Procedure 415 Asbestos Management Control Program

Procedure 415 Asbestos Management Control Program
PROCEDURE 415
Adopted
Last Revised
Review Date
November 23, 2010
September 5, 2013
September 2018
ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT CONTROL PROGRAM
1.
PURPOSE
This procedure establishes an Asbestos Management Control Program (AMCP) as required by Ontario
Regulation 278/05 under the Occupational Health and Safety Act. The program consists of two
components: 1) a management system which controls all facility maintenance, alteration, repair or other
activities which may disturb asbestos. The management system also provides for assessment or reassessment of materials confirmed or suspected to contain asbestos. If this assessment indicates
continuing disturbance or severe deterioration of asbestos, such material shall be removed in accordance
with the requirements of the Regulation; and, 2) the removal of asbestos, whenever such work risks
disturbing the asbestos already in place in any building restoration or expansion project.
2.
DEFINITIONS
ACMs
Asbestos-containing materials
AMCP
Asbestos Management Control Program
Asbestos Coordinator
The person at Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
responsible for management of asbestos, contacted through
[email protected]
Friable asbestos
Asbestos material which can be crumbled, pulverized or
powdered by hand pressure.
Non-friable asbestos
Material in which the asbestos fibres are bound or locked into the
product matrix, so that the fibres are not readily released.
“Type 1” asbestos removal
Activities where there is a low risk of exposure to airborne
asbestos fibres and almost no health risk.
“Type 2” asbestos removal
Activities where there is a moderate risk of exposure to airborne
asbestos fibres and some health risk.
“Type 3” asbestos removal
Activities where there is a high risk of exposure to airborne
asbestos fibres and a high risk of health effects.
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INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ON ASBESTOS
3.1 Scope
This procedure includes information on monitoring and work practices for all types of friable and nonfriable asbestos-containing materials (ACMs). For complete information on work classifications, refer
to Section 12 of the Regulation. Type 1 asbestos removal procedures may be performed by trained
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board staff or assigned to outside asbestos abatement
contractors. Procedures for emergency situations are also outlined. This procedure incorporates
provincial requirements enacted to November 2005. This procedure has been prepared to allow
sections appropriate for certain work practices to be separated and provided to the worker or
contractor performing the work.
This procedure excludes any information, policies or procedures related to “Type 2” and “Type 3”
(larger scale) asbestos removal whether brought about by deterioration or by renovation, alteration
or demolition projects. By their nature these types of projects are site specific and will require
documentation prepared for the specific scope, phasing and operational requirements of the project.
3.2 Occurrence and types of asbestos
Asbestos is not one mineral but a generic term used to describe a family of naturally occurring
fibrous hydrated silicates. These are divided on the basis of mineralogical features into two groups;
serpentines and amphiboles. The important property of asbestos as compared to non-asbestiform
varieties of silicates, is the presence of mineralogically long, thin fibres that can be easily separated.
According to some definitions, there are as many as thirty varieties of asbestos, but only six are of
commercial significance, as follows:
Serpentine:
Chrysotile
Amphibole:
Amosite
Crocidolite
Anthophyllite
Tremolite
Actinolite
The distinction between the two groups is based on crystalline structure. Serpentine minerals have a
sheet or layered structure whereas amphiboles have a chain-like crystal structure. The distinction
between asbestos types is important due to the different degrees of severity of asbestos-related
disease with different asbestos types. Of the three commercially important types (chrysotile, amosite
and crocidolite), chrysotile is considered the least hazardous while crocidolite is the most hazardous.
Current provincial regulation tends to reflect the variation of health effects between the different
forms of asbestos. The remaining three forms of asbestos (anthophyllite, tremolite and actinolite) are
very rarely found in commercial applications.
3.3 Health effects of asbestos
For many years, asbestos has been recognized as a health hazard for workers employed in
asbestos production, processing and use. Several serious, debilitating diseases that frequently result
in death have been linked to the inhalation of fine asbestos fibres. It is not clear how asbestos fibres
cause disease after ingestion into the lungs. For each disease, there is a latency period, usually
more than ten years between first exposure to asbestos and the appearance and confirmation of the
disease. The diseases linked to asbestos exposure are described below.
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Asbestosis:
Asbestosis is characterized by a fibrosis (scarring) of the lung tissue, which makes breathing difficult.
The most prominent symptom is breathlessness. Detection of asbestosis is possible by x-ray
examination and lung function testing. The disease is irreversible and will continue to progress even
after exposure is stopped. Rarely a cause of death itself, asbestosis results in an appreciable
reduction in life expectancy due to deaths from related illnesses. Asbestosis will develop only with
chronic exposure to high levels of airborne asbestos.
Mesothelioma:
This is a rare cancer arising from the cells of the pleura (lining of the chest cavity and lungs) and the
peritoneum (lining of the abdominal cavity). The development of mesothelioma is characterized by a
long latency period, usually at least fifteen years and sometimes more than forty years. There is no
effective treatment for mesothelioma. A large proportion of mesothelioma patients die within a year
of diagnosis. None survive longer than five years. Although asbestos was once thought to be
responsible for all mesothelioma, other causes have now been identified. The chance of contracting
mesothelioma in the absence of asbestos exposure is most remote.
Lung cancer:
Unlike asbestosis and mesothelioma, lung cancer is not strictly associated with asbestos exposure.
Furthermore, there is no basic difference between lung cancer caused by asbestos and that due to
other causes. In general, the risk of contracting lung cancer increases with the degree of asbestos
exposure, both in terms of intensity and duration. This risk is also greatly enhanced by smoking
(asbestos workers who contract lung cancer are invariably smokers).
Other asbestos-related cancers:
The relationship between asbestos exposure and asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer has
been clearly established and is beyond argument. Several other cancers have also been associated
with the inhalation of asbestos. Although the evidence of relationship is not as conclusive as for the
diseases mentioned above, these are gastrointestinal cancer affecting all parts of the gastrointestinal
tract (oesophagus, stomach, colon and rectum) and cancer of the larynx.
Other asbestos-related conditions:
A number of less serious effects have been associated with asbestos exposure, namely pleural
plaques and asbestos warts. Pleural plaques are areas of scarring of the pleural surfaces. In
general, they are not associated with any functional abnormality and are merely an indicator of
asbestos exposure. Asbestos warts are hamless skin growths that occur when asbestos fibres
penetrate the skin.
3.4 Uses of asbestos in buildings
Asbestos has been widely used in building and continues to still be used in a very limited way. The
uses of asbestos are generally classed into two groups: friable and non-friable products. A friable
material is one that when dry, can be crumbled, pulverized or powdered by simple hand pressure.
Although the use of friable materials in construction has been banned, these materials are still
present in many buildings due to the popularity of the material in the past. In order to establish an
AMCP, the many possible uses of asbestos must be known. Some of these uses are covered below
under the headings of non-friable and friable products.
3.5 Non-friable asbestos products
Asbestos cement products:
The largest use of asbestos (in terms of tonnage of fibres), is as a reinforcing agent in cementitious
products. Asbestos-reinforced cement is strong, durable, rigid and resistant to both fire and water.
Portland cement, water and asbestos are mixed to form a slurry. Using this slurry, end products can
be fabricated by a process similar to that used in paper making. Products include sheets, pipes and
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a wide variety of other shapes. The asbestos content of asbestos cement products is typically fifteen
percent.
Asbestos cement sheets are produced in four basic forms: flat sheet, corrugated panels, siding
shingles and roofing shingles. Uses of sheeting include building roofing and cladding, electrical
insulation, decorative panelling and laboratory table tops. Asbestos cement pipe is used for water
supply, sewage, irrigation, drainage applications, corrosive fluid handling and electrical and
telephone conduits. Asbestos cement products are still in use and production.
Gaskets and packing:
Long asbestos fibres blended with high temperature rubbers make excellent gasket materials.
Asbestos (bulk fibres, woven or plaited) provides strength and temperature resistance while the
rubber acts as a binder and sealing material. Asbestos yarns have been commonly used in the
manufacture of braided and woven packing materials.
Coatings and sealants:
Asbestos has been used as a reinforcing agent in a wide range of asbestos/polymer composites.
Applications include brake and transmission components, floor tiles, engine housings, bins and
containers, and a wide variety of coatings, adhesives, caulks, sealants and patching compounds.
The two most common asbestos/plastic uses have been in phenolic moulding compounds and vinylasbestos tiles. Few of these products remain in production, however.
Paper products:
Asbestos paper products are used in a wide variety of applications. In construction, the most
important are roofing felts, gaskets, pipeline wrap, millboard and electrical insulation. Some uses are
still in production (particularly where impregnated with tar or asphalt in roofing and in pipeline wrap).
Asbestos textiles:
Asbestos textile materials are predominantly manufactured from chrysotile fibres. Two types of yarn
are produced: plain, possibly braced with organic fibres; and, reinforced, which incorporates either
wire or another yarn such as nylon, cotton or polyester. Major uses for asbestos textiles are gaskets,
packing, friction materials, thermal and electrical insulation, and fire resistant applications (e.g.:
welding curtains, protective clothing, theatre curtains, hot conveyor belts and ironing board covers).
These products may be considered to become friable over time. Asbestos textiles are no longer in
widespread production.
Friction materials:
Asbestos has been used in the manufacture of brake and clutch linings and pads. The asbestos
fibres may be imbedded in a phenolic resin with various mixtures of fillers or a woven asbestos cloth
may be impregnated with the resin. Friction products are primarily used in vehicles but may be used
in any rotating machinery. They are still widely produced and used although brake and clutch
applications are no longer permitted in North America.
3.6 Friable asbestos materials and products
Friable asbestos materials and products are the main concern of the public and are the main focus
of the Asbestos Management Control Program. None of the following products remain in production.
Sprayed or trowelled fireproofing or sprayed insulation:
Several types of fireproofing or insulation were used in the period from the mid 1930’s to 1974.
Fibrous products were spray applied after being blown as a dry mix through an application gun.
These products have been shown to contain up to ninety percent (90%) asbestos in any of the three
major types (chrysotile, amosite or crocidolite). Cementitious products were trowelled or sprayed as
a wet slurry. The cementitious version of fireproofing rarely contained more than 30% to 40%
asbestos and always chrysotile.
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Sprayed or trowelled texture or acoustic plasters:
The use of asbestos was widespread in trowelled or sprayed texture coats, stipple coats or acoustic
plasters from the 1950’s to the late 1970’s. These products almost always contained less than 25%
chrysotile. Some of these products may be considered as non-friable in place and only become
friable when disturbed by construction or demolition. Other products in this group can be very soft
and extremely friable.
Mechanical system insulation:
The most widespread use of friable asbestos in buildings was for mechanical insulation. Use of
friable asbestos dates from the late 1950’s to the late 1970’s. These materials can have a variety of
appearances and asbestos content.
Typical appearances include:
► White, brown, pink or grey block
► White or grey corrugated paper (known as “aircell”)
► White, grey or brown layered paper
► Grey trowelled or hand applied material (with the appearance of hard, grey, dried “mud”)
It is possible to find all asbestos types in mechanical insulation although chrysotile is predominant
and amosite the next most common type.
3.7 Hazards of asbestos in buildings
In the late 1970’s public health authorities, the media, and the public at large, became concerned
about the health effect of asbestos materials on building occupants. It was known that asbestos
miners and factory workers and installers who regularly handled asbestos materials suffered a
higher incidence of respiratory diseases. These groups had been exposed to very high levels of
asbestos dust for prolonged periods. In response to these concerns, the Ontario Royal Commission
on Matters of Health and Safety Arising from the Use of Asbestos in Ontario was established in
1981. A three year study followed covering all aspects of the asbestos problem. After considering all
available data, the Commission concluded the following in its final report (Chapter 9, Page 585):
“The risk to occupants from asbestos in buildings is a small fraction of the risks faced by workers
exposed to asbestos under the 1 f/cc control limit for chrysotile (the current exposure limit for
industrial asbestos use in Ontario). It is less than 1/50 as great as the risk of commuting by car to
and from those buildings. In concluding that this risk is insignificant, we conclude that the risk does
not present a public health problem. While asbestos has caused serious health problems for workers
and may present a problem for building maintenance, renovation, construction and demolition
workers, we conclude that it does not pose a significant problem for the general occupants of a
building, except in the three situations outlined in Section D of this chapter, namely: (1) the occupant
is in the immediate vicinity of work that disturbs friable asbestos-continuing insulation; (2) the
occupant is within the range of air circulation of work that disturbs friable asbestos-containing
insulation; and, (3) the occupant is within range of friable asbestos-containing insulation that has
fallen onto building surfaces and is being disturbed.”
And in the overview to this section (Chapter 9, Page 548):
“We will conclude that it is rarely necessary to take corrective action in buildings containing asbestos
insulation in order to protect the general occupants of those buildings. On the other hand,
construction, demolition, renovation, maintenance, and custodial workers in asbestos-containing
buildings may be exposed to significant fibre levels and may during their work, cause elevated fibre
levels for nearby occupants”.
The general conclusions of the Royal Commission have been supported by independent
researchers, the Ontario Ministry of Labour and authorities in other jurisdictions. Air sampling has
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shown that the airborne asbestos levels in buildings with sprayed asbestos are no higher than
outdoor levels, unless the friable asbestos or asbestos debris is being disturbed at the time.
Airborne fibre levels in buildings are seldom found to be elevated, even when the ceiling space
containing the sprayed asbestos or asbestos mechanical insulation, functions as an air plenum.
4.
ELEMENTS OF THE ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT CONTROL PROGRAM
At Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board, the maintenance of a safe environment for staff,
students and outside contractors working on site depends on the establishment of an effective Asbestos
Management Control Program (AMCP).
An AMCP requires the following actions:
(1)
Perform an asbestos survey to detect and evaluate all asbestos-containing materials. Notify all
staff who may potentially disturb asbestos-containing materials during the course of their
activities. Note: Re-surveying of board schools is ongoing.
(2)
Remove asbestos-containing materials which have severely deteriorated or will be disturbed by
building maintenance, alteration, renovation or demolition work. This may involve a combination
of major and minor removal work. Major work (Type 2 and Type 3 operations) will require the
preparation of site-specific contract documents including a properly designed scope of work.
(3)
Establish procedures for building maintenance or renovation work which may require minor
disturbance or minor removal of asbestos where total removal is not undertaken.
(4)
Monitor the correct performance of building maintenance or renovation work performed following
the procedures described in (3) above.
(5)
Provide equipment and training to staff who might disturb asbestos materials remaining in the
building. Provide awareness training to other staff who may be in areas which have materials that
contain asbestos. Ensure that all outside contractors who work with or, by the nature of their
activities, come in contact with asbestos-containing materials are properly trained in relation to
their degree of possible exposure to the materials.
(6)
Re-inspect and re-evaluate asbestos-containing materials on a periodic basis.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board will designate an individual(s) to serve as Asbestos
Coordinator. This individual will be responsible for implementing the Asbestos Management Control
Program and may use outside technical experts or consultants in establishing and maintaining the AMCP.
The elements of the AMCP are described in the following sections (with the exception of major removal
projects). To properly establish this program, all maintenance staff and outside contractors must be aware
of the program and the procedures to follow when conducting maintenance and/or any other work that
might disturb asbestos-containing materials. Where such work requires that an area be isolated, the work
shall commence only after the Asbestos Coordinator has approved the plan of action or sought expert
advice from external sources. The survey of asbestos-containing materials described in a subsequent
section shall be consulted prior to performing any work involving renovation or maintenance which may
disturb asbestos-containing materials. At least one copy of the AMCP and survey must remain available
for examination at all times.
The Asbestos Management Control Program and asbestos surveys comply with or exceed current
provincial standards as detailed in Regulation 278/05.
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ASBESTOS ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING PROCEDURES
5.1 Asbestos records
Records of any possible earlier surveys and sampling of asbestos-containing materials will be
incorporated into the AMCP. Detailed records of sample results and known asbestos removal
operations will be incorporated into the AMCP as part of the permanent asbestos record for the
facility.
5.1.1
Detailed survey
Building records have been established in the form of comprehensive surveys by
qualified asbestos consultants. Final reports detail the extent and condition of all
asbestos-containing materials present in the buildings. Locations of samples and detailed
laboratory reports covering sample results are also incorporated in the survey. This
detailed survey, in conjunction with the Asbestos Management Control Program,
constitutes the main requirement of Ontario Regulation 278/05 Section 5. (1).
Copies of the detailed survey and the ACMP will be kept with the Asbestos Coordinator
and at each building. Both will be available at all times for review by anyone who feels
that asbestos may be disturbed by their work, or who may wish to determine if such
disturbance is a possibility. They will be used by Hastings and Prince Edward District
School Board staff and the Asbestos Coordinator to direct maintenance staff or
contractors in locating asbestos containing materials while they are performing their work.
Asbestos removal records are to be maintained as part of the AMCP to ensure that all
information regarding asbestos is current.
5.1.2
Ongoing Inspections
The survey forms the basis of the initial inspection of asbestos-containing materials at
Hastings & Prince Edward District School Board schools.
During normal maintenance operations at the various buildings, additional asbestoscontaining materials may be identified that were missed as part of the survey or changes
in the condition of identified asbestos-containing materials may be noted. All such
observations constitute "ongoing inspections" and shall be reported to the Asbestos
Coordinator for remedial action if necessary and entry into the permanent log of the
AMCP. Remedial actions will be handled by the Asbestos Coordinator using Hastings
and Prince Edward District School Board approved experienced outside asbestos
abatement contractors.
5.1.3
Inspection
As required by Ontario Regulation 278/05, an annual re-inspection will be conducted
either by an outside consultant appointed by Hastings and Prince Edward District School
Board management or by trained board staff in conjunction with the Asbestos
Coordinator. Reports noting the condition of all asbestos-containing materials will be
prepared and retained in the ACMP binder. Remedial action, if necessary, will be handled
by the Asbestos Coordinator using experienced outside asbestos abatement contractors
or, if minor in nature, by trained Hastings & Prince Edward District School Board staff.
5.1.4
Exposure records
An asbestos surveillance program in accordance with Ministry of Labour guidelines is
required for workers working in a Type 2 or Type 3 removal operation. The employer
must complete an Asbestos Work Report in accordance with the Regulations (refer to
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Section 21 and 22 of the Regulation) if any Type 2 or Type 3 removal work is
contemplated.
5.1.5
Amendments to the Regulations or Procedures
Changes to and all correspondence associated with Ontario Regulation 278/05 will be
kept in the ACMP binder.
5.2 Survey and sampling methods
The ACMP begins with locating all asbestos-containing materials at the various Hastings and Prince
Edward District School Board schools, sampling these materials and determining whether the
suspect materials contain asbestos. Not all friable materials contain asbestos. All friable materials
should be sampled, particularly if they were installed during the times when asbestos was commonly
used (refer to Section 1.5).
Performing an inspection requires considerable care be taken, but the guidelines are relatively
simple. Ontario Regulation 278/05 requires an inspection or survey if any friable material is
deteriorating, and before any construction or demolition operation. Sampling of non-friable material
is required if the material may be disturbed by construction work, requires disposal and in advance
of any demolition work. The survey should encompass all materials described in Section 1.5. Initial
surveys were completed by Building Survey Consultants during the 1990's and are in the process of
being updated.
In conducting the survey, plans or specifications have been used only as reference documents as
materials may have been substituted or the plans incomplete. Thermal and pipe insulation was in
use from the 1920's to the mid-1970's. Some manufacturers of asbestos-containing insulation
products continued to use up inventories for several years thereafter so time periods may also be
irrelevant in conducting a survey.
In conducting the survey, all friable materials were located and their condition assessed. This
included all materials hidden by suspended ceilings, and where accessible, above fixed ceilings.
Once friable materials were identified, samples were taken for analysis (note: samples of non-friable
materials were also selected). Formulae for the number of samples to be taken of a given material or
in a defined area are detailed in the Regulation. Surveyor judgment was used based on visual
similarities of homogeneous materials. The locations of friable materials and sample locations were
detailed as the survey progressed.
5.3 Sample collection procedures
Representative samples were taken from within the suspect material by penetrating the entire depth
of the material (since it may have been applied in more than one layer or covered with paint or other
protective coating). Mechanical insulation was sampled in a number of areas as was other forms of
possible asbestos-containing materials such drywall compound, sprayed fireproofing, ceiling tiles
and floor tiles. The straight runs and fittings of all piping systems were visually identified as
fibreglass only and were not sampled.
Samples were only taken when an area was unoccupied.
The material was sprayed with a light mist of water to minimize the potential of fibre release during
the sampling procedure. The material was not disturbed any more than absolutely necessary. When
possible, samples were selected from areas where the encapsulating material was not intact.
If additional samples are to be taken in the future the person taking the samples should wear a halfface respirator. It takes very little disturbance to result in significant levels of fibre release.
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If pieces of material break off during the sampling procedure, the contaminated area must be
cleaned up with a vacuum cleaner equipped with a HEPA filter or by wet cleaning. Where
appropriate use a plastic drop sheet. When finished, dispose of the drop sheet, cleaning materials
and any pieces of damaged material as asbestos-containing waste. Use only approved bags for
disposal.
Seal the area of insulating material where the sample was selected with duct tape or other suitable
encapsulating material.
5.4 Assessment of materials sampled
During the survey all samples collected were carefully identified as to material and location and
placed inside a sealable container ("zip-lock" bags are acceptable containers). All sampling details
were entered on to a “chain of custody” form. As samples are magnified under a microscope at the
laboratory only a piece of material approximately the size of a dime was required for proper
identification.
During the survey and sampling detailed observations were made regarding the extent and condition
of the materials as well as appropriate response actions in the event that a material tested positive
for asbestos. The evaluation of mechanical insulation was performed using the criteria described
below. The evaluation of non-friable materials is of much less significance since these materials
generally only become a concern if disturbed by construction, demolition or maintenance activities.
In such cases, only the presence and location of non-friable materials need be noted.
Note: In the event of disturbance of friable asbestos, the friable material which will be disturbed must
be removed.
Mechanical System Insulation
Since mechanical insulation is generally covered with a flexible or rigid covering of painted canvas,
metal or plastic (PVC), the evaluation is largely dependent on the condition of the jacketing and the
potential for the friable insulation material to be disturbed by occupant activity. During the survey the
factors listed in Appendix "A" were used to evaluate each installation, system or section.
5.5 Bulk sample analysis
Samples collected during the survey were labelled with the following information:
Sample number
Building & room description
Date of sample
Description of material (e.g. elbow insulation)
Name of sampler
Samples were submitted to a qualified laboratory for analysis by Polarized Light Microscopy and
Dispersion Staining using the following method as prescribed by the Regulation:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Test Method EPA/600/R-93/116: Method for the
Determination of Asbestos in Bulk Building Materials. June 1993.
The laboratory selected for the analysis work must participate in a proficiency testing program. Any
laboratory that has accreditation under the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NVLAP)
would meet the above criteria.
5.6 Documentation and notification of results
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Once the field survey and analysis were complete, the results (whether positive or negative for
asbestos) were reported in a fashion readily accessible and understandable by Hastings and Prince
Edward District School Board management staff and outside contractors. The report includes:
•
•
•
•
•
List of materials containing asbestos.
Results of bulk sample analysis.
Adequate description by room or area of all mechanical insulation and non-friable material.
Summary of any materials possibly requiring removal.
Summary of any materials requiring minor remedial action.
Note regarding all materials tested that did not contain asbestos (to avoid unnecessary sampling
later).
Copies of the final survey report will be retained by the Asbestos Coordinator and a copy placed at
each building. All Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board employees who may occupy an
area where asbestos-containing materials are located will be informed of the survey findings. This
will permit them to adopt appropriate procedures to protect both themselves and other occupants of
the building from the asbestos. This also applies to outside contractors and contract employees.
5.7 Visual re-inspection
The Asbestos Coordinator, perhaps in conjunction with an outside consultant will arrange to have
all asbestos-containing materials detected in the survey re-inspected on an annual basis. Bulk
samples do not need to be re-taken unless additional materials are discovered that were missed
during the survey or if the composition of a given material is in doubt. The re-evaluation must
encompass all factors originally noted in the survey and should concentrate on any signs of
deterioration, de-lamination or changes in occupant activity in the adjacent areas (that would
increase the potential for damage). In the event of disturbance of friable materials by water leak,
structural failure, etc. all asbestos-containing materials in the area(s) shall be re-evaluated
immediately using the criteria outlined in Appendix "B" Emergency Procedures.
5.8 Air monitoring
The technique of air monitoring is sometimes suggested as a means of determining whether or not
any particular area poses a potential health problem. Presently there are no requirements for air
sampling for hazard identification. There are a number of reasons for this. The usual method used,
the NIOSH Phase Contrast Microscopy method (PCM), does not differentiate asbestos fibres from
any other types of fibre: thus, the results of PCM are not specific for asbestos, only for airborne
fibres. Also, due to the limited resolution of the optical microscope, the small diameter fibres typical
of asbestos cannot always be readily detected.
A more definitive analysis method is Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) but this method is
time consuming and, therefore, comparatively costly.
Lastly, the use of air sampling is only specific to the time period in which the sample is being taken.
The air may be perfectly acceptable at the time and the sample results confirm this to be the case. If
friable asbestos is subsequently disturbed, however, there may be a sharp increase in the airborne
fibre count and resultant potential health hazard. This would, of course, not be detected. For these
reasons air sampling is not routinely used in assessing the actions to be taken in a building. PCM
sampling is usually restricted to the monitoring of asbestos abatement operations in a building.
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If occupants request air sampling in a building, this may be performed to address specific concerns.
In this case, monitoring shall be performed by a consultant using a combination of Phase Contrast
Microscopy (PCM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).
6.
ASBESTOS WORK PRACTICES
The following procedures describe the asbestos work practices to be implemented at Hastings and
Prince Edward District School Board facilities. These procedures comply with or exceed the
requirements of Ontario Regulation 278/05.
6.1 Emergency procedures in the event of suspected contamination
Building occupants may encounter fallen material which may be suspected of containing asbestos.
This may occur in areas where asbestos has been documented or in areas not included in the
survey. In these cases it is important that the possible exposure of occupants in the immediate areas
to airborne asbestos fibres be minimized by effectively isolating the areas. These procedures are
covered in detail in Appendix "B".
6.2 Scheduled work
The work practices that may be undertaken by Facilities maintenance staff or as part of normal
building repair or maintenance work are covered by Ontario Regulation 278/05.
The Regulation classifies asbestos work in three categories, as follows:
“Type 1”
Activities where there is a low risk of exposure to airborne asbestos
fibres and almost no health risk.
“Type 2”
Activities where there is a moderate risk of exposure to airborne
asbestos fibres and some health risk.
“Type 3”
Activities where there is a high risk of exposure to airborne asbestos
fibres and a high risk of health effects.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board employees will not undertake “Type 2”, “Type 3”
or glove bag asbestos repair or removal work. This will be contracted out to experienced asbestos
abatement contractors. “Type 3” work will involve an experienced asbestos consultant to design
proper specifications, scope of work and air monitoring to ensure safe work practices are strictly
adhered to. Maintenance staff should be prepared to undertake possible “Type 1” and emergency
procedures.
All asbestos related work should be designed to minimize the impact on building occupants.
When access to a “Type 2” or “Type 3” work area is required on an emergency basis, (power failure,
etc.), proper entry precautions should be covered in the specifications and reviewed in advance with
the appropriate parties.
6.2.1
“Type 1” Operation
The following are “Type 1” operations:
1.
Installing or removing ceiling tiles that are asbestos-containing material, if the
tiles cover an area less than 7.5 square metres and are installed or removed
without being broken, cut, drilled, abraded, ground, sanded or vibrated.
2.
Installing or removing non-friable asbestos-containing material, other than ceiling
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tiles, if the material is installed or removed without being broken, cut, drilled,
abraded, ground, sanded or vibrated.
3.
4.
6.2.2
Breaking, cutting, drilling, abrading, grinding, sanding or vibrating non-friable
asbestos-containing material if,
I.
the material is wetted to control the spread of dust or fibers; and,
ii.
the work is done only by means of non-powered hand-held tools.
Removing less than one square metre of drywall in which joint-filling compounds
that are asbestos-containing material have been used. O. Reg. 278/05, s. 12 (2).
“Type 2” Operation
The following are “Type 2” operations:
1.
Removing all or part of a false ceiling to obtain access to a work area, if
asbestos-containing material is likely to be lying on the surface of the false
ceiling.
2.
The removal or disturbance of one square metre or less of friable asbestoscontaining material during the repair, alteration, maintenance or demolition of all
or part of machinery or equipment or a building, aircraft, locomotive, railway car,
vehicle or ship.
3.
Enclosing friable asbestos-containing material.
4.
Applying tape or a sealant or other covering to pipe or boiler insulation that is
asbestos-containing material.
5.
Installing or removing ceiling tiles that are asbestos-containing material, if the
tiles cover an area of 7.5 square metres or more and are installed or removed
without being broken, cut, drilled, abraded, ground, sanded or vibrated.
6.
Breaking, cutting, drilling, abrading, grinding, sanding or vibrating non-friable
asbestos-containing material if,
i. the material is not wetted to control the spread of dust or fibers, and
ii. the work is done only by means of non-powered hand-held tools.
7.
Removing one square metre or more of drywall in which joint filling compounds
that are asbestos-containing material have been used.
8.
Breaking, cutting, drilling, abrading, grinding, sanding or vibrating non-friable
asbestos-containing material if the work is done by means of power tools that are
attached to dust-collecting devices equipped with HEPA filters.
9.
Removing insulation that is asbestos-containing material from a pipe, duct or
similar structure using a glove bag.
10.
Cleaning or removing filters used in air handling equipment in a building that has
sprayed fireproofing that is asbestos-containing material.
11.
An operation that:
I.
is not mentioned in any of paragraphs 1 to 10,
ii.
may expose a worker to asbestos,
iii. is not classified as a “Type 1” or “Type 3” operation.
O. Reg. 278/05, s. 12 (3).
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6.2.3 “Type 3” Operation:
The following are “Type 3” operations:
1.
The removal or disturbance of more than one square metre of friable asbestoscontaining material during the repair, alteration, maintenance or demolition of all
or part of a building, aircraft, ship, locomotive, railway car or vehicle or any
machinery or equipment.
2.
The spray application of a sealant to friable asbestos-containing material.
3.
Cleaning or removing air handling equipment, including rigid ducting but not
including filters, in a building that has sprayed fireproofing that is asbestoscontaining material.
4.
Repairing, altering or demolishing all or part of a kiln, metallurgical furnace or
similar structure that is made in part of refractory materials that are asbestoscontaining materials.
5.
Breaking, cutting, drilling, abrading, grinding, sanding or vibrating non-friable
asbestos-containing material, if the work is done by means of power tools that
are not attached to dust-collecting devices equipped with HEPA filters.
6.
Repairing, altering or demolishing all or part of any building in which asbestos is
or was used in the manufacture of products, unless the asbestos was cleaned up
and removed before March 16, 1986. O. Reg. 278/05, s. 12 (4).
Work involving any type of asbestos operation will be duly recorded and a permanent
record maintained in the ACMP binder.
Work procedures for Type 1 Operations are covered in Appendix "C".
6.3
Emergency Operations
Emergency operations may arise in several circumstances. An example of unscheduled emergency
work includes water leaking from piping or from a vessel with asbestos insulation.
Whenever possible, Type 2 operations should be followed for emergency work. If Type 2 operations
cannot be performed due to the urgency of repair, some judgement will be required by the staff on
site. The general principal of the above work would be to protect the worker performing the
emergency work and to minimize the exposure of building occupants to airborne asbestos fibres.
Guidelines for emergency work are covered in Appendix "D”.
7.
INSPECTIONS AND MONITORING OF ASBESTOS WORK
7.1
Inspections
A proper asbestos inspection and assessment protocol should set out uniform standards for
evaluation (i.e. if asbestos is in good, fair or poor condition). The standards for all asbestoscontaining materials are laid out in Appendix "A".
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board management recognizes the need to deal with
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asbestos-containing materials quickly and thoroughly where such materials may be in poor
condition. Identification of all areas containing asbestos will help in the ongoing monitoring program.
The inspection program is divided into three sections.
Detailed Survey
Ongoing Inspections
Annual Inspections
•
•
•
7.1.1
Detailed Survey
Detailed re-surveys of all Hastings & Prince Edward District School Board properties is
ongoing. Completed re-surveys will be retained in conjunction with the ACMP binder.
7.1.2
Ongoing inspections
The Asbestos Coordinator will retain an ongoing responsibility for conducting normal
building inspections. Deficiencies discovered as part of this process will be recorded in the
ACMP along with the results of appropriate remedial actions.
7.1.3
Annual inspections
Ontario Regulation 278/05 requires annual inspections of buildings containing asbestos
materials. In addition to the "ongoing inspections" Hastings and Prince Edward District
School Board management will institute a formal program of annual inspection of all
asbestos-containing materials. The annual inspection may be conducted by an outside
consultant. Formal reports will be prepared and retained in the ACMP binder.
7.2
Air Monitoring
Compliance with all aspects of the Regulation will provide a safe environment for maintenance
workers, building occupants and outside contractors. No provincial or federal standards require air
monitoring of Type 1 or Type 2 work. In some Type 2 projects, air monitoring may be useful to
provide proof of compliance with the specified work practices.
Air monitoring and analysis is possible using either Phase Contrast Microscopy (PCM) or
Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Asbestos consultants have the capabilities to collect
samples for both PCM and TEM. There are a number of laboratories available to read PCM
samples but TEM capabilities are limited owing to the significant cost of equipment.
PCM testing must be employed both inside and outside the asbestos work area for Type 3 work.
Should analysis of sample results indicate elevated levels of airborne fibres (above 0.02 f/cc)
outside the asbestos work area (containment unit), the contractor will immediately cease removal
operations and be subject to a complete review of his operations. Should cleanup be required
outside the asbestos work area all costs associated with the cleanup shall be the responsibility of
the contractor (including all sampling costs).
8.
TRAINING
Section 19, Ontario Regulation 278/05 deals with the requirements for asbestos training. The
Regulation specifically requires that instruction and training be given:
•
•
•
on the hazards of asbestos exposure
on personal hygiene and work practices
on the use, cleaning and disposal of respirators and protective clothing
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The training must be provided by a competent person (as defined by the Act) to every worker
working in a Type 1, Type 2 or Type 3 operation.
It is the responsibility of the Asbestos Coordinator to ensure that all staff assigned to these positions
are identified, trained and updated (including new employees) as appropriate.
General awareness training (health effects, etc.) should be provided to all operations staff working in
proximity to asbestos-containing materials.
9.
COMMUNICATIONS
Facility Services is responsible for asbestos management at Hastings and Prince Edward District
School Board and appoints an Asbestos Coordinator to be the point contact for all issues related to
asbestos.
The Asbestos Coordinator can be reached at [email protected]
As of the most recent revision date of this procedure, the Asbestos Coordinator is:
Sarah Stewart
[email protected]
613 966-1170 or 1 800 267-4350, ext. 2105
Cell 613 847-1231
In the event that the Asbestos Coordinator is unavailable or an immediate response is required, the
Manager of Operations and Maintenance should be contacted.
As of the most recent revision date of this procedure, the Manager of Operations and Maintenance
is:
Nick Pfeiffer
[email protected]
613 966-1170 or 1 800 267-4350, ext. 2245
Cell 613 827-0348
Legal References:
•
•
•
•
Occupational Health and Safety Act, as amended by Bill 168
Ontario Regulation 837 – Designated Substance – Asbestos, made under the Occupational Health and Safety
Act, O. Reg. 278/05
Ontario Regulation 278/05 – Designated Substance – Asbestos on Construction Projects and in Buildings and
Repair Operations, made under the Occupational Health and Safety Act
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Test Method EPA/600/R-93/116: Method for the Determination of
Asbestos in Bulk Building Materials. June 1993
District References:
•
•
•
Administrative Procedure 420 Occupational Health and Safety
FORM 415-1 Asbestos Exposure Log
FORM 415-2 Asbestos Inspection Log
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APPENDIX "A"
EVALUATION OF ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIALS
The potential risk from friable asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) is dependent on the disturbance of
these materials. An assessment of hazard potential must take into account both the accessibility and
condition of the asbestos-containing materials relative to the use of the area where the asbestoscontaining materials are found.
CONDITION
Good
Jacketed insulation shows no sign of damage or deterioration. No friable asbestoscontaining insulation is exposed.
Fair
Damage to jacketed insulation, (minor damage, deterioration or de-lamination) or nonjacketed insulation. Friable asbestos-containing materials are exposed but intact. Minor
or no fallout below damaged areas.
Poor
Jacket of insulation on material is damaged, deteriorated or delaminated. Friable
asbestos-containing materials are exposed and dislodged. Significant amounts of
insulation are missing.
Both accessibility and condition factors will be combined to produce general recommendations for each
area/room at the buildings.
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APPENDIX "B"
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES TO BE FOLLOWED
IN THE EVENT OF SUSPECTED CONTAMINATION
In a building where it is readily apparent that friable asbestos-containing materials have fallen and are
being disturbed to the extent that exposure to airborne friable materials is likely to occur, it is a
requirement under Ontario Regulation 278/05 to have the material examined to establish whether the
material contains asbestos.
IF THIS OCCURS:
1.
Do not clean up, cover, move, or come in contact with the suspect materials.
Cease work in the area and notify the Asbestos Coordinator.
2.
After the Asbestos Coordinator has been notified, the area will be isolated. If it is not
possible to safely isolate the area, the coordinator will notify appropriate persons not to
enter the area. If possible, the doors should be locked and/or other appropriate measures
taken to prevent entry.
3.
The ventilation systems to the affected areas shall be disabled.
4.
The Asbestos Coordinator will determine a plan of action to remedy the situation (refer to
survey for confirmation of asbestos).
5.
In cases of emergency maintenance work, consult "Procedures for Emergency Work" in
Appendix "D".
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APPENDIX "C"
PROCEDURES FOR “TYPE 1” ASBESTOS REMOVAL
These procedures are to be followed by all persons performing the following types of work:
(1)
Installing or removing ceiling tiles that are asbestos-containing material, if the tiles cover an area
less than 7.5 square metres and are installed or removed without being broken, cut, drilled,
abraded, ground, sanded or vibrated.
(2)
Installing or removing non-friable asbestos-containing material, other than ceiling tiles, if the
material is installed or removed without being broken, cut, drilled, abraded, ground, sanded or
vibrated.
(3)
Breaking, cutting, drilling, abrading, grinding, sanding or vibrating non-friable asbestos-containing
material if,
(4)
I.
the material is wetted to control the spread of dust or fibers; and,
ii.
the work is done only by means of non-powered hand-held tools.
Removing less than one square metre of drywall in which joint-filling compounds that are
asbestos-containing material have been used.
Note: If proposed work in an area is extensive and the possible asbestos content of the
materials to be worked on is unknown, secure bulk samples for laboratory identification using
Polarized Light Microscopy analysis (PLM). If samples are representative of all materials in the
area of work and PLM analysis establishes that no asbestos-containing materials are present
asbestos-related procedures will not have to be followed.
1.0
EQUIPMENT
Have all equipment at the work area before proceeding.
1.1
Vacuum
Use of a vacuum is recommended. Wet cleaning methods may be used in place of a vacuum. If a
vacuum is used it must be equipped with a High Efficiency Particulate Air filter (HEPA). When not in use
both ends of the vacuum hose and the hose inlet connection to the vacuum must be sealed with duct
tape.
Note: HEPA vacuums may only be opened in a Type 2 enclosure for cleaning and changing filters.
1.2
Respirators
Use of respirators is optional but strongly recommended for work on sheet flooring, removal of any type of
ceiling tile, all overhead work and for drilling or cutting of non-friable asbestos-containing materials.
Respirators should also be used for extended work in crawl spaces or pipe chases if asbestos-containing
materials are present.
If the worker requests a respirator, the employer must provide a half-face respirator (or better) equipped
with HEPA filters. Respirators must be used in accordance with written use procedures provided to
workers as per established training procedures. Respirators must be fit-tested. Thoroughly wash
respirators and dispose of filters as contaminated waste at the conclusion of work.
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Note: Persons having facial hair shall not use half-face respirators as the seal between face and
respirator cannot be maintained.
1.3
Protective clothing
Disposable clothing should be used. Non-disposable clothing, if worn, must be thoroughly cleaned of all
contamination using a HEPA vacuum and laundered separately. Disposable clothing is to be disposed of
as asbestos waste at the conclusion of work at each site.
1.4
2.
Other equipment and supplies
•
Polyethylene sheeting (6 mil) to serve as drop sheets.
•
Pump sprayer with a mister nozzle or alternative method to thoroughly wet materials. Do not use
compressed air or high pressure water spray equipment for cleaning work areas.
•
Labelled yellow waste bags (6 mil) for all asbestos waste, disposable equipment and tools, plastic
sheeting, HEPA filter cartridges, disposable clothing, etc.
•
Small tools and cleaning supplies; e.g. scouring pads, sponges, brushes, buckets, etc.
•
Asbestos warning signs for use at work areas.
OTHER PROTECTIVE MEASURES
No eating, drinking or smoking allowed in the asbestos work areas.
On leaving work area, worker shall proceed to washroom provided. Wash all exposed skin on
hands and face.
3.
PREPARATION
Wherever practical before disturbing non-friable asbestos materials cover floor and surfaces
below with polyethylene sheeting to catch debris.
Wherever dust on surfaces is likely to be disturbed, remove with a HEPA vacuum or a damp cloth
before starting work.
4.
EXECUTION
4.1
Removal of vinyl asbestos floor tiles
Do not use electric powered scrapers.
Start removal by wedging a heavy duty scraper in the seam of two adjoining tiles. Gradually force the
edge of one tile up and away from the floor. Do not break off the tiles in pieces.
Continue the removal of tiles using hand tools, removing tiles intact wherever possible. When the
adhesive or mastic holding the tiles is spread heavily or is quite hard, it may prove easier to force the
scraper through tightly adhered areas by striking the scraper with a hammer while maintaining the scraper
at a 20 to 30 degree angle to the floor. Should the tiles still prove difficult to remove a hot air gun may be
used to soften the adhesive.
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Caution: The mastic or glue used to secure the tiles often contains asbestos. Ensure that all tools are
thoroughly cleaned after completion of work.
Caution: Ensure that hot air gun is properly grounded if water is used on the tiles.
As tiles are removed place them into asbestos waste receptors (disposable bags). Do not break the tiles
into smaller pieces.
After the removal of tiles from a small area, scrape up any remaining adhesive with a hand scraper until
only a thin film remains. Deposit all scrapings in the asbestos waste receptors. Do not scrape surfaces of
adhering pieces of tile. Do not use powered electric scrapers.
On completion of the area of work, vacuum clean the floor with HEPA vacuum or, alternatively, damp
clean the area with a disposable cloth.
4.2
Removal of asbestos-containing sheet flooring
Note: Sheet flooring often has a felt underlay that may become friable if aggressively disturbed.
Do not use electric powered scrapers.
Remove binding strips or other protective mouldings. At all times workers shall wear coveralls and
respirators fitted with HEPA filters.
Make a series of cuts 100 mm to 200 mm (4" to 8") apart through top layers and approximately half way
through the felt backing. Make cuts parallel to the walls.
Start at the end of the room furthest from the door and pry up a corner of the strip, separating the top
sheet from the backing layer. Pull the top layer back upon itself slowly and evenly. The half-backing and
top layer should pull free. Place the material into an asbestos waste receptor (6 mil bag). Wet the
asbestos-felt underlay remaining on the floor as soon as it is exposed.
Continue with successive strips. Avoid walking on exposed asbestos felt. Seal asbestos waste receptors
when filled. Remove maximum of three strips before wet scraping exposed felt underlay.
Remove remaining adhered underlay. Soak area with water applied using sprayer. Allow water to
penetrate felt, three strips at a time. Avoid walking on felt whenever possible.
When floor has been cleaned of asbestos felt, vacuum up any loose pieces of dirt with a HEPA vacuum.
Do not dry sweep the area.
Thoroughly clean tools and equipment with a damp cloth before putting tools back into regular service.
Dispose of cloth as asbestos waste.
4.3
Installing, cutting or drilling non-friable asbestos materials
Note: Work using power tools not fitted with a HEPA filter dust collector must not be performed as Type
1 work.
Place polyethylene drop sheet in area of work. Use of respirators is optional but recommended.
Where possible wet all materials to be disturbed.
Immediately place waste in asbestos waste receptor (6 mil bag). Frequently during work clean area with
HEPA vacuum or by wet methods.
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At completion of work clean drop sheets which are to be re-used with HEPA vacuum or by wet methods.
Drop sheets not cleaned for re-use shall be disposed of as asbestos waste.
4.4
Removal of other non-friable materials
Note: Work using power tools not fitted with a HEPA filter dust collector must not be performed as “Type
1” work.
This procedure applies only to materials which can be removed intact, or in sections, without producing a
pulverized or powdered waste (i.e. friable). This procedure is most applicable to asbestos cement board
products, acoustic tiles, gaskets, etc.
Place polyethylene drop sheet in area of work. Use of respirators is optional but recommended.
Where possible wet all materials to be disturbed.
Undo fasteners necessary to remove material. Whenever possible remove asbestos cement panels
intact. Break only if unavoidable. If broken thoroughly wet freshly exposed edges.
Where sections have adhered to the substrate, wet the materials and use hand scraping to remove
adhering material.
Place removed material in asbestos waste receptor (6 mil bag). Frequently during work clean area with
HEPA vacuum or by wet methods (damp cloth).
At completion of work clean drop sheets which are to be re-used with HEPA vacuum or by wet methods.
Drop sheets not cleaned for re-use shall be disposed of as asbestos waste.
5.0
WASTE DISPOSAL
Place waste into asbestos labelled disposal bag, seal with tape, clean the exterior of the bag with a clean
wet cloth and place the bag into a second clean asbestos labelled bag. Seal the second bag securely with
tape. Use a barrel or fibre drum when the asbestos waste material is likely to tear the bags. Seal the outer
container and properly label.
Provide a secure storage area for holding minor amounts of asbestos waste in sealed containers until
proper disposal arrangements can be made.
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APPENDIX "D"
PROCEDURES FOR EMERGENCY WORK
Emergency asbestos removal and repairs should, whenever possible, be performed following “Type 2”
procedures.
1.
Emergency procedures
If Type 2 procedures cannot be strictly observed due to the urgency, some judgement will be required by
the staff on site, or the Asbestos Coordinator, if available. The general principal of this work will be to
protect the worker performing the repairs, and to minimize the exposure of others to airborne asbestos
fibres. The following guidelines shall be observed.
1.
Clear area of all occupants. Construct enclosure around area if time permits.
2.
Shut down or disable ventilation systems serving the affected area. Blank off return
registers and exhausts.
3.
Worker performing repairs shall wear protective respirator and protective clothing. If
street clothes are worn they may have to be disposed of if contaminated.
4.
Use drop sheet under work to minimize clean-up, if possible.
5.
Perform emergency repair with minimum disturbance of asbestos.
6.
Using asbestos equipment perform clean-up of visible material before allowing
unprotected personnel to enter area. Use HEPA filtered vacuum or wet cleaning
procedures.
7.
Decontaminate using Type 2 procedures. Return at appropriate time to complete repairs
under Type 2 conditions.
Note: The above emergency procedures are also appropriate in the event of a breach or failure of
a containment system (enclosure) for Type 2 or Type 3 operations and in the event of major
damage to a glove bag.
2.0
Equipment for Emergency Procedures
Supplies and equipment should be kept on hand to respond to an emergency situation. The following are
essential to conduct an effective response:
2.1
Equipment
HEPA vacuum complete with all fittings, clean respirators, water sprayer, minor tools (knife, pliers, tin
snips, etc.).
2.2
Supplies
Disposal bags, polyethylene sheeting (6 mil), assorted glove bags and tools, securing straps, wetting
agent (surfactant), disposable coveralls, asbestos warning signs and barrier tape, "irritant smoke tube" for
fit testing respirators.
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APPENDIX "E"
PROCEDURE FOR WORK ABOVE FALSE CEILINGS
WHERE THERE IS IDENTIFIED MATERIAL THAT CONTAINS ASBESTOS
Workplace parties may be required under O.Reg. 278/05 to inspect locations above false ceilings. The
guidance note provides the procedure under which these inspections should take place.
Inspecting a building to find friable asbestos-containing material may require entry into the space above a
false ceiling. If sprayed-on insulation has been applied to the building structure, some of the insulating
material may have broken free and fallen onto the surface of the false ceiling. Entry into the ceiling space
could therefore disturb such fallen material, creating an exposure hazard if the material contains
asbestos.
Since, in conducting an inspection, it is not known whether there is likely to be asbestos-containing
material lying on the ceiling surface, it is advisable to assume there is and the ceiling space should only
be entered from an unoccupied room; in schools, entry should be carried out only outside of classroom
hours. The following procedure is recommended:
1. Place a drop sheet of polyethylene or other suitable material beneath the area where the ceiling
space is to be entered.
2. Carefully raise the edge of a ceiling tile and examine the surfaces of adjacent tiles for evidence of
fallen insulation.
3. If the surface of the adjacent tiles is clean or very little insulation has fallen the raised tile may be
removed by sliding it over an adjacent tile, and the ceiling space entered.
4. If a significant amount of insulation has fallen, lower the raised tile and put on protective clothing
that is impervious to asbestos and an air-purifying respirator with filters approved for protection
against asbestos.* The protective clothing should have tight-fitting cuffs at the wrists and ankles
and should include a head cover. When a respirator is worn, a good fit should be ensured by
checking the seal between the face and the respirator.
Respirators certified by the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health meet
this requirement.
5. The ceiling space may then be entered.
6. When inspection of ceiling space is completed, replace ceiling tile.
7. Clean the drop sheet and the protective clothing by wiping with a damp cloth or vacuuming with a
HEPA-filtered vacuum. This damp cloth should then be placed in a plastic bag clearly marked as
asbestos waste.
PROCEDURE FOR WORK ABOVE FALSE CEILINGS
WHERE THERE IS NO KNOWN ASBESTOS,
WHERE THERE IS A POSSIBILITY OF PIPE INSULATION
1. Carefully raise the edge of a ceiling tile and examine the surfaces of adjacent tiles for evidence of
fallen insulation.
2. If there is disturbed pipe insulation, then work is not authorized. If there is asbestos that is not on
the inventory, it should be reported to update the inventory. In all cases, report immediately to
the Asbestos Coordinator for corrective action.
3. If the area is free of asbestos, then work can proceed. Do not disturb any pipe insulation unless
proper clean up procedures are used.
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