2015 DPS Annual Security Report (Published Oct. 1, 2015)

2015 DPS Annual Security Report (Published Oct. 1, 2015)
ANNUAL
SECURITY
REPORT
October 1, 2015
Department of Public Safety
4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20016
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY
Annual Security Report 2015
POLICY ON REPORTING THE ANNUAL DISCLOSURE OF CRIME
STATISTICS
The safety and well-being of all members of our community are of great concern to American University.
Many departments and employees are dedicated to making the campus a safer place to live and work. A safe
environment depends on the cooperation and involvement of individuals like you. We encourage all members
of the AU community to use this report as a guide for safe practices on and off campus.
To comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act,
Public Safety prepares this report and works with several university offices and public agencies— such as the
Office of the Dean of Students, Housing and Dining Programs, Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution
Services, and the DC Metropolitan Police Department (MPD)—to gather the information herein. Each entity
provides updated data on its educational efforts and programs. Campus crime, arrest, and referral statistics
include those reported to Public Safety, designated campus offices (including but not limited to directors,
deans, department heads, designated resident life staff, student conduct staff, advisors to students and student
organizations, and athletic administrators), and local law enforcement agencies.
The university also has a voluntary confidential reporting system through which crimes are reported to
officials at the Counseling Center, Student Health Center, Kay Spiritual Life Center, and Faculty and Staff
Assistance Program.
This publication contains information to aid in the cooperative effort of creating a safer campus.
It contains specific information on safety and security, crime prevention, patrol operations and breadth of
authority, policies relating to reporting crime, campus disciplinary procedures, and crime statistics for the
three previous calendar years. These statistics reflect reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain offcampus buildings or property owned or controlled by American University, and on public property that is
immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.
This publication is posted on American University’s website by October 1 each year. We notify all students,
staff, and faculty of the website via email and informational postings within the campus. You can obtain this
report online at american.edu/finance/publicsafety/asr.cfm
All current or prospective faculty, staff, and students can obtain a paper copy by calling 202-885-2527, visiting
Human Resources or Public Safety on campus, or writing to:
ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT REQUEST
Public Safety American University
4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20016-8068
Additional information about security, crime prevention programs, and crime statistics is available by
contacting Public Safety at 202-885-2527.
American University Annual Security Report
1
GREETINGS!
American University is a community of more than 15,000 students, faculty, and staff who work, live, and
study on a beautiful campus in an urban setting. The annual report is written to comply with the Jeanne Clery
Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) passed by Congress.
These reports are provided on an annual basis on October 1 each year. Since the last report, AU Public Safety
has made significant improvements in the safety and security services we provide to the AU community. We
are very excited about these enhancements, and we hope that once you read about them in this report, our
excitement will be contagious.
During this last year, Public Safety:
•
Continued to increase the number of Salto locks in university residence halls.
•
Refurbished and upgraded blue-light phone towers through campus.
•
Increased the number of sworn officers in our department
•
Continued to implement physical security standards to ensure uniformity among university facilities.
Detailed descriptions of these enhancements are contained in this document. It is our hope that these
innovations and improvements will have the desired effect of enhancing safety and security services on
campus. We will certainly continue to partner, solve problems, and share information about upcoming police
and community events, as well as crime trends and alerts, to maintain a high level of preparedness. We are
certain that after reading this document, you will be impressed with the myriad safety and security services
provided to the campus community. Please join us in these efforts by reading this report and referring to it
often.
Thank you and be prepared.
The American University Department of Public Safety
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Table of Contents
POLICY ON REPORTING THE ANNUAL DISCLOSURE OF CRIME STATISTICS ................................................................................................................ 1
Table of Contents ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3
PUBLIC SAFETY .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
PATROL OPERATIONS........................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
PHYSICAL SECURITY UNIT..................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
POLICE COMMUNICATIONS AND CUSTOMER RELATIONS ................................................................................................................................... 7
POLICE ADMINISTRATION .................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
PUBLIC SAFETY INVESTIGATIONS ......................................................................................................................................................................... 7
RELATIONSHIP WITH LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES .............................................................................................................................. 7
NON-CAMPUS CRIMINAL ACTIVITY ...................................................................................................................................................................... 8
CRIME PREVENTION AND CAMPUS SAFETY AWARENESS PROGRAMS ...................................................................................................................... 9
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS .................................................................................................................................................................................. 9
SELF-DEFENSE TRAINING ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
SERVICES AND OTHER PROGRAMS .................................................................................................................................................................... 10
CRIME PREVENTION TIPS ................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
AVAILABLE CRIME INFORMATION...................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Daily Crime Log .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 13
MISSING STUDENT NOTIFICATIONS......................................................................................................................................................................... 14
SCOPE ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 14
POLICY STATEMENT ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 14
DEFINITIONS ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 14
POLICY................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 14
NOTIFICATION OF POLICY .................................................................................................................................................................................. 15
EFFECTIVE DATES ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 15
REPORTING CRIMINAL ACTIONS AND EMERGENCIES.............................................................................................................................................. 16
Rave Mobile Safety Guardian App ..................................................................................................................................................................... 17
REPORTING HAZING........................................................................................................................................................................................... 17
CAMPUS-WIDE EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................. 19
EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION FOR AU GUESTS .................................................................................................................................................... 21
EMERGENCY EVACUATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ......................................................................................................................... 22
ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT................................................................................................................................................................................. 23
PREVENTING AND RESPONDING TO SEX OFFENSES AND INCIDENTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND
STALKING................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 24
BYSTANDER INTERVENTION TRAINING: STEP UP! .............................................................................................................................................. 24
U ASK DC ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 25
ONLINE EDUCATION .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 25
PEERS ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 25
FRATERNITY AND SORORITY LIFE ....................................................................................................................................................................... 26
REPORTING SEX-RELATED OFFENSES AND INCIDENTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING TO
PUBLIC SAFETY ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
STUDENT CONDUCT DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SEX OFFENSES AND INCIDENTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE,
SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING ...................................................................................................................................................................... 28
SEX OFFENSE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING RESOURCES AND VICTIMS’ RIGHTS .................... 30
OASIS: Advocacy Services .................................................................................................................................................................................. 31
COLLEGIATE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM ................................................................................................................................................................. 31
VICTIMS’ RIGHTS ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 32
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND RESOURCES .................................................................................................................................................. 33
ASSISTING A FRIEND .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 34
HARM REDUCTION INFORMATION .................................................................................................................................................................... 34
CONFIDENTIAL RESOURCES ON CAMPUS .......................................................................................................................................................... 35
Dating Abuse, Domestic Violence, and Stalking Resources ................................................................................................................................ 35
Understanding the Difference between Healthy and Unhealthy Relationships ................................................................................................. 36
CIVIL PROTECTION ORDERS (WASHINGTON, DC) ............................................................................................................................................... 36
THE CAMPUS SEX CRIMES PREVENTION ACT ..................................................................................................................................................... 40
TITLE IX............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40
ACCESS TO CAMPUS FACILITIES: SAFETY AND SECURITY ......................................................................................................................................... 42
CAMPUS ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 42
GROUNDS .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42
ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGS ................................................................................................................................................. 42
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RESIDENCE HALLS .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 42
OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT HOUSING ..................................................................................................................................................................... 42
ALARMS AND CLOSED-CIRCUIT CAMERAS ......................................................................................................................................................... 43
SALTO LOCKS FOR ENHANCED RESIDENCE HALL AND BUILDING SECURITY ....................................................................................................... 43
ELECTRONIC KEY BOXES FOR ENHANCED CONTROL OF TEMPORARY ISSUANCE OF KEYS ................................................................................. 43
SECURITY CONSIDERATION IN MAINTENANCE .................................................................................................................................................. 43
STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS ................................................................................................................................................................................... 44
SAFETY ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 44
GENERAL SAFETY TIPS FOR STUDYING ABROAD ................................................................................................................................................ 44
RESOURCES FOR SEXUAL HARASSMENT, RELATIONSHIP VIOLENCE, AND SEXUAL ASSAULT ABROAD .............................................................. 45
STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM—MADRID, SPAIN......................................................................................................................................................... 49
ON-SITE CONTINGENCY PLAN IN AN EMERGENCY ............................................................................................................................................. 49
SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR CASES OF SEXUAL ASSAULT AND RAPE................................................................................................................. 50
SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR CASES OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ........................................................................................................................... 51
PERSONAL STREET SAFETY ................................................................................................................................................................................. 52
STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM—BRUSSELS, BELGIUM ................................................................................................................................................. 53
PERSONAL STREET SAFETY ................................................................................................................................................................................. 55
STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM—NAIROBI, KENYA ....................................................................................................................................................... 57
GENERAL SAFETY TIPS IN NAIROBI ..................................................................................................................................................................... 58
TRANSPORTATION SECURITY PRECAUTIONS ..................................................................................................................................................... 59
GENERAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ........................................................................................................................................................................ 59
PERSONAL TRAVEL ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 60
IN AN EMERGENCY ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 61
PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS ................................................................................................................................................................................ 61
UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES ............................................................................................................................................................ 62
RESIDENCE HALL REGULATIONS......................................................................................................................................................................... 62
STUDENT CONDUCT CODE ................................................................................................................................................................................. 62
FACULTY AND STAFF CONDUCT ......................................................................................................................................................................... 62
DRUG POLICY ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 63
ENFORCEMENT OF DC UNDERAGE DRINKING AND DRUG LAWS ....................................................................................................................... 63
UNIVERSITY SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATING ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES ......................................................................................................... 63
DESCRIPTION OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE EDUCATION PROGRAMS .......................................................................................................... 64
LOCAL AND FEDERAL LAWS PERTAINING TO ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ...................................................................................................................... 68
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CRIMES AND PENALTIES – ALCOHOL VIOLATIONS ...................................................................................................... 68
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CRIMES AND PENALTIES – DRUG VIOLATIONS ............................................................................................................ 69
FEDERAL CODES AND PENALTIES – DRUG ABUSE, PREVENTION, AND CONTROL .............................................................................................. 72
CRIME STATISTICS AND CAMPUS SECURITY AUTHORITIES ...................................................................................................................................... 76
LIST OF UNIVERSITY OFFICIALS TO WHOM CRIMINAL OFFENSES SHOULD BE REPORTED ................................................................................. 76
DEFINITION OF CLERY ACT REPORTABLE CRIMES .................................................................................................................................................... 79
CRIMINAL HOMICIDE ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 79
FORCIBLE SEX OFFENSES .................................................................................................................................................................................... 79
NON-FORCIBLE SEX OFFENSES ........................................................................................................................................................................... 79
OTHER CRIMES................................................................................................................................................................................................... 79
REPORTABLE CRIMES BEGINNING FOR CALENDER YEAR 2013 .......................................................................................................................... 80
CORRESPONDING DC CRIMINAL CODE REGARDING SEXUAL ASSAULT, DATING VIOLENCE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND
STALKING ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 80
CORRESPONDING DC CRIMINAL CODE REGARDING CONSENT WITH REGARD TO SEXUAL ACTIVITY ................................................................ 83
HATE CRIMES ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 83
OTHER OFFENSES ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 84
DEFINITION OF CLERY ACT REPORTABLE LOCATIONS ON CAMPUS ......................................................................................................................... 85
RESIDENTIAL FACILITY (SUBSET OF “ON CAMPUS” STATISTICS)......................................................................................................................... 85
NON-CAMPUS PROPERTY .................................................................................................................................................................................. 85
PUBLIC PROPERTY .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 85
CRIMINAL OFFENSES ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 86
MAIN CAMPUS ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 86
HATE CRIME OFFENSES ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 88
MAIN CAMPUS ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 88
CRIMINAL OFFENSES ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 89
TENLEY CAMPUS ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 89
HATE CRIME OFFENSES ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 91
TENLEY CAMPUS ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 91
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CRIMINAL OFFENSES ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 92
WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF LAW CAMPUS ........................................................................................................................................................ 92
HATE CRIME OFFENSES ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 94
WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF LAW CAMPUS ........................................................................................................................................................ 94
CRIMINAL OFFENSES ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 95
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 95
CRIMINAL OFFENSES ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 97
MADRID, SPAIN .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 97
CRIMINAL OFFENSES ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 99
NAIROBI, KENYA................................................................................................................................................................................................. 99
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 101
MAIN CAMPUS ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 101
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 102
TENLEY CAMPUS .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 102
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 103
WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF LAW CAMPUS ...................................................................................................................................................... 103
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 104
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, AU OFFICES.................................................................................................................................................................... 104
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 105
MADRID, SPAIN, AU OFFICES ........................................................................................................................................................................... 105
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 106
NAIROBI, KENYA, AU OFFICES .......................................................................................................................................................................... 106
WASHINGTON, DC, METRO MAP........................................................................................................................................................................... 107
IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS AT AMERICAN UNIVERSITY .......................................................................................................................... 108
APPENDIX .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 109
I.
Policy on Alcohol Service at University Events ...................................................................................................................................... 109
II.
Policy on Clery Timely Warning Notices, Safety Advisories and Emergency Notifications .................................................................... 109
III.
Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy ................................................................................................................................. 109
IV.
American University Student Conduct Code 2015-201 .................................................................................................................... 109
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PUBLIC SAFETY
Public Safety has primary responsibility for the security of American
University (AU). Our mission is to create and maintain a safe and
secure environment by protecting lives, securing property, and
preserving peace and order. Our staff consists of professional
campus police and security officers, trained police dispatchers,
customer relations representatives, and other team members
dedicated to providing first-class customer service to all members of
the AU community. We also employ students who perform a variety
of duties as Public Safety Aides (PSAs). The Executive Director of
University Police and Emergency Management oversees the
following departments: Police Operations, Police Communications,
Investigations, Police Administration, and Physical Security.
PUBLIC SAFETY
OPEN ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
EMERGENCY CALLS
202-885-3636
NON-EMERGENCY CALLS
202-885-2527
Program our numbers into your cell
phone for easy access and reference.
When on Main or Tenley Campus, dial
202-885-3636 instead of 911 because
Police Operations is managed by a captain through the shift sergeants emergency services, such as fire and
and corporals who supervise the individual shifts and processes.
ambulance, can respond more
University police officers patrol university facilities, including
effectively with the assistance of AU
academic and administration buildings, parking lots, athletic fields
Public Safety.
and grounds. They patrol by vehicle, by bicycle, and on foot. Officers
check in at residence hall front desks but do not routinely patrol the
OFFICE LOCATION
interior of residential buildings unless requested to do so. They
South side of Main Campus directly
provide safety escorts for individuals on campus upon special
across from the shuttle depot
request. Police Operations participates in managing all university
special events that require university police officers. University police
officers respond to all reports of crime, fire, medical, and other
MAILING ADDRESS
emergencies and coordinate with the District of Columbia fire and
Public Safety Building
police departments and with federal agencies. Our on-campus police 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
dispatch service coordinates officer response and communications
Washington, DC 20016-8068
for all emergency calls and requests for service. PSA patrols and
security cameras supplement officer patrols.
PATROL OPERATIONS
Police Authority
University police officers are commissioned law enforcement officers of the District of Columbia and have
full investigative and arrest authority on university property. As commissioned officers, university police
officers are sworn to uphold the Constitution and all laws and legal regulations for the United States and the
District of Columbia. Furthermore, the officers are obligated as officials of AU to enforce university rules and
regulations, where it does not conflict with federal, state, and local laws.
University police officers are permitted to stop individuals suspected of criminal activity and to request their
name, address, business, and destination. Anyone failing to answer these questions to the satisfaction of the
officers may be detained for further investigation. Resistance to detention may result in a more serious
charge. Officers must be mindful of their safety while performing their duties. For this reason—and based on
articulable suspicion of a potential threat—the law permits officers to search a person who has been detained
to ensure that he or she does not possess a weapon. All university police officers are required to identify
persons they suspect of being perpetrators of, or witnesses to, a crime.
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Officer Training
University police officers attend a 10-week Campus Public Safety Institute program sponsored by the
Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. This comprehensive program provides
valuable training in all aspects of university policing. Additionally, university police officers must successfully
complete certification or recertification in skills such as CPR and first aid. AU police officers also receive
training in; Incident Command, Defensive Tactics, Emergency Response, Infection Control, and other areas.
PHYSICAL SECURITY UNIT
The Physical Security unit is responsible for preventing unauthorized access to university facilities. It
maintains the security and intrusion alarm systems, closed-circuit television systems, keys, and access-card
control. The Physical Security Manager works closely with Facilities Management and many other units on
campus to identify and promptly repair any malfunctioning security devices. Unit personnel conduct periodic
audits to assess physical security requirements and future expansion.
POLICE COMMUNICATIONS AND CUSTOMER RELATIONS
The Police Communications Center is staffed by trained university police dispatchers who operate Public
Safety’s 24-hour Emergency Dispatch Service. They dispatch university police officers and other personnel to
all incidents and calls for service and they monitor the university’s camera systems. Police Administration
staff serve at the welcome desk weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., providing information and assisting with
other customer relations issues. The Police Communications Center and Police Administration unit are
managed by the Supervisor of Police Communications and the Captain of Police Administration, respectively.
POLICE ADMINISTRATION
The Police Administration Division provides support services to patrol officer efforts on campus. In
cooperation with Police Operations staff the division facilitates Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution
Services referrals. It also coordinates training and reports confidential information to campus administrators
around the university. The programs enable Public Safety to communicate with campus community
members more regularly and to build relationships of mutual trust and respect. All police reports, statistics,
statements, and evidence are released through this bureau. Staff members are also responsible for key
functions, such as records management, crime analysis, and Security Officers Management Branch
certification compliance. Additionally, the Police Administration Division gives direct support in all of the
previously mentioned areas to the Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management.
PUBLIC SAFETY INVESTIGATIONS
University police officers conduct preliminary investigations of reported crimes. We coordinate investigations
of serious campus crimes with the MPD. When appropriate, we present investigation results to the U.S.
Attorney for prosecution, to Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services for action, or to both.
RELATIONSHIP WITH LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES
AU is located in upper northwest Washington, DC, in the Second District of the Metropolitan Police
Department (MPD). The Second District’s headquarters is located approximately one and one-half miles
from campus. The Department of Public Safety maintains a close working relationship with MPD and
communicates items of mutual concern on a daily basis. MPD dispatches officers when a felony is reported,
when requested by the Department of Public Safety or by a victim, or when an arrest is made. MPD works
with university police officers on complex or specialized cases. MPD officers meet with campus law
enforcement directors to discuss mutual concerns, coordinate programs, and exchange information. AU
Public Safety does not currently have a Memorandum of Understanding with MPD.
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NON-CAMPUS CRIMINAL ACTIVITY
Public Safety does not provide law enforcement service for non-campus activity involving students, because
AU does not have any officially recognized student organizations with non-campus locations. Non-campus
criminal activity that occurs within the District of Columbia is handled through MPD. Public Safety officers
may respond to non- campus locations at the request of MPD for the purpose of enforcing the Student
Conduct Code. AU may take disciplinary action for non-campus infractions of the code when a student’s
behavior threatens or endangers the safety and well-being of the campus community; when a student is the
subject of a violation of local, state, or federal law; or when, in the judgment of university officials, a student’s
alleged misconduct has a negative effect on the university’s pursuit of its mission or on the well-being of the
greater community. AU’s Public Safety coordinates with MPD on a monthly basis to receive follow-up
reports on activities involving students.
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CRIME PREVENTION AND CAMPUS SAFETY AWARENESS PROGRAMS
Public Safety maintains comprehensive crime prevention and campus safety awareness programs. Working
with the Office of Campus Life and other units, the crime prevention coordinator develops and monitors
procedures and programs to promote safety, security, and crime prevention. A common theme of all safety
awareness programs is to encourage students and employees to be aware of their responsibility for their own
security and the security of others.
While it is the responsibility of each member of Public Safety to promote crime prevention throughout the
university community, the coordinator is specifically responsible for implementing Public Safety’s proactive
stance on crime prevention as part of its basic philosophy. This includes, but is not limited to, conducting
programs, answering questions about safety and security, responding to inquiries about Public Safety’s role on
campus, and encouraging residents to become actively safety-conscious. To help students and employees
protect themselves and their property, this unit develops and makes available to the university community a
variety of educational programs and materials.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS
Crime Prevention and Awareness presents the following programs to all faculty, staff, and students upon
request and at the request of resident assistants in the residence halls. These programs address specific needs
of the audience and focus on individuals taking personal responsibility for their safety, avoiding unsafe
situations, and using Public Safety services. These sessions can be arranged by calling the coordinator of
special events and crime prevention at 202-885-2527.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Who is Public Safety? introduces students to the functions, purpose, and services of Public Safety. It
provides important phone numbers and educates attendees on the training, credentials, and authority
of university police officers on campus and in surrounding neighborhoods.
Safety in the City educates students about living in an urban setting and using crime prevention skills.
This program is typically customized for a specific audience.
Be Safe @ Home provides students with safety tips and tools to use in their campus residence and
around campus. These sessions encourages safe living on campus and explains how to avoid
becoming a victim and how to enhance safety during emergencies.
Alcohol and Drug Awareness illustrates the effects of alcohol and the dangerous consequences of
underage drinking. Additional programs educate students on the hazards of drug use, including
danger to their well-being and the legal ramifications, financial hardships, and social difficulties to
which drug use or experimentation can lead.
Self-Defense Training teaches practical physical self-defense techniques to members of the AU
community (see below for more details).
Dating Violence educates individuals, primarily women, on acquaintance rape and preventive
strategies to avoid dangerous dating situations. This program educates students on forms of dating
violence, such as emotional and sexual abuse.
Any interested group should contact Public Safety at 202-885-2527. The Wellness Center and the Office of
Campus Life may offer related programs on acquaintance rape, alcohol, and relationships.
SELF-DEFENSE TRAINING
The Department of Public Safety offers classes that teach self-defense techniques for all ages and genders.
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Classes/Sections
Self-defense classes are offered every fall and spring semester to all members of our community. Additional
information is available at http://www.american.edu/publicsafety/. These classes are taught by police
officers and any member of the AU community, current or former, is welcome to participate.
SERVICES AND OTHER PROGRAMS
Safe Escort Service
Public Safety provides escorts, whether on foot or vehicle, to any member of the community who feels
unsafe. These escorts are only from university property to university property. Safe escorts may be arranged
by calling 202-885-2527 or using an emergency telephone.
Safe Ride Back to Campus
If a student finds themselves stranded in DC for any reason, they can call a cab and have it take them to the
Public Safety Building. The student should notify Public Safety that they are on their way by calling 202-8852527. Public Safety will pay for the cab and place the charge on the student’s account, ensuring that even
without money or a ride, students can always return safely to campus. This service can be utilized within a 10mile radius of the main campus.
Other Education and Counseling Programs
Educational programs and counseling options are available to students and employees at AU. The Wellness
Center (202-885-3380) and the Department of Human Resources (202-885-2591) sponsor a wide variety of
substance abuse education programs. The Counseling Center and Human Resources have counseling options
available for individuals and groups.
CRIME PREVENTION TIPS
Public Safety provides the following information to students:
General Safety Tips
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Program Public Safety’s emergency number 202-885-3636 into your cell phone.
Be aware of your surroundings.
Travel in groups at night whenever possible, especially when walking.
Use lighted walkways and thoroughfares, even if it means going out of your way.
Walk briskly, with your head up, and with assurance. Do not walk in brush-covered areas or against
buildings.
Do not wear dangling jewelry when traveling into the city. Keep purses, backpacks, and money belts
close to the body, and do not leave them unattended.
Do not struggle if someone attempts to take your property.
In the Residence Halls
•
•
•
Attend crime prevention seminars held in the residence halls. Public Safety and Housing and Dining
Programs sponsor seminars on a variety of subjects that could help students avoid becoming victims
of crime.
Lock your room’s door at all times, whether the room is occupied or not, and while you are sleeping.
Many victims of burglaries have been out of their rooms for only minutes or were down the hall a
short distance from their rooms when the burglaries occurred.
Report doors that are propped open—they increase vulnerability to crime. If you find an interior or
exterior residence hall door propped open, call a resident assistant and close the door.
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•
Lock cash, credit cards, jewelry, and other valuables in a drawer or trunk. Take these valuables with
you during school breaks. Be careful not to leave clothing and other property unattended in lounges
or laundry rooms.
Safety When Coming and Going
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Lock your bicycle with a high-security lock.
Park your vehicle in a well-lit and populated area. If this is impossible, scan the area before getting
into or out of your vehicle. Know your surroundings!
Get into your vehicle briskly, quickly, and confidently
.
Avoid becoming too absorbed with the task at hand, such as keeping your head down at the key lock
or occupying yourself with bags, books, or keys. Stay alert to avoid becoming a target for crime.
Keep keys in hand to avoid unnecessary delay upon reaching your car.
Always plan ahead, even if you are late or in a rush.
Whenever possible, travel by way of the university shuttle, which travels to the Tenleytown Metro
station, Tenley Campus, and Washington College of Law.
Reporting Suspicious Activity or Persons
Report suspicious incidents, activities, or persons immediately to residence hall staff and to Public Safety at
202-885-3636. Instant crime reporting or reporting suspicious behavior as soon as possible is critical in
reducing campus crime and in assisting Public Safety in its efforts to promote campus safety. Never hesitate
to contact Public Safety with any suspicion regarding your own or someone else’s safety. Public Safety
encourages prompt reporting of all crimes to our department and/or non-campus law enforcement entities
(911) when the victim of a crime elects to or is unable (physically or mentally) to make such a report. We
strongly urge you to program your cell phone with Public Safety’s emergency number: 202-885-3636.
AVAILABLE CRIME INFORMATION
Crime Prevention Boards
Public Safety posts crime alerts, crime prevention tips, and similar information on crime prevention boards.
At various campus events throughout the year, we display information regarding Public Safety services and
crime prevention programs, and we distribute crime prevention literature. Crime prevention boards are
located at:
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Asbury, next to AU Central
Mary Graydon Center First Floor, next to elevators
Megabytes
Butler Ticket Office
Bender Library, ground floor under the stairs
McDowell Hall, behind the front desk
Leonard Hall, behind the front desk
Brandywine First Floor, next to elevators
Tenley Shuttle Stop (under construction)
Hurst Hall, next to Room #101
Timely Warnings—Crime Alerts
Crime Alerts are AU’s method of providing timely warnings to the campus community. Issued at the
direction of the Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management, Crime Alerts inform
the campus community of crimes the university considers to represent a serious or continuing threat to
American University Annual Security Report
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students and employees. In evaluating what constitutes a serious or continuing threat, the director of Public
Safety will consider factors including, but not limited to, crime type, location, likelihood of reoccurrence, and
time of initial reporting to Public Safety. Once it is determined that there is a serious or continuing threat,
Public Safety will draft and distribute Crime Alerts. Crime Alerts issued by Public Safety will contain
information about the reported crime, location, dates of occurrence, suspect description(s) if applicable,
Public Safety contact information, confidential reporting options, location of the Crime Alert online, and
safety tips. To protect the identity of a victim, certain information may be redacted or generalized. Redaction
of specific information from a Crime Alert may also be done if release of the information would compromise
the investigation of law enforcement. All redaction of information is done at the discretion of the Executive
Director of University Police and Emergency Management or his/her designee.
These alerts are generated by crimes reported to Public Safety, local law enforcement agencies, or campus
security authorities (e.g., deans of academic units, directors and department heads of administrative units).
When provided in a timely manner, Crime Alerts aid in the prevention of similar occurrences. The alerts may
be posted on the Public Safety website (american.edu/finance/publicsafety/crimealerts.cfm) and on bulletin
boards throughout the university (e.g., in residence halls and in heavily trafficked buildings, such as Bender
Library and Mary Graydon Center). Public Safety may also issue these alerts to community coordinators at
off-campus housing controlled by AU and to the security desk of the Washington College of Law. Alerts may
also be sent to the campus community via email or text. Crime Alert flyers will be removed after a 30-day
period and no Crime Alert will ever identify a victim by name.
Timely Warnings, Safety Advisories and Emergency Notifications are governed by the University Policy on
Clery Timely Warning Notices, Safety Advisories and Emergency Notifications, included in the Appendix.
Crime Alerts are posted at the following locations, in addition to residence halls:
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Mary Graydon Center Information Desk
Washington College of Law Security Desk
Off Campus offices (4200 Wisconsin Avenue, 4620 Wisconsin Avenue, 4401 Connecticut Avenue,
3200 New Mexico Ave, 4200 Wisconsin Ave)
Nebraska Lot (corner of Nebraska Avenue and New Mexico Avenue NW)
Asbury, next to AU Central
Mary Graydon Center First Floor, next to elevators
Megabytes Cafe
Butler Ticket Office
Bender Library, ground floor under the stairs
McDowell Hall, behind the front desk
Leonard Hall, behind the front desk
Brandywine First Floor, next to elevators
Tenley Shuttle Stop (under construction)
Hurst Hall, next to Room #101
Public Safety Front Desk
Anyone with information warranting a Crime Alert should report the circumstances to Public Safety by
phone (202-885-3636), from any on-campus telephone (x3636), or in person at Public Safety.
American University Annual Security Report
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Daily Crime Log
Public Safety maintains a daily crime log, which is written in an easily understood format and describes the
nature of the crime, date the crime was reported, date and time the crime occurred, general location of the
crime, and disposition of the complaint, if known. Public Safety enters or updates reports within two business
days of receiving the information. The log records virtually all crimes reported to Public Safety. There are
times, however, when information may be withheld from the log. If there is clear and convincing evidence
that releasing such information would jeopardize an ongoing criminal investigation or the safety of an
individual, cause a suspect to flee or evade detection, or result in the destruction of evidence, that information
may be withheld until the adverse effect is no longer likely to occur. In addition, updates are not required
after 60 days have passed from the date of the initial entry.
Access the log under Campus Security at Public Safety’s website at
w.american.edu/publicsafety/dailycrimelog.pdf.
Upon request, the most recent 60-day period of the log may be inspected at Public Safety during normal
business hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.), Monday through Friday, unless the university is closed. Any portion of the
log older than 60 days may be inspected at Public Safety within two business days of being requested. Logs
are kept for seven years. Requests for copies of the crime log can be made to Public Safety at 202-885-2527.
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MISSING STUDENT NOTIFICATIONS
SCOPE
This statement establishes the policy and procedures for the AU community regarding the reporting,
investigation, and required emergency notification when a residential student is deemed to be missing. While
the scope of this policy is directed primarily to residential students and the staffs of Campus Life and Public
Safety, all members of the AU community, including students, faculty, and staff share the responsibility of
reporting to designated university officials when they believe that a student is missing.
POLICY STATEMENT
The safety of students living on campus is of utmost priority for AU. To this end, this policy is established to
assist in locating AU students living in on-campus housing who, based on the facts and circumstances known
to AU, are determined to be missing. This policy is in compliance with the missing person provision of the
Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008.
DEFINITIONS
A. Residential Student
A student who resides in on-campus housing under an AU licensing agreement and is currently enrolled at
the university
B. Missing
For purposes of this policy, a residential student is presumed missing if he or she is overdue in reaching home
or campus for more than 24 hours past his or her expected arrival and a check of his or her residence
supports that determination. A residential student may be considered missing if he or she is overdue in
reaching home, campus, or another specific location past his or her expected arrival, or if any additional
factors lead university staff to believe he or she is missing, and a check of his or her residence supports that
determination.
POLICY
In General
AU will notify all residential students of the provisions of the Missing Student Notification Policy and will
actively investigate or assist in the investigation of all missing student reports involving residential students.
The missing person’s contact(s) (and custodial parent or guardian if the student is under age 18) will be
notified within 24 hours once the student is determined to be missing.
Designation of Emergency Contact by Residential Students
On an annual basis, each residential student, upon checking into his or her residence hall room, has the
option to confidentially register an emergency contact (“missing person contact”) for AU to notify within 24
hours of when the student has been determined to be missing. The missing person contact information will
be registered confidentially, will be accessible only to authorized university officials, and will not be disclosed,
except to law enforcement personnel in furtherance of a missing person investigation.
This missing person contact may be listed in addition to the general-purpose emergency contact provided
during the residence hall check-in process. If a missing person contact is not formally declared, the university
will notify the general-purpose emergency contact.
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If a student is under age 18 and non-emancipated, the student’s custodial parent or guardian (in addition to
any designated missing person contact) will be notified in the event the student is deemed missing.
Procedures for Reporting and Notification Regarding Missing Students
Individuals who have reason to believe that a student is missing should immediately report their concerns to
Public Safety. Public Safety will engage appropriate residence hall and other university staff in immediate
efforts to locate the student. These efforts may include but are not limited to:
1. Contacting the student via his or her telephone or email account.
2. Checking with roommates, friends, members of the residential community, and others who may have
relevant information.
If a student who has been reported missing is not located within 24 hours, as determined in consultation with
Public Safety, the following will occur:
1. The dean of students or designee will notify the student’s designated missing person contact, generalpurpose emergency contact, and/or the custodial parent or legal guardian, as appropriate.
2. Public Safety will notify law enforcement agencies, including the MPD, coordinate its investigation
with outside law enforcement agencies, and continue its efforts to locate the student.
If in the course of this investigation, foul play is evident or strongly indicated or there are other compelling
circumstances, law enforcement will be contacted immediately.
NOTIFICATION OF POLICY
Notification of this policy will be made directly to all student residents in campus housing annually through
its inclusion in AU’s Annual Security Report and through the residence hall registration process.
EFFECTIVE DATES
This policy is effective June 1, 2009, revised July 1, 2010.
Frequency of Review and Update
The policy is reviewed biennially unless changes in laws or university business needs require a different
review/revision schedule.
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REPORTING CRIMINAL ACTIONS AND EMERGENCIES
The university encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to Public Safety to ensure inclusion in
the annual crime statistics and to aid in providing timely Crime Alerts to the community, when appropriate.
Students, faculty, staff and visitors should immediately report any criminal off to Public Safety. Emergencies,
potential criminal actions, or suspicious activities can be reported by regular telephone, by emergency
telephone, or in person.
•
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You may dial 202-885-3636 or, from any on-campus telephone, extension 3636.
You can make reports in person at the Public Safety Building or to uniformed university police
officers on patrol throughout campus. Reports made to Public Safety will be included in annual
statistical compilations and the daily crime log, when appropriate, and will be evaluated for timely
warning consideration. You also can report criminal offenses to other officials at AU, including deans
of academic units and directors and heads of certain administrative units (as listed on p. 76-78).
These reports will also be included in annual statistical compilations and evaluated for timely warning
consideration, but only crimes reported to Public Safety will be included in the daily crime log. If
reports are made to other university officials and forwarded to Public Safety, Public Safety may
include the crimes reported, provided that there is enough information in terms of classification,
timeframe, and location.
Blue-light emergency phones are two-way call boxes, mounted on stand-alone towers or pillars
topped with blue lights. These telephones automatically connect to the Public Safety office when the
button on the box is depressed. If an individual needs help, this feature allows him or her to speak
directly with Public Safety. A communications specialist will send the appropriate emergency
personnel to the caller. The blue phones also allow the caller to call another extension on campus by
activating the gray button and dialing the extension. All blue-light emergency phones are equipped
with cameras and with LED lighting to observe activity in that area. Sixty-nine blue-light telephones
are strategically located on the grounds of the university and in garages. There are 25 indoor
emergency red telephones located in various buildings and at the residence hall front desks. The red
telephones are identified by signs and automatically connect to the Public Safety office when the
receiver is lifted. The location of an activated telephone is displayed in the Public Safety office so that
officers can be dispatched to investigate, even if there is no voice communication. Note: In case of
emergency, an individual may dial extension x3636 from any on-campus telephone. Individuals using
an off-campus line or cell phone should call 202-885-3636.
You can make a confidential report to pastoral or professional counselors at the Counseling Center,
Student Health Center, and Kay Spiritual Life Center; to the sexual assault prevention coordinator
and coordinator of victim advocacy services in the Wellness Center’s OASIS (Office of Advocacy
Services for Interpersonal and Sexual Violence) program; and through the Faculty and Staff
Assistance Program. Pastoral counselors (individuals who are associated with a religious order or
denomination, are recognized by that religious order or denomination as individuals who provide
confidential counseling, and are functioning within the scope of that recognition as pastoral
counselors) and professional counselors (individuals whose official responsibilities include providing
mental health counseling to members of the institution’s community and who are functioning within
the scope of their license or certification; this definition applies even to professional counselors who
are not employees of the institution but are under contract to provide counseling at the institution)
are exempt from disclosing information when acting in their role of pastoral or professional
counselor. Consequently, reports to pastoral or professional counselors may not be included in
annual statistical compilations, included in the daily crime log, or evaluated for timely warning
consideration. AU does not currently have a written procedure to encourage counselors to inform
American University Annual Security Report
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•
persons they are counseling of any procedures to report crimes on a voluntary, confidential basis for
inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics.
You can also make a confidential report through Public Safety’s Crime Stoppers web page at
american.edu/ finance/publicsafety/tips.cfm. Such reports will not be used for Crime Alerts, daily
crime log entries, or Annual Security Report crime statistics unless the occurrences can be
substantiated through investigation. Additional confidential reporting can be done through the Rave
Mobile Safety Guardian app (as outlined below). These methods should not be used to report crimes
in progress.
Rave Mobile Safety Guardian App
In August 2014, the university unveiled the Rave Mobile Safety Guardian app for iOS and Android devices
with the following functionality:
Panic Button
This provides a direct, immediate connection to campus safety with GPS location and personal profile
information.
Tip Texting
This enables anonymous crime tip reporting and two-way communication via SMS or mobile app.
Guardian Timer
Students can identify friends, roommates, and family, along with Public Safety, as “Guardians.” During a
Timer session, Guardians can check the student’s status. If the Rave Guardian timer is not deactivated before
it expires, Public Safety is automatically given the user’s Rave Guardian profile to proactively identify and
check on the individual.
Whenever students, faculty, or staff connect with Public Safety from their mobile phone, the Rave Guardian
Campus Safety app automatically delivers a caller profile that the community member has provided, including
current location, medical conditions, course schedule, addresses, photo, and other critical data.
When we receive a report of an urgent situation, we dispatch officers to the scene to lend assistance,
investigate, prepare a report, and conduct follow-up, as needed. When appropriate, we notify District of
Columbia fire, emergency medical, and police personnel.
Please visit american.edu/publicsafety for more information about the Rave Mobile Safety Guardian app.
REPORTING HAZING
Hazing is strictly prohibited at AU. It is incompatible with the university’s academic mission and
compromises personal liberties. Hazing can be physical or psychological in nature. It is an intentional act or
method of initiation into a group, club, organization, or team that subjects another person, whether
voluntarily or involuntarily, to conduct that may injure, abuse, humiliate, harass, or intimidate that person.
Examples of hazing include, but are not limited to, the following:
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Imposing any requirement that compels a person to engage in conduct prohibited by university
policy
Forcing or requiring unnecessary physical activity or exercise
Forcing or requiring extended isolation or unnecessary exposure to the elements
Paddling or any other form of physical abuse
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Depriving others of sleep, study time, or the ability to communicate
Requiring others to wear conspicuous, embarrassing, or uncomfortable clothing or to carry unusual
items
Forcing or requiring ingestion of alcohol or any other liquid, solid matter, or gas
Preventing others from practicing personal hygiene
Withholding information from others that is essential to daily functioning
Requiring others to perform errands, provide entertainment, or engage in other degrading activities
Transporting others without their consent
Conducting quests or hunts as part of membership rituals, whether or not such activities endanger
participants or damage property
Addressing, interrogating, or deceiving others in a manner that may psychologically injure, abuse,
humiliate, harass, or intimidate them
Every member of the university community is responsible for reporting actual or suspected hazing activities
to the dean of students or to Public Safety as soon as possible. Appropriate university officials will investigate
the report to determine whether the allegations warrant a charge of hazing. If a charge is brought, the
individual, group, club, organization, or team will be subject to the disciplinary procedures outlined in the
Student Conduct Code. Law enforcement agencies off campus may also be notified.
Conduct Council sanctions for hazing may include suspension or dismissal from the university. Advisors to
clubs, organizations, or teams and their national or international officials may be notified in cases of alleged
violations of this policy. Disciplinary action taken by a club, organization, or team or by its national or
international officials will not preclude university action.
To report incidents of hazing or to receive further information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students
(202-885-3300, Butler 408) or Public Safety (202-885-2527, Public Safety Building). Anonymous reports may
be submitted through the Office of the Dean of Students’ online reporting form, located at americanadvocate.symplicity.com/hazing.
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CAMPUS-WIDE EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION
PROCEDURES
In the event of a campus-wide emergency, the university’s detailed emergency preparedness plan provides
notification instructions and operating procedures at american.edu/emergency. The web page provides access
links to emergency alerts and procedures, as well as university resources and policies relating to emergency
preparedness. A public version of the Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan can be
found at american.edu/emergency.
If you notice a forthcoming or an ongoing emergency, please contact the Department of Public Safety on the
emergency response line at 202-885-3636 immediately.
Once such an emergency has occurred and has been confirmed by Public Safety, the president of AU, the
Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management and the Emergency Response Team
(ERT) leader will convene and determine the scope of the incident. Upon their determination, the president
of AU will activate the Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan. Once the emergency
preparedness plan has been activated, the ERT will oversee the response team in conducting recovery and
restoration operations. The ERT will fulfill many operational functions during an emergency and is the
primary vehicle for implementing and managing the emergency response. The ERT is responsible for
confirming that there is a significant emergency or dangerous situation and for determining the appropriate
segment or segments of the campus community to receive a notification. The ERT is composed of the
following members:
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Daniel Nichols, ERT Leader, 202-885-2534
Phillip Morse, ERT Leader Alternate, 202-885-2549
Victoria Connaughton, ERT Member, 202-885-2188
David Dower, ERT Member, 202-885-2731
Vi Ettle, ERT Member, 202-885-2720
Abbey Fagin, ERT Member, 202-885-3411
Vin Harkins, ERT Member, 202-885-3704
Doug Kudravetz, ERT Member, 202-885-3283
Walter Labitzky, ERT Member, 202-274-4013
Camille Lepre, ERT Member, 202-885-5953
Chris Moody, ERT Member, 202-885-3370
Beth Muha, ERT Member, 202-885-2451
Tony Hollinger, ERT Member, 202-885-2403
Dave Swartz, ERT Member, 202-885-2612
In a campus-wide emergency response, the ERT will, without delay and taking into account the safety of the
community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system, unless the
notification will, in the professional judgment of the ERT, compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain,
respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. Public Safety will work in concert with the ERT to provide
a coordinated and effective response to the university community. AU will immediately notify the campus
community upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate
threat to the health or safety of faculty, students, or staff occurring on the campus.
The university operates a campus notification system, AU Alert, which will provide immediate text alerts and
updates to students, faculty, and staff with information and instructions, if there is an emergency. Public
American University Annual Security Report
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Safety will use these text alerts to notify the campus community of the nature of the emergency and
procedures to follow. Because we can send the alerts to any cell phone or email address regardless of physical
location, parents find them an invaluable resource for keeping informed if an emergency occurs on campus.
AU Alert works in conjunction with local alarm systems (such as fire alarms), outdoor mass notification
systems, desktop alerts, and wall-mounted alert beacons. In the event of an emergency, any or all of AU’s
notification capabilities mentioned herein can be utilized simultaneously. All enrolled AU students are
automatically enrolled in the AU Alert system. The AU Emergency Preparedness website,
american.edu/emergency, also contains numerous resources for emergency planning (e.g., shelter-in-place
and mass-care procedures).
The Vice president of University Communications or a designee will act as the university’s spokesperson and
will authorize the distribution of university-wide statements to keep the community updated. The university
conducts a campus-wide test of its emergency response and evacuation procedures annually. Additional
exercises are conducted as needed. The university administration and the ERT drill the Emergency
Management and Continuity of Operations Plan every spring. Based on the outcomes of the spring drill, the
building marshals receive training in the fall.
In certain emergency situations, the campus community may be advised to “shelter in place” to avoid or
minimize exposure to outside risks. Risks could include chemical or radioactive releases and some weatherrelated emergencies.
If an incident occurs and the buildings or areas around you become unstable, or if the air outdoors becomes
dangerous due to toxic or irritating substances, it is usually safer to stay indoors, because leaving the area may
expose you to that danger. Thus to “shelter in place” means to make a shelter of the building that you are in,
and with a few adjustments this location can be made even safer and more comfortable until it is safe to go
outside.
Once shelter-in-place instructions have been communicated, students, faculty, and staff should stay in the
same building they were in when they first received the message. If they are outside, they should go to the
nearest building and await further instructions.
While it may be advisable to shelter in place in certain situations, no one can be forced to do so. Campus
community members who choose not to shelter in place should vacate the premises immediately, so the
building can be secured as soon as possible.
The ERT will be responsible for keeping building marshals informed of the situation as it unfolds. Building
marshals will:
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Communicate information to building occupants.
Shut and lock all windows and doors.
Limit egress to one door or area of the building.
Affix orange tape on all exterior doorways to visually remind occupants to stay in the building.
Instruct occupants to gather in the center of the room, away from doors and windows.
Communicate when the “all clear” message is given.
The alert system was successfully implemented on June 1, 2012 (tornado warning); June 29, 2012 (police
incident); October 28, 2012 (weather closing); January 28, 2013 (delayed opening—weather); March 6, 2013
(weather closing); March 22, 2013 (police incident); May 5, 2013 (fire alarm–monitoring station); June 13,
2013 (severe weather warning); June 13, 2013 (severe weather warning); August 13, 2013 (possible gas leak);
September 9, 2013 (water main break); December 9, 2013 (delayed opening—weather); December 10, 2013
(weather closing); December 11, 2013 (police incident); December 12, 2013 (police incident); January 3, 2014
American University Annual Security Report
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(delayed opening—weather); January 8, 2014 (burst water pipe); January 20, 2014 (weather closing); January
21, 2014 (weather closing); January 22, 2014 (delayed opening—weather); January 28, 2014 (network outage);
February 5, 2014 (power outage); February 12, 2014 (weather closing); February 13, 2014 (weather closing);
February 28, 2014 (sprinkler outage); March 3, 2014 (weather delay) March 6, 2014 (DC Water Alert; March
7, 2014 (DC Water Alert); March 12, 2014 (weather closing); March 13, 2014 (delayed opening—weather);
March 5, 2014 (DC water alert); and March 17, 2014 (weather closing); June 10, 2014 (Power Outage);
October 15, 2014 (Tornado Warning); November 3, 2014 (police activity); January 6, 2015 (weather operating
status), January 12, 2015 (weather delay); January 27, 2015 (weather delay); February 5, 2015 (police activity);
February 16, 2015 (weather closing); February 21, 2015 (weather closing); February 26, 2015 (weather
operating status); March 1, 2015 (weather conditions-ice); March 2, 2015 (weather operating status); March 5,
2015 (weather closing); March 6, 2015 (weather delay).
AU also conducted several announced all-emergency communication tests. The tests occurred on October
12, 2012; October 17, 2013; March 14, 2013; March 13, 2014 and January 8, 2015. These tests were
announced through AU’s daily announcements via [email protected]
The ERT and building marshals, in coordination with ServeDC, conducted Community Emergency Response
Team (CERT) training and exercises in the spring and fall of 2012. The training equipped the participants to
better prepare for, respond to, and cope in the event of an emergency or disaster. During the intensive
collaboration, skill testing and tabletop modules were completed that mimicked the multiagency response to
real-life scenarios involving the local community. The CERT program is a nationally recognized model of
emergency response training, first developed by the Los Angeles City Fire Department.
Notification to the campus of the emergency response and evacuation procedures is made annually to
students, faculty, and staff. It is included in the notice announcing the publication of the Annual Security
Report. Also, AU’s Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management and crime
prevention coordinator discuss emergency procedures during new student orientation and at residence hall
floor presentations, tabling events, and various student group presentations.
Depending on the nature of the incident, other local or federal agencies such as MPD and the DC Fire and
Emergency Medical Services Department may respond to the incident.
EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION FOR AU GUESTS
Visitors to campus can prepare for emergency or dangerous situations on campus and the surrounding area
before they happen, so they can access up-to-the-minute alerts and advisories, by taking the following
proactive steps:
Look for wall-mounted alert beacons throughout campus. These beacons flash and sound to capture the
attention of building occupants from a distance. They display custom messages about the nature of the
emergency and appropriate responses to take.
Listen for outdoor sirens positioned throughout campus. These mass notification systems will sound an
alarm and provide instructions.
Follow the Department of Public Safety on Twitter @AUPublicSafety. Create a free Twitter account at
twitter.com or download the free Twitter mobile app.
Register for text alerts and Twitter feeds from the following local and regional jurisdictions:
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National Capital Region
capitalert.gov
@capitalalert
DC Metropolitan Police Department
mpdc.dc.gov/service/dc-police-alert
@DCPoliceDept
Alert DC
textalert.ema.dc.gov
@DC_HSEMA
The Department of Public Safety encourages AU guests who do not have access to a smartphone or are
unable to join Twitter to contact the department directly at 202-885-2527.
EMERGENCY EVACUATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Students who register with the Academic Support and Access Center who have an impairment that may
impact their ability to evacuate a building in an emergency, are oriented to all procedures related to their
safety in all university buildings, including residence halls and academic buildings, during an intake meeting
with an academic counselor in the Academic Support and Access Center (ASAC). Students participate in a
required intake meeting when they request reasonable accommodations. Information about the ASAC can be
found at american.edu/asac or by calling 202-885-3360.
Housing staff provides information on emergency evacuation plans and designated areas of rescue in the
residence halls during the opening floor meetings at the beginning of each semester. The ASAC creates and
updates an emergency evacuation list that includes the names of students with disabilities, their residence hall
and room location, and type of disability. The list is provided to the Department of Public Safety and
Housing and Dining Programs. The list is kept at each of the residence hall front desks to be referenced by
AU personnel in the event of an emergency.
The Office of University Safety Programs has placed “Areas of Rescue Assistance” signs in highly trafficked
areas of university buildings to ensure that students, faculty, staff and visitors with mobility impairments can
be quickly located and evacuated from the building in the event of an emergency.
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ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT
The Annual Fire Safety Report contains information about campus fire safety practices and standards of AU.
This report is published on or before October 1. It contains a description of each on-campus student housing
facility fire safety system; the number of fire drills held during the previous calendar year; and policies or rules
on portable electrical appliances, smoking, and open flames in student housing facilities. The Annual Fire
Safety Report also contains procedures for evacuating student housing in case of fire; policies regarding fire
safety education and training programs provided to students, faculty, and staff; a list of the titles of each
person or organization to which students and employees should report that a fire has occurred; and possible
plans for future improvements in fire safety.
The Annual Fire Safety Report is available at american.edu/finance/rmehs/FireSafety.cfm.
A paper copy of the report is available from Public Safety at 202-885-2527 or
[email protected]
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PREVENTING AND RESPONDING TO SEX OFFENSES AND INCIDENTS OF
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND
STALKING
The university’s Title IX Compliance Project Team is responsible for recommending policies and procedures
to respond to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Programs regarding the
prevention of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking are offered regularly through the
Office of Campus Life and by Public Safety to students, faculty, and staff Public Safety offers a physical
defense course for women, RAD Systems, which teaches rape prevention and practical self-defense
techniques. Campus Life offers programs on relationship violence and sexual assault. Details of upcoming
programs and support resources are available at american.edu/sexualassault.
BYSTANDER INTERVENTION TRAINING: STEP UP!
Step Up! is a prosocial behavior and bystander intervention program that educates students to be proactive in
helping others. Teaching people about the determinants of prosocial behavior makes them more aware of
why they sometimes do not help. As a result, they are more likely to help in the future.
The learning outcomes of Step Up! are:
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•
•
•
•
Raise awareness of situations where intervention is warranted
Teach students how to use the five decision-making steps to intervene
Increase students’ motivation to help
Develop skills and confidence when responding to problems or concerns
Ensure the safety and well-being of self and others
Why Bystander Intervention?
Most problematic behaviors on college campuses involve bystanders. Step Up! training provides a framework
that explains the bystander effect; reviews relevant research; and teaches skills for intervening successfully
using the five decision-making steps and the S.E.E. Model (Safe; Early; Effective). A survey at three
universities (University of Arizona, University of California–Riverside, and University of Virginia) revealed
that student-athletes encounter multiple situations where bystander intervention would be appropriate,
including, alcohol abuse, hazing, sexual assault/relationship abuse, and discrimination. Almost 90 percent of
participants related a problem that could have been avoided with intervention and up to 85 percent indicated
they would like to learn skills to intervene.
Primary Components of Step Up!
Five Decision-Making Steps
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•
Notice the event.
Interpret the event as a problem—investigate!
Assume personal responsibility.
Know how to help.
Implement the help: Step Up! using the 3 D’s – Direct, Delegate, Distract.
The S.E.E. Model
•
SAFE Responding
Decide on a course of action that best ensures the safety of those involved. Maintain mutual respect
and mutual purpose.
American University Annual Security Report
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•
•
EARLY Intervention
Understand the importance of intervening early—before a situation becomes a problem, crisis, or
disaster.
EFFECTIVE Helping
Develop specific helping skills and understand how to avoid harmful helping.
Step Up! Training
Step Up! Offers training on 11 topics. Each training session includes the five decision-making steps, factors
that affect helping, strategies for effective helping, and specific scenarios that address one of 11 topics. The
trainings can be altered to include campus- or location-specific statistics and definitions including campus and
local definitions of sexual harassment, sexual assault, rape, and consent.
Who Can be Step Up! Trained?
Step Up! training is offered by request. Any university group, including academic classes, may request a
training program. Each training session lasts 90 minutes.
For more information about Step Up!, please visit american.edu/ocl/stepup or
www.facebook.com/StepUpAU.
U ASK DC
If you or someone you care about needs help, U ASK can help you find it. U ASK DC is a project of Men
Can Stop Rape and the District of Columbia Executive Office of the Mayor’s Office of Victim Services.
Get immediate access to the information needed most in the event of a sexual assault on one of DC’s nine
college campuses—quickly, confidentially , and free. U ASK is an invaluable tool for any DC college student.
Search “U ASK DC” on the iTunes App Store, Google Play Store, or Blackberry Appworld.
U ASK respects your privacy:
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100% secure and confidential
No identifying information is collected, stored, or shared by U ASK or U ASK sponsors.
ONLINE EDUCATION
All AU undergraduate and graduate students are expected to complete online courses about healthy
relationships, the importance of consent and being a good communicator, and the many ways students can
help create a safe and positive campus community.
PEERS
Peer Educators for the Elimination of Relationship and Sexual Violence (PEERS) is comprised of passionate
student leaders at AU who are recruited, trained, and supervised by AU’s sexual assault prevention
coordinator. The mission of PEERS is to increase awareness of sexual assault, dating abuse, and stalking and
to reduce the incidence of sexual violence in the AU community through outreach and education. PEERS
provides workshops and facilitates discussions on dating abuse, stalking, and sexual violence to any
university-affiliated group.
To request a PEERS workshop, please contact the Sexual Assault Prevention Coordinator at 202-885-3055.
American University Annual Security Report
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During Welcome Week 2015, the Wellness Center will launch “Empower AU”, a 90 minute training program
for all new undergraduate students. Empower AU will educate approximately 2,000 incoming students on
sexual violence, consent, bystander intervention, and resources on and off campus.
FRATERNITY AND SORORITY LIFE
As part of Student Activities, the staff of Fraternity and Sorority Life serves as advisors, mentors, and
educators, providing the foundation for student engagement, leadership development, and student-initiated
programming in a challenging environment that promotes personal, social, and intellectual growth.
The Fraternity and Sorority Life community at AU provides a variety of education and trainings for the
community, including:
•
•
•
•
•
Hazing Prevention 101
Provided for all new members each semester
Alcohol and Other Drug Education
Provided by the Wellness Center and required for all new members each semester
Sexual Assault Prevention and Bystander Intervention Education
Provided by the Wellness Center and required for all new members each semester
T.I.P.S. (Training for Intervention ProcedureS)
Provided by the Wellness Center, every chapter having at least two members trained in T.I.P.S.
Speakers
Each semester, speakers discuss various topics with the FSL community; 75 percent of each chapter
is required to attend.
Additional information about programs offered by Fraternity and Sorority Life is available from the assistant
director of fraternity and sorority life at 202-885-3288 or augreeklife.com.
REPORTING SEX-RELATED OFFENSES AND INCIDENTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING
VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING TO PUBLIC SAFETY
Public Safety provides the following information to students:
Individuals should report sex-related offenses and incidents of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual
assault, and stalking to Public Safety as soon as possible. Public Safety will help you file a university incident
report and assign a female or male officer, as appropriate, to handle the initial interview. We will offer you the
option of contacting MPD when you report the incident to us. It is extremely important to preserve evidence
as proof of a criminal offense or for obtaining a protection order. We will honor and respect your decision to
pursue or not to pursue criminal or civil action. If you so choose, Public Safety can assist with obtaining a
rape kit and provide support as you work with the MPD Sex Crimes Unit.
When a university employee reports an incident involving sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence,
or stalking to the Department of Public Safety, the employee is provided with information about services,
including the Employee Assistance Program, Employee Relations, protective orders, and victim assistance
programs.
The Department of Public Safety has the option to bar non-affiliates from all AU property when they are a
respondent in an allegation involving sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.
Public Safety resources are available regardless of whether the victim decides to pursue criminal charges.
In addition to filing a report with Public Safety, you may also file an internal university complaint pursuant to
the university’s Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy. The following information is derived from the
American University Annual Security Report
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Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy and a copy of the Discrimination and Sexual Harassment
Policy is available as Appendix A of this report. The university’s procedures are intended to afford a prompt,
fair, and impartial investigation and resolution of the complaint.
Individuals (“Complainant”) must file a complaint with the university office having disciplinary jurisdiction
over the accused person (“Respondent”). Therefore, complaints should be reported to the following office
(“Responsible Official”):
Complaints against Students
A complaint against a student is referred to the dean of students (American University, Butler Pavilion 408,
4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016; 202-885-3300; [email protected]).
Complaints against Law Students
A complaint against a law student is referred to the Washington College of Law dean of student affairs (WCL
Dean of Student Affairs, 4801 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016; 202-274-4052;
[email protected]).
Disability Complaints involving Students
Complaints of student matters are referred to the Section 504 Officer, (Director of Student Conduct and
Conflict Resolution Services, Butler Pavilion, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016; 202885-3328; [email protected]).
Complaints against Staff, University Administrator, University Guest, or Contractor
A complaint against a staff member, university administrator, vendor, or guest is referred to the assistant vice
president of human resources (American University, 3201 New Mexico Avenue NW, Suite 350, Washington,
DC 20016; 202-885-2591; [email protected]).
Complaints against a Faculty Member, Faculty Administrator, or Individual Carrying Out
Teaching Responsibilities
A complaint against a faculty member or faculty administrator (e.g., dean, chair) is referred to the dean of
academic affairs (American University, Leonard Hall Lower Level, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW,
Washington, DC 20016; 202-885-2125; [email protected]).
Complaints against the President or a Member of the University’s Cabinet
A complaint against a member of the university president’s cabinet is referred to the university president
(President’s Office Building, 202-885-2121), and a complaint against the university president is referred to the
chairman of the board of trustees (c/o Secretary of the Board of Trustees, President’s Office Building, 4400
Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016).
Once a complaint has been reported and until the resolution of the matter, the Responsible Official may take
interim measures to ensure safety and non-retaliation for all parties. Examples of interim measures include
separation of the parties, no-contact directives, and alternative academic or housing arrangements.
Depending on the nature of the allegations, the investigation of the complaint could include interviews with
the Complainant, the Respondent, and/or witnesses; review of written documentation and relevant policies;
and any other steps necessary to thoroughly investigate the allegations. During the investigation, the
Complainant and the Respondent will have an equal opportunity to identify witnesses and evidence that the
Responsible Official may consider. The Responsible Official will use a preponderance of the evidence
standard when evaluating the allegations and formulating the outcomes of the investigation and any related
American University Annual Security Report
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disciplinary proceedings. To the extent that a related disciplinary proceeding has a different standard of proof
for findings of responsibility, the preponderance of the evidence standard in this policy will be used instead.
At the conclusion of the investigation, the Responsible Official will notify simultaneously, in writing, the
concerned parties of the outcome of the investigation, including referral to the appropriate disciplinary
procedures:
Student Respondent
The student disciplinary procedure, including appeal, is outlined in the Student Conduct Code. Potential
student sanctions include, but are not limited to, a written warning, a ban from specific areas of campus, loss
of specific student privileges, community service, transfer or loss of on-campus housing privileges,
disciplinary probation, disciplinary suspension, or permanent dismissal. Complainants may elect to file
charges through the student disciplinary procedures at any time within one year of the alleged incident.
Staff Respondent
Human Resources will take action in accordance with the Staff Personnel Policies Manual Disciplinary Policy.
Potential staff sanctions include, but are not limited to, verbal or written warning, mandatory counseling,
mandatory training, suspension, and termination. Appeal procedures for termination are outlined in the Staff
Personnel Policies Manual Termination Section. Appeal of disciplinary action may be grieved through the
Staff Personnel Policies Manual Complaint Policy and Procedure.
Faculty Respondent
The Provost’s Office will take action in accordance with the Faculty Manual Disciplinary Procedures.
Potential faculty sanctions include, but are not limited to, written warning, mandatory counseling, mandatory
training, suspension, and termination. Minor sanctions may be grieved through the Faculty Manual Grievance
Procedures. Major sanctions may be appealed through the Faculty Manual Disciplinary Procedures.
All parties engaged in the complaint process are expected to maintain confidentiality. Failure to do so may
result in disciplinary sanctions. All reports or complaints will be kept confidential except that individuals with
a legitimate need to know will be informed of the complaint in order for the university to respond effectively
to each complaint.
In some cases, Complainants may request that their names be kept confidential and that the university take
no action on their report (“confidential reporting”). The Responsible Official will evaluate each request and
advise the Complainant that “confidential reporting” will limit the university’s ability to respond fully to the
matter, including pursuing disciplinary action against the Respondent. Nevertheless, in most instances, the
university will honor such confidentiality requests unless to do so will impede its ability to provide a safe and
nondiscriminatory environment for all students.
STUDENT CONDUCT DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SEX OFFENSES AND
INCIDENTS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND
STALKING
Complaints filed under the university’s Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy may lead to the
initiation of student disciplinary procedures. A student has the option of bringing forth a complaint directly
to Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services. The following information is derived from the Student
Conduct Code and a copy of the Student Conduct Code can be found as Appendix B of this report. The
university’s student disciplinary procedures are intended to afford a prompt, fair, and impartial resolution of
the complaint. To ensure this, complainants/complaining witnesses and respondents involved in disciplinary
proceedings related to cases of sex offenses and incidents of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual
assault, and stalking are afforded the following:
American University Annual Security Report
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
To be informed of the allegations, the hearing date, and the hearing outcome at the same time
To be allowed reasonable time to prepare a response
To hear and respond to evidence upon which an allegation is based
To present relevant witnesses and ask questions of the witnesses at disciplinary hearings
To be assured of confidentiality according to the terms of the university policy on confidentiality
To request that any person conducting a disciplinary conference (hearing officer) or serving as a
Conduct Council member or hearing administrator, be disqualified on the grounds of personal bias
To be provided with an opportunity to review these rights before any disciplinary conference or
hearing
To have the respondent be considered not responsible for the allegations until found responsible
based on what is more likely than not to have occurred (by a preponderance of the evidence)
To have reasonable access to the case file prior to and during the disciplinary conference or hearing
To have an advisor as defined in Section XI of the Student Conduct Code
To appeal the outcome of the case according to Section XVII of the Student Conduct Code
Moreover, the Student Conduct Code also affords the complainant/complaining witness the same
opportunities as the respondent, including but not limited to: (i) receiving notice of the disciplinary
proceeding date at the same time as the respondent; (ii) being present during any disciplinary proceeding; (iii)
presenting victim impact statements; (iv) receiving simultaneous written notice of the outcome of the
disciplinary proceedings and of the procedures to appeal the results as described in the Student Conduct
Code; and (v) the right to appeal an outcome as described in the Student Conduct Code.
Conduct Council members and Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services staff will receive annual
training on issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, as well as how to
conduct a hearing process that protects the safety of complaining witnesses and promotes accountability.
In cases of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, rape, or stalking, the complainant/complaining
witness and respondent may be advised and accompanied by an advisor of their choice during a disciplinary
conference or hearing or related meeting. An advisor of their choice is not limited to only an AU student,
faculty, or staff member. However, the role of advisor is limited to consultation as described in Section XI(a)
of the Student Conduct Code.
In addition, the university will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence
(defined in Section 16, Title 18, U.S. Code) or a non-forcible sex offense the results of any disciplinary
hearing conducted against the student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged
victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense the university will provide the results of the disciplinary
hearing to the victim’s next of kin, if so requested.
Disciplinary records are maintained by Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services for seven years
from the date of the letter providing notice of final disciplinary action. Release of disciplinary records to third
parties is provided in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as
amended, until a student has graduated from the university or as required by law. Records for a student who
is suspended or dismissed or who withdraws with a disciplinary case pending are maintained indefinitely.
Release of these categories of disciplinary records to third parties is provided in accordance with all applicable
laws, including FERPA and the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act.
American University Annual Security Report
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SEX OFFENSE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND
STALKING RESOURCES AND VICTIMS’ RIGHTS
The following are on- and off-campus resources (including but not limited to counseling, health, mental
health, victim advocacy, and legal assistance) designed to assist victims of sex offenses and instances of
domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
Students and employees are provided written notification about services and protective measures available to
victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. These services include existing
counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, and other services available on and off
campus. These notifications will also include how to request changes to academic, living, working situations,
and other protective measures. This information is provided in several places including the ASR, OASIS
brochures, our website, and emails AU sends to students when a report is filed.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
AU OASIS (Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal and Sexual Violence)
202-885-7070
DC Rape Crisis Hotline
202-333-RAPE (7273)
AU Dean of Students
202-885-3300
Emergencies on Campus
202-885-3636
Emergencies off Campus
911
MPD Sexual Assault Unit
202-727-3700
MPD Second District Headquarters
202-715-7300
Counseling Center at American University
202-885-3500
Sibley Memorial Hospital Emergency Room
202-537-4080
Network for Victim Recovery DC
202-742-1720
Washington Hospital Center Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE)
1-800-641-4028
American University Annual Security Report
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NATIONWIDE
RAINN.org
800-656-HOPE (4673)
RAINN online hotline
ohl.rainn.org/online
OASIS: Advocacy Services
American University's Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal and Sexual Violence (OASIS) provides
free and confidential advocacy services for anyone in the campus community who is a survivor of sexual
violence (sexual assault, dating or domestic violence, and stalking. OASIS staff consists of the Sexual Assault
Prevention Coordinator and Coordinator of Victim Advocacy Services. As confidential resources, OASIS
staff are not legally permitted to report a sexual assault unless requested by the victim/survivor or unless
there is immediate danger to human life.
AU’s OASIS, Department of Public Safety, and other Office of Campus Life departments can provide any
student with a “Resources for Victims and Survivors of Sexual Assault” brochure specifically addressing
resources for victims and survivors of sexual assault. The brochure has also been distributed to all offices
providing direct services to students, and faculty and staff in those offices have been directed to make it
available to any student who visits their office. The brochure includes information regarding:
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Definitions of conduct.
Actions to take if a student becomes a victim.
Tips on how to help a friend.
Procedures for filing a complaint on campus.
Victims’ rights.
Confidential resources and policy updates.
Guidelines of consent.
On- and off-campus resources available to all students.
Contact OASIS at [email protected] or (202) 885-7070.
COLLEGIATE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
The Collegiate Assistance Program (CAP) provides access to a Nurseline service and a Student Assistance
Program designed to help students manage common problems and stressors that can detract from academic
success.
The services are available to students 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, by calling 1-855-678-8679 and
entering PIN: 1009. These services are provided by OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions.
CAP includes:
Telephone/Online Counseling
Students facing stressful or emotional issues have 24/7, year-round access to prompt counseling services.
Beginning with students’ first toll-free call, master’s-level clinicians will listen carefully to assess their needs.
Crisis intervention specialists and licensed clinicians are always ready for urgent situations.
Web-Based Services
American University Annual Security Report
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The website for students, liveandworkwell.com, offers a wealth of information on a full range of topics. The
site includes thousands of articles, interactive learning tools, cognitive behavioral therapy modules, searchable
databases, and helpful resources for students who want to develop their own self-improvement strategies.
Legal and Financial Services
These include assistance with nonclinical issues, such as debt, divorce, child custody matters, and shelter from
abuse relationships. The effect of these and other practical concerns can be just as detrimental to a student’s
health and well- being as a clinical issue.
Nurseline
A technology-enabled, clinical nurse triage service is available to students 24/7. Nurseline promotes personal
health management by providing health information, advice, and support through telephone interactions. It
helps callers make informed health decisions by providing answers to commonly asked questions.
For more information about CAP, please contact the Student Health Center, 202-885-3380,
[email protected] or visit american.edu/ocl/healthcenter.
VICTIMS’ RIGHTS
Students who identify themselves as victims of sex offenses and instances of domestic violence, dating
violence, sexual assault, and stalking may rely on the following provisions in support of their recovery:
1. You do not have to identify the alleged perpetrator, unless the information is necessary to respond to
your request for a specific form of assistance.
2. You can choose whether or not to file a complaint with the appropriate university department or
with law enforcement.
3. Before making a report to a university official, you can request information about university policies
and procedures regarding the release of personally identifiable information.
4. You can request assistance from Public Safety in filing a report with the MPD.
5. You can access medical care without consenting to a crime investigation by Public Safety and/or
MPD.
6. You can access confidential physical and mental health care at the Student Health Center and the
Counseling Center.
7. You can request a barring of personal contact between you and the alleged perpetrator through the
Office of the Dean of Students.
8. You can request relocation in university housing through the Office of the Dean of Students.
9. You can request a change in your class schedule to avoid contact with the alleged perpetrator
through the Office of the Dean of Students.
10. You can request a change in your email address and server login through the Office of the Dean of
Students.
11. You can request that a visual barrier be placed between you and the respondent during a disciplinary
hearing.
12. The Student Conduct Code also affords you, as the complainant/complaining witness, the same
opportunities as the respondent, including but not limited to: (i) receiving notice of the disciplinary
proceeding date at the same time as the respondent; (ii) being present during any disciplinary
proceeding; (iii) presenting victim impact statements; (iv) receiving simultaneous written notice of the
outcome of the disciplinary proceedings and of the procedures to appeal the results as described in
the Student Conduct Code; and (v) the right to appeal an outcome as described in the Student
Conduct Code.
American University Annual Security Report
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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND RESOURCES
You can use the following services regardless of whether you were sexually assaulted on or off campus:
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•
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•
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•
For immediate medical support, call 1-800-641-4028 to connect with the Sexual Assault Nurse
Examiner Program. The SANE Program will connect you with a confidential advocate who can
arrange free transportation for you and support persons to and from the Washington Hospital
Center. Law Enforcement will not be involved unless requested by the individual accessing the
SANE program. The SANE program provides free medical examinations to collect and preserve
evidence. Additionally, SANE provides free STI/HIV testing and preventative treatment for
STI/HIV and pregnancy. An individual can choose which portions of the SANE program they want
to utilize. This means that an individual can skip the forensic exam and simply access the SANE
program for free preventative STI/HIV and pregnancy medication. The results of an exam are held
for 90 days or longer upon request, giving a survivor time to decide whether he or she would like to
press criminal charges.
It is best not to shower or bathe prior to this exam. Bring with you, in a paper bag, any clothes or
articles you were wearing when the assault occurred. Preserving evidence may be necessary to the
proof of criminal domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking or in obtaining a
protective order. A staff member from Housing and Dining Programs or Public Safety can help you
arrange transportation to the hospital via cab voucher or ambulance.
Receive medical attention at the Student Health Center (SHC). The SHC can provide testing for
sexually transmitted diseases and other services; however, the SHC cannot collect evidence for MPD
in preparation for possible criminal prosecution. It is therefore important that you go to a hospital if
you believe there is any possibility that you may press criminal charges. Washington Hospital Center,
with its SANE program, is the preferred hospital to refer victims.
Report the assault to campus authorities, such as those in Housing and Dining Programs, the Office
of the Dean of Students, and University Athletics. Licensed and professional counselors in the
Counseling Center and Faculty and Staff Assistance Program, as well as pastoral counselors in the
university chaplain’s office can provide confidential counseling. Pastoral and professional counselors
must be acting in these roles within the university to be excluded from Public Safety’s reporting
requirements.
Contact American University's Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal and Sexual Violence
(OASIS) provides free and confidential advocacy services for anyone in the campus community who
is a survivor of sexual violence (sexual assault, dating or domestic violence, and stalking. OASIS staff
consists of the Sexual Assault Prevention Coordinator and Coordinator of Victim Advocacy Services.
As confidential resources, OASIS staff are not legally permitted to report a sexual assault unless
requested by the victim/survivor or unless there is immediate danger to human life.
File charges through the university’s internal conduct system: Student Conduct and Conflict
Resolution Services. You may file a complaint in the university in addition to charges you may have
filed through the court system (criminal or civil).
File a Title IX sex discrimination complaint in addition to filing a criminal complaint.
Call outside sources, such as the DC Rape Crisis Hotline at 202-333-RAPE (7273).
Call friends or family to assist you.
Get psychological counseling through the university Counseling Center, Faculty and Staff Assistance
Program, or the DC Rape Crisis Hotline.
Request changes in your academic and living situations through the Office of the Dean of Students.
American University Annual Security Report
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ASSISTING A FRIEND
Helping someone can be a scary situation, but it is important that we know what we can do to help when
someone is in need. If you are trying to help a friend, follow these guidelines:
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Believe your friend. Statements such as “I believe you” and “It wasn’t your fault” can be extremely
helpful.
Make sure your friend feels safe in his or her current location.
Listen and be available.
Do not judge or blame your friend for what happened.
Encourage action but allow your friend to decide what actions to take. For example, encourage your
friend to seek medical attention, but do not force him or her to do so. Making choices helps your
friend to regain control lost during the assault.
Be patient. Healing from a sexual assault takes time. Continue to offer your support to your friend
throughout the coming weeks and months, or even longer. Remember that every healing process is
unique.
Get support for yourself. Supporting a friend can result in stress and confusion in your own life. You
can also utilize the resources in this report.
The most important point to remember is that the assault is not your friend’s fault.
HARM REDUCTION INFORMATION
No matter what, sexual assault is never the survivor’s fault. While some safety strategies, such as traveling in
groups and trusting your instincts, can help reduce your likelihood of being a victim of any crime, the only
person who can prevent sexual assault is the perpetrator.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Be aware of your surroundings at all times.
Trust your instincts. If the situation doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. Confront the person
immediately or leave.
Don’t allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t know or trust.
Know how you’re getting home from a social event. If the friend or group of friends you were
planning on walking with have already left, call Public Safety at 202-885-2527 and it will send a taxi
for you. If you don’t have money with you at the time, your student account will be charged, or you
can pay later.
Be cautious of fellow students that you just met or only consider an acquaintance. Unfortunately, the
people we trust the most can be the most hurtful. It is important to be aware and vigilant with
everyone you encounter.
Remember that alcohol and other drugs can interfere with your ability to communicate effectively
and deal with potentially dangerous situations. Be responsible in your decision making with regard to
alcohol and drugs.
Think about what your sexual limits are, and be prepared to communicate them directly.
Be aware of sex-role stereotypes that prevent you from acting as you want to, such as a woman not
being able to initiate sexual activity or a man not being able to say “no.”
If you have any questions, please contact AU’s Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal and Sexual
Violence at [email protected] or 202-885-7070 for confidential support.
American University Annual Security Report
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CONFIDENTIAL RESOURCES ON CAMPUS
The following offices and individuals are confidential resources available to all members of the AU
community with concerns regarding sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and/or stalking:
Professional Counselors—Counseling Center
214 Mary Graydon Center 202-885-3500
(including the satellite office located in the Washington College of Law)
OASIS (Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal and Sexual Violence)
Wellness Center
McCabe 123
202-885-7070
[email protected]
Medical Staff—Student Health Center
McCabe First Floor 202-885-3380
Ordained Clergy—Kay Spiritual Life Center
202-885-3336
These confidential resources are not permitted to report a sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence,
and/or stalking unless requested by the victim/survivor or if there is immediate danger to human life.
Contact information for these resources can be found in the On-Campus Resources portion of this report.
For additional information, please visit american.edu/sexualassault. Notice: Any office or staff member
outside of the resources listed above is required under Title IX to report knowledge of an incident involving
sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and/or stalking to the appropriate authorities for follow-up.
Dating Abuse, Domestic Violence, and Stalking Resources
Contact AU’s Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal and Sexual Violence at [email protected] or
202-885-7070 for confidential support and information about dating abuse and stalking. Break the Cycle
(Helpline at 1-888-988-8336) provides legal services and other advocacy programs for survivors ages 12–24.
My Sister’s Place (202-529-5991) provides 24-hour hotline and support services.
American University Annual Security Report
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Understanding the Difference between Healthy and Unhealthy Relationships
Healthy Relationships
EQUALITY
Partners share decision-making roles
HONESTY
Partners are open and communicate needs and
desires
SUPPORT
Partners encourage each other
COMFORT
Partners are free to be themselves
UNDERSTANDING OF BOUNDARIES
Respect is given to each partner’s privacy
INDEPENDENCE WITHIN THE
RELATIONSHIP
PHYSICAL SAFETY
Partners feel safe when together and in the space
that they may share
SEXUAL RESPECT
Partners never force any physical activity without
consent. There is active and enthusiastic consent
before any sexual activity.
Unhealthy Relationships
CONTROL
One partner makes decisions for the other
DISHONESTY
One partner lies to the other
DISRESPECT
One partner may insult, demean, or otherwise put
the other down
INTIMIDATION
One partner may attempt to coerce the other into
doing things he or she does not feel comfortable
with
LACK OF PRIVACY
Examining a partner’s phone, email, or social media
discussions without permission or consent
DEPENDENCE ON THE OTHER
INDIVIDUAL
PHYSICAL ABUSE
One partner may use force to exert his or her will
on another (e.g., slapping, pushing, hitting)
SEXUAL ABUSE
Force or coercion is used by one partner against the
other. Even in relationships, consent is required
before any sexual activity.
CIVIL PROTECTION ORDERS (WASHINGTON, DC)
A civil protection order (CPO) is a court order from the DC Court that protects you from abuse by a current
or former spouse, domestic partner, intimate/dating partner, relative (by blood or marriage/domestic
partnership), housemate, someone you have a child in common with, or someone who is/was in a
relationship with someone who you are/were in a relationship with. It also protects victims of stalking, sexual
assault, or sexual abuse who do NOT have the type of relationship described above. You should file for a
CPO with the DC Court as soon as possible after the abuse occurs. You can file for a CPO up to two years
after the incident. You must live in DC or at least one incident must have occurred in DC to seek protection
from the DC Court; however, the order will protect you in all states. If you feel you are in immediate danger,
contact 911 (off campus) or Public Safety at 202-885-3636.
What is the legal definition of domestic violence in the District of Columbia?
This section defines domestic violence for the purposes of getting a CPO.
In Washington, DC, domestic violence is divided into three categories: intimate partner violence, intrafamily
violence, and interpersonal violence, which are explained in detail below. “Domestic violence” is when one of
the following people commits or threatens to commit any crime against you:
•
•
Someone you are or were married to, in a domestic partnership with, or in a romantic, dating, or
sexual relationship with (“intimate partner violence”)
Someone related to you by blood, adoption, legal custody, marriage, or domestic partnership (e.g.,
your brother or your father-in-law) (“intrafamily violence”)
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•
•
•
Someone you have a child in common with—this can be “intrafamily violence” and/or “intimate
partner violence”
Someone you share(d) a home with (e.g., a roommate) (“interpersonal violence”)
Someone who is/was in an intimate relationship with the same person that you are/were in an
intimate relationship with (e.g., you are dating Jane and Jane’s ex-husband assaults you)
(“interpersonal violence”)
Note: If you are a victim of stalking, sexual assault, or sexual abuse, you can file for a CPO against the
offender even if you do not fall into one of these above categories.
What types of CPOs are there? How long do they last?
There are two types of CPO in Washington, DC:
Temporary (Ex Parte) Protection Orders
A temporary protection order can be issued the day that you file your petition without the abuser being
present in court (this is what is meant by an ex parte order). The judge can give you this temporary order if
the judge believes that the safety or welfare of you or your household member is in immediate danger from
the abuser.
The first temporary protection order that you get can last up to 14 days. Once you return to court, the judge
can extend the temporary protection order for an additional 14-day period (or for a longer period if both
parties consent) until the final court hearing or trial is completed.
Civil Protection Orders
A final protection order can be issued by a judge after one of the following happens:
1. There is a court hearing where you and the abuser both appear and present evidence and testimony
to the judge, or
2. There is a court hearing where only you appear (i.e., the abuser fails to appear, even though you can
prove he or she was properly served with notice of the court date), or
3. In court, the abuser consents to the protection order being issued.
In Option 1 or 2, above, the judge will only issue the final protection order if he or she has “good cause” to
believe that the abuser committed or threatened to commit a criminal offense against you, your animal, or any
animal in your household. For Option 3, this is not a requirement.
A final protection order lasts up to one year. The expiration date should be included on the order. However,
the length of the order is subject to change if either party files a motion in court and proves that there is
“good cause” to either extend or rescind (i.e., cancel) it.
How can a CPO help me?
In a CPO, a judge can order the abuser to:
•
•
•
•
Stop committing or threatening to commit criminal offenses against you and any other protected
person (named in the petition).
Stay away from you, any other protected person, and any other specific locations (“stay away order”).
Have no contact with you and any other protected person (“no contact order”).
Stay away from the home OR leave the home where you are living (“vacate order”) whether that
home is:
o Marital property of the parties;
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Jointly owned, leased, or rented and occupied by you and the abuser (including if you used
to live there but had to leave due to the abuse);
o Owned, leased, or rented by you alone; or
o Jointly owned, leased, or rented by you and another person (not the respondent).
Participate in a psychiatric or medical treatment or counseling program(s) for domestic violence,
parenting, alcohol, drugs, etc.
Pay your costs and attorney fees.
Give up possession of any firearms.
Return personal property owned by you alone or by you and the abuser (including keys).
Give you financial assistance and/or spousal support to pay your rent/mortgage/bills or other
expenses.
Pay you child support.
Not remove you and/or your children from his/her health insurance policy.
Reimburse you for medical costs, property damage, or other expenses you have due to the abuser’s
actions (you will have to bring medical bills, receipts, invoices, or estimates to the final hearing).
o
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The order can also:
•
•
•
•
Grant you temporary custody of your children and arrange visitation in a way to protect your safety
(note that the abuser must prove to the judge that visitation will not endanger the child or
significantly harm the child’s emotional development).
Order police assistance to help enforce the terms of the order (such as getting your keys returned or
escorting the abuser home to collect personal belongings).
Give you custody or control of a domestic animal that belongs to you or to the respondent or that
lives in either household.
Order anything else that you can show you need in order to be free from the violence. Whether the
judge grants any or all of these depends on the facts of your case.
How much does it cost to file and serve a CPO? Do I need a lawyer?
Filing
There is no fee to file for a CPO.
Serving
As long as you have a valid home or work address for the person you are getting the order against, the MPD
will serve the protection order petition (and motions) at no charge when the party being served lives or works
in the District of Columbia. If the person lives in Maryland or Virginia, service may also be free as part of an
agreement between Washington, DC, and the sheriff departments in the surrounding areas of Maryland and
Virginia.
Lawyer
Although you do not need a lawyer to file for a CPO, it may be to your advantage to seek legal counsel. This
is especially important if the abuser has a lawyer. Even if the abuser does not have a lawyer, it is
recommended that you contact a lawyer to make sure that your legal rights are protected.
For help in filing an order, you can go to the Domestic Violence Intake Center
(dccourts.gov/internet/public/aud_dvu/ intake.jsf ), which is in the Superior Court. The Office of the
Attorney General for the District of Columbia (oag.dc.gov) represents some people who file for CPOs. If the
Office of the Attorney General cannot take your case, it may be able to help you get an attorney.
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In addition, the domestic violence agencies in your area and/or court staff may be able to answer some of
your questions or help you fill out the necessary court forms.
There are two Domestic Violence Intake Centers in DC:
D.C. Superior Court
500 Indiana Avenue NW Room 4550
Washington, DC
202-879-0152
Satellite Domestic Violence Intake Center
1328 Southern Avenue SE Suite 311
Washington, DC
Both centers are open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
It may be possible to obtain an Emergency Temporary Protective Order (ETPO), which is good for up to
five days. If you are in an emergency situation and wish to file for an ETPO when the intake centers are not
open, call the police and they will put you in contact with a SAFE advocate who will explain the process of
obtaining an ETPO.
The Department of Public Safety, Dean of Students Office and/or Wellness Center can assist you in filing a
CPO and support you along the way.
Upon receiving a report of stalking, dating violence, domestic violence, or sexual assault, AU police officers
will provide the victim with information on how to obtain a protective order in the District of Columbia. An
officer will provide the victim with transportation to the courthouse and assist him or her throughout the
filing process. AU police officers will collaborate with other law enforcement jurisdictions to serve the
protective order, and they will notify the victim when the respondent is served.
UNIVERSITY RESOURCES
Department of Public Safety
202-885-2527 (24/7)
Please note that speaking to law enforcement does not, in any way, obligate you to file for a Temporary CPO.
Office of the Dean of Students
202-885-3300
OASIS (Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal and Sexual Violence)
Wellness Center
McCabe 123
202-885-7070
[email protected]
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
For more information about available resources (including legal assistance), please visit:
“Break the Cycle”
breakthecycle.org
The Network for Victim Recovery of DC
nvrdc.org
National Domestic Violence Hotline
800-799-SAFE (7233)
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24-Hour Shelters, Hotlines, and Counseling
House of Ruth at 202-667-7001 x217
My Sister’s Place at 202-529-5991
THE CAMPUS SEX CRIMES PREVENTION ACT
The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act (Section 1601 of Public Law 106-386) provides for the tracking of
convicted, registered sex offenders working or volunteering on campus or enrolled as students at institutions
of higher education. The Sex Offender Registry database provides information on Class A sex offenders
living, residing, working, or attending school in the District of Columbia only. For this information, go to the
MPD Sex Offense Registry at mpdc.dc.gov/service/sex-offender-registry.
TITLE IX
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on
the basis of sex in education programs and activities. Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex can
include dating and domestic violence, stalking, sexual harassment and/or sexual violence, such as rape, sexual
assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion.
AU prohibits sex discrimination in any form and provides resources for support and complaint resolution.
AU’s Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy identifies prohibited conduct under Title IX and outlines
complaint procedures. The policy is available at american.edu/policies.
Complaints may be directed to the University’s Title IX officers:
Title IX officer – for complaints against university students Dean of Students
408 Butler Pavilion
202-885-3300
[email protected]
Deputy Title IX officer – for complaints against Washington College of Law students
WCL Dean of Student Affairs
4801 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20016
202-274-4052
[email protected]
Section 504 Officer – for student disability discrimination complaints
Director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services Butler Pavilion
202-885-3328
[email protected]
Deputy Title IX officer – for complaints against faculty members, faculty administrators, and individuals
with teaching responsibilities
Dean of Academic Affairs Leonard Hall Lower Level 202-885-2125
[email protected]
Deputy Title IX officer – for complaints against staff university administrators, university guests, and
contractors
Assistant Vice President of Human Resources
3201 New Mexico Avenue NW, Suite 350 Washington, DC 20016
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202-885-2591
[email protected]
The Student Conduct Code defines types of sexual misconduct and outlines the procedures for resolving
complaints through the student disciplinary system. The Conduct Code is available at american.edu/ocl/sccrs
or by calling 202-885-3328.
General information and resources pertaining to sexual assault are available at american.edu/sexualassault.
Additional information can be found by contacting OASIS (Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal
and Sexual Violence) at 202-885-7070 or [email protected]
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ACCESS TO CAMPUS FACILITIES: SAFETY AND SECURITY
CAMPUS
AU has an open environment, allowing individuals to move freely around the campus; however, the
university restricts access to its facilities to members of the academic community and bona fide guests. This
open environment makes all members of the university community responsible for immediately reporting
suspicious activity to Public Safety. Report suspicious incidents, activities, or persons to Public Safety Police
Emergency (202-885-3636) as soon as possible. Individual vigilance is essential in helping Public Safety
promote campus safety and reduce campus crime. In order to uphold this policy, all students, faculty, and
staff must have an AU ID card (OneCard) and present it when requested by a university official. When
university police officers challenge individuals for suspicious activity, individuals must identify themselves and
present student, employee, or other identification, as requested. Individuals who do not have legitimate
reasons for being on campus or in a university building, and who refuse to comply with a request to leave,
may be subject to arrest under the District of Columbia Code, Section 22-3302, Unlawful Entry.
GROUNDS
Access to the grounds is generally not controlled. The outside athletic facilities and adjacent unlit areas are
closed at dark. University police officers question individuals observed using the field after hours, displaying
suspicious behavior, or suspected of unlawful acts. Public Safety stresses that individuals should not hesitate
to contact the department with any suspicion regarding their own or someone else’s safety.
ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGS
Academic and administration buildings are open during regular business and class hours. Instructional
facilities are generally open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., Monday through Friday, with modified weekend hours.
Other areas may be open for 24-hour use during exam periods or for other special needs. University police
officers lock and unlock exterior building entrances in accordance with the building’s schedule. They admit
individuals to locked buildings and areas only if the individuals have valid identification and written
authorization.
RESIDENCE HALLS
Residence halls are locked 24 hours per day, with an electronic system controlling access. Residents and
visitors enter through the main entrance only. Residents use an access card to open the building door.
Visitors are granted entry by the front desk staff and must be escorted by a resident. The front desks are
staffed 24 hours per day, except during holidays. University personnel and maintenance staff check in at the
front desks when entering residence halls. While the university makes every effort to prevent access by
uninvited visitors, residents must also take an active role in that effort. Residents should report strangers to
the hall staff and avoid holding doors open for nonresidents to enter. Residents are held responsible for the
actions of their guests. We encourage students to lock their room doors at all times.
OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT HOUSING
AU provides off-campus student housing at the Berkshire Apartments at 4201 Massachusetts Avenue NW,
Washington, DC. At this location, building attendants staff the front desk 24 hours per day. The university
employs full-time community coordinators who reside in the building. Residents of the university-provided
Berkshire Apartments must comply with the university’s Student Conduct Code, including Drug and Alcohol
Policies. All criminal activities at these locations should be reported to local police and to the community
coordinators, if there is student involvement.
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The Berkshire Apartments are located in the Washington, DC, Second Police District. Residents of the
Berkshire Apartments can call MPD at 311 for non-emergencies and 911 for emergencies. To help ensure
timely notifications and accurate statistics, we encourage individuals to contact AU’s Public Safety after filing
a report with MPD.
AU’s Washington Semester coordinates apartment housing on Capitol Hill and Woodley Park through the
Washington Intern Student Housing Program. A full-time community coordinator, who is employed by the
university, is present in conjunction with these residences. Residents must comply with the university’s
Student Conduct Code, including Drug and Alcohol Policies. All criminal activities should be reported to
local police and to the community coordinator. Residents of these apartments should contact MPD at 311 for
non-emergencies and 911 for emergencies. To help ensure timely notification and accurate statistics, we
encourage individuals to contact AU’s Public Safety after filing a report with MPD.
ALARMS AND CLOSED-CIRCUIT CAMERAS
Limited-access areas in academic and administrative buildings are connected to intrusion alarms that report to
a central monitoring station in the Public Safety office. Systems are located in several 24-hour areas on
campus. Upgrades and expansions of these systems are planned and installed annually. All residence hall
exterior doors are alarmed. These alarms are monitored by Public Safety and sound a local siren.
SALTO LOCKS FOR ENHANCED RESIDENCE HALL AND BUILDING SECURITY
Public Safety completed the installation of Salto-locking technology in all on-campus residence halls. This
technology allows students access to their rooms using smart-chip technology embedded in their universityissued ID card. Because the doors automatically lock, this technology significantly reduces the opportunity for
unauthorized access should students inadvertently leave their door unlocked. If a student loses his or her ID,
the ID is simply deleted from the system without the need for expensive lock records and change of keys
with other roommates. In addition, Salto locks maintain an audit trail detailing who entered the room and
when.
ELECTRONIC KEY BOXES FOR ENHANCED CONTROL OF TEMPORARY ISSUANCE OF KEYS
During the last academic year, Public Safety continued maintenance of electronic key boxes in selected
buildings on campus. These boxes secure keys and access-control cards in a locked box in various remote
locations on campus. Individuals who need temporary access to rooms, labs, offices or studios simply swipe
their campus ID, and the key box grants them access to authorized keys. A timer is automatically set by the
boxes, and an email is sent to the user if he or she keeps the key out of the box for too long. The key box
maintains an audit trail to provide administrators with needed information on who accessed what and when.
SECURITY CONSIDERATION IN MAINTENANCE
Public Safety officers routinely check lighting on campus during regularly assigned patrols. When they find
lights that are out or dim, they initiate a work order for Facilities Management (FM). FM maintains university
facilities with safety and security in mind. University officers and FM work closely together to identify any
broken doors, windows, locks, lights, or other hazards. These items receive expedited maintenance action. We
encourage all members of the university to promptly report any unsafe facility conditions by calling 2FIX at
202-885-2349 to reach the Facilities Information Center. Individuals can report any conditions that cause
concern about personal safety and property protection to Public Safety by calling 202-885-2527. Public Safety
personnel regularly inspect campus facilities to assess potential risks and make recommendations for
improvement.
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STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS
The following information is provided to students participating in study abroad programs.
SAFETY
With the safety of students abroad a top priority, AU Abroad operates academically challenging programs
where students learn from close integration with their host cultures. AU Abroad only administers programs
that we deem safe.
AU Abroad performs regular risk assessments of every program administered. Faculty and staff at our sites
know how to contact students locally or when they travel; at each site, students are given 24-hour emergency
contact numbers and informed of emergency procedures. When students travel independently, we ask that
they keep on-site staff apprised of their plans. AU Abroad will modify or cancel planned field trips or other
activities when necessary to ensure student safety. Before students leave the United States, they receive a
general safety orientation. Once on site, students receive more detailed instructions from local professionals.
AU Abroad is in regular communication with our on-site directors and coordinators regarding any security
concerns.
The decision to study abroad is one that must be made by you and your family. Even with the care that
university staff members devote to your safety, and even if you carefully follow provided guidelines, we
cannot guarantee a completely safe environment, just as no one can guarantee it here in the United States.
Nor can we force you to follow these guidelines when you are on your own. We urge you, however, to pay
attention to them and to exercise the same caution as you would in the United States, in order to have the
best study abroad experience possible.
You may find more safety information at american.edu/abroadatau. With more than 20 years of excellence
and experience in the field, we are committed to administering safe programs abroad. Should you have any
questions about AU Abroad safety or other details, we invite you to get in touch with us. Call AU Abroad
director Sara Dumont at 202-885-1320 or the AU Public Safety emergency number 24 hours per day, 7 days
per week, at 202-885-3636.
GENERAL SAFETY TIPS FOR STUDYING ABROAD
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Register your travel plans with the U.S. Department of State before you leave.
Be alert and aware of your surroundings. If a suspicious situation occurs, report it to the appropriate
people. For example, if you see a package or bag that appears to be unattended, mention it to
appropriate personnel or to the police. Do not leave your own bags unattended at any time, and do
not agree to carry or look after any package, parcel, or luggage for anyone.
Keep a low profile avoiding confrontations or situations that could become provocative or put you
in any danger. Similarly, stay away from demonstrations and unruly crowds. In addition, try to
integrate yourself into the host culture so that you do not stand out as a tourist.
Keep all important documents, such as your passport, in a safe place at all times. Pouches or belts
(for documents and money) worn under your clothing are recommended when you are traveling.
Report stolen documents immediately. If your passport is stolen, inform the U.S. embassy
immediately.
Make several clear photocopies of your passport (and visa, where applicable). Leave a copy of these
documents with a parent or guardian, and take a few copies with you—but keep them separate from
your passport in a safe place.
Please be cautious when you meet new people. Just as you would not do in the United States, you
should not provide your local address or phone number, or those of fellow students, to strangers.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Never get into a car with strangers or put yourself in a situation where you are alone with a stranger
or people you have only just met.
The U.S. State Department occasionally issues advisories for travel to certain countries or worldwide.
AU Abroad will inform you if an advisory is issued specific to your site. If you wish to know about
general worldwide advisories, either call our office or check online at the State Department’s website
at travel.state.gov.
AU Abroad advises against traveling alone to any locations, especially those for which the State
Department has issued specific warnings. If you are planning to travel on your own to countries that
might raise concerns, with warning signals such as recent terrorist attacks, historically strained
relations with the United States, etc., you should check with program staff for the most recent
information. If you do travel on your own, you should inform program officials of your itinerary and
how you can be reached. If you do not do this, AU Abroad cannot be responsible for locating you or
assisting you in emergencies. Keep a copy of your passport and sufficient funds or an international
credit card with you at all times.
Road travel abroad is always a concern. AU Abroad very strongly discourages you from driving in
other countries, since you are not familiar with the customs, laws, and road signs. On-site staff hire
reliable and careful drivers for any planned trips. For travel on your own, you should assume that the
roads present additional significant risks and consider alternative forms of travel. Hitchhiking is
strongly discouraged.
While studying abroad, students, faculty, and staff can utilize AU’s resources (as listed in the
preceding pages), if they, or someone they know, is the victim of sexual assault, dating violence,
and/or stalking. The resources are available even if the AU community member is in a foreign
country.
There is also an international inventory of hotlines, shelters, refuges, crisis centers, and women’s
organizations, searchable by country, plus an index of domestic violence resources in more than 70
languages at hotpeachpages.net.
In the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate, consular officers are available for emergency assistance 24
hours per day, 7 days per week.
To contact a U.S. embassy or consulate, go to usembassy.gov.
To contact the Department of State while in the United States, call 888-407-4747 during business
hours and 202-647-5225 after hours.
While in AU’s study abroad programs, students, faculty, and staff retain their rights to file a Title IX
complaint.
RESOURCES FOR SEXUAL HARASSMENT, RELATIONSHIP VIOLENCE, AND SEXUAL
ASSAULT ABROAD
The resources identified below apply to all of the university’s study abroad programs.
Addressing Sexual Assault, Stalking, and Relationship Violence Abroad
Students are encouraged to be aware of cultural and social attitudes toward sexual harassment, rape, and
sexual assault victims, as they may vary greatly in different countries. Students should speak with their study
abroad advisor and in-country program director to learn more.
If an AU student discloses an experience of sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating
violence, or stalking to any program staff member or study abroad advisor, that staff member or advisor will
be required to make a report of the assault to the Office of the Dean of Students. The dean of students will
follow up with the student regarding what was reported. If a student is seeking support, but does not want to
American University Annual Security Report
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make a report or is unsure if he or she wants a report made, he or she should speak instead to a confidential
resource, such as an AU’s victim advocate. The victim advocate ([email protected] or 202-885-7070) can
provide confidential support even while a student is abroad.
What to Do If You Have Been Sexually Assaulted Abroad
•
•
•
•
•
•
Find a place where you feel safe.
Contact someone you trust who can support you.
Consider contacting an AU’s confidential victim advocate at [email protected] or 202-885-7070.
The victim advocate can provide emotional support, connect you with resources, and provide
guidance on navigating medical and legal support systems. As a confidential resource, the victim
advocate will not share any information with any person or organization unless you request that the
advocate do so.
Consider contacting the Department of State at 202-647-4444 or calling the emergency number for
U.S. citizens at the U.S. embassy in your country, which can be found through
travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_4965.html. Someone at each U.S. embassy will answer the
phone 24 hours per day and provide information about local laws and customs.
Consider seeking medical attention even if you are not seeking evidence collection. It is important to
be tested for sexually transmitted infections and to treat possible internal injury.
Consider talking with a counseling professional who can help you begin to process and understand
what happened. This person can help you cope with emotional difficulties that may arise after an
assault.
For Sexual Harassment, Relationship Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Assault Survivors Abroad
American University's Office of Advocacy Services for Interpersonal and Sexual Violence (OASIS) provides
free and confidential advocacy services for anyone in the campus community who is a survivor of sexual
violence (sexual assault, dating or domestic violence, and stalking, whether they are domestic or abroad.
OASIS staff consists of the Sexual Assault Prevention Coordinator and Coordinator of Victim Advocacy
Services. As confidential resources, OASIS staff are not legally permitted to report a sexual assault unless
requested by the victim/survivor or unless there is immediate danger to human life.
Contact OASIS at [email protected] or (202) 885-7070.
The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) can be reached at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673) or you
can initiate an anonymous and confidential online chat with them at rainn.org.
Additional Resources for Sexual Harassment, Relationship Violence, Stalking, and Sexual
Assault Survivors Abroad
Country-Specific Assistance
Office for Victims of Crime
ovc.ncjrs.gov/findvictimservices
U.S. Department of State
202-647-4444
Emergency Number for U.S. Citizens at U.S. Embassies
travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_4965.html
Someone at each U.S. embassy will answer 24 hours per day and provide information regarding local laws and
customs.
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On-Campus Resources for Sexual Harassment, Stalking, Relationship Violence, and Sexual
Assault Survivors
The Counseling Center cannot provide counseling over the phone, but it can provide support upon an
individual’s return to the United States. The Counseling Center can be contacted at 202-885-3500.
The Office of the Dean of Students will assist in communicating with academic advisors and with counseling,
housing, and other units and resources on campus and investigate if the assault or harassment is committed
by another AU student. The dean of students can be reached at 202-885-3300 or [email protected]
TITLE IX
While on study abroad programs, students, faculty, and staff retain their rights to file a Title IX complaint.
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on
the basis of sex in education programs and activities. Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex can
include dating or domestic violence, stalking, sexual harassment or sexual violence, such as rape, sexual
assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion.
AU prohibits sex discrimination in any form and provides resources for support and complaint resolution.
AU’s Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy identifies prohibited conduct under Title IX and outlines
complaint procedures. It is available at american.edu/policies.
Complaints may be directed to the University’s Title IX officers:
Title IX Officer – for complaints against university students
Dean of Students
408 Butler Pavilion
202-885-3300
[email protected]
Deputy Title IX Officer – for complaints against Washington College of Law students
WCL Dean of Student Affairs
4801 Massachusetts Avenue NW 202-274-4052
[email protected]
Section 504 Officer – for student disability discrimination complaints
Director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services
Butler Pavilion
202-885-3328
[email protected]
Deputy Title IX Officer – for complaints against faculty members, faculty administrators, and individuals
carrying out teaching responsibilities
Dean of Academic Affairs
Leonard Hall Lower Level
202-885-2125
[email protected]
Deputy Title IX Officer – for complaints against staff university administrators, university guests, and
contractors Assistant Vice President of Human Resources
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3201 New Mexico Avenue NW Suite 350
Washington, DC 20016
202-885-2591
[email protected]
The Student Conduct Code defines types of sexual misconduct and outlines the procedures for resolving
complaints through the student disciplinary system. It is available at american.edu/ocl/sccrs or by calling 202885-3300.
General information and resources pertaining to sexual assault are available at american.edu/sexualassault. A
sexual assault prevention coordinator is on the Wellness Center staff in McCabe Hall (202-885-3055,
[email protected]).
COLLEGIATE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
The Collegiate Assistance Program (CAP) provides access to a Nurseline service and a Student Assistance
Program designed to help students manage common problems and stressors that can detract from academic
success. The services are available to students 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, by calling 1-855-678-8679
and entering PIN: 1009. These services are provided by OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions.
CAP includes:
Telephone/Online Counseling
Students facing stressful or emotional issues have 24/7, year-round access to prompt counseling services.
Beginning with students’ first toll-free call, master’s-level clinicians will listen carefully to assess their needs.
Crisis intervention specialists and licensed clinicians are always ready for urgent situations.
Web-Based Services
The website for students, liveandworkwell.com, offers a wealth of information on a full range of topics. The
site includes thousands of articles, interactive learning tools, cognitive behavioral therapy modules, searchable
databases, and helpful resources for students who want to develop their own self-improvement strategies.
Legal and Financial Services
These include assistance with nonclinical issues, such as debt, divorce, child custody matters, and shelter from
abuse relationships. The effect of these and other practical concerns can be just as detrimental to a student’s
health and well-being as a clinical issue.
Nurseline
A technology-enabled, clinical nurse triage service is available to students 24/7. Nurseline promotes personal
health management by providing health information, advice, and support through telephone interactions. It
helps callers make informed health decisions by providing answers to commonly asked questions.
American University Annual Security Report
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STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM—MADRID, SPAIN
The following information is provided to AU students participating in study abroad programs.
This program is designed for students who speak intermediate to advanced Spanish and seek a structured
study abroad program focusing on the academic theme of contemporary Spain. The program is organized by
two full-time staff members in Madrid who coordinate course work and homestays, internships, excursions,
and other cultural events.
The Iberian Experience program offers students a broad range of opportunities to learn about this cultural
metropolis and the rest of the country as you will be living, studying, and interning in Madrid and traveling to
other regions. Through the program’s academic curriculum, field trips, internships, and other activities,
participants will be able to immerse themselves in Spain’s politics, history, culture, and society, an experience
that fosters international consciousness and cross-cultural learning. Students earn a full semester of AU credit.
During participation in the Iberian Experience program, students live in a Spanish home. The homestay
allows participants to experience the warmth and hospitality of Spain while improving their language skills. In
the homestay, students enjoy breakfast, evening meals, and, in most cases, weekly laundry privileges. Students
may be in single or double rooms. Students commute approximately 30 minutes from their homestays to the
program offices in the center of Madrid. During program excursions, students stay in pensions and hotels.
AU leases office space at:
AU Center
C/Comandante Zorita, 4
Madrid, Spain 28020
To report any crime that occurs at or in the vicinity of the above AU Center, please contact Francisco Gomez
Santiago at 00 34 619 841689 and/or Professor Elena Dominguez at 00 34 617 941165.
In the AU Center, the front door on the street must be rung and opened from the inside before anyone can
enter the building. In residences, approximately 85 percent of buildings have a doorman. The center opens
from 8:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. and is closed on weekends. However, the director and coordinator are available
24 hours per day, 7 days per week. There is a reception desk at the entrance of the AU Center. The
receptionist allows students and instructors in and out.
AU does not provide its own security and/or police department in Madrid. For all criminal complaints and
police assistance matters, please contact the local police. For the police department in the Chamartin District,
contact:
Calle del Príncipe de Vergara, 142 28002 Madrid
Telephone: 00 34 91 588 0345
In the event of an emergency, students should contact the police emergency line at 112 (similar to 911 in the
United States). Once the police have been contacted, students should contact the program directors listed
above.
ON-SITE CONTINGENCY PLAN IN AN EMERGENCY
•
•
If you are at home, do not leave. Someone from the program staff will contact you. Wait for
instructions. Stay calm, as telephone lines may be busy.
If you are at Mosaic International Institute or at an internship office do not leave either one until you
receive further instructions.
American University Annual Security Report
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•
•
If you are on the street in Madrid and do not have a cell phone with you, go to a public place (such
as a cafeteria or restaurant) and from there contact the program staff. If you have your phone,
chances are that the program staff will have contacted you already. Do not leave the cafeteria or
restaurant until you receive instructions.
If you are in another Spanish city or another European city, go to a public place and from there
contact the program staff
Please remember the following:
•
•
•
•
•
You and the program staff are registered in the U.S. embassy in Madrid. Program staff will receive
official information and instructions from the embassy and/or from AU Abroad in Washington and
will send information to you and your host families.
Your homestay in Madrid is the first place to go to and to stay until you receive further information
from program staff
Do not use public transportation such as metro or bus.
If the streets appear to be safe, take a taxi to your homestay.
Local and international phones and email servers are likely to be difficult to use for a while. Please
stay calm and follow instructions. Do not move out of your homestay without notifying the program.
We need to know where you are.
If a student does not return to his or her homestay as expected, the host family would report the student as
missing to the program director. If inquiries to the student’s host family or roommates do not provide
information regarding the student’s whereabouts, the local police and hospitals would be contacted.
In conjunction with this effort, the director of AU Abroad in Washington would be contacted to see if any
communication from the student had been received, and the director of AU Abroad would subsequently
contact the student’s parents or guardians to see whether they had heard from the student. If none of these
efforts yields information about the student’s location, the U.S. consulate abroad would be contacted.
To contact the director of AU Abroad, call 202-885-1321 or send an email to [email protected]
While you are studying abroad, AU policies for the main AU campus regarding drugs and alcohol will apply
to you. Failure to comply with the established policies will result in the consequences discussed in the Code
of Conduct. If you have any questions concerning AU policies, please talk with on-site staff
SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR CASES OF SEXUAL ASSAULT AND RAPE
The following information is provided by the U.S. embassy in Madrid, Spain.
What is considered sexual assault in Spain?
Any unauthorized sexual contact is criminally punishable per Spanish law. The law defines various sexual
crimes and sentencing varies by crime. For example, sexual abuse is subject to lower sentencing while rape
may be subject to the highest possible sentence. Acquaintance or date rape is considered as serious as any
other type of sexual assault.
What steps should I take if I have been the victim of a sexual assault?
Report the incident to the police right away. File a police report and request a copy. Have a medical exam to
preserve any physical evidence of the crime. Remember that physical evidence is very important in sexual
assault cases and can deteriorate as time passes.
American University Annual Security Report
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You should not change clothes, avoid bathing if possible, and have a physical exam at the first opportunity.
You should take these steps even if you are unsure about whether to report the crime to police. If you decide
to pursue a prosecution at a later time, these steps preserve evidence that will assist the prosecutor.
How does the medical exam work?
The medical exam will be performed only in specific hospitals throughout Spain that are trained to work with
victims of sexual assault. The police will instruct the victim of a sexual assault where he or she needs to go to
have the forensic examination performed. These exams are performed by certified medical doctors in Spain
who are licensed to conduct forensic examinations. The exam will involve a pelvic exam, genital swabs, taking
of hair samples, fingernail scrapings, blood samples, and saliva samples. The victim may ask for a support
person to remain with him or her throughout the exam process.
Do I have to have a medical exam?
No, but it is very difficult to convict anyone in a rape/sexual assault charge without a physical exam. Even if
you are not interested in taking the case to court, it is important to get medical attention to determine if you
have been injured in any way and to discuss treatment and prevention options for pregnancy and sexually
transmitted diseases. Emergency contraception (the morning-after pill) is available in Spain, as is prophylaxis
for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.
What is my role in the case?
You will be interviewed by the police, public prosecutor, investigating judge, and defense counsel throughout
the proceeding.
How do I maintain my privacy during the case?
Strict data protection laws in Spain make it illegal to publicize the victim’s name.
What can the embassy do?
Provide lists of local doctors and clinics. Send a consular officer or after-hours duty officer to accompany
victims for the medical exam.
SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR CASES OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Is domestic violence a crime in Spain?
Yes.
How can I get help?
You can get a protection order after reporting the crime to the police or to a court. Shelters for victims of
domestic violence are available in every region in Spain and are safe. Law enforcement or social services will
provide a victim with a local shelter referral. This report does not publish locations of shelters because the
locations are kept secret as a safety measure. Young children may stay with their mothers in some shelters.
What other resources are available to me?
The Spanish domestic violence hotline is 016. This number is toll-free and no record of calling this number
will appear on your phone bills. English operators are available and this service is completely confidential.
This service provides access to social resources, financial aid, sheltered housing, employment advice,
residence papers, and legal advice. Stalking is also a crime in Spain and can be reported to the police. The 016
hotline will provide victims with referrals to free emergency programs.
The police have implemented SAF (servicio de atencion a la familia) and SAM (servicio de atencion a la
mujer) to work with women who have been sexually or physically abused. The central SAF office is located at
American University Annual Security Report
51
Calle Julián González Segador, s/n 28043 Madrid. In emergencies, dial 012 and tell the operator your name,
where you are, and that you need help.
The Americans Overseas Domestic Violence Crisis Center is available for a number of services, including
advocacy to obtain resources, case management, relocations, counseling, and emergency assistance. To call
toll-free from Spain, dial the AT&T USADirect Access Number (900-99-0011) and then dial 866-879-6636.
Hot Peach Pages is a global information center for women, searchable by country (hotpeachpages.net/usa).
You can find additional domestic abuse centers to call and information on your rights.
Embassy staff is available to try to answer any questions you might have. In an emergency involving an
American citizen in Spain, you can reach the embassy at the following numbers: (34)91-587-2240 or (34)91587-2200 (after hours).
PERSONAL STREET SAFETY
Madrid is a large city, therefore you should exercise the same caution there as in large American cities.
Although Madrid has a relatively low rate of violent crime, a marked increase in robberies calls for some tips
for traveling in Spain.
Money and Valuables
When traveling, bring only what you absolutely need, leaving non-essential items at your apartment or in a
safe at the hotel. Make a photocopy of your passport to carry and leave the real one in a safe place. Especially
in Madrid, don’t carry your passport!
Purse and Wallet Snatching
Thieves usually work in pairs. They snatch purses or wallets from pedestrians, cyclists, and even people in
vehicles, grabbing them and running away. One common technique on the streets, carried out in pairs, is for
one thief to spill something (mustard, ketchup, etc.) on a victim. While one of them pretends to clean off the
victim, the other locates valuables and runs off. Be especially alert for “double teaming” on the metro and in
any crowded or tourist areas.
Automated Teller Machines
When using automated teller machines (ATMs) in Madrid, be alert. Many recent scams have involved thieves
distracting people at ATMs and taking either their money or their card while they are using the machine. One
common technique is to drop a bill by a person’s feet, tell him or her that he or she has dropped money, and
when the person reaches down to pick it up, the thief runs off with the card.
Precautions You Can Take
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Do not carry a purse. If you do, make sure that it has a long strap to cross over your body, around
your neck. It should have a thick strap that cannot be snipped with scissors.
If you wear a backpack, keep it in front of you, or buy a small lock for it that cannot be opened
without your knowledge. Pay attention to where you store your cell phone, laptop, and other
important items.
Keep your valuables in your front, never back, pockets.
Carry only enough cash for the day’s needs. Don’t carry all of your credit cards on you at one time.
Be aware of your surroundings, especially of someone who asks you questions or tries to distract you.
Keep a separate record (photocopies are good) of your passport number, check numbers, and credit
cards.
Write down the phone numbers for cancelling credit cards in case you need to do so.
American University Annual Security Report
52
Emergency Contacts
Keep the program staff and an emergency contact in the United States well-informed of your whereabouts
and activities, and provide these people with copies of your important travel documents (i.e., passport, visa,
plane tickets, traveler’s checks, and prescriptions).
Laws and Codes of Conduct
Make yourself aware of both the rules and regulations of the study abroad program sponsor and the local
laws and customs of the countries you will be visiting. Understand that you will have to not only conform to
the legal system of the country you will be visiting, but also to obey the codes of conduct required of program
participants.
Alcohol and Drugs
Use and abuse of alcohol and drugs abroad can increase the risk of accident and injury. Many study abroad
accidents and injuries are related to the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs abroad. Violating drug laws in
other countries may result in very serious consequences. In some countries, being found guilty of violating
drug laws can result in consequences as serious as death.
While you are on your study abroad program, AU policies for the main AU campus regarding drugs and
alcohol will apply to you. Failure to comply with established policies will result in the consequences discussed
in the Code of Conduct. If you have any questions concerning AU policies, please talk with staff
Contact information for the U.S. embassy in Spain:
Embassy switchboard
Telephone: 91-587-2200
American Citizen Services
Telephone: 91-587-2240
(8:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m., Monday–Friday) Telephone: 91-587-2200 (after-hour emergencies)
The American Citizen Services unit is located at:
American Embassy
Calle Serrano 75
28006 Madrid
Telephone: (34)91 587 2240 [email protected]
The American Citizen Services unit of the consular section provides information and assistance to U.S.
citizens in the Madrid area. This unit handles a wide variety of services, such as issuing emergency passports,
processing passport applications, providing notary services, furnishing voting information, and documenting
births and deaths of Americans in Spain. It also assists travelers in distress—for example, in acquiring funds
from home and arranging for medical care— and assists Americans arrested or incarcerated in Spain.
STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM—BRUSSELS, BELGIUM
The European Union in Action program provides an in-depth understanding of the European Union and the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) through a combination of classes and seminars with European
Union and NATO decision makers; access to behind-the-scenes players in Brussels; internships; field trips
outside the city; homestays; and cultural activities.
American University Annual Security Report
53
Students live with a family while in the program. The homestay experience offers insights into normal life for
citizens living in one of the most powerful cities in the world. It also provides a daily connection with modern
Belgian culture that might otherwise be missed in the hectic pace of this busy European capital.
A student receives three evening meals with the host family each week and breakfast daily. An additional meal
stipend is provided to help defray the cost of some other meals, allowing a student to have as much or as little
interaction with the host family as the student desires. For a student who wishes to integrate into Belgian
culture and improve her or his French, it is the perfect opportunity. However, for a student who wants to live
more independently, there is no obligation to spend time with the family. Most, if not all, homestay hosts
speak English and/or French.
AU leases administrative officespace at:
Place de l’Alma 3, bte.7
B-1200 Brussels, Belgium
In the event of an emergency and/or criminal occurrence, students in the program should contact the
European Union emergency response telephone number at 112. Within Belgium, they may also call 101.
(These two numbers are the European and Belgian equivalents of 911.)
Within the program, students should contact the housing coordinator, Benedicte Debray, at 0495-83-01-66 or
the program director, Jerome Sheridan, at 0477-33-05-08.
There are no personnel employed by AU who provide any form of security at either AU-leased premises or
local homestays. At the beginning of each semester, a Belgian police officer briefs students for one to one
and one-half hours on safety in Belgium, covering security in all aspects of daily life, including shops, cafés,
restaurants, public transport, and on the street.
Entrance at AU’s premises is controlled by a key. The door to the premises is unlocked when AU staff arrives
and it is locked when AU staff leaves. Entrance into the building in which AU’s premises are located is
controlled by card key. Each student has his or her own card key to enter the building.
If a student does not return to his or her homestay as expected, the host family would report the student as
missing to the program director. If inquiries to the student’s host family or roommates do not provide
information regarding the student’s whereabouts, the local police and hospitals would be contacted.
In conjunction with this effort, the director of AU Abroad in Washington would be contacted to see if any
communication from the student had been received, and the director of AU Abroad would subsequently
contact the student’s parents or guardians to see whether they had heard from the student. If none of these
efforts yields information about the student’s location, the U.S. consulate abroad would be contacted.
To contact the director of AU Abroad, call 202-885-1321 or send an email to [email protected]
While you are studying abroad, AU policies for the main AU campus regarding drugs and alcohol will apply
to you. Failure to comply with established policies will result in the consequences discussed in the Code of
Conduct. If you have any questions concerning AU policies, please talk with on-site staff
In Brussels, the local member of the Rape Crisis Network is located at:
Sos Viol
Rue Blanche
24-1060 Brussels
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54
Phone: 02-534-3636
Fax: 02-534-8667
[email protected]
PERSONAL STREET SAFETY
Brussels is a large city, and, therefore, you should exercise the same caution there as in large American cities.
Money and Valuables
When traveling, bring only what you absolutely need, leaving inessential items at your apartment or in a safe
at the hotel. Make a photocopy of your passport to carry and leave the real one in a safe place. Especially in
Brussels, don’t carry your passport!
Purse and Wallet Snatching
Thieves usually work in pairs. They snatch purses or wallets from pedestrians, cyclists, and even people in
vehicles, grabbing them and running away. One common technique on the streets, carried out in pairs, is for
one thief to spill something (mustard, ketchup, etc.) on a victim. While one of them pretends to clean off the
victim, the other locates valuables and runs off. Be especially alert for “double teaming” on the metro and in
any crowded or tourist areas.
Automated Teller Machines
When using automated teller machines (ATMs) in Brussels, be alert. Many recent scams have involved thieves
distracting people at ATMs and taking either their money or their card while they are using the machine. One
common technique is to drop a bill by a person’s feet, tell him or her that he or she has dropped money, and
when the person reaches down to pick it up, the thief runs off with the card.
Precautions You Can Take
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Do not carry a purse. If you do, make sure that it has a long strap to cross over your body, around
your neck. It should have a thick strap that cannot be snipped with scissors.
If you wear a backpack, keep it in front of you, or buy a small lock for it that cannot be opened
without your knowledge. Pay attention to where you store your cell phone, laptop, and other
important items.
Keep your valuables in your front, never back, pockets.
Carry only enough cash for the day’s needs. Don’t carry all of your credit cards on you at one time.
Be aware of your surroundings, especially of someone who asks you questions or tries to distract you.
Keep a separate record (photocopies are good) of your passport number, check numbers, and credit
cards.
Write down the phone numbers for cancelling credit cards in case you need to do so.
Emergency Contacts
Keep the program staff and an emergency contact in the United States well-informed of your whereabouts
and activities, and provide these people with copies of your important travel documents (i.e., passport, visa,
plane tickets, traveler’s checks, and prescriptions).
Laws and Codes of Conduct
Make yourself aware of both the rules and regulations of the study abroad program sponsor and the local
laws and customs of the countries you will be visiting. Understand that you will have to not only conform to
American University Annual Security Report
55
the legal system of the country you will be visiting, but also to obey the codes of conduct required of program
participants.
Alcohol and Drugs
Use and abuse of alcohol and drugs abroad can increase the risk of accident and injury. Many study abroad
accidents and injuries are related to the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs abroad. Violating drug laws in
other countries may result in very serious consequences. In some countries, being found guilty of violating
drug laws can result in consequences as serious as death.
While you are on your study abroad program, AU policies for the main AU campus regarding drugs and
alcohol will apply to you. Failure to comply with established policies will result in the consequences discussed
in the Code of Conduct. If you have any questions concerning AU policies, please talk with on-site staff
Contact information for the U.S. embassy in Brussels:
Regentlaan 27 Boulevard du Régent
B-1000 Brussels
Telephone: (32-2)811-4000
Fax: (32-2)811-4500
9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday–Friday
If you are an American citizen with an after-hours emergency, please call (32)(0)2-811-4000.
The American Citizen Services unit of the consular section assists American citizens in Belgium. Among
other services, the unit provides passport services, registers the birth of children, assists with federal benefits,
offers notary services, gives information on voting, and provides information to Americans visiting and
residing in Belgium. All of these services are available at the consular section by appointment.
The unit also provides emergency assistance to American citizens in distress, such as those who are destitute,
arrested, separated from minor children, or sick. In an emergency, the embassy duty officer can be reached at
any time.
U.S. Embassy
Consular Section
Bd du Regentlaan 25 1000 Brussels
Telephone: (32)(0)2-811-4300
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STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM—NAIROBI, KENYA
Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is one of the fastest growing cities in the world. With more than 40 ethnic
groups and numerous immigrants from around Africa and beyond, the city boasts a remarkable wealth of
cultures. As the headquarters for the United Nations Environmental Program and the United Nations
Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) and the hub for many international nongovernmental
organizations in the region, the city is in many ways a microcosm of the rapidly changing face of Africa.
Nairobi and Kenya in general provide an ideal location for AU’s theme programs: Issues in Sustainable
Development and Public Health.
Program participants live in private and secure apartments convenient for all their activities. These apartments
are fully furnished with a TV, kitchen, laundry room, and most laundry services. Each apartment houses at
least four students.
The AU offices in Nairobi are located at AU Abroad, Riverside Drive (off Chiromo Flyover), Kileleshwa,
Nairobi. Participants of the program will live at Njema Court, Rhapta Road, Westlands, Nairobi.
While in the Nairobi program, please report any crimes to the following personnel:
Program Director Mwangi Njagi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0713180292
Program Assistant Victor Mwanza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0724523417
U.S. Embassy, Nairobi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 020-363 6170
020-363 6451
020-3636000
020-3636622
Kenya Police Emergency Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 999
112
Nairobi Police Control Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 020-714995
020-724201
Emergency Response Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 999 (landline) or 112 (mobile)
Nairobi Fire Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 020-222181
222181-2
When reporting any threats or incidents, provide a description of the incident, including:
•
•
•
•
•
The kind of incident.
Your name.
Any observations about the incident.
Exact location of the incident.
Other pertinent identifying information.
In an emergency, call 999 (land line) or 112 (mobile phone). The emergency service is for use when an
immediate response is required. Use this service to contact the police while a crime is occurring or if anyone
is in immediate danger. The 999 system also handles calls for the fire brigade (department) and ambulance
services. Kindly specify the kind of service that you need.
The AU Abroad office and student residences are enclosed by high security fences. Student residences have a
brick wall topped with an electric fence. The apartment complex contracts a private security company (as do
American University Annual Security Report
57
most apartment complexes, businesses, and private individuals in Nairobi). The same applies to the AU
Abroad office. All residents must know their apartment numbers and any pertinent details, because they are
usually questioned before being allowed to enter the building. Security personnel patrol the grounds to
maintain order. The office in which the residents report any problems (the equivalent of a front desk) is open
24 hours per day, 7 days per week. The AU Abroad center employs much the same security arrangement with
the exception of the front desk.
Access to both facilities is strictly controlled by security guards. Access for residents and workers is
straightforward, but visitors to student apartments are questioned and the resident consulted before the
visitor is allowed in the building.
Program participants are advised to always carry their United States International University (USIU)
identification and a photocopy of their passport.
If a student does not return to his or her homestay as expected, the host family would report the student as
missing to the program director. If inquiries to the student’s host family or roommates do not provide
information regarding the student’s whereabouts, the local police and hospitals would be contacted.
In conjunction with this effort, the director of AU Abroad in Washington would be contacted to see if any
communication from the student had been received, and the director of AU Abroad would subsequently
contact the student’s parents or guardians to see whether they had heard from the student. If none of these
efforts yields information about the student’s location, the U.S. consulate abroad would be contacted.
To contact the director of AU Abroad, call 202-885-1321 or send an email to [email protected]
While you are studying abroad, AU policies for the main AU campus regarding drugs and alcohol will apply
to you. Failure to comply with established policies will result in the consequences discussed in the Code of
Conduct. If you have any questions concerning AU policies, please talk with on-site staff
GENERAL SAFETY TIPS IN NAIROBI
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Keep to the main areas of Nairobi.
Keep to the main roads and avoid shortcuts, back alleys, etc.
Be particularly wary of people hanging around outside hotels—a common place for criminals to mug
tourists.
Ignore street children and others who approach you in the streets.
Do not carry large sums of money when shopping, and do not wear expensive jewelry or other
expensive items. Keep your belongings on you in a zipped pocket or in a bag that you carry over
your shoulder.
Do not accept food and drink from strangers.
Register with the U.S. embassy online at travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/ui.
On your phone, program the phone numbers of Nairobi program staff, all your colleagues, and the
local police. Never give out somebody else’s phone number without his or her consent. Never use
your phone on the street; instead, if you need to use it, call from inside a shop.
Avoid travel late at night.
Never walk in a narrow street or space, such as between a wall and parked cars.
Never leave food or drink unattended in a public place.
Never give strangers your address or let them into your apartment. If you feel uncomfortable with
someone in your apartment, call the security guards.
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TRANSPORTATION SECURITY PRECAUTIONS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
At night, the only real option you have is to call a taxi, since you won’t be allowed to make the 20minute walk to the nearest taxi stand. That’s why it is important to become very familiar with taxi
drivers in Westlands and to build a relationship with a few of them.
Stay alert and be aware of your surroundings. Do not expose what you have. Avoid carrying valuable
things in open bags and pockets. Try putting them in zippered pockets or compartments.
Avoid allowing any unauthorized personnel in your group.
Avoid being distracted by other passengers. Pay attention. If you notice anything or anyone strange,
alert your colleagues.
Try to blend in. All sorts of people ride matatus, but those who appear naïve and unaware are the
ones targeted.
If you’re worried about squeezing past people on a crowded matatu, only ride in those with a seat
available in the front few rows.
Never board or ride on an empty matatu.
Never use your phone while crossing streets in the city center, and avoid using your phone in a
matatu, especially if seated next to the window.
If you lose your belongings, file a report at the nearest police station, especially if you lose your
identification cards, credit cards, and cell phone.
GENERAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
•
•
•
•
•
•
Avoid public venues such as political rallies and crusades, and also avoid bars, night clubs, and
restaurants that broadcast events and games. You should monitor local media for current
information, and amend your travel and meeting arrangements accordingly. By taking necessary
precautions, the risks of a security incident can be reduced drastically. Always pay attention to your
surroundings and use common sense.
Avoid hanging out in areas with a high concentration of people. If something or someone strikes you
as suspicious, make a mental note of it, and report the incident or person as soon as possible to the
AU Abroad Kenya office.
In addition to terrorism, other criminal activities in Nairobi include robbery, mugging, burglary, and
carjacking. Recently, Nairobi has also had cases of kidnapping.
Be discreet when strangers ask you a lot of personal questions. Some will ask out of amiable
curiosity, but others will ask to try and extract a favor from you, a “donation,” for example. Others
may have sinister motives. A good way to disarm overly curious strangers is to turn the conversation
back on them by asking them similarly detailed personal questions. Never take strangers to your
residence. Be wary of traveling to unfamiliar areas of Nairobi.
Always carry the following with you:
o Your USIU identification card
o A photocopy of your passport
o Your cell phone, which should always be fully functional, with the battery charged and with
ample available credit
o At least 1,000 Kenyan shillings (Ksh) for emergencies
Memorize the phone numbers of the AU Abroad Kenya director, most importantly, and your
colleagues, and call if you are in trouble or need to talk. Register with the U.S. embassy in Kenya
online to receive advisory alerts on any changing situations in Kenya and the region at
nairobi.usembassy.gov.
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Con Artists
It is common to run into people in Nairobi who want to ply money from you. They assume the role of
political refugee and request money for their family. Others pretend to be students collecting contributions
for their schools. Another scam involves men dressing up as beggars, acting as though they are blind, and
asking for money. The most common places to encounter such people are along Moi Avenue and Tom
Mboya Streets in the city center, at the junction between Riverside Drive, and on the road to Kileleshwa next
to the bank near the AU Abroad office. Exercising common sense is your best weapon against tricks and
scams. You should never give money to a stranger.
Road Crossing
•
•
•
Crossing the road in Nairobi can be arduous and dangerous. Traffic lights sometimes don’t work and
even when they do, many motorists do not respect them. Your best survival strategy is to follow the
lead of the Kenyans when crossing the road.
Always keep the following in mind when attempting to cross the road: look right, left, and then right
again to make sure the road is clear before crossing. When walking along the road, walk against
traffic, allowing you to see oncoming vehicles.
Again, stay safe by not making calls when crossing the road in the city center.
Mugging
Mugging and pickpocketing are common in Nairobi and can happen to anyone. To be safe, don’t carry
anything you can’t bear to lose. Do not carry expensive valuables—and only carry the amount of money you
need for a specific purpose hidden in several places; for example, keep a small amount in your pocket for
spending, some between your foot and sock, and the rest in your money belt.
Violent Crime
Violent crime can be prevented by not resisting, chasing, or fighting thieves. Walking around at night,
especially alone, increases your chances of violent attack. If you take precautions and use common sense, you
can reduce the chances of becoming a victim of violent crime. Should you become a victim of violent
robbery, however, comply without a fight. If threatened, give your attacker what he or she wants. Let go of
your valuables rather than get hurt.
Bag Snatching
Try not to behave too much like an unsuspecting tourist, such as walking, absorbed in your guide book, while
your camera and wallet bulge from your pockets.
Safety When Going Out
•
•
•
•
Never go out alone. Always bring one of your fellow students or colleagues along to provide support.
Spiking of drinks is common in pubs, so don’t accept open drinks (alcoholic or nonalcoholic) from
anyone.
If your drink has been left unattended, dispose of your drink upon your return.
Keep your eyes and ears open; if you hear talk of date rape or drugs or if friends seem overly
intoxicated for what you know they have consumed, leave the party or club immediately and don’t go
back to it.
PERSONAL TRAVEL
The current political and military activities in Kenya and the larger East Africa region have made individual
travel risky. AU Abroad therefore advises its students against any trips not sanctioned by the program.
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IN AN EMERGENCY
In an emergency, please contact the following (keep this list with you at all times):
Mwangi D. Njagi
Program Director
Cell: 0713 180 292
[email protected]
Fredrick K. Iraki
Swahili Instructor
Phone:254-727-110881
Email:[email protected]
Victor Mwanza
Program Assistant
Cell: 0724 523 417
[email protected]
Judith Kiprop Kiswahili Instructor
Cell: 0722 590 396
[email protected]
United States International University
P.O. Box 14634-00800
Nairobi, Kenya Telephone: 020 360 6000
Kellen Njagi
USIU International Students Officer Ext: 212
[email protected]
Frances Aldous-Worley
Student Affairs Coordinator
Phone: 254-708-848865
Email: [email protected]
Sabina Ayot
Homestays Coordinator
Email: [email protected]
Zuhra Magut Kiswahili Instructor
Cell: 0722 372 403
[email protected]
U.S. Embassy
United Nations Avenue Nairobi
P. O. Box 606 Village Market 00621 Nairobi, Kenya
Embassy switchboard: 020 363 6000
Emergency after-hours line: 0722 204445
AU Abroad
American University
4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC
20016-8039
Telephone: 1-202-885-1320
Fax: 202-885-1370
Sara Dumont, Director [email protected]
Kelly Jo Bahry, Assistant Director
[email protected]
PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS
Most of our partner organizations have projects in informal settlement areas. These organizations play a
major role in ensuring your security while with them. Let the AU Abroad Kenya staff know in advance when
you have a field trip with your organization. Below are some of the issues you need to find out from your
organization before going out for a field meeting. For your safety, please give this information to the AU
Abroad office:
•
•
•
•
•
Where you will be visiting
How you will get there
Name of the person and organization you will be visiting
Kind of forum/meeting
Time of projected return
Having this information helps us to monitor situations and events in that particular area, and if there are any
concerns, we are able to address the situation and suggest steps to be taken.
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UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES
AU strives to create a healthy and safe community through education and intervention efforts for alcohol and
other drugs. AU community members uphold university policies and abide by local, state, and federal laws
pertaining to these substances. Individuals accept personal responsibility for the outcome of their decisions
regarding alcohol and other drugs.
Policies of AU regarding alcohol and other drugs are covered in the Staff Manual, the Student Conduct Code,
the Residence Hall Regulations, and the Alcohol and Drug Policies section of this report. The University
Policy on Alcohol Service at University Events is included in the Appendix.
RESIDENCE HALL REGULATIONS
The types of misconduct that subject a student to disciplinary action include but are not limited to: the sale,
distribution, use, or possession of alcohol; the violation of university policies pertaining to the sale,
distribution, use, or possession of alcohol in the residence halls; knowingly and voluntarily being in the
presence of alcohol in the residence halls; the sale, distribution, use, or possession of any illegal drug or drug
paraphernalia in the residence halls; and knowingly and voluntarily being in the presence of any illegal drug or
drug paraphernalia in the residence halls.
STUDENT CONDUCT CODE
In addition to the Residence Hall Regulations, the Student Conduct Code lists types of student misconduct
that subject a student to disciplinary action, including but not limited to unauthorized possession, use,
manufacture, distribution, and/or sale of any controlled substance or illegal drug and illegal drug
paraphernalia; violation of university policies pertaining to the sale, distribution, use, or possession of alcohol;
and violation of local, state, or federal law.
FACULTY AND STAFF CONDUCT
Employee misconduct—including that of all full-time faculty and staff adjunct faculty, and part-time staff related to alcohol or other drug abuse will not be tolerated. Violation of the university’s Alcohol and Drug
Abuse Policies or the Guidelines for Serving Alcohol at University Events will result in appropriate
disciplinary action in accordance with university policies. Such disciplinary action may include termination of
employment and referral for legal prosecution.
Obvious examples of prohibited conduct include but are not limited to the unauthorized use, possession,
manufacture, distribution, dispensation, or sale of alcohol, drugs, or drug paraphernalia on university
premises, on university business, in university-supplied vehicles, during the employee’s work hours, or during
university-sponsored activities; coming to work or performing any job duties while impaired by alcohol or
drugs on university premises, in university-supplied vehicles, in any location while on university business, or
during university-sponsored activities; the possession, use, manufacture, distribution, dispensation, or sale of
alcohol or drugs off university premises that may adversely affect the individual’s work performance, his or
her own or others’ safety at work, or the university’s reputation in the community; failure to adhere to the
requirements of any drug treatment or counseling program in which the employee is enrolled; conviction
under any criminal drug statute for a violation occurring in the workplace or in another location while on
university business or during university-sponsored activities, or conviction under any criminal drug statute
under circumstances that adversely affect the university’s reputation in the community; failure to notify the
university of any conviction, within five days of the conviction, under any criminal drug statute for a violation
occurring in the workplace, on university premises, on university business, in university-supplied vehicles,
during employee’s work hours, or during university-sponsored activities; deliberate failure to comply with the
requirements of law or federal rules and regulations under the university’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policies.
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DRUG POLICY
Possession and/or use of illicit drugs and unauthorized controlled substances is contrary to university policy
and in violation of federal and District of Columbia laws. The university prohibits the possession, use,
manufacture, distribution, and/or sale of illegal drugs and illegal drug paraphernalia. Students at the university
who use or are otherwise involved with drugs in violation of the Student Conduct Code and/or the university
Housing Agreement are subject to university disciplinary action in addition to any action taken by local or
federal law enforcement authorities. Questions about the Drug Policy should be directed to the Office of the
Dean of Students, 202-885-3300, 408 Butler Pavilion.
ENFORCEMENT OF DC UNDERAGE DRINKING AND DRUG LAWS
The university cooperates fully with law enforcement authorities to enforce violations of DC underage
drinking laws and federal and state drug laws. Violations of the Student Conduct Code or Residence Hall
Regulations, which are also violations of federal or local law, may be referred to external law enforcement. In
such situations, cases may proceed concurrently at the university and in the criminal justice system.
UNIVERSITY SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATING ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES
Students found responsible through the conduct system for violating the Student Conduct Code are given
sanctions. These sanctions are implemented in accordance with university policies. There are no automatic
sanctions for particular offenses. Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services evaluates cases
individually and applies sanctions consistent with the severity of the offense; however, the predictable
consequences for drug- and alcohol-related offenses are typically as follows:
Alcohol Violations
1. First-time minor violations may result in sanctions including but not limited to a letter of warning,
censure, and educational and reflective assignments.
2. Second-time minor violations may result in sanctions including but not limited to an alcohol
education program, an alcohol and drug evaluation, and disciplinary probation for a specified period
(also see Parental Notification on this page).
3. Repeated violations of the Alcohol Policy may result in sanctions including but not limited to
disciplinary probation for a specified period, removal from the residence halls, suspension, or
dismissal.
4. Students, faculty, or staff caught driving drunk on campus may be stopped by university police
officers for traffic violations on campus. If, during such a stop, the officer believes the driver is
intoxicated, the officer or MPD may conduct a field sobriety test and make an arrest.
Refer to District of Columbia Crimes and Penalties—Alcohol; see page 68.
Drug Violations
1. First-time sale, use, or possession of illegal drugs may result in sanctions including but not limited to
disciplinary probation, barring from the residence halls, a drug education program, removal from the
residence halls permanently or for a specified period, and suspension or dismissal from the
university.
2. Second-time sale, use, or possession of illegal drugs may result in sanctions including but not limited
to removal from the residence halls permanently, suspension or dismissal from the university, and
recommended participation in a drug treatment program (depending upon the situation).
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3. First-time sale or distribution of illegal drugs may result in sanctions including but not limited to
disciplinary probation, permanent removal from the residence halls, participation in a drug treatment
program, suspension, or dismissal from the university.
Parental Notification
AU will generally notify parents or guardians of students’ misconduct related to alcohol or controlled
substances when:
•
•
A student’s behaviors or violations of the university’s alcohol or drug policies are judged by the dean
of students or designee to be egregious, to indicate that the student’s health or safety may be at risk,
or to indicate that the student may have placed others at risk.
A student who is under 21 is found responsible for a violation of the university’s alcohol and/or drug
policies and is placed on disciplinary probation (typically a first drug violation or second alcohol
violation), however minor, and all subsequent violations of alcohol or drug policies.
DESCRIPTION OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE EDUCATION PROGRAMS
The following information is provided to the campus community about drug and alcohol abuse resources.
On-Campus Resources
In case of an emergency, contact Public Safety at 202-885-3636. If you are ever in doubt about your own
health and safety or someone else’s, call for help.
The Office of the Dean of Students, at 202-885-3300, provides general information about campus resources.
It also offers programming during orientation and through various organized groups of students interested in
educating the campus community about alcohol and drug use and related issues.
The Student Health Center can provide treatment and/or referral for health issues related to alcohol and
other drug use. For more information, call 202-885-3380. The Counseling Center offers individual counseling
for students concerned about alcohol and other drug use. For more information, call 202-885-3500 or visit
american.edu/ocl/counseling.
Residence hall assistants and directors can discuss alcohol and other drug use with students and can advise
students about referrals and how to help a friend who may have a problem. The staff also provides hall and
floor programming on these topics throughout the year.
The Wellness Center has an evidence-based approach with extensively trained specialist peer educators. You
can see the information about each program in the programs section of the Wellness Center’s website at
american.edu/ocl/wellness.
The Faculty and Staff Assistance Program, a component of Human Resources, offers an array of substance
abuse prevention and intervention programs for faculty and staff who have problems with alcohol or other
drugs. Call extension 2588 for further information or to request help for a colleague or friend you suspect
may have a problem. The Faculty and Staff Assistance Program offers confidential, professional, and personal
counseling services to eligible faculty/staff and their immediate families. Visit the Faculty and Staff Assistance
Program home page at american.edu/hr/fsap.cfm.
Student Health Center
The following information is provided to students about the Student Health Center and other resources:
The Student Health Center (SHC) offers many health prevention services such as routine immunizations,
health screenings, and screenings for sexually transmitted infections. Students with chronic health problems
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are encouraged to engage the health center as a “medical home” through which preventive treatment and
coordination of care services may be employed to maintain their best possible health throughout the college
experience.
Stress, anxiety, and a wide range of other emotions can be normal reactions to college life. When emotional,
relational, or psychological difficulties make it hard to be a successful student, it is important to reach out and
ask for help. Various types of support and treatment are available and may address your needs. The SHC is
pleased to be able to offer psychiatric care to students through a psychiatric nurse practitioner.
The main focus of psychiatric care at the SHC is the management of psychiatric medications. If you or your
therapist thinks psychiatric medication might be helpful to you, or you would like to discuss the option of
medication, you may set up an initial psychopharmacology evaluation. This initial evaluation, scheduled for 45
minutes, is an opportunity for the prescribing clinician to hear about your current problems and symptoms
and to assess if medication is appropriate. This visit is also a time for you to ask questions about psychiatric
medication and to learn about medication options, possible side effects, risks and benefits, and nonpharmacological options.
If you are interested in counseling and psychotherapy, contact AU’s Counseling Center by phone or stop by
the office to schedule a confidential appointment with a counselor. The Counseling Center also provides
referrals to psychiatric and psychological care in the community and addresses all urgent psychiatric
emergencies. It can be reached at 202-885-3500 and is located in MGC 241.
Screening, Counseling, and Treatment
The Tobacco Cessation Workshop is a free program offered to all AU students who would like individual
support to quit smoking or chewing tobacco.
The Alcohol Workshop is an alcohol education program offered to all AU students who would like to
explore personal decision making related to alcohol use.
The Marijuana Workshop is a two-session assessment and education program offered to all AU students who
would like to examine their use of marijuana to reduce risky behaviors and harmful consequences.
Counseling Center
Mary Graydon, Room 214
202-885-3500
american.edu/ocl/counseling
Free, confidential services for AU students, including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Assessments
Crisis intervention
Consultations
Referrals for additional help
Workshops
Self-help materials
Student-Led Wellness Programs
The Wellness Center is dedicated to delivering effective and engaging events and programs to the AU
community. Its student-led programs, Wellness Crew and Cabana Crew, play an integral role in achieving this
mission. Members are a diverse group of AU students who are interested in proactively addressing health and
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wellness issues on campus. They are trained to educate their classmates about college lifestyles and wellness
issues in a positive, interactive, fun, and nonjudgmental manner.
The Wellness Center welcomes students with interest in all health topics who wish to have a positive impact
on the health and well-being of the AU community.
The following information is provided to students who may be interested in joining the Wellness Network.
What is the Mission of the Wellness Network?
The mission of the Wellness Network is to encourage, support, and advance a healthy lifestyle for the AU
community. As a Network member, you will have the unique opportunity to learn the most current
information on a variety of health-related topics, including sexual health; eating disorders/body image;
alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; and general wellness. The Wellness Network is dedicated to providing
education with sensitivity to race, gender, sexual orientation, culture, religion, and individual capabilities.
Cabana Crew
Cabana Crew duties are similar to Wellness Crew members, with a primary focus on organizing Cabana
outings. Duties include attending weekly meetings to brainstorm ideas and participating in office hours to
coordinate logistics and to staff the Cabana.
How Can I Join?
For more information about the recruitment process, please contact Tessa Telly at [email protected] or
202-885-3255.
Off-Campus Resources
While AU strives to help members of the campus community learn about alcohol and other drugs, we realize
that sometimes students may wish to seek off campus help. The following is a list of contacts and resources:
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)
4530 Connecticut Avenue NW Suite 111
Washington, DC 20008
202-966-9115
aa-dc.org
Narcotics Anonymous
P.O. Box 9863
Washington, DC 20016
na.org
NIH National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Support and Treatment
1-800-662-HELP
niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/support-treatment
U.S. Department of Justice
Drug Enforcement Administration
http://www.dea.gov/index.shtml
Al-Anon
al-anon-alateen-dcmd.org
For friends and family members of problem drinkers (local chapter website)
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National Information and Referral Resources
National Institutes of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
niaaa.nih.gov
Rethinking Drinking – Concerned about your drinking habits?
rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov
National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA)
drugabuse.gov
KOLMAC Clinic
The Kolmac Clinic serves the Washington, DC, and Baltimore, Maryland, metro areas with six outpatient
drug and alcohol treatment centers for substance abuse treatment, outpatient rehabilitation, and outpatient
continuing care. It is located 1.5 blocks north of the McPherson Square Metro Station (Blue/Orange Line)
and three blocks east of Farragut North Metro Station (Red Line).
1411 K Street NW, Suite 703
Washington, DC 20005
202-638-1992
Admissions: 301-589-0255
Fax: 202-638-2608
kolmac.com
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LOCAL AND FEDERAL LAWS PERTAINING TO ALCOHOL AND DRUGS
The following is a brief summary of District of Columbia and federal laws pertaining to alcohol and drugs.
This is not an exhaustive list and is subject to change. The law constantly evolves and is subject to different
interpretations.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CRIMES AND PENALTIES – ALCOHOL VIOLATIONS
DC Official Code, Title 25, Chapter 10, § 25-1002 as of May 19, 2014
Purchase, possession, or consumption by persons under 21; misrepresentation of age; penalties
(a)
No person who is under 21 years of age shall purchase, attempt to purchase, possess, or drink an
alcoholic beverage in the District, except as provided under subchapter IX of Chapter 7.
(b)
(1) No person shall falsely represent his or her age, or possess or present as proof of age an
identification document which is in any way fraudulent, for the purpose of purchasing, possessing, or
drinking an alcoholic beverage in the District.
(2) No person shall present a fraudulent identification document for the purpose of entering an
establishment possessing an on-premises retailer’s license, an Arena C/X license, or a temporary
license.
(3) For the purpose of determining valid representation of age, each person shall be required to
present to the establishment owner or representative at least one form of valid identification, which
shall have been issued by an agency of government (local, state, federal, or foreign) and shall contain
the name, date of birth, signature, and photograph of the individual.
(c)
(1) Except as provided in paragraph (4)(D) of this subsection, any person who violates any provision
of this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction, shall be subject to a fine and
suspension of driving privileges as follows:
A. Upon the first violation, a fine of not more than $300 and suspension of driving privileges in the
District for 90 consecutive days;
B. Upon the second violation, a fine of not more than $600 and suspension of driving privileges in
the District for 180 days; and
C. Upon the third and each subsequent violation, a fine of not more than $1,000 and suspension of
driving privileges in the District for one year.
DC Official Code, Title 25, Chapter 10, D.C. Code § 25-1001 as of May 19, 2014
Drinking of alcoholic beverage in public place prohibited; intoxication prohibited
(a)
Except as provided in subsections (b) and (c) of this section, no person in the District shall drink an
alcoholic beverage or possess in an open container an alcoholic beverage in or upon any of the
following places:
(1) A street, alley, park, sidewalk, or parking area;
(2) A vehicle in or upon any street, alley, park, or parking area;
(3) A premises not licensed under this title where food or nonalcoholic beverages are sold or
entertainment is provided for compensation;
(4) Any place to which the public is invited and for which a license to sell alcoholic beverages has not
been issued under this title;
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(5) Any place to which the public is invited for which a license to sell alcoholic beverages has been
issued under this title at a time when the sale of alcoholic beverages on the premises is prohibited by
this title or by the regulations promulgated under this title; or
(6) Any place licensed under a club license at a time when the consumption of the alcoholic
beverages on the premises is prohibited by this title or by regulations promulgated under this title.
(b)
Subsection (a)(1) of this section shall not apply if drinking or possession of an alcoholic beverage
occurs:
(1) In or on a structure which projects upon the parking, and which is an integral, structural part, of a
private residence, such as a front porch, terrace, bay window, or vault; and
(2) By, or with the permission of, the owner or resident.
(c)
No person, whether in or on public or private property, shall be intoxicated and endanger the safety
of himself, herself, or any other person or property.
(d)
Any person violating the provisions of subsection (a) or (c) of this section shall be guilty of a
misdemeanor and, upon conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not more than the amount set
forth in § 22-3571.01, or imprisoned for not more than 90 days, or both.
(e)
Any person in the District who is intoxicated in public and who is not conducting himself or herself
in such manner as to endanger the safety of himself, herself, or of any other person or of property
shall be treated in accordance with Chapter 6 of Title 24.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CRIMES AND PENALTIES – DRUG VIOLATIONS
DC Official Code, Title 48, Subtitle III, Chapter 9, Unit A, § 48-904.01 as of May 19, 2014
Prohibited acts A; penalties
(a)
(1) Except as authorized by this chapter or Chapter 16B of Title 7 [§ 7-1671 et seq.], it is unlawful for
any person knowingly or intentionally to manufacture, distribute, or possess, with intent to
manufacture or distribute, a controlled substance.
(2) Any person who violates this subsection with respect to:
A. A controlled substance classified in Schedule I or II that is a narcotic or abusive drug shall be
imprisoned for not more than 30 years or fined not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01,
or both;
B. Any other controlled substance classified in Schedule I, II, or III, except for a narcotic or abusive
drug, is guilty of a crime and upon conviction may be imprisoned for not more than five years, fined
not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01, or both; except that upon conviction of
manufacturing, distributing or possessing with intent to distribute one-half pound or less of
marijuana, a person who has not previously been convicted of manufacturing, distributing, or
possessing with intent to distribute a controlled substance or attempting to manufacture, distribute,
or possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance may be imprisoned for not more than 180
days or fine of not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01, or both;
C. A substance classified in Schedule IV is guilty of a crime and upon conviction may be imprisoned
for not more than three years, fined not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01, or both; or
D. A substance classified in Schedule V is guilty of a crime and upon conviction may be imprisoned
for not more than one year, fined not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01, or both.
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(b)
(1) Except as authorized by this chapter, it is unlawful for any person to create, distribute, or possess
with intent to distribute a counterfeit substance.
(2) Any person who violates this subsection with respect to:
A. A counterfeit substance classified in Schedule I or II that is a narcotic or abusive drug shall be
imprisoned for not more than 30 years or fined not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01,
or both;
B. Any other counterfeit substance classified in Schedule I, II, or III, except for a narcotic or abusive
drug, is guilty of a crime and upon conviction may be imprisoned for not more than five years, fined
not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01, or both;
C. A counterfeit substance classified in Schedule IV is guilty of a crime and upon conviction may be
imprisoned for not more than three years, fine not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01,
or both; or
D. A counterfeit substance classified in Schedule V is guilty of a crime and upon conviction may be
imprisoned for not more than one year, fine not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01, or
both.
(c)
Repealed.
(d)
(1) It is unlawful for any person knowingly or intentionally to possess a controlled substance unless
the substance was obtained directly from, or pursuant to, a valid prescription or order of a
practitioner while acting in the course of his or her professional practice, or except as otherwise
authorized by this chapter or Chapter 16B of Title 7 [§ 7-1671 et seq.], except as provided in
paragraph (2) of this subsection. Any person who violates this subsection is guilty of a misdemeanor
and upon conviction may be imprisoned for not more than 180 days, fined not more than the
amount set forth in § 22-3571.01, or both.
(2) Any person who violates this subsection by knowingly or intentionally possessing the abusive
drug phencyclidine in liquid form is guilty of a felony and, upon conviction, may be imprisoned for
not more than three years, fined not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01, or both.
(e)
(1) If any person who has not previously been convicted of violating any provision of this chapter, or
any other law of the United States or any state relating to narcotic or abusive drugs or depressant or
stimulant substances is found guilty of a violation of subsection (d) of this section and has not
previously been discharged and had the proceedings dismissed pursuant to this subsection, the court
may, without entering a judgment of guilty and with the consent of such person, defer further
proceedings and place him or her on probation upon such reasonable conditions as it may require
and for such period, not to exceed one year, as the court may prescribe. Upon violation of a
condition of the probation, the court may enter an adjudication of guilt and proceed as otherwise
provided. The court may, in its discretion, dismiss the proceedings against such person and discharge
him or her from probation before the expiration of the maximum period prescribed for such
person’s probation. If during the period of probation such person does not violate any of the
conditions of the probation, then upon expiration of such period the court shall discharge such
person and dismiss the proceedings against him or her. Discharge and dismissal under this subsection
shall be without court adjudication of guilt, but a nonpublic record thereof shall be retained solely for
the purpose of use by the courts in determining whether or not, in subsequent proceedings, such
person qualifies under this subsection. Such discharge or dismissal shall not be deemed a conviction
for purposes of disqualifications or disabilities imposed by law upon conviction of a crime (including
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the penalties prescribed under § 48-904.08 for second or subsequent convictions) or for any other
purpose.
(2) Upon the dismissal of such person and discharge of the proceedings against him under
paragraph (1) of this subsection, such person may apply to the court for an order to expunge from all
official records (other than the nonpublic records to be retained under paragraph (1) of this
subsection) all recordation relating to his or her arrest, indictment or information, trial, finding of
guilty, and dismissal and discharge pursuant to this subsection. If the court determines, after hearing,
that such person was dismissed and the proceedings against him or her discharged, it shall enter such
order. The effect of such order shall be to restore such person, in the contemplation of this law, to
the status he or she occupied before such arrest or indictment or information. No person as to
whom such order has been entered shall be held thereafter under any provision of any law to be
guilty of perjury or otherwise giving a false statement by reason of failure to recite or acknowledge
such arrest, or indictment, or trial in response to any inquiry made of him or her for any purpose.
(3) A person who was discharged from probation and whose case was dismissed pursuant to
paragraph (1) of this subsection shall be entitled to a copy of the nonpublic record retained under
paragraph (1) of this subsection but only to the extent that such record would have been available to
the person before an order of expungement was entered pursuant to paragraph (2) of this subsection.
A request for a copy of the nonpublic record may be made ex parte and under seal by the person or
by an authorized representative of the person.
(f)
The prosecutor may charge any person who violates the provisions of subsection (a) or (b) of this
section relating to the distribution of or possession with intent to distribute a controlled or
counterfeit substance with a violation of subsection (d) of this section if the interests of justice so
dictate.
(g)
For the purposes of this section, “offense” means a prior conviction for a violation of this section or
a felony that relates to narcotic or abusive drugs, marijuana, or depressant or stimulant drugs, that is
rendered by a court of competent jurisdiction in the United States.
DC Official Code, Title 48, Subtitle III, Chapter 9, Unit A, § 48-904.06 as of May 19, 2014
Distribution to minors
(a)
Any person who is 21 years of age or over and who violates § 48-904.01(a) by distributing a
controlled substance which is listed in Schedule I or II and which is a narcotic drug, phencyclidine, or
a phencyclidine immediate precursor to a person who is under 18 years of age may be punished by
the fine authorized by § 48-904.01(a)(2)(A), by a term of imprisonment of up to twice that authorized
by § 48-904.01(a)(2)(A), or by both.
(b)
Any person who is 21 years of age or over and who violates § 48-904.01(a) by distributing for
remuneration any other controlled substance which is listed in Schedule I, II, III, IV, or V, except for
phencyclidine or a phencyclidine immediate precursor, to a person who is under 18 years of age may
be punished by the fine authorized by § 48-904.01(a) (2)(B), (C), or (D), respectively, by a term of
imprisonment up to twice that authorized by § 48-904.01(a)(2)(B), (C), or (D), respectively, or both.
DC Official Code, Title 48, Subtitle III, Chapter 9, Unit A, § 48-904.07a as of May 19, 2014
Drug-free zones
(a)
All areas within 1,000 feet of an appropriately identified public or private day care center, elementary
school, vocational school, secondary school, junior college, college, or university, or any public
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swimming pool, playground, video arcade, youth center, or public library, or in and around public
housing, as defined in section 3(1) of the United States Housing Act of 1937, approved August 22,
1974 (88 Stat. 654; 42 U.S.C. § 1437a(b)), the development or administration of which is assisted by
Department of Housing and Urban Development, or in or around housing that is owned, operated,
or financially assisted by the District of Columbia Housing Authority, or an event sponsored by any
of the above entities shall be declared a drug-free zone. For the purposes of this subsection, the term
“appropriately identified” means that there is a sign that identifies the building or area as a drug-free
zone.
(b)
Any person who violates § 48-904.01(a) by distributing or possessing with the intent to distribute a
controlled substance which is listed in Schedule I, II, III, IV, or V within a drug-free zone shall be
punished by a fine up to twice that otherwise authorized by this chapter to be imposed, by a term of
imprisonment up to twice that otherwise imposed, or both.
DC Official Code, Title 48, Subtitle III, Chapter 9, Unit A, § 48-904.08 as of May 19, 2014
Second or subsequent offense
(a)
Any person convicted under this unit of a second or subsequent offense may be imprisoned for a
term up to twice the term otherwise authorized, fined an amount up to twice that otherwise
authorized, or both.
(b)
For purposes of this section, an offense is considered a second or subsequent offense if, prior to
commission of the offense, the offender has at any time been convicted under this unit or under any
statute of the United States or of any state relating to a controlled substance.
(c)
A person who is convicted of violating § 48-904.06 may be sentenced according to the provisions of
§ 48-904.06 or according to the provisions of this section, but not both.
DC Official Code, Title 48, Subtitle III, Chapter 9, Unit A, § 48-904.10 as of May 19, 2014
Possession of drug paraphernalia
Whoever, except for a physician, dentist, chiropodist, or veterinarian licensed in the District of Columbia or a
state, registered nurse, registered embalmer, manufacturer or dealer in embalming supplies, wholesale
druggist, industrial user, official of any government having possession of the proscribed articles by reason of
his or her official duties, nurse or medical laboratory technician acting under the direction of a physician or
dentist, employees of a hospital or medical facility acting under the direction of its superintendent or officerin
immediate charge, person engaged in chemical, clinical, pharmaceutical or other scientific research, acting in
the course of their professional duties, has in his or her possession a hypodermic needle, hypodermic syringe,
or other instrument that has on or in it any quantity (including a trace) of a controlled substance with intent
to use it for administration of a controlled substance by subcutaneous injection in a human being shall be
fined not more than the amount set forth in § 22-3571.01 or imprisoned for not more than 180 days, or both.
FEDERAL CODES AND PENALTIES – DRUG ABUSE, PREVENTION, AND CONTROL
United States Code, Title 21, Chapter 13, Subchapter I, Part D, §844
Penalties for simple possession
a.
Unlawful acts; penalties
It shall be unlawful for any person knowingly or intentionally to possess a controlled substance unless such
substance was obtained directly, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order, from a practitioner, while acting
in the course of his professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by this subchapter or subchapter
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II of this chapter. It shall be unlawful for any person knowingly or intentionally to possess any list I chemical
obtained pursuant to or under authority of a registration issued to that person under Section 823 of this title
or Section 958 of this title if that registration has been revoked or suspended, if that registration has expired,
or if the registrant has ceased to do business in the manner contemplated by his registration. It shall be
unlawful for any person to knowingly or intentionally purchase at retail during a 30-day period more than 9
grams of ephedrine base, pseudoephedrine base, or phenylpropanolamine base in a scheduled listed chemical
product, except that, of such 9 grams, not more than 7.5 grams may be imported by means of shipping
through any private or commercial carrier or the Postal Service. Any person who violates this subsection may
be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than one year, and shall be fined a minimum of $1,000,
or both, except that if he commits such offense after a prior conviction under this subchapter or subchapter
II of this chapter, or a prior conviction for any drug, narcotic, or chemical offense chargeable under the law
of any state, has become final he shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment for not less than 15 days but
not more than two years, and shall be fined a minimum of $2,500, except, further, that if he commits such
offense after two or more prior convictions under this subchapter or subchapter II of this chapter, or two or
more prior convictions for any drug, narcotic, or chemical off chargeable under the law of any state, or a
combination of two or more such offenses have become final he shall be sentenced to a term of
imprisonment for not less than 90 days but not more than three years, and shall be fined a minimum of
$5,000. Notwithstanding any penalty provided in this subsection, any person convicted under this subsection
for the possession of flunitrazepam shall be imprisoned for not more than three years, shall be fined as
otherwise provided in this section, or both. The imposition or execution of a minimum sentence required to
be imposed under this subsection shall not be suspended or deferred. Further, upon conviction, a person
who violates this subsection shall be fined the reasonable costs of the investigation and prosecution of the
offense including the costs of prosecution of an offense as defined in Sections 1918 and 1920 of Title 28,
except that this sentence shall not apply and a fine under this section need not be imposed if the court
determines under the provision of Title 18 that the defendant lacks the ability to pay.
United States Code, Title 21, Chapter 13, Subchapter I, Part D §859
Distribution to persons under age 21
a.
First offense
Except as provided in Section 860 of this title, any person at least 18 years of age who violates section
841(a)(1) of this title by distributing a controlled substance to a person under 21 years of age is (except as
provided in subsection (b) of this section) subject to (1) twice the maximum punishment authorized by
section 841(b) of this title, and (2) at least twice any term of supervised release authorized by Section 841(b)
of this title, for a first offense involving the same controlled substance and schedule. Except to the extent a
greater minimum sentence is otherwise provided by Section 841(b) of this title, a term of imprisonment under
this subsection shall be not less than one year. The mandatory minimum sentencing provisions of this
subsection shall not apply to offenses involving five grams or less of marijuana.
b.
Second offense
Except as provided in Section 860 of this title, any person at least 18 years of age who violates Section
841(a)(1) of this title by distributing a controlled substance to a person under 21 years of age after a prior
conviction under subsection (a) of this section (or under Section 333(b) of this title as in effect prior to May
1, 1971) has become final is subject to (1) three times the maximum punishment authorized by Section 841(b)
of this title, and (2) at least three times any term of supervised release authorized by Section 841(b) of this
title, for a second or subsequent off involving the same controlled substance and schedule. Except to the
extent a greater minimum sentence is otherwise provided by Section 841(b) of this title, a term of
imprisonment under this subsection shall be not less than one year.
Penalties for third and subsequent convictions shall be governed by Section 841(b)(1)(A) of this title.
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United States Code, Title 21, Chapter 13, Subchapter I, Part D, §860
Distribution or manufacturing in or near schools and colleges
a.
Penalty
Any person who violates Section 841(a)(1) of this title or Section 856 of this title by distributing, possessing
with intent to distribute, or manufacturing a controlled substance in or on, or within 1,000 feet of, the real
property comprising a public or private elementary, vocational, or secondary school or a public or private
college, junior college, or university, or a playground, or housing facility owned by a public housing authority,
or within 100 feet of a public or private youth center, public swimming pool, or video arcade facility, is
(except as provided in subsection (b) of this section) subject to (1) twice the maximum punishment
authorized by Section 841(b) of this title; and (2) at least twice any term of supervised release authorized by
Section 841(b) of this title for a first offense. A fine up to twice that authorized by Section 841(b) of this title
may be imposed in addition to any term of imprisonment authorized by this subsection. Except to the extent
a greater minimum sentence is otherwise provided by Section 841(b) of this title, a person shall be sentenced
under this subsection to a term of imprisonment of not less than one year. The mandatory minimum
sentencing provisions of this paragraph shall not apply to offenses involving five grams or less of marijuana.
b.
Second offenders
Any person who violates Section 841(a)(1) of this title or Section 856 of this title by distributing, possessing
with intent to distribute, or manufacturing a controlled substance in or on, or within 1,000 feet of, the real
property comprising a public or private elementary, vocational, or secondary school or a public or private
college, junior college, or university, or a playground, or housing facility owned by a public housing authority,
or within 100 feet of a public or private youth center, public swimming pool, or video arcade facility, after a
prior conviction under subsection (a) of this section has become final is punishable (1) by the greater of (A) a
term of imprisonment of not less than three years and not more than life imprisonment or (B) three times the
maximum punishment authorized by Section 841(b) of this title for a first offense, and (2) at least three times
any term of supervised release authorized by Section 841(b) of this title for a first offense. A fine up to three
times that authorized by Section 841(b) of this title may be imposed in addition to any term of imprisonment
authorized by this subsection. Except to the extent a greater minimum sentence is otherwise provided by
Section 841(b) of this title, a person shall be sentenced under this subsection to a term of imprisonment of
not less than three years. Penalties for third and subsequent convictions shall be governed by Section
841(b)(1)(A) of this title.
United States Code, Title 21, Chapter 13, Subchapter I, Part D, §863
Drug paraphernalia
a.
In general
It is unlawful for any person:
1.
To sell or offer for sale drug paraphernalia;
2.
To use the mails or any other facility of interstate commerce to transport drug paraphernalia; or
3.
To import or export drug paraphernalia.
b.
Penalties
Anyone convicted of an offense under subsection (a) of this section shall be imprisoned for not more than
three years and fined under title 18.
c.
Seizure and forfeiture
Any drug paraphernalia involved in any violation of subsection (a) of this section shall be subject to seizure
and forfeiture upon the conviction of a person for such violation. Any such paraphernalia shall be delivered
to the Administrator of General Services, General Services Administration, who may order such
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paraphernalia destroyed or may authorize its use for law enforcement or educational purposes by federal,
state, or local authorities.
d.
“Drug paraphernalia” defined
The term “drug paraphernalia” means any equipment, product, or material of any kind which is primarily
intended or designed for use in manufacturing, compounding, converting, concealing, producing, processing,
preparing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance,
possession of which is unlawful under this subchapter. It includes items primarily intended or designed for
use in ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing marijuana, cocaine, hashish, hashish oil, PCP,
methamphetamine, or amphetamines into the human body, such as:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Metal, wooden, acrylic, glass, stone, plastic, or ceramic pipes with or without screens, permanent
screens, hashish heads, or punctured metal bowls;
Water pipes;
Carburetion tubes and devices;
Smoking and carburetion masks;
Roach clips: meaning objects used to hold burning material, such as a marijuana cigarette, that has
become too small or too short to be held in the hand;
Miniature spoons with level capacities of one-tenth cubic centimeter or less;
Chamber pipes;
Carburetor pipes;
Electric pipes;
Air-driven pipes;
Chillums;
Bongs;
Ice pipes or chillers;
Wired cigarette papers; or
Cocaine freebase kits.
e.
Matters considered in determination of what constitutes drug paraphernalia
In determining whether an item constitutes drug paraphernalia, in addition to all other logically relevant
factors, the following may be considered:
1.
Instructions, oral or written, provided with the item concerning its use;
2.
Descriptive materials accompanying the item which explain or depict its use;
3.
National and local advertising concerning its use;
4.
The manner in which the item is displayed for sale;
5.
Whether the owner, or anyone in control of the item, is a legitimate supplier of like or related items
to the community, such as a licensed distributor or dealer of tobacco products;
6.
Direct or circumstantial evidence of the ratio of sales of the item(s) to the total sales of the business
enterprise;
7.
The existence and scope of legitimate uses of the item in the community; and
8.
Expert testimony concerning its use.
Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties
Updated information about federal drug trafficking penalties for most drugs is available at
justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ ftp3.shtml.
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CRIME STATISTICS AND CAMPUS SECURITY AUTHORITIES
LIST OF UNIVERSITY OFFICIALS TO WHOM CRIMINAL OFFENSES SHOULD BE REPORTED
Criminal offenses can be reported directly to Public Safety or to other officials at AU who have been
designated as campus security authorities. These are individuals with significant responsibility for student and
campus activities and include deans of academic units and directors and department heads of administrative
units, including the Counseling Center, the Student Health Center, Kay Spiritual Life Center, and Faculty and
Staff Assistance Program. The crimes reported to these sources are tallied and provided to Public Safety to be
included in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. If enough pertinent information is available, these reports
may also be used for the issuance of Crime Alerts to the AU community and inclusion in the Daily Crime
Log. As previously mentioned, pastoral counselors, licensed professional counselors employed through AU,
and those acting as medical professionals are not required to disclose any information to Public Safety.
The following persons have been designated as campus security authorities to whom students and employees
should report criminal offenses described in the law for the purpose of making timely warning reports and
the annual statistical disclosure:
Assistant Vice Provost—Undergraduate Admissions, 202-885-6053
Assistant Vice Provost—Financial Aid, 202-885-6500
Executive Director, University Police—Public Safety, 202-885-2549
Director—Community and Local Government Relations, 202-885-3370
Director—Athletics and Recreation, 202-885-3001
Associate Director—Athletics/Senior Women’s Administrator—Athletics and Recreation, 202-885-3024
University Chaplain, 202-885-3320
Executive Director—Career Center, 202-885-1804
Director of Recreational Sports, 202-885-6215
Dean—College of Arts and Sciences, 202-885-2446
Dean—School of Communications, 202-885-2061
Dean—School of Public Affairs, 202-885-2940
Dean—Dean of Academic Affairs 202-885-2125
Dean—School of Education, Teaching, and Health, 202-885-3720
Dean—Kogod School of Business, 202-885-1985
Dean—School of International Service, 202-885-1603
Dean—Washington College of Law, 202-274-4004
Chief Information Security Officer, 202-885-3998
Controller—Office of the Controller, 202-885-2840
Program Administrator—AUNTL, 202-885-6494
Senior Director—Center for Diversity and Inclusion, 202-885-3651
Director—Center for Diversity and Inclusion, 202-885-3346
Coordinator LGBTQ Programming—Center for Diversity and Inclusion, 202-885-3346
Program Coordinator—Center for Diversity and Inclusion, 202-885-3347
Multicultural Program Coordinator—Center for Diversity and Inclusion, 202-885-3652
Women and Gender Programming Coordinator—Center for Diversity and Inclusion, 202-885-3959
Assistant Director, Student Athletes—Academic Support and Access Center, 202-885-3890
Senior Director—Academic Support and Access Center, 202-885-3360
Director, Academic and Disability Support—Academic Support and Access Center, 202-885-3360
Coordinator, Supplemental Instruction—Academic Support and Access Center, 202-885-3360
Coordinator, Learning Resources —Academic Support and Access Center, 202-885-3360
Director—AU Abroad, 202-885-1320
Associate Director—AU Abroad, 202-885-1323
Associate Director—AU Abroad, 202-885-1328
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Director—Counseling Center, 202-885-3500
Assistant Vice President—Budget and Finance Resource Center, 202-885-2729
Assistant Vice President—Risk Management and Safety Services, 202-885-3284
Assistant Vice President—Human Resources, 202-885-2451
Medical Director—Student Health Center, 202-885-3958
Director—International Student and Scholar Services, 202-885-3355
Director—Jewish Studies Program, 202-885-2423
Executive Director—Center For Teaching, Research, and Learning, 202-885-2117
Director—Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, 202-885-2981
University Librarian, 202-885-3232
Faculty Coordinator—Human Resources, 202-885-3739
Employee Relations Advisor—Human Resources, 202-885-2548
Senior Director—Human Resource Delivery, 202-885-2589
Employee Relations Advisor—Human Resources, 202-885-2548
Director—Employee Relations and Recruiting, 202-885-2721
Director—Facilities Management, 202-885-2403
Assistant Director—Facilities Management, 202-885-2321
Executive Assistant to the President, 202-885-2121
Vice President—Communication, 202-885-5950
University President, 202-885-2121
Chief of Staff—Office of the President, 202-885-2121
Director of Special Projects—Office of the President, 202-885-2121
University Provost, 202-885-2127
University Registrar, 202-885-2022
Chair—Faculty Senate, 202-885-2295
Vice Chair—Faculty Senate, 202-885-2295
Director—Student Finance and Collections, 202-885-3541
Assistant Vice President—Communications and Media, 202-885-5950
Dean—Washington Semester, School of Professional and Extended Studies, 202-895-4900
Assistant Dean—Student Services, Washington Semester, 202-895-4912
Senior Director—University Center and Student Activities, 202-885-3296
Associate Director—Programming and Operations, University Center, 202-885-3393
Assistant Director—Fraternity and Sorority Life, 202-885-3288
Associate Director—Leadership Development, University Center, 202-885-3392
Director—University Honors and Scholars Program, 202-885-6194
Associate Director—University Honors Program, 202-885-6194
Assistant Vice President—Campus Life, 202-885-3357
Vice President—Campus Life, 202-885-3484
Special Assistant to the Vice President—Campus Life, 202-885-3499
Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students, 202-885-3300
Associate Dean(s) of Students, 202-885-3371
Coordinator, Orientation, Transition and Retention Programs—Dean of Students Office, 202-885-3374
Case Manager—Dean of Students Office, 202-885-3301
Director—Center for Community Engagement and Service, 202-885-1551
Director—Wellness Center, 202-885-3255
Coordinator—Health and Wellness Education, 202-885-3384
Director—Residence Life, 202-885-3370
Director of Global Opportunities—Washington College of Law, 202-274-4237
Assistant Dean—Career and Professional Development—Washington College of Law, 202-274-4091
Assistant Vice President—Housing and Dining Programs, 202-885-3370
Director—Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services, 202-885-3328
Assistant Director—Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services, 202-885-3328
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Coordinator of Student Activities—Student Activities and University Center, 202-885-3900
Director—University College and Learning Communities, 202-885-6737
Executive Director—Washington College of Law, 202-274-4004
Associate Dean—Student Affairs Washington College of Law, 202-274-4052
Director—Minority Affairs Washington College of Law, 202-274-4032
Director—Facilities, Washington College of Law, 202- 274-4013
Program Director—AU Abroad, Brussels, 202-885-1320 (see program information for international contact) Program
Director—AU Abroad, Madrid, 202-885-1320 (see program information for international contact) Program Director—
AU Abroad, Nairobi, 202-885-1320 (see program information for international contact) International Programs
Coordinator(s)—School of International Service, 202-885-1685
Vice Provost—Academic Administration, 202-885-2127
Assistant Director—Student Affairs Washington College of Law, 202-274-4031
Honor Code Prosecutor—Washington College of Law, 202-274-4000
Associate Director—Program on Law and Government, Washington College of Law, 202-274-4305
Associate Director—International Legal Studies Programs, Washington College of Law, 202-274-4415
Associate Director—Weinstein Trial Advocacy Program, Washington College of Law, 202-274-4000
Associate Dean—Faculty and Academic Affairs, Washington College of Law, 202-274-4196
Director—Law and Government Programs, Washington College of Law, 202-274-4011
Director—International Legal Studies Program, Washington College of Law, 202-274-4415
Associate Dean—Faculty and Academic Affairs, Washington College of Law, 202-274-4196
Director- University College, 202-885-2478
Director -AU Scholars Program, 202-885-2181
Director- Community Based Research Scholars, 202-885-3118
Director- AU Honors, 202-885-2996
Chair- Frederick Douglas Scholars Committee, 202-885-2961
Director- Frederick Douglas Scholars, 202-885-6213
Senior Associate Dean- Academic Affairs-Kogod School of Business, 202-885-1993
Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs- Kogod School of Business, 202-885-1912
Associate Dean- College of Arts and Sciences, 202-885-3776
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies- College of Arts and Sciences, 202-885-2524
Assistant Dean for Student and Academic Affairs- School of Communication, 202-885-2054
Associate Dean for Academic Administration- School of Communication, 202-885-2002
Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs and Graduate Education- School of International Service, 202-885-1620
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education- School of International Service, 202-885-2036
Associate Dean- School of Public Affairs, 202-885-2427
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs- School of Public Affairs, 202-885-6443
All resident assistants, resident directors, community coordinators, orientation leaders and athletic coaching
staff are mandated to provide information concerning all criminal activity to the Department of Public Safety
directly or through their supervisors.
Public Safety maintains a close relationship with the MPD’s Second District to ensure notifications of
crimes that have occurred on or near the AU campus and non-campus property that were reported directly to
these law enforcement agencies.
Requests for crime statistics were made of the MPD, as well as the local police departments of Nairobi,
Madrid, and Brussels. These requests asked for statistics of Clery Act reportable crimes that occurred on any
of AU’s campuses, non-campus property, and public property adjacent to and immediately accessible from
any AU campus. As of the publishing of this report, none of the aforementioned jurisdictions provided any
applicable information.
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DEFINITION OF CLERY ACT REPORTABLE CRIMES
CRIMINAL HOMICIDE
Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter
The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another
Negligent Manslaughter
The killing of another person through gross negligence
FORCIBLE SEX OFFENSES
Any sexual act directed against another person, without consent of the victim, including instances where the
victim is incapable of giving consent:
Forcible Rape
The carnal knowledge of a person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is
incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or
physical incapacity (or because of his/her youth)
Forcible Sodomy
Oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly
against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because
of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity
Sexual Assault with an Object
To use an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly, the genital or anal opening of the
body of another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable
of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical
incapacity
Forcible Fondling
The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification without the
consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her
age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity
NON-FORCIBLE SEX OFFENSES
Incest
Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein
marriage is prohibited by law
Statutory Rape
Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent
OTHER CRIMES
Robbery
The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons
by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear
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Aggravated Assault
An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily
injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death
or great bodily harm. Simple assaults are excluded.
Burglary
Unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. Attempted forcible entry is included.
Motor Vehicle Theft
The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. A motor vehicle is self-propelled and runs on land surface
and not on rails. Watercraft, construction equipment, airplanes, and farming equipment are specifically
excluded from this category.
Arson
Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house,
public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
REPORTABLE CRIMES BEGINNING FOR CALENDER YEAR 2013
Dating Violence
The term “dating violence” means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship
of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be
determined based on a consideration of the following factors: the length of the relationship, the type of
relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
Domestic Violence
The term “domestic violence” includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or
former spouse of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is
cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of
the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any
other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or
family violence laws of the jurisdiction.
Stalking
The term “stalking” means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a
reasonable person to (a) fear for his or her safety or the safety of others or (b) suffer substantial emotional
distress.
CORRESPONDING DC CRIMINAL CODE REGARDING SEXUAL ASSAULT, DATING
VIOLENCE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND STALKING
Sexual Abuse Offenses: Title 22, Chapter 30
22-3002. First-degree sexual abuse
Felony
a.
A person shall be imprisoned for any term of years or for life, and in addition, may be fined in an
amount not to exceed $250,000, if that person engages in or causes another person to engage in or
submit to a sexual act in the following manner:
1.
By using force against that other person;
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2.
By threatening or placing that other person in reasonable fear that any person will be subjected to
death, bodily injury, or kidnapping;
3.
After rendering that other person unconscious; or
4.
After administering to that other person by force or threat of force, or without the knowledge or
permission of that other person, a drug, intoxicant, or other similar substance that substantially
impairs the ability of that other person to appraise or control his or her conduct.
22-3003. Second-degree sexual abuse
Felony
A person shall be imprisoned for not more than 20 years and may be fined in an amount not to exceed
$200,000, if that person engages in or causes another person to engage in or submit to a sexual act in the
following manner:
1.
By threatening or placing that other person in reasonable fear (other than by threatening or placing
that other person in reasonable fear that any person will be subjected to death, bodily injury, or
kidnapping); or
2.
Where the person knows or has reason to know that the other person is:
A.
Incapable of appraising the nature of the conduct;
B.
Incapable of declining participation in that sexual act; or
C.
Incapable of communicating unwillingness to engage in that sexual act.
22-3004. Third-degree sexual abuse
Felony
A person shall be imprisoned for not more than 10 years and may be fined in an amount not to exceed
$100,000, if that person engages in or causes sexual contact with or by another person in the following
manner:
1.
By using force against that other person;
2.
By threatening or placing that other person in reasonable fear that any person will be subjected to
death, bodily injury, or kidnapping;
3.
After rendering that person unconscious; or
4.
After administering to that person by force or threat of force, or without the knowledge or
permission of that other person, a drug, intoxicant, or similar substance that substantially impairs the
ability of that other person to appraise or control his or her conduct.
22-3005. Fourth-degree sexual abuse
Felony
A person shall be imprisoned for not more than five years and, in addition, may be fined in an amount not to
exceed $50,000, if that person engages in or causes sexual contact with or by another person in the following
manner:
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1.
By threatening or placing that other person in reasonable fear (other than by threatening or placing
that other person in reasonable fear that any person will be subjected to death, bodily injury, or
kidnapping); or
2.
Where the person knows or has reason to know that the other person is:
A.
Incapable of appraising the nature of the conduct;
B.
Incapable of declining participation in that sexual contact; or
C.
Incapable of communicating unwillingness to engage in that sexual contact.
22-3006. Misdemeanor sexual abuse
Probable Cause Misdemeanor
Whoever engages in a sexual act or sexual contact with another person and who should have knowledge or
reason to know that the act was committed without that other person’s permission, shall be imprisoned for
not more than 180 days and, in addition, may be fined in an amount not to exceed $1,000.
Domestic Violence/Dating Violence
Title 16, Section 1031
a.
A law enforcement officer (shall) arrest a person if the law enforcement officer has probable cause to
believe that the person:
1.
Committed an intra-family offense that resulted in physical injury, including physical pain or illness,
regardless of whether or not the intra-family offense was committed in the presence of the law
enforcement officer; or
2.
Committed an intra-family offense that caused or was intended to cause reasonable fear of imminent
serious physical injury or death.
b.
The law enforcement officer shall present the person arrested under subsection (a) of this section to
the U.S. Attorney for charging under Title 16, Section 1002.
Stalking
Title 22, Section 3133
a.
It is unlawful for a person to purposefully engage in a course of conduct directed at a specific
individual:
1.
With the intent to cause that individual to:
A.
Fear for his or her safety or the safety of another person
B.
Feel seriously alarmed, disturbed, or frightened
C.
Suffer emotional distress
2.
That the person knows would cause that individual reasonably to:
A.
Fear for his or her safety or the safety of another person
B.
Feel seriously alarmed, disturbed, or frightened
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C.
Suffer emotional distress
3.
That the person should have known would cause a reasonable person in the individual’s
circumstances to:
A.
Fear for his or her safety or the safety of another person
B.
Feel seriously alarmed, disturbed, or frightened
C.
Suffer emotional distress
b.
This section does not apply to constitutionally protected activity.
c.
Where a single act is of a continuing nature, each 24-hour period constitutes a separate offense.
d.
The conduct on each of the occasions needs to be the same as it is on the others.
16-1031. Arrests
a.
A law enforcement officer shall arrest a person if the law enforcement officer has probable cause to
believe that the person:
1.
Committed an intra-family offense that resulted in physical injury, including physical pain or illness,
regardless of whether or not the intra-family offense was committed in the presence of the law
enforcement officer; or
2.
Committed an intra-family offense that caused or was intended to cause reasonable fear of imminent
serious physical injury or death.
b.
The law enforcement officer shall present the person arrested under subsection (a) of this section to
the U.S. Attorney for charging.
Because local laws are constantly changing, please visit either of the following sites for the most up-to-date
legislation within the District of Columbia: lexisnexis.com/hottopics/dccode or dc.gov/page/lawsregulations-and-courts.
CORRESPONDING DC CRIMINAL CODE REGARDING CONSENT WITH REGARD TO
SEXUAL ACTIVITY
22-3001. Definitions.
“Consent” means words or overt actions indicating a freely given agreement to the sexual act or contact in
question. Lack of verbal or physical resistance or submission by the victim resulting from the use of force,
threats, or coercion by the defendant shall not constitute consent.
Because local laws are constantly changing, please visit either of the following sites for the most up-to-date
legislation within the District of Columbia: lexisnexis.com/hottopics/dccode/ or dc.gov/page/lawsregulations-and-courts.
HATE CRIMES
Hate crimes include any of the aforementioned offense and/or any other crime involving bodily injury
reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority that manifests evidence that the victim was
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intentionally selected because of the perpetrator’s bias (categories of bias are race, gender, religion, sexual
orientation, ethnicity/national origin, gender identity, and disability), and any crime listed below if there is
evidence that it occurred due to the perpetrator’s bias. The crimes below are presented in the Clery Act
statistics as of August 2008:
Larceny
The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive
possession of another
Simple Assault
An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor
the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth,
possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness
Intimidation
To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words
and/ or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack
Vandalism
To willfully or maliciously destroy, injure, disfigure, or deface any public or private property, real or personal,
without the consent of the owner or person having custody or control, by cutting, tearing, breaking, marking,
painting, drawing, covering with filth or any other such means as may be specified by local law
OTHER OFFENSES
Liquor Law Violations
The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, or possessing
of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to
a minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public
conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned (Drunkenness and DUI are not included
in this definition)
Drug Abuse Violations
Violations of state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and
making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine,
heroin, codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs
(barbiturates, Benzedrine)
Illegal Weapons Possession
The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as manufacture,
sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly
weapons to minors; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned offenses.
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DEFINITION OF CLERY ACT REPORTABLE LOCATIONS ON CAMPUS
Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous
geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s
educational purposes, including residence halls; and any building or property that is within or reasonably
contiguous to paragraph (1) of this definition that is owned by the institution but controlled by another
person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail
vendor)
RESIDENTIAL FACILITY (SUBSET OF “ON CAMPUS” STATISTICS)
Any student housing facility that is owned or controlled by the institution, or is located on property that is
owned or controlled by the institution, and is within the reasonably contiguous geographic area that makes up
the campus is considered an on-campus student housing facility
NON-CAMPUS PROPERTY
Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the
institution; or any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of,
or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the
same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution
PUBLIC PROPERTY
All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the
campus or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus
For AU’s main campus, non-campus properties (as defined above) are the following:
Greenberg Theatre and AU offices
4200 Wisconsin Avenue NW, DC
AU Offices
3201 New Mexico Avenue NW, DC
4545 42nd Street NW, Washington, DC
4401 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC
The Brandywine building
4000 Brandywine Street NW, DC
AU-leased apartments and common areas
4201 Massachusetts Avenue NW, DC
Other properties as designated through lease agreement with American University and that vary year to year.
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CRIMINAL OFFENSES
MAIN CAMPUS
Type of Offense
On Campus
Residential
Facility
Non-Campus
Building or
Property
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
7
4
0
9
2013
8
5
0
0
2014
21
19
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
1
0
1
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
7
2
2
0
2014
7
4
1
1
Criminal Homicide
Murder/Non-negligent
manslaughter
Negligent manslaughter
Sex Offenses*
Forciblesexoffenses
Non-forcible sex offenses
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
2012
25
12
1
0
2013
16
8
3
0
2014
8
3
4
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
1
0
1
1
2012
4
2
0
0
2013
7
2
0
0
2014
4
4
0
1
Motor Vehicle Theft
Arson*
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Domestic Violence*
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
5
3
1
0
2014
6
6
1
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
7
2
0
0
2014
3
2
1
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
18
9
1
2
2014
10
6
2
4
Dating Violence*
Stalking*
NOTE: The Residential Facility statistics are subsets of the On Campus statistics.
Unfounded Crimes: "For calendar year 2014, one (1) on campus forcible sex offense was determined to be
unfounded by MPD detectives"
* Due to the fact that Arson, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, and Sex Offenses are not
applicable to the Uniform Crime Reporting hierarchy rule, some instances of the aforementioned are counted
in multiple categories. Hence, a singular criminal incident may be listed under a variety of categories if facets
of the incident meet criteria defined herein. As always, please refer to the Daily Crime Log for information
regarding the most recent criminal occurrences.
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87
HATE CRIME OFFENSES
MAIN CAMPUS
In 2012, there was one (1) Simple Assault Offense on the Main Campus characterized by bias toward
national origin.
In 2013, there was one (1) Intimidation Offense in a residence hall characterized by racial bias.
In 2013, there was one (1) Defacing Property Offense in a residence hall characterized by religious bias.
In 2013, there was one (1) Intimidation Offense in a residence hall characterized by sexual orientation bias.
In 2013, there was one (1) Defacing Property Offense in a residence hall characterized by sexual orientation
bias.
In 2013, there were seven (7) Defacing Property Offense in a residence hall characterized by racial bias.*
In 2014, there was one (1) Intimidation Offense in an on-campus residence hall characterized by gender bias.
In 2014, there was one (1) Intimidation Offense in an on-campus characterized by racial bias.
In 2014, there was one (1) Intimidation Offense in an on-campus residence hall characterized by religious
bias.
In 2014, there were two (2) Vandalism Offense in an on-campus characterized by racial bias. One (1) of
these was in a residence hall.
In 2014, there was one (1) Vandalism Offense in an on campus residence hall characterized by gender bias.
* These offenses were the result of a single incident occurring in a residence hall.
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CRIMINAL OFFENSES
TENLEY CAMPUS
Type of Offense
On Campus
Residential
Facility
Non-Campus
Building or
Property
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
1
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
2
1
0
0
2013
4
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
1
1
0
0
2013
1
1
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
Criminal Homicide
Murder/Non-negligent
manslaughter
Negligent manslaughter
Sex Offenses*
Forcible sex offenses
Non-forcible sex offenses
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft
Arson*
Domestic Violence*
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2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
Dating Violence*
Stalking*
NOTE: The Residential Facility statistics are subsets of the On Campus statistics.
* Due to the fact that Arson, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, and Sex Offenses are not
applicable to the Uniform Crime Reporting hierarchy rule, some instances of the aforementioned are counted
in multiple categories. Hence, a singular criminal incident may be listed under a variety of categories if facets
of the incident meet criteria defined herein. As always, please refer to the Daily Crime Log for information
regarding the most recent criminal occurrences.
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HATE CRIME OFFENSES
TENLEY CAMPUS
In 2012, there was one (1) vandalism of property on the Tenley Campus characterized by gender bias.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported on the Tenley Campus in 2013.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported on the Tenley Campus in 2013.
American University Annual Security Report
91
CRIMINAL OFFENSES
WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF LAW CAMPUS
Type of Offense
On Campus
Non-Campus Building
or Property
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
Criminal Homicide
Murder/Non-negligent
manslaughter
Negligent manslaughter
Sex Offenses*
Forcible sex offenses
Non-forcible sex offenses
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
1
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
2
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft
Arson*
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Domestic Violence*
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
2
0
0
Dating Violence*
Stalking*
* Due to the fact that Arson, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, and Sex Offenses are not
applicable to the Uniform Crime Reporting hierarchy rule, some instances of the aforementioned are counted
in multiple categories. Hence, a singular criminal incident may be listed under a variety of categories if facets
of the incident meet criteria defined herein. As always, please refer to the Daily Crime Log for information
regarding the most recent criminal occurrences.
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93
HATE CRIME OFFENSES
WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF LAW CAMPUS
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported on the WCL Campus in 2012.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported on the WCL Campus in 2013.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported on the WCL Campus in 2014.
American University Annual Security Report
94
CRIMINAL OFFENSES
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM
Type of Offense
On Campus
Non-Campus Building
or Property
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
1
0
Criminal Homicide
Murder/Non-negligent
manslaughter
Negligent manslaughter
Sex Offenses*
Forcible sex offenses
Non-forcible sex offenses
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft
Arson*
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Domestic Violence*
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Dating Violence*
Stalking*
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Brussels, Belgium, AU offices in 2012.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Brussels, Belgium, AU offices in 2013.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Brussels, Belgium, AU offices in 2014.
* Due to the fact that Arson, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, and Sex Offenses are not
applicable to the Uniform Crime Reporting hierarchy rule, some instances of the aforementioned are counted
in multiple categories. Hence, a singular criminal incident may be listed under a variety of categories if facets
of the incident meet criteria defined herein. As always, please refer to the Daily Crime Log for information
regarding the most recent criminal occurrences.
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96
CRIMINAL OFFENSES
MADRID, SPAIN
Type of Offense
On Campus
Non-Campus Building
or Property
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
Criminal Homicide
Murder/Non-negligent
manslaughter
Negligent manslaughter
Sex Offenses*
Forcible sex offenses
Non-forcible sex offenses
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft
Arson*
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Domestic Violence*
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Dating Violence*
Stalking*
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Madrid, Spain, AU offices in 2012.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Madrid, Spain, AU offices in 2013.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Madrid, Spain, AU offices in 2014.
* Due to the fact that Arson, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, and Sex Offenses are not
applicable to the Uniform Crime Reporting hierarchy rule, some instances of the aforementioned are counted
in multiple categories. Hence, a singular criminal incident may be listed under a variety of categories if facets
of the incident meet criteria defined herein. As always, please refer to the Daily Crime Log for information
regarding the most recent criminal occurrences.
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CRIMINAL OFFENSES
NAIROBI, KENYA
Type of Offense
On Campus
Non-Campus Building
or Property
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
2
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Criminal Homicide
Murder/Non-negligent
manslaughter
Negligent manslaughter
Sex Offenses*
Forcible sex offenses
Non-forcible sex offenses
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft
Arson*
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Domestic Violence*
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
n/a
n/a
n/a
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Dating Violence*
Stalking*
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Nairobi, Kenya, AU offices in 2012.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Nairobi, Kenya, AU offices in 2013.
There were no Hate Crime Offenses reported at the Nairobi, Kenya, AU offices in 2014.
* Due to the fact that Arson, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, and Sex Offenses are not
applicable to the Uniform Crime Reporting hierarchy rule, some instances of the aforementioned are counted
in multiple categories. Hence, a singular criminal incident may be listed under a variety of categories if facets
of the incident meet criteria defined herein. As always, please refer to the Daily Crime Log for information
regarding the most recent criminal occurrences.
American University Annual Security Report
100
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS
MAIN CAMPUS
Type of Offense
On Campus
Residential
Facility
Non-Campus
Building or
Property
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
1
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
2
0
0
0
2013
0
0
1
0
2014
3
3
0
15
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
1
1
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
320
320
19
0
2013
283
281
3
10
Arrests
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
Judicial Referrals
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
2014
389
388
1
0
2012
53
46
0
0
2013
60
55
1
1
2014
80
72
8
0
2012
2
2
0
0
2013
2
2
0
0
2014
1
1
0
0
NOTE: The Residential Facility statistics are subsets of the On Campus statistics.
American University Annual Security Report
101
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS
TENLEY CAMPUS
Type of Offense
On Campus
Residential
Facility
Non-Campus
Building or
Property
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
62
61
0
0
2013
17
17
0
0
Arrests
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
Judicial Referrals
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
7
7
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
NOTE: The Residential Facility statistics are subsets of the On Campus statistics.
American University Annual Security Report
102
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS
WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF LAW CAMPUS
Type of Offense
On Campus
Non-Campus Building
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Arrests
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
Judicial Referrals
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
NOTE: The Residential Facility statistics are subsets of the On Campus statistics.
American University Annual Security Report
103
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, AU OFFICES
Type of Offense
On Campus
Non-Campus Building
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Arrests
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
Judicial Referrals
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
American University Annual Security Report
104
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS
MADRID, SPAIN, AU OFFICES
Type of Offense
On Campus
Non-Campus Building
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Arrests
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
Judicial Referrals
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
American University Annual Security Report
105
ARRESTS AND JUDICIAL REFERRALS
NAIROBI, KENYA, AU OFFICES
Type of Offense
On Campus
Non-Campus Building
Public Property
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
Arrests
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
Judicial Referrals
Liquor law violations
Drug abuse violations
Weapons law violations
American University Annual Security Report
106
WASHINGTON, DC, METRO MAP
American University Annual Security Report
107
IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS AT AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
American University Department of Public Safety
202-885-2527
EMERGENCY ON CAMPUS
202-885-3636
EMERGENCY OFF CAMPUS
911
Request a Safety Escort
202-885-2527
AUTO Shuttle Service
202-885-2886
Counseling Center at American University
202-885-3500
2FIX (report unsafe facilities)
202-885-2349
American University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution that operates in compliance with
applicable laws and regulations. The university prohibits discrimination and discriminatory harassment
(including sexual harassment and sexual violence) against any AU community member on the basis of race,
color, national origin, religion, sex (including pregnancy), age, sexual orientation, disability, marital status,
personal appearance, gender identity and expression, family responsibilities, political affiliation, source of
income, veteran status, an individual’s genetic information, or any other bases under federal or local laws
(collectively “Protected Bases”). For information, contact the dean of students ([email protected]), assistant
vice president of human resources ([email protected]), or dean of academic affairs
([email protected]); or American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC
20016; 202-885-1000.
For information regarding the accreditation and licensing of American University, please visit
american.edu/academics. UP15-149
American University Annual Security Report
108
APPENDIX
I.
II.
III.
IV.
Policy on Alcohol Service at University Events
Policy on Clery Timely Warning Notices, Safety Advisories and Emergency
Notifications
Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy
American University Student Conduct Code 2015-201
American University Annual Security Report
109
University Policy: Policy on Alcohol Service at
University Events
Policy Category: Student Policies, Administrative Policies
Subject: Alcohol service at university events
Office Responsible for Review of this Policy: Office of Campus Life, Office of
the Provost, Office of Finance and Treasurer
Procedures: Alcohol Approval Form (Please contact the office of Student Activities,
University Center, or Procurement and Contracts to obtain an alcohol approval form)
Related University Policies: Employee Alcohol and Drug Policy found in the
American University Staff Personnel Policy Guide, Advertising Policy, Posting Policy,
Tavern Programming Guidelines, and the AUTO Van Request and Charter
Manifesto.
I. SCOPE
This policy establishes guidelines for alcohol service at University sponsored events.
II. POLICY STATEMENT
American University is committed to maintaining a healthy and safe academic
environment that reflects high standards of personal responsibility and behavior.
Alcohol abuse will not be tolerated under any circumstances. This policy permits the
responsible use of alcohol in moderation by persons of legal drinking age and in
accord with these guidelines.
III. DEFINITIONS
University Sponsored Events – Events hosted by the University, whether the event is
held on or off university premises.
University Premises – buildings and grounds owned, leased, operated, controlled, or
supervised by the University.
IV. POLICY
A. Authorization Requirements
1
1. The president, provost, dean, vice provost or appropriate vice president
must authorize, in advance, alcohol service for all university events,
whether the events are held on or off university premises.
2. The president, provost, dean, vice provost or appropriate vice president
must authorize the expenditure of university funds to purchase alcohol for
approved events.
B. General Requirements
1. Consumption of alcohol is prohibited on university premises except as
authorized by this policy.
2. Possession of alcohol is prohibited in university residence halls, Bender
Arena, and at open-air events.
3. Advertising that highlights the availability of alcohol at an event is
prohibited.
4. University officials reserve the right to check proof of age at university
events.
5. University officials can deny admission, alcohol services, or continued
attendance at a university event to anyone who, in the sole judgment of the
officials, is intoxicated.
6. Food or snacks and nonalcoholic beverages must be available at university
events where alcohol is served.
7. One-price, all-you-can-drink arrangements are prohibited.
8. Bring-Your-Own-Beverage (BYOB) arrangements are prohibited.
C. Legal and Risk Management Requirements
1. Alcohol service on university premises is limited to beer and wine.
2. Alcohol service off university premises must comply with the vendor’s
license.
3. The vendor’s license for university dining service permits the service of
beer and wine in any university venue.
4. A District of Columbia permit is required to serve beer and wine at
approved events on university premises that are not covered by the
vendor’s license for university dining services. A permit is also required for
approved university events at which alcohol is sold or an admission fee is
assessed in any form. The alcohol vendor is responsible for obtaining the
permit.
5. Non-university vendors must provide a certificate of insurance with a
minimum of $1 million in liquor liability coverage. The certificate should
accompany the alcohol approval form.
6. All contracts must have the appropriate signatures prior to approved
university events being held. If alcohol will be served at an event, a copy of
the signed alcohol approval form, liquor license, District of Columbia
permit when applicable, and certificate of insurance when applicable must
accompany the contract.
2
D. Additional Information
1. Faculty and Staff may obtain an Alcohol Approval Form in the offices of
Student Activities, University Center, and Procurement and Contracts and
through my.american.edu on the Controller’s Office Forms & Resources
page. Students can obtain the form in the office of Student Activities.
2. Questions about the Alcohol Policy should be directed to the Office of the
Vice President of Campus Life (x3310) or to the Office of the Provost
(x2127).
3. The university reserves the right to amend this policy in accordance with
the law, community standards, or the best interests of the university.
E. University Sanctions for violating the Alcohol Policy can be found in the Staff
Manual posted on my.american.edu and in the Student Handbook posted on
www.american.edu/policies.
V. EFFECTIVE DATE
Last revised May 2005; October 2010
3
VI. SIGNATURE, DATE, AND APPROVAL
This policy needs to be signed by the appropriate officer (listed below) before it is
considered approved
Approved:
4
American University
Student Conduct Code
2015–2016
d
American University • Student Conduct Code
Preamble
The central commitment of American University
is to the development of thoughtful, responsible
human beings in the context of a challenging yet
supportive academic community.
American University
Common Purpose
Statement
of
To achieve its ends, an academic community requires the
knowledge, integrity, and decency of its members. In turn, the
community helps individuals develop habits and values that will
enable them to achieve personal satisfaction and to contribute to a
better world. This Student Conduct Code is designed to benefit the
American University community and to assist in forming the
highest standards of ethics and morals among its members. It
fosters the university’s commitment to excellence and equity and
affirms the shared values that make community life possible.
Students with alleged violations of the Student Conduct Code
should contact Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services
to receive further information on conduct procedures.
I. Authority for Student Discipline
Ultimate authority for all university policy is vested in the Board of Trustees of American University.
Non-academic disciplinary authority has been delegated by the president to the vice president of
Campus Life to implement student conduct policies and take all necessary and appropriate action to
protect the safety and well-being of the campus community.
The Board of Trustees reserves the right to review, and to take any action it deems necessary, in any
conduct case. In practice, the resolution of nonacademic conduct cases may involve an array of
university administrators and committees of students, staff, and faculty. Students are asked to
assume positions of responsibility in the university conduct system in order to contribute their skills
and insights to the resolution of conduct cases. The university reserves the right to amend this
Student Conduct Code at any time according to established procedures.
II. Responsibilities and Rights
Provisions afforded to parties involved in cases subject to Title IX and the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act
are italicized in applicable sections and stated in summary below, in part B.
A. Every student has a duty to understand and abide by the rules and regulations of the university.
Ignorance of a rule or regulation will not be an acceptable reason to find a student not responsible.
Students accused of conduct violations are entitled to the following procedural protections:
1. to be informed of the allegations against them;
2. to request an informal resolution of the case;
3. to be allowed reasonable time to prepare a response;
4. to hear and respond to evidence upon which an allegation is based;
5. to present relevant witnesses and ask questions of the witnesses at disciplinary hearings;
6. to be assured of confidentiality according to the terms of the university policy on Confidentiality
of Student Records;
7. to request that any person conducting a disciplinary conference (hearing officer), or serving as a
Conduct Council member or hearing administrator, be disqualified on the grounds of personal
bias;
8. to be provided with an opportunity to review these rights before any disciplinary conference or
hearing;
9. to be considered not responsible for the allegations until found responsible based on what is
more likely than not to have occurred (by a preponderance of the evidence);
10. to have reasonable access to the case file prior to and during the disciplinary conference or
hearing;
2 11. to have an advisor as defined in Section XI of this Student Conduct Code; and
12. to appeal the outcome of the case according to Section XVII of this Student Conduct Code.
B. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, a federal statute, mandates that schools
receiving federal funds must ensure that all students, irrespective of sex, have access to an equal
educational opportunity. The university’s Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy provides the
complaint resolution process to assist the university in ensuring an educational environment and
work place free from sexual harassment, discrimination, and discriminatory harassment. A copy of
the university’s Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy is available at
www.american.edu/policies/upload/Discrimination-and-Sexual-Harassment-Policy.pdf. Prohibited
conduct under Title IX, the Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy, and the Student Conduct
Code includes sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, rape, sexual assault, sexual
exploitation, and stalking. These types of prohibited conduct will not be resolved in mediation. To
ensure the prompt, fair, and impartial resolution of these types of prohibited conduct,
complainants/complaining witnesses and respondents are afforded the following in disciplinary
proceedings:
1. to be informed at the same time of the allegations, the hearing date, and the hearing outcome;
2. to be allowed reasonable time to prepare a response;
3. to hear and respond to evidence upon which an allegation is based;
4. to present relevant witnesses and ask questions of the witnesses at disciplinary hearings;
5. to be assured of confidentiality according to the terms of the university policy on Confidentiality
of Student Records;
6. to request that any person conducting a disciplinary conference (hearing officer), or serving as a
Conduct Council member or hearing administrator, be disqualified on the grounds of personal
bias;
7. to be provided with an opportunity to review these rights before any disciplinary conference or
hearing;
8. to have the respondent be considered not responsible for the allegations until found responsible
based on what is more likely than not to have occurred (by a preponderance of the evidence);
9. to have reasonable access to the case file prior to and during the disciplinary conference or
hearing;
10. to have an advisor as defined in Section XI of this Student Conduct Code;
11. to be notified of the outcome as the complainant/complaining witness in cases of crimes of
violence, non-forcible sex offenses, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence and
stalking; and
3 12. to appeal the outcome of the case according to Section XVII of this Student Conduct Code.
III. Scope of Authority
The Student Conduct Code (“Code”) is the university’s policy for nonacademic conduct offenses
and applies to all students, recognized student organizations, and provisionally recognized student
groups at American University, including students at the Washington College of Law (“WCL”).
However, alleged prohibited conduct by WCL students will not be subject to the resolution
mechanism described in this policy, except in cases involving conduct prohibited by the university’s
Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy. Such violations will be resolved using the procedures
set forth in this Code. All other alleged prohibited conduct by WCL students will be resolved
according to the procedures set forth in the Honor Code for the Washington College of Law.
The university retains authority over alleged infractions that occur during a student’s matriculation
or attendance at the university, including winter, spring, and summer breaks, and periods of leave of
absence from the university. Therefore, a hearing may be scheduled after a student has completed a
program, withdrawn, or graduated from the university. Generally, the university will take disciplinary
action for on-campus infractions of the Code. However, the university may take disciplinary action
for off-campus infractions of the Code when a student’s behavior threatens or endangers the safety
and well-being of the campus community; when a student is the subject of a violation of local, state,
or federal law; or when, in the judgment of university officials, a student’s alleged misconduct has a
negative effect on the university’s pursuit of its mission or on the well-being of the greater
community.
IV. Violations of Law and University Regulations
Students may be accountable both to civil authorities and to the university for acts that constitute
violations of law and of this Code. Disciplinary action at the university will normally proceed while
criminal proceedings are pending and will not be subject to challenge on the grounds that criminal
charges involving the same incident have been dismissed or reduced.
V. Definitions
A. “Aggravated violation”—a violation that resulted or could have resulted in significant damage to
persons or property or which otherwise posed a substantial threat to the stability and
continuance of normal university or university-sponsored activities.
B. “Coerce”—to force one to act based on fear of harm to self or others. Means of coercion may
include, but are not limited to, pressure, threats, emotional intimidation, or the use of physical
force. Coercion also includes forcing a person to act by impairing the faculties of that person
through the administration of a substance.
C. “Complaining witness”—the person alleged to have been subjected to any of the following:
sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, rape, sexual assault, sexual exploitation,
stalking.
D. “Consent”—words or conduct indicating a freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or
4 to participate in sexual activities. Sexual contact will be considered “without consent” if no clear
consent, verbal or nonverbal, is given; if inflicted through force, threat of force, or coercion; or
if inflicted upon a person who is unconscious or who otherwise reasonably appears to be
without the mental or physical capacity to consent.
E. “Dating Violence”—violence or abusive behavior against an intimate partner (romantic, dating,
or sexual partner) that seeks to control the partner or has caused harm to the partner (the harm
may be physical, verbal, emotional, economic, or sexual in nature). The existence of such a
relationship shall be determined based on consideration of the following factors: the length of
the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of the interaction between the
persons involved in the relationship.
F. “Disciplinary conference”—a forum in which a hearing officer meets with a student to resolve
an alleged violation of the Code.
G. “Disciplinary hearing”—a forum in which a panel of the Conduct Council meets with a student
to resolve an alleged violation of the Code.
H. “Disorderly”—conduct which a reasonable person, under similar circumstances, should be
expected to know would disturb the peace.
I. “Domestic Violence”—violence or abusive behavior against a roommate, family member, or
intimate partner that causes physical or psychological injury, pain, or illness.
J. “Group”—an association of persons that has applied for recognition as a student organization,
but is not yet formally recognized by the university.
K. “Harassment”—an intimidating, hostile, or coercive act which is intentional or persistent.
L. “Hazing”—an intentional act or method of initiation into a group, club, organization, or team
that subjects another person, whether voluntarily or involuntarily, to conduct that may injure,
abuse, humiliate, harass, or intimidate that person.
M. “Hearing Administrator”—a staff member who conducts disciplinary hearings as set forth in
Section XV of this Code.
N. “Hearing Officer”— a staff member who conducts disciplinary conferences as set forth in
Section XIV of this Code.
O. “Institution” and “University”—American University and all of its undergraduate and graduate
departments and programs.
P. “Organization”—an association of persons that is formally recognized by the university as a
student organization.
Q. “Physical Assault”—Unwanted physical contact or the use of physical force to threaten or cause
physical injury, pain, or illness.
5 R. “Preponderance of the Evidence”—a measure of proof that a reasonable person would accept
as “more likely than not” that a fact is true or that an incident occurred.
S. “Rape”—any act of sexual intercourse or sexual penetration of any orifice of the body with a
body part or other object that takes place against a person’s will or without consent, or that is
accompanied by coercion or the threat of bodily harm. [Also see “consent” and “coerce.”]
T. “Reckless”—conduct which a reasonable person, under similar circumstances, should be
expected to know would create a substantial risk of harm to persons or property or which would
otherwise be likely to result in interference with normal university or university-sponsored
activities.
U. “Relevant”—related to the charges at hand. Relevant information may be excluded by a hearing
officer or administrator during a disciplinary conference or hearing if it is unfairly prejudicial.
V. “Sexual assault”—any intentional sexual touching with any object(s) or body part(s) that is
against a person’s will or without consent or that is perpetrated through coercion or threat of
bodily harm.
W. “Sexual exploitation”—taking sexual advantage of another, for one’s own advantage or benefit,
or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited. Examples include, but are
not limited to: recording, photographing or transmitting sexual photos, sounds, images or other
information; voyeurism; indecent exposure; prostituting or soliciting another person; inducing
incapacitation to commit acts of sexual misconduct; knowingly exposing another person to
sexually transmitted infection (STI) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
X. “Sexual harassment”—unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other oral,
written or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: submission to or rejection of such conduct
is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of education, employment or
participation in other university activities; submission to or rejection of such conduct by an
individual is used as the basis for evaluation in making academic or personnel decision affecting
that individual; or such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
individual’s work or academic performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive
environment for working, learning or living on campus [Also see Discrimination and Sexual
Harassment Policy.]
Y. “Stalking”—repeated, unwanted contact with any person, including contact by electronic means
or by proxy, or the credible threat of repeated contact with the intent to place a reasonable
person in fear for his or her safety or the safety of his or her family or close acquaintances or to
inflict substantial emotional distress.
Z. “University premises”—buildings and grounds owned, leased, operated, controlled, or
supervised by the university.
AA. “University-sponsored activity”—any activity on or off university premises that is specifically
initiated or supervised by the university.
BB. “Weapon”—firearms, fireworks, explosives, metal knuckles, knives, or any other instrument
6 designed or used to inflict injury to person or property.
VI. Prohibited Conduct
This Code is not written with the specificity of a criminal statute, nor is it intended to cover every
instance of potentially prohibited conduct. American University expects its students, wherever they
are, to adhere to high standards of honor and good citizenship and to conduct themselves in a
responsible manner that brings credit to themselves and the university. The following misconduct is
subject to disciplinary action:
A. attempting to engage in any prohibited conduct;
B. interpersonal violence including, but not limited to, physical assault, dating violence and
domestic violence;
C. conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person;
D. sexual assault;
E. sexual exploitation;
F. sexual harassment;
G. rape;
H. using, possessing, distributing, or manufacturing a weapon, or possessing any object produced as
a weapon; or any object that is visually indistinguishable from a weapon [exceptions may be
made for use of imitation weapons or athletic equipment when used within policies specified by
Athletics & Recreation, Health and Fitness faculty, Student Activities, or Performing Arts, as
applicable.]
I. hazing;
J. arson;
K. violation of university policies pertaining to the use and/or possession of alcohol;
L. violation of university policies pertaining to the sale and/or distribution of alcohol;
M. unauthorized possession and/or use of any controlled substance, illegal drug (including
marijuana) or drug paraphernalia;
N. manufacture, distribution and/or sale of any controlled substance or illegal drug (including
marijuana) or drug paraphernalia;
O. violation of local, state, or federal law;
P. entry, attempt to enter, or remaining without authority or permission in any university office,
7 residence hall room, university sponsored event, or university premises;
Q. intentionally initiating or causing to be initiated any false report, warning, or threat of fire,
explosion, or other emergency;
R. harassment;
S. stalking;
T. theft of property or services or knowingly possessing stolen property;
U. in university matters not covered by the Academic Integrity Code: dishonesty; misrepresentation;
fraud; forgery; or knowingly using false information, documents, or instruments of
identification;
V. intentionally or recklessly destroying or damaging university property or the property of others;
W. tampering with, or unauthorized or fraudulent use of campus telephone equipment, telephone
credit cards, or access codes;
X. abuse of university computer equipment, networks, systems, or services;
Y. intentionally or recklessly interfering with normal university or university-sponsored activities,
including, but not limited to, studying, teaching (including class sessions and office hours),
research, university administration; or fire, police, or emergency services;
Z. disorderly conduct or interfering with the rights of others;
AA. illegal gambling or gaming, as defined by local, state or federal law;
BB. willfully failing to comply with the directions of university officials, including public safety
officers and residence life staff members, acting in performance of their duties;
CC. unauthorized use of the university’s corporate name, logo, or symbols;
DD. unauthorized soliciting or canvassing by any individual, group, or organization;
EE. violations of other published nonacademic university regulations or policies, including, but not
limited to, policies related to discrimination and discriminatory harassment, computer use,
residence life, hazing, and amplification of sound;
FF. violating the terms of any disciplinary sanction imposed in accordance with this Code.
VII. Standards of Classroom Behavior
Primary responsibility for managing the classroom environment rests with the faculty. Students who
engage in any prohibited or unlawful acts that result in disruption of a class may be directed by the
faculty member to leave the class for the remainder of the class period. Longer suspensions from
8 class or dismissal on disciplinary grounds must be preceded by a disciplinary conference or hearing,
as set forth in Sections XIV and XV of this Code. Academic dishonesty allegations are processed in
accordance with procedures set forth in the Academic Integrity Code. Students will be subject to
both the Student Conduct Code and the Academic Integrity Code in cases where there is a
combination of alleged violations of academic and nonacademic regulations.
VIII. Student Groups and Organizations
Groups of students and student organizations are expected to comply with all university policies
including this Code and all additional policies pertaining to groups and organizations. Allegations of
policy violations by groups or organizations will be investigated and resolved through Student
Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services. A group or organization may be held responsible for the
actions and behaviors of its members and guests. The decision to hold a group or organization
responsible as a whole is ultimately determined by examining the circumstances of a situation and by
taking into account factors that include, but are not limited to, the following:
1. actions were committed by one or more officers or authorized representatives acting in the
scope of their group or organizational capacities;
2. actions involved, were committed by, or were condoned by (actively or passively) a number of
group or organization members, alumni, or guests;
3. actions occurred at or in connection with an activity or event funded, sponsored, publicized,
advertised, or communicated about by the group or organization;
4. actions occurred at or in connection with an activity or event that a reasonable person would
associate with the group or organization;
5. actions should have been foreseen by the group or organization or its officers, but reasonable
precautions against such actions were not taken;
6. actions were the result of a policy or practice of the group or organization;
7. actions would be attributable to the group or organization under the group’s own policies
(including local or national risk management guidelines);
8. actions were taken by individuals who, but for their affiliation with the group or organization,
would not have been involved in the incident;
9. one or more officers or members of a group or organization fail to report knowledge or
information about a violation to, or otherwise fail to cooperate with, appropriate university or
emergency officials; and
10. the group or organization, or any member acting on its behalf, fails to satisfactorily complete the
terms of any disciplinary sanction or outcome.
A. Recognized student organizations and student groups with provisional recognition, as well as
their members and officers, may be held collectively and/or individually responsible for violations of
9 the Code and/or other university policies.
B. Sanctions for group or organization misconduct may include revocation or denial of registration
or recognition, as well as other appropriate sanctions. Sanctions for misconduct by a group with
provisional recognition may include denial of recognition, as well as other appropriate sanctions.
C. Recognized student organizations, including fraternities and sororities, may appoint panels or
boards to mediate disputes and enforce association bylaws. Decisions or recommendations by such
panels or boards do not constitute official action by the university.
IX. Interim Suspension
The dean of students or designee may suspend a student from the university for an interim period
pending disciplinary or criminal proceedings or medical evaluation regarding behavior relevant to
such proceedings. The interim suspension will be effective immediately, without prior notice,
whenever there is evidence that the continued presence of the student at the university poses a
substantial and immediate threat to him or herself, to others, or to the stability and continuation of
normal university functions. Interim suspension excludes students from university premises and
other privileges and activities. A student suspended on an interim basis will be given a prompt
opportunity to speak with the dean of students or designee in order to discuss the following issues
only:
(a) The reliability of the information concerning the student’s conduct, including the matter of
identity; and
(b) Whether the conduct and surrounding circumstances reasonably indicate that the continued
presence of the student on university premises poses a substantial and immediate threat to him
or herself, to others, or to the stability and continuation of normal university functions.
X. Conduct Council
The Conduct Council will consist of students, faculty, and staff selected by the director of Student
Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services and appointed by the dean of students with the approval
of the vice president of campus life. Candidates for selection and appointment to the Conduct
Council will be nominated by the Student Government, Residence Hall Association, Graduate
Leadership Council, Student Bar Association, Faculty Senate, and Staff Council. In addition,
students, faculty, and staff may apply to become members of the Conduct Council by contacting
Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services. The director of Student Conduct and Conflict
Resolution Services or designee is responsible for training and providing administrative support to
the Council. Specifically, Conduct Council members and Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution
Services staff will receive annual training on the issues related to dating violence, domestic violence,
sexual assault, and stalking, as well as how to conduct a hearing process that protects the safety of a
complaining witness and promotes accountability. Among other duties, members of the Conduct
Council will sit on hearing panels designed to resolve allegations referred for a hearing in accordance
with Section XV of this Code.
A. The director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services or designee will select a
hearing panel from the Conduct Council comprised of three (3) persons: one (1) student and two (2)
10 members of the faculty/staff.
B. Both the findings and the sanctions determined by Conduct Council hearing panels are
recommendations to the dean of students or designee, who will render a decision.
C. Members of the Conduct Council who are alleged to have committed any violation of this Code,
other university policies, or a criminal offense may be temporarily suspended from their positions by
the director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services while allegations against them are
pending. Members found responsible for any such violation or offense may be disqualified from any
further participation in the university conduct system.
Additional grounds and procedures for removal may be established by the director of Student
Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services.
XI. Advisors
A. At their own discretion, complainants and respondents may be advised by an American
University student, faculty, or staff member. The role of the advisor is limited to consultation. While
advisors may be present at disciplinary conferences or hearings, they may not address hearing
bodies, speak in disciplinary proceedings, or question witnesses. Advisors may not act on behalf of
the complainant/complaining witness or respondent, or contact any participant in the conduct
process. Because the purpose of this conduct process is to provide a fair review of alleged violations
of this Code, rather than a formal legal proceeding, participation of persons acting as legal counsel is
not permitted.
B. In cases of dating violence, domestic violence, rape, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, or stalking, the
complainant/complaining witness and respondent may be advised and accompanied by an advisor of their choice during
a disciplinary conference or hearing and related meetings. Advisors of choice are not limited to American University
students, faculty, or staff. However, the role of an advisor is limited to consultation as described in Section XI(A).
XII. Standards of Due Process
Students who may be subject to removal from university housing, suspension, or dismissal will be
referred to a disciplinary hearing, as specified in Section XV of this Code. Students who may be
subject to lesser sanctions for nonacademic misconduct will be referred to a disciplinary conference,
as set forth in Section XIV of this Code. Formal rules of evidence will not be applied, nor will
deviations from prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a decision unless significant prejudice to
the parties involved or the university result.
XIII. Procedures for Case Resolution
A. Mediation is encouraged as an alternative means to resolve some conduct cases. The director of
Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services will determine if mediation is appropriate. The
director, at his or her discretion, may decline to process a complaint until the parties in a
nonacademic misconduct case make a reasonable attempt to achieve a mediated settlement. To be
binding in a conduct case, any mediated settlement must be approved by the director of Student
Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services. If mediation fails, the case will be forwarded for a
disciplinary conference.
11 B. Any American University student, faculty, or staff member may refer a student, a recognized
student organization, or a student group with provisional recognition suspected of violating this
Code to the director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services. Those referring cases are
normally expected to serve as the complainant and to present relevant evidence in hearings or
disciplinary conferences. The complainant may request the assistance of an advisor, as set forth in
Section XI of this Code. A written complaint must be filed with the director of Student Conduct
and Conflict Resolution Services within 15 days (excluding weekends, official university holidays,
winter and spring breaks) of the occurrence or discovery of the alleged infraction(s). The deadline for
filing a case will be extended if there is an alleged violation of the university’s Discrimination and Sexual Harassment
Policy, Whistleblower Policy, or a Code violation involving sexual harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, rape,
sexual assault, sexual exploitation, or stalking. In such cases, the complainant will have one year from the date of
discovery to file a complaint as set forth in these policies. Requests for extensions of the 15 day or one year
filing periods must be made in writing to the director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution
Services or designee, and will be evaluated based on whether a reasonable person might be justified
in filing after the deadline because of relevant circumstances.
C. The director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services or designee will conduct a
preliminary review to determine whether the alleged misconduct, if proved, might result in removal
from university housing, suspension or dismissal. Students that may be subject to removal from
university housing, suspension, or dismissal, will be entitled to a disciplinary hearing before a
Conduct Council panel. Students who are unlikely to be subject to removal from university housing,
suspension, or dismissal will be referred to a disciplinary conference with a hearing officer, as set
forth in Section XIV of this Code.
D. Students referred for a disciplinary hearing by the director of Student Conduct and Conflict
Resolution Services may request to have their cases resolved in a disciplinary conference in
accordance with Section XIV of this Code. Such request must be in writing, affirming that the
student is aware a hearing is being waived. The full range of sanctions may be imposed, including
removal from university housing, suspension, or dismissal from the university. Both the findings and
the sanctions determined by the hearing officer are recommendations to the dean of students or
designee, who will render a decision. The director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution will
have the sole discretion in granting such a request.
E. Hearing panel members, hearing administrators, complainants, and respondents will have the
right to question relevant witnesses who make statements at disciplinary hearings.
F. The university may withhold awarding a diploma or degree otherwise earned until the completion
of the process as set forth in this Code, including the completion of all sanctions imposed.
Withholding of a diploma or degree means not conferring a diploma or degree otherwise earned for
a defined period of time or until the completion of assigned sanctions.
XIV. Procedures for Disciplinary Conferences
Students accused of nonacademic offenses that will likely result in penalties less than removal from
university housing, suspension, or dismissal are subject to a disciplinary conference with a hearing
officer. The director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services or designee will serve as
the hearing officer and conduct the disciplinary conference. Any party may challenge a hearing
12 officer on the ground of personal bias. The hearing officer may be disqualified by the director of
Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services or the dean of students or designee. The hearing
officer will make inquiries into evidence as necessary to ensure a just outcome of the case. If the
respondent chooses not to appear for a disciplinary conference, the information supporting the
allegations will be considered and a decision will be made in the absence of the respondent.
Nonetheless, the complainant will be required to file a case that meets the standard of a
preponderance of the evidence.
In complex cases, the director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services, at his or her
discretion, may refer the case to a disciplinary conference board. Conference board members will be
selected by the director. The board will consist of one hearing officer and two Conduct Council
members, including at least one student. Decisions of the disciplinary conference board are
determined by majority vote.
The director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services will review all disciplinary
conference decisions to ensure their procedural integrity and consistency with the outcomes of prior
disciplinary cases. In cases where the director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services
serves as the hearing officer, the dean of students or designee will conduct the review.
The following procedural protections are provided to respondents in disciplinary conferences:
A. written notice of the specific allegations at least three (3) business days prior to the scheduled
conference with additional time at the director’s discretion;
B. reasonable access to the case file prior to and during the conference;
C. an opportunity to respond to the evidence; and
D. a right to be accompanied by an advisor, as provided in Section XI of this Code.
In cases of sexual harassment, sexual assault, rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual exploitation, or stalking,
the complainant or complaining witness and respondent will be entitled to the same opportunities including, but not
limited to: (i) receiving notice of the conference date at the same time as the respondent; (ii) being present during
conference proceedings; (iii) receiving simultaneous written notice of the outcome of the disciplinary conference, of the
procedures to appeal the results as described in Section XVII, or any change to the results that occurs prior to the time
the results become final, and when such results become final; and (iv) the right to appeal an outcome as described in
Section XVII.
XV. Procedures for Disciplinary Hearings
Students accused of nonacademic offenses that will likely result in sanctions such as removal from
university housing, suspension, or dismissal are subject to a disciplinary hearing convened by a
hearing administrator before Conduct Council members.
A. The director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services or designee will serve as the
hearing administrator and conduct the hearing. He or she may participate in hearing panel
deliberations and discussions, but cannot vote. The hearing administrator is responsible for final
decisions on all procedural issues and may modify hearing procedures, if necessary, to ensure a
13 fair and expedient administration of the hearing.
B. The director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services or designee will give
respondents notice of the hearing date and the specific allegations against them at least five (5)
business days in advance of the hearing. Respondents will be accorded reasonable access to the
case file, which will be retained in the office of the director of Student Conduct and Conflict
Resolution Services.
C. If the respondent chooses not to appear for a disciplinary hearing, the information supporting
the allegations will be considered, and a decision will be made in the absence of the respondent.
The complainant will be required to present a case that meets the standard of a preponderance
of the evidence.
D. All hearings are closed to the public, unless parties mutually request that a hearing be open to
the public. The hearing administrator will ordinarily honor such requests unless there are
overriding interests to have the hearing closed (e.g., to protect the identity of a sexual
harassment victim). Even in a public hearing, the hearing panel may limit the number of
observers based on the physical limitations of the hearing room.
E. The hearing administrator will exercise control over the proceedings to avoid needless
consumption of time and to achieve orderly completion of the hearing. Any person, including
the respondent, who disrupts a hearing may be excluded by the hearing administrator for cause.
F. The university will make audio recordings of hearings. A transcript of the hearing will be
provided, upon written request by the complainant or respondent, who must pay for the cost of
the transcript service.
G. Any party may challenge a panel member or the hearing administrator on the grounds of
personal bias. Hearing panel members may be disqualified by the hearing administrator. A
hearing administrator may be disqualified by a majority vote of the members of the hearing
panel. Votes will be by secret ballot.
H. People presenting statements will be asked to affirm that their statements are truthful and may
be subject to allegations of violating this Code by intentionally providing false information to the
university.
I. People presenting statements, other than the complainant and the respondent, will be excluded
from the hearing except when providing statements to the hearing panel. All parties, the people
making statements, and the public will be excluded during panel deliberations, which will not be
recorded or transcribed.
J. The allegations against the respondent must be established by a preponderance of the evidence.
K. Formal rules of evidence will not be applicable in disciplinary proceedings conducted pursuant
to this Code. The hearing administrator will abide by the rules of confidentiality and privilege,
but will admit all other matters into evidence which are relevant. The respondent or complainant
may challenge the relevance of evidence. Irrelevant or unduly repetitious evidence may be
excluded by the hearing administrator. The sexual history or sexual character of a party will not
be admissible in disciplinary proceedings unless such information is determined relevant by the
14 hearing administrator.
L. Complainants and respondents will be accorded an opportunity to ask relevant questions of
witnesses who make statements at the hearing.
M. Written statements will be admitted into evidence only if signed by the person submitting the
written statement and witnessed by the director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution
Services or designee, or if notarized.
N. A determination of responsibility will be followed by a supplemental proceeding in which either
party may submit relevant evidence or make relevant statements concerning appropriate
sanctions. The past disciplinary record of the respondent will be supplied to the panel only
during the supplementary proceeding.
O. Any determination of responsibility by majority vote of the hearing panel will be supported by
written findings, which will be placed in the case file and made available to the student
respondent before a final decision is rendered by the dean of students.
In cases of sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, rape, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, or stalking,
the person identified as the complainant or complaining witness and respondent will be entitled to the same
opportunities, including but not limited to: (i) receiving notice of the hearing date at the same time as the respondent;
(ii) being present during any disciplinary proceeding; (iii) receiving simultaneous written notice of the outcome of the
disciplinary hearing, of the procedures to appeal the results of any such proceeding as described in Section XVII, of any
change to the results that occurs prior to the time the results become final, and when such results become final; and (iv)
the right to appeal an outcome as described in Section XVII.
XVI. Sanctions
Significant mitigating or aggravating factors will be considered in determining sanctions, including
the present demeanor and past disciplinary record of the respondent, the nature of the violation, and
the severity of any damage, injury, or harm resulting from it. Repeated or aggravated violations of
any part of this Code may also result in relocation or removal from university housing, suspension,
or dismissal. Sanctions which may be imposed in accordance with this Code include, but are not
limited to:
A. “Censure”—a written reprimand for violation of specified regulations, including a warning that
continuation or repetition of prohibited conduct may be cause for additional disciplinary action.
B. “Disciplinary Probation”—status assigned for a designated period of time, during which any
other violation of the Code may result in removal from university housing, suspension, or
dismissal from the university. Students on disciplinary probation may not hold or run for any
elected or appointed positions. Additional conditions appropriate to the violation may be
imposed.
C. “Restitution”—repayment of the direct cost to the university for damages resulting from a
violation of this Code.
D. “Relocation in University Housing”—administrative reassignment to a different residence hall
15 and/or room.
E. “Removal from University Housing”—denial of housing privileges.
F. “Suspension”—exclusion from university premises and other privileges or activities as set forth
in the suspension notice. This action will be permanently recorded on the student’s academic
transcript.
G. “Dismissal”—permanent termination of student status and exclusion from university premises,
privileges, and activities. This action will be permanently recorded on the student’s academic
transcript.
H. “Revocation of Degree”—rescinding a student’s degree awarded by the university.
I. “Other Sanctions”—other sanctions may be imposed instead of or in addition to those specified
in sections (A) through (G) including, but not limited to, service or research projects.
XVII. Appeals
Disciplinary determinations may be appealed in keeping with the following provisions:
A. The complaining witness may only appeal in cases where the complaining witness has a right to know the outcome
of the case under the Campus Security Act, as amended. The respondent may appeal any disciplinary decision.
B. The appeal must be submitted in writing to Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services
within seven (7) business days after the notice of the case outcome. In the case where the complaining
witness is informed of the case outcome, and an appeal is submitted by the complaining witness or respondent, the
other party shall be given an opportunity to respond within seven (7) business days of notification that an appeal
has been submitted.
C. Appeals will be reviewed by an appellate board of the Conduct Council to determine their
viability. The appellate board will consist of three (3) persons: one (1) student and two (2)
members of the faculty/staff selected from the Conduct Council by the director of Student
Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services. The appellate board will be constituted of members
who did not serve on the original hearing panel. The appellate board will meet as soon as
possible after the appeal is received.
D. The appellate board will determine viability based on the following conditions:
i.
new information that significantly alters the finding of fact;
ii. evidence of improper procedure; or
iii. insufficient/excessive sanctions.
In cases where the respondent is found not responsible, either party may submit an appeal, if the case is one in which the
complainant/complaining witness has the right to be notified of the outcome. Decisions of the appellate board
about the viability of the appeal are determined by majority vote and are final. Only when deemed
16 viable will the appeal be forwarded to the vice president of Campus Life or designee for review and
decision.
E. The appellate board may deny the request for appeal and affirm the findings of the hearing
officer or dean of students, or grant the request for appeal and forward its recommendations to
the vice president of Campus Life or designee.
F. Appeals will be decided based on the notification letter, the outcome letter, the appeal statement,
witness statements, and evidence. All written materials considered by the appellate board and
vice president of Campus Life or designee will be subject to inspection by the appealing
party/parties. New hearings will not be conducted on appeal. Decisions rendered by the vice
president of Campus Life or designee are final.
G. The following standards will apply when appeals are considered by the vice president of Campus
Life or designee:
i.
Sanctions may be increased or decreased, only if found to be substantially disproportionate
to the offense.
ii. Cases may be remanded for rehearing, only if specified procedural errors or errors in
interpretation of university regulations were so substantial as to deny the respondent (or
complainant) a fair hearing, or if new and significant evidence becomes available that could not
have been discovered by a properly diligent student before or during the original hearing.
iii. Cases may be dismissed, if the finding is held to be unsupported by the evidence.
H. The imposition of sanctions will be deferred while an appeal is pending, unless, in the discretion
of the vice president of Campus Life or designee, the continued presence of the respondent in
the residence halls or on the campus poses a substantial threat to him or herself, to others, or to
the stability and continuance of normal university functions.
XVIII. Disciplinary Records
Except as noted below, disciplinary records are maintained by Student Conduct and Conflict
Resolution Services for seven (7) years from the date of the letter providing notice of final
disciplinary action. Release of disciplinary records to third parties is provided in accordance with the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (FERPA), until a student has
graduated from the university, or as required by law. Records for a student who is suspended,
dismissed, or who withdraws with a disciplinary case pending are maintained indefinitely; release of
these categories of disciplinary records to third parties is provided in accordance with all applicable laws, including
FERPA and the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act. [See also the Confidentiality of Student
Records policy for additional information.] Amended and approved by the president, August 2015.
17 RESIDENCE HALL REGULATIONS
These are implementing regulations, based on American University’s Student Conduct Code, and are
incorporated as an addendum to that document. Violations of these regulations­ may result in
referral to Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution Services for review and appropriate action. The
residence halls include the halls and any areas contiguous to the halls. Engaging in prohibited
conduct may be a violation of both the Student Conduct Code and the residence hall regulations.
Responsibility for Damage
Residents will be held responsible for damage to residence hall buildings or furniture and will be
billed for repair or replacement­ where they have caused damage in their own rooms or in common
areas. In the event of willful damage to the common areas located in the immediate vicinity of a
student’s room, or to the furnishings or facilities located therein, if the willful perpetrators of such
damage cannot be identified, all resident students served by that common area may be assessed for
repair or replacement costs.
Responsibility for Guests
Residents will be held responsible for the behavior of their guests and any other persons in their
residence hall rooms, pertaining­ to the regulations for conduct at American University, and may be
charged in lieu of the guest or visitor with violating the respective sections of these policies.
The following conduct is expressly prohibited:
I. Related to Residence Hall Security
1. To enter any residence hall without showing an access card or proper identification to a housing
staff member, or upon the request of a staff member.
2. For any visitor not escorted by a resident of that residence hall complex to fail to leave the
building upon the request of any housing or university­ staff member.
3. For any visitor to enter the building unescorted or fail to be accompanied by a resident escort
from that residence hall complex at all times.
4. To escort or permit entrance to any nonresident of a residence­ hall who is not known to the
student or for whom the student does not assume responsibility as a guest.
5. To prop open outside doors or exit ways without the permission­ of a housing staff member.
6. To use any marked fire exit except during a fire alarm.
7. To block any fire door or fire exit.
8. To sound any elevator alarm bell without due cause, or to interfere with the normal operation of
elevators.
9. To duplicate any room key or access card.
18 10. To fail to return a spare key within 10 minutes of signing it out at the front desk.
11. To fail to return room keys upon vacating a room.
12. To go behind the reception desk in any residence hall without­ authorization from the resident
director.
13. To enter or exit the residence hall through a window when no emergency is present.
14. To enter restricted areas including, but not limited to, building roofs.
II. Related to Fire Codes
1. To set any fire within the buildings or areas contiguous to the buildings.
2. To use any halogen lamp, broiler oven, electric coffee maker, popcorn popper, microwave oven,
hotplate, open burner, or electric water heating device in student rooms, on carpeted floors,
in hallways, or other non-designated areas.
3. To cook indoors with charcoal or any open flame device.
4. To possess or burn any candle or incense indoors.
5. To keep any refrigerator with an electrical requirement exceeding seven (7) amps.
6. To fail to immediately evacuate the buildings properly when a fire alarm sounds or to reenter any
building during a fire alarm before receiving permission from a housing or Public Safety staff
member.
7. To tamper with fire equipment, or to carry or remove fire extinguishers from their mounts or
storage boxes except in case of a fire.
8. To pull or activate any fire alarm when no fire is present, or to falsely report any fire or other
emergency.
9. To use electrical lights and appliances totaling more than 850 watts in a student room at any one
time.
10. To disconnect, sound, or otherwise tamper with any smoke detector.
11. To run electrical wires beneath any rug or carpet.
12. To smoke anywhere other than in areas where smoking is permitted. Smoking is prohibited in all
residence halls.
19 III. Related to Property
1. To remove furniture from any common area without authorization of housing staff.
2. To keep any unauthorized student furniture designated for other areas in student rooms.
3. To place waterbeds in student rooms.
4. To keep any pet, except fish, in student rooms.
5. To remove any wall-mounted furniture.
6. To mark or deface any surface (e.g., door, wall, carpet).
7. To mark, deface, steal, harbor, or damage any property belonging to the university, any hall,
resident, or commercial vendor (such as vending machines, video games, washing machines,
dryers, or telephone equipment).
IV. Other Prohibited Conduct
1. To engage in any disorderly conduct or to interfere with the rights of other students in their
academic pursuits. This specifically­ and especially pertains to other residents’ rights to an
environment conducive to study and to sleep.
2. To engage in sports activity within the residence halls.
3. To engage in sports activity or to create excessive noise within 50 feet of any residence hall.
4. To shout or to otherwise create disturbances from any residence­ hall window.
5. To create excessive noise by any means. This will include playing loudspeakers through room
windows at any time and noise audible outside a student room or in public areas, especially, but
not limited to after 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, or past 1 a.m. on weekends. These times
are considered­ quiet hours.
6. To drop or throw any object or any liquid from windows.
8. To keep dangerous materials, including but not limited to, firearms, air or CO2-powered
weapons, fireworks, and dangerous­ weapons.
9. To use, or possess any illegal drug (including medical marijuana) or drug paraphernalia in the
residence halls.
10. To sell, manufacture, or distribute any illegal drug (including medical marijuana) or drug
paraphernalia in the residence halls.
11. To knowingly and voluntarily be in the presence of any illegal­ drug (including medical
marijuana) or drug paraphernalia in the residence halls.
20 12. To violate university policies pertaining to the use or possession of alcohol in the residence halls.
13. To violate university policies pertaining to the sale, manufacture, or distribution­ of alcohol in
the residence halls.
14. To knowingly and voluntarily be in the presence of alcohol in the residence halls.
15. To refuse to follow a directive from a housing staff member when acting in the performance of
his or her duties. Directive may include but are not limited to: directive to produce student
identification, directive to remain in the area, and directive to allow staff entry to a residential
space to investigate possible health/safety emergencies or suspected violations of University
policy.
16. To solicit, canvass, post, or distribute any materials within the residence halls without the
approval of the resident director or to violate the university or residence hall posting policies.
17. To have an overnight guest without the roommate(s)’s consent.
18. To have a guest visit in the residence halls for longer than three (3) days. Repeated visits by
guests over extended periods may be considered unauthorized occupancy of a room by the
guest.
19. The university reserves the right to prohibit repeated, extended visits.
Amended and approved by the vice president of Campus Life April 2008, amended and approved June 2011,
amended and approved June 2014, amended and approved August 2015.
21 Department of Public Safety
4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20016
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