Momentum | Modbus Plus 170 PNT Series | User guide | Momentum Modbus Plus 170 PNT Series User guide

TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter and
Option Adapter User Guide
870 USE 101 00
Mod
icon
Version 2.2
Data, Illustrations, Alterations
Data and illustrations are not binding. We reserve the right to alter products in line with our policy of continuous product development.
If you have any suggestions for improvements or amendments or have found errors in this publication, please notify us by e-mail at
techcomm@modicon.com.
Training
Schneider Automation Inc. offers suitable further training on the system.
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See addresses for Technical Support Centers at the end of this publication.
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All terms used in this publication to denote Schneider Automation Inc. products are trademarks of Schneider Automation Inc.
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Copyright
All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or
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are not authorized to translate this document into any other language.
© 1998 Schneider Automation Inc. All rights reserved.
TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter and
Option Adapter User Guide
870 USE 101 00
Version 2.2
December 1998
Document Set
TSX Momentum I/O Bases User Guide
870 USE 002 00
TSX Momentum Interbus Communication Adapter User Manual
870 USE 003 00
TSX Momentum FIPIO Communication Adapter User Manual
870 USE 005 00
170 PNT Series Modbus Plus Communication Adapters for TSX Momentum
User Guide
870 USE 103 00
170 NEF Series Modbus Plus Communication Adapters for TSX Momentum
User Guide
870 USE 111 00
Contents
About This Book ........................................................................ 1
Revision History ................................................................................................
Document Scope ..............................................................................................
Validity Note .....................................................................................................
Related Documentation ....................................................................................
User Comments ................................................................................................
1
1
2
2
2
Part I
Getting Started.......................................................................... 3
Chapter 1
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters ........ 5
Section 1.1
Introducing the M1 Processor Adapters ........................................................... 6
Overview ........................................................................................................... 6
Front Panel Diagram ........................................................................................ 7
Overview of Ports ............................................................................................. 8
Memory and Performance Characteristics ....................................................... 9
Power Supply ................................................................................................. 11
Section 1.2
Features of Each Processor Adapter .............................................................
Overview .........................................................................................................
171 CCS 700 00 .............................................................................................
171 CCS 700 10 .............................................................................................
171 CCS 760 00 .............................................................................................
171 CCC 760 10 .............................................................................................
171 CCS 780 00 .............................................................................................
171 CCC 780 10 .............................................................................................
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
12
12
13
16
19
22
25
28
v
Contents
vi
Chapter 2
Overview of TSX Momentum Option Adapters .................. 31
Section 2.1
Introducing the TSX Momentum Option Adapters ........................................... 32
Basic Features of Option Adapters ................................................................. 32
Section 2.2
Serial Option Adapter ......................................................................................
Overview .........................................................................................................
Front Panel Components ................................................................................
Specifications ..................................................................................................
Section 2.3
Modbus Plus Option Adapter .......................................................................... 39
Overview ......................................................................................................... 39
Front Panel Components ................................................................................ 40
Specifications .................................................................................................. 43
Section 2.4
Redundant Modbus Plus Option Adapter ........................................................
Overview .........................................................................................................
Front Panel Components ................................................................................
Specifications ..................................................................................................
Chapter 3
Assembling TSX Momentum Components ........................ 53
Section 3.1
Assembling a CPU .......................................................................................... 54
Overview ......................................................................................................... 54
Assembling a Processor Adapter and I/O Base .............................................. 55
Disassembling a Processor Adapter from an I/O Base ................................... 58
Section 3.2
Assembling a CPU with an Option Adapter ..................................................... 60
Overview ......................................................................................................... 60
Assembling a Processor Adapter and an Option Adapter ............................... 61
Mounting the Assembled Adapters on the I/O Base ....................................... 64
Disassembling a Module with an Option Adapter ............................................ 67
Section 3.3
Installing Batteries in an Option Adapter ......................................................... 71
Installation Guidelines ..................................................................................... 71
Section 3.4
Labeling the CPU ............................................................................................ 73
Guidelines for Labeling the CPU ..................................................................... 73
33
33
34
37
45
45
46
50
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Contents
Part II
Communication Ports ............................................................ 75
Chapter 4
Using the Modbus Ports ...................................................... 77
Section 4.1
Modbus Port 1 ................................................................................................
Overview .........................................................................................................
Modbus Port 1 ................................................................................................
Cable Accessories for Modbus Port 1 ............................................................
Section 4.2
Modbus Port 2 ................................................................................................ 85
Overview ......................................................................................................... 85
Modbus Port 2 ................................................................................................ 86
Four-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks ........................... 89
Two-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks ............................ 92
Cable for Modbus RS485 Networks .............................................................. 95
Connectors for Modbus RS485 Networks ...................................................... 98
Terminating Devices for Modbus RS485 Networks ...................................... 100
Pinouts for Modbus RS485 Networks ........................................................... 101
Chapter 5
78
78
79
82
Using the I/OBus Port ........................................................ 107
How I/OBus Works ....................................................................................... 108
Guidelines for I/OBus Networks ................................................................... 109
I/OBus Accessories ...................................................................................... 111
Chapter 6
Using the Modbus Plus Ports ............................................ 115
Modbus Plus Features for Momentum .........................................................
Two Types of Modbus Plus Networks ..........................................................
Standard Cabling Schemes ..........................................................................
Cluster Mode Cabling Schemes ...................................................................
Cable Accessories for Modbus Plus Networks .............................................
Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams for Modbus Plus Networks ............................
Modbus Plus Addresses ...............................................................................
Peer Cop ......................................................................................................
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
116
117
119
121
125
128
132
134
vii
Contents
Part III
Modsoft.................................................................................. 137
Chapter 7
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft .............................. 139
Section 7.1
Configuring the Processor Adapter ............................................................... 140
Overview ....................................................................................................... 140
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter .............................................................. 141
Specifying an M1 Processor Type ................................................................. 144
Default Configuration Parameters ................................................................. 146
Changing the Range of Discrete and Register References .......................... 149
Changing the Size of Your Application Logic Space ..................................... 151
Changing the Number of Segments .............................................................. 152
Changing the Size of the I/O Map ................................................................. 154
Establishing Configuration Extension Memory .............................................. 156
Section 7.2
Configuring Option Adapter Features ............................................................ 157
Overview ....................................................................................................... 157
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil ....................................................... 158
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock ................................................................. 160
Setting the Time ............................................................................................ 162
Reading the Time-of-Day Clock .................................................................... 165
Section 7.3
Modifying Communication Port Parameters .................................................. 166
Overview ....................................................................................................... 166
Accessing the Port Editor Screen .................................................................. 167
Parameters Which Should Not Be Changed ................................................. 168
Changing the Mode and Data Bits ................................................................ 169
Changing Parity ............................................................................................. 171
Changing the Baud Rate ............................................................................... 172
Changing the Modbus Address ..................................................................... 173
Changing the Delay ....................................................................................... 174
Changing the Protocol on Modbus Port 2 ..................................................... 175
Section 7.4
I/O Mapping the Local I/O Points .................................................................. 176
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map ............................................................... 176
Chapter 8
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft ................. 181
Supporting an I/O Map for an I/OBus Network .............................................. 182
Accessing an I/O Map Screen for an I/OBus Network .................................. 183
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map ............................................................................ 185
viii
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Contents
Chapter 9
Configuring a Modbus Plus Network in Modsoft
with Peer Cop ...................................................................... 191
Section 9.1
Getting Started .............................................................................................
Overview .......................................................................................................
Accessing the Peer Cop Configuration Extension Screen ...........................
The Default Peer Cop Screen ......................................................................
192
192
193
195
Section 9.2
Using Modbus Plus to Handle I/O ................................................................
Overview .......................................................................................................
Devices on the Network ................................................................................
Defining the Link and Accessing a Node ......................................................
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information ...........................................
Specifying References for Input Data ...........................................................
Accessing the Remaining Devices ...............................................................
Completing the I/O Device Configuration in Peer Cop .................................
197
197
198
199
202
206
210
212
Section 9.3
Passing Supervisory Data over Modbus Plus ..............................................
Overview .......................................................................................................
Devices on the Network ................................................................................
Configuring a Node to Exchange Data .........................................................
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information ...........................................
Specifying References for Input and Output Data ........................................
Defining the References for the Next Node ..................................................
Defining References for the Supervisory Computer .....................................
Completing the Configuration .......................................................................
215
215
216
217
220
221
226
231
236
Chapter 10
Saving to Flash in Modsoft ................................................ 237
Preparing to Save to Flash ........................................................................... 238
Saving to Flash ............................................................................................. 239
Part IV
Concept ................................................................................. 241
Chapter 11
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept .............................. 243
Section 11.1
Configuring the Processor Adapter ..............................................................
Overview .......................................................................................................
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter .............................................................
Default Configuration Parameters ................................................................
Changing the Range of Discrete and Register References ..........................
Changing the Size of the Full Logic Area .....................................................
Understanding the Number of Segments .....................................................
Changing the Size of the I/O Map ................................................................
Establishing Configuration Extension Memory for Peer Cop ........................
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
244
244
245
250
252
254
255
256
258
ix
Contents
Section 11.2
Configuring Option Adapter Features ............................................................ 261
Overview ....................................................................................................... 261
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil ....................................................... 262
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock ................................................................. 265
Setting the Time ............................................................................................ 268
Reading the Time-of-Day Clock .................................................................... 269
Section 11.3
Modifying Communication Port Parameters .................................................. 270
Overview ....................................................................................................... 270
Accessing the Modbus Port Settings Dialog Box .......................................... 271
Changing the Baud Rate ............................................................................... 272
Changing Mode and Data Bits ...................................................................... 273
Stop Bit Should Not Be Changed .................................................................. 274
Changing Parity ............................................................................................. 274
Changing the Delay ....................................................................................... 275
Changing the Modbus Address ..................................................................... 276
Changing the Protocol on Modbus Port 2 ..................................................... 277
Section 11.4
I/O Mapping the Local I/O Points .................................................................. 278
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map ............................................................... 278
Chapter 12
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept ................ 281
Supporting an I/O Map for an I/OBus Network .............................................. 282
Accessing an I/O Map Screen for an I/OBus Network .................................. 283
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map ............................................................................ 285
x
Chapter 13
Configuring a Modbus Plus Network in Concept
with Peer Cop ...................................................................... 289
Section 13.1
Getting Started .............................................................................................. 290
Overview ....................................................................................................... 290
Accessing the Peer Cop Dialog Box ............................................................. 291
Adjusting the Amount of Extension Memory ................................................. 293
Other Default Settings in the Peer Cop Dialog Box ....................................... 294
Section 13.2
Using Modbus Plus to Handle I/O .................................................................
Overview .......................................................................................................
Devices on the Network ................................................................................
Changing the Peer Cop Summary Information .............................................
Specifying References for Input Data ............................................................
Specifying References for Output Data .........................................................
296
296
297
298
300
304
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Contents
Section 13.3
Chapter 14
Passing Supervisory Data over Modbus Plus ..............................................
Overview .......................................................................................................
Devices on the Network ................................................................................
Specifying References for Input and Output Data ........................................
Defining the References for the Next Node ..................................................
Defining References for the Supervisory PLC ..............................................
307
307
308
309
313
316
Saving to Flash with Concept ........................................... 319
Saving to Flash ............................................................................................. 319
Appendices ................................................................................................ 323
Appendix A Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions ........................... 325
Standard Ladder Logic Elements ................................................................. 326
DX Loadable Support ................................................................................... 330
A Special STAT Instruction ........................................................................... 331
Appendix B Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes .......................... 337
Appendix C TIO Power Supply Module ................................................... 341
Section C.1
Module Overview ..........................................................................................
Introduction ...................................................................................................
Front Panel Components ..............................................................................
Specifications ...............................................................................................
342
342
343
345
Section C.2
Wiring ...........................................................................................................
Overview .......................................................................................................
Choosing a Terminal Connector ...................................................................
Terminal Connector Coding ..........................................................................
Mounting the Terminal Connectors ..............................................................
External Operating Voltage Connections .....................................................
350
350
351
352
353
354
Index
................................................................................................ 357
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
xi
Contents
xii
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
About This Book
Revision History
This is version 2.2 of this manual. The following information has been added or
changed:
Version
Change
2.2
New pinout diagram for Modbus RS485 Connector “T” (RJ45 base)
2.2
New pinout diagram for I/OBus cable.
2.1
New pinout diagram for Modbus RS485 Connector “T” (DB9 base)
2.1
Corrected part number for Modbus RS485/Modbus Plus 10 ft Interconnect
Cable (170 MCI 021 80) and added part number for Modbus Plus 10 ft Drop
Cable (170 MCI 021 20)
2.0
Descriptions of two new Processor Adapters, the 171 CCC 760 10 and
171 CCC 780 10
2.0
Details about Modbus RS485 networks for Momentum
2.0
Details about new Modbus Plus features for Momentum
2.0
Instructions for configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
2.0
Description of the 170 CPS 110 00 TIO Power Supply module
To find out about any changes to the manual after this version was published,
consult our web site at www.modicon.com.
Document Scope
This manual contains complete information about the TSX Momentum M1
Processor Adapters and Option Adapters. It does not contain information about
TSX Momentum I/O bases or Communication Adapters.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
1
About This Book
Validity Note
This manual is valid for Modsoft 2.6 and Concept 2.1.
Related
Documentation
You may find the following other manuals useful:
User Comments
2
Title
Part Number
Momentum I/O Bases User Guide
870 USE 002 00
Momentum Modbus Plus PNT Series Communication
Adapters User Guide
870 USE 103 00
Momentum Modbus Plus NEF Series Communication
Adapters User Guide
870 USE 111 00
We welcome your comments about this document. You can reach us by e-mail at
techcomm@modicon.com.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Getting Started
I
At a Glance
Purpose
This part describes the M1 Processor Adapters and Option Adapters and explains
how to assemble them.
In This Chapter
This part contains the following chapters:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
For Information On ...
See Chapter ...
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
1
Overview of TSX Momentum Option Adapters
2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
3
3
Overview of TSX Momentum M1
Processor Adapters
1
At a Glance
Purpose
A TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapter can be snapped onto a Momentum I/O
base to create a central processing unit (CPU) that provides programmable logic
control to local and distributed I/O.
This chapter describes the six M1 Processor Adapters.
In This Chapter
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
This chapter contains the following sections:
For This Topic...
See Section...
Introducing the M1 Processor Adapters
1
Features of Each Processor Adapter
2
5
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
Section 1.1
Introducing the M1 Processor Adapters
Overview
Purpose
A TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapter stores and executes the application
program, controlling the local I/O points of its host I/O base and distributed I/O
devices on a common communication bus.
This section describes the front panel components, memory and performance
characteristics of M1 Processor Adapters.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Front Panel Diagram
Overview of Ports
Memory and Performance Characteristics
Power Supply
6
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
Front Panel Diagram
Introduction
This section provides a diagram of a typical M1 Processor Adapter.
Diagram
A typical Processor Adapter is shown in the following diagram:
Label Description
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
1
Standard port connector
2
Optional second port connector
3
LED indicators
7
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
Overview of Ports
Introduction
Each Processor Adapter is equipped with at least one Modbus port. Some models
also have a second port. The ports allow the Processor Adapter to communicate
with:
z
z
z
Ports Per
Processor
Adapter
Programming panels
Network I/O points under its control
Network supervisory computers
The following table indicates which ports are available with each Processor
Adapter:
Processor Adapter
Modbus Port 1 Modbus Port 2 I/O Bus Port
171 CCS 700 00
x
171 CCS 700 10
x
171 CCS 760 00
x
171 CCC 760 10
x
171 CCS 780 00
x
x
171 CCC 780 10
x
x
x
x
Modbus Port 1
Modbus Port 1 is a general-purpose asynchronous serial port with dedicated
RS232 slave functionality. This port has an RJ45 connector.
Modbus Port 2
Modbus Port 2 is a general-purpose asynchronous serial port with dedicated
RS485 slave functionality. This port has a 9-pin D connector.
I/OBus Port
The I/OBus port is used to control and communicate with other network (non-local)
I/O modules under the control of the CPU. This port has a 9-pin D connector.
8
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
Memory and Performance Characteristics
Introduction
Processor Adapters are equipped with internal memory and Flash RAM. This
section explains those two types of memory and describes the memory size and
performance characteristics of each Processor Adapter.
Internal Memory
Internal memory includes user memory and state RAM:
z
z
User memory contains the control logic program and such system overhead as
the Processor Adapter configuration, I/O mapping, checksum and system
diagnostics.
State RAM is the area in memory where all the input and output references for
program and control operations are defined and returned.
The user may change the way internal memory is allocated by adjusting
parameters for user memory and state RAM.
Flash RAM
Flash RAM contains the executive firmware, which is the operating system for the
PLC. It also contains a firmware kernel, which cannot be changed. The kernel is a
small portion of memory that recognizes acceptable executive firmware packages
and allows them to be downloaded to the Processor Adapter.
Space is also provided in Flash so that a copy of the user program and state RAM
values can be stored. This back-up capability is particularly useful in configurations
where no battery is used (ie., a Processor Adapter without an Option Adapter).
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
9
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
Memory and Performance Characteristics, Continued
Memory Size and
Clock Speed
The memory size and clock speed of each processor are described in the table
below:
Processor Adapter Internal Memory
User Memory* Flash RAM
Clock Speed
171 CCS 700 00
64K bytes
2.4K words
256K bytes
20MHz
171 CCS 700 10
64K bytes
2.4K words
256K bytes
32MHz
171 CCS 760 00
256K bytes
12K words
256K bytes
20MHz
171 CCC 760 10
512K bytes
18K words
512K bytes
32MHz
171 CCS 780 00
64K bytes
2.4K words
256K bytes
20MHz
171 CCC 780 10
512K bytes
18K words
512K bytes
32MHz
* In a default configuration. The amount of user memory may be increased or
decreased by adjusting other parameters.
Input and Output
References
The number of registers (for 3x and 4x references) and discretes (for 0x and 1x
references) supported by each processor are described in the table below:
Processor Adapter Registers
Discretes
171 CCS 700 00
2048
2048*
171 CCS 700 10
2048
2048*
171 CCS 760 00
4096
2048*
171 CCC 760 10
26032
8192 0x references
8192 1x references
171 CCS 780 00
2048
2048*
171 CCC 780 10
26032
8192 0x references
8192 1x references
*This total may include any combination of 0x and 1x references.
10
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
Power Supply
Supplied by
Base
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
A Processor Adapter requires 5 V, which is supplied by its I/O base.
11
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
Section 1.2
Features of Each Processor Adapter
Overview
Purpose
This section provides a photograph and specifications for each Processor Adapter.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics.
Topic
171 CCS 700 00
171 CCS 700 10
171 CCS 760 00
171 CCC 760 10
171 CCS 780 00
171 CCC 780 10
12
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 700 00
Overview
This section describes the 171 CCS 700 00 Processor Adapter, including key
features, a diagram and specifications.
Key Features
The key features of this Processor Adapter are:
z
z
z
Diagram
Modbus Port 1
64K bytes of internal memory
20 MHz clock speed
The connector and LED indicators are shown in the following diagram:
Label Description
1
Modbus Port 1 connector
2
LED indicators
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
13
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 700 00, Continued
LED Indicators
This Processor Adapter has two LED indicators, RUN and COM ACT. Their
functions are described in the table below:
LED
Status
Function
RUN
Green
On continuously when the CPU has received power and is
solving logic.
Flashes an error pattern if the CPU is in kernel mode .
(See Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes)
COM ACT
Specifications
Off
CPU is not powered up or is not solving logic.
Green
May be on continuously or blinking. Indicates activity on
Modbus port 1.
Off
No activity on Modbus port 1.
The following table contains specifications for the 171 CCS 700 00 TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter:
Memory
Internal Memory
64K bytes
User Memory
2.4K words
Flash RAM
256K bytes
Clock Speed
20 MHz
Input and Output References
Registers
2048
Discretes
2048 (any combination of 0x and 1x references)
I/O Servicing
Local I/O
Services all the points on any host Momentum I/O base
Watchdog timer
419 ms
Logic solve time
0.25 ms/k ladder logic instructions
Continued on next page
14
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 700 00, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
Mechanical
Weight
42.5 g (1.5 oz)
Dimensions (HxDxW)
25.9x61.02x125mm
(1.01 x 2.37 x 4.86 in)
Material (Enclosures/
bezels)
Lexan
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
RFI Susceptibility/
immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industrystandard enclosure, with access restricted to qualified
service personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40...+85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
Degree of protection
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
Di-electric strength
RS232 is non-isolated from logic common
Agency Approvals
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
15
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 700 10
Overview
This section describes the 171 CCS 700 10 Processor Adapter, including key
features, a diagram and specifications.
Key Features
The key features of this Processor Adapter are:
z
z
z
Diagram
Modbus Port 1
64K bytes of internal memory
32 MHz clock speed
The connector and LED indicators are shown in the following diagram:
Label Description
1
Modbus Port 1 connector
2
LED indicators
Continued on next page
16
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 700 10, Continued
LED Indicators
This Processor Adapter has two LED indicators, RUN and COM ACT. Their
functions are described in the table below:
LED
Status
Function
RUN
Green
On continuously when the CPU has received power and is
solving logic.
Flashes an error pattern if the CPU is in kernel mode .
(See Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes)
COM ACT
Specifications
Off
CPU is not powered up or is not solving logic.
Green
May be on continuously or blinking. Indicates activity on
Modbus port 1.
Off
No activity on Modbus port 1.
The following table contains specifications for the 171 CCS 700 10 TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter:
Memory
Internal Memory
64K bytes
User Memory
2.4K words
Flash RAM
256K bytes
Clock Speed
32 MHz
Input and Output References
Registers
2048
Discretes
2048 (any combination of 0x and 1x references)
I/O Servicing
Local I/O
Services all the points on any host Momentum I/O base
Watchdog timer
262 ms
Logic solve time
0.16 ms/k ladder logic instructions
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
17
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 700 10, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
Mechanical
Weight
42.5 g (1.5 oz)
Dimensions (HxDxW)
25.9x61.02x125mm
(1.01 x 2.37 x 4.86 in)
Material (Enclosures/
bezels)
Lexan
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
RFI Susceptibility/
immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industrystandard enclosure, with access restricted to qualified
service personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40...+85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
Degree of protection
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
Di-electric strength
RS232 is non-isolated from logic common
Agency Approvals
18
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 760 00
Overview
This section describes the 171 CCS 760 00 Processor Adapter, including key
features, a diagram and specifications.
Key Features
The key features of this Processor Adapter are:
z
z
z
z
Diagram
Modbus Port 1
I/OBus port
256K bytes of internal memory
20 MHz clock speed
The connectors and LED indicators are shown in the following diagram:
Label Description
1
Modbus Port 1 connector
2
I/OBus port connector
3
LED indicators
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
19
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 760 00, Continued
LED Indicators
This Processor Adapter has two LED indicators, RUN and COM ACT. Their
functions are described in the table below:
LED
Status
Function
RUN
Green
On continuously when the CPU has received power and is
solving logic.
Flashes an error pattern if the CPU is in kernel mode .
(See Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes)
COM ACT
Specifications
Off
CPU is not powered up or is not solving logic.
Green
May be on continuously or blinking. Indicates activity on
Modbus port 1.
Off
No activity on Modbus port 1.
The following table contains specifications for the 171 CCS 760 00 TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter:
Memory
Internal Memory
256K bytes
User Memory
12K words
Flash RAM
256K bytes
Clock Speed
20 MHz
Input and Output References
Registers
4096
Discretes
2048 (any combination of 0x and 1x references)
I/O Servicing
Local I/O
Services all the points on any host Momentum I/O base
Watchdog timer
419 ms
Logic solve time
0.25 ms/k ladder logic instructions
Continued on next page
20
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 760 00, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
Mechanical
Weight
42.5 g (1.5 oz)
Dimensions (HxDxW)
25.9x61.02x125mm
(1.01 x 2.37 x 4.86 in)
Material (Enclosures/
bezels)
Lexan
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
RFI Susceptibility/
immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industrystandard enclosure, with access restricted to qualified
service personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40 ... +85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
Degree of protection
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
Di-electric strength
RS232 and I/OBus are non-isolated from logic common
Ground continuity
30 A test on the exposed metal connector
Agency Approvals
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
21
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCC 760 10
Overview
This section describes the 171 CCC 760 10 Processor Adapter, including key
features, a diagram and specifications.
Key Features
The key features of this Processor Adapter are:
z
z
z
z
Diagram
Modbus Port 1
I/OBus port
512K bytes of internal memory
32 MHz clock speed
The connectors and LED indicators are shown in the following diagram:
Label Description
1
Modbus Port 1 connector
2
I/OBus port connector
3
LED indicators
Continued on next page
22
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCC 760 10, Continued
LED Indicators
This Processor Adapter has two LED indicators, RUN and COM ACT. Their
functions are described in the table below:
LED
Status
Function
RUN
Green
On continuously when the CPU has received power and is
solving logic.
Flashes an error pattern if the CPU is in kernel mode .
(See Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes)
COM ACT
Specifications
Off
CPU is not powered up or is not solving logic.
Green
May be on continuously or blinking. Indicates activity on
Modbus port 1.
Off
No activity on Modbus port 1.
The following table contains specifications for the 171 CCC 760 10 TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter:
Memory
Internal Memory
512K bytes
User Memory
18K words
Flash RAM
512K bytes
Clock Speed
32 MHz
Input and Output References
Registers
26032
Discretes
8192 0x references
8192 1x references
I/O Servicing
Local I/O
Services all the points on any host Momentum I/O base
Watchdog timer
262 ms
Logic solve time
0.16 ms/k ladder logic instructions
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
23
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCC 760 10, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
Mechanical
Weight
42.5 g (1.5 oz)
Dimensions (HxDxW)
25.9x61.02x125mm
(1.01 x 2.37 x 4.86 in)
Material (Enclosures/
bezels)
Lexan
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
RFI Susceptibility/
immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industrystandard enclosure, with access restricted to qualified
service personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40 ... +85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
Degree of protection
24
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
Di-electric strength
RS232 and I/OBus are non-isolated from logic common
Ground continuity
30 A test on the exposed metal connector
Agency Approvals
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 780 00
Overview
This section describes the 171 CCS 780 00 Processor Adapter, including key
features, a diagram and specifications.
Key Features
The key features of this Processor Adapter are:
z
z
z
z
Diagram
Modbus Port 1
Modbus Port 2
64K bytes of internal memory
20 MHz clock speed
The connectors and LED indicators are shown in the following diagram:
Label Description
1
Modbus Port 1 connector
2
Modbus Port 2 connector
3
LED indicators
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
25
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 780 00, Continued
LED Indicators
This Processor Adapter has two LED indicators, RUN and COM ACT. Their
functions are described in the table below:
LED
Status
Function
RUN
Green
On continuously when the CPU has received power and is
solving logic.
Flashes an error pattern if the CPU is in kernel mode .
(See Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes)
COM ACT
Specifications
Off
CPU is not powered up or is not solving logic.
Green
May be on continuously or blinking. Indicates activity on
Modbus port 1.
Off
No activity on Modbus port 1.
The following table contains specifications for the 171 CCS 780 00 TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter:
Memory
Internal Memory
64K bytes
User Memory
2.4K words
Flash RAM
256K bytes
Clock Speed
20 MHz
Input and Output References
Registers
2048
Discretes
2048 (any combination of 0x and 1x references)
I/O Servicing
Local I/O
Services all the points on any host Momentum I/O base
Watchdog timer
419 ms
Logic solve time
0.25 ms/k ladder logic instructions
Continued on next page
26
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCS 780 00, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
Mechanical
Weight
42.5 g (1.5 oz)
Dimensions (HxDxW)
25.9x61.02x125mm
(1.01 x 2.37 x 4.86 in)
Material (Enclosures/
bezels)
Lexan
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
RFI Susceptibility/
immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industrystandard enclosure, with access restricted to qualified
service personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40 ... +85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
Degree of protection
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
Di-electric strength
RS232 and RS485 are non-isolated from logic common
Ground continuity
30 A test on the exposed metal connector
Agency Approvals
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
27
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCC 780 10
Overview
This section describes the 171 CCC 780 10 Processor Adapter, including key
features, a diagram and specifications.
Key Features
The key features of this Processor Adapter are:
z
z
z
z
Diagram
Modbus Port 1
Modbus Port 2
512K bytes of internal memory
32 MHz clock speed
The connectors and LED indicators are shown in the following diagram:
Label Description
1
Modbus Port 1 connector
2
Modbus Port 2 connector
3
LED indicators
Continued on next page
28
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCC 780 10, Continued
LED Indicators
This Processor Adapter has two LED indicators, RUN and COM ACT. Their
functions are described in the table below:
LED
Status
Function
RUN
Green
On continuously when the CPU has received power and is
solving logic.
Flashes an error pattern if the CPU is in kernel mode .
(See Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes)
COM ACT
Specifications
Off
CPU is not powered up or is not solving logic.
Green
May be on continuously or blinking. Indicates activity on
Modbus port 1.
Off
No activity on Modbus port 1.
The following table contains specifications for the 171 CCC 780 10 TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter:
Memory
Internal Memory
512K bytes
User Memory
18K words
Flash RAM
512K bytes
Clock Speed
32 MHz
Input and Output References
Registers
26032
Discretes
8192 0x references
8192 1x references
I/O Servicing
Local I/O
Services all the points on any host Momentum I/O base
Watchdog timer
262 ms
Logic solve time
0.16 ms/k ladder logic instructions
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
29
Overview of TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters
171 CCC 780 10, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
Mechanical
Weight
42.5 g (1.5 oz)
Dimensions (HxDxW)
25.9x61.02x125mm
(1.01 x 2.37 x 4.86 in)
Material (Enclosures/
bezels)
Lexan
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
RFI Susceptibility/
immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industrystandard enclosure, with access restricted to qualified
service personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40 ... +85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
30
Degree of protection
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
Di-electric strength
RS232 and RS485 are non-isolated from logic common
Ground continuity
30 A test on the exposed metal connector
Agency Approvals
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
870 USE 101 00 V2.2
Overview of TSX Momentum
Option Adapters
2
At a Glance
Purpose
An Option Adapter may be inserted between the Processor Adapter and the I/O
base to provide:
z
z
z
A battery backup for the CPU
A time-of-day clock
Extra communication ports
This chapter describes the three types of TSX Momentum Option Adapters.
In This Chapter
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
This chapter contains the following sections:
For This Topic...
See Section...
Introducing the TSX Momentum Option Adapters
1
Serial Option Adapter
2
Modbus Plus Option Adapter
3
Redundant Modbus Plus Option Adapter
4
31
Option Adapters
Section 2.1
Introducing the TSX Momentum Option Adapters
Basic Features of Option Adapters
Introduction
This section describes the basic features of all Option Adapters:
z
z
z
Batteries
A time-of-day (TOD) clock
Communication port(s)
Batteries
The batteries used to back up the CPU’s user program and state RAM.
Time-of-Day
Clock
The time-of-day clock allows you to use the date and time as an element in your
user program.
Communication
Ports
The three TSX Momentum Option Adapters are distinguished by the
communications ports they offer, as shown in the table below:
32
Option Adapter
Communication Port(s)
172 JNN 210 32
Software-selectable RS232/RS485 serial port
172 PNN 210 22
One Modbus Plus port
172 PNN 260 22
Two Modbus Plus ports for a redundant (back-up) cable run
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Section 2.2
Serial Option Adapter
Overview
Purpose
This section describes the 172 JNN 210 32 Serial Option Adapter, including the
front panel components and specifications.
In This Section
This section includes the following topics:
Topics
Front Panel Components
Specifications
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
33
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components
Overview
The front panel includes:
z
z
z
Diagram
An LED indicator
Battery compartment
Modbus Port 2 connector
The diagram below shows the location of LED indicator, the battery compartment,
and the Modbus Port 2 connector.
Label Description
1
LED indicator
2
Battery compartment door
3
Modbus Port 2 connector
Continued on next page
34
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components, Continued
LED Indicator
Modbus Port 2
Auto-Logout
Feature On
Modbus Port 2
This Option Adapter has one LED indicator, the Com Act indicator. Its functions are
described in the table below.
LED
Status
Function
COM ACT
Green
May be on steadily or blinking. Indicates activity on the RS232/
RS485 serial port.
Off
No activity on the RS232/RS485 serial port.
Modbus Port 2 is a general-purpose asynchronous serial port with user-selectable
RS232/RS485 slave functionality. The choice between RS232 and RS485 is made
in the software.
Note: When this Option Adapter is assembled with a 171 CCS 780 00 Processor
Adapter or a 171 CCC 780 10 Processor Adapter (with built-in Modbus Port 2), the
Modbus Port 2 on the Option Adapter is electrically disabled. The TOD clock and
the battery backup on the Option Adapter remain functional.
If the RS232 port is chosen, auto-logout is supported. If a programming panel is
logged into the CPU via the serial port and its cable gets disconnected, the
Processor Adapter automatically logs out the port. This auto-logout feature is
designed to prevent a lock-up situation that could prevent other host stations from
logging in on other ports.
Auto-logout is not available for any RS485 port, including the RS485 option on the
Serial Option Adapter. The user must log out of the processor using the
programming software.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
35
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components, Continued
Pinouts for
Modbus Port 2
36
The 172 JNN 210 32 Serial Option Adapter uses the following pinouts:
Pin
For RS232
For RS485
1
DTR
RXD -
2
DSR
RXD +
3
TXD
TXD +
4
RXD
5
signal common
signal common
6
RTS
TXD -
7
CTS
8
cable shield
cable shield
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Specifications
Specifications
This section provides the specifications for the 172 JNN 210 32 TSX Momentum
Serial Option Adapter:
Mechanical
Weight
Dimensions (HxDxW)
85.05 g (3 oz)
58.3 (on battery side) x 60.6 x 143.1mm
(2.27 x 2.36 x 5.57 in)
Material (Enclosures/bezels) Lexan
Time-of-Day Clock
Accuracy
+/- 13 s/day
Batteries
Type
AAA alkaline, two required
two included with Option Adapter (in separate package)
Service life
< 30 days from the time a battery-low indication is received
to actual battery failure @ 40degrees C maximum ambient
temperature with the system continuously powered down.
Shelf life
In excess of 5 yr @ room temperature
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
37
Option Adapters
Specifications, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
RFI Susceptibility/ immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industry-standard
enclosure, with access restricted to qualified service
personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40...+85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
Degree of protection
Di-electric strength
Agency Approvals
38
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
RS232/485 is non-isolated from logic common
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Section 2.3
Modbus Plus Option Adapter
Overview
Purpose
This section describes the 172 PNN 210 22 Modbus Plus Option Adapter, including
the front panel components and specifications.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Front Panel Components
Specifications
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
39
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components
Overview
The front panel includes:
z
z
z
z
Diagram
An LED indicator
Battery compartment
Address switches
9-pin D-shell connector for Modbus Plus communications
The diagram below shows the LED indicator, address switches, Modbus Plus
connector, and battery compartment.
Label Description
1
LED indicator
2
Battery compartment door
3
Address switches for Modbus Plus
4
9-pin D-shell connector for Modbus Plus
communications
Continued on next page
40
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components, Continued
LED Indicator
This Option Adapter has one LED indicator, the MB+ ACT indicator. This indicator
flashes the following patterns, based on the status of the Modbus Plus node:
Pattern
Meaning
6 flashes/s
This is the normal operating state for the node. It is receiving
and passing the network token. All nodes on a healthy
network flash this pattern.
1 flash/s
The node is offline just after power-up or after exiting the
6 flashes/s mode. In this state, the node monitors the
network and builds a table of active nodes. After being in this
state for 5s, the node attempts to go to its normal operating
state, indicated by 6 flashes/s.
2 flashes, then OFF for 2s
The node detects the token being passed among the other
nodes, but never receives the token. Check the network for
an open circuit or defective termination.
3 flashes, then OFF for 1.7s
The node is not detecting any tokens being passed among
the other nodes. It periodically claims the token but cannot
find another node to which to pass it. Check the network for
an open circuit or defective termination.
4 flashes, then OFF for 1.4s
The node has detected a valid message from a node using a
network address identical to its own address. The node
remains in this state for as long as it continues to detect the
duplicate address. If the duplicate address is not detected
for 5s, the node changes to its 1 flash/s mode.
ON
Indicates an invalid node address.
OFF
Possible fault with Modbus Plus Option Adapter.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
41
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components, Continued
Modbus Plus
Address
Switches
The two rotary switches on the Option Adapter are used to set a Modbus Plus node
address for the CPU module. The switches are shown in the following diagram.
Their usage is described in detail in Modbus Plus Addresses on page 132.
The switches in this diagram are set to address 14.
42
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Specifications
Specifications
This section provides the specifications for the 172 PNN 210 22 TSX Momentum
Serial Option Adapter:
Mechanical
Weight
Dimensions (HxDxW)
85.05 g (3 oz)
58.3 (on battery side) x 60.6 x 143.1mm
(2.27 x 2.36 x 5.57 in)
Material (Enclosures/bezels) Lexan
Time-of-Day Clock
Accuracy
+/- 13 s/day
Batteries
Type
AAA alkaline, two required.
Two included with Option Adapter (in separate package).
Service life
< 30 days from the time a battery-low indication is received
to actual battery failure @ 40degrees C maximum ambient
temperature with the system continuously powered down.
Shelf life
In excess of 5 yr @ room temperature
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
43
Option Adapters
Specifications, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
RFI Susceptibility/ immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industry-standard
enclosure, with access restricted to qualified service
personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40...+85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
Degree of protection
Di-electric strength
500 V
Ground continuity
30 A test on the exposed metal connector
Agency Approvals
44
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Section 2.4
Redundant Modbus Plus Option Adapter
Overview
Purpose
This section describes the 172 PNN 260 22 Redundant Modbus Plus Option
Adapter, including the front panel components and specifications.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Front Panel Components
Specifications
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
45
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components
Overview
The front panel includes:
z
z
z
z
Diagram
Two 9-pin D-shell connectors for Modbus Plus communications
Three LED indicators
Battery compartment
Address switches
The diagram below shows the LED indicators, address switches, battery
compartment and Modbus Plus connectors.
Label Description
1
9-pin D-shell connector for Modbus Plus port A
2
Array of three LED indicators
3
Battery compartment door
4
Address switches for Modbus Plus
5
9-pin D-shell connector for Modbus Plus port B
Continued on next page
46
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components, Continued
LED Indicators
This Option Adapter has three LED indicators. Their functions are described in the
table below.
LED
Status
Function
MB+ ACT
Green
Indicates activity on one or both of the Modbus Plus ports (see
the flash pattern table below)
Off
No activity on either Modbus Plus port
ERR A
ERR B
Red
Indicates a communications failure on Modbus Plus port A*
Off
No problems detected on Modbus Plus port A
Red
Indicates a communications failure on Modbus Plus port B*
Off
No problems detected on Modbus Plus port B
* If you are not using redundant cabling on the Modbus Plus link (i.e., if only one of the
ports is being used) the Error LED for the unused port will be on constantly when Modbus
Plus communication occurs on the network.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
47
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components, Continued
MB+ ACT Flash
Patterns
This table provides the patterns that the MB+ ACT indicator will flash to indicate the
status of the Modbus Plus node.
Pattern
Meaning
6 flashes/s
This is the normal operating state for the node. It is
receiving and passing the network token. All nodes on a
healthy network flash this pattern.
1 flash/s
The node is offline just after power-up or after exiting the
6 flashes/s mode. In this state, the node monitors the
network and builds a table of active nodes. After being in
this state for 5s, the node attempts to go to its normal
operating state, indicated by 6 flashes/s.
2 flashes, then OFF for 2s
The node detects the token being passed among the other
nodes, but never receives the token. Check the network for
an open circuit or defective termination.
3 flashes, then OFF for 1.7s
The node is not detecting any tokens being passed among
the other nodes. It periodically claims the token but cannot
find another node to which to pass it. Check the network for
an open circuit or defective termination.
4 flashes, then OFF for 1.4s
The node has detected a valid message from a node using
a network address identical to its own address. The node
remains in this state for as long as it continues to detect the
duplicate address. If the duplicate address is not detected
for 5s, the node changes to its 1flash/s mode.
ON
Indicates an invalid node address.
OFF
Possible fault with Modbus Plus Option Adapter.
Continued on next page
48
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Front Panel Components, Continued
Modbus Plus
Address
Switches
The two rotary switches on the Option Adapter are used to set a Modbus Plus node
address for the CPU module. The switches are shown in the following diagram.
Their usage is described in detail in Modbus Plus Addresses on page 132.
The switches in this diagram are set to address 14.
Modbus Plus
Ports A and B
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
This Option Adapter has two Modbus Plus ports. Redundant cabling on the Modbus
Plus network offers increased protection against cable faults or excessive noise
bursts on either one of the two cable paths. When one of the channels experiences
communication problems, error-free messaging can continue to be processed on
the alternate path.
49
Option Adapters
Specifications
Specifications
This section provides the specifications for the 172 PNN 260 22 TSX Momentum
Serial Option Adapter:
Mechanical
Weight
Dimensions (HxDxW)
85.05 g (3 oz)
58.3 (on battery side) x 60.6 x 143.1mm
(2.27 x 2.36 x 5.57 in)
Material (Enclosures/bezels) Lexan
Time-of-Day Clock
Accuracy
+/- 13 s/day
Batteries
Type
AAA alkaline, two required.
Two included with Option Adapter (in separate package).
Service life
< 30 days from the time a battery-low indication is received
to actual battery failure @ 40degrees C maximum ambient
temperature with the system continuously powered down.
Shelf life
In excess of 5 yr @ room temperature
Operating Conditions
Temperature
0 ... 60 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Chemical interactions
Enclosures and bezels are made of Lexan,
a polycarbonate that can be damaged by strong
alkaline solutions
Altitude, full operation
2000m (6500ft)
Vibration
10 ... 57Hz @ 0.075mm displacement amplitude
57...150Hz @ 1g
Ref. IEC 68-2-6 FC
Shock
+/-15g peak, 11ms, half sine wave
Ref. IEC 68-2-27 EA
Continued on next page
50
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Option Adapters
Specifications, Continued
Specifications,
Continued
RFI Susceptibility/ immunity
Meets CE mark requirements for open equipment.
Open equipment should be installed in an industry-standard
enclosure, with access restricted to qualified service
personnel.
Ref. IEC 801-3: 80 ... 1000 MHz, 10 V/m
Ref. IEC 1000-4-3, EN 50140 Criteria A
Storage Conditions
Temperature
-40...+85 degrees C
Humidity
5 ... 95% (noncondensing)
Safety Parameters
Degree of protection
Di-electric strength
500 V
Ground continuity
30 A test on the exposed metal connectors
Agency Approvals
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Unintentional access (UL 508 Type 1, NEMA250 Type 1,
IP20 conforming to IEC529)
z
z
UL 508, CSA, CUL, CE
FM class1, div2 pending
51
Option Adapters
52
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum
Components
3
At a Glance
Purpose
This chapter describes how to assemble and disassemble a TSX Momentum M1
CPU, using the following components:
z
z
z
z
Processor Adapter
I/O Base
Option Adapter
Label
It also describes how to install batteries in the Option Adapter.
In This Chapter
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
This chapter contains the following sections:
For Information On ...
See Section ...
Assembling a CPU
1
Assembling a CPU with an Option Adapter
2
Installing Batteries in an Option Adapter
3
Labeling the CPU
4
53
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Section 3.1
Assembling a CPU
Overview
Purpose
This section describes how to assemble a Processor Adapter with an I/O base and
how to disassemble them.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Assembling a Processor Adapter and I/O Base
Disassembling a Processor Adapter from an I/O Base
54
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Assembling a Processor Adapter and I/O Base
Overview
A Processor Adapter can be snapped directly onto a Momentum I/O base, making
connections at three points:
z
z
The plastic snap extensions on the two sides of the M1 unit fit into the two
slots on the sides of the I/O base
The 12-pin ATI connectors on the two units mate together
The components can be snapped together by hand – no assembly tools are
required.
This section contains safety precautions for handling components and a procedure
for assembling a Processor Adapter and an I/O base.
CAUTION
ADAPTER MAY BE DAMAGED BY STATIC ELECTRICITY
Use proper ESD procedures when handling the adapter, and do not touch the internal
elements. The adapter’s electrical elements are sensitive to static electricity.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in equipment damage.
CAUTION
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITRY MAY BE EXPOSED
Electrical circuitry on the I/O base may be exposed when a Momentum adapter is not
mounted. Make sure that the I/O base is not under power when it does not have an adapter
mounted on it. To make sure that power is not present, do not insert the wiring connectors
to the I/O base until after the adapter has been mounted.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in injury or equipment damage and will
void the product warranty.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
55
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Assembling a Processor Adapter and I/O Base, Continued
Procedure:
Assembling a
Processor
Adapter and an
I/O Base
Follow the steps in the table below to assemble a Processor Adapter and an I/O
base.
Step
Action
1
Choose a clean environment to assemble the I/O base and adapter to protect the
circuitry from contamination.
2
Make sure that the I/O base is not under power when you assemble the module.
3
Align the two plastic snap extensions on the Processor Adapter with the slots on
the sides of the I/O base. The 12-pin ATI connectors will automatically line up
when the units are in this position. The two devices should be oriented such that
their communication ports are facing out on the back side of the assembly.
Continued on next page
56
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Assembling a Processor Adapter and I/O Base, Continued
Procedure:
Assembling a
Processor
Adapter and an
I/O Base,
Continued
Next Step
Step
Action
4
Push the Processor Adapter onto the base, gently pressing the locking tabs
inward.
Result: The locking tabs on each side of the Processor Adapter slide inside the
I/O base and out through the locking slot. The 12-pin ATI connectors on the two
units are mated to each other in the process.
Once the Processor Adapter has been assembled, it can be mounted on a DIN rail
or surface mounted inside a panel enclosure. A TSX Momentum M1 CPU assembly
is classified as open equipment, i.e., electrical circuitry on the unit may be exposed.
Open equipment should be installed in an industry-standard enclosure, and direct
access must be restricted to qualified service personnel.
For a detailed description of installation procedures and grounding considerations,
refer to the TSX Momentum I/O Bases User Manual (870 USE 002 00).
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
57
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Disassembling a Processor Adapter from an I/O Base
Overview
This section contains safety precautions and a procedure for disassembling a
Processor Adapter from an I/O base.
CAUTION
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITRY MAY BE EXPOSED
Before removing an adapter from the base, disconnect the wiring connectors. Make sure
that the I/O base is not under power when it does not have a Momentum adapter mounted
on it.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in injury or equipment damage and will
void the product warranty.
Tools Required
A flat-head screw driver.
Procedure:
Disassembling
an Adapter from
an I/O Base
Follow the steps in the table below to remove a Processor Adapter from an I/O
base.
Step
Action
1
Choose a clean environment to disassemble the unit, in order to protect the
circuitry from contamination.
2
Make sure that the I/O base is not under power by removing the terminal
connectors from the I/O base.
Continued on next page
58
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Disassembling a Processor Adapter from an I/O Base, Continued
Procedure:
Disassembling
an Adapter from
an I/O Base,
Continued
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Step
Action
3
Use a screwdriver to push the clips on both sides of the Processor Adapter inward,
as shown in the illustration below.
4
Lift off the adapter.
59
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Section 3.2
Assembling a CPU with an Option Adapter
Overview
Purpose
An Option Adapter may only be used in conjunction with a Processor Adapter. It
may not be used alone with an I/O base.
This section describes how to add an Option Adapter when assembling a TSX
Momentum module and how to remove an Option Adapter from the assembled
module.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Assembling a Processor Adapter and an Option Adapter
Mounting the Assembled Adapters on the I/O Base
Disassembling a Module with an Option Adapter
60
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Assembling a Processor Adapter and an Option Adapter
Overview
If a TSX Momentum Option Adapter is used, it is mounted between a Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter and a Momentum I/O base in a three-tiered stack.
This section contains guidelines, safety precautions and a procedure for
assembling a Processor Adapter and an Option Adapter.
The next section describes how to mount the assembled adapters on an I/O base.
Guidelines
We recommend that you snap together the Option Adapter and the M1 Processor
Adapter before mounting them on the I/O base.
Connection
Points Between
Adapters
The Option Adapter and M1Processor connect at these four points:
z
z
z
No Tools
Required
The plastic snap extensions on the two sides of the M1 fit into the two slots on
the sides of the Option Adapter
The 12-pin ATI connectors on the center of the back walls of the two units mate
together
The 34-pin processor extension connectors that run along the left sidewalls of
the components mate together
The components can be snapped together by hand; no assembly tools are
required. A flat-head screw driver is required to disassemble the unit.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
61
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Assembling a Processor Adapter and an Option Adapter, Continued
Procedure:
Assembling an
Option Adapter
and Processor
Follow the steps in the table below to assemble an option adapter and an M1
processor.
Step
Action
1
Choose a clean environment to assemble the Option Adapter and processor to
protect the circuitry from contamination.
2
Align the two plastic snap extensions on the sides of the M1 Processor Adapter
with the slots on the sides of the Option Adapter.
The 12-pin ATI connectors and processor extension connectors will
automatically line up when the units are in this position. The two devices
should be oriented so that their communication ports are facing out on the back
side of the assembly.
CAUTION
PIN ALIGNMENT
Proper assembly requires that the 34 pins on the processor extension
connector be aligned correctly with the mating socket on the M1 processor
adapter. Do not connect one side and try to rotate the M1 onto the option
adapter.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in equipment damage.
3
Push the Processor Adapter onto the Option Adapter, gently pressing the
locking tabs inward.
Result: The locking tabs on each side of the Processor Adapter slide inside
the Option Adapter and out through the locking slot. The 12-pin ATI connectors
on the two units are mated to each other in the process.
Continued on next page
62
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Assembling a Processor Adapter and an Option Adapter, Continued
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Follow the directions in the next section to mount the assembled adapters on the
I/O base.
63
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Mounting the Assembled Adapters on the I/O Base
Overview
This section gives guidelines, safety precautions and a procedure for mounting the
assembled Processor and Option Adapter on an I/O base.
Guidelines
The assembled adapters connect with the I/O base at these seven points:
z
z
z
z
Two plastic snaps on the front of the Option Adapter fit into two slots on the
front of the I/O base
The plastic snap extensions on the two sides of the Option Adapter fit into the
two slots on the sides of the I/O base
The 12-pin ATI connectors on the center of the back walls of the two units mate
together
The plastic stirrup on the back of the Option Adapter clips onto the bottom of
the I/O base
CAUTION
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITRY MAY BE EXPOSED
Electrical circuitry on the I/O base may be exposed when an adapter is not mounted. Make
sure that the I/O base is not under power whenever it does not have a Momentum adapter
mounted on it.
To make sure that power is not present, do not insert the wiring connectors to the I/O base
until after the adapter has been mounted. When more than one connector is on the I/O
base, remove all connectors to prevent the unit from receiving power from an unexpected
source.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in injury or equipment damage and will
void the product warranty.
Continued on next page
64
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Mounting the Assembled Adapters on the I/O Base, Continued
Procedure:
Mounting the
Assembled
Adapters on an
I/O Base
Follow the steps in the table below to mount the assembly on an I/O base.
Step
Action
1
Make sure that the I/O base is not under power when you assemble the module.
2
Align the four plastic snap extensions (on the front and sides of the Option
Adapter) with the slots on the I/O base.
The 12-pin ATI connectors will automatically line up when the units are in this
position. The devices should be oriented such that their communication ports are
facing out on the back side of the assembly.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
65
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Mounting the Assembled Adapters on the I/O Base, Continued
Procedure:
Mounting the
Assembled
Adapters on an
I/O Base,
Continued
Step
Action
3
Push the assembled adapters onto the base, gently pressing the locking tabs
inward.
Snap #1 shown in the illustration below will not align properly with the mating slot in
the I/O base unless the Option Adapter is placed straight onto the base. Do not
attach just one latch and rotate the Option Adapter onto the I/O base.
Result: The locking tabs on each side of the Option Adapter slide inside the I/O
base and out through the locking slot. The 12-pin ATI connectors on the two units
are mated to each other in the process.
4
66
Apply slight pressure to the top of the stirrup on the back of the Option Adapter so
that it snaps into place on the bottom of the I/O base.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Disassembling a Module with an Option Adapter
Overview
The three-tiered assembly is designed to fit together tightly so it can withstand
shock and vibration in an operating environment. This section contains two
procedures:
z
z
Tools Required
Removing the assembled adapters from the I/O base
Removing the Option Adapter from the Processor
Flat-head screwdriver.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
67
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Disassembling a Module with an Option Adapter, Continued
Procedure:
Removing the
Adapter
Assembly from
the I/O Base
Follow the steps in the table below to remove the assembled Option Adapter and
M1 Processor Adapter from the I/O base.
Step
Action
1
Make sure that the power is off by removing the terminal connectors from the
I/O base.
2
Remove the assembled unit from its wall or DIN rail mounting surface.
CAUTION
EXPOSED CIRCUITRY IN BATTERY COMPARTMENT
Use care when you insert a screwdriver in the battery compartment so that you
do not scratch any exposed elements.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in equipment damage.
3
Open the battery door and use a flat-head screwdriver to release snaps 1 and 2
as shown in the illustration below.
Continued on next page
68
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Disassembling a Module with an Option Adapter, Continued
Procedure:
Removing the
Adapter
Assembly from
the I/O Base,
Continued
Step
Action
4
Once snaps 1 and 2 have been disengaged, use the screwdriver to release
snaps 3 and 4 on the front of the assembly.
5
Gently lift the stirrup on the back of the Option Adapter with your fingers until it
disengages from the bottom of the I/O base. Then lift the Option Adapter and
M1 assembly from the I/O base.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
69
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Disassembling a Module with an Option Adapter, Continued
Procedure:
Disassembling
an Option
Adapter and M1
Processor
70
Follow the steps in the table below to remove the Option Adapter from the M1
processor.
Step
Action
1
Use a screwdriver to push the clips on both sides of the adapter inward.
2
Lift off the adapter.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Section 3.3
Installing Batteries in an Option Adapter
Installation Guidelines
Why Install
Batteries?
If you are using a Momentum Option Adapter in your CPU assembly, you have a
battery-backup capability. The batteries will maintain user logic, state RAM values
and the time-of-day clock in the event that the CPU loses power.
What Kind of
Batteries?
Two AAA alkaline batteries can be installed in the compartment on the side of the
Option Adapter. A set of batteries is supplied with the module (not installed).
&$87,21
ELECTRONIC CIRCUITRY EXPOSED
When the battery door is open, electronic circuitry is exposed. Follow proper ESD
measures while handling the equipment during battery maintenance.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in injury or equipment damage.
Installing
Batteries
When installing the batteries, observe correct polarity, as indicated on the
compartment door.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
71
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Installation Guidelines, Continued
Leave Power On
When Changing
Batteries
Once your CPU has been commissioned and is running, maintain power to the
module whenever you change the batteries.
If you change the batteries while the power is OFF, you will have to reload your user
logic program (either from the application you have stored in Flash or from the
original files).
Removing and
Replacing
Batteries
Battery maintenance should be performed by only qualified personnel according to
the following diagram.
Monitor the
Battery
Because a Momentum CPU assembly is designed to be installed in a cabinet
where it cannot be seen at all times, no LED was created to monitor health.
We recommend that you reserve a battery coil in your Modsoft 2.6 or Concept 2.1
configuration and use it to monitor the health of your battery and report the need for
replacement prior to battery failure (refer to Reserving and Monitoring a Battery
Coil for Modsoft or Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil for Concept).
72
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Section 3.4
Labeling the CPU
Guidelines for Labeling the CPU
Overview
A fill-in label is shipped with each I/O base. This label should be placed on the M1
Processor Adapter that you mount on that base.
This section describes the label and provides an illustrated example.
Fill-In Label
A completed label provides information about the assembled module and its I/O
field devices that can be used by service and maintenance personnel.
The model number of the I/O base is marked on the fill-in label directly above the
color code. The cutout area above the I/O model number allows the model number
of the adapter to show through.
Note: An Option Adapter may also be used in the assembled module. You will find
its model number printed in the upper left corner of Option Adapter housing.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
73
Assembling TSX Momentum Components
Guidelines for Labeling the CPU, Continued
Example of a
Fill-In Label
74
A fill-in label is illustrated in the diagram below. The numbered pointers in the
diagram refer to the descriptions in the table that follows.
No.
Description
1
Fields for plant name, station name and network address
2
Cutout–the model number of the adapter shows through
3
Model Number of the I/O base
4
Color code of the I/O base
5
Short description of the I/O base
6
Field for the symbol name of inputs
7
Field for the symbol name of outputs
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Communication Ports
II
At a Glance
Purpose
This part describes the communication ports available with TSX Momentum
Processor Adapters and Option Adapters.
In This Chapter
This part contains the following chapters:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
For Information On ...
See Chapter ...
Using the Modbus Ports
4
Using the I/OBus Port
5
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
6
75
Using the Modbus Ports
4
At a Glance
Purpose
This chapter describes Modbus Port 1 and Modbus Port 2, including
communication parameters, cabling guidelines for Modbus RS485 networks, cable
accessories and pinouts.
In This Chapter
This chapter contains the following sections:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
For This Topic...
See Section...
Modbus Port 1
1
Modbus Port 2
2
77
Using the Modbus Ports
Section 4.1
Modbus Port 1
Overview
Purpose
Modbus Port 1 is standard on most TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters. This
section describes the port and recommended cable accessories.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Modbus Port 1
Cable Accessories for Modbus Port 1
78
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Modbus Port 1
Introduction
Modbus Port 1 is an RS232 asynchronous serial port that permits a host computer
to communicate to the CPU for:
z
z
z
z
Programming
Data transfer
Upload/download
Other host operations
This section describes the port.
Connector Type
The Modbus Port 1 connector is a female RJ45 phone jack.
Diagram
The following diagram shows the position of Modbus Port 1 on a Processor
Adapter:
Label Description
1
Modbus Port 1
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
79
Using the Modbus Ports
Modbus Port 1, Continued
Port Parameters
Modbus Port 1 supports the following communication parameters.
Baud
Parity
50
1800
75
2000
110
2400
134
3600
150
4800
300
7200
600
9600
1200
19,200
EVEN
ODD
NONE
Mode/Data Bits
7-bit ASCII
8-bit RTU
Stop Bit
1
2
Modbus Address
In the range 1 ... 247
Continued on next page
80
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Modbus Port 1, Continued
Default
Parameters
The factory-set default communication parameters for Modbus Port 1 are:
z
z
z
z
z
9600 baud
EVEN parity
8-bit RTU mode
1 stop bit
Modbus address
A Processor Adapter cannot support more than one stop bit. If you change this
default setting in the configuration software, the Processor Adapter will ignore the
change.
All other port parameters can be successfully modified in the configuration
software.
Auto-Logout
Feature
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
If a programming panel is logged into the CPU via the RS232 serial port and its
cable gets disconnected, the CPU automatically logs out the port. This auto-logout
feature is designed to prevent a lock-up situation that could prevent other host
stations from logging in on other ports.
81
Using the Modbus Ports
Cable Accessories for Modbus Port 1
Overview
This section describes the cable and D-shell adapters needed to connect Modbus
Port 1 to a programming station. It also provides pinouts for the adapters.
Cables
The cable connecting a programming station to the CPU (via Modbus Port 1) can
be up to 9.5m long. Three premade cable assemblies are available from Schneider
Automation:
Length
Part Number
1 m (3 ft)
110 XCA 282 01
3 m (10 ft)
110 XCA 282 02
6 m (20 ft)
110 XCA 282 03
All three assemblies are standard eight-position, foil-shielded, flat telephone cables
with male RJ45 connectors on each end. One RJ45 connector plugs into Modbus
Port 1 on the CPU, and the other plugs into a female D-shell adapter that fits onto
the programming station.
D-Shell Adapters
Two D-shell adapters are available from Schneider Automation for CPU-tocomputer connections:
z
z
A 110 XCA 203 00 9-pin adapter for PC-AT type stations
A 110 XCA 204 00 25-pin adapter for PC-XT type stations
These adapters have an RJ45 jack on one end that allows them to clip directly onto
a cable assembly.
Continued on next page
82
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Cable Accessories for Modbus Port 1, Continued
110 XCA 203 00
Pinout
The pinout for this adapter is shown in the diagram below:
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
83
Using the Modbus Ports
Cable Accessories for Modbus Port 1, Continued
110 XCA 204 00
Pinout
84
The pinout for this adapter is shown in the diagram below:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Section 4.2
Modbus Port 2
Overview
Purpose
Three Momentum components offer this port:
z
z
z
171 CCS 780 00 Processor Adapter
171 CCC 780 10 Processor Adapter
172 JNN 210 32 Serial Option Adapter
This section describes the port and provides guidelines for Modbus RS485
networks.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Modbus Port 2
Four-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks
Two-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks
Cable for Modbus RS485 Networks
Connectors for Modbus RS485 Networks
Terminating Devices for Modbus RS485 Networks
Pinouts for Modbus RS485 Networks
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
85
Using the Modbus Ports
Modbus Port 2
Two Types of
Port
Modbus Port 2 is available in two types:
Component
Type of Port
Type of Connector
171 CCS 780 00 and
171 CCC 780 10
Processor Adapters
Built-in, dedicated RS485
port
9-pin D-shell connector
172 JNN 210 32
Serial Option Adapter
User may configure port as
RS232 or RS485*
RJ45 phone jack connector
*If the Option Adapter is combined with the 171 CCS 780 00or 171 CCC 780 10 Processor
Adapter, the Modbus port on the Option Adapter will be disabled.
Features of an
RS485 Port
Modbus Port 2 can be configured as an RS485 port. RS485 supports two-wire or
four-wire cabling. A multimaster/slave system must use two-wire cabling. A single
master/slave system may use two- or four-wire cabling.
The RS485 protocol handles messaging over long distances with higher level of
noise immunity than RS232 without the need for modems.
Limit of Two
Modbus Ports
The Momentum M1 Processor Adapters can support a maximum of two Modbus
ports.
If a 172 JNN 210 32 Serial Option Adapter is used in conjunction with a
171 CCS 780 00 or 171 CCC 780 10 Processor Adapter, the RS485 port on the
Processor Adapter becomes Modbus Port 2. The port on the Option Adapter
becomes electrically neutral and does not support any communication activities.
(The TOD clock and battery backup system on the Option Adapter continue to
work.)
Continued on next page
86
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Modbus Port 2, Continued
Port Parameters
Modbus Port 2 offers the following communication parameters:
Baud
Parity
50
1800
75
2000
110
2400
134
3600
150
4800
300
7200
600
9600
1200
19,200
EVEN
ODD
NONE
Mode/Data Bits
8-bit RTU
7-bit ASCII
Stop Bit
1
Modbus Address
In the range 1 ... 247
Comm Protocol
RS232
RS485
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
87
Using the Modbus Ports
Modbus Port 2, Continued
Default
Parameters
Auto-Logout
Feature Only
with RS232
The factory-set default communication parameters for Modbus Port 2 are:
z
z
z
z
z
z
9600 baud
EVEN parity
8-bit RTU mode
1 stop bit
Modbus network address 1
RS232 protocol
Note: Processor Adapters support only one stop bit. If you change this default
setting in the configuration software, the Processor Adapter will ignore the change.
Note: The protocol must be changed from RS232 to RS485 for the
171 CCS 780 00and 171 CCC 780 10 Processor Adapters or the port will not
function.
If the Serial Option Adapter is used and the RS232 port is chosen, auto-logout is
supported. If a programming panel is logged into the CPU via the serial port and its
cable gets disconnected, the Processor Adapter automatically logs out the port.
This auto-logout feature is designed to prevent a lock-up situation that could
prevent other host stations from logging in on other ports.
Auto-logout is not available for any RS485 port, including the RS485 option on the
Serial Option Adapter. The user must log out of the processor using the
programming software.
88
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Four-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks
Introduction
Four-wire cabling schemes may be used for single master/slave communications.
Only one master is allowed. The master may be located anywhere in the network.
Length
The maximum length of cable from one end of network to other is 2000 ft (609 m).
Number of
Devices
The maximum number of devices in a network is 64 if all are TSX Momentum
devices. Otherwise, the maximum is 32.
Termination
You must terminate both ends of the cable run with special terminating resistors.
Master Cable
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 Terminating RJ45 Resistor Plugs
(pack of 2)
170 XTS 021 00
The master of this master/slave cabling scheme must be connected on at least one
side to a master cable, a special cable that crosses the transmit and receive lines.
The other side may be connected to a master cable, or, if the master is at one end
of the cable run, a terminating resistor.
Description
Part Number
Modbus RS485 (RJ45/RJ45) Master Communication Cable
170 MCI 041 10
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 Terminating RJ45 Resistor Plugs
(pack of 2)
170 XTS 021 00
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
89
Using the Modbus Ports
Four-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Slave Cabling
Single Master/
Slave Option 1
The slaves use a pin-for-pin cable, such as the Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485
Short Interconnect Cable or any Cat. 5 4-Twisted Pair Ethernet cable AWG#24.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 10
The following diagram shows components used in a four-wire single master/slave
cabling scheme. In this view, a master cable (#3) is used on both sides of the
master. Each Momentum module must include a Processor Adapter or Option
Adapter with a Modbus RS485 port.
Label
Description
Part Number
1
Terminating resistor plug
170 XTS 021 00
2
Modbus RS485 connector “T” (DB9 base)
170 XTS 040 00
3
Modbus RS485 Master Communication Cable
170 MCI 041 10
4
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable 170 MCI 020 10
5
Modbus RS485 connector “T” (RJ45 base)
170 XTS 041 00
Continued on next page
90
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Four-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Single Master/
Slave Option 2
The following diagram shows components used in a four-wire single master/slave
cabling scheme. In this view, the master is at one end of the network and is
connected by a single master cable (#3). Terminating resistors (#1) are used at
both ends of the network.
Each Momentum module must include a Processor Adapter or Option Adapter with
a Modbus RS485 port.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Label
Description
Part Number
1
Terminating resistor plug
170 XTS 021 00
2
Modbus RS485 connector “T” (DB9 base)
170 XTS 040 00
3
Modbus RS485 Master Communication Cable
170 MCI 041 10
4
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable 170 MCI 020 10
5
Modbus RS485 connector “T” (RJ45 base)
170 XTS 041 00
91
Using the Modbus Ports
Two-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks
Introduction
Two-wire cabling schemes may be used for single master/slave or multimaster/
slave communications. Masters may be located anywhere in the network.
CAUTION
POTENTIAL FOR MULTIMASTER CONFLICTS
Configure a multimaster network carefully to avoid masters issuing simultaneous or
conflicting commands to the same slave module.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in injury or equipment damage.
Length
The maximum length of cable from one end of network to other is 2000 ft (609 m).
Number of
Devices
The maximum number of devices in a network is 64 if all are TSX Momentum
devices. Otherwise, the maximum is 32.
Termination
One end of the cable run must be terminated with a terminating resistor.
The other end of the cable must be terminated with a terminating shunt, which
connects the transmit pair to the receiver pair.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 Terminating RJ45 Resistor Plugs
(pack of 2)
170 XTS 021 00
Modbus RS485 Terminating RJ45 Shunt Plugs
170 XTS 042 00
Continued on next page
92
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Two-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Cable
Multimaster/
Slave Cabling
All devices are connected with the same pin-for-pin cable, such as the Modbus Plus
or Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable or any Cat. 5 4-Twisted Pair Ethernet
cable AWG#24. A master/slave system using 2-wire cabling does not require the
special master communication cable.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 10
The following diagram shows components used in a multimaster/slave network.
Each Momentum module must include a Processor Adapter or Option Adapter with
a Modbus RS485 port.
Label
Description
Part Number
1
Terminating resistor plug
170 XTS 021 00
2
Modbus RS485 connector “T” (DB9 base)
170 XTS 040 00
3
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable 170 MCI 020 10
4
Modbus RS485 connector “T” (RJ45 base)
170 XTS 041 00
5
Terminating shunt plug
170 XTS 042 00
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
93
Using the Modbus Ports
Two-Wire Cabling Schemes for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Single Master/
Slave Cabling
94
The following diagram shows components used for single master/slave
communications in a two-wire cabling scheme. Each Momentum module must
include a Processor Adapter or Option Adapter with a Modbus RS485 port.
Label
Description
Part Number
1
Terminating resistor plug
170 XTS 021 00
2
Modbus RS485 connector “T” (DB9 base)
170 XTS 040 00
3
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable 170 MCI 020 10
4
Modbus RS485 connector “T” (RJ45 base)
170 XTS 041 00
5
Terminating shunt plug
170 XTS 042 00
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Cable for Modbus RS485 Networks
Overview
This section describes the cables which should be used in constructing an RS485
network for TSX Momentum components.
Master
Communication
Cable
This cable is required for master/slave communications in a four-wire cabling
scheme. This cable is 10” long and has a blue boot.
Description
Part Number
Modbus RS485 (RJ45/RJ45)
Master Communication Cable
170 MCI 041 10
Photo
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
95
Using the Modbus Ports
Cable for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Interconnect
Cables
Cable for connecting two Modbus RS485 devices, such as TSX Momentum
modules, is available from Schneider Automation in two lengths. These cables
have a black boot.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
Short Interconnect Cable (10”)
170 MCI 020 10
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
3 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 36
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
10 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 021 80
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
30 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 80
Photo
Continued on next page
96
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Cable for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Other Premade
Cable
Interconnect cable in various lengths may be obtained from other vendors,
including Amp:
Description
Amp Part Number
2 ft
621 894-2
5 ft
621 894-4
7 ft
621 894-5
10 ft
621 894-6
14 ft
621 894-7
Custom Cable
For custom cabling, use Cat. 5 4-Twisted Pair Ethernet Cable AWG#24. It may be
shielded or unshielded. Shielded cable is recommended for long runs and for noisy
environments. You may use stranded or unstranded cable. Keep in mind that
stranded cable is more flexible.
Custom Cable
Vendors
Vendors include:
Vendor
Part # for Shielded Cable
Part # for Unshielded Cable
Belden
1633A
1583A non plenum
1585A plenum
Berk/Tek
530131
540022
Alcatel Cable Net --
Crimping Tool
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Hipernet Cat. 5 - UTP
(LSZH-rated cable)
Schneider Automation provides a crimping tool (490 NAB 000 10) and an RJ45 die
set (170 XTS 023 00) to attach the 170 XTS 022 00 connector to the cable.
97
Using the Modbus Ports
Connectors for Modbus RS485 Networks
Overview
This section describes the connectors which should be used in constructing an
RS485 network for TSX Momentum components.
RJ45 Connector
“T”
This connector is used with the RS485 port on the 172 JNN 210 32 Option Adapter.
DB9 Connector
“T”
Description
Part Number
Modbus RS485 Connector “T”
(RJ45 base)
170 XTS 041 00
Photo
This connector is used with the RS485 port on the Processor Adapters.
Description
Part Number
Modbus RS485 Connector “T”
(DB9 base)
170 XTS 040 00
Photo
Continued on next page
98
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Connectors for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Connectors for
Custom Cabling
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
This RJ45 connector should be used when constructing custom cable for an RS485
network.
Description
Part Number
RJ45 Connector (pack of 25)
170 XTS 022 00
Photo
99
Using the Modbus Ports
Terminating Devices for Modbus RS485 Networks
Overview
This section describes terminating devices which should be used in constructing
Modbus RS485 networks for TSX Momentum devices.
Terminating
Resistor Plugs
Terminating resistor plugs are used with the RS485 connector (RJ45 base) at the
last device on either end of a four-wire cable network or at one end of a two-wire
cable network. The plug is red.
Shunt Plugs
100
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
Terminating RJ45 Resistor Plugs
(pack of 2)
170 XTS 021 00
Photo
Shunt plugs are used with the RS485 connector (RJ45 base) at one end of a twowire cable network. The plug is used at the last device on the network. The plug is
blue.
Description
Part Number
Modbus RS485 Terminating
RJ45 Shunt Plugs
170 XTS 042 00
Photo
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Pinouts for Modbus RS485 Networks
Overview
This section contains pinouts for wiring an RS485 network for TSX Momentum
components.
RJ45 Pinout
Here are the pinouts for wiring an RJ45 connector for RS485:
Pin
Function
1
RXD -
2
RXD +
3
TXD +
4
5
Signal common
6
TXD -
7
8
Shield
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
101
Using the Modbus Ports
Pinouts for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
9-Pin D-Shell
Pinout
Here are the pinouts for wiring a male 9-pin D-shell connector for RS485. The
metal shell is connected to chassis ground.
Pin
Function
1
TXD +
2
RXD +
3
Signal common
4
5
6
TXD -
7
RXD -
Continued on next page
102
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Pinouts for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Master
Communication
Cable
Here is the pinout for the 170 MCI 041 10 Modbus RS485 (RJ45/RJ45) Master
Communication Cable:
Interconnect
Cables
Here is the pinout for the 170 MCI 02x xx Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
Interconnect Cables (10 in, 3 ft, 10 ft and 30 ft):
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
103
Using the Modbus Ports
Pinouts for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Modbus RS485
Connector “T”
(DB9 Base)
Here is the pinout for the Modbus RS485 Connector “T” (DB9 base):
Continued on next page
104
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Ports
Pinouts for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Modbus RS485
Connector “T”
(RJ45 Base)
Here is the pinout for the Modbus RS485 Connector “T” (RJ45 base):
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
105
Using the Modbus Ports
Pinouts for Modbus RS485 Networks, Continued
Terminating
Resistor Plugs
Here is the pinout for the Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 Terminating RJ45
Resistor Plugs:
Terminating
Shunt Plugs
Here is the pinout for the Modbus RS485 Terminating RJ45 Shunt Plugs:
106
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the I/OBus Port
5
At a Glance
Purpose
Two TSX Momentum components offer I/OBus master capabilities:
z
z
171 CCS 760 00 Processor Adapter
171 CCC 760 10 Processor Adapter
This section explains how I/OBus works, provides guidelines for creating I/OBus
networks with TSX Momentum components, and describes recommended cable
accessories.
In This Chapter
This chapter contains the following topics:
Topics
How I/OBus Works
Guidelines for I/OBus Networks
I/OBus Accessories
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
107
Using the I/OBus Port
How I/OBus Works
Introduction
I/OBus allows a Momentum CPU to assume bus master capabilities over as many
as 256 slave devices over an Interbus cable.
How Signals Are
Passed
I/OBus operates as a logical ring, with signals being passed by the master over a
remote bus cable to each slave device in series. The slaves return signals to the
master over the same cable.
How Data is
Transferred
The I/OBus functions as a logical shift register. The application's entire data
stream, originating at the master, is transferred serially from slave to slave down the
remote bus. Each slave regenerates the entire stream before passing it on. As a
slave handles the stream data, it extracts the portion that is assigned to it and adds
any output data to the stream.
108
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the I/OBus Port
Guidelines for I/OBus Networks
Overview
This section gives guidelines for creating an I/OBus network using TSX Momentum
components.
Network Scheme
Physically, the bus looks like a tree with the master at the head and the slaves
distributed along a trunk (see below).
Slave Devices
An I/OBus slave device can be:
z
z
z
I/OBus
Restrictions
A Momentum I/O base with a 170 INT 110 00 Interbus Communication Adapter
mounted on it
A Modicon Terminal Block I/O module enabled for Interbus communications
A standard Interbus module designed by a third party manufacturer
The I/OBus network does not support Interbus-compatible devices that require the
Interbus PCP protocol.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
109
Using the I/OBus Port
Guidelines for I/OBus Networks, Continued
I/OBus
Specifications
110
The table below provides I/OBus specifications.
Number of distributed slave stations
supported
256 maximum (subject to hardware/
Cable spacing between nodes
400 m (1300ft) maximum
Maximum distance between master
and furthest slave
13 km (8 mi)
Transmission speed
500 kbits/s
Number of
16-bit words
Input words
256 maximum
Output words
256 maximum
software limitations)
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the I/OBus Port
I/OBus Accessories
Overview
Modicon provides several cabling solutions for I/OBus:
z
z
z
Low profile cables in two lengths
A 1m cable for connecting devices on different DIN rails in a cabinet
A connector kit for building custom-length Interbus cables
This section describes those solutions.
Low Profile
Cables
For side-by-side mounting of the CPU with Interbus I/O modules on a DIN rail or
wall, Modicon provides two specially molded low profile cables.
Part Number
Length
170 MCI 007 00
11.4 cm (4.5 in)
170 MCI 100 01
100 cm (39 in)
These cables have a male 9-in D-shell connector on one end and a female 9-pin Dshell on the other. The male connector plugs into the female I/OBus port on the
Processor Adapter, and the female connector plugs into the male connector on the
left side of a 170 INT 110 00 Interbus Communications Adapter on an I/O base.
Additional cables can then be used to connect a series of I/O modules via their
Interbus communication ports.
1 m Cable
A 1m (39 in) Interbus cable (170 MCI 100 00) is also available to allow you to
connect modules on separate DIN rails.
Note: The connectors on the 170 MCI 100 00 cable are not low profile.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
111
Using the I/OBus Port
I/OBus Accessories, Continued
Interbus Cable
Connector Kit
I/OBus communicates over Interbus full duplex cable. For custom cable lengths,
Modicon offers an Interbus cable connector kit (part number 170 XTS 009 00). The
kit includes two connectors, one male and one female, that can be soldered to an
Interbus full duplex cable of the appropriate length.
The recommended cable is Belden 8103 or equivalent.
Note: The connectors in the 170 XTS 009 00 Kit are not low profile.
Continued on next page
112
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the I/OBus Port
I/OBus Accessories, Continued
Interbus Cable
Pinouts
The following diagram shows how to wire the connectors of the remote bus cable:
Pin
Wire Color
Outgoing Connection
Pin
Wire Color Ingoing Connection
1
Yellow
DO
Data Out
1
Yellow
DO
Data Out
2
Gray
DI
Data In
2
Gray
DI
Data In
3
Brown
Brown
Common
3
4
GND
Reference conductor,
fiber-optic adapter
4
GND*
Reference conductor,
fiber-optic adapter
Common*
5
Vcc
Power-supply for fiberoptic adapter
5
Vcc*
Power-supply for fiberoptic adapter
6
Green
DO_N
Data Out Negated
6
Green
DO_N
Data Out Negated
7
Pink
DI_N
Data In Negated
7
Pink
DI_N
Data In Negated
8
Vcc
Additional power
supply for fiber-optic
adapter
8
Vcc*
Additional power
supply for fiber-optic
adapter
9
Plug identification
9
Not used
* Physically isolated
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
113
Using the I/OBus Port
114
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
6
At a Glance
Purpose
Modbus Plus ports are available with:
z
z
172 PNN 210 22 Option Adapter (Single Port)
172 PNN 260 22 Option Adapter (Redundant Ports)
This section gives an overview of Modbus Plus networks for TSX Momentum
components.
In This Chapter
Note: The Modbus Plus Network Planning and Installation Manual
(890 USE 100 00) provides details for the complete design and installation of a
Modbus Plus cable system.
This chapter contains the following topics:
Topics
Modbus Plus Features for Momentum
Two Types of Modbus Plus Networks
Standard Cabling Schemes
Cluster Mode Cabling Schemes
Cable Accessories for Modbus Plus Networks
Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams for Modbus Plus Networks
Modbus Plus Addresses
Peer Cop
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
115
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Modbus Plus Features for Momentum
Introduction
When a Modbus Plus network is constructed entirely of Momentum components, it
may take advantage of two new features:
z
z
Cluster Mode
cluster mode, which allows small groups of devices to be linked by short
lengths of cable;
supporting up to 64 nodes on a single section of cable.
A cluster may consist of up to eight Momentum devices. A network may contain up
to eight clusters.
The cable between devices in a cluster may be 10 in to 3 ft. The cable between
clusters or between a cluster and the trunk must be at least 10 ft.
The maximum length of the network continues to be 1500 ft. The maximum
number of devices in a network continues to be 64.
64 Nodes
Note: Only Momentum devices are allowed in a cluster.
When a Modbus Plus network consists entirely of Momentum devices, then a single
section of cable may support 64 nodes instead of the standard 32 nodes.
Example: If a single SA85 is added to a network of Momentum modules, the
network is no longer Momentum only, but a mixture of devices. Each cable section
must be limited to 32 nodes. Cable sections must be connected by a repeater.
116
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Two Types of Modbus Plus Networks
I/O Networks and
Supervisory
Networks
In a distributed control environment, Modbus Plus can be used in either of two
ways:
z
z
As an I/O network
As a supervisory network
CAUTION
CRITICAL I/O MUST BE SERVICED IN AN I/O NETWORK
Design your Modbus Plus architecture to meet the needs of your network. Modbus Plus can
offer deterministic I/O servicing or non-deterministic supervisory servicing of programming,
user interface, and third party ModConnect devices. Do not use a supervisory network to
service critical I/O.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in injury or equipment damage.
I/O Networks
Supervisory
Networks
In a deterministic I/O network architecture, one CPU services up to 63 Momentum
I/O modules, Terminal I/O modules or other Modbus Plus devices.
Note: When a programming panel or other human-machine interface (HMI) device
is used as part of a deterministic Modbus Plus I/O network, it should be connected
via the RS232 port on the CPU, not as a Modbus Plus node.
In a supervisory architecture, several intelligent processing devices share system
data with each other. Many kinds of devices may be part of the network. You
should be aware of each device's requirement for access to the network and of the
impact each device will have on the timing of your network communication,
especially when servicing non-critical (and non-deterministic) I/O.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
117
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Two Types of Modbus Plus Networks, Continued
What if I Need
Both Types?
118
If your system requires both supervisory and I/O handling architectures, one
solution is to use a Processor Adapter with I/OBus capabilities as the I/O network
and either a 172 PNN 210 22 or 172 PNN 260 22 Option Adapter with Modbus Plus
for the supervisory network.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Standard Cabling Schemes
Introduction
In a standard Modbus Plus cabling scheme, each peer device connects via a drop
cable to a tap along a trunk cable.
Length
The maximum length of cable from one end of the network to the other is 1500 ft
(450 m) if no repeaters are used.
You can use up to three Modicon RR85 Repeaters to extend the cable to up to
6000 ft (1800 m). Each repeater allows you to extend the cable 1500 ft (450 m).
Distance
Between Nodes
Number of
Devices
Description
Part Number
Modicon RR85 Repeater
NW-RR85-000
Nodes must be separated by at least 10 ft of cable. This requirement is more than
satisfied by standard drop cables:
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus Drop Cable, 2.4 m / 8 ft
990 NAD 211 10
Modbus Plus Drop Cable 6 m / 20 ft
990 NAD 211 30
The maximum number of devices in a network is 64:
z
z
Termination
If you use only Momentum products, you may use up to 64 devices on one
cable section without a repeater.
If you use a mixture of devices, you may use up to 32 devices on one cable
section. You must use a repeater to connect to another cable section. You
may use up to three repeaters and four cable sections in all.
You must terminate both ends of the network. If your network consists of two or
more sections separated by a repeater, each section must be terminated at both
ends.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
119
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Standard Cabling Schemes, Continued
Momentum
Network
This diagram depicts a Modbus Plus network constructed with a Momentum CPU
and Momentum I/O. One cable segment supports all 64 nodes. No repeater is
used.
Mixture of
Devices
This diagram depicts a mixture of Momentum and other Modbus Plus devices.
Three repeaters are used to connect four cable sections.
120
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Cluster Mode Cabling Schemes
Introduction
In cluster mode, Momentum I/O devices may be placed in small groups, connected
by much shorter lengths of cable than in standard Modbus Plus cabling schemes.
You may use clusters and standard single nodes in the same network.
Length of
Network
The maximum length of cable from one end of the network to the other is 1500 ft
(450 m) if no repeaters are used.
You can use up to three Modicon RR85 Repeaters to extend the cable to up to
6000 ft (1800 m). Each repeater allows you to extend the cable 1500 ft (450 m).
Number of
Devices in
Network
Description
Part Number
Modicon RR85 Repeater
NW-RR85-000
The maximum number of devices in a network is 64:
z
z
Clusters in a
Network
If you use only Momentum products, you may use up to 64 devices on one
cable segment without a repeater.
If you use a mixture of devices, you may use up to 32 devices on one cable
section. You must use a repeater to connect to another cable section. You
may use up to three repeaters and four cable sections in all.
The maximum number of clusters in a network is 8. The maximum number of
devices in a cluster is 8. Only Momentum devices may be used in the cluster.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
121
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Cluster Mode Cabling Schemes, Continued
Termination
Cable Between
Nodes in a
Cluster
Cable Between
Clusters
Drop Cables
You must terminate both ends of the network with special terminating resistors.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 Terminating RJ45 Resistor Plugs
(pack of 2)
170 XTS 021 00
The minimum length of cable between nodes in a cluster is 10 in (.25 m).
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 10
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 3 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 36
The minimum length of cable between clusters is 10 ft (3 m).
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 10 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 021 80
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 30 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 80
Drop cables connecting a cluster to the trunk cable must be at least 10 ft (3 m) long.
A 10 ft drop cable is available. A 30 ft drop cable may be fabricated by removing
one RJ45 connector from a 30 ft interconnect cable. Connect the open end of the
cable to a Modbus Plus tap, using the wiring diagrams on 128.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus 10 ft. Drop Cable
170 MCI 021 20
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 30 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 80
Continued on next page
122
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Cluster Mode Cabling Schemes, Continued
Cluster Scheme
#1
In this example, two clusters of Momentum I/O modules are connected in
sequence. The trunk cable continues from the clusters in both directions.
Label
Description
Part Number
1
Modbus Plus Tap
990 NAD 230 00
2
Modbus Plus 10 ft Drop Cable
170 MCI 021 20
3
Modbus Plus Connector “T” (DB9 base)
170 XTS 020 00
4
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable
OR
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 3 ft Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 10
5
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 30 ft Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 80
170 MCI 020 36
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
123
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Cluster Mode Cabling Schemes, Continued
Cluster Scheme
#2
124
In this example, two clusters are connected in sequence. The network ends with
the second cluster.
Label
Description
Part Number
1
Modbus Plus Tap
990 NAD 230 00
2
Modbus Plus 10 ft Drop Cable
170 MCI 021 20
3
Modbus Plus Connector “T” (DB9 base)
170 XTS 020 00
4
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 Short Interconnect Cable
OR
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 3 ft Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 10
5
Modbus Plus / Modbus RS485 30 ft Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 80
6
Terminating resistor plug
170 XTS 021 00
170 MCI 020 36
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Cable Accessories for Modbus Plus Networks
Overview
This section describes the cables, connector and terminating device which should
be used in constructing a Modbus Plus network for TSX Momentum components.
Cable Within
Clusters
Cable for connecting two Modbus Plus devices within a cluster is available from
Schneider Automation in two lengths. These cables have a black boot.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
Short Interconnect Cable (10”)
170 MCI 020 10
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
3 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 36
Photo
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
125
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Cable Accessories for Modbus Plus Networks, Continued
Cable Between
Clusters
Cable for connecting two Modbus Plus clusters, or for fabricating drop cables to and
from clusters, is available from Schneider Automation in two lengths. These cables
have a black boot.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus 10 ft. Drop Cable
170 MCI 021 20
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
10 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 021 80
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
30 ft. Interconnect Cable
170 MCI 020 80
Photo
Continued on next page
126
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Cable Accessories for Modbus Plus Networks, Continued
DB9 Connector
“T”
Terminating
Resistor Plugs
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
This connector is used in cluster mode with a Modbus Plus Communication
Adapter or with the 172 PNN 210 22 or 172 PNN 260 22 Modbus Plus Option
Adapters.
Note: Only one connector “T” may be used with each adapter, making it
impossible to use redundant cabling in cluster mode.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus Connector “T”
(DB9 base)
170 XTS 020 00
Photo
Terminating resistor plugs are used with the connector “T” at the last device in a
cluster when it is also the last device in the Modbus Plus network. The plug is red.
Description
Part Number
Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
Terminating RJ45 Resistor Plugs
(pack of 2)
170 XTS 021 00
Photo
127
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams for Modbus Plus Networks
Overview
This section contains pinouts and wiring diagrams for constructing an Modbus Plus
network for TSX Momentum components.
Drop Cable from
Tap to Cluster
Here is the diagram for wiring an interconnect cable (with one RJ45 connector
removed) from a Modbus Plus tap to a cluster:
Drop Cable from
Cluster to Tap
Here is the diagram for wiring an interconnect cable (with one RJ45 connector
removed) from a cluster to a Modbus Plus tap:
Continued on next page
128
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams for Modbus Plus Networks, Continued
Interconnect
Cables
Here is the pinout for the 170 MCI 02x xx Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485
Interconnect Cables (10 in, 3 ft, 10 ft and 30 ft):
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
129
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams for Modbus Plus Networks, Continued
Modbus Plus
Connector “T”
(DB9 Base)
Here is the pinout for the Modbus Plus Connector “T” (DB9 base):
Continued on next page
130
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams for Modbus Plus Networks, Continued
Terminating
Resistor Plugs
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Here is the pinout for the Modbus Plus or Modbus RS485 Terminating RJ45
Resistor Plugs:
131
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Modbus Plus Addresses
Introduction
Modbus Plus devices function as peers on a logical ring. Each device accesses the
network by acquiring a token frame that is passed in a rotating address sequence.
Each device on a Modbus Plus network needs a unique address in the range
1...64. The device address determines the logical order in which the network token
will be passed from device to device.
CAUTION
COMMUNICATION ERRORS MAY RESULT
Do not install a Modbus Plus Option Adapter before you have set its Modbus Plus address
for your application. See your network administrator to get the Modbus Plus node address
for this module.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in injury or equipment damage.
Address
Sequence
The assignment of addresses does not have to map to the physical layout of the
network–e.g., device 17 is placed physically before device 3. This is important to
understand because the network's token rotation is defined by device addressese.g., device 2 will pass the token to device 3, device 3 to device 4, etc.
Illegal Addresses
If you set the node address to 00 or to a value greater than 64:
z
z
z
The COM LED will go ON steadily to indicate an illegal address assignment.
The Run LED will flash 4 times.
The Processor Adapter will not run until you set a valid, unused address on the
Option Adapter and cycle power.
Continued on next page
132
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Modbus Plus Addresses, Continued
Setting Modbus
Plus Addresses
Example of an
Address
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Two rotary switches on the Momentum Option Adapter are used to set the network
address. The top switch (X10) sets the upper digit (tens) of the address. The lower
switch (X1) sets the lower digit (ones) of the address.
Node Address
X10 Setting
X1 Setting
1 ... 9
0
1 ... 9
10 ... 19
1
0 ... 9
20 ... 29
2
0 ... 9
30 ... 39
3
0 ... 9
40 ... 49
4
0 ... 9
50 ... 59
5
0 ... 9
60 ... 64
6
0 ... 4
The illustration below shows a sample setting for address 14:
133
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Peer Cop
What Is Peer
Cop?
A Momentum M1 Processor Adapter has the ability to define point-to-point
transactions between itself and other devices on the Modbus Plus network. The
tool for defining these transactions is a panel software configuration utility known as
Peer Cop.
Configuring
Network Devices
with Peer Cop
Each device on the network can be configured to send and receive Peer Cop data.
z
z
Four Types of
Data
Transactions
Sources and
Destinations
In a Modbus Plus I/O networking architecture, the CPU on the network can be
used to configure the entire Peer Cop database.
In a Modbus Plus supervisory architecture, each CPU on the network needs to
be configured to handle the Peer Cop data that it will send or receive.
Peer Cop allows you to define four types of data transactions:
Peer Cop Data
Transaction
Function
Maximum Data Length/Token Frame
Global Output
Data to be broadcast globally
to all devices on the network
32 words
Specific Output
Data to be transmitted to
individual devices
32 words/device
Global Input
Data messages received by all 32 words
devices on the network
Specific Input
Data received by a specific
device from a specific device
500 words to all specific devices
32 words/device
500 words from all specific devices
Peer Cop uses defined data references (like PLC discretes or registers) as sources
and destinations. For example, a block of registers can constitute the data source
for the transmitting device, and that same or another block of registers can be the
data destination for the receiving device.
Continued on next page
134
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
Peer Cop, Continued
How Peer Cop
Data Is Sent and
Received
The reception of Peer Cop source data and the delivery of Peer Cop destination
data are handled by the token rotation. The token is always passed to the next
logical device in the network's address sequence.
Because all the Modbus Plus devices monitor the network, any one device can
extract the data addressed specifically to it. Likewise, all devices can extract global
data. Peer Cop then enables the Modbus Plus device currently holding the token to
direct specific data to individual devices and broadcast global data to all devices on
the network as part of its token frame.
Effect of Using
Peer Cop
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
The net effect of using Peer Cop for data transactions is that each sending device
can specify unique references as data sources and each receiving device can
specify the same or different references as data destinations. When devices
receive global data, each device can index to specific locations in the incoming data
and extract specific lengths of data from those points. Data transactions therefore
happen quickly as part of the token rotation and can be directly mapped between
data references in the sending and receiving devices.
135
Using the Modbus Plus Ports
136
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Modsoft
III
At a Glance
Purpose
This part describes how to configure an M1 CPU, how to I/O map an I/OBus
network, how to configure a Modbus Plus network with Peer Cop and how to save
to Flash using Modsoft 2.6.
In This Chapter
This part contains the following chapters:
For Information On ...
See Chapter ...
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
5
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
6
Configuring a Modbus Plus Network in Modsoft with Peer Cop 7
Saving to Flash in Modsoft
870 USE 101 00 V.2.1
8
137
Configuring an M1 CPU with
Modsoft
7
At a Glance
Introduction
This chapter explains how to configure a CPU using Modsoft 2.6. The procedures
and examples described here can be applied with Modsoft Lite 2.6 as well.
In This Chapter
The chapter contains the following topics.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
For This Topic...
See Section...
Configuring the Processor Adapter
1
Configuring Option Adapter Features
2
Modifying Communication Port Parameters
3
I/O Mapping the Local I/O Points
4
139
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Section 7.1
Configuring the Processor Adapter
Overview
Purpose
This section describes how to configure a TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapter
using Modsoft 2.6.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter
Specifying an M1 Processor Type
Default Configuration Parameters
Changing the Range of Discrete and Register References
Changing the Size of Your Application Logic Space
Changing the Number of Segments
Changing the Size of the I/O Map
Establishing Configuration Extension Memory
140
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter
Introduction
Procedure
This section describes how to select an M1 Processor Adapter with Modsoft 2.6,
starting from the Configuration Overview editor.
Note: For a full description of how to use Modsoft 2.6, refer to Modicon Modsoft
Programmer Software (V.2.6) User Guide (890 USE 115 00).
Follow the steps below to select an M1 Processor Adapter.
Step
Action
1
With a new Configuration Overview editor on the screen, move the cursor onto the
OverView selection on the top menu bar.
Result: A pulldown list of options appears.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
141
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Move the cursor onto PLC Type in the pulldown list and push <Enter>.
Result: The following list of PLC types appears on the screen:
3
Move the cursor onto MOMNTUM and push <Enter>.
Result: You will be prompted to select between the M1 Processor type and the
Magnum.
4
Place the cursor on M1 and push <Enter>.
Continued on next page
142
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter, Continued
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
You are now ready to specify the type of TSX M1 Momentum Processor Adapter for
configuration.
143
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Specifying an M1 Processor Type
Introduction
Once you have selected an M1 Processor Adapter in Modsoft 2.6, you must choose
between three types of M1 processors.
z
z
z
A 2.4K machine
A 12.0K machine
An 18.0K machine
These numbers refer to the amount of user memory in the CPU.
Which Type
Should I
Choose?
If You Choose
the Wrong Type
Use the table below to determine which processor type to choose:
Processor Adapter
Type
171 CCS 700 00
2.4
171 CCS 700 10
2.4
171 CCS 760 00
12.0
171 CCC 760 10
18.0
171 CCS 780 00
2.4
171 CCC 780 10
18.0
If you choose the wrong machine type for the CPU you are configuring, you can run
into the following kinds of problems:
z
z
If you specify too much memory, Modsoft allows you to create a configuration
and logic program that could be too big for the CPU you are using. When you
try to transfer your program to the CPU, your transfer will fail.
If you specify too little memory, Modsoft restricts the size of your configuration
and logic program, and may not allow you to I/O Map an I/OBus network (as
described in I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft).
Continued on next page
144
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Specifying an M1 Processor Type, Continued
Procedure
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Follow the steps below to specify an M1 Processor Type.
Step
Action
1
As a result of selecting an M1 Processor Adapter, you will be presented with a
pop-up screen that allows you to select the machine type. Move the cursor onto
the desired memory size (2.4, 12.0 or 18.0).
2
Push <Enter>.
145
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Default Configuration Parameters
Overview
This section describes the default configuration parameters.
Defaults for a
2.4K Adapter
This sample Configuration Overview screen shows the default configuration
parameters.
Defaults for a
12.0K Adapter
This sample Configuration Overview screen shows the default configuration
parameters:
Continued on next page
146
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Default Configuration Parameters, Continued
Defaults for an
18.0 Adapter
This sample Configuration Overview screen shows the default configuration
parameters:
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
147
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Default Configuration Parameters, Continued
Default Values
148
Here are the default parameters:
Parameter
2.4K Adapter
12.0K Adapter
18.0K Adapter
Coils in state RAM
1536 (0x)
1536 (0x)
1536 (0x)
Discrete inputs in state
RAM
512 (1x)
512 (1x)
512 (1x)
Input registers in state
RAM
48 (3x)
48 (3x)
48 (3x)
Output registers in state
RAM
1872 (4x)
1872 (4x)
1872 (4x)
Bytes of user memory
space available for
application logic
1678
13100
17676
Words of user memory
space for the I/O Map
32
512
32
I/O logic segments
One, which will
allow you to I/O
Map the I/O points
on the local base
unit
One, which will
allow you to I/O
Map the I/O points
on the local base
unit
One, which will
allow you to I/O
Map the I/O points
on the local base
unit
Memory allocated for
configuration extension
None
None
None
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Range of Discrete and Register References
Introduction
This section provides guidelines and a procedure for changing the range of discrete
(0x and 1x) and register (3x and 4x) references.
Guidelines
When you change the range of discrete and register references, follow these
guidelines:
z
z
z
z
Adjust the range of discretes in increments of 16. Sixteen discretes consume
one word.
Adjust the range of registers in increments of 1. Each register consumes one
word.
The total number of register and discrete references cannot exceed 3k words.
A minimum configuration of 16 0x discretes, 16 1x discretes, one 3x register,
and one 4x register is required.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
149
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Range of Discrete and Register References, Continued
Procedure
From the Configuration Overview screen, follow the steps below to change the
range of discrete and register references:
Step
Action
1
From the Overview menu, select Ranges.
Result: The cursor will appear in the Ranges field of the editor on the high range
0x value.
2
150
Modify the range of your discrete and register references by changing the high
value, in keeping with the guidelines described above. Press <Enter> after
completing each field.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Size of Your Application Logic Space
Introduction
The number shown in the Size of Full Logic Area field in the Configuration
Overview screen indicates the total amount of memory available for your
application logic. You cannot directly enter this field to modify the value. You can,
however, change the amount of memory available by manipulating the size of other
fields in the Configuration Overview screen.
Example 1
If you reduce the size of the I/O Map area, the number in the Full Logic Area field
automatically increases. Say you are using a 12.0K machine and you change the
size of the I/O Map from the default value of 512 to 256–a decrease of 256 words.
The default Size of Full Logic Area will automatically increase from 1198 to 1454.
Example 2
Similarly, if you allocate some number of words to configuration extension memory
(to support Peer Cop), you will reduce the Size of Full Logic Area by the number of
words allocated the configuration extension memory.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
151
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Number of Segments
Introduction
The number of segments specified in the Configuration Overview screen
determines the number of I/O Map drops that you will be able to set up for your
CPU.
The number of segments you will need depends on whether your Processor
Adapter will support an I/OBus network.
For I/OBus
Networks
You must change the number of segments to 2 if you want to create an I/O Map to
support an I/OBus network.
For All Other
Cases
The default number of segments (1) is correct. You only need one drop because
the only points to be I/O Mapped are those on the local base.
Continued on next page
152
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Number of Segments, Continued
Procedure
From the Configuration Overview screen, follow the steps below to change the
number of segments:
Step
Action
1
From the Overview menu, select I/O.
Result: The cursor will appear in the I/O field of the editor on the number of
segments.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
2
Type the new number of segments.
3
Push <Enter>.
153
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Size of the I/O Map
Introduction
The default size of the I/O Map and your options vary, depending on whether or not
your Processor Adapter supports an I/OBus network.
Processors For
I/O Bus
Networks
With I/OBus, an I/O Map table is used to define the number, location, and type of
I/O devices on the network bus.
All Other
Processors
Default
512 words
Minimum
17 words
Other Processor Adapters only use the I/O Map for local I/O. The default of 32
words is sufficient for any TSX Momentum I/O base. Depending on the
requirements of your I/O base, you may be able to reduce the number of words to
the minimum, 17, in order to increase the size of the full logic area.
Default
32 words
Minimum
17 words
Continued on next page
154
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Size of the I/O Map, Continued
Procedure
From the Configuration Overview screen, follow the steps below to change the size
of the I/O Map:
Step
Action
1
From the Overview menu, select I/O.
Result: The cursor will appear in the I/O field of the editor on the number of
segments.
2
Push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves to the I/O Map Reserved Words field.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
3
Modify the I/O Map size by typing a new number in this field.
4
Push <Enter>.
155
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Establishing Configuration Extension Memory
Introduction
By default, no memory space is allocated for configuration extension memory. If
you want to use the Peer Cop capability to handle Modbus Plus communications,
you need to define some configuration extension memory to enable Peer Cop.
Extension memory is specified as a number of 16-bit words. That number is
entered in the ExtSize entry of the Configuration editor. Once an adequate
number of words has been specified here, Peer Cop will be enabled in the CfgExt
pulldown list.
How Much
Memory?
The minimum Peer Cop ExtSize memory requirement is 20 words; the maximum
is 1366 words.
Follow these guidelines for estimating the amount of extension memory you will
need for your Peer Cop database:
For...
Procedure
Add...
Up to a maximum of...
Overhead
9 words
--
Global output
5 words
--
Global input
number of words=
number of devices x
(1 + 2 x number of device subentries)
1088 words
Specific output
2 words for every device entry in Peer Cop
128 words
Specific input
2 words for every device entry in Peer Cop
128 words
From the Configuration Overview screen, follow the steps below to establish
configuration extension memory:
Step
Action
1
From the Cfg Ext menu, select Cfg. Extension Size.
Result: The cursor will appear in the Cfg. Extension Used/Size entry.
156
2
Type the desired size.
3
Push <Enter>.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Section 7.2
Configuring Option Adapter Features
Overview
Purpose
This section describes how to implement the battery backup and time-of-day (TOD)
clock features of the TSX Momentum Option Adapters.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock
Setting the Time
Reading the Time-of-Day Clock
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
157
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil
Introduction
Since the Option Adapter does not have an LED to indicate when the battery is low,
we recommend that you reserve a 0x reference to monitor the health of the battery.
This section describes how to reserve and monitor a battery coil, using the
Configuration Overview editor in Modsoft 2.6.
Reserving a
Battery Coil
To reserve a battery coil, perform the steps in the following table.
Step
Action
1
From the Overview menu, select Specials.
Result: The cursor moves into the Battery Coil field on the Configuration
Overview screen.
2
Enter a coil number in the range of available 0xxxx references.
Example: If you have set the range of 0x's at 000001...001536, you might want to
enter the reference value of the last coil–1536.
3
Push <Enter>.
Continued on next page
158
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil, Continued
Monitoring the
Battery Coil
Monitor the battery coil in ladder logic or tie it to a lamp or alarm that will indicate
when the battery is low.
Interpreting the
Battery Coil
The battery coil will always read either 0 or 1.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
z
z
A coil state of 0 indicates that the battery is healthy.
A coil state of 1 indicates that the battery should be changed.
159
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock
Overview
Each Option Adapter has a time-of-day clock. To use this feature, you must reserve
a block of eight 4x registers.
This section describes how to reserve those registers, using Modsoft 2.6.
Reserving
Registers for the
TOD Clock
To reserve registers for the time-of-day clock, perform the steps in the following
table.
Step
Action
1
From the Overview menu, select Specials.
Result: The cursor moves into the Battery Coil field on the Configuration
Overview screen.
2
Push the down arrow key twice to move the cursor into the Time of Day Clock
field.
Continued on next page
160
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock, Continued
Reserving
Registers for the
TOD Clock,
Continued
Step
Action
3
Enter a number (the first in a series of eight) in the range of available 4xxxx
references.
Example: If you want registers 400100...400107 reserved for the TOD clock,
enter 100.
4
Push <Enter>.
Result: The reference value you specified and the seven that follow it are now
reserved for TOD clock data.
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Setting the time.
161
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Setting the Time
Overview
Option 1
Once you have reserved a block of registers for the time-of-day clock, you have to
set the correct time. Modsoft offers two ways to do this:
z
z
using the Set Hardware Clock dialogue
setting the register bits individually
Note: The time-of-day clock complies with guidelines for the year 2000.
You must be online or in combined mode to access the Set Hardware Clock
dialogue.
Step
Action
1
From the PlcOps menu, select Set Hardware Clock.
Result: The Set Hardware Clock dialogue appears.
2
You may set the time directly or copy the current time setting from your
programming panel.
z
z
3
To copy the setting from your programming panel, proceed to step 4.
The time setting for your programming panel is displayed on the left. The
controller time setting is displayed on the right. The time is expressed as
hh:mm:ss. The date is expressed as mm-dd-yy.
z
z
4
To set the time directly, proceed to step 3.
To modify the settings, type a new value in the date or time field for the
controller.
To confirm the default settings or your modified settings, press <Enter>.
To copy the current time setting from your programming panel, type Y in response
to the question: Write PANEL clock data to PLC? (Y/N). Then
press <Enter>.
Continued on next page
162
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Setting the Time, Continued
Option 2
Go online and set the register values individually, using the following guidelines and
procedure for setting the status bits and setting the time bits. The CPU must be
running while you are setting the bits.
Setting the
Status Bits
The control register (4x) uses its four most significant bits to report status:
Control Register
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1 = error
1 = All clock values have been set
1 = Clock values are being read
1 = Clock values are being set
Setting the Time
Bits
The following table shows how the registers handle time-of-day clock data, where
register 4x is the first register in the block reserved for the clock:
Register
Data Content
4x
The control register
4x + 1
Day of the week (Sunday = 1, Monday = 2, etc.)
4x + 2
Month of the year (Jan = 1, Feb = 2, etc.)
4x + 3
Day of the month (1...31)
4x + 4
Year (00...99)
4x + 5
Hour in military time (0...23)
4x + 6
Minute (0...59)
4x + 7
Second (0...59)
Continued on next page
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Setting the Time, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to set the register values for the time-of-day
clock:
Step
Action
1
Set the correct date and time in registers 4x + 1 through 4x + 7.
Example: To set the clock for Thursday, April 9, 1998 at 4:17:00, set the following
values in the registers:
z 4x + 1 5
z
z
z
z
z
z
2
164
4x + 2
4
4x + 3
9
4x + 4
98
4x + 5
4
4x + 6
17
4x + 7
00
Load the value 8000H in register 4x to write the data to the clock.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Reading the Time-of-Day Clock
Overview
This section tells how to read the time-of-day clock and uses an example to
describe how to interpret the time-of-day clock registers.
Reading the
Clock
Set the value 4000H in register 4x to read data from the clock.
Example
If you reserved registers 400100...400107 as your TOD clock registers, set the time
bits, and then read the clock at 9:25:30 on Thursday, July 16, 1998, the registers
would display the following values:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Register
Reading
Indication
400100
0110000000000000
All clock values have been set;
clock values are being read
400101
5 (decimal)
Thursday
400102
7 (decimal)
July
400103
16 (decimal)
16
400104
98 (decimal)
1998
400105
9 (decimal)
9 a.m.
40010 6
25 (decimal)
25 minutes
40010 7
30 (decimal)
30 seconds
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Section 7.3
Modifying Communication Port Parameters
Overview
Purpose
The communication parameters on the Modbus ports are set at the factory. This
section describes how to access the Port editor and how to edit the default
parameters.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics.
Topic
Accessing the Port Editor Screen
Parameters Which Should Not Be Changed
Changing the Mode and Data Bits
Changing Parity
Changing the Baud Rate
Changing the Modbus Address
Changing the Delay
Changing the Protocol on Modbus Port 2
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Accessing the Port Editor Screen
Introduction
Modbus port parameters can be modified using the Port editor in Modsoft 2.6. This
screen is accessed from the Configuration Overview editor.
How To Get
There
To access the Port editor from the Configuration Overview editor, move the cursor
onto the Ports selection on the top menu bar, then push <Enter>.
Port Editor
Showing Default
Values
If you have not previously modified any port parameters, the following screen will
appear. The screen shows the default parameters for two Modbus ports, 01 and 02.
If you have previously modified any communication port parameters, the new
values will appear in the screen.
Two Sets of
Parameters
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
This screen will always show two sets of port parameters, even if your particular
CPU configuration supports only Modbus Port 1. In that case, ignore any parameter
values shown for Port 2.
167
Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Parameters Which Should Not Be Changed
Overview
Two parameters on the Port editor screen should not be changed. These are the
stop bit and head-slot parameters.
Stop Bit
Each port operates only with 1 stop bit. While Modsoft will allow you to select 2
stop bits, this setting is invalid.
Head-Slot
The Head-Slot parameter is set to 0 and should be left at this value for the TSX
Momentum M1 CPUs.
168
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Mode and Data Bits
Introduction
Procedure
From the Port editor screen, each port can be configured to operate in one of two
possible modes – RTU or ASCII.
z
z
If the mode is RTU, the number of data bits is always 8.
If the mode is ASCII, the number of data bits is always 7.
Note: The factory-set default is 8-bit RTU.
To change the mode and data bit parameters, perform the steps in the following
table.
Step
Action
1
Place the cursor on the current Mode entry for the Modbus port you want to enter.
Push <Enter>.
Result: A popup window appears in the top left corner of the screen displaying your
two Mode options:
Continued on next page
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Mode and Data Bits, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Use an arrow key to toggle the cursor onto the desired Mode selection in the popup
window, then push <Enter>.
Result: The Port editor screen is updated with the Mode type you have specified,
the corresponding Data Bit value appears, and the cursor moves to the Parity
column. For example, if you change Modbus port 1 from RTU mode to ASCII mode,
the Data Bit value also automatically changes from 8 to 7, as shown below:
170
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing Parity
Introduction
From the Port editor screen, a port can be configured for even, odd, or no parity
checking. The factory-set default is EVEN parity.
Procedure
To change the parity parameter, perform the steps in the following table.
Step
Action
1
Place the cursor on the current Parity entry for the Modbus port you want to enter.
Push <Enter>.
Result: A popup window appears in the top left corner of the screen displaying your
three Parity options:
2
Use an arrow key to toggle the cursor onto the desired Parity selection in the popup
window, then push <Enter>.
Result: The Port editor screen is updated with the Parity type you have specified,
and the cursor moves to the Stop Bits column.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Baud Rate
Overview
Procedure
Each port can be configured for a baud in the range 50...19,200. Sixteen valid
bauds are user-selectable. The factory-set default is 9600 baud.
Note: If you use a baud rate lower than 4800, you should adjust the default delay
parameter. See Changing the Delay.
To change the baud parameter, perform the steps in the following table.
Step
Action
1
Place the cursor on the current Baud entry for the Modbus port you want to enter.
Push <Enter>.
Result: A popup window appears in the top left corner of the screen displaying 16
baud values:
2
Use an arrow key to toggle the cursor onto the desired Baud selection in the popup
window, then push <Enter>.
Result: The Port editor screen is updated with the Baud number you have specified,
and the cursor moves to the Head-Slot column.
172
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Modbus Address
Overview
Each port can be assigned a Modbus network address in the range 1...247. That
address must be unique with respect to all other device addresses on the same
Modbus networks.
Since Modbus Port 1 and Modbus Port 2 are always on different Modbus networks,
they can both be assigned the same address value without conflict. The factory-set
default for both ports is address 1.
Procedure
From the Port editor screen, perform the steps in the following table to change the
Modbus Address:
Step
Action
1
Place the cursor on the current Address entry for the Modbus port.
2
Type a number in the range 1...247. Push <Enter>.
Result: The Port editor screen is updated with the Address number you have
typed, and the cursor moves to the Delay column.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Delay
Overview
The default value for the delay parameter is 10 ms. This value is appropriate for
most TSX Momentum applications.
However, if you use baud rates lower than 4800, you should adjust the delay timing.
Delay Timing
If you use baud rates lower than 4800, adjust the delay timing as indicated in the
following table:
Baud Rate
Delay (in Msec)
2400
20
1200
30
600
50
300
100
Valid Delay
Values
The delay must always be a value between 10 and 200 ms, expressed in 10 ms
increments.
Procedure
From the Port editor screen, perform the steps in the following table to change the
Delay parameter:
Step
Action
1
Place the cursor on the current Delay entry for the Modbus port.
2
Type a new value in the range 10 ... 200 ms, using 10 ms increments. Push
<Enter>.
Result: The Port editor screen is updated with the Delay you have specified.
174
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Changing the Protocol on Modbus Port 2
Overview
If your TSX Momentum M1 CPU is using the Modbus Port 2 provided by the 172
JNN 210 32 Option Adapter, you can specify whether it will use the RS232 or
RS485 protocol. The factory-set default for Modbus Port 2 is RS232.
If you are using the Modbus Port 2 provided on the 171 CCS 780 00 or
171 CCC 780 10 Processor Adapter, the port is hardwired as a dedicated RS485
protocol. However, you must change the default setting on the Port editor screen
from RS232 to RS485, or the port will not function.
Procedure
From the Port editor screen, perform the steps in the following table to change the
Protocol on Modbus Port 2.
Step
Action
1
Place the cursor on the current Protocol entry for Modbus port 2. Push <Enter>.
Result: A popup window appears in the top left corner of the screen displaying the
two protocol options:
2
Use an arrow key to toggle the cursor onto the desired protocol selection in the
popup window, then push <Enter>.
Result: The Port editor screen is updated with the protocol you have specified.
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Section 7.4
I/O Mapping the Local I/O Points
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map
Introduction
Every M1 Processor Adapter is assembled on an I/O base. The I/O points on the
base are the local I/O for that processor.
As part of the configuration process, you need to create an I/O Map for the local
I/O. The I/O Map assigns the appropriate range and type of (0x, 1x, 3x, or 4x)
reference values from the CPU's state RAM to the input and/or output points on the
local base unit.
Accessing an I/O
Map Screen
To access an I/O Map screen from the Configuration Overview screen, move the
cursor onto the I/O Map command on the top menu and push <Enter>.
Result: An I/O Map screen appears with the cursor placed in the Module field. The
label in the top left corner of the screen identifies it as Type: MOMENTUM I/O.
Continued on next page
176
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map, Continued
Editing the Local
I/O Map
To edit the Local I/O Map, perform the steps in the following table.
Step
Action
1
To select the local base unit for drop 1, push <Shift><?> .
Result: A list of all available Momentum base units appears in a window over the
I/O Map screen, as shown below. The list includes all Momentum I/O bases.
2
Move the cursor onto the model number of your local base unit
(e.g., the 170 ADM 370 10 24 VDC 16-point in/ 8-point out base in the sample
screen). Push <Enter>.
Result: The module type and description of the base you select appears in the
(Drop 1) I/O Map screen:
Continued on next page
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map, Continued
Editing the Local
I/O Map
Step
Action
3
Assign the appropriate state RAM reference(s) to the unit.
Example: In the screen below, one 3x register (300001) has been assigned for the
input points and one 4x register (400001) has been assigned for the output points:
4
Press <Esc> to return to the Configuration Overview editor.
Continued on next page
178
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map, Continued
Local I/O Only
This screen is always used to I/O Map the local I/O base only. No other I/O base
units can be I/O Mapped on this screen.
If you attempt to select a second Momentum I/O base in this screen, the following
error message appears:
I/O Bus: A
Special Case
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
If you are I/O Mapping a Processor Adapter which supports I/OBus communication
stations, you will need to go to a separate I/O Map screen for Drop 2. That process
is described in I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft .
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Modsoft
180
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network
with Modsoft
8
At a Glance
Purpose
This chapter describes how to I/O Map an I/OBus network using Modsoft 2.6.
Topics
This chapter contains the following topics:
Topics
Supporting an I/O Map for an I/OBus Network
Accessing an I/O Map Screen for an I/OBus Network
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map
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I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
Supporting an I/O Map for an I/OBus Network
Introduction
The 171 CCS 760 00 and 171 CCC 760 10 Processor Adapters have an I/OBus
communication port that enables them to control and communicate with network
slave I/O.
If you are using I/OBus to control network I/O, you need to write an I/O Map in your
configuration. This section describes the configuration parameters required to
support an I/O Map for I/OBus.
I/O Map
Reserved Words
By default, 512 words are reserved for I/O Mapping. This may or may not be the
appropriate memory allocation to support your I/OBus network. A rule of thumb for
roughly estimating the number of words required for I/O Mapping is:
z
z
16 words for overhead
10 words/module on the network (including both the local and the network I/O)
The idea behind adjusting the memory size is to allow you to completely I/O Map
your network while preserving as much user memory as possible for your
application program.
Required
Settings
Make sure that the following parameters are set on the Configuration Overview
screen:
Parameter
Setting
Processor type
z
z
Next Step
182
12.0 for a 171 CCS 760 00
Processor Adapter
18.0 for a 171 CCC 760 10
Processor Adapter
Number of segments
2
I/O Map reserved words
Enough to support your I/O map
Once you have made sure that your Configuration Overview parameters are set
properly, you can access a second I/O Map screen for the I/OBus network.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
Accessing an I/O Map Screen for an I/OBus Network
Overview
This section describes how to access an I/O Map screen for an I/OBus network.
Procedure
To access the I/O Map screen for your I/OBus network, perform the steps in the
following table.
Step
Action
1
From the Configuration Overview screen, move the cursor onto the I/OMap
command on the top menu and push <Enter>.
Result: The Type: MOMENTUM I/O screen for the local I/O base appears.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
Accessing an I/O Map Screen for an I/OBus Network, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Select Drop from the top menu bar of this I/O Map screen.
Result: A pulldown menu appears.
3
Select Add Drop (or Next Drop if you have already established the drop) from the
pulldown menu, then push <Enter>.
Result: A new I/O Map screen appears labeled Type: IOBUS. You are now ready
to start I/O Mapping the I/OBus network.
Next Step
184
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map
Overview
The maximum number of modules which can be I/O Mapped on the I/OBus network
depends on your Processor Adapter:
Processor Adapter
Max. Modules
Max. I/O Bits
171 CCS 760 00
128
2048
171 CCC 760 10
256
4096
You may use up to 16 IOBUS screens to map your I/OBus network. Each page
allows you to enter up to 16 I/O base and/or InterBus I/O modules.
The first column on the screen tells you which page you are on.
Procedure
To enter I/O bases or Interbus I/O modules in the I/OBus I/O Map, perform the
steps in the following table.
Step
Action
1
Place the cursor in the Module column in row 1 (for NODE 01) and push the <F8>
key OR <Shift> <?>.
Result: A list of I/O names appears, as shown below. This list includes model
numbers for the available Momentum I/O bases and Terminal Block I/O modules. It
also includes a series of InterBus Module Identifier codes (see list at the end of
this section).
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Move the cursor onto the desired model number and push <Enter>.
Result: The module type and its description are displayed on the I/O Map screen.
The cursor is positioned so that you can assign the appropriate state RAM
reference(s) to the unit.
Example: If you select a 170 ADI 350 00 32-point input base, the screen will look
like this:
3
Enter the desired reference number–in this case a 3x register (300020), which will
be the first of two contiguous input registers for the 32-bit input base. The second
register is automatically assigned.
4
Move the cursor to the Module column opposite NODE 02 and push <Shift> <?>.
Result: The base/module selection popup appears again over the I/O Map
screen.
Continued on next page
186
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I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
5
Continue to select and map modules one after the other. You must enter the
modules in contiguous node slots on the screen, e.g. you cannot enter a module in
slot 7 if you have not filled slot 6.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map, Continued
Generic InterBus
Module Identifier
Codes
InterBus device manufacturers embed an identifier code in their network slave
modules in conformance with InterBus standards. The code identifies a device by
its I/O type but not its specific model or name.
I/OBus recognizes the InterBus identifier codes provided below and allows you to
I/O Map devices that use these codes. However, you cannot use the module zoom
screens to define the parameters for these InterBus modules.
Identifier Code
I/O Type
0101_IOBUS
One-word discrete output
0102_IOBUS
One-word discrete input
0103_IOBUS
One-word discrete bidirectional
0201_IOBUS
Two-word discrete output
0202_IOBUS
Two-word discrete input
0203_IOBUS
Two-word discrete bidirectional
0231_IOBUS
Two-word analog output
0232_IOBUS
Two-word analog input
0233_IOBUS
Two-word analog bidirectional
0301_IOBUS
Three-word discrete output
0302_IOBUS
Three-word discrete input
0303_IOBUS
Three-word discrete bidirectional
0331_IOBUS
Three-word analog output
0332_IOBUS
Three-word analog input
0333_IOBUS
Three-word analog bidirectional
0401_IOBUS
Four-word discrete output
0402_IOBUS
Four-word discrete input
0403_IOBUS
Four-word discrete bidirectional
0431_IOBUS
Four-word analog output
0432_IOBUS
Four-word analog input
0433_IOBUS
Four-word analog bidirectional
Continued on next page
188
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I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map, Continued
Generic InterBus
Module Identifier
Codes, Continued
Moving Between
Pages
Identifier Code
I/O Type
0501_IOBUS
Five-word discrete output
0502_IOBUS
Five-word discrete input
0503_IOBUS
Five-word discrete bidirectional
0531_IOBUS
Five-word analog output
0532_IOBUS
Five-word analog input
0533_IOBUS
Five-word analog bidirectional
0633_IOBUS
Eight-word analog bidirectional
1233_IOBUS
Sixteen-word analog bidirectional
To move from one I/O Map page to the another, use the <PageUp> and
<PageDown> keys.
z
z
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
<PageDown> opens the next page–e.g., to move from page 1 to page 2
<PageUp> opens the previous page–e.g., to move from page 2 to page 1
189
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Modsoft
190
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Configuring a Modbus Plus
Network in Modsoft with Peer Cop
9
At a Glance
Purpose
Communication transactions over Modbus Plus are defined in Modsoft 2.6 by a
configuration tool called Peer Cop. This section uses examples to explain how to
use Peer Cop to configure the two types of network architecture:
z
z
In This Chapter
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
An I/O network, where the Peer Cop of the CPU defines all the communication
transactions over the full network.
A supervisory network with two or more CPUs communicating with each other
and with additional devices on the network.
This chapter contains the following sections:
For This Topic...
See Section...
Getting Started
1
Using Modbus Plus to Handle I/O
2
Passing Supervisory Data over Modbus Plus
3
191
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Section 9.1
Getting Started
Overview
Purpose
This section explains how to access the Peer Cop Configuration Extension screen
and describes the default screen.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Accessing the Peer Cop Configuration Extension Screen
The Default Peer Cop Screen
192
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Accessing the Peer Cop Configuration Extension Screen
Introduction
Before you can access the Peer Cop Configuration Extension screen, you must
have specified enough extension memory to support your Peer Cop database.
This section describes how to access the screen and, if necessary, adjust the
amount of configuration extension memory.
Accessing the
Screen
Starting from the Configuration Overview screen, select Peer Cop from the Cfg Ext
menu.
Note: If Peer Cop is disabled in the pulldown list, you will need to specify enough
extension memory to support your Peer Cop database before you can continue.
Adjusting
Extension
Memory
Extension memory is specified as a number of 16-bit words. That number is
entered in the ExtSize field of the Configuration Overview screen. Once an
adequate number of words has been specified there, Peer Cop will be enabled in
the Cfg Ext menu.
Extension
Memory Size
The minimum Peer Cop memory requirement is 20 words. The maximum is 1366
words.
Continued on next page
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Accessing the Peer Cop Configuration Extension Screen, Continued
Estimating How
Much Memory to
Reserve
194
Follow these guidelines for estimating the amount of extension memory you will
need for your Peer Cop database:
For...
Add...
Up to a maximum of...
Overhead
9 words
--
Global output
5 words
--
Global input
number of words=
number of devices x
(1 + 2 x number of device subentries)
1088 words
Specific output
2 words for every device entry in Peer Cop
128 words
Specific input
2 words for every device entry in Peer Cop
128 words
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
The Default Peer Cop Screen
Overview
This section describes the Peer Cop screen as it appears the first time you access
it.
Diagram
The first time you click on Peer Cop in the Cfg Ext menu, the following screen
appears:
Description
The Peer Cop screen is divided into two regions by a horizontal rule.
At the top of the screen is a group of Peer Cop summary entries
z
z
z
z
Timeout
ON Error
Total Links
Access to Node
The lower half of the screen displays the Peer Cop reference information, i.e., the
register or discrete references that the CPU uses to handle specific and global
inputs/outputs with other nodes on the network.
The Add Node popup menu appears near the bottom of the screen.
Continued on next page
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
The Default Peer Cop Screen, Continued
Next Step
196
No values are set anywhere in the default Peer Cop screen. The following two
examples show how to set up Peer Cop to configure different types of Modbus Plus
networks.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Section 9.2
Using Modbus Plus to Handle I/O
Overview
Purpose
This section uses an example to explain how to configure a Modbus Plus network
for I/O servicing. In this example, a CPU will control four Momentum I/O modules.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Devices on the Network
Defining the Link and Accessing a Node
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information
Specifying References for Input Data
Accessing the Remaining Devices
Completing the I/O Device Configuration in Peer Cop
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Devices on the Network
Introduction
This section describes the five devices which comprise the sample network and the
strategy used to assign addresses.
The Network
Devices
The following table lists the Modbus Plus address and components of each TSX
Momentum module on the network:
Modbus Plus
Address
I/O Base Type
Adapter Type
1
(type not specified)
M1 Processor Adapter
(type not specified)
172 PNN 210 22
Modbus Plus Option Adapter
Address
Strategy
198
2
170 ADI 340 00
16-point input
170 PNT 110 20
Modbus Plus Communication Adapter
3
170 ADO 340 00
16-point output
170 PNT 110 20
Modbus Plus Communication Adapter
4
170 ADI 350 00
32-point input
170 PNT 110 20
Modbus Plus Communication Adapter
5
170 ADO 350 00
32-point output
170 PNT 110 20
Modbus Plus Communication Adapter
In this type of architecture, assign the lowest network address (1) to the CPU.
When the network initializes, the CPU will be the first device to get the token, and
the token rotation table will be built with respect to the controlling device on the
network.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining the Link and Accessing a Node
Overview
When you reach the default Peer Cop screen, a popup menu asks you to define a
link and access a node.
What Is a Link?
The link is the Modbus Plus network on which the CPU resides.
The only valid link value for a Momentum M1 CPU is 1. An M1 can function only on
one Modbus Plus network–multiple Modbus Plus links are not supported.
What Is a Node?
The node is the Modbus Plus address of one of the I/O devices on the network.
A valid node value in our example is any number in the range 2...5. For our
example, we will first access the170 ADI 340 00 16-point input module at Modbus
Plus address 2.
Note: Address 1, the network address of the CPU itself, is not a valid node to
access since the CPU does not need to access itself over the network.
Continued on next page
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining the Link and Accessing a Node, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to define the link and access a node, using the
popup menu.
Step
Action
1
With the cursor flashing in the Link value field, make sure that the Link value in the
popup is 1. Push <Enter>.
Result: The Link value is set to 1, and the cursor moves to the Node field.
2
Enter the value 2 in the Node field.
Continued on next page
200
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining the Link and Accessing a Node, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
3
Push <Enter>.
Result: The Add Node popup disappears, and the Peer Cop summary information
values are set as follows:
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Confirming the Peer Cop summary information.
201
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information
Overview
Once you have defined the link and accessed a node, the Peer Cop summary
information values assume default settings. This section describes those settings
and how to confirm or change them.
Timeout
The default Timeout is 500 ms.
Timeout is the maximum interval that Modbus Plus on a Peer-Copped device will
remain healthy without communication activity. If this interval is exceeded, the
device will clear its network health bit and will no longer try to communicate via
Modbus Plus.
The timeout interval must be in the range 20 ... 2000ms, and it must be specified as
an increment of 20ms.
For our example, we will change the timeout value to 240ms.
On Error
The default On Error setting is CLEAR.
The On Error setting specifies how the Peer-Copped device will treat the last values
received before a timeout, once Modbus Plus communications have been restored.
One of two settings may be used–CLEAR or HOLD. CLEAR sets all the previously
received values to 0, and HOLD retains the previous values.
For our example, we will change the the setting to HOLD.
Continued on next page
202
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to change the Peer Cop summary information.
Step
Action
1
Push <Tab> to move the cursor to the menu bar at the top of the Peer Cop screen.
2
Move the cursor onto the Timeout command. Push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves into the Timeout field in the Peer Cop summary
information region, and the default value, 500, is cleared.
3
Type the number 240, then push <Enter>.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
4
Now select On Error from the menu bar.
Result: The cursor moves into the On Error field in the Peer Cop summary
information region, and a popup menu appears with two choices listed – CLEAR
and HOLD.
5
Move the cursor onto HOLD and push <Enter>.
Result: The On Error value in the Peer Cop summary information region is set to
HOLD. Your Peer Cop screen should now look like this:
Continued on next page
204
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information, Continued
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Specifying references for input data.
205
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Specifying References for Input Data
Introduction
The Peer Cop screen is now set to access the device at Modbus Plus address 2,
which for this example is a 170 ADI 340 00 16-point input module.
This section explains how to specify the reference for input data from this module.
Device
Requirements
When you use Peer Cop to handle a Modbus Plus I/O architecture, you need to be
aware of the type of I/O you are configuring at each network address. Peer Cop
does not know that the device at address 2 is a discrete 16-point input module.
You need to know that a specific input reference with a length of one word (16 bits)
is required to handle this module.
We will assign a 3x register (300016) as a specific input to the CPU. When the the
170 ADI 340 00 sends input data to the CPU, it will be sent to this register.
Continued on next page
206
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Specifying References for Input Data, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to define the specific input in Peer Cop.
Step Action
1
Move the cursor to the REFERENCE column of the SPECIFIC INPUT field, using the
cursor arrow keys.
2
Type the value 300016 in the REFERENCE column of the SPECIFIC INPUT field,
then push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves into the LEN column of the SPECIFIC INPUT field.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Specifying References for Input Data, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
3
Type the value 1 in the LEN column of the SPECIFIC INPUT field, indicating that the
the device at address 2 will transmit 1 word of data (or 16 bits). Then push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor is now on BIN (binary) the TYPE column.
4
Push <Enter>.
Result: A popup menu appears. You can choose between leaving the data type as
binary or changing it to BCD.
Continued on next page
208
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Specifying References for Input Data, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
5
In this case, we will leave the default BIN setting. Push <Enter>.
Result: The Peer Cop screen is now set to handle a 16-point input module at
Modbus Plus address 2. The screen should like like this:
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Accessing the remaining devices.
209
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Accessing the Remaining Devices
Introduction
The I/O modules at Modbus Plus addresses 3 ... 5 can be configured individually in
a manner similar to that used for the 170 ADI 340 00 module at address 2.
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to access a new device address (in this case,
address 3), using the AddNode command.
Step
Action
1
Push <Tab> to move the cursor to the menu at the top of the Peer Cop screen.
2
Using a left or right arrow key as necessary, move the cursor onto the AddNode
command. Push <Enter>.
Result: The Add Node popup appears over the Peer Cop screen with the cursor
flashing in the Link value field.
3
Make sure that the Link value in the Add Node popup is 1. Push <Enter>.
Result: The Link value is set to 1, and the cursor moves to the Node value field of
the Add Node popup.
Continued on next page
210
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Accessing the Remaining Devices, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
4
Enter the value 3 in the Node field. Push <Enter>.
Result: The Add Node popup disappears, and the Peer Cop summary information
values are set as follows:
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
You are now ready to configure Peer Cop for the device at Modbus Plus address 3,
which for this example is a 170 ADO 340 00 16-point output module.
211
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Completing the I/O Device Configuration in Peer Cop
Introduction
Using the procedures described previously, you can complete the I/O configuration
in Peer Cop. This section shows completed Peer Cop screens for this example.
Register
Assignments
For this example, we have made the following register assignments:
Completed
Screen: Node 2
MB+ Address
Device Type
Register Assignment
2
16-point discrete input
300016
3
16-point discrete output
400016
4
32-point discrete input
300017 and 300018
5
32-point discrete output
400017 and 400018
The completed Peer Cop screen for node 2 should look like this:
Continued on next page
212
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Completing the I/O Device Configuration in Peer Cop, Continued
Completed
Screen: Node 3
The completed Peer Cop screen for node 3 should look like this:
Completed
Screen: Node 4
The completed Peer Cop screen for node 4 should look like this:
Note: The lengths (LEN) for the 32-bit I/O devices at addresses 4 and 5 need to
be specified as 2 words (32 bits).
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Completing the I/O Device Configuration in Peer Cop, Continued
Completed
Screen: Node 5
214
The completed Peer Cop screen for node 5 should look like this:
Note: The lengths (LEN) for the 32-bit I/O devices at addresses 4 and 5 need to
be specified as 2 words (32 bits).
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Section 9.3
Passing Supervisory Data over Modbus Plus
Overview
Purpose
This Peer Cop example deals with a network where three CPUs communicate over
Modbus Plus. Each device needs its own Peer Cop configuration.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Devices on the Network
Configuring a Node to Exchange Data
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information
Specifying References for Input and Output Data
Defining the References for the Next Node
Defining References for the Supervisory Computer
Completing the Configuration
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Devices on the Network
Introduction
This section describes the three CPUs which exchange data over the sample
Modbus Plus network and the strategy used to assign node addresses.
Devices
The three CPUs and their functions are described in the following table:
Address
Strategy
216
MB+ Address
CPU
Function
1
Pentium supervisory computer with
an AT984 host-based PLC card
Receives specific input data
and sends global outputs
2
171 CCS 760 00 TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter with
172 PNN 210 22 Modbus Plus
Option Adapter
Controls I/OBus network
and exchanges data with
AT984 supervisor
3
171 CCS 760 00 TSX Momentum
M1 Processor Adapter with
172 PNN 210 22 Modbus Plus
Option Adapter
Controls I/OBus network
and exchanges data with
AT984 supervisor
In this type of architecture, assign the lowest network address (1) to the
supervisory computer. When the network initializes, the supervisor will be the first
device to get the token, and the token rotation table will be built with respect to the
supervising device.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Configuring a Node to Exchange Data
Getting Started
To Peer Cop this sample configuration, each CPU must be separately programmed
to communicate with the others over Modbus Plus. Begin by connecting your
programming panel to the 171 CCS 760 00 TSX Momentum M1 device at Modbus
Plus address 2. Access the Peer Cop with your Modsoft 2.6 software.
When you reach the default Peer Cop screen, you need to initialize the summary
information region. To do this, define a link value and a node value in the Add Node
popup.
What Is a Link?
The link is the Modbus Plus network on which the CPU resides.
The only valid link value for a Momentum M1 CPU is 1. An M1 can function only on
one Modbus Plus network–multiple Modbus Plus links are not supported.
What Is a Node?
The node is the Modbus Plus address of one of the I/O devices on the network.
For our example, we will first access the AT984 supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus
address 1.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Configuring a Node to Exchange Data, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to define the link and access a node.
Step
Action
1
With the cursor flashing in the Link value field of the Add Node popup, make sure
that the Link value in the popup is 1. Push <Enter>.
Result: The Link value is set to 1, and the cursor moves to the Node value field of
the Add Node popup.
Continued on next page
218
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Configuring a Node to Exchange Data, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
If the value in the Node field is 1, as in our example, press <Enter>.
Otherwise, enter the value 1 in the Node field to indicate that you will access the
CPU at address 1. Then press <Enter>.
Result: The Add Node popup disappears, and the Peer Cop summary information
values are set as follows:
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Confirming the Peer Cop summary information.
219
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Confirming the Peer Cop Summary Information
Overview
Once you have defined the link and accessed a node, the Peer Cop summary
information values assume default settings. This section describes those settings.
Timeout
The default Timeout is 500 ms.
Timeout is the maximum interval that Modbus Plus on a Peer-Copped device will
remain healthy without communication activity. If this interval is exceeded, the
device will clear its network health bit and will no longer try to communicate via
Modbus Plus.
The timeout interval must be in the range 20 ... 2000 ms, and it must be specified
as an increment of 20 ms.
For our example, we will use the default setting.
On Error
The default On Error setting is CLEAR.
The On Error setting specifies how the Peer-Copped device will treat the last values
received before a timeout, once Modbus Plus communications have been restored.
One of two settings may be used–CLEAR or HOLD. CLEAR sets all the previously
received values to 0, and HOLD retains the previous values.
For our example, we will use the default setting.
Next Step
220
Specifying references for input and output data.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Specifying References for Input and Output Data
Overview
We will now set up the 171 CCS 760 00 TSX Momentum M1 CPU at Modbus Plus
address 2. This device will:
z
z
Defining the
Specific Output
send eight 4x registers of specific output to the supervisory computer at
Modbus Plus address 1.
receive five 4x registers of global input from the supervisory computer. These
registers are the first five registers in a 10-register block broadcast by the
supervisor.
The following table describes how to define the specific output in Peer Cop.
Step
Action
1
Move the cursor to the REFERENCE column of the SPECIFIC OUTPUT field with
the cursor arrow keys.
2
In the REFERENCE column of the SPECIFIC OUTPUT field, type the value
400016. Push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves into the LEN column of the SPECIFIC OUTPUT field.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Specifying References for Input and Output Data, Continued
Defining the
Specific Output,
Continued
Step
Action
3
In the LEN column of the SPECIFIC OUTPUT field, type the value 8, indicating that
the the M1 CPU at address 2 will send eight 16-bit words to the supervisory PLC.
Push <Enter>.
Result: The Peer Cop screen should like this:
Continued on next page
222
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Specifying References for Input and Output Data, Continued
Defining the
Global Inputs
Now the M1 needs to be Peer Copped to receive five words of global data from the
supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus address 1. Follow the steps in the table below to
specify the global input references.
Step Action
1
In the REFERENCE column on the first line of the GLOBAL INPUT field, type the
value 400001, the first register in which the CPU will store data. Push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves into the LEN column of the GLOBAL INPUT field.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Specifying References for Input and Output Data, Continued
Defining the
Global Inputs,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Type the value 5 in the LEN column of the GLOBAL INPUT field, indicating that the
CPU will receive five words of global data from the supervisory computer. Push
<Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves into the TYPE column of the GLOBAL INPUT field.
3
The default data format for these words is binary (BIN). This is the desired type for
our example, so push <Enter> twice.
Result: The cursor moves into the INDEX column of the GLOBAL INPUT field.
Continued on next page
224
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Specifying References for Input and Output Data, Continued
Defining the
Global Inputs,
Continued
Step
Action
4
Type the value 1 in the INDEX column of the GLOBAL INPUT field, indicating that
the the M1 CPU at Modbus Plus address 2 will receive the five words of global input
data beginning with word 1. Push <Enter>.
Result: The Peer Cop screen is now set to send eight words of specific output to
the supervisor at Modbus Plus address 1 and receive five words of global data from
the supervisor. The screen should like this:
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Defining the references for the next node.
225
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining the References for the Next Node
Overview
We now want to attach the Modsoft 2.6 programming panel to the 171 CCS 760 00
TSX Momentum M1 CPU at Modbus Plus address 3 and create a similar Peer Cop
for this device to communicate with the supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus address 1.
In this case, we want the M1:
z
z
to send 16 words of specific output to the supervisor.
to receive the last seven words of global input from the supervisor. (Remember
that the supervisor will be transmitting a total of 10 contiguous words of global
data over the network.)
Link and Node
Settings
Make sure that the Link setting is 1 and the Node setting is 1, indicating that this
CPU will be exchanging data with the supervisory computer at address 1.
Defining Specific
Outputs
Follow the steps in the table below to define the specific output in Peer Cop.
Step
Action
1
In the REFERENCE column of the SPECIFIC OUTPUT field, type the value
400024. Push <Enter>.
Continued on next page
226
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining the References for the Next Node, Continued
Defining Specific
Outputs,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Type the value 16 in the LEN column of the SPECIFIC OUTPUT field. Push
<Enter>.
3
With the TYPE column of the SPECIFIC OUTPUT filed set to BIN, push <Enter>
twice.
Result: The Peer Cop screen should like this:
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining the References for the Next Node, Continued
Defining Global
Inputs
Follow the steps in the table below to define the global input data from the
supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus address 1.
Step
Action
1
In the REFERENCE column of the first GLOBAL INPUT field, type the value 400001,
the first register which will be used to store global input data. Push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves to the LEN column.
Continued on next page
228
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining the References for the Next Node, Continued
Defining Global
Inputs, Continued
Step
Action
2
Type the value 7 in the LEN column of the GLOBAL INPUT field to indicate that
seven words will be accepted. Then push <Enter>.
Result: The remaining reference field is filled automatically and the cursor moves to
the TYPE column.
3
With the TYPE column of the SPECIFIC OUTPUT filed set to BIN, push <Enter>
twice.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
229
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining the References for the Next Node, Continued
Defining Global
Inputs, Continued
Step
Action
4
Type the value 4 in the INDEX column of the GLOBAL INPUT field, indicating that
the M1 CPU at Modbus Plus address 3 will receive the seven words of global data
starting with word 4.
Result: The Peer Cop screen is now set to send 16 words of specific output to the
supervisor at Modbus Plus address 1 and to receive seven words of global data
from the supervisor. The screen should like this:
Next Step
230
Defining references for the supervisory computer.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining References for the Supervisory Computer
Overview
At this point, we will attach the Modsoft 2.6 programming panel to the AT984
supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus address 1 and set up two Peer Cop screens to
handle the M1 CPUs at addresses 2 and 3.
We know that the M1 at Modbus Plus address 2 is sending eight words of specific
output to the supervisor and that the M1 at Modbus Plus address 3 is sending 16
words of specific output to the supervisor. The supervisor will receive this data as
specific inputs.
We also know that the supervisor is sending 10 words of global data, parts of which
will be received by both of the M1 CPUs.
Accessing
Node 2
Make sure the Link setting is 1 and the Node setting is 2, indicating that the
supervisory computer will exchange data with the CPU at address 2.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
231
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining References for the Supervisory Computer, Continued
Specifying
References for
Node 2
We know that this M1 CPU sends eight words of specific output to the supervisor
and receive five words of global data from the supervisor.
Follow the steps in the table below to define the registers that the supervisor will
transmit to and receive from the M1 CPU at Modbus Plus address 2.
Step
Action
1
In the REFERENCE column of the SPECIFIC INPUT field, type the value 400001,
the first register which will receive the input. Push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves to the LEN column.
Continued on next page
232
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining References for the Supervisory Computer, Continued
Specifying
References for
Node 2,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Type the value 8 in the LEN column of the SPECIFIC INPUT field to indicate the
number of registers that will be received. Push <Enter>.
Result: The REFERENCE field is completed automatically and the cursor moves
to the TYPE column.
3
With the TYPE column of the SPECIFIC INPUT filed set to BIN, push <Enter>
twice.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
233
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining References for the Supervisory Computer, Continued
Specifying
References for
Node 2,
Continued
Step
Action
4
In the REFERENCE column of the GLOBAL OUTPUT field (at the bottom of the
screen), type 400033, the first register which will be sent. Push <Enter>.
Result: The cursor moves to the LEN column.
5
Type the value 10 in the LEN column of the GLOBAL OUTPUT field to indicate the
number of registers to be sent. Push <Enter>.
Result: The REFERENCE field is completed automatically and the cursor moves to
the TYPE column.
Continued on next page
234
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Defining References for the Supervisory Computer, Continued
Specifying
References for
Node 2,
Continued
Step
Action
6
With the TYPE column of the GLOBAL OUTPUT filed set to BIN, push <Enter>
twice.
Result: The Peer Cop screen should like this:
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Complete the configuration by creating a Peer Cop screen from the supervisor that
accesses node 3 and defines the references for that node.
235
Using Peer Cop with Modsoft
Completing the Configuration
Overview
To complete the configuration of the supervisory computer at Modbus Plus address
1, create a Peer Cop screen that accesses the CPU at address 3 and defines the
references for that CPU.
Accessing
Node 3
Using the AddNode command, create a new Peer Cop screen with a Link setting of
1 and a Node setting of 3.
Specifying
References for
Node 3
We know that this M1 CPU sends 16 words of specific output to the supervisor and
receive seven words of global data from the supervisor. Follow the steps in the
table below to define the registers that the supervisor will transmit to and receive
from the M1 CPU at Modbus Plus address 3.
236
Step
Action
1
In the REFERENCE column of the SPECIFIC INPUT field, type the value 400020,
the first register which will receive the input. Push <Enter>.
2
Type the value 16 in the LEN column of the SPECIFIC INPUT field, indicating the
number of registers that will be received. Push <Enter>.
3
The GLOBAL OUTPUT fields should already be complete, since you filled them out
for node 2. The completed Peer Cop screen should look like this:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Saving to Flash in Modsoft
10
At a Glance
Purpose
You save to Flash so that, in the event of an unexpected loss of power, the
application logic and state RAM values will be preserved.
This section describes how to save the application logic and state RAM values to
Flash using Modsoft 2.6.
In This Chapter
This chapter contains the following topics:
Topics
Preparing to Save to Flash
Saving to Flash
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
237
Saving to Flash in Modsoft
Preparing to Save to Flash
Before You Save
to Flash
Before you can save to Flash in Modsoft, you need to specify how the controller will
react when power is re-established. This section describes three options. The next
section describes how to specify an option.
Three
Parameters
Modsoft will ask you three questions:
Q1 Continue power down Run state? Y/N
Q2 Start PLC after download? Y/N
Q3 Continue? Y/N
Q1 and Q2 define the state of the controller after power is re-established. Q3 simply
initiates a save-to-Flash operation in the controller. Q3 cannot be invoked unless
Q1 and Q2 have been answered Y(es) or N(o).
Three Possible
States
The following table shows you the three states that you may specify for the
controller:
If the Answer Is ...
Then the Controller ...
Q1 = Y
Comes back in the state it was in (Running or Stopped) before
power was lost
Q2 = N
Q1 = N
Comes back Running when power is restored
Q2 = Y
Q1 = N
Comes back Stopped when power is restored
Q2 = N
238
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Saving to Flash in Modsoft
Saving to Flash
Conditions for
Saving to Flash
Save-to-Flash
Procedure
In order to save the application program and state RAM values to Flash:
z
z
The Modsoft panel must be Online
The PLC must be stopped (not solving logic)
Follow the steps below to save to Flash.
Step
Action
1
With the PLC online, go to the Ladder Diagram editor or the Segment Status
Display.
2
From the PlcOps pulldown on the top menu, select Save to Flash.
Result: If the PLC is stopped when you select Save to Flash, the following screen
appears:
3
Answer the first two questions to specify the way you want the PLC to restart after a
power-down.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
239
Saving to Flash in Modsoft
Saving to Flash, Continued
Save-to-Flash
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
4
Type Y in response to question 3.
Result: The PLC will save your application logic and state RAM table to Flash.
When the save is completed, the following system message appears:
240
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Concept
IV
At a Glance
Purpose
This part describes how to configure an M1 CPU, how to I/O map an I/OBus
network, how to configure a Modbus Plus network with Peer Cop and how to save
to Flash using Concept 2.1.
In This Chapter
This part contains the following chapters:
For Information On ...
See Chapter ...
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
9
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept
10
Configuring a Modbus Plus Network in Concept with Peer Cop 11
Saving to Flash with Concept
870 USE 101 00 V.2.1
12
241
Configuring an M1 CPU with
Concept
11
At a Glance
Purpose
In This Chapter
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
This chapter explains how to configure a CPU using Concept 2.1.
Note: Concept 2.1 does not support the following Processor Adapters: the 171
CCC 760 10 and the 171 CCC 780 10. These Processor Adapters will be
supported in Concept 2.2.
This chapter contains the following sections:
For This Topic...
See Section...
Configuring the Processor Adapter
1
Configuring Option Adapter Features
2
Modifying Communication Port Parameters
3
I/O Mapping the Local I/O Points
4
243
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Section 11.1
Configuring the Processor Adapter
Overview
Purpose
This section describes how to configure a TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapter
using Concept 2.1.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter
Default Configuration Parameters
Changing the Range of Discrete and Register References
Changing the Size of the Full Logic Area
Understanding the Number of Segments
Changing the Size of the I/O Map
Establishing Configuration Extension Memory for Peer Cop
244
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter
Introduction
This section describes how to select an M1 Processor Adapter for a new project
using Concept 2.1.
Note: For a full description of Concept, refer to the set of manuals shipped with
the software.
Note: Concept 2.1 does not support the following Processor Adapters: the 171
CCC 760 10and the 171 CCC 780 10. These Processor Adapters will be
supported in Concept 2.2.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
245
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps below to select an M1 Processor Adapter for a new project.
Step
Action
1
From the File menu, select New Project.
Result: A new project is opened and the file name [untitled] appears over
the menu bar.
2
From the Project menu, select Configurator.
Result: The PLC Configuration screen appears.
Continued on next page
246
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
3
From the Configure menu, select PLC Type OR double-click on the Type field in
the dialog box.
Result: The PLC Selection dialog box appears. The default selection is Quantum.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
247
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
4
From the PLC Family dropdown menu, select MOMENTUM.
Result: The CPU/Executive menu changes to reflect the choices available for
Momentum.
Continued on next page
248
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Selecting an M1 Processor Adapter, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
5
Choose your PLC type from the CPU/Executive menu.
Result: The remaining fields are filled with corresponding values.
6
Click the <OK> button.
Result: Your PLC type and default configuration parameters are displayed in the
PLC Configuration screen.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Default Configuration Parameters
Overview
This section describes the default configuration parameters.
Defaults for a
2.4K Machine
This sample PLC Configuration screen shows the default configuration parameters.
Continued on next page
250
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Default Configuration Parameters, Continued
Defaults for a
12.2K Machine
This sample PLC Configuration screen shows the default configuration parameters.
Default Values
Here are the default parameters:
Parameter
For a 2.4K Machine
Coils in state RAM
1536 (0x)
1536 (0x)
Discrete inputs in state RAM
512 (1x)
512 (1x)
Input registers in state RAM
48 (3x)
48 (3x)
Output registers in state RAM 1872 (4x)
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
For a 12.2K Machine
1872 (4x)
Full logic area (in bytes)
1678
11532
Words of user memory space
for the I/O Map
144
144
I/O logic segments
2
2
Memory allocated for
configuration extension
None
None
251
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Range of Discrete and Register References
Introduction
This section provides guidelines and a procedure for changing the range of discrete
(0x and 1x) and register (3x and 4x) references.
Guidelines
When you change the range of discrete and register references, follow these
guidelines:
z
z
z
z
Adjust the range of discretes in increments of 16. Sixteen discretes consume
one word.
Adjust the range of registers in increments of 1. Each register consumes one
word.
The total number of register and discrete references cannot exceed the
maximum of state memory displayed at the top of the dialog.
A minimum configuration of 16 0x discretes, 16 1x discretes, one 3x register,
and one 4x register is required.
Continued on next page
252
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Range of Discrete and Register References, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps below to change the range of discrete and register references,
using the PLC Configuration screen:
Step
Action
1
From the Configure menu, select Memory Partitions OR double-click on any
field in the Ranges section of the dialog box.
Result: The PLC Memory Partition dialog box appears.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
2
Modify the range of your discrete and register references by changing the value
in the variable boxes, in keeping with the guidelines described above.
3
Click the <OK> button.
253
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Size of the Full Logic Area
Introduction
The number shown in the Available Logic Area field in the PLC Configuration
screen indicates the total amount of memory available for your application logic.
You cannot directly enter this field to modify the value. You can, however, change
the amount of memory available by manipulating the size of other fields in the PLC
Configuration screen.
Example 1
For example, if you reduce the expansion size of the I/O Map, the number in the
Available Logic Area field automatically increases. Say you are using a 12.2K
machine and you change the size of the I/O Map from 512 to 256, a decrease of
256 words. The Available Logic Area will automatically increase from 1198 to 1454.
Example 2
Similarly, if you allocate some number of words to the Peer Cop expansion size,
you will reduce the Available Logic Area by the number of words allocated for Peer
Cop.
254
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Understanding the Number of Segments
Only the First
Segment is
Solved
The number of segments specified in the Configuration Overview screen
determines the number of I/O Map drops that you will be able to set up for your
CPU. The default number of segments is 2.
This number is adequate for all processor adapters and does not need to be
changed. However, you should only use the second segment for I/OBus I/O
mapping or other subroutines.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
255
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Size of the I/O Map
Introduction
The default size of the I/O Map is 144 words. You may want to adjust this number
to provide more support for an I/OBus network or to increase the size of the full
logic area.
Processors for
I/OBus Networks
With I/OBus, an I/O Map table is used to define the number, location and type of I/O
devices on the network bus.
All Other
Processors
Default
144 words
Minimum
4 words
Maximum
6143 words
Other Processor Adapters only use the I/O Map for local I/O. The default of 144
words is more than sufficient for any TSX Momentum I/O base. Depending on the
requirements of your I/O base, you may be able to reduce the number of words to
the minimum, 4, in order to increase the Available Logic Area.
Default
144 words
Minimum
4 words
Continued on next page
256
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Size of the I/O Map, Continued
Procedure
From the PLC Configuration screen, follow the steps below to change the size of
the I/O Map:
Step
Action
1
From the Configure menu, select I/O Map.
Result: The I/O Map dialog box appears.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
2
Modify the size of the I/O Map by typing a new value in the Expansion Size field
OR by adjusting the sliding scale.
3
Click the <OK> button.
257
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Establishing Configuration Extension Memory for Peer Cop
Introduction
By default, the Peer Cop capability is disabled. If you want to use Peer Cop to
handle Modbus Plus communications, you need to enable this capability and adjust
the amount of configuration extension memory.
How Much
Memory?
The minimum Peer Cop memory requirement is 20 words; the maximum is 1366
words.
Follow these guidelines for estimating the amount of extension memory you will
need for your Peer Cop database:
For...
Add...
Up to a maximum of...
Overhead
9 words
--
Global output
5 words
--
Global input
number of words=
number of devices x
(1 + 2 x number of device subentries)
1088 words
Specific output
2 words for every device entry in Peer Cop
128 words
Specific input
2 words for every device entry in Peer Cop
128 words
Continued on next page
258
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Establishing Configuration Extension Memory for Peer Cop, Continued
Procedure
From the PLC Configuration screen, follow the steps below to enable Peer Cop and
adjust the amount of Configuration Extension memory:
Step
Action
1
From the Configure menu, select Config extensions OR double-click anywhere
in the Config Extensions region of the screen.
Result: The Configuration Extension dialog box appears.
2
Click the check box next to Peer Cop, then click OK.
Result: Peer Cop status changes from Disabled to Enabled in the PLC
Configuration screen.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
259
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Establishing Configuration Extension Memory for Peer Cop, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
3
From the Configure menu, select Peer Cop.
Result: The Peer Cop dialog box appears.
260
4
Modify the amount of configuration extension memory allocated to Peer Cop by
typing a new value in the Expansion Size field OR by adjusting the sliding scale
next to the field.
5
Click the <OK> button.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Section 11.2
Configuring Option Adapter Features
Overview
Purpose
This section describes how to implement the battery backup and time-of-day (TOD)
clock features of the TSX Momentum Option Adapters using Concept 2.1.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock
Setting the Time
Reading the Time-of-Day Clock
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
261
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil
Introduction
Since the Option Adapter does not have an LED to indicate when the battery is low,
we recommend that you reserve a 0x reference to monitor the health of the battery.
This section describes how to reserve and monitor a battery coil, using the Specials
dialog box in Concept 2.1.
Reserving a
Battery Coil
From the PLC Configuration screen, perform the steps in the following table to
reserve a battery coil.
Step
Action
1
From the Configure menu, select Specials... OR double-click on any field in the
Specials region of the dialog box.
Result: The Specials dialog box appears.
Continued on next page
262
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil, Continued
Reserving a
Battery Coil,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Click the check box next to Battery Coil.
3
Type a number from the range of available 0xxxx references in the box marked Ox.
Example: If you have set the range of 0x's at 000001...001536, you might want to
enter the reference value of the last coil–1536.
4
Click the <OK> button.
Result: The dialog box closes and the register you have specified is displayed on
the PLC Configuration screen.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Reserving and Monitoring a Battery Coil, Continued
Monitoring the
Battery Coil
Monitor the battery coil in ladder logic or tie it to a lamp or alarm that will indicate
when the battery is low.
Interpreting the
Battery Coil
The battery coil will always read either 0 or 1.
264
z
z
A coil state of 0 indicates that the battery is healthy.
A coil state of 1 indicates that the battery should be changed.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock
Overview
Each Option Adapter has a time-of-day clock. To use this feature, you must reserve
a block of eight 4x registers.
This section describes how to reserve those registers, using Concept 2.1.
Reserving
Registers for the
TOD Clock
To reserve registers for the TOD clock, perform the steps in the following table.
Step
Action
1
From the Configure menu, select Specials... OR double-click on any field in the
Specials region of the dialog box.
Result: The Specials dialog box appears.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
265
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock, Continued
Reserving
Registers for the
TOD Clock,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Click the check box next to Time Of Day.
3
Type a number (the first in a series of eight) from the range of available 4xxxx
references in the corresponding field. Observe the maximum register value.
Example: If you want registers 400100 ... 400107 reserved for the TOD clock,
type 100.
4
Click the <OK> button.
Result: The registers you have specified are displayed on the PLC Configuration
screen.
Continued on next page
266
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Setting up the Time-of-Day Clock, Continued
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Setting the time.
267
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Setting the Time
Overview
Setting the
Status Bits
Once you have reserved a block of registers for the time-of-day clock, you have to
set the correct time. With Concept, you must go online and set the register bits
individually, using the following guidelines for setting the status bits and setting the
time bits. The CPU must be running.
Note: The time-of-day clock complies with guidelines for the year 2000.
The control register (4x) uses its four most significant bits to report status:
Control Register
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
1 = error
1 = All clock values have been set
1 = Clock values are being read
1 = Clock values are being set
Setting the Time
Bits
268
The following table shows how the registers handle time-of-day clock data, where
register 4x is the first register in the block reserved for the clock:
Register
Data Content
4x
The control register
4x + 1
Day of the week (Sunday = 1, Monday = 2, etc.)
4x + 2
Month of the year (Jan = 1, Feb = 2, etc.)
4x + 3
Day of the month (1...31)
4x + 4
Year (00...99)
4x + 5
Hour in military time (0...23)
4x + 6
Minute (0...59)
4x + 7
Second (0...59)
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Reading the Time-of-Day Clock
Overview
This section uses an example to describe how to interpret the time-of-day clock
registers.
Example
If you reserved registers 400100...400107 as your TOD clock registers, set the time
bits, and then read the clock at 9:25:30 on Thursday, July 16, 1998, the registers
would display the following values:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Register
Reading
Indication
400100
0110000000000000
All clock values have been set;
clock values are being read
400101
5 (decimal)
Thursday
400102
7 (decimal)
July
400103
16 (decimal)
16
400104
98 (decimal)
1998
400105
9 (decimal)
9 a.m.
40010 6
25 (decimal)
25 minutes
40010 7
30 (decimal)
30 seconds
269
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Section 11.3
Modifying Communication Port Parameters
Overview
Purpose
The communication parameters on the Modbus ports are set at the factory. This
section describes how to access the Modbus Port Settings dialog box and edit the
default parameters.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Accessing the Modbus Port Settings Dialog Box
Changing the Baud Rate
Changing Mode and Data Bits
Stop Bit Should Not Be Changed
Changing Parity
Changing the Delay
Changing the Modbus Address
Changing the Protocol on Modbus Port 2
270
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Accessing the Modbus Port Settings Dialog Box
Introduction
Modbus port parameters can be modified using the Modbus Port Settings dialog
box in Concept 2.1.
How to Get There
From the Configure menu, select Modbus port settings... .
Modbus Port
Default Settings
If you have not previously modified any port parameters, the following dialog box
will appear. The dialog box shows the default parameters for two Modbus ports, 1
and 2.
If you have previously modified any communication port parameters, the new
values will appear in the dialog box.
Two Sets of
Parameters
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
This dialog box will always show two sets of port parameters, even if your particular
CPU configuration supports only Modbus Port 1. In that case, ignore any
parameter values shown for Port 2.
271
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Baud Rate
Overview
Each port can be configured for a baud in the range 50 ... 19,200. Sixteen valid
baud rates are user-selectable. The factory-set default is 9600 baud.
Procedure
To change the baud parameter, perform the steps in the following table.
Step
Action
1
Click on the down arrow under the Baud heading.
Result: A menu appears displaying 16 baud values.
2
Click on the desired rate.
Result: The Modbus Port Settings dialog box is updated with the Baud number you
have specified.
272
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing Mode and Data Bits
Introduction
Procedure
From the Modbus Port Settings dialog box, each port can be configured to operate
in one of two possible modes – RTU or ASCII.
z
z
If the mode is RTU, the number of data bits is always 8.
If the mode is ASCII, the number of data bits is always 7.
Note: The factory-set default is 8-bit RTU.
To change the mode and data bit parameters, perform the steps in the following
table.
Step
Action
1
Click on the down arrow under Mode.
Result: A menu appears displaying your two Mode options.
2
Click on the RTU or ASCII entry.
Result: The Ports setting Window is updated with the Mode type you have
specified, the corresponding Data Bit value appears.
Example: If you change Modbus Port 1 from RTU mode to ASCII mode, the Data
Bit value also automatically changes from 8 to 7.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
273
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Stop Bit Should Not Be Changed
One Stop Bit
Each port operates with 1 stop bit. While Concept will allow you to select 2 stop
bits, this setting is invalid.
Changing Parity
Introduction
From the Modbus Port Setting screen, a port can be configured for even, odd, or no
parity checking. The factory-set default is EVEN parity.
Procedure
To change the parity parameter, perform the steps in the following table:
Step
Action
1
Click on the down arrow under the Parity heading.
Result: A menu appears with the three Parity choices.
2
Click on the None, Odd or Even entry.
Result: The Modbus Port Settings dialog box is updated with the Parity type you
have specified.
274
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Delay
Overview
The Delay parameter is set to 10 ms and should be left at this value for most
applications. Do not change this parameter unless your application demands it.
If you must change this parameter, you may select a value from 10 ... 1000 ms, in
10 ms increments.
Procedure
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Follow the steps in the table below to change the delay:
Step
Action
1
Click on the Delay parameter for the port.
2
Type a new value in the range 10 ... 1000 ms, using increments of 10 ms.
275
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Modbus Address
Overview
Each port can be assigned a Modbus network address in the range 1 ... 247. That
address must be unique with respect to all other device addresses on the same
Modbus networks.
Since Modbus port 1 and Modbus port 2 are always on different Modbus networks,
they can both be assigned the same address value without conflict. The factory-set
default for both ports is address 1.
Procedure
276
From the Modbus Port Settings dialog box, perform the steps in the following table
to change the Modbus Address:
Step
Address
1
Click on the Address field for the appropriate Modbus port.
2
Type a new value in the range 1 ... 247.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Changing the Protocol on Modbus Port 2
Overview
Procedure
If your TSX Momentum M1 CPU is using the Modbus Port 2 provided by the 172
JNN 210 32 Option Adapter, you can specify whether it will use the RS232 or
RS485 protocol. The factory-set default for Modbus Port 2 is RS232.
Note: If you are using the Modbus Port 2 provided on the 171 CCS 780 00
Processor Adapter, the port is hardwired as a dedicated RS485 protocol. You must
change the default setting on the Port editor screen from RS232 to RS485, or the
port will not function correctly.
From the Modbus Port Settings dialog box, perform the steps in the following table
to change the Protocol on Modbus Port 2.
Step
Action
1
Click on the down arrow under the Protocol heading.
Result: A menu appears with the two protocol options.
2
Click on RS232 or RS485.
Result: The Modbus Port Settings dialog box is updated with the protocol you have
specified.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
277
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Section 11.4
I/O Mapping the Local I/O Points
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map
Introduction
Every M1 Processor Adapter is assembled on an I/O base. The I/O points on the
base are the local I/O for that processor.
As part of the configuration process, you need to create an I/O Map for the local
I/O. The I/O Map assigns the appropriate range and type of (0x, 1x, 3x, or 4x)
reference values from the CPU's state RAM to the input and/or output points on the
local base unit.
Accessing an I/O
Map Screen
To access an I/O Map screen from the PLC Configuration screen, select I/O map...
from the Configure menu.
Result: The I/O Map dialog box appears.
Continued on next page
278
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Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map, Continued
Editing the Local
I/O Map
From the I/O Map dialog box, perform the steps in the following table to edit the
local I/O Map:
Step
Action
1
Click the Edit... button at the end of the row.
Result: The Local Momentum I/O dialog box appears.
2
Click the button under Module and select your local I/O base from the dropdown
menu.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
279
Configuring an M1 CPU with Concept
Accessing and Editing the I/O Map, Continued
Editing the Local
I/O Map,
Continued
Step
Action
3
Double-click on your selection or click the <OK> button.
Result: The I/O base you selected is displayed in the Local Momentum Drop
dialog box.
4
Complete any required fields for Input and Output References.
5
Click the <OK> button.
Local I/O Only
This screen is always used to I/O Map the local I/O base only. No other I/O base
units can be I/O Mapped on this first screen.
I/O Bus: A
Special Case
If you are I/O Mapping a Processor Adapter which supports I/OBus communication
stations, you will need to go to a separate I/O Map screen for Drop 2. That process
is described in I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept.
280
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network
with Concept
12
At a Glance
Purpose
This chapter describes how to I/O Map an I/OBus network using Concept 2.1.
Topics
This chapter contains the following topics:
Topics
Supporting an I/O Map for an I/OBus Network
Accessing an I/O Map Screen for an I/OBus Network
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
281
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept
Supporting an I/O Map for an I/OBus Network
Introduction
The 171 CCS 760 00 Processor Adapter has an I/OBus communication port that
enables it to control and communicate with other network slave I/O.
If you are using I/OBus to control network I/O, you need to write an I/O Map in your
configuration. This section describes the configuration parameters required to
support an I/O Map for I/OBus.
I/O Map
Reserved Words
Note: Concept 2.1 does not support the 171 CCC 760 10 Processor Adapter.
This Processor Adapter will be supported in Concept 2.2.
Make sure that you have reserved enough words for I/O mapping to support your
I/OBus network. The default setting is 144 words. To estimate the number of
words you require, allow:
z
z
16 words for overhead
10 words/module on the network (including both the local and the network I/O)
Allot sufficient memory to completely I/O Map your network, while preserving as
much user memory as possible for your application program.
Number of
Segments
Make sure that the number of segments is set to 2, the default setting. If you have
changed this setting to 1, you will not be able to support an I/OBus network.
Next Step
Once you have made sure that your Configuration Overview parameters are set
properly, you can access an I/O Map screen for an I/OBus network.
282
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I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept
Accessing an I/O Map Screen for an I/OBus Network
Overview
This section describes how to access an I/O Map screen for an I/OBus network
using Concept 2.1.
Procedure
To access the I/O Map screen for your I/OBus network, perform the steps in the
following table.
Step
Action
1
From the Configure menu, select I/OMap.
Result: The I/O Map dialog is displayed.
2
Click on the Insert button.
Result: I/OBus is displayed as the Type for Drop 2.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
283
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept
Accessing an I/O Map Screen for an I/OBus Network, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
3
Click the Edit... button on the I/OBus line of the I/O Map dialog.
Result: The Remote I/O Bus Drop dialog appears.
Next Step
284
Editing the I/OBus I/O map.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map
Overview
Procedure
The maximum number of modules which can be I/O Mapped on the I/OBus network
depends on your Processor Adapter and its executive:
Processor Adapter
Executive
Max. Modules
Max. I/O Bits
171 CCS 760 00
984
128
2048
171 CCS 760 00
IEC
44
1408
Note: Concept 2.1 does not support the 171 CCC 760 10 Processor Adapter.
This Processor Adapter will be supported in Concept 2.2.
To enter I/O bases or Interbus I/O modules using the Remote I/OBus Drop dialog,
perform the steps in the following table.
Step
Action
1
Click on the button under the Module heading.
Result: A list of module types is displayed, including I/OBus modules identified by
code number (a list of codes is provided at the end of this section):
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
285
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Click on the desired model number and then click the <OK> button.
Result: The module type and its description are displayed on the Remote I/O Bus
Drop screen. The proper field is enabled so that you can assign state RAM
reference(s) to the unit.
Generic InterBus
Module Identifier
Codes
3
Enter the desired reference number. Where there is more than one register the
balance is automatically assigned.
4
Continue to select and map modules one after the other. You must enter the
modules in contiguous node slots on the screen, e.g. you cannot enter a module in
slot 7 if you have not filled slot 6.
InterBus device manufacturers embed an identifier code in their network slave
modules in conformance with InterBus standards. The code identifies a device by
its I/O type but not its specific model or name.
I/OBus recognizes the InterBus identifier codes provided below and allows you to
I/O Map devices that use these codes. However, you cannot use the module zoom
screens to define the parameters for these InterBus modules.
Identifier Code
I/O Type
IOBUS-0101
One-word discrete output
IOBUS-0102
One-word discrete input
IOBUS-0103
One-word bidirectional
IOBUS-0201
Two-word discrete output
IOBUS-0202
Two-word input
IOBUS-0203
Two-word bidirectional
IOBUS-0231
Two-word analog output
IOBUS-0232
Two-word analog input
IOBUS-0233
Two-word analog bidirectional
Continued on next page
286
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I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept
Editing the I/OBus I/O Map, Continued
Generic InterBus
Module Identifier
Codes, Continued
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Identifier Code
I/O Type
IOBUS-0301
Three-word discrete output
IOBUS-0302
Three- word input
IOBUS-0303
Three-word bidirectional
IOBUS-0331
Three-word analog output
IOBUS-0332
Three-word analog input
IOBUS-0333
Three-word analog bidirectional
IOBUS-0401
Four-word discrete output
IOBUS-0402
Four-word input
IOBUS-0403
Four-word bidirectional
IOBUS-0431
Four-word analog output
IOBUS-0432
Four-word analog input
IOBUS-0433
Four-word analog bidirectional
IOBUS-0501
Five-word discrete output
IOBUS-0502
Five-word input
IOBUS-0503
Five-word bidirectional
IOBUS-0531
Five-word analog output
IOBUS-0532
Five-word analog input
IOBUS-0533
Five-word analog bidirectional
IOBUS-0633
Eight-word analog bidirectional
IOBUS-1233
16-word analog bidirectional
287
I/O Mapping an I/OBus Network with Concept
288
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Configuring a Modbus Plus
Network in Concept with Peer Cop
13
At a Glance
Purpose
Communication transactions over Modbus Plus are defined in Concept 2.1 by a
configuration tool called Peer Cop. This section uses examples to explain how to
use Peer Cop to configure the two types of network architecture:
z
z
In This Chapter
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
An I/O network, where the Peer Cop of the CPU defines all the communication
transactions over the full network.
A supervisory network with two or more CPUs communicating with each other
and with additional devices on the network.
This chapter contains the following sections:
For This Topic...
See Section...
Getting Started
1
Using Modbus Plus to Handle I/O
2
Passing Supervisory Data over Modbus Plus
3
289
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Section 13.1
Getting Started
Overview
Purpose
This section explains how to access the Peer Cop Configuration Extension screen
and describes the default screen.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Accessing the Peer Cop Dialog Box
Adjusting the Amount of Extension Memory
Other Default Settings in the Peer Cop Dialog Box
290
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Accessing the Peer Cop Dialog Box
Introduction
This section describes how to access the Peer Cop dialog box in Concept 2.1.
Accessing the
Screen
Follow the steps below to access the Peer Cop from the PLC Configuration Screen.
Step
Action
1
Check the status of Peer Cop.
z
z
If Peer Cop is enabled, jump to step 4.
If Peer Cop is disabled, continue with step 2.
Example: The Peer Cop status is reported in the Configuration Extensions
section of the PLC Configuration Screen. Here Peer Cop is disabled:
2
Double-click on the Peer Cop field.
Result: The Configuration Extension dialog box appears.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
291
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Accessing the Peer Cop Dialog Box, Continued
Accessing the
Screen,
Continued
Step
Action
3
Click the check box next to Peer Cop, then click OK.
Result: Peer Cop status changes from Disabled to Enabled in the PLC
Configuration screen.
4
Select Peer Cop from the Configure menu.
Result: The Peer Cop dialog box appears.
292
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Adjusting the Amount of Extension Memory
Introduction
The default amount of memory allotted for Configuration Extension is 100 words.
This amount may be adjusted within the Peer Cop dialog box.
Extension
Memory Size
The minimum Peer Cop memory requirement is 20 words; the maximum is 4041
words.
Estimating How
Much Memory to
Reserve
Follow these guidelines for estimating the amount of extension memory you will
need for your Peer Cop database::
For...
Changing the
Amount of
Memory
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Add...
Up to a maximum of...
Overhead
9 words
--
Global output
5 words
--
Global input
number of words=
number of devices x
(1 + 2 x number of device subentries)
1088 words
Specific output
2 words for every device entry in Peer Cop
128 words
Specific input
2 words for every device entry in Peer Cop
128 words
Type the desired size in the Expansion Size text box or use your mouse to adjust
the button on the horizontal slider.
293
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Other Default Settings in the Peer Cop Dialog Box
Overview
This section describes the default settings for Health Timeout and Last Value.
Diagram
The first time you access the Peer Cop dialog box, the following screen appears:
Health Timeout
The default Timeout is 500 ms.
Timeout is the maximum interval that Modbus Plus on a Peer-Copped device will
remain healthy without communication activity. If this interval is exceeded, the
device will clear its network health bit and will no longer try to communicate via
Modbus Plus.
The timeout interval must be in the range 20...2000 ms, and it must be specified as
an increment of 20 ms.
Continued on next page
294
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Other Default Settings in the Peer Cop Dialog Box, Continued
Last Value
The default Last Value setting is Clear on timeout. This setting specifies how
a peer-copped device will treat the last values received before a timeout, once
Modbus Plus communications have been restored.
Option
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Effect
Clear on timeout
Sets all values received before timeout to 0.
Hold on timeout
Retains the values received before timeout.
295
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Section 13.2
Using Modbus Plus to Handle I/O
Overview
Purpose
This section uses an example to explain how to configure a Modbus Plus network
for I/O servicing. In this example, a CPU will control four Momentum I/O modules.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Devices on the Network
Changing the Peer Cop Summary Information
Specifying References for Input Data
Specifying References for Output Data
296
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Devices on the Network
Introduction
This section describes the five devices which comprise the sample network and the
strategy used to assign addresses.
The Network
Devices
The following table lists the Modbus Plus address and components of each TSX
Momentum module on the network:
Modbus Plus
Address
I/O Base Type
Adapter Type
1
(type not specified)
M1 Processor Adapter
(type not specified)
172 PNN 210 22
Modbus Plus Option Adapter
Address
Strategy
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
2
170 ADI 340 00
16-point input
170 PNT 110 20
Modbus Plus Communication Adapter
3
170 ADO 340 00
16-point output
170 PNT 110 20
Modbus Plus Communication Adapter
4
170 ADI 350 00
32-point input
170 PNT 110 20
Modbus Plus Communication Adapter
5
170 ADO 350 00
32-point output
170 PNT 110 20
Modbus Plus Communication Adapter
In this type of architecture, assign the lowest network address (1) to the CPU.
When the network initializes, the CPU will be the first device to get the token, and
the token rotation table will be built with respect to the controlling device on the
network.
297
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Changing the Peer Cop Summary Information
Overview
For our example, we will change the default Health Timeout setting to 240 ms and
the default Last Value setting to Hold on timeout.
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to change the default values, using the Peer Cop
dialog box.
Step
Action
1
Click the Hold on Timeout radio button.
Result: The Hold on Timeout option is selected and the Clear on Timeout option
is deselected.
Continued on next page
298
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Changing the Peer Cop Summary Information, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Select the Health Timeout default value (500) with your mouse and type the new
value (240) in its place OR use the horizontal slider to change the value.
Result: The new Health Timeout value is 240.
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Specifying references for input data.
299
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Input Data
Introduction
This section describes how to specify the references for input data. In this
example, you will start by accessing the device at Modbus Plus address 2, which is
a 170 ADI 340 00 16-point input module.
Device
Requirements
When you use Peer Cop to handle a Modbus Plus I/O architecture, you need to be
aware of the type of I/O you are configuring at each network address. Peer Cop
does not know that the device at address 2 is a discrete 16-point input module. You
need to know that a specific input reference with a length of one word (16 bits) is
required to handle this module.
We will assign a 3x register (300016) as a specific input to the CPU. When the the
170 ADI 340 00 sends input data to the CPU, it will be sent to this register.
Continued on next page
300
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Input Data, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to define the specific input, starting from the
Peer Cop dialog box.
Step
Action
1
Click on the Specific Input... button.
Result: The Specific Input dialog box appears.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
301
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Input Data, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Since you are addressing the device at address 2, you will use the line for Source
2. Type the value 300016 on that line in the Dest. Ref. column.
3
Type the value 1 in the Length column, indicating that the device at address 2 will
exchange one word of data. In this case, we will leave the default BIN setting.
Continued on next page
302
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Input Data, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Step
Action
4
Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the device at address 4, using the settings in the figure
below. Then click <OK>.
Specifying output references.
303
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Output Data
Introduction
This section describes how to specify the references for output data. In this
example, you will start by accessing the device at Modbus Plus address 3, which is
a 170 AD0 340 00 16-point output module.
Device
Requirements
When you use Peer Cop to handle a Modbus Plus I/O architecture, you need to
know which type of I/O you are configuring at each network address and how many
input or output references each device requires. In this example, we will create a
specific output reference with a length of one word (16 bits).
We also will assign a 4x register (400016) as a specific input to the CPU. When the
the 170 ADO 340 00 sends input data to the CPU, it will be sent to this register.
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to define the specific output.
Step
Action
1
Click on the Specific Output... button in the Peer Cop dialog box.
Result: The Specific Output dialog box appears.
Continued on next page
304
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Output Data, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Since you are addressing the device at address 3, you will use the line for
Source 3. Type the value 400016 on that line in the Dest. Ref. column.
3
Type the value 1 in the Length column, indicating that the device at address 3
will supply one word of data. In this case, we will leave the default BIN setting.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
305
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Output Data, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
306
Step
Action
4
Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the device at address 5, using the settings in the
figure below. Then click <OK>.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Section 13.3
Passing Supervisory Data over Modbus Plus
Overview
Purpose
This Peer Cop example deals with a network where three CPUs communicate over
Modbus Plus. Each device will need to have its own Peer Cop configuration.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Devices on the Network
Specifying References for Input and Output Data
Defining the References for the Next Node
Defining References for the Supervisory PLC
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
307
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Devices on the Network
Introduction
This section describes the three CPUs which exchange data over the sample
Modbus Plus network and the strategy used to assign node addresses.
Devices
The three CPUs and their functions are described in the following table:
Address
Strategy
308
MB+ Address
CPU
Function
1
Pentium supervisory computer with an
ATRIUM 180-CCO-111-01 host-based
PLC card
Receives specific input data
and sends global outputs
2
171 CCS 760 00 TSX Momentum M1
Processor Adapter with
172 PNN 210 22 Modbus Plus Option
Adapter
Controls I/OBus network
and exchanges data with
ATRIUM supervisor
3
171 CCS 760 00 TSX Momentum M1
Processor Adapter with
172 PNN 210 22 Modbus Plus Option
Adapter
Controls I/OBus network
and exchanges data with
ATRIUM supervisor
In this type of architecture, assign the lowest network address (1) to the
supervisory computer. When the network initializes, the supervisor will be the first
device to get the token, and the token rotation table will be built with respect to the
supervising device.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Input and Output Data
Overview
We will now set up the 171 CCS 760 00 TSX Momentum M1 CPU at Modbus Plus
address 2 to:
z
z
Defining the
Specific Output
send eight 4x registers of specific output to the supervisory computer at
Modbus Plus address 1.
receive five 4x registers of global input data from the ATRIUM supervisor.
These registers are the first five registers in a 10-register block of global
outputs broadcast by the supervisory controller.
Note: For this example, we will use the default values for Health Timeout (500 ms)
and Last Value (Clear on timeout).
The following table describes how to define the specific output, starting from the
Peer Cop dialog box.
Step
Action
1
Click on the Specific Output... button.
Result: The Specific Output dialog box appears.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
309
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Input and Output Data, Continued
Defining the
Specific Output,
Continued
Step
Action
2
Since you are addressing the device at address 1, you will use the line for Source
1. Type the value 400023 on that line in the Dest. Ref. column.
3
Type the value 8 in the Length column, indicating that 8 words of data will be
exchanged. In this case, we will leave the default BIN setting. Click <OK>.
Continued on next page
310
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Input and Output Data, Continued
Defining the
Global Inputs
Now the M1 needs to be Peer Copped to receive five words of global data from the
supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus address 1. Follow the steps in the table specify
the input reference.
Step
Action
1
Click on the Global Input... button.
Result: The Global Input dialog box appears.
2
Since this device will be receiving data from the CPU at address 1, you do not
need to change the default sending address (selected under the heading 1-64).
Type 400001 in the Dest. Ref column on the first line, to indicate the first register
the CPU will use to store the input data..
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
311
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Specifying References for Input and Output Data, Continued
Defining the
Global Inputs,
Continued
Next Step
312
Step
Action
3
Type the value 1 in the Index column, indicating that the CPU will receive part of
the global input data beginning with the first word.
4
Type the value 5 in the Length column, indicating that the CPU will accept five
words of the global input data. Leave the default BIN setting.
5
Click <OK>.
Defining the references for the next node.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Defining the References for the Next Node
Overview
We now want to attach the Concept 2.1 programming panel to the 171 CCS 760 00
TSX Momentum M1 CPU at Modbus Plus address 3 and create a similar Peer Cop
for this device to communicate with the supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus address 1.
In this case, we want the M1:
z
z
to send 16 words of specific output to the supervisor.
to receive the last seven words of global input from the supervisor. (Remember
that the supervisor will be transmitting a total of 10 contiguous words of global
data over the network.)
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
313
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Defining the References for the Next Node, Continued
Defining Specific
Outputs
Follow the steps in the table below to define the specific output in Peer Cop.
Step
Action
1
Click on the Specific Output... button.
Result: The Specific Output dialog box appears.
2
Since you are addressing the device at address 1, you will use the line for Source
1. Type the value 400024 on that line in the Dest. Ref. column.
3
Type the value 16 in the Length column, indicating that 16 words of data will be
exchanged. In this case, we will leave the default BIN setting.
4
Click <OK>.
Continued on next page
314
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Defining the References for the Next Node, Continued
Defining Global
Inputs
Follow the steps in the table below to define the global input data from the
supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus address 1.
Step
Action
1
Click on the Global Input... button.
Result: The Global Input dialog box appears.
Next Step
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
2
Since this device will be receiving data from the CPU at address 1, you do not
need to change the default sending address (selected under the heading 1-64).
Type 400001 in the Dest. Ref column on the first line, to indicate the first register
the CPU will use to store the input data.
3
Type the value 4 in the Index column, indicating that the CPU will receive part of
the global input data beginning with the fourth word.
4
Type the value 7 in the Length column, indicating that the CPU will accept seven
words of the global input data. Leave the default BIN setting.
5
Click <OK>.
Defining references for the supervisory PLC.
315
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Defining References for the Supervisory PLC
Overview
At this point, we will attach the Concept 2.1 programming panel to the
ATRIUM 180-CCO-111-01 supervisory PLC at Modbus Plus address 1 and set up
Peer Cop screens to handle the M1 CPUs at addresses 2 and 3.
We know that the M1 at Modbus Plus address 2 is sending eight words of specific
output to the supervisor and that the M1 at Modbus Plus address 3 is sending 16
words of specific output to the supervisor. The supervisor will receive this data as
specific inputs.
We also know that the supervisor is sending 10 words of global data, parts of which
will be received by both of the M1 CPUs.
Defining the
Specific Inputs
First we will define the specific inputs to be received by the supervisor.
Step
Action
1
Click on the Specific Input... button.
Result: The Specific Input dialog box appears.
2
Enter the references for each CPU on the appropriate source line, as shown below.
Then click <OK>.
Continued on next page
316
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Using Peer Cop with Concept
Defining References for the Supervisory PLC, Continued
Defining the
Global Outputs
This supervisory CPU sends out 10 words of global output, parts of which are
received by each of the M1 CPUs.
Step
Action
1
Click on the Global Output... button.
Result: The Global Output dialog box appears.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
2
In the Source Ref. column, type the value 400033, the first register which will be
sent.
3
In the Length column, type the value 10, the number of registers that will be sent.
4
Click <OK>.
317
Using Peer Cop with Concept
318
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Saving to Flash with Concept
14
Saving to Flash
Overview
You save to Flash so that, in the event of an unexpected loss of power, the
application logic and state RAM values will be preserved.
This section describes how to save the application logic and state RAM values to
Flash using Concept 2.1.
Note: You may only save to Flash if you are using the Concept 984 executive. You
cannot save to Flash if you are using the Concept IEC executive.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
319
Saving to Flash with Concept
Saving to Flash, Continued
Procedure
Follow the steps in the table below to save to Flash:
Step
Action
1
From the Online menu on the main menu bar, select Connect.
Result: The Connect to PLC dialog box appears.
2
Select the correct parameters to connect with your PLC. Under Access Level,
select the radio button to Change Configuration.
3
Click <OK>.
Result: The Connect to PLC dialog box disappears and Concept connects to
your PLC.
Continued on next page
320
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Saving to Flash with Concept
Saving to Flash, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
4
From the Online menu on the main menu bar, select Online control panel.
Result: The Online Control Panel appears.
5
Click the Flash program... button.
Result: The Save to Flash dialog box appears.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
321
Saving to Flash with Concept
Saving to Flash, Continued
Procedure,
Continued
Step
Action
6
Select the appropriate parameters in the dialog box and click the Save to
Flash button.
Result: A dialog box will appear asking if you really want to save to Flash.
7
Click the Yes button.
Result: Concept completes the save to Flash and a message appears on the
screen confirming the completed save.
322
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Appendices
At a Glance
Purpose
This part provides supplemental information on Ladder Logic elements and
instructions, LED flash patterns and error codes, and the TIO Power Supply
module.
In This Chapter
This part contains the following chapters:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.1
For Information On ...
See Appendix...
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
A
Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes
B
TIO Power Supply Module
C
323
Ladder Logic Elements and
Instructions
A
At a Glance
Overview
The executive firmware for the TSX Momentum M1 Processor Adapters supports
the ladder logic programming language for control applications. The following core
set of ladder logic elements (contacts, coils, vertical and horizontal shorts) and
instructions are built into the CPU's firmware package. For a detailed description of
all instructions, see the Ladder Logic Block Library User Guide (840 USE 101 00).
In This Appendix
This appendix contains the following topics:
Topics
Standard Ladder Logic Elements
DX Loadable Support
A Special STAT Instruction
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
325
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
Standard Ladder Logic Elements
Introduction
This section provides a glossary of standard ladder logic symbols and instructions.
Ladder Logic
Symbols
The table below provides the meaning of standard ladder logic symbols.
Symbol
Meaning
Nodes Consumed
Normally open (N.O.) contact
1
Normally closed (N.C.) contact
1
Positive transitional (P.T.) contact
1
Negative transitional (N.T.) contact
1
Normal coil
1
Memory-retentive or latched coil; the
two symbols mean the same thing, and
the user may select the preferred
version for online display.
1
Horizontal short
1
Vertical short
0
Continued on next page
326
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
Standard Ladder Logic Elements, Continued
Standard Ladder
Logic
Instructions
The table below provides standard ladder logic instructions and their meaning.
Symbol
Meaning
Nodes Consumed
Counter and Timer Instructions
UCTR
Counts up from 0 to a preset value
2
DCTR
Counts down from a preset value to 0
2
T1.0
Timer that increments in seconds
2
T0.1
Timer that increments in tenths of a second
2
T.01
Timer that increments in hundredths of a second
2
T1MS
A timer that increments in milliseconds
3
Integer Math Instructions
ADD
Adds top node value to middle node value
3
SUB
Subtracts middle node value from top node value
3
MUL
Multiplies top node value by middle node value
3
DIV
Divides top node value by middle node value
3
DX Move Instructions
R∀T
Moves register values to a table
3
T∀R
Moves specified table values to a register
3
T∀T
Moves a specified set of values from one table to
another table
3
BLKM
Moves a specified block of data
3
FIN
Specifies first-entry in a FIFO queue
3
FOUT
Specifies first-entry out of a FIFO queue
3
SRCH
Performs a table search
3
STAT
CROSS REF
1
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
327
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
Standard Ladder Logic Elements, Continued
Standard Ladder
Logic
Instructions,
Continued
Symbol
Meaning
Nodes Consumed
DX Matrix Instructions
AND
Logically ANDs two matrices
3
OR
Does logical inclusive OR of two matrices
3
XOR
Does logical exclusive OR of two matrices
3
COMP
Performs logical complement of values in a matrix
3
CMPR
Logically compares values in two matrices
3
MBIT
Logical bit modify
3
SENS
Logical bit sense
3
BROT
Logical bit rotate
3
AD16
Signed/unsigned 16-bit addition
3
SU16
Signed/unsigned 16-bit subtraction
3
TEST
Compares the magnitudes of the values in the top and 3
middle nodes
MU16
Signed/unsigned 16-bit multiplication
3
DV16
Signed/unsigned 16-bit division
3
ITOF
Signed/unsigned integer-to-floating point conversion
3
FTOI
Floating point-to-signed/unsigned integer conversion
3
EMTH
Performs 38 math operations, including floating point
math operations and extra integer math operations
such as square root
3
Ladder Logic Subroutine Instructions
JSR
Jumps from scheduled logic scan to a ladder logic
subroutine
2
LAB
Labels the entry point of a ladder logic subroutine
1
RET
Returns from the subroutine to scheduled logic
1
Continued on next page
328
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
Standard Ladder Logic Elements, Continued
Standard Ladder
Logic
Instructions,
Continued
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Symbol
Meaning
Nodes Consumed
Other Special Purpose Instructions
CKSM
Calculates any of four types of checksum
operations (CRC-16, LRC, straight CKSM,
and binary add)
3
MSTR
Specifies a function from a menu of
networking operations
3
PID2
Performs proportional-integral-derivative
calculations for closed-loop control
3
TBLK
Moves a block of data from a table to
another specified block area
3
BLKT
Moves a block of registers to specified
locations in a table
3
XMIT
Allows CPU to act as a Modbus master
3
329
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
DX Loadable Support
Introduction
The M1 CPUs can use DX loadable instructions, which support optional software
products that can be purchased for special applications. DX loadables provide the
user with special ladder logic functions.
Loaded on
Page 0
The code for DX loadables gets loaded into the Page 0 area. Thus, for every word
of DX loadable that is loaded, one word of Page 0 becomes unavailable for other
use (such as application logic).
Limited
Functionality
DX loadables are limited in the functionality they can provide because they do not
provide storage for variables and are limited in their size.
M1 Support
M1 supports only loadables targeted for 80x86 microprocessors running in 16-bit
real mode that have not made any hard-coded hardware assumptions (e.g., the
address and format of the TOD clock). Obviously, there must be enough available
memory to fit the loadable.
Saved to Flash
Since DX loadables are stored in Page 0 memory, they are saved whenever a saveto-Flash operation is initiated.
330
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
A Special STAT Instruction
Overview
A special version of the STAT instruction has been developed to support
Momentum M1 CPUs. The STAT instruction accesses a specified number of words
in a status table in the CPU's system memory. Here vital diagnostic information
regarding the health of the CPU and the I/OBus I/O under its control is posted.
From the STAT instruction, you can copy some or all of the status words into a block
of registers or a block of contiguous discrete references.
This section describes the STAT instruction.
Avoid Discretes
We recommend that you do not use discretes in the STAT destination node
because of the excessive number required to contain status information.
Specify Length
The copy to the STAT block always begins with the first word in the table up to the
last word of interest to you. For example, if the status table is 20 words long and
you are interested only in the statistics provided in word 11, you need to copy only
words 1...11 by specifying a length of 11 in the STAT instruction.
Diagram of STAT
Block
The STAT block includes a top node (for destination) and a bottom node (for
length). The STAT block is represented in the following illustration.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
331
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
A Special STAT Instruction, Continued
Top Node
Content
The reference number entered in the top node is the first position in the destination
block–i.e., the block where the current words of interest from the status table will be
copied. The reference may be:
z
z
Bottom Node
Content
The first 0x reference in a block of contiguous discrete outputs
The first 4x reference in a block of contiguous holding registers
The integer value entered in the bottom node specifies the number of registers or
16-bit words in the destination block where the current status information will be
written.
The length–i.e., number of words–in the status table will vary depending on
whether or not I/OBus I/O is being supported:
z
z
332
Without I/OBus, the STAT instruction is 12 words long.
With I/OBus, the instruction is 20 words long.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
A Special STAT Instruction, Continued
Words 1...12
The first 12 words describe the CPU status and are detailed in the following table:
Word
Description
1
Displays the following aspects of the PLC's status:
2
Reserved for internal use.
3
Displays more aspects of the controller status:
4
Not used.
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
333
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
A Special STAT Instruction, Continued
Words 1...12,
Continued
Word
Description
5
Displays the PLC's stop state conditions:
6
Displays the number of segments in ladder logic; a binary number is shown:
Continued on next page
334
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
A Special STAT Instruction, Continued
Words 1...12,
Continued
Word
Description
7
Displays the address of the end-of-logic (EOL) pointer:
8 and 9
Not used.
10
Uses its two least significant bits to display RUN/LOAD/DEBUG status:
11
Not used.
12
Indicates the health of the ATI module:
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
335
Ladder Logic Elements and Instructions
A Special STAT Instruction, Continued
Words 13...20
Words 13...20 are available only for the 171 CCS 760 00 and 171 CCS 760 10
Momentum M1 Processor Adapters to indicate the status of I/OBus modules
controlled over the I/O Bus network.
This Word... Indicates the Status of These I/O Modules...
336
13
1...16
14
17...32
15
33...48
16
49...64
17
65...80
18
81...96
19
97...112
20
113...128
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Run LED Flash Patterns and Error
Codes
Run LED Flash
Pattern and Error
Codes
B
The following table lists the flash pattern of the Run LED on the TSX Momentum
Processor Adapters. It also lists the associated codes (in hex format).
Number of Blinks
Code (hex)
Continuous
0000
Requested Kernel mode
2
080B
ram error during sizing
080C
run output active failed
082E
MB command handler stack error
0835
Main loop broken
0836
Power down / Power holdup
0837
Power down reset absent
072B
master config write bad
3
Error
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
337
Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes
Run LED Flash
Pattern and Error
Codes, Continued
Number of Blinks
Code (hex)
Error
4
0607
modbus cmd-buffer overflow
0608
modbus cmd-length is zero
0609
modbus abort command error
0614
mbp bus interface error
0615
bad mbp response opcode
0616
timeout waiting for mbp
0617
mbp out of synchronization
0618
mbp invalid path
0619
page 0 not paragraph aligned
061E
bad external uart hardware
061F
bad external uart interrupt
0620
bad receive comm state
0621
bad transmit comm state
0622
bad comm state trn_asc
0623
bad comm state trn_rtu
0624
bad comm state rcv_rtu
0625
bad comm state rcv_asc
0626
bad modbus state tmr0_evt
0627
bad modbus state trn-int
0628
bad modbus state rcv-int
0631
bad interrupt
0637
Bad I/OBus transmit state
0638
Bad I/OBus receive state
0503
ram address test error
052D
P.O.S.T BAD MPU ERROR
0402
ram data test error
5
6
Continued on next page
338
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes
Run LED Flash
Pattern and Error
Codes, Continued
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Number of Blinks
Code (hex)
Error
7
0300
EXEC not loaded
0301
EXEC Checksum
8
8001
Kernal prom checksum error
8003
unexpected exec return
8005
Flash program / erase error
8007
Watchdog timeout event
339
Run LED Flash Patterns and Error Codes
340
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
TIO Power Supply Module
C
At a Glance
Purpose
This appendix describes the 170 CPS 110 00 TIO Power Supply module. The
module provides a regulated output voltage with protection against overload and
overvoltage. It can be used to power TSX Momentum I/O bases.
In This Appendix
This appendix contains the following sections:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
For This Topic...
See Section...
Module Overview
1
Wiring
2
341
TIO Power Supply Module
Section C.1
Module Overview
Introduction
Purpose
This section describes the front panel components of the 170 CPS 111 00 TIO
Power Supply module and provides specifications.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Front Panel Components
Specifications
342
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
TIO Power Supply Module
Front Panel Components
Overview
This section contains a diagram of the front panel of the 170 CPS 111 00
TIO Power Supply module and a description of the LEDs.
Front Panel
Diagram
The front panel of the power supply module is shown in the diagram below:
Label
Description
1
Module identifier
2
Identification label
3
LED status display
4
Protective cover
5
Input voltage (AC) terminal strip connector mounting slot
6
PE spade-lug connector
7
Output voltage (DC) terminal strip connector mounting slot
8
Grounding busbar connector mounting slot
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
343
TIO Power Supply Module
Front Panel Components, Continued
LED Diagram
This module has one LED, which is shown in the diagram below:
LED Description
The Pwr OK LED is described in the table below:
344
Indicator
Condition
Message
Pwr ok
Green
Power supply module is ready.
Off
Power supply module is not ready.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
TIO Power Supply Module
Specifications
Overview
This section contains specifications for the 170 CPS 110 00 TIO Power Supply
module.
General
Specifications
The following table contains general specifications for the power supply module.
Nominal Input Voltage
230 VAC or 120 VAC (jumper selectable)
Nominal Output Voltage
24 VDC
Maximum Output Current
(isolated)
0.7 A
Protective Circuitry
Inputs
Self-restoring fuse
Outputs
Overvoltage protection: limited by a transzorb diode (type:
SM6T30A)
Overload protection: by thermal current limiting (should the
thermal current limiting respond, the input voltage must be
switched -- off/on for reactivation).
Frequency
Input voltage
50/60 Hz + 5%
Internal chopper frequency
90 ... 110 kHz
Power
Efficiency
Typically 0.76 for IA = 0.7 A
Apparent power
Typically 32 VA for IA = 0.7 A
Effective power
Typically 21 W for IA = 0.7 A
Isolation
Input/output voltage‘
L, N, PE isolated from UB, M
Fusing
Input
Internal self-restoring fuse
Min external F1: for 230 VAC, 0.315 A, slow-blow
Min external F1: for 120 VAC, 0.63 A, slow-blow
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
345
TIO Power Supply Module
Specifications, Continued
General
Specifications,
Continued
Fault Information
Inputs
None
Outputs
Green status LED for output voltage ok
Environmental Conditions
Regulations
VDE 0160, UL 508
Permissable operating and
ambient temperatures
GUF (-40 ... +60 deg. C) adhering to DIN 40040, refer to the
derating curve for uninhibited convection, operation
orientation is vertical
Permissable storage
temperature
-40 ... +85 deg. C
Internal power dissipation
Roughly 1.2 + 5 x IA (in W, IA in A)
Noise immunity
EN 55011 (DIN VDE 0875) class A
Safety classification
Class 1 (VDE 0160, IEC 1131)
Continued on next page
346
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
TIO Power Supply Module
Specifications, Continued
AC Input Voltage
This section contains specifications for AC input voltage, selectable by jumper.
Input Voltage
EX - EY not jumpered
L/N = 230 VAC
EX - EY jumpered
L/N = 120 VAC
Limiting Values
With jumper
100 Veff -15% to 120 Veff +10%
Without jumper
230 Veff -15% to 240 Veff +10%
Power Failure
Half wave loss at
100 Veff -15%
Min. of a half wave at
>= 100 Veff
Min. of a half wave at
230 Veff -15%
Input Current
For 85 Veff
Typically 0.366 Aeff, IA = 0.7 A
For 170 Veff
Typically 0.188 Aeff, IA = 0.7 A
For 230 Veff
Typically 0.188 Aeff, IA = 0.7 A
Power on Current
I2T
0.3 A2s
IT
0.02 As
Continued on next page
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
347
TIO Power Supply Module
Specifications, Continued
Power on Surge
Current Curve
The following chart shows power on surge current for 120 VAC + 10% or 240 VAC +
10%.
DC Output
Voltage
This section contains specifications for DC output voltage:
Number
1 x UB = 24 VDC, max. 0.7 A, isolated
Limiting Values
UBmin
21 VDC
UBmax
30 VDC
Output Current
IA
0 ... 0.7 A
Output Ripple
Typical
150 mV/p-p (max. 20 MHz)
Max.
250 mV/p-p (max. 20 MHz) - measured with a 0.1 microF capacitor
Voltage Regulation
Typically +500 mV for 0.7A after 0.35 A
Typically -500 mV for 0.35A after 0.7 A
Continued on next page
348
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
TIO Power Supply Module
Specifications, Continued
Output Current
Chart
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
The following chart shows output current (derating) for uninhibited vertical
convection:
349
TIO Power Supply Module
Section C.2
Wiring
Overview
Purpose
This section describes the types of terminal connectors available, how to code
terminal connectors and how to mount them. It also describes external operating
voltage connections.
In This Section
This section contains the following topics:
Topics
Choosing a Terminal Connector
Terminal Connector Coding
Mounting the Terminal Connectors
External Operating Voltage Connections
350
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
TIO Power Supply Module
Choosing a Terminal Connector
Introduction
Power is supplied to the module through an 8-pole terminal connector. Two types
of terminal connectors are available:
z
z
screw-in
spring-clip
Screw-In Version
Screw-in terminals can be used with cable with a diameter of up to 12 AWG (2.5
mm2). They come in sets of three. The part number is 170 XTS 011 00.
Spring-Clip
Version
Spring-clip terminals can be used with cable with a diameter of up to 14 AWG (1.5
mm2). They come in sets of three. The part number is 170 XTS 012 00.
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
351
TIO Power Supply Module
Terminal Connector Coding
Safety
Requirement
This module is used in hazardous and harmless voltage ranges. For safety, code
the terminal connectors and the power supply module to prevent inadvertent
exchanges of terminal blocks.
Coding Set
To complete the coding described below, order the 170 XCP 200 00 coding set.
This set contains coding keys and combs.
Coding Diagram
Install coding keys in the positions shown in the following diagram:
352
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
TIO Power Supply Module
Mounting the Terminal Connectors
Introduction
This section describes how to mount terminal connectors and how to remove them,
including safety considerations.
CAUTION
ELECTRICAL HAZARD
Only mount and remove terminal connectors when the module is not under power.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in injury or equipment damage.
Mounting
To mount a terminal connector, press it into the module’s pin connector.
Removal
To remove a terminal connector, press both extractors, as shown in the diagram
below:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
353
TIO Power Supply Module
External Operating Voltage Connections
Overview
This section contains a diagram of the external operating voltage connections and
explanatory notes.
Diagram
The following diagram shows the external operating voltage connections for the 170
CPS 11 00 TIO Power Supply module:
Row
Terminal
Connection
Function
2
1
EX
Jumper connection
2
2
EY
Jumper connection
2
3, 4
L
AC input voltage, line
2
5, 6
N
AC input voltage, neutral
2
7, 8
PE
Earth ground
3
1, 2, 3, 4
UB
DC output voltage
3
5, 6, 7, 8
M
DC output voltage return
Continued on next page
354
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
TIO Power Supply Module
External Operating Voltage Connections, Continued
Grounding
The spade-lug connector on the front of the module provides a short, secure PE
grounding surface.
Electrical safety
Power supply modules may not be operated in parallel. Physically separate input
cabling from output cabling.
Fusing
Dimension the F1 fuse to match the operative load, observing the minimum values
in the following table:
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Voltage
Jumper Placement
External Fusing (min. F1)
120 VAC
Mounted
0.63 A slow-blow
230 VAC
Removed
0.315 A slow-blow
355
TIO Power Supply Module
356
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Index
Numerics
171 CCC 760 10 Processor Adapter
diagram, 22
key features, 22
LEDs, 23
not supported in Concept 2.1, 243
specifications, 23
171 CCC 780 10 Processor Adapter
changing protocol to RS485, 175
diagram, 28
key features, 28
LEDs, 29
need to change protocol to RS485, 88
not supported in Concept 2.1, 243
specifications, 29
171 CCS 700 00 Processor Adapter
diagram, 13
key features, 13
LEDs, 14
specifications, 14
171 CCS 700 10 Processor Adapter
diagram, 16
key features, 16
LEDs, 17
specifications, 17
171 CCS 760 00 Processor Adapter
diagram, 19
key features, 19
LEDs, 20
specifications, 20
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
%
$&
171 CCS 780 00 Processor Adapter
changing protocol to RS485, 175, 277
diagram, 25
key features, 25
LEDs, 26
need to change protocol to RS485, 88
specifications, 26
172 JNN 210 32 Serial Option Adapter
diagram, 34
LED indicator, 35
limitations when used with certain
processor adapters, 86
specifications, 37
172 PNN 210 22 Modbus Plus Option
Adapter
diagram, 40
LED indicator, 41
Modbus Plus address switches, 42
specifications, 43
172 PNN 260 22 Redundant Modbus Plus
Option Adapter
diagram, 46
LED indicators, 47
Modbus Plus address switches, 49
ports, 49
specifications, 50
357
Index
A
M
assembly
Processor Adapter and I/O base, 55
Processor Adapter and Option Adapter,
61
Processor Adapter, Option Adapter and
I/O base, 64
Modbus Plus
addresses, 132
cluster mode, 116
cabling schemes, 121
network types, 117
new features for Momentum, 116
Peer Cop, 134
standard cabling schemes, 119
Modbus Plus network architecture
address strategy, 198, 216, 297, 308
two types, 191, 289
Modbus Plus port, 115
cable accessories, 125
pinouts and wiring diagrams, 128
Modbus Port 1, 8, 79
auto-logout feature, 81
cable accessories, 82
connector type, 79
diagram, 79
parameters, 80
Modbus Port 2, 8, 35, 86
auto-logout, 35
autologout feature with RS232, 88
changing protocol from RS232 to
RS485, 175, 277
parameters, 87
pinouts, 36
Modbus RS485, 86
cable, 95
connectors, 98
four-wire cabling schemes, 89
pinouts, 101
terminating devices, 100
two-wire cabling schemes, 92
C
communication ports
configuring with Concept, 270
configuring with Modsoft, 166
delay parameter, 174, 275
stop bit, 168, 274
I
I/OBus network
accessing an I/O map screen, 183, 283
editing an I/O map, 185, 285
supporting an I/O map, 182, 282
I/OBus port, 8, 107
cable accessories, 111
pinouts, 113
InterBus module identifier codes, 188, 286
L
local I/O
I/O mapping with Concept, 278
I/O mapping with Modsoft, 176
358
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
Index
O
Option Adapter
batteries
installation, 71
purpose, 32
reserving and monitoring a battery
coil in Concept, 262
reserving and monitoring a battery
coil in Modsoft, 158
communication ports, 32
configuring in Concept, 261
configuring in Modsoft, 157
purpose, 31
time-of-day clock, 32
reading in Concept, 269
reading in Modsoft, 165
setting the time in Modsoft, 162
setting time in Concept, 268
setting up in Concept, 265
setting up in Modsoft, 160
Processor Adapter
configuring with Concept, 244
configuring with Modsoft, 141
default configuration parameters in
Concept, 250
default configuration parameters in
Modsoft, 146
Flash RAM, 9
front panel diagram, 7
internal memory, 9
power supply, 11
S
saving to Flash
Concept
procedure, 320
Modsoft
options, 238
procedure, 239
purpose, 237, 319
Stop bit, 88
P
Peer Cop, 134
Concept
accessing Peer Cop dialog box, 291
adjusting amount of extension
memory, 293
health timeout, 293, 294
Last Value setting, 295
specifying references for input data,
300
specifying references for output
data, 304
Modsoft
accessing a node, 199
accessing configuration extension
screen, 193
adjusting amount of extension
memory, 193
defining a link, 199
On Error setting, 202
specifying references for input data,
206
timeout, 202
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
359
Index
360
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2
31000318
Schneider Automation GmbH
Steinheimer Strasse 117
D-63500 Seligenstadt
Tel: (49) 6182 81-2584
Fax: (49) 6182 81-2860
Schneider Automation S.A.
245, Route des Lucioles-BP147
F-06903 Sophia-Antipolis Cedex
Tel: (33) 92 96 20 00
Fax: (33) 93 65 37 15
Modicon, Square D and Telemecanique are PLC brand names from Schneider. These products are sold in
the US by Square D; in Canada, Latin America, Europe, Africa, Asia/Pacific and Middle East by Schneider; in
Germany by AEG Schneider Automation; in China and Persian Gulf by Schneider Automation; in South
Africa by ASA Systems Automation; in Austria by Online.
Schneider Automation, Inc.
One High Street
North Andover, MA 01845
Tel: (1) 508-794-0800
Fax: (1) 508-975-9400
1298
870 USE 101 00 V.2.2 © 1998 Schneider Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
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