Your Guide To Connecting Micro-generation to the Electricity Network

Your Guide To Connecting Micro-generation to the Electricity Network
YOUR GUIDE TO
Connecting Micro-generation
to the Electricity Network
YOUR GUIDE TO
Connecting Micro-generation
to the Electricity Network
Report prepared for Sustainable Energy Ireland by:
Econnect Ireland
January 2009
Copyright © 2009 Sustainable Energy Ireland
All rights reserved
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form
or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written
permission of Sustainable Energy Ireland.
DISCLAIMER
While the authors consider that the information given in this work is sound, all parties must rely upon their
own skill and judgement when making use of it. The authors do not make any representation or warranty,
expressed or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this Guide and
assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of such information. The authors will not
assume any liability to anyone for any loss or damage arising out of the provision of this Guide.
This Guide describes the connection process for micro-generators in place at the time of writing. However,
the connection process is subject to change. The reader should be aware that in the event of any
discrepancy between this Guide and the requirements of the CER or system operators, the requirements of
the CER or system operators shall prevail. While this Guide has been produced with the guidance from ESB
Networks, EirGrid and the CER it is not a definitive interpretation of the connection offer process.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This Guide has been produced with assistance from ESB Networks, EirGrid and the CER.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
Who is Sustainable Energy Ireland? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
2
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
2.1
Connecting your micro-generator to the electricity grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
2.2
What this Guide does not cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
3
What is micro-generation? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
4
Types of micro-generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
4.1
5
Questions to ask your supplier and installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Connection process – inform and fit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
5.1
ESB Networks micro-generation notification form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
5.2
Installation of micro-generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
5.3
Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
5.4
Metering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
6
Sale of electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
7
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
7.1
ESB Networks Micro-generation Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
8
Appendix A – Contact Details of Key Organisations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
9
Appendix B – Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
1
1
WHO IS SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND?
Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI) is a statutory authority set up by
the Government in 2002 as Ireland’s national energy agency with
a mission to promote and assist the development of sustainable
energy.
SEI’s activities can be divided into two main areas:
•
Energy Efficiency – Energy is vital to how we live our daily lives but most of us don’t
use energy as efficiently as we could. By assisting those who use energy, to be more
energy efficient, SEI can help to reduce the amount of energy we use overall.
•
Renewable Energy – Energy that is generated from renewable sources such as wind
and solar power. It is clean and doesn’t produce harmful greenhouse gases. By
promoting the development and wider use of renewable energy in Ireland, SEI can
help to further benefit the environment, in particular through reducing the threat of
climate change.
SEI is also involved in other activities such as stimulating research and development,
advising on energy policy and publishing energy statistics. Sustainable Energy Ireland is
funded by the National Development Plan 2007–2013.
DID YOU KNOW?
• Approximately 7% of the electricity generated in large power stations
is wasted in being transported to the consumer. Micro-generation offsets
these network losses by generating electricity close to point of use.
• In 2007 9.4% of Ireland’s electricity was generated from renewable
sources.
• Each kilowatt hour of electricity from the Irish grid typically results in
600g of CO2 emissions.
2
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
2
INTRODUCTION
Today many households and small businesses are considering
installing micro-generation. Micro-generation involves installing
a small generator powered by either a renewable source such as
wind, solar or biomass or using combined heat and power (CHP)
technology (normally fuelled by natural gas).
Micro-generators reduce the amount of electricity that would otherwise have to be
bought from the grid. By installing a micro-generator you can take action to address the
issues of climate change, rising electricity prices and reliance on fossil fuels.
Central to the Government’s energy policy is the promotion of renewable generation
and efficient delivery of energy to homes and businesses. The Government has
committed to a target of meeting 40% of our total demand for electricity from
renewable sources by 2020. There is also a target for 800MW of CHP to be installed by
2020. Micro-generation is expected to make a contribution to meeting these targets.
The benefits of micro-generation include:
•
Lower electricity bills
•
It hedges against future electricity price rises
•
Less greenhouse gas emissions
•
Reduced reliance on fossil fuels
•
Reduced electrical losses on the ESB Network
•
Your Building Energy Rating [1] is improved
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3
2.1 Connecting your micro-generator to the electricity network
This Guide is intended to give information on connecting micro-generators to the
electricity network. ESB Networks has put in place a simplified process for connecting
micro-generation to the network. This process applies to generators that produce less
than 5.75 kW (single phase connection to the house) or 11 kW (3 phase connection to
the house) of electrical power. For those wishing to connect larger generators to the grid
a separate Guide is available on the SEI website.
Figure 2.1 shows a typical connection of micro-generation to the electricity grid.
Figure 2.1: Example: Connecting a Solar PV micro-generator to the electricity
network
Daylight hits the solar
PV panel and is converted
to clean electricity
The electricity is DC
(Direct Current), so the
converter makes it AC
(Alternating Current)
synchronised with mains
electricity so it can be
used normally
The solar system is
connected to the mains
via your consumer unit
The PV roof generates
electricity during
daylight hours
4
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
THE KEY POINTS FOR A SUCCESSFUL CONNECTION ARE:
• Select a micro-generator that uses an interface certified as meeting
the required ESB Network settings.
• Notify ESB Networks that you intend to network connect
micro-generation using their standard form.
• Purchase the micro-generator from a reputable supplier.
• Use a qualified installer and registered electrical contractor to install
and connect the micro-generator.
Many types of micro-generator technologies are commercially available. These include;
generators that produce electricity from wind, solar, hydro, biomass and micro-CHP. In
terms of connecting to the grid, the process is the same regardless of the technology
used.
All electrical installations are potentially dangerous. It is vital that the micro-generator is
installed and connected correctly and safely by a qualified installer and registered
electrical contractor. ESB Networks must be informed of the intention to install a microgenerator. The equipment used to form the interface between the generator and the
electricity network must be of a type previously approved by ESB Networks.
2.2 What this Guide does not cover
This Guide provides information on connecting micro-generators to the low voltage
electricity distribution network. However, micro-generators can also operate without
being connected to the ESB network. These generation schemes may include battery
banks for energy storage; such off-grid generators are not covered in this Guide. Similarly,
generators that are used for a standby electricity supply (for example diesel standby
generators) are not covered in this Guide.
DID YOU KNOW?
• Currently most of the electricity generated in Ireland is produced
in large power stations from fossil fuels such as gas, coal, peat, and oil.
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
5
In addition to getting a network connection, many other elements of a micro-generation
installation have to be dealt with in order to get the generator operational. These
include:
•
Deciding on the micro-generation technology;
•
Deciding on the optimal siting and size of micro-generator to install;
•
Obtaining planning permission for the project if it is not exempted from this
requirement, information can be found on the Department of Environment,
Heritage and Local Government [2] website;
•
Planning and financing the project;
•
Health and safety.
These issues are outside the scope of this Guide. However, further information can be
obtained from the contacts listed in Appendix A.
6
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
3
WHAT IS MICRO-GENERATION?
Micro-Generation is currently defined by ESB Networks in their
Conditions Governing Connection and Operation of MicroGeneration [3] as a source of electrical energy with an equipment
rating of:
(1) Less than 25A – single phase connection to the house – this is equivalent to a
maximum output of 5.75 kW, or
(2) Less than 16A – 3 phase connection to house – this is equivalent to a maximum
output of 11 kW
All electrical equipment should display a rating stating the electrical voltage, current and
power ranges that it can safely operate within. Electrical power is measured in Watts (W)
and kilowatts (kW) (being a unit of 1,000 Watts). Typical load ratings of household
appliances are shown in Table 3.1.
Table 3.1: Typical load ratings
Appliance
Rating (W or kW)
Current (A) flowing
at this power (single phase)
Microwave oven
600 W
2.6 amps
Television
200 W
0.87 amps
Single bar electric fire
1000 W (1 kW)
4.35 amps
Kettle
3000 W (or 3 kW)
13.04 amps
Electric shower
8000 W (or 8 kW)
34.78 amps
Electricity consumption, as reflected in electricity bills, is measured by an ESB meter.
The unit of electricity is the kilowatt-hour (kWh). For example, a unit of electricity,
1 kWh would be the amount of electrical energy used by a 1kW electric heater that
was operating for one hour. On average, Irish households use 5,000 kWh of electricity
per year.
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
7
4
TYPES OF MICRO-GENERATORS
Micro-generators can produce electricity from a number of
different fuel sources. These include the following:
Wind turbines
Wind turbines produce electricity from the wind. The blades of a wind turbine drive a generator
that produces electricity.
Photovoltaic Cells (PV)
PV cells convert sunlight falling onto them into electricity through the use of semi-conducting
material. PV cells are most commonly situated on the roofs of buildings. Typically, 7m2 of PV will
yield a maximum of 1 kW of electrical power.
Hydro power
Hydro power converts the flow of water into electrical energy. The water flowing along rivers
or from a reservoir can turn a generator which will then produce electricity.
Micro Combined Heat and Power (CHP)
Micro-CHP devices can produce both electricity and heat for a house or small business. They can
be fuelled by gas, diesel or biomass.
Figure 4.1: Some examples of micro-generation – PV cells, wind turbine,
micro CHP unit
Choosing the right micro-generator for you is likely to be influenced by factors such as;
•
feasibility of obtaining planning consent
•
availability and price of fuel (e.g. wind is free but unpredictable)
•
cost of equipment and installation
•
suitability of the site for chosen renewable technology.
8
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
The SEI website includes a section on Practical Guidelines for buyers when selecting a
supplier or installer of renewable technology. It would be advisable to follow these
guidelines [4] before purchasing a micro-generator.
Once a suitable technology has been selected it is advisable to make contact with a
number of suppliers of the technology. The suppliers will be able to provide advice on
the type and size of generators that are available and appropriate to your premises and
needs.
4.1 Questions to ask your supplier and installer
Equipment
• Is the required interface unit included with the micro-generator?
• Do the micro-generator and interface unit bear the CE Mark? The CE Mark indicates that a
product complies with all relevant EU standards.
• Are the micro-generator and interface unit certified by a non compulsory quality label?
• Does the interface unit have a type test certificate meeting ESB Networks requirements?
• Can the supplier provide the Interface Compliance Test Certificate?
• Will the installation, including the interface unit, meet all the requirements set out in the ESB
Networks document ‘Conditions Governing the Connection and Operation of MicroGeneration’?
• How often will the micro-generator require servicing and will the supplier provide this?
Installation
• Will the dealer install the micro-generator?
• How many years has the supplier/installer been in business?
• How many micro-generators that are connected to the ESB Network has the dealer installed?
Are references available?
• How much of the installation will be sub-contracted?
• Who is ultimately responsible for what segments of work?
• Is the installer a registered electrical contractor?
• Will the installation conform to ETCI and ESB Networks requirements?
• Will a wiring diagram be provided for the installation?
• What are the earthing and lightning protection requirements?
• Have all the correct labelling and warning notices been attached?
• Will the installer provide a Certificate of Completion recognised by the ETCI?
• Is full documentation, including an operation manual, provided with the system(in English)?
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
9
5
CONNECTION PROCESS – INFORM AND FIT
ESB Networks have developed a dedicated connection process
for “one-off” micro-generators; this is detailed in Figure 5.1.
This simple process applies to micro-generators:
•
that have a maximum output of less than 5.75 kW (single phase connection to the
house) or 11 kW (3 phase connection to house)
•
which use an interface that has an Interface Compliance Test Certificate
acceptable to ESB Networks
If the micro-generator satisfies the above criteria then the customer simply has to inform
ESB Networks in writing of the intention to install a micro-generator. This requires the
customer to complete the ESB Networks’ Micro-Generation Notification Form NC6 [7].
Section 5.1 explains how to complete this one page form. The completed form should
be returned to Generator Applications, ESB Networks, P.O. Box 29, Garrycastle, Athlone,
Co. Westmeath. A copy of the Interface Compliance Test Certification must accompany
this application form. The equipment supplier will be able to provide you with the
relevant certificate. If no instruction to suspend installation is received from ESB Networks
(within 20 working days of receipt of Notification Form), then installation can proceed.
If you are considering installing more than one micro-generator into the same
connection point, the sum of the ratings of all the generators must be less than the 5.75
kW (for single phase supplies to the property) or 11 kW (for three phase supplies to the
property) as per the limits specified in the ESB Networks “Conditions Governing
Connection and Operation of Micro-generation” [3]. Combined generation larger than
the above are not considered micro-generation and are managed by a different
connection process (please refer to “Guide to Connecting Renewable and CHP Electricity
Generation to the Electricity Network”).
If the intention is to connect multiple micro-generation installations, such as those
associated with new housing estates, then such projects would be treated as a single
large development. The connection of such installations should be progressed as part of
the connection application for the overall development and, as such, the inform and fit
process, does not apply. In the event that studies indicate that any network upgrades are
required due to the connection of such generation, these costs will be borne by the
developer.
10
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
Figure 5.1: Micro-generation flow chart
Select supplier and installer for the micro-generator
Is the micro-generator selected less than 5.75kW (single phase
connection to the house) or 11kW (3 phase connection to house)?
NO
See separate Guide on
Connection for Generators
to the Electricity Grid
YES
Does the micro-generator use an interface that complies
with ESB Networks requirements?
Obtain interface Compliance Test Certificate
from manufacturer / supplier
Complete Notification Form NC6 and submit to ESB Networks
(with the Interface Compliance Test Certificate)
If no instruction to suspend the installation is issued by ESB
Networks (within 20 working days of receipt of Notification Form)
then installation of the micro-generator can proceed.
The micro-generator is installed by a registered Electrical
contractor to ETCI standards
Electrical contractor will submit Certifcate to RECI or ECSSA
Micro-generator operational
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
11
5.1 ESB Networks micro-generation notification form
Completion of the ESB Networks Micro-generator Notification form NC6 [7] requires the
submission of the following information:
•
site name and address
•
site co-ordinates
•
applicant name and contact details
•
Meter Point Reference Number (MPRN) number
•
installer/consultant contact details
•
details of micro-generator interface
•
details of micro-generator
Figure 5.2 shows the layout of the micro-generation form.
DID YOU KNOW?
• ESB Networks is the company that owns, operates and develops the
electricity distribution network in Ireland. The distribution network
consists of medium and low voltage networks. All domestic and the
vast majority of commercial customers are connected to the
distribution network.
12
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
Figure 5.2: Micro-Generation Notification Form
2
1
3
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
13
1
MPRN Number: This is a unique 11-digit number that
is assigned to every electricity connection / meter in
the country. If the micro-generator is to be connected to
an existing electrical connection, then the relevant MPRN
number can be found on your electricity bill. If the microgenerator is to be installed in a new building that does
not yet have an MPRN number then this field can be left
blank, but the ESB Networks Micro-Generation
Notification NC6 form should accompany the application
for a new electrical connection that would be submitted
in the usual manner. Please see ESB Networks website for
information on applying for a new electrical connection.
2
Site co-ordinates: The site co-ordinates requested in
this form are the Easting and the Northing coordinates of the premises in which the micro-generator
would be installed. These can be found from a 1:50,000
Discovery Series Ordnance Survey (OS) map. Easting coordinates are the numbers on the horizontal axis. Northing
co-ordinates are the numbers on the vertical axis.
Information on ‘How to give a grid reference’ can be found
in a panel on the right hand side of all OS Discovery Series
maps. Alternatively, you can obtain the longlat references
from a satellite navigation system (satnav) and use the
convertor available on the OSI website [5].
3
Your supplier will be able to provide you with the
details of the micro-generator and interface unit
required to complete this form. In addition to this
information, a copy of the Interface Compliance Test
Certificate should be enclosed along with the application
form.
If ESB Networks do not respond to the ESB Networks
Micro-Generation Notification NC6 form within 20
working days then the micro-generator can be installed.
14
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
5.2 Installation of micro-generation
All micro-generation installations should be installed by a qualified installer and
connected by a registered electrical contractor. Currently in Ireland there are two
organisations that are responsible for the registration of electrical contractors; Register of
Electrical Contractors of Ireland (RECI) and Electrical Contractors Safety and Standards
Association (ECSSA). These organisations will be able to supply a list of registered
electrical contractors in the local area where the micro-generation is to be installed.
The electrical contractor should install the micro-generator in accordance with the ETCI
National Rules for Electrical Installations and all ESB requirements including those set out
in Conditions Governing Connection and Operation of Micro-generation [3]. The
electrical contractor should take particular care to ensure the correct earthing and
lightning protection for the micro-generator is in place. They should also ensure that the
installation is labelled correctly as per Conditions Governing Connection and Operation
of Micro-generation [3].
Once work is complete, the electrical contractor is required to provide a Certificate of
Completion recognised by the Electro-Technical Council of Ireland (ETCI). This Certificate
must then be sent to their Registration body (i.e. RECI or ECSSA). The customer should
also receive a copy of this Certificate of Completion.
5.3 Costs
There are presently no costs associated with processing an ESB Networks MicroGeneration Notification NC6 form; it is not typical for micro-generation connection to
provoke the need for network upgrades. In the unusual event that network upgrades are
required, ESB Networks will inform the customer after the ESB Networks MicroGeneration Notification NC6 form is submitted.
5.4 Metering
Usually the existing ESB meter can continue to be used but it will not record any
electricity that is exported onto the grid. To record the exported electricity a smart meter
or an interval meter needs to be installed.
Smart metering is an emerging technology in Ireland, see Figure 5.3. A smart metering
pilot project commenced in 2008 under the management of the Commission for Energy
Regulation. It has been agreed that micro-generators are to receive priority in the roll out
of smart meters [8].
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
15
As an interim measure before the roll out of smart meters, ESB Networks can provide
interval meters to micro-generation installations. An interval meter records the electricity
that is imported or exported every 15 minutes. A limited number of micro-generators
(the first 100 to apply) will only be required to pay the installation cost in order to receive
an interval meter. Additional micro-generators will be required to pay the full cost of
both the meter and installation. The current charges are available on the ESB Networks
website (in 2008 the installation cost was €258 but this is subject to change) [9]. To apply
for an interval meter, the Micro-Generation Interval Metering Application Form NC7 [10]
should be completed and returned to ESB Networks with the installation fee.
Figure 5.3: Smart meter
Smart meter: A smart meter is an advanced modern
electricity meter that has many functions including:
6
•
detailed measurements of how much electricity is
imported / exported
•
information on the time of day that electricity has
been imported / exported
•
connection with the system operator through
a communications network – this can include
functionality to permit the system operator to remotely
switch the electricity supply or to take a remote meter
reading.
SALE OF ELECTRICITY
With the introduction of interval and smart metering the facilities are now in place to
record any exported energy. Rules have also been introduced in the electricity market to
allow electricity supply companies to purchase from micro-generators. A full list of
electricity supply companies that are active in the electricity market can be found on the
CER website1.
1 At the time of printing this guide no electricity supply company is offering to purchase electricity from
micro-generation. SEI anticipates that measures will be place in the future to provide for the sale
of the exported electricity.
16
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
7
REFERENCES
7.1 ESB Networks Micro-generation Documents
[1] Directive 2202/91/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on the energy
performance of buildings
http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/lex/LexUriServ/site/en/oj/2006/l_114/l_11420060427en00640085.pdf
[2] Information Planning Exemptions for Renewable Technologies from Department of
Environment, Heritage and Local Government
http://www.environ.ie/en/DevelopmentandHousing/PlanningDevelopment/
Planning/TopicalIssues/Renewables/
[3] Conditions Governing the Connection and Operation of Micro-generation
http://www.esb.ie/esbnetworks/downloads/conditions_governing_the_connection_and_operation
_of_microgeneration_131106.pdf
[4] SEI Practical Guidelines for Buyers
http://www.sei.ie/Grants/GreenerHomes/Homeowners/Practical_Guidelines_for_Buyers/
[5] OSI Coordinates Converter’
http://www.osi.ie/en/alist/co-ordinate-converter-tool.aspx
[6] EU Directive 2001/77/EC on the promotion of electricity produced from renewable
energy sources in the internal electricity market
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/pri/en/oj/dat/2001/l_283/l_28320011027en00330040.pdf
[7] Micro-generation Installation Notification Form - NC6,
http://www.esb.ie/esbnetworks/downloads/form_nc6.pdf
[8] Smart Metering, The next step in implementation,
http://www.cer.ie/en/electricity-retail-market-current-consultations.aspx?article=01b6318d-38764630-8bb5-f54fb368be16&mode=author
[9] ESB Networks Standard Charges for services regularly provided by ESB Networks
http://www.esb.ie/esbnetworks/downloads/standard_charges_quick_reference.pdf
[10] Micro-generation Interval Metering Application Form – NC7,
http://www.esb.ie/esbnetworks/downloads/form_nc7.pdf
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
17
8
APPENDIX A – CONTACT DETAILS OF KEY ORGANISATIONS
Sustainable
Energy Ireland
Glasnevin
Dublin 9
Tel: +353 (0)1 836 9080
Fax: +353 (0)1 837 2848
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.sei.ie
Commission for
Energy Regulation
ESB Networks
RECI
Generator Connections
PO Box 29
Garrycastle
Athlone
Co. Westmeath
Tel: 1850 372 757
Fax: 0906479329
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.esb.ie/esbnetworks
Register of Electrical
Contractors of Ireland
Unit 9, KCR Industrial Estate
Ravensdale Park
Kimmage
Dublin 12
Tel: +353 (0)1 492 9966
Fax: +353 (0)1 492 9983
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.reci.ie
Irish Hydro Power
Association
The Exchange
Belgard Square North
Tallaght
Dublin 24
Tel: +353 (0)1 4000 800
Fax: +353 (0)1 4000 850
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cer.ie
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.irishhydro.com
Irish Wind Energy
Association
ECSSA
Electrical Contractors Safety
and Standards Association Ltd.
Coolmore House, Park Road,
Killarney
County Kerry
Tel: +353 (0)64 37266
Fax: +353 (0) 64 37269
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.ecssa.ie
Killowen House
Southernlink Business Park
Jigginstown
Naas
Co. Kildare
Tel: +353 (0)45 899341
Fax: +353 (0)45 889616
Email: [email protected]
MEGA
Micro Electricity Generation
Association
Charleville Castle
Tullamore
Co. Offaly
Renewable Energy
Installer Academy
c/o Action Renewables
Innovation Centre
NI Science Park
Belfast
BT3 9DT
Tel: 028 9073 7866
028 9073 7865
Fax: 028 9073 7825
Email: [email protected]
Solar Energy
Society of Ireland
c/o Focas Institute,
Dublin Institute of Technology
Kevin Street
Dublin 8
Email: [email protected]
The Irish CHP Association
c/o bmf Business Services
Clifton House
Lower Fitzwilliam St.
Dublin 2
Tel: +353 (0)1 661 3755
Fax: +353 (0)1 661 3786
Email: [email protected]
18
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
9
APPENDIX B – GLOSSARY
Table 10.1
Explanation of key terms
Micro-generation
Micro-generation describes the production of electricity using small generators. Microgeneration is typically associated with installations in domestic or small business
properties.
Renewable energy
Renewable energy refers to electricity generated from a renewable and sustainable fuel
source. Renewable energy currently generated in Ireland includes energy derived from
the wind, biomass, solar, hydro and marine.
Combined Heat and Power (CHP)
Combined heat and power is the simultaneous production of heat and electricity.
Although not always fuelled from renewable sources, CHP is very efficient as it uses
both the heat and electricity produced onsite and is considered to be a low carbon
source of energy.
Alternating Current (AC)
The current received by the customer from ESB Networks is generally AC. This means
that the current waveform alternates in the direction that it flows.
Direct Current (DC)
This means that the current waveform flows in a constant direction. The current
produced by micro-generators is generally DC. Micro-generators connected to the grid
will require an inverter to convert the current from DC to AC.
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
19
Interface unit
An interface unit is the equipment that ESB Networks require for micro-generation to
safely connect to the electricity network. It includes protection equipment to
disconnect the micro-generator should any electrical fault occur either in the microgenerator or on the electricity network. An inverter may also be included in the
interface unit.
Inverter
This is a device that converts current from DC to AC.
Kilowatt (kW)
A kilowatt is a measurement of electrical power. It is used to express how much
electrical energy a device can produce or consume.
Voltage
Voltage is a measure of electrical potential between two points. For micro-generation
applications it is generally measured in Volts (V) or kilovolts (kV).
Single Phase
The supply to domestic dwellings is generally a single phase supply. The voltage for
single phase supply in Ireland is 230 volts.
Three Phase
A 3 phase supply has 3 conductors which each carry an AC current. The voltage for 3
phase supplies in Ireland is 400 Volts. Some commercial premises and farms may
receive a three phase supply.
20
Your Guide to Connecting Micro-Generation to the Electricity Network
Sustainable Energy Ireland
Glasnevin
Dublin 9
Ireland
T. +353 1 8369080
F. +353 1 8372848
[email protected]
www.sei.ie
Sustainable Energy Ireland is funded by the Irish Government
under the National Development Plan 2007-2013 with
programmes part financed by the European Union
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