null  User manual
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
TECHNICAL MANUAL
OPERATOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
FOR THE
IMPROVED HAWK GUIDED MISSILE SYSTEM
This copy is a reprint which includes
current pages from Changes I through 5.
AUGUST 1972
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TM 9-1425-525-12-4
WARNING
RADIATION HAZARD
This equipment contains the following radioactive items:
Nomenclature
NSN
Isotope
Amount (Microcuries)
NOTE
Refer to manual containing specific item of equipment for a list of radioactive tubes in that equipment.
Refer to TM 3-261, TM 38-250, and TB 43-0116 for information relative to shipping, storage, handling, and disposal of
radioactive material.
FIRST AID FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTACT
The following first aid procedure for wounds caused by anything coated with a radioactive particle material represent the
only reasonable first aid treatment which would possibly be available:
a.
Stimulation of mild bleeding by normal pressure about the wound and by use of suction cups.
WARNING
Do not suck the wound by mouth. The wound must be washed with soap and flushed with plenty of clear
water
b. If the wound is of the puncture type, or the opening is quite small, an incision should be made to promote free
bleeding and to facilitate cleaning and flushing of the wound.
c. Evacuate patient to a medical facility where monitoring of the wound can be accomplished. All such wounds
should be examined by a medical officer.
d. For wounds involving the extremities, pending medical attention, place a lightly constricting band (tourniquet) 2
to 4 inches closer to the heart than the site of the wound. The band should be tight enough to halt the flow of blood in
superficial blood vessels but not tight enough to stop the pulse (arterial flow).
CLEANING SURFACES ON WHICH TUBES HAVE BEEN BROKEN
Wet Method. Put on rubber or plastic gloves. Pick up large fragments with forceps then, using a wet cloth, wipe across the
area. Make one wipe at a time and fold cloth in half, using the clean side for wiping each time. When cloth becomes too
small, discard and start again with a clean piece of cloth. Care must be taken not to rub the radioactive particles into the
surface being cleaned by using a back and forth motion. All debris and cloths used for cleaning should be sealed in a
container such as a plastic bag, heavy waxed paper, ice cream carton, or glass jar for disposal.
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TM 9-1425-525-12-4
WARNING FOR RADIO-FREQUENCY RADIATION HAZARD
Radio-frequency (rf) radiation from radar antennas and associated equipment is a potential hazard to personnel. Rf
radiation is not cumulative but it can be hazardous. It heats the body tissues, and, if the radiation intensity is sufficiently
high, will permanently damage the tissue. This damage is not immediately apparent.
Precautions should be taken to ensure that personnel are not exposed to rf radiations of hazardous intensity levels.
Personnel who must be within the hazardous distances for the below listed radars should be instructed not to place
themselves on the radiating side of the antenna, and to never look into a transmitting horn or open waveguide which is
connected to an energized transmitter.
Personnel are prohibited from entering areas where they may be exposed to levels of rf radiation above 10 milliwatts per
square centimeter (10 mw/cm’). This level, though not considered hazardous, is stipulated by AR 40-583 as the maximum
permissible exposure level for personnel.
A power intensity of at least 10 mw/cm2 is present along the axis of each radar’s transmitted beam, for the distances listed
below. These distances are based on calculations and actual measurements and may be used as a guide to prevent radiofrequency radiation injury. In each instance, radiation intensity rapidly diminishes as the distance is increased.
ANTENNA
DISTANCE
High-powered Illuminator Radar
Cw Acquisition Radar non-scanning
scanning
Pulse Acquisition Radar
Range-only Radar
111.5 m (366 ft)
74 m (243 ft)
36 m (118 ft)
15.2 m (50 ft)
45.1 m (148 ft)
The 36 m distance for the scanning CWAR antenna does not mean the system constitutes a hazard to personnel while the
antenna is scanning. When the antenna stops scanning and is stationary, those systems capable of producing power
densities greater than 50 mw/cm2 must be controlled so that tinder no circumstances will personnel be exposed to
intensities equal to or greater than 50 mw/cm2. When the radar is energized to full radiate, personnel must not be within
74 meters (243 feet) of the antenna along the designated azimuth.
No radiation hazard exists at radar ground level if the radars are not depressed below zero degrees elevation.
When at all possible during maintenance, however, place the antenna at a high elevation. Personnel are restricted from
the area atop the radars or other elevated locations in front of the antennas when radiating.
Personnel may move in and around the CWA R to zero range at ground level provided they are below the horizontal center
line of the antennas. There is no height restriction to either side or rear of the antennas.
Potentially hazardous power density levels do not exist in the radiation field of the pulse acquisition radar when scanning.
The above information is applicable to typical HAWK sites. The services of the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency
are available, in accordance with the provisions of AR 40-583 for the evaluation of potential radio-frequency hazards at
sites where unusual operating or site conditions may exist.
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WARNING
DANGEROUS VOLTAGE
is used in the operation of this equipment
DEATH ON CONTACT
may result if personnel fail to observe safety precautions
Never work on electronic equipment unless there is another person nearby who is familiar with the operation and hazards
of the equipment and who is competent in administering first aid. When the technician is aided by operators, he must warn
them about dangerous areas.
Whenever possible, the power supply to the equipment must be shut off before beginning work on the equipment. Take
particular care to ground every capacitor likely to bold a dangerous potential. When working inside the equipment, after the
power has been turned off, always ground every part before touching it.
Use extreme caution when operating equipment protected by interlocks. Ensure that interlocks (doors, panels, and
drawers) are functioning properly. (TM 9-1425-525-12-4)
Be careful not to contact high-voltage connections when installing or operating this equipment.
Whenever the nature of the operation permits, keep one band away from the equipment to reduce the hazard of current
flowing through the vital organs of the body.
WARNING
Do not be misled by the term ’low voltage." Potentials as low as 50 volts may cause death under adverse
conditions.
For artificial respiration, refer to FM 21-11.
EXTREMELY DANGEROUS POTENTIALS
Refer to manual containing specific item of equipment for a list of those units with greater than 500 volts in
that equipment.
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For the pulse acquisition radar:
MECHANICAL HAZARD
When performing maintenance procedures in the vicinity of the antenna, ensure that the antenna SAFE/ OPERATE
switch, located on the receiver-transmitter group, is in the SAFE position, and the stow lock is engaged.
For the IFF antenna:
MECHANICAL HAZARD
When performing maintenance procedures in the vicinity of the IFF antenna, ensure that both of the two antenna safety
switches (one located on the 1FF antenna pedestal and the other on the whip antenna base) are set to SAFE. In addition,
not more than three personnel should occupy the roof of the ICC or PCP at any time.
For the cw acquisition radar:
MECHANICAL HAZARD
When performing maintenance procedures in the vicinity of the antenna, ensure that the antenna SAFETY SWITCH,
located on the radar set group, is in the SAFE position.
For the range-only radar:
MECHANICAL HAZARD
When performing maintenance procedures in the vicinity of the antenna, ensure that the antenna SAFETY SWITCH,
located on the base of the pedestal, is in the SAFE position.
For the high-powered illuminator radar:
MECHANICAL HAZARD
When performing maintenance procedures in the vicinity of the antenna, ensure that the antenna PEDESTAL SAFETY
SWITCH, located on the motor-generator assembly, is in the SAFE position.
For the launcher:
MECHANICAL HAZARD
When performing maintenance procedures in the vicinity of the LCHR boom, ensure that the correct LAUNCHERS SAFEOPERATE-ALERT switch for the LCHR to be checked, located on the launching section control box, is set to the
LAUNCHERS SAFE position.
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WARNING
EXPLOSIVES
Intercept-aerial guided missiles MIM-23B, MIM-23C, MIM-23D, MIM-23E, and MIM-23F contain explosives. All applicable
safety regulations will be strictly enforced. Explosive components containing electrical wiring must be protected at all times
from stray voltages or induced electrical currents.
Handling operations should not be performed during electrical storms.
WARNING
X-RAY HAZARD
X-rays exist within the PAR when radiating.
The X-rays are emitted from stabilotron tube QK630(V5) and thyratron tube 5949A(V3). Do not operate the PAR with the
receiver-transmitter screened doors open or the shield removed from VS.
Failure to heed the warning may result in unnecessary exposure to low-level radiation. The severity of this exposure
damage is dependent on the proximity of the source (tube) and the length of exposure.
WARNING
X-RAY HAZARD
X-rays exist within the HIPIR when radiating.
The X-rays are emitted from PA klystron tube VA968(V2). Do not operate the HIPIR with the protective tube shield
removed from V2.
Failure to heed the warning may result in unnecessary exposure to low-level radiation. The severity of this exposure
damage is dependent on the proximity of the source (tube) and the length of exposure.
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TM 9-1425-525-12-4
WARNING
DANGEROUS CHEMICALS
are used in the operation
of this equipment
DEATH
may result if personnel fail
to observe safety precautions
The following is a list of chemicals used in the operation or maintenance of the equipment in this manual, including proper
care and handling procedures and corrective actions (fire and first aid procedures).
Item (NSN/APN)
Methyl chloroform
1, 1, 1- trichloroethane
Electrolyte (sulfuric acid)
Care and Handling Procedures
Corrective Actions
Flammable. Avoid heat, sparks, and
open flames
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Excessive inhalation can cause drowsiness,
dizziness, drunkenness,
unconsciousness, and death at extreme
doses
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration.
If breathing is difficult, give
oxygen. Get medical attention.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin. Wear protective gloves
to 15 minutes.
Wash skin promptly and thoroughly
with flowing water or shower for 5
Avoid contact with eyes. Do not wear
contact lenses when working with
this material. Wear safety goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with water for
5 to 15 minutes.
Avoid swallowing
Do not induce vomiting. Get medical
attention.
Non-flammable. Can ignite finely divided
combustible materials.
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Vapors can cause irritation of nose
and throat.
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial
respiration. Get medical attention.
Avoid contact with skin. Can cause
severe irritation, burns, and ulceration.
Wear safety clothing.
Remove soaked clothing promptly.
Wash skin thoroughly with large
amounts of water. Get medical
attention.
Avoid contact with eyes. Can cause
severe irritation, corneal damage,
and blindness. Wear safety goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with large
amounts of water. Get medical
attention.
Avoid swallowing. Can cause severe
damage or death.
Give victim large amounts of water,
if conscious. Get medical attention.
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TM 9-1425-525-12-4
WARNING
DANGEROUS CHEMICALS
Continued
Item (NSN/APN)
Dry cleaning solvent type I
P-D-680
Butyl alcohol OC 265
Care and Handling Procedures
Corrective Actions
Flammable. Avoid heat, sparks, and
open flame.
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Excessive inhalation can cause headache, dizziness, and nausea. Use with
adequate ventilation. When heated,
may yield carbon monoxide.
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration.
Get medical attention.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin
Wash skin promptly and thoroughly
with mild soap and water. Apply
skin cream.
Avoid contact with eyes. Vapor is irritating
to eyes. Do not wear contact
lenses when working with this material.
Wear safety goggles.
Flush eyes promptly and thoroughly
with water. Get medical attention.
Avoid swallowing
Do not induce vomiting. Get medical
attention.
Extremely flammable. Avoid heat,
sparks, and open flame. Can ignite
under almost all normal temperatures.
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Vapors are toxic. Can produce symptoms
of intoxication. Use with adequate
ventilation
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration.
If breathing is difficult, give
oxygen. Get medical attention.
Avoid contact with skin
Remove soaked clothing promptly.
Wash skin thoroughly with water
for 15 minutes minimum. Get medical
attention.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear safety
goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with water for
15 minutes minimum. Get medical
attention.
Avoid swallowing. Can cause severe
nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain,
bleeding and central nervous system
damage,
Never give anything by mouth to an
unconscious person. If victim is not
alert, give black coffee and active
charcoal. If victim is alert, induce
vomiting. Get medical attention.
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TM 9-1425-525-12-4
WARNING
DANGEROUS CHEMICALS
Continued
Item (NSN/APN)
Care and Handling Procedures
Corrective Actions
Methanol 0M232, grade A
Flammable. Avoid heat, sparks, and
open flame.
Use C02, dry chemical or "alcohol
type’ foam extinguisher.
Vapors can cause headache, dizziness,
weakness, gastrointestinal or
visual disturbance.
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration.
If breathing is difficult, give
oxygen. Keep victim warm and cover
eyes to exclude light. Get medical
attention.
Avoid contact with skin. Wear rubber
gloves.
Remove soaked clothing promptly.
Wash skin thoroughly with large
amounts of water for 15 minutes
minimum. Get medical attention.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear safety
goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with large
amounts of water for 15 minutes
minimum.
Avoid swallowing. Can cause drowsiness,
visual disturbances, possible
blindness.
If conscious, give victim large
amounts of soapy water and induce
vomiting. Get medical attention.
Flammable. Avoid heat, sparks, and
open flame. Fumes may spread long
distances and flash back.
Use C02, dry chemical or ’alcohol
type" foam extinguisher.
Vapors can cause irritation of nose
and throat.
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration.
If breathing is difficult, give
oxygen. Get medical attention.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin. Wear protective gloves.
Remove soaked clothing promptly.
Wash skin thoroughly with soap and
water for 5 minutes minimum. Get
medical attention.
Avoid contact with eyes. Can cause
corneal burns and eye damage. Wear
safety goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with water for
15 minutes minimum. Get medical
attention.
Avoid swallowing. Can cause depression,
dizziness, headache, vomiting,
and unconsciousness. Can cause
death.
Get immediate medical attention.
Isopropyl alcohol, technical
IT 1735 grade 3
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TM 9-1425-525-12-4
WARNING
DANGEROUS CHEMICALS
Continued
Item (NSN/APN)
Insulation varnish MIL-V-173
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)
(contained in General Electric
and Electrical Utilities capacitors
located in the motorgenerator assembly)
Care and Handling Procedures
Corrective Actions
Flammable. Avoid heat, sparks, and
open flame.
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Vapors can cause drowsiness, headache, dizziness and irritation of eyes,
nose and throat. Use with adequate
ventilation.
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration.
Get medical attention.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin. Wear rubber gloves.
Wash skin promptly and thoroughly
with mild soap and water. Apply
skin cream.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear safety
goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with water for
15 minutes minimum. Get medical
attention.
Avoid swallowing
Do not induce vomiting. Get medical
attention.
Remove victim to fresh air and give
oxygen if short of breath. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration.
Keep victim warm. Get medical
attention.
Do not allow capacitors to become
overheated. Replace any capacitors
that show signs of swelling or leakage.
If material leaks or vaporizes, persons in the area should wear protective
clothing (paper suits, gloves, disposable
booties, organic respirators)
when disposing of contaminants.
Remove all ignition sources. Ventilate
the area. If solid material is
present, sweep onto paper or other
suitable material and burn in safe
place. If in a liquid form, absorb on
paper towels. Evaporate in a safe
place, then burn. PCB material can
also be disposed of in an approved
hazardous waste location.
Excessive inhalation can cause nausea,
vomiting, loss of weight, liver
damage and abdominal pain. When
liver damage is severe, it can be fatal.
Remove victim to fresh air and give
oxygen. Get medical attention.
Avoid contact with skin. Wear protective
gloves.
Remove contaminated clothing
promptly. Blot excess with paper
towels. Wash skin thoroughly with
soap and water for 15 minutes
minimum.
Avoid contact with eyes. Do not wear
contact lenses when working with
this material. Wear safety goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with water for
15 minutes minimum. A drop of
vegetable oil may be added to relieve
irritation. Get medical attention.
Get medical attention immediately.
Avoid swallowing
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WARNING
DANGEROUS CHEMICALS
Continued
Item (NSN/APN)
Care and Handling Procedures
Corrective Actions
Toluene OC 265
Flammable. Avoid heat, sparks, and
open flame.
Use C02, dry chemical, ’alcohol
type’ foam, water spray or fog
extinguisher.
Remove victim to fresh air. If
breathing is irregular or stopped,
perform artificial respiration. Get
medical attention.
Vapors can cause dizziness, headache
or unconsciousness.
Mineral spirits
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin. Wear protective gloves and
clothing.
Remove soaked clothing. Wash skin
promptly and thoroughly with mild
soap and water.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear safety
goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with clear water
for 15 minutes minimum.
Avoid swallowing.
Do not induce vomiting. Get medical
attention.
Flammable. Avoid heat, sparks, and
open flame.
Use C02, dry chemical, ’alcohol
type" foam, water spray or fog
extinguisher.
Vapors can cause dizziness, headache
or unconsciousness.
Remove victim to fresh air. If
breathing is irregular or stopped,
perform artificial respiration. Get
medical attention.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin. Wear protective gloves and
clothing.
Remove soaked clothing. Wash skin
promptly and thoroughly with mild
soap and water.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear safety
goggles.
Flush eyes promptly with clear water
for 15 minutes minimum.
Avoid swallowing.
Do not induce vomiting. Get medical
attention.
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WARNING
DANGEROUS CHEMICALS
Continued
Item (NSN/APN)
Care and Handling Procedures
Corrective Actions
Freon
(Cleaning compound solvent)
(Ethylene glycol freon cleaning
solvent)
Non-flammable. Use in small quantities.
Open flames, high temperatures,
alkali or alkaline earth
metals may cause hazardous
decomposition with emission of
hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids which
are possible carbonyl halides.
Absorb spills with paper, vermiculite,
floor absorbent, or other
absorbent material.
Use in well-ventilated area. Vapors
will concentrate in low areas. Excessive
inhalation may cause lightheadedness,
shortness of breath, possible
stupor, and at high
concentrations can affect heart
rhythm. Use an air mask at high
concentrations.
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration.
If breathing is difficult, give
oxygen. DO NOT give epinephrine or
similar drugs, since such drugs may
induce erratic heartbeat. Get medical
attention.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin. Wear protective gloves.
Wash skin promptly and thoroughly
with mild soap and water.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear safety
goggles.
Immediately flush eyes thoroughly
with water.
Avoid swallowing.
If conscious, give two glasses of water.
Induce vomiting immediately.
DO NOT induce vomiting in an
unconscious victim. Get medical
attention.
Avoid water contamination as mixture
can become flammable.
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Excessive high temperature may produce
irritating vapors.
Remove victim to fresh air.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin.
Wash promptly and thoroughly.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear safety
goggles.
Flush eyes promptly and thoroughly
with water. Get medical attention.
Dielectric coolant fluid 0S45
type 2
k
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TM 9-1425-525-12-4
WARNING
DANGROUS CHEMICL
Continued
Item (NSN/APN)
Care and Handling Procedures
Corrective Actions
Coolant
(Union Carbide PM-3961)
Flammable. Avoid open flames
and sparks.
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Avoid contact with skin. Wear rubber
gloves.
Wash skin promptly and thoroughly
with water.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear
safety goggles.
Flush eyes promptly and thoroughly
with water.
Avoid swallowing. Can cause damage to the central nervous system
and severe kidney damage.
Get medical attention immediately.
Avoid water contamination as
mixture can become flammable.
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Excessive high temperature may
produce irritating vapors.
Remove victim to fresh air.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact with skin.
Wash skin promptly and thoroughly.
Avoid contact with eyes. Wear
safety goggles.
Flush eyes promptly and thoroughly
with water. Get medical
attention.
Flammable. Avoid open flames
and sparks.
Use C02 or dry chemical extinguisher.
Use in well-ventilated area.
Remove victim to fresh air. If
breathing has stopped, perform
artificial respiration. Get medical
attention.
Avoid contact with skin. Wear protective
clothing (rubber gloves,
apron, and safety goggles).
Wash skin promptly and thoroughly
with soap or mild detergent
and water. If irritation persists
after washing, get medical attention.
Avoid contact with eyes. Do not
wear contact lenses when working
with this material. Wear safety
goggles.
Flush eyes promptly and thoroughly
with water. Get medical
attention.
Avoid swallowing.
Do not induce vomiting. Get medical
attention immediately.
Dielectric coolant fluid 0S59
type 3
Naphtha TTN 97 TTYIGRA
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Insert the latest changed pages in accordance
with the instructions on the transmittal sheet.
LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
NOTE: On a changed page. the portion of the text affected by the
latest change is indicated by a vertical line in the outer
margin of the page Changes to illustrations are indicated by
a letter suffix adacent to the identification number. Added or
completely revised chapters, sections, paragraphs, tables,
etc , are indicated by a vertical line by the title
Dates of issue for original and changed pages are:
Original 0, 28 Aug 1972
Change 1,
6 Feb 1978
Change 2,
7 Mar 1979
Change 3 , 15 Jun 1981
Change 4, 31 Mar 1987
Change 5,
5 Dec 1988
THE EFFECTIVITY OF THE PAGES IN THIS PUBLICATION IS LISTED) BELOW.
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LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES - Continued
Page No.
*Change No.
Page No.
*Change No.
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B
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TECHNICAL MANUAL
No.9-1425-525-12-4
HEADQUARTERS
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
WASHINGTON, D.C., 28 August 1972
}
OPERATOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
FOR THE
HAWK GUIDED MISSILE SYSTEM
REPORTING ERRORS AND RECOMMENDING IMPROVEMENTS
You can help improve this manual. If you find any mistakes or if you know of a way to improve the
procedures, please let us know. Mail your letter, DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publication
and Blank Forms) direct to: Commander, U.S. Army Missile Command, ATTN: AMSMI-LC-ME-PM,
Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898-5238. A reply will be furnished to you.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER
1.
2.
3.
4.
Paragraph
INTRODUCTION
Scope ............................................................................................................................ 1-1
Forms, records, and reports.......................................................................................... 1-2
Reporting equipment improvement recommendations
(EIR s) ........................................................................................................................... 1-3
Responsibilities ............................................................................................................. 1-4
Periodic tests................................................................................................................. 1-5
ELECTRICAL INSPECTION AND REPAIR
General ......................................................................................................................... 2-1
Inspection...................................................................................................................... 2-2
Electrical troubleshooting .............................................................................................. 2-3
Meter demagnetizing..................................................................................................... 2-3.1
Soldering ....................................................................................................................... 2-4
Removal and installation of electrical components ....................................................... 2-5
Replacement of typical modules ................................................................................... 2-6
Replacement of headset cable assembly ..................................................................... 2-7
Replacement of headset boom assembly-i10668949................................................... 2-8
Repair and maintenance of coaxial cables ................................................................... 2-9
Lacing of wiring harness ............................................................................................... 2-10
MECHANICAL INSPECTION AND REPAIR
General ......................................................................................................................... 3-1
Inspection...................................................................................................................... 3-2
Mechanical troubleshooting .......................................................................................... 3-3
Removal and installation of mechanical components ................................................... 3-4
Spot painting ................................................................................................................. 3-5
Operation of the torque wrench and tensiometer tester................................................ 3-6
Drills, countersinks, extractors, and pipe thread sizes.................................................. 3-7
Safety wiring.................................................................................................................. 3-8
EQUIPMENT SERVICING
General ......................................................................................................................... 4-1
Air conditioner filter servicing ........................................................................................ 4-2
Servicing the radar and high-frequency console air filter.............................................. 4-3
Servicing the filter elements of the
liquid coolant filter assembly ......................................................................................... 4-4
Cleaning parent plates and circuit card modules .......................................................... 4-5
Drawer slide cleaning and lubrication............................................................................ 4-6
Cleaning procedure for LED contacts ........................................................................... 4-7
i
Page
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-6
2-30
2-32
2-34
2-42
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-5
3-8
3-8
3-8
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-4
4-5
4-7
C5
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Paragraph
CHAPTER
5.
Table 5-1.
APPENDIX
A.
B.
Page
HANDLING PROCEDURES FOR ELECTROSTATIC
DISCHARGE SENSITIVE ITEMS
General ...........................................................................................................................5-1
5-1
Material required for handling ESDS items .....................................................................
Handling procedures for ESDS items .............................................................................5-2
Test and installation of ESDS items................................................................................5-3
5-1
5-1
5-1
REFERENCES................................................................................................................
EXPENDABLE SUPPLIES AND MATERIAL LIST .........................................................
A-1
B-1
ii
C4
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
1-1.
Scope
a. This
technical
manual
(TM)
contains
instructions for the information and guidance of the
personnel responsible for operation and organizational
maintenance of the HAWK air defense guided missile
system.
b. The requirement for nomenclature distinction
between ’Basic and Improved’ HAWK Systems and
major items is no longer applicable. Action to delete this
distinctive terminology will be taken as the respective
pages of this manual are changed for other reasons.
1-2.
Forms, Records, and Reports
Department of the Army forms and procedures used
for equipment maintenance will be those prescribed by
DA PAM 738-750, The Army Maintenance Management
System (TA MMS). The DA PAM is published in the
Maintenance Management UPDATE.
Units may
subscribe to Maintenance Management UPDATE by
submitting a completed DA Form 12-13.
1-3.
Reporting
Equipment
Recommendations (EIR’s)
Improvement
tell us what you don’t like about your equipment. Let us
know why you don’t like the design. Tell us why a
procedure is hard to perform. Put it on an SF 368
(Quality Deficiency Report). Mail it to the address stated
in DA PAM 738-750. We’ll send you a reply.
1-4.
Responsibilities
Operators and crew chiefs are directly responsible
for assigned materiel. Section and platoon leaders are
charged with supervisory responsibility for material
pertaining to their commands. Unit and organizational
commanders are required to ensure that materiel issued
or assigned to their commands is properly used and
maintained in a serviceable condition.
1-5.
Periodic Tests
Certain units and panel meters require periodic tests
to ensure their accuracy. These periodic tests are
performed by DS and GS personnel. It is the
responsibility of organizational personnel, however, to
ensure that these tests are performed as scheduled and
that the units are available for testing. The list of units
requiring periodic test is contained in Appendix D of TM
9-4935-1540-14-1.
If your equipment needs improvement, let us know.
Send us an EIR. You, the user, are the only one who can
(1-2 blank )1-1
C1
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
CHAPTER 2
ELECTRICAL INSPECTION AND REPAIR
2-1. General
The purpose of this visual electrical inspection guide
and repair data is to detect the first signs of electrical
failures of assemblies in the materiel, and to insure that
appropriate corrective action is taken before expensive
and
time-consuming repairs or replacements are
required. The system of preventive maintenance
services is based on frequent inspections and services
accomplished by operators or maintenance personnel
under active supervision of all commanders and leaders.
2-4. Soldering
a. General. Soldering. is the most common
method of binding connections in electrical or electronic
work. There are many types of connections, each of
which may require a slightly different method
of
soldering. Standard soldering methods, based upon
experience, indicate the best way to solder particular
types of electrical connections.
b. Soldering Electrical Connections. The following
data supplements information contained in TB SIG 222.
A 25- to 35-watt soldering iron is used for printed circuit
board repair, especially when repairing beat-sensitive
devices such as semiconductors. Low-temperature
rosin-core solder is used, and special care taken to
insure that excess solder does not short to an adjacent
part Although rosin flux is non-conductive, it may flake
and fall into components and interfere with their
operation. Remove excess rosin flux with alcohol.
Figures 2-1 through 2-30 illustrate typical soldering
techniques for electrical components.
2-2. Inspection
Refer to table 2-1, the visual electrical inspection
guide, to:
a. Determine the condition of an item, i.e.,
serviceable or unserviceable.
b. Recognize conditions which would cause
failure.
c. Insure proper application of maintenance
policies at prescribed levels.
2-5. Removal and Installation of Electrical
Components
a. General. This section contains typical removal
and installation procedures for electrical components in
general use throughout the system. Each illustration
represents a typical electrical component and its
associated hardware.
b. Malfunction. In the event of malfunction, the
consoles or accessories should be returned to a
serviceable condition as quickly as possible by replacing
the defective subassembly or chassis with a good unit.
The faulty unit can be taken to a bench to be repaired
and returned to operational spares.
c. Printed Circuit Board Mounted Parts.
2-3. Electrical Troubleshooting
This paragraph provides information for locating and
correcting troubles in the electrical systems of the major
items of the improved HAWK air defense guided-missile
system. Troubleshooting procedures in a systematic
step-by-step operation are designed to aid the technician
in isolating defective components in a minimum of time.
The malfunction column of table 2-2 lists the troubles
that may be expected to occur in the electrical system of
the shelters. In items 1, 2, 3, and 9, it is assumed that
power is present in the input cables from the outside
power source. The probable cause column lists the
causes of the trouble. The corrective action column
gives the procedures for locating the cause of trouble
and, where necessary-, the remedial steps to be taken.
NOTE
2-3.1. Meter Demagnetizing
Erratic meter readings may be caused by a buildup
of static electricity on the meter face. This buildup can be
neutralized by the application of neutralizer "STAT-NUL"
6850-00-882-6690 to the face of the affected meters.
This neutralizer should be used whenever it is suspected
that meters have become magnetized and prior to
performing the periodic meter test procedures.
The key numbers shown below in
parentheses refer to figure 2-31.
(1) Method A. Cut the leads (I) as close to the
defective part as possible and discard the part. Use
needle-nose pliers to loop the leads of the new
2-1
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 2-1. Visual Electrical Inspection Guide -Typical
Part
Cables and wires
Capacitors
Coils
Connectors
Electron tubes
Electron tube sockets
Electron tube shields,
clamps and retainers
Fuses
Indicator lamps
Meters
Push switches
Push-pull (interlock)
switches
Reactors
Relays
Resistors
Condition
Securely attached to pins and terminals.
Not broken or kinked.
Insulation free from breaks, cracks, tears, cuts, abrasions, oil, grease, burns,
and fungus growths, and not pulled loose from connectors.
Securely installed.
Not broken, cracked, charred, blistered, discolored, or swelled.
No evidence of oil or electrolyte leakage.
Securely installed.
Not broken, cracked, charred, blistered, discolored, or swelled.
No evidence of oil or potting compound leakage.
Securely installed.
Not broken, cracked, chipped, or corroded.
Inserts not broken, burned, or corroded.
Pins not broken, burned, or corroded.
Clean and free from foreign matter.
Correct tubes installed.
Envelopes not broken or cracked.
Not loose in base.
High-voltage tubes clean and free from foreign matter and caps in place
and secure.
Securely installed.
Not broken, cracked, or chipped.
In place and secure.
Not broken, cracked, bent, or chipped.
Not blown.
Securely installed.
Proper type and rating.
Correct lamps installed, securely seated, and not broken.
Lenses securely seated and not broken or cracked.
Securely installed.
Pointers not broken or bent.
Covers not broken.
Securely installed.
Depress easily and return to original position when released.
Securely installed.
Depress easily and return to original position when released.
Pull out and remain out, but return easily to original position when depressed.
Electrical connections are secure, and offer a continuous path for current
flow.
Securely installed.
Not broken, cracked, charred, blistered, discolored, or swollen,
No evidence of oil or potting compound leakage.
Standoff insulators not broken, cracked, or chipped, and no hairline cracks
or carbonized arc-over paths.
Standoff insulators clean and free from foreign matter.
Securely installed.
Not broken, charred, or discolored.
Contacts not burned, pitted, or stuck together.
Securely installed.
Not broken, cracked, charred, blistered, discolored, or swollen.
2-2
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Part
Rotary switches
Standoff insulators
Terminal boards
Toggle switches
Transformers
Variable resistors
Variable transformers
2-1. Visual Electrical Inspection Guide -Typical-- Continued
Condition
Securely installed.
Knobs securely attached to shaft and not broken, cracked, or chipped,
Knobs turn easily to all positions.
Indexes aline with pointers at the lock position.
Insulation is free from breaks or cracks.
Stops are operative where applicable.
Movable contacts aline themselves with the stationary contact at each
position.
Contacts are free from bends, burns, and breaks.
Not broken, cracked, or chipped.
No hairline cracks or carbonized arc-over paths.
Clean and free from foreign matter.
Securely installed.
Not broken, chipped, or cracked.
Free from foreign matter.
Securely installed.
Move easily to all positions.
Momentary-contact toggle switches return to original position when
released.
Electrical connections are secure, and offer a continuous path for current
flow.
Securely installed.
Not broken, cracked, charred, blistered, discolored, or swollen.
No evidence of oil or potting compound leakage.
Standoff insulators not broken, cracked, or chipped, and no hairline cracks
or carbonized arc-over paths.
Standoff insulators clean and free from foreign matter.
Securely installed.
Not broken, cracked, charred, or swollen.
Terminals not shorted.
Securely installed.
Windings clean and not broken, rough, or loose.
Brushes securely installed and not broken, cracked, or chipped.
Brushes bear firmly on windings along entire brush paths and do not go off
ends of windings.
Clean and free from foreign matter.
part around the remaining sections of the old leads.
Solder the new part in place and cut off any excess lead.
Insure that the clippings do not fall onto the board to
cause short circuits.
(2) Method B. Cut the leads (1) close to the board
and discard the defective part. Heat the connections (2)
long enough to melt the solder and remove the
remaining leads. Insert the leads of the new part into the
mounting holes. If necessary, enlarge the mounting
holes with a sharp-pointed tool. Solder the leads, using
as little solder as possible.
NOTE
The key numbers shown below in
parentheses refer to figure 2-32.
d. Semiconductors. The semiconductors (2) should
be replaced on the printed circuit board as described in
subparagraph c. Semiconductors can be easily ruined by
the application of t(x) much heat. The wattage rating of
the soldering iron (3) must not exceed 35 watts and lowtemperature rosin-core solder must be used, A heat sink
(long-nosed pliers) (1) must always be used. The
terminal lead (4) must be held by, long-nosed pliers
during the soldering to insure that the heat is diverted
away from the semiconductor. The pliers should remain
attached to the terminal lead for a short time after
soldering is completed to insure that the heat is drawn
away.
e. Submodules. Refer to figure 2-33.
f. Submodule Electron Tubes..
Refer to
subparagraph e to remove the submodule. Refer to
figure 2-34 for submodule electron tube removal and
installation procedures. Refer to subparagraph e to
install the submodule.
2-3
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 2-2 Electrical Troubleshooting of the Main Power Supply Typical
Item
1.
Malfunction
GENERATOR ON indicator
lamp does not light.
Probable cause
Burned out or broken lamp
Corrective action
Replace
WARNING
Notify the power source operator to set the generator circuit breaker to the OFF position and disconnect
the power cable from the generator before taking corrective action to replace a faults component.
Poor connection between
416-vac power cable and cable
entry connector
Loose connection due to damn
aged or cross threads on plug
and connector
Loose wire connections or improper wiring
2.
PHASE INDICATOR lamp, does
not light.
Same as above
Improper phase sequence from
power source
3.
MAIN POWER ON lamp does
not light
Burned out or broken )amp
Poor connection between
416-vac power cable and cable
entry connector
Loose wire connections or improper wiring
Faulty MAIN POWER circuit
breaker
4.
UTILITY ON indicator lamp
does not light
Burned out or broken lamp
Faulty UTLITY POWER circuit
breaker
Faulty transformer
Improper or faulty wiring
check the light circuit for
faulty, broken, or improper
wiring.
2-4
Inspect connector and cable plug
for damaged pins or plugged
pin holes
Check wire connections for
tightness at cable entry connector Check out wiring using
applicable schematic.
Same as above
Disconnect input 416-vac power
cable and notify power source
operating personnel
Replace
Inspect connector and cable plug
for damaged pins or plugged
pin holes.
Check wire connections for
tightness at cable entry connector Check out wiring using
applicable schematic,
Check wire connectors on load
side for tightness. Using a voltmeter, check for presence of
416 vac on load side of the circuit breaker. If not present, replace the circuit breaker,
Replace.
Check wire connectors on load
side for tightness. Using a voltmeter, check for presence of
416 vac on load side of the circuit breaker. If not present, replace the circuit breaker,
Check all wire connections for
tightness. Using a voltmeter,
check for presence of 208 vac
on secondary’ side of the transformer. If not present, replace
transformer.
Using the applicable schematic,
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 2-2. Electrical Troubleshooting of the Main Power Supply - Typical - Continued
Item
5
Malfunction
No output from 416-vac receptacle. MAIN POWER indicator
lamp illuminated
Probable cause
Faulty receptacle
Poor wire connections
Improper wiring
Broken wire
6
7
8
9
Normal light circuit not functioning. UTILITY ON indicator
lamp illuminated
No output from 120-vac receptacIe . Normal lights
illuminated
No power from 208-vac receptacle. UTILITY ON indicator
lamp illuminated.
Emergency lights do not illuminate.
Corrective action
Shut off MAIN PO’WER circuit breaker.
Using applicable schematic, working
from the receptacle, check all wire runs
and connections until source of trouble is
located.
Faulty light switch
ground
Using a 120 vac test lamp, one lead of
the test lamp and check the load side of
the switch for presence of120 vac. If all
connectors and connections are in good
order and 120 vac is not present, replace
switch.
Faulty blackout controls
Improper wiring, poor connections or broken wire between LIGHTS switch and
blackout controls.
Check switches as above.
Using the applicable schematic, check
wiring between switches.
Faulty receptacle
Poor wire connections
Improper wiring
Broken wire
Shut off MAIN POWER circuit breaker.
Using applicable schematic, working
from the receptacle, check all wire runs
and connections until source of trouble is
located.
Same as above
Same as above.
Poor connection between emer
gency power cable and cable
entry connector
Loose wire connections or improper wiring
Inspect connector and cable plug for
damaged pins or plugged holes
.
Check wire connections for tightness at
cable entry connector. Check out wiring
using applicable schematic.
Faulty EMERGENCY
circuit breaker
LIGHTS Check wire connectors on load
side for tightness. Using a volt- meter,
check for presence of24 or 28 vdc,
whichever is applicable to the shelter, on
the load side of circuit breaker. If not
present, replace the circuit breaker.
Improper or faulty wiring
Using the applicable schematic, check
the light circuit for faulty, broken, or
improper wiring.
2-5
C5
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
q. Circuit Breakers. Refer to figure 2-45.
r. Tip Jacks. Refer to figure 2-46.
2-6. Replacement of Typical Modules
WARNING
Ensure that power has been removed
from the drawer before removing and
installing modules.
Removal and installation of typical modules are shown in
figures 2-46.1 and 2-47. Figure 2-46.1 and view A of
figure 2-47 show the removal of the module when the
module extractor is required. View H of figure 2-47
shows the removal of the hand-type modules. When
using the module extractor, attach it and then jiggle it
back and forth firmly, but not excessively, until the
module is loosened from the parent board connector. Let
the hand, not the arm, do the work on the module
extractor. Disengage the module extractor and carefully
remove the module by hand.
CAUTION
During installation, if resistance is
encountered, check to see if the module
is correctly keyed for the slot and check
for pin and jack damage.
Figure 2-1. Correct and incorrect methods of applying
soldering iron - typical.
CAUTION
In step g below, the threads on the
control shaft will be stripped if excessive
force is used to tighten the nut.
g. Variable Resistors. Refer to figure 2-35.
h. Reactors. Refer to figure 2-36.
i. Meters. Refer to figure 2-37.
j. Relays. Refer to figure 2-38.
k. Transformers. Refer to figure 2-39.
l. Indicator Lamps and Lampholders. Refer to figure
2-40.
m. Fuses and Fuseholders. Refer to figure 2-41.
n. Toggle Switches. Refer to figure 2-42.
o. Rotary Switches. Refer to figure 2-43.
Figure 2-2. Correct and incorrect methods of using
solder - typical.
p. Connectors. Refer to figure 2-44.
2-6
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-3. Correct method of positioning soldering iron - typical.
Figure 2-4. Removing excess wire after soldering - typical.
2-7
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
THE ABOVE CONNECTIONS DO NOT HAVE SUFFICIENT
MECHANICAL STRENGTH TO WITHSTAND STRESSES
APPLIED TO THE WIRE.
THE EXPOSED PORTION OF BARE WIRE SHOULD BE
TOUCHED WITH A HOT IRON UNTIL THE SOLDER FLOWS
OVER ALL SURFACES. IF THE WIRE IS COATED WITH
ENAMEL, OR IS DIRTY, IT MUST BE CLEANED.
AIR SPACES AND POCKETS FILLED WITH BLACK ENAMEL
PERMIT ENTRANCE OF AIR WHICH, IN TIME, MAY CAUSE
OXIDATION OF WIRE AND SOLDER, WEAKENING THE
CONNECTION.
MI 64344
Figure 2-5. Faulty soldering connections - typical.
2-8
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
PC-TYPE SOLDER CONNECTION
A. A MINIMUM AMOUNT OF SOLDER SHALL COVER THE TOP OF THE
CONDUCTOR.
B. WIRE, SOLDER AND TERMINAL MUST BE COMPLETELY FUSED AT
THIS POINT AND WIRE MUST BE ADJACENT TO TERMINAL.
C. ENTIRE MASS CONSISTING OF TERMINAL, WIRE AND SOLDER MUST
BE FREE OF ALL FOREIGN SUBSTANCES.
D. CONDUCTOR WIRE (COPPER).
E. TERMINAL OR PRINTED CIRCUIT (PC) PAD.
F. SMOOTH SOLDER CONTOUR AND PROPER FILLETING ACTION
INDICATING REQUIRED FLOWING AND WETTING ACTION.
Figure 2-6. Enlarged cross-sections of properly soldered connections - typical.
Figure 2-7. Thermal shunt - typical.
2-9
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-8. Correct ribration bend - typical.
Figure 2-9. Incorrect methods of soldering - typical.
2-10
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-10. Eyelet terminals - typical.
Figure 2-11. Suggested methods for tinning (wire) - typical.
2-11
Figure 2-12. Soldering turret-type terminals - typical.
Figure 2-13. Soldering multiple-type connections typical.
Figure 2-14. Soldering double-ended terminals - typical.
2-12
Figure 2-15. Soldering bifurcated terminal side route single connection - typical.
Figure 2-16. Soldering bifurcated terminal multiple side
route connections - typical.
Figure 2-17. Soldering bifurcated terminal bottom
route connections - typical.
2-13
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-18. Soldering bifurcated terminal top route connections - typical.
Figure 2-19. Soldering feedthru terminal top
termination - typical.
Figure 2-20. Soldering feedthru terminal bottom
termination - typical.
2-14
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-21. Soldering wire inserted in hole - typical.
2-15
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
NOTE ANY SOLDER ON THE OUTSIDE SURFACE OF THE
SOLDER CUP SHALL BE IN THE FORM OF A THIN
FILM ONLY
Figure 2-22. Soldering wire inserted in tubular terminal with weep hole - typical.
2-16
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-23. Separating braided shielding at inner conductor - typical.
2-17
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-24. Examples of insulation trim - typical
Figure 2-25. Soldering butt joints - typical.
2-18
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-26. Soldering butt joints and loop joints - typical.
Figure 2-27. Soldering overlapping flat surfaces - typical.
Figure 2-28. Soldering ground connections - typical
2-19
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-29. Soldering wires to fuseholders - typical.
Figure 2-30. Soldering clamp-type lug terminals to wire - typical.
2-20
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
A
B
1-Leads
1-Leads
2-Connections
Figure 2-31. Printed circuit board, mounted part removal
and installation - typical.
Figure 2-33. Submodule removal and installation typical.
1-Long-nosed pliers (heat sink)
2-Semiconductor
3-Soldering iron
4-Terminal lead
Figure 2-32. Semiconductor removal and installation typical.
2-21
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
1—Electron tube shield
2—Electron tube
3—Submodule
Figure 2-34. Submodule electron tube removal and installation - typical.
A
1—Hexagon nut
2—Lockwasher
3—Flat washer
4—Panhead screw
5—Variable resistor
B
1—Hexagon nut
2—Locking nut
3—Lockwasher
4—Variable screw
C
1—Setscrew
2—Knob
3—Locking nut
4—Lockwasher
5—Variable resistor
Figure 2-35. Variable resistor removal and installation- typical.
2-22
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
1-Hexagon nut
2-Lockwasher
3-Panhead screw
4-Meter
Figure 2-37. Meter removal and installation - typical.
A
1-Self-Iocking nut
2-Panhnad screw
3-Flat washer
4-Reactor
B
1-Panhead screw
2-Lockwasher
3-Flat washer
4-Reactor
Figure 2-36. Reactor removal and installation - typical.
2-23
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
A
1-Panhead screw
2-Relay
B
1-Panhead screw
2-Relay
C
1-Self-locking nut
2-Relay
Figure 2-38. Relay removal and installation - typical.
2-24
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
A
1-Panhead screw
2-lockwasher
3-Flat washer
4-Transformer
B
1-Self-locking nut
2-Transformer
C
1-Self-locking nut
2-Panhead screw
3-Flat washer
4-Transformer
D
1-Panhead screw
2-Transformer
Figure 2-39. Transformer removal and installation - typical
A
1-Lens
2-Larnp
3-Hexagon nut
4-Lampholder
5-Lockwas her
Figure 2-40. Indicator lamp and lampholder removal and installation - typical.
2-25
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
A
1-Indicator
2-Fuse
3-Hexagon nut
4-Fuseholder
B
A
1-Cap
2-Fuse
3-Hexagon nut
4-Lockwasher
5-Panhead screw
6-Fuseholder
1-Hexagon nut
2-Lock washer
3-Toggle switch
4-Key washer
B
C
1-Hexagon nut
2-Lockwasher
3-Switch-guard stop
4-Switch guard
5-Toggle switch
6-Key washer
1-Fuseholder indicator
2-Fuse
3-Panhead screw
4-Lock washer
5-Fuseholder body
6-Gasket
Figure 2-42. Toggle switch removal and installation typical.
Figure 2-41. Fuse and fuseholder removal and
installation - typical.
2-26
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
A
1-Setscrew
2-Knob
3-Setscrew
4-Straight shaft
5-Cupling
6-Panhead screw
7-Hexagon nut
8-Lockwasher
9-Pinhead screw
10-Hexagon nut
11-Lock washer
12-Hexagon nut
13-Flat washer
14-Bracket
15-Panhead screw
16-Hexagon nut
17-Lockwasher
18-Bracket
19-Rotary switch
B
1-Setscrew
2-Knob
3-Panhead screw
4-Lock washer
5-Flat washer
6-Hexagon nut
7-Lockwasher
8-Pinhead screw
9-Hexagon nut
10-Rotary switch
11-Rotary switch assembly
Figure 2-43. Rotary switch removal and installation typical.
1-Hexagon nut
2-lockwasher
3-Panhead screw
4-Connector
Figure 2-44. Connector removal and installation typical.
2-27
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
1-Panhead screw
2-Lockwasher
3-Flat washer
4-Circuit breaker
Figure 2-45. Circuit breaker removal and installation typical.
1-Hexagon nut
2-Tip jack
Figure 2-46. Tip jack removal and installation - typical.
2-28
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-46.1. Replacement of typical modules.
2-28.1 (2-28.2 blank)
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-47. Replacement of typical modules.
2-29
TM 9-1425-525-12-AC7
(5) Remove and retain the cable retainer (6)
from each cable (7 and 8).
(6) Loosen the two nuts (9), and remove the
cables from the switch housing.
(7) Remove and retain the flat washer, spring,
and nut from coiled cable assembly 10176208 (8).
Discard the cable assembly and preformed packing.
c. Installation.
(1) Dress the end of the straight cable (7), as
necessary, for a 1.9 cm (3/4-inch) length of red
lead and a 31.11 cm (1-1/4-inch) length for the
remaining five leads. Clean and tin the ends of the
six leads to 0.63 cm (1/4-inch).
(2) Insure that the nut, spring, flat washer,
and preformed packing are installed on the straight
cable, and insert the end of the cable (7) into the
switch housing as shown on figure 2-48.
(3) Install the retained cable retainer (6) on
the straight cable 0.63 cm (1-1/4-inch) from the end
Of the cable jacket
(4) Dress the end of new coiled cable assembly 10176208 for a 31.11 cm (1-1/4-inch) lead
length. Cut the orange lead back to the cable
jacket, and the red lead to a 1.9 cm (3/4-inch)
length. Strip and tin the ends of the six leads to
0.63 cm (1/4-inch).
2-7.
Replacement of Headset Cable
Assembly
a. General. This paragraph provides removal
and installation procedures for replacing the coiled
cable assembly used in the communication headset.
NOTE
The key numbers shown below in parentheses
refer to figure 2-48 unless otherwise specified.
b. Removal.
(1) Remove and retain the four screws, cover,
and preformed packing from the switch housing.
NOTE
Handle the switch with care while the cover is
being removed to prevent the actuator (1) and
plunger (2) from becoming disengaged from the
switch housing (3).
(2) Unsolder the two red leads (4) from the
switch terminals.
(3) Cut through the remaining five leads at
the center of each heat shrink insulation sleeving
(5) and conductor splice.
(4) Pull the insulation sleeving and conductor
splice from the cut leads.
1-Actuator
2-Plunger
3-Switch housing
4-Red lead
5-Heat shrink insulation sleeving
6-cable retainer
7-Straight cable
8-Coiled cable assembly
9-Coiled cable assembly
Figure 2-48. Headset coiled assembly removal and installation - typical.
2-30
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Figure 2-49. Replacement of headset coiled cable assembly - typical.
(5) Assemble the retained nut, spring, flat
washer, and new preformed packing 10182406
(1 through 4, fig. 2-49) onto the coiled cable
assembly.
(6) Insert the end of the new coiled cable
assembly (8) into the switch housing.
(7) Install the retained cable retainer (6) on
the coiled cable 0.63 cm (1/4-inch) from the end
of the cable jacket.
(8) Slide a 1.9 cm (3/4-inch) length of heat
shrink insulation sleeving onto each lead (except
the red lead) on either cable.
(9) Solder together like - colored (except red)
leads from each cable, using a lap joint.
(10) Position and install the heat shrink insulation sleeving centrally over the five soldered
connections.
spring, and nut, being careful not to cross the
threads.
(14) Check the switch by pressing on the
actuator (1) and observing that the plunger (2)
activates the switch mechanism. If the actuator
cannot be fully depressed, or if the actuator and
plunger have become disengaged from the switch
housing, refer to figure 2-50 for realinement of the
plunger. Remove any loose foreign matter from the
housing.
(15) Assemble the retained preformed packing
to the cover and install on the switch housing,
carefully tightening the four retained soft brass
screws.
d. Continuity Check. An ohmmeter connected
between the specified pins of connector P1 ( fig. 2-49)
should produce the following normal resistance indications.
(1) 150 ohms between P1-A and P1-B (left
ear).
(2) 150 ohms between P1-E and P1-F (right
ear).
(11) Assemble and solder the two red leads (4)
to the switch terminals.
(12) Gently pull on the two cables (7 and 8)
until the cable retainers (6) butt against the inside
wall of the switch housing, making sure that no
strain is placed upon the leads.
(13) Secure each cable to the switch housing by
installing the preformed packing, flat washer,
(3) 40 to 100 ohms between P1-C and P1-D
(microphone) when the switch actuator (1, fig. 2-48)
is pressed.
Figure 2-50. Headset switch plunger alinement - typical.
2-31
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
C2
(4) Remove and retain the boom assembly
2-8. Replacement of Headset Boom
Assembly-10668949
a. General. This paragraph provides removal
and installation procedures for replacing the boom
assembly used on communication headset
10673294-1, and 10673293-11.
(7).
CAUTION
Handle the microphone cord assembly
(8) with care when removing it from the
boom assembly (7) to prevent damage
to the microphone (13), and cord clip
(10).
NOTE
The key numbers shown below in parentheses
refer to figure 2-51 unless otherwise specified.
b. removal
(1) Disconnect the microphone cord plug (1)
from the headset plug (2).
(2) Remove and retain the machine screw (3)
and unscrew the knurled nut (4).
(3) Remove and retain the flat knurled washer
(5), and the wedge-shaped grooved washer (6).
(5) Remove and retain the microphone cord
assembly (8) with microphone clip (9), and cord
clip (10).
c. Installation.
NOTE
Figure 2-52 illustrates a headset with a completely assembled boom assembly (3, fig. 2-52)
and microphone cord assembly (4, fig. 2-52).
1-Microphone cord plug
2-Headset plug (microphone)
3-Machine screw
4-Knurled nut
5-Flat knurled washer
6-Wedge-shaped grooved washer
7-Boom assembly
8-Microphone cord assembly
9-Microphone clip
10-Cord clip
11-Dome assembly
12-Wedge-shaped grooved washer
13-Microphone
Figure 2-51. Headset, boom assembly, and microphone cord assembly-exploded view.
2-32
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
1-Headset plug (microphone)
2-Microphone cord plug
3-Boom assembly
4-Microphone cord assembly
Figure 2-52. Headset, and boom assembly-installed.
2-33
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
C4
(1) Remount the microphone cord assembly
(8) onto the new boom assembly (7).
(2) Mount the new boom assembly (7) onto
the dome assembly (11).
(3) Replace the wedge - shaped grooved washer
(6) as described in a and b below.
2-9.
Repair and Maintenance of Coaxial
Cables
a. General. This paragraph contains information
concerning the type of connectors to be used, considerations to be made when selecting connectors,
methods of coupling the connectors, and methods
of attaching the cable shielding to the connectors.
Instructions for terminating coaxial cables using
various types of connectors are also provided.
b. Types of Connectors. The various types of
connectors used for terminating and connecting
coaxial cables are shown in figure 2-53.
c. Selection of Connectors. When selecting connectors to be used for terminating coaxial cables,
three things must be considered: size of the cable
to be used (no further mention will be made of
cable size as this should be obvious), methods of
coupling the connectors, and methods of attaching
the cable shielding.
(a) To ensure proper replacement, make
certain that the grooved side of the washer is facing
the dome assembly (11).
(b) The thick part of the wedge is aligned
with the thin part of the wedge-shaped grooved
washer (12) already attached to the dome assembly (11).
(4) Replace the flat knurled washer (5) with
the knurled side facing the wedge-shaped grooved
washer.
(5) Replace the knurled nut (4), with the
recessed side facing away from the flat knurled
washer (5), and the machine screw (3).
(6), Reconnect the microphone cord plug (2,
fig. 2-52) to the headset plug (1, fig. 2-52).
Figure 2-53. Connectors, adapters, and coupling methods.
2-34
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
C4
(b) Slip the locknut and gasket on the cable,
with the "V" groove of the gasket toward the end of the
cable.
(c) Comb out the shielding and turn it back
from the dielectric.
(1) Methods of coupling connectors. When
connecting or coupling the connectors, three methods
are used:
(a) Bayonet coupling method. This method
provides a push-on and twist-lock type connection. The
jacks and receptacles have two or three external
protrusions referred to as bayonet ears, while the plugs
have coupling nut slots which receive the bayonet ears.
When subjected to vibrations, bayonet couplings will
generate excess circuit noise.
(b) Threaded coupling method. A threaded
coupling provides a screw-type connection. The jacks
and receptacles have external-threaded bodies, while
the plugs have internal-threaded couplings nuts. This
method supplies a positive connection with minimum
noise generation.
(c) Push-on coupling method. This method
provides a means for rapidly connecting and disconnecting the connectors.
The connectors are held
together by a press fit, retaining springs, or a springloaded ball bearing detent. The push-on coupling will
separate easily when subjected to vibrations or
excessive movement.
(2) Methods of attaching cable shielding. There
are three methods of attaching the cable shielding to the
connector: soldering, clamping, and crimping.
(a) Soldering method. The UHF series connector, almost exclusively, requires the soldering
method.
(b) Clamping method. This is the technique
most commonly employed for attaching the cable
shielding to the connector. It has the advantage of
providing a good moisture seal and also strong metal-tometal cable retention.
(c) Crimping method. This is the easiest
method used for attaching the cable shielding to the
connector; however, it requires a ferrule clamp nut
assembly to replace the braid clamp, gasket, washer
and clamp nut used in the clamping method. This
method also requires the use of special tools.
Termination Procedures.
The following
d.
procedures explain the methods employed for terminating coaxial cables, using various types of connec- tors.
(1) Termination procedure, using a BNC series
connector.
NOTE
When removing the dielectric, be careful
not to cut or nick the conductor.
NOTE
When removing the cable jacket
(insulation), be careful not to cut or
nick the shielding.
shown
(a) Strip the cable jacket to the dimensions
in
figure
2-54.
Figure 2-54. Terminating a coaxial cable, using an
improved BNC series connector.
2-35
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
C4
(d) Cut the dielectric to the dimensions
shown in figure 2-54.
(e) Comb the shielding toward the end of
the cable, and place the clamp over the shielding.
(f) Push the clamp on the cable until the
clamp is seated against the cable jacket.
(g) Fold the shielding back over the clamp,
and trim it to the length shown in figure 2-54.
CAUTION
Do not apply excess heat to the
conductor thereby distorting the
dielectric.
Distortion may prevent
proper mating with the bushing and
the insulator.
(h) Tin the exposed conductor surface.
(i) Solder the contact onto the conductor,
and remove the excess solder.
(j) Insert the cable assembly into the connector body, ensuring that the sharp edge of the
clamp is seated in the gasket groove.
(k) ’Tighten the locknut securely.
(2) Termination procedure, using an MS901220-0001 connector.
NOTE
When removing the cable jacket
(insulation), be careful not to cut or
nick the shielding.
(a) Strip the cable jacket to the dimensions
shown in figure 2-55.
(b) Slip the locknut, plain washer, and rubber washer over the cable.
(c) Comb out the shielding and turn it back
from the dielectric.
NOTE
When removing the dielectric, be
careful not to cut or nick the
conductor.
Figure 2-55. Terminating a coaxial cable, using an
MS9012-20-0001 coaxial connector.
(h) Tin the exposed conductor surface, and
remove the excess solder.
(i) Insert the cable assembly into the connector body, and tighten the locknut securely.
(j) Remove the cap on the connector body,
and solder the contact onto the conductor.
(h) Install the cap on the connector body,
and tighten it securely.
(3) Termination procedure, using an rf connector and fitting.
(d) Cut the dielectric and the conductor to
the dimensions shown in figure 2-55.
(e) Comb the shielding toward the end of
the cable, and place the cone-shaped washer over the
cable.
(f) Push the washer on the cable until the
inside shoulder is seated against the cable jacket.
(g) Fold the shielding back over the coneshaped washer, and trim it to the length as shown in
figure 2-55.
CAUTION
Do not apply excess heat to the conductor
thereby distorting the dielectric. Distortion
may prevent proper mating with the
connector body.
NOTE
When removing the cable jacket
(insulation), be careful not to cut or
nick the shielding,
2-36
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
C4
(4) Termination procedure, using a threaded
connector.
(a) Strip the cable jacket and conductor jacket as
shown in figure 2-56.
(b) Slip the locknut, plain and cone-shaped washers
over the cable.
(c) Comb out the shielding and turn it back from the
dielectric.
NOTE
When removing the dielectric, be careful not
to
cut or nick the conductor.
NOTE
When removing the cable jacket (insulation),
be careful not to cut or nick the shielding.
(a) Strip the cable jacket to the dimensions shown in
figure 2-57.
(d) Cut the dielectric and conductor to the
dimensions shown in figure 2-56.
(e) Fold the shielding back over the cone shaped
washer, and trim it to the length shown in
figure 2-56.
CAUTION
Do not apply excess heat to the conductor thereby distorting the dielectric. Distortion may prevent mating with the
receptacle.
NOTE
If using coaxial cable RG-59, 62 or 71/U, cut
off and discard the narrow portion of the
bushing.
(b) Slip the clamp nut, washer, and bushing over the
cable.
(c) Comb out the shielding and turn it back from the
dielectric.
(f) Tin the exposed conductor surface.
g) Solder the contact onto the conductor,
and remove the excess solder,
(h) Insert the cable assembly into the fitting, and
tighten the locknut securely.
NOTE
When removing the dielectric, be carefut not
to cut or nick the conductor.
(d) Cut the dielectric and conductor to the
dimensions shown in figure 2-57.
(e) Comb the shielding toward the end of the cable,
and place the clamp over the shielding.
Figure 2-56. Terminating a coaxial cable, using an rf connector and fitting.
2-37
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
NOTE
The contact must be seated against the
dielectric,
(i) Solder the contact onto the conductor,
and remove excess solder.
(j) Insert the cable assembly into the connector body.
(h) Tighten the clamp nut securely.
(5) Termination procedures, using series N
connector.
(f) Push the clamp on the cable until the
clamp is seated against the cable jacket.
(g) Fold the shielding back over the clamp,
and trim it to the length shown in figure 2-57.
CAUTION
Do not apply excess heat to the
conductor thereby distorting the
dielectric. Distortion may prevent
proper mating with the connector
body.
(h) Tin the exposed conductor surface.
NOTE
When removing the cable jacket
(insulation), be careful not to cut or
nick the shielding.
(a) Strip the cable jacket to the dimensions
shown in figure 2-58.
(b) Slip the locknut and gasket over the
cable.
(c) Comb out the shielding and turn it back
from the dielectric.
NOTE
When removing the dielectric, be
careful not to cut or nick the
conductor.
(d) Cut the dielectric and the conductor to
the dimensions shown in figure 2-58.
(e) Comb the shielding toward the end of
cable, and place the clamp over the cable.
(f) Fold the shielding back over the clamp,
and trim it to the length as shown in figure 2-58.
CAUTION
Do not apply excess heat to the
conductor
thereby
distorting
the
dielectric. Distortion may prevent proper
mating with the connector body.
(g) Tin the exposed conductor surface.
(h) Solder the contact onto the conductor,
and remove the excess solder.
(i) Insert the cable assembly into the connector body.
(j) Tighten the locknut assembly.
(6) Termination procedure, using an MS series
connector.
NOTE
When removing the cable jacket
(insulation), be careful not to cut or
nick the shielding.
(a) Strip the cable jacket to the dimensions
shown in figure 2-59.
(b) Slip the insulation sleeving over the
cable.
Figure 2-57. Terminating a coaxial cable, using a
threaded connector.
2-38
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
C4
CAUTION
Do not apply excess heat to the
conduc- tor thereby distorting the
dielectric. Dis- tortion may prevent
proper mating with the connector body.
(e) Tin the exposed conductor surface.
(f) Solder the contact onto the conductor.
and remove the excess solder.
NOTE
Be sure that the holes in the shield
connector are nearest the connector
body.
(g) Slip the shield connector over the collar
of the connector body.
Figure 2-58. Terminating a coaxial cable, using a series
N coaxial connector.
NOTE
When removing the dielectric, be
careful not to cut or nick the
conductor.
(c) Fold the shielding back to expose the
dielectric, and cut the dielectric to the dimensions shown
in figure 2-59.
(d) Slip the phenolic fiber spacer over the
conductor, and ensure that the spacer is seated against
the
dielectric.
Figure 2-59. Terminating a coaxial cable, using an MS
series connector.
2-39
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
C4
(h) Place the flat washer over the dielectric
and slide it back against the flange of the ferrule.
(h) Solder the shield connector to the collar
through the holes in the shield connector.
(i) Insert a 7/8-inch long fiberglass sleeving
into the shield connector, and ensure that the sleeving is
seated against the collar of the connector body.
(j) Insert the cable assembly into the connector body, and ensure that the contact is flush with the
front of the connector body.
(k) Fold the shielding over the fiberglass
sleeving and the shield connector.
(l) Whip the shielding to the shield connector with 30 AWG bare tinned copper wire
(approximately eight turns).
(m) Solder the copper wire to the shielding.
(n) Trim the excess shielding that protrudes
beyond the whipping.
(o) Push the insulation sleeving toward the
connector body until the sleeving is seated against the
connector body.
(7) Termination procedures for special purpose
electrical cable assembly coaxial cable (fig. 2-60).
(a) Install a 7/8-inch length of shrinkable
tubing on the coaxial cable.
(b) Install the nut and crimp the ferrule onto the coaxial cable.
(c) Remove 15/16 of an inch of outer
sheath (cotton braid) from the end of the coaxial cable.
(i) Place the back insulator over the dielectric and butt it against the flat washer.
(j) Tin the conductor.
(k) Cut the conductor 7/32 of an inch from
the back insulator (fig. 2-60).
(l) Install the inner contact on the conductor with the slotted end out, ensure that it is butted
against the back insulator, and solder.
NOTE
Use a 42-watt soldering iron and a
0.016 - diameter solder.
CAUTION
Avoid cutting or nicking of wire braid.
(d) Slide the wire braid back on the cable
far enough to allow the inner retaining sleeve to be
inserted over the dielectric and underneath the braid.
Then position the inner retainer sleeve 7/16 of an inch
under the braid.
(e) Smooth the wire braid over the inner
sleeve, and cut the wire braid flush with the end of the
inner sleeve.
(f) Slide the outer sleeve forward on the
cable over the wire braid. Butt the rear edge of the
sleeve against the cable outer sheath. Crimp the wire
braid between the inner and outer sleeves, using the 100
nest on the crimping tool.
(g) Strip the dielectric from the conductor,
leaving 5132 of an inch of dielectric ferrule in front of the
flange.
Figure 2-60. Assembly stage and contact point
identification.
2-40
C4 TM 9--1425--525--124
(m) Clean excess solder and flux from the
face of the back insulator And inner contact.
(o) Repair the other coaxial cable
following steps (a) through (m) above.
e. Assembly Procedure for Rf Connector 9167003
(n) Slide the "0" ring and front insulator onto
the inner contact
(1) Cut the end of the coaxial cable flush
before performing the connector procedure.
Note
Remove the front insulator after checking
for a fit. Replace when the other coaxial
cable
has
been
repaired.
Figure 2-61. Assembly of rf connector 9167003.
2-41
4 TM 9-1425-525-12-4
(2) Slip nut no. 2 (small), nut no. 1 (large) and the plug
connector spring over the coaxial cable.
promote cold flow of the insulation under the tie. This
condition can result in low insulation value or short
circuits.
(3) Strip the outer insulation back 3/8 of an inch from the
end of the coaxial cable. Be careful not to damage the
shielding.
b. Methods.
(1) Continuous lacing (figs. 2-62 and 2-63).
The
materials commonly used for continuous lacing are
lacing tape, cord, or small diameter tubing. The stitching should be equally spaced up to the point of branching or other termination. Where the harness ending
consists of a single wire or a pair of wires, a clove hitch
secured by a square knot is sufficient. In component
assemblies where wires break from the cable trunk to a
termination, the tie should be made a distance from the
branch to provide a sufficient vibration bend.
(4) Assemble the sleeve from the connector over the
shielding and up against the coaxial insulation.
(5) Comb out the braided shield wire so that no strands
are snarled or crossed.
(6) Fold all strands of the shield braid back over the
sleeve making sure that no strands are crossed.
(7) Solder strands to the sleeve using a minimum of solder and
heat. Do not damage the insulation under the sleeve.
(8) Trim the excess strand ends neatly from the sleeve.
(9) Trim the dielectric from the center con- ductor to within 1/16
of an inch of the sleeve.
(10) Make certain that the center conductor wire strands are
close together and tin them with a minimum of solder.
Figure 2-62. Equal Spacing
(11) Inspect all workmanship.
(12) Insert the center conductor through the hollow probe of the
connector, and slide the spring, nuts, and probe together and
assemble them. (Use retaining ring pliers 5120-00-293- 0044
when tightening the assembly.) Solder the center conductor and
probe end, leaving no excess solder on the probe.
Figure 2-63. Vibration Bend
(1.q) Trim off the protruding center conductor, if any.
(14) Using a multimeter, ensure that there is no continuity
between the center conductor and the outer shell of the
connector.
2-10. Lacing of Wiring Harness a. Lacing. To prevent
damage to insulation and breaking of conductors caused by
vibration and other movements, the wires must be tied together
in bun- dles or harnesses and secured to the structure or to a
tiebar. Various methods such as continuous lacing, spot ties,
plastic cable ties, plastic tubing, and spiral- wrapped plastic tape
are commonly used for lacing the cable trunk. Excessive
tension, visible as a defor- mation of the outside diameter of the
cable trunk, will
Figure 2-64 Clove and square knot.
Figure 2-64. Clove stitch and square knot.
2-42
C4 TM 9-1425-525-12-4
(5) Double lock stitch (figs. 2-68 and 2-69). The double
lock stitch is used primarily to prevent lacing from
loosening but is frequently used for complete lacing. It is
made by making two single stitches around the bundle
and securing with a lock stitch.
(3) Running or single stitches (fig. 2-65). Running or
single stitches are successfully used on insulation that
has high potential cold flow characteristics. They are
made by passing the free end of the lacing material
around the bundle, over the standing part, and through
the loop.
Figure 2-65. Running Stitch
Figure 2-68. Double lock stitch.
4) Single lock stitch (figs. 2-66 and 2-67). The single
lock stitch is commonly used for continuous lacing. It
is formed by making a single stitch, then passing the
free end under the lacing between the two stitches and
through the loop.
Figure 2-69. Double lock stitch completed.
Figure 2-66. Single lock stitch
method
(6) Spacing of stitches. The wires in a finished cable trunk should
have a minimum number of crossovers. Crossovers, if necessary,
should be at least 8 inches from the termination. Terminating
stitches should be made at the end of each lacing. The type of stitch
is determined mainly by the type of insulation and diameter of the
bundle. The most commonly used stitch spacing is indicated in table
2-3.
Table 2-3. Stitch Spacing
Lacing Internal
inches approximate
Cable or harness
diameter
1/2 inch or less
1 inch
Larger diameter
3/4 to 1 1/2
2
3
Figure 2-67. Single lock stitch completed.
2-43
TM 9--1425-525-12-4
(7) Serve (fig & 2-70 and 2-71). The length of the serve or
endless tie should be equal to approximately the outside
diameter of the wire bundle and should not exceed 3/4 inch.
To prevent the lacing from loosening, it should be served at
the point of origin and at the point of termination of the lacing.
The serve is used at bundle branches or breakouts and at all
bundle end terminations. The serve is made by forming a
loop along the bundle with the lacing tape, the ends of the
tape toward the bundle end. Wrap the lacing end of the tape
around the bundle and over the loop. Upon reach- ing the
desired length of serve, pass the lacing end through the loop
and pull the ends away from each other. Adjust by pulling
until the cross is under the serve. Cut this excess tape from
each end of the serve
Figure 2-72. Spot Tie
CAUTION
Cut the end of nylon straps off flush with
the boss to avoid cuts to hands from the
sharp edges. The plastic ties may also be
used as cable clamps. Care should be
taken that no cable clamp be placed over a
cable tie.
Figure 2-70. Serve at point of origin
(9) Service loop (fig. 2-73). Where a loop must be
provided to allow opening of an access door, the har- ness
should be served at the start and end of the loop.
The loop should not be laced, but should be secured by
spot ties or plastic cable ties.
Figure 2-71. Serve method of tying.
(8) Spot ties (fig. 2-72). Spot ties are frequently used in place of
continuous lacing. They are made exactly like the termination ties.
Figure 2-73. Service loop.
Figure 2-73.
Service loop
2-44
TM 9- 1425-525-12-4
CHAPTER 3
MECHANICAL INSPECTION AND REPAIR
inspection must include any brackets, lockwashers,
locknuts, locking wires, or cotter pins as well as any
connecting tubes, hose, or electrical
3-1. General
The purpose of mechanical inspection and repair is to
detect the first signs of mechanical failures and to insure
that appropriate corrective action is taken
before
expensive and time-consuming repairs or replacements
are required.
This system is based on frequent
inspection and services accomplished by operators or
maintenance personnel under active supervision of all
commanders and leaders.
e.
Excessively worn means worn beyond
serviceable limits or to a point likely to result in failure if
the unit is not replaced before the next scheduled
inspection. Excessive wear of mating parts or linkage
connection is usually evidenced by too much play (lash
or lost motion). It includes illegibility as applied to
markings, data and caution plates, and printed matter.
3-2. Inspection
The following procedures apply to preventive
maintenance services and to all inspections, and are just
as important as the specific procedures.
f. Such expressions as "adjust if necessary" or
"replace if necessary" are not used in the specific
procedures. It is understood that whenever inspection
reveals the need of adjustment, repair, or replacement,
the necessary action will be taken.
NOTE
Use table 3-1 as a visual inspection
guide to determine the need for
mechanical maintenance.
3-3. Mechanical Troubleshooting
This paragraph provides information for locating and
correcting troubles in the mechanical parts of the major
items of the improved HAWK air-defense guided-missile
system. Troubleshooting procedures, in a systematic
step-by-step operation, are designed to aid the
technician in isolating defective components in a
minimum of time.
a. Inspections to see if items are in good condition, correctly assembled or stored, secure, not
excessively worn, not leaking, and adequately lubricated
apply to most items in the preventive maintenance and
inspection procedures. Any or all of these checks that
are pertinent to any item l (including supporting,
attaching, or connecting members) will be performed
automatically, as general procedures, in addition to any
specific procedures given.
3-4.
Removal and Installation of Mechanical
Components
a. General. This section provides maintenance
instructions for authorized organizational maintenance
personnel of the improved HAWK air- defense guidedmissile system. Maintenance consists of replacement of
parts and detailed adjustments of parts listed in the
Organizational, DS, GS, and Depot Maintenance Repair
Parts and Special Tool Lists Illustration Supplement.
Using troops will have the materiel sent to direct support
maintenance
personnel
to perform
all other
replacements and adjustments.
b. Inspection for good condition is usually an
external visual inspection to determine whether the unit
is damaged beyond safe or serviceable limits. Good
condition is explained further as meaning not bent or
twisted, not chafed or burred, nor broken or cracked, not
bare or frayed, not dented or collapsed, not torn or cut,
not deteriorated.
c. Inspection of a unit to see that it is correctly
assembled or stowed is usually a visual inspection to see
if the unit is in its normal position in the materiel and if all
its parts are present and in their correct relative position.
b. Repair of Hydraulic Leaks - Typical.
d. Inspection of a unit to determine if it is secure
is usually an external visual examination or a check by
hand or wrench for looseness. Such an
(1) Safety.
Relieve all pressure in a
hydraulic unit before attempting to make repairs or
before disconnecting hydraulic lines or couplings.
3-1
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 3-1. Visual Mechanical Inspection Guide -- Typical
Part
Bearings
Condition
Securely installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, wear, chipping, cracks, burrs, breaks, and
overheating.
Inspect for proper installation, smoothness of operation, proper lubrication,
and any other damage which might impair bearing operation.
Bolts and nuts
Securely installed.
No missing bolts or nuts.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, wear, cracks, breaks, bends, and damaged
threads.
Bulbs and lights
Properly installed.
Inspect for nonoperating lights and signals, missing bulbs, loose connections,
and correct hookup.
Cleanliness and general appearance Visually inspect for the presence of dirt, sand, grime, and excessive
accumulations of oil, grease, or hydraulic fluid.
Connectors
Properly installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, cracks, breaks, bends, damaged pins, damaged
threads, gaskets, and covers.
Desiccants
Properly installed.
Inspect for discoloration (including moisture saturation), proper location, and
general condition.
Dials and scales
Properly installed.
No evidence of chipped paint, scratches, and bends.
Inspect for correct adjustment, security, legibility, and proper type.
Distribution boxes
Properly installed.
No evidence of scratched paint, rust, corrosion, cracks, and dents.
Inspect for correct safety wire, damaged switches, cleanliness, missing parts,
security and legibility of nameplates, markings, and equipment placards.
Electrical cables
Properly installed.
No evidence of cracked, frayed, or worn insulation.
Inspect for presence of dust caps, proper potting of connectors, and for
external damage to connectors.
Fittings
Properly installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, damaged or missing gaskets and seals,
damaged threads, cracks, dents, burrs, and leaks.
Gages
Proper type and properly installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, cracks, breaks and leaks.
Inspect legibility of markings, completeness, and cleanliness.
Gears
Properly installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, wear, missing or damaged teeth, burrs, cracks,
or excessive backlash.
3-2
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 3-1. Visual Mechanical Inspection Guide - Typical - Continued
Part
Condition
Hinges
Proper finish and ease of operation.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, sag, bent pins, cracks, bends, or wedr.
No loose or missing hardware.
Hoses
Proper cure dates.
No evidence of wear, kinks, cracks, weathering, or leaks.
Make sure connections and clamps are secure.
Latches and catches
Proper finish and ease of operation.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, cracks, breaks, burrs, dents, and bent pins.
No loose or missing hardware.
Levels
Properly installed.
No evidence of corrosion, cracks, broken glass and rust.
Inspect for security of mounting, liquid level, bubble size, and correct
adjustment.
Lubrication points
Properly installed.
Check for insufficient or excessive lubricant.
Inspect for missing or broken fittings.
Properly installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, scratches or cracks.
Inspect for correct attachment, overheating, missing parts, cleanliness,
security and legibility of nameplates, markings, and equipment placards.
Motors
Mounting hardware
Properly installed.
respect equipment for secure attachment and for loose or missing nuts, bolts,
screws, washers, rivets, clamps, lockwiring, etc.
Nameplates, markings and placards
Properly installed.
Inspect for clarity, legibility, and secure attachment.
Insure that information is correct and up to date.
Painted or finished surfaces
Properly painted or finished surfaces.
No evidence of cracks, chips, scratches, blisters, or peeling.
Inspect for proper color, and general condition around welded areas and areas
likely to be damaged during handling.
Pins
Securely installed.
Inspect for missing or improperly installed pins.
Inspect all alinement, attachment, and holding pins for rust, corrosion, wear,
burrs, cracks, bends, chafing, and general condition.
Preservation
Inspect for adequate preservation against rust, corrosion, dirt, fungus, and
damage from handling, shipping, or storage. Consult MIL-P-116 if unit is
to be placed in shipment or storage.
Retaining-ring grooves
No evidence of rust, corrosion, burrs, nicks and dents.
3-3
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 3-1. Visual Mechanical Inspection Guide - Typical - Continued
Part
Condition
Safetywiring
Properly installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, broken wires, and damage which could affect
security.
Inspect for proper orientation and proper tension.
Seals and gaskets
Proper cure dates (where applicable) and installation.
No missing seals or gaskets.
No evidence of breaks, leaks, wear, or resiliency.
Shafts
Securely installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, wear, chafing, cracks, burrs, and bends.
Pay special attention to the finish of bearing surfaces.
Shields
Properly installed.
No evidence of paint or finish cracks, chips, scratches, rust, corrosion,
peeling, or oxidation.
Inspect for bends, cracks, breaks (especially on welds), security, correct
adjustment, and hardware.
Springs
Properly installed.
No missing springs.
No evidence of cracks or breaks.
Proper tension, compression or torque.
Stops and limiting devices
Proper assembly and adjustment.
Any condition which might affect spring operation.
No evidence of rust, corrosion or missing parts.
Threaded holes
No evidence of rust, corrosion, plugged holes, stripped or damaged threads.
Proper inserts are used.
Tubing
Properly installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, cracks, leaks, clamps, fittings and bends are
properly installed.
Valves and manifolds
Proper finish and installation.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, missing parts, leaks, nicks, burrs, damaged
threads or fittings.
Windows
Properly installed.
No evidence of cracked or broken glass, missing or broken seals, and
discoloration.
Inspect for cleanliness and general condition.
Wire cables
Properly installed.
No evidence of rust, corrosion, broken strands, kinks, flat spots, necked -down
areas, and separations.
Inspect for security of attachment, and lubrication.
3-4
C4 TM 9--1425-525-12-4
with lines of the same size, material, and configuration
as those removed. Inspect the shoulders of the fittings
for scoring and grit before installing a new line. Use
lubricant only on male threads when installing lines. Do
not tighten fittings more than prescribed for their specific
size (table 3-2). Over- tightening will weaken the joint or
cause leakage.
c. Backlash Measuring. Use two thickness
gages (3, fig. 3-1), one on either side of the gear tooth
as shown in figure 3-1, to determine the backlash. Add
the thickness of the two gages for the total backlash
clearance.
(2) Cleanliness. Take the necessary precautions
to prevent contamination of the hydraulic fluid. Keep
storage and handling containers sealed and clean. Use
storage and handling containers only for hydraulic fluid.
Filter fluid that has been exposed to dust or other
impurities. Do not reuse badly contaminated hydraulic
fluid. (3) Deist plugs. Install the dust plugs immediately
upon removal of the hydraulic lines or couplings. Keep
the dust plugs in a clean, closed container until ready for
use. Check the dust plugs for cleanliness and condition
of threads before using.
(4) Contamination. Impurities in the hydraulic
fluid affect the performance of a hydraulic unit in the
following ways:
(a) Contamination causes the pumps to
score or seize.
(b) Contamination lodges in the valves,
retarding or preventing their proper function.
(c) Contamination collects in the fluid lines,
restricting normal flow.
(d) Solid particles clog small openings,
preventing development of required operating pressures.
(e) Sediment fills the grooves of the pistons
and spools, increasing static friction between moving
parts and impairing the operation of the unit.
Table 3-2. Tubing F7ared-Fittigl Torque Specifications
Tube od (inches)
3/16
1/4
5/16
3/8
1/2
5/8
3/4
1.00
(5) Preformed packings and seals. Discard all
reformed packings and seals immediately upon
disassembly of the hydraulic components. Use only new
ones when assembling the hydraulic components Coat
them with a thin film of hydraulic oil before installation.
Use a preformed packing installation tool when available;
otherwise slip a tube of paper over the threads or
grooves to protect the preformed packing or seal during
installation.
Torque (inch-pounds) (max)
Aluminum alloy
Steel
55
100
125
250
350
500
750
65
65
120
150
250
90
3-5. Spot Painting
CAUTION
Do not paint weather seals, gaskets,
any
other
sealing
or
material.
Paint causes sealing
material to deteriorate and leak.
a. Painting Don’ts. Certain basic precautions in
the application of paint, varnish, enamel, and lacquer are
generally applicable. The following should be observed
at all times:
(6) Containers.
Use clean, plastic parts
containers to hold and protect the parts from damage or
loss during the repair or replacement of the hydraulic
components. Prevent parts from striking against each
other. Completely immerse the metal parts in the
hydraulic fluid when they must remain in a container for
more than four hours.
(1) Don’t paint over an unclean surface. Be
sure that all dirt, rust, scale, etc. Are removed.
(2) Don’t fail to stir paint thoroughly.
(3) Don’t mix one paint with another unless
instructed to do so.
(4) Don’t fail to follow instructions which
may appear on containers, particularly with respect to
the addition of thinner and application instructions
(5) Don’t apply paint or varnish unless the
drying conditions are satisfactory.
(6) Don’t paint in wet or extremely cold
weather (below 50 F).
(7) Female fittings. Install a male fitting or a rigid
plug to prevent collapse or distortion of the shoulder
when using a wrench on an extended shoulder of a
female fitting.
(8) Removal and replacement of hydraulic lines.
Replace
defective
hydraulic
lines immediately
3-5
C4 TM 9--1425-525-12-4
(15) Don’t use electrical connections that
show any inclination to become loose or to arc.
(16) Don’t pour paint out of a container in
a manner that obscures the label.
(17) Don’t fail to strain paint before using
if needed.
(18) Don’t fail to remove all traces of wax
from surfaces where paint or varnish is to be used.
(19) Don’t paint without proper
ventilation.
(20) Don’t waste paint by spraying
beyond the item being coated.
(21) Don’t paint over a moist or wet
surface.
(22) Make sure paint does not come
between the ground strap and the chassis.
(23) Avoid paint on operator-instruction
plates and faces of gages and meters.
b. Touchup Painting.
(1) General. When material has spots
from which the protecting paint has disappeared and
the rest of the paint surface is in a satisfactory
condition, it is often advantageous to do a touchup
rather than a complete painting job. The bare spots
may have been caused by natural wear or abrasion,
mechanical injury, rust or corrosion of the surface
under the original paint, or other causes. In such
cases, it is necessary to clean the material beneath
the spots and repaint, using a method as near as
possible to that used on the original paint job.
Figure 3-1. Backlash measuring - typical.
Figure 3-1. Backlash measuring typical
(2) Cleaning. The spots to be painted must
be thoroughly cleaned so that no decay, dirt, rust,
corrosion, etc., remains. The remaining paint should
also be worked down to a feather-edge if it is desirable to
hide the lap.
(7) Don’t apply abnormally heavy coats.
(8) Don’t add too much thinner.
(9) Don’t use paint buckets, cans, paint
rollers, spray guns, or brushes which are not clean.
(3) Painting. While touchup painting may
be (clone by the brush method, spraying is superior,
because the edges of the new paint can be feathered out
to blend with the old surface and, if the old and new
colors match, the areas of new paint will not be
noticeable. In touchup work, it is of course necessary to
use such fillers, undercoats, finish coats, etc., as are
required by the material being painted and to insure that
the composition of the paint coating is the same.
(10) Don’t apply cold paints or varnishes.
(11) Don’t leave old paint- and oil-soaked
clothes lying around in the paint shop. They are a fire
hazard.
(12) Don’t fail to clean brushes, paint rollers,
and spray guns immediately after using.
(13) Don’t smoke when painting.
c. Touchup and Refinishing Procedure.
(1) When touching up damaged areas, the
procedure should be as similar to the original method of
finishing as possible. A very clean surface is imperative.
A spray gun will blend
(14) Don’t release the tops of pressure-feed
material containers before releasing the air pressure.
3-6
CTTM 9-1425-525-12-4
painted areas better than a brush. However, touch- up by brushing usually will be satisfactory on assemblies.
(2) If the undercoat has been damaged, carefully wipe the area to be refinished with dry- cleaning solvent or mineral
spirits paint thinner, apply primer, and allow to dry.
(3) When an invisible lap is required, the edges of the
damaged area should be smooth or "feathered in" with
flint paper to remove all ridges and carefully wiped with
solvent or thinner before the primer and top coat are
applied.
(4) If the old finish is in generally good condition,
carefully clean the surface with a cleaning solvent or
thinner and apply the top coat.
(5) Where general disintegration of the surface is
evident or the under surface is corroded, the film must
be stripped clean from the start. Corrosion must be
removed or neutralized by- typical mechanical or
chemical treatment or by utilizing both methods. If
necessary, the surfaces must be
pretreated (anodized or phosphatized) before the
required finish is applied.
Figure 3-2. Operation of torque Wrench and tensiometer
tester - typical.
NOTE
A large variation between readings
indicates that the operator is not
pulling the torque wrench correctly.
CAUTION
Optical elements, bearings, rubber, or other
components, which might be damaged by
stripping materials or procedures, must be
removed from the instrument before
stripping the coatings.
e. Average three or more of the differences recorded to
find the amount of error in the torque wrench.
f. Refer to table 3-3 for the torque wrenches used in the
improved HAWK system.
3-6. Operation of the Torque Wrench and
Tensiometer Tester
3-7. Drills, Countersinks, Extractors, and Pipe
Thread Sizes
NOTE
The key numbers shown below in
parentheses refer to figure 3-2.
Refer to table 3-4 for the types and capacities.
b. Pull the torque wrench slowly and smoothly in
a
clockwise direction until the pointer (5) of the tester reads
within 2 percent of the preset value.
3-8. Safetywiring
Certain structural fasteners undergo extreme stress.
These fasteners must be safety wired to prevent the
slightest rotation. Figure 3-3 illustrates a common
technique for safety wiring two hexagon-head capscrews
together. The safety wire (9505-00-555-8648) can also
be secured through a hole to some convenient structural
member. Keep the fastener, and wire accordingly.
c. The torque wrench meter should now indicate
not, record the difference.
’
wrench
a. Place the torque wrench (2) on the torque
tensiometer tester (1), and adjust the
torque wrench
meter (3) to the desired setting. in mind the direction of
rotation which tightens
0;
if
CAUTON
If structural fasteners are wired in the
wrong direction, they will loosen and
serious damage may result.
d. Repeat the above steps two times.
3-7
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 3-3. Torque Wrenches
Item
Where
carried
Part number
Description
Values
1.Electro-mechanical shops 6, 8
5120-585-8434 Rigid frame end drive style,
w/visual dial indicating torque
mechanism, 1/4-in. male square
drive
0-75 pound-inches
2.Ground
5120-776-1841
equipment
test shop
(GETS)
0-300 pound-inches
3.Electro-mechanical shops 6, 8
5120-640-6364 Rigid frame end drive style,
w/right adapter, w/visual dial
indicating torque mechanism,
1/2-in. square drive
Rigid frame end drive style,
w/visual dial indicating torque
mechanism 3/8-in. male square
drive
Figure 3-3. Safetywiring of structural fasteners - typical.
3-8
0-175 pound-feet
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 3-4. Drills, Countersinks, Extractors, and Pipe Thread Sizes
Item
1. Drills
Fraction or
drill size
Number
site drills
80
79
1/64
78
77
76
75
74
73
72
71
70
69
68
1/32
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
3/64
55
54
53
1/16
52
51
50
49
48
5/64
47
46
45
35
34
33
32
31
4-32
44
43
42
3/3241
40
39
38
37
36
7/64
0.1100
0.1110
0.1130
0.1160
0.1200
Decimal
equivalent
0.0135
0.0145
0.0156
0.0160
0.0180
0.0200
0.0210
0.0225
0.0240
0.0250
0.0260
0.0280
0.0292
0.0310
0.0312
0.0320
0.0330
0.0350
0.0360
0.0370
0.0380
0.0390
0.0400
0.0410
0.0420
0.0430
0.0465
0.04690
0.0520
0.0550
0.0595
0.0625
0.0635
0.0670
0.0700256, 64
0.0730
0.0760
0.0781
0.07853-48
0.0810
0.0820356,
0.0860
0.0890
0.0935
0.0937
0.0960
0.0980
0.0995
0.1015
0.1040
0.1065
0.1093
Tap
Thread
size
Diameter
body
.80
1-56
1-64, 72
4-36
4-40
4-48
5-40
5-44
6-32
6-36
6-40
3-9
Included
angle
Screw
Drill
Extractor
Guide
TM 9- 1425-525-12-4
Table 3-4. Drills, Countersinks, Extractors, and Pipe Thread Sizes - Continued
1. Cont
Fraction or
drill size
Decimal
equivalent
Number
size drills
1/80.1250
30
29
0.1285
0.1360
28
9/64
27
26
25
24
23
5/32- 22
21
20
19
18
11/64
17
16
15
14
13
3/16
12
11
10
9
8
7
13/64
6
5
4
3
7/322
1
Letter
size drills
A
15/64
B
C
D
1/4 -E
F
G
17164
H
I
J
K
9/32L
M
19/64
N
0.1405
0.1406
0.1440
0.1470
0.149510-24
0.1520
0.1540
0.1562
0.1570
0.1590
0.1610
0.1660
0.1695
0.1719
0.1730
0.177012-24
0.1800
0.1820
0.1850
0.1875
0.1890
0.1910
0.1935
0.1960
0.1990
0.20101/420
0.2031
0.2040
0.2055
0.2090
0.21301/428
0.2187
0.22i0
0.2280
Tap
body
Thread
angle
Diameter
8-32,
36
8-20
10-30
10-32
12-28
12-32
0.2340
0.2344
0.2380
0.2420
0.2460
0.2500
0.25705/1618
0.2610
0.2656
0.2660
0.27205/1624
0.2770
0.2810
0.2812
0.2900
0.2950
0.2968
0.3020
3-10
Included
Screw
Drill
Extractor
Guide
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Table 3-4. Drills, Countersinks, Extractors, and Pipe Thread Sizes - Continued
Item
1. Cont.
Fraction or
drill size
Letter
size drills
5/160
P
21/64
Q
R
11/32S
T
23/64
U
3/8
V
W
25/64
X
Y
13/32Z
27/64
7/16
29/64
15/3231/64
1/2
33/64
17/3235/64
9/1637/64
19/3239/64
5/841/64
21/3243/64
11/1645/64
23/3247/64
3/449/64
25/3251/6413/1653/64 27/3255/64 7/8
57/64 2913259/64
1511661/64 31/3263/64 1
Decimal
equivalent
0.31253/8-16
0.3160
0.3230
0.3281
0.33203/8-24
0.3390
0.3437
0.3480
0.3520
0.3594
0.36807/1614
0.3750
0.3770
0.3860
0.39067/1t"20
0.3970
0.4040
0.4062
0.4130
0.42191/2-13
0.4375
0.45311/2-20
0.4687
0.48449/1612
0.5000
0.5153
0.5312
0.5469
0.5625
0.5781
0.5937
Tap
Thread
size
Diameter
body
9/16-18
5/8-11
5/8-18
11/1611
0.6094
0.625011/1616
0.6406
0.65623/4-10
0.6729
0.68253/4-16
0.7031
0.7187
0.7344
0.7500
0.76567/8-9
0.7812
0.7969
0.81257/8-14
0.8281
0.8437
0.8594
0.87501-8
0.8906
0.9082
0.9219
0.93751-12,
14
0.9531
0.9687
0.98441-1/8-7
1.0000
3-11
Included
angle
Screw
Drill
Extractor
Guide
TM 9- 1425-525-12-4
Table 3-4. Drills, Countersinks, Extractors, and Pipe Thread Sizes - Continued
Item
Fraction r
drill size
Decimal
equivalen
t
Tap
size
1. Cont.
Letter
size drills
1-3/64
1.0469
1-7/64
1-1/8
1-11/64-
1.1093
1.1250
1.1719
1-7/812
1-1/4-7
1-7/321-1/4
1-16/64-
1.2187
1.2500
1.2968
1-11/321-3/8
1-27/64-
1.3437
1.3750
1.421911/2-12
1.5000
1-1/2 -
Thread
Diameter
body
Included
angle
3/8"
60
degrees
82
degrees
100
degrees
Drill
Extractor
Guide
1/4"
5/16"
3/8"
7/16"
1/2"
1/8"’
3/16"
1/4"
5/16"
11/32"
1/4"
5/16"
3/8"
7/16"
1/2"
9/32"
5/16"
3/8"
7/16"
1/2"
1-11412
1-3/8-6
1-3/812
1-1/2-6
2. Countersinks
3/8"
3/8"
3. Extractors
4. Pipe
thread
sizes
Screw
1/8-27
2/8-18
3/8-18
R
7/16"
37/64"
1/2-14
3/4-14
111-1/2
1-1/8-11/2"
11-1/2
1-1/211-1/2
211-1/2
2-1/8-8
3-8
3-1/2-8
4-8
23/32"
56/64"
15/27"
147/64"
2-7/32"
2-5/8"
3-1/4"
3-3/4"
*4-1/4"
3-12
C4 TM 9-1425--52-12-4
CHAPTER 4
EQUIPMENT SERVICING
4-1. General
When a new or reconditioned major item of the HAWK air-defense
guided-missile system is first received by the using organization, it is
the responsibility of the officer-in-charge to determine whether the
materiel has been properly prepared for service, and to ensure that
it is in condition to perform its assigned mission when placed in
service. For this purpose, a visual inspection will be made of all
major components, assemblies, subassemblies, and accessories to
make sure that they are present, properly assembled, secured, and
clean. Equipment records will be checked to determine that the
major item has been correctly adjusted and lubricated.
4-2. Air Conditioner Filter Servicing
a. The air filter may be checked by noting the air flow in the
shelter during operation of the air conditioner. If the air flow appears
to be dropping, check the filter for sand or dust.
b. The air filter may be cleaned by using the following
method:
NOTE
Refer to figure 4-1 for removal of the air filter
from the air conditioner.
1-Turnlock fastener
2-Front panel
3-Filter clip
4-Filter
Figure 4-1. Replacement of the air conditioner filter
typical.
WARNING
Failure to perform steps (1) and (2)
below may cause injury to personnel.
(1) Provide adequate ventilation when using
the dry-cleaning solvent.
4-3. Servicing the Radar, Launcher, and HighFrequency Console Air Filter
(2) Wear protective rubber gloves during
the cleaning operation, and avoid contact with the eyes.
Clean the air filter as described in paragraph 4-2b above.
(3) Immerse the air filter in dry-cleaning
solvent (TM 740-1525, table D-1), and wash thoroughly.
NOTE
Refer to figure 4-2 to remove the air
filter
from
the
high-frequency
console.
(4) Place the filter face down until dry.
(5) Apply a light coat of lubricating oil (TM
740-1525, table D-1) to the filter.
4-1
TM 9-1425-525-12-4C1
Replace with stainless steel type filters
NOTE
The filter elements must be inspected
for damage. If damaged, they must be
replaced.
Spare
elements
are
contained in filter assembly repair kit
5959133.
NOTE
The filter assembly (3) need not be
removed from its mount to clean the
filter elements.
b. Clean the filter elements as shown in figure 4-4.
c. Connect the quick-disconnects (4) to the filter
assembly (3).
d.
Fill the cooling system.
1-Turnlock fastener
2-Grille’- /
3-Filter
Figure 4-2. Replacement of the high-frequency console
air filter - typical.3
4-4. Servicing the Filter Elements of the Liquid
Coolant Filter Assembly
1--Filler cap
2-Draincock
3-Filter assembly
4--Quick-disconnects
5-Indicator valve knob
6--Sight tube
7-Bypass indicator
Figure 4-3. Cooling system filler cap and indicator valve
- typical.
NOTE
The key numbers shown below in
parentheses refer to figure 4-3.
a. Disconnect the quick-disconnects (4) from
the filter assembly (3).
4-2
TM 9-1425-525-12-4C4
Figure 4-4. Cleaning the filter elements in the liquid coolant filter assembly - typical.
4-3
TM 9-1425-525-12-4C4
Failure to perform the following four
steps may cause injury to personnel.
Failure to perform the following four
(5) Do not smoke in the vicinity of 1, 1, 1trichloroethane fumes. Hot glowing ash causes
breakdown and resultant hazardous gaseous products.
e. Check for proper coolant flow through the
filters while the system is operating by pressing and
releasing the bypass indicator (7) and noting that it does
not move more than 1/8-inch upward.
(6) Do not allow 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane to
vaporize in the presence of hot surfaces or ignition
sources as this can cause the emission of toxic
fumes.
4-5. Cleaning Parent Plates and Circuit Card
Modules
a. General. This paragraph provides a general
method for cleaning the parent plates and circuit card
modules contained in the major items of the
HAWK
system.
(7) Do not allow pockets of 1, 1, 1trichloroethane fumes to accumulate. Blow-dry the area
using the spray gun to blow air only.
(8) Provide adequate ventilation as 1, 1, 1trichloroethane vapors are anesthetic and can cause
stupor, sleepiness, or unawareness. Eye irritation and
dizziness are signs of inadequate ventilation.
Respiratory protection must be provided in event of
spillage in closed spaces. Avoid prolonged or repeated
contact with skin. Unprotected personnel must be
evacuated immediately.
b. Preparation.
Failure to perform step (1) below may
cause injury to personnel.
(9) Fill the spray gun container with 1, 1, 1trichloroethane (TM 740-1525, table D-1) and ad- just it
for a fine spray.
(1) Deenergize the appropriate major item
per the applicable TM.
c. Parent Plate Cleaning
(2) For the ICC, PCP, and BCC open the
shelter main entrance door. Additionally for the ICC and
PCP make sure that the ADP exhaust vent on the shelter
roof and the ADP intake
vents on the rear and
side of the shelter are open.
assembly exercising
caution to avoid damaging
(3) Place a portable
electric fan in the shelter
and connect it to an
external power source. Position the fan to blow air out
through the open shelter door.
(1) Gain access to the particular parent
plate assembly exercising caution to avoid damaging
any surrounding assemblies. If a parent plate can be
readily removed to an open work area, it would be
advisable to do so.
(2) Place a highly absorbent cellulose
wiping towel (TM 740-1525, table D-1) or equivalent, at
the bottom of the parent plate to be cleaned.
NOTE
If paint spraying equipment is not
available,
12-ounce
aerosol
containers of 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane
(TM 740-1525, table D-1) may be used.
Failure to perform steps (3) and (4)
be- low may cause equipment
damage.
(4) Turn on the electrically driven air
compressor for the paint sprayer, and adjust the
pressure from 18 to 40 psi maximum.
(3) Do not use a brush or wipe areas of the
parent plates as this may cause damage to pins or
wirewraps.
4-4
C4 TM 9--1425--525-12(4) Keep 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane away from the blower
bearings or drawer slides as the lubricant may dissolve.
(5) Spray an even coat of 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane over a small
section (about six inches square) of the parent plate allowing
each section to become reasonably dry before proceeding .
This
become reasonably dry before proceeding. This is
necessary when working inside a shelter to prevent an
excessive concentration of vapors. When working on an
unenclosed major item, e.g. the
IHIPIR, this requirement
may be relaxed. Spray
the plate from top to bottom.
Failure to perform the following step may
cause equipment damage.
(8) Do not immerse a circuit card module in the solvent for
extended periods of time. If not thoroughly cleaned within a
two-minute process time, allow the module to dry for a
minimum of three hours, preferably 24 hours, before
recleaning.
d. Circuit Card Module Cleaning.
(9) Immerse the cleaned module in the second bucket and
gently agitate it to assure thorough rinsing. Immersion time
should be about 30 seconds.
(10) Allow the module to dry on a suitable rack or fixture.
Failure to perform steps (1), (2), and (3)
below may cause injury to personnel.
(1) Wear Buna-N rubber gloves, or equivalent,
the cleaning operation.
(11) While the module is drying, remove the next module, and
perform steps (6) through (10).
during
(12) Replace the previously dried module and repeat the steps
sequentially so that only two modules are removed at one
time, the module being dried and the module being cleaned.
(2) Avoid contact with the eyes and inhalation of fumes
when working with 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane.
(13) When the first bucket containing the initial cleaning
solution becomes very dirty, as evidenced by the amount of
dirt being carried into the second bucket, safely discard the
solution. Rinse the bucket with a small amount of fresh 1, 1,
1-trichloroethane, and discard the solution. Refill the bucket
with the proper amount of clean 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane. This
bucket now contains therinse solution while the former second
bucket now contains the initial cleaning solution.
(3) Pouring of solvent and cleaning of modules
should
be performed outside the shelter, or as close to the open
shelter door as possible, for optimum
ventilation.
(4) Pour 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane into two four
gallon,
corrosion-resistant, steel buckets (TM
740-1525, table
D-1) or equivalent, to a depth sufficient to cover a typical
circuit card module. The contents of the first bucket will be
used as a cleaning
solution while the contents of the
second bucket will be used as a rinsing solution.
NOTE
Refer to paragraph 2-6 for removal and
installation of typical modules.
4-6. Drawer Slide Cleaning and Lubrication
a. General. This paragraph provides a general method for
cleaning and lubricating the drawer slides contained in the
major items of the HAWK system.
Materials Required
1, 1, 1
1-gal. can
6810-00-664-0387
Trichlor5-gal. can
6810-00-664-0388
oethane
55-gal. drum
6810-00-551-1487
Lubricant,
6-oz. spray can
9150-00-9036431
Dry Film
Brush,
2 1/2 in. round
7290-00-685-3980
14 1/2 in. long
7290-00-178-8315
Brush, Varnish
2 in. wide
8020-00-889-7918
(or Equivalent) 1 in. wide
8020-00-260-1306
(5) Remove the circuit card module from the area being
cleaned, such as the DTO No. 1 drawer,
noting the
manner in which the modules are removed to ensure proper
replacement.
(6) Dip the module into the first bucket of 1, 1, 1trichloroethane.
(7) Brush the module clean using a one-inch soft nylon bristle
varnish brush (TM 740-1525, table D-l), or equivalent, being
careful to avoid component damage. Immersion time should
be limited to about one
minute. Remove and examine the
module. Reclean, as required, restricting additional immersion
time to 30
seconds.
Absorbent material, rubber gloves, protective eye covering and respirators as required.
4-5
TM 9-1425-525-12wC4
The fumes of trichloroethane are toxic. Refer to the trichloroethane warning located below for handling
procedures and corrective actions.
Item (NSN/APN)
Care and handling procedures
Methyl chloroform
1, 1, 1- trichloroethane
Flammable. Avoid heat, sparks, and
open flames.
Excessive inhalation can cause drowsiness, dizziness, drunkenness, unconsciousness, and death at extreme
doses.
Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin. Wear protective gloves.
to 15 minutes.
Avoid contact with eyes. Do not wear
contact lenses when working with
this material. Wear safety goggles.
Avoid swallowing. Do not induce vomiting.
Corrective action
Use CO;
or dry chemical extinguisher.
Remove victim to fresh air. If not
breathing, perform artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give
oxygen. Get medical attention.
Wash skin promptly and thoroughly
with flowing water or shower for 5
Flush eyes promptly with water for
5 to 15 minutes.
Get medical
attention.
(2) Do not smoke in the vicinity of 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane fumes. Hot glowing ash causes breakdown
and resultant hazardous gaseous products.
The following procedure
performed
in
a
dry,
environment.
(3) Do not allow 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane to vapor- ize in
the presence of hot surfaces or ignition sources as this
can cause the emission of toxic fumes.
must be
dust-free
(4) Do not allow pockets of 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane fumes
to accumulate. Blow-dry the area using the spray gun to
blow dry air only.
NOTE
This procedure is not intended to be
used on those
slides located inside
shelters that have filtered air
inputs,
i.e., the BCC, ICC/PCP and the shops.
(5) Provide adequate ventilation as 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane vapors are anesthetic and can cause
stupor, sleepiness, or unawareness. Eye irritation and
dizziness are signs of inadequate ventilation. Respiratory protection must be provided in the event of spill- age
in closed spaces. Avoid prolonged or repeated contact
with skin. Unprotected personnel must be evacuated
immediately.
b. Preparation.
c. Drawer Slides Cleaning and Lubrication.
Failure to perform the following five
steps may cause injury to personnel.
(1) Deenergize the appropriate major item per
applicable TM.
(1) Remove the drawer from the major item in
accordance with the applicable TM’s or accepted procedures.
the
4-6
C5 TM 9-1425-525-12-4
dust or sand storms, (3) after prolonged nonenvironmentally controlled storage and (4) whenever
abrasive contaminants are visible on slide components.
(11) This procedure should be repeated
only when necessary. Inspect slide components at least
semiannually. If defective, replace slide. If there is
insufficient lubricant or mechanical operation of the slide
is difficult, clean and lubricate per this procedure.
The following procedure uses trichloroethane in a
confined space. Use gloves,
sleeves, aprons, eye
protection, and respirators as necessary.
NOTE
4-7. Cleaning Procedure for LED Contacts
On those slide components that are impractical to
remove from either the major item or the drawer, follow
the same procedure, but do not remove the slide
components.
Use a paint or varnish brush, or
equivalent, and a sufficient amount of trichloroethane to
ensure proper cleaning. Use highly absorbent mateensure proper cleaning. Use highly absorbent material
25,
(e.g., a cellulose wiping towel, TM 740-15 table D-1),
or equivalent, to ensure that excessive trichloroethane
does not collect inside the major item or drawer.
(2) Remove the slide components of the
drawer and major item.
(3) Pour a sufficient amount of 1, 1, 1trichloroethane (TM 740-1525, table D-1) into the
corrosion-resistant metal containers to cover the slide
components.
(4) Thoroughly wash the slide components
in the first container and rinse in the second container.
When the trichloroethane in the first container becomes contaminated, properly discard it. Rinse the
container with fresh trichloroethane and refill. Use the
new trichloroethane as the rinse and the previous
rinse solution as the wash solution.
(5) Ensure that all components are
thoroughly dry by either allowing sufficient time for air
drying or
blow dry using clean dry air.
(6) Spray on a coat of the dry film lubricant,
ensuring that all track surfaces are coated. Ensure
that all ball or roller bearing surfaces are coated. Allow
lubricant to dry per instructions on the dry film
lubricant container or until completely dry to the touch.
(7) Reassemble the slide components on
the drawer and major item.
(8) Replace the drawer in the major item.
(9) Once this procedure has been
performed, fur- ther cleaning should be limited to blowing
with dry compressed air. If compressed air is not
available,
clean with a soft brush.
(10) Slides should be cleaned with
compressed air or a soft brush: (1) after field movement,
(2) after
a. General This paragraph provides a general
method for cleaning light emitting diodes (LED) contacts.
This cleaning procedure should be performed whenever
a new LED is installed or if an LED flickers.
b. Preparation.
Failure to perform the following four
steps may cause injury to personnel.
(1) Deenergize the appropriate major item
console per the applicable TM.
(2) Do not smoke in the vicinity of 1, 1, 1trichloroethane fumes. Hot glowing ash causes
breakdown and resultant hazardous gaseous products.
(3) Do not allow 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane to
vaporize in the presence of hot surfaces as this can
cause the emission of toxic fumes.
(4) Provide adequate ventilation as 1, 1, 1trichloroethane vapors are anesthetic and can cause
stupor, sleepiness, or unawareness. Eye irritation and
dizziness are signs of inadequate ventilation. Respira
tory protection must be provided in event of spillage in
closed spaces. Avoid prolonged or repeated contact with
skin. Unprotected personnel must be evacuated
immediately.
c. Procedure.
Not all indicator holders are interchangeable with
indicator receptacles. Failure to use the correct parts
may cause damage to either indicator holder or indicator
receptacle.
4-7
TM 9-1425-525-124
Once the LED contact button (4, fig. 4-5) and LED
contact (5, fig. 4-5) are spray cleaned with 1, 1, 1trichloroethane, pre- vent contact with your
fingers.
NOTE
The key numbers shown below in parentheses
refer to figure 4-5.
(1) Remove indicator holder (1) from the indicator receptacle (2).
(2) Remove burnt-out or flickering LED(s) (3) from indicator holder.
(3) Clean the new or flickering LED contact button (4) by stroking it
with 600 grit emery cloth eight to 10 times.
(4) Check the LED contact button for any pointed surfaces. If any
pointed surface is found, round off using 600 grit emery cloth.
(5) Spray clean the LED contact button using 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane
(TM 740-1525, table D-1).
(6) Visually examine LED contacts (5) for evidence of wear. LED
contacts that do not have defined contact cup edges must be
replaced.
(7) Spray clean the LED contacts using 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane.
(8) Visually examine LED contacts for discoloration. LED contacts
that are discolored must be cleaned using a contact file.
(9) Spray clean the LED contact assembly (6) (both top and bottom
sides) using 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane.
(10) Install LED(s) into indicator holder (1).
(11) Install indicator holder into indicator receptacle.
(12) Press the appropriate console LAMP TEST indicator-switch to
ensure proper operation of LED.
(13) If LED still flickers, replace LED and perform steps c(1) through
(5) and (10) through (12) above.
(14) If LED still flickers after performing step
(13) above, replace LED contact assembly (6).
Figure 4-5. Indicator-switch assembly-typical,
4-8
C5 TM 9-1425-525-12-4
CHAPTER 5
HANDLING PROCEDURES FOR ELECTROSTATIC
DISCHARGE SENSITIVE ITEMS
5-1. General
a. This chapter provides general instructions on
the
proper handling of electrostatic discharge sensitive
(ESDS) items (modules) used in the HAWK system.
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is the transfer of
electrostatic charge between items at different
electrostatic potentials, either by direct contact of
indirectly via an electronic field. Modules containing
ESDS devices can be damaged or destroyed by ESD
voltages as low as 20 volts. Materials that are prime
generators of electrostatic voltages include common
plastics such as polyethylene, vinyls, foam, polyurethane,
synthetic textiles, fiberglass, glass, rubber,
and
numerous other commonly used materials. Sliding,
rubbing or separation of these materials may cause them
to generate electrostatic voltages of up to
15,000
volts. Personnel can also generate electrostatic charges
(up to 30, 000 volts) depending on the nature of
the
ground, the presence of paint or carpets, and the type of
clothing and shoes worn.
c. All packaging of completed assemblies containing
ESDS items must be clearly marked with a cautionary
label. The materials used for the cautionary label must
neither generate nor store electrostatic charges (refer to
table 5-1).
5-3. Test and Installation of ESDS Items
During test and installation of ESDS items, it is important
to follow these guidelines.
a. When removing or installing printed wiring assemblies
containing ESDS items, antistatic personnel wrist-straps
must be grounded to the equipment
b. The effects of ESD on electrical and electronic
items are not generally recognized because:
assembly or system. The power must be off during
(1) Failures due to ESD are often analyzed as removal or
installation to prevent transient voltages being caused by
electrical overstress due to transients other than static;
(2) Failures caused by ESD are often incorrectly
categorized as random, unknown, infant mortality,
manufacturing defect, or other, due to improper depth of
failure analysis;
(3) Few failure analysis laboratories are equipped with
scanning electron microscopes or other equipment and
technology required to trace failures
to ESD.
5-2.
work that accompanies the ESDS item or assembly must
stay outside the protective container or be placed inside
its own antistatic container. The ESDS item must remain
in its protective container until ready for use or
inspection. When storing ESDS items, the storage site
selected must be well away from sources of
electromagnetic and electrostatic fields. Table 5-1 lists
materials required for proper handling of ESDS items.
b. ESDS item leads or connector terminals should not
be probed by multimeters. When a multimeter must be
used, touch ground with electrical test equipment probes
before probing the ESDS item.
c. Both complete and incomplete assemblies containing
ESDS items must be wrapped, covered or bagged with
antistatic material and have an ESD label or tag attached
whenever they are not being
worked on.
Table 5-1. Materials Required for Handling ESDS Items
Handling Procedures for ESDS Items
a. The personnel responsible for handling ESDS
must receive training for proper handling.
Item
items
b. When transporting or storing ESDS items
or
assemblies containing ESDS items, antistatic
bags,
antistatic trays, or tote boxes lined with conductive
cushioning must be used, and an ESD label
must
be attached to the outer surface. The paper-
Personnel wrist strap
Cushioning (roll)
Antistatic bags
Label (MIL-STD-129)
Label (MIL-STD-129)
(5-2 blank) 5-1
National Stock Number
(NSN)
5895-01-134--9623
8135--01-057--3607
8105-01-120-3373
7960-01-077-4894
7960-01-077-1156
C5TM 9-1425-525-12-4
APPENDIX B
EXPENDABLE SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS LIST
b. Column 2-- Description. Indicates the Federal item
name and, if required, a description to identify the
item. The last line for each item indicates the part
number followed by the Federal Supply Code for
Manufacturer (FSCM) in parentheses, if applicable.
B- . Scope
This appendix lists expendable supplies and materials
you will need to operate and maintain the HAWK Missile
System. These items are authorized to you by CTA
50-970, Expendable Items (Except Medical, Class V,
Repair Parts, and Heraldic Items).
c. Column 3 - Unit of Measure (U/M). Indicates the
measure used in performing the actual maintenance
function. This measure is expressed by a two-character
alphabetical abbreviation (e.g., ea, in, pr). If the unit of
measure differs from the unit of issue, requisition the
lowest unit of issue that will satisfy your requirements.
B-2. Explanation of Columns
a. Column 1 - National Stock Number. This is the
National Stock Number assigned to the item; use it to
request or requisition the item.
B-1
TM 9-1425-S25-12-4C5
Expendable Supplies and Materials List
TM 9-1425-525-12-4
(1)
National stock
number
8040-00-290-4301
8040-00-270-8136
8040-00-515-2246
8040-00-664-4318
8040-00-543-7170
8040-00-721-9091
6810-00-205-6786
6810-00-286-5435
8020-00-051-7098
8020-00-889-7920
8305-00-965-1654
8305-00-943-0981
8030-00-292-1102
5350-00-221-0872
8030-00-850-7076
8010-00-225-7000
8030-00-919-9204
6850-00-174-9672
(2)
(3)
Description
U/M
Adhesive, MIL-A-5092 Type II (81349)
Adhesive, Epoxy, 1 qt, MIL-A-8623 Type 2 (81349)
Adhesive, MIL-A-5540 Type 2 (81349)
Adhesive, Syn-ru, Liquid Form, MIL-A-5092 Type 2
(81349)
Adhesive, Syn-ru, Liquid Form, 1 pt cn, MMA189
(81348)
Adhesive, Syn-ru, Liquid Form, 1 pt cn w/separate
catalyst, MIL-A-25457 (81349)
Alcohol, Denatured Type 111 O-E 760 (81348)
Alcohol, Isopropyl, Technical, 1 gl cn, TT1735
Grade A (81348)
Brush, Photo (19139)
Brush, Varnish, Nylon Bristle, one-inch, .375 in.
thick, H-B-695 (81348)
Cloth, Coated Nylon, OD ru ctd both sides, oil,
water, flame, and weather resistant, .007 x 39 x 100
yd rl, MIL-C-20696 (81349)
Cloth, Satin, MrL-C-20296 (81349)ea
Compound, antiseize, Petrolatum Zinc Dust, 8 oz
MIL-T-22361 (81349)
Cloth, Abrasive, Crocus P-C-458 (81348)
Compound, Coating, Metal Pretreatment, MIL-P-15328
(81349)
Compound, Coating, MIL-L-3891F1 yel (81349)
Compound, Coating, 5 oz bt, MIL-S-14735 (18876)
Compound, Corrosion Removing, 1 gl bt MIL-M-10578
Type 2 (81349)
B-2
qt
kt
kt
pt
pt
pt
kt
qt
gl
ea
ea
yd
tu,
oz
sh
kt
qt
oz
gl
C5 TM 9-1425-525-124
Expendable Supplies and Materials List - Continued
(1)
National stock
number
8030-00-081-2339
8030-00-664-4019
8030-00-297-6677
8030-00-262-9041
8030-00-723-2746
6850-00-927-9461
7690-00-824-0501
6850-00-835-0484
6850-00-856-7955
6850-00-290-0042
6850-00-984-5853
6850-00-078-4459
9150-00-252-6383
9620-00-529-9629
9150-00-269-8255
9150-00-080-9652
9150-00-190-0905
(2)
(3)
Description
U/M
Compound, Sealing, Liquid Form, Red, 10 cc bt
MIL-S-22473GRA (81349)
Compound, Sealing, Liquid Syn-ru Base, Red, 1 pt cn,
MIL-S-4383 (81349)
Compound, Sealing, Semi-solid Syn-ru, w/separate
catalyst, 24oz base/lqt catalyst, MIL-S-8516-2
Method B (81349)
Compound, Sealing, Syn-ru, Paste Form, Black,
MIL-S-7124 (81349
Compound, Sealing, Syn-ru, Paste Form, 1 pt cn
base w/jar catalyst, MIL-S-8802CLB2 (81349)
Compound, Silicone, 5 oz tu, MIL-L-11137 (18876)
Decal, 9167662 (18876)
Deicing-Defroster Fluid, 0-D-00190 (81348)
Desiccant, Activated, MIL-D-3464 (81349)
Desiccant, Activated, 5 lb cn, MIL-D-3716 Type 4
Grade H (81349)
Cleaning Compound Solvent, 5 gl cn, MIL-C-81302
(81302)
Fluid, Heat Transfer, (Coolant Glycol) 5959151
(18876)
Fluid, Hydraulic, MIL-H-5606 Type 1 (81349)
Graphite, Dry Lubricant, MIL-G-6711 (81349)
Grease, Aircraft MIL-G-4343B (81349)
Grease, Silicone, MIL-L-15719 (81349)
Grease, Automotive and Artillery, 6.5 lb cn,
MIL-G-10924, (81349)
B-3
cc
pt
kt
kt
ea
oz
ea
cn
cn
cn
gl
gl
qt
ea
lb
tu
lb
TM 9-1425-525-12 4 C5
Expendable Supplies and Materials List - Continued
(1)
National stock
number
9150-00-985-7246
9150-01-040-1423
9150-00-753-4588
9150-00-223-4004
6850-00-109-4362
7510-00-145-0063
7510-00-224-6732
8040-00-078-5073
8040-01-048-2193
1430-00-983-3894
1430-00-076-1888
8010-00-166-3152
9150-00-948-6912
8030-00-838-7789
9150-01-078-9586
6810-00-275-6010
6810-00-292-9676
6810-00-281-2785
6810-00-223-9073
(2)
(3)
Description
U/M
Grease, Aircraft and Instrument, 1.75 lb
MIL-G-23827 (81349)
Grease, Molykote, 3 oz tu, FS-34512 (71984)
Grease, Silicone Insulated Electric Motor, G300
(01139)
Grease, Molybdenum Disulfide, 6.5 cn,
MIL-G-21164 (81349)
Grease, Silicone, MIL-S-13901 (18876)
Ink, Black, Liquid, Opaque, Stencil Marking, 1 oz
cn, MIL-I-43553 (81349)
Ink, White, Stencil Marking, TT-I-1795 (81348)
cn,
lb
oz
Kit, Adhesive, Hysol, 80055MG (73168)
Kit, Compound Hardener, Hysol Kit 6C (04347)
Kit, Fluid Press, 5957338 (18876)
Kit, Fluid Filter Repair, 5959133 (18876)
Lacquer, White, Lusterless, T-T-L-20 (81348)
Lubricant, Solid Film, MIL-L-46010 (81349)
Lubricant, Corrosion Preventive, 1 lb cn,
MIL-C-23411 (81349)
Lubricant, Fluorocarbon, 16 oz cn, MIL-L-60326
(81349)
Methanol, Technical, 5 gl cn, 0-M-232 (81348)
Methanol, Technical, 0-M-232 (81348)
Methyl, Ethyl, Ketone, Technical, 1 gl cn, TTM261
(81348)
Naphtha, Aromatic, 5 gl cn, TTN97 (81348)
kt
kt
kt
kt
qt
gl
B-4
oz
lb
Pt
oz
pt
lb
oz
gl
qt
gl
gl
Cs TM 9-142S-52S-12
Expendable Supplies and Materials List - Continued
(1)
National stock
number
9150-00-223-4116
9160-00-943-4691
9150-00-082-5636
9150-00-223-4129
9150-00-189-6727
9150-00-782-2627
9150-00-263-3490
9150-00-231-6689
9150-00-082-5636
9160-00-237-4777
5350-00-161-9044
6640-00-240-5851
9150-00-250-0926
8030-00-656-1032
8030-00-664-4968
7920-00-205-1711
4020-00-618-0261
4010-00-956-2871
(2)
(3)
Description
U/M
Oil, Gear Lubrication, Mineral Oil, Mineral Base,
Antifoam, 5 gl cn, MIL-L-6086 (81349)
Oil, Insulating, Electrical, 0S59 MIL-C-47220 Type 3
(81349)
Oil, Lubricating, Hydraulic, MIL-S-81087 (81349)
Oil, Lubricating Instrument, 1 qt cn (OAI),
MIL-L-6085 (81349)
Oil, Lubricating, MIL-L-2104 (81349)
Oil, Lubrication, Aircraft Turbine Engine, Synthetic
1 qt cn, MIL-L-7808 (81349)
Oil, Lubrication, General Purpose, Corrosion and
Oxidation Resistant, 1 qt cn, MIL-L-7870 (81349)
Oil, Lubrication, General Purpose, Corrosion and
Oxidation Resistant, 1 qt cn, (pl-Special), VVL800
(81348)
Oil, Silicone Fluid (F50), MIL-S-81087 (81349)
Oil, Insulating, Electrical, OS45 MIL-C-47220 Type 2
(81349)
Paper, Abrasive Backing, Closed Coating, 9Xll sh,
P-P-121 (81348)
Paper, Lens Cleaning, NNN-P-40 (81348)
Petrolatum, Technical, 1.75 lb cn, VV-P-236 (81348)
Preservative, Coating, Rubber, MIL-P-11520 (81349)
Putty, Zinc Chromate w/Asb Filler, 10 lb cn,
MIL-P-8116 (81349)
Rag, Wiping, Cotton, 50 lb be, DDD-R-30 (81348)
Rope, Fibrous, 300 ft per re, 9167894 (18876)
Rope, Wire MIL-C-5424 Size 1-4 (81349)
B-5
gl
gl
qt
qt
qt
qt
qt
qt
qt
gl
ea
hd
lb
gl
lb
lb
ft
ft
TM 9-1425-525-12—4 C5
Expendable Supplies and Materials List - Continued
(1)
National stock
number
8040-00-225-4548
3439-00-555-4629
(2)
(3)
Description
U/M
R.T.V. 102, 12 oz cn, MIL-A-46106 Type 1 (81349)
Sealing and Coating Compound, Corrosion Inhibitive
MIL-S-81733, Type I or Type II
Solder, Tin Alloy, QQ-S-571 or SN60WRP 0.032 1
(81348)
6850-00-597-9765
Solvent, Cleaning Compound, Petroleum Base, 1 qt cn,
MIL-C-18718 (81349)
6850-00-664-5685
5350-00-242-4405
8510-00-817-0295
9320-00-065-4326
Solvent, Dry Cleaning, P-D-680 (81348)
Steel Wool, FF-S-740 (81348)
Talcum Powder, U-T-30 (81349)
Tape, Adhesive, Rubber, 0.5 in wide, black, 100 ft
roll, 10105495-1 (18876)
Tape, Adhesive, Rubber, Syn, Black lw, Moisture
Proof, 9183590 (18876)
Tape, Insulating, 10066892 (18876)
Tape, Insulation, Electrical, MIL-I-24391 (81349)
Tape, Lacing and Tying, Nylon, Fungus Resistant,
500 yd sl, MIL-T-43435 Type 1 Fl (81349)
Tape, Lacing and Tying, MPD1508 (18876)
Tape, Lacing and Tying, , Plain Weave, Fl Braid
250 yd sl, MIL-T-43435 (81349)
Tape, Pressure Sensitive, Adhesive, Transparent
1-1/2w, 72 yd roll, 9086466 (18876)
9320-00-812-4218
5970-00-076-1885
5970-00-419-4290
4020-00-656-1125
4020-00-789-0802
4020-00-656-1257
7510-00-721-9756
8010-00-160-5787
8010-00-242-2089
8010-00-558-7026
Thinner, Dope and Lacquer, 1 gl cn, TT-T-266 (81348)
Thinner, Paint, Petroleum Spirits, 1 gl cn TT-T-291
(81348)
Thinner, Paint, 340 to 485 Deg F Distillation Range,
5 gl cn, TT-T-291 (81348)
B-6
oz
lb
lb
gl
qt
lb
cn
ft
ft
ea
ft
ro
yd
yd
yd
gl
gl
gl
C5 TM 9-1425-525-12-4
Expendable Supplies and Materials List - Continued
(1)
National stock
number
8310-00-559-5212
6810-00-281-2002
6810-00-664-0387
(2)
(3)
Description
U/M
8010-00-180-6345
5970-00-076-8988
8010-00-221-2809
Thread, Nylon, V-T-295 (81348)
Toluene, Technical, 1 gl cn, TT-T-548 (81348)
Trichloroethane 1, 1, 1 Technical, (Inhibited) 1 gl cn,
0-T-620 (81348)
Varnish, Oil, MIL-V-173 (81349)
Varnish, Insulating, Electrical, 9056163 (18876)
Varnish, Oil, TT-V-109 (81348)
gl
gl
ea
qt
6810-00-297-9540
8305-00-267-3009
9505-00-555-8648
6810-00-598-6600
Water, Distilled, O-B-41 (81348)
Webbing, Textile, MIL-W-4088 (81349)
Wire Safety, MS20995C47 (96906)
Xylene, Technical, 1 gl cn, TT-X-916 (81348)
gl
yd
sl
gl
B7 (B8 blank)
yd
gl
TM 9- 1425-525-12-4
APPENDIX A
REFERENCES
Refer to TM 9-1425-525-L for a list of other publications pertinent to this material and associated equipment.
A-1
TM 9-1425-525-12-4C4
By Order of the Secretary of the Army:
JOHN A. WICKHAM, LR.
General, United States Army
Chief of Staff
Official:
R. L. DILWORTH
Brigadier General, United States Army
The Adjutant General
Distribution:
To be distributed in accordance with DA Form 12-32, Operator, Organizational Maintenance requirements for HAWK
Missile System.
žU.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: IOU - 533-072/00103
PIN: 009747-000
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