Road Safety Strategy Annual Review 2010

Road Safety Strategy Annual Review 2010
ROAD SAFETY STRATEGY
ANNUAL REVIEW 2010
Údarás Um Shábháilteacht Ar Bhóithre
Road Safety Authority
Foreword
The road safety performance of a country can be measured by the number of deaths
that occur on the roads for every million people in the population. In 2010 Ireland
recorded 47 road deaths per million population. This represents an improvement of
56% from 107 people killed per million inhabitants in 2001. While very significant
improvements have been made in enhancing the safety of Irish roads in 2010, this
report highlights that there is a considerable body of work yet to be done in order
to maintain the reduction of deaths and serious injuries on Irish roads and the
targets set out in the Government Road Safety Strategy. That target is to reduce
fatalities to not greater than 60 fatalities per million, 252 deaths per annum or
saving 400 lives during the lifetime of the Strategy. Whilst we have exceeded the
target at 47 deaths per million population in 2010, it is important that our efforts
are maintained and we do not become complacent. There are still too many people
dying and seriously injured needlessly on our roads.
The contributory behaviours remain the same, speeding, impaired driving, non use of seatbelts and
unsafe behaviour by or towards vulnerable road users. The RSA has targeted these behaviours through a
range of interventions and initiatives. While major progress has been made in addressing Ireland’s drink
driving problem, speed remains the biggest contributory factor to deaths and injuries on Irish roads. The
biggest challenge facing us is to change this culture of inappropriate speeding through enforcement,
awareness raising and educational campaigns.
To achieve the actions set out in the Road Safety Strategy, a very high level of partnership working across
all of the key agencies, with strong political support is necessary. In the current economic climate we
face challenges in ensuring that the roadworthiness and quality of the national vehicle fleet does not
deteriorate, that the built infrastructure is maintained and that road users are engaged and committed
to further improvements that promotes responsible and safe road use.
1
Introduction to Road Safety Strategy Annual Review
Priority Actions
The primary aim of the Road Safety Strategy is to reduce collisions, deaths and serious injuries on Irish
roads. The Road Safety Strategy identifies a number of key behaviours that will be changed by the actions
set out in this strategy. These behaviours are:
 Inappropriate speeding
 Impaired driving
 Not using seat belts and child safety restraints
 Unsafe behaviour towards and careless action of vulnerable road users
The Strategy Action Plan outlines the respective actions many of which require a multiagency approach.
Throughout the lifetime of the Strategy the RSA efforts will be deployed in education, evaluation and
enforcement interventions.
The RSA has responsibility, in accordance with the Road Safety Authority Act 2006, for producing and
formally reporting on the implementation of the third Government Road Safety Strategy 2007 – 2012.
Action 83 of the Road Safety Strategy requires the RSA; to produce and present to the Minister for
Transport an annual report by the second quarter of the following year.
There are a total of 126 specific measures or actions identified in the Strategy which must be implemented
within the lifetime of the strategy. Responsibility for each action has been allocated to a lead Department
or Agency and specifically to an individual within each organisation. A completion date for each action
has also been set.
Thirty-seven of these actions are relevant to 2010. This document describes these 37 actions and their
current status. Of the 37 actions, 4 have been completed in full and on time, a further 33 are annual
actions which were completed in 2010.
Progress Report on 2009 Actions
The actions required in 2010 are outlined below. The actions are categorised under the headings of
Education, Enforcement, Engineering and Evaluation which form the policy framework of the Strategy.
There is a traffic light system to illustrate progress and delays experienced in achieving actions in 2010.
The RSA Board and Executive will continue to ensure that all actions in the strategy are a priority for the
Organisations responsible for their implementation and will support them in achieving these actions.
2
Education
Key:
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
2.
Implement mass media
campaigns which target
the main causal factors for
collisions, deaths and serious
injuries for all road users but
in particular the high risk
groups.
RSA
Annually
The RSA had a comprehensive programme
of activity commissioned for 2010. It was
completed in consultation with the Garda
National Traffic Bureau and the TISPOL
international policing plan.
The main themes for the year included AntiDrug Driving, Anti Speeding, ‘Crashed Lives’
campaign, Mobile Phones and Driving, the
Safe Cross Code, and the Rules of the Road.
New Anti-Drug Driving TV and Digital activity
campaign was launched in August 2010.
Specifically two ads were adapted from
abroad for use in Ireland.
A new TV, Radio, Press and Digital campaign
in support of the roll out of An Garda
Síochána Safety Camera project commenced
in early November 2010.
The RSA “Crashed Lives” campaign (featuring
true life stories) ran on TV during the
month of June and a new series of ads were
launched at the annual Christmas road
safety campaign in mid December.
All digital interventions commenced in Q2
and ran throughout the year.
A new mobile phone TV & Cinema advert,
adapted from the UK, screened in cinemas
in October while radio was broadcast in May
and September.
The joint North / South motorbike safety ad
was screened in July.
The RSA’s ‘Roundabouts’ TV ad was aired in
May.
A new Safe Cross Code TV and Digital activity
campaign went live in late November.
In addition, short term campaigns using
radio interventions were aired during
the year for ‘Driving for Work’, ‘Drink
Driving’, ‘Day Time Running Lights’, ‘He
Drives, She Dies’, ‘Driver Fatigue’ , ‘Vehicle
Maintenance’ , ‘Pedestrian Safety’, ‘Cycle
Safety’, ‘CPC’, ‘ADI’, ‘Irish Road Safety Week’
and ‘Driver Fatigue’.
Anti Drink Driving campaigns focusing on the
‘Morning After’ in conjunction with MEAS
aired in December.
3
Education (continued)
Key:
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
3
Integrate mass media
campaigns with the policing
plans of An Garda Siochana
and other enforcement
agencies.
RSA
Annualy
‘In 2010, the RSA matched media campaigns
in line with Garda enforcement activity with
particular focus on “Crashed Lives”, Mobile
Phone radio, ‘Driving for work’, Seatbelts,
drug driving, anti-speeding & the motorbike
ad ‘Underneath’.
5
Continue to promote joint
North/South cooperation
on road safety awareness
campaigns.
RSA/DoENI
Annually
The Road Safety Authority continued to
collaborate with DoENI sharing resources
and ads in particular “Crashed Lives” and the
motorbike ad “Underneath”.
The RSA also provided feedback on the
draft Northern Ireland Road Safety Strategy
20/20 vision; Driving Forward Road Safety
2010-2020.
7
Develop and implement
education interventions
aimed at the high risk 17 to
24 year age group.
RSA
Annually
The RSA piloted a programme ‘Wrecked.
ie’ which targets 17-24 year olds who may
not have participated in formal road safety
educational programmes. The pilot sites
included; 1 FÁS regional training centre and
7 Youthreach centres and 5 Garda Diversion
Programmes, evenly divided between rural
and urban centres. Feedback from the pilot
has been incorporated into the final version
and this will be rolled out nationally in 2011.
Your Road to Safety
In 2010, a total of 46 teachers participated
in an in-service training programme for the
transition year programme; ‘Your Road to
Safety’. By the end of December 2010, 297
teachers had participated in the in-service
training programme and now deliver ‘Your
Road to Safety’ in schools.
‘SAFEGRADS’ was offered to all Third Level
Institutions in 2010 in association with the
Union of Students Ireland. 18 third level
colleges availed of the programme in 2010.
No Names Clubs
No Name Club is a National Voluntary Youth
organisation run by and for young people
aged 15 years plus who come together in
a safe and lively environment without the
pressure of alcohol or drugs. The Road
Safety Authority in conjunction with No
Names Club ran a road safety competition
inviting members of the 40 No Names Clubs
in Ireland to submit entries to (a) design a
suite of greeting cards with a road safety
theme for Valentine’s Day, Leaving Cert
and Christmas. (b) to design a piece of
high visibility clothing which would raise
road safety awareness. 36 No Names clubs
throughout the country participated in the
greeting cards competition with a total of
300 greeting cards submitted. 29 No Names
Clubs submitted entries for the design
of a piece of high visibility clothing. The
standard of entries was very high. Winners
and runners up will be presented with their
prizes at the National Youth Awards which
will be held in County Kilkenny in April 2011.
4
Education (continued)
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Key:
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
Team Theatre
The Road Safety Authority formed a
partnership with Team Theatre, a Drama in
Education Company. ‘Doughnuts’, a road
safety play was developed which is a theatre
production for secondary school students.
‘Doughnuts’ looks at the devastating
consequences of dangerous driving for
a group of teenagers in a small town in
Ireland. The programme is aimed at 4th, 5th
and 6th year students and consists of a play,
educational resource material and post show
workshops.
‘Doughnuts’ uses interactive and visual
means to connect with the audience and
raise awareness of road safety issues among
young adults. Dance, lighting, sound and
digital production is used to create a realistic
view of the consequences of dangerous
driving.
The official show case performance took
place in Smock Alley Theatre in Dublin on
the 27th of November 2010. Team Theatre
staged 10 productions of “Doughnuts” in
2010 throughout the country visiting Kerry,
Wicklow, Kilkenny, Kildare, Mayo and Clare.
Team theatre will continue to stage this
play over a 7 week period commencing in
February 2011 which will bring the total
number of performances to 50.
14
Integrate international road
safety awareness events
such as UN Global Road
Safety Awareness Week, EU
Road Safety Day and World
Day of Remembrance for
Road Traffic Victims into road
safety plans.
RSA
2007 /
Annually
In 2010, a total of 135,000 people visited the
Shuttle (Road Safety Interactive Roadshow)
at various locations. In the first half of the
year, shuttle activities took place in schools
and in the Summer months, it attended
local festivals and events.
Irish Road Safety week took place from the
11th -18th October and included a visit from
the OECD and an Academic lecture on Drug
Driving took place on the 11th October.
The “Leading Lights Road Safety Awards”
also took place on Wednesday 13th October,
during Irish Road Safety Week.
European Night without Accidents was held
in nightclubs throughout the country in
association with Road Safety Officers, the
nightclub industry and Students Union of
Ireland on the 16th October.
World Remembrance Day for Road Traffic
Victims took place on the 16th of November
where a number of ecumenical services took
place.
18
Host an annual international
conference on road safety
to update and review best
practice developments
RSA
Annually
5
A successful international road safety
conference on speeding was held in Dublin
Castle on 31st May 2010.
Education (continued)
Key:
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
19
Implement specific
educational measures
aimed at vulnerable road
users. In particular: use of
high visibility material for
pedestrians, cyclists and
motor cyclists; Awareness
of intoxicated pedestrians;
Use of Personal Protection
Equipment for cyclists and
motorcyclists; Awareness of
blind spots on HGVs; Care for
young and older people
RSA
Annually
“Check it Fits” campaign took place in May
and October checking child safety restraints
in 10 locations throughout the country in
which a total of 2,561 child car seats were
checked.
In 2010 the RSA continued to;
• distribute High Visibility vests through
pharmacies in association with Age
Action, Gardaí, Road Safety Officers,
Community Groups, Festivals, sports
clubs, youth clubs, pre-schools, high
profile social and sporting events and
through the RSA Shuttle (Road Safety
Interactive Roadshow) .
The RSA with its partners distributed:
• 2 5,000 high visibility vests through the
“Bike Buyers Guide” for motorcyclists.
• 1 20,000 high visibility jackets to school
children in September is association with
the ESB
• 5 0,000 high visibility vests with the
Farmers Journal and FBD Insurance
• 3 40,000 high visibility arm bands with
the Sunday Independent
• 1 00,000 high visibility arm bands to
children through the Seat Belt Sherriff
and High Glo silver campaign
• 2 ,500 high visibility vests were
distributed through the Roscommon
Herald in September.
• 8 ,000 high visibility vests through
Advance Pitstop
• 1 00,000 high visibility vests through the
Gardaí at various road safety events and
school talks.
• 2 0,000 adult armbands from the
Shuttle and the Gardaí at various events
throughout the year.
6
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Key:
Enforcement
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
22
Publish an Annual Garda
Road Safety Policing Plan.
Garda
Síochána
Annually
The Annual Garda Road Safety Policing Plan
has been published annually and can be
found on the Garda Síochána web-site at
www.garda.ie
23
Rollout of Garda Traffic
Corps across all Divisions
to planned manning level
and with all necessary
equipment, technology and
administrative support. 1,200
Traffic Corps personnel by
2008.
Garda
Síochána
4th Qtr.
2008/
Annually
• Q
uality management is to the fore in
relation to traffic management. The Galway
division has been successfully audited by
the National Standards Authority of Ireland
to the ISO standard and has been certified
to the ISO 9001:2000 Quality Management
System (QMS)
•Twenty Four (24) Gardai are qualified
Forensic Collision Investigators. A further
30 are in the process of being trained.
•A further three “total station” Forensic
Collision Investigation Kits have been
purchased and deployed. This will help to
reduce “road closure” times.
•Eight (8) new mobile speed detection
systems have been purchased by An Garda
Síochána. These systems utilise up to date
technology and will enhance the current
night time enforcement capability.
•One hundred and two (102) vehicles have
been fitted with Automated Number Plate
Recognition technology.
•Garda Síochána Analysis Service is now
being used extensively to inform with
regard to intelligence led enforcement.
24
The RSA accepts that to
strive for 100% compliance is
desirable but recognises that
it can never be achieved.
However demanding targets
are required. Achieve a
target level of compliance
with speed limits for cars
and motor cycles by 2012:
Increase the number of
compliant drivers from 18%
to 60% or better with the
urban speed limit on urban
national roads. Increase
compliance on urban
arterials from 14% to 60% or
better in a 50km/h zone and
from 11% to 60% or better in
a 60km/h zone. Increase the
compliance level on regional
roads from 84% to 90% or
better; Increase compliance
on 2-lane national primary
roads from 74% to 90% or
better.
Garda
Síochána
Annually
An Garda Síochana:
•Has identified Speed Enforcement zones
(i.e. road sections with the greatest
propensity for speed related collisions)
and has placed particulars on the Garda
web-site. At least 80% of overall speed
enforcement will be conducted on these
zones.
•A further detailed analysis of collision
prone zones has been completed to
underpin the deployment of safety
cameras as part of the Safety Camera
Project. They will replace the current
collision prone zones and some new
locations have been identified.
•The Gardai have enhanced its
management information systems in
terms of use of mobile detection systems
in respect of locations, collision times
and days of the week.
Speeding Offences –Intercept
•There were 55,952 intercept speeding
detections recorded in 2010.
Speeding Offences – Non Intercept
•There were 100,834 non intercept
speeding detections recorded in 2010.
•As directed by the Assistant
Commissioner Traffic (Ref: TB63/3/08) it
is intended for at least 80% of total speed
enforcement to be carried out in the
speed enforcement zones, as specified
on the Garda web page. This is in line
with the strategic objective of targeted
intelligence led enforcement.
7
Key:
Enforcement (continued)
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
25
Achieve a target level of
compliance with speed
limits for goods vehicles
and single deck buses by
2012. Increase articulated
vehicles’ compliance with
speed limits on urban
national roads (at 50 km/h
sign) from 33% to 70% or
better and to increase rigid
vehicles’ compliance on
the same roads from 23%
to 70% or better. Increase
speed limit compliance
by articulated vehicles on
2-lane national roads from
13% to 60% or better and
to increase compliance of
rigid vehicles from 24% to
60% or better. Increase rigid
and articulated vehicles’
compliance with speed
limits on regional roads to
95% or better. Increase the
percentage of single deck
buses complying with speed
limits on 2-lane national
roads to 85% or better.
Garda
Síochána
Annually
An Garda Síochána:
Continue the operation
of MAT, determine the
incidence of drink driving in
Ireland and achieve a target
level of compliance with
drink driving law. (See action
number 122, 123)
Garda
Síochána
27
•Has in conjunction with general
enforcement operations implemented
in 2010 five special operations, each
of three day duration, with a view to
increasing awareness amongst drivers of
goods vehicles and single deck buses of
the dangers of inappropriate speed;
•Is ensuring special and increased
emphasis on enforcement and
compliance with speed limits with
regard to these vehicles;
•Has enhanced their enforcement and
management technical systems to
support the achievement of the goal.
Annually
An Garda Síochána:
•Has conducted a detailed analysis of
drink driving over the three year period
Nov 2005 to October 2008 and same is
published on the Garda website;
•Has engaged in media/educational
campaigns with their partners in road
safety;
•Continues to allocate considerable
resources to Mandatory Alcohol Testing.
Provisional figures indicate that 57,628
MAT checkpoints were conducted in
2010 (31st December 2010), resulting in
556,496 breath tests being performed
of which 1,502 were positive or failure/
refusal. The number of positive breath
tests together with the number of
failures or refusals by drivers to submit
to test is now 0.27% which represents a
marked improvement on 2.0%when MAT
checkpoints commenced in 2006.
8
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Key:
Enforcement (continued)
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
28
Achieve a target level of
compliance by 2012, through
covert and high visibility
enforcement, on seat belt
wearing and child safety
restraint use as follows:
Increase adult front seatbelt
wearing rates from 86% to
95% or better and increase
the adult wearing rate in
rear seats from 63% to
95% or better; increase
primary school front seatbelt
wearing rates from 76% to
95% or better and rear seat
wearing rates from 64%
to 95% or better; Increase
wearing rates for secondary
school-goers in front seats
from 88% to 95% or better
and in rear seats from 76%
to 95% or better.
Garda
Síochána
Annually
An Garda Siochana focused on increasing
seatbelt usage compliance through public
awareness campaigns and intensive and
high visibility actions:
Promote An Garda Síochána
Traffic Watch scheme
to enable community
support for road traffic law
enforcement.
Garda
Síochána
38
Increase enforcement of
driver hours and checking of
operators’ licences. Check
at least 1% of days worked
by drivers of Goods Vehicles
and Buses and increase this
threshold to 3% from 2010,
to comply with EU Directive
EC 2000 / 30.
RSA
3rd Qtr. 2007
/ 4th Qtr.
2010
Up to the end of December 2010, the RSA
has successfully prosecuted 70 cases in the
Courts, a further 2 cases were prosecuted
but were struck out. Over 232 cases are
currently in the system, with 67 of these
cases with court dates received and 33 cases
awaiting Court dates.
39
Participate with other
EU member states in a
campaign of coordinated
Checkpoints.
RSA
Annually
At the year ended 31 December, 2010,
the RSA had participated in 3 TISPOL
(Operation truck/bus) weeks. The first
TISPOL operation took place from 8th to 14th
March (operation truck)when a total of 8
checkpoints were held during the course of
this week. A second TISPOL operation took
place from 19th -25th July ( operation bus)
when a total of 7 checkpoints were held
during the course of the week. The third
TISPOL operation took place from 11th to
17th October (Operation Truck) when a total
of 15 checkpoints were held.
29
•In conjunction with the Road Safety
Authority the Gardai continue to
participate in the Transition Year
Programme.
•There were 17,340 seatbelt offence
detections up to the 31st December
2010.
•The publication on a monthly basis
of enforcement data with regard to
offences involving (a) speeding (b)
seatbelts, (c) mobile phone offences
(34,549) offences detected up to 31st
December 2010).
Annually
An Garda Siochana has conducted
an internal review and evaluation of
the effectiveness of the Traffic Watch
Programme.
The recommendations to improve
the internal processes are due to be
implemented on the next PULSE release.
Following this there will be a re-launch
and then a public engagement process will
commence.
Up to the end of December 2010, there
were 10 days of coordinated checkpoints
(crossborder and port) with the UK and
Northern Ireland authorities.
9
Engineering
Key:
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
47
Complete the development
of major inter-urban routes
from Dublin to Galway (N6),
Limerick (N7), Cork (N8),
Waterford (N9).
NRA/LAs
4th Qtr. 2010
Completed All Major Inter-Urban routes,
totalling 738km mainline route, to
motorway or equivalent standard, by end
of 2010.
738km now opened to traffic = 100%
This action is now closed.
48
Continue network
maintenance and
improvement works on
National Primary and
National Secondary roads
NRA/LAs
4th Qtr. 2010
(Note - Network improvements works and
Maintenance are ongoing tasks that need to
be carried out every year)
55
Continue to monitor and
develop road types, for
example divided roads,
ensuring best safety
standards are incorporated
into road design
NRA/LAs
Annually
Two 2+2 schemes opened in 2010, namely
N3 Kells to Carnaross and N21 Castleisland
Bypass. Schemes currently being monitored
and other 2+2 schemes are at design stage.
Examine and make available
grant schemes for road
safety audits and road user
audits on non-national
roads.
DoT
58
NRA TD 10 Road Link Design for Type 2 and
Type 3 Dual -carriageways published in
Dec 2007, was reviewed in 2010 based on
feedback from schemes. Type D and Type C
Lay-bys now to be included 2+2 schemes at
approximated 2.5km and 10km respectively
(See NRA TD69-10)
Annually
On 21 August 2008 Circular RLR 16/2008:
“Road Safety Audits and Road User Audits on
Regional and Local Roads” was issued to all
local authorities, requesting that they carry
out such audits on schemes funded or cofunded by the Department, and setting out
the procedures for doing so.
It is a matter for the Local Authority to
now undertake these audits and follow the
procedures set out by the Department.
59
Provide resources for lowcost safety schemes and
expand the medium-cost
schemes on non-national
roads.
DoT
Annually
In 2010, the Department of Transport
allocated €6.26 million under the scheme
to local authorities in respect of safety
improvement works to be undertaken at 247
locations throughout the country.
59
Increase the number of
minor realignment schemes
over the lifetime of the
Strategy
NRA/LAs
Annually
The Pavement and Minor Improvement
grant is expended on either strengthening of
the current road profile or realignment of a
discrete section.
In 2010 in excess of 140 pavement
improvement schemes were undertaken on
the network.
10
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Key:
Engineering (continued)
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
61
Increase the number of
minor realignment schemes
over the lifetime of the
Strategy
NRA/LAs
Annually
The Pavement and Minor Improvement
grant is expended on either strengthening of
the current road profile or realignment of a
discrete section.
In 2010 in excess of 140 pavement
improvement schemes were undertaken on
the network.
62
Continue the Signing and
Lining programmes on
National roads.
DoT
Annually
A circular was issued to all Local Authorities
requesting that they carry out audits
on schemes funded or co-funded by the
Department, and setting out the procedures
for doing so.
69
Each local authority to
publish a prioritised
plan on road building,
design, construction and
maintenance
LAs
Annually
Local Authorities have adopted this
approach.
11
Other Road Safety
Measures
Key:
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
83
Review / monitor
implementation of the
Road Safety strategy and
produce an annual report to
the Minister for Transport
by the end of the second
quarter of the following year.
This will emphasise road
safety outcomes achieved,
cost-benefit analysis and
value-for-money.
RSA
Annually
Annual Strategy Monitoring Reports have
been completed and submitted to the
Minister for Transport for each year of the
Strategy.
86
Maintain the Cabinet
Level Committee on Road
Safety to monitor progress,
assess priorities and
identify difficulties in the
implementation of the Road
Safety Strategy.
DoT
Annually
Committee meets regularly. Meetings took
place in June and November 2010.
87
Implement all relevant EU
Directives and participate
actively in the development
of future policy at EU level.
RSA / DoT
Annually
Transposition of all EU Directives &
Regulations within the remit of the RSA is up
to date.
98
Commence a programme of
review and modernisation of
existing driver test centres
and develop new test centres
to meet the driving testing
requirements of all vehicles
RSA
Annually &
complete 4th
Qtr. 2012
The RSA completed a review of its estate
requirements. The Review has been
signed off by the RSA Board, submitted
to the Department of Transport and the
RSA is presently awaiting agreement
from the Department to proceed with the
implementation of the recommendations
contained in the review.
102
Review and update the
annual publication of road
collision facts and the
collection of data to support
this analysis.
RSA
Annually
The Road Collision Factbook 2008 was
published in January 2010. A review of the
design and format for future publications
has been completed. Work commenced on
the Road Collision Factbook 2009 is due to be
published in January 2011.
104
Review and expand the
national speed and seat belt
wearing survey on Irish roads
and publish nationally on an
annual basis.
RSA
3rd Qtr 2008
/Annually
The national speed & seatbelt wearing
survey was reviewed and expanded. Two
reports are now published each year (one
seatbelt and one speed) in a user friendly
format incorporating trend analysis. These
reports can also be downloaded from the
RSA website.
The RSA also collaborated with the Gardaí in
analyzing data from the new Safety Camera
Network.
12
Other Road Safety
Measures (continued)
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Key:
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
105
Participate in European and
International road safety
research programmes: FERSI
(Forum of European Road
Safety Research Institutes);
SARTRE (Societal Attitudes to
Road Traffic Risk in Europe);
SAFTYNET (An EU project
designed as a precursor to an
EU road safety observatory);
IRTAD (International
Road Traffic and Accident
Database); CARE (An EU Road
Accident Traffic Database);
ETSC (European Transport
Safety Council); CORDIS
(Community Research and
Development Information
Service 2007 - 2013).
RSA
Annually
The RSA contributed to the ETSC reports
“Tackling the Three Main Killers” which
was published in May 2010, “Road Target in
Sight” published in June 2010 and “Deaths
on Rural Roads” published in October 2010.
The Road Safety Authority contributed to the
ETSC Annual report on road safety
The research department represented
the Road Safety Authority at the annual
meeting of the Board of Forum of European
Road Safety Research Institutes (FERSI), the
annual meeting of the OECD – International
Transport Forum; International Road Traffic
and Accident Database (IRTAD), BESTPOINT
(Criteria for BEST practise demerit POINT
system) and the annual PIN meeting of the
European Transport Safety Council (ETSC).
The Road Safety Authority hosted an
academic lecture on the effects of drugs and
driving in October.
Ireland was awarded the Road Safety PIN
Award 2010 for ‘Outstanding Progress in
Road Safety’ by the European Transport
Safety Council
106
Research emerging ‘in road’
and ‘in vehicle’ road safety
technologies and make
recommendations on their
use/introduction
RSA
Annually
The RSA produced an information leaflet
promoting the EURO-NCAP system. It is an
aid for consumers in selecting the safest cars
on the market.
The NRA also funded two experimental
projects on the N11 in Wicklow. These
projects included the installation of Retro
Reflective Solar Powered Road Studs, and
the installation of two “Driver Feedback
Signs”. The Driver Feedback signs alerts the
driver to the speed they are travelling at.
The RSA worked with the motor industry in
providing free vehicle health checks both
at the RSA’s Child Safety Roadshows in May
and also during Irish Road Safety Week in
October. The Vehicle Standards Unit within
the RSA is examining a number of new
and emerging technologies. The RSA has
prepared a report on in-vehicle technology
for the Policy Advisory Panel.
13
Key:
Evaluation, Road Safety
Data and Research
Programmes
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
110
Review and research the
outputs from collision
analysis, including precrash
behaviour of those involved
in fatal and serious injury
collisions
RSA/An
Garda
Síochána
2nd Qtr. 2010
A review of Gardaí files was undertaken and
analyzed with a report due to be published
in 2011.
112
Research and update
training and development
programmes for the Garda
Traffic Corps based on
experience in Ireland and
best practice from other
comparable jurisdictions
Garda
Siochana /
RSA
Annually
Roads policing training is provided at the
Garda College. GNTB have developed a new
one week comprehensive Roads Policing
Programme in Road Traffic and Road
Transport Legislation including inspection
of vehicles for delivery to all members
of the Traffic Corps. Specialist training
for Forensic Collision Investigators to
professional qualification is delivered at the
Garda College
Niche on the job training courses are also
delivered in areas such as road transport,
drugs interdiction and fuel smuggling.
Traffic members are continuously updated
through the continuous professional
development programme, with regard to
changes in legislation and Garda policies
and procedures.
113
Research and update the
mapping of collision-prone
zones and include analysis by
volume and type of vehicles
on the road network with
special emphasis on regional
and local roads.
NRA
Annually
•Evaluation of Collision Remedial Measures
Programmes was completed in 2008 and
is available on NRA website. Draft review
of 2009 work has been submitted – final
doc to be published in Q2 2011.
•Evaluation of Traffic Calming Programmes
was completed in 2008 and is available
on NRA website. Draft review of 2009
work has been submitted – final doc to be
published in Q2 2011.
•NRA are continuing to participate in CEDR
(Conference of European Directors of
Roads) Road Safety Committee. Ireland
chaired this sub-committee in 2010.
•The NRA recently developed a GIS system
to identify collision clusters based on the
number of injury collisions per km of road
and the average collision rate of that
road type. This has replaced any analysis
of discrete junctions as it is a much more
structured and comprehensive review of
the network.
•Ongoing. EuroRap 2008 report was
launched by Minister of Transport. Risk
mapping to be published in 2011.
115
Conduct Road Safety Audit
of all new national road
schemes and review the
standards on an annual basis
NRA
Annually
14
The NRA are continuing to administer
the road safety audit programme. As part
of the work to implement the EU Road
Infrastructure Safety management Directive,
a new Road Safety Audit course leading to a
‘Certificate of Competence’ was developed .
The first 5 week course was completed in Qtr
4 2010 and another is planned for 2011.
There are also a number of
outstanding actions from 2008
and 2009 which are behind
schedule or only partially
complete. These are as follows;
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Key:
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
16
Each Local Authority will
appoint a full time Road
Safety Officer to promote
road safety.
LAs
2nd Qtr 2009
CCMA advise that although a number of LA’s
have appointed full-time RSOs majority of
LA’s give priority to road safety but this is
done on a part-time basis within the staffing
and resource restrictions. In the absence of
further developments, this action will not
now be delivered due to funding restrictions
on local authorities.
30
Expand the range of road
safety-related offences
covered by way of penalty
points and administrative
fines.
DoT
1st Qtr. 2009
Five additional penalty point offences were
introduced on 1st May 2009:
1. Using vehicle without test certificate.
2. Driving vehicle before remedying
dangerous defect.
3. Driving dangerously defective vehicle.
4. Using vehicle without certificate of
roadworthiness
5. bridge strikes etc
The total number of road traffic offences
attracting penalty points is now 42.
Following consultation with relevant
stakeholders, preparatory work has
commenced in the department to extend
the penalty points and fixed charge systems
to other traffic offences.
37
72
Develop and ensure effective
sanctions for all vehicles
and drivers on Irish roads
including out-of-state
operators who breach
relevant transport legislation
while operating within the
state.
DoT/RSA
Legislate for graduated
driver licensing
DoT
2nd Qtr. 2009
Specific measures to address out of state
drivers who breach HGV/Bus regulations are
included in Part 4 of the road Road Traffic
Act 2010.
Discussions between DoT, RSA And Garda
Síochána relating to practical applications of
the provisions are taking place.
3rd Qtr 2008
A public consultation was carried out by
the RSA in 2009. Recommendations were
made on foot of this consultation by the
RSA. The previous Minister approved these
recommendations in principle in May 2010
following which the RSA worked out details
on the piloting and implementation of GDL.
In September 2010, the RSA formally
announced the 9 new measures as part
of the introduction of a Graduated Driver
licensing System in Ireland.
Primary and secondary legislation is required
to give effect to the proposals. Regulations
will be introduced on various aspects in the
coming months.
Primary legislation requirements will be
provided in the next Road Traffic Bill.
15
There are also a number of
outstanding actions from 2008
and 2009 which are behind
schedule or only partially
complete. These are as follows;
Key:
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
(continued)
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
109
Review (HSE) emergency
response to road collisions
in light of available
evidence on best practice
and value-for-money.
Commence implementation
on the recommendations
to improve the survival,
treatment and recovery
of those involved in road
collisions
HSE
2nd Qtr. 2009
The HSE has invested in re-equipping
ambulances and updating its ambulance
fleet. Training continues to be provided to
paramedic staff in advanced life support
techniques and all staff continue to be
up-skilled in line with clinical practice
guidelines. The HSE is continuing to restructure the distribution of ambulance
locations in order to optimise ambulance
response times.
Spatial analysis surveys have been
completed in the south west, mid west,
north east, midlands and northwest regions
and are ongoing in the south, west and
eastern regions providing the evidential
basis for restructuring services nationwide.
Satellite navigation technology is being
more commonly used in order to better
identify locations where assistance is
needed.
The reconfiguration of the hospital network
is ongoing to ensure that it provides
optimum care in the appropriate locations
– including such considerations as access to
major trauma care with the appropriate skill
mix support.
116
Prepare a comprehensive
freight transport strategy
that maximizes road safety.
DoT
4th Qtr. 2008
Under the auspices of the North/South
Ministerial Council an All Ireland Freight
Forum has been established, outputs
of which will provide key inputs to the
development of a freight transport strategy.
One of five key priorities for the Forum, and
ultimately the strategy, will be the theme of
“safer, compliant, eco-efficient road freight
transport”. Work on this theme is being
led by the DOE NI, the DoTand Sustainable
Energy Ireland who are being assisted by
the RSA, and a Work Programme has been
developed to pursue this agenda.
120
Implement the
recommendations of the
Coroners Review Group,
December 2000, on the
setting up of a National
Coroners’ database.
DoJELR
4th Qtr. 2008
The Coroner Service Implementation Team
has been established in Navan to develop
and out in place arrangements to implement
the Coroners Bill, 2007, once enacted. The
matter of the development of a database
concerning all aspects of coronial activities
will be addressed by the Implementation
Team.Informal discussions have taken
place with the Coroners Society of Ireland
and individual coroners as to how such a
database could be established in a low cost
way. It is intended to build on these ideas, if
possible, by tapping into existing resourses
within the Department.
16
There are also a number of
outstanding actions from 2008
and 2009 which are behind
schedule or only partially
complete. These are as follows;
Not completed in 2010
Annual actions completed in 2010
Completed in 2010
Key:
(continued)
Action
No.
Measure of Action
Lead Dept/
Agency
Completion
Date
Current Status
121
Develop and implement
an integrated research
methodology to provide data
on the incident of drinkdriving in Ireland.
RSA / Garda
Síochána
1st Qtr. 2008
The Coroners Bill was introduced in the
seanad in April, 2007 and is awaiting
Committee Stage. It incorporates many
of the recommendations contained in the
Report of the Coroners Review Group. Its
main objective is to reform comprehensively
the existing legislation relating to coroners
by replacing the Coroners Act 1962 with
modern updated provisions, taking into
account the jurisprudence of our courts and
the European Court of Human Rights. It also
takes account of developments in the legal
system and the ongoing reform of coroner
services in other common law jurisdictions.
17
Road Safety Strategy 2007 – 2012
Third Annual Review 30th June 2011
In total 212* people lost their lives in 2010 compared to 238 in 2009 an 11% reduction.
 29% of road deaths were under 25 years of age.
 43% of road deaths occurred at the weekend.
 Sunday was the most dangerous day of the week accounting for 26% of road deaths.
 The hours between 6pm and 8pm were the most dangerous period of the day, with 27 deaths (13%)
 The average monthly fatality rate was 18.
 With 10 deaths recorded in December 2010, this is the lowest recorded month in decades.
Despite the fact that there are now over eight times the number of licensed vehicles and license
holders in the state compared to 1959 road deaths are 31% lower.
Over the last 10 years much progress has been made in reducing the number of fatalities and serious
injuries on Irish Roads. In 2000 the fatality rate per million registered vehicles was 247 per million whilst
in 2010 this was reduced to 88 per million registered vehicles.
Table 1: Road Deaths by Road User Category 2010
Road User
No. Fatalities 2009
%
Pedestrian
41
19.3
Cyclist
3
1.4
Motorcyclist
17
8.0
Car Users
133
62.7
PSV
1
0.5
Goods vehicle
13
6.1
Other
4
1.9
Total
212
100
*Please note that the figure of 212 is based on Garda fatality figures as at 31st December 2010.
Subsequent increases/decreases in this figure are not reflected here.
Table 2: Irish Road Safety in Context – 1998 to 2010
Year
Deaths
Monthly Average
No. Vehicles
No. Licence Holders
1998
458
38
1,510,853
1,943,184
1999
413
34
1,608,156
2,039,509
2000
415
35
1,682,221
2,014,296
2001
411
34
1,769,684
2,036,624
2002
376
31
1,850,046
2,110,666
2003
335
28
1,937,429
2,217,076
2004
374
31
2,036,307
2,285,323
2005
396
33
2,138,680
2,352,540
2006
365
30
2,296,393
2,444,159
2007
338
28
2,441,564
2,539,090
2008
279
23
2,497,568
2,632,136
2009
238
20
2,467,660
2,648,407
2010
212
18
2,416,387
2,655,048
18
Monthly average number of fatalities
Expressed as a monthly average, the number of fatalities in 2000 was 35 and in 2010 it was 18 per month.
This represents a reduction of 48.6% in annual monthly averages since 2000. The fatality rate per million
population was 47 in 2010, a decrease from the 2009 rate of 54.
Figure 1: Trend in the annual monthly average number of fatalities
60
50
40
30
Target 2012
20
10
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
0
Cost Benefit Analysis
Since records began in 1959, on average, 300 people per year were killed and more than 8,000 were
injured in road collisions in the Republic of Ireland. As well as the human tragedy of so many deaths and
injuries, road collisions have a substantial economic cost, in the order of €1billion every year.
The estimated cost of all fatal and injury collisions reported to and recorded by, An Garda Síochána in
2010 was €856million
In estimating cost benefits for 2007-2010 the RSA used the updating mechanism as set out in the Goodbody
Economic Consultant’s report. The 2002 cost values were inflated to 2010 values, using the growth in
Gross National Product (GNP) per person employed. The following table outlines the costs per collision
and crash severity.
Table 3: Estimates of the unit costs of collisions using updating mechanism
Crash Severity
Cost per collision (Euro 2010)
Fatal
2,583,311
Serious
345,121
Minor
33,991
Material damage
2,719
The next step undertaken was to estimate the annual reduction in fatal and injury collisions and associated
cost savings using the average of 2004-2006 as the baseline for comparison. The following table outlines
the reduction in collision types. It shows that there were 384 less fatal collisions and 445 less fatalities
over the period 2007-2010 compared to the baseline, the average of the period 2004-2006.
19
Table 4: The benefits of the Road Safety Strategy illustrated by expected fatal, serious and minor injury collisions
avoided.
The table below illustrates the expected fatal, serious and minor injury collisions which were avoided
by the implementation of the measures contained in the Road Safety Strategy.
Collisions
Type
Baseline
(2004
-2006
average)
2007
Reduction in
2007**
2008
Reduction in
2008**
2009
Reduction in
2009**
2010*
Reduction in
2010**
Cumulative
reduction
(200720010)**
Fatal
338
309
29
254
84
220
118
185
153
384
Serious 701
618
83
613
88
485
216
419
282
691
Minor
4,540
532
5,869
-797
5,200
-128
5180
-108
-1233
378
338
40
279
99
238
140
212
166
445
Serious 943
860
83
835
108
640
303
-
-
-
Minor
6,946
698
8,923
-1279
9102
-1458
-
-
-
5,072
Casualties
Fatal
7,644
*Provisional figures
** Reductions are based on the baseline (2004-2006 average)
The following table illustrates the cost savings per collision type and it is expressed in savings per
million euro. It is important to note it is not related to casualties. In terms of collision cost reduction
from 2007 to 2010 there was a saving of E1.2 billion as a consequence of a reduction in collisions.
Table 5: Estimated value of the collision reduction from 2007 to the end of 2010
compared to the average of 2004-2006 (as a baseline)
Estimated value of collision reduction (Million Euros)
Type
Value
Fatal
992
Serious
238
Minor
-42*
Total
1,189
* There was an increase in reported injury collisions in 2009, which was contrary to the decreasing trends of recent years.
However this increase may be related to improved reporting procedures between an Garda Síochaná and the Road Safety
Authority. Analysis of injury collisions will have to be carried out over the next few years to fully assess the trend.
20
Fatalities
Total fatalities reduced by 11% in 2010 compared with 2009. Substantial reductions have been recorded
in all road user categories with the highest reduction in pedal cyclist casualties (57% reduction). The
number of drivers who were killed in 2010 showed a reduction of 26.6 % compared to 2009. Fatalities
among motorcyclists fell by 32% compared to 2009 figures and there was 3% increase in fatalities for
pedestrians. Fatalities among passengers were also higher in 2010 than in 2009 (31%).
Figure 2: Fatalities classified by age in 20101
In 2009, 26.9% of all the people killed were aged 17-24. Twenty-five percent of drivers killed were aged
17-24 however, of the driver population in 2010 (both learner permit and full licence holder), 17-24 year
olds make up 12%. Thus, drivers aged 17-24 were significantly over represented in road traffic fatalities
in 2010 (2-fold over-representation). Twelve percent of people killed were aged 65 and over.
Number of fatalities
50
43
40
40
30
10
19
19
20
5
2
4
16
10
9
7
6
6
Male
Female
0
0-9
10-16
17-24
25-34
35-49
50-64
65+
In 2010, the following issues in relation to deaths and gender were noteworthy:
 79% were male.
 31% of males killed were car drivers.
 33% of females killed were car drivers.
 22% of females killed were passengers.
 24% of females killed were pedestrians.
Figure 3: Percentage of Fatalities by road user and age group, 2010.
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
0-5
6-9
Car drivers
1
10-14
15-17
18-20
Car passangers
21-24
Pedestrians
Data is excluded where gender/age are unknown.
21
25-34
35-44
45-54
55-64
65+
Breakdown of road user fatalities in 2010
Drivers and passengers of motor vehicles (excluding motorcycles)
In 2010, 147 motor vehicle (car, van, trucks etc) occupants were killed in collisions.
Motorcyclists
The 17 motorcyclist fatalities that occurred in 2010 accounted for 8% of all fatalities. In 2010,
motorcyclists were 15 times more likely than car users to be killed per vehicle kilometres travelled.
Pedalcyclists
In 2010, 3 pedal cyclists were killed representing 1.4% of all fatalities
Pedestrians
In 2010, 41 pedestrians were killed. 19.5 % of the pedestrians killed were 65 years old and over.
73% of pedestrians killed were male.
Other vehicles account for 4.
Table 6:
Fatalities by Road User Type
2009
2010
Change in %
Pedestrians
40
41
3%
Pedal Cyclists
7
3
-57%
Motor Cyclists
25
17
-32%
Car Users
146
133
-9%
PSV Users
1
1
0%
Goods Vehicle
17
13
-24%
Other or Unknown
2
4
100%
Total
238
212
-11%
Figure 4: Fatalities by month, 2010
The worst month for fatalities in 2010 was October when 36 people were killed. December recorded the
lowest number of collisions in which 10 people died.2
40
36
35
28
30
25
22
19
19
20
15
15
14
12
13
13
11
10
10
5
0
Jan
2
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Data as of the 31st January according to the Garda Daily Status Sheet.
22
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Figure 5: Fatalities by hour and day of the week, 2010
The highest number of fatalities occurred between 18:00-19:00 and 00:00 to 02:00. The number of fatal
collisions between the hours of 21.00hrs and 03.00hrs, the hours most strongly associated with drinking
and driving, was 58 in 2010, with 63 people being killed in these collisions. This period accounted for 31
per cent of fatal collisions and 30 per cent of fatalities in 2010.
8.0
7.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
0.0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Figure 6: Fatalities by day of the week, 2010
The worst days of the week for fatalities during 2010 Saturday and Sunday, these 2 days accounted for
43% of all the fatalities.
Sunday
54
38
Saturday
29
Friday
19
Thursday
27
Wednesday
21
Tuesday
24
Monday
0
10
20
30
23
40
50
60
Figure 7: Fatalities by road user type, 2007-2010
There has been a decrease in fatalities by user type from 2007 to 2010 in Goods Vehicles Users, PSV
Users, Car Users, Pedal Cycle Users and Motorcycle Users.
250
2007
2008
2009
200
2010 (provisional)
171
160
150
146
133
100
81
49
50
33
32
20 17
13
5 8
1 0 1 1
0
Goods Vehicle Users
PSV Users
Car Users
15 13
2 4
Others
24
7
40 41
29
25
17
3
Pedal Cycle Users
Motor Cycle Users
Pedestrians
Figure 8: Fatalities by County, 2010
In 2010, the two counties with the most fatalities were Dublin which recorded 21 fatalities, followed by
Donegal with 19 fatalities. The counties with the lowest number of people killed were Tipperary South
and Longford with 2 fatalities.
County
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Carlow
9
7
3
1
3
5
Dublin
41
34
35
22
31
21
Kildare
14
23
13
13
10
10
Kilkenny
6
4
12
5
5
6
Laois
14
8
5
12
5
9
Longford
9
6
6
3
2
2
Louth
14
14
16
7
5
8
Meath
30
22
14
9
12
6
Offaly
8
9
5
8
4
4
Westmeath
12
18
14
3
4
7
Wexford
21
20
17
16
4
7
Wicklow
8
11
9
4
4
5
Clare
12
9
12
7
7
4
Cork
39
33
31
24
21
18
Kerry
11
21
14
19
12
11
Limerick
17
16
16
18
22
18
Tipperary NR
10
15
6
12
5
3
Tipperary SR
5
11
12
9
7
2
Waterford
9
8
6
7
3
5
Galway
21
19
24
24
23
6
Leitrim
8
3
7
5
0
3
Mayo
14
11
9
10
10
7
Roscommon
5
5
7
3
4
9
Sligo
11
4
7
7
7
3
Leinster
Munster
Connacht
Ulster (part of)
Cavan
10
7
10
8
9
11
Donegal
27
19
22
18
14
19
Monaghan
11
8
6
5
5
3
Total
396
365
338
279
238
212
25
Ireland’s position on road safety relative to other countries
In 2010, Ireland entered the top 6 best performing EU countries in terms of road deaths per million
population. Contributing to this improvement was a 11 % decrease in road deaths between 2009 and
2010. Ireland is now ranked in 6th place out of 25 EU countries. Ireland was one of the most improved
European countries in terms of the reduction in road deaths between 2001 and 2010.
Despite Ireland performing well at an EU level in 2010, there is still a large gap between Ireland and
best practice countries such as Sweden, United Kingdom and the Netherlands. Ireland recorded 47
road deaths per million of population in 2010 compared to the UK, Sweden and the Netherlands who
recorded less than 40 deaths per million of population.
Figure 9: Road deaths per million population in 2010*
2010 Fatalities
Sweden
UK
Malta
County
Road
Deaths
Road
Deaths/
Million
Sweden
UK
Malta
Netherlands
Switzerland
Norway
Germany
Israel
Ireland
Denmark
Finland
Spain
Estonia
EU 27
France
Luxembourg
Slovakia
Italy
Austria
Slovenia
Hungary
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Belgium
Portugal
Lithuania
Latvia
Poland
Bulgaria
Romania
Greece
266
1943**
15
640*
327*
210*
3657*
352*
212*
265*
270*
2435*
78
30921
3992*
32
353
3934*
552
138
739
60
802*
840*
845*
300
218
3907
775
2377
1281*
28
31
36
39
42
43
45
46
47
48
50
53
58
62
62
64
65
65
66
67
74
75
76
77
79
90
97
102
102
111
113
The Netheralnds
Switzerland
Norway
Germany
Israel
Ireland
Denmark
Finland
Spain
Estonia
EU 27
France
Luxembourg
Slovakia
Italy
Austria
Slovenia
Hungary
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Belgium
Portugal
Lithuania
Latvia
Poland
Bulgaria
Romania
Greece
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
Provisional figures
* Provisional figures or national estimates for 2010 as final figures for 2010 were not available at the time of going to print
** UK 2010: ETSC estimate for the whole UK based on EC Care Quick indicator. The final count for GB will be available on the 24
June 2011 on www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics.
26
Road Safety Review
This document provides a progress update under each of the 4 E’s (Education, Enforcement, Engineering
and Evaluation) in terms of 2010 priorities, achievements and reforms.
Education
The RSA’s policy is to deliver road user education in a cumulative approach
up to third level in the education system and in local communities. Road
safety education ensures that all road users develop appropriate attitudes
and safe behaviours. In 2010, the RSA distributed the following education
programmes:
Pre-Primary Level
‘Simon and Friends’
The RSA developed a road safety pack called ‘Simon & Friends’ which can be used in pre schools throughout
the country. The series centres on four characters who promote age appropriate road safety messages
to children - holding hands, stopping, looking and listening and setting a good example. At the end of
each story there are a number of extension activities which preschool providers can use to prompt other
learning experiences with the children. Stories are also recorded onto a CD Rom which can be played
to children in their early year’s environment. The CD also contains a number of road safety songs. The
pack also contains an accompanying teacher’s guide called ‘Hand in Hand’ which includes information
about integrating road safety into the preschool sector and contains suggested activities, games and
songs which support the ‘Simon and Friends’ stories. In 2010 a total of 25 County and City Childcare
Committees committed to roll out the programme to a network of 4,169 childcare providers such as
crèches and preschools throughout the country. County and City Childcare Committees organized local
training sessions for providers on the ‘Simon and Friends’ storybooks and also organized a ‘Beep Beep
Day!’ (a road safety awareness day) in their county. Preschool providers use the ‘Simon and Friends’
resources and games to promote road safety during their ‘Beep Beep Day!’.
Primary Level
‘Be Safe’
‘Be Safe’ is an activity based resource pack on road safety, fire safety and water safety which was
developed for primary schools. With materials aimed at children from infants to sixth class, it was
developed specifically as part of the SPHE (Social, Personal and Health Education) curriculum and is
relevant to the SPHE Strand, ‘Myself’, which addresses Safety and Protection, Personal Safety, Safety
Issues and Making Decisions.
‘Be Safe’ was developed in association with practicing teachers. The lesson plans are immediately
accessible to both teachers and children. Each topic is first introduced with age-appropriate information
which is then explored and developed through class discussion, activities and worksheets.
These Primary and Secondary school programmes are ongoing and a survey will be conducted in 2011 to
ascertain usage in schools throughout the country.
Back to School Campaign
In 2010, the RSA distributed 3,196 ‘Back to School Road Safety Packs’ to primary schools which contained:
A high visibility vest which was co-sponsored by the ESB for each new entrant to primary school. A
total of 120,000 high vis vests were circulated.
 A copy of the 2nd edition of the School Newsletter.
A copy of the ‘Let’s Go’ school guidelines. These guidelines provide school authorities with information
on how to be road safety aware when organising or travelling to school events.
 A ‘Going to School’ leaflet for new entrants to the school.
 A copy of the Safe Cross Code CD and Poster.
27
‘Seatbelt Sheriff and Hi-Glo Silver’
Seatbelt Sheriff and Hi-Glo Silver were distributed to each school in Ireland in 2010. A total of 496 schools
entered the Seatbelt Sheriff and Hi-Glo Silver competition in 2010. A website was developed for schools
and teachers: www.seatbeltsheriff.ie
‘Seatbelt Sheriff’ is a fun way to get children in first class involved in saving lives. Children become
Seatbelt Sheriffs by taking a pledge to always buckle up and also make sure that everyone else in the car
is buckled up. They are given a sheriff’s badge plus a certificate which shows that they are authorised to
instruct all passengers and drivers to ‘Buckle Up’ in any vehicle that they are travelling in. ‘Hi-Glo Silver’
is the Seatbelt Sheriff’s horse and his message is one of visibility. He encourages children to remind
their parents that they should wear high-visibility jackets or belts when out walking. Hi-Glo Silver was
sent to children in 2nd class, who received the Seatbelt Sheriff’s message the previous year. Through
this element of the campaign, the RSA has delivered 100,000 high visibility arm bands free of charge to
school children.
Cycling Proficiency Training
In 2010, 4,662 students received cycle proficiency training in schools. The aim of this training is to formally
train children to ride a bicycle safely and to encourage positive and responsible attitudes towards personal
safety. A subsidy of E5.00 per student is paid by the RSA to local authorities to assist with the cost of
national school students who participated in the scheme.
Secondary Level
‘Streetwise’
‘Streetwise’ was promoted to all schools in 2010. ‘Streetwise’ is an activity based interactive road safety
educational resource for the Junior Certificate Programme (12- 15 year olds) under the curriculum subject
CSPE (Civic, Social and Political Education).
The module can be run over 12 weeks.
The following lessons are covered:
Lesson 1 Pedestrians
Lesson 2 Cyclists
Lesson 3 Motorcyclists
Lesson 4 Seatbelts
Lesson 5 Speed and speeding
Lesson 6 Hazard perception
Lesson 7 Driver fatigue
Lesson 8 Drink driving
Lesson 9 Road safety engineering
All students must complete an action project as part of their Junior Certificate examination. With each of
the above topics, we have provided suggestions for these action-based projects. Each school in Ireland
received a copy of Streetwise in 2008.
‘Your Road to Safety’- a Transition Year Programme
This programme encourages active learning and the development of awareness, knowledge, skills and
values which will create a foundation for the development of safe road users now and into the future.
The programme is available in 20 hour and 45 hour formats and builds on the active learning approaches
of the Transition Year Programme. Both programmes feature inputs from other agencies such as the
ambulance service, fire service and An Garda Síochána as well as providing for visiting speakers, trips out
of school, projects and case studies. It is supported by digital resources including access to international
websites on road safety issues from the Road Safety Authority website www.rsa.ie. The programme
provides for an introduction to road safety for pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and motorists, and
covers such issues as safety belts and airbags, driver fatigue, drink/drug driving, road safety engineering
28
and enforcement, basic first aid at road crashes, emergency services and rehabilitation, licensing and
insurance issues, the NCT, purchasing a car and driving abroad. Relevant Driver Theory Test learning is
included at the end of each module.
In 2010, a total of 43 new teachers participated in an in-service training programme on the resource pack.
To date, 297 teachers have participated in an in-service training programme.
Wrecked.ie
In 2010 the RSA developed a pilot programme entitled ‘Wrecked.ie’ which is targeted at the high risk
17-24 year old age group. The programme was developed with a multi agency editorial committee
which included representation from An Garda Síochana, the Health Service Executive, the Fire Service,
Local Authority Road Safety Officer, Youthreach, FÁS, and a Behavioral Psychologist from Trinity College
Dublin. The programme is presented as both an online and offline computer based resource. ‘Wrecked.ie’
features a series of vodcasts recorded by Irish actors who recount experiences of reckless driving – without
showing their faces. The vodcasts are illustrated with high tech animation which demonstrates the key
points in each speaker’s testimony. ‘Wrecked.ie’ is accompanied by a ‘leaders guide’ which includes
additional exercises on each of the topics, providing them with an opportunity to look at themselves and
their behavior in relation to road safety.
In 2010 ‘Wrecked.ie’ was piloted with Youthreach, Fas and Garda Diversion Programmes throughout the
country and is due to be rolled out throughout the country in 2011.
Third Level
‘Safe Grads’ – Road Safety Guidelines for Third Level Colleges
The RSA developed road safety guidelines aimed at 3rd level colleges to enable them to host an informative
and successful road safety week. Eighteen colleges throughout the country participated in the ‘Safe
Grads’ programme which included Carlow I.T, Blanchardstown I.T, Letterkenny I.T, Athlone I.T, Dublin City
University, Dublin Institute of Technology, Galway Mayo Institute of Technology (Castlebar and Galway),
Cork Institute of Technology, Cavan Institute of Technology, Tallaght I.T., Waterford I.T., University College
Cork, University of Limerick, the Institute of Art and Design Dun Laoghaire, NUI, Galway, Dundalk Institute
of Technology and University College Dublin.
Community Education
Community Road Safety Programme
In 2010 the Road Safety Authority trained 130 people who work with community groups on a voluntary or
a professional basis on how to deliver ‘Protecting Our Community- A Call to Action!’ in their community.
The Community Road Safety Programme focuses on changing people’s attitudes and behaviour towards
road safety. The RSA will train community leaders to deliver this training to community groups. This
resource pack is based on the Rules of the Road and will focus on changing the attitudes and behaviour
of drivers, pedestrians, motorcyclists and cyclists.
It focuses on four main topics:
Speed and speeding;
Use of seatbelts, airbags and correct child restraints;
Impairment (alcohol, illegal and legal drug use, driver fatigue and mobile phone use);
Unsafe behaviour towards / by vulnerable road users (pedestrians, motorcyclists, cyclists, young
children and older people).
29
Mobility Matters
In 2010, the Road Safety Authority (RSA) in association with An Garda Síochana, HSE, the Association of
Optometrists in Ireland, the Association of Physiotherapy in Ireland, Age Action and Active Retirement
Ireland developed this toolkit for people working directly with older adults. The aim of Mobility Matters is
to equip older adults with the road safety knowledge and skills required to remain mobile and independent
road users. The programme deals with the following topics of information: pedestrian safety, cycle
safety, safety on buses, driving safely, impaired driving, buying a car including safety features and driver
comfort, car maintenance, planning for change and staying mobile. Sessions are highly interactive. A
purpose built DVD has been designed to accompany the programme. The programme will be piloted in
2011 and following the pilot it will be rolled out nationally.
Play it Safe– Road Safety Guidelines for Sporting Organisations
The RSA developed road safety guidelines for sporting organisations in conjunction with the IRFU, GAA,
FAI and Cycling Ireland. The guidelines provide sporting organisations with information on how to be
road safety aware when organising or travelling to and from sporting events. The guidelines are available
for download on the RSA website. Play it Safe was distributed to all clubs associated with the GAA, IRFU,
FAI and Cycling Ireland and was promoted in game programmes in 2010.
‘Leading Lights in Road Safety’ Awards Ceremony
The awards ceremony took place on Wednesday 13th October 2010 in Dublin Castle, where the Supreme
Award winner was presented to an individual for the most innovative and outstanding road safety
initiative, and for their leadership and exemplary dedication to the area of road safety. National school
teacher Tommy Duffy, Holy Family National School in Swords Co. Dublin who established a Cycling Safety
Training Club in his school to promote safe cycling among the pupils, won the Road Safety Authority (RSA)
‘Supreme Award’ for road safety.
Leading Lights in Road Safety were handed out in twelve categories including Education (Primary,
Secondary and Third Level), Community, Open Category, Road Safety Officer, Public Sector, Local Print
Media, Local Broadcast Media, National Media, Business and Approved Driving Instructor.
‘European Night Without Accident’
The RSA hosted the third ‘European Night Without Accident’ on Saturday 16th October 2010 as part of
‘Irish Road Safety Week’. The initiative aimed to promote responsible behaviour behind the wheel among
young adults. The initiative was run by young adult volunteers who encouraged groups of youngsters
entering night-clubs to appoint a ‘designated driver’ for the night. The ‘designated driver’ was given a
wrist-band to show their intention to stay alcohol-free for the night. When leaving the night-club, the
‘designated driver’ was invited to be voluntarily breathalysed by the volunteers to see if the commitment
was honoured. Results showed that a high number of young people acted as designated drivers and
chose to abstain from drinking and driving on the night. It took place in 8 nightclubs in 6 different towns
and cities throughout the country.
Local Authority Road Safety Officers
The RSA hosted three seminars with Local Authority Road Safety Officers in 2010. The aim of the seminars
was to facilitate a more integrated approach to road safety throughout the country. The RSA developed
an information portal for Road Safety Officers (RSOs). Road Safety Officers are informed of all road
safety activities through this medium which includes weekly road safety statistics provided by An Garda
Síochána, press releases, details of all road safety educational programmes which include pre-primary,
primary, secondary, third level and community level.
30
‘Road Safety Interactive Shuttle’
In 2010 the Shuttle attended 62 events including primary, secondary and third level institutes as well
as national events such as Young Scientist Exhibition, Community Emergency Services Safety weekend,
Navan Shamrock Festival, Ploughing Championships and Cathal Brugha Army barracks to name but a few.
In 2010 approximately 135,000 people have visited the Shuttle.
The “Shuttle” is a road safety experience which is aimed at taking road safety directly to the heart of local
communities nationwide.
The Shuttle has:
 Reaction timers;
 Computers equipped with the Driver Theory Test, interactive games and access to the RSA website;
 Exhibition areas to promote road safety;
 Plasma screen showing a series of road safety advertisements and road safety programming;
 Motorbike simulator;
 Car simulator;
 Bicycle simulators.
Streetsmart
In 2010 ‘Streetsmart’ was piloted in 6 primary schools around the country. ‘Streetsmart’ is a road safety
intervention aimed to bring road safety to life in a fun way for young school children. The central prop
is a ‘Streetscape’ map (measuring 9 metres x 10 metres), which is a typical street scene designed for
children aged between 4 and 8. Children are given ‘walking cars’ and ‘stand up bikes’ and taught how
to use the road safely. The Streetscape can be set up in the school hall. RSA staff liaised with teachers
beforehand to determine the best activities to offer to students. Streetscape is supported by the ‘Shuttle’
which includes a dedicated area for children. Children can participate in a range of activities such as
storytelling, road safety games and an interactive road safety question and answer session. Activities are
facilitated by RSA staff and teachers. In 2010 a teachers pack was developed to assist in the roll out of
‘Streetsmart’.
31
ADVERTISING
Four new Road Safety awareness campaigns were launched in 2010.
They included:
1. A new Anti-Drug Driving TV Campaign
2. Safe Cross Code TV campaign,
3. A joint TV campaign with An Garda Siochana to raise awareness of the new Safety Camera project
4.A new series of ‘Crashed Lives’ TV adverts which feature true-life accounts of road crashes, as told by
victims or their families.
Anti Drug Driving
The RSA broadcast a new public service anti-drug driving TV and Cinema campaign in July 2010. The
Campaign included a new 60 second TV advert called ‘Cell’, which was acquired from Victoria in Australia
and adapted for use in Ireland. This advert depicts the tragic consequences of a driver’s decision to take
drugs and then drive after leaving a nightclub.
A second advert entitled ‘Dead Girl Talking’ was adapted from the UK and was aired on TV and in
cinemas. This 50 second advert shows a young woman describe how she and her friends were involved in
a collision after taking drugs, the consequences of that decision were fatal, something which is revealed
in a dramatic twist at the end of the advert.
To raise awareness of the serious risk that drug driving poses to road safety, research was commissioned
by the Road Safety Authority (RSA) among 17 to 34 year olds into the use of illegal drugs while driving.
The results highlighted alarming behaviour with as many as 1 in 5 people (22%) admitting they were a
passenger in a car driven by someone under the influence of drugs.
Safe Cross Code
A new Safe Cross Code TV Campaign aimed at teaching children how to cross the road safely went live in
November 2010. The campaign revives the old Safe Cross Code song that was so popular in the 1970’s. It
has been given a major update for the 21st Century and now includes two 20 second animated TV adverts
called ‘Jack’ and ‘Annie’. The key message in the campaign is, - ‘Your need the code to cross the road’.
It also includes a new Safe Cross Code website. The website, which is found on rsa.ie, contains a newly
developed ‘Safe Cross Code’ game, plus an animated ‘X Factor’ style safe cross code song and dance
which is performed by the Safe Cross Code animated characters.
Safety Camera Awareness Campaign
The RSA and An Garda Síochána joined forces to develop a major public information campaign ahead
of the deployment of the network of safety cameras on the county’s roads. The campaign includes a 40
second TV advert entitled ‘Lifebouy’; a 30 second radio advert; a press campaign plus an online campaign.
The campaign went live on 17th November and ran up to the end of December.
‘Crashed Lives’
The RSA also launched a new series of ‘Crashed Lives’ TV and radio advertisements.
‘Crashed Lives’ is a road safety campaign featuring true life case studies in which people speak about the
consequences of a crash or about the loss of loved ones in road collisions and how it has changed their
lives forever - and robbed everyone of their dreams.
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The first ‘Crashed Lives’ ads were launched in December 2007 and a second series followed in December
2008. The new series of ads included three true life accounts and features Siobhán O’Brien, Marjorie
Flood and Dr Áine Carroll who share their story of how the consequences of road crashes have affected
their lives.
Mark Flood
Mark Flood was killed after a night out in Dunshaughlin. His tragic death left a family and a much wider
community devastated. Marjorie, his mother, tells the story of how her family’s world was shaken to
its core early one morning, when she found out that her son had been needlessly killed on the road.
Marjorie reminds us that until you’re affected, you don’t realise how many people die in preventable
crashes on our roads.
Siobhán O’Brien
Siobhán, a young woman, was due to graduate the very next day, when suddenly her whole world was
turned upside down following a collision with an articulated truck. Siobhán now has an acquired brain
injury, and in her ad, she explains how it only takes a split second for an entire life to change forever.
Dr. Áine Carroll
Dr. Áine Carroll, Consultant in Rehabilitation Medicine at the National Rehabilitation Hospital has seen
the full spectrum of the catastrophic consequences of collisions on the road. From individuals whose
whole lives have been made unrecognisable by a single moment on the road, to families who must
devote everything to support a survivor of a road crash, often for the rest of their lives. As a patient’s
mother once said to Dr Carroll, there are sometimes worse things than dying.
The RSA’s second series of ‘Crashed lives’ TV adverts aired over the summer of 2010. It included the
following edits, ‘James’, ‘Conor’, ‘Sarah’ and ‘Consultant’.
Results of Campaign Effectiveness research indicated that:
 88% of motorists reported that they had changed some aspect of their behavior on the roads
 90% of drivers said that the campaign has influenced their behavior
 94% of drivers said that the campaign makes them think a lot about their behavior
‘Better Safer Driver’ Campaign
The RSA’s ‘Better Safer Driver’ Campaign of TV adverts are designed to generate awareness of some
important manoeuvres that are commonly linked to fatal or serious road collisions. During 2010 the RSA
aired its two ‘Better Safer Driver’ adverts ‘Roundabouts’ and ‘Motorway Driving’.
The 30 second TV advert ‘Roundabouts’ was aired on TV for four weeks throughout April and again in
September / October. The RSA 30 second TV advert on ‘Motorway Driving’ aired throughout June.
‘Underneath’
The RSA motorcycle Safety TV advert ‘Underneath’, which was produced jointly with the DOE in Northern
Ireland, aired on TV screens throughout July and August 2010.
Bank Holiday 2010 TV Campaign
As part of its 2010 strategy of targeting bank holiday weekends with re-runs of old road safety adverts the
RSA broadcast the following ads;
 ‘Shame’ Anti Drink Driving Advert over the St Patrick’s weekend
 ‘Damage’ Seatbelt Advert over the May bank holiday weekend
 ‘Texting’ the Pedestrian safety TV advert over the August bank holiday Weekend.
33
RADIO CAMPAIGNS 2010
‘ADI’ Radio Ad
The RSA ran its 30 second Approved Driving Instructor radio advert which reminds novice drivers that they
should only use RSA approved ADI’s when taking lessons.
‘Local is Lethal’ Radio Ad
The RSA activated its 30 second radio advertising campaign ‘Local is Lethal’ over the summer 2010. The
ad states that the biggest risk of being killed or injured is on local roads.
‘Driver CPC’ Radio Ad
The RSA ran a new 30 second radio advert in mid July to remind bus and truck drivers of the need to
maintain their Driver CPC entitlements by completing their one days training for 2010 by the 10th
September deadline.
‘He Drives, She Dies’ Radio Ad
The RSA radio advertising campaign ‘He Drives, She Dies’ ran on local radio stations nationwide for a two
week period during July.
Driving For Work’ Radio Campaign
The RSA and the Health and Safety Authority joined forces to re-launch the driving for work road safety
guidelines for employers in 2010. The campaign was backed by a national and local radio advert, asking
employers to use the RSA’s and HSA’s ‘Driving for Work Guidelines’ to assist in implementing safe driving
policies in the workplace. The advert aired during March.
‘Harvest’ Radio Advert
The RSA and the Irish Farmers Association re-broadcast the 30second radio advert aimed at highlighting
the dangers associated with an increase in agricultural vehicles on the roads over the summer period.
The advert aired on national and local radio stations over the summer months.
Mobile Phones & Driving Campaign
The RSA’s Mobile Phones & Driving radio advert aired on national and local radio during May and
September.
Driver Fatigue Radio Campaign
The RSA’s 30 second radio advert highlighting the dangers of driver fatigue aired on national and local
radio over the Easter Bank Holiday period.
Vulnerable Road Users Campaign
Three new radio adverts, promoting vulnerable road users safety, were produced in 2010. One targets
pedestrians a second targets drivers and focus on the need to be on the lookout for vulnerable road users.
The third is aimed at cyclists. The ads aired in October / November 2010.
‘Is Your Vehicle Ready for Winter?’
A new 30 second radio advert aired throughout November urging motorists to ensure their vehicle was
serviced for winter and that they perform regular safety checks.
34
Severe Weather Campaign
In response to the unprecedented nature of the severe weather event, which occurred in late 2010 the
RSA commissioned twenty one ‘15sec’ radio messages providing basic safety tips for road users in severe
weather scenarios. These ‘stings’ covered both snow and icy conditions as well as the hazards posed
during a thaw. The RSA deployed these messages repeatedly on national and local radio and often within
a matter of hours after receiving a ‘Severe Weather Warning’ from Met Eireann. In addition many of the
stations added additional bonus ‘airings’ to the schedule, free of charge. The RSA is extremely grateful to
these stations for their help and commitment to road safety.
Promotions/Events
The Ploughing Championships
The RSA brought its Road Safety Interactive Shuttle to the 2010 Ploughing Championships which was
attended by over 150,000 people. As part of its drive to promote road safety at the event, the RSA offered
50,000 free high visibility vests in association with FBD Insurance and the Irish Farmers’ Journal to promote
safety on the roads and on the farm.
High Visibility Giveaways
In 2010, the RSA teamed up with a number of organisations to distribute high visibility material free of
charge. This included:
 25,000 high visibility biker jackets in conjunction with the Bike Buyers’ Guide;
 2,500 high visibility vests distributed through the Roscommon Herald in September;
Over 120,000 children’s high visibility vests were distributed as part of the ‘Back to School Campaign’
in September 2010 to all children starting school. This campaign was run in conjunction with the ESB
Cars;
 50,000 high visibility jackets in conjunction with FBD Insurance and the Irish Farmers’ Journal;
 8,000 high visibility jackets given away through Advanced Pitstop;
Over 100,000 vests distributed through An Garda Síochána at various road safety events and school
talks;
 340,000 adult armbands distributed through the Sunday Independent in October
Other initiatives:
 100,000 armbands distributed as part of the Seatbelt Sheriff/Hi Glo Silver campaign.
Over 20,000 adult armbands were given to the public from our interactive shuttle at various events
around the country and through An Garda Síochána;
High visibility materials distributed through the Road Safety Interactive Shuttle at 62 locations
nationwide. This included the distribution of vests, armbands, bags, ruck sack covers;
High visibility materials distributed to scouts, girl guides, youth clubs, crèches, hospitals and various
organizations on request.
BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition 2010
The Road Safety Authority (RSA) invited students to visit their fun-filled Road Safety Interactive Shuttle at
the 2010 BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition which took place at the RDS from 12th – 16th January
2010. Members of the RSA staff were on hand to offer advice and information on any road safety issues
and as part of its drive to promote road safety to students at the event. Other initiatives included;
Screening of RSA TV ads on a continual basis.
An XBOX Competition - Students were in with a chance to win an XBOX 360 each day by taking part in
a quiz which related to all activities on stand;
35
 RSA Material – high visibility back packs, reflective armbands and bags were distributed to students.
Seatbelt Sheriff & High Glo Silver Awards
The annual Seatbelt Sheriff & High Glo Silver Awards took place on Tuesday 2nd February in Dublin
Castle. The event was attended by 300 primary school children and their families, their teachers, senior
members of An Garda Síochána, the Minister for Transport and RSA personnel.
Online Road Safety Video for Goods Vehicle Drivers and Cyclists
The RSA, in association with Smarter Travel (Department of Transport), the Irish Road Haulage Association,
Cyclist.ie and Dublin City Council, launched an online road safety video to promote safety among cyclists
and Heavy Goods Vehicle (HGV) drivers. In particular the video highlights the dangers posed by the blind
spots on goods vehicles.
Ordnance Survey Ireland Launch
The RSA, the Health Service Executive (HSE) and OSI collaborated to produce a web-based road safety
application, which displays the pattern and locations of road collisions in recent years in Ireland where
death and personal injury was involved, showing collision data on OSI maps at national, county and local
levels by severity, year and type. The service was launched on Tuesday 30th March 2010.
The system allows people to see collision statistics and information throughout Ireland and could be
used by the public to plan ‘safe routes’ for a journey.
Check it Fits Road Show
The ‘Check it Fits’ child car seats campaign visited a total of ten locations around the country in May and
October 2010.
Third International Conference on Road Safety
The RSA’s third international conference on road safety was held in Dublin Castle on Monday 31st May.
Experts from Ireland, the UK, Sweden and Belgium joined almost 200 delegates at the conference which
focused on the topic of speeding.
Driving Abroad Road Safety Campaign
The RSA issued a media statement in 2010 urging people who were considering travelling abroad not to
leave road safety in the airport. The appeal was made as figures from the Department of Foreign Affairs
indicated that up to 240 Irish citizens died while abroad in 2009, an increase of 20% on 2008 figures. A
number of these were as a result of road collisions. Further research indicated that 12 Irish people alone
died in road crashes in Australia since 2007.
RSA and HSA ‘Driving for Work’ Seminars
A series of ‘Driving for Work’ half day seminars were hosted by the RSA, the Health and Safety Authority
(HSA) and the Gardaí in Kilkenny, Cork, Athlone, Sligo and Dublin in June 2010. The aim of the seminars
was to highlight the importance of safe driving for work among local businesses. Speakers at the seminars
included the RSA, the HSA, An Garda Síochána and the ESB.
Irish Road Safety Week, Oct 11th to Oct 17th 2010
The RSA urged the public to get involved in Irish Road Safety Week 2010 by announcing details of activity
that would be taking place around the country. A 20 second advert promoting Irish Road Safety Week was
also broadcast on national and local radio.
36
Annual RSA Road Safety Lecture
The RSA hosted its second Annual Lecture on Road Safety on Monday 11th October. The theme was drug
driving and at the lecture it was revealed that, in Ireland, drug driving could be as serious a problem as
drink driving. Guest speaker Dr Doug Beirness, the main author of the OECD/ITF report on ‘Drugs and
Driving’, revealed that drugs were a contributory factor in as many as 1 in 3 driver deaths in Canada in
the period 2000 to 2007.
Speed Enforcement Zone Alert
TomTom, a provider of location and navigation solutions launched new content for its ‘sat nav’ devices
in conjunction with the Road Safety Authority in November 2010. The new software alerts drivers when
they are entering or exiting one of the new speed enforcement zones in Ireland. The objective is to help
drivers to drive safely and more responsibly with the new Speed Enforcement Zone Alert.
World Remembers Victims of Road Crashes
The RSA, An Garda Síochána, Road Safety Officers and the road safety group PARC joined up to mark
World Remembrance Day for Road Traffic Victims’ on Sunday 21st November 2010.
Christmas & New Year Road Safety Campaign 2010
President of Ireland, Mary McAleese launched the RSA and An Garda Síochána Christmas and New Year
Road Safety Campaign on Thursday 16th December 2010 at the National Rehabilitation Hospital, Dun
Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. The RSA also launched the new series of ‘Crashed Lives’ TV and radio advertisements
at the event.
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DRIVER LICENSING AND TESTING REFORMS
The Driver Testing and Licensing Directorate is responsible for the driver
testing system and for the management of the driver licensing regime. The
objective of the Directorate is to ensure that the way drivers learn to drive
and the rules by which they continue to drive makes road use safer.
The particular tasks for which the Directorate is responsible are:




delivery of the driver testing service
oversight of driver licensing regime
oversight of delivery of Driver Theory Test Service, and
management of penalty points system
Driver Testing Service
The objective of the driver testing service is to deliver a fair and efficient driving test in accordance with
the EU Directives and national legislation. 154,166 applications for tests were received in 2010. Almost
80% of applications are made online. The RSA committed to and met the target of delivering tests within
an average ten week time frame for 2010. The Tables below set out data on activity across the driver
testing service in 2010.
Figure 10: The following table gives an overview of the average waiting times across the six regions:
Average Waiting Time for Cars at 31 December 2010
Region/Test Centre
Average Waiting Time
in Weeks
Region/Test Centre
Average Waiting Time
in Weeks
Athlone 11
Loughrea 10
Ballina 8
Mallow 9
Birr 10
Monaghan 9
Buncrana 9
Mullingar 10
Carlow 10
Naas 12
Carrick-On-Shannon
8
Navan 11
Castlebar 11
Nenagh 11
Cavan 8
Newcastle West
8
Churchtown 10
Portlaoise 9
Clifden 9
Raheny 9
Clonmel 10
Rathgar 10
Cork 11
Roscommon 9
Donegal 10
Shannon 7
Dundalk 11
Skibbereen 8
Dungarvan 9
Sligo 8
Ennis 10
Tallaght 11
Finglas 10
Thurles
10
Galway 10
Tipperary
9
Gorey 12
Tralee
8
Kilkenny 9
Tuam
10
Killarney 9
Tullamore
10
Kilrush 11
Waterford
10
Letterkenny 9
Wexford
9
Limerick 9
Wicklow
10
Longford 8
Total
9.5
38
Figure 11: The following table outlines the fail and pass rates for the various categories of licence in 2010.
Driving Test Results by Vehicle Category 2010
Category Description
Category
Pass
Fail
Total
% Pass
Motorcycle (exceeding 125cc)
A
2266
1030
3296
69%
Motorcycle (51-125cc)
A1
99
154
253
39%
Motorcycle(not exceeding 50cc and/or 45km/h)
M
4
9
13
31%
Car
B
49127
53491
102618
48%
Truck (G.V.W. exceeding 7500 kg)
C
2525
1146
3671
69%
Truck (G.V.W. exceeding 3501 - 7500 kg)
C1
116
55
171
68%
Bus
D
945
465
1410
67%
Minibus(9 - 16 passenger seats)
D1
458
254
712
64%
CPC PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE - Bus
927
52
979
95%
CPC PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE - Truck
1447
80
1527
95%
Car + Trailer
EB
305
166
471
65%
Truck + Trailer
EC
1194
491
1685
71%
C1 Truck + Trailer
EC1
9
2
11
82%
Bus + Trailer
ED
0
0
0
0%
Minibus + Trailer
ED1
0
0
0
0%
Work vehicle/Tractor
W
6
3
9
67%
TOTAL
Total
59428
57398
116826
51%
Figure 12: The following table breaks down the driving test applications per licence category.
2010 Applications Received per Category
CATEGORY
TOTAL NUMBER
A
4,300
A1
431
B
137,417
C
4,284
C1
251
CPC TRUCK /ARTIC
1,863
D
1,374
D1
665
CPC BUS
1,000
EB
767
EC
1,718
EC1
16
ED
-
ED1
-
M
52
W
28
TOTAL
154,166
39
Graduated Licensing Scheme
An objective of the RSA is to reduce long term reliance on learner permits and move to a graduated driving
licensing (GDL) system. In September 2010 the RSA announced a suite of GDL measures to be implemented
over a period of time. Initial Basic Training (IBT) for motorcyclists was introduced in December 2010 while
Essential Driver Training (EDT) for car learner drivers was introduced in April 2011. Measures relating to lower
alcohol levels for learners and novice drivers, a review of the driver theory test, an enhancement of the
driving test, the displaying of R plates, a consideration of the implementation of a Hazard Perception Test,
accelerated penalty points for certain driving offences as well as the availability of alternative sentencing
options for traffic offences are all at various stages of implementation.
Regulation of Driving Instruction
A key and critical element to the reduction of death and injuries on Irish roads is to reform the way in
which drivers are trained, tested and licensed. The RSA had put in place a regulatory system for driving
instructors. Since 1 May 2009 any person giving instruction must be a registered Approved Driving
Instructor (ADI). This process is designed to ensure that each instructor meets certain standards in the
areas of driving, knowledge of aspects of road safety and the giving of tuition. At the end of 2010, 1,816
persons had been approved as ADI’s.
The RSA then introduced Initial Basic Training (IBT) for Motorcycle learners. This important programme
seeks to change the way learners learn to drive here in Ireland. The programme is up and running though
regulations have yet to be made in relation to the IBT programme. IBT has become well integrated into
learning to ride a motorcycle and been welcomed by both ADI’s and Learners alike. Currently there are 52
ADI’s providing IBT to Motorcyclists nationwide.
Initial Basic Training (IBT) for Motorcycle learners
Initial Basic Training (IBT) is a training course that teaches basic riding skills to learner motorcyclists. It is
part of the RSA’s Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) scheme and is intended to improve road safety.IBT is a 16
hour course broken into four separate modules to be completed in sequence. These modules are a mixture
of theory and practical riding skills.
When a novice rider has completed an IBT course, their instructor will record the details of their training in
an IBT logbook and issue each successful learner with a Certificate of Satisfactory Completion. Learners can
then apply for and undergo a practical driving test following the 6 month wait rule (if applicable).
The Conversion module
If a learner wants to upgrade the bike they ride (from automatic to manual or tricycle to two-wheeler) they
can complete a conversion module. This module allows them to get the training they need to operate a
different type of bike without having to repeat the whole IBT course.
IBT courses are only available at RSA approved IBT training centre’s and may only be delivered by RSA approved
IBT instructors. Before beginning training, learners should check that both centre and instructor have been
issued with an RSA certificate of approval.
Completing an initial basic training course means novices will:
 learn to become better safer road users;
 develop a strong understanding of basic motorcycle riding skills;
 be able to practice riding unaccompanied on a public road.
Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (Driver CPC)
The Road Safety Authority implemented Driver CPC for Bus and Truck Drivers in line with EU Directive
2003/59/EC and subsequently developed a 4 stage testing process for new drivers which consists of 2 theory
tests (2 hours each) and a 30 minute practical test in addition to the standard driving test. All professional
Bus and Truck Drivers are obliged to complete 1 day of periodic training each year in order to maintain their
entitlement to drive for a living and a classroom-based training syllabus was developed by the RSA for use
as part of this Driver CPC training process. As of the 31st of December 2010 there were 345 RSA approved
training centres throughout the country providing Driver CPC training and up to this date approximately
81,000 training days were completed by 90 Training providers. In 2010, 2000 CPC cards were issued to newly
qualified drivers.
40
Figure 13: In 2010, there were 6,966 CPC theory tests conducted as outlined below
Theory Test
Applications
Received
Tests Conducted
Passed
January
514
472
397
February
661
461
396
March
837
626
562
April
653
734
654
May
671
570
481
June
615
629
509
July
639
557
475
August
569
538
473
Sept
810
592
495
Oct
676
696
582
Nov
656
694
589
Dec
276
397
333
Total
7,557
6,966
5,946
41
ENFORCEMENT
Enforcement activity by the Gardaí is a key factor in reducing deaths and
injuries on our roads. Instrumental to the enforcement activity is the
recognition that enforcement activity is optimally effective if combined with
public awareness strategies to ensure the public are aware of the purpose
and reasons for the enforcement. In 2010 the RSA timed its promotion
activity to coincide with the enforcement activity of the Gardaí.
In 2010 there was high visibility enforcement of the law targeting speed, Mandatory Alcohol Testing,
seatbelt wearing, licensing, vehicle roadworthiness and driver rest regulations. An important principle
of the enforcement activity was the recognition that success in enforcement achieves increased levels of
compliance with road traffic law.
The following table provides data from a number of sources regarding detection of non compliance with the
law in relation to speeding, seatbelts wearing and driving whilst intoxicated. It also records the number of
breath tests conducted during 2010. The table also illustrated the reductions in fatalities for 2010. The figures
for deaths and serious injuries are provisional.
Table 7: GNTB Provisional figures / table – 25/07/2011
2001
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Speeding
157,852
141,723
143,661
157,852
181,335
177,549
172,911
157,831
Seat belts
39,129
22,613
18,084
26,687
30,002
28,659
19,367
17,370
11,344
12,307
13,370
17,868
19,838
18,053
14,786
12,606
DWI* Arrests
12,841
2002
13,441
* Driving While Intoxicated
42
Penalty Points
There are 42 offences in the penalty point system. Data for penalty points at the end of 2010 is set out below.
Drivers resident in Dublin, Cork and Kildare recorded the highest number of penalty points. The RSA have
been running a comprehensive public awareness programme, ‘Get the Point not the Points’ to educate the
public about the penalty point system.
Figure 15: Number of Penalty Points (current) Issued to Drivers as at 31st December 2010 (Cumulative Figure from Introduction)
**County
Number of Drivers
Total
10 P.P.
11 P.P.
12 P.P.*
4
27
1
5
6,118
1
8
3
1
6,304
91
7
16
3
2
11,706
139
392
45
100
18
29
44,202
7
64
7
12
1
1
10,773
4,147
360
1,093
140
248
44
54
115,774
109
518
17
106
6
19
1
11
18,025
31
314
8
78
2
20
1
5
10,493
4,761
109
1,215
39
301
15
60
2
5
26,039
1 P.P.
2 P.P.
3 P.P.
4 P.P.
5 P.P.
6 P.P.
7 P.P.
CARLOW
121
4,453
33
1,110
18
271
6
69
CAVAN
106
4,970
54
888
26
194
4
49
CLARE
151
9,181
61
1,750
47
382
15
CORK
1,879
32,346
706
6,666
421
1,461
163
8,670
80
1,444
44
280
5,939
82,227
2,408
17,917
1,197
KERRY
315
14,243
94
2,586
KILDARE
131
8,397
42
1,464
KILKENNY
365
18,972
195
LAOIS
DONEGAL
GALWAY
8 P.P. 9 P.P.
166
8,321
70
1,970
35
496
20
140
2
30
3
11,253
LEITRIM
79
5,979
43
1,359
33
330
12
94
9
22
7
7,967
LIMERICK COUNTY COUNCIL
33
2,401
14
443
7
100
4
17
2
2
LONGFORD
150
3,012
56
641
41
119
10
35
8
7
3
3
4,085
LOUTH
297
9,724
95
1,825
65
378
16
89
9
21
3
5
12,527
MAYO
42
2,592
10
485
26
94
4
33
2
3
1
4
3,296
1
9,971
3,023
MEATH
171
7,842
73
1,449
46
294
11
64
17
3
MONAGHAN
104
7,434
47
1,264
38
266
8
53
3
17
1
OFFALY
3
421
14,564
223
3,176
125
695
26
181
17
49
ROSCOMMON
81
3,854
29
627
25
123
2
23
1
2
SLIGO
74
5,574
35
1,143
34
270
4
58
2
17
NORTH TIPPERARY
77
5,621
16
1,248
29
275
7
68
4
21
2
SOUTH TIPPERARY
76
4,696
33
891
12
164
4
46
2
9
1
WATERFORD COUNTY CO.
139
5,442
55
1,187
29
244
11
68
4
7
WESTMEATH
128
6,108
48
1,271
40
282
12
67
6
9
WEXFORD
37 in disqualification
3,718
23 for six
873months,
15
* Receipt of 12 points results
227
7
53
2
9
** County refers to county where
driving
issued 12
WICKLOW
80
5,180 licence
32 was
1,059
244
8
68
2
14
2
DUBLIN CITY COUNCIL
109
5,569
70
2
15
LIMERICK CITY COUNCIL
166
WATERFORD CITY COUNCIL
341
NO Driver Number
Grand Total
9,235
3
19,483
4,767
1
7,212
1
7,369
5,934
2
7,188
2
7,974
4
4,968
2
6,703
2
5
7,184
1
52
1,071
30
250
9
12,400
74
2,980
63
741
33
224
8
66
2
17
16,774
11,757
157
2,612
86
631
28
146
7
39
2
4
15,810
4,863
185,116
1,194
44,609 25,442
14
2
3
1
1
16,804
500,363
6,052
28,235 15,019
833
3,843
320
887
261,245
100
177
* Receipt of 12 points results in disqualification for six months, ** County refers to county where driving licence was issued
Breakdown of drivers by licence type
The table below shows that 261,245 drivers, with no licence, committed penalty point offences in 2010.
Full
Provisional
No Licence
394,589
27,568
261,245
43
683,402
Excessive Speed and Road Traffic casualties
Excessive speed is said to be the main direct contributor to road traffic collisions and collision severity, in
terms of serious injury and fatality, with other major factors such as drink driving, illicit drug use and risk
taking. Speed has an exponentially detrimental effect on road safety. Thus as speed increases, so do the
number and severity of collisions.
The European Transport Safety Council (ETSC) in its report ‘Traffic Law Enforcement across the EU’ published
in May 2006 concluded that, “To control speed, automated speed enforcement systems must be used,
and offences must be followed up by procedures able to manage with a large number of violations.” The
successful reduction of speed related road casualties throughout the EU has been achieved by focusing on
this strategy.
In 2010 the RSA produced a report on excessive speed related collisions (see Table 9). The examination of
the excessive speed related road collisions and casualties on Irish roads over the period 1997-2009 revealed
the following:
Over the period 1997-2009, 1,150 lives were lost on Irish road network as a result of excessive or
inappropriate speed*. This represents 24 % of the total fatalities within the period 1997-2009. An
additional 3,366 people were seriously injured over the same period.
34% of the people killed due to excessive speed were killed between the hours of 12-midnight and
04:59.
47% of the speed related fatalities occurred on Saturday and Sunday.
30% of the speed related fatalities occurred during the summer months (June, July and August).
39% of the people killed due to excessive speed were young males aged 17-24.
Just under half of all drivers responsible for fatal collisions where excessive speed was cited as a
contributory factor were young males aged 17-24.
Table 9: All road deaths where excessive speed was cited as contributory factor by age & gender, 1997-2009*
1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total
%
Male 0-9
1
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0.3
Female 0-9
3
2
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
10
0.9
Male 10-16
11
8
3
4
2
3
1
2
3
0
1
1
0
39
3.4
Female 10-16
1
4
0
4
3
3
4
0
2
3
0
1
0
25
2.2
Male 17-24
48
67
52
61
47
37
23
31
26
20
14
10
7
443
38.5
Female 17-24
8
12
10
2
10
5
2
4
6
4
1
5
0
69
6.0
Male 25-34
31
26
23
26
25
29
21
18
19
11
8
2
5
244
21.2
Female 25-34
5
2
3
4
4
0
1
2
5
3
0
2
0
31
2.7
Male 35-49
13
13
8
19
15
12
16
8
2
7
4
1
3
121
10.5
Female 35-49
5
4
6
2
3
1
2
0
2
1
0
3
0
29
2.5
Male 50-64
5
6
4
5
4
2
5
1
2
1
1
0
0
36
3.1
Female 50-64
1
4
2
0
0
4
2
2
0
0
3
1
0
19
1.7
Male 65+
5
8
7
2
3
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
29
2.5
Female 65+
3
1
1
4
1
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
15
1.3
Male age
unknown
6
1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
13
1.1
Female age
unknown
3
2
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
0.8
Gender
unknown
1
2
1
3
1
1
3
0
1
1
0
0
0
14
1.2
Total
150
162
125
139
123
99
81
71
70
53
34
27
16
1150
100
*2010 figures not available
44
Table 10: All drivers responsible for fatal collisions where excessive speed was cited as contributory factor by age
& gender, 1997-2009*
1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total %
Male u17
6
2
1
1
1
3
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
15
2.1
Female U17
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0.3
Male 17-24
39
57
35
45
34
26
19
27
23
17
10
11
5
348
48.3
Female 17-24
1
0
7
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
0
2
0
18
2.5
Male 25-34
24
19
22
23
20
19
17
15
16
9
7
1
3
195
27.0
Female 25-34
1
1
2
1
3
1
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
12
1.7
Male 35-49
8
7
7
11
11
10
10
6
1
5
3
2
2
83
11.5
Female 35-49
2
2
2
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
1.2
Male 50-64
4
2
3
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
19
2.6
Female 50-64
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
5
0.7
Male 65+
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
4
0.6
Female 65+
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0.1
Male age unknown
3
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
1.0
Female age unknown
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0.4
Gender unknown
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.0
Age & Gender
Unknown
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.0
Total
89
96
81
88
75
63
49
51
47
33
21
18
10
721
100
*2010 figures not available
Speed surveys
The Road Safety Strategy has set demanding targets whilst recognising that 100% compliance with speed
limits is desirable but can never be achieved.
In 2010 the RSA published a report on speeding as part of its annual surveys of vehicle speeds on the Irish
road network. The survey results indicated that compliance rates are improving but there is significant room
for improvement. The free speeds survey generally give a mixed results compared to results from previous
years with regard to rural roads. The proportion of articulated vehicles and rigid trucks violating vehicle
specific speed limits has decreased on motorways, national primary and local roads; and increased on dual
carriageway and regional roads.
There were significant improvements in the proportion of vehicles complying with speed limits on urban
national and urban residential roads. However, driver compliance with speed limits on urban roads is still
poor. On average, 56% of motorists exceeded the posted speed in urban areas.
45
Figure 16: Percentage of cars exceeding speed limit on urban roads, 2003-2009
Percentage of cars driving in excess of speed limit on urban roads
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2003
4
4
23
Urban residential - 50km/h zone
47
20
36
67
70
Urban arterial - 50km/h
speed limit zone
40
86
91
86
67
67
Urban arterial - 60km/h
speed limit zone
32
89
80
75
83
78
86
Urban national - 50km/h sign
82
89
98
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
Figure 17: Percentage of cars exceeding speed limit on rural roads, 1999-2009
60
Percentage Speeding
50
40
30
20
10
0
1999
2000
Motorway
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
National Primary
Dual Carriageway
46
2008
2009
2010
National Secondary
Current Status:
The following table charts progress against targets set out in the Road Safety Strategy using the most recent
data published in 2010.
 Articulated vehicles (80 kilometres an hour).
There are significant compliance issues with urban national, national primary 2-lane and regional 2-lane
roads. See table on next page.
Vehicle Type
Articulated Vehicles
Road type
2009
2012 target
(Road Safety
Strategy)
Compliance %
Compliance %
Urban national -50km/h sign
23
70
National primary 2-lane
33
60
National secondary 2-lane
59
60
Regional road 2-lane
74
95
Local road 2-lane
98
95
 Bus (80 kilometres an hour excluding double deck buses or coaches)
Whilst the number of buses observed was small there was significant non compliance on national
primary 2-lane road types. See table below:
Vehicle Type
Bus
Road type
2009*t
2012 target
(Road Safety
Strategy)
Compliance %
Compliance %
National primary 2-lane
22
85
National Secondary 2-lane
74
85
*Results should be interpreted carefully as the number of buses observed was small
 Car
There was significant non compliance on urban national 50km/h and 60km/h and regional
2 lane roads.
Vehicle Type
Car
Road type
2009
2012 target
(Road Safety
Strategy)
Compliance %
Compliance %
Urban national -50km/h Speed
limit zone
17
60
Urban Arterial – 60km/h
33
60
Urban Arterial – 50km/h
Speed limit zone
32
60
National primary 2-lane
77
90
National secondary 2-lane
92
90
Regional road 2-lane
59
90
Local road 2-lane
85
90
47
 Rigid Vehicles
There is significant non compliance on urban national and national primary 2-lane roads.
Vehicle Type
Articulated Vehicles
Road type
2009
2012 target
(Road Safety
Strategy)
Compliance %
Compliance %
Urban national 50km/h sign
27
70
National primary 2-lane
43
60
National secondary 2-lane
67
60
Regional road 2-lane
79
95
Local road 2-lane
97
95
Impaired Driving
Ireland has a drink driving problem. A total of 12,606 people in period January to December 2010 were charged
with driving whilst under the influence of alcohol. Irish and European research establishes that Ireland’s
excessive alcohol consumption is reflected in deaths and injuries on our roads. The research also indicates
that at half the current legal limit drivers are twice as likely to be involved in a collision.
Advisory Panel to the Road Safety Authority
The Policy Advisory Panel produced a paper on reducing the Blood Alcohol Levels for drivers which was
used by the Road Safety Authority Board to advise the Government on this issue. The panel recommended
a reduction to 0.05% blood alcohol concentration from current level of 0.08% and a further reduction for
novice drivers to 0.02%.
In 2010 the Medical Bureau of Road Safety continued to roll out and maintain the agreed necessary roadside
alcohol screening devices for Mandatory Alcohol Testing (MAT). The enforcement was supported by media
and educational campaigns.
Seatbelt Wearing
It is well recognised that “seat belts” have enormous life saving potential. Increasing seatbelt wearing rates
will not only reduce fatalities but also the severity of injuries. The best way to increase seat-belt usage is
through public awareness campaigns and through intensive and high visibility actions.
The 2009 Seatbelt Survey (published in 2010) carried out by the RSA indicated that the use of seat belts by
drivers and front-seat passengers in cars was 90 %, no change from 2008 but 33 percentage points increase
since 1999. Under the Strategy a target of 95 % for front seat belt wearing has been set.
Seatbelt Use by Location
The 2009 un-weighted nationwide estimates for driver seatbelt compliance by road type were
 89 % for urban national primary
 87 % for urban national secondary
 93 % for rural national primary
 91 % for rural national secondary
 92 % for regional roads
 86 % for county roads
48
Seatbelt Use by Gender
In 2009 women were more likely than men to belt up in front seats, with wearing rates of 94 % and 87 %
respectively. Females had higher seat belt use than males in every seating position.
Seatbelt Use by Seating Position
90 % of front seat occupants observed were wearing a seatbelt.
Current Status:
Figure 19: Driver & Front Passenger seatbelt wearing rates (%), 1991-2009
The front seatbelt wearing rates have increased substantially since the early 1990’s when just over 50% of
people wore seatbelts. This figure increased to 90% in 2009.
100
90
2012 target
Front seatbelt wearing rate
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
1990
0
Table 11: Wearing rates (%) for adults in the rear seats.
The wearing rate for rear seats for adults has also increased substantially from just 26% in 2005 to 79%
in 2009.
Wearing Rate (%)
2012 Target
95
2009
79
2008
78
2007
84
2006
63
2005
26
49
School pupil - seat belt wearing
The 2009 school seat belt survey showed a consistent increase in seat-belt wearing rates for both primary
and secondary schools. For primary school pupils the seat belt wearing rate for rear seat passengers was 80
% in 2009 which is 6 percentage points higher than the 74 % recorded in 2008. For secondary school pupils
the seat belt wearing rate for rear seat passengers was 83 % which is 11 percentage points higher than the
72 % recorded in 2008.
In the case of front seat belts this rate decreased from 86% to 82% for primary school pupils. The rate of seat
belt wearing for secondary school pupils remained at the 2008 levels of 87% in 2009.
Table 11: Wearing rates (%) for adults
in the rear seats.
Table 12: Primary schools - front seat belt
wearing rates, 2009.
Wearing Rate (%)
Wearing Rate (%)
2012 Target
95
2012 Target
95
2009
82
2009
80
2008
86
2008
74
2007
80
2007
70
2006
76
2006
64
2005
70
2005
60
2003
68
2003
48
Table 13: Primary schools - rear seat belt
wearing rates, 2009.
Table 14: Secondary schools - front seat belt
wearing rates, 2009.
Wearing Rate (%)
Wearing Rate (%)
2012 Target
95
2012 Target
95
2009
87
2009
83
2008
87
2008
72
2007
78
2007
63
2006
88
2006
76
2005
68
2005
55
2003
62
2003
44
50
Vehicle Standards and Enforcement
Road Haulage Enforcement
In 2010, RSA Transport Officers conducted inspections of 3,143 drivers at 510 roadside check points arranged
with An Garda Síochana. This compares with 2,527 drivers and 318 checkpoints in 2009.
In addition Transport Officers conducted 831 premises inspections and inspected driving time records for
4,030 drivers. This compares with 1,146 premises and 6,287 drivers in 2009.
There was a 22% reduction in the number of working days checked at roadside and premises checks during
2010 compared to 2009 which is largely attributable to (i) reduction of 3 in Transport Officer numbers as
a consequence of retirements (ii) time spent preparing legal proceedings and attendance at Court and
(iii) inclement weather conditions. At end 2010, RSA had 14 Transport Officers available for official duties.
Reduced enforcement resources will adversely impact on the RSA’s ability to improve operator and driver
compliance with the EU rules on driving times, tachographs and operator licensing.
RSA successfully prosecuted all its 74 cases at Court during 2010.
During 2010 the RSA continue to work with An Garda Síochána in relation to road transport enforcement
activities. The overall strategy put in place in relation to checks is to target enforcement efforts on noncompliant operators while minimising inconvenience to compliant operators. Contacts were also
strengthened with the UK and Northern Ireland Authorities and concerted checkpoints were arranged at land
border crossings and sea-ports, each agency operating within its own jurisdiction. Concerted checkpoints are
a key component of the RSA enforcement strategy
As part of the enforcement strategy, RSA has published a range of guidance material for operators and
drivers which explains in simple language the key legal obligations in relation to driver’s hours, tachographs,
working time and operator licensing. This has helped operators and drivers to become and remain compliant.
The guidance material is updated as necessary in the light of changing or new legal obligations. However,
there are still bus and truck operators who pose a significant risk to road safety by choosing to remain
noncompliant.
Other significant developments during 2010 included
I.Adoption of new legislation to give effect to EU Directives 4 and 5 of 2009 concerning the conduct
of enforcement activities and the updating of national legislation dealing with the enforcement of
the EU rules relating to tachographs and driver’s hours.
II.Adoption of new legislation on a single report form to be used by Members of An Garda Siochana to
record enforcement activities relating to tachograph, drivers’ hours and vehicle roadside checks.
III.Inclusion of scheme for a fixed charge penalty scheme for road transport related offences in the
Road Traffic Act 2010.
IV.Submission of draft proposals for new legislation to the Department relating to the Road Transport
Working Time Directive.
V. Publication of the RSA wall-planner for operators.
VI. Participation in EU Exchange programmes on digital tachographs manipulations and fraud.
Reports from other Member States
Reports were received from other Member States concerning infringements by drivers in relation to
tachograph and driver’s hours rules while operating in those States. This information is recorded and used
as part of the targeting of operators. Reports were received in respect of 1,195 drivers which is similar to
the numbers (2,541) received in 2009. The bulk of these reports were received from the UK Vehicle Operator
Standards Agency (VOSA).
Digital Tachograph Scheme
During 2010, 8,691 digital cards were issued to applicants compared with 9,036 in 2009. The average processing
time for digital tachograph cards has been less than three weeks since the RSA took over processing digital
tachograph cards.
51
The RSA prepared for the doubling of digital tachograph cards from 2011 onwards, by reviewing administration
and processes. The RSA identified that processing improvements, and the introduction of a online system in
late 2011 would enable it to manage the increased level of applications and continue to provide excellent
customer service as well as move the administration of digital tacho cards to being self-financing. A tender
for the required system was published in October 2010.
National Car Test (NCT)
Following a procurement process run in accordance with EU procurement rules, the RSA, in December 2008,
awarded a further single national contract for the provision and operation of the NCTS for the period from
January 2010 to December 2019 to Applus+ Car Testing Service Limited (“Applus+”). Applus+ is a leading
multinational company in testing, inspection, certification and technological services. Applus+ took over
provision of the service on 4 January 2010.
The RSA has a contract in place with Applus+ which requires the contractor to meet a number of specific
performance standards in a wide range of operational areas including customer service, premises, test
equipment, staff, test arrangements, facilities management and management information technology. The
contract sets out the penalties which can be imposed in the event that the contractor fails to meet the
performance requirements. The RSA monitors the performance of the NCT continuously. The RSA is assisted
by a Supervision Services Contractor (SSC) in supervising and monitoring the performance of National Car
Testing Service Limited (NCTS) to ensure that it is providing the car testing service in accordance with the
terms of the contract between the Company and the RSA.
The transition of the service from the old to the new contractor went relatively smoothly, albeit with reduced
volumes for the first few weeks as Applus+ bedded in new IT systems and coped with adverse weather
conditions. New test centres were opened at Greenhills, Tallaght and in Carndonagh, Co Donegal, while new
equipment was installed in all centres, in a 9 month implementation programme.
During 2010 NCTS experienced the highest demand since the introduction of the service with more than 1.3
million tests undertaken – 893,664 full tests with a pass rate of 51.8% and 419,077 retests with a pass rate of
90%. Demand on the call centre was also at the highest level ever with almost 2 million calls.
The year proved challenging as demand exceeded the expectation of the company, particularly in the early
part of the year. The company failed to meet the performance standards in relation to waiting times for test
appointments, both overall and at individual test centres and incurred a performance adjustment. All other
key performance measures were met.
Commercial Vehicle Roadworthiness Testing
The annual testing of commercial vehicles in Ireland is carried out, at present, by over 146 privately
operated test centres appointed and supervised by the Local Authorities. According to returns made to the
RSA by test centres some 119,185 Heavy Goods Vehicle (i.e. HGVs, large trailers, buses and ambulances)
and 387,724 Light Goods Vehicle tests were completed in 2010. In 2010, RSA Vehicle Inspectors made 173
Commercial Vehicle Test Centre visits to ensure compliance with standards and consistency of testing.
RSA Vehicle Inspectors participated in 440 roadside checkpoints in 2010 which represents an increase of
over 47% from 2009. Roadworthiness checks were completed on 3,612 HGV’s and these checks revealed
that 1,706 vehicles had defects with 40% of these vehicles having defects serious enough to warrant
immediate action, such as impoundment, repair on site or a new test.
This would be similar to the outcome of checks on Irish vehicles in the UK up to November 2010 where
circa 50% of Irish commercial vehicles checked at the roadside were found to be defective and close to
40% of the defects were serious enough to warrant immediate prohibition of the vehicle. In excess of
10,700 Irish commercial vehicles were checked in the UK up to November 2010. For this period, the Road
Safety Authority recorded and reviewed all reports received and issued 974 letters to operators in relation
to reported serious defects.
52
Vehicle Standards
Vehicle standards are continuously changing and improving with safety, environmental and technological
developments. There is also a robust legal obligation to regulate vehicle standards resulting from Ireland’s
Road Traffic Acts and EC Directives.
The RSA represents Ireland at EC and international forums and is responsible for inputting to and implementing
EC policy relating to the type approval and entry into service of new vehicles. The RSA is also responsible for
proposing new Road Traffic legislation for vehicles in use on our roads. The RSA works closely with a number
of other State bodies in relation to vehicle standards, including the Department of Transport, Tourism and
Sport, the Revenue Commissioners, An Garda Siochana, the National Standards Authority of Ireland and the
Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government.
EC Whole Vehicle Type Approval
Vehicles with ECWVTA (EC Whole Vehicle Type Approval) meet with common safety and environmental
requirements and can be sold anywhere in the EC. Since April 2009 all cars (M1 vehicles – passenger vehicles
with eight or less passenger seats and a driver’s seat) require ECWVTA in order to be registered and enter
into service. ECWVTA will apply to additional vehicle categories on a phased basis and since October 2010,
new buses manufactured in a single stage must comply. Also in 2010, four amending statutory instruments
were signed into law by Minister for Transport which gave affect to EC and UN/ECE regulatory Acts relating
to ECWVTA.
The National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI) is the designated type approval authority (see www.nsai.
ie). The RSA works closely with the NSAI to ensure the type approval system is working effectively.
Public Consultations
During 2010, the RSA carried out the following public consultations in relation to Vehicle Standards:
 Motor Caravans
In 2010 the RSA carried out a review of the arrangements for testing motor caravans, including a
public consultation. The outcome of that review was to make a number of recommendations to the
Minister for Transport regarding the testing of motor caravans, including requiring them to be tested
at the Commercial Vehicle Test Centres on the fourth anniversary of first registration and thereafter
every two years until the vehicle is ten years old, after which annual testing will apply.
Following Ministerial approval of our recommendations, draft amendments to the Vehicle Testing
Regulations were submitted to the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) in December
2010.
 Mobile Machines
A number of commercial vehicles such as cranes, mobile workshops, cement mixers etc. fall into the
motor taxation category of “mobile machine”. Heretofore, these vehicles have not been subject to
roadworthiness testing. An information note was sent to the registered owners of mobile machines
clarifying the roadworthiness test requirements for these vehicles for them, and draft amendments to
the Vehicle Testing Regulations were submitted to the DTTAS in December 2010 to specifically include
mobile machines.
 Braking
In March 2010, proposals to bring the braking standards of all new vehicles into line with best practice in
the EC were submitted to the Department Of Transport. It also proposed strengthening the current law
by requiring braking devices to be maintained throughout the lifetime of the vehicle.
 Spray Suppression
A proposal and draft regulations to mandate the fitment of Spray Suppression Systems to all new goods
vehicles exceeding 7.5 tonnes Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) and trailers exceeding 3.5 tonnes GVW was
submitted to the DTTAS in late 2010.
53
 Written-off vehicles
This consultation, was launched in December 2010 and it proposed ways in which the current
administrative system should deal with written-off vehicles. Consideration was given as to how the
current system would be strengthened through the introduction of a legislative framework for managing
written off vehicles and support processes and procedures to ensure they present no road safety risk.
 Buses involved in the organised transport of children
This consultation made recommendations for verifying the standard of fitment of safety belts and also
proposed introducing a new requirement to have safety belts on all buses carrying children on organised
trips. The consultation ran from April until May 2010 and a report and recommendations issued thereafter.
These recommendations proposed that a formal safety belt verification exercise would take place as part
of the roadworthiness test for all buses fitted with safety belts and would commence on 29 October
2010. It also proposed that from October 2011 all buses involved in the organised transport of children
will require certified or approved safety belt installations. A comprehensive awareness campaign was
conducted for bus owners including the distribution of an information note to all bus owners in early
August 2010. There was also a dedicated helpline established to deal with queries and bus owners in
general expressed positive feedback on the clarity and user friendliness of the new requirements.
 Review of the Weight Limits for Motor Vehicles and Trailers in Ireland
The RSA review of weight limits was still under consideration in the Department in 2010. A derogation
allowing an increase in the gross weight of 5 axle (2+3) vehicles from the EU accepted 40 tonnes to 42
tonnes has been in place since 2003. The derogation was extended by DTTAS in September 2010 until
June 2011. This extension was put in place to facilitate a study on bridge and road structures to be
carried out by the Department which will determine if the weight increases can be accommodated.
 Review of the Use of Agricultural and Works Vehicles on Irish Roads
The Department signalled its intention to publish the RSA review of the Use of Agricultural and Works
Vehicles on Irish Roads in July 2010. A number of meetings have been held with the main stakeholders
since then in preparation for its publication and a decision is awaited from the Minister on when the
review will be published.
 Technical Advisory Forum
The Technical Advisory Forum continued to advise the RSA on the future technical standards and
contents of the national car and commercial vehicle roadworthiness tests. The Forum is comprised of
representatives of the DIT, NCT, SIMI, RSA Vehicle Inspectorate, Local Authority Authorised Officers, An
Garda Síochána, the Taxi Regulator’s office, VTN Testers Committee, AA, Irish Tyre Industry Association
and NSAI.
ADR* applications for test
The RSA took over processing of ADR testing applications from Bus Eireann in January 2010. Some administrative
improvements were introduced and 2,721 applications were processed in 2010.
* Commercial vehicles which carry dangerous substances
54
ENGINEERING
Infrastructural measures to make Irish roads safer are a key component
of the current Road Safety Strategy. The National Roads Authority (NRA)
and the 36 local authorities around the country have continued with an
extensive new road building campaign, as well as improving the safety of
existing roads including treatment of high collision locations and traffic
calming measures.
The successful completion of the inter-urban motorways, the upgrade of the M50 and the M3, together with
the completion of many other important schemes made 2010 a landmark year.
The outlook for the coming years is that public finances will be very strained, with reduced budgets available
to maintain and improve the national road network.
National Network
The national road network now totals approximately 5,425 km made of:
 1,187km dual carriageway
 4,328km other
The network carries about 45% of the countries total road traffic. Traffic volumes fell in 2008 and 2009,
while in 2010 the volumes stabilised. Most freight in the country is distributed by road, and the strong
growth in exports in 2010 certainly showed on some of our major routes, with Dublin Port Tunnel traffic
growing by 10% over 2009 levels, for example.
Network operations include providing travel information through variable messages, emergency phone
services, tolling, tunnel operations, winter services, emergency response and service areas. About 320km
of the 900km motorway network is being operated by Public Private Partnerships.
Accomplishments 2010
Opened 6 new sections of the interurban routes in 2010, i.e.
M7 Castletown Nenagh, M7 Nenagh Limerick, N7 Limerick Tunnel, M7/M8 Portlaoise to Cullahill/
Castletown, M9 Waterford Knocktopher,M9 Carlow Knocktopher, and so completing all remaining
Major Inter-Urban routes:
M1 Dublin to Boarder/Belfast (Completed 2007)
M6 Dublin to Galway
(Completed in 2009)
M7 Dublin to Limerick
(Completed in 2010)
M8 Dublin to Cork (Completed in 2010)
M9 Dublin to Waterford (Completed in 2010)
 Completed 137km of other road schemes in 2010. The schemes are
M3
Clonee to North of Kells
N10 Kilkenny Link Road
M18 Gort Crusheen Scheme
N21 Castleisland Bypass
M50 Upgrade Scheme Phase 2
N52 Kells Bypass
N59 N59 Derrylea Realignment
N78 Athy Link Road
55
Opened three on-line service areas totalling six facilities:
M1 – at Castlebellingham, Co. Louth and at Lusk, Co. Dublin and on the M4 at Enfield, Co. Kildare.
Completed a National Secondary Roads Needs Study.
Completed a Scoping Study for the National Cycle Network on behalf of the Department of Transport.
Completed a National Roads Traffic Management Study.
Commenced the compensation process in respect of land acquisition (notices to treat) on the following
schemes:
N5 Longford Bypass
N5 Ballaghaderreen Bypass
M11 Gorey to Enniscorthy
N22 Tralee Bypass
N25 New Ross Bypass
N56 Mountcharles to Inver
Submitted for approval from An Bord Pleanála the following road schemes:
N4 The Downs Grade Separation
M20 Cork to Limerick
N21 Adare Bypass
N52 Carrickbridge to Dalystown
Published Seanda, NRA Archaeological Magazine, Issue 5.
Published updated Archaeological and Architectural Assessment Guidelines.
Road Safety
The National Roads Authority, in conjunction with Local Authorities, completed 201 road safety
improvement schemes in 2010, ranging from junction improvements, improved lines of sight at bends and
pedestrian crossings to traffic calming schemes.
The schemes completed have included minor realignment, signing and lining, junction improvements such
as Scrub Cross on the N80 and near Clonakilty on N71, and traffic calming improvements such as on the
N52 in Carrig and on the N55 at Glasson.
The road safety section is also involved in the ERA-NET ‘Safety at the heart of road design’ project. The
Authority is one of the co-funders of this three-year programme along with 10 other EU countries.
The National Roads Authority is also deeply involved in the implementation of the new EU Road
Infrastructure Safety Management Directive. This directive principally covers the four areas of Road Safety
Infrastructure Assessment, Road Safety Audit, Network Safety Management and Safety Inspections. The
Authority has been working with Department. of Transport to enable the directive to be implemented on
the TEN T network in Ireland.
One of the key requirements of the EU Road Infrastructure Safety Management Directive is that all Road
Safety Auditors have a Certificate of Competence. The Authority is working with the Road Safety Authority
and University College Dublin to provide one of the first courses of its type in Europe.
The Road Safety Section continues to maintain a very close working relationship with our counterparts in
Transport Scotland, the Welsh Assembly, Roads Service Northern Ireland and the English Highways Agency.
This close working relationship allows for a mutual exchange of good practice for example Northern Ireland
and the Authority publish a Joint EuroRAP review of the entire national road network on the island of
Ireland.
Winter Services
During 2010 two very severe winter weather events took place, first in January and again in November /
December. At the request of Government, the Authority centralised the purchasing and co-ordination of salt
56
for use by local authorities on national roads. This policy directive arose from the “Review of the Transport
Response to Winter Weather”, conducted by the Department of Transport after last winter’s severe weather.
The new arrangement ensured that an average seasonal supply of salt was already in the country by
November, which assisted greatly in dealing with the unprecedented early onset of severe winter weather.
Additionally, the National Roads Authority circulated to local authorities a draft Winter Maintenance
Manual to assist in providing guidance to Local Authorities and to ensure greater consistency of approach
across the Local Authority system. It is envisaged that the document will be finalised in 2011, taking
account of experience gained during the current winter season.
The Authority continued to provide road weather information data on the national road network through
the ICENET road weather information system. A number of enhancements to the system have been
implemented in 2010. An additional five weather stations have been deployed on network bringing
the total number of stations up to sixty five. Weather cameras were installed at all broadband enabled
weather station sites; in total forty five sites now have camera coverage. The weather cameras operate
24/7 through the use of infra-red sensing during the hours of darkness. Through forecasts provided by
Met Éireann and taking into account the predetermined thermal area characteristics such as altitude, data
generated by the road weather information system is relayed to each local authority and forms the basis of
decision making as to whether or not treatment of the roads is required.
In 2011, the Authority will make the camera images from the weather stations available through the
website, further enhancing the level of road weather data being made available to road users.
The data from the weather stations is available online at
www.nra.ie/RoadWeatherInformation
Signage and Delineation
In 2010, the Authority continued to roll out its programme of improvements to road signage on the
national road network. In total approximately 1,100km of route were re-signed, principally on the M7, M8,
N11, N14, N15, N25, N61, N63, N69, N70, N71and N81 routes.
In addition the Authority continued to undertake its programme of signage maintenance and works and
lining renewal programme across the network.
Travel Information Service for Drivers
The Authority utilises a co-ordinated suite of traffic monitoring, detection and control devices and
information services, utilising a central computer system and communications network, supported by
operational staff generally based in a dedicated control centre.
The initial deployment was on the M1, and was extended to the M50 and radial approaches to Dublin
in 2010. This included 30 large electronic variable message signs (VMS) and automatic number plate
recognition (ANPR) cameras. A new control centre in the Dublin Port Tunnel operations centre commenced
operations in 2010 for the control of this signage and will become fully operational in early 2011. This will
allow for the setting of signs to alert drivers of traffic congestion, major delays caused by traffic collisions or
other events. In addition, journey time information will be posted.
In August 2009, the Minister for Transport designated almost 300km of high quality dual carriageway as
motorway, and during 2010 the Authority has installed new roadside emergency telephones along the
newly designated sections of motorway.
By the end of 2010 there were over 900 emergency telephones operating across the motorway network.
In 2011 a centralised call answering service will become fully operational at the Dublin Port Tunnel traffic
control centre.
For further information on ITS, go to the Authority’s website www.nratraffic.ie.
57
Service Areas
Service Areas opened at three locations on the motorway network in 2010, at Lusk and Castlebellingham
on the M1 and at Enfield on the M4. The public response to these new facilities has been very positive. We
believe that they contribute to safety by providing good, accessible rest areas for commercial vehicle, bus
and car drivers, and provide essential services for the travelling public.
During 2010 the Authority placed informational (brown) signs throughout the motorway network
indentifying off-line petrol and service facilities located within a kilometre or so of junctions.
Low cost safety improvement works scheme for regional and local roads
In 2010, €6,268,195 was provided to 36 local authorities under the Low Cost Safety Improvements Scheme
for safety measures at accident blackspots. This allocation covered 247 separate schemes, with an average
cost of €25,000.
58
EVALUATION
The Strategy recognises the importance of evaluation and research in
improving the availability of accurate and timely data / information to
support and inform policy decisions and strategy action implementation.
Road Safety Research
In 2010 the RSA commenced a programme of work specified in the Road Safety Strategy 2007-2012. Key
areas include;
 Maintenance of the road collision database and data system;
 In-depth analysis of collision data;
 Production of statistical reports on road collisions in Ireland;
 Survey of speed and seat belt wearing on Irish roads;
 Survey of driver attitudes and behaviour;
 Systematic identification of high collision locations on national road networks;
 Multidisciplinary research to understand how road collisions and resulting injuries are caused;
 Evaluating ways to prevent collisions and injuries;
 Participation in national and international research projects in the field of road safety;
 Participation in EU research programmes such as SARTRE 4, CARE, IRTAD, BESTPOINT and EURORAP;
 Provision of information to the public, national and international bodies.
The RSA also liaises with the Garda National Traffic Bureau, the National Roads Authority, the Local
Government Computer Services Board and other organisations on aspects of road safety research activities.
The following research publications were published in 2010:
1. 2009 Road Collision Facts
2. 2009 Speed Survey Report
3. 2009 Seat Belt Survey Report
4. 2009 Driver Attitude and behaviour survey report
5. 2009 Use of mobile phone when driving
These can be accessed on www.rsa.ie
Road Collision Database
The collision data provided by the An Garda Síochána is mapped and analysed by the RSA Research
Unit. The results of the analysis are published by the RSA in its annual Road Collision Fact Book. The
results are used to monitor trends, target safety initiatives and to inform the on-going review of public
policy in relation to road safety. In 2010, the 2009 Road Collision Facts was published. The report shows
that, of the 26,495 Garda-recorded motor vehicle traffic collisions in 2009, 238 people were killed, 9,742
people were injured of which 640 were seriously injured, and 19,880 collisions involved property or
material damage only.
Inappropriate use of Fog Lights
Roadside observation surveys were undertaken of cars at 75 sites in 20 areas of Ireland in 2009. In
total there were 58,008 observations made. There were 7,108 cases where fog lights were left on
inappropriately (13%).
59
Use of mobile phone when driving
Roadside observation survey of the use of mobile phones when driving was published in 2010. The
survey recoded whether or not a hand held mobile phone was observed to be in use by the driver of
all moving vehicles passing the survey location. In total there were 33,949 observations made in which
1,964 drivers were observed to be using a hand held mobile phone. This represents an overall noncompliance rate of 6%.
Pedal cyclist helmet wearing
A roadside observation survey of pedal cyclist helmet usage was published in 2010. The survey was
undertaken at 45 sites in seven areas throughout Ireland. It was found that overall the helmet wearing
rate is 40.3%.
Policy Advisory Panel (PAP).
The objectives of the Policy Advisory Panel are to facilitate communication and consultation between
stakeholders, provide access to information and research, and assist the RSA in the development,
implementation and evaluation of its policies.
The Policy Advisory Panel (PAP) met on three occasions in 2010. Reports were produced on the following
 The In - Vehicle Technology report
The Speed Fallacy Report. This is a concept relating to challenging the idea that there is a time
benefit to be derived driving at high speed.
 Use of Alcohol Ignition Interlocks
60
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