Helios Imaging Inc
July 21, 2015
Exemption No. 12107
Regulatory Docket No. FAA-2015-0879
Mr. Jeffrey J. Antonelli
100 North LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60602
Dear Mr. Antonelli:
This letter is to inform you that we have granted your request for exemption. It transmits our
decision, explains its basis, and gives you the conditions and limitations of the exemption,
including the date it ends.
By letter dated March 30, 2015, you petitioned the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on
behalf of Helios Imaging, Inc. (hereinafter petitioner or operator) for an exemption. The
petitioner requested to operate an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) to conduct scripted
closed-set filming and construction inspections.
See Appendix A for the petition submitted to the FAA describing the proposed operations and
the regulations that the petitioner seeks an exemption.
The FAA has determined that good cause exists for not publishing a summary of the petition
in the Federal Register because the requested exemption would not set a precedent, and any
delay in acting on this petition would be detrimental to the petitioner.
Airworthiness Certification
The UAS proposed by the petitioner is a Helios 960, a proprietary design based on the
Tarot 960 airframe.
The petitioner requested relief from 14 CFR part 21, Certification procedures for products
and parts, Subpart H—Airworthiness Certificates. In accordance with the statutory criteria
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provided in Section 333 of Public Law 112−95 in reference to 49 U.S.C. § 44704, and in
consideration of the size, weight, speed, and limited operating area associated with the
aircraft and its operation, the Secretary of Transportation has determined that this aircraft
meets the conditions of Section 333. Therefore, the FAA finds that the requested relief from
14 CFR part 21, Certification procedures for products and parts, Subpart H—Airworthiness
Certificates, and any associated noise certification and testing requirements of part 36, is
not necessary.
The Basis for Our Decision
You have requested to use a UAS for aerial data collection1 and closed set motion picture and
filming. The FAA has issued grants of exemption in circumstances similar in all material
respects to those presented in your petition. In Grants of Exemption Nos. 11062 to Astraeus
Aerial (see Docket No. FAA-2014-0352), 11109 to Clayco, Inc. (see Docket No. FAA-20140507), 11112 to VDOS Global, LLC (see Docket No. FAA-2014-0382), and 11213 to Aeryon
Labs, Inc. (see Docket No. FAA-2014-0642), the FAA found that the enhanced safety
achieved using an unmanned aircraft (UA) with the specifications described by the petitioner
and carrying no passengers or crew, rather than a manned aircraft of significantly greater
proportions, carrying crew in addition to flammable fuel, gives the FAA good cause to find
that the UAS operation enabled by this exemption is in the public interest.
Having reviewed your reasons for requesting an exemption, I find that—



They are similar in all material respects to relief previously requested in Grant of
Exemption Nos. 11062, 11109, 11112, and 11213;
The reasons stated by the FAA for granting Exemption Nos. 11062, 11109, 11112, and
11213 also apply to the situation you present; and
A grant of exemption is in the public interest.
Our Decision
In consideration of the foregoing, I find that a grant of exemption is in the public interest.
Therefore, pursuant to the authority contained in 49 U.S.C. 106(f), 40113, and 44701,
delegated to me by the Administrator, Helios Imaging, Inc. is granted an exemption from
14 CFR §§ 61.23(a) and (c), 61.101(e)(4) and (5), 61.113(a), 61.315(a), 91.7(a), 91.119(c),
91.121, 91.151(a)(1), 91.405(a), 91.407(a)(1), 91.409(a)(1) and (2), and 91.417(a) and (b), to
the extent necessary to allow the petitioner to operate a UAS to perform aerial data collection
and closed set motion picture and filming. This exemption is subject to the conditions and
limitations listed below.
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Aerial data collection includes any remote sensing and measuring by an instrument(s) aboard the UA.
Examples include imagery (photography, video, infrared, etc.), electronic measurement (precision surveying, RF
analysis, etc.), chemical measurement (particulate measurement, etc.), or any other gathering of data by
instruments aboard the UA.
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Conditions and Limitations
In this grant of exemption, Helios Imaging, Inc. is hereafter referred to as the operator.
Failure to comply with any of the conditions and limitations of this grant of exemption will be
grounds for the immediate suspension or rescission of this exemption.
1. Operations authorized by this grant of exemption are limited to the Helios 960 when
weighing less than 55 pounds including payload. Proposed operations of any other
aircraft will require a new petition or a petition to amend this exemption.
2. Operations for the purpose of closed-set motion picture and television filming
are permitted.
3. The UA may not be operated at a speed exceeding 87 knots (100 miles per hour). The
exemption holder may use either groundspeed or calibrated airspeed to determine
compliance with the 87 knot speed restriction. In no case will the UA be operated at
airspeeds greater than the maximum UA operating airspeed recommended by the
aircraft manufacturer.
4. The UA must be operated at an altitude of no more than 400 feet above ground level
(AGL). Altitude must be reported in feet AGL.
5. The UA must be operated within visual line of sight (VLOS) of the PIC at all times.
This requires the PIC to be able to use human vision unaided by any device other than
corrective lenses, as specified on the PIC’s FAA-issued airman medical certificate or
U.S. driver’s license.
6. All operations must utilize a visual observer (VO). The UA must be operated within
the visual line of sight (VLOS) of the PIC and VO at all times. The VO may be used
to satisfy the VLOS requirement as long as the PIC always maintains VLOS
capability. The VO and PIC must be able to communicate verbally at all times;
electronic messaging or texting is not permitted during flight operations. The PIC
must be designated before the flight and cannot transfer his or her designation for the
duration of the flight. The PIC must ensure that the VO can perform the duties
required of the VO.
7. This exemption and all documents needed to operate the UAS and conduct its
operations in accordance with the conditions and limitations stated in this grant of
exemption, are hereinafter referred to as the operating documents. The operating
documents must be accessible during UAS operations and made available to the
Administrator upon request. If a discrepancy exists between the conditions and
limitations in this exemption and the procedures outlined in the operating documents,
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the conditions and limitations herein take precedence and must be followed.
Otherwise, the operator must follow the procedures as outlined in its operating
documents. The operator may update or revise its operating documents. It is the
operator’s responsibility to track such revisions and present updated and revised
documents to the Administrator or any law enforcement official upon request. The
operator must also present updated and revised documents if it petitions for extension
or amendment to this grant of exemption. If the operator determines that any update
or revision would affect the basis upon which the FAA granted this exemption, then
the operator must petition for an amendment to its grant of exemption. The FAA’s
UAS Integration Office (AFS−80) may be contacted if questions arise regarding
updates or revisions to the operating documents.
8. Any UAS that has undergone maintenance or alterations that affect the UAS operation
or flight characteristics, e.g., replacement of a flight critical component, must undergo
a functional test flight prior to conducting further operations under this exemption.
Functional test flights may only be conducted by a PIC with a VO and must remain at
least 500 feet from other people. The functional test flight must be conducted in such
a manner so as to not pose an undue hazard to persons and property.
9. The operator is responsible for maintaining and inspecting the UAS to ensure that it is
in a condition for safe operation.
10. Prior to each flight, the PIC must conduct a pre-flight inspection and determine the
UAS is in a condition for safe flight. The pre-flight inspection must account for all
potential discrepancies, e.g., inoperable components, items, or equipment. If the
inspection reveals a condition that affects the safe operation of the UAS, the aircraft is
prohibited from operating until the necessary maintenance has been performed and the
UAS is found to be in a condition for safe flight.
11. The operator must follow the UAS manufacturer’s maintenance, overhaul,
replacement, inspection, and life limit requirements for the aircraft and
aircraft components.
12. Each UAS operated under this exemption must comply with all manufacturer
safety bulletins.
13. Under this grant of exemption, a PIC must hold either an airline transport,
commercial, private, recreational, or sport pilot certificate. The PIC must also hold a
current FAA airman medical certificate or a valid U.S. driver’s license issued by a
state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, a territory, a possession, or the Federal
government. The PIC must also meet the flight review requirements specified in
14 CFR § 61.56 in an aircraft in which the PIC is rated on his or her pilot certificate.
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14. The operator may not permit any PIC to operate unless the PIC demonstrates the
ability to safely operate the UAS in a manner consistent with how the UAS will be
operated under this exemption, including evasive and emergency maneuvers and
maintaining appropriate distances from persons, vessels, vehicles and structures. PIC
qualification flight hours and currency must be logged in a manner consistent with
14 CFR § 61.51(b). Flights for the purposes of training the operator’s PICs and VOs
(training, proficiency, and experience-building) and determining the PIC’s ability to
safely operate the UAS in a manner consistent with how the UAS will be operated
under this exemption are permitted under the terms of this exemption. However,
training operations may only be conducted during dedicated training sessions. During
training, proficiency, and experience-building flights, all persons not essential for
flight operations are considered nonparticipants, and the PIC must operate the UA
with appropriate distance from nonparticipants in accordance with 14 CFR § 91.119.
15. UAS operations may not be conducted during night, as defined in 14 CFR § 1.1. All
operations must be conducted under visual meteorological conditions (VMC). Flights
under special visual flight rules (SVFR) are not authorized.
16. The UA may not operate within 5 nautical miles of an airport reference point (ARP) as
denoted in the current FAA Airport/Facility Directory (AFD) or for airports not
denoted with an ARP, the center of the airport symbol as denoted on the current
FAA-published aeronautical chart, unless a letter of agreement with that airport’s
management is obtained or otherwise permitted by a COA issued to the exemption
holder. The letter of agreement with the airport management must be made available
to the Administrator or any law enforcement official upon request.
17. The UA may not be operated less than 500 feet below or less than 2,000 feet
horizontally from a cloud or when visibility is less than 3 statute miles from the PIC.
18. If the UAS loses communications or loses its GPS signal, the UA must return to a
pre-determined location within the private or controlled-access property.
19. The PIC must abort the flight in the event of unpredicted obstacles or emergencies.
20. The PIC is prohibited from beginning a flight unless (considering wind and forecast
weather conditions) there is enough available power for the UA to conduct the
intended operation and to operate after that for at least five minutes or with the reserve
power recommended by the manufacturer if greater.
21. Air Traffic Organization (ATO) Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA). All
operations shall be conducted in accordance with an ATO-issued COA. The
exemption holder may apply for a new or amended COA if it intends to conduct
operations that cannot be conducted under the terms of the attached COA.
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22. All aircraft operated in accordance with this exemption must be identified by serial
number, registered in accordance with 14 CFR part 47, and have identification
(N−Number) markings in accordance with 14 CFR part 45, Subpart C. Markings must
be as large as practicable.
23. Documents used by the operator to ensure the safe operation and flight of the UAS and
any documents required under 14 CFR §§ 91.9 and 91.203 must be available to the
PIC at the Ground Control Station of the UAS any time the aircraft is operating.
These documents must be made available to the Administrator or any law enforcement
official upon request.
24. The UA must remain clear and give way to all manned aviation operations and
activities at all times.
25. The UAS may not be operated by the PIC from any moving device or vehicle.
26. All Flight operations must be conducted at least 500 feet from all nonparticipating
persons, vessels, vehicles, and structures unless:
a. Barriers or structures are present that sufficiently protect nonparticipating persons
from the UA and/or debris in the event of an accident. The operator must ensure
that nonparticipating persons remain under such protection. If a situation arises
where nonparticipating persons leave such protection and are within 500 feet of
the UA, flight operations must cease immediately in a manner ensuring the safety
of nonparticipating persons; and
b. The owner/controller of any vessels, vehicles or structures has granted permission
for operating closer to those objects and the PIC has made a safety assessment of
the risk of operating closer to those objects and determined that it does not
present an undue hazard.
The PIC, VO, operator trainees or essential persons are not considered
nonparticipating persons under this exemption.
27. All operations shall be conducted over private or controlled-access property with
permission from the property owner/controller or authorized representative.
Permission from property owner/controller or authorized representative will be
obtained for each flight to be conducted.
28. Any incident, accident, or flight operation that transgresses the lateral or vertical
boundaries of the operational area as defined by the applicable COA must be reported
to the FAA's UAS Integration Office (AFS−80) within 24 hours. Accidents must be
reported to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) per instructions
contained on the NTSB Web site: www.ntsb.gov.
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If this exemption permits operations for the purpose of closed-set motion picture and
television filming and production, the following additional conditions and limitations apply.
29. The operator must have a motion picture and television operations manual (MPTOM)
as documented in this grant of exemption.
30. At least 3 days before aerial filming, the operator of the UAS affected by this
exemption must submit a written Plan of Activities to the local Flight Standards
District Office (FSDO) with jurisdiction over the area of proposed filming. The 3-day
notification may be waived with the concurrence of the FSDO. The plan of activities
must include at least the following:
a. Dates and times for all flights;
b. Name and phone number of the operator for the UAS aerial filming conducted
under this grant of exemption;
c. Name and phone number of the person responsible for the on-scene operation of
the UAS;
d. Make, model, and serial or N−Number of UAS to be used;
e. Name and certificate number of UAS PICs involved in the aerial filming;
f. A statement that the operator has obtained permission from property owners
and/or local officials to conduct the filming production event; the list of those
who gave permission must be made available to the inspector upon request;
g. Signature of exemption holder or representative; and
h. A description of the flight activity, including maps or diagrams of any area, city,
town, county, and/or state over which filming will be conducted and the altitudes
essential to accomplish the operation.
31. Flight operations may be conducted closer than 500 feet from participating persons
consenting to be involved and necessary for the filming production, as specified in the
exemption holder’s MPTOM.
Unless otherwise specified in this grant of exemption, the UAS, the UAS PIC, and the UAS
operations must comply with all applicable parts of 14 CFR including, but not limited to,
parts 45, 47, 61, and 91.
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This exemption terminates on July 31, 2017, unless sooner superseded or rescinded.
Sincerely,
/s/
John S. Duncan
Director, Flight Standards Service
Enclosures
Drone/UAS Practice Group
100 North LaSalle Street
Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602
Tel. 312.201.8310
Jeffrey@Antonelli-Law.com
U.S. Department of Transportation
Docket Management System
1200 New Jersey Ave S.E.
Washington, D.C. 20590
March 30, 2015
Re: Request for Exemption under Section 333 of the FAA Modernization and Reform
Act of 2012 and Part 11 of the Federal Aviation Regulations from Certain Provisions of
14 C.F.R.
Dear Sir or Madam:
Pursuant to Section 333 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (the Reform
Act) and 14 C.F.R. Part 11, Antonelli Law files this petition for exemption on behalf of Helios
Imaging Inc. (“Helios”), an operator of Small Unmanned Aircraft (“UA”) used for scripted,
closed-set filming for the motion picture and television industries and for the construction
industry. Specifically, applicant seeks an exemption from the Federal Aviation Regulations
(“FARs”) listed in Appendices A and B to allow commercial operation of its UA, so long as such
operations are conducted within and under the conditions outlined herein or as may be
established by the FAA in a grant of this petition.
Approval of the exemption for petitioner will allow commercial operation of the Helios
960, a proprietary design based on the Tarot 960 airframe, for scripted closed-set filming for (1)
the motion picture and television industries; and (2) the construction industry in Class G airspace
nationwide, or as otherwise prescribed in an Air Traffic Organization (“ATO”) issued COA. The
UA operations contemplated by this petition, particularly the construction industry proposed use,
are in the public interest because they clearly satisfy the "Four D's" of exemplary uses of UAs: to
replace work that is dangerous, difficult, dull, or dirty, and at the same time provide an
equivalent or greater level of safety than alternative manned aircraft operations. The UA covered
by this petition is a small battery-powered craft, weighing approximately 18 lbs. (8 kg.),
inclusive of battery and payload. Operation of the UA under the strict conditions proposed below
will provide an equivalent level of safety, as Congress intended, while still allowing commercial
operations. Operations using this UA are far safer than conventional operations conducted with
helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft that weigh thousands of pounds, carry highly flammable fuel,
and operate in close proximity to the ground, trees, infrastructure, and people.
Congress directed the FAA to consider seven factors in deciding whether to approve
Section 333 exemption petitions - size, weight, speed, operational capability, proximity to
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Table of Contents
I.
Publishable Summary........................................................................................................................ 5
II.
Petitioner’s Contact Information ..................................................................................................... 5
III. Proposed Operations ......................................................................................................................... 6
A.
The UA ........................................................................................................................... 6
B.
The Crew ........................................................................................................................ 6
C.
Flight Conditions ............................................................................................................ 7
D.
Flight Operations ............................................................................................................ 7
IV. Aircraft and Equivalent Level of Safety ......................................................................................... 8
V. Proposed Conditions of the Exemption .......................................................................................... 9
VI. Privacy............................................................................................................................................... 12
VII. Public Interest and Safety .............................................................................................................. 12
VIII. Regulations from Which Exemption is Requested .................................................................... 14
A.
Appendix A: FARs as to which Helios wishes the same determination to be made as
has been made previously. ............................................................................................ 14
B.
Appendix B: Helios’s argument for exemption from 14 C.F.R. §61.113: Private pilot
privileges and limitations: Pilot in command. .............................................................. 17
1.
The FAA and foreign regulators recognize that obtaining a manned aircraft pilot
license is unnecessary for safe operation of a UA ............................................... 17
2.
The FAA has and has already exercised the authority to exempt applicants from
the airman certificate requirement ....................................................................... 19
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Exhibit List
Exhibit 1: DJI WooKong-M User Manual..............Submitted separately due to upload constraints
Exhibit 2: DJI WooKong-M ......................................................................................................... 22
Exhibit 3: DJI WooKong-M Features ........................................................................................... 25
Exhibit 4: DJI WooKong-M Specifications .................................................................................. 31
Exhibit 5: iOSD Mark II User Manual ......................................................................................... 34
Exhibit 6: Ground Station Wireless Data-Link User Manual ...........................................................
.................................................................................Submitted separately due to upload constraints
Exhibit 7: 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink & iPad Ground Station User Guide ..................................... 51
Exhibit 8: Futaba 14MZ Transmitter User Manual ..........................................................................
.................................................................................Submitted separately due to upload constraints
Exhibit 9: Futaba 14SG Transmitter User Manual ...........................................................................
.................................................................................Submitted separately due to upload constraints
Exhibit 10: SimpleBGS Software User Manual ........................................................................... 58
Exhibit 11: Helios 960 Information ........................................ Submitted confidentially to the FAA
Exhibit 12: Tarot 960 Assembly Section ................................ Submitted confidentially to the FAA
Exhibit 13: Helios Imaging Inc. Inspection Procedures ......... Submitted confidentially to the FAA
Exhibits 10-12 have been submitted confidentially and are not available to the public.
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I.
Publishable Summary
Pursuant to 14 C.F.R. § 11, the following summary is provided for publication in the
Federal Register, should it be determined that publication is needed:
Applicant seeks an exemption from the following rules:
14 C.F.R 21(h); 14 C.F.R. 43.7; 14 C.F.R. 43.11; 14 C.F.R. 45.11; 14 C.F.R. 45.27;
14 C.F.R. 45.29; 14 C.F.R. 61.113; 14 C.F.R. 91.7(a); 14 C.F.R. 91.9(b)(2); 14
C.F.R. 91.9(c); 14 C.F.R. 91.103(b)(2); 14 C.F.R. 91.105; 14 C.F.R. 91.113(b); 14
C.F.R. 91.119(c); 14 C.F.R. 91.121; 14 C.F.R. 91.151(a); 14 C.F.R. 91.203(a) and
(b); 14 C.F.R. 215; 14 C.F.R. 91.403; 14 C.F.R. 91.405(a); 14 C.F.R. 91.407(a)(1);
14 C.F.R. 409(a)(1) and (a)(2); and 14 C.F.R. 91.417(a) and (b) to operate
commercially a small unmanned aircraft system (UA) (18 lbs. or less).
Approval of the exemption for petitioner will allow commercial operation of the
Helios 960, a propriety design, for scripted closed-set filming for (1) the motion
picture and television industries and (2) the construction industry nationwide in Class
G airspace nationwide, or as otherwise prescribed in an ATO issued COA. The
requested exemption should be granted because operation of small UA, weighing
approximately 18 lbs. (8 kg.), inclusive of battery and payload, conducted in the strict
conditions outlined below, will provide an equivalent level of safety, while still
allowing commercial operations. The lightweight aircraft covered by the exemption
are far safer than conventional operations conducted with helicopters and fixed-wing
aircraft weighing thousands of pounds and carrying highly flammable fuel, and
operating in close proximity to the ground, power lines, transmission towers,
pipelines, and people. The seven factors Congress directed the FAA to consider when
approving Section 333 exemption petitions - size, weight, speed, operational
capability, proximity to airports, proximity to populated areas, and operation within
visual line of sight – each support the request. In particular, the aircraft are small, and
will operate at slow speeds, and close to the ground in order to more safely and
efficiently conduct inspections that would otherwise involve a risk of death to the
inspectors. The substantial increase of safety and decrease of risk to human life,
coupled with the low risk use of UAs to conduct these operations, weigh heavily in
favor of granting the exemption.
II.
Petitioner’s Contact Information
Gerardo Dan Rocha
Director
Helios Imaging, Inc.
26 West 371 Jewell Road
Winfield, IL 60190
Counsel for Petitioner:
Antonelli Law
100 North LaSalle Street
Suite 2400
5
Chicago, IL 60602
Tel: 312-201-8310
Fax: 888-211-8624
Email: jeffrey@antonelli-law.com
III.
Proposed Operations
A.
The UA
The requested exemption will permit petitioner to operate the Helios 960, a proprietary
design, with a maximum weight of approximately 18 lbs. (8 kg.), inclusive of batteries and
technical payload. This rotorcraft operates at a speed of no more than 35 knots and has the
capability to hover and move in the vertical and horizontal planes simultaneously.
The UA will use the following:
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



GPS/Autopilot System: DJI WooKong-M, with its accompanying Main Controller (MC),
Internal Measurement Unit (IMU), and GPS.
Receiver: Futaba R6014HS 14-Channel 2.4GHz FASST
Datalink: DJI iOSD Mark II 2.4 Ghz, which displays power voltage, flight velocity, height,
distance from the home point, horizontal attitude and GPS satellite number acquired to make
the location calculation.
Transmitter 1 (Tx1): Futaba 14 MZ, used by the UA operator to control the UA
Transmitter 2 (Tx2): Futaba 14 SG, used by the camera operator to control the gimbal and
camera
Please refer to Exhibits 1-12 for further information regarding the UA. Details regarding
the design and assembly of the UA are being submitted confidentially, due to the proprietary
nature of the UA. The petition and the supporting documentation in the Exhibits are hereinafter
referred to as the “operating documents.”
The specific conditions of the proposed exemption that relate to the characteristics of the
UA are numbers 1, 5, and 16-20 in Section V below. Each has been adopted or imposed by the
FAA in numerous previous grants of Section 333 exemption petitions.
B.
The Crew
The crew will consist of a pilot in command (PIC), a visual observer (VO), and a camera
operator (CO).
The PIC, VO, and CO will have been trained in operation of UAs generally. The PIC is a
lifelong model aircraft hobbyist, with years of general UA experience. Additionally, the PIC will
have completed, at a minimum, 40 hours of UA flight training with this specific UA prior to
operations, and will be required to participate in annual training thereafter.
The specific conditions of the proposed exemption that relate to the training and
characteristics of the crew are numbers 3 and 6-9 in Section V below. Each has been adopted or
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imposed by the FAA in numerous previous grants of Section 333 exemption petitions.
C.
Flight Conditions
The UA will be used for scripted closed-set filming for the motion picture and television
industries and the construction industry. It will be flown in Class G airspace nationwide under
200 feet above ground level (“AGL”) and under controlled conditions over property that is
restricted as stated below under D. Flight Operations. Petitioner will work with the local FSDO
when planning operations. Petitioner will only operate its UA in visual meteorological conditions
(VMC). The UA will at all times be no less than 500 feet below and no less than 2,000 feet
horizontally from a cloud, and petitioner will not conduct operations unless visibility is at least 3
statute miles from the PIC. The flight crew will always make a safety assessment of the risk of
every operation, and will only operate when it is determined that no hazards are present.
The specific conditions of the proposed exemption that relate to the flight conditions in
which the UA will be operated are numbers 2, 4, 16, and 28-29 in Section V below. Each has
been adopted or imposed by the FAA in numerous previous grants of Section 333 exemption
petitions.
D.
Flight Operations
The purpose of every UA flight will be to conduct safe, accurate, and efficient (i) scripted
closed-set filming for the motion picture and television industries or (ii) site inspections for the
construction industry in Class G airspace nationwide.
The PIC will be responsible for flying the UA and will use a Futaba 14 MZ transmitter.
The PIC will have visual contact with the UA at all times and will have available on screen
display to observe telemetry data, including battery power and flight altitude. The on screen
display/telemetry information will also be available on an iPad. The main purpose of the iPad
with the telemetry information is to set an audio signal for when the voltage on the battery is
running low.
The VO will be responsible for the overall safety of the operation. The VO will observe
the UA and flight operational area without any display monitors.
The CO will use a Futaba 14SG transmitter to control the gimbal and the camera. The CO
will use an on screen display monitor to observe the camera data and change what is being
viewed.
Prior to the day of an operation, the flight crew will conduct a site inspection. The flight
crew will look for obstructions in the filming or construction area, and determine a safe flight
plan. The flight crew will also make a note of any public access points in the general area, where
nonparticipating individuals could access the operational area. The flight crew will adapt their
flight plan to avoid these areas.
On the day of an operation, the flight crew will cone off the flight operational area (if not
already roped off), up to ½ square miles. The only individuals allowed within the flight
operational area will be participants – actors, crew members, or construction workers. All other
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nonparticipating individuals and vehicles will be outside the sectioned-off area. Prior to each
operation, the flight crew will conduct a safety briefing with all individuals who will be in the
flight operational area.
The flight crew will set a “home area” that the UA will launch from and return to. The
area will have a ten-foot radius and be marked off with traffic cones. The flight crew will stand
outside this area. During operations, the flight crew will wear high visibility safety vests and
helmets. The three members of the flight crew will stand next to each other and be able to
communicate orally.
The flight crew will conduct a pre- and post-flight inspection, as laid out in Helios’s
Inspection Procedures, Exhibit 12. The flight crew will also conduct an inspection flight each
week, going through both the pre- and post-flight procedures to ensure that the Helios 960 is in a
safe condition.
In the unlikely event of emergency or a lost link, the UA will be equipped with an
emergency “return to home” feature as part of the DJI WooKong-M flight control. If there is a
lost link, the WooKong-M will be programmed to rise 65.6 feet (20 meters) instantaneously (not
to exceed a maximum altitude of 200 AGL), travel horizontally to the home area, and land. For
more information regarding the emergency fail safe methods, please refer to the WooKong-M
User Manual (Exhibit 1) to this petition. The failsafe section begins on page 17 of that document.
Flights will be terminated at 20% of battery life. Currently, the Helios 960’s battery is
limited to approximately 10 minutes of flight time. Helios will use an iPad to monitor telemetry
data, including battery life. The iPad will send an audio signal when the battery depletes to 20%
of remaining power.
The specific conditions of the proposed exemption that relate to flight operations are
numbers 11-12, 17-25, and 32-35 in Section V below. Each has been accepted or imposed by the
FAA in numerous previous grants of Section 333 exemption petitions.
IV.
Aircraft and Equivalent Level of Safety
Petitioner proposes that the exemption apply to UAs that have the characteristics and that
operate with the limitations proposed herein. These limitations provide for a level of safety at
least equivalent to or higher than manned aircraft operations under the current regulatory
structure. Section V below identifies the limitations and conditions to which petitioner agrees to
be bound when conducting commercial operations under a grant of this petition. Appendix A
contains a matrix connecting: (i) the specific proposed condition with (ii) the FAR provision for
which it provides an equivalent level of safety and (iii) one or more recent Section 333
exemption grants in which the FAA recognized this equivalent level of safety. Appendix B
requests relief from additional FARs that are not identified in Appendix A.
Approval of the commercial operations outlined in this petition presents no national
security issue. The PIC is willing to undergo a background check, including the proposed
Transportation Security Administration Vetting process, to ensure that no national security threat
is present. Operation and Certification of Small Unmanned Aircraft, 80 Fed. Reg. 9543 at 9572
(proposed Feb. 23, 2015 (to be codified at 14 C.F.R. Parts 21, 43, 45, et al.)).
8
V.
Proposed Conditions of the Exemption
1. The UA will weigh approximately 18 lbs. (8 kg.), inclusive of battery and technical payload.
2. UA operations under this exemption will be limited to conducting operations for the purpose
of scripted closed-set filming for the motion picture and television industries and
construction site inspections in Class G airspace nationwide.
3. Flights will be operated within line of sight of a pilot and visual observer.
4. Flights will be operated at an altitude of no more than 200 feet AGL, as indicated by the
procedures specified in the operating documents. All altitudes reported to ATC must be in
feet AGL.
5. The UA will not be flown at an indicated airspeed exceeding 35 knots.
6. Minimum flight crew for each operation will consist of the UA pilot in command (PIC), a
visual observer (VO), and a camera operator (CO).
7. The PIC will have, at minimum, 40 hours of training on the UA to be operated under this
grant before accepting commercial operations.
8. The petitioner will not permit any PIC to operate unless the PIC meets its qualification
criteria and demonstrates the ability to safely operate the UA in a manner consistent with
how the UA will be operated under this exemption, including evasive and emergency
maneuvers and maintaining appropriate distances from persons, vessels, vehicles and
structures. PIC qualification flight hours and currency will be logged in a manner consistent
with 14 CFR § 61.51(b). A record of the PIC training will be documented and made available
upon request by the Administrator. Training operations will only be conducted during
dedicated training sessions. During training, proficiency, and experience-building flights, all
persons not essential for flight operations will be considered nonparticipants, and the PIC
will operate the UA with appropriate distance from nonparticipants in accordance with 14
CFR § 91.119.
9. The VO will not perform any other duties beyond assisting the PIC with seeing and avoiding
other air traffic and other ground based obstacles/obstructions, and will not be permitted to
operate the camera or other instruments.
10. The PIC will be designated before the flight and will not be allowed to transfer his or her
designation for the duration of the flight. The PIC will ensure that the VO can perform the
functions prescribed in these conditions and the operating documents.
11. A briefing will be conducted in regard to the planned UA operations prior to each day’s
activities. It will be mandatory that all personnel who will be performing duties in connection
with the operations be present for this briefing.
12. Prior to each flight, the PIC will inspect the UA, including the Ground Control Station, to
ensure it is in a condition for safe flight. If the inspection reveals a condition that affects the
9
safe operation of the UA, the PIC will not operate the UA until the necessary maintenance
has been performed and the UA is found to be in a condition for safe flight. All maintenance
and alterations will be properly documented in the aircraft records.
13. Petitioner will conduct a functional flight test on any UA that has undergone maintenance or
alterations that affect the UA operation or flight characteristics, e.g. replacement of a flight
critical component. The PIC who conducts the functional test flight will make an entry in the
aircraft records.
14. The petitioner will carry out its maintenance, inspections, and record keeping requirements,
at the direction and under the supervision of the UA manufacturer. Maintenance, inspection,
alterations, and status of replacement/overhaul component parts will be noted in the aircraft
records, including total time in service, description of work accomplished, and the signature
of the manufacturer, authorizing the return of the UA to service. The manufacturer will make
an entry in the aircraft record of the corrective action taken against discrepancies discovered
between inspections.
15. When conducting operations for the motion picture and television industry, petitioner will
submit a written Plan of Activities, and any additional necessary paperwork, to the FSDO at
least one day before the proposed operations begin.
16. The UA will be operated within visual line of sight (VLOS) of the PIC and VO at all times.
This requires the PIC to be able to use human vision unaided by any device other than
corrective lenses. PIC and VO will at all times be able to communicate verbally. They will
not be permitted to use electronic messaging or texting to communicate during flight
operations.
17. The PIC will not begin a flight unless (considering wind and forecast weather conditions)
there is enough power to fly at normal cruising speed to the intended landing point and land
the UA with 20% battery power remaining.
18. Actual total flight time for each operational flight will result in no less than a 20% battery
reserve.
19. The UA will have the capability to abort a flight in case of unexpected obstacles or
emergencies.
20. The UA will be programmed so that if it loses communication with the ground station or
loses its GPS signal, it will return to a pre-determined location within the planned operating
area and land or be recovered in accordance with the operating documents
21. If the UA and its radio control link disconnect during flight, the system’s failsafe protection
will be triggered and the multirotor will return to home and land automatically, rather than
flying off uncontrollably or landing at an unknown location.
22. The operating documents required under 14 CFR §§ 91.9 and 91.203 will be maintained and
available to the PIC at the Ground Control Station of the UA any time the UA is operating.
These documents will be made available to the Administrator or any law enforcement official
10
upon request. If a discrepancy exists between the conditions and limitations in the exemption
grant and the procedures outlined in the operating documents, the grant conditions and
limitations will take precedence and will be followed. Otherwise, the petitioner will follow
the procedures outlined in its operating documents. If it updates or revises its operating
documents, it will present updated and revised documents to the Administrator upon request.
If the petitioner determines that any update or revision would affect the basis upon which the
FAA granted the exemption, then the Petitioner will petition for an amendment to the grant
of exemption.
23. Petitioner will obtain written and/or oral permission from the landowners/authorized agents
of the landowners over which flights will be conducted.
24. Petitioner will obtain all required permissions and permits from territorial, state, county or
city jurisdictions, including local law enforcement, fire, or other appropriate governmental
agencies.
25. UA operations will not be conducted during night, as defined in 14 CFR § 1.1. All operations
will be conducted under visual meteorological conditions (VMC). Flights will not be
conducted under special visual flight rules (SVFR).
26. The petitioner will obtain an Air Traffic Organization (ATO) issued Certificate of Waiver or
Authorization (COA) prior to conducting any operations under the grant of exemption.
Petitioner will request a Notice to Airman (NOTAM) not more than 72 hours in advance, but
not less than 48 hours prior to the operation. All operations will be conducted in accordance
with airspace requirements in the ATO issued COA, including class of airspace, altitude level
and potential transponder requirements.
27. The UA will not be operated within 5 nautical miles of an airport reference point as denoted
on a current FAA-published aeronautical chart unless a letter of agreement with that airport’s
management has been obtained, and the operation is conducted in accordance with a
NOTAM as required by the operator’s COA. Any letter of agreement with the airport
management will be made available to the Administrator upon request.
28. The UA will not be operated less than 500 feet below, or less than 2,000 feet horizontally
from, a cloud or when visibility is less than 3 statute miles from the PIC.
29. All operations shall be conducted in Class G airspace or as otherwise prescribed in an ATO
issued COA.
30. All aircraft operated in accordance with this exemption will be identified by serial number,
registered in accordance with 14 CFR part 47, and have identification (N-Number) markings
in accordance with 14 CFR part 45, Subpart C. Markings will be as large as practicable.
31. Before conducting operations, petitioner will ensure that the radio frequency spectrum used
for operation and control of the UA complies with the Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) or other appropriate government oversight agency requirements.
32. The UA will remain clear and yield the right of way to all manned aviation operations and
11
activities at all times.
33. The UA will not be operated by the PIC from any moving device or vehicle.
34. The UA will not be operated over congested or densely populated areas.
35. Petitioner will conduct all flight operations at least 500 feet from all nonparticipating
persons, vessels, vehicles, and structures unless one of the following three conditions is met:
a. Barriers or structures are present that sufficiently protect nonparticipating persons from
the UA and/or debris in the event of an accident. The petitioner will ensure that
nonparticipating persons remain under such protection. If a situation arises where
nonparticipating persons leave such protection and are within 500 feet of the UA, the PIC
will ensure that flight operations cease immediately.
b. The aircraft is operated near vessels, vehicles or structures where the owner/controller of
such vessels, vehicles or structures has granted permission and the PIC has made a safety
assessment of the risk of operating closer to those objects and determined that it does not
present an undue hazard.
c. Operations nearer to the PIC, VO, operator trainees or essential persons do not present an
undue hazard to those persons per § 91.119(a).
36. Petitioner will report any incident, accident, or flight operation that transgresses the lateral or
vertical boundaries of the operational area as defined by the applicable COA to the FAA's
UAS Integration Office (AFS-80) within 24 hours. Petitioner will report accidents to the
National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) per instructions contained on the NTSB Web
site: www.ntsb.gov.
VI.
Privacy
There is little concern that the proposed flights will cause invasions of privacy because all
flights will occur (i) over public spaces, where there is no expectation of privacy, and around
participating individuals or (ii) over private, restricted property where applicant has permission
from the landowner/authorized agent to film. When the UA is being flown, the onboard cameras
will be focused on the film or inspection area, not on nonparticipating individuals who may be
present during filming.
VII.
Public Interest and Safety
The planned UA use will increase ground safety in both the television and movie
industry, and the construction industry. The enhanced safety and reduced environmental impact
achieved using a UA with the specifications described by the petitioner and carrying no
passengers or crew, rather than a manned aircraft of significantly greater proportions, carrying
crew in addition to flammable fuel, gives the FAA good cause to find that the UA operation
enabled by this exemption is in the public interest.
Satisfaction of the criteria provided in Section 333 of the Reform Act of 2012 – size,
12
weight, speed, operating capabilities, proximity to airports and populated areas and operation
within visual line of sight and national security – provide more than adequate justification for the
grant of the requested exemption allowing commercial operation of applicant’s UA for filming
the television and movie industry and the construction industry, pursuant to petitioner’s rules of
operation.
A. Motion Picture and Television Industry Filming
As the FAA has repeatedly recognized in granting other exemptions under Section 333,
the use of a UA to take videos and photography over closed, scripted, motion picture and
television sets significantly increases the level of safety for both the actors and crew. Currently,
filmmakers use manned aircraft, which can weigh 6,000 lbs. or more. Manned aircraft also, by
definition, carry a pilot and other crew. They carry flammable fluids, and require large areas to
take off, operate over, and land.
By using the Helios 960, many of these dangerous conditions will be alleviated. The
Helios 960 weighs under 15 lbs. The pilot and flight crew will be safely on the ground rather
than several hundred feet in the air. The UA is powered by a battery, and requires a small area to
operate in. The FAA has previously determined that using a UA such as the Helios 960 will
provide a greater level of safety when filming for the motion picture and television industry.
Exemption No. 11062.
B. Construction Inspections
Use of a UA to conduct inspections of construction projects will provide a greater level
of safety than what is currently available. The construction industry has traditionally been very
dangerous for workers, both based on the working conditions and equipment used, including
helicopters and cranes. Currently, aerial inspections are not done on many construction projects.
Instead, inspections are conducted from the ground, or from within the structure being
constructed, giving a limited view of the project. This limits the capabilities of architects and
construction crews examining the work that has been done, and could lead to misidentification or
failure to identify flaws in the construction. Those projects that do incorporate aerial inspections
must rely upon manned helicopters or other types of aircraft, devices that can pose a great risk to
those piloting and those on the ground below, without providing the most accurate results.
Alternatively, using the Helios 960 to videotape and photograph construction sites will
allow the construction crew to gain a better vantage point of the structure. Safety concerns can be
better identified and fixed, and the inspectors will be able to gain a more thorough understanding
of construction progress. This UA will be able to provide a quick and cost effective aerial
inspection of an entire jobsite, something that is much more difficult to perform without this
technology. The device can be used to check the progress of the project and provide visual
information on hard-to-reach areas that may not be adequately inspected otherwise without
putting people in danger. UAs can be equipped with specialized cameras and sensors that
provide enhanced detection of other concerns, such as gas leaks, lack of structural integrity. The
FAA has previously determined that using a UA such as the Helios 960 will provide an
equivalent or greater level of safety than manned flight when inspecting construction sites.
Exemption Nos. 11109 and 11204.
13
VIII. Regulations from Which Exemption is Requested
A.
Appendix A: FARs as to which Helios wishes the same determination to be made as
has been made previously.
FAR
Provision
21(h)
Applicable condition(s) in
Section 5 of petition
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 16, 25, 28, 29,
34, 35
43.7
43.11
45.11
45.27
45.29
61.113
13, 14
12
30
39
30
7
91.7(a)
12
91.9(b)(2)
22
91.9(c)
91.103(b)(2)
30
3, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 28
91.105
91.113(b)
91.119(c )
6
3, 32
4, 34
FAA Exemption Decision
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066, 11067,
11080, 11109, 11111, 11110, 11114, 11136, 11138,
11150, 11153, 11156, 11157, 11166, 11167, 11170,
11171, 11172, 11174, 11176, 11177, 11178, 11184,
11185, 11188, 11189, 11191, 11192, 11193, 11195
No. 11208
No. 11208
No. 11208
No. 11188
Nos. 11136, 11157, 11170, 11185, 11193
See Appendix B for argument regarding why
petitioner should be exempted from the private pilot
license requirement
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066, 11067,
11080, 11109, 11110, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153,
11156, 11157, 11158, 11160, 11161, 11166, 11167,
11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11177, 11178, 11184,
11185, 11188, 11189, 11191, 11192, 11193, 11195,
11204
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066, 11067,
11080, 11109, 11110, 11111, 11112, 11114, 11136,
11138, 11150, 11153, 11156, 11157, 11062, 11063,
11064, 11065, 11066, 11067, 11080, 11109, 11110,
11111, 11112, 11114, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153,
11156, 11157, 11174, 11177, 11178, 11184, 11185,
11189, 11192, 11193, 11195
Nos. 11136, 11170, 11171, 11174, 11185
No. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066, 11067,
11080, 11109, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156, 11158,
11160, 11161, 11166, 11167, 11171, 11172, 11176,
11177, 11178, 11184, 11185, 11188, 11188, 11189,
11191, 11192, 11193, 11195, 11204
No. 11185
No. 11238
Nos. 11162, 11163, 11164, 11165, 11166, 111080,
111109, 11110, 11111, 11112, 11114, 11136,
11138, 11150, 11153, 11156, 11160 11161, 11166,
11167, 11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11176, 11178,
11185, 11188, 11189, 11190, 11193
14
FAR
Provision
91.121
Applicable condition(s) in
Section 5 of petition
4
91.151(a)
17, 18
91.203 (a)
and (b)
22
91.215
91.403
91.405(a)
26, 27
12, 13, 14
12, 13, 14
91.407(a)(1)
14
91.409(a)(1)
12, 13, 14
91.409(a)(2)
12, 13, 14
FAA Exemption Decision
Nos. 11162, 11163, 11164, 11165, 11166, 111080,
111109, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156, 11160
11161, 11166, 11167, 11170, 11171, 11174, 11176,
11178, 11185, 11188, 11189, 11190, 11193
Nos. 11110, 11153, 11156, 11161; 111109, 11110,
11112, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156, 11160
11161, 11166, 11167, 11170, 11171, 11172, 11174,
11176, 11178, 11185, 11188, 11189, 11190, 11193
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066,
11067, 11080, 11109, 11110, 11111, 11112,
11114, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156,
11157, 11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11176,
11177, 11178, 11184, 11185, 11188, 11188,
11189, 11191, 11192, 11193, 11195
No. 11185, 11195
No. 11185
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066,
11067, 11080, 11109, 11110, 11111, 11112,
11114, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156,
11157, 11158, 11160, 11161, 11166, 11167,
11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11176, 11177,
11178, 11184, 11185, 11188, 11188, 11189,
11191, 11192, 11193, 11195, 11204
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066,
11067, 11080, 11109, 11110, 11111, 11112,
11114, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156,
11157, 11158, 11160, 11161, 11166, 11167,
11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11176, 11177,
11178, 11184, 11185, 11188, 11188, 11189,
11191, 11192, 11193, 11195, 11204
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066,
11067, 11080, 11109, 11110, 11111, 11112,
11114, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156,
11157, 11158, 11160, 11161, 11166, 11167,
11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11176, 11177,
11178, 11184, 11185, 11188, 11188, 11189,
11191, 11192, 11193, 11195, 11204
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066,
11067, 11080, 11109, 11110, 11111, 11112,
11114, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156,
11157, 11158, 11160, 11161, 11166, 11167,
11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11176, 11177,
11178, 11184, 11185, 11188, 11188, 11189,
11191, 11192, 11193, 11195, 11204
15
FAR
Provision
91.417(a)
Applicable condition(s) in
Section 5 of petition
12, 13, 14
91.417(b)
12, 13, 14
FAA Exemption Decision
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066,
11067, 11080, 11109, 11110, 11111, 11112,
11114, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156,
11157, 11158, 11160, 11161, 11166, 11167,
11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11176, 11177,
11178, 11184, 11185, 11188, 11188, 11189,
11191, 11192, 11193, 11195, 11204
Nos. 11062, 11063, 11064, 11065, 11066,
11067, 11080, 11109, 11110, 11111, 11112,
11114, 11136, 11138, 11150, 11153, 11156,
11157, 11158, 11160, 11161, 11166, 11167,
11170, 11171, 11172, 11174, 11176, 11177,
11178, 11184, 11185, 11188, 11188, 11189,
11191, 11192, 11193, 11195, 11204
16
B.
Appendix B: Helios’s argument for exemption from 14 C.F.R. §61.113: Private pilot
privileges and limitations: Pilot in command.
Helios requests an exemption from 14 C.F.R. §61.113 so that the PIC of the UA will not
be required to possess a private or commercial pilot’s license. As the FAA and numerous other
national airspace regulators have recognized, UA operations conducted by persons who do not
hold a pilot’s license can still achieve the equivalent level of safety of current operations by
manned aircraft with pilots holding a private or commercial pilot’s license.
Although it recognizes that a pilot’s license is unnecessary for safe UA operation, the
FAA has to date declined to allow grant exemptions under Section 333 that would permit
individuals who possess neither a private nor a commercial pilot’s certificate to conduct
commercial UA operations. It has specified two reasons for declining to do so. First, it has stated
that it does not possess the authority under Section 333 to exempt individuals from the
requirement under 49 U.S.C. §44711 to hold an airman certificate authorizing the airman to
serve in the capacity for which the certificate was issued. Exemption No. 11110 at 14. Second,
the FAA has concluded that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) security screening
required of all certified airmen meets the statutory requirement in Section 333 that operations not
pose a threat to national security. Exemption No. 11110 at 15.
Helios respectfully requests that the FAA reconsider its position. There is no dispute that
it is unnecessary for an operator of a UA to go through the rigorous process of becoming a
certified pilot in order to safely operate a UA. In addition, the FAA does have the authority to
exempt UA operators from the requirement in 49 U.S.C. §44711to hold an airman certificate for
“serv[ing] in the capacity for which the certificate was issued.” Indeed, it has exercised that
authority repeatedly in the Section 333 process. Finally, the FAA’s security concerns can be
addressed by a variety of methods involving operator background checks to be conducted by
government agencies.
1. The FAA and foreign regulators recognize that obtaining a manned aircraft
pilot license is unnecessary for safe operation of a UA
The FAA, like the other national airspace regulators that have considered the issue, has
concluded that UA operations conducted by persons who do not hold a pilot’s license can still
achieve the equivalent level of safety of current operations by manned aircraft with pilots
holding a private or commercial pilot’s license. In its recent UAS NPRM, the FAA stated:
“While these airman certification requirements are necessary for manned aircraft
operations, they impose an unnecessary burden for many small UAS operations.
This is because a person typically obtains a private or commercial pilot certificate
by learning how to operate a manned aircraft. Much of that knowledge would not
be applicable to small UAS operations because a small UAS is operated
differently than manned aircraft. In addition, the knowledge currently necessary to
obtain a private or commercial pilot certificate would not equip the certificate
holder with the tools necessary to safely operate a small UAS… Thus, requiring
persons wishing to operate a small UAS to obtain a private or commercial pilot
certificate imposes the cost of certification on those persons, but does not result in
a significant safety benefit because the process of obtaining the certificate does
17
not equip those persons with the tools necessary to mitigate the public risk posed
by small UAS operations.” Operation and Certification of Small Unmanned
Aircraft, 80 Fed. Reg. 9543 at 9550 (proposed Feb. 23, 2015 (to be codified at 14
C.F.R. Parts 21, 43, 45, et al.)).
The FAA’s conclusion that manned aircraft flying experience is unnecessary for the
operation of a UA is supported by research by the FAA and the Army Research Laboratory.
They demonstrate that UAs, even those much larger than the sUAS proposed by Helios, can be
safely flown by non-certificated pilots with a small amount of training. For example, one Army
Research Laboratory study concluded:
"[T]he specific motor skills needed to control the radio-controlled UAV would
have to be learned by aviators independently of the motor skills learned in flying
an aircraft. In particular, the somatic and visual cues that pilots use during aircraft
landings would not be useful (and perhaps even counter-productive) for the
different skill sets and perceptual viewpoint necessary for radio-controlled
landings.”1
Additional research reports lend further support for the exclusion requested. For example, a
report sponsored by the FAA concluded that "We know that certain systems, like the U.S. Army
Hunter and Shadow systems, are successfully flown by pilots with no manned aircraft
experience."2
In addition, foreign government airspace regulators that have examined the issue have
consistently recognized that the skills required to fly a manned aircraft are irrelevant to operating
a UA. For that reason, they have concluded that UA operators do not need to have a private or
commercial pilot’s license. Canada, for example, does not require a pilot’s license to operate a
UA. Transport Canada requires training of UA operators, but that training is limited to pilot
ground school and flight operation training on UAs, not manned aircraft.3 Moreover, Canada
allows this training to be “provided by other pilots, manufacturers, [UA] flight training
1
Michael J. Barnes, Beverly G. Knapp, Barry W. Tillman, Brett A. Walters & Darlene Veliki,
Crew systems analysis of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) future job and tasking environments,
Technical Report ARL-TR-2081, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD: Army Research Laboratory,
page 12 (2000), available at http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a374230.pdf.
2
Kevin W. Williams, Unmanned Aircraft Pilot Medical Certification Requirements, Report
DOT/FAA/AM-07/3, FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute, page 2, (2007), available at
http://fas.org/irp/program/collect/ua-pilot.pdf. While the authors speculated that UAS use in
populated areas may change this assessment, indicating further research was needed to address
this concern, this concern is inapplicable as Helios’s flights will not be in congested areas. See
also Jason S. McCarley & Christopher D. Wickens, Human Factors Implications of UAVs in the
National Airspace, Institute of Aviation, Aviation Human Factors Division, University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign, 13 (2004), available at
http://www.tc.faa.gov/logistics/grants/pdf/2004/04-G-032.pdf.
3
See Civil Aviation, Standards, Transport Canada, Advisory Circular: Guidance Material for
Operating Unmanned Air Vehicle Systems under an Exemption at 14 and 18-22, (Nov. 27, 2014)
available at http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/ca-opssvs/ac-600-004.pdf.
18
organizations or . . . self taught.” 4
Similarly, the United Kingdom’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) recognized that
determining “Remote Pilot qualification requirements on the same basis as manned aircraft may
yield requirements that are too inflexible, too onerous and inappropriate for UAS operations.” 5
As a result, the CAA only requires UA operators to demonstrate UA operator competence.6
While there are a variety of ways to demonstrate competence, the most common is to complete a
course that will lead to a ground exam and flight test. Australia, too, requires only passage of a
UA-specific ground school program in lieu of a private pilot license.7 Finally, more than a dozen
countries, including Germany, Italy, France, Spain and the Netherlands, have adopted the
National UAS Certificate for Small Unmanned Aircraft (BNUC-S) Standard for UA pilot
certification.8 This standard results in a type-specific UA certificate and does not require the
operator to have a pilot’s license. The process involves taking a short ground school course,
passing a ground school test and then passing a practical test on commercial operation of the
specific UAS per the UAS manufacturer’s operations manual.
All of this experience and evidence indicates that the proposed exemption will provide a
greater level of safety than operations under 14 C.F.R. §61.113. In this instance, the PIC has had
decades of UA experience. He has focused his training and education on UAs generally, and in
particular on the aircraft to be operated, rather than taking additional time and risk to train on a
manned aircraft, weighing several thousand pounds and carrying highly flammable fuel.
The FAA has concluded in the NPRM that such UA-specific training is more than
sufficient to provide an equivalent level of safety for UA operations. Sometime in the next 1824 months, that position will be enshrined in a valid regulation. However, in the meantime, the
FAA claims it lacks the authority to relax the requirement to possess a pilot certificate. As we
show in the next section, that position is both incorrect and contradicted by the FAA’s recent
decisions.
2. The FAA has and has already exercised the authority to exempt applicants from
the airman certificate requirement
The FAA claims that it lacks authority to exempt UA operators from the requirement of
49 U.S. §44711 to hold an airman certificate authorizing the airman “to serve in the capacity for
which the certificate was issued.” See, e.g., Exemption No. 11110 at 14. This claim is
inconsistent with both (i) the statutory language of that section and Section 333, and (ii)
4
Id. at 14.
Civil Aviation Authority, Safety Regulation Group, Unmanned Aircraft System Operations in
UK Airspace – Guidance, Section 2, Chapter 5, Page 2 (Aug. 10, 2012), available at
https://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/CAP722.pdf.
6
Civil Aviation Authority, Unmanned Aircraft and Aircraft Systems, available at
http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?catid=1995&pagetype=90
7
Australian Government Civil Aviation Safety Authority, available at
http://www.casa.gov.au/scripts/nc.dll?WCMS:STANDARD::pc=PC_100374.
8
See EuroUSC International, “Pilot Qualification,” available at
http://eurousc.com/services/pilot-qualifications/.
5
19
numerous recent FAA decisions.
The operative part of 49 USC §44711 provides that a “person may not . . . serve in any
capacity as an airman with respect to a civil aircraft, . . . used, or intended for use, in air
commerce — (A) without an airman certificate authorizing the airman to serve in the capacity
for which the certificate was issued . . . “ If the FAA’s interpretation were correct, this language
would require that any person wishing to operate a UA for commercial operations have an
airman certificate authorizing the person to serve as an airman in commercial operations.
However, in all of its recent grants of Section 333 petitions, the FAA has – without
explicitly acknowledging the fact - exempted commercial UA operators from the § 44711(A)
requirement that they hold an airman certificate authorizing them “to serve in the capacity for
which the certificate was issued.” It has done so by allowing them to operate a UA so long as
they hold a private pilot’s or sport pilot’s authorization, even though such a certificate does not
permit commercial operations. Exemption No. 11062 at 15-18; Exemption No. 11110 at 14-16;
Exemption No. 11191 at 3-5; and Exemption No. 11229 at 3 and 8.
The FAA argues that it cannot exempt applicants from the requirements of §44711
because, while the specific language of Section 333 grants it limited statutory flexibility relative
to 49 U.S.C. §44704 for the purposes of airworthiness certification, Section 333 does not provide
flexibility relative to §44711 and other sections of Title 49. Exemption No. 11110 at 14. This
argument ignores the plain language of the statute. The relevant language of Section 333 is:
(a) IN GENERAL.—Notwithstanding any other requirement of this subtitle, and
not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of
Transportation shall determine if certain unmanned aircraft systems may operate
safely in the national airspace system before completion of the plan and
rulemaking required by section 332 of this Act or the guidance required by
section 334 of this Act.
(b) ASSESSMENT OF UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS.—In making the
determination under subsection (a), the Secretary shall determine, at a
minimum—
(1) which types of unmanned aircraft systems, if any, as a result of their size,
weight, speed, operational capability, proximity to airports and populated areas,
and operation within visual line of sight do not create a hazard to users of the
national airspace system or the public or pose a threat to national security; and
(2) whether a certificate of waiver, certificate of authorization, or airworthiness
certification under section 44704 of title 49, United States Code, is required for
the operation of unmanned aircraft systems identified under paragraph (1).
(c) REQUIREMENTS FOR SAFE OPERATION.—If the Secretary determines
under this section that certain unmanned aircraft systems may operate safely in
the national airspace system, the Secretary shall establish requirements for the
safe operation of such aircraft systems in the national airspace system.
20
The language of Section 333(b) is permissive: it requires that the Secretary “determine, at
a minimum . . . whether a certificate of waiver, certificate of authorization, or airworthiness
certification under section 44704 of title 49, United States Code, is required for the operation of
unmanned aircraft systems identified under paragraph (1).” Nothing in (b) precludes the
Secretary from determining whether or not a pilot’s license is required for operation of a UA
identified under paragraph (b)(1).
Indeed, the FAA has implicitly conceded the point by granting exemptions from the
requirement that commercial UA operators hold a commercial pilot certificate. From an
analytical standpoint, there is no difference between granting an exemption from the commercial
pilot’s license requirement and granting an exemption from the private or sport pilot’s license
requirement. Both are clearly exemptions from a specific statutory requirement in 49 U.S.C.
§44711. If the FAA has the statutory authority under Section 333(b) to do the former, it has the
same authority to do the latter.9
For all of the reasons set forth above, the FAA should reconsider its position and exercise
its full authority to grant an exemption from all the requirements of 49 USC §44711, so that a
person serving as a commercial UA operator need not have a pilot’s license.
9
The FAA has not specifically identified the statutory provision that underpins its authority to
grant the exemptions from the commercial pilot’s license requirement. Whether the statutory
basis is Section 333 or some other provision makes no difference. If there is a basis for a partial
exemption from in 49 U.S.C. § 44711, that basis also justifies an exemption from the entire
provision.
21
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THE PROFESSIONAL MULTIROTOR AUTOPILOT SYSTEM
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Gallery
22
WooKong-M Features
Multi-Rotor Stabilization Controller
9 Types Of Multi-Rotors And A Customized Motor Mixer
Built-In Gimbal Stabilization Function
Support iPad Ground Control Station (GCS)
New Assistant Software for Smartphone
Supporting Futaba S-bus receiver
Power Monitoring Unit
Built-in Damper
Precise Position and Altitude hold
High Accuracy and Driving Handfeel
Motor arm/disarm mode
Multiple flight control mode/ Intelligent Switching
Point of Interest (POI)
RTH Switch from Transmitter
Support iOSD MARK II
Intelligent Orientation Control (IOC)
Enhanced Fail-Safe and Auto Go Home/Landing
Multi-rotor One-power Output Fail Protection
Two Levels Low Voltage Protections and Auto Go Home
Upgrade to Ground Station Control System
Learn More
23
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MC
IMU
GPS
click and drag
Multi-Rotor Stabilization Controller
Multi-Rotor Stabilization Controller
DJI Wookong Multi-Rotor stabilization controller is a complete flight system for all
multi-rotor platforms for commercial and industrial AP applications. Unlike others,
WooKong allows the use of regular ESC commonly used in RC helicopters without any
wiring modification; Heli mode setup provides a seamless transition for current Ace One
AP professionals. WK-M utilizes high quality components precisely calibrated with
temperature compensation in all gyros and sensors, industry renowned flight algorithm
9 Types Of Multi-Rotors And A Customized
Motor Mixer
Built-In Gimbal Stabilization Function
Support iPad Ground Control Station
(GCS)
in autopilot and UAV field.
New Assistant Software for Smartphone
Supporting Futaba S-bus receiver
25
Power Monitoring Unit
9 Types Of Multi-Rotors And A Customized Motor Mixer
Support 9 traditional motor mixer:
Quad I, Quad X
Hexa I,Hexa V, Hexa Y, Hexa IY
Octo X, Octo I,Octo V
It’s a UAS that targeted at commercial and industrial multirotor platforms with simple
Built-in Damper
Precise Position and Altitude hold
High Accuracy and Driving Handfeel
Motor arm/disarm mode
configuration, easy installation and stable performance.
Multiple flight control mode/ Intelligent
Switching
Point of Interest (POI)
RTH Switch from Transmitter
Built-In Gimbal Stabilization Function
The gimbal stabilization module is compatible with most 2-axis gimbal systems. The
system will adjust the camera according to the attitude of the aircraft after setting the
parameters the first time. The scope of the gimbal servo output frequency is 400hz,
200hz, 100h and 50hz, the higher frequency output makes the adjustment more efficient.
Support iOSD MARK II
Intelligent Orientation Control (IOC)
Enhanced Fail-Safe and Auto Go
Home/Landing
At the same time, the limit of the gimbal servo rolling and pitching is extended to 90°.
Multi-rotor One-power Output Fail
Protection
Two Levels Low Voltage Protections and
Auto Go Home
Upgrade to Ground Station Control System
Support IPad Ground Control Station (GCS)
WooKong-M GCS now supports iPad (currently iPad 3, iPad4, iPad mini), the only thing
you need to do is to plug in a Bluetooth datalink and the BTU module. Gone are the days
of the heavy laptop, now you don’t need to install maps and drivers, forget about the
Windows OS version compatibility problems, and don’t worry about Google Earth.
Without long cables, it is as easy for you to control the aircraft with your ground station
as play a game on your iPad. More-over the trend of using the iPad Waypoint will be
another highlight. Click here for more information.
New Assistant Software For Smartphone
The WooKong-M now provides assistant software for iPhone4s, iPhone5, iPad3, iPad4,
iPadmini, iPod5. You can do parameter adjustments at any time on your mobile devices,
using only an LED indicator with a built-in Bluetooth module which makes it easier and
convenient. It uses low power Bluetooth to minimize the power consumption of your
mobile devices. It is easy to use and will automatically save your last connection
records. The password mechanism ensures your safety link. Parameters can be
automatically synchronized to the Cloud Server and can be restored immediately when
you changed your mobile devices.
26
Supporting Futaba S-Bus Receiver
Compatible with almost all radios-PCM or 2.4Ghz
Power Monitoring Unit
Specially designed for WKM to solve the high power consumption problem of the power
support system. It contains two power outputs for the entire WKM system and receiver
separately, a battery voltage monitor, and two CAN-Bus interfaces.
Built-In Damper
Small footprint and weight offer ease of installation in tight spaces, for various aircraft
sizes.
Precise Position And Altitude Hold
With WKM, the multirotors will have position and altitude lock in windy conditions.
Precise hovering in less than 2m horizontal and 0.5m vertical.
High Accuracy And Driving Handfeel
With the WKM, flying a multi-rotor will be as easy as driving a car. The pilot is released
from the stress of controlling the multi-rotor and able to pay more attention to other
tasks such as camera angle, instead of focus on flying.
27 Mode
Motor Arm/Disarm
1. Start Motor: When using WKM, pushing throttle stick before takeoff will not start
motors. You have to execute any one of following four Combination Stick
Commands (CSC) to start motors.
2. Stop Motor: We provide two options to stop motors: Immediate and Intelligent.
Immediately Mode: By using this mode, in any control mode, once motors start and
throttle stick is over 10%, motors will stop immediately when throttle stick is back
under 10% again. In this case, if you push the throttle stick over 10% in 5 seconds
after motors stop, motors will re-start, CSC is no needed. If you don’t push throttle
stick after motors start in three seconds, motors will stop automatically.
Intelligent
Mode: By using this mode, different control modes have different way of stopping
motors. In Manual Mode, only executing CSC can stop motors. In Atti. or GPS Atti.
Mode, any one of following four cases will stop motors:
Multiple Flight Control Mode/ Intelligent Switching
GPS Atti. Mode
Command Stick
Meaning
Multi attitude control; Stick center position for 0º attitude, its endpoint is 35º.
Atti. Mode
Manual Mode
Maximum angular velocity is 150°/s. No attitude
angle limitation and vertical velocity locking.
YES
Command Linearity
Stick Released
Lock rotor position when GPS signal is
adequate.
Only attitude stabilizing.
NOT Recommend
Altitude Lock
Maintain the altitude best above 1 meter from ground.
NO
GPS Lost
After 10s when GPS signal is lost, system enters
Atti. Mode automatically.
—
Safety
Attitude & speed mixture control ensures stability; Enhanced fail-safe
Depends on experience.
Applications
AP work
—
Only performing attitude stabilizing without
position lock.
Sports flying.
Point Of Interest (POI)
WooKong-M has a new function: Point of Interest. When the GPS signal is good, users
can record the present position of the aircraft as a point of interest by the preset switch
on the remote control. The aircraft could achieve a circle flight around the point of
interest with the nose in the point in an area of 5 meters to 500 meters radius, when the
rolling command is given. This function is easy to set up and convenient to operate, it is
28
suitable for all-round shooting of a fixed scenic spot.
RTH Switch From Transmitter
In addition to the function of failsafe RTH, WooKong-M now has a new function of
RTH switch from transmitter. It is unnecessary to turn into failsafe mode.
Support IOSD MARK II
The WooKong-M now support iOSD MARK II. This will undoubtedly give you a
fantastic flight performance. Depending upon DJI’s accumulation of historic and reliable
information integration technology, the iOSD MARK II can grab the most accurate firsthand flight data information in the shortest possible time.
Intelligent Orientation Control (IOC)
Usually, the forward direction of a flying multi-rotor is the same as the nose direction. By
using Intelligent Orientation Control (IOC), wherever the nose points, the forward
direction has nothing to do with nose direction:
In course lock flying, the forward direction is the same as a recorded nose direction. See
the following figures (Mode 2) In home lock flying, the forward direction is the same
as the direction from home point to multi-rotor.See the following figures (Mode 2)
Enhanced Fail-Safe And Auto Go Home/Landing
Enhanced fail-safe is the feature to ensure that the multi-rotor will hover automatically if
it loses RC signal. After losing the signal in a certain time period, WKM will calculate
the safest way to return the helicopter to the home position. The helicopter will hover
over your GPS start point and land automatically. This feature will guarantee the safety
of your expensive payloads and equipments on the platform.
29
Multi-Rotor One-Power Output Fail Protection
In most conditions, the whole multi-rotor will retain good attitude and rotate around the
frame arm with no power output, due to imbalanced mechanical structure and external
environment. Rotating is mainly caused by payload and external environment. When
payload is heavier, rotating speed is faster. On rotating, the hexa-rotor physical structure
can cause rudder to become out of control. The humanistic protection function from
WooKong-M, in Attitude or GPS Mode, keeps attitude under control even with any one
power output failed and highly reduces crash risk.
Two Levels Low Voltage Protections And Auto Go Home
In order to prevent your multi-rotor from a crash or other harmful consequence caused by
low battery voltage, we have designed two levels of low voltage protection. You can
choose to not to use them, but all two level protections have LED warning as default.
First level will blink yellow light continuously; second level will blink red light
continuously. Compare the Go Home and Landing of low voltage protection and the Go
Home and Landing in Enhanced Failed-safe, the generations of Home Location are the
same; the Go Home routes are the same; the difference is that there is no hovering before
landing in low voltage protection.
Upgrade To Ground Station Control System
WooKong-M can be upgraded to ground station which is a more powerful unmanned
platform to satisfy the high requirement of customers.
Now you just need to buy a DJI professional datalink and upgrade to the latest
WooKong-M 5.26 firmware, then free Ground Station function is available without S/N
and free 50 waypoints supported. Besides the 3D map, it also contains such ground
control functions as joystick/keyboard control, one key takeoff and click & go.
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Size and Weight
Basic Performance
Multi Rotor Types
31
Quad-Rotor: +4,x4;
Hex-Rotor +6,x6,Y6,Rev Y6;
Octo-Rotor +8,x8,V8
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Flight Performance
Hardware
Supported ESC Output
400Hz refresh frequencys
Recommended Transmitter
PCM or 2.4GHz with minimum 7 channels and Failsafe function available on all channels
Recommended Battery
2S~6S LiPo
Power Consumption
MAX 5W (0.9A@5V, 0.7A@5.8V,0.5A@7.4V,0.4A@8V)
Operating Temperature
-5°C to +60°C
(You have to keep the IMU warm if you want to use it under low temperature, could be
-5°Cor lower)
Assistant Software System Requirement
Windows XP sp3 / Windows 7 / Windows 8
Hovering Accuracy
Vertical: ± 0.5m
Horizontal: ± 2m
Suitable Wind Condition
< 8m/s (17.9mph/28.8km/h)
Max Yaw Angular Velocity
150 deg/s
Max Tilt Angle
35°
Ascent/Descent
±6m/s
Weight
Total Weight: <= 118g(overall)
Dimensions
Main Controller: 51.2mm x 38.0mm x 15.3mm
IMU: 41.4mm x 31.1mm x 27.8mm
GPS & Compass: 50mm (diameter) x 9mm
LED Indicator: 25mm x 25mm x 7mm
PMU: 39.5mm x 27.5mm x 9.7mm
Built In Functions
Three Modes Autopilot
Enhanced Failsafe
2-axis Gimbal Support
Low Voltage Protection
Go Home & Auto Landing
D-Bus Receiver Supported
Intelligent Orientation Control
32
Notice: Flight Performance can be effected by mechanical performance and payloads
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DJI Developer
iOSD (On Screen Display)
User Manual
V2.10
For iOSD Firmware Version V3.01 & iOSD Assistant V4.0*
April 7, 2014
* iOSD Firmware V3.01 compatible with iOSD Assistant V4.0.
www.dji-innovations.com
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
34
1
Disclaimer
Thank you for purchasing product(s) from DJI Innovations. Please read the instructions carefully before installing the
hardware and software for this product, this will ensure trouble free operation of your iOSD. Please use DJI products in
accordance with the provisions of your local authorities and regulations.
As DJI Innovations has no control over use, setup, final assembly, modification (including use of non-specified DJI parts i.e.
motors, ESCs, propellers, etc.) or misuse, no liability shall be assumed nor accepted for any resulting damage or injury. By
the act of use, setup or assembly, the user accepts all resulting liability. DJI Innovations accepts no liability for damage(s)
or injured incurred directly or indirectly from the use of this product.
DJI and iOSD are registered trademarks of DJI Innovations. Names of products, brands, etc., appearing in this manual are
trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owner companies. This product and manual are copyrighted by
DJI Innovations with all rights reserved. No part of this product or manual shall be reproduced in any form without the
prior written consent or authorization of DJI Innovations. No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the
product or information contained herein.
Contents
Disclaimer ............................................................................................................................................................. 2
Contents ............................................................................................................................................................... 2
Introduction .......................................................................................................................................................... 3
In the Box.............................................................................................................................................................. 4
Assembly............................................................................................................................................................... 5
Display Description ................................................................................................................................................ 7
Test ...................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Assistant Software ............................................................................................................................................... 10
Software and Driver Installation ....................................................................................................... 10
Assistant Software GUI ................................................................................................................... 10
Assistant Software Usage................................................................................................................ 10
Firmware & Assistant Software Upgrade ........................................................................................... 11
Appendix ............................................................................................................................................................ 13
Port Description............................................................................................................................. 13
Specifications ................................................................................................................................ 14
Trouble Shooting ........................................................................................................................... 15
Some Descriptions for the iOSD Version1.0 ...................................................................................... 16
Connection Between iOSD and Autopilot System ............................................................................. 17
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
35
2
Introduction
DJI iOSD is specially designed for DJI autopilot system during the FPV flight or other aero-modeling activates. DJI iOSD
can transmit video and iOSD information in real time, which will help you to obtain the aircraft status information during a
FPV flight. It can display power voltage, flight velocity, height, distance from the home point, horizontal attitude, GPS
satellite number, etc. iOSD and video information are superposed on the receiver, making iOSD data clearly visible and
bringing you a more involved flight experience.
DJI iOSD should be used in conjunction with a DJI autopilot system. It supports two video input sources under PAL or
NTSC mode, which can be selected remotely by an R/C transmitter switch. The R/C TX switch can also change the
wireless video transmitter channel remotely when user uses the wireless video transmitter specified by DJI. The iOSD
supports online upgrades. The iOSD has built-in BEC, which is on one hand for the power supply of the camera, on the
other hand for the power supply of the autopilot system’s main controller to improve the power supply reliability of the
main controller.
Specified autopilot systems for the iOSD
Status
Autopilot system & Aircraft
Supported
A2, WKM, NAZA-M*, NAZA-M V2*, PHANTOM 2
Not yet supported
WKH、ACE ONE、ACE WAYPOINT
*iOSD should be connected to the NAZA-M or NAZA-M V2 via the PMU V2 (NAZA-M V2 Accessory).
*iOSD should not be connected to the WKM and NAZA-M/ NAZA-M V2 at the same time.
*NAZA-M should be upgrade to the firmware version of V3.16 (or above), with the same assistant software V2.16 of
Naza-M V2.
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
36
3
In the Box
iOSD Controller ×1
Connect the iOSD controller to your DJI autopilot system via
CAN-Bus Cable. It communicates with the main controller,
receives data from the main controller, superimposes the data
with the video image, and then transmits the whole information
via a transmitter.
dJI
dJI
cable.
dJI
Connect the iOSD to your autopilot system through a CAN-Bus
dJI
CAN-Bus Cable ×2
Video Input Cable ×1
Connect the iOSD with video input source (i.e. camera or DJI
Z15) for video input and power supply, with maximum current
of 1A. If you connect the iOSD to DJI Z15, please use the 4PinAudio Head cable.
If connect to other camera, use the 4Pin cable for the
connection in accordance with the wiring diagram.
Video Output Cable ×2
Only when you use the wireless video transmitter module
specified by DJI, you can use the bi-port cable to connect the
iOSD with the video transmitter module. Otherwise, you can
use the one-port cable for your own connection in accordance
with the wiring diagram.
2-PIN to 3-PIN Cable ×1
Connect the iOSD with the R/C receiver through this cable.
When there are two video signal inputs, it is used for the
selection of video signal sources. It can be used for the
selection of AVL58 video channel.
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
37
4
Assembly
1.
Fix the iOSD controller on your aircraft.
2.
Connect the iOSD with the video signal source, wireless video TX module, DJI autopilot system and R/C
receiver. Make sure the connection is correct in accordance with the wiring diagram.
3.
Setup a 3-position switch on the R/C TX as the iOSD control switch.
4.
Connect your wireless video RX module with the display screen.
Please refer to DJI autopilot system manual, your TX manual, and your wireless video RX for more details.
3-Position Switch Control
Choose a 3-position switch and make sure you connect the correct channel of the receiver to the iOSD switch port.
Position -1
Position -2, (hold position -2 for 1.5s): every toggle from Position -1 to Position -2 increases the
channel of the wireless video transmitter module by 1 (from CH1 to CH8), only for the wireless video
transmitter module specified by DJI.
Position -3
Position -2, (hold position -2 for 1.5s): toggle the switch to select the required video input, when
there are two video inputs. Only the toggle from Position -3 to Position -2 can change the video input source.
AV1 is default.
Position -1
Position -2
Position -3
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
38
5
Video Output Port
If you use wireless video transmission module AVL58 specified by DJI, connect through the bi-port cable.
If you use your own module, please connect through the one-port cable according the pin description.
Channel Control pin:Control signal for the video transmitter channel number (CH1…..CH8).If your video
transmitter does not support this feature, then ignore this pin.
Video and OSD output pin: make sure this is correctly connected.
Positive/Negative voltage of battery pin: its output voltage is equate to the voltage of the battery, supplying
power for your wireless video transmitter. It is recommended to solder the two cables of the same function.
Please make sure the input voltage of your own wireless video transmitter is matched to the voltage of
BATT, to prevent damage from your wireless video transmitter module. For example, if the Battery is
6S(25V) and the input voltage of the wireless video transmitter is 3S(12V), then you cannot use the
BATT+ to supply power since the 25V is larger than 12V.
!
Or
Wireless Video Transmitter
Specified by DJI(AVL58)
Negative voltage of battery(=BATT-)
Positive voltage of battery(=BATT+)
!
Channel Control
Video GND
Video and OSD output
Other
Wireless Video Transmitter
AVL58
TRANSMITTER
3-position switch
R/C Receiver
DJI Z15 GCU
AV1 Signal
B
A
T
T
GND GND
Or
AV Input 1
Power
Ground Camera1
PMU
DJI
Autopilot System
AV Input 2
Power Camera2
Ground
Important: iOSD can be connected to any CAN-Bus port of the WKM system, BUT should be connected to the NAZA-M or NAZA-M
V2 via the PMU V2 (NAZA-M V2 Accessory). NAZA-M should be upgraded to the firmware version of V3.10 or above when using
with the PMU V2 , with the same assistant software V2.10 of NAZA-M V2. iOSD should not be connected to the WKM and NAZAM/NAZA-M V2 at the same time. Refer to the Appendix for more connection details.
Video Input Port
If you use the DJI Z15, it is recommended to use the 4Pin- Audio Head cable for connecting the iOSD and GCU.
If you use the 4Pin cable, please connect the iOSD to the Z15's GCU according to the above chart.
If you use your own camera(s), please connect through the Video Input Cable according the pin description.
AV1/AV2 pin:you can select the required input. AV1 is default. POWER pin: supply power for Video input
source such as a camera, with the maximum current of 1A. If the battery is 3S LiPo then: Output Voltage = Input
Votage. If 4S~6S then: Output Voltage=11.2V. Make sure your camera is rated for this voltage and
current(1A), if not, please use a separate battery supply.
If you use other wireless video transmitter and the rated voltage is over the voltage of BATT+, you can use the
POWER pin to apply power. Make sure the total current consumption of wireless video transmitter and camera
is lower than 1A, otherwise will damage your iOSD.
Aircraft End
Ground End
12.0V 90%
CH
P 0o
R 0o
0.0 ms
D
H 1m
Az 34°
ATT
FS
0
AV1
0.0
Display Screen
5
0
0
Wireless Video RX
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
39
6
Display Description
The iOSD information is displayed on the screen as shown below.
7
1
12.0V 90%
P 0o
R 0o
CH
2
8
10
9
0.0
m
s
0
AV1
45~179
3
D
4
H 1m
17
5
6
11
45~179
0.0
Az 34°
13
14
5
0
0
ATT
FS
18
NO.
12
15
16
Function
Display
Description
Real time battery voltage of the aircraft power, unit in V. (For
PHANTOM 2 there will be current battery level percentage shown in
1
Power voltage
、 blink
addition.)
Blink: first level low-voltage alert, the alert threshold is same to the
protection voltage value set in the assistant software.
2
Distance
3
CH1、
Channel
aircraft
CH2、……CH8
between
and
When the home point is successfully recorded, this item will show, unit
home D
in m.
points
4
Height
Wireless video transmitter channel selection.
The vertical height between the aircraft and the take-off point, unit in
H
m.
The autopilot system control mode.
5
Control mode
ATT is Atti mode
ATT、M、GPS
GPS is GPS Atti. mode
M is Manual mode
6
7
Fail-safe mode
Pitch attitude
FS is in Fail-safe mode
FS 、 APT 、
APT is in ground station mode
GHome
P
0o
GHome is in go home status
Positive value means the aircraft nose is up; negative value means the
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
40
7
aircraft nose is down.
Positive value means the aircraft is right.
0o
8
Roll attitude
R
9
Flight velocity
0.0m/s
10
GPS satellite
0
11
Video input
AV1、AV2
Negative value means the aircraft is left.
The aircraft horizontal speed.
Number of GPS satellites acquired.
Video input source selected, AV1 or AV2 can be chosen.
Display the relative angle between aircraft nose and home point. The
aircraft nose is pointing to the home point when the icon
is in the
middle of the screen, this may help you to bring back the aircraft by
distinguishing the aircraft nose direction.
For example, when the icon
on your display screen is located in the
Orientation-3 as shown in the following figure, you can change the
aircraft nose direction through operating your R/C TX. When the icon
12
Aircraft
direction
nose
arrives at the Orientation-1, your aircraft nose is heading the home
、
、
point, which can help you pull your aircraft back to the home point
easily.
Orientation-4
Orientation-5
Aircraft
Orientation-2
Orientation-3
Aircraft nose direction
Orientation-1
Home point
90 Orientation-3
Orientation-5
13
Vertical velocity
0.0
Orientation-1
Display Screen
Orientation-2 135
Orientation-4
:Upward speed
0.0 、
:Downward speed
Use attitude line for aircraft attitude observation
craft up:
craft down:
14
Attitude line
craft left:
craft right:
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
41
8
15
16
Gimbal Attitude
Display the 3- axis attitude of the gimbal when a gimbal is used.
5
0
0
Compass error
indicator
Roll Direction
Pitch Direction
Yaw Direction
5
0
0
blink
For NAZA-M user, Blinking
will appear when compass has errors,
please calibrate your compass.
Azimuth angle is a horizontal angle
measured clockwise from the North
N
0°
17
Azimuth angle
Az(0o ~360o)
W
base line to the line goes through the
H
270°
90°
D
Az=225°
E
home point and aircraft position.
180°
S
Home Point
Users can locate the aircraft by
Aircraft
calculating the aircraft position using
Az D , H .
18
Airport alert
Blink
Blinks when the aircraft enters a no-fly zone*.
Disappears when the aircraft exits no-fly zone.
Notes:
* For more information about the no-fly zones, visit www.dji.com and download the Phantom 2 User Manual.
Test
Please use the following procedures to test your installation, in order to make sure the iOSD is working properly.
1.
Ensure batteries are fully charged for R/C transmitter, iOSD and all the other devices on your aircraft.
2.
Make sure all connections and wiring are correct and secure.
3.
Make sure the communication between the wireless video RX and TX modules is normal.
4.
Switch on the R/C transmitter, and power on the iOSD and autopilot system.
5.
Check the LED indicator on the iOSD. The iOSD is powered when the LED is on.
6.
If there are two video inputs, please select an input by toggling the TX 3-position switch; otherwise, please
skip to the next step.
7.
If you use the wireless video RX and TX modules specified by DJI, please select the channel you require by
toggling the TX 3-position switch; otherwise, please skip to next step.
8.
Observe the display screen to make sure the video and iOSD information are displaying on the screen.
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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9
Assistant Software
Software and Driver Installation
1.
Please download driver installer and assistant software from the iOSD page of DJI website.
2.
Connect the iOSD Controller and the PC via USB cable, power on the iOSD Controller system.
3.
Run driver installer, and follow the instructions strictly to finish installation.
4.
Run assistant software installer, and follow the instructions strictly to finish installation.
Assistant Software GUI
iOSD Setting
Data View
Software Version &
Firmware Version,
etc
Text Indication
Main
Warnings Setting
Data Communication
Indicator
PC Connection
Indicator
Assistant Software Usage
Using the assistant software, adjust the display position of the iOSD information, upgrade the firmware and assistant
software are available. In addition, the flight data will automatically be saved as files in the iOSD, which can be viewed by
connecting to the PC.
1.
Power on your computer.
2.
Make sure the iOSD is power on. Connect the iOSD Controller to the PC with a USB cable. (If the iOSD is
connected to the autopilot system and both of them are power on, and then switch on the transmitter first.)
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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10
3.
Run the iOSD Assistant Software.
4.
If the Data Communication Indicator is Red on, please double check the connections and driver installation;
otherwise if the indicator is blinking Green, go to next step.
5.
Select the Main item to adjust the display position of the iOSD information if necessary. And then configure the
warning of GPS Satellite Number, Distance and Height Range if warnings are required.
6.
Click the DataView item, and follow the tips to get the flight attitude data, main control input and output
information, etc.
Note:
(1) If you do not configure the Warnings Setting, the iOSD will show warnings in default values.
(2) It will auto detect the firmware version when you open the assistant software and prompt the check for updates
window if your version is not the latest one.
(3) If enter the Data View mode, the iOSD controller will temporarily quit the parameter configuration mode, and
act as a USB Device to connect to the PC. You can manually select and read any data file from the USB Device.
If you need to re-enter the parameter configuration mode, please power cycle the iOSD.
(4) The speed of data loading will be very slow for large files. For the large file on the iOSD controller, please copy
the file to the local hard drives of the PC, and then open the file for viewing.
(5) The Compass Data Recording is added in the iOSD Firmware version V2.00 (or above); you can read the
Compass data in the DataView item of the iOSD assistant software V2.00.
Firmware & Assistant Software Upgrade
Please follow the procedure for firmware upgrade; otherwise the iOSD might not work properly.
1.
Make sure your computer is connected to the Internet. Please close all the other applications during the
firmware upgrade, including anti-virus software and firewall.
2.
Make sure the power supply is securely connected. DO NOT un-plug the power supply until firmware upgrade
has finished.
3.
Connect the iOSD to PC with Micro-USB cable, DO NOT break connection until firmware upgrade is finished.
4.
Run the assistant software and wait for connection.
5.
Select Info
6.
DJI server will check your current software and firmware version, and get the latest software and firmware
Software and Firmware.
prepared for the unit.
7.
If there is a software version more up-to-date than your current version, you will be able to click to download the
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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11
new version. Please re-install the assistant software follow the prompts
8.
If there is a firmware version more up-to-date than your current version, you will be able to click to update them.
9.
Wait until Assistant software shows “finished”. 10. Click OK and power cycle. Your unit is now up-to-date.
Note:
If firmware upgrade failed, the iOSD will enter waiting for firmware upgrade status automatically, please try again
with the above procedures.
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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12
Appendix
Port Description
Power Battery Input Port,input voltage range: 11V~26V
Control Signal Input Port,for wireless video module channel selection and video input source
selection
Video Signal Output Port
AV-OUT:Video Signal Output, including both video and iOSD information
AV- GND:Video Signal Ground
UART: transmit the wireless channel control signal to the wireless video transmitter (For
example AVL58)
BATT+:it is equate to the Positive Voltage of Battery
BATT-:it is equate to the Negative Voltage of Battery
Video Input Port,2 input sources are available, and the default setup is AV1
AV1:Video Input Source 1
AV2:Video Input Source 2
POWER:11~13V, supply power for video input source with the maximum current of 1A
GND:Ground
Micro-USB Port:Connects the iOSD with PC for firmware upgrade
CAN-Bus : Communication of the iOSD with autopilot system through CAN-Bus
LED
LED indicator for power
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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13
Specifications
Performance Parameter
Video Input Mode
PAL/NTSC
Video Output Mode
PAL/NTSC
Physical
Temperature (V1.0)
-20~70oC
(Mark II)
-20~60oC
Size
52mm X 41mm X 11mm
Weight (V1.0)
42g
(Mark II)
56 g
Hardware Supported
Voltage
3S~6S(LiPos)
Current (Typical Value) (V1.0)
51mA@25.2V; 87mA@12.6V
(Mark II)
60mA@25.2V; 103mA@12.6V
Rated Power
1.25W
Controller Supported
WKM, NAZA-M, NAZA-M V2
Software Supported
Built-in Functions
iOSD Information Transmission
Video Transmission,2 Video Signal input Channels/Switchable
Remote channel selection of the Wireless Video Transmitter Module, when
using the video transmitter specified by DJI
Built-in BEC: improve the reliability of power supply for the main controller
DJI Z15 Supported
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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14
Trouble Shooting
No.
1
2
What
Only
iOSD
information,
video signal loss.
Only video signal, iOSD
information loss.
Why
How to
Make sure the connection between iOSD
Video input error.
Connection
iOSD
controller and video input port is OK.
between
controller
and
autopilot system error.
Make sure the connection between iOSD
controller and DJI autopilot system is OK.
Make
3
Both video signal and iOSD
information loss.
Signal
transmission
error.
sure
the
Wireless
Video
Transmitter Channel Setting is correct.
Make sure the communication between
the video transmitter and the receiver
is working correctly.
The video signal cable
4
Both video signal and iOSD
to
display
screen
is
information loss.
unconnected or short
Make sure the connection of video signal
cable is OK.
circuit.
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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15
Some Descriptions for the iOSD Version1.0
There is an adapter for the Version1.0, to solve the problem that the iOSD is incompatible with your camera. If there is
the incompatible problem with your device, please contact your authorized dealer to get an adapter for free.
There are two adapter versions, including SA0 and SA0 for Z15. If the iOSD is working with the Z15, please use the
version of SA0 for Z15, otherwise if with your camera, use the SA0. Please connect the adapter according to the below
figure.
Using the SA0:
DJI
iOSD
AV Input1
Power Camera1
Ground
AV Input2
Power Camera2
Ground
Using the SA0 for Z15:
DJI Z15 GCU
DJI
iOSD
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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16
Connection Between iOSD and Autopilot System
Connection Between iOSD and NAZA-M/NAZA-M V2
1.
If use with DJI multi-rotor, you can solder the power cable of the PMU V2 to the power pads on frame
bottom board. Please refer to DJI multi-rotor manual for details. Then connect the iOSD to a battery.
2.
If use with 3rd part aircraft, you can make a connecter by yourself to connect PMU V2 and battery.
(1)
NAZA-M (Fig.1): Make a connecter to connect the PMU V2 (NAZA-M V2 Accessory), iOSD, VU and
battery.
(2)
NAZA-M V2 (Fig.2): Make a connecter to connect the PMU V2, iOSD and battery.
Battery
Disconnected
Connecter made
by yourself
Fig.1 Connection between iOSD and NAZA-M
Battery
Connecter made
by yourself
Fig.2 Connection between iOSD and NAZA-M V2
Connection Between iOSD and WKM (Fig.3)
Battery
Fig.3 Connection between iOSD and WKM
©2012-2013 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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17
2.4G Bluetooth Datalink & iPad
Ground Station User Guide V1.10
Thank you for purchasing DJI products. Please strictly follow this user guide to mount and connect the 2.4G
Bluetooth Datalink, install the Assistant Software on your computer, as well as the App on your mobile device.
Note:The map of Mainland China download from Mainland China IP addresses has differences with the actual
geographic environments. If users download the map of Mainland China from foreign IP addresses, which will be
more accurate.
2.4G Bluetooth Datalink
The 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink consists of the Air end and the Ground end, which provides reliable and stable remote
wireless transmissions for Ground Station based applications. The signal flow is as shown below.
Flight control CAN-Bus
system
The Air
end
Signals from
Ground Station
PC Ground
Station
USB
The
Ground end CAN-Bus
Signals from Flight
control system
BTU module Bluetooth
Bluetooth
iPad Ground
Station
Flight control systems that support the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink
ACE ONE(Firmware V4.02 or above), WKM(Firmware V5.24 or above),
NAZA-M, NAZA-M V2(Firmware V4.00 or above), A2(Firmware V2.0 or above)
Important: To make your Phantom 2 compatible with the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink, please update the firmware of
Phantom 2 and BTU module to the latest version.
1.1 In the box
The Ground end of
2.4G Bluetooth
Datalink
The Air end of
2.4G Bluetooth
Datalink
BTU
Module
CAN-Bus
cable
USB
cable
DC power
cable
Ground Station
Installer CD for
PC
Important:the firmware of BTU should be upgraded to version 1.0.1.2 or above to use with the 2.4G Bluetooth
Datalink.
1.2 User supplied
To use the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink and Ground Station, please prepare the Flight control system, the aircraft,
batteries, PC or iPad etc.
©2013-2014 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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1.3 Connections and use
(1)
(2)
Please assemble the antenna of the Ground end first.
For connections and use please refer to the diagram below.
Antenna
The tail of the Antenna
should be pointed
downward and
unobstructed to ensure the
communication distance.
90o
The Air end
Distance between the
two ends should be
more than 1.5m
To Flight control system
To any CAN-Bus port on ACE ONE, WKM ,
NAZA-M,NAZA-M V2
Or to the CAN2 port(or the CAN-Bus port
on the devices connected to the CAN2
port) on A2
The Ground end
Antenna
The tail of the Antenna
should be pointed
upwards and
unobstructed to ensure
the communication
distance.
USB port
Connect to a PC via a
USB cable to use the
PC Ground Station or
configure the 2.4G
Bluetooth Datalink in
the Assistant Software.
PC Ground Station
Extra power
supply port
2.4G Bluetooth Datalink
Assistant Software
Assistant Software of
Flight control system
Communication&
power supply port
CAN-Bus port
iPad Ground
Station
Connect the BTU
module when using the
iPAD Ground Station
Assistant of Flight
control system
DC power port
+
-
Connect DC power, you
can choose one of the
USB power supply or DC
power supply to provide
power for the Ground
end.
3S-6S Battery
9.9V~25.2V
DC power
+
-
Notes:
(1)
You can configure the Flight control system using the Assistant software on a PC or iOS mobile Device
wirelessly over the link of the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink, however you cannot upgrade the firmware of
the Flight control system using this communication route.
(2)
When connecting a BTU module or a LED Bluetooth unit to the Flight control system to configure in
the Assistant on mobile devices, as well as connecting a BTU module to the Ground end to use the iPad
Ground station, the two Bluetooth communication links will not interfere with each other.
(3)
If the Air end is changed to connect to a new Main controller, you should power cycle the Ground end.
(4)
Make sure the LED indicator of BTU module is green after power on, for specific usage details please
refer to the BTU Manual.
(5)
For usage of the PC Ground Station please refer to the latest Ground Station User Manual.
Important :
(1)
If there are obstacles between the ground and air ends then the radio signal of the 2.4G Bluetooth
Datalink will be weak; please make sure the antennas are always visibly unobstructed during the flight.
Human body, trees, buildings or hills will disconnect the link between the Air end and the Ground end.
(2)
Make sure the antenna of the Air end is pointing down, and the antenna of the Ground end is pointing
upwards; it’s better to put the Ground end at a high place to get further transmission distance.
(3)
When using the ACE ONE Flight control system with the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink, the Ground Station
will connect to the Main controller 15s after power on.
©2013-2014 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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1.4 LED Indicator descriptions
The LED Indicators of the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink will work after power on, the descriptions are shown below.
LED
TX/RX
Green blinks
LINK
Sending
Solid Green The Air end links with the
Ground end successfully
TX/RX LINK
The Air
Red blinks
Receiving
Solid Red
end
The Air end delinks with the
Ground end
Yellow blinks Searching the
Main controller
Green blinks
Sending
Solid Green The Air end links with the
Ground end successfully
Red blinks
The
Receiving
Solid Red
The Air end delinks with the
Ground end
Ground
end
TX/RX
LINK
Yellow blinks Power voltage of
the Ground end
is less than 9.9V
Notes :
(1)
(2)
(3)
LED Indicators on both ends will blink when powering on, then the TX/RX indicator of the Air end will
blink when searching the Main controller.
The LED Indicators of LINK on both ends should be solid green to indicate that the two ends have linked
successfully.
It’s recommended to check the power voltage of the Ground end regularly when using batteries for
power supply, in order to avoid over-discharging.
1.5 Upgrade
Use the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink Assistant software to upgrade the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink and BTU module.
Please refer to the diagram below to connect when upgrading.
To upgrade the Ground
end and BTU module
To upgrade the Air end
and the Ground end
2.4G Bluetooth
Datalink Assistant
software
2.4G Bluetooth
Datalink Assistant
software
Important : POWER CYCLE the Flight control system and 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink after upgrade.
©2013-2014 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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iPad Ground Station App
The iPad Ground Station is designed for remote flight control in applications of surveillance, aerial photography,
etc., it should be used with the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink to achieve auto flight after the setting of the routes. The
application with easy usable design offers great portability and simple operation, which will provide users with an
extraordinary flight experiences.
1.1 Introduction
Functions
Map information display
Joystick mode
One key Take off/ Go Home
Flight display in real time
Single waypoint
Auto Landing
Flight simulator
Waypoints
Customized Waypoints
4 kinds of Route Template
Customized Route Template
Low voltage alert
Voice guidance function
Flight control systems that support the iPad Ground Station
WKM(Firmware V5.24 or above), NAZA-M, NAZA-M V2(Firmware V4.00 or above),A2(Firmware V2.0 or above).
Important: Phantom 2 supports iPad Ground Station V1.4.58. To use the iPad Ground Station with the Phantom 2,
please update the main controller firmware to V2.00 or above, update the central board firmware to V1.0.1.24 or
above while the BTU firmware should be updated to V1.0.1.3 or above.
iOS Devices that support the iPad Ground Station
iPad3,iPad4,iPad mini, iPad mini with Retina display,iPad Air(iOS 6.1 or above)
1.2 First Time Use
First time use
Tips and Notes
1. Open your iPad and search “DJI” in the App Store to download and install
the Ground Station(GS) App.
2. Open the Bluetooth function of your iPad.
There will have popups if you forget to
enable the Bluetooth
3. Connect the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink and BTU module to the Flight Please refer to the Datalink part to
control system, power on.
connect
4. Run the GS App, create an account through the Internet and login.
PC account is available to login.
5. The GS will search your Main controller and named with“NEW”, you will LED in GS indicates
be asked to set a new name and a password for the Main controller.
after the GS is
connected with the Main controller
6. Please read the tips text carefully after login. Open the FisrtUse function FisrtUse function can be opened and
to make use of the help text.
closed in“More“
7. Enable the Flight Simulator and try out the follow functions:
Joystick
(1) Flight Simulator can be opened and
Use the sticks on the screen to control the aircraft
Single waypoint Edit a single waypoint and go
Waypoints
Use the templates
“Settings“
closed in“More“
“Settings“
(2) When using the GS the Flight control
to set routes,
batch the
system will enter into GPS control mode and
waypoints and upload the routes, then confirm and go
the aquired satellites shoule be more than 6.
Location
Use to locate the aircraft
(3) In GPS control mode the GS control
Auto Landing
The aircraft will land slowly
©2013-2014 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
or the iPad
priorto the Transmitter, Users can toggle
54
-4-
One key Go Default Home point is the one recorded by the aircraft
automatically after recording conditions are satisfied
Home
the control mode switch to other mode and
back to the GPS mode quickly to get the
control by Transmitter.
(1) Please view the map of fight fields via
8. Disable the Flight Simulator and power cycle the Flight control system to
start real flights. Click on Joystick and you can use One key Take off to take
off your aircraft
Internet in the GS before outdoors flights,
then the maps can be used off-line.
(2) Please use the GS for real flights after
you are familiar with its use and functions,
Refer to all help text in the App.
1.3 Using Tips
1.
Customized Route Template
In Waypoints mode, users can set a route and click
to save it as a template. Users can view all
the customized route templates in the template menu, slip from right to left on a template and you can
choose to detele it.
2.
Capturing waypoints
In Waypoints mode, click
to capture the aircraft attitude (including longitude, latitude, height and nose
pointing direction) properties to build a new waypoint during flight. This function is always available when the
UAV is hovering or flying.
1.4 Flight Limit of Special Areas
All UAV operators should abide by all regulations from such organizations at ICAO (International Civil Aviation
Organization) and per country airspace regulations. For safety reasons, key areas have been restricted, such as:
a)
Within the radius of 15Km from Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China.
b)
Within the radius of 8Km from the airport.
Users will not be able to build waypoints or Home points in designated special areas and the waypoint routines go
through these special areas are invalid, and the UAV will fail to cruise to those areas.
All the special areas have been restricted are specified on the DJI official website and please refer to Special Areas
List (http://www.dji.com/fly-safe/category-gs) to obtain details.
©2013-2014 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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Appendix
3.1 2.4G Bluetooth specifications(Deliveries passed FCC)
Performance
RF Data Rate
1536kbps
Indoor/Urban Range
≤350m
Outdoor/RF Line-of-Sight Range
≤2km
Transmit Power
≤125mW
Receiver Sensitivity (1%PER)
-94dBm
Power Consumption
The Ground end: ≤2.3W The Air end: ≤1.8W
Features
Frequency Band
2.4G(2400MHz ~2483MHz)
Serial Data Rate
115200 bps
Antenna Options
SMA
Operating Temperature
-10°C ~+60°C
Size (No Antenna)
The Ground end: 73mmx47.8mmx17.1mm
The Air end:
Weight (with Antenna)
49.8mmx36.4mmx11.4mm
The Ground end: 93g
The Air end: 32g
Supply Voltage
The Ground end: 9.9V-25.2V
The Air end: 6V
Current (Transmitting signal)
0.18A@12.5V
Current (Receiving signal)
0.30A@6V
Power supply
Regulatory Approvals
FCC(USA)
Yes
3.2 2.4G Bluetooth specifications(Deliveries passed CE)
Performance
RF Data Rate
1536kbps
Indoor/Urban Range
≤200m
Outdoor/RF Line-of-Sight Range
≤1.1km
EIRP (Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power)
≤100mW
Receiver Sensitivity (1%PER)
-94dBm
Power Consumption
The Ground end: ≤1.3W The Air end: ≤0.9W
Features
Frequency Band
2.4G(2400MHz ~2483MHz)
Serial Data Rate
115200 bps
Antenna Options
SMA
Operating Temperature
-10°C ~+60°C
Size (No Antenna)
The Ground end: 73mmx47.8mmx17.1mm
©2013-2014 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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The Air end:
Weight (with Antenna)
49.8mmx36.4mmx11.4mm
The Ground end: 93g
The Air end: 32g
Supply Voltage
The Ground end: 9.9V-25.2V
The Air end: 6V
Current (Transmitting signal)
0.10A@12.5V
Current (Receiving signal)
0.15A@6V
Power supply
Regulatory Approvals
CE(European)
Yes
3.3 FAQ
2.4G Bluetooth Datalink Failure
The Ground Station fails to connect with the Main controller, please check the following items
The distance between the two ends of the 2.4G Bluetooth Datalink should be more than 1.5m.
Make sure the Ground end is connected correctly and the LED indicator of BTU is green.
If above are ok please power cycle, while this problem continues after powering cycle, there may be hardware
problems such as the Antenna is broken, please contact your authorized dealer.
©2013-2014 DJI Innovations. All Rights Reserved.
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SimpleBGC Software User Manual
Board ver. 3.0
Firmware ver. 2.4
GUI ver. 2.4
© 2013-2014 Basecamelectronics®
58
1
Connection to PC
To connect board to your PC, you need a miniUSB cable. First time a USB cable is plugged, you need
to install the appropriate software driver. If your PC does not install the driver automatically, install one
manually from this link: http://www.silabs.com/products/mcu/pages/usbtouartbridgevcpdrivers.aspx.
After you install the driver and connecting the board, a new virtual COM port will be created. You need
to choose this COM port in the SimleBGC software (GUI) to initiate the connection.
It is safe to connect USB and main power (battery) simultaneously. But be very careful to not reverse
the polarity of the main battery, because in this case it will burn out controller and may damage your
PC!
There is also a possibility to use Bluetooh–To-Serial adapter (HC-05, HC-06, Sparkfun BlueSMiRF, and
comparable) to connect to the GUI and tune the board remotely. There is a special connector on the
board that matches the same one on the BT module. It is marked as UART and contains pins: 5V,
GND, RX, TX. You can solder BT module over it or use extender Male-Male 4pin cable.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Bluetooth module must be configured at 115200 baud rate and Even
parity (generally its not set by default!). Refer your module's user manual to find out how to
configure bluetooth. With these settings, you will be able connect to the GUI and even to
upgrade firmware remotely.
Running application
Follow these steps to connect your main controller board to the GUI software:

Connect the mini-USB cable

Start the GUI, select correct COM-port from the list, and click "Connect".
After the connection is established, all board settings and profiles will be loaded into the
GUI. You can re-load the current board parameters anytime by clicking the "READ" button.

After adjusting parameters in the GUI you should write them to the controller board by
clicking the "WRITE" button. Only the current profile parameters will be saved to the board.
To return to the default settings push the "RESET TO DEFAULTS" button.

To choose a different profile (with different settings) select it from the list of profiles (located
in the upper right corner of the GUI window). You can store different settings as three
different profiles onto the controller board. You can switch profiles saved on the board by
choosing the profile in the GUI or by pressing the MENU button on the controller board.
Remember that some settings are common for all profiles and can not be saved on a per-profile basis.
Parameters such as sensor orientation, hardware configuration, RC inputs, and motors outs are the
same across all profiles.
The GUI starts in the English version of the user interface. To change the interface language, choose
one in the 'language' menu and restart the program.
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GUI Blocks
The GUI contains different functional blocks:
1. Configuration block in the central part of the window, organized by ‘tab’:

Basic – Basic gimbal stabilization settings. Adjusting these settings is usually adequate to
achieve good camera stabilization.

Advanced — More precise tuning options.

RC Settings – settings to control the gimbal roll/pitch/yaw orientation with RC inputs.

Service – Specify the behavior of the MENU button (located on the controller board or
mounted externally) and tune the battery monitoring service.

Follow Mode – settings related to special mode of the camera control.

Real-time Data — real-time sensor data monitoring. This screen is extremely helpful in
tuning your gimbal performance. Firmware Update — Firmware and GUI software versions
and update options.

Firmware Upgrade – lets you to check the fresh version of firmware and upgrade if
necessary.
2. Connection — COM-port selection and connection status.
3. Profile — Profile selection, loading, re-naming, and saving.
4. Control Panel — graphic visualization of gimbal orientation angles in three axes.

Black arrows are displaying the angles, blue arrows are a 10x time magnification to provide
higher precision. Red marks show target angles that gimbal should keep.

Thin blue lines shows the maximum (peak) deflection from the central, neutral point.
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
Blue digits show peak deflection amplitude. Using these numbers, stabilization quality can
be estimated.

Vertical red bars to the right of the scales show actual power level, from 0 to 100%.
5. READ, WRITE, RESET TO DEFAULTS buttons are used to transfer setting from/to board.
6. MOTORS ON/OFF button is used to toggle motors state.
7.
At the bottom of the screen, tips, status or error messages (in red color) are displayed . Overall
cycle time and I2C error count is also displayed.
8. Battery voltage indicator with warning sector.
Basic Settings
Note: Before tuning your controller, install the camera into the gimbal firmly and ensure your gimbal’s
center of gravity is leveled as much as possible.

P,I,D – PID regulation parameters for all axes. .
◦ P – describes the power of disturbance response. Higher values means a stronger
response reaction to external disturbance. Raise this value until the stabilization quality of
fast disturbances will be adequate. If the “P” value is too high, oscillations of the axis will
start to be present. These oscillations will get worse if there are vibrations that reach the
IMU sensor board. If oscillations occur, raise the “D” parameter by 1 or 2 units, and then try
to raise the “P" value again.
◦ D – The “D” value reduces the reaction speed. This value helps to remove low-frequency
oscillations. A “D” value that is too high can cause high-frequency oscillations, particularly,
when the IMU sensor is exposed to vibrations.
◦ I – The “I” value changes the speed at which the gimbal moves to incoming RC commands
and to move the gimbal back to neutral. Low values result in a slow and smooth reaction to
RC commands and to getting back to neutral. Increase this value to speed up the
movement

Limit Accelerations - this option lets to limit angular accelerations in case of hard RC or Serial
control (useful to prevents jerks or skipped steps, smoother camera control, less impact on the
multirotor's frame). The less is value, the smoother is camera rotation under control.

POWER – maximum voltage supplied to the motors (0 - 255, where 255 means full battery
voltage). Choose this parameter according to your motor characteristics. Basic tuning:
◦ Motors should not get too hot! Motor temperatures of over 80С will cause permanent
damage to motor magnets.
◦ A Power value that is too low will not provide enough force for the motor to move the gimbal
and stabilize the camera adequately. A low power value will be most noticeable in windy
conditions, when the gimbal is not well balanced, or if the gimbal suffers from mechanical
friction. Slowly lower the Power parameter to find its optimal value. Find the lowest value
that still provides good stabilization and adequate holding torque.
◦ Raising the power equals raising the “P” value of PID settings. If you raise the POWER
value, you should re-tune your PID values as well.

“+” - Additional power that will be add to the main power in case of big error (caused by
missed steps). It helps to return camera to the normal position. If main power + additional power
is greater than 255, the result is limited to 255.

INVERT – reverse motor rotation direction. It's extremely important to choose the correct motor
rotation direction to not damage your gimbal. To determine the correct direction, set the P, I, and
D values to 0 and the POWER values to 80 (or higher if your motors don’t produce enough
force to hold/move the camera). Level the camera tray horizontally and click the AUTO button in
the "Motor configuration" settings. The gimbal will make small movement to determine correct
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motor rotation direction. Wait for the calibration procedure to complete. Then, re-set your PID
values and tune your Power values.

NUM.POLES – Number of motor poles. This value needs to be equal to the number of magnets
in your motor’s bell. During the “auto” calibration process described above, this value is
automatically detected. However, this value is sometimes not correctly determined during the
“auto” calibration process and will need to be verified and possibly corrected manually. Most
brushless gimbal motors are built with 14 poles (or magnets) and utilize a DLRK winding
scheme. Count your motor magnets and enter this value if the value is not correct in the GUI.

External FC Gain – Gain value for matching the gimbal data from your flight controller
(optional). For better stabilization and utilization of some additional features, the knowledge
about the frame inclination angles is required. SimpleBGC IMU doesn't provide such
information. Most of FC have servo outs for connecting gimbals. This outs should be connected
to SimpleBGC controller through EXT_ROLL and EXT_PITCH inputs.
◦ Activate gimbal outs in FC and set range limits for angles you generally fly (for example ,+30 degrees of frame inclination should equals full servo range about 1000-2000).
◦ Deactivate all filters and smoothing of FC gimbal settings (if present).
◦ In the RC-settings tab, make sure that inputs EXT_ROLL, EXT_PITCH doesn't used to
control gimbal. (i.e. are not chosen as source for any other RC control task).
◦ In REALTIME DATA tab, check availability of EXT_FC_ROLL, EXT_FC_PITCH signals, and
make sure they are split to axes correctly. (Frame roll angle tilting should cause
EXT_FC_ROLL change in approximately 900..2100 range. The same is for pitch.)
◦ Connect power supply, and setup stabilization as described above (tune POWER, INVERT,
PID)
◦ Push AUTO button in FLIGHT CONTROL GAIN group, and smoothly incline copter frame
to different directions by all axes for 10-30 seconds.
◦ Push AUTO button again to complete calibration. (Calibration will stop automatically after
some time too). New gains will be written into EEPROM and shown in the GUI.
NOTE : You may skip this step and leave zero values at initial setup.

Sensor — Specify your IMU sensor board’s orientation and position on the gimbal . For a
standard IMU sensor installation, look at the gimbal from behind just like the camera will view
out from the gimbal. Viewing the gimbal in this way, the UP and Right direction will match the Z
and X axis. You can place the IMU sensor in any direction, keeping its sides always parallel to
the motor axis (be very accurate here, it is a very important to precisely align the sensor and
mount it firmly). Configure your IMU orientation in the GUI. The correct configuration should
result in the following:
▪ Camera pitches forward – the PITCH arrow spins clockwise in the GUI.
▪ Camera rolls right - ROLL arrow spins clockwise in the GUI.
PITCH
▪ Camera yaws clockwise - YAW arrow spins clockwise.
✔
ROLL
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◦ Skip Gyro calibration at startup - With this option, the board starts working immediately
after powering it on, using the saved calibration data from last gyroscope calibration call.
However, stored calibration data may become inaccurate over time or during temperature
changes. We recommend you to re-calibrate your gyro from time to time to ensure the best
performance.
Second IMU sensor
There is an option to install the second IMU sensor on the gimbal's frame. The advantage is more
precise stabilization (you may use lower PID's to get the same quality) and knowing of frame tilting, that
greatly helps for 3-axis system to extend the range of working angles.
Second IMU should be connected to the same I2C bus as main (in parallel). Sensors should have
different I2C-address (Main IMU – 0x68, Frame IMU – 0x69). On the Basecam IMU, address 0x69 may
be set by cutting the ADDR bridge, located on the back side of the sensor:
Mounting the Frame IMU
There are two options where to place the second IMU: below YAW motor and above it. In case of 2axis stabilization, there is only one option – above ROLL motor.
Frame IMU:
above YAW
YAW
MOTOR
below YAW
(above ROLL)
ROLL
MOTOR
PITCH
MOTOR
Camera IMU
If the sensor is placed above YAW motor, it helps to stabilize ROLL, PITCH and YAW motors. But the
system becomes less stable during long work (because the frame heading, estimated from the second
IMU, may drift with time and auto-correction may not work in all cases).
If the sensor is placed below YAW motor, it does not help YAW axis stabilization, but works more
reliable.
Like the main (camera) IMU, the frame IMU may be mounted in any orientation, keeping its axis parallel
with motor's axis.
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Configuring the frame IMU
To configure the frame IMU, first of all set its location in the “Advanced” tab, “Sensor” area. Write
settings to the board and go to the “Basic” tab. Press the button “Frame IMU”:
If the second IMU is connected properly, this button becomes active. It means that all IMU settings now
affect on the frame IMU. Change sensor orientation (axis TOP, RIGHT) and write setting to the board, if
necessary (board will be restarted). After restart, calibrate the accelerometer and gyroscope like you did
it for the main IMU. For the accelerometer, you can do simple calibration or extended 6-point
calibration.
You may notice that right panels with arrows are displaying now angles not for the main, but for the
frame IMU. Also, in the “Realtime Data” tab, accelerometer's and gyroscope's data go for the frame
IMU. It helps to properly configure an orientation of the sensor and check its calibration.
RC Settings tab

RC Input Mapping – here you can assign hardware RC inputs to virtual control channels.
There are 4 hardware inputs provided on the board for RC Radio control connections, which
you can assign to control any of three channels, one for each axes, and one command channel.
If control for an axis is not needed, leave the option at "no input".

RC_ROLL pin mode – allows to configure several formats of incoming signal for RC_ROLL pin:
◦ Normal – incoming signal is in the PWM format, that most RC-receivers generally outputs
◦ Sum-PPM - some receivers may have this signal output. It is a PWM format modification, in
which every channel transmits sequentially through one cable. In this case you do not need
to connect other channels (read your receiver's user manual to check if it has SumPPM
out).
◦ Futaba s-bus – receivers made by Futaba may transmit data in special digital format, up to
16 channels by one wire. Connect it to RC_ROLL pin.
◦ Spektrum – another digital multi-channel protocol, that is used to communicate Spektrum's
satellite modules with the main module, and in its clones. Because there are many
modifications of this protocol, it may not work as expected in the first versions of
SimpleBGC firmware (but we will work on correct implementation in next versions). There is
a dedicated socket on the board (marked Spektrum) that matches standard connector. You
should bind satellite module with the transmitter manually.

For each control targets you can choose appropriate hardware input from the drop-down list.
◦ RC_ROLL, RC_PITCH, RC_YAW, FC_ROLL, FC_PITCH – hardware inputs on board that
accept signal in the PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) format (excepting RC_ROLL, see
above). Most RC receivers output this signal type.
◦ ADC1, ADC2, ADC3 — dedicated analog inputs, marked on the board as A1, A2, A3 and
accepts analog signal in range from 0 to +3.3 volts. For example, joystick variable resistor
provides such signal. Connect A1..A3 to the center contact of variable resistor, +3.3V and
GND to side contacts. See Connection Diagram for more info.
◦ VIRT_CH_XX – In case of RC_ROLL pin mode is set to multi-channel signal format, you
can chose one of the virtual channels.
 Control targets:
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◦ ROLL, PITCH, YAW - controls the position of the camera
◦ CMD allows to execute some actions. You can configure 2- or 3-position switch on your RC
for specified channel, and assign it to CMD channel. Its range is splitted into 3 sections :
LOW ,MID ,HIGH. When changing the position of your RC-switch, signal jumps from one
section to another, and assigned command is executed. The full list of available commands
is described in the section “MENU BUTTON” of this manual.
◦ FC_ROLL, FC_PITCH – is used to mark any of PWM inputs to be a signal from the external
flight controller. See “External FC gain” section for details.

RC Mix - you can mix 2 inputs together before applying to any of ROLL, PITCH or YAW axis. It
lets to control the camera from the 2 sources (joystick and RC for example). You can adjust the
proportion of the mix from 0 to 100%.

ANGLE MODE — RC stick will control the camera angle directly. The full RC range will cause a
camera to go from min to max angles, as specified above. If RC stick doesn't move, camera
stands still. The speed of rotation depends on the “SPEED” setting and the acceleration limiter
setting.

SPEED MODE — RC stick will control the rotation speed. If stick is centered - camera stands
still, if stick is deflected, camera starts to rotate, but does not exceed min-max range. Speed is
slightly decreased near min-max borders. Speed of rotation is proportional to stick angle and
the SPEED setting. RC control inversion is allowed in both of control modes.

MIN.ANGLE, MAX.ANGLE – range of the angles controlled from RC or in Follow mode. To
inverse the control, set higher value first, and lower value second. For example, if you want to
configure a camera to go from leveled position to down position, set 0-90 (or 90-0 to inverse).

LPF – Control signal filtering. The higher is value, the smoother is reaction to the stick
commands. This filter cuts fast stick movements, but adds some delay.
Follow Mode
There is a special control mode, when the camera “follows” for a tilting of the outer frame, but
eliminates small frame jerking. Several modes of operation are possible:
•
Disabled – camera is locked to ground and may be rotated only from RC.
◦ Estimate frame angles from motors - it use magnetic field for rough estimation of frame
tilting. Helps to increase the range of the frame angles where the gimbal's operation is
stable. To proper operation in this mode, it is strictly required to calibrate Offset setting (see
below). Like with the Follow mode, its not recommended to use this option in flight, its
dedicated for hand-held systems only.
NOTE that this option is ignored if you connect second IMU mounted on the frame, because
the data from the second IMU is more precise than from motors.)
•
Follow Flight Controller – camera is controlled from RC together with the mixed signal from
an external flight controller (FC). Almost every FC has servo outputs to drive a gimbal. It feeds
the information about the frame angles to this outputs, in the PWM format that all servos
understand. SimpleBGC can get this information and use it to control a camera. It is necessary
to connect and calibrate external flight controller (see EXT.FC GAIN settings). After calibration
you can setup the percentage values for ROLL and PITCH axis, so the camera will follow frame
inclinations.
•
Follow PITCH, ROLL – this mode is dedicated to
hand-held systems. FC connection is not required.
In this mode, the position of the outer frame by
PITCH and ROLL is estimated from the motor's
magnetic field. This means that if motor skips steps,
position will be estimated incorrectly and operator
should correct camera by hands, returning it to
proper position. You should use this mode carefully
for FPV flying, because if the camera misses its
initial direction, there is no chance to return it back
automatically.
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ROLL axis mode
locked to the
ground
soft transition
angle of the camera
inclination by PITCH
follow frame
8
◦ Follow ROLL start, deg. - Set the angle (in degrees) of the camera PITCH-ing up or down,
where the ROLL axis enters follow mode. Below this angle, ROLL is in lock mode.
◦ Follow ROLL mix, deg. - Set the range (in degrees) of the camera PITCH-ing, where the
ROLL axis is gradually switched from the 'lock' mode to 'follow' mode (see picture)
Hint: to completely disable follow for ROLL, set these values to (90, 0). To permanently
enable follow for ROLL (regardless of the camera PITCH-ing), set values to (0, 0).
•
Follow YAW – the same as above, except it can be enabled only for YAW axis. For example,
you can lock camera by ROLL and PITCH axis by selecting “Disabled” option, but still control
camera by YAW by enabling “Follow YAW” option.
There are additional settings to tune follow mode:
•
Dead band, degrees: you can set the range where the rotation of an outer frame does not
affect the camera. It helps to skip small jerks when you operate gimbal by hands.
•
Expo curve: you can specify the strength of the control when outer frame declines from neutral
position. For example: when the expo curve is enabled (i.e. is not flat), small or medium
declination of an outer frame will cause very fine control even if I-term is configured high. But
the strength of control exponentially grows when angles of declination becomes close to 60
degrees. It gives a big freedom in camera operation: from fine and smooth control to very fast
movements.
•
OFFSET: it is a very important to properly configure the initial position of the motor's magnetic
poles, because all further calculations use this information. For YAW axis it allows to fine adjust
a camera heading relative to a frame heading. For PITCH and ROLL axis there is an option to
calibrate offset automatically. To do this, power on system, hold frame leveled, and press AUTO
button. Don't forget to write setting when finished.
If the camera after power on is not leveled, you need to adjust the offset setting.
✔
•
SPEED - adjust the speed of the camera rotation in the follow mode. Don't set big values that
motors can not handle (if motor does not produce enough torque, it will skip steps and
synchronization will be broken). In this case, acceleration limiter may help to have big speed
but do not miss steps.
Operation in the Follow Mode
At system startup in the follow mode, keep the frame horizontally and manually adjust the camera to
the horizontal position, and adjust it's heading. Camera easily "jumps" between the magnetic poles.
Rotate the camera by hands to desired horizontal position, it will stick to the nearest magnetic pole.
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Gently rotate and tilt the frame. Turns within ± 45º will control the speed of the camera from 0 to 100%.
Camera rotates in accordance with the SPEED settings until it's angles are not equal the frame's
angles, or until given restrictions will be achieved.
If the camera moves unpredictably, perhaps its the wrong direction of rotation of the motors and you
need to change the Reverse flag in the 'Basic' tab .
To achieve the smooth motion, increase the LPF parameter (in the 'RC' tab), increase Expo curve,
and decrease the SPEED and the Acceleration limits. For more dynamic control, change these
settings in the opposite direction.
In case of failure of stabilization due to external disturbances, the camera can completely lose
synchronization with the frame . In this case, it is necessary to return it to the proper position by hands.
IT IS VERY IMPORTANT to keep the frame horizontally, because at this point the frame's zero angles
are calibrated.
You can switch between modes on-the-fly by activating different profiles. Camera will keep their position
between modes.
Advanced tab

AHRS - options influencing on camera angle determination accuracy.
◦ Gyro trust – The higher is value, the more trust to the gyro data compared with the
accelerometer data when estimating angles. It can reduce errors caused by accelerations
during moving, but also decreases gyro drift compensation, resulting in horizon drift over
time. For smooth flying, it is recommended to set low values (40-80), which will give more
stable horizon for longer time. For aggressive flying, it's better to set higher values (100150).
◦ Accelerations compensation – enable it to use a physical model of multirotor to
compensate accelerations during flight. This option works only when external FC is
connected and calibrated.

Serial port speed — changes baud rate used for serial communication. Decrease it when
using over-the-air serial adapters that can't work on maximum speed. The GUI can auto-detect
the baud rate configured in the board.

PWM Frequency — sets the PWM frequency used to drive motors by power stage. Two modes
are available : Low Frequency (in audible range) and High Frequency (outside audible range).
In the high frequency mode it is necessary to increase the POWER setting a bit.

Motor outputs — you can assign hardware motor outs for any of stabilization axes. For
example, you can use second controller for YAW stabilization and set it up this way:
ROLL=disabled, PITCH=disabled, YAW=ROLL_OUT, and connect a YAW motor to hardware
ROLL_OUT.

RC Sub-Trim – allows to correct transmitter inaccuracy.
◦ ROLL, PITCH, YAW trim – central point trimming. Central point here is PWM 1500. It's
better to trim it in transmitter. But in case of it is not possible (when using joystick, for
example), you can use AUTO function in the GUI. Just place stick in center, and press
AUTO button. Actual data becomes new center point. Press WRITE button to apply settings.
◦ Dead band — adjusts a dead band around neutral point. There's no control while RC signal
is inside this range. This feature works only in SPEED mode, and helps to achieve better
control by eliminating jitters of stick around neutral point.
◦ Expo curve – adjusts the curvature of an exponential function, that allows to get precise
control from RC in the range of the small values, but rough and strong control near
endpoints. Works only in SPEED mode.

Sensor
◦ Gyro LPF – adjusts filtering gyro data. It's not recommended to set values different than 0,
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because it will make adjusting PID controller harder. You can experiment with this.
◦ Gyro high sensitivity - Increases gyro sensitivity twice. Use this option for big-sized DSLR
cameras, in case if your PID settings are close to upper limits, but stabilization still not good.
Increasing gyro sensitivity equals to multiplying P and D values by 2.
◦ I2C Pullups Enable - turns ON built in I2C pull-up resistors for SDA and SCL lines.
Use function on only if sensor doesn't work properly.
◦ Frame IMU – set the location of the frame IMU. See Second IMU sensor section of this
manual.
Service tab
Menu Button
If you've connected menu button to BTN connector on the controller, you can assign different actions to
it.
Available actions:

Use profile 1..5 — loads selected profile

Calibrate ACC – the accelerometer calibration, works the same way as button in the GUI.

Calibrate Gyro – gyroscope calibration.

Swap RC PITCH – ROLL — temporary swap RC inputs from PITCH to ROLL. In the most
cases only one PITCH channel is enough to control a camera in 2-axis systems. Before a flight
you can assign control from pitch channel to roll, and make a camera precisely leveled.
Activating this function again swaps channels back, and saves roll position in the static memory.

Swap RC YAW – ROLL — like the previous point.

Set tilt angles by hand – motors will be turned off, after that you can take the camera in hands
and fix it in the new position for a few seconds. Controller will save and hold the new position.
This function may be useful to correct camera position before flight if there is no RC control
connected.

Motors toggle, Motors ON, Motors OFF - commands to change the state of the motors.

Reset controller
Battery Monitoring
On some latest board versions there is a voltage sensor installed to monitor the main battery voltage. It
is used to apply voltage drop compensation (PID becomes stable during whole battery life-cycle), and
to make low-voltage alarms and do the motor cut-off when the battery becomes discharged.
•
Calibrate - adjusts the rate of internal multiplier to make measured voltage more precise. You
need a multimeter to measure the real voltage, than enter this value in the calibration dialog.
•
Low voltage - alarm - set the threshold to make alarm when the voltage drops below it.
•
Low voltage - stop motors - set the threshold to stop motors when the voltage drops below it.
•
Compensate voltage drop - set this option to automatically increase the POWER parameter
(which controls the output power goes to the motors), when the battery loose voltage due to
discharge process.
•
Set defaults for - select the battery type to fill the fields above with the default settings for
selected type.
NOTE: you can add the voltage sensor to old boards in DIY way, by soldering a voltage divider
33k/10k: 33k goes to the battery “+”, 10k goes to the GND, and common point goes to the pin 19 of
the 328p MCU (if this pin is grounded, de-solder it first).
Buzzer
On some boards there is an output to the buzzer. It is used to buzz on some events. Events are
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configured (turned ON or OFF) in the GUI. You can connect an active buzzer only (which has an
internal sound generator), working from 5..12V, currents below 40mA (check this Digikey product
search for example)
NOTE: you can connect the buzzer to old boards in DIY way, by soldering its “+” wire to the pin 32
of the 328p MCU, and “-” wire to the GND.
Realtime Data tab
In this tab you can see raw sensor data stream, and logical RC input levels.

ACC_X,Y,Z – accelerometer data.

GYRO_X,Y,Z – gyroscope data. Helps to determine quality of P and D settings. Disturb gimbal
by hand and see trace. If it looks like sine wave, D setting is too low and gimbal tends to lowfrequency oscillations. If some noise is always present even without any disturbance, D setting
is too high and gimbal tends to high-frequency self-excitation.

ERR_ROLL,PITCH,YAW – stabilization error graph. Same as peak indicators on the control
panel and shows maximum deflection angle.
Each graph can be turned on or off, scale can be adjusted for Y axis. You can pause the data
transmission at any time.
Setup step-by-step sequence
1. Adjusting the mechanics
Mount the camera on the tray and balance the gimbal in all three axes. Stabilization quality strongly
depends on balance quality. To check your balance, pick your turned off gimbal in hands. Make fast
motions along all axes, try to catch resonance point and swing the gimbal. If it is hard to do - gimbal is
balanced correctly.
NOTE : Good balance and low friction can scale down power consumption and keep good
quality of stabilization.
If you rewound motors by yourself, it's recommended to check winding. Remove motors from gimbal,
connect them to controller and set parameters P=0, I=0.1, D=0 for each axis and set enough POWER.
Connect main power supply. Motors should spin smoothly, while rolling the sensor. Little jitter is normal
due to magnetic force between rotor and stator (“cogging” effect).
Pay great attention to sensor installation. Its axes must be parallel with motor axes. Pay attention to
mechanical links. They must be a VERY RIGID and backlash-free. Sensor provides feedback data for
stabilization, and even any little freedom or flexibility will cause delays and low-frequency resonances.
This can complicate setting of PID, and cause unstable work in real conditions (frame vibrations, wind,
etc)
2. Calibrating the sensor
Gyro is calibrated every time you turn the controller on, and it takes about 4 seconds. Try to immobilize
sensor (camera) as hard as you can in first seconds after powering on, while signal LED is blinking.
After powering on you have 3 seconds to freeze gimbal before calibration starts.
If you activated option “Skip gyro calibration at startup”, gyro is not calibrated every time and controller
start working immediately after powering up. Be careful and recalibrate gyro manually, if you will notice
something wrong with IMU angles.
Calibrating Accelerometer
You must perform ACC calibration only once, but it's recommended to recalibrate it from time to time or
when the temperature significantly changes.
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
Simple calibration mode: set the sensor horizontally, and press CALIB.ACC in the GUI (or
menu button, if it's assigned). LED will blink for 3 seconds. Try not to move sensor during
calibration. At this step no matter how camera is leveled. You are calibrating the sensor, not the
camera!

Advanced mode (recommended): perform calibration in simple mode as above. Then turn
sensor in order that each side of sensor looks up (6 positions at all, including base one). Fix the
sensor in each position, press CALIB.ACC button in the GUI, and wait about 3-4 seconds, while
LED if flashing. The order does not matter, but the base position always goes first (because the
simple calibration cancels a result of advanced calibration). You have not to press WRITE
button, calibration data is written automatically after each step.
NOTE: Precise accelerometer calibration is a very important for horizon holding during
dynamic flying or YAW rotation.
X
Z
X
Z
X
Z
Z
X
Z
Z
X
X
4. Tuning basic settings

Connect the main power supply.

Set POWER according to the motor configuration (see recommendations above)

Auto-detect number of poles and motors direction. Do not proceed to next step until proper
direction will be detected!

Adjust PID controller. To check stabilization quality, use peak indicator in the control panel
(shown by the blue traces and blue numbers). Incline the frame by small angles and try to
minimize peak values by increasing P, I and D to its maximum. You may use gyro data from
Realtime Data tab to estimate stabilization quality, too.
Better to tune PID with the “Follow Mode” turned OFF for all axes.
Suggested algorythm for PID tuning:
1. Set I=0.01, P=10, D=10 for all axes. Gimbal should be stable at this moment. If not,
decrease P and D a bit. Than start to tune each axis sequentially:
2. Gradually increase P until motor starts oscillate (you may knock camera and see on the
gyro graph, how fast oscillation decays). Increase D a little – it should damp oscillations,
and decay time decreases. The lower is decay time, the better.
3. Repeat step 2 until D reaches its maximum, when high-frequency vibration appears (you
may feel it by hands and see noisy line on the gyro graph). Current P and D values are
maximum for your setup, decrease them a little and go to step 4
4. Increase I until low-frequency oscillation starts. Decrease I a little to keep gimbal stable.
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Now you found a maximum for all PID values for selected axis. Repeat from step 1 for
other axes.
5. When all axes are tuned in static, try to move gimbal's frame, emulating a real work. You
may notice that cross-influence of axes may make gimbal not stable. In this case, decrease
a little PID values from its maximum for axes that looses
The result of good tuning – stabilization error is less than 1 degree when you slightly rock a gimbal's
frame.
5. Connecting and configuring RC
•
Connect one of the free receiver's channels to RC_PITCH input, preserving right polarity
In the RC Settings tab:
•
Set SORCE=PWM
•
Assign RC_PITCH input to PITCH axis
•
Leave all other axes and CMD as “no input”
•
For PITCH axis, set MIN.ANGLE=-90, MAX.ANGLE=90, ANGLE MODE=checked, LPF=5,
SPEED=10 (not used in angle mode)
•
Connect the battery to the main controller and receiver, and check that RC_PITCH input
receives data in the “Realtime Data” tab (slider should be blue filled and reflects to stick
movement)
Now you can control the camera from your RC transmitter, from -90 to 90 degrees. If you are not
satisfied with the speed of movement, adjust the I-term setting for PITCH in the “Basic” tab.
Try the SPEED mode and feel difference with the ANGLE mode.
Connect and tune remaining axes the same way, as required.
6. Testing gimbal in real conditions
Connect controller to the GUI and turn ON multirotor motors, holding it above your head. Check the
vibrations on the camera by using Realtime Data tab / ACC raw data. Try to decrease the level of
vibrations using soft dampers.
NOTE: Brushless motors versus traditional servos provide faster reaction, but less torque.
That's why it's hard for them to fight against wind and air flows from props. If you are developing
multirotor frame by yourself, try to avoid this influences (for example, lengthen arms a bit, or tilt
motors away from center or place camera above props in case of H-frame). Also bear in mind,
when copter moves with high speed, an air flow is deflected and can affect the gimbal.
Status LED
There are 2 LEDs on board. Red led lights when power is connected. Green/blue LED signals show actual
state of the system:

LED is off — pause before calibration, to take hands off or to level gimbal.

LED blinks slowly – Calibration is in action. Freeze gimbal during this process.

LED blinks fast — system error, stabilization cannot be performed. To check error description,
connect to GUI.

LED is on — normal operation mode.

LED is on, but blinks irregularly – I2C errors appears.
Also, additional LEDs may present to signal serial communication on RX and TX line.
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Possible problems and solutions
Problem
Possible causes
Solutions
Motors don’t spin
-Power supply is not connected
-Supply polarity inverted
-POWER set to 0
-Check all connections
-Set POWER between 50..200
Camera is trying to align, but falls
back
-Camera is not balanced
-Balance camera
-Check motor winding
- Increase POWER parameter
During fast YAW rotating, camera
deflects by ROLL, and then slowly
gets to horizon.
-Bad accelerometer calibration
-Sensor is not in parallel with motor
axes
-Make advanced ACC calibration by 6
positions
-Align sensor with motor axes
During fast motion with acceleration,
camera deflects, and then slowly gets
to horizon
-This is normal effect of accelerations
-Try to increase Gyro Trust in
Advanced tab
YAW arrow slowly spins in the GUI
-Slow drift is normal (less than 1
degree/minute). It’s because of gyro
drifts over time .
-Note to sensor Immobility during gyro
calibration
-Re-calibrate gyro
-It's an error in motor windings, or one
phase is broken
- POWER is not high enough
Camera slowly drifts by any or all axes - Bad gyro calibration
just after power on
-Re-calibrate gyro
Clicks and
crunch are heard during work. LED is
synchronously blinking.
-I2C errors present. Errors are
possible if sensor wires are too long,
or motors outs affect sensor by
capacitive linkage.
-Shorter sensor wires;
-Lower pullup resistors value on the
sensor board;
-Install spike LC-filter on motor outs
(make 2-3 turns of motor cable
through ferrite coil);
- Install spike LC-filter on sensor wires
(the same as motor filter);
- Replace sensor with version with
LLC;
High-frequency oscillations.
-Feedback self-excitation as a result
of high D parameter
-Check the graphs to understand on
what axis is the problem, and lower D
value.
Low-frequency oscillations.
-Feedback self-excitation as a result
of high D parameter or high P
Lower P, increase D
GUI cannot connect to the board.
-Wrong COM-port selected
-GUI and firmware versions doesn’t
match.
-Try different COM-ports
-Upload the latest firmware, and
download matching GUI version.
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SimpleBGC
SimpleBGC3.0
3.0(32bit)
(32bit)connection
connectiondiagram
diagram
IMU SENSOR
GND
CUT
BATTERY 3s..6s
+
5V
SDA
(8 - 25V)
SCL
ADDR
BUZZER
(5..12V)
2nd FRAME IMU (optional)
IMU SENSOR
GND
BAT
USB
CAM STAB ROLL
I2C
+5V
GND
CAM STAB PITCH
GND
UART
SCL
SDA
VCC
GND
TXD
SPEKTRUM
+5V
+
ROLL
MOTOR
YAW
MOTOR
GND
SCL
+5V
Y
5V
SDA
RXI
X
BUZZER
RC_PITCH
FLIGHT
CONTROLLER
(OPTIONAL)
RC_ROLL
RC_YAW
FC_ROLL
FC_PITCH
GND
+3.3V
A1
A2
A3
BTN
AUX1..3
RECEIVER
+5V
ROLL
PITCH
GND
PITCH
MOTOR
YAW
MENU
BUTTON
CAM CONTROL ROLL / SumPPM / SBUS
CAM CONTROL PITCH
CAM CONTROL YAW
+3.3V
SIGNAL
GND
FERRITE RINGS (optional, if I2C errors)
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JOYSTICK 1..3
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