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USER MANUAL
WX 64
Sixty-Four Channel
Controller
P/N: 77036023-1
Revision: 1.1
Reference Firmware: 1.03 (rev. 1.3.3)
The Fixed Gas Detection Experts
WX64 User Manual | 2
THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS MANUAL IS ACCURATE TO OUR
KNOWLEDGE.
As a result of continuous research and development, the specifications of this product
may be modified at any time without prior notice.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
The modification of the material and the use of parts of an unspecified origin shall
entail the cancellation of any form of warranty.
The use of the unit has been projected for applications specified in the technical
characteristics. Exceeding the values cannot in any case be authorized.
LIABILITY
Neither Oldham nor any other associated company can be held liable for any
damages, including, without limitations, damages for the loss or interruption of
manufacture, loss of information, defect of the WX4 unit, injuries, loss of time, financial,
or material loss, or any direct or indirect consequence of loss occurring in the context
of the use or impossibility of use of the product, even in the event that Oldham has
been informed of such damage.
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
Labels intended to remind you of the principal precautions of use have been placed on
the unit in the form of pictograms. These labels are considered an integral part of the
unit. If a label falls off or becomes illegible, see to it that it is replaced.
Warning: Read & understand contents of this manual prior to operation.
Failure to do so could result in serious injury or death.
WX64 User Manual | 3
WX64 User Manual | 4
Table of Contents
SECTION - 1 GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1.1
Important Safety Issues
1.2
General Description
1.3
Data Display Screens
1.3.1
Main Data Screen
1.3.2
24-Hour Trend Screen
1.3.3
Bar Graphs Screen
1.3.4
Combination Screen
1.3.5
Zone Screen
1.4
Specifications
1.4.1
DC Power Supply Requirements
1.4.2
Ambient Temperature Range
1.4.3
Humidity Range
1.4.4
Altitude
1.4.5
Housings
1.4.6
Non-Intrusive Magnetic Keypad
9
9
10
10
10
12
13
15
16
17
17
18
18
18
19
19
SECTION - 2 BASIC OPERATION
2.1
Main Menu Configuration
2.2
Changing Menu Variables Using The Keypad
2.3
Alarm Outputs
2.3.1
Standard Relay 1, 2 and 3
2.3.2
Horn/Piezo
2.3.3
Discrete Relay
2.3.4
Programmable Relay
2.4
Channel Configuration Entry Menu
2.4.1
Channel Configuration Menus
2.4.2
Alarm 1 / Alarm 2 / Alarm 3 Menu
2.4.3
Fault Alarm Menu
2.4.4
Data From Menu To Set Input Source
2.4.5
Linearize
2.4.6
Configure Menu
2.5
Communication Settings Menu
2.5.1
Com 1-4 Settings
2.5.2
ModBus TCP Settings
2.5.3
Network Settings
2.6
Security Menu
2.6.1
User Name
2.6.2
Lock Code
2.6.3
ModBus Lock Code
2.7
System Menu
2.7.1
Version
2.7.2
Configure
2.7.3
Zone Names
21
21
29
29
30
32
33
34
34
35
36
37
37
41
42
44
45
47
48
49
49
49
49
49
51
51
53
WX64 User Manual | 5
2.7.4
2.7.5
2.7.6
2.7.7
2.7.8
Mimic Mode
SD Card
View Event Log
Clear Event Log
View Sensor Life
53
54
55
56
56
SECTION - 3 INPUT/OUTPUT BOARDS
3.1
Main I/O Interface Board #10-0331
3.2
Input / Output Option Boards
3.2.1
Optional Analog Input Board #10-0334
3.2.2
Optional Discrete Relay Board #10-0345
3.2.3
Optional *Bridge Sensor Input Board #10-0347
3.2.4
Bridge Sensor Input Board Initial Setup
3.2.5
Optional 4-20mA Analog Output Board #10-0348
3.2.6
Optional Programmable Relay Board #10-0350
3.2.7
Optional 24 VDC 600 Watt Power Supply
3.2.8
Optional 24 VDC 150 Watt Power Supply #10-0172
59
59
60
61
62
63
63
64
65
66
68
SECTION - 4 DIAGNOSTICS
4.1
Standard Relays
4.2
Discrete Relays
4.3
Programmable Relays
4.4
Analog Inputs
4.4.1
View Inputs
4.4.2
Calibrate Board
4.5
Analog Outputs
4.6
Piezo
4.7
LEDs
4.8
Serial Ports
4.9
I/O Board Configuration
69
69
70
70
71
71
71
72
72
73
74
75
SECTION - 5 ModBus
5.1
ModBus TCP
5.2
ModBus Slave Writes
5.3
ModBus Slave Register Location
5.3.1
Coils
5.3.2
Discrete Inputs
5.3.3
Input Registers
5.3.4
Holding Registers
5.3.5
Standard Relay 1
5.3.6
Standard Relay 2
5.3.7
Standard Relay 3
5.3.8
Discrete Relays
5.3.9
Horn/Piezo
5.3.10
Channel Configuration
5.3.11
Programmable Relays
WX64 User Manual | 6
77
77
77
77
78
78
81
85
87
90
93
96
97
97
102
SECTION - 6 ENCLOSURE OPTIONS
6.1
Panel / Rack Mount Enclosure
6.2
NEMA 4X Wall Mount Fiberglass Enclosure
6.3
NEMA 7 Wall Mount Aluminum Enclosure
107
107
107
109
SECTION - 7 WIRELESS OPTION
7.1
Radio Setup Menu
7.1.1
Hop Channel
7.1.2
System ID
7.1.3
Mode
7.2
Wireless Monitor Mode
7.2.1
Radio Status Alarms - Wireless Monitor Mode
7.3
Wireless ModBus Slave Mode
7.4
Wireless ModBus Master Mode
7.5
Antenna Selection
7.5.1
Dipole And Collinear Antennas
7.5.2
Yagi Antennas
7.5.3
Mounting Near Other Antennas
7.5.4
Coax Cables
7.6
Surge Protection & Grounding
7.6.1
Antenna Grounding
7.6.2
Connections To Other Equipment
111
112
113
113
113
113
114
115
115
115
115
116
117
117
117
118
118
SECTION - 8 WEBPAGE
8.1
System Screen
8.2
Zone Screen
8.3
Channel Screen
8.4
Event Log Screen
8.5
Configure
8.5.1
Alarm Outputs
8.5.2
Channel Configuration
8.5.3
Copy Channels
8.5.4
Programmable Relays
8.5.5
System Configuration
8.5.6
Configuration Upload/Download
119
120
121
122
123
124
124
125
125
126
126
127
SECTION - 9 TROUBLESHOOTING
9.1
Channel Errors
9.1.1
Comm Error
9.1.2
Config Error
9.1.3
I/O Error
9.2
Reset To Factory Defaults
129
129
129
129
129
130
WX64 User Manual | 7
WX64 User Manual | 8
SECTION - 1 GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1.1 Important Safety Issues
The following symbols are used in this manual to alert the user of important instrument
operating issues:
This symbol is intended to alert the user to the presence of important
operating and maintenance (servicing) instructions.
This symbol is intended to alert the user to the presence of dangerous
voltage within the instrument enclosure that may be sufficient magnitude to
constitute a risk of electric shock.
WARNINGS:

Shock Hazard - Disconnect or turn off power before servicing this
instrument.

WARNING- EXPLOSION HAZARD- DO NOT REPLACE FUSE
UNLESS POWER HAS BEEN SWITCHED OFF OR THE AREA IS
KNOWN TO BE NON-HAZARDOUS.

WARNING- EXPLOSION HAZARD- DO NOT DISCONNECT
EQUIPMENT UNLESS POWER HAS BEEN SWITCHED OFF OR
THE AREA IS KNOWN TO BE NON-HAZARDOUS.

Use a properly rated CERTIFIED AC power (mains) cable installed as
per local or national codes.

A certified AC power (mains) disconnect or circuit breaker should be
mounted near the controller and installed following applicable local and
national codes. If a switch is used instead of a circuit breaker, a
properly rate CERTIFIED fuse or current limiter is required to be
installed as per local or national codes. Markings for positions of the
switch or breaker should state (I) for on and (O) for off.

Clean only with a damp cloth without solvents.

Equipment not used as prescribed within this manual may impair
overall safety.
WX64 User Manual | 9
1.2 General Description
The Oldham WX64 64 Channel Controller is designed to display and control alarm
event switching for up to 64 sensor data points. It may also be set as a 16, 32 or 48
channel controller for applications needing fewer inputs. Three programmable standard
alarms with features such as ON and OFF delays, Alarm Acknowledge, along with
dedicated horn and fault relays make the WX64 well suited for many multi-point
monitoring applications. Data may be input to the WX64 by optional analog inputs or
via the multiple communication ports. These communication ports are programmable
so the controller can be configured with multiple Master or Slave configurations. With a
ModBus RTU slave RS-485 port configured, sending data to PCs, PLCs, DCSs, or
even other WX64 Controllers is available. The Ethernet port allows the unit to be a
ModBusTCP Master and Slave and also provides access to the embedded webpage.
Options such as analog I/O and discrete relays for each alarm are easily added to the
2
addressable I C bus. Option boards have 16 channels and therefore require multiple
boards for 64 channel applications.
In addition to traditional analog and serial methods of providing monitored values, the
WX64 is also capable of sending and receiving wireless data.
A color 320 x 240 pixel graphic LCD readout displays monitored data as bar graphs,
trends and engineering units. System configuration is through user friendly menus or
via the internal webpage that can be accessed through the Ethernet connection built
into the main I/O Board. All configuration data is retained in non-volatile memory during
power interruptions and can also be backed up and loaded using the SD card located
to the left of the display. The WX64 front panel is shown below in Figure1-1 displaying
the Combination screen. Additional data screens are shown in section 1.
1.3 Data Display Screens
The WX64 Controller offers five distinct graphic displays for depicting the monitored
data. These are Main Data, 24-Hour Trend, Bar Graphs, Zone and Combination
Menu
Screens. Pressing
from any of these display screens will bring you to the Main
Edit
Menu. Pressing
from the Main Data, 24-Hour Trend or Combination Screens will
skip the Main Menu and bring you directly to the Channel Configuration Menu for the
channel that is selected.
1.3.1
Main Data Screen
The WX64 Main Data screen shown below (Figure1-1) displays all active channels at
once. It is capable of displaying 16, 32, 48 or 64 channels depending on the
controller’s configuration. This screen displays measurement name and uses a bar
graph and colored cells that flash with new alarms to indicate alarm conditions. Once
the alarms have been acknowledged by an operator, the cell will remain the
appropriate color but will stop flashing, showing the alarm has been acknowledged.
Utilizing the Display Alarm feature in the Systems Configuration menu allows new
WX64 User Manual | 10
alarms to always force the LCD to the Main Data screen. This is useful for applications
requiring channels with new alarms to be displayed.
Figure1-1
While in the Main Data screen, use
/
/
Edit
/
to highlight any cell and
Next
press
to go directly to that channel’s configuration menu or press
twice to
scroll through that channel’s individual data screens. The exploded channel 38 in the
example below (Figure 1-2) indicates it is the channel selected, and unused channels
are grayed out when turned off.
WX64 User Manual | 11
Figure 1-2
Main Data Screen (64 Ch. Mode)
1.3.2
24-Hour Trend Screen
The WX64 24-Hour Trend screen shown in Figure 1-3 displays a 24-hour trend of input
data for the channel selected. Vertical tick marks are each hour and horizontal tick
marks are each 10% of full scale. Colored lines indicate alarm levels. The alarm level
lines have triangles on the right end that indicate high and low trip for each alarm level.
A triangle that points up represents a high trip alarm and one that points down
represents a low trip alarm. Since each data point must be collected for several
minutes before it may be displayed, it is likely input values will fluctuate during this
interval. Therefore, MAX, MIN and AVERAGE values are stored in RAM memory for
each subinterval. To accurately portray the trend, a vertical line is drawn between MIN
& MAX values for each subinterval. The AVERAGE value pixel is then left blank,
leaving a gap in the vertical line. This is demonstrated in the noisy area of the 24-hour
trend in Figure 1-3. If the MAX & MIN values are within 2% of each other, there is no
need for the vertical line and only the AVERAGE value pixel is darkened as in the quiet
areas. If there is no trend data available, the corresponding section of the graph will be
grayed out. This will occur on power interruptions.
WX64 User Manual | 12
The top portion of each trend screen indicates channel number, real-time reading in
engineering units, measurement name, range, and MIN, MAX & AVERAGE values for
the preceding 24-hour period. When a channel reaches alarm state, the colored bar
changes to the color that represents that alarm level and flashes. Once the alarm is
acknowledged, the bar stops flashing.
Figure 1-3
24-Hour Trend Screen
1.3.3
Bar Graphs Screen
The WX64 Bar Graphs screen shown in Figure 1-4 allows 16 channels to be viewed
simultaneously. Both engineering units and bar graph values are indicated in real time.
Lines across the bars indicate the alarm trip points, making it easy to identify channels
near alarm. The bar graph alarm lines have colored triangles on the bottom that
indicate alarm level and high or low trip for each alarm. A triangle that points right
represents a high trip alarm and one that points left represents a low trip alarm. When
a channel reaches alarm state, the bar graph changes to the color that represents that
alarm level and flashes. Once the alarm is acknowledged, the bar stops flashing. If
there are more than 16 channels active, the scroll bar along the right side of the screen
indicates channels not in the viewing area. If one of the channels not in the viewing
WX64 User Manual | 13
area goes into alarm, the scroll bar arrow flashes the corresponding color of the alarm,
indicating which direction the user must scroll to display it. This is demonstrated by the
top scroll bar arrow below.
Figure 1-4
Bar Graphs Screen
WX64 User Manual | 14
1.3.4
Combination Screen
The WX64 Combination screen shown in Figure 1-5 offers a view of a single channel
but displays the data as a 30-minute trend, bar graph and large engineering units. The
bar graph and the background color change and flash indicating alarm condition. Once
the alarm is acknowledged, they stop flashing. Colored lines across the bar graph and
30-minute trend indicate alarm levels. The alarm level lines have triangles on the right
end that indicate high and low trip for each alarm level. A triangle that points up
represents a high trip alarm and one that points down represents a low trip alarm. The
Combination Screen is also useful for testing inputs for stability since MAX, MIN &
AVERAGE values reset each time this screen is selected. For example, to test stability
over a one-hour period for an input, begin timing as soon as the channel is selected.
One hour later, record the MAX, MIN & AVERAGE values. The visible trend is only 30
minutes, but the difference between MAX & MIN indicates peak to peak excursions
over the one-hour period and AVERAGE is the average for the hour. Longer or shorter
tests may also be run. A blue vertical line is drawn on the screen when the screen is
selected and moves to the left, indicating how long this screen has been active. The
example below (Figure 1-5) has been active for 26 minutes.
Figure 1-5 Combination Screen
WX64 User Manual | 15
1.3.5
Zone Screen
The WX64 Zone screen displays the eight possible zones simultaneously. If an alarm
condition occurs, the user will be able to quickly see in what zone the situation is
occurring. Each active zone is divided into alarm levels, which are green until an alarm
is present. Inactive zones and alarm levels are grayed out. If an alarm should occur,
the zone name field will flash and the corresponding box in the assigned zone will turn
the color of the alarm that is present or alternate if two different colors are present.
Once the alarm has been acknowledged the name field will stop flashing. Utilizing the
Display Alarm feature in the Systems Configuration menu allows new alarms to always
force the LCD to the Zone screen. This is useful for applications requiring zones with
alarms to be displayed. If the Zone feature is not utilized, this screen can be turned off
in the Systems Menu.
The Zone screen is also helpful for configuring the different zones. To display all the
Edit
channels included in any zone, press
blue box to outline one of the zones. Use
while in the Zone screen. This will cause a
/
/
/
to select the correct
Edit
zone and press
again. The Main Data screen will appear with all the channels
that are included in the selected zone displayed in color and the channels that are not
in the selected zone grayed out. Any channel needed to be included or excluded from
the selected zone can be selected and configured from this screen.
WX64 User Manual | 16
No r t h
A1
Tank
A1
We s t
A1
En t r a n c e
A2
A3
Far m
A2
F
Ga t e
A2
A2
A1
Ma i n
A3
A3
S wi t c h g e a r
A1
F
Co n t r o l
F
Ro o m
A3
F
A2
Ro o m
A3
F
Pr o c e s s
A1
A2
Z ON E
7
A1
A2
Z ON E
8
A1
A2
A3
F
A3
F
A3
F
Figure 1-6
Zone Screen
1.4 Specifications
1.4.1
DC Power Supply Requirements
Standard WX64 power requirements are 10-30 VDC @ 12 watts applied to terminals 1
& 3(+) and 5 & 7(-) of TB4 on the standard I/O Board (see section 3.0). Optional
features increase power consumption as described below:

Discrete Relay Board option; add 6.5 watts per board (assumes all 16 relays are
energized).

Programmable Relay Board option; add 6.5 watts per board (assumes all 16
relays are energized).

Analog Input Board option; add 1/2 watts per board plus transmitter power
consumption.

4-20mA Output Board option; add 2.5 watts per board.
WX64 User Manual | 17

Bridge Sensor Input Board option; add 3 watts max per board with eight 10-0192
modules installed (power consumption of the sensors not included).

TB4 terminals 2, 4, 6 & 8 of the standard I/O Board provide a maximum of 500mA
fused output power for powering of auxiliary external devices such as relays,
lamps or transmitters. Power consumed from these terminals should be
considered when calculating system power consumption.
1.4.1.1
600 Watt AC – 24 VDC Power Supply
*110-120 VAC @8.5A max
*220-240VAC @ 5A max
* Universal AC input automatically selects AC input range.
The 600 watt power supply (Figure 3-7) is for powering the WX64 and up to 64
detectors. This power supply can be paralleled with up to three additional 600 watt
power supplies providing up to 2400 watts for applications with large power
requirements. It also features a built in DC-OK signal and remote on-off control.
1.4.1.2
150 Watt AC – 24 VDC Power Supply
*110-120 VAC @3.2A max
*220-240VAC @ 1.6A max
* A slide switch on the front of the power supply selects AC input range.
The 10-0172 150 watt power supply (Figure 3-7) is for powering the WX64 and up to
64 detectors.
1.4.1.3
Relays
The WX64 comes standard with five Standard SPDT 5A relays, consisting of one
dedicated HORN and one dedicated FAULT relay plus 3 programmable alarm relays.
Programmable relays provide voting logic for ALARM 1, ALARM 2, and ALARM 3.
Discrete relays and additional Programmable relays are optional. All relays are rated at
5 Amp for 28 VDC and 250 ~VAC RESISTIVE loads.
IMPORTANT: Appropriate diode (DC loads) or MOV (AC loads) snubber
devices must be installed with inductive loads to prevent RFI noise spikes.
Relay wiring should be kept separate from low-level signal wiring.
1.4.2
Ambient Temperature Range
-25 to 60 degrees C
1.4.3
Humidity Range
0 to 90% R. H. Non-Condensing.
1.4.4
Altitude
Recommended up to 2000 meters.
WX64 User Manual | 18
1.4.5
Housings
*General purpose panel mount weighing 7 lbs and including hardware for 19” rack
mounting (Figure 6-1).
*NEMA 4X wall mount in fiberglass enclosure weighing 54 lbs (Figure 6-2).
*Includes non-intrusive magnetic keypad.
1.4.6
Non-Intrusive Magnetic Keypad
Menu
The WX64 operator interface includes eight front panel touch keys
/
Alarm
Reset
Next
/
/
Edit
/
/
/
/
. A magnetic keypad option offers these eight keys with
adjacent magnetic keys. This option is included as a standard feature. It is useful in
applications where it may be inconvenient to open the enclosure’s door to access the
touch keypad.
WX64 User Manual | 19
WX64 User Manual | 20
SECTION - 2 BASIC OPERATION
The WX64 offers 5 graphic screens for viewing monitored data and several Set-Up
menu screens for operator interface to configuration menus. The Main Data screen
allows viewing of all active channels simultaneously. The Trend screen displays a 24hour trend one channel at a time. The Combination screen displays a bar graph, large
engineering units and a 30-minute trend one channel at a time. The Zone screen
displays the eight possible zones simultaneously. Input channels may be displayed in
Next
sequence from the Trend and Combination screens with
/
.
switches
between the 5 graphic data screens. When WX64 power is applied, the graphic LCD
starts in the Main Data screen.
2.1 Main Menu Configuration
Variables inside Main menu tree allow optimum WX64 configuration for a wide range of
demanding multi-point monitoring applications. The main menu is entered by pressing
Menu
Edit
Channel configuration menus are entered by pressing
from any channel’s
Edit
data screens, and scrolling to the desired menu using
/
. Pressing
again enters the selected menu’s tree of variables. This Setup mode may be exited
Next
manually by pressing
or automatically when no keys are pressed for 5 minutes.
Alarm relays and front panel alarm LED indicators remain active during the Setup
mode. A Security menu offers a password feature to prevent tampering with WX64
parameters. See Figure 2-1 – Figure 2-7 for a complete WX64 menu tree layout.
WX64 User Manual | 21
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
A1
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
1
A2
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
0
A3
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
0
A c k n o wl e d g e
No
Fai l s af e
Zone
No
1
Ye s
Ov e r r i d e 1 C h a n n e l
Standard Relay Menus are
Identical
Ho r n / P i e z o
Al a r m
Ou t p u t s
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
1
~
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
2
~
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
3
~
Ho r n / P i e z o
~
Di s c r e t e
~
Re l a y
Al a r m
1
Al a r m
2
Al a r m
3
Be e p
On
On
A c k n o wl e d g e
Ye s
Fai l s af e
No
Pi e z o
No
Al a r m
Di s c r e t e
Ch a n n e l
Co n f i g
Me a s u r me n t
1 P CT L E L
N a me
Ch . 3 7
Me a s u r me n t
4 6 P CT L E L
N a me
Ch . 3 8
Me a s u r me n t
6 P CT L E L
N a me
Ch . 3 9
Ma i n
~
Co n f i g
C o mmu n i c a t i o n
Se c u r i t y :
No
A3
Fai l s af e
No
~
C OM2
Se t t i n g s
~
C OM3
Se t t i n g s
~
C OM4
Se t t i n g s
~
Se t t i n g s
T i me o u t
Po l l
9600
Ra d i o
500
( ms )
~
COM1-4 Menus are Identical
~
Sl a v e
Se t t i n g s ~
Se c u r i t y :
~
~
Us e r
N a me
Di a g n o s t i c s
~
Lock
Co d e
Mo d b u s
Un l o c k e d
De f a u l t
Lock
Us e r
Co d e
By t e
T i me o u t ( ms )
Ma s t e r
Po l l
v 1. 0 0
~
Zone
~
N a me s
Ca r d
Vi e w
Se t t i n g s
En a b l e d
H o s t n a me
Co n f i g u r e
Ye s
Co n t r o l l e r 1
Ad d r e s s
19 2 . 16 8 . 0 . 10 0
N e t ma s k
255.255.255.0
Ga t e w a y
19 2 . 16 8 . 0 . 1
~
Ev e n t
Cl e a r
500
0
Sy s t e m
Vi e w
A B CD
D e l a y ( ms ) 2 5 0
Ne t wo r k
SD
Se t t i n g s
Or d e r
Ma s t e r
DHCP
Ve r s i o n
250
Se t u p
Mo d b u s T C P
Sy s t e m
Ma s t e r
( ms )
De l a y
~
Se t t i n g s
Se t t i n g s
Mo d b u s
B a u d Ra t e
Se t t i n g s
~
Un l o c k e d
No
Fai l s af e
See Figure 2-2
Se t t i n g s
Ne t wo r k
Fai l s af e
A2
C OM1
C OM1
Mo d b u s T C P
Me n u
Ou t p u t s
Ch a n n e l
Re l a y
A1
Func t i on
C o mmu n i c a t i o n
Al a r m
0
Log
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
~
Log
~
Li f e
~
See Figure 2-4
E n t e r i n g D i a g n o s t i c s mo d e . I n p u t s w i l l
not
b e p r o c e s s e d . Al a r m r e l a y s a n d a n a l o g
o u t p u t s ma y c h a n g e , c a u s i n g u n d e s i r a b l e
s t a t e s a f f e c t i n g e q u i p me n t
connect ed t o
t hi s cont r ol l er .
Ok
(Ed i t )
Ca n c e l
( Ne x t )
Di a g n o s t i c s
St a n d a r d
Re l a y s
~
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y s
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y s
~
An a l o g
Input s
~
An a l o g
out put s
~
Pi e z o
~
L E Ds
~
Se r i a l
I/ O
Po r t s
Bo a r d
Co n f i g
~
~
Figure 2-1
WX64 User Manual | 22
See Figure 2-5/2-7
Ch .
38
Al a r m
1
Se t Po i n t
20
Lat chi ng
Tr i p
On
No
On
Hi g h
De l a y
Of f
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
0
( mi n )
0
Dr i v e
Ch .
Ye s
38
Al a r m
2
Se t Po i n t
40
Lat chi ng
Tr i p
On
No
On
Hi g h
De l a y
Of f
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
0
( mi n )
0
Dr i v e
Ye s
Co l o r
Re d
Ch .
38
Al a r m
3
Se t Po i n t
60
Lat chi ng
Tr i p
On
No
On
Hi g h
De l a y
Of f
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
0
( mi n )
0
Dr i v e
Ye s
Co l o r
Re d
En a b l e d ?
Ch a n n e l
See Figure 2-1
Co n f i g
Ch a n n e l
Me a s u r me n t
1 P CT L E L
N a me
Ch . 3 7
Me a s u r me n t
4 6 P CT L E L
N a me
Ch . 3 8
Me a s u r me n t
6 P CT L E L
N a me
Ch . 3 9
38
Co n f i g
Al a r m
1
~
Al a r m
2
~
Al a r m
3
~
Faul t
Al a r m
~
Da t a
Fr om
Ch .
~
Co n f i g u r e
~
Faul t
Al a r m
Se t Po i n t
~
Li near i ze
No
38
Ch .
- 10
38
Da t a
Sr c
Fr om
An a l o g
Mi n
Ra w
Ma x
Ra w
Fi l t er
Local
800
Ca l
Ma r k e r
Ch .
Co u n t
Bo a r d
38
Li near i ze
Ou t p u t
10 . 0 0
20.00
20.00
30.00
30.00
40.00
40.00
50.00
50.00
60.00
60.00
70.00
70.00
80.00
80.00
90.00
90.00
38
Co n f i g u r e
Me a s u r e me n t
En g i n e e r i n g
N a me
Un i t s P CT L E L
Zer o
0
Sp a n
10 0
D e c i ma l
Po i n t s
Ch a n n e l
On ?
1
De a d b a n d
Co p y
To
Co p y
To
Re s t o r e
WX64 User Manual | 23
0
Ye s
Zone
Figure 2-2
See Figure 2-3
~
Input
Ch .
10
De f a u l t
Me n u
10 . 0 0
Inf o
Input
4000
S a mp l e
( %)
1
Ch a n n e l
~
Gr o u p
~
Ch .
~
De f a u l t s
See Figure 2-3
Ch .
38
Al a r m
1
Se t Po i n t
20
Lat chi ng
Tr i p
On
No
On
Hi g h
De l a y
Of f
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
0
( mi n )
0
Dr i v e
Ch .
Ye s
38
Al a r m
2
Se t Po i n t
40
Lat chi ng
Tr i p
On
No
On
Hi g h
De l a y
Of f
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
0
( mi n )
0
Dr i v e
Ye s
Co l o r
Re d
Ch .
38
Al a r m
3
Se t Po i n t
60
Lat chi ng
Tr i p
On
No
On
Hi g h
De l a y
Of f
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
0
( mi n )
0
Dr i v e
Ye s
Co l o r
Re d
En a b l e d ?
Ch a n n e l
See Figure 2-2
38
Co n f i g
Al a r m
1
~
Al a r m
2
~
Al a r m
3
~
Faul t
Al a r m
~
Da t a
Fr om
Ch .
~
Co n f i g u r e
~
Faul t
Al a r m
Se t Po i n t
~
Li near i ze
No
38
Ch .
- 10
38
Da t a
Sr c
Fr om
An a l o g
Ch .
38
Ma r k e r
Input
Ma r k e r
En a b l e d
Mi n
Ra w
800
Ma r k e r
%
Ma x
Ra w
4000
Fi l t er
S a mp l e
Local
Ca l
Ma r k e r
Ch .
Co u n t
Bo a r d
38
Se n s o r
Li f e
Ch . 0 1
Co p y
CA L
No
Li near i ze
Ou t p u t
10 . 0 0
20.00
20.00
30.00
30.00
40.00
40.00
50.00
50.00
60.00
60.00
70.00
70.00
80.00
80.00
90.00
90.00
38
IN
~
Input
Ch .
No
- 16
as
De f a u l t
Me n u
10 . 0 0
Inf o
10
Ma r k
Me n u
Co p y
To
Ch a n n e l
To
2
Co n f i g u r e
Me a s u r e me n t
En g i n e e r i n g
N a me
Un i t s P CT L E L
Zer o
0
Sp a n
10 0
D e c i ma l
Po i n t s
Ch a n n e l
On ?
Zone
Co p y
To
Co p y
To
Re s t o r e
( %)
To
Co p y
No w
1
Ch a n n e l
~
Gr o u p
~
Ch .
~
De f a u l t s
Figure 2-3
WX64 User Manual | 24
Co p y
Co p y
1
De a d b a n d
Ch . 0 1
0
Ye s
To
Gr o u p
Gr o u p
C h . 0 1- 16
~
Co n f i g u r e
N a me
Co n t r o l l e r
1
Co n t r a s t
50
Da t e
10 / 2 0 / 2 0 10
T i me
09:43:28
En a b l e
Ch a n n e l
Di s p l a y
Wa r mu p
Ca l
Sy s t e m
See Figure 2-1
v 1. 0 0
Co n f i g u r e
~
Zone
~
SD
N a me s
Ca r d
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Cl e a r
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
Log
Log
Li f e
( mi n )
1
En a b l e d
Ye s
Ne g a t i v e
Zone
Ve r s i o n
64
Da t a
1
T i me
Sc r e e n
Bl o c k
Ma i n
T i me
Pu r g e
Zone
Co u n t
Al a r m
Ye s
N a me s
Zone
1
Zone
2
No r t h
Tank
Far m
Zone
3
We s t
Ga t e
Zone
4
S wi t c h g e a r
Ro o m
Zone
5
Co n t r o l
Ro o m
Zone
6
Ma i n
Zone
7
Zone
7
Zone
8
Zone
8
SD
En t r a n c e
Pr o c e s s
Ca r d
~
Ca r d
~
Logger
~
Sa v e
St a t u s
Co n f i g
Fi l e
OK
~
~
Load
Co n f i g
Fi l e
~
Vi e w
Log
En a b l e d
Fi l e
YES
Tr end
~
T i me
Da t e
Ev e n t
09:42
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
1
09:30
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
Re s e t
Ch .
09:28
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
1
0 8 : 15
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Sy s t e m
2 1: 3 7
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
2 1: 3 5
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
2 1: 3 0
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
2 1: 2 8
out
19
19
i n
19
Bo o t
- -
1
out
07
Al a r m
2
out
07
Al a r m
2
i n
07
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
1
i n
07
17 : 5 6
0 7 / 0 9 / 2 0 10
C o mm
Er r o r
16
15 : 5 3
0 7 / 0 2 / 2 0 10
Co n f i g
11: 15
0 6 / 12 / 2 0 10
Co l d
09:37
0 6 / 0 1/ 2 0 10
Ca l
out
46
09:30
0 6 / 0 1/ 2 0 10
Ca l
i n
46
05:36
0 5 / 2 4 / 2 0 10
Faul t
out
32
05:35
0 5 / 2 4 / 2 0 10
Faul t
i n
32
Er r o r
Bo o t
22
- -
Sy s t e m
Ve r s i o n
V 1. 0 0
Co n f i g u r e
Ar e
you
sur e
you
t hme
e s
event
Z o cnl ee a r N a
SD
CY ae sr d( E d i
t )
wa n t
l og?
No
~
t o
~
~
( Ne x t )
Vi e w Ev e n t
Log
Cl e a r
Ev e n t
Log
~
~
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
ppm
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Pp m
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Ch .
Ch .
Me a s u r e me n t
Figure 2-4
WX64 User Manual | 25
H2 S
H2 S
32
of f
48
of f
Ox y g e n
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
1
Of f
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
2
Of f
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
3
Of f
Faul t
Ho r n
Re l a y
Of f
Re l a y
Of f
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
C h . 0 1- 16
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
C h . 0 1- 16 ~
Al a r m
1
~
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
C h . 17 - 3 2 ~
Al a r m
2
~
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
Ch . 3 3 - 4 8 ~
Al a r m
3
~
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
Ch . 4 9 - 6 4 ~
Faul t
~
See Figure 2-6
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Di a g n o s t i c s
See Figure 2-1
St a n d a r d
Re l a y s
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 1
Of f
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y s
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 2
Of f
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 3
Of f
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y s
An a l o g
Input s
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 4
Of f
An a l o g
out put s
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 5
Of f
Pi e z o
~
L E Ds
~
Se r i a l
I/ O
Po r t s
Bo a r d
Co n f i g
"
"
P r o g r a mma b l e
"
R l y . 16
"
Of f
~
~
An a l o g
Input
An a l o g
Input
An a l o g
Input
C h . 0 1- 16
~
Vi e w
An a l o g
Input
C h . 17 - 3 2
~
Ca l i b r a t e
An a l o g
Input
Ch . 3 3 - 4 8
~
An a l o g
Input
Ch . 4 9 - 6 4
~
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
C h . 0 1- 16
Input s
~
Bo a r d
~
See Figure 2-6
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
C h . 0 1- 16
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
C h . 0 1- 16
~
An a l o g
Ou t
1
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
C h . 17 - 3 2 ~
An a l o g
Ou t
2
4 mA
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
Ch . 3 3 - 4 8 ~
An a l o g
Ou t
3
12 mA
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
Ch . 4 9 - 6 4 ~
An a l o g
Ou t
4
2 0 mA
An a l o g
Ou t
5
16 mA
"
An a l o g
"
Ou t
"
7
8 mA
"
0 mA
See Figure 2-7
Figure 2-5
WX64 User Manual | 26
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
C h . 0 1- 16
Al a r m
1
Al a r m
1
~
Ch . 0 1
Al a r m
1
Of f
Al a r m
2
~
Ch . 0 2
Al a r m
1
Of f
Al a r m
3
~
Ch . 0 3
Al a r m
1
Of f
~
Ch . 0 4
Al a r m
1
Of f
~
Ch . 0 5
Al a r m
1
Of f
Faul t
"
"
C h . 16
Al a r m
Ra w
An a l o g
Vi e w
Input
C h . 0 1- 16
Input s
Ca l i b r a t e
~
Bo a r d
~
See Figure 2-5
"
"
1
Of f
Co u n t s
Ou t p u t
C h . 0 1- 16
Ch . 0 9 :
0 0 12 5 8
Ch . 0 2 :
002248
C h . 10 :
0 0 16 8 2
Ch . 0 3 :
0 0 3 10 8
C h . 11:
002654
Ch . 0 4 :
0 0 17 9 2
C h . 12 :
003677
Ch . 0 5 :
003859
C h . 13 :
002451
Ch . 0 6 :
0 0 18 6 2
C h . 14 :
0 0 12 3 6
Ch . 0 7 :
0 0 17 2 4
C h . 15 :
002799
Ch . 0 8 :
0 0 2 19 3
C h . 16 :
0 0 15 6 0
Bo a r d
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
01
~
An a l o g
Ou t
1
8 mA
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
02
~
An a l o g
Ou t
2
4 mA
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
03
~
An a l o g
Ou t
3
12 mA
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
04
~
An a l o g
Ou t
4
2 0 mA
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
05
~
An a l o g
Ou t
5
16 mA
"
"
An a l o g
Ou t
"
7
"
"
Ca l i b r a t e
0 mA
Figure 2-6
WX64 User Manual | 27
Co u n t s
0 0 14 3 6
Ca l i b r a t e
An a l o g
Ra w
C h . 0 1:
"
Input
"
"
16
~
See Figure 2-5
Pi e z o Be e p
" Ne x t "
Te s t . Pr e s s
To Ex i t .
BEEP!
L ED
Bl i n k
" Ne x t "
Te s t . Pr e s s
To Ex i t .
Di a g n o s t i c s
St a n d a r d
Re l a y s
~
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y s
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
See Figure 2-1
Re l a y s
~
An a l o g
Input s
~
An a l o g
out put s
~
Pi e z o
~
L E Ds
I/ O
TXA
TXB
~
Se r i a l
Po r t s
Bo a r d
~
Co n f i g
RX A
RX B
S UCCE S S
C OM1
~
RX A
RX B
Co n n e c t
Co n n e c t
C OM1 t o C OM2
T X A - >RX A a n d
C OM2
TXA
TXB
a n d C OM3 t o
T X B - >RX B .
TXA
TXB
C OM4 .
2
4
Wi r e .
RX A
RX B
F A I L URE
C OM3
or
RX A
RX B
C OM4
TXA
TXB
An a l o g I n p u t
C h 1 – C h 16
An a l o g
C h 17 –
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 1
C h 1 – C h 16
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 1
C h 17 – C h 3 2
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 1
Ch 3 3 – Ch 4 8
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 1
Ch 4 9 – Ch 6 4
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 2
C h 1 – C h 16
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 2
C h 17 – C h 3 2
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 2
Ch 3 3 – Ch 4 8
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 2
Ch 4 9 – Ch 6 4
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 3
C h 1 – C h 16
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 3
C h 17 – C h 3 2
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 3
Ch 3 3 – Ch 4 8
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 3
Ch 4 9 – Ch 6 4
Di s c .
Faul t
Ch 1 –
Di s c . Re l a y
Faul t
Al a r m
C h 17 – C h 3 2
Di s c . Re l a y
Faul t
Al a r m
Ch 3 3 – Ch 4 8
Di s c . Re l a y
Faul t
Al a r m
Ch 4 9 – Ch 6 4
An a l o g
C h 17 –
An a l o g
Ch 3 3 –
An a l o g
Ch 4 9 –
Re l a y
Al a r m
C h 16
A n a l o g Ou t
C h 1 – C h 16
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
Figure 2-7
WX64 User Manual | 28
Input
Ch 3 2
Ou t
Ch 3 2
Br i d g e
Ch 3 3 –
Input
Ch 4 8
Ou t
Ch 4 8
Br i d g e
Ch 4 9 –
Input
Ch 6 4
Ou t
Ch 6 4
2.2 Changing Menu Variables Using The Keypad
Upon entering a menu, a blue highlight bar controlled by
/
indicates the
selected variable. Some are simple YES/NO or ON/OFF entries toggled by pressing
Edit
. Others, such as Measurement Name and Eunits fields may have many ASCII
character possibilities. Allowed ASCII characters are as follows:
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz{|}~ blank
Edit
space !"#→%&`()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected]
/
places a cursor over the item and
scrolls through each allowed entry.
/
move the cursor within a
Edit
field. When the field is complete,
clears the cursor and loads it into non-volatile
Next
memory where it is retained indefinitely and
will cancel any changes that have
Next
been made in the active field. With no cursor present,
closes open menus in
reverse order and returns the LCD to the most recent data display.
2.3 Alarm Outputs
The menu item identified as ALARM OUTPUTS is accessed through the Main Menu.
Selecting it allows users to configure the different types of outputs that can be
connected to the WX64 controller through the menu shown in Figure 2-8. The variables
under this menu are STANDARD RELAY 1, STANDARD RELAY 2, STANDARD
RELAY 3, HORN/PIEZO, DISCRETE RELAY and PROGRAMMABLE RELAY
BOARD.
WX64 User Manual | 29
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
A1
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
1
A2
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
0
A3
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
0
A c k n o wl e d g e
No
Fai l s af e
Zone
Al a r m
No
1
Ye s
Ov e r r i d e 1 C h a n n e l
Standard Relay and Programmable
Relay Menus are Identical
Ho r n / P i e z o
Ou t p u t s
0
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
1
~
Al a r m
1
Be e p
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
2
~
Al a r m
2
On
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
3
~
Al a r m
3
~
A c k n o wl e d g e
~
Fai l s af e
No
Pi e z o
No
Ho r n / P i e z o
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
Br d ~
On
Ye s
Al a r m
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
A1
Fai l s af e
No
A2
Fai l s af e
No
A3
Fai l s af e
No
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
Br d
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
1
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
2
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
3
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
4
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
5
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
6
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
7
~
Figure 2-8
2.3.1
Standard Relay 1, 2 and 3
Every WX64 comes standard with three programmable relays that users can
individually program to suit their needs. This is achieved through the STANDARD
RELAY menus accessed from the ALARM OUTPUTS menu. Only one Standard
Relay menu screen is shown in Figure 2-9 because all the standard relay’s menus are
identical. Under the STANDARD RELAY menu, the user can configure the following.
WX64 User Manual | 30
Al a r m
Ou t p u t s
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
1
~
A1
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
1
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
2
~
A2
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
0
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
3
~
A3
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
~
A c k n o wl e d g e
~
Fai l s af e
~
Zone
Ho r n / P i e z o
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
1
0
No
No
Ye s
Ov e r r i d e 1 C h a n n e l
Standard Relay and Programmable
Relay Menus are Identical
0
Figure 2-9
2.3.1.1
A1 A2 & A3 Votes Required
A1 Votes Required, A2 Votes Required & A3 Votes Required are the number of A1,
A2 & A3 level alarms that must be present for the relay to activate. This allows creation
of logical AND function equations that control standard relays. Default settings for
standard relay 1 are A1 Votes = 01 A2 Votes = 00 & A3 Votes = 00, which cause
relay 1 to trip if any channel has an A1 level alarm active. Default settings for standard
relay 2 are A1 Votes = 00 A2 Votes = 01 & A3 Votes = 00, which cause relay 2 to trip
if any channel has an A2 level alarm active. Example: If either default setting is
modified such that A1 Votes = 02 and A2 Votes = 01, then any two channels must
have an A1 level alarm active and any one channel must have an A2 level alarm active
to trip that relay. REMEMBER! One of the A1s and the A2 could be on the same
channel. These level alarms must come from a channel included in the Zone entry
described below.
2.3.1.2
Acknowledge
Turning on Acknowledge YES allows the standard relay to be deactivated during
alarm conditions by an Alarm Reset. This is useful if an audible device is being driven
by the relay.
2.3.1.3
Failsafe
Failsafe controls relay activation for this standard relay. Failsafe YES causes the relay
to de-energize during alarm conditions and energize when there is no alarm. Thereby,
a power failure forces the relay contact to the alarm position. Note the standard Fault
relay is always failsafe and may be monitored separately to indicate loss of power
conditions in many applications.
2.3.1.4
Zone 1-8
Zones offer additional flexibility by controlling which channel zones trip this menu’s
standard alarm relay. There are eight possible zones that can be assigned to the
relays individually. Some applications have different types of sensors, or sensors in
different areas connected to the same WX64 Controller. In these cases, it may be
undesirable for a sensor in one area to trip the same relay as a sensor in another area.
The Zone menus may restrict this. For example, channels 1-32 might be set to trip
WX64 User Manual | 31
standard relay 1 while channels 33-64 trip standard relay 2. This is done by assigning
channels 1-32 to zone 1 and channels 33-64 to zone 2 and turning only zone 1 to YES
for Standard relay 1 and only zone 2 to YES for standard relay 2. Another possibility is
channels 1-32 be set to trip standard relay 1 while channels 33-64 trip relays on an
optional discrete relay PCB configured for Alarm 1 (see section 3.2.2).
2.3.1.5
Override Channels 1-8
Override allows entering one of the 256 different alarms that will trip this relay
regardless of the Votes or Zone entries. There are four alarms per channel and 64
channels and any one of these alarms may be used as the override. This feature is
useful when one channel’s alarm has more significance than the others. Up to eight
override alarms may be entered per relay.
2.3.2
Horn/Piezo
The WX64 is equipped with a low decibel audible piezo that chirps when keys are
pressed and may be configured to audibly indicate alarm conditions. The standard
horn relay is similar to the standard A1 & A2 relays.
Al a r m
Ou t p u t s
Ho r n / P i e z o
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
1
~
Al a r m
1
Be e p
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
2
~
Al a r m
2
On
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
3
~
Al a r m
3
~
A c k n o wl e d g e
~
Fai l s af e
No
~
Pi e z o
No
Ho r n / P i e z o
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
Al a r m
On
Ye s
Figure 2-10
2.3.2.1
A1 A2 & A3
Alarm 1, Alarm 2 & Alarm 3 menus control how this alarm level from each channel
will affect the standard horn relay. Choices are OFF, ON or BEEP (one Hz. Pulsating).
As an example, A1 conditions might pulse the horn (BEEP) and A2 conditions cause a
steady horn (ON). Any other combination of these 3 choices is possible for A1, A2 and
A3 levels affecting the horn relay. This feature is very useful since it allows the horn
relay to serve as another level A1, level A2, level A3 or all three. Individual channel
alarms may also be configured to not affect the Horn relay on a channel by channel
basis (see section 2.4.2.5).
2.3.2.2
Acknowledge
Turning on Acknowledge YES allows the Horn relay to be deactivated during alarm
conditions by an Alarm Reset. This is useful if an audible device is being driven by the
relay
WX64 User Manual | 32
2.3.2.3
Failsafe
Failsafe controls relay activation for this relay. Failsafe YES causes the horn relay to
de-energize during alarm conditions and energize when there is no alarm. Thereby, a
power failure forces the relay contact to the alarm position.
2.3.2.4
Piezo Alarm
Piezo Alarm ON causes the audible piezo to duplicate the action of the horn relay.
This feature may be used to provide a low decibel indication of the status of the
system’s horn.
2.3.3
Discrete Relay
10-00345 Discrete relay options may also be configured to function in a Failsafe mode
using the ALARM OUTPUTS menu shown in Figure 2-11. Entering YES causes these
discrete relays to have energized coils when no alarm condition exists for the
associated channel and de-energized coils when the alarm occurs. Failsafe is useful
for indicating failed relay coils and loss of power conditions.
Al a r m
Ou t p u t s
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
1
~
A1
Fai l s af e
No
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
2
~
A2
Fai l s af e
No
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
3
~
A3
Fai l s af e
No
Ho r n / P i e z o
Di s c r e t e
~
Re l a y
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
~
~
Figure 2-11
WX64 User Manual | 33
2.3.4
Programmable Relay
The 10-0350 Programmable Relay option board may be added if the user needs 16
more programmable relays in addition to the three standard relays. These 16 relays
are configured through the PROGRAMMABLE RELAY menus accessed from the
ALARM OUTPUTS menu show in Figure 2-12. Only one Programmable Relay menu
screen is shown because all the Programmable relay’s menus are identical. Under the
PROGRAMMABLE RELAY menu, the user can configure the same parameters as
STANDARD RELAYS discussed in section 2.3.1.
Al a r m
Ou t p u t s
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
Br d
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
Br d
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
1
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
1
~
A1
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
1
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
2
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
2
~
A2
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
0
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
3
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
3
~
A3
Vo t e s
Re q u i r e d
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
4
~
A c k n o wl e d g e
~
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
5
Ho r n / P i e z o
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
Br d ~
"
"
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
0
No
~
Fai l s af e
"
~
Zone
No
16
~
Ov e r r i d e 1 C h a n n e l
Standard Relay and Programmable
Relay Menus are Identical
1
Ye s
0
Figure 2-12
2.4 Channel Configuration Entry Menu
CHANNEL CONFIGURATION is accessed through the MAIN MENU. Once in the
CHANNEL CONFIGURATION entry menu, shown on the left in Figure 2-13, use
/
to scroll up or down to select the channel that is to be configured. Once the
Edit
correct channel is selected,
brings you to that channel’s configuration menu,
shown on right below. These items affect only the specific channel selected. System
specific variables are accessed through the MAIN MENU shown in Figure 2-1.
Ch a n n e l
Co n f i g
Me a s u r me n t
1 P CT L E L
N a me
Ch . 3 7
Me a s u r me n t
4 6 P CT L E L
N a me
Ch . 3 8
Me a s u r me n t
6 P CT L E L
Ch a n n e l
Ch . 3 9
Co n f i g
1
~
Al a r m
2
~
Al a r m
3
~
Faul t
Al a r m
~
Da t a
N a me
38
Al a r m
Fr om
~
Li near i ze
~
Co n f i g u r e
~
Figure 2-13
WX64 User Manual | 34
2.4.1
Channel Configuration Menus
Once the appropriate channel has been selected, its configuration menu allows the
following parameters to be accessed: Alarm 1, Alarm 2, Alarm 3, Fault Alarm, Data
From, Linearize and Configure.
Ch .
38
Al a r m
1
Se t Po i n t
20
Lat chi ng
No
Tr i p
On
On
Hi g h
De l a y
Of f
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
0
( mi n )
0
Dr i v e
Ye s
Ch .
38
Al a r m
2
Se t Po i n t
Ch .
38
Al a r m
Tr i p
Se t Po i n t
Lat chi ng
Tr i p
On
On
Of f
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
38
Co n f i g
( mi n )
1
~
Al a r m
2
~
Al a r m
3
~
Al a r m
~
Faul t
Da t a
Fr om
~
Li near i ze
~
Co n f i g u r e
~
Of f
No
On
Hi g h
De l a y
(s ec )
De l a y
Ho r n
0
( mi n )
0
Dr i v e
Ye s
Co l o r
Re d
0
Dr i v e
Ye s
Re d
En a b l e d ?
Al a r m
On
0
Co l o r
Ch a n n e l
60
No
Hi g h
De l a y
40
Lat chi ng
3
No
Ch .
38
Faul t
Al a r m
Se t Po i n t
Ch .
38
Da t a
Sr c
Fr om
An a l o g
Mi n
Ra w
Ma x
Ra w
Fi l t er
800
Ca l
Ma r k e r
Input
4000
S a mp l e
Local
- 10
Co u n t
Bo a r d
10
De f a u l t
Me n u
~
Ch .
38
Li near i ze
Input
Ou t p u t
10 . 0 0
10 . 0 0
N a me
20.00
20.00
Un i t s P CT L E L
30.00
30.00
Zer o
0
40.00
40.00
Sp a n
10 0
50.00
50.00
0
60.00
60.00
Ye s
70.00
70.00
1
80.00
80.00
1
90.00
90.00
Ch .
Inf o
38
Co n f i g u r e
Me a s u r e me n t
En g i n e e r i n g
D e c i ma l
Po i n t s
Ch a n n e l
On ?
Zone
De a d b a n d
Co p y
To
Co p y
To
Re s t o r e
( %)
Ch a n n e l
~
Gr o u p
~
Ch .
~
De f a u l t s
Figure 2-14
WX64 User Manual | 35
2.4.2
Alarm 1 / Alarm 2 / Alarm 3 Menu
The ALARM MENU parameters are listed only once, because alarms 1, 2 and 3 are
identical, except A1 does not have the option to change the color; it is always yellow,
and only A3 can be turned off if not needed. The following parameters can be
accessed while in the ALARM MENUS.
Ch a n n e l
38
Ch .
Co n f i g
38
Al a r m
3
Al a r m
1
~
Se t Po i n t
60
Al a r m
2
~
Lat chi ng
No
Al a r m
3
~
Tr i p
Faul t
Al a r m
~
On
~
Of f
Li near i ze
~
Ho r n
Co n f i g u r e
~
Co l o r
Da t a
Fr om
On
De l a y
Hi g h
(s ec )
De l a y
Dr i v e
En a b l e d ?
( mi n )
0
0
Ye s
Re d
No
Figure 2-15
2.4.2.1
Setpoint
SETPOINT is the value where the alarm trips. It is entered in engineering units. For
example, if a channel monitors 0-50 ppmH2S and the alarm must trip at 10 ppm, the
correct entry is 10.00.
2.4.2.2
Latching
LATCHING determines either manual or automatic alarm reset operation. YES
requires a manual Alarm Reset to unlatch the alarm even though an alarm condition
no longer exists. YES also causes this alarm group’s common relay, front panel LED
and optional discrete relay to latch. NO allows all outputs for this alarm to automatically
reset as soon as the alarm condition clears.
2.4.2.3
Trip On
TRIP ON is set to HIGH for increasing alarms or LOW for decreasing alarms to
determine if the alarm activates upon exceeding or falling below the setpoint.
2.4.2.4
On/Off Delays
The ON DELAY / OFF DELAY entries allow ON and OFF time delays affecting how
long the setpoint must be surpassed before an alarm event transition occurs. ON
delays are limited to 10 seconds while OFF delays may be as long as 120 minutes.
Delays are useful in many applications to prevent nuisance alarms and unwanted
cycling into and out of alarm conditions.
2.4.2.5
Horn On
The HORN ON entry allows linking this alarm to the common horn relay. NO causes
the alarm to have no effect upon the horn relay. Entering YES causes this alarm to turn
the horn relay on steady, or, to pulse it depending upon horn configuration in the
system menu (see section 2.3.2.1).
WX64 User Manual | 36
2.4.2.6
Color
COLOR gives the option of assigning A2 or A3 alarms different colors besides the
default RED. The options are RED BLUE and ORANGE.
2.4.2.7
Enabled
ENABLED? Is for Alarm 3 only. Because most applications require only two alarm
levels, A3 is turned NO (off) from the factory. YES activates the A3 alarm level if
needed.
2.4.3
Fault Alarm Menu
The channel alarm identified as Fault activates when the input is out of range in the
negative direction. The fault level is always low trip and the dedicated common fault
relay is always failsafe. The minimum setting is -10% of full scale. The factory default
setting is -10, which is -10% of 100 or default full scale value. If the full scale value is
changed, the fault value is automatically updated to reflect the new value. For
example, if the fault level is -10 and the full scale value is changed from 100 to 50, the
fault level will automatically change to -5, which is -10% of the new full scale value. If
the fault level is -5 (-5% of full scale) and the full scale value is changed from 100 to
50, the fault level will automatically change to -2.5 which is -5% of the new full scale
value.
Ch a n n e l
38
Co n f i g
Al a r m
1
~
Al a r m
2
~
Al a r m
3
~
Faul t
Al a r m
~
Da t a
Fr om
Ch .
38
Faul t
Al a r m
Se t Po i n t
- 10
~
Li near i ze
~
Co n f i g u r e
~
Figure 2-16
2.4.4
Data From Menu To Set Input Source
Channels may be independently configured to accept input data from the following
sources:

An analog input PCB attached to the I C bus. These include Analog and
Bridge input boards.

ModBus RS-485 from up to four configured master ports connected to
ModBus slave devices.

ModBus TCP/IP connected to the Ethernet port.
2
Note: Each ModBus menu selection also requests the RTU # and the Alias
register # location of the data to be retrieved from the RTU. Alias register
WX64 User Manual | 37
numbers define the location of the variable representing the input value and
must be obtained from the manufacturer of the ModBus RTU device.

One of our Radio Modem kits may be connected to the ModBus RS-485
master port to enable wireless communication to OLCT 200/RF wireless
sensor transmitters. See section 7.2.
Channel’s inputs are configured using the following parameters in the DATA FROM
MENU.
Ch a n n e l
38
Co n f i g
Ch .
38
Da t a
Fr om
Al a r m
1
~
Sr c
Al a r m
2
~
Mi n
Ra w
800
Al a r m
3
~
Ma x
Ra w
4000
Al a r m
~
Fi l t er
~
Local
Li near i ze
~
Ma r k e r
Co n f i g u r e
~
Faul t
Da t a
Fr om
An a l o g
S a mp l e
Ca l
Co u n t
Bo a r d
Me n u
Input
10
De f a u l t
~
Figure 2-17
2.4.4.1
Source
Edit
toggles the SRC or source entry between Analog, ModBus 16bit, ModBus 16bit
Signed, ModBus 32bit, Wireless Monitor, and Digital Input. This parameter tells the
WX64 where the information to be displayed comes from. Each 16 channel group can
have multiple sources. For example if an application needs 12 4-20 inputs and 52
ModBus inputs, the first 12 channels can be programmed for Analog input and the last
52 channels can be programmed to accept the ModBus inputs. For ModBus 16bit, a
single register will be interpreted as an unsigned 16bit integer. For ModBus 16bit
signed, a single register will be interpreted as a signed 16bit integer. For ModBus
32bit, 2 consecutive registers are read and interpreted as a 32bit IEEE Floating Point
value. In 32bit Mode, the register value is read directly and not scaled with Min/Max
Raw parameters.
2.4.4.2
Min Raw & Max Raw
MIN/MAX RAW is the Min Raw and Max Raw counts entries included in Input Data
From: menus define the range of input counts that provide Measurement Range readout values described in section 2.4.6.2. This menu entry is determined by the A/D
converter resolution of the channel’s input. For example, if the input is a 10 bit ModBus
device with zero at 200 counts and 100% at 1000 counts, then this menu’s MIN should
be set at 200 and MAX at 1000. If communicating with the WX64’s optional 12 bit
Analog Input PCB, the MIN should be 800 and the MAX 4000.
If the input device’s resolution is unknown, the live counts variable on the Combination
screen displays actual raw A/D counts currently being read by this channel. This
reading may be used to test the input device for what A/D counts are provided for zero
and 100% if these values are unknown. Forcing the input device to read zero should
WX64 User Manual | 38
provide the A/D counts value needed to make this channel’s display also read zero.
Likewise, forcing the input device to read 100% should provide the A/D counts value
needed to make the WX64 channel’s display also read 100%.
Note: Each Data From: item has a matching default Min/Max counts value of 20% to
100% with ± 5% over/under range applied. If the default value is incorrect for the input
device, it should be edited.
2.4.4.3
Filter Sample Count
The FILTER SAMPLE COUNT is the number of samples from an Analog Input
channel that are averaged together before displayed. The valid range is 1-40 with the
default value of 10. If a channel has a noisy input the sample rate can be increased,
causing the noise to average itself out. This higher number of samples causes the
channel to react slower to input.
2.4.4.4
Local Cal
LOCAL CAL is available with the Analog Input option. There are three choices Board
Default, On, and Off. With the Analog Input option used for both the Analog and Bridge
input boards, Board Default automatically turns the local calibration feature On for the
Bridge input and Off for the Analog Input. If there is a need to calibrate a channel
locally and the board default is Off it can be manually changed.
WX64 CAL MODE features allow pushbutton calibration of zero and span values. This
feature should be utilized only when there are no other zero/span controls within the
monitoring system since it is inappropriate to calibrate a signal at more than one point.
Therefore, if calibration is to be performed at another transmitter or monitoring device,
the WX64 CAL MODE feature should not be used.
The CALIBRATION MENU allows entering the correct Cal ZERO & Cal SPAN setpoint
values needed to calibrate the sensor. These are entered in the same engineering
units as input range. Set Zero & Set Span controls in this menu allow pushbutton
calibration by moving the highlight bar to each and pressing the EDIT key. A live
reading of the channel’s value in the tool tip box allows calibration checks to see if an
adjustment is needed. Unintentional calibrations are reset by the Set Unity Gain menu
item. Set Unity Gain resets zero offset to 0 and span gain to 1. It is useful for returning
the calibration to a known starting place. Sensor aging may be monitored by recording
zero and span readings at Unity Gain when it is new, and again at later dates when
degradation may have occurred.
To check zero calibration, apply the ZERO calibration value to the sensor and observe
the live reading. If the zero reading differs from the zero setpoint, a calibration is
needed. To calibrate zero, move the highlight bar to Set Zero and press EDIT. A
warning message explains that pressing EDIT again will change the zero calibration
and any other key will exit. The procedure for span calibration is identical. For
example, if an LEL combustible sensor is to be spanned with 50% LEL span gas, the
span setpoint must be 50%. If 45% LEL is to be used later, the span setpoint must be
changed to 45% to match the span calibration gas. If the reading is only 40% LEL with
the 50% gas applied, a span calibration is needed. Move the pointer to the Set Span
entry and press EDIT twice. Unity Gain may be used at any time to cancel incorrect
calibrations and start again.
WX64 User Manual | 39
2.4.4.5
Marker Menu
Some transmitters or monitoring devices providing WX64 inputs also indicate special
modes of operation, such as Calibration, Maintenance or Fault, by transmitting a
special <4mA or negative “Marker” value. The WX64 offers channel Marker menus for
detecting and indicating such events (see Figure 2-18). While active, the WX64
displays a 6-digit ASCII message to indicate the special event and if equipped with
10-0348 4-20mA output option, the WX64 also transmits the same <4mA value.
Ch .
Sr c
38
Da t a
Wi r e l e s s
Fr om
Ch .
En a b l e d
Ma r k e r
%
Ra w
200
Ma x
Ra w
10 0 0
Ma r k
ID
10
Int er f ace
C OM1
Ma r k e r
Me n u
Ma r k e r
Ma r k e r
Mi n
R e mo t e
38
Mo n i t o r
as
Se n s o r
Me n u
Ye s
- 16
IN
Li f e
CA L
Ye s
~
Figure 2-18
2.4.4.5.1
Marker Enabled
Turns the marker feature ON and OFF.
2.4.4.5.2
Marker %
The negative Marker value is entered into the Marker % field as a negative percent of
full scale. For example, -15.62% of full scale detects a marker value of 1.5mA (1.5mA
is -15.62% of full scale when 4-20mA is the range). Marker mode is active when the
input value reads the Marker % ±1% of full scale.
2.4.4.5.3
Mark As
The Mark As menu allows user entry of the 6-digit ASCII message to be displayed
when the marker is detected.
2.4.4.5.4
Sensor Life
Sensor Life should only be activated when the Marker event is Calibration and when a
sensor life value is transmitted after each calibration. This feature is provided primarily
for use when interfacing the WX64 to Oldham’s OLCT 200 Sensor Transmitters, which
may be configured to transmit sensor life values after each calibration (Figure 2-19).
For Sensor Life to record properly the monitor must perform as follows: After the
Calibration Marker interval, 4.0mA transmits for 10 seconds to indicate its calibration
mode is complete. The monitor then transmits between 4.0mA and 5.0mA for five
seconds depending on remaining sensor life where 4.0mA = 0% and 5.0mA = 100%
remaining sensor life. The WX64 reads this value and records it as the channel’s
Sensor Life. Sensor Life is stored in the WX64 ModBus database and displayed as a
bar graph in the Sensor Info screen (see section 2.7.7). It is a useful tool for planning
sensor replacement schedules.
WX64 User Manual | 40
Figure 2-19
2.4.4.6
Remote ID
When the Data From is set to receive input through the Communications ports, this is
where the salve’s unique ID number is entered. Remote ID numbers up to 247 are
valid.
2.4.4.7
Alias
The Alias register numbers define the location of the variable representing the input
value of the ModBus data received through the Communications ports. This number
must be obtained from the manufacturer of the ModBus RTU device.
2.4.4.8
Interface
The Interface assigns what communication port the ModBus slave or Wireless radio is
connected to and the channel it will get its data from. The communication port that is
assigned here must be configured as a ModBus Master or Wireless Monitor in the
Communications Menu (see section 2.5.1).
2.4.4.9
Slave Byte Order
If ModBus 32bit is selected, a Byte Order entry appears at the bottom of the menu.
This determines WORD and BYTE alignment of data at the remote ModBus transmitter
when sending its 4 byte IEEE Floating Point values. With the select bar on this entry,
the EDIT key toggles between the 4 possible modes.
2.4.5
Linearize
The linearization menu allows each channel to have its own linearization curve stored
in the controller’s non-volatile memory. Input versus output points must be entered in
percent of full scale values. This means if the range is 0-200 ppmH2S, then 100 ppm is
50% of full scale. Zero input will provide a zero output and 100% input a 100% output.
Nine intermediate points may be entered to define the curve.
WX64 User Manual | 41
Ch a n n e l
38
Ch .
Co n f i g
38
Li near i ze
Al a r m
1
~
Input
Ou t p u t
Al a r m
2
~
10 . 0 0
10 . 0 0
Al a r m
3
~
20.00
20.00
Faul t
Al a r m
~
30.00
30.00
~
40.00
40.00
Li near i ze
~
50.00
50.00
Co n f i g u r e
~
60.00
60.00
70.00
70.00
80.00
80.00
90.00
90.00
Da t a
Fr om
Figure 2-20
2.4.6
Configure Menu
From the entry level setup menu in Figure 2-14, the CONFIGURE menu may be
entered for setting variables defining how the controller presents monitored data to the
various graphic displays.
Ch a n n e l
38
Co n f i g
Ch .
38
Co n f i g u r e
Al a r m
1
~
Inf o
Al a r m
2
~
En g i n e e r i n g
Al a r m
3
~
Zer o
0
Faul t
Al a r m
~
Sp a n
10 0
Da t a
Fr om
Me a s u r e me n t
N a me
Un i t s P CT L E L
~
D e c i ma l
Po i n t s
Li near i ze
~
Ch a n n e l
On ?
Co n f i g u r e
~
Zone
0
Ye s
1
De a d b a n d
Co p y
To
Co p y
To
Re s t o r e
( %)
1
Ch a n n e l
~
Gr o u p
~
Ch .
~
De f a u l t s
Figure 2-21
2.4.6.1
Info / Measurement Name
The first two items in this menu are for entering the 16 character Measurement Name
and 6 character engineering unit ASCII fields. Eunits should define the units of
measure for what this channel is to display. Measurement Name should describe the
source of this data in the user’s terminology. Section 2.2 of this manual describes how
to use the front keypad to modify these fields.
WX64 User Manual | 42
2.4.6.2
Zero / Span
The ZERO / SPAN entries allow configuration of the measurement range displayed by
this channel. Measurement Range works along with A/D Counts menus, described in
section 2.4.4.2, to define the range of the input signal’s engineering units. For example,
if a channel’s input is 4-20mA from a transmitter monitoring 0 to 10ppm chlorine, then
the Zero value should equal 0.000 and the Span value equal 10.00. The six ASCII
engineering units previously entered are automatically displayed at the top of each
menu as a reminder. Four digits must appear in this entry, so trailing 0’s may appear
here that are not displayed on other data screens.
2.4.6.3
Decimal Points
Resolution of displayed channel values is configured in this menu by setting the
number digits trailing the decimal point. Values are limited to a maximum of four digits,
and a polarity sign. An auto-ranging feature displays the highest resolution allowed by
this menu’s decimal point entry. For example, if three decimal points are entered, and
the range is 0 to 100ppm, the reading will be 0.000 at 0ppm and 100.0 at 100ppm.
However, this may be undesirable due to the high resolution at zero unless the
sensor’s output is extremely stable. If decimal points are limited to one, the 0ppm
reading becomes 0.0 and the 100ppm reading remains 100.0. Resolution may be
limited further by setting decimal points to 0. In the above example, this would cause
0ppm to display 0 and 100ppm to display 100.
2.4.6.4
Channel On?
The Channel On? entry determines if this channel is to be utilized. Turning it off will
cause the controller to never process inputs applied to this channel and no alarms will
be tripped or data displayed. Inactive channels will be grayed out on the Main Data
screen and skipped when scrolling through the 30-Minute Trend screens. Channels
may be turned off in groups of 16. This is done in the System Setup menu described in
section 2.7.2.4.
2.4.6.5
Zone
The ZONE feature allows assigning of channels into up to eight possible ZONES. This
is useful for applications that may need all alike gases or inputs from a certain area to
be grouped together. Once the channels are assigned to a certain group, relays can be
configured to respond to only the channels in this ZONE (see section 2.3.1.4).
2.4.6.6
Deadband
DEADBAND allows forcing low values to continue to read zero. This is useful when
there are small amounts of background gases that cause fluctuating readouts above
zero. The highest amount of deadband allowed is 5%. The 4-20mA output is affected
by this menu item and will remain at 4mA until the input gets above the programmed
deadband level.
2.4.6.7
Copy to Channel
This menu simplifies the Setup procedure by allowing similar channels to be copied
from one to another. For example, if some channels are identical except for the
Measurement Name entry, one channel could be configured and copied to the other
channels that are the same. Only Measurement Name then must be configured on the
WX64 User Manual | 43
Edit
Edit
copied channels. Use
once more to copy.
2.4.6.8
and
/
to select channel numbers and
Copy to Group
This menu simplifies the Setup procedure by allowing one channel to be copied to a
whole group of channels. For example, if some groups of 16 channels are identical
except for the Measurement Name entry, one channel could be configured and copied
to the whole group at one time. Only Measurement Name then must be configured on
Edit
the copied channels. Use
and
/
to select the group to be copied then
Edit
point to Copy Now? Press
2.4.6.9
once more to copy.
Restore Ch. Defaults
This menu allows the user to reset a specific channel to factory defaults without
affecting any other channels. This is useful if a channel must be changed to a different
input. All channel configurations will be reset, and the user can configure the new
parameters from the factory defaults. A confirming dialog box will appear before the
channel is reset, protecting against an accidental restore.
2.5 Communication Settings Menu
COMMUNICATION SETTINGS menu is accessed through the MAIN MENU. This
menu is used to configure the four possible communication ports. Once in the
COMMUNICATION SETTINGS entry menu, shown on the left in Figure 2-22, use
/
to scroll up or down to select the communication port that is to be
Edit
configured. Once the correct com port is selected,
brings you to that com port’s
configuration menu, shown on the right below. Com ports 1-4 have identical menus
and are shown only once.
WX64 User Manual | 44
C OM1
Func t i on
Se t t i n g s
Mo d b u s
Ma s t e r
B a u d Ra t e
T i me o u t
Po l l
9600
( ms )
De l a y
Ra d i o
500
( ms )
250
Se t u p
~
COM1-4 Menus are Identical
C o mmu n i c a t i o n
Se t t i n g s
Mo d b u s T C P
Se t t i n g s
~
Sl a v e
C OM2
Se t t i n g s
~
Ma s t e r
T i me o u t ( ms )
C OM3
Se t t i n g s
~
Ma s t e r
Po l l
C OM4
Se t t i n g s
~
Mo d b u s T C P
Ne t wo r k
Se t t i n g s
Se t t i n g s
By t e
Se t t i n g s
C OM1
Or d e r
A B CD
500
D e l a y ( ms ) 2 5 0
~
~
Ne t wo r k
DHCP
Se t t i n g s
En a b l e d
H o s t n a me
Ye s
Co n t r o l l e r 1
Ad d r e s s
19 2 . 16 8 . 0 . 10 0
N e t ma s k
255.255.255.0
Ga t e w a y
19 2 . 16 8 . 0 . 1
Figure 2-22
2.5.1
Com 1-4 Settings
The four ModBus RS-485 ports can be individually configured multiple ways using the
following menus.
C o mmu n i c a t i o n
Se t t i n g s
C OM1
C OM1
Se t t i n g s
~
Func t i on
C OM2
Se t t i n g s
~
B a u d Ra t e
C OM3
Se t t i n g s
~
T i me o u t
C OM4
Se t t i n g s
~
Po l l
~
Ra d i o
Mo d b u s T C P
Ne t wo r k
Se t t i n g s
Se t t i n g s
Se t t i n g s
Mo d b u s
Ma s t e r
9600
( ms )
De l a y
( ms )
Se t u p
~
COM1-4 Menus are Identical
Figure 2-23
WX64 User Manual | 45
500
250
~
2.5.1.1
Function
The Function parameter allows the communication ports to be set as ModBus Master,
ModBus Slave, Wireless Monitor, Redundant Port or Disabled.
ModBus Master
Master mode allows the communication port to poll any device using the ModBus RTU
protocol. This setting is also utilized for Wireless ModBus Master. See section 7.4.
ModBus Slave
Slave mode allows the communication port to be polled by any ModBus Master device
using the ModBus RTU protocol. This setting is also utilized for Wireless ModBus
Slave. See section 7.3
Wireless Monitor
This mode is exclusively for wireless communication to Oldham’s OLCT 200 wireless
sensor transmitters See section 7.2.
Redundant Port
This setting allows the user to create a redundant port which uses the settings from
another port that is already configured. Redundant mode works with ports configured
as ModBus Master. When configured as a redundant port, the Primary port
communicates until it gets a communication error. The WX64 then switches to the
redundant port and continues to poll the slave nodes. When communication has
switched to the redundant port, the WX64 trips the Fault relay, beeps, and displays a
warning telling the user there has been a communication error. The user is able to
Ignore the warning for 12 hours or Test the Primary port. Ignoring the problem gives
technicians time to troubleshoot and fix the problem. If the problem is not going to be
fixed, the warning message can be cleared permanently by disabling the redundant
port. If the user chooses to test the port and it passes, a success message will appear
and the error message will be cleared.
Before a Primary port switches to its redundant port, a scan must fail 3 times. All
channels set up to use the primary port are polled. At the end of the scan, if an error
has occurred on any channel, the error count is incremented. After 3 scans fail, the
redundant port takes over communication. If the redundant port also fails 3 times,
communication is switched back to the primary port. When both ports fail, the WX64
will continuously switch between primary and redundant port.
Individual channels do not enter COMM ERROR mode unless both primary and
redundant port failures occur.
Manual test can be performed on the redundant or primary port by going into the
redundant port’s com setting menu and selecting TEST REDUNDANT PORT or TEST
PRIMARY PORT. While in this menu the WX64 also gives the active port on the
screen.
Disabled
Select Disable to turn the port off if not needed.
WX64 User Manual | 46
2.5.1.2
Baudrate
This setting allows user to set the data rate of the communication port. The options
include 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600 and 115200.
2.5.1.3
Timeout
The Master TIMEOUT menu item affects the WX64’s master ModBus ports. TIMEOUT
is the length of time in milliseconds the controller waits before a ModBus request fails.
Three consecutive failed requests must occur before a communication error is
indicated. This item is useful for optimizing throughput to the WX64 from other slave
RTUs.
2.5.1.4
Poll Delay
The time in milliseconds the unit will delay between ModBus master requests.
2.5.1.5
Radio Setup
RADIO SETUP is used to configure radio kits that are connected directly to the WX64.
See section 7.1.
2.5.1.6
Slave Byte Order
If ModBus Slave is selected, a BYTE ODER entry appears in the menu. This
determines WORD and BYTE alignment of data at the remote ModBus transmitter
when sending its 4 byte IEEE Floating Point values. With the select bar on this entry,
Edit
the
toggles between the 4 possible modes. Min / Max Raw values are not used
in this mode.
2.5.1.7
Wireless Timeout
If Wireless Monitor is selected, a WIRELESS TIMEOUT entry appears in the menu.
Edit
The
toggles between 1m, 6m, 12m and 18m. These represent the number of
minutes the WX64 will wait before going into COMM. ERROR. See section 7.2.1.
2.5.2
ModBus TCP Settings
C o mmu n i c a t i o n
Se t t i n g s
Mo d b u s T C P
Se t t i n g s
~
Sl a v e
C OM2
Se t t i n g s
~
Ma s t e r
T i me o u t ( ms )
C OM3
Se t t i n g s
~
Ma s t e r
Po l l
C OM4
Se t t i n g s
~
Mo d b u s T C P
Ne t wo r k
Se t t i n g s
Se t t i n g s
~
~
Figure 2-24
WX64 User Manual | 47
By t e
Se t t i n g s
C OM1
Or d e r
A B CD
500
D e l a y ( ms ) 2 5 0
2.5.2.1
Slave Byte Order
If ModBus Slave is selected, a BYTE ODER entry appears in the menu. This
determines WORD and BYTE alignment of data at the remote ModBus transmitter
when sending its 4 byte IEEE Floating Point values. With the select bar on this entry,
Edit
the
toggles between the 4 possible modes. Min / Max Raw values are not used
in this mode.
2.5.2.2
Master Timeout
The time in milliseconds before the unit gives up on a ModBus request and moves on
to the next channel. After three consecutive timeouts, the channel enters the COM
Error state.
2.5.2.3
Master Poll Delay
The time in milliseconds the unit will delay between ModBus master requests.
2.5.3
Network Settings
C o mmu n i c a t i o n
Se t t i n g s
Ne t wo r k
Se t t i n g s
C OM1
Se t t i n g s
~
DHCP
C OM2
Se t t i n g s
~
H o s t n a me
C OM3
Se t t i n g s
~
Ad d r e s s
19 2 . 16 8 . 0 . 10 0
C OM4
Se t t i n g s
~
N e t ma s k
255.255.255.0
~
Ga t e w a y
19 2 . 16 8 . 0 . 1
Mo d b u s T C P
Ne t wo r k
Se t t i n g s
Se t t i n g s
En a b l e d
Ye s
Co n t r o l l e r 1
~
Figure 2-25
2.5.3.1
DHCP Enabled
Enable this parameter to allow the IP address to be set automatically by an external
DHCP server. When this parameter is enabled, the unit can be accessed by its
hostname or IP address, although the IP address will be dependent on the DHCP
server and could potentially change.
2.5.3.2
Hostname
When DHCP is enabled, hostname identifies the unit on a network instead of IP
address. This feature requires an external DHCP/DNS server to be present. The
hostname does not apply when DHCP is disabled.
2.5.3.3
IP Address
IP address identifies the unit on a network. This is automatically set when DHCP is
enabled.
2.5.3.4
Netmask
Specify if your network requires. Netmask specifies the subnet addressing scheme.
This is automatically set when DHCP is enabled.
WX64 User Manual | 48
2.5.3.5
Gateway
Gateway is the IP address of the device that may connect this subnet to other
networks. This is automatically set when DHCP is enabled.
2.6 Security Menu
A password entered in the SECURITY menu allows locking all menus. Viewing menus
is not denied but attempts to edit variables flashes the Locked message on the LCD.
Ma i n
Al a r m
Me n u
Se c u r i t y :
Ou t p u t s
Ch a n n e l
Co n f i g
C o mmu n i c a t i o n
Se c u r i t y :
~
Us e r
N a me
~
Lock
Co d e
Se t t i n g s ~
Un l o c k e d
Mo d b u s
Lock
Un l o c k e d
De f a u l t
Co d e
Us e r
0
~
Sy s t e m
~
Di a g n o s t i c s
~
Figure 2-26
2.6.1
User Name
Authorized individuals locking the system should first enter a name, phone number or
other contact information into the 10-digit field so they can be contacted to unlock the
unit at a later date.
2.6.2
Lock Code
To lock or unlock the system, the correct 4-digit authorization number must be entered
into the Lock Code field. The WX64 will ask this 4-digit code to be re-entered and then
it will be locked. Once locked, re-entering the code will unlock the unit. It is very
important to record the 4-digit code. However, if lost, the controller may be unlocked by
entering the override code: 8621
2.6.3
ModBus Lock Code
The ModBus database is normally locked. The register 40099 is used to unlock the unit
and allow writes. When written with the unlock code (found in the security menu), the
database unlocks and stays unlocked while writes occur and for 10 minutes of being
idle. The default ModBus lock code is 1234.
2.7
System Menu
The SYSTEM menu is accessed through the MAIN MENU. Some items needing
configuration are not specific to a channel but affect the entire WX64 system. These
are located in the system entry menu shown in Figure 2-27. System menus are
Edit
accessed by pointing to the desired item and pressing
WX64 User Manual | 49
.
Co n f i g u r e
N a me
Co n t r o l l e r
1
Co n t r a s t
50
Da t e
10 / 2 0 / 2 0 10
T i me
09:43:28
En a b l e
Ch a n n e l
Di s p l a y
Wa r mu p
Ca l
T i me
Pu r g e
Zone
T i me
Ne g a t i v e
Tank
Far m
Zone
3
We s t
Ga t e
Zone
4
S wi t c h g e a r
Ro o m
Zone
5
Co n t r o l
Ro o m
Zone
6
Ma i n
Zone
7
Zone
7
Co n f i g u r e
Zone
8
Zone
8
Sl a v e
~
Ca r d
St a t u s
~
Logger
Log
~
Sa v e
Co n f i g
Fi l e
~
Li f e
~
Load
Co n f i g
Fi l e
~
Vi e w
Log
v 1. 0 0
~
~
N a me s
Mo d e
Vi e w
Se n s o r
No r t h
SD
~
Ca r d
Ev e n t
N a me s
2
Zone
Cl e a r
Ye s
1
Co n f i g u r e
Ev e n t
1
Ye s
Zone
Sy s t e m
Vi e w
1
( mi n )
Zone
Ve r s i o n
SD
64
Da t a
En a b l e d
Zone
Mi mi c
Ma i n
( mi n )
Sc r e e n
Bl o c k
Co u n t
Al a r m
Log
En t r a n c e
Mi mi c
Pr o c e s s
Mi mi c
Mo d e
Mo d e
En a b l e d
No
C OM1
ID
1
Ca r d
OK
En a b l e d
Fi l e
YES
Tr end
~
T i me
Da t e
Ev e n t
09:42
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
1
09:30
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
Re s e t
Ch .
09:28
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
1
0 8 : 15
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Sy s t e m
2 1: 3 7
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
2 1: 3 5
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
2 1: 3 0
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
2 1: 2 8
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
17 : 5 6
0 7 / 0 9 / 2 0 10
C o mm
15 : 5 3
0 7 / 0 2 / 2 0 10
Co n f i g
11: 15
0 6 / 12 / 2 0 10
Co l d
09:37
0 6 / 0 1/ 2 0 10
Ca l
out
46
09:30
0 6 / 0 1/ 2 0 10
Ca l
i n
46
05:36
0 5 / 2 4 / 2 0 10
Faul t
out
32
Ve r s i o n
05:35
0 5 / 2 4 / 2 0 10
Faul t
i n
32
Co n f i g u r e
out
19
19
i n
19
Bo o t
- -
1
out
07
Al a r m
2
out
07
Al a r m
2
i n
07
1
i n
07
Er r o r
16
Er r o r
22
Bo o t
- -
Sy s t e m
Z
SD
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
ppm
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Pp m
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Ch .
Ch .
Me a s u r e me n t
H2 S
H2 S
32
of f
48
of f
Ox y g e n
Figure 2-27
WX64 User Manual | 50
V 1. 0 0
A r e y o u s u r e y o u wa n t
t hme
e s
event
l og?
o cnl ee a r N a
CY ae sr d( E d i
t )
No
Vi e w Ev e n t
Log
Cl e a r
Ev e n t
Log
t o
( Ne x t )
~
~
~
~
~
2.7.1
Version
The VERSION line in the System menu displays the version of firmware that is
programmed in the controller.
Sy s t e m
Ve r s i o n
v 1. 0 0
Co n f i g u r e
~
Zone
N a me s
~
Mi mi c
Mo d e
~
SD
Ca r d
Vi e w
Cl e a r
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
~
Log
~
Log
~
Li f e
~
Figure 2-28
2.7.2
Configure
Some items needing configuration are not specific to a channel but affect the entire
WX64 system. These are located in the CONFIGURE entry menu shown on the right
side of Figure 2-29. System Configuration menus are accessed by pointing to the
Edit
desired item and pressing
.
Sy s t e m
Ve r s i o n
Co n f i g u r e
v 1. 0 0
N a me
Co n t r o l l e r
Co n f i g u r e
~
Co n t r a s t
Zone
N a me s
~
Da t e
Mi mi c
Mo d e
~
T i me
~
En a b l e
~
Di s p l a y
Log
~
Wa r mu p
Li f e
~
Ca l
SD
Ca r d
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Cl e a r
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
Log
1
50
10 / 2 0 / 2 0 10
09:43:28
Ch a n n e l
Al a r m
T i me
Pu r g e
Zone
Bl o c k
Ma i n
64
Da t a
( mi n )
T i me
Sc r e e n
Co u n t
( mi n )
En a b l e d
Ne g a t i v e
1
1
Ye s
Ye s
Figure 2-29
2.7.2.1
Name
Assign the controller a name for use in the backup configuration file name on the SD
card. The controller name is limited to 16 characters.
2.7.2.2
Contrast
The Configure menu item identified as CONTRAST allows users to adjust the LCD
contrast to a level suitable to the ambient lighting. Selecting CONTRAST and pressing
Edit
causes the
/
keys to increase and decrease LCD contrast.
WX64 User Manual | 51
2.7.2.3
Date & Time
Adjust the date and time here for use in DATA and EVENT LOGGING. This is a factory
setting but may need to be adjusted for the end user’s location.
2.7.2.4
Enable Channel Count
For applications that do not need 64 channels, the WX64 can be configured to display
16, 32 or 48. With fewer channels to be displayed in MAIN DATA screen, the cells
expand for better resolution.
2.7.2.5
isplay Alarm
Utilizing the display alarm feature in the System menu allows the WX64 controller to
force the LCD to the MAIN DATA or ZONE screens when an alarm level is reached.
This proves to be useful if channel or zone must be displayed when in alarm. The
MAIN DATA screen is the default alarm screen from the factory.
2.7.2.6
Warmup & Cal Purge Time
WARMUP & CAL PURGE TIME are available to prevent unwanted alarm trips during
these times. This time can be adjusted up to five minutes for sensors that take a long
time to warm up or drift back down after a calibration.
2.7.2.7
Zone Screen Enabled
In some applications, all points are linked together in one large ZONE, so the ZONE
screen does not need to be displayed. Turning ZONE SCREEN ENABLED to NO
causes scrolling through the screens to skip the ZONE screen.
2.7.2.8
Block Negative
This setting prevents negative channel values from being displayed. It applies to all
channels.
WX64 User Manual | 52
2.7.3
Zone Names
ZONES 1-8 names can be edited for a quick reference while in the zone screen. These
16 character names show up in the title bar of each zone.
Sy s t e m
Ve r s i o n
Zone
N a me s
v 1. 0 0
Zone
1
Co n f i g u r e
~
Zone
2
Tank
Far m
Zone
N a me s
~
Zone
3
We s t
Ga t e
Mi mi c
Mo d e
~
Zone
4
S wi t c h g e a r
Ro o m
~
Zone
5
Co n t r o l
Ro o m
Ma i n
SD
Ca r d
Vi e w
Cl e a r
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
Log
No r t h
En t r a n c e
~
Zone
6
Log
~
Zone
7
Zone
7
Li f e
~
Zone
8
Zone
8
Pr o c e s s
Figure 2-30
2.7.4
Mimic Mode
When mimic mode is enabled, the WX64 will duplicate the data and alarms of another
WX64, which can be connected with RS485 or TCP/IP. Entering the communications
port and slave ID allows the WX64 to automatically retrieve programmed configuration
parameters from the Main controller. The Mimic controller’s communication port must
be configured as the ModBus Master and the Main controller’s communication port is
set to ModBus Slave. Once connected, the Mimic controller will update automatically
one minute after any parameter is changed in the Main controller.
Figure 2-31
WX64 User Manual | 53
2.7.5
SD Card
A two gigabyte SD card comes standard with each WX64. This SD card is not needed
for normal operation, but is useful for data logging and backing up configuration.
When the data logger is enabled, every ten minutes the Min, Max, Average, Alarm
1/2/3 status, Fault status, Calibration status and Alarm reset for each active channel is
written to the SD card in one-minute intervals. The log files are stored on the SD card
by date. Each day a new file is created and stored in a directory structure as follows:
UNIT_NAME\YEAR\MONTH\DAY.csv. The files are comma delimited text files and
work with MS Excel, which can be used to create historical plots of the data.
The first line in the file contains a date stamp. The next line is the header. The header
shows the name of each column. The AVG fields in the header list the zero and span
values for that channel. The zero and span can be used when creating plots. Another
line exists for each minute of the day. Those lines are time stamped with the hour and
minute.
The numeric format of the MIN, MAX and AVG values are based on channel settings.
The decimal precision is the same that is viewed from the unit. This can be adjusted
with the decimal points parameter in each channel’s Configure menu.
The SD Card can store more than 1 year of historical data, but backups of the card
should be performed on occasion. Backing up logs requires removing the SD card and
inserting it in a PC that has a card reader interface.
Sy s t e m
Ve r s i o n
SD
v 1. 0 0
Ca r d
St a t u s
Ca r d
OK
Co n f i g u r e
~
Logger
Zone
N a me s
~
Sa v e
Co n f i g
Fi l e
~
Mi mi c
Mo d e
~
Load
Co n f i g
Fi l e
~
~
Vi e w
Log
SD
Ca r d
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Cl e a r
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
Log
En a b l e d
Fi l e
YES
Tr end
~
~
Log
~
Li f e
~
Figure 2-32
2.7.5.1
Card Status
When the SD card is properly inserted into the card slot, CARD STATUS will display
OK. If the SD card is removed or becomes corrupt, the green LED (Figure1-1) will blink
continuously and CARD STATUS will say CARD NOT FOUND.
2.7.5.2
Logger Enabled
Enabling the Data Logger allows the WX64 to record the channel data for all active
channels.
WX64 User Manual | 54
2.7.5.3
Save Configuration File
By selecting SAVE CONFIG FILE, the current configuration file will be backed up on
the SD card. This can be beneficial in the event of a board failure or if multiple WX64s
must be programmed the same. The filename of the saved will be
UnitNameDDMMYY.cfg where DDMMYY is the current date. Saving configuration will
overwrite previous saves from the same date. It is recommended to back up
configuration once a unit is fully configured.
2.7.5.4
Load Configuration File
Once a file is backed up on the SD card, it can be loaded back into the WX64 to
change the current configuration to a previous configuration, or the SD card can be
moved to another unit and the configuration can be copied to the second unit. This is
done by selecting LOAD CONFIG FILE then selecting the name and date of the
configuration file that is to be copied.
2.7.5.5
View Log File Trend
VIEW LOG FILE TREND displays historic 24 hours of data using the 24-Hour Trend
screen format shown in Figure 1-3. The user selects the date to be displayed and all
active channels for that day are loaded into the WX64. Use the
/
to scroll
through the 64 channels of historic data. The WX64 24-Hour Historic Trend data
screen is identified by the cyan background color in the graph area. All alarm
processing is active during viewing of historic trend, and if a new alarm becomes
present, a prompt will ask the user if s/he would like to continue viewing the historic
data or exit this mode and view real time readings.
2.7.6
View Event Log
The WX64 logs the last 255 events, first in first out, in non-volatile memory so a SD
card is NOT necessary to view the event log. The events are time and date stamped,
and if channel specific, the number is shown in the right column. Use
scroll through the events.
/
to
The following events are logged: Alarm 1 In, Alarm 1 Out, Alarm 2 In, Alarm 2 Out,
Alarm 3 In, Alarm 3 Out, Fault In, Fault Out, Comm Error, Config Error, Cal In, Cal Out,
System Boot and Cold Boot.
WX64 User Manual | 55
Sy s t e m
T i me
Da t e
Ev e n t
v 1. 0 0
09:42
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
1
out
19
Co n f i g u r e
~
09:30
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
Re s e t
19
Zone
N a me s
~
09:28
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
1
Mi mi c
Mo d e
~
0 8 : 15
0 7 / 13 / 2 0 10
Sy s t e m
2 1: 3 7
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
2 1: 3 5
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
2 1: 3 0
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
2 1: 2 8
Ve r s i o n
SD
Ca r d
Vi e w
~
Ev e n t
Cl e a r
Vi e w
Log
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
~
Log
~
Li f e
~
Ch .
i n
19
Bo o t
- -
1
out
07
2
out
07
Al a r m
2
i n
07
0 7 / 12 / 2 0 10
Al a r m
1
i n
07
17 : 5 6
0 7 / 0 9 / 2 0 10
C o mm
Er r o r
16
15 : 5 3
0 7 / 0 2 / 2 0 10
Co n f i g
11: 15
0 6 / 12 / 2 0 10
Co l d
09:37
0 6 / 0 1/ 2 0 10
Ca l
out
46
09:30
0 6 / 0 1/ 2 0 10
Ca l
i n
46
05:36
0 5 / 2 4 / 2 0 10
Faul t
out
32
05:35
0 5 / 2 4 / 2 0 10
Faul t
i n
32
Er r o r
22
Bo o t
- -
Figure 2-33
2.7.7
Clear Event Log
After initial setup and testing of the controller, CLEAR EVENT LOG is used to
manually clear all events in the log file. If the event log is not cleared, the older events
will be pushed out as new ones occur.
Sy s t e m
Sy s t e m
Ve r s i o n
v 1. 0 0
Ve r s i o n
V 1. 0 0
Co n f i g u r e
~
Co n f i g u r e
Zone
N a me s
~
Z
Mi mi c
Mo d e
~
SD
~
Vi e w Ev e n t
Log
Cl e a r
Ev e n t
Log
SD
Ca r d
Vi e w
Cl e a r
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
Log
~
Log
~
Li f e
~
A r e y o u s u r e y o u wa n t
t hme
e s
event
l og?
o cnl ee a r N a
CY ae sr d( E d i
t )
No
t o
( Ne x t )
~
~
~
~
~
Figure 2-34
2.7.8
View Sensor Life
Sensor Life is available when at least one channel has Sensor Life activated in the
Marker menu (see section 2.4.4.5). The Sensor Info screen displays each channel’s
sensor status as illustrated in Figure 2-35. Channels with Sensor Life disabled are
indicate by Ch. # Disabled below the bar. Cal Required indicates no Calibration
Marker value has been received by the WX64.
WX64 User Manual | 56
Sy s t e m
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
%
v 1. 0 0
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Co n f i g u r e
~
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Zone
N a me s
~
Me a s u r e me n t
ppm
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Mi mi c
Mo d e
~
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Pp m
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
%
Ox y g e n
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Me a s u r e me n t
Ch .
Ch .
Me a s u r e me n t
Ve r s i o n
SD
Ca r d
Vi e w
Cl e a r
Vi e w
Ev e n t
Ev e n t
Se n s o r
~
Log
~
Log
~
Li f e
~
Figure 2-35
WX64 User Manual | 57
H2 S
H2 S
32
of f
48
of f
Ox y g e n
WX64 User Manual | 58
SECTION - 3 INPUT/OUTPUT BOARDS
3.1 Main I/O Interface Board #10-0331
!
!
The most basic WX64 Controller requires only the I/O Board shown in Figure 3-1 for
interfacing to field wiring. The WX64 primary power supply is applied to terminals 1 &
3(+) and 5 & 7(-) of TB4. This may be from 10 – 30 VDC. WARNING! HIGH
VOLTAGES SUCH AS 115 VAC APPLIED TO THESE TERMINALS MAY
CAUSE SEVERE DAMAGE! DC output terminals 2 & 4(+) and 6 & 8(-) on TB4
provide up to 500mA of fused output power for powering remote devices such
as lamps, transmitters etc.
This Board includes two RS-485 ports that can be independently configured either
master or slave, one Ethernet port, five Standard SPDT 5A relays, consisting of one
dedicated HORN and FAULT relay plus 3 programmable alarm relays, and power
supply I/O terminals. The Ethernet port allows the unit to be a ModBusTCP Master and
Slave and also provides access to the embedded webpage. The failsafe Fault circuit
detects firmware and CPU failures along with transmitter failures. JP1 allows the RS485 ports to be configured for 2- or 4-wire operation. A 40 pin ribbon cable connects
2
the I/O Board to the WX64 CPU and Display nest assembly. Two I C bus connectors
allow addition of optional functions such as analog I/O and discrete alarm relays for
each channel.
Horizontal jumpers installed in position 1 at JP1 connect the RS-485 port’s RX & TX
lines, simplifying 2-wire daisy chains by providing additional terminals for incoming and
outgoing cables. For example, installing the two COM 1 jumpers connects screw
terminals 1 & 5 and terminals 3 & 7 at TB3. RS-485 terminating resistors R5 (COM 1)
and R11 (COM 2) are located on the MAIN I/O Board and installed by moving the
jumpers at JP2 to position 1. These resistors should not be installed if the port is not at
the end of the communication line.
TB1 of the Main I/O Board allows the WX64 to be acknowledged remotely. A low signal
at this input will simulate an Alarm Reset event (see section 2.3.1.2). The ‘+’ input of
TB1 is pulled up to +5V. An external circuit or relay can pull the ‘+’ input low (to the ‘-‘
input) to activate the Alarm Reset event. The wiring to the external circuitry should be
no longer than 10 feet.
An optional Auxiliary Standard Relay piggyback Board (part #10-0332) may be added
to the I/O Board via ribbon cable J3. This option adds another five SPDT 5A relays that
mimic the five standard relays. Auxiliary Standard Relay contacts are available at TB1
on the optional 10-0332 shown in Figure 3-1.
An optional RS-485 Isolated piggyback Board (part #10-0368) may be added to the I/O
Board via ribbon cable J5. This option adds two additional isolated RS-485 ports for a
total of four. These two additional serial ports can also be configured for either Master
or Slave. Horizontal jumpers installed in position 1 at JP2 & JP3 (com port 3) and JP5
& JP6 (com port 4) connects the RS-485 port’s RX & TX lines, simplifying 2-wire daisy
chains by providing additional terminals for incoming and outgoing cables. For
WX64 User Manual | 59
example, installing the two COM 1 jumpers connects screw terminals 1 & 5 and
terminals 3 & 7 at TB1. RS-485 terminating resistors are installed by moving the
jumpers at JP1 (com port 3) and JP4 (com port 4) to position 1. These resistors should
not be installed if the port is not at the end of the communication line.
Figure 3-1
Main I/O Board
3.2 Input / Output Option Boards
Telephone style RJ11 connections (J3 and J4 on all option Boards) are used to add
optional 16 channel analog and digital I/O. All option Boards must have 24 VDC
applied to TB3 or TB4 which are tied together making daisy chaining the 24 VDC from
one option board to another possible. All I/O options except the Programmable Relay
Board have LEDs to indicate which channel and alarm they are assigned to. The
Programmable Relay is not limited to groups of 16 channels like the other options, so
the LEDs are not required. The connected I/O screen in the Diagnostics Menu is also
useful for displaying and programming the connected I/O Boards.
WX64 User Manual | 60
3.2.1
Optional Analog Input Board #10-0334
Many transmitters or sensors have analog output signals, and the 12 bit Analog Input
Board, shown in Figure 3-2, is available to accept these. TB1 and TB2, with 24
positions each, offer 3 terminals per channel for distributing power and receiving
analog inputs. These are EXC and HI / LO inputs. TB3 and TB4, with only two
positions each, are for daisy chaining the power supply from one option board to
another. Precision 150 ohm 5 watt resistors (R1 – R16) between each channel’s IN LO
and IN HI terminals are termination resistors for 4-20mA inputs.
EXC and IN LO terminals are bussed together internally. EXC terminals are tied
directly to TB3 and TB4 +24 VDC and IN LO terminals are tied to TB3 and TB4 power
supply common. Bussing allows transmitter power to be brought into the system at a
single point (TB3 or TB4) and distributed back out at each channel’s EXC / IN LO
terminals to simplify field wiring. Figure 3-2 includes typical wiring to 2 & 3 wire 4-20mA
transmitters.
Figure 3-2
WX64 User Manual | 61
3.2.2
Optional Discrete Relay Board #10-0345
An optional Discrete Relay Board, shown in Figure 3-3, adds 16 5 amp (resistive) form
C relays per 16 channel alarm board. Each BOARD may be configured via Diagnostics
Menu in the WX64 for ALARM 1, ALARM 2, ALARM 3 or FAULT for channels 1-16, 1732, 33-48 or 49-64. Each relay has an LED associated with it indicating whether the
relay is energized. An illuminated LED indicates energized. Alarm groups, or zones,
may be created by connecting adjacent channels together using JP5 as shown. This
creates an OR function with selected channels, causing any alarm included within the
zone to actuate ALL zoned relays. Failsafe operation of 10-0345 discrete relays may
be programmed in the system configuration menu as described in section 2.3.3. Many
WX64 applications utilize the five standard alarm relays (see section 3.0) and 16
optional programmable relay board, and do not require discrete relays for each of the
64 alarm events (64 A1s, 64 A2s, 64 A3s & 64 Faults). If discrete relays are needed for
all 64 alarms, then 16 boards are required. Each 10-0345 is powered with 24 VDC at
TB3 and TB4.
TB5 provides an open collector failure detection output. If communication is lost with
the CPU board or if the relay board’s processor fails, the positive terminal of TB5 is
pulled low.
All relays are rated at 5 Amp for 28 VDC and 250 ~VAC RESISTIVE loads.
IMPORTANT: Appropriate diode (DC loads) or MOV (AC loads) snubber
devices must be installed with inductive loads to prevent RFI noise spikes.
Relay wiring should be kept separate from low-level signal wiring.
Figure 3-3
WX64 User Manual | 62
3.2.3
Optional *Bridge Sensor Input Board #10-0347
An optional 16-channel, 12 bit Bridge Sensor Input board allows popular gas detectors
to be connected directly to the WX64 without additional signal conditioning or
transmitters. Up to eight dual channel 10-0192 modules may be installed in each 16channel 10-0347. Each 10-0192 channel is equipped with a bridge amplifier and
balance potentiometer and an adjustable switching regulator for setting the correct
sensor excitation voltage. A three position coarse gain jumper allows setting the gain of
the bridge amplifier. Fault supervision circuitry forces the WX64 into a FAULT condition
upon sensor failure or removal.
This option may also be configured to accept 4-20mA inputs for mixing bridge sensors
and current loops into the same board. Placing any channel’s 2 position LEL/4-20mA
jumper into 4-20mA position and installing the associated precision 100 ohm socketed
resistor allows 4-20mA signals to be applied to its C & A terminals. The 10-0192
sensor modules are not required for channels accepting 4-20mA.
Channels receiving input data from this board should have the Data From: menu set
for Analog Input, as described in section 2.4.4. The board default activates Cal Mode
described in section 2.4.4.4 needed to zero and span sensor readings. After
performing the one-time only Initial Setup as described below, all subsequent
calibrations are by the WX64’s electronic Cal Mode menus.
*Catalytic sensors connected directly to the WX64 should be limited to ranges of 01000ppm.
3.2.4
Bridge Sensor Input Board Initial Setup
Catalytic bead sensors vary widely in power requirements and sensitivity. It is therefore
important to configure each channel to match the sensor with which it will operate.
1.
Prior to connecting sensors, apply power to the system. Note this board
requires 24 VDC power be connected to its TB3 or TB4 terminals 1 & 2 as
shown in Figure 3-4. Measure the voltage between each channel’s A and R
terminals and set the Voltage Adjust potentiometers for the correct sensor
excitation voltage. This may range from 1.5 volts to 7.5 volts depending upon
sensor specifications.
Sensors may be damaged by accidental over voltage conditions. It is
recommended the Voltage Adjust potentiometer screws be covered by a
dollop of RTV or similar material after completion of this procedure to
avoid accidental over voltage conditions.
2.
Remove system power and connect sensor wires to the R-C-A terminals.
Reapply system power and confirm correct voltage across each sensor’s A &
R terminals. Note: If sensor wires are long, it may be necessary to measure
2
the excitation voltage at the sensor end to compensate for I R losses in the
wiring.
3.
With the minus voltmeter lead on TB3 common, connect the plus lead to the
channel’s red test point. With zero air on that sensor, adjust its Balance
potentiometer for .4 volts at the test point.
WX64 User Manual | 63
4.
Apply 50% LEL combustible span gas to the sensor and allow the test point
voltage to stabilize. Two volts = 100% input to the A – D Converter and .4
volts = 0%. Therefore, 1.2 volts = 50%. Place the 3 position Coarse LEL Gain
jumper into the position which reads between .8 volts and 1.2 volts on the test
point with 50% LEL gas on the sensor. Gain settings for each jumper position
are as follows: no jumper = 1, LOW = 7, MED = 21, HI = 41. Multiple jumpers
have an additive affect upon gain, so the LOW and MED jumpers together
provide a gain of 28.
Initial setup is now complete and normally only requires repeating if a sensor is
replaced. Final calibration of this channel may now be performed using the WX64’s
electronic Cal Mode feature described in section 2.4.4.4.
Figure 3-4
3.2.5
Optional 4-20mA Analog Output Board #10-0348
An optional 16 bit 4-20mA analog output board, shown in Figure 3-5, may be
2
connected to the I C bus. Each channel’s output will transmit 4mA for 0% readings and
WX64 User Manual | 64
20mA for 100% readings. Loop drive capability depends upon the level of the WX64’s
primary DC power supply. With at least 20 volts DC primary power, they are capable of
driving 20mA through a 750 ohm load. Outputs are self-powered, and DC power
should not be provided by the receiving device. Note: This board requires nominal 24
VDC power be connected to TB3 or TB4 terminals as shown in Figure 3-5. Since the
board has 16 channels, four are required for 64-channel applications.
The analog output board has a failure detection circuit. If the output board’s processor
fails, or if communication is lost with the CPU board, then the outputs of all channels
go to 0mA.
Figure 3-5
3.2.6
Optional Programmable Relay Board #10-0350
An optional Programmable Relay Board, shown in Figure 3-6, adds 16 programmable
5 amp (resistive) form C relays per 16-channel alarm board. Each relay may be
configured via the Alarm Outputs Menu in the WX64 Main Menu for ALARM 1 VOTES,
ALARM 2 VOTES, ALARM 3 VOTES, ACKNOWLEDGE, FAILSAFE, ZONES and
OVERRIDES. Each relay can be individually programmed for any channel or
combination of channels using the zone and override parameters. Many WX64
WX64 User Manual | 65
applications need more than the five standard relays that are provided on the Main I/O
Board, but do not need a separate relay contact for each channel. The Programmable
Relay Board is a viable cost-effective option. It gives the flexibility of an additional 16
fully programmable relays.
Each 10-0350 is powered with 24 VDC at TB3 and TB4. Each relay has a LED
associated with it indicating whether the relay is energized. An illuminated LED
indicates energized relays.
TB5 provides an open collector failure detection output. If communication is lost with
the CPU board or if the relay board’s processor fails, the positive terminal of TB5 is
pulled low.
All relays are rated at 5 Amp for 28 VDC and 250 ~VAC RESISTIVE loads.
IMPORTANT: Appropriate diode (DC loads) or MOV (AC loads) snubber
devices must be installed with inductive loads to prevent RFI noise spikes.
Relay wiring should be kept separate from low-level signal wiring.
Figure 3-6
3.2.7
Optional 24 VDC 600 Watt Power Supply
The WX64 Controller may be powered from 10-30 VDC. However, many applications
require 24 VDC power for the monitors or transmitters providing inputs to the WX64. A
600 watt AC / DC power supply may be included for these applications (115VAC or
230VAC). When ordered from the factory, it is pre-wired to provide 24 VDC primary
WX64 User Manual | 66
power for the WX64 controller as well as any transmitters or monitors that may be
connected by the end user.
Figure 3-7
600 Watt 24 VDC Power Supply
WX64 User Manual | 67
3.2.8
Optional 24 VDC 150 Watt Power Supply #10-0172
The WX64 Controller may be powered from 10-30 VDC. However, many applications
require 24 VDC power for the monitors or transmitters providing inputs to the WX64. A
150 watt AC / DC power supply may be included for these applications (115VAC or
230 VAC selected via slide switch). When ordered from the factory, it is pre-wired to
provide 24 VDC primary power for the WX64 controller as well as any transmitters or
monitors that may be connected by the end user.
Figure 3-8
WX64 User Manual | 68
SECTION - 4 DIAGNOSTICS
A System Diagnostic Mode shown in Figure 2-5 - Figure 2-7 may be entered during
normal operation from the MAIN menu. The entry menu, shown below, offers useful
routines for testing front panel LEDs, relays, serial ports and analog I/O. It is exited
Next
manually by pressing
and automatically if no keys are pressed for 5 minutes.
The unit will reboot when diagnostics is exited. It is very important to understand that
CHANNEL INPUT DATA IS NOT PROCESSED DURING THE
DIAGNOSTICS MODE. It is possible to miss important input values while
utilizing this mode and appropriate safeguards should be in place. However,
the Diagnostics Mode can prove invaluable when testing I/O since relays and
analog outputs may be stimulated without driving inputs to precise levels.
4.1
Standard Relays
STANDARD RELAY allows manual actuation of the Standard Relays while in the
Edit
Diagnostic mode. Highlight the relay to be actuated and press
I/O board confirm relay actuation.
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
1
Of f
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
2
Of f
St a n d a r d
Re l a y
3
Of f
Faul t
Ho r n
Re l a y
Re l a y
Figure 4-1
WX64 User Manual | 69
Of f
Of f
LEDs on the Main
4.2 Discrete Relays
DISCRETE RELAYS allows manual actuation of the connected Discrete Relays while
Edit
in the Diagnostic mode. Highlight the channel group to be actuated and press
.
Edit
Then select the alarm group and press
. These steps bring you to the screen on
the right in Figure 4-2 and allow the actuation of each relay in the group to be activated
individually. LEDs on the Discrete Relay board confirm relay actuation.
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
C h . 0 1- 16
Al a r m
1
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
C h . 0 1- 16 ~
Al a r m
1
~
Ch . 0 1
Al a r m
1
Of f
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
C h . 17 - 3 2 ~
Al a r m
2
~
Ch . 0 2
Al a r m
1
Of f
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
Ch . 3 3 - 4 8 ~
Al a r m
3
~
Ch . 0 3
Al a r m
1
Of f
Di s c r e t e
Re l a y
Ch . 4 9 - 6 4 ~
Faul t
~
Ch . 0 4
Al a r m
1
Of f
~
Ch . 0 5
Al a r m
1
Of f
"
C h . 16
"
Al a r m
"
"
1
Of f
Figure 4-2
4.3 Programmable Relays
PROGRAMMABLE RELAY allows manual actuation of the Programmable Relays
Edit
while in the Diagnostic mode. Highlight the relay to be actuated and press
on the Programmable Relay board confirm relay actuation.
P r o g r a mma b l e
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 1
Of f
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 2
Of f
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 3
Of f
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 4
Of f
P r o g r a mma b l e
Rl y . 0 5
Of f
"
"
P r o g r a mma b l e
"
R l y . 16
Figure 4-3
WX64 User Manual | 70
"
Of f
LEDs
4.4 Analog Inputs
By selecting a channel group you can VIEW INPUTS or CALIBRATE BOARD.
Ra w
An a l o g
Input
An a l o g
An a l o g
Input
C h . 0 1- 16
~
Vi e w
An a l o g
Input
C h . 17 - 3 2
~
Ca l i b r a t e
An a l o g
Input
Ch . 3 3 - 4 8
~
An a l o g
Input
Ch . 4 9 - 6 4
~
Input
Input s
Ra w
Co u n t s
0 0 14 3 6
Ch . 0 9 :
0 0 12 5 8
Ch . 0 2 :
002248
C h . 10 :
0 0 16 8 2
Ch . 0 3 :
0 0 3 10 8
C h . 11:
002654
Ch . 0 4 :
0 0 17 9 2
C h . 12 :
003677
Ch . 0 5 :
003859
C h . 13 :
002451
Ch . 0 6 :
0 0 18 6 2
C h . 14 :
0 0 12 3 6
Ch . 0 7 :
0 0 17 2 4
C h . 15 :
002799
Ch . 0 8 :
0 0 2 19 3
C h . 16 :
0 0 15 6 0
C h . 0 1- 16
~
Bo a r d
Co u n t s
C h . 0 1:
~
Ca l i b r a t e
Bo a r d
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
01
~
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
02
~
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
03
~
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
04
~
Ca l i b r a t e
Input
05
~
"
Ca l i b r a t e
"
Input
"
"
16
~
Figure 4-4
4.4.1
View Inputs
The channel inputs are displayed as raw counts and can be useful for troubleshooting.
These counts have no calibration applied to them so the user can see a particular
channel’s Analog to Digital counts.
4.4.2
Calibrate Board
Initial calibrating of each analog input channel is done at the factory by selecting each
channel, one at a time, and applying 20mA. The analog input board self-adjusts its
output and stores this value in non-volatile memory.
WX64 User Manual | 71
4.5 Analog Outputs
If the WX64 is equipped with an analog output option board, the output can be
manually stimulated by selecting the channel group then the channel to be ramped up.
Edit
Pressing the
increases the output value in 4mA increments from 0mA to 20mA.
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
C h . 0 1- 16
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
C h . 0 1- 16
~
An a l o g
Ou t
1
8 mA
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
C h . 17 - 3 2 ~
An a l o g
Ou t
2
4 mA
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
Ch . 3 3 - 4 8 ~
An a l o g
Ou t
3
12 mA
An a l o g
Ou t p u t
Ch . 4 9 - 6 4 ~
An a l o g
Ou t
4
2 0 mA
An a l o g
Ou t
5
16 mA
"
An a l o g
"
Ou t
Figure 4-5
4.6 Piezo
Selecting PIEZO pulses the controller’s local piezo buzzer.
Pi e z o Be e p
" Ne x t "
Te s t . Pr e s s
To Ex i t .
BEEP!
Figure 4-6
WX64 User Manual | 72
"
16
"
0 mA
4.7 LEDs
Selecting LEDs from the diagnostics menu causes the six LEDs on the front panel to
blink without affecting their corresponding relays.
L ED
Bl i n k
" Ne x t "
Te s t . Pr e s s
To Ex i t .
Figure 4-7
WX64 User Manual | 73
4.8 Serial Ports
Testing the controllers 2 standard and 2 optional communication ports is made easy by
connecting the ports together as shown in Figure 4-8 and selecting SERIAL PORTS in
the diagnostic menu. The controller does a self-diagnostic by polling one
communication port with the other to ensure correct operation. It gives a SUCCESS or
FAILURE report.
TXA
TXB
RX A
RX B
S UCCE S S
C OM1
RX A
RX B
Co n n e c t
Co n n e c t
C OM1 t o C OM2
T X A - >RX A a n d
C OM2
TXA
TXB
a n d C OM3 t o
T X B - >RX B .
TXA
TXB
C OM4 .
2
4
Wi r e .
RX A
RX B
F A I L URE
C OM3
or
RX A
RX B
C OM4
TXA
TXB
Figure 4-8
WX64 User Manual | 74
4.9 I/O Board Configuration
The board configuration screen shows all connected I/O options. This is also the menu
where the user must go if s/he wants to change the configuration or channel group of
an option board. To change the configuration of an option board, first go to the I/O
Board configuration screen. All the connected I/O boards are displayed. Second,
remove the PGM jumper J2 on the option board you want to configure. A box will be
displayed as show below in Figure 4-9. Use
/
to select the parameter to be
Edit
changed and press the
to toggle trough the options. Third, replace the PGM
jumper J2, once the correct configuration is selected. The box will disappear once the
jumper is reinstalled. These three steps can be repeated for as many options as
necessary, but only one PGM jumper J2 can be removed at a time.
An a l o g I n p u t
C h 1 – C h 16
An a l o g
C h 17 –
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 1
C h 1 – C h 16
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 1
C h 17 – C h 3 2
DR
Input
Ch 3 2
Bo a r d
C h a n DAnil saecr l.m
Br i d g e
Ch 3 3 –
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 1
Ch 3 3 – Ch 4 8
Se t t i n g s
R a n g eDA il sa cr m.
Br i d g e
Ch 4 9 –
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 1
Ch 4 9 – Ch 6 4
sc.
C h . 0 1-DA il 16
ar m
C h 17
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 3
C h 1 – C h 16
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 3
C h 17 – C h 3 2
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 3
Ch 3 3 – Ch 4 8
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 3
Ch 4 9 – Ch 6 4
Di s c .
Faul t
Ch 1 –
Di s c . Re l a y
Faul t
Al a r m
C h 17 – C h 3 2
Di s c . Re l a y
Faul t
Al a r m
Ch 3 3 – Ch 4 8
Di s c . Re l a y
Faul t
Al a r m
Ch 4 9 – Ch 6 4
An a l o g
C h 17 –
An a l o g
Ch 3 3 –
An a l o g
Ch 4 9 –
Re l a y
Al a r m
C h 16
A n a l o g Ou t
C h 1 – C h 16
Ou t
Ch 3 2
Ch 3 3
Re l a y
2
Ch 4 8
Input
Ch 6 4
Di s c . Re l a y
Al a r m 2
C h 1 – C h 16
Al a r m
Re l a y
2
– Ch 3 2
Input
Ch 4 8
–
Ch 4 9
Al a r m
Ou t
Ch 4 8
P r o g r a mma b l e
Re l a y
Figure 4-9
WX64 User Manual | 75
1
Re l a y
2
Ch 6 4
–
Ou t
Ch 6 4
WX64 User Manual | 76
SECTION - 5 ModBus
The WX64 is equipped with two standard RS-485 ports that can be independently
configured as ModBus master or slave, an optional RS-485 Isolated piggyback Board
(part # 10-0368) may be added to the I/O Board via ribbon cable J5. This option adds
two additional isolated RS-485 ports for a total of four. These two additional serial ports
can also be configured for either Master or Slave. Section 5.0 defines register locations
of data available via the WX64 slave port.
5.1 ModBus TCP
In addition to the RS-485 ports, the WX64 supports both master and slave
ModBusTCP. ModBusTCP is always enabled through the Ethernet port. See section
2.5 for ModBus configuration options. The ModBusTCP slave is always active on port
502. The unit can be polled by its IP Address or hostname. When ModBusTCP slave is
used, the slave ID field of the message is ignored. Channels can be configured to poll
using the WX64’s ModBusTCP master interface. Devices are polled by IP Address, not
hostname.
5.2 ModBus Slave Writes
The ModBus slave ports allow function code 5 (write coil), as well as function codes 6
and 16 (write holding registers). These function codes can be used to write
configuration parameters to the WX64. By default, all ModBus writes are disabled
except the unlock parameter 40099. The ModBus lock code can be written to register
40099 to enable writes to other registers. The unit will be unlocked for 10 minutes after
the last write occurs. After the 10 minute timeout, the unit will automatically save any
parameters that have been written. All written parameters can be saved manually by
writing a value of 1 to coil 95 or register 40095.
Writing parameters that span multiple registers (such as 32bit floating points) requires
function code 16. All of the registers must be written at once.
5.3 ModBus Slave Register Location
The following tables describe the WX64’s ModBus slave database. Any portion of this
data may be read by a ModBus master device such as a PC, PLC or DCS. Since the
ModBus port is RS-485, many WX64s may be multi-dropped onto the same cable.
WX64 User Manual | 77
5.3.1
Coils
All coils are duplicated in the holding register table. These values can be read or
written using either the coil register or the holding register.
Actions
Alarm
Reset
N/A
1
1
N/A
1
5
Write 1 to
simulate pressing
the alarm reset
button
Save
Config
N/A
95
95
N/A
1
5
Saves
configuration now
Config
Changed
N/A
96
96
N/A
1
5
This register is
set to 1 when a
configuration
parameter has
changed. The
user can clear it
by writing 0.
5.3.2
Discrete Inputs
All discrete inputs are duplicated in the input register table. These values can be read
using either discrete register or the holding register.
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Lock
Status
N/A
12005
12005
N/A
2
N/A
Standard
Relay 1
State
Standard
Relay 2
State
Standard
Relay 3
State
N/A
12020
12020
N/A
2
N/A
N/A
12021
12021
N/A
2
N/A
N/A
12022
12022
N/A
2
N/A
Indicates the lock
state for ModBus
writes.
Locked = 1
Unlocked = 0
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
WX64 User Manual | 78
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Fault
Relay
State
Horn
Relay
State
Warmup
N/A
12023
12023
N/A
2
N/A
N/A
12024
12024
N/A
2
N/A
N/A
12025
12025
N/A
2
N/A
Standard
Relay 1
Flashing
N/A
12026
12020
N/A
4
N/A
Standard
Relay 2
Flashing
N/A
12027
12027
N/A
4
N/A
Standard
Relay 3
Flashing
N/A
12028
12028
N/A
4
N/A
Fault
Relay
Flashing
N/A
12029
12029
N/A
4
N/A
Horn
Relay
Flashing
N/A
12034
12034
N/A
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
Not in warmup =
0
In warmup = 1
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether standard
relay 1 has been
acknowledged.
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether standard
relay 2 has been
acknowledged.
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether standard
relay 3 has been
acknowledged.
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether the fault
has been
acknowledged.
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether the horn
relay has been
acknowledged.
WX64 User Manual | 79
Channel Data
Type
Channel
First
Last
Read
FC
2
Write
FC
N/A
Notes
13512
Block
Size
1
Alarm 1
Status
Alarm 1
Flashing
Alarm 2
Status
Alarm 2
Flashing
Alarm 3
Status
Alarm 3
Flashing
Fault
Status
Comm
Error
Config
Error
IO Error
Cal Flag
Marker
Detected
Linearizing
1-64
13449
1-64
13513
13576
1
2
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
13577
13640
1
2
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
13641
13704
1
2
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
13705
13768
1
2
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
13769
13832
1
2
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
13833
13896
1
2
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
13897
13960
1
2
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
13961
14024
1
2
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
1-64
1-64
14025
14089
14153
14088
14152
14216
1
1
1
2
2
2
N/A
N/A
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
Off = 0, On = 1
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
14217
14280
1
2
N/A
1-64
14281
14344
1
2
N/A
Set if the
channel’s
linearize map is
non default.
Off = 0, On = 1
Unacknowledged
error. Off = 0, On
=1
Error
Flashing
WX64 User Manual | 80
Off = 0, On = 1
5.3.3
Input Registers
Type
Channel
First
Last
32001
32002
Block
Size
N/A
N/A
Read
FC
4
4
Write
FC
N/A
N/A
Product ID
Version
N/A
N/A
32001
32002
Custom
Feature
Customer
ID
Lock
Status
N/A
32003
32003
N/A
4
N/A
Reads value 72
Reads version *
100
N/A
N/A
32004
32004
N/A
4
N/A
N/A
N/A
32005
32005
N/A
4
N/A
Boot Date,
Year
N/A
32006
32006
N/A
4
N/A
Boot Date,
Mon
N/A
32007
32007
N/A
4
N/A
Boot Date,
Day
N/A
32008
32008
N/A
4
N/A
Boot
Time,
Hour
Boot
Time, Min
N/A
32009
32009
N/A
4
N/A
N/A
32010
32010
N/A
4
N/A
Boot
Time, Sec
N/A
32011
32011
N/A
4
N/A
Standard
Relay 1
State
Standard
Relay 2
State
N/A
32020
32020
N/A
4
N/A
N/A
32021
32021
N/A
4
N/A
Indicates the lock
state for ModBus
writes.
Locked = 1
Unlocked = 0
System boot
timestamp
0000 - 9999
System boot
timestamp
0 – 12
System boot
timestamp
0 – 31
System boot
timestamp
0 – 23
System boot
timestamp
0 – 59
System boot
timestamp
0 – 59
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Standard
Relay 3
State
N/A
32022
32022
N/A
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
WX64 User Manual | 81
Notes
Fault
Relay
State
Horn
Relay
State
Warmup
N/A
32023
32023
N/A
4
N/A
N/A
32024
32024
N/A
4
N/A
N/A
32025
32025
N/A
4
N/A
Standard
Relay 1
Flashing
N/A
32026
32020
N/A
4
N/A
Standard
Relay 2
Flashing
N/A
32027
32027
N/A
4
N/A
Standard
Relay 3
Flashing
N/A
32028
32028
N/A
4
N/A
Fault
Relay
Flashing
N/A
32029
32029
N/A
4
N/A
Horn
Relay
Flashing
N/A
32034
32034
N/A
4
N/A
WX64 User Manual | 82
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
Off = 0, On = 1,
doesn’t take into
account failsafe
Not in warmup =
0
In warmup = 1
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether standard
relay 1 has been
acknowledged.
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether standard
relay 2 has been
acknowledged.
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether standard
relay 3 has been
acknowledged.
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether the fault
has been
acknowledged.
False = 0, True =
1. Indicates
whether the horn
relay has been
acknowledged.
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Active
Port for
COM1
N/A
32030
32030
N/A
4
N/A
Active
Port for
COM2
N/A
32031
32031
N/A
4
N/A
Active
Port for
COM3
N/A
32032
32032
N/A
4
N/A
Active
Port for
COM4
N/A
32033
32033
N/A
4
N/A
When a
redundant port is
enabled, this
value indicates
which port is in
use. (0) or the
port number of
the redundant
port (1-3).
(PortNumber – 1)
See active port for
COM1. (1) or the
port number of
the redundant
port (0,2,3).
(PortNumber – 1)
See active port for
COM1. (2) or the
port number of
the redundant
port (0,1,3).
(PortNumber – 1)
See active port for
COM1. (3) or the
port number of
the redundant
port (0-2).
(PortNumber – 1)
WX64 User Manual | 83
Channel Data
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Analog
Output
1-64
31001
31064
1
4
N/A
Channel
Value
1-64
33001
33064
1
4
N/A
Channel
Value
Channel
Value
1-64
33065
33192
2
4
N/A
1-64
33193
33384
3
4
N/A
Alarm 1
Status
Alarm 1
Flashing
Alarm 2
Status
Alarm 2
Flashing
Alarm 3
Status
Alarm 3
Flashing
Fault
Status
Comm
Error
Config
Error
IO Error
1-64
33449
33512
1
4
N/A
16bit integer
value tracking
analog output.
Uses a range of
800 – 4000 to
represent 420mA.
16bit
representation of
float w/ ±5%
over/under range.
* see formula
32bit IEEE
Floating point
Character string
representation of
value. 2 ASCII
characters per
register
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
33513
33576
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
33577
33640
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
33641
33704
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
33705
33768
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
33769
33832
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
33833
33896
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
33897
33960
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
33961
34024
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
1-64
34025
34088
1
4
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
WX64 User Manual | 84
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Cal Flag
Marker
Detected
Linearizing
1-64
1-64
34089
34153
34152
34216
1
1
4
2
N/A
N/A
Off = 0, On = 1
Off = 0, On = 1
Set if the channel’s
linearize map is non
default.
Off = 0, On = 1
Error
1-64
34281 34344 1
2
N/A
Unacknowledged
Flashing
error. Off = 0, On =
1
Sensor
1-64
34401 34464 1
4
N/A
-2 = Disabled, -1 =
Life
Cal Required, 0 –
100 = Sensor life
* 16bit representation of float w/ ±5% over/under range is calculated as follows:
1-64
34217
34280
1
2
N/A
DisplayValue = ModBusValue * (SpanValue – ZeroValue) * 1.1 + ZeroValue – (SpanValue – ZeroValue) * 0.5
32767
5.3.4
Holding Registers
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Alarm
Reset
N/A
40001
40001
N/A
3
6, 16
System
Name
N/A
40010
40017
N/A
3
6, 16
Date,
Year
Date,
Mon
Date,
Day
Time,
Hour
Time,
Min
Time,
Sec
N/A
40020
40020
N/A
3
6, 16
Simulates the
alarm reset
button. Write a
value of 1 to
activate.
Character string,
2 characters per
register
0000 - 9999
N/A
40021
40021
N/A
3
6, 16
0 – 12
N/A
40022
40022
N/A
3
6, 16
0 – 31
N/A
40023
40023
N/A
3
6, 16
0 – 23
N/A
40024
40024
N/A
3
6, 16
0 – 59
N/A
40025
40025
N/A
3
6, 16
0 – 59
WX64 User Manual | 85
Warmup
Time
Cal Purge
Time
Block
Negative
N/A
40027
40027
N/A
3
6, 16
N/A
40028
40028
N/A
3
6, 16
N/A
40029
40029
N/A
3
6, 16
Time in minutes.
0–5
Time in minutes.
0–5
No = 0, Yes = 1
Zone Names
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Zone 1
Name
N/A
40030
40037
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 2
Name
N/A
40038
40045
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 3
Name
N/A
40046
40053
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 4
Name
N/A
40054
40062
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 5
Name
N/A
40062
40069
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 6
Name
N/A
40070
40077
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 7
Name
N/A
40078
40085
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 8
Name
N/A
40086
40093
N/A
3
6, 16
Character string,
2 characters per
register
Character string,
2 characters per
register
Character string,
2 characters per
register
Character string,
2 characters per
register
Character string,
2 characters per
register
Character string,
2 characters per
register
Character string,
2 characters per
register
Character string,
2 characters per
register
WX64 User Manual | 86
Actions
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Save
Config
Config
Changed
N/A
40095
40095
N/A
3
6
N/A
40096
40096
N/A
3
6
Security
Unlock
N/A
40099
40099
N/A
3
6
Saves
configuration now
This register is
set to 1 when a
configuration
parameter has
changed. The
user can clear it
by writing 0.
This register must
be written with
the ModBus
unlock code
before any
parameter can be
written using
function codes 6
or 16. 0000 –
9999, 1234
5.3.5
Standard Relay 1
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
A1 Votes
N/A
40100
40100
N/A
3
6, 16
A2 Votes
N/A
40101
40101
N/A
3
6, 16
A3 Votes
N/A
40102
40102
N/A
3
6, 16
Acknowledge
N/A
40103
40103
N/A
3
6, 16
Failsafe
N/A
40104
40104
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 1
Enable
N/A
40105
40105
N/A
3
6, 16
Alarm 1 channels
required. 0 - 64
Alarm 2 channels
required. 0 – 64
Alarm 3 channels
required. 0 - 64
Relay is
acknowledgeable.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Relay is failsafe.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 1
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
WX64 User Manual | 87
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Zone 2
Enable
N/A
40106
40106
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 3
Enable
N/A
40107
40107
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 4
Enable
N/A
40108
40108
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 5
Enable
N/A
40109
40109
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 6
Enable
N/A
40110
40110
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 7
Enable
N/A
40111
40111
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 8
Enable
N/A
40112
40112
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 1
Channel
N/A
40113
40113
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 1
Alarm
N/A
40114
40114
N/A
3
6, 16
Use zone 2
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 3
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 4
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 5
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 6
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 7
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 8
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
WX64 User Manual | 88
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Override 2
Channel
N/A
40115
40115
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 2
Alarm
N/A
40116
40116
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 3
Channel
N/A
40117
40117
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 3
Alarm
N/A
40118
40118
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 4
Channel
N/A
40119
40119
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 4
Alarm
N/A
40120
40120
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 5
Channel
N/A
40121
40121
N/A
3
6, 16
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Notes
Override 5
Alarm
N/A
40122
40122
N/A
3
6, 16
WX64 User Manual | 89
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Override 6
Channel
N/A
40123
40123
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 6
Alarm
N/A
40124
40124
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 7
Channel
N/A
40125
40125
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 7
Alarm
N/A
40126
40126
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 8
Channel
N/A
40127
40127
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 8
Alarm
N/A
40128
40128
N/A
3
6, 16
5.3.6
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Standard Relay 2
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
A1 Votes
N/A
40140
40140
N/A
3
6, 16
A2 Votes
N/A
40141
40141
N/A
3
6, 16
A3 Votes
N/A
40142
40142
N/A
3
6, 16
Acknowledge
N/A
40143
40143
N/A
3
6, 16
Failsafe
N/A
40144
40144
N/A
3
6, 16
Alarm 1 channels
required. 0 - 64
Alarm 2 channels
required. 0 – 64
Alarm 3 channels
required. 0 - 64
Relay is
acknowledgeable.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Relay is failsafe.
No = 0, Yes = 1
WX64 User Manual | 90
Zone 1
Enable
N/A
40145
40145
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 2
Enable
N/A
40146
40146
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 3
Enable
N/A
40147
40147
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 4
Enable
N/A
40148
40148
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 5
Enable
N/A
40149
40149
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 6
Enable
N/A
40150
40150
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 7
Enable
N/A
40151
40151
N/A
3
6, 16
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Zone 8
Enable
N/A
40152
40152
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 1
Channel
N/A
40153
40153
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 1
Alarm
N/A
40154
40154
N/A
3
6, 16
WX64 User Manual | 91
Use zone 1
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 2
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 3
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 4
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 5
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 6
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 7
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Notes
Use zone 8
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Override 2
Channel
N/A
40155
40155
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 2
Alarm
N/A
40156
40156
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 3
Channel
N/A
40157
40157
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 3
Alarm
N/A
40158
40158
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 4
Channel
N/A
40159
40159
N/A
3
6, 16
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Override 4
Alarm
N/A
40160
40160
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 5
Channel
N/A
40161
40161
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 5
Alarm
N/A
40162
40162
N/A
3
6, 16
WX64 User Manual | 92
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Notes
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Override 6
Channel
N/A
40163
40163
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 6
Alarm
N/A
40164
40164
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 7
Channel
N/A
40165
40165
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 7
Alarm
N/A
40166
40166
N/A
3
6, 16
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Override 8
Channel
N/A
40167
40167
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 8
Alarm
N/A
40168
40168
N/A
3
6, 16
5.3.7
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Notes
Create an
override channel.
0 is disabled. 0 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Standard Relay 3
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
A1 Votes
N/A
40180
40180
N/A
3
6, 16
A2 Votes
N/A
40181
40181
N/A
3
6, 16
A3 Votes
N/A
40182
40182
N/A
3
6, 16
Acknowledg
e
N/A
40183
40183
N/A
3
6, 16
Alarm 1 channels
required. 0 - 64
Alarm 2 channels
required. 0 – 64
Alarm 3 channels
required. 0 - 64
Relay is
acknowledgeable.
No = 0, Yes = 1
WX64 User Manual | 93
Failsafe
N/A
40184
40184
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 1
Enable
N/A
40185
40185
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 2
Enable
N/A
40186
40186
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 3
Enable
N/A
40187
40187
N/A
3
6, 16
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Zone 4
Enable
N/A
40188
40188
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 5
Enable
N/A
40189
40189
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 6
Enable
N/A
40190
40190
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 7
Enable
N/A
40191
40191
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 8
Enable
N/A
40192
40192
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 1
Channel
N/A
40193
40193
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 1
Alarm
N/A
40194
40194
N/A
3
6, 16
WX64 User Manual | 94
Relay is failsafe.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 1
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 2
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 3
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Notes
Use zone 4
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 5
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 6
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 7
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Use zone 8
channels for
voting. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Override 2
Channel
N/A
40195
40195
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 2
Alarm
N/A
40196
40196
N/A
3
6, 16
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Override 3
Channel
N/A
40197
40197
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 3
Alarm
N/A
40198
40198
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 4
Channel
N/A
40199
40199
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 4
Alarm
N/A
40200
40200
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 5
Channel
N/A
40201
40201
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 5
Alarm
N/A
40202
40202
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 6
Channel
N/A
40203
40203
N/A
3
6, 16
WX64 User Manual | 95
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Notes
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use. Alarm 1 =
0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Override 6
Alarm
N/A
40204
40204
N/A
3
6, 16
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Override 7
Channel
N/A
40205
40205
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 7
Alarm
N/A
40206
40206
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 8
Channel
N/A
40207
40207
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 8
Alarm
N/A
40208
40208
N/A
3
6, 16
5.3.8
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Notes
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel
to use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Discrete Relays
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
A1
Failsafe
N/A
40220
40220
N/A
3
6, 16
A2
Failsafe
N/A
40221
40221
N/A
3
6, 16
A3
Failsafe
N/A
40222
40222
N/A
3
6, 16
Makes discrete
relays boards that
use alarm 1
failsafe. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Makes discrete
relays boards that
use alarm 2
failsafe. No = 0,
Yes = 1
Makes discrete
relays boards that
use alarm 3
failsafe. No = 0,
Yes = 1
WX64 User Manual | 96
5.3.9
Horn/Piezo
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Alarm 1
Mode
N/A
40230
40230
N/A
3
6, 16
Alarm 2
Mode
N/A
40231
40231
N/A
3
6, 16
Alarm 3
Mode
N/A
40232
40232
N/A
3
6, 16
Acknowledg
e
Failsafe
Piezo
Alarm
N/A
40233
40233
N/A
3
6, 16
Off = 0,
On = 1,
Beep = 2
Off = 0,
On = 1,
Beep = 2
Off = 0,
On = 1,
Beep = 2
Off = 0, On = 1
N/A
N/A
40234
40235
40234
40235
N/A
N/A
3
3
6, 16
6, 16
No = 0, Yes = 1
No = 0, Yes = 1
5.3.10 Channel Configuration
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Tag
1-64
40401
40912
8
3
16
Eng. Units
1-64
40913
41104
3
3
16
Zero Value
Zero Value
Span
Value
Span
Value
1-64
1-64
1-64
41297
41425
41553
41424
41552
41680
2
2
2
3
3
3
16
16
16
2 characters per
register
2 characters per
register
Integer and divisor
32bit IEEE Float
Integer and divisor
1-64
41681
41808
2
3
16
32bit IEEE Float
WX64 User Manual | 97
Alarm 1
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Setpoint
1-64
41809
41936
2
3
16
Setpoint
Latching
Trip
1-64
1-64
1-64
41937
42065
42129
42064
42128
42192
2
1
1
3
3
3
16
6, 16
6, 16
On Delay
1-64
42193
42256
1
3
6, 16
Off Delay
1-64
42257
42320
1
3
6, 16
Horn Drive
1-64
42321
42448
1
3
6, 16
Integer and
divisor
32bit IEEE Float
No = 0, Yes = 1
Low = 0,
High = 1
Time in seconds.
0 – 10
Time in minutes.
0 - 120
No = 0, Yes = 1
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Setpoint
1-64
42449
42576
2
3
16
Setpoint
Latching
Trip
1-64
1-64
1-64
42577
42705
42769
42704
42768
42832
2
1
1
3
3
3
16
6, 16
6, 16
On Delay
1-64
42833
42896
1
3
6, 16
Off Delay
1-64
42897
42960
1
3
6, 16
Horn Drive
Color
1-64
1-64
42961
43025
43024
43088
1
1
3
3
6, 16
6, 16
Integer and
divisor
32bit IEEE Float
No = 0, Yes = 1
Low = 0,
High = 1
Time in seconds.
0 – 10
Time in minutes.
0 - 120
No = 0, Yes = 1
Alarm color
displayed on the
unit
Red = 0,
Blue = 1,
Orange = 2
Alarm 2
WX64 User Manual | 98
Alarm 3
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Setpoint
1-64
43089
43216
2
3
16
Setpoint
Latching
1-64
1-64
43217
43345
43344
43408
2
1
3
3
16
6, 16
Trip
1-64
43409
43472
1
3
6, 16
On Delay
1-64
43473
43536
1
3
6, 16
Off Delay
1-64
43537
43600
1
3
6, 16
Horn Drive
Color
1-64
1-64
43601
43665
43664
43728
1
1
3
3
6, 16
6, 16
Enable
1-64
43729
43792
1
3
6, 16
Integer and
divisor
32bit IEEE Float
No = 0,
Yes = 1
Low = 0,
High = 1
Time in seconds.
0 – 10
Time in minutes.
0 - 120
No = 0, Yes = 1
Alarm color
displayed
on the unit
Red = 0,
Blue = 1,
Orange = 2
No = 0, Yes = 1
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Setpoint
1-64
43793
43920
2
3
16
Setpoint
1-64
43921
44048
2
3
16
Integer and
divisor
32bit IEEE Float
Fault
WX64 User Manual | 99
Data From
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Source
1-64
44369
44432
1
3
6, 16
Min Raw
Max Raw
Remote ID
Interface
1-64
1-64
1-64
1-64
44433
44497
44561
44625
44496
44560
44624
44688
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
6, 16
6, 16
6, 16
6, 16
Filter
Count
Local Cal
1-64
44689
44752
1
3
6,16
Analog In = 0,
ModBus
16bit = 1,
Signed ModBus
16bit = 2,
ModBus
32bit = 3,
Wireless
Monitor = 4,
Digital In = 5
Integer
Integer
0 – 247
COM1 = 0
COM2 = 1
COM3 = 2
COM4 = 3
TCP/IP = 4
1 – 40
1-64
44753
44816
1
3
6,16
Byte Order
1-64
44881
44944
1
3
6,16
Alias
1-64
44945
45072
2
3
16
IP Address
1-64
45073
45200
2
3
16
TCP/IP
Port
1-64
45201
45328
1
3
6, 16
WX64 User Manual | 100
No = 0,
Yes = 1,
Board
Default = 2
ABCD = 0
CDAB = 1
BADC = 2
DCBA = 3
ModBus alias.
0 – 65535
Target address
for ModBusTCP
TCP/IP port for
ModBusTCP.
0 - 65535
Linearize Map
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Point 1
1-64
45329
45584
4
3
16
Point 2
1-64
45585
45840
4
3
16
Point 3
1-64
45841
46096
4
3
16
Point 4
1-64
46097
46352
4
3
16
Point 5
1-64
46353
46608
4
3
16
Point 6
1-64
46609
46864
4
3
16
Point 7
1-64
46865
47120
4
3
16
Point 8
1-64
47121
47376
4
3
16
Point 9
1-64
47377
47632
4
3
16
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
2x 32bit IEEE
Floats, Input and
Output
WX64 User Manual | 101
Configure
Type
Channel
First
Last
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Decimal
Points
1-64
47633
47696
1
3
6, 16
Channel
Enable
Zone
1-64
47697
47760
1
3
6, 16
1-64
47761
47824
1
3
6, 16
Deadband
%
1-64
47825
47952
2
3
16
0 = 0,
1 = 1,
2 = 2,
3 = 3,
No = 0,
Yes = 1
Zone 1 = 0,
Zone 2 = 1,
Zone 3 = 2,
Zone 4 = 3,
Zone 5 = 4,
Zone 6 = 5,
Zone 7 = 6,
Zone 8 = 7,
32bit IEEE Float
(0.0 – 5.0)
5.3.11 Programmable Relays
The programmable relay option allows 16 relays to be configured. The configuration
parameters are the same for all 16 relays. The following table shows the base address
of each programmable relay.
Programmable
Relay Number
Base ModBus Address
Relay 1
Relay 2
Relay 3
Relay 4
Relay 5
Relay 6
Relay 7
Relay 8
Relay 9
Relay 10
Relay 11
Relay 12
Relay 13
Relay 14
Relay 15
Relay 16
49000
49040
49080
49120
49160
49200
49240
49280
49320
49360
49400
49440
49480
49520
49560
49600
WX64 User Manual | 102
The register for each relay parameter is determined by adding the offset to that relay’s
base address.
Type
Channel
Address
Offset
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
A1 Votes
N/A
0
N/A
3
6, 16
A2 Votes
N/A
1
N/A
3
6, 16
A3 Votes
N/A
2
N/A
3
6, 16
Acknowledge
N/A
3
N/A
3
6, 16
Failsafe
N/A
4
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 1
Enable
N/A
5
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 2
Enable
N/A
6
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 3
Enable
N/A
7
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 4
Enable
N/A
8
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 5
Enable
N/A
9
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 6
Enable
N/A
10
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 7
Enable
N/A
11
N/A
3
6, 16
Zone 8
Enable
N/A
12
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 1
Channel
N/A
13
N/A
3
6, 16
Alarm 1 channels
required. 0 - 64
Alarm 2 channels
required. 0 – 64
Alarm 3 channels
required. 0 - 64
Relay is
acknowledgeable.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Relay is failsafe.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 1
channels for voting.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 2
channels for voting.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 3
channels for voting.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 4
channels for voting.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 5
channels for voting.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 6
channels for voting.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 7
channels for voting.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Use zone 8
channels for voting.
No = 0, Yes = 1
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
WX64 User Manual | 103
Type
Channel
Address
Offset
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Override 1
Alarm
N/A
14
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 2
Channel
N/A
15
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 2
Alarm
N/A
16
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 3
Channel
N/A
17
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 3
Alarm
N/A
18
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 4
Channel
N/A
19
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 4
Alarm
N/A
20
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 5
Channel
N/A
21
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 5
Alarm
N/A
22
N/A
3
6, 16
Alarm for this
override channel to
use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel to
use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel to
use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel to
use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel to
use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
WX64 User Manual | 104
Type
Channel
Address
Offset
Block
Size
Read
FC
Write
FC
Notes
Override 6
Channel
N/A
23
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 6
Alarm
N/A
24
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 7
Channel
N/A
25
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 7
Alarm
N/A
26
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 8
Channel
N/A
27
N/A
3
6, 16
Override 8
Alarm
N/A
28
N/A
3
6, 16
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel to
use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel to
use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
Create an override
channel. 0 is
disabled. 0 - 64
Alarm for this
override channel to
use.
Alarm 1 = 0,
Alarm 2 = 1,
Alarm 3 = 2
WX64 User Manual | 105
WX64 User Manual | 106
SECTION - 6 ENCLOSURE OPTIONS
6.1 Panel / Rack Mount Enclosure
The WX64 shown in Figure 6-1 is a half width 19” rack enclosure. It is supplied with
hardware that allows mounting in either a full-width 19” rack style cabinet or it may be
panel-mounted in a rectangular cutout. Only one 16-channel I/O option Board such as
analog input or discrete relays, may be mounted directly to the back of the enclosure.
Additional 16-channel I/O option boards must be located external from the assembly
2
on another mounting plate. An extension I C cable up to 10’ is required for this
purpose. Weight is approximately 7 pounds. Properly ground the enclosure and follow
national and local electrical codes.
Figure 6-1
Rack/Panel Mount
(19” Rack spreader plates & Panel mount bezel not shown)
6.2 NEMA 4X Wall Mount Fiberglass Enclosure
The WX64 shown in Figure 6-2 is a fiberglass NEMA 4X wall mount enclosure. Eleven
16-channel I/O option boards, such as analog input or discrete relays, may be mounted
inside this enclosure with the addition of a 0010-1269 expansion plate. It is suitable for
mounting outdoors, but an above-mounted weather deflector shield is recommended.
Weight is approximately 55 pounds. Figure 6.4 provides important warning information
concerning correct grounding procedures for non-metallic enclosures. Conduit entries
are not provided so installers may place entries as needed. Bottom or lower side areas
are recommended. Care must be taken to avoid drilling into circuit boards mounted
inside the enclosure. Properly ground the enclosure and follow national and local
electrical codes.
WX64 User Manual | 107
Figure 6-2
NEMA 4X Wall Mount
WX64 User Manual | 108
6.3
NEMA 7 Wall Mount Aluminum Enclosure
The WX64 shown in Figure 6-3 is an aluminum NEMA 4X / 7 wall mount enclosure
designed for mounting into DIV 1&2 Groups B,C,D potentially hazardous areas. Five
16-channel I/O option PCB’s, such as analog inputs or discrete relays, may be
mounted inside this enclosure with the addition of a 0010-1284 expansion plate. It is
suitable for mounting outdoors, but an above-mounted weather deflector shield is
recommended. Weight is approximately 110 pounds. Properly ground the enclosure
and follow national and local electrical codes.
Figure 6-3
NEMA 7 Wall Mount
WX64 User Manual | 109
Figure 6-4
WX64 User Manual | 110
SECTION - 7 WIRELESS OPTION
WX64’s communication ports may be connected to a FHSS (Frequency Hopping
Spread Spectrum) wireless radio modem shown in Figure 7-1. There are two different
frequency options offered, 900 MHz and 2.4 GHz. 900 MHz is available in a single port
modem (10-0364) or dual port modem (10-0365). 2.4 GHz is also available in a single
port (10-0357) or dual port modem (10-0358). The dual port radio modems have two
radio modules installed and can be used to receive and transmit data simultaneously.
The radio kit options allow three separate modes of wireless operation. These are
“Wireless Monitor” (section 7.2) accepting data from wireless OLCT 200 sensor
transmitters, “Wireless ModBus Slave” (section 7.3) providing data to a ModBus
master (master side of network requires additional radio), and “Wireless ModBus
Master” (section 7.4) accepting wireless data from ModBus slaves (slaves side of
network requires additional radio). When used in the “Wireless Receiver” mode, the
radio must be connected to a port configured for WIRELESS MONITOR. “Wireless
ModBus Master” mode requires the radio be connected to the WX64’s RS-485 port
configured for MODBUS MASTER and “Wireless ModBus Slave” mode connects it to
the RS-485 port configured for MODBUS SLAVE (Section 2.5.1.1). It is important to
remember RADIO SETUP functions described in section 7.1 may be performed from
the COMMUNICATION SETTINGS menu.
Each transceiver on a wireless network must have their RADIO SETUP menus
configured to share the same hopping channel (0-32) and System ID (0-255) to
communicate. All WX-series wireless transceivers utilize a Server-Client network
where Clients synchronize their hopping to the Server. The Server transmits a beacon
at the beginning of every hop (50 times per second). Client transceivers listen for this
beacon, and upon hearing it, will indicate InRange with the LED on the radio modem
board and synchronize their hopping with the Server. Each network should consist of
only one Server. There should never be two servers on the same RF Channel number
in the same coverage area, as the interference between the two servers will severely
hinder RF communications. The Server must be in a powered location (as opposed to
a battery-powered OLCT 200 utilizing a “sleep” mode) and Servers typically should be
centrally located since all Clients must receive the beacon in order to communicate.
WX64 User Manual | 111
2.4 GHz Radio Modem
900 MHz Radio Modem
Note: Note:
10-0357 Has One Radio Module Installed
10-0364 Has One Radio Module Installed
10-0358 Has Two Radio Modules Installed
10-0365 Has Two Radio Modules Installed
Figure 7-1
7.1 Radio Setup Menu
Radio modules connected to the WX64’s communication port may be configured
Edit
through the RADIO SETUP menu. Pressing the
key with the arrow pointing to
the Radio Setup menu brings the RADIO SETUP menus to the screen (right side of
Figure 7-2).
C OM1
Func t i on
Po l l
9600
( ms )
De l a y
Ra d i o
Ho p
Ma s t e r
B a u d Ra t e
T i me o u t
Ra d i o
Se t t i n g s
Mo d b u s
500
( ms )
Ch a n n e l
Sy s t e m
Mo d e
250
Se t u p
~
COM1-4 Menus are Identical
Figure 7-2
WX64 User Manual | 112
ID
Se t u p
17
10 8
Se r v e r
7.1.1
Hop Channel
Hop Channel may be set from 1-32 using the WX64 keypad and assigns the pseudorandom radio frequency hopping pattern. A transceiver will not go InRange of or
communicate with a transceiver operating on a different Hop Channel.
7.1.2
System ID
System ID may be set from 1-255 using the WX64 keypad and is similar to a
password character or network number and makes network eavesdropping more
difficult. A transceiver will not go in range of or communicate with a transceiver
operating on a different System ID.
7.1.3
Mode
Mode may be set for CLIENT or SERVER. For a single WX64 communicating to up to
64 battery powered OLCT 200 transceivers, Mode must = Server. To prolong battery
life, OLCT 200s sleep most of the time and therefore may not be Servers. If an
application calls for multiple WX64 locations, only one may be set for Server and all
others must be Clients. This single Server transmits a beacon that all of the network’s
Clients synchronize to. ONLY ONE SERVER PER NETWORK.
7.2 Wireless Monitor Mode
Wireless Monitor mode is exclusively for wireless communication to our OLCT 200
wireless sensor transmitters (please visit www.oldhamgas.com ). In Monitor mode the
radio connects to the WX64’s communication port and receives input data from up to
64 OLCT 200 wireless sensor transmitters. Wired and wireless inputs may be mixed
between the WX64’s 64 channels, so it is possible to also accept wired signals from
analog input option PCBs described in section 3.2.
Use the WIRELESS MONITOR setting shown in Figure 7-3 ONLY FOR
COMMUNICATION TO OLCT 200 WIRELESS TRANSCEIVERS. See section 7.4 for
setting up wireless networks with other ModBus slave devices.
OLCT 200s transmit 200 counts for 0% and 1000 counts for 100% full scale readings
so Input Min/Max menu values should be 200 & 1000. The Remote ID menu entry
must match the Remote Id address setting in the wireless OLCT 200 providing data to
this WX64 channel. Input Req is typically set to VALUE but also allows a Battery
Voltage entry into this field. Entering Battery Voltage causes the channel to display
(and alarm) from battery voltage levels at this OLCT 200/RF. Voltage level of the 3.6
volt lithium battery in this OLCT 200 is also displayed on this screen.
WX64 User Manual | 113
Ch .
Sr c
38
Da t a
Wi r e l e s s
Fr om
Ch .
En a b l e d
Ma r k e r
%
Ra w
200
Ma x
Ra w
10 0 0
ID
10
Int er f ace
C OM1
Ma r k e r
Ma r k e r
Ma r k e r
Mi n
R e mo t e
38
Mo n i t o r
Me n u
Ma r k
as
Se n s o r
Me n u
Ye s
- 16
IN
Li f e
CA L
Ye s
~
Figure 7-3
7.2.1
Radio Status Alarms - Wireless Monitor Mode
When an WX64 channel’s INPUT DATA FROM menu is set for WIRELESS
MONITOR, in addition to processing the OLCT 200/RF’s 10-bit “counts” value, it also
receives status bits indicating Communications Error, Low Battery and Calibration.
C h 0 7 - C o mE r r
Wi r e l e s s
P CT L E L
2 4 0 0 Co u n t s
Mi n : 0
Ma x : 9 0
Av g : 3 2
Zer o:0
S p a n : 10 0
50
10 0 2 7
24
21
18
15
12
9
6
3m
R mt C a l , L o B a t t ,
C o mE r r conditions
Displayed here
80
60
40
Observe this arrow to monitor
time between RF transmissions.
Arrow resets to right of screen
after each transmission (typically
5 minutes with Comm Error after
18 minutes).
20
0
Figure 7-4
7.2.1.1
Communications Error
Each channel’s 30-minute trend screen (Figure 7-4) is very useful for diagnosing
wireless problems since it indicates amount of time since the most recent transmission
was received. The arrow on the bottom of the trend screen resets to far right each time
a transmission is received by that channel. When not in alarm, OLCT 200s transmit
every 5 minutes, so the arrow should never progress past the 5-minute interval. The
WX64 activates the channel’s FAULT alarm and indicates ComErr if no transmission
has been received in 18 consecutive minutes. This interval can be adjusted in the
communication settings menu for transmitters that are configured to communicate
more often. See section 2.5.1.12.
WX64 User Manual | 114
7.2.1.2
Low Battery
Indicates the OLCT 200s integral 3.6V lithium D cell (part # 10-0293) has dropped to
below 3.3V and should be replaced very soon. LoBatt is indicated on the WX64’s LCD
readout and the background color turns red. Relays are not energized by low battery
conditions. The actual battery voltage of each wireless OLCT 200 may be seen in the
INPUT DATA FROM screen described above in section 7.2.
7.2.1.3
Calibrations
Calibrations performed at the OLCT 200/RF force a transmission of 75 counts
(negative 15.62%), which may be indicated on the WX64’s LCD readout by In Cal by
using the “Marker Menu” described in section 2.4.4.5. Alarms are inhibited while the
“Marker Value” of -15.62% is activated.
7.3 Wireless ModBus Slave Mode
Wireless ModBus allows one or many WX64s to function as wireless ModBus slaves
by connecting their RS-485 ModBus slave ports to a radio modem. These wireless
networks require a ModBus master such as a DCS, HMI or another WX64 64 Channel
Controller; also equipped with a radio modem. As in all WX-series wireless networks,
one transceiver must be designated as Server and all others as Clients. No special
configuration is required by the master or slave since this is a standard ModBus RTU
network. However, radios must have the same Hop Channel and System ID settings
to communicate.
The entire WX64 ModBus database, including registers and supported Function
Codes, is documented in section 5.3.
7.4 Wireless ModBus Master Mode
WX64 applications as a “Wireless ModBus master” are similar to the “Wireless
Monitor” mode described in section 7.2 and wiring to the radio modem is identical. The
radio setup menus described in section 7.1 may also be used for configuring hop
channel and system ID settings. The difference is each Channel’s INPUT DATA
FROM menu must be configured with the correct MODBUS values to match the slave
device instead of Wireless Monitor. Wired and wireless inputs may be mixed between
the WX64’s 64 channels so it is also possible to accept wired signals from analog input
option PCB’s described in section 3.2.
This is a popular application when the ModBus slave is another remote WX64, WX16
or our WX4 controller available with built-in radio modem compatible with the WX64
Radio Kit. Other ModBus slave devices may also be converted to wireless by addition
of another Radio Kit at the slave’s location.
7.5 Antenna Selection
7.5.1
Dipole And Collinear Antennas
These antennas are connected to the radio via a length of coax cable. If the cable is
larger than 6mm diameter (1/4 inch), do not connect the cable directly to the radio
WX64 User Manual | 115
connection on the WX64 enclosure. Thick cables have large bending radii and
sideways force on the connector can cause a poor connection. Use a short flexible
pigtail (such as our 1000-2308) between the thick cable and the radio.
The polarity of these antennas is the same as the main axis, and they are normally
installed vertically. They can be mounted horizontally (horizontal polarity), however the
antenna at the other end of the wireless link would need to be mounted perfectly
parallel for optimum performance. This is very difficult to achieve over distance. If the
antenna is mounted vertically, it is only necessary to mount the other antennas
vertically for optimum “coupling” – this is easy to achieve.
Dipole and collinear antennas provide best performance when installed with at least 1
to 2 “wavelengths” clearance of walls or steelwork. The wavelength is based on the
frequency:
Wavelength in meters = 300 / frequency in MHz
Wavelength in feet = 1000 / frequency in MHz
Therefore, 900 MHZ antennas require at least 2/3 meter (2 feet) and 2.4GHz 15 cm (6
inches). Antennas may be mounted with less clearance, but radiation will be reduced.
If the radio path is short, this won’t matter. It is important the antenna mounting bracket
be well connected to “earth” or “ground” for good lightning surge protection.
7.5.2
Yagi Antennas
Yagi antennas are directional along the central beam of the antenna. The folded
element is toward the back and the antenna should be “pointed” in the direction of the
transmission. Yagis should also be mounted with at least 1 to 2 wavelengths of
clearance from other objects. The polarity of the antenna is the same as the direction
of the orthogonal elements. For example, if the elements are vertical, the Yagi
transmits with vertical polarity.
In networks spread over wide areas, it is common for a central unit to have an omnidirectional antenna and the remote units to have Yagi antennas. In this case, as the
omni-directional antenna will be mounted with vertical polarity, then the Yagis must
also have vertical polarity. Care needs to be taken to ensure the Yagi is aligned
correctly to achieve optimum performance.
Two Yagis can be used for a point-to-point link. In this case they can be mounted with
the elements horizontally to give horizontal polarity. There is a large degree of RF
isolation between horizontal and vertical polarity (approx –30dB), so this installation
method is a good idea if there is a large amount of interference from another system
close by transmitting vertical polarity.
WX64 User Manual | 116
An important mounting tip: If a Yagi has drainage holes in the dipole element, do not
mount the antenna with the drainage holes.
7.5.3
Mounting Near Other Antennas
Avoid mounting your network’s antenna near any other antenna even when the other
antenna is transmitting on a different radio band. High RF energy of the transmission
from a close antenna can “deafen” a receiver. This is a common cause of problems
with wireless systems.
Because antennas are designed to transmit parallel to the ground rather than up or
down, vertical separation between antennas is a lot more effective than horizontal
separation. If mounting near another antenna cannot be avoided, mounting it beneath
or above the other antenna is better than mounting beside it. Using different polarity to
the other antenna (if possible) will also help to isolate the RF coupling.
7.5.4
Coax Cables
If a coax cable connects to the antenna via connectors, it is very important to
weatherproof the connection using our 1000-2314 or equivalent sealing tape. Moisture
ingress into a coax cable connection is the most common cause of problems with
antenna installations. A three layer sealing process is recommended – an initial layer
of electrical PVC tape, followed by a second layer of self-vulcanizing weatherproofing
tape (1000-2314), with a final layer of electrical PVC tape.
Allowing a drip “U loop” of cable before the connection is also a good idea. The loop
allows water to drip off the bottom of the U instead of into the connection, reduces
installation strain and provides spare cable length in case later the original connectors
need to be removed, the cable cut back and new connectors fitted.
Avoid installing coax cables together in long parallel paths. Leakage from one cable to
another has a similar effect as mounting an antenna near another antenna.
7.6 Surge Protection & Grounding
Voltage surges can enter the WX64 via the antenna connection, power supply
connection, connections to other equipment and even the “earth” or “ground”
connection. Surges are electrical energy following a path to earth, and the best
protection is achieved by “draining” the surge energy to earth via an alternate path.
Wireless devices need to have a solid connection to earth via a ground stake or ground
grid if the soil has poor conductivity. Solid connection means a large capacity
conductor (not a small wire) with no coils or sharp bends. All other devices connected
to the WX64 need to be grounded to the same ground point. There can be significant
resistance between different ground points leading to very large voltage differences
WX64 User Manual | 117
during lightning activity. As many wireless units are damaged by earth potential surges
due to incorrect grounding as are damaged by direct surge voltage.
It is very difficult to protect against direct lightning strikes but the probability of a direct
strike at any one location is very small. Unfortunately, power line surges and
electromagnetic energy in the air can induce high voltage surges from lightning activity
several miles away.
7.6.1
Antenna Grounding
Electromagnetic energy in the air will be drained to ground via any and every earth
path. An earth path exists between the antenna and the WX64, and to protect against
damage this earth path current must be kept as small as possible. This is achieved by
providing better alternate earth paths. It is important to ground the antenna to the same
ground point as the WX64. Antennas are normally mounted to a metal bracket that
should be grounded to the WX64 earth connection. Surge energy induced into the
antenna will be drained first by the mount’s ground connection, second by the outside
shield of the coax cable to the ground connection on the radio and third by the internal
conductor of the coax cable via the radio electronics. This third earth path causes
damage unless the other two paths provide a better earth connection allowing surge
energy to bypass the electronics.
When an antenna is located outside of a building and outside of an industrial plant
environment, external coax surge diverters are recommended to further minimize the
effect of surge current in the inner conductor of the coax cable.
Coax surge diverters have gas-discharge element that breaks down in the presence of
high surge voltage and diverts any current directly to a ground connection. A surge
diverter is not normally required when the antenna is within a plant or factory
environment, as the plant steelwork provides multiple parallel ground paths and good
earthing will provide adequate protection without a surge diverter.
7.6.2
Connections To Other Equipment
Surges can enter the wireless unit from connected devices, via I/O, serial or Ethernet
connections. Other data devices connected to the wireless unit should be well
grounded to the same ground point as the wireless unit.
Special care needs to be taken where the connected data device is remote from the
wireless unit requiring a long data cable. As the data device and the wireless unit
cannot be connected to the same ground point, different earth potentials can exist
during surge conditions.
There is also the possibility of surge voltages being induced on long lengths of wire
from nearby power cables. Surge diverters can be fitted to the data cable to protect
against surges entering the wireless unit.
The same principle applies when the I/O device is not close to the wireless unit, thus,
the risk of surge increases. Surge diverters for I/O wiring are available to protect the
wireless unit.
WX64 User Manual | 118
SECTION - 8 WEBPAGE
All WX64 controllers come standard with an embedded webpage. The webpage gives
remote access to view and configure parameters inside the controller. There are two
levels of security clearance. The first level allows the user to view channel status and
configuration while the second level allows the user to change configuration
parameters directly from the computer.
The webpage requires a modern web browser. Supported browsers include Internet
Explorer 8*, Google Chrome, or Mozilla Firefox 2+. Viewing pages in an outdated
browser will result in improperly drawn pages.
In order to view the webpage, the user must know the IP address or, if DHCP enabled,
the controller’s hostname. This information can be viewed from the Network Settings
menu (see section 2.5.3). Once the name or address is entered into a browser, a popup box ask the user for the username and password. The name and password are
fixed: the NAME: admin and the PASSWORD: controller64. After access is gained,
the user will be able to see channel data, event logs and configuration. If a parameter
needs to be changed, the user must login before the controller will accept the change.
This login password can be changed in the Security menu under ModBus Lock Code
(see section 2.6.3). The default ModBus Lock Code is 1234.
* Internet Explorer does not allow access to hostnames that contain a ‘_’ character.
WX64 User Manual | 119
8.1 System Screen
The System screen shown below (Figure 8-1) displays all active channels at once. It is
capable of displaying 16, 32, 48 or 64 channels depending on the controller’s
configuration. This screen, very similar to the Main Data screen, displays measurement
name and uses colored cells that flash with new alarms to indicate alarm conditions.
Once the alarms have been acknowledged by an operator the cell will remain the
appropriate color but will stop flashing, showing the alarm has been acknowledged.
The five standard relays states are shown at the bottom of the screen. The boxes
duplicate the LED behavior as seen when looking at the unit. A flashing box indicates
an unacknowledged relay, a red box indicates an energized (de-energized for failsafe)
relay.
While in the System screen, use the mouse to click on any cell to go directly to that
channel’s individual data screens. The unused channels are grayed out when turned
off.
Viewing only channels belonging to a certain zone can be enabled using the zone
drop-down box. Selecting a zone will cause channels belonging to other zones to dim.
The System screen is updated automatically every 15 seconds.
Figure 8-1
WX64 User Manual | 120
8.2 Zone Screen
The webpage’s Zone screen (Figure 8-2) displays the eight possible zones
simultaneously see section 1.3.5. If an alarm condition occurs, the user will be able to
quickly see in what zone the situation is occurring. Each active zone is divided into
alarm levels, which are green until an alarm is present. Inactive zones and alarm levels
are grayed out. If an alarm should occur, the zone name field will flash and the
corresponding box in the assigned zone will turn the color of the alarm that is present
or alternate if two different colors are present. Once the alarm has been
acknowledged, the name field will stop flashing.
To display all the channels included in any zone, use the mouse to click that zone box.
The System screen will appear with all the channels that are included in the selected
zone displayed in color and the channels that are not in the selected zone dimmed.
The zone screen is updated automatically every 15 seconds.
Figure 8-2
WX64 User Manual | 121
8.3 Channel Screen
The Channel screen shown in Figure 8-3 displays a 24-hour trend of input data for the
channel selected. Vertical tick marks are each hour and horizontal tick marks are each
10% of full scale. Colored lines indicate alarm levels. Since each data point must be
collected for several minutes before it may be displayed, it is likely input values will
fluctuate during this interval. Therefore, MAX, MIN and AVERAGE values are stored in
the controller for each subinterval. Checking the Min, Max and Avg box in the lower left
corner turns the respective lines on and off. If there is no trend data available, the
corresponding section of the graph will be grayed out. This will occur on power
interruptions.
The top portion of each trend screen indicates channel number, real time reading in
engineering units, and measurement name. When a channel reaches alarm state, the
colored bar changes to the color that represents that alarm level and flashes. Once the
alarm is acknowledged, the bar stops flashing.
The top portion of the page updates automatically every 15 seconds. The trend is
updated when a channel is changed or the ‘Refresh Trend’ button is pressed.
Figure 8-3
WX64 User Manual | 122
8.4 Event Log Screen
Displays the last 255 events logged in the WX64. The events are logged in a first in
first out format, in non-volatile memory, so a SD card is not necessary to view the
event log. These events include Alarms In and Out, Alarm Resets, Calibrations,
System and Cold Boots, and Communication and Configuration Error. The events are
time and date stamped, and if channel-specific, the number is shown in the right
column in Figure 8-4.
Figure 8-4
WX64 User Manual | 123
8.5 Configure
The configuration pages allow viewing and editing of most system parameters. The
exceptions are communication and security settings, which must be set from the unit’s
keypad interface. All changes made to the configuration parameters will not be saved
until the user has entered the correct login password.
8.5.1
Alarm Outputs
Figure 8-5
WX64 User Manual | 124
8.5.2
Channel Configuration
Figure 8-6
8.5.3
Copy Channels
Figure 8-7
WX64 User Manual | 125
8.5.4
Programmable Relays
Figure 8-8
8.5.5
System Configuration
Figure 8-9
WX64 User Manual | 126
8.5.6
Configuration Upload/Download
The configuration upload/download page allows transferring system configuration to or
from the unit via the webpage. When the download link is clicked, the unit saves the
current configuration into a file and transfers it to the user. It should be saved as a .cfg
file. When uploading configuration, select a .cfg file and press upload. Note that the
maximum length of a filename for an uploaded file is 28 characters. After a successful
upload, the unit will restart and the webpage will attempt to refresh after 30 seconds.
Figure 8-10
WX64 User Manual | 127
WX64 User Manual | 128
SECTION - 9 TROUBLESHOOTING
9.1 Channel Errors
The following errors indicate potential hardware or configuration problems. If an error
occurs, a message is displayed for that channel.
9.1.1
Comm Error
Comm Error can occur for ModBus or wireless channels. This error indicates the data
was not received. Comm Error can indicate a timeout or an invalid reply from a device.
Check communication settings for the port used as well as the Data from menu for
that channel. The ports themselves can be tested from the Diagnostics menu.
9.1.2
Config Error
Config error can occur for ModBus or wireless channels only. This error indicates that
the Interface selected is configured for something else. For example, if COM1 is set to
ModBus slave and a channel 1 is set with a Source of ModBus 16bit and an
Interface of COM1. To correct this, either edit the COM port in Communication
Settings menu or edit the channel’s Interface in the Data From menu.
9.1.3
I/O Error
I/O Error indicates a problem communicating with the analog input boards. This error
will affect an entire group of 16 channels at a time, assuming they are all set up for
analog input. Check wiring from the Main I/O Board to the affected Analog Input board.
Verify that the analog input board is set up for the correct channel group. Only a single
input board in a system can be set to use each channel group. See I/O Board Config
in the Diagnostics menu.
WX64 User Manual | 129
9.2 Reset To Factory Defaults
The WX64 configuration can be reset to factory defaults. This is done through the
Coldboot menu shown in Figure 9-1. To access the Coldboot menu, hold the Edit key
and cycle power. The Edit key can be released once the Loading Configuration Data
progress bar appears. If an SD Card is installed, this menu will allow backing up the
current configuration before starting the Coldboot.
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WX64 User Manual | 130
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