Programme Specification Undergraduate Programmes Programme Title: Awarding Body/Institution

Programme Specification Undergraduate Programmes Programme Title: Awarding Body/Institution
Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Programme Specification
Undergraduate Programmes
Awarding Body/Institution
University of London
Teaching Institution
Goldsmiths, University of London
Name of Final Award and Programme Title Graduate Diploma in Music
Name of Interim Award(s)
N/A
Duration of Study / Period of Registration
1 year full-time
UCAS Code(s)
N/A
QAA Benchmark Group
Languages and Related Studies
FHEQ Level of Award
Level 6
Programme Accredited by
N/A
Date Programme Specification Approved
25 Mar 2011
Date of this Version
4 Feb 2016
Primary Department / Institute
Centre for English Language and Academic Writing
Departments which will also be involved in teaching part of the programme
Music
Programme Overview
The Graduate Diploma Programme is aimed at postgraduate students who need a year to develop or consolidate their
language skills in academic English, to undertake preliminary study in the subject areas they would like to study at MA level, and
to familiarise themselves both with ways of working in British academic culture and in the standards required at Master’s degree
level. Students who successfully complete the programme at the required level are guaranteed a place on a relevant
Goldsmiths Master’s degree. Students who wish to go on to study elsewhere in the UK will be given the appropriate one-to-one
tutorial support in their applications. The Graduate Diploma programme has five pathways: Creative and Cultural Industries
(CCI); Design (D); Media, Culture and Social Sciences (MCSS); Music (M) and a Pre-Masters Certificate in Counselling and Therapy
(CT).
This programme specification relates to the Music pathway. The programme consists of four major components:
A: Critical Moments in Western Thought: Modernity and Postmodernity; (30 credits); B: EAP Skills (30 credits); C: Interdisciplinary
Option (30 credits, not applicable when specific pathway is 60 Credits, as in Design and Music); D: Specific Pathway Modules (30
credits)
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
What are the Entry Requirements?
• Students must normally be 18 years of age on admission
• A minimum score of 5.5 in IELTS (with no sub score lower than 5.5) or equivalent in other English Language examinations
• Students must normally have already completed (or be about to finish) an undergraduate degree in their own country.
• Selection is by interview and/or submission of a portfolio of work or equivalent material.
Aims of the Programme
The programme consists of four major components:
A: Critical Moments in Western Thought: Modernity and Postmodernity (30 credits); B: EAP Skills (30 credits); C: Interdisciplinary
Option (30 credits, not applicable when specific pathway is 60 Credits, as in Counselling, Design or Music); D: Specific Pathway
Modules (30 credits)
The generic aims of the programme are for students to:
i. experience learning in British higher education in a way that is both authentic and challenging;
ii. learn what is expected of students attending lectures in a UK university;
iii. learn about an academic subject at university level;
iv. learn what is expected of students in seminars and class discussion at a UK university;
v. learn what is expected of students in written work at a UK university, including a range of text types and assessment criteria;
vi. learn to engage with and respond to teachers and fellow students from a range of disciplinary, cultural, and linguistic
backgrounds;
vii. develop the skills necessary to become independent and life long learners.
A and B are Core EAP modules (60 credits) in all pathways and consist of the following four skills:
Reading
The development of reading skills takes place principally in the pre-lecture and post-lecture textual analyses modules, which
accompany the lecture module entitled: Critical Moments in Western Thought: Modernity and Postmodernity. Skills such as
skimming, scanning, close reading and cohesion awareness are practised on texts drawn from a range of sources including from
primary and secondary sources and encyclopaedia entries on topics related to key areas of western thought. Texts are also
exploited for relevant vocabulary extension. Students are encouraged to take a critical view of the texts under study by
considering how they support and/or contrast with the content of the lecture programme or the students’ previous learning.
Reading skills are also developed in similar ways in the interdisciplinary options.
Writing
The development of academic writing is closely integrated with reading. Texts are analysed in terms of their structure,
organisation and language use, in order to help students understand what is required in their own writing, when they come to
write essays related to the content of the lecture module. The development of summarising skills (distinguishing general and
specific information, paraphrasing and synthesising) is also a main focus of these modules.
Writing skills are developed from a more discrete perspective in the Academic Writing/Grammar Development module. This
covers the basic principles of essay writing (paragraph structure, paraphrasing and citation, referencing and bibliography
compilation, drafting and editing) as well as focusing on specific aspects of sentence structure and syntax.
Writing skills are also developed in relation to a specific researched topic in the interdisciplinary option.
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Listening
Students regularly attend the previously mentioned lecture module. They will practise and develop note-taking skills; develop
knowledge and understanding of a relevant academic subject; and further develop appropriate vocabulary and grammar. Where
possible, they will also audit undergraduate lectures, in order to familiarise themselves with the atmosphere of a British
university lecture environment. Listening skills are also covered in the interdisciplinary option, and are of course practised de
facto by students in their subject specific modules, as well as in their everyday student life. Listening skills will be specifically
assessed in the formal examination relating to the core EAP units at the end of the programme, as well as through listening/
summary tasks in the modules.
Speaking
Speaking is of course a regular feature of all modules, and the variety of seminar types, visits, walks, etc organised in the subject
specific pathways encourage this in a suitable diverse range of contexts. Specific attention to the skills of giving a seminar
presentation will be paid in the core EAP modules, where students develop the ability to plan, organise, carry out research and
produce an oral presentation on an issue of interest to the student and, ideally, related to their future area of study.
Presentations and seminar participation are also a key part of the learning, teaching, and assessment of the interdisciplinary
options. Speaking skills will be assessed in the formal examination relating to the core EAP units at the end of the programme.
The subject specific modules of the programme offer students the opportunity to prepare for a specific pathways on the MA and
MMus taught degrees by specialising either in performance, composition (electronic and instrumental), or musicology (including
ethnomusicology, historical musicology, popular music). Students take one core module in their chosen specialist area and
choose to complementary optional modules.
What Will You Be Expected to Achieve?
Students who successfully complete the programme will be able to:
Knowledge & Understanding:
Taught by:
A1
gain a good overview of your intended master’s
programme;
All modules
A2
develop initial understanding of its core precepts and
practices;
All modules
develop your knowledge of music through reading from a
A 3 selected range of key texts and when relevant scores and
other musical materials;
A4
develop your knowledge through practising key skills in
the relevant discipline;
demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of music
in ways appropriate to the intended area of music, e.g. in
A5
writing, performance or other creative and practice-base
modes;
Music modules
All modules
Music modules
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Cognitive & Thinking Skills:
Taught by:
B 1 To reason critically
All modules
B 2 To develop an argument;
All modules
B 3 To analyse and interpret a range of text types;
All modules
B 4 To condense complex information in a concise way;
All modules
B 5 To synthesise and apply information in a range of contexts; All modules
B6
To interpret communication in a cross-cultural and
intercultural environment;
To evaluate critically the arguments and rationales of
B 7 historical and interpretive writing in the field of music
studies;
All modules
Music modules
To communicate and discuss orally and in writing issues
B 8 arising from texts, interpretive writing, composition and/or Music modules
performance practice;
Subject Specific Skills and Professional Behaviours
and Attitudes:
C1
Taught by:
To research and deliver a seminar presentation, using OHPs
Core modules
and other facilities as required;
To use the internet for purposes such as deciding on which
Core modules
C 2 university programmes to apply for, as well as in some
research contexts;
C3
To speak, write and read the English language at a level
suitable for postgraduate study in a British university;
Core modules
C4
To carry out a substantial independent research project,
making full use of library and resource facilities;
Core modules
C 5 To work cross-culturally;
Core modules
C6
To interact with a range of academic staff as well as
students in a socially and culturally appropriate manner;
Core modules
C7
To present systematically organised arguments orally to
groups, and to defend them in critical discussion;
All modules
To perform to an advanced level on a musical instrument
OR to compose music in response to creative direction and
Music modules
C8
specification OR be able to evaluate and write critically
about musical practices;
To understand key concepts, terms, strategies and
C 9 practices concerning music in historical and cultural
context;
Music modules
To understand the sociocultural contexts of musical
C 10 practices and discourses of a range of different musical
practices;
Music modules
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Transferable Skills:
D1
Taught by:
To structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally
Core modules
and in writing;
D 2 To participate constructively in groups;
All modules
D 3 To manage time;
All modules
D 4 To work independently;
All modules
D 5 To find information and use IT;
All modules
D6
To assess the relevance and importance of the ideas of
others;
All modules
D 7 To interpret and apply information in a range of contexts;
All modules
To engage with complex and initially unfamiliar ideas in a
competent manner;
All modules
D8
D 9 To communicate cross-culturally;
All modules
How Will You Learn?
CELAW and the Music Department are committed to a diverse and stimulating range of learning and teaching methods that
ensure the programme outcomes are addressed rigorously and effectively. The programme provides a network of crossreferenced and cumulative knowledge delivered across the modules. This is further developed through your independent
research and learning activities directed towards module assignments. You achieve the outcomes through the experience of
interconnected teaching and learning strategies across these various elements of the programme, in both group and individual
settings, which foster new understandings and further your existing skills. Cognitive and transferable skills are integral to your
learning experiences across all elements of the programme.
The programme will combine a range of teaching methods and workshop-based practices relevant to the study of music.
Programme outcomes that emphasise knowledge and understanding are developed in lecture-seminar sessions supported by
tutorials, and where relevant, workshop sessions and one-to-one performance lessons. Practical and subject-related skills are
developed, when appropriate, through one-to-one lessons in performance, group workshops and/or class based task. Classbased tasks may be done individually or in groups (including analytic, listening-based, or discursive exercises) or by setting up or
reviewing follow-up tasks undertaken outside of class.
Learning and teaching is supported by a wide variety of practical activities that pertain to some aspects of the programme,
including the Goldsmiths Sinfonia, the Chamber Choir, the Contemporary Music Ensemble, the Music Department's concert
series, masterclasses, guest lectures, and events run by the Graduate Forum, Electronic Music Studios and the Department's
various research centres and units.
1. Subject Knowledge and Understanding
The English language and academic skills development parts of the programmes will deliver the following learning outcomes:
Reading/Writing
The programme combines the type of learning situations that students can expect to encounter in a British university i.e. lectures,
seminars and tutorials, with those more familiar to the language-learning environment, such as group work, pair work, and lab
work. The importance of Independent Study for purposes of both academic research and language practice is emphasised. Given
the wealth of reading material that students will be required to familiarise themselves with, they will be introduced to a wide
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
range of reading strategies, as well as being made aware that they can use their reading to familiarise themselves also with
textual cohesion strategies in writing. In the pre-lecture textual analysis class, for example, students will learn to analyse texts for
the structure of their argumentation, how paragraphs and sentences are linked, and for their general academic organising
vocabulary as well as key vocabulary related to the conceptual content. Writing development will be seen as an ongoing and
pervasive part of the programme, and students will be encouraged, and required to write in a range of different text types,
notably summaries both from listening and reading, short opinion pieces, reflective writing, and researched essays
Listening
Students will attend weekly lectures on the topic: Critical Moments in Western thought: Modernity and Postmodernity. They will
also attend a range of different classes/lectures/ activity types, relevant to specialist study in music. Students are thus presented
appropriate challenges suitable to prepare them for their future studies. In the lecture follow-up class, students will work
sometimes individually or in small groups and sometimes with the whole class reviewing their understanding of the principal
concepts of the lecture, developing their note-taking abilities, and improving their language skills, especially vocabulary.
Speaking
Students will attend and take part in a range of teaching and learning activities that will enable them to achieve the learning
outcomes described above, including small group collaborative learning, task based learning, and whole group class work.
Students are expected to make an active contribution in every class. Students will be taken through the stages of preparing a
seminar presentation, and given the opportunity to present one to the rest of the class. When not presenting, students will be
expected to ask appropriate questions or provide comments to the presenter. It will be emphasised that students should
maximise their speaking opportunities outside of formal classes, and ideally keep a notebook for new vocabulary and
expressions, how which expressions fit in which contexts, and generally develop their idiomatic as well as their formal registers.
2. Intellectual skills
Intellectual skills develop through the programme outlined above. Each module involves discussion of key issues, practice in
applying concepts orally and in writing, analysis of conceptual material and feedback sessions.
3. Subject Specific skills
All students receive initial guidance on how to identify, locate and use music materials available in the library and on-line.
Guidelines for the production of coursework essays are given out at the start of the programme. Strategies for study through the
relevant language skills are taught explicitly and practised extensively throughout the programme. Other practical skills are
taught, as necessary, in the modules run by the Music Department.
4. Transferable skills
All modules require written work and regular feedback on this is given to the student to develop their understanding and powers
of expression. Skill D2 is developed through paired and group work including designating group leaders (on a rotating basis) to
report back from discussions and through giving feedback to seminar presentations. Skill D3 is learnt through the management
of time to meet various deadlines for submission of coursework. Skills D1 and D6 are developed in classes, seminars and tutorials,
which rely on discussion and interaction, as well as presentations given by students. IT skills are developed through independent
learning, and relevant learning resources support staff. Skills D7-D9 are germane to active engagement in the programme, and
their general relevance will be stressed throughout.
How Will You Be Assessed?
All skills discussed above will be taught and assessed at an appropriate level.
1 Subject knowledge and understanding
Summative assessment of the programme outcomes occurs across the four major components. Individual modules use the most
effective and appropriate assessment method according to the topic.
The methods are either:
i) a project portfolio that demonstrates ability to undertake a number of focussed creative tasks with a short statement
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
(c.500-1500 words).
ii) a 1500-2000 word essay that demonstrates ability to apply to a set task, conduct independent research, produce an academic
argument that can be supported by evidence and examples.
iii) oral presentations relating to the subject of your future studies demonstrating evidence of research supported by secondary
sources.
iv) written project: more specialised than an essay, a project usually treats a more restricted topic in a more penetrative manner
and its presentation may take a different form. It need not necessarily be longer than an essay, but carries the expectation that
detailed research has been carried out and that the writer has acquired a more authoritative knowledge of the subject matter.
v) technical assignment: a piece of work in subjects such as composition, tonal harmony analysis, focussed on creative or
technical work presented in music notation. This is often accompanied by substantial commentary or explanation of the notated
work.
vi) composition project: a piece of work will be compositional rather than written and may take the form of a musical score and/
or recording with commentary.
vii) performance: a practical demonstration of music performance skills either solo or as part of an ensemble.
The learning outcomes are achieved and demonstrated in their most extensive and comprehensive form in all of the
components that comprise the individual pathway.
The methods are:
Reading/Writing
Students submit non-assessed written assignments on a regular basis. These will often be summaries, which test both reading
comprehension and writing ability. At the end of each term they do an assessed summary and a 1500-2000 word essay. Similar
assessed work is done in the interdisciplinary units also. The subject specific pathways require a range of assessment types as per
the discipline concerned, and will make up 25% or 50% of the overall assessment as relevant. There is also an end of programme
examination linked to the core EAP modules. The essay titles are based on specific purpose language work while the other
reading and writing tasks conform to the assessment of use and understanding of English in tests such as the Cambridge/UCLES
Certificate in Advanced English.
Listening
Students do one assessed listening summary in each term and also a number of non-assessed assignments, which help students
to develop their listening skills. There is also an end of programme examination linked to the core EAP modules. The content of
the texts chosen for summary will link to the specific purpose language work, and a shorter listening task will test the general use
and understanding of English as in standard testing tasks, used for example in the Cambridge/UCLES Certificate in Advanced
English.
Speaking
Students make one assessed class presentation at the end of each term, in both the core EAP and interdisciplinary modules. Nonassessed assignments will help them to develop their speaking and presentation skills. They will also help students to
demonstrate their knowledge and understanding and develop their own opinions. Students will receive both general and
individual feedback on their non-assessed work and presentations.
Formative assessment occurs in class discussion of tasks set, tutorial review of your progress, as well as written and oral feedback.
5.2 Intellectual skills
The variety of assessment methods used, all place great emphasis on the student’s ability to demonstrate the ‘thinking’ skills
through the production of coherent written and oral responses, which are relevant to the tasks set.
5.3 Practical skills
Assessment is by a range of module assignments, researched essays and presentations and by written, listening, and speaking
examinations.
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
5.4 Transferable skills
Effective communication of ideas is an important criterion in assessing all areas of a student’s work, and the regular feedback as
well as the final mark reflects this. Assessment is by a range of module assignments and are designed to assess a range of specific
conceptual content. These include researched essays and presentations, as well as written and listening examinations. Oral skills
are assessed by the student giving a 10 minute presentation to two interlocutors under exam conditions.
Marking Criteria
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to an
exceptionally accomplished level.
WRITTEN WORK
Addressing the Title
Shows excellent understanding of title giving appropriate attention to defining
terms, setting parameters. Addresses question throughout with no irrelevance.
Effective (review of issues in) conclusion.
Support of and Critical Approach to Ideas
Supports all main ideas or points of the argument, with relevant examples and/or
evidence. Includes adequate, appropriate referencing. Analyses rather than
describes, and shows an ability to evaluate main issues comprehensively. Positions
her/himself successfully within the argument.
Organisation
A fully coherent essay which explicates the argument through logically related and
clearly identified stages. There is a strong introduction which outlines the aims
and organisation and a conclusion. There is no unnecessary repetition and
organisational lexis is used throughout.
Accuracy
Uses a wide range of complex sentence structures accurately and appropriately.
Spelling is nearly perfect.
Vocabulary and Style
Communicates effectively and appropriately using a formal academic style and a
wide range of academic and subject-specific vocabulary.
ORAL PRESENTATIONS:
Academic Content
Presents a clearly focused argument, which shows strong support and
independence of thought. Shows thorough analysis based on solid and wideranging research.
80-100%
I: First
(Exceptional)
Organisation and Clarity of Ideas
Gives a fully coherent presentation on an academic topic, clearly structured, both
within and between sections. The relationship between ideas is logically succinct
and repetition is avoided.
Fluency and Interaction
Is in fluent control of communication in both general academic content and
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
specific theoretical ideas. At ease in responding to and promoting interactive
discussion.
Pronunciation and Intonation
Has very clear and accurate pronunciation of both discrete items of pronunciation
(terminology, names) and interconnected speech. Near native speaker attainment
of appropriate intonation patterns when enumerating and emphasising, for
example.
Grammatical Accuracy and Vocabulary
Communicates with near native speaker accuracy and appropriacy using a wide
range of vocabulary & structures suitable to the academic context.
CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL WORK:
Creative work demonstrates originality, individuality and coherence. Technique,
theoretical understanding and imagination are integrated and aims are well
formulated and of contemporary relevance. All materials and realisations are
produced to a professional standard, in the form of music notation, studio
production, performance or systems design, as relevant. Accompanying written
work demonstrates effective engagement with critical approaches.
CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE:
The performer demonstrates technical mastery, a clear understanding of structure
and a convincing musical interpretation that consistently holds the attention of the
audience. Specific virtues, such as dexterity, flexible dynamics, secure intonation,
timbral diversity and control, rhythmic accuracy and intelligent phrasing, are
evident and deployed to excellent effect. The performer appears relaxed and
confident. Technical exercises are near faultless.
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to an
excellent level.
WRITTEN WORK
Addressing the Title
Shows excellent understanding of title giving appropriate attention to defining
terms, setting parameters. Addresses question throughout with no irrelevance.
Effective (review of issues in) conclusion.
Support of and Critical Approach to Ideas
Supports all main ideas or points of the argument, with relevant examples and/or
evidence. Includes adequate, appropriate referencing. Analyses rather than
describes, and shows an ability to evaluate main issues comprehensively. Positions
her/himself successfully within the argument.
Organisation
A fully coherent essay which explicates the argument through logically related and
clearly identified stages. There is a strong introduction which outlines the aims
and organisation and a conclusion. There is no unnecessary repetition and
organisational lexis is used throughout.
Accuracy
Uses a wide range of complex sentence structures accurately and appropriately.
Spelling is nearly perfect.
Vocabulary and Style
Communicates effectively and appropriately using a formal academic style and a
wide range of academic and subject-specific vocabulary.
ORAL PRESENTATIONS:
Academic Content
Presents a clearly focused argument, which shows strong support and
independence of thought. Shows thorough analysis based on solid and wideranging research.
70-79%
I: First
(Excellent)
Organisation and Clarity of Ideas
Gives a fully coherent presentation on an academic topic, clearly structured, both
within and between sections. The relationship between ideas is logically succinct
and repetition is avoided.
Fluency and Interaction
Is in fluent control of communication in both general academic content and
specific theoretical ideas. At ease in responding to and promoting interactive
discussion.
Pronunciation and Intonation
Has very clear and accurate pronunciation of both discrete items of pronunciation
(terminology, names) and interconnected speech. Near native speaker attainment
of appropriate intonation patterns when enumerating and emphasising, for
example.
Grammatical Accuracy and Vocabulary
Communicates with near native speaker accuracy and appropriacy using a wide
range of vocabulary & structures suitable to the academic context.
CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL WORK:
Creative work demonstrates originality, individuality and coherence. Technique,
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to a very
good level.
WRITTEN WORK
Addressing the Title
As above but there may be slight lapses of focus in text. Effective conclusion.
Support of and Critical Approach to Ideas
Is competent at supporting and referencing major points although there may be
one or two weaknesses. Analysis is generally apparent though there may be
insufficient depth in a few places, or a little too much description. Explores most of
the major issues and makes a good attempt at evaluating them, and positioning
her/himself.
Organisation
A coherent essay that successfully explicates the argument although sections
could on occasion be more clearly identified or more logically related.
Unnecessary repetition is generally avoided. Good use of organisational lexis.
Contains an appropriate introduction and conclusion.
Accuracy
Uses a wide range of complex sentence structures accurately and appropriately
with only minor errors. Only minor errors in spelling also.
Vocabulary and Style
Communicates quite effectively and appropriately using a formal academic style
and a reasonable range of academic and subject-specific vocabulary. Some errors
may occur when using complex language but these do not impede understanding.
ORAL PRESENTATIONS:
Academic Content
Shows well focused main argument with good support. Effective analysis based on
appropriate research.
60-69%
IIi: Upper Second
(Very good)
Organisation and Clarity of Ideas
Gives a coherent presentation on an academic topic, but structuring either within
or between sections could be clearer. The relationship between ideas is evident
but could be more succinct. Repetition is generally avoided.
Fluency and Interaction
Good communication in general academic content and with expression of
theoretical ideas. Occasional difficulty and hesitancy in interactive discussion.
Pronunciation and Intonation
Has a generally competent level of pronunciation and intonation but with some
minor lapses.
Grammatical Accuracy and Vocabulary
Communicates accurately and appropriately using a wide range of vocabulary &
structures suitable to the academic context. Some errors may occur when using
complex language but these do not impede communication.
CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL WORK:
Creative work demonstrates clear signs of coherence and individuality. There is a
confident use of a wide range of relevant techniques, explored rigorously and with
imagination. Work is informed by contemporary and relevant theoretical ideas. All
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to a
good level.
WRITTEN WORK
Addressing the Title
Addresses the title but there may be occasional irrelevance and/or lapses in the
focus of the argument. Introduction or conclusion may need further development.
Support of and Critical Approach to Ideas
Is generally competent at supporting and referencing but is not always thorough.
Explores relevant issues, can analyse and evaluate but not consistently, or showing
weakness in one area or another. May not position her/himself, or may not do so
clearly.
Organisation
Good attempt at organisation as above. Some sections could be more clearly
identified or more logically related but this doesn’t impede the argument. An
introduction and conclusion are evident. Some use of organisational lexis. There
may be some unnecessary repetition.
Accuracy
Uses a good range of sentence structures with only a few errors. Some spelling
errors may occur.
Vocabulary and Style
Uses a good range of vocabulary in a generally appropriate style but occasional
errors may impede understanding.
ORAL PRESENTATIONS:
Academic Content
Clear main argument with occasional weakness in construction. Some attempt at
analysis but may be based on limited research.
50-59%
IIii: Lower Second
(Good)
Organisation and Clarity of Ideas
Gives a presentation on an academic topic, with occasional lapses in clarity, either
within or between sections, or in the links between ideas. There may be some
evidence of repetition or lack of cohesion.
Fluency and Interaction
Effective in general academic content but may experience difficulty with
theoretical ideas. May have problems with interaction concerning hesitancy and
pausing.
Pronunciation and Intonation
Has generally clear pronunciation and intonation but hindered occasionally
through first language interference, unfamiliarity with names/terminology, or flat
inappropriate intonation (through reading).
Grammatical Accuracy and Vocabulary
Uses a reasonable range of vocabulary and structures but occasional errors may
impede communication.
CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL WORK:
Creative work demonstrates some degree of independent thinking or potential. A
range of techniques are applied effectively with some evidence of imagination. All
materials and realisations are produced to a good standard, in the form of music
notation, studio production, performance or systems design, as relevant.
Accompanying written work evidences some understanding of relevant critical
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes.
WRITTEN WORK
Addressing the Title
Some attempt evident to address title but held back by irrelevance and/or weak
conclusion. Inappropriate length.
Support of and Critical Approach to Ideas
Makes an attempt to follow academic notions of support and critical approach but
sometimes falls down in terms of consistency, appropriacy, analytical skills, or
length.
Organisation
Attempts to organise the essay into sections that identify and explicate the
argument, although these may be difficult to identify or may be illogically related.
Some use of organisational lexis and an attempt at an introduction and conclusion.
Accuracy
Uses a satisfactory range of sentence structures and may contain errors. There may
be frequent spelling errors.
Vocabulary and Style
Uses a satisfactory range of vocabulary but may lack or misuse the appropriate
language and subject-specific terminology. Errors sometimes impede
understanding and the style may not be appropriate.
ORAL PRESENTATIONS:
Academic Content
Shows attempt at argument, although may be inconclusive due to lack of in-depth
research, resulting in a tendency to over-rely on description.
40-49%
III: Third
(Pass)
Organisation and Clarity of Ideas
Makes an attempt at structuring a presentation on an academic topic, but the
delivery is affected by some poor organisation, either of sections, or of ideas. May
be repetitious or lack cohesive markers.
Fluency and Interaction
Able to communicate in general academic content but some difficulty with
theoretical ideas. Some inappropriate hesitation and inconsistent interactive skills.
Pronunciation and Intonation
Communicates in part but is sometimes unsuccessful due to the problems listed
above.
Grammatical Accuracy and Vocabulary
Uses an adequate range of vocabulary & structures but may lack or misuse
appropriate language and subject-specific terminology. Errors sometimes impede
communication.
CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL WORK:
Creative work demonstrates a satisfactory understanding of techniques, with some
evidence of imaginative application. All materials and realisations are produced to
an acceptable standard. Accompanying written work shows understanding of the
work’s methods and aims.
CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE:
The voice or instrument is controlled satisfactorily, but inconsistently. There are
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
30-39%
Represents an overall failure to achieve the appropriate learning outcomes.
WRITTEN WORK
Addressing the Title
Title poorly addressed leading to lack of coherent focus. May resort to descriptive
writing.
Support of and Critical Approach to Ideas
There are a few signs that the student can support, reference, analyse, evaluate or
position her/himself but these are undeveloped or inconsistent. The essay may be
short due to such weaknesses.
Organisation
Some attempt to organise the argument into sections, but unclear and illogical
organisation results in unnecessary repetition and makes the argument difficult to
follow. Little use of organisational lexis. Some difficulty in clearly identifying either
an introduction or conclusion.
Accuracy
Uses an inadequate range of sentence structures, contains several errors and
spelling is weak.
Vocabulary and Style
Uses a limited range of vocabulary. Errors are clearly evident and frequently
impede understanding. There may be noticeable inconsistencies in voice.
ORAL PRESENTATIONS:
25-39%
Fail
Academic Content
Content mostly descriptive, although some attempt at constructing analysis.
General lack of focus of argument showing little or no research.
Organisation and Clarity of Ideas
Barely able to structure a presentation on an academic topic. Neither the
structuring between or within sections is clear and the delivery lacks overall
coherence and cohesion.
Fluency and Interaction
Communication confined to simple sentences and lack of cohesion in expression
of academic ideas. Simplistic memorisation or reading impedes fluency. Barely
able to interact effectively.
Pronunciation and Intonation
Speaks with frequent errors of pronunciation and/or intonation. Communication is
consequently very poor.
Grammatical Accuracy and Vocabulary
Uses a limited range of vocabulary & structures. Errors are clearly evident and
frequently impede communication.
CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL WORK:
Creative work demonstrates some engagement with the task set but will fail to
meet the required standards: they will demonstrate inadequate technical
competence, imaginative thinking or conceptual coherency. Scores, CDs, data or
other relevant materials may be poorly produced.
CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE
14
Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
0-29%
Represents a significant overall failure to achieve the appropriate learning
outcomes.
WRITTEN WORK
Addressing the Title
Failure to address title. No coherent development.
Support of and Critical Approach to Ideas
Fails to support and reference ideas or work within academic conventions. The
essay is not analytical or points are not explored. It may be very short as a result of
such weaknesses.
Organisation
An incoherent essay that fails to use any organisational principles, such as an
introduction, sections, a conclusion or organisational lexis, to explicate the
argument. Excessive repetition.
Accuracy
Uses a poor range of sentence structures. Inaccurate spelling is a problem.
Vocabulary and Style
Lacks the necessary appropriate vocabulary/style for academic writing and makes
very frequent errors.
ORAL PRESENTATIONS:
10-24%
Bad fail
Academic Content
Content purely descriptive. No attempt at analysis or personal argument. No
definition or focus of topic. No research.
Organisation and Clarity of Ideas
Fails to structure a presentation on an academic topic. Very little coherence
between ideas.
Fluency and Interaction
Unable to maintain coherent communication in academic content. Frequent
pauses and prompts needed. Clear evidence of memorisation or reading of notes.
Unable to interact.
Pronunciation and Intonation
Is largely unintelligible due to major and repeated errors of pronunciation and
intonation.
Grammatical Accuracy and Vocabulary
Lacks necessary vocabulary/structures for basic communication and makes very
frequent errors.
CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL WORK:
This will demonstrate inadequate technical competence, imaginative thinking or
conceptual coherency. Relevant materials will be inadequately produced.
CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE:
There is a significant lack of control of the voice or instrument, with little or no
evidence of musical understanding.
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Mark
Descriptor
Specific Marking Criteria
1-9%
Very bad fail
0%
Non submission or
plagiarised
A submission that does not even attempt to address the specified learning
outcomes (shall be deemed a non valid attempt and module must be re-sat).
A categorical mark representing either the failure to submit an assessment or a
mark assigned for a plagiarised assessment.
How is the Programme Structured?
This programme takes place over an academic year. Most of the delivery takes place in the Autumn and Spring terms (eleven
weeks each, with a ‘reading’ week to devote to assignments in week 6). At the beginning of the Summer term, time is devoted to
exam preparation and final tutorials. The examination normally takes place towards the end of May/beginning of June. There
may be other activities going on in the University that students can make use of, such as the PureGold music festival, as well as a
number of other departmental activities, which the subject specific tutors can alert students to. The programme of study has four
main components. This includes 2 core modules in English for Academic Purposes; 1 core interdisciplinary module in music and
two optional modules in music. The music modules chosen must relate to the intended future degree and agreed in
consultation with a tutor in the Music department.
The 2 core EAP modules are assessed by coursework and an examination comprising 3 unseen papers and an Oral examination.
The remaining modules are assessed via a variety of methods which include, for example, essays and reflective journals. The
programme has a total of 4 modules which are weighted at 25% each. The pass mark is 40% and a pass in all modules must be
achieved. Progression to an MA or MMus in the Music department is subject to interview and achieving an overall mark of 50%.
CELAW and the Music Department have a good record of managing programmes for International students, which have been in
operation since 1993. Central co-ordination and overview of the programmes, as well as personal tutoring of the students will be
undertaken by the both departments. Programme Convenors will also offer group tutorials and one-to-one tutorials where
necessary.
Academic Year of Study
1
Module Title
Critical Moments in Western
Thought: Modernity and
Postmodernity
Academic Writing & Grammar
Development
Graduate Diploma in Music
Module
Code
LS61001B
LS61002A
Credits Level
30
15
6
6
Module
Selection
Status
Module Assessment
Term
Core
Textual Comprehension
(Autumn Term - 25%)
1500-2000 word researched
essay (Spring Term - 75%)
1, 2
Core
In-class Summary Writing
(Autumn Term - 25%)
Timed Essay (Spring Term 25%)
Writing Exam (Summer Term 25%)
Reading Exam (Summer Term 25%)
1-3
16
Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Module Title
Academic Listening & Speaking
Module
Code
LS61003A
Credits Level
15
6
Module
Selection
Status
Module Assessment
Term
Core
Oral Presentation (Autumn
Term - 25%)
Summary (Spring Term - 25%)
Listening Exam (Summer Term 25%)
Oral Exam (Summer Term 25%)
1-3
Creative Research Project
MU53027D
30
6
Optional
Research Essay
MU53029A
30
6
Optional
A. Practice-based creative
project accompanied by a
research paper/critical
commentary of 3000 words.
(80%)
B.Blog, podcast or video related
to your final project and
research. (20%)
An essay of 6000 – 8000 words
(100%)
30 minute final performance
exam with typewritten
programme notes of at least
800 words, and a concert
review (hard copy must be
presented) of the other
performance student’s public
recital in T3 (50%)
5 minute mid term recital with
typewritten programme notes
of at least 500 words in T1
(25%)
Chamber Music performance in
T2 (25%)
1-3
1-3
Advanced Classical Performance MU53026A
30
6
Optional
Minimalism and Post-minimalism MU53009A
15
6
Optional
An essay of 3000 words (100%)
1
Soviet Music and Beyond
15
6
Optional
An essay of 3000 words (100%)
2
MU53012A
Improvisation
MU53040A
15
6
Optional
Narrative, Representation and
Popular Song
MU53033A
30
6
Optional
A performance
(ensemble and /or solo) with a
substantial improvised
component agreed with Tutor
(c. 15 mins). (100%)
1-3
2
MU53033A
1
17
Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Module Title
Advanced Topics in Music
History: Mozart's Operas
Module
Code
MU53034A
Credits Level
30
Module
Selection
Status
6
Optional
Module Assessment
Term
2
3000 word essay
Academic Support
Students on the Graduate Diploma in Music are given tutorial support as the necessity arises. Each student will be allocated a
personal tutor from CELAW, who will liaise, as required, with the allocated personal tutor in the Music Department. Tutors are
responsible for teaching students enabling strategies such as keeping good notes, keeping coherent vocabulary notes and
taking notes during lectures. The tutor is also responsible for noticing any particular learning difficulties that a student might be
facing, and helping with applications regarding their future studies. Both departments have a Senior Tutor who is available for
students to see in confidence about any matters, academic or otherwise, that may be affecting their studies.
Students are encouraged to make use of the library and computing facilities in the University’s Rutherford Building. The Centre
for English Language and Academic Writing has developed a self-access web site for Goldsmiths’ students for information and
interactive tasks on academic writing and listening to lectures.
Links With Employers, Placement Opportunities and Career Prospects
The majority of students who study for the Graduate Diploma in Music normally proceed to Postgraduate programmes within
the Music Department. Specifically, the Graduate Diploma in Music is designed for students who with to progress onto one of the
pathways on the MA and MMus degrees offered by the Music Department.
What are the Requirements of a Goldsmiths Degree?
Undergraduate degrees have a total value of 360 credits. They are composed of individual modules, each of which has its own
credit value. Full-time students take modules to the value of 120 credits each year and part-time students not less than 45 credits
and not more than 90 credits each year. Each full–time year corresponds to a level of the Framework for Higher Education
Qualifications.
Year 1 = Level 4
Year 2 = Level 5
Year 3 = Level 6
Modules:
Modules are defined as:
“Optional” – which can be chosen from a group of modules
“Compulsory” – which must be taken as part of the degree
“Core” – which must be taken as part of the degree and passed with a mark of at least 40%.
Progression:
Full-time students are required to have passed modules to a minimum of 90 credits before proceeding to the next year.
Part-time students normally must pass new modules to a minimum value of 45 credits before proceeding to the next year.
In addition, some programmes may specify particular modules which must be passed, irrespective of the minimum requirements,
before proceeding to the next year.
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Award of the degree:
In order to graduate with a classified degree, students must successfully complete modules to the value of 360 credits. However if
a module which has not be defined as “core” has been failed with a mark of 35-39% and all three permitted attempts have been
used, this module may be compensated (treated as if it has been passed) so long as the average mean mark for all 120 credits at
that level is 45% or above. No more than 60 credits may be compensated this way across a programme and no more than 30 at
any one level.
Classification:
Final degree classification will be calculated on the basis of a student's best marks for modules equivalent to 90 credits at Level 4,
105 credits at level 5 and 105 credits at level 6, applying a relative weighting of 1:3:5 to modules at level 4, 5 and 6 respectively
Degrees are awarded with the following classifications:
First Class – 70%+
Upper Second – 60-69%
Lower Second – 50-59%
Third – 40-49%
Students who, following the application of compensation and having used all their permitted resit attempts, have passed
modules to the value of 300-345 credits, at least 60 of which are at level 6 may be awarded a pass degree
Intermediate Exit Points:
Some programmes incorporate intermediate exit points of Certificate of Higher Education and Diploma of Higher Education,
which may be awarded on the successful completion of modules to the value of 120 credits at level 4 or 240 (120 of which at level
5) credits respectively. The awards are made without classification.
The above information is intended as a guide. For further information, please refer to the Regulations for Undergraduate
Students, which may be found here: http://www.gold.ac.uk/governance/studentregulations/
Programme-specific Rules and Facts
The 2 core EAP modules are assessed by coursework and an examination comprising 3 unseen papers and an Oral examination.
The remaining modules are assessed via a variety of methods which include, for example, essays, compositions and
performances. The programme has a total of 5 modules which are weighted between 12.5%-25%.
The pass mark is 40%. Students must pass all modules of the programme to be awarded the Graduate Diploma.
The offer of a place on one of the Music MA or MMus programmes will be subject to application and interview during the
Graduate Diploma year. All Graduate Diploma students will be guaranteed an interview and will be given suitable advice about
progression to Music PGT level programmes.
How will Teaching Quality be Monitored?
Goldsmiths employs a number of methods to ensure and enhance the quality of learning and teaching on its programmes.
Programmes and modules must be formally approved against national standards and are monitored throughout the year in
departmental staff / student forums and through the completion of module evaluation questionnaires. Every programme also
has at least one External Examiner who produces an annual report which comments on the standards of awards and student
achievement.
This output is considered with other relevant data in the process of Annual Programme Review, to which all programmes are
subject, and which aims to identify both good practice and issues which require resolution.
Every six years all programmes within a department are also subject to a broader periodic review. This aims to ensure that they
remain current, that the procedures to maintain the standards of the awards are working effectively and the quality of the
learning opportunities and information provided to students and applicants is appropriate.
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Programme Title: GRADUATE DIPLOMA in MUSIC
Detailed information on all of these procedures are published on the webpages of the Quality Office (http://www.gold.ac.uk/
quality/).
In addition to the University-wide evaluation of teaching, we follow the Code of Practice of the British Association of Lecturers in
English for Academic Purposes (BALEAP). The code set standards for English Language and Study Skills programmes for speakers
of other languages.
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