Operation Manual
Operation Manual
Operation Manual
Version 1.0
June 2015
Dave Smith Instruments/Sequential
1527 Stockton Street, 3rd Floor
San Francisco, CA 94133
USA
©2015 Dave Smith Instruments
www.davesmithinstruments.com
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian
Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numerique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du
Reglement sur le materiel brouilleur du Canada.
For Technical Support, email: [email protected]
Table of Contents
A Few Words of Thanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Getting Started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Sound Banks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comparing an Edited Program to its Original State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Program from Scratch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Live Panel Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving a Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Canceling Save. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving to the Next Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
6
7
Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Global Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Globals - Top Row . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Globals - Bottom Row. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Oscillators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Oscillator Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Slop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Mixer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Filter Envelope. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Changing the Filter Envelope’s Response Curve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Amplifier Envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Effects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Main Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Low Frequency Oscillators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Poly Mod. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Poly Mod Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Arpeggiator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Arpeggiator Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Programming the Sequencer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Sequencer Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Distortion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Hold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Glide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Unison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Using Chord Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Write. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Canceling Save. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Comparing Before You Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Globals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Preset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Pitch and Mod Wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Pitch Wheel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Modulation Wheel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Misc Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Aftertouch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Exporting Programs and Banks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Calibrating the Prophet-6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
How and When to Calibrate the Oscillators and Filters . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Calibrating the Pitch and Mod Wheels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Resetting the Global Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Using USB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Appendix A: Alternative Tunings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Appendix B: Troubleshooting and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Contacting Technical Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
MIDI Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NRPN Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Control NRPN Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sysex Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Packed Data Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66
70
74
74
77
Credits and Acknowledgements
Sound Design
Joseph Akins
John Bowen
Richard Devine
Peter Dyer
Tim Koon
Kurt Kurasaki
Kevin Lamb
Jason Lindner
Cord Mueller
Drew Neumann
Robert Rich
Matia Simovich
James Terris
Mitch Thomas Taiho Yamada
The DSI Crew
Ashley Bellouin, Fabien Cesari, Bob Coover, Carson Day, Chris Hector, Tony Karavidas,
Mark Kono, Andrew McGowan, Joanne McGowan, Tracy Wadley, and Mark Wilcox.
Special thanks to Ikutaro Kakehashi and Yamaha Corporation. Thanks also
to Robert Rich for the alternative tunings content. And finally, a shout out to
OMOM (Old Men Of MIDI) for their support, camaraderie, and sound design.
A Few Words of Thanks
Thank you for purchasing the Prophet-6. We take a lot of pleasure in creating all
of our instruments but bringing the Prophet-6 to life was particularly satisfying.
In many ways it brings my 40-plus years of designing synthesizers full circle. I’ll
tell you why.
In 2014, two events occurred that led to the creation of the Prophet-6. The first
was a fairly common one around our office — our usual informal discussion
about what would be interesting to build next. (We don’t do marketing surveys
around here.) We all agreed that an analog poly synth with true voltage-controlled
oscillators, filters, and amplifiers would not only be exciting to design, but would
also almost certainly sound great. So we decided to do it.
Event two transpired when, unknown to me, my old friend and collaborator in the
creation of MIDI, Ikutaro Kakehashi, founder of Roland, asked Yamaha Corporation
to consider returning ownership of my original company brand, Sequential Circuits,
to me. (Yamaha had purchased Sequential’s assets when we closed shop back in
1987.) Yamaha generously agreed and suddenly Sequential was back — almost. All
we needed was an awesome new product to bear the name.
Well, you know how the story ends: with the very synth you’ve just purchased. We
figured that building the best-sounding analog poly synth possible would be a fitting
tribute to Sequential’s most famous instrument, the Prophet-5, the poly synth that
started it all.
The Sequential Prophet-6 takes the best qualities of the Prophet-5 and adds some nice
touches that the original never had, such as stereo outputs, velocity and aftertouch
sensitivity, dual digital effects, a high-pass filter, a polyphonic step sequencer, an
arpeggiator, and of course, MIDI. The result is a synth with vintage analog tone and
the reliability of a state-of-the-art, modern instrument.
I hope you enjoy the Prophet-6 as much as we enjoyed designing it for you.
Cheers,
Getting Started
The Prophet-6 is a six-voice, polyphonic analog synthesizer with
voltage-controlled oscillators, filters, and amplifiers. It was designed to
provide all of the warmth and presence of a vintage-era synth with the
added convenience and stability of a state-of-the-art, modern instrument.
The Prophet-6 is first and foremost a performance instrument. All of its
sound-shaping controls are immediately accessible on its front panel,
packing a tremendous amount of power and versatility into a compact,
easy-to-use format.
You can find in-depth information about each of the Prophet-6’s parameters in later sections of this manual. But don’t hesitate to dive right in and
start turning knobs and pressing buttons before you begin reading. You
can always get back to where you started, even if you have no idea what
you’re doing. So start exploring and keep your ears and mind open!
Phones
Left
Right
LP Filter
POLY MOD
MASTER VOL
FILTER ENV
FREQ 1
OSC 2
DISTORT
PW 1
FILTER
TAP TEMPO
EFFECTS
A
ON/OFF
AMOUNT
Sustain
TYPE
MIX
Sequencer
MIDI Thru
MIDI Out
MIDI In
ARPEGGIATOR
ON/OFF
VALUE
BPM
OCTAVES
USB
AC In
AFTERTOUCH
SEQUENCER
RECORD
MODE
PLAY
FREQ 1
AMOUNT
MIXER
SLOP
OSCILLATOR 1
2
CLOCK
B
EFFECT
Volume
CLOCK
SHAPE 1
FREQ 2
On/Off
MISC PARAMETERS
LFO AMT
AMP
FILTER
PAN SPREAD
KEY MODE
P WHL RANGE
PRGM VOL
FILTER ENVELOPE
HIGH-PASS FILTER
Half Full
SYNC
1
FREQUENCY
SYNC
SHAPE
AMOUNT
PULSE WIDTH
OSC 1
OSC 2
CUTOFF
RESONANCE
SUB OCTAVE
NOISE
CUTOFF
RESONANCE
OSCILLATOR 2
LOW FREQUENCY OSCILLATOR
VELOCITY
KEYBOARD
VELOCITY
KEYBOARD
ATTACK
ENV AMOUNT
DECAY
SUSTAIN
RELEASE
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE
LOW-PASS FILTER
Half Full
FREQUENCY
LFO SYNC
SHAPE
INITIAL AMT
FREQ 1
FREQ 2
PW 1+2
AMP
FILTER
FREQUENCY
0
DOWN
UP
HOLD
TRANSPOSE
PITCH
GLIDE RATE
GLIDE
UNISON
FINE
SHAPE
PULSE WIDTH
LOW FREQ
KEYBOARD
ENV AMOUNT
Decrement
Increment
Transpose
Master Tune
MIDI Channel
MIDI Clock
Clock Port
Param Xmit
Param Rcv
MIDI Control
MIDI SysEx
BANK
TENS
Local Ctrl
Seq Jack
Pot Mode
Sustain +/-
Alt Tuning
Vel Response
AT Response
Stereo/Mono
Pgm Dump
SELECT
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
SELECT
BANK
PROGRAM
VELOCITY
ENV AMOUNT
ATTACK
DECAY
SUSTAIN
RELEASE
MIDI Out
9
WRITE
GLOBALS
PRESET
MOD
Prophet-6 front panel
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Getting Started
1
Sound Banks
The Prophet-6 contains a total of 1000 programs. 500 are permanent and
500 can be overwritten. Banks 0-4 are User Banks that can be overwritten. Banks 5-9 are Factory Banks that are permanent. You can edit the
programs of either bank, but you can only save them to Banks 0-4. As
shipped from the factory, presets 000-499 are identical to 500-999.
Decrement
Increment
Transpose
Master Tune
MIDI Channel
MIDI Clock
Clock Port
Param Xmit
Param Rcv
M
BANK
TENS
Local Ctrl
Seq Jack
Pot Mode
Sustain +/-
Alt Tuning
Vel Response
AT Response
St
SELECT
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
SELECT
BANK
PROGRAM
Program bank, tens, and number selectors
Selecting Programs
Use the bank, tens, and program selector buttons to select and recall
programs.
To choose a program:
1. Hold down the bank button then press a program selector button (0-9)
to specify the “hundreds” bank of the program.
2. Hold down the tens button then press a program selector button (0-9)
to specify the “tens” digit of the program.
3. Press a program selector button (0-9) to specify the “ones” digit of the
program.
To choose program 123, for example:
1. Hold bank and press 1. Then release the bank button.
2. Hold tens and press 2. Then release the tens button.
3. Press program selector button 3.
2
Getting Started
Dave Smith Instruments
It’s not always necessary to enter all 3 digits of a program number to
recall it.
For example:
• If the current program is 100 and you want to recall program 101,
simply press “1.”
• If the current program is 100 and you want to recall program 110, hold
down the tens button and press “1.”
• If the current program is 100 and you want to recall program 115, hold
down the tens button and press “1.” Then release the tens button and
press “5.”
Pressing the globals button three times in a row saves the current program as
the default program that appears when you turn on the Prophet-6.
Editing Programs
Because all of the sound-shaping controls of the Prophet-6 appear on its front
panel, editing an existing program is simple: just turn a knob and listen to its
effect. Keep turning knobs and pressing buttons and if you like what you’ve
created, save the program. (See “Saving Programs” on page 5.)
The rotary controls on the front panel are a mixture of “endless” rotary encoders
and potentiometers or “pots.” You can choose between three different modes that
determine how the synth reacts when parameters are edited with a pot. For details,
see “Pot Mode” on page 13.
Comparing an Edited Program to its Original State
When editing a program, it’s often useful to compare its edited state to
its original state to evaluate your edits. Alternatively, before saving a
program to a new location you may want to check the program in the
target location before you overwrite it.
To compare an edited program to a saved version:
1. Edit a program.
2. Press the write button. It starts flashing.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Getting Started
3
3. Press the global button. Both LEDs on the button light up, indicating
compare mode.
4. Play the keyboard to hear the saved version of the sound.
5. To disable the compare function and return to the edited sound, turn off
the global button. Programs can’t be written while in compare mode.
6. If you want to save the edited sound, the write button is still flashing and ready to save, so enter a location with the program selector
buttons. The sound is saved.
7. Alternatively, if you want to cancel saving and continue editing, press
the write button. It stops flashing and saving is canceled.
Creating a Program from Scratch
An existing program can be very useful as a jumping off point for new
sounds. But it’s also useful (and educational) to create a new sound from
scratch. The Prophet-6 makes this easy by providing a “Basic Preset”
that you can quickly recall at any time. This preset is very simple, with a
single oscillator as its basis.
To recall the Basic Preset:
1. Hold down the preset button.
2. Press the write button.
Live Panel Mode
The Prophet-6 also features a “live panel” mode in which its sound
switches to the current settings of its knobs and switches. In other words,
the current preset is ignored and what you see on the front panel is what you
hear. This is a great mode for learning, experimentation, and instant gratification.
To enter live panel mode:
• Press the preset button to toggle it off. Note that you can’t change
programs or banks with Preset off.
To return to preset mode:
• Press the preset button again to toggle it on.
4
Getting Started
Dave Smith Instruments
PRESET
Toggling off the preset button enables “live panel” mode
Saving a Program
If you’ve created a sound that you like, you’ll probably want to save it.
Saving a program overwrites a previously saved program. Sound designers often save many incremental versions of a program as they continue
to refine it. These intermediate versions often make good jumping off
points for new sounds.
To save a program to the same preset location:
1. Press the write button. Its LED begins blinking.
2. Press a program selector button (0-9) to specify the “ones” digit of the
program.
3. The write button LED stops blinking and the program is saved.
Be careful when write is enabled. You can change banks and tens without
executing write, but once you press a program selector button (0-9) for the “ones”
digit, the write command is executed and the program at that location is overwritten.
To save a program to a different bank location:
1. Press the write button. Its LED begins blinking.
2. Hold down the bank button then press a program selector button to
specify the “hundreds” bank of the program. You can only save to
Banks 0-4.
3. Hold down the tens button then press a program selector button (0-9)
to specify the “tens” digit of the program.
4. Press a program selector button (0-9) to specify the “ones” digit of the
program.
5. The write button LED stops blinking and the program is saved.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Getting Started
5
Canceling Save
Sometimes you may want to cancel saving a program before you
commit.
To cancel the Save process before you commit:
• If the write button LED is flashing, press it again. The LED stops flashing and saving is canceled. You can return to editing if you want.
Comparing Before You Save
Before saving a program to a new location, it’s a good idea to listen to the
program in the target location to make sure you really want to overwrite it.
To evaluate a program before you overwrite it:
1. Get ready to save by pressing the write button. It starts flashing.
2. Press the global button. Both LEDs on the button light up, indicating
compare mode.
3. Use the program buttons to navigate to the sound you want to compare
and play the keyboard to hear the sound.
4. To disable the compare function and go back to the edited sound, turn
off the global button. Programs can’t be written while in compare
mode.
5. If you want to save the edited sound, the write button is still flashing
and ready to save, so enter a location with the program buttons. The
sound is saved.
6. Alternatively, if you want to cancel saving and continue editing, press
the write button. It stops flashing and saving is canceled.
6
Getting Started
Dave Smith Instruments
Moving to the Next Level
The Prophet-6 is filled with possibilities for sound creation. Although
we realize that you’d rather spend your time exploring its capabilities,
we’d like to point you toward a few things that will help you tailor the
instrument to your needs.
First, check out the Global Settings section of this manual. Read about
Pot Modes and determine which works best for you when you’re editing
sounds. You’ll also find information about MIDI setup. Read this to more
effectively integrate the Prophet-6 into your MIDI rig. To get the most
out of the Prophet-6’s live performance capabilities, read up on using a
footswitch or expression pedal.
And finally, be on the lookout for tips and notes scattered throughout this
manual to gain a better working knowledge of the Prophet-6. The better
you know your instrument, the more you’ll get out of it. We wish you
many hours of musical exploration!
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Getting Started
7
Connections
1
2
3
4
1. AC Power Connector—Accepts a standard, grounded IEC power
cord. Operates over a range of 100 to 240 volts and 50 to 60 Hz.
2. USB—For bidirectional MIDI communication with a computer. The
Prophet-6 is a Class Compliant USB device and does not require additional drivers when used with Mac OS or Windows. See Using USB on
page 58 for more information.
3. MIDI In, Out, and Thru—Standard 5-pin MIDI DIN connectors.
4. Footswitch-Sequence—Accepts a momentary, normally open or
normally closed footswitch to turn the sequencer or arpeggiator on and
off. Alternatively, an audio signal connected to this jack can be used to
either control sequencer/arpeggiator playback, or to gate the filter and
amplifier envelopes while notes are held. See “Seq Jack” on page 13
for more information about choosing the appropriate mode for these
behaviors.
5. Footswitch-Sustain—Accepts a momentary, normally open or
normally closed footswitch to control sustain. See “Sustain +/-” on page
14 for more information.
6. Expression Pedal-Volume—Accepts a standard expression pedal
that has a variable resistor on a TRS (tip-ring-sleeve) ¼ inch phone plug.
Once connected, you can use the pedal to control volume to add expressiveness and dynamics to live performance.
8
Connections
Dave Smith Instruments
5
6
7
4
5
6
7
8
9
7. Expression Pedal-LP Filter—Accepts a standard expression pedal
that has a variable resistor on a TRS (tip-ring-sleeve) ¼ inch phone plug.
Once connected, you can use the pedal to control the cutoff frequency of
the low-pass filter to add expressiveness to live performance.
8. Audio Outputs—Unbalanced, ¼ inch audio outputs. The Prophet-6
sounds great in stereo, but can be switched to mono if needed. See
“Mono/Stereo” in Global Settings on page 13.
9. Headphones—A ¼ inch stereo headphone jack. Headphone volume is
controlled by the master vol knob on the front panel.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Connections
9
Global Settings
Global settings are parameters that affect all programs. These include
settings such as Master Tune, MIDI Channel, MIDI Clock, and others.
Global parameters are printed above the numeric program selector
switches (0 - 9). Use the Globals switch to choose between the two sets.
The red LED indicates that the upper row is active. The yellow LED
indicates that the lower row is active
GLOBALS
The Globals button
Transpose
Master Tune
MIDI Channel
MIDI Clock
Clock Port
Param Xmit
Param Rcv
Local Ctrl
Seq Jack
Pot Mode
Sustain +/-
Alt Tuning
Vel Response
AT Response
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Globals 0-4
Clock Port
Param Xmit
Param Rcv
MIDI Control
MIDI SysEx
Alt Tuning
Vel Response
AT Response
Stereo/Mono
Pgm Dump
4
5
6
7
8
MIDI Out
9
Globals 5-9
Decrement
Increment
BANK
TENS
SELECT
BANK
PROGRAM
SELECT
Use the Bank and Tens buttons to scroll forward and backward, respectively, through parameter settings
10
Global Settings
Dave Smith Instruments
To set a Global parameter:
1. Press the globals button. Pressing it once activates the upper set of
parameters. Pressing it a second time enables the lower set of parameters.
2. Press the program selector button (0 - 9) that corresponds to the desired
parameter. The parameters are printed above each switch.
3. Use the bank and tens buttons as decrement and increment buttons to
step through available settings.
4. Once you’ve chosen the desired setting, press the globals button again
to exit.
Globals - Top Row
0. Transpose: -12…12—Master Transpose control, 0 is centered. Steps
in semitones up to one octave up (+12) or down (-12).
1. Master Tune: -50…50—Master Fine Tune control; 0 centered. Steps
in cents as much as a quarter-tone up (+50) or down (-50).
2. MIDI Channel: All, 1…16—Selects which MIDI channel to send and
receive data, 1 to 16. All receives on all 16 channels.
3. MIDI Clock: Sets the Prophet-6’s ability to send and receive MIDI
clock messages:
•
Off: MIDI Clock is neither sent nor received
•
Out: MIDI Clock is sent, but not received
•
In: MIDI Clock is received, but not sent
• Slave Thru (i-0): MIDI Clock is received and passed to MIDI Out
• In, No Start/Stop (n55): Receives MIDI Clock but does not respond to
MIDI Start or Stop command.
When set to in or slave thru, if no MIDI clock is present at the selected input,
the arpeggiator and sequencer will not function.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Global Settings
11
4. Clock Port: MID, USB—Sets the ports, MIDI or USB, by which MIDI
clock signals are received.
5. Param Xmit: Off, CC, NR—Changes to the values of front panel
controls are transmitted via MIDI as Continuous Controllers (CC) or Nonregistered Parameter Number (NR). Transmission of parameters can also be
turned off. You could, for example, turn the filter cutoff frequence knob on
the Prophet-6 and have it affect the cutoff frequency of another synthesizer.
For a list of Prophet-6 CCs and NRPNs, see Appendix D.
NRPNs are the preferred method of parameter transmission, since they cover
the complete range of all parameters, while CCs are limited to a range of 128.
6. Param Rcv: Off, CC, NR—Sets the method by which parameter changes are
received via MIDI. As with transmission, NRPNs are the preferred method.
7. MIDI Control: Off, On—When On, the synth will respond to MIDI
controllers, including Pitch Wheel, Mod Wheel, Pedal, Volume.
8. MIDI Sysex: MID, USB— When set to MIDI (MID) it will receive
and transmit them using the MIDI ports/cables When set to USB it
will receive and transmit them using the USB port/cable. MIDI SysEx
messages are used when sending and receiving a variety of data including, programs, alternative tunings, system updates, and more.
9. MIDI Out: MID, USB—Sets the port by which MIDI data will be trans-
mitted (MIDI or USB).
12
Global Settings
Dave Smith Instruments
Globals - Bottom Row
0. Local Control: Off, On—When on (the default), the keyboard and
front panel controls directly affect the Prophet-6. When off, the controls
are transmitted via MIDI but do not directly affect the “local” synth (that
is, the Prophet-6). This is primarily useful for avoiding MIDI data loops
that can occur with some external sequencers.
1. Seq Jack: NOR, Tri, Gat, T-g (Normal, Trigger, Gate, T-G)—Selects
the mode for signals received on the rear-panel Sequencer jack.
• With normal selected, a footswitch will start sequencer playback.
• With trig selected, an audio signal connected to the sequencer jack will
step the sequencer when the sequencer’s play button is on.
• With gate selected, an audio signal connected to the sequencer
jack will trigger and gate the envelopes while you hold a note or
chord. Additionally, turning on the sequencer or arpeggiator will add
sequencer or arpeggiator playback—but controlled by the Prophet-6’s
clock bpm and value settings and not the audio trigger.
• With t-g (trigger+gate) selected, an audio signal connected to the
sequencer jack will trigger and gate the envelopes while you hold a
note or chord. Additionally, pressing the sequencer’s play button will
also add synchronized sequencer playback.
For best results when triggering the sequencer with an audio signal, use a loud
signal with a sharp attack/decay and little or no sustain.
2. Pot Mode: Rel, Pas, Jup (Relative, Passthru, Jump)—The rotary controls
on the front panel are a mixture of “endless” rotary encoders and potentiometers or “pots.” The pots are identifiable by their lined knobs and the
fact that they have about 300° of travel. There are three pot modes to determine how the synth reacts when the programmable parameters are edited.
(Master volume is not programmable, so these modes don’t apply.)
In Relative mode, changes are relative to the stored setting. In Relative mode, the
full value range is not available until either the minimum or maximum value and
the respective lower or upper limit of the pot’s travel is reached. For example,
the resonance parameter has an internal value range of 0 to 127. Let’s
say the physical position of the resonance pot is the equivalent to a
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Global Settings
13
value of 100. If you switch to a program that has a stored Resonance
setting of 63 and turn the pot all the way up, it will only go to 90. To get
to the maximum value of 127, you first have to turn down until the value is
at the other extreme and the pot is at the limit of its travel (in this case, 0
and fully counter-clockwise, respectively).
In Passthru mode, turning the pot has no effect until after the edited
value equals the preset value (that is, until the edited value “passes
through” the stored value).
Jump mode uses an absolute value based upon the position of the pot
when edited: turn a pot and the value jumps immediately from the stored
value to the edited value.
3. Sustain +/- : Nor, Rev, n-r, r-n (Normally Open, Normally Closed,
Sustain Normally Open/Sequencer Normally Closed, Sustain Normally
Closed/Sequencer Normally Open)—The Sustain pedal polarity param-
eter affects both the sustain pedal and sequencer jack input ports. There
are two types of momentary footswitches, normally open and normally
closed. Either type can be used with the Prophet-6. Not sure which type
you have? If the behavior of the footswitch is the opposite of what is
expected — that is, down is off and up is on — changing this setting will
correct that.
4. Alt Tuning: Nor, 1…16 (Normal, 1…16)—Selects one of the Prophet-6’s
built-in tunings. Set to normal, the tuning is standard, chromatic tuning.
Choosing 1 through 16 selects an alternative, non-chromatic, non-Western
scale that can be used to emulate ethnic instruments or in other creative ways.
See “Appendix A: Alternative Tunings” on page 59 for a description of
each tuning. Additional tunings can be imported into the Prophet-6 as a
SysEx message. For more information, see Appendix A.
5. Vel Response: 0-3 (Curve 0, Curve 1, Curve 2, Curve 3)—Sets one of four
velocity curves to adjust the keyboard’s velocity response to your playing style.
6. AT Response: 0-3 (Curve 0, Curve 1, Curve 2, Curve 3)—Sets one of
four pressure curves to adjust the keyboard’s aftertouch response to your
playing style.
14
Global Settings
Dave Smith Instruments
7. Stereo/Mono: Ste, Mon (Stereo, Mono)—The Prophet-6 defaults to
stereo operation. When set to Mono, this parameter defeats all pan settings
and modulation, effectively making each of the outputs a mono output.
8. Pgm Dump: Prg, Ten, Ban, usr, All (Program, Tens, Bank, User
Banks, All)—Transmits the current program, ten programs from the
currently selected bank and tens location, the current bank, all user
banks (0-4), or all banks (both user and factory) in SysEx format via the
selected MIDI port. (See: “MIDI Sysex.”) Dumped programs will load
back into the same bank and program location in memory when received by
the Prophet-6 via MIDI.
Oscillators
Oscillators provide the raw building blocks of the Prophet-6’s sound by
producing waveforms, each of which has its own inherent sound character based on its harmonic content. The Prophet-6 has two oscillators, plus
a sub oscillator and a noise generator per voice. Level controls for each
of these are located in the Mixer section.
Each oscillator is capable of generating triangle, sawtooth, and variablewidth pulse waves. These waveshapes are continuously variable and
smoothly transition from one shape to the next as you turn the shape
knob. This provides a variety of “in-between” waveshapes.
The oscillators on the Prophet-6 are extremely stable. To emulate the random
pitch drift and oscillator instability of vintage instruments, use the slop parameter to
dial in as little or as much drift as you like.
FREQUENCY
SYNC
SHAPE
MIXER
SLOP
OSCILLATOR 1
AMOUNT
PULSE WIDTH
OSC 1
OS
SUB OCTAVE
NO
OSCILLATOR 2
FREQUENCY
FINE
SHAPE
PULSE WIDTH
LOW FREQ
KEYBOARD
Oscillators 1 and 2
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Oscillators
15
Oscillator 1 can be hard-synced to Oscillator 2 for complex, harmonically-rich sounds when modulated.
Oscillator 2 features a fine knob for detuning and thickening sounds,
a low freq switch that allows it to function as an LFO for modulation
purposes, and a keyboard switch that disables keyboard control over its
pitch (useful when used as an LFO, or for drones and other effects).
Oscillator Parameters
Frequency: Sets the base oscillator frequency over a 9-octave range from
16 Hz to 8KHz (when used with the Transpose buttons). Adjustment is in
semitones.
The global Master Tune settings affect the pitch of all oscillators. See “Globals Top Row” on page 11 for more information.
Fine: Fine tune control with a range of a quartertone up or down. The 12
o’clock position is centered. Steps are in cents (50 cents = 1/2 semitone).
Shape: Triangle, Sawtooth, Pulse—Used to select the waveshape
generated by the oscillator. Waveshapes are continuously variable and
smoothly transition from one shape to the next as you turn the shape
knob. This provides a variety of “in-between” waveshapes.
Pulse Width: Changes the width of the pulse wave from a square wave
when the pulse width knob is at center position, to a very narrow pulse
wave when the pulse width knob is full left or right.
Applying pulse width modulation using poly mod or the low frequency oscillator
is a great way to add movement and thickness to a sound, especially when creating
pad or string-like sounds.
16
Oscillators
Dave Smith Instruments
Sync: Off, On—Turns Oscillator 1 hard sync on. Sync forces Oscillator
1 (the slave) to restart its cycle every time Oscillator 2 (the master) starts
a cycle. This provides a way to create more complex, harmonically rich
shapes from simple waveforms—especially when the frequency of Oscillator 1 is set to a different interval than Oscillator 2.
Oscillator 1
Oscillator 2
Oscillator 1
synced to
Oscillator 2
Oscillator hard sync
Use Poly Mod to sweep the pitch of Oscillator 1 when it is synced to generate
the classic, hard-edged sync sound.
Low Frequency: Off, On—Turns Oscillator 2 into a low-frequency
oscillator, essentially providing another LFO source for modulation
using Poly Mod. The frequency, fine, shape, and pulse width controls
still apply and will affect the character of any low-frequency modulation
applied using Oscillator 2.
Keyboard: Off, On—When off, the Oscillator 2 ignores the keyboard
and note data received via MIDI and plays at its base frequency setting.
Oscillator 2 pitch can still be affected by modulation from other sources
when in this mode.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Oscillators
17
Slop
Slop adds randomized detuning to the oscillators to emulate the tuning
instability of vintage analog oscillators. This tuning instability is a big
part of what made vintage instruments sound characteristically warm and fat.
Because the Prophet-6 oscillators are extremely stable, small amounts
of Slop can help impart a very vintage tone to what is otherwise a very
stable, modern instrument. Slop amount is adjustable from subtle, barely
perceptible amounts to wildly out of tune.
The global Master Tune settings affect the pitch of all oscillators. See “Globals Top Row” on page 11 for more information.
SLOP
AMOUNT
Oscillator Slop
18
Slop
Dave Smith Instruments
Mixer
The Mixer section is where you set the levels of the various sound
generators on the Prophet-6. These include Oscillator 1, Oscillator 2,
Sub Octave (Oscillator 1 sub oscillator) and the white noise generator.
You must turn up at least one of these in order to make sound with the
Prophet-6. (Alternatively, you can use the filter to generate its own sine
wave in self-oscillating mode.)
Rather than limit the Prophet-6’s outputs to keep the instrument from clipping,
we allow you to adjust levels at various points in its signal path. This gives you the
option to “overload” things in interesting ways, if you wish to do so. If not, try reducing
the levels of the oscillators in the mixer section, the env amount parameter in the Amplifier Envelope, or the resonance parameter in either the low-pass or high-pass filter.
MIXER
OSC 1
OSC 2
SUB OCTAVE
NOISE
The Mixer
Osc 1: Sets the output level of Oscillator 1.
Osc 2: Sets the output level of Oscillator 2.
Sub Octave: Controls the level of a triangle wave oscillator pitched one
octave below Oscillator 1. Because a triangle wave has few harmonics
and is mainly characterized by its fundamental frequency, adding a sub
octave to sounds such as bass are a great way to increase their low-register
presence.
Noise: Sets the output level of the white noise generator.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Mixer
19
Filters
Filters take the basic, raw sound of the oscillators and noise generator
and subtract frequencies, changing the harmonic content and character of
their sound. This change can be varied over time using the Filter Envelope to produce more dynamic, animated timbres.
The Prophet-6’s two-filter architecture allows for a wide range of sonic
possibilities. The Low-Pass Filter is a 4-pole, 24 dB per-octave, resonant
filter. The High-Pass Filter is a 2-pole, 12 dB per octave, resonant filter.
In simple terms, the Low-Pass Filter cuts high frequencies and the HighPass Filter cuts low frequencies. If used at the same time, the two filters
act as a band-pass filter, passing only the band of frequencies that fall
between the high-pass and low-pass cutoff points.
HIGH-PASS FILTER
Half Full
VELOCITY
CUTOFF
RESONANCE
KEYBOARD
ENV AMOUNT
LOW-PASS FILTER
Half Full
CUTOFF
RESONANCE
ENV AMOUNT
VELOCITY
KEYBOARD
The Low-Pass Filter and High-Pass Filter
Cutoff: Sets the filter’s cutoff frequency. On the Low-Pass Filter,
frequencies are reduced from the top down — cutting the high frequencies and passing the low, hence the name “low-pass.” On the High-Pass
Filter, frequencies are reduced from the bottom up — cutting the low
frequencies and passing the high, hence the name “high-pass.”
Resonance: Emphasizes a narrow band of frequencies around the cutoff
frequency. On the Low-Pass Filter, high levels of resonance can cause the
filter to self oscillate and generate its own pitch.
20
Filters
Dave Smith Instruments
High levels of resonance can sometimes cause the Prophet-6 outputs to clip
if its sound generators are also set to high output in the Mixer. Monitor your outputs
carefully to ensure optimal, clean signal levels. If you experience signal clipping, try
reducing the levels of the oscillators in the mixer section, the env amount parameter in
the Amplifier Envelope, or the resonance parameter in either the low-pass or high-pass
filter.
Env Amount: Sets the amount of modulation from the filter envelope to
the filters. Higher amounts more dramatically affect the cutoff frequency.
This control is bipolar. Positive settings produce standard behavior as
described in “Filter Envelope” on page 22. Negative settings invert the
envelope. Experiment with this control to create a variety of expressive
filtering effects.
Velocity: on, off—When enabled, allows key velocity to influence filter
frequency. If the env amount is set to a positive value on the low-pass
filter, the harder you play, the more the filter will open and the brighter
the sound will be. Conversely, if the env amount is set to a negative
value, the harder you play, the more the filter will close and the less
bright the sound will be. This control makes for more touch-sensitive
sounds
Keyboard: off, half, full—Sets the amount of modulation from the
keyboard to the filter’s cutoff frequency. Selecting half or full means
that the higher the note played on the keyboard, the more the filter opens.
This is useful for adding brightness to a sound as higher notes are played,
which is typically how acoustic instruments behave. If both half and full
are off, keyboard filter tracking is off, meaning that filter frequency is unaffected by playing higher or lower notes on the keyboard.
On the Low-Pass Filter, setting keyboard to full when the filter is self oscillating
will cause the filter-generated pitch to follow the keyboard in tune (i.e. in semitones).
Setting the keyboard to half will cause the filter-generated pitch to follow the keyboard
pitch in quarter tones.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Filters
21
Filter Envelope
The Prophet-6’s low-pass and high-pass filters share a dedicated, fourstage envelope generator. The Filter Envelope is used to shape the
harmonic characteristics of a synthesized sound by giving you filtering
control over its attack, decay, sustain, and release stages.
This is one of the most important factors in designing a sound. Without
an envelope, the filters would be completely static. They would stay
open or closed by a fixed amount that wouldn’t change over the duration
of a sound. That’s not very interesting to listen to and it’s not how instruments behave in the real world.
In general, sounds produced by an instrument are brighter at their beginning (the attack stage) and grow mellower as they die out (the decay
and release stages). In other words, their harmonic content changes over
time. This is exactly what the filter envelope is designed to emulate.
FILTER ENVELOPE
ATTACK
DECAY
SUSTAIN
RELEASE
Amplitude
Release
Sustain
Decay
Attack
Filter envelope
Time
A typical 4-stage envelope
22
Filter Envelope
Dave Smith Instruments
Attack: Sets the attack time of the envelope. The higher the setting, the
slower the attack time and the longer it takes for the filter(s) to open to
the level set with the filter cutoff knob. Percussive sounds typically have
sharp (short) attacks.
Decay: Sets the decay time of the envelope. After a sound reaches the
filter frequency set at its attack stage, decay controls how quickly the
filter then transitions to the cutoff frequency set with the sustain knob.
The higher the setting, the longer the decay. Percussive sounds, such as
synth bass, typically have shorter decays (and a generous amount of lowpass filter resonance).
Sustain: Sets the filter cutoff frequency for the sustained portion of the
sound. The sound will stay at this filter frequency for as long as a note is
held on the keyboard.
Release: Sets the release time of the envelope. This controls how
quickly the filter closes after a note is released.
The description of envelope behavior above is true when the envelope amount
parameter is set to a positive value. But since this control is actually bi-polar, it is
possible to set a negative amount of modulation. In this case, the envelopes are
inverted and their behavior changes. The best way to get a feel for the difference is to
experiment with both positive and negative settings of the envelope amount parameter.
The cutoff frequency setting may limit the effect of the envelope on the filter. For
example, on the low-pass filter, if cutoff is at its highest setting, a positive envelope
amount will have no effect on the filter since the filter is already completely open.
Changing the Filter Envelope’s Response Curve
By default, the envelopes of all synthesizers are designed to have certain
type of response curve that is largely dependent on the preference of the
designer. In most cases, this can’t be changed. The current preference is
that the faster or snappier the envelopes, the better.
However, in the case of the Prophet-6, there is a hidden feature in the
Poly Mod section that allows you to modify the responsiveness of the
Filter Envelope’s ADSR controls. This opens up a new level of fine
adjustment of these controls that is subtle but powerful. Try it and see.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Filter Envelope
23
To adjust the responsiveness of the filter envelope:
1. Select a program — such as a synth brass sound — that has a slightly
soft but bright attack.
2. Repeatedly play a series of notes or chords on the keyboard, so you can
hear the effect of the adjustments as you follow the steps below.
3. In the Poly Mod section, enable the lp filter as the only destination
(disable all other Poly Mod destinations such as freq 1, freq 2 etc.).
4. In the Poly Mod section, turn the filter env control slightly counterclockwise. Try a setting of about 11 o’clock.
5. Continue to play a series of chords and turn the env amount knob
clockwise in the low-pass filter section. Try moving it back and forth
between 1 o’clock and 3 o’clock.
6. As you do this, compare different settings of the Poly Mod filter env
control, the Low-Pass Filter env amount, and different Attack, Decay,
Sustain, and Release settings on the Filter Envelope.
The interaction of these controls is worth exploring for greater flexibility
and control of the Filter Envelope.
Amplifier Envelope
After passing through the filters, a synthesized sound goes into an analog
voltage controlled amplifier or VCA, which controls its overall loudness.
The VCA has a dedicated, four-stage envelope generator.
The Amplifier Envelope is used to shape the volume characteristics of
a sound over time by giving you control over its attack, decay, sustain,
and release stages. Along with the filter envelope, this is one of the most
important factors in designing a sound.
Without a volume envelope, the loudness of a sound wouldn’t change
over the duration of a note. It would begin immediately, remain at its full
volume for the duration of the note, then end immediately when the note
was released. Again, that’s not very interesting sonically and it’s not typically how instruments behave in the real world.
24
Amplifier Envelope
Dave Smith Instruments
To give you a real-world example, the main difference between the
sound of the wind and the sound of a snare drum is that they have very
different volume envelopes. Otherwise, they are essentially both white
noise. Wind has a relatively slow attack, a long sustain, and a long decay
and release. A snare drum has a sharp attack, no sustain, and virtually no
decay or release. But again, they are both fundamentally white noise.
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE
VELOCITY
ENV AMOUNT
ATTACK
DECAY
SUSTAIN
RELEASE
Amplitude
Release
Sustain
Decay
Attack
Amplifier envelope
Time
A typical four-stage, ADSR envelope shape
Attack: Sets the attack time of the envelope. The higher the setting, the
slower the attack time and the longer it takes for a sound to reach its full
volume. Pads typically have softer (longer) attacks. Percussive sounds
have sharper (shorter) attacks.
Decay: Sets the decay time of the envelope. After a sound reaches its full
volume at its attack stage, decay controls how quickly the sound transitions to the level set with the sustain control. The higher the setting, the
longer the decay. Percussive sounds, such as synth bass, typically have
shorter decays.
Sustain: Sets the sustain level of the envelope. The higher the setting,
the louder the sustained portion of the sound will be. The sound will stay
at this level for as long as a note is held on the keyboard.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Amplifier Envelope
25
Release: Sets the release time of the envelope. This controls how
quickly a sound dies out after a note is released.
Env Amount: Sets the amount of modulation from the Amplifier Envelope to the VCA. In most cases you will probably want to set this fully
clockwise for maximum VCA volume. If you experience signal clipping,
try reducing the env amount or the levels of the oscillators in the mixer
section.
To recreate the “gated VCA” effect used on certain classic rock anthems,
choose an organ sound, then set the vca env amount to zero, route the LFO square
wave to amp with an initial amt setting of 100% and hold a few chords.
Velocity: This button enables keyboard velocity to modulate the VCA
Envelope Amount. The harder you play, the more the VCA envelope is
affected. This makes for more touch-sensitive sounds.
Effects
The Prophet-6 effects section allows you to add up to two, 24-bit, 48 kHz
digital effects to any sound. Though the Prophet-6 sounds great on its own,
adding a touch of reverb or delay can enhance many sounds with a subtle
(or not so subtle) sense of ambience and depth. Other effects such as the
chorus and phaser are useful for adding more conspicuous tonal enhancement as well as emulating classic instruments such as string ensembles
and so on.
While the effects themselves are digital, the main signal path of the
Prophet-6 is analog, with the effects generated in a separate audio chain,
converted to analog, then added to the main signal path using the mix
knob. The on/off switch enables and disables both Effect A and Effect B,
using a true bypass, ensuring a pure analog signal path.
Effects settings are saved individually with each program. Time-based
effects such as the Delays can be synchronized to the arpeggiator, sequencer,
or MIDI clock to produce repeats that occur on the beat.
26
Effects
Dave Smith Instruments
EFFECTS
A
ON/OFF
EFFECT
2
CLOCK
B
TYPE
MIX
SYNC
1
The Effects section
Effects are divided into sets A and B. You can choose a single effect from
each set. Effect A and B are applied one after another, in series. For this
reason, reverb effects are only available as Effect B, since it’s the last
stage in the serial effects chain — where reverb is traditionally applied.
Either effect can also be set to “off.”
Effect A:
• Delay 1 (“bbd”) - vintage bucket-brigade emulation
• Delay 2 (“ddl”) - classic digital delay
• Chorus (“CHO”) - vintage chorus
• Phase Shifter 1 (“PH1”) vintage 6-stage phaser, high resonance
• Phase Shifter 2 (“PH2”) vintage 6-stage phaser, lower resonance
Effect B:
• Delay 1 (“bbd”) - vintage bucket-brigade emulation
• Delay 2 (“ddl”) - classic standard digital delay
• Chorus (“CHO”) - vintage chorus
• Phase Shifter 1 (“PH1”) vintage 6-stage phaser, high resonance
• Phase Shifter 2 (“PH2”) vintage 6-stage phaser, lower resonance
• Reverb 1 (“HAL”) - classic hall emulation
• Reverb 2 (“rOO”) - classic room emulation
• Reverb 3 (“PLA”) - classic plate emulation
• Reverb 4 (“SPr”) - vintage guitar-amp-style spring emulation
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Effects
27
To use Effects:
1. Press the on/off switch to turn on Effects.
2. Press effect and choose A or B, depending on which you want to apply
and configure.
3. Turn the type knob to select an effect. Names are abbreviated. For
instance “bbd” is the bucket-brigade delay. Refer to the list above.
4. Turn the mix knob to the right to blend in a good amount of the processed
signal. You’ll want to be able to clearly hear the effect when you tweak its
settings. You can dial it down afterward.
5. Use the parameter 1 and parameter 2 knobs to adjust the effect’s parameters to your taste. See “Effects Parameters” on page 29 for details
on the adjustable parameters on each effect type.
6. Finally, adjust the mix knob to optimize the amount of the effect. Full
left is completely dry. Full right is completely wet (a 100% processed
signal).
7. Repeat as needed to add a second effect.
Main Parameters
On/Off: Turns both effects, A and B, on and off. The on/off switch uses a
true bypass, ensuring a pure analog signal path.
Effect: A, B—Selects either effect A or B for editing. Once selected, all
adjustments apply to that effect.
Type: Off, bbd, ddl, CHO, PH1, PH2, HAL, rOO, PLA, SPr—Selects the effect type.
Mix: 0...127—Sets the balance between the processed (wet) signal
and unprocessed (dry) signal. Full left is completely dry. Full right is
completely wet.
Clock Sync: On, Off—When a delay effect is chosen, this enables syncing
of the timed delay repeats (feedback) to the Arpeggiator, Sequencer, or MIDI
clock. When Sync is on, delay time provides the following values:
28
Effects
Dave Smith Instruments
Value
Delay Time
1
2d
2
4t
4d
4
8d
8
8t
16d
16
4 beats
3 beats
2 beats
1 beat
1 1/2 beat
1 beat
3/4 of 1 beat
1/2 of 1 beat
1/2 of 1 beat
3/8 of 1 beat
1/4 of 1 beat
Maximum delay time is 1 second. The combination of longer synced delay
times with slower tempos can result in delay times that would be greater than 1
second. When that happens, the delay time is divided by 2 until it no longer exceeds
the 1 second limit. For example, if the BPM is set to 60 and Delay Time is set to Half,
the expected delay time would be 2 seconds. The actual delay time will be 1 second
(i.e. 2 seconds divided by 2).
Parameter 1: Variable, depending on the effect—This knob adjusts
parameter 1 for the chosen effect. Each effect has two adjustable parameters, which differ depending on the effect. See “Effects Parameters” on
page 29 for details about the adjustable parameters on each effect type.
Parameter 2: Variable, depending on the effect—This knob adjusts
parameter 2 for the chosen effect. Each effect has two adjustable parameters, which differ depending on the effect. See “Effects Parameters” on
page 29 for details about the adjustable parameters on each effect type.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Effects
29
Display
bbd
Effect Type
bucket-brigade delay
Parameter 1
delay time
Parameter 2
feedback amount
ddl
digital delay
delay time
feedback amount
cho
chorus
rate
depth
PH1
phaser 1
rate
depth
PH2
phaser 2
rate
depth
HAL
hall reverb
time
early reflections
rOO
room reverb
time
early reflections
PLA
plate reverb
time
early reflections
SPr
spring reverb
decay
tone
bbd: This is a vintage bucket-brigade delay emulation. Bucket-brigade
delays were originally a type of analog delay characterized by relatively
short delay times and a warmer character than digital delays due to their
loss of treble and clarity in the delayed analog signal. Adjustable parameters are delay time and feedback amount.
To recreate a classic bucket-brigade time-shifting effect, try adjusting the time
parameter in real time.
ddl: This is a classic digital delay, Adjustable parameters are delay time
and feedback amount.
CHO: This is a vintage chorus emulation. Use it to thicken and add
animation to any sound. Adjustable parameters are rate and depth.
PH1: This is a vintage phaser emulation with high resonance. Use it to
add a deep, sweeping, swirling resonant effect to a sound. Adjustable
parameters are rate and depth.
PH2: This is a vintage phaser emulation with lower resonance. Use it to
add a swirling resonant effect to a sound. Adjustable parameters are rate
and depth.
HAL: This is a Hall reverb. It’s the largest of the available reverbs. Adjustable parameters are reverb time and early reflection amount.
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Effects
Dave Smith Instruments
rOO: This is a Room reverb. It’s the second largest of the available reverbs.
Adjustable parameters are reverb time and early reflection amount.
PLA: This is a Plate reverb. It emulates a classic reverb plate. Adjustable
parameters are reverb time and early reflection amount.
SPr: This is a Spring reverb. It emulates a vintage, guitar-amp-style
reverb. Adjustable parameters are decay and tone.
Low Frequency Oscillators
The LFO is a special-purpose oscillator that produces a frequency below
the range of human hearing. The LFO is typically used for periodic
modulation such as vibrato (periodic pitch modulation) and tremolo
(periodic amplitude modulation).
The LFO on the Prophet-6 produces a variety of waveshapes, including
triangle, sawtooth, reverse sawtooth, square, and random. Though most
often used for low-frequency modulation, the Prophet-6 LFO can actually
function at speeds that extend into the audible range for extreme effects.
LOW FREQUENCY OSCILLATOR
FREQUENCY
LFO SYNC
SHAPE
INITIAL AMT
FREQ 1
FREQ 2
PW 1+2
AMP
FILTER
The Low-Frequency Oscillator
Triangle and Random waves are bipolar. That is, their waveshape is positive for half of their cycle and negative for the other half. In the case of the
triangle wave, this makes it possible to generate a natural-sounding vibrato
that goes alternately sharp and flat in equal amounts on either side of a center
frequency. Random, also known as “sample and hold,” generates a series
of random values, each held for the duration of one cycle
The square wave, sawtooth, and reverse sawtooth generate only positive
values. In the case of the square wave this makes it possible to generate naturalsounding trills.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Low Frequency Oscillators
31
Triangle
Sawtooth
Reverse
Sawtooth
Square
Random
0
LFO waveshapes
The Prophet-6 has a sixth “hidden” LFO waveshape that you can use as a
modulation source — noise. To access this, choose random then turn frequency all the
way clockwise. This generates a white noise waveform.
The LFO can be free-running or synced to the arpeggiator, sequencer, or
MIDI clock for tempo-synced effects such as filter sweeps, tremolo, and so on.
Frequency: Sets the frequency of the LFO waveshape routed to the
destination. See also “LFO Sync” below.
LFO Sync: When on, the LFO synchronizes with the arpeggiator,
sequencer, or MIDI clock. By default, the LFO wave cycle is reset when
you press a key (but is not reset if you press a key while other notes are
held).
Shape: Triangle, Sawtooth, Reverse Sawtooth, Square, Random—The
wave shape of the LFO. A sixth waveshape, noise, can be generated by
selecting random and turning the frequency knob all the way to the right.
Initial Amount: Sets the amount of LFO modulation routed to the
selected destinations. Setting an amount here applies the selected modulation continuously. If you set this parameter to zero but still select a
modulation destination, modulation is only applied when you use the
Mod Wheel.
Freq 1: Selects the frequency of Oscillator 1 as a modulation destination.
Use a triangle wave as a source to create vibrato. Use a square wave to
create trills.
Freq 2: Selects the frequency of Oscillator 2 as a modulation destination.
Use a triangle wave as a source to create vibrato. Use a square wave to
create trills.
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Low Frequency Oscillators
Dave Smith Instruments
PW 1+2: When Oscillator 1 and/or 2 is set to square wave, this modu-
lates the pulse width of the wave. Use a triangle wave LFO to create a
chorus-like effect often used to emulate strings.
Amp: Selects the amplitude level as a modulation destination. Use a
triangle wave LFO to create a tremolo effect.
LP Filter: Selects the Low-Pass Filter frequency as a modulation destination. Use a triangle wave LFO to create an auto-wah effect. Modulating
the Low-Pass Filter at high frequencies can create interesting timbres.
HP Filter: Selects the High-Pass Filter frequency as a modulation destination. Modulating the High-Pass Filter at high frequencies can create
interesting timbres.
Poly Mod
Although the overall sonic character of the Prophet-6 is determined by its
analog oscillators and filters, much of its power to make truly unique and
unusual sounds comes from the Poly Mod section.
POLY MOD
FILTER ENV
OSC 2
FREQ 1
SHAPE 1
PW 1
FILTER
The Poly Mod section
Poly Mod modulation sources:
• Filter envelope
• Oscillator 2 frequency
Poly Mod modulation destinations:
• Oscillator 1 frequency
• Oscillator 1 waveshape
• Oscillator 1 pulse width
• low-pass filter frequency
• high-pass filter frequency
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Poly Mod
33
You can control how much the source affects the destination by dialing in
a specific modulation amount with the filter env or osc 2 knobs. Modulation amount can either be positive or negative.
Use Poly Mod to create complex harmonic effects ranging from FM
(frequency modulation) to audio-rate filter modulation and beyond. Many
classic sounds on the original Prophet-5 were created through clever use
of Poly Mod.
Poly Mod Parameters
Filter Env: Selects the amount of modulation from the Filter Envelope
that is applied to a selected destination. Modulation amount can be either
positive or negative.
Osc 2: Selects the amount of modulation from Oscillator 2 that is applied
to a selected destination. Modulation amount can be either positive or
negative.
When using osc 2 as a modulation source, the modulation character is
affected by the waveshape currently chosen for Oscillator 2 (triangle, sawtooth, or
square/pulse). Try setting Oscillator 2 to low frequency (using the low freq switch) to
further increase modulation possibilities.
Freq 1: Selects Oscillator 1 frequency as a modulation destination.
Choose osc 2 as a modulation source to produce FM effects with their
characteristic complex harmonics and metallic timbre.
Shape 1: Selects the Oscillator 1 waveshape as a modulation destination.
This can animate the timbre of Oscillator 1 in interesting ways.
PW 1: When Oscillator 1 is set to pulse wave, choosing this as a destination modulates its pulse width. This will animate the timbre of Oscillator 1
in interesting ways.
LP Filter: Selects the Low-Pass Filter cutoff frequency as a modulation
destination.
HP Filter: Selects the High-Pass Filter cutoff frequency as a modulation destination.
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Poly Mod
Dave Smith Instruments
Arpeggiator
The Prophet-6 has a full-featured Arpeggiator. Turn it on, hold a chord
and the Prophet-6 will play a pattern based on the individual notes held.
Choose a mode (up, down, random, etc.), an octave range (1, 2, or 3),
and a tempo, then pair it with an appropriately percussive sound, and
you’ll be surprised at the number of creative things you can do.
When hold is active, the Arpeggiator is in “relatch” mode, where playing a new chord latches to the new chord rather than adding notes to the
existing chord.
If you enable hold, you can release the notes on the keyboard and the
Arpeggiator will continue to play. In addition, the Arpeggiator features
auto-latching: With hold on, played notes are held on and arpeggiated,
and any additional notes you play are added to the arpeggio—as long as
at least one key is continuously held.
You can sync the Arpeggiator to external MIDI clock, or even an external
audio signal. When the Arpeggiator is playing, the Sequencer is disabled.
CLOCK
TAP TEMPO
BPM
ARPEGGIATOR
VALUE
ON/OFF
OCTAVES
MODE
SEQUENCER
RECORD
PLAY
The Arpeggiator section
To use the Arpeggiator:
1. Press the Arpeggiator on/off switch to turn it on.
2. Hold down one or more notes on the keyboard. The Arpeggiator plays
them according to the settings you’ve chosen.
3. To latch arpeggiation on (so that you don’t have to continuously hold
down notes) press the hold button.
4. Adjust settings such as mode, octave, repeats, bpm and value.
5. To synchronize a delay effect to the Arpeggiator, turn on clock sync in
the Effects section, choose a delay, and adjust its delay time setting as
desired.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Arpeggiator
35
An audio signal connected to the rear-panel footswitch - sequence jack can be
used to control arpeggiator (and sequencer) playback. This makes it possible to tempo
sync the arpeggiator to a recorded drum track or other audio source. See “Seq Jack” on
page 13 for more information about choosing the appropriate mode for these behaviors.
Arpeggiator Parameters
Tap Tempo—Tapping the tap tempo button sets the tempo from 30 to
250 BPM. The LED flashes at the BPM rate you set. Tap the button at
least 4 times to set the tempo.
BPM: 30…250—Sets the tempo for the arpeggiator in BPM (beats per
minute). The tap tempo LED flashes at the BPM rate. When lfo sync is
enabled on the low-frequency oscillator, or clock sync is enabled in the
Effects section, the BPM rate affects the LFO frequency and/or delay effect.
When syncing to an external MIDI clock source, the BPM setting has no effect.
Value—Selects a basic note value relative to the BPM. See the table below:
Name
Half
Qtr
Tempo
BPM/2
BPM
Timing Division
Half note
Quarter note
8th
8th D
8th S
8th T
BPM x 2
BPM x 2
BPM x 2
BPM x 3
Eighth note
Eighth note, dot
Eighth note, swing timing
Eighth note triplets
16th
16th S
16th T
32nd
BPM x 4
BPM x 4
BPM x 6
BPM x 8
Sixteenth note
Sixteenth note, full swing timing
Sixteenth note triplets
Thirty-second note
On/Off—Turns the Arpeggiator on and off.
Octave: 1 Octave, 2 Octaves, 3 Octaves—Set to 1 Octave, only the
keyed notes are arpeggiated. Set to 2 Octaves, the keyed notes and the
notes one octave above them arpeggiate. Set to 3 Octaves, the keyed
notes and the notes one and two octaves above them arpeggiate.
Mode: Sets the order in which notes play when Arpeggiator is on. See the table.
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Arpeggiator
Dave Smith Instruments
Arp Mode
Behavior
Up
Plays from lowest to highest note
Down
Plays from highest to lowest note
Up + Down
Plays from lowest to highest and back to lowest
Random
Plays notes in random order
Assign
Plays notes in the order the keys were pressed
Sequencer
The Prophet-6’s sequencer is similar to a classic step sequencer. It allows
you to create a single sequence of up to 64 steps, including rests and ties,
with up to 6 notes per step. In addition, you can play along with a
sequence (provided there is available polyphony), making it a powerful
live performance tool. When the Sequencer is playing, the Arpeggiator is
disabled.
CLOCK
TAP TEMPO
BPM
ARPEGGIATOR
VALUE
ON/OFF
OCTAVES
MODE
SEQUENCER
RECORD
PLAY
The Sequencer/Arpeggiator
An audio signal connected to the rear-panel footswitch - sequence jack can
be used to control sequencer playback. This makes it possible to tempo sync the
sequencer (or arpeggiator) to a recorded drum track or other audio source. See “Seq
Jack” on page 13 for more information about choosing the appropriate mode for
these behaviors.
Programming the Sequencer
Though programming the sequencer is simple, you can create sequences that
are rhythmically and melodically complex by combining a repeating phrase
or bass line with chords, ties, and rests. You can play up to 64 steps with up
to 6 notes held simultaneously per step. For most sequences you’ll probably
want to use sounds with a relatively sharp attack and short release.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Sequencer
37
Most factory programs have a sequence associated with them. Recall a
program and press the Sequencer’s play button to hear its associated sequence.
To program a note sequence:
1. Press the record button.
2. Perform the sequence on the keyboard. The display indicates the
current step as you play.
When recording a chord as a step, as long as you continue to hold at least one
note down, you can keep adding notes to the chord/step, and even use the transpose
buttons to extend the keyboard range while doing it.
3. To add a rest as you play, press the tens/increment button for that step,
then continue playing.
4. To add a “tie” that extends the length of a note, continue to hold down
the note(s) and press the tens/increment button repeatedly to extend the
note the number of steps you want.
5. When you’re done, press play to listen to your sequence.
6. To save the sequence, save the program and they are saved together.
(See “Saving a Program” on page 5.)
If you want to play live along with the sequencer, be sure to leave voices available. In other words, don’t play 6-note chords for every step in the sequence!
To play a sequence:
1. Press play. The sequence plays back at the current BPM setting.
2. To stop playback, press play again.
Alternatively, you can start and stop sequencer playback using a footswitch
connected to the rear-panel seq jack or using MIDI start/stop messages sent from a
DAW or other MIDI device. See “Seq Jack” on page 13 for more information.
Use the bpm, value, or tap tempo controls to adjust sequencer playback speed.
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Sequencer
Dave Smith Instruments
To transpose a sequence:
1. Press play. The sequence begins playback.
2. Press and hold record and press a key on the keyboard. “Middle C”
is the reference point. Playing a note above middle C transposes the
sequence higher by that interval. Playing a note below middle C transposes the sequence lower by that interval.
Sequencer Parameters
Here are the controls and parameters used when interacting with the sequencer.
Record: On, Off—This switch turns sequencer recording on and off.
Play: On, Off—This switch turns sequencer playback on and off.
BPM: 30…250—Sets the tempo for the Sequencer and Arpeggiator in BPM
(beats per minute). The tap tempo LED flashes at the BPM rate. When lfo
sync is turned on, the BPM rate affects the LFO frequency. When syncing to
an external MIDI clock source, the BPM setting has no effect.
Tap Tempo: 30…250—Tap this button at least 4 times to quickly set the
tempo for the Sequencer and Arpeggiator. The LED flashes at the BPM
rate you set.
Value: Sets the note value for each sequencer/arpeggiator step relative
to the BPM. value works with both internal and external clock sources.
The following table lists the values:
Name
Half
Qtr
Tempo
BPM/2
BPM
Timing Division
Half note
Quarter note
8th
8th D
BPM x 2
BPM x 2
Eighth note
Eighth note, dot
8th S
BPM x 2
Eighth note, swing timing
8th T
BPM x 3
Eighth note triplets
16th
16th S
16th T
32nd
BPM x 4
BPM x 4
BPM x 6
BPM x 8
Sixteenth note
Sixteenth note, full swing timing
Sixteenth note triplets
Thirty-second note
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Sequencer
39
Master Volume/Program Volume
The master output level of the Prophet-6 is controlled by the front-panel
master vol knob. In addition, the volume of an individual program
can be set with the prgm vol knob in the misc parameters section. This
is useful for ensuring that your sounds have roughly the same volume
from program to program. Unison sounds in particular can be very loud
compared to other programs.
MASTER VOL
The Master Volume knob
MISC PARAMETERS
PAN SPREAD
KEY MODE
P WHL RANGE
PRGM VOL
The program volume knob (prgm vol) in the misc parameters section
To set the volume of an individual program:
1. Choose a program.
2. In the misc parameters section, turn the prgm vol knob to set its
volume.
3. Save the program. (See “Saving a Program” on page 4.)
MIDI volume can also influence the overall volume of the Prophet-6 if you are
controlling it from an external MIDI source.
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Sequencer
Dave Smith Instruments
Distortion
The Prophet-6 provides stereo analog distortion. This can be used to
add warmth, harmonic complexity, and an aggressive edge to sounds.
The character of the distortion is affected by the harmonic content of a
program. Sounds with more high-end will sound different than sounds
with fewer harmonics. To add distortion, use the distortion knob.
DISTORT
AMOUNT
The Distortion knob
Transpose
The up and down buttons in the transpose section transpose the keyboard
up or down in octaves. The LED indicates the current keyboard transposition state. Transposing the keyboard also changes the MIDI note
numbers of the keys so that MIDI notes sent are also transposed. Transpose settings are global and are not saved with individual programs.
0
DOWN
UP
TRANSPOSE
The Transpose controls
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Distortion
41
Hold
When hold is on, any notes played will continue to play until hold is
turned off. When used in conjunction with the Arpeggiator, notes are
latched on and replaced by any new note(s) struck. If hold is on and at
least one key continuously held down, any new notes played are added to
the arpeggio.
HOLD
The Hold button
Glide
Glide or portamento causes the pitch of a note to glide up or down from
the pitch of the previously played note. Glide is turned on and off using
the glide switch, but the glide amount must also be set. If the glide
button is on, but glide amount is set to 0, glide has no effect.
GLIDE RATE
GLIDE
The Glide controls
There are four modes that determine how glide behaves.
Fixed Rate (FR):The time to transition between notes varies with the
interval between the notes; the greater the interval, the longer the transition time. The glide rate is fixed. This is the default glide mode.
Fixed Rate A (FRA): The same as Fixed Rate, but glide is only applied
when playing legato. That is, glide only occurs when a note is held until
the next note is played. This effectively allows glide to be turned on and
off from the keyboard.
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Hold
Dave Smith Instruments
Fixed Time (FT): Glide is set to a fixed time, regardless of the interval
between notes.
Fixed Time A (FTA): The same as Fixed Time, but glide only occurs
when playing legato.
To select a glide mode:
1. Press and hold the glide switch. The numeric display shows the
currently selected Glide mode.
2. To select a different mode, continue to hold down the glide switch then
press the bank/decrement and tens/increment switches to step through
the other choices.
3. When finished, release the glide switch.
Unison
When unison is on, the Prophet-6 functions like a monophonic
synthesizer in that only 1 note can be played at a time. However, that
one note can be powered by as many as six voices, depending on how
many you choose to use. With up to 12 oscillators powering a single
note (2 oscillators per voice x 6 voices), you can create some very dense,
speaker-rattling sounds.
If you want to create an ultra heavy synth bass, try using Unison!
Unison gives you control over not only how many voices to stack, but
also the amount of detuning between the oscillators, and what note gets
priority if you happen to play more than one note on the keyboard. (This
is called the key assign mode or note priority. See “Key Assign Modes”
on page 45 for details.)
UNISON
The Unison button
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Unison
43
To use Unison:
1. Press and hold the unison switch.
2. With the Unison switch held down, use the bank/decrement and tens/
increment switches to choose the number of voices to stack, then
release the Unison switch.
3. To detune the oscillators, use the slop knob.
Using Chord Memory
Unison has another useful feature: chord memory. Instead of assigning
voices to a single note, hold down a chord on the keyboard and press the
Unison switch. The Prophet-6 memorizes the notes of the chord. Single
notes played on the keyboard will then trigger all notes of the stored
chord, transposing them as you play up or down the keyboard. Try using
this feature to create powerful chord stabs and hits.
If you save a program that uses chord memory, the chord is saved with
the program. “CHD” will then appear as a choice if you step through
voice stacking options using the banks/decrement and tens/increment
buttons while holding down unison.
If low-note priority is chosen in Global settings, the note that you play corresponds to the lowest note of the chord voicing. Changing the Key Assign Mode to
high-note priority will make the note that you play correspond to the highest note in
the chord voicing.
To use chord memory:
1. Hold down a chord on the keyboard (6 notes maximum).
2. Press the unison switch. The chord voicing is memorized. Play a few
notes to listen to the result.
3. If you save the program, the unison chord memory is saved with it.
To clear chord memory:
1. Turn off Unison.
2. Hold down a single note.
3. Press the unison button.
4. Save the program again.
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Unison
Dave Smith Instruments
Key Assign Modes
Key Assign (sometimes called note priority) determines what note has
priority when more than one note is played on the keyboard or via MIDI:
• Low-note priority (LO) is most common in vintage synths and is often
used for playing trills by holding a note and repeatedly tapping a lower
note.
• Low retrigger (LOr) causes the envelopes to be retriggered with each
keystroke.
•
High note (Hi) and high retrigger (Hir) are similar to the low note
settings, except that the highest note is given priority.
• Last note (LAS) and last retrigger (LAr) give priority to the last note
played.
To choose the Key Assign mode:
1. Press and hold key mode in the misc parameters section. The numeric
display shows the currently selected mode.
2. To select a different mode, continue to hold down the key mode switch
then press the bank/decrement and tens/increment switches to step
through the other choices.
3. Release the key mode switch when you’re finished.
Key Assign settings are only relevant to Unison mode. They do not affect polyphonic playback.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Unison
45
Write
The write button saves the currently active program. Saving a program
overwrites a previously saved program.
The Prophet-6 contains a total of 1000 programs. 500 are permanent and
500 can be overwritten. Banks 0-4 are User Banks that can be overwritten. Banks 5-9 are Factory Banks that are permanent. You can edit the
programs of either bank, but you can only save them to Banks 0-4. As
shipped from the factory, presets 000-499 are identical to 500-999.
WRITE
The Write button
Decrement
Increment
Transpose
Master Tune
MIDI Channel
MIDI Clock
Clock Port
Param Xmit
Param Rcv
MIDI Control
MIDI SysEx
BANK
TENS
Local Ctrl
Seq Jack
Pot Mode
Sustain +/-
Alt Tuning
Vel Response
AT Response
Stereo/Mono
Pgm Dump
SELECT
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
SELECT
BANK
PROGRAM
MIDI Out
9
Program bank, tens, and number selectors
To save a program to the same preset location:
1. Press the write button. Its LED begins blinking.
2. Press a program selector button (0-9) to specify the “ones” digit of the
program.
3. The write button LED stops blinking and the program is saved.
To save a program to a different bank location:
1. Press the write button. Its LED begins blinking.
2. Hold down the bank button then press a program selector button (0-9)
to specify the “hundreds” bank of the program. You can only save to
Banks 0-4.
3. Hold down the tens button then press a program selector button (0-9)
to specify the “tens” digit of the program.
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Write
Dave Smith Instruments
4. Press a program selector button (0-9) to specify the “ones” digit of the
program.
5. The write button LED stops blinking and the program is saved.
Canceling Save
Sometimes you may want to cancel saving a program before you
commit.
To cancel the Save process before you commit:
• If the write button LED is flashing, press it again. The LED stops flashing and saving is canceled. You can return to editing if you want.
Comparing Before You Save
Before writing a program to a new location, it’s a good idea to listen to the
program in the target location to make sure you really want to overwrite it.
To evaluate a program before you overwrite it:
1. Get ready to save by pressing the write button. It starts flashing.
2. Press the global button. Both LEDs on the button light up, indicating
compare mode.
3. Use the program buttons to navigate to the sound you want to compare
and play the keyboard to hear the sound.
4. To disable the compare function and go back to the edited sound, turn
off the global button. Programs can’t be written while in compare
mode.
5. If you want to save the edited sound, the write button is still flashing
and ready to save, so enter a location with the program buttons. The
sound is saved.
6. Alternatively, if you want to cancel saving and continue editing, press
the write button. It stops flashing and saving is canceled.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Write
47
Globals
Global settings are parameters that affect all programs. These include
settings such as Master Tune, MIDI Channel, MIDI Clock, and others.
Global parameters are printed in two rows the program number switches
(0 - 9). Press the Globals switch once to access the top row. Press it twice
to access the bottom row. For details on the various Global parameters,
see “Global Settings” on page 10.
GLOBALS
The Globals button
To change a Global setting:
1. Press the globals button. Pressing it once accesses the top row of
Global parameters. Pressing it twice accesses the top row of Global
parameters. The LED indicates which row is active.
2. Press the program selector button that corresponds to the Global
parameter you want to change.
3. Use the bank/decrement and tens/increment buttons to step through
the available settings until you reach the one you want.
4. When finished, press globals again to exit.
Pressing the globals button three times in a row saves the current program as
the default program that appears when you turn on the Prophet-6.
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Globals
Dave Smith Instruments
Preset
The preset switch toggles “live panel” mode on and off. In live panel
mode the Prophet-6 ignores the currently active preset and reverts to the
current front-panel settings of its knobs and switches. In other words,
what you see on the front panel is what you hear. This is a great mode for
learning, experimentation, and instant gratification.
PRESET
The Preset button
To enter live panel mode:
• Press the preset button to toggle it off. The Prophet-6 is now in live
panel mode. What you see on the front panel is what you hear. Note
that you can’t change programs or banks with Preset off.
To return to preset mode:
• Press the preset button again to toggle it on. The LED is lit. The
current program is what you hear.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Preset
49
Pitch and Mod Wheels
The Prophet-6 has a spring loaded Pitch wheel and a Mod wheel. You
can use these controls to enhance live performance by bending notes and
adding modulation in real time as you play.
In the same way that guitar players use note bends and vibrato to give
their playing expressiveness and character, these two controls can really
help you define your sound as a performer and take you beyond just
playing notes on the keyboard.
Pitch
Mod
The Pitch and Modulation wheels
Pitch Wheel
You can set a range in semitones for the Pitch wheel, depending on your
playing preference. The range is up to 12 semitones (1 octave). Many
musicians use a range of 2 semitones (a whole step) since this is the bend
range of many acoustic instruments. For guitar whammy bar effects, you
many wish to set a wider range.
To set the pitch bend range:
1. In the misc parameters section, press and hold the p whl range button.
2. With the button still held down, use the bank/decrement and tens/
increment switches to choose the number of semitones (up to 12) for
the pitch bend range, then release the p whl range button.
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Pitch and Mod Wheels
Dave Smith Instruments
Modulation Wheel
The Mod wheel controls the amount of modulation applied to any destinations chosen in the low-frequency oscillator section. This allows you to
“perform” LFO modulation in real time by moving the Mod wheel. This is a
great way to add expressiveness to a sound or performance.
To choose a modulation destination for the Mod wheel:
1. In the low-frequency oscillator section, choose a modulation destination as well as a shape and frequency for the LFO. (See “Low
Frequency Oscillators” on page 31 for more details.)
2. To apply modulation only when using the Mod wheel, set the initial
amt knob to zero. (Turing this knob up will apply LFO modulation
continuously — not just when the Mod wheel is used.)
Many programs use the Mod wheel to add vibrato. In this case, Freq 1 and
Freq 2 are enabled as modulation destinations in the low-frequency oscillator
section. This adds vibrato when you push the mod wheel forward. Set the initial amt
knob to zero to apply vibrato only when using the Mod wheel.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Pitch and Mod Wheels
51
Misc Parameters
The misc parameters section allows you to access controls for a number
of essential functions described below. To set the key mode and p whl
range, hold down the associated button in the misc parameters section,
then use the bank/decrement and ten/increment buttons to step through
available settings.
MISC PARAMETERS
PAN SPREAD
KEY MODE
P WHL RANGE
PRGM VOL
The Misc Parameters controls
Pan Spread: Pans the audio in the stereo field individually per voice. Set
to 0, all voices are panned to the center. As Pan Spread is turned up, the
audio in each voice is gradually moved away from the center by greater
amounts. Every other voice goes in a different direction, left or right.
This creates a broader stereo field while playing.
Key Mode: Low Note (LO), High Note (Hi), Last Note (Las), Low
Note Retrigger (LOr), High Note Retrigger (Hir), Last Note Retrigger
(LAr)—Selects the key priority when more than one key is played
simultaneously in when in Unison mode. low note, high note and last
are monophonic playback modes that give priority to the lowest,
highest, or last note played, as their names imply.
note
P Wheel Range: 0...12 Semitones— Selects the range in semitones
when moving the Pitch Wheel forward or backward. Twelve semitones
equals 1 octave.
Program Volume: Sets the volume of an individual program. This is
useful for matching volume between programs.
There is enough gain in the Prophet-6 that if you set some programs to a
high program volume, clipping distortion may occur. If this happens, try lowering the
program volume, the levels of the oscillators in the Mixer, the VCA envelope amount, or
the resonance parameter of the low-pass or high-pass filter.
52
Misc Parameters
Dave Smith Instruments
Aftertouch
Aftertouch is a performance feature that allows you to add modulation to
a sound by applying additional pressure to a key after the key is already
down. The greater the pressure applied, the more modulation is applied.
The Prophet-6 provides monophonic (or “channel”) aftertouch, which
means that applying pressure to any key within a chord will apply modulation to all notes currently held.
The Aftertouch section lets you choose the amount of modulation
applied using aftertouch and which parameters are modulated (oscillator frequency, filter cutoff, etc.). You can set either a positive or negative
amount.
For example, if you select the Low-Pass Filter as destination (filter lp),
set a positive amount of aftertouch, then press the keys harder, the filter
cutoff frequency will increase, making the filter open wider and the
sound become brighter.
Conversely, if you select the Low-Pass Filter as destination (filter lp),
set a negative amount of aftertouch, then press the keys harder, the filter
cutoff frequency will be lowered, making the filter close more and the
sound become more muted.
The Prophet-6 provides four different aftertouch response settings for your
convenience. The default setting provides a linear response. To choose a different
response curve, use the at response button in the globals section. See page 14 for
more details.
AFTERTOUCH
AMOUNT
FREQ 1
FREQ 2
LFO AMT
AMP
FILTER
The Aftertouch controls
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Aftertouch
53
Amount: Selects the amount of aftertouch applied to a selected destination. Positive amount settings apply positive amounts of modulation.
Negative amount settings apply negative amounts of modulation.
Freq 1: Selects Oscillator 1 frequency as an aftertouch modulation destination. With a positive amount setting, pressing the keys harder will shift
the Oscillator 1 pitch upward. With a negative amount setting, pressing
the keys harder will shift the Oscillator 1 pitch downward.
Freq 2: Selects Oscillator 2 frequency as an aftertouch modulation destination. With a positive amount setting, pressing the keys harder will shift
the Oscillator 2 pitch upward. With a negative amount setting, pressing
the keys harder will shift the Oscillator 2 pitch downward.
LFO Amount: Selects the lfo amount parameter as an aftertouch modu-
lation destination. With a positive amount setting, pressing the keys
harder will increase the amount of LFO modulation to any destination selected in the low-frequency oscillator section. With a negative
amount setting, pressing the keys harder will increase the amount of
LFO modulation — with the LFO waveform inverted.
Amp: Selects Amplitude as an aftertouch modulation destination. With
a positive amount setting, pressing the keys harder will increase the
volume of a sound. With a negative amount setting, pressing the keys
harder will decrease the volume of a sound.
If the Amplifier Envelope’s env amount is set to full, positive amounts of amp
aftertouch will have no effect since the VCA is already at its maximum output level.
LP Filter: Selects the Low-Pass Filter cutoff frequency as a modulation
destination. With a positive amount setting, pressing the keys harder will
open the filter wider and make a sound become brighter. With a negative
amount setting, pressing the keys harder will close the filter more and
make a sound more muted.
54
Aftertouch
Dave Smith Instruments
HP Filter: Selects the High-Pass Filter cutoff frequency as a modulation
destination. With a positive amount setting, pressing the keys harder will
increase the high-pass cutoff frequency, reducing the low-end of a sound.
With a negative amount setting, pressing the keys harder will decrease
the high-pass cutoff frequency allowing more low frequencies to pass.
Controlling the low-pass or high-pass filter frequency with Aftertouch may or
may not have an audible effect, depending on the cutoff frequency of the filter.
Exporting Programs and Banks
You can use the pgm dump command in the globals section to transmit the
current program, bank, or all banks in SysEx format via the selected
MIDI port. This allows you to save your programs so that you can share
them or archive them.
To export a program or bank as a SysEx file over MIDI:
1. Press the globals button once (this enables the upper set of parameters)
then press program selector 8 to select the midi sysex command.
2. Use the bank/decrement and tens/increment buttons to select the
appropriate MIDI port — MIDI (MID) or USB (usb).
3. Press globals a second time (this enables the lower set of parameters)
then press program selector 8 to select the pgm dump command. The
write button begins flashing.
4. Use the bank/decrement and tens/increment buttons to select the
desired option — program (PRO), tens (ten), bank (ban), user banks
(USR), all (all).
5. Press write. The program or bank is exported.
Dumped programs will load back into the same bank and program location in
memory when received by the Prophet-6 via MIDI.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Exporting Programs and Banks
55
Calibrating the Prophet-6
The Prophet-6 is calibrated at the factory. Controls such as the pitch and
mod wheels shouldn’t require re-calibration. However, because its oscillators and filters are voltage controlled and can be affected by extremes
of temperature, you may need to use the built-in calibration function to
tune them occasionally.
How and When to Calibrate the Oscillators and Filters
The first time you use the Prophet-6, please run its built-in oscillator and
filter calibration procedure. Let it warm up for several minutes and come
to its normal operating temperature before doing so.
Repeat the calibration procedure as needed over the next few days of
use. The Prophet-6 learns the range of temperatures at your location and
will keep itself in tune over this range.
Later, if you use the Prophet-6 in a different environment that is measurably warmer or cooler (on stage, in an air-conditioned studio, and so on)
run the calibration procedure again.
To calibrate the oscillators and filters:
1. Hold down the preset button and press 0.
2. The front panel LEDs and display begin flashing as the Prophet-6
performs its auto-calibration procedure. Don’t turn off the power while
it’s doing this.
3. When finished, the front panel controls will return to normal and you
can play the Prophet-6 again.
56
Calibrating the Prophet-6
Dave Smith Instruments
Calibrating the Pitch and Mod Wheels
In general, the Pitch and Mod wheels shouldn’t require re-calibration.
However, if you experience what seems like a persistent problem with
either of them, the Prophet-6 has built-in auto-calibration procedure that
you can use to remedy the problem.
To calibrate the Pitch and Mod wheel’s low position:
1. Rotate and hold both wheels in their low position.
2. Hold down the preset button and press 7.
To calibrate the Pitch wheel’s center position:
• With the Pitch wheel centered, hold down the preset button and press 8.
To calibrate the Pitch and Mod wheel’s high position:
1. Rotate and hold both wheels in their high position.
2. Hold down the preset button and press 9.
Resetting the Global Parameters
If you’re trying to track down a problem, it’s sometimes a good idea to
reset the Global parameters to their defaults. This is a quick way to make
sure that the Prophet-6 returns to its factory settings.
To reset all Global parameters to their default settings:
• Hold down the global button and press write.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Calibrating the Prophet-6
57
Using USB
The Prophet-6’s USB 2.0 port enables bidirectional MIDI communication with a computer. A MIDI interface and MIDI cables are not necessary, just a USB cable. The Prophet-6 is a Class Compliant USB device.
That means it does not require any additional drivers to be installed to
communicate with a Mac or Windows computer. The Prophet-6 transmits
and receives MIDI data via USB, but does not transmit audio.
MIDI In and USB should not be used at the same time, as overlapping
messages from different sources may cause the Prophet-6 to respond unpredictably.
MIDI Out and USB can be used at the same time and transmit the same data.
USB Notes
Under Mac OS X, “Prophet-6 Keyboard” will appear as a MIDI port
when connected via USB and can be configured using the Mac’s Audio
MIDI Setup utility (typically found in Applications/Utilities).
Under Windows, the first time the Prophet-6 is connected via USB, the
“Found new hardware” alert appears and it is automatically installed as
“Prophet-6 Keyboard.”
In Windows, if you unplug the USB cable and plug it back in while a
program has the Prophet-6 port open, you may have to resync. That
usually means going to the Prophet-6 Keyboard Properties — in the
Windows Device Manager under “Sound, video, and game controllers”
— and clicking OK. If Prophet-6 Keyboard is no longer listed in the
Device Manager, power the Prophet-6 down and back up again while it
is connected via USB. It should be detected on power up.
58
Using USB
Dave Smith Instruments
Appendix A: Alternative Tunings
By default, the Prophet-6 is set to standard, chromatic western tuning.
Additionally it supports up to 16 additional alternative tunings, which
you can access using the alt tuning button in the globals section.
From the factory, the Prophet-6 ships with 16 preset alternative tunings
ranging from Equal temperament to Indonesian Gamelan tunings. If you
want, you can replace these with other tunings that you can find on the
Internet. These must be in SysEx format. You can download them into
the Prophet-6 using SysEx Librarian for Mac or MIDI-OX for Windows.
Here are descriptions of the default alternative tunings:
Nor (Normal) 12 Tone Equal Temperament (non-erasable)
The default Western tuning, based on the twelfth root of two.
1. Harmonic Series
MIDI notes 36-95 reflect harmonics 2 through 60 based on the fundamental of A = 27.5 Hz. The low C on a standard 5 octave keyboard acts
as the root note (55Hz), and the harmonics play upwards from there. The
remaining keys above and below the 5 octave range are filled with the
same intervals as Carlos’ Harmonic 12 Tone that follows.
2. Carlos Harmonic Twelve Tone
Wendy Carlos’ twelve note scale based on octave-repeating harmonics.
A = 1/1 (440 Hz). 1/1 17/16 9/8 19/16 5/4 21/16 11/8 3/2 13/8 27/16 7/4
15/8
3. Meantone Temperament
An early tempered tuning, with better thirds than 12ET. Sounds best in
the key of C. Use this to add an authentic touch to performances of early
Baroque music. C=1/1 (260 Hz)
4. 1/4 Tone Equal Temperament
24 notes per octave, equally spaced 24root2 intervals. Mexican composer
Julian Carillo used this for custom-built pianos in the early 20th century.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix A: Alternative Tunings
59
5. 19 Tone Equal Temperament
19 notes per octave (19root2) offering better thirds than 12 ET, a better
overall compromise if you can figure out the keyboard patterns.
6. 31 Tone Equal Temperament
Many people consider 31root2 to offer the best compromise towards just
intonation in an equal temperament, but it can get very tricky to keep
track of the intervals.
7. Pythagorean C
One of the earliest tuning systems known from history, the Pythagorean
scale is constructed from an upward series of pure fifths (3/2) transposed
down into a single octave. The tuning works well for monophonic melodies against fifth drones, but has a very narrow palate of good chords to
choose from. C=1/1 (261.625 Hz)
1/1 256/243 9/8 32/27 81/64 4/3 729/512 3/2 128/81 27/16 16/9 243/128
8. Just Intonation in A with 7-limit Tritone at D#
A rather vanilla 5-limit small interval JI, except for a single 7/5 tritone
at D#, which offers some nice possibilities for rotating around bluesy
sevenths. A=1/1 (440 Hz) 1/1 16/15 9/8 6/5 5/4 7/5 3/2 8/5 5/3 9/5 15/8
9. 3-5 Lattice in A
A pure 3 and 5-limit tuning which resolves to very symmetrical derived
relationships between notes. A=1/1 (440 Hz)
1/1 16/15 10/9 6/5 5/4 4/3 64/45 3/2 8/5 5/3 16/9 15/8
10. 3-7 Lattice in A
A pure 3 and 7-limit tuning which resolves to very symmetrical derived
relationships between notes. Some of the intervals are very close
together, offering several choices for the same nominal chords. A=1/1
(440 Hz)
1/1 9/8 8/7 7/6 9/7 21/16 4/3 3/2 32/21 12/7 7/4 63/32
60
Appendix A: Alternative Tunings
Dave Smith Instruments
11. Other Music 7-Limit Black Keys in C
Created by the group Other Music for their homemade gamelan, this
offers a wide range of interesting chords and modes. C=1/1 (261.625 Hz)
1/1 15/14 9/8 7/6 5/4 4/3 7/5 3/2 14/9 5/3 7/4 15/8
12. Dan Schmidt Pelog/Slendro
Created for the Berkeley Gamelan group, this tuning fits an Indonesianstyle heptatonic Pelog on the white keys and pentatonic Slendro on the
black keys, with B and Bb acting as 1/1 for their respective modes. Note
that some of the notes will have the same frequency. By tuning the 1/1 to
60 Hz, Dan found a creative way to incorporate the inevitable line hum
into his scale. Bb, B = 1/1 (60 Hz)
1/1 1/1 9/8 7/6 5/4 4/3 11/8 3/2 3/2 7/4 7/4 15/8
13. Yamaha Just Major C
When Yamaha decided to put preset microtunings into their FM synth
product line, they selected this and the following tuning as representative
just intonations. As such, they became the de-facto introduction to JI for
many people. Just Major gives preferential treatment to major thirds on
the sharps, and a good fourth relative to the second. C= 1/1 (261.625)
1/1 16/15 9/8 6/5 5/4 4/3 45/32 3/2 8/5 5/3 16/9 15/8
14. Yamaha Just Minor C
Similar to Yamaha’s preset Just Major, the Just Minor gives preferential
treatment to minor thirds on the sharps, and has a good fifth relative to
the second. C= 1/1 (261.625) 1/1 25/24 10/9 6/5 5/4 4/3 45/32 3/2 8/5
5/3 16/9 15/8
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix A: Alternative Tunings
61
15. Harry Partch 11-limit 43 Note Just Intonation
One of the pioneers of modern microtonal composition, Partch built
a unique orchestra with this tuning during the first half of the 20th
century, to perform his own compositions. The large number of intervals
in this very dense scale offers a full vocabulary of expressive chords
and complex key changes. The narrow spacing also allows fixedpitched instruments like marimbas and organs to perform glissando-like
passages. G = 1/1 (392 Hz, MIDI note 67)
1/1 81/80 33/32 21/20 16/15 12/11 11/10 10/9 9/8 8/7 7/6 32/27 6/5 11/9
5/4 14/11 9/7 21/16 4/3 27/20 11/8 7/5 10/7 16/11 40/27 3/2 32/21 14/9
11/7 8/5 18/11 5/3 27/16 12/7 7/4 16/9 9/5 20/11 11/6 15/8 40/21 64/33
160/81
16. Arabic 12-Tone
A 12-tone approximation of an Arabic scale, which appears in some electronic keyboards designed for use with Arabic music. Not a JI scale, nor
equal tempered. These are the intervals in Cents relative to C:
60 = Cents 0. 61 = Cents +151. 62 = Cents +204. 63 = Cents +294. 64 = Cents +355. 65 = Cents +498.
66 = Cents +649. 67 = Cents +702. 68 = Cents +853. 69 = Cents +906. 70 = Cents +996. 71 = Cents +1057. 72 = Cents +1200
62
Appendix A: Alternative Tunings
Dave Smith Instruments
Appendix B: Troubleshooting
and Support
Troubleshooting
If you’re experiencing problems or unexpected behavior from your
Prophet-6, here are a few typical scenarios and their solutions:
The sequencer or arpeggiator has stopped running.
Check the MIDI Clock setting in the Globals to ensure the Prophet-6 is
set to out or, if set to in or slave thru, make sure the Prophet-6 is receiving MIDI clock.
Some of the programs sound different than usual.
Check the Mod Wheel position. The Mod Wheel can do more than just
add vibrato. Also, check the Clock settings in the Global menu to ensure
the Prophet-6 is set to out or, if set to in or slave thru, make sure the
Prophet-6 is receiving MIDI clock.
There is a ground hum in the audio output.
USB can cause ground loops, so try to resolve any grounding issues between
the computer and the Prophet-6. Or use MIDI, which is opto-isolated.
The Prophet-6 is behaving erratically.
This is almost always caused by a MIDI data loop. Make sure that any
MIDI Thru functionality is turned off on the MIDI interface/hardware or
in the MIDI software application. Disconnect all the Prophet-6’s MIDI
connections—MIDI and USB cables—and see if the problem persists.
You can also monitor the MIDI traffic with MIDI Monitor (Mac OS)
or MIDI-OX (Windows) to see if the Prophet-6 is being overrun with
duplicate messages.
The Prophet-6 doesn’t seem to respond to its controls.
Make sure Local Control is on in the Global settings.
MIDI System Exclusive data is not transmitted/received.
Make sure that the MIDI SysEx setting in the Global settings is set to usb
or midi depending on which you are using to transmit or receive MIDI
messages.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix B: Troubleshooting and Support
63
The Prophet-6 plays out of tune.
Check Transpose and Master Tune parameters in the Global settings. If
they seem correct, you may need to retune the oscillators. See “Calibrating the Prophet-6” on page 56. If this doesn’t help, recalibrate the
pitch and mod wheels. “Calibrating the Pitch and Mod Wheels” on page
57.
The pitch or mod wheel doesn’t go go full range.
Recalibrate the pitch and mod wheels. See “Calibrating the Pitch and
Mod Wheels” on page 57.
A filter sounds strange or out of tune.
You may need to retune the filters. See “Calibrating the Prophet-6” on
page 56.
It is not necessary to run any of the calibration routines on a regular basis. You
should only run it if you are experiencing problems.
If you are still experiencing a problem with the Prophet-6, try resetting the
Global parameters. See “Resetting the Global Parameters” on page 57.
Contacting Technical Support
If you are still having a problem with the Prophet-6, contact Technical
Support at [email protected] Please include your
Prophet-6 serial number, the version of the operating system (shown
during startup in the main display), and the purchase date.
If you have not already reset the Global parameters and run the calibration
routines (see Troubleshooting, above), you should do it before contacting Technical
Support. It’s probably the first thing they’ll ask you to do.
64
Appendix B: Troubleshooting and Support
Dave Smith Instruments
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
The Prophet-6 receives MIDI data according to the settings you have
chosen in the global settings. In addition, there is interaction between
some of the Program parameters that determine the overall response of
Prophet-6 to MIDI data. Following are the Global parameters that affect
response to MIDI:
MIDI Channel: All, 1…16—Selects which MIDI channel to send and
receive data, 1 to 16. All receives on all 16 channels.
MIDI Clock: Sets the Prophet-6’s ability to send and receive MIDI clock
messages:
•
Off: MIDI Clock is neither sent nor received
•
Out: MIDI Clock is sent, but not received
•
In: MIDI Clock is received, but not sent
• Slave Thru (i-0): MIDI Clock is received and passed to MIDI Out
• In, No Start/Stop (n55): Receives MIDI Clock but does not respond to
MIDI Start or Stop command.
When set to in or slave thru, if no MIDI clock is present at the selected input,
the arpeggiator and sequencer will not function.
Clock Port: MID, USB—Sets the port(s), MIDI or USB, by which MIDI
clock signals are received.
Param Xmit: Off, CC, NR—Changes to the values of front panel controls
are transmitted via MIDI as Continuous Controllers (CC) or Non-registered
Parameter Number (NR). Transmission of parameters can also be turned off.
NRPNs are the preferred method of parameter transmission, since they cover
the complete range of all parameters, while CCs are limited to a range of 128.
Param Rcv: Off, CC, NR—Sets the method by which parameter changes are
received via MIDI. As with transmission, NRPNs are the preferred method.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
65
MIDI Control: Off, On—When On, the synth will respond to MIDI
controllers, including Pitch Wheel, Mod Wheel, Pedal, Volume.
MIDI Sysex: MID, USB— When set to MIDI (MID) it will receive and
transmit them using the MIDI ports/cables When set to USB it will
receive and transmit them using the USB port/cable. MIDI SysEx
messages are used when sending and receiving a variety of data including, programs, alternative tunings, system updates, and more.
MIDI Out: MID, USB—Sets the port by which MIDI data will be transmit-
ted (MIDI or USB)..
MIDI Messages
System Real-Time Messages
Status
Description
1111 1000
MIDI Timing Clock
Received Channel Messages
Status
Second
Third
Description
1000 nnnn
0kkkkkkk
0vvvvvvv
Note Off. Velocity is ignored
1001 nnnn
0kkkkkkk
0vvvvvvv
Note On. Note off if vvvvvvv = 0
1010 nnnn
0kkkkkkk
0vvvvvvv
Polyphonic Key Pressure
1011 nnnn
0vvvvvvv
0vvvvvvv
Control Change; see “Received Controller Messages”
1100 nnnn
0ppppppp
1101 nnnn
0vvvvvvv
1110 nnnn
0vvvvvvv
Program change, 0-99 for Programs 1-100 within
current Bank
Channel Pressure
0vvvvvvv
Pitch Bend LS Byte then MS Byte
Notes: 0kkkkkkk
Note number 0 — 127
nnnn
Channel number 0 to 15 (MIDI channel 1-16).
Ignored if MIDI channel set to ALL
0vvvvvvvValue
66
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
Dave Smith Instruments
Received Controller Messages
Status
Second
Third
Description
1011 nnnn
1
0vvvvvvv
Mod Wheel: directly assignable controller
1011 nnnn
4
0vvvvvvv
Foot Controller: directly assignable controller
1011 nnnn
7
0vvvvvvv
Volume: Combined with Master Volume and Voice
Volume
1011 nnnn
74
0vvvvvvv
Brightness: Added to low-pass filter cutoff frequency
1011 nnnn
32
0vvvvvvv
Bank Select: 0 - 4 select user banks 0 - 4; 5 - 9 select
factory banks 0 - 4; others ignored
1011 nnnn
64
0vvvvvvv
Damper pedal: Holds envelopes in Sustain if 0100 0000
or higher
1011 nnnn
123
0vvvvvvv
All Notes Off: Clear all MIDI notes
1011 nnnn
121
0vvvvvvv
Reset All Controllers: Clears all MIDI controllers to 0,
MIDI volume to maximum
See sections below for additional Continuous Controller (CC) and Nonregistered Parameter Number (NRPN) messages received.
Transmitted Channel Messages
Status
Second
Third
Description
1000 nnnn
0kkkkkkk
0000000
Note Off.
1001 nnnn
0kkkkkkk
0vvvvvvv
Note On.
1011 nnnn
0vvvvvvv
0vvvvvvv
Control Change; see “Transmitted Controller Messages”
1100 nnnn
0ppppppp
1101 nnnn
0vvvvvvv
1110 nnnn
0vvvvvvv
Program change, 0-99 for Programs 00-99 within
current Bank
Channel Pressure
0vvvvvvv
Pitch Bend LS Byte then MS Byte
Notes: 0kkkkkkk
Note number 0 — 127
nnnn
Channel number 0 to 15 (MIDI channel 1-16).
Ignored if MIDI channel set to ALL
0vvvvvvvValue
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
67
Transmitted Controller Messages
Status
Second
Third
Description
1011 nnnn
0000 0001
0vvvvvvv
Mod Wheel
1011 nnnn
0000 0100
0vvvvvvv
Foot Controller: When assigned to Pedal 1 or Pedal 2
1011 nnnn
0000 0111
0vvvvvvv
Volume: When assigned to Pedal 1 or Pedal 2
1011 nnnn
0100 1010
0vvvvvvv
Brightness: When assigned to Pedal 1 or Pedal 2
1011 nnnn
0010 0000
0vvvvvvv
Bank Select: 0 - 9
1011 nnnn
0100 0000
0vvvvvvv
Damper pedal: Sends 0 if off, 0111 1111 when on
1011 nnnn
0000 0111
0vvvvvvv
Volume knob
See sections that follow for additional Continuous Controller (CC) and
Non-registered Parameter Number (NRPN) messages transmitted.
68
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
Dave Smith Instruments
Additional Continuous Controllers Transmitted/Received
The following table details how MIDI Continuous Controllers (CCs) are
mapped to Prophet-6 controls. They are transmitted when Param Xmit is
set to CC, and recognized/received when MIDI Rcv Receive is set to CC.
CC#
Param
CC#
Param
0
Bank Select MSB
71
Osc 1 Pulse Width
1
Mod Wheel
74
Brightness
3
BPM
75
Osc 2 Freq
4
Foot Controller
76
Osc 2 Freq Fine
5
Glide Mode
77
Osc 2 Level
6
Data Enttry MSB
78
Osc 2 Shape
7
MIDI Volume
79
Osc 2 Pulse Width
8
Sub Osc Level
96
Data Increment
9
Distortion Amount
97
Data Decrement
38
Data Entry LSB
98
NRPN Param LSB
39
Volume LSB
99
NRPN Param MSB
40
VCA Env Amt
100
RPN Param LSB
41
VCA Env Vel Amt
101
RPN Param MSB
43
VCA Env Attack
102
Low-pass Freq
44
VCA Env Decay
103
Low-pass Resonance
45
VCA Env Sustain
104
Low-pass Key Amt
46
VCA Env Release
105
Low-pass Vel On/Off
47
Low-pass Env Amt
106
High-pass Freq
50
Filter Env Attack
107
High-pass Resonance
51
Filter Env Decay
108
High-pass Key Amt
52
Filter Env Sustain
109
High-pass Vel On/Off
53
Filter Env Release
120
All Sound Off
54
High-pass Env Amt
120
Reset Controllers
58
Arp On/Off
121
Reset Controllers
59
Arp Mode
122
Local Control On/Off
60
Arp Range
123
All Notes Off
62
Arp Time Signature
124
Omni Mode Off
64
Damper Pedal
125
Omni Mode On
65
Glide On/Off
126
Mono Mode On
67
Osc 1 Freq
127
Poly Mode On
69
Osc 1 Level
70
Osc 1 Shape
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
69
NRPN Messages
The Non-Registered Parameter Number (NRPN) MIDI messages are
used to transmit and receive both global and program parameters. They
are transmitted when MIDI Parameter Send is set to NRPN in Global,
and received when MIDI Parameter Receive is set to NRPN in Global.
The messages are handled in standard MIDI format using the NRPN CC
commands in running status byte format. Below is the format used for
transmitting a NRPN parameter.
Transmitted NRPN Messages
Status
Description
1011 nnnn
Control Change
0110 0011
NRPN parameter number MSB CC
0vvv vvvv
Parameter Number MSB
0110 0010
NRPN parameter number LSB CC
0vvv vvvv
Parameter Number LSB
0000 0110
NRPN parameter value MSB CC
0vvv vvvv
Parameter value MSB
0010 0110
NRPN parameter value LSB CC
0vvv vvvv
Parameter value LSB
The parameter number can be found in the two tables below, one for
Global parameters, and the other for Program parameters. The parameter
numbers and the parameter values are broken into two 7-bit bytes for
MIDI transmission; the LSB has the seven least-significant bits, and the
MSB has the seven most-significant bits, though in most cases the MSB
will be zero or one, and never more than two.
When receiving an NRPN, all messages do not necessarily need to be
transmitted, since the synth will track the most recent NRPN number,
though it is usually good practice to send the entire message above.
Once an NRPN is selected, the synth will also respond to NRPN Data
Increment and Decrement commands, which some controllers utilize.
Finally, it responds to one RPN (Registered Parameter Number)
command, the RPN/NRPN Reset command, which can be handy for
resetting the currently selected parameter to a known state.
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Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
Dave Smith Instruments
Received NRPN Messages
Status
Second
Third
Description
1011 nnnn
0110 0011
0vvvvvvv
NRPN parameter number MSB CC
1011 nnnn
0110 0010
0vvvvvvv
NRPN parameter number LSB CC
1011 nnnn
0000 0110
0vvvvvvv
NRPN parameter value MSB CC
1011 nnnn
0010 0110
0vvvvvvv
NRPN parameter value LSB CC
1011 nnnn
0110 0000
0xxxxxxx
NRPN parameter value Increment
1011 nnnn
0110 0001
0xxxxxxx
NRPN parameter value Decrement
1011 nnnn
0010 0101
0111111
RPN parameter number MSB CC - Reset NRPN parameter number (when both MSB and LSB received)
1011 nnnn
0010 0100
0111111
RPN parameter number LSB CC - Reset NRPN parameter number (when both MSB and LSB received)
Global Parameter Data
The table shows the Global data sent and received on global parameter
dumps, and corresponding NRPN number when sent/received individually.
NRPN
Range
Description
NRPN
Range
Description
1024
0-100
Master Fine Tune
1033
0-3
1025
0-24
Master Coarse Tune
1026
0-16
MIDI Channel
0 = All
MIDI Out Select
0 = Off
1 = MIDI
2 = USB
3 = MIDI+USB
1027
0-3
MIDI Clock Mode
0 = Off
1 = Master
2 = Slave
3 = Slave Thru
1035
0-1
Local Control*
0 = Off
1 = On
1037
0-2
Pot Mode
0 = Relative
1= PassThru
2 = Jump
1039
0-3
Seq Jack
0 = normal
1= trigger
2= gate
3= trigger+gate
1040
0-3
Sustain Polarity
0 = normally open
1= normally closed
2= Sustain Normally Open/
Sequencer Normally Closed
3= Sustain Normally Closed/
Sequencer Normally Open
1028
0-1
MIDI Clock Port
0 = MIDI Port
1 = USB
1029
0-2
MIDI Param Send*
0 = NRPN
1 = CC
2= Off
1030
0-2
MIDI Param Receive†
0 = NRPN
1 = CC
2= Off
1031
0-1
MIDI Control Enable
0 = Off
1 = On
1041
0-3
Velocity Response
1042
0-3
Aftertouch Response
1032
0-1
MIDI SysEx Enable
0 = Off
1 = On
1043
0-1
Mono/Stereo
0 = Stereo
1 = Mono
1044
0-16
Alt Tuning
*Controller received, but not transmitted.
†Controller transmitted, but ignored when received.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
71
Program Parameter Data
The following table lists Prophet-6’s program parameters.
NRPN
Value
NRPN
Description
Value
Description
0
0-60
Osc 1 Freq
68
0-127
VCA Env Decay
1
0-1
Osc 1 Sync
69
0-127
VCA Env Sustain
2
0-127
Osc 1 Level
70
0-127
VCA Env Release
3
0-254
Osc 1 Shape
71
0-1
VCA Env Vel On/Off
4
0-255
Osc 1 Pulse Width
77
0-254
Low-pass Env Amt
5
0-60
Osc 2 Freq
78
0-127
Filter Env Attack
6
0-254
Osc 2 Freq Fine
79
0-127
Filter Env Decay
0-127
Filter Env Sustain
7
0-127
Osc 2 Level
80
8
0-254
Osc 2 Shape
81
0-127
Filter Env Release
9
0-255
Osc 2 Pulse Width
82
0-254
High-pass Env Amt
10
0-1
Osc 2 Low Freq
88
0-254
LFO Freq
11
0-1
Osc 2 Key On/Off
89
0-255
LFO Initial Amt
27
0-127
Osc 1 Sub Level
90
0-4
LFO Shape
28
0 -3
Glide Mode
91
0-1
LFO Sync
29
0-1
Glide On/Off
93
0-1
LFO Freq 1
Dest On/Off
94
0-1
LFO Freq 2
Dest On/Off
95
0-1
LFO PW 1, 2
Dest On/Off
96
0-1
LFO Amp Dest
On/Off,
97
0-1
LFO Low-pass
Dest On/Off
98
0-1
LFO High-pass
Dest On/Off
30
0-127
Glide Rate
31
0-24
Pbend Range
32
0-127
Noise Level
33
0-127
Slop
45
0-164
Low-pass Freq
46
0-255
Low-pass Res
47
0-2
Low-pass Key Amt
48
0-1
Low-pass Vel On
49
0-164
High-pass Freq
109
0-254
Pressure Amt
0-1
Pressure Freq 1
Dest On/Off
50
0-255
High-pass Res
110
51
0-2
High-pass Key Amt
111
0-1
52
0-1
High-pass Vel On
Pressure Freq 2
Dest On/Off
62
0-127
Voice Volume
112
0-1
Pressure Low-pass
Dest On/Off
63
0-127
Pan Spread
113
0-1
64
0-127
Distortion Amt
Pressure High-pass
Dest On/Off
66
0-127
VCA Env Amt
114
0-1
67
0-127
VCA Env Attack
Pressure VCA
Dest On/Off
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Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
Dave Smith Instruments
NRPN
Value
Description
115
0-1
Pressure LFO Amt
Dest On/Off
119
0-5
FX 1 Select
120
0-127
121
0-255
NRPN
Value
Description
236-255
32 - 125
Name 0-19
256-319
12-108
Seq Step 1-64
Note 1
FX 1 Mix
320-383
0-127
Seq Step 1-64 Vel 1
FX 1 Param 1
384-447
12-108
Seq Step 1-64
Note 2
448-511
0-127
Seq Step 1-64 Vel 2
512-575
12-108
Seq Step 1-64
Note 3
122
0-127
FX 1 Param 2
123
0-1
FX 1 Sync
127
0-9
FX 1 Select
128
0-127
FX 2 Mix
576-639
0-127
Seq Step 1-64 Vel 3
640-703
12-108
Seq Step 1-64
Note 4
704-767
0-127
Seq Step 1-64 Vel 4
768-831
12-108
Seq Step 1-64
Note 5
832-895
0-127
Seq Step 1-64 Vel 5
896-959
12-108
Seq Step 1-64
Note 6
960-1023
0-127
Seq Step 1-64 Vel 6
1024
0-100
Tuning Fine
129
0-255
FX 2 Param 1
130
0-127
FX 2 Param 2
131
0-1
FX 2 Sync
135
0-1
FX On/Off
143
0-254
PolyMod Filter Env
Amt
144
0-254
PolyMod Osc 2 Amt
145
0-1
PolyMod Freq 1
Dest On/Off
146
0-1
PolyMod Shape 1
Dest On/Off
147
0-1
PolyMod PW
1 Dest On/Off
148
0-1
PolyMod Low-Pass
Dest On/Off
149
0-1
PolyMod High-Pass
Dest On/Off,
156
0-1
Unison On/Off
157
0-6
Unison Mode
158
0-5
Key Mode
160
0-1
Arp On/Off
161
0-4
Arp mode
162
0-2
Arp Range
163
0-9
Arp Tim Sig
167
30-250
BPM
168
0-1
Seq On/Off
169
0-63
Seq Length
170
0-1
Seq Mode
171
0-1
Seq Play Mode
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
1025
0-24
Tuning Coarse
1026
0-16
MIDI Channel
1027
0-4
MIDI Clock
1028
0-1
MIDI Clock Port
1029
0-2
MIDI Param Send
1030
0-2
MIDI Param Receive
1031
0-1
MIDI MIDI Control
1032
0-1
MIDI SysEx Control
1033
0-1
MIDI Out
1035
0-1
Local Control
1037
0-2
Pot Mode
1039
0-3
Seq Jack
1040
0-3
Sustain Polarity
1041
0-3
Velocity Response
1042
0-3
At Response
1043
0-1
Stereo Mono
1044
0-16
Alt Tuning
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
73
Control NRPN Data
The following table lists the Prophet-6’s control NRPN data. It is
received and transmitted but not saved as part of a program.
NRPN
Value
Description
1088
0-1
Seq Play/Stop *
1
0-1
Osc 1 Sync
2
0-127
Osc 1 Level
3
0-254
Osc 1 Shape
*Only available in normal Seq jack mode.
Sysex Messages
Universal System Exclusive Message (Device Inquiry)
Status
Description
1111 0000
System Exclusive (SysEx)
0111 1110
Non-realtime message
0vvv vvvv
If MIDI channel is set to 1 - 16, 0vvvvvvv must match (unless MIDI Channel = ALL); always
responds if 0vvvvvvv = 0111 1111.
0000 0110
Inquiry Message
0000 0001
Inquiry Request
1111 0111
End of Exclusive (EOX)
The Prophet-6 responds with:
Status
Description
1111 0000
System Exclusive (SysEx)
0111 1110
Non-realtime message
0vvv vvvv
If MIDI Channel = ALL, 0vvvvvvv = 0111 1111. Otherwise 0vvvvvvv = Channel Number
0 - 15.
0000 0110
Inquiry Message
0000 0010
Inquiry Reply
0000 0001
DSI ID
0010 1101
Prophet-6 ID (Family LS)
0000 0001
Family MS
0000 0000
Family Member LS
0000 0000
Family Member MS
0jjj nnnn
Main Software version: jjj - Minor rev; nnnn - Major rev
1111 0111
End of Exclusive (EOX)
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Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
Dave Smith Instruments
Request Program Dump
Status
Description
1111 0000
System Exclusive (SysEx)
0000 0001
DSI ID
0010 1101
Prophet-6 ID
0000 0101
Request Program Transmit
0000 00vv
Bank Number, 0 - 9
0vvv vvvv
Program Number, 0 - 99
1111 0111
End of Exclusive (EOX)
The Prophet-6 will respond by sending out the Program Data in the
format described below in Program Data Dump.
Request Program Edit Buffer Dump
Status
Description
1111 0000
System Exclusive (SysEx)
0000 0001
DSI ID
0010 1101
Prophet-6 ID
0000 0110
Request Program Edit Buffer Transmit
1111 0111
End of Exclusive (EOX)
The Prophet-6 will respond by sending out the current Program edit
buffer in the format described below in Program Edit Buffer Data Dump.
Request Global Parameter Dump
Status
Description
1111 0000
System Exclusive (SysEx)
0000 0001
DSI ID
0010 1101
Prophet-6 ID
0000 1110
Request Global Parameter Transmit
1111 0111
End of Exclusive (EOX)
The Prophet-6 will respond by sending out the current values of Global
Parameters in the format described in Global Parameters Data Dump.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
75
Program Data Dump
Status
Description
1111 0000
System Exclusive (SysEx)
0000 0001
DSI ID
0010 1101
Prophet-6 ID
0000 0010
Program Data
0000 00vv
Bank Number: 0 - 9
0vvv vvvv
Program Number: 0 - 99
0vvv vvvv
1024 bytes expanded to 1171 MIDI bytes in “packed MS bit” format
1111 0111
End of Exclusive (EOX)
Program Edit Buffer Data Dump
Status
Description
1111 0000
System Exclusive (SysEx)
0000 0001
DSI ID
0010 1101
Prophet-6 ID
0000 0011
Edit Buffer Data
0vvv vvvv
1024 bytes expanded to 1171 MIDI bytes in “packed MS bit” format
1111 0111
End of Exclusive (EOX)
Global Parameters Data Dump
Value
Description
1111 0000
System Exclusive (SysEx)
0000 0001
DSI ID
0010 1101
Prophet-6 ID
0000 1111
Main Parameter Data
0vvv vvvv
50 nibbles (LS then MS) for 25 Global parameters
1111 0111
End of Exclusive (EOX)
The Global Parameters Data Dump is not recognized when received; it is only
transmitted when requested. NRPN messages are used to change Globals.
76
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
Dave Smith Instruments
Packed Data Format
Data is packed in 8 byte “packets”, with the MS bit stripped from 7 parameter bytes, and packed into an eighth byte, which is sent at the start of the 8
byte packet.
Example:
Input DataPacked MIDI data
1 A7 A6 A5 A4 A3 A2 A1 A0
2 B7 B6 B5 B4 B3 B2 B1 B0
3 C7 C6 C5 C4 C3 C2 C1 C0
4 D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D0
5 E7 E6 E5 E4 E3 E2 E1 E0
6 F7 F6 F5 F4 F3 F2 F1 F0
7 G7 G6 G5 G4 G3 G2 G1 G0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
G7
A6
B6
C6
D6
E6
F6
G6
F7
A5
B5
C5
D5
E5
F5
G5
E7
A4
B4
C4
D4
E4
F4
G4
D7
A3
B3
C3
D3
E3
F3
G3
C7
A2
B2
C2
D2
E2
F2
G2
B7
A1
B1
C1
D1
E1
F1
G1
A7
A0
B0
C0
D0
E0
F0
G0
This explains why it takes 1171 MIDI bytes to transmit 1024 Program data bytes.
Prophet-6 Operation Manual
Appendix C: MIDI Implementation
77
Dave Smith Instruments
1527 Stockton Street, 3rd Floor
San Francisco, CA 94133
USA
www.davesmithInstruments.com
DSI-10079R 06-15
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