Health and Safety Plan

Health and Safety Plan
Area 1 Phase 1
Health and Safety Plan
Baltimore Works Site
Baltimore, Maryland
REVISED
November 2013
By:
Environmental Resources Management, Inc.
Harbor Point Development LLC
For:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – Region III
Maryland Department of the Environment
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0
INTRODUCTION
1
1.1
PURPOSE
1
1.2
BACKGROUND
2
2.0
PROJECT PERSONNEL AND RESPONSIBILITIES
4
3.0
SITE CONTROL MEASURES
5
4.0
PERSONNEL TRAINING
6
5.0
MEDICAL MONITORING
7
6.0
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION CONTROL
8
6.1
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION PROCESS
8
6.2
CHEMICAL HAZARDS
8
6.3
SOIL CONDITIONS
8
6.4
GROUNDWATER CONDITIONS
9
7.0
FIELD ACTIVITIES
10
8.0
SITE PERSONNEL
11
9.0
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
12
10.0
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
16
11.0
DECONTAMINATION PROCEDURES
17
11.1
EQUIPMENT DECONTAMINATION
17
11.2
PERSONNEL DECONTAMINATION
18
12.0
ACTION LEVELS
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13.0
14.0
THERMAL STRESS
22
13.1
HEAT STRESS
22
13.2
COLD STRESS
27
13.2.1
13.2.2
Frostbite
Hypothermia
27
27
13.2.3
Control Measures for Cold Stress
28
SAFE WORK PRACTICES AND STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
31
14.1
31
GENERAL SAFE PROVISIONS
14.1.1
14.1.2
Smoking and Eating Areas
Sanitation and Potable Water
32
32
14.1.3
14.1.4
Temporary Facilities
First Aid Station
32
33
14.1.5
Eye Wash Stations
33
15.0
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
34
16.0
SAFE WORK PRACTICES
35
16.1
PRE-EXCAVATION
35
16.2
FALL PROTECTION
35
16.3
WEATHER-RELATED EVENTS
36
16.3.1
16.3.2
Lightning Safety for Outdoor Workers
Noise
36
38
17.0
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PROCEDURES
39
18.0
SPILL CONTAINMENT PROGRAM
40
19.0
SITE COMMUNICATION
41
20.0
COMMUNICATION AND REVIEW OF SITE-SPECIFIC HASP PLAN
(HAZARD COMMUNICATION)
42
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21.0
22.0
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN
43
21.1
PERSONNEL ROLES AND LINES OF AUTHORITY
43
21.2
EVACUATION ROUTES AND PROCEDURES
43
21.3
ASSEMBLY POINTS
43
EMERGENCY RESPONSE
44
22.1
NOTIFICATION OF SITE EMERGENCIES
44
22.2
DIRECTIONS TO THE NEAREST HOSPITAL
44
23.0
EVACUATION PROCEDURES
45
24.0
INCIDENT REPORTING PROCEDURE
46
25.0
INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS
47
26.0
CERTIFICATION OF FAMILIARITY WITH PLAN BY SITE PERSONNEL
48
LIST OF FIGURES
Deleted: 1
1
Site Location Map
2
Air Monitoring Station Locations
LIST OF APPENDICES
A
Map to Hospital
B
Job Hazard Analysis Form
C
Material Safety Data Sheets
D
Daily Safety Meeting Form
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1.0
INTRODUCTION
This Health and Safety Guidance (“HSG”) has been prepared for inclusion
with the Detailed Development Plan (DDP) for Harbor Point Area 1
Development (“Site”). For Phase 1 construction in Area 1, the primary
chemical of concern is hexavalent chromium in soil and groundwater, or
on debris below the MMC synthetic layers. Lead and PNAs are identified
as potential contaminants of concern in Areas 2 and 3.
Harbor Point is located on a peninsula in the Northwest Branch of the
Patapsco River located in Baltimore, Maryland (Figure 1). The peninsula
joins the mainland at the east side of the site, bounded by South Caroline
Street and the Baltimore Inner Harbor. The main site area is referred to as
Area 1, and the Southeast Quadrant is referred to as Area 2. Additionally,
the property located midway between Wills Street and South Caroline
Street North of Philpot Street is referred to as Area 3.
The approved Environmental Remediation System (ERS) is operated and
maintained by Honeywell International Inc. (“Honeywell”) pursuant to
the Consent Decree dated April 27, 1989, as amended, among Honeywell,
EPA and MDE, to contain chromium contaminated groundwater and
minimize the possibility of exposure to impacted soil. The ERS consists of
the Multimedia Cap (MMC), Hydraulic Barrier, Head Maintenance
System (HMS) and Outboard Embankment.
1.1
PURPOSE
Harbor Point Development (HPD) is developing this site which is
currently owned and maintained by Honeywell International.
Environmental Resources Management, Inc. (ERM) has prepared this
HSG to be used, as appropriate, by Contractors engaged in preparing and
implementing Contractor-Specific Health and Safety Plans (HASP) for
Area 1 development. This HSG is intended to address worker safety
related to potential exposure to environmental constituents of concern,
e.g., chromium, and not health and safety, OSHA or other regulations
pertaining to general construction activities.
This HSG does not supersede the Final Master Health and Safety Plan for
Honeywell Baltimore Inner Harbor, dated August 2002 and revised June
2007.
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This Health and Safety guidance document is not intended to be and shall
not be used as a Contractor-Specific HASP. Also, this document is not
intended to be inclusive of all health and safety conditions that may be
encountered at the Site, such as those associated with general construction
activities. Rather, this document is solely intended to provide guidance to
Contractors to identify and address contaminated environmental media
that may affect their work and, at a minimum, must be included in their
HASP. It is the sole responsibility of Contractors to prepare and
implement their own HASP in accordance with all applicable federal,
state and local regulations and standards of care.
All Contractor-Specific HASPs will provide Site-specific health and safety
requirements that are pertinent to their own anticipated activities. It is the
responsibility of the Contractor to review the project documents to make
its own determination as to the appropriate level of personnel protection
based on the task being performed.
In the event that a conflict in procedures or requirements exists between
this HSG and a Contractor-Specific HASP, the procedures or requirements
that are most protective of human health will be applied. HPD, or its
representative, will review all Contractor-Specific HASPs, but will not be
responsible for approving the completeness or measures specified.
1.2
BACKGROUND
The Site has been divided into Areas 1, 2, and 3. Area 1 is the principal
site of Honeywell’s (formerly AlliedSignal) Baltimore Works Facility
(Figure 1). Chromium ore was processed in Area 1 from 1845 to 1985. The
former manufacturing processes resulted in chromium impacts to soil and
groundwater. An Environmental Remediation System (ERS) is
maintained and operated by Honeywell International Inc. (Honeywell) to
contain CrVI-impacted groundwater in Area 1 and control the potential
for human exposure to affected soil. The ERS consists of a Multimedia cap
(MMC), Hydraulic barrier, Head Maintenance System (HMS), a
groundwater storage and transfer system, and Outboard Embankment.
The HMS maintains an inward groundwater gradient to mitigate the
migration of chromium-impacted groundwater from the Site.
Area 2 was mainly used for coal and raw chromium ore storage. In
addition, a fertilizer warehousing and supply company operated in this
area for many years.
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Area 3 consists of five separate properties all with a history of industrial
activity. This industrial activity included brass casing, oil blending and
storage, lumber storage and coating/plastics production.
Honeywell purchased all of these properties by 1993 at which time all
manufacturing was halted and subsequently all buildings and tanks were
removed from these sites.
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2.0
PROJECT PERSONNEL AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Contractors shall designate and assign appropriately trained and qualified
personnel to fulfill the following responsibilities for implementation of its
HASP. These titles and the names of the individuals assigned should be
included in the written HASP:
•
Project Manager (PM) – The Project Manager will serve as the
Contractor’s principal point of contact for project-related decisions
and communication;
•
Project Health and Safety Coordinator (HSC) – the HSC will be
responsible for preparing and overseeing implementation of the
Contractor-Specific HASP, as well as updating the HASP as
conditions warrant. The HSC will be consulted by the Contractor’s
PM or field personnel whenever site conditions may require
modification to the Contractor’s HASP.
•
Site Safety Officer (SSO) – The SSO or designee will be responsible
for ensuring that the Contractor’s HASP is properly implemented
by contractor’s employees and subcontractors. The SSO will serve
as the primary point of contact for communications between field
personnel and management. The SSO will be responsible for
notifying the PM and the HSC of field conditions that may require
modification to the HASP. It is the responsibility of the SSO or
designee to ensure that site personnel are in conformance with the
level of personal protection equipment (PPE) specified by the
Contractor’s HASP. It is incumbent upon the SSO to establish and
maintain direct lines of communication with the Owner and/or its
representative.
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3.0
SITE CONTROL MEASURES
The Contractor’s written HASP must describe how site control will be
maintained. The Contractor should ensure through the assigned SSO that
site control is maintained by establishing egress and ingress points for
work activities and modifying them, as appropriate, as the project and
work areas progress. The Contractor’s HASP should ensure that the site
is properly secured at all times to restrict unauthorized access by visitors
or other personnel.
The Contractor must ensure that visitors not engaged in site work will be
provided with the appropriate level of PPE and escorted at all times while
onsite by the SSO or designee. The Contractor should implement controls
for all on-site personnel such that smoking, eating, drinking, or other
activities which promote hand to mouth contact are only permitted in
designated clean area(s), the locations of which will be determined by the
SSO.
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4.0
PERSONNEL TRAINING
The Contractor’s HASP must describe what training is necessary to safely
conduct the specific job and what types of employees receive training.
The Contractor will distribute its HASP to appropriate employees and
subcontractors involved in the project. Prior to commencing with the
fieldwork, the Contractor’s SSO should discuss the contents of the HASP
with Contractor’s workers and subcontractor employees. The SSO shall
maintain documentation of specialty training provided for his role and the
Contractor’s employees based on their specific work task and
responsibility. These documents shall be made available to the Owner or
Owner’s representative if requested.
It is the responsibility of the Contractor to ensure that its employees and
subcontractors engaged in implementation of project activities comply
with the applicable OSHA regulations in 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926. It
is required that employees who may come into contact with subsurface
soils and groundwater during performance of the work comply with the
training specified in 29 CFR 1910.120(e). Particular attention to dust
suppression activities will be required should Chromium Ore Process
Residue (COPR) be encountered. Additionally, field staff will be provided
training in advance of site activities on the physical and characteristics of
COPR and, should COPR be identified, the Contractor will use that
opportunity to train field staff to visually recognize this material. It is the
Contractor’s responsibility to determine which employees may potentially
be in contact with contaminated subsurface soils and groundwater. It is
anticipated that the workers with the following job descriptions may
potentially come into contact with contaminated media and must have the
appropriate health and safety training:
•
Backhoe Operators
•
Vacuum Truck or Pump Operators
•
Truck Drivers
•
Laborers/Spotters
Deleted: to prevent the potential for the
release of elevated quantities of chromium
contaminated dust/particulate matter
Deleted: should COPR be i
Workers on site only occasionally for a specific limited task (such as, but
not limited to, groundwater monitoring, land surveying, or geophysical
surveying) should also comply with the training specified in 29 CFR
1910.120(e).
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5.0
MEDICAL MONITORING
Personnel involved in site operations with the potential for encountering
contaminated media must have undergone medical surveillance with
their employer, to include initial and periodic examinations, prior to
performing field work at the site. Each employer’s occupational health
physician will determine the frequency of examinations based on a
variety of factors. The Contractor is responsible for the Contractor’s
employees involved in field activities associated with the project would be
required, as appropriate, to adhere to the medical monitoring
requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120(f). Project personnel will utilize the
services of a licensed occupational health physician with knowledge
and/or experience in the hazards associated with the project to provide
the medical examinations and surveillance specified herein. Medical “fitfor-duty” certifications shall be maintained on Site for all HAZWOPER
workers.
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6.0
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION CONTROL
6.1
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION PROCESS
Prior to initiating any new project activity or when there is a change in
site conditions, the SSO will assist project team members in completing
and documenting a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA). A copy of the JHA form
that may be used by the Contractor is located in Appendix B.
6.2
CHEMICAL HAZARDS
Chromium, hexavalent chromium, lead and polynuclear aromatics
(PNAs) may be present at the Site. For Phase 1 construction in Area 1, the
primary chemical of concern is hexavalent chromium in soil, COPR and
groundwater, or on debris below the MMC synthetic layers. Lead and
PNAs may be present in Areas 2 and 3. Chemicals may be introduced
into the body by ingestion, inhalation, or absorption through the skin.
Since not all chemicals have the same level of toxicity, the length of time
for the exposure and the concentration of the chemical are important in
determining the potential risk to onsite workers. Inhalation and skin
contact are the most common routes of entry for the type of work that is
contemplated for this site. Chemicals can be introduced into the body by
ingestion when chemicals present on the hands are transferred to food or
cigarettes.
6.3
SOIL CONDITIONS
The uppermost material encountered in all of the soil borings collected on
this site is fill material, ranging in thickness from about 7 to 30 feet. The
fill consists of medium compact to loose, gray and brown fine to coarse
sand, with some silt, trace to some gravel, trace clay, and with variable
amounts of brick, concrete fragments, cinders and wood and likely
contain materials impacted by hexavalent or trivalent chromium. As a
general practice COPR was not land filled at the site; however, the 1985 IT
report and 1986 NUS report indicated the potential presence of COPR in
dispersed in soils at the site. Soil containing elevated concentrations of
chromium can be expected to be encountered below the layers of the
multimedia cap. Lead and PNAs may also be encountered in soil in Area
2.
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6.4
GROUNDWATER CONDITIONS
Elevated concentrations of hexavalent chromium have been reported in
shallow groundwater. Shallow ground water levels have not been
recorded above elevation +3 feet mean sea level (msl).
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7.0
FIELD ACTIVITIES
The following activities are anticipated to be performed during
construction of the Area 1, Phase 1 development.
•
Continuous operation of the Transfer Station and HMS including
the storage and transfer contaminated groundwater;
•
Installation of erosion and sediment controls;
•
Demolition of concrete structures and asphalt paving;
•
Selective demolition of the Transfer Station;
•
Exposing portions of the MMC synthetic materials;
•
Excavation, temporary storage and transportation of clean and
contaminated soils and water;
•
Sheet Pile and Pipe Pile driving;
•
Concrete forming;
•
Installation of clean fill, aggregates, and synthetic materials;
•
Installation of utilities in clean fill;
•
Backfill and surface grading;
•
Vibration monitoring; and
•
HMS modifications.
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8.0
SITE PERSONNEL
Workers with the following job descriptions will be engaged in activities
conducted in at the site:
•
Heavy Equipment Operators
•
Vacuum Truck or Pump Operators
•
Truck Drivers
•
Laborers/Spotters
•
Technical Personnel
Other visitors to the site, not directly involved in proposed work activities,
will be considered in the HASP as Technical Personnel listed above.
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9.0
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Level D is the expected level of protection for this construction work.
However, it is the responsibility of the Contractor to review the project
documents in order to make its own determination as to the appropriate
level of PPE for its personnel and subcontractors, as well as applicable
action levels for use of more protective PPE. At a minimum, Level D PPE
consists of the following:
•
Coveralls or long sleeve shirts and long pants, unless otherwise
directed by the SSO;
•
Outer protective work gloves at a minimum for all hazardous or
potentially hazardous material handling activities that may occur
during site activities;
•
As a conservative measure, workers that may routinely come into
contact with groundwater (e.g., workers in the trench making the
utility line connections) should be in poly-coated Tyvek, (Modified
Level D) or similar chemical resistant suit, chemical resistant gloves
and boots;
•
Steel-toed work boots;
•
Hard Hat, where appropriate;
•
Safety Glasses; and
•
High visibility outer ware or safety vest.
•
Options, as required;
o
Disposable outer boots;
o
Hearing protection; and
o
Chemical Resistant gloves.
Deleted: outer water and
Contractors performing intrusive operations into known or potential
chromium impacted areas must address specific air/personal air
monitoring requirements for hexavalent chromium in accordance with
either 29 CFR 1910.1026 or 1926.1126. Prior to initiating any new project
activity or when there is a change in site conditions, an additional JHA
will be completed. A copy of the JHA form is located in Appendix B.
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Personal Protective Equipment requirements are provided in Table 9-1,
below.
Table 9-1.
Personal Protection Equipment Requirements
PPE Level
Ensemble Components
Level D
•
Long pants and shirt
with sleeves.
•
Safety-toed footwear.
•
Safety glasses with
molded side shields.
•
Hard hat.
•
Work gloves
•
Hearing protection if
hazard is present
Should be worn
only as a work
uniform and not in
any area with
respiratory or skin
hazards. It provides
minimal protection
against chemical
hazards.
Anticipated Use
• Demolition of
concrete
structures and
asphalt paving.
• Excavation,
temporary
stock pile and
transportation
of soils.
• Installation of
clean fill,
aggregates, and
synthetic
materials.
• Installation of
utilities in clean
fill area.
• Air monitoring.
• Backfill and
surface
grading.
• Pile driving.
• Concrete
forming.
• Dewatering.
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PPE Level
Ensemble Components
Anticipated Use
Modified Level D
Level D and the following:
Any of the abovereferenced tasks in
which there is
moderate potential
for skin contact with
chromium impacted
soil and/or water
and for all activities
involving direct
contact with
chromium impacted
soils located beneath
the multimedia cap.
•
Disposable poly-coated
Tyvek coveralls.
•
Safety-toed rubber
boots or disposal boot
covers over shoes.
•
Thin nitrile gloves.
•
Green nitrile gloves
over thin nitrile gloves
when primary gloves
may tear or puncture.
Level C
Level D or Modified Level
D and the following:
Should be worn
when the criteria for
using air-purifying
respirators are met,
and a lesser level of
skin protection is
needed.
•
Full-face air purifying
respirator with
combination dust
organic vapor
cartridges at least rated
N-100 or better. If
second action level
surpassed
•
Half-face air purifying
respirator with
combination dust
organic vapor
cartridges at least rated
N-100 or better. If first
action level surpassed
Any of the abovereferenced tasks in
which there is
moderate potential
for skin contact with
chromium soil and
air monitoring data
indicate a need for
respiratory
protection.
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PPE Level
Ensemble Components
Anticipated Use
Level B
Not anticipated to be
required
Tasks requiring
Level B PPE are not
anticipated during
this project. If Level
B PPE is needed, as
determined by the
SSO and/or the
Project Health and
Safety Coordinator,
the HASP will be
revised.
Not anticipated to be
required
Tasks requiring
Level A PPE are not
anticipated during
this project. If Level
A PPE is needed, as
determined by the
SSO and/or the
Project Health and
Safety Coordinator,
the HASP will be
revised.
Should be worn
when the highest
level of respiratory
protection is needed,
but a lesser level of
skin protection is
needed.
Level A
Should be worn
when the highest
level of respiratory,
skin, and eye
protection is needed.
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10.0
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
The type of respiratory protection required will be based on the results of
ambient air monitoring, the results of any models used to predict ambient
air concentrations, and the professional judgment of either the SSO or the
Project Health and Safety Coordinator (HSC). Respiratory protection
requirements are outlined on Table 9-1.
As required by 29 CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection, a cartridge changeout schedule will be developed based on either the results of ambient air
monitoring, the results of any models used to predict ambient air
concentration or the professional judgment of the Project HSC. The Sitespecific dust action levels utilized for this HASP were developed from the
data collected during the Pre-Construction Air Monitoring Study,
conducted from 23 April through 22 June 2013.
The Site soil data indicates that the soil CrVI concentration presents
conditions requiring exposure monitoring for the project. As such, the
action level triggering upgrading to Level C is based on the Site-specific
dust action level, as provided in Section 12 and the Site-specific Air
Monitoring Plan. The Site-specific dust action levels are more
conservative than the OSHA requirements and as such are protective of
both perimeter receptors and those workers involved in intrusive work on
the Site.
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11.0
DECONTAMINATION PROCEDURES
Decontamination involves the orderly controlled removal of contaminants
from both personnel and equipment. The purpose of decontamination
procedures is to prevent the spreading of contaminated materials into
uncontaminated areas. All site personnel should limit contact with
contaminated soil, groundwater or equipment in order to reduce the need
for extensive decontamination. Decontamination only applies to site
personnel and equipment that contact contaminated media.
11.1
EQUIPMENT DECONTAMINATION
All contaminated tools and equipment will be decontaminated on site
using appropriate methods. Dry decontamination procedures will consist
of thoroughly brushing or wiping down tools and equipment. Wet
decontamination will consist of thoroughly scrubbing and cleaning tools
with a designated cleaning solution. All wipes, pads or towels will be
containerized. All decontamination fluids will be drummed and
temporarily stored within the limits of the sealed container storage area
shown on DDP Drawing EN1.01 for proper off-site disposal.
Equipment and materials used in the decontamination process may
include the following:
•
High pressure/hot water cleaning using only potable water/fire
water;
•
Phosphate-free detergent;
•
Five-gallon bucket;
•
Potable water;
•
Distilled water;
•
Paper towels; and
•
Brushes.
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11.2
PERSONNEL DECONTAMINATION
Decontamination is required for all workers exiting a contaminated area.
Personnel may re-enter the Support Zone only after undergoing the
decontamination procedures. Personnel shall remove all contaminated
PPE and containerize it in drums. All work boots are to be
decontaminated using a secured boot brush mounted over disposable
plastic sheeting. All personnel shall remove any inner clothing that is
contaminated and redress. All personnel must wash face and hands
before taking breaks, eating and at the end of the work shift. All PPE and
wash water drums will be disposed properly.
Emergency decontamination for a life threatening medical emergency will
consist of removal of the victim’s outer protective clothing or equipment
to the extent where life saving procedures/medical treatment can be
performed. Final decontamination can be postponed until emergency
medical attention is received. The emergency medical personnel must be
advised of the potential contamination.
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12.0
ACTION LEVELS
The potential exposure pathways of concern are incidental inhalation,
ingestion or dermal contact with CrVI, lead and polynuclear aromatics
from soil/debris/dust. Therefore, measures will be followed during
soil/debris handling to eliminate the potential exposure pathway.
Particular attention to dust suppression activities will be required should
COPR be encountered.
The SSO will routinely conduct real-time air monitoring for total airborne
particulate concentrations to demonstrate that the Site-specific dust action
level, as provided in the Air Monitoring Plan, is not exceeded during
construction. It is expected that such monitoring will be performed
throughout the duration of intrusive activities below the MMC synthetic
layers and until contaminated media has been completely removed from
the Site.
Site-specific background values and action levels have been established
based upon the data evaluation presented in the Air Monitoring Plan, as
derived from the Preconstruction Air Monitoring program. It is important
to note that the site-specific dust action level will be established in the Air
Monitoring Plan. Since the Site-specific dust action level is based on the
background threshold value for pre-construction baseline air, compliance
with the plan should result in no increase in particulate born inorganic or
organic constituents due to project soil intrusive activities and serves as a
real-time surrogate for CrVI as well as other particulate borne constituents
including lead and PAHs. Therefore the Site-specific dust action level is
significantly protective of potential particulate exposure to workers
during intrusive activities.
A correlation between total airborne particulate concentrations and CrVI
concentrations has been established for the site based upon the results of
the Preconstruction Air Monitoring Study as presented in the Air
Monitoring Plan. Based upon this correlation, it is extremely improbable
that either the OSHA action levels for total particulates or CrVI will be
exceeded given the restrictive Site-specific dust action level and response
actions, including stopping work potentially contributing to elevated
particulate concentrations (See Table 12-1). To meet the OSHA and Sitespecific monitoring requirements, CrVI air sampling will be initiated
should the Site-specific dust level be exceeded, as described in the Air
Monitoring Plan. Air sampling will continue for 5 consecutive days to
document CrVI airborne concentrations. Confirmation that the Sitespecific dust levels are serving as a surrogate for the OSHA action level,
will be accomplished by comparing laboratory analytical results utilizing
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OSHA Method ID 215 to the OSHA action level (0.25 µg/M3). While
highly unlikely, if the OSHA CrVI action level is exceeded, reassessment
of the response actions will be taken and changes made to reduce
potential dust emitting activities.
Real-time aerosol monitors (RAM, DustTrak™ DRX 8534 will be utilized
at four (4) perimeter air monitoring (PAM) stations to continuously
monitor total particulate concentrations as the surrogate for CrVI (Figure
2). The PAM stations will continuously monitor and record total
particulate concentrations at 1-minute averages operating at
approximately 2 liters per minute (lpm), 24 hours per day, seven days per
week.
Work Zone (WZ) monitoring will be performed utilizing two (2) RAMs;
one positioned upwind and the other positioned downwind of the
intrusive activity area. The WZ stations will continuously monitor and
record total particulate concentrations at 1-minute averages operating at
approximately 2 liters per minute (lpm) during work hours.
The DustTrak™ DRX 8534 total particulate concentration audible alarm
shall be set at to the site-specific dust action level as approved by EPA and
MDE. Real-time and sampling pump instrumentation will be calibrated
daily per manufacturer’s instructions and have adequate and redundant
power-supplies to ensure constant operation. All documentation
regarding real-time results, monitoring times, dates, duration and
monitoring locations shall be available to the Owner or Owner’s
representative upon request. The Developer or Developer’s
representative must provide all air monitoring data to MDE immediately
upon receipt and, in a similar time frame, will also place the data on a
website that can be accessed by the public.
Deleted:
Table 12-1 outlines the steps to be taken by the SSO when the Site-specific
action levels of the various contaminants are exceeded. Respiratory
protection is selected based on occupational exposure limits of the
constituents at the site and the potential for exposure to vapors and dust
from site activities.
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Table 12-1. Action Levels and Response Actions Requirements
Chemical
(Method)
Site-Specific
Action Level
Dust
Greater than
established
Real-time
action level
sustained in the
Aerosol
work zone for
Monitor
(RAM) and 15 minutes
NIOSH
Analytical
Method 500
Greater than
action level
sustained in the
work zone for
30 minutes
Greater than
action level
sustained in the
work zone for 1
hour
Chemical
(Method)
Regulatory
Action Level
Hexavalent OSHA Action
Chromium Level: 0.25
µg/M3
(OSHA
Analytical
Method ID
215)
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
Response Actions
•
Contact PM and Project Health and
Safety Coordinator.
•
Evaluate work practices and assess
engineering controls to reduce
airborne concentrations.
•
Continue to monitor RAM dust
concentration level.
•
Implement dust suppression.
•
If readings are less than action level
for 15 minutes, resume work.
•
If readings are at or greater than the
action level for more than 15 minutes,
initiate air sampling at WZ stations.
•
If readings are at or greater than the
action level for more than one hour,
STOP work and contact the Owner or
its representative.
•
Continue RAM monitoring and air
sample collection for one, 24-hour
duration after the RAM level has
stabilized.
Response Actions
Site-specific dust action levels are
serving as a real-time surrogate for this
requirement. If the Site-specific dust
action level is exceeded for more than 1
hour follow the response actions above
and don respiratory protection. CrVI
analyses will be used to confirm the
protectiveness of the surrogate.
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13.0
THERMAL STRESS
13.1
HEAT STRESS
Heat stress is caused by a combination of factors such as temperature,
humidity, type of work being performed, and use of personal protective
equipment including protective clothing. Heat stress tends to increase
body temperature, heart rate, and sweating. The key to preventing heat
stress is education of personnel relative to the hazards associated with
working in the heat and implementation of proper controls and work
practices. Table 13-1 summarizes heat stress disorders and
prevention/first aid issues.
When the temperature is above 80º Fahrenheit (F), the SSO will monitor
both the temperature and the humidity throughout the day in order to
determine the Heat Index. The National Weather Service has developed a
Heat Index that combines the ambient temperature and humidity into
value that reflects how hot it really feels. This Heat Index can be used to
determine the risk associated with working outdoors during the hot
months of the year. To use the heat index chart (Table 13-2), read the
temperature at the left and humidity across the top, the Heat Index is
where the two intersect. For example, with a temperature of 96 and a
humidity of 50%, the Heat Index is 108.
The SSO will also inform site workers when the Heat Index Risk Level, as
defined on Table 13-3, reaches Danger and/or Extreme Danger; the
following additional precautions may be implemented at the discretion of
the SSO based on factors such as use of Tyvek coveralls and the physical
activity associated with each task. The following actions or work practices
will be implemented, as practical, as part of the Heat Stress Management
Program.
•
Designated areas will be used for site workers to take breaks and
for eating;
•
If possible, physically demanding and strenuous tasks may be
scheduled for the cooler parts of the day;
•
Site workers will be required to drink 6-8 ounces of cool water or
electrolyte replacement drinks every 60 minutes. Diabetics should
use caution when using electrolyte replacement drinks to replenish
fluids as these drinks may have high sugar content;
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•
Site workers taking prescription medications should check with
their doctor or other medical professional regarding the interaction
between working in hot environments and their medications;
•
SSO will more closely observe site workers, especially those
working in Tyvek coveralls or performing strenuous job tasks;
•
Implement worker rotation during strenuous or physically
demanding job tasks; and
•
SSO will implement a work-rest cycle.
Table 13-1.
Disorder
Heat Stress Disorders
Symptoms
Heat Rash
or Prickly
Heat
♦Rash
Heat
Cramps
♦Sudden onset of
muscle cramps
usually in legs or
arms
♦Itching
♦Hot, moist skin
♦Normal pulse
♦Normal or
slightly elevated
temperature
Cause
Prevention/First Aid
♦Hot, humid
conditions
♦Ointments
♦Loss of water
(sweating)
♦Move into shade
♦Keep skin clean and
♦Sweat doesn’t
dry
evaporate
♦Good daily personal
easily
hygiene
♦Sweat ducts
become
clogged
♦Loss of
electrolytes
♦Replacing
water but not
electrolytes
♦Loosen clothing
♦Drink tepid
electrolyte drinks or
water
♦Seek medical
assistance if
conditions persist
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Disorder
Heat
Exhaustion
Symptoms
♦Pale, clammy
skin
♦Profuse
perspiration
♦Thirst from
dehydration
Cause
♦Overexertion
♦Cool by applying
damp cool
compresses or ice
packs
♦Headache
♦Drink tepid
electrolyte drinks or
water
♦Nausea
♦Loss of
coordination
♦Elevated
temperature
(>103F)
♦Flushed, hot, dry
skin
♦Move into shade
♦Excessive loss ♦Remove PPE
of water and
♦Loosen street
electrolytes
clothing
♦Weakness
Heat
Stroke
Prevention/First Aid
♦Summon medical
assistance
♦Failure of
body’s
cooling
(sweating)
mechanism
♦Summon medical
assistance
immediately
♦Move to shade
♦Remove PPE
♦Absence of
sweating
♦Loosen street
clothing
♦Delirious
♦Cool by fanning or
applying damp
compress or ice
packs
♦Rapid pulse
♦Nausea
♦Headache
♦Dizziness
♦Unconsciousness
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Table 13-2.
Heat Index Chart
Relative Humidity (%)
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
100
110 136
Temperature (F)
108 130 137
106 124 130
137
104 119 124
131 137
102 114 119
124 130
137
100 109 114
118 124
129
136
98
105 109
113 117
123
128
134
96
101 104
108 112
116
121
126
132
94
97
100
102 106
110
114
119
124
129
136
92
94
96
99
101
105
108
112
116
121
126
131
90
91
93
95
97
100
103
106
109
113
117
122 127
132
88
88
89
91
93
95
98
100
103
106
110
113 117
121
86
85
87
88
89
91
93
95
97
100
102
106 108
112
84
83
84
85
86
88
89
90
92
94
96
98
100
103
82
81
82
83
84
84
85
86
88
89
90
91
93
95
80
80
80
81
81
82
82
83
84
84
85
86
86
87
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Table 13-3.
Heat Index Risk Level and Associated Health Effects
Heat Index
Associated Risk
>130
Extreme Danger
Heat stroke highly likely with continued exposure
105-130
Danger
Heat exhaustion and heat cramps likely and heat
stroke possible with prolonged exposure and/or
physical activity
90-105
Extreme Caution
Heat cramps and heat exhaustion possible with
prolonged exposure and/or physical activity
80-90
Caution
Fatigue possible with prolonged exposure and/or
physical activity
Notes:
•
Heat Index values were devised for shady, light wind conditions. Exposure to full
sun may increase these values by up to 15º.
•
Heat Index values were devised for the general public wearing typical lightweight
summer clothing. Acclimatized workers may be able to work under conditions with
a slightly higher Heat Index.
•
The use of personal protective equipment, including clothing increases the heat stress
load on the body.
The work-rest cycle outlined below may be implemented based on the
professional judgment of the SSO and/or the Project Health and Safety
Coordinator.
Heat Index
Risk Level
Work-Rest Cycle
> 130
Extreme Danger
15 minute break every 30 minutes
105-130
Danger
15 minute break every 60 minutes
90-105
Extreme Caution
15 minute break every 90 minutes
80-90
Caution
15 minute break every 120 minutes
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13.2
COLD STRESS
Cold stress situations may be encountered at the site. If lower than
normal temperatures (i.e., less than 35ºF) are forecasted the following
information will be utilized. Most cold related worker fatalities have
resulted from failure to escape low environmental air temperatures, or
from immersion in low temperature water. The two most prominent
adverse effects from exposure to cold temperatures are frostbite and
hypothermia. A person qualified in first aid or a professional medical
provider should administer treatment for cold related injuries. The single
most important aspect of life-threatening hypothermia is a drop in the
deep-core body temperature. Response to cold stress will be based on
Cold Stress section of the ACGIH TLV booklet.
13.2.1
Frostbite
Frostbite occurs when the extremities do not get sufficient heat from the
central body stores. The fluids around the cells of the body tissues freeze
from exposure to low temperatures. This condition can result in damage
to, and loss of, tissue. The most vulnerable areas are the nose, cheeks,
ears, fingers, and toes. Damage from frostbite can occur in either the outer
layers of skin or in the tissue beneath these layers and can be serious,
resulting in scarring, tissue death, permanent loss of movement, or
amputation.
13.2.2
Hypothermia
This is the most severe form of cold stress and results from a drop in the
body’s core temperature. Hypothermia can occur in relatively mild
temperatures if there is a wind and the person’s clothing becomes wet.
The symptoms of hypothermia are:
•
First, uncontrollable shivering and the sensation of the cold;
•
Heartbeat slows and may become irregular;
•
Pulse weakens and blood pressure changes;
•
As the body’s core temperature drops, other signs may include cool
skin, slow irregular breathing, and apparent exhaustion;
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13.2.3
•
When core temperatures are in the mid-range, the victim may
become listless, confused, exhibit severe shivering, or develop
severe pain in the extremities; and
•
Final signs are a significant drop in blood pressure, fatigue, and
shallow respiration.
Control Measures for Cold Stress
Worker comfort will be monitored and increased layers of PPE or
modesty clothing worn under the PPE may be required to minimize cold
stress for those persons working inside a building. For those workers
performing tasks outside a building when ambient temperature falls
below 36ºF, the following guidelines should be used:
•
If wind chill is a factor, shielding the work area or providing
employees an outer windbreak layer garment will reduce the
cooling effect of the wind;
•
Extremities, ears, toes, and nose will be protected from extreme
cold by protective clothing;
•
Employees performing light work and whose clothing may become
wet will wear an outer layer of clothing that is impermeable to
water;
•
Employees performing moderate to heavy work and whose
clothing may become wet will wear an outer layer of clothing that
is water repellent; and
•
Outer garments must provide for ventilation to prevent wetting of
inner clothing by sweat.
Workers who become immersed in water or whose clothing becomes wet
will immediately be provided a change of clothing and be treated for
hypothermia if necessary. If the clothing becomes wet from sweating, the
employees may finish the task that caused the sweating before changing
into dry clothes. Metal handles of tools and control bars will be covered
by thermal insulating materials when temperatures fall below 30ºF.
Whenever a site becomes covered with snow or ice, eye wear providing
employees’ protection against ultraviolet light, glare, and blowing ice
crystals shall be worn.
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When conducting work in air temperatures below 35º F, the following
practices shall be followed:
•
If the clothing of an employee is expected to become wet, the outer
layers of clothing must be impermeable to water;
•
If an employee’s underclothing becomes wet it must be changed
immediately. If the clothing becomes wet from sweating, the
employee may finish the task that caused the sweating before
changing into dry clothing;
•
Employees will be provided a warm area (65º F or above) to change
from work clothing into street clothing and for breaks;
•
Hot liquids, such as soups, warm drinks, etc. shall be provided in
the break area. The intake of caffeine containing products shall be
discouraged due to their diuretic and circulatory effects;
•
If appropriate, approved space heaters may be provided in the
work area to warm the hands, feet, etc;
•
The buddy system shall be practiced. Any employee observed with
signs of cold stress shall immediately proceed to the break area;
•
Employees will be reminded to layer their clothing, i.e., wear
thinner, lighter clothing next to the body with heavier clothing
layered outside the inner clothing;
•
Avoid overdressing when going into warm areas or when
performing activities that are strenuous. This could potentially lead
to heat stress situations;
•
Auxiliary heated versions of hand wear, footwear, etc., can be used
in lieu of mittens, insulated socks, etc. if extremely cold conditions
exist;
•
Employees handling liquids with high evaporation rates (gasoline,
hexane, alcohol, etc.) shall take special precautions to avoid soaking
of clothing with the liquids because of the added danger of cold
injury caused by evaporative cooling;
•
Work shall be arranged in such a way that sitting still or standing
for long periods is minimized; and
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•
If the air temperature is 20º F or below the hands shall be protected
by mittens or gloves prior to contact with cold surfaces such as
metal, etc.
Air temperature is not the only factor to be considered while evaluating
cold stress situations. Wind chill cooling rate and the cooling power of air
are critical factors. The higher the wind speed the greater the risk of
experiencing cold related injuries. For exposed skin, continuous exposure
should not be permitted when the air speed and temperature result in an
equivalent chill temperature of –25º F or less.
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14.0
SAFE WORK PRACTICES AND STANDARD OPERATING
PROCEDURES
14.1
GENERAL SAFE PROVISIONS
For Contractor’s convenience, key regulations (including constructionrelated regulations) that may apply to the project activities are listed
below. Contractors are responsible for ensuring that their HASPs address
the issues and regulations applicable to their respective scopes of work for
the project.
•
Hazardous Waste Site Operations (29 CFR 1910.120);
•
Construction Activities (29 CFR 1926);
•
Hazard Communication (29 CFR 1910.1200 & 29 CFR 1926.59);
•
Personal Protective Equipment (29 CFR 1920.132 & 29 CFR 1926.95)
•
Fire Protection (29 CFR 1910.39 & 29 CFR 1926.150);
•
Excavations (29 CFR 1926 Subpart P);
•
Powered Hand Tools (29 CFR 1910.242 & 29 CFR 1926.301);
•
Electrical Safety (29 CFR Subpart S & 29 CFR 1926.400-449);
•
Fall Protection (29 CFR 1926 Subpart M);
•
Walking Working Surfaces (29 CFR 1910.22)’
•
Welding (29 CFR 1910.251 & 29 CFR 1926.350-354);
•
Earthmoving Equipment (29 CFR 1926.602);
•
Hazardous Energy Control (29 CFR 1910.147);
•
Sanitation (29 CFR 1926.51);
•
Scaffolding (29 CFR 1910.28 &29 CFR 1926.450-454);
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14.1.1
•
Confined Space Entry (29 CFR 1910.146):
•
Respiratory Protection (29 CFR 1910.134).
Smoking and Eating Areas
Smoking will only be allowed in designated areas. Upon mobilization at
the site, the SSO will establish smoking areas per site-specific or clientspecific requirements. Individuals caught smoking outside the designated
smoking areas will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including
immediate termination.
Upon mobilization at the site, the SSO will establish eating and break
areas per site-specific or client-specific requirements. Eating will only be
allowed in the designated areas and the areas will be maintained in a
clean and sanitary condition.
14.1.2
Sanitation and Potable Water
Containers used for drinking water will be equipped with a tap and
capable of being tightly closed. In addition, the container will be labeled
as “Drinking Water” or “Potable Water.” Disposal cups will be stored in
a sanitary condition and a receptacle for disposing of the cups will be
near-by.
Potable and non-potable water containers and portable toilets (if used)
will comply with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.141 requirements.
14.1.3
Temporary Facilities
All temporary facilities will be maintained in a clean and sanitary
condition to discourage the entrance of rodents or vermin. If rodents or
vermin become an issue, the SSO will be responsible for implementing an
extermination program per site-specific or client-specific guidelines.
Trailers and other temporary structures used as field offices or for storage
will be anchored with rods and cables or by steel straps to ground
anchors. The anchor system will be designed to withstand winds and
must meet applicable state or local regulations for the anchoring of mobile
trailer homes. Use of standard anchoring systems to anchor structures is
not permitted in Area 1 due to potential damage to the MMC. Methods
designed to avoid impacting the MMC will be used to secure structures.
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14.1.4
First Aid Station
A designated area must be readily accessible to employees. Signs shall be
posted indicating the location for the first aid station and name of
designated first aid provider(s). The sign should be in the form of a
symbol that does not require workers to have language skills to
understand it.
14.1.5
Eye Wash Stations
The location of each eyewash station must be identified with a highly
visible sign. The sign should be in the form of a symbol that does not
require workers to have language skills to understand it. Eye wash
stations must be inspected monthly.
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15.0
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
The following standard operating procedures will be adhered to at all
times:
•
All personnel entering the site must check in with the SSO.
•
All individuals entering the site must demonstrate to the SSO that
they have been adequately trained as defined in Section 4.
•
All individuals must be familiar with emergency communication
methods and how to summon emergency assistance.
•
Use of alcoholic beverages before, during operations, or
immediately after hours is absolutely forbidden. Alcohol can
reduce the ability to detoxify compounds absorbed into the body as
the result of minor exposures and may have negative effects with
exposure to other chemicals. In addition, alcoholic beverages will
dehydrate the body and intensify the effects of heat stress.
•
Horseplay of any type is forbidden.
•
All unsafe conditions will be immediately reported to the SSO, who
will document such conditions in the field log. The SSO will be
responsible for ensuring that the unsafe condition is correctly as
quickly as possible.
•
No smoking, eating, chewing gum or tobacco, taking medication,
or applying cosmetics in the Contamination Reduction Zone or the
Exclusion Zone. Wash hands and face thoroughly prior to
conducting the activities in the Support Zone.
•
Smoking, matches, and lighters are only allowed in the designated
smoking area.
•
Avoid contact with potentially contaminated substances. Avoid,
whenever possible, kneeling on the ground, or leaning or sitting on
trucks, equipment or the ground. Do not place equipment on
potentially contaminated surfaces.
•
If PPE becomes torn or saturated with contaminated material,
immediately leave the Exclusion Zone, go through the
decontamination steps, and replace the affected PPE. Additionally,
wash any exposed skin thoroughly with soap and water.
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16.0
SAFE WORK PRACTICES
16.1
PRE-EXCAVATION
Prior to mobilizing to the field, the Project Manger will be responsible for
ensuring a Subsurface Clearance Checklist is followed, including
verifying that the following issues have been adequately addressed.
16.2
•
Contacting the State’s One Call or equivalent utility locator service
to identify underground pipelines, utility lines, and fiber optic
cable;
•
Contacting appropriate municipality to identify underground
water and sewer lines;
•
Contacting posted pipeline companies; and
•
Contacting client to identify underground pipelines or other
obstructions.
•
Contacting client to notify Honeywell, the MDE and the EPA that
excavation to the synthetic layers, or through the synthetic layers is
about to occur. The anticipated date of the beginning of excavation
will also be stated.
FALL PROTECTION
In the event that project team members and/or subcontractors are
working more than six feet above grade and are not protected by
handrails, complete floor decking or working on approved access ways,
fall protection equipment will be required.
The distance above grade is measured from the employee’s feet to the
grade or approved work surface. Fall protection equipment will consist of
an ANSI-approved full-body harness and shock-absorbing (or retractable)
lanyard with double-locking d-rings.
Acceptable anchor points to which the lanyard may be attached includes,
but are not limited to, the following:
•
Structural beams at least six-inches in depth for one or more
persons in a completed structure;
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16.3
•
Pipes at least four-inches in diameter for one person;
•
Pipes at least six-inches in diameter for two people;
•
Nozzles at least three-inches for one person;
•
Nozzles greater than three-inches for two people; and
•
Permanent platform handrail post below mid-rail for one person.
WEATHER-RELATED EVENTS
Weather-related events that may impact field work include, but are not
limited to, rain, thunder, lightning, flash flooding, high winds and
tornados. The SSO will be responsible for determining what site work can
be performed safely in the rain and at what point work will cease due to
either quality or safety issues. In the event of thunder and/or lightning,
all work will be suspended until 15 minutes have elapsed from the last
clap of thunder or flash of lightning.
16.3.1
Lightning Safety for Outdoor Workers
Safety and productivity are not mutually compatible, so one must be
chosen over the other. Easy choice: SAFETY FIRST! Lightning has visited
most all outdoor work environments. Anticipate a high-risk situation and
move to a low-risk location.
Lightning safety awareness is a priority at every outdoor facility and
operation. Education is the single most important means to achieving
lightning safety. The following steps are suggested:
•
Monitor weather conditions in the early morning hours. Local
weather forecasts -- from The Weather Channel or NOAA Weather
Radio or other notably reliable source -- should be noted 24 hours
prior to scheduled activities. An inexpensive portable weather
radio is recommended for obtaining timely storm data.
•
Suspension and resumption of work activities should be planned in
advance. Understanding of SAFE shelters is essential. SAFE
evacuation sites include:
o Fully enclosed metal vehicles with windows up;
o Substantial buildings;
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o Low ground -- seek cover in clumps of bushes; and
o Trees of uniform height, such as a forest.
•
UNSAFE SHELTER AREAS include all outdoor metal objects, like
power poles, fences and gates, high mast light poles, metal
bleachers, electrical equipment, mowing and road machinery.
AVOID solitary trees. AVOID water. AVOID open fields. AVOID
high ground and caves.
•
Lightning's distance from you is easy to calculate: If you hear
thunder, the associated lightning is within audible range ... about 68 miles away. The distance from Strike A to Strike B also can be 6-8
miles. Suspend activities, allowing sufficient time to get to shelter.
Of course, different distances to safety will determine different
times to suspend activities. A good lightning safety motto is:
•
If you can see it (lightning), flee it; if you can hear it (thunder), clear it.
•
If you feel your hair standing on end, and/or hear "crackling
noises," you are in lightning's electric field. If caught outside during
close-in lightning, immediately remove metal objects (including
baseball cap), place your feet together, duck your head, and crouch
down low in baseball catcher's stance with hands on knees.
•
Wait a minimum of 30 minutes from the last observed lightning or
thunder before resuming activities. Be extra cautious during this
phase as the storm may not be over.
•
People who have been struck by lightning do not carry an electrical
charge and are safe to handle. Apply first aid immediately if you
are qualified to do so. Get emergency help promptly.
During rain, lightning and/or thunder events, site workers should seek
shelter in either a building or vehicle. In the event of a tornado, site
workers should seek shelter in a building, expect trailers, or in a low-lying
area.
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16.3.2
Noise
Employees performing any noisy task, such as but not limited to,
operating heavy equipment, using power tools, or employees working
nearby the person performing the task will wear hearing protection
consisting of either earplugs or earmuffs. Personnel operating heavy
equipment, such as pile driving equipment and excavators with hoe-ram
attachments will also wear hearing protection.
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17.0
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PROCEDURES
Entry into existing Site confined spaces is strictly forbidden by untrained
personnel and without a confined space permit issued by the Site Safety
Officer. Entry into HMS confined spaces is anticipated for the Harbor
Point construction activities. HMS confined space signage is current at
the Site. If a project task or activity involves entry into a permit-required
confined space or if there is a question as to whether or not a job task or
activity involves a permit-required confined space, the PM or SSO will
contact the Project Health and Safety Coordinator for assistance.
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18.0
SPILL CONTAINMENT PROGRAM
The spill containment program for this project will involve the use of
preventative measures in order to reduce the potential for environmental
releases. These preventative measures will include the following:
•
Equipment inspection;
•
Staging equipment on containment pads;
•
Secondary containment for fuel storage tanks; and
•
General housekeeping practices; and
•
Appropriately sized and stocked spill/release kits/containers.
If project activities involve the use of drums or other containers, the drums
or containers will meet the appropriate DOT regulations and will be
inspected and their integrity assured prior to being moved. Operations
will be organized so as to minimize drum or container movement. Drums
or containers that cannot be moved without failure will be over-packed
into an appropriate container.
Additionally, refer to the site-specific Spill Prevention and Response Plan
dated November 2013.
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
40
NOVEMBER 2013
19.0
SITE COMMUNICATION
Telephones and two-way radios will be used for communication between
the project team and the client. Cell phones may be used as part of the
communication method. However, cell phones cannot be used while
driving any type of vehicle.
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
41
NOVEMBER 2013
20.0
COMMUNICATION AND REVIEW OF SITE-SPECIFIC HASP PLAN
(HAZARD COMMUNICATION)
An initial review of the site-specific HASP will be held either prior to
mobilization or after mobilization but prior to commencing work at the
site to communicate HASP details and answer questions to individuals
working at the site. Daily tailgate safety meetings will be held each
morning to review work practices for the day and to discuss safety issues.
Any new hazard or safety information will be disseminated at the daily
tailgate safety meeting or as needed throughout the day.
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
42
NOVEMBER 2013
21.0
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN
This section describes possible contingencies and emergency procedures
to be implemented at the site.
21.1
PERSONNEL ROLES AND LINES OF AUTHORITY
The SSO has primary responsibility for site evacuation and notification in
the event of an emergency situation. This includes taking appropriate
measures to ensure the safety of site personnel and the public. Possible
actions may involve the evacuation of personnel from the site area and
ensuring that corrective measures have been implemented, appropriate
authorities notified, and follow-up reports completed. If the SSO is not
available, the Project Health and Safety Coordinator will assume these
responsibilities. Subcontractors are responsible for assisting the SSO in
their mission within the parameters of their scope of work.
21.2
EVACUATION ROUTES AND PROCEDURES
In the event of an emergency, it is important to be aware of the prevailing
wind direction and evacuate upwind or crosswind.
21.3
ASSEMBLY POINTS
The primary Assembly Point is in front of the construction trailer. The
secondary Assembly Point is in front of the spill trailer. In the event of an
emergency requiring evacuation to an Assembly Point, the SSO will be
responsible to account for the presence of all project team members and
subcontractors on-site at the time of the emergency.
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
43
NOVEMBER 2013
22.0
EMERGENCY RESPONSE
22.1
NOTIFICATION OF SITE EMERGENCIES
The Contractor must have systems in place for responding to all
emergencies. The written HASP should note the potential emergencies
associated with this specific project and describe methods anticipated to
perform the following:
22.2
•
Notify appropriate individuals, authorities, and/or health care
facilities of the site activities and anticipated duration prior to the
mobilization of equipment;
•
Ensure that, at a minimum, the following safety and monitoring
equipment is available at the site: first aid supplies, fire
extinguishers, a non-phosphate soap and water solution and
potable water rinse, and potable water for eye washing;
•
Ensure that a sufficient number of cellular telephones are present
during site activities for emergency response and office
communications. If deemed appropriate by the SSO or HSC, twoway radios may also be used on site for communication among
workers;
•
Have working knowledge of all safety equipment available at the
site;
•
Ensure that a map, which details the most direct route to the
nearest hospital, is readily available with the emergency telephone
numbers;
•
The Contractor’s HASP shall contain a list of emergency response
telephone numbers. This list will be maintained at the work site by
the SSO or his designee in a readily accessible location for use in
case of an emergency.
DIRECTIONS TO THE NEAREST HOSPITAL
The Contractor’s HASP will include a map and written directions to the
Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Entrance located at 1800 Orleans
Street (Appendix A). The SSO will identify site egress routes during the
daily briefing prior to commencement of that day's work.
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
44
NOVEMBER 2013
23.0
EVACUATION PROCEDURES
Where site evacuation could possibly be a health and safety consideration,
the Contractor’s HASP should define the primary evacuation route and
also identify an alternate evacuation route based on the scheduled site
operations. The two routes will be established independent of each other
in the event of an obstruction on a particular route. A system should be in
place to ensure that employees can easily evacuate the work area. It is
recommended that daily evacuation routes will be reviewed with site
workers at the start of each day.
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
45
NOVEMBER 2013
24.0
INCIDENT REPORTING PROCEDURE
In the event that a health and safety incident occurs, it is imperative that
specific reporting procedures be followed so that appropriate corrective
action can be taken by the HSC and the PM for the duration of the project.
The Contractor’s HASP must define methods by which accidents are
reported, investigated, and prevented in the future. It is recommended
that the Contractor’s PM and the HSC investigate the facility/site
conditions to determine: (1) the severity of the incident; (2) the cause of the
incident; (3) the means to prevent the incident from recurring; and, (4)
personnel responsible for implementing the corrective action.
The following additional personnel shall be identified in the Contractor’s
HASP and notified within a reasonable timeframe, but this should be no
later than 1 hour after any incident.
•
Jonathan Flesher, HPD, (cell: 443-463-3937
•
Ken Biles, CH2M Hill, (cell: 443-271-6694);
•
Bob Steele, CH2M Hill (cell: 609-625-1780)
•
Bill Berlett, CH2M Hill (cell: 847-770-0209)
•
Chris French, Honeywell (cell: 973-216-7506)
The Contractor’s HASP will include an incident reporting form so that
consistent and appropriate information is obtained regarding employee
exposures or accidents. The form will be filed at the Contractor’s office
with the employee's medical and safety records to serve as documentation
of the incident and the actions taken.
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
46
NOVEMBER 2013
25.0
INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS
All safety events, including incidents, will be recorded and documented
within 24 hours of an incident. All incidents will be reported to Bill
Berlett (see above) and investigated in a timely manner. Incidents will
require entry into the Honeywell Event Tracking System by CH2M Hill.
The Safety Team will schedule the investigation and include the SSO, the
Project Manager, project supervision (subcontractors, and client), the
injured/involved employee(s) and the Project Health and Safety
Coordinator. Root cause analysis will be performed to assess the apparent
cause and identify corrective measures to be implemented to prevent reoccurrence. The last page of the Incident Form is used to document the
investigation.
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
47
NOVEMBER 2013
26.0
CERTIFICATION OF FAMILIARITY WITH PLAN BY SITE PERSONNEL
By signing below, signee certifies that they have read, understand and
will abide by the contents of this HASP.
Name
Signature
Company
Date
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
48
NOVEMBER 2013
Name
Signature
Company
Date
Deleted: AUGUST
HARBOR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC
49
NOVEMBER 2013
Figures
Figure 1
Site Location Map
SITE
3
AREA 1
2
Figure 2
Construction Air Monitoring Locations
Harbor Point
Baltimore, Maryland
OAM-2
PAM-4
MET
PAM-3
PAM-1
PAM-2
MET – Meteorological Station
PAM – Perimeter Air Monitor
OAM – Off-site Air Monitor
1 – City Recreation Pier
2 – Baltimore National Aquarium
OAM-1
Appendix A
Map to Hospital
1000 Dock St, Baltimore, MD 21231 to 1800 Orleans St, Baltimore, MD 21287 - Google ... Page 1 of 2
Directions to 1800 Orleans St, Baltimore, MD
21287
1.6 mi – about 9 mins
Loading...
©2013 Google - Map data ©2013 Google -
https://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=1000+Dock+St,+Baltimore,+MD... 6/14/2013
1000 Dock St, Baltimore, MD 21231 to 1800 Orleans St, Baltimore, MD 21287 - Google ... Page 2 of 2
1000 Dock St, Baltimore, MD 21231
1. Head east on Dock St toward Wills St
Restricted usage road
go 443 ft
total 443 ft
2. Take the 1st left onto S Caroline St
About 1 min
go 0.2 mi
total 0.3 mi
3. Take the 3rd right onto Fleet St
About 2 mins
go 0.4 mi
total 0.7 mi
4. Turn left onto S Washington St
About 4 mins
go 0.7 mi
total 1.5 mi
5. Turn left onto Orleans St
Destination will be on the right
About 1 min
go 0.1 mi
total 1.6 mi
1800 Orleans St, Baltimore, MD 21287
These directions are for planning purposes only. You may find that construction projects, traffic, weather, or other events may cause
conditions to differ from the map results, and you should plan your route accordingly. You must obey all signs or notices regarding your
route.
Map data ©2013 Google
Directions weren't right? Please find your route on maps.google.com and click "Report a problem" at the bottom left.
https://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=1000+Dock+St,+Baltimore,+MD... 6/14/2013
Appendix B
Job Hazard Analysis Form
JHA
Job Hazard Analysis
Project Number:
Project / Client Name:
Project Manager:
Location:
Partner-in-Charge:
Date and Revision Number:
SPECIFIC TASK:
Hard Hat
Minimum Required PPE for Entire Task:
Safety Glasses
Safety-Toe Shoes
Hearing Protection
Reflective Vest
Gloves
Goggles
Respirator
Face Shield
PPE clothing
<enter type here>
<enter type and cartridge type>
<enter type here (eg, Tyvek, FRC, long sleeves)>
Additional Task-Step Specific PPE:
(as indicated below under Controls)
Equipment / Tools Required:
Training Required for this Task:
Permits Required for this Task:
Other (specify):
<enter additional PPE here>
Forms Associated with This Task:
JHA Developed / Reviewed By:
Name / Job Title:
Task Steps1
1
App B_Job Hazard Analysis Form.xlsx
JHA Review In Field
Name / Job Title:
Potential Hazards & Consequences2
Field Safety Officer (FSO) to ensure all personnel performing this task have reviewed
JHA and agree to follow it. Site-specific changes to this JHA have been made as
warranted based on this review. FSO Signature/Date:
Name / Job Title:
Hazard
Types3
Likelihood5
1a
1b
Severity5
RISK5
Controls to Eliminate or Reduce Risks4
auto-calculate 1a
auto-calculate 1b
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
Page 1 of 3
Print Date: 7/1/2013
Task Steps1
Potential Hazards & Consequences2
Hazard
Types3
Likelihood5
Severity5
RISK5
Controls to Eliminate or Reduce Risks4
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
auto-calculate
ONE JHA PER TASK. SUBCONTRACTORS MUST PROVIDE THEIR OWN JHAS. JHAS SHOULD BE WRITTEN IN PLAIN LANGUAGE AND SHOULD BE NO MORE THAN 2-3 PAGES IN LENGTH.
INSERT ADDITIONAL ROWS AS NEEDED ABOVE (MUST MANUALLY COPY AND PASTE FORMULA IN COLUMN H). ROW HEIGHTS MAY NEED TO BE MANUALLY EXPANDED TO VIEW ALL TEXT.
LEAVE SEVERAL BLANK OVERSIZED ROWS TO ALLOW HANDWRITTEN FIELD ADDITIONS. CAN ALSO DELETE UNNEEDED ROWS TO FIT PAGE(S).
1. Each task consists of a set of steps. List and number all the steps in the sequence they are performed. Specify the equipment or other details.
2. List potential hazards and consequences - ONE PER ROW. Use numbers and letters for each hazard/impact listed (1a, 1b, etc). Hazards should be described in terms of their specific origin and negative consequences (e.g., instead of “moving equipment”, write “injury from getting
struck by forklift”).
3. For each potential hazard, select the hazard type from the following list:
H&S - Health & Safety
S - Security
E - Environmental
PL - Property Loss
multiple - multiple hazard types
4. Describe the specific actions or procedures that will be implemented to eliminate or reduce each hazard. Be clear, concise, and specific. Use objective, observable, and quantified terms (e.g., instead of “use good body positioning,” write “don’t bend at waist or reach above head”).
Use numbers and letters corresponding to listed hazards.
5. Select the likelihood of occurrence and severity of each hazard, AFTER implementation of the planned control measures (use the Risk Matrix as a guide). The corresponding risk rating should be calculated by multiplying the likelihood and severity [ RISK = Likelihood x Severity].
A risk rating of > 15 indicates that work cannot continue without additional control measures and approval of Partner-in-Charge.
WAYS TO ELIMINATE OR REDUCE RISKS (IN ORDER OF PREFERENCE):
ELIMINATE / AVOID
App B_Job Hazard Analysis Form.xlsx
-->
SUBSTITUTE / MODIFY
-->
ISOLATE -->
ENGINEER / SAFEGUARD -->
Page 2 of 3
TRAINING AND PROCEDURES
-->
WARNING AND ALERT MECHANISMS -->
PPE
Print Date: 7/1/2013
Risk Matrix
Likelihood
What could go wrong?
What is the worst thing that could happen if something goes wrong?
1
2
INSIGNIFICANT
negligible or no
injury could result
MINOR
minor injury
requiring only
first aid
Hazard Severity
3
4
MODERATE
HIGH
Injury resulting in Serious injury or
lost time could
death could
occur
occur
5
VERY HIGH
multiple deaths
could occur
1
VERY
UNLIKELY
1
2
3
4
5
2
UNLIKELY
2
4
6
8
10
3
POSSIBLE
3
6
9
12
15
4
LIKELY
4
8
12
16
20
5
VERY LIKELY
5
10
15
20
25
Appendix C
Material Safety Data Sheets
(Example)
1
2
0
He a lt h
2
Fire
1
Re a c t iv it y
0
P e rs o n a l
P ro t e c t io n
E
Material Safety Data Sheet
Chromium MSDS
Section 1: Chemical Product and Company Identification
Product Name: Chromium
Contact Information:
Sciencelab.com, Inc.
14025 Smith Rd.
Houston, Texas 77396
Catalog Codes: SLC4711, SLC3709
CAS#: 7440-47-3
US Sales: 1-800-901-7247
International Sales: 1-281-441-4400
RTECS: GB4200000
TSCA: TSCA 8(b) inventory: Chromium
Order Online: ScienceLab.com
CI#: Not applicable.
Synonym: Chromium metal; Chrome; Chromium Metal
Chips 2" and finer
Chemical Name: Chromium
CHEMTREC (24HR Emergency Telephone), call:
1-800-424-9300
International CHEMTREC, call: 1-703-527-3887
For non-emergency assistance, call: 1-281-441-4400
Chemical Formula: Cr
Section 2: Composition and Information on Ingredients
Composition:
Name
CAS #
% by Weight
Chromium
7440-47-3
100
Toxicological Data on Ingredients: Chromium LD50: Not available. LC50: Not available.
Section 3: Hazards Identification
Potential Acute Health Effects:
Hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), of eye contact (irritant), of inhalation. Slightly hazardous in case of ingestion.
Potential Chronic Health Effects:
CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: A4 (Not classifiable for human or animal.) by ACGIH, 3 (Not classifiable for human.) by IARC.
MUTAGENIC EFFECTS: Not available. TERATOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Not
available. The substance may be toxic to kidneys, lungs, liver, upper respiratory tract. Repeated or prolonged exposure to the
substance can produce target organs damage.
Section 4: First Aid Measures
Eye Contact:
p. 1
Check for and remove any contact lenses. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with plenty of water for at least 15
minutes. Get medical attention.
Skin Contact:
In case of contact, immediately flush skin with plenty of water. Cover the irritated skin with an emollient. Remove contaminated
clothing and shoes. Wash clothing before reuse. Thoroughly clean shoes before reuse. Get medical attention.
Serious Skin Contact:
Wash with a disinfectant soap and cover the contaminated skin with an anti-bacterial cream. Seek medical attention.
Inhalation:
If inhaled, remove to fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. Get medical
attention.
Serious Inhalation: Not available.
Ingestion:
Do NOT induce vomiting unless directed to do so by medical personnel. Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious
person. Loosen tight clothing such as a collar, tie, belt or waistband. Get medical attention if symptoms appear.
Serious Ingestion: Not available.
Section 5: Fire and Explosion Data
Flammability of the Product: May be combustible at high temperature.
Auto-Ignition Temperature: 580°C (1076°F)
Flash Points: Not available.
Flammable Limits: Not available.
Products of Combustion: Some metallic oxides.
Fire Hazards in Presence of Various Substances:
Slightly flammable to flammable in presence of open flames and sparks, of heat. Non-flammable in presence of shocks.
Explosion Hazards in Presence of Various Substances:
Risks of explosion of the product in presence of mechanical impact: Not available. Risks of explosion of the product in
presence of static discharge: Not available.
Fire Fighting Media and Instructions:
SMALL FIRE: Use DRY chemical powder. LARGE FIRE: Use water spray, fog or foam. Do not use water jet.
Special Remarks on Fire Hazards:
Moderate fire hazard when it is in the form of a dust (powder) and burns rapidly when heated in flame. Chromium is attacked
vigorously by fused potassium chlorate producing vivid incandescence. Pyrophoric chromium unites with nitric oxide with
incandescence. Incandescent reaction with nitrogen oxide or sulfur dioxide.
Special Remarks on Explosion Hazards:
Powdered Chromium metal +fused ammonium nitrate may react violently or explosively. Powdered Chromium will explode
spontaneously in air.
Section 6: Accidental Release Measures
Small Spill:
Use appropriate tools to put the spilled solid in a convenient waste disposal container. Finish cleaning by spreading water on
the contaminated surface and dispose of according to local and regional authority requirements.
Large Spill:
Use a shovel to put the material into a convenient waste disposal container. Finish cleaning by spreading water on the
contaminated surface and allow to evacuate through the sanitary system. Be careful that the product is not present at a
concentration level above TLV. Check TLV on the MSDS and with local authorities.
p. 2
Section 7: Handling and Storage
Precautions:
Keep away from heat. Keep away from sources of ignition. Ground all equipment containing material. Do not ingest. Do not
breathe dust. Wear suitable protective clothing. In case of insufficient ventilation, wear suitable respiratory equipment. If
ingested, seek medical advice immediately and show the container or the label. Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Keep away
from incompatibles such as oxidizing agents, acids, alkalis.
Storage: Keep container tightly closed. Keep container in a cool, well-ventilated area.
Section 8: Exposure Controls/Personal Protection
Engineering Controls:
Use process enclosures, local exhaust ventilation, or other engineering controls to keep airborne levels below recommended
exposure limits. If user operations generate dust, fume or mist, use ventilation to keep exposure to airborne contaminants
below the exposure limit.
Personal Protection:
Splash goggles. Lab coat. Dust respirator. Be sure to use an approved/certified respirator or equivalent. Gloves.
Personal Protection in Case of a Large Spill:
Splash goggles. Full suit. Dust respirator. Boots. Gloves. A self contained breathing apparatus should be used to avoid
inhalation of the product. Suggested protective clothing might not be sufficient; consult a specialist BEFORE handling this
product.
Exposure Limits:
TWA: 0.5 (mg/m3) from ACGIH (TLV) [United States] TWA: 1 (mg/m3) from OSHA (PEL) [United States] TWA: 0.5 (mg/m3)
from NIOSH [United States] TWA: 0.5 (mg/m3) [United Kingdom (UK)] TWA: 0.5 (mg/m3) [Canada]Consult local authorities for
acceptable exposure limits.
Section 9: Physical and Chemical Properties
Physical state and appearance: Solid. (Metal solid.)
Odor: Odorless.
Taste: Not available.
Molecular Weight: 52 g/mole
Color: Silver-white to Grey.
pH (1% soln/water): Not applicable.
Boiling Point: 2642°C (4787.6°F)
Melting Point: 1900°C (3452°F) +/- !0 deg. C
Critical Temperature: Not available.
Specific Gravity: 7.14 (Water = 1)
Vapor Pressure: Not applicable.
Vapor Density: Not available.
Volatility: Not available.
Odor Threshold: Not available.
Water/Oil Dist. Coeff.: Not available.
Ionicity (in Water): Not available.
p. 3
Dispersion Properties: Not available.
Solubility:
Insoluble in cold water, hot water. Soluble in acids (except Nitric), and strong alkalies.
Section 10: Stability and Reactivity Data
Stability: The product is stable.
Instability Temperature: Not available.
Conditions of Instability: Excess heat, incompatible materials
Incompatibility with various substances: Reactive with oxidizing agents, acids, alkalis.
Corrosivity: Not available.
Special Remarks on Reactivity:
Incompatible with molten Lithium at 180 deg. C, hydrogen peroxide, hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, most caustic alkalies and
alkali carbonates, potassium chlorate, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, bromine pentafluoride. It may react violently or ignite with
bromine pentafluoride. Chromium is rapidly attacked by fused sodium hydroxide + potassium nitrate. Potentially hazardous
incompatibility with strong oxidizers.
Special Remarks on Corrosivity: Not available.
Polymerization: Will not occur.
Section 11: Toxicological Information
Routes of Entry: Inhalation. Ingestion.
Toxicity to Animals:
LD50: Not available. LC50: Not available.
Chronic Effects on Humans:
CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: A4 (Not classifiable for human or animal.) by ACGIH, 3 (Not classifiable for human.) by IARC.
May cause damage to the following organs: kidneys, lungs, liver, upper respiratory tract.
Other Toxic Effects on Humans:
Hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), of inhalation. Slightly hazardous in case of ingestion.
Special Remarks on Toxicity to Animals: Not available.
Special Remarks on Chronic Effects on Humans:
May cause cancer based on animal data. There is no evidence that exposure to trivalent chromium causes cancer in man.
Special Remarks on other Toxic Effects on Humans:
Acute Potential Health Effects: May cause skin irritation. Eyes: May cause mechanical eye irritation. Inhalation: May cause
irritation of the respiratory tract and mucous membranes of the respiratory tract. Ingestion: May cause gastrointestinal tract
irritation with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. Chronic Potential Health Effects: Inhalation: The effects of chronic exposure include
irritation , sneezing, reddness of the throat, bronchospasm, asthma, cough, polyps, chronic inflammation, emphysema, chronic
bronchitis, pharyngitis, bronchopneumonia, pneumoconoisis. Effects on the nose from chronic chromium exposure include
irritation, ulceration, and perforation of the nasal septum. Inflammation and ulceration of the larynx may also occur. Ingestion
or Inhalation: Chronic exposure may cause liver and kidney damage.
Section 12: Ecological Information
Ecotoxicity: Not available.
BOD5 and COD: Not available.
p. 4
Products of Biodegradation:
Possibly hazardous short term degradation products are not likely. However, long term degradation products may arise.
Toxicity of the Products of Biodegradation: The product itself and its products of degradation are not toxic.
Special Remarks on the Products of Biodegradation: Not available.
Section 13: Disposal Considerations
Waste Disposal:
Waste must be disposed of in accordance with federal, state and local environmental control regulations.
Section 14: Transport Information
DOT Classification: Not a DOT controlled material (United States).
Identification: Not applicable.
Special Provisions for Transport: Not applicable.
Section 15: Other Regulatory Information
Federal and State Regulations:
Connecticut hazardous material survey.: Chromium Illinois toxic substances disclosure to employee act: Chromium Illinois
chemical safety act: Chromium New York release reporting list: Chromium Rhode Island RTK hazardous substances:
Chromium Pennsylvania RTK: Chromium Minnesota: Chromium Michigan critical material: Chromium Massachusetts
RTK: Chromium Massachusetts spill list: Chromium New Jersey: Chromium New Jersey spill list: Chromium Louisiana spill
reporting: Chromium California Director's List of Hazardous Substances: Chromium TSCA 8(b) inventory: Chromium SARA
313 toxic chemical notification and release reporting: Chromium CERCLA: Hazardous substances.: Chromium: 5000 lbs.
(2268 kg)
Other Regulations:
OSHA: Hazardous by definition of Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200). EINECS: This product is on the
European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances.
Other Classifications:
WHMIS (Canada): Not controlled under WHMIS (Canada).
DSCL (EEC):
R40- Limited evidence of carcinogenic effect S36/37/39- Wear suitable protective clothing, gloves and eye/face protection.
S45- In case of accident or if you feel unwell, seek medical advice immediately (show the label where possible).
HMIS (U.S.A.):
Health Hazard: 2
Fire Hazard: 1
Reactivity: 0
Personal Protection: E
National Fire Protection Association (U.S.A.):
Health: 2
Flammability: 1
Reactivity: 0
Specific hazard:
p. 5
Protective Equipment:
Gloves. Lab coat. Dust respirator. Be sure to use an approved/certified respirator or equivalent. Splash goggles.
Section 16: Other Information
References: Not available.
Other Special Considerations: Not available.
Created: 10/10/2005 08:16 PM
Last Updated: 05/21/2013 12:00 PM
The information above is believed to be accurate and represents the best information currently available to us. However, we
make no warranty of merchantability or any other warranty, express or implied, with respect to such information, and we assume
no liability resulting from its use. Users should make their own investigations to determine the suitability of the information for
their particular purposes. In no event shall ScienceLab.com be liable for any claims, losses, or damages of any third party or for
lost profits or any special, indirect, incidental, consequential or exemplary damages, howsoever arising, even if ScienceLab.com
has been advised of the possibility of such damages.
p. 6
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
ERA A Waters Company
SECTION 1: PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
MANUFACTURER:
ADDRESS:
ERA
16341 Table Mountain Parkway
Golden, CO, 80403 U.S.A.
BUSINESS PHONE:
FAX:
303-421-0159
EMAIL:
CHEMICAL EMERGENCY PHONE:
Product Name(s):
Catalog / Part Number(s):
MSDS Creation Date:
Revision Date:
Hexavalent Chromium 1000 mg/L
019, 973, 186004178
November 22, 2005
July 18, 2012
MSDS Reference Number:
303-431-8454
[email protected]
352-535-5053 (INFOTRAC)
019
SECTION 2: HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
Toxic. Harmful by inhalation. May cause cancer. Risk of cancer depends on duration and level of exposure. The matrix of each standard is a
K2Cr2O7/water mixture listed below which is classified as dangerous by Directive 199/45/EC. Use only as directed and in accordance with
good laboratory practices.
SECTION 3: COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
EXPOSURE LIMITS
CHEMICAL INGREDIENT NAME
Potassium dichromate
CAS
NUMBER
EC
NUMBER
%
BY
WT.
OSHA
ACGIH
7778-50-9
231-906-6
”0.1
0.1 mg/m3 PEL
0.05 mg/m3
EU
LABEL
HAZARD
LABEL
Notes: This standard is 125 mL of a mixture containing potassium dichromate salt with the balance being •99.9% water. Hexavalent
chromium is a known human carcinogen. Exposure Limits are 8-Hour TWA (Time Weighted Average) unless designated C (Ceiling) or STEL
(Short Term Exposure Limit). Other components considered Non-Hazardous under OSHA 1910.1200 (HazCom) as they are not present in
concentrations exceeding 1% (or 0.1% if considered a known or potential carcinogen). Material Use: Analytical reagent or certified reference
material used in laboratories. Uses also include research and development.
SECTION 4: FIRST-AID MEASURES
Inhalation: Remove to fresh air.
Skin Contact: Flush with water.
Eye Contact: Immediately flush with water for a minimum of 15 minutes.
Ingestion: Get medical attention
After following first aid measures, seek medical attention.
SECTION 5: FIRE-FIGHTING MEASURES
Flammable Properties: Not flammable.
Extinguishing Media: Dry chemical, carbon dioxide or appropriate foam.
Unique Aspects Contributing To a Fire: None.
Special Fire Fighting Procedures: None.
Note: As in any fire, wear self-contained breathing apparatus, and full protective gear.
SECTION 6: ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
Absorb liquid with spill pillow or other absorbent. Ventilate and wash spill site after material pick up is complete. Place wastes into closed
containers for proper disposal.
SECTION 7: HANDLING AND STORAGE
Handle in accordance with good laboratory practices. Store in a dry well-ventilated place. This product is intended for use only by people
trained in the safety and handling of chemicals and laboratory preparations.
SECTION 8: EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION
Handle in accordance with good laboratory practices. Wash thoroughly after handling.
Respiratory Protection: Not normally needed. If exposure limits are exceeded, use approved respirator.
Eye Protection: Safety glasses with side shields or safety goggles
Skin Protection: Neoprene or other chemical resistant gloves.
Engineering Controls: Not normally needed. If exposure limits are exceeded, work in a fume hood.
MSDS Reference #: 019
PAGE 1 of 2
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
ERA A Waters Company
SECTION 9: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
DATA FOR MATRIX:
Appearance:
Clear to yellow
Physical State:
Liquid
Odor:
NA
pH:
NA
Specific Gravity:
Flash Point:
Explosion Limits:
Boiling Point:
NA
NA
NA
NA
Melting Point:
Vapor Pressure:
Vapor Density (air=1):
Solubility in Water:
NA
NA
NA
Soluble
SECTION 10: STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
Hazardous Polymerization Will Not Occur __X__
Hazardous Decomposition/Combustion Products: NA
Conditions and Materials to Avoid: Oxidizing agents.
May Occur____
Stability: Stable __X__
Unstable ____
SECTION 11: TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Primary Route(s) of Exposure Under Normal Use: Skin contact: may cause skin irritation or be harmful if absorbed through skin. Eye
contact: may cause eye irritation. Inhalation: hamful if inhaled, may be irritation to mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract.
Ingestion: harmful if swallowed.
Target Organ(s): Lungs, kidneys, blood.
Acute Effects: Harmful by inhalation. May cause sensitization by inhalation and skin contact. Ingestion can cause vomiting.
Potassium dichromate: Oral, child: LDLO=26 mg/kg; Oral, man: LDLO=143 mg/kg; Oral, rat:LD50=25 mg/kg; Skin, rabbit:LD50=14
mg/kg.
Chronic Effects: Carcinogen; Teratogen; May cause heritable gentic damage. Reproductive hazard; May impair fertility. May cause harm to
the unborn child.
Other Information: Chemical Ingredient(s) potassium dichromate is classified as carcinogen(s) by OSHA, IARC (Group 1), NTP, ACGIH (A1),
or California. California Prop-65: This product is or contains chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer.
SECTION 12: ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Harmful to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment. Avoid release into the environment.
SECTION 13: DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
To determine proper disposal, consult applicable federal, state and local environmental control regulations.
SECTION 14: TRANSPORT INFORMATION
Shipment Name/Type:
Non-hazardous for transport.
UN Number:
NA
Shipping/Hazardous Class: NA
Packing Group: NA
Shipping regulations are based on combinations of criteria such as quantity, class and packaging according to DOT, IATA and (49) CFR.
SECTION 15: REGULATORY INFORMATION
EU Symbol of Danger: Toxic (T) concentration ”0.1 C <0.2%
EU Risk Phrases: May cause cancer [R45]; May cause heritable genetic damage [R46]; Harmful by inhalation [R20].
U.S. TSCA:
Canada:
Listed
This product has been classified according to the hazard criteria of the CPR and this MSDS contains all the information
required by the CPR.
SECTION 16: OTHER INFORMATION
United States EPA Regulatory Information:
SARA 313:
Yes (0.1% deminimis)
CERCLA RQ:
10 lbs
NOTE:
NFPA Rating:
Health: 3
Flammability: 0
Reactivity: 0
HMIS Rating:
Health: 3
Flammability: 0
Physical Hazard: 0
NA = Data not available, not established, determined or not pertinent.
DISCLAIMER: The information contained herein has been compiled from data presented in various technical sources believed to be accurate. This information is
intended to be used only as a guide and does not purport to be complete. ERA makes no warranties and assumes no liability in connection with the use of this
information. It is the user’s responsibility to determine the suitability of this information and to assure the adoption of necessary precautions.
MSDS Reference #: 019
PAGE 2 of 2
Appendix D
Daily Safety Meeting Form
Daily Safety Meeting
Documentation Form
Project Name:
Project Number:
Meeting Date & Time:
Meeting Leader:
FSO
Document Routing
Retain copy in site health & safety file.
What work will be conducted on site today and by whom?
Work Task
Conducted By
What overlapping operations/simultaneous operations will occur today?
Any follow-up from previous Major Incidents, Near Misses, Unsafe Acts or Unsafe
Conditions discussed today?
List any new / short-service personnel on site today?
Safety Meeting Core Topics – All Site Workers and Visitors
What PPE is required in order to enter the work zone?
What are the potential hazards associated with today’s work. How will they be managed?
What are the potential impacts of planned activities to: Visitors? Nearby workers? Public?
Is everyone aware that they are empowered to stop work if something is questionable or unsafe?
What happens and who do you contact if there is an injury or emergency? If working at an active
facility, how will you be alerted of an emergency and what will you do?
Who do you contact if you have questions, or before deviating from written procedures?
Where is fire extinguisher, first aid kit, eyewash, safety shower located?
Are any work permits required? Are permits completed and posted in plain view of workers?
Have all excavation / borehole locations been cleared of underground utilities/structures, in
accordance with ERM and client-specific subsurface clearance procedures?
Have all tools / equipment / vehicles been inspected today to ensure safe operating condition?
Will a follow-up safety meeting be conducted after lunch?
Has anything unexpected or out-of-the-ordinary occurred on this job recently to share?
What is the worst that could happen if something goes wrong today?
ERM
1
Form Rev.: 05-2012
Daily Safety Meeting
Documentation Form
Project Name:
Project Number:
Meeting Date & Time:
Meeting Leader:
Safety Topics Related to ERM 2011/2012 Incident Trends – All Site Workers and Visitors
What activities occurring today could result in hand injuries? Is everyone aware that the use of
fixed open-blade knives is not permitted without cut-resistant gloves?
Does the site pose natural hazards to be avoided? Thorny underbrush/ticks/poison ivy?
What areas of the site have slip/trip/fall hazards? Are everyone’s work boots in good shape?
How will the on-site team avoid vehicle accidents? Is everyone aware that taking their eyes off
the road for more than 2 seconds (for any reason) leads to vehicle accidents?
Who attended the safety meeting today (employees, subcontractors, visitors)?
Name
Company
Signature
Sign-In
Initials*
Sign-Out
Initials**
* Initials in this space verify that the employee is fit for performing work.
**Initials in this space verify that the employee was uninjured during the workday.
Who visited the site today but was not involved in work activities?
Name
Company
ERM
2
Arrival Time
Form Rev.: 05-2012
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