Security Versus Cost

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Engineers’ Guide to
Medical Electronics
Featured Products
Security Versus Cost
The Move to Distributed Healthcare
Healthy Challenges
From Advantech: Customizable 10.4”
fanless medical grade ODM tablet.
MEMs Motion Sensing Enables NextGeneration Medical Systems
From Axiomtek: Medical Grade
Touch LCD Monitor –MMT175
Annual Industry Guide
Solutions for engineers and embedded developers
creating medical electronic components and systems
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Welcome to the 2012
Engineers’ Guide to
Medical Electronics
Engineers’ Guide to Medical
Electronics 2012
www.eecatalog.com/medical
VP/Associate Publisher
Clair Bright
[email protected]
(415) 255-0390 ext. 15
Editorial
Editorial Director
In August 2011, a computer threat analyst (and diabetic)
showed a gathering of hackers at DefCon in Las Vegas how
easy it is to wirelessly take control of an insulin pump on
which a diabetic’s life could hinge. Jerome “Jay” Radcliffe’s
demonstration was designed to spotlight the need to build
software defenses into pace makers, insulin pumps and
other medical devices. While some experts downplayed
the risk in the context of the larger risk posed by not monitoring, Representatives Anna Eshoo (D-CA) and Ed Markey
(D-MA) have since asked the General Accountability Office
(GAO) to study the safety, reliability and compatibility of
wireless-enabled medical devices and the regulatory bodies
that oversee them. This story hasn’t played out fully yet,
but we can expect to hear much more about security and
medical devices.
In this issue, we provide insight into some surprising
threats that can be addressed with built-in security protocols to protect against unauthorized access to information
inside the device or that establish secure authentication
between devices. But security is only the tip of the iceberg.
We also dig into power issues relating to voltage dips and
power interrupts for medical equipment designers that
demand close scrutiny. In other articles, experts explain
the use of integrated USB microcontrollers in medical
applications to the unique challenges of medical navigation
applications along with sensor processing solutions. Our
panel of experts touch on a wide range of current topics
and trends, and you’ll find all the product information you
need to make the best technology decisions for your application needs.
Cheryl Berglund Coupé
John Blyler
[email protected]
(503) 614-1082
Editor
Cheryl Berglund Coupé
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Production Manager
Spryte Heithecker
Graphic Designers
Keith Kelly - Senior
Nicky Jacobson
Production Assistant
Jenn Burkhardt
Senior Web Developer
Mariam Moattari
Advertising/Reprint Sales
VP/Associate Publisher
Embedded Electronics Media Group
Clair Bright
[email protected]
(415) 255-0390 ext. 15
Sales Manager
Marcy Carnerie
[email protected]
(510) 919-4788
Marketing/Circulation
Jenna Johnson
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President and Publisher
Vince Ridley
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Vice President, Sales
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Special Thanks to Our Sponsors
Editor
P.S. To subscribe to our series of Resource Catalogs for
developers, engineers, designers, and managers, visit:
www.eecatalog.com/medical
2
The Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics is published by Extension Media LLC. Extension Media
makes no warranty for the use of its products and assumes no responsibility for any errors which
may appear in this Catalog nor does it make a commitment to update the information contained
herein. The Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics is Copyright ®2011 Extension Media LLC. No
information in this Catalog may be reproduced without expressed written permission from Extension
Media @ 1786 18th Street, San Francisco, CA 94107-2343.
All registered trademarks and trademarks included in this Catalog are held by their respective
companies. Every attempt was made to include all trademarks and registered trademarks where
indicated by their companies.
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
Contents
Healthy Challenges
by Cheryl Coupé......................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
Medical Platforms You Can Count On
by Advantech ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 8
Bringing Quality Healthcare to the Workplace and Retail Environment
by Intel ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Medical Device and System Solutions from Elma Electronic Inc.
by Elma Electronic ................................................................................................................................................................................... 16
Security Measures for Internet Enabled Devices
by Icon Labs ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 17
The Move to Distributed Healthcare
by Cheryl Coupé....................................................................................................................................................................................... 18
Key Power Issues for Medical Equipment Designers
by Chris Jones, product marketing director and Conor Quinn, technical marketing director, Embedded Power, Emerson Network Power ...... 20
Designing Portable, Wearable and Implantable Medical Electronics with Ultra-Low-Power
Microcontrollers
by Rajesh Verma, MSP430 product marketing manager and Srini Sridhara, MCU member group technical staff, Texas Instruments ....... 23
Security Versus Cost
by Cheryl Coupé....................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
MEMS Motion Sensing Enables Next-Generation Medical Systems
by Bob Scannell, business development manager, inertial MEMS products, Analog Devices, Inc........................................................30
USB Connectivity in an Embedded World
by Pedro Pachuca, MCU interface marketing manager, Silicon Labs ...................................................................................................... 34
Products and Services
Chips
Chips
Micross Components
Semiconductor Die and Specialized Packaging Solutions....... 37
Boards
Modules
Radicom Research, Inc.
Medical Modems .................................................................. 38
Motherboards
Advantech Corporation
AIMB-580 .............................................................................. 39
AXIOMTEK
Intel® Tunnel Creek CPU & Intel® TopCliff IOH Combine
to Deliver Excellent Computing Performance with Low
Power Consumption -PICO822 .............................................. 39
COMMELL
COMMELL launches LV-67H---2nd generation Core i7/i5/i3
Mini-ITX................................................................................. 40
4
VersaLogic Corp.
Intel® Core™ 2 Duo processor on standard EBX footprint ..... 41
Low power Intel® Atom™ processor Z5xx on a
PC/104-Plus form factor ........................................................ 41
Systems
Logic Supply
SR101 15” Intel Atom N270 IP65 Panel PC .......................... 42
Development
Application
AXIOMTEK
Medical Grade Touch LCD Monitor –MMT175 .................... 43
Icon Labs
Floodgate Firewall................................................................. 44
Iconfidant SSH & SSL............................................................ 45
Systems
Advantech Corporation
10.4” Customizable Medical Grade ODM Tablet.................. 46
HIT-W121 .............................................................................. 46
PIT-1502W ............................................................................. 47
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
Healthy Challenges
Medical Device Manufacturers Provide New Care Platforms
by Cheryl Coupé
From home healthcare and telemedicine to high-end
diagnostic and treatment applications, change is rippling through the medical equipment market. As always,
technology advances drive much of the evolution, but government and market factors also have an impact. Healthcare
reform in the United States, high-speed networks that bring
diagnostic tools to remote areas around the world, and consumer acceptance of home monitoring devices all provide
opportunities for device developers. As always, opportunities also come with challenges – in human-machine
interfaces,
performance,
security, enclosures, standards and many other
areas. We talked to Justin
Moll, director of marketing
for Elma Bustronic, and
Clayton Tucker, global business director for Embedded
Healthcare Technologies at
Emerson Network Power to
get their take on the changes
under way.
t *T UIJT KVTU B QPSUBM GPS IFBMUIDBSF QSPGFTTJPOBMT TP UIF
patient does not need to travel to the facility?
t *TJUBDPTUTBWJOHUPUIFFOUJSFJOEVTUSZ t 0SJTUIJTBNBSLFUJOHBOEUSBJOJOHPQQPSUVOJUZGPSJOTVSance providers and healthcare groups?
The level of concern over privacy is higher in Western cultures compared to other regions such as China, resulting
in those geographies having
lower barriers to implementation and faster adoption,
and thereby driving the
market
development.
A
more phased approach may
be required in Western
cultures,
with
devices
offering increasing levels
of functionality as privacy
and cultural issues adapt
and change. Some home
monitoring and interfacing
services that already exist on
a small scale (devices that alert professional care givers
of accidents, “falling and I cannot get up”model) may be
the starting point. Those portals to the home already exist
for some patients with chronic conditions and for elderly
care. These applications may provide a platform for new
extended home healthcare applications. Society’s acceptance of these services is the barrier in Western cultures;
technology is most definitely not.
Flexible, mobile, connected,
real-time healthcare is the
next step in addressing the
world’s access to affordable
healthcare.
EE Catalog: The market for
home healthcare and mobile medical devices is exploding,
providing plenty of opportunities for embedded developers – but what kind of challenges does this present?
Clayton Tucker, Emerson Network Power:
Primarily there are information-management and security issues associated with
extending healthcare to the patient’s home.
WiFi and 3G are widely adopted and suitable
home networking technologies. While data
protection and network access are well established capabilities in these mediums,the acquisition and processing
of patient healthcare information in the relatively insecure home environment presents further challenges.
There is also a question of what applications can extend
to the home.Is it just the collection of vitals, i.e., pulse,
blood pressure, temperature, etc.?Or is it more extensive
peak flow, oxygen, ECG, blood glucose and other basic
fluid analysis? These usage models affect how embedded
developers approach their projects:
6
EE Catalog: Consumer-oriented design requirements
such as those for smartphones and other “infotainment”
devices are spilling into many embedded designs. How
are developers adapting medical devices to meet those
expectations and still meet stringent industry-specific
requirements?
Tucker, Emerson Network Power: Consumer smartphones do not have the life cycle, extensive I/O and
ruggedness required by healthcare professionals. The
additional security elements required for HIPAA information sharing and transfer are not associated with standard
smartphone protocols. Some medical equipment makers
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
are designing mobile platforms for the clinical environment, there is much to consider here due to the life cycle
factors plus specialized purpose-built elements not usually found in consumer platforms. The driving factors
for designers of industrial healthcare platforms include
dust and moisture protection greater than IP54, fanless
operation, drop-proof or designing for rugged use, industrial components with a minimum five-year life cycle,
healthcare ergonomics and aesthetics. It is important to
note that this is not a commercial off-the-shelf platform
like the Xoom or iPad. Those products can go a great distance but in the end the I/O, clinical applications and the
aforementioned design elements drive a more industrial
clinical design approach.
EE Catalog: What are some of the challenges developers
are addressing in today’s medical imaging equipment?
Justin Moll, Elma Bustronic: One of
the big challenges for imaging equipment
such as MRIs and PET/CAT scans is battling time. The longer the scan takes, the
less productivity you are pulling from this
capital-intensive equipment. Slow scans
cause patient backlogs, tie-up key personnel and decrease
satisfaction in patient care. In addition, certain scans use
radioactive dyes whose exposure in patients needs to be
kept to the minimum time necessary. Developers are utilizing faster embedded-system designs that achieve high
availability (minimal downtime) and reliability, while
tackling the massive data processing required for these
systems. In particular, systems that offer backwards compatibility to existing VME or cPCI architectures provide
a cost-effective solution with a wide ecosystem. This is
achieved while providing significant performance gains
for the high-bandwidth requirements, reducing the time
required for scans.
Tucker, Emerson Network Power: Beyond the challenges
already mentioned – dust and moisture protection greater
than IP54, fanless operation, drop-proof or designing
for rugged use, industrial components with a minimum
five-year life cycle,healthcare ergonomics and aesthetics
– medical equipment developers face a multitude of open
standards and interoperability issues that are common to
many design engineers. While open standards are very
valuable for driving innovation and holding down cost
through competition, they can also present interoperability challenges when different companies interpret and
implement specifications in slightly different ways. What’s
more, in some areas there is a plethora of open standards.
At the board and module level for example, there are
over 30 form factor standards ranging from the smallest
pluggable mezzanine to the largest high-performance
server boards, with sub-specifications and implementation options within every standard. Navigating that
maze takes some expertise and experience, which is why
www.eecatalog.com/medical
SPECIAL FEATURE
medical equipment companies are increasingly turning to
embedded computing specialists to manage their platform
integration.
EE Catalog: What future developments are you most
excited about in terms of medical electronics?
Moll, Elma Bustronic: The interesting dynamic that we
see is the optimization of performance density for medical
devices and instruments. Space is a premium in most electronics applications and this holds true for most medical
designs. However, the human-machine interface is a critical element in most devices. So developers need to find
ways to optimize front-panel space as well as the overall
footprint of the device enclosure. Enclosures are now being
designed with precise sizes in mind with highly versatile
extrusions. This allows a customized (with a precise-sized
enclosure) design using standard parts, which minimizes
costs and leadtimes. On the front of the enclosure panel,
dual concentric switches are also being employed that
have two switches in one housing. This saves critical
front-panel space. More devices are also using high-end
encoders that offer superior tactile feedback. This allows
the medical personnel to tune the device “by feel” without
having to divert their attention from the patient.
Tucker, Emerson Network Power: We are excited
about flexible, mobile, connected, real-time healthcare
platforms. Bringing healthcare to the patient provides
challenges but it also provides us with some healthy challenges to overcome through better designs and improved
capabilities as an industry. We are addressing many of
these new requirements and Emerson Network Power can
often get in front of the curve due to our vast experience
in creating platforms for telecommunications, military
and aerospace, government, automation, digital signage
and other applications. This experience provides us with
a clear path in understanding the challenges that have
been conquered in these other areas. Flexible, mobile, connected, real-time healthcare is the next step in addressing
the world’s access to affordable healthcare.
Cheryl Berglund Coupé is editor of EECatalog.
com. Her articles have appeared in EE Times,
Electronic Business, Microsoft Embedded Review and Windows Developer’s Journal and she
has developed presentations for the Embedded
Systems Conference and ICSPAT. She has held a
variety of production, technical marketing and
writing positions within technology companies and agencies in
the Northwest.
7
Medical Platforms You Can Count On
Advantech is a market leader with over 10 years of experience delivering comprehensive
high-performance computing systems for the medical market and top 10 global medical
companies. All computing platforms are designed to satisfy demanding mission-critical
Product reliability and quality
following strict quality assurance procedures; our products have been adopted by major
medical companies worldwide.
Certifications
Advantech medical products meet UL60601-1/EN06061-1 standards for electrical and
under existing national regulations.
Product longevity
vendors and suppliers, Advantech always provides customers with stable and reliable
Customer service
With local support provided by regional service centers in the US, China, Asia, and Europe,
Global sales and services
With 25 years of experience, and the combined talent of more than 2,000 people, Advantech
operates an extensive support, sales and marketing network in 16 countries and 28 major
cities to deliver fast time-to-market services to our worldwide customers.
8
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
The Emergence of Healthcare Infotainment
Healthcare Healthcare Infotainment terminals are a variety of “bedside
terminals” that allow patients to do anything from watching movies and
TV, to making phone calls, playing games, or communicating via the
internet. They can also be used for email, web browsing, accessing
hospital intranets, or if medically advisable, even work.
providers to perform medical functions.
Application Areas
Hospitals / Medical Centers
Bedside entertainment programs
Communication and intranet services
Service on demand applications
Remote patient data retrieval
Treatment Centers
Elderly Care / Home Healthcare
Wide viewing angle and sharp images
for diagnosis and discussion
Photo, video, and multimedia display
Advertising and educational services
Video capture
Video communication for easy
interaction
Personal alarms and telecare
monitoring system
Emergency call
Community service bulletin
Successful Applications
Enhancing Data Accuracy and
Higher Patient Satisfaction
in the Ward
Location : Taiwan
Hospital : ChungGung Memorial Hospital
Application :
Location : Hong Kong
Hospital : Hong Hong Sanatorium & Hospital
Application : Bedside infotainment & facility control
www.eecatalog.com/medical
9
Single Integrated Bedside Solution
Potential Applications
Hospital services/directions
Menus/special order
Promotional videos
Internet access
Digital phone
Intranet access
Movies-on-demand
Bed administration
Accounts and billing
HIS reporting/surveys
Electronic drug charting
Educational programming
Nursing observation assistant
Electronic patient records (EPR)
Computerized physician/provider
order entry (CPOE)
Video conferences with home
Software Solutions
Working with the world’s leading clinical bedside computing technology, our software partners
provide a secure touchscreen gateway to clinical diagnostic power, up to date medical data and the
latest digital entertainment & communications services from every patient bedside.
Service Delivery
Medication
data
HIS server
Streaming
server
LAN
Emergency call
Emergency
alarm
DC-in
Radio, TV, Films
Telephone
MSN, e-mail
Web shopping and games
Food and drink ordering
Medical education
USB
Bar code
scanner
UPS
Magnetic
swipe
Finger
printer
Why Choose Advantech for Healthcare Solutions?
Over ten years experience in medical markets
Dedicated medical R & D team of engineers
Strict revision control and design reliability
Serving the top 10 global medical companies
Global logistics and RMA services with local support
Extensive customization capability from board to system level
Experience with global healthcare market regulations
Sealed to meet IP65/NEMA4 standards
Longevity and superior warranty/service options
Global company with worldwide presence
Ecosystem partnership for patient infotainment software development
10
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
Product Information
PIT-1501W/1502W
PATIENT
INFOTAINMENT
TERMINAL
CHECKLIST
Intel® Atom™ 1.6 GHz Processor / Atom™ Dual Core Processor 1.6 GHz
15.6" TFT-LCD display with touchscreen
Built-in 2.0 megapixel camera
Built-in mic, speaker & head-set support
Equipped with RFID/Wi-Fi/Smart Card Reader
Built-in emergency key and 2 x indicators
Multiple input supports: RJ-45, USB x 2, COM x 1
Windows® XP Embedded architecture
Touchscreen
Remote control
RFID
Smart card
Durable
Anti-bacterial enclosure
Easy to clean and disinfect
Flexible mounting
solutions
Quiet/silent operation
PIT-1702
Intel® Celeron® M Processor ULV 1.06 GHz/
Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor 1.06 GHz
17" TFT-LCD with touchscreen
Built-in 2.0 megapixel camera
Built-in mic, speaker & head-set support
Equipped with RFID/WiFi/Smart Card Reader
Built-in emergency key and 2 x indicators
Multiple input supports: RJ-45, USB x 2
Windows® XP Embedded architecture
Low heat dissipation
Flexible communications
Easily updatable
Digital TV Tuner
Flexible audio options
UTC-W101
10.1” Wide w/touchscreen, Intel® Atom™ Processor Z530 1.6 GHz
Optional : RFID/Wi-Fi/TV Tuner
Lightweight / Flexible Mounting VESA75
Front panel IP65/NEMA4 compliant
Windows® XP Embedded architecture
IPX1 and IP65/ NEMA4
HIT-W121
11.6” Wide Full Flat Display with touchscreen, Intel® Atom™
Dual Core Processor 1.6 GHz
Smart Card Reader Ready
Optional: Handset /RFID/Wi-Fi /TV Tuner/2.0 Megapixel camera
Lightweight/Flexible Mounting VESA75
IP54 Front Panel and IPX1 system compliant
Windows® XP Embedded architecture
Q1 2011
Q4 2010
HIT-W151
15.6” Wide Full Flat Display with touchscreen, Intel® Atom™
Dual Core Processor 1.6 GHz
Smart Card Reader Ready
Optional: Barcode/RFID/Wi-Fi/TV Tuner/2.0 Megapixel camera
Lightweight / Flexible Mounting VESA75/100
Windows® XP Embedded architecture
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www.eecatalog.com/medical
11
CASE STUDY
SoloHealth* Station
Intel® Core™ i5 Processor
Healthcare Industry
Bringing Quality Health Care to the
Workplace and Retail Environment
SoloHealth* enables individuals to conveniently monitor their blood pressure, vision, weight and body mass
LQGH[XVLQJLWVVHOIVHUYLFHKHDOWKVFUHHQLQJNLRVNEDVHGRQWKHODWHVW,QWHOŠWHFKQRORJLHV
“Our health screening kiosks
empower consumers and
employees to take charge of their
own health, while reducing costs
and improving access to care.”
In the U.S., a national discussion is
underway about how to lower the cost
and improve the performance of the
healthcare system. Compared to any
peer country, the U.S. spends far more
per person and ranks last in population
health, according to a recent study by
the Conference Board of Canada.1 Large
sections of the American public suffer
from a wide range of preventable or
treatable conditions: 65 million people
have hypertension; 65 million are prediabetic; 122 million are overweight or
obese; and 150 million have some form of
visual impairment. The delivery of health
care needs to be transformed into a more
preventative and proactive approach
versus a reactionary one, referred to as
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Health System.2
At the forefront of innovation, SoloHealth*
is advancing wellness and prevention
programs with solutions that incorporate
the latest computing and networking
technologies. Currently in test market,
its SoloHealth Station allows people
to screen their vision, blood pressure,
ZHLJKWERG\PDVVLQGH[%0,DQGRYHUDOO
health – or any combination of the four –
in seven minutes or less. The station can
be conveniently located in the workplace
or a retail environment, giving workers
and shoppers tools and information to
positively impact their own health.
SoloHealth is also committed to working
with strategic partners to increase general
public health awareness, having received
a substantial grant from the National
Institutes of Health and having recently
presented the SoloHealth Station to a
panel including Secretary of Health and
Human Services Kathleen Sebelius.
– Rick Voight
VP, Channel Development
SoloHealth*
12
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
“The SoloHealth* Station
complements our in-store
pharmacies, giving us a highly
personalized and interactive
avenue to reach and engage
our customers.”
– Mike Juergensmeyer
VP Fuel & Pharmacy
Schnucks Markets, Inc.
Figure 1. SoloHealth* Station: Self-Service
Health Screening Kiosk
The Technology That Helps Drive
Innovation
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SoloHealth Station provides a multi-screen
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health recommendations, medical product
information and local physician listings. The
kiosk was also designed with the ability to
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today’s changing health care system.
CHALLENGES
‡Multi-service station: 'HYHORSDVHOI
service kiosk capable of conducting
multiple health screenings via a simple
touch screen and helpful interactive videos.
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based computer runs various health
tests and manages multiple screens
simultaneously.
‡Secure connectivity: The station
communicates over the Internet and
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The SoloHealth Station administers simple
tests with help from straightforward
touchscreen menus and interactive
instructional videos. The station provides
consumers a customized report that
shows an assessment of their near and
distance vision, blood pressure, weight
DQGERG\PDVVLQGH[%0,DVZHOODV
educational videos on a number of health
topics and conditions, a listing of doctors,
and valuable offers from healthcare
partners. Consumers can choose a doctor
on the screen and immediately connect
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appointment. As a result, the physicians
listed by the kiosk will have greater access
to new patients, particularly as the patient
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healthcare legislation.
The SoloHealth Station does not replace
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screening and encourage consumers to
visit a healthcare provider for a followXSH[DPZKHQQHHGHG$VFRQVXPHUV
become more educated about health
issues involving weight, blood pressure
and eyesight, they are likely to visit their
healthcare professionals on a more regular
basis, resulting in better outcomes.
13
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and Retailers
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to reduce health care costs, including
programs designed to motivate employees
to become more aware and proactive
about their overall health. Such programs
can be reinforced by encouraging
employees to regularly perform health
screening at self-service kiosks located in
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cafeteria or gym.
Pharmacy
Beyond The Kiosk
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consumer touchpoints using digital, email,
mobile, social and other technologies.
After the initial screening, users can create
accounts accessible from any SoloHealth
Station, as well as a future online
portal and mobile applications. With the
consumer’s approval, these applications
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trending of health data among corporate
wellness programs, motor vehicle
departments, healthcare providers and
insurance companies, among others:
‡&RUSRUDWLRQV Offer incentives based
on employee progress toward wellness
program goals
Local
Providers
Mobile/Web
Devices
Insurance
Companies
Data Insights
In Store
Figure 2. Touchpoints Enabled by the SoloHealth* Platform
Supermarkets and other mass merchant
retailers also provide convenient access
to health screening for a large portion of
the populace that typically goes shopping
once or twice a week. Without changing
their behavior, consumers can get tested
RXWVLGHRIWKHGRFWRU·VRIÀFH0RUHRYHU
kiosks, often placed near pharmacies, can
help retailers increase shopper loyalty
and drive higher sales of pharmaceuticals
and other health-related products. The
SoloHealth Station is currently in test
trials in stores operated by Schnucks
0DUNHWVDFKDLQRIPRUHWKDQ
VWRUHVLQWKH0LGZHVW
14
‡,Q6WRUHIncrease sales by displaying
targeted advertising, promoting store
specials, offering coupons
‡,QVXUDQFH&RPSDQLHV Enroll patients
HJ0HGLFDUH3DUW'DQGSHUIRUPULVN
assessments
‡0RELOH:HE0DNHLWHDVLHUIRU
consumers to access and track health
data from anywhere, anytime
‡/RFDO3URYLGHUV Attract new patients
and monitor current patient health
screening results
‡'DWD,QVLJKWV Tie health screen data to
SHUVRQDOKHDOWKUHFRUG3+5DQGFROOHFW
shopper market data
7DNLQJWKH6HOI6HUYLFH.LRVN
to a New Level
The SoloHealth Station builds on its
predecessor, the award-winning EyeSite
vision-screening kiosk, which currently
serves retail outlets in nine metro markets.
The new kiosk performs three additional
tests and was designed with high speed
connectivity and cloud computing in mind.
All of the functionality is supported by a
single computer board equipped with an
Intel Core i5 processor that eliminates
the need for multiple computers. The
high-performance processor is quick to
respond to touchscreen inputs, enabling
DQH[FHSWLRQDOXVHUH[SHULHQFH
For its previous design, the station
required a second computer for its digital
VLJQDJHGLVSOD\1RZWKHKLJKGHÀQLWLRQ
digital signage, user interface screen and
vision testing display are all supported by
the Intel Core i5 processor-based board.
This consolidation helps to minimize the
kiosk footprint, which requires about
WKHVDPHÁRRUVSDFHDVWUDGLWLRQDOEORRG
SUHVVXUHPDFKLQHV7KH,QWHOŠSURFHVVRU
based board allows SoloHeath to run the
entire station on one PC, instead of two,
which lowered the overall cost, size and
FRPSOH[LW\RIWKHPDFKLQH
The Intel Core i5 processor-based
FRPSXWHUKDVWKHFDSDELOLW\WRH[HFXWH
multiple health screenings simultaneously,
while playing video content on multiple
screens and responding to users’
touchscreen inputs. The processor
platform can also communicate in a secure
fashion with other systems over local area
QHWZRUNV/$1WKH,QWHUQHWRUPRELOH
connections. The platform uses the latest
security encryption technologies to ensure
the consumer data is not compromised.
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
“The SoloHealth Station will
impact millions of Americans
by providing them with free
and easy health screenings,
connecting them with local
physicians and allowing them
to track their results over time.”
- Bart Foster
CEO
SoloHealth.
/RZHULQJWKH7RWDO&RVWRI
Ownership
SoloHealth designed its kiosks using
technologies that lower operating
H[SHQVHVIRUFRPSDQLHVDQGUHWDLOHUV
Reducing support costs, the SoloHealth
Station can be serviced remotely, with
functions such as rebooting, diagnosing
problems and, in some cases, restoring
corrupted software. When system issues
DUHUHVROYHGUHPRWHO\H[SHQVLYHRQVLWH
repair visits aren’t needed. SoloHealth
is also able to gather valuable data and
generate reports regarding overall usage
patterns and demographics.
The computing system in the SoloHealth
6WDWLRQLV,QWHOŠY3URŒWHFKQRORJ\
compatible; so in the future, SoloHealth
can turn on a set of technologies that
improve system manageability, software
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RQHRIWKHWHFKQRORJLHVLV,QWHOŠ$FWLYH
0DQDJHPHQW7HFKQRORJ\,QWHOŠ$073,
which provides advanced remote
management and maintenance. It enables
,7SURIHVVLRQDOVWRTXHU\À[DQGSURWHFW
networked devices, even when they’re
powered off, not responding or have
software issues. “Since many retail stores
don’t have onsite IT departments, getting
V\VWHPVUHSDLUHGFDQEHDQH[SHQVLYH
and time-consuming proposition. Intel
$07HQDEOHVPDLQWHQDQFHXSJUDGHV
and repairs over a network connection
ZLWKRXWDWUXFNUROOWRWKHVLWHµVD\V$OH[
Zilberman, market development manager
at Intel.
Just the Beginning
The SoloHealth Station is focused on
some of the most common and serious
health conditions of the population –
obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes
and vision impairment. SoloHealth, with
active involvement from Intel, designed its
kiosk with the leading-edge technologies
and performance headroom needed to
DFFRPPRGDWHH[SDQVLRQWRPHHWIXWXUH
needs. “Self-service healthcare options
ZLOOSOD\DQH[WUHPHO\LPSRUWDQWUROHLQ
reducing healthcare costs and improving
DFFHVVPRYLQJIRUZDUGDQGZHDUHH[FLWHG
WREHDOHDGHULQWKLVSLYRWDOQHZVSDFHµ
says Bart Foster, CEO of SoloHealth.
For more information about the SoloHealth Station, visit ZZZVRORKHDOWKFRP
For more information about health care solutions from Intel, visit ZZZLQWHOFRPJRPHGLFDO
1
Source: www.conferenceboard.ca/press/newsrelease/11-05-12/Health_Spending_Other_Countries_Get_Better_Results_For_Less.aspx
2
Source: Dr. Ralph Snyderman, chancellor emeritus of the Duke University Health System, speaking at the 2011 National Undergraduate Bioethics Conference, http://dukechronicle.com/article/speakers-outline-future-bioethics
3
Intel® Active Management Technology (Intel® AMT) requires the platform to have an Intel AMT-enabled chipset, network hardware and software, as well as connection with a power source and a corporate network connection. With regards to
notebooks, Intel AMT may not be available or certain capabilities may be limited over a host OS-based VPN or when connecting wirelessly, on battery power, sleeping, hibernating or powered off. For more information, see http://www.intel.com/
technology/manage/iamt.
Copyright © 2011 Intel Corporation. All rights reserved. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel Core and Intel vPro are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
www.eecatalog.com/medical
Printed in USA
0811/MS/SD/PDF
Please Recycle
325921-001US
15
Medical Device and System
Solutions from Elma Electronic Inc.
by Elma Electronic
Elma offers leading solutions for various Medical devices and
systems. This includes instrument cases, rotary switches and
LEDs, and cabinet enclosures. The company also provides
products and solutions for standard architecture embedded
computing platforms, including powered enclosures, backplanes and boards. Elma is renowned for its quality modular
solutions, design expertise, and superior service. Our design
solutions can be found in products such as MRI machines,
blood analyzers, diagnostic equipment and more.
Instrument Cases &
Components
Medical electronic instruments need reliable, quality
enclosures to house the
electronics.
Elma offers
various
portable,
lab/
desktop, and rackmount
enclosure types in nearly
endless configurations. Our modular design allows a wide
range of sizes and design implementations. Starting with a
proven base platform, customization is quicker, easier, and
more cost-effective – in even small quantities.
Rotary Switches,
Knobs, and LEDs
Medical devices often
require
switches
and
knobs for attenuating and
selector controls.
Elma
offers a wide range of incremental encoders, selector
and coded switches, and
potentiometers for mission-critical applications. Where
many far-East products fail before 10,000 lifecycles, our
products work well within specifications above 25K, 50K,
and for some products 100K lifecycles. Elma achieves this
by using quality components, design-for-reliability initiatives, superior materials such as gold plating and rugged
steel components, and more. Elma soft touch, bell shaped,
and other knobs offer superior ergonomics and aesthetics,
giving your medical device a feel of quality design.
Elma also offers LEDs, light guides, and other indication and
illuminating products for medical devices. Creative designs
such as SMD versions for manufacturability, flexible light
guides that allow all types of PCB-to-panel connections and
LED light tubes are just a few of our solutions.
16
Backplanes, System
Platforms and Integrated Embedded
Computing
Elma’s Systems division
provides system architecture, hardware, and
software design to quickly
deliver complete solutions and expedite time to market.
The company’s focus is to leverage proven technology based
on standard architectures (i.e. VME, VPX, CPCI, ATCA and
MicroTCA). With the acquisition of ACT/Technico in January
2009, Elma became a leading supplier of open-standards
embedded boards and integrated sub-systems. Elma’s
Embedded Computing Products and Services meet a range of
ESD and temperature requirements, providing solutions for a
myriad of applications such as MRI machines, PETscan devices
and more. Powered chassis and enclosures, backplanes,
processor boards, mass storage, RAID, I/O and networking
solutions, RTOS, Linux/Windows and device drivers continue
to be offered under the brand name of ACT/Technico.
Cabinet Enclosures
and Lab Carts
Medical labs, IT rooms,
and some medical equipment need racks, cabinets,
desks/consoles, or carts
designed for various environments. Optima EPS,
an Elma company, offers
cabinet enclosure and related products with EMC, seismic/
mobile, sealing, and other design options. The company
offers a lightweight aluminum extruded approach that
provides a wide range of configurations through a modular
design. Our design experts can create a cost-effective
custom solution for you based on a proven platform.
CONTACT US
Elma Electronic
44350 Grimmer Blvd
Fremont, CA 94538
510-656-3400
[email protected]
www.elma.com
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
Security Measures for
Internet Enabled Devices
Increased reliance on intelligent devices and a growing number of threats
require proactive security measures.
by Icon Labs
Embedded devices, including medical devices, are the
fastest growing segment of Internet users. The number of
embedded devices on the Internet is predicted to be five
times the number of PCs on the Internet by 2015. As our
reliance on intelligent devices grows, so does our vulnerability to the failure of these devices. Extension Media
talked to Alan Grau, CEO of Icon Labs, about security
threats for embedded devices, trends in device security
and what steps companies should take to protect their
devices from Internet threats.
Q: It seems I read about a new security threat, Internet
attack or virus almost daily. Most of these attacks are
against Windows PCs and enterprise networks. Are
embedded devices vulnerable to the same type of threats?
Aren’t many of the malware and viruses specifically targeted to Windows PCs?
A: Yes and no. A large number of security threats specifically target Windows or Linux, but an increasing number
of Internet attacks threaten embedded devices directly.
We have identified the three most significant Internet
threats directed at embedded devices. The first is data
protection: ensuring that data stored on the device, and
communication with the device, is not intercepted or
improperly accessed. The second threat is unauthorized
access whereby someone actually hacks into and takes
control of the device. The third threat is Denial of Service
(DoS) attacks, an attack against a device causing it to fail
or degrading its performance to the point that the device
cannot effectively operate.
All too often companies rush designs and launch products
without ensuring sufficient security measures are in place,
leaving the devices completely vulnerable to attack. With
insufficient security, an unauthorized person can access
the device or intercept communications. While encryption
and authentication technology has addressed some of the
issues, they only provide a basic level of security and do
not provide protection from DoS attacks. The result of a
DoS attack can be just as severe as if the device had been
hacked. Companies need to recognize that threats against
embedded devices are growing and the stakes are rising.
Q: What steps can companies take to protect their devices
from these attacks?
A: Companies must start with encryption and authentication, but to ensure adequate protection a firewall must be
added to the embedded device.
Q: What products are available to companies building
embedded devices that address these security issues?
A: Icon Labs has developed three tools - Iconfidant SSH,
Iconfidant SSL, and Floodgate Packet Filter – that allow
companies to build security and protection into their
embedded devices. Iconfidant SSH and SSL provide
encryption and authentication for secure remote access.
Floodgate Packet Filter is an embedded firewall that provides both static and dynamic filtering (stateful packet
inspection). Floodgate also provides threshold-based filtering specifically designed to protect against DoS attacks.
Together these products protect embedded devices from
all major Internet threats.
Q: How real are these threats? Aren’t many embedded
devices built using custom operating systems that are not
vulnerable to Windows based viruses?
A: The threats are very real. While most embedded devices
are not vulnerable to Windows viruses, they are still
vulnerable to many other threats such as DoS attacks.
Automated hacking drones constantly scan Internet-connected computers looking for any vulnerability. If a device
is connected to the Internet you need to assume it will be
attacked.
www.eecatalog.com/medical
CONTACT INFORMATION
Icon Labs
3636 Westown Pkwy, Suite 203
West Des Moines, IA 50266
888-235-3443x22 Toll Free
515-226-3443x22 Telephone
877-379-0504 Fax
[email protected]
www.iconlabs.com
17
EECatalog
INDUSTRY FORECAST
The Move to Distributed Healthcare
Devices Incorporate Sensors and Telehealth Capabilities to Increase Access
by Cheryl Coupé
While the need for large medical equipment such as MRIs
continues, Jack Gold,president and principal analyst of J.
Gold Associates, LLC says, “If you look at what’s taking
place in the medical arena over the next few years, we’re
moving to a much more distributed approach. And especially we’re moving to a much more sensor-based approach.”
Drivers for this change include increased capabilities and
improved costs of sensors, increasing processing power
(both independent and embedded in the sensor) and the
improved availability of wired and wireless networks.
This trend is supported by a new report, “The World Market
for Telehealth – A Quantitative Market Assessment – 2011
Edition,” by InMedica, the medical electronics market
research group within IMS Research, which forecasts that
the world market for telehealth will exceed $1 billion by
2016 and could jump to $6 billion in 2020.
“Many public healthcare
systems now have targets to
reduce both the number of
hospital visits and the length
of stay in hospital,” stated
Diane Wilkinson, research
manager at InMedica. “This
has led to a growing trend
for healthcare to be managed outside the traditional
hospital environment, and
as a result, there is a growing
trend for patients to be
monitored in their home environment using telehealth
technologies once their treatment is complete.”
From an embedded perspective, Gold explains, “We’re
moving to world where it’s not just massive machines; it’s
also lots of small machines networked together. Embedded
capability is revolutionizing the way we think about
healthcare.”While we can now gather more information
about patients, the peripheral impact is what to do with
that information, how to store it and keep it secure and how
to compensate providers for its use outside of traditional
care environments. These changes are having a dramatic
impact in the medical community, and the decisions that
are made from governments on down will impact device
manufacturers for some time. Embedded developers will
need to address issues around reliability and security,
power requirements and interoperability. While care providers are being driven by consumer demands for cheaper,
more accessible information (and the implications of that),
developers reap some of the benefits of consumerization,
such as the number of sensors in consumer devices
driving costs down, and the
trend towards reusable software that should improve
both development time and
costs.
Similar to evolutions in
other industries (such as
smart grid), the technology
is moving faster than the
infrastructure can handle.
Wilkinson adds, “By far the most established market for
telehealth at present is the US, as evidenced by the Veteran’s Health Administration’s extensive home telehealth
service, which aims to have 92,000 patients enrolled on
telehealth services by 2012. There has also been some
large-scale trial activity in Europe, most notably in the UK
in 2010 and 2011, where PCTs have initiated some projects
involving more than 2,000 patients. What is apparent is
the convergence of many different industries in this space,
including telehealth companies, device manufacturers,
healthcare agencies, service providers and telecommunication companies to name but a few.”
18
Ed Hill, Intel’s director of
marketing for embedded
communications,
sees
healthcare reform in the U.S.
as a significant market force
that will change the landscape from a device standpoint. Intel has been involved
from both a policy and legislative standpoint and is highly
interested in how the reform process will address the costs
of delivering healthcare in a new distributed care model
that not only provides services in traditional hospitals and
clinics but also in the home and remote locations. These
changes bring new opportunities for device manufacturers,
and Intel wants to be there with them. The company has
historically had a foothold at the big machine level, which
is where the bulk of market share in medical has been.
Intel processors have traditionally been used for image
reconstruction within imaging devices where its advanced
vector extensions (AVX)improves performance due to
wider vectors, which provides faster image reconstruction
time. While device manufacturers eventually reach a point
of minimal return in terms of image reconstruction time,
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
INDUSTRY FORECAST
Intel processors continue to support higher resolutions
required in applications such as 3D diagnostics.
of reporting: what the device is doing and what it is
reporting.
While MIPS and ARM have been primarily found in
smaller devices, Intel is looking to make similar moves
in healthcare as it has in other markets, working to drive
its Atom processor down to smaller handheld and mobile
devices. To support this, Intel is continuing to focus on
lower power and lower cost devices, with higher battery
life for more portability along with high processing performance. This direction meets worldwide needs for medical
teleconnection, for instance from a hospital in Beijing,
China to a remote community clinic where local doctors
can work with a hospital that has expertise to assist on a
remote diagnosis using multiple screens, video feed and
even real-time image sharing. Hill sees an opportunity
for these solutions to be more portable and lower cost to
provide remote patient-monitoring systems that include
display and camera for remote telehealth discussions, to
complement large, dedicated equipment in urban centers.
Similar to evolutions in other industries (such as smart
grid), the technology is moving faster than the infrastructure can handle. Hill believes that a determining factor in
the evolution of these connected medical devices will be
how insurance companies react – as in, who pays? – and
how quickly providers are willing to pay to update their
practices. A few things will help drive change: too few
doctors for an increasing numbers of patients, the large
number of baby boomers with disposable income and
consumer demand. Hill also sees an increase in venture
capital funds available in healthcare-related technologies
– indicating that a large market is perceived to be there.
Security continues to be a hot topic, as well as interoperability between devices, which Hill believes is quickly
reaching a point where it will become a standard requirement. Another aspect of healthcare reform that he
believes developers need to be concerned about is quality
www.eecatalog.com/medical
Cheryl Berglund Coupé is editor of EECatalog.
com. Her articles have appeared in EE Times,
Electronic Business, Microsoft Embedded Review and Windows Developer’s Journal and
she has developed presentations for the Embedded Systems Conference and ICSPAT. She has
held a variety of production, technical marketing and writing
positions within technology companies and agencies in the
Northwest.
19
Key Power Issues for Medical
Equipment Designers
by Chris Jones, product marketing director and Conor Quinn, technical marketing director, Embedded Power, Emerson Network Power
Although many electronic design engineers will consider
the provision of power for medical applications to be a reasonably well-understood subject, there is one particular
area, concerning voltage dips and power interrupts, that
demands close scrutiny.
The overall provisions of the IEC 60601-1 safety standard
are likely to be familiar territory to any design engineer
working in the field of medical equipment. The standard
defines the general safety requirements for equipment
that has ‘not more than one connection to a particular
supply mains and is intended to diagnose, treat or monitor the patient under medical supervision and which
makes physical or electrical contact with the patient.’ IEC
60601-1 has been adopted by the US as UL 60601-1, as well
as most major industrialized
countries, including Canada
(C22.2 No. 601.1), the UK
and Europe (EN 60601-1),
Japan (JIS T0601-1), Australia and New Zealand (AS/
NZ 3200.1).
standard non-medical unit, in order to comply with the
60601-1 safety standard.
Since the design of high-efficiency switch-mode power
supplies is a specialist task demanding considerable skill
and resources, and the medical equipment has to undergo
strict compliance testing, most designers will choose
to use a standard commercially available medical power
supply for their application if one is available, or request a
customized unit from a specialist power supply company.
By using power supplies that are already pre-approved
to the 60601-1 safety standard, medical equipment
manufacturers can accelerate compliance testing of
their own products and speed time-to-market. Taking
this pre-approved route also minimizes the risk of them
encountering any unforeseen
development problems in an
area outside their own field
of expertise, which could
negatively impact launch
timescales.
One of the main problems
is that deciding whether
or not an item of medical
equipment meets the
requirements of IEC
61000-4-11 is open to
interpretation.
Safety standard 60601-1
applies to an extremely
broad and diverse range of
equipment intended for use
in medical, dental and laboratory environments. Typical
examples extend from small
items of equipment such as
infusion pump controls and
endoscopic cameras, through to much larger systems such
as dialysis machines, CTI and MRI scanners and gamma
imaging systems.
There are a considerable
number of medical power
supply manufacturers worldwide, many of which produce
technically excellent products.
When choosing a particular
supplier, it is almost certainly
best to look for a company that
manufactures a wide range of
power supplies, preferably
has a proven expertise in both ac-dc and dc-dc conversion
technologies, and which has a consistent track record for
delivering standard and customized medically approved
products to leading medical equipment manufacturers.
Build or Buy?
Designing in-house or choosing a commercially available
ac-dc power supply for a medical product involves a host of
considerations. These include the system’s overall power
budget and current and voltage requirements, as well as
the power supply’s conversion efficiency, physical size,
control and monitoring functions, set-up or programmable
features and – not least – its cost. In addition to these factors, it is essential to ensure that the power supply has
higher isolation and lower safety ground leakage than a
20
Given that nowadays there is a wide availability of power
supplies that comply with 60601-1, at first glance it would
seem that choosing a suitable unit is merely a case of
checking that the product meets all the requirements of
the application. However, it is not quite that simple. IEC
60601-1 is a prime example of what is termed a base standard; it covers all the general requirements for electrical
medical equipment, but it also has a number of associated
standards, known as collateral standards. One of these
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
is IEC 60601-1-2, which defines the rigorous electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements of medical power
supplies.
It goes without saying that all 60601-1 compliant power
supplies meet the EMC requirements of IEC 60601-1-2,
otherwise they would not be approved – in fact, these
requirements have been a mandatory condition of sale
since 2004. However, meeting the voltage dip requirements of IEC 60601-1-2 – which are themselves the subject
of a further complementary pair of IEC standards known
as 61000-4-11 and 61000-4-34 – is still a matter involving
a degree of controversy.
IEC 61000-4-11 and IEC 61000-4-34 are matched standards that define how equipment must be capable of
tolerating voltage dips, voltage variations and short-term
power interrupts on the ac mains supply. The standards
specify the same depths and durations of voltage dips, and
cover both single-phase and three-phase equipment. IEC
61000-4-11 applies to equipment rated at up to 16 amps
per phase connected to 50 Hz or 60 Hz ac supply networks,
and IEC 61000-4-34 applies to equipment rated at more
than 16 amps per phase. Since in many respects the standards are the same, this article limits its discussion to IEC
61000-4-11.
Classification
Explanation
A
Normal performance within limits
specified by the manufacturer,
requestor or purchaser
B
Temporary loss of functionality or
performance degradation which
ceases after the disturbance ceases,
and from which the equipment under
test recovers its normal performance,
without operator intervention
C
Temporary loss of functionality or
performance degradation, the correction
of which requires operator intervention
D
Irrecoverable loss of functionality or
performance, owing to hardware or
software damage, or loss of data
Table 1: Evaluation of IEC 61000-4-11 test results
One of the main problems is that deciding whether or not
an item of medical equipment meets the requirements of
IEC 61000-4-11 is open to interpretation. In broad terms,
the standard stipulates that the equipment should not
suffer ‘loss of functionality’ for a 30 percent dip in supply
voltage lasting 0.5 s, a 60 percent dip lasting 100 ms, and
a 100 percent dip lasting 10 ms. The equipment should
also not suffer ‘loss of functionality’ in the event of ac
power being removed altogether for a period of 5 seconds.
However, the term ‘loss of functionality’ is to some degree
subjective, and the compliance test procedure recognizes
this fact by defining four distinct classification categories,
as shown in Table 1.
www.eecatalog.com/medical
Choice of Classification Categories
Provided that the equipment is not intended for critical
life-support functions, the choice of which classification
category to adopt for compliance testing is left to the
equipment designer’s discretion. The designer must also
decide what constitutes full functionality – and therefore
by definition, what also constitutes ‘loss of functionality.’
This is inevitably something of a gray area. Most standard
low- to medium-power open-frame medical power supplies, which represent by far the largest segment of the
market, are too small and inexpensive to satisfy classification level A; achieving lengthy hold-up times at full load
with no degradation in output voltage regulation demands
the addition of significant holdup capacitance or larger
input components for lower voltage operation. A number
of power supply manufacturers include this detailed EMC
characterization data in their product datasheets or application notes, to help designers decide which classification
to use for compliance testing their equipment, and it is
worth checking for this information to help narrow the
field of choice.
The Embedded Power division of Emerson Network Power (www.
healthcarepowersupplies.com) manufactures a diverse range of ac-dc
power supplies for use in medical equipment. This image shows a
60601-1 compliant unit from the company’s iMP series of configurable
power supplies, which is capable of delivering up to 1500 watts and can
be equipped with a power hold-up module to maintain full load output
for up to 54 ms.
There are a variety of techniques available to medical
equipment designers seeking to satisfy the stringent
classification level A. They can oversize the power supply
for the application, or fit more capacitance to its output
– which has maximum limits based on various design criteria. If commercially justified, custom power supplies can
also be considered. Another solution is to use a modular
power supply, which provides a flexible and cost-effective
means of incrementally increasing output capability and
adding extra capacitance, to extend the hold-up time in
the event of an ac input dip. Some of the better modular
medically approved power supplies on the market offer
optional power hold-up modules, which can extend the
21
time that the output voltage will be maintained by a significant amount.
Over-specifying a power supply to meet the voltage
dip requirements of IEC 60601-1-2 can be an expensive
decision. Medical equipment designers would do well to
carefully evaluate the system’s overall power budget and
required level of functionality, before deciding on a specific power supply.
Conor Quinn is director of technical marketing at
Emerson Network Power, with responsibility for
embedded power products. Quinn is a regular contributor to the specification and roadmap initiatives
of industry groups including PSMA (Power Sources
Manufacturers Association), PMBus (Power Management Bus) and PICMG (PCI Industrial Computer Manufacturers
Group). Quinn holds a BE in electrical engineering from University
College Cork in Ireland and a MSEE and a PhD in engineering from
the University of Minnesota.
Chris Jones is director of product marketing at the Embedded Power
business of Emerson Network Power. Jones is responsible for the
development of the company’s range of standard
embedded power products, from product definition
to portfolio management. Jones holds a bachelor’s
degree in electrical engineering (BSEE) from West
Coast University in Los Angeles, California.
Medical Electronics ONLINE
www.eecatalog.com/medical
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22
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
Designing Portable, Wearable and
Implantable Medical Electronics with
Ultra-Low-Power Microcontrollers
by Rajesh Verma, MSP430 product marketing manager and Srini Sridhara, MCU member group technical staff, Texas Instruments
Recent statistics show that healthcare spending in the
U.S. and around the world in general continues to grow
rapidly.According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S. healthcare spending in 2010 was
$2.6 trillion and accounted for 18 percent of the nation’s
gross domestic product (GDP).Multiple factors such as
increasing costs, aging populations and the growing
prevalence of chronic diseases are forcing healthcare
providers and medical device manufacturers to rethink
how healthcare can be delivered in a reliable but costeffective manner.
At the same time, advances in microcontrollers have
enabled medical electronics to become smaller, cheaper
and more portable.As medical devices become more
accessible to consumers,
we see patient monitoring
and therapeutic solutions
move away from hospitals
and closer to the patient.
The wider use of personal
health monitoring systems
should lead to better patient
outcomes and help reduce
healthcare costs.
A typical portable medical
device that patients can use
in the convenience of their
homes or on the go – such as
a blood glucose meter, blood
pressure monitor, heart
rate monitor or pulse oximeter – has several system
requirements.The product
needs to have a small form
factor, a long battery life
and a low development
cost.A small form factor
is possible if there are a
minimal number of external
www.eecatalog.com/medical
components outside of the microcontroller.For example,
a microcontroller with integrated peripherals such as an
analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a digital-to-analog
converter (DAC), operational amplifiers, a USB interface
and a segmented LCD controller not only helps ensure a
smaller, cheaper circuit board, but also reduces the bill
of materials (BOM) costs and development time.If only
a small battery such as a CR2032 coin cell is used in the
system, the active and standby power modes need to
have ultra-low power consumption and enable only the
required peripherals for any given time.Many portable
medical devices today require that the original battery
lasts at least two to three years.Battery life plays a major
role in determining the form factor of the end product.
Figure 1: Texas Instruments’ MSP430TMplatform of 16-bit microcontrollers is designed specifically for ultralow-power applications. With a real-time clock standby mode that uses as little as .3 μA and active power
modes that draw 100-200 μA/MHz, MSP430 devices have the industry’s lowest power consumption.
23
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
the physical layer (PHY) but also
the phase-locked loop (PLL) and the
low dropout regulator (LDO) used
to regulate the voltage coming from
a connected USB host.These devices
are capable of up to 20 MHz performance with a coin cell battery such
as the CR2032. Most of the analog
signal conditioning chain, such as
the ADC, comparator and DAC, are
already integrated in the microcontroller.
Achieving the longest battery life
relies on obtaining the lowest
average power consumption.First,
the ultra-low power standby mode
has to disable all but the most
necessary system components.In
the case of MSP430’s 5xx and 6xx
generation devices, there is a lowpower mode known as LPM3.5 (or
shutdown RTC mode) where most of
the system clocks and peripherals
are disabled but the RTC remains
active.If there is a serviceable interrupt, the device typically wakes up
in 3 microseconds or less.It services
the interrupt and quickly enters the
low-power mode again, keeping the
active duty cycle to a minimum.For
devices that spend most of their
time in an ultra-low power standby
mode, this can translate into a battery life that is 10 years or longer.
Figure 2: Block Diagram of the New MSP430F563x/663x microcontroller seriesthat includes a small
form factor such as a 7x7mm BGA package, a high degree of integration with analog and digital
peripherals, ultra-low power, and scalable memory options.
24
Even small batteries can occupy 25 percent or more of
the volume in a medical device.Therefore, it is critical
for a compact medical device to utilize the most powerefficient microcontrollers so that a small battery can be
used in the system.In addition, a low development cost is
possible if the development tools are easy to understand
and affordable. It helps if design questions can be quickly
answered, e.g., via an online support forum.Today’s
microcontrollers are well-suited to handle the above
challenges of portable and wearable medical electronics.
Engineers designing medical devices are able to match
their memory, performance and integration needs with
the many devices available.
In the future, new technologies will
continue to enable more medical
innovations.MSP430 devices today
are already used in a variety of energy-harvesting applications where there is no traditional battery.In these cases,
energy from the surrounding environment is sufficient
to power the MSP430 microcontroller.Another exciting
new technology is ferroelectric random access memory,
or FR AM.This is a non-volatile memory that is about as
fast as SR AM, has an average active power that is much
less than that of EEPROM and flash and can serve as a
unified memory space with flexible code and data partitioning.Of particular interest for medical applications,
FR AM is not affected by radiation.The MSP430FR57xx
devices from Texas Instruments integrate FR AM, samples are currently available.
New system-on-chip (SoC) devices need very few
external components to complete a medical design.For
example, an integrated USB module can include not only
Because much higher performing and smaller microcontrollers are available today compared to even a few years
ago, medical devices have started to become more wear-
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
able. Clothing that embeds cardiac sensors and associated
electronics for ECG and heart rate monitoring applications have already been developed.Accessories such as
chest straps, wrist monitors
and ear clips for monitoring
blood oxygenation, caloric
burn and heart rate are
common.For example, the
BodyMedia FITTM system
(shown in Figure 3) consists
of a wearable armband monitor that tracks the user’s
waking and sleeping activity
on a daily basis.The optional
clip-on display monitor provides visual feedback of the user’s activity level.Wearable
devices tend to spend more time in active mode compared to other portable devices.MSP430 devices such as
SPECIAL FEATURE
the MSP430FR57xx series, which integrates FR AM and
achieves ultra-low active powerconsumption of 100 μ A/
MHz, will be particularly suitable for wearable medical
applications.
Apart from portable and
wearable medical devices,
new technologies and innovations are key to enabling
implantable medical devices.
Since
the
development
of the first cardiac pacemaker five decades ago, the
implantable medical device
industry has proliferated.
Today, implantable defibrillators, drug delivery systems
and neurostimulators are available to treat a variety of
chronic diseases. Unlike portable devices, most implant-
New system-on-chip (SoC)
devices need very few
external components to
complete a medical design.
Figure 3: BodyMedia FITTM system featuring a wearable armband and display
www.eecatalog.com/medical
25
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
able devices require continuous operation, making long
battery life a must-have.For example, an implantable
neurostimulation device can be used to treat epileptic
seizures. The device continuously monitors electroencephalograph (EEG) signals, and the microcontroller in
such a device detects the onset of seizure events using
EEG data. Once the microcontroller detects a seizure
event, it triggers a programmable pulse generator to send
electrical impulses to the vagus nerve. The stimulation
of the vagus nerve prevents or reduces the severity of
the on-coming seizure. Since seizure events are unpredictable, the microcontroller is running continuously
to detect the onset of an epileptic seizure. Despite the
microcontroller operating continuously, the battery in
the device must last for several years in order to avoid
repeated surgeries to replace it. The ultra-low active and
sleep-mode power consumption of MSP430 devices can
enable such a class of devices.
Microcontrollers play a key role in enabling portable,
wearable, and implantable medical electronics, and
the ultra-low power consumption of microcontrollers
extends the battery life of these personal health devices.
The resulting reduction in the size and cost of personal
health devices enables portability and widespread use.As
these devices proliferate in the market, we see the patient
becoming more empowered to monitor and address their
own health needs, which will hopefully lead to a healthier
society.
Srini Sridhara leads ultra-low-power memory
design in advanced CMOS technologies for microcontroller products for Texas Instruments’
member group technical staff. He received a
bachelor’s degree in technology from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in 1999 and a
doctorate in electrical engineering from University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign in 2006.
Rajesh Verma is a product marketing manager
for the medical market within TI’s MSP430
microcontroller division. He has a BS in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois
at Chicago, a MS in electrical engineering from
Purdue University and a MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.
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Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
Security Versus Cost
Developers Weigh Options, Including Liability and Brand Protection
by Cheryl Coupé
Medical equipment developers face obvious and not-soobvious security challenges. The one most consumers
are aware of is the Privacy Rule of the Health Insurance
Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which established standards to protect patient information. This
could impact how information must be protected when
it is transmitted froma home healthcare or drug-delivery
device, for instance. Other security issues relate to safety
and liability concerns around device consumables with
limited lifetimes. As an example, surgical equipment may
only be tested and warranted for use with the original
manufacturer’s tool head – and the tool head may have
a limited lifetime in duration or number of uses. Both of
these situations require built-in security protocols that
protect against unauthorized access to information inside
the device or that establish secure authentication between
devices.
ports, they are difficult (read: expensive) for development
as well. While large, high-margin, relatively low-volume
equipment can absorb these costs, they can add up on
high-volume, lower-cost products. For these devices,
developers may choose lower-cost options such as writing
a secure algorithm and embedding it in a microcontroller
or crypto-accelerator – or even doing nothing. While these
options are less secure, there may be a credible business
case if liability risks are low.
Tool heads require secure authentication with surgical equipment to
ensure safety.(Source: Atmel Corporation)
Remote monitoring and drug delivery devices require security to protect patient data.(Source: Atmel Corporation)
Typically, medical equipment developers have had a few
options to meet these security needs. Secure microcontrollers include a robust embedded software-based
security algorithm as well as physical protections. Those
often include disabled debug ports to restrict access,
active shields to prevent remote scans and environmental
tampers that allow the chip to only operate within controlled environments (one way for hackers to gain illicit
access is to run the chip outside of prescribed conditions,
such as voltage or temperature, which can lead to improper
performance and vulnerabilities). Secure microcontrollers
provide a high level of confidence, but those added features make them expensive to purchase and without debug
www.eecatalog.com/medical
Atmel product marketing manager Eustace Asanghanwa
raises an additional risk for manufacturers – that of brand
and market protection. With the surgical tool tip example,
for instance, the manufacturer may simply choose to embed
security into a non-secure microcontroller to authenticate
the tip to the device.But if the tip is a high-volume, highmargin product, it may be attractive to black marketers
who could access the security information and then manu-
Secure microcontrollers
provide a high level of
confidence, but those
added features make them
expensive.
27
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
facture and sell thousands – or hundreds of thousands – of
these units. “When that happens,” says Asanghanwa, “the
original manufacturer not only loses market share from
the knock-offs, they are also exposed in terms of liability
because the knock-offs are being sold under a brand name
that they own.” If personal injury results from the fakes,
there could be even greater damage to the brand.
and complexity of a secure microcontroller that combines
security and computing in one device. According to Asanghanwa, “If you go with a turn-key solution, what you’ve
done is you’ve separated computing from the security. If
you keep the security by itself it is a smaller device now,
and you can buy a cheaper microcontroller to offer the
computing to go with the security device.”
Asanghanwa explains how easily black marketers can
access secure information with a simple Google search
that can turn up offers from all over the world to extract
the secret information from chips for $1,000 or less. “So
someone with $1,000 can get a means to produce counterfeit at volumes of whatever number they can come up
with. In other words, take over a whole platform or a whole
market. So those are the stakes involved in this market in
not being able to store a root secret securely.”
Turn-key approach uses a peripheral security device to service the security requirements of a standard microcontroller.
Atmel ATAES132 devices are available in 8-pin SOIC , TSSOP and UDFN
packages.
Atmel now offers an option for developers not willing (or
able) to take those risks, but who can’t take on the cost
Asanghanwa describes the advantages of the Atmel
ATAES132 turn-key device. “All internal workings are not
firmware – they’re hard-wired logic. It does one thing and
it does it very well. That has two advantages: It’s going
to do the same thing all the time, and it doesn’t depend
on the customer to implement firmware correctly or keep
from introducing bugs that may open vulnerabilities. ”The
Atmel devices use the Advanced Encryption Standard
(AES), a symmetric-key encryption standard adopted by
the U.S. government that meets compliance requirements
for medical equipment manufacturers. The devices are
compatible with standard serial EEPROMs, which allows
Tamper-hardened security devices (left) command more than a 200% price premium over non-secure counterparts. The diagram on the right illustrates how a security device such as CryptoAuthentication fits in a system architecture, at a fraction of the price. (Source: Atmel Corporation)
28
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
developers to add security features to existing systems
without retooling circuit boards.
Another advantage to this turn-key approach is that the
authentication process uses a derivation of the root secret
embedded in the device but doesn’t expose it, which keeps
hackers from getting access. And because the security in
each device is tied to a unique serial number defined in
the Atmel factory, there is no way to successfully massproduce clones.
Asanghanwa adds a few security tips for developers.
“What we always advise developers to do is to talk to a
security expert to review their systems, because a lot of
security systems fail because there’s an exposure and a
window somewhere. When developing software, it’s nice
to review the system to understand what is key inside
and make sure they don’t release that information either
directly or inadvertently.” A common security error that
developers might make is to save some querying round
Medical Electronics ONLINE
SPECIAL FEATURE
trips on authentication by storing the root secret inside
the microcontroller. When they do that, they open up a
vulnerability.“I will check that you understand the root
secret in the system, make sure it’s embedded in the security device and never use it in other parts of the system,”
saysAsanghanwa. “Even though these devices are easy to
work with, it’s always good to consult a security expert
so the pieces that are keeping the system secure are kept
secret within the system.”
Cheryl Berglund Coupé is editor of EECatalog.
com. Her articles have appeared in EE Times,
Electronic Business, Microsoft Embedded Review and Windows Developer’s Journal and
she has developed presentations for the Embedded Systems Conference and ICSPAT. She has
held a variety of production, technical marketing and writing
positions within technology companies and agencies in the
Northwest.
www.eecatalog.com/medical
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29
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
MEMS Motion Sensing Enables
Next-Generation Medical Systems
by Bob Scannell, business development manager, inertial MEMS products, Analog Devices, Inc.
Precision navigation, typically associated with applications developed for land, air and sea vehicles, is
increasingly being used in medical applications ranging
from surgical instrumentation to robotics. And while the
design requirements of a surgical navigation system share
broad similarities with traditional vehicle navigation,
there are also distinct new challenges posed by the environment and the level of required performance.
This article looks at the unique challenges of medical navigation applications and explores possible solutions ranging
from various sensor mechanisms to necessary sensor
processing to the unique system characteristics and data
processing required. Critical sensor specifications will
be reviewed and explained for their individual contribution, and more importantly, the potential error and drift
mechanisms will be discussed to aid in sensor selection.
Opportunities and approaches for sensor enhancement
through integration, sensor fusion, and sensor processing
(such as Kalman filtering) will be highlighted as well.
motion is critical. Table 1 outlines some of the basic pertinent medical applications by motion type. Later, more
advanced applications where combinations of motion in
complex scenarios that present additional challenges will
be discussed.
Acceleration/
Position
Tilt
Angular
Rate/
Angle
Variation
Shock
CPR Assist
Patient
Down
Monitors
Scanning
Instruments
Tremor
Control
High
Value
Equipment
Warranty
Activity
Monitors
Bed-Patient
Positioning/
Aspiration
Surgical
Tools
Equipment
Wear
BioFeedback
Monitors
Blood
Pressure
Monitors
Prosthetics
CPR
Assist
Imaging
Equipment
Table 1: Inertial sensors accurately capture varied and complex motion
to drive widespread medical applicability.
Most Motion is Complex in Nature
While simple motion detection – linear movement along
one axis, for example –is valuable to a number of applications (such as detecting whether an elderly person has
fallen), a majority of applications involve multiple types
and axes of motion. Being able to capture this complex,
multi-dimensional motion can not only enable new benefits, but is also key to maintaining accuracy in the most
critical environments.
Figure 1: MEMS silicon structures sense acceleration and rotation and
convert this to an electrical signal with the help of signal processing.
Translating the Detection of Linear and
Rotational Motion into Healthcare Value
Silicon-based accelerometers and gyroscopes known as
micro-electromechanical systems or MEMS (Figure 1) are
commonly found today in a wide range of devices. These
inertial sensors detect and measure motion, with minimal
power and size, and are valuable to nearly any application
where movement is involved, and even those where lack of
30
In many cases, it is necessary to combine multiple sensor
types (linear and rotational, for instance) in order to precisely determine the motion an object has experienced. As
an example, an accelerometer can be used to determine
inclination angle since it is sensitive to the Earth’s gravity.
As a MEMS accelerometer is rotated through a +/- 1g
field, (+/- 90o), it is able to translate that motion into an
angle representation. However, the accelerometer cannot
distinguish static acceleration (gravity) from dynamic
acceleration. In the latter case, an accelerometer can be
combined with a gyroscope, and post-processing of both
devices can discern the linear acceleration versus tilt,
based upon known motion dynamic models. This process
of sensor fusion obviously becomes more complex as the
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
system dynamics (number of axes of motion and degrees
of freedom of motion) increases.
It is also important to understand the environmental
influences on sensor accuracy. Temperature is an obvious
key concern, and can typically be corrected for; in fact
higher precision sensors are pre-calibrated and will
dynamically compensate themselves. A less obvious factor
to consider is the potential for even slight vibrations to
produce shifts in accuracy of rotational rate sensors. These
effects, known as linear acceleration effect and vibration
rectification, can be significant depending on the quality
of the gyroscope. Sensor fusion is relied on to improve
performance by using an accelerometer to detect linear
acceleration and applying this knowledge, along with a
calibrated understanding of a gyroscope’s linear acceleration sensitivity, for correction.
For many applications, particularly those requiring performance beyond basic ‘pointing’ (up, down, left, right) or
simple movement (in motion, or not), multiple degreesof-freedom motion detection is required. For example, a
six degree-of-freedom inertial sensor is defined as having
the ability to detect linear acceleration on each of three
(x,y,z) axis, and rotational movement on the same three
axis, also referred to as roll, pitch and yaw; as depicted in
Figure 2.
Navigation from Vehicles to Surgical
Instruments
The use of inertial sensors as a navigation aid has become
prevalent in industry. Typically, they are used in conjunc-
SPECIAL FEATURE
tion with other navigation devices such as GPS. When GPS
access is unreliable, inertial guidance fills the gap in coverage with what is called “dead-reckoning.” Other sensors,
including optical and magnetic, may be added depending
on the environment and the performance goals. Each
sensor type has its own limitations. MEMS inertial sensors provide the potential to fully compensate for these
other sensor inaccuracies since they are free from many of
the same interferences and do not require external infrastructure: no satellite, magnetic field, or camera is needed
– just inertia). The major navigational sensor approaches
are outlined in Table 2, along with their strengths and
potential limitations.
As with the potential for GPS blockage in vehicle navigation, the medical corollary is optical guidance and the
potential for line-of-sight blockages. Inertially based sensors perform dead-reckoning during the optical blockage,
as well as enhance system reliability by providing redundant sensing.
Sensor
Type
Major
Advantage
Potential
Limitations
Applicable
to Medical
Navigation?
GPS
Long Term
Absolute
Reference
Potential
Blockages
No
Magnetic
No Required
Infrastructure
(except Earth)
Subject
to Field
Interference
Limited
Optical
Intuitive
Line of Sight
Obstruction
Limited
Inertial
SelfContained
Relative, not
absolute
reference
Yes
Table 2: Outlined are various navigational sensors widely used in
industry and their applicability to medical navigation.
Medical Navigation
Figure 2: Linear x, y and z motion, plus rotational roll, pitch and yaw
make up the six degrees of motion measurement required for full
motion assessment.
www.eecatalog.com/medical
One medical application outlined in Table 2 involves
use of inertial sensors in the operating room for more
accurate alignment of artificial knee or hip joints with
a patient’s unique anatomical structure. The goal here
is to improve joint alignment to less than 1º error from
the patient’s natural alignment axis versus what is 3º
or larger error today with purely mechanical alignment
approaches. Greater than 95 percent of total knee arthoplasty (TK A) procedures today are done with mechanical
alignment. Computer-assisted approaches using optical
alignment have only slowly begun to replace some
mechanical procedures, likely due to the equipment overhead required. Whether mechanical or optical alignment
is used, approximately 30 percent of these procedures
result in misalignment (defined as >3º error), which
leads to both discomfort and often additional surgery.
Reducing misalignment has the potential of offering
less invasive and shorter surgery time, increasing post-
31
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
DIOx
SELF-TEST
TRIAXIAL
ACCEL
TRIAXIAL
GYRO
TEMP
RST
I/O
VCC
ALARMS
POWER
MANAGEMENT
CONTROLLER
GND
CONTROL
REGISTERS
CS
SPI
PORT
DIGITAL
FILTER
CALIBRATION
CORRECTION
OUTPUT
REGISTERS
SCLK
DIN
DOUT
ADIS16334
Figure 3: MEMS-based inertial measurement units provide precision six-degrees-of-motion measurement in compact form factors suitable to surgical instrumentation.
operative patient comfort and producing longer lasting
joint replacements. Inertial sensors in the form of a full
multi-axis inertial measurement unit (IMU), as shown in
Figure 3, have been shown
to provide substantial
improvement in accuracy
for TK A.
Sensor Selection
and System-Level
Processing
As with the potential for
GPS blockage in vehicle
navigation, the medical
corollary is optical guidance
and the potential for lineof-sight blockages.
There is a large variation
in the performance levels
of inertial sensors. Devices
suitable for gaming are not
able to address the highperformance navigation
problem outlined here.
The key MEMS specifications of interest are bias
drift, vibration influence,
sensitivity and noise. Precision industrial and medical
navigation typically require performance levels that are
an order of magnitude higher than is available from the
MEMS sensors targeted for use in consumer devices.
Table 3 outlines general system considerations, which –
through analysis – can help focus the sensor selection.
Most systems will implement some form of Kalman filter
to effectively merge multiple sensor types. The Kalman
filter takes into account the system dynamics model, the
relative sensor accuracies and other application-specific
control inputs to then make the best determination of
32
actual movement. Higher accuracy inertial sensors (low
noise, low drift and stability over temperature/time/
vibration/supply-variance) reduce the complexity of the
Kalman filter, the number
of redundant sensors
required and the number
of limitations placed on
allowable system operational scenarios.
MEMS Adoption in
Medical Applications
Motion capture within
the most complex medical
applications poses both
highly challenging and
computationally
intensive design problems.
Fortunately, many of
the principles required
for solving these next-generation medical challenges
are based on proven approaches from classical industrial navigation problems, including sensor fusion and
processing techniques. Within medical navigation, the
complexity of motion and the requirements on precision
and reliability will drive the need for:
t
t
t
t
.VMUJQMFTFOTPST
"EEJUJPOBMTFOTPSQPTUQSPDFTTJOH
4PQIJTUJDBUFEBMHPSJUINT
$PNQMFYUFTUDPNQFOTBUJPOTDIFNFT
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
System Variable
Conditions/Considerations
Environment
indoor/outdoor, temperature, shock/
vibration, interference sources
Performance Rating / Goals
accuracy, repeatability, speed, stability
Operator
assisted or autonomous, trained or untrained
Safety
Life Critical, Inaccessible, Redundancy
Budget
Cost/Time to Implement, Risk
Table 3: Considerations in sensor selection.
The availability of highly accurate and environmentally
robust sensor developments is driving a new surge in the
adoption of MEMS inertial sensors within the medical
field. These inertial MEMS devices are capable of offering
advantages in precision, size, power, redundancy and accessibility over existing measurement/sensing approaches.
Medical Electronics ONLINE
Bob Scannell is a business development manager for
ADI’s inertial MEMS products. He has been with
ADI for more than 15 years in various technical
marketing and business development functions ranging from sensors to DSP to wireless, and previously
worked at Rockwell International in both design and
marketing. He holds a BS degree in electrical engineering from UCLA
(University of California, Los Angeles), and an MS in computer engineering from USC (University of Southern California).
www.eecatalog.com/medical
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33
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SPECIAL FEATURE
USB Connectivity in an
Embedded World
by Pedro Pachuca, MCU interface marketing manager, Silicon Labs
Embedded developers have rapidly adopted the universal
serial bus (USB) as the interface of choice for enabling
connectivity to other applications due to its ease-of-use,
plug-and-play functionality and robustness. Although
USB connectivity has become a key requirement for most
embedded applications, in most cases it is just one of many
design requirements for a typical industrial, medical and
consumer electronics application.
In most embedded applications, there is the additional
requirement of achieving specific product cost targets,
which adds yet another layer of complexity to already challenging designs. A highly-integrated USB solution not only
enables the easiest path to achieving USB connectivity but
can also provide the performance and analog capabilities
required to enable developers to achieve their design goals
in a cost-effective way.
For example, a blood pressure monitor that requires USB
connectivity to enable the end user to download information to a PC must also perform its primary blood pressure
measurement functions. This requires a complex set of
interactions between pressure sensors and analog-todigital converters for rapid data acquisition, intensive
data manipulations to calculate blood pressure, and user
interface design to properly display the results in a humanreadable format.
The medical equipment market has even adopted an
optimized USB device standard, the personal healthcare
device (PHCD) class, which leverages the ubiquitous USB
interface to enable standardized transmission of data and
messages regardless of device manufacturer. Microcontrollers (MCUs) used in medical device applications ideally
need to provide a variety of interface methods including
integrated USB controllers for easy host and device connectivity.
A New Generation of USB MCUs
The rapid adoption of USB in industrial, medical and consumer electronics applications is challenging embedded
developers to incorporate USB connectivity into their
products while maintaining or, in some cases, reducing
overall costs. Early versions of USB-based MCUs were
developed to enable the addition of USB, but they lacked
the capability to support other functions or peripherals.
In the early days of USB, these devices played a key role
in boosting the overall popularity of the USB interface.
Even today, these bridge devices can be effective solutions
that quickly enable the addition of full-speed USB via a
companion chip, thus avoiding the need to redesign entire
systems. However, for cost-sensitive applications, this
approach may not be ideal.
To overcome this cost penalty, the new generation of USBbased MCUs incorporates a greater number of functions
Fig 1. USB personal healthcare device class supports easy, cost-effective connectivity.
34
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
and peripherals. However, although the number of USBbased MCUs with different combinations of peripherals
has grown significantly, a gap still exists for highly integrated solutions that incorporate not only the right mix
of peripherals but also ensure that these functions are
sufficiently robust to support critical application requirements. Although application requirements are highly
dependent on the characteristics and functionality of
the final product, there are three main areas of interest
common to most applications.
system. At the simplest level, the CPU should be capable
of taking data from the UART interface (UART FIFO) and
placing it into the USB FIFO, and vice versa. However,
what if this same application needs to perform other
simple functions, such as reversing the endian ordering,
or complex functions, such as applying software filters?
What began as a simple task suddenly becomes a much
more complex operation that requires special attention to
properly manage and places an increasingly large burden
on the CPU.
The first area that will be
explored is CPU performance
and the impact of USB when
it is included as an integrated
peripheral. The second area
to consider is the analog
functions or peripherals that
play an important role when
interfacing with real-world
signals. Finally, since almost
every application is cost-sensitive, a USB implementation
that reduces cost by eliminating external components
is highly desirable.
A typical protocol bridge is
expected to pass data from
one peripheral to another,
practically in real-time, so
the CPU needs to have the
performance necessary to
read, write and manipulate
data with an acceptable
latency. CPU cores that can
execute 70 percent of their
instructions in one or two
system
clock
cycles(see
Figure 2) are sufficient to not
only meet the needs of protocol bridge applications but
also to address most other
full-speed USB applications.
As an additional benefit, a
high-speed CPU executes
more work in less time,
which can, in turn, reduce overall power consumption by
enabling a system to stay in low-power mode longer.
…A gap still exists for
highly integrated solutions
that incorporate not
only the right mix of
peripherals but also ensure
that these functions are
sufficiently robust to
support critical application
requirements.
Most often, the CPU is
responsible for executing
user code, and its ability to
execute instructions and
process data in a timely manner is paramount. A typical
cost-effective USB controller incorporates a first-in/
first-out (FIFO) function block to manage the incoming
and outgoing USB packets while the CPU is used to read
and write data to/from these buffers, in addition to performing other tasks.
Interplay Between CPU and USB Function
Let’s examine a USB-to-serial bridge application to understand how CPU performance can be impacted. In this
bridge application example, assume that the requirement
is to bridge a serial-based UART device with a USB-based
Fig 2. Silicon Labs USB MCUs with high-speed 8051 CPU core can
execute 70 percent of their instructions in one or two clock cycles,
enablingsystems to remain in low-power mode longer.
www.eecatalog.com/medical
Incorporating Analog Functions in USB
Solutions
Analog functions or peripherals, such as analog-to-digital
converters (ADCs) and comparators, are commonly used
across many applications. For example, ADCs and comparators are used in everything from basic battery-management
implementations to highly sophisticated data-acquisition
systems in high-speed sensor interfaces. To support such a
wide range of applications, ADCs and comparators must be
robust and possess enough features to address these varying
requirements while still being sufficiently inexpensive to
be integrated into a USB MCU. An ADC with a 500ksps conversion time with a track-and-hold capability enables the
insertion of clock cycles after each ADC conversion.
Specifically, each conversion is preceded by a tracking period
of three ADC clock cycles after the start-conversion signal
(see Figure 3). This mode is very useful when multiple ADC
channels are in operation because it enables the proper settling time necessary for an accurate conversion. Additionally,
a programmable window detection feature can be used to
compare the ADC output registers with user-programmed
limits. This feature is especially desirable in battery manage-
35
EECatalog
SPECIAL FEATURE
ment applications in which the user sets a limit on how low
the battery can go before an alarm is triggered. In addition,
because no CPU intervention is required to implement this
feature, there is a very short latency period, which further
enhances the safety of these types of battery applications.
for USB clock tolerance. In addition to the cost reduction achieved by removing external components, the
elimination of the external crystal also brings another
major benefit: electromagnetic interference (EMI) is dramatically reduced by eliminating the clock-related noise
emissions. Additionally, these solutions have integrated
termination resistors that are fully software-controllable.
The elimination of the external crystal and its associated
components and the integration of termination resistors
are major steps forward in helping designers reduce the
cost and complexity of adding USB to a design.
Fig 3. ADC tracking mode is useful when multiple ADC channels are in
operation.
Comparators provide another very useful analog function
widely used in many applications. Typical implementations
can be found in devices such as blood glucose meters, in which
a comparator is used to detect the insertion of a test strip, or
insulin pumps, which require a fast shutdown mechanism in
case the motor pump stalls. As shown in these two examples,
the response time and power consumption of the comparator
are critical. While traditional USB-based devices have a loose
specification for these comparators, some USB MCUs provide
comparators with programmable response times as low as
100ns. Power consumption is also user-selectable and can be
as low as 1μA. When viewed in this context, it is possible to
achieve analog performance numbers in MCU-based devices
comparable to those found in typical standalone analog ICs.
USB-based MCUs with integrated high-performance analog
features can provide a cost-effective, single-chip solution by
replacing external analog chips.
Fig 4. Example of a USB MCU with on-chip USB controller and precision
internal oscillator.
Benefits of Integrated USB MCU Solutions
The integration of USB connectivity into a single-chip
MCU solution (as shown in Figure 4) may require a different way of thinking about how best to cost-optimize
the system design. For example, adding USB to a design
may have a substantial impact on the way the clock tree
system is designed. To ensure reliable USB connectivity, it
is critical that USB clock accuracy be maintained. Typical
USB-based MCUs require designers to add an external
crystal and associated components to meet USB clock
accuracy requirements. This approach not only increases
the cost of the solution but also increases the PCB design
complexity and overall size. In addition, external termination resistors are often required to identify the USB speed,
further increasing the cost of the USB implementation.
A clock recovery capability integrated in many USB fullspeed devices eliminates the need for a costly external
crystal by enabling the internal oscillator to adjust itself
based on the incoming USB data stream. This capability
allows the internal oscillator to meet the requirements
36
Summary
USB connectivity is a key requirement for many embedded
applications. Highly integrated USB MCU solutions not
only offer the easiest path to achieving USB connectivity
but also provide high-performance CPU cores coupled
with integrated analog capabilities that help reduce component counts and BOM costs. USB MCU solutions enable
embedded system developers to dramatically simplify
their designs while reducing costs.
Pedro Pachuca manages Silicon Labs’ global microcontroller (MCU) interface product business. Mr.
Pachuca joined Silicon Labs in early 2010. Previously,
he was a product marketing manager at Freescale
Semiconductor where he developed MCU business
strategies to penetrate new global markets and managed a business with an annual run rate in excess of $250 million. Mr.
Pachuca holds a BSSE degree from the Instituto Politecnico Nacional
at Mexico City.
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
Micross Components
SOP
Micross Components, formerly listed as Chip Supply,
Inc., is a leading global provider of distributed and specialty electronic components and services, with over 10
years’ experience in supplying semiconductor die and
packaging solutions to medical device manufacturers.
If you’re looking for increased performance in a smaller
space with high reliability, we can supply the best electronic component for your device. Further, by partnering
with your engineering and manufacturing teams from
the outset, we can insure that your design, validation and
production requirements are all successfully met.
Bare Die and Wafer Processing
Authorized by over 20 major semiconductor manufacturers, Micross Components offers a broad range of
technologies and thousands of part types. With our complete wafer processing capabilities, we can provide the
performance of OTS products in the smallest form factor
available – bare die – allowing increased miniaturization
of your device.
Packaging Solutions
When OTS products cannot be used and handling bare die
is either impractical or too costly, Micross Components can
provide the right solution through our multiple packaging
options.
Chips
Chips
Semiconductor Die and
Specialized Packaging Solutions
CHIP ON BOARD
FLIP CHIP
Size Comparison
Lifecycle Planning & Obsolescence Management
Continued component availability is a source of concern
for many manufacturers, most especially medical device
manufacturers. Through strong relationships with our
electronics suppliers, Micross Components can support
you with strategic planning and up-to-date information on
potential changes in product lines and product availability.
FEATURES & BENEFITS
Chip Scale Packaging (CSP) – a best fit for those seeking
the smallest form factor with ease of handling. Because
our CSP’s are designed in-house, features such as
package thickness, leaded or lead-free balls, and signal
routing can be customized to your device.
◆ Recognized industry leader with the broadest range
◆
Multi-Chip Modules – a solution that provides the advantage of increased functionality and performance with
overall space savings. By integrating multiple die into
a single package, Micross Components can broaden
design options and improve management of product
life-cycles.
◆
◆
◆
Wafer Level CSP (WLCSP) – an option gaining popularity in the medical manufacturing industry for its size,
weight, and also cost savings once a device goes into
production. WLCSP is not a “packaging solution,” per
se, but rather a modification of the bare die itself by
redistribution of the bond pads; hence, the size savings.
Other options include, but are not limited to - hermetic/
ceramic packaging, custom packaging, high-reliability
COTS/iPEM’s/Micro SSD’s, and robotic solder exchange
from lead-free to SnPb finshed terminal leads for tin
whisker mitigation.
XXXFFDBUBMPHDPNNFEJDBM
of specialty electronics solutions, offering the smallest form factors available for next generation builds
or new product designs.
Significant space and weight savings via bare die or
other packaging options smaller than those offered
by semiconductor manufacturers.
Design consulting and custom packaging production.
ISO certified supplier of custom, high-reliability
components for medical, military, space and critical
industrial applications.
On shore production facilities, as well as the technical expertise needed, to insure conformance to your
manufacturing and process control requirements.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Micross Components.
7725 N. Orange Blossom Trail
Orlando, FL 32810
USA
407.298.7100 Telephone
407.290.0164 Fax
[email protected]
www.micross.com
$IJQTt
Emulators/Analyzers
Radicom Research, Inc.
Medical Modems
Compatible Operating Systems: Windows XP, 2000, Vista, Win7,
Window CE, Embedded XP, Linux, MAC
Supported Interfaces: USB, Serial TTL, RS232
These very small and versatile modems are available
in both Serial TTL and the popular USB interfaces. The
Radicom Research Medical Modem™ family is Safety,
Emissions, and Telco compliant to meet most medical
device requirements. As well as compliance with
IEC60601-1 for medical applications, 3KV breakdown is
also available in both the USB and Serial versions. The
certifications are transferable to allow easy integration
into almost any platform. All Medical Modem versions
are CCITT and Bell compliant for complete compatibility
to existing and future installations. The family is also
compliant to domestic and international Telco standards.
Versions include 300bps (V.21/Bell103), 1200/2400bps
(Bell212/V.22/V.22bis), 14.4kbps (V.32bis), 33.6kbps
(V.34) and 56kbps (V.90/V.92). All platforms are available
with FAX, voice playback and record, as well as DTMF
tone generation and detection. These versatile products can be provisioned for applications ranging from
system monitoring and reporting to answering inbound
calls with voice responses. Available in commercial and
industrial temperature ranges, all versions are RoHS
Compliant.
TECHNICAL SPECS
◆ 3KV Isolation on selected models. -40C° to +85C°
operating temperature
◆ AT Commands, Data flow control, and speed buffer-
ing Automatic format / speed sensing
◆ V.44 data compression V.42bis and MNP-5 data
compression V.29 Fast-POS support
◆ Low power consumption, typical 82/94mA (on-hook/
off-hook)
◆ Works under operating systems (O/S) of Windows
2000, XP, Vista, Win7, Windows CE & Embedded XP,
Linux and MAC.
AVAILABILITY
Shipping now
APPLICATION AREAS
FEATURES & BENEFITS
◆ Available USB, Serial TTL and RS232 interfaces,
Medical Devices, Remote Monitoring, Industrial Controls, Data Acquisition.
Internal Modules or External Stand-alone.
◆ USB models are compatible with both USB 1.1 and
USB 2.0 host controllers. Linux (CDC-ACM), Windows
and Mac O/S support
◆ AT command set Up to V.92 56K bps data speeds,
send / Receive 14.4 kbps Fax speed, voice play-back
and recording
◆ Concurrent DTMF, ring and caller ID detection.
Line-in use, extension pick-up and remote hang-up
detection. Caller ID type I and II for select countries
◆ FCC, IC, CE, IEC60601-1 (medical), IEC60950-1
certified, c/UL approved (V92HU-E2-MD), RoHS
compliant.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Radicom Research, Inc.
2148 Bering Drive
San Jose, Ca 95131
USA
408-383-9006 x 112 Telephone
408-383-9007 Fax
[email protected]
www.radi.com
t#PBSET
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
Modules
Modules
Medical Certifications: IEC60601-1 or EN60601-1
Advantech Corporation
AIMB-580
Compatible Operating Systems: Windows XP, Windows 7, Linux
AIMB-580 features Intel’s latest 2 chip solutions for power
management savings to increase energy efficiency, PCIe
Gen 2 for GFX add-on card support, high-bandwidth DDR3
memory support, Intel vPro technology with AMT6.0 for
remote management, all in a low-power design that does
not sacrifice performance.
TECHNICAL SPECS
◆ Supports SATA RAID 0, 1, 5, 10, AMT 6.0, TPM 1.2
(optional)
◆ Supports embedded software APIs and utilities
CONTACT INFORMATION
Advantech Corporation
38 Tesla
Suite 100
Irvine, CA 92618
USA
(800) 866-6008 Toll Free
(949) 789-7178 Telephone
(949) 789-7179 Fax
[email protected]
www.advantech.com/medical
◆ Supports Intel® Core™ i7/i5/i3/Pentium/Xeon proces-
sor with Q57/3450 chipset
◆ Four DIMM socket supports up to 16 GB DDR3
800/1066/1333 MHz SDRAM
◆ Supports dual display of VGA and DVI and dual GbE
LAN
Motherboards
Motherboards
Rich connectivity with up to ten USB 2.0 and four COM
ports (3 x RS-232, 1 x RS-232/422/485 with auto flow control
support) is integrated in a standard 244 x 244 mm mATX
form factor. AIMB-580 motherboard also supports dual
display for DVI + CRT.
AXIOMTEK
Intel® Tunnel Creek CPU &
Intel® TopCliff IOH Combine to
Deliver Excellent Computing
Performance with Low Power
Consumption -PICO822
Supported Architectures: x86
The PICO822 is a highly integrated, small form factor
x86 embedded computer targeted at system developers
and OEMs who need excellent computing performance
for very little power consumption and up to 32GB of
integrated SSD (optional), it’s hard to beat the cost per
performance offered by the PICO822. This board is ideally suited for portable medical devices, in-vehicle and
in-flight computing or entertainment systems. The board
ships with a specially designed low profile heatsink
that doesn’t restrict access to the full featured I/O (see
features section). A proprietary expansion interface on
the bottom of the board interface allows for additional
expansion (USB, UART, Tx/Rx, SMBus, DC input, SDVO).
FEATURES
◆
◆
◆
◆
Intel® Atom™ EG20T PCH
Onboard DDR2-667/800 max. up to 1GB
Onboard SSD max. up to 32GB
2 x COM port, 1 x SATA, 4 x USB 2.0 + 1 client port
AVAILABILITY
Portable medical devices, in-vehicle & in-flight computing, or entertainment systems.
CONTACT INFORMATION
AXIOMTEK
18138 Rowland St.
City of Industry, CA 91744
USA
1.888.GO.AXIOM Toll Free
626.581.3232 Telephone
[email protected]
www.axiomtek.com
◆ Intel® Atom™ Processor E600 Series
XXXFFDBUBMPHDPNNFEJDBM
#PBSETt
COMMELL
Taiwan Commate Computer Inc.(COMMELL), the worldwide leader of Industrial Mini-ITX mainboard, introduced
the Mini-ITX motherboard LV-67H that designed for
the 2nd generation Intel Core i7/i5/i3 processors in the
rPGA988B socket. The Mini-ITX mainboard based on
intel QM67 Express chipset, providing a single-chip
architecture and delivering with Intel vPro & Intel AntiTheft Technology, along with a intel 2nd generation 32
nm Core i7/i5/i3, the Intel processors with HD Graphic
3000 that contains a refresh of the sixth generation
graphics core enabling substantial gains in performance
and lower power consumption, this innovative two-chip
solution provides Intel Intel Hyper-Threading technology
which giving you smart multitasking performance
to move between applications quickly. This platform
delivers higher performance, energy efficiency, most
secure and manageable, It is ideal for a various range
of applications, such as industrial control and automation, gaming, Medical Instruments, Surveillance Server,
Military systems, print imaging and digital signage etc.
LV-67H equipped with dual-channel DDR3 memory up to
a maximum of 16GB in dual SO-DIMM slots. Dual channel
24-bit LVDS, VGA, DVI . LV-67H provides a wide range
of storage, I/O, expansion connectivity, and full range
power source input, including PS/2 ports, 5 x RS232C
and 1 x RS232/422/485 ports, Networking is provided by
Intel 2 x 82574L Giga LAN, 10 x USB2.0 ports, High Definition Audio port, 4 SATA2.0 and 2 SATA3.0, Expansion
takes the form of one PCIE x16 slot, two Mini-PCIE slots,
and 9V~24V full range DC input.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Taiwan Commate Computer Inc.
886-2-26963909 Phone
886-2-26963911 Fax
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.commell.com.tw
Embedded Intel® Solutions
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and design information to engineers
and embedded developers who design with
Intel® Embedded processors
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Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
Motherboards
Motherboards
COMMELL launches LV-67H---2nd
generation Core i7/i5/i3 Mini-ITX
VersaLogic Corp.
Intel® Core™ 2 Duo processor
on standard EBX footprint
VersaLogic’s Mamba SBC provides extreme performance
and high reliability for the most demanding embedded
applications. It combines a 2.26 GHz Intel® Core™2 Duo
processor, high-end graphics and video, and extensive onboard I/O on an industry standard EBX platform.
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Industrial temp. (-40º to +85ºC) version
High-performance video and audio
Standard EBX format (5.75” x 8”)
On-board data acquisition support
MIL-STD-202G shock/vibe
CONTACT INFORMATION
TECHNICAL SPECS
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
VersaLogic Corp.
4211 West 11th Ave.
Eugene, OR 97402 USA
541-485-8575 Phone
1-800-824-3163 Toll Free
541-485-5712 Fax
[email protected]
www.VersaLogic.com/mamba
2.26 GHz Intel® Core™ 2 Duo processor
Up to 8 GB DDR3 RAM
Dual gigabit Ethernet
Mid power – 18.5W typical
PC/104-Plus expansion
Motherboards
Motherboards
Standard features include dual gigabit Ethernet, up to 8 GB
DDR3 RAM, six USB 2.0 ports, four serial ports, two SATA
ports, HD audio, and eUSB flash storage. Data acquisition
features include up to sixteen analog inputs, up to eight
analog outputs, and thirty-two digital I/O lines. Expansion is
available via PC/104-Plus, PCIe Mini Card, and SPX. Analog
and LVDS interfaces support flexible display configurations.
VersaLogic Corp.
Low power Intel® Atom™ processor
Z5xx on a PC/104-Plus form factor
VersaLogic’s Tiger is a compact single board computer on
a rugged 3.6” x 4.5” PC/104-Plus form factor. Featuring the
low power Intel® Atom™ processor Z5xx (Menlow XL),
Tiger packs powerful 1.6 GHz performance backed by legendary VersaLogic quality. Available in both commercial
(0º to +60ºC) and industrial (-40º to +85ºC) temperature versions!
Add VersaLogic’s long-term (5+ year) product availability
guarantee and customization options and feel the power
of the Tiger!
With more than 30 years experience delivering extraordinary support and on-time delivery, VersaLogic has
perfected the art of service, one customer at a time. Experience it for yourself. Call 800-824-3163 for more information!
TECHNICAL SPECS
◆ Intel® Atom™ processor Z5xx up to 1.6 GHz
◆ Low power, 6W (typical)
XXXFFDBUBMPHDPNNFEJDBM
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
High-performance video and HD audio
Gigabit Ethernet
Up to 2 GB DDR2 RAM
PCI & ISA expansion
Fanless operation
Industrial temp. (-40º to +85ºC) version
CONTACT INFORMATION
VersaLogic Corp.
4211 West 11th Ave.
Eugene, OR 97402 USA
541-485-8575 Phone
1-800-824-3163 Toll Free
541-485-5712 Fax
[email protected]
www.VersaLogic.com/tiger
#PBSETt
Logic Supply
SR101 15” Intel Atom
N270 IP65 Panel PC
Compatible Operating Systems: Windows XP, Windows 7,
Windows Embedded Standard 2009
Supported Architectures: x86, 32-bit
The SR101 features a proprietary mainboard with an
efficient Intel® Atom™ N270 processor and 945GSE
chipset housed in a durable VESA-mountable panel. The
panel is brushed silver with a smooth and polished bezel
surrounding a 15-inch touch-screen LCD and it’s easily
mounted on a stand or installed into a wall. The SR101’s
professional and functional style is sleek enough for a
lobby waiting room and discreet enough for a laboratory
setting.
Systems
Systems
Logic Supply announces the SR101 series of rugged,
IP65-rated Panel PCs, featuring an Intel® Atom™ processor and milled stainless steel enclosure. Designed to
withstand the damaging effects of splashing or spraying
liquids as well as general wear and tear from multiple
users, the SR101 is primed for 24/7 functionality in a fastpaced medical environment.
TECHNICAL SPECS
◆ Has a 1.6 GHz Intel® Atom™ N270 Processor with
945GSE chipset for a total TDP of less than 12 W
Employing IP65-rated I/O connector cables and LCD
touch-screen, this device is protected from all angles,
so it can be mounted in a variety of ways. The 5-wire
resistive touchscreen can be operated by users wearing
gloves, and is much easier to clean than a keyboard or
mouse. In addition, reducing the reliance on connected
peripheral devices frees up valuable laboratory bench or
cart space.
◆ Features a 15” LCD display with resistive type 5-wire
The SR101 comes complete with 1 GB RAM, 160 GB HDD,
I/O cable kit, and 12-volt DC power source. It offers 3 USB
2.0 ports, Gb LAN, 2 RS-232 COM ports, and a power
cable making this all-in-one system perfect for easy integration with other devices and components.
APPLICATION AREAS
touch-screen; contrast ratio of 800:1 and brightness
of 350 nits
◆ Includes 160 GB SATA HDD, 1 GB RAM, and offers an
onboard PCIe Mini Card slot for expansion
◆ Screen resolution is 1024 x 768
◆ Dimensions are: 400 x 55 x 310 mm (15.75” x 2.17” x
12.2”); Weight is: 7.05 kg/15.5 lb.
Medical Imaging, Diagnostics, Digital Signage, Data and
Image Acquisition
AVAILABILITY
FEATURES & BENEFITS
Mid-September
◆ Can be configured with a solid state storage device;
this extends the life of the system by eliminating the
wear and tear of mechanical components
◆ Utilizes off-the-shelf hardware so driver support and
integration with other systems and components are
straightforward and simple
◆ Options are available for assembly and testing services by Logic Supply’s expert technicians, ensuring
the system arrives fully operational, ready for deployment
◆ Available with a Windows Embedded Standard operating system; custom image is available for project
customers
t#PBSET
CONTACT INFORMATION
Logic Supply
35 Thompson Street
South Burlington, VT 05403
802 861 2300 Telephone
[email protected]
www.logicsupply.com
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
AXIOMTEK
Medical Grade Touch LCD
Monitor –MMT175
Axiomtek offers a 17-inch 300 nits slim medical grade LCD
monitor with various signal interfaces including DVI, VGA,
S-Video, Audio-in and 3 USB ports. The MMT175 features a
spill and dust resistant front panel: IP65, and an IPX1 enclosure, with a lock-type medical adaptor plug design – ideal
for different medical environments. This medical grade
monitor incorporates an optional 1.3 mega pixel camera,
microphone and speakers if this is what you need in a
monitor. Our MMT175 has a reliable user-friendly interface
making ideal for point-of-care, HMI and other remote monitoring health terminals.
TECHNICAL SPECS
APPLICATION AREAS
Medical, POC (point of care) HMI for medical equipment,
remote monitoring, health terminals (Telemedicine) and
more!
CONTACT INFORMATION
◆ 17” TFT 380 nits SXGA LCD
◆ Water/dust-proof design (front bezel: IP65, full
AXIOMTEK
18138 Rowland St.
City of Industry, CA 91744
USA
1.888.GO.AXIOM Toll Free
626.581.3232 Telephone
[email protected]
www.axiomtek.com
enclosure: IPX1)
◆ Built-in internal microphone/2W stereo speakers
◆ VGA, S-video, video, DVI, Audio-in, 3 USB ports (1
slave, 2 host)
◆ Bluetooth/1.3 mega pixels camera/ combo/RFID
(Optional)
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Power Consumption Drives
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Advanced USB—The Software
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Microchip’s mTouch technology offers
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controllers.
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CONTACT INFORMATION
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Using 8-bit 8051s in a 32-bit World
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Annual Industry Guide
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New Mil/Aero Requirements
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From Elma Electronic Inc.:
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Icon Labs
Floodgate Firewall
Compatible Operating Systems: Any embedded OS or kernel
including INTEGRITY, VelOSity and VxWorks.
Supported Architectures: Any Internet enabled network hardware.
Floodgate Packet Filter is an embedded firewall that
allows networked devices to control the packets they
process. Floodgate protects against potentially malicious
attacks by filtering packets before they are processed by
an embedded device.
Floodgate uses a two stage filtering engine that provides
both threshold and rules-based filtering. Thresholdbased filtering protects against denial of service (DoS)
attacks, broadcast storms, and other conditions that
result in a flood of unwanted packets. Rules-based
filtering allows packets to be blocked based on static criteria such as port number, protocol, or source IP address.
Internet Threats for Embedded Devices
In enterprise environments, firewalls, intrusion prevention systems and other security devices protect against
Internet threats. In the embedded environment, devices
are built using smaller processors and without the
defenses found in more sophisticated environments.
As a result, embedded devices are vulnerable to DoS
attacks, packet floods and other Internet attacks.
TECHNICAL SPECS
◆ Static filtering blocks packets based on configu-
◆
◆
◆
◆
rable filtering rules. Supports filtering by source IP
address, MAC address/type, port, protocol or user
defined criteria.
Built in Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI) filtering for
TCP/UDP and ICMP packets.
Threshold-based filtering blocks packets in real time
based on threshold crossings.
Supports both white list and black list filtering.
Layer-based callbacks allow filtering to be inserted at
any layer in the network stack for maximum flexibility.
FEATURES & BENEFITS
APPLICATION AREAS
◆ Allows OEMs to easily add firewall security to exist-
ing products or new designs.
◆ Portable source code for use with any embedded OS.
◆ Fully configurable rules engine allows full control
over filtering behavior.
Medical Devices for home & hospital use, Server and
Storage Networking, Telecom/Networking, Military/
Aerospace, Industrial Controls, Consumer Devices,
Mobile/Handheld
◆ Small footprint and optimized design for embedded
systems.
◆ Unique two-step filtering engine first blocks packets
using filtering rules and stateful packet inspection
and then using thresholds to protect from Internet
threats, network traffic floods and DoS attacks.
t%FWFMPQNFOU
CONTACT INFORMATION
Icon Labs
3636 Westown Pkwy, Suite 203
West Des Moines, IA 50266
888-235-3443x22 Toll Free
515-226-3443x22 Telephone
877-379-0504 Fax
[email protected]
www.iconlabs.com
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
Application
Application
Library for Embedded Devices
Floodgate is a source code library that provides packet
filtering capabilities for embedded devices. Floodgate
uses callback routines that are inserted into the device’s
packet processing code. Layer-based callbacks allow filtering to be easily inserted at any layer in the network
stack for maximum flexibility.
Icon Labs
Iconfidant SSH & SSL
Compatible Operating Systems: VxWorks, Linux, Solaris
Supported Architectures: Any hardware running VxWorks, Linux
or Solaris.
Iconfidant SSH & SSL are source code products providing
embedded security for VxWorks, Solaris and Linux based
systems. Iconfidant allows network equipment vendors
to easily add secure, encrypted communication to their
devices.
Iconfidant SSH implements SSHv1 and SSHv2 protocols and includes:
t ssh – rlogin/rsh-like client program.
t sshd – ssh login daemon.
t sftp – secure file transfer program for SSH1 and
SSH2
t sftp-server – secure FTP server subsystem.
TECHNICAL SPECS
◆ Encryption/hash algorithm support: AES, 3DES,
Iconfidant SSL implements SSLv2/v3 and TLS protocols
and includes:
t ssl – ssl client program.
t ssld – ssl login daemon.
t tls – tls client program
Twofish, Blowfish, Arcfour, CAST128, DSA, RSA,
Diffie-Hellman, MD5, SH1.
◆ Logical API allows easy integration of Iconfidant
libraries with existing CLI & Web interface.
◆ Support for WindRiver Web & CLI interfaces provided
(formerly RapidControl CLI & Web).
◆ Supports multiple communication channels.
FEATURES & BENEFITS
products or new designs.
◆ Full source code provided, royalty free.
◆ Drop in support for VxWorks, Solaris and Linux.
◆ Small footprint and optimized design for embedded
Medical Devices, Server and Storage Networking,
Telecom/Networking, Military/Aerospace, Industrial
Controls, Consumer Devices, Mobile/Handheld
systems.
Application
Application
APPLICATION AREAS
◆ Allows OEMs to easily add security to existing
◆ Strong authentication and encryption protect against
common Internet attacks.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Icon Labs
3636 Westown Pkwy, Suite 203
West Des Moines, IA 50266
888-235-3443x22 Toll Free
515-226-3443x22 Telephone
877-379-0504 Fax
[email protected]
www.iconlabs.com
XXXFFDBUBMPHDPNNFEJDBM
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Advantech Corporation
10.4” Customizable Medical
Grade ODM Tablet
Compatible Operating Systems: Windows 7
Customizable 10.4” fanless medical grade ODM tablet.
This medical grade tablet is lightweight, portable and
quiet to use, and it streamlines workflow while increasing
productivity.
Powered by an Intel® Atom™ Z650/Z670 Processor, this
medical tablet makes for the ideal solution suited for the
healthcare environment.
TECHNICAL SPECS
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Intel® Atom™ Z650/Z670 Processor
Battery Life: 5-7 Hours (using both batteries)
Dual Cameras: 5.0 MP and 2.0 MP
Dual Protection: IP54 and 3-foot Drop
Dual Touch Modes: Digitizer and Resistive
CONTACT INFORMATION
Advantech Corporation
38 Tesla
Suite 100
Irvine, CA 92618
USA
(800) 866-6008 Toll Free
(949) 789-7178 Telephone
(949) 789-7179 Fax
[email protected]
www.advantech.com/medical
APPLICATION AREAS
Mobile clincal assistant solution suitable for EMR, HER,
and Nursing Information Systems
Advantech Corporation
Systems
Systems
HIT-W121
Compatible Operating Systems: WES, WES7, Windows 7, Linux:
Fedora 13, Ubuntu, Android
HIT-W121, an iService/Healthcare Infotainment Terminal,
has an 11.6” single-surface touchscreen, is powered by
an Intel® Atom™ D510 Processor, supports Windows,
Android and Linux operating systems, and is built with a
compact, VESA mountable form factor. The medical-grade
device works well not only in healthcare applications, but
with its slim design, it is an exceptional choice for applications in iServices such as retail shelf displays, banking,
and RFID-based Smart Card applications.
◆ ITE & medical dual certificates provide complete
application coverage
TECHNICAL SPECS
CONTACT INFORMATION
◆ Revolutionary & specialized design focused on
healthcare applications and terminal leasing market
◆ 43 mm thick slim design achieves balance between
fanless & Atom dual-core performance
◆ Provides natural viewing experience with 16:9, 11.6”
display
◆ Rich options - Handset/ RFID/ Smart card reader/
Barcode Scanner/ MSR
t%FWFMPQNFOU
Advantech Corporation
38 Tesla
Suite 100
Irvine, CA 92618
USA
(800) 866-6008 Toll Free
(949) 789-7178 Telephone
(949) 789-7179 Fax
[email protected]
www.advantech.com/medical
Engineers’ Guide to Medical Electronics 2012
Advantech Corporation
PIT-1502W
Compatible Operating Systems: Windows 7, Windows XP, Linux:
Fedora, Ubuntu, Android
PIT-1502W which equipped a 15.6” multi-function touchscreen, WiFi, RFID, handset, smart card reader and 2
megapixel camera is a member of PIT family of Advantech.
PIT-1502W can provide patients with various entertainment
programs such as TV, movies or computer games because
of Microsoft Wiindows XPE Embedded and Intel Atom Dual
Core processor. Patients can easily communicate with families by internet because 1.3 megapixel camera, WiFi and
Ethernet (RJ-45) connectivity are standard functions of PIT1501W. Identification recognition for both hospital staff and
patients is possible with the RFID and smart card reader.
TECHNICAL SPECS
APPLICATION AREAS
Patient Infotainment, Bedside Terminal, EMR, Hospital
Information Systems
CONTACT INFORMATION
Advantech Corporation
38 Tesla
Suite 100
Irvine, CA 92618
USA
(800) 866-6008 Toll Free
(949) 789-7178 Telephone
(949) 789-7179 Fax
[email protected]
www.advantech.com/medical
◆ Slim Design achieves the balance between Fanless &
Atom Dual-Core Performance
Isolated I/O as COM & Lan
Easy cleaning Touch Panel complies with IP65 protection
Programmable Touch Hotkeys
Rich Options - Handset/ RFID/ Smart card reader/
Barcode Scanner/ MSR
Embedded Intel® Solutions
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and design information to engineers
and embedded developers who design with
Intel® Embedded processors
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