qb3aoo04

qb3aoo04
IBM Network Station
IBM
IBM Network Station Manager
Installation and Use
November 1998
To view or print the latest update, go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
SC41-0664-02
IBM Network Station
IBM
IBM Network Station Manager
Installation and Use
November 1998
To view or print the latest update, go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
SC41-0664-02
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the information in “Appendix H.
Notices” on page 383.
Third Edition (November 1998)
This edition applies to version 1, release 3, modification 1 of IBM Network Station Manager (product number
5648-C05) and to all subsequent releases and modifications until otherwise indicated in new editions.
This edition replaces SC41-0664-01.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1998. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users — Documentation related to restricted rights — Use, duplication or disclosure is
subject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
About IBM Network Station Manager Installation
How to Use this Book . . . . . . . . . .
Who should read this book . . . . . . . .
Information Available on the World Wide Web . .
How to send your comments . . . . . . . .
and Use
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(SC41-0664)
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Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station .
What Is the Network Station? . . . . . . .
How Do Network Stations Work? . . . . . .
What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?
LAN Network Examples . . . . . . . .
MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnets and Subnet Masks . . . . . . .
Boot Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NVRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BOOTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TFTP or NFS for Boot File Service . . . . . .
Java on the Network Station . . . . . . . .
Windows Applications on the Network Station . .
Network Station Memory Requirements . . . .
Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments
Roaming User Example . . . . . . . .
Load Balancing Example . . . . . . . .
What is New in Release 3? . . . . . . . .
Moving from an Older Version? . . . . . . .
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Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station Environment
on a Microsoft Windows NT Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM Network Station Manager and Prerequisites . . . . . . . . .
Resolving Installation Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM Network Station Manager to Run Windows-based Applications . . .
Installing Citrix MetaFrame and Lotus SmartSuite 97 . . . . . . . . . .
Installing NCD WinCenter UIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM Network Station Manager Software Automatically Using a Response
File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Boot Server for Your Network Stations . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up Your Boot Server and Your Authentication Server . . . . . . .
Using DHCP on Your Boot Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using NVRAM on Your Boot Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Additional Software Components After the Initial Installation . . . . .
Installing IBM DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Microsoft DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the NDIS Intermediate Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the 128–Bit NC Navigator Browser . . . . . . . . . . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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iii
Configuring DHCP on the Windows NT Server Platform . . . . . . . . .
Configuring IBM DHCP on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Microsoft DHCP on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP for Multiple Servers on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . . .
Configuring IBM DHCP for Multiple Servers . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Microsoft DHCP for Multiple Servers . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Users and Groups for IBM Network Station Users . . . . . . .
Managing User Groups on a Stand-Alone Server That Is in a Domain . . .
Starting and Stopping Servers and Services on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . .
Configuring Printers on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printer Administration Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating IBM Network Station Manager Software and Migrating IBM Network
Station Manager Preference Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Single-Server Software Upgrade and Single-Server Migration Method
The Dual-Server Software Upgrade and User Preference Information Migration
Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving Network Station Files from an Old Server to a New Server . . . .
Before You Continue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 3. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station Environment
on an AS/400 Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before You Continue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Network Stations to an Existing BOOTP Environment . . . . . . .
Adding Network Stations with the Green Screen . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Network Stations with Operations Navigator . . . . . . . . .
Adding Network Stations to an Existing DHCP Environment . . . . . . .
Migrating BOOTP Clients to a DHCP Environment . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Printers on an AS/400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printer Administration Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The CRTDEVPRT Command. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Collecting Hardware Information Using the Inventory Server . . . . . . .
Optimizing Your AS/400 Server for Network Stations . . . . . . . . . .
What the Setup Assistant Does . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HTTP Directives for the IBM Network Station Manager Program . . . . .
TFTP Subnet Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) with Your Network Station
Benefits of Using SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retrieving the SNMP MIB File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 4. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network
on an RS/6000 Server . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Server Software . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating Server Software. . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Components After the Initial Installation . . .
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Station Environment
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128-Bit NC Navigator Browser . . . . . . . . .
Configuring an RS/6000 Server for Network Stations . . .
Gathering Configuration Information . . . . . . .
Choosing a Boot Method and Configuring the Server . .
Before You Continue . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suppressed Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing from AIX to a Printer Attached to a Network Station
Defining the AIX Remote Print Queue . . . . . . .
Verifying printer operation . . . . . . . . . . .
RS/6000 Administration: Alternative Methods . . . . .
Configuring Network Stations Using the chbootptab Script
Configuring Network Stations Manually . . . . . .
Understanding the nsconf Script . . . . . . . .
Setting Up AIX Server Routing . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up BOOTP Relay Configuration . . . . . .
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Chapter 5. Installing and Configuring
on an OS/390 Server . . . . .
About this Chapter . . . . . . .
Installation Steps. . . . . . . .
Configuration Steps . . . . . . .
Before You Continue . . . . . .
Configuring Printers on OS/390 . . .
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
Printing Support . . . . . . .
Using NetSpool and IP PrintWay .
NLS Considerations . . . . . . .
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IBM Network Station Environment
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Chapter 6. Installing and Configuring
on a VM/ESA Server . . . . .
About this Chapter . . . . . . .
Installation . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration . . . . . . . . .
Before You Continue . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing.
Configuring Printers on VM/ESA . .
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
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IBM Network Station Environment
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Chapter 7. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager
Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logging On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Roam Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After You Log In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 5250 Emulation Application . . . . . . . . . . .
Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function . . . . . . . . . .
Eliminating the 5250 Emulator New Session Dialog Box for Japanese Users
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 3270 Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Learning About the 3270 Emulation Function . . . . . . . . . .
Eliminating the 3270 Emulator New Session Dialog Box for Japanese Users
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Contents
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Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the NC Navigator Browser . . . . .
Learning About NC Navigator Browser Functions .
Learning About NC Navigator Mail Functions . .
Learning About NC Navigator News Functions . .
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . .
JAVA Virtual Machine . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Application . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Applet . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the Time Zone Environment Variable
Learning About Printer Datastreams . . . . . .
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Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program - an Overview . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who Can Use the IBM Network Station Manager Program? . . . . . . .
Working with IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults . . . . . .
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program Using a Browser . . . . .
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager Program Setup Tasks - Examples .
Changing your Desktop Style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace . . . . . . . .
Changing Your Desktop Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the Boot Monitor Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding the Network Station Boot Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS) Configuration on the Network Station
Configuring a Local Area Network Attached Printer . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users . . . . . .
Working with Menu Bar Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatically Starting a 5250 Session on a Network Station . . . . . . .
Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session Menu Button for a Network Station
Configuring a Terminal Session for a Network Station . . . . . . . . .
Changing Your Icon Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling the Control Menu for a 5250 Session. . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling the 5250 or 3270 Emulator for Euro Currency Support . . . . . .
Changing the Screen Size of a 3270 Session . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Java Applets for NC Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Directory Buttons for NC Navigator. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Your Network Proxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Menus and Messages Language Type . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Group Settings to a User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Education . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing and Using How To... Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples . . . . . . . .
Setting Up an AIX Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
Setting Up a Windows NT Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 9. Working with User Services
Accessing User Services . . . . . .
Console. . . . . . . . . . . .
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
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Login . .
Terminals .
WindowMgr
Utilities . .
Setup . .
Statistics .
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Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility .
Accessing the IBM Network Station Setup Utility . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Setup Utility Tasks . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Monitor Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With the Blanking Pedestal . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Twinaxial Station Address . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the Startup Language . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Keyboard Language . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Verbose Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resetting an IBM Network Station to the Factory Defaults . . . .
Viewing the Boot PROM Version of an IBM Network Station . . .
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the Network Setting
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting
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Appendix A. Problem Resolution.
Problem Resolution Tables . . .
Common Error Situations . . .
Error Codes . . . . . . .
PC Server Error Situations . .
OS/400 Error Situations . . .
AIX Error Situations . . . . .
OS/390 Error Situations . . .
VM/ESA Error Situations . . .
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Appendix B. Twinaxial Network Stations . . . . .
Planning for Your Twinaxial TCP/IP Network. . . . .
Simple Twinaxial Subnet . . . . . . . . . .
Isolated Twinaxial Subnet with an Unassociated LAN.
Twinaxial Subnet Associated with a LAN . . . . .
Subnetting for Your Twinaxial Network. . . . . . .
Configuring Twinaxial Network Stations Checklist . . .
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Appendix C. National Language
Locale Information . . . . .
DBCS Unique Support . . . .
Input Methods . . . . .
Printers . . . . . . . .
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Appendix D. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings 361
Appendix E. Configuring ICA Virtual Printing for Network Stations .
Understanding Software Combinations . . . . . . . . . . .
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Contents
. 367
. 367
vii
viii
Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session for Your Network Station . . . . .
ICA Virtual Print Configuration Scenarios for NT 4.0 . . . . . . . . . .
NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a PC Server-Attached Printer . . . . . .
NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network Station) Attached Printer
NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to another PC Server
(Remote Printing). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ICA Virtual Print Configuration Scenarios for NT 3.51. . . . . . . . . .
NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Your Server . . . .
NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network Station)-Attached Printer
NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Another PC Server
(Remote Printing). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. 367
. 368
. 368
369
Appendix F. Using TN3270E Display Support and Printer Support .
Configuring Persistent 3270 LU Session Names . . . . . . . .
Valid Types of -DISPLAY_NAME Parameters . . . . . . . .
Configuring Printers Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program .
Configuring TN3270E General Printer Support . . . . . . . . .
Configuring TN3270E Application-Specific Printer Support . . . . .
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Appendix G. Serial Port Printer Connection . . . . . . . . .
Using a 9 to 25 pin cable through a db25-db25 null modem interposer .
Using a 9 to 25 pin null modem cable . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Appendix H. Notices .
Trademarks . . . .
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Index
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Readers’ Comments — We’d Like to Hear from You .
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
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About IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
(SC41-0664)
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
ix
How to Use this Book
Figure 1. How to Use this Book
x
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Who should read this book
This information is intended for the person who is installing and administering the IBM
Network Station Manager.
Information Available on the World Wide Web
You can obtain the latest version of this book on the World Wide Web from the
following URL:
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
This is the same URL that is printed on the cover of this book.
How to send your comments
Your feedback is important in helping to provide the most accurate and high-quality
information. If you have any comments about this book or any other documentation, fill
out the readers’ comment form at the back of this book.
v If you prefer to send comments by mail, use the readers’ comment form with the
address that is printed on the back. If you are mailing a readers’ comment form from
a country other than the United States, you can give the form to the local IBM branch
office or IBM representative for postage-paid mailing.
v If you prefer to send comments by FAX, use either of the following numbers:
– United States and Canada: 1-800-937-3430
– Other countries: 1-507-253-5192
v If you prefer to send comments electronically, use this network ID:
– IBMMAIL, to IBMMAIL(USIB56RZ)
– [email protected]
Be sure to include the following:
v The name of the book.
v The publication number of the book.
v The page number or topic to which your comment applies.
About IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use (SC41-0664)
xi
xii
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
What Is the Network Station? . . . . . . .
How Do Network Stations Work? . . . . . .
What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?
LAN Network Examples . . . . . . . .
LAN Network Example 1 . . . . . . .
LAN Network Example 2 . . . . . . .
LAN Network Example 3 . . . . . . .
MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnets and Subnet Masks . . . . . . .
Boot Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NVRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BOOTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TFTP or NFS for Boot File Service . . . . . .
Java on the Network Station . . . . . . . .
Windows Applications on the Network Station . .
Network Station Memory Requirements . . . .
Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments
Roaming User Example . . . . . . . .
Load Balancing Example . . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP to Avoid Conflicts . . .
Determining DHCP Classes . . . . . .
What is New in Release 3? . . . . . . . .
Moving from an Older Version? . . . . . . .
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What Is the Network Station?
Traditionally, the user’s interface with the server has been either the nonprogrammable
workstation or the personal computer (PC). The IBM Network Station network computer
(hereafter referred to as Network Station) offers an attractive alternative to traditional
methods of network computing. Individual diskless workstations connect to a server (or
series of servers), and you can manage them centrally with the IBM Network Station
Manager program.
Using a Network Station is similar to using a PC. The Network Station uses a keyboard,
mouse, and display. The biggest difference is that the Network Station files reside on a
network server rather than on a hard drive inside of each user’s machine. The Network
Station presents a graphical user interface (GUI), which provides the user access to
many resources. Network Stations can access the following kinds of resources:
v 5250 emulator
v 3270 emulator
v Remote X applications
v Web browser
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
1
v Java applets or applications
v Windows NT applications
v Local and remote printers
The Network Station communicates using Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol (TCP/IP) over a token-ring, Ethernet, or twinaxial connection to the server.
Each Network Station runs the common client program, and the server runs the IBM
Network Station Manager program and several other application programs.
How Do Network Stations Work?
Figure 2 shows what happens when you power on an IBM Network Station.
Figure 2. Network Station Power-On Sequence
„1… A non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) resident boot monitor program is
started. The Network Station automatically runs a series of power-on self tests (POST).
„2… The Network Station contacts a BOOTP or DHCP boot server. The Network Station
exchanges its media access control (MAC) address for the IP address that is provided
2
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
by the server. The boot server also provides the address or path of the base code
server. The Network Station may alternatively retrieve this information from values that
are stored in its NVRAM.
„3… The Network Station downloads the base code from the base code server using
trivial file transfer protocol (TFTP) or network file system (NFS).
„4… The Network Station downloads the terminal-based configuration information from
the terminal configuration server.
„5… The Network Station presents a log-on screen. When the user enters a userid and
password, the authentication server verifies the user’s identification.
„6… The user’s configuration server downloads and initiates the personalized
environment preferences of the user.
„7… The Network Station displays the personalized desktop of the user. The user
accesses applications on the servers where they reside.
The IBM Network Station Manager program allows you to set and change
configurations for Network Stations and Network Station users. Your HTTP server
makes the IBM Network Station Manager program available to your Web browser. See
“Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 245 for more
information about the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Each Network Station contains a simple network management protocol (SNMP) agent
as part of its operating system. An SNMP manager at a central location can
communicate and exchange information with the agent on a Network Station. You can
use this information to manage your network environment. SNMP is an
industry-standard protocol for network management. See “Collecting Hardware
Information Using the Inventory Server” on page 140 for information about using SNMP
to collect hardware information for Network Stations that are attached to AS/400
servers.
Each Network Station can display the IBM Network Station Setup Utility. The IBM
Network Station Setup Utility allows you to View or Set (change) configuration settings
on a particular Network Station. For example, you can view the MAC address or set the
monitor resolution of the Network Station. See “Chapter 10. Working With the IBM
Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301 for more information.
After the Network Station base code is loaded, the User Services programs become
available. User Services are programs that provide users with tools to manage the
Network Station’s operational environment. Listed below are some of the user services:
v Monitoring messages applicable to a specific Network Station
v Locking your screen (with password control)
v Monitoring statistics (for example, how much memory is available on a specific
Network Station)
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
3
See “Chapter 9. Working with User Services” on page 297 for more information on User
Services.
What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?
In order for the Network Station to communicate with your servers, you need a TCP/IP
network. If you understand your TCP/IP network, installing and configuring your
Network Station and IBM Network Station Manager program is much easier. To help
understand your network, you should draw a diagram of your network.
Refer to the network examples in this section to help you understand how to configure
your network. Choose the network example that most closely resembles your network
diagram. Refer to these examples as you go about configuring and installing Network
Stations on your network. If you are going to be using twinaxial Network Stations, see
“Appendix B. Twinaxial Network Stations” on page 347.
Note: You do not need to be an expert in order to set up a TCP/IP network. However,
you should have an understanding of basic TCP/IP. A detailed introduction to
TCP/IP is beyond the scope of this book. If you need to improve your
understanding of TCP/IP, you can contact your IBM sales representative, who
has information about classes in your area.
LAN Network Examples
LAN Network Example 1
Figure 3 on page 5 shows an example of a network diagram in which two Network
Stations are connected over a simple local area network (LAN).
4
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 3. Two Network Stations Connected to the Server over a Simple LAN
LAN Network Example 2
Figure 4 on page 6 shows an example of a network diagram in which two Network
Stations are connected to the server over a local LAN. Two more Network Stations
connect to the server through a router over a remote LAN.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
5
Figure 4. Two Network Stations Connected to the Server over a Local LAN and Two
Network Stations Connected to the Server through a Router over a Remote LAN
LAN Network Example 3
In Figure 5 on page 7, additional Network Stations connect to the server using both
Ethernet and token-ring connections. Two token-ring LANs connect via a router. A
Domain Name Server also connects to the network.
6
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 5. Four Network Stations Connected to a Network Using a Router and a Domain
Name Server
MAC Addresses
Every Network Station comes with a unique identifying number that can be used to
keep track of which IP address has been assigned to it. Media access control (MAC)
addresses of each Network Station are assigned by manufacturing and hard-coded into
the machine. The MAC address of a Network Station is on the side panel of the small
box in which the logic unit is packaged (see Figure 6 on page 8). If you no longer have
the box, see “Finding the Default MAC Address” on page 306 for instructions on how to
find the MAC address.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
7
Figure 6. MAC Address on the Box
You can override the burned-in MAC address with a customer-assigned MAC address.
See “Specifying a User-Configurable MAC Address” on page 307 for instructions on
how to override the burned-in MAC address.
IP Addresses
Internet Protocol (IP) addresses are numbers that are assigned to devices on a network
(or on the Internet). IP addresses allow computers to communicate through TCP/IP. IP
addresses consist of four numbers (from 0 to 255) that are separated by periods, for
example 192.168.1.1. The numbers that are separated by periods indicate the network
to which a computer belongs and the specific location of the host computer within that
network.
IP addresses are not just for computers such as Network Stations, but also for routers,
servers, and even subnets and networks themselves. For example, the IP address of a
network might be 192.168.1.0. A router on that network might use the IP address
192.168.1.1. A Network Station on the same network might have the address
192.168.1.145.
8
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Each Network Station must have a unique IP address. If you are using the DHCP boot
method, you must specify a range of IP addresses so that the server can assign an
address to each Network Station. For intranets (networks within your own organization),
you can assign your own addresses. However, if you want to connect to the Internet, a
central authority must officially assign the network addresses and domain names. At the
time of this writing, the authority is as follows:
Network Solutions, Inc.
InterNIC Registration Services
505 Huntmar Park Drive
Herndon, VA 22070
1-703-742-4811
E-mail: [email protected]
WWW: http://rs.internic.net
Subnets and Subnet Masks
A subnet is a division within a computer network. Some administrators of large networks
need to divide their networks into subnetworks (or subnets). Subnets allow certain
groups of users to share access to certain files or resources. Other administrators
divide their networks in order to make the most efficient use of a relatively small
address pool. Most small networks do not require subnetting. A basic introduction to
subnets and subnet masks is in the paragraphs that follow. You should read this
discussion only if it is up to you to subnet your network or to find out the subnet mask.
The subnet mask is a value that allows the system to determine which are the network
parts and which are the host parts of an IP address. In IP addressing, there are many
different subnet masks. Sometimes the first six digits of an IP address indicate the
network; other times the first nine digits indicate the network. The subnet mask is the
code that determines which digits indicate the network and which indicate the host.
Later in the book, you will record your network’s subnet mask on a table. If you belong
to a large subnetted network that someone else set up, you can ask that person for the
subnet mask value. If you know that your network is not subnetted, use the following
table to find your subnet mask.
Remember: You should use Table 1 only if you are sure that your network is not
subnetted.
Table 1. Subnet Mask Default Values According to Network Class
Network Type
Left-Most Value of IP
Address
Subnet Mask Default
Class A
0 through 126
255.0.0.0
Class B
128 through 191
255.255.0.0
Class C
192 through 223
255.255.255.0
An IP address such as 192.168.1.2 is really a dotted decimal expression of a 32–bit
binary value. In binary numbers, 192.168.1.2 is expressed as
11000000.10101000.00000001.00000010. Each set of eight numbers (0 or 1)
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
9
represents eight bits of the IP address. Every IP address contains some bits that
identify it as belonging to a particular network. The other bits identify a single host (such
as a Network Station) along the network.
Most networks fall into one of three classes: Class A, Class B, or Class C. As Table 1
on page 9 shows, the network’s class can be determined by examining the first eight
bits of the network’s IP address. When expressed in dotted decimal notation, those first
eight bits are the leftmost number of the address, the number that comes before the
first dot. In Class A networks, the first eight bits are expressed in decimal as a number
from 1 to 126. For Class B networks, that number ranges from 128 to 191. For Class C
networks, the value of the first eight bits of the IP address ranges from 192 to 223.
The class of the network determines how much space is available for subnetting. For
example, in a Class A network, the network portion of the address is only the first eight
bits. In other words, the first eight bits are all that is necessary to indicate the network
to which the IP address belongs. That leaves the remaining 24 bits to serve as pointers
toward the subnet and the individual hosts that lie on the network. In this discussion,
host means any device that has a unique IP address including Network Stations. The IP
address of a Class A network is network.host.host.host. The host.host.host does not
indicate three separate hosts, but rather that three eight-bit segments a(or 24 bits) are
required to indicate a single host on the network. Obviously, there can be only a very
small number of true Class A networks. In fact, there are only 126 such networks. Most
of these belong to large corporations or universities, which acquired their Class A
networks in the early days of the Internet when network addresses were plentiful. All
Class A network addresses are all assigned.
In a Class B network, the first 16 bits of an IP address indicate the network while the
remaining 16 are available for subnetting. IP addresses that belong to Class B networks
are network.network.host.host.
In a Class C network, the first 24 bits indicate the network, while only the last eight can
be used for subnetting or to identify the host. IP addresses that belong to Class C
networks are network.network.network.host. Class C networks are the most common
type of network.
You must know more than the class of the network to determine how an IP address is
deciphered. When you subnet a network, it is not always apparent what subnet a
device belongs to unless you know the subnet mask. For example, given the Class C
IP address 192.168.1.45, you know that the network to which the device belongs is
192.168.1.0. You can tell this by applying the simplified formula
network.network.network.host. However, you do not know how the network is
subnetted or to what subnet the device belongs. Additionally, the class of the network is
not always apparent. The subnet mask allows you to determine all of these things.
Like IP addresses, subnet masks are 32–bit values expressed in dotted decimal
notation. The subnet mask 255.255.255.0 is expressed in binary as
11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000. A binary 1 in the subnet mask indicates that the
corresponding bit in the IP address is treated as part of the network address. Using
Boolean algebra, if you perform an ″AND″ operation on the binary IP address and
subnet mask, the result is the IP address of the network. In Boolean algebra, the ″AND″
10
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
function means that if both numbers are 1’s, the result is 1. If either number is not a 1,
the result is 0. For example, given the IP address 192.168.1.2 and the subnet mask
255.255.255.0, the ″AND″ operation is as follows:
11000000.10101000.00000001.00000010 = IP add. 192.168.1.2
11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 = Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
11000000.10101000.00000001.00000000 = Subnet add. 192.168.1.0.
You can think of the subnet mask as a code for deciphering what an IP address means.
You can use Table 2 to determine how many subnets are indicated by specific eight-bit
mask values. For example, if you see the address 192.168.1.35 and you know that the
subnet mask of the Class C network to which that address belongs is 255.255.255.128,
you know how to decipher the address. By using Table 2, you can say that the network
address is 192.168.1.0 and that the host whose IP address ends in .35 belongs to the
first of two subnets.
To put it more simply, the network address 192.168.1.0 means that devices whose
adresses begin with 192.168.1 belong to the 192.168.1 network. The first 24 bits of the
address indicate the network, and the last eight bits of the address indicate the subnet
and host. The way that you arrived at this distinction was by applying the subnet mask.
Because the subnet mask ends in 128, you know that the network is broken into two
subnets. If you want to divide the Class C network 192.168.1.0 into two subnets, you
should use a subnet mask of 255.255.255.128. The first 24 bits of the address indicate
the network. The last eight bits of the address indicate the hosts.
Since the maximum value of each eight bits is 11111111 in binary or 255 in decimal,
there are, theoretically, 255 possible hosts in the two subnets. Therefore, the theoretical
number of possible hosts per subnet is 255 hosts that are divided by two subnets, or
128 hosts per subnet. You could theoretically use the IP addresses 192.168.1.0 through
192.168.1.127 for the first subnet and 198.165.1.128 through 192.168.1.255 for your
second subnet. In reality, you would have to give up some of these addresses. The first
and last addresses in each subnet have special values. You cannot assign the first and
last addresses to any devices on the network. The first address in each subnet is the
subnet address; the last address is the broadcast address. Therefore, the true range of
your addresses is 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.126 and 192.168.1.129 to 192.168.1.254.
If you need to subnet a Class C network, the way in which you specify the last eight
bits of the subnet mask determines how you divide your network. Table 2 shows the
number of available subnets according to the value that is given to an eight-bit subnet
mask in a Class C network.
Table 2. Subnet Mask Values For Class C Addresses
Subnet Mask
Binary Value
Number of Subnets
Number of Hosts
Per Subnet
255.255.255.0
00000000
1
254
255.255.255.128
10000000
2
126
255.255.255.192
11000000
4
62
255.255.255.224
11100000
8
30
255.255.255.240
11110000
16
14
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
11
Table 2. Subnet Mask Values For Class C Addresses (continued)
Subnet Mask
Binary Value
Number of Subnets
Number of Hosts
Per Subnet
255.255.255.248
11111000
32
6
255.255.255.252
11111100
64
2
255.255.255.254
11111110
128
0
255.255.255.255
11111111
254, Do not use on Class
C networks
0
Suppose that you want to break the same Class C network into four subnets instead of
two. Using Table 2 on page 11, you choose the subnet mask 255.255.255.192. You can
then configure a network with 248 hosts on four subnets. Since 248 hosts divided by
four subnets equals 62, you could have 62 hosts on each of your four subnets. You can
create a table for planning your network that looks like Table 3.
By planning ahead, you should allocate IP and mask addresses to anticipate a
maximum number of controllers and Network Stations. If you do not do this and your
network environment changes, you will have to reallocate your initial assignments. Then
your initial devices will receive different IP addresses.
Table 3. Subnet Mask 255.255.255.192 Example
12
Subnet
IP Address
Comments
1st Subnet
192.168.1.0
Network Address (not assigned to any host)
1st Subnet
192.168.1.1
Network Station #1
1st Subnet
.
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192.168.1.2
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Network Station #2
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1st Subnet
192.168.1.62
Network Station #62
1st Subnet
192.168.1.63
Broadcast Address (not assigned to any host)
2nd Subnet
192.168.1.64
Network Address (not assigned to any host)
2nd Subnet
192.168.1.65
Network Station #63
2nd Subnet
.
.
.
192.168.1.66
.
.
.
Network Station #64
.
.
.
2nd Subnet
192.168.1.126
Network Station #124
2nd Subnet
192.168.1.127
Broadcast Address (not assigned to any host)
3rd Subnet
192.168.1.128
Network Address (not assigned to any host)
3rd Subnet
192.168.1.129
Network Station #125
3rd Subnet
.
.
.
192.168.1.130
.
.
.
Network Station #126
.
.
.
3rd Subnet
192.168.1.190
Network Station #186
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 3. Subnet Mask 255.255.255.192 Example (continued)
Subnet
IP Address
Comments
3rd Subnet
192.168.1.191
Broadcast address (not assigned to any host)
4th Subnet
192.168.1.192
Network Address (not assigned to any host)
4th Subnet
192.168.1.193
Network Station #187
4th Subnet
.
.
.
192.168.1.194
.
.
.
Network Station #188
.
.
.
4th Subnet
192.168.1.254
Network Station #248
4th Subnet
192.168.1.255
Broadcast Address (not assigned to any host)
Of course, you could assign any network device to any IP address. We simply filled the
Comment section of our sample tables with ″Network Station #X″ by way of illustration.
In reality, you must devote IP addresses to routers, Domain Name Servers, and other
devices on your network.
Class C networks are not the only networks to be subnetted. Class B networks are
often subnetted. The only difference in subnetting a Class B network is that the network
portion of its address is shorter (and its host portion is longer) than that of a Class C
address. For example, the network portion of the Class B address 192.168.0.0 is
192.168. That leaves the last 16 bits (the 0.0) free for subnetting. To divide that network
into two large subnets, you would use the subnet mask 255.255.192.0. That
configuration results in the two subnets 192.168.0.0 through 192.168.127.0 and
192.168.128.0 through 192.168.254.0.
Subnets are meaningful only to hosts on your physical network. Hosts outside of your
network are concerned only with the network portion of the IP address. Routers inside
your network apply the subnet mask to IP addresses to determine how to deliver
information packets inside the network.
For more information about subnets, refer to the Redbook, TCP/IP Tutorial and
Technical Overview, GG24-3376.
Boot Methods
Because a Network Station has no disk from which to boot, it must request information
either from its own non-volatile-random-access memory (NVRAM) or from a server. The
Network Station needs to find an IP address for itself. The IP address allows the
Network Station to communicate with other hosts. The Network Station can use one of
three methods to request and receive this information:
v Non-Volatile-Random-Access Memory (NVRAM)
v Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)
v Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP)
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
13
Both the BOOTP and DHCP boot methods require a boot server. BOOTP servers can
only respond to BOOTP clients, but DHCP servers can respond to both BOOTP and
DHCP clients.
Table 4 shows the boot servers that are available on each platform.
Table 4. Boot Servers Supported by Various Operating Systems
Boot
Servers
OS/390
VM/ESA
DHCP
BOOTP, DHCP BOOTP, DHCP BOOTP, DHCP DHCP
OS/400
AIX
NT
Note: If you use the BOOTP or DHCP boot methods, you must configure all routers
and gateways in your network to send and receive BOOTP or DHCP packets. If
you cannot configure your routers to be BOOTP or DHCP relay agents, you
could do either of the following:
v Use an AIX or UNIX system that has the necessary configuration support to
receive limited BOOTP or DHCP broadcasts. Then forward those broadcasts
to the appropriate server.
v Use the NVRAM boot method for those Network Stations that are behind a
router that cannot forward BOOTP or DHCP broadcasts.
NVRAM
Non-Volatile Random-Access Memory (NVRAM) refers to the local Network Station
memory. When you use the NVRAM boot method, you code the IP addresses of the
Network Station and its server into the memory of the individual Network Station. The
Network Station powers on and requests the base code file download from the server.
The NVRAM boot method is most practical in small, stable networks. You may also
choose to use the NVRAM boot method for one of the following reasons:
v As a method to avoid routers that block BOOTP and DHCP broadcast requests.
BOOTP and DHCP broadcast requests for IP addresses can create unnecessary
traffic on the network. Many network routers are configured not to pass these
broadcast requests. Since NVRAM does not need to request its IP address (because
it has been entered in the memory of the Network Station), it does not make the
broadcasts.
v As an aid in finding and correcting problems with network connections.
v As an aid in finding and correcting problems with BOOTP or DHCP configurations.
This method may not work well for larger networks for the following reasons:
v You must enter setup data into each Network Station manually.
v DHCP and BOOTP can configure many more parameters (such as the DNS address)
that cannot be easily configured with this method.
For information about how to configure NVRAM, see “Configuring an IBM Network
Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting” on page 309.
14
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
BOOTP
Bootstrap protocol (BOOTP) is a TCP/IP protocol that allows the Network Station to
request an IP address and the location of the base code file from a server.
To use the BOOTP boot method, the network administrator must record the MAC
addresses of all the Network Stations on the network. Then the network administrator
assigns each of them an IP address. The administrator then enters those assignments
on a BOOTP table. When you need to change IP addresses, you can do so centrally on
the table in the boot server rather than individually on each Network Station.
When a Network Station powers on, it broadcasts its MAC address to the BOOTP
server. The server looks up the IP address of the Network Station according to its MAC
address. BOOTP then returns a reply that assigns the IP address for the Network
Station and the name and location of the base code file.
Because BOOTP assigns IP addresses statically (fixing an IP address according to a
computer’s MAC address and then recording this assignment), it is less versatile than
DHCP.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is also a TCP/IP protocol. DHCP provides
a way for a server to automatically allocate IP addresses and configuration information
without forcing the administrator to record and track the MAC addresses of the
networked computers. DHCP is capable of assigning either a permanent IP address or
a temporary IP address for every host or Network Station within a predetermined range
of IP addresses. It is also capable of assigning IP addresses either statically or
dynamically.
The static assignment is similar to the way BOOTP allocates IP addresses. You define
the MAC address of every Network Station in the DHCP server configuration along with
an IP address, which is reserved for the station with this MAC address. When the
Network Station sends a request into the DHCP server, identifying itself by its MAC
address, the server returns the IP address that it has reserved for that client.
In dynamic IP address assignment, the server still identifies a Network Station by its
MAC address. However, instead of using a fixed IP address, it allocates any address
out of the available pool. The server leases the address to the Network Station for a
specified period of time. The address returns to the pool either when the client releases
it or when the lease runs out.
DHCP can allow for unlisted clients. Any client, even if its MAC address is not defined
in the DHCP configuration, may request an IP address from the pool of available
addresses. The use of unlisted clients might be appropriate in an environment in which
it is not necessary or preferable to keep track of MAC addresses.
While BOOTP servers can handle requests only from BOOTP clients, DHCP can handle
requests from both DHCP and BOOTP clients.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
15
DHCP servers (unlike BOOTP servers) can reuse IP addresses that are not currently
being used.
Finally, DHCP provides a large set of configuration options, including user-defined
options. These options configure many advanced network environments. See “Taking
Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 18 for more information.
TFTP or NFS for Boot File Service
The Network Station can use either of two protocols to receive the base code file from
the base code server. The protocol that you use may depend on the operating system
platform of your base code server (see Table 5).
Trivial file transfer protocol (TFTP) is a simple protocol that is used to transfer files.
TFTP is available on every platform.
The network file system (NFS) makes files and directories available to clients. NFS is
generally more reliable than TFTP.
Table 5. Protocols Supported by Various Operating Systems
Protocols
OS/390
VM/ESA
OS/400
AIX
NT
TFTP, NFS
TFTP, NFS
TFTP
TFTP, NFS
TFTP, NFS
Java on the Network Station
Java is a programming language that is designed to bridge the gap between different
platforms. Java’s imperative, ″Write once, run anywhere,″ refers to its portability and to
the ability of a single Java program to run on different platforms. To view Java
applications, you need a bundle of Java-enabling programs called a Java Virtual
Machine (JVM). Using the JVM on diskless clients such as the Network Station allows
the user to access applications without using permanent disk space either on the
Network Station or on the server. You can download a JVM from servers, making it
possible to start and configure Java programs.
There are two kinds of Java programs:
v Applets — require a browser or applet viewer
v Applications — display directly
The first variety, applets, rely on a browser or applet viewer to provide windows and
graphical layout. In general, the browser does not trust applets since they are
downloaded across the Internet. In other words, the browser can restrict applets from
reading or writing to local files and from connecting to machines other than those from
which they are downloaded. These restrictions protect users from virus-contaminated
programs and provide a safe environment for examining programs on the Internet.
16
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
The Network Station can run Java applets and applications. Only a single Java
application can run within the Network Station. When a Java application is running, it
precludes applets from running, both on the desktop and in the browser.
For more information about Java, see the following Web sites:
v http://www.javasoft.com
v http://www.ibm.com/java
Windows Applications on the Network Station
Network Stations can run Windows applications through the use of a multi-user
Windows server. There are several products that can provide a multi-user Windows
server:
v Citrix WinFrame is a multi-user Windows application server based on Windows NT
3.51. Citrix WinFrame communicates to the Network Station using the independent
computer architecture (ICA) protocol.
v NCD WinCenter is an multi-user Windows application product that requires Citrix
WinFrame. NCD WinCenter communicates to the Network Station using the X11
protocol.
v Citrix MetaFrame is a multi-user Windows application product that requires Microsoft
Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition. Citrix MetaFrame communicates to
the Network Station using the ICA protocol.
Network Stations that boot from a Release 2.5 IBM Network Station Manager licenced
program server can communicate to a multi-user Windows server using the X11
protocol. Network Stations that boot from a Release 3 IBM Network Station Manager
licenced program server can communicate to a multi-user Windows server using the
X11 protocol or the ICA protocol.
For more information see the following Web sites:
v WinFrame and MetaFrame - http://www.citrix.com
v WinCenter - http://www.ncd.com
v Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition - http://www.microsoft.com
Network Station Memory Requirements
Network Stations download each of their appplications including their base systems into
memory. You should verify that your Network Stations have enough memory to run their
applications. Use the table at
http://www.pc.ibm.com/networkstation/support/memrec_data.html to determine how
much memory your Network Stations need.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
17
Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments
You can install the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program on multiple
computer systems. Each of these computer systems can perform specific server roles.
On any particular computer, the IBM Network Station Manager program can perform
more than one server role. A brief description of each server role follows:
BOOTP/DHCP Server
The BOOTP or DHCP server provides the Network Station with information
such as its IP address, the base code server address, and the address of the
terminal configuration server. You can change these addresses on DHCP
servers. See “Load Balancing Example” on page 19 for an example of how to
specify a different address for the base code server and terminal configuration
server. You do not need to install the IBM Network Station Manager program
on this server.
Base Code Server
The IBM Network Station Manager program on this server provides the
operating system and the application programs that are downloaded to the
Network Stations. You do not use this server to configure Network Stations.
Terminal Configuration Server
The IBM Network Station Manager program on this server provides
terminal-based configuration settings. The IBM Network Station Manager
program manages these settings. Examples of items to configure on this
server are a printer that is attached to the Network Station or the Network
Station’s keyboard language. The address of the terminal configuration server
is the same as the address of the base code server by default. The inventory
server (AS/400 only) runs on this server.
Authentication Server
The IBM Network Station Manager program on this server provides user
authentication (where the user logs in) and user-based configuration settings.
The IBM Network Station Manager program manages these settings.
Examples of what you might configure on this server are a user’s start-up
programs or a user’s browser preferences. The address of the authentication
server is the same as the address of the base code server by default. See
“Roaming User Example” on page 19 for an example of how to specify a
different address for the authentication server.
Some examples when you might want to take advantage of multiple servers, are as
follows:
v A user from Chicago is visiting New York and expects to sign on and use the same
configuration that he has at home. For more information, see “Roaming User
Example” on page 19.
v All users power on their IBM Network Station at 8:00 AM and create network
congestion. For more information, see “Load Balancing Example” on page 19.
Note: All servers must be running version 1 release 3 of the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program for these examples to work.
18
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Roaming User Example
Figure 7 shows how multiple servers can allow visiting users to obtain their home
configurations.
Figure 7. Roaming User Example
In the case of a user from Chicago visiting New York, one server is in Chicago, and one
server is in New York.
The server in New York provides the following information:
v The IBM Network Station IP address
v The operating system and applications
v The terminal-based configuration information
v A log-on dialog
The visiting user selects the Roam button on the login dialog. The user then enters the
name or address of the Chicago authentication server (10.2.1.2).
The Chicago authentication server provides the following information:
v The authentication of the user
v The user-based configuration information
The IBM Network Station Manager program on the server in New York manages the
terminal-based configuration information. The IBM Network Station Manager program
on the server in Chicago manages the user-based configuration information.
Load Balancing Example
Figure 8 on page 20 shows how multiple servers can reduce network congestion when
a large number of Network Stations power on simultaneously. The administrator installs
the IBM Network Station Manager program on multiple servers that act as base code
servers.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
19
This distributes copies of the large executable files (operating system and applications)
across servers. You can use DHCP to configure groups of Network Stations to access
different base code servers.
Note: There is no way to separate the base code server from the terminal configuration
server when using BOOTP. You can only do this by using DHCP.
Figure 8. Load Balancing Example
This example uses four systems to divide up the work load:
v Two Windows NT systems are performing the role of base code servers (host
10.3.1.2, the base code server that we use in our example, and host 10.4.1.2). This
example uses two base code servers to divide the work load. Any number of base
code servers is possible.
v A RS/6000 system is performing the role of a DHCP server (host 10.2.1.2). You do
not need to install the IBM Network Station Manager program on this system.
v An AS/400 system is performing the role of terminal configuration and authentication
server (host 10.1.1.2). We use the IBM Network Station Manager program that is
installed on the terminal configuration and authentication server to centrally manage
all user configurations and terminal configurations. One IBM Network Station
Manager program should manage all IBM Network Stations to prevent conflicts.
A user would see a log-on dialog from the base code server and do the following:
1. Click the Roam button.
2. Enter the address of the authentication server (10.1.1.2).
Tip: If you want to use DHCP, you should use the IBM Network Station Manager
program to check that DHCP is configuring DNS. Ensure that you have selected
DNS Configuration from BOOTP or DHCP server. To find this setting, click
Hardware, click Workstations, and then select System Defaults.
For this configuration to work, you must configure the items in Table 6 on page 21 in the
DHCP server settings.
20
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 6. DHCP Options for Load Balancing
Description
Example
Option 66 or bootstrap server - base code
server IP address
10.3.1.2
Option 67 - bootfile path
/netstation/prodbase/kernel
Option 211 - protocol to use for the base
code server. Possible values are tftp, nfs
or rfs/400.
nfs
Option 212 - terminal configuration server
IP address. Up to two addresses
separated by a blank can be specified.
10.1.1.2
Option 213 - Configuration files path name
for option 212. Up to two paths separated
by a blank can be specified.
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
Option 214 - Protocol to use for option
212. Possible values are tftp, nfs, or
rfs/400. Up to two values separated by a
blank can be specified.
rfs/400
Notes:
1. Options 211, 212, 213, and 214 are site specific options in DHCP. If you are already using
these options for another purpose, you will need to configure DHCP to avoid conflicts. See
“Configuring DHCP to Avoid Conflicts”.
2. When two configuration servers are specified, the first server is tried. If that fails, then the
second server is tried. If the second server is successful, then the second value in options
213 and 214 are used.
3. The IBM Network Stations must be using boot monitor version 3.0.0 or later. See “Viewing
the Boot PROM Version of an IBM Network Station” on page 308 for information on how to
view the boot monitor version.
Refer to the appropriate page for instructions on how to configure DHCP for load
balancing on your platform:
v AS/400, see “Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing” on page 151
v RS/6000, see “Configuring Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)” on
page 165
v VM/ESA, see “Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing” on page 220
v Windows NT, see “Configuring DHCP for Multiple Servers on Windows NT Server
4.0” on page 71
Configuring DHCP to Avoid Conflicts
The DHCP options in Table 6 have the flexibility to apply on a network, subnet, class, or
client basis. If you find that options 211-214 are already in use for other purposes, you
can separate these options by subnet or class. Use Table 7 on page 22 to determine
the Network Station classes.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
21
Determining DHCP Classes
Table 7 lists the DHCP classes assigned to each IBM Network Station type and model.
Table 7. IBM Network Station DHCP Classes
Type-Model
Class
8361-100
IBMNSM 2.0.0
8361-110
IBMNSM 2.1.0
8361-200
IBMNSM 1.0.0
8361-210
IBMNSM 1.1.0
8361-341
IBMNSM 3.4.1
8362-A22
IBMNSM A.2.0
8362-A23
IBMNSM A.2.0
8362-A52
IBMNSM A.5.0
8362-A53
IBMNSM A.5.0
If you cannot find the type and model number of your Network Station listed in the table, then do
the following:
1. Power on the Network Station.
2. As soon as the Network Station begins to search for its host server (message NS0500),
press the Escape key.
3. Press the F2 key to view the hardware configuration. The class number is in the DHCP field.
What is New in Release 3?
This release of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program introduces many
new features. These features include:
World-Wide National Language Enablement
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program is enabled across a wide
variety of languages and locales.
Integrated NC Navigator
The NC Navigator for the IBM Network Station is a fully compatible subset of
the popular Netscape Navigator Release 3 browser. A 40-bit browser is
included. A 128-bit browser is available in the United States and Canada as a
separately orderable program (except for IBM Network Station Manager for PC
Servers, where it is included). The NC Navigator provides many new functions
including a mail client and a news reader. See “Learning About NC Navigator
Browser Functions” on page 236 and the NC Navigator online help for more
information. Installing the 128-bit browser disables the 40-bit browser.
Converged 3270/5250 Emulators
The 3270 and 5250 client functions have been enhanced, and now have very
similar interfaces and functionality. See “Learning About the 3270 Emulation
Function” on page 231, “Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function” on
page 227, and the emulator online help for more information.
22
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
VTxxx Telnet
The IBM Network Station Manager program supports VTxxx telnet client.
Java Virtual Machine (JVM) 1.1.4
The JVM 1.1.4 provides an updated JVM.
Java Just-In-Time (JIT) Compiler
The Java JIT compiler compiles an application’s or applet’s Java bytecode as
it downloads into the Network Station. The JIT is most effective in improving
compute intensive and string manipulation operations.
Group Support
User group support allows an administrator to specify configuration values for
a group of users. See “Assigning Group Settings to a User” on page 288 and
the IBM Network Station Manager program online help for more information.
Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) Client Protocol Support
The integrated ICA client provides a low bandwidth connectivity for accessing
Microsoft Windows applications. See “Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session
Menu Button for a Network Station” on page 278 for more information.
Printing Support
Support for print client (LPR) allows local print applications to print on remote
printers. Support for printer server (LPD) allows remote print clients to print on
printers attached to the Network Station. See “Configuring a Local Area
Network Attached Printer” on page 269 and “Configuring a Network
Station-Attached Printer for Other Users” on page 270 for more information.
Separation of Servers
Several server functions that were previously bundled can now be installed on
multiple servers. This allows you to balance network traffic and allows end
users to access their normal desktop when they are away from their normal
server. See “Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 18 for
more information.
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
You should use DHCP when possible. DHCP allows you to take advantage of
new features such as separating your servers to balance network traffic. See
“Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 18 for more
information.
DHCP is available on the following platforms: AIX, OS/390, OS/400 V4R2,
VM/ESA, and Windows NT.
To configure DHCP on OS/400 you must have V4R2 Operations Navigator.
Operations Navigator requires Client Access installed on your Windows 95/NT
PC and a connection from that PC to the AS/400 system.
Lotus eSuite 1.1 WorkPlace
Lotus eSuite 1.1 WorkPlace is available as a separately orderable program.
The IBM Network Station Manager program allows the Lotus eSuite WorkPlace
to be configured as the system desktop. See “Changing your Desktop Style to
Lotus eSuite WorkPlace” on page 262 for more information.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
23
Omron, Japanese Input Method
The Omron, Japanese Input Method is available in multi-byte character set
countries as a separately orderable program. The IBM Network Station
Manager program allows for the configuration of the Omron, Japanese Input
Method.
Network Station Memory Requirements
Each of the applications that are downloaded to the Network Station require
memory. See “Network Station Memory Requirements” on page 17 for more
information.
Broadcast Boot (for AS/400)
The broadcast boot support provides the capability to boot multiple Network
Stations in parallel through a single transmission. See “TFTP Subnet
Broadcast” on page 148 for more information.
Inventory Server (for AS/400)
The inventory server provides the capability to collect information about your
Network Stations. See “Collecting Hardware Information Using the Inventory
Server” on page 140 for more information.
Twinaxial Network Station Support (for AS/400)
The twinaxial support allows the attachment of twinaxial Network Stations over
existing twinaxial cabling. See “Appendix B. Twinaxial Network Stations” on
page 347 for more information.
Moving from an Older Version?
If you are moving from an older version of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program to this version (Release 3) of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program, you may want to consider the following:
Configuration Information and User Data
Any configuration information that you entered through the IBM Network
Station Manager program interface is migrated. This includes user data,
system-wide, user, and workstation configuration information. If you edited
configuration files manually (such as standard.nsm), you should refer to the
Advanced User Information at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs for more information
on how to migrate your configuration.
NC Navigator
The IBM Network Station Manager Release 3 licensed program does not
support the IBM browser. Installation of Release 3 will automatically install and
reset your primary browser to the 40-bit NC Navigator. IBM browser
bookmarks are migrated to the NC Navigator. It is possible that the NC
Navigator may render HTML slightly differently than the IBM browser. The
128-bit browser is available in the US and Canada. You can install the 128-bit
browser after installing the IBM Network Station licensed program. The NC
Navigator provides many new functions, including a mail client and a news
reader. See “Learning About NC Navigator Browser Functions” on page 236
and the NC Navigator online help for more information.
24
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
If prior to Release 3 you had installed both the IBM Browser and the NC
Navigator Browser, then one of the following conditions apply after the
migration is complete:
v If only IBM Browser bookmarks were saved, then the IBM Browser
bookmarks are available in the NC Navigator bookmarks.
v If both NC Navigator and IBM Browser bookmarks were saved, then the NC
Navigator bookmarks are available in the NC Navigator bookmarks and the
IBM Browser bookmarks are converted to NC Navigator bookmarks format.
The converted IBM Browser bookmarks are stored on the users home
workspace in a file called IBMBrowser.html.
If you want to incorporate the IBM Browser bookmarks into the NC Navigator
bookmarks, have each user perform the following steps:
1. Start the NC Navigator browser.
2. Click Window->Bookmarks. This opens the Bookmarks window.
3. Click File->Import. A list of files in the user’s home workspace appear.
4. Click the IBMBrowser.html file.
5. Click OK. The IBM Browser bookmarks are now included in the NC
Navigator bookmarks under a new folder called Hotlist Page.
New Boot Monitor Code
The boot monitor code in Release 3 contains many new functions. To take
advantage of these new functions, you must update the boot monitor code on
each of your Network Stations. See “Updating the Boot Monitor Code” on
page 265 for instructions on how to update the boot monitor code.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
25
26
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station
Environment on a Microsoft Windows NT Server
About this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM Network Station Manager and Prerequisites . . . . . . . . .
Resolving Installation Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM Network Station Manager to Run Windows-based Applications . . .
Installing Citrix MetaFrame and Lotus SmartSuite 97 . . . . . . . . . .
Activating Citrix MetaFrame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing NCD WinCenter UIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM Network Station Manager Software Automatically Using a Response
File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Boot Server for Your Network Stations . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up Your Boot Server and Your Authentication Server . . . . . . .
Using DHCP on Your Boot Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using NVRAM on Your Boot Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Additional Software Components After the Initial Installation . . . . .
Installing IBM DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Microsoft DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the NDIS Intermediate Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the 128–Bit NC Navigator Browser . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP on the Windows NT Server Platform . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring IBM DHCP on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . . . . . . . .
Creating DHCP Options on IBM DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Microsoft DHCP on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . . . . . .
Creating DHCP Options on Microsoft DHCP. . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP for Multiple Servers on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . . . .
Configuring IBM DHCP for Multiple Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Microsoft DHCP for Multiple Servers . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Users and Groups for IBM Network Station Users . . . . . . . .
Managing User Groups on a Stand-Alone Server That Is in a Domain . . . .
Starting and Stopping Servers and Services on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . .
Configuring Printers on Windows NT Server 4.0 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printer Administration Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating IBM Network Station Manager Software and Migrating IBM Network
Station Manager Preference Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Single-Server Software Upgrade and Single-Server Migration Method
The Dual-Server Software Upgrade and User Preference Information Migration
Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving Network Station Files from an Old Server to a New Server . . . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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Before You Continue . . . .
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90
About this Chapter
You will find instructions for planning, installing, upgrading, and configuring a Network
Station environment on a Windows NT Server 4.0 server or a Windows NT Server 4.0,
Terminal Server Edition server in this chapter.
The following figure demonstrates the flow of the entire manual.
Use the following table to find information on common IBM Network Station Manager
installation tasks and IBM Network Station Manager configuration tasks.
If you need to...
Read this section
Install IBM Network Station Manager for the
first time.
Read the “Installing IBM Network Station
Manager and Prerequisites” on page 29 to
install Windows NT Server 4.0 software; or
Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server
Edition software; and all of the IBM Network
Station Manager software.
Install IBM Network Station Manager on several Read the “Installing IBM Network Station
identical servers.
Manager Software Automatically Using a
Response File” on page 51 to install IBM
Network Station Manager on several identical
servers.
28
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Install IBM Network Station Manager software
as a separate boot server and a separate
authentication server.
Read the “Installing a Boot Server for Your
Network Stations” on page 52 to install IBM
Network Station Manager software on separate
boot servers and separate authentication
servers.
Upgrade IBM Network Station Manager
software.
Read the “Updating IBM Network Station
Manager Software and Migrating IBM Network
Station Manager Preference Files” on page 79
to upgrade your IBM Network Station Manager
software to the new release and preserve your
current IBM Network Station Manager
information.
Apply a Service Update to your IBM Network
Station Manager software.
Add a new IBM Network Station user to your
network.
Read the “Managing Users and Groups for IBM
Network Station Users” on page 74 to add a
Windows NT Server 4.0 user and add the new
user to the IBM Network Station Manager
software.
Configure a printer to work with your IBM
Network Station Manager.
Read the “Configuring Printers on Windows NT
Server 4.0” on page 76 to configure printers to
work with your Network Stations.
Run Windows applications on your IBM
Network Station
Read the “Installing IBM Network Station
Manager to Run Windows-based Applications”
on page 46 for information how to run
Windows applications on your Network Station.
Use DHCP to assign Internet Protocol (IP)
addresses to your IBM Network Stations
Read the “Installing Additional Software
Components After the Initial Installation” on
page 54 to install DHCP services and configure
DHCP services in your network.
Installing IBM Network Station Manager and Prerequisites
Note: Do not use this guide to install the IBM Network Station Manager on a
WinCenter version 3.x server. You can find the WinCenter information in the
book ″IBM Network Station Manager for WinCenter Pro V3.0,″ 6th Edition. The
publication code of that book is WINAB202.PDF. You can access the WinCenter
book on the Web at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
29
Before you begin
Before you begin the following installation checklists, you should have done the
following:
v Drawn a diagram of your network. See “What Do I Need To Know About
TCP/IP Networks?” on page 4.
v Bookmarked or copied the pages which contain the Network Example diagrams
that you will use as you install and configure your network. These are Figure 3
on page 5, Figure 4 on page 6, and Figure 5 on page 7.
v Checked to ensure that there are no users that are logged onto your server. If
you need to restart your server, any active Network Station users will lose their
applications.
v Read the readme.txt file on the IBM Network Station for PC Server compact
disk (CD). If you downloaded your IBM Network Station Manager for PC Server
software from the Internet, refer to the download Web pages for the readme.txt
file. The file contains information about prerequisites, installation, and
late-breaking code changes.
Depending on whether your server has the proper prerequisites in place, the installation
process may take from 30 minutes to 90 minutes.
If you encounter problems during the installation process, refer to “Resolving Installation
Problems” on page 45.
Complete the following checklist and mark off each item as you complete it. The
checklist has three stages. To complete the installation checklist, you will do the
following:
v Verify prerequisites—hardware, software, and memory requirements.
v Install the IBM Network Station Manager software. You may also install the following
software that is included on your IBM Network Station Manager software CD. (The
Web download only includes IBM Network Station Manager software and eNetwork
On-Demand software. You must get the additional software products separately.):
– Adobe Acrobat Reader
– Netscape Navigator 4.04
– Lotus Domino Go 4.6.2.2
v Configure DHCP on your server if you plan to use DHCP to start your IBM Network
Stations.
Planning and installing: Check off each item as you complete the task.
__ 1. Verify IBM Network Station memory requirements:
Network Stations download each of their applications that includes their base
systems into memory. You should verify that your Network Stations have
enough memory to run their applications. Use the table at
30
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
http://www.pc.ibm.com/networkstation/support/memrec_data.html to determine
how much memory your Network Stations need.
Notes:
a. If you plan to use multiple applications on your Network Stations, ensure
that each Network Station has adequate memory to handle the projected
applications.
b. Subsequent releases may have increased memory requirements.
__ 2. Make sure that you properly install Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 with all
prerequisites:
You may install both Windows NT Server 4.0 and Windows NT Server 4.0,
Terminal Server Edition with the instructions in this manual. The installation for
both Windows NT Server software types is identical unless otherwise noted.
Consult Table 8 to make sure that your system is ready for the installation. If you
lack any of the prerequisites, you may enter the procedure as directed by the
column titled ″Where Can I Find Instructions?″.
Table 8. Operating System Prerequisites
Prerequisite
How Do I Know If the
Prerequisite Is In Place?
You need 800 MB of free hard
__ a.
disk space to install both
Windows NT Server 4.0 and all
IBM Network Station Manager
software. Windows NT Server
4.0 and Service Pack 3 require
300 MB. You need up to 500
MB of free disk space for the
IBM Network Station software.
Where Can I Find
Instructions?
You may need to reinstall the
Determine if you have
operating system beginning
enough hard disk space
with Step 3 on page 34.
for the IBM Network
Station Manager
software after you install
Windows NT Server.
From the Windows NT
desktop, double-click on
the My Computer icon.
You need 1 GB of free hard
__ b. Right mouse-click on
disk space to install both
the drive on which you
Microsoft Windows NT Server
plan to install the IBM
4.0, Terminal Server Edition
Network Station
and IBM Network Station
Manager.
Manager software. Windows
__ c. Select Properties.
NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server
__ d. Make sure that there is
Edition requires 500 MB for
at least 500 MB of free
installation. You need up to
space.
500 MB of free disk space for
the IBM Network Station
Manger software.
Note: If you plan to install
your IBM Network Station
Manager software after you
download it from the Web, you
need an extra 250 MB of free
space to download the
software and expand the setup
executable files on your hard
drive.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
31
Table 8. Operating System Prerequisites (continued)
Prerequisite
Windows NT Server 4.0
How Do I Know If the
Prerequisite Is In Place?
__ a. Click
Start->Settings>Control
Panel->System.
Where Can I Find
Instructions?
Step 3 on page 34.
__ b. Select the General tab if
it is not currently
selected.
__ c. Read the information
under System: at the top
of the page to make
sure that Windows NT
Server 4.0 is installed.
Windows NT Server 4.0,
Terminal Server Edition
__ a. Click
Start->Settings>Control
Panel->System.
Step 3 on page 34.
__ b. Select the General tab if
it is not currently
selected.
__ c. Read the information
under System: at the top
of the page to make
sure that Windows NT
Server 4.0, Terminal
Server Edition is
installed.
Configure Regional Settings
__ a. Select
Start->Settings>Control Panel.
__ b. Double-click on
Regional Settings.
__ c. Click the Input Locales
tab.
__ d. Check to see if your
locale is highlighted.
32
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Step 55 on page 38.
Table 8. Operating System Prerequisites (continued)
Prerequisite
Service Pack 3
Note: Do not add Service
Pack 3 if you are running
Windows NT Server 4.0,
Terminal Server Edition.
How Do I Know If the
Prerequisite Is In Place?
__ a. Choose
Start->Programs>Administrative
Tools->Windows NT
Diagnostics.
Where Can I Find
Instructions?
Step 56 on page 38.
__ b. Select the Version tab if
it is not yet selected.
__ c. Read the information
under the computer
graphic to make sure
that Service Pack 3 has
been installed.
NTFS (not FAT) file system
You can convert a FAT partition
__ a. From the Windows NT
to NTFS by carrying out the
desktop, double-click on
following steps
the My Computer icon.
__ a. Open a command
__ b. Right mouse-click on
prompt.
the drive on which you
__
b.
Type the following
plan to install the IBM
command:
convert x:
Network Station
/fs:ntfs, where x is the
Manager.
partition that you want
__ c. Select Properties.
to convert.
__ d. Look under file system:
to ensure that the drive
uses NTFS instead of
FAT.
Proper MTU size (for
token-ring and mixed
token-ring and Ethernet
networks only)
Note: Some token-ring
adapters may not have an
option to change the MTU size.
If you experience network
problems that you attribute to
the MTU size, you may need
an updated token-ring adapter.
__ a. Access the Network
Control Panel by
clicking
Start->Settings>Control
Panel->Network>Adapters.
Step 54 on page 38.
__ b. Click on Properties.
__ c. Click on Advanced.
__ d. The MTU size appears
in the Maximum Packet
Size text field. In a pure
token-ring local area
network (LAN), the
maximum packet size
should be 4096. In a
mixed Ethernet and
token-ring network, the
maximum packet size
should be 1400.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
33
Table 8. Operating System Prerequisites (continued)
Prerequisite
How Do I Know If the
Prerequisite Is In Place?
Stand-Alone Server or
Stand-Alone Server attached to __ a. Choose
Start->Programsa domain. (recommended)
>Administrative
Tools->Server
Manager.
__ b. Read the description of
your computer. If there
is no indication of the
server type (Primary
Domain Controller or
Backup Domain
Controller), then your
machine is a
Stand-Alone server or a
Stand-Alone server
attached to a domain.
Stand-Alone server and
Stand-Alone server
attached to a domain
are the recommended
server types.
Where Can I Find
Instructions?
To change the server type to
Stand-Alone or Stand-Alone
server attached to a domain
from a Primary Domain
Controller or a Backup Domain
Controller, you must reinstall
the operating system beginning
with Step 3.
You may also switch between
Stand-Alone server and a
Stand-Alone server attached to
a domain. You do not have to
reinstall the operating system
to change between the
Stand-Alone server and the
Stand-Alone server attached to
a domain.
If all of the prerequisites are in place, go to 57 on page 38.
__ 3. To install Windows NT Server 4.0 or to install Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal
Server Edition on your machine, begin here. With the machine off, insert the
diskette labeled ″Microsoft Windows NT Server (or Microsoft Windows NT Server
4.0, Terminal Server Edition) Setup Disk 1″. Start your computer.
__ 4. When prompted to do so, insert the second diskette and press the Enter key.
__ 5. On the Windows NT Server Setup Welcome to Setup screen, press Enter to set
up Windows NT now.
__ 6. Press Enter for Setup to detect mass storage devices in your computer.
Note: You may need to follow the instructions from your personal computer
manufacturer to configure some mass storage devices and network
interface cards.
__ 7. Insert the third diskette as prompted and press Enter.
__ 8. Once Setup recognizes your computer’s mass storage devices, press Enter as
prompted.
__ 9. When prompted to do so, insert the CD, ″Microsoft Windows NT Server″, or
″Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition″. Press the Enter
key.
__ 10. Use the Page Down key to scroll to the end of the licensing agreement. Press
F8 if you agree with the conditions.
__ 11. If Setup finds a previous version of NT, press N to cancel the upgrade and
install a fresh copy of Windows NT.
34
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 12. If the list of components that Setup displays matches your computer, press
Enter.
__ 13. Setup detects partitions on your drive. Unless you need to preserve data on
your existing partitions, you should delete the existing partitions and create new
ones. Otherwise, you may install Windows NT on an existing partition.
Notes:
a. Windows NT Server 4.0 and IBM Network Station Manager require at least
800 MB of free space.
b. Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition, and IBM Network Station
Manager requires at least 1 GB of free space.
c. Unless you need to preserve a partition in order to save other software, you
should delete any existing partitions and create a new one.
__ 14. Highlight the install partition and press Enter to install Windows NT.
__ 15. Use the arrow keys to highlight Format the partition using the NTFS file system.
Press Enter.
Important: Do not choose the FAT file system. If you choose the FAT file
system, the IBM Network Station Manager installation fails.
__ 16. After Setup formats the new partition, press Enter to accept the default location
to install the Windows NT Server operating system. If you wish, you may enter
a different directory for the Windows NT Server software installation.
__ 17. Press enter to perform an exhaustive examination of your hard disk.
__ 18. After Setup has copied the necessary files, remove the diskettes and the CD
from their drives and press Enter to restart the computer as instructed.
Note: Some PC Server computers will ask you if you expected the hardware
configuration change. This happens because you reformatted a hard
drive partition. Select Change is expected or simply accept the
changes.
__ 19. When Setup continues, insert the CD and click OK as directed.
__ 20. Click Next to begin the Setup program.
__ 21. Enter your name and organization. Click Next.
__ 22. Enter the CD key as directed. Click Next.
__ 23. Choose the correct licensing model. For Windows NT Server 4.0 if you choose
Per Server, select only the number of licenses that you have purchased. For
Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition, select the number of terminal
server desktops. Click Next.
__ 24. Type a computer name and click Next.
__ 25. Select a server type and then click Next. The recommended server type is
Stand-Alone server. You can install IBM Network Station Manager on Windows
NT Servers configured as Primary Domain Controllers (PDCs) or Backup
Domain Controllers (BDCs). These configurations are not suggested due to the
work load the BDCs and PDCs handle in addition to the typical IBM Network
Station Manager work load. The server type options are as follows:
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
35
Primary Domain Controller (PDC) (not recommended)
The server that contains the primary copy of the security accounts
database for a domain. Each domain contains only one PDC.
Backup Domain Controller (BDC) (not recommended)
A server that contains a backup copy of the security accounts
database for a domain. A domain can contain more than one BDC.
Stand-Alone server (recommended)
A server that supports clients but that is neither a BDC nor the PDC of
its domain. Create a Stand-Alone server and then, if desired, configure
it to be part of a domain.1
__ 26. Create an administrator password as prompted, then click Next.
__ 27. Choose whether or not to create an emergency repair disk, then click Next.
__ 28. When Setup continues, select the components that you want to install and then
click Next. If you are not certain of what components to install, simply accept
the default values.
__ 29. For Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition, if you want to install
Internet Explorer 4.01 at this time, select Yes. If you want to install Netscape
Navigator 4.04, select No. You will install Netscape Navigator 4.04 later.
__ 30. Click Next to continue Setup.
__ 31. Select This computer will participate on a network. Choose Wired to the
Network, then click Next.
__ 32. De-select the check box for installing Microsoft Internet Information Server and
then click Next. You will install a newer Microsoft Internet Information Server
version later.
__ 33. Click the Start Search button to find your network adapter card. If Windows NT
Server cannot find your card, select Choose from list.
Note: You should install the latest driver for your network adapter card. Check
with your network adapter card manufacturer for the latest updates.
__ 34. Select an adapter card and click Next to install the selected adapter card.
__ 35. Follow the prompts to define or install your network adapter card.
Note: If your network contains any routers or bridges, you must make sure that
your network adapter card supports them. If a dialog box prompts you to
configure your network adapter card, look to see if the configuration
window includes advanced properties. If you do not have the option of
configuring advanced parameters, you must install a more advanced
network adapter card.
Note: If your server token-ring adapter supports advanced functions, check to
make sure that the MTU size is correct by carrying out the following
steps:
1. You may attach your Stand-Alone server configuration to a domain after you install your Windows NT software and your IBM Network
Station Manager software.
36
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ a. Access the Network Control Panel by clicking
Start->Settings->Control Panel->Network->Adapters.
__ b. Click on Properties.
__ c. Click on Advanced.
__ d. The MTU size appears in the Maximum Packet Size text field.
__ e. Refer to Table 8 on page 31 for the correct packet size information
for your network.
__ f. Enter the correct packet size and click Ok and then Close.
__ 36. Once you have defined your network adapter card, select the networking
protocols to use on your network, then click Next.
Note: IBM Network Station Manager software requires Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) services.
__ 37. Click Next to install Network Services.
__ 38. Click Next to install selected components.
__ 39. Enter the IP address of the server in the Network Address field, then click
Continue.
__ 40. In the TCP/IP Setup window, select No when asked if you want to use DHCP.
Note: This question relates to your Windows NT Server IP Address and not to
your Network Station IP addresses. Unless you want your NT Server to
receive its IP address dynamically, select No.
__ 41. In the Microsoft TCP/IP Properties window, specify your server’s IP address,
your network’s subnet mask, and the IP address of the default router.
__ 42. Select the DNS tab. Enter your TCP/IP domain name address and your DNS
Server IP address.
__ 43. If you use WINS, select the WINS Address tab. Enter your WINS Server IP
address.
__ 44. Click Apply, then OK.
__ 45. Click Next to enable bindings for all services.
__ 46. Click Next to start the network.
__ 47. Click on Domain and enter the domain (for example, my company) or the
workgroup (for example, workgroup) in which your server belongs. Then click
Next.
__ 48. Click Finish.
__ 49. In the Date/Time Properties window, under the Time Zone tab, highlight your
time zone. If appropriate for your location, select Automatically adjust clock for
daylight saving changes.
__ 50. Select the Date and Time tab. Verify the information and then click Close.
__ 51. In the Detected Display window, click OK.
__ 52. To accept your display type and adapter, you must select the following
commands in order:
a. From the Settings tab, click Test.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
37
b. If the test succeeds, click OK in the Testing Mode window.
c. Select Yes, OK (if everything is correct), and OK.
__ 53. When Setup finishes copying files, remove all disks as directed and click on the
button to restart the computer.
__ 54. When the computer restarts, log in as administrator.
__ 55. Make sure that the regional settings are correct for your location.
Important: You must configure the regional settings for your locale. If you do
not, the IBM Network Station Manager will not install in your
language, even if you choose your language during the installation.
To configure regional settings, carry out the following steps:
__ a. Select Start->Settings->Control Panel->Regional Settings->Input
Locales.
__ b. If your locale is not highlighted, click on Add, then select your locale
from the scrolldown list and click OK.
__ c. Click Apply in the Regional Settings Properties window.
__ d. Click the Regional Settings tab.
__ e. If your region is not highlighted, select your region from the scrolldown
list.
__ f. Check the box that is labeled Set as system-default locale.
__ g. Insert the CD, ″Microsoft Windows NT Server, (or Microsoft Windows NT
Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition)″ into the CD-ROM drive.
__ h. Click OK.
__ i. After the Regional Settings program runs, remove the CD and close the
CD interface window.
__ j. Select Yes to restart the computer.
__ 56. Install Service Pack 3 if you installed Windows NT Server 4.0. Obtain Service
Pack 3 from Microsoft or download it from http://www.microsoft.com. If you
installed Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition, do not install Service
Pack 3.
Note: Carry out the following steps to see if you previously installed the service
pack:
__ a. Click Start->Settings->Control Panel->System.
__ b. Select the General tab.
__ c. Read the information under System at the top of the page. You
will see Service Pack 3 if it is installed.
Once you have installed Windows NT Server 4.0 with Service Pack 3, you may
continue.
__ 57. Install prerequisite software:
Besides properly installing either Windows NT Server 4.0, or Windows NT
Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition; you must make three decisions before you
install the IBM Network Station Manager:
38
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 9. Three Prerequisite Component Decisions
Component
IBM Option
Microsoft Option
1. Choose a Web browser. You
use this Java enabled Web
browser on either your
Windows NT Server 4.0 or
Windows NT Server 4.0,
Terminal Server Edition to run
IBM Network Station Manager.
Later, you can install a NC
Navigator Web browser for
individual Network Station
users.
Netscape Navigator 4.04.
Included on CD. See Step 58
for instructions.
Microsoft Internet Explorer
4.0.1. Obtain from Microsoft.
This version is required for
Microsoft Internet Information
Server Web server. See Step
58 for instructions.
2. Choose a Web server.
Lotus Domino Go 4.6.2.2 or
greater. Included on CD. See
Step 59 on page 40 for
instructions.
Microsoft Internet Information
Server 4.0. This Web server
requires Microsoft Internet
Explorer 4.0.1 browser. Do not
use an older version. Obtain
from Microsoft. See Step 59
on page 40 for instructions.
3. Choose a DHCP server (not
required if using NVRAM boot
method).
IBM DHCP. Included on CD.
Microsoft DHCP. Included on
See Step 60 on page 42 for
Windows NT Server 4.0
instructions and a discussion of installation CD. See Step 60
the advantages of choosing
on page 42 for instructions.
IBM DHCP.2
__ 58. Install either Netscape Navigator 4.04 or Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0.1 as
your default browser:
You must install one of the above Web browsers as your default browser in
order to use the IBM Network Station Manager. You can load Netscape
Navigator 4.04 from the IBM Network Station Manager for PC Server CD or
obtain Internet Explorer 4.0.1 from Microsoft. Remember that Microsoft Internet
Information Server 4.0 requires Internet Explorer 4.0.1. Make sure that you
install that browser if you are using Internet Information Server 4.0. Do not try
to use an older version of the browser.
If you want to use Internet Explorer 4.0.1, you need to install it on a Windows
NT Server 4.0 server. Skip to Step 58.l on page 40.
Note: If you installed Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Edition Server, and you
previously installed Internet Explorer 4.0.1; skip to Step 59 on page 40.
To install Netscape Navigator 4.04 from the IBM Network Station Manager
installation for PC Server CD, carry out the following steps:
__ a. Insert the CD, ″IBM Network Station Manager for PC Server″ into the
CD-ROM drive. It may take a moment for the first screen to appear on
your display.
2. You may install the eNetwork On-Demand software on a separate server without any of the IBM Network Station Manager software.
This way, you can dedicate the separate server to DHCP or DNS especially in large enterprise networks.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
39
__ b. Select the language of your choice. This selection only identifies the
language that the CD uses to perform the installation. It is not
necessarily the language of the installed software.
Note
To install Netscape in a language that does not appear on the first
screen of the CD, carry out the following steps:
__ 1) Select Other Languages.
__ 2) Select Install Additional Products.
__ 3) Select Netscape Navigator 4.0.
__ 4) Open the readme.txt file. Follow the instructions that are
contained in the readme.txt file.
__ 5) Go to Step 58.f.
__ c. Select Install Additional Products.
__ d. Select Netscape Navigator 4.0.
__ e. Click Yes to proceed with the installation.
__ f. Follow the Setup instructions. You can choose either a typical or a
custom installation.
__ g. After the successful installation, double-click on the Netscape Navigator
icon to open the browser.
__ h. Follow the wizard prompts until you are asked if you want to make
Netscape Navigator 4.04 your default browser. You do not need to create
a user profile. If you do not want to create a user profile, you can click
on Next and then Finish until you see the default browser prompt.
__ i. Select Yes to make Netscape Navigator 4.0.4 your default browser. You
must make this selection in order to use this browser to open the IBM
Network Station Manager.
Note: You may select the check box to not perform this check in the
future.
__ j. When a window appears indicating that Netscape is unable to locate the
server, close the window and ignore the message.
__ k. Close the browser and continue to Step 59.
__ l. To install Internet Explorer 4.0.1, carry out the following steps:
1) Obtain the browser from Microsoft or download it from
http://www.microsoft.com.
2) Install the browser as your default browser by following the
instructions that accompany the product.
3) Restart the machine as prompted.
4) Continue to Step 59.
__ 59. Install either IBM’s Lotus Domino Go Webserver 4.6.2.2 or Microsoft Internet
Information Server 4.0:
40
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Choose a Web server from which to run the IBM Network Station Manager.
Look for IBM’s Lotus Domino Go Webserver 4.6.2.2 on the installation CD.
To install Microsoft Internet Information Server, go to Step 59.j on page 42.
To install IBM’s Lotus Domino Go Webserver 4.6.2.2 from the installation CD,
carry out the following steps:
__ a. If you have not yet done so, insert the CD, ″IBM Network Station
Manager for PC Server″ into your CD-ROM drive.
__ b. Select the language of your choice if you have not yet done so. This
selection only identifies the language that the CD uses to perform the
installation. It is not necessarily the language of the installed software.
Note
If you want to install Lotus Domino Go Webserver 4.6.2.2 in a
language that does not appear on the screen, carry out the
following steps:
__ 1) Select Other Languages.
__ 2) Select Install Additional Products.
__ 3) Select Lotus Domino Go Webserver 4.6.2.2.
__ 4) Open the readme.txt file. Follow the instructions that are
contained in the readme.txt file.
__ 5) Go to Step 59.e.
__ c. Select Install Additional Products if you have not yet done so.
__ d. Select Lotus Domino Go 4.6.2.2.
__ e. Follow the prompts of the installation program. When you are prompted
to choose what components to install, you must choose at least the
following components:
v Lotus Domino Go Webserver 4.6.2.2
v Security File
v NT Service
__ f. Setup prompts you to enter the directories for the installation of the Web
server. You may simply accept the defaults.
__ g. When prompted to do so, enter an administrator ID and an administrator
password to use while administrating your Web server.
__ h. After the installation, you may choose to restart your server machine
later if you continue immediately with the installation of the IBM Network
Station Manager.
Note: After the installation of the IBM Network Station Manager, you can
install a more advanced version of Lotus Domino Go Webserver
4.6.2.2. The IBM Network Station Manager does not require the
advanced version of the Web server. You can download the
advanced version from http://www.lotus.com.
__ i. After the installation of the Web server, go to Step 60 on page 42.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
41
__ j. If you choose to use Microsoft Internet Information Server 4.0, carry out
the following steps:
1) Obtain Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0.1 if you do not already have it
on your machine. The download operation of Internet Information
Server requires this level of the browser. Do not use an older version
of the product. You can download the browser from
http://www.microsoft.com.
2) Obtain Microsoft Windows NT Option Pack. You can download the
option pack from http://www.microsoft.com. Because this is a large
download, create a directory in which to place the option pack. The
option pack contains the Internet Information Server software.
3) Follow the installation instructions that accompany the product.
4) Once the Web server has installed successfully, go to Step 60.
__ 60. If you will use DHCP in your network, install IBM DHCP or Microsoft DHCP:
You must choose between IBM and Microsoft DHCP. Look for IBM DHCP on
the IBM Network Station Manager installation CD. If you select IBM DHCP
during the installation, it will install along with the IBM Network Station Manager.
IBM DHCP is part of the eNetwork On-Demand Server (eNOD). It includes the
following features:
v Full compliance with Internet RFCs
v Dynamic DNS updates
v User classing
v Support for interfacing with other corporate IP management systems
v Automatic detection of duplicate IP addresses
v Full compatibility with DHCP on all IBM platforms
To install IBM DHCP, you do not need to take any action at this time. When you
install the IBM Network Station Manager software, you can automatically install
the IBM DHCP software. Choose Yes at that time.
If you choose to use IBM DHCP, go to Step 61 on page 43.
Microsoft DHCP is not included on the IBM Network Station Manager CD.
To install Microsoft DHCP, carry out the following steps:
__ a. Choose Start->Settings->Control Panel->Network->Services.
__ b. Select Server.
__ c. Click on Add.
__ d. Insert the CD, ″Windows NT Server 4.0″ into the CD-ROM drive.
__ e. From the Services tab in the Network panel, select Microsoft DHCP
Server.
__ f. Click on OK.
__ g. Click Continue if the text box indicates the proper path from your
CD-ROM drive.
__ h. Shut down and restart your computer as prompted.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ i. Make sure that the Microsoft DHCP server is running by carrying out the
following steps:
__ 1) From the Windows NT desktop, choose Start->Settings->Control
Panel->Services.
__ 2) If the Microsoft DHCP server is not running, highlight it and select
Start.
Attention: You may need to reinstall Service Pack 3 if you install Microsoft
DHCP if you installed Windows NT Server 4.0. Refer to step 56 on page 38 to
determine if Service Pack 3 is currently installed.
__ j. Once you have successfully installed DHCP, continue with Step 61.
__ 61. Install the IBM Network Station Manager software, including TCP/IP services
and other dependencies:
Note:
Some software packages require the following commands before you
install them on your Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Edition Server.
Refer to the documentation that ships with your software for specific
installation instructions.
To install IBM Network Station Manager software on your Windows NT
Server 4.0, Terminal Edition Server, carry out the following steps to make
the registry information and icons accessible to all users:
__ a. At a command line prompt, type ’change user /install’.
__ b. Press enter to start the installation program.
__ c. Type ’change user /execute’.
__ a. If you plan to upgrade from an older version of the IBM Network Station
Manager, read the information in “Updating IBM Network Station
Manager Software and Migrating IBM Network Station Manager
Preference Files” on page 79. If the information in that section instructs
you to perform a single-server migration, make sure that you instruct any
users to log off your server. Active Network Station users will lose their
applications. You may want to perform the migration after business hours
or at some time when there are no Network Station users on the
network.
__ b. Close all programs and log on as administrator.
__ c. If you have not yet done so, insert the CD, ″IBM Network Station
Manager for PC Server.″
__ d. Select the language of your choice if you have not yet done so. This
selection only identifies the language that the CD uses to perform the
installation. It is not necessarily the language of the installed software.
__ e. Select Install IBM Network Station Manager.
__ f. Select Run Installation.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
43
__ g. Confirm your language choice on the pop-up screen that appears. This
language is only the language in which the installation dialogs appear. It
is not necessarily the language of the software after installation. The
Setup program automatically detects the language of your server and
installs the software accordingly.
__ h. Click Next on the Welcome screen.
__ i. Select Yes to accept the license agreement.
__ j. Use the following instructions to install your IBM Network Station
Manager software:
__ 1) If you are upgrading from a previous version of IBM Network
Station Manager, read “Updating IBM Network Station Manager
Software and Migrating IBM Network Station Manager Preference
Files” on page 79.
__ 2) If you plan to use IBM DHCP, select Yes. If you plan on using
another DHCP, or none at all, select No.
Note: At the time of this writing, you should not use IBM DHCP
on an Integrated PC Server Card in an AS/400 server.
__ 3) Choose a destination directory and select Next.
__ 4) Choose Program Group and select Next.
__ 5) If you are upgrading from a previous version of IBM Network
Station Manager, refer to Step 3 on page 83 for the proper
directory path to fill in here. If you are not upgrading, do not enter
anything here. Select Next.
__ 6) Choose the destination for your eNetwork On-Demand software
and select Next.
__ 7) If you are in the United States and Canada, you may install the
128-bit version of the NC Navigator Web browser in place of the
standard version. Select Yes to install this United States and
Canada-only software.
__ 8) Verify products to be installed and select Next.
__ 9) If you are installing IBM DHCP, select OK to install the NDIS
Intermediate Driver 3.0. This message only appears if you install
IBM DHCP.
__ 10) If you want a shortcut to the IBM Network Station Manager
software on your desktop, select Yes.
__ 11) After the installation, select Yes to restart your computer and
finish the installation.
Now that you have finished installing the IBM Network Station Manager, continue to
“Configuring DHCP on the Windows NT Server Platform” on page 55. If you are
updating your IBM Network Station Manager software, refer to Step 4 on page 83 to
move your Network Stations to the new server.
44
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
In order to run Windows-based applications, you need to install additional software.
Refer to “Installing IBM Network Station Manager to Run Windows-based Applications”
on page 46.
Resolving Installation Problems
If problems occur during the installation of the IBM Network Station Manager, consider
the following items:
v If a previous version of the NDIS Intermediate Driver exists on your machine, Setup
will attempt to uninstall it automatically. If that uninstallation fails, you must uninstall
the driver manually. Setup will bring up the Network Control Panel. Uninstall the
driver by carrying out the following steps:
__ 1. From the Network Control Panel, select the Protocols tab.
__ 2. Highlight DHCP Driver by clicking on it once.
__ 3. Click on Remove.
__ 4. Click on Yes.
__ 5. Click on Close.
__ 6. Click on Yes.
__ 7. Restart the server.
__ 8. Begin the installation process again by returning to Step 61 on page 43.
v If you choose to use IBM DHCP, Setup will automatically install the NDIS
Intermediate Driver for you. If that installation fails, you must install it manually. To
install the driver manually, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. When Setup asks if you want to use IBM DHCP, click on Yes.
__ 2. The licensing agreement appears. Click on OK if you agree to it.
__ 3. Click on Next.
__ 4. When the Network Control Panel appears, click on the Protocols tab.
__ 5. Click on Add.
__ 6. Click on Have Disk.
__ 7. The path to the NDIS Intermediate Driver should appear in the text box.
Make sure that the path is correct and that the path indicates your CD-ROM
drive.
__ 8. Click on OK.
__ 9. Click on Close.
__ 10. When prompted to reboot, choose No. It is safe to wait until after the
installation to restart your computer. If you choose Yes, you must begin the
installation again by returning to Step 61 on page 43.
v For Windows NT Server 4.0 servers only, if you try to install IBM DHCP on a
multiprocessor machine, you may encounter problems. Contact Microsoft to fix the
problem. Microsoft provides a fix that is called Q156655 (″ndis-fix″).
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
45
Installing IBM Network Station Manager to Run Windows-based Applications
You can run Windows-based applications on your Network Stations if you add additional
software to your Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Edition Server computer. You can
use the ICA protocol or the X11 Windows protocol to run your Windows-based
applications. The additional software includes the following:
Note: This trial-use software does not work on Windows NT Server 4.0 servers. You
must run Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition to activate the
trial-use software.
1. IBM Network Station Manager (required)
2. Citrix MetaFrame software (required)
3. NCD WinCenter UIS (optional)
4. Windows application such as Lotus SmartSuite 97
Look for the Try and Buy NCD WinCenter UIS software on your IBM Network Station
Manager – Supplemental Trial Products CD. Look for the Demonstration Version of
Citrix MetaFrame software, and Lotus SmartSuite 97 on a separate CD delivered with
your IBM Network Station Manager software.
After you install your Windows-based software, you need to create a Network Station
user button to start a MetaFrame or WinCenter UIS session. Refer to “Configuring a
Local (ICA) Client Session Menu Button for a Network Station” on page 278 and
configure your Network Stations to use MetaFrame. Refer to “Setting Up a Windows NT
Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 294 and configure
your Network Stations to use NCD WinCenter UIS.
Read this section and follow the instructions to install and configure these applications.
46
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Note: To activate this trial-use software to run Windows-based applications on your
Network Stations, you must install MetaFrame and TCP/IP services in your
operating system. To use the optional X11 Windows protocol you must install
both Citrix MetaFrame and NCD WinCenter UIS software.
Figure 9. Additional Software Needed to Run Windows-based Applications on Your
Network Stations
Using the Citrix ICA client that is provided with the IBM Network Station Manager
software package, IBM Network Station users can execute Windows-based applications
on a server running Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition and
Citrix MetaFrame.
This package includes a Demonstration Version of Citrix MetaFrame with a five (5)
concurrent user license and a Demonstration Version of Lotus SmartSuite 97
application software to demonstrate these capabilities.
The Demonstration Version of Citrix MetaFrame has limited functionality, and must be
activated on Citrix’s activation website within 5 days of installation. Upon activation, this
software is functional for 45 days and can be used to run the Lotus SmartSuite 97
Windows-based applications. Other Windows-based applications cannot be added with
this trial offering.
You may install Lotus SmartSuite 97 at the same time that you install Citrix MetaFrame.
If you install Lotus SmartSuite 97 at this time, the entire SmartSuite 97 package will be
installed to C:\Lotus. If you do not install Lotus SmartSuite 97 at this time, refer to the
Terminal.doc file located in the root directory of the Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal
Server Edition CD-ROM for instructions on installing Lotus SmartSuite 97.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
47
To install this software, please follow the directions in “Installing Citrix MetaFrame and
Lotus SmartSuite 97”. If you downloaded your IBM Network Station Manager software
package from the Internet and you wish to obtain the trial offering, contact your IBM
Business Partner.
NCD WinCenter UIS allows you to use the X11 Windows protocol to run
Windows-based applications on your Network Stations. However, this protocol is
optional. You may simply run Windows-based applications with the ICA protocol Citrix
MetaFrame provides. To activate the optional X11 Windows protocol, you must install
both Citrix MetaFrame and NCD WinCenter UIS.
Installing Citrix MetaFrame and Lotus SmartSuite 97
Follow these steps to install the Demonstration Version of MetaFrame and Lotus
SmartSuite 97. Before you install MetaFrame, ensure that no other users are logged on
to the server.
__ 1. Find your MetaFrame license number. This number is on a sticker attached to
the Demonstration Version MetaFrame CD booklet.
__ 2. Insert the MetaFrame Demonstration CD-ROM in the server’s CD-ROM drive.
The MetaFrame CD-ROM installation splash screen automatically appears. If the
splash screen does not automatically appear, choose Run from the Start menu
and type d:\i386\autorun.exe where d is the letter of your CD-ROM drive.
__ 3. Click MetaFrame Setup to begin installation.
__ 4. The MetaFrame license is displayed. Please read the terms of the license
agreement and then click I Agree to continue with the installation or Quit to
cancel installation.
__ 5. The MetaFrame Licensing Enter License Serial Number dialog box appears.
Enter your MetaFrame license number exactly as it appears on the license
sticker and click OK.
Various dialog boxes will appear on-screen quickly as MetaFrame is installed.
You can safely ignore these dialog boxes.
__ 6. When the Lotus SmartSuite 97 installation panel appears, select an appropriate
installation option. If you install Lotus SmartSuite 97 at this time, the entire
SmartSuite 97 package will be installed to C:\Lotus.
If you do not install Lotus SmartSuite 97 at this time, refer to the Terminal.doc file
located in the root directory of the Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server
Edition CD-ROM for instructions on how to install Lotus SmartSuite 97.
__ 7. If any errors occur during installation, a dialog box appears with the location of
the error log file. View the log file with a text editor to determine the cause of the
errors.
__ 8. When the installation is completed, the server is automatically rebooted.
Activating Citrix MetaFrame
Once the Demonstration Version of MetaFrame is installed, it must be activated within 5
days. Follow these steps to activate your MetaFrame server.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 1. Logon as an administrator. Select Start, MetaFrame Tools (common), and
Citrix Licensing. Citrix Licensing displays all of your installed licenses and their
license numbers. You must use the license numbers displayed by Citrix
Licensing when activating your software in Step 5 below.
The next step in the installation process is to activate your software by
contacting the Citrix Activation Server. This is done using the Citrix License
Activation Wizard.
The Citrix License Activation Wizard can connect to the Citrix Activation Server
using a TCP/IP Internet connection, a modem connection, or a connection to the
Citrix Activation Web page using a Web browser. To use a TCP/IP Internet
connection, you must install TCP/IP on your server and have Internet access. To
use a modem connection, you must have a modem attached and properly
configured for dial out. To use a Web browser, you must have an Internet
connection and a Web browser.
__ 2. Click Activation Wizard in the MetaFrame Tools folder. The Citrix License
Activation Wizard dialog box appears.
__ 3. Select the method you want to use to activate your MetaFrame server and click
Next.
__ 4. If you choose Activate Over The Internet or Activate By Modem and the Citrix
ICA Win32 Client is not installed, you are prompted to install it. Follow the
instructions that appear to install the Citrix ICA Win32 Client. After installation,
select Activate Over The Internet, Activate With Web Browser (does not
require additional software), or Activate By Modem and click Next.
__ 5. Click Finish to connect to the Citrix License Activation Server. When the Citrix
License Activation System window appears, follow the directions to obtain your
activation code. Record your activation code exactly as it appears.
Notes:
a. The license number is a 29-digit number. This 29-digit number is different
than the 21-digit serial number on the serial number sticker. Use the Citrix
Licensing interface to determine the license number as explained in Step 1.
b. If your server does not have a modem or an Internet connection, see the
MetaFrame booklet for a list of URLs and telephone numbers to use for
activation.
__ 6. To activate your Citrix software, start Citrix Licensing or click on the Citrix
Licensing window if it is already started. Select the Citrix license you are
activating from the list of displayed licenses, and then click Activate License on
the License menu. The Activate License dialog box appears. Enter your
activation code from Step 1 above and click OK. Your Citrix software is now
activated.
Refer to “Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session Menu Button for a Network Station”
on page 278 and configure your Network Station to use the ICA protocol to run
Windows-based applications. You need to enter three items to create a Network Station
MetaFrame button: A button name, ICACLNT, and the IP address for your MetaFrame
server. (If you have DNS running, you may enter the server name.)
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
49
Installing NCD WinCenter UIS
Before you install your trial NCD WinCenter UIS software, you need to contact NCD,
Inc. for a temporary key that activates your trial-use software on the IBM Network
Station Manager – Supplemental Trial Products CD. The easiest method is to enter the
temporary key during installation; however, you may also enter the key after you install
the software.
To get your temporary NCD WinCenter UIS key, perform the following instructions:
__ 1. In the US only call 1-800-800-9599 or send an e-mail to [email protected]
Note: For customers outside the US, contact your nearest NCD reseller by
viewing the NCD website at http://www.ncd.com.
__ 2. Provide your company information. NCD provides you with a temporary key to
activate your Try and Buy NCD WinCenter UIS software.
__ 3. Write your temporary key in the table below.
Table 10. Temporary Key to Activate NCD WinCenter UIS Try and Buy Software
Requested information:
Write your information here:
NCD WinCenter UIS software temporary key
(supplied by NCD).
To install NCD WinCenter UIS on your Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition
server, perform the following instructions. Make sure that you have the trial-use
activation key before you proceed. Refer to Table 10. You may use your trial-use
activation key after you install; however, activating your software during installation is
the easiest method.
Note: During this trial-use period, you must have Citrix MetaFrame PC Based licenses
to use the NCD WinCenter UIS licenses.
__ 1. Insert your IBM Network Station Manager – Supplemental Trial Products CD into
your CD-ROM drive.
__ 2. Select Installing NCD WinCenter UIS.
__ 3. Select Install UIS.
__ 4. You may enter your trial-use activation key when prompted to add a Citrix
license.
__ 5. If you want an X11 and Microsoft Client Allocation, select Yes to enable them. If
you do not want these options, select No to disable them.
Refer to “Setting Up a Windows NT Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program” on page 294 and configure your Network Station to use the X11 Windows
protocol to run Windows-based applications. You need to enter four items to create a
Network Station WinCenter UIS button: A button name, the server IP address,
wincenter, and required parameters for your WinCenter UIS server.
50
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Installing IBM Network Station Manager Software Automatically Using a
Response File
You can use the setup.exe command to install the IBM Network Station Manager
software suite on more than one identical server. During your first server installation, the
setup.exe command line options record a response file, setup.iss, which you can use to
install the IBM Network Station Manager software suite on additional servers.
Note: The automatic installation only works from a CD copy of the IBM Network Station
Manager software. You cannot use this procedure if you downloaded the IBM
Network Station Manager software from the Web.
The setup.iss response file records the installation of the IBM Network Station Manager,
eNetwork On-Demand Server, (and depending on user input), the NDIS Intermediate
Driver and NC Navigator (North-American) browser on your PC Server. Make sure that
you install the prerequisites for these products on each additional server. The response
file records error messages and user-specified paths. If the additional servers do not
have identical prerequisite software installed such as Netscape Navigator 4.04, the
installation prompts you for input and the installation is not automatic.
To create the response file and install your software automatically in batch mode from
the command line, follow the instructions below:
1. On a command line, enter the following command to install the IBM Network Station
Manager software suite on your first server and generate the setup.iss response file
for additional installations: x:\ntnsm\en\products\nsm\setup.exe -r -SMS where x
is your CD-ROM drive letter.
Note: This command installs the full IBM Network Station Manager software suite
that includes eNetwork On-Demand services.
To install the IBM Network Station Manager software suite automatically in batch mode
on an additional, identical Windows NT Server, use the response file from your first
installation. Use the setup command to invoke the response file.
1. Copy the setup.iss file from your first installed server Windows NT subdirectory
(commonly C:\WINNT) to the Windows NT subdirectory on your additional server.
2. Enter the following command to run the IBM Network Station Manager software
suite installation automatically on your additional servers:
x:\ntnsm\en\products\nsm\setup.exe -s -f1C:\WINNT\setup.iss where x: is the
CD-ROM drive or a mapped network drive, and C:\WINNT\ is your Windows NT
subdirectory.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
51
Installing a Boot Server for Your Network Stations
Separating Boot servers from Authentication servers is a powerful way to centrally
administer several Network Stations in your enterprise. You can do this with the IBM
Network Station Manager for PC Server software. By separating your Boot server from
your Authentication server, you can make your LAN network traffic and your WAN
network traffic more efficient.
A Boot server includes only the executable programs for the Network Station clients and
the TCP/IP services. The Boot server does not include any of the IBM Network Station
Manager software or IBM Network Station login services. You need a separate
Authentication server for these services.
For example, consider an enterprise with a centralized hub office and several branch
offices. The branch offices connect to the centralized hub office via a slow wide area
network (WAN) link, and locally the Network Stations connect within the branch via a
fast LAN connection. With this network topology, you would install the Network Station
configuration server and authentication server at the centralized hub office. This
provides a single point for you to store company-wide preference information and user
data. You would install a smaller boot server at each branch for your Network Station
executable programs to run locally from the boot server.
You may centralize your Network Station administration with this concept. Run your IBM
Network Station Manager software at the centralized hub office. Reduce the network
traffic by sending authentication and user specific files over the WAN link. Start your
Network Stations (a network intensive activity) locally, and run common programs
across the LAN to reduce your WAN traffic.
Set your Network Station to start from the local network and obtain the operating
system (OS) configuration files from the remote network. The login screen starts locally,
authenticates the user remotely, and obtains his or her login preferences and home files
from the remote system. After the user authenticates through the remote system, all
programs operate from the local server. The remote server saves all user preferences
and personal files.
Setting up Your Boot Server and Your Authentication Server
Install the IBM Network Station Manger software on your Network Station boot server.
This Windows NT Server 4.0 (or Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition) Boot
server should be closer (via LAN hops) to your Network Stations than your
Authentication server. Typically this solution authenticates Network Stations over a WAN
and starts Network Stations via a LAN (with or without routers).
To install the IBM Network Station Manager software on your Network Station boot
server, perform the following command:
1. From a Command Prompt, enter the following command:
x:\ntnsm\en\products\nsm\setup.exe /bs
2. where x: is your CD-ROM drive letter.
52
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
To install the IBM Network Station Manager software on your authentication,
configuration, and user home directory server, perform the following commands. This
Windows NT 4.0 Server has a remote wide area network (WAN) connection to your
LAN.
1. From a Command Prompt, enter the following command:
x:\ntnsm\en\products\nsm\setup.exe /as
2. where x: is your CD-ROM drive letter.
Using DHCP on Your Boot Server
In order to set up the Network Station to access its preferences, you must set the
Configuration Host IP Address on each Network Station. You can do this through the
Setup Utility for NVRAM, or through a DHCP implementation. DHCP is recommended.
You can use DHCP to centrally administer your network topology without individually
changing each Network Station through NVRAM.
You should set the following DHCP options to your desired network settings.
Set the following DHCP options to use a separate boot server:
DHCP Option
DHCP Option Purpose
Option 66
Specifies the boot server
Write your value here...
Option 212
Specifies the configuration
server
Option 213
Directory for downloading
configuration data
/netstation/prodbase/configs/
(this is the default value)
Option 214
Protocol for downloading
configuration data
″nfs″ (this is the default value)
Using NVRAM on Your Boot Server
You may configure each Network Station separately with NVRAM. Change these setting
through the Setup Utility on each Network Station. Access the Setup Utility on the
Network Station by carrying out the following steps:
1. Power on the Network Station
2. When the ’NS0500 Search for Host System’ message appears on the screen, press
the Escape key.
3. If password control is active, enter the case-sensitive administrator password.
4. Press the F3 key to Set Network Parameters.
5. Under ’IP Addressed from’ choose NVRAM.
6. Set the first ’Boot Host IP Address’ to the IP address of the Local Boot/Application
server.
7. Set the first ’Configuration Host IP Address’ to the IP address of the Remote
Configuration/Home server.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
53
Installing Additional Software Components After the Initial Installation
You may want to install certain software components after you install the IBM Network
Station Manager software.
Note: TCP/IP services allow you to serve the operating system to your Network
Stations. The operating system is in a file that is called the kernel. After the
kernel downloads to the Network Station, the Network Station relies on the
TCP/IP services to interact with information on your Windows NT server.
Installing IBM DHCP
If you previously installed your IBM Network Station Manager software without the IBM
DHCP server, carry out the following steps to install the IBM DHCP server now:
__ 1. Insert the IBM Network Station Manager for PC Server CD into your CD-ROM
drive.
__ 2. Select the language of your choice.
__ 3. Click Explore CD.
__ 4. Find the directory x:\ntnsm\en\products\eNOD\tcpip\, where x is the letter that
is associated with your CD-ROM drive.
__ 5. Double-click on the file setup.exe to run the installation of the eNetwork
On-Demand server.
__ 6. During the installation, choose to install only the DHCP component.
Installing Microsoft DHCP
If you previously installed your IBM Network Station Manager software without the
Microsoft DHCP server, carry out the following steps to install the IBM DHCP server
now: To install the Microsoft DHCP server after you previously installed the IBM
Network Station Manager software, refer to Step 60 on page 42.
Installing the NDIS Intermediate Driver
The NDIS intermediate driver controls the networking on your Windows NT server. This
driver automatically installs when you install the IBM Network Station Manager software.
However, you may need to install the NDIS intermediate driver manually or reinstall the
NDIS intermediate driver manually under certain conditions.
To manually install the NDIS intermediate driver, perform the following steps:
1. Insert the IBM Network Station Manager CD into your CD-ROM drive.
2. Wait for the autorun dialog box to appear.
3. Select Exit.
4. Right click on the Network Neighborhood Icon on you desktop.
5. Select the Protocols tab.
6. Click the Add button.
54
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
7. Click the Have Disk button.
8. Enter {your CD-ROM drive letter}:\ntnsm\en\products\enod\ndis.
9. Click OK.
10. The IBM Intermediate Support Driver is highlighted, click OK.
11. Close the Network panel.
12. Click Yes to restart your computer.
Installing the 128–Bit NC Navigator Browser
During the installation of the IBM Network Station Manager software, customers in the
United States and Canada have the option of installing the 128–bit NC Navigator
browser. However, if you would like to install it after the installation of the IBM Network
Station Manager, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Insert the CD, ″IBM Network Station Manager for PC Server.″
__ 2. Select the language of your choice
__ 3. Click Explore CD.
__ 4. Find the directory x:\ntnsm\en\products\ncnav\, where x is the letter that is
associated with your CD-ROM drive.
__ 5. Double-click on the file setup.exe to run the installation program.
__ 6. When the installation is complete, open the IBM Network Station Manager.
__ 7. Under Setup Tasks, choose Startup.
__ 8. Under Startup, choose Environment Variables.
__ 9. If you want all users to access the 128–bit browser, select the System button. If
you only want one group to use the browser, select the Group button.
__ 10. Above the Add an Environment Variable button, type NAV_128SSL in the empty
text field on the left.
__ 11. Type True in the empty text field on the right.
__ 12. At the bottom of the screen, click on Finish to save the variable. The browser
is ready for use.
Configuring DHCP on the Windows NT Server Platform
DHCP is a powerful network administration tool. A careful, well-thought out DHCP
configuration can make a network run effectively. Whenever you make changes to your
network configuration, you must ensure that the DHCP configuration reflects those
changes. Read “DHCP” on page 15 for additional information about DHCP.
Collect the following information about your network before configuring DHCP. Record
your information in Table 11 on page 56.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
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Table 11. Gathering DHCP Information
DHCP Option
Number
Field
Description
Defining the Subnet Options
N/A
Subnet Number
(Subnet IP
Address)
The IP address associated with a particular
subnet. For Class C networks whose subnet
mask is 255.255.255.0, the subnet address is the
same as the network address. For Figure 5 on
page 7, the subnet IP address is 192.168.1.0. If
the subnet mask of your network is not
255.255.255.0, see “Subnets and Subnet Masks”
on page 9 for more information.
N/A
Start DHCP Pool The first IP address in the range which you have
Address (IP
specified for your pool of available addresses. In
Range From)
Network Example 3, for the subnet 192.168.1.0,
the Start DHCP Pool Address could be
192.168.1.2.
N/A
Last DHCP Pool
Address (IP
Range To)
The last IP address in the range which you have
specified for your pool of available addresses. In
Network Example 3, for the subnet 192.168.1.0,
the Last DHCP Pool Address could be
192.168.1.3.
Option 1
Subnet Mask
A value that enables network devices to direct
packets of information accurately in a subnetted
environment. For Figure 5 on page 7, the subnet
mask is 255.255.255.0. For a discussion of
subnet masks, refer to “Subnets and Subnet
Masks” on page 9.
Option 3
Router IP
The IP address of the default router to which
Address (Default TCP/IP packets not addressed to your network
Gateway)
will be sent. In Network Example 3, for the subnet
192.168.1.0, the default gateway IP address is
192.168.1.1.
Option 6
Domain Name
Server (IP
Address)
Delivering the Domain Name Server IP address to
clients allows them to use either fully qualified
host names or IP addresses when they
communicate with other devices. In Figure 5 on
page 7, the IP address of the Domain Name
Server is 192.168.1.5.
Option 15
Domain Name
The domain name allows the Network Station to
specify its domain to other devices. In Figure 5 on
page 7, where the fully qualified host name is
server.mycompany.com, the domain name is
mycompany.com.
Defining DHCP Options
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Write Your Network Value
Here
Table 11. Gathering DHCP Information (continued)
DHCP Option
Number
Field
Description
Write Your Network Value
Here
Option 66
Trivial File
Transfer Protocol
(TFTP) Server
Name (TFTP or
NFS)
The server from which the Network Station
downloads its operating system. This option
serves the operating system kernel using both
NFS, and TFTP. When you specify this option,
you must use an IP address, not the computer
name of the server. NFS is the recommended
download protocol. Enable the NFS download
with Option 211.
Option 67
Boot File name
The name of the file that contains the Network
/netstation/prodbase/kernel
Station operating system. This value is a constant Note: This is the NFS
and has been entered for you on the table.
pathname.
Option 211
Base Code
Server Protocol
This option sets the protocol used for the
operating system kernel download. Specify this
option to enable Option 66 to serve the kernel
using NFS.
nfs
Configuring IBM DHCP on Windows NT Server 4.0
The minimum number of steps to run IBM DHCP are to create a new subnet; define an
IP address pool for your subnet; define DHCP options 1, 3, 6, 15, 66, 67, and 211; save
your new configuration values; and stop and restart your DHCP service. See Table 11
on page 56 for the values for your DHCP configuration.
Note: Before any of your IBM DHCP settings take effect, you need to stop your DHCP
service and start your DHCP service. See “Starting and Stopping Servers and
Services on Windows NT Server 4.0” on page 76 for detailed information.
You may wish to set up advanced DHCP features by adding classes, clients, and
multiple server options. The sample DHCP configuration walks you through the steps
necessary to configure an advanced DHCP setup. Most of the IBM DHCP default
values are sufficient for common DHCP configurations. The following instructions guide
you in changing the defaults as needed.
Note: If you plan to use IBM DHCP, you must ensure that the device driver associated
with your LAN adapter card is compatible with the NDIS Intermediate Driver.
Please refer to the installation readme.txt file for known incompatibilities.
Note: Several of the DHCP utility screens have comment fields. Use these comment
fields to keep track of information about your DHCP configuration.
To configure IBM DHCP, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. If you have not yet done so, complete Table 11 on page 56.
__ 2. In order to configure DHCP on your server, you must access the eNetwork
On-Demand Server:
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
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To access the program from the Windows NT desktop, click
Start->Programs->eNetwork On-Demand Server->DHCP Server
Configuration.
The following screen appears:
Figure 10. Main eNOD DHCP Configuration Window
__ 3. Once you open the eNetwork On-Demand (eNOD) DHCP Server Configuration
window, change the options to describe your own network structure. Refer to
Table 11 on page 56 for the information that you provided which pertains to your
network structure.
The following example shows a DHCP configuration that is based on Network
Example 3, Figure 5 on page 7. As you read the instructions for configuring
DHCP, you can see what configuration values you would enter to configure the
sample environment.
The sample environment contains the following entities:
v 1 DHCP server
v 1 Token-ring network
v 4 IBM Network Stations. Ns1 and ns2 belong to the subnet and receive their
addresses dynamically. Ns3 and ns4 exist as clients with fixed IP addresses
outside of the subnet.
v 1 Domain Name Server
v 1 Router
All of these exist on the same token-ring network. Table 12 on page 59
summarizes the configuration. A step-by-step explanation of the example
accompanies the DHCP instructions which follow the table.
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Table 12. Sample DHCP Information for Network Example 3
Field
Value
Defining the Subnet Options
Subnet Number (subnet address)
192.168.1.0
Start DHCP Pool Address (IP Range From)
192.168.1.1
Last DHCP Pool Address (IP Range To)
192.168.1.100
Defining DHCP Options
Subnet Mask (DHCP Option 1)
255.255.255.0
Router (DHCP Option 3)
192.168.1.1 and 10.1.1.1
DNS Address (DHCP Option 6)
192.168.1.5
Domain Name (DHCP Option 15)
mycompany.com
Boot File Name (DHCP Option 67)
/netstation/prodbase/kernel
Defining Advanced DHCP Options
Client Name
ns3
Client Name
ns4
Client ID (MAC address)
0000e5686f14 (for ns3)
Client ID (MAC address)
0000e5806g63 (for ns4)
Client IP Address
10.1.1.2 (for ns3)
Client IP Address
10.1.1.3 (for ns4)
Note: The IBM Network Stations ns1 and ns2 do not appear in the table
because they represent hosts whose MAC addresses are unknown to the
server. The DHCP server will allocate their IP addresses dynamically.
You can configure options on several levels, including the global, subnet, class,
and client levels. If you configure an option at the global level, the value applies
to every client unless a value from a more specific level (such as a subnet level)
overrides it. For example, if you configure a router at the global level, every client
in the network recognizes that router as its own. However, if you configure a
different router at the subnet level, all clients within that subnet recognize the
second router as their own.
Refer to your network diagram to decide how to configure your network. Usually,
you begin by declaring some global options, and then you set up at least one
subnet or class and possibly some individual clients.
To construct the sample network, the administrator carries out the following
steps:
__ a. First, the administrator defines some global DHCP options. To configure
global options, carry out the following steps:
__ 1) Once you have opened the eNetwork On-Demand DHCP
Configuration utility, select File->New.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
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__ 2) The graphical display beneath Current Configuration — untitled
should show a DHCP server with a highlighted Global icon.
__ 3) If Global is highlighted, select Configure->Modify selected item.
__ 4) The Global Parameters window opens with the Excluded
Addresses tab selected.
Later, when you configure a subnet, you will specify a range of
addresses that your DHCP server will use to supply clients with IP
addresses. You must exclude from the range the IP addresses of
any entities on your network whose addresses are permanent or
fixed. You must exclude the following types of addresses from the
DHCP range:
v Any device whose address is fixed, including:
– Boot servers, configuration servers, http servers, domain
name servers
– Routers and network printers
– Network Stations that start using NVRAM
If you do not exclude such addresses from the range, you might
cause address conflicts in your network.
To exclude IP addresses, like the router in Network Example 3,
enter them in the IP address field and click on Add. The
administrator in Network Example 3 does not exclude the
broadcast address because it does not fall within the range of
available IP addresses. For Network Example 3, if the DHCP range
extended from 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.50, the administrator
would have to exclude three IP addresses from the range. The
administrator would exclude the addresses of the DHCP server
(192.168.1.4), the Domain Name Server (192.168.1.5), and the
router (192.168.1.1).
__ 5) Select the DHCP Options tab. The following screen appears:
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 11. Defining Global DHCP Options
__ 6) In the new window, select a DHCP option from the field on the left
of the screen. Refer to Table 11 on page 56. Enter the value for
that option in the Option Value window to the right. In Network
Example 3, the administrator selects options 1, 3, 6, and 15. The
administrator specifies these options at the global level because
they apply to all of the clients in the sample network. The above
graphic shows the administrator specifying the IP address of the
router.
Network Example 3, Global Parameters Summary:
v DHCP Options:
– Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
– Router: 192.168.1.1
– Domain Name Server address: 192.168.1.5
– Domain Name: mycompany.com
v Click Ok to go back to the main screen.
__ b. Next, the administrator of Network Example 3 creates a subnet. To create
a subnet, carry out the following steps:
__ 1) From the main eNOD DHCP configuration window, make sure that
Global is highlighted.
__ 2) From the menu pulldown, select Configure->Add Subnet.
__ 3) The Subnet Parameters window appears with the Subnet
Definition tab selected:
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61
Figure 12. Defining a Subnet
__ 4) Enter the information from Table 11 on page 56 on the screen. You
need to create a range of IP addresses from which the DHCP
server draws from when it allocates addresses to your clients. You
may enter a descriptive subnet name in the top field.
A lease is the duration of time in which a client may use an IP
address. The default least time is sufficient for most DHCP
configurations. DHCP clients automatically renew their leases when
half of the lease time has expired. If you set a non-default lease
time, the DHCP utility automatically sets Option 51 for you.
Network Example 3 shows a lease time of 24 hours.
You have the option of using the Comment field to enter
miscellaneous notes that will help you to administer the subnet. No
comments appear in Network Example 3.
__ 5) Select the DHCP Options tab.
__ 6) Configure the remaining DHCP options 66, 67, and 211 from
Table 11 on page 56. You may also redefine the DHCP options that
you set at the global level. Remember that these values will
override the ones that you specified at the global level.
__ 7) Click on OK at the bottom of the screen once you have finished
configuring your subnet.
__ 8) When you return to the main window, you will see the information
you have specified reflected in the graphical display at the bottom
of the screen. If you highlight Global at the top of the screen, the
display at the bottom of the screen shows the options that you
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
specified globally. That display also indicates on what level (global,
subnet, class, or client) each option was specified.
Network Example 3, Subnet Definition Summary
v Subnet address: 192.168.1.0
v Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
v IP address range: 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.3
v Addresses excluded from range: None
v Lease Time: 24 hrs.
v Comment: None
v DHCP Options:
– Router: 192.168.1.1
__ c. The simple IBM DHCP installation is now complete. To use IBM DHCP,
you must select File->Save to save your settings. You may simply use the
default IBM DHCP configuration file or rename it as you choose. Refer to
“Starting and Stopping Servers and Services on Windows NT Server 4.0”
on page 76 and stop your DHCP service and start your DHCP service for
your changes to take effect.
If you have a mixed network, you may need to configure classes and
clients. For example, a mixed network might include Network Stations,
personal computers, and UNIX workstations. Most DHCP clients ignore
DHCP options that do not apply to them so configuring clients and classes
may not be necessary.
Next, the administrator of the sample network creates a class of clients.
Because Network Stations must access a server in order to receive their
operating system, there are two DHCP options that apply only to them.
DHCP option 66 specifies the location of the computer from which the
Network Station must download its operating system. Option 67, boot file
name, is the name of the operating system kernel file.
The way to avoid configuring these options for PCs is to specify them at
the class level. You can create a class of clients that is based on the
hardware model of the Network Station. Every Network Station in your
network belongs to a class that is based on its hardware model. For all
Network Station hardware models, the boot file name is ″kernel.″ Thus,
when a client that belongs to a Network Station class reaches the DHCP
server, it receives the necessary information to access its kernel.
You must create a separate class for each hardware model of the Network
Station.
To create a class within a subnet, carry out the following steps:
__ 1) Find out the proper class value by referring to “Determining DHCP
Classes” on page 22.
__ 2) In the main eNOD DHCP Configuration window, highlight the
subnet.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
63
__ 3) From the menu pulldown, choose Configure->Add class. The
following screen appears:
Figure 13. Adding a Class
__ 4) Refer to 3.c.1 on page 63 and enter the correct class value in the
text field.
__ 5) Enter the range of IP addresses from which the server may draw to
serve clients in this class.
__ 6) Click on the DHCP Options tab.
__ 7) In the new window, select DHCP option 66. Enter the IP address of
the server which will deliver the kernel to Network Stations that
belong to this class.
Note: You may change previously entered DHCP Option values at
this point.
__ 8) Select DHCP option 67. Enter the value
/netstation/prodbase/kernel.
__ 9) Save your changes by clicking on OK at the bottom of the screen.
As the above graphic shows, the administrator of the sample network
configures a class of Network Stations that is called IBMNSM A.2.0.
To create a class outside of a subnet, highlight Global in the main window
and then carry out the above steps. You do not need to provide a range of
addresses unless you create the class within a subnet.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
For more guidance in configuring classes, refer to “Determining DHCP
Classes” on page 22.
Network Example 3, Class Definition Summary
v Address Range: 129.168.1.1 — 192.168.1.100
v Class Name: IBMNSM A.2.0
v DHCP Option 66: 192.168.1.4
v DHCP Option 67: /netstation/prodbase/kernel
__ d. The administrator of Network Example 3 creates two clients which do not
receive their IP addresses dynamically. The two clients are ns3 and ns4.
If you want DHCP to give a static IP address to a client, you need create
the client at either the global level or the subnet level. To create an
individual client at the global level, carry out the following steps:
__ 1) From the main configuration window, highlight Global.
__ 2) From the menu pulldown, select Configure->Add Client.
__ 3) The Client Parameters window appears with the Client Definition
tab selected:
Figure 14. Defining a Client that Does Not Receive its IP Address Dynamically
__ 4) Fill in the information on the screen.
In the Client name field, enter the computer name of the Network
Station. In Network Example 3, the computer name of the first
Network Station is ns3.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
65
For Client hardware type, choose 1 Ethernet (10 Mb) for Ethernet
machines or 6 IEEE 802 Networks for token-ring machines.
The client ID is the MAC address of the Network Station. See
“Working With MAC Addresses” on page 305 for more information
about MAC addresses.
If you specify a client at the client level because it has a fixed IP
address, select Assign this address and supply an address for the
client. The administrator in the sample network supplies a fixed
address for the client ns3.
__ 5) Select the DHCP Options tab.
__ 6) You may enter or change any of the previously defined DHCP
options at this point. Refer to Table 11 on page 56. The
administrator of Network Example 3 must specify a different router
for ns3 and ns4:
Figure 15. Specifying DHCP Options for a Client with a Fixed IP Address
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Network Example 3, Client Definition Summary for ns3
v Client Name: ns3
v Client Hardware Type: 6 IEE 802 Networks
v Client ID: 0000e586f14
v IP Address: Assign this address: 10.1.1.2
v Lease Time: Default Lease (24 hrs.)
v Comment: None
v DHCP Options
– Router: 10.1.1.1
__ 4. Click on File->Save(or)Save As and save your changes.
You have finished configuring IBM DHCP. Refer to “Starting and Stopping Servers and
Services on Windows NT Server 4.0” on page 76 and stop your DHCP service and start
your DHCP service for your changes to take effect.
When you make changes to your network, you must enter the configuration utility to
reflect those changes in DHCP. To make global changes or to change an existing
subnet, class, or client, highlight the object in the main window and choose
Configure->Modify selected item.
Go to “Before You Continue . . .” on page 90.
Creating DHCP Options on IBM DHCP
For advanced configurations, you may need to configure DHCP options which do not
appear in the list of options on the DHCP interface. To create an option, carry out the
following steps:
1. Open the DHCP Server Configuration window by selecting Start->Programs>eNetwork On-Demand Server->DHCP Server Configuration.
2. Highlight Global.
3. From the pulldown menu, choose Configure->Modify selected item.
4. Select the DHCP Options tab.
5. Click the New button.
6. Fill in the Create New Option screen.
7. Once you have created your DHCP option, click OK to return to the main DHCP
configuration page.
8. Highlight Global or the class, subnet, or client for which you want to configure your
new DHCP option.
9. Select the new DHCP option that you created and enter the appropriate
information.
10. When you are finished, click OK to save your changes and then exit the DHCP
configuration utility.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
67
Configuring Microsoft DHCP on Windows NT Server 4.0
This section explains how to configure the Microsoft version of DHCP. If you are
planning to use Microsoft DHCP, you should have already installed it on your server. If
you have not yet done so, refer to page 42.
Configure Microsoft DHCP by carrying out the following steps:
__ 1. If you have not yet done so, complete Table 11 on page 56.
__ 2. From the NT desktop, select Start->Programs->Administrative Tools->DHCP
Manager.
__ 3. In the DHCP Manager window, select Server from the pulldown menu and
choose Add.
__ 4. Enter the IP address of the server which will act as the DHCP server.
__ 5. In the lefthand sector of the main DHCP Manager window, highlight your server
by clicking on it once.
__ 6. In the DHCP Manager window menu bar, select Scope->Create.
__ 7. In the Create Scope window, enter the pool of available IP addresses for a
group of Network Stations. You may want the range to include enough
addresses for all of your Network Stations, or create two or more scopes to
accommodate your clients. In Microsoft DHCP, a scope is similar to a subnet.
Enter the following information in the Create Scope window:
v Start Address: This is the first address in the range of available IP addresses
for the scope. It is part of the range.
v End Address: This is the last address in the range of available IP addresses
for the scope. It is also part of the range.
v Subnet Mask: Enter the subnet mask for this scope. For more information
about subnet masks, refer to “Subnets and Subnet Masks” on page 9.
v Exclusion Range: If any addresses within the scope (the range of available
IP addresses) belong to a device with a fixed IP address, you must exclude
this IP address from the scope. Examples of devices whose IP addresses
are fixed include the DHCP server, DNS servers, routers, and Network
Stations that do not use DHCP to start. If you leave those addresses in the
range, the DHCP server might assign them to a client. Enter the following
two values under the Exclusion Range:
– Start Address: Type the first IP address to exclude from your scope. Click
on Add to enter it in the Excluded Addresses box. If you make an error
and would like to remove an address from the Excluded Addresses box,
highlight it and then click the Remove button.
Note: If you want to enter a single address (or several individual
addresses that do not form a range), use the Start Address box for
each address. Type the address and then click on Add.
– End Address: Type the last IP address to exclude from your scope. Click
on Add to enter it in the Excluded Addresses box.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
v Lease Duration: You can specify the length of time your Network Stations
use their assigned IP addresses. Do not give your Network Stations unlimited
lease times. Choose a workable lease time. Even if you give your Network
Stations a lease time of only a few hours, you do not need to do any work to
keep them running. They will automatically renew their own leases when half
of the lease time has expired.
v Name: This is an optional field. You can fill in a value that you can use to
refer to the scope.
v Comment: This field is also optional. Use it to enter any special information
about the scope. An example of a comment might be ″Used by third-floor
administrative staff.″
__ 8. When you have entered all of the appropriate information on the Create Scope
screen, click on OK.
__ 9. When asked if you want to activate the scope, choose Activate Now.
__ 10. In the main DHCP Manager window, highlight the scope that you just created.
__ 11. Select DHCP Options from the menu bar and choose from among Scope,
Global, or Defaults. What you are deciding is the group to which you want to
apply the DHCP options that you are about to configure. If you select Global,
the options apply to every client on your network. If you select Scope, the
options apply to all of the clients in the scope that you have highlighted. Do not
select Default. If you do, a standard set of options will take effect which will not
allow you to start your Network Stations.
__ 12. Once you select a group of clients to which to apply the options, you must
specify which options you want to configure. To configure DHCP options, carry
out the following steps:
__ a. Select an option from the Unused Options box at the left of the screen.
You must configure the following options:
v Router
v Boot file name
v Host name
__ b. Once you have highlighted an option, click on the Add button.
__ c. If you have selected an option that requires some value (like an IP
address), click on the Value button. You can then enter the value for that
option in a text box. If the option requires an array of values (such as a
range of IP addresses), click on Edit Array. Enter the required
information, click on Add, and then click on OK.
Note: If you try to add an option, but the value box appears greyed out;
click on OK and return to the main DHCP Manager window. From
there, select DHCP Options and choose from Scope, Global,
and Default again. Once you reenter the DHCP Options window,
highlight the option you were working on in the Active Options
box. The Value button should no longer appear greyed out.
__ d. Once you have configured the three required options as well as any
additional options, click on OK.
__ 13. Repeat this process for as many scopes as you would like to create.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
69
__ 14. If you want to reserve an IP address for an individual client, you can do so by
carrying out the following steps:
__ a. In the DHCP Manager window, highlight the scope in which you want the
new client to exist.
__ b. From the DHCP Manager window menu bar, select Scope->Add
Reservations.
__ c. Enter the following information in the Add Reserved Clients window:
v IP Address: Enter the IP address that you want to reserve for this
Network Station. The address may be outside the range of the scope
that you highlighted.
v Unique Identifier: The unique identifier is the MAC address of the
Network Station. For more information about MAC addresses, refer to
“Working With MAC Addresses” on page 305.
v Client Name: Enter the computer name of the Network Station.
v Client Comment: Use this optional field to enter an administrative
comment.
__ d. Click Add.
__ e. If you want to reserve another IP address for another client, do so now.
Otherwise, click on Close to return to the main DHCP Manager window.
__ f. From the menu bar, select Scope->Active Leases.
__ g. The client that you just created should now appear in the Active Leases
window.
__ h. Highlight the client that you just created.
__ i. Click on the Properties button.
__ j. Select Options.
__ k. Enter options for this client as you did before for the scope.
__ l. Click on OK.
__ 15. Your Microsoft DHCP server is ready to start Network Stations. Make sure that
you set each Network Station to the ″Network″ setting in the Setup Utility. See
“Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the Network Setting” on
page 308 for guidance.
Once you have configured your DHCP server, go to “Before You Continue . . .” on
page 90.
Creating DHCP Options on Microsoft DHCP
For advanced DHCP configurations, you may need to configure DHCP options which do
not exist on the Microsoft DHCP interface. To create a DHCP option, carry out the
following steps:
1. Open the DHCP interface by selecting Start->Programs->Administrative
Tools->DHCP Manager.
2. Highlight the group of clients to which you want the new option to apply (global,
scope, or client).
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
3. Select DHCP Options from the pulldown menu.
4. Choose Defaults.
5. In the Option Class list, select Standard Option Types.
6. In the Name box, type a new option name. The name should be descriptive of the
function that the option adds to your configuration.
7. In the Data Type list, click the data type for the option. The data type is the way
that the system reads the option value information.
8. In the Identifier box, type a unique number to associate with the option.
9. In the Comment box, enter information that will guide you or other users who need
to configure the option. For example, a comment might read, ″Protocol to use for
terminal configuration information.″
10. From the DHCP Options: Default Values dialog box, type the value for the option
in the Value box.
11. When you have configured your new option, click OK to save your changes and
exit the configuration utility.
Configuring DHCP for Multiple Servers on Windows NT Server 4.0
You can configure DHCP so that the client obtains its IP address from the DHCP
server, loads the kernel from a base code server, and loads terminal configuration from
a terminal configuration server, and authenticates from an authentication server. “Load
Balancing Example” on page 19 explains the concept of using multiple servers in detail.
Note: To simplify DHCP administration in your network, you should give your IBM
Network Station Manager servers permanent IP addresses instead of making
them DHCP clients.
This section provides specific instructions for configuring DHCP for the example that is
found in Figure 8 on page 20.
To configure your network for multiple servers, you must set DHCP options 211, 212,
213, and 214. To configure these options on IBM DHCP, refer to “Configuring IBM
DHCP for Multiple Servers”. To configure them on Microsoft DHCP, refer to “Configuring
Microsoft DHCP for Multiple Servers” on page 73.
Configuring IBM DHCP for Multiple Servers
Many of the DHCP options that are required for multiple servers do not exist on the IBM
DHCP interface. However, IBM DHCP comes with a DHCP starter file that contains the
class information and the options that are missing from the main interface. The simplest
way to configure IBM DHCP for multiple servers is to open this template file from the
DHCP configuration utility. If you are upgrading from a previous version of the IBM
Network Station Manager and you used DHCP before, the name of the file is
r3dhcpsd.cfg. For all other users, the default name of the starter file is dhcpsd.cfg.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
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If you choose not to run the DHCP starter file, you must create DHCP options 212, 213,
and 214. You must also configure DHCP option 66, the base code server IP address.
To do so, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Open the DHCP Server Configuration window by selecting
Start->Programs->eNetwork On-Demand Server->DHCP Server
Configuration.
__ 2. Highlight Global.
__ 3. From the pulldown menu, choose Configure->Modify selected item.
__ 4. Select the DHCP Options tab.
__ 5. Click the New button.
__ 6. Fill in the Create New Option screen once for each of the options in Table 13.
Use the information in Table 13 as a reference for the options that you create.
Table 13. Options to Create for multiple servers
Value Format
Option Name
Option
number
Brief
Option value
description of description
option
String
Terminal
Configuration
Server
212
IP address of
server to
deliver
terminal
configuration
data
IP address of
terminal
configuration
server
String
Terminal
Configuration
path
213
The path to
access
terminal
configuration
information for
option 212
(terminal
configuration
server)
Path name
String
Terminal
Configuration
Protocol
214
Protocol to
use for option
212 (terminal
configuration
server)
NFS or TFTP
Value you
should
specify
NFS
__ 7. Once you have created all four DHCP options, click OK to return to the main
DHCP configuration page.
__ 8. Highlight Global or the class, subnet, or client for which you want to configure
your new DHCP options.
__ 9. When the parameters screen appears, select option 66, base code server.
Enter the IP address of the server from which you want this client or group of
clients to download the kernel.
__ 10. Select each of the four DHCP options that you created and enter the
appropriate value that uses the last column of Table 13.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 11. When you are finished, click OK to save your changes and then exit the DHCP
configuration utility.
Configuring Microsoft DHCP for Multiple Servers
Because DHCP options 211, 212, 213, and 214 do not exist on the Microsoft DHCP
interface, you must create them manually. To do so, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Open the DHCP interface by selecting Start->Programs->Administrative
Tools->DHCP Manager.
__ 2. Highlight the group of clients to which you want the new options to apply
(global, scope, or client).
__ 3. Select DHCP Options from the pulldown menu.
__ 4. Select DHCP option 66, base code server.
__ 5. Enter the IP address of the server from which you want this client or group of
clients to download the kernel.
__ 6. Click OK to save your changes.
__ 7. From the main DHCP Manager window, select DHCP Options from the
pulldown menu and choose Defaults.
__ 8. In the Option Class list, select Standard Option Types.
__ 9. In the Name box, type a new option name. Refer to Table 14 for the names of
the options you must create.
__ 10. In the Data Type list, click the data type for the option. The data type is the way
that the system reads the option value information. Refer to Table 14 for the
proper data type for each value.
__ 11. In the Identifier box, type a unique number to associate with the option. Again,
use Table 14.
__ 12. In the Comment box, enter the appropriate information from Table 14.
__ 13. From the DHCP Options: Default Values dialog box, type the value for the
option in the Value box.
Table 14. Options to Create for Microsoft DHCP on Multiple Servers
DHCP Option
Name
Data Type Identifier Comment
Value
Base Code
Server
Protocol
String
211
Protocol to use for
Option 66 (base code
server)
NFS
Terminal
Configuration
Server
String
212
IP address of server to
deliver terminal
configuration information
Terminal
Configuration
Path
String
213
Path to access terminal
configuration information
\netstation\prodbase\configs\
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
73
Table 14. Options to Create for Microsoft DHCP on Multiple Servers (continued)
DHCP Option
Name
Data Type Identifier Comment
Value
Terminal
Configuration
Protocol
String
NFS
214
The protocol used to
access terminal
configuration information
__ 14. When you have configured all of the above options, click OK to save your
changes and exit the configuration utility.
Managing Users and Groups for IBM Network Station Users
When you add Network Stations to an existing Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0
environment, you must complete two tasks:
v Add a user account for the user of the Network Station. See “Managing User Groups
on a Stand-Alone Server That Is in a Domain” on page 75.
v Make the necessary DHCP configuration changes. See “Configuring DHCP on the
Windows NT Server Platform” on page 55.
IBM Network Station Manager assigns administrative control and sets directory
permissions by using Windows NT local groups. The IBM Network Station Manager
installation program creates NSMUser and NSMAdmin local groups on your server.
You must define each Network Station user in your network and add each Network
Station user to the NSMUser group. To limit administrative control, you should put the
user in the NSMUser group only. To assign full administrative control, put the user in
both the NSMUser and the NSMAdmin groups.
You may also use Windows NT groups to organize preferences. You can only use local
groups that exist on the server with IBM Network Station Manager installed on it for this
purpose.
When you add either a user account or create a group and add users to it, use the
following restrictions for user names, group names, and passwords:
v User names and group names must not be identical to Windows NT Server 4.0
domain names or server names.
v Names cannot be more than 20 characters long.
v Names must be subsets of ″invariant ASCII″ or the English alphanumeric set. In
other words, they may not contain any of the following elements:
– Double-byte characters
– Characters above ASCII 33 and below ASCII 127
– Control characters
– Spaces or tabs
– Any of the following characters:
- Forward slash (/)
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
- Backward slash (\)
- Colon (:)
- Semicolon (;)
- Asterisk (*)
- Question mark (?)
- Quotation mark (″)
- ″Greater than″ symbol (>)
- ″Less than″ symbol (<)
- Brackets ([), (])
- ″Plus sign″ (+)
Managing User Groups on a Stand-Alone Server That Is in a Domain
If you install IBM Network Station Manager on a Stand-Alone Server that is in a
domain, use the following instructions to manage Network Station users on the domain.
Before you create a user, decide where user data will be stored, whether on the
Primary Domain Controller of a network or on another server. On a Stand-Alone Server
that is a member of a domain, the IBM Network Station Manager logon service
searches for the user name on the local machine. If the user name is found, the logon
service attempts to log the user in and stops searching for the user even if the logon
attempt is unsuccessful. You need to add domain users to the NSMUser group on the
Stand-Alone Server.
To eliminate duplication of users and make future expansion of your network easier, you
should create your users on a Primary Domain Controller and add them to the
NSMUser group on the Stand-Alone Server.
To add domain users or global groups to the local NSMUser group, complete the
following instruction:
1. On the local server select Start->Programs->Administrative Tools
(Common)->User Manager for Domains.
2. Double click on the NSMUser group.
3. Click on Add.
4. Make sure the domain is visible in the List Names From box.
5. Highlight the user or global group and click on Add.
6. Click on OK to close the Add Users and Groups panel.
7. Repeat these steps to add users or groups to the NSMAdmin group.
If you would like a user with full administrative authority, you need to add the user id to
the Domain Admins global group. You can add this group to your user id from the
PDC.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
75
Starting and Stopping Servers and Services on Windows NT Server 4.0
So that your network runs smoothly, ensure that you start your servers and services.
There are several servers and services that must be running:
v Lotus Domino Go Webserver or Microsoft Internet Information Server
v IBM or Microsoft DHCP server
v IBM TCP/IP Services
v NFS server or TFTP server
v Ethernet adapter or token-ring adapter
To start the Lotus Domino Go Webserver, Microsoft Internet Information Server,
Microsoft DHCP, IBM DHCP, or IBM TCP/IP, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. From the Windows NT desktop, choose the following path: Start->Settings>Control Panel->Services.
__ 2. Select the server or service which you want to start.
__ 3. Click on Start.
To enable your Ethernet adapter or token-ring adapter, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. From the Windows NT desktop, choose the following path: Start->Settings>Control Panel->Network->Adapters.
__ 2. Select the network adapter that is installed on your computer.
__ 3. Click on Start to enable the adapter or Stop to disable it.
Configuring Printers on Windows NT Server 4.0
You can configure printers for your Network Stations with the IBM Network Station
Manager unless the datastream generated by the application does not match a
datastream that your printer understands. Table 62 on page 242 describes which
datastreams the common Network Station applications produce.
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
Using Figure 16 on page 77 as an example, Table 15 on page 77 explains the basic
steps to configure printers for your Network Stations.
Note: You should review the online help information text for IBM Network Station
Manager Printer Settings to become more familiar with the Print function for
Network Stations.
Identify the scenario that best meets your needs and follow the steps to configure your
printers.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 16. Possible Network Station Printing Scenarios
Table 15. Configuration Descriptions for Basic Printer Scenarios
Desired Print Scenario
Print Job Flow in
Figure 16
Configuration Instructions
Network Station to a LAN
printer
Network Station A to
Printer 1
Network Station to a
locally attached printer
Network Station B to
Printer 5
1. In the IBM Network Station Manager software, configure
an entry in the Local Parallel Printer or the Local Serial
Printer field, depending on how the printer connects to
the Network Station.
Network Station to
another Network Station
with an attached printer
Network Station A to
Network Station B to
Printer 5
1. In the IBM Network Station Manager software, configure
an entry in the Remote Printer Server field with the IP
address of the Network Station to which the printer is
attached. In the Queue name field, type PARALLEL1 or
SERIAL1, depending on how the printer connects to the
Network Station.
1. In the IBM Network Station Manager software, configure
an entry in the Remote Printer Server field for the LAN
printer.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
77
Table 15. Configuration Descriptions for Basic Printer Scenarios (continued)
Desired Print Scenario
Print Job Flow in
Figure 16 on page 77
Configuration Instructions
Windows NT Server 4.0
to a Network Station with
an attached printer
Windows NT Server 4.0
to Network Station B to
printer 5
You must use the Windows NT Server 4.0 CD to install
LPD/LPR on the Windows NT Server 4.0 machine. Carry out
the following steps:
1. Insert the CD.
2. Select Control Panel->Network->Services.
3. Click Add.
4. Highlight Microsoft TCP/IP Printing and press Enter
twice.
5. Restart the Windows NT server.
Note: You may need to reinstall Service Pack 3. Refer
to 56 on page 38.
6. Boot the Network Station from the Windows NT server.
7. On the Windows NT desktop, select My
Computer->Printers->Add Printer.
8. Select My Computer and click Next.
9. Select Add Port.
10. Highlight LPR Port and click on New Port.
11. In the Add LPR Compatible Printer window, enter the
name or IP address of the Network Station to which the
printer is attached. Then enter the name of the printer or
print queue (SERIAL1 or PARALLEL1) on that server.
12. Click OK.
13. You must specify PCL, ASCII, or PostScript in the
Network Station Manager for this printer. The default is
PostScript.
14. Choose Close->Next.
15. In the Add Printer wizard window, select the
manufacturer and model of the printer that is attached to
the Network Station.
16. Click Next.
17. Select whether you want the printer to be shared by
users.
18. Print a test page to confirm proper setup.
Printer Administration Techniques
Administrating a printer environment is a difficult task. You should create a printer
network diagram. Based on your printing needs and your diagram, you should develop
a printing strategy. Under the right conditions, Network Stations can print to most types
of printers.
One technique to consider is to have a server control the printers for your Network
Stations. In Figure 16 on page 77, the Windows NT 4.0 server could control a LAN
printer like Printer 4. If Network Station A and B always sent their print jobs to the
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Windows NT server, the Windows NT server controls the flow of print jobs to the printer.
This scenario reduces the work load on the Network Stations when the printer buffer is
full, because the Windows NT server negotiates print jobs with the printer. However,
handling these print jobs would likely draw on the central processing unit (CPU) of the
Windows NT server. This technique will likely hinder the server’s performance
depending on the size and frequency of your print jobs. Since you would send the print
job from a Network Station, to a server, and then to a printer, this technique would
increase network traffic too.
Having a server control your Network Station printing is also advantageous in an
environment with mixed printer datastreams. Since Network Station applications only
generate certain datastreams, you may have to send print jobs to a server, which
transforms the job into a datastream for your printer. Depending on which application
generates the job, you may or may not need to transform your print jobs. This may
require more administration in the Network Station Manager software and on the server.
Your end users would also need to have a better understanding of printing and
networking. To eliminate confusion, you should consider having all print jobs sent to the
server regardless of whether the job needs to be transformed or not. In the end, you
will have fewer printer entries in the IBM Network Station Manager software and fewer
printer device descriptions on the server.
When you have a server that controls the printers for your Network Stations, you
perform less administration, but you sacrifice speed. When a server controls your print
jobs, its CPU works harder, possibly slowing performance. Your end users will notice
that it takes longer for them to receive their printouts. If you set up your printing strategy
so that your Network Stations send their jobs directly to the printer (whenever
datastream transformation is unnecessary), you reduce printing time. Since the print job
goes directly to the printer, your server does not bear the load of controlling print jobs.
Sending your print jobs directly to the printer also reduces the chance of the server
misinterpreting your print job. When a server misinterprets a print job, the job may
become lost or damaged.
Updating IBM Network Station Manager Software and Migrating IBM Network
Station Manager Preference Files
When you install your IBM Network Station Manager software, the installation program
checks to see if you installed a previous IBM Network Station Manager software
release. If your IBM Network Station Manager software is an older version, a dialog box
prompts you to install the new IBM Network Station Manager software. Depending on
your current software version, the dialog box asks you to apply a Service Update or
upgrade to a new IBM Network Station Manager release. These Service Updates
include only updated IBM Network Station Manager software and updated eNetwork
On-Demand software.
You should read this entire section before you take any steps to migrate your files.
Preference file migration and client migration is a complex process. Do not try to
migrate your preference files without following the instructions in this section.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
79
Note: If you manually modified any configuration files instead of using the IBM Network
Station Manager in the past, refer to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs and read the
Advanced User Information located there.
Figure 17. IBM Network Station Manager for PC Server CD
Note: Refer to Figure 17. You can identify the IBM Network Station Manager Service
Update release by looking on the face of your CD. If you downloaded the
Service Update from the Internet, refer to the download website for the release
information and version information. Every service update is cumulative. The
service update is not a patch or a fix. It is a complete stand-alone software
product that includes the latest enhancements to the IBM Network Station
software.
There are three steps involved in updating your IBM Network Station Manager software.
First, you need to preserve your user information so that you can re-use (or migrate)
your user information. Second, you need to replace the old IBM Network Station
Manager software with updated software. Lastly, test one Network Station from the new
IBM Network Station Manager software before you move all of your Network Stations to
the new platform.
User information includes user preference files, terminal configuration preference files,
and other information specific to individual Network Stations and Network Station users.
The user preference files do not include your browser preference files.
Note: If you installed both the IBM Browser and the Navio Browser prior to migrating to
Release 3, see “Moving from an Older Version?” on page 24 for further
information.
Several factors affect your migration strategy. However, in all migration strategies, you
must move all of your IBM Network Station Manager preference files and user files from
your old software to your new software. To perform a single-server update method, you
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
need one IBM Network Station Manager server. To perform a dual-server update
method, you need a second server that will become your primary IBM Network Station
Manager server after you complete the update.
Release 3.0 IBM Network Station Manager supports most Windows NT Server 4.0
languages locales.
Table 16. Upgrade Path For IBM Network Station Manager Software: Server Software
Previous IBM Network Station Manager
Release
New IBM Network Station Manager Release
3.0
Windows NT Server 4.0, US English
Windows NT Server 4.0, All supported
languages
English WinCenter 3.x
Windows NT Server, Terminal Server Edition
1.0
You may change from any previously supported version of Windows NT Server type to
the ones that are listed below. However, the recommended platform is a Stand-Alone
server type or a Stand-Alone server that is attached to a domain.
Table 17. Upgrade Path For IBM Network Station Manager Software: Server Type
Previous IBM Network Station Manager
Release
New IBM Network Station Manager Release
3.0
Primary Domain Controller (PDC)
Stand Alone (SA) (recommended)
Stand Alone Server attached to a Domain
(SAD) (recommended)
Primary Domain Controller (PDC)
Backup Domain Controller (BDC)
Backup Domain Controller (BDC)
Stand Alone (SA) (recommended)
Stand Alone Server attached to a Domain
(SAD) (recommended)
Primary Domain Controller (PDC)
Backup Domain Controller (BDC)
The Single-Server Software Upgrade and Single-Server Migration Method
If you have one IBM Network Station Manager server that you wish to update, you
should perform a single-server software upgrade and single-server migration. Use these
upgrade instructions to apply a service update to your server or to update your software
from one release to a new one.
There are two types of single-server software update methods. The first method is a
standard single-server update. The second method is a media-assisted single-server
update. If you are not going to change your server type, you may use the standard
single-server update method. If you need to reinstall your Windows NT Server software
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
81
or change server types (for example, from a PDC to a Stand-Alone server), you need to
follow the media-assisted, single-server update method.
Before you start either update method, all users must log off the system because you
need to restart the server to complete the update. If a Network Station user is logged
into the server, they may lose their applications and data if they do not log off.
To use the single-server migration method, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. There are two methods of migrating preference files during a single-server
migration. Table 18 explains the two methods and outlines the necessary steps:
Table 18. Software Update Methods for Single-Server Upgrades and Single-Server
Migrations
Software Update Method
Use in this Situation
Standard
Simple upgrade of IBM
Network Station Manager.
Steps
a. Install the IBM Network
Station Manager.
b. Enter the path to the user
preference information that
you wish to migrate as
prompted.
Media-assisted
v When you change the
server type (for example,
from a PDC to a
Stand-Alone server).
v When you reinstall the
operating system.
a. Before you install the IBM
Network Station Manager,
copy all of your user
preference information files
onto a diskette or other
storage media.
Note: Do not use the hard
drive that you will reinstall
the Windows NT Server
software on.
b. Reinstall the operating
system if necessary.
c. Install the IBM Network
Station Manager. When
Setup asks for a migration
path, enter a path to the
migration files on the
diskette or other storage
media.
__ 2. If you are using the standard update method as described in Table 18, go to
Step 3 on page 83. If you are using the media-assisted method as described in
Table 18, copy all of the files in the following directories in the Table 19 onto a
diskette or other storage media:
Table 19. Directory Structures for Saving User Preference Files
Release 2.x IBM Network Station Manager
paths
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Release 3.x IBM Network Station Manager
paths
Table 19. Directory Structures for Saving User Preference Files (continued)
x:\users
x:\nstation\userdata
x:\{float}\nstation\USERBASE
x:\nstation\configs
x:\{float}\nstation\PRODBASE\configs
x:\nstation\esuite\registry
x:\{float}\nstation\PRODBASE\esuite\registry
Where x:\ is the subdirectory where your Release 2.x IBM Network Station Manager software is
installed. Where x:\{float}\ is the subdirectory where your Release 3.x IBM Network Station
Manager software is installed.
__ 3. Begin the installation process by following the instructions in Step 1 on page 30.
A setup dialog box prompts you to enter the migration path to access the user
information preference files. If you use the media-assisted update method as
described in Table 18 on page 82, enter the disk drive letter and the subdirectory
where the setup program can access the preference files. If you use the
standard update method as described in Table 18 on page 82, the default
location is c:\nstation\. If that location is correct for your server, click Next. If not,
enter the proper path.
Note: When prompted for a migration path, only enter the root x:\{float}\nstation
subdirectory for Release 3.x or the root x:\nstation subdirectory for
Release 2.x. You do not need to enter multiple subdirectories.
__ 4. Return to 61 on page 43 and complete the installation instructions. After you
finish, return here.
Once the new software installs and you migrate the configuration files, you must
move your existing Network Station computers to your new IBM Network Station
Manager software. To do so, carry out the following steps:
__ a. If you plan to use DHCP with your new IBM Network Station Manager
software, you must configure the DHCP server to handle Network Station
boot requests. Refer to “Configuring IBM DHCP on Windows NT Server
4.0” on page 57 or “Configuring Microsoft DHCP on Windows NT Server
4.0” on page 68 if you have not done so already.
__ b. Select one Network Station first to test your new IBM Network Station
Manager software. This test client should be close to your IBM Network
Station Manager server.
__ c. If your clients use NVRAM to start from your old server, go to Step 4.d. If
your clients used DHCP to start from your old server, go to Step 4.h on
page 84.
__ d. Restart the test client without making any changes to the Network Station.
The Network Station starts from the new IBM Network Station Manager
software and the server may automatically update the Network Station
boot PROM and the Network Station restarts automatically.
Note: Do not touch the Network Station during the boot PROM update
process. If you interrupt the boot PROM update, you have to
replace the Network Station.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
83
__ e. If your Network Station has a token-ring adapter, it updates again and
restarts automatically.
__ f. Each time you restart the test Network Station it starts from the new IBM
Network Station Manager software. Test the user preference files on the
test client. IF everything appears correctly, repeat the instructions from
step 4.d on page 83 for all of the clients that you want to migrate.
__ g. Once you migrate all of the clients so that they start from the new server,
test the preference files. If you are sure that you want to use NVRAM to
start your clients, your migration is complete. If you want to use DHCP to
start your clients, continue to Step 4.h.
__ h. If you have not yet done so, install and configure DHCP as instructed in
“Configuring DHCP on the Windows NT Server Platform” on page 55.
__ i. In your current DHCP configuration, you should have already set the
following DHCP options so that the following values apply to all of your
Network Stations:
v Option 66: The IP address of the boot server.
v Option 67: /netstation/prodbase/kernel
If you have not set the above options, do so now.
__ j. Configure the following option as a global parameter with the following
value:
v Option 211: ″nfs″ or ″tftp″
Note: If you select ″tftp″ as your boot protocol, the kernel downloads
via the TFTP protocol and then the Network Station switches to
the NFS protocol for all other data transfers.
Option 211 does not exist on the Microsoft DHCP interface. To create a
new DHCP option while using Microsoft DHCP, refer to “Creating DHCP
Options on Microsoft DHCP” on page 70.
__ k. Restart the test client. The server automatically updates the boot PROM
of the Network Station and the client restarts automatically.
Note: Do not touch the Network Station while the Network Station boot
PROM updates. If you interrupt the boot PROM update, you have
to replace the Network Station.
__ l. If the test client has a token-ring adapter, it updates again and restarts
automatically.
__ m. Restart the test client to check the DHCP configuration.
__ n. If everything appears correctly on your test client, restart all of the
remaining Network Stations that you wish to move over to the new server.
__ o. Test your Network Stations to see if the user profile information is correct.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
The Dual-Server Software Upgrade and User Preference Information Migration
Method
If you have more than one Windows NT Server in your network, you can use a
dual-server migration method to re-use your current user preference information and
update your IBM Network Station Manager software. Your current Network Station users
can operate off the old server until you configure and test the new server. Use these
update instructions to apply a service update to your IBM Network Station Manager
software or to update your IBM Network Station Manager software from an old release
to a new one.
To perform the dual-server update method, you need to install a copy of the updated
IBM Network Station Manager software on one server, test the software installation, and
gradually move all of your Network Station users and Network Station clients to the new
server. While you prepare the new server, current Network Station users can use the
old IBM Network Station Manager server until the new server is ready.
There are two types of dual-server update methods. One is for NVRAM clients, and the
other is for DHCP clients.
Figure 18 illustrates the steps that you must take to perform a dual-server migration.
More detailed instructions follow.
Figure 18. Quick Overview of the Dual-Server Migration Process.
1. „1… Start with your old server that contains your preference files.
2. „2… Prepare your new server.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
85
3. „3… Determine a dual-server migration configuration and migrate your preference
files to the new server.
4. „4… Move the file x:\nstation\configs\defaults.r2 from the new server to the old
server.
5. „5… Start a test client from the old server that uses NVRAM.
6. „6… Start the test client from the new server that uses NVRAM.
7. „7… Start the test client from the new server that uses DHCP.
8. „8… Migrate remaining clients.
9. „9… Decommission the old server and run the clean up utility.
To perform a dual-server migration, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. On your new server, install Windows NT Server 4.0 or Windows NT Server 4.0,
Terminal Server Edition with the necessary prerequisites. Refer to 1 on page 30
__ 2. On your new server, map a drive to your old server as an unused drive letter (for
example, o:).
Note: If you cannot map a network drive between your new server and your old
server, refer to “The Single-Server Software Upgrade and Single-Server
Migration Method” on page 81 for instructions on how to perform a
media-assisted update method.
a. Right click on Network Neighborhood.
b. Select Map Network Drive....
c. Enter the letter you wish to assign to the mapped drive (for example, o:)
d. Enter the directory for the mapped drive (for example, \\oldnetwork\drive).
e. Select Ok.
Note: You may need to enter a user name and password to map the drive to
the old server.
__ 3. Create (or replicate) users from your old server to your new server by following
these instructions:
a. You need to create the NSMUser and NSMAdmin groups on the new server.
Refer to “Managing Users and Groups for IBM Network Station Users” on
page 74.
b. If you are migrating from a PDC to a Stand-Alone server attached to a
domain, copy all of the users in NSMUser and NSMAdmin to your new
system.
You may also add global groups from the PDC to the NSMUser and
NSMAdmin groups on your new system.
c. If you are migrating to a Stand-Alone server, you need to manually re-create
all of your users on the new server. Following which, you must add them to
the NSMUser and NSMAdmin groups as appropriate. Refer to “Managing
Users and Groups for IBM Network Station Users” on page 74.
__ 4.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Begin the installation process by following the instructions in Step 1 on page 30
.A setup dialog box prompts you to enter the migration path to access the user
information preference files. Enter the path to your old IBM Network Station
Manager user preference information. For example, o:\nstation where o: is the
mapped drive to your old server. Click Next.
Note: When prompted for a migration path, only enter the root x:\{float}\nstation
subdirectory for Release 3.x or the root x:\nstation subdirectory for
Release 2.x. You do not need to enter multiple subdirectories.
Note: You may need to remap the drive to the old server to complete the
instructions. Refer to Step 2 on page 86.
After you install the IBM Network Station Manager software on your new server, you
need to prepare the old server for the dual-server update, test a single Network Station,
and move all of your Network Stations over to the new server. After you successfully
move all of your Network Stations, you may run a cleanup utility to erase the old IBM
Network Station software from your old server.
Follow these instructions to prepare your old server and test one Network Station on
your new IBM Network Station Manager software by using NVRAM:
1. Copy the file x:\nstation\configs\defaults.r2 from your new server to the following
subdirectory on your old IBM Network Station Manager server (where x:\nstation is
the location of your new IBM Network Station Manager installation):
Table 20. Subdirectory for defaults.r2 Migration File
Release 2.x subdirectory
Release 3.x subdirectory
o:\nstation\configs
o:\{float}\nstation\PRODBASE\configs
Where o:\nstation\configs is the mapped drive to your old Release 2.x server and
o:\{float}\nstation\PRODBASE\configs is the mapped drive to your old Release 3.x server.
2. On your test Network Station, set the Boot Parameter option to read the defaults.r2
instead of defaults.dft by performing the following instructions:
Table 21. Instructions for Updating the Boot Monitor to Start Up from a New Server
Release 2.x Boot Monitor instructions
Release 3.x Boot Monitor instructions
a. Power on the Network Station.
a. Power on the Network Station
b. Hit the escape key when the NS0500
Searching for Host System message
appears.
b. Hit the escape key when the NS0500
Searching for Host System message
appears.
c. Press F6 to enter the Boot Parameters
screen.
c. Press F5 to enter the Configuration
Parameters screen.
d. Replace defaults.dft with defaults.r2
d. Highlight the Configuration File line.
e. Press Enter to save.
e. Enter defaults.r2.
f. Press Enter to restart your Network Station.
f. Press Enter twice to save your changes and
restart your Network Station.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
87
Your Network Station restarts, the boot PROM may update, and then it restarts
again.
Note: Do not touch the Network Station during the boot PROM update process. If
you interrupt the boot PROM update, you have to replace the Network
Station.
3. Refer to Step 2 on page 87 and erase the file name in 2.d on page 87 on your test
Network Station client.
4. Restart the test Network Station.
If your test Network Station displays a logon screen and all of your user preferences
are correct, read the next section and start to move all of your Network Stations to the
new server.
Follow these instructions to move your remaining Network Station clients from the old
server to your new server:
1. On your old server, rename the file defaults.dft in the o:\nstation\configs (Release
2.x server) or o:\{float}\nstation\PRODBASE\configs (Release 3.x server)
subdirectory to defaults.old.
Note: The setup utility moved the defaults.dft file to the new server during the new
server installation.
2. Rename the defaults.r2 file to defaults.dft on the old server.
3. Restart your remaining Network Stations.
Note: The Network Stations restart twice and may update their boot PROM. Do not
interrupt the boot PROM update. If you do, you have to replace the Network
Station.
4. Your software upgrade and user preference file migration is complete.
If you use DHCP, perform the following instructions to move your Network Station
clients over to the new IBM Network Station Manager software.
1. Set the following DHCP options on your old server:
v Option 66: new server IP address
v Option 67: /nstation/kernel
v Option 211: tftp
v Option 213: /netstation/prodbase/configs/
v Option 214: nfs
2. Power on your test Network Station client.
Note: The test Network Station should restart twice and update its boot PROM. Do
not touch the Network Station during the boot PROM update. If you interrupt
the boot PROM update, you have to replace the Network Station.
3. Verify that your preferences, such as your menu bar buttons and wallpaper color,
from the test Network Station client.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
4. If the preferences are correct, restart all of your Network Stations so that they
update their boot PROM and start from the new server.
Note: Update all of your Network Station boot PROMs before you continue.
5. Change the following options in the DHCP configuration of your old server:
v Option 67: /netstation/prodbase/kernel
v Option 211: nfs
Note: You may specify TFTP for Option 211. If you specify TFTP, the kernel
downloads to the Network Station via TFTP, but the file transfer protocol
switches over to NFS after the kernel downloads.
6. Configure DHCP on the new server.
7. Turn off the DHCP service on the old server.
After you complete the dual-server update method, you may wish to clean up the old
IBM Network Station Manager software. Look for the cleanup utility program included
on your IBM Network Station Manager software to do this.
Copy the clean up utility from x:\ntnsm\en\utility\ntnsmrr2.exe on your IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program CD (where x is your CD-ROM drive) to your old
server. From a command line enter the following command:
v {float:}\ntnsmrr2.exe where {float:} is the location you copied the clean utility to on
the old server. (You may run the utility from a floppy diskette.)
Moving Network Station Files from an Old Server to a New Server
If you installed an updated copy of IBM Network Station Manager, you may manually
move your existing user preference files from your old IBM Network Station Manager
server to your new one. You may repeat this process as many times as necessary to
move user preferences files. The process will not affect the old preference files, but
each time that you migrate the preference files to the new server, the current
preference files are overwritten.
This process is useful if you slowly convert over to your new IBM Network Station
Manager environment as a test platform. You can run the migration whether you used a
single-server update method, dual-server update method, or if you installed a fresh
copy of IBM Network Station Manager.
You need to do the following before you move your user preference files from the old
server to the new server.
v Your server must have access to the old user preference files. This access can be a
backup directory on your local hard drive, media such as a floppy diskette, or a
mapped network drive to another server. Look for a list of user preference file
directories in Table 19 on page 82.
v
Each user accounts that you migrate must exist in the NSMUser group on the new
IBM Network Station Manager server. Only those accounts that are in NSMUser will
be moved.
Chapter 2. Microsoft Windows NT
89
Note: You may gradually migrate select users from your old server to your new
server by creating them in the NSMUser group on your new server. Only
create the users that you wish to move to the new server and follow the
procedure below. If they are not in NSMUser, the user preference files will not
migrate.
To move user preference files from your old server to your new server, follow the
commands below:
__ 1. Select Start->Program->Command Prompt.
__ 2. Enter x:\{float}\nstation\servbase\bin\nsmmigr.exe <migration path> where
x:\{float}\ is the location of your IBM Network Station Manager software and
<migration path> is the location of the old user preference files.
Note: You only need to specify the root x:\nstation\ subdirectory. You do not
need to enter all of the subdirectories that are listed in Table 19 on
page 82.
If the migration succeeds, a Migration Successful message displays when the
migration process completes.
Test your user preferences and repeat the process to move your user preferences as
needed.
Before You Continue . . .
v Verify that the Network Parameters that are configured in the Setup Utility of each
Network Station agree with your start up method. For example, to serve IP
addresses to an IBM Network Station through a DHCP server, you need to set the IP
Address From field in the Setup Utility to Network. The factory sets new IBM Network
Stations to Network during the manufacturing process. See “Chapter 10. Working
With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301 for more information.
v Verify that your DHCP server, NFS server or TFTP server, and HTTP server are
started. See “Starting and Stopping Servers and Services on Windows NT Server
4.0” on page 76.
v Verify that you excluded any statically addressed devices in your DHCP addressing
range.
v If you use DHCP and you have a router between your IBM Network Stations and
your boot server, verify that the router handles DHCP requests.
v For more information about using the IBM Network Station Manager software, refer
to “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 245.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Chapter 3. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station
Environment on an AS/400 Server
About this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before You Continue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Network Stations to an Existing BOOTP Environment . . . .
Adding Network Stations with the Green Screen . . . . . . .
Adding Network Stations with Operations Navigator . . . . . .
Adding Network Stations to an Existing DHCP Environment . . . .
Migrating BOOTP Clients to a DHCP Environment . . . . . . .
Configuring Printers on an AS/400 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . .
Printer Administration Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . .
The CRTDEVPRT Command. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Collecting Hardware Information Using the Inventory Server . . . .
Optimizing Your AS/400 Server for Network Stations . . . . . . .
What the Setup Assistant Does . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HTTP Directives for the IBM Network Station Manager Program . .
HTTP Directives for a V3R7 System . . . . . . . . . .
HTTP Directives for V4R1 and Later Systems . . . . . . .
TFTP Subnet Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) with Your Network
Benefits of Using SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retrieving the SNMP MIB File . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing. . . . . . . . . . . .
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About this Chapter
This chapter contains instructions for planning, installing, and configuring a Network
Station environment on an AS/400 server. It also contains the setup procedure for
twinaxial Network Stations. While completing the installation procedure and the
configuration procedure, do not deviate from the order of the steps. The following figure
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
91
demonstrates the flow of this manual.
Installation
This section describes the preparation and installation of the IBM Network Station
Manager (5648-C05) licensed program.
Attention: If you have manually changed any configuration files instead of using the
IBM Network Station Manager in the past, refer to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs for
Advanced User Information.
__ 1. Review the Informational authorized program analysis report (APAR)
Use Table 22 to identify the Informational APAR. You should review the APAR to
see the latest information about 5648-C05. You should also verify that you have
the CD labeled AS/400 Network Station PTFs. This CD contains PTFs for
OS/400 and the IBM Network Station Manager product. Do not apply the PTFs
until later in this procedure.
Table 22. Informational APARs and PTFs for 5648-C05
Informational APAR for 5648-C05
Latest Group PTF package for 5648-C05
II11118
SF990823
__ 2. Verify prerequisite OS/400 software.
3. The group PTF package SF99082 is on the CD labeled AS/400 Network Station PTFs.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Your AS/400 server must meet the following minimum software requirements:
v OS/400 Version 3 Release 7, Version 4 Release 1, Version 4 Release 2, or
Version 4 Release 3.
v OS/400 TCP/IP Connectivity Utilities (5769-TC1)
v For V4R3 and later, IBM HTTP Server for AS/400 (5769–DG1)
__ 3. Verify Network Station Memory Requirements.
Network Stations download each of their appplications including their base
systems into memory. You should verify that your Network Stations have
enough memory to run their applications. Use the table at
http://www.pc.ibm.com/networkstation/support/memrec_data.html to determine
how much memory your Network Stations need.
__ 4. Verify Security Authority
Your user profile must have the following authorities:
v *SECADM
v *ALLOBJ
v *IOSYSCFG
To check your security authorities, type the following command at the AS/400
command line to view your user profile:
DSPUSRPRF youruserid
__ 5. Change Library QSYSLIBL
If you have never installed the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program
on your system, skip to step 6.
a. At an AS/400 command line, type DSPSYSVAL QSYSLIBL, and the Display
System Value display appears.
b. If you cannot find the value QSYS2924, go to step 6. Otherwise, type
WRKSYSVAL QSYSLIBL at an AS/400 command line.
c. Next to the QSYSLIBL system value, enter option 2.
d. Space over the QSYSLIBL system value, and press the Enter key.
e. Press the F3 key to exit.
__ 6. Apply the latest PTFs for OS/400.
__ a. Insert the CD that is labeled AS/400 Network Station PTFs into your
AS/400 CD drive (for example OPT01).
__ b. At an AS/400 command line, type GO PTF.
__ c. Select option 8, and the Install Options for Program Temporary Fixes
display appears.
Chapter 3. AS/400
93
Install Options for Program Temporary Fixes
System:
Type choices, press Enter.
Device . . . . . . . . .
AS400TEST
Name, *SERVICE
Automatic IPL . . . . . .
N
Y=Yes
N=No
Restart type
*SYS
*SYS, *FULL
PTF type . . . . . . . .
1
1=All PTFs
2=HIPER PTFs and HIPER LIC fixes
only
3=HIPER LIC fixes only
4=Refresh Licensed Internal Code
Other options . . . . . .
N
Y=Yes
N=No
F3=Exit
. . . . . .
F12=Cancel
__ d. Enter the device name where the AS/400 Network Station PTFs CD is
located (for example OPT01).
Note: You may receive a message that no PTFs were installed. This message
means that your operating system did not need any PTFs. That does not
exclude you from applying PTFs later in step 14 on page 96. Also, you
may have received messages that some PTFs did not install. You can
ignore these messages, because it pertains to the PTFs on the CD that
are not pertinent to your system.
__ 7. Add QTODSYS to library list (OS/400 V3R7 only)
If you are not using OS/400 V3R7, skip to step 8.
__ a. At an AS/400 command line, type WRKSYSVAL QSYSLIBL.
__ b. Next to the QSYSLIBL system value, enter option 2.
__ c. In the Library field, type QTODSYS, and press the Enter key.
__ d. Press the F3 key to exit.
__ 8. Perform an IPL.
The PTFs that you just installed require that you perform an IPL of the AS/400
system before you install the IBM Network Station Manager program. You must
perform this step for the IBM Network Station Manager program to function
correctly.
__ a. Ensure that the system IPL mode is in the normal mode.
__ b. Use the following command to perform the IPL:
PWRDWNSYS *IMMED RESTART(*YES) IPLSRC(B)
__ 9. If TCP/IP is active, you must end the HTTP server. Type ENDTCPSVR *HTTP at an
AS/400 command prompt. You cannot complete this procedure while the HTTP
server is active.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 10. Delete previous versions of all browsers.
Table 23. Licensed Product Numbers for Previous Browsers
Product
License Program Numbers of Previous
Versions
IBM Network Station Browser
5648B08 and 5648B18
Navio NC Navigator Browser
5648B10 and 5648B20
Use the DLTLICPGM LICPGM(license program number) command to delete all
previous versions (see Table 23) of the IBM Network Station Browser and Navio
NC Navigator browsers. This command does not delete the user preferences
and bookmarks for the Navio products.
Note: Release 3.0 of IBM Network Station Manager (NSM) does not support
the IBM Network Station Browser. If you install Release 3.0 of NSM,
your IBM Network Station Browser bookmarks will be migrated to the
integrated NC Navigator. You must delete the IBM Browser from your
server. Network Stations will continue to ship with authorizations to use
the IBM Network Station Browser. This allows Network Stations that use
prior releases of NSM to use the IBM Browser. Network Stations using
Release 3.0 of NSM cannot use the IBM Network Station Browser, even
though they may ship with authorizations to use the product.
__ 11. If you have installed the IBM Browser and the Navio NC Navigator for a
previous version of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program, see
“Moving from an Older Version?” on page 24.
__ 12. Delete previous versions of the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Use the DLTLICPGM LICPGM(5733A07) command to delete any previous versions
of the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 13. Install the IBM Network Station Manager program (5648-C05)
The IBM Network Station Manager for AS/400 licensed program product is
available for AS/400 systems with Version 3 Release 7 levels or later of
OS/400.
__ a. Insert the CD that contains the IBM Network Station licensed program
into your AS/400 CD drive (for example OPT01).
__ b. Install the licensed program.
To install a new licensed program, type the following command on any
AS/400 command line:
RSTLICPGM LICPGM(5648C05) DEV(OPT01) OPTION(*BASE)
Note: If your server’s primary language is not the language you wish to
install, then specify LNG (language number) on the RSTLICPGM
command.
The install program automatically installs the 40-bit NC Navigator
browser, which is part of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program.
__ c. Verify that the restore and migration was successful.
Chapter 3. AS/400
95
Use the DSPJOBLOG command to view the AS/400 job log. Look for any
installation or migration errors and take the appropriate action.
v If you find any migrations errors, correct the error and run the
migration program again. See Table 71 on page 334 for information
about specific migration errors. Issue the command CALL
PGM(QYTC/QYTCMIMP).
__ 14. Apply the PTFs for IBM Network Station Manager
To avoid an unnecessary IPL, you must follow these steps in the exact order
they are presented.
__ a. Insert the CD labeled AS/400 Network Station PTFs into your AS/400
CD drive (for example OPT01).
__ b. At an AS/400 command line, type GO PTF.
__ c. Select option 8, and the Install Options for Program Temporary Fixes
display appears.
Install Options for Program Temporary Fixes
System:
Type choices, press Enter.
Device . . . . . . . . .
AS400TEST
Name, *SERVICE
Automatic IPL . . . . . .
N
Y=Yes
N=No
Restart type
*SYS
*SYS, *FULL
PTF type . . . . . . . .
1
1=All PTFs
2=HIPER PTFs and HIPER LIC fixes
only
3=HIPER LIC fixes only
4=Refresh Licensed Internal Code
Other options . . . . . .
Y
Y=Yes
N=No
F3=Exit
. . . . . .
F12=Cancel
__ d. Enter the device name where the AS/400 Network Station PTFs CD is
located (for example OPT01). In the Automatic IPL field, select N,
because you do not need to IPL your system after applying these PTFs.
__ e. In the Other options field, select YES. The Other Install Options display
appears.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Other Install Options
System:
AS400TEST
Type choices, press Enter.
Omit PTFs
. .
N
Y=Yes, N=No
Apply Type . .
3
1=Set all PTFs delayed
2=Apply immediate, set delayed PTFs
3=Apply only immediate PTFs
F3=Exit
F12=Cancel
__ f. Enter option 3 for the Apply Type field, and Press the Enter key.
__ 15. Install optional software
The following describes the installation of optional software for Network
Stations.
__ a. Install the 128 bit NC Navigator (5648-C20)
For installation instructions, consult the Informational APAR II11283.
__ b. Install eSuite Workplace (5648-KN2) for OS/400 V4R2 or later only
For installation instructions, consult the README on the CD of
5648-KN2 or the product literature.
__ c. Install Omron, Japanese Input Method (5648-OMR)
For installation instructions, consult the README on the CD of
5648-OMR or the product literature.
__ 16. Installation Complete.
You have installed all the required software for the IBM Network Station
Manager program. Continue to “Configuration” to configure your TCP/IP
environment and boot server.
Configuration
This checklist helps you configure your TCP/IP environment and boot server. Do not
deviate from the checklist’s order.
__ 1. Administer twinaxial Network Stations.
v If you want to administer twinaxial Network Stations, read and complete
“Appendix B. Twinaxial Network Stations” on page 347.
v Otherwise, continue to step 2 on page 98.
Chapter 3. AS/400
97
__ 2. Choose a boot and configuration method.
You must determine which boot method your Network Stations will use, and
how you will configure your Network Station environment. Use Chapter 1,
specifically sections “Boot Methods” on page 13 and “What Do I Need To Know
About TCP/IP Networks?” on page 4, to learn more about boot methods and
TCP/IP. Then use Table 24 to determine which boot method fits your needs and
operating system. Record your boot method in Table 25.
Table 24. Available Boot and Configuration Methods by OS/400 Version
Boot Method
V3R7 and V4R1 OS/400
Configuration Method
V4R2 OS/400 Configuration Method
BOOTP
Green screen
Green screen or Operations Navigator4
DHCP
Not available
Operations Navigator4
NVRAM
Perform configuration on each client.
Perform configuration on each client.
Table 25. Boot Method
Field
Description
Boot Method
The method by which the
Network Station will obtain its
IP address and boot files.
Write Boot Method Here
__ 3. Gather host information with Table 26.
Stop: If you already have TCP/IP installed and configured, please skip to step
4 on page 99. Otherwise, complete the following table.
The Setup Assistant, a green screen wizard, prompts you to enter this
information later.
Table 26. AS/400 Host Information
Field
Description
„1… AS/400 IP Address
In Figure 5 on page 7, the AS/400 IP Address is
192.168.1.4. The AS/400 IP address is the address
that uniquely identifies this AS/400 to TCP/IP. This
address will be associated with the local host name to
create a name entry in the Host Names table.
Write Value Here
4. Operations Navigator is a powerful graphical interface for Windows 95/NT clients. With Operations Navigator, you can use your
Windows 95/NT skills to manage and administer your AS/400 systems. You can work with database administration, file systems,
Internet network administration, and users and users groups. For more information about Operations Navigator, see Client Access for
Windows 95/NT - Setup, SC41-3512.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 26. AS/400 Host Information (continued)
Field
Description
„2… Next Hop IP Address
(Default Route)
The next hop address is the address of the IP router (if
any) that your local LAN uses to route network traffic to
other networks within and outside of your organization.
In Figure 5 on page 7, the next hop address is
192.168.1.1. The next hop address creates a default
route for all network traffic that does not terminate on
this host. You need this information only if your local
LAN attaches to one or more IP routers.
„3… Remote Name Server IP
Address
The remote name server (Domain name server (DNS))
IP address is the address of the system (if any) that
will act as primary name server in this domain. In
Figure 5 on page 7, the DNS is 192.168.1.5.
„4… AS/400 Local Host Name
The local host name is the name that is used to
uniquely identify this system in a TCP/IP domain. In the
example server.mycompany.com, the Local Host Name
is server.
„5… AS/400 Local Domain Name
Remote servers use the domain name to identify the
local host to other systems. In the example
server.mycompany.com, the Local Domain Name is
mycompany.com
Write Value Here
Domain names consist of labels that are separated by
periods. Your local domain name should describe your
organization. The last portion of the local domain name
should follow Internet conventions. Use COM for
commercial enterprises, GOV for government
organizations, and EDU for educational institutions.
__ 4. Gather LAN information with Table 27 on page 100.
Stop: If you have configured the LAN that will serve the Network Stations, skip
to step 5 on page 100. Otherwise, complete the following table.
For each LAN that is attached to your AS/400, you will need to duplicate and
complete a copy of Table 27 on page 100. The Setup Assistant prompts you for
this information later.
Chapter 3. AS/400
99
Table 27. AS/400 LAN Information Chart
Field
Description
„1… Line Description
You must create a line on your AS/400 Server. First, you
must determine which resource you will use. To view the
communications resources for your system, on any
command line, type:
Write Value Here
WRKHDWRSC *CMN
After you have selected a resource from this list, you
must create the line description by using one of the
following commands:
CRTLINTRN LIND(TRNLINE) RSRCNAME(CMN03)
ADPTADR(*ADPT) SSAP(*SYSGEN)
TEXT('Token-Ring Line') AUTOCRTCTL(*YES)
CRTLINETH LIND(ETHLINE)
RSRCNAME(CMN03)
ADPTADR(*ADPT) SSAP(*SYSGEN)
TEXT('Ethernet Line') AUTOCRTCTL(*YES)
where:
v CMN03 is the resource name.
v TRNLINE or ETHLINE is the line description’s name.
Record the name of the line description you just created.
„2… LAN IP Address
The LAN IP Address is the address that uniquely
identifies each AS/400 communication line to the LAN.
Each LAN should have a unique IP address assigned. In
Figure 5 on page 7, the LAN IP Address is 192.168.1.4,
because the example AS/400 has only one LAN.
„3… LAN Subnet Mask
A subnet mask is a configuration value that allows you to
specify how your system determines what are the
network and host parts of an IP address. For example,
the subnet mask (255.255.255.0) indicates that the first
three parts of the IP address relate to the network and
the fourth part identifies unique hosts on this subnetwork.
__ 5. Gather IP router/gateway information.
Stop: IP Router/Gateway information is necessary only if you have a router
between your server and its clients. If you do not have this condition,
skip to step 6 on page 101. Otherwise, complete the following table.
For each router that is attached to your AS/400, duplicate and complete a copy
of Table 28 on page 101. The Setup Assistant prompts you for this information
later.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 28. AS/400 IP Router/Gateway Information Chart
Field
Description
„1… Route (Remote LAN) IP
Address
The network portion of the IP address of the remote
LAN. In Figure 5 on page 7, the Route (Remote LAN)
IP Address is 10.1.1.1.
„2… Route (Remote LAN) Subnet
Mask
The subnet mask for the route.
„3… Next Hop Address
The IP address of the router that will handle any
requests that match the route IP address. In Figure 5
on page 7, the Next Hop Address is 192.168.1.1.
__ 6.
Write Value Here
Based on your decision in Table 25 on page 98, perform the appropriate action.
v If you choose to use the BOOTP protocol, go to step 7.
v If you choose to use the DHCP protocol, go to step 8 on page 103.
v If you choose to use the NVRAM boot method, go to step 9 on page 106.
__ 7. Gather information for a new BOOTP environment.
Use this section to gather information to configure a new BOOTP environment.
Use Table 29 to record the specific information that is needed to identify each
Network Station in your network environment.
Note: Twinaxial Network Stations do not require BOOTP table entries. If you
have twinaxial Network Stations, do not make any BOOTP entries in the
Setup Assistant. Continue to step 9 on page 106.
You will use this information to create a BOOTP entry for each Network Station
in the Setup Assistant. You should complete one copy of Table 29 for each LAN
adapter with attached Network Stations.
Table 29. BOOTP Network Station Information
Field
Description
„1… Client Host Name
The host name identifies the Network Station
as a unique destination within a TCP/IP
environment. In Figure 5 on page 7, the host
name for one of the Network Stations is
ns1.mycompany.com.
„2… MAC Address
The Media Access Control (MAC) address is
a unique hardware-specific identifier for each
Network Station. The address is located on
the box of the Network Station. To find the
MAC address without the box, follow this
procedure:
Write Value Here
a. Power on the Network Station.
b. After the keyboard controller test, press
Escape.
c. In the Setup Utility, press F4.
d. Record the MAC address.
Chapter 3. AS/400
101
Table 29. BOOTP Network Station Information (continued)
Field
Description
„3… IP Address
Each Network Station requires a unique IP
address. In Figure 5 on page 7,
NS1.mycompany.com has an IP Address of
192.168.1.2.You must assign a specific
address to each Network Station. You should
ensure that the IP address is valid for your
organization and that no other device in the
network uses it.
„4… Hardware Type
Your Network Stations can attach to either a
token-ring or Ethernet LAN.
Write Value Here
v Record a hardware type of 6 for
token-ring or IEEE (802.3) Ethernet
networks.
v Record a hardware type of 1 for a Version
2 (802.2) Ethernet network.
„5… Gateway IP Address
for Remote LANs
If you do not use a gateway IP address for
remote LANs, disregard this field and leave it
blank in the Setup Assistant.
If the LAN that you are attaching Network
Stations to is not directly attached to your
AS/400, it is referred to as a remote LAN.
You need to specify the IP Address of the IP
router/gateway that your Network Station will
use to reach the server.
In Figure 5 on page 7, the gateway IP
address for Network Station
ns3.mycompany.com is 10.1.1.1.
„6… Subnet Mask for
Remote LANs
If you do not use a gateway IP address for
remote LANs, disregard this field and leave it
blank in the Setup Assistant.
„7… Boot Type
The boot type is a constant. IBMNSM
identifies this network device as a Network
Station.
IBMNSM
„8… Boot File Name
The boot file name is the name of the file
that the Network Station downloads and
uses to boot the remote device. The value,
kernel, is a constant.
kernel
The boot file path is the path name that is
used to access the boot file on the host and
is a constant.
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
„9… Boot File Path
The Boot File Name is case sensitive.
The Boot File Path is case sensitive.
Use Table 30 on page 103 to define any additional Network Stations for the
BOOTP table.
102
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 30. Additional BOOTP Network Stations
„7… Host Name
„8… MAC Address
„9… IP Address
„10… Printer Type
You have completed gathering information for a BOOTP environment. Go to
step 9 on page 106.
__ 8. Gather information for a new DHCP environment.
This section helps you collect information for the DHCP setup wizard. When you
first set up a DHCP environment, you will configure its global attributes. Table 31
collects the necessary data for the DHCP global information.
Table 31. DHCP Global Information
Field
Description
„1… Migrate BOOTP
If your AS/400 serves BOOTP clients, Yes or No
you have entries in the BOOTP table.
If you would like to migrate your
existing clients, select the Yes radio
button. These migrated clients will use
the DHCP server to obtain their IP
addresses, but the addresses will be
static as they are in BOOTP.
Write Value Here
„2… Global Bootstrap Address
The Bootstrap server delivers the boot
files to the Network Stations. Enter the
Bootstrap server’s IP address. In
Figure 5 on page 7, the Bootstrap
server address for subnet 192.168.1.0
is 192.168.1.4. For the subnet
10.1.1.0, the Bootstrap server
address is still 192.168.1.4, but you
must pass a gateway address of
10.1.1.1 on line „12…. In most cases,
the Bootstrap server address is the
same IP address as your DHCP
server.
„3… Default Lease Time
This refers to the amount of time a
server lets clients keep an IP address.
Chapter 3. AS/400
103
Table 31. DHCP Global Information (continued)
Field
Description
„4… Network Station Class Numbers
For each model of Network Station in
your subnet, you must define a class
that represents it. A Network Station
class is a three digit number, prefaced
by IBMNSM. To define Network
Station class numbers, see
“Determining DHCP Classes” on
page 22. Record the class names
here.
Write Value Here
Table 32 helps you collect the values to define a subnet in your DHCP
environment. For each subnet you wish to define, copy and complete Table 32.
Table 32. DHCP Subnet Information
Field
Description
„1… Support Twinaxial Devices
If you intend to support twinaxial Network Yes or No
Stations, answer yes. Then, read
“Planning for Your Twinaxial TCP/IP
Network” on page 347 for twinaxial
considerations and “Subnets and Subnet
Masks” on page 9. Then complete
“Configuring Twinaxial Network Stations
Checklist” on page 353.
„2… Subnet based on range or
entire subnet
Note: For subnets supporting
twinaxial Network Stations, you
must choose entire subnet.
In the DHCP wizard, subnet IP
Range or Entire
addresses are defined two different
ways—based on an entire subnet or on a
restricted range. The entire subnet option
allocates every possible address for
DHCP. In Figure 3 on page 5, the entire
subnet option allocates 192.168.1.1
through 192.168.1.255. If you base the
subnet’s addresses on a range, you
control the beginning and ending IP
addresses.
„3… Subnet name
This value is for descriptive use only. It
does not affect the performance of
DHCP, but you should use a value that is
easily recognizable. In Figure 5 on
page 7, the subnet name could be
192.168.1.0.
„4… Subnet description
This value is also for descriptive use
only. An example subnet description for
Figure 5 on page 7 could be Token-Ring
Subnet.
104
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Write Value Here
Table 32. DHCP Subnet Information (continued)
Field
Description
„5… Subnet Address
Note: The Subnet Address is
only for subnets in which the
entire subnet is reserved for
DHCP addressing.
The IP address associated with a
particular subnet. For a Class C network
whose subnet mask is 255.255.255.0,
the subnet address is the same as the
network address. In Figure 5 on page 7,
the subnet IP address is 192.168.1.0.
Write Value Here
If you are creating a twinaxial subnet,
copy the value from line „1… in Table 80
on page 355.
„6… Starting address range
Note: Twinaxial subnets can
ignore this field. It is only for
subnets based on a range.
The first IP address in the range which
you have specified for your pool of
available addresses. For the subnet
192.168.1.0 in Figure 5 on page 7, the
starting address could be 192.168.1.2.
„7… Ending address range
Note: Twinaxial subnets can
ignore this field. It is only for
subnets based on a range.
The last IP address in the range which
you have specified for your pool of
available addresses. For the subnet
192.168.1.0 in Figure 5 on page 7, the
ending address range could be
192.168.1.3. The specified range
(192.168.1.2 – 192.168.1.3) allows for
only two clients on the subnet.
„8… Subnet Mask
A value that enables network devices to
direct packets of information accurately in
a subnetted environment. In Figure 5 on
page 7, the subnet mask is
255.255.255.0. For more information
about subnet masks, refer to “Subnets
and Subnet Masks” on page 9.
If you are creating a twinaxial subnet,
copy the value from line „3… in Table 80
on page 355.
„9… Excluded IP Address
Note: This field is not applicable
to twinaxial subnets.
If any routers, gateways, or statically
addressed servers are within your subnet
range, you must exclude those IP
addresses. If you have migrated BOOTP
clients, you do not need to exclude their
IP addresses. If the DHCP range was
192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.50 in
Figure 5 on page 7, you would exclude
192.168.1.4 and 192.168.1.5. They are
the static IP addresses of the domain
name server and the client server.
The following values are delivered to the Network Stations.
Chapter 3. AS/400
105
Table 32. DHCP Subnet Information (continued)
Field
Description
Write Value Here
„10… Deliver gateway IP
addresses
The IP address of the default router to
which TCP/IP packets not addressed for
your network are sent. In Figure 5 on
page 7, for the subnet 10.1.1.0, the
default gateway IP address for client
ns3.mycompany.com is 10.1.1.1.
Yes or No
If yes, enter the gateway IP address or
addresses.
„11… Deliver Domain Name
Server (DNS) address to clients
in their subnet
Delivering the Domain Name Server IP
address to clients allows them to use
either fully qualified host names or IP
addresses when they communicate with
other devices. In Figure 5 on page 7, the
IP address of the Domain Name Server
is 192.168.1.5.
Yes or No
If yes, enter the DNS IP address or
addresses.
„12… Deliver domain name to
client
The domain name allows the Network
Yes or No
Station to specify its domain to other
devices. In Figure 5 on page 7, where the
fully qualified host name is
server.mycompany.com, the domain name
is mycompany.com.
If Yes, enter domain name.
„13… Subnet Mask
A value that enables network devices to
direct packets of information accurately in
a subnetted environment. This subnet
value is delivered to the Network Stations
and is usually the same value that you
recorded on line „8… of Table 32 on
page 104. For Figure 5 on page 7, the
subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. For more
information about subnet masks, refer to
“Subnets and Subnet Masks” on page 9.
„14… Append domain name to
host name
The Append domain name option
specifies whether the DHCP server
should append a domain name to client
responses that omit a domain name.
Inherited means that it uses the values
defined on the global level.
Yes, No, or Inherited
__ 9. Preparation for the Setup Assistant
The Setup Assistant is a green screen wizard. You must run the Setup Assistant
even if you are migrating from a previous release of the IBM Network Station
Manager program.
If you choose not to use the Setup Assistant or want more information about its
function, see “What the Setup Assistant Does” on page 145.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
If you want to change any values after completing the Setup Assistant, you must
make the changes manually.
Stop: Read each of these list items before using the Setup Assistant.
v Run the Setup Assistant from the AS/400 system console rather than a
PC. Setup Assistant’s Task 5000 might stop and start the TCP/IP
server. If you are on a PC, you will be disconnected when TCP/IP
ends.
v Verify that your user profile has the following special authorities:
– *SECADM
– *ALLOBJ
– *IOSYSCFG
To check your security authorities, type the following command at the
AS/400 command line to view your user profile:
DSPUSRPRF youruserid
__ 10. Start the Network Station Setup Assistant by typing the following command at
any command line:
STRNSSA
The Setup Assistant introductory display appears.
F3=Exit
IBM Network Station Setup Assistant
System:
Welcome to the IBM Network Station Setup Assistant for the AS/400.
AS400TEST
This setup assistant will guide you through the process of preparing
your AS/400 to service IBM Network Station network computers, hereafter
refered to as Network Stations.
To successfully complete all the steps in the setup process you must
first work through the planning and preparation steps in the IBM Network
Station Installation and Use manual. This manual will guide you through
the installation of required software and help you gather the necessary
information to describe your network environment.
Press F3 at this time if you need to complete the planning and
preparation tasks.
Bottom
Press Enter to continue with the setup process.
F3=Exit
__ 11. Press Enter to continue with the setup process. The IBM Network Station Setup
Tasks display appears.
Chapter 3. AS/400
107
IBM Network Station Setup Tasks
System:
AS400TEST
Type option, press Enter.
1=Select
Opt
Task
ID
2000
3000
4000
5000
Description
Install Required Software
Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations
Select Boot Protocol
Start and Verify Required Servers
Completed
YES
NO
NO
NO
Bottom
Parameters or command
===>
F3=Exit F4=Prompt F10=Display job log
F12=Cancel
This display shows the main IBM Network Station Setup Assistant task IDs, a
description of the task, and a completion status. The Setup Assistant follows
these basic rules:
a. A completion status of YES means that the task finished. NO means that
the task is not finished.
b. Subsequent tasks are dependent on the successful completion of previous
tasks.
c. Select the tasks in order. Do not deviate from the checklist unless directed.
d. You must complete every task, including tasks that you do not have values
to enter.
e. If a task does not complete, you will see an error message on the bottom
line. For more information about the error, and to find out how to recover,
press F10 (Display job log). Press F10 again to see the detailed messages.
Then press F1 (Help) with the cursor on the error message to find out what
recovery actions to take.
f. You should review the job log as you complete these main tasks. If any
errors occur, the Setup Assistant records them in the job log.
g. To start a task, type 1 (to select) next to the task.
__ 12. Task 2000 - Install the Required Software
Task 2000 will have a completion status of YES if you installed the correct
PTFs and TCP/IP products on your system. If the completion status is YES, go
to step 14 on page 109. Otherwise, go to step 13.
__ 13. Task 2000 recovery
Type 1 next to Task 2000 and press the Enter key. The following display
appears.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Install Required Software
System:
AS400TEST
Type option, press Enter.
1=Select
Opt
Task
ID
2100
2200
2300
Description
Install TCP/IP Connectivity Utilities/400
Display Missing Required PTFs
Install OS/400 - Host Servers
Completed
YES
YES
YES
Bottom
Parameters or command
===>
F3=Exit F4=Prompt F10=Display job log
Task 2100 was ended by user.
F12=Cancel
v If the completion status of task 2100 is NO, type 1 next to task 2100 and
press the Enter key.
__ a. After The Restore Licensed Program display appears, load the
licensed program CD or tape in your AS/400.
__ b. Fill in the type of media in the Device field.
__ c. Press Enter to start the installation.
v If the completion status of task 2200 is NO, type 1 next to task 2200 and
press the Enter key.
__ a. After the Setup Assistant displays the missing PTFs, record the
missing PTFs.
__ b. Exit the Setup Assistant by pressing F3.
__ c. Load and apply the missing PTFs.
__ d. Restart the Setup Assistant by using the STRNSSA command.
v If the completion status of task 2300 is NO, type 1 next to task 2300 and
press the Enter key.
__ a. After the Restore Licensed Program display appears, load the
licensed program CD or tape in your AS/400.
__ b. Fill in the type of media in the Device field.
__ c. Press Enter to start the installation.
__ 14. Task 3000 - Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations
On the IBM Network Station Setup Tasks screen, type 1 next to task 3000 and
press Enter. The Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations display appears.
Chapter 3. AS/400
109
Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations
System:
AS400TEST
Type option, press Enter.
1=Select
Opt
Task
ID
3100
3200
3300
3400
Description
Identify AS/400 to the Local Networks
Create TCP/IP Routes to Remote Networks
Set TCP/IP Servers to Autostart
Add HTTP Server Directives
Completed
NO
NO
NO
NO
Bottom
Parameters or command
===>
F3=Exit F4=Prompt F10=Display job log
F12=Cancel
__ 15. Task 3100 - Identify AS/400 to the Local Networks
Type 1 next to task 3100 and press Enter. The Identify AS/400 to the Local
Networks display appears.
Identify AS/400 to the Local Networks
System:
AS400TEST
Type option, press Enter.
1=Select
Opt
Task
ID
3110
3120
Description
Set Host Specific Internet Information
Create or Verify TCP/IP Interfaces
Completed
NO
NO
Bottom
Parameters or command
===>
F3=Exit F4=Prompt F10=Display job log
F12=Cancel
__ 16. Task 3110 - Set Host Specific Internet Information
On the Identify AS/400 to the Local Network display, type 1 next to task 3110
and press Enter. The Set Host Specific Internet Information display appears.
110
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Set Host Specific Internet Information
System:
Type choices, press Enter.
Internet Addresses:
„1…AS/400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
„2…Default Route . . . . . . . . . . . .
„3…Remote Name Server . . . . . . . . . .
192.168.1.4
192.168.1.1
192.168.1.5
Names:
„4…Local Host Name
SERVER
„5…Local Domain Name
. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
MYCOMPANY.COM
Bottom
F3=Exit
F12=Cancel
__ 17. Enter the Host Specific Internet information
v If you have an existing TCP/IP environment, the Setup Assistant displays
your host information. Verify that the names and addresses are correct.
Then, go to step 18.
v Otherwise, fill in the data on this display from Table 26 on page 98, where:
– „1… is the AS/400 Internet Address.
– „2… is the Default Route/Next Hop Internet Address.
– „3… is the IP Address of the Remote Server.
– „4… is the Local Host Name.
– „5… is the Domain Name.
Press Enter and the Setup Assistant returns to the Identify AS/400 to the
Local Networks display. If the task ran successfully, Task 3110 has a
completion status of YES.
__ 18. Task 3120 - Create New TCP/IP Interfaces
On the Identify AS/400 to the Local Network display, type 1 next to task 3120
and press Enter. The Define or Verify TCP/IP Interface(s) display appears.
Chapter 3. AS/400
111
Create or Verify TCP/IP Interface(s)
System:
Type choices, press Enter:
First Interface:
„1… Line Description . . . . . . . . . . .
„2… Internet Address . . . . . . . . . . .
„3… Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Second Interface:
Line Description . . . . . . . . . . .
Internet Address . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Third Interface:
Line Description . . . . . . . . . . .
Internet Address . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TRNLINE
192.168.1.4
255.255.255.0
Name
Name
Bottom
F3=Exit
F12=Cancel
__ 19. Enter the TCP/IP Interface Information
v If you have an existing LAN and are not adding additional LANs, verify that
the displayed information is correct. Press Enter and go to step 20.
v Otherwise, use the information in Table 27 on page 100 to create LANs,
where:
– „1… is the Line Description.
– „2… is the Internet Address.
– „3… is the Subnet Mask.
Remember, that each LAN must have a different IP address, but one LAN’s
IP address must match the IP address of your AS/400 host.
Press Enter to create a TCP/IP interface and to return the Identify AS/400 to
the Local Networks display. If the task ran successfully, Task 3120 will have a
completion status of YES.
__ 20.
Press Enter to return to the Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations
display.
__ 21. Task 3200 - Create TCP/IP Routes to Remote Networks
On the Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations display, type 1 next to task
3200 and press Enter. The Create TCP/IP Routes to Remote Networks display
appears.
112
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Create TCP/IP Routes to Remote Networks
System:
AS400TEST
This screen is optional----Type choices, and press Enter:
Route 1:
„1…Internet Address . . . . . . . . . . .10.1.1.1
„2… Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . .255.255.255.0
„3… Next Hop Address . . . . . . . . . . .192.168.1.1
Route 2:
Internet Address . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Next Hop Address . . . . . . . . . . .
Route 3:
Internet Address . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Next Hop Address . . . . . . . . . . .
Bottom
F12=Cancel
__ 22. Enter TCP/IP Routes Information
v If you do not want to use, add, or create new routes, press Enter and
proceed to step 23.
v Otherwise, use the information from Table 28 on page 101 to create new
routes, where:
– „1… is the Internet Address.
– „2… is the Subnet Mask.
– „3… is the Next Hop Address.
Press Enter to return to the Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations
display. If the task ran successfully, Task 3200 has a completion status of
YES.
__ 23. Task 3300 - Set TCP/IP Servers to Autostart
On the Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations display, type 1 next to task
3300 and press Enter. The Confirm Autostart of Servers display appears.
Verify that each of the following lines appear:
CHGTFTPA AUTOSTART(*YES)
CHGHTTPA AUTOSTART(*YES)
CHGTELNA AUTOSTART(*YES)
After pressing Enter, you return to the Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network
Stations display. If the task ran successfully, Task 3300 has a completion status
of YES.
__ 24. Task 3400 - Add HTTP Server Directives
On the Configure TCP/IP for IBM Network Stations display, type 1 next to task
3400 and press Enter. The Confirm Addition of HTTP Server Directives display
appears.
Chapter 3. AS/400
113
Press Enter and if the task ran successfully, Task 3400 has a completion status
of YES.
__ 25. Press Enter to return to the IBM Network Station Setup Tasks screen. Task
3000 will have a completion status of YES.
__ 26. Task 4000 - Configure IBM Network Stations
Type 1 next to task 4000 on the Network Station Setup Task List display and
press Enter. The Select Boot Protocol display appears.
Select Boot Protocol
System:
AS400TEST
Type choice:
Select boot protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
*BOOTP
*DHCP,
*BOOTP,
*NVRAM
If you select *DHCP, the following command will be run:
===>
CHGDHCPA AUTOSTART(*YES)
If you select *BOOTP, the following command will be run:
===>
CHGBPA AUTOSTART(*YES)
Press enter to select boot protocol and run these commands.
Bottom
F3=Exit
F12=Cancel
__ 27. Select your boot protocol
Based on your decision in Table 25 on page 98, select your boot protocol and
press the Enter key.
v If you choose *DHCP or *NVRAM, go to step 34 on page 116.
v Otherwise, the Work with BOOTP Table display appears.
__ 28. The Work with BOOTP Table display
114
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
WORK WITH BOOTP TABLE
SYSTEM:
TYPE OPTIONS, PRESS ENTER.
1=ADD 2=CHANGE 4=REMOVE
OPT
_
AS400TEST
5=DISPLAY
CLIENT
HOST
NAME
MAC
ADDRESS
IP
ADDRESS
________________________________
BOTTOM
F3=EXIT
F12=CANCEL
F5=REFRESH
F17=TOP
F6=PRINT LIST
F18=BOTTOM
F11=SET BOOTP TABLE DEFAULTS
If you press F11 on this display, you can set the BOOTP table defaults for when
you add BOOTP table entries. You can set defaults for the hardware type,
subnet mask, gateway IP address, boot file name, and boot file path. These
settings save time and typing if you are setting up multiple Network Stations. To
change the defaults, press F11 from this display.
Note: If you have twinaxial Network Stations, you do not need to make BOOTP
entries in the BOOTP table. Press the F3 key to continue.
__ 29. Type 1 (Add) on the empty first line to add an entry for Network Station. The
Add BOOTP Table Entry display appears.
ADD BOOTP TABLE ENTRY
SYSTEM:
NETWORK DEVICE:
„1… CLIENT HOST NAME
. . .
„2… MAC ADDRESS . . . .
„3… IP ADDRESS . . . .
„4… HARDWARE TYPE . . .
NETWORK ROUTING:
„5… GATEWAY IP ADDRESS
„6… SUBNET MASK . . . .
BOOT:
„7… TYPE . . . . . . .
„8… FILE NAME . . . . .
F4=PROMPT
ns1.mycompany.com
. . 00.00.A5.45.C2.62
. . 192.168.1.2
. . 1
. .
. .
. .
. .
„9… FILE PATH . . . . . . .
F3=EXIT
AS400TEST
IBMNSM
KERNEL
/QIBM/PRODDATA/NETWORKSTATION/
F12=CANCEL
__ 30. Enter BOOTP information.
Chapter 3. AS/400
115
Stop: Some of the fields on this display are case sensitive, such as the MAC
address. You should type all information in upper case.
Use the information from Table 29 on page 101 to fill in the Add BOOTP Table
Entry display, where:
v „1… is the Fully Qualified Host Name.
v „2… is the MAC Address.
v „3… is the IP Address.
v „4… is the Hardware Type.
v „5… is the Gateway IP Address for Remote LANs.
v „6… is the Subnet Mask for Remote LANs.
v „7… is the Type.
v „8… is the Boot File Name.
v „9… is the Boot File Path.
__ 31. Verify that no duplicate host names, MAC addresses, or IP addresses are in the
table. If an address is incorrect, the Network Station will not start correctly.
__ 32. Repeat step 29 on page 115 through step 31 for each Network Station listed on
Table 30 on page 103.
__ 33. Press Enter to return to the IBM Network Station Setup Tasks screen.
__ 34. Task 5000 - Start and Verify Required Servers
Type 1 next to task 5000 on the Network Station Setup Tasks display and press
Enter. The Confirm Start and Verify of Required Servers display appears.
Confirm Start and Verify of Required Servers
System:
AS400TEST
Type choice:
End TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
*NO
*NO, *YES
If you configured new lines and/or added new TCP/IP interfaces, you have
to end TCP/IP for the changes made to take affect.
The following commands are needed to start the required servers:
===>
STRTCP
===>
STRSBS QSERVER
===>
STRHOSTSVR SERVER(*ALL)
Press enter to run these commands.
Bottom
F3=Exit
F12=Cancel
__ 35. Initiate Task 5000.
v If TCP/IP is active, task 5000 gives you the option to end TCP/IP.
v
If you have created new lines or TCP/IP interfaces, you must select *YES.
__ 36. Complete Task 5000.
116
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Note: The Setup Assistant turns on the Network Station Login Server . If you
end your TCP/IP or IPL your system, you must restart the Network
Station Login Server. To start the Network Station Login Server, type
CALL QYTC/QYTCUSVR ('STRTCPSVR ') at an AS/400 command line. If you
are using OS/400 V4R3 or later, you can start and stop the Network
Station Login Daemon with Operations Navigator. Locate the Network
Station Login Daemon using the path: Network/Servers/TCPIP.
v If task 5000 successfully completes, read the exit screen and press Enter.
Press the F3 key to exit the Setup Assistant.
v If task 5000 fails, retry the task and choose not to end TCP/IP. If the task
fails again, check the job log (F10) and take appropriate action.
__ 37. Setup Assistant configuration complete
v If you choose the BOOTP protocol, you have completed the configuration of
the BOOTP server. To add Network Stations later, see “Adding Network
Stations to an Existing BOOTP Environment” on page 129. Go to “Before You
Continue” on page 128.
v If you choose the DHCP protocol, go to step 38.
v If you choose the NVRAM boot method, go to “Chapter 10. Working With the
IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301 and then return to “Before
You Continue” on page 128.
__ 38. Use the values that you gathered earlier to complete the DHCP wizard, which
helps you define a new DHCP environment.
Note: In the DHCP wizard, screen titles are in the upper left-hand corner of
each window. In the checklist below, each step title shares the name of
the screen from the DHCP wizard. Throughout the upcoming procedure,
samples screens demonstrate the configuration of Figure 5 on page 7.
__ 39. Use Figure 19 on page 118 to locate the DHCP server.
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Figure 19. Directory Path to the DHCP Server. „A… V4R2 „B… V4R3 and later
__ 40. In Operations Navigator on your PC, double-click the DHCP server to start the
New Configuration wizard.
__ 41. New Configuration
Read the welcome message and click Next.
__ 42. Migrate BOOTP
v If your screen title is Default Lease Time, go to step 44 on page 119.
v If your screen title is Disable BOOTP server, go to step 43 on page 119.
v Otherwise, do the following:
__ a. Check the Yes radio button.
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Why migrate now?
The BOOTP and DHCP servers cannot run simultaneously. To
support your existing BOOTP clients in the new DHCP
environment, you must migrate them. They will appear as clients
and keep their BOOTP values. To migrate at a later time, click
No (see “Migrating BOOTP Clients to a DHCP Environment” on
page 133).
__ b. Enter the Bootstrap server’s IP address from line „2… of Table 31 on
page 103. The Bootstrap server address you enter is defined on the
global level.
Figure 20. Migrate BOOTP Configuration. In Figure 5 on page 7, the Bootstrap server is
192.168.1.4
__ 43. Disable BOOTP server
v If this screen title is Default Lease Time, go to 44.
v Otherwise, read the screen and check the Yes radio button.
__ 44. Default Lease Time
Enter the value from line „3… of Table 31 on page 103. Remember that this is a
global value.
__ 45. Create a New Subnet
Read the screen and check the Yes radio button.
__ 46. Subnet Manages Twinaxial Devices
Check the appropriate radio button.
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v If you do not want to support twinaxial Network Stations, go to step 48 .
v Otherwise, continue to step 47.
__ 47. Twinaxial Workstation Controller Address
a. Enter the value from line „2… of Table 80 on page 355.
b. Go to step 49.
__ 48. Address Range or Subnet
Use the value from line „2… of Table 32 on page 104 to make a decision.
v If you choose to define a subnet that is based on an address range, go to
step 50 on page 121.
v Otherwise, continue to step 49.
__ 49. Define Subnet Based on Entire Physical Subnet
Figure 21. Defining an Entire Subnet. Sample configuration for Figure 5 on page 7 if
NS3 and NS4 are twinaxial Network Stations.
__ a. Enter the values on lines „3…, „4…, and „5… from Table 32 on page 104 to
define a new subnet.
Twinaxial Support: If your new subnet will support twinaxial Network
Stations, the wizard defines your subnet based on
the workstation controller address. The wizard also
calculates your mask address. You can alter the
mask address.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ b.
v If you are configuring a twinaxial subnet, go to 52 on page 122.
v Otherwise, go to step 51.
__ 50. Define Subnet Based on an Address Range.
Use lines „3…, „4…, „6…, „7…, and „8… from Table 32 on page 104 to define a
new subnet.
Figure 22. Define Subnet Based on an Address Range. Sample configuration for
Figure 5 on page 7.
__ 51. Exclude Addresses
Use the Add button to enter any values from line „9… in Table 32 on page 104.
Chapter 3. AS/400
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Figure 23. Exclude Addresses. In the Figure 5 on page 7, subnet 9.5.67.0 would
exclude the router, server, and the domain name server.
__ 52. Subnet Lease Time
Click the radio button labeled Inherit the server’s default lease time. This
subnet will assume the value defined in step 44 on page 119. You can change
default lease times later..
__ 53. Subnet Gateways
Use the value from line „10… in Table 32 on page 104.
__ 54. Subnet Domain Name Server
Use the Add button to enter any values from line „11… in Table 32 on page 104.
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Figure 24. Domain Name Server. Sample configuration for Figure 5 on page 7.
__ 55. Subnet Domain Name
Use the Yes radio button to enter any values from line „12… in Table 32 on
page 104.
Figure 25. Subnet’s Domain Name.
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__ 56. More Subnet Options
Click the Yes radio button.
__ 57. Subnet Options
Using the Add button, move and define the following mandatory options in the
Selected Options window.
v Tag 1 Subnet mask—Use the value from line „13… in Table 32 on page 104.
Figure 26. Additional Subnet Options
Additional Options
The server sends these options to the Network Station. Add and define
any other options applicable to your network. Consult the online help
information for additional options.
__ 58. Subnet Options
In the second Subnet Options screen (see Figure 27 on page 125), make the
following decisions:
__ a. Append Domain to Host Name–Use the value from line „14… of Table 32
on page 104.
__ b. Bootstrap server–Use the inherited value.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 27. More Subnet Options. „A… V4R2 „B… V4R3 and later
__ 59. Support Unlisted Clients
When you enable the Support Unlisted Clients option, the DHCP server will
issue an IP address to any Network Station that requests an IP address. If you
do not want to support unlisted clients, the DHCP server will only issue IP
addresses to Network Stations that are statically defined. See “Adding Network
Stations to an Existing DHCP Environment” on page 131 if you want to define
Network Stations statically.
__ 60. Start DHCP
You should start DHCP only if you do not need to make additional subnets or
clients. You can start the DHCP server by using Operations Navigator later.
__ 61. New DHCP Configuration Summary
Verify that you configured the subnet correctly, and then click the Finish button.
The wizard will configure the DHCP server with the information you entered.
__ 62. Define the bootstrap server
__ a. In the DHCP Configuration screen, right mouse click on the Global icon
and choose Properties.
__ b. Click on the Other tab.
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125
__ c. In the Bootstrap server field, enter the value from line „2… in Table 31 on
page 103 .
Note: If you migrated your BOOTP clients, you have already defined the
bootstrap server address. Verify that the address is correct.
__ d. Click the OK button.
__ e. From the File menu, choose Update Server.
__ 63.
Define Network Station Classes
Note: The DHCP server automatically adds the classes IBMNSM 1.0.0, 2.0.0,
and 3.4.1. If you are defining one of these classes, right mouse click on
that class and choose Properties. Then skip to 63.d.
__ a. In the DHCP Server Configuration screen, right mouse click on the
Global icon and choose New Class.
__ b. After the New Client Properties screen appears, enter the value from line
„4… of Table 31 on page 103 in the Name field. Figure 28 is an example
class description for an Ethernet, Series 1000 Network Station.
Figure 28. Class description for Series 1000 Ethernet Network Station.
__ c. You can enter a description of the class in the Description field.
__ d. Click on the Options tab.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ e. In the Available Options window, locate Tag 67 (Boot file name) and click
the Add button.
Note: If the DHCP wizard preconfigured any of your classes, it already
defined Tag 67. You should verify that the boot path and filename
are correct and skip to 63.g.
__ f. In the File name field, enter /QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/kernel.
__ g. Click the Other tab.
__ h. In the Bootstrap server field, enter the IP address from line „2… of
Table 31 on page 103.
__ i. Click the OK button.
__ j. From the File menu, choose Update Server.
__ k. Repeat step 63.a on page 126 through 63.j for each Network Station
class that you defined in line „4… of Table 31 on page 103.
__ 64. Configuration of DHCP server complete
You have completed the configuration of the DHCP server.
v If you have a subnet with twinaxial Network Stations and want to associate
that subnet with another subnet (like “Twinaxial Subnet Associated with a
LAN” on page 349), you must complete the following:
__ a. Power one of your twinaxial Network Stations on. While the Network
Station loads its kernel, the AS/400 server creates a twinaxial line
description and TCP/IP interface.
__ b. Turn on IP forwarding.
Type: CHGTCPA, and set the value for IP datagram forwarding to *YES.
Then press the Enter key.
__ c. At an AS/400 command prompt, type CFGTCP. Then choose option 1.
__ d. Locate and end the twinaxial interface.
__ e. Use option 2 to change the twinaxial interface. The Change TCP/IP
Interface display appears.
__ f.
In the Associated local interface field, enter the value in field „4… of
Table 80 on page 355.
__ g. Press the Enter key and start the twinaxial interface. To take
advantage of the associated interface, you must restart your twinaxial
Network Station.
v If you want to add new subnets to your DHCP server, click on the Global
icon in the DHCP Server Configuration screen. Then under the File menu,
choose New and Subnet-Basic.
v If you want to add statically addressed clients to your DHCP server, see
“Adding Network Stations to an Existing DHCP Environment” on page 131.
v If you choose not to start the DHCP server earlier, remember to start the
DHCP before you attempt to start your Network Stations. To start the DHCP
server, locate the DHCP server in Operations Navigator. Right-click on the
DHCP server and choose Start.
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127
Go to the section “Before You Continue”.
Before You Continue
Before you begin using your Network Stations, read and complete (when applicable)
each of the following items:
v To take advantage of new functionality, you must update the boot monitor on your
Network Stations. Each of your Network Stations must have a minimum boot monitor
version of 3.0.0. Even if you have purchased new Network Stations, you should
verify and update the boot monitors of your Network Stations. For information about
updating boot monitors, see “Updating the Boot Monitor Code” on page 265.
v
The Setup Assistant turns on the Network Station Login Server . If you end your
TCP/IP or IPL your system, you must restart the Network Station Login Server. To
start the Network Station Login Server, type CALL QYTC/QYTCUSVR ('STRTCPSVR ') at
an AS/400 command line. To end the Network Station Login Server, type CALL
QYTC/QYTCUSVR ('ENDTCPSVR '). Notice the space after the single quotation mark. If
you are using OS/400 V4R3 or later, you can start and stop the Network Station
Login Daemon (NSLD) with Operations Navigator. Locate the NSLD using the path:
Network/Servers/TCPIP.
Tip: In OS/400 V4R3 or later, you can set the NSLD to autostart when TCP/IP
starts. Double click the NSLD, and check the Start when TCP/IP is started
option.
v If you use the BOOTP or NVRAM boot method, you must enable DNS support
through the Network Station Manager program. To enable DNS support, see
“Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS) Configuration on the Network Station” on
page 267.
v Verify that the Network Parameters in the Setup Utility of your Network Stations
agree with your boot method. For example, if you want a Network Station to obtain
its IP address through a DHCP server, ensure that the IP Address from field is
Network. See “Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on
page 301 for more information about the Setup Utility. In the Setup Utility, the factory
default boot method is Network.
v Verify that you started your BOOTP or DHCP server, NFS or TFTP server, and HTTP
server.
v Verify that you excluded any statically addressed devices in your DHCP addressing
range.
v If you have a router between your Network Station and your boot server, verify that
your router can handle BOOTP and DHCP requests.
v If you move a twinaxial Network Station to a different port, change its station
address, or delete its device description, the twinaxial Network Station will receive a
different IP address.
v For more information about setting up Network Stations, see the following sections:
– “Chapter 7. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager
Applications” on page 223
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
– “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 245
– “Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301
Adding Network Stations to an Existing BOOTP Environment
This section describes how to add Network Stations to an existing BOOTP environment.
There are two methods to add Network Stations:
v To add Network Stations with the green screen, go to “Adding Network Stations with
the Green Screen”.
v To add Network Stations with Operations Navigator, go to “Adding Network Stations
with Operations Navigator”.
Adding Network Stations with the Green Screen
This procedure describes how to add Network Stations to an existing BOOTP
environment.
__ 1. For each new Network Station, fill out a new row of information on Table 29 on
page 101.
__ 2. At an AS/400 command prompt, type:
WRKBPTBL
__ 3. In the options field, enter 1 to add a Network Station.
__ 4. Enter the newly recorded information from Table 29 on page 101.
Note: Remember to enter the information in rows 1, 2, 3, and when applicable,
rows 5 and 6.
__ 5. Press Enter to exit the Configure TCP/IP BOOTP menu.
Adding Network Stations with Operations Navigator
The procedure adds Network Stations to an existing BOOTP environment. Operations
Navigator requires OS/400 V4R2 or later.
__ 1. For each new Network Station, fill out a new row of information on Table 29 on
page 101.
__ 2. In Operations Navigator, locate the BOOTP server with the path: Network
object/Servers/OS/400.
__ 3. Double click the BOOTP server.
__ 4. Click the Add button.
__ 5. Fill in the Network Device information, where:
v Host Name is line „1… of Table 29 on page 101.
v MAC address is line „2… of Table 29 on page 101.
v IP address is line „3… of Table 29 on page 101.
Chapter 3. AS/400
129
v Hardware type is line „4… of Table 29 on page 101.
__ 6. If you do not use Gateway IP addresses for remote LANs, leave this field blank.
Otherwise, enter the value from line „5… of Table 29 on page 101.
__ 7. If you do not use a Subnet Mask for remote LANs, leave this field blank.
Otherwise, enter the Subnet Mask value as recorded on line „6… of Table 29 on
page 101.
__ 8. Verify that the following default values are correct:
v Type is IBM Network Station Manager.
v Filename and directory are /QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/kernel.
Figure 29. Add BOOTP Client. Sample Configuration for a Network Station in Example
Figure 3 on page 5.
__ 9. Click the OK button.
__ 10. Repeat steps 4 on page 129 through 9 for each additional Network Station.
__ 11. Click the OK button to update the BOOTP server.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Adding Network Stations to an Existing DHCP Environment
A DHCP environment can support individually defined clients. A client definition is useful
because you can define an IP address for clients. When the clients request an IP
address from the server, the server always returns the defined address.
Use Table 33 to gather the necessary values to define a client.
Table 33. Information to Define DHCP Clients
Field
Description
„1…Client Name
Record a name for your client.
„2…Unique Identifier
The MAC address is a unique
hardware-specific identifier for each Network
Station. The address is located on the box of
the Network Station. To find the MAC
address without the box, follow this
procedure:
Write Value Here
__ 1. Power on the Network Station.
__ 2. After the keyboard controller test,
press the Escape key.
__ 3. In the Setup Utility, press the F2 key.
__ 4. Record the MAC address.
„3… Hardware Type
Identify the Network Station’s hardware type
to the server.
The possibilities are:
v Ethernet (100 MB)
v IEEE 802 Networks
„4… Description
Describe the client. This value is not
mandatory and does not affect the
performance of the client.
„5… IP Address
Assign a valid and unused IP address to
your Network Station. In Figure 5 on page 7,
the IP address of ns1.mycompany.com is
192.168.1.2.
Assign address from pool or defined
If defined, enter IP address.
„6… Lease Time
This refers to the amount of time a server
lets clients keep an IP address. The lease
time has three options:
Inherit, user-defined, or never expire
v Inherit means that the client uses the
value of the global lease time.
v User-defined value.
v Never expire.
Chapter 3. AS/400
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Table 33. Information to Define DHCP Clients (continued)
Field
Description
Write Value Here
„7…Subnet Mask
A value that enables network devices to
direct packets of information accurately in a
subnetted environment. This subnet value is
delivered to the Network Stations. In
Figure 5 on page 7, the subnet mask is
255.255.255.0. For more information about
subnet masks, refer to “Subnets and Subnet
Masks” on page 9
„8… Append domain name to
host name
The Append domain name option specifies
whether the DHCP server should append a
domain name to client responses that omit a
domain name.
„9… Bootstrap Server
The Bootstrap server delivers the boot files
Inherited or defined
to the Network Stations. Enter the Bootstrap
server’s IP address. In Figure 5 on page 7,
the Bootstrap server address for subnet
192.168.1.0 is 192.168.1.4. Inherited means
that the value is inherited from the global
level.
Yes or No
If defined, enter Bootstrap server IP Address.
__ 1. Clients can be defined on a global or subnet level, depending on which
properties you want the clients to inherit.
v To define a client on a global level, right mouse click on the Global icon.
v To define a client on a subnet level, right mouse click on the subnet for which
the client should belong.
__ 2. Click New Client, and the New Client Properties display appears.
__ 3. Click on the General tab.
__ 4. Enter the values „1…, „2…, „3…, and „4… from Table 33 on page 131 into their
respective fields.
__ 5. Click the IP Address tab.
__ 6. Click the appropriate radio button and use any values from line „5… of Table 33
on page 131.
__ 7. Click the Leases tab.
__ 8. Enter the value from line „6… of Table 33 on page 131.
__ 9. Click the Options tab.
__ 10. In the Available options window, add tags 1 and 67 to the Selected options
window.
__ 11. Define Tag 1–Subnet mask–with the value on line „7… of Table 33 on page 131.
__ 12. Define Tag 67–Boot file name–with the value
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/kernel
__ 13. Add and define any additional options applicable to your network environment.
__ 14. Click on the Other tab.
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__ 15. Use the values on lines „8… and „9… of Table 33 on page 131 and check the
appropriate radio buttons.
__ 16. Click the OK button.
The DHCP server will define a client with the name from line „1… of Table 33 on
page 131.
__ 17. From the File menu, choose Update Server. The DHCP server will update itself
with the client you just defined.
Migrating BOOTP Clients to a DHCP Environment
DHCP can support BOOTP clients. If you want your existing BOOTP entries to remain
statically addressed (versus dynamically addressed), you can migrate them into your
DHCP environment. The migration program defines the BOOTP clients as Clients.
v If you have not configured your DHCP environment, go to step 38 on page 117 and
migrate the BOOTP clients during the setup procedure.
v If you have configured your DHCP and you choose not to migrate, follow the
procedure below.
__ 1. In the DHCP Server Configuration screen, choose Migrate BOOTP from the
File menu.
__ 2. Enter the Bootstrap server IP address.
The Bootstrap server serves the boot files to the Network Station. In Figure 3
on page 5, the Bootstrap server IP address is 192.168.1.4.
Configuring Printers on an AS/400
You can configure printers for your Network Stations with the IBM Network Station
Manager program unless the datastream generated by the Network Station application
does not match a datastream that your printer understands. Table 62 on page 242
describes which datastreams the common Network Station applications produce. If your
Network Station application does not produce a datastream that your printer
understands, you must send the print job to an AS/400 server. The AS/400 server
transforms the print job into the datastream of your choice.
Note: Transforming print jobs requires OS/400 Version 4 Release 2 or later.
For example, if Network Station A in Figure 30 on page 134 generates a print job from
NC Navigator for Printer 1 (a Printer Control Language (PCL) printer), the Network
Station cannot send its print job directly to the printer. Because NC Navigator can only
generate PostScript (PS) datastreams, the Network Station must send its print job to
the AS/400 server, which will transform the print job into a PCL datastream. A queue on
the AS/400 server then sends the transformed print job to Printer 1.
For server-based applications, such as a 5250 session, you must configure a printer on
the server where the application is running. In this case, think of the Network Station as
only a window to the server, in that server still performs the ″work″. In Figure 30 on
page 134
Chapter 3. AS/400
133
page 132, if Network Station A is running a 5250 session on the AS/400 server and you
want to print to Printer 4, you must create a printer device description on the AS/400
server. The AS/400 server will send the print job to Printer 4. To create a printing device
description on your AS/400 system, see “The CRTDEVPRT Command” on page 137.
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
Using Figure 30 as an example, Table 34 explains the basic steps to configure printers
for your Network Stations.
Figure 30. Possible Network Station Printing Scenarios
Identify the scenario that best meets your needs and follow the steps to configure your
printers.
Table 34. Configuration Descriptions for Basic Printer Scenarios
Desired Print Scenario
Print Job Flow in
Figure 30
Network Station to a LAN
printer
Network Station A to
Printer 4
134
Configuration Instructions
1. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an
entry in the Remote Printer Server field for the LAN
printer.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 34. Configuration Descriptions for Basic Printer Scenarios (continued)
Desired Print Scenario
Print Job Flow in
Figure 30 on page 134
Configuration Instructions
Network Station to a LAN
printer with a different
datastream
Network Station A to
AS/400 server to Printer 1 1. On the server that will transform the print job, create a
printer device description and queue.
The printer device description must contain the IP
address or host name of the LAN printer. For more
information on configuring a printer device description,
see “The CRTDEVPRT Command” on page 137.
2. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an
entry in the Remote Printer Server field with the IP
address or host name of the transform server and its
queue name.
Network Station to a
locally attached printer
Network Station A to
Printer 6
1. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an
entry in the Local Parallel Printer or the Local Serial
Printer field, depending on how the printer connects to
the Network Station.
Network Station to a
locally attached printer
with different datastream
Network Station B to
AS/400 Server to Printer
5
1. On the server that will transform the print job, create a
printer device description and queue.
The printer device description must contain the IP
address or host name of the Network Station to which the
printer is attached. For more information on configuring a
printer device description, see “The CRTDEVPRT
Command” on page 137.
2. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an
entry in the Remote Printer Server field with the IP
address or host name of the transform server and its
queue name.
Network Station to
another Network Station
with an attached printer
Network Station B to
Network Station A to
Printer 6
Network Station to
Network Station A to
another Network Station
AS/400 server to Network
with an attached printer
Station B to Printer 5
and a different datastream
1. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an
entry in the Remote Printer Server field with the IP
address of the Network Station to which the printer is
attached. In the Queue name field, type PARALLEL1 or
SERIAL1, depending on how the printer connects to the
Network Station.
1. On the server that will transform the print job, create a
printer device description and queue.
The printer device description must contain the IP
address or host name of the Network Station to which the
printer is attached. For more information on configuring a
printer device description, see “The CRTDEVPRT
Command” on page 137.
2. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an
entry in the Remote Printer Server field with the IP
address or host name of the transform server and its
queue name.
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135
Table 34. Configuration Descriptions for Basic Printer Scenarios (continued)
Desired Print Scenario
Print Job Flow in
Figure 30 on page 134
Configuration Instructions
Network Station to a
server controlled printer
Network Station A to
AS/400 server to Printer 2 1. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an
entry in the Remote Printer Server field with the host
or 3
name or IP address of the server that controls the printer.
In the Queue name field, enter the name of the queue
that controls the printer.
In this scenario, it does not matter if the datastreams do
not match. If you used the CRTDEVPRT command (as
specified in “The CRTDEVPRT Command” on page 137),
the server will automatically transform the job if
necessary.
Printer Administration Techniques
Administrating a printer environment is a difficult task. You should create a printer
network diagram. Based on your diagram and printing needs, you should develop a
printing strategy. Under the right conditions, Network Stations can print to most types of
printers.
One technique to consider is to have a server control the printers for your Network
Stations. In Figure 30 on page 134, the AS/400 server could control a LAN printer like
Printer 4. If Network Station A and B always sent their print jobs to the AS/400 server,
the AS/400 server could control the flow of print jobs to the printer. This scenario would
reduce the work load on the Network Stations when the printer’s buffer is full, because
the AS/400 would negotiate print jobs with the printer. However, handling these print
jobs would likely draw on the central processing unit (CPU) of the AS/400 server. This
technique will likely hinder the server’s performance depending on the size and
frequency of your print jobs. Since you would send the print job from a Network Station,
to a server, and then to a printer, this technique would increase network traffic too.
Having a server control your Network Station printing is also advantageous in an
environment with mixed printer datastreams. Since Network Station applications only
generate certain datastreams, you may have to send print jobs to a server, where the
print job can be transformed into a datastream that your printer understands. Depending
on which application generates the job, you may or may not need to transform your
print jobs. This may require more administration in the Network Station Manager
program and on the server. Your end users would also need to have a better
understanding of printing and networking. To eliminate confusion, you should consider
having all print jobs sent to the server regardless of whether the job needs to be
transformed. In the end, you will have fewer printer entries in the Network Station
Manager program and fewer printer device descriptions on the server.
When you have a server that controls the printers for your Network Stations, you
perform less administration, but you sacrifice speed. When a server controls your print
jobs, its CPU works harder, possibly slowing performance. Your end users will notice
that it takes longer for them to receive their printouts. But if you set up your printing
strategy so that your Network Stations send their jobs directly to the printer (whenever
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
datastream transformation is unnecessary), you can reduce printing time. Since the
print job goes directly to the printer, your server does not bear the load of controlling
print jobs. Sending your print jobs directly to the printer also reduces the chance of the
server misinterpreting your print job. When a server misinterprets a print job, the job
may become lost or damaged.
The CRTDEVPRT Command
The CRTDEVPRT command creates a printer device description on your AS/400 server.
__ 1. From an AS/400 command prompt, type CRTDEVPRT, and specify the following
parameters:
v Device description
v Device Class = *LAN
v Device Type = 3812
v Device Model= 1
v LAN attachment = *IP
v Activation Timer = 1-2550 seconds
v Inactivity Timer = 1-30 seconds, or *NOMAX
v Host Print Transform = *YES
v Image Configuration = Obtain a value from Table 35 on page 138.
v Manufacturing/Type/Model = Prompt (F4) and match value
v Remote Location = Name or IP address of the LAN attached printer(or server)
or IP address of a Network Station with an attached printer
v Port Number = TCP/IP port number that is used by printer
– 2501-IBM network printers
– 6464-printer attached to a Network Station
– 9100-most other network printers
v System Driver Program
– *NETSTNDRV for printers attached to Network Station
– *IBMPJLDRV for IBM network printers
– *HPPJLDRV for HP PJL-compatible printers attached directly to the TCP/IP
network
The AS/400 system automatically creates an output queue with the name of the
device description. For more information about AS/400 printing, see the
publication Printer Device Programming, SC41-5713.
__ 2. Activate the device.
v Type: WRKCFGSTS CFGTYPE(*DEV) CFGD(device description), and vary the
device on.
__ 3. Start a printer writer.
v Type: STRPRTWTR DEV(device description)
Chapter 3. AS/400
137
Table 35. Common Printers and Their Image Configuration Values. For more values,
see the publication Printer Device Programming, SC41-5713.
Image Configuration Value
Printer
Compaq Pagemarc 20
*IMGD01
Epson EPCL-4 Printer
*IMGA01
Epson EPCL-5 Printer
*IMGA02
Epson Stylus Photo with PostScript
*IMGB10
Epson Stylus Color 600, 800 with PostScript
*IMGB11
HP Color Laserjet 5
*IMGA04
HP Color Laserjet 5M
*IMGD04
HP Deskjet 560C, 820C, 1200C
*IMGA04
HP Deskjet 500, 600, 1200
*IMGA01
HP Deskjet 1600C, 1600CN
*IMGA04
HP Deskjet 1600CM
*IMGD04
HP Laserjet II, IID, IIP
*IMGA09
HP Laserjet II, IID, IIP with PostScript
*IMGB01
HP Laserjet III, IIID, IIISi, 4L
*IMGA01
HP Laserjet III, IIID, IIISi, 4L with PostScript
*IMGD01
HP Laserjet 4, 4P, 4V, 4Si, 4 Plus
*IMGA02
HP Laserjet 4M, 4MP, 4MV, 4Si MX, 4M Plus
*IMGD02
HP Laserjet 5, 5P, 5Si
*IMGA02
HP Laserjet 5M, 5MP, 5Si MX
*IMGD02
HP Laserjet 6, 6P, 6L
*IMGA02
HP Laserjet 6M, 6MP
*IMGD02
IBM 3112, 3116 Page Printer with IPDS feature
*IMGD02
IBM 3112, 3116 Page Printer (ASCII/LAN)
*IMGA02
IBM 3112, 3116 Page Printer with PostScript
*IMGD02
IBM 3130, 3160-1 AF Printer (240-pel mode)
*IMGC01
IBM 3130 AF Printer (300-pel mode)
*IMGC02
IBM 3825, 3827, 3828 AF Printer
*IMGC09
IBM 3825, 3827, 3828 AF Printer (with AFIG)
*IMGC01
IBM 3829 AF Printer
*IMGC01
IBM 3835-001 AF Printer
*IMGC10
IBM 3835-001 AF Printer (with AFIG)
*IMGC05
IBM 3835-002, 3900 AF Printer
*IMGC05
IBM 3912, 3916 Page Printer (ASCII/LAN)
*IMGA01
IBM 3912, 3916 Page Printer with IPDS feature *IMGC06
(twinax)
IBM 3930-03 Page Printer
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
*IMGA01
Table 35. Common Printers and Their Image Configuration Values (continued). For
more values, see the publication Printer Device Programming, SC41-5713.
Image Configuration Value
Printer
IBM 3930-03 Page Printer with PostScript
*IMGD01
IBM 3935 AF Printer
*IMGC02
IBM 4019 LaserPrinters (HP mode)
*IMGA09
IBM 4019 LaserPrinters with PostScript
*IMGB01
IBM 4028 LaserPrinters
*IMGC06
IBM 4029 LaserPrinters
*IMGA01
IBM 4029 LaserPrinters with PostScript
*IMGB02
IBM 4039 LaserPrinters
*IMGA01
IBM 4039 LaserPrinters with PostScript
*IMGD07
IBM 4049 LaserPrinters
*IMGA02
IBM 4049 LaserPrinters with PostScript
*IMGD02
IBM 4079 Color Jetprinter PS
*IMGB09
IBM 4303 Network Color Printer
*IMGB05
IBM 4312, 4317, 4324 NP with IPDS feature
(twinax)
*IMGC06
IBM 4312, 4317, 4324 NP with IPDS feature
(LAN)
*IMGC06
IBM 4312, 4317, 4324 NP (ASCII/LAN)
*IMGA02
IBM 4312, 4317, 4324 NP with PostScript
(ASCII/LAN)
*IMGD02
IBM InfoPrint 60
*IMGC03
IBM InfoPrint 62 Model 2
*IMGC05
IBM InfoPrint 62 Model 3
*IMGC06
IBM InfoColor 70
*IMGB05
IBM InfoPrint 4000
*IMGC05
IBM InfoPrint 4000 High Resolution
*IMGC06
Lexmark 4039Plus
*IMGB02
Lexmark Optra C Color Printer
*IMGD11
Lexmark Optra E, E+
*IMGA02
Lexmark Optra N
*IMGD02
Lexmark Optra R+, Rx+, Lx+, Lxn+
*IMGD02
Lexmark Optra S Printers
*IMGD02
Lexmark Optra SC Color Printer
*IMGD05
Okidata OL400 LED Page Printer
*IMGA01
Okidata OL800, OL810 LED Page Printers
*IMGA02
QMS 2025, 3225
*IMGB12
Chapter 3. AS/400
139
Table 35. Common Printers and Their Image Configuration Values (continued). For
more values, see the publication Printer Device Programming, SC41-5713.
Image Configuration Value
Printer
QMS Magicolor CX
*IMGD04
Tektronix Phaser 140
*IMGB09
Tektronix Phaser 400
*IMGB05
Tektronix Phaser 300
*IMGB04
Tektronix Phaser 540, 550
*IMGB05
Tektronix Phaser 560
*IMGB06
Xerox 4219/MRP
*IMGA01
Xerox 4220/MRP
*IMGA02
Xerox 4230 DocuPrinter
*IMGA02
Xerox 4512, 4517 Network Printer
*IMGA02
Xerox 4520mp Printer
*IMGB13
Xerox 4700 II Color Document Printer
*IMGD04
Xerox 4915 Color Laser Printer
*IMGB08
Xerox 4920, 4925 Color Laser Printer
*IMGB05
Collecting Hardware Information Using the Inventory Server
You can collect Network Station hardware information through the use of the IBM
Network Station Manager inventory server and SNMP services. The inventory server
collects and stores information in a DB2 for AS/400 database.
For OS/400 Version 4 Release 2 and later, enter the command STRTRPMGR to start the
trap manager. The command STRTCPSVR SERVER (*NSMI) starts the inventory server, and
the ENDTCPSVR SERVER (*NSMI) command ends the inventory server. In Version 4
Release 1 and Version 3 Release 7, start the inventory server by calling the
QYTC/QYTCSSTR program. End the inventory server by calling the QYTC/QYTCSEND
program. The logical file QAYTCSNC1 in library QUSRSYS contains the data.
Examples of how to extract the information that is stored in the DB2 for AS/400
database follows. These examples assume that you have installed the IBM DB2 Query
Manager and SQL Development Kit for AS/400.
__ 1. Start an SQL session by entering the following CL command:
STRSQL
__ 2. Run a query that returns the system ID, hardware ID, system memory, host
name, and last scan time for all Network Stations in the database file that have
more than 8 MB of memory by entering the following SQL command:
SELECT SYSTEM_ID, SYSTEM_HARDWARE_ID, SYSTEM_MEMORY_SIZE,
HOST_NAME_NET FROM QUSRSYS/QAYTCSNC1 WHERE SYSTEM_MEMORY_SIZE > 8
__ 3. Run a query that returns the same fields for all of the current inventory entries by
entering the following SQL command:
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
SELECT SYSTEM_ID, SYSTEM_HARDWARE_ID, SYSTEM_MEMORY_SIZE,
HOST_NAME_NET FROM QUSRSYS/QAYTCSNC1 WHERE
CONFIG_CHANGE_TYPE = "*CURRENT"
__ 4. Run a query that shows the change history for a given system (that is selected
by the network host name ns1.mycompany.com) by entering the following SQL
command:
SELECT SYSTEM_ID, SYSTEM_HARDWARE_ID, CONFIG_CHANGE_TYPE,
CONFIG_CHANGE_TIME, SYS_OBJ_ID, IP_ADDRESS, SYSTEM_MEMORY_SIZE,
VIDEO_MEMORY_SIZE, BOOT_SOFTWARE_ID, OS_LANG_ID, PCMCIA_CARD_ID,
DISPLAY_ID, KEYBD_ID, PROCESSOR_ID, NET_INTERFACE_TYPE,
SYSTEM_LOCATION, SYSTEM_CONTACT FROM QUSRSYS/QAYTCSNC1 WHERE
HOST_NAME_NET = "ns1.mycompany.com"
The database field names of file QAYTCSNC1 in library QUSRSYS are as follows:
Table 36. QAYTCSNC1 Values
Field Name Alias
Field Name
Description
SYSTEM_ID
YTCSSYID
The unique identifier of the Network Station. This
identifier ties the workstation specific configuration
preferences set and collected by the Network Station
Manager to the Network Station. This value is shipped
with the same value as SYSTEM_HARWARE_ID. (NCD
MIB object: ncdSysLocalMACAddress)
SERVER_ID
YTCSSVID
The unique identifier of the inventory server system that
collected the configuration data. A value of *LOCAL
indicates that the server on which the data resides
collected the data.
SYSTEM_HARDWARE_ID
YTCSHSID
The burned-in MAC address of the Network Station.
(NCDMIB object: ncdSysPhysicalMACAddress)
CONFIG_CHANGE_TYPE
YTCSCHTY
This value indicates whether this entry is current
(*CURRENT) or replaced (* REPLACED). Replaced
entries effectively become a change history log.
CONFIG_CHANGE_TIME
YTCSCHTI
The date and time that the inventory data in this entry
was last changed.
FIRST_SCAN_TIME
YTCSCHFS
The date and time of the first configuration scan.
LAST_SCAN_TIME
YTCSCHLS
The date and time of the most recent configuration scan.
LAST_START_TIME
YTCSCHST
The date and time the operating system kernel of the
Network Station last started.
SYS_OBJ_ID
YTCSOBJI
The authoritative identifier of the management agent
residing in the Network Station. (MIB-II object:
SysObjectID)
IP_ADDRESS
YTCSIPAD
The IP address of the Network Station.
HOST_NAME_NET
YTCSHSTN
The IP host name of the Network Station as known by
its inventory server system.
HOST_NAME_SYS
YTCSHSTS
The IP host name of the Network Station as known to
itself. (MIB-II object: sysName)
SYSTEM_VENDOR_ID
YTCSVENI
The name of the vendor of the Network Station. (MIB-II
object: sysDescr)
Chapter 3. AS/400
141
Table 36. QAYTCSNC1 Values (continued)
Field Name Alias
Field Name
Description
SYSTEM_MODEL_ID
YTCSMODI
The model number of the Network Station. (MIB-II
object: sysDescr)
SYSTEM_MEMORY_SIZE
YTCSSYSM
The system memory size (in bytes) of the Network
Station. (NCD MIB object: ncdSysMemTotal)
VIDEO_MEMORY_SIZE
YTCSVIDM
The video memory size (in Megabytes) of the Network
Station. (NCD MIB object: ncdSysVideoMemTotal)
BOOT_SOFTWARE_ID
YTCSBTSW
The boot monitor software version of the Network
Station. (NCD MIB object: ncdSysBootPromVersion)
BOOT_LANG_ID
YTCSBTLI
The national language configured for the boot monitor of
the Network Station. Possible values are:
v 1 = English
v 2 = French
v 3 = German
v 4 = Italian
v 5 = Spanish
v 6 = Japanese
(NCD MIB object: ncdBootPromLanguage)
OS_SOFTWARE_ID
YTCSOSSW
The operating system kernel software version of the
Network Station. (MIB-II object: sysDescr)
OS_LANG_ID
YTCSOSLI
The national language locale configured for the operating
system kernel of the Network Station. See Table 81 on
page 357 for language values. (NCD MIB object:
ncdSystemInitialLocale)
PCMCIA_CARD_ID
YTCSPCMI
The identification information for a PCMCIA card
installed in the Network Station. The information includes
the vendor, type, and model of the card. (NCD MIB
object: ncdSysPCMCIAAttributes)
DISPLAY_ID
YTCSDSPI
The identification information for a display attached to
the Network Station. (NCD MIB object:
ncdSysDisplayType)
OS_DISPLAY_RESOLUTION
YTCSDSPR
The display resolution used by the operating system on
the Network Station. (NCD MIB object:
ncdSysDisplayResolution)
KEYBD_CNTRL_ID
YTCSKBCI
The keyboard controller version number of the Network
Station. (NCD MIB object:
ncdSysKeyboardControllerVersion)
KEYBD_ID
YTCSKBID
The hardware ID associated with the keyboard attached
to the Network Station. (NCD MIB object:
ncdXserverKeyboardHardwareID)
KEYBD_LANGUAGE_ID
YTCSKBLN
Identifies the number of keys and the keyboard language
selected by the Network Station user. (NCD MIB object:
ncdXserverKeyboardMappingName)
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 36. QAYTCSNC1 Values (continued)
Field Name Alias
Field Name
Description
PROCESSOR_ID
YTCSPROI
The identification information for the processor of the
Network Station. (NCD MIB object:
ncdSysProcessorVersion)
NET_INTERFACE_TYPE
YTCSNITY
The identification information for the type of network
interface of the Network Station. Possible values are:
v 6 = Ethernet
v 9 = token-ring
v 116 = TDLC (twinaxial data link control)
(NCD MIB-II object: ncdSysMicrocodeVersion)
NET_INTERFACE_SPEED
YTCSNISP
The network interface speed (in bytes per second) for
the Network Station. (MIB-II object: ifSpeed)
NET_INTERFACE_ADDRESS
YTCSNIAD
The MAC address of the network interface for the
Network Station. (MIB-II object: ifAddr)
NET_INTERFACE_ID
YTCSNIID
The identification information for the network interface
firmware of the Network Station. (NCD MIB object:
ncdSysMicrocodeVersion)
SYSTEM_LOCATION
YTCSSYSL
The Terminal location value set in the Network Station
Manager. (MIB-II object: sysLocation)
SYSTEM_CONTACT
YTCSSYSC
The Contact person value set in the Network Station
Manager. (MIB-II object: sysContact)
BOOT_IPA
YTCSBSIP
The IP address of the boot file server used by the
Network Station. This value is only applicable when the
BOOT_SOURCE value is trivial file transfer protocol
(TFTP) or network file system (NFS). (NCD MIB object:
ncdBootActualServer)
BOOT_SOURCE
YTCSBSRC
The boot file source used by the Network Station.
Possible values are:
v 1 = boot source was either a PROM, flash memory
card, or OTP (one-time programmable) card.
v 2 = boot source used the TCP/IP protocol TFTP.
v 4 = boot source was NFS.
(NCD MIB object: ncdBootActualSource)
BOOTP_IPA
YTCSBPIP
The IP address of the BOOTP or DHCP server used by
the Network Station. (NCD MIB object:
ncdSysBootpServerIPAddress)
CONFIG1_IPA
YTCSCSA1
The IP address of the first configuration server used by
the Network Station to obtain configuration information.
(NCD MIB object: ncdFileInitialFileServer1)
CONFIG2_IPA
YTCSCSA2
The IP address of the second configuration server used
by the Network Station to obtain configuration
information. (NCD MIB object: ncdFileInitialFileServer2)
Chapter 3. AS/400
143
Optimizing Your AS/400 Server for Network Stations
By configuring some components of your TCP/IP, you can increase the network
performance of your Network Stations. The numbers listed below are recommendations
only. You may need to experiment with these values to optimize your system.
__ 1. Increase your line description’s maximum frame size.
v For a token-ring line, type: CHGLINTRN LIND(YY) MAXFRAME(ZZ)
The value YY is the line description’s name, and ZZ is maximum frame size
(recommended minimum size of 4096 for token-ring lines and 1496 for
ethernet lines).
v For an Ethernet line, type: CHGLINETH LIND(YY) and press the F4 key.
Scroll down and change the maximum frame size values to best fit your
system with a maximum value less than 1496.
__ 2. Enlarge the Send/Receive buffer sizes.
Type: CHGTCPA TCPRCVBUF (64000) TCPSNDBUF (64000).
__ 3. Change TFTP Attributes
Type: CHGTFTPA and press F4. The Change TFTP Attributes screen appears.
Change TFTP Attributes (CHGTFTPA)
Type choices, press Enter.
Autostart server . . . . . . . .
*NO
Enable subnet broadcast . . . . *YES
Number of server jobs:
Minimum . . . . . . . . . . . > „X…
Maximum . . . . . . . . . . . > „Y…
Server inactivity timer . . . .
30
ASCII single byte CCSID:
Coded character set identifier
00819
Maximum block size . . . . . . .
„YY…
Connection response timeout . .
60
Allow file writes . . . . . . . *NONE
Alternate source directory . . . '*NONE'
F3=Exit F4=Prompt
F24=More keys
F5=Refresh
F12=Cancel
*YES, *NO, *SAME
*YES, *NO, *SAME
1-20, *SAME, *DFT
1-250, *SAME, *DFT
1-1440, *SAME, *DFT
1-65532, *SAME, *DFT
512-65464, *SAME, *DFT
1-600, *SAME, *DFT
*DFT, *NONE, *CREATE...
More...
F13=How to use this display
__ a. Increase the number of TFTP jobs that are started on the host.
The value „X… is the minimum number, and „Y… is the maximum number
of server jobs. Determine the appropriate values for your AS/400 server
and network environment.
__ b. Set TFTP Maximum block size the same as the line description’s
maximum frame size.
The value „YY… is the same as value „ZZ… entered on step 1.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
What the Setup Assistant Does
You should use the Setup Assistant to configure your AS/400 for use with Network
Stations. If you choose not to use the Setup Assistant, you must manually perform the
functions of the Setup Assistant as described in Table 37.
Table 37. Functional Description of the Setup Assistant
Task Number
Function of the Setup Assistant
Task 2000
Verify required PTFs and software
Task 3000
v Configure or verify TCP/IP information, including:
– local domain and host name
– host table entries
– name server
– TCP/IP interfaces
– routes
v Set servers to autostart
– CHGTFTPA AUTOSTART (*YES)
– CHGHTTPA AUTOSTART (*YES)
– CHGTELNA AUTOSTART (*YES)
v Add HTTP directives
HostName xxxx
Enable POST
Enable GET
Map /QIBM/NetworkStation/Admin /QYTC/QYTCMAIN.PGM
Map /networkstation/admin /QYTC/QYTCMAIN.PGM
Pass /QIBM/NetworkStation/* /QIBM/ProdData/HTTP/Protect/NetworkStation/*
Pass /networkstation/* /QIBM/ProdData/HTTP/Protect/NetworkStation/*
Exec /QYTC/* /QSYS.LIB/QYTC.LIB/*
Task 4000
Choose Boot Protocol
v If you choose *BOOTP:
CRTDUPOBJ OBJ(QATODBT) FROMLIB(QSYS) OBJTYPE(*FILE)
TOLIB(QUSRSYS) NEWOBJ(QATODBTP) DATA(*YES)
CHGBPA AUTOSTART(*YES)
The setup assistant then calls the WRKBPTBL.
v If you choose *DHCP:
CHGDHCPA AUTOSTART(*YES)
RMVLNK OBJLNK('\QIBM\UserData\NetworkStation\StationConfig\hosts.nsm')
Chapter 3. AS/400
145
Table 37. Functional Description of the Setup Assistant (continued)
Task Number
Function of the Setup Assistant
Task 5000
Start and Verify Required Servers
The Setup Assistant executes the following commands:
CRTUSRPRF USRPRF(QTFTP)
PASSWORD(*NONE)
CHGAUT
OBJ('/QIBM/Service/NetworkStation/FFDC') +
USER(QTFTP) DTAAUT(*RWX)
CHGAUT
OBJ('/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/kernel') +
USER(QTFTP) DTAAUT(*RX)
CHGSYSVAL
SYSVAL(QRETSVRSEC) VALUE('1')
STRTCP
STRSBS QSERVER
STRHOSTSVR SERVER(*ALL)
CALL QYTC/QYTCUSVR 'STRTCPSVR '
Depending on your system’s language, the Setup Assistant also adds some HTTP
directives. For more information about HTTP directives, see “HTTP Directives for the
IBM Network Station Manager Program”.
HTTP Directives for the IBM Network Station Manager Program
When you used the Setup Assistant to configure your Network Station environment, it
used a table similar to Table 38 to configure your HTTP directives. If you are using a
web browser to access your HTTP server and it is sending garbled characters, verify
that your HTTP directives are correct. You should also use this section if you did not
use the Setup Assistant to configure your Network Station environment.
Table 38. Primary Languages and Their DefaultFsCcsid and DefaultNetCcsid Values
146
Language
Primary Language
Value
DefaultFsCcsid Value DefaultNetCcsid
Value
Belgian Dutch
2963
500
819
Belgian English
2909
500
819
Brazilian Portuguese
2980
37
819
Canadian French
2981
500
819
Czech
2975
870
912
Danish
2926
277
819
Dutch Netherlands
2923
37
819
English Uppercase
2950
37
819
English Uppercase
and Lowercase
2924
37
819
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 38. Primary Languages and Their DefaultFsCcsid and DefaultNetCcsid
Values (continued)
Language
Primary Language
Value
DefaultFsCcsid Value DefaultNetCcsid
Value
English Uppercase
DBCS
2938
37
819
Finnish
2925
278
819
French
2928
297
819
German
2929
273
819
Greek
2957
875
813
Hungarian
2976
870
912
Italian
2932
280
819
Japanese (Katakana)
DBCS
2962
5026
932
Korean DBCS
2986
933
949
Norwegian
2933
277
819
Polish
2978
870
912
Portuguese
2922
37
819
Russian
2979
1025
915
Spanish
2931
284
819
Swedish
2937
278
819
Traditional Chinese
2987
937
950
Turkish
2956
1026
920
v To view and change your HTTP directives on a V3R7 system, see “HTTP Directives
for a V3R7 System”.
v To view and change your HTTP directives on a V4R1 or later system, see “HTTP
Directives for V4R1 and Later Systems”.
HTTP Directives for a V3R7 System
In addition to the HTTP directives in Table 37 on page 145, you have to do change a
HTTP attribute. At an AS/400 command prompt, type CHGHTTPA CCSID(XXXXX), where
XXXXX is the DefaultNetCcsid value for your language in Table 38 on page 146. Then,
you must start and stop the HTTP server. Use the ENDTCPSVR *HTTP and STRTCPSVR
*HTTP commands.
HTTP Directives for V4R1 and Later Systems
__ 1. At an AS/400 command prompt, type WRKHTTPCFG.
__ 2. After the Work with HTTP Configuration screen appears, scroll down to the
entries that were added by the Setup Assistant. The following screen is an
example of HTTP directives for a Turkish V4R1 or later system.
Chapter 3. AS/400
147
02110
02120
02130
02140
02150
02160
02170
Map /QIBM/NetworkStation/Admin /QYTC/QYTCMAIN.PGM
Map /networkstation/admin /QYTC/QYTCMAIN.PGM
Pass /QIBM/NetworkStation/* /QIBM/ProdData/HTTP/Protec
Pass /networkstation/* /QIBM/ProdData/HTTP/Protect/Net
Exec /QYTC/* /QSYS.LIB/QYTC.LIB/*
DefaultNetCcsid 00920
DefaultFsCcsid 01026
>
>
__ 3. Verify that the DefaultNetCcsid and DefaultFsCcsid values match the values in
Table 38 on page 146 for your language. If the values do not match or do not
exist, add the statements with the correct values.
__ 4. Verify that the following statements are also in your HTTP directives.
Map /networkstation/admin /QYTC/QYTCMAIN.PGM
Pass /networkstation/* /QIBM/ProdData/HTTP/Protect/NetworkStation/*
If the statements are not in your directives, you must add them.
__ 5. At an AS/400 command prompt, type WRKHTTPCFG *ADMIN. Verify that the following
statements are in the directives for your HTTP ADMIN server.
Map /networkstation/admin /QYTC/QYTCMAIN.PGM
Pass /networkstation/* /QIBM/ProdData/HTTP/Protect/NetworkStation/*
If the statements are not in your directives, you must add them.
__ 6. At an AS/400 command prompt, use ENDTCPSVR *HTTP to end the HTTP server.
Then restart the HTTP server with STRTCPSVR *HTTP.
TFTP Subnet Broadcast
When multiple Network Stations start up at the same time, they can create heavy
network usage, sometimes called boot storms. TFTP Subnet Broadcast (or Broadcast
Boot) is a solution to balancing your network traffic during these boot storms.
These boot storms occur because the AS/400 server is trying to deliver each Network
Station its own boot file. When the TFTP Subnet Broadcast option is enabled and
multiple Network Stations request their boot files, the server stages the boot file
download and only distributes it once to all Network Stations.
You must enable the TFTP Subnet Broadcast option on both the AS/400 server and the
Network Stations. By default, the TFTP Subnet Broadcast option is enabled. To verify
this value, type CHGTFTPA. The Enable Subnet Broadcast value must be *YES.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Attention
Before you use TFTP Subnet Broadcast, you must verify or apply the PTFs
described in Table 39 to every AS/400 server in your network. These PTFs
prevent unpredictable results, including possible data loss.
Table 39. PTFs Necessary for TFTP Subnet Broadcast
OS/400 Operating System
PTF Number
V3R7
MF18144
V4R1
MF18175
V4R1.4
MF18176
V4R2
MF18143
To enable the TFTP Subnet Broadcast (Broadcast Boot) option on the clients, use the
IBM Network Station Manager program. See the online help information for assistance.
For more information about TFTP Subnet Broadcast, see the TCP/IP Configuration and
Reference manual, SC41-5420.
Using Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) with Your Network Station
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an industry-standard protocol for
network management. SNMP provides the mechanisms to monitor Network Stations
from an SNMP manager at a central location. IBM provides SNMP manager support
through the Tivoli Management Environment (TME) 10 NetView product.
The Network Station contains an SNMP agent as part of its operating system. The
SNMP manager communicates with the SNMP agent on the Network Station. The
SNMP agent represents a Management Information Base (MIB) that contains many
different MIB objects or variables. Figure 31 on page 150 shows how SNMP manages
certain aspects of Network Stations.
Note: An SNMP manager can only read MIB objects from the Network Station. This
does not support SNMP write .
TME 10 NetView provides the following functions, which you can use to monitor and
manage Network Stations:
v MIB browser
v MIB monitor
v MIB application builder
v Event desk
Chapter 3. AS/400
149
Figure 31 provides a view of a sample network with the TME 10 NetView product that is
installed on a PC.
Figure 31. Network Station - SNMP Management
Benefits of Using SNMP
Accessing and viewing MIB objects provides valuable information to manage your
Network Stations.
The following list contains common MIB objects and a description of their function:
v Amount of memory that is installed (ncdSysMemTotal)
This MIB object reports the installed memory in a Network Station.
v Amount of free memory (ncdSysMemAvail)
This MIB object reports the amount of free memory in a Network Station.
v CPU-idle time (ncdSysIdleTime)
This MIB object reports the amount of time when the CPU is idle (not working).
v Elapsed time since the device was started (SysUpTime)
This MIB object reports the date and time the Network Station was last IPLed.
For a complete list of MIB objects you can use, see “Retrieving the SNMP MIB File” on
page 151.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Retrieving the SNMP MIB File
The SNMP MIB file ships with the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program. To
view the MIB file, obtain and place it on a PC or AIX workstation.
1. Retrieve the SNMP MIB file from your AS/400 server by using FTP (File Transfer
Protocol) or other file transfer methods. The SNMP MIB file is:
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/snmpmib.txt.
2. Use the MIB loader tool, located in NetView on your workstation, to load the SNMP
MIB file on your workstation.
For additional information on SNMP, see the documentation that comes with the TME
10 NetView product.
Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing
You must complete the following steps in order to configure DHCP for load balancing on
an AS/400 server. In the first set of steps, you create the templates to define options
211 through 214.
Later in these instructions, you define DHCP classes on the subnet level. Since you
configure the load balancing values on the DHCP class, only Network Stations can use
them. If you have any other devices that use DHCP on that same subnet, they will not
be affected. Before you complete this section, read “Taking Advantage of Multiple
Server Environments” on page 18.
Table 40. Gathering for Load Balancing
Value
Description
Basecode Server
The IBM Network Station Manager program on this
server provides the operating system and the application
programs that are downloaded to the Network Stations.
You do not use this server to configure Network Stations.
Write Value Here
Terminal Configuration The IBM Network Station Manager program on this
Server
server provides terminal-based configuration settings.
The IBM Network Station Manager program manages
these settings. Examples of items to configure on this
server are a printer that is attached to the Network
Station or the Network Station’s keyboard language. The
address of the terminal configuration server is the same
as the address of the base code server by default. The
inventory server (AS/400 only) runs on this server.
Chapter 3. AS/400
151
Table 40. Gathering for Load Balancing (continued)
Value
Description
Authentication Server
The IBM Network Station Manager program on this
server provides user authentication (where the user logs
in) and user-based configuration settings. The IBM
Network Station Manager program manages these
settings. Examples of what you might configure on this
server are a user’s start-up programs or a user’s browser
preferences. The address of the authentication server is
the same as the address of the base code server by
default. See “Roaming User Example” on page 19 for an
example of how to specify a different address for the
authentication server.
Bootstrap Server
The bootstrap server delivers the boot files to the
Network Station.
Write Value Here
__ 1. In Operations Navigator, double-click DHCP. You should see a screen similar to
Figure 32.
Figure 32. DHCP Server Configuration
__ 2. Click File.
__ 3. Click Option Templates. You should see a screen similar to Figure 33 on
page 153.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 33. User Defined Option Templates
__ 4. Click the New button.
__ 5. Enter the following:
v Tag: 211
v Name: Base Code Server Protocol
v Value label: Enter the protocol for the Base Code Server
v Description: Protocol to use for Base Code Server.
You should see a screen similar to Figure 34.
Figure 34. New Option Template
__ 6. Click the OK button.
Chapter 3. AS/400
153
__ 7. Click the New button.
__ 8. Enter the following:
v Tag: 212
v Name: Terminal Configuration Server
v Value label: Enter the IP address for the Terminal Configuration Server
v Description: Terminal configuration server IP address or name.
__ 9. Click the OK button.
__ 10. Click the New button.
__ 11. Enter the following:
v Tag: 213
v Name: Terminal Configuration Path
v Value label: Enter the path for the Terminal Configuration.
v Description: Configuration file path name for option 212 (terminal
configuration server).
__ 12. Click the OK button.
__ 13. Click the New button.
__ 14. Enter the following:
v Tag: 214
v Name: Terminal Configuration Protocol
v Value label: Enter the protocol for the Terminal Configuration
v Description: Protocol to use for option 212 (terminal configuration
server).
__ 15. Click OK.
__ 16. Click OK.
__ 17. Right mouse click on the subnet that you want to load balance and click New
Class.
Note: For each model of Network Station in your subnet, you must define a
class that represents it. A Network Station class is a three digit number,
prefaced by IBMNSM. To define Network Station class numbers, see
“Determining DHCP Classes” on page 22.
__ 18. After the New Class Properties screen appears, enter the DHCP class name in
the Name field. For example, the DHCP class name of a Series 1000 Ethernet
Network Station is IBMNSM A.2.0.
__ 19. Click Options.
__ 20. Click 211 in the Available options list, then click Add. Enter rfs/400. You should
see a screen similar to Figure 35 on page 155.
154
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 35. Subnet Properties Option 211
__ 21. Click 212 in the Available options list, then click Add. Enter the terminal
configuration server IP address. For example, 10.1.1.2. You can specify up to
two addresses, separating them by a blank.
__ 22. Click 213 in the Available options list, and then click Add. Enter the
configuration files path name. For example,
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/. You can specify up to two paths,
separating them by a blank.
__ 23. Click 214 in the Available options list, then click Add. Enter rfs/400.
__ 24. Click OK.
__ 25. Click File, then Update Server, to update the server with the changes that you
just made.
__ 26. Click the Other tab.
__ 27. In the Bootstrap server field, enter the IP address of the base code (Bootstrap)
server. For example, 10.1.1.4. You should see a screen similar to Figure 36 on
page 156.
Chapter 3. AS/400
155
Figure 36. Subnet Properties for Bootstrap Server
__ 28. Click the OK button.
__ 29. From the File menu, choose Update Server.
__ 30. Repeat step 17 on page 154 through step 29 for each DHCP class.
156
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Chapter 4. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station
Environment on an RS/6000 Server
Installing Server Software . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating Server Software. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Components After the Initial Installation . . . . .
128-Bit NC Navigator Browser . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring an RS/6000 Server for Network Stations . . . .
Gathering Configuration Information . . . . . . . .
Choosing a Boot Method and Configuring the Server . . .
Configuring BOOTP Protocol . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
Configuring Network Stations Locally — NVRAM . . .
Before You Continue . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suppressed Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing from AIX to a Printer Attached to a Network Station .
Defining the AIX Remote Print Queue . . . . . . . .
Verifying printer operation . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS/6000 Administration: Alternative Methods . . . . . .
Configuring Network Stations Using the chbootptab Script .
Configuring Network Stations Manually . . . . . . .
Understanding the nsconf Script . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up AIX Server Routing . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up BOOTP Relay Configuration . . . . . . .
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158
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163
165
169
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176
176
This chapter describes how to install and configure the IBM Network Station Manager
software on a RS/6000, hereafter called Network Station.
Note: To view the latest updates on installing and configuring the Network Station type
the following URL address in your Internet browser:
http://service.boulder.ibm.com/nc
This URL gives you access to the Network Station Software screen. From this
screen select the following:
v AIX
v IBM R3.0 Network Station Software for AIX
v Read/Print Documentation
v R3.0 NSM Software Installation Instructions and README
For additional information after you have installed the Network Station see
http://ServerName/networkstation/admin. Where the servername is the
hostname of the server on which the Netstation Manager is installed.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
157
Installing Server Software
Attention
If you have manually changed any configuration files instead of using the IBM
Network Station Manager in the past, refer to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs then
select Advanced User Information.
Use the following procedure to verify that you have the required prerequisite hardware
and software, and to install Network Station Manager filesets:
__ 1. Verify prerequisite hardware.
To install a Network Station server environment on an RS/6000, you need the
following hardware:
v An RS/6000 server that runs AIX 4.2.1 or later
v One or more Network Stations
__ 2. Verify prerequisite software.
Before you install the Network Station Manager filesets, you must have installed
the following software which can be found on the AIX V4.2.1 (or later) Volume 1
CD:
v AIX Version 4.2.1 for servers or later. These are the specific required AIX
filesets:
– bos.rte
– bos.net.tcp.server (If DHCP is to be used.)
– bos.iconv
Note: All of the above commands can have their AIX level verified by issuing
the following command: lslpp -h fileset name. An example would be
lslpp -h bos.rte The bos.iconv package level can be determined
issuing the command: lslpp -h bos.iconv.*
v A web server, such as the Internet Connection Server or domino GO
Webserver. Install the following filesets from the internet_server.base V4.2.1
or later package:
– internet_server.base.admin
– internet_server.base.httpd
– internet_server.base.doc
You must install a web server to use the IBM Network Station Manger.
v The bos.net.nfs.client fileset to provide Network File System (NFS) support
required by the Network Station.
v A web browser, such as Netscape (the netscape fileset). You must install a
web browser to use the IBM Network Station Manager, which configures
Network Stations.
Note: Expect the bos.iconv fileset to include all subsets of the installed AIX
supported languages.
158
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 3. Verify network requirements.
LAN connectivity through Ethernet or token-ring must be installed, configured,
and running.
Although NFS is recommended as the exclusive means of communication with
your Network Station, you may still desire to utilize tftp for downloading the
kernel and configuration information. If you choose to do this , you MUST do the
following.
Before Installation
a. Become the root user
b. Enter the following: 'touch /etc/tftpaccess.ctl'
c. Enter the following: 'chmod 644 /etc/tftpaccess.ctl'
__ 4. Filesystem Requirements
Network Station Manager filesystem installation requires at least one physical
partition of free DASD, with DASD in the rootvg volume group.
__ 5. Install the Network Station Manager filesets on the RS/6000 server.
After signing on as root use the following procedure to install the filesets:
__ a. Use the fast path shortcut below to open the System Management
Interface Tool (SMIT) Install/Update From All Available Software menu:
smitty install_selectable_all
Use the List function (F4) and select an input device or directory from the
list that is displayed.
__ b. Use the List function to display a list of all available software on the
selected input device or directory.
__ c. Use the Find function to search for netstation, then highlight and install
the following filesets.
netstation.base
netstation.msg.lang (where lang is mixed case)
netstation.msg.lang (where lang is all uppercase)
Note: You must select both netstation.msg.lang datasets, for
example en_US and EN_US. The Unicode datasets (all
uppercase) support more languages than the mixed case
datasets.
__ d. End of Installation Procedure.
v You do not have to restart the system if you only installed the
netstation filesets.
v The software installation process runs the /usr/netstation/bin/nsconf
script, which sets up and enables the following on the RS/6000 server:
– RS/6000 host-specific configuration
– BOOTP
– NFS
– Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)
Chapter 4. RS/6000
159
– Internet Connection Server (ICS) or domino Go Webserver
For more information about the /usr/netstation/bin/nsconf script, see
“Understanding the nsconf Script” on page 175.
Migrating Server Software
v If you installed a previous version of Network Station Manager and you are installing
version 3, the migration happens automatically during the install. Refer to the
following URL www.ibm.com/nc/pubs then select Advanced User Information for
more detailed information.
v During the code migration from version 2 to version 3, the migration program saves a
subset of the config file.
v During the migration process, all files in the /usr/netstation/configs/ directory are
saved in /usr/lpp/save.conf/usr/netstation/configs/.
Notes:
1. Remove the list of files saved.
2.
local nsm has been replaced by default dft. Do not edit any file without first
referring to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs. See Advanced User Information for
more detailed information.
v If you are migrating from a prior release of Network Station (prior to release 2.x or
release 2.x without NSM), your preferences will not be migrated. You must use
release 3.0 of NSM exclusively to re-create your prior configuration.
Installing Components After the Initial Installation
You may want to install certain software components after you have installed the IBM
Network Station Manager software.
128-Bit NC Navigator Browser
If you are in Canada or the United States, you may choose to obtain and install the
128-bit NC Navigator browser for AIX.
Note: After installing the NC Navigator browser you must set an environment variable
through the IBM Network Station Manager to make it functional.
To install the NC Navigator browser do the following:
__ 1. Use the fast path shortcut to open the SMIT Install/Update From All Available
Software menu:
smitty install_selectable_all
__ 2. Select an input device or directory by choosing from the selections that are
displayed when you use the List function
160
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 3. Use the List function to display a list of all available software on the selected
input device or directory.
__ 4. Use the Find function to search on netstation, then highlight the following fileset
and select to install:
netstation.navigator-us.rte
__ 5. When the installation is complete, open the IBM Network Station Manager.
__ 6. Under Setup Tasks, choose Startup.
__ 7. Under Startup, choose Environment Variables.
__ 8. If you want all users to access the 128–bit browsers, select the System button.
If you only want one group to use the browser, select the Group button.
__ 9. Above the Add an Environment Variable button, type NAV_128SSL in the empty
text field on the left.
__ 10. Type True in the empty text field on the right.
__ 11. At the bottom of the Screen, click on Finish to save the variable. The browser
is now ready for use.
Configuring an RS/6000 Server for Network Stations
Configuring an RS/6000 server for Network Stations requires the following tasks:
v Choosing a boot method
v Gathering configuration information
v Configuring the RS/6000 server
Gathering Configuration Information
Table 41 lists the information you need to configure your RS/6000 server and Network
Stations. Use this table to record information for your system:
Table 41. RS/6000 Configuration Information Chart
Field
Description
„1… RS/6000 server IP
Address
The RS/6000 server IP address is the
address that uniquely identifies this RS/6000
to Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol (TCP/IP). This address is associated
with the local host name to create a name
entry in the Host Names table.
Write Value Here
Chapter 4. RS/6000
161
Table 41. RS/6000 Configuration Information Chart (continued)
Field
Description
„2… Media Access Control
(MAC) address (hardware
address) of each Network
Station
The (Media Access Control) MAC address for
BOOTP and DHCP is a unique
hardware-specific identifier for each Network
Station. The address is located on the
Network Station’s box. To find the MAC
address without the box, follow this
procedure:
Write Value Here
1. Power the network station on.
2. After the keyboard controller test, press
the Escape key.
3. In the Setup Utility, press F2.
4. Record the MAC address.
„3… IP address of each
Network Station or IP
address range needed for
a DHCP environment
where IP addresses are
being assigned
dynamically.
Ensure all IP addresses and IP address
ranges are valid and unique for your network.
„4… Host name of each
Network Station
The host name identifies the Network Station
as a unique destination within a TCP/IP
network.
„5… Subnet mask
The subnet mask is a value that enables
network devices to direct packets of
information accurately in a subnetted
environment.
„6… IP address for the
Gateway (if one exists in
your network)
If the local area network (LAN) that you are
attaching Network Stations to is not directly
attached to the RS/6000, you need to specify
the IP address of the IP Router/Gateway that
the Network Stations use to access the
server.
„7… IP address for the
The Domain name sever IP address is the
Domain Name server (if
address of the system (if any) that will act as
one exists for your network primary name server in this domain.
and you are using the
BOOTP or DHCP)
Choosing a Boot Method and Configuring the Server
You must configure each Network Station so that the server recognizes it when it
attempts to connect during the boot process. You can configure the Network Stations
centrally (using BOOTP from the server), or you can configure them locally (using
NVRAM on each unit). You can also configure an RS/6000 to use Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP). Choose one of the following methods to configure your
Network Stations:
v If you choose to use BOOTP, go to “Configuring BOOTP Protocol” on page 163.
162
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
v If you choose to use DHCP, go to “Configuring Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP)” on page 165.
v If you choose to use NVRAM, go to “Configuring Network Stations Locally —
NVRAM” on page 169.
Configuring BOOTP Protocol
The ″Internet Protocol (IP) Addressed From″ parameter on each Network Station must
be set to network before you can configure the Network Stations from the server. See
“Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting” on page 309.
Each Network Station must have an entry in the BOOTP table on the server. Use the
procedure that is described below to add a line to the server /etc/bootptab file for each
Network Station:
__ 1. Use the following fast path command to open the SMIT BOOTP Device menu:
smitty bootp
An example of the BootP Device menu is in Figure 37:
BootP Device
Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
List All BootP Devices
Add a new BootP Device
Change / Show Characteristics of a BootP Device
Duplicate a new BootP Device from an existing Device
Remove a BootP Device
F1=Help
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F10=Exit
F3=Cancel
Enter=Do
F8=Image
Figure 37. RS/6000 BootP Device Menu
__ 2. Select Add a new BOOTP Device. The Add a new BootP Device dialog box
displays as shown in Figure 38 on page 164:
Chapter 4. RS/6000
163
Add a new BootP Device
Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
* Hostname
* Hardware Type
Hardware Address
* IP Address
* TFTP Server IP
* Boot File
* Boot Directory
Domain Name Server
Gateway
* Subnet Mask
F1=Help
F5=Reset
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F6=Command
F10=Exit
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
F3=Cancel
F7=Edit
Enter=Do
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
+
F4=List
F8=Image
Figure 38. RS/6000 Add a New BootP Device Dialog Box
__ 3. In the Add a new BOOTP Device dialog box, type or select the following
information:
__ a. The host name of the Network Station
Type the value that is recorded on line „4… in Table 41 on page 161.
__ b. The hardware Type of the Network Station (Choose from the list)
__ c. The hardware Address (the MAC address for the Network Station that you
are configuring)
Use the value that is recorded on line „2… in Table 41 on page 161. Type
the value without the : colon separators. Either type the string with no
separators or with period separators.
__ d. The IP Address of the Network Station
Type the value that is recorded on line „3… in Table 41 on page 161.
__ e. The TFTP Server IP address
This is typically the IP address of the RS/6000 being configured, type the
value recorded on line „1… in Table 41 on page 161.
__ f. The boot file
Type kernel in this field.
__ g. The boot directory
Type /usr/netstation/ in this field. Type the directory path as shown
including the trailing /.
__ h. The IP Address for the Domain Name Server
Type the value that is recorded on line „7… in Table 41 on page 161.
164
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Note: This field is optional. If your environment does not require this,
leave it blank:
__ i. The IP Address for the Gateway
Type the value that is recorded on line „6… in Table 41 on page 161.
Note: This field is optional. If your environment does not require this field,
leave it blank.
__ j. The subnet mask
Type the value that is recorded on line „5… in Table 41 on page 161.
__ k. If all fields and selections are correct, press the Enter key to add this
Network Station to the BOOTP table.
Repeat these steps for each Network Station.
Note: If you are configuring more than one Network Station, select
Duplicate a new BootP Device from an Existing Device in the
BootP Device Menu as a starting point to configure the next
Network Station. Many fields contain the same information for all
Network Stations.
__ l. This completes the BOOTP Configuration Procedure. Go to “Before
You Continue” on page 169.
v You can also configure Network Stations by using the chbootptab script
(see “Configuring Network Stations Using the chbootptab Script” on
page 173) or by manually editing the /etc/bootptab file (see
“Configuring Network Stations Manually” on page 174).
Configuring Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
Note: To assist you in making the decision on whether to use DHCP, refer to “Taking
Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 18, and “Determining
DHCP Classes” on page 22.
The DHCP and BOOTP daemons cannot run on the same machine at the same time
because both daemons use the same protocol and the same UDP port. DHCP replaces
BOOTP, and supports all features of BOOTP. There is no need to run both daemons on
the same machine.
It is also possible to setup a relay DHCP daemon. This server forwards DHCP requests
to another DHCP server. Use this relay feature if you want to use a DHCP server in
another network because the broadcast requests from a Network Station will not cross
subnets.
DHCP configuration is more advanced than BOOTP. If you already have a running
BOOTP configuration, convert the entries in the /etc/bootptab file into
the/etc/dhcpsd.cnf file automatically with the /usr/sbin/bootptodhcp command. This
command appends the proper client entries to the DHCP configuration file. You can find
more information within the file /etc/dhcpsd.cnf and in the AIX Version 4 System
Chapter 4. RS/6000
165
Management Guide: Communications and Networks. You can also see AIX Version 4.3
System Management Guide: Communications and Networks.
Use the following procedure to set up the /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file for your network and
start DHCP.
__ 1. Edit the /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file by using the example in 166 as a guide.
The configuration file example and description shows configuration file entries for
a variety of configurations, such as:
v Variable IP address, variable host name
v Variable IP address, static host name
v Static IP address inside managed IP range
v Static IP address outside managed IP range
v BOOTP address records
It is likely that your configuration file is less complex since this example contains
all possibilities of how DHCP can assign IP addresses or host names. See
“Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 18 and
“Determining DHCP Classes” on page 22.
__ 2. After you set up the configuration file, use the following procedure to start the
DHCP server:
__ a. Disable the start of BOOTP
To disable the start of BOOTP, edit the /etc/inetd.conf file and place a #
in the first column of the bootps line. Then enter the following command to
restart the inetd subsystem:
refresh -s inetd
__ b. Enter the following command to check for any active BOOTP daemons:
ps -eaf | grep bootp
__ c. If any BOOTP processes are running, enter the following command to
stop them:
kill -9 PID
Where PID is the process ID of the BOOTP process that is listed by the
ps command.
__ d. Enter the following command to start DHCP :
startsrc -s dhcpsd
When you start DHCP for the first time, be sure to check the log files for
errors in your server or client configuration. It is a good idea to enable all
events for logging.
__ 3. This completes the DHCP configuration. Go to “Before You Continue” on
page 169.
#global declaration of the log files
„1… numLogFiles 4
logFileSize 100
logFileName /tmp/dhcp.log
166
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
„2… logItem SYSERR
logItem OBJERR
logItem PROTERR
logItem WARNING
logItem EVENT
logItem ACTION
logItem INFO
logItem ACNTING
logItem TRACE
#how long is IP address valid
„3… leaseTimeDefault
30 minutes
leaseExpireInterval
10 minutes
#BOOTP should be supported
„4… supportBOOTP yes
#All clients will be served
„5… supportUnlistedClients yes
#declare global options
„6… option 28 9.3.1.255
#broadcast address
option 3
9.3.1.74
#default gateway
option 6
9.3.1.74
#domain name server
option 15 austin.ibm.com
#Domain name
option 12 "bootserv.austin.ibm.com"
#special BOOTP options
„7… option sa 9.3.1.116
#bootserver
option hd "/usr/netstation/"
#boot directory
option bf "kernel"
#kernel file
#our network with subnetmask
#this must be the first statement
„8… network 9.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
{
#BOOTP clients
„9…
client 6 0000E568D75E 9.3.1.199
client 6 0000E5E8EC76 9.3.1.202
#DHCP clients outside managed subnet
„10…
client 6 0000E568D739 9.3.1.201
{
option 51 0xffffffff
#infinite address lease time
}
#subnet with variable IP addresses
„11…
subnet 9.3.1.0
9.3.1.135-9.3.1.139
{
#hosts with variable IP addresses
#need not to be mentioned explicitly, since
#supportUnlistedClients=yes
#hosts with fixed IP addresses within managed subnet
„12…
client 6 0000e568f5f0 9.3.1.135
#hosts with variable IP address, but fixed host name
#this needs DDNS enabled (last two lines)
„13…
client 6 0000e568f5ee "any"
{
option 12 "sv2040b" #hostname
}
#To support multi server environments the following is suggested
# hosts with class identifier for Network Station Model 8361-200
„14…
class "IBMNSM 1.0.0" 9.3.1.138-9.3.1.139
{
option 66 "9.3.1.116"
# Network Station Class Boot
# Server IP address
option 67 "/usr/netstation/kernel"
# Boot Image file
option 211 "nfs"
# Boot Server TCPIP access protocol
option 212 "9.3.1.117" # Terminal Configuration Server(s)
# IP address(es) (two may be defined)
Chapter 4. RS/6000
167
option 213 "/usr/netstation/configs" # Configuration file
# (two may be defined)
option 214 "nfs"
# Terminal Server TCPIP access protocol
# (two may be defined)
} #end class definition
} #end subnet
} #end network
„15… #Actions for updating DNS
updateDNS
"/usr/sbin/dhcpaction '%s' '%s' '%s' '%s' PTR NONIM >>/tmp/rmdns.out 2>&1"
removeDNS
"/usr/sbin/dhcpremove '%s' PTR NONIM >>/tmp/rmdns.out 2>&1"
The following list describes the entries in the example configuration file in 166:
„1… The declaration of the log files.
DHCP should use four log files with a 100KB maximum file size and base name
/tmp/dhcp.log. These log files are important, and the only source of information for
error messages and debugging.
„2… The events to be logged by DHCP
During setup, you should enable all events. Once DHCP is running, you can
decrease the amount of logging.
„3… Declaration of the lease time interval
After 30 minutes, the client has to renew the lease interval. In the case where the
client cannot renew its IP address because the DHCP server cannot be contacted,
the IP will expire in 10 minutes.
„4… This DHCP server should answer BOOTP requests.
„5… If set to no you have to declare all MAC addresses of your clients in the
configuration file to serve them by DHCP. If set to yes, DHCP serves any incoming
requests.
„6… These are global options that are transmitted to the client when it requests
start-up information.
You should (at a minimum) declare these four, if available. For additional options,
refer to the comments in the original AIX /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file.
„7… Special options for BOOTP
The Network Station uses these options to load the kernel file and configuration
files. The Network Station reads these options even when using the DHCP protocol.
„8… Here is the declaration of the network
You must adhere to the TCP/IP network conventions. Be sure to use the right
network address and mask.
„9… These lines declare the BOOTP clients.
As with the BOOTP setup, you have to register every client with its MAC address
and the corresponding IP address. If you want to specify different BOOTP options
for a client, you have to put these options into brackets right after the client
statement.
„10… An example for a DHCP client outside of the subnet managed by DHCP
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
This looks similar to the BOOTP client definition. Because DHCP cannot renew any
IP addresses outside its managed range, you have to specify an infinite lease time
for these clients. This results in the same behavior as BOOTP clients. They will get
an IP address assigned and do not have to renew it.
„11… This is the declaration of the subnet managed by DHCP and the range of the
IP addresses for the address pool of DHCP.
Unless otherwise specified, any client requesting an IP address from DHCP will get
an address out of this pool, if possible. Because the option supportUnlistedClients
is yes, you do not have to specify any MAC addresses of your clients.
„12… With statements similar to this, you can assign fixed IP addresses to special
clients, in the case where the software depends on a fixed address.
„13… If you use DDNS, the IP address of your host can vary, but it will always have
the same host name. To specify the host name, you have to assign a host name
with option 12 to this client.
„14… It is recommended that Release 3 clients be defined/isolated by class instead
of MAC address within a DHCP managed network. If you want to configure a multi
server environment, see “Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on
page 18 and “Determining DHCP Classes” on page 22.
„15… These commands update the DNS database if DHCP assigns or releases IP
addresses.
Configuring Network Stations Locally — NVRAM
Note: This approach is practical only if you’re configuring a very small number of IBM
Network Stations.
Use the procedure in “Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the NVRAM
Setting” on page 309 to configure Network Stations locally.
Note: Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP) is a choice in the Network Station
NVRAM boot choices; however, the RS/6000 platform does not support RARP
for booting Network Stations.
Before You Continue
v Verify that you started your DHCP, or HTTP server, and that the BOOTP, TFTP, and
NFS daemons are running (biod, nfsd, rpc.mountd, rpc.statd, and rpc.lockd).
Note: TFTP and BOOTP daemons are transient daemons. Unless you run the ps
-ef command while they are actually running you will not be able to verify that
they have run successfully. Also, the TFTP daemon is used only with AIX
V4.3.1 and later.
v If you are using DHCP, and you have a router between your IBM Network Stations
and your boot server, verify that the router is configured to handle DHCP requests.
v Use a web browser to access the IBM Network Station Manager at URL
http://ServerName/networkstation/admin to administer local client applications,
Chapter 4. RS/6000
169
including the NC Navigator web browser and terminal emulators. You need root user
authority to perform this task on the server. See “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program” on page 245 for information on using the Network Station
Manager.
v To take advantage of new functionality, you must update the boot monitor on your
Network Stations. Each of your Network Stations must have a minimum boot monitor
version of 3.0.0. Even if you have purchased new Network Stations, you should
verify and update the boot monitors of your Network Stations. For information about
updating boot monitors, see “Updating the Boot Monitor Code” on page 265.
v Verify that the Network Parameters that are configured in the Setup Utility of each
Network Station agree with your boot method. For example, if you want an IBM
Network Station to obtain its IP address through a DHCP server, ensure that the IP
Address From field in the Setup Utility is set to Network. IBM Network Stations are
set to Network when they are shipped from the factory. See “Chapter 10. Working
With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301 for more information.
v For more information about setting up Network Stations, see the following sections:
– “Chapter 7. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager
Applications” on page 223
– “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 245
– “Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301
Suppressed Login
In order to keep the login window from being displayed, perform the following steps.
Remember that the userid you are creating will automatically login without a password,
so these userids must have very limited authority.
1. Create a text file to add the Network Station IP address or hostname, userid, and
password. The values should be separated by one or more spaces. For example:
10.9.99.99
userid1
netstationName userid2
password1
password2
You can use wild cards (UNIX regular expressions) to specify the IP address or
hostname.
2. Run the /usr/netstation/bin/createKIOSKS text file from the command in step 1. A
file /usr/netstation/configs/kiosks.nsl is created. This is an encrypted version of
the text file.
3. Delete or hide the text file created in step 1 for security.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Printing from AIX to a Printer Attached to a Network Station
In the RS/6000 environment, printing from an RS/6000 AIX application is done through
the AIX print spooler subsystem. You can use the print spooler subsystem to print to a
printer attached to the Network Station. To print, you define a remote queue for the
printer attached to the Network Station and submit jobs to be printed using standard
AIX print commands. For example, qprt and enq. Local Network Station clients do not
use a local spooler subsystem for printing.
Refer to AIX Version 4 Guide to Printers and Printing for general AIX printer installation
and configuration information.
Setting up AIX to print to a printer attached to the Network Station includes these tasks:
v Defining an AIX remote print queue
v Connecting a printer to the Network Station
v Verifying printer operation
Refer to “Appendix G. Serial Port Printer Connection” on page 381 for information on
connecting a printer to the Network Station.
Defining the AIX Remote Print Queue
Use the following procedure to define the AIX remote print queue:
__ 1. As root, use the fast path shortcut to open the SMIT Add a Print Queue menu
smitty mkpq. If you prefer to work in the graphical SMIT interface, type smit
mkpq.
__ 2. From the Add a Print Queue menu, select remote and press Enter.
__ 3. From the Type of Remote Printing menu, select Local filtering before sending
to print server and press Enter.
__ 4. From the Remote Printer Type menu, select your printer type and press Enter.
__ 5. From the Remote Printer Type list, select your printer model and press Enter. If
your printer is not listed, select Other to use a generic printer definition.
The Add a Remote Print Queue with Local Filtering dialog box displays as shown
in Figure 39 on page 172:
Chapter 4. RS/6000
171
Add a Remote Print Queue with Local Filtering
Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
Hewlett-Packard LaserJ>
Description
* Name of new PRINT QUEUE to add
*
*
[]
Remote server characteristics
HOSTNAME of remote server
Name of QUEUE on remote server
TYPE of print spooler on remote server
Send PASS-THROUGH FLAG to queue
on remote server?
F1=Help
F5=Reset
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F6=Command
F10=Exit
F3=Cancel
F7=Edit
Enter=Do
[]
[]
AIX Version 3 or 4
yes
+
+
F4=List
F8=Image
Figure 39. RS/6000 Add a Remote Print Queue with Local Filtering Dialog Box
__ 6. In the Add a Remote Print Queue with Local Filtering dialog box, type or select
the following:
__ a. Type the name SERIAL1 or PARALLEL depending on which one of the
remote print queues you are adding.
__ b. Type the host name of the Network Station in the HOSTNAME of remote
server field.
__ c. Type the name of the Network Station remote print queue in the Name of
QUEUE on remote server field.
__ d. Select BSD for the TYPE of print spooler on remote server.
__ e. Press the Enter key to create the queue.
End of remote print queue setup.
Verifying printer operation
To verify printer operation, enter the following command to submit a job to a printer
queue:
enq -Pname_of_print_queue /etc/motd
If you need additional printer support information, please see AIX Version 4 Guide to
Printers and Printing.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
RS/6000 Administration: Alternative Methods
This section includes the following RS/6000 system administration tasks. These tasks
are either optional configuration methods or alternative methods of configuring an
RS/6000 server Network Station environment:
v “Configuring Network Stations Using the chbootptab Script”
v “Configuring Network Stations Manually” on page 174
v “Understanding the nsconf Script” on page 175
v “Setting Up AIX Server Routing” on page 176
v “Setting Up BOOTP Relay Configuration” on page 176
Configuring Network Stations Using the chbootptab Script
To configure Network Stations centrally using the chbootptab script, at the command
line, enter the following information on one line:
/usr/netstation/bin/chbootptab -A -h hostname -t hardware_type
-s tftp_server_ip -a hardware_address -b boot_file -i ip_address
-d boot_directory
You can also use these optional flags:
-n domain_name_server
-g gateway_ip
-m subnet_mask
Where:
v hostname is the value that is recorded on line „4… in Table 41 on page 161.
v hardware_type is the Hardware Type of the Network Station.
v tftp_server_ip is the TFTP Server IP address.
This is typically the IP address of the RS/6000 that you are configuring. See the
value that is recorded on line „1… in Table 41 on page 161.
v hardware_address is the hardware address (the MAC address for the Network
Station that you are configuring).
Use the value recorded on line „2… in Table 41 on page 161. Enter the value without
the colon separators. Either enter the string with no separators or with period
separators.
v boot_file is kernel.
v ip_address is the IP address of the Network Station.
Enter the value that is recorded on line „3… in Table 41 on page 161.
v boot_directory is /usr/netstation/.
Note: Type the path as shown including the trailing /.
v domain_name_server is the IP address for the Domain Name Server.
Chapter 4. RS/6000
173
Enter the value that is recorded on line „7… in Table 41 on page 161.
v gateway_ip is the IP address for the gateway.
Enter the value that is recorded on line „6… in Table 41 on page 161.
v subnet_mask is the subnet mask.
Enter the value that is recorded on line „5… in Table 41 on page 161.
Repeat the script for each Network Station that you are configuring.
For information about additional flags that are available with the chbootptab script,
enter at the command line:
/usr/netstation/bin/chbootptab -?
Configuring Network Stations Manually
Use the following procedure to configure Network Stations manually by editing the
/etc/bootptab file. For each Network Station that you want your server to boot, copy
the template below and replace the labels in uppercase with the appropriate values.
Enter on one line:
NC_HOST_NAME:ht=NETWORK_TYPE:ha=MAC_ADDRESS:ip=IP_ADDRESS:bf=kernel
hd=/usr/netstation/:sm=SUBNET_MASK:gw=GATEWAY_IP:ds=NAMESERVER_IP:
Note: When you edit the /etc/bootptab file manually, each entry is longer than one line
of text can display in your editor. Do not put a manual return (line feed) in the
entry ,or the entry will fail. (Your editor may be set up to wrap lines automatically;
if this is the case, the entry will work. Just do not manually press the Enter key
to force a return.)
Replace...
NC_HOST_NAME
NETWORK_TYPE
MAC_ADDRESS
IP_ADDRESS
with...
network name of the Network Station (for example,
hostname)
ethernet, ieee802, or tokenring
hardware address of the Network Station
IP address of the Network Station
The following fields are optional and can be left blank (for example, :sm=:gw=:) if they
do not exist in your network.
Replace...
SUBNET_MASK
GATEWAY
NAMESERVER_IP
with...
subnet mask of the network
gateway IP of the network
domain name server IP of the network
Note: Each Network Station that you want your AIX system to boot using BOOTP must
have an entry in the /etc/bootptab file.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Understanding the nsconf Script
These are the tasks that the nsconf script performs for you during software installation
(you do not need to perform these tasks).
v The nsconf script enables TFTP access from the IBM Network Stations by
performing these tasks on the server:
– In the /etc/inetd.conf file, removing the # in the leftmost column for the ’tftp’ entry.
– Running /usr/bin/refresh -s inetd
– Adding the following line to the /etc/tftpaccess.ctl file:
allow:/usr/netstation
Note: The existence of the /etc/tftpaccess.ctl file limits TFTP access to only the
directories explicitly listed in this file. You may want to add additional ’allow’
statements to support other TFTP activity on the server. You might also
want to remove the /etc/tftpaccess.ctl file if you want to allow unlimited
TFTP access to the server. See the tftp man page for additional
information.
– Adding the entry ’/usr/netstation -ro’ to the /etc/exports file.
– Running /usr/sbin/exportfs -a, which exports all the directories listed in the
/etc/exports file for NFS client access.
–
Running /usr/sbin/mknfs -B. The mknfs command configures the system to run
the Network File System (NFS) daemons. The mknfs command adds an entry to
the inittab file so that the /etc/rc.nfs file is run on system restart. The mknfs
command also executes the /etc/rc.nfs file immediately to start the NFS
daemons.
v The nsconf script enables NFS access from the IBM Network Stations by changing
the IP entry in the ’file-service-table’ stanza of the
/usr/netstation/configs/defaults.dft file to the IP address of your AIX server.
v The nsconf script enables the IBM Network Stations to dynamically load X11 fonts
from an AIX font server. The script changes the IP entry in the ’xserver-default-fontpath’ stanza of the /usr/netstation/configs/defaults.dft file to the IP address of your
AIX font server. The script checks for the existence of theX11.fnt.fontServer fileset
and if it finds the fileset, runs /usr/lpp/X11/bin/fsconf.
If at any time you need to disable the server code, enter the following command:
/usr/netstation/bin/nsconf -d
Running the nsconf script with the -d flag comments out references to the Network
Stations in the /etc/bootptab file. This keeps the Network Stations from booting using
the BOOTP protocol. Configuration information is not erased from the system, and the
server code can be reactivated by running the nsconf script again with no flags.
Note: Running nsconf -d does not turn off BOOTP, TFTP, and NFS. These processes
must be shut down manually.
Chapter 4. RS/6000
175
Setting Up AIX Server Routing
If you set up your server as a gateway between your Network Stations and other
networks, you must configure the /etc/rc.net file to do IP forwarding. Add the following
line to the end of the /etc/rc.net file:
/usr/sbin/no -o ipforwarding=1
Note: If you would like your server to begin forwarding packets immediately, run the
same command manually at the command prompt.
Setting Up BOOTP Relay Configuration
If you set up your RS/6000 server to be a gateway between your Network Stations and
the Network Station boot server and you wish to use BOOTP or DHCP, you must
configure the /etc/dhcprd.cnf file to do direct broadcast forwarding. Once configured,
the RS/6000 will forward the Network Station BOOTP or DHCP broadcast message to a
specific boot server on another network.
The RS/6000 can function as only one of the following:
v BOOTP server (bootpd enabled)
v DHCP server (dhcpsd enabled)
v BOOTP/DHCP Relay (dhcprd enabled)
This is the procedure to configure BOOTP relay:
__ 1. Disable bootp in the /etc/inetd.conf file by placing a # in the first column of the
bootps line. Save the file and refresh the inetd subsystem by entering the
following command:
refresh -s inetd
__ 2. Check for any active BOOTP daemons by entering:
ps -ef | grep bootp
If any bootp processes are running, stop them by entering:
kill -9 PID
The PID is the process ID of the bootpd command listed in the previous ps
command output.
__ 3. Make sure that dhcpsd is not running by entering:
ps -ef | grep dhcpsd
If it is running, disable it by entering:
smit spdhcpsd
and selecting NOW or BOTH to disable dhcpsd.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 4. Edit the /etc/dhcprd.cnf file to specify the IP address of each server to which
the Network Station BOOTP or DHCP broadcast should be forwarded. Entries
are in this form:
server
IP_address
where IP_address is the IP address of the destination server. To have the
Network Station BOOTP or DHCP broadcast forwarded to multiple BOOTP or
DHCP servers, add additional ’server’ lines.
__ 5. Start the dhcprd daemon by entering the following command:
smit stdhcprd
and select NOW or BOTH to start dhcprd.
Chapter 4. RS/6000
177
178
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Chapter 5. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station
Environment on an OS/390 Server
About this Chapter . . . . . . .
Installation Steps. . . . . . . .
Configuration Steps . . . . . . .
Before You Continue . . . . . .
Configuring Printers on OS/390 . . .
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
Printing Support . . . . . . .
Using NetSpool and IP PrintWay .
NLS Considerations . . . . . . .
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179
180
182
198
198
199
199
199
200
About this Chapter
This chapter contains instructions for planning, installing, and configuring a Network
Station environment on an OS/390 server. When necessary, you will be pointed to the
Program Directory for the Network Station Manager Release 3.0 for OS/390 for
installation information. The program directory ships with the IBM Network Station
Manager for OS/390 licensed program.
While completing the installation procedure and the configuration procedure, do not
deviate from the order of the steps. The following figure demonstrates the flow of this
manual.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
179
Installation Steps
This section describes the preparation and installation of the IBM Network Station
Manager (5648-C05) licensed program.
Attention: If you have manually modified any configuration files instead of using the
IBM Network Station Manager program in the past, refer to
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs for Advanced User Information.
__ 1. Review the information authorized program analysis report (APAR) described in
the Program Directory for the Network Station Manager Release 3.0 for OS/390.
__ 2. Verify prerequisite OS/390 software.
Your OS/390 server must have the following installed:
v OS/390 Version 2 Release 5 or OS/390 Version 2 Release 4 (5647-A01)
With OS/390 Version 2 Release 5:
– TCP/IP 3.4 (FMID HTCP340 and JTCP349)
With OS/390 Version 2 Release 4:
– TCP/IP 3.2 for MVS with OE MVS Application Feature (FMID JTCP327) or
OS/390 TCP/IP UNIX Services (FMID JTCP329)
– TCP/IP Network Station Manager for OS/390 (FMID JTCP32N). This
includes Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), TimeD, and Trivial
File Transfer Protocol (TFTP).
180
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
UNIX System Services enabled system with the Hierarchical File System
(HFS) (to contain kernel code for Network Station). The Shell & Utilities ships
with the UNIX System Services.
v Domino Go Webserver
– Domino Go Webserver 4.6.1 (5697-C58). You can use this with OS/390
Version 2 Release 4, but it is not included in the product. You must order it
separately. However, Domino Go Webserver 4.6.1 is included in OS/390
Version 2 Release 5.
– Domino Go Webserver 5.0 (5697-D43). This must be ordered separately
and can only be used with OS/390 Version 2 Release 5.
v JavaScript capable browser.
v Network File System (NFS).
Note: The Network File System SAF or SAFEXP option requires the level of
NFS that is included in OS/390 Version 2 Release 6. If you (as an
OS/390 V2R4 or OS/390 V2R5 customer) require this function at this
time, contact your IBM representative to discuss possible special
arrangements to install OS/390 V2R6 NFS for a limited time, under
additional terms and conditions.
If the use of the EXPORTS option is sufficient for your security
environment, you may avoid the need for OS/390 V2R6 NFS. The
Network File System included with OS/390 V2R4 and OS/390 V2R5
supports this security environment.
__ 3. Verify IBM Network Station memory requirements.
Network Stations download each of their appplications including their base
systems into memory. You should verify that your Network Stations have enough
memory to run their applications. Use the table at
http://www.pc.ibm.com/networkstation/support/memrec_data.html to determine
how much memory your Network Stations will need.
__ 4. Install the IBM Network Station Manager program (5648-C05).
The IBM Network Station Manager for OS/390 licensed program is available for
OS/390 Version 2 Release 5 or OS/390 Version 2 Release 4 systems. The IBM
Network Station Manager for OS/390 licensed program consists of the following:
v Network Station client
v Network Station Manager
v 40-bit NC Navigator browser
The Program Directory for the Network Station Manager Release 3.0 for OS/390
that ships with the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program describes the
procedure for installing the IBM Network Station Manager from the distribution
tape. The program directory contains the following information:
v Basic and optional program materials and documentation
v IBM support available
v Program and service APARs and PTFs
v Installation requirements and considerations
Chapter 5. OS/390
181
v Migration instructions
v Installation instructions
You should also review the Preventive Service Planning (PSP) bucket for any
changes to the installation information.
__ 5. Install optional software.
__ a. Install the 128-bit NC Navigator (5648-C20)
For installation instructions, see the Program Directory for the 128-bit NC
Navigator Browser for Network Station Manager.
__ b. Install eSuite Workplace (5648-KN2) (CD-ROM only)
For installation instructions, refer to the README file that is shipped with
the product.
__ c. Install Omron, Japanese Input Method (5648-OMR)
For installation instructions, refer to the README file that is shipped with
the product.
__ 6. Installation complete.
You have installed all the required software for the IBM Network Station Manager
program. At the end of the installation instructions in the Program Directory for
Network Station Manager Release 3.0 for OS/390, you have a Network Station
running that is using NVRAM as the boot method, NFS as the boot file protocol,
and the Domino Go Webserver as your server. If you want to use DHCP as your
boot method, use TFTP as your boot file protocol, change your Domino Go
Webserver configuration settings, or change login information, continue to
“Configuration Steps”. Otherwise, go to “Before You Continue” on page 198.
Configuration Steps
__ 1. Verify that you installed the required software that is listed in step 2 on
page 180.
__ 2. Choose the boot file protocol you want to use. You have already configured and
started NFS. However, you can use TFTP, in addition to NFS.
You can use either NFS or TFTP to load the base code files from the base
code server. However, you must use NFS to save and retrieve user
configuration files, such as those pointed to by the NSLD.
Also, using NFS allows users to save preferences, such as bookmarks, and
allows the NC Navigator browser proxy or socks server settings to be saved
across logins.
You may want to use TFTP if you are migrating from a previous release of
Network Station Manager that used TFTP.
Note: The TFTP server uses well-known port 69. The TFTP server has no user
authentication. Any client that can connect to port 69 on the server has
access to TFTP. If the TFTP server is started without a directory, it
182
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
allows access to the entire HFS. To restrict access to the HFS, start the
TFTP server with a list of directories.
__ 3. Configure and start the Network File System (NFS).
You have already configured and started the port mapper server and NFS using
the instructions in the Program Directory for the Network Station Manager
Release 3.0 for OS/390. However, if you want to change your configuration,
continue with this step. Otherwise, go to step 4 on page 184.
To configure and start NFS, follow these steps:
a. Update the attribute data set file, for example, nfsattr, to include the
following settings (refer to the NFSATTR DD statement in the NFS startup job
stream to find this data set):
binary
hfs(/hfs)
security(exports)
nomaplower
writetimeout(120)
binary is the setting of the transfer mode.
/hfs sets the prefix for the Hierarchical File System.
security(exports) specifies the type of security checking you are using to
provide access to your NFS data.
nomaplower turns off mapping of lowercase to uppercase for file names.
Therefore, mixed cased is recognized.
writetimeout(120) specifies the number of seconds before a data set is
released after a write operation. The default value is 30 seconds. Normally,
writetimeout values should be kept short because write operations result in
exclusive locking. However, NFS involves relatively slow client machines
that may have long pauses between write operations, so a larger value is
appropriate.
b. Update the export data set, for example, exports (refer to the EXPORTS DD
statement in the NFS startup job stream to find this data set). This data set
contains entries for directories that may be exported to Network File System
clients. The server uses this data set to determine which data sets and
prefixes may be accessed by a client, and to write protect data sets on the
server provided that the SECURITY site attribute is set to either
SECURITY(EXPORTS) or SECURITY(SAFEXP). This file is not used for
SECURITY(SAF) or SECURITY(NONE). You should specify READ ONLY
access to the boot kernel directory for all users. The following is an example
of an export data set:
/hfs/usr/lpp/nstation/ -ro
/hfs/etc/nstation/
c. Start NFS.
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To start NFS, run the proc by using the following command from the
operator’s console:
start mvsnfs
For details about configuring NFS, see the OS/390 NFS Customization and
Operation, SC26-7029 and the OS/390 NFS User’s Guide, SC26-7028.
Note: Both the port mapper server and NFS can be automatically started by
including the information in PROFILE.TCPIP.
__ 4. If you decided to use the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server, continue
with this step, otherwise go to step 5.
Note: The TFTP server uses well-known port 69. The TFTP server has no user
authentication. Any client that can connect to port 69 on the server has
access to TFTP. If the TFTP server is started without a directory, it allows
access to the entire HFS. To restrict access to the HFS, start the TFTP
server with a list of directories.
To start the TFTP server, use one of the following methods:
v Issue the following tftpd command:
tftpd -l -a /usr/lpp/nstation/standard
-a /etc/nstation /usr/lpp/nstation/standard /etc/nstation
In OS/390 V2R4, tftpd is located in the /usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/sbin/ directory.
In OS/390 V2R5, tftpd is located in the /usr/lpp/tcpip/sbin/ directory.
v Use a JCL procedure (proc). The procedure named TFTPD is installed in the
SEZAINST library.
Before running TFTPD, you must change the PARM= parameter of the tftpd
command that is called in the proc.
– Edit the TFTPD proc
– Change -a /usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard to -a
/usr/lpp/nstation/standard
To start TFTP, run the proc by using the following command from the
operator’s console:
start tftpd
For more information about TFTP in TCP/IP 3.2, refer to the Network Station
Manager for S/390, SC31-8546. For more information about TFTP in TCP/IP 3.4,
refer to OS/390 eNetwork Communications Server IP Configuration, SC31-8513.
__ 5. Choose a boot protocol and configuration method.
You have already set up your Network Station to use NVRAM. However, you can
use DHCP instead. Use Chapter 1, specifically sections “Boot Methods” on
page 13 and “What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?” on page 4, to
learn more about boot methods and TCP/IP.
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Notes:
a. Although BOOTP clients are supported, use the DHCP server to respond to
BOOTP requests.
b. If you use the DHCP boot method and use the DHCP options 67, 211, 212,
213, or 214, these options override the settings specified on the Set Boot
Parameters Panel of the Network Station Setup Utility.
Table 42. Available Boot Protocols and Boot Methods by Level of OS/390
Boot Method
OS/390 V2R4 and V2R5 Configuration Method
DHCP or BOOTP
Edit the boot server configuration file (dhcpsd.cfg).
NVRAM
No boot server configuration necessary.
If you choose to use a DHCP boot protocol, go to step 6.
If you choose to use a NVRAM boot protocol, go to step 9 on page 192.
__ 6. Gather information for setting up your DHCP environment.
When you set up a DHCP environment, first you will define its global attributes,
then you will define the subnets in your DHCP environment. Table 43 and
Table 44 on page 186 describe global and subnet information you will need to set
up your DHCP environment.
After reviewing this information, you will fill in the worksheets in Table 45 on
page 187 and Table 46 on page 188 with your own DHCP environment values.
Refer to OS/390 eNetwork Communications Server IP Configuration, SC31-8513,
for more information on DHCP.
Table 43. DHCP Global Information
Field
Description
number_of_log_files
This provides the logging information for the server. Specify the
number of log files you need, the size of the log file, and name of the
log file, and at least one type of log item.
size_of_log_file
name_of_log_file
type_of_log_item
supportBootP [YES|NO]
If your OS/390 serves BOOTP clients and if you would like to migrate
your existing clients, these migrated clients will use the DHCP server
to obtain their IP addresses, but the addresses will be static like
BOOTP.
supportUnlistedClients [YES|NO]
Determines whether the server responds to requests from DHCP
clients other than those whose client IDs are listed in the configuration
file.
address_of_bootstrap
If you migrate BOOTP clients, you must define their bootstrap server.
The bootstrap server delivers the boot files to the IBM Network
Stations.
base_code_server_protocol
The protocol of the base code server (NFS or TFTP).
terminal_configuration_address
The address of the terminal configuration server.
terminal_configuration_path_name
The path name for the terminal configuration server.
terminal_configuration_server_protocol
The protocol of the terminal configuration server (NFS or TFTP).
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Table 43. DHCP Global Information (continued)
Field
Description
boot_file_name
The name of the boot file that is passed to a DHCP client. This name
must contain the fully-qualified path name and be less than 128
characters in length.
amount_of_default_lease_time
The amount of time a server lets clients keep an IP address.
hw_type
These fields are used to define a client outside of a subnet. clientID
can be a MAC address, a domain name, or a host name.
clientID
client_ipaddr
host_name
The host name of the client.
Table 44. DHCP Subnet Information
Field
Description
subnet_addr
Note: The subnet address is only for subnets
in which the entire subnet is reserved for
DHCP addressing.
The IP address associated with a particular subnet. For a Class C
network whose subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, the subnet address is
the same as the network address. In Figure 5 on page 7, the subnet
IP address is 192.168.1.0. If the subnet mask of your network is not
255.255.255.0, refer to “Subnets and Subnet Masks” on page 9 for
more information.
subnet_mask
A value that enables network devices to direct packets of information
accurately in a subnetted environment. In Figure 5 on page 7, the
subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. For more information about subnet
masks, refer to “Subnets and Subnet Masks” on page 9.
subnet_start
Note: Only for subnets based on a range.
The first IP address in the range that you have specified for your pool
of available addresses. For the subnet 192.168.1.0 in Figure 5 on
page 7, the starting address could be 192.168.1.2.
subnet_end
Note: Only for subnets based on a range.
The last IP address in the range that you have specified for your pool
of available addresses. For the subnet 192.168.1.0 in Figure 5 on
page 7, the ending address range could be 192.168.1.3. The
specified range (192.168.1.2 – 192.168.1.3) allows for only two clients
on the subnet.
address_of_excluded_client
If any routers, gateways, statically addressed clients (not using
BOOTP or DHCP) or servers are within your subnet range, you must
exclude those IP addresses. If you have migrated BOOTP clients, you
do not need to exclude their IP addresses. If the DHCP range was
192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.50 in Figure 5 on page 7, you would
exclude 192.168.1.4 and 192.168.1.5. They are the static IP
addresses of the Domain Name Server and the Client Server.
amount_of_default_lease_time
The amount of time a server lets clients keep an IP address.
address_of_router
The IP address of the default router to which TCP/IP packets not
addressed for your network are sent. In Figure 5 on page 7, for the
subnet 10.1.1.0, the default router IP address for client
ns3.mycompany.com is 10.1.1.1.
address_of_domain_name_server
Delivering the domain name server IP address to clients allows them
to use either fully qualified host names or IP addresses when they
communicate with other devices. In Figure 5 on page 7, the IP
address of the domain name server is 192.168.1.5.
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Table 44. DHCP Subnet Information (continued)
Field
Description
name_of_domain_name_server
The domain name allows the IBM Network Station to specify its
domain to other devices. In Figure 5 on page 7, where the fully
qualified host name is server.mycompany.com, the domain name is
mycompany.com.
boot_file_name
The name of the file that contains the IBM Network Station’s operating
system. This value is a constant and has been entered for you on the
table.
address_of_bootstrap
The bootstrap server delivers the boot files to the IBM Network
Stations. Enter the bootstrap server’s IP address. In Figure 5 on
page 7, the bootstrap server address for subnet 192.168.1.0 is
192.168.1.4. For the subnet 10.1.1.0, the bootstrap server address is
still 192.168.1.4, but you must pass a router address of 10.1.1.1
(see the router IP address identified previously).
Now, make one copy of the DHCP global worksheet, make a copy of the DHCP
subnet worksheet for each subnet you want to define. Using the information that
is described in Table 43 on page 185 and Table 44 on page 186, fill in the
worksheets with your own DHCP environment values. You will use this
information in step 7 on page 188 when you configure DHCP.
Table 45. DHCP Global Worksheet
Field
Value
number_of_log_files
size_of_log_file
name_of_log_file
type_of_log_item
supportBootp [YES|NO]
supportUnlistedClients [YES|NO]
address_of_bootstrap
base_code_server_protocol
terminal_configuration_address
terminal_configuration_path_name
terminal_configuration_server_protocol
boot_file_name
/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/kernel
amount_of_default_lease_time
hw_type
clientID
client_ipaddr
host_name
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Table 46. DHCP Subnet Worksheet
Field
Value
subnet_addr
subnet_mask
subnet_start – subnet_end (subnet_range)
address_of_excluded_client
address_of_router
address_of_domain_name_server
name_of_domain_name_server
boot_file_name
address_of_bootstrap
__ 7. Configure DHCP.
The IBM DHCP server provides IP addresses and configuration information to
clients that are based on statements that are contained in the DHCP server
configuration file and information that is provided by the client.
The name of the configuration file is dhcpsd.cfg.
The sample DHCP configuration file on page 189 is based on the values in
“What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?” on page 4. To build your
configuration file, follow these steps by using the values you gathered in Table 45
on page 187 and Table 46. For details on the statements that are used in the
following steps, refer to the OS/390 eNetwork Communications Server IP
Configuration, SC31-8513.
__ a. Declare log files.
numLogFiles number_of_log_files
logFileSize size_of_log_file
logFileName name_of_log_file
logItem type_of_log_file
__ b. Migrate and serve BOOTP.
supportBootP [YES | NO]
The default value is NO.
__ c. Support all clients (both registered and unregistered).
supportUnlistedClients [YES | NO]
The default value is YES.
__ d. Define your global bootstrap server.
bootStrapServer address_of_bootstrap
__ e. Configure for load balancing.
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option
option
option
option
211
212
213
214
base_code_server_protocol
terminal_configuration_address
terminal_configuration_path_name
terminal_configuration_server_protocol
__ f. Specify the global boot file name.
option 67 boot_file_name
__ g. Specify the default lease time of the leases that are issued by the server.
leaseTimeDefault amount_of_default_lease_time
The default value is 1440 minutes.
__ h. Define the Domain Name Server IP address and name related to all the
subnets that are served by this server.
option 6 address_of_domain_name_server
option 15 name_of_domain_name_server
__ i. For each clients you want to define outside of a subnet, use a Client
statement and option similar to the following:
client hw_type clientID client_ipaddr
{
option 12 host_name
}
__ j. For each subnet:
1) Define the subnet.
subnet subnet_addr subnet_mask subnet_start
subnet_end
2) Define an IP router address for this subnet.
option 3 address_of_router
3) Define the bootstrap server address for this subnet.
bootStrapServer address_of_bootstrap
4) Exclude addresses from the range of IP addresses you defined for this
subnet.
client 0 0 client_address
The following is a sample DHCP configuration file that is based on the values
that are used in “What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?” on page 4.
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Global Server data:
# Overrides for server defaults and globally defined options
#---------------------------------------------------------------logFileName dhcpsd.log
logFileSize 100
numLogFiles 4
logItem SYSERR
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189
logItem ACNTING
logItem EVENT
logItem PROTERR
logItem WARNING
logItem INFO
logItem TRACE
logItem ACTION
supportBootp YES
supportUnlistedClients NO
bootStrapServer 192.168.1.4
option
option
option
option
option
211
212
213
214
67
"nfs"
"10.1.1.2"
"/hfs/etc/nstation/StationConfig/"
"nfs"
/hfs/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/kernel
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Lease time values
#---------------------------------------------------------------leaseTimeDefault 12 HOURS
#---------------------------------------------------------------#---------------------------------------------------------------# Time Server data:
# option 2 -> offset of the time server from UTC in seconds
# option 4 -> IP address of an RFC 868 time server
#---------------------------------------------------------------option 2 -14400
option 4 192.168.1.4
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Options related to all subnets served by this server.
# option 6 -> Domain Name Server IP addresses
# option 15 -> Domain Name
#---------------------------------------------------------------option 6 192.168.1.5
option 15 mycompany.com
#---------------------------------------------------------------# IBM Network Station manager data:
# option 67 -> Name of the boot file for the client to request
#---------------------------------------------------------------class "IBMNSM 1.0.0"
{
option 67 /hfs/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/kernel
}
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Client Definitions:
#----------------------------------------------------------------
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Token Ring
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Model 100
client 6 0000E580FCA8 ANY
{
}
# Model 1000
client 6 0000E5D40047 10.1.1.2
{
option 12 ns3.mycompany.com
}
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Ethernet
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Model 100
client 1 0000A7013F27 ANY
{
option 12 ns4.mycompany.com
}
#---------------------------------------------------------------# Subnet sections.
# option 3 -> Router IP addresses
# option 1 -> subnet mask (This option is generated by the
#
SUBNET statement. It should not be specified
#
as an option.
#
# Subnet 192.168.1.00
#
#---------------------------------------------------------------SUBNET 192.168.1.00 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1-192.168.1.100
{
option 1 255.255.255.0
option 3 10.1.1.1
#---------------------------------------------------------------# RESTRICT ADDRESSES THAT WE DO NOT CONTROL.
#---------------------------------------------------------------client 0 0 192.168.1.4
client 0 0 192.168.1.5
}
__ 8. Start the DHCP server.
To start the DHCP server, use one of the following methods:
v Issue the following dhcpsd command:
dhcpsd [-q|-v] [-f configFile]
-q
starts the server in quiet mode, which means that no banner is displayed
when the server starts.
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191
-v
starts the server in verbose mode. This causes messages that deal with
client communication to display.
-f configFile
is the name of the DHCP server configuration file. By default, the server
searches for a file called dhcpsd.cfg in the directory that is specified by
the etc environment variable.
In OS/390 V2R4, dhcpsd is located in the /usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/sbin/ directory.
In OS/390 V2R5, dhcpsd is located in the /usr/lpp/tcpip/sbin/ directory.
v Use a JCL procedure (proc). The procedure named DHCP is installed in the
SEZAINST library. Run the proc by using the following command from the
operator’s console:
start dhcp
__ 9. Start the TIMED server.
You have already configured the TIMED server using the instructions in the
Program Directory for the Network Station Manager Release 3.0 for OS/390.
However, if you want to change your configuration, continue with this step.
Otherwise, go to step 10.
The TIMED daemon provides the time. TIMED gives the time in seconds since
midnight January 1, 1900.
To start the TIMED server, issue the following timed command:
timed [-l] [-p port]
-l
logs all the incoming requests and responses to the system log. Logged
information includes the IP address of the requestor.
-p port
identifies the port. The TIMED server usually receives requests on
well-known port 37. You can specify the port in which requests are to be
received.
In OS/390 V2R4, timed is installed in /usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/sbin directory. In
OS/390 V2R5, timed is installed in the /usr/lpp/tcpip/sbin directory
__ 10. Configure and start the Domino Go Webserver.
You have already configured and started the Domino Go Webserver using the
instructions in the Program Directory for the Network Station Manager Release
3.0 for OS/390. However, if you want to change your configuration, continue
with this step. Otherwise, go to step 11 on page 195.
To configure the Domino Go Webserver, follow these steps:
v Modify the Domino Go Webserver configuration file
v Update and verify the NLSPATH variable
v Verify the configuration of the Domino Go Webserver.
__ a. Add the following directives to the Domino Go Webserver configuration
file, httpd.conf, at the end of the Protection directives, but before the
Service directives. These directives are provided in sample file
/usr/lpp/nstation/samples/progdir.dgw.txt.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
These directives set up basic authentication to protect the programs for
the IBM Network Station Manager.
Protection PROT_NSM {
Userid
%%SERVER%%
PasswdFile
%%SAF%%
PostMask
[email protected](*)
PutMask
[email protected](*)
GetMask
[email protected](*)
Mask
[email protected](*)
AuthType
Basic
ServerId
NetworkStation_Manager
}
Protect /networkstation/cgi-bin/* PROT_NSM
Figure 40. Protection with ICS Server interfacing to RACF (or equivalent system)
v Protect /networkstation/cgi-bin/ requests activate protection. The
protection setup is defined on the Protection directive that has a label
of PROT_NSM. The Protect directive points to a Protection directive. This
Protect directive must be placed after the Protection directive to which
it points.
v The Userid directive identifies the user name the server changes to
before accessing files. This user ID must have root authority.
v The text associated with ServerId is displayed by most browsers on
the screen and enables the user to verify that the user ID and
password being entered are for the Network Station Manager
program.
By specifying a unique ServerId for the Network Station Manager
program, only IBM Network Station Manager program requests will be
processed by the authenticated user. Because applications
authenticated will be run as superusers, only IBM Network Station
Manager program applications should be installed in the library that is
specified by the URL mapping /networkstation/cgi-bin/*.
Refer to the Domino Go Webserver Webmaster’s Guide for information
on updating the Domino Go Webserver configuration file.
__ b. Add the following mapping directives to the Domino Go Webserver
configuration file (httpd.conf) in the Mapping Rules section, but before
the Pass directives. These directives MUST be in the order in which they
appear, and they MUST be placed before the Pass /* statement. These
directives are provided in sample file
/usr/lpp/nstation/nsm/samples/progdir.dgw.txt.
These statements allow the Domino Go Webserver to access the IBM
Network Station Manager program and its resources.
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193
Exec /networkstation/admin/* /usr/lpp/nstation/nsm/cgi-bin/QYTCMAIN
Exec /networkstation/cgi-bin/*.PGM /usr/lpp/nstation/nsm/cgi-bin/*
AddType .htm-813 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-813 IBM-813
AddType .htm-819 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-819 IBM-819
AddType .htm-912 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-912 IBM-912
AddType .htm-920 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-920 IBM-920
AddType .htm-943 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-943 IBM-943
AddType .htm-949 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-949 IBM-949
AddType .htm-950 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-950 IBM-950
AddType .htm-1250 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-1250 IBM-1250
AddType .htm-1251 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-1251 IBM-1251
AddType .htm-1253 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-1253 IBM-1253
AddType .htm-1381 text/html 8bit
AddCharSet .htm-1381 IBM-1381
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
MAP
/networkstation/CS_CZ/x*.htm
/networkstation/CS_CZ/*.htm
/networkstation/EL_GR/x*.htm
/networkstation/EL_GR/*.htm
/networkstation/HU_HU/x*.htm
/networkstation/HU_HU/*.htm
/networkstation/JA_JP/*.htm
/networkstation/KO_KR/*.htm
/networkstation/PL_PL/x*.htm
/networkstation/PL_PL/x*.htm
/networkstation/RU_RU/x*.htm
/networkstation/RU_RU/*.htm
/networkstation/TR_TR/*.htm
/networkstation/ZH_CN/*.htm
/networkstation/ZH_TW/*.htm
/networkstation/*.htm
Pass /networkstation/*
1.0 IBM-813
1.0 IBM-819
1.0 IBM-912
1.0 IBM-920
1.0 IBM-943
1.0 IBM-949
1.0 IBM-950
1.0 IBM-1250
1.0 IBM-1251
1.0 IBM-1253
1.0 IBM-1381
/networkstation/CS_CZ/*.htm-1250
/networkstation/CS_CZ/x*.htm-912
/networkstation/EL_GR/*.htm-1253
/networkstation/EL_GR/x*.htm-813
/networkstation/HU_HU/*.htm-1250
/networkstation/HU_HU/x*.htm-912
/networkstation/JA_JP/*.htm-943
/networkstation/KO_KR/*.htm-949
/networkstation/PL_PL/*.htm-1250
/networkstation/PL_PL/x*.htm-912
/networkstation/RU_RU/*.htm-1251
/networkstation/RU_RU/x*.htm-1251
/networkstation/TR_TR/*.htm-920
/networkstation/ZH_CN/*.htm-1381
/networkstation/ZH_TW/*.htm-950
/networkstation/*.htm-819
/usr/lpp/nstation/nsm/*
__ c. Update the NLSPATH setting by adding the following to the NLSPATH
variable in the /etc/httpd.envvars file:
/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N.cat
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N.cat is the name that is associated with the
Network Station Manager program catalog.
Note: In the list of files that are defined for NLSPATH= do not code the
real name of the IBM Network Station Manager program catalog
(nsmmsg.cat). The file name should be represented by %N.
Specifying the real file name for the IBM Network Station Manager
message catalog (or any other catalog) may result in a failure by
the application to access the catalog.
__ d. Verify the NLSPATH settings.
Verify the Domino Go Webserver NLSPATH setting by calling a Domino
Go Webserver script. This script displays a list of all environment
variables and their current settings. Call this script with the following
URL:
http://yourservername:portnumber/cgi-bin/environ.sh
v yourservername is the host name or TCP/IP address of the Domino
Go Webserver.
v portnumber is the port that is configured for use with the IBM Network
Station program.
v The name of the script is /usr/lpp/internet/server_root/cgibin/environ.sh
__ e. Verify the configuration of the Domino Go Webserver.
Verify basic authentication to ensure that the IBM Network Station
Manager program functions properly. From a user ID having UID=0
authority, start the IBM Network Station Manager program by using the
following URL:
http://yourservername:portnumber/networkstation/admin
For detailed information on the Domino Go Webserver, refer to the Domino Go
Webserver for OS/390 Webmaster’s Guide.
__ 11. Configure and start the Network Station Login daemon (NSLD) server.
You have already configured NSLD by using the instructions in the Program
Directory for the Network Station Manager Release 3.0 for OS/390. However, if
you want to change your configuration or your logging setting, continue with this
step. Otherwise, go to step “Before You Continue” on page 198.
The NSLD server responds to Network Station Login client requests for login
information about the user ID that is logging into an IBM Network Station. The
NSLD server first determines whether the user ID and password combination
that are passed are valid on this system. If it is not valid, an error response is
sent to the client. If it is valid, the information passed back to the IBM Network
Station includes the user’s user ID and group ID, home directory, and Network
Station Manager preference directory.
The NSLD server reads a configuration file (NSLD CONFIG) that contains
information necessary to mount the product defaults, user configuration, and
user’s home directories.
The NSLD CONFIG file is located in /usr/lpp/nstation/nsm/samples.
Chapter 5. OS/390
195
__ a. If you are not changing any user configuration server, product defaults,
or user’s home directory definitions, go to step 11.b on page 197. If you
are changing definitions, follow these steps:
1) Copy the contents of the NSLD CONFIG file into another file to save
the default settings. Now, edit the NSLD CONFIG file to make your
changes. The file will look similar to the following:
! User Configuration server
nsm_userconfig_mount_type = MOUNT_NFS
nsm_userconfig_server = xx.xx.xx.xx
nsm_userconfig_directory = /hfs/etc/nstation/
!
! Product defaults
! The server and mount_type for the product defaults will be the
same as the user configuration server.
nsm_prod_sysdefaults_directory = /hfs/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/SysDef/
!
! User's home directory
home_mount_type = MOUNT_NFS
home_directory = /hfs/etc/nstation/users/%s
Figure 41. Sample NSLD CONFIG File
nsm_userconfig_mount_type defines the mount type. MOUNT_NFS is
the only value.
nsm_userconfig_server is the name or IP address of the server
where you defined the user information. If a null string follows the =,
the authentication server is used.
nsm_userconfig_directory is the directory path name of the user
configuration server, which contains the user- specific information.
For OS/390, /hfs/etc/nstation/ is the standard location.
nsm_prod_sysdefaults_directory is the directory path name of the
product defaults. For OS/390,
/hfs/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/SysDef/ is the standard location.
home_mount_type defines the mount type.
MOUNT_NFS is the only value.
home_directory is the directory path name of the user’s home
directory. If a null string follows the =, the user’s home directory that
is defined on the authentication server is used.
196
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
The directory path names must consist of an absolute path to the
mountpoint. The path name must use a forward slash (/) as a
directory delimiter.
2) Make any changes to this new CONFIG file.
__ b. Verify that the NSLD environment variable NLSPATH includes the
following:
/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N.cat
__ c. Because you have already started NSLD, you must stop NSLD before
restarting it with different settings. To stop NSLD, issue the following
command from the operator’s console:
cancel nsld
__ d. Start the NSLD server.
Start the NSLD server by using the following inscnsld command.
INSCNSLD is located in the /usr/lpp/nstation/nsm/sbin directory.
inscnsld [-l] [-f filename] [-t timeout] [-c concurrency_limit]
-l
Logs the requests and replies. Information about each logon request
and reply is logged to the system log. This information includes the
type of the request or reply, the success or failure of requests, and
the destination of the replies. Errors and important events always
are logged, even when this option is not specified.
NSLD writes data to the user facility of the SYSLOGD daemon. For
more information on the SYSLOGD daemon, refer to the OS/390
TCP/IP OpenEdition Configuration Guide, SC31-8304, for OS/390
V2R4, and OS/390 eNetwork Communication Server: IP
Configuration Guide, SC31-8513, for OS/390 V2R5.
-f filename
Identifies the name of the configuration file that is read when the
NSLD server is started.
-t timeout
Sets the packet timeout. The NSLD server usually waits 5 seconds
before presuming that a transmitted packet has been lost. You can
specify a different timeout period in seconds.
-c concurrency_limit
Sets the concurrency limit. The NSLD server spawns both threads
and processes to handle incoming requests. You can specify the
limit for the number of threads that may be concurrently processing
requests under a single process. When the limit is exceeded, a new
process is spawned to handle requests. The default is 200 threads.
The NSLD server preforks a child process to handle incoming requests
when the concurrency limit is exceeded. Consequently, immediately after
the NSLD server is started, two NSLD processes exist.
Chapter 5. OS/390
197
If there are many concurrent NSLD requests, the NSLD server may fork
additional processes. When the number of concurrent requests being
processed drops below the concurrency limit, the number of NSLD
processes is decreased back to two.
Before You Continue
Before you begin using your Network Stations, read and complete (when applicable)
each of the following items:
v Update the boot monitor code on your Network Stations to be at least Version 3.0.
Even if you have purchased new Network Stations, you should update the boot
monitors of your Network Stations. For information about updating boot monitors, see
“Updating the Boot Monitor Code” on page 265.
v Verify that the Network Parameters in the Setup Utility of your Network Stations
agree with your boot method. For example, if you want a Network Station to obtain
its IP address through a DHCP server, ensure that the IP Address from field is
Network. See “Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on
page 301 for more information about the Setup Utility. Network Stations are set to
start from the Network when they are shipped from the factory.
v Verify that your BOOTP or DHCP server, NFS or TFTP server, and Domino Go
Webserver are started.
v Verify that you excluded any statically addressed devices in your DHCP addressing
range.
v If you have a router between your Network Station and your boot server, verify that
the router is configured to handle BOOTP and DHCP requests.
v For more information about setting up Network Stations, see the following sections:
– “Chapter 7. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager
Applications” on page 223
– “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 245
– “Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301
Configuring Printers on OS/390
You can configure printers for your Network Stations with the IBM Network Station
Manager program unless the datastream generated by the Network Station application
does not match a datastream that your printer understands. Table 62 on page 242
describes which datastreams the common Network Station applications produce. If your
Network Station application does not produce a datastream that your printer
understands, you will not be able to print.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
Table 47 explains the basic steps to configure printers for your Network Stations.
Identify the scenario that best meets your needs and follow the steps to configure your
printer.
Table 47. Configuration Descriptions for Basic Printer Scenarios
Desired Print Scenario
Configuration Instructions
Network Station to a LAN
printer
In the Network Station Manager program, configure an entry in the
Remote Printer Server field for the LAN printer.
Network Station to a locally
attached printer
In the Network Station Manager program, configure an entry in the
Local Parallel Printer or the Local Serial Printer field, depending on
how the printer connects to the Network Station.
Network Station to another
Network Station with an
attached printer
In the Network Station Manager program, configure an entry in the
Remote Printer Server field with the IP address of the Network
Station to which the printer is attached. In the Queue name field,
type PARALLEL1 or SERIAL1, depending on how the printer connects
to the Network Station.
Printing Support
The 3270 emulator for Network Station Manager 3.0 supports print screen function.
TN3270E support for LU1/LU3 printing will be available soon. In the meantime, until the
TN3270E functions become available, applications residing on OS/390 can use
NetSpool and IP PrintWay to print to a Network Station Manager printer. NetSpool and
IP Printway are separately orderable products, which are also priced separately.
LPR/LPD support is now provided. This allows the Network Station Manager to act as
either a printer client or printer server. That is, local client applications on the Network
Station Manager can send print jobs to remote printer servers or remote printers, and
remote print clients can send print jobs to either a serial port or parallel port on the
Network Station Manager. LPR support is available on all version of OS/390. LPD
support is available on OS/390 Version 2 Release 5 or on a later release.
LPR/LPD streaming mode is also supported. This allows a print client to send a print
request to a print server while a print data file is still being generated. Previously the
print data file had to be generated completely before submitting the job to the printer
server. This method required alot of memory to completely spool the data file. For the
Network Station Manager, streaming mode support is very useful because it does not
requires a large amount of memory.
Using NetSpool and IP PrintWay
Using NetSpool and IP PrintWay, you can intercept the VTAM LU1/LU3 traffic, convert it
to ASCII, and send it to an IBM Network Station through the LPR client. NetSpool
converts the LU1/LU3 printer stream to line mode data. Using IP PrintWay, the LPR
client sends the print data to the Network Station Manager LPD.
Chapter 5. OS/390
199
IP PrintWay also supports LPR streaming.
For more information on NetSpool and IP PrintWay, refer to IBM NetSpool Guide,
G544-5301, and IBM IP PrintWay Guide, S544-5379, respectively.
NLS Considerations
There are two server configuration tasks you must complete if you want your Network
Station to use a language other than US English. First, you must configure the Network
Station Login daemon to set the appropriate language and locale values for users that
do not have explicit settings. Second, you must configure the Network Station Manager
to serve web browsers using language and locale values other than US English.
During Network Station login, environment variables are set on the Network Station
client machine to establish the user’s preferred settings for language and locale. The
value of the LANG environment variable in the environment of the Network Station
Login daemon is used as the default value for users of a network station. The value of
the LANG environment variable must be set to one of the OS/390 supported values that
are listed in Table 48. The Network Station Login daemon itself does not have any NLS
considerations. All logging is done to the system log in US. English.
Table 48. LANG Environment Variable Settings
LANG Value
200
Language
En_Us
US English
C
Default locale
Cs_CZ
Czech
Da_DK
Danish
De_CH
German (Swiss)
De_DE
German
El_GR
Greek
En_GB
English (UK)
Es_ES
Spanish
Fi_FI
Finnish
Fr_BE
Belgian French MNCS
Fr_CA
Canadian French MNCS
Fr_CH
French (Swiss)
Fr_FR
French
Hu_HU
Hungarian
It_CH
Italian MNCS (Swiss)
It_IT
Italian
Ja_JP
Japanese (Katakana)
Ko_KR
Korean DBCS
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 48. LANG Environment Variable Settings (continued)
LANG Value
Language
Nl_BE
Belgian Dutch
Nl_NL
Dutch Netherlands
No_NO
Norwegian
Pl_PL
Polish
POSIX
Default locale
Pt_BR
Brazilian Portuguese
Pt_PT
Portuguese
Ru_RU
Russian
SAA
Default locale
Sv_SE
Swedish
S390
Default locale
Tr_TR
Turkish
Zh_CN
Simplified Chinese
Zh_TW
Traditional Chinese
The following set of LANG values are accepted values, but they are not translated to the
specified language. They are translated to US English.
Sq_AL
Albanian
Ar_AA
Arabic
Bg_BG
Bulgarian
Hr_HR
Croatian
En_BE
Belgian English
Et_EE
Estonian
Fa_IR
Farsi
Iw_IL
Hebrew
IS_IS
Icelandic
Lt_LT
Lithuanian
Lv_LV
Latvian
Mk_MK
Macedonian
Ro_RO
Romanian
Sr_SP
Serbian (Cyrillic)
Sk_SK
Slovakian
Sl_SL
Slovenian
Th_TH
Thai
The following set of LANG values specified in the first column are mapped to the LANG values
specified in the second column and translated to the specified language. The values in the
second column are preferred.
FRAN
Fr_FR
French
Chapter 5. OS/390
201
Table 48. LANG Environment Variable Settings (continued)
LANG Value
Language
GERM
De_DE
German
ITAL
It_IT
Italian
SPAI
Es_ES
Spanish
UK
En_GB
English (UK)
USE
En_US
US English
The Network Station Manager runs as a set of CGI interface programs that are driven
by the Domino Go Webserver. This means that the Network Station manager is
dependent on the configuration of the webserver. Specifically, the Network Station
manager is dependent on the setting of the LANG environment variable and the
defaultFsCp and that are defined in the webserver configuration file. The LANG
environment variable, which is inherited by using an InheritEnv directive, determines
which language the Network Station manager will use to display data for the clients.
The LANG environment variable must be set to one of the OS/390 locales that are
listed in Table 48 on page 200. Because the Domino Go Webserver only supports a
limited subset of these locales, the LANG environment variable set for the webserver
must be overridden for the Network Station Manager using an InheritEnv directive. See
the Domino Go Webserver Webmaster’s Guide for details on the configuration
directives.
Note: Using an InheritEnv directive in the webserver configuration file overrides the
default inheritance of environment variables from the webserver to the CGI. You
should also use an InheritEnv statement for the standard environment variables
(such as PATH, NLSPATH, etc) so their values will be set in the Network Station
Manager’s environment.
Set the defaultFsCp and defaultNetCp directives to the values that are shown in
Table 49. Clients accessing the Network Station Manager from Microsoft Windows
based platforms can use the alternate Windows value for defaultNetCp. This only
applies for the languages Cs_CZ, El_GR, Hu_HU, Pl_PL, and Ru_RU.
Table 49. defaultFsCp and defaultNetCp Directive Settings
202
Alternate
Windows
defaultNetCp
Value
LANG Value
defaultFsCp
Value
defaultNetCP
Value
C
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Default locale
POSIX
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Default locale
SAA
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Default locale
S390
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Default locale
En_US
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
US English
Sq_AL
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Albanian
Ar_AA
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Arabic
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Language
Table 49. defaultFsCp and defaultNetCp Directive Settings (continued)
Alternate
Windows
defaultNetCp
Value
LANG Value
defaultFsCp
Value
defaultNetCP
Value
Bg_BG
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Bulgarian
Nl_BE
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Belgian Dutch
Fr_BE
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Belgian French
MNCS
Pt_BR
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Brazilian
Portuguese
Fr_CA
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Canadian French
MNCS
Hr_HR
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Croatian
Cs_CZ
IBM-870
ISO8859-2
Da_DK
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Danish
Nl_NL
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Dutch
Netherlands
En_GB
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
English (UK)
En_BE
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Belgian English
Et_EE
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Estonian
Fa_IR
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Farsi
Fi_FI
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Finnish
Fr_FR
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
French
Fr_CH
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
French (Swiss)
De_DE
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
German
De_CH
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
German (Swiss)
El_GR
IBM-875
ISO8859-7
Iw_IL
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Hu_HU
IBM-870
ISO8859-2
IS_IS
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Icelandic
It_CH
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Italian MNCS
(Swiss)
It_IT
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Italian
Ja_JP
IBM-939
IBM-942
Japanese
(Katakana)
Ko_KR
IBM-933
IBM-949
Korean DBCS
Lt_LT
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Lithuanian
Lv_LV
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Latvian
IBM-1250
IBM-1253
Language
Czech
Greek
Hebrew
IBM-1250
Hungarian
Chapter 5. OS/390
203
Table 49. defaultFsCp and defaultNetCp Directive Settings (continued)
204
Alternate
Windows
defaultNetCp
Value
LANG Value
defaultFsCp
Value
defaultNetCP
Value
Mk_MK
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Macedonian
No_NO
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Norwegian
Pl_PL
IBM-870
ISO8859-2
Pt_PT
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Portuguese
Ro_RO
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Romanian
Ru_RU
IBM-1025
ISO8859-5
Sr_SP
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Serbian (Cyrillic)
Sk_SK
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Slovakian
Sl_SL
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Slovenian
Es_ES
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Spanish
Sv_SE
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Swedish
Th_TH
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Thai
Zh_CN
IBM-935
IBM-1381
Simplified
Chinese
Zh_TW
IBM-937
IBM-950
Traditional
Chinese
Tr_TR
IBM-1026
ISO8859-9
Turkish
GERM
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Obsolete German
FRAN
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Obsolete French
UK
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Obsolete English
(UK)
ITAL
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Obsolete Italian
SPAI
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Obsolete Spanish
USE
IBM-1047
ISO8859-1
Obsolete US
English
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
IBM-1250
IBM-1251
Language
Polish
Russian
Chapter 6. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station
Environment on a VM/ESA Server
About this Chapter . . . . . . .
Installation . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration . . . . . . . . .
Before You Continue . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing.
Configuring Printers on VM/ESA . .
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
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205
206
207
220
220
221
221
About this Chapter
This chapter contains instructions for planning, installing, and configuring a Network
Station environment on a VM/ESA server. While completing the installation procedure
and the configuration procedure, do not deviate from the order of the steps. The
following figure demonstrates the flow of this manual.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
205
Installation
This section describes the preparation and installation of the IBM Network Station
Manager (5648-C05) licensed program.
Attention: If you have manually modified any configuration files instead of using the
IBM Network Station Manager program in the past, refer to
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs for Advanced User Information.
__ 1. Verify prerequisite software.
Your VM/ESA server must have the following:
v VM/ESA Version 2 Release 3.0
v TCP/IP Function Level 310
v Network File System (NFS), which is included with TCP/IP Function Level 310
v OpenEdition with Byte File System (BFS) (to contain kernel code for Network
Station)
v Web server (for VM/ESA)
v JavaScript capable browser.
__ 2. Verify IBM Network Station memory requirements.
Network Stations download each of their appplications including their base
systems into memory. You should verify that your Network Stations have enough
memory to run their applications. Use the table at
http://www.pc.ibm.com/networkstation/support/memrec_data.html to determine
how much memory your Network Stations will need.
__ 3. Install the IBM Network Station Manager program (5648-C05).
The IBM Network Station Manager for VM/ESA licensed program product is
available for VM/ESA Version 2 Release 3.0. You can install the IBM Network
Station Manager for VM/ESA from tape.
The Program Directory for Network Station Manager Release 3 for VM/ESA
ships with the IBM Network Station Manager. It describes the procedure for
installing the IBM Network Station Manager from the distribution tape. The
Program Directory for Network Station Manager Release 3 for VM/ESA contains
the following information:
v Basic and optional program materials and documentation
v IBM support available
v Program and service APARs and PTFs
v Installation requirements and considerations
v Installation instructions
Use the Virtual Machine Serviceability Enhancements Staged with Extended
(VMSES/E) to install the IBM Network Station Manager. For information about
VMSES/E, see VMSES/E Introduction and Reference, GC24-5837.
__ 4. Install optional software.
__ a. Install the 128-bit NC Navigator (5648-C20)
For installation instructions, consult the product’s program directory.
206
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 5. Installation complete.
You have installed all the required software for the IBM Network Station Manager
program. Continue to “Configuration” to configure your TCP/IP environment and
boot server.
Configuration
__ 1. Choose a boot protocol and configuration method.
You must determine which boot protocol your Network Stations will use, and
how you will configure your Network Station environment. Use Chapter 1,
specifically sections “Boot Methods” on page 13 and “What Do I Need To Know
About TCP/IP Networks?” on page 4, to learn more about boot methods and
TCP/IP. Then use Table 50 to determine which boot method fits your needs and
operating system.
Table 50. Available Boot Protocols and Boot Methods by Level of VM/ESA
Boot Method
V2R3 VM/ESA Configuration Method
BOOTP
Edit the configuration file.
DHCP
Edit the configuration file.
NVRAM
No boot server configuration necessary.
Table 51. Boot Method
Field
Description
Boot Method
The method by which the
Network Station will obtain its
IP address and boot files.
Write Value Here
__ 2. Gather host information.
Stop: If you already have TCP/IP installed and configured, skip to step 3 on
page 208. Otherwise, complete the following table.
Table 52. VM/ESA Host Information Chart
Field
Description
„1… VM/ESA IP Address
Each node on a network is known as a host and has a
unique address called an Internet Protocol (IP)
address. This address is a 32-bit integer that is
expressed in the form nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn.
Write Value Here
In the example Figure 5 on page 7, the VM/ESA IP
address is 192.168.1.4. The VM/ESA IP address is the
address that uniquely identifies this VM/ESA to TCP/IP.
This address will be associated with the local host
name to create a name entry in the Host Names table.
Chapter 6. VM/ESA
207
Table 52. VM/ESA Host Information Chart (continued)
Field
Description
„2… Next Hop IP Address
(Default Route)
The next hop address is the address of the IP router (if
any) that your local LAN uses to route network traffic to
other networks within and outside of your organization.
In Figure 5 on page 7, the next hop address is
192.168.1.1. The next hop address creates a default
route for all network traffic that does not terminate on
this host. You need this information only if your local
LAN attaches to one or more IP routers.
„3… Remote Name Server IP
Address
The remote name server (domain name server) IP
address is the address of the system (if any) that will
act as primary name server in this domain. In Figure 5
on page 7, the DNS is 192.168.1.5.
„4… VM/ESA Local Host Name
The local host name is the name that is used to
uniquely identify this system in a TCP/IP domain. In the
example server.mycompany.com, the local host name is
server.
Write Value Here
„5… VM/ESA Local Domain Name Remote servers use the domain name to identify the
local host to other systems. In the example
server.mycompany.com, the local domain name is
mycompany.com
Domain names consist of labels that are separated by
periods. Your local domain name should be descriptive
of your organization. The last portion of the local
domain name should follow Internet conventions; that
is, use COM for commercial enterprises, GOV for
government organizations, and EDU for educational
institutions.
__ 3. Gather LAN information.
Stop: If you have already configured the LAN that will serve the Network
Stations, skip to step 4 on page 209. Otherwise, complete the following
table.
For each LAN that is attached to your VM/ESA, you should duplicate and
complete a copy of Table 53.
Table 53. VM/ESA LAN Information Chart
Field
Description
„1… Line Description
You must create a line for your IBM Network Stations.
„2… LAN IP Address
The LAN IP address is the address that uniquely identifies
each VM/ESA communication line to the LAN. Each LAN
should have a unique IP address assigned. In Figure 5 on
page 7, the LAN IP address is 192.168.1.4. The example
VM/ESA has only one LAN.
208
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Write Value Here
Table 53. VM/ESA LAN Information Chart (continued)
Field
Description
„3… LAN Subnet Mask
A subnet mask is a configuration value that allows you to
specify how your system determines what are the network
and host parts of an IP address. For example, the subnet
mask (255.255.255.0) indicates that the first three parts of
the IP address relate to the network and the fourth part
identifies unique hosts on this subnetwork.
Write Value Here
__ 4. Gather IP router/gateway information.
Stop: IP router/gateway information is necessary only if you have a router
between your server and its clients. If you do not have this condition,
skip to step 1 on page 207. Otherwise, complete the following table.
For each router that is attached to your VM/ESA system, you should duplicate
and complete a copy of Table 54.
Table 54. VM/ESA IP Router/Gateway Information Chart
Field
Description
„1… Route (Remote LAN) IP
Address
The network portion of the IP address of the remote
LAN. In Figure 5 on page 7, the route (remote LAN) IP
address is 10.1.1.1.
„2… Route (Remote LAN) Subnet
Mask
The subnet mask for the route.
„3… Next Hop Address
The IP address of the router that will handle any
requests that match the route IP address. In Figure 5
on page 7, the next hop address is 192.168.1.1.
Write Value Here
__ 5. Based on your decision in Table 50 on page 207, perform the appropriate
action:
v If you choose to use the BOOTP protocol, go to step 6.
v If you choose to use the DHCP protocol, go to step 7 on page 211.
v If you choose to use the NVRAM boot method, go to step 8 on page 215.
__ 6. Gather information for a new BOOTP environment.
Use this section to gather information to configure a new BOOTP environment.
Use Table 55 on page 210 to record the specific information that is needed to
identify each Network Station in your network environment. You will use this
information to create a BOOTP entry for each Network Station. You should
complete one copy of Table 55 on page 210 for each LAN adapter with attached
Network Stations.
Chapter 6. VM/ESA
209
Table 55. BOOTP Network Station Information
Field
Description
„1… Client Host Name
The host name identifies the Network Station
as a unique destination within a TCP/IP
environment. In Figure 5 on page 7, the host
name for one of the Network Stations is
ns1.mycompany.com.
„2… MAC Address
The Media Access Control (MAC) address is
a unique hardware-specific identifier for each
Network Station. The address is located on
the box of the Network Station. To find the
MAC address without the box, follow this
procedure:
a. Power on the Network Station.
b. After the keyboard controller test, press
Escape.
c. In the Setup Utility, press F4.
d. Record the MAC address.
„3… IP Address
Each Network Station requires a unique IP
address. In Figure 5 on page 7,
NS1.mycompany.com has an IP address of
192.168.1.2.You must assign a specific
address to each Network Station. You should
ensure that the IP address is valid for your
organization and that no other device in the
network uses it.
„4… Hardware Type
Your Network Stations can attach to either a
token-ring or Ethernet LAN.
v Record a hardware type of 6 for
token-ring or IEEE (802.3) Ethernet
networks.
v Record a hardware type of 1 for a Version
2 (802.2) Ethernet network.
„5… Gateway IP Address
for Remote LANs
If you do not use a gateway IP address for
remote LANs, disregard this field.
If the LAN that you are attaching Network
Stations to is not directly attached to your
VM/ESA system, it is referred to as a remote
LAN. You need to specify the IP address of
the IP router/gateway that your Network
Station will use to reach the server.
In Figure 5 on page 7, the gateway IP
address for Network Station
ns3.mycompany.com is 10.1.1.1.
„6… Subnet Mask for
Remote LANs
210
If you do not use a gateway IP address for
remote LANs, disregard this field.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Write Value Here
Table 55. BOOTP Network Station Information (continued)
Field
Description
Write Value Here
„7… Boot Type
The boot type is a constant. IBMNSM
identifies this network device as a Network
Station.
IBMNSM
„8… Boot File Name
The boot file name is the name of the file
that the Network Station downloads and
uses to boot the remote device. The value,
kernel, is a constant.
kernel
The boot file path is the path name that is
used to access the boot file on the host and
is a constant.
/../VMBFS:VMSYSU:QIBM/ProdData/
NetworkStation/
„9… Boot File Path
The boot file name is case sensitive.
The boot file path is case sensitive.
Use Table 56 to define any additional Network Stations for the BOOTP table.
Table 56. Additional BOOTP Network Stations
„7… Host Name
„8… MAC Address
„9… IP Address
„10… Printer Type
You have completed gathering information for a BOOTP environment. Go to
step 8 on page 215.
__ 7. Gather information for a new DHCP environment.
When you first set up a DHCP environment, you must configure its global
attributes. Fill in the information in Table 57 to collect the necessary data for the
DHCP global information.
Table 57. DHCP Global Information
Field
Description
Write Value Here
„1… Migrate BOOTP
If your VM/ESA serves BOOTP
clients, you have entries in the
BOOTP table. If you would like to
migrate your existing clients, these
migrated clients will use the DHCP
server to obtain their IP addresses,
but the addresses will be static like
BOOTP.
Yes or No
Chapter 6. VM/ESA
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Table 57. DHCP Global Information (continued)
Field
Description
Write Value Here
„2… Global Bootstrap Address
If you migrate BOOTP clients, you
must define their Bootstrap server.
The Bootstrap server delivers the boot
files to the IBM Network Stations.
Enter the Bootstrap server’s IP
address. In Figure 5 on page 7, the
Bootstrap server address for subnet
192.168.1.0 is 192.168.1.4. For the
subnet 10.1.1.0, the Bootstrap server
address is still 192.168.1.4, but you
must pass a gateway address of
10.1.1.1 on line „12…. In most cases,
the Bootstrap server address is the
same IP address as your DHCP
server.
„3… Default lease time
This refers to the amount of time a
server lets clients keep an IP address.
„4… Network Station Class Numbers
For each model of Network Station in
your subnet, you must define a class
that represents it. A Network Station
class is a three digit number, prefaced
by IBMNSM. To define Network
Station class numbers, see
“Determining DHCP Classes” on
page 22. Record the class names
here.
Table 58 helps you collect the values to define a subnet in your DHCP
environment. For each subnet you wish to define, copy and complete Table 58.
Table 58. DHCP Subnet Information
Field
Description
Write Value Here
„1… Support Twinaxial Devices
If you intend to support twinaxial IBM
Network Stations, answer yes. Then,
read “Planning for Your Twinaxial TCP/IP
Network” on page 347 for twinaxial
considerations and “Subnets and Subnet
Masks” on page 9.
Yes or No
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 58. DHCP Subnet Information (continued)
Field
Description
Write Value Here
„3… Subnet based on range or
entire subnet?
Note: For subnets supporting
twinaxial IBM Network Stations,
you must choose entire subnet.
Subnet IP addresses are defined two
different ways—based on an entire
subnet or on a restricted range. The
entire subnet option allocates every
possible address for DHCP. In Figure 3
on page 5, the entire subnet option
allocates 192.168.1.1 through
192.168.1.255. If you base the
addresses of the subnet on a range, you
control the beginning and ending IP
addresses.
Range or Entire
„4… Subnet Name
This value is for descriptive use only. It
does not affect the performance of
DHCP, but you should use a value that is
easily recognizable. In Figure 5 on
page 7, the subnet name could be
192.168.1.0.
„5… Subnet Description
This value is also for descriptive use
only. An example subnet description for
Figure 5 on page 7 could be Token-Ring
Subnet.
„6… Subnet Address
Note: The subnet address is
only for subnets in which the
entire subnet is reserved for
DHCP addressing.
The IP address associated with a
particular subnet. For a Class C network
whose subnet mask is 255.255.255.0,
the subnet address is the same as the
network address. In Figure 5 on page 7,
the subnet IP address is 192.168.1.0.
„7… Starting Address
The first IP address in the range that you
Note: Only for subnets based on have specified for your pool of available
a range.
addresses. For the subnet 192.168.1.0 in
Figure 5 on page 7, the starting address
could be 192.168.1.2.
„8… Ending Address
The last IP address in the range that you
Note: Only for subnets based on have specified for your pool of available
a range.
addresses. For the subnet 192.168.1.0 in
Figure 5 on page 7, the ending address
could be 192.168.1.3. The specified
range (192.168.1.2 – 192.168.1.3) allows
for only two clients on the subnet.
„9… Subnet’s Mask
A value that enables network devices to
direct packets of information accurately in
a subnetted environment. In Figure 5 on
page 7, the subnet mask is
255.255.255.0. For more information
about subnet masks, refer to “Subnets
and Subnet Masks” on page 9.
Chapter 6. VM/ESA
213
Table 58. DHCP Subnet Information (continued)
Field
Description
„10… Excluded IP Address
If any routers, gateways, or statically
addressed servers are within your subnet
range, you must exclude those IP
addresses. If you have migrated BOOTP
clients, you do not need to exclude their
IP addresses. If the DHCP range was
192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.50 in
Figure 5 on page 7, you would exclude
192.168.1.4 and 192.168.1.5. They are
the static IP addresses of the domain
name server and the client server.
„11… Subnet Lease Time
The subnet lease time has three options.
Choose one:
Write Value Here
inherit, user-defined, or never expire
v Inherit means that the subnet uses the
value of the global lease time.
v User-defined is a value defined by
you.
v Never expire.
The following values are delivered to the IBM Network Stations.
„12… Deliver gateway IP
addresses?
The IP address of the default router to
which TCP/IP packets not addressed for
your network are sent. In Figure 5 on
page 7, for the subnet 10.1.1.0, the
default gateway IP address for client
ns3.mycompany.com is 10.1.1.1.
Yes or No
If yes, enter the gateway IP address or
addresses.
„13… Deliver domain name server Delivering the domain name server IP
(DNS) address to clients in their address to clients allows them to use
subnet?
either fully qualified host names or IP
addresses when they communicate with
other devices. In Figure 5 on page 7, the
IP address of the domain name server is
192.168.1.5.
Yes or No
If yes, enter the DNS IP address or
addresses.
„14… Deliver domain name to
client?
The domain name allows the IBM
Network Station to specify its domain to
other devices. In Figure 5 on page 7,
where the fully qualified host name is
server.mycompany.com, the domain name
is mycompany.com.
If Yes, enter domain name.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Yes or No
Table 58. DHCP Subnet Information (continued)
Field
Description
„15…Subnet Mask
A value that enables network devices to
direct packets of information accurately in
a subnetted environment. This subnet
value is delivered to the IBM Network
Stations and is usually the same value
that you recorded on line „9… of Table 58
on page 212. For Figure 5 on page 7,
the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. For
more information about subnet masks,
refer to “Subnets and Subnet Masks” on
page 9.
„16… Boot File Name
The name of the file that contains the
IBM Network Station’s operating system.
This value is a constant and has been
entered for you on the table.
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/kernel
The Append domain name option
specifies whether the DHCP server
should append a domain name to client
responses that omit a domain name.
Yes, No, or inherited.
„17… Append domain name to
host name?
Write Value Here
The boot file name is case sensitive.
__ 8. Preparation for setup.
As system administrator, you need to plan the integration of IBM Network
Stations into your computing environment. A system administrator is a user that
has root authority. A user ID with root authority (UID=0) installs and configures
your system for Network Station use.
__ 9. Verify your TCP/IP configuration for IBM Network Stations.
__ a. Verify that TCP/IP is enabled. If it is not enabled, refer to the TCP/IP
Feature for VM/ESA Function Level 310 Program Directory for information
on how to enable TCP/IP.
__ b. Browse the PROFILE TCPIP configuration file and the TCPIP DATA file to
verify the following information:
v VM/ESA IP address
v Default route/next hop IP address
v Remote name server IP address
v VM/ESA local host name
v VM/ESA local domain name
v TCP/IP interfaces
For each LAN:
– Line description
– LAN IP address
– LAN subnet mask
v TCP/IP routes to remote networks
For each router:
– Remote LAN IP address
Chapter 6. VM/ESA
215
– Remote LAN subnet mask
– Next hop address
__ 10. Configure your Web server.
To configure your Web server, refer to the product documentation that is
shipped with the Web server you are using.
__ 11. Select your boot protocol.
Based on your decision in step 1 on page 207, select your boot protocol:
v If you choose the BOOTP protocol, continue to step 12.
v If you choose the DHCP method, continue to step 13.
v If you choose the NVRAM boot method, go to “Chapter 10. Working With the
IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301, then return to step 14 on
page 217.
__ 12. Configure the BOOTP server.
Two files contain the information necessary to run the BOOTP server. The
machine file contains the mapping between the client hardware address and IP
address. The machine file also contains the BOOTP data that is passed to the
client. The configuration file lists adapters on the host that should be monitored.
The configuration file also determines whether to forward BOOTP requests and
when and where the requests are sent.
To configure the BOOTP server, follow these steps:
__ a. Update the TCP/IP server configuration file to specify any BOOTP
startup parameters.
__ b. Update the DTCPARMS file for BOOTPD.
__ c. Configure the ETC BOOTPTAB file to add or remove BOOTP entries for
each IBM Network Station physically present in your network.
__ d. Issue the BOOTPD command.
For more information, see the TCP/IP Function Level 310 Planning and
Customization manual.
__ 13. Configure the DHCP server.
Two files contain the information necessary to run the DHCP server. The
machine file defines the information returned to clients as configuration
parameters and determines how addresses are to be assigned. The
configuration file lists adapters on the host that should be monitored. The
configuration file also determines whether to forward BOOTP or DHCP requests
and when and where the requests are sent.
To configure the DHCP server, follow these steps:
__ a. Update the TCP/IP server configuration file to specify any DHCP startup
parameters.
__ b. Update the DTCPARMS file for DHCPD.
__ c. Configure the ETC DHCPTAB file to add or remove entries for each IBM
Network Station physically present in your network.
__ d. Issue the DHCPD command.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
For more information, see the TCP/IP Function Level 310 Planning and
Customization manual. For information about the options that are used to
configure DHCP for load balancing, refer to “Configuring DHCP for Load
Balancing” on page 220.
__ 14. Configure the Trivial File Transfer Protocol daemon (TFTPD) server.
The TFTPD server transfers files between the Byte File System (BFS) and the
TFTP clients. TFTPD supports access to files in a BFS directory structure that
are mounted during initialization.
To configure the TFTPD server, follow these steps:
__ a. Update the TCP/IP server configuration file.
__ b. Update the DTCPARMS file for TFTPD.
__ c. Review and address additional configuration considerations.
__ d. Create the TFTPD PERMLIST data file.
__ e. Create the TFTPF USERLIST data file.
For details on configuring the TFTPD server and using the TFTPD command
and associated subcommands, see the TCP/IP for VM/ESA Function Level 310
Planning and Customization.
__ 15. Configure the Network File System (NFS) server.
NFS provides clients access to files and directories.
To configure the NFS server, follow these steps:
__ a. Enable the NFS feature. You must enable NFS before you can use it.
For information on enabling NFS, see the TCP/IP Feature for VM/ESA
Function Level 310 Program Directory.
__ b. Update the TCPIP server configuration file.
__ c. Update the DTCPARMS file for VMNFS.
__ d. Perform advanced configuration steps as needed.
For details on configuring the NFS server, see the TCP/IP for VM/ESA Function
Level 310 Planning and Customization.
__ 16. Configure the Network Station Login daemon (NSLD) server.
The NSLD server responds to Network Station Login client requests for login
information about the user ID logging into an IBM Network Station. The NSLD
server first determines if the user ID and password combination are valid on
this system. If it is not valid, an error response in sent to the client. If it is valid,
the information passed back to the IBM Network Station includes the user’s
user ID and group ID, home directory, and Network Station Manager preference
directory.
Note: The NSLD code must be in an authorized library to determine user ID
and password validity. When you are using IBM Network Station
Manager, the /usr/lpp/nsm/sbin/ directory contains the NSLD code.
Chapter 6. VM/ESA
217
The NSLD server reads a configuration file (NSLD CONFIG) that contains
information necessary to mount the product defaults, user configuration, and
user’s home directories.
__ a. If you are not changing the user configuration server, product defaults, or
user’s home directory definitions, go to step 16.d on page 219 to start
the NSLD server. If you are changing definitions, continue to the
following step.
__ b. Copy the contents of the NSLD CONFIG file into another file. The file will
look similar to the following:
! User Configuration server
nsm_userconfig_mount_type = MOUNT_NFS
nsm_userconfig_server = xx.xx.xx.xx
nsm_userconfig_directory = /../VMBFS:VMSYSU:QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation
!
! Product defaults
! The server and mount_type for the product defaults will be the
same as the user configuration server.
nsm_prod_sysdefaults_directory = /../VMBFS:VMSYSU:QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/SysDef/
!
! User's home directory
home_mount_type = MOUNT_NFS
home_directory = /../VMBFS:VMSYSU:QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/users/$USERID
nsm_userconfig_mount_type
defines the mount type as MOUNT_NFS.
nsm_userconfig_server
is the name or IP address of the server. If a null string follows the =,
nsm_userconfig_server is the authentication server.
nsm_userconfig_directory
is the directory path name of the user configuration server.
nsm_prod_sysdefaults_directory
is the directory path name of the product defaults.
home_mount_type
defines the mount type as MOUNT_NFS.
home_directory
is the directory path name of the user’s home directory. If a null
string follows the =, home_directory is the user’s HOME directory
defined by the authentication server. The home path name can
include a $USERID format string to allow substitution with user
specific data.
The directory path names must consist of an absolute path to the mount
point. The path name must use a forward slash (/) as a directory
delimiter.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ c. Update the NSLD CONFIG file.
__ d. Start the NSLD server by adding the nsld command to the PROFILE
EXEC:
nsld [port] [([STAYUP|TRACE]
port
specifies the port that receives requests. The NSLD server usually
receives requests on well-known port 256.
STAYUP
indicates that the NSLD server should continue to operate if
subsequent VM/ESA TCP/IP failures occur.
TRACE
indicates that the NSLD server should display trace information
while processing requests.
__ e. Use the NSLD subcommands.
You must be logged on to the NSLD server to use the NSLD
subcommands. Table 59 provides the shortest abbreviation and a
description for each NSLD subcommand.
Table 59. NSLD Subcommands
Subcommand
Minimum Abbreviations
Description
CMS
CMS
Passes a command to CMS for execution.
EXIT
EXIT
Stop the NSLD server and its processing.
EXIT is equivalent to QUIT and STOP.
HELP
HELP
Displays a summary of NSLD
subcommands.
QUIT
QUIT
Stops the NSLD server and its processing.
QUIT is equivalent to EXIT and STOP.
STAYUP
STAYUP
Toggles the STAYUP mode of the NSLD
server.
STOP
STOP
Stops the NSLD Server and its processing.
Stop is equivalent to EXIT and QUIT.
Notes:
1) Do not issue any CMS command that would take considerable time
to run, for example, XEDIT. While the CMS command runs, the
server does not respond to requests.
2) The CMS keyword is usually not required because the server passes
any command string that is not recognized as a NSLD subcommand
to CMS. The CMS keyword identifies commands that are normally
interpreted as subcommands, for example TRACE.
After completion of any command, the following ready prompt displays:
NSLD Ready;.
Chapter 6. VM/ESA
219
Before You Continue
Before you begin using your Network Stations, read and complete (when applicable)
each of the following items:
v To take advantage of new functionality, you must update the boot monitor on your
Network Stations. Each of your Network Stations must have a minimum boot monitor
version of 3.0.0. Even if you have purchased new Network Stations, you should
update the boot monitors of your Network Stations. For information about updating
boot monitors, see “Updating the Boot Monitor Code” on page 265.
v Verify that the Network Parameters in the Setup Utility of your Network Stations
agree with your boot method. For example, if you want a Network Station to obtain
its IP address through a DHCP server, ensure that the IP Addressed from field is
Network. See “Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on
page 301 for more information about the Setup Utility. Network Stations are ready to
start when they ship from the factory.
v Verify that your BOOTP or DHCP server, NFS or TFTP server, and web server are
started.
v Verify that you excluded any statically addressed devices in your DHCP addressing
range.
v If you have a router between your Network Station and your boot server, verify that
the router handles BOOTP and DHCP requests.
v For more information about setting up Network Stations, see the following sections:
– “Chapter 7. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager
Applications” on page 223
– “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 245
– “Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 301
Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing
To configure DHCP for load balancing on an VM/ESA server, you must define Options
211 through 214 in the ETC DHCPTAB file. You define DHCP classes on the subnet
level. Because you configure the load balancing values on the DHCP class, only
Network Stations can use them. If you have any other devices using the DHCP on that
same subnet, they will not be affected. Before you complete this section, read “Taking
Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 18.
Table 60 on page 221 lists and describes the DHCP load balancing options. Refer to
TCP/IP for VM/ESA Function Level 310 Planning and Customization for more
information on DHCP options.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 60. DHCP Load Balancing Options
Option Number (Name)
Description
Data Format
211 (Base Code Server
Protocol)
Protocol to use for Option 66 (Base Code
Server).
Character String
212 (Terminal Configuration
Server)
Terminal configuration server IP address
of name. You can specify up to two
addresses separated by a blank.
IP Addresses
213 (Terminal Configuration
Path)
Configuration file path name for Option
212 (Terminal Configuration Server). You
can specify up to two paths separated by
a blank.
Character String
214 (Terminal Configuration
Protocol)
Protocol to use for Option 212 (Terminal
Configuration Server). You can specify up
to two values separated by a blank.
Character String
For example:
subnet __line
{
option 211 "nfs"
option 212 "192.5.179.25"
option 213 "/../VMBFS:VMSYSU:QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/"
options 214 "nfs"
}
class IBMNSM 1.0.0
class IBMNSM 2.0.0
class IBMNSM 4.0.0
vendor IBM Network Station
Configuring Printers on VM/ESA
You can configure printers for your Network Stations with the IBM Network Station
Manager program unless the datastream generated by the Network Station application
does not match a datastream that your printer understands. Table 62 on page 242
describes which datastreams the common Network Station applications produce. If your
Network Station application does not produce a datastream that your printer
understands, you will not be able to print.
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
Table 61 on page 222 explains the basic steps to configure printers for your Network
Stations. Identify the scenario that best meets your needs and follow the steps to
configure your printers.
Chapter 6. VM/ESA
221
Table 61. Configuration Descriptions for Basic Printer Scenarios
Desired Print Scenario
Network Station to a LAN
printer
222
Configuration Instructions
1. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an entry in
the Remote Printer Server field for the LAN printer.
Network Station to a locally
attached printer
1. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an entry in
the Local Parallel Printer or the Local Serial Printer field,
depending on how the printer connects to the Network Station.
Network Station to another
Network Station with an
attached printer
1. In the Network Station Manager program, configure an entry in
the Remote Printer Server field with the IP address of the
Network Station to which the printer is attached. In the Queue
name field, type PARALLEL1 or SERIAL1, depending on how the
printer connects to the Network Station.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Chapter 7. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station
Manager Applications
Logging On . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Roam Button . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After You Log In . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 5250 Emulation Application . . .
Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function . .
Eliminating the 5250 Emulator New Session Dialog
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 3270 Application . . . . . . .
Learning About the 3270 Emulation Function . .
Eliminating the 3270 Emulator New Session Dialog
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the NC Navigator Browser . . . . .
Learning About NC Navigator Browser Functions .
Creating NC Navigator Directory Buttons . . .
Learning About NC Navigator Mail Functions . .
Learning About NC Navigator News Functions . .
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . .
JAVA Virtual Machine . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Application . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Applet . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the Time Zone Environment Variable
Learning About Printer Datastreams . . . . . .
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Logging On
After you power on your IBM Network Station network computer, the login screen
appears. Figure 42 on page 224 shows the initial login screen. You can sign on by
typing your user ID and password in the appropriate entry box.
Note: The mouse pointer must be inside the window to make the window active.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
223
Figure 42. Network Station Login Screen
Roam Button
The Roam button allows a user to log in to a server other than the server that is
displayed on the login screen.
To log in to a server other than the server name that is displayed on the login screen,
take the following steps:
1. Click the Roam button on the login screen. A screen similar to the one that is
shown in Figure 43 appears.
2. Type in the name or IP address of the host where your user ID account is
established and click OK. Your personal desktop will appear on the Network Station
that you are using.
Figure 43. Network Address Screen used for Roaming
For more information about roaming and working with multiple servers, see “Taking
Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 18.
After You Log In
Whether you log in as usual or log in using the Roam button, your regular set of
Network Station applications appear.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 44 shows the Network Station Menu bar, which contains the applications
available to select. The applications will appear on your screen if the IBM Network
Station Manager program specified them to autostart. See “Chapter 8. Using the IBM
Network Station Manager Program” on page 245 for more information. If no applications
autostart, you can select an application from the Menu bar. Available default application
buttons are 5250, 3270, and NC Navigator (a browser).
Figure 44. Network Station Menu Bar
The buttons within the Menu bar are as follows:
v Log out
Clicking Log out logs you off the Network Station.
v Hide or Show
Clicking Hide makes the Menu bar float out of view when you move the mouse
pointer off the Menu bar. To retrieve the Menu bar, move your mouse pointer to the
very bottom of your screen. (If you clicked the Move to top button, go to the very top
of the screen instead.) The Hide button or Show button is useful if the Menu bar
covers part of an application window. Click the Show button to display the Menu bar.
v Move to top or Move to bottom
Clicking Move to top moves the Menu bar to the top of the screen. The Move to top
button changes to read Move to bottom after the Menu bar moves to the top.
Clicking the Move to bottom moves the Menu bar back to the bottom.
v Other buttons
Other buttons on the Menu bar represent applications you can use.
v Lock screen
The Lock screen button allows you to lock the screen when you leave the
workstation. Clicking the Lock screen button enables a prompt for the password.
Note: You can control the presentation of buttons on the Menu bar. In your
environment, you may or may not want users to have access to various
applications (for example, additional 5250 sessions). The IBM Network Station
Manager program allows you the flexibility of controlling access to various
applications through Menu Bar Options. See “Working with Menu Bar Options”
on page 272 for more information about working with Menu Bar Options.
Working with the 5250 Emulation Application
The 5250 application provides access to an AS/400 system. How each 5250 session is
presented on the Network Station depends on how you configured the session using
the IBM Network Station Manager program.
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If, using the IBM Network Station Manager program, the 5250 session was set to
autostart, a 5250 session appears on your Network Station as shown in Figure 45.
Figure 45. 5250 Session Display
If you click the 5250 button within the Network Station Menu bar, a New 5250 Session
window appears. See Figure 46.
Figure 46. New 5250 Session Dialog Box
Note: You can use the name of the system or the IP address of the system to connect
to or start a session. To use a system name, you must set up name translation
(using the Domain Name Server (DNS)) information in your TCP/IP
configuration.
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Depending on the volume of network traffic, it can take from several seconds to a
minute to see the sign-on display.
Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function
5250 emulation provides AS/400 system users with greater function than they normally
receive if they use only a nonprogrammable work station (NWS) to access the system.
This additional function is available by clicking various pulldown options from the 5250
Menu bar. See Figure 47.
Figure 47. 5250 Emulation Session with Expanded Pulldowns
Pulldowns are available to allow you to quickly access 5250 emulation functions. See
Figure 47. For example, multi-session support (Command pulldown), font selection by
session (Option pulldown), screen print (Print pulldown), and online help (Help)
information.
The following list shows additional 5250 emulation support:
v Keyboard remapping5
v Color mapping (basic and advanced)5
v Record/playback capability5
v Autostart of playback file (from the Record/playback function)5
v Auto-logon5
5. The IBM Network Station Manager program controls these 5250 Emulation functions. See “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station
Manager Program” on page 245 for more information. The online help information in the IBM Network Station Manager program
provides more information along with all default settings.
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v User customized keypads5
v Enter/Field Exit key locations (you can specify your choice of keys to be used for the
Enter and Field Exit keys)
v Multiple screen size support (for example: 24 X 80, 27 X 132)
v Office Vision/400 controller text assist
v Cut, copy, paste function5
v Hotspot support
v Cursor style options (Cursor style options are block, underscore, blink, and no blink.)
v Rule line support
v Row indicator and column indicator
v Customizable window title5
v Column separator function
All the 5250 emulation functions have shipped defaults. Those functions that are
managed by the IBM Network Station Manager program also have IBM-supplied
defaults. See “Appendix D. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page 361 for a listing of all 5250 emulation defaults controlled by the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
Accessing the online 5250 Emulation Help (by clicking the Help button) provides more
information about how to make each of these 5250 Emulation functions work.
Eliminating the 5250 Emulator New Session Dialog Box for Japanese Users
The IBM Network Station Manager program (by default) displays a New Session Dialog
box coupled with a Language ID Selection Dialog box for Japanese users. The New
Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection box are shown in Figure 48 and
Figure 49 on page 229.
Figure 48. Japanese New Session Dialog Box
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Figure 49. Language ID Selection Dialog Box
These dialog boxes are presented because the IBM Network Station Manager program
needs to know which language ID to use. Japanese users have two language options:
Japanese Extended Katakana and Japanese Extended Latin.
Having to choose the language option makes Japanese users go through the extra
steps of selecting their host and language ID.
These extra steps (New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection Dialog box)
can be eliminated by adding the LANGID parameter value to the 5250 Startup
configurations. Figure 50 shows the configuration information needed to eliminate the
New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection Dialog box.
Figure 50. Network Station Manager Program with 5250 -LANGID used.
Following is an example of the -LANGID coding for the two language options:
Japanese Extended Katakana:
Japanese Extended Latin:
-LANGID JA_JP.IBM930
-LANGID JA_JP.IBM939
Notes:
1. You can configure the LANGID parameter in either the Program or Menu functions
of Startup.
2. You must type the parameter values in uppercase
Accessing Help
You can access help for the 5250 Emulator or your AS/400 session.
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For 5250 emulator help, click Help in the emulator’s Task bar. To access help for
AS/400, sign on to AS/400 and press F1.
Working with the 3270 Application
The 3270 application provides access to a System/390. How a 3270 session is
presented on the Network Station depends on how you configured the session using
the IBM Network Station Manager program.
If you have set the 3270 session to autostart, a 3270 session appears on the screen of
your Network Station. See Figure 51.
Figure 51. 3270 Session Display
If the 3270 session is configured not to autostart, and you click the 3270 button on the
Menu bar, a New 3270 Session window appears. See Figure 52 on page 231.
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Figure 52. New 3270 Session Dialog Box
Note: You can use the system’s name or IP address to log on. To use a system name,
you must set up name translation information (using the Domain Name Server
(DNS)) in your TCP/IP configuration.
Depending on the volume of network traffic, it can take from several seconds to a
minute for the Host Login Session screen to appear.
Learning About the 3270 Emulation Function
3270 emulation provides users with greater function than they normally receive using a
3270 nonprogrammable work station (NWS) to access a System/390. This additional
function is available by clicking various pulldown options from the 3270 Menu bar. See
Figure 53 on page 232:
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Figure 53. 3270 Emulation Session with Expanded Pulldowns
Figure 53 shows the pulldowns that are available to allow you to quickly access 3270
emulation functions such as the following:
v Multi-session support (Command pulldown)
v Font selection by session (Option pulldown)
v Print support (Print pulldown)
v Edit support (Edit pulldown)
v Online help (Help) information
The following list shows some of the 3270 emulation support:
v Keyboard remapping6
v Color mapping6
v Record/playback6
v Autostart of playback file (from the Record/playback function)6
v Auto-logon6
v User customized keypads6
v Graphics support6
v Choosing an Enter key location6
6. The IBM Network Station Manager program controls these 3270 emulation functions. See “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station
Manager Program” on page 245 for more information. Also, the online help information in the IBM Network Station Manager program
provides information along with all default settings for 3270 emulation.
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v Screen size support (for example: 24 x 80, 32 x 80, 43 x 80, and 27 x 132)6
v Cut/Copy/Paste function6
v Auto action (hotspot support)
v Cursor style options (The cursor style options are block or underscore and blink or
no blink.)6
v Rule line6
v Row and column indicator6
v Customizable window title6
All the 3270 emulation functions have shipped defaults. Those functions that are
managed by the IBM Network Station Manager program also have IBM-supplied
defaults. See “Appendix D. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page 361 for a listing of all 3270 emulation defaults controlled by the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
Accessing the 3270 emulation Help (clicking the Help button) provides more information
about how to make each of these 3270 emulation functions work.
Eliminating the 3270 Emulator New Session Dialog Box for Japanese Users
The IBM Network Station Manager program (by default) displays a New Session Dialog
box coupled with a Language ID Selection Dialog box for Japanese users. The New
Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection box are shown in Figure 54 and
Figure 55 on page 234.
Figure 54. Japanese New Session Dialog Box
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Figure 55. Language ID Selection Dialog Box
These dialog boxes are presented because the IBM Network Station Manager program
needs to know which language ID to use. Japanese users have two language options:
Japanese Extended Katakana and Japanese Extended Latin.
Having to choose the language option makes Japanese users go through the extra
steps of selecting their host and language ID.
These extra steps (New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection Dialog box)
can be eliminated by adding the LANGID parameter value to the 3270 Startup
configurations. Figure 56 shows the configuration information needed to eliminate the
New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection Dialog box.
Figure 56. Network Station Manager Program with 3270 -LANGID used.
Following is an example of the -LANGID coding for the two language options:
Japanese Extended Katakana:
Japanese Extended Latin:
-LANGID JA_JP.IBM930
-LANGID JA_JP.IBM939
Notes:
1. You can configure the LANGID parameter in either the Program or Menu functions
of Startup.
2. You must type the parameter values in uppercase
Accessing Help
You can access help for the 3270 Emulator or your Host session.
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You can access 3270 emulator help by clicking Help in the emulator tool bar. In
general, to access help for the 3270 application, place your mouse pointer inside the
Host session window and press F1.
Working with the NC Navigator Browser
You can use NC Navigator to access the Internet and the IBM Network Station
Manager program. See “Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program”
on page 245 for more information.
If you configured the NC Navigator session to autostart, a NC Navigator session will
appear on the screen of your Network Station. See Figure 57.
Figure 57. NC Navigator Browser Session Display
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If you did not configure NC Navigator to autostart, and you click the NC Navigator
button within the Menu bar, an NC Navigator session will appear. Depending on the
volume of network traffic, you can expect it to take from several seconds to a minute for
the NC Navigator screen to appear.
Some of the NC Navigator functions have defaults that are managed by the IBM
Network Station Manager program. For example, you can configure proxies, SOCKS,
mail servers, and news servers by using the IBM Network Station Manager program.
See “Working with Your Network Proxies” on page 286 for more information.
Many of the NC Navigator functions, including those functions that are managed by the
IBM Network Station Manager program, have shipped or IBM-supplied defaults. See
“Appendix D. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings” on
page 361 for a listing of all NC Navigator defaults controlled by the IBM Network Station
Manager program.
Learning About NC Navigator Browser Functions
The NC Navigator browser has many capabilities to help you manage Internet access
and quick connection to the IBM Network Station Manager program. These functions
and others are available by clicking various pulldown options from the browser Menu
bar. See Figure 58 on page 237.
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Figure 58. NC Navigator Browser with Extended Pulldowns
Figure 58 shows the pulldowns that are available to allow you to quickly access NC
Navigator functions. For example:
v Multiple NC Navigator session support (New Web Browser in the File pulldown)
v E-mail (Netscape Mail in the Window pulldown)
v Font selection by user (General Preferences in the Option pulldown)
v Online help (Help) information
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Creating NC Navigator Directory Buttons
Directory buttons provide quick access to frequently used URLs.
The directory buttons appear (when configured) below the URL input field of the NC
Navigator.
Use the Network Station Manager program to administer the directory buttons. See
Figure 93 on page 286 for additional information.
Learning About NC Navigator Mail Functions
NC Navigator mail has many capabilities to help you read and manage E-mail
messages. These functions, and others, are available by clicking various pulldown
options from the NC Navigator Mail menu bar. See Figure 59 on page 239.
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Figure 59. NC Navigator Mail with Extended Pulldowns
Figure 59 shows the pulldowns that are available to allow you to quickly access NC
Navigator functions. For example:
v Reply to mail (Reply in the Message pulldown)
v News reader (Netscape News in the Window pulldown)
v Online help (Help) information
Learning About NC Navigator News Functions
NC Navigator news has many capabilities to help you read and manage newsgroup
messages. These functions and others are available by clicking various pulldown
options from the NC Navigator Mail menu bar. See Figure 60 on page 240.
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Figure 60. NC Navigator News with Extended Pulldowns
Figure 60 shows the pulldowns that are available to allow you to quickly access NC
Navigator functions. For example:
v Reply to news message (Reply in the Message pulldown)
v E-mail (Netscape Mail in the Window pulldown)
v Online help (Help) information
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Accessing Help
You can access help for the NC Navigator by using the Help menu option. The help
includes a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section and an addendum for last-minute
changes.
For NC Navigator help, place your mouse pointer in the NC Navigator Menu bar and
click Help.
JAVA Virtual Machine
You can set up Java applets and applications by using the IBM Network Station
Manager program. You can configure applets and applications to autostart on your
workstation, or configure them as menu items (buttons in the Menu bar).
Note: Only a single Java application can run within the Network Station and, if running,
also precludes applets from running in both the desktop and the browser. Many
applets can run simultaneously.
Starting an Application
You must install applications on the file system of the server.
Notes:
1. Only a single Java application can run on the Network Station. No Java applets can
run if a Java application is running. However, you can run many Java applets
simultaneously.
2. You must use the IBM Network Station Manager program to run a Java application.
You can set the Java application to autostart, or (if a button exists for the
application) you can click the button).
Starting an Applet
You can install Applets on the file system of your boot host, or downloaded from a
remote system with a Universal Resource Locator (URL). You can load the applet by
specifying tags on an HTML page.
You can run applets three different ways:
v By creating a button on the Menu bar for an applet
v By creating a button for a browser URL
v By starting a browser and then loading an HTML page which contains an applet
You manage configuration of the applet through parameter tags within the HTML file
(the applet vendor determines the specific parameter names). Applets that load from the
file system of your boot host should be well-known and trusted applets (the source of
the applet is reliable). There are no security restrictions for Applets running on the local
file system. The applet may write to files and communicate with other machines. Writing
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to other machines may be desirable if you are saving your spreadsheet. However,
writing to other machines could be a problem if a malicious applet erased your files.
Working with the Time Zone Environment Variable
The TZ environment variable is important in the sending and receiving of mail, running
applications, and time-stamping documents. Setting the TZ environment variable
becomes even more important when you work across multiple time zones.
You should set the time zone (TZ) environment variable by using the Network Station
Manager program.
See “Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable” on page 275 for an example.
Learning About Printer Datastreams
You need to know the datastream your default applications (applications shipped with
the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program) produce. Knowing which
datastream the applications produce allows you to choose a printer capable of
processing and printing the files your applications create. Table 62 shows the supported
datastreams for each application.
Table 62. Applications and Datastreams
Default Application Name
PostScript
Datastream
PCL Datastream
ASCII Datastream
5250 Session
X
X
X
3270 Session
X
X
X
NC Navigator
X
Lotus eSuite WorkPlace
X
Each platform (AS/400, Microsoft NT, RS/6000, OS/390, VM/ESA) has a process for
managing printers. The following list directs you where to go for information on how
each platform manages printers for use with Network Stations.
v See “Configuring Printers on VM/ESA” on page 221 for VM/ESA.
v See “Configuring Printers on an AS/400” on page 133 for AS/400.
v See “Configuring Printers on Windows NT Server 4.0” on page 76 for Windows NT.
Use the IBM Network Station Manager program to administer printers for your Network
Station users.
“Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 245 contains
two examples about using printers with Network Stations:
1. “Configuring a Local Area Network Attached Printer” on page 269
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2. “Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users” on page 270
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Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
IBM Network Station Manager Program - an Overview . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who Can Use the IBM Network Station Manager Program? . . . . . . .
System Administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Individual End Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults - Example . . . . . .
Working with System-Wide Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Workstation Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Group Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Individual User Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program Using a Browser . . . . .
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager Program Setup Tasks - Examples .
Changing your Desktop Style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace . . . . . . . .
Changing Your Desktop Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the Boot Monitor Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding the Network Station Boot Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS) Configuration on the Network Station
Configuring a Local Area Network Attached Printer . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users . . . . . .
Working with Menu Bar Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hiding the Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the Menu Bar Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menu Bar Options Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatically Starting a 5250 Session on a Network Station . . . . . . .
Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session Menu Button for a Network Station
Implementing ICA Load Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring ICA Virtual Printing for Network Stations . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Terminal Session for a Network Station . . . . . . . . .
Using Debug Log in a Terminal Session . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Your Icon Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling the Control Menu for a 5250 Session. . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling the 5250 or 3270 Emulator for Euro Currency Support . . . . . .
Changing the Screen Size of a 3270 Session . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Java Applets for NC Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Directory Buttons for NC Navigator. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Your Network Proxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Menus and Messages Language Type . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Group Settings to a User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Education . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing and Using How To... Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples . . . . . . . .
Setting Up an AIX Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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IBM Network Station Manager Program - an Overview
The IBM Network Station Manager program is a browser-based application program.
This application program allows you to perform the setup tasks and management tasks
that are associated with the following:
v All IBM Network Station Network Computers or all Network Station users
v A group of Network Stations users
v A specific (one) Network Station or Network Station user
Figure 61 on page 247 shows the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager
program. The left-most frame of the screen contains a selection list of the Setup Tasks.
Setup Tasks are selected functions of various applications that are managed with the
IBM Network Station Manager program. For example, 5250 and 3270 emulation
sessions, NC Navigator sessions, and Lotus eSuite WorkPlace.
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Figure 61. Network Station Manager Program Main Screen
Figure 62 on page 248 provides an expanded list of Setup Tasks that you can manage
with the IBM Network Station Manager program:
Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
247
Figure 62. Setup Tasks Supported by the IBM Network Station Manager Program
IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow
Figure 63 on page 249 provides a graphical view of how the IBM Network Station
Manager program flows. Take a moment to study Figure 63 on page 249; it highlights
the differences between the defaults and setup tasks that a system administrator and
end user can work with.
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Figure 63. IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow
Who Can Use the IBM Network Station Manager Program?
Figure 63, shows that both system administrators and individual end users can access
and use the program.
Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
249
The special authorities defined on the Host server determine the level of function a user
can access.
For example, on an AS/400, the system administrators must have special authorities
(SPCAUT (*SECADM and *ALLOBJ) authority). Other users should have a level of
authority less than *SECADM and *ALLOBJ.
System Administrators
System administrators have full use of the program. System administrators can work at
a level that is either system-wide, for a specific group, for a specific user, or for a
workstation. For example, an administrator could specify that all Network Station users
have one 5250 emulation session available and that one particular user could have an
additional 5250 emulation session.
For information about how to sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program, see
“Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program Using a Browser” on page 257.
Figure 64 on page 251 shows the screen a system administrator sees after signing onto
the IBM Network Station Manager program. Look at the range of functions that are
presented in the Setup Tasksframe.
Note: This screen can vary in how it appears depending on the Web browser you are
using.
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Figure 64. System Administrator Level
Figure 65 on page 252 compares these functions to the range of functions that are
available to individual end users.
Individual End Users
End users also have access to the IBM Network Station Manager program. However,
the functions that an end user can work with are limited.
Figure 65 on page 252 shows the screen that an end user would see after signing on to
the IBM Network Station Manager program. Look at the range of functions that are
presented in the Setup Tasksframe.
Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
251
Figure 65. End-User Level
As you can see, the program’s flexibility allows broad system-wide settings
management by the administrator and individual settings management by the end user.
Working with IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults
There are four levels of defaults. They are:
v IBM-supplied defaults. The IBM-supplied defaults provide settings that are supported
by the IBM Network Station Manager program.
You can not change IBM-supplied defaults. You can override IBM-supplied defaults
by using the IBM Network Station Manager program feature of System defaults or
User level defaults.
See “Appendix D. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings”
on page 361 for a complete list of all IBM-supplied default values for the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
v System defaults. You can use system defaults to change settings for all users or all
workstations. System defaults take precedence over IBM-supplied defaults.
v Group defaults. You can use group defaults to change settings for all users that are
in a specific group. Group defaults take precedence over system-wide defaults and
IBM-supplied defaults.
v User defaults. You can use user defaults to change settings for an individual user.
User defaults take precedence over IBM-supplied defaults, system defaults, and
group defaults.
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v Workstation defaults. You can use workstation defaults to change settings for
workstations. Workstation defaults take precedence over IBM-supplied defaults and
System Defaults.
Note: Settings work differently in the Startup function of Setup Tasks. For Programs,
Menus, and Environment Variables, the IBM-supplied, System-specified, and
User-specified, are additive. However, for the same environment variable, the
value set at the user level takes precedence over the value set at the system or
IBM-supplied levels. (The values for a given environment variable are not
additive.) Any settings that are specified at the system or user level are added to
those that are specified in the IBM-supplied default settings.
For example, every Network Station user has one 5250 session specified as the
IBM-supplied default. If the administrator used the System defaults function to
assign all users an additional 5250 session, then all users would have two 5250
sessions available. If the administrator then used the User level defaults to
assign USERXYZ another 5250 session, then USERXYZ would have three 5250
sessions. The origin of these sessions would be one each from IBM-supplied
defaults, System defaults, and User defaults.
IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults - Example
This example uses the Desktop background setting. You can locate the Desktop
background setting in the Workstations function of Hardware Setup Tasks.
The IBM-supplied setting for Desktop background is the IBM bitmap.
At this point, the administrator sets all Desktop backgrounds to dark red. Using the IBM
Network Station Manager program, the administrator applies the change by working
through the System Defaults level. This change, to the color dark red, overrides the
IBM-supplied value of the IBM bitmap for Desktop background.
After viewing the color of dark red, a user determines that dark red is too difficult to look
at for long periods of time. The user then requests his Desktop background color be
changed to green. The user can either change the Desktop background color or request
the administrator to do it.
The administrator can make the change by selecting the Hardware Setup Task,
Workstations, User defaults and specify the user ID of the person who is requesting the
change. The administrator can then scroll to the Desktop background field, specify
green, and then click Finish to apply the change. This change, to a User default
setting, overrides the IBM-supplied default and the administrator set System Default
value of dark red.
Notes:
1. If a user changes the background setting, they go directly to the Hardware and
Workstation settings panel. You will bypass the Default selection panel.
2. To see the Desktop background change, you must log off and then log on to the
workstation.
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Working with System-Wide Defaults
Figure 66 is representative of the panel that appears when a selection occurs from the
Setup Tasks frame. This example uses the Workstation Defaults panel.
Figure 66. Hardware Defaults
As you can see, the Workstation Defaults panel allows you to work with the following:
v System defaults for all workstations and users
v Workstation defaults for a particular workstation
v Workstation defaults for a specific group
v Workstation defaults for a particular user
Note: The Workstation Defaults panel is unique in that it allows you to specify settings
for workstations in addition to specific groups or users.
System defaults have settings that are not available when working with an individual
user, a specific group, or specific workstation.
Working with Workstation Defaults
You may configure each Network Station using either DHCP, BOOTP, or NVRAM.. You
can identify each Network Station by TCP/IP hostname, IP address, or MAC address. If
TCP/IP hostname is entered it must exactly match what the Network Station is told that
its hostname is (lower case). BOOTP or DHCP tell each Network Station their
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hostname. Only include the hostname option specified on the Network Station’s client
statement in BOOTP or DHCP. If you specify a separate domain name option in
BOOTP or DHCP, do not include that in the workstation name. You must type MAC
addresses separated by colons (for example, 00:00:e5:80:7c:8f). You must type IP
addresses as dotted decimals (for example, 9.1.2.3).
Tips on Identifying or Referring to your Network Station: Following are some tips
for addressing your Network Station:
IP addressing
You can use the IP address when you are booting the Network Station using
NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP. When you use the IBM Setup Utility you can type
the IP address you configured using DHCP, BOOTP, or NVRAM. However, be
aware that the Network Station’s IP address may change on every boot if you
use the address pool feature of DHCP.
TCP/IP hostname
You can use the TCP/IP host name when you are booting the Network Station
using BOOTP or DHCP. It is unlikely that the Network Station knows its
hostname when it boots using NVRAM. Type the hostname you configured into
DHCP or BOOTP as instructed above. By using the TCP/IP hostname or IP
address you can replace a Network Station and have the new Network Station
pick up the old Network Station’s configuration. You would set up the new
Network Station with the old Network Station’s hostname or IP address.
MAC address
You can use the MAC address when you are booting the Network Station
using NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP. The MAC address is tied to the physical
Network Station and will not change if your network is reconfigured. The MAC
address only changes if you decide to reprogram it on the Network Station.
The MAC address can be found using the IBM Setup Utility and by selecting
F2. d.
Using the Workstation Browse Button: The Workstation Browse button, when
clicked, provides a list of all workstations configured using the IBM Network Station
Manager program.
Working with Group Defaults
Use group defaults to add or change settings on a group-by-group basis.
Any group that you want to work with must already exist on the host server. You can
not create groups by using the IBM Network Station Manager program. The user must
already be in a group.
Note: For example, with OS/390, groups are defined by the administrator of the
external security manager installed on your OS/390 system.
To get started, do the following:
v Click Select User’s Group from the Setup Tasks frame.
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v Type the name of the user whom you want to inherit a particular group’s settings and
click Next.
v Type the name of the group and click Next.
Note: If you do not know a group name, click the Browse button and a list of groups
is presented for you to choose from.
Working with Individual User Defaults
Use user defaults to change settings on a user-by-user basis, one user at a time. Using
user defaults gives you flexibility that allows customization of individual sessions.
From any of the Default panels, select User defaults, type the user ID name, and
press the Next button.
Note: If you do not know a user ID name, you can click a Browse button for a list of
users.
Working with Settings
Settings are fields that you see after you have selected the defaults (System,
Workstation, Group, or User) that you want to use. For example, Figure 67 shows the
Standard Desktop Settings fields for Screen colors, Icon preferences, Fonts, and
Window focus.
Figure 67. Desktop Manager Settings Fields
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 67 on page 256 shows that Standard Desktop settings that are being worked
with from the System Defaults level. Choosing System Defaults settings changes
applies changes to ALL users.
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program Using a Browser
To best understand and learn how the IBM Network Station Manager program works,
you should sign on and follow the examples in this chapter.
To start working with the IBM Network Station Manager program, power on your
Network Station. Click NC Navigator from the Menu bar on your Network Station. See
Figure 68.
Figure 68. IBM Network Station Menu Bar
Notes:
1. You can also use the following Web browsers to sign on to the IBM Network Station
Manager program:
v Netscape 4.0 or later:
– Windows 95
– Windows NT
– AIX
v Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 or later
2. To access the IBM Network Station Manager program using NC Navigator, click the
Directory pulldown and select IBM Network Station Manager for (Your Server
Name). Your server name is the name of the system where your Network Stations
get their boot file.
The NC Navigator browser appears. See Figure 69 on page 258.
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Figure 69. NC Navigator Browser
Click the Directory pulldown and select IBM Network Station Manager for (Your
Server Name). See Figure 70 on page 259.
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Figure 70. NC Navigator Browser with Directory Pulldown
The IBM Network Station Manager sign on screen appears:
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Figure 71. Sign on Screen
Note: An alternative way to reach the sign-on screen is to enter the following
case-sensitive URL in your browser’s URL field:
http://yourservername/networkstation/admin
Where yourservername is the Host name or TCP/IP address.
If you are using a VM/ESA system, the URL you specify depends on the location
of the Network Station Manager program. Use the following URL if the Network
Station Manager program is in the root directory of the server:
http://yourservername:port/admin.htm
Use the following URL if the Network Station Manager program is located in a
subdirectory of the root directory of the server:
http://yourservername:port/nsmhtml/admin.htm
Type your user ID and password, then click Sign on.
The main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager appears.
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Figure 72. System Administrator Level
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager Program Setup Tasks Examples
Note: You must be a system administrator to work with these examples.
Figure 72 shows that radio buttons represent Setup Tasks and text in the left-most
frame of the screen.
Clicking on any radio button or text presents a panel from which you select a set of
defaults you want to work with.
When working with these examples, select User defaults and use your own user ID.
Then, when you are finished with the examples, you can see the results on your
workstation.
To see the changes you make using the IBM Network Station Manager program, you
must log off and then log on to your workstation.
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Notes:
1. Not shown in most examples are the main panel and the Default selection panel.
2. See “Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples” on page 291 for
information about working with remote programs, such as AIX sessions and
WinCenter Pro for PC applications.
Changing your Desktop Style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace
Notes:
1. Lotus eSuite WorkPlace is not available for VM/ESA systems.
2. You must use an IBM Network Station Series 1000 with 64 MB of memory to run
Lotus eSuite WorkPlace.
3. This example, when complete, changes your desktop style from Standard desktop
with menu bar (the default) to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace with menu bar.
Complete the following steps to change your desktop style:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup and then click Menus.
__ 2. Select User defaults and type in your user ID (USER001 in this example). Click
Next to continue.
__ 3. In the Desktop and Menu Bar Options section, click the Desktop Style list box
and select Lotus eSuite WorkPlace with or without menu bar support. See
Figure 73 on page 263.
Note: If you choose eSuite WorkPlace without Menu bar, eSuite Workplace uses
the whole display. Additionally, when you log out of eSuite WorkPlace, you
also log off your Network Station.
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Figure 73. Desktop Style Selection
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Changing Your Desktop Background
You may have requirements for providing different desktop backgrounds; for example,
your company logo. Complete the following steps to see how to change desktop
backgrounds:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Workstations.
__ 2. Select User defaults, and type in your user ID (USER001 in this example). See
Figure 74 on page 264.
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Figure 74. Workstation Defaults Panel with User Defaults Selected
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Workstation Settings frame appears as shown (scrolled-down) in Figure 75
on page 265.
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Figure 75. Hardware Settings Example
__ 4. Scroll to Desktop background and select Tiles (bitmap).
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Tips for working with the screen saver fields and the desktop background fields:
1. You can use your own bitmaps for a screen saver or your desktop background.
2. Place the bitmap in a directory where the IBM Network Station Manager program
can find it. For AS/400, place these bitmaps in:
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/SysDef/
Updating the Boot Monitor Code
Update your boot monitor code to ensure that the boot monitor code on your Network
Stations matches the boot monitor code on your boot server. Updating the boot monitor
code provides access to the latest function of the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program. You must update any Network Station that has a boot monitor code
version less than 3.0.0.
You may want to alert your users that a warning message will appear, on their
workstation, during the boot monitor code update. The warning indicates not to power
off the workstation during the update. To power off the workstation could cause physical
damage to the workstation.
You do not have to use the update boot monitor function if you are working with
Windows NT. Windows NT performs the boot monitor code update automatically.
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__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Workstations.
__ 2. Select System defaults or Workstation defaults, and type in the workstation
name or click the Browse button for a list of configured Network Stations .
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 4. Scroll to the Update to boot monitor installed on the boot server field. Select
Update. See Figure 76.
Figure 76. Updating the Boot Monitor
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Overriding the Network Station Boot Setting
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Workstations.
__ 2. Select System defaults or Workstation defaults, and type in the workstation
name or click the Browse button for a list of configured Network Stations .
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 4. Scroll to the Enable boot using BOOTP or DHCP field as shown in Figure 77 on
page 267.
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Figure 77. Overriding the Network Station Boot Setting
__ 5. Click the Drop boxThe possible choices are:
Default from terminal
Selecting this choice means the boot is determined by the value set in the
IBM Network Station Setup Utility under the Set Network Parameters
function. The value can be either Network or NVRAM.
Yes
Selecting this choice means the boot method is Network.
This means that the boot method is either DHCP or BOOTP and is
determined on how you configured the Network Stations.
No Selecting this choice means the boot method is NVRAM.
The Network Station boots from the server specified in the Boot Host IP
Address field in the Set Network Parameters function in the IBM Network
Station Setup Utility.
__ 6. Click Finish to apply the change.
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS) Configuration on the Network Station
You can use the Network Station Manager program to update the DNS information on a
Network Station.
The domain name server (DNS) or host name table on the host keeps track of all hosts
in a particular domain. You can also store this information on the Network Station.
There are two fields from which to select DNS support. They are:
v DNS Configuration from BOOTP or DHCP server
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If you select this field, the Network Station gets its DNS and domain name
configuration from a BOOTP or DHCP server.
You must use BOOTP or DHCP to configure your Network Stations. DHCP allows
you to specify the IP address of your domain name server. DHCP also resolves
BOOTP requests from Network Stations.
You must use DHCP to configure your Network Stations. DHCP allows you to specify
the IP address of your domain name server. DHCP also resolves BOOTP requests
from Network Stations.
v DNS Configuration created by Network Station Manager
If you select this field, the Network Station gets its DNS and domain name
configuration from a file created by Network Station Manager. The Network Station
Manager copies the DNS and domain name configuration of the server where it is
running to the file. The Network Station reads this file on its next boot to pick up the
DNS and domain name.
In addition, if you select this field, the Network Station Manager copies the Host table
from the server where it is running to the configuration file. The Host table contains
names and their corresponding IP addresses. The Host table information is also
picked up by the Network Station on its next boot. Placing Host table information on
the Network Station allows the Network Station to resolve network names when there
is no DNS.
You can update the file on the Network Station when changes occur to the DNS,
domain name, or Hosts table. You do this by checking the Update Network Station
Manager DNS file field.
Placing the Host Table information on the Network Station allows network name
resolution to occur on the Network Station rather than on the Host Table on the
server.
For AS/400 Users:
1. If you are at V4R2 and have PTF SF47482 applied, you do not have to use the
Update Network Station Manager DNS file function. The update of the Network
Station Manager DNS configuration file takes place automatically when you
change the DNS, domain name, or Hosts table of the AS/400.
2. You need all object authority (*ALLOBJ) to update the Host Table. If you have
authorities less than *ALLOBJ you can update the Host table. However, your
changes are not passed to the Network Station.
To work with DNS configuration follow the steps below:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Workstations.
__ 2. Select a default.
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 4. Scroll to the Domain Name Server field. Select the method you want to use for
network name resolution. See Figure 78 on page 269.
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Figure 78. Updating the Domain Name Server Code
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Configuring a Local Area Network Attached Printer
Local Area Network (LAN)-attached printers are printers not necessarily attached to a
Network Station or other devices. They typically have their own host name or IP
address.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Printers.
__ 2. Select User defaults, and type in your user ID (USER001 in this example).
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 4. Scroll to Printer List. For all users, you must define LAN-attached printers as
remote printers. Therefore, scroll (if necessary) to the Remote Printer Server
section. Fill out the Remote Printer Server section with the following information:
Remote Printer Server
The Host name or IP address of the LAN-attached printer.
Queue Name
The name of the queue associated with the LAN-attached printer.
Some LAN-attached printers require queues for their configuration, and
some LAN-attached printers do not. If the LAN-attached printer has a queue
name associated with it, place that name in the Queue Name field. Leave
the Queue Name field blank if you do not have a queue associated with the
LAN-attached printer.
When you make print requests, the Print Selector List displays the queue
name. The Print Selector List displays the @ sign that is followed by either
the host name or the IP address. If you did not use a queue name the Print
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Selector List displays a @ sign followed by the IP address. For example, in
the queue name field could be @ 10.1.12.34.
Stream Type
The type of printer data stream the LAN-attached printer supports.
Description
You can type anything in this field. Important information to put in the
Description field could be the physical location of the printer.
Figure 79 shows you how to describe a LAN-attached printer.
Figure 79. Configuring a LAN-attached Printer
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
When you type information in the Remote Print Server section, that information
constructs fields in the Print Selector List. The Print Selector List appears when users
request a print action. The Queue Name and Description fields are the most useful
fields. You can use the Queue Name to identify the print queue and the IP address.
Description can be anything you typed in when configuring the printer. The physical
location of the printer may be something users need to know.
Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users
Complete the following steps to configure a Network Station-attached printer:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Printers.
__ 2. Select User defaults, and type in your user ID (USER001 in this example).
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__ 3. Scroll to Printer List. Your Network Station-attached printer is considered a
remote printer for all users except the user to whose Network Station the printer
is attached. Therefore, scroll (if necessary) to the Remote Print Server section.
Fill out the Remote Printer Server section with the following information:
Remote Printer Server
The Host name or IP address of the Network Station to which the printer is
attached.
Queue Name
The name of the queue associated with the Network Station-attached
printer.
Stream Type
The type of printer data stream the Network Station-attached printer
supports.
Description
You can type anything in this field. Important information to put in the
Description field could be the physical location of the printer.
You can configure a Network Station-attached printer. See Figure 80.
Figure 80. Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer as a Remote Printer for Other
Users
In the example where a locally-attached printer is configured as a remote printer
for other users, you must pay close attention to the following:
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Queue name field
On locally attached printers the Queue name is, by default, either
PARALLEL1 or SERIAL1. When you configure a locally attached printer for
others use, the Print Selector List contains a queue name of either
PARALLEL1 or SERIAL1 for that printer. The resulting Print Selector Lists
for a user could then contain two Queue name entries, each reading
PARALLEL1.
Description field
In this example, where a user’s Print Selector List could have two identical
Queue name entries, the Description field can determine which printer to
choose.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Working with Menu Bar Options
This example discusses default Menu bar buttons, hiding Menu bar buttons, and
customizing Menu bar buttons.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Menus, and select System
defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Desktop and Menu Bar Options frame appears. See Figure 81.
Figure 81. Startup Settings Example Working With Desktop and Menu Bar Options
__ 2. Scroll to the Buttons to appear on standard desktop when menu bar is enabled
field.
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__ 3. The Menu bar options that are shipped from IBM. See Figure 81 on page 272.
__ 4. Make any changes that are appropriate for your working environment.
If you do not change the Menu bar options fields, each of your Network Station
users will have a fully populated Menu bar displayed on their workstation. Fully
populated means the Menu bar on each workstation has the following buttons:
v Log out
v Hide
v Move to top or Move to bottom
v Lock screen
v 5250
v 3270
v NC Navigator (browser)
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Hiding the Menu Bar
Using the IBM Network Station Manager program, you can hide the presence of the
Menu bar from your Network Station users.
You may have situations in which you do not want the Menu bar to be available. For
example, you may not want anyone to be able to log out or end any applications that
may be running on the Network Station. Or you might not want to provide an
opportunity for someone to lock the screen. You may have a Network Station publicly
available, and if the Lock Screen button is available, anyone could lock the screen with
a password known only to them.
You can hide the Menu bar from all Network Station users by making the Desktop style
field value Standard desktop without menu bar. See Figure 82 on page 274.
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Figure 82. Hiding the Menu Bar
Customizing the Menu Bar Buttons
You can customize the Menu bar, selectively specifying values for the Menu bar
options.
For example, Figure 83 on page 275 shows the fields and their values that would
exclude the following Menu bar buttons:
v Log out - The value changes to No.
v Lock - The value changes to No.
v Buttons for 5250, 3270, and NC Navigator. You receive these buttons with the IBM
Network Station Manager program. The check box is now deselected.
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Figure 83. Customizing the Menu Bar Buttons
Menu Bar Options Summary
If you hide the Menu bar (using System defaults, Group defaults, or User defaults), only
applications that are specified to automatically start appear on the workstations of
users. You manage automatically starting applications in Setup Tasks using the
Programs function.
The User level (individual user preferences) does not support enabling or disabling the
shipped menu bar buttons for 5250, 3270, or browser buttons.
If you have created customized Menu bar settings but have hidden the Menu bar, no
buttons from the customization are available.
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable
Setting the TZ environment variable is important when working across multiple time
zones and in particular if you use Java applications.
You must be aware of the following requirements:
v All characters must be typed in upper case
v The time zone value on your server must be set correctly
v You must use standard time (for example, Central Standard Time (CST) not Central
Daylight Time (CDT)
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Complete the following steps to set the TZ environment variable:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Environment Variable, and
select System defaults. In the bottom frame click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Environment Variable Settings frame appears. See Figure 84.
Figure 84. Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable
__ 3. Scroll to Environment Variables. This setting, when completed, sets the time
zone environment variable. Complete the following fields:
Environment Variable
Type ’TZ’. TZ means time zone.
Value
Type CST. This means Central Standard Time. Following are other possible
values for the TZ environment variable:
276
Hours From Greenwich
Mean Time (GMT)
Value
Description
0
GMT
Greenwich Mean Time
+1
ECT
European Central Time
+2
EET
Eastern European Time
+2
ART
(Arabic) Egypt Standard Time
+3
EAT
Eastern African Time
+3.5
MET
Middle East Time
+4
NET
Near East Time
+5
PLT
Pakistan Lahore Time
+5.5
IST
India Standard Time
+6
BST
Bangladesh Standard Time
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Hours From Greenwich
Mean Time (GMT)
Value
Description
+7
VST
Vietnam Standard Time
+8
CTT
China Taiwan Time
+9
JST
Japanese Standard Time
+9.5
ACT
Australia Central Time
+10
AET
Australia Eastern Time
+11
SST
Solomon Standard Time
+12
NST
New Zealand Standard Time
-11
MIT
Midway Islands Time
-10
HST
Hawaii Standard Time
-9
AST
Alaska Standard Time
-8
PST
Pacific Standard Time
-7
PNT
Phoenix Standard Time
-7
MST
Mountain Standard Time
-6
CST
Central Standard Time
-5
EST
Eastern Standard Time
-5
IET
Indiana Eastern Standard Time
-4
PRT
Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands
Time
-3.5
CNT
Canada Newfoundland Time
-3
AGT
Argentina Standard Time
-3
BET
Brazil Eastern Time
-1
CAT
Central African Time
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Automatically Starting a 5250 Session on a Network Station
You can automatically start a 5250 session (sign on display) on a Network Station. This
eliminates using the default 5250 button on the Menu bar. Using the 5250 button
requires you to specify the host or IP address before the 5250 sign on screen is
available. Complete the following steps to automatically start a 5250 session on a
Network Station:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Programs, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Programs Settings frame appears. See Figure 85 on page 278.
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Figure 85. Automatically Starting a 5250 Session on an IBM Network Station
__ 3. Scroll to 5250 Sessions to Autostart. This setting, when completed, automatically
starts a 5250 session for you when you sign on to your workstation. Complete
the following fields:
AS/400 system
Type the name or TCP/IP address of the AS/400 from which your
workstation receives its boot file.
Session title
Type in a text string that represents your 5250 session, for example,
5250#2. This text string will appear in the Title bar of your 5250 session.
This field is optional, and you do not need a value. However, if you work
with multiple 5250 sessions, the title helps the session.
Other fields
Use the default settings.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session Menu Button for a Network Station
Note: Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) is a general-purpose presentation
services protocol. You can use ICA to access Microsoft Windows applications
from a Network Station or PC client.
Complete the following steps to configure a local (ICA) client session Menu button:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Menus, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
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__ 2. The Menu Contents frame appears (scrolled forward to Local Program Menu
Items). SeeFigure 86.
Figure 86. Starting a Local Client Session on an IBM Network Station
__ 3. This setting, when completed, creates a menu button that, when clicked, starts
the specified Local program. Complete the following fields:
Menu item label
The text you type in this field appears in the menu button on your Network
Station.
Program to run
Type the name of the local program that runs when you click the Menu
button.
Parameters
In this field you can use parameters that can be passed to the local
program. Following is a list of parameters and their descriptions:
-h(ost) Identifies the PC server the ICA client connects to. You can use the PC
server IP address or host name if you have domain name server
support.
This is a required parameter.
-ti(tle)
Specifies the text to be displayed by the window manager. The text
string must be enclosed with quotation marks. For example, -ti ’ICA
Client’.
-c(olor)
Specifies the number of colors the ICA client may use. This value can
be either 16 or 256.
-g(eometry)
Specifies the position (location) on the display where the window is
placed. The value is expressed in the form: width x height.
-ca(che)
Specifies the size of the memory cache for video display. The possible
choices are: 0, 512, 1024, 2048 (default), 3072, 4096, and 8192.
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-w(orkdir)
The directory specified becomes the logged on user’s default directory
on the PC server. You must insert additional slashes into the directory
name (for example, \users\sdh must be specified as \\users\\sdh).
-domain
Specifies the domain that is automatically entered into the PC Login
menu.
-username
Specifies the user name that is automatically entered into the PC Login
menu.
-password
Specifies the password that is automatically entered into the PC Login
menu.
-lb
Specifies to turn on load balancing for this connection.
-en(cryption)
Turns off the simple encryption protocol driver (The -en parameter has
nothing to do with Secure ICA option pack).
Note:
The encryption parameter must have two consecutive dashes preceding
the en. It is also must be the last parameter specified. You must insert
additional slashes into the directory name (for example, \users\sdh must
be specified as \\users\\sdh).
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Implementing ICA Load Balancing
You implement load balancing by specifying the -lb parameter in the Other parameters
field of the Local (ICA) Client Session configuration. Load balancing provides the client
access to a quantity or ’FARM’ of PC servers in a PC server network. The load
balancing function determines which PC server is doing the least amount of work.
When the Local (ICA) client that requests an application be served, the client receives it
from the PC server identified as performing the least amount of work.
Configuring ICA Virtual Printing for Network Stations
See “Appendix E. Configuring ICA Virtual Printing for Network Stations” on page 367 for
detailed information on printer configuration.
Configuring a Terminal Session for a Network Station
Terminal sessions, when configured, provide the function to have a X session on your
Network Station. Complete the following steps to configure a X session:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Programs, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame click Next to continue.
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__ 2. The Program Contents frame appears (scrolled forward to Terminal Sessions).
SeeFigure 87.
Figure 87. Starting a Terminal (X ) Session on an IBM Network Station
__ 3. This setting, when completed, allows the user to initiate a X session on the
Network Station.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Note: You can use the Menus function of Startup to give users a Menu bar button.
Clicking that Menu bar button allows them to type in the name of the host to
which they want to Telnet.
Choose a name for the Menu item label and leave the Host field blank. Click
Finish to complete the task. The next time the user logs on the Network Station
they will have a button that, when clicked, prompts for the remote host name.
Using Debug Log in a Terminal Session
The debug log can assist in isolating problems in a Terminal Session. Use the following
steps to setup a debug log:
1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Menus. In the bottom frame click
Next to continue.
2. Scroll forward to Terminal Sessions.
3. In the Other Parameters field type:
-xrm '"NCDterm*logDirectory: <directory_name>"'
4. The directory must already exist. Make sure to type the single quote mark followed
by the double quote mark where indicated.
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5. Following is a complete example that shows the debug log being created in the
user’s directory:
-xrm '"NCDterm*logDirectory:
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/users/${USER}"'
Changing Your Icon Location
Complete the following steps to change icon locations:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Desktop, click Standard Desktop, and select
User defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Standard Desktop Settings frame appears. See Figure 88.
Figure 88. Desktop Settings Example
__ 3. Scroll to Icon preferences. In the Icon location field, select Top left.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Disabling the Control Menu for a 5250 Session
Disabling the Control Menu prevents users from accessing the 5250 emulator functions
available through the Control pulldown.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click 5250 and select User defaults. In the bottom
frame, click Next to continue.
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__ 2. The 5250 Settings appear. See Figure 89.
Figure 89. 5250 Setting Example
__ 3. Scroll to the Allow use of section.
__ 4. In the Control menu drop box, select No to disable the Control menu. (The
default is Yes, meaning that you can use the Control menu).
By disabling use of the Control menu, your 5250 sessions will not have the
Control pulldown displayed for use.
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Enabling the 5250 or 3270 Emulator for Euro Currency Support
5250 or 3270 emulation can support access to the Euro currency symbol. Follow the
steps below to implement the Euro currency support:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup. Click Menus or Programs(this
example uses Menu Items) and click your choice of default. In the bottom frame,
click Next to continue.
__ 2. Scroll to either the 3270 or 5250 Menu Items (this example uses 5250 Menu
Items) section.
__ 3. The 5250 Menu Items appear. See Figure 90 on page 284.
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Figure 90. Enabling the Euro Currency Symbol
__ 4. Type in the values for Menu Item Label, AS/400 or OS/390 system name, and
-EURO in the Other parameters field as shown in Figure 90.
Note: The Other parameter value of -EURO must be typed in upper case
characters.
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Changing the Screen Size of a 3270 Session
Your organization may have requirements for varying 3270 session screen sizes.
Complete the following steps to change screen sizes of your 3270 emulation sessions:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click 3270 and select User defaults. In the bottom
frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The 3270 Settings panel appears. See Figure 91.
Figure 91. 3270 Settings Example
__ 3. Scroll to the Screen size field. Select 24 x 80.
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This action changes your 3270 session screen size from 32 x 80 (the default) to
24 x 80.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Enabling Java Applets for NC Navigator
Java applets can add function to your browser sessions if your browsers are allowed to
run them. Complete the following steps to enable Java applets on your browser:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Internet, click NC Navigator, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The NC Navigator Settings frame appears. See Figure 92.
Figure 92. NC Navigator Browser - Enabling Java Applets
__ 3. Scroll to the Security section. In the Enable Java Applets field, select Yes as the
value.
Selecting this value enables Java applets to run on user001’s workstation.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Creating Directory Buttons for NC Navigator
Directory buttons provide quick access to specified URLs. As administrator, you can
control the creation and access to directory buttons. Complete the following steps:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Internet, click NC Navigator, and select one
of the available defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The NC Navigator Settings frame appears. See Figure 93 on page 286.
Chapter 8. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
285
Figure 93. NC Navigator Browser - Creating Directory Buttons
__ 3. Scroll to the Navigator directory button definition section.
__ 4. Type in the values you want to use for each directory button. In this example
Figure 93 shows:
Name
Button1
URL
http://yourbusiness.com
Fly-over help
URL or name for YourBusiness
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Working with Your Network Proxies
Following are Network proxies you can work with when using the IBM Network Station
Manager program:
v File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
v HTTP
v GOPHER
v Security
v SOCKS
v Outgoing mail (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP))
v Incoming mail (POP3)
v News (NNTP)
__ 1. From the Setup Tasksframe, click Internet, click Network, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. Scroll to the Proxy section.
__ 3. The Network Settings frame appears. See Figure 94 on page 287.
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Figure 94. Working with Your Network Proxies
The values in Figure 94 are examples only. You must know the names, (and in
some cases port numbers) to be used for these proxies. If you do not know the
names, you may have to work with your network administrator or your network
service provider.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Changing the Menus and Messages Language Type
There may be times when you want to have some users work in a language other than
the primary language of the host. Complete the following steps to change the language
for messages and menus:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Language, and then select User defaults
using user ID user001. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Language Settings frame appears. See Figure 95 on page 288.
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287
Figure 95. Changing the Menus and Messages Language Type
__ 3. Scroll to the LC_MESSAGES field. In the LC_MESSAGES field, select SV_SE
(Swedish in Sweden) as the value.
Selecting this value makes all menus, and messages appear in Swedish for
user001.
Note: If you change the LANG parameter values, the keyboard mapping
language for a user’s keyboard should also be the same. You can find the
keyboard mapping language parameter in the Workstations function under
the Hardware Setup Task.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Assigning Group Settings to a User
Note: A user must belong to the group before you can specify that the user inherit that
group’s settings. Also, the group must have settings before you can assign those
settings to a user.
You create groups on the Host server. Associating users with groups is also
done on the Host server.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Select User’s Group. Type in user001 in the
For which user do you want to select a group field. See Figure 96 on page 289.
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Figure 96. Selecting a User to be Associated with a Group
__ 2. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Select Group for user001 panel appears. See Figure 97.
Figure 97. Selecting a Group to Use for Defaults
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__ 3. Click the Group to use for defaults for this user drop box. Select the group
whose settings you want user001 to inherit. In this example that is GROUPX.
When user001 logs on next time, user001 will have any settings configured for
GROUPX.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
IBM Network Station Manager Program Education
You should provide some hands-on education, similar to what you just experienced, for
your users of the Network Stations.
Practice choosing and applying settings within the various Setup Tasks to build skills
among your users.
Accessing and Using How To... Help
The IBM Network Station Manager program contains a How To... help category.
The How To... category is organized by the tasks you can perform while using the IBM
Network Station Manager program. For example, it contains instructions about how to
create 5250 sessions, change your desktop to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace, and configure
NC Navigator sessions.
How To... help can be accessed by clicking the Help button at any time. Figure 98 on
page 291 shows a view of the Help Contents where How To... is located.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 98. Finding How To... Help
Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples
Following are examples that use the IBM Network Station Manager program:
v Setting up an AIX session on your IBM Network Station by using Remote Program
support
v Setting up a Windows NT session on your IBM Network Station by using Remote
Program support
Setting Up an AIX Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
Complete the following steps to set up an AIX session using the IBM Network Station
Manager program:
__ 1. Verify that the user ID and password on the Host system match the user ID and
password on the authentication server.
__ 2. You must create a .rhosts file on the AIX server. This file must contain the
Network Station’s name and the name that the user logs into AIX with. This file
resides on the AIX server under the user’s directory. An example for a user ID
of user001 would be:
Location and name of file
/home/user001/.rhosts
Contents of .rhosts file
NWS1.mycompany.ABC.com user001
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The .rhosts file can contain multiple lines. Each line should have one Network
Station name and one user name on it. If a user will be working from more than
one Network Station, create an entry for each Network Station. Following is an
example of the contents of a .rhosts file that allows user001 to sign on to
multiple Network Stations:
Location and name of file
/home/user001/.rhosts
Contents of .rhosts file
NWS1.mycompany.ABC.com user001
NWS2.mycompany.ABC.com user001
NWS2.mycompany.ABC.com user001
If you want to allow user001 to sign-on to any Network Station, the path name
and contents of the .rhosts file would be as follows:
Location and name of file
/home/user001/.rhosts
Contents of .rhosts file
+ user001
__ 3. On the RS/6000, run the following command:
CHMOD 600 .rhosts
Running the CHMOD command changes the access permissions to the .rhosts
file. Changing the access permissions allows checking of the .rhosts file to
verify that a user (user001 in this example) is listed in the .rhosts file.
__ 4. You can verify that the access permissions worked by running the following
command:
ls -al .rhosts
You should see -rw - - - - - - - 1 user001 system.
__ 5. Sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 6. From Setup Tasks, click Startup, then click Menu.
__ 7. From Program Defaults, click User defaults.
If you are setting this up for someone else, type the user ID of that user or click
Browse to select the user ID.
__ 8. Click Next to continue.
__ 9. Scroll ahead to Remote Programs Menu Items and type in the information. See
Figure 99 on page 293.
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Figure 99. Remote Program Example for AIX
Where:
Menu item label
This text string appears in the Menu bar on the Network Station.
Remote host
The name or IP address of the AIX server.
Program to run
This identifies the program to run on the AIX server.
Optional parameters
-display is an AIX requirement that causes the program to display on the
Network Station rather than on the remote host. ${IP} is an IBM-supplied
environment variable that is replaced with the IP address of the Network
Station. -lang C is an AIX requirement that is used by programs such as
Netscape on AIX.
The required parameters for AIX-Session are:
-display
${IP}:0
__ 10. Click Finish to apply the AIX remote program setting.
__ 11. Log off and then log on your Network Station. The Menu bar should have a
button labeled AIX-Session. See Figure 100.
Figure 100. Menu Button for Remote Program Example for AIX
__ 12. Click AIX-Session. A window opens with your X-station session.
From the Aixterm window, you can run additional programs.
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Setting Up a Windows NT Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program
The following steps create a button on the Network Station for both WinCenter Pro and
WinCenter UIS sessions. Complete the following steps using the IBM Network Station
Manager program:
__ 1. Verify that you have a Windows NT machine in your network that has the
WinCenter application loaded on it.
__ 2. Verify that the user has a valid user profile and password on the Windows NT
server. When you request a session from the Windows NT server (for the
Network Station), the user must sign on.
__ 3. Sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 4. From Setup Tasks, click Startup, then click Menu.
__ 5. From Program Defaults, click User defaults.
If you are setting this up for someone else, type that user’s ID or click >Browse
to select the user ID.
__ 6. Click Next to continue.
__ 7. Scroll ahead to Remote Programs Menu Items and type in the information. See
Figure 101.
Figure 101. Remote Program Example for Windows NT
Where:
Menu item label
This text string appears in the Menu bar on the Network Station.
Remote host
The name or IP address of the Windows NT server.
Program to run
This identifies the program to run on the Windows NT server. For
WinCenter Pro and WinCenter UIS, enter the value wincenter.
Optional parameters
-display is a WinCenter requirement that causes the program to display on
the Network Station rather than on the remote host. ${IP} is an
IBM-supplied environment variable that gets replaced with the IP address
of the Network Station.
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You must enter the following parameters for your WinCenter application:
-display
${IP}:0
__ 8. Click Finish to apply the WinCenter Pro remote program setting.
__ 9. Log off and then log on your Network Station. The Menu bar should have a
button labeled WinCenter Pro or WinCenter UIS. See Figure 102.
Figure 102. Menu Button for Remote Program Example for NT
__ 10. Click WinCenter Pro or WinCenter UIS and a window opens with your
WinCenter session.
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Chapter 9. Working with User Services
Accessing User
Console. . .
Login . . .
Terminals . .
WindowMgr .
Utilities . . .
Setup . . .
Statistics . .
Services
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User services are programs that provide administrators with tools to manage the IBM
Network Station’s environment. You can work with User Services whenever you want,
including when an application is running. Following are a list of User Services:
v Console
v Login (The Login User Service is not available.)
v Terminals (The Terminals User Service is not available.)
v WindowMgr
v Utilities
v Setup (The Setup User Service is not available.)
v Statistics
Accessing User Services
Access User Services by pressing the Shift, Alt, and Home keys all at the same time.
Figure 103 shows the User Services window with all the service programs that are
displayed within the menu bar.
Figure 103. User Services Window
Console
This function provides a menu bar option (Console) for handling messages. Figure 104
on page 298 shows the tools available through the Console services option.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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Figure 104. User Services: Console View
Click the button by Messages to display messages that record Network Station activity.
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function.
Clear Messages
Selecting this option clears all the current messages from the console display.
Rescan Messages
Selecting this option refreshes messages in the console window. Messages
that are not displayed appear in the refreshed window.
Close
Selecting this option closes the console function of User Services.
Login
The Login services option is disabled. The IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program provides a login capability.
Terminals
The Terminal services option is disabled. The IBM Network Station Manager Program
provides terminal or workstation management.
WindowMgr
Figure 105 on page 299 shows the tools available through the WindowMgr services
option.
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Figure 105. User Services: Window Manager View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function:
Builtin Window Manager
Selecting this option starts the Builtin Window Manager (an OSF or
Motif-style). Deselecting this option ends the Builtin Window Manager.
The Builtin Window Manager function provides you with the ability to size,
move, and make active (clicking) all the windows open on your monitor.
Utilities
Figure 106 shows the tools available through the Utilities services option.
Figure 106. User Services: Utilities View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function.
Refresh Screen
Selecting this option refreshes the active window.
Blank Screen
Selecting this option starts the screen-saver program.
Lock Screen
Selecting this option locks the screen after prompting for a password. The
Lock Screen function keeps anyone without the password from using the
workstation.
Rescan Font Path
Selecting this option refreshes any font changes that are provided by the
system administrator.
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For example, if the font used is so large, you can not display an entire 5250
session, have the administrator provide a smaller font. Select the smaller font
by clicking the Option pulldown, clicking Font, and selecting the smaller font.
Another use of fonts would be to make your windows smaller. Using smaller
fonts enables several full windows on a screen.
Note: The 5250 Emulation program provides multiple fonts. From the 5250
Tool bar, select the Option pulldown and click Fonts.
Test Network
Selecting this option runs the network test, similar to the Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) command PING.
Setup
The Setup services option is disabled.
Statistics
Figure 107 shows the tools available through the Statistics services option.
Figure 107. User Services: Statistics View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function within the
statistics services function.
Show version
Selecting this option displays version numbers and other information about the
current state of the IBM Network Station.
Show Memory
Selecting this option displays information about free and installed memory in
the IBM Network Station.
Show Connections
Selecting this option displays information about all the current X clients that are
connected to the IBM Network Station.
Show Statistics
Selecting this option displays statistics that pertain to the IBM Network Station.
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Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
Accessing the IBM Network Station Setup Utility . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Setup Utility Tasks . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Monitor Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With the Blanking Pedestal . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Twinaxial Station Address . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the Startup Language . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Keyboard Language . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Verbose Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-Configurable MAC Addresses. . . . . . . . . . .
Resetting an IBM Network Station to the Factory Defaults . . . .
Viewing the Boot PROM Version of an IBM Network Station . . .
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the Network Setting
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting
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This chapter contains information about using the Setup Utility of the IBM Network
Station network computer, hereafter referred to as the Network Station. The Setup
Utility menu allows you to View or Set (change) configuration settings that relate to a
particular IBM Network Station. The Setup Utility is primarily a tool for administrators to
find and correct problems on the network. You can use the IBM Network Station
Manager to restrict a user’s privileges in the Setup Utility.
Accessing the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
Access the Setup Utility by carrying out the following steps:
1. Power on the Network Station.
2. When the NS0500 Search for Host System message appears on the black screen,
press the Escape key.
3. If password control is active, you must enter the case-sensitive administrator
password.
Note: You can specify the administrator password through the IBM Network Station
Manager in the Hardware setup tasks under Miscellaneous Settings.
The following screen appears:
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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SCRN02
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
=
=
=
=
=
=
IBM Network Station
Setup Utility
View Hardware Configuration
Set Network Parameters
Set Boot Parameters
Set Configuration Parameters
Set Monitor Parameters
Set Language Parameters
F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic Messages Disabled
Enter=Reboot
Notes:
1. If the administrator has not set the password in the IBM Network Station Manager,
any user can access the configuration settings in the IBM Setup Utility.
2. If you attempt the password three times without success, you can only view the
hardware configuration.
3. If you changed the administrator password by using IBM Network Station Manager,
you must boot the Network Station up to the Login window. This enables the new
administrator password at the system unit.
Users who are granted limited access by the administrator in IBM Network Station
Manager do not see the complete screen shown above. They see only the first option,
which allows only for viewing the hardware configuration.
IBM Network Station Setup Utility Tasks
You can find information about Setup Utility tasks in Table 63 on page 303 and Table 64
on page 303, in the text-based instructions which follow, or in both sources.
Table 63 on page 303 and Table 64 on page 303 divide Setup Utility tasks into two
categories: Tasks that deal with configuration settings and tasks that deal with
appearances. The tables point you to the steps you need to take to perform each task.
You can reach many of the required screens simply by pressing one key, and many of
the tasks consist of a single keystroke. When the task is more complicated or bears
explanation, the tables direct you to the text-based instructions in the remainder of the
chapter.
Note: For specific instructions about configuring a Network Station to boot from
NVRAM settings, refer to “Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the
NVRAM Setting” on page 309.
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Table 63. Common Configuration Tasks in Setup Utility
Configuration Item
To View
To Set
Network Station IP Address
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
Subnet Mask
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
Default MAC Address
See “Finding the Default MAC
Address” on page 306.
N/A.
User-configurable MAC Address
See “Viewing the
User-Configurable MAC Address”
on page 307.
See “Specifying a
User-Configurable MAC Address”
on page 307.
Gateway IP Address
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
IP Addressed From (Is NVRAM or a Network
setting being used to boot?)
F3.
F3.
Table 64. Common Appearance Tasks in Setup Utility
Appearance Item
To View
To Set
Keyboard Language
F7.
F7. See “Selecting a Keyboard
Language” on page 305.
Monitor Resolution
F6.
F6. See “Setting Monitor
Resolution”.
Verbose Diagnostic Messages (activity and
messages displayed during boot)
F10.
F10. See “Using Verbose
Diagnostic Messages” on
page 305.
Blanking Pedestal
F6.
See “Working With the Blanking
Pedestal” on page 304.
Setting Monitor Resolution
You can change the resolution of the monitor that is attached to a Network Station to
improve a screen image that is not clear.
CAUTION:
Setting a resolution that is not supported by your monitor can permanently
damage the monitor.
Note: For the best video image, you should power on the monitor before you start the
logic unit.
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays during
system startup.
__ 2. Press the F6 key.
__ 3. Press the F2 key.
__ 4. Select a new monitor resolution by using the Up and Down arrow keys.
__ 5. After selecting your resolution, press Enter.
__ 6. Test the resolution by pressing Enter again. A properly resolved monitor clearly
displays the resolution setting in the center of a full-screen grid.
Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
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Working With the Blanking Pedestal
The Blanking Pedestal allows you to increase the contrast between black and white on
your monitor. To activate the Blanking Pedestal, carry out the following instructions:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the NS0500 Search for
Host System message displays during system startup.
__ 2. Press F6.
__ 3. Press the F9 key to enable or disable the Blanking Pedestal. The F9 key acts as
a toggle switch.
Once you have enabled the Blanking Pedestal, your display changes immediately.
Setting the Twinaxial Station Address
Note: You should read this section only if you are using twinaxial connectivities in your
Network Station environment.
The twinaxial station address is a logical address that is assigned to particular physical
outlet along a twinaxial cable. It is not an IP address. The twinaxial station address may
range from 0 through 6.
You can specify the twinaxial station address that a Network Station uses. To set the
twinaxial station address, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays during
startup.
__ 2. Press F8 to access the Set Twinax Station Address screen.
__ 3. Enter an address value between 0 and 6.
__ 4. Press Enter to save the new twinaxial address.
Selecting the Startup Language
The first time you start a Network Station, a screen prompts you to select a Startup
Language. The Startup Language is the language that the Network Station uses in its
own interface. For example, the screens that you see in the Setup Utility appear in the
language that you select. The Startup Language is not the same as the keyboard
language or the language that the IBM Network Station Manager interface uses. For
information about setting the keyboard language for a Network Station, see “Selecting a
Keyboard Language” on page 305.
To change the Startup Language after the first time the Network Station is started,
complete the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the NS0500 Search for
Host System message displays during system startup.
__ 2. Press F7, Set Language Parameters.
__ 3. Press F3, Select Startup Language.
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__ 4. Select the language of your choice.
__ 5. Press Enter. The language that you see on screen changes immediately.
Selecting a Keyboard Language
Warning: You should use the IBM Network Station Manager program to change
keyboard languages. If you change the language in the Setup Utility, you
might specify a different language than what is in the IBM Network Station
Manager. The value in the IBM Network Station Manager overides any value
in the Setup Utility.
You can select a keyboard language to use with this Network Station. Selecting a
different language changes the mapping of keys. By changing the mapping of keys, you
could cause a different character to display when a certain key is pressed.
To select a keyboard language, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays during
the startup process.
__ 2. In the main Setup Utility screen, press the F7 key.
__ 3. Press the F2 key to select a keyboard language.
__ 4. Use the Up and Down arrow keys to select a language from the options
displayed.
__ 5. Press Enter to save your selection.
Using Verbose Diagnostic Messages
You have the choice of whether or not to monitor boot activity from the boot host on an
individual Network Station. When you enable Verbose Diagnostic Messages in Setup
Utility, messages appear on the monitor during the boot process as files are loaded.
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays during
the startup process.
__ 2. Press the F10 key to change the status of Verbose Diagnostic Messages. The
F10 key acts as a toggle switch. Verbose Diagnostic Messages are currently
disabled when the display reads ″F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic Messages
Disabled.″ When the display reads, ″F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic Messages
Enabled, it means that Verbose Diagnostic Messages are currently enabled.
Working With MAC Addresses
You use a MAC address (which is an alpha-numeric value) to identify a computer.
Network Stations can have two kinds of MAC addresses: Default MAC addresses, and
user-configurable MAC addresses.
Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
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Default MAC Addresses
The default MAC address is a unique identifier that corresponds permanently to a
particular Network Station. The Network Station receives its default MAC address in the
factory where the machine is manufactured. The default MAC address does not
change, even when you specify a user-configurable MAC address.
Finding the Default MAC Address: You can find the default MAC address by viewing
the MAC address label in the Network Station packaging. See Figure 6 on page 8 for
guidance.
On a new Network Station which has no user-configurable MAC address, you can view
the default MAC address in the Setup Utility. To do so, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the Search for Host
System message displays during the startup process.
__ 2. Press the F2 key to view the MAC address.
Note: Remember, that the default MAC address will only appear here if no
user-configurable MAC address is active. See “Recovering the Default
MAC Address” for information about recovering the default MAC address
once you have specified a user-configurable MAC address.
Recovering the Default MAC Address: Once you have entered a user-configurable
MAC address, you can reset the MAC address to the default by carrying out the
following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the Escape
key after the Search for Host System message displays during system startup.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. On the command line, type the following command: ma default.
__ 4. To return to the Setup Utility, type SE and press the Enter key or type RS to
restart the Network Station.
User-Configurable MAC Addresses
You may wish to configure your own MAC addresses for Network Stations. By
configuring your own MAC addresses, you can create a sequence of identifiers that has
meaning to you as an administrator. Your own MAC addresses will be more memorable
than the randomly produced default MAC addresses that reside in the Network Stations.
By configuring a MAC address, you do not permanently delete or overwrite the default
MAC address. You can retrieve it from the memory of the Network Station at any time.
For instructions about how to reset the default MAC address, see “Recovering the
Default MAC Address”.
If you are using DHCP in your network to dynamically allocate IP addresses, you
should not configure your own MAC addresses. User-configurable MAC addresses are
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
most useful for the kind of tracking and close administrative scrutiny that are usually
associated with small, static, stable networks.
The user-configurable MAC address must follow the conventions of the default MAC
address. It must consist of 12 digits, in pairs that are sectioned off by colons. When you
create a user-configurable address, you can use the numbers 0 through 9 and the
letters A through F. The first digit in the MAC address must always be 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, C,
D, E, or F. After the first digit, you may enter any values you wish, as long as they
follow the conventions that have already been discussed.
Specifying a User-Configurable MAC Address:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the Escape
key after the Search for Host System message displays during system startup.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. On a Network Station command line, type the following command: ma
XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX, where XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX is your user-configurable MAC
address.
__ 4. To return to the Setup Utility, type SE and press the Enter key or type RS to
restart the Network Station.
Viewing the User-Configurable MAC Address: You can view the active MAC
address on an IBM Network Station by carrying out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during system
startup.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. On a Network Station command line, type the following command: ma.
__ 4. Press Enter.
__ 5. To return to the Setup Utility, type se and press Enter.
Resetting an IBM Network Station to the Factory Defaults
Even if you have already configured your Network Station, you may wish to clear all of
the settings and restore the factory defaults. To do this, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the Escape
key after the Search for Host System message displays.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. Type nv to enter the NVRAM utility. Press Enter.
__ 4. Type l to load the default values. Press Enter.
__ 5. Type s to save the new values. Press Enter.
__ 6. Type y to verify that you want to save the values. Press Enter.
__ 7. Type q to quit the NVRAM utility.
__ 8. To return to the Setup Utility, type se and press Enter.
Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
307
Viewing the Boot PROM Version of an IBM Network Station
You may want to ensure that you have a certain version of boot PROM (also called the
boot monitor) loaded on your Network Station. You can learn what version you have
currently installed on your Network Station by carrying out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays.
__ 2. Press F2, View Hardware Configuration.
The Boot Monitor version appears as the third categorized item. The Boot Monitor
version is the same thing as the boot PROM version.
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the Network Setting
For your Network Stations to boot using BOOTP or DHCP, you must set each logic unit
to Network in the Setup Utility. Network is the factory default setting. You can also set
this value in the IBM Network Station Manager. For more information about setting boot
preferences in the IBM Network Station Manager, see “Overriding the Network Station
Boot Setting” on page 266. To change or verify the Network Station’s boot setting, carry
out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during the
startup process.
__ 2. Press F3, Set Network Parameters.
__ 3. On the line IP Addressed from, use the right and left arrow keys to highlight
Network.
__ 4. Once you have highlighted Network on the IP Addressed from line, you must
configure the following parameters:
v DHCP IP Addressing Order
v BOOTP IP Addressing Order
Choose whether you want DHCP or BOOTP to be the primary boot method of
this Network Station. For guidance in making that decision, refer to “Boot
Methods” on page 13. If you want to use both DHCP and BOOTP, type 1 next to
your first choice and 2 next to your second choice. If you want to use only one
boot method, type 1 beside your selection. Type D for ″Disabled″ beside the
method that you do not want to use.
__ 5. If you have an Ethernet Network Station, choose the appropriate Ethernet
standard for your network/
__ 6. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 7. Your individual Network Station is now ready to boot using the Network setting.
However, you must make sure that you have configured your server to process
boot requests from BOOTP or DHCP clients. To configure your server to use
BOOTP or DHCP, refer to your platform-specific installation chapter of this book.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting
This section contains information about setting up a Network Station to boot from the
NVRAM setting.
Note: If you make an error during the following procedure, recover the default
information that you have overwritten by pressing F11.
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during the
startup process.
__ 2. Press F3, Set Network Parameters.
__ 3. On the line IP Addressed from, use the right and left arrow keys to highlight
NVRAM.
__ 4. On the lines beneath IP Addressed from, fill in the requested information
concerning your network’s topology. Refer to your network topology diagram for
your network’s configuration information.
Notes:
a. To replace existing text, you must backspace to delete the text and then
type your values. You cannot type over existing values.
b. Do not press Enter at the end of a line. Instead, use the arrow keys to
move from one line to the next. Press Enter only when you are finished with
the whole screen.
Table 65. Boot and Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting. Table 65 explains the configuration
items and refers you to the sample values for Figure 4 on page 6.
Configuration Item
Description
Network Station IP Address
The IP address for this individual IBM Network Example 2 = 192.168.1.2 or
Network Station.
192.168.1.3
Value for Network Examples
First Boot Host IP Address
The IP address of the primary server
that you will use to boot this Network
Station.
Network Example 2 = 192.168.1.4
Second Boot Host IP Address
The server that you will use to boot
this IBM Network Station should the
first boot host fail. If you have no
backup server, you may enter the
value 0.0.0.0 or the same IP address
as that of the first boot host.
Network Example 2 = 0.0.0.0
Third Boot Host IP Address
The server that you will use to boot
this individual Network Station should
the first and second boot hosts fail. If
you have no third boot host, you may
enter 0.0.0.0 or the same IP address
as that of your first or second boot
host.
Network Example 2 = 0.0.0.0
Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
309
Table 65. Boot and Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting (continued). Table 65 on page 309
explains the configuration items and refers you to the sample values for Figure 4 on page 6.
Configuration Item
Description
Value for Network Examples
First Configuration Host IP Address
The IP address of the server from
which the Network Station downloads
its workstation configuration
information. This may or may not be
the same server as the boot host.
See “Taking Advantage of Multiple
Server Environments” on page 18, for
information. If you do not specify a
configuration host, the Network
Station goes to the boot host as a
default configuration server. If you do
not want to specify a separate
configuration host, you may enter
0.0.0.0 or the IP address of the boot
host.
Network Example 2 = 0.0.0.0
Second Configuration Host IP
Address
The IP address of the configuration
host that you want the Network
Station to use should the first
configuration host fail. If you do not
want to specify a second
configuration host, you may enter
0.0.0.0 or the IP address of the first
configuration host.
Network Example 2 = 0.0.0.0
Gateway IP Address
The IP address of the principle router
of the Network Station’s network.
Network Example 2 = 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask
See “Subnets and Subnet Masks” on
page 9 for a discussion of subnet
masks. If the Network Station will
never need to access anything that
does not reside on its subnet, you
can use the value 0.0.0.0.
Network Example 2 = 255.255.255.0
Broadcast IP Address
The broadcast IP address is the
Network Example 2 = 192.168.1.255
address that is used to communicate
with every host on the network. For
Class C networks whose subnet
mask is 255.255.255.0, the broadcast
address is the first three portions of
the network address with 255 in the
final portion.
__ 5. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 6. You must now specify the proper paths for the Network Station to follow to reach
its boot and configuration files. From the Setup Utility main screen, press F4, Set
Boot Parameters. Go to the next step for information about what parameters to
enter.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 7. Specify the boot parameters that are explained in Table 66. Make sure that you
use forward slashes, as indicated in the table. If you use backslashes, the
Network Station may not boot.Type in the values that are specified for your
platform.
Notes
v Directory, file, and protocol values are case-sensitive.
v You can access the default values for the OS/390 and OS/400 platforms
by deleting the ones that appear on the screen and then pressing Enter.
The proper values take effect even though they do not appear on
screen.
Table 66. Boot Parameters for NVRAM Booting
Boot Parameter Description
Platform
Boot File
OS/390
kernel
VM
kernel
TFTP Boot
Directory
NFS Boot
Directory
The file that contains the
operating system for the
Network Station.
Type this value
OS/400
kernel
AIX
kernel
NT
kernel
The path that the Network
Station uses to access the
Boot File in the boot server
when using TFTP to
download the operating
system.
OS/390
/hfs/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/
VM
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
The path that the Network
Station uses to access the
Boot File from the boot
server when using NFS to
download the operating
system.
OS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
AIX
/usr/netstation/
NT
/nstation/prodbase/
OS/390
/hfs/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/
VM
/../VMBFS:VMSYSU:QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
OS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
AIX
/usr/netstation/
NT
/netstation/prodbase/
__ 8. Specify the Boot Host Protocol
In the Set Boot Parameters display, you can specify the order of the boot
protocols for the Network Station. The supported protocols are:
v TFTP
v NFS
v Local
Use the numbers 1 through 3 for the boot host protocol order or use a D to
disable the protocol. The Local boot host protocol is for booting from a flash card
only. The Network Station will attempt to use the first protocol and if
unsuccessful, it will attempt to use the next if specified.
__ 9. Press Enter to save your changes.
Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
311
Note: If you have made a mistake and you want to recover the default boot
parameter values, backspace over the current values and restart the
Network Station.
__ 10. Press F5, Set Configuration Parameters.
__ 11. Enter your network’s configuration information by using Table 67.
Table 67. Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting
Configuration Parameter
Description
Platform
Configuration file
The name of the file that
contains the Network
Station’s configuration
information.
OS/390
Type this value
VM
OS/400
See 312
AIX
NT
First Configuration Directory The path name that the
configuration host uses to
locate the configuration file
of the Network Station.
Second Configuration
Directory
Configuration Host Protocol
OS/390
/hfs/etc/nstation/StationConfig/
VM
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
OS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
AIX
/usr/netstation/configs/
NT (NFS)
/netstation/prodbase/configs/
NT (TFTP)
/nstation/prodbase/configs/
The path name that the
second configuration host
uses to locate the
configuration file of the
Network Station. If you
have not configured a
second configuration host,
you may leave this line
blank.
OS/390
/hfs/etc/nstation/StationConfig/
VM
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
OS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
AIX
/usr/netstation/configs/
NT (NFS)
/netstation/prodbase/configs/
NT (TFTP)
/nstation/prodbase/configs/
The protocol that the
Network Station uses to
access its configuration files
from the configuration host.
Use the left and right arrow
keys to change the host
protocols. The available
protocols are NFS,
RFS/400, Local, Default,
and TFTP.
Note: You can also specify
a second Configuration
Host Protocol. The Network
Station will use the second
host protocol if the first host
protocol fails.
OS/390
First: NFS
VM
First: NFS
OS/400
First: TFTP
AIX
First: NFS
NT
First: NFS
Note: It is recommended that you not enter a configuration file on the F5 Setup
screen. The Network Station normally searches for its configuration file
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
based on its TCP/IP host name, IP address or MAC address. If you enter
a configuration file you prevent the Network Station from performing this
search.
If you do not plan to configure a Network Station individually then you
should type standard.nsm as the configuration file on the F5 screen.
This causes the Network Station to read the standard configuration file
without taking extra time to search for its individual file.
__ 12. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 13. If you have not yet done so, you must install the IBM Network Station Manager
software on the servers in your network. Refer to your platform’s installation
chapter of this book for instructions.
End of Procedure.
Chapter 10. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
313
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
Problem Resolution Tables . . . . . .
Common Error Situations . . . . . .
PANIC Mode at an IBM Network Station
Error Codes . . . . . . . . . .
PC Server Error Situations . . . . .
OS/400 Error Situations . . . . . .
AIX Error Situations . . . . . . . .
OS/390 Error Situations . . . . . .
VM/ESA Error Situations . . . . . .
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315
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326
326
329
334
339
343
346
Problem Resolution Tables
This appendix contains information to help you resolve error situations. Error situations
that are specified in Table 68 are common across all server platforms. Other error
situations are specific to individual operating systems. If you do not find the error in
Table 68, refer to the table of contents above for the operating system on your server.
If you are unable to solve the problem, request software service for your Network
Station. Refer to your local telephone listings to contact your IBMhelpcenter. In the
United States, call 1-800-237-5511 for software service. For hardware problems, refer to
the IBM Network Station Setup and Use book (SA41-0036) that is shipped with
individual Network Stations.
Common Error Situations
The following error situations are common across all Network Station platforms.
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
BOOTP table cannot be read
This problem may occur if the information in your BOOTP table
is incorrect. Verify the accuracy of your BOOTP settings in your
BOOTP table.
BOOTP Problems
You may need to restore the BOOTP table from a backup copy.
Browser Problems
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
315
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error message 404 - file not
found
This error indicates a URL that is not entered correctly.
Verify the spelling and case sensitivity of the URL you used to
access the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program.
If the spelling and case of the URL are correct, you can check
the directives specified in the HTTP server configuration.
Directives are statements in the HTTP server configuration that
allow access to the HTTP server.
Color Problems
Colors appear incorrectly in
applications
Color capabilities are fixed at 256 available colors. Some
applications use as many colors as possible, thus leaving no
colors for additional applications. Try to start other applications
before starting an application that uses a large number of colors.
Applications that do not use 256 colors may have to be changed
to use 256 color support.
Cursor Problems
Busy cursor (cursor seems
busy trying to perform a task)
The first time you open an application from the Network Station
menu bar, the cursor stays busy until the application finishes
loading. Additional requests for another session of the same
application show the cursor being busy for only 3 seconds.
Depending on network traffic, the application may take longer
than 3 seconds to appear. The application is loading; however,
the cursor is not busy for more than 3 seconds.
Cursor in wrong position within When you leave one application to go to another application
an application
using the mouse, the cursor may not be at the same position
when you return. The cursor probably repositioned itself to the
place where you clicked the mouse to restart the application.
You can reposition the cursor using the directional arrow keys.
DHCP Problems
Duplicate address conflict
You may have a duplicate address conflict when DHCP pings
the network if a device (such as a printer, server, or other
workstation) with a static Internet Protocol (IP) address is off.
This occurs only if the static IP address is within the range of
DHCP addresses in your DHCP configuration.
Explicitly exclude the static IP address from your DHCP address
range to resolve the duplicate address conflict.
316
Rogue DHCP server
If you have two DHCP servers in your network, ensure the
ranges of IP addresses in the servers do not overlap.
Migration problems from
BOOTP to DHCP
When you completely migrate from BOOTP to DHCP, disable
BOOTP on the server.
DHCP broadcasts do not pass
through entire network
Check the relay agent configuration in all of your routers and
gateways.
Suspected class problem in
DHCP configuration
DHCP needs correct class values in the DHCP configuration. If
the classes are corrupt for any reason, you need to restore the
classes from a backup.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Timing problems when BOOTP BOOTP requires two packets for each transmission and DHCP
and DHCP run at the same
requires four. This presents possible timing problems if both run
time
at the same time.
BOOTP and DHCP may begin communication simultaneously,
but BOOTP establishes protocol before DHCP. BOOTP assigns
a permanent IP address, which DHCP does not recognize due
to the delay. DHCP tries to assign the BOOTP-allocated address
which presents duplicate address conflicts.
Disable BOOTP on the server.
Environment Variables - Java Applet Viewer
Environment variable not
replaced
Environment variables cannot be used when you work with
properties in the Java Applet Viewer section of the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program. The property value is not
replaced with the Environment Variable value. For example, if
you declared name=${IP} in the properties box, you might
expect to get the Internet Protocol (IP) address of the Network
Station user. Instead, you get ${IP}.
Host Unknown or Unknown Host Message
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
317
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Host Unknown message
appears on the Network
Station
This message could appear for several reasons:
v You specified a wrong system name or IP address in the
program or menu functions of Startup Tasks in the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
v You specified a wrong system name or IP address in a 3270
or 5250 session.
v Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
names do not resolve in the menu functions of Startup Tasks
in the IBM Network Station Manager program.
v You specified the wrong server host name in the language
panel or it cannot be resolved.
v The hostnames in the NC Navigator Options Network
preferences or Network panel are incorrect or they cannot be
resolved.
v The remote print server on the Printers panel is incorrect or it
cannot be resolved.
You should validate the system name or IP address.
You should also access the Hardware-Workstation Setup Task
and specify the correct Domain Name Server (DNS) to use. This
configures the Network Station DNS so that the DNS resolves
host names into IP addresses.
You may configure a DNS using DHCP or have the Network
Station Manager configure your DNS. If you choose DHCP,
ensure that option 6 is correct for the Network Station. If you
choose to let the Network Station Manager configure the DNS,
Network Station Manager uses the server DNS information.
Verify that the server DNS is correct for the Network Station and
press Update Network Station Manager DNS file to refresh the
DNS configuration.
You must power down your Network Station and power on your
Network Station for the name information to become available.
IBM Network Station Manager Program
318
Changed hardware Network
Station settings not being
applied
Some changes require the Network Station to be restarted
before they take effect. If you restart the Network Station and
the changes are still not applied, use the IBM Setup Utility,
Select F5 (Set Network Parameters) and make sure the IP
Addressed from parameter value is Network. See “Chapter 10.
Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on
page 301 for more information.
Changed keyboard setting has
not been applied
Restart your Network Station in order for the changed keyboard
setting to take effect.
Changes made to 5250, or
3270 have not been applied
Log out and log back in for changes to take effect.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Inactive navigational buttons in In Help text, the navigational buttons (Back and Next) are not
Help
active until you have linked to other topics. Once you have
moved, by linking other topics, you establish a history of that
movement. The buttons use this history to determine whether
the Back and Next buttons can be used.
Microsoft Internet Explorer
windows are displayed behind
the main window
In the IBM Network Station Manager program, if you request
help or a list of users or terminals, a popup window contains the
requested information. Internet Explorer may open the popup
window behind the larger main window from which you made
the request. To find the popup, you may need to move or
minimize the larger window.
Pulldown box does not stay
open to accept hardware
setting changes
Try one of the following three options:
v If you are running a browser in a Windows environment,
change the screen size to something other than 640 X 480.
v Try resizing your current window and then open the pulldown
again.
v Try scrolling the window to change the initial position of the
pulldown. This may make room to display more of the
pulldown list.
Resizing the NC Navigator
window causes problems
When you run IBM Network Station Manager from NC Navigator
on a Network Station and you resize the window, you go back to
the main IBM Network Station Manager screen.
After signing on, on your server, increase the memory cache
setting for the NC Navigator browser to a value greater than the
default 1K (1000).
Resizing the Netscape window
causes problems
If you resize the Netscape window while the IBM Network
Station Manager program is being loaded, Netscape may stop
the load and you will not get a sign-on screen. You must close
the IBM Network Station Manager browser window and restart
the program; wait until after the logon screen is displayed before
you resize the window.
After signing on, resizing the Netscape window may cause the
server name or name of the user whose defaults you are
displaying to disappear. If cache is set to 0, resizing the window
may cause unpredictable results.
Update of boot monitor has not Restart your Network Station in order for the updated boot
been applied
monitor to take effect.
Java Problems
If the Java applet or application does not start, examine the messages that are displayed in the
User Services console. These should give an indication of any problems that are found by the
Java Virtual Machine (JVM) in running the program. In addition, you can determine whether the
JVM is loaded by noting a change in the amount of memory currently being used, as found in
User Services Statistics. See “Chapter 9. Working with User Services” on page 297, for more
information.
The following Java error messages describe the error and give problem resolution information.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
319
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Cannot find class
The JVM cannot find the class file requested by the Java applet
or application. If the error is returned while you are running a
Java application, inspect the class path that is specified in the
startup programs or menus. Confirm that the directories with
program class files are in the class path and that they have the
correct format. Also ensure that the name in the Network Station
Manager’s Application (Class) Name field does not contain the
.class file name extension.
or
Class not found
If the classes are provided in a zip file, the fully qualified zip file
name must explicitly appear within the class path. In addition,
due to differences in the file systems, the classes may not be
found since they are referred to in a case-sensitive manner. It
may be possible to rename the class to the name that is
indicated in the console message.
Some systems use mount points with different names than the
actual directory structure leading to the class file. If you use a
server with mount points, ensure the mount point name is
correct in the class path specification.
For an applet, the codebase portion of the applet tag within the
HTML file lists the locations where classes are found.
Also check the file access permissions on the directories and
files to make sure that users are allowed to read the files.
IO exception while reading (a
file name)
Ensure that you specified a valid HTML file name as the startup
program or menu URL name in the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program. Also ensure that the file is readable
by the user.
IO exception while reading (a
remote server name)
An HTTP address rather than a file system location was passed
to the applet viewer. AppletViewer is essentially a browser that
needs to have a defined proxy server and port before it can load
HTTP files. To do this, you need to set the HTTP proxy or Socks
Host parameter by using the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program. Select the Internet Setup Task and then the
Network section.
If you are loading the applet from your host server, you do not
need to use an HTTP address. Instead, you can simply fill in the
local path and HTML file name.
Launcher Shutdown Monitor
320
If your applet does not start and the next message in the
console is Launcher Shutdown Monitor, ensure that you
specified a valid HTML file name as the startup program or
menu URL name in the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program. Also ensure that the file is readable by the user.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Out of memory
The Network Station may not have enough memory to run the
application or applet. Possible causes include the following:
v Other applications are using memory, and not enough
memory is left for the Java application or applet to run.
v The stack size and heap size parameters need to be
adjusted. The stack and heap sizes can be set with the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program. For applications,
the parameters are set in the Startup Tasks (programs or
menus) section. For an applet, the parameters are set in the
Internet Tasks (Applet Viewer section).
Unusable class name (name)
Check the name in the Application (Class) Name field in the
startup program or menu section in the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program. Do not include a path or the .class
file name extension in this field.
Other
If you do not see any messages in the User Services Console
window that explain your problem, activate Verbose Diagnostic
Messages by using the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program. For applications, Verbose messages can be set in the
Startup Tasks (programs or menus) section. For an applet,
Verbose messages can be set in the Internet Tasks
(AppletViewer section). Additional messages are displayed when
your application or applet is run.
The following Java error conditions are not related to specific Java error messages:
Applet cannot read Properties
or get a Security Exception
while trying to read the System
Properties
Applets may only read properties which are explicitly allowed by
the system configuration. A property can be configured to be
accessible by defining a new property of the form .applet and
assigning it a value of true. This may be done through the
Network Station Manager licensed program in the AppletViewer
configuration section. The default properties that may be read by
an applet are as follows:
v java.vendor
v java.version
v java.vendor.url
v java.class
v os.name
v os.version
v os.arch
v file.separator
v path.separator
v line.separator
If the class sun.applet.AppletViewer is used to view applets, the
accessible property list differs from above and depends on the
property file defined within your home directory.
Cannot close Java error
message box
Scroll to the end of the error message box and click OK.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
321
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Cursor does not appear in text
field
The Java Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) is designed to create a
development environment independent of the underlying
windowing mechanisms. These classes use the native window
calls to do the work, but provide a uniform interface to
programmers. However, Java Abstract Window Toolkit cannot
hide all the differences. Thus appearances may change from
one Java Virtual Machine on one platform to another Java
Virtual Machine on a different platform.
or
Window layout (for example,
button positions) appears
different from the way it
appears when the applet is run
on another platform
Data written to a file does not
appear in the file
Make sure the Java applet or application closes the file to force
all data to be written to the file.
Text does not appear or is a
different style
Check the font sizes and styles. They may need to be changed
to a different setting. Not all fonts are available on all Java
Virtual Machines.
Unwanted keystrokes appear
in applications
If the screen saver comes on while you are in an application
and you press a key to end the screen saver, that keystroke
appears in your application. Remove the unwanted keystroke.
Keystrokes
Language Problems
Wrong language appears on
the Network Station when you
power on the logic unit
You must reset the keyboard language to your language from
the Setup Utility.
v Power on the Network Station.
v When the NS0500 Search for Host System message
appears, press the Escape key to start the Setup Utility.
v Press F1 (if necessary).
v Enter your password (if necessary).
v Press F7.
v Press F3 to select language.
v Choose one of the following options for the appropriate
language:
– 1 for English (US)
– 2 for French
– 3 for German
– 4 for Italian
– 5 for Japanese
– 6 for Spanish
v Press Enter three times to save your selection and restart the
Network Station.
Login Problems
322
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Network Station displays a
light blue screen and the
Network Station does not log
in properly
This problem normally occurs when the required.nsm file could
not be read during power on.
If you boot from NVRAM check the following items to correct
this problem:
v Make sure that the Configuration line in the F5 screen is
accurate.
v On an AS/400, OS/390, and Virtual Machine (VM) server, the
Network Station automatically looks for the required.nsm file if
the Configuration File value is blank.
Note: If you need to enter the required.nsm file manually,
make sure that the path and the file name are entered
correctly.
v Ensure the accuracy of the Configuration Directory.
v Select the correct Configuration Host Protocol.
If you boot from DHCP, look for the correct configuration
information in “Taking Advantage of Multiple Server
Environments” on page 18.
Host xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (IP
address) not responding to
ICMP Echo error message
followed by NS0090 Press a
key to continue message
This error message indicates that two devices in your network
are trying to use the same IP address. Verify that the IP address
you assigned to the Network Station is not used by a different
device in your network.
If all of your IP addresses are assigned to Network Stations (or
other devices using a media access control (MAC) address, the
error will be NS0600 IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx in use by (MAC
address) xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx. This error message also indicates a
conflict in which two devices try to use the same IP address.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
323
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Login stops at NS0500 Search
for Host System message
There are several reasons this message appears:
v Your server may not be running.
v Your network cable connections may not be tight.
If you are running IBM Operating System/400 Version 3
(OS/400), OS/390, or VM, you may need to reset the NVRAM to
the factory defaults if you boot from NVRAM. Following the
NVRAM reset, you must reenter the NVRAM values for the
Network Station and power off and power on the Network
Station.
v When the NS0500 Search for Host System message
appears, press the Escape key.
v From the Setup Utility screen, press the following keys at the
same time: (left)Ctrl - (left)Alt - (left)Shift - F1, to start the
Boot Monitor command prompt.
v Type NV to start the NVRAM Utility.
v Type L to load factory defaults.
v Type S to save factory defaults.
v Type Y to confirm save.
v Type Q to exit the NVRAM Utility.
v Type SE to restart the Setup Utility.
v Re-enter the correct NVRAM values in the Setup Utility.
v Press Enter to restart your Network Station.
Monitor Problems
Display image too large to fit
on monitor
Your Network Station may be set to automatically detect which
monitor you are using. For autodetect to work correctly, you
must power on the monitor before you power on the Network
Station.
Network Station Directory Problem
324
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
File not found
When the Network Station reads files, it sends information to the
message area of the console. This information includes the path
of the file being read. This is useful to figure out why the
Network Station is not finding its files.
The Network Station uses a local-remote file table to search for
files. The Network Station looks for the file in the local area first,
and then uses the table to map to the network directory. In the
console message area, sometimes the path is the local path
and sometimes it is the remote path.
The local path is the path in the local directory structure on the
Network Station. The remote path is the path exported by the
server to the Network Station.
For example, on an AS/400 server, /netstation/prodbase/ is a
local Network Station client path. The corresponding remote
server directory is /QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation. Sometimes
the console message log records /netstation/prodbase/ and
sometimes it shows /QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation when
searching for a file.
Out of Memory Problems
’Out of Memory’ message
appears
When applications load in Network Station memory, they use a
block of available free memory large enough to start the
application. After an application closes, its memory frees up, but
this freed block may not be large enough for an additional
application.
When you calculate memory requirements, you may find that
you have enough memory to run a number of applications, but
there may not be a large enough block of unallocated memory
to start an additional application. Power off and power on your
Network Station to clear all random access memory (RAM).
Start your applications in order of largest to smallest memory
requirement.
If this process does not work, you may need to upgrade your
Network Station RAM to run all of your applications.
PANIC Appears on Your Network Station
P A N I C appears on your
Network Station and you are
given a > cursor
The Network Station operating system stopped unexpectedly.
See “PANIC Mode at an IBM Network Station” on page 326 for
more information about recovering from a PANIC situation.
or
Screen turns reverse video
(mostly black) and you are
given a > cursor
Resource File Does Not Exist Error
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
325
Table 68. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error messages Resource file
does not exist and Unable to
open resource appear in the
console log, but your Network
Station network operates
normally.
The Network Station Manager licensed program source code
operates on multiple operating system platforms. Due to this
complexity, the licensed program will occasionally make multiple
searches throughout your network to find Network Station
hardware and Network Station servers.
The Network Station Manager licensed program does this to
identify which type of server operating system you are using.
Some of the searches succeed because they are designed for
your operating system. Searches for other operating systems do
not succeed.
Every time the Network Station Manager licensed program
unsuccessfully searches for a different operating system, it
records a Resource file does not exist and Unable to open
resource console log error message.
Screen Flashes
Screen flashing or crackling
sound
Screen flashes, along with some crackling sounds, can occur
when you are logging out of the Network Station. The flashing
does not harm hardware or applications.
PANIC Mode at an IBM Network Station
When the Network Station operating system stops unexpectedly, a PANIC error
condition occurs. The PANIC situation sends you out of the normal graphical user
interface to the boot monitor command prompt.
To recover from a PANIC, simply power off your Network Station and power it back on.
Occasionally, a PANIC error situation persists. If this occurs, contact IBM support for
help in determining the cause of the recurring PANIC error condition.
Error Codes
This table lists error codes that are found while powering on your system.
Table 69. Network Station Error Codes
326
Message Number Message Description
Status and or Recovery
NS0070
Boot Monitor Resolution
Shows the boot monitor screen
resolution. Go to the IBM Network
Station Setup Utility to change
resolution settings.
NS0080
Server Resolution
Shows the server screen resolutions.
Go to the IBM Network Station Setup
Utility to change resolution settings.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 69. Network Station Error Codes (continued)
NS0090
Press a key to continue
Note: Message is displayed with
yellow text.
Look for other Network Station
messages on the screen to assist in
problem determination. Record the
message number and refer to this
table. Press a key to go to the IBM
Network Station Setup Utility and
take appropriate action to correct the
problem.
NS0091
No input device detected. Startup will If no keyboard or mouse is detected,
continue in 1 minute.
the startup process will continue in
one minute. If the message is
Note: Message is displayed with
displayed when keyboard and mouse
yellow text.
are connected, you may need to
replace the Network Station.
NS0200
NVRAM checksum error
Bad NVRAM settings. Use the NV
utility Boot Monitor command prompt
to return to the default settings.
To reach the Boot Monitor command
prompt (>), press the Escape key
after the Network Station displays the
NS0500 Search for Host System
message during the startup
sequence.
Then, press (Left)Alt - (Left)Ctrl (Left)Shift - F1 from the IBM Network
Station Setup Utility.
Type NV and press Enter. Then, in
the order that they are listed, use NV
command functions: L, S, Y (yes),
and then Q.
Type RS and press enter to reboot
the system.
NS0240
Keyboard status timeout
Keyboard error. Ensure that your
keyboard cable connections are tight.
NS0250
Keyboard BAT failure
Keyboard error. Ensure that your
keyboard cable connection is tight.
NS0260
Keyboard initialization timeout
Keyboard error. Ensure that your
keyboard cable connection is tight.
NS0270
Mouse status timeout
Mouse error. Ensure that your mouse
cable connection is tight.
NS0280
Resolution is not supported on this
hardware
Choose a different monitor resolution.
NS0500
Search for Host System...
NS0503
Host IP addresses are all 0.0.0.0
Invalid IP address of 0.0.0.0 is
configured. Correct the IP address
and retry.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
327
Table 69. Network Station Error Codes (continued)
NS0505
Host not responding to ICMP Echo
Server not found. Check the server
IP address settings. Correct if
necessary and retry.
NS0570
Connection cancelled by user
User pressed the Esc key to cancel
the kernel download. Press Enter to
reboot.
NS0580
File cyclic redundancy check (CRC)
data error
A damaged kernel file was
downloaded.
NS0590
Check network connection
Your token-ring or Ethernet cable is
not connected, not functional, or not
active.
NS0610
Searching for Subnet Mask
n/a
NS0620
Invalid IP address 0.0.0.0
An invalid IP address of 0.0.0.0 is
configured. Correct the IP address
and retry.
NS0630
Boot Server IP address = 0.0.0.0
An invalid boot server IP address of
0.0.0.0 is configured. Correct the
boot server IP address and retry.
NS0660
Illegal Block Size
Server problem. The server is
responding with an illegal block size
less than 128 bytes or greater than
8192 bytes.
NS0670
Illegal Option
Server problem. The server is
returning an option that is not valid.
NS0700
Twinax timeout, unable to contact
host
To correct this problem try the
following items:
v Ensure the twinaxial cable
connection is good.
v Check the workstation controller.
v Run Wrap test. If test fails, replace
the Network Station.
NS0710
Twinax timeout, host connection lost
Try the following:
v Ensure that the twinaxial cable
connection is good.
v Check the workstation controller.
328
NS0711
Station address in use
Select a different address that is not
currently used by an active device on
that port.
NS0720
No twinaxial activity detected
Check to see if the cable is properly
connected to the Network Station and
the workstation controller.
NS0850
Twinaxial hardware failed
Replace the Network Station.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
PC Server Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to a PC Server that runs the Windows NT operating
system.
Table 70. PC Server Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
Boot Problems
Extremely slow client boot
times
If you use graphics-intensive Open GL three dimensional screen
savers, you may experience extremely slow boot times.
Select a different screen saver for your PC Server or disable the
screen saver.
Unable to log in as
administrator while roaming
from an AS/400 server to a PC
Server
If you are roaming from an AS/400 server to an PC Server, the
PC Server only accepts 10 character administrator userids. An
AS/400 server userid can be 12 characters. You need to select
an AS/400 server userid of 10 characters or less.
DHCP Problems
DHCP changes do not seem to You need to stop DHCP services and restart DHCP services for
take effect
the changes to take effect.
DHCP Configuration Utility
Error message: Multiple
instances of the Configuration
Utility cannot be run while
running the DHCP
Configuration Utility
If the DHCP Configuration Utility ends abnormally, it may leave
some registry entries, which prevent you from starting the utility
again.
From a command line, type tcpcfg -f. This command clears the
unwanted registry and allows you to start the configuration tool.
Installation Problems
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
329
Table 70. PC Server Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Generic error message: An
unrecoverable error occurred
during setup.
Several error conditions can occur during installation of the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program. They are:
Cannot find location of eNod install
You can install the licensed program using the NSM C.
(This may require you to reinstall your operating system.)
Required PTF not installed on NTAP
This PTF fixes a registry compatibility problem with the
Wedge install. See the readme.txt file for further
information.
After you have applied the PTF, try the installation again.
Not enough space on your Install disk
You need at least 800 MB of free space on your hard drive
to install the Network Station Manager licensed program on
a Windows NT Server 4.0 server. You need 1000 MB of
free space on your hard drive to install the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program on a Windows NT
Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition server.
The install drive is not formatted for NTFS
You must select an install drive that is formatted for NTFS.
You may start setup again and choose another NTFS
formatted drive. You may also convert your drive to the
NTFS file system.
During a Migration Update, Unable to rename NSMAdmin
and NSMUser groups
Delete the groups NSMAdminTemp and NSMUserTemp.
Then recreate all users to the NSMAdmin and NSMUser
groups.
330
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 70. PC Server Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error message: An error
occurred while configuring
eNetwork On-Demand Server.
The install program could not configure the eNetwork
On-Demand (eNOD) server. Perform the following steps and
configure eNOD manually.
You may also configure eNOD to run on a stand-alone DHCP
server without installing the Network Station Manager licensed
program code.
If you need to manually install eNOD services, perform the
following steps:
1. Insert your IBM Network Station Manager licensed program
CD for PC Server into your CD-ROM drive.
2. Select the Start button.
3. Select Run.
4. Enter the following information in the data entry box where X
is your CD-ROM drive letter.
5. X:\ntnsm\en\products\enod\tcpip\setup.exe
6. Select Ok.
7. Follow the steps in the Installation wizard.
Error Message: An error
occurred while installing the
NC Navigator (North
American).
This error only pertains to the North American version of the
Network Station Manager licensed program.
The installation program could not install the NC Navigator. You
need to manually install NC Navigator from a North American
Network Station Manager licensed program CD.
Refer to “Installing the 128–Bit NC Navigator Browser” on
page 55 and install the NC Navigator program.
Error message: An error
occured while trying to create
the user directory for the IBM
Network Station Manager.
The installation program did not create some or all of the
following directories:
v \..\nstation\userbase
v \..\nstation\userbase\groups
v \..\nstation\userbase\sysdef
v \..\nstation\userbase\home
v \..\nstation\userbase\users
v \..\nstation\AppBase
The installation program did not create some or all of the
following base permissions:
v \nstation = NSMAdmin, Administrators, SYSTEM = Full
Control, NSMUser = Change
v \nstation\userbase\home = NSMAdmin, Administrators,
SYSTEM = Full Control, NSMUser = Change
v \nstation\userbase\users = NSMAdmin, Administrators,
SYSTEM = Full Control, NSMUser = Change
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
331
Table 70. PC Server Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error message: IBM Network
Ensure that your network cable is plugged in and ensure that
Station Manager could not
your Network Adapter is operating properly.
install the IBM Network Station
If you configure the wrong drivers for your Network Adapter card
Manager Login Services.
or if your Network Adapter is not working properly before you
install IBM Network Station Manager, the installation fails.
Error message: This machine
does not have Windows NT
Server 4.0 or Windows NT
Server 4.0, Terminal Server
Edition installed.
You must run Windows NT Server 4.0 or Windows NT Server
4.0, Terminal Server Edition to operate the Network Station
Manager licensed program.
Install one of these operating systems and try the setup again.
Error message: This program
The Network Station Manager licensed program installation
requires a monitor with VGA or requires screen resolution of 640 x 480 or greater.
better resolution.
Reset your screen resolution to a minimum 640 x 480 resolution
by performing the following steps:
1. Select the Start button.
2. Select Settings.
3. Select Control Panel.
4. Double click on Display in the control panel dialog box.
5. Select the Settings tab.
6. On Desktop Area slider bar, left click and hold the left button
down.
7. Drag the slider bar to the right until the screen resolution is
greater than 640 x 480.
8. Select Ok.
After you make these changes, try your setup again.
Error message: Unable to
create one of the IBM Network
Station Manager user groups.
The installation program could not create one or more IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program user groups. You
will need to create these user groups manually.
See, “Managing Users and Groups for IBM Network Station
Users” on page 74 for instructions on how to create the following
groups:
v Local groups
v Network Station Manager Administrator
v Network Station Manager User
Error message: Unable to
install the NDIS Intermediate
Driver 3.0.
332
The install shield setup could not properly install the NDIS
Intermediate Driver 3.0. You need to manually install this driver
to complete your Network Station Manager licensed program
installation. See, “Resolving Installation Problems” on page 45
for instructions.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 70. PC Server Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error message: Unable to load
InServe.dll for installation and
configuration of the Network
Station Manager.
Your installation requires the InServe.dll that could not be loaded
into memory. Reboot your PC Server and try to run the
installation again.
Error message: Unable to
obtain the Domain Controller
name.
The install shield could not find the Domain controller for your
Windows NT server name.
Ensure that your Windows NT server Domain name is correct.
Try the setup again.
Internet Explorer Problem
Microsoft Internet Explorer
windows are displayed behind
the main window
If you request help or a list of users and terminals in the IBM
Network Station Manager program, a popup window opens that
contains the requested information. Internet Explorer may open
the popup window behind the larger main window from which
you made the request. To find the popup, you may need to
move or minimize the larger window.
Network Interface Card Problem
Incompatible network interface
card drivers
If you install an older network interface card (NIC) and NIC
driver in your PC Server, you may experience problems.
Generally, the IBM Intermediate Support Driver works best with
NIC drivers that use NDIS 3.0 or later. If you experience
problems after you load the IBM Intermediate Support Driver, try
to find a miniport NIC driver for your PC Server NIC. Install this
new driver before you try to isolate other networking problems.
The following drivers have known problems:
v Replace the NIC driver AMDPCN.SYS with PCNTN4M.SYS
from AMD on an IBM PC 325. Download Disk 2 for the
updated driver from the AMD web site at the following URL:
http://www.amd.com/
v Driver IBMENIIN.SYS will not work properly when controlling
the Ethernet/A adapter for MCA. There is currently no
updated driver.
Windows NT Associated Processor Problems
A generic error message
appears when you try to run
the IBM Network Station
Manager on a Windows NT
Associated Processor installed
in an AS/400 server
Your Windows NT Associated Processor creates a virtual
token-ring network with the AS/400 server. At the time of this
writing, the IBM DHCP driver does not work with this virtual
network in your AS/400 server.
Contact IBM service to request a PTF to correct this IBM DHCP
problem.
You may also try using Microsoft DHCP to correct this problem.
Uninstall IBM DHCP and install Microsoft DHCP.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
333
OS/400 Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to an AS/400 server that runs the IBM Operating
System/400 (OS/400) operating system.
Table 71. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
IBM Network Station Manager Program
IBM Network Station Manager
program will not start
This could be because the Retain Server Security Data
QRETSVRSEC) system value was not set to 1.
To verify, from any AS/400 system command line, type:
DSPSYSVAL QRETSVRSEC. The value will be displayed. If the value
is not 1, you can change it using the following command from
any AS/400 command line: CHGSYSVAL SYSVAL(QRETSVRSEC)
VALUE('1').
User Defaults browse button
does not work
To activate the browse button do the following:
1. Enter WRKLIB QYTC
2. In front of the QYTC library, enter option 12 to work with
objects
3. Locate the QYTCMCLS object.
4. Enter option 2.
5. Press F6 to add new users.
6. Add a line where user=QTMHHTP1 and object authority=*USE.
IBM Setup Assistant Problems
Task 5000 of the IBM Setup
Assistant does not complete
successfully
In task 5000, if you selected to end TCP/IP, it is possible that all
of the server jobs might not have ended before task 5000 starts
TCP/IP. If this is the case, you will receive the message that
task 5000 did not complete successfully.
You can select task 5000 again, choose not to end TCP/IP, and
press Enter to start the required servers. At this time all of the
server jobs should have had time to end so that the start is
successful.
Login Problems
334
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 71. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Communication error in a
Network Station dialog box and
Network Station users cannot
log in
This error message indicates a variety of communication errors.
If you receive this message, check the console. If you see Error
17, typically this indicates that your authentication server login
daemon is down. Follow the corrective action below:
or
Determine if the Network Station login daemon on your AS/400
authentication server is running by one of the following two
methods:
Catch-all for comm error in a
Network Station dialog box and v From the AS/400 console, type NETSTAT *CNN.
Network Station users cannot
v Look for an active local port 256.
log in
If local port 256 is active, the Network Station login daemon is
running.
OR
v For V3R7 to V4R2, type the command CALL QYTCUSVR
('STRTCPSVR ') on the console.
v For V4R3 or higher, use Operations Navigator to STRTCPSVR.
Login is successful but no
Restart the QServer subsystem on the AS/400 server. Enter the
applications appear on the task QPWFSERVSD command.
bar
System hangs at NS0500
Search for Host System
message
For twinaxial Network Stations, vary on the device or the
workstation controller.
’Unable to connect to Login
Server, See System
Administrator’ message
appears at login.
There may be a problem with your network. The authentication
server may be down or there is something wrong with the
authentication server. You may need to restart the authentication
server on your AS/400. Verify IP addresses and names in the
authentication server.
Migration Problems
Unable to determine list of files The list of files in the ’directory name’ directory could not be
for migration
determined. If this directory contains any files, the files have not
been migrated as required by the current version of the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program. They may be
unusable by the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program.
Correct the error and run the migration again by issuing the
command CALL PGM(QYTCMIMP).
Unable to migrate file
The file ’old file name’ could not be migrated to the file ’new file
name’. This migration is required by the current version of the
IBM Network Station Manager licensed program. These files
may not be usable by the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program. The problem occurred either accessing the
file ’old file name’ or creating or updating the file ’new file name’.
Correct the error and run the migration program again by issuing
the command CALL PGM(QYTC/QYTCMIMP).
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
335
Table 71. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Unable to retrieve list of users
The list of users with IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program files could not be retrieved. The user level files have
not been migrated and are not compatible with the current
version of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program.
Correct the error and run the migration program again by issuing
the command CALL PGM(QYTC/QYTCMIMP).
Unable to delete file
The file ’file name’ could not be deleted. This file has been
successfully migrated or is no longer needed by the current
version of the IBM Network Station Manager. The failure of the
deletion will have no effect on the operation of the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program.
Correct the error and delete the file using the Remove Link
(DEL) command.
Migration problem did not
complete successfully
The program to migrate the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program files as required by the current version of the
IBM Network Station Manager licensed program did not
complete successfully. One or more files may not be usable by
the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program.
Correct the error and run the migration program again by issuing
the command CALL PGM(QYTC/QYTCMIMP).
Error occurred while
determining the national
language ID and locale
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program was
determining the correct national language ID and locale when
the error occurred. The feature code was ’feature code’. This
was caused by a software problem.
Use the Work with Problems WRKPRB) command to collect the
appropriate information and contact IBM Support to report this
error. This message and any previous messages have been
written to the job log of ’job number’.
Unable to determine the
national language version of
the system
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program was in the
process of determining the national language version of the
system when the error occurred. The national language version
is determined by using the QLANGID system value. The IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program uses the system
national language version to establish the language used on the
Network Station before a user logs in.
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program has
defaulted to United States English as the language of the
Network Stations.
If you wish to reset this value, see “Selecting the Startup
Language” on page 304.
No Login Window
336
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 71. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
No Login window on monitor - The most likely cause is an incorrect entry for this Network
User Services window appears Station in the BOOTP table.
instead
Another possible cause is that the default configuration file on
the server has been corrupted or deleted. The default
configuration file, standard.nsm, is located in the /configs
subdirectory of the directory indicated in the hd tag of the
BOOTP table entry. You may need to reinstall the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program.
OS/400 Console Error and Log Messages
While configuring and running IBM Network Station Manager licensed program on your server,
several messages are sent to the console and to the log. These messages record several server
events such as invalid passwords, Portable Operating System Interface for Computer
Environments (POSIX) messages, and startup information.
The error messages below help you resolve common IBM Network Station Manager errors.
NSM9505, NSM9507,
NSM9508, NSM9509,
NSM9510, and NSM9511 File
transfer and network errors
This series of errors indicates network transmission problems.
Try some or all of the following to diagnose and correct these
errors:
v Ensure cable connections are tight.
v Vary on all networking bridges, routers, gateways, switches,
workstation controllers, and other hardware.
v Ensure that Ethernet and token-ring lines are configured and
operating properly.
v Ensure that frame sizes are correct on all networking bridges,
routers, gateways, switches, workstation controllers and other
hardware.
NSM9530 Exiting abnormally,
error code: xx
Refer to the error code ’xx’ in your error message and take
appropriate corrective action.
v Error 3: Malloc failed. You may need to free up some server
memory.
v Error 5: Listen failed on socket. Check the preceding error
message to correct the problem.
v Error 6: Accept failed. Check the preceding error message to
correct the problem.
v Error 7: Server data error. The server could not read your
configuration file. Verify the accuracy of the configuration file
and retry.
You may need to restart the network authentication server to
correct the errors listed above.
NSM9537 Memory allocation
failed
There is not enough free memory on your server for the
Network Station Manager licensed program to operate.
Check your storage pool allocations and allocate more memory
for your server storage pool.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
337
Table 71. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
NSM9549 Error retrieving
server data
The server needs a working Network Station configuration file.
The configuration file is either corrupt, the configuration file is
unusable, or the configuration file is not found.
Verify that all configuration files are not corrupt.
Verify accuracy of configuration file information and configuration
file syntax.
Look in the displayed path to figure out where the configuration
file should be.
Printer Problems
Printer not available to other
applications
The AS/400 system locks the printer if someone started a printer
writer to that printer. To release the printer and make it available,
run the End Printer Writer (ENDPRTWTR) command for that printer
on the AS/400 system.
Program Temporary Fix (PTF) Problems
PTFs not working
If the PTFs being installed are for the IBM Network Station
Manager for AS/400 product, you may have to restart the IBM
Network Station Manager system unit. This causes a new
software download to the system unit. The new downloaded
software contains the program fixes for the Network Station.
Problem communicating using Host names
Some Network Stations unable
to communicate with some
Hosts using the Host names
table
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program checks the
authority level of the person making the Host Table updates. You
need to make sure the person who adds names to the Host
Table has all object authority (*ALLOBJ) . If you have authorities
less than *ALLOBJ you can update the Host table but the
changes are not passed to the Network Station.
Network Station does not boot
If you are using BOOTP with twinaxial Network Stations, the
twinaxial Network Station defines itself in the BOOTP table. If
the twinaxial Network Station does not boot, you need to apply
PTF SF47202.
No twinaxial activity detected
Ensure that the cable is plugged into the Network Station and
the twinaxial workstation controller.
Twinaxial Problems
338
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 71. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Twinaxial timeout
Ensure that the twinaxial cable is plugged into the Network
Station and the twinaxial workstation controller. Replace the
cable if necessary.
or
Unable to connect to host
Ensure that the workstation controller is powered on and the
workstation controller is varied on.
If you suspect bad Network Station hardware, run the Wrap test
to determine if your Network Station hardware is bad.
To run the Wrap test, do the following:
v Restart the Network Station.
v At the NS0500 Search for Host System message, press the
escape key.
v Press (left)Alt - (left)Ctrl - (left)Shift - F1.
v Enter EX.
v Enter 1.
v Enter 5.
v Press the Enter key to test one iteration or type E to loop until
error.
If the message returned during the Wrap test says ’the wrap test
was not successful’, contact your local IBM your Network
Station.
Station address in use
Change the twinaxial address to one not assigned to an active
device on that port.
To change the twinaxial address from the individual Network
Station do the following:
v Restart your Network Station.
v At the NS0500 Search for Host System message, press the
escape key.
v Press F8.
v Enter an address value between 0 and 6.
v Press the Enter key.
v Restart the Enter key to restart your logic unit.
AIX Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to an RS/6000 server that runs the AIX operating
system.
Table 72. AIX Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
BOOTP in Debug Mode
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
339
Table 72. AIX Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Logging errors in debug mode
to diagnose BOOTP problems
If you start BOOTP from inetd, you will log the BOOTP startup
events for your server and Network Station. This information is
useful to debug BOOTP problems.
Start debug mode by performing the following steps:
1. Enter vi /etc/inetd.conf
2. Place a # character in column one in front of bootps.
3. Save the changed file.
4. Enter refresh -s inetd
5. Enter ps -ef | grep bootp
6. Find the PID, and use kill <pid_no>
7. Start bootpd in debug mode by entering bootpd -d -d -d -d
-s /etc/bootptab
Power on the Network Station and look for errors on the
RS/6000 screen where you started bootpd in debug mode from.
After you finish debugging, turn off the bootpd program by
entering pressing Ctrl - C. Remove the # character in front of
bootpd in the /etc/inetd.conf file. Enter refresh -s inetd to
refresh.
Fonts Missing
Missing fonts
The fonts.dir file on your server font directories may not
accurately reflect the correct number of fonts.
To solve this problem perform the following tasks:
1. On the font server, change to the main font directory by
typing cd /usr/netstation/pcf
2. Change into the 100dpi subdirectory by typing cd 100dpi
3. Look at the size of the fonts.dir file by typing ls -l fonts.dir
4. Run the mkfontdir command by typing mkfontdir
5. Look at the size of the new fonts directory by typing ls -l
fonts.dir
6. Change to the /misc subdirectory by typing cd ../misc
7. Run the mkfontdir command by typing mkfontdir
8. Power down the Network Station
9. Power on the Network Station
Keyboard Mapping problem in XDM
340
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 72. AIX Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Keyboard map does not work
under XDM
XDM assumes that the Network Station is a local graphics
terminal because it is not an xstation. The keyboard is
remapped for a graphic terminal.
Set the XSTATION environment variable to the display name by
adding the following lines in the /usr/lib/X11/xdm/Xsession file
before any executable code:
if [ -z ″$EXT_NCD_SETUP″ ]
Then enter this string:
export XSTATION=′echo $DISPLAY | cut -f1 - d\;′
fi
Note: You need to use accent grave marks (′) in the export
command above. The commands above check to see if your
device is a Network Station and then the XSTATION variable
displays the Network Station name.
Power down your Network Station and power on your Network
Station for the changes to take effect.
Network Traffic
Network traffic when CDE
dtterm is in focus
When a CDE tterm session is in focus, you will see network
traffic. This is due to the default tterm cursor that blinks in your
CDE tterm window. Each time it blinks, it sends a request to the
RS/6000.
You may change to aixterm as your standard window or change
the default tterm cursor to reduce this network traffic by
performing the following steps:
1. Select Options from the dtterm menu bar.
2. Select Global.
3. In the Global window change the blinking cursor selection
box to Disabled.
Note: You may also wish to change the cursor blink rate
from this window.
No DNS Entry
No DNS Entry for server error
message appears
Add the following line at the bottom of the /etc/httpd.conf file to
solve this problem:
HostName host.full.domain.path
No Login Window
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
341
Table 72. AIX Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
No Login window on monitor - The most likely cause is an incorrect entry for this Network
User Services window appears Station in the BOOTP table. Verify that you entered a forward
instead
slash ’/’ at the end of your boot directory entry.
A corrupt default configuration file also may cause this problem.
The default configuration file, standard.nsm, is located in the
/configs subdirectory of the directory indicated in the hd tag of
the BOOTP table entry. You may need to reinstall the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program.
NVRAM Setting Reverts to Network setting
NVRAM setting only works for
initial boot and NVRAM setting
reverts to Network setting
When you set an individual Network Station to boot via NVRAM,
the settings may only take effect for the first time you power on
your Network Station. You need to modify required.nsm to
repeatedly boot from NVRAM.
Change the ip-use-address-discovery variable in your
required.nsm file to one of the following values:
v true for network setting
v false for NVRAM setting
Change the value to true to boot via the Network setting and
change the value to false to boot via NVRAM.
PANIC situation in AIX
PANIC caused by missing
$HOME environment variable
If you are using IBM Network Station Browser code and your
Network Station PANICs, you may not have the $HOME
environment variable set on the Network Station. This variable
should be set automatically when you run the
/usr/netstation/bin/Xstartup.ibm8361 script through CDE.
Verify the environment variable by performing the following
steps:
v Press the Pause key to start the Console Monitor
v Select Setup
v Select User Setup
v Select Environment Variables
v Verify your $HOME environment variable
If the $HOME environment variable is not set, run the
Xstartup.ibm8361 script again.
Printing Problems
342
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 72. AIX Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Stairstep, misaligned printouts
In the UNIX operating system, the lines in files end in line feeds
without carriage returns. Some print queues add a carriage
return to the end of each line feed. This is what causes the
misaligned, stairstep printing.
Format your print file locally and print remotely.
OR
Prepend a command to the print file to add the carriage returns
if your printer requires them. For a PCL printer this command is
ESC&k2G. Create the ESC character in vi by pressing Ctrl - V
and then the ESC key.
Program Manager Problems
Error message 403 error,
access denied by rule appears
Verify all of your permissions.
Verify the accuracy of your name servers.
Verify the spelling of the URL for the
http://../NetworkStation/Admin
Resizing the Netscape window
when using AIX causes loss of
data input on IBM Network
Station Manager program
panels
Do not resize the window after you have entered data. Resizing
the window resets the values.
Unable to find messages
Ensure that your locale values such as LANG, NLSPATH and so
on are set correctly for the Network Station Manager licensed
program and the HTTPD server.
Syslogd to Resolve AIX Network Station Manager Problems
Use syslogd to record system
events when debugging
problems
Use the syslogd command to collect information on problem
situations including booting, ftp, nfs, and so forth.
Add the following line to the /etc/syslog.conf file:
*.debug /usr/spool/mqueue/syslog.out
This line collects system events and it records them in the file
syslog.out. Read the syslog.out file messages to diagnose
problems.
OS/390 Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to the OS/390 operating system.
Table 73. OS/390 Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
Browser problems
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
343
Table 73. OS/390 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
The IBM Network Station
Browser will not start
You may have deleted the IBM Network Station Manager for the
OS/390 licensed program and then reinstalled it.
In deleting the licensed program, some of the files that support
the IBM Network Station Browser were also deleted.
Reinstall the IBM Network Station Browser licensed program.
Browser hangs or presents the The following are potential causes:
message ″Document contains v Domino Go Webserver directive is not mapped to the proper
no data″.
executable.
v Executable does not exist.
v Executable is not readable by the Domino Go Webserver.
v Browser is not Java-script enabled.
v Browser is not frames-capable.
v Executable does not have the″sticky-bit″ on.
For OpenEdition, executables which are to be executed from
a partitioned data set must have the ″sticky-bit″ turned on.
All the executables in /usr/lpp/nstation/nsm/cgi-bin/* for the
Network Station Manager program must have this bit turned
on. The contents of this file contains text similar to the
following:This file is not executable. MVS loads the
actual program from the partitioned data set because
the stick bit is on.
v The library containing the actual Network Station Manager
program executables is not in the link list.
v C++ DLL not in Link or LPA List
For systems that do not have the C++ Program Product
installed, the C++ DLL Library is required for the Network
Station Manager program to execute.
Correct the problem and retry the application.
Error Message: EZZ7354
(User:) Error during
authentication for user.
Basic Authentication is not being performed by the Domino Go
Webserver. IBM Network Station Manager program requires that
Basic Authentication be performed before allowing any IBM
Network Station Manager program functions to be performed.
This error is caused by the Domino Go Webserver returning a
null user ID and is usually caused by errors in the Domino Go
Webserver configuration file (httpd.conf).
344
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 73. OS/390 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error Message: Retrieval failed This response is the result of two configuration errors.
for the message PSA_4_NSM_ v Basic Authentication is not being performed by the Domino
AUTHENTICATION_
Go Webserver. IBM Network Station Manager requires that
ERROR_MSG {1,5} (User:)
Basic Authentication be performed before allowing any IBM
Error during authentication for
Network Station Manager functions to be performed. There
user.
are probably errors in the Domino Go Webserver
configuration files.
v IBM Network Station Manager program could not access its
catalog to properly display a message for the authentication
failure.
An internal representation of the message identifier is
displayed beginning with PSA_. Sufficient information should
be provided to enable the user to identify the error being
reported.
Verify that the IBM Network Station message catalog resides
in a library specified by the NLSPATH variable of the ICS
server and validate user preferences (read/write) that can be
accessed by all (read only) for this file.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks listed in the frame on the left,
select the NSM Error Messages task at the bottom.
This task enables the Administrator to key in a
message number and obtain a message description.
__ 2. Key in a valid IBM Network Station Manager message
number, such as 7350, and select the Submit key.
If you receive a response similar to the following, the
Network Station Manager program was able to access
the message catalog: EZZ7350 (User: <User_name>)
Unable to access HTML file <File_Name>
If you receive a response similar to following, this
indicates that the IBM Network Station Manager
program could not access the message
catalog:Retrieval failed for the message
PSA_0_NSM_NO_TEMPLATE_MSG:{1,1} ...
Verify that the message catalog has been placed in a
directory which is accessible by the ICS server and
contained in the NLSPATH variable and validate user
preferences (read/write) that can be accessed by all
(read only) for this file. See step10.c on page 194
information on setting the NLSPATH variable.
Network Station Manager Problems
IBM Network Station Manager
program will not start
Check to see if the ICS server is running and configured
properly.
Syslog to Resolve OS/390 Problems
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
345
Table 73. OS/390 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Problems occurred and
debugging information is
needed.
Use the export command to set the environment variable
SYSLOG to YES. This provides you with extended debugging
information to help you diagnose the problem. To stop producing
extended debugging information, set the environment variable
SYSLOG to NO.
VM/ESA Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to the VM/ESA operating system.
Table 74. VM/ESA Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
No Login Window
No Login window on monitor - The most likely cause is an incorrect entry for this Network
User Services window appears Station in the BOOTP table.
instead
Another possible cause is that the default configuration file on
the server has been corrupted or deleted. The default
configuration file, standard.nsm, is located in the /configs
subdirectory of the directory indicated in the hd tag of the
BOOTP table entry. A reinstallation of the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program may be required.
Network Station Manager Debug Tool
Any problem that occurs in the
Network Station Manager.
346
After a problem occurs, specify a user ID on the DEBUG
statement (DEBUG: userid) in the NSM SETUP file. Then, rerun
the problem. Debug files will be sent to the user ID specified on
the DEBUG statement. The debug files contain information that
will help you solve the problem that occurred. See the Program
Directory for Network Station Manager Release 3 for VM/ESA
for information about the NSM SETUP file.
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Appendix B. Twinaxial Network Stations
Planning for Your Twinaxial TCP/IP Network. . . . .
Simple Twinaxial Subnet . . . . . . . . . .
Isolated Twinaxial Subnet with an Unassociated LAN.
Twinaxial Subnet Associated with a LAN . . . . .
Subnetting for Your Twinaxial Network. . . . . . .
Configuring Twinaxial Network Stations Checklist . . .
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347
347
348
349
350
353
Planning for Your Twinaxial TCP/IP Network
On an AS/400 server, you can set up your network environment so that some or all of
the Network Stations use twinaxial connectivities. A special type of TCP/IP runs over
the twinaxial network. You can create a relationship between the workstation controller
and the TCP/IP interface. A TCP/IP interface identifies your workstation controller to
your AS/400 server and Network Stations. Each TCP/IP interface must have a unique
IP address. As a result, the server assigns IP addresses to your twinaxial Network
Stations.
The Network Stations attached to the workstation controller act as if they were a
TCP/IP subnet. Therefore, the subnet represented by the TCP/IP interface has a
network address and a subnet mask. The twinaxial subnet can also use a Domain
Name Server (DNS), just like any other subnet.
The twinaxial interface acts just like any other local area network (LAN) interface. It can
interact with the other LAN cards on your server in much the same way as a router’s
multiple interfaces work together. The interface can pass packets from your twinaxial
Network Stations to a LAN card on the same server. The LAN card can forward the
packets to a router and out to the Internet, just like “Twinaxial Subnet Associated with a
LAN” on page 349.
Simple Twinaxial Subnet
Figure 108 on page 348 shows an example of an isolated twinaxial Network Station
subnet. The AS/400 server does not connect to a LAN.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
347
Figure 108. Simple Twinaxial Network Station Subnet
Since this example has no LAN and the IP addresses are never externalized, you can
assign any IP addresses to the twinaxial Network Stations. You should use private IP
addresses (10.x.x.x), so that if you add a LAN interface later, your IP addresses will not
conflict with other IP addressed devices.
With this ″closed″ environment, your Network Stations can only communicate with the
AS/400 server and any other devices that are connected to workstation controllers. For
example, you can use the 5250 emulation to communicate with the server. You can also
use the NC Navigator to browse the Web server on the AS/400 system.
Isolated Twinaxial Subnet with an Unassociated LAN
Refer to Figure 109 on page 349 for an example of an environment in which the
Network Stations are still isolated, but the AS/400 server has a LAN attached network.
The Network Stations can still communicate with the server and devices on other
workstation controllers ,but they cannot communicate beyond the AS/400 server.
348
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Figure 109. Isolated Twinaxial Network Station Subnet with an Unassociated LAN
In this example, the network 192.168.1.0 connects the AS/400 system to the Internet
through a router. The address of the Ethernet card is 192.168.1.1. The network 10.1.1.0
connects the AS/400 system to the Network Stations. You can assign any IP addresses
that you like on this network, because the addresses are not externalized beyond the
AS/400 server. The address of the twinaxial interface is 10.1.1.1. The addresses of the
Network Stations are 10.1.1.2 and 10.1.1.3. The subnet mask for both networks is
255.255.255.0.
The network 192.168.1.0 has no association with the internal network 10.1.1.0. The
10.1.1.0 network has no gateway or router, so it cannot communicate with devices
beyond those that are attached to the workstation controller.
The Network Stations in this example can perform the same tasks that are illustrated in
Figure 108 on page 348. However, these Network Stations can use NC Navigator to
send and receive Internet e-mail if the AS/400 server is the mail server. Since the
AS/400 server can act as a mail server, it would use the Ethernet card to distribute the
e-mail to the Internet. The Network Stations would have to communicate only with the
AS/400 server to obtain e-mail.
Twinaxial Subnet Associated with a LAN
Figure 110 on page 350 shows an environment in which the Network Stations can
communicate beyond the workstation controller (such as the Internet).
Appendix B. Twinaxial
349
Figure 110. Network Stations associated with a LAN
In this example, the Network Stations connect to the Internet, so they have real,
external IP addresses. The LAN network has an association with the twinaxial network.
In order to do that, you must split the network 192.168.1.0 into two subnets by applying
a subnet mask of 255.255.255.192.
The first subnet is 192.168.1.0. The address of the Ethernet card is 192.168.1.1. This
subnet could contain devices with addresses ranging from 192.168.1.1 through
192.168.1.63.
The second subnet is 192.168.1.64 and attaches twinaxial Network Stations. This
subnet contains devices with addresses ranging from 192.168.1.65 through
192.168.1.128. In fact, the twinaxial Network Stations treat the IP address of their
interface as their gateway IP address to the AS/400 server. The AS/400 server
automatically passes the IP address of the twinaxial interface as a gateway to the
twinaxial Network Stations.
You must then associate the twinaxial interface with the Ethernet interface. Both the
Ethernet and twinaxial subnets must be in the same subnet to work correctly. The
AS/400 system can then act as a router, passing information packets from the twinaxial
interface to the Ethernet card and out to the Internet.
Subnetting for Your Twinaxial Network
To create a twinaxial subnet like “Twinaxial Subnet Associated with a LAN” on
page 349, you must create subnets. This section describes how to subnet your network
so you can create a twinaxial subnet with an associated LAN. These twinaxial Network
Stations have the opportunity to take advantage of the Internet.
350
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
The following tables show the relationship between the number of Network Stations that
a subnet and its subnet mask can support. After you determine how many Network
Stations you will add to your Network, use the corresponding table to determine the
range of IP addresses that you need.
For example, if you wanted to support 25 twinaxial Network Stations, you would use
Table 77 on page 353. The subnet mask of your subnet is 255.255.255.224. You could
then use the IP address range of A.B.C.32 through A.B.C.63 and assign A.B.C.33 to the
TCP/IP interface. If you use these values, your twinaxial Network Stations can receive
IP addresses of A.B.C.34 through A.B.C.62.
Table 75 shows the address ranges for a subnet that can support up to 5 Network
Stations. These subnets use the subnet mask address of 255.255.255.248. Each range
is a block of 8 IP addresses, where the first address of the range is the subnet address.
You should use the second address to define the TCP/IP interface.
Table 75. Subnets Supporting Up to 5 Network Stations. The numbers in this table are
the fourth segment of an IP address. Each of these subnets uses a subnet mask
address of 255.255.255.248.
Range
Subnet Address
Interface
Address
Available IP
Addresses
Broadcast
Address
0-7
0
1
2-6
7
8-15
8
9
10-14
15
16-23
16
17
18-22
23
24-31
24
25
26-30
31
32-39
32
33
34-38
39
40-47
40
41
42-46
47
48-55
48
49
50-54
55
56-63
56
57
58-62
63
64-71
64
65
66-70
71
72-79
72
73
74-78
79
80-87
80
81
82-86
87
88-95
88
89
90-94
95
96-103
96
97
98-102
103
104-111
104
105
106-110
111
112-119
112
113
114-118
119
120-127
120
121
122-126
127
128-135
128
129
130-134
135
136-143
136
137
138-142
143
144-151
144
145
146-150
151
152-159
152
153
154-158
159
160-167
160
161
162-166
167
168-175
168
169
170-174
175
Appendix B. Twinaxial
351
Table 75. Subnets Supporting Up to 5 Network Stations (continued). The numbers in
this table are the fourth segment of an IP address. Each of these subnets uses a
subnet mask address of 255.255.255.248.
Range
Subnet Address
Interface
Address
Available IP
Addresses
Broadcast
Address
176-183
176
177
178-182
183
184-191
184
185
186-190
191
192-199
192
193
194-198
199
200-207
200
201
202-206
207
208-215
208
209
210-214
215
216-223
216
217
218-222
223
224-231
224
225
226-230
231
232-239
232
233
234-238
239
240-247
240
241
242-246
247
248-255
248
249
250-254
255
To create subnets that support up to 13 Network Stations, use Table 76. The subnets
use a subnet mask of 255.255.255.240. The address ranges are in blocks of 16. The
format is similar to Table 75 on page 351.
Table 76. Subnets Supporting Up to 13 Network Stations. The numbers in this table
are the fourth segment of an IP address. Each of these subnets uses a subnet mask
address of 255.255.255.240.
352
Range
Subnet Address
Interface
Address
Available IP
Addresses
Broadcast
Address
0-15
0
1
2-14
15
16-31
16
17
18-30
31
32-47
32
33
34-46
47
48-63
48
49
50-62
63
64-79
64
65
66-78
79
80-95
80
81
82-94
95
96-111
96
97
98-110
111
112-127
112
113
114-126
127
128-143
128
129
130-142
143
144-159
144
145
146-158
159
160-175
160
161
162-174
175
176-191
176
177
178-190
191
192-207
192
193
194-206
207
208-223
208
209
210-222
223
224-239
224
225
226-238
239
240-255
240
241
242-254
255
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 77 shows the address ranges for a subnet that can support up to 5 Network
Stations. Each subnet uses a subnet mask address of 255.255.255.224. Each subnet is
a block of 32 IP addresses. The format is similar to Table 76 on page 352.
Table 77. Subnets Supporting Up to 29 Network Stations. The numbers in this table
are the fourth segment of an IP address. Each of these subnets uses a subnet mask
address of 255.255.255.224.
Range
Subnet Address
Interface
Address
Available IP
Addresses
Broadcast
Address
0-31
0
1
2-30
31
32-63
32
33
34-62
63
64-95
64
65
66-94
95
96-127
96
97
98-126
127
128-159
128
129
130-158
159
160-191
160
161
162-190
191
192-223
192
193
194-222
223
224-255
224
225
226-254
255
In Table 78, each subnet contains 61 available IP addresses. The subnets use a subnet
mask address of 255.255.255.192. The address ranges are in blocks of 64. However,
this twinaxial subnet is different from the previous subnets. Even though this subnet can
support 61 IP addresses, you can connect a maximum of 56 Network Stations to the
workstation controller. Furthermore, this subnet can support only 40 concurrently active
Network Stations. Just like the other tables, the subnet address is the first IP address in
the range. You should define the interface with the second address of the range. The
broadcast address is the last address in the range.
Table 78. Subnets Supporting Up to 61 Available IP Addresses. The numbers in this
table are the fourth segment of an IP address. Each of these subnets uses a subnet
mask address of 255.255.255.192.
Range
Subnet Address
Interface
Address
Available IP
Addresses
Broadcast
Address
0-63
0
1
2-62
63
64-127
64
65
66-126
127
128-191
128
129
130-190
191
192-255
192
193
194-254
255
Configuring Twinaxial Network Stations Checklist
Use this checklist to determine how to set up your twinaxial Network Stations.
__ 1. Read “Planning for Your Twinaxial TCP/IP Network” on page 347.
__ 2. Verify prerequisites.
a. OS/400 V4R2 or later
Appendix B. Twinaxial
353
b. PTF SF47202—A fix that allows the BOOTP server to serve twinaxial
Network Stations
__ 3. Choose which scenario matches your needs.
a. If you want a scenario like “Simple Twinaxial Subnet” on page 347, in which
the twinaxial Network Stations are isolated on an Intranet, you need to create
and identify the line description for the workstation controller. Complete
Table 79. You should use the BOOTP protocol to serve your Network
Stations in this environment. In the Setup Assistant, choose *BOOTP for a boot
protocol. Unlike configuring for non-twinaxial Network Stations, you do not
need to make BOOTP entries in the BOOTP table. When the twinaxial
Network Station first communicates with the host system, the AS/400 server
automatically creates BOOTP entries. Return to step 2 on page 98 and write
BOOTP in Table 25 on page 98.
Table 79. Twinaxial TCP/IP Information. Use this table for “Simple Twinaxial Subnet” on page 347 and
“Isolated Twinaxial Subnet with an Unassociated LAN” on page 348 only.
Field
Description
„1… Line Description
Name
The first twinaxial Network Station to use a workstation
controller automatically creates a line description on your
AS/400 server. To create and identify the line description,
use the following procedure:
__ 1) Connect a twinaxial Network Station to its
workstation controller.
Note: Make sure the workstation controller is active.
__ 2) Power the Network Station on.
Note: If this is the first time you have powered on
the Network Station, it will request a twinaxial port
address.
__ 3) Allow the Network Station to complete its POST test
and begin searching for a host server (NS0500).
The AS/400 server automatically creates a line
description and device description for the twinaxial
Network Stations. Continue with the procedure to
identify the name of the line description.
__ 4) After the Network Station has begun looking for a
host server, type DSPMSG MSGQ(*SYSOPR) at an AS/400
command prompt.
__ 5) In the message log, look for the message ″DSPxx
cannot connect. TCP/IP interface not added for
line QTDLxxxxxx,″ where QTDLxxxxxxx is the name
of the line description for the twinaxial Network
Stations.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Write Value Here
Table 79. Twinaxial TCP/IP Information (continued). Use this table for “Simple Twinaxial Subnet” on
page 347 and “Isolated Twinaxial Subnet with an Unassociated LAN” on page 348 only.
Field
Description
„2… Interface IP
Address
The IP address of your interface is the address that
identifies your workstation controller to your AS/400 server
and Network Stations. Each interface should have a unique
IP address. The interface’s IP address determines the IP
addresses of your Network Stations. You should use the
second available address in your subnet as the interface IP
address. For example, in a subnet of 10.1.1.0, you should
define the interface address as 10.1.1.1. Your twinaxial
Network Stations will then have IP addresses of 10.1.1.x. If
your needs match “Simple Twinaxial Subnet” on page 347 or
“Isolated Twinaxial Subnet with an Unassociated LAN” on
page 348, then you should use a private (10.x.x.x) IP
address to identify your interface.
„3… Subnet Mask
A value that enables network devices to direct packets of
information accurately in a subnetted environment. This
subnet value is delivered to the Network Stations. If your
needs match “Simple Twinaxial Subnet” on page 347 or
“Isolated Twinaxial Subnet with an Unassociated LAN” on
page 348, then you should use a subnet mask value of
255.255.255.192. For more information about subnet masks,
refer to “Subnets and Subnet Masks” on page 9.
Write Value Here
b. If you want a scenario like “Isolated Twinaxial Subnet with an Unassociated
LAN” on page 348, complete Table 79 on page 354. In this scenario, the
twinaxial Network Stations are isolated on a subnet,but the AS/400 server
has a LAN connection. You should use the BOOTP protocol to serve your
Network Stations in this environment. In the Setup Assistant, choose *BOOTP
for a boot protocol. Unlike non-twinaxial Network Stations, you do not need to
make BOOTP entries in the BOOTP table. The twinaxial Network Station will
automatically create BOOTP entries. Return to step 2 on page 98 and write
BOOTP in Table 25 on page 98.
c. If you have a scenario like “Twinaxial Subnet Associated with a LAN” on
page 349, where the twinaxial Network Stations have real IP addresses, you
will use the DHCP boot protocol.
Table 80. DHCP Twinaxial Information
Field
Description
„1… Subnet Address
The IP address associated with a particular subnet. Use
Table 75 on page 351, Table 76 on page 352, Table 77 on
page 353, or Table 78 on page 353 to determine the range
of IP addresses that you will need to obtain. The first IP
address of the range is the subnet address.
Write Value Here
Appendix B. Twinaxial
355
Table 80. DHCP Twinaxial Information (continued)
Field
Description
„2… Interface IP
Address
The IP address of your interface is the address that
identifies your workstation controller to your AS/400 server
and Network Stations. Each interface should have a unique
IP address. The interface’s IP address determines the IP
addresses of your Network Stations. The interface is the
second IP address of the range.
„3… Subnet Mask
Address
A value that enables network devices to direct packets of
information accurately in a subnetted environment.
Write Value Here
v If you used Table 75 on page 351 to determine your
address range, then your subnet mask address is
255.255.255.248.
v If you used Table 76 on page 352 to determine your
address range, then your subnet mask address is
255.255.255.240.
v If you used Table 77 on page 353 to determine your
address range, then your subnet mask address is
255.255.255.224.
v If you used Table 78 on page 353 to determine your
address range, then your subnet mask address is
255.255.255.192.
„4… Associated Local
Interface
Since you want your twinaxial IBM Network Stations to
connect to a LAN, you must associate your twinaxial
interface with the LAN interface. In Figure 110 on page 350,
the associated local interface address for the twinaxial
interface is 192.168.1.1.
For each subnet that you want to define, complete a copy of Table 80 on
page 355. Return to step 2 on page 98 and write DHCP in Table 25 on
page 98.
356
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Appendix C. National Language Support
Locale Information . .
DBCS Unique Support .
Input Methods . .
Printers . . . . .
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357
358
358
359
Locale Information
Table 81 lists all of the possible locales that are supported by the IBM Network Station
Manager.
Table 81. Locale Information
Locale ID
Language / Locale
AR_AA
Arabic / Arabic Speaking
BE_BY
Byelorussia / Belarus
BG_BG
Bulgarian / Bulgaria
CA_ES
Catalan / Spain
CS_CZ
Czech / Czech Republic
DA_DK
Danish / Denmark
DE_CH
German / Switzerland
DE_DE
German / Germany
EL_GR
Greek / Greece
EN_GB
English / UK
EN_US
English / US
ES_ES
Spanish / Spain
ES_LA
Spanish / Latin America
ET_EE
Estonian / Estonia
FI_FI
Finnish / Finland
FR_BE
French / Belgium
FR_CA
French / Canada
FR_CH
French / Switzerland
FR_FR
French / France
IW_IL
Hebrew / Israel
HR_HR
Croatian / Croatia
HU_HU
Hungarian / Hungary
IS_IS
Icelandic / Iceland
IT_CH
Italian / Switzerland
IT_IT
Italian / Italy
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
357
Table 81. Locale Information (continued)
Locale ID
Language / Locale
JA_JP
Japanese / Japan
KO_KR
Korean / Korea
LT_LT
Lithuanian / Lithuania
LV_LV
Latvian / Latvia
MK_MK
Macedonian / Macedonia
NL_BE
Dutch / Belgium
NL_NL
Dutch / Netherlands
NO_NO
Norwegian / Norway
PL_PL
Polish / Poland
PT_BR
Portuguese / Brazil
PT_PT
Portuguese / Portugal
RO_RO
Romanian / Romania
RU_RU
Russian / Russia
SQ_AL
Albanian / Albania
SR_SP
Serbian Cyrillic / Serbia
SV_SE
Swedish / Sweden
TH_TH
Thai / Thailand
TR_TR
Turkish / Turkey
UK_UA
Ukranian / Ukraine
VI_VN
Vietnamese / Vietnam
ZH_CN
Chinese / PRC (Simplified)
ZH_TW
Chinese / ROC (Traditional)
DBCS Unique Support
Input Methods
The IBM Network Station supports the following double-byte input methods:
v Chinese (Simplified)
– PinYin
– English to Chinese
– Intelligent ABC
v Chinese (Traditional)
– Tsang-Jye
– Phonetic Symbols
v Japanese
– Kana to Kanji Conversion
358
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
– Romanji to Kana Conversion
v Korean
– ASCII
– Hangul
– Hanja
Printers
The following printer data streams can be printed to an IBM Network Station locally
attached printer:
Printer Data Stream
Chinese
(Simplified)
Chinese
(Traditional)
Adobe PostScript (PS) Level
2
Japanese
Korean
x
Epson ESC/P
x
x
x
x
IBM Pages
x
x
x
x
IBM PS55 (5575/5577)
x
x
x
x
HP PCL
x
x
x
x
Canon LIPS
x
NEC PC-PR 201
x
Appendix C. National Language Support
359
360
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Appendix D. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings
The following tables contain all of the IBM Network Station Manager default settings.
The settings are in the same order as found in the Setup Tasks frame of the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
Table 82. IBM Network Station Workstation Default Settings
Workstation Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Mouse settings:
v Mouse button configuration
v Right-handed
v Mouse pointer speed
v Medium
Keyboard settings:
v Keyboard Repeat rate
v Medium
v Keyboard Repeat delay
v Medium delay
v Keyboard mapping language
v Default from terminal
Monitor settings:
v Minutes before screen saver turns on
v 10
v Screen saver
v IBM bitmap
v Minutes before monitor standby
v 20
v Minutes before monitor suspend
v 40
v Minutes before monitor power down
v 60
v Desktop background
v IBM bitmap
Local Services settings:
v Allow remote X clients
v No
Boot Parameters settings:
v Language to be used during boot sequence
v English
v Number of times to try reloading operating system
v 0
v Update to boot monitor installed on the boot server
v No update except on Windows NT
server
Miscellaneous settings:
v Allocate memory to speed window refresh
v No
Table 83. IBM Network Station Printer Default Settings
Printer Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Print Client settings:
v Maximum LPR buffer size
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
v 10%
361
Table 83. IBM Network Station Printer Default Settings (continued)
Printer Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Print Server settings:
v Maximum LPD buffer size
v 10%
v Stream jobs if buffer overflows
v Yes
v Remote systems allowed to print on this IBM Network
Station
v All systems
Table 84. IBM Network Station Startup Menu Contents Default Settings
Startup Menu Contents Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Desktop and Menu Bar option settings:
v Desktop style
v Standard desktop with menu bar
Buttons to appear on standard desktop when menu bar
is enabled:
v Log out
v Yes
v Hide
v Yes
v Top/Bottom
v Yes
v Lock
v Yes
Table 85. IBM Network Station Standard Desktop Setting Default Values
Standard Desktop Setting Default Values
Item:
Default Value:
Screen colors:
v Background color for window frame in focus
v Mint green
v Background color for window frame not in focus
v Gray
v Foreground color for all window frames
v Black
Icon preferences:
v Icons placed
v On desktop
v Icon location
v Bottom left
Fonts:
v Font size for icons and menus
v 12
Window focus
Windows become active by clicking
on the window
Table 86. 5250 Default Settings
5250 Default Settings
362
Item:
Default Value:
Key remapping capability
Disabled
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 86. 5250 Default Settings (continued)
5250 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Default keyboard file for:
v PC Keyboard (101 keys)
v None
v PC Keyboard (102 keys)
v None
v 5250 Keyboard (122 keys)
v None
Color Settings:
v Color customization capability
v Basic
v Default color scheme
v None
v Additional color schemes to make available
v None
Record/Playback Settings:
v Record/Playback capability
v Enabled
v Playback sequences to make available
v None
Allow Use of Settings:
v Command menu
v Yes
v Option menu
v Yes
v Print menu
v Yes
v Miscellaneous preferences
v Yes
v New Session window
v Yes
v Edit menu
v Yes
v Control menu
v Yes
v Help menu
v Yes
v Font menu list
v Yes
v Pop-up keypad
v Yes
Screen settings:
v Screen size
v 27 rows, 132 columns
v Column separators
v Disabled
v Image/Fax Display
v Disabled
Table 87. 3270 Default Settings
3270 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Key remapping capability
Disabled
Default keyboard file for:
v PC Keyboard (101 keys)
v None
v PC Keyboard (102 keys)
v None
Color Settings:
v Color customization capability
v Basic
v Default color scheme
v None
v Additional color schemes to make available
v None
Appendix D. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings
363
Table 87. 3270 Default Settings (continued)
3270 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Record/Playback Settings:
v Record/Playback capability
v Enabled
v Playback sequences to make available
v None
Allow Use of:
v Command menu
v Yes
v Option menu
v Yes
v Help menu
v Yes
v Miscellaneous preferences
v Yes
v New Session window
v Yes
v Edit menu
v Yes
v Print menu
v Yes
v Graphics
v No
v Font Menu list
v Yes
v Pop-up keypad
v Yes
Miscellaneous settings:
v Screen size
v 32 X 80
v Key for Enter function
v Control key
v Telnet 3270 port to connect to
v 23
Table 88. Internet Network Default Settings
Internet Network Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Web server port on the boot host
80
Applet launcher port
5555
Table 89. NC Navigator Browser Defaults
NC Navigator Browser Defaults
Item:
Default Value:
Proxy configuration
Manual proxies obtained from Internet
Network panel
Security Settings:
v Enable JavaScript
v Yes
v Enable Java Applets
v No
v Enable SSL 2
v Yes
v Enable SSL 3
v Yes
Network Settings:
364
v Maximum memory cache
v 1024 KB
v Maximum TCP/IP connections
v 4
v Network buffer size
v 32 KB
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Table 90. Java Applet Viewer Settings
Java Applet Viewer Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Verbose mode
Off
Verify classes
Remote only
Maximum heap size
3 MB
JAVA stack size
256 KB
Native code stack size
32 KB
Garbage collection:
v Verbose
v Off
v Only when needed
v Off (garbage collection runs as an
asynchronous thread in parallel
with other threads)
NOTE: The Java Applet Viewer setting defaults are also the defaults for the Java Applications
found on the Startup Programs and Menus screens.
Table 91. Language Default Settings
Language Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Format to use for dates, currency, numbers, and
messages
Default from server
Appendix D. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings
365
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Appendix E. Configuring ICA Virtual Printing for Network Stations
Note: The ICA virtual Print support is only available for AS/400 and Windows NT 4.0.
For Windows NT 4.0 you must have IBM Network Station for Windows NT 3.0
and Service Update 3.
For AS/400 you must have certain PTFs installed. Access INFO APAR II11118 to
obtain the program temporary fix (PTF) numbers for your operating system level.
Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) is software that provides connections to
servers that in turn allow access to Windows-based applications. ICA support is
available with Windows NT 3.51 and for Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server Edition
(TSE).
Understanding Software Combinations
Citrix is a company that supplies software products. The products are bundled with NT
3.51 and NT 4.0, and allow you to load an NT desktop session from the server onto
your IBM Network Station. With the NT session you can access your Windows-based
applications as if you were on your server. The Citrix software products are:
v Citrix WinFrame
Citrix WinFrame is a bundled combination of WinFrame and ICA used with Windows
NT 3.51 as a Windows application server. WinFrame is orderable from Citrix. When
you order WinFrame 1.7, you receive Windows NT 3.51 with WinFrame built on to it.
v Citrix MetaFrame
MetaFrame is a bundled combination of MetaFrame and ICA. MetaFrame is
separately orderable software that is installed on Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server
Edition (TSE) .
Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session for Your Network Station
You have to configure an ICA session in the IBM Network Station Manager program
regardless of your print environment. Complete the following steps to configure the ICA
client:
__ 1. Open the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 2. Click Startup.
__ 3. Click Menus.
__ 4. Scroll to Local Program Menu Items.
__ 5. Type the following values in the Local Program Menu Items fields:
Menu item label field
The name you want to appear on the Menu bar button for this ICA client
session.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
367
Program to run field
Type ICACLNT.
Parameters field
Type -H <IP address of PC Server or PC Server host name>. For
example: -H 10.1.2.245
__ 6. Click Finish.
__ 7. Close the IBM Network Station Manager program.
You have now created a Menu bar button that will appear on your Network
Station the next time you log on to it.
Clicking this Menu bar button will launch an ICA client session on your Network
Station.
Continue with these configuration steps before you start work on your Network
Station.
__ 8. Select one of the printer configuration scenarios and complete the configurations
steps on the NT server.
ICA Virtual Print Configuration Scenarios for NT 4.0
The following list describes the NT 4.0 printer configuration scenarios:
v NT 4.0 printer configuration for Network Station users printing to a PC server (NT)
attached printer
See “NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a PC Server-Attached Printer”.
v NT 4.0 printer configuration for a locally (Network Station) attached printer
See “NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network Station) Attached Printer” on
page 369.
The IBM Network Station Manager program also offers administrators and users the
ability to configure locally attached (to a Network Station) serial or parallel printers.
See “Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users” on page 270
for more information.
v NT 4.0 printer configuration for a printer attached to another PC Server (Remote
Printing)
See “NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to another PC Server
(Remote Printing)” on page 370.
NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a PC Server-Attached Printer
You must have MetaFrame installed on NT 4.0. From your NT desktop complete the
following configuration steps:
__ 1. Double-click My Computer from your NT desktop.
__ 2. Double-click Printers from the My Computer folder.
__ 3. Double-click Add Printer from the Printers folder.
The Add Printer Wizard appears.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 4. Select, from the Add Printer Wizard, My Computer and click Next.
__ 5. Click the box before either the LPT1 or COM1 port you want to use for this
printer configuration and click Next.
__ 6. Select the printer manufacturer and printer you are configuring. Click Next.
__ 7. Type, in the Printer name field, a name that you want to use to identify this
printer and then click Next.
__ 8. Select Not Shared and click Next.
__ 9. Select Yes to print a test page or select No if you do not want to print a test
page.
__ 10. Click Finish.
Your Printer is now configured and ready for use.
NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network Station) Attached Printer
Note: You have to have Microsoft TCP/IP print services installed. You need the
″Microsoft NT 4.0″ CD to install TSE TCP/IP print services. To add the TSE
TCP/IP print services:
__ 1. Insert the NT TSE 4.0 compact disk.
__ 2. Right mouse click on Network Neighborhood.
__ 3. Click Properties.
__ 4. Click the Services tab.
__ 5. Select Microsoft TCP/IP Printing.
__ 6. Click Add.
__ 7. Click Microsoft TCP/IP Printing.
__ 8. Click OK.
The Windows NT Setup panel appears. Follow the instructions and click
Continue.
__ 9. Follow the instructions until the install is complete.
From your NT desktop complete the following configuration steps:
__ 1. Double-click My Computer from your NT desktop.
__ 2. Double-click Printers from the My Computer folder.
__ 3. Double-click Add Printer from the Printers folder.
The Add Printer Wizard appears.
__ 4. Select, from the Add Printer Wizard, My Computer and click Next.
__ 5. Click Add Port.
__ 6. Select Client Printer Port and click New Port.
__ 7. Type the Port Name and click OK.
For a parallel-attached printer type in client\LPT1:
For a serial-attached printer type in client\COM1:
__ 8. On the Port Name panel Click OK and you are returned to the Add Printer
Wizard panel.
Appendix E. Configuring ICA Virtual Printing for Network Stations
369
__ 9. Click Next.
__ 10. Select a port by clicking the box next to the port you want to work with and
click Next.
__ 11. Select the printer manufacturer from the left column and printer from the right
column. Click Next.
__ 12. Type, in the Printer name field, the NT Client name assigned to your Network
Station followed by ″#LPT1:″ (do not use the quote marks (″).
To obtain the NT client name complete the following steps:
__ a. Click the Start button on your Desktop.
__ b. Click Programs.
__ c. Click MetaFrame Tools (Common).
__ d. Click MetaFrame Administration. The MetaFrame Administration panel
appears.
__ e. In the left frame, click your NT user ID.
__ f. Click the Information tab.
__ g. Locate the Client name field.
The Client Name field will be the IP address of the Network Station.
__ 13. In the Printer name field copy or type the Client name exactly as it appeared in
the MetaFrame Administration tool followed by #LPT1:. For example:
10.1.2.33#LPT1:
__ 14.
Select Not Shared and click Next.
__ 15. Select Yes to print a test page or select No if you do not want to print a test
page.
__ 16. Click Finish.
Your Printer is now configured and ready to use.
NT 4.0 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to another PC Server
(Remote Printing)
The following configuration steps must be performed on the PC server to which you are
not physically connected but has the printer you want to print to attached to it.
__ 1. Double-click My Computer from your NT desktop.
__ 2. Double-click Printers from the My Computer folder.
__ 3. Double-click Add Printer from the Printers folder.
The Add Printer Wizard appears.
__ 4. Select, from the Add Printer Wizard, My Computer and click Next.
__ 5. Click the box before either the LPT1 or COM1 port you want to use for this
printer configuration and click Next.
__ 6. Select the printer manufacturer and printer you are configuring. Click Next.
__ 7. Type, in the Printer name field, a name that you want to use to identify this
printer and then click Next.
Remember the share name you choose. You need the share name when you
configure a printer session on a different server.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
__ 8. Select Shared and select the computer operating systems that will be
printing to this printer.
__ 9. Click Next.
__ 10. Select Yes to print a test page or select No if you do not want to print a test
page.
__ 11. Click Finish.
Your Printer is now configured and ready to use.
The following configuration steps must be performed on the PC server to which you are
attached. These configuration steps will add the printer attached to a different server as
a shared network printer.
__ 1. Double-click My Computer from your NT desktop.
__ 2. Double-click Printers from the My Computer folder.
__ 3. Double-click Add Printer from the Printers folder.
The Add Printer Wizard appears.
__ 4. Select, from the Add Printer Wizard, Network printer server and click Next.
The Connect to Printer panel appears.
__ 5. Under Shared Printer, find your network you belong to and double click it.
__ 6. Double click the group on the server the sharing printer belongs to.
__ 7. Click the PC server name to which the shared printer belongs.
__ 8. Select that shared printer from the list and click OK.
__ 9. Click Finish.
The shared printer from the other PC server is now available to you when you
make print requests from your applications.
ICA Virtual Print Configuration Scenarios for NT 3.51
Following are three ICA virtual print configuration scenarios. The scenarios are:
v NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Your Server
See “NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Your Server” on
page 372.
v NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network Station)-Attached Printer
See “NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network Station)-Attached Printer”
on page 372.
The IBM Network Station Manager program also offers administrators and users the
ability to configure locally attached (to a Network Station) serial or parallel printers.
See “Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users” on page 270
for more information.
v NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Another PC Server (Remote
Printing)
See “NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Another PC Server
(Remote Printing)” on page 373.
Appendix E. Configuring ICA Virtual Printing for Network Stations
371
NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Your Server
You must have WinCenter installed on NT 3.51. The CD you will need is ″Microsoft NT
3.5.1″. From your NT desktop complete the following configuration steps:
__ 1. From the Main program group double click Control Panel.
__ 2. From the Control Panel double click Printers.
__ 3. From the Main Menu Bar click Printer and then click Create Printer.
The Create Printer panel appears. From the Create Printer panel complete the
following steps:
__ a. Type in the Printer Name field the name you want to give this PC
server-attached printer.
You might consider using the name of the printer as identification. For
example: IBM ExecJet. Using this type of name makes it easy to identify
the printer to which you want your jobs sent.
__ b. In the Driver field select the correct printer driver for the printer attached
to the boot server.
__ c. In the Print to field use one of the following values:
v For a parallel printer type LPT1:
v For a serial printer type COM1:
__ d. Click OK.
The Printer Setup panel appears.
__ e. Choose your printer setup options you want to use. Click OK.
Your printer is now configured.
NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network Station)-Attached Printer
From your NT desktop complete the following configuration steps:
__ 1. From the Main program group double click Control Panel.
__ 2. From the Control Panel double click Printers.
__ 3. From the Main Menu Bar click Printer and then click Create Printer.
The Create Printer panel appears. From the Create Printer panel complete the
following steps:
__ a. Leave the Printer Name field blank. This field is complet when the Print to
field receives a value.
__ b. In the Driver field select the correct printer driver for the printer attached
to the Network Station.
__ c. In the Print to field use one of the following values:
v For a parallel printer type CLIENT\LPT1:
v For a serial printer type CLIENT\COM1:
__ d. Click OK.
The name of the printer will be a composite of the Network Station’s IP
address and the parallel or serial type you selected in 3.c. For example:
10.1.2.33#LPT1.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Your printer is now configured and ready to use.
NT 3.51 Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Another PC Server
(Remote Printing)
The following configuration steps must be performed on the PC server to which you are
not physically connected but has the printer you want to print to attached to it. From
that PC server’s desktop complete the following configuration steps:
__ 1. From the Main program group double click Control Panel.
__ 2. From the Control Panel double click Printers.
__ 3. From the Main Menu Bar click Printer and then click Create Printer.
The Create Printer panel appears. From the Create Printer panel complete the
following steps:
__ a. Type in the Printer Name field the name you want to give this PC
server-attached printer.
You might consider using the name of the printer as identification. For
example: IBM ExecJet. Using this type of name makes it easy to identify
the printer to which your jobs are sent.
__ b. In the Driver field select the correct printer driver for the printer attached
to the server.
Remember the driver name you use for this configuration. You will use the
same driver name when you configure this printer on another server in
your network.
__ c. In the Print to field use one of the following values:
v For a parallel printer type LPT1:
v For a serial printer type COM1:
__ d. Click the Share this printer on the network field.
The Share Name field and the Location field are now active.
The Share Name field assumes the name you typed in the Printer Name
field. You can change the Share name to be anything you like.
The name in the Share Name field is important. It is the name you must
use when you configure this printer on another server in your network.
It is recommended that you use the Location field to show where the
printer is physically located. For example, LASER PRINTER - BLDG1.
__ e. Click OK.
The Printer Setup panel appears.
__ f. Choose your printer setup options you want to use. Click OK.
Your printer is now configured.
Next, the following configuration steps must be performed on the PC server to which
you are attached. These configuration steps add the printer attached to a different
server as a shared network printer.
__ 1. From the Main program group double click Control Panel.
__ 2. From the Control Panel double click Printers.
Appendix E. Configuring ICA Virtual Printing for Network Stations
373
__ 3. From the Main Menu Bar click Printer and then click Create Printer.
The Create Printer panel appears. From the Create Printer panel complete the
following steps:
__ a. Type in the Printer Name field the Share Name you assigned during the
configuration of the shared printer on the other server.
__ b. In the Driver field select the same driver you choose during the
configuration of the shared printer on the other server.
__ c. In the Description field it is recommended to put the printer’s shared name
and the physical location.
__ d. In the Print to field use one of the following values:
v For a parallel printer type select an LPT: value.
v For a serial printer type select an COM: value.
__ e. Click OK.
The Printer Setup panel appears.
__ f. Choose your printer setup options you want to use and click OK.
Your printer is now configured.
Note: Depending on the applications you use, you may need to change the
printer on the other server to be your default printer. To change your
default printer:
a. Double click Print Manager from the Main panel.
b. Click the down arrow in the Default field.
c. Select the printer you want to be your default printer.
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Appendix F. Using TN3270E Display Support and Printer Support
TN3270E support provides:
v Persistent 3270 logical unit (LU) session names
v General printer support (that is not connected to specific application programs)
v Application-dependent printer support (When an application runs, print requests from
that application are routed to a specific printer.)
Configuring Persistent 3270 LU Session Names
You can specify the virtual LU display name for 3270 sessions by using the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
The -DISPLAY_NAME parameter options:
v Give a user access to the 3270 applications authorized for the user’s display LU
name.
v Limits application access to specifically named Network Stations.
v Provide enhanced 3270 application security.
v Control the number of 3270 sessions that can be started on the target System/390.
v Associate a 3270 application printer with a specific 3270 session.
Complete the following steps to configure persistent 3270 LU session names:
__ 1. Open the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 2. From Setup Tasks, click Startup.
__ 3. Click Programs or Menus.
The Programs function of Startup automatically starts a 3270 session or sessions
after login. The Menus function of Startup controls the Menu bar buttons; one or
more menu bar buttons can start 3270 sessions.
__ 4. Scroll to 3270 Sessions to AutoStart if using Programs or scroll to 3270 Menu
Items if using Menus.
This example uses the Menus function.
__ 5. Type, in the Menu item label field, a name you want to appear on the button.
__ 6. Type in the System/390 field, the name or IP address of the host.
__ 7. Type in the Other parameters field, the following parameters and values:
-DISPLAY_NAME
See “Valid Types of -DISPLAY_NAME Parameters” on page 376 to view
possible values you can use with the -DISPLAY_NAME parameter.
-DISPLAY_NAME and the parameter value are case sensitive and must
be typed in upper-case.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
375
Valid Types of -DISPLAY_NAME Parameters
Following are valid types of -DISPLAY_NAME parameters:
Note: The first five -DISPLAY_NAME parameter types associate the user with the IBM
Network Station being used.
The last two -DISPLAY_NAME parameter types depend on the IBM Network
Station hardware.
″XXXXXX″
Where XXXXXX is a 2 through 8 upper-case character name of the 3270
session. You must use quotes with the parameter. The user only has a single
session.
″XXXXXXX+n″
″XXXXXXX+n″ allows the user to start n 3270 sessions, where n is a number
from 1 through 9. The LU session name is the 2 through 7 character name
XXXXXXX followed by a number.
For example:
-DISPLAY_NAME "DCLNEA+5"
″DCLNEA+5″ allows the user to have up to five 3270 sessions with session
names of DCLNEA1, DCLNEA2, DCLNEA3, DCLNEA4, and DCLNEA5.
″XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZ ″
″XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZ ″ allows an attempt to launch one of multiple
3270 sessions (three for this example) with the specified names. The quotes
must be used, and a single space separates names. The maximum number of
names is limited by the size of the Other parameters field (256 characters).
TN3270E support attempts to provide a 3270 session that is based on the first
parameter value (XXXXXX in this example). If that 3270 session is not
available, the next parameter value is tried (YYYYYY in this example). Only
one 3270 session defined as a -DISPLAY_NAME parameter value is started.
USE_USER_ID
USE_USER_ID allows the user to start a single 3270 session where the LU
session name is the same as the user’s User ID (2 through 8 characters).
USE_USER_ID+n
USE_USER_ID+n allows the user to start n 3270 sessions. N is a number
from 1 through 9. The LU session name is the same as the user’s Network
Station User ID (7 characters maximum) with the number n appended to the
end. For example: USE_USER_ID+4 and a User ID of JUAN would have
session names of JUAN1, JUAN2, JUAN3, and JUAN4.
TN3270E support does not automatically start each session as represented by
the value assigned to n. You can click the 3270 Menu bar button on the
Network Station four times to start each of the four 3270 sessions.
USE_MAC_ADDRESS
USE_MAC_ADDRESS allows the user to start a single 3270 session where
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
the session name is created starting with an alpha character. The alpha
character indicates the type of communication card. The T represents token
ring, the X represents Twinax, and the E represents Ethernet and is followed
by the lower three bytes of the Media Access Control (MAC) address. The
MAC address is displayed on the IBM Network Station ″View Hardware
Configuration″ screen (boot monitor screen). For example:
USE_MAC_ADDRESS with a token ring Network Station and MAC address of
00.00.E5.68.D5.99 would result in a session name of T68D599.
USE_MAC_ADDRESS+n
USE_MAC_ADDRESS+n allows the user to start n 3270 sessions where the
session name is created as above but with n appended to the end. For
example: USE_MAC_ADDRESS+3 with a token ring Network Station and MAC
address of 00.00.E5.68.D5.99 would result in session names of T68D5991,
T68D5992, and T68D5993.
Configuring Printers Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
You must use the IBM Network Station Manager program to configure printers for use
with the TN3270E print support. For locally attached (to a Network Station) printers the
configuration is already done. Queues named PARALLEL1 and SERIAL1 already exist.
You can configure remotely attached printers by completing the following steps to
access the printer configuration support:
__ 1. Open the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 2. From Setup Tasks, click Hardware.
__ 3. Click Printers.
__ 4. Scroll to Remote printer.
__ 5. Type in the name or IP address of the remote printer server.
__ 6. Type in the queue name associated with the printer you want to use.
You will use the queue name when configuring printer support for TN3270E
support. You also need to remember which type case (upper-case or lower-case)
you used.
After you have completed the IBM Network Station Manager program printer
configuration, you can continue with:
v Configuring TN3270E General Printer Support
v Configuring TN3270E Application-Specific Printer Support
Configuring TN3270E General Printer Support
TN3270E general printer support allows you to configure an association of specific
printers with specific 3270 sessions. Complete the following steps:
__ 1. Open the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 2. From Setup Tasks, click Startup.
__ 3. Click Programs or Menus.
Appendix F. Using TN3270E Display Support and Printer Support
377
The Programs function of Startup automatically starts a 3270 session or sessions
after login. The Menus function of Startup controls the Menu bar buttons; one or
more menu bar buttons can start 3270 sessions.
__ 4. Scroll to 3270 Sessions to AutoStart if using Programs or scroll to 3270 Menu
Items if using Menus.
This example uses the Menus function.
__ 5. Type, in the Menu item label field, a name you want to appear on the button.
__ 6. Type in the System/390 field, the name or IP address of the host.
__ 7. Type in the Other parameters field, the following parameters and values:
-PRINTER_GENERAL XXXXXX
Where XXXXXX is the parameter value and is the queue name of the
printer as defined in the IBM Network Station Manager program. The
queue name must be typed in the same case (upper or lower) that you
used in the IBM Network Station Manager program
-PRINTER_GENERAL must be typed in upper-case. No quotation
marks are required because there is only one parameter value.
-PRINTER_NAME YYYYYY
Where YYYYY is the value for this parameter and is the name of one or
more printer LU names that you want to make available to this 3270
session.
-PRINTER_NAME and the parameter value are case sensitive and must
be typed in upper-case.
See “Valid Types of -DISPLAY_NAME Parameters” on page 376 for a
list of values used with the -PRINTER_NAME parameter.
Following is an example of the Other parameters field:
-PRINTER_GENERAL hpqueue -PRINTER_NAME POSTSCRIPT1
These values result in making available:
v The printer associated with hpqueue
v The printer named POSTSCRIPT1
v The 3270 display session
Configuring TN3270E Application-Specific Printer Support
TN3270E application-specific printer support allows you to configure an association of
specific applications, printers, and 3270 sessions. The applications themselves must
have programming support that is built in to point to specific printers and 3270
sessions. Complete the following steps:
__ 1. Open the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 2. From Setup Tasks, click Startup.
__ 3. Click Programs or Menus.
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The Programs function of Startup automatically starts a 3270 session or sessions
after login. The Menus function of Startup controls the Menu bar buttons; one or
more menu bar buttons can start 3270 sessions.
__ 4. Scroll to 3270 Sessions to AutoStart if using Programs or scroll to 3270 Menu
Items if using Menus.
In this example the Menus function is used.
__ 5. Type, in the Menu item label field, a name you want to appear on the button.
__ 6. Type in the System/390 field, the name or IP address of the host.
__ 7. Type in the Other parameters field, the following parameters and values:
-PRINTER_APP
-PRINTER_APP must be typed in upper-case.
The parameter value is the queue name of the printer as defined in the
IBM Network Station Manager program. The queue name must be
typed in the same case (upper or lower) that you used in the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
-DISPLAY_NAME
The value for this parameter is the name of one or more display LU
names on which you want to allow certain applications to run.
-DISPLAY_NAME and the parameter value are case sensitive and must
be typed in upper-case..
-DISPLAY_NAME is an optional parameter. However, you probably want
to use this parameter most of the time to identify the 3270 display to the
application program.
You can get the names of these displays from your System/390
administrator.
See “Valid Types of -DISPLAY_NAME Parameters” on page 376 for a
list of values that can be used with the -DISPLAY_NAME parameter.
Following is an example of how the Other parameters field could be typed:
-PRINTER_APP hpqueue -DISPLAY_NAME "D3270PJL D3270MAP"
The user gets either display D3270PJL or display D3270MAP.
If the display LU session D3270PJL is available when the command is run, the user
gets a display session to D3270PJL. The physical printer hpqueue is associated with
D3270PJL.
If D3270PJL is not available, display session D3270MAP is used and the physical
printer hpqueue is associated with D3270MAP.
Appendix F. Using TN3270E Display Support and Printer Support
379
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Appendix G. Serial Port Printer Connection
If you are connecting a serial port printer to a Network Station, you should use one of
the following:
v A 9 (female) to 25 (male) pin cable (Cable AR or equivalent) through a db25-db25
null modem interposer (Cable E or equivalent).
v A 9 (female) to 25 (male) pin null modem cable (electrically equivalent to the
description in Table 94 on page 382).
For additional information about cable characteristics, please see Adapters, Devices,
and Cable: Information for Micro Channel Bus Systems (SA23-2764).
Using a 9 to 25 pin cable through a db25-db25 null modem interposer
Cable AR (recommended)
This Serial Port cable (Async Cable EIA-232) is for systems that have a nine pin serial
port connector.
Table 92. Pin-out for Modem (Non-Interposer) Cable
Pin no. (9 Pin)
Female
Signal Name (9 Pin)
Pin No. (25 Pin)
Male
Signal Name (25 Pin)
1
Data Carrier Detect
8
Data Carrier Detect
2
Receive Data
3
Receive Data
3
Transmit Data
2
Transmit Data
4
Data Terminal Ready
20
Data Terminal Ready
5
Signal Ground
7
Signal Ground
6
Data Set Ready
6
Data Set Ready
7
Request to Send
4
Request to Send
8
Clear to Send
5
Clear to Send
9
Ring Indicator
22
Ring Indicator
Cable E Interposer (recommended)
Table 93. Pin-out for Cable E, Printer/Terminal Interposer-EIA-232
System End Connector
Socket (Female)
Signal
Device End Connector Pin
(Male)
1
Shield Ground
shell
2
TxD
3
3
RxD
2
4
RTS
5
5
CTS
4
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
381
Table 93. Pin-out for Cable E, Printer/Terminal Interposer-EIA-232 (continued)
System End Connector
Socket (Female)
Signal
Device End Connector Pin
(Male)
6,8
DSR, CD
20
7
Signal Ground
7
20
DTR
6,8
Using a 9 to 25 pin null modem cable
The hardware interface uses the 9 pin D-shell female connector and pin assignments
defined for RS-232-C. The voltage levels are EIA only. Current loop interface is not
supported. There are two identical connectors.
Table 94. Pin-out for Terminal (Interposer Cable)
382
Pin No. (9 Pin)
Female
Signal Name (9 Pin)
Pin No. (25 Pin)
Male
Signal Name (25 Pin)
1
Data Carrier Detect
20
Data Terminal Ready
2
Receive Data
2
Transmit Data
3
Transmit Data
3
Receive Data
4
Data Terminal Ready
6
Data Set Ready
5
Signal Ground
7
Signal Ground
6
Data Set Ready
20
Data Terminal Ready
7
Request to Send
5
Clear to Send
8
Clear to Send
4
Request to Send
9
Ring Indicator
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Appendix H. Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A. IBM
may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other
countries. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the products and
services currently available in your area. Any reference to an IBM product, program, or
service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM product, program, or service
may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not
infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the
user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product,
program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described
in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to
these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
500 Columbus Avenue
Thornwood, NY 10594
U.S.A.
For license inquiries regarding double-byte (DBCS) information, contact the IBM
Intellectual Property Department in your country or send inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM World Trade Asia Corporation
Licensing
2-31 Roppongi 3-chome, Minato-ku
Tokyo 106, Japan
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other
country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION “AS IS”
WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING,
BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do
not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore,
this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes
are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in
new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or changes in the
product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience
only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The
materials at those Web sites are not part of the materials for this IBM product and use
of those Web sites is at your own risk.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
383
Licensees of this program who wish to have information about it for the purpose of
enabling: (i) the exchange of information between independently created programs and
other programs (including this one) and (ii) the mutual use of the information which has
been exchanged, should contact:
IBM Corporation
Software Interoperability Coordinator
3605 Highway 52 N
Rochester, MN 55901-7829
U.S.A.
Such information may be available, subject to appropriate terms and conditions,
including in some cases, payment of a fee.
The licensed program described in this information and all licensed material available
for it are provided by IBM under terms of the IBM Customer Agreement, IBM
International Program License Agreement, or any equivalent agreement between us.
Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled environment.
Therefore, the results obtained in other operating environments may vary significantly.
Some measurements may have been made on development-level systems and there is
no guarantee that these measurements will be the same on generally available
systems. Furthermore, some measurement may have been estimated through
extrapolation. Actual results may vary. Users of this document should verify the
applicable data for their specific environment.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those
products, their published announcements or other publicly available sources. IBM has
not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance,
compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the
capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those
products.
All statements regarding IBM’s future direction or intent are subject to change or
withdrawal without notice, and represent goals and objectives only.
This information is for planning purposes only. The information herein is subject to
change before the products described become available.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business
operations. To illustrate them as completely as possible, the examples include the
names of individuals, companies, brands, and products. All of these names are fictitious
and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual business enterprise is
entirely coincidental.
COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language, which
illustrates programming techniques on various operating platforms. You may copy,
modify, and distribute these sample programs in any form without payment to IBM, for
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing application programs
conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which
the sample programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested
under all conditions. IBM, therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability,
or function of these programs. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample
programs in any form without payment to IBM for the purposes of developing, using,
marketing, or distributing application programs conforming to IBM’s application
programming interfaces.
If you are viewing this information softcopy, the photographs and color illustrations may
not appear.
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in
the United States, or other countries, or both:
AIX
Application System/400
AS/400
Client Access
DB2
eNetwork
IBM
IBM Network Station
InfoColor
InfoPrint
Information Assistant
IPDS
Micro Channel
MVS
NetView
Network Station
On-Demand Server
OpenEdition
Operating System/400
OS/390
OS/400
RS/6000
S/390
System/390
VM/ESA
400
Lotus is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporation in the United States and other
countries.
TME10 and Tivoli are trademarks of Tivoli Systems Inc. in the United States and other
countries.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows 95 logo are registered trademarks
of Microsoft Corporation.
Appendix H. Notices
385
Java and HotJava are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries licensed
exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of
others.
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IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Index
Numerics
128–Bit NC Navigator browser
installing on a Windows NT server after initial
installation 55
3270
application, working with 230
changing screen size 284
default settings 363
Japanese users
eliminating the 3270 emulator new session dialog
box 233
printer datastreams 242
TN3270E
configuring application-specific printer support
378
configuring general printer support 377
configuring persistent 3270 LU session names
375
5250
application, working with 225
automatically starting 277
default settings 362
Japanese users
eliminating the 5250 emulator new session dialog
box 228
printer datastreams 242
A
address
IP 8
MAC 7
AIX
problem resolution 339
trouble shooting 339
applets, java 241
application
3270 230
5250 225
Java virtual machine 241
NC Navigator browser 235
NC Navigator mail 238
NC Navigator news 239
application printer datastreams 242
AS/400
adding BOOTP clients 129
adding Network Stations to DHCP 131
before you continue 128
collecting hardware information 140
configuring printers 133
defining DHCP classes for Network Stations
load balancing 151
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
AS/400 (continued)
migrating BOOTP clients to DHCP 133
optimizing Network Station performance 144
problem resolution 334
trouble shooting 334
authentication server role 18
B
base code server role 18
before you continue
AS/400 128
OS/390 198
RS/6000 169
VM/ESA 220
Windows NT 90
bookmarks, migrating 25
boot
from NVRAM 309
from the network 308
methods 13
monitor 2
monitor code, updating 265
override the Network Station boot setting 266
PROM
updating 265
viewing the version 308
sequence 2
BOOTP
adding clients (AS/400) 129
boot method 15
configuring (RS/6000) 163
migrating clients to DHCP (AS/400) 133
relay (RS/6000) 176
server role 18
bootptab file (RS/6000) 174
broadcast boot, configuring on AS/400 148
browser, NC Naviagtor 236
C
chbootptab script (RS/6000) 173
class, IBMNSM DHCP 22
classes, defining DHCP classes for Network Stations
(AS/400) 126
console, user services 297
creating directory buttons for NC Navigator 238
customizing menu bar buttons 274, 275
D
126
datastreams, printer 242
DBCS (double byte character set) unique support
debug log, for a terminal session 281
default settings 361
358
387
desktop
background
changing 263
using an XBM file 263
manager, default settings 362
style, changing 262
determining DHCP classes 22
DHCP
adding clients to DHCP (AS/400) 131
boot method 15
class, IBMNSM 22
configuring (RS/6000) 165
configuring for multiple servers on a Windows NT
server 71
configuring on a Windows NT server 55
server role 18
directory buttons
creating 238
enabling for NC Navigator 285
domain name server, updating 267
E
emulator
3270 230
5250 225
environment variable, time zone (TZ)
eSuite, printer datastreams 242
example
LAN network 4
load balancing 19
roaming user 19
twinaxial network 347
242
F
factory defaults, resetting a Network Station to the
307
G
Gateway IP address
setting in Setup Utility 303
viewing in Setup Utility 303
H
hardware default settings 361
hide, menu bar 273
Hide Menu button 225
how to
access the Setup Utility 301
add BOOTP clients (AS/400) 129
add clients to DHCP (AS/400) 131
add IBM Network Stations to a Windows NT
environment 74
assign group settings to a user 288
automatically start a 5250 session on a Network
Station 277
change menu bar settings 272
change the language for menus and messages 287
388
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
how to (continued)
change the screen size of a 3270 session 284
change your desktop background 263
change your desktop style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace
262
change your icon location 282
configure a LAN-attached printer 269
configure a Network Station-attached printer for other
users 270
configure a Network Station to boot from the Network
setting 308
configure a Network Station to boot from the NVRAM
setting 309
configure a terminal session for a Network Station
280
configure a Windows NT session on a Network
Station 294
configure an AIX session on a Network Station 291
configure an ICA client session menu button for a
Network Station 278
configure IBM DHCP on a Windows NT server 57
configure Microsoft DHCP on a Windows NT server
68
configure printers (AS/400) 133
configure printers (OS/390) 198
configure printers (VM/ESA) 221
configure printers (Windows NT) 76
create directory buttons for NC Navigator 285
customize menu bar buttons 274
disable the control menu for a 5250 session 282
enable Java applets for NC Navigator 285
enable the 5250 or 3270 emulator for Euro currency
support 283
help 290
hide the menu bar 273
install IBM DHCP after the initial installation 54
install Microsoft DHCP after initial installation on a
Windows NT server 54
install the 128–bit NC Navigator browser on a
Windows NT server after the initial installation 55
install the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program on a Windows NT server 27
login 223
migrate BOOTP clients (AS/400) 133
migrate files on a Windows NT server 79
optimize Network Stations(AS/400) 144
override the Network Station boot setting 266
recover the default MAC address 306
reset a Network Station to the factory defaults 307
resolve installation problems on a Windows NT
server 45
resolve problems 313
select a keyboard language 305
select a startup language 304
set the Gateway IP address in Setup Utility 303
how to (continued)
set the monitor resolution 303
set the Network Station IP address 303
set the subnet mask in Setup Utility 303
set the time zone (TZ) environment variable 275
set the twinaxial station address 304
set up BOOTP relay (RS/6000) 176
specify a user-configurable MAC address 307
start and stop services on a Windows NT server 76
update the boot monitor code 265
update the DNS configuration on the Network Station
267
use the Roam button 224
use verbose diagnostic messages 305
view a user-configurable MAC address 307
view the Boot PROM version of a Network Station
308
view the default MAC address 306
view the Gateway IP address in Setup Utility 303
view the Network Station’s IP address 303
view the subnet mask in Setup Utility 303
work with Setup Utility 301
work with the blanking pedestal 304
work with your network proxies 286
HTTP directives (AS/400) 146
I
IBM DHCP
configuring on a Windows NT server 57
installing on Windows NT after initial installation 54
IBM Network Station Manager licensed program
configuring for OS/390 182
configuring for RS/6000 161
configuring for VM 207
installing for OS/390 180
installing for RS/6000 158
installing for VM 206
IBM Network Station Manager program
creating directory buttons 238
default settings 361
examples
assigning group settings to a user 288
automatically starting a 5250 session on an IBM
Network Station 277
changing Desktop background 263
changing desktop style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace
262
changing menu bar settings 272
changing the language of menus and messages
287
changing the screen size of a 3270 session 284
changing your icon location 282
configuring a LAN-attached printer 269
configuring a Network Station attached printer for
others 270
IBM Network Station Manager program (continued)
examples (continued)
configuring a terminal session for a Network
Station 280
configuring an local ICA client session menu
button for a Network Station 278
creating directory buttons for NC Navigator 285
disabling the control menu for a 5250 session
282
enabling Java applets for NC Navigator 285
enabling the 5250 or 3270 emulator for Euro
currency support 283
override the Network Station boot setting 266
setting proxies 286
setting the time zone (TZ) environment variable
275
setting up a Windows NT session 294
setting up an AIX session 291
updating the boot monitor code 265
updating the DNS configuration on the Network
Station 267
help 290
installing on a Windows NT server 27
overview 246
problem determination 326
starting 257
working with defaults 252
IBMNSM DHCP class 22
ICA client
configuring 278
load balancing 280
ICA printing 367
NT 3.51 examples
printer configuration for a locally (Network
Station)-attached printer 372
printer configuration for a printer Attached to
another PC Server (Remote Printing) 373
Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Your
Server 372
NT 4.0 examples
Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network
Station) Attached Printer 369
Printer Configuration for a PC Server-Attached
Printer 368
Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to
another PC Server (Remote Printing) 370
ICA protocol 17
icon location, changing 282
Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) printing 367
input methods, DBCS 358
interface, associating a twinaxial and LAN interface 127
Internet network default settings 364
introduction 1
inventory server, collecting hardware information(AS/400)
140
Index
389
IP address
8
J
Java
applet viewer, default settings 365
applets, enabling for NC Navigator 285
defined 16
virtual machine 241
K
keyboard language, selecting
305
Microsoft DHCP (continued)
installing after initial installation on a Windows NT
server 54
migrating 24
monitor
setting resolution 303
working with the blanking pedestal 304
Move to Bottom button 225
Move to Top button 225
multi-user Windows server 17
multiple server environments 18
L
N
LAN-attached printer, configuring 269
LAN network examples 4
language
default settings 365
keyboard, setting 305
startup, setting 304
support 357
type, changing 287
load balancing
configuring (AS/400) 151
configuring DHCP on a Windows NT server 71
example 19
load balancing, local (ICA) client sessions 280
local ICA client
configuring 278
load balancing 280
locale information 357
Lock Screen button 225
login
IBM Network Station Login Server 128
Network Station 223
suppressed 170
national language support 357
NC Navigator
browser
function 236
working with 235
default settings 364
mail function 238
news function 239
printer datastreams 242
network class 10
Network Station
adding to Windows NT environment
common error situations 315
configure an attached printer 270
error codes 326
how does it work 2
IP address, setting 303
IP address, viewing 303
logging on 223
problem resolution 313
understanding 1
what is it 1
news, NC Navigator 239
NFS 16
nsconf script (RS/6000) 175
NVRAM
boot method 14
how to boot from 309
problem determination 326
M
MAC address 7
recovering the default MAC address 306
specifying a user-configurable MAC address 307
viewing a user-configurable MAC address 307
viewing the default MAC address 306
mail, NC Navigator 238
menu bar
changing 272
customizing menu bar buttons 274
hiding 273
menu bar buttons
Hide or Show 225
Lock screen 225
Move to bottom 225
Move to top 225
MetaFrame 17
MIB file, retrieving 151
Microsoft DHCP
configuring on a Windows NT server 68
390
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
O
OS/390
before you continue 198
configuring printers 198
problem resolution 343
trouble shooting 343
OS/400
problem resolution 334
trouble shooting 334
P
PANIC mode
326
74
PC Server
problem resolution 329
trouble shooting 329
PCL datastream 242
performance
collecting hardware information(AS/400) 140
optimizing Network Stations(AS/400) 144
PostScript datastream 242
power-on sequence 2
printer
configure a LAN-attached printer 269
configure a Network Station-attached printer for other
users 270
configuring (AS/400) 133
configuring (OS/390) 198
configuring (RS/6000) 171
configuring (VM/ESA) 221
configuring (Windows NT) 76
datastreams 242
DBCS 359
problem determination 316
serial port connection 381
verifying operation (RS/6000) 172
printing, ICA 367
NT 3.51 examples
printer configuration for a locally (Network
Station)-attached printer 372
printer configuration for a printer Attached to
another PC Server (Remote Printing) 373
Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to Your
Server 372
NT 4.0 examples
Printer Configuration for a Locally (Network
Station) Attached Printer 369
Printer Configuration for a PC Server-Attached
Printer 368
Printer Configuration for a Printer Attached to
another PC Server (Remote Printing) 370
printing, using Independent Computing Architecture (ICA)
367
problems
AIX PANIC situation 342
bootp in debug mode in AIX 339
BOOTP Problems 315
browser 315
color 316
communicating using Host names 338
cursor 316
DHCP 316
DHCP changes on a PC Server 329
DHCP configuration on a PC Server 329
domain name server (DNS) 338
environment variables 317
host table 338
host unknown error message 317
problems (continued)
IBM Network Station Manager program 318
installing the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program 329
Java 319
keyboard mapping problem on AIX 340
keystrokes 322
language 322
logging into an AS/400 server 334
login 322
migrating 335
missing fonts on AIX 340
monitor 324
network interface card on a PC Server 333
Network Station directory 324
network traffic on AIX 341
no DNS entry for AIX server 341
no login window on AIX 341
no login window on OS/400 336
NVRAM settings on AIX 342
OS/390 browser problems 343
OS/400 console error and log messages 337
out of memory 325
PANIC mode 325
PC Server slow boot times 329
printing on OS/400 338
printing with AIX 342
program manager on AIX 343
program manager on OS/390 345
PTFs on OS/400 338
syslogd to troubleshoot AIX problems 343
twinaxial 338
using IBM Setup Assistant on OS/400 334
using Internet Explorer on a PC Server 333
using the IBM Network Station Manager program on
OS/400 334
VM/ESA Login Problems 346
Windows NT Associated Processor on a PC Server
333
problems, installation on a Windows NT server 45
proxies, specifying for a network 286
R
Roam button 224
roaming user example 19
roles, server 18
routing (RS/6000) 176
RS/6000
/etc/bootptab file 174
adding a BOOTP device 163
chbootptab script 173
choosing a boot method 162
configuration information 161
configuring DHCP 165
configuring NVRAM 169
Index
391
RS/6000 (continued)
installing other components 160
installing the 128-bit NC Navigator browser
nsconf script 175
optional administration tasks 173
prerequisite hardware 158
prerequisite software 158
printing to an AIX printer 171
problem resolution 339
setting up routing 176
trouble shooting 339
verifying printer operation 172
160
S
screen saver, using an XBM file 263
separation of servers 18
serial port printer connection 381
server environments, multiple 18
Setup Assistant
problems 334
what it does 145
Setup Utility
accessing 301
tasks 302
working with 301
Show Menu button 225
SNMP
agent 3
retrieving the MIB file 151
using 149
startup language, selecting 304
statistics, user services 300
subnet mask 9
setting in Setup Utility 303
subnetting your twinaxial network 350
viewing in Setup Utility 303
subnetting for twinaxial networks 350
T
TCP/IP networks 4
terminal
configuration server role 18
session
configure 280
debug log 281
TFTP 16
TFTP, subnet broadcast (AS/400) 148
time zone, environment variable
encironment variable, time zone 275
time zone (TZ), environment variable 242
TN3270E
configuring
application-specific printer support 378
general printer support 377
persistent 3270 LU session names 375
392
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
TN3270E support 375
trouble shooting 313
twinaxial
associating interfaces 127
network examples 347
setting the station address 304
U
understanding the Network Station
updating, Boot PROM code 265
user services
accessing 297
console 297
statistics 300
utilities 299
Windowmgr 298
working with 297
utilities, user services 299
1
V
verbose diagnostic messages, using 305
VM/ESA
before you continue 220
configuring printers 221
problem resolution 346
trouble shooting 346
VM/ESA DEBUG tool 346
VTxxx, configuring a terminal session 280
W
what is new in release 3? 22
WinCenter 17
WinCenter Pro, setting up a session using the IBM
Network Station Manager program 294
WinCenter UIS, setting up a session using the IBM
Network Station Manager program 294
Windowmgr (window manager), user services 298
Windows application server
configuring 278
load balancing 280
Windows applications on the Network Station 17
Windows NT
adding IBM Network Stations 74
before you continue 90
configuring DHCP 55
configuring DHCP for multiple servers 71
configuring IBM DHCP 57
configuring Microsoft DHCP 68
configuring printers 76
installing a Network Station environment on 27
installing IBM DHCP after initial installation 54
installing Microsoft DHCP after initial installation 54
installing the 128–bit NC Navigator browser after
initial installation 55
migrating 79
Windows NT (continued)
problem resolution 329
resolving installation problems 45
setting up a session using the IBM Network Station
Manager program 294
starting and stopping services 76
trouble shooting 329
WinFrame 17
X
X window, configuring a terminal session
X11 protocol 17
XBM file
for desktop background 263
for screen saver 263
280
Index
393
394
IBM Network Station Manager Installation and Use
Readers’ Comments — We’d Like to Hear from You
IBM Network Station
IBM Network Station Manager
Installation and Use
November 1998
To view or print the latest update, go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
Publication No. SC41-0664-02
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