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Dance Associate in Arts Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to examine and interpret dance movement in terms of time,
space, and energy.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to create dance sequences using compositional principles of
time, space, and energy.
Dance Instructor Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to create and teach a sample class, demonstrating
correct instruction in body alignment, musicality, breathing,
and muscular control in a selected dance technique.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to examine and interpret dance movement in terms of time,
space, and energy.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to create dance sequences using compositional principles of
time, space, and energy.
The Dance program offers lower-division preparation for
students who plan to transfer to pursue a bachelor’s degree in
dance. Students planning to transfer and/or earn this associate
degree may also need to complete additional requirements
or electives required by the transfer institution, as many CSUs
and UCs have unique admissions and preparation-for-the-major
requirements. Students should meet with a MiraCosta College
counselor to identify required courses and to develop a written
plan for their targeted university.
Required courses:
DNCE 100
Dance Appreciation
or DNCE 101
Dance History
3
or DNCE 105
Dance Cultures of the World
DNCE 154
Ballet II
1.5
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to demonstrate and teach the complete Pilates mat work
choosing correct modifications after assessing movement
contraindications.
DNCE 160
Rehearsal and Performance
1.5
or DNCE 162
Dance Arts Ensemble I
or DNCE 261
Dance Repertory
or DNCE 262
Dance Arts Ensemble II
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to demonstrate and teach the complete Pilates reformer
work choosing correct modifications after assessing movement
contraindications.
DNCE 168
Jazz Dance II
1.5
DNCE 178
Modern Dance II
1.5
DNCE 185
Choreography I
3
Select 10 units from the following list of courses:
10
Pilates Instructor Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to create and design a safe, complete Pilates exercise regimen
incorporating both Pilates mat and reformer exercises.
DNCE 140
Ballroom Dance Performance I
DNCE 143
Ballroom Dance Performance II
DNCE 146
Latin Dance Performance I
DNCE 147
Latin Dance Performance II
DNCE 152
Ballet I
DNCE 154
Ballet II
DNCE 159
Pilates Mat Work I
DNCE 163
Creative Dance and Improvisation
DNCE 166
Jazz Dance I
DNCE 169
Introduction to World Dance Forms
DNCE 171
Selected World Dance
DNCE 176
Modern Dance I
DNCE 178
Modern Dance II
DNCE 183
Commercial Dance
DNCE 186
Choreography II
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 153
Areas of Study & Courses
DNCE 191
Tap Dance I
DNCE 193
Tap Dance II
DNCE 260
Dance Touring Ensemble
DNCE 263
Contemporary Dance Workshop and
Performance A
DNCE 264
Contemporary Dance Workshop and
Performance B
DNCE 266
Jazz Dance III
DNCE 288
Dance Pedagogy
takes theory and technique courses in Pilates mat work and
apparatus taught by certified Pilates professionals. The student
learns methods to appraise and design suitable exercise
programs for people of all ages and physical conditions.
To prepare the student for employment, instruction uses both
classroom work with a variety of instructional methods, such as
lecture, lab/demonstration, and independent/group projects,
and internship experiences in Pilates and fitness facilities.
Required courses:
Total Units
22
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Dance Instructor
The Dance Instructor certificate prepares dancers to teach
in private studios, recreational facilities, or community dance
programs. Students study theory and technique courses in
dance choreography, performance, and instruction. They
gain a well-rounded foundation in dance that encompasses
a variety of dance genres and teaching methodologies.
Most candidates for this certificate already have experience
in a specific dance genre and need to gain a broader
understanding and experience in the overall field of dance
education.
Required courses:
DNCE 140
Ballroom Dance Performance I
1
or DNCE 146
Latin Dance Performance I
DNCE 152
Ballet I
1.5
DNCE 160
Rehearsal and Performance
1.5
or DNCE 162
Dance Arts Ensemble I
DNCE 168
Jazz Dance II
1.5
DNCE 178
Modern Dance II
1.5
DNCE 185
Choreography I
3
DNCE 186
Choreography II
3
DNCE 288
Dance Pedagogy
DNCE 260
Dance Touring Ensemble
or DNCE 261
Dance Repertory
or DNCE 262
Dance Arts Ensemble II
Dance Stretch
Creative Dance and Improvisation
DNCE 169
Introduction to World Dance Forms
DNCE 179
Musical Theatre Dance
DNCE 183
Commercial Dance
DNCE 261
Dance Repertory
2
1.5
DNCE 292
3
Pilates Apparatus II
1.5
DNCE 258
Pilates Pedagogy
1.5
DNCE 259
Pilates Mat Work II
1.5
BIO 190
Survey of Human Musculoskeletal System
1
KINE 190
Introduction to Kinesiology
3
DNCE 292
Internship Studies
BUS 130
Small Business Management
BUS 170
Entrepreneur I
BUS 171
Entrepreneur II
2.5
3
16
Active participatory dance courses that are related in content
are grouped together. Students are allowed four enrollments
within each CRC group, but each course may be taken only
once unless its catalog description indicates it is repeatable.
Enrollments include any combination of course completions
(with an evaluative or nonevaluative symbol recorded on the
student’s transcript), withdrawals, and repetition.
Ballroom CRC
DNCE 140
Ballroom Dance Performance I
DNCE 143
Ballroom Dance Performance II
Choreography CRC
DNCE 185
Choreography I
DNCE 186
Choreography II
DNCE 263
Contemporary Dance Workshop and
Performance A
DNCE 264
Contemporary Dance Workshop and
Performance B
DNCE 160
Rehearsal and Performance
DNCE 261
Dance Repertory
DNCE 262
Dance Arts Ensemble II
Jazz CRC
Internship Studies
22.5
Pilates Instructor
The Pilates Instructor certificate prepares students to teach in a
Pilates studio, health club, recreational facility, or rehabilitation
center or to develop their own small business. The student
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
DNCE 257
Dance Performance CRC
Certificate of Achievement
154 1
Contemporary Dance Workshop CRC
or DNCE 262 Dance Arts Ensemble II
Total Units
Pilates Mat Work I
Courses Related in Content (CRC)
3
DNCE 163
1
DNCE 159
Total Units
Dance Cultures of the World
DNCE 158
Pilates Apparatus I
Select at least 3 elective units from the following
DNCE 105
Select 3 units from the following:
DNCE 157
DNCE 266
Jazz Dance III
DNCE 268
Jazz Dance IV
Latin CRC
DNCE 146
Latin Dance Performance I
DNCE 147
Latin Dance Performance II
Pilates CRC
DNCE 157
Pilates Apparatus I
Areas of Study & Courses
DNCE 158
Dance Stretch
DNCE 257
Pilates Apparatus II
DNCE 258
Pilates Pedagogy
DNCE 259
Pilates Mat Work II
Courses
DNCE 100: Dance Appreciation
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students who completed
DNCE 101 before Fall 2009.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course examines the aesthetics of dance using the
elements of time, space, and energy. It introduces students
to the origins of dance within cultural contexts. Topics include
dance genres, movement vocabulary, notation symbols, and
dance-production elements that choreographers use to convey
their creative intent. Students are required to attend a live
dance performance.
DNCE 143: Ballroom Dance Performance II
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
This continued study of ballroom dance principles and
techniques focuses on intermediate-level American and
international ballroom dances, including slow waltz, Viennese
waltz, tango, quickstep, jitterbug swing, and lindy hop. Students
learn and perform ballroom dance choreography while
improving alignment, musicality, styling, and partnering skills.
Topics include historical and multicultural aspects of these
dance forms. Students are required to attend a live dance
performance.
DNCE 146: Latin Dance Performance I
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
DNCE 101: Dance History
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course introduces beginning principles and techniques
of Latin American dances, such as the salsa, cha cha,
and merengue. Students learn and perform Latin dance
choreography while improving alignment, timing, footwork,
styling, and partnering techniques. Topics include historical and
multicultural aspects of Latin dances. Students are required to
attend a live dance concert.
This course provides a historical survey of dance in western
civilization from antiquity to the present. It emphasizes the
cultural context and historical development of ballet and
modern dance, and it relates dance to other art forms within
various historical periods. Students are required to attend a live
dance performance.
DNCE 147: Latin Dance Performance II
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DNCE 146.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
DNCE 105: Dance Cultures of the World
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course surveys dance around the world in a cultural and
social context. It emphasizes the different ways dance is used to
express ideas about the relationship between a person and the
body, the opposite sex, religion, cultural traditions, and ritual.
Cultures include Africa, Asia, Latin America, Middle East, North
America, and Eastern Europe.
DNCE 140: Ballroom Dance Performance I
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
This course introduces beginning principles and techniques
of American and international ballroom dances, such as the
fox-trot, waltz, tango, and swing. Students learn and perform
ballroom dance choreography while improving alignment,
musicality, partnering skills, and styling. Topics include historical
and multicultural aspects of ballroom dances. Students are
required to attend a live dance performance.
This continued study of Latin dance principles and techniques
focuses on intermediate Latin American dances, including
rumba, samba, and mambo. Students learn and perform Latin
dance choreography while improving alignment, styling, and
musicality. Topics include historical and multicultural aspects
of these dance forms. Students are required to attend a live
dance concert.
DNCE 152: Ballet I
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of ballet technique,
principles, and terminology. It prepares students for more
advanced study in ballet. Topics include terminology, variations
of ballet barre, center, petite allegro, adagio, and grande
allegro work. Students develop increased proficiency and
skill attainment with each repetition, and they are required to
attend a live dance performance. (May be repeated three
times.)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 155
Areas of Study & Courses
DNCE 154: Ballet II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DNCE 152.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
DNCE 160: Rehearsal and Performance
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course focuses on intermediate ballet technique,
principles, and terminology. It prepares students for more
advanced study in ballet. Topics include terminology, variations
of ballet barre, center, petit allegro, adagio, and grande
allegro work. Students develop increased proficiency and
skill attainment with each repetition. (May be repeated three
times.)
This course develops students’ dance performance skills
from the studio environment to the stage. Students work with
faculty and student choreographers in both traditional and
contemporary dance styles to ultimately learn, rehearse, and
complete a student-choreographed dance for a live and
recorded performance. The course examines performance
techniques, how dance choreography is interpreted, and
the relationship between dance choreography and musical
accompaniment.
DNCE 157: Pilates Apparatus I
Units: 1
Prerequisites: DNCE 159.
Corequisite: DNCE 159 if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
This course uses the universal reformer to teach Pilates
concepts, movement, and technique. Students learn beginning
exercises that develop and improve body alignment, strength,
flexibility, control, coordination, and breathing. These apparatus
exercises also aid in correcting imbalances or dance/sports
injuries. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses,
maximum credit, 4 units.
DNCE 158: Dance Stretch
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
This course includes specific flexibility and strengthening
exercises designed to improve overall body awareness. It
introduces students to body awareness programs, such
as yoga, ideokinesis, gyrokinesis, Pilates, Alexander, and
Feldenkrais techniques. Students are required to attend a live
dance performance. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity
courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
DNCE 159: Pilates Mat Work I
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
This Pilates conditioning course emphasizes basic Pilates mat
work exercises and body awareness that lead to improved
strength, flexibility, control, coordination, body alignment, and
breathing. Students learn basic Pilates principles to develop a
kinesiological awareness for improved dance/sports technique
and performance. (May be repeated two times.) UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
156 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
DNCE 162: Dance Arts Ensemble I
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course provides the opportunity for the beginningto-intermediate dancer to rehearse and perform works
choreographed by faculty for live and recorded performance.
The course covers all phases of the dance concert process
from audition and rehearsal to performance. Students perform
under professional working conditions and requirements and
experience different choreography, musical accompaniment,
and dance styles each semester the course is offered. (May be
repeated one time.)
DNCE 163: Creative Dance and Improvisation
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
This course develops improvisational skills in dance, using the
tools of time, space, and energy. It explores creative movement
through various stimuli, such as music, video, sound, text,
and art. Students work on structured improvisational tasks in
solos, duets, and small groups, analyzing movement through
discussion and personal reflection. Students must attend a live
dance event and write a reflective critique. (May be repeated
one time.)
DNCE 166: Jazz Dance I
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of jazz-dance
technique, principles, and terminology. It prepares students
for a more advanced study in jazz dance. Topics include
terminology, warm-up, on-the-diagonal combinations, and
dance combinations center floor. Students develop increased
proficiency and skill attainment with each repetition. Students
are required to attend a live dance performance. (May be
repeated one time.)
Areas of Study & Courses
DNCE 168: Jazz Dance II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DNCE 166
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
DNCE 178: Modern Dance II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DNCE 176
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course provides study in intermediate jazz-dance
technique, principles, and terminology. It prepares students
for a more advanced study in jazz dance. Topics include
terminology, warm-up center floor, on-the-diagonal
combinations, and dance combinations center floor. Students
develop increased proficiency and skill attainment with each
repetition. (May be repeated one time.)
This course is a continued study of modern dance, based on
the principles of contraction and release, fall and recovery,
and effort/shape. Students learn movement combinations and
group choreography, utilizing intermediate modern dance
technique, improvisation, and choreographic variations.
Students are required to attend a live dance concert. (May be
repeated three times.)
DNCE 169: Introduction to World Dance Forms
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
DNCE 179: Musical Theatre Dance
Units: 1-2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 6 hours. (1008.00)
This course introduces the dance and music of various world
dance cultures, including Africa, Asia, South America, the
Middle East, and Europe. Students learn basic dance steps,
postures, rhythms, timing, and movements of different world
dance forms. The course examines the function and aesthetic
of dance within various cultures, such as ritual, social, and
artistic expression. Students develop increased proficiency and
skill attainment with each repetition, and they are required to
attend a live dance performance. (May be repeated one time.)
DNCE 171: Selected World Dance
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.00)
This course offers a concentrated study of dance movement
and technique from a selected world dance culture. It
emphasizes understanding the world dance culture’s particular
style, aesthetic, and cultural significance. Students learn the
specific posture, alignment, rhythms, footwork, arm movements,
and musicality of the selected world dance form. Topics may
vary to include dances from Africa, Asia, South America, the
Middle East, and other parts of the world. Students are required
to attend a live dance concert.
DNCE 176: Modern Dance I
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course introduces modern dance principles and
techniques, exploring the elements of time, space, energy, and
shape. Students learn correct body alignment, rhythm, breath,
and balance through the study and practice of modern dance
combinations. Students are required to attend a live dance
performance. (May be repeated three times.)
This course focuses on dance techniques within the context of
historical and contemporary Broadway musicals and/or plays.
Students assess how movement, energy, stage presence, and
musicality affect level of performance, and they integrate these
techniques into choreography and a theatrical performance.
Entry into this course is by audition.
DNCE 183: Commercial Dance
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1008.10)
This course emphasizes movement for commercial dance work
used in movies, concert dance, television, musical theater,
and videos offering current trends in popular dance styles.
It includes turns, floor work, leaps, and rhythm techniques.
Students are required to attend a live dance performance. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit,
4 units.
DNCE 185: Choreography I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DNCE 152, DNCE 166, or DNCE 176.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course focuses on the art and craft of choreography using
the compositional dance principles of time, space, and energy.
Students analyze dances by contemporary choreographers
and create dance sequences using structured improvisation,
movement exploration, and musical interpretation. The course
emphasizes solo and small-group work. (May be repeated one
time.)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 157
Areas of Study & Courses
DNCE 186: Choreography II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: DNCE 185.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
DNCE 258: Pilates Pedagogy
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: DNCE 157 and DNCE 259.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course continues the development of choreographic
concepts and skills from DNCE 185. Students create and craft
dance compositions based on the principles of time, space,
and energy, expanding movement concepts from solo or
small-group work to larger-group choreography. Topics include
music/accompaniment and basic costume design.
This course is designed for the intermediate/advanced Pilates
student. It covers the theory and practical application of
teaching Pilates. Topics include assessment, goal setting, lesson
plans, communication, cueing, precautions, and modifications
for Pilates clients.
DNCE 191: Tap Dance I
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course provides study in beginning tap-dance technique,
principles, and terminology. It prepares students for a more
advanced study in tap dance. Topics include terminology,
warm-up, combinations across the floor, and center-floor
combinations. Students develop increased proficiency and skill
attainment with each repetition. (May be repeated one time.)
DNCE 193: Tap Dance II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DNCE 191
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course provides study in intermediate tap-dance
technique, principles, and terminology. It prepares students
for a more advanced study in tap dance. Topics include
terminology, warm-up, combinations across the floor, and
center-floor combinations. Students develop increased
proficiency and skill attainment with each repetition. (May be
repeated one time.)
DNCE 257: Pilates Apparatus II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: DNCE 157
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course focuses on the intermediate through advanced
exercises and concepts using the Universal Reformer developed
by Joseph H. Pilates. The exercises focus on improved body
alignment, strength, flexibility, control, centering, coordination,
and breathing. This course employs a series of exercises
designed to enhance dance performance and prevent injury. It
also aids in dance/sports rehabilitation. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
158 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
DNCE 259: Pilates Mat Work II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: DNCE 159.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course focuses on the intermediate through advanced
exercises and concepts developed by Joseph H. Pilates.
The exercises focus on improved body alignment, strength,
flexibility, control, centering, coordination, and breathing. This
course employs a series of exercises designed to enhance
dance performance and prevent injury. It also aids dance/
sports rehabilitation. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity
courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
DNCE 260: Dance Touring Ensemble
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course allows students to study traditional and
contemporary choreography through rehearsal and
competitive performance. Dancers participate in concerts
and festivals on campus and throughout the community and
region, including American College Dance Festival Association
(ACDFA) competitions. Students experience different repertoire
each semester the course is offered. (May be repeated three
times.)
DNCE 261: Dance Repertory
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course provides analysis and aesthetic study of existing,
major choreographic works by dance faculty or guest artists.
Students participate in the creative process, production, and
performance of a complete dance work while studying its
aesthetic form and content.
Areas of Study & Courses
DNCE 262: Dance Arts Ensemble II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course provides the opportunity for the intermediateto-advanced dancer to rehearse and perform works
choreographed by faculty for live and recorded performance.
The course covers all phases of the dance concert process
from audition and rehearsal to performance. Students perform
under professional working conditions and requirements.
DNCE 263: Contemporary Dance Workshop and Performance
A
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course offers students and choreographers a beginningto-intermediate level experience working in a collaborative
workshop setting. Students participate in the creative process
throughout the workshop, which culminates in a public
performance. Students work under professional working
conditions and requirements.
DNCE 264: Contemporary Dance Workshop and Performance
B
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course offers students and choreographers an
intermediate-to-advanced level experience working in a
collaborative workshop setting. Students participate in the
creative process throughout the workshop, which culminates
in a public performance. Students work under professional
working conditions and requirements.
DNCE 266: Jazz Dance III
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DNCE 168.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course provides study in intermediate/advanced jazzdance technique, principles, and terminology. Topics include
body alignment, and musicality.
DNCE 288: Dance Pedagogy
Units: 2
Prerequisites: DNCE 146, DNCE 152, DNCE 166, or DNCE 176.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.10)
This course for dancers with a strong understanding of dance
technique and aesthetics covers the theory and practical
application of teaching dance. Topics include the analysis of
objectives, principles, and techniques of dance instruction,
including the development of lesson plans, syllabi, musical
accompaniment, and student-learning outcomes for a variety
of levels, styles, and settings.
DNCE 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
DNCE 296: Topics in Dance
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.5 hours.
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 1.5 hours.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 2.5 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Dance that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
DNCE 268: Jazz Dance IV
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DNCE 266
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00)
This course provides study in advanced jazz dance technique,
principles, and terminology. Topics include musicality and
various jazz styles.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 159
Areas of Study & Courses
DNCE 298: Directed Study in Dance
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1008.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
DNCE 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Design
engineering design. The program also offers courses for those
who may not be pursuing a career in design but who have
an interest in or need to understand graphic communication.
The engineering course work includes engineering design
graphics courses for students majoring in aerospace,
civil, environmental, industrial, mechanical, and structural
engineering. The architectural course work gives students a
working knowledge of the practices and technical aspects
of architectural design and drawing. Careers in architecture,
some of which require an undergraduate degree, include
urban planner, surveyor, draftsperson, building inspector,
corporate architect, and technical illustrator. Employers for
students obtaining certificates and associate degrees include
federal, state, and local land use planning agencies; building
and transportation agencies; private architectural, contract,
and construction companies; and for-profit industrial and
manufacturing companies in life science, defense, sport/
recreation equipment, and various other industries.
Contact Information
Chair: David Parker
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
Department: Design
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Paul Clarke
David Parker
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Architectural Design Associate in Arts Degree
and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to design and create graphical representations of the built
environment based on industry standards.
Computer-Aided Drafting Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to design and create graphical representations of the built
environment based on industry standards.
Computer-Aided Drafting and Design Associate
in Arts Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to design and create graphical representations of the built
environment based on industry standards.
Mechanical Design Associate in Arts Degree
and Certificate of Achievement
The Design program offers courses in architecture, drafting,
and engineering for students who wish to transfer to a fouryear institution or gain employment in the fields of architectural
design, computer aided design, mechanical design, and
160 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to design and create graphical representations of the built
environment based on industry standards.
Areas of Study & Courses
Associate Degrees
DESN 102
Architectural Drawing
3
Associate in Arts Degrees
DESN 103
Architectural Communications
3
DESN 105
Construction Materials
3
DESN 200
Architectural Design I
3
DESN 201
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting II
3
DESN 207
Revit Building Information Modeling
3
DESN 290
Portfolio and Presentation
1
or DESN 292
Internship Studies
or DESN 299
Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Architectural Design
Computer-Aided Drafting
Computer-Aided Drafting and Design
Mechanical Design
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees). Students should meet
with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and to
develop a written educational plan for their chosen degree or
certificate.
Certificates
Select at least 6 elective units from the following:
BUS 133
Project Management
DESN 107
History of Western Architecture -A
Sustainable Perspective
DESN 204
Advanced 3D Modeling and Prototyping
HORT 127
Landscape Design
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
6
Total Units
32
Certificate of Achievement
Computer-Aided Drafting
This certificate provides a solid foundation in computer-aided
drafting (CAD). In addition to the common core of required
courses, students choose an area of emphasis (architecture,
engineering, or landscape) and complete all the courses from
that emphasis. Completion of this program prepares students
for entry level support positions in a variety of local industries
or for continuing their education. Typical job titles of students
completing this certificate include drafter, CAD operator,
AutoCAD technician, and architectural and civil drafter.
This certificate consists of 18 units of required core courses
and 6-8 units of elective courses from one area of emphasis:
architecture, engineering, or landscape. Students should
select an emphasis area and complete both courses in that
emphasis.
Required courses:
Certificate of Achievement
DESN 101
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
4
DESN 110
Graphics Communication
4
DESN 201
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting II
3
DESN 203
Solid Modeling
3
DESN 204
Advanced 3D Modeling and Prototyping
3
DESN 290
Portfolio and Presentation
1
or DESN 292
Internship Studies
Architectural Design
or DESN 299
Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
This certificate program gives students a working knowledge
of the practices and technical aspects of architectural design
and drawing. Students complete the required core courses
and choose an elective course that relates to their own career
objective. Completion of this certificate provides students with
a foundation in architectural design, construction materials,
computer-aided drafting, and building-information modeling,
and it enables students to qualify for entry-level positions in
detailing, revisions, design update, and general office practice.
Select an area of emphasis in either Architecture,
Engineering or Landscape from below:
Required courses:
6-8
Emphasis in Architecture (6 units):
DESN 102
Architectural Drawing
DESN 207
Revit Building Information Modeling
Emphasis in Engineering (8 units):
DESN 111
Engineering Design Graphics
DESN 120
Manufacturing Processes
Emphasis in Landscape (6 units):
DESN 100
Fundamentals of Design
3
DESN 101
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
4
HORT 127
Landscape Design
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 161
Areas of Study & Courses
HORT 220
Computer-Aided Landscape Design
Applications
Total Units
24-26
Certificate of Achievement
Computer-Aided Drafting and Design
This certificate provides a solid foundation in computer-aided
drafting and design (CADD). In addition to the common core
of required courses, students choose an area of emphasis
(architecture, engineering, or landscape) and complete at
least 9 elective units from that emphasis. Completion of this
program prepares students for entry-level support positions in
a variety of local industries or for continuing their education.
Typical job titles of students completing this certificate include
designer, CAD technician, design drafter, and architectural
and civil designer.
This certificate consists of 19 units of required core courses
and 9-11 units of elective courses from one area of emphasis:
architecture, engineering, or landscape.
Required courses:
Required courses:
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
4
DESN 110
Graphics Communication
4
DESN 201
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting II
3
DESN 203
Solid Modeling
3
DESN 204
Advanced 3D Modeling and Prototyping
3
DESN 290
Portfolio and Presentation
1
or DESN 292
Internship Studies
or DESN 299
Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
9
Architecture Emphasis
DESN 100
Fundamentals of Design
DESN 102
Architectural Drawing
DESN 105
Construction Materials
DESN 200
Architectural Design I
DESN 207
Revit Building Information Modeling
Project Management
DESN 111
Engineering Design Graphics
DESN 120
Manufacturing Processes
DESN 207
Revit Building Information Modeling
Architectural Drawing
HORT 117
Plant Identification: Trees, Shrubs, and
Vines
HORT 126
Landscape Irrigation
HORT 127
Landscape Design
HORT 220
Computer-Aided Landscape Design
Applications
Total Units
DESN 111
Engineering Design Graphics
4
DESN 120
Manufacturing Processes
4
DESN 203
Solid Modeling
3
DESN 204
Advanced 3D Modeling and Prototyping
3
DESN 290
Portfolio and Presentation
DESN 292
Internship Studies
DESN 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
1
Total Units
23
Certificate of Proficiency
Applied Design
This certificate prepares individuals with skills fundamental
to careers in professional interior and industrial design. It is
designed for students who desire to secure entry-level positions
or who plan to continue their education at a college of design.
Job titles typical of students completing this certificate include
design assistant or interior design assistant.
ART 100
Drawing and Composition
3
DESN 100
Fundamentals of Design
3
DESN 101
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
4
6-7
DESN 102
Architectural Drawing
DESN 107
History of Western Architecture -A
Sustainable Perspective
DESN 200
Architectural Design I
Emphasis in Industrial Design (6-7 units)
DESN 110
Graphics Communication
DESN 203
Solid Modeling
DESN 204
Advanced 3D Modeling and Prototyping
Total Units
16-17
Certificate of Proficiency
27
Mechanical Design
This certificate prepares individuals for entry-level jobs with
companies and agencies involved in the design and/or
manufacture of mechanical objects, devices, and equipment.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
4
4
Emphasis in Design (6 units)
Certificate of Achievement
162 AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
Graphics Communication
Select an area of emphasis in Interior Design or Industrial
Design from below:
Landscape Emphasis
DESN 102
DESN 101
DESN 110
Required courses:
Engineering Emphasis
BUS 133
Select one unit from the following list of courses:
DESN 101
Select at least 9 units from one of the three areas of
emphasis (Architecture, Engineering, or Landscape):
Students develop the knowledge and skills needed to take
design ideas from concept sketches to digital models, physical
prototypes, detail drawings, and subsequent manufacture
and production. Job titles of students completing this
certificate include drafter, designer, mechanical designer, and
engineering assistant. The certificate also equips employed
and transfer students with expertise using the latest industrystandard design tools required for job promotions, advanced
study, and professional practice.
Construction Management
This certificate program prepares students for entry-level
opportunities in the growing construction industry. It introduces
students to the communication tools, construction materials,
and management principles required for an entry-level position
and/or further study in construction management. In addition
Areas of Study & Courses
to the required courses, students may select an elective course
in a more specialized area of emphasis.
print, fabricate, and/or manufacture physical prototypes in a
rapid manner.
Required courses:
Required courses:
DESN 101
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
or DESN 102
Architectural Drawing
DESN 105
3-4
DESN 101
Construction Materials
3
BUS 131
Management Principles
3
BUS 133
Project Management
3
Choose one course from the following:
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
BUS 130
Small Business Management
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
DESN 207
Revit Building Information Modeling
HORT 128
Landscape Construction
3-4
15-17
Certificate of Proficiency
Engineering Design Graphics
This certificate provides students an opportunity to explore and
become proficient with the graphic tools used by designers and
engineers to take ideas from design concept, to prototype, to
physical product. Students who complete this certificate are
encouraged to then pursue the Mechanical Design or CADD
Certificate of Achievement and continue their engineering
education.
DESN 101
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
4
DESN 110
Graphics Communication
4
DESN 111
Engineering Design Graphics
4
DESN 203
Solid Modeling
3
Total Units
15
Certificate of Proficiency
Drafting Fundamentals
This certificate introduces and provides an overview of the
issues and skills involved in drafting education or a career in
drafting. A graphics communication course covering sketching,
visualization, and projection is combined with a computeraided drafting and architectural drawing course to help
students develop skills using the board and AutoCAD. These
courses provide a foundation for work or study related to
drafting.
Required courses:
DESN 101
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
4
DESN 102
Architectural Drawing
3
DESN 110
Graphics Communication
4
Total Units
4
DESN 120
Manufacturing Processes
4
DESN 201
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting II
3
DESN 203
Solid Modeling
3
DESN 204
Advanced 3D Modeling and Prototyping
3
Total Units
17
Courses
Total Units
Required courses:
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
11
Certificate of Proficiency
3D Modeling and Prototyping
This certificate of proficiency will prepare students for
opportunities in the emerging fields of 3D Printing (3DP), Rapid
Prototyping (RP), and Additive Manufacturing (AM). Students
develop skills in producing digital 3D models that are used to
DESN 100: Fundamentals of Design
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00)
This course introduces the fundamentals of the design process
as students develop and apply design skills using visual
elements and principles of two- and three-dimensional design.
It includes solving visual problems and creating authentic
designs using black and white and color media in both twoand three-dimensions. Students also study design in historical,
social, and multicultural contexts. (Formerly DRAF 136.)
DESN 101: AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (0953.00)
This course introduces computer-aided drafting. Students use
computers with AutoCAD software and peripheral equipment
to develop computer-generated drawings for various fields
and industries, including architecture, engineering, landscape,
and interior design. Students learn principles and techniques
that enable them to create, edit, modify, scale, and plot twodimensional technical drawings. (Formerly DRAF 101.)
DESN 102: Architectural Drawing
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0201.00)
This course provides the methods and techniques required for
architectural drawing. It covers freehand sketching, line work,
lettering, geometric constructions, orthographic and isometric
projections, and construction drawings, which include floor
plans, elevations, sections, and details. (Formerly ARCH 101.)
DESN 103: Architectural Communications
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DESN 102.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0201.00)
This course provides students the fundamentals of architectural
presentation, rendering, and model making. It introduces
standards and applications of design language, color theory,
pen and ink, freehand drawing, two-point perspective, and
model making technique. (Formerly ARCH 103.)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 163
Areas of Study & Courses
DESN 105: Construction Materials
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0201.00)
DESN 120: Manufacturing Processes
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours. (0953.00)
This course provides an overview of the processes and materials
used in construction. Topics include elements of planning,
designing, and contracting of the work. The course emphasizes
site preparation and the materials used in residential and
commercial projects, including wood, concrete, steel, glazing,
and masonry as applied to the interiors and exteriors of
buildings. (Formerly ARCH 105.)
This course provides students a basic understanding of the
properties of materials and how these materials, including
plastics, metals, ceramics, and composites, are transformed
into finished products. Students study basic and advanced
manufacturing processes, including material removal, joining
and assembly, molding and casting, surfacing, and finishing.
(Formerly DRAF 120.)
DESN 107: History of Western Architecture -A Sustainable
Perspective
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0201.00)
DESN 200: Architectural Design I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: DESN 102.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0201.00)
This course introduces the history of Western architecture from
the ancient Near East to the present day with an emphasis on
the timeless principles of sustainability. It examines selected
significant historical works of architecture to shed light on the
technological, religious, and social forces that shaped these
works. Students explore the principles of sustainable design as
they examine past exemplars of architectural design through
the lens of present day sustainability guidelines.
DESN 110: Graphics Communication
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in DRAF
110 or ENGR 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00)
This course introduces graphics as a fundamental means of
communicating technical information for product design,
manufacturing, and construction. Students develop an
understanding of graphics communication in the design
process and gain hands-on experience using modern
computer-aided solid modeling software to produce part
models, assemblies, and drawings according to industry
standards. (Formerly DRAF/ENGR 110.)
DESN 111: Engineering Design Graphics
Units: 4
Prerequisites: DESN 110
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in DRAF
111 or ENGR 111.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00)
This course prepares engineering and design students to use
the graphic communication tools used by engineers in industry.
Students develop an advanced understanding of these tools in
the engineering design process and gain hands-on experience
using modern computer-aided solid modeling software to
produce complex part models, assemblies, and drawings.
(Formerly DRAF/ENGR 111.)
164 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This course introduces the basics of architectural design.
Students learn and apply fundamental form and space
concepts to a design project using visual communication,
spatial communications, and creative problem solving.
(Formerly ARCH 102.)
DESN 201: AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: DESN 101.
Corequisite: DESN 101 if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00)
This course focuses on applying advanced AutoCAD skills in
the design process to create models, drawings, and related
documentation for a variety of applications and industries.
Topics include tolerancing, block libraries, attributes, bills of
materials, isometric drawings, plotting, modeling, and photorealistic 3D rendering. Students develop and apply skills in
visualizing, creating, and editing 3D shapes for modeling,
testing, rapid prototyping, and marketing. The course
emphasizes improving productivity and developing modeling
and presentation skills. (Formerly DRAF 201.)
DESN 203: Solid Modeling
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DESN 101 and DESN 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (0953.00)
This course introduces engineering and design students to 3D
parametric solid modeling, including basic and intermediate
parts, assemblies, and drawings. From their models, students
produce CAD drawings to include orthographic, pictorial,
section, and detail views. The course also covers dimensioning,
dimensional tolerancing, and thread notation per ASME
Y14.5M-1994 and uses Pro/Engineer (Creo) and SolidWorks
software extensively.
Areas of Study & Courses
DESN 204: Advanced 3D Modeling and Prototyping
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DESN 203 or DESN 201.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (0953.00)
This course provides advanced theory and hands-on
application of 3D modeling and prototyping to students
with prior CAD modeling experience or coursework. Building
upon the fundamentals, students develop skill in solid and
surface modeling, mold designing, rapid prototyping, and
additive manufacturing. Students develop and refine modeling
skills, produce prototypes, enhance presentation models,
and use simulation and 3D printing tools to solve design
problems. Additional topics include file translation, presentation
assessment, and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and
Computer Numerical Control (CNC) techniques. (Formerly
DRAF 204.)
DESN 207: Revit Building Information Modeling
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: DESN 101 and DESN 102.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in ARCH
207 or DRAF 207.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00)
This course prepares intermediate design students to create,
detail, and present CAD models of the built environment
using Revit building information modeling software. Students
create and modify building models, produce presentations
including renderings and animated walk-throughs, manipulate
parametric objects, create schedules and details from the
data base, and generate construction documents from the
model. The course is intended for students pursuing careers
in architecture, engineering, construction, drafting, and
landscape and interior design. (Formerly ARCH 207/DRAF 207.)
DESN 290: Portfolio and Presentation
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0953.00)
Students develop a professional portfolio using their best work
from previously completed architecture and drafting courses
to highlight their design and drawing achievements. The
course also covers how students can market themselves for the
workforce through resume writing, job search strategies, and
presentation and interview skills.
DESN 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance. (Formerly DRAF 292.)
DESN 296: Topics in Design
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0953.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Drafting that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule. (Formerly
DRAF 296.)
DESN 298: Directed Study in Design
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (0953.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement. (Formerly DRAF
298.)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 165
Areas of Study & Courses
DESN 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance. (Formerly DRAF
299.)
Dramatic Arts
Full-Time Faculty
Eric Bishop
Andrew Layton
Tracy Williams
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Dramatic Arts Associate in Arts Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to demonstrate theatrical techniques-theories and adapt
production practices.
Design and Technology Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to participate in and effectively observe, analyze, and critique
the strengths and weaknesses of dramatic performances,
taking into account various aspects of their design and
technical production, including but not limited to scenic
design, lighting design, overall stagecraft, lighting, makeup,
and sound.
Associate in Arts in Theatre Arts for Transfer
Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to demonstrate theatrical techniques-theories and adapt
production practices.
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degree
Dramatic Arts
The Dramatic Arts program includes theoretical and practical
courses in all aspects of theatre. Students take courses to
prepare for a transfer major in dramatic arts, for professional
training, or to fulfill general education requirements.
Performance and technical theatre opportunities are available
to both majors and non-majors. Career options include
both creative and technical work in the performing arts/
entertainment industry, such as live theatre, film, television, and
broadcasting; academic research and teaching; and other
communications-related fields, such as advertising and public
relations.
Contact Information
Chair: Tracy Williams
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/DRAM
166 Department: Theatre and Film
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
The Dramatic Arts program offers lower-division preparation
for students who plan on transferring to pursue a bachelor’s
degree in dramatic arts. Students planning to transfer and/
or earn this associate degree may also need to complete
additional requirements or electives required by the transfer
institution, as many CSUs and UCs have unique admissions and
preparation-for-the-major requirements. Students should meet
with a MiraCosta College counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written plan for their targeted university.
Required courses:
DRAM 105
Introduction to Theatre
3
DRAM 107
Introduction to Design for Performance
3
DRAM 123
Script Analysis for Performance and
Design
3
DRAM 130
Acting I
3
DRAM 253
Stage Makeup
3
DRAM 256
Stagecraft
3
Select at least 3 units from the following:
DRAM 270
Rehearsal and Performance - Technical
Theatre
DRAM 271
Rehearsal and Performance -- Acting
3
Areas of Study & Courses
DRAM 272
Rehearsal and Performance -- Musical
Theatre
Total Units
DRAM 271
Rehearsal and Performance -- Acting
DRAM 272
Rehearsal and Performance -- Musical
Theatre
21
List A:
Associate in Arts Degree
9
DRAM 107
Introduction to Design for Performance
DRAM 123
Script Analysis for Performance and
Design
DRAM 141
Stage Lighting
DRAM 146
Introduction to Stage Costume
DRAM 231
Acting II
DRAM 253
Stage Makeup
DRAM 256
Stagecraft
May select a maximum of 3 units from courses below if
not used in Required Core above:
DRAM 270
Rehearsal and Performance - Technical
Theatre
DRAM 271
Rehearsal and Performance -- Acting
DRAM 272
Rehearsal and Performance -- Musical
Theatre
Total Units
Associate in Arts in Theatre Arts for Transfer Degree
Students completing this associate degree will have completed
lower-division major preparation requirements for a theatre arts
degree, an emphasis or option within a theatre arts degree, or
a degree considered similar to theatre arts at a participating
California State University (CSU) campus. Following transfer
to a participating CSU campus, students will be required to
complete no more than 60 units to obtain a bachelor’s degree;
however, some CSU campuses accepting this degree may
require additional lower-division major preparation. This degree
may not be appropriate preparation for students transferring
to a non-participating CSU campus or to a university or college
that is not part of the CSU system. Students should consult with
a MiraCosta counselor for further information regarding the
most efficient pathway to transfer as a theatre arts major and
to determine which CSU campuses are participating in this
program. Career options for those who attain a bachelor’s
degree in theatre arts include actor, set designer, stage
manager, artist, designer, museum curator, photographer,
illustrator, and other related career paths.
To complete the degree, students must fulfill the following
requirements:
18
To insure this degree is completed with no more than 60 units,
students should select courses that will also satisfy a general
education requirement on the CSU-GE or IGETC-CSU general
education pattern. Students are also strongly advised to
complete the CSU History, Constitution, and American Ideals
requirement prior to transfer.
*
Course approved for the CSU-GE general education
pattern.
** Course approved for the CSU-GE and IGETC-CSU general
education patterns.
Associate in Arts Degree
Design and Technology
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degree p. 52s). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) CSU transferable units
Complete all courses required in the major with a “C” or
better
Complete the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general education
pattern
Achieve a minimum CSU transferable GPA of 2.0
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College.
Required Core: (6 units)
DRAM 105
DRAM 130
Introduction to Theatre
Acting I
**
*
May select a maximum of 3 units from courses below:
DRAM 270
3
3
3
Rehearsal and Performance - Technical
Theatre
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 167
Areas of Study & Courses
Certificate
enrollments within each CRC group, but each course may
be taken only once unless its catalog description indicates
it is repeatable. Enrollments include any combination of
course completions (with an evaluative or nonevaluative
symbol recorded on the student’s transcript), withdrawals, and
repetition.
Acting CRC
DRAM 130
Acting I
DRAM 148
Acting for the Camera
DRAM 231
Acting II
Actor’s Academy CRC
DRAM 126
Shakespearean Acting Lab
DRAM 226
Advanced Performance Lab
Voice and Movement CRC
DRAM 109
Practicum of Voice and Diction
DRAM 110
Voice and Diction
DRAM 232
Movement for the Stage
Courses
DRAM 105: Introduction to Theatre
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course exposes students to fundamental practices and
creative processes in dramatic arts, focusing on the relationship
of theatre to various cultures throughout history and on the
contributions of significant individuals. It introduces elements
of the production process, including collaboration, playwriting,
acting, directing, design, and criticism, and it explores differing
periods, styles, and genres of theatre through reading,
discussion, films, and live theatre critique. Students are required
to attend college theatre performances. C-ID THTR-111.
Certificate of Achievement
Design and Technology
This occupational certificate program prepares students for
professional careers in theatre, film, television, music, and/or
dance by teaching skills in scenery, costumes, lighting, sound,
and makeup.
Required courses:
DRAM 105
Introduction to Theatre
3
DRAM 107
Introduction to Design for Performance
3
DRAM 123
Script Analysis for Performance and
Design
3
DRAM 139
Stage and Concert Management
3
or DRAM 253
Stage Makeup
DRAM 141
Stage Lighting
3
DRAM 146
Introduction to Stage Costume
3
DRAM 256
Stagecraft
3
DRAM 270
Rehearsal and Performance - Technical
3
Theatre
*
Total Units
*
To complete the DRAM 270 requirement, multiple sections
must be taken in any unit combination to fulfill a total of 3
units.
Courses Related in Content (CRC)
Active participatory dramatic arts courses that are related
in content are grouped together. Students are allowed four
168 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
24
DRAM 107: Introduction to Design for Performance
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00)
This course explores the principles, elements, techniques, and
practices of design for performance. Topics include analysis
of space, movement, mood, period, style, texture, materials,
and color using industry-standard techniques of rendering,
model-making, drafting, and presentation. The classroom
experience stresses the importance of working collaboratively
on projects and understanding critique as part of the design
process. Students are required to attend college theatrical
performances. C-ID THTR-172.
DRAM 109: Practicum of Voice and Diction
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course emphasizes vocal training for actors. It includes the
basics of vocal training: projection, articulation, expression,
breathing techniques, and relaxation as needed for theatrical
productions.
Areas of Study & Courses
DRAM 110: Voice and Diction
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in COMM
110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course introduces students to techniques for improving
the quality, flexibility, and effectiveness of the speaking voice.
Students examine and practice clear articulation of American
English sounds. Topics include vocal expressiveness and variety,
physical relaxation, posture, breath control techniques, and the
International Phonetic Alphabet. Attendance at local theatrical
productions is required.
DRAM 120: Dramatic Literature (Ancient Greeks to
Shakespeare)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course introduces students to dramatic literature from
the Greeks to the Seventeenth Century. It emphasizes the
analysis of dramatic structure and practice, including reading
strategies, character and plot analyses, and production
practices and styles of the historical periods covered. Students
may be required to attend live performances.
DRAM 121: Dramatic Literature (Restoration to Present)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course introduces students to dramatic literature from
the 18th century to the present. It emphasizes the analysis of
dramatic structure and practice, including reading strategies,
character and plot analyses, and production practices and
styles of the historical period covered. Students may be required
to attend live performances.
DRAM 123: Script Analysis for Performance and Design
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00)
DRAM 126: Shakespearean Acting Lab
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)
This lab course focuses on the basics of classical acting
techniques, including comprehension and delivery of
Shakespeare’s works. It includes ensemble work, exercises,
games, and the examination of universal themes. Students are
required to attend local theatrical productions.
DRAM 130: Acting I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of acting and
performance techniques based on Stanislavski’s principles.
It emphasizes the ability to express thought, emotion, and
character through the effective use of voice, movement, and
script analysis. Students are required to attend live theatrical
performances.
DRAM 133: Performance and Design Portfolio Practicum
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition, nomination, or interview.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course focuses on the study and practical application of
theatre techniques in competitive performance and design.
Students enter their performance/design practicum project
into a competitive field for evaluation and feedback from
outside professionals and educators. At the end of this course,
acting/design students prepare a performance work/design
portfolio to demonstrate skills and maximize their strengths.
Students also compare and contrast their work with peers at
other educational institutions and tour other college/university
theatre programs in conjunction with the Kennedy Center/
American College Theatre Festival. Students enter this course
by audition/interview or nomination by the Kennedy Center/
American College Theatre Festival. (May be repeated three
times.)
This course explores the principles, theories, and techniques of
play script analysis and script scoring for theatrical production.
Students learn how to read and break down a play for textual
analysis, script scoring, dramatic structure, imagery, and
character development. Students are required to attend live
theatrical performances. C-ID THTR-151.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 169
Areas of Study & Courses
DRAM 139: Stage and Concert Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00)
This course introduces the skills and procedures involved in
stage managing a theatrical, dance, or music production.
Through hands-on experience and observation, students learn
to develop the knowledge and skills involved in managing
a live performance. They also learn how to properly devise
and design scheduling systems to prep, organize, and run
rehearsals; design and develop a production book and prompt
script; run appropriate dimmer and sound checks; design,
organize, and format scenic shifts and their execution; and
develop systems for calling lighting and sound cues during
live performance. Students are required to attend two live
performances.
DRAM 141: Stage Lighting
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00)
This course introduces students to the technique and practices
of theatrical stage lighting, and it develops skills relative to
common applications in the field. Students engage in both
lecture and practice, gaining hands-on experience while
demonstrating skills learned in coursework. Creating and
designing lighting projects in class as well as working on current
MiraCosta College Theatre productions, students evaluate
and analyze the effectiveness of their skills and creations and
critically reflect on their execution. Students are required to
attend local theatrical productions. C-ID THTR-173.
DRAM 146: Introduction to Stage Costume
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00)
This course gives students the opportunity to study costume
history, design, and basic construction techniques as an
introduction to costuming. Students learn about fabrics and
conventional and non-conventional costume materials.
Students are required to attend college theatrical productions.
C-ID THTR-174.
DRAM 148: Acting for the Camera
Units: 3
Prerequisites: DRAM 130.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course introduces performance for the camera concerning
the mediums of film, video, and television. Students examine
practical approaches and techniques specifically required
for each different medium to provide a comprehensive
understanding of the relationship between performance and
media.
170 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
DRAM 226: Advanced Performance Lab
Units: 1
Prerequisites: DRAM 126.
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)
This advanced performance lab course focuses on advanced
process and methodology, performance styles, and
performance approaches. Students are required to attend live
theatrical performances.
DRAM 231: Acting II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: DRAM 130.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course provides an in-depth application of Stanislavski’s
principles with an emphasis on characterization, scene
study, methodology, and process. Acting studies focus on
performance from varied acting philosophies (e.g., Meisner,
Michael Chekhov, Hagen), styles, and genres. Students are
required to attend live theatrical performances. (May be
repeated one time.) C-ID THTR-152.
DRAM 232: Movement for the Stage
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course creates an environment in which students explore
dynamic movement. It emphasizes not only physical control,
strength, flexibility, and creative imagination but also the
integration of mind, body, and emotion. (May be repeated one
time.)
DRAM 253: Stage Makeup
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00)
This course introduces students to the technique and practices
of theatrical makeup, and it develops skills relative to the
common applications for stage and film. Students engage in
the practice hands-on and create looks ranging from basic
corrective makeup to fantasy character makeup. Students
evaluate and analyze the effectiveness of their creations, reflect
on their skills, produce proper design documentation, and put
makeup into practice backstage during MiraCosta College
Theatre productions. C-ID THTR-175.
Areas of Study & Courses
DRAM 256: Stagecraft
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00)
This course introduces students to the technique and practices
of theatrical stagecraft, and it develops skills relative to the
common applications found backstage. Students engage
in both lecture and practice, gaining hands-on experience
while demonstrating skills learned in course work. Creating
scenic environments for current MiraCosta College Theatre
productions, students evaluate and analyze the effectiveness of
their creations, critically reflect on their skills, and put them into
practice. C-ID THTR-171.
DRAM 270: Rehearsal and Performance - Technical Theatre
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: May not enroll in two sections of the same
course in any given semester.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 9 hours. (1007.00)
This course provides students with theatre production
experience. All students participate in the Kennedy Center/
American College Theatre Festival academic theatre
competition. Production crew positions include stage or house
management, construction, scenery, properties, costume,
lighting, sound, and running crews. The course emphasizes
the rehearsal process and culminates in public performances.
Students are required to attend theatrical productions. (May be
repeated three times.) C-ID THTR-192.
DRAM 271: Rehearsal and Performance -- Acting
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 9 hours. (1007.00)
This course provides students with the opportunity to perform
in non-musical theatrical productions. All students participate
in the Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival
academic theatre competition. The course emphasizes the
rehearsal process and culminates in public performances.
(May be repeated three times.)
DRAM 272: Rehearsal and Performance -- Musical Theatre
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 9 hours. (1007.00)
DRAM 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
DRAM 296: Topics in Dramatic Arts
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Dramatic Arts that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
DRAM 298: Directed Study in Dramatic Arts
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1007.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
This course provides students with the opportunity to perform in
main-stage musical productions. All students participate in the
Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival academic
theatre competition. The course emphasizes the rehearsal
process and culminates in public performances. (May be
repeated three times.) C-ID THTR-192.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 171
Areas of Study & Courses
DRAM 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Economics
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Earth Sciences
Earth Sciences is an interdisciplinary field that includes
astronomy and space science, climatology, geology, physical
geography, and oceanography. Students take courses in
these areas of study to prepare for a major or to fulfill general
education requirements in physical science.
Contact Information
Chair: Chris Metzler
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/EART
Department: Physical Sciences
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Full-Time Faculty
Chris Metzler
Courses
EART 106: Earth and Space Science
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1930.00)
This course introduces astronomy, including planetary origin
and motions; earth science, including origin and composition
of earth, landforms, and plate tectonics; atmospheric
processes, including climate and weather; earth’s oceans and
other bodies of water, and their currents and tides as well as the
hydrologic cycle. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: No credit if taken after
a college level course in Astronomy, Geology, or Earth Science.
172 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Economics is the science that examines the production,
distribution, and consumption of goods and services as well
as the theory and management of economies and economic
systems. Students take economics courses to prepare for
a major or to fulfill general education requirements. With a
bachelor’s degree, students have career options in banking,
business, management, finance, insurance, real estate,
marketing, law, politics, government, journalism, health care,
and education.
Contact Information
Chairs: Lynne Miller
Department: Social Science
[email protected]
Office: Building OC3600,
(Fall 2014), Herschel Stern
760.795.6648
[email protected] (Spring
2015)
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ECON
Full-Time Faculty
Shafin Ali
Courses
ECON 100: Survey of Economics
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2204.00)
This course provides a non-technical introduction to economics.
Designed for the non-major, it shows the application of basic
economic principles to contemporary social issues and public
policy. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: No credit if taken after ECON 101
or ECON 102.
Areas of Study & Courses
ECON 101: Principles of Economics: MACRO
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2204.00)
This course introduces the science of economics as applied
to the aggregate economy. It emphasizes national income
determination, money and banking, monetary and fiscal
policies, international economic relationships, and issues
associated with economic growth.
ECON 102: Principles of Economics: MICRO
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2204.00)
ECON 298: Directed Study in Economics
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (2204.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Education
This introductory course focuses on choices of individual
economic units. Topics include scarcity, opportunity costs,
comparative advantage, supply, demand, elasticity, cost
theory, and price and output determination under various
market structures and factor markets.
ECON 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
The Education discipline offers preparation for multiple- and
single-subject teaching credentials as well as introductory
courses to assist students in making career choices. A liberal
studies major is recommended for students planning to transfer
to CSU to earn a multiple-subject (grades K-6) credential.
Requirements vary among transfer institutions, so students
planning to earn a bachelor’s degree and teaching credential
should meet with a MiraCosta College counselor early in their
first semester to identify courses that will meet requirements for
their intended major and transfer institution.
Contact Information
Chair: Penny Skemp
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 173
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
Contact Information
EDUC 115: Foundations of Teaching as a Profession
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0801.00)
Chairs: Kelly Hagen
[email protected]
(Letters, Pre-Transfer), John
Kirwan [email protected]
(Letters, Transfer)
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ENGL
This course introduces teaching careers in primary and
secondary education and involves 45 hours of supervised
fieldwork in community K-12 settings. Topics include the
historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of
education; contemporary issues in public education; teaching
pedagogy, curriculum, and instruction; teacher and student
roles in the teaching/learning process; teacher qualifications
and dispositions, California schools, and the credentialing
system; and the contributions of culture, ethnicity, race,
language, age, gender, sexual orientation, motivation, and
learning styles.
EDUC 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
English
The English discipline includes courses in expository and
creative writing and American, British, and world literature.
Students take these courses to prepare for a major in
English and/or to fulfill general education requirements. A
bachelor’s degree in English can lead to a career in law,
education, journalism, mass media, marketing, public relations,
communications, business, or the humanities.
174 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Department: Letters, Transfer
Department and Letters, PreTransfer Department
Office: Building SAN Admin,
760.634.7876
Full-Time Faculty
Robert Archer
Anthony Burman
Maria Figueroa-Chacon
Teresa Guinon
Kelly Hagen
Susan Herrmann
José Jara
Jeff Keehn
John Kirwan
Curry Mitchell
Jane Mushinsky
Dara Perales
Jim Sullivan
Chad Tsuyuki
Robert Turner
Courses
ENGL 40: English Grammar and Usage
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (1501.00)
This course reviews basic grammar conventions and
emphasizes sentence craft and clarity. Topics include the parts
of speech, sentence types, syntax development, and editing
strategies. This course is intended for students who want to
improve the accuracy and complexity of their prose at the
sentence level.
ENGL 49: Introduction to Academic Writing
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ACE 49, ENGL 802, ESL 49, OR ESL 802.
Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00)
This course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing. It
provides practice in gathering, organizing, and communicating
information and in applying the principles and conventions of
standard edited American English. Offered pass/no pass only.
ENGL 50: Introduction to College Composition
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ENGL 49, ESL 49, or ACE 49 or eligibility determined
by the English placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ACE 50, ENGL 803, ESL 50, or ESL 803.
Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00)
This course offers intensive practice in the writing process,
critical reading, and critical thinking. It also provides practice in
acquiring, synthesizing, and communicating information and
in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited
American English.
Areas of Study & Courses
ENGL 100: Composition and Reading
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ACE 50, ENGL 50, or ESL 50 or eligibility determined
by the English placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00)
This course in critical reading and expository writing offers
training in the reading and writing processes, the development
and organization of expository prose, and research techniques.
The course emphasizes quality in logic and diction.
ENGL 201: Critical Thinking, Composition, and Literature
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ENGL 201H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00)
Designed to continue the critical thinking, reading, and writing
practice begun in ENGL 100, this course teaches critical
thinking, reading, composition, research, and argument using
literature as the basis for analysis. This course is designed for
students who seek to satisfy both the full-year composition and
the critical-thinking transfer requirements. C-ID ENGL-110.
ENGL 201H: Critical Thinking, Composition, and Literature
(Honors)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ENGL 201.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00)
This course offers enhanced instruction in critical thinking,
critical writing, and research using the genres of literature
(poetry, drama, short story, and novel). It is intended for
highly motivated students who seek to satisfy the full-year
composition and critical-thinking transfer requirements. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for ENGL 201 or ENGL 201H.
ENGL 202: Critical Thinking and Composition
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ENGL 202H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00)
This course emphasizes critical thinking, particularly in the
reading and writing of argument. Content includes methods of
analysis; principles of logic, including the relationship between
language and logic; techniques of reasoning, including the
use of evidence; techniques of style; and research skills. C-ID
ENGL-105.
ENGL 202H: Critical Thinking and Composition (Honors)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ENGL 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00)
This course offers enhanced instruction in critical thinking and
writing, particularly in the reading and writing of argument.
Content includes methods of analysis; principles of logic,
including the relationship between language and logic;
techniques of reasoning, including the use of evidence;
techniques of style; and research skills. It is intended for
highly motivated students who seek to satisfy the full-year
composition and critical-thinking transfer requirements. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for ENGL 202 or ENGL 202H.
ENGL 280: Creative Writing
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1501.00)
This course focuses on the elements of creative writing,
particularly through the study and creation of prose fiction
and poetry. It offers practice in various genres and forms,
based on instructor approach, and it promotes the writing
process through a combination of drafting exercises and
revision strategies. Utilizing workshops as the primary mode
of instruction, this course offers the opportunity to produce
creative works for publication, performance, and/or personal
enrichment.
ENGL 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 175
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
ENGL 296: Topics in English
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1501.00)
ESL 20: Listening and Speaking for Non-Native Speakers of
English
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.86)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
English that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
ENGL 298: Directed Study in English
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1501.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
English as a Second
Language
The English as a Second Language (ESL) discipline includes
courses in academic writing, reading and vocabulary
development, grammar, and speaking and listening. ESL
courses emphasize critical thinking and clear communication,
and those numbered 50 and higher are associate-degree
applicable. Non-native speakers of English take these courses
to build skills for success in all college courses and in the
workplace.
Contact Information
Chairs: Melissa Lloyd-Jones
[email protected]
(Fall 2014), Mary Gross
[email protected] (Spring
2015)
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ESL
Department: English as a
Second Language
Office: Building SAN Admin,
760.634.7876
Full-Time Faculty
Mary Gross
Melissa Lloyd-Jones
176 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This course emphasizes the development of aural and oral
competence in standard American English through listening
to and participating in a variety of communicative activities. It
offers instruction and practice in listening and speaking skills
to develop students’ ability to understand and participate
in conversations, discussions, and other interpersonal
communication in academic, work-related, and social contexts.
Practical applications include participating in small group
discussions, working on individual pronunciation and intonation
variations, and developing academic note taking competence.
Offered pass/no pass only.
ESL 30: Reading and Vocabulary Development for Non-Native
Speakers of English
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.85)
This course is designed for non-native speakers who are making
the transition to the use of academic English and who require
the development of reading and vocabulary skills needed for
academic and workplace success. Students read a variety
of texts and apply appropriate reading strategies as well as
participate in activities to advance vocabulary and facilitate
comprehension. Offered pass/no pass only.
ESL 40: Grammar for Non-Native Speakers of English
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.87)
This course reviews basic grammar for non-native speakers
of American English and emphasizes standard usage. Topics
include parts of speech, clauses, verb forms and tenses,
pronoun case, and sentence types. The course is intended
for non-native speakers who are making the transition to the
use of academic English and who require the development
of grammatical skills for academic and workplace success.
Offered pass/no-pass only.
ESL 49: Introduction to Academic Writing for Students from
Multilingual Backgrounds
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ACE 49, ENGL 49.
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (4930.84)
This course is designed for students from diverse language
backgrounds who are making a transition to the use of
academic English and who require the development of writing
skills. The course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and
writing. It provides practice in gathering, organizing, and
communicating information and in applying the principles
and conventions of standard edited American English. Offered
pass/no pass only.
Areas of Study & Courses
ESL 50: Introduction to College Composition for Students from
Multilingual Backgrounds
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ACE 49, ENGL 49, or ESL 49 or eligibility determined
by the English placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ACE 50, ENGL 50, ENGL 803, or ESL 803.
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (4930.84)
This course, designed for students from diverse language
backgrounds, offers intensive practice in the writing process,
critical reading, and critical thinking. It also provides practice in
acquiring, synthesizing, and communicating information and
in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited
American English.
ESL 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
Film
Students take film courses to satisfy general education
requirements in arts and humanities and to explore the
discipline. Students who earn a bachelor’s degree in film at
a four-year university pursue careers as filmmakers, editors,
digital media artists, film archivists, media educators, film
festival curators, script analysts, cinematographers, television
producers, and studio executives.
Contact Information
Chair: Tracy Williams
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/FILM
Full-Time Faculty
Department: Theatre and Film
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Courses
FILM 101: Introduction to Film
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
FILM 101H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00)
As an introduction to film as an art form and as a cultural
artifact, this course examines content and techniques found in
film, historical and stylistic influences on film makers, their artistic
values, and the social implications of film. Students view feature
films as well as shorts and animated films as a basis for critical
analysis.
FILM 101H: Introduction to Film (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
FILM 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00)
This honors course offers highly motivated students an enriched
introduction to film as an art form and as a cultural artifact.
Students examine, research, and present content and
techniques found in film, historical and stylistic influences on film
makers, their artistic values, and the social implications of film.
Students view feature films as well as shorts and animated films
as a basis for critical analysis. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
FILM 101 or FILM 101H.
FILM 106: Study of Filmed Plays
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in DRAM
106.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00)
This course focuses on filmed adaptations of plays by
comparing and contrasting the stage and screen versions in
concept, writing, and production. Students gain insight and
appreciation for both art forms through structural analysis,
class discussions, and written critiques. Students are required to
attend public performances.
FILM 110: Film History
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00)
This course traces the history of motion pictures from 1880 to the
present. It examines film as a serious historical study including
aesthetics, politics, economics, socio-political assumptions
and biases, and evolving technologies. It also explores both
American and foreign films from their conception as an
entertainment novelty through their ethical, social, and political
consequences on society today.
Billy Gunn
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 177
Areas of Study & Courses
FILM 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
FILM 296: Topics in Film
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in Film
that are not included in regular course offerings. Each Topics
course is announced, described, and given its own title and
296 number designation in the class schedule.
FILM 298: Directed Study in Film
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (0612.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
French
The International Languages Department offers courses that
provide the foundation for French language study. They
also satisfy either the humanities requirement for general
education or the proficiency requirement in an international
language when required for transfer. A bachelor’s degree in
an international language such as French can lead to a career
178 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
in advertising, broadcasting, consulting, translating, teaching,
international service, public relations, social work, and sales.
Note: Students educated in a non-English speaking country
through high school or equivalent will generally not earn lowerdivision transfer credit in their language at most universities.
Students who might be affected by this rule should consult a
counselor and/or the International Languages Department
Chair before enrolling in the courses described below.
Contact Information
Chair: Andrea Petri
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/FREN
Department: International
Languages
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Courses
FREN 101: Elementary French (First Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
FREN 102, FREN 201, or FREN 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1102.00)
This introductory course develops French language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It covers
basic French pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar.
The course also provides for increased awareness of the
Francophone world’s history, geography, and customs,
including its socio-political practices and cultural artifacts. This
course corresponds to the first two years of high school French.
FREN 102: Elementary French (Second Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: FREN 101 or two years of high school French with a
C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
FREN 201 or FREN 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1102.00)
This course continues to develop French language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in FREN 101, and it develops the student’s ability to
engage in casual conversation, express opinions, and make
suggestions in French. The course also provides for increased
awareness of the francophone world’s history, geography, and
customs, including its socio-political practices and cultural
artifacts. This course corresponds to the third year of high
school French.
Areas of Study & Courses
FREN 201: Intermediate French (Third Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: FREN 102 or three years of high school French with
a C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
FREN 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1102.00)
This course continues to develop French language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in FREN 101 and FREN 102, and it develops the
student’s ability to engage in casual conversation, express
opinions, and make suggestions in French. The course also
provides for increased awareness of the French-speaking
world’s history, geography, and customs, including its
socio-political practices and cultural artifacts. This course
corresponds to the fourth year of high school French.
FREN 202: Intermediate French (Fourth Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: FREN 201 or four years of high school French with
a C or better.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1102.00)
This course continues to develop French language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in FREN 201. It also develops the student’s ability
to express opinions and make recommendations in Frenchlanguage debates and discussions. The course provides for
increased awareness of the French-speaking world’s history,
geography, and customs, including its socio-political practices
and cultural artifacts through extensive reading and writing
assignments as well as oral presentations.
FREN 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
FREN 296: Topics in French
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1102.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
French that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
FREN 298: Directed Study in French
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1102.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Geography
Geography is the study of the earth, including the distribution
and interconnectedness of all natural and cultural
phenomena, and how places are particular expressions of
nature and culture. Students take courses to prepare for a
major in geography or to fulfill general education requirements.
With a bachelor’s degree, students find career options in
teaching and research, natural resource management,
meteorology (weather), cartography (map-making), urban/
regional planning, location analysis, and geographic
information system (GIS) work.
Contact Information
Chairs: Lynne Miller
Department: Social Science
[email protected]
Office: Building OC3600,
(Fall 2014), Herschel Stern
760.795.6648
[email protected] (Spring
2015)
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/GEOG
Full-Time Faculty
Herschel Stern
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 179
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
GEOG 101: Physical Geography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00)
This course introduces the science of the natural environment
from a spatial perspective. It examines processes, distributions,
and interrelationships of climate, water, life forms, soil, and
landforms and their significance in environmental issues.
GEOG 101L: Physical Geography Laboratory
Units: 1
Prerequisites: GEOG 101.
Corequisite: GEOG 101 if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (2206.00)
This course is intended to accompany GEOG 101. It
emphasizes map reading and the collection, presentation, and
interpretation of physical geographic data.
GEOG 102: Cultural Geography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00)
This course takes a broad view of geographic patterns of
human behavior, including the development, distribution,
ecological relationships, and landscapes of cultural features
and processes, at scales ranging from local to global. Topics
include population dynamics, economic activity, politics,
language, religion, folk and popular culture, ethnicity, and
urban settlement.
GEOG 104: World Geography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00)
This global survey course examines the distinguishing features
of major culture regions and the interrelationships among
culture regions set in the context of physical and human
geography. Principal areas of focus include economic
development, geopolitics, ecological relationships, sociocultural issues, and globalization.
GEOG 108: Environmental Sustainability and Society
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00)
This course examines a broad range of environmental issues
from multiple perspectives by using a geographic framework
to study natural resources and environmental degradation
in relationship to politics, economics, ethics, and other sociocultural processes. It addresses the basic science behind
environmental issues while emphasizing the social dimensions
of problems and sustainable solutions. Topics include basics of
physical geography and demography, exploitation of water,
mineral, energy, and biological resources, and the degradation
of life, land, water, and air, including climate change.
GEOG 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
GEOG 296: Topics in Geography
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Geography that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
180 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
GEOG 298: Directed Study in Geography
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (2206.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Geology
Geology is the scientific study of the origin, history, and structure
of the earth. Students take courses to prepare for a major
in geology and to fulfill general education requirements.
With a bachelor’s degree, students find career options within
private corporations (such as petroleum, mining, engineering,
hydrology, and environmental consulting companies),
government agencies (such as the U.S. Geological Survey, the
California Department of Conservation, and regional planning
offices), and education.
Contact Information
Chair: Chris Metzler
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/GEOL
Department: Physical Sciences
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Full-Time Faculty
Keith Meldahl
Chris Metzler
John Turbeville
Courses
GEOL 101: Physical Geology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
GEOL 101H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1914.00)
Physical geology introduces the processes at work changing
the earth today. Within the context of global tectonics, it
explores the origins of rocks and minerals and the dynamics
of processes such as igneous activity, seismicity, and crustal
deformation driven by the release of earth’s internal heat. It also
examines how air, water, and ice move in response to gravity
and energy from the sun, sculpting earth’s surface by eroding,
transporting, and depositing weathered rock materials.
GEOL 101H: Physical Geology (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
GEOL 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1914.00)
This course introduces the processes at work changing
the earth today. Within the context of global tectonics, it
explores the origins of rocks and minerals and the dynamics
of processes such as igneous activity, seismicity, and crustal
deformation driven by the release of earth’s internal heat. It also
examines how air, water, and ice move in response to gravity
and energy from the sun, sculpting earth’s surface by eroding,
transporting, and depositing weathered rock materials. This
honors course offers highly motivated students the opportunity
to complete, document, and discuss independent scientific
research. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for GEOL 101 or
GEOL 101H.
GEOL 101L: Physical Geology Laboratory
Units: 1
Prerequisites: GEOL 101 or GEOL 101H
Corequisite: GEOL 101 or GEOL 101H if prerequisite not met.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in GEOL
101LH.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1914.00)
This course, which is intended to accompany GEOL 101/
GEOL 101H, provides hands-on experience in identifying mineral
samples, rock samples, and fossils, interpreting geologic and
topographic data from various maps, and analyzing geologic
exposures. Field trips to study local geology are required.
GEOL 101LH: Physical Geology Laboratory (Honors)
Units: 1
Prerequisites: GEOL 101 or GEOL 101H
Corequisite: GEOL 101 or GEOL 101H if prerequisite not met.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
GEOL 101L.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (1914.00)
This course, which is intended to accompany GEOL 101/
GEOL 101H, provides hands-on experience in identifying mineral
samples, rock samples, and fossils, interpreting geologic and
topographic data from various maps, and analyzing geologic
exposures. This honors course offers highly motivated students
the opportunity to complete and present independent scientific
research and its application to geologic problems in the
field. Students perform field observations at specific geologic
points of interest off campus. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
GEOL 101L or GEOL 101LH.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 181
Areas of Study & Courses
GEOL 120: Environmental Geology: Earth Hazards and
Humanity
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1914.00)
for general education or the proficiency requirement in an
international language when required for transfer. A bachelor’s
degree in an international language such as German can lead
to a career in advertising, broadcasting, consulting, translating,
teaching, international service, public relations, social work,
and sales.
This course explores the interaction of humans with the
geologic environment. Topics include earth processes that
produce geologic hazards (flooding, earthquakes, landslides,
volcanoes, coastal hazards); formation, distribution, and
exploitation of geologic resources (soils, surface water,
groundwater, fossil fuels, and ore deposits); and human effects
on the earth environment (global warming, ozone depletion,
hazardous waste disposal, landfills, river dams, and land
subsidence).
Note: Students educated in a non-English speaking country
through high school or equivalent will generally not earn lowerdivision transfer credit in their language at most universities.
Students who might be affected by this rule should consult a
counselor and/or the International Languages Department
Chair before enrolling in the courses described below.
GEOL 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
GEOL 298: Directed Study in Geology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1914.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
German
The International Languages Department offers courses
that provide the foundation for German language study.
These courses also satisfy either the humanities requirement
182 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Contact Information
Chair: Andrea Petri
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/GRMN
Department: International
Languages
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Courses
GRMN 101: Elementary German (First Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
GRMN 102, GRMN 201, or GRMN 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1103.00)
This introductory course develops German language
acquisition through listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
It covers basic German pronunciation, vocabulary, and
grammar. It also explores the history, geography, and customs
of the German-speaking countries. This course corresponds to
the first two years of high school German.
GRMN 102: Elementary German (Second Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: GRMN 101 or two years of high school German
with a C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
GRMN 201 or GRMN 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1103.00)
This course continues to develop German language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in GRMN 101, and it develops the student’s ability
to engage in casual conversation, express opinions, and make
suggestions in German. The course also provides for increased
awareness of the German-speaking world’s history, geography,
and customs, including its socio-political practices and cultural
artifacts. This course corresponds to the third year of high
school German.
Areas of Study & Courses
GRMN 201: Intermediate German (Third Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: GRMN 102 or three years of high school German
with a C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in GRMN
202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1103.00)
This course continues to develop German language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in GRMN 101 and GRMN 102, and it develops the
student’s ability to engage in casual conversation, express
opinions, and make suggestions in German. The course also
provides for increased awareness of the German history,
geography, and customs, including its socio-political practices
and cultural artifacts. This course corresponds to the fourth year
of high school German.
GRMN 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
Gerontology
Gerontology is a multidisciplinary study of the human aging
process. It examines the physiological, psychological, and
social aspects of aging as well as how an aging population
affects contemporary society. Professionals in the field
work for community and human service organizations;
retirement communities; federal, state, and local government
agencies; educational and research institutions; and related
organizations that work either directly or indirectly with aging
adults.
Contact Information
Chair: Robert Kelley
[email protected]
Dean: Nikki Schaper
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/GERO
Department: Psychology
Office: Building OC3100,
760.795.6871
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Gerontology Associate in Arts Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to evaluate the differing needs of the elderly based on age,
health, sex, race, ethnicity, and class.
Associate Degree
Associate in Arts Degree
Gerontology
The Gerontology program offers lower-division preparation
for students who plan on transferring to pursue a bachelor’s
degree in gerontology. Students planning to transfer and/
or earn this associate degree may also need to complete
additional requirements or electives required by the transfer
institution, as many CSUs and UCs have unique admissions and
preparation-for-the-major requirements. Students should meet
with a MiraCosta College counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written plan for their targeted university.
Required courses:
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
Part A: Elective Courses - Select a minimum of 6 units of
the following courses.
COMM 215
Intercultural Communication
GERO 130
Caregiving: Techniques for Working with
the Frail Elderly
GERO 250
Intergenerational Issues
GERO 292
Internship Studies
HEAL 101
Principles of Health
NURS 160
Certified Nursing Assistant
NUTR 125
Nutrition and Aging
PSYC/SOC
145
Psychology/Sociology of the Family
PSYC 170
Psychology of Aging: Adult Development
and Aging
Part B: Elective Courses - Select a minimum of 9 units
from the following list, including any courses listed above
not used for Part A.
BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
or BIO 101
& 101L
General Biology
and General Biology Laboratory
BIO 220
Human Physiology
COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
PSYC 101
General Psychology
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 3
6
9
183
Areas of Study & Courses
GERO 130: Caregiving: Techniques for Working with the Frail
Elderly
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1309.00)
or PSYC 101H General Psychology (Honors)
PSYC/SOC
103
Social Psychology
PSYC/SOC
104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
or PSYC/
SOC 104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
SOC 110
Comparative Cultures
Total Units
18
Certificates
Certificate of Proficiency
Optimal Aging and Older Adulthood
This program provides a multidisciplinary study of the theories
and factors related to optimal aging and improved functioning
in older adulthood. The certificate emphasizes optimal aging,
starting with young adulthood and continuing through older
adulthood, in recognition that cognitive, social, and biological
factors influence a person’s longevity, healthcare requirements,
and quality of life.
Required courses:
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
3
Required Electives:
Part A (Choose one course):
KINE 210
Exercise Prescription for Special
Populations
NUTR 125
Nutrition and Aging
PSYC 170
Psychology of Aging: Adult Development
and Aging
Part B (Select a minimum of 6 units from the following list,
including any courses listed above not used in Part A):
HEAL 101
Principles of Health
HEAL 222
Stress Management
KINE 204
Techniques and Analysis of Fitness and
Weight Training
NUTR 100
Nutrition Today
Total Units
3
6
12
Courses
GERO 101: Introduction to Aging
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1309.00)
This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of gerontology
and the study of aging, with an emphasis on biology/
physiology, psychology, and sociology. It emphasizes the
impact of increased life expectancy and aging on individuals,
families, and health care providers and systems. Topics include
factors linked to gender, race, ethnicity, and cultural diversity
as well as changes and challenges for social and public
services, public policy, and the politics of aging. Gerontology is
a growing field with practical applications in health care, fitness
and wellness, social work, and social services.
184 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This course provides practical and theoretical information on
age-related physical and cognitive changes and how to work
with the elderly who are frail due to advanced age and/or
chronic illness. It explores cultural diversity and its affect on
caregiving, health consequences of caregiving, and available
community resources. This course is specifically targeted for
students interested in working in the field of aging or those who
are caregivers for family members.
GERO 250: Intergenerational Issues
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1309.00)
This course examines interpersonal relations between older
adults and other age groups in the United States. It explores
policies and related programs that impact intergenerational
relationships and care-giving interactions. It highlights societal,
cultural perspectives and issues and real-world outcomes.
GERO 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
GERO 296: Topics in Gerontology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (2001.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Gerontology that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
Areas of Study & Courses
Health Education
HEAL 222: Stress Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1262.00)
This course introduces students to the concepts of stress
management and prevention. It emphasizes the analysis
of stressful events, application of appropriate techniques,
and development and implementation of a stress reduction/
prevention plan. Topics include the physiology of the stress
response, adaptive and maladaptive behaviors, stressprevention strategies, stress-reduction techniques, and how to
implement a self-care stress-reduction plan.
HEAL 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
The Health Education program offers courses for students
planning to transfer in a variety of health-related fields as
well as for students needing to fulfill general education
requirements. Career opportunities include teaching; health
care administration; federal, state, and local health care
agency work (such as for the County Health Department, Cal
OSHA, and the Environmental Protection Agency); and health
care and education in the private sector.
Contact Information
Chair: Robert Fulbright
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/HEAL
Department: Kinesiology,
Health and Nutrition
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Gail Meinhold
Courses
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
HEAL 296: Topics in Health
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Health that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
HEAL 101: Principles of Health
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00)
This survey course on the principles of health and wellness aims
to enhance the student’s self-awareness through exposure
to the principles of wellness. Topics include exercise, weight
maintenance, nutrition, human sexuality, sexual responses,
sexually transmitted diseases, drug use, misuse and abuse,
cancers, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 185
Areas of Study & Courses
HEAL 298: Directed Study in Health
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (0837.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
HEAL 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
History
social services, journalism, finance, law enforcement, public
relations, advertising, or government service.
Contact Information
Chair: Brad Byrom
[email protected]
Dean: Nikki Schaper
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/HIST
Department: History
Office: Building OC3100,
760.795.6871
Full-Time Faculty
Robert Bond
Brad Byrom
Lesley Doig
Lisa Lane
Christopher Sleeper
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Associate in Arts in History for Transfer Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to construct a historical thesis that could be supported by
selected primary sources from the era covered by the course.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to articulate the causal and/or consequential elements of an
event from the era covered by the course.
Associate Degree
Associate in Arts Degree
Associate in Arts in History for Transfer Degree
Students completing this associate degree will have completed
lower-division major preparation for a history degree, an
emphasis or option within a history degree, or a degree
considered similar to history at a California State University
(CSU) campus. Following transfer to a participating CSU
campus, students will be required to complete no more
than 60 units to obtain a bachelor’s degree; however, some
CSU campuses may require additional lower-division major
preparation. This degree may not be appropriate preparation
for students transferring to a CSU campus not accepting this
degree or to a university or college that is not part of the CSU
system. Students should consult with a MiraCosta counselor
for further information regarding the most efficient pathway
to transfer as a history major and to determine which CSU
campuses are participating in this program.
To complete the degree, students must fulfill the following
requirements:
The study of history is the endeavor to understand the present
by becoming knowledgeable about the past. As the context
of all human activity, history gives students the depth needed
to understand society and their place in it. Students may take
courses to prepare for a major in history or to fulfill general
education requirements. A bachelor’s degree in history can
lead to a career in business administration, law, teaching,
186 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) CSU transferable units
Complete all courses required in the major with a “C” or
better
Complete the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general education
pattern
Achieve a minimum CSU transferable GPA of 2.0
Areas of Study & Courses
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College.
Required Core: 6 units
HIST 110
United States History to 1877
or HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
or HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
List A: 6 Units. Select two courses. (It is recommended
that you select courses that meet lower-division major
preparation requirements at your intended transfer
university.)
HIST 100
3
3
6
World History to 1500
or HIST 100H World History to 1500 (Honors)
HIST 101
World History Since 1500
Area 1: 4 Units.
CHNS 101
Elementary Chinese (First Semester)
CHNS 201
Intermediate Chinese (Third Semester)
FREN 101
Elementary French (First Semester)
FREN 102
Elementary French (Second Semester)
FREN 201
Intermediate French (Third Semester)
FREN 202
Intermediate French (Fourth Semester)
GRMN 101
Elementary German (First Semester)
GRMN 102
Elementary German (Second Semester)
GRMN 201
Intermediate German (Third Semester)
ITAL 101
Elementary Italian (First Semester)
ITAL 102
Elementary Italian (Second Semester)
ITAL 201
Intermediate Italian (Third Semester)
ITAL 202
Intermediate Italian (Fourth Semester)
JAPN 101
Elementary Japanese (First Semester)
JAPN 102
Elementary Japanese (Second
Semester)
JAPN 201
Intermediate Japanese (Third Semester)
JAPN 202
Intermediate Japanese (Fourth
Semester)
SPAN 101
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
SPAN 102
Elementary Spanish (Second Semester)
SPAN 201
Intermediate Spanish (Third Semester)
SPAN 202
Intermediate Spanish (Fourth Semester)
Area 2: 3 Units.
Any History course not used above.
HIST 103
Western Civilization to 1648
HIST 103H
Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
HIST 104
Western Civilization Since 1648
HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
HIST 105
History of England
HIST 105H
History of England (Honors)
HIST 107
East Asian Societies
HIST 109
History of the Middle East
HIST 115
Women in American History
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
Mexican American History Through 1877
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
HIST 145
African American History to 1877
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
HIST 165
California History
Total Units
19
All courses listed above can also be used in specific general
education categories on the CSU-GE (Plan B p. 72) or
CSU-IGETC (Plan C p. 76) general education patterns. To
insure this degree is completed with no more than 60 units,
students should select courses for required general education
categories that may also be used to complete the degree
requirements.
Courses
or HIST 101H World History Since 1500 (Honors)
List B: 7 Units. Select one course from each Area.
HIST 141
7
HIST 100: World History to 1500
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 100H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course traces the historical development of the world to
1500. It emphasizes the interaction between the environment
and people, the development of religious and philosophical
systems, and the internal evolution and interaction within and
among cultures. Students experience a variety of learning
techniques designed to promote greater cross-cultural
understanding.
HIST 100H: World History to 1500 (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course emphasizes the historical interaction between
the environment and people, the development of religious
and philosophical systems, and the internal evolution and
interaction within and among cultures from early civilizations
to 1500. As an honors course, it offers an enriched experience
for highly motivated students through a pro-seminar format,
challenging course work, emphasis on the use of sources as
evidence, and the development of analytical historical theses.
UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for HIST 100 or HIST 100H.
HIST 101: World History Since 1500
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 101H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course traces the historical development of the world since
1500. It emphasizes the relationship between technology and
society, the development of rationalism and imperialism, and
the movement toward independent nationhood and global
interdependence.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 187
Areas of Study & Courses
HIST 101H: World History Since 1500 (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
HIST 104H: Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 104.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course emphasizes the historical interaction between
the environment and people, the development of religious
and philosophical systems, and the internal evolution and
interaction within and among cultures from 1500 to present. As
an honors course, it offers an enriched experience for highly
motivated students through a pro-seminar format, challenging
course work, emphasis on the use of sources as evidence,
and the development of analytical historical theses. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for HIST 101 or HIST 101H.
This course covers the history of western civilization from 1648
to contemporary times with an emphasis on western culture
and humanities. As an honors course, it offers an enriched
experience for highly motivated students through a pro-seminar
format, challenging course work, emphasis on the use of
sources as evidence, and the development of analytical
historical theses. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for HIST 104 or
HIST 104H.
HIST 103: Western Civilization to 1648
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 103H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
HIST 105: History of England
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 105H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course covers the history of western civilization from
earliest times to 1648 with an emphasis on western culture and
humanities. It explores social, economic, political, and artistic
trends as well as the history of gender, sexuality, and ideas
during the ancient and medieval eras.
This course examines the cultural, social, political, economic,
intellectual, and diplomatic history of England from earliest
times to the present. Topics include the creation of Britain,
Viking and Roman influence, feudalism, commercialism,
empire, world wars, Soviet relations, and contemporary
developments.
HIST 103H: Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 103.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
HIST 105H: History of England (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 105.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course covers the history of western civilization from
earliest times to 1648 with an emphasis on western culture
and humanities. As an honors course, it offers an enriched
experience for highly motivated students through a pro-seminar
format, challenging course work, emphasis on the use of
sources as evidence, and the development of analytical
historical theses. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for HIST 103 or
HIST 103H.
This course examines the cultural, social, political, economic,
intellectual, and diplomatic history of England from earliest
times to the present. As an honors course, it offers an enriched
experience for highly motivated students through a pro-seminar
format, challenging course work, emphasis on the use of
sources as evidence, and the development of analytical
historical theses. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for HIST 105 or
HIST 105H.
HIST 104: Western Civilization Since 1648
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 104H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
HIST 107: East Asian Societies
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in ASIA
107.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2201.00)
This course covers the history of western civilization from
1648 to contemporary times with an emphasis on western
culture and humanities. It explores social, economic, political,
intellectual, and artistic trends as well as the history of gender,
sexuality, and culture during the early modern, modern, and
contemporary eras.
This course examines the social and political foundations of
East Asia through historical, religious, and literary documents.
188 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
HIST 109: History of the Middle East
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course covers the history of the Middle East from origins to
contemporary times. Topics include the political, social, and
economic development of early Mesopotamia, the Persian
Empire, the development of monotheistic religions (Judaism,
Christianity, and Islam), the Abbasid Caliphate, the Crusades,
the Ottoman and Safavid empires, European imperialism, and
modern Middle Eastern states.
HIST 110: United States History to 1877
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 110H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course covers the history of the United States from the early
cultures to Reconstruction. It emphasizes political, economic,
social, and cultural developments. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for one series: HIST 110/HIST 110H & HIST 111/HIST 111H;
HIST 141 & HIST 142; or HIST 145 & HIST 146. C-ID HIST-130.
HIST 110H: United States History to 1877 (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course covers the history of the United States from the early
cultures to Reconstruction. It emphasizes political, economic,
social, and cultural developments. As an honors course, it offers
an enriched experience for highly motivated students through a
pro-seminar format, challenging course work, emphasis on the
use of sources as evidence, and the development of analytical
historical theses. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for one series:
HIST 110/HIST 110H & HIST 111/HIST 111H; HIST 141 & HIST 142; or
HIST 145 & HIST 146. C-ID HIST-130.
HIST 111: United States History Since 1877
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 111H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course covers the history of the United States from
Reconstruction to the present. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
one series: HIST 110 & HIST 111; HIST 141 & HIST 142; or HIST 145 &
HIST 146. C-ID HIST-140.
HIST 111H: United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 111.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course covers the political, social, economic and cultural
history of the United States since reconstruction. As an honors
course, it offers an enriched experience for highly motivated
students through a pro-seminar format, challenging course
work, emphasis on the use of sources as evidence, and
the development of analytical historical theses. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for one series: HIST 110/HIST 110H & HIST 111/
HIST 111H; HIST 141 & HIST 142; or HIST 145 & HIST 146. C-ID
HIST-140.
HIST 113: American Military History
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 113H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course surveys American military history from the
colonial period to the present. It emphasizes the institutional,
technological, social, political, and cultural contexts in times
of peace and conflict. The course reviews all major American
conflicts and emphasizes the military’s influence upon foreign
policy, domestic affairs, and diplomacy.
HIST 113H: American Military History (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HIST 113.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course surveys American military history from the
colonial period to the present. It emphasizes the institutional,
technological, social, political, and cultural contexts in
times of peace and conflict. The course reviews all major
American conflicts and emphasizes the military’s influence
upon foreign policy, domestic affairs, and diplomacy. As an
honors course, it offers an enriched experience for highly
motivated students through a pro-seminar format, challenging
course work, emphasis on the use of sources as evidence,
and the development of analytical historical theses. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for HIST 113 or HIST 113H.
HIST 115: Women in American History
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course surveys the history of women in America from the
colonial period to the present. It emphasizes the historical
roles of women in the family, community, labor force, and
political system. The course also emphasizes the similarities and
differences based on class, race, and ethnic identities.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 189
Areas of Study & Courses
HIST 116: History of the Americas to 1830
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
HIST 145: African American History to 1877
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course surveys the histories of the American continent as
an integrated whole. It examines major pre-Columbian Indian
cultures, Native American heritage, European exploration,
conquest, and colonization, and the growth of independence
movements. It also studies the diverse cultures, societies,
economies, political structures, and constitutions of Latin
America, Canada, and the United States from a comparative
perspective.
This course covers the historical development of the role of
African Americans in United States history from colonial origins
through Reconstruction. It emphasizes the black experience
within political, social, economic, and cultural frameworks. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for one series: HIST 110/HIST 110H &
HIST 111/HIST 111H; HIST 141 & HIST 142; or HIST 145 & HIST 146.
HIST 117: History of the Americas Since 1830
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course presents an integrated history of American
nations in the 19th and 20th centuries. It emphasizes the Latin
American wars of independence, U.S. foreign policy with Latin
America, Canada’s relations with the Western hemisphere,
Latin American society in the 20th century, and the impact of
globalization on the American continent.
HIST 141: Mexican American History Through 1877
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This study of United States history emphasizes a Chicano/a,
Latino/a perspective through the Mexican-American War and
the late 19th century. This course focuses on major political,
social, economic, and cultural factors; it explores the roles
played by the diverse peoples and cultures who shared in
the development of U.S. history. The course emphasizes the
contributions of ancient Indians and civilizations and the
influences of Spanish institutions and cultures. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for one series: HIST 110 OR HIST 110H &
HIST 111 OR HIST 111H; HIST 141 & HIST 142; or HIST 145 &
HIST 146.
HIST 142: Mexican American History Since 1877
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This history of the United States from Reconstruction to the
present emphasizes the Chicano/a, Latino/a experience.
It explores the economic, social, cultural, and political
developments and impacts on diverse peoples of the U.S.
emphasizing the Mexican American experience. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for one series: HIST 110 or HIST 110H &
HIST 111 or HIST 111H; HIST 141 & HIST 142; or HIST 145 & HIST 146.
190 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
HIST 146: African American History Since 1877
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course covers the historical development of the role of
African Americans in United States history from Reconstruction
to the present. It emphasizes the black experience within
political, social, economic, and cultural frameworks. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for one series: HIST 110/HIST 110H & HIST 111/
HIST 111H; HIST 141 & HIST 142; or HIST 145 & HIST 146.
HIST 165: California History
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
This course addresses the social, economic, political, and
cultural history of California. It begins with an overview of
the indigenous, Native American population and continues
through the Spanish, Mexican, and American eras. Topics
covered include studies of the mission era, pastoral era,
gold rush, railroad era, development and modification of the
California Constitution, and the rise of modern industries, such
as aerospace and information technologies.
HIST 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
Areas of Study & Courses
HIST 296: Topics in History
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00)
Horticulture
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
History that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
HIST 298: Directed Study in History
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (2205.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
The Ornamental Horticulture discipline examines the art
and science of cultivating plants. The Horticulture program
at MiraCosta also includes sustainable design, installation,
and maintenance of landscapes, floral design, nursery and
organic crop production, and wine technology. Students
take horticulture courses to prepare for the major, complete
job-related certificates, earn continuing education units
(CEUs) for professional licenses, and fulfill general education
requirements. Career options include florist and nurseryindustry work, urban agriculture, landscape architecture,
irrigation design and water management, landscape design,
landscape installation and management, golf and sports turf
management, urban forestry, horticulture sales and services,
grove and vineyard management, and winemaking.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 191
Areas of Study & Courses
Contact Information
Chair: Karen Smith
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/HORT
Associate Degrees
Department: Horticulture and
Hospitality
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Associate in Arts Degrees
Full-Time Faculty
Megan Allison
Claire Ehrlinger
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Landscape Architecture Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to use hand drawn and computer-generated graphics to
produce accurate landscape plans that reflect sustainable,
functional, and aesthetic principles.
Landscape Management Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to inventory, analyze, and recommend an efficient
management plan for the turf, trees, shrubs, and landscape
elements of a landscape.
Landscape Architecture
Landscape Management
Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students earning
an associate degree in Landscape Architecture are eligible to
take the Landscape Architecture Registration Exam to achieve
state licensure after completing requisite apprenticeship.
Students should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify
required courses and to develop a written educational plan for
the specific degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Certificates
Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production Associate
in Arts Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to integrate concepts and skills learned in core courses to
manage environmental and other growth factors to produce
healthy and marketable crops.
Certificate programs prepare students for state, county, and
city employment in most areas of landscape management,
such as park and grounds supervision and state or county
agriculture inspection. In the private sector, graduates find jobs
in agri-sales and services, organic food production, retail and
wholesale nurseries and greenhouses, landscape and irrigation
design, landscape contracting, and water management. Any
of these majors may be completed in three semesters and one
or two summer sessions by students who attend full-time.
192 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
Certificate of Achievement
*
Landscape Architecture
This certificate is designed to provide employable technical skill
training in the field of professional residential landscape design
development. It also provides a foundation for students who
plan to enter a college of landscape architecture.
Required courses:
DESN 101
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
4
DESN 102
Architectural Drawing
3
HORT 117
Plant Identification: Trees, Shrubs, and
Vines
3
HORT 126
Landscape Irrigation
3
HORT 127
Landscape Design
3
HORT 128
Landscape Construction
3
HORT 220
Computer-Aided Landscape Design
Applications
3
HORT 230
Landscape Architecture
3
Select one course from the following electives:
DESN 103
Architectural Communications
DESN 200
Architectural Design I
HORT 110
Introduction to Sustainable Horticulture
HORT 115
Soil Science
HORT 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
2-4
Total Units
HORT 292 or HORT 299 may be taken for a maximum of 3
units.
Certificate of Achievement
Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production
This certificate provides students with the practical, hands-on
experience they need to pursue employment in the areas of
plant production, maintenance, or sales of ornamental and/or
food crops in California.
Required courses:
HORT 115
Soil Science
3
HORT 116
Plant Science
4
HORT 117
Plant Identification: Trees, Shrubs, and
Vines
3
HORT 134
Plant Pest Control
3
HORT 140
Subtropical Fruit and Plant Production
3
HORT 144
Nursery Management and Production
27-29
HORT 145
Sensory Analysis of Wines
HORT 147
Wines of California
HORT 148
Introduction to Wine Production
HORT 149
Vineyard Production and Management
HORT 171
Floral Design
HORT 292
Internship Studies
HORT 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
Certificate of Achievement
SPAN 101
Landscape Management
*
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
Total Units
20.5-23
*
Required courses:
Certificate of Proficiency
HORT 292 and HORT 299 may be taken for a maximum of 3
units.
HORT 110
Introduction to Sustainable Horticulture
3
HORT 115
Soil Science
3
HORT 116
Plant Science
4
HORT 117
Plant Identification: Trees, Shrubs, and
Vines
3
HORT 121
Landscape Management
3
HORT 126
Landscape Irrigation
3
HORT 127
Landscape Design
3
Required courses:
HORT 128
Landscape Construction
3
DESN 101
HORT 134
Plant Pest Control
3
6-7
HORT 128
Select at least two courses from the following electives:
Irrigation Technology
This certificate is designed to teach the theory, design, and
installation of irrigation systems including the materials,
installation practices, maintenance, crew management, and
operations of a landscape irrigation business. The program
emphasizes residential and large-scale irrigation system
installation and water management.
AutoCAD Computer-Aided Drafting I
4
HORT 121
Landscape Management
3
HORT 126
Landscape Irrigation
3
Landscape Construction
3
AUTO 100
Small Engine Repair
BUS 130
Small Business Management
or BUS 170
& BUS 171
Entrepreneur I
and Entrepreneur II
Certificate of Proficiency
HORT 118
Arboriculture
Wine & Viticulture Technology
HORT 292
Internship Studies
HORT 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
SPAN 101
Total Units
1.5-4
*
This certificate prepares students for employment in the
California horticulture and landscape contracting industries by
providing practical, hands-on experience.
3
Select one course from the following electives:
Total Units
*
13
The Wine and Viticulture Technology Certificate cross-trains
students for work in the wine production, wine sales, and
viticulture areas.
*
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
Required courses:
34-35
HORT 115
Soil Science
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 3
193
Areas of Study & Courses
HORT 145
Sensory Analysis of Wines
HORT 147
Wines of California
HORT 148
Introduction to Wine Production
HORT 149
Vineyard Production and Management
Total Units
3
3
1.5
3
13.5
Courses
HORT 110: Introduction to Sustainable Horticulture
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00)
This course introduces sustainable horticulture principles and
practices in gardening, landscaping, nursery management,
and floriculture. Topics include basic botany, cultural practices,
propagation, structures and layout, pest management,
planting, container gardening and houseplants, floral design,
plant identification, and career opportunities. Students are
required to attend field labs and field trips.
HORT 115: Soil Science
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0103.00)
This course examines the physical, chemical, and biological
properties of soil and covers soil conditions that restrict plant
growth. Students learn to solve soil problems that may exist
in the field, greenhouse, and landscape with a focus on
sustainable practices. The course emphasizes problem-solving
techniques that apply to Southern California soils, including
fertility, salinity, pH, high calcium, specific toxicities, and
physical problems. Students are required to participate in field
labs and trips.
HORT 116: Plant Science
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0103.00)
This introductory course offers students an opportunity to learn
the basic principles of plant science pertaining to food and
ornamental plants. The course emphasizes plant morphology,
anatomy and function, plant physiology, reproduction,
biotic and abiotic environmental factors that impact plant
growth and development, plant-soil-climate interrelationships,
plant taxonomy and nomenclature, and plant diversity and
adaptations. Learning activities include plant studies in the
field, greenhouse, and landscape. Students are required to
attend field labs and field trips.
194 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
HORT 117: Plant Identification: Trees, Shrubs, and Vines
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00)
This course covers the identification, growth habits, culture,
and ornamental use of plants found in Southern California
landscapes. Topics include botanical and common names,
plant family relationships, and environmental adaptations.
Students learn to identify by sight memory 200 plants from
certification test and local plant lists. Students are required to
attend field trips both on and off campus.
HORT 118: Arboriculture
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0199.00)
This course introduces the care and management
of landscape trees. It covers soil, water, and nutrient
management, integrated pest management, and tree biology.
Topics include tree selection, protection, and fertilization,
pruning basics, safety, and climbing. This course prepares
students for the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA)
Certification exam and provides ISA Continuing Education Units
(CEUs).
HORT 121: Landscape Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10)
This course introduces landscape ecosystems and emphasizes
turfgrass, trees, and border plantings. Students learn landscape
management practices, including soil preparation, fertilization,
irrigation, cultivation, mowing, pruning and growth control,
pest management, and fire safety. Students practice basic
skills needed for successful maintenance of landscaped areas.
Participation in field trips and field labs is required.
HORT 126: Landscape Irrigation
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10)
This course introduces the design, installation, and
maintenance of a water efficient landscape irrigation system.
Topics include water supply, basic hydraulics, climate, soil
and plant characteristics, component identification and
terminology, and pipe sizing as well as types of sprinklers,
valves, and controllers.
Areas of Study & Courses
HORT 127: Landscape Design
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10)
HORT 144: Nursery Management and Production
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.30)
This course introduces the principles and practices of
landscape design. Topics include the principles and process
of design, drafting, hand drawn graphics, and presentation
methods. Projects emphasize residential and small commercial
sites. Students are required to attend field trips.
This course analyzes the operation and management of
plant nursery facilities and personnel, including cultural
practices, scheduling of nursery crops, marketing, and legal
and environmental issues. Students examine the relationships
of light, temperature, moisture, humidity, and fertility as well
as their impact on plant production. Topics include pruning,
transplanting, propagation, and pest control methods. Students
are required to attend field trips to local nurseries.
HORT 128: Landscape Construction
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10)
This course introduces the fundamentals of landscape
construction. Topics include soil preparation, paving and
construction materials, hand and power tool use, turf and plant
installation, plan reading, estimating, and bid preparation.
The course also covers local codes, state requirements, and
employment opportunities. It prepares students to pass the C-27
Landscaping Contractor’s License exam. Students are required
to attend field trips.
HORT 134: Plant Pest Control
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00)
This course involves a study of the common pests that invade
ornamental plantings and nursery crops in Southern California,
including weeds, invertebrate pests, and plant diseases.
Students learn to diagnose pest problems and design solutions
to these problems based upon an integration of approved
pest management techniques and practices. This course is
designed to assist students in preparing for California licensing
exams in pest management, including California Laws &
Regulations, or to earn continuing education hours to maintain
their license.
HORT 145: Sensory Analysis of Wines
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0104.00)
This course surveys the history and development of winemaking,
detailing the grape varieties produced in the major wineproducing regions of the world. Topics include the influence
of climate and soil; wine fermentation, handling, storage,
and bottling methods; and wine disorders. Students learn
organoleptic tasting techniques to differentiate among the
characteristics and styles of various wines. Students must be 21
years old to enroll and pay a lab fee, and they are required to
attend field trips to local wineries.
HORT 147: Wines of California
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: HORT 145.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0104.00)
This course introduces the wines and major wine producing
regions of California. It covers history, viticultural practices,
winemaking styles, and sensory evaluation techniques of
representative California wines. Students must be 21 and are
required to attend field trips and pay a lab fee.
HORT 140: Subtropical Fruit and Plant Production
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00)
HORT 148: Introduction to Wine Production
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0104.00)
This course examines the principles and practices involved
in subtropical fruit and plant production, such as citrus and
avocados. Topics include propagation, site selection, planting,
fertilization, irrigation, and pest control. The course also covers
harvest techniques, marketing, and industry economic trends.
Field trips to local orchards and groves are required.
This course provides beginning winemakers with basic how
to instructions and advanced technical training on aspects
of winemaking. It emphasizes the importance of specialized
backgrounds needed to solve the wide variety of problems
encountered in commercial wine production. Students must be
21 and are required to attend field trips and pay a lab fee.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 195
Areas of Study & Courses
HORT 149: Vineyard Production and Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0104.00)
This course covers responsibilities of vineyard management.
Topics include climate zones, soil selection, financing, farm
organization, irrigation systems, field layout, varietal selection,
nutritional needs, harvesting, labor management, marketing,
and budgeting. Students are required to attend field trips to
local vineyards.
HORT 171: Floral Design
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.20)
This course introduces students to the practical skills and theory
of basic floral design. Topics include selecting flowers and
foliages used in arrangements, basic design principles, cut
flower preparation and care, merchandising, and packaging.
HORT 220: Computer-Aided Landscape Design Applications
Units: 3
Prerequisites: DESN 101.
Advisory: HORT 127.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in HORT
129.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00)
This course introduces the application of computer-based
design software packages, including image manipulation,
modeling, multimedia, and drafting combined with hand
graphics for the development of landscape plans, perspectives,
elevation drawings, and presentation graphics.
HORT 230: Landscape Architecture
Units: 3
Prerequisites: HORT 127.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10)
This project-based class offers continued study in the field of
landscape architectural design. It emphasizes site analysis,
sensory evaluation, sustainable design principles, cost
considerations, rendering, site details, model building, and oral
presentation. Students work both individually and in groups
on projects at the urban and community scale, and they are
required to attend field trips.
196 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
HORT 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
HORT 296: Topics in Horticulture
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0109.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Horticulture that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
HORT 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Areas of Study & Courses
Hospitality
Restaurant Management Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to research a specific human resource responsibility for the
hospitality industry and interview a hospitality management
professional about the research findings.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to create a marketing plan for a product/service in hospitality
marketing.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to develop an operational strategy for a restaurant.
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degrees
Hospitality Management
Restaurant Management
The Hospitality Management program offers courses for
students planning to transfer as hospitality majors to four-year
institutions as well as career and technical courses that can
lead to certificates of proficiency and achievement. Career
options include front office, reservations, sales, marketing,
customer service, and management positions in hotels,
restaurants, theme parks, attractions, clubs, and casinos.
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Contact Information
Certificates
Chair: Karen Smith
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/
instruction/hospitality/
Department: Horticulture and
Hospitality
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Karen Smith
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Hospitality Management Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to identify specific job titles within the hospitality, food service,
and tourism industries and describe the responsibilities of the
positions as well as the outlook for future job growth.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to research, compare, and prepare written documents
reviewing a specific legal procedure used in hotels/motels or
restaurants.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to develop an operational strategy for a restaurant.
Certificate of Achievement
Hospitality Management
This certificate provides students with the broad technical
background required in today’s increasingly diverse hospitality
industry. This program was developed with input from
professional industry members, who comprise the MiraCosta
College Hospitality Management Advisory Board, as well as
the cooperation of local hospitality executives and members.
Courses in this program complement the skills learned on
the job and are valuable to either the person who is seeking
a certificate/degree or the individual who is already in the
field and desires to increase his/her overall effectiveness in a
particular area.
Required courses:
HOSP 100
Introduction to Hospitality Management
3
HOSP 110
Guest Services and Presentations
3
HOSP 114
Hospitality Law
3
HOSP 120
Hospitality Human Resources
Management
3
HOSP 128
Hospitality Marketing
3
HOSP 134
Sustainable Facilities Management
3
HOSP 150
Purchasing and Cost Control
3
Select at least 6 units from the following:
HOSP 130
Conference and Special Event
Management
HOSP 133
Front Office Management
HOSP 145
Hospitality Supervision
HOSP 153
Restaurant Management
Total Units
6
27
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 197
Areas of Study & Courses
Certificate of Achievement
Certificate of Proficiency
Restaurant Management
Food Service Operations
The Restaurant Management Certificate of Achievement
provides students with the broad technical background
necessary in today’s increasingly diverse food services industry.
Requirements for the certificate were developed with input from
professional industry members, who comprise the MiraCosta
College Hospitality Management Advisory Board, as well as with
cooperation from local restaurant and food services executives.
Courses for this certificate complement the skills learned on the
job and are valuable to either the person seeking a certificate/
degree or the individuals already employed in the field and
seeking to increase their overall effectiveness with new skills
qualifying them for promotions.
The Food Service Operations Certificate of Proficiency is
designed to prepare students with the specific technical
and supervisory job skills employers demand for entry-level
management positions.
Required courses:
Total Units
Required courses:
HOSP 100
Introduction to Hospitality Management
3
HOSP 110
Guest Services and Presentations
3
HOSP 130
Conference and Special Event
Management
3
HOSP 150
Purchasing and Cost Control
3
HOSP 153
Restaurant Management
3
15
HOSP 100
Introduction to Hospitality Management
3
HOSP 110
Guest Services and Presentations
3
HOSP 114
Hospitality Law
3
Front Office Operations
or HOSP 120
Hospitality Human Resources Management
This certificate prepares students for entry-level work in the
hospitality industry with a focus on front-office procedures.
The courses in this certificate also apply to the Hospitality
Management Certificate of Achievement.
HOSP 128
Hospitality Marketing
3
HOSP 130
Conference and Special Event
Management
3
Certificate of Proficiency
HOSP 145
Hospitality Supervision
3
Required courses:
HOSP 150
Purchasing and Cost Control
3
HOSP 100
Introduction to Hospitality Management
3
HOSP 153
Restaurant Management
3
HOSP 110
Guest Services and Presentations
3
24
HOSP 120
3
Certificate of Proficiency
Hospitality Human Resources
Management
HOSP 133
Front Office Management
3
Catering Operations
HOSP 145
Hospitality Supervision
The Catering Operations Certificate of Proficiency is designed to
prepare students with the specific technical and supervisory job
skills employers demand for banquet and catering positions.
Total Units
Total Units
Required courses:
3
15
Certificate of Proficiency
Meeting and Event Management
Students gain the skills and knowledge needed for planning
and managing successful meetings, conferences, trade shows,
weddings, and other special events.
HOSP 110
Guest Services and Presentations
3
HOSP 130
Conference and Special Event
Management
3
HOSP 150
Purchasing and Cost Control
3
Required courses:
HOSP 153
Restaurant Management
3
HOSP 114
Hospitality Law
3
12
HOSP 120
3
Certificate of Proficiency
Hospitality Human Resources
Management
or HOSP 110
Guest Services and Presentations
Dining Room Operations
HOSP 128
Hospitality Marketing
3
The Dining Room Operations Certificate of Proficiency is
designed to prepare students for entry-level work in the
hospitality industry with a focus on front-of-the-house restaurant
procedures. The courses in this certificate also apply to the
Restaurant Management Certificate of Achievement.
HOSP 130
Conference and Special Event
Management
3
Total Units
Required courses:
Guest Services and Presentations
3
HOSP 130
Conference and Special Event
Management
3
HOSP 145
Hospitality Supervision
3
HOSP 153
Restaurant Management
3
198 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Choose 3 units from the following courses:
HOSP 133
Front Office Management
HOSP 134
Sustainable Facilities Management
Total Units
HOSP 110
Total Units
12
Certificate of Proficiency
Rooms Division Management
The Rooms Division Management Certificate of Proficiency
is designed to prepare students with the specific technical
and supervisory job skills employers demand for entry-level
management positions.
3
15
Areas of Study & Courses
Required courses:
HOSP 114
Hospitality Law
3
HOSP 120
Hospitality Human Resources
Management
3
HOSP 133
Front Office Management
3
HOSP 134
Sustainable Facilities Management
3
HOSP 150
Purchasing and Cost Control
Total Units
3
15
Courses
HOSP 100: Introduction to Hospitality Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
This course covers the history, scope, and functions of the
hospitality, food service, and tourism industries. It emphasizes
basic management theories and principles as they apply to
the industry. Topics include an overview of career opportunities,
responsibilities, professionalism, and career ethics. Students
may be required to visit various hospitality sites.
HOSP 110: Guest Services and Presentations
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
This course helps students develop the service and presentation
skills expected of uniformed employees, supervisors, and
managers when interacting with hospitality guests and
colleagues. The course covers approaches designed to exceed
the needs and expectations of colleagues and guests. Students
may be required to visit various hospitality sites.
HOSP 114: Hospitality Law
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
This course covers the legal principles that apply to the
hospitality industry, including possible legal issues for hotel and
restaurant operators as well as rights and responsibilities of
hospitality establishments. Topics include how U.S. laws and
regulations affecting the lodging industry have increased and
how hoteliers and restaurant operators can avoid lawsuits. This
course allows students to gain Hospitality Law certification from
the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging
Association.
HOSP 120: Hospitality Human Resources Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in HOSP
117.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
This course presents an overview of human resource
management in hospitality settings. Topics include employment
laws, discrimination and harassment claims, wrongful
discharge, and laws affecting overtime work, wages, benefits,
and tips. The course examines recruitment, selection, and
turn-over issues as well as training programs, labor unions,
and regulations affecting legal work status and living wages.
Students may be required to visit various hospitality sites.
HOSP 128: Hospitality Marketing
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
This course takes a practical perspective in introducing students
to the marketing of hotel, restaurants, and clubs. Topics
include market segmentation, marketing techniques, and
marketing methodologies, including sales, advertising, public
relations, promotions, packaging, pricing strategies, revenue
maximization, and travel purchasing systems. This course
allows students to gain Hospitality Marketing certification from
the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging
Association. Students may be required to visit various hospitality
sites.
HOSP 130: Conference and Special Event Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
This course introduces students to the field of conference and
special event management. Students examine the different
types of conferences and special events and the types of
organizations that stage those events. The course also covers
the role of the planner, including setting objectives, program
design, budgeting, site selection, negotiations, contracts,
speaker selection, registration, on-site logistics, transportation,
and security and legal issues. Students may be required to visit
various hospitality sites.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 199
Areas of Study & Courses
HOSP 133: Front Office Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
HOSP 153: Restaurant Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.10)
This course provides training for entry-level positions in the
lodging industry. The curriculum includes instruction in hotel/
motel front office procedures and other duties performed
in establishments that provide lodging, meals, convention
facilities, and other hospitality services to the general public
or to an organization’s membership. This course reviews guest
relations; registration and reservation systems; cash, credit, and
audit procedures; safety and security. Students consider how
front office activities affect other departments and focus on
managing the front office.
This course develops key skills necessary to open and operate
a successful restaurant. Students explore different types of
food services, choose a concept and site for a restaurant,
develop financing and operations strategies, and learn
how to purchase appropriate food and beverage products,
control food and overhead costs, and layout an efficient
restaurant and kitchen. Successful completion qualifies the
student for Managing Foodservice Operations certification from
the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation.
Students may be required to visit various hospitality sites.
HOSP 134: Sustainable Facilities Management
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
HOSP 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course examines hospitality-industry practices in lodging
and food-service property management. Topics include how
sustainable practices apply to the management and design
of hospitality facilities, implications of the United Nations’s
environmental guidelines, industry trends, and techniques to
reduce expenses, increase efficiency, and ensure safe and
sanitary operations that meet guests’ expectations. Students
may be required to visit various hospitality sites.
HOSP 145: Hospitality Supervision
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
This course provides students with the competencies necessary
to supervise in the hospitality industry. Students learn a wide
range of supervisory skills, such as effective communication,
training, coaching, evaluating, disciplining, and conflict
management. Topics include techniques for managing
productivity and change as well as how the supervisor’s skills,
attitudes, and abilities impact these objectives. Students may
be required to visit various hospitality sites.
HOSP 150: Purchasing and Cost Control
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.10)
This course presents the principles and theories of control
as it applies to food, beverage, supplies, and labor costs. It
emphasizes the operating budget, income and cost control,
menu pricing, and linens and supplies. Students learn how to
effectively purchase and cost foods and supplies for special
events and daily operations. Students may be required to visit
various hospitality sites.
200 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
HOSP 296: Topics in Hospitality
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Hospitality that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
Areas of Study & Courses
HOSP 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Humanities
Humanities is an interdisciplinary study of human thought and
culture, such as philosophy, literature, and the arts. Students
take humanities courses to explore the discipline and to
satisfy general education requirements. With a bachelor’s
degree in humanities, students pursue careers in education,
communication, art, and public relations as well as professional
positions in museums, theatres, and art centers.
Contact Information
Chair: John Kirwan
[email protected]
(Letters, Transfer)
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/HUMN
Department: Letters, Transfer
Office: Building SAN Admin,
760.634.7876
Courses
HUMN 101: Introduction to the Arts
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HUMN 101H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00)
HUMN 101H: Introduction to the Arts (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
HUMN 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00)
This honors course introduces highly motivated students to
interdisciplinary humanities. The course explores at least six
humanities subjects, such as cinema, dance, music and
opera, architecture, theater, literature, painting and other twodimensional art, and sculpture. An entrée to cultural literacy,
this course studies both genres and examples of the arts in
an effort to better understand various art forms, the cultures,
eras, and styles which they exemplify, and essential elements
of our individual humanness, including creativity and a sense
of the aesthetic. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for HUMN 101 or
HUMN 101H.
HUMN 250: American Studies: First Contact Through the Civil
War
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00)
This course is an interdisciplinary study of American identities
as expressed through culture from the 1580s through the Civil
War. It explores materials from American philosophy, religion,
music and dance, art, architecture, history, and literature. The
course gives special attention to contending ideas and beliefs
that have shaped American identities and experience in the
past and continue to do so in the present.
HUMN 251: American Studies: 1870s to the Present
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00)
This course is an interdisciplinary study of American identities
as expressed through culture from the 1870s to the present. It
explores materials from American philosophy, religion, music
and dance, art, architecture, history, and literature. The course
gives special attention to contending ideas and beliefs that
have shaped American identities and experience in the past
and continue to do so in the present.
This course introduces students to interdisciplinary humanities.
The course explores at least six humanities subjects, such
as cinema, dance, music and opera, architecture, theater,
literature, painting and other two-dimensional art, and
sculpture. An entrée to cultural literacy, this course studies
both genres and examples of the arts in an effort to better
understand various art forms, the cultures, eras, and styles
which they exemplify, and essential elements of our individual
humanness, including creativity and a sense of the aesthetic.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 201
Areas of Study & Courses
HUMN 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
HUMN 296: Topics in Humanities
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in Art
that are not included in regular course offerings. Each Topics
course is announced, described, and given its own title and
296 number designation in the class schedule.
HUMN 298: Directed Study in Humanities
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1504.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Interdisciplinary Studies
Contact Information
Dean: Mario Valente
[email protected]
202 Office: Building OC1200,
760.795.6637
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Courses
INTR 100: Foundation Skills for the College Experience
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 4 hours. (4930.14)
This course prepares new and returning students to develop the
knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors that are necessary
for academic and personal success. Students learn how to
adapt to the college environment and prepare for academic
achievement and lifelong learning. Topics include academic,
life, stress, and time management; strategic study skills;
educational planning; student services; and resources to
promote academic and personal success, career assessment,
exploration and goal setting, computer basics (such as
operating systems, file management, email, academic course
management systems, safe and ethical computing practices,
Internet browsing, and word processing), the effective use
of library and learning resources, and the development of
information literacy skills. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
CRLP 100, COUN 100, COUN 105, COUN 110, or INTR 100.
Italian
The International Languages Department offers courses in
Italian that provide the foundation for language study. They
also satisfy either the humanities requirement for general
education or the proficiency requirement in an international
language when required for transfer. A bachelor’s degree in
an international language such as Italian can lead to a career
in advertising, broadcasting, consulting, translating, teaching,
international service, public relations, social work, and sales.
Note: Students educated in a non-English speaking country
through high school or equivalent will generally not earn lowerdivision transfer credit in their language at most universities.
Students who might be affected by this rule should consult a
counselor and/or the International Languages Department
Chair before enrolling in the courses described below.
Contact Information
Chair: Andrea Petri
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/ITAL
Department: International
Languages
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Full-Time Faculty
Andrea Petri
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Areas of Study & Courses
Italian Associate in Arts Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to engage in meaningful conversations about social issues,
cultural productions, and cultural aspects covered in the first
two years of Italian courses, demonstrating command of the
first two years’ vocabularies, structure, and pronunciation in the
target language and comprehending native speaker speech.
Associate Degree
Associate in Arts Degree
Italian
The Italian program offers lower-division preparation for students
who plan on transferring to pursue a bachelor’s degree in
Italian. Students planning to transfer and/or earn this associate
degree may also need to complete additional requirements
or electives required by the transfer institution, as many CSUs
and UCs have unique admissions and preparation-for-the-major
requirements. Students should meet with a MiraCosta College
counselor to identify required courses and to develop a written
plan for their targeted university.
Required courses:
ITAL 201
Intermediate Italian (Third Semester)
4
ITAL 202
Intermediate Italian (Fourth Semester)
4
ITAL 210
Intermediate Italian Conversation and
Reading
3
ITAL 121
Introduction to Italian Culture
3
Select at least one course from the following:
3-4
ART 258
Ancient to Gothic Art
ART 259
History of Renaissance to Modern Art
FILM 110
Film History
HIST 103
Western Civilization to 1648
Western Civilization Since 1648
or HIST 104H Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
ITAL 101
Elementary Italian (First Semester)
ITAL 102
Elementary Italian (Second Semester)
Total Units
This course continues to develop Italian language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in ITAL 101, and it develops the student’s ability to
engage in casual conversation, express opinions, and make
suggestions in Italian. The course also provides for increased
awareness of the Italian world’s history, geography, and
customs, including its socio-political practices and cultural
artifacts. This course corresponds to the third year of high
school Italian.
ITAL 121: Introduction to Italian Culture
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1502.00)
This course introduces students of Italian to various aspects of
the Italian culture and civilization. Areas of study include history,
music, literature, philosophy, political ideas, customs, and Italy’s
influence on and contribution to the civilization of America and
the world. The course does not require prior study of the Italian
language or culture.
ITAL 201: Intermediate Italian (Third Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ITAL 102 or three years of high school Italian with a
C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ITAL 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1104.00)
or HIST 103H Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
HIST 104
ITAL 102: Elementary Italian (Second Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ITAL 101 or two years of high school Italian with a
C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ITAL 201 or ITAL 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1104.00)
17-18
Courses
ITAL 101: Elementary Italian (First Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
ITAL 102, ITAL 201, or ITAL 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1104.00)
This course continues to develop Italian language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in ITAL 101 and ITAL 102, and it develops the
student’s ability to engage in casual conversation, express
opinions, and make suggestions in Italian. The course also
provides for increased awareness of the Italian history,
geography, and customs, including its socio-political practices
and cultural artifacts. This course corresponds to the fourth year
of high school Italian.
This introductory course develops Italian language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It covers
basic Italian pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. It also
explores the history, geography, and customs of the Italianspeaking world. This course corresponds to the first two years of
high school Italian.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 203
Areas of Study & Courses
ITAL 202: Intermediate Italian (Fourth Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: ITAL 201 or four years of high school Italian with a
C or better.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1104.00)
Japanese
This course continues to develop Italian language acquisition
through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It reviews and
expands upon the vocabulary and grammatical structures
introduced in ITAL 201. It also develops the student’s ability
to express opinions and make recommendations in Italianlanguage debates and discussions. The course provides for
increased awareness of the Italian-speaking world’s history,
geography, and customs, including its socio-political practices
and cultural artifacts through extensive reading and writing
assignments as well as oral presentations.
ITAL 210: Intermediate Italian Conversation and Reading
Units: 3
Prerequisites: ITAL 102 or three years of high school Italian with a
C or better.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1104.00)
This course improves students’ reading comprehension and
conversational skills through the expanded use of first-year
Italian vocabulary and grammatical structures.
ITAL 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
ITAL 296: Topics in Italian
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1104.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Italian that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
204 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
The International Languages Department offers courses that
provide the foundation for Japanese language study. They
also satisfy either the humanities requirement for general
education or the proficiency requirement in an international
language when required for transfer. A bachelor’s degree in an
international language such as Japanese can lead to a career
in advertising, broadcasting, consulting, translating, teaching,
international service, public relations, social work, and sales.
Note: Students educated in a non-English speaking country
through high school or equivalent will generally not earn lowerdivision transfer credit in their language at most universities.
Students who might be affected by this rule should consult a
counselor and/or the International Languages Department
Chair before enrolling in the courses described below.
Contact Information
Chair: Andrea Petri
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/JAPN
Department: International
Languages
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
JAPN 101: Elementary Japanese (First Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
JAPN 102, JAPN 201, or JAPN 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1108.00)
This course introduces contemporary Japanese and the
Japanese writing system (hiragana, katakana, and selected
kanji characters). It examines the language’s structure and
emphasizes the development of language acquisition through
listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn about
Japanese history, geography, and customs as well as about
the relationship between language and culture. This course
corresponds to the first two years of high school Japanese.
JAPN 102: Elementary Japanese (Second Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: JAPN 101 or two years of high school Japanese
with a C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
JAPN 201 or JAPN 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1108.00)
This course continues to develop Japanese language
acquisition through listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
It introduces more advanced kanji characters and reviews
(recycles) first semester Japanese vocabulary and grammar.
The course also continues to develop the student’s ability to
read, interpret, and discuss Japanese-language narratives
about newly introduced cultural aspects of the Japanesespeaking world. This course corresponds to the third year of
high school Japanese.
JAPN 201: Intermediate Japanese (Third Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: JAPN 102 or three years of high school Japanese
with a C or better.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
JAPN 202.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1108.00)
This third course in the Japanese language sequence
continues to develop Japanese language acquisition through
listening, speaking, reading, and writing at the intermediatemid level. It introduces more advanced kanji characters
and reviews (recycles) first-year Japanese vocabulary and
grammar. The course also continues to develop the student’s
ability to read, interpret, and discuss Japanese-language
narratives about newly introduced cultural aspects of the
Japanese-speaking world. This course corresponds to the fourth
year of high school Japanese.
JAPN 202: Intermediate Japanese (Fourth Semester)
Units: 4
Prerequisites: JAPN 201 or four years of high school Japanese
with a C or better.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1108.00)
This fourth semester course in the Japanese language
sequence continues to develop Japanese language
acquisition through listening, speaking, reading, and writing
at the intermediate-high level. Students practice writing in
Japanese with kanji characters, review grammar and syntax,
and expand their vocabulary and knowledge of idiomatic
constructions. The course also continues to develop the
student’s ability to read, interpret, and discuss Japaneselanguage narratives about Japanese history, geography, and
culture.
JAPN 210: Intermediate Conversation I and Reading
Units: 3
Prerequisites: JAPN 102 or three years of high school Japanese.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1108.00)
This course stresses oral communication and reading
comprehension through cultural materials in order to improve
and expand the student’s conversational skills in Japanese.
It emphasizes practical topics, fundamental and expanded
vocabulary, and commonly used idioms. Students learn to
employ Japanese in general discussions of assigned topics
and simple dialogues. The course also reviews communicative
functions.
JAPN 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 205
Areas of Study & Courses
JAPN 296: Topics in Japanese
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1108.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Japanese that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
Contact Information
Chair: Robert Fulbright
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/
instruction/kinesiology/
Department: Kinesiology,
Health and Nutrition
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Robert Fulbright
JAPN 298: Directed Study in Japanese
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1108.00)
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, a student will be able
to demonstrate the ability to teach yoga on the mat.
Kinesiology
Personal Fitness Trainer Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, a student will be able
to describe how to implement fitness assessments and proper
protocols for cardio-respiratory, muscular strength, muscular
endurance, flexibility, and body composition.
Yoga Instructor Certificate of Achievement
Associate Degree
Students interested in the field of kinesiology can earn an
Associate in Arts degree in Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis
in Applied Health, Nutrition, and Kinesiology (see degree
requirements).
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Personal Fitness Trainer
Kinesiology is the study of human anatomy, physiology, and
the mechanics of body movement. Students take courses to
prepare for entry-level positions in health and fitness clubs,
wellness centers, and individualized personal training as well
as for university transfer. Career options include personal
trainer, exercise instructor, and various positions at fitness and
recreational centers or in school or recreational programs.
With a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology, students can apply
to physical therapy programs or pursue careers in athletic
training, fitness, nutrition, physical education, or other healthrelated fields.
This certificate is designed for individuals interested in entering
the field of fitness training and/or instruction. Students
completing the certificate should be prepared for entry-level
positions in the health and fitness industry, such as health and
fitness clubs, wellness centers, schools, and YMCAs, and for
training individual clients. Upon completion of the certificate
program, students may consider sitting for the National
Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM), American College of
Sports Medicine (ACSM), American Council on Exercise (ACE),
National Strength & Conditioning Association (NSCA), and
National Council Strength & Fitness (NCSF) national certification
exams.
Required courses:
BUS 130
Small Business Management
3
BIO 190
Survey of Human Musculoskeletal System
1
KINE 190
Introduction to Kinesiology
3
KINE 203
Techniques in Athletic Training
3
KINE 204
Techniques and Analysis of Fitness and
Weight Training
3
KINE 210
Exercise Prescription for Special
Populations
3
KINE 292
Internship Studies
NUTR 105
Human Performance and Sports Nutrition
*
Select a minimum of three units from the courses below:
206 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
0.5-3
3
3
Areas of Study & Courses
KINE 100
Functional Resistance Training
KINE 110
Walking for Fitness
KINE 112
Cardiorespiratory Stabilization Training
KINE 113
Cardiorespiratory Strength Training
KINE 114
Cardiorespiratory Power Training
KINE 141
Stabilization Weight Training
KINE 143
Strength Endurance Weight Training
KINE 144
Reactive Weight Training
KINE 150
Beginning Yoga
KINE 154
Intermediate Yoga
KINE 155
Advanced Yoga
KINE 156
Corrective Flexibility Training
KINE 157
Active Flexibility Training
KINE 158
Functional Flexibility Training
KINE 161
Beginning Martial Arts
KINE 162
Intermediate Martial Arts
KINE 163
Advanced Martial Arts
symbol recorded on the student’s transcript), withdrawals, and
repetition.
Cardiorespiratory Training CRC
Yoga Instructor
The Yoga Instructor certificate program prepares individuals to
meet the licensure requirements for the Allied Yoga Registry,
which enables students to become nationally licensed. This
comprehensive and wisdom-based program uses anatomy
and physiology as well as English and Sanskrit terminology to
provide students with both a broad background and practical
experience in the essential elements of yoga. Completion of
the program prepares students for employment in health clubs,
spas, yoga studios, hospitals, and the health industry as well as
for self-employment as yoga instructors.
Required courses:
KINE 145
Yoga Teacher Training Foundation
3
KINE 147
Yoga Teacher Training Development
3
KINE 149
Yoga Teacher Training Integration
3
BIO 190
Survey of Human Musculoskeletal System
1
BUS 130
Small Business Management
Beginning Yoga
Intermediate Yoga
KINE 155
Advanced Yoga
Cardiorespiratory Power Training
KINE 156
Corrective Flexibility Training
KINE 157
Active Flexibility Training
KINE 158
Functional Flexibility Training
KINE 161
Beginning Martial Arts
KINE 162
Intermediate Martial Arts
KINE 163
Advanced Martial Arts
3
*
Total Units
1.5
14.5
* KINE 150, KINE 154, and KINE 155 can be taken as .5 unit or 1
unit courses.
Courses Related in Content (CRC)
Active participatory kinesiology courses that are related in
content are grouped together. Students are allowed four
enrollments within each CRC group, but each course may
be taken only once unless its catalog description indicates
it is repeatable. Enrollments include any combination of
course completions (with an evaluative or nonevaluative
KINE 141
Stabilization Weight Training
KINE 143
Strength Endurance Weight Training
KINE 144
Reactive Weight Training
Yoga CRC
Certificate of Achievement
KINE 154
Cardiorespiratory Strength Training
KINE 114
Stabilization Weight Training CRC
For KINE 292, a minimum of .5 unit or a maximum of 3 units
may be applied to this certificate.
KINE 150
KINE 113
Martial Arts CRC
22.5-25
Select a minimum of 1.5 units from the courses below:
Cardiorespiratory Stabilization Training
Flexibility Training CRC
Total Units
*
KINE 112
KINE 150
Beginning Yoga
KINE 154
Intermediate Yoga
KINE 155
Advanced Yoga
Courses
KINE 100: Functional Resistance Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This course implements the latest scientific functional training
methodologies to enhance activities of daily living, weight
loss, body appearance, bone density, stress reduction, core
strength, balance and coordination, while decreasing the risk
of orthopedic injury and low back pain through functional
resistance training. It is designed for students interested in
increasing muscular strength, muscular endurance, body
composition and movement performance. (May be repeated
three times.) UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses,
maximum credit, 4 units.
KINE 110: Walking for Fitness
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.10)
Students enhance their individual health and well-being and
develop positive attitudes toward life-long fitness and wellness
through fitness walking. The course focuses on improving an
individual’s cardiopulmonary functioning, body composition,
goal setting, nutritional awareness, and weight management
through behavior management. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or
all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 207
Areas of Study & Courses
KINE 112: Cardiorespiratory Stabilization Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
KINE 143: Strength Endurance Weight Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This cardiorespiratory stabilization training course is designed
to improve cardiorespiratory fitness in students through a
variety of low-level intensity cardiovascular conditioning
activities. Students learn how to develop cardiorespiratory
stabilization training programs. Topics include the benefits
of cardiorespiratory stabilization training, the cardiovascular
system, and cardiorespiratory stabilization acute training
variables, modalities, guidelines, and methods. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
This strength endurance course improves stabilization
endurance and increases prime mover strength. Students
perform exercises in strength endurance, hypertrophy, and
maximal strength phases to improve overall work capacity,
enhance joint stabilization, and increase lean body mass. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit,
4 units.
KINE 113: Cardiorespiratory Strength Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This cardiorespiratory strength training course is designed to
improve cardiorespiratory fitness in students through a variety
of moderate-to-high level intensity cardiovascular conditioning
activities. Students learn how to develop cardiorespiratory
strength training programs. Topics include the benefits of
cardiorespiratory strength training, the cardiovascular system,
and cardiorespiratory strength acute training variables,
modalities, guidelines, and methods. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
KINE 114: Cardiorespiratory Power Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This cardiorespiratory power training course is designed
to improve cardiorespiratory fitness in students through a
variety of high-level intensity cardiovascular conditioning
activities. Students learn how to develop cardiorespiratory
power training programs. Topics include the benefits of
cardiorespiratory power training, the cardiovascular system,
and cardiorespiratory power acute training variables,
modalities, guidelines, and methods. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
KINE 141: Stabilization Weight Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This stabilization training course addresses physical structural
imbalances and emphasizes stabilization endurance
training. Students perform stabilization training exercises
in a proprioceptively enriched environment to improve
alignment of the kinetic chain. They focus on increasing their
ability to stabilize their joints, improve posture, and enhance
neuromuscular efficiency. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all
activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
208 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
KINE 144: Reactive Weight Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This reactive training course improves specific forms of training
necessary for maximal force production. Students perform
exercises in the reactive training phase to enhance reaction
time, speed, and explosive movement. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
KINE 145: Yoga Teacher Training Foundation
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0835.20)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of yoga that are
essential for both practice and teaching. Students learn
proper body mechanics, alignment principles, and breathing
techniques as they relate to the performance and instruction
of beginning yoga poses. Topics include the history and
philosophy of yoga, Sanskrit terminology, injury prevention, and
vocational opportunities.
KINE 147: Yoga Teacher Training Development
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0835.20)
This course provides students with the tools to design and teach
a 60-minute yoga class with verbal clarity. It integrates yogic
history and philosophy with yoga sutras, body mechanics and
alignment, and complementary practices, such as breathing
styles, flow sequences, and subtle body. Topics include
principles of teaching yoga as well as lifestyle choices and
ethics for yoga teachers.
Areas of Study & Courses
KINE 149: Yoga Teacher Training Integration
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0835.20)
KINE 156: Corrective Flexibility Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This course provides aspiring yoga teachers with the tools to
deepen their independent practice in order to strengthen their
teaching and develop a personal teaching style. The course
continues to focus on designing, integrating, and implementing
knowledge and teaching of asanas, pranayama techniques,
meditation, and yogic history and philosophy. Students also
learn about the business aspects of teaching yoga.
This corrective flexibility course is designed to increase joint
range of motion, improve muscle imbalances, correct altered
joint motion, and address posture distortions. Correct flexibility
includes self-myofascial release and static stretching. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
KINE 150: Beginning Yoga
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.20)
This course introduces students to the beginning practice of
yoga. Students learn the practice of gentle, restorative, and
vinyasa flow to improve concentration, physical endurance,
flexibility, balance, and posture. The course integrates basic
breathing techniques to increase oxygen intake, enhance
the mind-body connection, and reduce stress. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit 4 units.
KINE 154: Intermediate Yoga
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: KINE 150.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.20)
This course introduces students to the intermediate practice
of yoga. Students learn the practice of gentle, restorative, and
vinyasa flow to improve concentration, physical endurance,
flexibility, balance, and posture. The course integrates
intermediate breathing techniques to increase oxygen intake,
enhance the mind-body connection, and reduce stress. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit 4
units.
KINE 155: Advanced Yoga
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: KINE 154.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.20)
This course introduces students to the advanced practice of
yoga. Students learn the practice of restorative and vigorous
vinyasa flow to improve concentration, physical endurance,
flexibility, balance, and posture. The course integrates
advanced breathing techniques to increase oxygen intake,
enhance the mind-body connection, and reduce stress. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit 4
units.
KINE 157: Active Flexibility Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This active stretching course is designed to use agonists and
synergists to dynamically move the joint into a range of motion.
This form of stretching increases motorneuron excitability,
creating reciprocal inhibition of the muscle being stretched. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit,
4 units.
KINE 158: Functional Flexibility Training
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This functional flexibility course is designed to use force
production of a muscle and the body’s momentum to take
a joint through the full available range of motion. Dynamic
stretching uses the concept of reciprocal inhibition to improve
soft tissue extensibility. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity
courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
KINE 161: Beginning Martial Arts
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This course introduces students to the beginning skills of martial
arts, which is a nonaggressive yet highly effective form of selfdefense. Students learn about the history and philosophy of
martial arts, safety procedures, standards of etiquette, body
dynamics, and precise beginning-level movements in a setting
of diligent, cooperative training. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or
all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
KINE 162: Intermediate Martial Arts
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: KINE 161.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This course introduces students to intermediate skills of martial
arts, which is a nonaggressive yet highly effective form of
self-defense. Students learn about intermediate movements
and body dynamics, safety procedures, and standards of
etiquette in a setting of diligent, cooperative training. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Any or all activity courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 209
Areas of Study & Courses
KINE 163: Advanced Martial Arts
Units: 0.5-1
Prerequisites: KINE 162.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (0835.00)
This course introduces students to advanced skills of martial
arts, which is a nonaggressive yet highly effective form of selfdefense. Students learn about advanced movements and
body dynamics, safety procedures, meditation techniques,
and advanced defense strategies in a setting of diligent,
cooperative training. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all activity
courses, maximum credit, 4 units.
KINE 190: Introduction to Kinesiology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1270.00)
This course introduces students to the field of kinesiology and
nutrition, including its history, scope, and sub-disciplines.
Students explore principles of kinesiology and career
opportunities within kinesiology and nutrition/dietetics as well as
professional characteristics and ethical responsibilities of those
who work in the field. Topics include nutrition, biomechanics,
fitness/posture assessments, assessment tool use (body
fat, flexibility, cardiorespiratory), exercise prescriptions, and
behavior management.
KINE 200: Physical Education in the Elementary School
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0801.00)
This course teaches students how to develop physical
education curriculum to best meet the needs of elementary
school children based on national and state physical and
health education content standards for California public
schools. The course emphasizes the role and significance of
physical education, instructional methods, and motor skill,
movement, and total wellness concepts, including nutrition,
disease prevention, and the adverse effects of drug/narcotic,
alcohol, and tobacco use.
KINE 203: Techniques in Athletic Training
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1270.00)
This course explores the basic fundamentals of athletic injury
health care. It emphasizes prevention, recognition, basic
assessment, immediate care, treatment, and rehabilitation of
common athletic injuries. Topics include theory and application
of taping and wrapping, basic first aid, emergency field care,
and anatomical landmark recognition. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Any or all KINE theory courses, maximum credit 8 units.
210 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
KINE 204: Techniques and Analysis of Fitness and Weight
Training
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1270.00)
In this introduction to personal fitness training, students design
a comprehensive fitness program that includes muscular
strength and endurance, flexibility, and cardio respiratory
and core training to meet individual client needs. The course
emphasizes program design, fitness assessment, posture
analysis, biomechanics, exercise physiology, muscle anatomy,
professional development, nutrition, goal setting, and behavior
modification. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Any or all KINE theory
courses, maximum credit, 8 units.
KINE 210: Exercise Prescription for Special Populations
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1270.00)
This course examines the exercise implications for special
populations related to age, medical condition, and level of
fitness. Topics include exercise prescription for heart conditions,
stroke, diabetes, orthopedic problems, obesity, hyperlipidemia,
pregnant, asthmatic, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis,
epilepsy, cerebral palsy, older adult populations, and children.
The course also covers the role of exercise in risk factor
modification as well as contraindications to exercise for special
populations.
KINE 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
KINE 296: Topics in Kinesiology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0835.00)
LRNS 40: Educational Planning and Assessment
Units: .5
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 0.50 hour. (4930.32)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Kinesiology that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
KINE 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Learning Skills
The Learning Skills program offers skills courses for students with
learning disabilities.
Contact Information
Chair: Kelly Hagen
[email protected]
(Letters, Pre-Transfer)
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/SPEC
Department: Letters, PreTransfer
Office: Building SAN Admin,
760.634.7876
This course is designed for students who have a suspected
learning disability. A learning disabilities specialist evaluates
the student’s learning strengths, weaknesses, and styles with a
goal toward establishing appropriate educational objectives
and improved academic performance. Initial and follow-up
instruction strengthen the student’s understanding of results
and applications of his/her learning disabilities. Offered pass/
no pass only.
LRNS 42: Strategies Designed for Students with Learning
Disabilities: Mathematics
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.32)
This is a self-paced course designed for students with learning
disabilities. Students receive instruction in mathematics as
prescribed by individualized plans. The course emphasizes
visual and auditory processing skills through work in
mathematics plus compensatory techniques. Additional areas
of study include self-advocacy and learning strategies.
LRNS 46: English Essentials Designed for Students with
Learning Disabilities
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.32)
This course prepares students to write clear and organized
sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Students review basic
principles of grammar and usage and learn to identify and
apply knowledge of main ideas and supporting details in
their reading and writing. They also utilize study strategies to
enhance learning in classes incorporating written language.
The course focuses on individual learning and compensatory
techniques and incorporates self-advocacy, disabilitymanagement, and learning strategies. This course is designed
for students with learning disabilities.
Liberal Arts
Full-Time Faculty
Nancy Klump Schaefer
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 211
Areas of Study & Courses
The liberal arts associate degree’s integrated curriculum
offers students a broad knowledge of the arts, humanities,
mathematics, sciences, and social sciences, and it presents
an appreciation of their contribution to society from historical
and contemporary perspectives. Students are provided with a
well-rounded education that offers the opportunity for depth
of knowledge within an area of emphasis. This multidisciplinary
approach enables students to develop communication, critical
thinking, and intellectual skills that effectively prepare them
for lifelong learning and advanced study in a wide range of
majors at the university level. Career paths after the attainment
of a bachelor’s degree include the fields of administration,
communications, education, finance, law, management, and
the visual and performing arts.
Students should select two or more courses within a single
discipline in an "area of emphasis" to expand their depth of
knowledge within a discipline. Students are advised to meet
with a counselor to select the area of emphasis that is most
appropriate to their educational goal. All courses in the area
of emphasis must be completed with a letter grade of "C" or
better. Students may earn only one emphasis within the liberal
arts major.
Contact Information
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6881
Full-Time Faculty
Joanne Benschop
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Liberal Arts Associate in Arts Degree (all areas
of emphasis)
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to develop communication, critical thinking, and intellectual
skills that effectively prepare him/her for lifelong learning and
for advanced study in a wide range of majors at the university
level.
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degrees
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Applied
Health, Nutrition, and Kinesiology p. 212
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Arts and
Humanities p. 213
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Business
and Technology p. 214
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Creative
and Applied Arts p. 215
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in
Mathematics and Sciences p. 217
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in
Multicultural Studies p. 218
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Social and
Behavioral Sciences p. 219
Liberal Arts with an Area
of Emphasis in Applied
Health, Nutrition, and
Kinesiology
Associate in Arts Degree
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Applied
Health, Nutrition, and Kinesiology
The integrated pattern of courses listed below is focused on the
theoretical and applied aspects of health and nutrition. These
courses can assist students in developing an understanding of
the theories and concepts related to healthful living strategies
and provide a foundation for entry into allied health careers.
Students transferring to a four year university may choose
courses that will provide a basic foundation for further university
study in areas such as kinesiology, nutrition, nursing, and the
health sciences. Potential career paths include the fields of
food science, dietetics and nutrition, education, community
health education, athletic training, physical therapy, and
medical technicians. Students are advised to meet with a
counselor to select courses that are most appropriate to their
educational goal.
Students must complete a total of 18 units.
Select 6 units from the following courses:
212 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
BIO 101
General Biology
BIO 202
Foundations of Biology: Evolution,
Biodiversity, and Organismal Biology
BIO 204
Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry,
Cell Biology, Genetics, and Molecular
Biology
BIO 210
Human Anatomy
BIO 220
Human Physiology
BIO 230
Fundamentals of Microbiology
CHEM 100
Introductory Chemistry
6
Areas of Study & Courses
CHEM 102
Introduction to Organic and Biological
Chemistry
CHEM 104
Chemistry of Living Things (Introduction
to General, Organic, and Biochemistry)
CHEM 108
Preparatory Chemistry
CHEM 110
General Chemistry
CHEM 111
General Chemistry
Select 6 units from the following courses:
variety of majors within the humanities discipline, including
creative writing, English, humanities and art, linguistics, literature
and writing studies, museum studies, religious studies, and
philosophy. It also provides lower-division preparation for a wide
range of majors within the communication studies discipline.
Select a minimum of 18 units from the following:
6
ART 100
Drawing and Composition
3
ART 101
Design and Color
3
HEAL 101
Principles of Health
ART 103
3D Design
3
KINE 190
Introduction to Kinesiology
ART 157
Art Orientation
3
KINE 200
Physical Education in the Elementary
School
ART 158
Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and
the Americas
3
KINE 203
Techniques in Athletic Training
ART 201
Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art
3
KINE 204
Techniques and Analysis of Fitness and
Weight Training
ART 254
Understanding and Appreciating the
Photographic Image
3
NUTR 100
Nutrition Today
ART 258
Ancient to Gothic Art
3
NUTR 105
Human Performance and Sports Nutrition
ART 259
History of Renaissance to Modern Art
3
ART 260
History of Modern Art
3
or ART 260H
History of Modern Art (Honors)
Select 6 units from the following courses:
ANTH 102
6
Cultural Anthropology
or ANTH 102HCultural Anthropology (Honors)
ART 290
Landmarks of Art
3
BIO/BTEC
180
Biostatistics
CHNS 101
Elementary Chinese (First Semester)
4
COMM 101
Public Speaking
CHNS 102
Elementary Chinese (Second Semester)
4
COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
CHNS 201
Intermediate Chinese (Third Semester)
4
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
COMM 101
Public Speaking
3
MATH 103
Statistics
COMM 106
Group Communication
3
NURS 155
Basic Medical Terminology
COMM 111
Oral Interpretation of Literature
3
NUTR 108
Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition
COMM 120
Principles of Human Communication
3
NUTR 125
Nutrition and Aging
COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
3
PSYC 101
General Psychology
COMM 212
Argumentation
3
COMM 215
Intercultural Communication
3
COMM 220
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
DNCE 100
Dance Appreciation
3
DESN 107
History of Western Architecture -A
Sustainable Perspective
3
DNCE 101
Dance History
3
DNCE 105
Dance Cultures of the World
3
or PSYC 101H General Psychology (Honors)
PSYC/SOC
104
Statistics for Behavioral Science
or PSYC/
SOC 104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
or SOC 101H Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
Liberal Arts with an Area
of Emphasis in Arts and
Humanities
Associate in Arts Degree
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Arts and
Humanities
These courses emphasize the study of cultural literacy,
humanistic activities, and the artistic expression of human
beings. Students evaluate and interpret the ways in which
people through the ages in different cultures have responded
to themselves and the world around them in artistic and cultural
creation. Students also learn to value aesthetic understanding
and to incorporate these concepts when constructing value
judgments. This area of emphasis prepares students for a
DRAM 105
Introduction to Theatre
3
DRAM 120
Dramatic Literature (Ancient Greeks to
Shakespeare)
3
DRAM 121
Dramatic Literature (Restoration to
Present)
3
DRAM 130
Acting I
3
ENGL 100
Composition and Reading
4
ENGL 201
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature
4
or ENGL 201H
Critical Thinking, Composition, and Literature
(Honors)
ENGL 202
Critical Thinking and Composition
or ENGL 202H
Critical Thinking and Composition (Honors)
FILM 101
Introduction to Film
or FILM 101H
Introduction to Film (Honors)
FILM 106
Study of Filmed Plays
3
FILM 110
Film History
3
FREN 101
Elementary French (First Semester)
4
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 4
3
213
Areas of Study & Courses
FREN 102
Elementary French (Second Semester)
4
MUS 114
History of Rock and Roll
3
FREN 201
Intermediate French (Third Semester)
4
MUS 115
3
FREN 202
Intermediate French (Fourth Semester)
4
History and Appreciation of Western
Music
GRMN 101
Elementary German (First Semester)
4
MUS 116
A Survey of World Music
3
4
MUS 119
Jazz History
3
or MUS 119H
Jazz History (Honors)
GRMN 102
Elementary German (Second Semester)
GRMN 201
Intermediate German (Third Semester)
4
HIST 100
World History to 1500
3
or HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors)
HIST 101
World History Since 1500
or HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors)
HIST 103
Western Civilization to 1648
or HIST 103H
Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
HIST 104
Western Civilization Since 1648
or HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
HIST 110
United States History to 1877
or HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
or HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
HUMN 101
Introduction to the Arts
3
3
3
3
3
3
or HUMN 101H Introduction to the Arts (Honors)
HUMN 250
American Studies: First Contact Through
the Civil War
3
PHIL 100
Informal Logic and Critical Thinking
3
PHIL 101
Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge
and Reality
3
PHIL 102
Contemporary Moral Problems
3
PHIL 221
Philosophy of Religion
3
READ 100
Critical Reading and Thinking
3
RELG 101
World Religions
3
RELG 105
Eastern Religions
3
SPAN 101
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
4
SPAN 102
Elementary Spanish (Second Semester)
4
SPAN 201
Intermediate Spanish (Third Semester)
4
SPAN 202
Intermediate Spanish (Fourth Semester)
4
SPAN 203
Spanish for Native Speakers
4
SPAN 205
Hispanic Film, Literature, and
Composition
3
SPAN 210
Intermediate Conversation and Reading
3
Liberal Arts with an Area
of Emphasis in Business
and Technology
HUMN 251
American Studies: 1870s to the Present
3
ITAL 101
Elementary Italian (First Semester)
4
ITAL 102
Elementary Italian (Second Semester)
4
ITAL 121
Introduction to Italian Culture
3
ITAL 201
Intermediate Italian (Third Semester)
4
ITAL 202
Intermediate Italian (Fourth Semester)
4
ITAL 210
Intermediate Italian Conversation and
Reading
3
Associate in Arts Degree
JAPN 101
Elementary Japanese (First Semester)
4
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Business and
Technology
JAPN 102
Elementary Japanese (Second
Semester)
4
JAPN 201
Intermediate Japanese (Third Semester)
4
JAPN 202
Intermediate Japanese (Fourth
Semester)
4
JAPN 210
Intermediate Conversation I and
Reading
3
LIT 120
Introduction to Literature
3
LIT 250
American Literature: First Contact
Through the Civil War
3
LIT 251
American Literature: Mid-1800s to the
Present
3
LIT 260
English Literature Through the 18th
Century
3
LIT 261
English Literature: Romantic to
Contemporary
3
LIT 265
Shakespeare Studies
3
or LIT 265H
Shakespeare Studies (Honors)
LIT 270
World Literature to 1600
3
LIT 271
World Literature Since 1600
3
MUS 100
Introduction to Music Theory
3
MUS 113
Multicultural Roots of American Music
3
214 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This pattern of courses is designed to provide students with
the introductory skills and knowledge required for entry to the
world of business, commerce, and technology. Students are
introduced to technical skills required in business, and the
business courses emphasize theories, strategies, and practices
that are applicable to small entrepreneurial ventures as well as
business conducted in the global marketplace. The computer
studies information and technology courses (CSIT) and the
media arts technology courses (MAT) provide students with
the opportunity to develop, access, analyze, and integrate
information in a professional setting. Critical thinking courses
focus on the development of decision making and problem
solving techniques. This emphasis is ideal for the liberal arts
student seeking an enhanced understanding of the business
environment and the practical application of the skills required
for success in the business world. Students transferring to
a university may choose courses that will prepare them for
majors in accounting, finance, business, and economics, or
courses selected can provide a lower-division foundation for
a business minor. Career paths include employment in the
fields of management, marketing, accounting, music, the
hospitality industry, and information technology. Students are
advised to meet with a counselor to select courses that are
most appropriate to their educational goal.
Areas of Study & Courses
Students must complete a minimum of 18 units.
Select a minimum of 3 units from the following courses:
ACCT 101
Practical Accounting
ACCT 148
Computer Accounting
ACCT 158
Business Mathematics
ACCT 201
Financial Accounting
ECON 100
Survey of Economics
ECON 101
Principles of Economics: MACRO
ECON 102
Principles of Economics: MICRO
MATH 64
Intermediate Algebra
MATH 103
Statistics
MATH 115
Calculus with Applications
Select a minimum of 6 units from the following courses:
3
MAT 180
Publishing 1: Adobe InDesign
MAT 255
Business of Media Arts
Select one course from the following courses:
ENGL 201
3-4
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature
or ENGL 201HCritical Thinking, Composition, and Literature
(Honors)
ENGL 202
Critical Thinking and Composition
or ENGL 202HCritical Thinking and Composition (Honors)
6
PHIL 100
Informal Logic and Critical Thinking
READ 100
Critical Reading and Thinking
READ 101
Reading for College Success
Liberal Arts with an Area
of Emphasis in Creative
and Applied Arts
BUS 117
Human Resources Management
BUS 120
Introduction to Business
BUS 131
Management Principles
BUS 132
Marketing
BUS 133
Project Management
BUS 134
Retail Management
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
Associate in Arts Degree
BUS 140
Legal Environment of Business
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Creative and
Applied Arts
or BUS 140H Legal Environment of Business (Honors)
BUS 160
International Business
BUS 170
Entrepreneur I
BUS 171
Entrepreneur II
BUS 290
Business Communication
or BUS 290H Business Communication (Honors)
HOSP 100
Introduction to Hospitality Management
HOSP 114
Hospitality Law
HOSP 120
Hospitality Human Resources
Management
MTEC 160
Business of Music I
MTEC 260
Business of Music II
Select a minimum of 6 units from the following courses:
CSIT 110
Computer Applications
CSIT 120
Fundamentals of Computer Information
Systems
CSIT 125
Microsoft Word for Business
CSIT 128
Microsoft Excel for Business
CSIT 131
Microsoft Access for Business
CSIT 134
Microsoft PowerPoint for Business
CSIT 137
Google Apps for Business
CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
CSIT 149
Microsoft Windows
CSIT 155
Social Media for Business
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
MAT 120
Media Design 1: Production
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
MAT 135
Graphic Design 1: Principles
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
MAT 160
Video 1: Production
MAT 165
Web Design 2: Tools and Techniques
MAT 170
Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator
6
These courses emphasize the nature of artistic activities and
expression of art through analysis, examination, performance,
and technical development. This emphasis provides students
the opportunity to develop a multidisciplinary and global
perspective within the arts. Students may explore technological
art forms and gain an appreciation of their influential
relationship with contemporary culture and society. This
area of emphasis provides students with lower-division major
preparation and a foundation for upper-division study for
a wide range of majors within the arts, including applied
computer graphics, animation/illustration, art, dance, film,
graphic design, information technology and communication
design, music, television, film and media studies, and visual
and performing arts.
Select a minimum of 18 units from the following:
ART 100
Drawing and Composition
3
ART 101
Design and Color
3
ART 102
Drawing and Composition II
3
ART 103
3D Design
3
ART 157
Art Orientation
3
ART 158
Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and
the Americas
3
ART 201
Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art
3
ART 202
Painting: Acrylic
3
ART 203
Life Drawing I
3
ART 204
Painting I: Oils
3
ART 205
Painting: Watercolor
3
ART 206
Mixed Media Figure Studies I
3
ART 207
Beginning Photography
3
ART 208
Advanced Photography
3
ART 210
Printmaking
3
ART 211
Mixed Media Figure Studies II
3
ART 212
Painting II: Acrylics
3
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 215
Areas of Study & Courses
ART 213
Life Drawing II
3
DRAM 105
Introduction to Theatre
3
ART 214
Painting II: Oils
3
DRAM 107
Introduction to Design for Performance
3
ART 215
Painting II: Watercolor
3
DRAM 110
Voice and Diction
3
ART 216
Sculpture
3
DRAM 123
3
ART 217
Figure Sculpture
3
Script Analysis for Performance and
Design
ART 218
Printmaking II
3
DRAM 126
Shakespearean Acting Lab
1
ART 223
Woodworking and Furniture Design I
3
DRAM 130
Acting I
3
ART 224
Woodworking and Furniture Design II
3
DRAM 141
Stage Lighting
3
3
DRAM 146
Introduction to Stage Costume
3
Acting for the Camera
3
ART 225
Ceramics I
ART 226
Ceramics II
3
DRAM 148
ART 230
Introduction to Sculptural Installation
3
DRAM 226
Advanced Performance Lab
1
ART 231
Introduction to Video and Performance
Art
3
DRAM 231
Acting II
3
DRAM 232
Movement for the Stage
2
Digital Media for the Visual Artist
3
DRAM 253
Stage Makeup
3
ART 244
ART 245
Introduction to Media Culture
3
DRAM 256
Stagecraft
ART 251
Digital Photography
3
DRAM 270
1-3
ART 254
Understanding and Appreciating the
Photographic Image
3
Rehearsal and Performance - Technical
Theatre
3
DRAM 271
Rehearsal and Performance -- Acting
1-3
ART 258
Ancient to Gothic Art
3
DRAM 272
1-3
ART 259
History of Renaissance to Modern Art
3
Rehearsal and Performance -- Musical
Theatre
ART 260
History of Modern Art
3
ENGL 280
Creative Writing
3
FILM 101
Introduction to Film
3
or FILM 101H
Introduction to Film (Honors)
FILM 106
Study of Filmed Plays
3
FILM 110
Film History
3
MAT 120
Media Design 1: Production
3
or ART 260H
History of Modern Art (Honors)
ART 270
History and Theory of Museum and
Gallery Exhibition
3
ART 271
Practical Museum and Gallery Exhibition
and Management
3
ART 295
Visual Art/Professional Practice
3
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
3
COMM 111
Oral Interpretation of Literature
3
MAT 135
Graphic Design 1: Principles
3
COMM 220
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
3
DNCE 100
Dance Appreciation
3
MTEC 110
Recording Arts I
2
DNCE 101
Dance History
3
MTEC 111
Recording Arts II
2
DNCE 105
Dance Cultures of the World
3
MTEC 120
Digital Audio Production I
2
DNCE 140
Ballroom Dance Performance I
1
MTEC 140
Sound Reinforcement I
2
DNCE 143
Ballroom Dance Performance II
1
MTEC 141
Sound Reinforcement II
2
DNCE 146
Latin Dance Performance I
1
MTEC 210
Recording Arts III
2
DNCE 152
Ballet I
1.5
MTEC 211
Recording Arts IV
2
DNCE 154
Ballet II
1.5
MTEC 220
Digital Audio Production II
2
DNCE 160
Rehearsal and Performance
1.5
MUS 100
Introduction to Music Theory
3
DNCE 163
Creative Dance and Improvisation
DNCE 166
1
MUS 101
Music Theory I
3
Jazz Dance I
1.5
MUS 102
Music Theory II
3
DNCE 168
Jazz Dance II
1.5
MUS 103
Musicianship I
1
DNCE 169
Introduction to World Dance Forms
1
MUS 104
Musicianship II
1
DNCE 171
Selected World Dance
1
MUS 115
Modern Dance I
1.5
History and Appreciation of Western
Music
3
DNCE 176
DNCE 178
Modern Dance II
1.5
MUS 120
Piano I
1
DNCE 179
Musical Theatre Dance
1-2
MUS 121
Piano II
1
DNCE 185
Choreography I
3
MUS 129
Piano for Music Majors
1
DNCE 191
Tap Dance I
1.5
MUS 131
Guitar II
1
DNCE 193
Tap Dance II
1.5
MUS 144
Applied Music I
DNCE 263
Contemporary Dance Workshop and
Performance A
1.5
MUS 150
Contemporary Big Band
1
MUS 152
Small Group Jazz Ensemble
2
DNCE 264
Contemporary Dance Workshop and
Performance B
1.5
MUS 153
Jazz/Commercial Improvisation
2
DNCE 268
Jazz Dance IV
1.5
MUS 161
Masterworks Chorale
1
216 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
1.5
Areas of Study & Courses
MUS 164
Musical Theater Ensemble
1
BIO 170
Marine Biology
4
MUS 165
Chamber Choir
2
BIO 172
Marine Ecology
3
MUS 166
Vocal Jazz Ensemble
2
BIO/BTEC 180
Biostatistics
4
MUS 170
Symphony Orchestra
1
BIO 202
4
MUS 175
Classical Guitar Ensemble
1
Foundations of Biology: Evolution,
Biodiversity, and Organismal Biology
MUS 201
Advanced Music Theory
3
BIO 204
Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry,
Cell Biology, Genetics, and Molecular
Biology
4
BIO 210
Human Anatomy
4
BIO 220
Human Physiology
4
MUS 203
Advanced Musicianship
MUS 244
Applied Music II
1
1.5
Liberal Arts with an
Area of Emphasis in
Mathematics and
Sciences
Associate in Arts Degree
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Mathematics
and Sciences
The science courses in this category examine the physical
universe, its life forms, and its natural phenomena. These
courses assist the student in developing an appreciation of
the scientific method and encourage an understanding of
the relationships between science and other human activities.
The mathematics courses encourage the understanding
of mathematical concepts through the development of
quantitative reasoning skills. This area of emphasis provides
students with lower-division preparation for a variety of
majors within the scientific disciplines, including astronomy,
biology, chemistry, and physics, as well as preparation for
mathematics majors. Additionally, students may prepare for
nursing, kinesiology, public health, and other health science
majors. Many of the courses will assist students in prerequisite
preparation for graduate programs within the health sciences.
BIO 230
Fundamentals of Microbiology
5
CHEM 100
Introductory Chemistry
4
CHEM 102
Introduction to Organic and Biological
Chemistry
4
CHEM 104
Chemistry of Living Things (Introduction
to General, Organic, and Biochemistry)
5
CHEM 108
Preparatory Chemistry
3
CHEM 110
General Chemistry
5
CHEM 111
General Chemistry
5
CHEM 210
Organic Chemistry I
5
CHEM 211
Organic Chemistry II
5
EART 106
Earth and Space Science
3
GEOG 101
Physical Geography
3
GEOG 101L
Physical Geography Laboratory
1
GEOL 101
Physical Geology
3
or GEOL 101H
Physical Geology (Honors)
GEOL 101L
Physical Geology Laboratory
1
or GEOL 101LH Physical Geology Laboratory (Honors)
Select a minimum of 18 units from the following courses. At
least one course must be a mathematics course. Courses
outside of the mathematics discipline that are approved for
the quantitative reasoning requirement on Plans B and C may
be used in lieu of a course with the MATH prefix.
ANTH 101
Biological Anthropology
or ANTH 101H
Biological Anthropology (Honors)
3
ANTH 101L
Biological Anthropology Laboratory
1
ANTH 190
Primate Behavior and Ecology
3
ASTR 101
Descriptive Astronomy
3
ASTR 101L
Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory
1
ASTR 120
Life in the Universe
3
ASTR 201
Introductory Astronomy
3
BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
4
or BIO 101
& 101L
General Biology
and General Biology Laboratory
BIO 102
Ecology and Environmental Biology
4
BIO 103
Animal Diversity
3
BIO 105
Genes and Technology in Society
3
BIO 150
General Botany
4
GEOL 120
Environmental Geology: Earth Hazards
and Humanity
3
HORT 116
Plant Science
4
MATH 103
Statistics
4
MATH 105
Concepts and Structures of Elementary
Mathematics I
3
MATH 106
Concepts and Structures of Elementary
Mathematics II
3
MATH 115
Calculus with Applications
4
MATH 126
Pre-Calculus I: College Algebra
4
MATH 131
Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry and
Analytic Geometry
4
MATH 135
Pre-Calculus Mathematics
5
MATH 150
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
5
or MATH 150H
Calculus and Analytic Geometry (Honors)
MATH 155
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4
MATH 226
Discrete Mathematics
4
MATH 260
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
4
MATH 265
Differential Equations
4
MATH 270
Linear Algebra
4
OCEA 101
Introduction to Oceanography
3
or OCEA 101H Introduction to Oceanography (Honors)
OCEA 101L
Introductory Oceanography Laboratory
1
PHSN 101
Fundamentals of Physical Science
3
PHSN 106
Energy, Motion, and Matter: An
Introduction to Physics and Chemistry
3
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 217
Areas of Study & Courses
PHSN 108
Introduction to Climate Change
or PHSN 108H
Introduction to Climate Change (Honors)
PHYS 111
Introductory Physics I
PHYS 112
3
FREN 102
Elementary French (Second Semester)
4
FREN 201
Intermediate French (Third Semester)
4
4
FREN 202
Intermediate French (Fourth Semester)
4
Introductory Physics II
4
GEOG 102
Cultural Geography
3
PHYS 151
Principles of Physics I
4
GEOG 104
World Geography
3
PHYS 152
Principles of Physics II
4
GRMN 101
Elementary German (First Semester)
4
PHYS 253
Principles of Physics III
4
GRMN 102
Elementary German (Second Semester)
4
4
GRMN 201
Intermediate German (Third Semester)
4
PSYC/SOC 104 Statistics for Behavioral Science
or PSYC/SOC
104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
PSYC 260
Physiological Psychology
3
Liberal Arts with an
Area of Emphasis in
Multicultural Studies
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
3
GERO 250
Intergenerational Issues
3
HIST 103
Western Civilization to 1648
3
or HIST 103H
Western Civilization to 1648 (Honors)
HIST 104
Western Civilization Since 1648
or HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
3
HIST 107
East Asian Societies
3
HIST 109
History of the Middle East
3
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
Associate in Arts Degree
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Multicultural
Studies
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
3
These interdisciplinary courses promote an appreciation of
multicultural influences in contemporary society. Courses in
this category encourage students to acquire the knowledge,
skills, and attitude needed to function effectively in a
pluralistic democratic society and to interact, negotiate, and
communicate with people from diverse groups in order to
create a civic and moral community that works for the common
good. This emphasis provides students with lower-division major
preparation for disciplines within the area of study devoted to
culture and society. These majors include Chicano studies,
ethnic studies, foreign language, global studies, international
development, peace and conflict studies, and women’s
studies.
HIST 145
African American History to 1877
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
3
HUMN 101
Introduction to the Arts
3
Select a minimum of 18 units from the following:
ADM 230
Policing in a Diverse and Multicultural
Society
3
ANTH 102
Cultural Anthropology
3
or ANTH 102H
Cultural Anthropology (Honors)
ANTH 104
Native American Cultures
3
ART 290
Landmarks of Art
3
BUS 160
International Business
3
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
3
CHNS 101
Elementary Chinese (First Semester)
4
CHNS 102
Elementary Chinese (Second Semester)
4
CHNS 201
Intermediate Chinese (Third Semester)
4
or HUMN 101H Introduction to the Arts (Honors)
HUMN 250
American Studies: First Contact Through
the Civil War
3
ITAL 101
Elementary Italian (First Semester)
4
ITAL 102
Elementary Italian (Second Semester)
4
ITAL 121
Introduction to Italian Culture
3
ITAL 201
Intermediate Italian (Third Semester)
4
ITAL 202
Intermediate Italian (Fourth Semester)
4
ITAL 210
Intermediate Italian Conversation and
Reading
3
JAPN 101
Elementary Japanese (First Semester)
4
JAPN 102
Elementary Japanese (Second
Semester)
4
JAPN 201
Intermediate Japanese (Third Semester)
4
JAPN 202
Intermediate Japanese (Fourth
Semester)
4
JAPN 210
Intermediate Conversation I and
Reading
3
LING 110
English Language Structure and
Function
3
LIT 250
American Literature: First Contact
Through the Civil War
3
LIT 251
American Literature: Mid-1800s to the
Present
3
COMM 135
Gender Studies in Communication
3
COMM 215
Intercultural Communication
3
DNCE 105
Dance Cultures of the World
3
LIT 270
World Literature to 1600
3
3
LIT 271
World Literature Since 1600
3
3
MUS 113
Multicultural Roots of American Music
3
A Survey of World Music
3
Introduction to International Relations
3
ECON 100
ECON 101
Survey of Economics
Principles of Economics: MACRO
ECON 102
Principles of Economics: MICRO
3
MUS 116
EDUC 115
Foundations of Teaching as a Profession
3
PLSC 150
4
PSYC/SOC 145 Psychology/Sociology of the Family
FREN 101
218 Elementary French (First Semester)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
3
Areas of Study & Courses
RELG 101
World Religions
3
COMM 106
Group Communication
3
RELG 105
Eastern Religions
3
COMM 120
Principles of Human Communication
3
SOC 105
Introduction to Justice Studies
3
COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
3
SOC 110
Comparative Cultures
3
COMM 212
Argumentation
3
SOC 120
Introduction to Women’s Studies
3
COMM 220
Introduction to Mass Communication
3
SOC 207
Race and Ethnic Relations
3
CSIT 160
Technology, the Individual, and Society
3
SOC 230
Introduction to Chicana/o Studies
3
CSIT 165
Living in an Online World
3
SOC 240
Introduction to Black Studies
3
ECON 100
Survey of Economics
3
SPAN 101
Elementary Spanish (First Semester)
4
ECON 101
Principles of Economics: MACRO
3
SPAN 102
Elementary Spanish (Second Semester)
4
ECON 102
Principles of Economics: MICRO
3
SPAN 201
Intermediate Spanish (Third Semester)
4
ENGL 100
Composition and Reading
4
SPAN 202
Intermediate Spanish (Fourth Semester)
4
ENGL 201
4
SPAN 203
Spanish for Native Speakers
4
Critical Thinking, Composition, and
Literature
SPAN 205
Hispanic Film, Literature, and
Composition
3
or ENGL 201H
Critical Thinking, Composition, and Literature
(Honors)
SPAN 210
Intermediate Conversation and Reading
3
ENGL 202
Critical Thinking and Composition
or ENGL 202H
Critical Thinking and Composition (Honors)
GEOG 102
Cultural Geography
3
GEOG 104
World Geography
3
GEOG 108
Environmental Sustainability and Society
3
Liberal Arts with an Area
of Emphasis in Social
and Behavioral Sciences
Associate in Arts Degree
Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis in Social and
Behavioral Sciences
Courses in this category emphasize the connection between
human behavior and social, political, and economic
institutions, and they promote an understanding of how
societies and social subgroups operate. Students are
encouraged to apply critical thinking techniques as they
evaluate the way individuals act and have acted in response
to their societies. The courses ensure opportunities for students
to develop and communicate an understanding of the
perspectives and methods of inquiry used in the social and
behavioral sciences. This area of emphasis provides students
with lower-division major preparation for many disciplines within
the social sciences, including criminal justice, economics,
political science, psychology, sociology, and history.
4
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
3
GERO 250
Intergenerational Issues
3
HIST 100
World History to 1500
3
or HIST 100H
World History to 1500 (Honors)
HIST 101
World History Since 1500
or HIST 101H
World History Since 1500 (Honors)
HIST 104
Western Civilization Since 1648
or HIST 104H
Western Civilization Since 1648 (Honors)
HIST 105
History of England
or HIST 105H
History of England (Honors)
3
3
3
HIST 107
East Asian Societies
3
HIST 109
History of the Middle East
3
HIST 110
United States History to 1877
3
or HIST 110H
United States History to 1877 (Honors)
HIST 111
United States History Since 1877
or HIST 111H
United States History Since 1877 (Honors)
HIST 113
American Military History
or HIST 113H
American Military History (Honors)
HIST 115
Women in American History
3
HIST 116
History of the Americas to 1830
3
HIST 117
History of the Americas Since 1830
3
Introduction to the Administration of Justice
(Honors)
HIST 141
Mexican American History Through 1877
3
HIST 142
Mexican American History Since 1877
3
ADM 200
Concepts of Criminal Law
3
HIST 145
African American History to 1877
3
ANTH 102
Cultural Anthropology
3
HIST 146
African American History Since 1877
3
or ANTH 102H
Cultural Anthropology (Honors)
HIST 165
California History
3
Introduction to Archaeology
3
NUTR 108
Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition
3
Native American Cultures
3
PHIL 100
Informal Logic and Critical Thinking
3
ANTH 190
Primate Behavior and Ecology
3
PLSC 101
Introduction to Political Science
3
CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
3
PLSC 102
American Institutions and History
4
PLSC 103
Comparative Government
3
CHLD 210
Child, Family, and Community
3
PLSC 150
Introduction to International Relations
3
COMM 101
Public Speaking
3
PSYC 100
Psychology of Personal Growth
3
Select a minimum of 18 units from the following:
ADM 100
or ADM 100H
ANTH 103
ANTH 104
Introduction to the Administration of
Justice
3
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 3
3
219
Areas of Study & Courses
PSYC 101
General Psychology
or PSYC 101H
General Psychology (Honors)
3
PSYC/SOC 103 Social Psychology
3
PSYC/SOC 104 Statistics for Behavioral Science
4
or PSYC/SOC
104H
Statistics for Behavioral Science (Honors)
PSYC 115
Human Sexuality
3
PSYC 121
Human Development
3
PSYC/SOC 145 Psychology/Sociology of the Family
3
PSYC 170
3
Psychology of Aging: Adult Development
and Aging
PSYC/SOC 205 Research Methods in Behavioral
Sciences
3
PSYC 260
Physiological Psychology
3
READ 100
Critical Reading and Thinking
3
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
3
or SOC 101H
Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
SOC 102
Contemporary Social Problems
3
SOC 105
Introduction to Justice Studies
3
SOC 110
Comparative Cultures
3
SOC 120
Introduction to Women’s Studies
3
SOC 207
Race and Ethnic Relations
3
SOC 230
Introduction to Chicana/o Studies
3
SOC 240
Introduction to Black Studies
3
Library
Library science courses ensure students have a good
foundation in information literacy skills for success at MiraCosta
College, at their transfer institution, and within the workforce.
Among the more essential of these skills is the ability to do the
following:
Access library materials using an online catalog and
electronic databases
Access and use information from a variety of sources and in
various formats
Develop and implement a research strategy
Evaluate print and non-print sources
Communicate an understanding of the information
gathered.
Contact Information
Chair: Jennifer Paris
[email protected]
Dean: Mario Valente
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/LIBR
220 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Department: Library Science
Office: Building OC1200,
760.795.6637
Areas of Study & Courses
Full-Time Faculty
Steven Deineh
Myla Stokes Kelly
Richard Ma
Jennifer Paris
Pamela Perry
Glorian Sipman
Courses
LIBR 101: College Research Skills
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
INTR 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1601.00)
This course introduces students to the nature of research and
the library’s role in research. It emphasizes the development
of information competency skills (the ability to find, evaluate,
and organize information) for papers, presentations, and
other research assignments. Students learn about a variety of
information resources, including print, electronic databases,
and the World Wide Web.
LIBR 201: Research in the Digital Age
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1601.00)
This course explores the complex digital information landscape
and teaches students critical research skills for the online
environment. Students employ multiple Web technologies
and advanced search strategies to navigate, assess, and
communicate information from diverse sources and formats.
The course covers appropriate sources for academic research,
responsible and ethical uses of information, and formulating
and executing effective research strategies.
LIBR 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
LIBR 296: Topics in Library Science
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1601.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Library Science that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
Linguistics
Linguistics is the study of the nature and structure of human
speech.
Contact Information
Chair: John Kirwan
[email protected]
(Letters, Transfer)
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/LING
Department: Letters, Transfer
Office: Building SAN Admin,
760.634.7876
Courses
LING 110: English Language Structure and Function
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1501.10)
This course familiarizes students with the grammatical patterns
of English structure. The content includes study of parts
of speech, the structure of phrases and clauses, and the
application of structural knowledge of the language to issues
that arise in real-world usage. It is designed for students seeking
a multiple-subject teaching credential.
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 221
Areas of Study & Courses
Literature
LIT 250: American Literature: First Contact Through the Civil
War
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Advisory: ENGL 100
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
This course explores America’s major writers and literary
movements from first contact through the Civil War. Topics
include contact and Native American literature, colonial,
revolutionary and New Republic writing, the literature of
antebellum reform, and the American Renaissance.
LIT 251: American Literature: Mid-1800s to the Present
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Advisory: ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
The Letters Department offers a variety of literature courses for
students who wish to satisfy a humanities general education
requirement.
Contact Information
Chair: John Kirwan
[email protected]
(Letters, Transfer)
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/LIT
Department: Letters, Transfer
Office: Building SAN Admin,
760.634.7876
Full-Time Faculty
Robert Archer
Anthony Burman
Maria Figueroa-Chacon
Susan Herrmann
José Jara
Jeff Keehn
John Kirwan
Curry Mitchell
Jane Mushinsky
Jim Sullivan
Chad Tsuyuki
Robert Turner
Courses
LIT 120: Introduction to Literature
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
This course provides a general introduction to literary genres-novel, short story, poetry, and drama--in order to enhance
students’ skills in analyzing texts and performances with insight
and appreciation. Students examine fundamentals of literary
analysis (plot, character, symbolism, theme, voice, tone, and
figurative language) as well as basic critical principles for
making literary judgments while reading texts.
222 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This course explores America’s major writers and literary
movements from 1870 to the present. Authors studied may
include Twain, Chesnut, James, Chopin, Hurston, Wharton,
Crane, O’Neill, Cather, Hughes, Hemingway, Ellison, Faulkner,
Stevens, Plath, O’Connor, Baldwin, Rich, Ginsberg, Kushner,
Viramontes, Parks, Silko and Morrison.
LIT 260: English Literature Through the 18th Century
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours.
This course surveys writers in English literature from the AngloSaxon era to the 18th century. It covers works of at least two
of the three most influential writers in the language (Chaucer,
Shakespeare, Milton) as well as their historical and cultural
backgrounds. Students read plays; epic, religious, romantic,
and satiric poetry; ballads; and non-fiction prose, including
essays and biography. Eras include medieval, Renaissance,
and Enlightenment.
LIT 261: English Literature: Romantic to Contemporary
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
This course surveys major writers in English literature from the
late 18th to the 21st century. It covers some of the best-known
poetry, essays, drama, and prose fiction written in modern
English as well as the historical and cultural backgrounds of
these works. Eras include romantic, Victorian, modern, postcolonial, and postmodern.
Areas of Study & Courses
LIT 265: Shakespeare Studies
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
LIT 265H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
This course introduces students to selected works by William
Shakespeare with the goal of enhancing their understanding
and appreciation of his writing. The course emphasizes not
only the intrinsic value of the works themselves but also the
historical, intellectual, political, social, and psychological forces
that influenced Shakespeare and which are manifested in his
extraordinary art.
LIT 265H: Shakespeare Studies (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in LIT 265.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
This course introduces highly motivated students to selected
works by William Shakespeare with the goal of enhancing their
understanding and appreciation of his writing. The course
emphasizes not only the intrinsic value of the works themselves
but also the historical, intellectual, political, social, and
psychological forces that influenced Shakespeare and which
are manifested in his extraordinary art. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for LIT 265 or LIT 265H.
LIT 270: World Literature to 1600
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
This course surveys world literature--including the Middle East,
Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas--from the ancient period
up to the 1600s. The selected literature will be studied for its
expression of the human experience and for its generation of
cultural and artistic values.
LIT 271: World Literature Since 1600
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: ENGL 50, ACE 50, or ESL 50.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
LIT 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
LIT 296: Topics in Literature
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1503.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Literature that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
LIT 298: Directed Study in Literature
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1503.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
This course surveys world literature--the Middle East, Asia, Africa,
Europe, Australia, and the Americas--from the 1600s up to the
present. Students study the selected literature for its expression
of the human experience and for its generation of cultural and
artistic values.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 223
Areas of Study & Courses
Massage Therapy
performing massage strokes, including massages for pain
management and traditional Chinese medicine techniques.
Massage Therapist (500 Hours) Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, a student will be
able to demonstrate advanced massage techniques when
performing massage strokes, including a variety of soft tissue
and myofascial release techniques.
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Holistic Health Practitioner (1000 Hours)
Massage therapy is manual manipulation of soft body tissues
(muscle, connective tissue, tendons, and ligaments) to
enhance a person’s health and well-being.
People seek massage therapy for a variety of reasons, such as
to reduce stress and anxiety, relax muscles, rehabilitate injuries,
reduce pain, and promote overall health and wellness.
At MiraCosta College, students learn how to provide massage
therapy as a healthcare professional. Graduates of the
program seek employment in a variety of settings, such as
physician offices, health and wellness centers, hotels and
resorts, physical therapy centers, rehabilitation clinics and
hospitals, sports organizations, day spas, cruise ships, and
private practice.
The Massage Therapy certificates meet state requirements,
and students are encouraged to obtain national certifications
through the National Certification Board for Therapeutic
Massage and Bodywork (NCTMB) and/or the Massage and
Bodywork Licensing Examination (MBLEx) governed by the
Federation of State Massage Therapy Boards.
Contact Information
Chair: Robert Fulbright
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/
instruction/massagetherapy/
Department: Kinesiology,
Health and Nutrition
Office: Building 4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Based upon the medical model, this program requires
comprehensive knowledge of medical terminology, body
systems, and business practices. It satisfies state and National
Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork
(NCBTMB) requirements, which include detailed knowledge
of body systems (anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology),
pathology, massage and bodywork assessment, theory and
application, including in-class and supervised practice,
and business and ethics. Becoming certified under NCBTMB
increases employment opportunities within/between states.
Graduates of the program seek self-employment in a
private practice or can expect employment in health and
wellness centers, hotels and resorts, physical therapy centers,
rehabilitation clinics and hospitals, sports organizations, spas,
and cruise ships.
Required courses:
Therapeutic Massage I
3
MASG 210
Therapeutic Massage II
3
MASG 215
Massage Clinical Practicum
3
MASG 218
Chair Massage
2
MASG 220
Sports Massage
3
MASG 230
Integrative Therapeutic Massage
3
BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
or BIO 101
General Biology
BIO 210
Human Anatomy
4
Small Business Management
3
HEAL 222
Stress Management
3
KINE 190
Introduction to Kinesiology
3
KINE 203
Techniques in Athletic Training
3
NURS 155
Basic Medical Terminology
3
NUTR 100
Nutrition Today
3
or NUTR 105
Human Performance and Sports Nutrition
Recommended Elective:
HEAL 292
Internship Studies
Total Units
Certificate of Achievement
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
Massage Therapist (500 Hours)
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, a student will be
able to demonstrate advanced massage techniques when
224 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
3-4
BUS 130
Gail Meinhold
Holistic Health Practitioner (1000 Hours)
Certificate of Achievement
MASG 110
42-43
The Massage Therapist (500 Hours) certificate program satisfies
both state and National Certification Board for Therapeutic
Massage & Bodywork (NCTMB) requirements to be certified as
a massage therapist by requiring 500 hours of instruction. Based
upon the medical model, the program requires comprehensive
knowledge of medical terminology, anatomy, pathology, and
Areas of Study & Courses
physiology. Instruction addresses contraindications, health and
hygiene, business ethics, and massage therapy techniques.
To apply for state certification and/or take the NCTMB exam,
applicants must be 18 years old and have completed the entire
500 hours. The certificate provides students with the necessary
theoretical background and practical experience to work in
the industry. Massage therapists work in a variety of settings,
such as physician offices, health and wellness centers, hotels
and resorts, physical therapy centers, rehabilitation clinics and
hospitals, sports organizations, day spas, cruise ships, and
private practice.
Required courses:
BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
or BIO 101
General Biology
3-4
BIO 210
Human Anatomy
4
MASG 110
Therapeutic Massage I
3
MASG 210
Therapeutic Massage II
3
MASG 215
Massage Clinical Practicum
3
MASG 218
Chair Massage
2
MASG 220
Sports Massage
3
HEAL 222
Stress Management
3
Choose one course from the following:
BUS 130
Small Business Management
KINE 203
Techniques in Athletic Training
NURS 155
Basic Medical Terminology
NUTR 100
Nutrition Today
NUTR 105
Human Performance and Sports Nutrition
Total Units
3
27-28
Courses
MASG 110: Therapeutic Massage I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00)
This foundation course introduces students to the history,
science, and practice of massage therapy. Topics include
basic anatomy and physiology as they relate to massage
therapy as well as professional standards expected of massage
therapists. Students practice giving massages using beginning
strokes and proper sanitation, hygiene, and body mechanics.
(Formerly HEAL 110.)
MASG 210: Therapeutic Massage II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MASG 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00)
MASG 215: Massage Clinical Practicum
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MASG 210.
Advisory: BIO 210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00)
This course provides the clinical practice for massage therapy.
Students focus on advanced therapeutic massage techniques,
business practices, massage marketing, ethics, and clinic
procedures of massage experience. (Formerly HEAL 215.)
MASG 218: Chair Massage
Units: 2
Prerequisites: MASG 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00)
This foundation course for the practice of chair massage builds
on skills gained in HEAL 110 as students learn and practice
chair massage techniques. Topics include physiological effects,
related anatomy, contraindications, body mechanics, ethics,
hygiene, and sanitation standards. Students are required to
receive a professional chair massage. (Formerly HEAL 218.)
MASG 220: Sports Massage
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MASG 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00)
This advanced massage course builds on the concepts
and practices of HEAL 210 and specifically covers massage
techniques and evaluation procedures for providing massage
to athletes. It focuses on the athlete’s condition, anatomy, and
sport. Topics include muscles and movement, common sports
injuries, basic postural analysis, contraindications, and sport
massage techniques. (Formerly HEAL 220.)
MASG 230: Integrative Therapeutic Massage
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MASG 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00)
This integrative massage course is broken up into two parts:
traditional Chinese medicine and massage for special
populations. The traditional Chinese medicine portion
introduces students to theories of the mind/body interface
drawn from recent scientific research. Students study and
practice Shiatsu, Tai Chi, Tuina, acupressure, and other Asian
bodywork therapies. Students develop treatment plans and
perform indicated techniques in the areas of prenatal and
geriatric massage, pain management, HIV/AIDS, and cancer.
(Formerly HEAL 230).
Students analyze and evaluate anatomical structures and
assess common pathology. The course includes intermediate
massage theory, methods and procedures of soft tissue
techniques, and contraindications. It provides students with the
necessary skills and knowledge to facilitate employment in the
medical massage and spa field. (Formerly HEAL 210.)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 225
Areas of Study & Courses
Mathematics
Associate in Science in Mathematics for
Transfer Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, a student will be
able to apply an appropriate technique to differentiate and
integrate a function.
Associate Degree
Associate in Science Degree
Associate in Science in Mathematics for Transfer
Degree
Mathematics, the abstract, deductive study of pattern and
structure, is the foundation of all science and technology
programs, such as biological, physical, computer, behavioral,
and social sciences as well as engineering. Areas of
mathematics include arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus,
and various other theoretical and applied subjects. Students
take mathematics courses to prepare for a mathematics major,
to meet prerequisites in related disciplines, or to fulfill general
education requirements. A bachelor’s degree in mathematics
can lead to a career in a computer-related field or as an
actuary, accountant, mathematician, statistician, or teacher.
Contact Information
Chair: Beth Powell
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/MATH
Department: Mathematics
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Lemee Nakamura
Victoria Noddings
Zikica Perovic
Brent Pickett
Beth Powell
Mohammed G. Rajah
Leila Safaralian
John Towers
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
226 To complete the degree, students must fulfill the following
requirements:
Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) CSU transferable units
Complete all courses required in the major with a “C” or
better
Complete the CSU-GE or CSU-IGETC general education
pattern
Achieve a minimum CSU transferable GPA of 2.0
Complete a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta
College.
Required Core Courses: (13 units)
Full-Time Faculty
Janeen Apalatea
Peter Avery
Angela Beltran
David Bonds
Keith Dunbar
Scott Fallstrom
Shannon Gracey
Julie Harland
Mark Laurel
Students completing this associate degree will have
completed lower-division major preparation requirements
for a mathematics degree, an emphasis or option within
a mathematics degree, or a degree considered similar to
mathematics at a participating California State University (CSU)
campus. Following transfer to a participating CSU campus,
students will be required to complete no more than 60 units to
obtain a bachelor’s degree; however, some CSU campuses
may require additional lower-division major preparation. This
degree may not be appropriate preparation for students
transferring to a CSU campus not accepting this degree or
to a university or college that is not part of the CSU system.
Students should consult with a MiraCosta counselor for further
information regarding the most efficient pathway to transfer as
a mathematics major and to determine which CSU campuses
are participating in this program.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
MATH 150
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
or MATH 150H
Calculus and Analytic Geometry (Honors)
MATH 155
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4
MATH 260
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
4
List A: 4 Units. Select one course.
MATH 226
Discrete Mathematics
MATH 265
Differential Equations
MATH 270
Linear Algebra
List B. 4 Units.
5
4
4
Select one course not used above.
MATH 226
Discrete Mathematics
MATH 265
Differential Equations
MATH 270
Linear Algebra
Total Units
21
Students are strongly advised to complete the History,
Constitution, and American Ideals requirement prior to transfer.
It is recommended that you select courses that meet lower-
Areas of Study & Courses
division major preparation requirements at your intended
transfer university.
Courses
MATH 20: Pre-Algebra
Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in MATH
820 or MATH 820B.
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
MATH 105: Concepts and Structures of Elementary
Mathematics I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1701.00)
This course prepares students for Elementary Algebra
(MATH 30). Topics include operations on positive and negative
numbers; fractions, decimals, and percents; perimeters, areas,
and volumes of geometric figures; fundamental algebraic
concepts; square roots; and applications.
This course covers set theory, problem solving, systems of
numeration, elementary number theory, numerical operations,
and arithmetic algorithms. It emphasizes cognitive learning and
the development of problem solving strategies and techniques.
Students work collaboratively in groups and/or independently
using manipulatives and models to explore structures and
formulate concepts. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for MATH 105
or MATH 106.
MATH 30: Elementary Algebra
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 20 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in MATH
830 or MATH 830B.
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
MATH 106: Concepts and Structures of Elementary
Mathematics II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 105 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1701.00)
Designed to prepare students for intermediate algebra, this
course teaches simplifying algebraic expressions involving
polynomials and rational terms; factoring; solving linear
equations; solving quadratic and rational equations using
factoring; analyzing graphs of linear equations; and solving
applied problems.
This continuation of MATH 105 covers the mathematical
concepts needed for teaching elementary school
mathematics. Core topics include the real number system,
geometry, Pythagorean theorem, measurement in both the
English and metric systems, transformations, and symmetry.
Students must demonstrate their understanding of the
concepts and structures of elementary mathematics using
critical thinking. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for MATH 105 or
MATH 106.
MATH 64: Intermediate Algebra
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 30 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in MATH
101 or MATH 101B.
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
This algebra course covers radicals, exponents, concepts of
relations and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions,
linear and quadratic functions, and the solutions of equations
from these topics.
MATH 103: Statistics
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
This course introduces data analysis. Topics include design of
experiments, descriptive statistics, correlation and regression,
probability, sampling, estimation, and significance testing.
Students use appropriate technology to analyze real-world
data. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for MATH 103, PSYC 104/
SOC 104, PSYC 104H/SOC 104H or BIO 180/BTEC 180.
MATH 115: Calculus with Applications
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
This course relates calculus to real-world applications in
social science, economics, and business. Topics include an
algebra review, graphing, limits, derivatives of polynomials of
one variable, maxima and minima, integration, derivatives
of logarithmic and exponential functions, development of
integration techniques, an introduction to multi-variable
calculus, and their application to problems. This course is
designed primarily for students majoring in social science,
economics, and business who require calculus and is not
recommended for mathematics, physical science, engineering,
or biological science majors. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
MATH 115, MATH 150, or MATH 150H.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 227
Areas of Study & Courses
MATH 126: Pre-Calculus I: College Algebra
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 64 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
MATH 135.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
MATH 150: Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
Units: 5
Prerequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 135 or eligibility determined by
the math placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
MATH 150H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 5 hours. (1701.00)
This course covers advanced algebra topics including
functions and their properties. Topics include linear, quadratic,
polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions
and their applications, graphs of functions, inverse functions,
and systems of equations and inequalities. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: MATH 126, MATH 131, and MATH 135 combined,
maximum credit, 5 units.
This course is the first in a three-semester calculus sequence
designed for mathematics, science, and engineering majors.
Topics include limits and continuity; differentiation of algebraic,
trigonometric and exponential functions and their inverses;
integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus; and
applications of differentiation and integration. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for MATH 115, MATH 150, or MATH 150H.
MATH 131: Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry and Analytic
Geometry
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 126 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
MATH 135.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
MATH 150H: Calculus and Analytic Geometry (Honors)
Units: 5
Prerequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 135 or eligibility determined by
the math placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
MATH 150.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 5 hours. (1701.00)
This course covers basic concepts of analytic geometry
and trigonometry, including definitions and properties of
trigonometric functions. Topics include solutions of applied
problems involving right triangles; graphs of trigonometric
functions; trigonometric identities; trigonometric equation
solving; evaluation of inverse trigonometric functions and
polar coordinates. The course also covers conics, systems of
non-linear equations, and sequences and series. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: MATH 126, MATH 131, and MATH 135 combined,
maximum credit, 5 units.
MATH 135: Pre-Calculus Mathematics
Units: 5
Prerequisites: MATH 130 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process
Corequisite: MATH 130 if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 5 hours. (1701.00)
This course covers functions and their properties. Topics
include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, trigonometric,
exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations
and inequalities; and conics.
This first in a three-semester calculus sequence is designed
for highly motivated mathematics, science, and engineering
majors. Topics include limits and continuity; differentiation of
algebraic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their
inverses; integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus;
and applications of differentiation and integration. The course
provides mathematically talented students the opportunity
to obtain a level of rigor above the level currently available
in existing courses. It emphasizes logical reasoning, problem
solving, and applications. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for
MATH 115, MATH 150, or MATH 150H.
MATH 155: Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 150 or MATH 150H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
This second course in a three-semester calculus sequence
covers advanced integration techniques, improper integrals,
infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, and polar
coordinates. The course is designed for mathematics, science,
and engineering majors.
MATH 226: Discrete Mathematics
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 135 or eligibility determined by
the math placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
Designed for students majoring in mathematics or computer
science, this course introduces discrete mathematics,
including logic, methods of proof, number theory, sets,
counting, relations, recursion, recurrence relations, Boolean
algebra, graphs, trees, and networks. Topics are illustrated
with applications to computer science, including design and
analysis of algorithms, undecidability, program correctness,
and digital logic design.
228 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Areas of Study & Courses
MATH 260: Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 155.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
This third course in a three-semester calculus sequence covers
vectors in two and three space, quadratic surfaces, vectorvalued functions of several variables, partial differentiation
and multiple integration, vector fields, and line integrals and
conservative fields. The course is designed for mathematics,
science, and engineering majors.
MATH 265: Differential Equations
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 155.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
MATH 296: Topics in Mathematics
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours.
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Mathematics that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
Media Arts &
Technologies
This course introduces the theory and applications of ordinary
differential equations of first and higher (mostly second) order
as well as systems of linear differential equations. It includes
both quantitative and qualitative methods. The course deals
with theoretical aspects of existence and uniqueness of
solutions as well as techniques for finding analytical, numerical,
and power-series solutions.
MATH 270: Linear Algebra
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 260.
Corequisite: MATH 260 if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 4 hours. (1701.00)
This course introduces students to the concepts of linear
algebra. Topics include matrix algebra, Gaussian elimination,
determinants of a matrix, properties of determinants, vector
spaces and their properties with an introduction to proofs, linear
transformations, orthogonality, eigenvalues and eigenvectors,
and computational methods.
MATH 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
The Media Arts & Technologies program provides a focused
sequence of courses for students who wish to transfer to a
four-year institution or gain employment in the fields of Web
and interactive design, graphic design, video production,
or print-media creation and delivery. Career options include
webpage design, Web/multimedia development, Web/
multimedia programming, graphic design, video editing,
video, production, media content development, information
architecture, graphics production, interface design, and layout
design. Specific career positions include Web designer, graphic
designer, video editor, webmaster, Web programmer, Flash
designer, art production assistant, video production assistant,
special effects artist, background artist, product modeler,
product animator, and storyboard artist.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 229
Areas of Study & Courses
Contact Information
Chairs: Jill Malone
[email protected]
(Fall 2014), Karl Cleveland
[email protected]
(Spring 2015)
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/IMT
Certificates
Department: Media Arts &
Technologies
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Karl Cleveland
Jill Malone
Jeff Uhlik
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
Certificate of Achievement
Graphic Design
This certificate provides students with the design and technical
skills needed to gain employment in the graphic design field
with organizations and small businesses that design and
distribute publications in both print and electronic media.
Students who complete this certificate will also be prepared
to start their own design businesses, work as freelancers, or
pursue a graphic design degree at a four-year university.
Students learn the key components of graphic design and
publishing using current computer software applications as
well as concept development through project planning and
management. Employment opportunities include graphic
designer, graphic artist, imaging specialist, photographic
assistant, layout artist, and graphic production assistant.
Foundation courses:
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
3
MAT 120
Media Design 1: Production
3
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
3
Graphic Design Associate in Arts Degree and
Certificate of Achievement
MAT 135
Graphic Design 1: Principles
3
Emphasis courses (select 12 units):
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to plan, design, and produce professional-level graphic
designs that apply design, layout, and typographic principles
and demonstrates effective communication solutions.
Video and Media Design Certificate of
Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to plan, design, and produce professional-level videos,
interfaces, applications, or experiences that integrate media,
utilize appropriate tools and techniques, and demonstrate
effective communication solutions.
Web Development and Design Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will
be able to plan and develop professional-level graphical
user interfaces, web pages, and websites that utilize
appropriate tools and techniques and demonstrate effective
communication solutions.
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degrees
Graphic Design
Web Development and Design
Students may earn one of the above-named associate degrees
by completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta College counselor to identify required
courses and to develop a written educational plan for the
specific degree or certificate they wish to earn.
230 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
MAT 155
Graphic Design 2: Typography
MAT 170
Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator
MAT 180
Publishing 1: Adobe InDesign
MAT 185
Graphic Design 3: Design and Layout
Advanced courses (select 3 units):
MAT 210
Digital Imaging 3: Advanced Photoshop
MAT 220
Digital Imaging 4: Advanced Illustrator
MAT 230
Publishing 2: Output for Print
MAT 255
Business of Media Arts
MAT 270
Advanced Design Studio
Required to graduate:
MAT 290
12
3
3
Portfolio Development
Recommended Electives:
ART 100
Drawing and Composition
ART 260
History of Modern Art
or ART 260H History of Modern Art (Honors)
Total Units
30
Note: MAT 292, MAT 296, or MAT 298 may be substituted
for courses within this certificate with approval of the MAT
Department Chair.
Certificate of Achievement
Video and Media Design
This certificate provides the skills students need to gain
employment in the corporate, broadcast, technical,
educational, and entertainment industries. Students learn
how to create video programs and digital media content
for broadcast, cable, DVD, Internet, and mobile delivery as
well as for dedicated computer presentations. Students gain
skills in all phases of video production, 3D and traditional
animation techniques, special effects, DVD authoring, and
project management. Employment opportunities include video
Areas of Study & Courses
editor, video production assistant, camera operator, product
animator, DVD author, mobile content developer, special
effects artist, and special effects animator.
MAT 270
MAT 290
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
3
MAT 120
Media Design 1: Production
3
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
3
MAT 135
Graphic Design 1: Principles
MAT 140
3D Animation 1: Maya
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
MAT 160
Video 1: Production
MAT 200
Video 2: Post-Production and Special
Effects
Advanced course:
MAT 240
3D Animation 2: Motionbuilder
MAT 270
Advanced Design Studio
Capstone:
MAT 290
3
12
3
3
Portfolio Development
Total Units
30
Note: MAT 292, MAT 296, or MAT 298 may be substituted for
courses within this certificate with approval of the MAT Program
Director.
Certificate of Proficiency
Digital and Print Publishing
This certificate provides focused skills necessary to gain
employment in the field of digital printing and publishing.
Students gain specific skills in graphic design, image
manipulation, page layout, digital illustration, and preparation
for final output. Graduates of this program are able to move
into employment opportunities as graphic artists, imaging
specialists, digital imaging assistants, layout artists, and graphic
production assistants.
Required courses:
30
Certificate of Achievement
Web Development and Design
This certificate trains students in the skills necessary to gain
employment in the dynamic field of Internet and mobile
content design, development, and delivery. Students gain skills
in all phases of website design, including page construction,
site design, dynamic content delivery, e-commerce, Flash
animation, web video, and Flash development for games,
advertising, interactive content, and mobile content.
Employment opportunities include webpage designer, website
designer, information architect, interface designer, mobile
content developer, web developer, Flash designer, or Flash
developer.
Foundation courses:
MAT 110
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
MAT 135
Graphic Design 1: Principles
MAT 170
Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator
MAT 180
Publishing 1: Adobe InDesign
MAT 210
Digital Imaging 3: Advanced Photoshop
MAT 220
Digital Imaging 4: Advanced Illustrator
MAT 230
Publishing 2: Output for Print
MAT 255
Business of Media Arts
15
Certificate of Proficiency
Video and Animation
This certificate forms a solid foundation in the skills students
need to create video, special effects and animation media
programs for delivery in traditional formats, over the Web, or via
mobile devices. Career opportunities include video editor, video
production assistant, special effects artist, background artist,
product modeler, product animator, and storyboard artist.
Required courses:
Media Design 1: Production
3
MAT 140
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
3
MAT 135
Graphic Design 1: Principles
3
12
MAT 120
Emphasis courses (select 12 units):
3
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
3
MAT 160
Video 1: Production
3
MAT 200
Video 2: Post-Production and Special
Effects
3
3D Animation 2: Motionbuilder
3
E-Commerce and Web Presence
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
MAT 240
MAT 165
Web Design 2: Tools and Techniques
Total Units
MAT 175
Web Design: JavaScript and jQuery
MAT 190
Flash 2: ActionScript
MAT 215
Web Design: Mobile Sites and Apps
MAT 235
Web Design 3: Site Design and
Architecture
MAT 225
Web Design: PHP and WordPress
MAT 255
Business of Media Arts
3D Animation 1: Maya
CSIT 146
Advanced courses (select 3 units):
15
Total Units
3
Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
Select 15 units from the following:
Note: MAT 292, MAT 296, or MAT 298 may be substituted for
courses within this certificate with approval of the MAT Program
Director.
MAT 110
3
Portfolio Development
Total Units
Foundation courses:
MAT 110
Emphasis courses (12 units):
Advanced Design Studio
Required to graduate:
15
Certificate of Proficiency
Graphic Communication
3
This certificate forms a solid foundation in graphic design
proficiency. These skills are essential in all types of visual
media where a message must be conveyed to a specific
target market. This certificate is designed to be completed in
conjunction with other MAT certificates to enhance a student’s
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 231
Areas of Study & Courses
ability to create more effective and dynamic communication or
for professionals who would like to enhance their job skills.
Required courses:
MAT 135
Graphic Design 1: Principles
3
MAT 155
Graphic Design 2: Typography
3
MAT 185
Graphic Design 3: Design and Layout
3
ART 100
Drawing and Composition
3
ART 260
History of Modern Art
3
or ART 260H
History of Modern Art (Honors)
Total Units
15
Certificate of Proficiency
Web Design
This certificate provides the focused skill set necessary to gain
employment in website design. Depending on which courses
are selected, students gain specific skills in web markup and
scripting languages, graphics production, web animation
techniques, database technologies, and website architecture
and design. Graduates of this program will be able to move
into employment opportunities such as webpage design,
web development, Flash designer, Flash developer, content
developer, and interface designer.
Required courses:
Five of the following:
MAT 125
Web Design 1: Fundamentals
MAT 150
Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
MAT 165
Web Design 2: Tools and Techniques
MAT 175
Web Design: JavaScript and jQuery
MAT 190
Flash 2: ActionScript
MAT 215
Web Design: Mobile Sites and Apps
MAT 225
Web Design: PHP and WordPress
MAT 235
Web Design 3: Site Design and
Architecture
CSIT 146
E-Commerce and Web Presence
Total Units
Courses
MAT 110: Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in ART
247.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.60)
In this course students use Adobe Photoshop to create
digital imaging designs of professional quality. Through the
manipulation of photographic and other raster graphic
images, students generate unique artwork that involves
photo editing, tonal and color correction, masking, layer
adjustments, painting techniques, blending modes, and
advanced compositing. Students study layout and design
techniques, application of color using CMYK and RGB, and
appropriate typography practices.
232 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
15
MAT 120: Media Design 1: Production
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.10)
This course introduces the fundamental skills needed for the
design and production of multimedia projects and interactive
programs. Topics include capturing and editing video, images,
and audio, basic 3D modeling and animation, and interactive
program design and development. The course also covers
proper formats for playback through various presentation
platforms and the basics of network protocol.
MAT 125: Web Design 1: Fundamentals
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.30)
This course introduces the fundamentals of building Web
pages, including XHTML coding, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS),
effective images/backgrounds, interface design, and File
Transfer Protocols (FTPs) for uploading websites. Students also
learn management techniques for personal websites, browser
and platform issues, and the basics of network protocols.
MAT 135: Graphic Design 1: Principles
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0614.10)
This course introduces the visual communication principles
and concepts of successful graphic design. Topics include
form, color palettes, text/image relationships, typography,
grid structures, and layout design. The course develops and
refines each student’s personal design sensibility by applying
appropriate and creative design presentations within cultural
and historical contexts.
15
MAT 140: 3D Animation 1: Maya
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 120.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.40)
This course introduces students to the concepts and
execution of 3D modeling, animation, and rendering using
Autodesk Maya. Topics include storyboard development and
visualization, efficient modeling and texturing techniques, 3D
environment design (including lighting and camera angles),
object and camera animation, and rendering considerations.
The course also covers proper formats for delivery through
various mediums.
Areas of Study & Courses
MAT 150: Flash 1: Animation and Interactivity
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 120.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0614.40)
Students approach web design using the latest animation and
interactive media design techniques and tools. They learn to
integrate animation, text, graphics, audio, and video to create
rich, interactive user experiences. The course emphasizes
effective interface design and design principles for time-based
media.
MAT 155: Graphic Design 2: Typography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 135.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0614.10)
This course covers the essential concepts of typographic design
and its incorporation into all forms of visual communication.
Topics include historical development and cultural impacts,
type design, ligature, word/image fusion, and structural and
experimental design. Students develop a solid understanding
of how to use type and letterforms to improve the quality of
comprehension and communication.
MAT 160: Video 1: Production
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 120.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.10)
This course offers detailed coverage of the video production
environment. It covers the process of creating and editing video
programs from concept and storyboards through shooting and
recording, culminating in acquiring, editing, and mastering
a digital program. Topics include proper formats for delivery
through various mediums.
MAT 165: Web Design 2: Tools and Techniques
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 125.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course builds on the skills developed in MAT 125. It
introduces students to techniques for designing websites
using industry-standard web design and development tools
(Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Flash). Topics include webpage design, image editing, animation, and producing and
programming websites using XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript.
MAT 170: Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in ART
248.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.60)
In this course students use Adobe Illustrator to create and
manipulate vector graphic images into personal artwork and
commercial output. Students generate effective typography
and vector shapes, utilize a variety of color palettes and
libraries, develop unique brushes and patterns, and convert
raster images into vector art. Through hands-on instruction
and multiple projects students transform objects, manipulate
perspective, utilize blends and gradients, understand the
differences between CMYK and RGB, and import and export
different graphic file formats.
MAT 175: Web Design: JavaScript and jQuery
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MAT 125.
Advisory: MAT 165
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0707.10)
This course introduces web design students to JavaScript
and jQuery for interactive web development, including how
JavaScript can be used in conjunction with HTML and CSS
to add interactivity, animation, visual effects, and advanced
functionality to web pages. Students explore interface design
and core programming concepts in JavaScript and jQuery to
create rich user experiences, manage dynamic content, create
animation, and make web pages more interactive and intuitive.
Students learn to design and script user interface elements
common on websites, such as content sliders, interactive
galleries, and more. Students also learn to use the HTML5
canvas element with JavaScript to draw, animate, and create
interactive graphics for HTML5 games or web applications.
Topics also include integrating and customizing jQuery plugins,
working with AJAX, and using API interfaces to web services,
such as maps and social media.
MAT 180: Publishing 1: Adobe InDesign
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 110 AND MAT 170
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.50)
This course introduces students to Adobe InDesign, the page
layout software program used by professional graphic artists to
publish ads, business cards, brochures, postcards, newsletters,
magazines, books, and more. It involves considerable
hands-on instruction and projects similar to those faced by
today’s designers. Students learn how to prepare documents
for professional publication, how to format type, import
images, use styles, generate tables, create swatches, and
apply shortcuts. Students learn typographic and publishing
techniques, basic design principles, and how to apply spot
and process color. Students will examine, troubleshoot, and
package digital files for output to a commercial press and for
the Web.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 233
Areas of Study & Courses
MAT 185: Graphic Design 3: Design and Layout
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 135.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0614.10)
MAT 215: Web Design: Mobile Sites and Apps
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MAT 165.
Advisory: MAT 150.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.30)
This course covers the process of creating effective, efficient,
and dynamic layouts to solve complex design problems.
Students explore every stage of the design process, including
concept development, intuitive design, and structural hierarchy
and grid design. The course emphasizes developing a creative
problem-solving approach and refining a personal design
sense.
This course introduces web design and development students
to design considerations and development techniques for
creating mobile websites and web applications. Students
explore the use of web technologies, including HMTL5, CSS3,
JavaScript, jQuery, and Flash/ActionScript, to design and
produce websites and apps optimized for delivery on mobile
and tablet devices. Topics include mobile media design,
understanding mobile platforms, browsers, and device
capabilities, responsive design, media queries, jQuery Mobile,
the PhoneGap framework, and Flash Air for Android and iOS
apps.
MAT 190: Flash 2: ActionScript
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 150.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.10)
This course expands upon the basic concepts covered in
MAT 150. It emphasizes ActionScript, user interface functionality,
advanced techniques, and efficient program development as
they relate to creating interactive user experiences. The course
also stresses development issues for multi-platform playback.
MAT 200: Video 2: Post-Production and Special Effects
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 110 or ART 247; MAT 160.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.40)
This course offers detailed coverage of the video postproduction environment. Students learn techniques for creating
complex video sequences by combining video, animated
graphics, Foley effects, advanced editing techniques, green
screen, and other special effects using industry-standard
software. The course emphasizes instruction in advanced video
editing techniques, and it covers final project output for delivery
through various presentation platforms.
MAT 210: Digital Imaging 3: Advanced Photoshop
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MAT 110.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in ART
252.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.60)
This course builds upon knowledge and skills gained in
MAT 110. Students use Adobe Photoshop to acquire advanced
digital imaging techniques for image design and production.
Through specific projects, students utilize higher-level
compositing techniques, apply advanced color management
tools, and generate 3D objects within a 3D workspace. Multiple
projects reinforce acquired knowledge through preparation of
digital files for print and online delivery.
234 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
MAT 220: Digital Imaging 4: Advanced Illustrator
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MAT 170.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.60)
This is an advanced course for MAT students who are planning
to pursue a career in graphic design. This course builds upon
concepts gained in MAT 170 and addresses advanced vector
design skills for developing logos, three-dimensional packaging,
signage, advertisements, business cards, digital illustrations,
and vector graphics for the Web.
MAT 225: Web Design: PHP and WordPress
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 165
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0707.00)
This course develops skills for building database driven,
dynamically generated websites using current dynamic
scripting languages, content management system (CMS)
applications, and presentation semantics with PHP, WordPress,
and CSS, respectively. Students develop dynamic websites
and CMS web applications as a basis for creating professional,
commercial, or other dynamic, interactive applications. Topics
include PHP scripting fundamentals, integrating dynamic
content with HTML and CSS, understanding WordPress as a
CMS, customizing and creating WordPress themes and plugins,
leveraging web design software, such as Dreamweaver and/
open-source code editors to create professional data-driven
websites, and designing dynamic websites with issues of
accessibility and device responsiveness in mind.
Areas of Study & Courses
MAT 230: Publishing 2: Output for Print
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 180
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0614.50)
This advanced publishing course takes students through the
process of producing and printing a press-ready publication
at a professional printing company. Students explore print
technologies (e.g., offset printing, variable-data printing, and
direct digital printing), learn the steps required for prepress,
production, binding, trimming, and finishing, and apply
prepress techniques using Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop,
and Adobe Illustrator. The course includes a professional print
bureau tour.
MAT 235: Web Design 3: Site Design and Architecture
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 165.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0614.30)
Students use industry-standard Web development tools and
techniques to design complex, professional-level websites.
The course emphasizes site architecture, content rationale,
interface design, and usability as well as creating an enriching
user experience within a team development environment.
MAT 240: 3D Animation 2: Motionbuilder
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MAT 140.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (0614.40)
This course introduces students to the advanced concepts
and execution of three-dimensional character animation and
rendering using Autodesk MotionBuilder, a major software
used primarily in game, film, and television production. Topics
include character rigging, facial and skeletal animation,
forward and inverse kinematics, motion capture, 3D editing,
Maya integration, and rendering considerations. The course
also covers proper formats for delivery through various
mediums.
MAT 255: Business of Media Arts
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour. (0614.00)
This course covers business principles for the media arts industry
and addresses such topics as market specialization, marketing
tools, client interface, pricing creative services, proposals,
contracts, and copyright issues.
MAT 270: Advanced Design Studio
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition with portfolio and instructor
approval.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0614.00)
This capstone course provides advanced students firsthand
experience in the function of a professional studio environment
where they create real-world projects for real-world clients.
Students experience client relations, project development and
management, problem solving, team management, asset
management, and project delivery considerations.
MAT 290: Portfolio Development
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: It is recommended that students complete most
courses within a MAT certificate or degree program before
enrolling in MAT 290.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (0614.00)
Students develop a personal portfolio that showcases their
media and design skills and completed projects. The portfolio’s
format is determined by individual student goals and current
available technology. The portfolio can be used to market the
student as a prospective employee of a digital media company
or as a self-promotion piece.
MAT 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 235
Areas of Study & Courses
MAT 296: Topics in Media Arts & Technologies
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0614.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Media Arts and Technologies that are not included in regular
course offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described,
and given its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
MAT 298: Directed Study in Media Arts Technology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (0614.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
MAT 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
include employment in physician offices, hospitals, surgical
centers, clinics, and various government agencies.
Contact Information
Chair: Kathryn Striebel
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/MA
Department: Business and
Medical Office Technologies
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Medical Office Professional Associate in Arts Degree
and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to complete all the steps in the Documentation Cycle and the
Patient Billing Cycle by creating a patient medical record with
all documents labeled and identified by step number.
Associate Degree
Associate in Arts Degree
Medical Office Professional
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Medical Office Professional
BOT 116
Office Systems and Procedures
3
Medical Administrative
Professional
MAP 100
Introduction to Medical Administrative
Careers
3
MAP 102
HIPAA Compliance
3
The Medical Administrative Professional program prepares
students to work in medical office settings. The program
includes training in medical office procedures as well as HIPAA
compliance, electronic health record, medical coding, and
health insurance practices. Students are encouraged to
complete an internship in a medical facility. Career options
236 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This certificate prepares students to work in medical office
settings. Students receive training in HIPAA compliance
procedures, basic computer competencies, medical office
procedures, medical terminology, basic anatomy, electronic
health record input and maintenance, and billing and coding
practices used in hospitals, medical offices, and clinics.
Required courses:
MAP 104
Medical Coding
3
MAP 105
Medical Insurance and Billing
3
MAP 110
Introduction to the Electronic Health
Record
3
Select at least 6 elective units from the following:
BOT 110
Word Processing
BOT 113
Basic Office Skills
BUS 137
Customer Service
6
Areas of Study & Courses
MAP 101
Medical Keyboarding and Document
Production
MAP 292
Internship Studies
MAP 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
NURS 151
Body Systems Survey for Health
Professions
NURS 155
Basic Medical Terminology
Courses
MAP 100: Introduction to Medical Administrative Careers
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (1223.00)
Total Units
24
Certificate of Proficiency
Medical Insurance and Coding Specialist
This certificate prepares students to perform specialized work
related to insurance and coding in medical settings.
Required courses:
MAP 102
HIPAA Compliance
3
MAP 104
Medical Coding
3
MAP 105
Medical Insurance and Billing
3
Select at least 3 elective units from the following:
MAP 110
Introduction to the Electronic Health
Record
MAP 292
Internship Studies
NURS 155
Basic Medical Terminology
3
Total Units
12
Certificate of Proficiency
Medical Office Specialist
This certificate prepares students to work in health information
management offices. Students receive training in all of the
medical administrative tasks performed to manage health
records, identify diagnostic codes, and initiate insurance billing.
Students acquire skills and training to obtain employment in all
health care facilities/settings.
Required courses:
MAP 100
Introduction to Medical Administrative
Careers
3
MAP 102
HIPAA Compliance
3
MAP 104
Medical Coding
3
MAP 105
Medical Insurance and Billing
3
Select one course from the following:
MAP 101
Medical Keyboarding and Document
Production
MAP 110
Introduction to the Electronic Health
Record
Total Units
3
15
This course introduces the documentation and revenue
cycle operations of a medical office, clinic, or hospital office
environment. Topics include the duties and responsibilities of
the receptionist, scheduler, insurance biller, medical coder,
transcriptionist, medical records auditor, HIPAA compliance
officer, health information technician, and office manager as
well as information on professional development and industry
certifications for administrative medical personnel.
MAP 101: Medical Keyboarding and Document Production
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (0514.20)
This keyboarding and document production course for medical
office professionals combines medical terminology with
advanced word processing skills. Exercises include practicing
keyboarding drills, creating medical documents, and inserting
electronic entries. The course emphasizes medical terminology,
procedures, phrases, and commonly used terms.
MAP 102: HIPAA Compliance
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (1223.00)
This course provides an easy-to-understand overview of the
Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
privacy and security rules and compliance tasks. Students
summarize the analysis, training, and technology needed to
properly plan and implement privacy and security policies. The
course covers what HIPAA is, what is required, what the student
can do to work toward compliance, and how the student can
maintain compliance on an ongoing basis.
MAP 104: Medical Coding
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (0514.20)
This course provides entry-level training in medical coding.
Students develop an understanding of Current Procedural
Terminology (CPT), International Classification of DiseasesClinical Modification(ICD-CM) Volumes I and II, and HCFA
Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) as they are
used in medical claims processing and record management.
Students review both paper and electronic medical
documentation to assign specific codes for diagnoses and
billing.
MAP 105: Medical Insurance and Billing
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (0514.20)
This course provides an overview of health insurance. It
introduces procedures for submitting insurance claims
for reimbursement to major health insurance carriers and
government agencies.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 237
Areas of Study & Courses
MAP 110: Introduction to the Electronic Health Record
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (0514.20)
This course provides students with an overview of all the
information entered into and extrapolated from an electronic
health record (EHR) as well as in-depth and practical training
on EHR software. Students examine specific sections of the EHR
in relation to health information management.
MAP 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
MAP 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Music
MAP 296: Topics in Medical Administrative Professional
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1208.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Medical Office Professional that are not included in regular
course offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described,
and given its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
MAP 298: Directed Study in Medical Administrative
Professional
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1208.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
238 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
The Music program offers courses in both traditional and
commercial music for students who plan on transferring as
music majors to four-year institutions, for those who need to
satisfy general education requirements, and for those who
Areas of Study & Courses
wish to earn a certificate or associate degree in traditional or
commercial music.
The program provides performance opportunities for music
majors, non-music majors, and non-traditional students looking
to participate in music classes.
Careers in traditional music include professional performance,
conducting, arts management, composing, academic
research, and public and private teaching.
Contact Information
Chair: Stephen Torok
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/MUS
Department: Music
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
The Music program offers lower-division preparation for students
who plan on transferring to pursue a bachelor’s degree in
music. Students planning to transfer and/or earn this associate
degree may also need to complete additional requirements
or electives required by the transfer institution, as many CSUs
and UCs have unique admissions and preparation-for-the-major
requirements. Students should meet with a MiraCosta College
counselor to identify required courses and to develop a written
plan for their targeted university.
Required courses:
Theory/History
Full-Time Faculty
Christy Coobatis
Matthew Falker
Arlie Langager
composition. Students select courses based on their own goals
for musical growth. All students, however, need a foundation of
theory, musicianship, and keyboarding proficiency.
Dan Siegel
Stephen Torok
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Music Performance Associate in Arts Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to demonstrate the ability to hear, identify, and work
conceptually with the elements of music through the successful
study of music theory and analysis, ear training, and piano
keyboard proficiency.
MUS 101
Music Theory I
3
MUS 102
Music Theory II
3
MUS 103
Musicianship I
1
MUS 104
Musicianship II
1
MUS 115
History and Appreciation of Western
Music
3
MUS 201
Advanced Music Theory
3
MUS 203
Advanced Musicianship
1
Piano
2
MUS 129
Piano for Music Majors
MUS 228
Advanced Piano
or MUS 229
Jazz/Commercial Piano
Individual Instruction
6
Co-enrollment in a performance ensemble and a
theory course is recommended.
MUS 144
Applied Music I
MUS 244
Applied Music II
Performance Ensembles (4 units to be selected from the
following):
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to perform standard repertoire and demonstrate performance
skills requisite for artistic self-expression at a level appropriate for
the particular music concentration.
MUS 150
Contemporary Big Band
MUS 152
Small Group Jazz Ensemble
MUS 161
Masterworks Chorale
Associate Degree
MUS 165
Chamber Choir
MUS 166
Vocal Jazz Ensemble
MUS 170
Symphony Orchestra
MUS 175
Classical Guitar Ensemble
Required Electives (Students should select Option 1
or Option 2 based on their interest of study following
transfer):
4
2
Option 1-Classical Performance
MUS 131
Guitar II
MUS 141
Vocal Fundamentals
MUS 228
Advanced Piano
MUS 241
Advanced Vocal Techniques
Option 2-Jazz/Commercial Performance
MUS 153
Associate in Arts Degree
Music Performance
Jazz/Commercial Improvisation
MUS 152
Small Group Jazz Ensemble
& MUS 231 and Jazz/Commercial Guitar
Total Units
29
The study of music provides students with the opportunity
to develop skills and theory in instrumental, vocal, and
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 239
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses Related in Content (CRC)
* Exception to the four-enrollment limitation: Students may
enroll in up to 8 units in any combination of music ensemble
courses with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Courses
MUS 100: Introduction to Music Theory
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This basic music theory course teaches students to read and
write musical notation, and it develops listening skills with
regard to rhythm and harmony. Students are required to attend
and analyze elements of live musical performances.
Active participatory music courses that are related in content
are grouped together. Students are allowed four enrollments
within each CRC group, but each course may be taken only
once unless its catalog description indicates it is repeatable.*
Enrollments include any combination of course completions
(with an evaluative or nonevaluative symbol recorded on the
student’s transcript), withdrawals, and repetition.
Applied CRC
MUS 144
Applied Music I
MUS 244
Applied Music II
Ear Training CRC
MUS 103
Musicianship I
MUS 104
Musicianship II
MUS 203
Advanced Musicianship
Ensembles CRC*
MUS 150
Contemporary Big Band
MUS 152
Small Group Jazz Ensemble
MUS 161
Masterworks Chorale
MUS 164
Musical Theater Ensemble
MUS 165
Chamber Choir
MUS 166
Vocal Jazz Ensemble
MUS 170
Symphony Orchestra
MUS 175
Classical Guitar Ensemble
Guitar CRC
MUS 130
Guitar I
MUS 131
Guitar II
MUS 231
Jazz/Commercial Guitar
Piano CRC
MUS 120
Piano I
MUS 121
Piano II
MUS 129
Piano for Music Majors
MUS 228
Advanced Piano
MUS 229
Jazz/Commercial Piano
Vocal CRC
MUS 141
Vocal Fundamentals
MUS 241
Advanced Vocal Techniques
240 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
MUS 101: Music Theory I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MUS 100.
Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 103, MUS 144, and
MUS 129 or appropriate level piano class.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course begins with a short review of music fundamentals
and emphasizes music theory topics, such as triads and their
inversions, seventh chords, non-harmonic tones, and four-part
writing (voice leading). Students are required to attend live
musical performances.
MUS 102: Music Theory II
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MUS 101.
Corequisite: MUS 104.
Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 129.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This continuation of MUS 101 introduces intermediate-level
analysis and compositional techniques found in 17th through
19th century Western classical music. The course emphasizes
four-part diatonic and chromatic chorale writing and related
analysis techniques in both major and minor keys. Topics
include diatonic and chromatic chord progressions, secondary
chords, augmented sixth chords, Neapolitan sixth chords,
chorale analysis techniques, and simple musical forms.
The course also emphasizes the recognition and correct
compositional use of modulation techniques including pivot
chord, secondary dominant, and common tone modulations.
MUS 103: Musicianship I
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course provides ear training for both the major and nonmajor and is strongly recommended for students enrolled in
theory classes. The course builds an aural foundation to music
theory, including basic pitches, rhythms, major and minor
scales, and primary harmonies. Students are required to attend
live musical performances.
Areas of Study & Courses
MUS 104: Musicianship II
Units: 1
Prerequisites: MUS 103.
Corequisite: MUS 102.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course provides continued ear training for both the major
and non-major and is strongly recommended for students
enrolled in theory classes. The course continues to develop
an aural foundation to music theory, including basic pitches,
rhythms, major and minor scales, and primary harmonies.
Students are required to attend live musical performances.
MUS 113: Multicultural Roots of American Music
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course surveys a variety of contemporary American music
genres, such as rock ’n’ roll, salsa, gospel, blues, jazz, Cajun,
Zydeco, and Tejano, from their roots in the music traditions of
immigrant groups to their evolution into distinctively new music
styles. Students approach American popular music with rigor,
requiring critical thinking through in-depth analyses of the socioeconomic and historic contexts.
MUS 114: History of Rock and Roll
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course surveys the history of rock and roll from its origin in
American popular music to the present. It relates the stylistic
changes that have occurred in rock and roll to the social
events that surround them. The course also examines historic
and current rock subcultures and the attitudes surrounding
them.
MUS 115: History and Appreciation of Western Music
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in MUS
115H, MUS 117, or MUS 118.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course introduces students to the canon of Western
classical music through a survey of great composers from the
medieval period to the present. Methods include historical
analysis of each style period and extensive guided listening.
The course also considers sociological influences upon art
and music. Students are required to attend live classical music
performances.
MUS 116: A Survey of World Music
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This ethno-musicological exploration of indigenous music
cultures around the world assists students in developing an
understanding and appreciation for indigenous musical styles.
The course presents music of Native America, Asia, India,
Africa, South and Central Americas, Europe, Mexico, the
Middle East, and the Caribbean. It emphasizes listening and
developing skills needed to distinguish various musical styles
and instrumentation. Students are required to attend live world
music performances.
MUS 119: Jazz History
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
MUS 119H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course assists students in developing an appreciation
and respect for jazz and blues as original and uniquely
American art forms. The topic, viewed through historical,
cultural, and sociological lenses, focuses upon the evolutionary
development of the music and the artists responsible for its
creation. Students gain an understanding of basic and jazzspecific musical concepts as well as the rich history of this
purely American music. The course emphasizes listening.
Students are required to attend live jazz performances.
MUS 119H: Jazz History (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
MUS 119.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This honors course offers highly motivated students an intense
introduction to American jazz and blues history. The topic,
viewed through historical, cultural, and sociological lenses,
focuses upon the evolutionary development of the music and
the artists responsible for its creation. Methods include historical
and sociological analysis of each style period and extensive
guided listening. The course emphasizes understanding the
impact of cultural, sociological, and other influences upon the
development of jazz. Students are required to attend live jazz
performances. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for MUS 119 or
MUS 119H.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 241
Areas of Study & Courses
MUS 120: Piano I
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Maximum of four courses among
MUS 120, MUS 121, MUS 129, MUS 228, MUS 229. NOTE: No
course within this grouping is repeatable.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1004.00)
This beginning piano class develops piano skills through the
use of standard songs and appropriate-level piano literature.
It also introduces fundamental musical notation. Students are
required to attend a professional piano performance.
MUS 121: Piano II
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Maximum of four courses among
MUS 120, MUS 121, MUS 129, MUS 228, MUS 229. NOTE: No
course within this grouping is repeatable.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1004.00)
This piano class continues to develop beginning piano skills
through the use of standard songs and appropriate level piano
literature. The course continues to develop student knowledge
of music fundamentals, including notation, scales, and chords.
Students are required to attend a live professional piano
performance.
MUS 129: Piano for Music Majors
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Advisory: MUS 100.
Enrollment Limitation: Maximum of four courses among
MUS 120, MUS 121, MUS 129, MUS 228, MUS 229. NOTE: No
course within this grouping is repeatable.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course provides technical knowledge and skills of piano for
all music majors. Students learn to play scales, arpeggios, and
chords. The course emphasizes the construction of triads and
seventh chords. Students prepare and play level-appropriate
piano repertoire in classical and jazz/contemporary styles,
and they are required to attend a live professional piano
performance.
MUS 130: Guitar I
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1004.00)
This course provides fundamental guitar performance
training through music reading for students with no or limited
formal guitar education. Topics include music theory, guitar
ergonomics, musicianship skills, and basic performance in an
ensemble and as a soloist. Students are required to attend a
live music concert.
242 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
MUS 131: Guitar II
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1004.00)
This course focuses on technical studies in chord progression
types, barre chord voicings/identification, transposition, blues
improvisation, and chord voicing in song arrangements. It
includes case-study project songs spotlighting various barre
chords, chord progressions, and common chord/bass line
patterns. Song materials feature blues, rock, popular, and folk
styles. Attendance at a live music concert is required.
MUS 141: Vocal Fundamentals
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 0.50 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1004.00)
This voice class addresses functional techniques in singing for
students seeking to develop specific vocal and musical abilities.
Areas covered include breathing, voice placement, diction,
phrasing, and interpretation. Students are required to attend a
live musical concert.
MUS 144: Applied Music I
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1004.00)
This course offers advanced study of performance techniques
for instrumentalists and vocalists. Students receive group
and individual instruction from master teachers, coordinated
with class performances and recitals. Students study musical
performance technique, historical performance practice, and
repertoire and are required to attend live instrumental and/or
vocal performances. (May be repeated once.)
MUS 150: Contemporary Big Band
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Repeatability Rule: Allow 8 units in any combination of MUS 150,
MUS 152, MUS 161, MUS 164, MUS 165, MUS 166, MUS 170,
MUS 175 with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This performance group concentrates on the preparation and
performance of large jazz ensemble/big band jazz. Students
study music from a wide variety of historical eras, ranging
from the 1920s swing style to contemporary styles. The course
introduces and reinforces many aspects of large jazz ensemble
performance, including stylistic interpretation, rhythmic
interpretation, section and ensemble balances, instrumental
blend, sight reading, and correct intonation. Students are
required to attend both on- and off-campus performances.
(May be repeated; see Repeatability Rule above.)
Areas of Study & Courses
MUS 152: Small Group Jazz Ensemble
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Repeatability Rule: Allow 8 units in any combination of MUS 150,
MUS 152, MUS 161, MUS 164, MUS 165, MUS 166, MUS 170,
MUS 175 with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
MUS 164: Musical Theater Ensemble
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Repeatability Rule: Allow 8 units in any combination of MUS 150,
MUS 152, MUS 161, MUS 164, MUS 165, MUS 166, MUS 170,
MUS 175 with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This performance group concentrates on the preparation
and performance of small group jazz. Students study jazz
from a wide variety of historical eras, ranging from the 1940s
bebop style to contemporary styles. The course introduces
and reinforces many aspects of jazz performance, including
rhythmic and stylistic interpretation, and it emphasizes
improvisational skill development. Students are required to
attend both on- and off-campus performances and events.
(May be repeated; see Repeatability Rule above.)
This course represents the musical component of college’s
musical theater production. The singing cast is selected by
audition. (May be repeated; see Repeatability Rule above.)
MUS 153: Jazz/Commercial Improvisation
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1004.00)
This course introduces students to melodic improvisational
techniques used in jazz and many commercial musical styles.
Participants study the art of constructing an appropriate linear
melodic solo in a variety of common styles, including swing,
Latin, bop, funk, fusion, and soul. The course relates music
theory and improvisation to chord/scale relationships and
modes, modal chord progressions, blues, rhythm changes, and
standard major and minor chord progressions.
MUS 161: Masterworks Chorale
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Repeatability Rule: Allow 8 units in any combination of MUS 150,
MUS 152, MUS 161, MUS 164, MUS 165, MUS 166, MUS 170,
MUS 175 with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
In preparation for performance, students work to advance
music literacy skills, build vocal and choral strength, accuracy,
and flexibility appropriate for the study of varied major choral
works. The Masterworks Chorale is a selective ensemble open to
students of all disciplines and community members by audition.
Over the course of several semesters of participation, members
perform accompanied and a cappella music representing a
broad spectrum of history, and they may perform with orchestra
or other instrumental ensembles. (May be repeated; see
Repeatability Rule above.)
MUS 165: Chamber Choir
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Repeatability Rule: Allow 8 units in any combination of MUS 150,
MUS 152, MUS 161, MUS 164, MUS 165, MUS 166, MUS 170,
MUS 175 with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This performance group studies traditional and contemporary
music through choral ensemble rehearsal and performance.
Students are required to participate in on- and off-campus
performances as well as in concert tours. (May be repeated;
see Repeatability Rule above.)
MUS 166: Vocal Jazz Ensemble
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Repeatability Rule: Allow 8 units in any combination of MUS 150,
MUS 152, MUS 161, MUS 164, MUS 165, MUS 166, MUS 170,
MUS 175 with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
Students study classic and contemporary vocal jazz ensemble
repertoire through vocal jazz ensemble rehearsal and
performance. They present concerts and festivals on campus
and throughout the community as well as during concert
tours. The course places secondary emphasis on listening,
improvisation, and solo singing skills. Students are required to
attend professional jazz performances. (May be repeated; see
Repeatability Rule above.)
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 243
Areas of Study & Courses
MUS 170: Symphony Orchestra
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Repeatability Rule: Allow 8 units in any combination of MUS 150,
MUS 152, MUS 161, MUS 164, MUS 165, MUS 166, MUS 170,
MUS 175 with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This performance group concentrates on the preparation and
performance of symphonic orchestral literature from the 17th
century to the present. Students study music from a wide variety
of historical eras, ranging from the baroque to contemporary
styles. The course introduces and reinforces many aspects of
classical performance, including stylistic interpretation, rhythmic
interpretation, section and ensemble balance, instrumental
blend, sight reading, correct intonation, and individual practice
strategies. Students are required to attend both on- and offcampus performances. (May be repeated; see Repeatability
Rule above.)
MUS 175: Classical Guitar Ensemble
Units: 1
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Repeatability Rule: Allow 8 units in any combination of MUS 150,
MUS 152, MUS 161, MUS 164, MUS 165, MUS 166, MUS 170,
MUS 175 with a four-enrollment maximum per course.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course covers classical guitar techniques and emphasizes
small and large ensembles. Students explore and perform
music from all periods, including Renaissance, Baroque, folk,
classical, and romantic. Students are required to attend a
live music concert. (May be repeated; see Repeatability Rule
above.)
MUS 201: Advanced Music Theory
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MUS 102.
Corequisite: MUS 203.
Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 129 or appropriate level
piano class.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course introduces advanced analysis and compositional
techniques found in 18th through 20th century Western
classical music. Topics include secondary dominants, modal
mixture, and augmented and Neapolitan sixth chords as
well as chorale analysis and binary and ternary musical
forms. The course emphasizes the recognition and correct
compositional use of modulation techniques, including pivot
chord, secondary dominant, and common tone modulations,
and it reviews four-part diatonic chorale writing and related
analysis techniques in both major and minor keys.
244 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
MUS 203: Advanced Musicianship
Units: 1
Prerequisites: MUS 104.
Corequisite: MUS 201.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course provides advanced ear training for music majors,
developing ear training skills needed for the study of music
theory. Topics include scale degree recognition with different
tonics, rhythm identification and dictation, intervals, cadences,
interval and melodic dictation, and predominant chord
identification. Students are required to attend live musical
performances.
MUS 228: Advanced Piano
Units: 1
Prerequisites: MUS 129.
Enrollment Limitation: Audition if prerequisite not met. Maximum
of four courses among MUS 120, MUS 121, MUS 129, MUS 228,
MUS 229.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course provides piano and advanced musicianship skills
training. Topics include complex notation, scales, chords,
transposition, and sight reading. Students develop advancedlevel piano performance skills using appropriate literature, and
they study prominent piano composers and different eras of
piano literature. Students are required to perform in public
at least once and attend a live professional classical piano
performance.
MUS 229: Jazz/Commercial Piano
Units: 1
Prerequisites: MUS 129.
Advisory: MUS 152 or MUS 153.
Enrollment Limitation: Audition if prerequisite not met. Maximum
of four courses among MUS 120, MUS 121, MUS 129, MUS 228,
MUS 229.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course provides jazz piano performance training and
covers advanced musicianship skills. It includes contemporary
notation, scales, chords, transposition, and sight reading.
Students continue to develop advanced level jazz piano
performance and accompanying skills using appropriate
literature, and they study prominent pianists and the different
eras of jazz piano history. Students are required to attend a live
professional piano performance and perform in public at least
once.
Areas of Study & Courses
MUS 231: Jazz/Commercial Guitar
Units: 1
Prerequisites: MUS 131.
Enrollment Limitation: Audition if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This course introduces intermediate-level plectrum style guitar
techniques, focusing on jazz and commercial musical styles.
Topics include accompaniment styles, improvisation using
scales and arpeggio patterns combined with a knowledge of
chord-scale relationships, reading chord charts and melody
lines, and performance of a continually expanding repertoire.
MUS 241: Advanced Vocal Techniques
Units: 1
Prerequisites: MUS 141 or MUS 144.
Enrollment Limitation: Audition if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1004.00)
This voice class covers advanced techniques in singing for
students seeking to further develop specific vocal training and
musical abilities. Topics include tone color, vowel modification,
diction for languages, and interpretation for varying musical
styles. Students are required to attend a live vocal performance.
MUS 244: Applied Music II
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: MUS 144.
Enrollment Limitation: Audition.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1004.00)
This course offers advanced study of performance technique
for instrumentalists and vocalists. Students receive group
and individual instruction from master teachers, coordinated
with class performances and recitals. Students study musical
performance technique, historical performance practice, and
repertoire and are required to attend live instrumental and/or
vocal performances. (May be repeated once.)
MUS 260: Songwriting
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
Students study and apply the skills necessary for popular
songwriting and presentation. Topics include melody, harmony,
form, timbre, voicing, marketing, and demo creation. The
course is designed for students with existing musical abilities.
MUS 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
MUS 296: Topics in Music
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours.
Lecture 4 hours. (1004.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Music that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
MUS 298: Directed Study in Music
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1004.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 245
Areas of Study & Courses
Music Technology
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to choose, position, and configure microphones and
preamplifiers to accurately capture and store audio.
Business of Music Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to demonstrate an understanding of intellectual property laws
as they specifically apply to the music industry.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to understand the process of affiliation with the appropriate
organizations for the registration and collection of copyright
royalties.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to demonstrate the ability to understand and interpret contracts
and terminology specifically found in the entertainment
industry.
Live Performance Audio Certificate of
Achievement
The Music Technology program offers courses for students
who wish to earn a certificate or associate degree in music
or music technology or who plan on transferring as a music
major to a four-year institution. Students are encouraged to
take part in performance opportunities for both music and nonmusic majors. Employment opportunities in the area of music
technology include audio recording, sound reinforcement,
music business, MIDI music systems, and songwriting.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to assemble the components used to create a professional
caliber sound reinforcement system.
Contact Information
Audio Recording Production
Chair: Stephen Torok
[email protected]
Dean: Jonathan Fohrman
[email protected]
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to organize, plan, manage, and complete a live concert
recording according to professional standards.
Associate in Arts Degree
Department: Music
Office: Building OC4700,
760.795.6844
Full-Time Faculty
Christy Coobatis
Dan Siegel
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The degree program includes the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Audio Recording Production Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be able
to teach methods to use current technologies to create a highquality musical presentation suitable for broadcast within a
given timeline.
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to work within a group to produce an audio recording
using audio equipment, such as mixers, audio recorders, signal
processors, patch bays, and microphones.
246 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for the Associate in Arts degree
(see Associate Degrees). Students should meet with a
MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and to
develop a written education plan for the specific degree or
certificate they wish to earn.
Areas of Study & Courses
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Business of Music
This program begins with the fundamentals of intellectual
property and contract law and expands to the strategies of
exploitation of creative works in today’s marketplace. Students
who complete the Business of Music program can apply their
skills to professional positions in all facets of the entertainment
industry.
Required courses:
MUS 115
History and Appreciation of Western
Music
or MUS 116
A Survey of World Music
MTEC 160
Business of Music I
3
MTEC 260
Business of Music II
2
Business Electives - Select nine units from the following:
Certificate of Achievement
Audio Recording Production
This certificate prepares students for jobs in the field of audio
recording and production. The curriculum includes in-depth
study of recording arts from general study to production of
a final product suitable for presentation within a portfolio.
Students learn all aspects of the process from the perspective of
a recording engineer to that of a performer.
BUS 130
Small Business Management
BUS 131
Management Principles
BUS 136
Human Relations in Business
BUS 140
Legal Environment of Business
BUS 140H
Legal Environment of Business (Honors)
BUS 170
Entrepreneur I
BUS 171
Entrepreneur II
Internship - Select two units from the following:
Music Technology Core Coursework
MUS 292
Internship Studies
MTEC 292
Internship Studies
MTEC 110
Recording Arts I
2
MTEC 111
Recording Arts II
2
MTEC 120
Digital Audio Production I
2
Total Units
MTEC 130
MIDI
2
MTEC 150
Audio Equipment Maintenance
2
Certificate of Achievement
MTEC 210
Recording Arts III
2
MTEC 211
Recording Arts IV
2
MTEC 220
Digital Audio Production II
2
Music Theory and Performance Training:
MUS 100
Introduction to Music Theory
MUS 120
Piano I
or MUS 121
Piano II
or MUS 130
Guitar I
or MUS 131
Guitar II
or MUS 141
Vocal Fundamentals
or MUS 161
Masterworks Chorale
4
Songwriting
MTEC 160
Business of Music I
Select at least three units from the following courses:
MTEC 292
Internship Studies
MTEC 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
Total Units
9
2
19
Live Performance Audio
This certificate prepares students for jobs in the field of sound
reinforcement and live sound production. The curriculum
represents a range of course work that encompasses the
technical and performance aspects of concert presentations.
Areas of focus include public address (PA) system operation
and maintenance, stage lighting/stagecraft, and concert
production. Students study basic performance skills to
understand sound reinforcement from both the engineer’s and
the performer’s perspective.
Music Technology Core Courses:
Choose one course from the following:
MUS 260
3
3
*
3
26
* MTEC 292 and MTEC 299 - Certificate requires the student take
a minimum of three units from any combination of MTEC 292
(.5-3 units) and MTEC 299 (1-4 units) for the required elective.
MTEC 110
Recording Arts I
2
MTEC 111
Recording Arts II
2
MTEC 130
MIDI
2
MTEC 140
Sound Reinforcement I
2
MTEC 141
Sound Reinforcement II
2
MTEC 150
Audio Equipment Maintenance
2
DRAM 141
Stage Lighting
3
DRAM 256
Stagecraft
3
Performance (choose one course from the following):
MUS 120
Piano I
MUS 130
Guitar I
MUS 141
Vocal Fundamentals
Choose one course from the following:
MUS 100
Introduction to Music Theory
MUS 114
History of Rock and Roll
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 1
3
247
Areas of Study & Courses
MUS 115
History and Appreciation of Western
Music
MUS 119
Jazz History
MUS 119H
Jazz History (Honors)
Choose three units from the following courses:
MTEC 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
Total Units
3
*
MTEC 292
Internship Studies
MTEC 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
Total Units
25
* MTEC 292 or MTEC 299 - Certificate requires a minimum of
three units from any combination of MTEC 292 (.5-3 units) and
MTEC 299 (1-4 units).
Certificate of Proficiency
Performance Technician
This certificate introduces students to necessary skills for
successful work in a theatrical arena that serves multimedia
events. Students are required to take part in the technical
as well as the performance aspects of both musical and
theatrical performances. Courses focus on performance venue
production.
Required courses:
Certificate of Proficiency
Digital Audio
This certificate is designed to expose students to concepts,
tools, and procedures in the world of digital audio. Upon
completion, students will be able to perform and complete
data acquisition, editing, and production of basic audio
presentations, and they will be oriented for utilization of digital
audio software in the recording studio.
Required courses:
16
MUS 100
Introduction to Music Theory
3
MTEC 110
Recording Arts I
2
MTEC 130
MIDI
2
MTEC 150
Audio Equipment Maintenance
2
DRAM 141
Stage Lighting
3
DRAM 256
Stagecraft
3
DRAM 270
Rehearsal and Performance - Technical
2
Theatre
*
Total Units
17
MUS 100
Introduction to Music Theory
3
MUS 120
Piano I
1
MTEC 110
Recording Arts I
2
Courses Related in Content (CRC)
MTEC 120
Digital Audio Production I
2
MTEC 130
MIDI
2
MTEC 150
Audio Equipment Maintenance
2
Active participatory music technology courses that are related
in content are grouped together. Students are allowed four
enrollments within each CRC group, but each course may
be taken only once unless its catalog description indicates
it is repeatable. Enrollments include any combination of
course completions (with an evaluative or nonevaluative
symbol recorded on the student’s transcript), withdrawals, and
repetition.
Select at least 3 elective units from the following:
MTEC 292
Internship Studies
MTEC 298
Directed Study in Music Technology
MTEC 299
Occupational Cooperative Work
Experience
3
Total Units
15
Certificate of Proficiency
Music Technology
DRAM 141
Stage Lighting
3
MTEC 110
Recording Arts I
2
MTEC 120
Digital Audio Production I
2
MTEC 130
MIDI
2
MTEC 140
Sound Reinforcement I
2
MTEC 150
Audio Equipment Maintenance
2
Select three elective units from the following:
MTEC 292
Internship Studies
MTEC 298
Directed Study in Music Technology
248 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
Digital Audio Production CRC
MTEC 120
Digital Audio Production I
MTEC 220
Digital Audio Production II
Recording Arts CRC
The Music Technology Certificate is designed to provide
concepts and application of principles needed to successfully
operate and maintain audio equipment. The curricula
ranges from the recording studio to stage and touring. Upon
successful completion a student will possess skills necessary for
employment as an audio technician, producer, engineer and
music products salesperson.
Required courses:
* A maximum of 2 units may be applied to this certificate.
3
MTEC 110
Recording Arts I
MTEC 111
Recording Arts II
MTEC 210
Recording Arts III
MTEC 211
Recording Arts IV
Sound Reinforcement CRC
MTEC 140
Sound Reinforcement I
MTEC 141
Sound Reinforcement II
Areas of Study & Courses
Courses
MTEC 110: Recording Arts I
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This first in a sequence of four recording-arts courses provides
an overview of recording music technology. It introduces the
physics of sound and covers sound processing equipment,
microphones, and recording-studio logistics. (Formerly MUS
181).
MTEC 111: Recording Arts II
Units: 2
Prerequisites: MTEC 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This second course in a recording arts sequence continues
the introduction to recording music technology begun in
MUS 181. It covers multi-track recording and management
procedures. Students utilize the recording studio to fulfill specific
assignments. (Formerly MUS 182).
MTEC 120: Digital Audio Production I
Units: 2
Prerequisites: MTEC 110.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This course provides a survey of various software, hardware,
and procedures involved with digital audio presentations.
Specific subject areas include audio component identification
and system integration. Course work includes the Avid Pro Tools
101 Certification test. (Formerly MUS 198).
MTEC 130: MIDI
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This survey course explores the full range of Musical Instrument
Digital Interface (MIDI) capable software equipment and
associated production techniques for music composition,
performance, and recording. Students who have completed or
are concurrently enrolled in MTEC 120 qualify for Avid Pro Tools
110 testing upon successful completion of MTEC 130. (Formerly
MUS 183.)
MTEC 140: Sound Reinforcement I
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This course provides an overview of live concert sound
reinforcement. Topics include theory and application of
individual sound system components, such as microphones,
mixers, amplifiers, and speakers. Students apply principles to
concert situations throughout the semester. (Formerly MUS 185.)
MTEC 141: Sound Reinforcement II
Units: 2
Prerequisites: MTEC 140.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This course covers advanced topics in sound system design,
stage management/organization, and sound checks. Topics
include troubleshooting and repair, live concert recording, and
live concert interfacing with MIDI and video systems. The lab
presents field opportunities for students to apply knowledge in
concert situations. (Formerly MUS 186.)
MTEC 150: Audio Equipment Maintenance
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in DRAM
192.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This course introduces audio maintenance, calibration, and
minor repair as well electronic building tips as they pertain to
music and theatre. Students learn basic electronic principles
and how they relate to matching audio components in
various system design applications for recording and sound
reinforcement. Topics include impedance matching, power
rating, and parallel and series type wiring as well as hands-on
work with basic electronic maintenance/repair kits. The course
emphasizes safety issues with electricity. (Formerly MUS 192/
DRAM 192.)
MTEC 160: Business of Music I
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1005.00)
This course explores the essential topics that every music
professional should be knowledgeable about, including the
essence of intellectual property, copyright law, publishing
administration, performing rights organizations, recording
contracts, and artist representation. These concepts are then
applied to the artist attempting to navigate the landscape of
the current music business. (Formerly MUS 286.)
MTEC 210: Recording Arts III
Units: 2
Prerequisites: MTEC 111.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This third in a four-course sequence provides an in-depth
technical and applied study of recording techniques covered
in the previous recording arts courses. Topics include effects
and dynamics processing and complex routing used in the
context of the multi-track recording and mixdown. Students
work within a group and utilize studio time to complete
assignments. (Formerly MUS 281).
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 249
Areas of Study & Courses
MTEC 211: Recording Arts IV
Units: 2
Prerequisites: MTEC 210.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This fourth and final course in the recording arts technology
sequence involves technical, personnel, and musical elements
for final production of commercial music projects. Students
individually organize and complete an outlined production of
a workforce-ready product in a multi-track recording facility.
(Formerly MUS 282).
MTEC 220: Digital Audio Production II
Units: 2
Prerequisites: MTEC 120.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1005.00)
This course provides a hands-on, programmed study and
application of Pro Tools and related audio software. Specific
subject areas include system organization and logic, software
operation, hardware configuration, and advanced editing and
production procedures. Course work includes the Avid Pro Tools
201 Certification test. (Formerly MUS 199).
MTEC 260: Business of Music II
Units: 2
Prerequisites: MTEC 160.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours. (1005.00)
This second in a two course series covers music distribution,
licensing, synchronization, marketing, and promotion in today’s
changing marketplace. Students learn effective methods for
submitting creative works for representation as well as how to
create a business strategy for an independent record release,
with the ultimate goal of deriving income from music sales and
publishing sources. (Formerly MUS 287.)
MTEC 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
250 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
MTEC 296: Topics in Music Technology
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1005.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Music Technology that are not included in regular course
offerings. Each Topics course is announced, described, and
given its own title and 296 number designation in the class
schedule.
MTEC 298: Directed Study in Music Technology
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 6 hours. (1005.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
MTEC 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance. (Formerly MUS
299.)
Areas of Study & Courses
Nursing
Contact Information
Chair: Julie Vignato
[email protected]
Dean: Sandy Comstock
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/NURS
Department: Nursing and
Allied Health
Office: Building OCT420,
760.757.2121 x 6466
Full-Time Faculty
Rita Barden
Karin Cohick
Yvette Duncan
Margaret Essman
Roland Estrella
Joan L. Moore
Susan Roberts
Susan Simpson
Julie Vignato
Program Student Learning Outcomes
(PSLOs)
The Registered Nursing (ADN) and Vocational Nursing (VN)
Programs prepare students to care for patients in hospitals and
other healthcare agencies through course work in humanities,
natural sciences, social sciences, and the nursing discipline.
These programs emphasize nursing theory and clinical practice
for direct patient care.
Licensure
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree Nursing
(ADN) program, graduates are eligible to apply for the National
Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. Upon
successful performance on the examination, they are licensed
as registered nurses (RNs).
Students completing the Certificate of Achievement in Licensed
Vocational Nursing Program may take additional courses
in general education to receive their Associate in Arts in
Licensed Vocational Nursing (see Associate Degrees p. 52).
Upon completion of the LVN associate degree program,
graduates are eligible to apply for the National Council
Licensure Examination for Vocational Nurses; if successful, they
are licensed as vocational nurses (LVNs).
Point System
A point system using multi-criteria developed by the California
Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office is used to accept
students into the RN program, both generic and LVNRN. A list of this criteria is located on the nursing website
(www.miracosta.edu/instruction/nursing/). Beginning fall 2011,
90 percent of student admission will be based on the point
system, and 10 percent of admitted students will come from the
established wait list.
TEAS Test
Students accepted into the RN program must take the Test
of Academic Skills (TEAS) and receive a composite score
of 62 percent in order to begin the program. Students who
do not receive at least a 62 percent will be counseled and
have a remediation plan designed. They will have one year to
complete the remediation plan before retesting for admittance.
This program has been approved by the Board of Registered
Nursing, PO Box 499210, Sacramento, CA 94244-2100.
The degree programs include the completion of a general
education (GE) pattern of courses. The knowledge, skills, and
abilities gained as a result of completing general education,
referred to as GE outcomes, can be viewed here p. 52.
Licensed Vocational Nursing Associate in Arts
Degree and Certificate of Achievement
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will
be able to promote and maintain a safe environment by
integrating nursing process and skill competency to intervene
therapeutically for the health of the patient.
Registered Nursing Associate in Science Degree
PSLO: Upon completion of this program, the student will be
able to manage and promote effective care while maintaining
a safe environment by integrating nursing process, clinical
reasoning, and skill competency to intervene therapeutically for
the health of the patient.
Associate Degrees
Associate in Arts Degree
Licensed Vocational Nursing
Students may earn the above-named associate degree by
completing a certificate of achievement and the general
education courses required for MiraCosta College’s Associate
in Arts degree (see Associate Degrees p. 52). Students should
meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses
and to develop a written educational plan for the specific
degree or certificate they wish to earn.
Associate in Science Degree
Registered Nursing
Track I - Generic ADN
Track II - LVN-to-RN (ADN)
The Registered Nursing program offers two tracks for students:
Track I and Track II. Track II is for California Licensed Vocation
Nurses only. Students must possess a valid Licensed Vocational
Nursing license to complete Track II.
Applications for admission are available in the Nursing and
Allied Health Occupations Administrative Office (Building
T420) on the Oceanside campus. Requirements include an
overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 for Human Anatomy
(BIO 210), Human Physiology (BIO 220), and Microbiology
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 251
Areas of Study & Courses
(BIO 230) with no grade less than "C" for each course and no
more than one repetition of any of these courses. Students
must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 for all college course work
taken. These selection criteria have been justified in an advisory
memo from the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s
Office dated July 1, 2005 regarding the Statewide Alignment of
Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) prerequisites.
Students accepted into the program must take the Test of
Academic Skills (TEAS) Version V and receive a composite
score of 62 percent in order to begin the program. Students
who do not receive at least a 62 percent will be counseled and
have a remediation plan designed. They will have one year to
complete the remediation plan before retesting for admittance.
This program has been approved by the Board of Registered
Nursing, PO Box 499210, Sacramento, CA 94244-2100.
or BIO 101
General Biology
BIO 210
Human Anatomy
BIO 220
Human Physiology
BIO 230
Fundamentals of Microbiology
ENGL 100
MATH 64
*
*
Composition and Reading
Intermediate Algebra
*
Total Units
GE Area C (Plan A)
3
***
Total Units
69.5-74.5
Note: Students completing Track I Generic ADN will not be
required to satisfy the American Institutions requirement (GE
Area G) due to the Board of Registered Nursing’s licensing
requirements.
Track II: LVN-to-RN (ADN)
Prerequisite units:
4
NURS 280
Transition from LVN to RN
NURS 281
Medical Surgical Nursing III
NURS 282
Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing
Track I: Generic ADN
Prerequisite Units:
Additional associate degree requirements:
5
20-25
Required courses:
Comparative Cultures
Required courses:
0-4
****
Contemporary Social Problems
SOC 110
4
3-4
*
Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
SOC 102
4
Prerequisite courses:
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
Introduction to Sociology
SOC 101H
California Licensed Vocational Nurses are eligible to apply
for a one-year LVN-RN transition program, also known as
the Registered Nursing (LVN-to-RN) program in pursuit of the
Associate Degree in Nursing. First-year nursing course work
credit is granted with evidence of a California LVN license in
good standing. Students complete a transition course offered
during summer and two subsequent semesters for eligibility to
apply to take the National Council License Exam for Registered
Nursing (NCLEX).
Students must have completed the following courses before
applying to the ADN program:
BIO 100
SOC 101
20-25
20-25
2
6.5
NURS 283
Medical Surgical Nursing IV
NURS 284
Contemporary Nursing Practice and
Leadership
NURS 284L
Preceptorship Lab
2
PHAR 201
Pharmacology Review & Update
2
NURS 180
Fundamentals of Nursing
4
NURS 181
Medical Surgical Nursing I
4
COMM 101
Public Speaking
NURS 182
Maternal-Child Nursing
5
or COMM 106
Group Communication
or COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
4
NURS 281
Medical Surgical Nursing III
6.5
NURS 282
Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing
3.5
PSYC 100
Psychology of Personal Growth
NURS 283
Medical Surgical Nursing IV
6
PSYC 101
General Psychology
NURS 284
Contemporary Nursing Practice and
Leadership
1.5
PSYC 103
Social Psychology
CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
Select at least three units from the following:
Preceptorship Lab
2
PHAR 150
Pathopharmacology I
2
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
PHAR 151
Pathopharmacology II
2
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
3
SOC 101H
Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
SOC 102
Contemporary Social Problems
SOC 110
Comparative Cultures
Public Speaking
or COMM 106
Group Communication
or COMM 207
Interpersonal Communication
Select at least three units from the following:
PSYC 100
*
Psychology of Personal Growth
3
Additional associate degree requirements:
GE Area C (Plan A)
***
3
***
0-4
PSYC 101
General Psychology
GE Area G (Plan A)
PSYC 103
Social Psychology
Total Units
CHLD 113
Child and Adolescent Growth and
Development
GERO 101
Introduction to Aging
252 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
3
*
NURS 284L
*
1.5
3
Medical Surgical Nursing II
COMM 101
6
*
NURS 183
*
3.5
*
52.5-61.5
Note: The lower unit total of 52.5 units for Track II is applicable
for students who test out of MATH 64 by receiving a passing
Areas of Study & Courses
score on the MiraCosta College Mathematics Competency
Examination. At least 60 units are required for an A.S. degree.
*
These courses may also satisfy a General Education (GE)
requirement and apply to GE Areas A, B, D and E. Cultural
Diversity, which is a required GE category (Area F), is
embedded throughout the Nursing program curriculum.
Each course has a component that promotes sensitivity
to cultural diversity and fosters an understanding of the
student’s role in the global community. Students completing
this degree will substantially meet this requirement.
** Students who have demonstrated Mathematics
competency through a qualifying score on the MiraCosta
College Mathematics Competency Examination are not
required to complete MATH 64. Students with a bachelor
degree from a United States regionally accredited college
or university will also meet this competency/prerequisite
associate degree requirement.
***Students with a bachelor’s degree from a United States
regionally accredited college in a non-nursing field are
required to complete only the course work necessary for
the Registered Nursing program, including prerequisites
and nursing course work. These students are not required to
complete any other courses required by the college for an
associate degree.
****
MATH 64 applies to all of the footnotes listed above.
Note: Any LVN licensed in the state of California is eligible to
apply for the Non-Degree 30-Unit Option LVN-RN program, for
which MiraCosta College acts as a facilitator. This program
is prescribed by the Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) and
provides an RN license for California only. Other states do not
recognize this option. A maximum of 30 units of nursing and
support courses is required to fulfill the unit requirement for
licensure by the BRN. A score of 62 percent must be achieved
on the TEAS Version V before acceptance into the program.
Students must also have a 2.0 GPA. This program is offered as
space allows. Please contact the Nursing and Allied Health
Department for course requirements. Students must possess
a valid California LVN license and complete the Registered
Nursing prerequisite courses before applying to the program.
Certificates
Certificate of Achievement
Licensed Vocational Nursing
The MiraCosta College Licensed Vocational Nursing program
is a six-quarter program leading to a certificate as a vocational
nurse. Those who qualify for enrollment receive intensive
training and in-class work as well as clinical practice in direct
patient care. The clinical practice is constantly supervised
by licensed or registered nurse specialists who guide and
teach students. Upon satisfactory completion of the program,
graduates are eligible to take the National Licensure
Examination for Vocational Nurses to achieve licensure. The
licensed vocational nurse may seek employment in hospitals,
skilled nursing facilities, clinics, physicians’ offices, or various
government agencies, as well as serve as a private-duty nurse
in hospitals or homes.
NURS 151, NURS 160, and PHAR 100 are prerequisites and
must be completed prior to applying for enrollment in the LVN
program. Once prerequisites are completed, students may
submit an application packet for admission into the program.
For admission requirements, go to www.miracosta.edu/
Instruction/Nursing/lvnprogram.htm.
Required courses:
NURS 151
Body Systems Survey for Health
Professions
or BIO 100
General Biology (Lecture and Lab)
or BIO 101
General Biology
NURS 160
Certified Nursing Assistant
6.5
NURS 170
Licensed Vocational Nursing I
7.5
NURS 171
Licensed Vocational Nursing II
7.5
NURS 172
Licensed Vocational Nursing III
7.5
NURS 173
Licensed Vocational Nursing IV
7.5
NURS 274
Licensed Vocational Nursing V
7.5
NURS 275
Licensed Vocational Nursing VI
7.5
PHAR 100
Basic Pharmacology--Dosages and
Calculations
Total Units
3-4
3
57.5-58.5
Note: Clinical instruction is conducted in area hospitals.
Certificate of Proficiency
Certified Nursing Assistant
The Certified Nursing Assistant certificate introduces students
to the basic information and nursing skills needed to pass the
state exam required for Nurse Aide Certification, which enables
students to work in acute care, long-term care facilities, and
home nursing.
Required courses:
NURS 160
Certified Nursing Assistant
Total Units
6.5
6.5
Certificate of Proficiency
Home Health Aide
The Home Health Aide (HHA) certificate prepares students who
are licensed as nursing assistants to care for elderly, recovering,
or disabled persons in their own homes or in licensed residential
care facilities. Topics covered include basic nursing services,
food preparation, and household services. Federal guidelines
do not require a competency exam prior to certification as
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 253
Areas of Study & Courses
an HHA. Certification is based upon verification of successful
completion of an approved HHA training program.
Required courses:
NURS 160
Certified Nursing Assistant
NURS 163
Home Health Aide
Total Units
6.5
2
8.5
Courses
NURS 151: Body Systems Survey for Health Professions
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1230.20)
This basic anatomy and physiology course is intended for
students who are preparing for a career in health professions.
The content is presented from simple to complex, beginning
with cellular functioning and progressing through the various
organ systems. Students learn how an organ is anatomically
designed to perform a specific physiological task and how
each organ system plays a role in maintaining homeostasis.
NURS 155: Basic Medical Terminology
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1230.20)
A study of the origin, correct spelling, pronunciation, meaning,
and correct usage of common medical terms and their
application to clinical records and reports. Emphasis is on the
roots, prefixes, suffixes, medical abbreviations, symbols, and
terms commonly used in medical records.
NURS 160: Certified Nursing Assistant
Units: 6.5
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100; American Heart Association
HealthCare Provider CPR Card (Valid SSN, MCC Physical and TB
clearance must be submitted on the first day of class).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 7.50 hours. (1230.30)
This course covers basic nursing skills, including fundamentals
of nursing, nutrition, gerontology, and home nursing. It is a
prerequisite for MiraCosta’s Licensed Vocational Nursing
program and has been approved by the State of California
Public Health Department for the Certified Nursing Assistant
certification. Upon successful completion of the course,
students may seek employment in long-term and skilled nursing
facilities, acute care, and in-home care.
254 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
NURS 163: Home Health Aide
Units: 2
Prerequisites: Current California Certified Nursing Assistant
certificate; and current physical and TB test (done within a
year) on MiraCosta physical form; and current American Heart
Association Basic Healthcare Provider CPR card.
Lecture 1.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (1230.80)
This 48-hour course is designed for the certified nursing assistant
to meet the state requirement of 40 hours to obtain a Home
Health Aide Certificate. Topics include the role of the home
health aide, federal and state requirements for the home health
aide, interpretation of medical and social needs of people
being served, personal care services, nutrition and cleaning,
and care tasks in the home.
NURS 166: American Medical Corps Transition to Vocational
Nurse
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1230.20)
This course introduces American Military Medical Corps
members to therapeutic communication, medical/surgical
nursing, basic nursing skills, basic pharmacology, and the
nursing process. Topics include adult growth and development,
gerontology, obstetrics, pediatrics, oncology, and hematology.
The course integrates related anatomy, pathophysiology,
pharmacology, and psychosocial considerations of patients
with their respective units.
NURS 170: Licensed Vocational Nursing I
Units: 7.5
Prerequisites: NURS 160 or a current California CNA license; and
PHAR 100; and NURS 151 or BIO 210 or BIO 220; and admission
to the LVN program.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4.50 hours, laboratory 9 hours. (1230.20)
This course introduces the beginning vocational nursing student
to therapeutic communication, the nursing profession, basic
nursing skills, basic pharmacology, and the nursing process.
NURS 171: Licensed Vocational Nursing II
Units: 7.5
Prerequisites: NURS 170.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4.50 hours, laboratory 9 hours. (1230.20)
This course introduces the vocational nursing student to
nutrition, medication administration, gerontology, adult growth
and development, the diabetic patient, and the integumentary
system. Each unit integrates related anatomy, pathophysiology,
pharmacology, psychosocial, and nutrition considerations of
the patients.
Areas of Study & Courses
NURS 172: Licensed Vocational Nursing III
Units: 7.5
Prerequisites: NURS 171.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4.50 hours, laboratory 9 hours. (1230.20)
NURS 182: Maternal-Child Nursing
Units: 5
Prerequisites: NURS 181 (ADN).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1230.10)
This course introduces the vocational nursing student to
perioperative and medical-surgical nursing, the genitourinary
and gastrointestinal systems, and communicable diseases.
Each unit integrates related anatomy, pathophysiology,
psychosocial, pharmacology, and nutrition considerations.
This course relates the nursing process to the needs of maternity
and pediatric patients and their families. Students adapt
previously learned skills and knowledge to the observation and
direct care of normal- and high-risk populations. They apply
theory, simulations, and clinical experiences to the clinical
practice, decision making, and prioritization of care that are
unique to these specialties. The integration of students’ clinical
experiences may include acute, chronic, long-term, and
clinic/ambulatory care settings as well as college nursing skills
laboratory simulations. Non-clinical activities in this course may
be presented in an online format.
NURS 173: Licensed Vocational Nursing IV
Units: 7.5
Prerequisites: NURS 172.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4.50 hours, laboratory 9 hours. (1230.20)
This course introduces vocational nursing students to the
nursing care of the neurological, endocrine, oncology,
orthopedic, and rehabilitation patient as well as the patient
with a hematological and lymphatic disease. Each unit
integrates related anatomy, pathophysiology, psychosocial,
pharmacology, and nutrition considerations.
NURS 183: Medical Surgical Nursing II
Units: 4
Prerequisites: NURS 181 (ADN).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1230.10)
NURS 180: Fundamentals of Nursing
Units: 4
Prerequisites: BIO 210; BIO 220; BIO 230; ENGL 100; and
admission to the RN program (ADN).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1230.10)
This course continues the study of caring for adult patients
with unmet medical needs. It emphasizes perioperative health
care needs across the adult life span and respective nursing
interventions. Students build on skills gained from the previous
semester in the application of the nursing process. Clinical
simulations and experiences provide students with opportunities
to apply theoretical concepts, improve clinical judgment,
and broaden clinical skills in acute, long-term, perioperative/
ambulatory, and/or college nursing lab care settings. Nonclinical activities in this course may be presented in an online
format.
This entry-level nursing course introduces students to the core
concepts, principles, and clinical skills common to all areas and
levels of the nursing practice. It integrates nursing knowledge
and skill, care attributes, and ethical conduct to present the
nursing process as foundational to the nursing practice. Course
content emphasizes the delivery of nursing care based on
a hierarchy of universal human needs and the relationship
between need fulfillment and patient integrity. This course
provides the platform upon which all subsequent nursing
courses build. Its integration of clinical experiences may include
acute, long-term, and perioperative/ambulatory care settings
as well as college nursing laboratory simulations. Non-clinical
activities in this course may be presented in an online format.
NURS 181: Medical Surgical Nursing I
Units: 4
Prerequisites: NURS 180 (ADN).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1230.10)
This course introduces the basic concepts required to care for
adult patients with stable and/or less complex medical-surgical
health problems, and it emphasizes problems experienced by
older adults. The course stresses management of unmet needs
and the nursing process as organizing frameworks for providing
nursing care. Clinical simulations and experiences provide
students opportunities to integrate and apply theoretical
concepts and clinical skills in acute, long-term, perioperative/
ambulatory, and/or college nursing lab settings. Non-clinical
activities in this course may be presented in an online format.
NURS 274: Licensed Vocational Nursing V
Units: 7.5
Prerequisites: NURS 173.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4.50 hours, laboratory 9 hours. (1230.20)
This course introduces the advanced vocational nursing
student to the nursing care of patients with circulatory and
respiratory diseases and disorders as well as home health/
hospice and leadership. Each unit integrates related anatomy,
pathophysiology, pharmacology, psychosocial, and nutrition
considerations. The course also covers leadership, supervision
skills, and interpersonal relationships.
NURS 275: Licensed Vocational Nursing VI
Units: 7.5
Prerequisites: NURS 274.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 4.50 hours, laboratory 9 hours. (1230.20)
This course introduces the advanced vocational nursing
student to the nursing care of obstetric, gynecologic, pediatric,
and mentally ill patients as well as growth and development
of the child and adolescent. Each unit integrates related
anatomy, pathophysiology, psycho-social, pharmacology,
and nutrition considerations. The course includes professional
adjustment to prepare the nursing student for employment.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 255
Areas of Study & Courses
NURS 280: Transition from LVN to RN
Units: 2
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the LVN to RN program.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1230.00)
This course facilitates the transition of the LVN student into the
RN curriculum. It introduces the philosophy and conceptual
framework of the program and the roles of the registered nurse.
The course content focuses on competencies expected of the
graduate ADN (Associate Degree Nurse), critical thinking skills,
role development, clinical skills, and the nursing process.
NURS 281: Medical Surgical Nursing III
Units: 6.5
Prerequisites: NURS 280 (LVN to RN) or NURS 183 (ADN).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 10.50 hours. (1230.00)
This course continues the study of caring for adult patients with
unmet medical needs. It examines the effect of complex and
chronic health problems on the physiologic and psychosocial
integrity of the adult and elderly patient. Students build on skills
gained from the previous semester in the application of the
nursing process as well as the perioperative health care needs
across the adult life span and respective nursing interventions.
Clinical simulations and experiences provide students with
opportunities to apply theoretical concepts, improve clinical
judgment, and broaden clinical skills in acute, long-term,
perioperative/ambulatory, and/or college nursing lab settings.
Non-clinical activities in this course may be presented in an
online format.
NURS 282: Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing
Units: 3.5
Prerequisites: NURS 280 (LVN to RN) or NURS 183 (ADN).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4.50 hours. (1230.00)
This course introduces students to the theory and practice of
nursing as related to mental health and illness. It examines
how mental healthcare problems impact client integrity in
various healthcare settings, and it emphasizes how therapeutic
communication establishes and maintains effective nurseclient relationships. Non-clinical activities in this course may be
presented in an online format.
NURS 283: Medical Surgical Nursing IV
Units: 6
Prerequisites: NURS 281 and NURS 282.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 9 hours. (1230.00)
This course focuses on the theory and practice of nursing
necessary to assist the acute and critically ill across the lifespan
in achieving client integrity. It emphasizes refining use of the
nursing process to provide nursing care for individuals with
complex and acute health problems. The clinical experience
affords students the opportunity to apply advanced theoretical
knowledge, critical thinking, and psychomotor skills in a
practical situation. Non-clinical activities in this course may be
presented in an online format.
256 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
NURS 284: Contemporary Nursing Practice and Leadership
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: NURS 281 and NURS 282
Corequisite: NURS 284L
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours. (1230.00)
This course facilitates the student’s transition to entry-level
registered nursing practice. It presents management and
leadership concepts that are applicable to a variety of health
care settings. Topics include transitioning from student to
registered nurse, decision-making, organization, values
clarification, resource allocation, and health care trends.
Integrated clinical experiences and simulations may occur in
acute, long-term, perioperative/ambulatory, and/or college
nursing laboratory care settings. Nonclinical activities in this
course may be presented in an online format.
NURS 284L: Preceptorship Lab
Units: 2
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 6 hours. (1230.10)
This clinical preceptorship for NURS 284 facilitates the successful
transition from student-nurse to entry-level graduate RN. It
enables the student to apply the nursing process to multiple
patient assignments using prioritization, delegation, and
supervision as well as essential nursing skills. Each student works
with his/her preceptor for 96 hours utilizing a variable time
schedule.
NURS 288: Nurse Externship
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: RS 183 (Generic RN) or Nursing 280 (LVN-RN
Bridge).
Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Nursing Program.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 12 hours. (1230.00)
This course provides registered nursing (RN) students an
opportunity to obtain clinical experience in the application
of all previously learned knowledge and skills. Students work
collaboratively with a faculty mentor, RN supervisor, and
members the health care team to meet job-oriented learning
objectives. Under an RN’s supervision, students are provided
opportunities to increase their nursing judgment and enhance
their nursing skills as preparation for their role as professional
graduate nurses. Students may receive G.I. bill benefits for this
course.
Areas of Study & Courses
NURS 290: Critical Care
Units: 1.5
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1.50 hours. (1230.00)
This course introduces students to critical care concepts
and care of patients experiencing cardiopulmonary
disorders. It discusses the relationship of pathophysiology
to clinical manifestations that patients experience and the
interventions the registered nurse needs to implement to
improve patient outcomes. Topics include rhythm and 12
lead electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis and treatment,
cardiovascular medications used to maintain hemodynamic
stability and perfusion, maintenance of artificial airways, and
mechanical ventilation.
NURS 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
NURS 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Nutrition
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
NURS 296: Topics in Nursing
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1230.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Nursing that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
The Nutrition discipline includes courses that provide students
with the scientific basis and applied knowledge of food and
nutrition. The courses fulfill general education requirements and
also enable students to transfer and pursue majors in nutrition
or other health-related majors. Nutrition majors work in healthcare facilities, community and public health organizations,
academia and research, the food industry, health/fitness and
sports industries, journalism, and general business corporate
wellness programs.
Contact Information
Chair: Robert Fulbright
[email protected]
Dean: Al Taccone
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/
instruction/nutrition/
Department: Kinesiology,
Health and Nutrition
Office: Building OC4800,
760.795.6811
Full-Time Faculty
Gail Meinhold
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 257
Areas of Study & Courses
Associate Degree
Students interested in the field of nutrition can earn an
Associate in Arts degree in Liberal Arts with an Area of Emphasis
in Applied Health, Nutrition, and Kinesiology (see degree
requirements).
Certificate
Certificate of Proficiency
Fitness Nutrition Specialist
This certificate provides the knowledge, skills, and abilities
to successfully work with clients and athletes seeking basic
nutritional guidance and to fight the battle against global
obesity. It is designed for students currently working on or
holding the Personal Fitness Trainer Certificate of Achievement.
Upon completion of the certificate program, students may
consider sitting for the National Academy of Sports Medicine
(NASM) Fitness Nutrition Specialist exam, the American Council
on Exercise (ACE) Lifestyle & Weight Management Coach
exam, and/or the International Fitness Professionals Association
(IFPA) Sports Nutrition Specialist exam.
Required courses:
NUTR 100
Nutrition Today
3
NUTR 105
Human Performance and Sports Nutrition
3
NUTR 108
Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition
3
KINE 204
Techniques and Analysis of Fitness and
Weight Training
3
Total Units
12
Courses
NUTR 100: Nutrition Today
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00)
This course relates scientific concepts of nutrition to the function
of nutrients in basic life processes. It emphasizes individual
needs; functions and sources of nutrients; current nutrition and
health issues; scientific method for analysis and evaluation of
nutrition information; dietary guidelines and current nutrition
recommendations; digestion, absorption, and metabolism;
health, fitness, and disease; nutrition in the life span; and
food safety. Students evaluate their food intake using several
methods, including a computer diet analysis. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for NUTR 100, NUTR 105, or NUTR 125.
258 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
NUTR 105: Human Performance and Sports Nutrition
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00)
This course introduces nutrition concepts to individuals
interested in sports, fitness, and health for various stages of the
life cycle. It emphasizes current theories and practices related
to nutrition and athletic performance. Topics include macro
and micro nutrient intakes, hydration, pre- and post-event food,
supplements and ergogenic aids, weight control, and body
composition related to performance. The course also examines
the cultural, sociological, and psychological influences related
to nutrition, fitness, and athletic achievement. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for NUTR 100, NUTR 105, or NUTR 125.
NUTR 108: Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00)
This course examines the regional, ethnic, cultural, religious,
historical, and social influences on food patterns, cuisines, and
health as well as how food is viewed as an expression of cultural
diversity. Students discuss, sample, and assess traditional
foods of geographic areas and cultures. They also explore
geographic factors in food availability, global food issues,
dietary habits, religious influences on food culture, and nutrition
problems of various ethnic groups. The course also addresses
nutrition consequences of ethnic food choices and sanitation
and safety practices.
NUTR 125: Nutrition and Aging
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00)
This course focuses on the specific nutritional needs
and problems in older adults. Topics include nutritional
requirements, diet modifications, body system changes, body
weight issues, nutrition-related chronic diseases, barriers to
proper nutrients, drug/nutrient interactions, and community
resources to assist the aging population. The course also
covers diet and nutrition guidelines for aging well. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for NUTR 100, NUTR 105, or NUTR 125.
Areas of Study & Courses
NUTR 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
NUTR 296: Topics in Nutrition
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Nutrition that are not included in regular course offerings. Each
Topics course is announced, described, and given its own title
and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
NUTR 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Oceanography
Oceanography is the scientific study of the ocean and its
phenomena. Students take courses to prepare for a major in
oceanography and to fulfill physical science general education
requirements. Career options include teaching, research,
marine product sales, and a variety of positions in private and
public environmental agencies.
Contact Information
Chair: Chris Metzler
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/OCEA
Department: Physical Sciences
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Full-Time Faculty
Keith Meldahl
Chris Metzler
John Turbeville
Courses
OCEA 101: Introduction to Oceanography
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
OCEA 101H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1919.00)
This course explores the major processes and features of the
world’s oceans. Topics include the origin and history of the
ocean basins, atmospheric circulation and weather, ocean
circulation, and the dynamics of waves, tides, and coastlines.
The course also reviews marine life (including plankton, nekton,
benthos, and marine mammals), explores the oceans as a
resource for people, and considers human impacts on marine
environments.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 259
Areas of Study & Courses
OCEA 101H: Introduction to Oceanography (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
OCEA 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1919.00)
This course offers highly motivated students an enriched
introduction to the scientific study of the oceans. The course
explores the major processes and features of the world’s
oceans, including plate tectonics, the origin and history of
the ocean basins, atmospheric circulation, weather and
climate, ocean circulation, and the dynamics of waves, tides,
and coastlines. The course also reviews marine life (including
plankton, nekton, benthos, and marine mammals), explores
the oceans as a resource for people, and considers human
impacts on marine environments. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit
for OCEA 101 or OCEA 101H.
OCEA 101L: Introductory Oceanography Laboratory
Units: 1
Prerequisites: OCEA 101 or OCEA 101H.
Corequisite: OCEA 101 or OCEA 101H if prerequisite not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Laboratory 3 hours. (1919.00)
This course is designed to accompany Oceanography 101
or 101H. It offers hands-on experience with oceanographic
materials and techniques in both the laboratory and field.
Topics include reading navigational charts and topographic
maps, interpreting sea floor features, analyzing seawater
chemistry, and studying waves and tides. On field trips, students
study waves, currents, and coastal processes and examine
organisms in coastal marine habitats and at an aquarium.
Students also participate in a half-day scientific ocean voyage.
OCEA 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
260 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
OCEA 298: Directed Study in Oceanography
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1919.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Pharmacology
The Nursing and Allied Health Department offers pharmacology
courses as part of the Nursing program.
Contact Information
Chair: Julie Vignato
[email protected]
Dean: Sandy Comstock
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/PHAR
Department: Nursing and
Alllied Health
Office: Building OCT420,
760.795.6796
Courses
PHAR 100: Basic Pharmacology--Dosages and Calculations
Units: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 20 or eligibility determined by the math
placement process.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 3 hours. (1230.20)
This course introduces important concepts, methods, and
principles of administering medications. Topics include drug
action and drug interaction, drug classifications, terminology,
pertinent abbreviations, legalities, pharmacokinetics, and
pharmacodynamics as well as problem solving for accurate
measurement of medications using the apothecary and metric
systems, conversion of these systems, ratio, proportion, and
other formulas.
Areas of Study & Courses
PHAR 150: Pathopharmacology I
Units: 2
Prerequisites: Admission into the RN program.
Corequisite: NURS 180 and NURS 181 (ADN).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours. (1221.00)
This introductory course presents the basic knowledge
required for safe, legal, and ethical medication administration
including dosage calculation. It emphasizes the nurse’s role
and individual accountability in pharmacologic therapy.
Topics include mechanisms of action, indications, absorption,
metabolism, distribution, and elimination in relation to
pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal,
integumentary, sensory, and other selected systems. Portions of
this course may be presented in an online format.
PHAR 151: Pathopharmacology II
Units: 2
Prerequisites: PHAR 150 (ADN).
Corequisite: NURS 182 and NURS 183 (ADN).
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours. (1221.00)
This course continues the study and application of
pharmacological therapy in nursing and emphasizes safety
as a primary nursing responsibility. It highlights mechanisms of
action, indications, absorption, metabolism, distribution, and
elimination in relation to pathophysiology of the reproductive,
endocrine, respiratory, immune, and other selected systems.
Topics include how growth, development, and cultural factors
influence drug therapy. The course emphasizes patient/family
education in medication management as well as legal and
ethical issues related to medication administration. Portions of
this course may be presented in an online format.
PHAR 201: Pharmacology Review & Update
Units: 2
Prerequisites: NURS 280.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
PHAR 151.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 2 hours. (1221.00)
This course reviews pharmacology principles, safe medication
administration, and dosage calculations. It emphasizes
therapeutic drug use in relation to health problems and
updates information regarding drug classifications and
prototype agents.
PHAR 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
PHAR 299: Occupational Cooperative Work Experience
Units: 1-4
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Career Center approval. May not enroll
in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or
internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Cooperative Work Experience is intended for students who are
employed in a job directly related to their major. It allows such
students the opportunity to apply the theories and skills of their
discipline to their position and to undertake new responsibilities
and learn new skills at work. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students may
not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative
work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship
studies during community college attendance.
Philosophy
Philosophy is the study of the fundamental nature of reality,
knowledge, and values based on logical reasoning. Students
take philosophy courses to prepare for a major or to fulfill
general education requirements in humanities or critical
thinking. With a bachelor’s degree in philosophy, students
pursue careers in education, business, government, journalism,
computer science, publishing, and writing. A philosophy
major also provides excellent undergraduate preparation for
graduate studies in the discipline, law school, MBA programs,
medical school, and professional seminary.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 261
Areas of Study & Courses
Contact Information
Chair: Isabel Luengo
[email protected]
Dean: Dana Smith
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/PHIL
Department: Philosophy and
Religious Studies
Office: Building SAN Admin,
760.634.7876
Full-Time Faculty
Isabel Luengo
Louisa Moon
Courses
PHIL 100: Informal Logic and Critical Thinking
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1509.00)
This course develops critical thinking skills through the study
of informal logic. Topics include the structure and evaluation
of arguments, fallacies, credibility, rhetorical devices, and
explanations. Using examples from the news media, advertising,
political speeches, and other real-life sources, students learn
the distinction between claims and theories that make sense
and claims and theories that do not survive rational scrutiny.
PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1509.00)
This introduction to philosophical inquiry emphasizes problems
of knowledge and reality through analysis of classical and
contemporary works on such issues as free will, personhood,
knowledge and belief, the existence of God, and the nature of
reality. The course encourages students to think independently
and formulate their own tentative conclusions.
PHIL 102: Contemporary Moral Problems
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1509.00)
This course examines the nature of morality as it applies to
a variety of personal and social issues through the reading
and analysis of classical and contemporary works. It explores
major ethical theories, including utilitarianism, Kantian ethics,
natural law theory, social contract theories, and feminist
ethics. The course emphasizes the application of ethical theory
to contemporary moral issues, such as war, pornography,
euthanasia, animal rights, and abortion.
262 MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
PHIL 221: Philosophy of Religion
Units: 3
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
Advisory: PHIL 101.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1509.00)
This course introduces the philosophical study of both religion
and the central concepts found in Eastern and Western
religious traditions with an emphasis on theism. It encourages
students to think rationally, critically, and independently about
the beliefs of religious adherents. Topics include arguments
for theism and atheism, the validity of religious experience, the
meaning of karma, concepts of God and Ultimate Reality, the
possibility of miracles, and the value of religion.
PHIL 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
PHIL 296: Topics in Philosophy
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Lecture 1 hour.
Lecture 2 hours.
Lecture 3 hours. (1509.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to study topics in
Philosophy that are not included in regular course offerings.
Each Topics course is announced, described, and given its own
title and 296 number designation in the class schedule.
Areas of Study & Courses
PHIL 298: Directed Study in Philosophy
Units: 1-3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor and department chair approval
and successful completion of 12 units of college work with at
least a 3.0 grade-point average.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Laboratory 3 hours
Laboratory 6 hours
Laboratory 9 hours. (1509.00)
This course allows students to pursue a special area of interest
in order to achieve specific goals beyond the scope of existing
courses within the discipline. Students work independently and
interact directly with an instructor on an individual basis and as
prescribed by the Directed Study Agreement.
Physical Science
Physical science, the study of the nature and properties of
energy and nonliving matter, is an interdisciplinary field that
includes astronomy, geology, physics, and chemistry. Students
take physical science courses to explore the discipline and to
satisfy general education requirements.
Contact Information
Chairs: Pierre Goueth
[email protected]
, Chris Metzler
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/PHSN
Department: Chemistry/
Physical Sciences
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
Courses
PHSN 101: Fundamentals of Physical Science
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1901.00)
This physical science survey course includes astronomy,
geology, physics, and chemistry. It emphasizes an
understanding of the fundamental principles, procedures,
and methods in science. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: No credit if
taken after college course in astronomy, chemistry, geology, or
physics.
PHSN 106: Energy, Motion, and Matter: An Introduction to
Physics and Chemistry
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1901.00)
This course introduces the non-scientist to the fundamental
concepts of physics and chemistry. Physics topics include
motion, force, work, energy, gravity, electricity, magnetism, and
light. Chemistry topics include chemical and physical properties
of elements and compounds, the periodic table, atomic theory
and structure, chemical bonding, and nuclear structure and
processes. This course also teaches students how to analyze
and solve problems using critical thinking and the scientific
method. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: No credit if taken after college
course in chemistry or physics.
PHSN 108: Introduction to Climate Change
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
PHSN 108H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3 hours. (1901.00)
This course explores the principles underlying the
interdisciplinary and rapidly growing field of climate science
and climate change. Topics include the Earth’s climate
system and climate history, the physics and chemistry of
greenhouse gases, and evidence for climate change. The
course investigates human influences on the climate system,
including greenhouse gas emissions and potential impacts of
climate change. It also considers various possible responses to
climate change, including alternative energy production, policy
responses, and adaptation.
PHSN 108H: Introduction to Climate Change (Honors)
Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
PHSN 108.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours. (1901.00)
This course offers highly motivated students an enriched
opportunity to explore the principles underlying the
interdisciplinary and rapidly growing field of climate science
and climate change. Topics include the Earth’s climate
system and climate history, the physics and chemistry of
greenhouse gases, and evidence for climate change. The
course investigates human influences on the climate system,
including greenhouse gas emissions and potential impacts
of climate change. Students investigate and evaluate various
possible responses to climate change, including alternative
energy production, policy responses, and adaptation. UC
CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for PHSN 108 or PHSN 108H.
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog 263
Areas of Study & Courses
PHSN 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per
unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center
approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative
work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the
theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship
position in a professional setting under the instruction of a
faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students
to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals
employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting,
employability skills development, and examination of the world
of work as it relates to the student’s career plans. Students
must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new
site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than
16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience
(general or occupational) and/or internship studies during
community college attendance.
Physics
Full-Time Faculty
Jonathan Cole
Erika Peters
Courses
PHYS 111: Introductory Physics I
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 130.
Advisory: MATH 125 or MATH 135 strongly recommended.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
PHYS 151.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1902.00)
This first course of a two-semester physics sequence covers the
properties of matter, mechanics, heat, and waves, including
sound. It is intended for students majoring in pre-medicine,
pre-dentistry, pre-optometry, and similar areas. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for either series PHYS 111 and PHYS 112 or
PHYS 151, PHYS 152, and PHYS 253.
PHYS 112: Introductory Physics II
Units: 4
Prerequisites: PHYS 111.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with credit in
PHYS 152 and PHYS 253.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1902.00)
This second of a two-course physics sequence covers light,
electricity, magnetism, and atomic physics. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for either series PHYS 111 and PHYS 112 or
PHYS 151, PHYS 152, and PHYS 253.
PHYS 151: Principles of Physics I
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 150 or MATH 150H.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1902.00)
Physics is the scientific study of the basic forces of nature,
including such topics as mechanics, heat, electricity,
magnetism, optics, quantum behavior, and atomic and
nuclear structure. Students take courses to prepare for a
physics major, to fulfill general education requirements, and to
meet prerequisites for related courses and programs, including
engineering, science, and computer science. Career options
for those with a bachelor’s degree in physics include teaching,
engineering, and research in universities, government, and
private industry.
Contact Information
Chair: Chris Metzler
[email protected]
Dean: Carlos Lopez
[email protected]
www.miracosta.edu/PHYS
264 Department: Physical Sciences
Office: Building OC3600,
760.795.6648
MiraCosta College 2014-2015 Catalog
This course provides a thorough understanding of the
fundamental principles of physics in the area of mechanics
and fluids. It is intended primarily for engineering, physics,
mathematics, and science majors. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for either series PHYS 111 and PHYS 112 or PHYS 151,
PHYS 152, and PHYS 253.
PHYS 152: Principles of Physics II
Units: 4
Prerequisites: MATH 155 and PHYS 151.
Corequisite: MATH 155 if prerequisites not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1902.00)
This course provides a thorough understanding of
the fundamental principles of physics in the areas of
thermodynamics, electricity, electrical circuits, magnetism, and
electromagnetic fields. It is intended for engineering, physics,
mathematics, and science majors. UC CREDIT LIMITATION:
Credit for either series PHYS 111 and PHYS 112 or PHYS 151,
PHYS 152, and PHYS 253.
Areas of Study & Courses
PHYS 253: Principles of Physics III
Units: 4
Prerequisites: PHYS 152.
Corequisite: PHYS 152 if prerequisites not met.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation
Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1902.00)
This course provides a thorough understanding of the
fundamental principles of physics in the areas of vibrations,
waves, sound, optics, special relativity, quantum mechanics,
and atomic and nuclear physics. It is intended for engineering,
physics, mathematics, and science majors. UC CREDIT
LIMITATION: Credit for either series PHYS 111 and PHYS 112 or
PHYS 151, PHYS 152, and PHYS 253.
PHYS 292: Internship Studies
Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 h