1 2015-2016 Catalog

1 2015-2016 Catalog
2015-2016 Catalog
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2015-2016 Catalog
Columbia State Community College is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, gender, sexual orientation/gender identity, religion, ethnic or national origin, sex, age, disability status, or status as a covered veteran in
educational and employment opportunities, and is committed to the education of a non-racially identifiable student body. Inquiries or complaints
should be directed to the Director of Human Resources, Room 116, Pryor Administration Building, 1665 Hampshire Pike, Columbia, TN 38401;
Telephone (931) 540-2521.
Individuals needing this material in an alternative format should contact the associate vice president for student services.
CoSCC SC-01-10-2015
Volume XXXIX
Information Directory
2015-2016 Catalog
Columbia State Community College
1665 Hampshire Pike • Columbia, TN 38401
(931) 540-2722 • www.columbiastate.edu
Inclement Weather Line: (931) 540-2515
TDD Relay Number (for the hearing impaired): 1-800-848-0298
Academic and Student Programs and Services . . . . . Margaret Smith, Executive Vice President - Provost��������(931) 540-2520
Access and Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christa Martin, Assistant to the President . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2644
Advancement and Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bethany Lay, Executive for Advancement . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2512
Alumni Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Molly Cochran, Development Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2554
Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Johnny Littrell, Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2630
Bookstore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jean Zimmerman, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2593
Business Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elaine Curtis, Associate Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2530
Career Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Freda Leslie Pillow, Career Counselor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2778
Clifton Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhonda Delk, Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 676-6966
Counseling and Student Support Services . . . . . . . . . Connie Gallon, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2572
Disability Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wynn Gooch, Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2857
Center for Workforce Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terri Kinloch, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-1121
Enrollment Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jill Riley, Chief Enrollment Services Officer and . . . . . . . (931) 540-2573
Director of Admissions
Extended Services and Williamson Campus . . . . . . . Shanna L. Jackson, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (615) 790-4419
Evening Services and Cohort Programs . . . . . . . . . . Kelley Pujol, Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2862
Facility Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tim Hallmark, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2620
Faculty, Curriculum and Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joni Lenig, Associate Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2750
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cherry Johnson, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-8267
Financial and Administrative Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kenneth R. Horner, Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2530
Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brett Seybert, Development Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2514
Health Sciences Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kae Fleming, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2600
Human Resources / Affirmative Action . . . . . . . . . . . . Christie Miller, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2521
Humanities and Social Sciences Division and
Learning Support Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Gay, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2780
Information Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emily Siciensky, Associate Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2704
Institutional Effectiveness and Planning . . . . . . . . . . . Tammy Borren, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2697
Institutional Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rion McDonald, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2523
Instructional Support, Distance Learning,
and University Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marilia Gerges, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2618
Instructional Technology Support Services . . . . . . . . . Bob Trybalski, Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2869
Lawrence County Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ruth Ann Holt, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 766-1600
Lewisburg Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elizabeth McDow, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 359-0351
Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathy Breeden, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2560
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Hall, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(931) 540-2622
Marketing and Public Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Spears-Boyd, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2516
President’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Janet F. Smith, President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2510
Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sharon Joyce Bowen, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2581
Science, Technology and Mathematics Division . . . . . Dearl Lampley, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2710
Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vacant, Associate Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2570
Teaching and Learning Center, Columbia . . . . . . . . . Anne Reeves, Tutor Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-1302
Teaching and Learning Center, Williamson . . . . . . . . Gena Ryan, Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(615) 790-5670
Testing Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patricia Harlan, Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (931) 540-2569
Williamson County Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ralph Walker, Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (615) 790-4400
Directory assistance for other offices is available through the main switchboard at (931) 540-2722.
The Columbia State Community College Catalog and Student Handbook is published by the Academic and Student Programs
and Services office, in conjunction with Student Services and Marketing and Public Relations.
Columbia State is a two-year college, serving a nine-county area in southern Middle Tennessee with locations in
Columbia, Franklin, Lawrenceburg, Lewisburg and Clifton. As Tennessee’s first community college, Columbia State is
committed to increasing access and enhancing diversity at all five campuses. Columbia State is a member of the
Tennessee Board of Regents, the sixth largest higher education system in the nation.
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Campus Locations
Columbia
1665 Hampshire Pike
Columbia, TN 38401
(931) 540-2722
Clifton Site
795 Main Street
Clifton, TN 38425
(931) 676-6966
Fax: (931) 676-6941
Lawrence County Center
1620 Springer Road
Lawrenceburg, TN 38464
(931) 766-1600
Fax: (931) 766-1602
Lewisburg Site
980 South Ellington Parkway
Lewisburg, TN 37091
(931) 359-0351
Fax: (931) 560-4118
Williamson County Center
104 Claude Yates Drive
Franklin, TN 37064
(615) 790-4400
Fax: (615) 790-4405
2015-2016 Catalog
Accrediting Agencies
Columbia State Community College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) to award the Associate of Arts degree, Associate of Fine Arts degree,
Associate of Science degree, Associate of Applied Science degree, Associate of Science in Teaching degree,
and Technical Certificates. Contact the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges
at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation
of Columbia State Community College.
Student Rights Related to Accreditation include: (1) to learn about the accreditation status of the institution, (2) to file a third-party
comment at the time of the institution's decennial review, or (3) to file a complaint against the institution for alleged non-compliance with
a standard or requirement. Normal inquiries about the institution, such as admission requirements, financial aid, educational programs,
etc., should be addressed directly to Columbia State Community College and not to the Commission's office.
In addition, some of the college programs have specialized accreditation by the following agencies:
Accounting, Business Administration,
Business, Economics, Information Systems
Technology
Accreditation Council for Business Schools
and Programs (ACBSP)
11520 West 119th Street
Overland Park, Kansas 66213
(913) 339-9356
www.acbsp.org
Advanced Integrated Industrial Technology
The Association of Technology, Management, and
Applied Engineering (ATMAE)
275 North York Street, Suite 401
Elmhurst, IL 60126-2752
(630) 433-4514
www.atmae.org
Emergency Medical Technology
Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs
for the EMS Professions
8301 Lakeview Pkwy Suite 111-312
Rowlett, Texas 75088
(817) 283-9403
www.caahep.org
Nursing
Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing
(ACEN)
3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850
Atlanta, Georgia 30326
(404) 975-5000
Fax: (404) 975-5020
www.acenursing.org
Radiologic Technology
Joint Review Committee on Education
in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)
20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850
Chicago, Illinois 60606-3182
(312) 704-5300
www.jrcert.org
Respiratory Care
Commission on Accreditation of Respiratory Care
(CoARC)
1248 Harwood Road
Bedford, Texas 76021-4244
(817) 283-2835
www.coarc.com
Veterinary Technology
American Veterinary Medical Association
Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and
Activities (CVTEA)
1931 N. Meacham Road, Suite 100
Schaumburg, Illinois 60173-4360
(847) 925-8070
Fax: (847) 925-1329
www.avma.org
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President’s Welcome
Dear Students,
On behalf of the faculty and staff, I am excited to welcome all new and retuning students
to the 2015-2016 academic year at Columbia State Community College. We are pleased
that you have chosen Columbia State as your college and thrilled that your will be here
to help us celebrate Columbia State’s 50th Anniversary.
Columbia State is Tennessee’s first community college and as such we have established
a high standard of academics and service. For the 50th we celebrate the opportunities
for learning that has been, is, and always will be at the heart of who Columbia State is.
There are a number of events planned to celebrate this milestone. More information will
be provided throughout the year.
Columbia State is a student-centered college that is committed to providing a learning
environment that is challenging, yet supportive of your success. The 2015-2016 Catalog
has been prepared to provide you with the information that will assist you in applying to
the College, registering for classes, applying for financial aid, and mapping out your
academic path – information that will assist you in being successful.
Education is a lifelong process and it is our goal that you succeed while you are here and that you are well-prepared for life and
work beyond Columbia State. You will find the outstanding faculty and staff of C-State to be exciting, energetic, dedicated,
helpful, and available to assist you with any questions you may have. Admissions, Financial Aid, other college offices, and your
assigned advisor are here to assist you and to provide you with a rich college experience.
While you are here at Columbia State, become involved – participate in and/or attend many of the extracurricular activities that
will enhance your learning. Activities such as plays, art exhibits, concerts, athletic events, competitions, curriculum/academic
societies, and Student Government Association (SGA) activities. You can keep up with happenings and events through you
college app and video displays throughout our campuses.
Become a member of the President’s Leadership Society. It will enhance your college and academic experiences through
workshops, fieldtrips, teambuilding/leadership activities and much more. This is an organization that I am personally involved
with.
Don’t leave before you graduate – the employer and/or the college you transfer to likes the certificate/degree – it says you
finished something you started.
I am more than honored to be your President and I welcome you to Columbia State. I hope to have an opportunity to talk with
you and get to know you as we encounter each other on campus. And most of all, I look forward to the opportunity of
congratulating you as you walk across the stage at graduation!!
I hope that you have a challenging and successful academic year!
Sincerely,
Janet F. Smith, Ph.D.
President
PS: Follow me on Twitter @PresCState, Instagram, or Facebook. Also, follow Columbia State on social media to be in the know!
2015-2016 Catalog
Tennessee Board of Regents
Mr. John Morgan, Chancellor
Members
The Honorable Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee and Chair, ex officio
The Honorable Julius Johnson, Commissioner of Agriculture, ex officio
Dr. Russ Deaton, Interim Executive Director, THEC, ex officio, non-voting
The Honorable Dr. Candice McQueen, Commissioner of Education, ex officio
Mr. Gregory Duckett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9th Congressional District
Mr. Darrell S. Freeman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7th Congressional District
Mr. Tom Griscom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3rd Congressional District
Mrs. Fran F. Marcum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4th Congressional District
Ms. Barbara U. Prescott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8th Congressional District
Ms. Rebecca Reeves, Student Regent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . University of Memphis - Lambuth
Ms. Emily J. Reynolds, Vice-Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . At-Large, Middle Tennessee
Mr. Howard W. Roddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . At-Large, East Tennessee
Ms. Leigh A. Shockey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . At-Large West Tennessee
Mr. J. Parker Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1st Congressional District
Mr. John D. Stites, II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6th Congressional District
Mr. Robert P. Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5th Congressional District
Ms. Danni B. Varlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2nd Congressional District
Ms. Dottye Webb, Faculty Regent . . . . . Tennessee College of Applied Technology, Newbern
Tennessee Higher Education Commission
Dr. Russ Deaton, Interim Executive Director
2014-2015 Commission Members
Evan Cope, Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Murfreesboro
David Kustoff, Vice Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Germantown
Keith Wilson, Vice Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kingsport
A C Wharton, Jr., Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis
Tre Hargett, Secretary of State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville
Justin P. Wilson, State Comptroller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville
David H. Lillard, Jr., State Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville
Mintha Roach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville
Jon Kinsey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chattanooga
Pam Koban . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville
Pam Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mt. Juliet
Bill Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Franklin
Dr. Sara Heyburn, non-voting ex-officio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Board of Education
Alex Martin, voting ex-officio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee Technological University
Siri Kadire, non-voting ex-officio . . . . . . . . . . . University of Tennessee Health Science Center
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2015-2016 Catalog
Table of Contents
Important Dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Admission to the College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Institutional Fees and Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Academic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Academic Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Center for Workforce Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Tennessee Transfer Pathway (TTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Degree Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Associate of Applied Science Degree Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Certificate Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Tennessee Transfer Pathway (TTP) Program Fliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
General Transfer Program Fliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Program Fliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Certificate Program Fliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Employee Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Columbia State Advancement and Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Columbia State Alumni Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Program Advisory Committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Clinical Instructors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
2015-2016 Catalog
Important Dates
These calendars are subject to change at any time prior to or during an academic term due to emergencies or causes beyond
the reasonable control of the institution, including severe weather, loss of utility services, or orders by federal or state agencies.
Fall Semester 2015
Academic Calendar
Part of Term in
Class Schedule
Full Term
Ten Week
1st 5 weeks
1st 7 weeks
2nd 5 weeks
2nd 7 weeks
3rd 5 weeks
Classes Begin
August 24
September 28
August 24
August 24
Classes End Last Day to Apply
for New Students
December 4 August 7
December 4 September 11
September 26 August 7
October 10
August 7
Last Day to Apply for
Returning Students
August 14
September 18
August 14
August 14
September 28
October 14
November 4
November 3
December 11
December 11
September 18
October 5
October 27
September 11
September 25
October 20
Final Exams
December 5-11
December 5-11
Final exams in short
terms are given on
the last class.
Dates for all part of term are posted online at www.columbiastate.edu/refunds-drops-withdrawals. All supporting
documents for a new applicant must be submitted within three working days of new student application deadline. To be eligible
for application deadline extension, returning students can have no new transfer college coursework since last attending
Columbia State. Final grades for this semester will be available in myChargerNet on December 18.
Registration Calendar
Priority Registration for currently enrolled students is April 6-7. Registration for Fall 2015 opens April 13 for all admitted
students. Register early to ensure class availability.
Fall 2015
Part of Term
Full Term
Ten Week
1st 5 weeks
1st 7 weeks
2nd 5 weeks
2nd 7 weeks
3rd 5 weeks
Last Day to Register
August 18
September 25
August 18
August 18
Last day to Add a Class
during this Part of Term
August 25
September 28
August 24
August 24
Last day to Drop, Withdraw
or Change to Audit
November 4
November 16
September 15
September 24
September 28
October 14
November 4
September 28
October 14
November 4
October 22
November 21
November 28
Tuition and Fees Calendar
Fall 2015
Part of Term
Payment Due
Refunds
Full Term
Ten Week
1st 5 weeks
1st 7 weeks
August 12
September 25
August 12
August 12
100%
August 23
September 27
August 23
August 23
2nd 5 weeks
2nd 7 weeks
3rd 5 weeks
September 25
October 9
November 3
September 27
October 13
November 3
75%
September 6
October 6
August 27
August 27
25%
September 20
October 16
September 1
September 4
October 2
October 20
November 8
October 6
October 28
November 13
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2015-2016 Catalog
Financial Aid Calendar
Priority Financial Aid Processing and Verification for Fall 2015 semester is July 1, 2015 to allow for timely processing. If
financial aid forms are not complete by this date, students should be prepared to pay their tuition and fees by the payment
deadline to maintain their class schedules. Additionally, failure to submit documents by this date could result in loss of
Tennessee Promise funds for applicable students.
Fall 2015 Part of Term
Awards Posted
Full Term
Ten Week
1st 5 weeks
1st 7 weeks
September 8
October 10
September 8
September 8
Disbursements Available
No Later Than
September 22
October 24
September 22
September 22
2nd 5 weeks
2nd 7 weeks
3rd 5 weeks
October 10
October 28
November 17
October 24
November 11
December 1
Posting and disbursement dates are contingent on faculty confirming enrollment by verifying student participation in a
class prior to census date. Students must attend/participate on the first day of class in order to receive disbursements
according to this schedule.
Class Holidays and Campus Closings
August 19
September 7
October 12 - 13
November 25
Convocation (All offices closed)
Holiday: Labor Day (Campus closed)
Fall Break (Classes do not meet; offices open)
Thanksgiving Holiday (Classes do not meet; offices open)
November 26-29
December 24 - January 1
Thanksgiving Holiday (Campus closed)
Seasonal Holiday (Campus closed)
Graduation Calendar
September 11
December 12 at 10:00 a.m.
December 2015 Graduation
Submit Intent to Graduate IF you wish to participate in the December
ceremony. Those not participating in the ceremony must still file an
intent and are encouraged to file early to ensure awareness of requirements before your final semester.
Graduation Ceremony
2015-2016 Catalog
Spring Semester 2016
Academic Calendar
Part of Term in
Class Schedule
Full Term
1st 5 weeks
1st 7 weeks
Classes Begin
Classes End
January 19
January 19
January 19
April 29
February 20
March 5
Last Day to Apply
for New Students
January 5
January 5
January 5
2nd 5 weeks
2nd 7 weeks
3rd 5 weeks
February 22
March 14
April 4
April 2
May 6
May 6
February 8
February 29
March 21
Last Day to Apply for
Final Exams
Returning Students
January 12
April 30 - May 6
January 12
Final exams in
short terms are
January 12
given on the last
class.
February 15
March 7
March 28
Dates for all part of term are posted online at www.columbiastate.edu/refunds-drops-withdrawals. All supporting
documents for a new applicant must be submitted within three working days of new student application deadline. To be eligible
for application deadline extension, returning students can have no new transfer college coursework since last attending
Columbia State. Final grades for this semester will be available in myChargerNet on May 13.
Registration Calendar
Priority Registration for currently enrolled students is November 9 - 15. Registration for Spring 2016 opens November 16 for
all admitted students. Register early to ensure class availability.
Spring 2016
Part of Term
Full Term
1st 5 weeks
1st 7 weeks
2nd 5 weeks
2nd 7 weeks
3rd 5 weeks
Last Day to Register
January 12
January 12
January 12
Last day to Add a Class
during this Part of Term
January 20
January 19
January 19
Last day to Drop, Withdraw
or Change to Audit
March 31
February 9
February 18
February 19
March 11
April 1
February 22
March 14
April 4
March 19
April 18
April 25
Tuition and Fees Calendar
Spring 2016
Part of Term
Payment Due
Refunds
Full Term
1st 5 weeks
1st 7 weeks
January 5
January 5
January 5
100%
January 18
January 18
January 18
2nd 5 weeks
2nd 7 weeks
3rd 5 weeks
February 19
March 11
April 1
February 21
March 13
April 3
75%
February 1
January 22
January 24
25%
February 14
January 26
January 30
February 26
March 20
April 7
March 2
March 27
April 11
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2015-2016 Catalog
Financial Aid Calendar
Priority Financial Aid Processing and Verification for Spring Semester is November 1, 2015 to allow for timely processing. If
financial aid forms are not complete by this date, students should be prepared to pay their tuition and fees by the payment deadline
to maintain their class schedules.
Spring 2016 Part of Term
Awards Posted
Full Term
1st 5 weeks
1st 7 weeks
February 2
February 2
February 2
Disbursements Available
No Later Than
February 17
February 17
February 17
2nd 5 weeks
2nd 7 weeks
3rd 5 weeks
March 9
March 30
April 20
March 23
April 13
May 4
Posting and disbursement dates are contingent on faculty confirming enrollment by verifying student participation in a class prior
to census date. Students must attend/participate on the first day of class in order to receive disbursements according to this
schedule.
Class Holidays and Campus Closings
December 24 - January 1
January 13
January 18
March 7 - 13
Graduation Calendar
February 8
May 7 at 10:00 a.m.
Seasonal Holiday (Campus closed)
Convocation (All offices closed)
Holiday (Martin Luther King Day) - College closed
Spring Break (Classes do not meet; offices open)
May 2016 Graduation
Submit Intent to Graduate IF you wish to participate in the May ceremony.
Those not participating in the ceremony must still file an Intent and are
encouraged to file early to ensure awareness of requirements before your
final semester.
Graduation Ceremony
Summer Semester 2016
Academic Calendar
Part of Term in
Class Schedule
Term 1 (10 weeks)
1st Term (5 weeks)
2nd Term (5 weeks)
Classes Begin
May 31
May 31
July 5
Classes End
August 5
July 1
August 5
Last Day to Apply
for New Students
May 16
May 16
June 20
Last Day to Apply for
Returning Students
May 23
May 23
June 27
Final Exams
Final exams
are given on
the last class
day.
Any terms offered within the Summer Semester will bee within the dates of May 9 and August 5. Date for all parts of term are
posted online at www.columbiastate.edu/refunds-drops-withdrawals. All supporting documents for a new applicant must be
submitted within three working days of new student application deadline. To be eligible for application deadline extension,
returning students can have no new transfer college coursework since last attending Columbia State. Final grades for the
Summer 2016 semester will be available in myChargerNet on August 12.
2015-2016 Catalog
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Registration Calendar
Priority Registration for currently enrolled students is April 4 - 5 . Registration for Summer 2016 opens April 6 for all admitted
students. Register early to ensure class availability.
Summer 2016
Part of Term
Term 1 (10 weeks)
1st Term (5 weeks)
2nd Term (5 weeks)
Last Day to Register
May 25
May 25
July 5
Last Day to Add a Class
during this Part of Term
May 31
May 31
July 5
Last Day to Drop, Withdraw
or Change to Audit
July 14
June 20
July 25
Tuition and Fees Calendar
Summer 2016
Part of Term
Term 1 (10 weeks)
1st Term (5 weeks)
2nd Term (5 weeks)
Payment Due
Refunds
100%
May 30
May 30
July 4
May 24
May 24
July 1
75%
June 7
June 3
July 8
25%
June 15
June 7
July 12
Financial Aid Calendar
Priority Financial Aid Processing and Verification for Summer 2016 semester is April 1, 2016 to allow for timely processing. If
financial aid forms are not complete by this date, students should be prepared to pay their tuition and fees by the payment deadline
to maintain their class schedules.
Summer 2016 Part of Term
Term 1 (10 weeks)
1st Term (5 weeks)
2nd Term (5 weeks)
Awards Posted
June 6-14
June 6-14
July 20
Disbursements Available
No Later Than
June 30
June 30
August 3
Posting and disbursement dates are contingent on faculty confirming enrollment by verifying student participation in a class prior
to census date. Students must attend/participate on the first day of class in order to receive disbursements according to this
schedule.
Class Holidays and Campus Closings
May 30
July 4
Holiday: Memorial Day (Campus closed)
Holiday: Independence Day (Campus closed)
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2015-2016 Catalog
General Information
Vision
permanent location for the College’s Williamson County Center.
Three additional semi-permanent sites have since been
established in leased facilities: the Lawrence County Center,
opened in 1988; the Lewisburg Site, opened in 1996; and the
Clifton Site, opened in 1997.
Core Values
The Northfield Workforce Development and Conference Center
opened in 2011. Columbia State offers courses at this site
currently. The Advanced Integrated Industrial Technology (AIIT)
and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) programs exist at this
site and these program faculty maintain regular office hours at this
location. For more information about the AIIT program call (931)
540-2711. For more information about EMS programs call (931)
626-3883.
As Tennessee's first community college, Columbia State will
continue to build on its heritage of excellence through innovation
in education and services that foster success and brings distinction
and recognition for the quality and effectiveness of the college.
_At Columbia State Community College we value …
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individual relationships with students
student-centered learning
excellence in instruction
lifelong learning and personal development
open access to college programs and facilities
effective communication
cooperative working relationships
recognition of outstanding achievement
commitment to community service and leadership
a strong work ethic and personal accountability
continuing professional development
diversity
Statement of Mission
Columbia State Community College enhances the lives of citizens
and the communities of southern middle Tennessee through
teaching, learning and student success.
History
On June 22, 1965, the State Board of Education approved
Columbia as the site of Tennessee’s first community college.
Once the Board of Education had approved the location of a
college in Columbia, the Maury County Quarterly Court approved
a resolution to purchase the two hundred four-acre Hickman farm
and pledged $250,000 to aid in the construction of the college.
Columbia State graduated its first class in June 1968. These
students had enrolled in 1966, when the College was temporarily
housed in the Education Building of the First Baptist Church and
other facilities throughout the city. The Columbia campus was
occupied in 1967. At that time the facilities were comprised of the
administration, gymnasium, library, maintenance, student center,
and science buildings.
The two-story Frank G. Clement Building was completed in 1969,
and the maintenance building was remodeled and enlarged in
1970. In 1971, the Jones Student Center was enlarged and an
athletic track was built. In February 1972, the John W. Finney
Memorial Library was completed. In the spring of 1976, the Health
Sciences Building was completed. On August 10, 1989, the
Natatorium, a mini-olympic indoor swimming pool, was dedicated.
The most recent building, the Waymon L. Hickman Building, was
completed in 2001. In 2011 Columbia State completed a redesign
of the original Natatorium into a Wellness Center.
In January 1988, Columbia State began offering courses in the
Yates Vocational Center in Franklin. In 1994, the facility was
transferred to the Tennessee Board of Regents, providing a
Campus Locations
Columbia Campus
The Columbia campus provides access to educational offerings
for students from Maury County and surrounding areas. It also
houses the president’s office and the administrative offices for
academic and student programs and services, advancement, and
financial and administrative services. The campus is located at
1665 Hampshire Pike at the intersection of State Highway 412
and Cayce Lane. For more information, call (931) 540-2722 or
email [email protected]
Clifton Site
The Clifton Site, established to provide access to post-secondary
education to the citizens of Wayne County and surrounding
areas, is located at 795 Main Street at the intersection of Highway
114 and Main Street in Clifton, Tennessee. The site offers credit
classes and degree programs, business and industry training,
and other community services. The Clifton Campus serves as a
Southern Middle Tennessee Entrepreneur Center (SMTEC), one
of nine regional entrepreneurial accelerators that have been
established throughout Tennessee to assist entrepreneurs.
SMTEC provides mentoring, education and training, strategic and
technical support, and assistance identifying sources of capital for
small businesses. For more information, call (931) 676-6966; fax
(931) 676-6941; or email [email protected]
Lawrence County Center
The Lawrence County Center offers traditional and nontraditional
educational opportunities for the citizens of Lawrence County and
the surrounding areas. Courses are offered throughout daytime,
afternoon, and evening hours as well as Saturdays. Evening
services are available during the regular semester. Workforce
development non-credit classes are also available throughout the
year. The Center is located adjacent to the Lawrence County High
School campus at 1620 Springer Road, Lawrenceburg,
Tennessee. For more information, call (931) 766-1600; fax (931)
766-1602; or email [email protected]
Lewisburg Site
The Lewisburg Site, located at 980 South Ellington Parkway in
Lewisburg, offers credit classes for students in Marshall and
surrounding counties. Additional non-credit training programs,
both general interest and employment-related, are conducted
throughout the year. For more information, call (931) 359-0351;
fax (931) 560-4118; or email [email protected]
2015-2016 Catalog
Williamson County Center
The Williamson County Center provides both traditional and
nontraditional educational opportunities for the citizens of
Williamson County and surrounding areas. Courses are offered
throughout the day, afternoon, and evening hours as well as
Saturdays. Additional non-credit programs, both general interest
and employment related, are available throughout the year. The
Center is located at 104 Claude Yates Drive, adjacent to Franklin
High School, off Hillsboro Road in Franklin, Tennessee. For more
information, call (615) 790-4400; fax (615) 790-4405; or email
[email protected]
Misrepresentation of Academic Credentials
Evening Services
2. Has successfully completed the required course work for and has been awarded one or more degrees or diplomas from a particular institution of higher education; or
The Evening office, located in room 109 in the Warf Building on
the Columbia campus, coordinates cohort programs and evening
learning communities and assists in coordinating some evening
student events and resources. This office is open 4:15 p.m. until
8:00 p.m. (Monday - Thursday). Questions about evening
programs of study at the Columbia campus may be sent to
[email protected] Evening services are also
available at all of the College’s campus locations.
Limitations and Reservations
The institution reserves the right to make changes as required in
course offerings, curricula, academic policies and other rules and
regulations affecting students. These changes will govern
current and formerly enrolled students and will become effective
whenever determined by the institution. Enrollment of all students
is subject to these conditions.
The course offerings and requirements of this institution are
continually under examination and revision. This catalog presents
course offerings and requirements in effect at the time of
publication but does not guarantee that they will not be changed
or revoked. However, adequate and reasonable notice will be
given to students affected by any changes. This catalog is not
intended to state contractual terms and does not constitute a
contract between the student and the institution.
Current information about offerings and requirements may be
obtained from the following offices:
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•
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•
Admission Requirements: Admissions office
Course Offerings: Department or division offering the courses
Degree Requirements: Records office
Fees and tuition: Business Services office
Columbia State provides the opportunity for students to increase
their knowledge by providing programs of instruction in the
various disciplines and programs through faculty who, in the
opinion of the College, are trained and qualified for teaching at
the college level. However, the acquisition of knowledge by any
student is contingent upon the student’s desire to learn and his
or her application of appropriate study techniques to any course
or program. The institution does not warrant or represent that
any student who completes a course or program of study will
necessarily acquire any specific skills or knowledge or will be
able to successfully pass or complete any specific examination
for any course, degree, or license.
It is a Class A misdemeanor to misrepresent academic
credentials. A person commits the offense of misrepresentation
of academic credentials who, knowing that the statement is false
and with the intent to secure employment at or admission to an
institution of higher education in Tennessee, represents, orally or
in writing that such person:
1. Has successfully completed the required course work for and has been awarded one or more degrees or diplomas from an accredited institution of higher education;
3. Has successfully completed the required course work for and has been awarded one or more degrees or diplomas in
a particular field or specialty from an accredited institution of higher education.
Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Gender in
Education Programs and Activities
It is the policy of Columbia State that no person shall be excluded
from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected
to discrimination under any education program or activity on the
basis of sex. Columbia State shall ensure that equal opportunity
and nondiscrimination exist on the basis of sex for students in all
education programs and activities, including but not limited to,
the following: (1) recruitment and admission; (2) academic,
extracurricular, research, occupational training, health-related
training, and other education programs; (3) rules on student life
activities; (4) housing; (5) facilities; (6) access to course
offerings; (7) counseling; (8) financial assistance; (9) employment
assistance; (10) health and insurance benefits and services; (11)
rules on marital or parental status; and (12) athletics.
Inquiries concerning this statement, its application to students, or
any regulations subsequently developed should be directed to
the Director of Human Resources, Room 116, Pryor Administration
Building, Columbia State Community College, 1665 Hampshire
Pike, Columbia, TN 38401, (931) 540-2521.
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2015-2016 Catalog
Admission to the College
Columbia State Community College offers many different
opportunities for education. All individuals are encouraged to
attend as either credit or non-credit students.
In order to be admitted as a credit student, individuals must meet
the requirements of admission to the category in which they are
applying. These requirements differ depending on the type of
admission chosen. The requirements reflect the academic
background and/or basic academic competencies required to
succeed in the various courses and programs.
Some specialized programs have specific admission requirements
in addition to the College's general admission requirements.
Acceptance to the College does not constitute admission to these
programs (see "Programs with Special Admission Requirements,"
p. 20).
Individuals wishing to take non-credit courses do not need to apply
for admission but may enroll directly through the Center for
Workforce Development (see “General Requirements for
Admission to Non-Credit Courses,” p. 19).
Admission application services are available on the Columbia
campus and at the administrative offices at all of the College’s
campus locations.
Selective Service
All U.S. citizens and non-citizens 18 through 25 years of age
residing in the United States must register with Selective Service
prior to registering for classes at the College. This does not apply
to those exempt by federal law including females, non-immigrant
aliens on student, visitor, tourist or diplomatic visas, and active
duty military. Contact the Admissions office for a detailed listing of
Selective Service exemptions.
Medical or Health Information
Columbia State requires all applicants for admission to provide
health information that, as a minimum, establishes the applicant's
compliance with Rules promulgated by the Tennessee Department
of Health regarding requirement for immunization against certain
diseases prior to attendance at a higher education institution, and
compliance with the latest standards for immunization for
meningococcal disease as set forth by the recommended
immunization schedule issued by the Center for Disease Control
Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.
Effective June 1, 2011, proof of immunization with two doses of
Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) and Varicella (chickenpox)
vaccines administered on or after the first birthday is required for
full-time students, defined as students taking 12 hours or more of
academic credits. Certain students are exempt from this
requirement. Contact the Admissions office at (931)-540-2790 or
www.columbiastate.edu/admissions for a current list of exemptions.
By state law (TCA § 49-6-5001), immunizations are not required if
they "conflict with the parents' or guardians' (or individuals over 18)
religious tenets and practices, affirmed under penalties of perjury.”
A Certificate of Immunization form, completed and signed by a
licensed doctor of medicine or osteopathy, or an official copy of a
State Health Department or military immunization record, must be
returned to the Admissions office. Students who do not provide the
properly completed certificate prior to registration for their second
semester will not be allowed to register until acceptable
documentation is on file. Once the documentation is on file, the
Records office will not issue or reproduce immunization or medical
records from these agencies. Requests for this information must
be directed to the issuing agency concerned.
The General Assembly of the State of Tennessee mandates that
each public or private postsecondary institution in the state provide
information concerning Hepatitis B infection to all first-time
entering students. Tennessee law requires that such students
complete a waiver form provided by the College that includes
detailed information about the disease. All entering first-time
students must complete this form before they will be allowed to
enroll in classes.
The Tennessee Eligibility Verification for Entitlement Act
The Tennessee Eligibility Verification for Entitlement Act (EVEA)
[TCA 4-58-101 seq.] requires public institutions of higher education
to verify that persons seeking a "state benefit" are either a "United
States Citizen" or "lawfully present" in the United States.
The term "state benefit" includes in-state tuition, lottery scholarship,
academic scholarship, common market, or any other form of tuition
assistance or wavier funded with state- appropriated dollars. State
benefit does not include tuition assistance funded privately, such
as a scholarship from the institution's foundation or a privately
endowed scholarship.
For more information on this act or documentation needed to verify
"state benefit" eligibility, please contact the admissions office.
General Requirements for Admission to Credit Studies
The Admissions office is the unit responsible for administering
admission policies of Columbia State Community College. The
Admissions office coordinates both general and program-specific
admission policies.
First-Time Applicants
To ensure adequate time for processing applications, the applicant
should submit an Application for Admission and satisfactory
scholastic credentials by the application deadline (see “Important
Dates,” p. 9) for the semester in which enrollment is planned. The
applicant must include a list of all educational institutions attended
beginning with high school. In general, admission to the College in
credit studies is granted to qualified applicants only after all
required documents are received by the Admissions office.
Returning Students
Students who have previously taken credit courses at Columbia
State and who return to the College after being absent for one
semester (excluding summer) must file an application for
readmission with the Admissions office.
Students who have attended other institutions of higher education
since last attending Columbia State must have all of these
institutions send official transcripts to the Admissions office.
2015-2016 Catalog
Admission Requirements for Specific Credit
Classifications
Undergraduate Degree Students
Students who have selected a program of study and are pursuing
a degree or certificate are classified as undergraduate degree
students. This classification includes beginning freshmen, transfer
students, and former Columbia State students.
Freshmen, Beginning Students are students who enroll in
college for the first time and are working toward an undergraduate
degree or certificate.
1. High School Graduates must meet the academic
assessment requirements and submit the following:
a. a completed Application for Admission. Applicants
are required to submit a one-time nonrefundable fee of
$10 with their initial Application for Admission.
b. an official transcript reflecting graduation from high
school. The high school must forward the transcript
directly to the Admissions office. Tennessee public high
school graduates’ transcripts must include a notation
indicating the student passed any required state
proficiency examinations. The transcript of a home
school student should be an official copy from an
affiliated organization as defined by state law (TCA §
49-50-801). Transcripts from independent home school
students must be accompanied by certification of
registration with the superintendent of the local education
agency, which the student would otherwise attend.
Students unable to provide a satisfactory secondary
school credential may substitute an acceptable High
School Equivalency Diploma (GED® or HiSET®).
c. ACT or SAT test scores (required of those under 21
years of age and others seeking admission to selected
programs). These scores are used only for advancement
and placement.
2. Non-High School Graduates (students who have not
graduated from high school) must comply with academic
assessment requirements and must:
a. be at least 18 years old.
b. submit a completed Application for Admission. Applicants
are required to submit a one-time nonrefundable fee of
$10 with their initial application for admission.
c. submit an official transcript of scores for the High School
Equivalency Diploma (GED® with a composite score of
a least 450 or HiSET® with a composite of at least 45
and no sub-test score below 8.)
Certified copies must be forwarded directly to the
Admissions office at Columbia State from the issuing
agency.
d. submit ACT or SAT scores (required of those under 21
years of age and others seeking admission to selected
programs). These scores are used only for advancement
and placement.
Transfer Students are students that have been previously
enrolled in an institution of higher education other than Columbia
State. Transfer students must be eligible to reenter the school
from which they are transferring. Students who are on current
dismissal from a previous institution may be admitted as a
transfer student on probation.
After application is made to Columbia State and all supporting
documentation is received, transfer credit evaluations are
conducted (see “Acquiring Credit,” in the Academic information
section p. 36).
All transfer students must:
1. submit a completed Application for Admission. Applicants are
required to submit a one-time nonrefundable fee of $10 with
their initial Application for Admission.
2. submit official transcripts from all previously attended
institutions of higher education. Certified copies must be
forwarded directly to the Admissions office at Columbia State
from the issuing institution. Transcripts carried by the student
may be used for advising and course selection but are not
acceptable for full admission and transfer of credit.
3. submit an official high school transcript showing graduation
or a High School Equivalency Diploma (GED® with a
composite score of a least 450 or HiSET® with a composite
of at least 45 and no sub-test score below 8) if less than 60
semester credits have been transferred, or when deemed
necessary for placement.
4. undergo assessment and placement if the student does not
meet a stated course prerequisite or basic academic
competencies.
5. students with ACT or SAT scores that are dated within three
years of the first class day of the semester for which the
student plans to enroll may choose to submit such scores for
use in assessment of academic placement.
Non-Degree Students
Students who enter the College for professional development and
personal enrichment and are not presently pursuing a degree are
classified as non-degree students. This classification includes
audit, undergraduate special students, adult special students,
transient students, and high school students.
Non-degree students are required to undergo assessment and
placement if they do not meet a stated course prerequisite or
basic academic competencies.
Non-degree students cannot become candidates for a degree or
certificate until they have changed their classification to
undergraduate degree student.
High school students admitted as non-degree students who wish
to continue at Columbia State after graduation from high school
must reapply for admission and be formally admitted to the
College as degree students. Non-degree students who have
previously taken credit courses at Columbia State and who return
to the College after being absent for one semester (excluding
summer) must file an application for readmission and submit any
required documentation.
Audit Students are students who wish to sit in a credit course
without earning credit. Students who wish to audit a course(s)
must obtain approval of the dean of the academic division in
which the course(s) is offered. Approval is granted on an
individual class basis according to available space and is limited
to unrestricted classes. Students are required to complete an
Application for Admission. Applicants are required to submit a
one-time nonrefundable fee of $10 with their initial Application for
Admission.
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2015-2016 Catalog
Prior to the last day to add a class a student may change from
audit to credit; however, all admission requirements must be met.
Credit students wishing to change to audit in lieu of dropping a
course may do so by following the proper procedures for a
change of registration status.
Undergraduate Special Students are students who have
graduated from high school or who have earned a High School
Equivalency Diploma ( GED® with a composite score of a least
450 or HiSET® with a composite of at least 45) but do not wish
to be admitted as undergraduate degree students. Students are
required to complete an Application for Admission. Applicants are
required to submit a one-time nonrefundable fee of $10 with their
initial Application for Admission.
Students who have not attended an institution of higher
education must submit an official high school transcript or High
School Equivalency Diploma (GED® or HiSET®). Students who
have attended an institution of higher education must submit an
official transcript from the last institution attended.
Undergraduate special students are not eligible for financial
assistance. Additionally, undergraduate special students are not
eligible for English or mathematics courses or for courses that
have English or mathematics prerequisites unless appropriate
test scores or prior college coursework is presented and evaluated.
Adult Special Students are students at least 21 years of age
who have not graduated from high school, or have not earned a
High School Equivalency Diploma (GED® with a composite
score of a least 450 or HiSET® with a composite of at least 45
and no sub-test score below 8) and who do not wish to be
admitted as undergraduate degree students.
Adult special students must present realistic academic goals for
the attainment of particular skills or knowledge through selected
courses and:
1. schedule an interview with the Chief Enrollment Services
Officer (or designee) or the Director of the center/site where
the student plans to attend.
2. submit a completed Application for Admission. Applicants are
required to submit a one-time nonrefundable fee of $10 with
their initial Application for Admission.
Transient Students* are degree students enrolled in good
standing at another college or university who wish to attend
Columbia State for one specific semester and transfer the work
back to the parent institution. A student who has been accepted
at a college or university but is to begin enrollment at a later
semester may also qualify as a transient student.
An Application for Admission and a Transient Student Approval
Form signed by the primary institution must be submitted to the
Admissions office to ensure that a transient student has the
required background and is eligible to enroll in a course or
courses. Transient applicants may also submit office college
transcript(s) if desired. Applicants are required to submit a onetime nonrefundable fee of $10 with their initial Application for
Admission.
*Limitations: This classification may be used for only one
semester unless special permission is given by the Chief
Enrollment Services Officer.
High School Students
High school students may be eligible to enroll in college courses
as non-degree students while completing high school. They may
take classes as approved by their high school and for which they
meet the prerequisites as defined in the Columbia State catalog
(see the “Course Descriptions” section, p. 181.)
Courses will not be expected to count toward the student’s high
school diploma unless the student has made prior arrangement
with the high school and/or local board of education. Eligible
students may take classes at any location where Columbia State
offers classes.
Upon graduation from high school, students must complete an
application and be readmitted to the College. Dual Enrollment
students may not take Learning Support courses.
Dual Enrollment Students - To be eligible for transfer college
courses, students:
1. must be enrolled as a 11th, or 12th grade student in a
Tennessee public or nonpublic secondary school, or in a
home education program.
2. may enroll in a specific course based on the course's specific
placement requirements as determined by the college.
3. must enroll in high school approved dual enrollment courses
in the general education core, Tennessee Transfer Pathways
leading to a degree Career and Technical Program of study
leading to an academic award, or middle college or equivalent
program.
4. must secure parental permission and high school approval.
5. submit a Dual Enrollment Application. Applicants are required
to submit a one-time nonrefundable fee of $10 with their
initial Application for Admission.
6. submit an official high school transcript.
To continue in dual enrollment, students must maintain a 2.0
cumulative college GPA.
Academically Talented and Gifted Students - High school
students in grades 9 through 12 who are academically talented/
gifted may qualify under Chapter 395 of the Public Acts of 1983
as follows:
“Academically talented/gifted students enrolled in grades 9, 10,
11, or 12 in public or private schools in Tennessee may with the
recommendation and approval of the high school principal and
appropriate higher education institution personnel, enroll in and
receive regular college degree credit from a Tennessee postsecondary institution if such a student has a grade point average
equivalent to 3.2 on a 4.0 maximum basis and if such placement
is a part of the student’s planned Individual Education Program
(IEP) as established by the multi-disciplinary team process.”
Academically talented/gifted students must submit the following:
1. completed Application for Admission. Applicants are required
to submit a one-time nonrefundable fee of $10 with their
initial Application for Admission.
2. signed letter of consent from student’s parent/guardian.
3. official high school transcript.
4. signed letter of recommendation/consent from the high
school’s principal which includes verification that coursework
with Columbia State is required in the student’s Individual
Education Program (IEP).
2015-2016 Catalog
International Students
This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant students. Students must submit the following before
admission and issuance of an I-20 form to apply for a F-1 student
visa will be considered:
1. completed Application for Admission. Applicants are required
to submit a one-time non-refundable fee of $10 with their
initial Application for Admission.
2. official copies of academic records from secondary schools,
colleges, or universities accompanied by notarized or certified
English translation of these documents. Minimum admission
requires completion of the secondary school. A syllabus for
each class to be considered for course substitution should
accompany college transcripts.
3. all applicants whose native language is not English must
submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)
scores or its equivalent directly from the testing agency.
Scores more than two years old are not acceptable. The
minimum score of 500 is required on the paper based TOEFL,
173 on the computer based TOEFL or 61 on the internet
based TOEFL. Additional institutional placement assessment
may be required of all international students.
4. financial support to show financial capability of first year fees
which consist of the current cost of attendance for an out-ofstate, full-time, off campus housed student. Amounts typically
increase each year. Expenses do not include tuition/fees for
the optional summer term. Transportation to/from the College
is not included. Additional funds are required for spouse and
or dependents.
5. tuberculosis immunization certification from a licensed
physician or other qualified medical authority; must be
certified 30 days prior to registering. Failure to submit such
certification shall result in denial of further enrollment or
admission. In the event that a student either has tuberculosis
or has potential tuberculosis requiring medical treatment,
continued enrollment will be conditioned upon the
determination by a licensed physician that further enrollment
does not present a risk to others and upon the student’s
compliance with any prescribed medical treatment.
6. proof of two doses of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR)
and Varicella (chickenpox) vaccines.
7. complete a waiver form provided by the College that includes
detailed information about Hepatitis B infection.
8. documentation substantiating official status with the US
Citizenship and Immigration Service (Passport, Visa, I-20s,
I-94, etc.).
Additional requirements for admission include:
1. as a condition of admission and continued enrollment,
students must purchase health insurance coverage through
the TBR’s Student/Scholar Health and Accident Insurance
Plan if they do not otherwise have adequate coverage.
Adequate coverage shall mean that the student’s coverage
meets or exceeds the level of coverage provided to participants
in the TBR’s Student/Scholar Health and Accident Insurance
Plan.
2. students must become familiar with the regulations of the US
Citizenship and Immigration Service and assume responsibility
for complying with these regulations. Documents are due to
the Admissions office by November 15 for the spring semester
or July 15 for the fall semester.
Permanent Residents - International students who are permanent
residents must submit a copy of the front and back of their
permanent resident card and meet all applicable admission
requirements stated for classification as undergraduate degree
students or non-degree students.
General Requirements for Admission to
Non-Credit Courses
Individuals register for non-credit courses through the Center for
Workforce Development office. For more information, call (931)
540-2659. Admission to the College is not required. Admission is
required, however, if a non-credit student wants to enroll in a credit
course (see “Admission Requirements,” p. 16). The Center for
Workforce Development office awards continuing education units
to participants of qualifying non-credit courses.
Additional Admissions Requirements for Transfer
Programs (A.A., A.S.)
Tennessee Board of Regents and University of Tennessee
Admission Standards
Admission will be granted to freshmen applicants who hold a
recognized high school diploma and/or meet any additional
requirements as stated below. The diploma will reflect a distribution
of college preparatory courses, such as those required in the core
elements of the Tennessee High School Diploma. These courses
include the following:
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 units
Mathematics
Algebra I and II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 units
Geometry or Higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 unit
Additional Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 unit Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 units
United States History* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 unit
European History, World History . . . . . . . . . . 1 unit
or World Geography
Single Foreign Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 units
Visual or Performing Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 unit
*Required by TCA § 49-7-110. Students deficient in the completion
of United States History are required to complete six semester
hours of United States History or three semester hours of United
State History and three semester hours of Tennessee History.
Policy and Procedures for Mandatory
Placement of Students
All students seeking credit must meet mandatory assessment and
placement requirements prior to registering for courses with
placement requirements.
Students scoring 19 or above on the ACT reading with ACT
English subscores of 18 or above and ACT math subscores of 19
or above (SAT: 460 verbal, 460 math) are eligible to pursue
college-level credit courses. Students who do not have scores
sufficient to place into college-level courses will be placed into
Learning Support and corequisite college-level courses accordingly.
Students scoring below 13 on the ACT Reading, English or Math
subscores will not be eligible to enroll in the corresponding
Learning Support courses. These students should visit the
Learning Support web page for recommended steps to improve
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2015-2016 Catalog
placement. For placement purposes, ACT or SAT scores must be
dated within three years prior to the first day of the first semester
of enrollment.
Transfer students who have credit in college-level math have met
math and reading placement requirements. Transfer students who
have credit in college-level English have met English and reading
placement requirements. Transfer students who have credit
earned and posted in any approved general education college
level course have met reading placement requirements. Students
who do not have appropriate scores are required to take either the
ACT, SAT or COMPASS test.
Students will be allowed only one opportunity to challenge scores
on the placement tests used by Columbia State for purposes of
placement into college-level classes. Students may challenge the
scores by taking a Columbia State administered placement test
(currently the computer-generated COMPASS exam or, as needed,
the pencil and paper version ASSET). The challenge exam cannot
be completed on the same day as the initial placement testing.
Fees for challenging placement are the responsibility of the
student.
Students whose test results indicate no deficiencies in the basic
academic competencies are permitted to enroll in college-level
courses. Students will not be permitted to enroll in any course
which has a stated prerequisite of one of the basic academic
competencies until they have successfully completed the
appropriate the required Learning Support competencies.
Programs with Special Admission Requirements
Health Science Programs
The following health science programs require admission to the
program after being admitted to the College:
• Computed Tomography Certificate
• Emergency Medical Services
Emergency Medical Technology (Basic)
Advanced Emergency Medical Technology (AEMT)
Paramedic
•
Nursing
•
Radiologic Technology
•
Respiratory Care
•
Veterinary Technology
There is a deadline by which applicants must submit their
applications to the appropriate health science program director.
The deadline dates for each program are listed in the catalog and
published program materials.
Students interested in gaining admission to a health science
program should follow the procedures listed below:
1. Apply for admission to the College as outlined on page 16 of
the Catalog.
2. Apply for admission to the specific program as outlined by the
specific program admission procedures in the catalog and
published program materials.
Health Science programs require completion of any required
Learning Support course work prior to program application and
admission. Review published program materials carefully regarding
prerequisite courses.
After the student has completed all college and program admission
requirements, the student’s application will be reviewed by the
program’s admissions committee. The program director will notify
all students in writing concerning the disposition of their application.
Class size is limited by space availability. Acceptance is not
automatic, and continuation after admission is not guaranteed.
Student progress is continually evaluated. (See the continuation
policy in the catalog description of each health science program.)
Students enrolled in these programs must participate in clinical
experiences at various hospitals, clinics, laboratories, professional
offices and/or other types of facilities. Transportation to and from
these clinical experiences is the sole responsibility of the student.
Columbia State does not assume liability for personal injury or
property damage incurred while en route to and from these
facilities.
Students in Computed Tomography, Advanced Emergency Medical
Technology, Emergency Medical Technology (Basic), Emergency
Medical Technology-Paramedic, Nursing, Radiologic Technology,
and Respiratory Care programs must have malpractice insurance.
Students will be assessed malpractice insurance fees at the time
of registration. The program director will provide information about
such coverage.
Students may also be required to carry personal health insurance
while enrolled in the health science programs.
Criminal background checks and routine drug screens are
required by several clinical training sites as condition of
participation in clinical education. Based on the results of the
criminal background check, a clinical affiliate may determine
to not allow one's presence at their facility. This could result
in a student's inability to successfully complete the
requirements of a specific course and the program.
Additionally, a criminal background may preclude licensure
or employment. More information is available from the
program director.
Health Science programs may entail specific physical
demands as required by the program's accrediting agency.
For more information regarding these, please contact the
appropriate program director.
Commercial Entertainment Program
Commercial Entertainment students must exhibit proficiency in at
least one of four areas: dance, drama, singing or music. Students
must be physically able to participate in all four areas. Admissions
requirements are listed with the Commercial Entertainment
Certificate Program.
Film Crew Technology
Film Crew Technology students must be able to visually assess
colors and be able to determine the difference between Red,
Black, Blue, Green and White. Admissions requirements are listed
with the Film Crew Certificate Program.
2015-2016 Catalog
Institutional Fees and Refunds
The following table provides cost details for the 2015-2016 academic year:
Application Fee
Cost
Applicants are required to submit a one-time non-refundable fee with their initial $10
Application for Admission. An application fee is not assessed for non-credit courses.
Maintenance Fees
In State Students
See "Registration Fees - Tennessee Residents", p. 23 for more information.
Cost
$152 per semester hour up to 12 hours
$30 per hour for all additional hours (13+)
Out-of-State Students
See "Non-residents of Tennessee", p. 23 for more information.
$627 per semester hour up to 12 hours
$125 per hour for all additional hours (13+)
Summer Term Fees
Fees and expenses for the summer term are
assessed strictly on a per-semester-hour basis with
no maximum.
Late Registration Fee
$25
A non-refundable late fee will be assessed for any student who does not complete
registration within the period designated by the College.
Exceptions:
1. A late registration fee is not assessed when registering late in any
non-credit course.
2. A late registration fee will not apply to classes where it is deemed
necessary by the director of records that further recruiting is required
in order to develop the class.
Regents Online Degree Program (RODP) Course
For more information, go to "Tuition and Fees" at www.rodp.org
Cost
In State Students
$152 per hour, no maximum
Out-of-State Students
$627 per hour, no maximum
Online Course Fee
$61 per hour, no maximum
General Access Fees
Campus Access Fee
This non-refundable fee is included in the registration fees and covers the cost of
one parking decal. Additional decals may be purchased at a cost of $1 per decal.
Cost
$10 per semester
International Education Fee
$10 per semester
This fee is charged to support international educational opportunities and experiences.
These fees are refundable only in situations where maintenance fees are refunded
at 100%.
Student Activity Fee
This non-refundable fee is charged to support student activities.
$3 per semester
Technology Access Fee
This fee is included in the registration fees. This fee is non-refundable except in
situations where maintenance fees are refunded at 100%.
$10 per semester hour or $112.50 maximum per
semester
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2015-2016 Catalog
Specialized Course Fees
Cost
Advanced Integrated Industrial Technology (AIIT) Academic Course Fee
$37 per credit hour
Health Sciences Academic Course Fee
Courses include: Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Radiologic Technology,
Respiratory Care, and Veterinary Technology.
$25 per credit hour
Columbia State Internet Course Fee (Web-Asynchronous)
$38 per credit hour
Individual Music Instruction Fee
$60 per credit hour
This fees is charged for all individual instruction courses in music. Music fee will
be refunded on the same basis as maintenance fees.
Other Fees (Non-refundable)
Cost
Credit by Exam fee
Charged for each exam a student takes to obtain "Credit by Exam".
$25 per course
Credit for Prior Learning Fee
Charged for any credit awarded for prior learning.
$15 per credit hour
Parking Fines - All parking fines are payable in the Business Services office and
double if not paid before the semester ends. Student records be encumbered until
all fines are cleared. Appeals should be submitted to the associate vice president
for student services in writing within five (5) days from the date of the citation.
Books and Supplies
Since the cost of books and supplies varies from one program to another and from
semester to semester, only an average book cost can be included in the Catalog.
The average cost of books and supplies is approximately $700 per semester.
Books and supplies may be purchased from the Barnes & Noble College bookstore
located on the Columbia and Franklin campuses.
Replacement of Lost ID Card
$1
American College Testing (Residual)
$38
CLEP
$105
Compass Challenge Fee
$20
High School Equivalency Exam: HiSET®
High School Equivalency Exam: GED®
$75
120
Non-Tennessee Board of Regents Proctoring Services
$25
Nursing Challenge Exam
$220
Nursing Challenge Exam Optional Portion
Pearson Vue®
$170
Praxis Series: Core Academic Skills for Educators
Varies according to the test
Non-Credit Courses
The Center for Workforce Development publishes course fees in its non-credit
schedule each semester. The fee for a course is based on length, instructor
payment, and other cost-related factors.
Varies according to the test
Cost
2015-2016 Catalog
General Information
Fees listed in this catalog are subject to change without notice.
The College, in conjunction with the Tennessee Board of Regents,
reserves the right to add, delete, or change fees for admission to
the College or for services rendered by the College at any time
without prior notice to the public.
Expenses are assessed and payable by the semester since each
semester is a separate unit of operation. Registration is not
complete until all fees have been paid (which means all checks
have cleared the bank), and no student may be admitted to
classes without having met his or her financial obligations. The
Business Services office on the Columbia campus or the
administrative office at any of the College’s campus locations will
accept payment by cash, check, MasterCard, Visa, American
Express or Discover Card. There is a $30 non-refundable charge
for any returned check given to the College. No student may
enroll, graduate, or receive a transcript until all accounts are
settled. The term “account” includes any indebtedness to the
College.
To help meet educational expenses each semester, Columbia
State offers the opportunity to enroll in an automatic payment plan
through QuickPAY. It is not a loan; therefore, there is no debt and
no interest or finance charges are assessed. A $25 per semester
nonrefundable fee is required. Payments are automatically
deducted on the 5th of each month (except for summer semester
which is deducted on the 20th) from a designated checking or
savings account, or the student may have the payment charged
to a credit card. For more information go to www.
mycollegepaymentplan.com/cscc.
Student identification (ID) cards are issued to all students at no
charge. This ID card is required of students for identification,
computer lab use, checking out library materials and some
bookstore purchases. Additionally, it allows a student to attend all
College activities open to the student body at no charge or at
student rates.
Expenses
Registration Fees - Tennessee Residents
Maintenance fees are assessed on a per-semester-hour basis.
Maintenance fees are determined annually by the Tennessee
Board of Regents.
Exceptions:
1. Certain statutory fee exceptions exist for dependents and
spouses of military personnel who were killed, died as a
direct result of injuries received, or were officially reported as
being either a prisoner of war or missing in action while
serving honorably as a member of the United States armed
forces during a qualifying period of armed conflict. Contact
the Financial Aid office to verify eligibility.
2. Persons who are totally disabled, persons 65 years of age or
older, and persons reaching 65 during the semester who are
domiciled in Tennessee are eligible to enroll in courses for
credit at a reduced rate; however, all other special and
incidental fees apply.
3. Totally disabled persons and persons 60 years of age or
older who are domiciled in Tennessee are eligible to enroll in
courses, subject to space available, as audit students
without payment of tuition, maintenance, or registration fees.
However, the application fee is required. These students
must contact the Records Office to register and can register
only after the due date of Tuition/Fee Payment (see "Important
Dates", p. 9).
4. Maximum fees do not apply to special offerings between
terms, concentrated courses during a term, and summer
term courses.
Audit Students
Students enrolling in regular college classes on an audit basis are
required to pay the same fees as those enrolling for credit, except
those 60 years of age or older and/or totally disabled persons as
noted above.
For purposes of 2 and 3 above, a totally disabled person is
defined as a person "suffering from a permanent total
disability which totally incapacitates such person from
working at an occupation which brings him/her an income."
This definition is established by law and cannot be modified
by the Tennessee Board of Regents or the College. Persons
who believe they qualify under this definition should contact
the coordinator of disability services for more information.
Non-residents of Tennessee - Residency Classification
Residency decisions are in compliance with the Tennessee Board
of Regents Policy No. 3:05:01:00 entitled Regulations for
Classifying Students in In-State and Out-of-State for the Purposes
of Paying College or University Fees and Tuition and for
Admission Purposes. Students are classified as in-state or outof-state for the purpose of assessing fees and tuition based on
regulations established by the Tennessee Board of Regents.
Contact admissions or enrollment services for a copy of the policy
and residency application.
The Tennessee Eligibility Verification for Entitlement Act (EVEA)
[TCA 4-58-101 seq.] requires public institutions of higher education
to verify that persons seeking a "state benefit" are either a "United
States Citizen" or "lawfully present" in the United States.
The term "state benefit" includes in-state tuition, lottery Scholarship,
academic scholarship, common market, or any other form of tuition
assistance or wavier funded with state- appropriated dollars. State
benefit does not include tuition assistance funded privately, such
as a scholarship from the institution's foundation or a privately
endowed scholarship.
For more information on this act or documentation needed to verify
"state benefit" eligibility, please contact the admissions office. The
responsibility for residency classification rests with the Enrollment
Services Operations Manager and all requests must be sent to
the admissions office. Residency classification may be appealed
to the associate vice president for student services.
Returned Checks (Tuition, fees, etc.)
The Columbia State Business Services office will notify the
student immediately upon receipt of returned or non-negotiable
checks. The student will have 10 days to redeem returned
checks.
In addition to all other unpaid tuition, fees, etc., the student will be
required to pay: (1) the late registration fee and (2) the returned
check fee. If the student does not pay the required fees within the
time allotted, his or her registration will be voided.
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2015-2016 Catalog
Students are not officially registered until all tuition and fees,
including any and all assessed fees outstanding from prior
enrollment, are paid.
e-Rate
1. The e-Rate is available to students who enroll at TBR
institutions, who are classified as non-residents of Tennessee,
and who are enrolled exclusively in online courses.
2. The e-Rate is 150% of the institution’s approved maintenance
fee rate.
3. To qualify for an e-Rate, students must
a. meet all institution admission requirements, and
b. be verified as an online out-of-state student enrolled
exclusively in courses delivered by a procedure
documented by the institution.
4. Students enrolled in any type courses (on-ground, telecourse,
distance education, etc.) other than online will not be eligible
for the e-Rate specified in this guideline and will instead incur
traditional non-resident fees and charges. Students who
enroll in both online courses and other type courses and
subsequently drop the other type courses will not then
become eligible for the e-Rate.
Institutional Refunds
1. Maintenance Fee Refunds and Adjustments
a. Refunds are 100% for courses canceled by the
institution.
b. Changes in courses involving the adding and dropping
of equal numbers of student credit hours for the same
term at the same time require no refund or assessment
of additional maintenance fees.
c. The fee adjustment for withdrawals or drops during
regular terms (fall and spring) is 75% from the first day
of classes through the fourteenth calendar day of
classes and then reduced to 25% for a period of time
which extends 25% of the length of the term. There is no
fee adjustment after the 25% period ends. Dropping or
withdrawing from classes during either the 75% for the
25% fee adjustment period will result in a fee adjustment
of assessed maintenance fees based on the total credit
hours of the final student enrollment as described in
item j. below.
d. For summer sessions and other short terms, the 75%
fee adjustment period and the 25% fee adjustment
period will extend a length of time which is the same
proportion of the term as the 75% and 25% periods are
of the regular terms.
e. All fee adjustment periods will be rounded to whole days
and the date on which each fee adjustment period ends
will be included in publications. In calculating the 75%
period for other than the fall and spring and in calculating
the 25% length of term in all cases, the number of
calendar days during the term will be considered. When
the calculation produces a fractional day, rounding will
be up or down to the nearest whole day.
f. A full refund (100%) is provided on behalf of a student
whose death occurs during the term. Any indebtedness
should be offset against the refund.
g. A 100% refund will be provided for students who enroll
under an advance registration system but who drop a
course or courses prior to the beginning of the first day
of class.
h. A 100% refund will be provided to students who are
compelled by the institution to withdraw when it is
determined through institutional error they were
academically ineligible for enrollment or were not
properly admitted to enroll for the course(s) being
dropped. The director of records must certify in writing
that this provision is applicable in each case.
i. When courses are included in a regular term’s
registration process for administrative convenience, but
the course does not begin until later in the term, the 75%
and 25% fee adjustment periods will be based on the
particular course’s beginning and ending dates. This
provision does not apply to classes during the fall or
spring terms which may meet only once per week.
Those courses will follow the same refund dates as
other regular courses for the term.
j. The fee adjustment is calculated as the difference
between (1) the cost of originally enrolled hours and (2)
the per credit hour cost of the courses at final enrollment
after adjustments have been applied for all courses
dropped. Adjustments are calculated at the full per credit
hour rate less the fee adjustment credit at the applicable
fee adjustment percentage (regardless of the original
number of hours enrolled) with total costs not to exceed
full-time tuition. For students dropping courses resulting
in a change from full-time status to part-time status, a
fee adjustment in the tuition and fees will result only if
the new calculated charges are less than the original
charges. Not all drops/withdrawals will result in a fee
adjustment.
2. Out-of-State Tuition Refunds and Fee Adjustments
The fee adjustment provision for out-of-state tuition is the
same as that for maintenance fees. A 75% fee adjustment
period and the 25% fee adjustment period will follow the
same dates as the fee adjustment periods for maintenance
fees. When 100% of maintenance fees are refunded, 100%
of out-of-state tuition is also refunded. Calculation procedures
are the same as those specified for maintenance fees.
The president of the College has the authority to determine,
on an individual basis, the applicability of the above refund
procedures in instances of unusual circumstances.
2015-2016 Catalog
Financial Assistance
General Information
Application Procedures
Columbia State offers grants, scholarships, loans and part-time
work to students who qualify. In most cases, the Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is used to determine a student's
eligibility for financial aid. Only a few scholarships do not require
completion of the FAFSA. All federal financial aid assistance
programs plus many state and institutional require completion of
the FAFSA.
To apply for most financial aid programs, a student must:
1. Complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.ed.gov using Columbia State's
school code (003483) after January 1 of each year.
2. The FAFSA must be completed by March 15 to be considered
for priority aid at Columbia State. Priority processing is July 1
to submit any new documents including verification to assure
the Financial Aid Office has sufficient time to complete
awarding.
3. An additional application is required for Federal Work Study
and Federal Direct Loans and may be obtained from the
Columbia State financial aid web site or in the Financial Aid
office. These should be submitted by the priority processing
date as listed each semester in the catalog.
4. An additional state application is required for Tennessee
Promise. More information is available at www.tnpromise.gov
about the November 1 deadline for this application.
Regulations and funding for institutional-, state-, and
federally-supported programs are subject to change.
Columbia State reserves the right to administer the programs
accordingly.
Financial aid applications and forms are available on the web at
www.columbiastate.edu/financialaid, in the Financial Aid Office,
Jones Student Center, Columbia campus, or in the administrative
office at any other college campus location.
Programs that Columbia State offers include:
• Federal Pell Grant
• Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
• Federal Work-Study and Institutional Work-Study
• Federal Direct Loans
• Federal Direct Parent Loans (PLUS)
• State of Tennessee Grants and Scholarships, including
Tennessee Student Assistance Award and HOPE
• Tennessee Promise Scholarships
• Various Academic and Performance Scholarships
• VA Educational Benefits
Some of these programs are need-based. Financial need is
calculated by a formula based on nationally determined standards.
The following formula is a simplified explanation of financial need:
Educational Costs - Expected Family Contribution = Financial
Need
Educational costs (Cost of Attendance) consist of tuition and fees;
books and supplies; room and board; transportation, personal
and other school related expenses. The expected family
contribution is what the student/spouse or student/parents should
be able to contribute toward educational costs. The costs in this
formula are determined by each school, and the expected family
contribution is determined by standard calculations based on
information from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA). A student may require additional money to attend
school, but not have financial need as defined by the federal
government.
Need analysis is determined by the U.S. Department of Education
by using information provided on the FAFSA. The FAFSA is used
to determine student eligibility for federal, state, institutional, and
private financial aid programs. The FAFSA may be filed after
January 1 each year and at the very latest, must be received by
June 30 of the following year.
NOTE: Students who already have a baccalaureate degree are
not eligible to receive Federal Pell Grant.
Methods of Selection
Applications received by March 15 will be given first priority. If
there are remaining funds after this date, funds will be awarded
on a first-come, first-served basis by the date the file is completed
until funds are exhausted.
The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
(FSEOG) is a non-repayable grant to help undergraduate students
with exceptional financial need. Priority is given to Pell Grant
recipients. Students must be Pell eligible, financially needy and
awards are prorated based on hours participating in each
semester.
FSEOG and Federal Work Study funds remaining at the end of
Spring semester will be used to assist eligible students with
Summer semester costs.
Federal Pell Grant funds are awarded as students are determined
eligible.
Awarding of loans under the Federal Direct Student Loan
Program are made following determination of eligibility upon
student requests.
All state programs are awarded as students are determined
eligible.
Eligibility
To be eligible for federal student aid, a student must meet all of
the following criteria:
• Have a high school diploma or a High School Equivalency
Diploma (GED® or HiSET®).
• Have a valid Social Security number.
• Have financial need.
• Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen.
• Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment for the purpose of
obtaining a degree or certificate.
• Be registered with Selective Service, if required.
• Must certify that you will use federal financial aid only for
educational purposes.
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2015-2016 Catalog
•
•
•
Must not be in default on a federal student loan or must not
owe money on a federal grant.
Must not be incarcerated, except in specific exceptions as
outlined in federal policy.
Make satisfactory academic progress.
Federally Funded Financial Aid Programs
Federal Pell Grants - These funds provide financial assistance to
eligible students who are pursuing an Associate's degree or
certificate. The Federal Pell Grant is awarded based on financial
need and eligibility is determined by the U.S. Department of
Education based on the information provided on the FAFSA. The
financial aid award is initially based upon full-time enrollment. If
a student's enrollment changes the award will be prorated.
For less than full-time enrolled students, the Federal Pell Grant is
prorated as follows:
Semester Credit Hours
Full-time
12 or more
Three-Quarter Time
9-11
Half-Time
6-8
Less than Half-Time
1-5
Please note: Financial aid is not available for short-term certificates
(less than 16 credit hours).
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Undergraduates with exceptional financial need may be eligible
for these SEOG funds. Eligibility is determined by the Financial
Aid office based on financial need and available funds. Pell
eligible students with a "0" family contribution whose FAFSA was
received by March 15 will receive first priority.
Federal Work Study - This program provides part-time
employment for eligible students. To be eligible for a part-time job,
a student must have a completed FAFSA on file, have financial
need, and be making satisfactory academic progress. Students
earn hourly rate (determined each award year). Federal workstudy payroll is processed monthly and time sheets are due from
the supervisors to the Business Office or Cashiers in the Pryor
Building by the 15th of each month. Funds will be directly
deposited into the student's bank account on the last working day
of each month. Applications for employment are available on the
Columbia State web site. All federal work-study students work in
accordance with the schedule set by the supervisor. FWS work
hours claimed must not be while students are scheduled to be in
class or involved in an athletic event. Failure to fulfill the work
schedule or perform satisfactory work will result in loss of
employment.
Student Loans
Columbia State Community College participates in the William D.
Ford Direct Student Loan Programs.
Federal Direct Student Loan (Subsidized) - Available to
students who demonstrate financial need. Eligible students may
borrow a subsidized Direct Loan to cover some or all of their
educational needs. For the subsidized loan, the U.S. Department
of Education pays the interest, while the student is in school at
least half-time, for the first six months after leaving school
(referred to as a "grace period"), and during a period of deferment
(a postponement of loan payment). The amount of the subsidized
loan cannot exceed the student's financial need.
Federal Direct Student Loan (Unsubsidized) - Does not require
a student to demonstrate financial need. The U.S. Department of
Education does not pay interest on unsubsidized loans. The
financial aid department will determine the amount of the
unsubsidized loan based on the cost of attendance minus other
financial assistance. For an unsubsidized loan the student is
responsible for paying the interest that accrues on the loan from
the time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full.
Depending on the student's financial need, a student may receive
both the subsidized and unsubsidized loans for the same
enrollment period, but the total amount of these loans may not
exceed the annual loan limit.
Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students
(PLUS) - These loans are available to parents of dependent
students regardless of income level if the parents have no
adverse credit history. The annual loan limits are based on the
cost of attendance minus other financial assistance. The loan will
be made co-payable to the school and parents and repayment
begins sixty (60) days after the disbursement.
Loan Disbursement
Federal Direct student loans are disbursed in two (2) equal
payments and sent directly to Columbia State. First-time
Freshman Borrowers will have a 30 day delay for first disbursement
after the first day classes. Federal regulations require the school
to verify the student is enrolled at least half-time (6 hours), is
participating in classes and making satisfactory academic
progress at the time of disbursement. Students receive notification
when loan payments arrive.
NOTE: Columbia State Community College does not endorse any
private student loans.
How to Apply
Columbia State Community College does not automatically
package loans. In order to apply for a Federal Direct Loan a
student must:
• Complete the FAFSA
• Complete a Columbia State Direct Loan Request form
available at www.columbiastate.edu/financialaid.
• First-time borrowers to Columbia State must, also, go to www.
studentloans.gov and:
1.Complete Direct Loan Entrance Counseling, a tool to
ensure a student understands the obligation to repay the
loan.
2.Sign Master Promissory Note (MPN), agreeing to the terms
of the loan.
• Returning students who have never borrowed a Federal Direct
Loan must, also, go to www.studentloans.gov and:
1.Complete Direct Loan Entrance Counseling.
2.Sign Master Promissory Note (MPN).
To apply for a Direct PLUS Loan:
• Parent will need to complete a Columbia State Direct PLUS
Request form available at www.columbiastate.edu/financialaid.
• Complete the Direct Plus Loan Process at www.studentloans.
gov.
• Endorse Direct PLUS Loan.
Priority processing for a fall loan is July 1 and for a spring loan is
November 1.
2015-2016 Catalog
Eligibility
In order to be eligible for a Federal Direct Loan (Subsidized and
Unsubsidized), students must:
1. Be enrolled in at least six credit hours.
2. Be making Satisfactory Academic Progress.
3. Completed Direct Loan Entrance Counseling.
4. Have electronically signed Direct Loan Master Promissory
Note.
5. Return Columbia State Direct Student Loan Request to the
Financial Aid office.
In order to be eligible for a Federal Direct Parent Loan for
Undergraduate Students (PLUS):
1. Student must have a completed FAFSA on file with Columbia
State.
2. Student must be enrolled in at least six credit hours.
3. Student must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress.
4. Parent must return Columbia State Direct PLUS Loan
application to the Financial Aid office.
5. Parent must have completed the PLUS Request Process and
endorsed the Direct PLUS Loan with the Department of
Education.
Delivery of Loan Proceeds
Schools are required to disburse all loan proceeds in at least two
payments. Columbia State will verify that the student is still
enrolled at least half-time (6 hours), attending class and making
Satisfactory Academic Progress before funds are released.
Disbursement dates will be posted on the Financial Aid web site.
If a student or parent wishes to cancel a loan and return the funds
to the lender, the student or parent must send an e-mail to
[email protected] or submit this information in
writing to the Financial Aid office. Please note that NO loan funds
are available for delivery prior to the first day of classes for any
semester.
Veterans Information and Services
Columbia State is a DoD Voluntary Education Partnership
Memorandum of Understanding (DOD MOU) school and
cooperates with the Veterans Administration in providing
educational opportunities for veterans and eligible persons
desiring to attend Columbia State under appropriate federal
legislation. Students receiving VA education benefits are required
to meet the same standard of progress as all other students.
Veterans should also be aware of the following additional
responsibilities:
1. All veterans are required to complete a Columbia State
Veteran's Request for Certification each semester of
attendance. Failure to do so will result in one's enrollment not
being certified for payment. Certification forms are available
on the Financial Aid web site.
2. Federal regulations require a student to be seeking a degree/
certificate in order to be eligible for veteran's benefits.
Students may only take classes that apply to the degree/
certificate they are currently seeking at Columbia State. Any
other classes taken will not be certified for payment. Please
refer to the degree and certificate requirements listed in the
catalog for information on eligible classes for one's program.
3. VA will not certify Learning Support classes that are delivered
entirely by online methods (Columbia State does not deliver
on-line Learning Support classes.)
4. Veteran students being certified for certificate programs must
meet the following progress standards:
a. Attain a 2.0 GPA for the current semester, or
b. Maintain a minimum cumulative GPA as shown below:
1. GPA must be at least 1.5 after attempting 50% of the
certificate program.
2. GPA must be at least 2.0 above 50% of the certificate
program.
Failure to meet these standards will result in being placed on
probation for one term; the student will be notified. Failure to
meet these standards at the end of the probationary term will
result in termination of GI Bill benefits until satisfactory
progress is regained.
5. Veteran students must notify school certifying official if they
add or drop a course, change degree program, change
address, or withdraw from classes.
6. The VA will not pay for the repeat of satisfactorily completed
courses.
7. If veteran students do not make satisfactory academic
progress, they may be placed on probation or suspension
from veteran's benefits.
8. The VA requires Columbia State to give prior credit for any
previous education a veteran student may have received.
Official academic transcripts from each previous college
attended must be on file in the Columbia State Records office.
Veteran's benefits can be certified for only two semesters
without official academic transcripts being on file. Any
subsequent semesters of attendance will not be certified for
payment until the required academic transcripts have been
received and evaluated by the Records office.
9. Veterans may complete a Student Veteran/Certain Veteran's
Dependent Tuition & Fees Payment Deferment request to
defer tuition and fees at Columbia State. These forms are
available in the Financial Aid office or by contacting the VA
certifying official. This form must be completed each school
semester.
The Financial Aid office will assist eligible individuals in completing
of necessary forms, program planning, and making appropriate
certifications to the Veterans Administration. Columbia State does
not participate in advance payment of tuition for veterans.
Veterans, and dependents of veterans who are eligible
beneficiaries of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs education
benefits or other governmentally funded educational assistance,
subject to the conditions and guidelines set forth in Tennessee
Code Annotated 49-7-104 as amended, may elect, upon formal
application, to defer payment of required tuition and fees until the
final day of their term for which the deferment has been requested.
Application for the deferment must be made no later than 14 days
prior to the beginning of the term, and the amount of the
deferment shall not exceed the total monetary benefits to be
received for the term. Students who have been granted deferments
must make timely payments on their outstanding tuition and fees
balance once education benefits are being delivered, and
eligibility for such deferment shall terminate if the student fails to
abide by an applicable rule or regulation, or to act in good faith in
making timely payments. This notice is published pursuant to
Public Chapter 279, Acts of 2003.
Questions regarding entitlement, eligibility, or payments from the
Department of Veterans Affairs should be directed to 1-888-4424551. Information regarding the Veterans Benefits Administration
or the GI Bill is available at www.benefits.va.gov/benefits.
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2015-2016 Catalog
For more information on VA benefits, contact Financial Aid
[email protected] or call the Columbia State
Financial Aid Office VA School Certifying Official at (615) 5914180.
Other Assistance Programs
Other financial assistance for students may be available through
programs with:
1. Workforce Development
2. Vocational Rehabilitation
Contact the Financial Aid office at [email protected]
edu for information regarding these programs.
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Standards for
Federal Financial Assistance
Federal and state regulations require that students meet certain
academic standards to be eligible for financial aid. The basic
standards are:
• Students are expected to maintain a satisfactory grade \
point average;
• Students are expected to successfully complete at least
67% of the classes they attempt; and
• Students are expected to complete their program in a timely
manner;
All coursework is evaluated for financial aid purposes whether or
not financial aid was received for that work. These standards will
be evaluated at the end of each semester. Following is more
information on each of the standards listed above.
Notification
It is the students’ responsibility to stay informed of the Satisfactory
Academic Progress Standards and to monitor their progress.
This status may be checked at any time on Charger Net. The
Financial Aid Office will notify, via Columbia State e-mail, any
student who does not meet the minimum requirements as well as
the results of any appeal at the end of each semester. It is the
responsibility of the student to check their Columbia State e-mail.
Appeals and supporting documentation must be submitted by
deadlines published each term on the Columbia State website.
Classes will be held from purging due to a submitted appeal and
pending decision only if purge is scheduled prior to committee
decision and student notification.
Term Grade Point Average (Qualitative)
Students who do not earn any credits (zero hours) in any one
semester will be considered to be in violation of Satisfactory
Academic Progress Standards. Additionally, these students may
be responsible for repayment of federal aid received for that term.
The GPA includes grades of W, F, FA & I and Learning Support.
Cumulative Grade Point Average Requirement (Qualitative)
Students must meet the retention standards of Columbia State in
order to maintain eligibility. A student must earn the overall
combined Grade Point Average (GPA) below to remain in good
standing. The overall GPA includes Learning Support hours but
not transfer. Students in violation of the cumulative GPA
requirement may also be on Academic Probation or Academic
Dismissal with the Records Office. The Records Office is
responsible for reviewing any appeals related to a student who is
on Academic Probation or Academic Dismissal.
Associate Degree Programs
Overall Combined GPA Hrs.
Minimum Cumulative GPA
00.1 – 14.0
No minimum
14.1 – 26.0
1.0
26.1 – 40.0
1.4
40.1 – 48.0
1.7
48.1 – 56.0
1.9
56.0 and above
2.0
Certificate Degree Programs
Overall Combined GPA Hrs.
Minimum Cumulative GPA
1 - 25%
1.0
26 – 50%
1.5
51% and above
2.0
Pace: Measurable Progress Requirement (Quantitative)
Students are expected to maintain progress toward the completion
of their degree. Therefore, students must have an overall
completion rate of 67% of all college level hours attempted
including learning support. The completion rate is calculated by
dividing the cumulative number of hours successfully completed
by the cumulative number of hours attempted including Learning
Support and transfer hours. A grade of “A, B, C, D or P” will be
required for successful completion. Grades of “W, I, F, or FA” are
not considered completions. Classes that are dropped/withdrawn,
repeated, or earn incomplete grades after the semester census
date (14th day of classes) are counted as attempted hours.
Students who do not keep pace with this progression requirement
will be considered to be making unsatisfactory academic progress.
Maximum Time Limit: Reasonable Length of Time Requirement
A reasonable length of time for completion of an educational
program is defined as no longer than 150% of the length of the
program. For example, a student enrolled in a degree program
that requires 60 credit hours must complete all requirements by
the time they have attempted 90 hours (60 hours x 150% = 90
hours). Students will not be considered to have reached the
150% hour maximum until after the semester in which they reach
or exceed the attempted hours allowed. It is important to note
that transfer hours accepted by the college count toward the
attempted hours. Learning Support hours count towards the
attempted hours.
Learning Support Limit
Students may receive aid for up to 30 attempted semester hours
of Learning Support coursework. Transfer credits will be included
in the total hours of eligibility. All attempts including withdrawals
and repeats count toward the maximum number of hours
attempted. This time limit cannot be appealed!
Repeated Courses
All credits from repeated courses will be counted toward the
maximum hours. Students may repeat a previously passed
course once and be eligible for payment on the repeat (2nd
attempt). If student passes class, then retakes the class again
and receives W grade for 2nd attempt, student is not eligible to
receive financial aid again for that class. Grades of W, F, FA and
I count as 2nd attempt for class. Students may repeat a failed
course until it is passed and be eligible for payment. These
students will eventually be in violation of Cumulative GPA, Pace,
and/or Maximum Time Frame.
2015-2016 Catalog
Transfer Students
All academic transcripts must be received and evaluated by the
institution prior to determining Satisfactory Academic Progress
Standards for financial aid. Only transfer credits officially
accepted by Columbia State Community College will be counted
in determining applicable Satisfactory Academic Progress
Standards.
Unsatisfactory Academic Progress
Failure to meet these standards results in the loss of eligibility of
financial aid, including, but not limited to, Federal Pell Grant,
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal
Direct Loans, Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS),
Federal Work Study, Tennessee Student Assistance Award
(TSAA), Tennessee Lottery Programs including HOPE, and
Tennessee Promise. Once a student becomes ineligible for
financial aid due to Unsatisfactory Academic Progress, the
student is not eligible to receive these funds until the standards
have once again been met or an eligible appeal has been
approved. Students must attend classes and pay for these
classes from their own resources until the guidelines have been
re-established, if eligible appeal not approved.
Appeal Process
Any loss of eligibility as a result of this policy may be appealed in
writing to the Director of Financial Aid and the Admissions &
Financial Aid Appeals Committee. All appeals may be submitted
in person to any campus by established deadlines to be forwarded
to the Director of Financial Aid or the appeal may be submitted to
[email protected] The Satisfactory Academic
Progress Appeal (SAP) form is available on the Financial Aid
website. The appeal must include a signed, written statement
explaining why student failed to make satisfactory academic
progress and what has changed in the student’s situation that will
allow satisfactory progress at the next evaluation. Appropriate
supporting documentation may be attached. The student will be
notified by Columbia State e-mail of the results of the appeal. All
decisions made by the committee are final.
For Maximum Time Limit appeals, only a SAPMAX Appeal for
Financial Aid Additional Coursework form needs to be submitted.
The student will be notified by Columbia State email of the result
of the appeal. If an appeal is denied one semester, the student
may submit another appeal for a future semester.
Financial Aid Probation
A student who appeals and has had their eligibility reinstated, will
be given the status of Financial Aid Probation. Students are put
on Financial Aid Probation if the student can reach good standing
within one semester, have not attended in the past 2 years, or
have extreme circumstances (i.e. major illness/injury/surgery,
death) which occurred during the last semester student attended.
Any extreme circumstances must be documented. The student
may receive aid for one payment period while on probation. The
next enrollment period after Financial Aid Probation, the student
must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress to remain
eligible. If not meeting SAP Standards, the student must file
another appeal. Students successful in the second appeal may be
placed on a Financial Aid Academic Plan designated by the
Admissions & Financial Aid Appeals Committee to assist the
student in reaching good standing with SAP.
Academic Plans
Students may be assigned a SAP Academic Plan to assist in
reaching good standing with the standards. The Academic Plan
may require the student to complete a specified percentage of
credit hours, earn a specified GPA, and meet with an academic
advisor. Students remain on the Academic Plan until back in good
standing with SAP. If a student fails to meet the Academic Plan
terms, the student is terminated from financial aid eligibility until in
good standing with SAP. The student may regain financial aid
eligibility by remaining in school, paying their own charges and
re-establishing eligibility. The student may then appeal to the
Admissions & Financial Aid Appeals Committee to reinstate
financial aid eligibility with the Satisfactory Academic Progress
(SAP) Appeal form available on the website.
Students are required to complete a Financial Aid Academic Plan
Acknowledgement form indicating the student understands and
agree to the terms of the Academic Plan before any financial aid
disburses.
The Academic Plan Acknowledgement form is
emailed to the student’s Columbia State email. Each semester
the student is on the Academic Plan, a new acknowledgement
form will be sent the student to complete and return before any
financial aid disburses.
Termination of eligibility to receive financial aid has no effect
on the right to enroll as a student at Columbia State.
Appeals not reviewed by Committee (Reviewed by Financial
Aid Director and/or Scholarships Coordinator)
• Maximum Time Frame – If a student is meeting the Pace &
Cumulative GPA guidelines of the SAP policy and is only in ]
violation of maximum time frame, students may be granted an
extension of hours to complete their degree. A SAPMAX
Appeal for Financial Aid Additional Coursework form is
submitted for this appeal.
• Term GPA/Zero Hour Completion violation – If a student is
meeting the Pace & Cumulative GPA guidelines of the SAP
policy and is only in violation of Term GPA/Zero Hour
Completion, students may be given a Warning.
• Pace – If a student can reach good standing within one
semester, have not attended in the past two years, or have
extreme circumstances (i.e. major illness/injury/surgery,
death) which occurred during the last semester student
attended, student may be placed on Probation for one
semester. If a student is still in violation after Probation
semester, then the student must re-appeal.
• Cumulative GPA violation - If a student can reach good standing within one semester, have not attended in the past
two years, or have extreme circumstances (i.e. major illness/
injury/surgery, death) which occurred during the last semester
attended, student may be placed on Probation for one
semester. If a student remains in violation after Probation semester, then the student must re-appeal.
Financial Aid Class Participation Policy
As recipients of Title IV aid (Federal Pell Grants, Federal Direct
Loans, Federal Direct Parent Loans, Federal Supplemental
Educational Opportunity Grants, State Grants, or Federal WorkStudy), students should participate in all class meetings.
As Columbia State Community College is a school that is not
required to take attendance by Title IV, the Financial Aid office
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2015-2016 Catalog
determines student participation in enrolled classes on the
College defined census date. After this date, a grade of "FA" is
used to alert the Financial Aid Department to unofficial withdrawals.
Students may no longer be eligible to receive financial assistance
for unofficial withdrawals. Students may also be billed for any
funds they have received and not earned. The Financial Aid office
is notified of official withdrawals by the Records Office weekly.
Students who find it necessary to stop attending class must
complete the official withdrawal process (see Academic
Information, Registration for Courses, “Dropping a Class”
and “Withdrawal”).
Return of Title IV Funds Policy
Students who withdraw from all classes prior to completing 60%
of an enrollment term will have their aid recalculated based on the
percent of the term they completed and may owe money to repay
the award. The Financial Aid office encourages students to read
this policy carefully. If a student is thinking about withdrawing from
all classes PRIOR to completing the semester, please CONTACT
the Financial Aid office to determine how withdrawal will affect
one's financial aid and possible repayment.
"Title IV Funds" refers to federal aid programs authorized under
the Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended) and includes:
Federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans, Direct Parent
Loans to Undergraduate Students (PLUS), Federal Pell Grants,
and Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG).
A student's withdrawal date is:
• The date the student began the institution's withdrawal
process (as described in Columbia State's class schedule) or
officially notified the institution of intent to withdraw, or
• The midpoint of the period for a student who stops attending
all classes without notifying the institution, or
• The student's last date of participation in a documented
course-related activity.
Students may withdraw from all classes using myChargerNet.
Refunds on all institutional charges (tuition and fees) are
calculated by using the institutional refund policy published in the
catalog. Refunds calculated by Columbia State as the result of
students who drop a class(es) but who do not totally withdraw
from the institution will be refunded to the student.
For a student who withdraws without providing notification to
Columbia State Records, the college will determine the withdrawal
date no later than 30 days after the end of the earliest of the (1)
payment period or period of enrollment, (2) academic year, or (3)
educational program.
The percentage of Title IV aid unearned to be returned to the
appropriate program shall be 100% minus the percent earned. No
program can receive a refund if the student did not receive aid
from that program. Unearned aid shall be returned first by
Columbia State within a 45-day time frame from the student's
account to the appropriate programs in the following order:
1. Unsubsidized Direct Loan
2. Subsidized Direct Loan
3. Direct Parent Loans to Undergraduate Students (PLUS)
4. Federal Pell Grant
5. Federal SEOG
When the total amount of unearned aid is greater than the amount
returned by Columbia State from the student's account, the
student is responsible for returning unearned aid to the appropriate
program(s) as follows:
1. Unsubsidized Direct Loan*
2. Subsidized Direct Loan*
3. Direct Parent Loans to Undergraduate Students (PLUS)*
4. Federal Pell Grant**
5. Federal SEOG**
*Loan amounts are returned by the student according to the terms
of the promissory note.
**Amounts to be returned by the student to federal grant programs
will be reduced by 50%. A student does not owe a repayment if
the original grant overpayment is $50 or less.
The Financial Aid office will notify the student in writing of the
amount of repayment for any funds returned to the U.S.
Department of Education on their behalf within 30 days of
determining the student's withdrawal. The student has 30 calendar
days after Columbia State Business Services notification of an
outstanding balance to make a repayment in full or make
satisfactory repayment arrangements.
If the student does not repay the entire amount or make
satisfactory repayment arrangements within the time allotted, any
repayment owed will be sent to the U.S. Department of Education
for collection. The student then has the opportunity to repay or
make satisfactory repayment arrangements with the U.S.
Department of Education. STUDENTS WHO HAVE NOT REPAID
OR MADE ARRANGEMENTS TO REPAY WILL BE INELIGIBLE
FOR TITLE IV AID AT ANY COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY.
NOTE: Students are responsible for making federal grant
repayments. THEY MUST ALSO REPAY COLUMBIA STATE FOR
ANY FUNDS RETURNED TO THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
EDUCATION ON THEIR BEHALF. Students may submit a written
appeal for a refund to the school's Business Services office for
extenuating circumstances surrounding their withdrawal from
school. For more information about the College's refund policy,
please see "Institutional Refunds”.
Worksheets used to determine the amount of a refund or return of
Title IV aid are available upon request in the Financial Aid office,
as well as examples of how the policy is applied.
If Columbia State determines from the Return of Title IV Funds
calculation the need for a post-withdrawal disbursement of Title IV
loan funds, the Financial Aid Office will notify the student within 30
calendar days of the date of the institution’s determination that the
student’s withdrawn. The written notification will be prior to
making any post-withdrawal disbursement of loan funds, whether
those loan funds are to be credited to the student’s account or
disbursed directly to the student, and will include information
necessary for the student, or parent for a Direct Parent PLUS
Loan, to make an informed decision as to whether the individual
would like to accept post-withdrawal disbursement of additional
loan funds. It is strongly encouraged not to make such an
authorization and increase the amount of Title IV loan debt unless
the student has an outstanding balance to Columbia State.
2015-2016 Catalog
State Funded Financial Aid Programs
The Tennessee Eligibility Verification for Entitlement Act (EVEA)
[TCA 4-58-101 seq.] requires public institutions of higher education
to verify that persons seeking a "state benefit" are either a "United
States Citizen" or "lawfully present" in the United States.
The term "state benefit" includes in-state tuition, Tennessee
Lottery Scholarships and Grants, Tennessee Promise Scholarship,
academic scholarship, common market, or any other form of
tuition assistance or waiver funded with state- appropriated
dollars. State benefit does not include tuition assistance funded
privately, such as a scholarship from the institution's foundation or
a privately endowed scholarship.
For more information on this act or documentation needed to
verify "state benefit" eligibility, please contact the admissions
office.
Tennessee Scholarships and Grants
Tennessee Scholarships and Grants are provided through the
Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation.(TSAC) and includes
funds from the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program.
The student must complete the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) by September 1st for the fall semester and
February 1st for the spring and summer semesters. Columbia
State Community College must be listed as the student’s first
school choice on the FAFSA. The results are sent to the
Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation (TSAC) to determine
eligibility. Student must be a Tennessee resident one (1) year
prior to enrollment; the dependent student’s residence status is
based on the parent(s) state of residence-the parent(s) must be a
resident of the state for one year prior to enrollment. Tennessee
Scholarships and Grants may not be awarded over the estimated
Cost of Attendance (COA); if awarded aid is more than the COA,
the Scholarships and/or Grants may be reduced. If a student is
enrolled less than full-time in a semester, the Tennessee
Scholarships and Grants are prorated based on the number of
hours in which student is enrolled. Student must be enrolled at
least half-time (6 hours) in the semester to be eligible to receive
Tennessee Scholarship and Grant funds.
Following are some of the Tennessee Scholarships and
Grants offered at Columbia State Community College; you
may view a complete listing of scholarships and grants
available through the Tennessee Student Assistance
Corporation (TSAC) by visiting their website http://www.
tn.gov/collegepays/mon_college/lottery_scholars.htm.
HOPE Scholarship –Enrollment Requirements Student must
have graduated from a Tennessee eligible high school, have an
overall weighted minimum 3.0 grade point average (GPA) or
achieve a minimum of 21 ACT (980 SAT), exclusive of the essay.
Students completing high school in a Tennessee home school
program must have been enrolled at the Tennessee home school
for at least one (1) year immediately preceding the completion of
the Tennessee home school program and must achieve a
minimum of 21 ACT (980 SAT), exclusive of the essay. Recipients
of a High School Equivalency Diploma ((GED® or HiSET®) must
achieve a minimum of 21 ACT (980 SAT), exclusive of the essay,
and meet additional eligibility requirements. ACT/SAT exams
must be taken on a national or state test date and prior to the first
day of college enrollment. Student must enroll at any postsecondary
institution within 16 months of graduation from an eligible high
school, home school or receiving the High School Equivalency
Diploma (GED® or HiSET®). Hope Scholarship may be awarded
fall, spring, and summer semesters equally.
HOPE Scholarship for Non-Traditional Students – The student
must be 25 years of age or older. Student's (and spouse's)
adjusted gross income (AGI) must be $36,000 or less on IRS tax
form. Student must enroll in an eligible postsecondary institution
as an entering freshman or have not been enrolled for at least two
(2) years after last attending any postsecondary institution and
have not earned a baccalaureate degree. Student must be
continuously enrolled at an eligible postsecondary institution in
the fall and spring semesters once beginning or returning to
college and maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress. Student
must have a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA after 12 attempted
credit hours or required GPA at subsequent benchmark (see
Hope Scholarship Renewal Criteria for benchmark hours and
GPA requirements). *Attempted hours and college grades prior to
re-enrollment at an eligible postsecondary institution after at least
a two year break in enrollment are not considered in calculation
of TELS hours and GPA. The attempted hours used to “earn” the
Non-Traditional Hope Scholarship are not used in calculation of
cumulative hours and GPA. Once awarded, the renewal criteria
and termination criteria shall be the same as for the Hope
Scholarship with the addition that the student’s (and spouse’s)
AGI must be $36,000 or less. NOTE: *The five (5) years and total
semester hour limitations shall be the sum of years or total
attempted hours while receiving the Hope Scholarship and the
Hope Scholarship for Non-Traditional students. Non-Traditional
Hope Scholarship may be awarded fall, spring, and summer
semesters equally.
Hope Scholarship – Renewal Criteria The student must have
a minimum 2.75 cumulative GPA at the end of semester in which
the student attempted 24 and 48 semester hours. The student
must have a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA at the end of the
semester in which the student attempted 72 and 96 semester
hours. However, if the student does not have a minimum 3.0
cumulative GPA at the end of the semester in which the student
attempted 72 and 96 semester hours, then the student must have
a minimum 2.75 cumulative GPA and have a semester GPA of at
least 3.0 at the end of the semester in which the student
attempted 72 and 96 semester hours and every semester
following; the student must maintain full-time enrollment-the
student’s continued eligibility will be determined on a semesterby-semester basis. Note: all hours attempted after high school
graduation are included in calculation of TELS hours and GPA.
Student must be continuously enrolled at an eligible postsecondary
institution in the fall and spring semesters and maintain Satisfactory
Academic Progress. Student must maintain enrollment status; the
student may not drop (or stop attending) from full-time enrollment
to part-time enrollment or withdraw from a semester. Student’s
renewal eligibility is reviewed at the end of each semester in
which the student is enrolled. If a student ceases to be academically
eligible for the Hope Scholarship, the student may regain the
award one-time only. The award may be re-established once the
student meets any of the above criteria and maintains continuous
enrollment and satisfactory academic progress at an eligible
postsecondary institution without the Hope Scholarship. If at any
time the student drops from full-time enrollment to part-time
enrollment or withdraws from a semester, the student will no
longer meet the minimum requirements; however, the student
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may appeal the ineligible status in order to restore Hope
Scholarship eligibility if the change in enrollment status was due
to a documented extenuating circumstance beyond the student’s
control. The student may use a one-time only repeat provision
should the student elect to replace the grade of a class with the
higher grade received from the repeated class; if the student
previously lost the award for the first time due to grades and if the
student has repeated a course with a higher grade that will bring
the TELS GPA at or above the minimum GPA required at the end
of the semester in which a benchmark is reached, the use of the
one-time repeat provision and one-time regain provision will serve
to work together to re-establish the student’s award.
Hope Scholarship – Termination Criteria Student has earned a
baccalaureate degree or five (5) years have passed from the date
of initial enrollment at any postsecondary institution or student
has attempted 120 semester hours or has received the Hope
Scholarship for eight (8) full-time equivalent semesters at any
postsecondary institution; whichever occurs later.
Never drop a course without inquiring with the Financial Aid Office
about how it may impact your lottery scholarship eligibility. Please
contact Columbia State Financial Aid at [email protected]
ColumbiaState.edu or call 931-540-8267.
General Assembly Merit Scholarship (GAMS) - Student must
have graduated from a Tennessee eligible high school, have an
overall weighted minimum 3.75 grade point average (GPA) AND
a 29 ACT (1280 SAT), exclusive of the essay. ACT/SAT exams
must be taken on a national or state test date and prior to the first
day of college enrollment. Students completing high school in a
Tennessee home school program, in addition to meeting the Hope
Scholarship requirements, and during the course of a homeschool
program, must be enrolled in at least four (4) college-level
courses totaling at least twelve (12) semester hours and achieve
a cumulative grade point average of 3.0. AND achieve a 29 ACT
(1280 SAT), exclusive of the essay. ACT must be taken on a
national test date; the SAT must be taken on a national or state
test date. ACT/SAT must be taken prior to the first day of college
enrollment. GAMS is awarded in addition to the Hope Scholarship.
A student may receive GAMS or the Aspire Award, but not both.
GAMS may be awarded fall, spring, and summer semesters
equally.
Aspire Award - A student must meet all Hope Scholarship
requirements. Parents’ or independent student’s (and spouse's)
adjusted gross income must be $36,000 or less on IRS tax form.
The Aspire Award is awarded in addition to the Hope Scholarship;
Non-Traditional students are not eligible for the Aspire Award. A
student may receive the Aspire Award or GAMS, but not both.
Aspire Award may be awarded fall, spring, and summer semesters
equally.
HOPE Access Grant - Student must have graduated from a
Tennessee eligible high school, have an overall weighted minimum
2.75 grade point average (GPA) and achieve a 18-20 ACT (860970 SAT), exclusive of the essay. ACT/SAT exams must be taken
on a national or state test date and prior to the first day of college
enrollment. Student must enroll at any postsecondary institution
within 16 months of graduation from an eligible high Parents’ or
independent student's (and spouse's) adjusted gross income
must be $36,000 or less on IRS tax form. Hope Access Grant is
non-renewable after 24 attempted hours; student may be eligible
for Hope Scholarship by meeting Hope Scholarship renewal
criteria. Hope Access Grant may be awarded fall, spring, and
summer semesters equally.
HOPE Foster Child Tuition Grant - Students must meet the high
school requirements of and be eligible for the HOPE Scholarship
or HOPE Access Grant; students who were in the custody of the
Department of Children's Services for at least one year after their
14th birthday and shall present official certification from the
Department of Children’s Services that the student meets the
eligibility requirements. The grant may be continued for a period
of no more than 4 years after the date of graduation from high
school or equivalent and for a period of no more than six years
after admittance to an eligible public postsecondary institution.
Students must maintain satisfactory academic progress standards.
Hope Foster Child Tuition Grant may be awarded fall, spring, and
summer semesters equally.
Tennessee Student Assistance Awards (TSAA) - Student must
have a valid Expected Family Contribution (EFC) of 2100 or less
as determined by the Department of Education based on FAFSA
information. Student must maintain Satisfactory Academic
Progress and not be in default on a loan or owe a refund on any
grant previously received at any institution and have not received
a baccalaureate degree. Prior year recipients will receive the
award if they meet all eligibility requirements and complete the
FAFSA on or before March 1; remaining funds will be awarded to
the neediest applicants on a first come, first served basis. To
receive priority consideration, students are strongly encouraged
to submit a FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1 each year.
. Student may receive TSAA for a total of four (4) semesters.
TSAA may be awarded fall and spring semesters equally.
Helping Heroes Grant (HHG) – Student must be an honorably
discharged veteran who had formally served the armed forces of
the United States, or former or current member of a reserve or
Tennessee National Guard unit who was called into active military
service of the United States. Student must be awarded the Iraq
Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, or Global War
on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal on or after September 11,
2001. Student must have not earned a baccalaureate degree, not
be in default on a federal Title IV educational loan or Tennessee
educational loan, and not owe a refund on a federal Title IV
student financial aid program or a Tennessee student financial aid
program, Student must be in compliance with federal drug-free
rules and laws for receiving financial assistance and not be
incarcerated. Award of the HHG shall be made after the
completion of a semester, so long as the student successfully
completes the course with a non-failing grade as the final grade
for the course. Student must complete the application for the
Helping Heroes Grant for each academic year with TSAC by
September 1 for fall enrollment, February 1 for spring enrollment,
or May 1 for summer enrollment; the grant is awarded on a firstcome, first-served basis.. Student must provide a copy of his/her
DD 214 to TSAC with application. Student may receive HHG for
a total of eight (8) “full” semesters or until the eighth anniversary
of the veteran’s honorable discharged from military service.
Tennessee Promise Scholarship - Tennessee Promise is a
scholarship and mentoring program designed as a last dollar
scholarship for tuition and mandatory fees not covered by gift aid,
in the form of the Federal Pell Grant, Tennessee Education
Lottery Scholarships including HOPE, Tennessee Student
2015-2016 Catalog
Assistance Awards, or state waivers/discounts. The tuition and
mandatory fees shall not include fees charged for the Regents
Online Degree Program (RODP). A critical component of
Tennessee Promise is the individual guidance each participant
will receive from a mentor who will assist the student navigates
the college admissions process. Community service performed
prior to each term of enrollment is a unique requirement.
Tennessee Promise Application Process - To participate in the
Tennessee Promise program, students are required to complete
the Tennessee Promise Scholarship award application for the
initial year of enrollment no later than November 1 of their senior
year of high school. For each successive year of participation,
students shall submit a renewal application no later than July 1
prior to the successive academic year giving notice to TSAC of
their intent to participate. The application is available utilizing the
TSAC Student portal: https://clipslink.guarantorsolutions.com/
StudentSignon/.
Students participating in the Tennessee Promise Scholarship
program shall file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA), or renewal FAFSA, by February 15 yearly for fall
enrollment. A student who meets all academic and non-academic
requirements of the Tennessee Promise Scholarship may transfer
from one eligible postsecondary institution to another eligible
institution and maintain the scholarship, provided the student is
able to complete the diploma or associate degree in the amount
of time remaining before reaching a terminating event. A TSAC
Change of Institution form is available by contacting the Financial
Aid Office or any campus front office and on the TSAC Student
Portal.
Tennessee Promise Eligibility - Be a Tennessee resident;
graduate from eligible high school, complete high school as a
home school student or obtain a GED® or HiSET® diploma,
provided that the GED® or HiSET® is obtained prior to the
student reaching nineteen (19) years of age; attend full time in the
fall term immediately following graduation at an eligible
postsecondary institution which includes the Tennessee
Community Colleges; maintain continuous enrollment as a full
time student unless granted a medical or personal leave of
absence (more information about this is available from the
Director of Financial Aid); maintain a minimum cumulative grade
point average of 2.0 as determined by the institution at the end of
each academic year if enrolled in an associate degree program;
receipt of the scholarship is limited to five (5) semesters total;
comply with U.S. Selective Service System requirements for
registration; be in compliance with federal drug-free rules and
laws for receiving financial assistance; not be in default on a
federal Title IV or Tennessee educational loan; not owe a refund
on a federal Title IV or a Tennessee student financial aid program;
and not be incarcerated.
Prior to initial fall enrollment, student must attend one mandatory
meeting with the partnering organizations related to financial aid,
FAFSA completion, and the college application process. Student
must attend a second mandatory meeting related to college
orientation with the partnering organization. Participants must
complete a minimum of eight (8) hours of community service prior
to each semester while participating in the Tennessee Promise
Scholarship program (more information is available from the
Partnering Organization on this requirement).
Tennessee Dual Enrollment Grant - The Dual Enrollment Grant
program provides opportunities for students to begin working
toward a college degree, while still pursuing a high school
diploma, and encourages post-secondary education and the
acceleration of post-secondary attainment. To participate in the
Tennessee Dual Enrollment Grant program, a student must meet
the College’s admissions criteria for Dual Enrollment and be
enrolled for college courses leading toward a credential for which
they also earn high school credit. A student must also be a
Tennessee resident, as defined by Chapter 0240-2-2, Classifying
Students In-State and Out-of-State, as promulgated by the
Tennessee Board of Regents, for one year from the date of
required grant submission which is September 15 for the fall
semester, February 1 for the spring semester, and May 1 for the
summer semester. For continued participation, a student must
maintain a 2.75 cumulative college grade point average that shall
be certified by an Enrollment Services representative each
semester. Once the courses and minimum cumulative grade point
average are certified, the award shall be processed. College
courses taken under the restrictions of this grant do not count
towards the Tennessee HOPE Scholarship college GPA and the
attempted credit hours limitation. For more information, contact
the Enrollment Services Operations Manager.
Institutional Funded Financial Aid Programs
Institutional Work - This program is designed to assist students
who do not qualify for Federal Work Study (FWS). Eligibility and
available funds determine the number of hours per week a
student may work. To be eligible for this program, a student must
be making satisfactory academic progress. Students earn an
hourly rate (determined each year). Institutional work payroll is
processed monthly. Timesheets are due from the supervisors to
the Business Office by the 15th of each month. Funds will be
directly deposited into the student's bank account on the last
working day of each month. Applications are available on the
Columbia State financial aid web site. All institutional work
students are expected to work in accordance with the schedule
set by their supervisor excluding the student's class schedules.
Failure to perform suitable work will result in loss of employment.
Scholarships - Columbia State Community College offers a
variety of institutional, foundation and private scholarships through
the generosity of the college community. Many scholarships
assist deserving students in obtaining their educational goals.
Generally, the criteria for awarding scholarships are based on
academic ability or financial need.
To be considered for a Columbia State scholarship, a student
must:
1. Have made application to Columbia State Community College.
2. Have a complete FAFSA on file for need-based scholarships.
3. Have scholarship application submitted to the Financial Aid
Office by March 15.
4. Graduating seniors must have the academic portion of the
scholarship application completed by a high school guidance
counselor, and the application must be submitted to the
Financial Aid office by March 15.
The following scholarships are offered to students who
demonstrate academic achievement, exceptional talent, or
financial need. These scholarships are awarded by the College
Financial Aid Scholarship Committee in the spring of each award
year. Completed applications must be submitted to the Financial
Aid Office by March 15.
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Academic Service Scholarships - Authorized by the Tennessee
Board of Regents, these scholarships pay the tuition for full-time
students per academic semester. Residents of Tennessee who
are recent graduates of a Tennessee high school may apply.
Applications must be submitted to the Financial Aid office by
March 15. The scholarships are not applicable for the summer
term.
Academic Service Scholarships are awarded on the basis of
scholastic achievement. Students with a minimum high school
grade point average of 2.9 or the equivalent, and an ACT
composite score of 19 are eligible to apply. Recipients of
Academic Service Scholarships are required to work 75 hours
each semester on campus.
Academic Service Scholarships are not automatically renewed.
Recipients must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA)
of 2.75 each semester. Failure to maintain the required GPA or a
satisfactory standard of conduct, or failure to fulfill the required
work obligation will result in the automatic forfeiture of the
scholarship.
Opportunity Scholarships - The purpose of the Opportunity
Scholarship is to provide opportunity for disadvantaged students
and enhance institutional diversity. Scholarships are awarded
based on financial need and available funds. Completion of the
FAFSA is required. This scholarship covers tuition and mandatory
fees for a limited number of part-time and full-time students. The
scholarship is renewable contingent upon maintaining at least a
2.0 GPA for each semester attended.
Foundation Scholarships - These private scholarships, available
through the Columbia State Foundation, are made possible
through the generosity of individuals, businesses and
organizations. Scholarship application must be submitted to the
Financial Aid office by March 15.
Persons interested in establishing a scholarship or supporting the
College’s educational endeavors are encouraged to contact the
Advancement Office at (931) 540-2512.
Private Scholarships - Recipients for these scholarships are
determined by the organization. Examples are churches, places
of employment and some civic organizations. Contact should be
made directly with those organizations for information.
Athletic Scholarships - These scholarships are available to
students who qualify to participate in intercollegiate athletics.
These scholarships vary in amounts and eligibility is determined
by the Athletic Department.
Additional Financial Aid Information
Reporting Aid Received From Sources Other Than
Columbia State
Students who receive outside aid such as loans, grants, or
scholarships from private organizations or governmental agencies
must report the source and amount of outside financial assistance.
Federal regulations require the Financial Aid office to adjust a
student's award package as to not exceed the student's need.
Students who knowingly withhold such information from the
Financial Aid office are subject to termination of their financial aid
and repayment of any excess aid to the federal government.
Verification
In an effort to curb abuse and fraud with the federal aid programs
and to ensure funds are awarded correctly, the federal government
randomly selects students for a process called verification. If
selected for verification, the Financial Aid office is required to
request documents to substantiate information reported on the
student's FAFSA. Items subject to verification include, but are not
limited to, adjusted gross income, nontaxable income, interest
income, asset amounts, number in household, and number in
post-secondary institutions.
If selected, certain documents such as Federal Income Tax
Transcripts, W-2 or a verification worksheet may be requested.
Students selected for verification must complete all required
procedures by the end of the academic year or end of their
enrollment period or by June 30, whichever comes first. No
financial aid funds will be disbursed until all verification
requirements have been met and processed.
Selective Service
Selective Service Registration is required to receive Title IV
federal aid funds. Any student who is required to register with
Selective Service and fails to do so will be ineligible for student
financial aid provided through programs established under Title IV
of the Higher Education Act.
Special Circumstances
If a family's financial circumstances change due to death,
disability, long-term unemployment, and/or excessive medical or
dental expenses, the student may be eligible for an adjustment to
their aid package. Applications are available by emailing
[email protected]
Awarding of Financial Aid
Student financial aid awards vary depending upon the student's
eligibility, financial need and available funds. The process of
packaging the different kinds of financial aid is based on the total
need analysis and aid determination cycle. The entire financial aid
program has been developed to ensure fair and equitable awards.
Payment of Awards and Refunds
Financial aid disbursements are credited to the student's account
after the census date or 14th day of classes. Refund dates are
posted each semester on the Financial Aid web site.
Institutional Fees and Refunds
See previous section, Institutional Fees and Refunds.
Financial Aid is not available for students who:
1. Are pursuing a short-term or institutional certificate (less than
16 credit hours).
2. Are non-degree seeking.
3. Are auditing classes.
4. Are undergraduate special students.
5. Are adult special students.
6. Are transient students (except in the case of some HOPE
recipients).
Student Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
As a financial aid consumer, students have the right to:
• Be informed about financial aid application procedures, cost of
attendance, aid available and renewal requirements. Additional
consumer information is available from the Financial Aid office
2015-2016 Catalog
upon request.
• Receive confidential protection of one's financial aid records.
The contents of one's financial aid file are maintained in
accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act. Additional information is available in the Student Handbook.
• Seek and receive full information and counsel from the
Director of Financial Aid regarding any financial aid matter.
As a financial aid consumer, students have the responsibility to:
• Complete applications correctly and on time.
• Read and understand all materials from the Financial Aid office
and other financial aid agencies; keep copies of all forms and
materials submitted.
• Know and comply with the rules governing one's aid programs.
• Comply with the provisions of any promissory note and all other
agreements signed.
• Register for the number of credit hours required, participate in
registered classes, and maintain satisfactory academic
progress.
• Report any of the following changes: withdrawal from college,
transfer to another college, name change, student address
change or parents address change.
• Request personal assistance about financial aid questions or
the information provided by financial aid personnel.
Consumer Information
In compliance with federal regulations pertaining to the Student
Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act, all prospective and
currently enrolled students have access to institutional information
regarding campus safety and security, crime statistics, Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act provisions, financial aid
programs and policies, retention and graduation data, and other
topics. Information is available on the Columbia State web site at
http://www.columbiastate.edu/consumer-information, in the student
handbook, or it can be obtained from the Student Services office.
How to Contact the Financial Aid Office
If you have questions or need assistance in applying for financial
aid, please contact: Enrollment Services Financial Aid, Jones
Student Center Columbia campus, Room 103, phone (931) 540 8267, by emailing [email protected] or dropping by
the front office of any other Columbia State campus.
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Academic Information
Student Classifications
Undergraduate Degree Students
All undergraduate students who have been admitted as credit
students and are pursuing a degree or certificate are classified as
undergraduate degree students. These students are further
classified at the freshman or sophomore level based on their level
of progress or placement within a program of study.
1. Freshman: A student with less than 30 semester hours
earned toward a degree.
2. Sophomore: A student with 30 or more semester hours
earned toward a degree.
Non-Degree Students
Students earning credit but who are not presently pursuing a
degree or certificate are classified as non-degree students. The
classifications for these students are listed under Non-Degree
Students on p. 17.
Non-Credit Students
Students enrolled in non-credit courses through The Center for
Workforce Development office are classified as non-credit
students.
Student Records
Permanent Student Records
The permanent record of a Columbia State Community College
credit student shall consist of: student name, social security
number or student identification number, courses enrolled each
term, cumulative grade point average (GPA), term GPA, hours
attempted, hours earned, grades, quality points earned, degrees
and certificates earned, academic program(s), honors, academic
status, and transfer credit. The permanent record will be
maintained Online and will be available on campus in the Records
office and viewed Online at various Columbia State locations by
authorized personnel. Online processes are backed up nightly.
The permanent record of a Columbia State Community College
non-credit, continuing education (CEU) student shall consist of:
student name, student social security number or student
identification number, courses enrolled in each term by course
title, number and continuing education units. The permanent
record is available through the Center for Workforce Development.
Social Security Number Use
Columbia State requires assignment of an individual student
number for internal identification of each student’s record. The
College began using the social security number as the student
identification number prior to January 1, 1975 and the federal law
allows continued use of this number. However, the primary
internal identification for student records is a randomly selected
eight digit number beginning with the letter “A” that has been
created for students, faculty, and staff to protect an individual's
social security number. Students are still required to disclose their
social security number when they apply for admission on the
application form. The social security number is then converted to
the random number for privacy. If at the time of application, a
student wishes not to disclose the social security number, the
institution will assign a unique social security number for the
student's use. Please note that if the student expects to receive
federal and/or state financial assistance, the student may be
required to disclose the social security number. For prompt and
accurate retrieval of records, students and alumni may be
required to give their social security number. While in most cases,
current students will be able to complete their business with the
College through myChargerNet by use of a user id and password,
occasionally when the social security number may be required.
Student identification numbers, whether a social security number
or an assigned number, are used administratively within the
College and are not given to third parties without the express
consent of the student.
Acquiring Credit
Unit of Credit
The College offers instruction and awards credit on the semester
hour basis, with the scholastic academic year consisting of two
semesters, fall and spring. Semester hour credit is also awarded
for classes offered during summer semesters. One semester hour
of credit is based upon 750 minutes of class instruction per
semester.
Prior to fall 1988, the College awarded credit on a quarter hour
basis. In fall 1988, the quarter hours earned were converted to
semester hours. One semester hour of credit is equivalent to one
and one-half quarter hours.
Transfer Credit
Credit may be granted for courses completed at other institutions
of higher education. Decisions concerning transfer work are
based on (1) equivalence of course content and level of instruction
to that provided by Columbia State and (2) appropriateness and
applicability of credit to the student's program at Columbia State.
Once students are admitted to Columbia State, transcripts are
evaluated and transfer credit is assigned. Once students receive
their acceptance letter, information regarding the awarding of
transfer credit can be accessed by logging into their myChargerNet
account and clicking on “View Transcript" to view their academic
transcript.
For coursework completed that has not already been approved as
equivalent, such as coursework at non-regionally accredited
institutions, additional information will be required. The student
must provide a copy of the course description or syllabus of the
course to the Records Office. If approved the classes are posted
to the student's record. The student will be notified as to the
outcome of the request.
Effective Summer 2015, transfer credit will be given for all courses
in which passing grades are achieved, including the grade of "D".
For students enrolled prior to Summer 2015, only grades of "C" or
higher are accepted. Credit will only be given for grades of "P" if
the course is comparable to a Columbia State course graded on
a "pass/fail" basis.
All grades of transfer courses are entered on the student's
Columbia State permanent academic record. Grades of transfer
courses are not included in the calculation of the student's grade
point average at Columbia State.
External credit received for advanced placement from a transfer
institution for CLEP, CEEB, ACT, etc., may also be accepted and
awarded for advanced placement at Columbia State upon receipt
2015-2016 Catalog
of official documentation (score reports, etc.) directly from the
testing agency. Additional detailed information regarding transfer
credit policies may be found at www.columbiastate.edu/policiesprocedures.
External Credit
A maximum of 42 semester hours credit earned through any
combination of external credit may apply toward a degree.
Possible sources of external credit include (1) credit by
examination, (2) military service/armed services schools, (3) high
school articulated courses, and (4) prior learning.
To receive external credit, the following conditions apply:
1. Applicants must not have received any grade, with the
exception of a “W”, in similar titled courses for which credit is
awarded.
2. Credit is awarded only in areas offered within the current
curriculum of the College and related to the student's
educational program.
3. Credit is awarded only for those learning experiences in
which it can be documented that all the outcomes for specific
courses in an approved degree program have been met.
Semester hours of credit toward graduation are awarded on the
basis of these conditions, but grades or quality points are not
awarded. These credits will not affect the academic grade point
average.
Transfer of external credit to other institutions is at the
discretion of the receiving institution.
1. External Credit by Examination
Students may earn college credit by examination for acceptable
scores on College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Examinations, the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB)
Advanced Placement Examination, the Enhanced American
College Testing Program (ACT), the International Association of
Administrative Professionals (IAAP) or comprehensive subject
examinations. Official documentation must be received directly
from the testing agency. Credit may be recorded on the student's
record after admission to the College.
Requests for all other external credit are submitted to the director
of records after the student has been admitted to the College and
registered for courses. External credit is evaluated by the division
dean and, if credit is earned, recorded on the student's record.
Comprehensive subject examinations are evaluated at the
departmental level and with approval of the division dean are
forwarded, with recommendations, to the Records office. However,
these exams will not be administered until a student has earned
12 hours (excluding Learning Support courses) of resident credit
at the College.
CLEP: Applications and information on the CLEP are available by
writing the College Level Examination Program, Box 6600,
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6600, by calling (609) 771-7865, or
by accessing www.collegeboard.com. Prior to 2001, credit is
awarded for acceptable scores received on subject examinations
only. CLEP discontinued the classification of Subject exams and
General exams with the transition to computer-based testing in
2001. Therefore, any acceptable test scores reported after 2001
will be reviewed for applicability to comparable Columbia State
courses.
CEEB: (College Board): Columbia State participates in the
Advanced Placement Program of CEEB and awards appropriate
credit in selected courses to qualified students who present an
official record of a grade of 3 or above on the examination. The
Advanced Placement Program of CEEB is coordinated by the
high schools.
ACT: Students whose standard score on the Enhanced ACT
English test is 32 or above may receive credit for Composition I
and II (ENGL 1010 and 1020).
Students whose standard score on the Enhanced ACT
Mathematics test is 31 or above may receive credit for Precalculus
Algebra (MATH 1710).
International Association of Administrative Professionals
(IAAP) Examination: Persons having successfully passed
sections of the IAAP examination are eligible to receive 13
semester hours of credit at Columbia State as follows:
BUSN 1310
INFS 1010
BUSN 1380
OFA 103
OFA 132
Business Communication 3
Computer Applications
3
Supervisory Management 3
Keyboarding
1
Records Management
3
Award of credit for successful completion of the IAAP examination
is subject to change whenever (1) the content of the examination
is changed so that it does not correspond to the content of the
courses designated above or (2) content of the Columbia State
courses designated above is revised to the degree that it does not
correspond to the examination content.
DANTES Subject Standardized (DSST)- Students may earn
college credit for acceptable scores on the DANTES Subject
Standardized Test based on Columbia State or TBR policy, or
credit can be awarded based upon the credit recommendations
and minimum scores recommended by the American Council on
Education. Students should submit an official DANTES transcript
for review.
Comprehensive Subject Examinations: Credit by institutional
examination may be available for courses which the division
deans have determined can be passed by proficiency examination.
Students who wish to take these exams must seek approval from
the appropriate division dean prior to taking the exam. If an
examination is available for the course, the student must see the
instructor to discuss the course syllabus and text and decide
whether to attempt the examination, and, if appropriate, schedule
an appointment to take the examination. Credit will be awarded
provided:
1. performance on the test is at least a "C".
2. the student has earned 12 semester hours of resident credit
at Columbia State (excluding Learning Support courses).
Prior to taking the examination, the student must complete an
Application for Permission to Take Credit by Examination request
(available in the division offices) and pay the Business Services
office the fee established for “credit by examination.” Upon
offering the examination, the instructor must photocopy the
receipt for payment of the fees and attach it to the Credit by
Examination Grade Report. Upon evaluation of the examination,
the instructor must submit the Credit by Examination Grade
Report and the photocopy of the receipt to the appropriate
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2015-2016 Catalog
division dean. Upon approval by the division dean and the
Executive Vice President-Provost the Credit by Examination
Grade Report and the photocopy of the receipt are submitted to
the Records office. Credit awarded prior to the last day of final
exams will be posted in that semester. Credit awarded after the
last day of final exams will be posted in the following semester.
2. External Credit for Military Service/Schools
Columbia State awards up to two hours of physical education
credit for active military service provided that the DD-214 form is
submitted to the Records office. The DD-214 must verify a
minimum of six months of active duty before one semester hour
of physical education credit is awarded. Credit may be awarded
for attendance at military schools and job classifications based
upon recommendations from the Office of Educational Credit of
the American Council on Education. Military service credit is
awarded provided that proper documentation supporting servicerelated educational experiences is presented to the director of
records before the end of the second term of enrollment and
information is submitted to the V.A. certifying official.
3. Dual Credit for Specific High School Courses
A student who has completed a career/technical secondary
course of study or certain other high school courses which have
been articulated with the college or through the state of Tennessee
(Dual Credit), has received a regular high school diploma, has
enrolled in a postsecondary institution within two years of
graduation, and who demonstrates attainment of equivalent
learning outcomes for specified career courses may receive credit
for those courses through the Columbia State Community College
articulation process. This postsecondary credit will be granted
upon successful admission to Columbia State. Transfer of
articulated career/technical credit from Columbia State to other
institutions is at the discretion of the receiving institution. Students
wishing to participate in the articulation program must:
1. Meet all regular admissions requirements of Columbia State
as published in the Catalog.
2. Provide official transcript of work completed at the high
school.
3. Attend the Columbia State Community College testing day
and complete a comprehensive subject assessment for each
credit requested or meet assessment requirements as
stated.
4. Pass the assessment requirements for each course for which
credit is requested.
5. Enroll at Columbia State within two (2) years of the date of
graduation from high school.
6. Contact the Science, Technology and Mathematics Division
at Columbia State to request the credit.
The number of articulated dual credit courses is very limited and
specific to each school district. For more information about the
articulation program, consult a high school guidance counselor or
the Science, Technology and Mathematics Division dean at
Columbia State.
4. External Credit through Tennessee Colleges of Applied
Technology (TCAT)
Students who have completed a diploma program consisting of at
least 1125 contact hours at a TCAT within the last three (3) years
may receive up to 30 credit hours toward the General Technology
or Health Sciences Majors, A.A.S. degree. This credit may count
toward the A.A.S. degree but will carry no quality points and will
not count in the calculation of the grade point average. Transfer
of articulated credit from Columbia State to other institutions is at
the discretion of the receiving institution.
Credit will not be awarded by Columbia State until students have
successfully completed fifteen (15) hours of college-level work at
Columbia State and all required Learning Support courses.
Students should contact the Science, Technology and Mathematics
division dean for more information.
5. External Credit for Department of Labor Apprenticeship
Program
Students who have completed a recognized Department of Labor
apprenticeship program may receive credit for up to 15 hours
toward the General Technology Major, A.A.S. degree. This credit
may count toward the A.A.S. degree but will carry no quality
points and will not count in the calculation of the grade point
average. Transfer of articulated credit from Columbia State to
other institutions is at the discretion of the receiving institution.
Credit will not be awarded by Columbia State until students have
successfully completed fifteen (15) hours of college-level work at
Columbia State and all required Learning Support courses.
Students should contact the Science, Technology and Mathematics
Division dean for more information.
6. External Credit for Prior Learning
A currently enrolled student at Columbia State may request credit
through documented work experience or life experience in the
field in which a degree or certificate is being pursued. The credit
may be granted for specific course credit in current Columbia
State courses or as elective credit in a discipline taught at
Columbia State. Credit will be granted only for documented prior
learning experiences that demonstrate achievement of the
student learning outcomes for the course(s) for which credit is
sought. Credit will not be given for RODP courses. Credit for prior
learning will not be given for credit that duplicates credit already
awarded or for courses for which a CLEP exam is available. If
courses for which prior learning credit has been granted are taken
at the College at a later date, the credit for prior learning will be
revoked.
The total amount of credit awarded cannot exceed 25% of the
requirements for the degree or certificate. The credit will be
identified as experiential credit on the transcript and may not be
accepted for transfer by other institutions. Determination of
transferability will be made by the receiving institution.
Students seeking prior learning credit should first contact the
Retention Coordinator for Science, Technology and Mathematics,
to obtain a Request for Prior Learning Credit Portfolio Consideration
form. The completed request form will be reviewed by a faculty
member in the discipline for which credit is sought and the
division dean. If they agree that the prior learning experiences
justify granting credit, the student will be asked to provide a
portfolio of relevant experiences. After verifying the portfolio, the
faculty member will complete a Granting of Credit for Prior
Learning form and forward it for approval by the division dean and
executive vice president - provost for academic and student
programs and services. Upon approval, the executive vice
president - provost will submit the form to the director of records
for posting of the credit into the student’s academic record. The
credit will be posted after the student has paid the applicable fees
(see “Credit for Prior Learning Fee,” p. 22) and has successfully
completed twelve (12) semester credit hours at the College and
will not apply toward meeting residency requirements for
graduation.
Transcript of Credits
Students who attend Columbia State may request a copy of their
2015-2016 Catalog
permanent academic record (transcript). There is no charge for
transcripts; however, the Records office may set a limit on a
reasonable number of copies that may be processed at any time
and may also establish a nonrefundable charge for the cost of
producing transcripts in excess of that number. All transcript
requests must be made in writing by mail or fax or through the
online transcript request. Telephone requests are not accepted
and electronic mail (e-mail) requests are only accepted if the
student scans and emails the signed request form. Students may
also call the transcript information line at (931) 540-2550 for
instructions on obtaining transcripts. No transcripts will be
released for or to a student who has any financial obligations with
the College or who has not completed all admissions requirements.
The Records office does not issue or reproduce transcripts from
other institutions of higher or secondary education. Requests for
transcripts or work taken at other colleges, universities, or high
schools must be directed to the institution concerned.
Registration for Courses
Full-time Student Semester Hour Load
To be classified as a full-time student, students must register for
at least twelve (12) semester hours credit. Sixteen to eighteen
(16-18) credit hours is the regular or normal load per semester.
Nineteen (19) hours is the maximum load. Any student desiring to
register for more than 19 credit hours must have:
1. completed all Learning Support course requirements, and
2. have earned a minimum cumulative grade point average
(GPA) of 3.0.
An overload may be requested by completing the Registration
and Overload Request form (available on myChargerNet) and
obtaining an advisor’s signature and the approval of one of the
following: an academic division dean, extended campus director,
or the associate vice president for faculty, curriculum and
programs.
Registration Procedures
Students must observe registration procedures and complete
registration on the dates posted (see “Important Dates,” p. 9) in
the catalog or on the Columbia State Web page. Students who
register after the official registration period must pay a late
registration fee. Registration following the period established as
the last date to register and last day to add a class (adjustment
period) is permitted only in exceptional cases and requires the
approval of the instructor, curricular coordinator or the division
dean. Students are not officially enrolled until all registration
requirements are completed and all fees are paid.
For eligible students, online registration is available through
myChargerNet, which is accessed from www.columbiastate.edu.
Columbia State conducts Priority Registration (pre-selection of
classes) for current students. Registration information is emailed
to all current students to inform them of their day to priority
register. Students have an assigned advisor who will assist in
course selection. Registration is conducted for first-time and
readmitted students during the open registration period as listed
(see “Important Dates,” p. 9). Student orientations are scheduled
before the Fall and Spring semesters to assist new and transfer
students in registering for classes. The Columbia State web site
each semester also has information on applying for admission or
readmission, testing requirements, paying fees, and dropping and
adding classes.
Change of Registration Procedures
Students are advised to carefully read the following regulations
and procedures applicable to drop, add or withdrawal. Registration
for courses implies that the student has entered into a contract to
complete each course’s requirements. Should conditions make it
necessary for the student to leave any class or leave the College
completely, the student must officially change his or her registration
status. Failure to do so will result in a failing grade, “F,” on the
student's permanent record. The “Dropping a Class” and “Adding
a Class” procedures apply when a student wishes to change one
or more class(es). If the student wishes to drop all classes, the
“withdrawal” procedure applies. A student who only informs an
instructor that he or she can no longer attend class without also
completing the required procedure has not officially dropped or
withdrawn.
Cancellation of Scheduled Classes
Columbia State reserves the right to cancel any scheduled class.
When this occurs, it is the student’s responsibility to check his/
her schedule by accessing their myChargerNet account or the
emailed canceled class listing.
Dropping a Class
Dropping a class can occur through the “last day to drop a class
or withdraw” for the regular/full semester (see “Important Dates,”
p. 9). Additional drop dates apply for other short term session
courses and appear on the Columbia State web page at www.
columbiastate.edu/refunds-drops-withdrawals.
Students may drop most classes by using myChargerNet.
However, to drop under the following circumstances students
must come in person to the Records office or to one of the
College’s campus locations:
1. to drop a course after the last official date to drop (includes
RODP courses).
2. to drop any course which the student is auditing.
3. to drop when the student’s account has a hold flag or
encumbrance.
Students who need to drop any course after the last official date
to drop are required to complete a form and must follow these
procedures:
1. Obtain the Change of Registration form and enter required
information. This form is available at all College campus
locations, and on the college's web page, www.columbiastate.
edu/records/forms.
2. Acquire applicable signatures:
a. instructor if dropping after the last official date to drop
(includes RODP courses) or an email from the instructor
for RODP courses.
b. RODP Contact if dropping after the last official date to
drop.
3. Present form to the Records office.
Adding a Class
Adding a class is permitted through the “Adjustment Period for
Registered Students," for the regular/full semester (see “Important
Dates,” p. 9.) Additional add dates apply for other short term
session courses appear on the Columbia State web page at www.
columbiastate.edu/refunds-drops-withdrawals. Students may
add most classes by using myChargerNet. However, to add a
course under the following circumstances students must come in
person to the Records office, or to one of the College’s campus
locations:
1. to add a course when the student’s account has a hold flag
or encumbrance.
2. to add a course which the student wants to audit.
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2015-2016 Catalog
Change To or From Audit
Qualified credit students who register for audit may change to
credit prior to the end of the adjustment period (see "Important
Dates", p. 9). This may be done on a Change of Registration form
by marking “Change from Audit to Credit” and submitting the
completed form to the Records office or any of the College’s
campus locations. Students cannot change from audit to credit
after the adjustment period.
Any time prior to the deadline for dropping or withdrawing,
students may change from credit to audit in lieu of dropping a
course, except for RODP courses. RODP courses cannot be
audited per www.rodp.org/degree-programs-courses/courselistings. This may be done on a Change of Registration form by
marking “Change from Credit to Audit” and submitting the
completed form to the Records office or any of the College’s
campus locations.
Withdrawal
Students who stop attending all classes without officially dropping
all courses have not withdrawn from the College and will receive
a failing grade in each class. Withdrawal through the “last day to
drop a class or withdraw” is permitted when the student has met
all obligations to the College.
Most students may drop all classes (withdraw) by using
myChargerNet account. However, to withdraw under the following
circumstances students are required to complete a form and must
come in person to the Records office, or to one of the College’s
campus locations:
1. to withdraw after the last official date to drop (includes RODP
courses).
2. to withdraw when enrolled in an audit course.
3. to withdraw when the student’s account has a hold flag or
encumbrance.
Students who need to drop all courses (withdraw) after the last
official date to drop are required to complete a form and must
follow these procedures:
1. Obtain the Change of Registration form and enter required
information.
2. Acquire applicable signatures:
a. instructor if dropping after the last official date to drop
(includes RODP courses).
b. RODP Contact if dropping after the last official date to
drop.
c. contact Financial Aid, if applicable
3. Present form to the Records office.
Students who are unable to process their withdrawal in person
may submit to the Records office a signed letter requesting
withdrawal. In the event a student is incapacitated, a designee
should provide proper documentation for withdrawal of the
student.
Grades for Withdrawals and Drops
Following the last day of the registration adjustment period, and
not later than two-thirds into the semester (see “Important Dates,”
p. 9), a student may officially drop a course(s) or withdraw from
the College and receive a “W” which means that no hours are
completed and the grade point average will not be affected.
Students who drop a course or who withdraw from the College
after two-thirds of the semester is complete will receive with
appropriate signatures a “W” in the course(s) they are passing.
Students will receive a failing grade, “F”, in the course(s) they are
not passing unless it can be clearly demonstrated that an unusual
circumstance or hardship exists. (See “Guidelines for Permitting
Late Withdrawal.”)
Guidelines for Permitting Late Withdrawal
Circumstances which directly hinder a student’s pursuit of a
course and which are judged to be out of the student’s control
may be a justifiable reason for permission for late withdrawal from
the College.
Students who leave the College under mitigating circumstances
without officially withdrawing may later appeal to the instructor for
a late withdrawal. This will be permitted only if students can show
that withdrawal was under conditions where they could not have
been expected to officially withdraw and if the student’s have no
encumbrances on their financial records.
Following are some general categories of mitigating circumstances
(this list is not all inclusive):
1. Serious illness of the student.
2. Serious illness or death in the student’s immediate family.
3. Immediate family or financial obligations which require a
change in terms, hours or place of employment which
prevents completion of a course.
4. Late withdrawal from a course due to unsatisfactory
achievement may be considered a mitigating circumstance if
(a) the student can demonstrate good faith effort in the
course up to the point of withdrawal; (b) the student can
submit evidence that tutoring was sought and a counselor,
advisor, or the instructor of the course was consulted
regarding an attempt to remedy the unsatisfactory work; (c)
the student attempted to drop or withdraw prior to the
deadline but was encouraged to continue or was denied
approval for withdrawal; or (d) it is determined that the
course will not be repeated by the student without successful
remedial study to prepare for completion of the course.
Classroom Behavior
The faculty member teaching the class has the primary
responsibility for control over classroom behavior in that class.
Faculty are expected to maintain academic integrity and an
environment conducive to learning within the classroom. In doing
so, they must adhere to College definitions for academic
dishonesty and academic misconduct and to the procedures to be
followed in the event a student is accused of either (see Online
Student Handbook).
Class Participation Policy
Instructors determine and publish in the syllabus their class
attendance policy. Beginning with the first class, faculty record
attendance to verify enrollment and eligibility for financial aid.
Unless prevented by circumstances beyond their control, students
should attend all classes for which they are registered regularly.
Regardless of the cause or nature of an absence, students are
responsible for all class work covered or assigned during the
absence. Policy for evaluating attendance as a part of the course
grade and the procedure for making up class work missed during
an absence is developed by each instructor. Whenever possible,
students should make arrangements in advance for scheduled
examinations or class work that will be missed during an
anticipated absence.
Institutional Absence
Students may be granted administrative or “institutional” absence
when the student represents the College at a public event which
is in the interest of the College or is engaged in an activity such
2015-2016 Catalog
as a field trip which contributes to the education of the student. In
granting an administrative absence, the College disclaims any
liability which may occur from the loss of instruction.
Grades
Grading System
At the end of each semester the quality of students’ work is
evaluated by the instructor. Grades are indicated by letters and
based on a four quality point system. Interpretation and quality
points for each letter grade are:
Quality Points Per
Grade Interpretation
Semester Hour Credit
AExcellent
B Good
CAverage
4
3
2
D
Inferior but passing
1
FFailure
0
FA
Unofficial Withdrawal
0
Used to designate those students who
stopped attending and did not
complete the course. Faculty must
indicate the date the student last
participated in course-related activities.
IIncomplete
0
P
Pass (awarded only to COP classes
and nursing clinicals)
0
W Withdrew (not a grade).
Used when withdrawal is on or prior to
last day to drop or withdraw. Withdrawal
permitted after the official drop period may
reflect a W only if the student is passing
at time of withdrawal.
0
X Not a grade. Used only when grades are
turned in too late to meet processing
deadline. (Later changed to reflect a grade.) 0
AU Not a grade. (Assigned to official audit.)
0
The grade point average (GPA) is determined by dividing the total
number of quality points acquired by the total number of grade
point hours. Repeated courses are excluded from this calculation
(see “Course Repeats," p. 42). Credit hours in courses from which
a student officially withdraws in good standing (see "Change of
Registration Procedures," p. 39) are not considered quality hours
attempted.
Incomplete Grade
An incomplete grade is given when a student fails, due to
extenuating circumstances, to complete all of the requirements
for a course. It is interpreted as an “F” until the "I" is replaced with
a passing grade.
active/current academic dismissal/suspension at another college
will be admitted to Columbia State on probation.
Since Admission policy allows transfer students to be admitted
with a "partial" transcript and transient students to be admitted
with a "Transient Student Approval Form" (i.e. not all final grades
are present or known), Students continuing beyond the initial
academic term with Columbia State must provide the final
transcript from the home institution. If the student was in fact
dismissed, the student will be held to the following dismissal/
retention standards.
At the end of the term with Columbia State, the student must have
achieved a 2.0 semester GPA (cumulative GPA does not apply)
otherwise, the student will be placed on retroactive academic
dismissal from Columbia State for one year. Students may not
appeal this dismissal from Columbia State.
Having successfully completed the term with a 2.0 semester GPA,
the student will be placed in academic good standing with
Columbia State. Should the student wish to continue with
Columbia State the student must comply with the retention
standards listed below.
Retention Standards
Dual Enrollment students see “High School Students” on p. 18 for
retention policies related to the Dual Enrollment program.
To remain in academic good standing, students must meet the
following retention standards:
1. attain a 2.0 grade point average (GPA) for the current
semester (see “Grading System” for instructions on
calculating GPA), or
2. meet minimum cumulative GPA as shown below:
0 - 14.0 grade point hours
No minimum
14.1 - 26.0 grade point hours
1.0
26.1 - 40.0 grade point hours
1.4
40.1 - 48.0 grade point hours
1.7
48.1 - 56.0 grade point hours
1.9
56.1 and above grade point hours
2.0
Failure to meet one of the above retention standards for the
semester will result in academic probation. Failure to meet the
above retention standards following academic probation will
result in academic dismissal from the College.
Academic Standing
Academic Dismissal
Students placed on a first academic dismissal are suspended for
one term (not including summer) and are eligible to reenroll on
probation as follows by completing an Application for Admission/
Readmission:
1. first dismissal at the end of fall semester: eligible to reenroll
the next summer semester
2. first dismissal at the end of spring semester: eligible to
reenroll the next spring semester
3. first dismissal at the end of summer semester: eligible to
reenroll the next spring semester
Students placed on academic dismissal for the second or more
times will be suspended for a period of one year (three terms
including summer). Students who have served the designated
terms of dismissal will be readmitted to the College on probation
with no need to appeal.
Transfer and Transient Students
All transfer/transient students must be eligible to reenter the
school from which they are transferring. A student who is on
Early Readmission for Students on Academic Dismissal
All students (including transfer/transient students) who have been
dismissed for successive (back to back) terms are not eligible for
An incomplete must be removed during the following semester,
excluding the summer term. If the incomplete is not removed, the
“I” will continue to be computed as an “F”. Students must request
and complete the assignments required to change the “I” to a
grade. Should this not occur in the following semester, the
instructor is no longer obligated to accept the work. The instructor
may, at his or her discretion, accept the work later and forward a
grade change to the division dean for approval, but there is no
obligation under policy to do so.
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early readmission and may not appeal. They will remain on
dismissal for a period of one year.
Current Columbia State students with first or non-subsequent
dismissals who wish to return early have the following options:
1. Students who believe that their circumstances have improved,
and they can now be academically successful may continue
on probation and register for a maximum of 8 semester
hours. They do not have to appeal but they must notify the
Records office in writing of their intention to continue.
2. Students who wish to take more than 8 semester hours must
submit the Academic Dismissal Appeal for Additional Hours
form to the Admissions Policies and Appeals Committee. The
committee may either sustain the 8 hour limit or allow
registration for more hours with one or more of the following
stipulations:
a. require the repeat courses in which the student earned
a failing grade.
b. recommend academic or career counseling.
through Self-Service but requires entry by Records office
personnel. However, Learning Support and Regents Online
Degree courses may not be taken for audit. Audit students may or
may not be required to do all the work assigned; however, they do
not take the final examination. Students auditing a course do not
receive credit for the course, and a grade is not assigned. Grade
reports will carry the symbol “AU” reflecting no credit attempted
and no quality points earned. Fees for audit students will be
assessed on the same basis as fees for credit students.
Academic Fresh Start
Any person who has not been enrolled in a college or university
for a period of four years may, upon enrolling or reenrolling at
Columbia State or transferring to Columbia State, petition to have
failing grades on all prior Columbia State coursework disregarded
in calculating his or her cumulative grade point average. Courses
with "D" grades can be excluded if the major specifies a grade of
"C" is required for the course. Previously satisfied Learning
Support courses will not be forfeited.
Students should explain on the appeal form any unusual hardships
that they wish the committee to consider in its deliberations.
Students must outline the actions they will take to ensure their
academic success.
The appeal form must be submitted at least 24 hours prior to the
committee’s final meeting. Permission to take more than eight
hours will be granted only under extraordinary circumstances. The
committee’s decision is final.
1. Retained grades will be calculated in the Fresh Start QPA/
GPA.
If the Registration Calendar is such that a student registers before
the official dismissal lists are communicated to all concerned, the
student’s current registration will be canceled and all paid fees
refunded.
3. The application of retained credit toward degree requirements
will be determined by the requirements currently in effect at
the time the academic renewal status is conferred on the
student. Specific program regulations must be met.
Course Repeats
If the request is granted, the earlier coursework will not count
toward meeting requirements for graduation but would appear on
the student’s transcript. A student will only be approved for the
academic fresh start one time. For information on applying for a
fresh start, contact a retention coordinator, division dean or
extended campus director.
Upon repeating a course, the original credit earned and any
quality points acquired are excluded from the cumulative totals on
the next grade report. In the event that a student repeats all
grades received in the third and all subsequent times will be
included in the grade point average.
A student who plans to transfer to an non TBR college or university
should contact that institution to determine the impact of academic
fresh start prior to implementing the program at Columbia State.
Also, this policy is independent of financial aid regulations.
Financial Aid requirements at the time of application will apply.
Therefore, a Fresh Start applicant should check with his/her
financial aid counselor for guidance.
Students are permitted to repeat courses in which their final
grades are “C” or lower. Students may be permitted to repeat a
course in which a grade of “B” or higher was earned only with the
approval of the executive vice president - provost for academic
and student programs and services as an exception to this policy.
Time in Course
1st
2nd
Grades included in Computation
Original grade earned
Only the grade earned the 2nd time
Grades earned in the 3rd and all
3rd and subsequent subsequent times are calculated in the
grade point average.
The student's record will continue to reflect all grades earned even
if a course has been repeated and excluded from grade/hour
totals.
Official Audit of a Course
Students may register in a course for the purpose of audit.
Permission to audit is given on the basis of space available and/
or discretion of the division dean and can not be processed
2.
Courses with "D" or "F" grades must be repeated at the
institution when they are required in the student's current
major. All remaining courses for the current degree objectives
must be completed at the institution. No transient credit will be
accepted after invoking Academic Fresh Start.
Availability of Grades
Students may review grades for a particular semester by accessing
their myChargerNet account on the Columbia State home page at
www.columbiastate.edu.
Honors
President’s List and Dean’s List
At the end of the fall and spring semesters a list of honor students
known as the President’s List and the Dean’s List are published to
recognize scholarly achievements.
President’s List - To qualify for the President’s List students must
earn 15 credit hours for the semester (excluding Learning
Support) with a semester GPA of 3.90 - 4.00.
2015-2016 Catalog
Dean’s List - To qualify for the Dean’s List students must earn 12
or more credit hours for the semester (excluding Learning
Support) with a semester GPA of 3.50 or higher (not to include
those on President’s List).
Graduation Honors
Degree students graduating with the following grade point
averages will receive the corresponding honor designations on
their diplomas and Columbia State transcript:
3.90 - 4.00
Summa Cum Laude
3.70 - 3.89
Magna Cum Laude
3.50 - 3.69
Cum Laude
Students who graduate Summa Cum Laude are awarded gold
cords to wear at Commencement. Certificate students are not
eligible for Summa, Magna, and Cum Laude honors.
Graduation honors are based on degree credit courses only;
however, the overall combined GPA that might include a Learning
Support course(s) must be equal to or higher than the overall
GPA.
Policy on the Awarding of Degrees
Columbia State awards five degrees: the Associate of Arts (A.A.),
the Associate of Science (A.S.), the Associate of Science in
Teaching (A.S.T.), the Associate of Fine Art (A.F.A.) and the
Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.).
Student may not earn a degree or certificate before completing all
Learning Support competencies as required by their program of
study.
The College will not award the A.A. or A.S. degree to persons who
already hold an A.A., A.S., A.S.T., A.F.A., baccalaureate, or higher
degree. Students holding advanced degrees may be awarded the
A.A.S. degree provided they meet the stated requirements.
Students must earn 25% of total program credits in residence at
Columbia State.
Multiple Degrees and Certificates
Students may earn an A.A., A.S., A.F.A. or A.S.T. degree
(designed for transfer) and an A.A.S. degree (not designed for
transfer) by completing the curriculum prescribed plus 16
semester hours over and above the total number of hours
required for the first degree.
Students may be awarded the A.S.T. if they have been awarded
an A.A. or A.S. degree previously; however, students previously
awarded the A.S.T. degree are not eligible for the A.A. A.S. or
A.F.A. degree.
Students who have been awarded an A.A.S. degree who
complete a different major which includes 16 semester hours over
and above those required for the first A.A.S. degree will earn a
second A.A.S. degree.
Students holding advanced degrees or a transfer associate’s
degree may be awarded the A.A.S. degree or technical certificate
provided they meet the stated requirements.
Students may earn multiple technical certificates as long as 25%
of the required hours were not required for previously earned
certificates.
Graduation
The certification of graduates and posting of degrees and
certificates is the responsibility of the Records office.
Students are encouraged to monitor their progress towards
graduation by consulting with an advisor and by accessing the
online degree audit on the college's Web page under
myCharterNet.
Students are allowed to graduate by the requirements of the
catalog under which they entered or any subsequent catalog,
provided the catalog containing the program being followed is not
more than six years old based on the date of completion of
graduation requirements. Students may not elect a catalog from
years that they were not enrolled at least one term. Students who
have been separated from the College for at least six years but
wish to complete their degree by transfer credit or by reenrolling
must follow the current catalog.
All students who plan to graduate with a degree must take a
general education examination as well as any other examination
required by the College or the Tennessee Board of Regents.
Students who fail to do so will not graduate and their diplomas will
be withheld. Students who have previously graduated from
Columbia State Community College or who have earned a
bachelor's degree or higher are exempted.
Columbia State holds two graduation ceremonies. They are held
in May and December of each year. Students who plan to
complete the requirements for graduation must file the Intent to
Graduate or Request for Technical Certificate form prior to the
published deadline (See "Important Dates," p. 9).
Students who are enrolled spring semester in courses they need
for graduation will be permitted to participate in the May
graduation ceremony, but will not be awarded the degrees until
after grades are received and degree requirements have been
confirmed as completed. Students who have registered for
summer and fall and who are scheduled to be enrolled in the final
courses needed for graduation may participate in the December
graduation ceremony. Even though students participate in the
ceremony, the degrees will not be awarded until all courses are
satisfactorily completed and all graduation requirements are met.
Outstanding Student Award
The Outstanding Student award is presented at Student Honors
Convocation to recognize the graduating student who, in the
opinion of the faculty, have outstanding academic achievements,
extracurricular activities, and service to Columbia State and the
community. An appropriately inscribed plaque is awarded to the
student.
Jo L. Hutton Prize
The Jo L. Hutton Prize was established in 1991 to honor Mr. Jo L.
Hutton, the founder of Middle Tennessee Bank.
The Jo L. Hutton Prize criteria include a student who has graduated
from a Maury County High School, earned the highest grade point
average while attending Columbia State Community College,
and will be transferring into a Baccalaureate degree program at
a university.
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2015-2016 Catalog
Academic Programs and Services
Academic programs and credit course offerings at Columbia
State are provided through three academic divisions within the
area of Instruction. The Extended Campuses and Programs office
coordinates the delivery of these offerings to the College’s
extended campuses and temporary teaching sites. Non-credit
offerings are provided through the Center for Workforce
Development office. The University Center coordinates with
universities offering degree programs on the Columbia campus.
Division of Health Sciences
Students seeking to work in the health care field may choose from
several programs which prepare them for entry-level positions in
these fields. These include emergency medical services, health
sciences, medical informatics, nursing, radiologic technology,
respiratory care, and veterinary technology. A certificate is
available in Computed Tomography.
Division of Humanities and Social Sciences
The humanities disciplines serve the entire College by providing
opportunities for artistic and intellectual development in classroom
and co-curricular activities. The required and elective courses
offered are designed to teach students to think critically, to
appreciate the record of cultural achievement of humankind, to
write and speak effectively and creatively about human experience,
and to examine and refine the individual's view of life. Transfer
students may select an emphasis in art (studio), English, foreign
language, graphic design, humanities, mass communication,
music, public relations, speech communication and Theatre Arts.
Social Science courses attempt to acquaint students with the
various aspects of human beings in their relations to culture,
environment, behavioral patterns, heritage and political
institutions. University-parallel emphasis are offered in early
childhood education, elementary education, exercise science,
geography, history, political science, psychology, social work, and
sociology. A certificate is available in basic early childhood
education.
Division of Science, Technology and Mathematics
For those students interested in the business area or in technology
and industry-related fields, this division offers numerous options.
Students may follow a university parallel track or seek a degree
in information systems technology with options in information
systems specialist, medical office technology, mobile technologies,
office information technology and computer networking/cyber
security; business or general technology. A career-entry program
and a transfer program is available in criminal justice. They may
also enroll in a certificate program in business. Advanced
Integrated Industrial Technology offers an A.A.S. and certificate
for students interested in careers in high tech manufacturing.
Courses in mathematics and science are offered in support of a
variety of transfer and applied sciences programs. These courses
help students develop the mathematical and scientific skills
necessary for job entry or to continue study in a technologic or
pure-scientific field. University-parallel emphases are offered in
agriculture, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics.
Moreover, pre-professional emphases are offered in dental
hygiene, dentistry, engineering, medicine, pharmacy, and physical
therapy.
Learning Support Program
The Learning Support program is designed to assure students are
college ready to enter the rigors of the college curriculum.
Faculty and staff provide assistance to students to help them
succeed in meeting required competencies. Courses are offered
in three skill areas: writing, reading and mathematics. These
skills courses are listed in the courses description section of the
catalog and course schedule as 0000 level courses in Learning
Support English, Mathematics, and Reading. For additional
information on program placement requirements see www.
columbiastate.edu/learning-support.
Center for Workforce Development
Columbia State plays an important role in the region’s economic
growth, community development and quality of life. The Center
for Workforce Development seeks to strengthen this role through
business and industry services, economic development
partnerships, and professional development opportunities.
Business, industry, and government have unique education and
training needs. The Center for Workforce Development works
closely with organizations throughout the Columbia State service
area to identify these needs and develop appropriate services.
Services include noncredit professional development and
specialized contract training.
Economic development partnerships help communities maximize
strengths and overcome weaknesses. The Center for Workforce
Development seeks opportunities for Columbia State to participate
in partnerships with economic development agencies, education
and training providers, and other organizations throughout the
region. These efforts help communities gain access to vital
education and training services.
Columbia State awards continuing education units to persons
successfully completing many of its noncredit courses.
University Center
For those students who desire a degree beyond an Associate
degree, Columbia State partners with Middle Tennessee State
University, and Trevecca Nazarene University to bring
baccalaureate degree programs to the Columbia State campus.
Partnerships include:
Elementary Education (K-5) with Middle Tennessee State
University (MTSU) - Students who have completed an Associate
of Science in Teaching degree can complete a B.S. degree on the
Columbia State campus. This degree is designed to meet the
professional needs of students planning to teach kindergarten
through fifth grade.
Nursing RN to BSN with Middle Tennessee State University
(MTSU) - Graduates of Columbia State's nursing program have
the opportunity to purse a bachelors degree (BSN) seamlessly
through an articulation agreement with MTSU. This unique
partnership allows two-year RNs to complete additional general
education coursework at community college tuition rates followed
by online upper division nursing courses at the university and
complete the BSN locally. For more information about the
required courses and the GPA minimums for admission to MTSU
contact the Health Sciences Division Office at 931-540-2599 or
931-540-2600.
2015-2016 Catalog
Agribusiness 2+2 with Middle Tennessee State University All bachelor's degree courses will be held at Columbia State's
Lewisburg campus or online. This partnership gives students the
opportunity to obtain a bachelor's degree closer to home when
they may already have job and family obligations.
Management and Human Relations (MHR), with Trevecca
Nazarene University - This B.A. degree program offers students
the chance to complete their B.A. on the Columbia State campus
in Columbia. Classes meet just one night per week, between 6:00
p.m. and 10:00 p.m. Classes are taken one at a time in sequence,
and each class meets for 5 weeks. The program is based on a
cohort model and gives students the benefit of building support
relationships with their fellow students through the 15 month
program. In order to qualify for the program, a student must have
earned a minimum of 40 credit hours. For further information, call
931-548-6054; or for information on any other program and the
requirements for admission, go to www.tnustarthere.org or 615336-9693.
Humanities (Choose 9 hours including 3 hours Literature)
*ART 1030: Art Appreciation -- 3 hours
*ARTH 2010: Survey of Art History I -- 3 hours
*ARTH 2020: Survey of Art History II -- 3 hours
*ENGL 2010: Introduction to Literature I: Fiction -- 3 hours
ENGL 2030: Experience of Literature -- 3 hours
ENGL 2110: American Literature I -- 3 hours
ENGL 2120: American Literature II -- 3 hours
*ENGL 2210: English Literature I -- 3 hours
*ENGL 2220: English Literature II -- 3 hours
*ENGL 2410: Western World Literature I -- 3 hours
*ENGL 2420: Western World Literature II -- 3 hours
HUM 1010: Introduction to Humanities I -- 3 hours
HUM 1020: Introduction to Humanities II -- 3 hours
*MUS 1030: Music Appreciation -- 3 hours
*PHIL 121: Elementary Ethics -- 3 hours
*PHIL 201: Introduction to World Religions -- 3 hours
*PHIL 1030: Introduction to Philosophy --3 hours
*THEA 1030: Introduction to Theatre -- 3 hours
Regents Online Degree Program - Columbia State, along with
other Tennessee Board of Regents system institutions, participates
in several Online degree programs through the Regents Online
Degree Program (RODP). For more information on these
degrees, access the RODP website at www.rodp.org. RODP
Student Support is available 7:45 a.m. until 4:15 p.m. Monday Friday in room 128 of the Warf Building on the Columbia campus
or at [email protected]
Sciences (Choose two courses - 8 hours)
ASTR 1030: Astronomy and Lab -- 4 hours
BIOL 1010: Biology I and Lab -- 4 hours
BIOL 1020: Biology II and Lab -- 4 hours
BIOL 2010: Human Anatomy and Physiology I -- 4 hours
BIOL 2020: Human Anatomy and Physiology II -- 4 hours
CHEM 1010: Intro to Chemistry I and Lab -- 4 hours
CHEM 1020: Intro to Chemistry II and Lab -- 4 hours
*ESC 1110: Introduction to Environmental Studies I -- 4 hours
*ESC 1120: Introduction to Environmental Studies II -- 4 hours
GEOG 1010: Physical Geography I -- 4 hours
GEOG 1020: Physical Geography II -- 4 hours
PHYS 1030: Concepts of Physics and Lab -- 4 hours
PSCI 1010: Survey of Physical Science I -- 4 hours
The Online degrees offered by Columbia State include:
•Associate of Applied Science in Professional Studies
Concentration: Information Technology
• Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Education
• Associate of Applied Science in Web Technology
• Web Page Authoring Technical Certificate
• Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice
• Associate of Arts in General Studies (*University Parallel)
• Associate of Science in General Studies (*University Parallel)
Mathematics (Choose one - 3 hours)
MATH 1130: College Algebra -- 3 hours
MATH 1530: Probability and Statistics (non-calculus) -- 3 hours
MATH 1630: Finite Mathematics -- 3 hours
MATH 1710: Precalculus I -- 3 hours
MATH 1720: Precalculus II (Trigonometry) -- 3 hours
MATH 1830: Intuitive Calculus -- 3 hours
MATH 1910: Calculus I -- 3 hours
MATH 1920: Calculus II -- 3 hours
*The university parallel associate degree programs are designed
for those students ultimately seeking bachelor degrees.
Social Science (Choose two courses - 6 hours)
ECON 2010: Macroeconomics -- 3 hours
ECON 2020: Microeconomics -- 3 hours
*GEOG 2010: World Regional Geography -- 3 hours
POLS 1020: Introduction to Political Science -- 3 hours
POLS 1030: American Government -- 3 hours
PSYC 1030: General Psychology -- 3 hours
SOCI 1010: Introduction to Sociology -- 3 hours
SOCI 1020: Social Problems -- 3 hours
*SOCI 1120: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology -- 3 hours
SOCI 2010: Marriage and Family -- 3 hours
For information on current partnerships, contact the University
Center by calling (931) 540-2619 or by accessing www.
columbiastate.edu/admissions/transfer-information/bachelor'sand-master's-on-campus. The University Center is located in
room 128 of the Warf Building on the Columbia campus.
The following are approved RODP General Education
requirements for students admitted Fall 2004 and later.
Communication (9 hours)
ENGL 1010: English Composition I -- 3 hours
ENGL 1020: English Composition II -- 3 hours
SPCH 1010: Fundamentals of Speech Communication -- 3 hours
History (Choose two courses - 6 hours)
*HIST 1110: Survey of World History I** -- 3 hours
*HIST 1120: Survey of World History II** -- 3 hours
HIST 2010: U.S. History I** -- 3 hours
HIST 2020: U.S. History II** -- 3 hours
HIST 2030: Tennessee History** -- 3 hours
*Courses contains at least one component of international
content
** Intended for students planning to graduate from a TBR
institution.
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2015-2016 Catalog
Extended Campuses and Programs
The Extended Campuses and Programs office at Columbia State
is responsible for coordinating course offerings and services at
the College's extended campuses and temporary instructional
sites. The office also works with employers, students, and faculty
to provide cooperative education opportunities and with K-12
schools to provide dual enrollment and educational outreach
programs. Contact extended campuses as follows: Clifton - (931)
676-6966, Lawrenceburg - (931) 766-1600, Lewisburg - (931)
359-0351, Williamson County - (615) 790-4400.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative education (co-op) gives students the opportunity to
integrate classroom study with related work experience in
industry, business, or government. Columbia State Community
College believes students may develop needed skills by engaging
in challenging and interesting situations in the work place. This
applied learning provides opportunities for students to demonstrate
their abilities in real-world work environments. The program is
flexible and is tailored to meet the needs of each individual
student.
Cooperative education is similar to an independent study course.
During periods of co-op employment, students are enrolled in a
co-op course, pay a registration fee, and comply with department
requirements. In order to qualify for entry and continue participation
in the program, students must meet criteria outlined in the most
current program brochure, and must not have engaged in conduct
that resulted in college disciplinary sanctions or academic
penalties.
Although there is no guarantee of co-op placement, permanent
work or any compensation, every effort is made to place students
to their best educational and financial advantage. If remuneration
is involved, the rate of pay is determined by agreement of the
employer and the student. The employer pays wages directly to
the student.
The co-op employer provides a supervisor and the College
assigns a faculty sponsor for each student. Periodic reports from
supervisors and communications by faculty assure that each
student obtains maximum benefit from the program. Grading for
co-op courses is on a pass/fail basis. Participation in cooperative
education involves no obligation on the part of either the student
or the employer with regard to permanent employment after
graduation.
For more information on cooperative education, contact the
appropriate Division Dean's Office.
Distance Education
Distance education is a method for extending educational
opportunities beyond the boundaries of the traditional campus.
Columbia State offers a number of courses each semester
through non-traditional delivery formats including desktop video
conferencing, hybrid courses, two-way video and audio, online
(web asynchronous), and web-enhanced courses. These courses
have the same course requirements, transferability, and general
content as courses with the same designation which are taught
through traditional classroom lecture during the full semester and
accelerated terms.
Distance education courses are included in each semester's
course schedule. For more information, access www.
columbiastate.edu/e-campus.
Desktop Video Conferencing
Desktop Video Conferencing courses allow students to participate
in a course in real time without the need to be at a physical
campus location. This methods of instruction allows students to
connect with the instructor virtually and provides the capability of
two-way audio and video and chat for interaction with the
instruction and other students. Students use their personal
computer equipped with a camera and microphone to take
desktop video conferencing courses. The students' computer
must have access to high-speed internet service (no dial up).
Campus computers may be used, but students will be limited to
camera and chat functions only (microphones may not be used.)
Hybrid Courses
“Hybrid” is the name used to describe a course that combines
in-the-classroom instruction with computer-based, Online
learning. In a hybrid course, half of the course is presented Online
and, as a result, the amount of on-campus classroom time is
reduced by one-half.
Two-way Video and Audio
Two-way video and audio courses are delivered through the
Interactive Television (ITV) system which integrates two or more
classrooms at distant locations to create one virtual classroom.
An instructor and students, located in one classroom, is joined
with other classrooms through two-way video and audio (ITV)
technology. This technology allows interaction between students
and the instructor similar to the interaction if all students were
located in the same classroom.
Online Course (Web-Asynchronous)
Students taking online courses have 24/7 access to the course
syllabus, lectures, assignments, discussions, quizzes, file sharing
and group collaboration. Regular participation and timely
assignment completion is expected just as is required in traditional
lecture courses. Students may use campus computer facilities or
participate in the course using a personal computer. Prior to
registering for online courses, students are advised to complete
the "Are you ready for Online courses Self-Evaluation" and check
system requirement at www.columbiastate.edu/e-campus/
OnlineCampus.
Web-Enhanced
Many of Columbia State's classes are Web-Enhanced. This
means that instructors use a safe place on the web for course
discussions, extra reading assignments, support materials, study
guides, etc. In many cases, textbook publishers may provide
"companion websites", which may include online study guides,
resources, web links, and integration of original materials. These
courses have no reduction in on-ground class meeting
requirements.
Dual Enrollment
Columbia State has agreements with a number of high schools
that allow qualifying students to earn credit simultaneously during
the high school schedule or after the school day. For information,
contact the Dual Enrollment Coordinator at (615) 790-4409.
2015-2016 Catalog
Planning a Course of Study
Academic Advising
Although educational decisions are ultimately the student's
responsibility, it is important that every student receive academic
advising to ensure the best possible choices are made. All
Faculty advisors are available to students for consultation and
maintain regular office hours for this purpose. Students will be
assigned advisors by mid-term of their first semester of study.
Students may print a Degree Audit Evaluation by accessing their
myChargerNet account. These printouts will indicate the courses
remaining toward particular degrees or certificates.
Students are responsible for:
• knowing the graduation eligibility requirements for their major
as stated in the catalog,
• obtaining an equivalency table and/or the requirements for
graduation at the senior institution to which students plan to
transfer,
• making an appointment with an advisor and keeping it,
• knowing important dates such as schedule change deadlines
or the last date for drop/withdrawal/change to audit, and
• consulting with instructors and with an advisor for referral to
college resources for help when experiencing academic
difficulty.
Placement in Courses
It is the responsibility of the advisor and the student to review the
student’s admissions and testing data and academic record to
assure that all course and program prerequisites are met.
Students should refer to the “Policy and Procedures for Mandatory
Placement of Students,” p. 19, for guidelines regarding Learning
Support courses. The College may deny registration in a course
where the Learning Support prerequisite or any other prerequisite
has not been met.
Planning a Program of Study
The selection of a degree or certificate program is basic to
planning a program of study since the general education and
program-specific requirements vary considerably from program to
program. Degree programs which may be selected include the
Associate of Arts, Associate of Fine Arts, Associate of Science,
Associate of Science in Teaching, and the Associate of Applied
Science. Other shorter programs of study may lead to a certificate.
Information on specific programs can be accessed through the
College Web site.
Career-Entry programs are designed primarily for immediate
employment and require the selection of a program-specific major
which leads to the Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree
or the technical certificate.
These programs are not designed for transfer to a senior
institution but some programs and courses may be transferable at
the discretion of the receiving institution.
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Academic Certificates requirements vary with each certificate.
An academic certificate may require a minimum of 12 semester
credit hours to a maximum of one full year of coursework. 25% of
the total credits required must be taken from the approved general
education course listing. Students seeking an academic certificate
must earn a minimum of 50% of the credits required for that
certificate in residence at Columbia State with an overall grade
point average of at least 2.0. Students can only receive two
academic certificates if they receive an A.A. or A.S. and an A.A.S.
Technical Certificate programs requirements for the technical
certificate of credit varies in required semester hours and can
include up to one full year of study in technical specialty courses
and are used for skills upgrade or to prepare for licensure
examinations. Students seeking a technical certificate must earn
a minimum of 50% of the program credits in residence at
Columbia State with an overall grade point average of at least 2.0.
These courses may result in a technical certificate which is noted
on the student’s transcript. The courses in these certificates can
be applied towards an Associate of Applied Science degree.
Career Advancement programs provide documentation for
employment or professional development credit. The courses
may be credit or non-credit and are focused on training for
specific skills.
Pre-professional programs are transfer programs which lead to
an Associate of Science or Associate of Arts degree and provide
students with the first two years of preparation for entrance into a
professional school such as medicine at a university. Since the
course requirements for admission to these professional schools
vary considerably, it is essential that students be familiar with the
entrance requirements of the university to which they intend to
apply and that they work closely with their pre-professional
program advisor at Columbia State when designing their program
of study. Generally, it is wise to select an emphasis in a field with
similar requirements, for example biology or chemistry, and
develop a program of study for that field that includes the
professional school entrance requirements.
Tennessee Transfer Pathway (TTP) are designed to transfer into
a baccalaureate program at any public university in Tennessee.
For further information regarding the TTP, go to www.
tntransferpathway.org. It is essential that transfer students decide
on a transfer institution as soon as possible and follow the major
requirements when planning a program of study. Degree
checklists for the various TTP's are available online at www.
columbiastate.edu/academics/TTP-general-transfer.
Students transferring to a Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR)
institution must meet the general education requirements listed
below under the “Tennessee Board of Regents’ General Education
Requirements and Undergraduate Requirements.” TBR
institutions include all state community colleges, Austin Peay
State University, East Tennessee State University, Middle
Tennessee State University, Tennessee State University,
Tennessee Technological University, and the University of
Memphis.
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2015-2016 Catalog
General Education Philosophy and Requirements
ENGAGE. LEARN. SUCCEED. CONTRIBUTE.
Columbia State strives to engage the entire college community in
a learning centered environment in which students acquire the
essential skills needed to be successful in and contribute to their
communities.
The general education core required of students in all degree
programs is central to achievement of this goal. Within this core
students will learn by reading, writing, speaking, and solving
quantitative problems within the disciplines explored as part of a
broad general education and within those specific to the students'
major field. As a necessary corollary to application of the essential
skills in learning, students will be required to think critically about
their subjects, identify relevant sources of information, and use
technology effectively.
Learning occurs within the context of an expanded core of
knowledge which provides a broader context for understanding,
appreciating and living in the modern world. Students will acquire
this knowledge by surveying one or more disciplines within each
of the following general areas of study:
• Social/Behavioral Sciences
• Humanities/Fine Arts
• Natural Sciences/Mathematics
For each of the selected disciplines, students will understand the
central concepts defining the selected disciplines; appreciate the
historical, political, and/or cultural impact of the disciplines; and
understand how the disciplines apply to their life and the world at
large.
Tennessee Board of Regents General Education
Requirements and Undergraduate Requirements
Effective Fall Semester 2004, each institution in the State
University and Community College System of Tennessee
(hereafter identified as the Tennessee Board of Regents System)
will subscribe to common general education requirements at the
lower-division. These requirements consist of forty-one (41)
semester hours in the following subject categories and are
required for completion of the Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate
of Fine Arts (A.F.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Associate of
Science in Teaching (A.S.T.), and all baccalaureate degrees.
Communication
9 semester hours*
Humanities and/or Fine Arts
9 semester hours
(One course must be in literature)
Social/Behavioral Sciences
6 semester hours
History
6 semester hours**
Natural Sciences
8 semester hours
Mathematics
3 semester hours
41 semester hours
Total
Courses designated to fulfill general education requirements by
Columbia State Community College for the Associate of Arts and
Associate of Science Degree Requirements are listed on p. 46.
A complete listing of the courses fulfilling general education
requirements for Tennessee Board of Regents institutions is
available on their web site at www.tbr.edu.
Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree shall be required to
demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to
completion of two years of college-level work. Students pursuing
an Associate of Arts degree shall be required to demonstrate
proficiency in foreign language equivalent to completion of one
year of college-level work.
*Six (6) semester hours of English composition and three (3)
hours in English oral presentational communication are required.
**Students who lack the required one unit (one year) of American
History from high school as an admissions requirement must
complete six (6) semester hours of U.S. History or three (3)
semester hours of U.S. History and three (3) semester hours of
Tennessee History to fulfill the history requirements in general
education. Otherwise, students may choose from among the
history courses approved at a particular institution to fulfill the sixsemester hour requirement in history.
Undergraduate Degree Requirements and Provisions
All baccalaureate degrees offered by institutions in the Tennessee
Board of Regents System shall require a maximum of 120
semester hours except in certain degree programs in which
approval to exceed the maximum has been granted. The
programs approved as exceptions to the maximum are identified
in institutional catalogs.
All associate degrees shall require a maximum of 60 semester
hours except in certain degree programs in which approval to
exceed the maximum has been granted. The programs approved
as exceptions to the maximum are identified in institutional
catalogs.
Credit hours earned in Learning Support courses are institution
credit; they are not applicable to credit hours required for any
certificate, associate, or baccalaureate degree.
College courses taken to address course deficiencies in high
school preparation and to meet minimum university admission
requirements effective fall 1989 may be used concurrently to
satisfy general education requirements specified above with the
exception of foreign language. Relative to removing deficiencies
in foreign language, the following provisions apply:
1. Students who pursue programs leading to the Associate of
Science or Bachelor of Science degrees may apply foreign
language courses taken to remove the deficiencies as
electives, if appropriate, or otherwise as add-on hours.
2. Students who pursue programs leading to the Associate of
Arts and Bachelor of Arts degrees may apply foreign
language courses taken to remove deficiencies toward
fulfillment of degree requirements.
2015-2016 Catalog
Transfer Provisions of General Education Courses
As a result of the 2010 Tennessee Complete College Act, public
colleges and universities have an approved transfer tract for
many majors that assures transfer with full junior status provided
community college graduates do not change their major before
entering their university studies.
1. Students who complete the Associate of Arts or Associate of
Science degree and transfer to a university within the
Tennessee Board of Regents System will have satisfied all
lower-division general education requirements.
2. Students who complete blocks of subject categories will have
satisfied the general education requirements for the
categories of note. For example, if the eight (8) semester
hours of natural sciences are completed, then this block of
general education requirement is fulfilled upon transfer to an
institution within the Tennessee Board of Regents System.
When a subject category is incomplete, a course-by-course
evaluation will be conducted, and the student will be subject
to specific requirements of the receiving institution.
3. Effective Summer 2015, transfer credit will be given for all
courses in which passing grades are achieved, including the
grade of "D". For students enrolled prior to Summer 2015,
only grades of "C" or higher are accepted. Credit will only be
given for grades of "P" if the course is comparable to a
Columbia State course graded on a "pass/fail" basis.
All grades of transfer courses are entered on the student's Columbia State permanent academic record. Grades of transfer courses are not included in the calculation of the
student's grade point average at Columbia State.
4. In certain cases, specific courses must be taken in general
education. It is important that students and advisors be
aware of any major requirements that must be fulfilled under
lower-division general education. In cases where specific
courses are required as part of general education for certain
majors, the student is responsible for enrolling in the correct
courses. Failure to fulfill specific major requirements in lowerdivision general education may result in the need to complete
additional courses.
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Associate of Arts and Associate of Science
Degree Requirements
General Degree Requirements
All associate degrees awarded by Columbia State Community
College shall require 60 semester credit hours with an overall
Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.0. The GPA includes all
classes taken including those not required for the degree.
Students must earn 25% of total program credits in residence at
Columbia State. Students may not graduate before completing all
Learning Support course requirements as determined by their
placement scores. Credit hours earned in Learning Support or
other courses for institutional credit only are not applicable as
credit hours required for the degree.
Degree Requirements1 for the Associate of Science (A.S.)
Communications:
English Composition:
ENGL 1010 - Composition I (3 hours)
ENGL 1020 - Composition II (3 hours)
6 credit hours
Speech: 3 credit hours
SPCH 1010 - Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3 hours)
or
SPCH 1030 - Argumentation and Debate (3 hours)
Humanities/Fine Arts:
Literature:
3 credit hours
Courses selected from fine arts/humanities*:6 credit hours
History:
6 credit hours
Selected in accordance with requirements of the college or university to which the student plans to transfer.2
Social/Behavioral Sciences*:
6 credit hours
Natural Sciences*:
8 credit hours
Mathematics*:
3 credit hours
*See “Courses Satisfying General Education Core Requirements”
in the next column or degree program fliers beginning on page 49
of the catalog for specific courses meeting this requirement.
Additional Courses:
19 credit hours
Courses must be appropriate to the program in which the student
plans to major upon transfer as listed under the program of study
(Substitutions or waivers require approval.)
Total:
60 credit hours
Courses Satisfying General Education Core Requirements
When core requirements are listed as electives in a program of
study, the courses must be selected from the following:
Course ID
Course Name
History Elective - Choose from the following:
HIST 1110
Survey of World Civilization I HIST 1120
Survey of World Civilization II HIST 2010
Survey of United States History I
Credits
3
3
3
Course ID Course Title
HIST 2020 Survey of United States History II HIST 2030 Tennessee History Credits
3
3
Humanities/Fine Arts Elective - Choose from the following:
ART 1030 Introduction to the Visual Arts ARTH 2010 Survey of Art History I ARTH 2020 Survey of Art History II ENGL 2015 Introduction to Film Studies ENGL 2130 Survey of American Literature ENGL 2230 Survey of British Literature ENGL 2330 Survey of World Literature ENGL 2920 Survey of African American Literature
HUM 1130 Arts and Culture I HUM 1131 Arts and Culture II MUS 1030 Music Appreciation PHIL 1030 Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 2030 Introduction to Ethics PHIL 2033 Major World Religions THEA 1030 Intro to Theatre and Performance 3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Mathematics Elective - Choose from the following:
MATH 1010 Math for Liberal Arts MATH 1530 Elementary Statistics MATH 1630 Finite Math MATH 1710 Precalculus Algebra MATH 1720 College Trigonometry
MATH 1730 Pre-calculus MATH 1720 College Trigonometry MATH 1830 Applied Calculus MATH 1910 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
Natural Sciences Elective - Choose from the following:
ASTR 1030 Astronomy BIOL 1030 Introduction to Biology 4
4
BIOL 1110 BIOL 1120 BIOL 2010 BIOL 2020 CHEM 1110 CHEM 1120 GEOG 1010 GEOG 1020 PHYS 2010 PHYS 2020 PHYS 2110 PHYS 2120 PSCI 1030 4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
(Note: BIOL 1030 cannot be paired with BIOL 1010, BIOL 1020, BIOL 1110, BIOL 1120, BIOL 2010, or BIOL 2020 to fulfill the science general education requirement.)
General Biology I General Biology II Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Human Anatomy and Physiology II General Chemistry I General Chemistry II Physical Geography I Physical Geography II Elements of Physics I Elements of Physics II Physics I Physics II Physical Science Social/Behavioral Sciences Elective - Choose from the following:
ECON 2010 Macroeconomics ECON 2020 Microeconomics GEOG 2010 World Regional Geography PHED 2120 Essential Lifetime Wellness POLS 1030 American Government POLS 1501 Introduction to International Affairs
POLS 2010 State and Local Government POL 201 Introduction to Politics and Government PSYC 1030 General Psychology PSYC 2130 Life Span Psychology SOCI 1010 Introduction to Sociology SOCI1020 Social Problems SOC 210 Cultural Anthropology SOCI 2010 Marriage and Family 1See “Tennessee Board of Regents’ General Education Requirements and Undergraduate Requirements,” p. 45.
2Students transferring to a TBR university should take U.S. History; students transferring to other universities should take the sequence required at the
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university to which they are transferring. Students who lack the required one unit (one year) of American History from high school as an admissions requirements must complete six (6) semester hours of U.S. History or three (3) semester hours of U.S. History and three (3) semester hours of Tennessee History to fulfill the history requirement in general education.
2015-2016 Catalog
Degree Requirements for the Associate of Arts (A.A.)
General degree requirements for the Associate of Arts degree are
the same as those listed for the Associate of Science. In addition,
the Associate of Arts requires proficiency in a foreign language
equivalent to completion of one year of college-level work. This
requirement may be met by completion of six (6) hours of the
same foreign language or through credit by exam.
Tennessee Transfer Pathway Major
In support of the Complete College Tennessee Act of 2010, the
Tennessee transfer pathways promote the community college
service of transfer preparation and recognize that one of the
characteristics of an effective community college provides for
success in ensuring that students achieve their goals-momentum
toward completion in completing degrees and transferring.
TBR Community College Pathways to University of Tennessee
and Tennessee Board of Regents parallel transfer routes are for
students who plan to transfer into a TBR or UT university
baccalaureate program. See program fliers for specific information
and course requirements for each Tennessee Transfer Pathway
beginning on page 53 of the catalog.
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Accounting
Agriculture - Agricultural Business
Agriculture - Animal Science
Agriculture - Plant and Soil Science
Art (Studio)
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Criminal Justice
Economics - Business
Engineering, Civil
Engineering, Mechanical
English
Exercise Science
Foreign Language
Geography
History
Information Systems
Mass Communication
Mathematics
Music
Physics
Political Science
Pre-Health Professions (Pre-Dentistry, Medicine, Optometry,
Pharmacy, and Veterinarian)
Pre-Occupational Therapy
Pre-Physical Therapy
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Speech Communication
Theatre Arts
Columbia State Community College - General
Transfer Major
These degrees are for students who plan to transfer into university
baccalaureate program. See program fliers for specific information
and course requirements for each General Transfer Major
beginning on page 115 of the catalog.
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Commercial Entertainment
Early Childhood Education
General Transfer, No Emphasis
Graphic Design
Humanities
Public Relations
Teaching: K-5 (AST degree)*
*Students planning to pursue a degree in secondary education
should major in general transfer with an emphasis in the subject
that they plan to teach. Electives could include EDU 201 and
EDU 221.
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Associate of Applied Science Degree and
Certificate Requirements
General Degree Requirements
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•
Associate of Applied Science Degree and
Certificate Requirements
Academic Certificate Programs
All associate degrees awarded by Columbia State Community
College shall require a minimum of 60 semester credit hours with
an overall Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.0. The GPA
includes all classes taken including those not required for the
degree. Students must earn 25% of total program credits in
residence at Columbia State. Students may not earn a degree or
certificate before completing all Learning Support competencies
as required by their program of study. Credit hours earned in
Learning Support or other courses for institutional credit only are
not applicable as credit hours required for the degree.
General Degree Requirements for the Associate of Applied
Science (A.A.S.)
Total semester hours for the Associate of Applied Science degree
vary from 60-74 hours with a GPA of at least 2.0 in program
courses. Specific degree requirements for majors leading to the
Associate of Applied Science degree are listed under each major.
General education course requirements for the A.A.S. are as
follows:
Information Systems Technology
Option I: Computer Networking/Cyber Security
Option II: Information Systems Specialist
Option III: Medical Office Technology
Option IV: Mobile Technologies
Option V: Office Information Technology
Medical Informatics
Nursing
Radiologic Technology
Respiratory Care
Veterinary Technology
Minimum Degree Requirements for Academic Certificates
Academic Certificates requirements vary with each certificate. An
academic certificate may require a minimum of 12 semester credit
hours to a maximum of one full year of coursework. 25% of the
total credits required must be taken from the approved general
education course listing. Students seeking an academic certificate
must earn a minimum of 50% of the credits required for that
certificate in residence at Columbia State with an overall grade
point average of at least 2.0. Students can only receive two
academic certificates if they receive an A.A. or A.S. and an A.A.S.
English Composition:
ENGL 1010 - Composition I Credits: (3)
3 credit hours
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Humanities/Fine Arts*:
3 credit hours
Technical Certificate Programs
Social/Behavioral Sciences*:
3 credit hours
Minimum Degree Requirements for Technical Certificates
Natural Sciences/Mathematics*:
3-4 credit hours
Additional Course*:
3-4 credit hours
Specific requirements for technical certificates vary. See specific
requirements under each certificate. Students seeking a certificate
must earn a minimum of 50% of the credits required for that
certificate in residence at Columbia State with an overall grade
point average of at least 2.0. This includes all classes taken even
those not required for the certificate.
Total:
15-17 credit hours
*See A.A.S. major for specific courses meeting this requirement.
Associate of Applied Science Degree
(Career-Entry Programs)
The Associate of Applied Science degree is designed for the
student who wishes to move directly into the job market after
graduation. See program fliers for specific information and course
requirements for each Associate of Applied Science degree
beginning on page 130 of the catalog.
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Advanced Integrated Industrial Technology
Option I: Mechatronics
Option II: Multi Skilled Technician
Business
Criminal Justice Technology
Option: Law Enforcement
General Technology
Option I: Business Directed Sequence
• Health Sciences
A.A./A.S. General Education Core
A.A.S. General Education Core
Pre-Allied Health General Education Core
These certificates are designed to allow students to gain entrylevel proficiency in specific skills. See program fliers for specific
information and course requirements for each Technical Certificate
beginning on page 166 of the catalog.
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Advanced Integrated Industrial Technology
Basic Early Childhood Education
Business
Commercial Entertainment
Option I: Songwriting
Option II: Performance
Computed Topography
Emergency Medical Services
Emergency Medical Technician (Basic)
Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT)
Paramedic
Film Crew Technology
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Course Descriptions
Explanation of Code following each course description:
(C)
This course is part of the Common Course Curriculum Library as delivered by TBR community colleges. The course is not designed for
transfer except to institutions offering similar level Associate of Applied Sciences (A.A.S.) or certificate programs.
(NT)
This course is not designed to transfer.
(T)
This course is part of the Tennessee Transfer Pathway for all public colleges.
(TE)
This course is a transfer course that may apply as an elective by a receiving institution.
Accounting
ACCT 1010 Principles of Accounting I(3)
This course includes a study of basic accounting principles, accrual
accounting, the accounting cycle, equipment accounting, financial
statements for sole proprietors, and an introduction to corporations. (T)
ACCT 1020 Principles of Accounting II(3)
An expansion of ACCT 1010 with an emphasis on corporations. Topics
include corporate accounting, bonds, statement of cash flows, managerial
and cost accounting, financial statement analysis, and capital investment
analysis. (Prerequisite: ACCT 1010.) (T)
Advanced Industrial Integrated Technology
AIT 1203 Mechanical Installation(1)
Includes motor and machine mounting, speed, torque, power measurement,
and various lifting and rigging techniques. (Prerequisite: AIT 1001.) Lecture/
Lab (NT)
AIT 1301 Principles of Instrumentation(2)
Introduces measurement and instrumentation concepts and applications by
examining the four main components of instrumentation: temperature,
pressure, flow, and level. (Prerequisite: AIT 1001)Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1302 Integrated Process Control(2)
Covers measurement and instrumentation concepts and applications and
introduces the concept of loop controls and the proper calibration of loops.
Examines the importance of PID controllers in a control loop. (Prerequisite:
AIT 1001.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1001 Basic Electricity(2)
Introduces electrical power systems used in industry. Provides introductory
theory and application of DC/AC circuits, control transformers, and
operation of DC power supplies. (Prerequisite: permission of instructor.)
Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1401 Basic Electrical Controls(2)
Provides instruction in the integrated application of basic electrical controls
including electrical motor controls with starting, reversing, and stopping
devices. (Prerequisite: AIT 1001.)Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1002 Power Development(1)
Introduces electrical power systems used in industrial settings, including
basic theory and application of DC generators, alternators, and electric
motors. (Prerequisite: permission of instructor.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1402 Basic Pneumatic Controls(1)
Introduces the student to pneumatic speed control circuits. Uses air
pressure regulators and flow controls to obtain cylinder speeds.
(Prerequisite: AIT 1003.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1003 Hydraulic/Pneumatic Fundamentals(1)
Introduces basic theory and application of hydraulic and pneumatic
industrial power systems. (Prerequisite: permission of instructor.)
Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1403 Basic Hydraulic Controls(1)
Provides instruction in hydraulic speed and pressure control; includes flow
control valves, metering circuits, pressure reducing valves, and sequence
valves. (Prerequisite: AIT 1003 or permission from instructor.) Lecture/Lab
(NT)
AIT 1004 Intro to Welding(1)
Through the methods of lecture and labs, the student will be introduced to
electric and gas welding and cutting. The student will be provided with the
fundamental principles of joining ferrous and non-ferrous metals, welding
and cutting processes, equipment operation, and safety procedures. The
student will develop the skills to safely use oxy-acetylene cutting equipment
and the skills to use the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process in all
positions. Training will also be included in plasma cutting and an
introduction to shop fabrication equipment. (NT)
AIT 1101 Electrical Power Distribution(1)
Provides instruction in the use of electrical power as it applies in industry.
Includes AC/DC circuit analysis, AC power generation and three-phase
distribution systems, and transformers. (Prerequisite: AIT 1001 or
permission of instructor.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1102 Fluid Power Distribution(2)
Provides instruction in the use of hydraulic and pneumatic power as it
applies to industry. Includes basic principles of pressure and flow, basic
hydraulic/pneumatic circuits including pumps, valves, cylinders, and
motors. (Prerequisite: AIT 1003.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1201 Electrical Installation(1)
Focuses on the installation of electrical industrial systems, including print
reading, wiring/box selection component installation, raceways and conduit,
control wiring, and wiring techniques. (Prerequisite: AIT 1001.) Lecture/Lab
(NT)
AIT 1202 Piping, Pneumatic, and Installation(1)
Focuses on the installation of pneumatic industrial systems, including
interpretation of drawings and diagrams, fabrication of pipe and pipe
fittings, pneumatic supply lines, piping safety, and pipe installation for
pneumatic systems.(Prerequisite: AIT 1003.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1501 Intermediate Electrical Controls(2)
Provides instruction in the integrated application of advanced industrial
controls for electrical systems. Emphasizes variable frequency drives,
proximity sensors, SCR speed controls. (Prerequisite: AIT 1401 or
permission from instructor.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1502 Intermediate Pneumatic Controls(1)
Provides instruction in the integrated application of advanced industrial
controls for pneumatic systems. Emphasizes pneumatic logic circuits.
(Prerequisite: AIT 1402 or permission from instructor.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1503 Intermediate Hydraulic Controls(1)
Provides instruction in the integrated application of advanced industrial
controls for hydraulic circuits. Emphasizes hydraulic synchronization
circuits and multi-pressure circuits. (Prerequisite: 1403 or permission from
instructor.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 1600 Workplace Safety(1)
Focuses on industrial safety practices. Includes personal safety and
equipment, hazard recognition, and safeguards. Covers electrical safety
procedures and hazardous materials. Emphasizes OSHA rules and
regulations. Lecture (NT)
AIT 2001 Integrated Process Management(2)
Emphasizes project team organization. Introduces the following concepts:
cycle time, production time, first pass yield, and barrier identification.
Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 2004 CNC Programming(2)
This course introduces CNC machining. The student will use safe practices
operating the CNC machines. The student will learn CNC programming.
The student will be able to identify parameters for material selection and
use basic setup techniques for machining projects. Students should be
able to explain operator safety, machine protect ion, data input, program
preparation, and program storage. Students will complete a project on a
CNC mill. (NT)
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AIT 2101 Predictive/Preventive Maintenance and Lubrication(1)
Focuses on maintenance techniques and procedures used with advanced
and highly technical industrial machinery. Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 2102 Power Transmission Systems(1)
Focuses on maintenance techniques and procedures used with advanced
and highly technical industrial machinery including v-belt and shaft drives,
couplings, chain drives, bearings and seals, brakes and clutches. Lecture/
Lab (NT)
AIT 2103 Advanced Mechanical(2)
Focuses on troubleshooting techniques necessary for advanced and highly
technical industrial machinery. (Prerequisite: AIT 1203.) Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 2201 Programmable Logic Controls(2)
Underlying principles and applications of programmable logic controllers
including installation, logic fundamentals, and numbering systems; basic
programming of inputs, outputs, timers, and counters comparators, basic
data manipulation, and safety circuits of industrial PLCs. (Prerequisite: AIT
1401 or permission from instructor.) Lecture (NT)
AIT 2202 Programmable Logic Controls Lab(2)
Provides practical applications of programmable logic controllers including
installation, logic fundamentals and numbering systems; basic programming
of inputs, outputs, timers, and counters, comparators, basic data
manipulation, and safety circuits of industrial PLCs. (Corequisite: AIT 2201.)
Lab (NT)
AIT 2205 Robot Operations(2)
The course covers the tasks that an operator, technician, engineer or
programmer needs to set up and program a FANUC Robotics Handling Tool
Software Package. Lecture/Lab (NT)
AIT 2215 Advanced Robotics(2)
This course deals with the advanced applications of robotics in a
manufacturing environment. Students will learn the advanced principles of
mechanical construction, electronics, sensors, motors and robot
programming culminating in an end-of-semester robot project. (Prerequisite:
AIT 2205.) (NT)
AIT 2300 Fundamentals of Mechatronic Systems(2)
The class provides students with basic skills and fundamental knowledge of
sophisticated automation systems and includes a focus on mechanics,
electrical, fluid/pneumatic and computers, and the integration of such to
achieve machine movement and control. (NT)
AIT 2310 Advanced Mechatronics(2)
This course provides students with advanced knowledge and skills in the
integration of mechanics, electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, robotics, and
computer networking to develop a comprehensive and cohesive production
sequence. (Prerequisite: AIT 2300.) (NT)
AGRI 1040 Introduction to Agricultural Engineering(3)
A general study of the field of agricultural engineering. Areas of study
include farm buildings and related structures, fundamentals of electricity,
farm power and machinery, and the principles of land measuring and
surveying. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (TE)
AGRI 1050 Introduction to Soil Science(4)
A study of the properties of soil--its origin, classification, and physical and
chemical composition. Lab exercises deal with soil minerals, soil structure,
and soil moisture; the effects of liming and fertilizing and their influence on
plant growth. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (T)
Art
ART 1030 Introduction to the Visual Arts(3)
A course designed to enable students to analyze and criticize their
environment through the visual arts. A lecture course, illustrated with slides
and videos. (T)
ART 2220 Art Activities and Appreciation(3)
A studio course designed to provide the student with exposure to basic art
materials, processes and concepts related to the visual arts. This course is
designed to meet the needs of students majoring in elementary education.
(TE)
Art History
ARTH 2010 Survey of Art History I(3)
A survey of architecture, painting and sculpture from prehistoric times to the
Renaissance. (T)
ARTH 2020 Survey of Art History II(3)
A survey of art events leading up to and including the art of the present. (T)
Art Performance
ARTP 1010 Drawing I(3)
An introduction to the materials and techniques of drawing.2 hrs. lecture, 4
hrs. studio.(T)
ARTP 1020 Drawing II(3)
Emphasis on drawing as a means of artistic expression.(Prerequisite: ARTP
1010.) 2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. studio. (T)
ARTP 1110 Two Dimensional Design(3)
A structured studio course that investigates the two-dimensional design
elements of form, line, shape, value, and texture. Studio problems and class
critiques are used to encourage professional and self-directed concepts. 2
hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. studio. (T)
Agriculture
ARTP 1120 Three Dimensional Design(3)
An emphasis on color theory, space, and three-dimensional problems. 2 hrs.
lecture, 4 hrs. studio. (T)
AGRI 1010 Introduction to Agricultural Business(3)
Scope, importance, and relationship of agribusiness to the general
economics as well as practical applications of agribusiness, and an
introduction to the theories of agricultural economics. (T)
ARTP 2010 Painting I(3)
An introduction to the techniques, materials and tools used in oil and acrylic
polymer painting. (Prerequisites: ARTP 1110.) 2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. studio.
(TE)
AGRI 1020 Introduction to Animal Science(4)
A basic study of the anatomy and physiology of farm animals. The
fundamentals of feeding, genetics, marketing, animal health, and meat
production will be discussed, as well as the scope of the animal industry in
today's society. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (T)
ARTP 2020 Painting II(3)
An emphasis on individual experimentation in oil and acrylic polymer
painting. (Prerequisite: ART 2510.) 2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. studio. (TE)
AGRI 1025 Livestock Management(3)
The management practices involved in the production of swine, beef cattle,
and sheep. Topics include crossbreeding, breeding, feeding, dehorning,
castration, vaccinating, diseases, internal and external parasite control,
marketing and the facilities needed. Students are assigned animals to care
for and manage throughout the semester. (Prerequisite: AGRI 1020.) 2 hrs.
lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (TE)
AGRI 1030 Introduction to Plant Science(3)
A study of the anatomy and physiology of cultivated plants used in
agriculture. The factors affecting plant growth such as insects, weeds,
diseases, and fertility will also be included. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (T)
ARTP 2610 Photography I(3)
Basic techniques and processes of black and white still photography.
Emphasis on artistic composition, exposure, lenses, lighting, films, and
indoor and outdoor subject matter. Studio time is available for students. (TE)
ARTP 2620 Digital Photography(3)
An emphasis on digital camera techniques, accessories, and specific
problems. Individual projects and assignments will be critiqued. Studio time
is available for students. (TE)
ARTP 2630 Introduction to Digital Graphic Arts(3)
An introduction to computer graphics software and techniques. Students will
learn fundamental skills in graphic design, digital imaging and illustration
using industry standard graphics software. (TE)
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
ARTP 2632 Digital Graphics II(3)
This course focuses on motion graphics or time-based art. Adobe Flash is
the leading software for the creation of online-based, interactive media. In
this course you learn the tools and concepts of this program and its many
interactive possibilities, including drawing, image, text, animation, sound,
and basic action-scripting integration. Also, you can explore the steps in
creating Flash productions from start-to-finish, including site map and
navigation building, button making, output, optimization, and testing. (TE)
ARTP 2710 Printmaking I(3)
An introduction to the printmaking processes; concentrating on wood cuts,
linoleum cuts, monoprints, and collographs. 2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. studio.(TE)
ARTP 2720 Printmaking II – Intaglio(3)
An emphasis on metal engraving, dry point, etching, and individual
experimentation. (Prerequisite: ART 2710.) 2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. studio. (TE)
Astronomy
ASTR 1030 Astronomy(4)
This is a survey course in Astronomy, covering the history of astronomy, the
solar system and its formation, the Sun and stars, and galaxies. (Prerequisite:
2 years of high school algebra and satisfactory placement test scores or
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Math.) 3
hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (TE)
Biology
BIOL 1030 Introduction to Biology(4)
A survey course in biology. This course provides an introduction to the
biological sciences, including the scientific method, structure and function of
cells, genetics, diversity of life, and ecology. Primarily designed for nonscience majors, whose program of study requires one semester of biological
science combined with a semester of chemistry, physics, physical science
or astronomy. BIOL 1030 cannot be paired with any other BIOL course to
fulfill the natural science general education requirements. Students will
receive only elective credit for BIOL 1030 if any other General Education
BIOL class is completed. (Corequisite or Prerequisite: Satisfactory
placement test scores or completion of all Competencies in Learning
Support Reading, Writing, and Math.) 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (TE)
BIOL 1110 General Biology I(4)
An introductory course emphasizing scientific methodology, principles of
cellular biology (structure, function, metabolism, and cellular division),
genetics and evolution. (Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores.
Corequisite: All required Learning Support Reading, Writing and Math.) 3
hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab.(T)
BIOL 1120 General Biology II(4)
A continuation of the study of the structure and function of living organisms
and includes the plant and animal kingdoms. Emphasis is placed on
tissues, systems, and comparative physiology. Ecology is also included.
(Prerequisite: BIOL 1110 and Satisfactory placement test scores.
Corequisite: All required Learning Support Reading, Writing and Math. ) 3
hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (T)
BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and Physiology I(4)
Fundamentals of cellular biology are introduced to the student in preparation
for later emphasis on the human integument, skeletal, muscular, and
nervous systems. Chemistry, tissues, and special senses are included.
(Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all
Competencies in Learning Support Reading, Writing and Math .) 3 hrs.
lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (T)
BIOL 2020 Human Anatomy and Physiology II(4)
A study of the structure and function of the human excretory, reproductive,
endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, digestive, and respiratory systems with
final emphasis on the interrelationships of the various systems. Metabolism,
development, and immunity are also included. (Prerequisite: BIOL 2010
and satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all Competencies in
Learning Support Reading, Writing and Math.) 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (T)
BIOL 2230 Microbiology(4)
An introductory study of the morphology, physiology, pathogenicity, and
control of bacteria. Also included are vertebrate immunology with particular
emphasis on the components of the immune system and antigen-antibody
interactions. The laboratory emphasizes the isolation and culture of bacteria
using quantitative and diagnostic techniques. (Prerequisite: Completion of
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
183
one of the following: BIOL 1110, 1120, 2010 or 2020.) 3
hrs. lecture, 2 hrs.
lab. (TE)
Business
BUS 2165 Current Topics in Business Management (1)
This course deals with a specific topic of special interest in business
management. Course content and credit will be determined by academic
departments and announced in the printed course schedule. This course
may be repeated for credit only if a different topic is covered. (NT)
BUS 2265 Current Topics in Business Management (2)
This course deals with a specific topic of special interest in business
management. Course content and credits will be determined by academic
departments and announced in the printed course schedule. This course
may be repeated for credit only if a different topic is covered. (NT)
BUS 2365 Current Topics in Business Management(3)
This course deals with a specific topic of special interest in business
management. Course content and credits will be determined by academic
departments and announced in the printed course schedule. This course
may be repeated for credit only if a different topic is covered. (NT)
BUSN 1300 Personal Finance(3)
This course helps students to define and reach personal financial goals.
Topics may include: planning, budgeting, taxes, credit, housing, insurance,
investing and retirement planning. (C)
BUSN 1305 Introduction to Business
(3)
This course provides an introduction to the business environment. Topics
may include business ownership and organization, management, marketing,
business ethics, accounting, economics, finance, and business careers. (C)
BUSN 1310 Business Communications(3)
This course is a study of the principles, practices, and mechanics of various
types of effective written and oral business communications. (C)
BUSN 1320 Business Calculations(3)
This course is a study of the application of mathematics to solve problems
related to routine business operations. Topics may include insurance,
taxes, consumer credit, retail applications, investments, and introductory
statistics. (Prerequisite: INFS 1010 and satisfactory placement test scores
or completion of all competencies in Learning Support Math.) (C)
BUSN 1330 Entrepreneurship(3)
This course explores the strategies necessary to start and operate a
business. Topics may include development of a business plan and
strategies in marketing, management, finance, accounting, customer
service, and operations. (C)
BUSN 1350 Sales and Service(3)
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of customer service and
selling. Topics may include developing and conveying a positive attitude,
identifying buying motives and customer needs, developing and delivering
a sales presentation, customer approaches, sales strategies, and cultivating
repeat business through service. (C)
BUSN 1380 Supervisory Management(3)
This course provides for the development of supervisory ability and
judgement through a presentation of the principles and techniques of
effective supervision. Topics may include functions of a supervisor,
communication, motivation, training, and the changing workplace. (NT)
BUSN 2300 Business Ethics(3)
This course introduces basic ethical theories and value systems and applies
these perspectives to moral issues, problems, and situations which arise
within the business environment. (C)
BUSN 2340 Human Resource Management(3)
This course is a study of principles of human resource management, which
may include equal employment law and the recruitment, selection, and
development of the human resources. (C)
BUSN 2370 Legal Environment of Business(3)
This is a study of the principles of the American legal system as they relate
to the conduce of business in society. (C)
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2015-2016 Catalog
BUSN 2375 Career Success(3)
This course is a study of concepts, traits, and skills needed to be successful
in the workplace. Positive self-image, professional image, business
etiquette, interpersonal skills, and career plans will be addressed. Interview,
resume, and job search skills will also be covered. (C)
BUSN 2380 Principles of Marketing(3)
This course is a study of basic marketing principles and practices, including
the selection of target markets and the development of the marketing mix
(produce, price, promotion, and place of distribution). (C)
BUSN 2395 Business Applications(3)
This capstone course requires students to apply critical thinking, problemsolving, and communication skills to a real or simulated business
environment. (Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing and Permission of
Instructor) (C)
Chemistry
CHEM 1110 General Chemistry I
(4)
The study of matter, nomenclature of inorganic compounds, stoichiometric
calculations, structure of atoms, bonding, the gaseous state, solutions, and
nuclear chemistry. (Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading, Writing and
Math.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (T)
CEN 125 Principles and Techniques of Dance Performance(1)
Study of principles and techniques of dance performance through practical
application of performing skills. In-depth work in body awareness,
development of mental discipline, and understanding the psychological
aspects involved in nonverbal communication. Experience in working with a
choreographer and performing in both laboratory and concert settings. One
hour weekly lecture and movement plus a minimum of sixty clock hours in
a movement laboratory. Course may be repeated for a maximum of four
credits. (NT)
CEN 135 Commercial Songwriting I(3)
The study and composition of song forms, lyrics, and musical styles, and
their application to country, pop, and other trends in commercial music.
(Prerequisite: Students expected to sing or play guitar or piano. This course
is only open to CEN Department majors or permission of the instructor.)
(NT)
CEN 136 Commercial Songwriting II(3)
A continuation of Songwriting I with emphasis on more focused writing of
material, advanced songwriting techniques, in-depth song development,
and exploration of musical styles and genres. Attention will be given to
music publishing, songplugging, and exploring commercial avenues for
song placement. (Prerequisite: CEN 135 or permission of the instructor.)
(NT)
CHEM 1120 General Chemistry II
(4)
The study of chemical equilibrium including ionic equilibria, acids, bases and
salts, solubility product principle, redox reactions, electrochemistry,
thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, introduction to organic chemistry.
Qualitative analysis is presented in laboratory. (Prerequisite: CHEM 1110.)
3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (T)
CEN 200 Audition/Showcase Techniques(2)
A course designed to prepare students for competitive auditions and singersongwriter showcases. Topics include selection of songs and dances that
will best showcase the student's individual talents, resume development,
publicity photos, strategies, and job opportunities. Students will participate
in auditions or showcases suitable for prospective employers and venues.
(Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.) (TE)
CHEM 2010 Organic Chemistry I
(4)
The study of properties of aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons,
stereochemistry alkylhalides, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, ethers, and
benzene. (Course offered Fall only). (Prerequisite: CHEM 1120.) 3 hrs.
lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (T)
CEN 203 Choreography I(1)
Rendering of movement improvisation, compositional elements, music, and
production to achieve the total choreographic offering. Lectures and
discussions on the creative process leading to the student's selection of
thematic material for choreographic exploration and development.(NT)
CHEM 2020 Organic Chemistry II
(4)
The study of spectroscopy, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and
their derivatives, condensation reactions, amines, phenols, fats,
carbohydrates, amino acids, and proteins. (Course offered in Spring only).
(Prerequisite: CHEM 2010.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (T)
CEN 204 Choreography II(1)
A continuation of CEN 203 with emphasis on form, content, music costumes
and props. The student will develop an original group dance and execute
plans for costumes, lighting, and makeup. (Prerequisite: CEN 203) (NT)
Commercial Entertainment
Students must be admitted into the Commercial Entertainment
Program before they can register for CEN courses.
CEN 101 Dance Combination(1)
Basic techniques of classical ballet, tap and jazz. Emphasis placed on
fundamentals, alignment, integration, terminology, vocabulary, combinations,
and style. Course may be repeated for a maximum of four credits. (NT)
CEN 102 Dance Performance and Production Lab(1)
A structured laboratory course giving credit to students for their experiences
in the production areas and performance of dance as an art form. The
course is fourfold in content, including auditions, rehearsals, performances,
and all facets of production. All students in the course are provided the
opportunity to be involved in a dance production in the capacities of
auditions, performance and/or production each semester. Forty-five
laboratory hours per semester. Course may be repeated for a maximum of
four credits. (NT)
CEN 107 Ballet Technique(1)
Basic techniques of classical ballet. Emphasis placed on fundamentals of
alignment, integration, terminology, and simple ballet movement vocabulary.
Course may be repeated for a maximum of four credits. (NT)
CEN 109 Tap Technique(1)
Basic technique of tap dance designed for the performing student.
Fundamentals of body placement, terminology, tap combinations, elements
of performance quality, and tap dance composition. Course may be
repeated for a maximum of four credits. (NT)
CEN 111 Jazz Technique(1)
Introduction to jazz dance through a study of its vocabulary, style, and
technique. Course may be repeated for a maximum of four credits. (NT)
CEN 207 Entertainment Business(3)
Survey of the business practices in the entertainment industry as they relate
to employees. Topics include implications of different types of employment,
making the deal and contracts, issues related to freelancing, self-marketing
and working with agents. The course also explores the role of professional
organizations, unions, and performing rights organizations and their
influence on standard practices in the entertainment industry. Upon
completion, students will be able to demonstrate a working vocabulary and
knowledge of basic employee practices in the industry as they relate to the
various crafts and venues. (TE)
CEN 209 Dance Pedagogy(3)
Principles and methods of the teaching of dance and the management of a
dance studio. Teaching methods for diverse ages and skill levels are
covered. Management topics include site selection, employee selection and
supervision, performance rights organization and customer service. (NT)
CEN 216 Professional Audition(1)
Independent preparation and presentation of a professional audition to
include solo vocal, dance and monologue presentations. Student will be
responsible for all aspects of the audition. This course serves as a capstone
experience for the Commercial Entertainment Program and should be taken
in the final semester. (NT)
CEN 217 Dance Studio Practicum(3)
Examination of and experience in a functioning dance school, including
teaching, choreographing, auditioning, and counseling students.
(Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.) (NT)
CEN 230 Digital Video Editing(3)
The study and practical application of editing music videos using Final Cut
Pro for the songwriter, vocalist, and instrumentalist. Students should expect
to spend at least two additional hours per week on team-based assignments.
(Corequisite: MUS 2350.) (NT)
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
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2015-2016 Catalog
Communications
COMM 1010 Intro to Mass Communications(3)
General orientation to the field of mass communications. Survey of basic
journalism, broadcasting, public relations, advertising, photography, film and
recording. (Prerequisite: satisfactory placement test scores or completion of
all Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Writing.) (T)
COMM 1020 Media Writing(3)
Theory and practices of writing for print and electronic media according to
the techniques, styles, and formats of various media. (Prerequisites:
Completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Writing and Reading,
and COMM 1010 or permission of the instructor.) (T)
COMM 1030 Introduction to Electronic Media(3)
This course examines the organization, structure, development, function,
social aspects and history of new media. Developing and emerging new
systems and methods of video and audio communication are studied
including contemporary texts, articles, and breaking news regarding new
technology, new regulation, new methods, and new uses of these emerging
media formats. Emphasis will be placed on Internet, cable, satellite and
other formats. (TE)
COMM 1240 Intro to Broadcasting(3)
General orientation to the field of broadcasting, including the structure,
function, social and historical aspects of broadcasting. (Course is offered
Spring only.) (Prerequisites: COMM 1010 and COMM 1020.) (TE)
COMM 1400 Introduction to Screenwriting(3)
The class will critically review scripts, write scripts and make short films
based on student composed scripts. (TE)
COMM 2450 Intro to Public Relations(3)
This course introduces the principles, theories and common practices in the
field of public relations. The history and the roles public relations play in our
society will be examined. (Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores
or completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Writing and
Reading.) (TE)
Computer Science Programming
CISP 1010 Computer Science I(4)
This course provides an introduction to computer programming in a
contemporary high-level language. Both concepts and applications of
actual programming in an event-driven. Graphical User Interface
environment will be addressed. Emphasis is placed on problem analysis,
use of structured programming techniques, data types, variable declaration,
functions, and data files. (Prerequisite: 19 Math ACT, or completion of all
competencies in Learning Support Math.) (T)
CISP 1020 Computer Science II(4)
This course provides advanced development of concepts and skills
introduced in CISP 1010. Attention will be directed to object oriented
programming techniques, enhanced programming logic skills, design of
effective interfaces for a GUI application in an event-driven environment and
use of advanced data file concepts. (Prerequisite: CISP 1010.) (T)
College Success
COLS 101 Columbia State College Success
(1)
This is a one-credit-hour elective course designed to assist new college
students in transitioning to the Columbia State Campus environment.
Learning modules include Success Strategies, Campus Resources/
Technology, Career Development, and Campus Involvement. The purpose
of the course is to provide information that will maximize students' chances
for success while minimizing the time required to achieve their educational
goals. (T)
Cooperative Education
COP 201-206 Cooperative Education(1-6)
This course is a practical work experience in an industry or business related
to the student's major field of study. Close liaison is maintained between
employer and co-op staff to ensure maximum benefit to the student. This
course should allow students to explore the field in which they feel their
vocational interests lie and determine whether it is suitable for them. This
course may be used as a general elective upon advisor's approval. Students
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
will be required to work a minimum of 60 hours for each credit hour earned.
Students may repeat co-op courses to a maximum total of six credit hours.
GRADING OF CO-OP COURSES IS ON A PASS/NO PASS BASIS.
(Prerequisite: permission of the instructor required.) (NT)
COP 201 Cooperative Education (60 hours minimum)
(1)
COP 202 Cooperative Education (120 hours minimum)
(2)
COP 203 Cooperative Education (180 hours minimum)
(3)
COP 204 Cooperative Education (240 hours minimum)
(4)
COP 205 Cooperative Education (300 hours minimum)
(5)
COP 206 Cooperative Education (360 hours minimum)
(6)
Criminal Justice Technology
CRMJ 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice
(3)
This course objective is for a student to examine policing, corrections, and
the American court system, amongst other topics. The student gains an
understanding of the complexity of the criminal justice processes, its lack of
central coordination and, most significantly, how justice is administrated in
American Society. (T)
CRMJ 1020 Introduction to the Legal Process(3)
This course reviews basic laws governing the maintenance of a democratic
society and how criminal and constitutional laws meet the challenge of
American Society. (T)
CRMJ 1322 Police Administration and Organization
(3)
A study of the principles of personnel management functions and
organization of the police agency. Topics include policy procedures,
evaluation of the research, planning, and development processes, and
operational duties and commands. (C)
CRMJ 1325 Issues and Ethics in Criminal Justice
(3)
This course is a review and in-depth examination of current issues, trends,
and ethical considerations concerning the criminal justice process with
emphasis on problems impacting local criminal justice agencies and
personnel. (C)
CRMJ 1330 Criminal Evidence and Procedures
(3)
This course will be an introduction to the American Criminal Justice System
with an emphasis on handling evidence and suspects, the US Constitution,
individual rights, criminal court procedures, the Exclusionary Rule, probable
cause, arrest procedures, search warrants, stop and frisks, admissions,
interrogations, and confessions, and the legal requirements to be followed
in processing criminal evidence and defendants. (C)
CRMJ 1340 Criminal Investigation
(3)
This course is an examination of the methods of interviews, interrogation,
admissions, confessions, written statements, criminal case report writing,
and evidence evaluation used in criminal investigations. (C)
CRMJ 1355 Understanding Terrorism
(3)
This course will introduce students to the study of terrorism, and will provide
a basic knowledge of the history and politics of terrorism as well as explore
contemporary terrorism events. The course will review major theories and
organization in the field of domestic and international terrorism. (C)
CRMJ 1360 Introduction to Crime Scene Investigation
(3)
This course is designed to train and prepare participants to become skilled
in the recognition, discovery, processing, preservation, collection, and
transmission of physical evidence found at the scene of the crime. The
course includes photography, sketching, fingerprinting, marking, chain of
custody, collection methods, sources of physical evidence, and transmission
to the laboratory. (C)
CRMJ 2010 Introduction to Law Enforcement(3)
An overview of the American Police, including the philosophy and historical
evolution behind the police force. Emphasis is on policing procedures;
crime prevention and control; functions of law enforcement; problems and
needs facing the police; and contemporary issues. (T)
CRMJ 2020 Introduction to Corrections(3)
An overview of corrections, including the philosophy and historical evolution
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2015-2016 Catalog
behind the development of corrections. Emphasis is on corrections
procedures, current prison conditions and operations, problems and needs
facing corrections, and related contemporary issues. (T)
CRMJ 2191 - 2391 Criminal Justice Practicum (1-3)
This course requires students to apply critical thinking, problem-solving, and
communication skills required in a real or simulated environment. It may be
used by an institution for a field placement, a service learning project, a
co-op experience, or a capstone course. (C)
CRMJ 2191 Criminal Justice Practicum CRMJ 2291 Criminal Justice Practicum
CRMJ 2391 Criminal Justice Practicum
(1)
(2)
(3)
CRMJ 2301 Computer Forensics
(3)
Computer Forensics introduces the student to the background, history and
terminology of computer crime. Students study the evolution of the internet
crime, criminal behavior and computer crime effects on law enforcement,
such as technological change and resource allocation. The student is given
the terminology and procedures for conducting forensic analysis and
processing computer evidence. (C)
CRMJ 2305 Introduction to Cyber Security for Criminal Justice (3)
This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the
concepts of cyber security. The course will prepare students for succeeding
courses in cyber security and forensics. (NT)
ECED 2340 Family Dynamics and Community Involvement(3)
The role of the family and community in the physical, cognitive, social, and
emotional growth of the child in a diverse society. Includes benefits of and
strategies for developing positive, reciprocal relationships with families in an
early childhood setting ages birth to age eight. Field experiences required.
(TE)
ECED 2335 Initial Practicum(3)
Initial Practicum is a supervised practicum which includes a minimum of 30
clock hours in instruction and 45 clock hours in a clinical site approved by
the Department (accredited agency, 3-Star, or Department-approved site).
These hours may be completed in the student's employment site with
Department approval. The course includes a study of the physical and
human qualities that combine to create an environment that is safe and
healthy and that promotes optimum learning for young children ages birth
through eight. (TE)
ECED 2365 Final Practicum(3)
Final Practicum is a supervised clinical experience with a minimum of 15
clock hours in instruction and 90 clock hours in a Clinical Site approved by
the Department (accredited agency, 3-Star, or Department-approval site).
Up to 45 hours may be completed in the student's employment site with
Department approval. Focuses on the student's demonstration of
competencies that produce positive developmental outcomes for young
children ages birth through eight. (TE)
CRMJ 2311 Juvenile Justice
(3)
This course is an overview of the extent, causes, nature, and control of
juvenile delinquency from a sociological perspective. Various theories of
delinquency causation, the role of social institutions, the major components
of the juvenile justice system and traditional juvenile corrections will be
presented. (C)
ECED 2390 Creative Development(3)
This course provides strategies for promoting creative development of the
child ages birth to eight. Students will gain an understanding of the concept
of creativity: what it is, why it is important, and how the development of
creativity in young children can be encouraged. Emphasis is on the
development of creativity in relation to art, music, language, movement, and
dramatic arts. Field experiences required. (TE)
CRMJ 2312 Criminology
(3)
This course is a systematic study of crime, criminals and criminal justice
system. It explores the fundamental elements of criminology through a
study of the causation and criminal behavior theories and examines the
relevant activities of the criminal justice system.(Prerequisite: CRMJ 1010).
(C)
ECED 2130 Clinical Practicum I(2)
Supervised practicum with a minimum of 15 clock hours in seminar and 45
clock hours in early childhood practical experiences. Course includes a
study of the physical and human qualities that combine to create an
environment that is safe and healthy, and promotes optimum learning for
young children ages birth to eight. (NT)
CRMJ 2340 Investigative Report Writing
(3)
This course focuses on preparing analytical investigative reports and
explores techniques of organizing, structuring, and investigating the report
to comply with proper guidelines. (Prerequisite: ENGL 1010). (C)
Economics
CRMJ 2381 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
(3)
This course provides an in-depth study of significant, relevant, and timely
trends and issues in the field of Criminal Justice. (C)
Early Childhood Education
ECED 1010 Introduction to Early Childhood Education(2)
An Introduction to the early childhood profession including an emphasis on
professionalism and developmentally appropriate practice. Includes an
overview of history of early education, theoretical program models, different
types of early childhood programs, community resources, professional
organizations, and contemporary trends and issues in programs for children
ages birth to eight. Field experiences required. (TE)
ECED 2310 Safe, Healthy, Learning Environments(3)
A study of the basic principles and practices of safety, health and nutrition
as they relate to the early childhood setting, home, and community for
children ages birth to eight. Also included is a study of principles of creating
appropriate learning environments for young children. Field experiences
required. (TE)
ECED 2315 Early Childhood Curriculum(3)
A study of developmentally appropriate practices and the teacher’s role in
supporting development of young children ages birth to eight. An emphasis
on curriculum planning including goals, environment, roles of teachers and
parents, materials, and settings. Field experiences required. (TE)
ECED 2320 Infant, Toddler, Child Development(3)
The study of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of young
children and their application to the care, guidance, and development of the
child, birth to eight. Laboratory observation and interaction. (TE)
ECON 2010 Macroeconomics(3)
Provides basic understanding of modern economic society; fundamental
economic concepts; measurement, determination and growth of national
income; determination of employment and price level; principles of money
and banking; monetary and fiscal policies; economics of less developed
countries; comparative economic systems. (T)
ECON 2020 Microeconomics(3)
Provides basic understanding of modern economic society; fundamental
microeconomics concepts; consumer and firm behavior; market structure
and allocation of resources; pricing of productive resources; antitrust
economics, labor economics; public economics and international economics.
(T)
Education
EDU 100 Creating College Success(3)
Creating College Success seeks to provide students with information, ideas,
strategies, techniques, and experiences that encourage and support
student success. Specific topics include orientation to college programs and
services, life/time management, improving concentration and memory,
teaching and learning styles, listening, reading and taking effective notes,
test-taking and importance of academic advisement, critical thinking, stress
management for academic success and communications skills. This course
may not be taken for credit if a student has taken DSPS 0800 without the
approval of the Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences. (TE)
EDU 201 Introduction to Education(3)
Introduction to Education is a general survey course in which students
explore the historical, philosophical, sociological, and psychological
foundations of education. Students will also use technology tools, including
basic computer skills--Windows, Internet, word processing, and presentation
skills--in ways that are integrated in contemporary learning environments.
Students are required to complete a 12-hour field study in an approved
classroom. (Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or completion
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Writing.) (TE)
EDU 221 Educational Psychology(3)
Educational Psychology is a study and application of the principles of
growth and development, learning theory, and assessment techniques in
the classroom setting. Pre-service teachers will use integrative technology,
including computer word processing, databases, spreadsheets, and
presentation tools, so that they will be acquainted with its use to improve
student learning, as well as to help teachers become more productive.
Students are required to complete a 6-hour field study in an approved
classroom. (Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or completion
of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Writing.) (TE)
EDU 222 Education of Exceptional Learners(3)
Education of Exceptional Learners is designed to increase the student's
understanding of the psychology and education of the exceptional child.
This course is not a methodology course, but it will provide an overview of
the range of exceptional characteristics that exist and the effects of these on
learning. The physical, mental, emotional, behavioral and social traits of
children and adolescents will be discussed. Students will gain an
understanding of pertinent federal and state legislation (Individuals with
Disabilities in Education Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act) by which
some children and adolescents are considered exceptional and identified as
such. Other topics will include legal issues, giftedness, as well as diversity
of culture and language. Pre-service teachers will also apply computers and
related technologies to support instruction in appropriate grade levels and
subject areas for exceptional learners. They will also complete an 8-hour
field study in an approved inclusive or special education classroom.
(Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all
Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Writing.) (TE)
EDU 225 Educational Technology for Teachers(3)
This course is designed for students pursuing a career in education, 21st
century classroom training, teachers who are novice users of the current
technology found in most 21st century classrooms, and current teachers
who want to improve their knowledge of how to use technology in the
classroom. Additional lab work required. (TE)
Emergency Medical Services
Students must be admitted in the Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
Program before they can register for EMSB, EMSA, EMSP or EMT
courses.
EMSB 1101 EMT Medical Skills Lab
(1)
EMT Medical Skills Lab is a laboratory based course utilizing scenarios to
emphasize EMS operations, communications, documentation, medical/
legal/ethical considerations, airway management, respiratory emergencies,
cardiovascular emergencies, acute diabetic emergencies, abdominal and
gastrointestinal emergencies, urologic emergencies, anaphylactic reactions,
behavioral emergencies, assisting with medication administration, and
successful assessment of patients with a variety of medical concerns. This
course includes application of principles and processes discussed in EMT
Medical Emergencies. (Prerequisite: Admission to the EMT Program)
(Corequisite: EMSB 1601 and EMSB 1111.) (NT)
EMSB 1102 EMT Trauma and Medical Skills Lab(1)
EMT Trauma and Medical Skills Lab is a laboratory based course utilizing
scenarios to emphasize obstetrics and gynecology, neonatal care, pediatric
emergencies, geriatric emergencies, environmental emergencies, patients
with special challenges, trauma and shock. (Prerequisite or Corequisite:
EMSB 1601, EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111, EMSB 2602, and EMSB 1112
depending on delivery schedule.) (NT)
EMSB 1111 EMT Clinical(1)
EMT Clinical is the one of two clinical courses designed to allow the student
to meet all psychomotor and affective outcomes for the clinical requirements
of an EMT program and build upon the concepts and knowledge learned in
EMT Medical Emergencies and EMS Operations. (Prerequisite: Admission
to the EMT Program) (Corequisite: EMSB 1601 and EMSB 1111.) (NT)
EMSB 1112 EMT Field Internship(1)
EMT Field Internship is the one of two clinical courses designed to allow the
student to meet all psychomotor and affective outcomes for the clinical
requirements of an EMT program and build upon the concepts and
knowledge learned during prior and/or concurrent courses. (Prerequisite or
Corequisite: EMSB 1601, EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111, EMSB 1602, and EMSB
1102 depending on delivery schedule.) (NT)
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
187
EMSB 1601 EMT Medical Emergencies and EMS Operations
(6)
EMT Medical Emergencies and EMS Operations is the one of two lecture
courses designed to provide the student with the knowledge of an entrylevel Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). This course includes the
following topics: Emergency Medical Responder-National Educational
Standards competencies, roles and responsibilities of the EMT, workforce
safety, wellness, public health, communications, documentation, EMS
operations, medical/legal/ethical considerations, fundamental anatomy and
physiology, life span development, fundamental pathophysiology, patient
assessment, airway management, respiratory emergencies, cardiovascular
emergencies, acute diabetic emergencies, abdominal and gastrointestinal
emergencies, urologic emergencies, anaphylactic reactions, and behavioral
emergencies. (Prerequisite: Admission to the EMT Program) (Corequisite:
EMSB 1101 and EMSB 1111.) (NT)
EMSB 1602 EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies
(6)
EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies is the one of two lecture courses
designed to provide the student with the knowledge of an entry-level
Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). This course includes the following
topics: obstetrics and gynecology, neonatal care, pediatric emergencies,
geriatric emergencies, environmental emergencies, patients with special
challenges, trauma and shock. Trauma and shock will include the following
topics: bleeding, soft tissue injuries, head and spine injuries, face and neck
injuries, chest injuries, abdominal and genitourinary injuries, and orthopedic
injuries. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: EMSB 1601, EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111,
EMSB 1102, and EMSB 1112 depending on delivery schedule.) (NT)
EMSA 1111 Advanced EMT Clinical(1)
The Advanced EMT Clinical is one of two courses designed to allow the
student to meet all psychomotor and affective objectives for the clinical
requirements of an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician program and
build upon the concepts and knowledge gained during prior and/or
concurrent courses. (Corequisites: EMSA 1501 and EMSA 1201.) (NT)
EMSA 1112 Advanced EMT Field Internship(1)
The Advanced EMT Field Internship is the one of two courses designed to
allow the student to meet all psychomotor and affective objectives for the
clinical requirements of an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician
program and build upon the concepts and knowledge gained during prior
and/or concurrent courses. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: EMSA 1111, EMSA
1502, and EMSA 1202 depending on delivery schedule. (NT)
EMSA 1201 Advanced EMT Medical Skills Lab(2)
The Advanced EMT Medical Skills Lab is the one of two laboratory based
courses intended to focus the student on developing skills related to theory
presented in didactic classes taken as corequisites for this course. This
laboratory experience will utilize scenarios to emphasize airway
maintenance, medication administration, and successfully assessing
patients with a variety of medical concerns. (Corequisites: EMSA 1501 and
EMSA 1111.) (NT)
EMSA 1202 Advanced EMT Trauma and Medical Skills Lab (2)
The Advanced EMT Trauma and Medical Skills Lab is one of two laboratory
based courses intended to focus the student on developing skills related to
theory presented in didactic classes taken as corequisites for this course.
This laboratory experience will utilize scenarios to emphasize airway
maintenance, medication administration, and successfully assessing
patients with a variety of medical concerns. (Prerequisite or Corequisite:
EMSA 1201, EMSA 1502, and EMSA 1112 depending on delivery schedule.)
(NT)
EMSA 1501 Advanced EMT Medical Emergencies(5)
The Advanced EMT Medical Emergencies is the one of two lecture courses
which includes basic and limited advanced skills focused on the acute
management and transportation of critical and emergent patients. This
course includes the following topics: Emergency Medical Responder and
Emergency Medical Technican-National Educational Standards
competencies, roles and responsibilities of the AEMT, workforce safety,
wellness, public health, communications, documentation, medical/legal/
ethical considerations, anatomy and physiology, life span development,
pathophysiology, patient assessment, critical thinking, airway management,
respiratory emergencies, cardiovascular emergencies, acute diabetic
emergencies, abdominal and gastrointestinal emergencies, urologic
emergencies, anaphylactic reactions, and behavioral emergencies.
(Corequisites: EMSA 1201 and EMSA 1111.) (NT)
EMSA 1502 Advanced EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies (5)
The Advanced EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies is one of two lecture
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2015-2016 Catalog
courses which includes basic and limited advanced skills focused on the
acute management and transportation of critical and emergent patients.
This course includes the following topics: obstetrics and gynecology,
neonatal care, pediatric emergencies, geriatric emergencies, environmental
emergencies, patients with special challenges, EMS operations, trauma and
shock. Trauma and shock will include the following topics: bleeding, soft
tissue injuries, head and spine injuries, face and neck injuries, chest
injuries, abdominal and genitourinary injuries and orthopedic injuries.
(Prerequisite or Corequisite: EMSA 1501, EMSA 1202, and EMSA 1112
depending on delivery schedule.) (NT)
EMSP 1311 - Paramedic Clinical I
(3)
Paramedic Clinical I is the first of three clinical courses designed to allow the
student to meet all psychomotor and affective objectives for the clinical
requirements of a paramedic program and build upon the concepts and
knowledge gained during the first semester. (Corequisites: EMSP 1801 and
EMSP 1401). (C)
EMSP 1401 Paramedic Skills Lab I
(4)
Skills Lab I is a laboratory based course utilizing scenarios to emphasize
airway management, medication administration and successful assessment
of patients with a variety of medical concerns and an introduction to
cardiology. This course includes application of principles and processes
discussed in Fundamentals I. (Corequisites: EMSP 1801 and EMSP 1211).
(C)
EMSP 1801 Fundamentals of Paramedic I
(8)
Fundamentals of Paramedic I is the first of two lecture courses to include
the following topics: paramedic roles, responsibilities, workforce safety,
wellness, public health, communications, documentation, EMS operations,
medical/legal considerations, anatomy and physiology, life span
development, general pathophysiology, general pharmacology, patient
assessment, critical thinking, airway management, respiratory emergencies
and introduction to cardiology. (Prerequisite: Admissions to the Paramedic
Program). (Corequisites: EMSP 1401 and EMSP 1211). (C)
EMSP 2303 Paramedic Practicum
(3)
Paramedic Practicum is a combination of laboratory and scenarios based
course intended to assist students on developing skills related to the
theories presented in their previous courses. This course will allow for
preparation for psychomotor licensure testing and preparation as a
competent entry level Paramedic. (Prerequisites: EMSP 1401 and EMSP
2402) (Corequisites: EMSP 2403 and EMSP 2513). (C)
EMSP 2402 Paramedic Skills Lab II
(4)
Paramedic Skills Lab II is a laboratory based course intended to utilize
scenarios to emphasize respiratory/cardiac emergencies (on-going from
EMSP 1401), pulmonology, neurology, endocrinology, gastroenterology,
urology, and nephrology, hematology, gynecology, obstetrics, neonatology,
pediatrics, trauma, continuing cardiology, and successful assessment of
patients with a variety of medical conditions. This course includes
application of principles and processes discussed in Fundamentals I.
(Prerequisites: EMSP 1801, EMSP 1401, and EMSP 1211) (Corequisites:
EMSP 2802 and EMSP 2412). (C)
EMSP 2403 Paramedic Capstone
(4)
Paramedic Capstone serves as a mechanism to insure that the student
meets academic requirements to test for National Registry and licensure.
This course will include all necessary steps needed to complete the
program including exit exams, preparation for National Registry practical
and written exams, exit interviews, patient care review by the Medical
Director, and any other administrative requirements that the program may
deem necessary. (Prerequisites: EMSP 1801 and EMSP 2802) (Corequisites:
EMSP 2303 and EMSP 2513). (C)
EMSP 2412 Paramedic Clinical II
(4)
Paramedic Clinical II is the second of three clinical experiences designed to
allow the student to meet all psychomotor and affective objectives for the
clinical requirements of a paramedic program and to build upon the
concepts and knowledge gained during prior and/or concurrent courses.
(Prerequisites: EMSP 1801, EMSP 1401 and EMSP 1211) (Corequisites:
EMSP 2802 and EMSP 2402). (C)
EMSP 2513 Paramedic Field Internship
(5)
Paramedic Field Internship provides evidence that the student is capable of
acting as a team leader in managing the emergency care and treatment of
an injured or ill patient at the paramedic level. The student will demonstrate
competency in this role. While all skill sets should have been achieved prior
to initiating the internship, patient types and pathologies may be used from
this experience to complete the minimum graduation academic requirements
as set forth in CoAEMSP accreditation documents and the Tennessee
Office of EMS. (Prerequisites: EMSP 1211 and EMSP 2412) (Corequisites:
EMSP 2303 and EMSP 2403). (C)
EMSP 2802 Fundamentals of Paramedic II
(8)
Fundamentals of Paramedic II is the second of two lecture courses to
include the following topics: respiratory and cardiology (on-going from
EMSP 1801), pulmonology, neurology, endocrinology, gastroenterology,
urology and nephrology, hematology, gynecology, obstetrics, neonatology,
pediatrics, geriatric emergencies, psychological emergencies and trauma/
shock. (Prerequisites: EMSP 1801, EMSP 1401 and EMSP 1211)
(Corequisites: EMSP 2402 and EMSP 2412). (C)
EMT 116 Basic EMT-IV Clinical Practice (Institutional Credit)
(1)
Supervised clinical application of knowledge and skills developed in EMT
118. Emphasis is on initiation of intravenous therapy, patient assessment,
basic airway management, communication, and treatments used to treat
trauma emergencies. (Prerequisite: Currently holds Tennessee licensure as
an EMT Basic; Corequisite: EMT 118.) Minimum of 48 clinical hours a
semester. (NT)
EMT 118 Basic EMT Intravenous (IV) Therapy (Institutional Credit) (3)
This course provides EMT Basics who seek EMT IV licensure the
knowledge, skills, and competencies consistent with the state of Tennessee
EMS regulations. This course emphasizes the acquisition of principles,
techniques and skills related to intravenous therapy including fluid and
electrolytes and acid-base balance. Other topics include but not limited to
review of EMT roles and responsibilities, EMS systems, medical legal
considerations, patient assessment, telecommunications, and assessment
and treatment of the trauma patient. (Prerequisite: Current Tennessee EMTBasic License) (Corequisite: EMT 116.) 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (NT)
Engineering
ENGR 2110 Statics(3)
A study of vector algebra, resultants, centroids, equilibrium, moments of
inertia, and virtual work. (Corequisite or Prerequisite: MATH 1910.) (T)
ENGR 2120 Dynamics(3)
A study of kinematics, kinetics, Newton's laws, work-energy principle,
impulse-momentum principle, vibrations. (Corequisite or Prerequisite:
MATH 1920.) (T)
Engineering Graphics
ERG 101 Engineering Graphics
(3)
This course introduces the student to graphics communication. Visualization,
projection techniques, standards, and conventions will be learned through
freehand sketches and the use of a computer. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (NT)
ERG 103 Solid Modeling with CAD
(2)
This course is designed to introduce the student to computerized threedimensional (3D) drafting or solid modeling. This course may not be taken
for credit if a student has completed ERG 101 using the equivalent software.
(Prerequisite: Drafting experience.) 1 hr. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (NT)
ERG 127 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing
(2)
A study of principles and applications of the latest techniques in geometric
dimensioning and tolerancing using the national standards ANSI Y14.5M.
Concepts of shape and size description of machine parts with several types
of fits and tolerances using geometric symbols will be studied. Students will
gain an appreciation of national standards in relationship to the production
of a quality product. (NT)
ERG 151 Computer Assisted Design/Drafting
(3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to computerized twodimensional (2D) drafting. This course may not be taken for credit if a
student has completed ERG 101 using the equivalent software. (Prerequisite:
Drafting experience.) 3 hrs. lecture/lab. (NT)
English
Dual Enrollment students are not eligible to take 0800 level courses.
ENGL 0800 Learning Support Writing I
(3)
This course focuses on writing competencies that demonstrate mastery of
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
such essential writing topics as purpose, audience analysis, organization,
supporting details, language skills, grammar and punctuation, and the
writing process. Based on diagnostic scores, student writing assignments
will be at the paragraph or essay level. To successfully complete the
Learning Support Writing requirements and meet prerequisites for ENGL
1010, students must reach a mastery level on an essay assignment with
supporting documentation. The student must master one of the two
required Learning Support Writing Competencies to receive a passing grade
for this course. (This course is institutional credit only.) (Prerequisite: 0 to
12 Writing ACT or comparable placement test score) (Corequisite: ENGL
1010) 3 hrs. lecture/lab.) (NT)
ENGL 0802 Learning Support Writing II
(2)
This course allows students to complete writing competencies to exit
Learning Support Writing. Students are required to attend a two (2) hour
class that provides remediation to support projects and assignments in
English 1010. Students will learn about the writing process: outlining,
constructing arguments, conducting research, and documenting sources.
The course emphasizes the process of revision as the main method of
improving writing. Demonstration of mastery of Learning Support Writing
Competencies 1 and 2 is required for successful completion. Upon
successful completion of English 0802, the student receives two (2)
institutional credits. Students enrolled in this course are also required to
co-enroll in English 1010. (Prerequisite: ACT English 13-17 or equivalent)
( Corequisite: ENGL 1010.)
ENGL 1010 Composition I
(3)
The ENGL 1010 course introduces students to writing and evaluating
argumentative essays; developing awareness of rhetorical techniques used
in persuasive writing; and applying argumentative elements and research in
assigned papers. Students must take this course as a degree requirement.
(Prerequisite: satisfactory ACT or satisfactory placement test scores or
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Writing
(Corequisite: READ 0800, READ 0802, ENGL 0800, ENGL 0802) (T)
ENGL 1020 Composition II
(3)
The ENGL 1020 course instructs students in the development of writing
skills beyond the levels of proficiency required in ENGL 1010, with emphasis
on interpretation and evaluation of literature (short fiction, poetry, and
drama) and more advanced research methods. (Prerequisite: ENGL 1010.)
(T)
ENGL 1070 Technical Writing(3)
The principles of effective technical communication are applied to a broad
variety of assignments from brief memos and summaries to detailed formal
reports and proposals. (Prerequisite: satisfactory ACT or placement test
scores or completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading and
Writing.) (TE)
ENGL 2015 Introduction to Film Studies(3)
The study of World Cinema focuses on terminology, analyses of film
techniques, genres, historical periods, and narrative styles. Course work
includes writing and speaking assignments. (T)
ENGL 2130 Survey of American Literature(3)
Survey of American Literature is a reading course that focuses on critical
analysis of representative works from the Colonial era to the present.
(Prerequisite: ENGL 1020.) (T)
ENGL 2230 Survey of British Literature(3)
Survey of British Literature is a reading course that focuses on critical
analysis of representative works from Beowulf to the present. (Prerequisite:
ENGL 1020.) (T)
ENGL 2330 Survey of World Literature(3)
Survey of World Literature is a reading course that focuses on critical
analysis of representative works from the ancient world to the present.
(Prerequisite: ENGL 1020.) (T)
ENGL 2910 Creative Writing(3)
Theory and practice of the creation of fiction, drama, and poetry by the
analysis of models and student manuscripts. (Prerequisite: satisfactory ACT
or placement test scores or completion of all Competencies in Learning
Support Reading and Writing.) (TE)
ENGL 2920 Survey of African American Literature(3)
African American Literature studies oral and written stories of African
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
189
American writers from the 18th century through the Harlem Renaissance to
present times, including well-known authors like Zora Neale Hurston,
Langston Hughes, Martin Luther King, Jr., and others. Students analyze
major themes like alienation, identity, double-consciousness, racism,
classism, rebellion, revolt and escape. They evaluate these works for their
literary merit, becoming aware of the personal, social, artistic and literary
values of African American authors; furthermore they discover connections
among these stories, poems, and speeches and their own experience.
(Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 or ACT English 32 or SAT Verbal 720 or
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Writing.) (T)
Film Crew Technology
FCT 1010 Set Equipment and Machinery
(3)
Introduction to equipment and machinery generally used on sets and in
studios. The course emphasizes working familiarity of equipment and
machinery and for each: explores safe usage and behavior, safety issues
and common unsafe practices. Upon completion, students should be able
to recognize generally used equipment and machinery on sight and specify
their general usage and safety. (Prerequisite: FCT 1012.) 6 hrs. lab. (NT)
FCT 1012 Introduction to Entertainment Technology(2)
Overview of the entertainment production industry and discussion of current
trends, technical terminology, working methods, and processes associated
with a variety of venues. The course explores career opportunities in the
stage and film industry with special emphasis on relationships between
various job categories, and roles of "below the line" production crews. Upon
completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of working
conditions in the industry and define and appropriately use industry specific
terms. (Corequisite: FCT 1013 and FCT 1014.) (NT)
FCT 1013 Motion Picture Safety and Etiquette(3)
Survey of health and safety issues, practices, regulations and etiquette
associated with working in the motion picture industry. The course
emphasizes safe uses and behaviors for working on stages, sets and
studios. The course also addresses use of hazardous materials, the
identification and mitigation of hazards and unsafe practices as well as
emphasizing situation-appropriate behavior, conflict resolution, working
effectively in teams, and applicable regulations/laws regarding workplace
behavior. Topics include inclement weather issues, ventilation, shop and
location conditions, electrical system safety, fire safety equipment and
procedures, current OSHA/EPA standards and other hazards associated
with entertainment productions as well as proper behavior, dress, and
etiquette in the workplace. Upon completion, students should be able to
demonstrate working knowledge of safety issues, practices, and regulations
applicable to entertainment venues. (Corequisite: FCT 1012). (NT)
FCT 1020 Basic Grip
(3)
Study of grip terminology, behaviors, skills and equipment as related to
motion-picture production. The course covers various grip/support packages
used in different environments for studio and location. Students will learn to
set up, operate and break down grip equipment and rigging, erect and
dismantle scaffolding; load, unload, position, and strike scenery, settings,
and scenic equipment; support and move cameras during shooting. Upon
completion, students should be able to execute basic grip directions given
by the key grip. (Prerequisite: FCT 1010.) (NT)
FCT 1210 Fundamentals of Lighting Technology(3)
Introduction to lighting techniques, practices and equipment. This course
covers the basic principles of lighting theory and how variables in lighting
can be used to control the production environment. Topics include basic
physics of lighting, lighting combinations, lighting effect, forms of color
correction, different lighting situations, and lighting safety. Upon completion,
students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of technical
lighting terms, principles of light, lighting crew protocol, and and lighting
manipulation. ( Prerequisite: FCT 2040). (NT)
FCT 1211 Fundamentals of Electricity(2)
Introduction to DC and AC circuits, electromagnetic devices, electronic
components, and analog and digital circuits. Upon completion, the student
will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of electricity, wiring,
distribution systems and safety relevant to the entertainment industry.
(Corequisite: FCT 1012.) 1 hr. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (NT)
FCT 2010 Set Construction Laboratory
(3)
Advanced construction techniques with an emphasis on set construction,
scheduling, problems and budgeting. Work on productions outside of class
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2015-2016 Catalog
is required. Upon completion, the student should be able to assist in all
fields related to the fabrication and decoration of sets and props.
(Prerequisites: FCT 1014 and CEN 205 or permission of the instructor.) 6
hrs. lab. (NT)
FCT 2020 Advanced Grip(3)
Advanced coverage of grip/support packages used in studio work and on
location. The course emphasizes strategies necessary to anticipate shooting
needs and problem solving. Topics include advanced coverage of lighting
and camera dollies, control and management of undesirable sound, and
rigging with emphasis on safety issues. Upon completion, students should
be able to execute grip directions given by the key grip, cinematographer
and/or director of photography. (Corequisite: FCT 1020 or permission of the
instructor.) 1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab. (NT)
FCT 2025 Motion Picture Sound Recording(2)
Introduction to sound recording techniques, practices and equipment. This
course covers the basic principles of audio theory and techniques used in
recording sound on location and in studio environments but in production
and post-production applications. Topics include basic physics of sound,
digital recording devices, boom microphones and wireless sound devices.
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding
of technical audio terms, recording techniques and basic principles of
capturing live audio. (Prerequisite: FCT 1010 and FCT 1012). 1 hr. lecture,
2 hrs lab. (NT)
FCT 2030 Film and Video Lighting(3)
Application of lighting principles to film and video formats. Emphasis is
placed on terminology, color theory and correction, film lighting techniques,
practices, and equipment. The course requires students to set up, move,
operate, and break down lighting equipment. Students are required to work
as a lighting technician on approved film sets. Upon completion, students
should be able to demonstrate an understanding of camera terms and
equipment, lighting crew protocol, applications of lighting theory to film,
assist on studio/location shoots and be able to execute basic directions
given by the gaffer. (Prerequisite: FCT 1211) (Corequisite: FCT 1210 or
permission of the instructor.) 1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab. (NT)
FCT 2040 Advanced Electric(3)
Study of electrical equipment and distribution techniques. The course
covers terminology, equipment, power distribution, safety, execution of
lighting diagrams, and other aspects of providing electrical capabilities on
location and in the studio. The course also explores digital information
common to motion-picture production. Upon completion, the student should
be able to assist with electric and digital information needs on location or in
a studio. (Prerequisite: FCT 1211.) 1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab. (NT)
FCT 2050 Film Production Laboratory(3)
Practical experience in a variety of crew positions with student and/or
professional film productions. This production-based capstone experience
will require that the student assist in a crew role on 1-2 college or
professional film productions for a minimum of 180 hours. Upon completion,
students should be able to demonstrate professional skills needed to pursue
careers as technical crew members in the film and video industry. (For
graduating students completing the FCT Program.) (Prerequisite: Permission
of the instructor.) Minimum of 180 hours a semester. (NT)
French
FREN 1010 Beginning French I
(3)
Essentials of French elementary grammar, pronunciation, conversation, and
simple readings. Laboratory required. (T)
FREN 1020 Beginning French II
(3)
Continuation of Beginning French I. (Prerequisite: FREN 1010 or permission
of the instructor.) Laboratory required. (T)
FREN 2010 Intermediate French I
(3)
Reading intermediate French texts, grammar review, and oral practice.
(Prerequisite: FREN 1020 or permission of the instructor.) Laboratory
required. (T)
FREN 2020 Intermediate French II
(3)
A continuation of intermediate French I, with emphasis on French readings
and oral practice. (Prerequisite: FREN 2010 or permission of the instructor.)
Laboratory required. (T)
General Technology
GENT 291 General Technology Capstone(1)
This is the capstone course for general technology majors. Students will
evaluate their personal strengths and weaknesses, in addition to their
opinions and knowledge regarding different leadership and management
styles in various workplace scenarios will also be discussed. Furthermore,
each student will make a presentation about a topic of interest in their
chosen career field and demonstrate their overall understanding of program
competencies. (NT)
Geography
GEOG 1010 Physical Geography I
(4)
An introduction to the atmosphere, including Earth/Sun relationships and
the processes that generate weather and determine climate. Areas of study
will include phenomena and hazards related to weather, and a detailed
analysis of climate and climate change, air pollution, and energy resources.
(Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all
Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Math ACT 13 or higher or
comparable placement test.) 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (T)
GEOG 1020 Physical Geography II
(4)
A general study of the forces shaping Earth's surface, including a study of
geomorphology, including the origin, evolution, form, and global distribution
of landforms. Focus will include a survey of hydrologic, organic, and mineral
resources, as well as a detailed analysis of global population pressures and
the resulting demands on food and other resources. Earth's surface
pollution, such as water, solid waste, and hazardous waste materials will
also be discussed. (Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Math ACT
13 or higher or comparable placement test.) 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (T)
GEOG 1030 Introduction to Cultural Geography(3)
This course covers spatial variation in human activity. Topics include
geographic extent of population characteristics, languages, religions,
economics, and governments. Most emphasis will be placed on the present
although some past cultural landscapes will be recalled. (T)
GEOG 2010 World Regional Geography (3)
A survey of the physical, cultural, socio-economic, and political traits
characteristic of developing and developed nations. Developing nations
examined include those of the Latin American, African, and Asian regions.
Developed nations explored include Japan and Australia, those of the North
American and European regions, and the former Soviet Socialist Republics.
(T)
German
GERM 1010 Elementary German I(3)
Introduction to German language and culture with emphasis in elementary
grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension. (TE)
GERM 1020 Elementary German II(3)
A continuation of the German language. This course focuses on the
development of basic communication skills in German. (Prerequisite:
GERM 1010.) (TE)
Health
HED 221 Personal Health
(3)
A study of personal health problems including communicable diseases,
nutrition, degenerative diseases, and fitness. This course will include
knowledge of basic human vital signs. (Course is offered Fall only.) (TE)
HED 231 Safety and First Aid
(3)
Focuses on the development of a safety attitude and understanding of
individual responsibility in personal and community programs for accident
prevention and control. Students are expected to acquire knowledge and
skills for the emergency care of individuals. Successful completion entitles
student to the American Heart Association certification. (T)
HED 241 Principles of Nutrition
(3)
Focuses on the nutritive value and function of food in the body, including
personal and family nutritive requirements. (T)
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
Health Information Technology
HIT 115 Introduction to Health Information Technology
(4)
This course is designed to introduce students to the principles of health
information management. The development, content and management of
the medical record will be explored as well as a basic overview of health
care delivery systems. Emphasis is placed on hospital and medical staff
organizations; patient record content; procedures in filling, numbering and
retention of patient records; quantitative analysis; release of patient
information; forms control and design; indexes and registers; regulatory and
accrediting agencies; and the transition to an electronic record. (NT)
HIT 125 Computer Applications in Health Information Technology (3)
This course provides students with knowledge and understanding of the
various computer applications and information systems that are encountered
in health information departments; Topics for discussion include clinical
vocabularies, data repositories (including the various registries), master
patient indices, health information abstracting, transcription, the
computerized patient record, voice recognition technology and scanning.
The use of databases, data collection methods, and the importance of data
quality will be discussed. (Prerequisite: HIT 115) (NT)
HIT 250 Legal Aspects of Health Information
(3)
This course is designed to assist students with an understanding of the legal
principles that govern the health information field. Emphasis is placed on
concepts and principles of the law, the health record as a legal document,
confidentiality, informed consent, release of information and current trends
in health legislation. (Prerequisite: HIT 115) (NT)
Health Sciences
HSC 291-293 Health Sciences Capstone - Leadership in Health Care depression and the New Deal, World War II, the post-war period and
contemporary issues. (Corequisite or Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement
test scores and completion of all Competencies in Learning Support
Reading.) (T)
HIST 2030 Tennessee History(3)
A survey of Tennessee history and its people from the 18th century with an
emphasis on political, economic, and social developments in a regional and
national context. (Corequisite or Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test
scores and completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading.)
(TE)
HIST 2991 Special Topics in History(1)
Special Topics in History is an in-depth study of a selected history topic,
including relevant political, social, cultural and/or economic development
and issues. This course may be repeated for up to 2 credits. (Prerequisite:
3 credit hours of HIST courses and permission of instructor.) (TE)
Humanities
HUM 1130 Arts and Culture I(3)
A survey course on art and culture from Ancient Civilizations up to the
Renaissance with an emphasis on the interaction of architecture, art,
culture, literature, and daily life. (T)
HUM 1131 Arts and Culture II(3)
A survey course on art and culture from the Renaissance to the contemporary
era with an emphasis on the interaction of architecture, art, culture,
literature, and daily life. (T)
Industrial Technology
(1-3)
Courses are designed to focus on theory and application for the development
of strategies and skills in preparing health sciences practitioners to pursue
leadership roles. Courses allow students to engage in independent study of
selected topics in a seminar or symposium format. Student will be involved
in the selection, presentation, and discussion of relevant topics. Student
attainment of competencies will be demonstrated using active learning
methods including personal portfolios, presentations, and discussions.
Expectations for depth and breadth of student mastery of concepts vary by
course (291, 292, and 293). (Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in a Health
Science degree program or holds a certificate/diploma in a health related
discipline or instructor permission.) (NT)
HSC 291 Health Sciences Capstone - Leadership in Health Care (1)
(15 hours minimum)
HSC 292 Health Sciences Capstone - Leadership in Health Care (2)
(30 hours minimum)
HSC 293 Health Sciences Capstone - Leadership in Health Care (3)
(45 hours minimum)
History
HIST 1110 Survey of World Civilization I(3)
Foundations of the modern world from the first civilizations through the
fifteenth century. Topics include western and non-western classical
civilizations, the Middle Ages, and the discovery of the Americas. (Corequisite
or Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores and completion of all
Competencies in Learning Support Reading.) (T)
HIST 1120 Survey of World Civilization II(3)
Major world events from the acceleration of global contact beginning in the
16th century, the age of revolutions, the "ism's" of the nineteenth century,
the world wars of the twentieth century, and the world today. (Course is
offered Spring only.) (Corequisite or Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement
test scores and completion of all Competencies in Learning Support
Reading.) (T)
HIST 2010 Survey of United States History I(3)
The colonial period, winning independence, constitutional development,
physical expansion, growing sectionalism, Civil War and reconstruction.
(Corequisite or Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores and
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading.) (T)
HIST 2020 Survey of United States History II(3)
Industrialization, populism and progressivism, imperialism, World War I, the
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
191
INT 122 Fundamentals of Work Teams(3)
A study of the concepts and procedures used in developing efficient work
teams. Topics covered include team organization and selection, setting and
achieving team goals, and creative problem solving. The benefits of the
team concept in increasing individual and group productivity will also be
addressed. (NT)
INT 124 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems(3)
Introduces the theory of fluid power and basic circuits using cylinders,
valves, accumulators, filters, pumps, motors, etc. as they are used in the
current industrial applications. Hands-on experience will be given using cutaways, standard components, and test stands. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab.
(NT)
INT 126 Numerical Control Concepts(3)
An introduction to the use of numerical control machines for manufacturing
processes. Computer controlled devices will also be included. (NT)
INT 127 Vibration Analysis and Predictive Maintenance(3)
An introduction to the basic theory, tools, and application of vibration
analysis, oil analysis, thermography, and ultrasonic analysis. The use of
equipment and hands-on experiences are included. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab.
(NT)
INT 128 Advanced Hydraulics/Pneumatics(3)
An advanced course in the theory and design of practical hydraulics and
pneumatics circuits. Hands-on experience using test stands and commercial
components is included. (Prerequisite: INT 124.) 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab.
(NT)
INT 134 Machinery Handbook(1)
Introduces the student to the reference handbook used in manufacturing
processes. Topics covered include locating specific items in the manual,
different types of manufacturing processes, industry standards for
manufacturing, and the metric system. (NT)
INT 135 Tool and Die Design(3)
Covers theory in the design of metal cutting tools. The course is designed
to give students the basic knowledge of the principles, tools, and commercial
standards of single point, fixture, and design. (NT)
INT 136 Tool and Die Technology(3)
A study of the technology of the different manufacturing processes,
including drills, lathes, and milling machines. (Prerequisite: INT 135.) (NT)
INT 137 Mechanical Power Transmission(3)
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2015-2016 Catalog
A study of the different mechanical means by which power is transmitted
from one location to another. Topics discussed will include gears, motors,
chain and belt drives, and applications. (NT)
INT 141 Blueprint Reading(3)
Interpretations of various prints found in a manufacturing environment. This
includes projection theory, dimensioning, shape description and
representation of fabrication methods. (NT)
INT 152 Process Control(1)
This course introduces the concepts and techniques of process control used
in the manufacturing environment. Production processes will be analyzed
based on the interpretation of control charts for variables and attributes.
Charts, such as X bar, R, and fraction defective charts, will be studied.
Control charts will be used to identify the causes of variation in a production
process. (NT)
INT 210 Engineering Economy(3)
Economic evaluation of alternatives, industrial and personal. Interest, time
value of investments, depreciation and income taxes, break-even cost
analysis and replacement analysis. (Prerequisite: MATH 1710.) (NT)
INT 212 Plant Layout and Materials Handling(3)
Materials handling classification and procedures, selection of equipment,
receiving and shipping areas, plant layout problems, and techniques, such
as line balancing and plant location factors. (NT)
INT 213 Operations Management(3)
Operations Management is a study of the management of systems or
processes that create goods and/or provide services. Topics to be covered
include quality management, forecasting, facility location, capacity and
layout, human resources, project management, inventory systems, and any
other current and relevant topics. The topics will be taught using both
quantitative and qualitative methods. (Prerequisite: Satisfactory ACT score
and one (1) year of high school algebra or completion of all Competencies
in Learning Support Math.) (NT)
INT 226 Numerical Control Concepts II(3)
This course introduces the student to advanced levels of CNC programming
used in manufacturing processes. Topics included are G-Code programming,
computer aided manufacturing (CAM), conversational machining
programming languages and familiarity with CNC machining utilizing both
the CAM and conversational programming languages and how they apply
relative to G-Code programming. (Prerequisite: ERG 101 and INT 126.) 3
hrs. lecture/lab.(NT)
INT 231 Time and Motion Study(3)
Design of work methods, including analysis and improvement. Determination
of time standards by stopwatch technique, work sampling technique and
standard data technique. (NT)
INT 251 Statistical Quality Control(3)
Statistical quality analysis of processes utilizing control chart techniques,
process capability, and other "tools of quality."(Prerequisite: MATH 1710.)
(NT)
Information Systems
INFS 1010 Computer Applications(3)
This course provides hands-on experience using commercial software
packages for business applications. Topics include microcomputer system
components, operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, and
presentation software. Keyboarding skills are highly recommended. (T)
Information Systems Technology
IST 1500 Computer System Essentials(3)
Cisco IT Essentials: PC Hardware and Software provides a comprehensive
overview of computer hardware and software and an introduction to
advanced concepts in computing. Topics include the internal components
of a computer, assembling a computer system, installing an operating
system, troubleshooting using system tools and diagnostic software,
connecting to the Internet, and sharing resources in a network environment.
This course integrates virtual learning tools to supplement classroom
learning and provide an interactive "hands-on" experience. (NT)
IST 1750 Computer Networking I(3)
CCNA 1: Network Fundamentals is the first of four courses leading to the
Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation. This course
introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of
the Internet and other computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered
models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the
application, network, data link, and physical layers. The principles and
structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts,
media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the
curriculum. Labs use a "model internet" to allow students to analyze real
data without affecting production networks. Packet Tracer (PT) activities
help students analyze protocol and network operation and build small
networks in a simulated environment. At the end of the course, students
build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling,
performing basic configurations of network devices such as routers and
switches, and implementing IP addressing schemes.(Prerequisite: IST
1500.) (NT)
IST 2090 Database Applications(3)
An introduction to the concepts and syntax of relational database
management systems for microcomputers. Topics include data modeling,
database design concepts including normalization, and their application
through the creation of tables, queries, forms and reports using the tools
provided in a relational DBMS. (Prerequisite: INFS 1010.) (NT)
IST 2400 Spreadsheet Applications
(3)
A study of advanced features of spreadsheets and various advanced
techniques for analyzing and manipulating data in spreadsheets. Emphasis
will be placed on business math topics such as: the time value of money and
the related topics of compound interest, annuities, bonds, and loans.
(Prerequisites: INFS 1010 and 19 Math ACT or completion of all
competencies in Learning Support Math.) (NT)
IST 2630 Web Page Development and Design
(3)
This course will cover the fundamental concepts of Web page design and
creation, Web graphics, and how the Internet and World Wide Web works.
Students will design and develop Web pages using Web page editing/
publishing software and optimize images for Web pages. Basic Web
pages containing scripts and simple Java applets will be created using Web
page editing software. (Prerequisite: INFS 1010.) (NT)
IST 2730 Advanced Web Page Development(3)
This course provides an introduction to client- side vs. server-side
environments. Database and scripting language(s) will be explored in
relation to Web design, along with emerging technologies. Topics are
covered, ranging from programming a basic e-commerce type shopping cart
to connecting to a database. Additional topics will include securing and
validating web applications and user input, monitoring web session
state,and using master templates. (Prerequisite: IST 2630.) (NT)
IST 2750 Computer Networking II(3)
CCNA 2: Routing Protocols and Concepts is the second of four CCNA
courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA)
designation. This course describes the architecture, components, and
operation of routers, and explains the principles of routing and routing
protocols. Students analyze, configure, verify, and troubleshoot the primary
routing protocols RIPv1, RIPv2, EIGRP, and OSPF. By the end of this
course, students will be able to recognize and correct common routing
issues and problems. Students complete a basic procedural lab, followed
by basic configuration, implementation, and troubleshooting labs in each
chapter. Packet Tracer activities reinforce new concepts, and allow
students to model and analyze routing processes that may be difficult to
visualize or understand. (Prerequisite: IST 1750.) (NT)
IST 2800 Database Development(3)
This course introduces students to data management using Relational
Database Management Systems (RDBMS). Course covers data modeling
techniques used to design databases. Students will create, modify, and
update databases using Structured Query Language (SQL). (Course is
offered Fall only.) (Prerequisite: IST 2090.) (NT)
IST 2810 Computer Security(3)
This course covers the theory and practice of computer security in operating
systems,networks, and data systems, with an emphasis on data protection.
Cryptographic techniques and tools are surveyed and applied to security
problems. From this course, students can expect to gain an understanding
of applying basic computer security theory to common problems found in
the business world today. Students will also be introduced to concepts in
computer forensics and investigation,such as acquiring and examining
digital evidence. (Prerequisite: IST 1750.) (NT)
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
193
IST 2850 Computer Networking III(3)
CCNA 3: LAN Switching and Wireless is the third of four courses leading to
the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation. This course
provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning
the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a
converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network
design model and how to select devices for each layer. The course explains
how to configure a switch for basic functionality and how to implement
Virtual LANs, VTP, and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. The
different implementations of Spanning Tree Protocol in a converged network
are presented, and students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to
implement a WLAN in a small-to-medium network. (Prerequisite: IST 2750.)
(NT)
credit only.(Corequisite: enrollment in MATH 1530.) (NT)
IST 2930 Computer Science III
(3)
A study of object-oriented programming through the use and practical
application of the C# language. Topics include classes,objects, methods,GUI
programming, graphics,databases, XML, Web pages and Internet.
(Prerequisite: CISP 1010.) (NT)
MATH 0802 Learning Support Mathematics II(2)
This course is a continuation of MATH 0800 for students who have not
demonstrated competency in all five Learning Support Mathematics
outcomes. (This course is institutional credit only.) (Prerequisite: Successful
completion of at least three of the five outcomes from MATH 0800.) 2 hrs.
lecture/lab. (NT)
IST 2950 Computer Networking IV
(3)
CCNA 4: Accessing the WAN is the last of four courses leading to the Cisco
Certified Network Associate (CCNA) designation. This course discusses
the WAN technologies and network services required by converged
applications in enterprise networks. The course use the Cisco Network
Architecture to introduce integrated network services and explains how to
select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet network
requirements. Students learn how to implement and configure common
data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of
traffic, access control, and addressing services. Finally, students learn how
to detect, troubleshoot, and correct common enterprise network
implementation issues. (Prerequisite: IST 1750.) (NT)
IST 2990 Project Integration Capstone
(3)
This is the capstone experience for Information Systems Technology
majors. It has an internship component and is intended to integrate
practical work experience with the cumulative knowledge and skills obtained
during the student's education. The student learns to set objectives and
measure performance against those objectives in a business setting
through a structured reporting process with the instructor. Students must
have sophomore standing and permission of instructor to register for this
course. (Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor).
(NT)
IST 2999 Current Topics in Information Systems Technology(3)
This course is a study of current developments in the field of Information
Systems Technology and special topics not covered in other courses. This
course may be repeated one time for credit with permission of the instructor
and only if a different topic is covered. (NT)
Marketing
MKT 204 Principles of Retail Management
(3)
A study of the retail management decision areas, known as the retail mix:
physical facilities, pricing, merchandise, promotion, and service. Methods
used by a retail manager in organizing, controlling, and leading the
organization toward its objectives are also covered. (NT)
Mathematics
Dual Enrollment students are not eligible to take 0800 level courses.
MATH 0010 Learning Support for MATH 1010
(2)
This course will allow students to develop and show mastery of the
outcomes to support college level mathematics which include: real number
sense and operations, solve equations, analyze graphs, modeling and
critical thinking, and operations with algebraic expressions. The student
must show competency in at least three of five Learning Support Mathematics
outcomes to earn a passing grade in this course. This course is institutional
credit only. (Corequisite: enrollment in MATH 1010.) (NT)
MATH 0530 Learning Support for MATH 1530(2)
This course will allow students to develop and show mastery of the
outcomes to support college level mathematics which include: real number
sense and operations, solve equations, analyze graphs, modeling and
critical thinking, and operations with algebraic expressions. The student
must show competency in at least three of five Learning Support Mathematics
outcomes to earn a passing grade in this course. This course is institutional
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
MATH 0800 Learning Support Mathematics I(3)
This course will allow students to develop and show mastery of the
outcomes required for entry into college-level mathematics which include:
real number sense and operations, operations with algebraic expressions,
analyze graphs, solve equations, and modeling and critical thinking.
Students must show competency in all five TBR approved mathematics
outcomes before enrolling in college-level mathematics. The student must
show competency in three out of five Learning Support Mathematics
outcomes to earn a passing grade in this course. (This course is institutional
credit only.) (Prerequisite: 13 to 18 Math ACT or comparable placement test
score.) 3 hrs. lecture/lab. (NT)
MATH 0900 Elementary Geometry(3)
A study of deductive and inductive reasoning, properties of two and three
dimensional figures, and congruence, similarity, and symmetry of geometric
figures. This course meets the 1989 high school admissions requirement in
geometry. (This course is institutional credit only.) (NT)
MATH 1000 Essentials of Algebra(3)
An algebra course containing a review of selected algebraic concepts;
functions, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and equations,
rational exponents, radicals, quadratic equations; properties and graphs of
functions; and exponential and logarithmic functions and equations.
Methods of solving real-world applications are integrated throughout the
course content. Essentials of Algebra is designed to provide students with
skills which support their success in upper college-level curricula and enable
them to achieve their educational goals. Upon earning a grade of "C" or
better, the student becomes eligible to enter either MATH 1710 (Precalculus
Algebra) or MATH 1630 (Finite Mathematics). (This course does not fulfill
the General Education core requirements for graduation or transfer.)
(Prerequisite: 19 to 21 Math ACT or satisfactory placement test scores or
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Math.) (TE)
MATH 1010 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts(3)
Mathematics as applied to real-life problems selected from such topics as
logic, set theory, consumer mathematics, statistics, probability, counting
methods of apportionment, and voting schemes. This course is designed to
expand the student's appreciation of how mathematics applies to quantitative
problems that originate in many fields, and the student will learn strategies
for solving some of these problems. (Prerequisite: 19 Math ACT or
satisfactory placement test scores or completion of at least 3 of 5
Competencies in Learning Support Mathematics OR (B) Co-requisite
enrollment in Learning Support Mathematics (MATH 0010.) (T)
MATH 1130 College Algebra
(3)
A college algebra course containing a study of expressions, equations, and
functions of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, and
logarithmic types. Applications of algebraic concepts will be emphasized
throughout the course. (Prerequisite: 19 Math ACT or satisfactory placement
test scores OR completion of at least 3 of 5 Competencies in Learning
Support Math.) (T)
MATH 1410 Number Concepts for Elementary Education(3)
A study of the concepts and methods of arithmetic, set theory, number
theory, numeration systems, and algebraic techniques and functions. This
course is primarily designed for elementary education majors. (Prerequisite:
19 Math ACT or satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all
Competencies in Learning Support Math.) (TE)
MATH 1420 Geometry for Elementary Education(3)
This course will cover topics in measurement, congruence, similarity, translations, graphing, curves in a plane, angles, three dimensional geometry,
networks, constructions, translations and rotation, and coordinate geometry.
(Prerequisite: 19 Math ACT or satisfactory placement test scores or
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Math.) (TE)
MATH 1530 Elementary Statistics(3)
An introduction to elementary statistical methods. Topics covered include
mean, standard deviation, standard scores, probability of events, binomial
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2015-2016 Catalog
and normal distribution, linear correlations, sampling, hypothesis testing,
goodness of fit, analysis of variance. (A) Prerequisite 19 Math ACT or
satisfactory placement test scores or completion of at least 3 of 5
Competencies in Learning Support Mathematics OR (B) Co-requisite
enrollment in Learning Support Mathematics (MATH 0530). (T)
MATH 1630 Finite Mathematics(3)
An introduction to finite mathematics, including linear, polynomial,
exponential, and logarithmic functions, linear systems of equations and
inequalities, mathematics of finance (interest, annuities, amortization),
linear programming, and matrix algebra with applications in these areas.
(22 Math ACT or satisfactory placement test scores, OR MATH 1000 or
MATH 1130.) (T)
MATH 1710 Precalculus Algebra(3)
A precalculus course including, but not limited to, selected algebraic topics
pertaining to: properties and graphs of polynomial, rational, exponential,
logarithmic, and other functions (including piecewise-defined functions);
solving systems of equations (with applications); matrices in the context of
solving systems of linear equations; sequences; and series. (Prerequisite:
22 Math ACT or satisfactory placement test scores or MATH 1000.) (T)
MATH 1720 College Trigonometry(3)
A study of trigonometric functions with applications. Topics covered include
trigonometric graphs, identities, inverse functions, vectors, complex
numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, right and oblique triangle
with applications. (Course is offered Spring only.) (Prerequisite: 22 Math
ACT with four years of high school math which includes precalculus or
MATH 1710 or special permission of the mathematics department.) (T)
MATH 1730 Pre-Calculus(4)
An integrated study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully
attempt calculus. Algebraic topics include: properties and graphs of
polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and other functions (including
piecewise-defined functions); solving systems of equations (with
applications); and matrices in the context of solving systems of linear
equations. Trigonometric topics include: trigonometric graphs; identities,
inverse functions; polar coordinates; and right and oblique triangles with
applications. (Prerequisites: 22 ACT Math or other satisfactory placement
test score, OR MATH 1000 OR MATH 1130.) (T)
methods, and Laplace transforms. (Course is offered Spring only.)
(Prerequisite: MATH 2110.) (T)
Music
MUS 1030 Music Appreciation
(3)
An introduction to music with emphasis on developing listening skills. A
broad spectrum of musical styles is covered including contemporary trends
and a synopsis of Western music history. (Corequisite or Prerequisite:
Satisfactory placement test scores and completion of all Competencies in
Learning Support Reading and Writing.) (T)
MUS 1110 Music Theory I(3)
A study of basic materials in music theory, such as notation, rhythms,
intervals, scales, triads, and key signatures. (Course is offered Spring only).
(Prerequisite: MUS 1810 with a grade of C or higher or satisfactory score on
theory diagnostic exam taken prior to the beginning of the fall semester.)
Corequisite: MUS 1111). (T)
MUS 1111 Aural Skills I(1)
Singing diatonic melodies in both major and minor keys using scale degree
numbers, rhythmic reading including division of the beat in simple and
compound meters, melodic dictation of scale wise melodies and arpeggiation
of tonic and dominant, interval recognition, harmonic dictation of I, II, IV and
V chords, rhythmic dictation in simple and compound meters. (Corequisite:
MUS 1110) (T)
MUS 1120 Music Theory II(3)
A study of harmony and melody including chord symbols and types; basic
harmonic progressions; four-voice texture; non-chord tones; harmonic
progressions and inversions. (Course is offered Fall only.) (Prerequisite:
MUS 1110; Corequisite: MUS 1121.) (T)
MUS 1121 Aural Skills II(1)
Continued singing with scale degree numbers, diatonic melodies of more
advance difficulty, including minor key melodies and adding alto and tenor
clefs, melodic dictation including all diatonic intervals and disjunct melodies,
harmonic dictation including all diatonic chords and recognition of non-chord
tones, rhythmic dictation using more complex rhythmic division in simple
and compound time. (Corequisite: MUS 1120) (T)
MATH 1830 Applied Calculus(3)
A survey of differential and integral calculus with applications. Topics include
limits, the derivative, differentiation techniques, exponential and logarithmic
functions, integration, applications of differentiation and integration. For
students not planning to major in engineering or mathematics. (Prerequisite:
22 Math ACT or satisfactory placement test scores, OR MATH 1130 or
MATH 1630 or MATH 1710 or MATH 1730.) (T)
MUS 1130 Instrumental Performance Ensemble(1)
Instrumental Performance Ensemble is designed to allow students the
opportunity to advance their musical skills by performing classical, popular
and jazz music at various college functions. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 4 credit hours. Four semesters of this course are required for
music majors with an instrumental emphasis. (For all students: an audition
is required prior to registration.) (T)
MATH 1910 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I(4)
Limits, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential
functions, applications of derivatives, antiderivatives and indefinite integrals.
(Prerequisite: 22 Math ACT with four years of high school mathematics
which includes precalculus or MATH 1710, MATH 1720 or MATH 1730 or
special permission of the mathematics department.) (T)
MUS 1410 College Chorus(1)
College Chorus is a vocal ensemble that rehearses and performs choral
literature representative of various historical periods and styles. Course is
open to all Columbia State students and may be repeated for a maximum of
4 credits. (The course meets 3 hours per week.) Four semester hours are
required for music majors with a vocal or choral emphasis. (For all students:
an audition is NOT required but singing experienced is preferred.) (T)
MATH 1920 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II(4)
Definite integral, applications of the definite integral, techniques of
integration, indeterminate forms, infinite sequences and series, and
parametric equations and polar coordinates. (Course is offered Spring only.)
(Prerequisite: MATH 1910.) (T)
MATH 2010 Linear Algebra(3)
An introduction to topics in linear algebra including linear systems, matrices
and matrix algebra, determinants, vectors and vector spaces, inner product
spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and linear transformations. (This
course does not fulfill the General Education core requirements for
graduation or transfer.) (Course is offered Spring only.) (Prerequisite: MATH
1910.) (T)
MATH 2110 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III(4)
Three dimensional analytic geometry and vectors, partial derivatives,
multiple integrals, vector calculus. (Course is offered Fall only.) (Prerequisite:
MATH 1920.) (T)
MATH 2120 Differential Equations(3)
Methods of solving linear differential equations, applications, series
solutions, systems of linear differential equations, graphical and numerical
MUS 1510 Class Voice I(1)
Small group instruction in basic vocal techniques of commercial music.
These techniques include posture, breath control, tone quality and diction.
Some music-reading skills expected. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of two credits. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Commercial
Entertainment Program.) 1 hr. lecture/lab. (TE)
MUS 1520 Class Voice II(1)
Continuation of vocal techniques in Class Voice I, with additional study of
vocal flexibility, uniform tone quality, repertoire, and extending the vocal
range. Course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits. (Prerequisite:
MUS 1510.) 1 hr. lecture/lab. (TE)
MUS 1610 Class Piano I(1)
Instruction in the rudiments of piano including such skills as note reading,
basic chord progressions, coordination exercises, penta scales and simple
keyboard repertoire. Course is open to all students. This is a required
course for music majors. 2 hrs. lecture/lab. (T)
MUS 1620 Class Piano II(1)
Keyboard skills include harmonization of melodies, transposition, sight
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
reading, basic chord progressions, scales and arpeggios in both major and
minor keys and more advanced keyboard repertoire. Course is open to all
students. This is a required course for music majors. (Prerequisite: MUS
1610). 2 hrs. lecture/lab. (T)
MUS 1800 Choral Lab(1)
Ensemble performance of commercial selections. Practice in sight reading
will be given. Actual performance presentations will be included in the
course. Class meets 3 hours per week. Course may be repeated for a
maximum of 4 credits. (TE)
MUS 1810 Fundamentals of Music I(3)
Provides the student with basic knowledge of notation, scales, keys, rhythm
and intervals. Practice in sight singing, dictation and part-writing will be
given. (TE)
MUS 1820 Fundamentals of Music II(3)
A continuation of Fundamentals of Music I. Triads and their inversion, voice
leading, part writing and musical analysis will be studied along with further
practice in sight singing and dictation. (Prerequisite: MUS 1810.) (TE)
MUS 1850 Musical Keyboarding I(1)
Acquaints beginning piano students with the keyboard. Includes such skills
as note reading, basic chords for harmonization of melodies, improvisation
and basic exercises for development of coordination and technique. (TE)
MUS 1860 Musical Keyboarding II(1)
A continuation of MUS 1850 with exercises for development of coordination
and technique, transposition, repertory and sight reading. (TE)
MUS 1910 Individual Piano I(2)
Private instruction in piano beginning at the student's level of proficiency.
One hour lesson per week. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4
credits. (T)
MUS 1920 Individual Piano II(2)
Intermediate private instruction in piano. One hour lesson per week.
Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. (Prerequisite: MUS
1910 or permission of the instructor.) (T)
MUS 1930 Individual Voice I(2)
Private instruction in voice beginning at the student's level of proficiency.
One hour lesson per week. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4
credits. (T)
MUS 1940 Individual Voice II(2)
Intermediate private instruction in voice. One hour lesson per week.
Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. (Prerequisite: MUS
1930 or permission of the instructor.) (T)
MUS 1950 Individual Guitar I(2)
Private instruction in guitar beginning at the student's level of proficiency.
One hour lesson per week. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4
credits. (T)
MUS 1960 Individual Guitar II(2)
Intermediate instruction in guitar. One hour lesson per week. Course may
be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. (Prerequisite: MUS 1950 or
permission of the instructor.) (T)
MUS 2110 Music Theory III(3)
A study of harmony and melody in chromatic styles; Neapolitan and
augmented sixth chords; modulation; ninth chords; eleventh and thirteenth
chords; concluding with a study of the final expansion of the major-minor
tonality system; added tones; quartal harmony; synthetic scales; polytonality;
pandiatonicism; form and style analysis; serial composition; avant-garde
styles. (Course is offered Spring only.) (Prerequisite: MUS 1120.)
(Corequisite: MUS 2111) (T)
MUS 2111 Aural Skills III(1)
Singing chromatic melodies with secondary harmonies and modulation,
melodic dictation including modulation to closely related keys, interval
recognition, rhythmic reading including subdivision of the beat in simple and
compound meters and syncopation, chord quality identification. (Corequisite:
MUS 2110.) (T)
MUS 2140 Advanced Private Instruction(2)
For students who wish to continue studying an instrument on which they
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
195
have received prior instruction. Course may be repeated for a maximum of
4 credits. (Prerequisite: permission of the Humanities and Social Sciences
Division dean.) (TE)
MUS 2200 History of Musical Theatre(3)
A study of the history of style and techniques of dance for musical, comedy,
opera, television, and stage plus choreography for these forms. (Course is
offered Spring only.) (TE)
MUS 2210 Survey of Music Literature(3)
A comprehensive course exploring significant composers and their
compositions. The course begins with works from the 14th century and
extends through the 20th century. An extensive amount of listening will be
required. (TE)
MUS 2330 Electronic Music I(3)
Principles of electronic digital sound synthesis, history of electronic music,
programming the digital music, use of computer music program(s),
electronic composition and contemporary trends in digital music.
(Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.) TE)
MUS 2350 Digital Audio Recording(3)
This course is designed to further develop MIDI sequencing skills as well as
introduce the concepts of digital audio recording. Development is
encouraged in the qualities necessary to obtain professional work in the
commercial music industry. Along with development, special attention is
given to selecting material appropriate to the student's skill level. Students
should expect to spend at least two additional hours per week on teambased lab assignments. (Course is offered Fall only.) (This course is only
open to CEN Department majors or permission of instructor.) (NT)
MUS 2360 Digital Music Production(3)
The study and practical application of producing music compositions for the
songwriter, vocalist, and instrumentalist. This course gives an overview of
the pre-production, in-production, and post-production aspects of recording
music and original material. Course topics include: demo budgeting for
musicians, proper protocol for working with session musicians, digital audio
mixing and mastering techniques, and conversion of audio files to multiple
formats. Student should expect to spend at least two additional hours per
week on team-based lab assignments. (Course is offered Spring only.) (NT)
Nursing
Students must be accepted into the Nursing Program before they can
register for NUR courses.
NUR 121 Math Applications for Nursing(1)
This course focuses on the arithmetic of dosages and solutions used by the
practicing nurse. Topics include the metric, apothecary, and household
systems, dosages in units and milliequivalents, dry powdered drugs and
calculations of IV flow rates. (Corequisites: NUR 1115 and NUR 1118 or
permission of the Nursing Program director.) 1 hr. per week. (NT)
NUR 122 Pharmacology(2)
Pharmacology introduces major classifications of drugs. The study of each
classification will include general characteristics, mechanism(s) of action,
expected results, side effects, and nursing implications. Application of the
nursing process will be included throughout this course. Representative
drugs for each category will be identified. (Prerequisite: Completion of NUR
1115, NUR 1118, NUR 121 or permission of the Nursing Program director.)
(Corequisites or Prerequisites: NUR 1126, NUR 1127 and NUR 1128.)
2 hrs. lecture per week; 30 hrs. total. (NT)
NUR 294 Coordinated Cooperative Student Externship(6)
An elective clinical practicum of planned and supervised clinical experiences
will be given in association with an R.N. mentor. Seminar and independent
research study will be utilized to meet course requirements for work-study
experience. Students will spend approximately 300 hours in a clinical
affiliate on day, evening, or weekend shifts. Enrollment is limited to qualified
students (see Nursing Program director). (Prerequisite: A minimum of a "C"
average in NUR 1115, NUR 1126, NUR 1127, NUR 121 and NUR 122.
NUR 1115 Nursing Foundations Practice(5)
This course, the first of a series of four courses, introduces students to
knowledge, processes and skills needed to plan and give nursing care to
patients. The concepts on which the nursing curriculum is developed are
introduced and will be integrated throughout successive courses. These
include stress-adaptations, basic needs, nursing process, growth and
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2015-2016 Catalog
development, communication, history and trends, pharmacology,
management, and legal and ethical issues. Course content focuses on basic
human needs for elimination, circulation, oxygen, temperature control,
comfort, sleep, stimulation, activity-exercise, salt-water balance, and
biological safety. Alterations in basic needs are included. Successful
completion of NUR 1115, NUR 1118, and NUR 121 are necessary in order
to move to the next semester. (Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing
Program [see College Catalog]; BIOL 2010.) (Corequisites: NUR 1118, NUR
121, BIOL 2020 and PSYC 1030.) 5 hrs. lecture per week. (NT)
NUR 1118 Nursing I Clinical and Skills Lab(2)
This course, the first of a series of four clinical courses, introduces students
to knowledge, processes and skills needed to plan and give nursing care to
patients. All basic nursing skills except IV therapy are introduced. Campus
laboratory experiences are designed to assist the student to develop
assessment, cognitive and psychomotor skills related to basic needs and
alterations in basic needs. Clinical experiences are designed to assist the
students in applying the nursing process to the healthcare of adults in
meeting altered basic needs in long term and acute care facilities.
(Prerequisite: BIOL 2010.) (Corequisites: NUR 1115, NUR 121, BIOL 2020
and PSYC 1030.) 4 hrs. clinical, 2 hrs. campus lab. (NT)
NUR 1126 Basic Medical-Surgical Nursing(3)
This course continues to focus on patients' basic needs with emphasis on
the nursing process to establish and maintain a safe environment. Students
are introduced to basic concepts of medical-surgical nursing including: fluid
and electrolytes, nutritional support, and nursing care of patients with
neoplasms. The course covers alterations in health related to special
sensory disorders and men's reproductive health. All units contain physical,
cultural and psychological stressors which are considered as co-contributors
to the development of various disease processes. Development stages,
pharmacology, nutrition, communication, history, trends, community and
legal/ethical are integrated throughout the course. Specific stressors
interfering with regulation, nutrition, homeostasis, elimination and adaptive
coping patterns are examined in terms of the nursing process. Specific
patient problems and the influence on other basic needs, as described by
Maslow, are identified. (Prerequisites: NUR 1115, NUR 1118, NUR 121,
BIOL 2010, BIOL 2020, and PSYC 1030) (Corequisites: NUR 1128.)
(Corequisite or Prerequisite: NUR 122, NUR 1127, BIOL 2230, and PSYC
2130.) 3 hrs. lecture per week. (NT)
NUR 1127 Health of Women and Infants(2)
This course continues to focus on patients' basic needs with emphasis on
the nursing process to establish and maintain a safe environment. Students
are introduced to the childbearing patient and family, and issues affecting
women's and infant's health. All units contain physical and cultural factors
that may contribute to the development and treatment of disease processes.
Childbearing content will focus on basic needs of the childbearing patient
and family, with the main focus on the nursing process throughout the
antepartal, intrapartal, post-partal and neonatal period. Common
complications of all phases of the childbearing cycle are included.
Coexisting conditions that influence pregnancy are introduced and
considered in depth in succeeding courses. Pharmacology, nutrition,
community resources, legal/ethical issues, communication and cultural
factors are integrated throughout the course. (Prerequisites: NUR 1115,
NUR 1118, NUR 121, BIOL 2010, BIOL 2020, and PSYC 1030) (Corequisite:
NUR 1128.) (Corequisite or Prerequisite: NUR 122, NUR 1126, BIOL 2230,
and PSYC 2130.) 2 hrs. lecture per week (NT).
NUR 1128 Nursing II Clinical(2)
This is the second clinical course that continues to focus on basic needs
with emphasis on nursing interventions to establish and maintain a
biologically and chemically safe environment. All IV therapy nursing skills
are covered. Clinical laboratory provides experiences in applying the
nursing process to meeting selected basic needs of patients in the general
hospital setting and to childbearing families. The main focus of the
childbearing clinical experiences will be on nursing interventions utilized
during the normal antepartal, intrapartal, post-partal and neonatal period.
Common complications of all phases of the childbearing cycle are included.
(Prerequisites: NUR 1115, NUR 1118, NUR 121, BIOL 2020 and PSYC
1030) (Corequisite or Prerequisites: NUR 1126, NUR 1127, NUR 122,
BIOL 2230 and PSYC 2130.) 6 hrs. clinical per week. (NT)
NUR 2116 Intermediate Med-Surg Nursing(4)
This course introduces the student to nursing care for patients of all ages.
The course covers alterations in health related to immune disorders;
hematopoietic disorders; endocrine disorders; gastrointestinal disorders;
hepatic, pancreatic, and biliary disorders; and renal/urinary disorders. All
units contain physical, cultural and psychological stressors which are
considered as co-contributors to the development of various disease
processes. Development stages, pharmacology, nutrition, communication,
history, trends, community and legal/ethical threads are integrated
throughout the course. Specific stressors interfering with regulation,
nutrition, homeostasis, elimination and adaptive coping patterns are
examined in terms of the nursing process. Specific patient problems and
the influence on other basic needs, as described by Maslow, are identified.
(Prerequisites: NUR 1126, NUR 1127, NUR 1128, NUR 122, all science
classes and PSYC 2130)(Corequisite: NUR 2118. (Corequisite or
Prerequisite: NUR 2117, NUR 2188 and NUR 2189.) 4 hrs. lecture per
week. (NT)
NUR 2117 Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing(2)
This course introduces the students to psychiatric nursing care. Specific
psychiatric disorders will be discussed in depth, as well as psychiatric
disorders throughout the life span. General principles of psychiatric/mental
health nursing will be presented. All units contain physical, cultural and
psychological stressors which are considered as co-contributors to the
development of various illnesses. Development stages, pharmacology,
nutrition, communication, history, trends, community and legal/ethical are
integrated throughout the course. (Prerequisites: NUR 1126, NUR 1127,
NUR 1128, NUR 122, all science classes and PSYC 2130) (Corequisite:
NUR 2118.) (Corequisites or Prerequisite: NUR 2116, NUR 2188, and NUR
2189.) 2 hrs. lecture per week. (NT)
NUR 2118 Nursing III Clinical(3)
This clinical course introduces the students to nursing care for patients of all
ages with stressors affecting: alterations in mental health and behavior,
autoimmune disorders, endocrine, hepatic, biliary, gastrointestinal, urinary/
renal, and hematopoietic functioning. Specific alterations in health
interfering with regulation, nutrition, homeostatis, elimination and adaptive
coping patterns are examined in terms of the nursing process. Clinical
experiences provide opportunities for the application of the nursing process
to the care of the child and adult populations in medical centers, mental
health facilities and other clinical agencies. The student is guided in the
application of management principles in organization and providing nursing
care for greater numbers of patients and/or patients with higher acuity
needs. In addition, various outpatient clinical facilities are utilized to
augment clinical laboratory experiences. (Prerequisites: NUR 1126, NUR
1127, NUR 1128, NUR 122, all science classes and PSYC 2130.)
(Corequisites or Prerequisite: NUR 2116, NUR 2117, NUR 2188 and NUR
2189.) 9 hrs. clinical per week. (NT)
NUR 2125 Advanced Med-Surg Nursing(6)
This course is the final course in the program of study. It provides learning
experiences in caring for patients of all ages with stressors of respiratory,
cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neurosensory and special sensory
function. Concepts and principles of management, as well as various
methods of delivery of nursing care, are included. The nursing process is
the framework for theory and clinical practice. Specific alterations in health
and their influence on basic needs, as described by Maslow, are identified.
Attention is given to psychological, social, cultural and physical contributions
to the development of these alterations in health. Since alterations in health
of each of these systems may result in life crisis and require changes in
lifestyle patterns, attention is given to crisis intervention, coping with chronic
illness, body image changes, and altered family patterns in illness.
Developmental stages, life-span concepts, pharmacology, nutrition,
communication, history trends, legal/ethical aspects and community
resources are integrated. (Prerequisites: NUR 2116, NUR 2117, and NUR
2118) (Corequisite: NUR 2128.) (Corequisites or Prerequisite: NUR 2188,
NUR 2189, NUR 2198, and NUR 2199.) 6 hrs. lecture per week. (NT)
NUR 2128 Nursing IV Clinical(3)
This is the final clinical course in the program of study. It provides learning
experiences in caring for patients of all ages with stressors of respiratory,
cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neurosensory, and special sensory
function. Concepts and principles of management, as well as various
methods of delivery of nursing care, are included. The nursing process is
the framework for clinical practice. Developmental stages, life-span
concepts, pharmacology, nutrition, communication, history trends, legal/
ethical aspects and community resources are integrated. Clinical
experiences are provided to assist students in applying the nursing process
and Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the care of individuals and groups of
patients in general hospitals, and other clinical agencies. Application of
management principles to groups of patients is implemented during the
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
semester. (Prerequisites: NUR 2116, NUR 2117, NUR 2118, NUR 2188 and
NUR 2189.) (Corequisite: NUR 2125.) (Corequisites or Prerequisite: NUR
2198 and NUR 2199.) 9 hrs. clinical per week. (NT)
NUR 2188 Applying Surgical Concepts(1)
This course focuses on the integration of all theory and clinical objectives,
including the transition from student nurse to graduate nurse. The major
emphasis will be on surgical clinical scenarios. Topics to be covered will
include care of the perioperative patient, pain management in adults,
dosage calculations, and the application of intravenous therapy principles.
(Prerequisites: NUR 122, NUR 1126, NUR 1127 and NUR 1128.)
(Corequisites: NUR 2116, NUR 2117, NUR 2118, and NUR 2189.) (NT)
NUR 2189 Applying Psychiatric Concepts(1)
This course focuses on the integration of all theory and clinical objectives,
including the transition from student nurse to graduate nurse. The major
emphasis will be on psychiatric/mental health nursing clinical scenarios.
Topics to be covered will include bipolar disorder, suicide, schizophrenia,
Alzheimer's, nursing research, resume writing, communication,
professionalism, licensure and continuing education. (Prerequisites: NUR
122, NUR 1126, NUR 1127 and NUR 1128.) (Corequisites: NUR 2116, NUR
2117, NUR 2118, and NUR 2188.) (NT)
197
OFA 240 Medical Terminology(3)
A study of the language of the allied health sciences and medicine with
emphasis on body systems, prefixes, suffixes, root terms, pronunciation and
spelling. (NT)
OFA 242 Medical Transcription(3)
Medical documents are transcribed from dictated material with emphasis on
productivity and accuracy. (Prerequisites: OFA 101 and OFA 240.) (NT)
OFA 245 Legal Terminology(3)
An introduction to legal terminology through the study of definitions and
application of terms within the context of relevant, up-to-date subject matter.
(NT)
OFA 246 Legal Transcription(3)
Students will transcribe legal documents from voice dictation using
computer and transcribers. (Prerequisites: OFA 101 and OFA 245.) (NT)
OFA 281 Medical Office Assistant(3)
A study of the career of a medical office assistant including medical ethics,
communications, billing and collections, and insurance in the medical office.
(Prerequisite: INFS 1010.) (NT)
NUR 2198 Applying Pediatric Concepts(1)
This course focuses on the integration of all theory and clinical objectives,
including the transition from student nurse to graduate nurse. The major
emphasis will be on pediatric nursing clinical scenarios. Topics to be
covered will include end of life, pain, IV calculations, dosage calculations,
pediatric medication administration and immunizations. (Prerequisites: NUR
2116, NUR 2117, NUR 2118, NUR 2188, and NUR 2189.) (Corequisites:
NUR 2125, NUR 2128 and NUR 2199.) (NT)
Philosophy
NUR 2199 Applying Medical Concepts(1)
This course focuses on the integration of all theory and clinical objectives,
including the transition from student nurse to graduate nurse. The major
emphasis will be on medical nursing clinical scenarios. Topics to be covered
will include end of life, time management/delegation and medical economics.
(Prerequisites: NUR 2116, NUR 2117, NUR 2118, NUR 2188, and NUR
2189.) (Corequisites: NUR 2125, NUR 2128 and NUR 2198.) (NT)
PHIL 1033 Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking(3)
This course presents a basic introduction to the various forms of reasoning
used to make and to analyze the validity and soundness of arguments. This
course focuses both on informal and formal logical processes. (TE)
Office Administration
OFA 101 Introduction to Word Processing
(3)
This course is for development of techniques in touch typing and the
introduction of skills involved in presentation of the keyboard, and the
various parts of the computer. The emphasis is on formatting business
documents, proper technique, speed and accuracy. (NT)
OFA 103 Keyboarding
(1)
This course introduces the student to touch keyboarding with an emphasis
on developing correct techniques, building speed and accuracy. (Course
may be waived if 1/2 unit of high school keyboarding credit has been
earned.) (NT)
OFA 132 Records Management(3)
This course is a study of the proper management, storage, retrieval, and
disposal of records. Application of filing classification skills using the
Association of Records Managers and Administrators' filing rules is covered.
Procedures for electronic storage and retrieval are also introduced. (Course
is offered Fall only.) (Prerequisite: INFS 1010.) (NT)
OFA 205 Business Documents and Publishing(3)
This course is a study of the various types of business documents and the
methods used to publish the documents. Course topics include generating
form letters, mailing labels, and directories; creating documents with tables,
charts, and watermarks; creating brochures and newsletters using columns,
and graphics; creating reference documents and online forms; and
generating other documents created in an office setting. Word processing
and desktop publishing software will be used in the course. (Course is
offered Fall only.) (Prerequisite: INFS 1010 and OFA 101.) (NT)
OFA 210 Event Management
(3)
This is an introductory class that will provide the student insight into the
industry of special events and the role the meeting and event professional
plays in it. Topics include vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics
and more. (NT)
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
PHIL 1030 Introduction to Philosophy(3)
An introduction to the basic problems of philosophy and a consideration of
representative types of philosophical thought concerning people, nature,
knowledge, and values. (Prerequisite: satisfactory placement test scores or
completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading or permission
of the instructor.) (TE)
PHIL 2030 Introduction to Ethics(3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to various ethical theories
and to show how they apply in both personal and social situations.
Emphasis will also be placed on different types of professional problems
involving ethical concerns. (TE)
PHIL 2033 Major World Religions(3)
This course presents a survey of the five major world religions today-including, their historical development, their basic tenets, their rituals and
practices and their cultural influences. (TE)
Physical Education
PHED 1010 Golf(1)
Acquaints the beginning player with correct swing, selection and use of
various clubs, and basic skills with practice application on the golf course.
(Course is offered Spring only.) (TE)
PHED 1110 Tennis I(1)
Emphasis on basic strokes, movement, rules, terminology and play
techniques for the beginner. (Course is offered Fall only.) (TE)
PHED 1120 Tennis II(1)
Improvement and refinement of strokes and serve. Strategy, tactics, and
game procedures for competition. (Course is offered Spring only.)
(Prerequisite: PHED 1110 or permission of the instructor.) (TE)
PHED 1210 Physical Conditioning(1)
Instruction and practice in maintaining personal physical fitness through
exercise and aerobic activity. (TE)
PHED 1212 Yoga(1)
Anyone who's interested in learning about yoga and how to perform yoga
exercises is welcome to enroll in this class. This course will not require you
to have previous experience in any particular area but you should have a
high school reading level. No books will be required. The will meet in the
Wellness Center. Learn the rules, fundamentals, skills and strategies of
yoga. Learn how to correctly execute required skills and techniques as well
as to use the equipment/facilities safely. Understand how kinesiology
relates to a healthy individual lifestyle. (TE)
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2015-2016 Catalog
PHED 1214 Introduction to Martial Arts/Self Defense(1)
This is a physical activity for men and women. This course is designed to
teach the study of coordinating mind and body in the practice of martial arts
and self-defense "mentality" is also stressed. The class will meet in the
Wellness Center. (TE)
PHED 1310 Racquetball(1)
Instruction and actual practice in the fundamentals of play, essential rules,
basic etiquette, and safety for play. (TE)
PHED 1510 Softball(1)
Provides an overview of fundamental skills (catching, hitting and throwing),
rules and safety of the game. (TE)
PHED 1610 Volleyball(1)
Emphasis on fundamental skills and techniques used in volleyball. Limited
tournament play. (Course is offered Spring only.) (TE)
PHED 1710 Badminton(1)
Emphasis on fundamental skills, basic strategies, rules, and etiquette for
play. Exposure to playing tournaments. (Course is offered Fall only.) (TE)
PHED 1810 Soccer(1)
Introduces basic fundamentals and techniques for play. Little or no
experience is necessary. (TE)
PHED 1910 Touch Football(1)
Development of skills in basic fundamentals and techniques through team
play. (TE)
PHED 2010 Weight Training(1)
Various training programs are presented. Emphasis on warm-ups, stretching,
individual exercises, running, and use of weight machines. Encourages
continuation and self-discipline of exercise. (TE)
PHED 2020 Intro. to Physical Educ., Recreation and Sport Mgmt.(3)
A study of the scope of opportunities the sport and recreation industry
presents; the historical, psychological, sociological, and philosophical
foundations of sport; and management and organizational concepts and
their application in sport and recreation enterprises. Ideal for students
majoring in sports management, recreation, exercise, fitness management,
physical education or athletic training. (Course is offered Spring only.) (NT)
PHED 2120 Essential Lifetime Wellness(3)
Students will discover their fitness levels and will learn how to maintain
fitness levels. Students will be evaluated for strength, flexibility, aerobic
fitness, body fat and lung capacity. An exercise and nutrition program will be
developed to meet the needs of the individual. Participants in the course will
also learn how to reduce personal health risk factors, improve nutrition,
control stress, and learn about cultural differences and its impact on health
and wellness. (T)
PHED 2220 Introduction to Exercise Science(3)
This course is designed to help students appreciate the importance of
physical activity, to introduce the discipline of kinesiology and help students
understand its relationship to physical activity, and to expand student
knowledge of physical activity professions. (Prerequisites: Satisfactory
placement test scores or completion of all Competencies in Learning
Support Reading and Math.) (Corequisite or Prerequisite: Learning Support
Writing.) (T)
PHED 2320 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries(3)
The student will develop a knowledge of prevention, treatment, and basic
rehabilitation of common athletic injuries as commonly seen at the
interscholastic level of competition. In addition, the student will be exposed
to negligence and liability issues in respect to athletic injuries. (Prerequisites:
Satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all Competencies in
Learning Support Reading and Math.) (Corequisite or Prerequisite: Learning
Support Writing.) (T)
PHED 2520 Contemporary Dance Introduces dances which are currently popular in this country. (TE)
(1)
PHED 2610 Archery(1)
Basic skills (stance, drawing, aiming, releasing) with strategy of shooting.
Correct and safe handling of tackle are emphasized. (TE)
PHED 2710 Basketball(1)
Fundamental skills, rules, and strategies of play. (TE)
Physical Science
PSCI 1030 Physical Science
(4)
An introductory course on selected topics in chemistry and physics.
(Prerequisites: 2 years of high school algebra and satisfactory placement
test scores, or completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading
and Math.) 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. (TE)
Physics
PHYS 2010 Elements of Physics I
(4)
The study of the fundamental laws of mechanics, fluids, sound and heat.
(Corequisite or Prerequisite: MATH 1710, or higher level general education
approved math class or permission of the instructor.)
3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (T)
PHYS 2020 Elements of Physics II(4)
The study of the fundamental laws of electricity and magnetism, optics, and
modern physics. (Prerequisite: PHYS 2010.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (T)
PHYS 2110 Physics I(4)
The study of mechanics and heat. (NOTE: Credit cannot be given for both
Physics I and Elements of Physics I or II.) (Corequisite or Prerequisite:
MATH 1910.) or (Corequisites: MATH 1720 and MATH 1910 with permission
of the Dean of Science, Technology and Math.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (T)
PHYS 2120 Physics II(4)
The study of electricity and magnetism, waves, optics and modern physics.
(Prerequisite: PHYS 2110); (Corequisite or Prerequisite: MATH 1920.)
3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (T)
Political Science
POL 201 Introduction to Politics and Government(3)
An examination of the nature of political activity, the concept of the nationstate, comparative political systems (democratic and authoritarian), world
politics and the discipline of political science. (TE)
POLS 1030 American Government(3)
A study of democratic theory, the Constitution, federalism, free speech,
interest groups, political parties, voting behavior, the presidency, Congress
and the Supreme Court. (T)
POLS 1501 Introduction to International Affairs(3)
This course explores the ways in which international affairs have impacted
world, economy, politics and vision of separate cultures, countries, and
governments. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: ENGL 1010) (T)
POLS 2010 State and Local Government(3)
A study of state and local government in Tennessee with a general survey
of state and local government in the United States. (Course is offered Spring
only.) (TE)
Psychology
PSYC 1030 General Psychology(3)
One-semester survey course that provides an introduction to the scientific
study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include history and
research methods, biological aspects of psychology, variations of
consciousness, cognitive processes, human development, and personality,
motivation, social psychology, and psychological disorders and therapies.
Credit may not be earned in both PSY 203 and PSY 101 or PSY 102.
(Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all
Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Writing.) (T)
PSYC 2110 Psychology of Adjustment(3)
The study of personal and social adjustment as it relates to coping with the
demands of everyday life. Topics include self-awareness, healthy
management of stress and emotions, interpersonal relationships, the
grieving process, and communication techniques. Methods to cultivate
personal growth and effective adjustment will be presented. (Course is
offered Fall only.) (T)
PSYC 2120 Social Psychology(3)
An introduction to social psychology including interpersonal attraction,
interaction between people, person perception, aggression, prosocial
behavior, conformity, obedience, attitudes, prejudice, and group processes.
(Course is offered Spring only.) (Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
199
scores or completion of all Competencies in Learning Support Reading and
Writing.) (T)
Radiologic Technologists or CNMT.) (Corequisites: RAD 220, RAD 230)
(NT)
PSYC 2130 Life Span Psychology(3)
Psychological and physiological growth and development of the human
organism beginning with conception and continuing through aging and
death. Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all
Competencies in Learning Support Reading and Writing.) (T)
RAD 220 Computed Tomography Physics (4)
This is one of a three course set in whole body Computed Tomography (CT)
imaging. The complete set provides formal specialized training in CT whole
body imaging prior to independent performance. Topics included in this
course are history of computed tomography, fundamentals of computers,
scanning methods, digital imaging, quality control, and radiation protection.
(Prerequisite: Graduate of CAHEA/JRCERT accredited Radiologic
Technology Program or accredited Nuclear Medicine Program and certified
or eligible for certification by the American Registry of Radiologic
Technologists or CNMT.) (Corequisites: RAD 210, RAD 230) (NT)
Radiologic Technology
Students must be admitted into the Radiologic Technology Program
before they can register for RAD courses.
RAD 101 Introduction to Radiography(2)
Provides students with an introduction to radiologic technology. Acquaints
students with ethical principles involved in relationships with patients,
radiologists, attending physicians, and members of the hospital staff. An
introduction to cultural diversity is also included. Medical terminology will be
covered as it applies to the specialty of radiology. Emphasizes nursing
procedures and techniques used in the radiology department. (NT)
RAD 106 Radiation Physics(2)
An in-depth study of the concepts of radiation physics. Emphasis will be
placed on the X-ray machine, circuitry, the X-ray tube and photon
production, X-ray interaction with matter, X-ray emission, beam restriction,
grids, radiographic film, and image quality. (NT)
RAD 112 Image Production I(2)
This course is designed to provide students with the basic principles of
formulating radiographic techniques, image production, and exposure. The
student will develop practical exposure techniques and be able to recognize
and evaluate qualitative factors in clinical radiographic images. An
introduction to both digital and conventional radiography is included. (NT)
RAD 113 Image Production II(2)
This course provides details of the principles of radiographic exposure
techniques. It is a continuation of RAD 112, Image Production I, and
includes analyzing the image, comparing exposure systems, special
imaging systems, PACS, computed radiography and the imaging modalities.
In addition, darkroom procedures including chemistry, processing, and
quality control will be covered. (Prerequisite: RAD 112.) (NT)
RAD 121 Radiographic Positioning I(3)
Instruction in the anatomy and positioning of the structures and organs of
the body, supplemented with practical application in the energized lab and
clinical education setting. Precise and detailed information on the various
positions will be provided. 3 hrs. lecture, 1 hr. lab and approximately 120
hours over the course of the semester in clinical orientation. (NT)
RAD 122 Radiographic Positioning II(2)
Instruction in the anatomy and positioning of the additional structures of the
human body. Classroom instruction is supplemented by practical application
in the radiographic lab. 2 hrs. lecture and 1 hr. lab per week. (NT)
RAD 123 Contrast Media Procedures(2)
Students must be admitted to the Radiology program before registering for
this course. Anatomy and positioning of the upper and lower gastrointestinal
tract, biliary system, urinary system. Included in this course is an
introduction to other modalities using contrast media as well as contrast
media reactions. (NT)
RAD 190 Radiologic Practicum I(3)
Provides practical clinical experience in diagnostic radiology. Students will
be given the opportunity to achieve competency in specific procedures by
performing the assigned procedures under direct supervision. Students will
be assigned approximately 15 hours per week in a clinical education setting
on day and evening shifts. (NT)
RAD 210 Computed Tomography Patient Management (4)
This is one of a three course set in whole body Computed Tomography (CT)
imaging. The complete set provides formal specialized training in CT whole
body imaging prior to independent performance. Topics included in this
course are patient care and management, whole body cross-sectional
anatomy, pathology, imaging procedures with protocols, and special
procedures in CT. (Prerequisite: Graduate of CAHEA/JRCERT accredited
Radiologic Technology Program or accredited Nuclear Medicine Program
and certified or eligible for certification by the American Registry of
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
RAD 230 Computed Tomography Clinic (8)
This course is one of a three course set in whole body Computed
Tomography (CT) imaging. The complete set provides formal specialized
training in CT whole body imaging prior to independent performance. The
clinical component is conducted at an approved clinical education center
and requires supervised performance of computed tomography of the head,
neck, spine, chest, abdomen, pelvis and musculoskeletal system.
Arrangements for clinical education are made by the students to obtain
clinical experience with a Columbia State approved CT facility in their
geographic area. (Prerequisite: Graduate of CAHEA/JRCERT, accredited
Radiology Technology Program or accredited Nuclear Medicine Program
and certified or eligible for certification by the American Registry of
Radiologic Technologists or CNMT.) (Corequisites: RAD 210, RAD 220)
(NT)
RAD 241 Radiographic Special Procedures(2)
Acquaints students with more advanced imaging procedures using contrast
media, including biliary, urinary, reproductive, circulatory, and central
nervous systems. Also included are studies using computed tomography,
magnetic resonance imaging, and computed radiography. Quality assurance
is also covered.(NT)
RAD 251 Survey of Medical and Surgical Diseases(2)
Designed to familiarize students with pathology, injuries, and diseases of the
human body commonly encountered in a variety of imaging modalities.
Research and team skills are enhanced through group projects. Includes
review of the radiologic technologist's role in modification of routines in
imaging and treatment of the patient with pathologic conditions. (NT)
RAD 281 Radiologic Review Seminar(2)
This course provides students with an assessment of core knowledge
mastery, identification of strengths and weaknesses, and remediation
opportunities. Included will be a review of all areas covered in the American
Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) curriculum and the American
Registry of Radioloic Technologists (ARRT) content outline. Practice tests
assess understanding, clinical decision-making skills, and readiness for the
certification exam. Students will also demonstrate entry level competencies
for professional employment. (NT)
RAD 291 Radiologic Practicum II(6)
Provides additional experience in a clinical education setting. Under indirect
supervision, students will continue to perform and document exams in which
competency has already been achieved. Demonstration of competency will
be required in additional procedures performed under direct supervision.
Students will be assigned approximately 37.5 hours per week in a clinical
education setting on day and evening shifts. (NT)
RAD 292 Advanced Radiation Physics and Radiobiology(2)
Offers an in-depth study of radiation concepts and radiobiology. Includes
review of the impact of technical factors and image processing practices
using both screen-film and digital capture methods. An overview of
specialized medical imaging and fluoroscopic equipment is provided. The
effects of radiation on the human body will be explored including monitoring
and exposure reduction for patient, personnel, and the public. (NT)
RAD 294 Radiologic Practicum III(8)
Provides additional opportunities for practical experience in a clinical
education setting. Students continue to perform competencies obtained
through Practicums I and II under indirect supervision, focusing on
proficiency. Students will be given the opportunity to achieve competency in
more difficult procedures performed routinely in medical imaging, under
direct supervision. Clinical assignments total approximately 30 hours per
week on day and evening shifts and may include modality rotations. (NT)
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2015-2016 Catalog
RAD 295 Radiologic Practicum IV(8)
Provides students with practical experience in diagnostic radiology and
special modalities within medical imaging. Students will continue to perform
all previously achieved competencies under indirect supervision, and will
complete remaining required competencies under direct supervision.
Successful completion of this course, as well as RAD 251 and 281, will
ensure that the student has been given the opportunity to meet or exceed
entry-level technologist requirements. Clinical assignments total
approximately 30 hours per week on day and evening shifts and will include
modality rotations. (NT)
Reading
Dual Enrollment students are not eligible to take 0800 level courses.
READ 0800 Learning Support Reading I
(3)
This course focuses on reading completion that demonstrates mastery of
essential topics such as vocabulary development, literal comprehension,
and inferential comprehension. Student reading assignments will be based
on a diagnostic reading assessment. Upon successful completion of the
READ 0800 course, the student will have the ability to read, comprehend,
and analyze college entry-level passages. The student must master one of
the two required Learning Support Reading Competencies to receive a
passing grade for this course. (Prerequisite: Reading ACT 0 -12 equivalent;
or comparable placement score; Corequisite: ENGL 1010) (This course is
institutional credit only.) 3 hrs. lecture/lab. (NT)
READ 0802 Learning Support Reading I
(2)
This Reading co-requisite is linked with ENGL1010 and focuses on students
mastering Tennessee Board of Regents approved reading competencies
that address essential topics such as: vocabulary development, main ideas,
major and minor supporting details, inferential reading, critical/logical
reading, and strategic reading. Students’ reading assignments will be based
on diagnostic reading assessments and ENGL1010 reading assignments.
This course incorporates online exercises that supplement classroom
instruction to support reading projects and assignments in ENGLISH 1010.
Upon completion of READ 0802, the student receives two (2) institutional
credits. (Prerequisite: ACT Reading 13-18 or equivalent; Co-requisite:
English 1010).
Respiratory Care
Students must be admitted into the Respiratory Care Program before
they can register for RCT courses.
RCT 101 Fundamentals of Respiratory Care I
(4)
Fundamentals of Respiratory Care I provides an introduction to respiratory
care as a profession, credentialing and licensure. Basic respiratory care
procedures, medical terminology, communication, legal and ethical aspects
of patient care, patient's rights, vital signs, body mechanics, isolation,
disinfection, and sterilization will be presented. The course will also review
the production, storage, and safety of medical gases and piping systems.
Gas laws and gas physics will be discussed as they relate to respiratory
care. Oxygen, hyperbaric, helium-oxygen, and carbon dioxide-oxygen
therapies will be presented as well as humidity and aerosolized medication
therapies, basic patient assessment, the effects of altitude on patient care
and the effects of smoking. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week.(NT)
RCT 102 Fundamentals of Respiratory Care II(4)
Fundamentals of Respiratory Care II presents basic respiratory care
modalities such as hyperinflation and bronchial hygiene therapies, and the
equipment needed to perform the procedures. Additionally, sputum collection
and the effects of aging on patient care will be reviewed. Common
laboratory values, thoracic imaging and airway devices will be reviewed.
(Prerequisites: A "C" or better must have been achieved in RCT 101, BIOL
2010 and MATH 1530 or MATH 1710.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per week.
(NT)
RCT 120 Respiratory Care Pharmacology(2)
The Respiratory Care Pharmacology course involves the study of different
classes of drugs that affect the cardio-respiratory system. Pharmacodynamics,
routes of administration, and drug calculations are included. Indications,
mode of action, adverse reactions, and assessment of effectiveness will be
reviewed for each drug class. (Prerequisites: RCT 101, BIOL 2010, and
MATH 1530 or MATH 1710.) (NT)
RCT 130 Intensive Care Monitoring(4)
Intensive Care Monitoring involves the study of basic dysrhythmias and their
effects on the body and includes hemodynamic assessment and advanced
cardiac life support (ACLS) provider training will be provided. (Prerequisites:
BIOL 2020 and 2230; RCT 102, 120 and 191.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab per
week. (NT)
RCT 150 Arterial Blood Gases(4)
The Arterial Blood Gas course provides an in-depth study of the basic
physiology of oxygen and carbon dioxide transport. Blood sampling and
analysis techniques will be developed. Interpretation of arterial blood gas
values and their application to patient care will be presented. (Prerequisites:
RCT 102, 191 and 120.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (NT)
RCT 191 Clinical Practice I(1)
Clinical Practice I provides an introduction to respiratory care in the acute
care hospital. Competence is to be obtained in medical gas therapy,
incentive spirometry, humidity and aerosol therapy, and aerosolized drug
therapy. (Prerequisite: RCT 101.) 8 hrs. supervised clinical experience per
week. (NT)
RCT 192 Clinical Practice II(3)
Clinical Practice II is an application of topics discussed in previous and
current respiratory care courses in the healthcare setting. Competence is to
be obtained in arterial blood sampling, IPPB and CPPD. Clinical experience
will be obtained in blood gas analysis and machine maintenance and QC.
(Prerequisites: RCT 102, 120 and 191.) 24 hrs. supervised clinical
experience per week. (NT)
RCT 212 Pulmonary Functions/Seminar(4)
The Pulmonary Functions/Seminar course studies the application,
performance, and interpretation of complete pulmonary function studies and
exercise testing. Other topics presented include metabolic assessment,
bronchoscopy, and pulmonary rehabilitation. The student's overall
respiratory care knowledge will be assessed using comprehensive exams.
Preparation for national credentialing exams will also be provided.
Successful completion of this course requires passing a comprehensive
exam styled after the national written registry exam. (Prerequisites: RCT
221, 242 and 293.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (NT)
RCT 221 Mechanical Ventilation(4)
Mechanical ventilation discusses the techniques of mechanical ventilation
including initiation, management and weaning, airway care, chest tube
systems, ventilator graphic analysis, extubation and end of life issues.
(Prerequisites: RCT 130, 150 and 192.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (NT)
RCT 242 Respiratory Pathophysiology(3)
The Respiratory Pathophysiology course studies the etiology,
pathophysiology, presentation and treatment of common pulmonary
diseases and sleep disorders. Disease presentation and treatment will in
part be presented, practiced and assessed by using various computer
training programs. (Prerequisites: RCT 130, 150 and 192.) 3 hrs. lecture.
(NT)
RCT 252 Neonatal/Pediatric Respiratory Care(4)
The Neonatal/Pediatric Respiratory Care course studies the etiology,
pathophysiology, presentation and treatment of common neonatal and
pediatric pulmonary diseases. Fetal lung development and the birth process
will be reviewed giving special emphasis to pulmonary changes,
complications, and newborn assessment. Disease presentation and
treatment will in part be presented, practiced and assessed by various
computer training programs. Neonatal mechanical ventilation techniques
will be discussed. Pediatric advanced life support (PALS) provider training
will be provided. (Prerequisites: RCT 221, 242 and 293.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3
hrs. lab. (NT)
RCT 293 Clinical Practice III(4)
Clinical Practice III is an application of topics discussed in previous and
current respiratory care courses in the healthcare setting. Competence is to
be obtained in the initiation, maintenance, weaning, extubation of patients
being mechanically ventilated and suctioning. Sleep testing will also be
presented. (Prerequisites: RCT 130, 150 and 192.) 24 hrs. supervised
clinical experience per week. (NT)
RCT 294 Clinical Practice IV(4)
Clinical Practice IV is an application of topics discussed in previous and
current respiratory care courses in the healthcare setting. Clinical experience
will be gained in neonatal and pediatric mechanical ventilation techniques,
pulmonary function testing, intubation and bronchoscopy. 24 hrs. supervised
clinical experience per week. (Prerequisites: RCT 221, 242 and 293.) (NT)
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
Social Work
SWRK 2010 Introduction to Social Work
(3)
This course provides an introduction to the social work profession. Because
the field of social work draws on the academic disciplines of sociology and
psychology, students will gain insight into the social and environmental
factors that influence individual lives. Students will become acquainted with
the challenges and rewards of social work. Social service agencies, as well
as current social policies, will also be discussed. Other topics will include
social work practice in family and children's services, healthcare, schools,
criminal justice, substance abuse, and workplace settings. (T)
Sociology
SOC 210 Cultural Anthropology(3)
Cultural Anthropology is the study of human culture across global societies.
This course involves a comparative examination of human cultures across
time and space and will introduce students to history, methods, and theories
of anthropology. Primary attention will be given to the topics of religion,
marriage and kinship, economics, warfare, and globalization. (TE)
SOCI 1010 Introduction to Sociology(3)
Sociology is the systematic study of human society. This introductory course
will provide an assessment of how social forces, institutions, and inequality
influence human interaction. Topics of study include: culture, crime,
economy, government, media, family, religion, education, race, ethnicity,
poverty, and gender. (T)
SOCI 1020 Social Problems(3)
This sociology course examines quality of life issues and contributing factors
to social problems with a focus on deviance and inequality. Topics of study
include sexual deviance, crime and violence, substance abuse, poverty,
and inequality of gender, race, and ethnicity. Problems in government and
the economy, along with global social problems, such as war, terrorism, and
environmental issues will also be covered. (Prerequisite: Students are
strongly encouraged to take SOCI 1010 prior to taking SOCI 1020.)
(Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all
Competencies in Learning Support Writing.) (T)
SOCI 2010 Marriage and Family(3)
This course examines the family as a social institution with an emphasis on
both men's and women's changing roles in the American family. Topics will
include: family background, mate selection, sexuality, family finances,
effective relationship communication, parenthood, marital conflict,
relationship abuse and violence, and issues concerning step families. (TE)
Spanish
SPAN 1010 Beginning Spanish I(3)
Essentials of Spanish elementary grammar, pronunciation, conversation,
and simple readings. Laboratory required. (T)
SPAN 1020 Beginning Spanish II(3)
Continuation of Beginning Spanish I. (Prerequisite: SPAN 1010 or permission
of the instructor.) Laboratory required. (T)
SPAN 2010 Intermediate Spanish I(3)
Reading intermediate Spanish texts, grammar review, and oral practice.
(Prerequisite: SPAN 1020 or permission of the instructor.) Laboratory
required. (T)
SPAN 2020 Intermediate Spanish II(3)
A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I with emphasis on Spanish readings
and oral practice. (Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or permission of the instructor.)
Laboratory required. (T)
Speech
SPCH 1010 Fundamentals of Speech Communication(3)
A course in interpersonal/intrapersonal aspects of communication focusing
on public speaking (persuasive, informative, media, and small group)
presentations. Also covers communication history, critical thinking,
multicultural and mass media communication styles. (Prerequisite: ENGL
1010 or 25 ACT English.) (T)
SPCH 1020 Interpersonal Communication(3)
The study and practice of dynamic interactions amongst individuals and
groups. Foci include transactions at work, tasks, and committees to achieve
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
201
meaningful results: activities, outcomes, recommendations and decisions. )
(T)
SPCH 1030 Argumentation and Debate(3)
This course introduces students to logical and rhetorical analyses of speech,
writing, and thinking. The greatest emphasis will be in understanding the
nature of logical proof, although ethical proof must be considered as well.
(Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 or 25 ACT English.) (T)
SPCH 2020 Organizational Communication(3)
Basic principles of communication within organizations. Topics and
activities may include organizational/communication theory, group problem
solving, case studies, interviewing, and formal presentations. (Prerequisite:
ENGL 1010.) (TE)
Stage Crew Technology
SCT 1010 Rigging and Fly Systems(3)
Advanced instruction in the principles and practices of the stage technician.
The student will practice the installation of temporary and permanent stages,
safe operation of ladders, lifts, scaffolds, stage equipment, hardware and
tools for installation and operation of scenery and stage drapery. Topics
include traps, wagons, settings for overhead rigging, hardware, knots,
roping, counterweights and motorized flying systems for scenery and
curtains, and winches, chain hoists and trusses. Upon completion, the
student will be able to assist with installation and operation of stages and
associated rigging and fly systems. (Prerequisites: CEN 205 and FCT 1014
or permission of the instructor.) (1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. lab).(NT)
SCT 1030 Sound for Stage Productions(3)
Introduction to the use of sound in entertainment, sound theory, methods
and equipment for stage and live events. Emphasis is placed on terminology,
protocol, cabling, troubleshooting, mixing skills, and the use and maintenance
of sound equipment. The course requires work outside of the classroom
applying the principles learned in the practical application of theater sound
for production. Upon completion, the student will be able to assist with sound
production in theater and stage venues. (1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab). (NT)
SCT 2010 Advanced Stagecraft Laboratory(3)
Advanced construction techniques with an emphasis on stage construction,
scheduling, problems and budgeting. Work on productions outside of class
is required. Upon completion, the student should be able to assist in all fields
related to the fabrication and decoration of sets and props. (Prerequisites:
CEN 205 and FCT 1014 or permission of the instructor.) (6 hrs. lab) (NT)
SCT 2020 Scenic Techniques Laboratory(3)
Advanced coverage of techniques, materials and tools used to paint
scenery. The course explores color theory, various media, proper preparation
of surfaces, and painting techniques and examines the ways these are used
in various entertainment venues including theater and film. Assigned
practical work in supervised production activities outside of class is required.
Upon completion, students should be able to assist with painting of props
and sets for a variety of entertainment venues. (Prerequisite: CEN 205 or
permission of the instructor.) (6 hrs. lab) (NT)
SCT 2030 Stage Lighting(3)
Application of lighting principles to theater and event venues. Topics include
hanging, alignment, focusing, maintenance, and operation of various types
of stage lighting fixtures, robotic lighting and computerized control of lights.
Students are required to work as a lighting technician at approved venues.
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding
of stage lighting theory and applications, and assist with theatrical and event
productions. (Prerequisites: FCT 1210 and FCT 1211 or permission of the
instructor.) (1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab). (NT)
SCT 2040 Stage Production Laboratory(4)
Practical experience in the machinations of backstage operations of a
theater as a crew member for a minimum of 120 hours. The concentration
of the course will vary depending on the skills of the student and the needs
of the theater production. (Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.)
Minimum of 120 hours a semester. (NT)
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2015-2016 Catalog
Study Abroad
STA 2010 Humanities Study Abroad Experience(3)
Study abroad credit can be awarded to students who participate in approved
Tennessee Consortium for International Studies coursework. (TE)
STA 2030 Social/Behavioral Science Study Abroad Experience(3)
Study abroad credit can be awarded to students who participate in approved
Tennessee Consortium for International Studies coursework. (TE)
Theatre
THEA 1020 Acting(3)
An introduction to basic acting techniques fundamental to performance in
theatre and media. Emphasizes improvisation, scene study, script analysis,
character study (introducing English, Stanislavskian and Brechtian tenique)
and the history of acting/performance art. Students engage in laboratory
exercises as well as public performance. (T)
THEA 1030 Intro to Theatre and Performance(3)
An introduction to the theatre arts including acting, directing, playwriting with
a brief overview of technical theatre, theatrical history, allied media (film/
television), and performance. Students study plays from theatre history,
write reviews of actual productions, and experience lab work in theatre. (T)
THEA 1040 Special Topics in Theatre(1)
This course will expose students to different topics in theatre history,
practice, and emerging trends and ideas in the field. (T)
THEA 1400 Stagecraft
(3)
Stagecraft provides students with an understanding of basic skills in stage
technology including: set design, construction, lighting design, costume
design and sound design. Students learn vocabulary, parts of the stage,
basic design history, and practice through lab assignments in theatre
technology designing, building, and operating theatre technology in
production. (T)
THEA 1430 Acting II(3)
A study of the classic primary texts, performance art works, and
methodologies of performance to evaluate performance works. Study and
skill building in acting, performance methods, new art formats, video and
stage media. Students will explore western and non-western approaches to
performance through critical analysis and will develop a greater awareness
of the expressive forms of humanistic performance. (TE)
VET 191 Clinical Practicum I(2)
Practical experience in veterinary clinics and/or related facilities. Students
complete an average of approximately 12 hours of clinical practicum per
week. (Prerequisite: VET 113.) (Corequisites: VET 102 and 201.) (NT)
VET 192 Clinical Practicum II(5)
Practical experience in veterinary clinics and/or related facilities.
(Prerequisites: VET 102, 191 and 201.) (Corequisites: VET 202 and 251.)
16 hrs. clinical practicum per week. (NT)
VET 193 Clinical Practicum III(5)
Practical experience in veterinary clinics and/or related facilities.
(Prerequisites: VET 192, 202 and 251.) (Corequisite: VET 203.) 16 hrs.
clinical practicum per week. (NT)
VET 201 Veterinary Lab Procedures I(5)
The lecture component of this course introduces the student to surgical
nursing concepts, small and large animal medical nursing, aseptic technique,
and surgical instrumentation. The lab component of this course readies the
student to assist the veterinarian in performing surgery, by introducing
anesthesia and operation of the anesthesia machine, nursing procedures
during the surgical process, and an introduction to radiographic procedures.
(Prerequisite: VET 113.) (Corequisites: VET 102 and 191.) 3 hrs. lecture, 6
hrs. lab. (NT)
VET 202 Veterinary Lab Procedures II(5)
A continuation of VET 201. An introduction to surgical nursing, anesthetic
techniques, and radiography. Includes a study of the course, development,
treatment, prevention, and control of infectious and non-infectious diseases
(Prerequisites: VET 102, 191 and 201.) (Corequisites: VET 192 and 251.) 3
hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab. (NT)
VET 203 Veterinary Lab Procedures III(5)
A continuation of VET 202. Emphasis upon laboratory animal care,
advanced radiographic techniques, exotic animal care, microbiology
techniques, and clinical pathology. Skills introduced in previous courses will
be refined. Field trips will be used when appropriate. (Prerequisites: VET
192, 202 and 251.) (Corequisite: VET 193.) 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab. (NT)
VET 251 Pharmacology(3)
Introduction to the major drug classifications. Use and control of,
measurements and conversion factors, and methods of drug action and
interaction used in small and large animal practice. (Prerequisites: VET 102,
191 and 201.) (Corequisites: VET 192 and 202.) (NT)
THEA 2430 Musical Drama and Speech(3)
Principles and practices governing the actor's use of voice, body, and
imagination for musical performances. Scene work. (Prerequisite:
Satisfactory placement test scores or completion of all Competencies in
Learning Support Reading.) (TE)
Veterinary Technology
Students must be admitted into the Veterinary Technology Program
before they can register for VET courses.
VET 102 Animal Anatomy(4)
This course provides an overview of the anatomy and physiology of
selected domestic animal species using an organ-system approach. Clinical
applications relative to organ systems are made when applicable. The cat
is used as the primary dissection model. (Prerequisite: VET 113.)
(Corequisites: VET 191 and 201.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (NT)
VET 112 Veterinary Technology Orientation I(4)
The lecture component of this course introduces the student to veterinary
hospital operation, professional standards and ethics. The lab component
includes restraint, introduction to lab procedures, equipment identification,
medical terminology, and administration of medications. (Corequisites or
Prerequisites: AGRI 1020 and BIOL 1110 or BIOL 1120.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3
hrs. lab. (NT)
VET 113 Veterinary Technology Orientation II(4)
The lecture component of this course introduces the student to medical
nursing concepts, laboratory procedures, and animal health care. The lab
component is a continuation of VET 112 with more emphasis on nursing
skills and laboratory procedures. (Prerequisite: VET 112.) (Corequisite or
Prerequisite: BIOL 2230.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. (NT)
See p. 181 for an explanation of C, NT, T,and TE codes.
2015-2016 Catalog
Employee Directory
Faculty
BAKER, MARY LOUISE (1993)
Associate Professor of Mathematics
A.S., Motlow State Community College - Mathematics (1988)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mathematics (1990)
M.S.T., Middle Tennessee State University - Mathematics (1993)
BASOA-McMILLAN, ANA (1998)
Director of International Education and Associate Professor of
English/Spanish
B.A., University of Santiago, Spain - English (1986)
M.A.T., Middle Tennessee State University - Spanish (1994)
A.B.D., University of Santiago, Spain - English (1988)
BENNS-OWENS, LACEY (2001)
Associate Professor of Communications
A.A., Rendlake College - Liberal Arts (1996)
B.S., Southern Illinois University - Speech Communications (1998)
M.S., Southern Illinois University - Speech Communications (2000)
BREW, HOLLY (2004)
Associate Professor of Business
B.A., Central Washington University - Family & Consumer Studies
(1997)
M.B.A., Lipscomb University - Business Administration (2003)
BRUNTON, LINDA L. (1981)
Professor of Psychology
B.S., Eastern Kentucky University - Psychology (1979)
M.A., Eastern Kentucky University - Psychology (1981)
Ed.D., Tennessee State University - Psychology (1992)
CARLOUGH, CHRISTOPHER (2013)
Instructor of Emergency Medical Technology
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - EMT/Paramedic
(2011)
B.S., Rutgers University - Ceramic Engineering (1982)
M.B.A., Oklahoma City University - Business Administration (1993)
CARTER-LOWE, MANDY (2000)
Associate Professor of Biology
B.S., Murray State University - Biology and Chemistry (1996)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Biology (1999)
CAUTHEN, DAVID (2007)
Program Director and Associate Professor of Emergency Medical
Technology
EMT-Paramedic Certificate, Manatee County Vocational Technical
School (1983)
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Theology (1997)
M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Theology (2001)
M.A., California Coast University - Psychology (2002)
Ph.D., California Coast University - Psychology (2007)
COBB, HERBERT (2003)
Associate Professor of Art
B.F.A., University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Studio Art (1991)
M.F.A., University of Memphis - Art (1995)
COOK, JOSEPH (2015)
Instructor of English
B.A., Alabama State University - English/Sociology (2011)
M.A., Auburn University - English & Rhetoric Composition (2015)
COOK, RITA JOAN (2001)
Associate Professor of English and Education
B.S.Ed., University of North Alabama - Physical Education (1993)
B.S., University of North Alabama - English (1994)
M.A., University of North Alabama - English (1998)
DARRELL, MICHAEL (2004)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mathematics (1992)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mathematics (2003)
DE LA MER, JAN (2011)
Assistant Professor of History
B.S., University of Nevada, Reno - History (1970)
M.A., University of Nevada, Reno - History (1980)
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley - History (1999)
DENNY, STEPHEN (2011)
Instructor of Emergency Medical Technology
Certificate, Columbia State Community College - Paramedic (1998)
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Paramedic (2002)
B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Hotel and Restaurant
Management (1993)
M.S., Eastern Kentucky University - Safety, Security/Emergency
Management (2014)
DEVERS, DANIEL (2007)
Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems
B.S., East Tennessee State University - Biology (2004)
M.S., East Tennessee State University - Computer Science (2006)
DOWLEN, SPENCE (2004)
Associate Professor of Biology
B.S., University of Arizona - Nuclear Engineering (1985)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Biology (2002)
DULANEY, WESTON (2014)
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., King University - Biology and Chemistry (2005)
M.S., Vanderbilt University - Biological Sciences (2010)
EVERHART, LISA (2009)
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.A., University of North Dakota - Advertising (1992)
M.S.N., Vanderbilt University - Nursing (1999)
DUNKIN, MARISSA (2006)
Clinical Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Radiologic
Technology
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Radiologic
Technology (1998)
B.S., Midwestern State University - Radiologic Sciences (2012)
FAWCETT, DAVID (1997)
Associate Professor of Physics and Mathematics
B.S., University of Louisville - Physics (1988)
M.S., University of Louisville - Physics (1994)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mathematics (2003)
FISHER, ALAN (2012)
Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems
B.S., Pennsylvania State University - Electrical Engineering (1977)
M.S., Union College - Computer Science (1990)
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FLAGEL, THOMAS (2008)
Associate Professor of History
B.A., Loras College - History (1989)
M.A., Kansas State University - European History (1992)
M.A., Creighton University - International Relations (1993)
FLEMING, KAE B. (1988)
Dean, Health Sciences Division and Professor of Radiologic
Technology
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Radiologic
Technology (1986)
R.T. (R), American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (1986)
B.S., College of St. Francis - Health Arts (1991)
M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Business Adm (1998)
Ed.D., Lipscomb University - Learning Organizations and Strategic
Changes (2012)
GAILANI, KRISTY (2009)
Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S., University of Illinois - Psychology (1978)
B.S., University of Illinois - Nursing (1983)
M.S., Saint Louis University - Nursing (1994)
GANTER, EMILIE (1993)
Associate Professor of English
B.A., Cornell University - History (1979)
M.A., Syracuse University - Creative Writing (1989)
GASKILL, EMILY (2006)
Associate Professor of Music
B.S., University of Alabama - Occupational Therapy (1975)
B.M.E., Mississippi University for Women - Music Education (1980)
M.M.E., Belmont University - Music Education (1995)
GAY, VICTORIA (1993)
Dean, Humanities and Social Sciences Division, Director of
Learning Support and Associate Professor of English
B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Foreign Language
(1982)
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University - English (1995)
GIDCOMB, BARRY D. (1985)
Professor of History
A.S., Columbia State Community College - History (1978)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - History (1981)
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University - History (1985)
D.A., Illinois State University - History (2000)
GILES, LORI (2015)
Instructor of Mathematics
B. A., University of Evansville - Mathematics (1999)
M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Mathematics (2002)
GORDON, CLIFFORD (2014)
Instructor of Art
A.A., Chattanooga State Community College - Studio Art (1999)
B.A., Tennessee State University - Studio Art (2001)
M.A., Memphis College - Studio Art (2004)
HALL, BRITTANY (2011)
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., University of Virginia's College at Wise - History (2007)
M.A., East Tennessee State University - English (2010)
HALL, SHANE (2015)
Instructor of English
A.A., Columbia State Community College (2008)
B.A., Vanderbilt University - English (2010)
M.F.A., Murray State University - Creative Writing (2012)
HALLQUIST, TOM (2007)
Assistant Professor of Communications
B.A., Northern Michigan University - History and Sociology (1970)
M.A., Bethel College and Seminary - Communications (2002)
HARDIN, JEFF (1994)
Professor of English
B.S., Austin Peay State University - English (1990)
M.F.A., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa - Creative Writing
(1993)
HARDISON, RICHARD (1999)
Associate Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Tennessee Technological University - Civil Engineering (1989)
M.A., Tennessee Technological University - Curriculum and
Instruction (1994)
HART, MARILYN (1998)
Associate Professor of Nursing
A.D.N., University of Tennessee - Nursing (1970)
B.A., George Peabody College - Sociology (1974)
M.S.N., Vanderbilt University - Nursing (1980)
Ed.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Education (1985)
HARVEY, JOHN MICHAEL (1990)
Assistant Professor of Accounting
A.S., Motlow State Community College - General Business (1980)
B.S., Tennessee Technological University - Accounting (1981)
M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Business
Administration (1986)
C.P.A. (Inactive), State of Tennessee - (1987)
HOBBS, CURTIS DALE (2012)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Vanderbilt University - Chemical Engineering (2009)
M.S., Tennessee Technology University - Mathematics (2012)
HOBBY, MICHELLE ROSE (2013)
Instructor of Radiology Technology
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Radiologic
Technology (2008)
B.S., East Tennessee State University - Radiography (2012)
HOLMES, SUSANNA (1990)
Associate Professor of English
B.A., Western Kentucky University - English (1974)
M.A., Western Kentucky University - English (1976)
HOPPER, NANCY JOHNSON (1993)
Program Director and Associate Professor of Radiologic
Technology
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Radiologic
Technology (1989)
R.T. (R), American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (1989)
B.S., Saint Joseph’s College of Maine - Radiologic Science (2000)
M.S., Saint Joseph's College of Maine - Education (2013)
HUDNALL, CATHY (1996)
Program Director and Assistant Professor of Commercial
Entertainment
B.A., Dominican College of San Rafael - Music (1989)
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Music (1998)
HUDSON, CHARLES GLENN (2007)
Associate Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Georgia College - Physics (1973)
M.S., Auburn University - Physics (1975)
Ph.D., Auburn University - Physics / Math (1977)
2015-2016 Catalog
HUFF, AMY (2015)
Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., University of Alabama - Huntsville (2005)
M.S.N., University of Alabama - Huntsville (2006)
JACKSON, DEMARCUS I. (2006)
Associate Professor of Psychology
A.A., Hopkinsville Community College - General Studies (1998)
B.S., Austin Peay State University - Psychology/Philosophy (2001)
M.S., Capella University - Educational Psychology and
Developmental Psychology (2003)
JANAKIRAMAN, DEEPA (2011)
Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Computer Science
(2007)
JAUDON, JON ALLENE (2008)
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., University of Alabama, Birmingham - Nursing (1977)
M.S.N., Boston University - Nursing (1980)
JERNIGAN, KRISTEN (2015)
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., Clarion University of Pennsylvania - Molecular Biology/
Biotechnology (2003)
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University - Cell and Developmental Biology
(2009)
JOHNSON, DANIEL (2004)
Associate Professor of Communications
B.F.A., University of Southern Mississippi - Theatre (1976)
M.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary - Communication
(1985)
JOHNSON, R. DAVID (2000)
Program Director and Associate Professor of Respiratory Care
A.S., Aquinas Junior College - Respiratory Care (1978)
B.S., Tennessee State University - Respiratory Care (1984)
M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University - Education (2011)
KATZ, LOUISE (1992)
Professor of Psychology
B.S., University of the State of New York - Liberal Arts (1990)
M.S., Tennessee State University - Guidance & Counseling (1991)
Ph.D., Tennessee State University - Psychology (1999)
Licensed Psychologist / HSP (Tennessee) (2000)
KEALEY, ERIN (2015)
Instructor of English
B.A., University of Virginia - Sociology (1997)
M.A., Georgetown University - Liberal Studies (2002)
M.A., Boston College - Philosophy (2004)
Ph.D., Purdue University - Philosophy and Literature (2010)
KELLEY, DANIEL (2015)
Associate Professor of English
B.S., University of North Alabama - English (1997)
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University - English (1999)
KENDALL-FITE, KAREN (1996)
Associate Professor of Biology
Medical Technology (ASCP), Vanderbilt University Medical Center
School of Allied Health (1978)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Biology (1975)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Biology (1993)
KENNEDY, MARY SUSAN (1981)
Professor of Marketing
B.A., Vanderbilt University - French (1978)
M.B.A., Southern Methodist University - Business Adm (1979)
Ph.D., University of Memphis - Business Administration (1994)
KITTELL, DEBORAH (2008)
Associate Professor of Learning Support Reading & College
Success
A.G.S., Mott Community College - General Studies (1992)
B.A., University of Michigan - Business Administration (1995)
M.A., Tennessee Technological University - Curriculum and
Instruction (2001)
Ph.D., Tennessee Technological University - Exceptional Learning
(2007)
KRICHBAUM, PERI (2008)
Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education and
Wellness Center Coordinator
B.S., Montclair State University - Physical Education (1987)
M.S., Indiana State University - Physical Education and Athletic
Training (1990)
LAMPLEY, DEARL (1998)
Dean, Science, Technology and Mathematics Division and
Associate Professor of Agriculture
B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Agriculture (1979)
M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Agriculture (1981)
LEE, MARK (1993)
Professor of Music
B.M., Florida State University - Music (1983)
M.M., Memphis State University - Music (1986)
M.A., Vanderbilt University - Music (2000)
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University - German (2007)
LENIG, STUART (1992)
Professor of Communications and Drama
B.A., Northern Arizona University - Humanities (1975)
M.A., Arizona State University - English (1977)
M.A., Occidental College - Theatre Arts and Rhetoric (1983)
M.F.A., University of Virginia - Drama (1989)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mass Communications
(2005)
M.A., Austin Peay State University - Communications (2011)
Ph.D., Tulane University - English (2006)
MAJOR, ROGER (1999)
Clinical Director and Associate Professor of Respiratory Care
B.A., Oakwood College - Biology (1979)
Certificate in Respiratory, University of South Alabama (1984)
MALONE, ANGELA (2008)
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., University of Tennessee, Martin - Biology (1998)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Biology (2002)
MANNS, SHELLEY D. (2002)
Assistant Director of Learning Support and Associate Professor of
English
B.A., Tennessee State University - English (1998)
M.A., Tennessee State University - English (2000)
MASHBURN, CAROLYN ANN (2010)
Instructor of Nursing
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Nursing (1987)
B.S.N., Tennessee State University - Nursing (2001)
M.S.N., Austin Peay State University - Nursing Education (2012)
MASSEY-HOLT, VIRGINIA (2011)
Assistant Professor of Nursing
M.S.N. Vanderbilt University - Nursing (2009)
McCORD-ACKLIN, CHERYL (1989)
Assistant Professor of Psychology
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B.A., Spellman College - Psychology (1979)
M.A., Fisk-Emery University - Psychology (1982)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Accounting &
Information Systems (2002)
McCOY, MEREDETH (1993)
Instructor of Mathematics
B.S., Oakwood College - Mathematics (1991)
RICHARDS, SANDRA NICOLE (2012)
Program Director and Assistant Professor of Veterinary Technology
B.S., August State University - Biology (2001)
D.V.M., Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine - Veterinary
Medicing (2007)
McCULLOUGH, ERIC (2011)
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medical Technology
A.S., Columbia State Community College - EMS (2004)
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Technology
(2005)
B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - English (2008)
M.E., Lipscomb University - Instructional Technology (2014)
MEWBOURN, GREGORY (2011)
Assistant Professor of History
B.S., University of North Alabama - History/Political Science (1995)
M.A., University of North Alabama - Secondary Education (2002)
M.A., University of North Alabama - History (2011)
MICELI, FRANK (2012)
Program Director and Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Technology
M.S., City University of New York - Criminal Justice (1983)
M.S., Columbia University - International Affairs (1992)
MILLER-TOOTHAKER, DEBORAH (2013)
Assistant Professor of Geography
B.A., University of Toledo - Anthropology (1994)
M.A., University of Toledo - Geography and Planning (1996)
Ph.D., Louisiana State University - Geography (2004)
MITCHELL, BEVERLY (1990)
Professor of English
B.A., Hendrix College - Languages (1976)
M.F.A., University of Arkansas - Literary Translation (1982)
MOSTAJIR, MEHRAN (2015)
Program Director and Instructor of Advanced Integrated Industrial
Technology
B.S., State University of New York, Buffalo - Mechanical
Engineering (1983)
M.A., State University of New York, Buffalo - Applied Mathematics
(1986)
M.S., State University of New York, Buffalo - Mechanical
Engineering (1988)
M.B.A., Gannon University School of Management - Business
Administration (1991)
MURRAY, MARILEE (2012)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., University of Michigan - English (2010)
B.S., University of Michigan - Mathematics (2010)
M.S., Bowling Green State University - Mathematics (2012)
PERLEY, SANDRA W. (1993)
Associate Professor of Nursing
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Medical Laboratory
Technology (1980)
M.S.N., Vanderbilt University - Acute/Critical Care Nursing (1991)
Ed.D., East Tennessee State University - Educational Leadership
and Policy Analysis (2015)
PEWITT, LAURIE (2004)
Associate Professor of Business Information Technology
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(1998)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Information Systems
(2000)
RICHARDSON, BRANDON (2015)
Instructor of Mathematics
B.S., University of North Alabama (2010)
M.S., University of Alabama, Huntsville - Mathematics (2013)
RIDLEY, READ (2008)
Program Director and Instructor of Film / Stage Crew Technology
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mass Communications
(1993)
ROBERSTON, SHERI (2015)
Instructor of Nursing
A.A.S., Chattanooga State Community College - Nursing (1992)
B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga - Nursing (1999)
M.S., Liberty University - Nursing Education (2013)
RUSSELL, SUSAN M. (1992)
Professor of Nursing
A.A., University of South Florida - General Education (1973)
A.B., Indiana University - Psychology (1975)
B.S.N., Indiana University - Nursing (1979)
M.S.N., University of Illinois - Psychiatric Nursing (1982)
Ed.D.,Tennessee State University - Curriculum & Instruction (2008)
Adult Psychiatric-Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist
Certified Nurse Educator, National League for Nursing (2008)
SEATON, ALESHA (2014)
Instructor of Biology
B.S., Philander Smith College - Biology (2009)
M.S., Tennessee State University - Biological Science (2011)
SENEFELD, JAMES L. (1985)
Professor of English
B.S., Ball State University - English, History (1968)
M.A., Ball State University - English (1971)
Ph.D., Ball State University - English (1977)
SERKOWNEK, SANDRA B. (1988)
Professor of Industrial Technology
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Pre-Engineering (1983)
B.S., Tennessee Technological University - Mechanical Engineering
(1985)
M.S., University of Tennessee - Industrial Engineering (1994)
Ph.D., Indiana State University - Technology Management (2012)
SISKA, KAREN A. (1978)
Professor of Education
B.A., David Lipscomb College - Speech (1972)
M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University - Guidance and
Counseling (1973)
N.C.C., National Board for Certified Counselors (1983)
Ph.D., Peabody College of Vanderbilt University - Higher Education
Administration (1984)
SMITH, JAMES (1998)
Associate Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Troy State University - Mathematics (1994)
M.S., University of South Alabama - Mathematics (1996)
SMITH, JUDY B. (1988)
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., University of North Carolina - Nursing (1977)
2015-2016 Catalog
M.S.N., University of Alabama, Huntsville - Adult Acute Care,
Nursing Education (1988)
STENSON, LATASHA (1998)
Assistant Professor of English
B.S., Tennessee State University - Arts and Sciences (1993)
M.A., Tennessee State University - English (1996)
STREET, GEORGETTA (2010)
Assistant Professor of Nursing
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Nursing (1985)
B.S.N., Excelsior College - Nursing (2003)
M.S.N., University of Alabama, Huntsville - Nursing (2006)
SUTHERLAND, CARA (2010)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Freed Hardeman University - Mathematics (2000)
M.S.T., Middle Tennessee State University - Mathematics (2008)
SWANSON-MOORE, SUSAN (2015)
Instructor of Nursing
B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga - Nursing (1978)
M.S., Vanderbilt University - Nursing (1993)
THYM, ROBERT (2012)
Instructor of English
B.A., Vanderbilt University - English (1981)
M.A., Middlebury College - English (1986)
WALKER, MELISSA (2015)
Instructor of Economics
B.S., Elon University - Accounting (1993)
M.B.A., University of Colorado at Denver - Business Administration
(2001)
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Economics (2015)
WARNER, CANDACE (2003)
Associate Professor of Sociology
B.A., Mississippi University for Women - Music-Commercial (1999)
M.S., Valdosta State University - Sociology (2002)
WARREN, MARIAN (2000)
Program Director and Associate Professor of Early Childhood
Education
B.S., Drake University - Education (1970)
M.S., Pacific University - Education (1972)
E.C.H. Certification, Western Illinois University (1994)
WESTLEY, JUDITH (2012)
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Mount Holyoke College - English (1983)
M.A., Columbia University - English (1984)
M.F.A., Warren Wilson College - Creative Writing (2008)
WHITE, DAVID (2010)
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
B.S., University of North Alabama - Chemistry / Education (1983)
M.A., University of Alabama, Birmingham - Chemistry (1995)
Ed.S., University of Alabama, Birmingham - Chemistry (2002)
WITT, LOREN (2010)
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.A., Goucher College - Biology - (1997)
M.S., University of the Incarnate Word - Biology (1999)
WRIGHT, ANDREW (2011)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Appalachian State University - Pure Mathematics (2009)
M.S., Appalachian State University - Mathematics (2011)
YORK, WENDY (2008)
Associate Professor of Business Information Technology
A.S., Volunteer State Community College - Business Education
(1990)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Business Education
(1992)
M.B.E., Middle Tennessee State University - Business Education
(1999)
YOUNG, JAMES (1992)
Assistant Professor of Nursing
A.S., University of Tennessee, Nashville - Nursing (1975)
B.S., Canisius College - Biology (1959)
M.S., Fordham University - Biology (1962)
Ph.D., University of Rochester - Anatomy (1968)
President Emeritus
O. Rebecca Hawkins, December 1996 - February 2008
Professional Staff
ANDERSON, IRIS (2009)
Coordinator, Human Resources
B.S., Lipscomb University - Management (1986)
M.B.A. Middle Tennessee State University - Business
Administration (1994)
ARNOLD, JON (2007)
Interim Coordinator, Purchasing/Financial Analyst
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Business Technology
(2005)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(2009)
BLUM, BARBARA (2003)
Program Director, Nursing
R.N., St. Joseph Mercy School - Nursing (1974)
B.S.N., University of Michigan - Nursing (1990)
M.S.N., University of Phoenix - Nursing (2005)
BOLLINGER, KENNETH (2001)
Coordinator, Theater and Event Services, Instructional Support and
Evening Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Business (1995)
B.S., Tennessee State University - Speech Communication and
Theatre (1997)
WHITTLE, GARY (2015)
Associate Professor of Information Systems Technology
B.A., Campbellsville University - Business Education (1998)
M.A., University of Louisville - Education (1994)
BORREN, TAMMY (1995)
Director of Planning and Institutional Effectiveness
B.S., Belmont College - Mathematics (1991)
M.S.T., Middle Tennessee State University - Mathematics (1994)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Accounting (2004)
WILLIAMS, ABREOTTA(2015)
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., Alabama A & M University - Biology (2009)
M.S., Alabama A & M University - Biology (2010)
PhD., Alabama A & M University - Plant Molecular Biology (2014)
BOWEN, SHARON JOYCE (1981)
Director, Records
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(1978)
B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Office Management
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(1981)
M.Ed., Trevecca Nazarene College - Administration and
Supervision (1990)
BRADLEY, JOAN (1988)
Computer Programmer Analyst, Information Technology
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Data Processing (1981)
BRADY, JON (2013)
Director TN Highway Safety Training Center, Workforce
Development
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Management and Human
Relations (2013)
BREEDEN, KATHY (2000)
Director, Library
B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Journalism (1975)
M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Library Science (1977)
BREWER, DORIS J. (1991)
Payroll Supervisor / Accountant I, Business Services
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1991)
B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Accounting (2005)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(1993)
BREWER, ERIN (2013)
Executive Assistant, Business Services
B.A., University of North Alabama - Sociology (2003)
BULLOCK, CHIQUITA (1989)
Retention Coordinator, Humanities and Social Sciences Division
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Accounting
Technology (1989)
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Management and Human
Relations (1999)
M.A., Antioch University - Management (2005)
CARROLL, RANDALL (2014)
Chief of Security, Facility Services
B.A., Memphis State University - Law Enforcement (1975)
COCHRAN, MOLLY (2012)
Alumni/Community Relations and Events, Office of Advancement
B.S., Murray State University - Advertising (1997)
M.S., Murray State University - Mass Communication (1999)
CORN, MICHAEL R. (2009)
Baseball Coach
B.S., Coker College - Physical Education (1998)
CROSS, EMILY (2015)
Accountant I - Foundation Accountant, Business Services
B.S., Martin Methodist College - Business Administration,
Accounting (2010)
CURTIS, BARBARA ELAINE (1975)
Associate Vice President, Business Services
A.A., Martin College - Liberal Arts (1972)
B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Accounting (1982)
M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Business
Administration (1998)
C.P.A. (Inactive), State of Tennessee (1987)
A.A.S., Snead State Community College - Veterinary Technology
(2003)
EARPS, LANDON (2015)
Librarian, Williamson County Center
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mass Communication
(2007)
M.S., University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa - Library Information
Studies (2013)
FLEMING, BRENT (2004)
Coordinator, Administrative Computing and DBA, Information
Technology
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Computer Information
Systems (1999)
GALLON, CONNIE (2015)
Director of Student Success Counseling, Student Services
B.S., Troy State University - Criminal Justice (1997)
M.S., Tarelton University - Counseling Psychology (2003)
GERGES, MARILIA (1992)
Director, Instructional Support, Distance Learning, University
Services
B.S., Campinas State University - Brazil - Agricultural Engineering
(1980)
M.S., Michigan State University - Agricultural Engineering
Technology (1984)
Ph.D., Michigan State University - Agriculture and Extension
Education (1991)
GOOCH, A. WYNN (2013)
Disability Services Counselor, Counseling and Disability Services
B.S., University of Tennessee, Martin - Business (2002)
M.S., Auburn University - Rehabilitation Counseling (2011)
GOODNIGHT, BRIDGET (2012)
Women's Basketball Coach
A.A.S., Northwest Mississippi Community College (1994)
B.S., Blue Mountain College - Biology and Chemistry (1996)
M.S., Delta State University - Health, Physical Education (2002)
HALL, DAVID (2011)
Director of Maintenance, Facility Services
A.S. Columbia State Community College - Pre-Engineering (1987)
B.S. Tennessee Technology University - Mechanical Engineering
(1989)
HALLMARK, TIMOTHY (2014)
Director of Facilities Services and Safety, Facility Services
B.S., University of North Alabama - Industrial Hygiene/General
Chemistry (2000)
M.S., University of Alabama at Birmingham - Environmental Health
Science - Industrial Hygiene (2002)
HARLAN, PATRICIA W. (1982)
Coordinator, Testing Services
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1980)
B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Office Management
(1982)
M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Organizational Management
(1998)
DELK, RHONDA (2015)
Coordinator, Clifton Site
B.S., Tennessee Technology University - Education (1987)
M.A., Tennessee Technology University - Education (1993)
HARRIS, HALEY (2013)
Record Transcript Analyst, Enrollment Services
B.B.A., Mississippi University for Women - Management
Information Systems (2009)
M.S., Mississippi University for Women - Global Commerce (2014)
DOSS, STEPHANIE (2013)
Technician, Veterinary Technology
HAYNES-BOOTH, JUSTIN (2008)
Systems Administrator, Information Technology
2015-2016 Catalog
HENSON, CHRISTOPHER (2012)
Development Officer, Fund Development, Office of Advancement
B.S., Wingate University - Sports Medicine (1994)
M.S., University of North Carolina at Pembroke - Organizational
Leadership (1997)
HOLMAN, DENISE (2014)
Coordinator, Veterans, Financial Aid
B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Business Management
(2004)
M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Business
Management (2012)
HOLMES, PAIGE (2014)
Coordinator, RxTN Program Coordinator, RxTN
B.S., Freed Hardiman University - Communications (1990)
M.B.A., Union University - Business Administration (2007)
HOLT, BETHANEY (2014)
Enrollment Recruiter, Enrollment Services
B.S., University of Tennessee, Chattanooga - Exercise Science
(2013)
HOLT, HOLLIE (2015)
Operations Manager, Economic and Workforce Development
B.A., University of Tennessee at Martin - Communications/Public
Relations (2001)
HOLT, RUTH ANN (1994)
Director, Clifton Site and Lawrence County Center
B.A., University of North Alabama - English (1989)
M.A.Ed., University of North Alabama - English (1991)
Ed.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Administration and
Supervision (2008)
HONN KIMBERLY (2013)
Business Manager, Business Services
B.S., Martin Methodist College - Accounting and Business (2006)
M.B.A., Tennessee Technology University - Accounting (2010)
HORNER, KENNETH R. (1977)
Vice President, Financial and Administrative Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(1972)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Accounting (1974)
M.B.A., Memphis State University - Business Administration (1987)
C.P.A. (Inactive), State of Tennessee (1976)
HURTE, BRIDGETTE (2008)
Coordinator, Student Services, Williamson County Center
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi - Speech / Language
Pathology (1995)
M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi - Counseling (2001)
JACKSON, SHANNA L. (2010)
Dean, Extended Services and Williamson Campus
B.S., Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University - Business
Administration (1992)
M.B.A., Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Management (1993)
Ed.D., Tennessee State University - Administration and Supervision
(2007)
JOHNSON, CHERRY (2014)
Director, Financial Aid
B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Mass Communication
(1980)
M.A., Bethel College - Education Specialties (2003)
JONES, CARL (2013)
Print & Digital Communications Coordinator, Marketing and Public
Relations
B.A., Auburn University - Visual Arts (1988)
JONES, ROBERT C. (2015)
Academic Coach, Student Support Services (TRIO)
B.S., University of North Alabama at Florence- History (2003)
M.A., University of North Alabama at Florence- History (2010)
KINLOCH, TERRI (2014)
Executive Director, Economic and Workforce Development
B.S., Vanderbilt University - Human and Organizational
Development ( 1996)
M.A., Vanderbilt University - Human Resource Development (1999)
LACHER, TERI (2011)
Clinical Laboratory Technician, Nursing
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Nursing (2005)
LAY, BETHANY (2010)
Executive for Advancement and Executive Director CSCC
Foundation, Office of Advancement
B.S., Freed Hardeman University - Education (1988)
M.A., Concordia University Chicago - Curriculum and Instruction
(1994)
Ed.S., Tennessee State University - Administration and Supervision
(2003)
LENIG, JONI (1987)
Associate Vice President, Faculty, Curriculum and Programs
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Mathematics (1984)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mathematics (1985)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Computer Science
(1987)
LEWIS, MATT (2007)
Enrollment Services Operations Manager, Enrollment Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Mass Communications
(2001)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Professional Studies
(2006)
M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University - Education (2011)
LINDSEY, LORI (2012)
Coordinator, Tennessee Grants and Scholarships, Financial Aid
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Physical Education
(2005)
B.S., Martin Methodist College - Physical Education (2007)
LITTRELL, JOHNNY (2012)
Interim Director of Athletics and Women's Softball Coach
LONG, DEBBIE (2006)
Analyst, Human Resources
B.S., University of Tennessee, Martin - Business Administration
(1990)
M.B.A., University of Phoenix - Business Administration (2003)
LUTTRELL, KAY G. (1987)
Computer Programmer Analyst, Information Technology
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Data Processing
(1980)
LYNCH, HEATHER (2013)
Completion Coach, RxTN
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Organizational
Communication (2009)
MARTIN, CHRISTA F. (1979)
Assistant to the President for Access and Diversity
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Data Processing
(1975)
B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Information Systems
(1976)
209
210
2015-2016 Catalog
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Information Systems
(1988)
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University - Higher Education
Leadership (2012)
MASSEY, KATHY (1999)
Technician, Veterinary Technology
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Animal Hospital
Technology (1981)
McCORMICK, SONJA (1993)
Coordinator, Records
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Sociology (1985)
B.A., Austin Peay State University - Sociology (1987)
M.A., Western Kentucky University - Sociology (1989)
McDONALD, RION (2009)
Director, Institutional Research
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi - Business Administration
(1995)
M.A., University of Alabama, Birmingham - Education (1997)
M.A., University of Alabama - Economics (2006)
McDOW, ELIZABETH (1987)
Director, Lewisburg Site
B.S., University of Montevallo - Physical Education (1973)
M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University - Administration and
Supervision (1988)
MEADE, ELLEN B. (1986)
Network Systems Analyst, Information Technology
B.S., University of Alabama - Computer Science (1981)
MILLER, CHRISTIE (2014)
Director of Human Resources, Human Resources
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1995)
B.S., Excelsior College - Human Resources Management (2002)
NEAL, WINSTON (2015)
Men's Basketball Coach, Athletics
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology - Management (2002)
M.S.A., Loyola Marymount University - Marketing (2004)
NELMS-CLARK, SHERICA (2010)
Director, Student Support Services, TRiO
B.S. Middle Tennessee State University - Political Science (1997)
M.Ed. Tennessee State University - Education Administration and
Supervision (2001)
Ed.D., Lipscomb University - Learning Organizations and Strategic
Changes (2012)
NODJAK, JENNIFER (2015)
Social Media & Special Events Coordinator, Marketing and Public
Relations
B.A., The Ohio State University, Columbus - Communications
(2015)
PERRY, HOPE (2014)
Academic Coordinator , Student Support Services (TRIO)
B.A., University of North Alabama - German (1993)
PILLOW, FREDA LESLIE (2010)
Career Counselor, Student Services
B.S., Tennessee State University - Communications (1994)
PUJOL, KELLEY (2013)
Coordinator, Evening Services and Cohort Programs
M.A., University of Denver - Creative Writing (2008)
Ed.D., Trevecca University - Leadership and Professional Practice
(2012)
RAY, REGINA (2000)
Coordinator, Veterans and Scholarships, Financial Aid
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Business Technology
(2000)
B.S., Martin Methodist College - Accounting (2007)
REEVES, ANNE (2007)
Tutor Coordinator, Teaching and Learning Center
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mass Communications
(1987)
RICHARDS, ANITA KAYE (2007)
Retention Coordinator, Science, Technology and Mathematics
Division
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(1997)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Interdisciplinary Studies
(1999)
RILEY, JILL (2014)
Chief Enrollment Services Officer and Director of Admissions,
Enrollment Services
B.A., Georgia Court University - Mathematics (1989)
M.A., Georgia Court University - Mathematics (1997)
ROBERTSON, ADAM (2013)
Student Services Coordinator, Lawrence County Center
B.S., University of North Alabama - Elementary Education (2007)
M.S., Mississippi State University - Counselor Education: Student
Affairs Administration (2009)
RYAN, GENA (2010)
Coordinator, Teaching and Learning Center - Franklin
B.S., Murray State University - Elementary Education (1983)
M.A., Austin Peay State University - Educational Administration /
Supervision (1987)
SCOTT, ANNE (2005)
Librarian I, Library
B.A., University of Alabama, Huntsville - Communications (1986)
M.L.S., University of Alabama - Library Service (1988)
SEYBERT, BRETT (2015)
Grants and Prospect Research Development Officer, Office of
Advancement
B.A., Milligan College - Communications (2007)
M.A., East Tennessee State University - English (2011)
SICIENSKY, EMILY (2004)
Associate Vice President, Information Technology
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Psychology (1973)
M.B.A., Western New England University - Business Administration
(1985)
Ed.D., Lipscomb University - Learning Organizations and Strategic
Changes (2014)
SMITH, CHERYL (2013)
Nursing Clinical Coordinator, Health Sciences
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Nursing (1985)
B.S.N., University of North Alabama - Nursing (1992)
M.S.N., University of Phoenix - Nursing (2004)
SMITH, ERICA (2015)
Internal Auditor
A.S., Enterprise State Community College (1989)
B.A., Austin Peay State University - Business Administration (1994)
M.A., Appalachian State University - Higher Education (2014)
SMITH, JANET F. (2008)
President
2015-2016 Catalog
B.S., Austin Peay State University - Health and Physical Education
(1969)
M.A., Austin Peay State University - Curriculum and Instruction
(1971)
Ph.D., Peabody College of Vanderbilt University - Higher Education
Administration (1983)
SMITH, MARGARET D. (2009)
Executive Vice President - Provost, Academic and Student
Programs and Services
B.S., Austin Peay State University - English and Speech / Theater
(1970)
M.A., Austin Peay State University - English (1975)
Ph.D., Peabody College of Vanderbilt University - Higher Education
Administration (1981)
SPEARS-BOYD, AMY (2008)
Director, Marketing and Public Relations
A.A., Columbia State Community College - English (1999)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mass Communication
(2002)
M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University - Education (2011)
STAUBUS, EMILY (2015)
Retention Coordinator, Health Sciences
B.B.A., Bridgewater College - Business Administration/Marketing
(2007)
ST. PIERRE, JOLINA (2012)
Public Relations Coordinator, Marketing and Public Relations
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Mass Communications
(2009)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mass Communications
(2011)
SZTAPKA, MICHAEL (2007)
Enrollment Recruiter, Enrollment Services
A.A., Mesa Community College - General Studies (1997)
B.A., DePaul University - English (2000)
M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University - Education (2011)
TRYBALSKI, ROBERT (2003)
Coordinator, Instructional Technology Support Services
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Management and Human
Relations (2002)
M.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Mass Communication
(2005)
WALKER, RALPH (1992)
Director, Williamson County Center
B.S., Austin Peay State University - Geology (1982)
M.A.Ed., Austin Peay State University - Curriculum and Instruction
(1990)
WILKINSON, MICHELE (2015)
Pryor Art Gallery Curator, Office of Advancement
B.S., Towson University - Art Education and Studio Art (1978)
WILLIAMS, RONDA (2014)
Enrollment Recruiter, Enrollment Services
B.A., University of Mount Union - Communications and Mass Media
(2002)
M.A., University of Akron - Organizational Communications (2004)
WILSON-MARTIN, SANDRA (2015)
President's Leadership/Student Leadership Coordinator, Student
Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College (2006)
B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Political Science (2009)
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Initial Licensure Program
K-6 (2011)
211
WINTERS, GLENNA (2000)
Professional and Instructional Development Specialist, Instructional
Support
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Technology
(2007)
WINTERS, TOM (2000)
Network Administrator, Information Technology
A.S., Nashville State Technical Institute - Computer Technology
(1984)
YATES, BETTY (1988)
Executive Assistant to the President
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1990)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(1995)
Support Staff
ALEXANDER, WILLIAM (2000)
Security Guard I, Facility Services
ANDERSON, MARGARET W. (1995)
Secretary II, Library
Certificate, Alexander City Junior College - Secretarial Science
(1977)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(1996)
ARMSTRONG, DEBORAH (1987)
Processing Clerk, Enrollment Services
ARMSTRONG, PEGGY (2005)
Custodian, Facility Services
BAILEY, BETTY (2010)
Testing Assistant, Testing Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer (2006)
B.S., Austin Peay State University - History (2008)
BASSHAM, DEAN (2010)
Custodian, Facility Services
BERRY, RORY (2004)
Library Assistant III, Library
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer (1989)
B.S., Athens State University - Liberal Studies (2001)
BOBO, EUGENIA (1995)
University Center and RODP Student Support Specialist
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Accounting (1988)
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer (1980)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Professional Studies
(2006)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(1996)
M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University - Education (2011)
BOOKER, CHARLES A. (1992)
Custodial Lead Worker, Williamson County Center
BOSHERS, LINDA (1988)
Administrative Secretary, Academic and Student Programs and
Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Business (1986)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(1995)
BRASHER, ROBERT A. (2012)
Custodial Lead Worker, Clifton Site
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2015-2016 Catalog
CARDIN, JOE THOMAS (2006)
Maintenance Mechanic, Facility Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(2012)
CARNES, COLTON (2015)
Lead Desktop Support Technician, Information Technology
CONANT, SHARON (2014)
Secretary II, Health Sciences
CPS, International Association of Administrative Professionals
(2008)
COOPER, DAVID (2006)
Maintenance Mechanic, Facility Services
CRAWFORD, JACKIE (2006)
Processing Clerk, Enrollment Services
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Business Technology
(2004)
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(2006)
DAVIDSON, NANCY (2013)
Account Clerk II, Business Services
B.S., Georgia Southwestern State University - Business/Accounting
(1980)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(2001)
GWIN, KELLIE (2000)
Processing Clerk, Enrollment Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College-General Transfer (2001)
HAGAN, ELIZABETH (2014)
Secretary III, Advancement
HALTER, JAYNE (2005)
Help Desk/Administrative Coordinator, Information Technology
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Technology
(2007)
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Management & Human
Relations (2013)
HARDY, NANCY (1999)
Secretary II, Humanities and Social Sciences Division
A.A.S., Kingsborough Community College - Secretarial Science
(1990)
HARPER, SHIRLEY (1999)
Secretary II, Williamson County Center
HARRIS, MARINA (2015)
Security Guard I, Facility Services
DAVIS, DIANE (2012)
Secretary/Clerk, Access and Diversity
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(2010)
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Management and Human
Relations (2014)
HARTSFIELD, MELANIE LYNNE (2006)
Account Clerk III, Business Services
B.B.A. Athens State University - Business Administration (2004)
DERRYBERRY, LIVIA (1980)
Records Clerk, Health Sciences Division
B.S.E.E., Austin Peay State University - Elementary Education
(1974)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(2000)
HOLT, BRENT (2013)
Utility/Grounds Worker, Facility Services
DUNCAN, JENNIFER (2008)
Processing Clerk, Enrollment Services
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1997)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(2010)
ESTES, DEBBORA (2004)
Custodian, Facility Services
FINCH, JENNA (2013)
Technical Clerk, RxTN
B.S., Western Michigan University - Education (1970)
GAIRRETT, JOLENE (2012)
Enrollment Services Customer Service Clerk, Enrollment Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(2008)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Liberal Studies (2011)
GOOCH, KIMBERLY (2014)
Accounts Payable Clerk, Accounts Payable
GUM, KATHRYN (2000)
Administrative Secretary, Student Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Professional Studies
(2004)
HAYES, LILLIAN (1989)
Custodial Lead Worker, Lawrence County Center
HUMPHREY, JAMES (1998)
Maintenance Utility Worker, Facility Services
KEETON, CRYSTAL (2005)
Learning Center Specialist, Lawrence County Center
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Business (2000)
KEETON, PATRICIA (2001)
Custodian, Facility Services
KELLMAN, PENELOPE (2003)
Secretary II, Humanities and Social Sciences Division and Science,
Technology and Mathematics Division
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(2006)
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(2012)
KROUSE, TRAVIS (2013)
Customer Service Clerk, Enrollment Services
B.A., Lipscomb University - Bible (2008)
MAXWELL, LAUREN (2003)
Account Clerk II/Lead Cashier, Business Services
McGREW, M. HELEN (1994)
Maintenance Mechanic, Facility Services
MOORE, RODNEY (2004)
Custodian, Facility Services
2015-2016 Catalog
MOORE, WANDA K. (1980)
Lead Worker, Records
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1990)
NEAL, YOLANDA C. (1997)
Secretary II, Student Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Early Childhood
Education (1999)
B.S., Indiana Institute of Technology - Business Administration
(2001)
NOLAN, JOHN (1995)
Custodial Lead Worker, Facility Services
OGILVIE, YOLANDA (2011)
Testing Assistant, Testing Services
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1999)
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University - Management (2005)
POBST, SUSAN (2014)
Campus Receptionist/Operator
B.A., Covenant College - Elementary Education (1986)
POE, RENEE (2008)
Library Assistant II, Library
POLK, RICKY (1989)
Custodian, Facility Services
RAY, DANNIE (2009)
Custodian, Facility Services
RIDGEWAY, TINA (2013)
Secretary, TRiO
Certificate, Columbia State Community College - Medical
Transcriptionist (1999)
ROCHELLE, CLARICE (2014)
Payroll Clerk, Business Services
ROGERS, TIMOTHY (2008)
Learning Center Specialist, Lewisburg Site
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Transfer
(2006)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Liberal Studies ((2014)
ROUNTREE, KATIE (2014)
Secretary II, President's Office
SCOTT, DEBBIE (1999)
Mail and Inventory Clerk II, Facility Services
SEWELL, MARION DEAN (2014)
Utility/Grounds Worker, Facility Services
SHARP, THERESA (2012)
Interim Secretary, Center for Workforce Development
B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University - Business (1981)
SLAUGHTER, WILLIAM (1999)
Security Guard I, Facility Services
SNOVER, DORIS (2008)
Security Guard I, Facility Services
STINNETT, KELLY (1992)
Administrative Secretary, Faculty, Curriculum and Programs
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1991)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(1995)
TAYLOR, PATRICK (2011)
Custodial Lead Worker, Lewisburg Site
TAYLOR, STARR (2015)
Desktop Technician, Information Technology
A.A. S., State Technical Institute in Memphis - Information
Technology (1999)
A.S., Southwest Tennessee Community College - University
Parallel (2008)
TKACZYK, HOLLY (2006)
Library Assistant III, Library
B.A., Michigan State University - English (1990)
TOMLIN, LlOYD (1998)
Computer Lab Technician, Information Technology
TUCKER, DAYNA (2015)
Account Clerk II, Business Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - General Studies (2012)
WEBSTER, KELVIN (2015)
Campus Support Specialist, Williamson County Center
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Business (1987)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Sociology/Psychology
(1992)
WERNER, FREDA (1993)
Secretary II, Science, Technology and Mathematics Division
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(1991)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(1995)
WESTMORELAND, MAX (2002)
Mail Courier, Facility Services
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Industrial Technology
(1983)
B.B.A., Cumberland University - Business Administration (1987)
WILLIAMS, BILL (2012)
Electronic Media Technician, Instructional Technology Support
Services
A.S., Columbia State Community College - Mass Communications
(2008)
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University - Electronic Media
Production
(2010)
WOODY, KATRINA (2011)
Secretary II, Health Sciences Division
A.A.S., Columbia State Community College - Office Administration
(2007)
C.P.S., International Association of Administrative Professionals
(2012)
WORKMAN, NIETA (2000)
Custodian, Facility Services
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2015-2016 Catalog
Columbia State Advancement and Foundation
On June 22, 1965, the State board of Education approved
Columbia as the site of Tennessee’s first community college. At
last, a college education would be more accessible for the
residents of South Central Tennessee.
The Columbia State Community College Foundation was formed
in 1971 as an institutionally related, yet independently chartered
and separate 501(c) (3). Trustees are leaders in Columbia
State's service area who contribute their time, experience, funds,
and wisdom in selfless services to the College and community.
Mission
The Columbia State Foundation's mission is to support and
partner with Columbia State to positively impact our communities
and student success through the maintenance and enhancement
of resources. This is achieved by excellence in relationship
building, fundraising, and investment management.
2014-2015 Executive Board
Mr. Barry White, Chair
Mr. Patrick Gilbert, Vice-Chair
Mr. Waymon Hickman, ex-officio, Honorary Foundation Trustee
Mr. Kenneth R. Horner, ex-officio, Treasurer
Ms. Bethany Lay, ex-officio, Executive Director/Secretary
Dr. Janet F. Smith, ex-officio
Ms. Debbie Hardy, Development Committee, Chair
Mr. Kirk Kelso, Development Committee, Vice-Chair
Mr. John Carroll, Investment/Finance Committee, Chair
Ms.Johnnie Ruth Elrod, Investment/Finance Committee, Vice-Chair
Mr. Brian Williams, Trustees Committee, Chair
Mr. Will Wilson, Trustees Committee, Vice-Chair
Foundation Board
Charlotte G. Battles
Thomas M. Bottoms
Pearl Bransford
Harvey Church
Dustin Flowers
Dr. Paul O. Gaddis
Melanie Hartsfield
Kenny Hay
Stephanie Hubbard
Shane Hughes
De'Marcus Jackson
Anthony Kimbrough
Elizabeth Lovell
Bill Marbet
Alma McLemore
Chaz Molder
Dr. Kenneth Moore
Keith Powell
W. Fred Reynolds
Jason F. Rich
Ben Rudd
Emily SIciensky
Con Vrailas
H. Alan Watson
Sondra Wilson-Martin
Jerry Winton
Columbia State Alumni Relations
Alumni Relations is within the Office of Advancement. Alumni
Relations works to cultivate, maintain, and deepen relationships
between Columbia State Community College and its current and
future alumni. The Office of Alumni Relations is committed to
connecting with alumni and keeping alumni connected to the
College. The Columbia State Alumni Relations invites all
graduates to stay connected to the College.
The Alumni Relations Advisory Council promotes Columbia State
within the community with an emphasis on engaging alumni and
utilizes member talents to participate in college initiatives to
strengthen alumni relations.
2015-2016 Catalog
215
Advisory Committees and
Clinical Instructors
Advisory Committees
Film Crew Technology
Advanced Integrated Industrial Technology
Wes Craven, Midnight Entertainment, California
George Loucas, TV Producer, Nashville
Demetria Kalodimos, WSMV Channel 4 News and Genuine Human
Thomas Collins, Assurance Operations, Lawrenceburg, TN
Lynn Funk, TN Aluminum Processors, Mt. Pleasant, TN
Roger Fuller, Modine Inc., Lawrenceburg, TN
Mark Jent, Modine, Inc., Lawrenceburg, TN
Donna King, Cosmolab, Lewisburg, TN
Albert Kirstiens, Mt. Pleasant Power Systems, Mt. Pleasant, TN
Brian Stockholm, Precision Design & Machine,Inc. Nashville, TN
Bill Phillips, Swarco, Columbia, TN
Lee Skelton, Production Engineer, W. R. Grace, Mt. Pleasant, TN
Gary Wedlake, Wedlake Industries, Hohenwald, TN
Business
Harvey Church, President, Maury County President, First Farmers and
Merchants Bank
Alison Gengelbach
Jami Gesselle, HR Coordinator, Integrity
Bryan Riddle, Analyst Warranty Systems, Nissan
Jim Robinson, CFO, Heritage Bank
Dan Ryan, Principal, Ryan Search & Consulting
Allison Spader, Vice President, Graphic Label Solutions
Commercial Entertainment
James I. Elliott, Chair, Songwriting, Mike Curb College of Entertainment &
Music Business, Belmont University
Tom Lawrence, WAKM Radio
Tammy Pierchoski, CEO, STARR and Host/Regional Sales Representative,
Pulaski TV Today-Channel 3
Melissa Reierson, Communications Manager, City of Franklin
Ron Shuff, Owner, Shuff’s Music Store
Lisa Silver, Grammy Nominated Songwriter and Recording Artist
Productions, Nashville
Sandy King, Storm King Productions, California
Diego Martinez, Millennium Studios., Louisiana
Bob Raines, Tennessee Film and Music Commission, Nashville
Doug Rice, DR & A Inc., Nashville
Kenny Spitler, MedFocus LLC., Brentwood
Steve Womack, Watkins Film School, Nashville
Information Systems Technology
David Allen, Coordinator of CTE, Williamson County Schools
Becky Bauer, Administrative Assistant, Pleasant Heights Baptist Church
Cheney Beckman, Maury Regional Medical Center
Jim Cochran, Owner, Big Dogs Computer Services
Satish Dave, CIO, Med Solutions, Inc.
Lori Decker, Recruiter, IBEX Global
Shawn Gean, Systems Analyst, FiServ, Inc.
Pryor Manning, Information Systems Manager, Nissan North America
John Mugler, Application Developer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Calvin Schimmel, Manager HIM Applications, Community Health Systems
Brent Shults, Application Engineer, Take Care Health Systems
Emily Siciensky, Associate Vice President of Information Technology,
Columbia State Community College
Michael Spivey, Chief Information Officer, Williamson Medical Center
Nursing
Tracy Brown, Director of Nursing, NHC-Oakwood, Lewisburg
Pam Browning, Regional Nursing Director, Tennessee Department of Health,
South Central Region, Columbia
Criminal Justice
Bethany Crutcher, Director of Nursing, NHC-Cool Springs, Franklin
Shirley Derryberry, Director of Nursing, NHC-Lewisburg, Lewisburg
Palysayanne Inthavong, Director of Nursing, Life Care, Columbia
Deborah Lumpkins, Vice President - Nursing, Maury Regional Medical
Dana Ausbrooks, Attorney, Franklin, TN
Terry Chandler, Detective, Mt. Pleasant Police Department
Donnie Harville, Vanderbilt University Police Department
Paul Kraft, Attorney, Spring Hill, TN
Kevin Martin, CJT December 2012 Graduate, Columbia State
Karen Martin, Director of Nursing, Marshall Medical Center, Lewisburg
Lori Orme, Director of Nursing, Williamson Medical Center, Franklin
Ann Patton, Unit Educator, St. Thomas Midtown, Nashville
Tammy Peter, Director of Nursing, NHC-Franklin, Franklin
Sherry Richardson, Director of Nursing, Tennessee College of Applied
Emergency Medical Services - Paramedic
Carrie Rogers, Chief Nursing Officer, Southern Tennessee Regional Health
Center, Columbia
Technology, Hohenwald
Donnie Bear, Director, Dickson County EMS
Lee Anne Boeringer, TN State EMS Representative
Jimmy Contreras, Director of Education, First-Call Ambulance
Scott Giles, MD, Medical Director; AirEvac
Jeffrey Guy, MD, Chief Medical Officer; Centennial Women's and Children's
System, Lawrenceburg
April Sherwood, Director of Nursing, NHC-Hillview, Columbia
Helen Smith, Inservice Coordinator, Crockett Hospital, Lawrenceburg
Angie Whittle, Director of Nursing, NHC-Columbia
Kae Fleming, Dean, Health Sciences, Columbia State Community College
Holly Kunz, ED Director, Maury Regional Hospital
Lynn Thompson, Director, Maury Regional EMS
Greta Woodall, RN, Southern Hills Medical Center, Department of
Kevin Ambrose, RN, Maury Regional Medical Center, Columbia
Pat O. Coleman, B.S., R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center,
Hospital
Emergency
Paramedic Student Representative
Radiologic Technology
Columbia
Dana Fuhs, R.T. (R)(CT)(MR), Premier Radiology, Brentwood
Shane Garner, B.S., R.T. (R)(MR), Vanderbilt One Hundred Oaks
Imaging, Nashville
James Grippo, M.D., Maury Regional Medical Center, Columbia
216
2015-2016 Catalog
John Henderson, R.T.(R), Horizon Medical Center, Dickson
Carrie Holland, R.T.(R), Southern Tennessee Regional Health System,
Lawrenceburg
Mike Johnson, R.T.(R), Horizon Medical Center, Dickson
Kelly King, R.T.(R), Marshall Medical Center, Lewisburg
Sarah Pierce, B.S., R.T.(R), RDMS, RVT, Southern Tennessee
Regional Health System, Pulaski
Gary T. Podgorski, M.D., Maury Regional Medical Center, Columbia
Joey Riddle, R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center, Columbia,
Committee Chair
Karla Roman, R.T.(R), Vanderbilt Bone and Joint Clinic, Franklin
Carlotta Solomon, R.T.(R), Fayetteville
Christi Thompson, R.T.(R)(M), Wayne Medical Center, Waynesboro
Raqual P. Waters, Community Member, Columbia State Community
College
Kristy Watkins, R.T.(R)(M), Heritage Medical Center, Shelbyville
Gwen Wright, R.T.(R), Middle Tennessee Bone and Joint Clinic, Columbia
Radiologic Technology Sophomore Class Rep., Columbia State
Radiologic Technology Freshman Class Rep., Columbia State
Respiratory Care
Anna Ambrose, R.R.T., Director of Respiratory Care, Vanderbilt University
Medical Center, Nashville
Cheryl Burney-Jones, R.R.T., Director of Respiratory Care, Monroe
Brenda Sewell, Coordinator of Adult Services & Technology, South Central
Tennessee Workforce Alliance
Cheryl A. Smith, MSN, RN, Clinical Coordinator, Columbia State
Community College
Helen Smith, RN, Southern Tennessee Regional Health System-
Lawrenceburg
Veterinary Technology
Deanna Bayless, LVMT, Ardmore, Tennessee
Warren Gill, Ph.D., Middle Tennessee State University
Phillip Gordon, DVM, Tennessee Department of Agriculture
Mary Kirby, LVMT, Franklin, TN
Steve Ladd, DVM, Hillsboro Animal Hospital
Louis Limbo, DVM, Pet Emergency Clinic, Columbia
Herbert McCollum, DVM, Priest Lake Veterinary Hospital
Amy Nunally, LVMT, Vanderbilt University
Reita Parham, Butler Animal Health
Joe Pearson, CAO, Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation
Kevin Thompson, Research Center Director, Mid TN Agricultural Research
and Educational Center
Ray Wakefield, DVM, Lewisburg, Tennessee
Carolyn Whitsett, LVMT
Veterinary Technology Freshman Class Representative,
Columbia State
Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville
Derrick Cox, R.R.T., Manager of Pulmonary Services, St. Thomas West,
Nashville, TN
John Freeman, R.R.T., Manager of Respiratory Care, St. Thomas MidTown, Nashville, TN
Veterinary Technology Sophomore Class Representative,
Twan Lansden, R.R.T., Director of Respiratory Care, Williamson Medical
Radiologic Technology
Rachel Adams, R.T.(R), Middle Tennessee Bone and Joint Clinic
Amy Allen, R.T.(R), Middle Tennessee Bone and Joint Clinic
Melissa Brackett, R.T.(R), Southern Tennessee Regional Health System-
Center, Franklin
Vickie Marci, R.R.T., Supervisor of Respiratory Care, St. Thomas
Rutherford, Murfreesboro
Dana Thomas, R.R.T., Director of Respiratory Care, Southern Tennessee
Regional Health System-Lawrenceburg
Christi Wright, R.R.T., Director of Respiratory Care, Maury Regional
Medical Center, Columbia
John Freels, MD, Medical Director, Columbia
Maura Lipp, MD, Medical Director, Columbia
Manerva Covarrubias, MD, Medical Director, Columbia
Respiratory Care Sophomore Class Representative, Columbia
State
Respiratory Care Freshman Class Representative, Columbia State
Rx-Tennessee
Amy Bridges, MLT, ASCP, Retired
Scott Buchanan, RN, WIlliamson Medical Center
Deborah Colvert, RN, Retired
Molly Culbreath, Coordinator, Academic Outreach, Middle Tennessee State
University, University College
Fred Drews, CEO, Mid-Tennessee Bone & Joint, P.C.
Kae B. Fleming, EdD, RT(R), Columbia State Community College
Douglas D. Harris, Sr., M.Ed., Community Relations Manager, Western
Governors University Tennessee
Kate Huddleston, RN, Maury Regional Medical Center
Terri Kinloch, Director, Center for Workforce Development, Columbia State
Community College
Selena Morgan, BSN, RN, EMT-P, Maury Regional Medical Center
Laurie L. Pewitt, Associate Professor, CIS, Columbia State Community
College
Freda Pillow, Director of Career Services, Columbia State Community
College
Columbia State
Clinical Instructors
Lawrenceburg
Kamilla Brewer, R.T.(R), Southern Tennessee Regional Health System-
Lawrenceburg
Tricia Cherry, R.T. (R) (M), Vanderbilt Cool Springs Imaging
Franklin Cole, R.T.(R)(CT), Wayne Medical Center
Pat O. Coleman, B.S., R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center
Paige Collins, R.T.(R) (CT), Southern Tennessee Regional Health
System-Pulaski
Brad Dunivan, R.T.(R), Heritage Medical Center
Denny Edney, R.T.(R)(CT)(MR), Horizon Medical Center
Tabatha Emerson, R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center
Candy Giles, R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center
Trint Hagan, R.T.(R)(CT), Southern Tennessee Regional Health SystemLawrenceburg
Tim Haurez, R.T. (R) (CT), Marshall Medical Center
John Henderson, R.T.(R), Horizon Medical Center
Amanda Hendrix, R.T.(R), Southern Tennessee Regional Health SystemPulaski
Robin Hensley, R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center
Carrie Holland, R.T.(R), Southern Tennessee Regional Health System-
Lawrenceburg
Fleecy Martin Johnson, R.T.(R), Southern Tennessee Regional Health
System-Pulaski
Mike Johnson, R.T.(R), Horizon Medical Center
Brandon Johns, R.T. (R), Horizon Medical Center
Kelly King, R.T.(R), Marshall Medical Center
John Kirk, R.T.(R)(CT), Maury Regional Medical Center
Megan Logue, R.T. (R), Vanderbilt Cool Springs Imaging
Sherrie McClure, R.T. (R), Lincoln Medical Center
2015-2016 Catalog
Dawn Millaway, R.T. (R) (M), Lincoln Medical Center
Tiffany Nunley, R.T. (R), Vanderbilt 100 Oaks Imaging Center
Gail F. Owens, R.T.(R), Vanderbilt Bone and Joint Clinic, Franklin, TN
Sarah Pierce, B.S., R.T.(R), ARDMS, RVT, Southern Tennessee
Regional Health System-Pulaski
Tedra Polk, R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center
Tonya Prater, R.T.(R), Southern Tennessee Regional Health SystemLawrenceburg
Cassie Redmon, R.T.(R) (CT) Hillside Hospital, Pulaski, TN - Southern
Tennessee Regional Health System-Pulaski
Joey Riddle, R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center
Erin Robbins, R.T.(R) (MR), Southern Tennessee Regional Health
System-Lawrenceburg
Sara Roberts, R.T. (R), Vanderbilt 100 Oaks Imaging Center
Karla Roman, R.T.(R), Vanderbilt Bone and Joint Clinic, Franklin, TN
Beverly Sisk, B.S.R.T.(R)(CT)(MR), Maury Regional Medical Center
Leah Skipworth, R.T.(R), Wayne Medical Center
Sheela Strickland, R.T.(R), ARDMS, Southern Tennessee Regional
Health System-Pulaski
Megan Stewart, R.T.(R), Horizon Medical Center
Christi Thompson, R.T.(R)(M), Wayne Medical Center
Chelsie Walp, R.T.(R)(M), Lincoln Medical Center
Kristy Watkins, R.T.(R)(M), Bedford County Medical Center
Jaimie Waugh, R.T.(R), Maury Regional Medical Center
Sandra Winn, R.T. (R) (M) (MR), Heritage Medical Center
Peggy Wood, R.T. (R), Hillside Hospital, Pulaski - Southern Tennessee
Regional Health System-Pulaski
Amanda Woodall, R.T.(R), Southern Tennessee Regional Health SystemLawrenceburg
Dana Woodard, R.T.(R), Middle Tennessee Bone and Joint Clinic
Gwen Wright, R.T.(R), Middle Tennessee Bone and Joint Clinic
Veterinary Technology
Marla Beason, LVMT, Ragland and Riley Veterinary Hospital
Dr. Robert Blaylock, Animal Care Veterinary Hospital
Sonya Bolt, LVMT, Spring Hill Veterinary Clinic
Dr. Kevin Bowlds, Animal Medical Center, Columbia, TN
Denise Brantley, LVMT, Maury County Animal Services
Dr. Kim Brasher, Belle Forest Animal Hospital
Dr. Terry Brockman, Richland Animal Clinic
Paula Casteel, LVMT, Giles County Animal Hospital
Dr. John Collier, Eastside Animal Hospital
Elaine Condra, LVMT, Hillsboro Animal Hospital
Dr. Kristen Dejardes, Crossroads Pet Professionals
Dr. Dorthy Dively, Metro Animal Services
Dr. David Edwards, Belle Meade Animal Hospital
Dawn Elza, LVMT, Richland Animal Clinic
Dr. Mike Fenwick, Hermitage Animal Clinic
Laura Gee, RLATG, RVT, Vanderbilt
217
Dr. Mark Girone, PetMed
Dr. Tresha Grissom, Lewisburg Animal Clinic
Janet Harris, LVMT, Lewisburg Animal Clinic
Dr. Donald Headrick, Williamson County Animal Hospital
Dr. P.K. Hendricks, Nashville Veterinary Specialities, Nashville, TN
Dr. Travis Hensley, Greenview Veterinary Hospital
Sarah Hollaway, LVMT, Williamson Animal Control
Dr. Todd Hurst, Harpeth Valley Animal Hospital
David Johnson, Middle Tennessee Agriculture Experiment Station
Dr. Richard Jones, Cool Springs Veterinary Hospital
Dr. Steve Ladd, Hillsboro Animal Hospital
Dr. Louis Laratta, Veterinary Ophthalmology Services
Judy Laudebauche, Metro Animal Services
Lauren Ledbetter, LVMT, Companion Animal Hospital
Kim Leeper, LVMT, Hermitage Animal Clinic
Dr. Louis Lembo, Animal Emergency Clinic
Dr. Frankie Locklar, Maury County Veterinary Hospital
Terry Manning, LVMT, Animal Care Veterinary Hospital
Wendy Malone, LVMT, Maury County Veterinary Hospital
Dr. Herbert McCollum, Priest Lake Veterinary Clinic
Dr. Montgomery McInturff, Tennessee Equine Hospital
Denise Miller, LVMT, Maury County Animal Services
Dr. Summerfield Mobley, Mobley Veterinary Clinic
Hugh Moorehead, University of Tennessee Dairy Research and
Education Center
Dr. R.D. Myers, Maury County Veterinary Hospital
Amy Nunally, LVMT, Vanderbilt University
Angie Overstreet, LVMT, Shoal Creek Animal Hospital
Dr. Kent Pardon, Eastside Animal Hospital
Dr. Donald Pearle, All Pets Health Center
Dr. Johnathan Pitts, Shoal Creek Animal Hospital
Dr. Kim Poynor, Spring Hill Veterinary Clinic
John Reale, LVMT, Crossroads Pet Professional
Dr. Thomas Riley, Ragland and Riley Veterinary Hospital
Kelley Rogers, LVMT, Belle Meade Animal Hospital
Betinna Bowers Schwan, Walden’s Puddle Wildlife Rehabilitation Center
Dr. Paula Schuerer, Animal Ark Animal Hospital
Laura Sigler, LVMT, PetMed
Dr. Mark Smith, Natchez Trace Veterinary Service
Desiree’ Stevens, LVMT, Williamson County Animal Hospital
Dr. Roger Story, Companion Animal Hospital
Martha Troutman, LVMT, Mobley Veterinary Clinic
Dr. Mark Wooten, Nolensville Veterinary Clinic
218
2015-2016 Catalog
Index
Absence, Institutional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Academic Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Academic Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Academic Certificates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 52
Academic Dismissal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Academic Divisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Academic Fresh Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Academic Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Academic Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Academic Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Academic Service Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Academic Standing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Academically Talented/Gifted Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Accounting TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 53
Accounting Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Accrediting Agencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Acquiring Credit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
ACT (American College Test). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 37
Adding a Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Additional Admission Requirements for
Transfer Programs (A.A. and A.S.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Admission Requirements for Credit Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Admission Requirements for Non-Credit Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Admission Requirements for Specific Credit Classifications. . . . . . . . . . 17
Admission Requirements, Programs with Special . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Admission to the College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Adult Special Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Advanced Emergency Medical Technician. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 174
Advanced Industrial Integrated Technology Advisory Committee. . . . . 215
Advanced Industrial Integrated Technology certificate. . . . . . . . . . 52, 166
Advanced Industrial Integrated Technology course descriptions . . . . . 181
Advanced Industrial Integrated Technology major . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 130
Advising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Advisory Committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Agribusiness 2+2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Agriculture - Agricultural Business TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 55
Agriculture - Animal Science TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 57
Agriculture - Plant and Soil Science TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 59
Agriculture Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Alumni Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Application Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Applying to the College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Art Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Art History Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Art Performance Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Art (Studio) TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51,61
Aspire Award. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Associate of Applied Science Degree Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 52
Associate of Arts Degree Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 50
Associate of Science Degree Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 50
Associate of Science in Teaching Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 128
Astronomy Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Athletic Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Auditing a Course. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 23, 39
Awarding of Financial Aid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Basic Early Childhood Education Certificate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 167
Basic EMT Technical Certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 174
Biology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Biology TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 63
Books and Supplies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Business Administration TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 65
Business Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Business Certificate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 168
Business Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Business AAS Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 132
Campus Access Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Campus Locations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 14
Cancellation of Scheduled Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Career Entry Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 52
CEEB (College Board) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Center for Workforce Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Certificates Offered. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Change of Registration Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Change To or From Audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Checks, Returned. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Chemistry Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Chemistry TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 67
Class Participation Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Classroom Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
CLEP (College Level Exam Program). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Clifton Site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 14
Clinical Instructors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
College Board (CEEB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
College Success Course Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Columbia Campus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 14
Columbia State Alumni Association. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Columbia State Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Commercial Entertainment Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 51, 115
Commercial Entertainment Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Commercial Entertainment Program Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . 215
Commercial Entertainment Certificate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52,169
Communications Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Comprehensive Subject Examinations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Computed Tomography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 172
Computer Science Programming Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Consumer Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Consumer Rights/Responsibilities Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Cooperative Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Cooperative Education Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Core Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Course Load. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Course Repeats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Courses Satisfying General Education Core Requirements. . . . . . . . . . 50
Credit by Examination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 37
Credit for Prior Learning, External. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 37
Criminal Justice Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Criminal Justice Technology Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Criminal Justice Technology AAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 134
Criminal Justice TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 69
DANTES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Dean’s List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Degree Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50, 51, 52
Degrees Offered. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 52
Degrees, Policy on Awarding of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Desktop Video Conferencing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Directories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
Dismissal, Academic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Dismissal, Appeal of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Distance Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Dropping a Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2015-2016 Catalog
Dual Credit for Specific High School Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Dual Enrollment Admissions Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Early Childhood Education Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Early Childhood Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 118
Early Readmission for Students on Academic Dismissal. . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Economics Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Economic-Business TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 71
Education Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Education, Secondary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Elementary Education (K-5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 128
Emergency Medical Services Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Emergency Medical Technician (Advanced) Certificate . . . . . . 20, 52, 174
Emergency Medical Technician (Basic) Certificate. . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 174
Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic Admissions Policy. . . . . . 176
Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic Advisory Committee . . . . 215
Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic Certificate. . . . . . 20, 52, 174
Employee Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Engineering - Civil TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 73
Engineering Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Engineering Graphics Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Engineering - Mechanical TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 75
English Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
English TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 77
e-Rate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Evening Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Exercise Science TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 79
Expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Extended Campuses and Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
External Credit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
External Credit by Examination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
External Credit for Department of Labor Apprenticeship Program. . . . . 38
External Credit for Military Service/Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
External Credit for Prior Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
External Credit through TN Colleges of Applied Technology (TCAT). . . 38
Faculty and Staff Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Federal College Work Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS). . . . . 26
Federal Pell Grants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Federal Direct Student Loan (Subsidized) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Federal Direct Student Loan (Unsubsidized) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Federally Funded Financial Aid Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Film Crew Technology Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Film Crew Technology Certificate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 179
Film Crew Technology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Financial Aid Appeals Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Financial Aid Application Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Financial Aid Class Participation Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Financial Aid Eligibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Financial Aid Methods of Selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Financial Aid Probation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Financial Aid Unsatisfactory Academic Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Financial Assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Financial Assistance Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards . . . . . 28
Fine Arts Elective Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
First-Time Applicants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Foreign Language TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 81
Foundation Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
French Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Freshmen, Beginning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Full-time Student Semester Hour Load. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
GED® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 18, 22, 25
General Assembly Merit Scholarship (GAMS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
General Education Core Requirements, Courses Satisfying . . . . . . . . . 50
General Education Development (GED®) Test Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
General Education Exam (Exit Exam). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
General Education Philosophy and Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 25
General Requirements for Admission to Credit Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
General Requirements for Admission to Non-Credit Courses . . . . . . . . 19
General Technology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
General Technology Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 136
General Transfer Degree Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
General Transfer Major (No Emphasis) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 120
Geography Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Geography TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 83
German Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Grades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Grades for Withdrawals and Drops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Grading System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Graduation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Graduation Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Graphic Design Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 122
Guidelines for Permitting Late Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Health Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Health Information Technology Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Health Sciences Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Health Sciences major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 138
Health Sciences Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Health Sciences Special Course Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Helping Heroes Grant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
High School Course Requirements (Deficiencies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
High School Equivalency Diploma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 18, 25
High School Graduates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
High School Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
HiSET®. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 18, 25
HiSET® Test Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
History Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
History TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 85
History of the College. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Honors and Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
HOPE Access Grant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
HOPE Foster Child Tuition Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
HOPE Scholarship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
HOPE Scholarship for Non-traditional Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Humanities Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Humanities Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 124
Humanities and Social Sciences Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Humanities / Fine Arts Elective Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Hybrid Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Important Dates for Fall 2015. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Important Dates for Spring 2016. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Important Dates for Summer 2016. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Incomplete Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Industrial Technology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Information Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Information Systems Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Information Systems Technology Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Information Systems Technology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Information Systems Technology Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 140
Information Systems TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 87
Institutional Absence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Institutional Fees and Refunds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Institutional Funded Financial Aid Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Institutional Refunds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Institutional Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
International Association of Administrative Professionals. . . . . . . . . . . . 37
International Education Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
International Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
219
220
2015-2016 Catalog
Jo L. Hutton Prize. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Late Registration Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Late Withdrawal, Guidelines for Permitting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Law Enforcement Option, Criminal Justice Technology Major. . . . 52, 134
Lawrence County Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 14
Learning Support Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188, 193, 200
Learning Support Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Lewisburg Site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 14
Limitations and Reservations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Loans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
LPN Career Mobility Ladder (Option A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 146
LPN Career Mobility Ladder (Option B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 146
Maintenance Fee Refunds and Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Mandatory Placement of Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 47
Marketing Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Mass Communication TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 89
Mathematics Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Mathematics Elective Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Mathematics TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 91
Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) Vaccination Requirement. . . . . . 16
Medical Informatics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 144
Military Service Credit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Minimum Degree Requirements for Technical Certificates. . . . . . . . . . . 52
Misrepresentation of Academic Credentials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Mission Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Multiple Degrees and Certificates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Music Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Music Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Music TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 93
Natural Sciences Elective Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Non-Credit Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Non-Credit Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 41
Non-Degree Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Nondiscrimination Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Non-High School Graduates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Non-Traditional Courses (Distance Education). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Northfield Workforce Development & Conference Center . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Nursing, Admissions Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 146
Nursing Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Nursing Challenge Exam Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Nursing Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Nursing LPN Career Mobility Ladder (Option A). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 146
Nursing LPN Career Mobility Ladder (Option B). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 146
Nursing Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 146
Nursing RN to BSN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Office Administration Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
On-line Courses (RODP) Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Opportunity Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Outstanding Student Award. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Paramedic Admissions Policy. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Paramedic Advisory Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Paramedic Certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 174
Parking Fines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Payment of Awards and Refunds (Financial Aid). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Permanent Residents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Permanent Student Records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Philosophy Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Physical Education Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Physical Science Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Physics Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Physics TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 95
Placement in Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Placement of Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 47
Planning a Program of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Policy and Procedures for Mandatory Placement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 47
Policy on Awarding of Degrees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Political Science Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Political Science TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 97
Praxis Series: Core Adademic Skills for Educators Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Pre-Health Professions TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 99
Pre-Occupational Therapy TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 101
Pre-Physical Therapy TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 103
Pre-Professional Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
President’s List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Private Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Probation, Academic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Probation, Financial Aid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Programs of Study for A.A.S. Degrees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Programs of Study for Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Programs of Study for Selected Emphases Within
the General Transfer Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Programs of Study for Selected Emphases Within
the Tennessee Transfer Pathway Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Programs with Special Admission Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Psychology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Psychology TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 105
Public Relations major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 126
Radiologic Technology Admissions Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 148
Radiology Technology Advisory Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Radiologic Technology Clinical Instructors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Radiologic Technology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Radiologic Technology Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 152
Reading Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Readmission, Academic Dismissal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Refunds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Regents Online Degree Program (RODP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 45
Registration Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 23
Registration for Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Registration Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Repayment of Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Repeating Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Replacement of Lost ID Card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Reporting Aid Received From Sources Other Than Columbia State. . . 34
Residency Classification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Respiratory Care Admissions Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 157
Respiratory Care Advisory Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Respiratory Care Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Respiratory Care Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 157
Retention Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Return of Title IV Funds Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Returned Check Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Returning Columbia State Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
RxTN Advisory Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Standards
for Federal Financial Assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Science, Technology and Mathematics Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Secondary Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Selective Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16, 34
Social/Behavioral Sciences Elective Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Social Security Number Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Social Work Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Social Work TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 107
Sociology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Sociology TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 109
Spanish Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Speech Communication TTP Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 111
Speech Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Stage Crew Technology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
State Funded Financial Aid Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2015-2016 Catalog
Student Activity Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Student Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Student Classifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Student Conduct and Discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Student Consumer Rights/Responsibilities Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Student Loans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Student Records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Study Abroad Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Summer Term Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Teaching: K-5 (AST) Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 128
Technical Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 52
Technology Access Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Tennessee Board of Regents and University of Tennessee
Admission Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Tennessee Board of Regents’ General Education Requirements and
Undergraduate Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Tennessee Dual Enrollment Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Tennessee Eligibility Verification for Entitlement Act. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16, 23
Tennessee Lottery Scholarships and Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Tennessee Promise Application Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Tennessee Promise Eligibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Tennessee Promise Scholarship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Tennessee Transfer Pathway. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 51
Tennessee Student Assistance Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Theatre Arts TTP Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 113
Theatre Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Transcript of Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Transfer Credit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Transfer Provisions of General Education Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Transfer Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 51
Transfer Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 41
Transient Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 41
Tuition and Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Two-way Video and Audio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Undergraduate Degree Requirements and Provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Undergraduate Degree Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 36
Undergraduate Special Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Unit of Credit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
University Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Veterans Information and Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Veterinary Technology, Admissions Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 162
Veterinary Technology Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Veterinary Technology Clinical Instructors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Veterinary Technology Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Veterinary Technology Major. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 52, 162
Vision. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Web-Enhanced Course. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Williamson County Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 15
Withdrawal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Work Study Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
221
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