CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS

CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 1 of 16
Section 1 - CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
PRODUCT NAME
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
SYNONYMS
"Product Code 321334, 321337, 321339, 322045, 321357, 321360, 321362, 321370, 321373, 321411,
321412, 321417, 321418, 321423, 321424 Comweld Mild Steel, High Test, Super Steel, LW1, LW1-6,
LW1-3"
PRODUCT USE
Consumable mild steel filler rods used for oxy-acetylene flame welding
and/or Gas Tungsten Arc-Welding (GTAW)
SUPPLIER
Company: Cigweld Pty Ltd
Address:
71 Gower Street
Preston
VIC, 3072
Australia
Telephone: +61 3 9474 7400
Telephone: +1 1300 654 674
Emergency Tel:+61 3 9474 7400
Email: [email protected]
Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
STATEMENT OF HAZARDOUS NATURE
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. NON-DANGEROUS GOODS. According to the Criteria of NOHSC, and the ADG
Code.
RISK
Risk Codes
R40(3)
SAFETY
Safety Codes
S24
S36
S37
S51
S09
S401
S13
S46
Risk Phrases
• Limited evidence of a carcinogenic effect.
Safety Phrases
• Avoid contact with skin.
• Wear suitable protective clothing.
• Wear suitable gloves.
• Use only in well ventilated areas.
• Keep container in a well ventilated place.
• To clean the floor and all objects contaminated by this material, use water
and detergent.
• Keep away from food, drink and animal feeding stuffs.
• If swallowed, IMMEDIATELY contact Doctor or Poisons Information Centre. (show
this container or label).
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 2 of 16
Section 3 - COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
NAME
steel filler rod which upon use generates
welding fumes
including
iron oxide fume
manganese fume
silica welding fumes
copper fume
action of arc on air may produce
ozone
nitrogen oxides
CAS RN
%
Not avail.
>60
1309-37-1.
7439-96-5.
69012-64-2
7440-50-8.
10028-15-6
Mixture
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
SWALLOWED
■ Not normally a hazard due to the physical form of product. The material is a physical irritant to the
gastro-intestinal tract.
EYE
• Particulate bodies from welding spatter may be removed carefully.
• DO NOT attempt to remove particles attached to or embedded in eye.
• Lay victim down, on stretcher if available and pad BOTH eyes, make sure dressing does not press on the
injured eye by placing thick pads under dressing, above and below the eye.
• Seek urgent medical assistance, or transport to hospital.
SKIN
■ If skin or hair contact occurs:
• Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available).
• Seek medical attention in event of irritation.
INHALED
• If fumes or combustion products are inhaled remove from contaminated area.
• Lay patient down. Keep warm and rested.
• Prostheses such as false teeth, which may block airway, should be removed, where possible, prior to
initiating first aid procedures.
• Apply artificial respiration if not breathing, preferably with a demand valve resuscitator, bag-valve mask
device, or pocket mask as trained. Perform CPR if necessary.
• Transport to hospital, or doctor.
NOTES TO PHYSICIAN
■ Copper, magnesium, aluminium, antimony, iron, manganese, nickel, zinc (and their compounds) in welding,
brazing, galvanising or smelting operations all give rise to thermally produced particulates of smaller
dimension than may be produced if the metals are divided mechanically. Where insufficient ventilation or
respiratory protection is available these particulates may produce "metal fume fever" in workers from an
acute or long term exposure.
• Onset occurs in 4-6 hours generally on the evening following exposure. Tolerance develops in workers but
may be lost over the weekend. (Monday Morning Fever)
• Pulmonary function tests may indicate reduced lung volumes, small airway obstruction and decreased carbon
monoxide diffusing capacity but these abnormalities resolve after several months.
• Although mildly elevated urinary levels of heavy metal may occur they do not correlate with clinical
effects.
• The general approach to treatment is recognition of the disease, supportive care and prevention of exposure.
• Seriously symptomatic patients should receive chest x-rays, have arterial blood gases determined and be
observed for the development of tracheobronchitis and pulmonary edema.
[Ellenhorn and Barceloux: Medical Toxicology].
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 3 of 16
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA
• There is no restriction on the type of extinguisher which may be used.
FIRE FIGHTING
• Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
• Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves for fire only.
• Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water courses.
• Use fire fighting procedures suitable for surrounding area.
• DO NOT approach containers suspected to be hot.
• Cool fire exposed containers with water spray from a protected location.
• If safe to do so, remove containers from path of fire.
• Equipment should be thoroughly decontaminated after use.
FIRE/EXPLOSION HAZARD
• Non combustible.
• Not considered to be a significant fire risk, however containers may burn.
• In a fire may decompose on heating and produce toxic / corrosive fumes.
FIRE INCOMPATIBILITY
■ Welding electrodes should not be allowed to come into contact with strong acids or other substances which
are corrosive to metals.
Welding arc and metal sparks can ignite combustibles.
HAZCHEM
None
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
MINOR SPILLS
■ Clean up all spills immediately.
Avoid contact with skin and eyes.
Wear impervious gloves and safety glasses.
Use dry clean up procedures and avoid generating dust.
Place spilled material in clean, dry, sealable, labelled container.
MAJOR SPILLS
■ Minor hazard.
• Clear area of personnel.
• Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
• Control personal contact by using protective equipment if risk of overexposure exists.
• Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water courses.
• Contain spill/secure load if safe to do so.
• Bundle/collect recoverable product and label for recycling.
• Collect remaining product and place in appropriate containers for disposal.
• Clean up/sweep up area. Water may be required.
• If contamination of drains or waterways occurs, advise emergency services.
Personal Protective Equipment advice is contained in Section 8 of the MSDS.
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 4 of 16
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING
• Limit all unnecessary personal contact.
• Wear protective clothing when risk of exposure occurs.
• Use in a well-ventilated area.
• Avoid contact with incompatible materials.
• When handling, DO NOT eat, drink or smoke.
• Keep containers securely sealed when not in use.
• Avoid physical damage to containers.
• Always wash hands with soap and water after handling.
• Work clothes should be laundered separately.
• Use good occupational work practice.
• Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
• Atmosphere should be regularly checked against established exposure standards to ensure safe working
conditions are maintained.
SUITABLE CONTAINER
• Packaging as recommended by manufacturer.
• Check that containers are clearly labelled.
Multi-wall paper container NOTE: Bags should be stacked, blocked, interlocked, and limited in height so that
they are stable and secure against sliding or collapse.
STORAGE INCOMPATIBILITY
■ Segregate from strong acids and strong oxidisers.
STORAGE REQUIREMENTS
• Store in original containers.
• Keep containers securely sealed.
• Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area.
• Store away from incompatible materials and foodstuff containers.
• Protect containers against physical damage and check regularly for leaks.
• Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
EXPOSURE CONTROLS
Source
___________
Australia Exposure
Standards
Australia Exposure
Standards
Material
___________
welding fumes (Welding
fumes (not otherwise
classified))
ozone (Ozone)
The following materials had no OELs on our records
• silica welding fumes:
TWA mg/m³
_______
5
Peak ppm
_______
Peak mg/m³
_______
0.1
0.2
Notes
_______
(see
Chapter 17)
CAS:69012- 64- 2
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 5 of 16
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
MATERIAL DATA
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS:
■ None assigned. Refer to individual constituents.
WELDING FUMES:
■ In addition to complying with any individual exposure standards for specific contaminants, where current
manual welding processes are used, the fume concentration inside the welder's helmet should not exceed 5
mg/m3, when collected in accordance with the appropriate standard (AS 3640, for example).
ES* TWA: 5 mg/m3
TLV* TWA: 5 mg/m3, B2 (a substance of variable composition)
OES* TWA: 5 mg/m3
Most welding, even with primitive ventilation, does not produce exposures inside the welding helmet above
5 mg/m3. That which does should be controlled (ACGIH). Inspirable dust concentrations in a workers breathing
zone shall be collected and measured in accordance with AS 3640, for example. Metal content can be
analytically determined by OSHA Method ID25 (ICP-AES) after total digestion of filters and dissolution of
captured metals. Sampling of the Respirable Dust fraction requires cyclone separator devices (elutriators)
and procedures to comply with AS 2985 (for example).
IRON OXIDE FUME:
■ For iron oxide (ferric oxide):
Inhalation of iron oxide dust or fume may produce a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis). The TLV-TWA is
recommended to minimise the potential for development of X-ray changes in the lung on long-term exposure.
These changes are not considered to be associated with any physical impairment of lung function, although
more sophisticated physiological testing, including measurement of the lung's mechanical properties and
expiratory lung flow is required to reach firm and final conclusions.
MANGANESE FUME:
■ It is the goal of the ACGIH (and other Agencies) to recommend TLVs (or their equivalent) for all
substances for which there is evidence of health effects at airborne concentrations encountered in the
workplace.
At this time no TLV has been established, even though this material may produce adverse health effects (as
evidenced in animal experiments or clinical experience). Airborne concentrations must be maintained as low as
is practically possible and occupational exposure must be kept to a minimum.
NOTE: The ACGIH occupational exposure standard for Particles Not Otherwise Specified (P.N.O.S) does NOT
apply.
SILICA WELDING FUMES:
■ The concentration of dust, for application of respirable dust limits, is to be determined from the
fraction that penetrates a separator whose size collection efficiency is described by a cumulative log-normal
function with a median aerodynamic diameter of 4.0 µm (+-) 0.3 µm and with a geometric standard deviation of
1.5 µm (+-) 0.1 µm, i.e..generally less than 5 µm.
For amorphous crystalline silica (precipitated silicic acid):
Amorphous crystalline silica shows little potential for producing adverse effects on the lung and exposure
standards should reflect a particulate of low intrinsic toxicity. Mixtures of amorphous silicas/ diatomaceous
earth and crystalline silica should be monitored as if they comprise only the crystalline forms.
The dusts from precipitated silica and silica gel produce little adverse effect on pulmonary functions and
are not known to produce significant disease or toxic effect.
IARC has classified silica, amorphous as Group 3: NOT classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans.
Evidence of carcinogenicity may be inadequate or limited in animal testing.
OZONE:
■ for ozone:
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 6 of 16
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
NOTE: Detector tubes for ozone, measuring in excess of 0.05 ppm, are commercially available.
Exposure at 0.2 ppm appears to produce mild acute but not cumulative effects. It is thought that exposures
of the order of 0.1 ppm will be tolerated by most workers including asthmatics. Chronic exposure at 0.1 ppm
or more can induce significant adverse effects in the lower respiratory tract of both normal and atopic
individuals.
Human exposure for 2 hours at an average concentration of 1.5 ppm ozone resulted in a 20% reduction in
timed vital capacity of the lung and other effects. Concentrations of ozone in excess of a few tenths ppm
cause occasional discomfort to exposed individuals manifest as headache, dryness of the throat and mucous
membranes of the eyes and nose following exposures of short duration.
Exposure to ozone during moderate to heavy work loads results in significantly decreased forced vital
capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at 0.12 ppm; this is effect is greater at
higher concentrations.
Odour Safety Factor(OSF)
OSF=1.1 (OZONE).
NITROGEN OXIDES:
■ For nitrous oxide:
The human reproductive, haematologic and nervous systems show toxic effects after nitrous oxide exposures.
Similarities between epidemiologic and animal studies allow the establishment of a TLV-TWA even in the
absence of clearly defined dose-response relationships in humans. The TLV-TWA is thus thought to be
protective against embryofoetal toxicity (resulting in an increased risk of spontaneous abortion) and
significant loss of human psychomotor and cognitive functions. Evidence of organ system impairment has only
been evident when nitrous oxide concentrations reach several hundred to several thousand ppm.
For nitric oxide:
Odour Threshold: 0.3 to 1 ppm.
NOTE: Detector tubes for nitrogen oxide, measuring in excess of 10 ppm, are commercially available.
Experimental animal date indicates that nitric oxide is one-fifth as toxic as nitrogen dioxide. The
recommended TLV-TWA takes account of this relationship. Exposure at or below the recommended TLV-TWA is
thought to reduce the potential for immediate injury, adverse physiological effects, pulmonary disease
(including the risk of increased airway resistance) from prolonged daily exposure
Odour Safety Factor (OSF)
OSF=7.7 (nitric oxide).
for nitrogen dioxide
Odour Threshold Value: 0.11-0.14 ppm
NOTE: Detector tubes for nitrogen dioxide, measuring in excess of 0.5 ppm, are commercially available.
The TLV-TWA is considered to be sufficiently low to reduce the potential for immediate injury or adverse
physiological effects from prolonged daily exposures. Although industrial data may contradict this conclusion,
this data is not sufficiently precise to invalidate the TLV.
Short exposures of workmen to nitrogen dioxide concentrations averaging 25 to 38 ppm resulted in
observable physiological response, but exposures of 3 to 5 minutes at 80 ppm produced tightness of the chest.
Odour Safety Factor (OSF)
OSF=7.7 (NITROGEN DIOXIDE).
PERSONAL PROTECTION
EYE
■ Welding helmet with suitable filter. Welding hand shield with suitable filter.
• Contact lenses may pose a special hazard; soft contact lenses may absorb and concentrate irritants. A
written policy document, describing the wearing of lens or restrictions on use, should be created for each
workplace or task. This should include a review of lens absorption and adsorption for the class of
chemicals in use and an account of injury experience. Medical and first-aid personnel should be trained in
their removal and suitable equipment should be readily available. In the event of chemical exposure, begin
eye irrigation immediately and remove contact lens as soon as practicable. Lens should be removed at the
first signs of eye redness or irritation - lens should be removed in a clean environment only after workers
have washed hands thoroughly. [CDC NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin 59], [AS/NZS 1336 or national
equivalent].
For most open welding/brazing operations, goggles, even with appropriate filters, will not afford sufficient
facial protection for operators. Where possible use welding helmets or handshields corresponding to AS 1336
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 7 of 16
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
and AS 1338 which provide the maximum possible facial protection from flying particles and fragments. [WRIAWTIA Technical Note 7].
HANDS/FEET
■ Welding Gloves
Safety footwear.
OTHER
■ Overalls.
• Eyewash unit.
Aprons, sleeves, shoulder covers, leggings or spats of pliable flame resistant leather or other suitable
materials may also be required in positions where these areas of the body will encounter hot metal.
RESPIRATOR
•Type BE Filter of sufficient capacity. (AS/NZS 1716 & 1715, EN 143:2000 & 149:2001, ANSI Z88 or national
equivalent)
The local concentration of material, quantity and conditions of use determine the type of personal protective
equipment required. For further information consult site specific CHEMWATCH data (if available), or your
Occupational Health and Safety Advisor.
ENGINEERING CONTROLS
■ Engineering controls are used to remove a hazard or place a barrier between the worker and the hazard. Welldesigned engineering controls can be highly effective in protecting workers and will typically be independent
of worker interactions to provide this high level of protection.
The basic types of engineering controls are:
Process controls which involve changing the way a job activity or process is done to reduce the risk.
Enclosure and/or isolation of emission source which keeps a selected hazard "physically" away from the worker
and ventilation that strategically "adds" and "removes" air in the work environment. Ventilation can remove
or dilute an air contaminant if designed properly. The design of a ventilation system must match the
particular process and chemical or contaminant in use.
Employers may need to use multiple types of controls to prevent employee overexposure.
For brazing or soldering the nature of ventilation is determined by the location of the work.
• For outdoor work, natural ventilation is generally sufficient.
• For indoor work, conducted in either open or limited spaces , use mechanical (general exhaust or plenum)
ventilation . (Open work spaces exceed 300 cubic meters per welder)
For work conducted in confined spaces, mechanical ventilation, using local exhaust systems, is required. (In
confined spaces always check that oxygen has not been depleted by excessive rusting of steel or snowflake
corrosion of aluminium) Mechanical or local exhaust ventilation may not be required where the process working
time does not exceed 24 mins. (in an 8 hr. shift) provided the work is intermittent (a maximum of 5 mins.
every hour). Local exhaust systems must be designed to provide a minimum capture velocity at the fume source,
away from the worker, of 0.5 metre/sec.
If risk of inhalation or overexposure exists, wear SAA approved respirator or work in fume hood.
Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
APPEARANCE
Comweld Mild Steel - Uncoated rod with no markings.
Comweld High Test - Copper coated rod with stamped end.
Comweld Super Steel - Copper caoetd rod with stamped end.
Comweld LW1 - Copper coated rod with stamped end.
Comweld LW1-6 - Copper coated rod with stamped end.
Comweld LW1-3 - Copper coated rod with stamped end.
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 8 of 16
Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
Does not mix with water.
Sinks in water.
State
Melting Range (°C)
Boiling Range (°C)
Flash Point (°C)
Decomposition Temp (°C)
Autoignition Temp (°C)
Upper Explosive Limit (%)
Lower Explosive Limit (%)
Manufactured
1500
Not available
Not applicable
Not available
Not applicable
Not applicable
Not applicable
Volatile Component (%vol)
Not applicable
Molecular Weight
Viscosity
Solubility in water (g/L)
pH (1% solution)
pH (as supplied)
Vapour Pressure (kPa )
Specific Gravity (water=1)
Relative Vapour Density
(air=1)
Evaporation Rate
Not applicable
Not Applicable
I mmiscible
Not applicable
Not a pplicable
Not applicable
7.9
Not applicable
Not applicable
Section 10 - STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
CONDITIONS CONTRIBUTING TO INSTABILITY
• Presence of incompatible materials.
• Product is considered stable.
• Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.
For incompatible materials - refer to Section 7 - Handling and Storage.
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS
ACUTE HEALTH EFFECTS
SWALLOWED
■ Not normally a hazard due to physical form of product.
EYE
■ Fumes from welding/brazing operations may be irritating to the eyes.
SKIN
■ Skin contact does not normally present a hazard, though it is always possible that occasionally individuals
may be found who react to substances usually regarded as inert.
INHALED
■ Fumes evolved during welding operations may be irritating to the upper-respiratory tract and may be harmful
if inhaled.
Manganese fume is toxic and produces nervous system effects characterised by tiredness. Acute poisoning is
rare although acute inflammation of the lungs may occur. A chemical pneumonia may also result from frequent
exposure. Inhalation of freshly formed metal oxide particles sized below 1.5 microns and generally between
0.02 to 0.05 microns may result in "metal fume fever". Symptoms may be delayed for up to 12 hours and begin
with the sudden onset of thirst, and a sweet, metallic or foul taste in the mouth. Other symptoms include
upper respiratory tract irritation accompanied by coughing and a dryness of the mucous membranes, lassitude
and a generalised feeling of malaise. Mild to severe headache, nausea, occasional vomiting, fever or chills,
exaggerated mental activity, profuse sweating, diarrhoea, excessive urination and prostration may also occur.
Tolerance to the fumes develops rapidly, but is quickly lost. All symptoms usually subside within 24-36 hours
following removal from exposure.
Persons with impaired respiratory function, airway diseases and conditions such as emphysema or chronic
bronchitis, may incur further disability if excessive concentrations of particulate are inhaled.
If prior damage to the circulatory or nervous systems has occurred or if kidney damage has been sustained,
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 9 of 16
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
proper screenings should be conducted on individuals who may be exposed to further risk if handling and use
of the material result
in excessive exposures.
Harmful levels of ozone may be found when working in confined spaces. Symptoms of exposure include irritation
of the upper membranes of the respiratory tract and lungs as well as pulmonary (lung) changes including
irritation, accumulation of fluid (congestion and oedema) and in some cases haemorrhage. Exposure may
aggravate any pre-existing lung condition such as bronchitis, asthma or emphysema.
Shielding gases may act as simple asphyxiants if significant levels are allowed to accumulate. Oxygen
monitoring may be necessary.
CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS
■ Principal route of exposure is inhalation of welding fumes from electrodes and workpiece. Reaction products
arising from electrode core and flux appear as welding fume depending on welding conditions, relative
volatilities of metal oxides and any coatings on the workpiece. Studies of lung cancer among welders indicate
that they may experience a 30-40% increased risk compared to the general population. Since smoking and
exposure to other cancer-causing agents, such as asbestos fibre, may influence these results, it is not clear
whether welding, in fact, represents a significant lung cancer risk. Whilst mild steel welding represents
little risk, the stainless steel welder, exposed to chromium and nickel fume, may be at risk and it is this
factor which may account for the overall increase in lung cancer incidence among welders. Cold isolated
electrodes are relatively harmless.
Welding fume with high levels of ferrous materials may lead to particle deposition in the lungs (siderosis)
after long exposure. This clears up when exposure stops. Chronic exposure to iron dusts may lead to eye
disorders.
severe disorders of the nervous system, has been reported in welders working on Mn steels in confined spaces.
Ozone is suspected to produce lung cancer in laboratory animals; no reports of this effect have been
documented in exposed human populations.
Other welding process exposures can arise from radiant energy UV flash burns, thermal burns or electric shock
The welding arc emits ultraviolet radiation at wavelengths that have the potential to produce skin tumours in
animals and in over-exposed individuals, however, no confirmatory studies of this effect in welders have been
reported.
TOXICITY AND IRRITATION
■ unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.
NITROGEN OXIDES:
OZONE:
■ Asthma-like symptoms may continue for months or even years after exposure to the material ceases. This may
be due to a non-allergenic condition known as reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) which can occur
following exposure to high levels of highly irritating compound. Key criteria for the diagnosis of RADS
include the absence of preceding respiratory disease, in a non-atopic individual, with abrupt onset of
persistent asthma-like symptoms within minutes to hours of a documented exposure to the irritant. A
reversible airflow pattern, on spirometry, with the presence of moderate to severe bronchial hyperreactivity
on methacholine challenge testing and the lack of minimal lymphocytic inflammation, without eosinophilia,
have also been included in the criteria for diagnosis of RADS. RADS (or asthma) following an irritating
inhalation is an infrequent disorder with rates related to the concentration of and duration of exposure to
the irritating substance. Industrial bronchitis, on the other hand, is a disorder that occurs as result of
exposure due to high concentrations of irritating substance (often particulate in nature) and is completely
reversible after exposure ceases. The disorder is characterised by dyspnea, cough and mucus production.
WELDING FUMES:
IRON OXIDE FUME:
COPPER FUME:
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS:
■ Not available. Refer to individual constituents.
WELDING FUMES:
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CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 10 of 16
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
■ WARNING: This substance has been classified by the IARC as Group 2B: Possibly Carcinogenic to Humans.
MANGANESE FUME:
Skin (rabbit) 500mg/24H Mild
Eye (rabbit) 500mg/24H Mild
SILICA WELDING FUMES:
TOXICITY
IRRITATION
Oral (rat) LD50: 3160 mg/kg
No data [RTECS]
■ For silica amorphous:
When experimental animals inhale synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) dust, it dissolves in the lung fluid and is
rapidly eliminated. If swallowed, the vast majority of SAS is excreted in the faeces and there is little
accumulation in the body. Following absorption across the gut, SAS is eliminated via urine without
modification in animals and humans. SAS is not expected to be broken down (metabolised) in mammals.
After ingestion, there is limited accumulation of SAS in body tissues and rapid elimination occurs.
Intestinal absorption has not been calculated, but appears to be insignificant in animals and humans. SASs
injected subcutaneously are subjected to rapid dissolution and removal. There is no indication of metabolism
of SAS in animals or humans based on chemical structure and available data. In contrast to crystalline silica,
SAS is soluble in physiological media and the soluble chemical species that are formed are eliminated via the
urinary tract without modification.
Both the mammalian and environmental toxicology of SASs are significantly influenced by the physical and
chemical properties, particularly those of solubility and particle size. SAS has no acute intrinsic toxicity
by inhalation. Adverse effects, including suffocation, that have been reported were caused by the presence of
high numbers of respirable particles generated to meet the required test atmosphere. These results are not
representative of exposure to commercial SASs and should not be used for human risk assessment. Though
repeated exposure of the skin may cause dryness and cracking, SAS is not a skin or eye irritant, and it is
not a sensitiser.
Repeated-dose and chronic toxicity studies confirm the absence of toxicity when SAS is swallowed or upon skin
contact.
Long-term inhalation of SAS caused some adverse effects in animals (increases in lung inflammation, cell
injury and lung collagen content), all of which subsided after exposure.
Numerous repeated-dose, subchronic and chronic inhalation toxicity studies have been conducted with SAS in a
number of species, at airborne concentrations ranging from 0.5 mg/m3 to 150 mg/m3. Lowest-observed adverse
effect levels (LOAELs) were typically in the range of 1 to 50 mg/m3. When available, the no-observed adverse
effect levels (NOAELs) were between 0.5 and 10 mg/m3. The difference in values may be explained by different
particle size, and therefore the number of particles administered per unit dose. In general, as particle size
decreases so does the NOAEL/LOAEL.
Neither inhalation nor oral administration caused neoplasms (tumours). SAS is not mutagenic in vitro. No
genotoxicity was detected in in vivo assays. SAS does not impair development of the foetus. Fertility was not
specifically studied, but the reproductive organs in long-term studies were not affected.
In humans, SAS is essentially non-toxic by mouth, skin or eyes, and by inhalation. Epidemiology studies show
little evidence of adverse health effects due to SAS. Repeated exposure (without personal protection) may
cause mechanical irritation of the eye and drying/cracking of the skin.
There is no evidence of cancer or other long-term respiratory health effects (for example, silicosis) in
workers employed in the manufacture of SAS. Respiratory symptoms in SAS workers have been shown to correlate
with smoking but not with SAS exposure, while serial pulmonary function values and chest radiographs are not
adversely affected by long-term exposure to SAS.
The substance is classified by IARC as Group 3:
NOT classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans.
Evidence of carcinogenicity may be inadequate or limited in animal testing.
Reports indicate high/prolonged exposures to amorphous silicas induced lung
fibrosis in experimental animals; in some experiments these effects were
reversible. [PATTYS]
OZONE:
continued...
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 11 of 16
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
■ NOTE: Ozone aggravates chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Ozone is suspected also of increasing the
risk of acute and chronic respiratory disease, mutagenesis and foetotoxicity. In animals short-term exposure
to ambient concentrations of less than 1 ppm results in reduced capacity to kill intrapulmonary organisms and
allows purulent bacteria to proliferate [Ellenhorn etal].
NITROGEN OXIDES:
TOXICITY
IRRITATION
Inhalation (human) LCLo: 200 ppm/1m
Nil Reported
Inhalation (man) TCLo: 6200 ppb/10m
Data for nitrogen dioxide:
Substance has been investigated as a mutagen and reproductive effector.
NOTE: Interstitial edema, epithelial proliferation and, in high
concentrations, fibrosis and emphysema develop after repeated
exposure.
CARCINOGEN
Ferric oxide
REPROTOXIN
manganese fume
International Agency
for Research on Cancer
(IARC) - Agents
Reviewed by the IARC
Monographs
Group
ILO Chemicals in the electronics industry
that have toxic effects on reproduction
3
Reduced fertility or
sterility
H si
Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
MANGANESE FUME:
SILICA WELDING FUMES:
COPPER FUME:
OZONE:
NITROGEN OXIDES:
IRON OXIDE FUME:
■ DO NOT discharge into sewer or waterways.
OZONE:
COPPER FUME:
■ Harmful to aquatic organisms.
MANGANESE FUME:
COPPER FUME:
IRON OXIDE FUME:
■ For Metal:
Atmospheric Fate - Metal-containing inorganic substances generally have negligible vapour pressure and are
not expected to partition to air.
Environmental Fate: Environmental processes, such as oxidation, the presence of acids or bases and
microbiological processes, may transform insoluble metals to more soluble ionic forms. Environmental
processes may enhance bioavailability and may also be important in changing solubilities.
Aquatic/Terrestrial Fate: When released to dry soil, most metals will exhibit limited mobility and remain in
the upper layer; some will leach locally into ground water and/ or surface water ecosystems when soaked by
rain or melt ice. A metal ion is considered infinitely persistent because it cannot degrade further. Once
released to surface waters and moist soils their fate depends on solubility and dissociation in water. A
significant proportion of dissolved/ sorbed metals will end up in sediments through the settling of suspended
particles. The remaining metal ions can then be taken up by aquatic organisms. Ionic species may bind to
dissolved ligands or sorb to solid particles in water.
continued...
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 12 of 16
Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Ecotoxicity:
Even though many metals show few toxic effects at physiological pH levels, transformation may
introduce new or magnified effects.
WELDING FUMES:
IRON OXIDE FUME:
MANGANESE FUME:
■ For manganese and its compounds:
Environmental fate:
It has been established that while lower organisms (e.g., plankton, aquatic plants, and some fish) can
significantly bioconcentrate manganese, higher organisms (including humans) tend to maintain manganese
homeostasis. This indicates that the potential for biomagnification of manganese from lower trophic levels to
higher ones is low.
There were two mechanisms involved in explaining the retention of manganese and other metals in the
environment by soil. First, through cation exchange reactions, manganese ions and the charged surface of soil
particles form manganese oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides which in turn form absorption sites for other
metals. Secondly, manganese can be adsorbed to other oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides through ligand
exchange reactions. When the soil solution becomes saturated, these manganese oxides, hydroxides, and
oxyhydroxides can precipitate into a new mineral phase and act as a new surface to which other substances can
absorb. The tendency of soluble manganese compounds to adsorb to soils and sediments depends mainly on the
cation exchange capacity and the organic composition of the soil. The soil adsorption constants (the ratio of
the concentration in soil to the concentration in water) for Mn(II) span five orders of magnitude, ranging
from 0.2 to 10,000 mL/g, increasing as a function of the organic content and the ion exchange capacity of the
soil; thus, adsorption may be highly variable. In some cases, adsorption of manganese to soils may not be a
readily reversible process. At low concentrations, manganese may be "fixed" by clays and will not be released
into solution readily. At higher concentrations, manganese may be desorbed by ion exchange mechanisms with
other ions in solution. For example, the discharge of waste water effluent into estuarine environments
resulted in the mobilization of manganese from the bottom sediments. The metals in the effluent may have been
preferentially adsorbed resulting in the release of manganese. The oxidation state of manganese in soil and
sediments may be altered by microbial activity; oxidation may lead to the precipitation of manganese.
Bacteria and microflora can increase the mobility of manganese.
The transport and partitioning of manganese in water is controlled by the solubility of the specific chemical
form present, which in turn is determined by pH, Eh (oxidation-reduction potential), and the characteristics
of the available anions. The metal may exist in water in any of four oxidation states.
Manganese(II) predominates in most waters (pH 4-7) but may become oxidized at a pH >8 or 9. The principal
anion associated with Mn(II) in water is usually carbonate (CO3.2), and the concentration of manganese is
limited by the relatively low solubility (65 mg/L) of MnCO3. In relatively oxidized water, the solubility of
Mn(II) may be controlled by manganese oxide equilibria, with manganese being converted to the Mn(II) or
Mn(IV) oxidation states. In extremely reduced water, the fate of manganese tends to be controlled by
formation of a poorly soluble sulfide. Manganese in water may undergo oxidation at high pH or Eh and is also
subject to microbial activity. For example, Mn(II) in a lake was oxidized during the summer months, but this
was inhibited by a microbial poison, indicating that the oxidation was mediated by bacteria . The microbial
metabolism of manganese is presumed to be a function of pH, temperature, and other factors.
Manganese in water may be significantly bioconcentrated at lower trophic levels. A bioconcentration factor
(BCF) relates the concentration of a chemical in plant and animal tissues to the concentration of the
chemical in the water in which they live. The BCF of manganese was estimated as 2,500 - 6,300 for
phytoplankton, 300 -5,500 for marine algae, 80 - 830 for intertidal mussels, and 35 - 930 for coastal fish.
Similarly, the BCF of manganese was estimated to be 10,00 -20,000 for marine and freshwater plants, 10,000 40,000 for invertebrates, and 10 - 600 for fish. In general, these data indicate that lower organisms such as
algae have larger BCFs than higher organisms. In order to protect consumers from the risk of manganese
bioaccumulation in marine mollusks, the U.S. EPA has set a criterion for manganese at 0.1 mg/L for marine
waters.
Elemental manganese and inorganic manganese compounds have negligible vapor pressures but may exist in air as
suspended particulate matter derived from industrial emissions or the erosion of soils. Manganese-containing
particles are mainly removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, with large particles tending to
fall out faster than small particles. The half-life of airborne particles is usually on the order of days,
depending on the size of the particle and atmospheric conditions. Some removal by washout mechanisms such as
rain may also occur, although it is of minor significance in comparison to dry deposition.
continued...
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 13 of 16
Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Ecotoxicity:
Manganese ion is toxic to aqueous organisms
Fish LC50 (28 d): orfe 2490 mg/l, trout 2.91 mg/l
Daphnia magna LC50: 50 mg/l
Pseudomonas putida LC50: 10.6 mg/l
Photobacterium phosphoreum LC50: 14.7 mg/l
Turbellarian worms (EC0): Polycelis nigra 660 mg/l (interference threshold); microregma 31 mg/l.
SILICA WELDING FUMES:
■ For Amorphous Silica: Amorphous silica is chemically and biologically inert. It is not biodegradable.
Aquatic Fate: Due to its insolubility in water there is a separation at every filtration and sedimentation
process. On a global scale, the level of man-made synthetic amorphous silicas (SAS) represents up to 2.4% of
the dissolved silica naturally present in the aquatic environment and untreated SAS have a relatively low
water solubility and an extremely low vapour pressure. Biodegradability in sewage treatment plants or in
surface water is not applicable to inorganic substances like SAS.
Terrestrial Fate: Crystalline and/or amorphous silicas are common on the earth in soils and sediments, and in
living organisms (e.g. diatoms), but only the dissolved form is bioavailable. On the basis of these
properties it is expected that SAS released into the environment will be distributed mainly into
soil/sediment. Surface treated silica will be wetted then adsorbed onto soils and sediments.
Atmospheric Fate: SAS is not expected to be distributed into the air if released.
Ecotoxicity: SAS is not toxic to environmental organisms (apart from physical desiccation in insects). SAS
presents a low risk for adverse effects to the environment.
For silica:
The literature on the fate of silica in the environment concerns dissolved silica in the aquatic environment,
irrespective of its origin (man-made or natural), or structure (crystalline or amorphous). Indeed, once
released and dissolved into the environment no distinction can be made between the initial forms of silica.
At normal environmental pH, dissolved silica exists exclusively as monosilicic acid [Si(OH)4]. At pH 9.4 the
solubility of amorphous silica is about 120 mg SiO2/l . Quartz has a solubility of only 6 mg/l, but its rate
of dissolution is so slow at ordinary temperature and pressure that the solubility of amorphous silica
represents the upper limit of dissolved silica concentration in natural waters. Moreover, silicic acid is the
bioavailable form for aquatic organisms and it plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of Si,
particularly in the oceans.
In the oceans, the transfer of dissolved silica from the marine hydrosphere to the biosphere initiates the
global biological silicon cycle. Marine organisms such as diatoms, silicoflagellates and radiolarians build
up their skeletons by taking up silicic acid from seawater. After these organisms die, the biogenic silica
accumulated in them partly dissolves. The portion of the biogenic silica that does not dissolve settles and
ultimately reaches the sediment. The transformation of opal (amorphous biogenic silica) deposits in sediments
through diagenetic processes allows silica to re-enter the geological cycle. Silica is labile between the
water and sediment interface.
Ecotoxicity:
Fish LC50 (96 h): Brachydanio rerio >10000 mg/l; zebra fish >10000 mg/l
Daphnia magna EC50 (24 h): >1000 mg/l; LC50 924 h): >10000 mg/l.
No data
COPPER FUME:
■ For copper:
Atmospheric Fate - Copper is unlikely to accumulate in the atmosphere due to a short residence time for
airborne copper aerosols. Airborne coppers, however, may be transported over large distances. Air Quality
Standards: no data available.
Aquatic Fate: Toxicity of copper is affected by pH and hardness of water. Total copper is rarely useful as a
predictor of toxicity. In natural sea water, more than 98% of copper is organically bound and in river waters
a high percentage is often organically bound, but the actual percentage depends on the river water and its pH.
Ecotoxicity: Copper accumulates significantly in the food chain. The toxic effect of copper in the aquatic
biota depends on the bio-availability of copper in water which, in turn, depends on its physico-chemical form
(i.e. speciation). Bioavailability is decreased by complexation and adsorption of copper by natural organic
matter, iron and manganese hydrated oxides, and chelating agents excreted by algae and other aquatic
organisms. Copper exhibits significant toxicity in some aquatic organisms. Some algal species are very
sensitive to copper. Silicate, iron, manganese and EDTA may reduce bioavailability.
For copper: Ecotoxicity - Significant effects are expected on various species of microalgae, some species of
continued...
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 14 of 16
Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
macroalgae, and a range of invertebrates, including crustaceans, gastropods and sea urchins. Copper is
moderately toxic to crab and their larvae and is highly toxic to gastropods (mollusks, including oysters,
mussels and clams). In fish, the acute lethal concentrations of copper depends both on test species and
exposure conditions. Waters with high concentrations of copper can have significant effects on diatoms and
sensitive invertebrates, notably cladocerans (water fleas). Most taxonomic groups of macroalgae and
invertebrates will be severely affected.
For Copper: Typical foliar levels of copper are: Uncontaminated soils (0.3-250 mg/kg) ; Contaminated soils
(150-450 mg/kg) ; Mining/smelting soils (6.1-25 mg/kg80 mg/kg300 mg/kg).
Terrestrial Fate: Plants - Generally, vegetation reflects soil copper levels in its foliage. This is
dependent upon the bioavailability of copper and the physiological requirements of species concerned. Crops
are often more sensitive to copper than the native flora. Soil: In soil, copper levels are raised by
application of fertilizer, fungicides, from deposition of highway dusts and from urban, mining and industrial
sources. Chronic and or acute effects on sensitive species occur as a result of human activities such as
copper fertilizer addition and addition of sludge. When soil levels exceed 150 mg Cu/kg, native and
agricultural species show chronic effects. Soils in the range 500-1000 mg Cu/kg act in a strongly selective
fashion allowing the survival of only copper-tolerant species and strains. At 2000 Cu mg/kg, most species
cannot survive. By 3500 mg Cu/kg, areas are largely devoid of vegetation cover. The organic content of the
soil appears to be a key factor affecting the bioavailability of copper. On normal forest soils, non-rooted
plants such as mosses and lichens show higher copper concentrations. The fruiting bodies and mycorrhizal
sheaths of soil fungi associated with higher plants in forests often accumulate copper to much higher levels
than plants at the same site.
OZONE:
■ Ozone is found in the atmosphere in varying proportions as it is produced continuously in the outer layers
of the atmosphere by the action of solar UV radiation on oxygen in the air. It is also formed locally in the
air from lightning and from electrical sparks. In the upper atmosphere it inhibits penetration of UV
radiation and so is beneficial to life. At ground level it is a harmful pollutant because of the damage it
can cause to lungs and to a wide range of materials.
The material is classified as an ecotoxin* because the Fish LC50 (96 hours) is less than or equal to 0.1 mg/l
* Classification of Substances as Ecotoxic (Dangerous to the Environment)
Appendix 8, Table 1
Compiler's Guide for the Preparation of International Chemical Safety Cards: 1993 Commission of the European
Communities.
NITROGEN OXIDES:
■ Environmental Fate: Oxides of nitrogen are found in soil, water and air. Nitrogen oxides are important in
almost all atmospheric reactions. Nitrogen oxides react with water to form nitric acid, a major contributor
to ‘acid rain’. Oxides of nitrogen are also important in maintaining the level of ozone in the stratosphere.
Low concentration of nitrogen dioxide as well as high amount of nitric oxide will reduce the formation of
ozone. Further, oxides of nitrogen are also a major contributor to production of photochemical smog.
Environmental Transport: Nitrogen oxides are transported in different environment in the form of gas and as a
dissolved gas in water.
Ecotoxicity
Ingredient
Persistence:
Water/Soil
CIGWELD Gas and TIG Welding Rods No Data
Available
welding fumes
No Data
Available
iron oxide fume
No Data
Available
manganese fume
No Data
Available
silica welding fumes
No Data
Available
copper fume
No Data
Available
Persistence: Air
No Data
Available
No Data
Available
No Data
Available
No Data
Available
No Data
Available
No Data
Available
Bioaccumulation
Mobility
LOW
continued...
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
ozone
nitrogen oxides
No Data
Available
No Data
Available
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 15 of 16
Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
No Data
Available
No Data
Available
LOW
Section 13 - DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
• Recycle wherever possible or consult manufacturer for recycling options.
• Consult State Land Waste Management Authority for disposal.
• Bury residue in an authorised landfill.
• Recycle containers if possible, or dispose of in an authorised landfill.
Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
HAZCHEM:
None (ADG7)
NOT REGULATED FOR TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS: ADG7, UN, IATA, IMDG
Section 15 - REGULATORY INFORMATION
POISONS SCHEDULE None
REGULATIONS
Regulations for ingredients
iron oxide fume (CAS: 1309-37-1) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia Exposure Standards","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)","Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","International
Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) - Agents Reviewed by the IARC Monographs","International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) - High Production Volume
List"
manganese fume (CAS: 7439-96-5) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (Domestic water supply - inorganic chemicals)",
"Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (IRRIG - inorganic chemicals)","Australia Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (Domestic water supply
quality)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm
(IRRIG)","Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","Australia National Pollutant Inventory","WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality - Guideline
values for chemicals that are of health significance in drinking-water"
silica welding fumes (CAS: 69012-64-2) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)"
copper fume (CAS: 7440-50-8) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (AQUA/1 to 6 - inorganic chemicals)","Australia Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (Domestic water supply - inorganic chemicals)","Australia Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (IRRIG - inorganic chemicals)","Australia - Australian
Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (STOCK - inorganic chemicals)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory
- Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (Aquatic habitat)","Australia - Australian Capital
Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (Domestic water supply quality)","Australia Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (IRRIG)","Australia Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (STOCK)","Australia ADI list Acceptable daily intakes for agricultural and veterinary chemicals","Australia Hazardous Substances","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)",
"Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","International Maritime Dangerous Goods Requirements (IMDG Code) - Marine Pollutants","International
Maritime Dangerous Goods Requirements (IMDG Code) - Substance Index","WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality - Guideline values for chemicals that are of
health significance in drinking-water"
ozone (CAS: 10028-15-6) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia Exposure Standards","Australia Hazardous Substances"
continued...
CIGWELD GAS AND TIG WELDING RODS
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
A317LP
CHEMWATCH 15523
Version No:5
CD 2011/4 Page 16 of 16
Section 15 - REGULATORY INFORMATION
No data for CIGWELD Gas and TIG Welding Rods (CW: 15523)
No data for welding fumes (CAS: , Not avail)
No data for nitrogen oxides (CAS: , Mixture)
Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION
■ Classification of the preparation and its individual components has drawn on official and authoritative
sources as well as independent review by the Chemwatch Classification committee using available literature
references.
A list of reference resources used to assist the committee may be found at:
www.chemwatch.net/references.
■ The (M)SDS is a Hazard Communication tool and should be used to assist in the Risk Assessment. Many factors
determine whether the reported Hazards are Risks in the workplace or other settings. Risks may be determined
by reference to Exposures Scenarios. Scale of use, frequency of use and current or available engineering
controls must be considered.
This document is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, review or
criticism, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written
permission from CHEMWATCH. TEL (+61 3) 9572 4700.
Issue Date: 24-Oct-2011
Print Date: 31-Oct-2011
This is the end of the MSDS.
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