Cisco | Signaling Interface H.323 | User guide | Cisco Signaling Interface H.323 User guide

Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface
User Guide
Cisco HSI Release 2.21
February 2004
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Text Part Number: OL-2156-04 Rev A1
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Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
Copyright © 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.
All rights reserved.
C ON T E N T S
Preface
xi
Document Objectives
xi
Audience xi
System Administrator xi
System Operator xii
System Technician xii
Document Organization
xii
Document Conventions
xiii
Related Documentation xiv
Release Notes xiv
Hardware Documentation xiv
Software Documentation xv
Related Documentation xv
Obtaining Documentation xv
World Wide Web xv
Documentation CD-ROM xv
Ordering Documentation xvi
Documentation Feedback xvi
Obtaining Technical Assistance xvi
Cisco.com xvi
Technical Assistance Center xvii
Cisco TAC Web Site xvii
Cisco TAC Escalation Center xviii
CHAPTER
1
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface Overview
Introduction
1-1
1-1
Cisco HSI Overview 1-1
PGW 2200 1-2
IP Network 1-2
Cisco HSI System Description 1-2
OAM Subsystem 1-3
Call Control Subsystem 1-3
RUDP 1-4
RADVision H.323 1-4
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E-ISUP 1-4
New Features Introduced in HSI Release 2.21
Asymmetric Codec Treatment 1-4
Empty Capability Set 1-4
H.323 Hairpin 1-4
T38 Fax 1-5
1-4
Operational Environment 1-5
Hardware Requirements 1-5
Software Requirements 1-5
Security 1-5
Cisco HSI Recovery
1-5
Cisco HSI System Limitations
CHAPTER
2
1-5
Installing and Configuring Cisco HSI Software
Introduction
2-1
2-1
Hardware and Software Requirements
2-1
Installing the Sun Solaris 8 Operating System
2-1
Installing the Cisco HSI 2-2
Before You Start 2-2
Configuring Groups and Users 2-2
Cisco HSI Installation Information 2-3
Installing the Cisco HSI 2-5
Installing a Dual Cisco HSI for a Redundant PGW 2200 Configuration
Starting the Cisco HSI
2-10
Stopping the Cisco HSI
Configuring the Cisco HSI
CHAPTER
3
2-10
2-10
Upgrading the Cisco HSI
2-10
Removing the Cisco HSI
2-11
Provisioning the Cisco HSI
Introduction
2-9
3-1
3-1
Cisco HSI Configuration 3-1
MML Configuration Commands 3-2
System Configuration Data 3-3
Static System Data 3-3
Dynamic System Data 3-5
H.323 Stack Configuration 3-8
Nonprovisionable Data 3-8
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MML Provisionable Data 3-9
H.323 System Parameters
Q.931 Parameters 3-9
RAS Parameters 3-10
H.245 Parameters 3-13
3-9
Configuring HSI Release 2.21 Features 3-16
Asymmetric Codec Treatment 3-16
Empty Capability Set 3-16
H.323 Hairpin 3-16
T.38 Fax 3-17
Configuring T.38 Fax on the Cisco PSTN Gateway 3-17
Configuring T.38 Fax on a Cisco IOS H.323 Gateway 3-17
Configuring T.38 Fax on a Cisco IOS MGCP Gateway 3-17
CHAPTER
4
Managing the Cisco HSI
Introduction
4-1
4-1
Restarting the Cisco HSI Application
Stopping Call Processing
Starting Call Processing
4-1
4-1
4-2
Stopping the Call Processing Application
Starting the Call Processing Application
Reporting the Cisco HSI Status
4-2
4-2
4-2
Measurements 4-2
System-Related Measurements 4-2
Call-Related Measurements 4-3
Resetting Measurements 4-6
Retrieving Counters 4-6
Overload 4-6
Overload Level 1 4-7
Overload Level 2 4-7
Overload Level 3 4-7
Setting Overload Data 4-7
Retrieving Overload Data 4-8
Logging 4-8
Rotating Log Files 4-8
Convention for Naming Convention the Log File
Log File Location 4-9
Log Messages 4-9
4-9
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Log Message Packages 4-10
Logging Levels 4-10
Setting Logging Levels 4-10
RADVision Logging 4-11
CHAPTER
5
Gapping 4-11
Setting Gapping 4-11
Retrieving Call Gapping Data
4-12
Troubleshooting Cisco HSI Alarms
5-1
Introduction
5-1
Alarms Overview 5-1
Debounce 5-1
Alarm Severity Levels 5-1
Retrieving and Reporting Alarms 5-2
Informational Event Requirements 5-2
SNMP Trap Types 5-2
Retrieving Alarm Messages 5-3
Noncontinuous Mode 5-3
Continuous Mode 5-3
Acknowledging and Clearing Alarms
Alarms List
5-4
5-5
Troubleshooting 5-6
H323_STACK_FAILURE 5-6
Description 5-6
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-6
Cause 5-6
Troubleshooting 5-6
CONFIGURATION_FAILURE 5-6
Description 5-6
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-6
Cause 5-7
Troubleshooting 5-7
EISUP_PATH_FAILURE 5-7
Description 5-7
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-7
Cause 5-7
Troubleshooting 5-7
GATEKEEPER_INTERFACE_FAILURE 5-8
GENERAL_PROCESS_FAILURE 5-8
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Description 5-8
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-8
Cause 5-8
Troubleshooting 5-8
IP_LINK_FAILURE 5-8
Description 5-8
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-8
Cause 5-8
Troubleshooting 5-9
LOW_DISK_SPACE 5-9
Description 5-9
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-9
Cause 5-9
Troubleshooting 5-9
OVERLOAD_LEVEL3 5-9
Description 5-9
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-9
Cause 5-10
Troubleshooting 5-10
VSC_FAILURE 5-10
Description 5-10
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-10
Cause 5-10
Troubleshooting 5-10
OVERLOAD_LEVEL2 5-11
Description 5-11
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-11
Cause 5-11
Troubleshooting 5-11
CONFIG_CHANGE 5-11
Description 5-11
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-11
Cause 5-11
Troubleshooting 5-11
ENDPOINT_CALL_CONTROL_INTERFACE_FAILURE 5-12
Description 5-12
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-12
Cause 5-12
Troubleshooting 5-12
ENDPOINT_CHANNEL_INTERFACE_FAILURE 5-12
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Description 5-12
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-12
Cause 5-12
Troubleshooting 5-12
GAPPED_CALL_NORMAL 5-13
Description 5-13
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-13
Cause 5-13
Troubleshooting 5-13
GAPPED_CALL_PRIORITY 5-13
Description 5-13
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-13
Cause 5-13
Troubleshooting 5-14
OVERLOAD_LEVEL1 5-14
Description 5-14
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-14
Cause 5-14
Troubleshooting 5-14
PROVISIONING_INACTIVITY_TIMEOUT 5-14
Description 5-14
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-14
Cause 5-15
Troubleshooting 5-15
PROVISIONING_SESSION_TIMEOUT 5-15
Description 5-15
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-15
Cause 5-15
Troubleshooting 5-15
STOP_CALL_PROCESSING 5-15
Description 5-15
Severity Level and Trap Type 5-15
Cause 5-15
Troubleshooting 5-16
Detailed Logging
APPENDIX
A
5-16
MML User Interface and Command Reference
Introduction
A-1
A-1
Starting an MML Command Session in the Cisco HSI
A-1
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MML Commands A-2
MML Command Syntax A-2
MML Command Conventions A-2
Case Sensitivity A-3
Starting an MML Session
A-3
Batch Files A-3
Creating a Batch File A-4
Starting a Batch File A-4
MML Responses A-5
Status Messages A-5
Error Messages A-5
MML Help
A-6
Quitting an MML Session
MML Command Reference
ack-alm
clr-alm
A-6
A-8
A-8
clr-meas
diaglog
h
A-6
A-9
A-10
A-10
help
A-11
prov-add
A-12
prov-cpy
A-13
prov-dlt
A-14
prov-ed
A-15
prov-exp
A-16
prov-rtrv
A-17
prov-sta
A-19
prov-stp
A-20
quit
A-21
radlog
A-22
restart-softw
A-23
rtrv-alms
A-24
rtrv-calls
A-24
rtrv-ctr
rtrv-dest
A-25
A-25
rtrv-gapping
A-26
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rtrv-log
A-27
rtrv-mml
rtrv-ne
A-28
A-28
rtrv-ne-health
rtrv-overload
rtrv-softw
A-29
A-29
A-30
set-dest-state
set-gapping
set-log
A-32
A-32
set-overload
A-33
sta-callproc
sta-softw
sta-trc
stp-call
A-34
A-35
A-35
A-37
stp-callproc
stp-softw
stp-trc
A-31
A-37
A-38
A-38
APPENDIX
B
Skeleton Configuration File
APPENDIX
C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
APPENDIX
D
E-ISUP Name-to-Cause Value Lookup
D-1
APPENDIX
E
E-ISUP Cause Value-to-Name Lookup
E-1
APPENDIX
F
H.323 Name-to-Cause Value Lookup
F-1
APPENDIX
G
H.323 Cause Value-to-Name Lookup
G-1
B-1
C-1
INDEX
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Preface
This preface describes the objectives, audience, organization, and conventions of the Cisco H.323
Signaling Interface User Guide, and explains how to find additional information on related products and
services. It contains the following sections:
•
Document Objectives, page xi
•
Audience, page xi
•
Document Organization, page xii
•
Document Conventions, page xiii
•
Related Documentation, page xiv
•
Obtaining Documentation, page xv
•
Obtaining Technical Assistance, page xvi
Document Objectives
This guide contains installation, configuration, system management, troubleshooting, and Man-Machine
Language (MML) command information for the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI).
This vesrion of the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide documents the Cisci H.323 Signaling
Interface (HSI) software, Release 2.21. Cisco HSI, Release 2.21 is associated with the Cisco Media
Gateway Controller Software, Release 9.3(2).
Audience
The intended audience is the system administrator, the system operator, and the system technician.
System Administrator
The system administrator is required to manage the host administrative functions, including:
•
Configuring and maintaining system parameters
•
Granting group and user IDs
•
Managing all Cisco Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Gateway (PGW 2200) files and
directories
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Document Organization
The system administrator should have an in-depth knowledge of UNIX and a basic knowledge of data
and telecommunications networking.
System Operator
The system operator is assumed to have knowledge of the following:
•
Telecommunications protocols
•
Basic computer software operations
•
Computer terminology and concepts
•
Hierarchical file systems
•
Common UNIX shell commands
System Technician
The system technician is assumed to have knowledge of the following:
•
Telecommunications protocols
•
Basic computer software operations
•
Computer terminology and concepts
•
Hierarchical file systems
•
Common UNIX shell commands
•
Log files
•
Configuration of telephony switching systems
•
Use of electrical and electronic telephony test equipment
•
Basic troubleshooting techniques
Document Organization
This document is organized as follows:
•
Preface
•
Chapter 1, “Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface Overview.”
•
Chapter 2, “Installing and Configuring Cisco HSI Software”
•
Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI”
•
Chapter 4, “Managing the Cisco HSI”
•
Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting Cisco HSI Alarms”
•
Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference”
•
Appendix B, “Skeleton Configuration File”
•
Appendix C, “Example HSI Configuration File”
•
Appendix D, “E-ISUP Name-to-Cause Value Lookup”
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Document Conventions
•
Appendix E, “E-ISUP Cause Value-to-Name Lookup”
•
Appendix F, “H.323 Name-to-Cause Value Lookup”
•
Appendix G, “H.323 Cause Value-to-Name Lookup”
Document Conventions
This manual uses the document conventions listed in this section.
Table 1
Document Conventions
Convention
Meaning
Comments and Examples
Boldface
Commands and keywords you
enter literally as shown
prov-sta
Italics
Variables for which you supply
values
command interface type
Courier
Font used for screen displays,
prompts, and scripts.
Are you ready to continue?
[Y]
Courier bold
Font used to indicate what the user Login: root
enters in examples of command
Password: <password>
environments.
Square brackets ([ ])
Optional elements
You replace the variable with
the type of interface.
command [abc]
abc is optional (not required),
but you can choose it.
Vertical bars ( | )
Separated alternative elements
command [abc | def]
You can choose either abc or
def, or neither, but not both.
Braces ({ })
Required choices
command {abc | def}
You must use either abc or def,
but not both.
Braces with vertical bars within A required choice within an
square brackets ([{ | }])
optional element
A string
A nonquoted set of characters
command [abc{ def | ghi}]
You have three options:
•
No entry
•
abc def
•
abc ghi
For example, when setting an
SNMP community string to
public, do not use quotation
marks around the string;
otherwise, the string will
include the quotation marks.
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Preface
Related Documentation
Table 1
Document Conventions (continued)
Convention
Meaning
Comments and Examples
System prompt
Denotes interactive sessions;
indicates that the user enters
commands at the prompt
The system prompt indicates
the current command mode.
For example, the prompt
Router (config)# indicates
global configuration mode.
Exclamation point (!) at the
beginning of a line
A comment line
Comments are sometimes
displayed.
Note
Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not covered in the
manual.
Tip
Means the following information will help you solve a problem. The tip information might not be
troubleshooting or even an action, but could be useful information, similar to a Timesaver.
Caution
Means reader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment
damage or loss of data.
Related Documentation
The following sections provide the titles of documents related to the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface
User Guide.
Release Notes
For information regarding subsequent releases of the Cisco H.323 signaling interface, refer to:
•
Release Notes for Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface, Release 2.21.
Hardware Documentation
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Hardware Installation Guide
•
Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco Media Gateway Controller
•
Cisco Media Gateway Hardware Installation Guide
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Obtaining Documentation
Software Documentation
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Installation and Configuration Guide
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MML Command Reference Guide
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Messages Reference Guide
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Billing Interface Guide
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Operations, Maintenance, and
Troubleshooting Guide
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Management Information Base Guide
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Node Manager User’s Guide 2.0
•
Cisco Signaling Link Terminal
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller Online Documentation Notice
•
Cisco Media Gateway Controller SLT Documentation Notice
Related Documentation
•
ITU Recommendation H.323, 1999
•
ITU Recommendation H.225, 1998
•
ITU Recommendation H.245, 1998
•
ITU Recommendation H.246 Annex C
Obtaining Documentation
These sections explain how to obtain documentation from Cisco Systems.
World Wide Web
You can access the most current Cisco documentation on the World Wide Web at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com
Translated documentation is available at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml
Documentation CD-ROM
Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a Cisco Documentation CD-ROM
package, which is shipped with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated monthly and may
be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or
through an annual subscription.
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Preface
Obtaining Technical Assistance
Ordering Documentation
You can order Cisco documentation in these ways:
•
Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order Cisco product documentation from
the Networking Products MarketPlace:
http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/order/order_root.pl
•
Registered Cisco.com users can order the Documentation CD-ROM through the online Subscription
Store:
http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription
•
Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by
calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, U.S.A.) at 408 526-7208 or, elsewhere
in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS (6387).
Documentation Feedback
You can submit comments electronically on Cisco.com. In the Cisco Documentation home page, click
the Fax or Email option in the “Leave Feedback” section at the bottom of the page.
You can e-mail your comments to bug-doc@cisco.com.
You can submit your comments by mail by using the response card behind the front cover of your
document or by writing to the following address:
Cisco Systems
Attn: Document Resource Connection
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883
We appreciate your comments.
Obtaining Technical Assistance
Cisco provides Cisco.com as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can
obtain online documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from online tools by using
the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) Web Site. Cisco.com registered users have complete access
to the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC Web Site.
Cisco.com
Cisco.com is the foundation of a suite of interactive, networked services that provides immediate, open
access to Cisco information, networking solutions, services, programs, and resources at any time, from
anywhere in the world.
Cisco.com is a highly integrated Internet application and a powerful, easy-to-use tool that provides a
broad range of features and services to help you with these tasks:
•
Streamline business processes and improve productivity
•
Resolve technical issues with online support
•
Download and test software packages
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Obtaining Technical Assistance
•
Order Cisco learning materials and merchandise
•
Register for online skill assessment, training, and certification programs
If you want to obtain customized information and service, you can self-register on Cisco.com. To access
Cisco.com, go to this URL:
http://www.cisco.com
Technical Assistance Center
The Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) is available to all customers who need technical assistance
with a Cisco product, technology, or solution. Two levels of support are available: the Cisco TAC
Web Site and the Cisco TAC Escalation Center.
Cisco TAC inquiries are categorized according to the urgency of the issue:
•
Priority level 4 (P4)—You need information or assistance concerning Cisco product capabilities,
product installation, or basic product configuration.
•
Priority level 3 (P3)—Your network performance is degraded. Network functionality is noticeably
impaired, but most business operations continue.
•
Priority level 2 (P2)—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects
of business operations. No workaround is available.
•
Priority level 1 (P1)—Your production network is down, and a critical impact to business operations
will occur if service is not restored quickly. No workaround is available.
The Cisco TAC resource that you choose is based on the priority of the problem and the conditions of
service contracts, when applicable.
Cisco TAC Web Site
You can use the Cisco TAC Web Site to resolve P3 and P4 issues yourself, saving both cost and time.
The site provides around-the-clock access to online tools, knowledge bases, and software. To access the
Cisco TAC Web Site, go to this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/tac
All customers, partners, and resellers who have a valid Cisco service contract have complete access to
the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC Web Site. The Cisco TAC Web Site requires a
Cisco.com login ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a login ID or
password, go to this URL to register:
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If you are a Cisco.com registered user, and you cannot resolve your technical issues by using the Cisco
TAC Web Site, you can open a case online by using the TAC Case Open tool at this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen
If you have Internet access, we recommend that you open P3 and P4 cases through the Cisco TAC
Web Site.
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Obtaining Technical Assistance
Cisco TAC Escalation Center
The Cisco TAC Escalation Center addresses priority level 1 or priority level 2 issues. These
classifications are assigned when severe network degradation significantly impacts business operations.
When you contact the TAC Escalation Center with a P1 or P2 problem, a Cisco TAC engineer
automatically opens a case.
To obtain a directory of toll-free Cisco TAC telephone numbers for your country, go to this URL:
http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml
Before calling, please check with your network operations center to determine the level of Cisco support
services to which your company is entitled: for example, SMARTnet, SMARTnet Onsite, or Network
Supported Accounts (NSA). When you call the center, please have available your service agreement
number and your product serial number.
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C H A P T E R
1
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface Overview
Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI) system and subsystems
and contains the following sections:
•
Cisco HSI Overview, page 1-1
•
Cisco HSI System Description, page 1-2
•
Operational Environment, page 1-5
•
Cisco HSI Recovery, page 1-5
•
Cisco HSI System Limitations, page 1-5
Cisco HSI Overview
The Cisco HSI adds an H.323 interface to the Cisco Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN)
Gateway (PGW 2200). This interface allows calls to be established between the PSTN and an H.323
network (see Figure 1-1).
The Cisco HSI provides the following services:
•
Translation of signaling protocols for establishing, controlling, and releasing calls
•
Administration of network parameters and protocol capabilities
•
System and call-related statistics
•
Fault reporting
•
Overload management
•
Event logging
•
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) interface
The Cisco HSI does not operate in an active/standby configuration and, therefore, does not provide the
same level of redundancy as the PGW 2200, which is configured as active/standby. We therefore
recommend that you use enough HSI nodes to support the number of simultaneous calls plus one. This
ensures (Trunk Group Caveats dependant) that, if one HSI fails, the calls are still adequately supported
by the remaining active HSI's.
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Cisco HSI System Description
Figure 1-1
Cisco HSI System Overview
Operational
support systems
H.323 signaling
interface
System
administrator
E-ISUP/
RUDP
H.323
System
technician
System
operator
Callers
Voice/
signaling
IP
network
Access
network
Cisco PGW 2200
69717
Voice
Voice/
signaling
Callers
PGW 2200
The PGW 2200 consists of the hardware and software that perform the signaling and call control tasks
(such as digit analysis, routing, and circuit selection) and seamlessly switch calls from the PSTN through
to the IP network.
IP Network
The purpose of the Cisco HSI is to enable the PGW 2200 to interoperate with the H.323 network.
Cisco HSI System Description
The Cisco HSI system has two subsystems (see Figure 1-2):
•
Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) subsystem
•
Call control subsystem
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Cisco HSI System Description
Figure 1-2
Cisco HSI Subsystems
MML
Batch File
Process
Manager
MML
Process
MML Log File
SNMP
Master Agent
SNMP
Subagent
H.323 Signaling
Interface
Alarms
Statistics
MML logfile
OAM
Call Control
Third party
RUDP
RADVision
PGW 2200
H.323 Signaling
interface
Provisioning files
Call trace
Logging
69718
SNMP
Workstation
OAM Subsystem
The OAM subsystem provides the following services:
•
Man-Machine Language (MML) interface that enables you to retrieve operational parameters and
modify configuration values through direct input or through batch files
•
SNMP interface that allows statistics and alarm retrieval
•
Management to provide automatic restart of the Cisco HSI application and control over the running
of the process
•
Statistics, events, call trace, and alarm output to files
•
Alarm events output to the MML interface
•
Overload control
Call Control Subsystem
The call control subsystem provides the following services:
•
Manages the Reliable User Data Protocol (RUDP) and H.323 stacks
•
Implements Enhanced ISDN User Part (E-ISUP)
•
Manages H.323 call control
•
Performs the conversion of calls between H.323 and E-ISUP call control messages
•
Provides call management and overload reduction actions
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Cisco HSI System Description
RUDP
RUDP transports the E-ISUP messages between the PGW 2200 and the Cisco HSI.
RUDP is a Cisco proprietary, connection-oriented, packet-based transport protocol.
RADVision H.323
The Cisco HSI uses the RADVision H.323 stack. The system uses the H.225 (Q.931 and registration,
admission, and status [RAS] protocol) and H.245 protocols to implement the H.323 endpoint signaling
function.
RADVision H.323 enables the creation of real-time voice H.323 calls over IP networks.
E-ISUP
E-ISUP is a proprietary Cisco protocol based on ISUP. E-ISUP is used for inter-PGW 2200 call control.
E-ISUP uses a subset of ISUP messages. The main differences between ISUP and E-ISUP are as follows:
•
E-ISUP is for the control of packet voice connection. It does not have circuit management messages
such as circuit reset and blocking.
•
E-ISUP is transported over RUDP in an IP network.
•
E-ISUP enables PGW 2200s to transport Session Description Protocol (SDP) information (such as
endpoint IP address and codec specifications) for call endpoints.
The Cisco HSI provides a conversion between the E-ISUP call control protocol originating from the
PGW 2200 and the H.323 call control protocol originating from the IP network (see Figure 1-1).
New Features Introduced in HSI Release 2.21
The following four features are introduced in Cisci HSI, Release 2.21.
Asymmetric Codec Treatment
The Asymmetric Codec Treatment feature averts the potential for inconsistencies in codec selection,
which might otherwise result when endpoints attempt to use different codecs for the transmission path.
Empty Capability Set
Empty Capability Set support enables the HSI to close opened logical channels, without releasing the
call. Subsequently, the HSI can open a new logical channel, potentially to a different endpoint, or use a
different codec.
H.323 Hairpin
The H.323 Hairpin feature can be used to connect a call between two H.323 endpoints without using
resources on the media gateway. For example, the PGW can respond to the dialled number in an
incoming H.323 call by routing the call to another HSI (perhaps the same HSI) rather than routing the
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Operational Environment
call to the PSTN. In this case, the originating and terminating HSIs establish the call normally but pass
the H.245 address of the H.323 endpoints. This enables the two endpoints to use H.245 to negotiate
media channels with each other directly, independent of the HSI.
T38 Fax
The T.38 Fax feature enables the HSI to alter a call, initially established for voice, to support a fax
transmission.
When a fax call is initiated, a voice call is established. When the terminating gateway detects the fax
tone generated by the terminating fax machine, the gateway initiates a T.38 mode request using H.245
procedures from the terminating gateway. If the opposite end of the call acknowledges the T.38 mode
request, the initial audio channel is closed and a T.38 fax relay channel is opened.
Operational Environment
This section provides operational environment requirements for the Cisco HSI.
Hardware Requirements
The Cisco HSI is targeted to run on a Sun Netra T1 100/105 platform with an 18-GB hard disk drive, a
Sun Netra 120 platform with a 36-GB hard disk drive, or a Sun Fire V120 platform with a 36-GB hard
disk drive. These platforms run on the Sun Solaris 8 operating system.
Software Requirements
The Sun Netra T1 100/105platform, Sun Netra 120 platform, and Sun Fire V120 platform run on the
Solaris 8 operating system.
Security
The application does not directly provide security features. All security must be implemented at the
UNIX level.
Cisco HSI Recovery
The Cisco HSI automatically restarts the main application process if that process terminates.
Cisco HSI System Limitations
The Cisco HSI does not implement security features.
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Installing and Configuring Cisco HSI Software
Introduction
This chapter contains instructions for the system administrator on how to install and configure the Cisco
H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI). This chapter contains the following sections:
•
Hardware and Software Requirements, page 2-1
•
Installing the Sun Solaris 8 Operating System, page 2-1
•
Installing the Cisco HSI, page 2-2
•
Starting the Cisco HSI, page 2-10
•
Stopping the Cisco HSI, page 2-10
•
Configuring the Cisco HSI, page 2-10
•
Upgrading the Cisco HSI, page 2-10
•
Removing the Cisco HSI, page 2-11
Hardware and Software Requirements
The Cisco HSI is targeted to run on a Sun Netra T1 100/105 platform with an 18-GB hard disk drive, a
Sun Netra 120 platform with a 36-GB hard disk drive, or a Sun Fire V120 platform with a 36-GB hard
disk drive. These platforms run on the Sun Solaris 8 operating system.
Installing the Sun Solaris 8 Operating System
The Sun Solaris 8 operating system must be installed before you install the Cisco HSI. Instructions for
installing Solaris 8 on the Sun Netra T1 100/105, Sun Netra 120, and Sun Fire V120 are in the Cisco
Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Installation and Configuration Guide, located at the
following URL:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/access/sc/rel9/swinstl/index.htm
After completing the Solaris 8 operating system installation, return to this document for Cisco HSI
installation procedures.
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Installing the Cisco HSI
Installing the Cisco HSI
This section provides step-by-step instructions for installing the Cisco HSI.
Before You Start
Complete the preinstallation tasks listed in Table 2-1 before installing the Cisco HSI. Use the checklist
to ensure that each task is completed. Detailed instructions for completing some tasks follow the
checklist.
Table 2-1
Check
Preinstallation Tasks Checklist
Preinstallation Task
Ensure that Solaris 8 is installed on the Sun Netra T1 100/105, Sun Netra 120, or
Sun Fire V120 platform, as described in the “Installing the Sun Solaris 8 Operating System”
section on page 2-1.
Note
The default platform for the Cisco HSI is the Sun Fire V120.
Configure group and user names, as described in the “Configuring Groups and Users” section
on page 2-2.
Gather the information listed in Table 2-2 and note it in the table for reference during the
installation.
Have your company internal support information and Cisco support contact information
readily available so you can get help with the installation if needed. If you have questions or
need assistance, see the “Obtaining Technical Assistance” section on page xvi.
Configuring Groups and Users
You must configure groups and users for the Cisco HSI on each host server. A user must be a member
of the “mgcgrp” group to use certain Cisco HSI functions, such as Man-Machine Language (MML).
To configure groups and users, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Log in as root.
Step 2
At the # prompt, enter the following commands:
# mkdir -p /export/home/users/mgcusr
# mkdir /export/BUILDS
# mkdir /export/PATCHES
# cd /export/home/users
# groupadd -g 20000 mgcgrp
# useradd -u 20001 -g 20000 -d /export/home/users/mgcusr -s /bin/csh mgcusr
# chown mgcusr:mgcgrp mgcusr
# passwd mgcusr <type password twice>
(Enter and confirm password)
Step 3
Log out, then log in as user mgcusr, using the password you applied in Step 2.
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Step 4
Verify that you are in directory /export/home/users/mgcusr by entering the following command:
# pwd
Step 5
Enter the following command:
# vi .cshrc
Step 6
Enter the vi insert mode by entering the following command:
# i (enter insert mode)
Step 7
Enter the following text on the first line:
source /opt/GoldWing/currentPM/local/setup.gw.csh
Step 8
Save the file and quit vi by entering the following commands:
[Esc] (exit insert mode)
:wq (write file and quit)
Step 9
Enter the following command:
# chmod 777 .cshrc
Cisco HSI Installation Information
Gather the information listed in Table 2-2 before you begin the Cisco HSI installation. Use the Notes
column in this table to record the information. Several steps in the installation procedure require you to
provide this information. Refer to this table as you proceed through the Cisco HSI installation steps.
Table 2-2
Cisco HSI Installation Information
Required Information
Notes
Base directory path
Note
Cisco HSI user name
Default: mgcusr
Cisco HSI group name
Default: mgcgrp
We strongly recommend that you accept the
default base directory path.
Gatekeeper IP address
Gatekeeper port
Default: 1719
Gateway prefix
Terminal alias
Gatekeeper ID
Note
This ID must match the entry configured in the
gatekeeper.
E-ISUP host port
Note
Typically 8003, but this entry must match the
peer port setting of the IPLNK object in the
PGW 2200 configuration.
VSC11 name (either the DNS2 host
name, if DNS is configured, or the IP
address of the Cisco PGW 22003)
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Table 2-2
Cisco HSI Installation Information (continued)
Required Information
Notes
VSC1 port
Note
Typically 8003, but this entry must match the
peer port setting of the IPLNK object in the
PGW 2200 configuration.
Installation node ID
Hardware platform
Sun Netra T1
Sun Netra 120
Sun Fire V120 (Default)
Installation location
1. VSC = virtual switch controller
2. DNS = domain name system
3. PGW = PSTN Gateway
The Cisco HSI application software is distributed in the OTTgw000.pkg file, which is in a Sun Packaging
Stream file format.
The Cisco HSI application software is distributed as a tar file with a name format GoldWing-xxxx.tar,
where xxxx is the version ID: for example, GoldWing-2.21.tar.
The default installation directory is /opt/GoldWing. You can specify a different directory. More than one
version of the software can exist. The parent directory is in /opt/GoldWing/2.21.
Links point to the current active version of the Cisco HSI application, as follows:
•
currentPM points to the current version to use for all software except the call processing application.
•
currentGW points to the version that may not be the latest version of the call processing application.
(GWmain)
Table 2-3 shows the subdirectories of the /opt/GoldWing/currentPM directory.
Table 2-3
CurrentPM Subdirectories
Subdirectory
Contents
./bin
All compiled executables.
./local
All scripts.
./etc
Base configuration files.
./lib
Shared libraries required by executables.
./toolkit
Toolkit files.
./var
Volatile directory that contains file locks and so on.
./var/log
Default log directory.
./var/prov
Provision system writes provisioning config files here.
./var/trace
Trace logs are written here.
Exported provisioning files are stored in /opt/GoldWing/export.
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Installing the Cisco HSI
Installing the Cisco HSI
This section provides step-by-step instructions for installing a single Cisco HSI for use with a simplex
PGW 2200 configuration (a configuration with one Cisco PGW 2200 host). To install a dual Cisco HSI
for use with a redundant PGW 2200 configuration (a configuration with two Cisco PGW 2200 hosts),
complete the steps in this section and then proceed to the “Installing a Dual Cisco HSI for a Redundant
PGW 2200 Configuration” section on page 2-9.
Note
In the following installation procedure, the package name is OTTgw000 and the version of the software
is 2.21; the /export/BUILDS directory is used to install the system software.
To install the Cisco HSI, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Verify that the Sun Solaris 8 operating system is installed. See the “Installing the Sun Solaris 8 Operating
System” section on page 2-1 for more information.
Step 2
Insert the Cisco HSI software CD in the CD-ROM drive.
Step 3
Log in as root and enter the following commands at the # prompt:
# cd /export/BUILDS
# tar xvf /mnt/cdrom/GoldWing-2.21.tar
The following text displays:
x
x
x
x
Step 4
./2.21/APPLICATIONS, 0 bytes, 0 tape blocks
./2.21/APPLICATIONS/OTTgw000.pkg, 38954496 bytes, 76083 tape blocks
./2.21/install.sh, 5223 bytes, 11 tape blocks
./2.21/uninstall.sh, 3053 bytes, 6 tape blocks
At the # prompt, enter the following commands:
# cd /export/BUILDS/2.21
# ./install.sh
The following text displays:
Processing package instance <OTTgw000> from
</export/BUILDS/2.21/APPLICATIONS/OTTgw000.pkg>
GoldWing H323 Adjunct Processor V0.1.6
(sparc) 2.21
Copyright (c) 2001 Cisco Systems, Ltd.
All Rights Reserved
This product is protected by copyright and distributed under
licenses restricting copying, distribution and decompilation.
Enter GoldWing base directory path (default /opt/GoldWing) [?,q]
Step 5
Press Enter to select the default HSI base directory path.
Caution
We strongly recommend that you select the default base directory path. Operational issues
might arise if other directories are used.
The following text displays:
Enter base directory path (default /opt/GoldWing/2.21) [?,q]
Step 6
Press Enter to select the default base directory path. The following text displays:
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Enter GoldWing user name
Step 7
Type the Cisco HSI user name mgcusr and press Enter (the default user name is cisco). The following
text displays:
Enter GoldWing group name
Step 8
Type the Cisco HSI group name mgcgrp and press Enter (the default user group name is sysadmin). The
following text displays:
Enter GateKeeper IP Address
Step 9
Type the gatekeeper IP address (see Table 2-2) and press Enter. The following text displays:
Enter GateKeeper Port
Step 10
Type the gatekeeper port (see Table 2-2) and press Enter (the default port is 1719). The following text
displays:
Enter GateWay Prefix
Step 11
Type the gateway prefix (see Table 2-2) and press Enter.
Note
The gateway prefix is the prefix that, when dialed from the H.323 network, causes the Cisco HSI
to route the call over E-ISUP to the PGW 2200.
The following text displays:
Enter Terminal Alias
Step 12
Type the terminal alias (see Table 2-2) and press Enter. The following text displays:
Enter GateKeeper Id
Step 13
Type the gatekeeper ID (see Table 2-2) and press Enter.
Note
The gatekeeper ID must match the entry configured in the gatekeeper.
The following text displays:
Enter E-ISUP Host Port
Step 14
Type the E-ISUP host port (see Table 2-2) and press Enter.
Note
The E-ISUP host port is typically 8003, but it must match the peer port setting of the IPLNK
object in the PGW 2200 configuration.
The following text displays:
Enter VSC1 Name
Step 15
Type the VSC1 name and press Enter.
Note
The VSCI name is either the DNS host name (if DNS is configured) or the IP address of the
PGW 2200.
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Installing the Cisco HSI
The following text displays:
Enter VSC1 Port
Step 16
Type the VSC1 port number (see Table 2-2) and press Enter.
Note
The VSCI port is typically 8003, but it must match the port setting of the IPLNK object in the
PGW 2200 configuration.
The following text displays:
Enter Installation NodeId
Step 17
Type the installation node ID (see Table 2-2) and press Enter.
Note
The installation node ID is a text field typically used by network designers for identification
purposes. Entering a value in this field does not affect functionality.
The following text displays:
Enter Hardware Platform
Step 18
Type the hardware platform name (see Table 2-2) and press Enter (typically, accept the default platform
name). The following text displays:
Enter Installation Location
Step 19
Type the installation location (see Table 2-2) and press Enter.
Note
The installation location field is a text field typically used by network designers for
identification purposes. Entering a value in this field does not affect functionality.
The following is an example of the screen that displays:
## Executing checkinstall script.
Modified Environment is:
------------------------BASEDIR=/opt/GoldWing/2.21
GWHOME=/opt/GoldWing
GWUSR=mgcusr
GWGRP=mgcgrp
GWCONF_IP=”10.70.54.53”
GWCONF_PORT=”1719”
GWCONF_PREFIX=”0208”
GWCONF_ALIAS=”cisco@OuterLondonDomain.com”
GWCONF_GKID=”OuterLondon”
GWCONF_HOST_PORT=8003
GWCONF_VSC1_NAME=goliath
GWCONF_VSC1_PORT=8003
GWCONF_NODEID=”H323-GW1”
GWCONF_HARDWARE=”Sun Netra T1”
GWCONF_LOCATION=”H323 - GW1”
------------------------The selected base directory </opt/GoldWing/2.21> must exist before installation is
attempted.
Do you want this directory created now [y,n,?,q]
Step 20
Type y to create the version directory. The following text displays:
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Using </opt/GoldWing/2.21> as the package base directory.
## Processing package information.
## Processing system information.
## Verifying disk space requirements.
## Checking for conflicts with packages already installed.
## Checking for setuid/setgid programs.
This package contains scripts which will be executed with super-user
permission during the process of installing this package.
Do you want to continue with the installation of <OTTgw000> [y,n,?]
Step 21
Review the output before you continue the installation. Type y to continue. The files are installed. The
following text displays:
Installing GoldWing H323 Adjunct Processor V0.1.6 as <OTTgw000>
## Installing part 1 of 1.
/etc/init.d/CiscoGW
/etc/rc3.d/S95CiscoGW <symbolic link>
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/GWmain
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/PMmain
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/mml
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/msg.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/parse
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/GWmain.base.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/GWmain.default.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/GWmain.static.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/H323SkeletonFileSimple.dat
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/parse.exclude.list
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/parse.list
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/lib/libgwMib_shlib.so
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/var/prov/active_config <symbolic link>
[ verifying class <none> ]
[ verifying class <script> ]
## Executing postinstall script.
Installed package instance is: OTTgw000
Installation of <OTTgw000> was successful.
Installed package instance environment variables are:
----------------------------------------------------PKGINST=OTTgw000
VERSION=2.21
BASEDIR=/opt/GoldWing/2.21
GWHOME=/opt/GoldWing
MGCUSR=mgcusr
MGCGRP=mgcgrp
----------------------------------------------------Setting link /opt/GoldWing/currentPM.
Setting link /opt/GoldWing/currentGW.
Installation of the Cisco HSI is now complete. The directory /opt/GoldWing now displays as follows:
drwxr-xr-x
lrwxrwxrwx
lrwxrwxrwx
-rwxrwxr-x
Note
7
1
1
1
cisco
cisco
cisco
root
sysadmin
sysadmin
sysadmin
other
512
19
19
3053
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
9
9
9
9
18:31
18:31
18:31
18:31
2.21
currentGW -> /opt/GoldWing/2.21
currentPM -> /opt/GoldWing/2.21
uninstall.sh
The links currentPM and currentGW point to the currently active version of the Cisco HSI. The uninstall
script has been copied here for convenience, but it can be run only by root user.
To check the Cisco HSI installation, enter pkgchk OTTgw000.
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Note
The package name is OTTgw000. If more than one instance of the package is installed, the package name
has a suffix (for example, OTTgw000.2, OTTgw000.3, and so on).
Outside of the /opt/GoldWing directory, the start/stop script CiscoGW is copied to the /etc/init.d
directory, and the link /etc/rc3.d/S95CiscoGW is created to facilitate automatic startup of the Cisco HSI
on system reboot.
When the installation is complete, a file named PKINST is written to the base directory on the installed
software.
Caution
Do not modify the PKINST file. It contains information derived from the installation, and the uninstall
script uses the PKINST file in the version directory to determine which package name to remove if more
than one instance of the package is installed.
Installing a Dual Cisco HSI for a Redundant PGW 2200 Configuration
A dual Cisco HSI can be installed and configured for use with a redundant Cisco PGW 2200
configuration (ee Figure 2-1).
Dual Cisco HSI with a Redundant PGW 2200 Configuration
Cisco PGW
2200-A
194.182.147.226
194.182.147.242
Caution
Cisco PGW
2200-B
Cisco HSI-A
194.182.147.227
194.182.147.243
Cisco HSI-B
194.182.147.228
194.182.147.244
69729
Figure 2-1
To ensure the successful installation of a dual Cisco HSI, after Step 21 of the “Installing the Cisco HSI”
section on page 2-5, make sure that you provision the software for the active host first before proceeding
to Step 1 below. See “Configuring the Cisco HSI” section on page 2-10 for configuration information.
Only one active provisioning session is permitted, and provisioning is permitted only on the active
Cisco HSI.
Exit the provisioning session on the active host and continue to Step 1 below. If software is not
provisioned after it is installed on the active host, the standby host is not synchronized with the active
host. As a result, a forced switchover might fail.
To install a dual Cisco HSI for a redundant PGW 2200 configuration (a configuration with two
Cisco PGW 2200 hosts), complete the following steps:
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Starting the Cisco HSI
Step 1
Continuing from Step 21 of the “Installing the Cisco HSI” section on page 2-5, exit server 1.
Step 2
Log in to server 2 as root and go to the # prompt.
Step 3
Insert the Cisco HSI CD in the CD-ROM drive.
Step 4
Follow the installation instructions found in Step 3 through Step 21 of the “Installing the Cisco HSI”
section on page 2-5.
Installation of the dual Cisco HSI for a redundant PGW 2200 configuration is now complete.
Starting the Cisco HSI
To start the Cisco HSI, execute the start script as the root user and enter the following command:
# /etc/init.d/CiscoGW start
Note
The application runs as root user because this is a requirement of a Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP) subagent application. If you do not run this script as the root user, the SNMP subagent
fails to connect to the master agent.
Stopping the Cisco HSI
To stop the Cisco HSI, log in as root user and enter the following command:
# /etc/init.d/CiscoGW stop
Configuring the Cisco HSI
To configure the Cisco HSI, you must first access the user interface. Use the mml command (see
Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference” for more information). If the setup.gw file
has been sourced, it is in the user path. Use the provisioning commands to configure the Cisco HSI as
required (see Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI” and Appendix A, “MML User Interface and
Command Reference” for more information).
Upgrading the Cisco HSI
Before removing an old version of the Cisco HSI, install the new version of the software. A provisioning
session can be exported to a flat file in a format that can be used as input to another provisioning session
(see prov-exp in Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference,” for more information).
When you upgrade the Cisco HSI version, the following conditions apply:
•
The Cisco HSI must first be stopped before installation is allowed to proceed.
•
The installation of the software overwrites the existing installed version of the software.
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Removing the Cisco HSI
•
The installation of a new version results in a new version directory being created in the
/opt/GoldWing parent directory. The links currentPM and currentGW are updated to point to this
new version.
Note
To revert to a previous version of the software, manually modify the currentPM and currentGW
links in the/opt/GoldWing parent directory to point to the previous version.
The uninstall.sh script uses the PKINST file in the version directory to determine which package name
to remove.
Removing the Cisco HSI
To remove the Cisco HSI, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Log in as root.
Step 2
Enter the following command to stop the Cisco HSI:
# /etc/init.d/CiscoGW stop
Step 3
Enter the following commands:
# cd /opt/GoldWing
# ls -l
The following is an example of the screen that displays:
drwxr-xr-x
lrwxrwxrwx
lrwxrwxrwx
-rwxrwxr-x
Step 4
7
1
1
1
cisco
cisco
cisco
root
sysadmin
sysadmin
sysadmin
other
512
19
19
3053
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
9
9
9
9
18:31
18:31
18:31
18:31
2.21
currentGW -> /opt/GoldWing/2.21
currentPM -> /opt/GoldWing/2.21
uninstall.sh
Enter the uninstall command and specify the version of the software that you want to uninstall; for
example:
# ./uninstall.sh 2.21
The following text displays:
Warning: This script will remove the package OTTgw000
Do you wish to proceed? [n] [y,n,?,q]
Step 5
Type y and press Enter. The following text displays:
Deleting generated files in /opt/GoldWing/2.21
The following package is currently installed:
OTTgw000
GoldWing H323 Adjunct Processor V0.1.6
(sparc) 2.21
Do you want to remove this package?
Step 6
Type y and press Enter. The following text displays:
## Removing installed package instance <OTTgw000>
This package contains scripts which will be executed with super-user
permission during the process of removing this package.
Do you want to continue with the removal of this package [y,n,?,q]
Step 7
Type y and press Enter. The following text displays:
## Verifying package dependencies.
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Removing the Cisco HSI
## Processing package information.
## Executing preremove script.
## Removing pathnames in class <script>
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/local/setup.gw
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/local/pmStart.sh
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/local/gwhalt
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/local/CiscoGW
## Removing pathnames in class <none>
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/local
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/lib/libgwMib_shlib.so
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/lib
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/parse.list
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/parse.exclude.list
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/H323SkeletonFileSimple.dat
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/GWmain.static.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/GWmain.request.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/GWmain.default.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/GWmain.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc/GWmain.base.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/etc
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/parse
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/msg.conf
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/mml
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/PMmain
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin/GWmain
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/bin
/opt/GoldWing/2.21/PKGINST
/etc/rc3.d/S95CiscoGW
/etc/rc3.d <shared pathname not removed>
/etc/init.d/CiscoGW
/etc/init.d <shared pathname not removed>
/etc <shared pathname not removed>
## Executing postremove script.
## Updating system information.
Removal of <OTTgw000> was successful.
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3
Provisioning the Cisco HSI
Introduction
This chapter describes the data that must be provisioned for the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI).
The data is divided into two areas: system configuration and H.323 stack data. This chapter contains the
following sections:
•
Cisco HSI Configuration, page 3-1
•
H.323 Stack Configuration, page 3-8
Cisco HSI Configuration
All configuration data is contained within configuration files. Cisco HSI starts with an initial
configuration file in $BASEDIR/currentGW/etc/GWmain.conf. This file is created during installation of
the software.
The configuration data within the file is defined as dynamic, static, or constant:
•
Dynamic data can be modified by a provisioning session (see Appendix A, “MML User Interface
and Command Reference”). It can be activated on the currently running Cisco HSI.
•
Static data can be modified by a provisioning session but cannot be activated on a running
Cisco HSI. Changes to dynamic and static data can be written to a separate provisioning file (in
$BASEDIR/currentGW/var/prov/configname/session.dat) that can be used during subsequent
restarts of the Cisco HSI.
•
Constant configuration data is contained within the configuration file and cannot be modified by
provisioning sessions. Constant configuration data can be modified only by system technicians or
administrators who use UNIX editing tools. This data is replicated from the initial configuration file
into the provisioning files, and is included in subsequent provisioning sessions.
Examples of the use of constant data are given in Appendixes D, E, F, and G. These appendixes
determine the mapping of cause values for incoming and outgoing H.323 and Enhanced ISDN User
Part (E-ISUP) messages. System technicians can modify these values in the initial configuration file
to explicitly choose the mappings for their system.
When a provisioning session creates a new configuration file, it also verifies that provisioned data is
within allowable ranges and indicates this in the start of the file. It checksums the configuration file and
writes the checksum as $BASEDIR/currentGW/var/prov/configname/checksum.dat. When the Cisco
HSI starts up, it attempts to read the active configuration, checks that the configuration has been verified,
and ensures that the checksum matches. If the active configuration is not verified or if the checksum is
faulty, the configuration reverts to using the $BASEDIR/currentGW/etc/GWmain.conf file.
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Cisco HSI Configuration
All configuration data that can be set in the system is defined in the Skeleton Configuration file (see
Appendix B, “Skeleton Configuration File”). The Skeleton Configuration file defines the data names and
types (strings or numbers), and defines whether the data is dynamic, static, or constant.
MML Configuration Commands
There are three types of MML configuration command:
•
Configuration session commands that work with entire provisioning data files (see Table 3-1)
•
Configuration component or parameter commands that perform actions on components or
parameters affecting a specific data file (see Table 3-2)
•
Configuration export commands
For more information about MML configuration commands, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and
Command Reference.”
Note
Parameter names used in MML commands are not case sensitive.
Table 3-1
Configuration Session Commands
Command
Description
prov-sta
Starts a provisioning session to create a new configuration or modify
an existing configuration
prov-cpy
Activates the configuration settings in the current provisioning
session
prov-stp
Terminates the provisioning session and saves the configuration
Table 3-2
Configuration Component or Parameter Commands
Command
Description
prov-add
Adds a component to the Cisco HSI
prov-dlt
Deletes a provisioned component
prov-ed
Modifies a provisioned component
prov-rtrv
Retrieves information about an existing provisioning session
The configuration export command is prov-exp, which exports the currently provisioned configuration
of the Cisco HSI to a file.
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Cisco HSI Configuration
System Configuration Data
System configuration data can be static or dynamic. Static data can be activated only at startup. Dynamic
data can be activated during system run time.
Static System Data
To modify the static system data parameters in Table 3-3, use the sys_config_static MML name variable
for the prov-add, prov-dlt, and prov-ed commands. Halt and restart the application for the changes to
take effect.
In the following example, the prov-add command adds the static system data parameter
VSCA_PORT_NUMBER1 to a static configuration file. The prov-ed command modifies the value of
the VSCA_PORT_NUMBER1 parameter. The prov-dlt command deletes the
VSCA_PORT_NUMBER1 parameter from the static configuration file.
Example
prov-add:name=sys_config_static,vsca_port_number1=8003
prov-ed:name=sys_config_static,vsca_port_number1=8002
prov-dlt:name=sys_config_static,vsca_port_number1
The parameters in Table 3-3 are written to a static configuration file or to a section within a file.
Table 3-3
Static System Data Parameters
Parameter
Type
Description
HOST_PORT_NUMBER1
[0-65535]
The first port number to be used by the Cisco HSI. The default value is 0.
Note
HOST_PORT_NUMBER2
[0-65535]
This value must match the peer port setting on the PGW1 2200
E-ISUP IPLNK object.
The second port number to be used by the Cisco HSI. The default value is 0.
Note
This value should always be set to 0.
VSCA_IPADDR1
STRING
The primary IP address of the primary PGW 2200.
VSCA_IPADDR2
STRING
The secondary IP address of the primary PGW 2200.
Note
VSCB_IPADDR1
STRING
The primary IP address of the secondary PGW 2200.
Note
VSCB_IPADDR2
STRING
This value must match that of VSCA_IPADDR1.
This parameter is not used in a standalone PGW configuration.
The secondary IP address of the secondary PGW 2200.
Note
This value of this parameter must match that of VSCB_IPADDR1.
This parameter is not used in a standalone PGW configuration.
VSCA_PORT_NUMBER1
[0-65535]
The first port number of the primary PGW 2200.
VSCA_PORT_NUMBER2
[0-65535]
The second port number of the primary PGW 2200.
Note
VSCB_PORT_NUMBER1
[0-65535]
This value must match that of VSCA_PORT_NUMBER1.
The first port number of the secondary PGW 2200.
Note
This parameter is not used in a standalone PGW configuration.
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Table 3-3
Static System Data Parameters (continued)
Parameter
Type
Description
VSCB_PORT_NUMBER2
[0-65535]
The second port number of the secondary PGW 2200.
Note
This value of this parameter must match that of
VSCA_PORT_NUMBER2. This parameter is not used in a
standalone PGW configuration.
ClipClirSupported
STRING
CLI Presentation or restriction is enabled if this parameter is present and set to
anything other than "". For example, to enable CLIP/CLIR support, set this
parameter explicitly to “Enabled.”
RaiSupported
STRING
RAI support is enabled if this parameter is present and set to anything other than
"". For example, to enable RAI support, set this parameter to “Enabled.”
DtmfSupportedDirection
STRING
This is set to “both”, “tx,” or “rx”. If this parameter is not present or is set to any
value other than “both,” “tx,” or “rx,” the DTMF Relay feature is disabled.
DtmfSupportedType
STRING
This is set to “dtmf” or “basicString.” If this parameter is not present or set to
any other value, the DTMF Relay feature is disabled.
H225PavoSupported
STRING
Pavo support is enabled if this parameter is present and set to anything other than
"". For example, set it to “Enabled.”
PavoRedirScreeningInd
[0-3]
The value of the Pavo redirecting number screening indicator. (If this parameter
is not provisioned, the default is Q.931 zero—user provided, not screened.)
PavoRedirReason
[0-15]
The value of the Pavo redirecting number reason field. This parameter has no
default. If unprovisioned, the redirecting number parameter will not contain the
Reason for Redirection field (octet 3b).
PavoRedirPresInd
[0-3]
The value of the Pavo redirecting number presentation indicator. (If this
parameter is not provisioned, the default is Q.931 zero—no indication.)
CliInDisplaySupported
STRING
T38MaxVal
STRING
If this parameter is present and set to anything other than "", the Calling Number
is also sent in the DISPLAY IE. The NetMeeting endpoint retrieves the calling
party number from the DISPLAY IE in the H.225 setup message. To enable this
parameter, set it to “Enabled.”
This T.38 Faxt38MaxVal parameter has the following optional attributes that can
be assigned values in a specific range.
Note
T38Options
STRING
Values for the following attributes must be expressed in hexadecimal
format.
•
MaxBit—[0x0—0xFFFFFFFF]. The default value is 0x90.
•
FxMaxBuf—[0x0—0xFFFFFFFF]. The default value is 0xc8.
• FxMaxData—[0x0—0xFFFFFFFF]. The default value is 0x48.
This T.38 Fax parameter is assigned one of the following optional values:
•
FxFillBit—[0 or 1] The default value is 0.
•
FxTransMMR—[0 or 1] The default value is 0.
•
FxRateTransJBIG—[0 or 1] The default value is 0.
•
FXRate—[Local or Trans] The default value is Trans.
•
FxUdpEC—[Red or FEC] The default value is Red.
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Table 3-3
Static System Data Parameters (continued)
Parameter
Type
Description
AsymmetricHandlingSupported
STRING
Asymmetric Codec Treatment support is enabled if this parameter is present and
set to anything other than "". To enable Asymmetric Codec Treatment, set this
parameter to “Enabled.”
UseConfID
STRING
Use this parameter to specify the precedence of extracting the Global Call ID
from the Conference ID or the GUID in the H.225 Setup message. The
provisioning of this property to a value other than "" gives precedence to the
Conference ID. For example, set it to “Enabled.” To set the precedence to the
GUID field, the crafts person can either delete the property from the config or
set it to "".
DualCLISupported
STRING
To enable Dual CLI support (see H.246 Annex C), set this parameter to anything
other than "". For example, to explicitly enable Dual CLI support, set this
parameter to “Enabled.”
1. PGW = Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Gateway
Dynamic System Data
To modify the dynamic system data parameters in Table 3-4, use the sys_config_dynamic MML name
variable for the prov-add, prov-dlt, and prov-ed commands. You need not halt and restart call
processing for the changes to take effect.
In the following example, the prov-add command adds the dynamic system data parameter
OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT to a dynamic configuration file. The prov-ed command modifies the value of
the OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT parameter. The prov-dlt command deletes the OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT
parameter from the dynamic configuration file.
Example
prov-add:name=sys_config_dynamic,OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT=20
prov-ed:name=sys_config_dynamic,OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT=25
prov-dlt:name=sys_config_dynamic,OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT
The MML commands write the parameters in Table 3-4 to a dynamic configuration file or to a section
within a file.
Table 3-4
Dynamic System Data Parameters
Parameter
Description
Default
LOGDIRECTORY
Specifies the directory used when the active log file is created, and
also specifies the directory where the rotated log file is stored.
/var/log/
LOGFILENAMEPREFIX
Specifies the filename prefix used when the log files are created or
rotated. The .log postfix is appended to the end of the prefix to
establish the name of the active log file.
platform.log
LOGPRIO
Defines the initial logging levels. By default it is set to TRACE. When TRACE
the system initializes and is running, the levels set for individual
packages (0x0000 to 0xFFFF) determine the log levels. See the
“Logging Levels” section on page 4-10.
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Table 3-4
Dynamic System Data Parameters (continued)
Parameter
Description
Default
LOGFILEROTATESIZE
Triggers a log file rotation based on the size of the active file. The
application regularly checks the current size of the file to determine
whether a rotation is required. If a file rotation is triggered by this
parameter, the rotated file might be slightly larger than the size
specified by this parameter. A file rotation is triggered by this
parameter causes the timer associated with the
LOGFILEROTATEINTERVAL parameter to be reset as well.
10 Mb
LOGFILEROTATEINTERVAL
Triggers a log file rotation based on the time elapsed since the
previous rotation. This timer is reset after any rotation occurs,
regardless of the cause or trigger of the rotation.
1440 minutes
(24 hours)
IPADDRNMS
Defines the IP address of the network management system.
—
OVLDSAMPLERATE
Defines the frequency of CPU sampling and threshold checking.
3000 millisecond
(ms) polling rate
OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT
Indicates what percentage of calls should be rejected when an
20
overload condition occurs. This parameter is used in conjunction with
the OVLDLEVEL1FILTER parameter. The overload level 1 value is
the lowest level of overload and must be less than or equal to the
provisioned values for OVLDLEVEL2PERCENT and
OVLDLEVEL3PERCENT.
Note
OVLDLEVEL1FILTER
If this value is set to zero, no overload level 1 treatment
occurs.
Indicates what call types should be gapped if an overload level 1
condition occurs. The possible values are:
•
Normal—Emergency or priority calls are not gapped.
•
All—All calls are gapped, regardless of type.
Note
Normal
If the overload percentage is set to 100, all calls are gapped
irrespective of this setting.
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWER Determines the number of active calls below which the application
CALLS
load must fall in order for the overload level 1 condition to be
removed.
1800
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPER
CALLS
1900
Determines how many simultaneous active calls trigger an overload
level 1 condition.
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWER Determines the CPU utilization level below which the application
CPU
must fall in order for the overload level 1 condition to be removed.
60
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPER
CPU
Determines the level of CPU utilization that triggers an overload
level 1 condition.
65
OVLDLEVEL2PERCENT
75
Indicates what percentage of calls should be rejected when an
overload condition occurs. The parameter is used in conjunction with
the OVLDLEVEL2FILTER parameter. This is the second level of
overload and must be less than or equal to the provisioned value of
OVLDLEVEL3PERCENT and greater than or equal to the
provisioned value of OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT.
Note
If this value is set to zero, no overload level 1 or 2 treatment
occurs (by definition, the level 1 value must also be zero).
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Table 3-4
Dynamic System Data Parameters (continued)
Parameter
Description
Default
OVLDLEVEL2FILTER
Indicates what call types should be gapped if an overload level 2
condition occurs (see OVLDLEVEL1FILTER).
Normal
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWER Determines the number of active calls below which the application
CALLS
load must fall in order for the overload level 2 condition to be
removed.
2000
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPER
CALLS
2200
Determines how many simultaneous active calls trigger an overload
level 2 condition.
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWER Determines the level of CPU utilization below which the application 70
CPU
must fall in order for the overload level 2 condition to be removed.
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPER
CPU
Determines the level of CPU utilization that triggers an overload
level 2 condition.
OVLDLEVEL3PERCENT
Indicates what percentage of calls should be rejected when an
90
overload condition occurs. The parameter is used in conjunction with
the OVLDLEVEL3FILTER parameter. This is the highest level of
overload and must be greater than or equal to the provisioned values
for OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT and OVLDLEVEL2PERCENT.
Note
OVLDLEVEL3FILTER
80
If this value is set to zero, no overload treatment occurs (by
definition, the level 1 and level 2 values must also be zero).
Indicates what call types should be gapped if an overload level 3
condition occurs (see OVLDLEVEL1FILTER).
Normal
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHLOWER Determines the number of active calls below which the application
CALLS
load must fall in order for the overload level 3 condition to be
removed.
2300
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPER
CALLS
2400
Determines how many simultaneous active calls trigger an overload
level 3 condition.
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHLOWER Determines the level of CPU utilization below which the application 85
CPU
must fall in order for the overload level 3 condition to be removed.
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPER
CPU
Determines the level of CPU utilization that triggers an overload
level 3 condition.
95
CIAGENTSCANPERIOD
Specifies the frequency with which the CIagent polls the CPU
utilization.
—
ALARMDEBOUNCETIME
Specifies the length of time that an alarm condition must persist
before being reported, and any associated action taken.
0
CALLREFERENCEUSAGE
Determines which call reference identity is passed on to the
PGW 2200 (call reference field or Conference ID).
—
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Table 3-4
Dynamic System Data Parameters (continued)
Parameter
Description
Default
DISKUSAGELIMIT
Represents a percentage of disk occupancy.
95
The application continually polls the system for disk occupancy, and
if the percentage rises above the limit set by DISKUSAGELIMIT, the
LOW_DISK_SPACE alarm is raised.
RegFailureReleaseCause
DISKUSAGELIMIT has a default value of 95 percent. The value
range is 0–100, inclusive. When dynamically provisioned, the
parameter DISKUSAGELIMIT, if not set within that range, is set to
the default value (95) and the CONFIGURATION_ FAILURE alarm
is raised.
This parameter specifies the Q.850 release cause, which the HSI uses
—
after the HSI fails three times to register to a gatekeeper.
This parameter is assigned a value in the range 1—127
H.323 Stack Configuration
Refer to the RADVision H.323 Protocol Stack Programmer’s Guide for definitions of each of the
RADVision parameters.
The parameter name is based on the ASN.1 paths, but in some cases the parameter name has been
shortened for convenience. For example, “capabilities” has been shortened to “caps.”
The case of the parameter name reflects exactly the ASN.1 definitions, but case is not important to MML
configuration.
Nonprovisionable Data
The parameters in Table 3-5 cannot be altered through MML commands.
Table 3-5
Nonprovisionable Data Parameters
H323_SYS
Description
system.manualstart
Present
system.pdlname
Absent
system.delimiter
#FF
ras.gatekeeper
Absent
ras.rasmulticastaddress
224.0.1.41.1718
h245.capabilities.manualoperation
Present
h245.masterslave.manualoperation
Present
q931.manualaccept
Present
q931.earlyH245
Present
q931.autoanswer
Present
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Table 3-5
Nonprovisionable Data Parameters (continued)
H323_SYS
Description
q931.manualcallprocessing
Present
q931.h245tunneling
Present
MML Provisionable Data
H.323 System Parameters
The parameters in Table 3-6 are required for H.323 stack initialization. To modify the parameters in
Table 3-6, use the h323_sys MML name variable for the prov-add, prov-dlt, and prov-ed commands.
Halt and restart the application for these changes to take effect.
Note
Table 3-6
The asterisk (*) after a parameter name in the first column of Table 3-6 denotes a mandatory RADVision
parameter that has an inbuilt default value if a value is not set in provisioning.
H.323 System Initialization Parameters
Parameter
Description
Type
Example
maxCalls*
Maximum number of concurrent calls allowed
INTEGER(0, 65535)
2500
maxChannels*
Maximum number of concurrent channels allowed
INTEGER(0, 65535)
2
Q.931 Parameters
To modify the parameters listed in Table 3-7, use the q931 MML name variable for the prov-add,
prov-dlt, and prov-ed commands.
In the following example, the prov-add command sets the Q.931 parameter maxCalls to the value 2000.
Example
prov-add:name=q931,maxCalls=2000
The Update Type column in Table 3-7 shows when the change to a parameter takes effect once a change
is made:
•
Immediate means that the effect of the change is immediate.
•
Start means that the application needs to be restarted for the change to take effect.
•
Next Call means that the next call has the new parameter set.
Note
Immediate and Next Call update types refer to dynamic system data.
Note
The asterisk (*) after a parameter name in the first column of Table 3-7 denotes a mandatory RADVision
parameter with an inbuilt default value that will be used if the value is not set in provisioning.
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Table 3-7
Q.931 Parameters
Parameter Name
Description
Example
Update Type
responseTimeOut*
The maximum time (in seconds) permitted INTEGER(1,200)
to receive the first response to a call. If this
parameter expires, the call is disconnected.
20
Immediate
connectTimeOut*
The maximum time (in seconds) the stack
waits for call establishment after the first
response is received. If this parameter
expires, the call is disconnected.
INTEGER(1,20000)
180
Immediate
callSignalingPort*
The number of the port receiving the calls
destined for the PGW 2200.
INTEGER(0,65535)
1720
Start
maxCalls*
The maximum number of simultaneous
INTEGER(0,65535)
calls permitted. If this parameter is
exceeded, the next call attempt returns busy.
2500
Next Call
notEstablishControl
The stack does not allow the switching of
control from the Q.931 to the H.245 stack.
Not present
Next Call
overlappedSending
NULL
Because the Q.931 configuration flag
indicates that both parties support overlap
sending, this state notifies the other party
that it can send an overlap sending message.
Present
Immediate
Note
Type
NULL
The Q.931 parameter overlappedSending has been combined with the RAS overlappedSending
parameter. If you set the Q.931 overlappedSending parameter, you also set the RAS overlappedSending
parameter.
RAS Parameters
The parameters in Table 3-8 are required for RAS stack initialization. To modify the RAS parameters,
use the ras MML name variable for the prov-add, prov-dlt, and prov-ed commands.
In the following example, the prov-add command sets the RAS parameter maxfail to the value 3.
Example
prov-add:name=ras,maxfail=3
The array index [i] in some of the parameter names in the first column of Table 3-8 must be replaced
with a valid braced index from 1 to 20, and must be continuous and unique (that is, it must contain no
duplicates).
The Update Type column in Table 3-8 shows when the change to a parameter takes effect after it is
modified:
•
Immediate means that the effect of the change is immediate.
•
Start means that the application needs to be restarted for the change to take effect.
•
Next Call means that the next call has the new parameter set.
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Table 3-8
Note
Immediate and next call update types are dynamic system data.
Note
The RAS parameter overlappedSending is not available here because it has been combined with the
Q.931 overlappedSending parameter. If you set the Q.931 overlappedSending parameter, you also set the
the RAS overlappedSending parameter.
Note
The asterisk (*) after a parameter name in the first column of Table 3-8 denotes a mandatory RADVision
parameter with an inbuilt default value that will be used if the value is not set in provisioning.
RAS Parameters
Parameter Name
Description
Type
Example
Update Type
manualRAS
If this parameter is present,
the stack does not perform
automatic RAS procedures
(it waits to be driven by the
application).
NULL
—
Start
responseTimeOut*
INTEGER(1, 200)
The time (in seconds) that
the stack waits until it
notifies the application that
the called party has failed to
respond to a transaction.
10
Immediate
maxFail*
Maximum number of retry
gatekeeper registration
attempts.
3
Immediate
allowCallsWhenNonReg
If this parameter is present, it NULL
allows calls to proceed even
if gatekeeper registration has
not been done for the
PGW 2200.
Not present
Immediate
manualRegistration
If this parameter is present,
the stack does not perform
automatic gatekeeper
registration procedures (it
waits to be driven by the
application).
NULL
Not present
Stop/Start
timeToLive
The maximum time (in
seconds) the registration of
the PGW 2200 with a
gatekeeper remains valid.
The stack reregisters
periodically.
INTEGER(1, 65535)
400
Immediate
INTEGER(1, 200)
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Table 3-8
RAS Parameters (continued)
Parameter Name
Description
Type
Example
Update Type
rasPort*
The number of the port
receiving all RAS
transactions for the current
endpoint. Set this parameter
to 0 to allow the software to
look for the available port.
INTEGER(0, 65535)
0
Start
compare15bitRasCrv
If this parameter is present, it NULL
causes the stack to ignore the
call reference value (CRV)
MSBit in RAS messages.
—
Immediate
maxRetries*
Maximum number of RAS
retransmissions.
INTEGER(1, 200)
3
Immediate
maxMulticastTTL
INTEGER(0, 200)
Maximum number of
multicast time to live (TTL).
3
Start
preGrantedArqUse
Choice of direct or routed. If STRING
direct, the pregranted
Admission Request (ARQ)
feature is used for both direct
and routed calls. If routed,
the pregranted ARQ feature
is used only for routed calls.
If absent, the pregranted
ARQ is not used.
direct
Next Call
manualDiscovery.ipAddress
The IP address of a known
gatekeeper with which an
endpoint might attempt to
register.
10.70.54.53
Start
manualDiscovery.port
The port associated with the INTEGER(0, 65535)
manualDiscovery.ipAddress,
which can, by agreement, be
either a well-known port or
another port.
1719
Start
gateway.prefix[i]
STRING
The gateway registers the
telephone prefix specified by
this parameter to indicate
that it is able to terminate it.
0208
Immediate
gatekeeperId
Identifies the gatekeeper
with which the endpoint is
trying to register.
OuterLondon
Immediate
terminalAlias[i].e164
STRING
Two variants of the same
address for the endpoint;
STRING
e164 is numeric and h323ID
is text.
0208001000
Immediate
terminalAlias[i].h323ID
STRING
STRING
GW@ot.com.au Immediate
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H.323 Stack Configuration
Table 3-8
RAS Parameters (continued)
Parameter Name
Description
Type
Example
Update Type
endpointVendor.t35CountryCode
These parameters identify
the manufacturer of the
endpoint.
INTEGER(0, 255)
11
Immediate
INTEGER(0, 255)
11
Immediate
INTEGER(0, 65535)
9
Immediate
endpointVendor.t35Extension
endpointVendor.manufacturerCode
endpointVendor.productId
Data that the manufacturer
assigns to each product.
STRING
H323ESP
Immediate
endpointVendor.versionId
Data that the manufacturer
assigns to each version.
STRING
R0.2.4
Immediate
H.245 Parameters
To modify the H.245 parameters listed in Table 3-9, use the h245 MML name variable for the prov-add,
prov-dlt and prov-ed commands.
In the following example, the prov-add command sets the H.245 parameter masterSlave.timeout to the
value 5.
Example
prov-add:name=h245,masterSlave.timeout=5
The Update Type column in Table 3-9 shows when a change to an H.245 parameter takes effect after it
is modified:
Note
Table 3-9
•
Immediate means that the effect of the change is immediate.
•
Start means that the application needs to be restarted for the change to take effect.
•
Next Call means that the next call has the new parameter set.
Immediate and Next Call update types are dynamic system data.
H.245 Parameters
Parameter Name
Description
Type
Example
Update
Type
masterSlave.terminalType
The terminal type for the
PGW 2200.
INTEGER(0, 255)
60
Next Call
masterSlave.manualResponse
NULL
If this parameter is present, it
cancels automatic
acknowledgment of master or slave
determination.
Present
Next Call
masterSlave.timeout
The maximum time (in seconds)
INTEGER(0, 65535) 5
the stack waits before it gives up on
the master/slave procedure.
Immediate
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H.323 Stack Configuration
Table 3-9
H.245 Parameters (continued)
Example
Update
Type
Parameter Name
Description
Type
channelsTimeout
The time (in seconds) the stack
waits for a response to a channel
establishment message.
INTEGER(0, 65535) 10
Immediate
roundTripTimeout
The time (in seconds) the stack
waits for round-trip procedure
completion.
INTEGER(0, 65535) 5
Immediate
requestCloseTimeout
The time (in seconds) the stack
waits for request close procedure
completion.
INTEGER(0, 65535) 5
Immediate
requestModeTimeout
The time (in seconds) the stack
waits for request mode procedure
completion.
INTEGER(0, 65535) 5
Immediate
caps.timeout
The maximum time (in seconds)
INTEGER(0, 65535) 5
the stack waits before it gives up on
the capability exchange procedure.
Immediate
caps.maxAudioDelay
Maximum H.255 multiplex audio
delay jitter.
INTEGER(0, 1023)
Immediate
mediaLoopTimeout
The timeout (in seconds) of the
media loop procedure.
INTEGER(0, 65535) 5
60
Immediate
Table 3-10, Table 3-11, and Table 3-12 list the parameters and modes related to the configuring of
codecs. The array index [i] must be replaced with a valid braced index from 1 to 20. The braced index
must be continuous and unique (that is, there must be no duplicates).
Table 3-10
H.245 Terminal Capability Codec Parameters
Parameter Name
Type
caps.table[i].entryNo
INTEGER(1, 65535)
caps.table[i].audio.g711Alaw64k
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g711Alaw56k
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g711Ulaw64k
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g711Ulaw56k
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g722at64k
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g722at56k
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g722at48k
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g7231.maxAudioFrames
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g7231.silenceSuppression
INTEGER(0, 1)
caps.table[i].audio.g728
INTEGER(1, 256)
caps.table[i].audio.g729
INTEGER(1, 256)
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H.323 Stack Configuration
Table 3-11 H.245 Channel Codec Parameters
Parameter Name
Type
chan[i].name
STRING
chan[i].audio.g711Alaw64k
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g711Alaw56k
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g711Ulaw64k
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g711Ulaw56k
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g722at64k
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g722at56k
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g722at48k
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g7231.maxAudioFrames
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g7231.silenceSuppression
INTEGER(0, 1)
chan[i].audio.g728
INTEGER(1, 256)
chan[i].audio.g729
INTEGER(1, 256)
Table 3-12 H.245 Modes
Parameter Name
Type
modes[i].name
STRING
modes[i].audio.g711Alaw64k
NULL
modes[i].audio.g711Alaw56k
NULL
modes[i].audio.g711Ulaw64k
NULL
modes[i].audio.g711Ulaw56k
NULL
modes[i].audio.g722at64k
NULL
modes[i].audio.g722at56k
NULL
modes[i].audio.g722at48k
NULL
modes[i].audio.g7231
INTEGER(1, 256)
modes[i].audio.g728
NULL
modes[i].audio.g729
NULL
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Provisioning the Cisco HSI
Configuring HSI Release 2.21 Features
Configuring HSI Release 2.21 Features
This section tells you how to enable the HSI features introduced in HSI Release 2.21. These features are:
•
Asymmetric Codec Treatment
•
Empty Capability Set
•
H.323 Hairpin
•
T.38 Fax
Asymmetric Codec Treatment
The Asymmetric Codec Treatment feature averts the potential for inconsistencies in codec selection,
which can result if the open channel requests are sent by each endpoint at nearly the same time, so that
neither side has received an open channel request prior to sending one. In practice, such asymmetric
conditions occur only for slow start calls. When there is a fast start recipient, both channels agree to use
the same codec in unison.
The Asymmetric Codec Treatment support is enabled if this parameter is present and set to anything
other than "". For example, support is enabled if the parameter is explicitly set to “Enabled.” To enable
Asymmetric Codec Treatment, enter the following command:
Example:
prov-add:name=sys_config_static, asymmetrichandlingsupported = "Enabled"
Empty Capability Set
The Empty Capability Set feature enables an H.323 endpoint to send a TCS message with empty
capabilities during a call. The TCS message causes the audio channels to close. This action enables the
negotiation and opening of new audio channels.
The Empty Capability Set feature is useful when the H.323 endpoint wishes to change the audio codec
during a call or if the endpoint needs to divert the media streams to a different location. Typically, the
feature is used to place a call on hold to disable the media stream until the user presses the Resume
button.
The Empty Capability Set feature on the HSI requires no provisioning.
H.323 Hairpin
The H.323 Hairpin feature (also called H.323 Hairpin) can be used to connect a call between two H.323
endpoints without using resources on the media gateway. For example, the PGW can respond to the
dialled number in an incoming H.323 call by routing the call to another HSI (perhaps the same HSI)
rather than routing the call to the PSTN. In this case, the originating and terminating HSIs establish the
call normally but pass the H.245 address of the H.323 endpoints. This enables the two endpoints to use
H.245 to negotiate media channels with each other directly, independent of the HSI.
The H.323 Hairpin feature on the HSI requires no provisioning. However, to operate throughout the
system, H.323 Hairpin must be enabled on the PGW. On the PGW, you enable H.323 Hairpin through a
trunk group property by issuing the following commands:
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prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="2000",AllowH323Hairpin="1"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3000",AllowH323Hairpin="1"
Note
H.323 Hairpin must be enabled for both the ingress and egress EISUP trunk groups.
Refer to PGW and Cisco IOS documentation at www.cisco.com for further information on these
commands.
T.38 Fax
You enable T.38 Fax for the HSI by specifying static system data parameters. By default, T.38 is
provisioned on the HSI by use of the following commands:
prov-add:name=sys_config_static,t38maxval="MaxBit 0x90, FxMaxBuf 0xc8, FxMaxData 0x48"
prov-add:name=sys_config_static,t38options="FxFillBit 0, FxTransMMR 0, FxTransJBIG 0,
FxRate Trans, FxUdpEC Red"
Table 3-3 describes the T.38 static system data parameters. The T.38 parameters for HSI correspond to
T.38 parameters proposed in the ITU T.38 recommendation.
Configuring T.38 Fax on the Cisco PSTN Gateway
To enable T.38 Fax throughout the system, you must enable T.38 Fax on the Cisco PGW. On the PGW,
T.38 is enabled through a trunk group property by use of the following MML command:
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="2000",FaxSupport="1"
Configuring T.38 Fax on a Cisco IOS H.323 Gateway
Enable T.38 Fax on a Cisco IOS H.323 gateway by issuing the following IOS commands:
voice service voip
fax protocol t38 ls-redundancy 0 hs-redundancy 0 fallback none
Configuring T.38 Fax on a Cisco IOS MGCP Gateway
Enable T.38 fax on a Cisco IOS MGCP gateway by issuing the following IOS commands:
voice service voip
fax protocol t38 ls-redundancy 0 hs-redundancy 0 fallback none
mgcp package-capability fxr-package
Refer to PGW and Cisco IOS documentation at www.cisco.com for further information on these
commands.
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C H A P T E R
4
Managing the Cisco HSI
Introduction
This chapter provides information about operation and management tasks for the Cisco H.323 Signaling
Interface (HSI) application. This chapter contains the following sections:
•
Restarting the Cisco HSI Application, page 4-1
•
Stopping Call Processing, page 4-1
•
Starting Call Processing, page 4-2
•
Stopping the Call Processing Application, page 4-2
•
Starting the Call Processing Application, page 4-2
•
Reporting the Cisco HSI Status, page 4-2
•
Measurements, page 4-2
•
Overload, page 4-6
•
Logging, page 4-8
•
Gapping, page 4-11
Restarting the Cisco HSI Application
To restart the Cisco HSI at the MML command prompt, use the restart-softw MML command. For more
information about this command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
To start the Cisco HSI application, see the “Starting the Cisco HSI” section on page 2-10.
Stopping Call Processing
To stop call processing, use the stp-callproc MML command. This command causes the handling of new
call requests to cease immediately, and, if no timeout period is specified, all existing calls are released
immediately. If a timeout period is specified, existing calls are released after the specified amount of
time has elapsed. For more information about the stp-callproc command, see Appendix A, “MML User
Interface and Command Reference.”
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Starting Call Processing
Starting Call Processing
To start call processing, use the sta-callproc MML command. For more information about this
command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
Stopping the Call Processing Application
To stop the call processing application, use the stp-softw MML command. For more information about
this command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
Starting the Call Processing Application
To start the call processing application, use the sta-softw MML command. For more information about
this command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
Reporting the Cisco HSI Status
To display the status of the Cisco HSI, use the rtrv-softw MML command. For more information about
this command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
Measurements
The following sections describe two measurement categories:
•
System-related measurements
•
Call-related measurements
System-Related Measurements
The CIagent is a Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) subagent. It handles the collection and
storage of the following system performance measurements:
•
CPU occupancy
•
RAM occupancy
•
Disk occupancy
•
TCP usage
Use the CIAGENTSCANPERIOD parameter to define the period that the CIagent polls the CPU for
utilization (see Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI”).
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Measurements
Call-Related Measurements
The Cisco HSI application handles all call-related measurements. An SNMP MIB handles the collection
of call-related measurement data.
The call-related measurements are organized into counter groups. The following MML counter groups
are required:
•
RAS (see Table 4-1 on page 4-3)
•
Q.931 (see Table 4-2 on page 4-4)
•
H.245 (see Table 4-3 on page 4-5)
The measurements in these groups are written to a file on disk every 30 minutes. The file name includes
the date and time that measurements were written to disk.
Table 4-1
RAS Counter Group
Counter Name
Measurement
Type
Comments
GK_DISC_ATT_TOT
Gatekeeper discovery
attempts
Integer
Incremented for every unicast gatekeeper request
(GRQ) sent or for every multicast operation
GK_REG_ATT_TOT
Registration request
attempts
Integer
Incremented for every registration request (RRQ)
sent
GK_REG_SUCC_TOT
Registration request
successes
Integer
Incremented for every registration confirmation
(RCF) received
GK_RCV_UNR_ATT_TOT
G- initiated unregistration Integer
attempts
Incremented for every unregistration request (URQ)
received from a gatekeeper (GK)
GK_XMIT_UNR_SUCC_TOT GK-initiated
unregistration successes
Integer
Incremented for every unregistration confirmation
(UCF) sent to a GK
GK_XMIT_UNR_ATT_TOT
T- initiated unregistration
attempts
Integer
Incremented for every URQ sent to a GK
GK_RCV_UNR_SUCC_TOT
T- initiated unregistration
successes
Integer
Incremented for every UCF received from a GK
GK_RLS_ATT_TOT
Disengage attempts
Integer
Incremented for every disengage request (DRQ) sent
to a GK
GK_RLS_SUCC_TOT
Disengage successes
Integer
Incremented for every disengage confirmation (DCF)
returned by a GK
GK_INFO_REPORT_TOT
Information reports
Integer
Incremented for every information request (IRQ) sent
to the GK
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Measurements
Table 4-2
Q.931 Counter Group
Counter Name
Measurement
Type
Comments
FC_INC_CALL_ATT_TOT
H.225 Incoming Fast
Connect Call Attempts
Integer
Incremented when a setup containing the fastStart
element is received.
FC_INC_CALL_SUCC_TOT
H.225 Incoming Fast
Connect Call Successes
Integer
Incremented when the Fast Connect procedure is
used to establish an incoming H.323 call.
FC_OTG _CALL_ATT_TOT
H.225 Outgoing Fast
Connect Call Attempts
Integer
Incremented when a setup containing the fastStart
element is sent to an H.323 endpoint.
Decremented when you revert to Version 1 signaling
(another measurement incremented).
FC_OTG_CALL_SUCC_TOT
H.225 Outgoing Fast
Connect Call Successes
Integer
Incremented when the Fast Connect procedure is
used to establish an outgoing H.323 call.
V1_INC_CALL_ATT_TOT
H.225 Incoming Version 1 Integer
Call Attempts
Incremented when an incoming H.323 Version 1
Setup is received. (That is, no fastStart element or
H.245 tunneling.)
V1_INC_CALL_SUCC_TOT
H.225 Incoming Version 1 Integer
Call Successes
Incremented when an incoming H.323 Version 1 call
is established.
V1_OTG_CALL_ATT_TOT
H.225 Outgoing Version 1 Integer
Call Attempts
Incremented when an outgoing H.323 call reverts to
Version 1 signaling.
V1_OTG_CALL_SUCC_TOT
H.225 Outgoing Version 1 Integer
Call Successes
Incremented when an outgoing H.323 call using
Version 1 is established.
INC_NORM_REL_TOT
H.225 Incoming Call
Normal Releases
Integer
Incremented when an established incoming H.323
call is taken down due to user on-hook
INC_ABNORM_REL_TOT
H.225 Incoming Call
Abnormal Releases
Integer
Incremented when an established incoming H.323
call is taken down due to anything other than user
on-hook
OTG_NORM_REL_TOT
H.225 Outgoing Call
Normal Releases
Integer
Incremented when an established outgoing H.323
call is taken down due to user on-hook.
OTG_ABNORM_REL_TOT
H.225 Outgoing Call
Abnormal Releases
Integer
Incremented when an established outgoing H.323
call is taken down due to anything other than user
on-hook.
PGW_T38_FAX_ATT_TOT
Q931
Integer
Incremented for each T.38 Fax Call request from the
PGW. Collection Intervals are provisionable (default
is 12 hours).
PGW_T38_FAX_SUCC_TOT
Q931
Integer
Incremented for each T.38 Fax Call request from the
PGW that is successfully reconfigured for T.38.
Collection Intervals: Provisionable (default 12 hours)
H323_INTERWORK_SUCC_
Q931
Integer
Incremented for each successful H.323-H.323
interworking condition. Collection Intervals are
provisionable (default is 12 hours).
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Table 4-3
H.245 Counter Group
Counter Name
Measurement
Type
Comments
MASTER_SLAVE_ATT_TOT
H.245 Master Slave
Determination Attempts
Integer
Incremented whenever either side of the
call initiates the master slave
determination procedure (using either
H.245 tunneling or a separate H.245
signaling path).
MASTER_SLAVE_SUCC_TOT
H.245 Master Slave
Determination Successes
Integer
Incremented whenever a master slave
determination procedure is completed.
TERM_CAP_XCHG_ATT_TOT
H.245 Terminal Capability
Exchange Attempts
Integer
Incremented whenever either side of the
call initiates the capability exchange
procedure (using either H.245 tunneling
or a separate H.245 signaling path).
TERM_CAP_XCHG_SUCC_TOT H.245 Terminal Capability
Exchange Successes
Integer
Incremented whenever a capability
exchange procedure is completed.
OPEN_CH_ATT_TOT
H.245 Open Logical
Channel Attempts
Integer
Incremented whenever either side of the
call initiates the open logical channel
procedure (using either H.245 tunneling
or a separate H.245 signaling path).
OPEN_CH_SUCC_TOT
H.245 Open Logical
Channel Successes
Integer
Incremented whenever an open logical
channel procedure is completed.
CLOSE_CH_ATT_TOT
H.245 Close Logical
Channel Attempts
Integer
Incremented whenever either side of the
call initiates the close logical channel
procedure (using either H.245 tunneling
or a separate H.245 signaling path).
CLOSE_CH_SUCC_TOT
H.245 Close Logical
Channel Successes
Integer
Incremented whenever a close logical
channel procedure is completed.
AVG_ROUND_TRIP_DELAY
H.245 Round Trip Delay
Determination
EMPTY_CAP_SET_TOT
H245
H323_T38_FAX_ATT_TOT
H245
H323_T38_FAX_SUCC_TOT
H245
Average (ms) The average time in milliseconds (ms) for
round trip delay measured as a result of
successful round trip delay determination
procedures.
Integer
Incremented each time an empty cap set
request is received from the remote peer.
Collection intervals are provisionable
(default is 12 hours).
Integer
Incremented for each T.38 Fax Call
request from the remote peer. Collection
intervals are provisionable (default is 12
hours)
Integer
Incremented for each T.38 Fax Call
request from the remote peer that is
successfully reconfigured for T.38 fax
working. Collection intervals are
provisionable (default is 12 hours).
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Overload
Table 4-3
H.245 Counter Group (continued)
Counter Name
Measurement
ASYMMETRIC_TOT
H245
Type
Integer
DTMF_ RELAY_ TOT
H245
Integer
Comments
Incremented for each asymmetric
condition encountered. Collection
intervals are provisionable (default is 12
hours).
incremented for each call where DTMF
relay is used. Collection intervals are
provisionable (default is 12 hours).
Resetting Measurements
The clr-meas MML command resets the measurement counters. This command resets an individual
counter or all counters in a counter group. The following are valid counter groups:
•
RAS
•
Q.931
•
H.245
For more information about the clr-meas command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and
Command Reference.”
Retrieving Counters
Use the rtrv-ctr MML command to retrieve measurement counters. This command displays the
measurements for a counter group. Valid counter groups are RAS, Q.931, and H.245. For more
information about the rtrv-ctr command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command
Reference.”
Overload
The system continuously checks call totals and CPU utilization. Each of these values is compared to
predefined limits. Three call total limits are available. Each limit has a hysteresis value and an alarm
associated with it. When the call total reaches the limit, an alarm is raised. When the call total falls below
the limit minus the hysteresis value, the alarm is cleared after the appropriate recovery action is taken.
Cisco HSI supports the following three levels of overload:
•
Overload level 1
•
Overload level 2
•
Overload level 3
The following factors can trigger any one of the overload levels:
•
CPU usage (the OVLDSAMPLERATE parameter defines the frequency of CPU sampling and threshold
checking)
•
Maximum calls allowed
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Overload
Disk usage can trigger a LOW_DISK_SPACE alarm. For more information about this alarm, see
Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting Cisco HSI Alarms.”
Overload Level 1
Use the following configuration parameters for overload level 1 (see Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco
HSI”):
•
OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT
•
OVLDLEVEL1FILTER
•
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWERCALLS
•
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPERCALLS
•
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWERCPU
•
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPERCPU
Overload Level 2
Use the following configuration parameters for overload level 2 (see Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco
HSI”):
•
OVLDLEVEL2PERCENT
•
OVLDLEVEL2FILTER
•
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWERCALLS
•
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPERCALLS
•
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWERCPU
•
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPERCPU
Overload Level 3
Use the following configuration parameters for overload level 3 (see Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco
HSI”):
•
OVLDLEVEL3PERCENT
•
OVLDLEVEL3FILTER
•
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHLOWERCALLS
•
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPERCALLS
•
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHLOWERCPU
•
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPERCPU
Setting Overload Data
The following MML commands set overload data:
set-overload:level1|level2|level3:cpu, lower=number, upper=number
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Logging
set-overload:level1|level2|level3:calls, lower=number, upper=number
set-overload:level1|level2|level3:gap, filter=normal|all, percent=number
The upper parameter specifies the threshold for overload detection, and the lower parameter specifies
the hysteresis point at which the overload condition is removed.
The lower value should be greater than the upper value of the next lower severity level.
For example:
set-overload:level1:cpu, lower=45, upper=50
set-overload:level1:gap, filter=normal, percent=50
set-overload:level2:cpu, lower=63, upper=70
set-overload:level2:gap, filter=normal, percent=75
set-overload:level3:cpu, lower=81, upper=90
set-overload:level3:gap, filter=normal, percent=95
These values mean that:
•
At less than 50 percent CPU usage, no call is gapped.
•
From 50 percent to 70 percent CPU usage, 50 percent of calls are gapped.
•
From 70 percent to 90 percent CPU usage, 75 percent of calls are gapped.
•
At more than 90 percent CPU usage, 95 percent of calls are gapped.
•
Before the overload level returns from level 3 to level 2, the CPU usage must fall to less than
81 percent.
Retrieving Overload Data
Use the rtrv-overload MML command to display the overload status and related overload data. For
information about this command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
Logging
The logging level of one or more service packages is set using the set-log MML command. For more
information about this command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
Rotating Log Files
Log files are rotated at system startup or when either of the following conditions occurs:
•
The size limit for the corresponding file is reached. The size of the corresponding log file is equal
to or greater than the value that the LOGFILEROTATESIZE configuration parameter specifies. The
default value for this parameter is 10 Mb (see Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI”).
•
The age limit for the corresponding file is reached. The corresponding log file is equal to or older
than the interval that the LOGFILEROTATEINTERVAL parameter specifies. The default value for
this parameter is 1440 minutes (24 hours). See Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI,” for more
information about this parameter.
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Logging
Convention for Naming Convention the Log File
Log rotation occurs when the system ceases to write to the current log file and commences to write to a
new log file. The LOGFILENAMEPREFIX parameter defines the name of the active log file (see
Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI”). The default is platform.log.
When log rotation is triggered, the existing file (for example, platform.log) is renamed with the format
platform_yyyymmddhhmmss.log (see Table 4-4). For example, a platform error file rotated on
September 30, 1999 at 12:36:24 is renamed platform_19990930123624.
Table 4-4
Note
Log Filename Format
Format
Definition
LOGFILENAMEPREFIX
Provisioned filename (default is platform.log)
yyyy
Year
mm
Month
dd
Day
hh
Hour
mm
Minute
ss
Second
The time stamp is the coordinated universal time (CUT) from the machine at the time of rotation.
Log File Location
The LOGDIRECTORY parameter defines the directory for active log files and rotated log files (see
Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI”). The default is $GWHOME/var/log/.
Log Messages
Log messages have the following format:
Date and timestamp, Package Name, <log level>, LogID:<text of the message>.
The following are examples of log messages:
Thu Dec 7 03:55:32:837 2000,
shutdownList() - NbOfItems 10
Thu Dec 7 03:55:32:837 2000,
shutdownList() - NbOfItems 10
Thu Dec 7 03:55:32:838 2000,
Thu Dec 7 03:55:32:838 2000,
Thread has joined.
Infrastructure, <DEBUG>, 205: GWModule Registration - Item 8
Infrastructure, <DEBUG>, 206 : GWModuleRegistration - Item 9
Infrastructure, <DEBUG>, 207 : GWReactor::thdId() returns 6.
Infrastructure, <DEBUG>, 208 : GWReactorModule::shutdown() -
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Logging
Log Message Packages
The following service packages can log messages:
•
Application
•
CallControl
•
Connection
•
DataManager
•
Eisup
•
FaultManager
•
Gapping
•
H323
•
Infrastructure
•
Overload
•
ProcessManager
•
Provisioning
•
Signal
•
Snmp
•
SnmpSubagent
•
Statistics
•
Trace
•
UserInterface
Logging Levels
Logging levels determine how much debug information is stored in the platform.log file for each
package. Levels are set through use of a hexadecimal number between 0x0000 and 0xFFFF. 0x0000 is
the lowest level, and switches off logging for a particular package. 0xFFFF is the highest logging level.
Note
We strongly recommend that you set all packages to log level 0x0000 in a live network. Set them to
higher levels only when you debug on an offline network.
Setting Logging Levels
The set-log MML command dynamically alters the log level setting during the execution of the system.
However, the set-log MML command does not affect the logging level of any current MML processes.
For more information about the set-log command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command
Reference.”
Note
The enabling of logging severely impacts HSI performance. We recommend the HSI be running at less
than 2 calls per second when you enable logging. Logging will be automatically disabled when the HSI
enters overload level 3. You can reenable logging when the HSI exits overload.
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Gapping
RADVision Logging
The Cisco HSI application provides the capability (through MML) to initiate RADVision logging. The
contents of the resultant log file are not under the control of the Cisco HSI application.
Use the radlog MML command to start and stop RADVision logging. RADVision logging can be
directed to a file or into the standard logging output. For information about this command, see
Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
Gapping
The gapping level can be set from 0 to 100 percent. From 0 to 99 percent, the call type (normal or
priority) is checked against the gapping level call status type. At 100 percent gapping, all calls are
gapped regardless of call type.
Setting Gapping
To activate call gapping, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Step 2
Determine the direction of the call to be gapped:
•
Incoming (inc) for calls originating from the H.323 network
•
Outgoing (otg) for calls originating from the PSTN Gateway (PGW 2200)
•
Both (both) for calls originating from either side
Determine what type of calls are to be gapped:
•
Normal calls (nonpriority calls)
•
All calls
Step 3
Determine the percentage of calls to be gapped. The percentage can range from 0 to 100 percent. If
100 percent is selected, all calls are gapped, regardless of the type of call.
Step 4
Enter the set-gapping MML command. For example, to gap 60 percent of all calls for both directions,
enter:
set-gapping:both:calltype=all,percent=60
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Gapping
Retrieving Call Gapping Data
To retrieve the current levels of call gapping for all gapping clients, enter the rtrv-gapping command.
The command displays text similar to the following:
Client Name
Direction
Level
Call Type
Active
Overload
Outgoing
10
Normal
No
Overload
Incoming
10
Normal
No
MML
Outgoing
20
All
Yes
MML
Incoming
30
All
Yes
The output shows the gapping levels set by the overload function and the MML command set-gapping.
The highest gapping level is used as the level to gap calls, which is indicated as Yes in the column titled
Active. In this example, the MML levels for outgoing and incoming calls are active.
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5
Troubleshooting Cisco HSI Alarms
Introduction
This chapter contains information about Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI) alarms, troubleshooting
procedures for these alarms, and information about detailed logging. This chapter contains the following
sections:
•
Alarms Overview, page 5-1
•
Retrieving Alarm Messages, page 5-3
•
Acknowledging and Clearing Alarms, page 5-4
•
Troubleshooting, page 5-6
•
Detailed Logging, page 5-16
Alarms Overview
An alarm can be in one of the following states:
•
Raised, when a persistent fault occurs in the system
•
Cleared, when the fault is fixed
Debounce
The alarms have a timeout (debounce) period. The debounce period is the time that elapses before an alarm
condition is accepted. Use the ALARMDEBOUNCETIME parameter to set the debounce period (see
Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI”). The default debounce period is 0.
Alarm Severity Levels
The Cisco HSI generates autonomous messages, or events, to notify you of problems or atypical network
conditions. Depending on the event severity level, events are considered alarms or informational events.
Table 5-1 lists the severity levels and the required responses.
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Alarms Overview
Table 5-1
Alarm Severity Levels
Severity Level
Description
Critical
A serious problem exists in the network. Clear critical alarms immediately.
A critical alarm should force an automatic restart of the application.
Major
A disruption of service has occurred. Clear this alarm immediately.
Minor
No disruption of service has occurred, but clear this alarm as soon as
possible.
Informational
An abnormal condition has occurred. It is transient and does not require
corrective action. (An invalid protocol call state transition is an example of
an event that prompts such an alarm.) No corrective action is required by
the management center to fix the problem.
Retrieving and Reporting Alarms
Events with a severity level of critical, major, or minor are classified as alarms and can be retrieved
through the Man-Machine Language (MML) interface and a Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) manager.
An alarm must be reported when an alarm state changes (assuming the alarm does not have an unreported
severity).
Informational Event Requirements
Informational events do not require state changes. An informational event is a warning that an abnormal
condition that does not require corrective action has occurred. An invalid protocol call state transition is
an example of an informational event. The informational event needs to be reported, but it is transient.
No corrective action is required by the management center to fix the problem.
An informational event is reported once, upon occurrence, through the MML and SNMP interfaces. The
MML interface must be in the rtrv-alms:cont mode for the event to be displayed. The event is not
displayed in subsequent rtrv-alms commands.
SNMP Trap Types
Alarms have SNMP trap types associated with them. Table 6-2 identifies the trap types.
Table 5-2
SNMP Trap Types
Trap Type
Trap Description
0
No error
1
Communication alarm
2
Quality of service
3
Processing error
4
Equipment error
5
Environment error
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Retrieving Alarm Messages
Retrieving Alarm Messages
Alarms can be displayed in noncontinuous mode or in continuous mode.
Noncontinuous Mode
To display all current alarms, use the rtrv-alms MML command.
Figure 5-1 shows an example of an alarm message displayed with the rtrv-alms MML command
(noncontinuous mode). For more information about the rtrv-alms MML command, see Appendix A,
“MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
Figure 5-1
Sample Alarm Message
Node ID
Alarm Category
Severity Level
“H323-GW1:ALM=\”VSC FAILURE\”,SEV=MJ
Displayed only if state=cleared
STATE=CLEARED
The example in Figure 5-1 shows a Cisco Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Gateway
(PGW 2200) communication failure on the Cisco HSI that has the node ID H323-GW1. The resulting
message is an alarm with a major severity level.
Continuous Mode
To display the names of active alarms and new alarm events, use the rtrv-alms:cont MML command.
Table 5-3 defines the message components that are displayed when the rtrv-alms:cont MML command
is used. The following is sample output from this command. For more information about the
rtrv-alms:cont MML command, see Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference.”
GW Signaling Gateway
M
RTRV
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27
2000-12-05 14:19:22
11:25:12.259,
11:25:13.259,
11:25:13.260,
11:25:14.011,
11:25:14.012,
** ALM=\"VSC FAILURE\",SEV=MJ”
ALM=\"VSC FAILURE\",SEV=MJ”STATE=CLEARED
** ALM=\"CONFIGURATION FAILURE\",SEV=MJ”
A^ ALM=\"ENDPOINT CHANNEL INTERFACE FAILURE\",SEV=IF”
A^ ALM=\"ENDPOINT CHANNEL INTERFACE FAILURE\",SEV=IF”
/* Listening for alarm events... (Ctrl-C to stop) */
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:13.259, ** ALM=\"VSC FAILURE\",SEV=MJ”
/* Ctrl-C pressed */
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Acknowledging and Clearing Alarms
Table 5-3
Elements of Continuous Mode Messages
Element
Description
systemId
The name of your device and its identifier.
YYYY-MM-DD
The year, month, and day that the alarm or information event occurred.
hh-mm-ss-ms
The hour, minute, second, and millisecond that the alarm or information event
occurred.
severity
The severity level of the alarm or information event. Severity is represented by a
two-character indicator with the following meanings:
almCat
•
*C—Critical alarm. A critical alarm indicates that a serious problem exists
in the network. It causes a restart or reboot of the Cisco HSI. Clear critical
alarms immediately.
•
**—Major alarm. A major alarm indicates the existence of a problem that
disrupts service. Clear major alarms immediately. Major alarms differ from
critical alarms in that they do not initiate automatic recovery processes.
•
*^—Minor alarm. A minor alarm indicates the presence of a problem that
does not disrupt service. Note and clear minor alarms as soon as possible.
•
A^—Informational event. An informational event indicates the presence of
an atypical network condition, such as a timer expiration, a value that has
exceeded preset thresholds, or unexpected response from an end point to a
signaling messages sent by the Cisco HSI.
•
— (Empty spaces in two leftmost columns). The alarm or event has been
cleared. “STATE=CLEARED” is displayed.
Alarm category. A text string that indicates whether the message is an alarm or
an informational event and the MML alarm or event message. See Table 5-4 for
a list of alarm categories.
Note
Despite its name, the alarm category field is used for both alarms and
informational events.
Acknowledgement Indicates whether the alarm has been acknowledged.
Acknowledging and Clearing Alarms
To acknowledge that an alarm is recognized but not cleared, use the ack-alm MML command. See
Appendix A, “MML User Interface and Command Reference,” for more information.
To clear an alarm, use the clr-alm MML command. See Appendix A, “MML User Interface and
Command Reference,” for more information.
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Alarms List
Alarms List
Table 5-4 lists alarms and information events. Troubleshooting information for each of the alarms and
information events can be found in the “Troubleshooting” section on page 5-6.
Table 5-4
Alarms and Informational Events
Alarm Event and Reference
Severity Level
H323_STACK_FAILURE, page 5-6
Critical
CONFIGURATION_FAILURE, page 5-6
Major
EISUP_PATH_FAILURE, page 5-7
Major
GATEKEEPER_INTERFACE_FAILURE, page 5-8
—
GENERAL_PROCESS_FAILURE, page 5-8
Major
IP_LINK_FAILURE, page 5-8
Major
LOW_DISK_SPACE, page 5-9
Major
OVERLOAD_LEVEL3, page 5-9
Major
VSC_FAILURE, page 5-10
Major
OVERLOAD_LEVEL2, page 5-11
Minor
CONFIG_CHANGE, page 5-11
Information
ENDPOINT_CALL_CONTROL_INTERFACE_FAILURE, page 5-12
Information
ENDPOINT_CHANNEL_INTERFACE_FAILURE, page 5-12
Information
GAPPED_CALL_NORMAL, page 5-13
Information
GAPPED_CALL_PRIORITY, page 5-13
Information
OVERLOAD_LEVEL1, page 5-14
Information
PROVISIONING_INACTIVITY_TIMEOUT, page 5-14
Information
PROVISIONING_SESSION_TIMEOUT, page 5-15
Information
STOP_CALL_PROCESSING, page 5-15
Information
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Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
This section provides troubleshooting procedures for the alarms listed in Table 5-4.
H323_STACK_FAILURE
Description
Irrecoverable failure in the RADVision stack. This alarm is reported to the management interface and
can be obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is critical. The trap type is 4.
Cause
The H.323 RADVision stack has failed to correctly initialize on an application startup. An automatic
application restart is initiated, and the application reverts to the base configuration data.
Troubleshooting
To clear the H.323 stack failure alarm, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Allow the application to restart and revert back to the base configuration data that is known to be reliable.
Step 2
Review the H323_SYS parameters in a provisioning session, ensuring that the values are correct and
within the memory limits of the machine.
Step 3
Use the prov-cpy MML command to recommit the new H323_SYS parameters.
Step 4
Use the restart-softw MML command to initiate a software restart.
Step 5
Use the rtrv-alms MML command to check the alarm list to see if the H.323 stack correctly initializes.
CONFIGURATION_FAILURE
Description
The configuration has failed. This alarm is reported to the management interface and can be obtained
with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is major. The trap type is 4.
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Troubleshooting
Cause
A major error has occurred in the configuration of the software packages. This is a potentially nonrecoverable
situation that requires an application restart.
Troubleshooting
To clear the CONFIGURATION_FAILURE alarm, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Use the restart-softw:init command to restart the application and revert to the base configuration.
Step 2
Review the modified parameters and ensure that the values are correct.
Step 3
Use the prov-cpy MML command to recommit the new parameters.
Step 4
Use the restart-softw MML command to initiate a software restart.
Step 5
Use the rtrv-alms MML command to check the alarm list to see if the problem has been resolved.
EISUP_PATH_FAILURE
Description
A failure of the RUDP layer has occurred. This alarm is reported to the management interface and can
be obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is major. The trap type is 4.
Cause
Both IP links A and B to a single Cisco PGW 2200 have gone down.
Troubleshooting
To clear the EISUP_Path_Failure alarm, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Use the rtrv-dest command to assess which Cisco PGW 2200 (standby or active) has been lost.
Step 2
Check the network connections, cables, and routers for that system.
Step 3
Use the clr-alms MML command to attempt to clear the alarm.
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Troubleshooting
GATEKEEPER_INTERFACE_FAILURE
This alarm has not been implemented.
GENERAL_PROCESS_FAILURE
Description
A general process failure has occurred. This alarm is reported to the management interface and can be
obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is major. The trap type is 4.
Cause
The Cisco HSI (GWmain program) quit unexpectedly (that is, there were no requests to stop or restart
the application). The process manager (PMmain) raises the GENERAL_PROCESS_FAILURE alarm so
that a trap is sent to the Rambler.
The process manager clears the GENERAL_PROCESS_FAILURE alarm when it restarts the Cisco HSI
(GWmain).
Troubleshooting
To trace the problem, look at either the core file or the log files.
IP_LINK_FAILURE
Description
A failure of the IP link has occurred. This alarm is reported to the management interface and can be
obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is major. The trap type is 4.
Cause
One of the two links to a single Cisco PGW 2200 has failed.
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Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
To clear the IP link failure alarm, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Use the rtrv-dest command to assess which PGW 2200 (standby or active) has been lost.
Step 2
Check the network connections, cables, and routers for that system.
Step 3
Use the clr-alm MML command to attempt to clear the alarm.
LOW_DISK_SPACE
Description
The disk space is low. This alarm is reported to the management interface and can be obtained with
SNMP. The alarm automatically clears when the disk usage decreases below the alarm limit.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is major. The trap type is 4.
Cause
The percentage of disk usage is greater than the alarm limit.
Troubleshooting
To obtain more disk space, remove old versions of installed software that are no longer required, or
archive log files from the $GWHOME/var/log directory, for example.
OVERLOAD_LEVEL3
Description
An overload level 3 condition exists. This alarm is reported to the management interface and can be
obtained with SNMP. This alarm automatically clears when the CPU occupancy or the number of active
calls drops below the lower limits set in the overload configuration for level 3.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is major. The trap type is 4.
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Troubleshooting
Cause
The OVERLOAD_LEVEL3 alarm is triggered when the CPU occupancy or the number of active calls
rises above the upper limits set in the overload configuration for level 3. Gapping is then initiated.
Troubleshooting
To clear the OVERLOAD_LEVEL3 alarm, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Wait for the number of calls to drop.
Step 2
If CPU occupancy remains high, request assistance from the system administrator.
VSC_FAILURE
Description
This alarm is derived by the Cisco HSI application from RUDP/SM events. This alarm is reported to the
management interface and can be obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is major. The trap type is 5.
Cause
Links to both (active and standby) Cisco PGW 2200s have gone down.
Troubleshooting
To clear the VSC_FAILURE alarm, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Use the rtrv-dest command to confirm that links to the Cisco PGW 2200s have gone down.
Step 2
Check the network connections, cables, and routers.
Step 3
Refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Operations, Maintenance, and
Troubleshooting Guide for detailed information about this alarm.
Step 4
Use the clr-alm command to attempt to clear the alarm.
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Troubleshooting
OVERLOAD_LEVEL2
Description
An overload level 2 condition exists. This alarm is reported to the management interface and can be
obtained with SNMP. This alarm automatically clears when the CPU occupancy or the number of active
calls drops below the lower limits set in the overload configuration for level 2.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is minor. The trap type is 4.
Cause
The OVERLOAD_LEVEL2 alarm is triggered when the CPU occupancy or the number of active calls
rises above the upper limits set in the overload configuration for level 2. Gapping is then initiated.
Troubleshooting
To clear the OVERLOAD_LEVEL2 alarm, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Wait for the number of calls to drop.
Step 2
If CPU occupancy remains high, request assistance from the system administrator.
CONFIG_CHANGE
Description
The running configuration has been modified.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 0.
Cause
A new configuration has been activated within a provisioning session.
Troubleshooting
This is an informational event.
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Troubleshooting
ENDPOINT_CALL_CONTROL_INTERFACE_FAILURE
Description
An individual call failure has occurred. This informational event is reported to the management interface
and can be obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 3.
Cause
The RADVision stack reports this alarm.
Troubleshooting
This is an informational event.
ENDPOINT_CHANNEL_INTERFACE_FAILURE
Description
An individual call failure has occurred. This informational event is reported to the management interface
and can be obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 3.
Cause
The RADVision stack reports this alarm.
Troubleshooting
This is an informational event.
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Troubleshooting
GAPPED_CALL_NORMAL
Description
A normal call has been rejected due to call gapping. This informational event is reported to the
management interface and can be obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 2.
Cause
The GAPPED_CALL_NORMAL alarm is triggered when gapping levels cause a normal call to be
rejected.
Troubleshooting
To clear the GAPPED_CALL_NORMAL informational event, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Use the rtrv-gapping MML command to retrieve gapping information.
Step 2
If the MML-specific gap levels are active, use the set-gapping MML command to modify them.
Step 3
If the overload-specific gap levels are active, either modify the provisioned overload gapping percent
levels or reduce the cause of the overload (see OVERLOAD_LEVEL1, page 5-14,
OVERLOAD_LEVEL2, page 5-11, and OVERLOAD_LEVEL3, page 5-9).
GAPPED_CALL_PRIORITY
Description
A priority or emergency call has been rejected due to call gapping. This informational event is reported
to the management interface and can be obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 2.
Cause
The GAPPED_CALL_NORMAL alarm is triggered when gapping levels cause a priority or emergency
call to be rejected.
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Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
To clear the GAPPED_CALL_PRIORITY informational event, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Change the MML gapping levels to less than 100 percent and change the call type to normal.
Step 2
Change the provisioned overload call filter type to normal.
OVERLOAD_LEVEL1
Description
An overload level 1 condition exists. This informational event is reported to the management interface
and can be obtained with SNMP.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 4.
Cause
The OVERLOAD_LEVEL1 alarm is triggered when the CPU occupancy or the number of active calls
rises above the upper limits set in the overload configuration for level 1. Gapping is then initiated.
Troubleshooting
To clear the OVERLOAD_LEVEL1 informational event, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Wait for the number of calls to drop.
Step 2
If CPU occupancy remains high, request assistance from the system administrator.
PROVISIONING_INACTIVITY_TIMEOUT
Description
A provisioning session has been inactive for 20 minutes. The text of the output is:
"H323-GW1:2001-01-30 11:12:57.421,A^ ALM=\"PROVISIONING INACTIVITY TIMEOUT\",SEV=IF"
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 3.
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Troubleshooting
Cause
The provisioning session has been inactive for 20 minutes. The provisioning session will be closed if
there is no activity within the next 5 minutes.
Troubleshooting
Ensure that activity in the provisioning session occurs at least every 20 minutes.
PROVISIONING_SESSION_TIMEOUT
Description
The current session has been terminated. The text of the output is:
"H323-GW1:2001-01-30 11:17:57.422,A^ ALM=\"PROVISIONING SESSION
TIMEOUT\",SEV=IF"
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 3.
Cause
The provisioning session has been inactive for longer than the time allowed.
Troubleshooting
Ensure that activity within the provisioning session occurs at least every 20 minutes.
STOP_CALL_PROCESSING
Description
A stop call processing request has been entered through the MML.
Severity Level and Trap Type
The severity level is information. The trap type is 4.
Cause
A user has entered the stp-callproc command through the MML.
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Detailed Logging
Troubleshooting
This is an informational event.
Detailed Logging
Logging occurs on 16 different levels for each package, and the logging mask (which is a 16-bit number
from 0x0000 to 0xFFFF) allows each specific log level to be turned on and off. The most-significant-bit
positions correspond to higher (that is, more processor intensive) levels of debugging.
We recommend that you set the logging level of all packages to 0x0000 in a live network. For debugging
a single call in an off-line network, the recommended level of debug is:
•
Set Eisup, CallControl, and H323 package log levels to 0xFFFF.
•
Set all other package log levels to 0x0000.
•
Turn radlog on by entering the MML command radlog::start.
Once the test call has been made, remember to set all the logging levels back to 0x0000 and to turn radlog
off by entering the MML command radlog::stop.
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A
MML User Interface and Command Reference
Introduction
This chapter provides information about Man-Machine Language (MML) command syntax and
conventions, batch files, and procedures for starting and stopping MML sessions in the Cisco H.323
Signaling Interface (HSI) application. The chapter contains the following sections:
•
Starting an MML Command Session in the Cisco HSI, page A-1
•
MML Commands, page A-2
•
Starting an MML Session, page A-3
•
Batch Files, page A-3
•
MML Responses, page A-5
•
MML Help, page A-6
•
Quitting an MML Session, page A-6
Starting an MML Command Session in the Cisco HSI
To start an MML command session within the HSI environment, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Log in to Cisco HSI as mgcusr.
Step 2
Become superuser by typing su <root password>.
Step 3
To start the software, enter the following command:
/etc/init.d/CiscoGW start
Step 4
Exit out of superuser.
Step 5
Type mml to start the MML command-line interpreter.
Tip
Press the Tab key twice to see a list of MML commands.
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MML Commands
MML Commands
To execute MML commands, log in to Cisco HSI and perform one of the following tasks:
•
Start the MML session (see the “Starting an MML Session” section on page A-3) and enter a
command.
•
Type a batch file command to start an MML session (see the “Starting a Batch File” section on
page A-4).
MML Command Syntax
MML commands use the following syntax:
command_name:target:[Parameter_List][;comments]
Parameter_List consists of a parameter name, an equal sign, and a value for the parameter.
The keywords and the value strings need not be enclosed in quotation marks. Anything you enter after a
semicolon (;) is treated as a comment. Use only one MML command on each line.
The “MML Command Reference” section on page A-6 contains detailed information about the
individual MML commands.
Tip
•
Use the Up Arrow key to scroll through all previous MML commands in turn.
•
Use the Down Arrow key to move forward in the command buffer.
•
Use the Left and Right Arrow keys to move along the command line.
•
Use the Backspace, Delete, and alphanumeric keys to edit an MML command.
MML Command Conventions
The MML commands use the conventions shown in Table A-1.
Table A-1
MML Command Conventions
Convention
Meaning
Comments and Examples
Square brackets ([ ])
Optional elements
command [abc]
abc is optional (not required),
but you can choose it.
Vertical bars ( | )
Separated alternative elements
command [abc | def]
You can choose either abc or
def, or neither, but not both.
Braces ({ | })
Angle brackets (< >)
Required choice of alternative
elements
Symbol specifier
command {abc | def}
You must use either abc or def,
but not both.
—
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Starting an MML Session
The MML commands can be interpreted and monitored through a network Transaction Language 1
(TL1) interface. The TL1 symbols shown in Table A-2 are used in MML
.
Table A-2
TL1 Symbols Used in MML
Symbol
Description
:
A parameter separator.
::
An empty parameter block.
&
Arguments are grouped together so that one parameter can convey several
arguments.
;
End of command (optional). Anything on the same line after this symbol is treated
as a comment.
Case Sensitivity
Command names and parameter names are not case sensitive You can enter commands and parameters
in either upper- or lowercase. Filenames are case sensitive when they are used as arguments in MML
commands.
Starting an MML Session
To start an MML session, complete the following steps:
Step 1
Log in to Cisco HSI.
Step 2
Type one of the following commands at the prompt:
•
mml
•
mml -b batchfile (see the “Starting a Batch File” section on page A-4)
The following example shows the start of an MML session:
user@host> mml
Welcome to the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface.
gw mml>
Batch Files
The Cisco HSI application supports the use of batch files. You can create an ASCII file of MML
provisioning commands for use as a batch file. You can also use a script file. When the commands are
read, the Cisco HSI executes them sequentially.
The following is an example of an MML provisioning batch file:
prov-sta::srcver="new",dstver="first"
prov-add:name="sys_config",nodeid="H323-GW1"
prov-add:name="h323_sys",messages=30000,channels=5000
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Batch Files
prov-add:name="ras",responsetimeout=10,allowcallswhennonreg=1
prov-add:name="ras",terminaltype=”gateway”,timetolive=900
prov-add:name="q931",reponsetimeout=20,connecttimeout=20,maxcalls=5000
prov-cpy
The prov-sta command establishes a provisioning session. The prov-cpy command copies configuration
settings from the current provisioning session to the Cisco HSI and activates the configuration. If the
command is successful, it also terminates the current provisioning session. If you are not ready to
commit a session, use the prov-stp command to save and stop the provisioning session.
The application provides a log function (diaglog command) that records the MML commands and
responses in a log file.
In the MML batch file, you can place a diaglog command at the beginning to start logging and a diaglog
command at the end to stop logging. For more information about the diaglog command, see the “MML
Command Reference” section on page A-6
For commands executed in both the process manager and the application, the application logs the user
ID, the login date and time, and the name of each command that is executed in batch mode to the
mml_batch_log file.
Note
Batch files can be defined for complete systems or to modify parts of an existing system.
Creating a Batch File
To create a batch file, use an ASCII text editor program to create a new file. Each command should be
on a separate line.
Starting a Batch File
To start executing a batch file, type mml -b batchfilename at the UNIX prompt.
After you enter the batch file command, the application displays the result of each MML command as it
is executed. Each command and its results are saved in the mml.log file. When the batch file is
completed, the MML session is ready to accept user commands.
The following example shows the start of a batch file named nolog.bat with these contents:
prov-sta:srcver=active,dstver=nolog
prov-ed:name=logging,eisup=0x0000
prov-cpy
and this output:
gp-capetown-16-> mml -b nolog.bat
Starting in batch mode.
Connecting to port 10129 on host gp-capetown
Welcome to the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface.
gw mml> gw mml> prov-sta:srcver=active,dstver=nolog
H323 Signaling Interface Tue Jan 22 05:57:12 2002
M SUCC
Successfully started provisioning session "nolog" from "active".Note: This provisioning
session has not been verified.
gw mml> prov-ed:name=logging,eisup=0x0000
H323 Signaling Interface Tue Jan 22 05:57:12 2002
M SUCC
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MML Responses
Successfully edited provisioning element(s):
MML Name : logging.
Parameter: EISUP.
Value : 0x0000.
gw mml> prov-cpy
H323 Signalling Gateway Tue Jan 22 05:57:13 2002
M SUCC
Successfully activated provisioning session nolog.
gw mml>
MML Responses
The following sections describe the two types of response messages that are displayed by the MML user
interface:
•
Status messages
•
Error messages
Status Messages
Table A-3 lists the MML status messages and their descriptions.
Table A-3
MML Status Messages and Descriptions
Status
Message
Description
RTRV
Retrieve
Retrieve and display the contents of the specified file
SUCC
Successful
Successful completion
Error Messages
If an MML command does not perform, an error message is displayed. Table A-4 lists the MML error
messages and their descriptions.
.
Table A-4
MML Error Messages and Descriptions
Error Message
Definition
Description
DENY
Command denied
The system recognizes the command but does not
perform the requested function.
ICNV
Input command not valid
The system does not recognize the MML
command.
IDNV
Input data not valid
An unknown parameter was entered.
IISP
Input syntax error
Incorrect syntax was entered.
IITA
Invalid target
The system cannot perform the requested
operation on the specified component, or the
component does not exist.
IPRM
Input parameter missing
An expected parameter was not entered.
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MML Help
Table A-4
MML Error Messages and Descriptions (continued)
Error Message
Definition
Description
SABT
Status abort
The requested operation did not complete within
the allotted time.
SNVS
Component not in valid state The requested operation failed because the
component is either not configured to accept the
operation or the component is already in the
desired state.
SNSP
State not supported
The operation is not supported by the component.
SROF
Status requested operation
failed
The requested operation failed.
MML Help
MML has an online help feature. The MML help command displays a list of valid system commands
and an explanation of each command’s use. To display the online help, start an MML session and type
help at the command line prompt. See the “help” section on page A-11.
Quitting an MML Session
To quit an MML session, type quit at the prompt.
MML Command Reference
This section describes the following MML commands:
•
ack-alm
•
clr-alm
•
clr-meas
•
diaglog
•
h
•
help
•
prov-add
•
prov-cpy
•
prov-dlt
•
prov-ed
•
prov-exp
•
prov-rtrv
•
prov-sta
•
prov-stp
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MML Command Reference
•
quit
•
radlog
•
restart-softw
•
rtrv-alms
•
rtrv-calls
•
rtrv-ctr
•
rtrv-dest
•
rtrv-gapping
•
rtrv-log
•
rtrv-mml
•
rtrv-ne
•
rtrv-ne-health
•
rtrv-overload
•
rtrv-softw
•
set-dest-state
•
set-gapping
•
set-log
•
set-overload
•
sta-callproc
•
sta-softw
•
sta-trc
•
stp-call
•
stp-callproc
•
stp-softw
•
stp-trc
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ack-alm
ack-alm
The ack-alm command acknowledges that an alarm event is recognized but does not clear the alarm.
ack-alm:event=alarm event
Syntax Description
alarm event
Usage Guidelines
The format of the alarm category name must be the same as the format of the alarm category name that
the rtrv-alms command displays. It is case sensitive.
Examples
This example recognizes the VSC_FAILURE alarm event is recognized, but the alarm is not cleared:
The alarm category or the text that appears in the body of the alarm. Alarm
event names are defined in Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting Cisco HSI
Alarms.”
gw mml> ack-alm:event=VSC_FAILURE
GW Signaling Interface
M
SUCC
2000-12-05 14:19:22
mml>
Related Commands
Command
Description
clr-alm
Clears an alarm event
rtrv-alms
Displays all active alarms
clr-alm
The clr-alm command clears an alarm event.
clr-alm:event=alarm event
Syntax Description
alarm event
Usage Guidelines
The alarm category must match the format shown in the alarm when the rtrv-alms command displays
it. It is case sensitive.
Examples
This example clears the alarm event VSC_FAILURE.
The alarm event name or the text that appears in the body of the alarm.
Alarm names are defined in Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting Cisco HSI
Alarms.”
gw mml> clr-alm:event=VSC_FAILURE
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clr-meas
GW Signaling Interface
M
SUCC
2000-12-05 14:19:22
mml>
Related Commands
Command
Description
ack-alm
Acknowledges that an alarm event is recognized but does not clear the
alarm.
rtrv-alms
Displays all active alarms
clr-meas
The clr-meas command resets a measurement counter.
clr-meas:counter group:name=measurement name
clr-meas:counter group
Syntax Description
counter group
measurement name
Examples
Valid counter groups are:
•
RAS
•
Q931
•
H245
For a list of measurement names, see Table 4-1, Table 4-2, and Table 4-3.
In this example, a measurement counter, GK_DISC_ATT_TOT (Gatekeeper Discovery Attempts), is
reset in the counter group RAS:
gw mml> clr-meas:RAS
GW Signaling Interface
M
SUCC
mml>
2000-12-05 14:19:22
mml> clr-meas:RAS:name=GK_DISC_ATT_TOT
GW Signaling Interface
M
SUCC
Related Commands
2000-12-05 14:19:22
Command
Description
rtrv-ctr
Displays the measurements for a counter group.
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diaglog
diaglog
The diaglog command starts and stops event logging into a diagnostics log.
diaglog:file name:start | stop
Syntax Description
file name
Examples
In this example, event logging is started in a diagnostics log named test5.
The user-defined name of the log file. The actual file name has a .log suffix
applied. The file is located in the logging directory defined in the
configuration data (see Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI”).
gw mml> diaglog:test5:start
test5_davek15823_20010130053323.log
In the preceding example, davek is the user who runs the command, and 15823 is the process ID of the
MML process from which the command is run.
Related Commands
Command
Description
radlog
Starts and stops RADVision logging into a specified log file.
rtrv-log
Displays the logging level of a package or all packages.
set-log
Sets the logging level of a package or all packages.
h
The h command redisplays a command or a series of commands. Items displayed depend on a specified
number or range. If no number is specified, only the last command is displayed.
h[::start=number[,end=number]]
Syntax Description
Examples
start
Entered as a number; specifies the first command to redisplay.
end
Entered as a number; specifies the end of the range of commands to
redisplay.
The MML command in the following example displays the last successful command entered:
mml> h
VSC H-323 Signaling Interface - H323-GW1 2000-06-20 10:04:28
M RTRV
"rtrv-log:all"
/* command 1 */
The MML command in the following example displays the third from the last successful command
entered:
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help
mml> h::3
VSC H-323 Signaling Interface - H323-GW1 2000-06-20 10:04:28
M RTRV
"rtrv-ne"
/* command 3 */
The MML command in the following example displays the last and second to last commands entered.
mml> h::start=1,end=2
VSC H-323 Signaling Interface - H323-GW1 2000-06-20 10:04:28
M RTRV
"rtrv-log:all"
/* command 1 */
"rtrv-ne"
/* command 2 */
help
The help command displays a list of valid system commands and an explanation of their use. If you do
not enter a command name as a parameter, the help command provides a list of MML commands,
descriptions, and values. If you enter a command name as a parameter, a description of that command
displays.
help[:command name]
Syntax Description
command name
Examples
The command shown in the following example displays help for a specific command:
The name of the MML command.
mml> help:rtrv-ctr
H323 Signalling Gateway
M SUCC
Tue Feb 12 19:09:58 2002
RTRV-CTR -- Display the measurements for a counter group
-------------------------------------------------------Purpose:
This MML command displays a measurement counter for a counter group
Format:
rtrv-ctr:<counter group>
Description: * counter group -- The name of an MML counter group (RAS, Q931 or H245)
Example:
The MML command shown in the following example displays measurement
counters for the counter group RAS.
mml> rtrv-ctr:ras;
GW Signalling GateWay 2000-12--5 14:19:32
M RTRV
"H323-GW1:GROUP=RAS,NAME=\"GK_DISC_ATT_TOT\",VAL=1000"
"H323-GW1:GROUP=RAS,NAME=\"GK_REG_ATT_TOT\",VAL=1000"
"H323-GW1:GROUP=RAS,NAME=\"GK_REG_SUCC_TOT\",VAL=1000"
mml>
If you enter the help command without a parameter, the help file displays information about all available
commands. The following example shows a portion of the help file that displays if you do not enter a
parameter:
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prov-add
mml> help
VSC H323 signaling interface – H323-GW1 2000-06-20 10:04:28
M RTRV
Available commands (in alphabetical order):
ack-alm:”<alm cat>” Acknowledges an alarm category on a component
clr-alm:”<alm cat>” Clears an alarm category on a component
clr-meas:”<meas cat>” Resets a measurement category on a component
diaglog:<file name>:START|STOP Starts/stops diagnostics log
h[::<number>[,<number>]] Displays a history of commands for a specified backward number or
range; the last command by default
help[:<command name>] Displays the list of MML commands or the help information on a
specified command
prov-add:name=<MML name>,<param name>=<param value>,... Adds the component
prov-cpy Commits provisioning data
prov-dlt:name=<MML name> Deletes the component
prov-add
The prov-add command adds a component to the Cisco HSI.
prov-add:name=MML name,param name=param value,...
Syntax Description
MML name
MML name for the element you are adding. Valid MML names are:
•
sys_config_static
•
sys_config_dynamic
•
h323_sys
•
ras
•
h245
•
q931
param name
The name of a valid configuration parameter for the specified name.
param value
The value you want to assign to the parameter.
Usage Guidelines
To define more than one parameter, enter additional param name=param value descriptions on the
command line. See Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI,” for the list of MML names, parameter
names, and their associated values.
Examples
The command shown in the following example adds a provisioning element with the MML name ras,
parameter name maxFail, and value 3:
gw mml> prov-add:name=ras,maxfail=3
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 15:15:02 2001
M SUCC
Successfully added provisioning element(s):
MML Name : ras.
Parameter: maxFail.
Value : 3.
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prov-cpy
Related Commands
Command
Description
prov-cpy
Activates the configuration settings in the current provisioning
session.
prov-dlt
Deletes a provisioned component.
prov-ed
Modifies a provisioned component.
prov-exp
Exports the current configuration of the Cisco HSI in MML
command form to a file or files.
prov-rtrv
Retrieves information about an existing provisioning session.
prov-sta
Establishes a provisioning session.
prov-stp
Terminates either a specified provisioning session or the current
provisioning session.
prov-cpy
The prov-cpy command copies configuration settings from the current provisioning session to the
Cisco HSI to activate the configuration. If this command is successful, it terminates the current
provisioning session. If this command fails, there is no active provisioning session. If any client level
parsing fails during the data session, a confirm is needed for the data to be activated.
prov-cpy[:confirm]
Syntax Description
confirm
Examples
The command shown in the following example copies the configuration changes from the current session
to the Cisco HSI:
If any client level parsing fails during the data session, a confirm is needed
for the data to be activated.
gw mml> prov-cpy
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 13:53:42 2001
M SUCC
Successfully activated the provisioning session.
Usage Guidelines
See Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI,” for a list of MML names, parameter names, and their
associated values.
Related Commands
Command
Description
prov-add
Adds a component.
prov-dlt
Deletes a provisioned component.
prov-ed
Modifies a provisioned component.
prov-exp
Exports the current configuration of the Cisco HSI in MML
command form to a file or files.
prov-rtrv
Retrieves information about an existing provisioning session.
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prov-dlt
Command
Description
prov-sta
Establishes a provisioning session.
prov-stp
Terminates either a specified provisioning session or the current
provisioning session.
prov-dlt
The prov-dlt command deletes a provisioned component. It allows you to delete a parameter rather than
deleting the MML group.
prov-dlt:name=MML name
prov-dlt:name=MML name,param=param name
prov-dlt:name=MML name param name
Syntax Description
MML name
param name
MML name for the element you are deleting. Valid MML names are:
•
sys_config_static
•
sys_config_dynamic
•
h323_sys
•
ras
•
h245
•
q931
The name of a valid configuration parameter for the specified name.
Usage Guidelines
See Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI,” for a list of MML names, parameter names, and their
associated values.
Examples
The MML command in the following example deletes the ras element:
gw mml> prov-dlt:name=ras
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 14:13:05 2001
M SUCC
Successfully deleted provisioning data for ras
The MML command in the following examples delete the maxCalls parameter of the ras element:
gw mml> prov-dlt:name=ras,param=maxCalls
gw mml> prov-dlt:name=ras,maxCalls
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 14:46:01 2001
M SUCC
Successfully deleted provisioning data for ras:maxCalls
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prov-ed
Related Commands
Command
Description
prov-add
Adds a component.
prov-cpy
Activates the configuration settings in the current provisioning
session.
prov-ed
Modifies a provisioned component.
prov-exp
Exports the current configuration of the Cisco HSI in MML
command form to a file or files.
prov-rtrv
Retrieves information about an existing provisioning session.
prov-sta
Establishes a provisioning session.
prov-stp
Terminates either a specified provisioning session or the current
provisioning session.
prov-ed
The prov-ed command modifies a provisioned component.
prov-ed:name=MML name,param name=param value,...
Note
Syntax Description
Enter only those parameters that must be modified.
MML name
MML name for the element you are modifying. Valid MML names are:
•
sys_config_static
•
sys_config_dynamic
•
h323_sys
•
ras
•
h245
•
q931
param name
The name of a valid configuration parameter for the specified name.
param value
The value you want to assign to the parameter.
Usage Guidelines
To change more than one parameter, enter additional param name=value descriptions on the command
line. See Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI,” for a list of MML names, parameter names, and their
associated values.
Examples
Use the MML command shown in the following example to edit a provisioning element with the MML
name ras, parameter name maxFail, and value 7:
gw mml> prov-ed:name=ras,maxfail=7
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 15:22:02 2001
M SUCC
Successfully edited provisioning element(s):
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prov-exp
MML Name : ras.
Parameter: maxFail.
Value : 7.
Related Commands
Command
Description
prov-add
Adds a component.
prov-cpy
Activates the configuration settings in the current provisioning
session.
prov-dlt
Deletes a provisioned component.
prov-exp
Exports the current configuration of the Cisco HSI in MML
command form to a file or files.
prov-rtrv
Retrieves information about an existing provisioning session.
prov-sta
Establishes a provisioning session.
prov-stp
Terminates either a specified provisioning session or the current
provisioning session.
prov-exp
The prov-exp command exports the current provisioned configuration of the Cisco HSI in MML
command form to a file. With this configuration file, you can prime a system with a cloned configuration
from an existing system. It also enables you to restore a baseline configuration to a system. You can use
the MML batch feature to import the exported data.
Start a dummy provisioning session with the prov-sta command before you use the prov-exp command.
prov-sta:srcver=active, dstver=dummy1
prov-exp:dirname=export directory name
prov-stp
Syntax Description
export directory name
Examples
The MML command shown in the following example saves the active file as config.mml to the
export/uk9/ directory:
Name of the directory to which the data is exported. This directory is a
subdirectory within the /opt/GoldWing/export directory established at
installation.
gw mml> prov-exp:dirname=uk9
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 14:29:11 2001
M SUCC
Successfully exported "active" to export/uk9/config.mml
The UNIX command shown in the following example executes MML in batch mode and imports the
configuration file that was exported in the previous example:
mml> -b /opt/GoldWing/currentGW/export/uk9/config.mml
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prov-rtrv
Related Commands
Command
Description
prov-add
Adds a component.
prov-cpy
Activates the configuration settings in the current provisioning
session.
prov-dlt
Deletes a provisioned component.
prov-ed
Modifies a provisioned component.
prov-rtrv
Retrieves information about an existing provisioning session.
prov-sta
Establishes a provisioning session.
prov-stp
Terminates either a specified provisioning session or the current
provisioning session.
prov-rtrv
The prov-rtrv command retrieves information about an existing provisioning session.
prov-rtrv:name=MML name
prov-rtrv:all
prov-rtrv:session
prov-rtrv:list
Note
Syntax Description
The prov-rtrv:list command is the only prov-rtrv command that can be executed outside of a
provisioning session. Use the prov-sta command to start a provisioning command.
name
The MML name for the elements that you want to display.
MML name
The MML component name for the component you want to display. Valid
MML names are:
•
sys_config_static
•
sys_config_dynamic
•
h323_sys
•
ras
•
h245
•
q931
all
Displays all components that have been provisioned.
session
Displays information about the provisioning session.
list
Provides a list of possible session names that you can use as the srcver
parameter to prov-sta:srcver=uk9,dstver=uk10.
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prov-rtrv
Usage Guidelines
See Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI,” for a list of MML names, parameter names and their
associated values.
Examples
The prov-rtrv command shown in the following example displays information about the MML
name ras:
gw mml> prov-rtrv:name=ras
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 14:46:01 2001
M SUCC
MML Name : ras.
Parameter: maxFail.
Value : 33.
The MML command shown in the following example displays information about the MML session:
gw mml> prov-rtrv:session
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 14:46:01 2001
M RTRV
Session ID = mml 6 | davek
SRCVER = uk9
DSTVER = inter
gw mml> prov-rtrv:list
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 14:46:01 2001
M RTRV
The following provisioning sessions are available:
uk9 matt inter
gw mml>
Related Commands
Command
Description
prov-add
Adds a component.
prov-cpy
Activates the configuration settings in the current provisioning
session.
prov-dlt
Deletes a provisioned component.
prov-ed
Modifies a provisioned component.
prov-exp
Exports the current configuration of the Cisco HSI in MML
command form to a file or files.
prov-sta
Establishes a provisioning session.
prov-stp
Terminates either a specified provisioning session or the current
provisioning session.
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prov-sta
prov-sta
The prov-sta command establishes a provisioning session. The data files are copied from the source
version to the destination version.
prov-sta::srcver=version,dstver=version
Syntax Description
srcver=version
dstver=version
Usage Guidelines
Selects a specific configuration version as the source for configuration
changes. The srcver variable represents a directory that exists in
$GWBASE/var/prov/. In place of the configuration version, you can also
enter:
•
new—Specifies a new default session configuration; no existing source
configuration is used.
•
active—Selects the active configuration as the source for configuration
changes.
Specifies the output version directory for the configuration session results.
The dstver variable represents a directory stored in $GWBASE/var/prov/.
If the source and destination filenames are the same, the new configuration overwrites the old
configuration. It is a good practice to copy an existing configuration instead of overwriting it so that you
can return to a known configuration if there are problems with the new one.
If the source provisioning session has not been verified, the message “Note: This provisioning session
has not been verified” is displayed, but the session starts normally.
If you try to start with a provisioning session that does not exist, an error is displayed, along with a list
of available sessions.
Examples
The MML command in the following example starts a provisioning session named nowt and creates a
new configuration named blah:
gw mml> prov-sta::srcver=nowt,dstver=blah
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 13:32:07 2000
M DENY
The provisioning session called "nowt" does not exist.
The following configurations are available:
sanfran2 uk9 final
telco mgcpvia miki
transit dave matt
The MML command in the following example starts a provisioning session and creates a new
configuration named ver1:
gw mml> PROV-STA::SRCVER="new", DSTVER="ver1"
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 13:32:07 2001
M SUCC
Successfully started provisioning session "ver1" from "new".
The MML command in the following example starts a provisioning session, opens the existing
configuration named ver1, and overwrites that configuration:
gw mml> PROV-STA::SRCVER="ver1", DSTVER="ver1"
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prov-stp
The MML command shown in the following example starts a provisioning session, opens the existing
configuration named ver1, and saves the updated configuration as ver2:
gw mml> PROV-STA::SRCVER="ver1", DSTVER="ver2"
Related Commands
Command
Description
prov-add
Adds a component.
prov-cpy
Activates the configuration settings in the current provisioning
session.
prov-dlt
Deletes a provisioned component.
prov-ed
Modifies a provisioned component.
prov-exp
Exports the current configuration of the Cisco HSI in MML
command form to a file or files.
prov-rtrv
Retrieves information about an existing provisioning session.
prov-stp
Terminates either a specified provisioning session or the current
provisioning session.
prov-stp
The prov-stp command terminates the provisioning session and saves the configuration.
prov-stp:confirm
prov-stp:session name:confirm
Syntax Description
Usage Guidelines
session name
Use the rtrv-mml command to retrieve the MML name given to the MML
process that started the provisioning session.
confirm
If no confirm option is entered, the command is rejected and a message
notifies you of the potential performance impact of this command.
You can use the name given to an MML session to stop a provisioning session. Each MML session (not
Telnet) gets an MML name: for example, mml1 or mml2. The maximum number of allowable MML
sessions is 12.
If you log in to the Cisco HSI from an MML session and start a provisioning session (for example, gw
mml> prov-sta:srcver=new,dstver=uk9), you can use the MML name (for example, mml2) to stop the
session with prov-stp (for example, prov-stp:mml2:confirm).
Use the rtrv-mml command to display all active MML sessions (see rtrv-mml, page A-28).
Examples
The MML command in the following example terminates the current provisioning session:
gw mml> prov-stp:confirm
H323 Signaling Interface Sun Jan 7 14:46:01 2001
M SUCC
Successfully stopped provisioning session "ver1"
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quit
The MML command in the following example terminates the uk9 provisioning session:
gw mml> prov-stp:uk9:confirm
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
Successfully stopped provisioning session "uk9"
gw mml>
If the previous session starts from an MML process assigned the name mml2, you can use the following
MML command:
gw mml> prov-stp:mml2:confirm
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
Successfully stopped provisioning session "uk9"
gw mml>
Related Commands
Command
Description
prov-add
Adds a component.
prov-cpy
Activates the configuration settings in the current provisioning
session.
prov-dlt
Deletes a provisioned component.
prov-ed
Modifies a provisioned component.
prov-exp
Exports the current configuration of the Cisco HSI in MML
command form to a file or files.
prov-rtrv
Retrieves information about an existing provisioning session.
prov-sta
Establishes a provisioning session.
quit
The quit command ends an MML session.
quit
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
Examples
The command in the following example ends an MML session.
gw mml> quit
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radlog
radlog
The radlog command starts or stops RADVision logging into a specified log file.
radlog:[file name]:start | stop
Caution
This command is processor intensive and results in very large log files. Use this command only to
retrieve information for single test calls, and do not use it on a live network that is processing numerous
calls.
Syntax Description.
file name
Examples
The command in the following example starts logging into a diagnostics log named file1:
The user-defined name of the log file. The actual filename has a .log suffix.
The file is located in the logging directory defined in the configuration data
(see Chapter 3, “Provisioning the Cisco HSI”).
gw mml> radlog:file1:start
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
RADLogging requested to start
The following command logs RADVision to the standard log file:
gw mml> radlog::start
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
RADLogging to standard log file
Related Commands
Command
Description
diaglog
Starts or stops event logging into a diagnostics log.
rtrv-log
Displays the logging level of a package or all packages.
set-log
Sets the logging level of a package or all packages.
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restart-softw
restart-softw
The restart-softw command restarts the call processing application. It applies the provisioning data
specified in the configVersion (if present) that overrides the existing active provisioning data.
restart-softw[:configVersion][:confirm]
Syntax Description
Examples
configVersion
In configVersion, init is a keyword, and this command restarts the call
processing application applying the etc/GWmain.conf configuration file as
the provisioning data. If configVersion is an unverified provisioning
session, the command fails.
confirm
If there are active calls, a notification is sent to the craft, and the command
must be reentered with the confirm parameter to take effect.
In the following example, the call processing application restarts using the etc/GWmain.conf
configuration files as the provisioning data:
gw mml> restart-softw:init
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
Application is now restarting using the default provisioning session.
There are no active calls.
New call requests are rejected.
Call Processing now stopped.
Application will restart in 60 seconds
In the following example, the application would restart using the active provisioning session. There are
no active calls, new call requests are rejected, and call processing is now stopped. The application is set
to restart in 12 seconds.
gw mml> restart-softw
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
In the following example, a restart passes an unverified provisioning session. The command fails. You
cannot use an unverified provisioning session.
gw mml> restart-softw:config2
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M DENY
In the following example, a restart uses a specified verified provisioning session. The application restarts
by using original as the provisioning session. There are no active calls, new call requests are rejected,
and call processing is now stopped. The application is set to restart in 12 seconds.
gw mml> restart-softw:original
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
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rtrv-alms
rtrv-alms
The rtrv-alms command retrieves all active alarms.
rtrv-alms
rtrv-alms:cont
Syntax Description
cont
Examples
In the following example, the output contains the standard alarm definition and also a NACK or an ACK
for noninformational alarms. NACK and ACK indicate the acknowledgement status of the alarm.
This parameter displays alarm events until you press Ctrl-C. All active
alarms are displayed, and then a message appears (for example:
“/* Listening for alarm events . . . (Ctrl-C to stop) */”).
gw mml> rtrv-alms
GW Signaling Interface
2000-12-05 14:19:22
M
RTRV
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:12.259, ** ALM=\"VSC FAILURE\",SEV=MJ” NACK
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:13.260, ** ALM=\"CONFIGURATION FAILURE\",SEV=MJ” ACK
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:14.011, A^ ALM=\"ENDPOINT CHANNEL INTERFACE FAILURE\",SEV=IF”
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:14.012, A^ ALM=\"ENDPOINT CHANNEL INTERFACE FAILURE\",SEV=IF”
In the following example, the output displays alarm events until you press Ctrl-C:
gw mml> rtrv-alms:cont
GW Signaling Interface
2000-12-05 14:19:22
M
RTRV
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:12.259, ** ALM=\"VSC FAILURE\",SEV=MJ”
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:13.259,
ALM=\"VSC FAILURE\",SEV=MJ” STATE=CLEARED
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:13.260, ** ALM=\"CONFIGURATION FAILURE\",SEV=MJ”
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:14.011, A^ ALM=\"ENDPOINT CHANNEL INTERFACE FAILURE\",SEV=IF”
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:14.012, A^ ALM=\"ENDPOINT CHANNEL INTERFACE FAILURE\",SEV=IF”
/* Listening for alarm events... (Ctrl-C to stop) */
"H323-GW1: 2000-11-27 11:25:13.259, ** ALM=\"VSC FAILURE\",SEV=MJ”
/* Ctrl-C pressed */
Related Commands
Command
Description
ack-alm
Acknowledges that an alarm event is recognized but does not clear the
alarm.
clr-alm
Clears an alarm event.
rtrv-calls
The rtrv-calls command displays all actively connected calls. If the time elapsed parameter is provided
(in units of minutes), calls display only if they exceed the specified time. The output includes the call
direction, time connected, calling and called address, and call reference.
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rtrv-ctr
rtrv-calls[:time elapsed]
Syntax Description
time elapsed
Examples
In the following example, the command displays all actively connected calls:
If the time elapsed parameter is provided (in units of minutes), calls display
only if they have exceeded the specified time.
gw mml> rtrv-calls
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
CallId SrcAddr DestAddr StartTime
124 04161234567 0299598125 2000-11-27 11:25:13.259
rtrv-ctr
The rtrv-ctr command displays the measurements for a counter group.
rtrv-ctr:counter group
Syntax Description
counter group
Examples
In the following example, the command displays the measurements for the RAS counter group:
The name of an MML counter group (RAS, Q931, or H245).
gw mml> rtrv-ctr:RAS
GW Signaling Interface
2000-12-05 14:19:22
M
RTRV
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK DISC ATT TOT\",VAL=10"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK REG ATT TOT\",VAL=0"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK REG SUCC TOT\",VAL=12"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK RCV UNR ATT TOT\",VAL=100"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK XMIT UNR SUCC TOT \",VAL=2000"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK XMIT UNR ATT TOT\",VAL=20"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK RCV UNR SUCC TOT\",VAL=10"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\""GK RLS ATT TOT\",VAL=20"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK RLS SUCC TOT\",VAL=30"
“H323-GW1:GROUP=\"RAS\",NAME=\"GK INFO REPORT TOT\",VAL=40"
Related Commands
Command
Description
clr-meas
Resets a measurement counter.
rtrv-dest
The rtrv-dest command retrieves status information about the IP links and E-ISUP signaling path to the
PGW 2200.
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rtrv-gapping
rtrv-dest:point code
rtrv-dest:sig path
rtrv-dest:all
Syntax Description
Examples
point code
The MML component name of a point code component.
sig path
The MML name of the logical signaling channel for which you want to
display information. This path should be made up of sig path DSS IP or sig
path NAS entities. Use the help:prov-add command to obtain a description
of sig path components.
all
Displays information about all external point codes and signal paths.
The MML command in the following example retrieves the destination of point code dpcl:
gw mml> retrv-dest:dpc1
MGC-01 Media Gateway Controller 2000-01-12 15:19:51
M RTRV
“dpc1:PKG=SS7-ANSI,ASSOC=UNK,PST=IS
Related Commands
Command
Description
set-dest-state
Changes the service state of an IP link or E-ISUP signaling path to in
service (IS) or out of service (OOS).
rtrv-gapping
The rtrv-gapping command retrieves information about overload-triggered call gapping.
The following information displays:
•
The active/inactive status of call gapping
•
The percentage of calls that are gapped
•
The type of calls to which gapping is applied
rtrv-gapping
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords
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rtrv-log
Examples
The following MML command retrieves the current levels of call gapping for all gapping clients:
gw mml> rtrv-gapping
Related Commands
Client Name
Direction
Level
Call Type
Active
Overload
Outgoing
10
Normal
No
Overload
Incoming
10
Normal
No
MML
Outgoing
20
All
Yes
MML
Incoming
30
All
Yes
Command
Description
set-gapping
Sets the type of calls to be gapped.
rtrv-log
The rtrv-log command displays the logging level of a package or all packages.
rtrv-log:package=x
rtrv-log:all
Syntax Description
package=x
Displays the logging level for the various packages that make up the
Cisco HSI.
For package names, see the “Log Message Packages” section on page 4-10.
all
Examples
Displays the logging levels of all packages.
In the following example, the command displays the logging levels of all packages:
gw mml> rtrv-log:all
H323 Signaling Interface Thu Dec 14 16:28:44 2000
M RTRV
Logging levels:
Application........0x0000
CallControl........0xFFFF
Connection.........0x0000
DataManager........0x0000
Eisup..............0xFFFF
FaultManager.......0x0000
Gapping............0x0000
H323...............0xFFFF
Infrastructure.....0x0000
OverLoad...........0x0000
ProcessManager.....0x0000
Provisioning.......0x0000
Signal.............0x0000
Snmp...............0x0000
SnmpSubagent.......0x0000
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rtrv-mml
Statistics.........0x0000
Trace..............0x0000
UserInterface.......0x0000
Related Commands
Command
Description
diaglog
Starts and stops event logging into a diagnostics log.
radlog
Starts and stops RADVision logging into a specified log file.
set-log
Sets the logging level of a package or all packages.
rtrv-mml
The rtrv-mml command displays the following information:
•
All active MML sessions
•
Session numbers of all active MML sessions
•
User IDs of the session originators
rtrv-mml
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
Examples
In the following example, the command displays all active MML sessions, their sessions numbers, and
the user IDs of the session originators.
gw mml> rtrv-mml
VSC H-323 Signaling Interface - H323-GW1 2000-06-20 10:04:28
M RTRV
mml1:matthewl
mml2:davek
rtrv-ne
The rtrv-ne command displays the type, hardware platform, vendor, location, version, and status of the
Cisco HSI.
rtrv-ne
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
Examples
In the following example, the command displays the type, hardware platform, vendor, location, version,
and status of the Cisco HSI.
gw mml> rtrv-ne
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rtrv-ne-health
H323 Signaling Interface Thu Dec 14 16:29:19 2000
M RTRV
Type: H323 Signaling Interface
Hardware platform: Sun netra t1
Vendor: Cisco Systems, Inc.
Location: H323 - GW1
Version: R1_1_0
Platform Status:
Signaling interface: Active
Call processing: Running
rtrv-ne-health
The rtrv-ne-health command displays the following information about the Cisco HSI status:
•
CPU load
•
Disk space
•
Number of currently connected calls
•
Number of calls in setup
rtrv-ne-health
Syntax Description
Examples
This command has no arguments or keywords.
In the following example, the command displays information about the Cisco HSI status:
gw mml> rtrv-ne-health
VSC H-323 Signaling Interface - H323-GW1 2000-06-20 10:04:28
M RTRV
CPU Load:
Disk space:
Number of connected calls:
Number of calls in setup:
23%
123456
23
12
rtrv-overload
The rtrv-overload command displays overload status information and value settings for the three
provisionable levels of overload.
rtrv-overload
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
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rtrv-softw
Examples
In the following example, the command displays overload status information:
gw mml> rtrv-overload
H323 Signaling Interface Tue Jan 30 11:21:45 2001
M SUCC
Overload/Gapping Information
NumCalls : 0 | CPU : 7% | DiskUsage : 27%
Status : Not in Ovld
Overload Configuration
DiskUsageLimit : 29%
OvldSampleRate : 3000ms
OvldLevel1Percent : 65%
OvldLevel1Filter : NORMAL
OvldLevel1ThreshLowerCpu : 30%
OvldLevel1ThreshUpperCpu : 35%
OvldLevel1ThreshLowerCalls : 800
OvldLevel1ThreshUpperCalls : 1000
OvldLevel2Percent : 75%
OvldLevel2Filter : ALL
OvldLevel2ThreshLowerCpu : 45%
OvldLevel2ThreshUpperCpu : 50%
OvldLevel2ThreshLowerCalls : 1100
OvldLevel2ThreshUpperCalls : 1400
OvldLevel3Percent : 90%
OvldLevel3Filter : NORMAL
OvldLevel3ThreshLowerCpu : 55%
OvldLevel3ThreshUpperCpu : 65%
OvldLevel3ThreshLowerCalls : 1400
OvldLevel3ThreshUpperCalls : 1600
Related Commands
Command
Description
set-overload
Defines the overload handling criteria and behavior.
rtrv-softw
The rtrv-softw command displays the status of the Cisco HSI and call processing activity. The following
software states can be displayed for the Cisco HSI:
•
Not running
•
Starting
•
Active
•
Restart pending
•
Halt pending
•
Reboot pending
The following software states can be displayed for call processing:
•
Running
•
Idle pending
•
Idle
rtrv-softw
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MML User Interface and Command Reference
set-dest-state
Note
When the Cisco HSI is in the restart pending, halt pending, or reboot pending software state, the
sta-callproc command cancels the pending state.
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
Examples
In the following example, the command displays the status of the Cisco HSI and call processing activity:
gw mml> rtrv-softw
VSC H-323 Signaling Interface - H323-GW1 2000-06-20 10:04:28
M RTRV
Platform Status:
Signaling interface: Active
Call processing:
Running
set-dest-state
The set-dest-state command changes the service state of an IP link or E-ISUP signaling path to IS (in
service) or OOS (out of service).
set-dest-state:ipLink1toVscA:IS|OOS
set-dest-state:ipLink2toVscA:IS|OOS
set-dest-state:ipLink1toVscB:IS|OOS
set-dest-state:ipLink2toVscB:IS|OOS
set-dest-state:EisupPath:IS|OOS
set-dest-state:ipLinkNms:IS|OOS
Syntax Description
Examples
IS
In service.
OOS
Out of service.
In the following example, the command changes the service state of an IP link signaling path to IS:
gw mml> set-dest-state:ipLink1toVscA:state=IS
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
Initiating state change of ipLink1toVscA to IS
gw mml> set-dest-state:ipLink1toVscA:state=OOS
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
Initiating state change of ipLink1toVscA to OOS
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set-gapping
Related Commands
Command
Description
rtrv-dest
Retrieves status information about the IP links and E-ISUP signaling
path to the PGW 2200.
set-gapping
The set-gapping command sets the type of calls to be gapped.
set-gapping: inc | otg | both : calltype=normal | all, percent=number
Syntax Description
Usage Guidelines
inc
Gaps calls from the H.323 network.
otg
Gaps calls from the PSTN over E-ISUP.
both
Gaps calls originating from either side.
normal
Gaps all calls except priority and emergency calls.
all
Gaps calls of all types.
number
Specifies the percentage of calls rejected due to call gapping.
If call gapping is set to 100 percent, all calls are gapped irrespective of the normal or all parameter
setting.
If the overload condition is active and call gapping is active, the higher of the two percentage values
determines whether new call attempts are accepted or rejected.
Examples
In the following example, the command sets all calls to be gapped and specifies that 50 percent of the
calls be rejected due to call gapping:
gw mml> set-gapping:both:calltype=all,percent=50
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
Successfully set gapping for target 'both', calltype 'all', and percentage 50
Related Commands
Command
Description
rtrv-gapping
Retrieves information about overload-triggered call gapping.
set-log
The set-log command sets the logging level of a package or all packages.
set-log:package:level=level, [confirm]
set-log:all:level=level, [confirm]
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set-overload
Syntax Description
package
One of the packages in the Cisco HSI.
For a list of package names, see the “Log Message Packages” section on
page 4-10.
level
Logging levels are set through the use of hexadecimal numbers between
0x0000 and 0xFFFF. The higher the number, the higher the level of debug.
confirm
If any client level parsing fails on the data session, a confirm is needed for
the data to be activated.
Usage Guidelines
Logging at any level implies that upper levels are included. When you are setting logging with the level
DEBUG, a confirmation is required because the amount of data logged affects service. For a list of the
packages that can log messages, see the “Log Message Packages” section on page 4-10.
Examples
In the following example, the command sets the logging level of the package gapping to 0xFFE0:
gw mml> set-log:gapping:0xFFE0
M SUCC
logging level for package gapping set to 0xFFE0
Related Commands
Command
Description
diaglog
Starts and stops event logging into a diagnostics log.
radlog
Starts and stops RADVision logging into a specified log file.
rtrv-log
Displays the logging level of a package or all packages.
set-overload
The set-overload command defines the overload handling criteria and behavior.
set-overload: level1|level2|level3:cpu,lower=number, upper=number
set-overload: level1|level2|level3:calls,lower=number, upper=number
set-overload: level1|level2|level3:gap,normal|all : number
Syntax Description
level 1 | level 2 | level 3 Overload behavior can be provisioned at three separate levels: 1, 2, and 3
(rising in severity).
lower=number
The lower threshold for overload detection and restoration of normal call
handling service.
upper=number
The upper threshold for overload detection and restoration of normal call
handling service.
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sta-callproc
Usage Guidelines
The set-overload command defines the upper and lower thresholds for overload detection and
restoration of normal call handling service. The percentage of calls to be gapped and the type of calls to
be gapped can also be configured. Any changes made become active immediately.
The lower value must always be less than the upper value. If the call gap percentage is set to 0, the system
takes no recovery action when overload is encountered, but the appropriate alarm is raised.
Inconsistent threshold settings for different levels can destabilize call processing. For successful
execution of this command, ensure that threshold settings are consistent, as follows:
Examples
•
The number of calls gapped at level 2 must be greater than or equal to the number of calls gapped
at level 1.
•
The number of calls gapped at level 3 must be greater than or equal to the number of calls gapped
at levels 1 and 2.
•
The lower level value of CPU occupancy must always be less than the upper level value.
•
The lower level value of CPU occupancy and the number of calls for level 2 must be greater than or
equal to the corresponding values for level 1.
•
The lower level value of CPU occupancy and the number of calls for level 3 must be greater than or
equal to the corresponding values for levels 1 and 2.
In the following example, the command sets the overload handling criteria and behavior at level 1, sets
the cpu to the lower threshold of 10, and sets the upper threshold to 14.
gw mml> set-overload:level1:cpu, lower =10, upper = 14
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 11:21:28 2001
M SUCC
Successfully added that configuration item.
Related Commands
Command
Retrieve
rtrv-overload
Displays the overload status and the data values for the three provisionable
levels of overload
sta-callproc
The sta-callproc command starts call processing.
sta-callproc
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
Examples
In the following example, the command starts call processing:
gw mml> sta-softw
gw mml> sta-callproc
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sta-softw
H323 Signaling Interface Thu Dec 14 16:31:09 2000
M SUCC
Starting call processing.
Related Commands
Command
Description
sta-softw
Starts the call processing application.
sta-softw
The sta-softw command starts the call processing application.
sta-softw
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords.
Examples
In the following example, the command starts the call processing application:
gw mml> sta-softw
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
The Call Processing Application is starting.
Related Commands
Command
Description
sta-callproc
Starts call processing
sta-trc
The sta-trc command starts the call processing tracing function.
sta-trc:Calltype=calltype,TraceLevel=trace level[,CdAddress=address]
[,CgAddress=address],log=filename[,prd=n]
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sta-trc
Syntax Description
Calltype=calltype
TraceLevel=trace level
This parameter defines the type of call to be traced. The possible values are:
•
inc—For H.323-originated calls
•
otg—For E-ISUP-originated calls
•
both—For calls originating from either side
This parameter defines the level of detail that is recorded in the call trace.
The possible values are:
•
terse—Traces only incoming/outgoing message names and RADvision
API calls.
•
brief—In addition to terse, traces internal interfaces, and call state
changes.
•
verbose—Traces all messages and their contents, RADvision API calls
and their contents, internal interfaces, and call state changes.
CdAddress=address
A filter used to trace calls using only the specified leading digits within the
called address. A match is performed on these digits and the initial called
address digits contained within the E-ISUP IAM message or the H225
SETUP message.
CgAddress=address
A filter used to trace calls using only the specified leading digits within the
calling address. A match is performed on these digits and the initial calling
address digits contained within the E-ISUP IAM message or the H.225
SETUP message.
log=filename
The filename for the trace output.
prd=n
The trace period (in seconds). At expiration of this period, the trace log is
closed. If no value is specified, the period defaults to 1800 seconds (30
minutes).
Defaults
The default trace for all calls is 30 minutes.
Usage Guidelines
Only one trace command at a time can be active. If an additional request is issued, the command is
rejected with a call trace already active indication.
Examples
In the following example, the command starts the call processing tracing function:
gw mml> sta-trc:Calltype=both, TraceLevel=terse, dAddress=012,CgAddress=013, log=tlog.txt,
prd=10
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
Related Commands
Command
Description
stp-trc
Halts the tracing currently active and closes the trace file.
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stp-call
stp-call
The stp-call command terminates a currently active call by forcing a release of the call.
Disconnect/release messages are sent in both directions.
stp-call:callref=x
stp-call:all
Syntax Description
Examples
callref
Refers to a positive integer.
all
Stops all calls.
In the following example, the command terminates a currently active call by forcing a release of the call
with a callref of 33.
gw mml> stp-call:callref=33
H323 Signaling Interface Thu Dec 14 16:43:54 2000
M SUCC
Stopped call 33
Related Commands
Command
Description
rtrv-calls
Displays all actively connected calls.
stp-callproc
The stp-callproc command stops further call processing by immediately terminating the handling of new
call requests.
stp-callproc[:timeout=T]
Syntax Description
Examples
timeout
If no timeout period is provided, existing calls are released immediately. If
a timeout period is provided, existing calls are released after the specified
amount of time has elapsed. When all calls have been released, a
notification message is sent to the craft terminal.
T
T is in seconds.
In the following example, the command stops further call processing by immediately terminating the
handling of new call requests:
gw mml> stp-callproc
H323 Signaling Interface Thu Dec 14 16:27:07 2000
M SUCC
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stp-softw
Stopped accepting new calls. Existing calls will be released in 5 seconds.
Stopping Call Processing.
stp-softw
The stp-softw command stops the call processing application. This command causes the Cisco HSI to
terminate.
stp-softw[:confirm]
Syntax Description
confirm
Examples
In the following example, the command stops the call processing application:
If there are active calls, a notification is sent to the craft. In order for the
command to take effect, it must be reentered with the confirm parameter.
gw mml> stp-softw
H323 Signaling Interface Thu Dec 14 16:27:36 2000
M SUCC
There are no active calls.
Application is now stopping
stp-trc
The stp-trc command halts the currently active tracing and closes the trace file.
stp-trc
Syntax Description
This command has no arguments or keywords
Examples
In the following example, the command halts the currently active tracing and closes the trace file:
gw mml> stp-trc
H323 Signaling Interface Day Mon 1 hh:mm:ss YYYY
M SUCC
Tracing deactivated.
Related Commands
Command
Description
sta-trc
Starts the call processing tracing function.
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A P P E N D I X
B
Skeleton Configuration File
Provisionable and configurable data elements within the Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI) are
grouped as dynamic, static, or constant data. You can modify dynamic and static data through the
provisioning MML commands.
At startup, the Cisco HSI reads a skeleton file, which contains information for every configurable item
within the system. It determines which group the item is in and what its possible ranges are. The format
for each item is:
PackageName
ItemName
GroupValueRange
The package name is an MML name for dynamic and static data, and service package names (determined
within the detailed design) for constant data.
The item name is as specified in the detailed design (that is, all constant data).
The group is one of the following:
•
S = Static data
•
D = Dynamic data
•
C = Constant data
The ValueRange is one of the following:
•
[ ] = Number: No range
•
[x–y] = Number: Acceptable range x to y
•
STRING = String value
•
NULL = No associated value
An example of an MML command follows:
RASmaxFailD[1-200]
In the preceding example, the PackageName is RAS, and the ItemName is maxFail. It is a dynamic
configuration item, and it is a numerical data type with an acceptable range of 1 to 200.
The skeleton file allows the system technician to specify whether data is provisionable and whether
provisionable data is static or dynamic.
Note
The skeleton configuration file should be modified only by authorized personnel.
The following is an example of a skeleton file:
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Skeleton Configuration File
#****** sys_config_static ************************
#Static
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
Nodeid
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
HOST_PORT_NUMBER1
S
[0-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
HOST_PORT_NUMBER2
S
[0-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
HOST_IPADDR1
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
HOST_IPADDR2
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
VSCA_IPADDR1
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
VSCA_IPADDR2
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
VSCB_IPADDR1
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
VSCB_IPADDR2
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
VSCA_PORT_NUMBER1
S
[0-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
VSCA_PORT_NUMBER2
S
[0-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
VSCB_PORT_NUMBER1
S
[0-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
VSCB_PORT_NUMBER2
S
[0-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
ClipClirSupported
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
DualCLISupported
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
RaiSupported
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
DtmfSupportedDirection
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
DtmfSupportedType
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
NetchatSupported
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
H225PavoSupported
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
PavoRedirScreeningInd
S
[0-3]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
PavoRedirReason
S
[0-15]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
PavoRedirPresInd
S
[0-3]
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CliInDisplaySupported
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
T38MaxVal
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
T38Options
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
AsymmetricHandlingSupported
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
UseConfID
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_DEFAULT
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_HC_DEFAULT
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_AccessBarred
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Acknowledgement
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_AddressIncomplete
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_AnonymousCallRejection
S
STRING
S
STRING
S
STRING
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Skeleton Configuration File
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_BlacklistBNumberMatched
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_BlacklistCliLengthInvalid
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_BlacklistCliMatched
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_BlacklistCpcRestricted
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_BlacklistNoCli
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_BlacklistNoaRestricted
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Busy
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_CallRejectCallGapping
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_CallTerminated
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_CallTypeIncompatible
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_CallingDroppedWhileOnHold S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_CallingPartyOffHold
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_ChannelOutOfService
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Congestion
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_CotFailure
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_CugAccessBarred
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_DteControlledNotReady
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_DteUncontrolledNotReady
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_ExcessiveDigCallProceeding
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_FacilityNotRegistered
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_FlowControlledCongestion
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_GroupRestrictions
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarred
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_InterceptedSubscriber
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_InterworkUnspec
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_InvalidCallRef
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_MesgWithUnrecElemDiscarded S
S
STRING
S
STRING
S
STRING
S
S
STRING
STRING
S
STRING
S
STRING
S
STRING
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_MessageNotUnderstood
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_MisroutedCallPortedNumber
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_NetworkAddressExtensionError
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_NetworkTermination
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_NewDestination
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_NumberUnobtainable
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_OperatorPriorityAccess
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_OutOfCatchmentArea
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarred
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_PermanentIcb
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_PortedNumber
S
STRING
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Skeleton Configuration File
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_PreemptionCctUnavailable
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Prefix0DialledInError
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Prefix1DialledInError
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Prefix1NotDialled
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_PriorityForcedRelease
S
STRING
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Proprietary
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_ProtErrThresholdExceeded
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_ProtocolErrorUnspec
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Reject
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_RejectedDivertedCall
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_RemoteProcError
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_RepeatAttempt
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_RouteOutOfService
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SelectiveCallBarring
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_ServiceIncompatible
S
STRING
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_ServiceTemporarilyUnavailable
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_ServiceUnavailable
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SignalNotUnderstood
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SignalNotValid
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SignallingSystemIncompatible
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SubControlledIcb
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SubNotFoundDle
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SubscriberCallTerminate
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SubscriberIncompatible
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SubscriberMoved
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_SubscriberOutOfService
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_TemporaryOos
S
STRING
S
STRING
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_TerminalCongestion
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Transferred
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_TranslationOos
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_UnallocatedDestNumber
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_UndefinedBg
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_Unknown
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_UnrecElemPassedOn
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_VacentCode
S
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
CC_EC_WhitelistCliNotMatched
S
S
S
STRING
STRING
S
S
S
STRING
STRING
STRING
STRING
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Skeleton Configuration File
#****** system ************************
#Static
H323_SYS
cidAssociate
S
NULL
H323_SYS
vtNodeCount
S
[0-65535]
H323_SYS
channels
S
[0-65535]
H323_SYS
messages
S
[0-65535]
H323_SYS
pktChans
S
[0-65535]
H323_SYS
protocols
S
[0-65535]
H323_SYS
maxProcs
S
[0-65535]
H323_SYS
maxBuffSize
S
[0-65535]
H323_SYS
maxCalls
S
[0-5000]
H323_SYS
maxChannels
S
[0-65535]
#****** sys_config_dynamic*************
#Dynamic
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
AlternateGatekeeperIp
D
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
AlternateGatekeeperPort
D
[0-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
AlternateGatekeeperId
D
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
Logdirectory
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
LogFilenamePrefix
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
LogPrio
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
LogFileRotateSize
D
[1000-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
LogFileRotateInterval
D
[0-65535]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
IPAddrRNMS
D
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
DiskUsageLimit
D
[20-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldSampleRate
D
[500-10000]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel1Percent
D
[0-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel1Filter
D
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel1ThreshLowerCalls D
[1-5000]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel1ThreshUpperCalls
D
[1-5000]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel1ThreshLowerCPU
D
[0-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel1ThreshUpperCPU
D
[0-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel2Percent
D
[0-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel2Filter
D
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel2ThreshLowerCalls
D
[1-5000]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel2ThreshUpperCalls
D
[1-5000]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel2ThreshLowerCPU
D
[0-100]
D
D
STRING
STRING
D
STRING
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Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel2ThreshUpperCPU
D
[0-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel3Percent
D
[0-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel3Filter
D
STRING
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel3ThreshLowerCalls
D
[1-5000]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel3ThreshUpperCalls
D
[1-5000]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel3ThreshLowerCPU
D
[0-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
OvldLevel3ThreshUpperCPU
D
[0-100]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
CiAgentScanPeriod
D
[]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
AlarmDebounceTime
D
[0-60000]
SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
RegFailureReleaseCause
D
[1-127]
#****** ras ************************
#Static
RAS
manualRAS
S
NULL
#****** ras ************************
#Dynamic
RAS
responseTimeOut
D
[1-200]
RAS
maxFail
RAS
allowCallsWhenNonReg
D
NULL
RAS
manualRegistration
D
NULL
RAS
timeToLive
RAS
rasPort
RAS
compare15bitRasCrv
RAS
maxRetries
RAS
maxMulticastTTL
D
[0-200]
RAS
preGrantedArqUse
D
STRING
D
D
[1-200]
[1-65535]
D
D
[0-65535]
NULL
D
[1-200]
RAS
manualDiscovery.ipAddress
D
STRING
RAS
manualDiscovery.port
D
[0-65535]
RAS
gateway.prefix[i]
D
STRING
RAS
gatekeeperId
D
STRING
RAS
terminalAlias[i].e164
D
STRING
RAS
terminalAlias[i].h323ID
D
STRING
RAS
endpointVendor.t35CountryCode
D
[0-255]
RAS
endpointVendor.t35Extension
D
[0-255]
RAS
endpointVendor.manufacturerCode
D
[0-65535]
RAS
endpointVendor.productId
D
STRING
RAS
endpointVendor.versionId
C
STRING
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
B-6
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
#****** q931 ************************
#Dynamic
Q931
responseTimeOut
D
[1-200]
Q931
connectTimeOut
D
[1-20000]
Q931
callSignalingPort
D
[0-65535]
Q931
maxCalls
Q931
notEstablishControl
D
NULL
Q931
overlappedSending
C
NULL
Q931
earlyH245
Q931
h245tunneling
D
[0-5000]
C
NULL
C
NULL
#****** h245 ************************
#Dynamic
H245
masterSlave.terminalType
D
[0-255]
H245
masterSlave.manualResponse
D
NULL
H245
masterSlave.timeout
H245
masterSlave.manualOperation
H245
channelsTimeout
D
[0-65535]
H245
roundTripTimeout
D
[0-65535]
H245
requestCloseTimeout
D
[0-65535]
H245
requestModeTimeout
D
[0-65535]
H245
mediaLoopTimeout
D
[0-65535]
H245
caps.manualOperation
D
NULL
H245
caps.timeout
H245
caps.maxAudioDelay
D
[0-1023]
H245
caps.table[i].entryNo
D
[1-65535]
D
D
[0-65535]
NULL
D
[0-65535]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g711Alaw64k
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g711Alaw56k
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g711Ulaw64k
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g711Ulaw56k
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g722at64k
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g722at56k
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g722at48k
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g728
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g729
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g729.echo[i]22k
D
[1-256]
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
B-7
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g7231.maxAudioFrames
D
[1-256]
H245
caps.table[i].audio.g7231.silenceSuppression
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].name
H245
chan[i].audio.g711Alaw64k
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g711Alaw56k
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g711Ulaw64k
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g711Ulaw56k
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g722at64k
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g722at56k
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g722at48k
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g728
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g729
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g7231.maxAudioFrames
D
[1-256]
H245
chan[i].audio.g7231.silenceSuppression
D
[1-256]
H245
modes[i].name
H245
modes[i].audio.g711Alaw64k
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g711Alaw56k
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g711Ulaw64k
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g711Ulaw56k
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g722at64k
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g722at56k
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g722at48k
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g728
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g729
D
NULL
H245
modes[i].audio.g7231
D
NULL
D
D
STRING
STRING
#****************** From GWmain.static.conf *******************
#Logging
#Const
Logging
Application
D
[0-65535]
Logging
CallControl
D
[0-65535]
Logging
CC
Logging
Connection
D
[0-65535]
Logging
DataManager
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Eisup
D
[0-65535]
D
[0-65535]
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
B-8
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
Logging
FaultManager
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Gapping
D
[0-65535]
Logging
H323
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Infrastructure
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Overload
D
[0-65535]
Logging
ProcessManager
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Provisioning
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Signal
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Snmp
D
[0-65535]
Logging
SnmpSubagent
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Statistics
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Trace
D
[0-65535]
Logging
UserInterface
D
[0-65535]
Logging
Configuration
Logging
Timer
D
[0-65535]
Logging
EISUP
D
[0-65535]
Logging
OTLogging
D
D
[0-65535]
STRING
##
#### Call Control Package
##
CCPackage
Hash
C
STRING
CCPackage
Pound
C
STRING
CCPackage
Star
C
STRING
CCPackage
StopDigit
CCPackage
A_CC_ChargeInd
CCPackage
A_CC_tEndToEndMethod
CCPackage
A_CC_tLineUser
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_tLineStatus
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_MLC_Action
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_tSCCPMethod
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_Interworking
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_tEndToEndInfAvail
CCPackage
A_CC_tIsdnAllTheWay
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_tEchoCancIr
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_tLineAccess
D
[]
C
STRING
D
C
[]
[]
C
[]
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
B-9
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
CCPackage
A_CC_BNumDataNOA
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_BNumDataNPI
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_BNumDataINN
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_ANumDataNOA
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_Clir
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_ANumDataSI
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_ANumDataNPI
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_A_Cli
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_AddANumDataNOA
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_AddANumDataSI
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_AddANumDataNPI
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_AddANumDataCLIR
D
CCPackage
A_CC_oLinecall
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_Location
D
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_CodeStandard
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_ProgressRestrict
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_oIsdnPref
CCPackage
A_CC_oIsdnAllTheWay
CCPackage
A_CC_oEndToEndInfAvail
CCPackage
A_CC_oNatInd
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_oLSPP
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_oNBit
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_oPORC
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_oPBit
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_oEndToEndMethod
CCPackage
A_CC_CollectCallInd
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_oSCCPMethod
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_GDES
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_GDTD
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_NOCI_VC
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_NOCI_ECDI
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_NOCI_CCI
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_NOCI_SI
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_TMR
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_INFO_CFN
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_GAPPEDCALLCAUSE
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_WAIT_CONFIRM
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_WAIT_ANSWER
C
[]
[]
C
[]
C
[]
C
[]
C
[]
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
B-10
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
CCPackage
A_CC_NUM_REL_RETRIES
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_WAIT_REL_RETRY
C
[]
CCPackage
A_CC_WAIT_RLC_FAIL
C
[]
# Cause code map
CCPackage
CC_EC_UnallocatedNumber
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NoRouteToTns
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NoRouteToDest
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_SpecialInformationTone
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_MisdialledTkPrefix
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ChUnacceptable
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_CallAwardedDeliveredEstCh
CCPackage
CC_EC_Preemption
C
CCPackage
CC_EC_PreemptionCctRes
C
CCPackage
CC_EC_NormalClearing
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_UserBusy
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NoUserResponding
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NoAnswerAlertedUser
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_SubAbscent
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_CallRejected
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NumberChanged
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_RedirectionToNewDest
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_RoutingError
CCPackage
CC_EC_NonSelectedUserClearing
CCPackage
CC_EC_DestOutOfOrder
CCPackage
CC_EC_InvalidNumberFormat
CCPackage
CCPackage
C
STRING
STRING
STRING
C
STRING
C
STRING
C
STRING
C
CC_EC_FacilityRejected
CC_EC_ResponseToStatusEnquiry
STRING
C
STRING
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NormalUnspecified
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NoCircuitAvailable
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NetworkOutOfOrder
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOos
CCPackage
CCPackage
CCPackage
CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOperational
CC_EC_TemporaryFailure
CC_EC_SwitchingEquipCongestion
C
STRING
C
STRING
C
STRING
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_AccessInfoDiscarded
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ReqCircuitUnavail
C
STRING
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
B-11
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
CCPackage
CC_EC_PrecedenceBlocked
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ResourcesUnavailUnspec
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_QualityUnavail
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotSubscr
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarredInCug
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarredInCug
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_BearcapNotAuthorized
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_BaercapNotAvail
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_InconOutgoingAccAndSubClass
C
STRING
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotAvail
CCPackage
CC_EC_BearcapNotImp
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ChTypeNotImp
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotImp
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_OnlyRestrictDigInfoBearer
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotImpUnspec
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_InvalidCallReferenceValue
C
STRING
CCPackage
CCPackage
CC_EC_ChIdNotExist
CC_EC_SuspendExistButNotThisId
C
STRING
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_CallIdInUse
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NoCallSuspended
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_CallIdHasBeenCleared
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_UserNotMemberOfCug
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_IncompatibleDest
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_NonExistentCug
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_InvalidTns
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_InvalidMsgUnspec
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_MandatoryElementMissing
CCPackage
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImp
CCPackage
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImpOrWrongState
C
STRING
C
STRING
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ElemTypeNotImp
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_InvalidElemContents
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_MsgInWrongState
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_EC_ParamUnrecPassed
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_UnallocatedNumber
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_NoRouteToSpecifiedTransitNetwork
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_NoRouteToDestination
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_SendSpecialInformationTone
C
STRING
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
B-12
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
CCPackage
CC_HC_MisdialedTrunkPrefix
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_ChannelUnacceptable
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_CallAwardedEstablishedChannel
C
CCPackage
CC_HC_Preemption
STRING
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_PreemptionCircuitReservedForReuse
CCPackage
CC_HC_NormalCallClearing
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_UserBusy
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_NoUserresponding
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_NoAnswerFromAlertedUser
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_SubscriberAbsent
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_CallRejected
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_NumberChanged
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_RedirectionToNewDestination
CCPackage
CC_HC_ExchangeRouteError
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_NonSelectedUserClearing
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_DestinationOutOfOrder
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_InvalidNumberFormat
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_FacilityRejected
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_ResponceToStatusEnquiry
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_NormalUnspecified
CCPackage
CCPackage
C
STRING
C
STRING
CC_HC_NoCircuitChannelAvailable
C
STRING
C
STRING
CC_HC_NetworkOutOfOrder
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOutOfService
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOperational
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_TemporaryFailure
CCPackage
CC_HC_SwitchingEquipmentCongestion
CCPackage
C
STRING
C
CC_HC_AccessInformationDiscarded
STRING
C
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_RequestedCircuitChannelNotAvailable
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_PrecedenceCallBlocked
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_ResourceUnavailable
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_QualityOfServiceNotAvailable
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotSubscribed
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_OutgoingCallsBaredWithinCUG
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_IncomingCallsBaredWithinCUG
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotAuthorized
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotPresentlyAvailable
CCPackage
CC_HC_InconsistencyAcessInfoSubscriberClass
CCPackage
CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionUnavailable
C
STRING
C
C
STRING
STRING
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
B-13
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
CCPackage
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotImplemented
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_ChannelTypeNotImplemented
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotImplemented
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_OnlyRestrictedDigitalBearerInfoCapability
CCPackage
CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionNotImplemented
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_InvalidCallreferenceValue
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_IdentifiedChannelDoesnotExist
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_ASuspendedCallExistsThisCallIdDoesNot
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_CallIdentityInUse
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_NoCallSuspended
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_CallHavingTheRequestedCallIdHasBeenCleared C
CCPackage
CCPackage
CCPackage
CCPackage
CCPackage
C
STRING
STRING
CC_HC_UserNotMemberOfCUG
CC_HC_IncompatibleDestination
CC_HC_NonExistantCUG
CC_HC_InvalidTransitNetworkSelection
C
STRING
C
STRING
C
STRING
C
CC_HC_InvalidMessage
STRING
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_MandatoryInformationElementIsMissing
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_MessageTypeNonExistantOrNotImplemented
C
STRING
CCPackage
STRING
CC_HC_MessageTypeNotCompatibleWithStateOrNonExistantOrNotImplemented C
CCPackage
CC_HC_InformationElementParameterNonExistantOrNotImplemented C
CCPackage
CC_HC_InvalidInformationElementContents
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_MessageNotCompatibleWithCallState
C
STRING
CCPackage
CC_HC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
CCPackage
C
CC_HC_ParameterNonExistantOrNotImplementedPassedOn C
STRING
STRING
STRING
#
# Package Gapping
# Set the gapping percentage level for each side. A level of 0
# indicates no gapping
# A level of 100 indicates gap all calls (except priority calls # see treatment below)
#
Gapping
H323level
C
[]
Gapping
EISUPlevel
C
[]
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
B-14
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
#
# Priority treatment determines the treatment of priority calls
# during gapping.
# GapAlways indicates priority calls are treated as normal calls
# GapNever indicate priority calls are never to be gapped
# GapOn100PercentGapping indicates priority calls are only gapped
# when 100 percent gapping is applied.
#
Gapping
PriorityCallTreatment
C
STRING
#
# Configuration for trace package
# There are five trace trigger locations. Each location can hold one type of
# six trigger types as follows:
#
# EISUP CallingPartyNumber (E.164 address)
# EISUP CalledPartyNumber (E.164 address)
# H323 CallingPartyNumber (E.164 address)
# H323 CalledPartyNumber (E.164 address)
# H323 OriginatingIPAddress and H323 OriginatingIPMask (dotted notation)
# H323 TerminatingIPAddress and TerminatingIPMask (dotted notation)
#
Trace
TraceOutputFilename
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger1.eisup.CallingPartyNumber
Trace
Trigger1.eisup.CalledPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger1.h323.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger1.h323.CalledPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger1.h323.OriginatingIPAddress
C
[]
Trace
Trigger1.h323.OriginatingIPMask
C
Trace
Trigger1.h323.TerminatingIPAddress
C
Trace
Trigger1.h323.TerminatingIPMask
C
[]
Trace
Trigger2.eisup.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger2.eisup.CalledPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger2.h323.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
C
[]
[]
[]
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
B-15
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
Trace
Trigger2.h323.CalledPartyNumber
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger2.h323.OriginatingIPAddress
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger2.h323.OriginatingIPMask
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger2.h323.TerminatingIPAddress
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger2.h323.TerminatingIPMask
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger3.eisup.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger3.eisup.CalledPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger3.h323.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger3.h323.CalledPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger3.h323.OriginatingIPAddress
C
[]
Trace
Trigger3.h323.OriginatingIPMask
Trace
Trigger3.h323.TerminatingIPAddress
Trace
Trigger3.h323.TerminatingIPMask
C
[]
Trace
Trigger4.eisup.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger4.eisup.CalledPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger4.h323.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger4.h323.CalledPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger4.h323.OriginatingIPAddress
C
[]
Trace
Trigger4.h323.OriginatingIPMask
C
[]
Trace
Trigger4.h323.TerminatingIPAddress
Trace
Trigger4.h323.TerminatingIPMask
C
[]
Trace
Trigger5.eisup.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger5.eisup.CalledPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger5.h323.CallingPartyNumber
C
[]
Trace
Trigger5.h323.CalledPartyNumber
C
Trace
Trigger5.h323.OriginatingIPAddress
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger5.h323.OriginatingIPMask
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger5.h323.TerminatingIPAddress
C
STRING
Trace
Trigger5.h323.TerminatingIPMask
C
STRING
C
[]
C
[]
C
[]
[]
#
# TraceTriggerSwitch(for CLI/SNMP application)
# This gates the output of the trigger data for each location
#
Trace
TriggerGate1
C
STRING
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
B-16
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
Trace
TriggerGate2
C
STRING
Trace
TriggerGate3
C
STRING
Trace
TriggerGate4
C
STRING
Trace
TriggerGate5
C
STRING
##
## Package EISUP
##
#
#The period for CISCO's RUDP timer manager in milli seconds
#
EISUP
RUDP_TIMER_CHECK_PERIOD_MSEC
C
[]
#The time to wait before failing over to another vsc.
EISUP
WAIT_TIME_BEFORE_FAIL_OVER_MILLI_SEC
C
[]
##
## Package Application
##
Application
DefaultCallProcessingStatus
C
STRING
Application
WaitBeforeCallReleaseTimer
C
[]
Application
RestartPendingTimer
C
[]
Application
HaltPendingTimer
C
[]
Application
RebootPendingTimer
C
[]
#
#Information required by the rtrv-ne-health MML command
#
Application
Hardware
C
STRING
Application
Location
C
STRING
##
## Package H323
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
B-17
Appendix B
Skeleton Configuration File
##
H323
maxTimers
C
[]
H323
tickPeriod
C
[]
H323
defaultSDPt
C
STRING
H323
overrideConfig
S
[0-1]
H323
defaultRadLog
S
[0-4]
##
## Statistics
##
Statistics
StatLogFileName
D
STRING
Statistics
StatOutputTime
D
[0-65535]
#
# Test entries for provisioning tests.
#
RAS
NumberNoRangeConst
C
[]
RAS
NumberRangeDynamic2_4
D
[2-4]
H245
NumberNoRangeConst
C
[]
H245
NumberRangeStatic1_4
S
[1-4]
Q931
QuotedDynamic
D
STRING
Q931
NonQuotedConst
C
STRING
Q931
ConnectTimeoutConst
C
STRING
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A P P E N D I X
C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
This appendix presents an example of an HSI configuration file.
Note
The configuration file does not contain a complete list of all configurable items.
#verified
#
# $Id: GWmain.base.conf,v 1.6 2002/09/09 15:27:10 syousaf Exp $
#
# This is the base configuration file that is concatenated to
# a file derived from questions at install time, to generate the GWmain.conf
# file, which is used by the Application GWmain.
###################################################################################
##
# LOGGING PACKAGE
#
# The Logging package determines the logging level for all defined packages.
# This is a bit mask which controls the 16 debug levels
#
Package = Logging
#
OTLogging
= "ON"
Application
= 0x0000
#CallControl
= 0xFF00
CallControl
= 0x0000
#Choice {ON, OFF}. Default: "OFF"
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Connection
= 0x0000
#Connection
= 0xFF00
DataManager
= 0x0000
#Eisup
= 0xFF00
Eisup
= 0x0000
FaultManager
= 0x0000
Gapping
= 0x0000
H323
Example of an HSI Configuration File
= 0x0000
Infrastructure
= 0x0000
Overload
= 0x0000
ProcessManager
= 0x0000
Provisioning
= 0x0000
Signal
= 0x0000
Snmp
= 0x0000
SnmpSubagent
= 0x0000
Statistics
= 0x0000
Trace
= 0x0000
UserInterface
= 0x0000
###################################################################################
##
# H323 Service Package
#
# Not modifiable at runtime (Static Provisionable Data)
#
Package = H323
#
maxTimers = 20
tickPeriod = 1000
defaultSDPt = "v=0\r\no=\r\ns=\r\nt=0 0\r\nc=IN IP4 0.0.0.0\r\nm=audio 0 RTP/AVP 0 8\r\n"
overrideConfig = 0
# Set to 1 to use the override_config.val file instead of RVConfig
defaultRadLog = 0
# Set to 3(or any rad log level) to start radvision logging at startup.
###################################################################################
##
# H323 RADVision SYSTEM Package
#
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Example of an HSI Configuration File
# Not modifiable at runtime (Static Provisionable Data)
#
Package = H323_SYS
#
maxCalls = 2500
maxChannels = 2
###################################################################################
##
# Q931 RADVIsion PACKAGE
#
Package = Q931
#
responseTimeOut = 60
connectTimeOut = 180
callSignalingPort = 1720
maxCalls = 2500
#notEstablishControl =
overlappedSending =
earlyH245 =
h245Tunneling =
###################################################################################
###
# H323 RADVision RAS Package
#
# Modifiable at runtime (Dynamic Provisionable Data) except for manualRAS
#
Package = RAS
#
responseTimeOut = 30
#manualRAS =
maxFail = 3
#allowCallsWhenNonReg =
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Appendix C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
#manualRegistration =
endpointVendor.productID = "GoldWing"
endpointVendor.t35CountryCode = 11
endpointVendor.t35Extension = 11
endpointVendor.manufacturerCode = 9
timeToLive = 600
rasPort = 0
#compare15bitRasCrv =
maxRetries = 3
maxMulticastTTL = 3
preGrantedArqUse = direct
###################################################################################
####
# H245 RADVision PACKAGE
#
# Dynamically Provisionable except for manualOperation(s)
Package = H245
#
channelsTimeout = 30
#roundTripTimeout = 5
#requestCloseTimeout = 5
#requestModeTimeout = 5
#mediaLoopTimeout = 5
## MasterSlave Determination
masterSlave.terminalType = 60
masterSlave.manualOperation =
masterSlave.manualResponse =
masterSlave.timeout = 30
caps.manualOperation =
caps.timeout = 30
caps.maxAudioDelay = 60
caps.table[1].entryNo = 7111
caps.table[1].audio.g711Ulaw64k = 20
caps.table[2].entryNo = 7110
caps.table[2].audio.g711Alaw64k = 20
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Example of an HSI Configuration File
caps.table[3].entryNo = 728
caps.table[3].audio.g728 = 20
chan[1].name = g711Alaw64k
chan[1].audio.g711Alaw64k = 20
chan[2].name = g711Ulaw64k
chan[2].audio.g711Ulaw64k = 20
chan[3].name = g728
chan[3].audio.g728 = 20
modes[1].name = g711Alaw64k
modes[1].audio.g711Alaw64k =
modes[2].name = g711Ulaw64k
modes[2].audio.g711Ulaw64k =
#modes[3].name = g728
#modes[3].audio.g728 =
###################################################################################
##
# CALL CONTROL PACKAGE
#
##
Package = CCPackage
#
Hash = A
Pound = A
Star = B
StopDigit = "#"
A_CC_ChargeInd = # BCI
A_CC_tEndToEndMethod =
A_CC_tLineUser =
A_CC_tLineStatus =
A_CC_MLC_Action =
A_CC_tSCCPMethod =
A_CC_Interworking =
A_CC_tEndToEndInfAvail =
A_CC_tIsdnAllTheWay =
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Example of an HSI Configuration File
A_CC_tEchoCancIr =
A_CC_tLineAccess =
A_CC_BNumDataNOA =
# CalledPN
A_CC_BNumDataNPI =
A_CC_BNumDataINN =
A_CC_ANumDataNOA =
# CallingPN
A_CC_Clir =
A_CC_ANumDataSI =
A_CC_ANumDataNPI =
A_CC_A_Cli =
A_CC_oLinecall = # CallingPC
A_CC_Location = # CauseInd
A_CC_CodeStandard =
A_CC_ProgressRestrict =
# Event Info
A_CC_oIsdnPref = # FCI
A_CC_oIsdnAllTheWay =
A_CC_oEndToEndInfAvail =
A_CC_oNatInd =
A_CC_oLSPP =
A_CC_oNBit =
A_CC_oPORC =
A_CC_oPBit =
A_CC_oEndToEndMethod =
A_CC_CollectCallInd =
A_CC_oSCCPMethod =
A_CC_GDES =
# GenericDigits
A_CC_GDTD =
A_CC_NOCI_VC =
# NatureOfConnection
A_CC_NOCI_ECDI =
A_CC_NOCI_CCI =
A_CC_NOCI_SI =
A_CC_TMR =
# TransmissionMediumRequired
A_CC_INFO_CFN = # confusion code on INFO receipt
A_CC_GAPPEDCALLCAUSE = 60 # congestion cause for releasing on gapping
A_CC_WAIT_CONFIRM = 30 #20..30 seconds (default is 30), from q764
A_CC_WAIT_ANSWER = 180 #90..180 seconds (default is 180), from q118, refd in
# ----- Cause Codes ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Example of an HSI Configuration File
# CC: Call Control, EC: Eisup Cause, HC: H323 Cause
# For the Eisup cause code values see CISCO: EISUP Protocol Specification ENG-46168 version 19
# For the H323 cause code values see ITU-T: Q.850
# The mappings below are considered constant and not provisionable.
# They can be made provisionable by moving them from the CCPackage
# to the SYS_CONFIG_STATIC package.
# The following is the Eisup to H323 cause code map.
# When the Eisup cause on the left is received from Eisup,
# the H323 cause on right is sent to H323.
# Note: the reverse is not true, this is a one way mapping.
#
The H323 to Eisup cause map is defined in further down.
CC_EC_UnallocatedNumber
= CC_HC_UnallocatedNumber
CC_EC_NoRouteToTns
= CC_HC_NoRouteToSpecifiedTransitNetwork
CC_EC_NoRouteToDest
= CC_HC_NoRouteToDestination
CC_EC_SpecialInformationTone
= CC_HC_SendSpecialInformationTone
CC_EC_MisdialledTkPrefix
= CC_HC_MisdialedTrunkPrefix
CC_EC_ChUnacceptable
= CC_HC_ChannelUnacceptable
CC_EC_CallAwardedDeliveredEstCh
= CC_HC_CallAwardedEstablishedChannel
CC_EC_Preemption
= CC_HC_Preemption
CC_EC_PreemptionCctRes
= CC_HC_PreemptionCircuitReservedForReuse
CC_EC_NormalClearing
= CC_HC_NormalCallClearing
CC_EC_UserBusy
= CC_HC_UserBusy
CC_EC_NoUserResponding
= CC_HC_NoUserresponding
CC_EC_NoAnswerAlertedUser
= CC_HC_NoAnswerFromAlertedUser
CC_EC_SubAbscent
= CC_HC_SubscriberAbsent
CC_EC_CallRejected
= CC_HC_CallRejected
CC_EC_NumberChanged
= CC_HC_NumberChanged
CC_EC_RedirectionToNewDest
= CC_HC_RedirectionToNewDestination
CC_EC_RoutingError
CC_EC_NonSelectedUserClearing
CC_EC_DestOutOfOrder
= CC_HC_ExchangeRouteError
= CC_HC_NonSelectedUserClearing
= CC_HC_DestinationOutOfOrder
CC_EC_InvalidNumberFormat
= CC_HC_InvalidNumberFormat
CC_EC_FacilityRejected
= CC_HC_FacilityRejected
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Appendix C
CC_EC_ResponseToStatusEnquiry
= CC_HC_ResponceToStatusEnquiry
CC_EC_NormalUnspecified
CC_EC_NoCircuitAvailable
Example of an HSI Configuration File
= CC_HC_NormalUnspecified
= CC_HC_NoCircuitChannelAvailable
CC_EC_NetworkOutOfOrder
CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOos
= CC_HC_NetworkOutOfOrder
= CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOutOfService
CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOperational = CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOperational
CC_EC_TemporaryFailure
CC_EC_SwitchingEquipCongestion
= CC_HC_TemporaryFailure
= CC_HC_SwitchingEquipmentCongestion
CC_EC_AccessInfoDiscarded
= CC_HC_AccessInformationDiscarded
CC_EC_ReqCircuitUnavail
= CC_HC_RequestedCircuitChannelNotAvailable
CC_EC_PrecedenceBlocked
= CC_HC_PrecedenceCallBlocked
CC_EC_ResourcesUnavailUnspec
= CC_HC_ResourceUnavailable
CC_EC_QualityUnavail
= CC_HC_QualityOfServiceNotAvailable
CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotSubscr
= CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotSubscribed
CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarredInCug
= CC_HC_OutgoingCallsBaredWithinCUG
CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarredInCug
= CC_HC_IncomingCallsBaredWithinCUG
CC_EC_BearcapNotAuthorized
= CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotAuthorized
CC_EC_BaercapNotAvail
= CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotPresentlyAvailable
CC_EC_InconOutgoingAccAndSubClass
= CC_HC_InconsistencyAcessInfoSubscriberClass
CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotAvail
= CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionUnavailable
CC_EC_BearcapNotImp
= CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotImplemented
CC_EC_ChTypeNotImp
= CC_HC_ChannelTypeNotImplemented
CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotImp
= CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotImplemented
CC_EC_OnlyRestrictDigInfoBearer
= CC_HC_OnlyRestrictedDigitalBearerInfoCapability
CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotImpUnspec
= CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionNotImplemented
CC_EC_InvalidCallReferenceValue
CC_EC_ChIdNotExist
CC_EC_SuspendExistButNotThisId
CC_EC_CallIdInUse
CC_EC_NoCallSuspended
CC_EC_CallIdHasBeenCleared
= CC_HC_InvalidCallreferenceValue
= CC_HC_IdentifiedChannelDoesnotExist
= CC_HC_ASuspendedCallExistsThisCallIdDoesNot
= CC_HC_CallIdentityInUse
= CC_HC_NoCallSuspended
= CC_HC_CallHavingTheRequestedCallIdHasBeenCleared
CC_EC_UserNotMemberOfCug
= CC_HC_UserNotMemberOfCUG
CC_EC_IncompatibleDest
= CC_HC_IncompatibleDestination
CC_EC_NonExistentCug
= CC_HC_NonExistantCUG
CC_EC_InvalidTns
= CC_HC_InvalidTransitNetworkSelection
CC_EC_InvalidMsgUnspec
CC_EC_MandatoryElementMissing
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImp
= CC_HC_InvalidMessage
= CC_HC_MandatoryInformationElementIsMissing
= CC_HC_MessageTypeNonExistantOrNotImplemented
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Example of an HSI Configuration File
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImpOrWrongState =
CC_HC_MessageTypeNotCompatibleWithStateOrNonExistantOrNotImplemented
CC_EC_ElemTypeNotImp = CC_HC_InformationElementParameterNonExistantOrNotImplemented
CC_EC_InvalidElemContents
= CC_HC_InvalidInformationElementContents
CC_EC_MsgInWrongState
CC_EC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
= CC_HC_MessageNotCompatibleWithCallState
= CC_HC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
CC_EC_ParamUnrecPassed
= CC_HC_ParameterNonExistantOrNotImplementedPassedOn
# When the H323 cause on the left is received from H323,
# the Eisup cause on the right is sent to Eisup.
# Note: the reverse is not true, this is a one way mapping.
#
The Eisup to H323 cause map is defined in above.
CC_HC_UnallocatedNumber
CC_HC_NoRouteToSpecifiedTransitNetwork
= CC_EC_UnallocatedNumber
= CC_EC_NoRouteToTns
CC_HC_NoRouteToDestination
= CC_EC_NoRouteToDest
CC_HC_SendSpecialInformationTone
= CC_EC_SpecialInformationTone
CC_HC_MisdialedTrunkPrefix
= CC_EC_MisdialledTkPrefix
CC_HC_ChannelUnacceptable
= CC_EC_ChUnacceptable
CC_HC_CallAwardedEstablishedChannel
CC_HC_Preemption
CC_HC_PreemptionCircuitReservedForReuse
CC_HC_NormalCallClearing
CC_HC_UserBusy
= CC_EC_CallAwardedDeliveredEstCh
= CC_EC_Preemption
= CC_EC_PreemptionCctRes
= CC_EC_NormalClearing
= CC_EC_UserBusy
CC_HC_NoUserresponding
= CC_EC_NoUserResponding
CC_HC_NoAnswerFromAlertedUser
= CC_EC_NoAnswerAlertedUser
CC_HC_SubscriberAbsent
= CC_EC_SubAbscent
CC_HC_CallRejected
= CC_EC_CallRejected
CC_HC_NumberChanged
= CC_EC_NumberChanged
CC_HC_RedirectionToNewDestination
= CC_EC_RedirectionToNewDest
CC_HC_ExchangeRouteError
= CC_EC_RoutingError
CC_HC_NonSelectedUserClearing
= CC_EC_NonSelectedUserClearing
CC_HC_DestinationOutOfOrder
= CC_EC_DestOutOfOrder
CC_HC_InvalidNumberFormat
= CC_EC_InvalidNumberFormat
CC_HC_FacilityRejected
= CC_EC_FacilityRejected
CC_HC_ResponceToStatusEnquiry
CC_HC_NormalUnspecified
= CC_EC_ResponseToStatusEnquiry
= CC_EC_NormalUnspecified
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Appendix C
CC_HC_NoCircuitChannelAvailable
CC_HC_NetworkOutOfOrder
Example of an HSI Configuration File
= CC_EC_NoCircuitAvailable
= CC_EC_NetworkOutOfOrder
CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOutOfService = CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOos
CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOperational = CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOperational
CC_HC_TemporaryFailure
CC_HC_SwitchingEquipmentCongestion
CC_HC_AccessInformationDiscarded
CC_HC_RequestedCircuitChannelNotAvailable
= CC_EC_TemporaryFailure
= CC_EC_SwitchingEquipCongestion
= CC_EC_AccessInfoDiscarded
= CC_EC_ReqCircuitUnavail
CC_HC_PrecedenceCallBlocked
= CC_EC_PrecedenceBlocked
CC_HC_ResourceUnavailable
= CC_EC_ResourcesUnavailUnspec
CC_HC_QualityOfServiceNotAvailable
= CC_EC_QualityUnavail
CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotSubscribed
= CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotSubscr
CC_HC_OutgoingCallsBaredWithinCUG
= CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarredInCug
CC_HC_IncomingCallsBaredWithinCUG
= CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarredInCug
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotAuthorized
= CC_EC_BearcapNotAuthorized
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotPresentlyAvailable
CC_HC_InconsistencyAcessInfoSubscriberClass
CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionUnavailable
= CC_EC_BaercapNotAvail
= CC_EC_InconOutgoingAccAndSubClass
= CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotAvail
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotImplemented
= CC_EC_BearcapNotImp
CC_HC_ChannelTypeNotImplemented
= CC_EC_ChTypeNotImp
CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotImplemented
= CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotImp
CC_HC_OnlyRestrictedDigitalBearerInfoCapability
= CC_EC_OnlyRestrictDigInfoBearer
CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionNotImplemented
= CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotImpUnspec
CC_HC_InvalidCallreferenceValue
= CC_EC_InvalidCallReferenceValue
CC_HC_IdentifiedChannelDoesnotExist
= CC_EC_ChIdNotExist
CC_HC_ASuspendedCallExistsThisCallIdDoesNot
= CC_EC_SuspendExistButNotThisId
CC_HC_CallIdentityInUse
= CC_EC_CallIdInUse
CC_HC_NoCallSuspended
= CC_EC_NoCallSuspended
CC_HC_CallHavingTheRequestedCallIdHasBeenCleared = CC_EC_CallIdHasBeenCleared
CC_HC_UserNotMemberOfCUG
CC_HC_IncompatibleDestination
CC_HC_NonExistantCUG
CC_HC_InvalidTransitNetworkSelection
CC_HC_InvalidMessage
CC_HC_MandatoryInformationElementIsMissing
= CC_EC_UserNotMemberOfCug
= CC_EC_IncompatibleDest
= CC_EC_NonExistentCug
= CC_EC_InvalidTns
= CC_EC_InvalidMsgUnspec
= CC_EC_MandatoryElementMissing
CC_HC_MessageTypeNonExistantOrNotImplemented = CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImp
CC_HC_MessageTypeNotCompatibleWithStateOrNonExistantOrNotImplemented =
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImpOrWrongState
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Example of an HSI Configuration File
CC_HC_InformationElementParameterNonExistantOrNotImplemented = CC_EC_ElemTypeNotImp
CC_HC_InvalidInformationElementContents
= CC_EC_InvalidElemContents
CC_HC_MessageNotCompatibleWithCallState
= CC_EC_MsgInWrongState
CC_HC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
= CC_EC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
CC_HC_ParameterNonExistantOrNotImplementedPassedOn = CC_EC_ParamUnrecPassed
# ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
###################################################################################
##
# FAULTMANAGEMENT PACKAGE
#
Package = FaultManagement
#
FMRaiseRecoveryAction = "ON"
FMClearRecoveryAction = "ON"
###################################################################################
##
# GAPPING PACKAGE
#
# Set the gapping percentage level for each side. A level of 0 indicates no gapping
# A level of 100 indicates gap all calls (except priority calls - see treatment below)
#
Package = Gapping
#
H323level = 0
EISUPlevel = 0
#
# Priority treatment determines the treatment of priority calls during gapping.
# GapAlways indicates priority calls are treated as normal calls
# GapNever indicate priority calls are never to be gapped
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Appendix C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
# GapOn100PercentGapping indicates priority calls are only gapped when 100 percent
# gapping is applied.
#
#PriorityCallTreatment = GapOn100PercentGapping
#PriorityCallTreatment = GapNever
PriorityCallTreatment = GapAlways
###################################################################################
##
# TRACE PACKAGE
#
# There are five trace trigger locations. Each location can hold one type of
# six trigger types as follows:
#
# EISUP CallingPartyNumber (E.164 address)
# EISUP CalledPartyNumber (E.164 address)
# H323 CallingPartyNumber (E.164 address)
# H323 CalledPartyNumber (E.164 address)
# H323 OriginatingIPAddress and H323 OriginatingIPMask (dotted notation)
# H323 TerminatingIPAddress and TerminatingIPMask (dotted notation)
#
Package = Trace
#
TraceOutputFilename = GWtrace.txt
Trigger1.eisup.CallingPartyNumber=1800
#Trigger1.eisup.CalledPartyNumber=1900
#Trigger1.h323.CallingPartyNumber=0299
#Trigger1.h323.CalledPartyNumber=0388
#Trigger1.h323.OriginatingIPAddress=203.188.2.3
#Trigger1.h323.OriginatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#Trigger1.h323.TerminatingIPAddress=203.155.7.9
#Trigger1.h323.TerminatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#Trigger2.eisup.CallingPartyNumber=1800
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Example of an HSI Configuration File
Trigger2.eisup.CalledPartyNumber=1900
#Trigger2.h323.CallingPartyNumber=0299
#Trigger2.h323.CalledPartyNumber=0388
#Trigger2.h323.OriginatingIPAddress=203.188.2.3
#Trigger2.h323.OriginatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#Trigger2.h323.TerminatingIPAddress=203.15y5.7.9
#Trigger2.h323.TerminatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#Trigger3.eisup.CallingPartyNumber=1800
#Trigger3.eisup.CalledPartyNumber=1900
#Trigger3.h323.CallingPartyNumber=0299
#Trigger3.h323.CalledPartyNumber=0388
Trigger3.h323.OriginatingIPAddress=203.188.2.3
Trigger3.h323.OriginatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#Trigger3.h323.TerminatingIPAddress=203.155.7.9
#Trigger3.h323.TerminatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#Trigger4.eisup.CallingPartyNumber=1800
#Trigger4.eisup.CalledPartyNumber=1900
#Trigger4.h323.CallingPartyNumber=0299
Trigger4.h323.CalledPartyNumber=0388
#Trigger4.h323.OriginatingIPAddress=203.188.2.3
#Trigger4.h323.OriginatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#Trigger4.h323.TerminatingIPAddress=203.155.7.9
#Trigger4.h323.TerminatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#Trigger5.eisup.CallingPartyNumber=1800
#Trigger5.eisup.CalledPartyNumber=1900
#Trigger5.h323.CallingPartyNumber=0299
#Trigger5.h323.CalledPartyNumber=0388
#Trigger5.h323.OriginatingIPAddress=203.188.2.3
#Trigger5.h323.OriginatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
Trigger5.h323.TerminatingIPAddress=203.155.7.9
Trigger5.h323.TerminatingIPMask=255.255.0.0
#
# TraceTriggerSwitch(for CLI/SNMP application)
# This gates the output of the trigger data for each location
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Appendix C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
#
TriggerGate1=ON
TriggerGate2=ON
TriggerGate3=ON
TriggerGate4=ON
TriggerGate5=ON
###################################################################################
##
# EISUP PACKAGE
#
#
Package = EISUP
#
#The period for CISCO's RUDP timer manage, in milli seconds
#RUDP_TIMER_CHECK_PERIOD_MSEC=20
#The time to wait before failing over to another VSC.
WAIT_TIME_BEFORE_FAIL_OVER_MILLI_SEC=1000
###################################################################################
##
# APPLICATION PACKAGE
#
#
Package = Application
#
DefaultCallProcessingStatus = "UP" #Choice {"UP", "DOWN"}
WaitBeforeCallReleaseTimer = 20
#Default is 60
RestartPendingTimer
= 20
#Default is 60
HaltPendingTimer
= 20
#Default is 60
RebootPendingTimer
= 20
#Default is 60
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Example of an HSI Configuration File
###################################################################################
##
# DYNAMIC SYSTEM DATA
#
#
Package = SYS_CONFIG_DYNAMIC
#
# Alternate Gatekeeper
ALTERNATEGATEKEEPERIP = "" #Leave blank if you don't want to provision an alternate
gatekeeper, otherwise insert IP address e.g. 10.70.54.55
ALTERNATEGATEKEEPERPORT = 1719
ALTERNATEGATEKEEPERID
= "OuterLondonAlt"
# Logging
#
LOGDIRECTORY
= "var/log/"
LOGFILENAMEPREFIX
= "platform"
LOGPRIO
CRIT}. Default: "WARN"
= "TRACE"
LOGFILEROTATESIZE
= 10240
LOGFILEROTATEINTERVAL = 1440
#Default: "var/log/"
#Default: "platform.log"
#Choice {DEBUG, TRACE, INFO, WARN, ERR,
#Default: 10240 bytes (10Mb)
#Default: 1440 min (24hrs)
# Overload
#
DISKUSAGELIMIT
= 98
#Default: 95% Disk Usage
OVLDSAMPLERATE
= 3000
OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT
= 20
OVLDLEVEL1FILTER
"NORMAL"
= "NORMAL" #Choice {"NORMAL", "ALL"}. Default:
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPERCPU
= 65
#Default: 100
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWERCPU
= 60
#Default: 100
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPERCALLS
= 1900
#Default: 1000
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWERCALLS = 1800
#Default: 1000
OVLDLEVEL2PERCENT
#Default: 0
= 75
#Default: 3000 msec polling rate
#Default: 0
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Appendix C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
OVLDLEVEL2FILTER
"NORMAL"
= "NORMAL" #Choice {"NORMAL", "ALL"}. Default:
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPERCPU
= 80
#Default: 100
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWERCPU
= 70
#Default: 100
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPERCALLS
= 2200
#Default: 1000
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWERCALLS
= 2000
#Default: 1000
OVLDLEVEL3PERCENT
= 90
#Default: 0
OVLDLEVEL3FILTER
Default: "NORMAL"
= "NORMAL"
#Choice {"NORMAL", "ALL"}.
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPERCPU
= 95
#Default: 100
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHLOWERCPU
= 85
#Default: 100
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPERCALLS
= 2400
#Default: 1000
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHLOWERCALLS
= 2300
#Default: 1000
###################################################################################
##
#
Package = SYS_CONFIG_STATIC
#
# Call Control
# For the Eisup cause code values see CISCO: EISUP Protocol Specification ENG-46168 version 19
# For the H323 cause code values see ITU-T: Q.850
# The default cause codes, used when there is no map entry for a received cause
CC_EC_DEFAULT
= CC_EC_NormalUnspecified
CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_NormalUnspecified
#
# Unassigned Eisup cause codes
#
CC_EC_AccessBarred
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_Acknowledgement
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_AddressIncomplete
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
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Appendix C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
CC_EC_AnonymousCallRejection
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_BlacklistBNumberMatched
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_BlacklistCliLengthInvalid
CC_EC_BlacklistCliMatched
CC_EC_BlacklistCpcRestricted
CC_EC_BlacklistNoCli
CC_EC_BlacklistNoaRestricted
CC_EC_Busy
CC_EC_CallRejectCallGapping
CC_EC_CallTerminated
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_CallTypeIncompatible
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_CallingDroppedWhileOnHold
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_CallingPartyOffHold
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_ChannelOutOfService
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_Congestion
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_CotFailure
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_CugAccessBarred
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_DteControlledNotReady
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_DteUncontrolledNotReady
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_ExcessiveDigCallProceeding
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_FacilityNotRegistered
CC_EC_FlowControlledCongestion
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_GroupRestrictions
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarred
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_InterceptedSubscriber
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_InterworkUnspec
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_InvalidCallRef
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_MesgWithUnrecElemDiscarded
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_MessageNotUnderstood
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_MisroutedCallPortedNumber
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_NetworkAddressExtensionError
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_NetworkTermination
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_NewDestination
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_NumberUnobtainable
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_OperatorPriorityAccess
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_OutOfCatchmentArea
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarred
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_PermanentIcb
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
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Appendix C
CC_EC_PortedNumber
CC_EC_PreemptionCctUnavailable
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_Prefix0DialledInError
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_Prefix1DialledInError
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_Prefix1NotDialled
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_PriorityForcedRelease
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_Proprietary
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_ProtErrThresholdExceeded
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_ProtocolErrorUnspec
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_Reject
CC_EC_RejectedDivertedCall
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_RemoteProcError
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_RepeatAttempt
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_RouteOutOfService
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SelectiveCallBarring
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_ServiceIncompatible
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_ServiceTemporarilyUnavailable
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_ServiceUnavailable
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SignalNotUnderstood
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SignalNotValid
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SignallingSystemIncompatible
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SubControlledIcb
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SubNotFoundDle
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SubscriberCallTerminate
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SubscriberIncompatible
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SubscriberMoved
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_SubscriberOutOfService
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_TemporaryOos
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_TerminalCongestion
CC_EC_Transferred
CC_EC_TranslationOos
CC_EC_UnallocatedDestNumber
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_UndefinedBg
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_Unknown
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_UnrecElemPassedOn
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_VacentCode
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_WhitelistCliNotMatched
Example of an HSI Configuration File
= CC_HC_DEFAULT
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Appendix C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
#
# T38 Fax default configuration
#
T38MaxVal = "MaxBit 0x90, FxMaxBuf 0xc8, FxMaxData 0x48"
T38Options = "FxFillBit 0, FxTransMMR 0, FxTransJBIG 0, FxRate Trans, FxUdpEC Red"
#
#
# EISUP Settings for GoldWing to look at EISUP Test Tool
# Point GWmain to look at the test tool HOST_PORT instead of the VSC's
#VSCA_IPADDR1=samson
#VSCA_PORT_NUMBER1=18613
#VSCB_IPADDR1=stonehenge
#VSCB_PORT_NUMBER1=18613
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Appendix C
Example of an HSI Configuration File
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A P P E N D I X
D
E-ISUP Name-to-Cause Value Lookup
This appendix lists the Cisco E-ISUP protocol names and their associated cause values.
Name
----CC_EC_AccessBarred
CC_EC_AccessInfoDiscarded
CC_EC_Acknowledgement
CC_EC_AddressIncomplete
CC_EC_AnonymousCallRejection
CC_EC_BaercapNotAvail
CC_EC_BearcapNotAuthorized
CC_EC_BearcapNotImp
CC_EC_BlacklistBNumberMatched
CC_EC_BlacklistCliLengthInvalid
CC_EC_BlacklistCliMatched
CC_EC_BlacklistCpcRestricted
CC_EC_BlacklistNoCli
CC_EC_BlacklistNoaRestricted
CC_EC_Busy
CC_EC_CallAwardedDeliveredEstCh
CC_EC_CallIdHasBeenCleared
CC_EC_CallIdInUse
CC_EC_CallRejectCallGapping
CC_EC_CallRejected
CC_EC_CallTerminated
CC_EC_CallTypeIncompatible
CC_EC_CallingDroppedWhileOnHold
CC_EC_CallingPartyOffHold
CC_EC_ChIdNotExist
CC_EC_ChTypeNotImp
CC_EC_ChUnacceptable
CC_EC_ChannelOutOfService
CC_EC_Congestion
CC_EC_CotFailure
CC_EC_CugAccessBarred
CC_EC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_DestOutOfOrder
CC_EC_DteControlledNotReady
CC_EC_DteUncontrolledNotReady
CC_EC_ElemTypeNotImp
CC_EC_ExcessiveDigCallProceeding
CC_EC_FacilityNotRegistered
CC_EC_FacilityRejected
CC_EC_FlowControlledCongestion
CC_EC_GroupRestrictions
Value
----54
1
55
56
116
3
2
4
137
133
134
135
132
136
57
5
6
7
102
8
61
95
98
97
9
10
11
58
60
141
108
32
12
59
79
13
123
62
14
110
96
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Appendix D
CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarred
CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarredInCug
CC_EC_IncompatibleDest
CC_EC_InconOutgoingAccAndSubClass
CC_EC_InterceptedSubscriber
CC_EC_InterworkUnspec
CC_EC_InvalidCallRef
CC_EC_InvalidCallReferenceValue
CC_EC_InvalidElemContents
CC_EC_InvalidMsgUnspec
CC_EC_InvalidNumberFormat
CC_EC_InvalidTns
CC_EC_MandatoryElementMissing
CC_EC_MesgWithUnrecElemDiscarded
CC_EC_MessageNotUnderstood
CC_EC_MisdialledTkPrefix
CC_EC_MisroutedCallPortedNumber
CC_EC_MsgInWrongState
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImp
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImpOrWrongState
CC_EC_NetworkAddressExtensionError
CC_EC_NetworkOutOfOrder
CC_EC_NetworkTermination
CC_EC_NewDestination
CC_EC_NoAnswerAlertedUser
CC_EC_NoCallSuspended
CC_EC_NoCircuitAvailable
CC_EC_NoRouteToDest
CC_EC_NoRouteToTns
CC_EC_NoUserResponding
CC_EC_NonExistentCug
CC_EC_NonSelectedUserClearing
CC_EC_NormalClearing
CC_EC_NormalUnspecified
CC_EC_NumberChanged
CC_EC_NumberUnobtainable
CC_EC_OnlyRestrictDigInfoBearer
CC_EC_OperatorPriorityAccess
CC_EC_OutOfCatchmentArea
CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarred
CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarredInCug
CC_EC_ParamUnrecPassed
CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOos
CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOperational
CC_EC_PermanentIcb
CC_EC_PortedNumber
CC_EC_PrecedenceBlocked
CC_EC_Preemption
CC_EC_PreemptionCctRes
CC_EC_PreemptionCctUnavailable
CC_EC_Prefix0DialledInError
CC_EC_Prefix1DialledInError
CC_EC_Prefix1NotDialled
CC_EC_PriorityForcedRelease
CC_EC_Proprietary
CC_EC_ProtErrThresholdExceeded
CC_EC_ProtocolErrorUnspec
CC_EC_QualityUnavail
CC_EC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
CC_EC_RedirectionToNewDest
CC_EC_Reject
CC_EC_RejectedDivertedCall
CC_EC_RemoteProcError
CC_EC_RepeatAttempt
E-ISUP Name-to-Cause Value Lookup
63
81
15
126
53
16
143
17
18
19
20
21
22
128
65
84
142
23
24
25
66
26
67
99
28
27
29
33
34
35
127
30
31
32
36
68
37
107
111
100
125
85
130
131
113
139
94
87
129
88
120
121
122
69
86
124
38
39
40
140
70
103
105
118
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Appendix D
E-ISUP Name-to-Cause Value Lookup
CC_EC_ReqCircuitUnavail
CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotImp
CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotSubscr
CC_EC_ResourcesUnavailUnspec
CC_EC_ResponseToStatusEnquiry
CC_EC_RouteOutOfService
CC_EC_RoutingError
CC_EC_SelectiveCallBarring
CC_EC_ServiceIncompatible
CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotAvail
CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotImpUnspec
CC_EC_ServiceTemporarilyUnavailable
CC_EC_ServiceUnavailable
CC_EC_SignalNotUnderstood
CC_EC_SignalNotValid
CC_EC_SignallingSystemIncompatible
CC_EC_SpecialInformationTone
CC_EC_SubAbscent
CC_EC_SubControlledIcb
CC_EC_SubNotFoundDle
CC_EC_SubscriberCallTerminate
CC_EC_SubscriberIncompatible
CC_EC_SubscriberMoved
CC_EC_SubscriberOutOfService
CC_EC_SuspendExistButNotThisId
CC_EC_SwitchingEquipCongestion
CC_EC_TemporaryFailure
CC_EC_TemporaryOos
CC_EC_TerminalCongestion
CC_EC_Transferred
CC_EC_TranslationOos
CC_EC_UnallocatedDestNumber
CC_EC_UnallocatedNumber
CC_EC_UndefinedBg
CC_EC_Unknown
CC_EC_UnrecElemPassedOn
CC_EC_UserBusy
CC_EC_UserNotMemberOfCug
CC_EC_VacentCode
CC_EC_WhitelistCliNotMatched
41
42
43
44
45
71
93
104
64
47
46
77
78
73
74
76
82
91
101
115
109
72
114
75
48
49
50
106
117
80
112
89
51
92
144
90
52
83
119
138
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Appendix D
E-ISUP Name-to-Cause Value Lookup
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
D-4
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A P P E N D I X
E
E-ISUP Cause Value-to-Name Lookup
This appendix lists the Cisco E-ISUP cause values and their associated names.
Value
----1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
Name
---CC_EC_AccessInfoDiscarded
CC_EC_BearcapNotAuthorized
CC_EC_BaercapNotAvail
CC_EC_BearcapNotImp
CC_EC_CallAwardedDeliveredEstCh
CC_EC_CallIdHasBeenCleared
CC_EC_CallIdInUse
CC_EC_CallRejected
CC_EC_ChIdNotExist
CC_EC_ChTypeNotImp
CC_EC_ChUnacceptable
CC_EC_DestOutOfOrder
CC_EC_ElemTypeNotImp
CC_EC_FacilityRejected
CC_EC_IncompatibleDest
CC_EC_InterworkUnspec
CC_EC_InvalidCallReferenceValue
CC_EC_InvalidElemContents
CC_EC_InvalidMsgUnspec
CC_EC_InvalidNumberFormat
CC_EC_InvalidTns
CC_EC_MandatoryElementMissing
CC_EC_MsgInWrongState
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImp
CC_EC_MsgTypeNotImpOrWrongState
CC_EC_NetworkOutOfOrder
CC_EC_NoCallSuspended
CC_EC_NoAnswerAlertedUser
CC_EC_NoCircuitAvailable
CC_EC_NonSelectedUserClearing
CC_EC_NormalClearing
CC_EC_DEFAULT
CC_EC_NormalUnspecified
CC_EC_NoRouteToDest
CC_EC_NoRouteToTns
CC_EC_NoUserResponding
CC_EC_NumberChanged
CC_EC_OnlyRestrictDigInfoBearer
CC_EC_ProtocolErrorUnspec
CC_EC_QualityUnavail
CC_EC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
CC_EC_ReqCircuitUnavail
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E-1
Appendix E
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
E-ISUP Cause Value-to-Name Lookup
CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotImp
CC_EC_ReqFacilityNotSubscr
CC_EC_ResourcesUnavailUnspec
CC_EC_ResponseToStatusEnquiry
CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotImpUnspec
CC_EC_ServiceOrOptionNotAvail
CC_EC_SuspendExistButNotThisId
CC_EC_SwitchingEquipCongestion
CC_EC_TemporaryFailure
CC_EC_UnallocatedNumber
CC_EC_UserBusy
CC_EC_InterceptedSubscriber
CC_EC_AccessBarred
CC_EC_Acknowledgement
CC_EC_AddressIncomplete
CC_EC_Busy
CC_EC_ChannelOutOfService
CC_EC_DteControlledNotReady
CC_EC_Congestion
CC_EC_CallTerminated
CC_EC_FacilityNotRegistered
CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarred
CC_EC_ServiceIncompatible
CC_EC_MessageNotUnderstood
CC_EC_NetworkAddressExtensionError
CC_EC_NetworkTermination
CC_EC_NumberUnobtainable
CC_EC_PriorityForcedRelease
CC_EC_Reject
CC_EC_RouteOutOfService
CC_EC_SubscriberIncompatible
CC_EC_SignalNotUnderstood
CC_EC_SignalNotValid
CC_EC_SubscriberOutOfService
CC_EC_SignallingSystemIncompatible
CC_EC_ServiceTemporarilyUnavailable
CC_EC_ServiceUnavailable
CC_EC_DteUncontrolledNotReady
CC_EC_Transferred
CC_EC_IncomingCallsBarredInCug
CC_EC_SpecialInformationTone
CC_EC_UserNotMemberOfCug
CC_EC_MisdialledTkPrefix
CC_EC_ParamUnrecPassed
CC_EC_Proprietary
CC_EC_Preemption
CC_EC_PreemptionCctUnavailable
CC_EC_UnallocatedDestNumber
CC_EC_UnrecElemPassedOn
CC_EC_SubAbscent
CC_EC_UndefinedBg
CC_EC_RoutingError
CC_EC_PrecedenceBlocked
CC_EC_CallTypeIncompatible
CC_EC_GroupRestrictions
CC_EC_CallingPartyOffHold
CC_EC_CallingDroppedWhileOnHold
CC_EC_NewDestination
CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarred
CC_EC_SubControlledIcb
CC_EC_CallRejectCallGapping
CC_EC_RejectedDivertedCall
CC_EC_SelectiveCallBarring
CC_EC_RemoteProcError
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Appendix E
E-ISUP Cause Value-to-Name Lookup
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
CC_EC_TemporaryOos
CC_EC_OperatorPriorityAccess
CC_EC_CugAccessBarred
CC_EC_SubscriberCallTerminate
CC_EC_FlowControlledCongestion
CC_EC_OutOfCatchmentArea
CC_EC_TranslationOos
CC_EC_PermanentIcb
CC_EC_SubscriberMoved
CC_EC_SubNotFoundDle
CC_EC_AnonymousCallRejection
CC_EC_TerminalCongestion
CC_EC_RepeatAttempt
CC_EC_VacentCode
CC_EC_Prefix0DialledInError
CC_EC_Prefix1DialledInError
CC_EC_Prefix1NotDialled
CC_EC_ExcessiveDigCallProceeding
CC_EC_ProtErrThresholdExceeded
CC_EC_OutgoingCallsBarredInCug
CC_EC_InconOutgoingAccAndSubClass
CC_EC_NonExistentCug
CC_EC_MesgWithUnrecElemDiscarded
CC_EC_PreemptionCctRes
CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOos
CC_EC_PermanentFrameModeOperational
CC_EC_BlacklistNoCli
CC_EC_BlacklistCliLengthInvalid
CC_EC_BlacklistCliMatched
CC_EC_BlacklistCpcRestricted
CC_EC_BlacklistNoaRestricted
CC_EC_BlacklistBNumberMatched
CC_EC_WhitelistCliNotMatched
CC_EC_PortedNumber
CC_EC_RedirectionToNewDest
CC_EC_CotFailure
CC_EC_MisroutedCallPortedNumber
CC_EC_InvalidCallRef
CC_EC_Unknown
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E-3
Appendix E
E-ISUP Cause Value-to-Name Lookup
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
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OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
A P P E N D I X
F
H.323 Name-to-Cause Value Lookup
This appendix lists the H.323 names and their associated cause values.
Name
----
Value
-----
CC_HC_ASuspendedCallExistsThisCallIdDoesNot
CC_HC_AccessInformationDiscarded
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotAuthorized
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotImplemented
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotPresentlyAvailable
CC_HC_CallAwardedEstablishedChannel
CC_HC_CallHavingTheRequestedCallIdHasBeenCleared
CC_HC_CallIdentityInUse
CC_HC_CallRejected
CC_HC_ChannelTypeNotImplemented
CC_HC_ChannelUnacceptable
CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_HC_DestinationOutOfOrder
CC_HC_ExchangeRouteError
CC_HC_FacilityRejected
CC_HC_IdentifiedChannelDoesnotExist
CC_HC_IncomingCallsBaredWithinCUG
CC_HC_IncompatibleDestination
CC_HC_InconsistencyAcessInfoSubscriberClass
CC_HC_InformationElementParameterNonExistantOrNotImplemented
CC_HC_InvalidCallreferenceValue
CC_HC_InvalidInformationElementContents
CC_HC_InvalidMessage
CC_HC_InvalidNumberFormat
CC_HC_InvalidTransitNetworkSelection
CC_HC_MandatoryInformationElementIsMissing
CC_HC_MessageNotCompatibleWithCallState
CC_HC_MessageTypeNonExistantOrNotImplemented
CC_HC_MessageTypeNotCompatibleWithStateOrNonExistantOrNotImplemented
CC_HC_MisdialedTrunkPrefix
CC_HC_NetworkOutOfOrder
CC_HC_NoAnswerFromAlertedUser
CC_HC_NoCallSuspended
CC_HC_NoCircuitChannelAvailable
CC_HC_NoRouteToDestination
CC_HC_NoRouteToSpecifiedTransitNetwork
CC_HC_NoUserresponding
CC_HC_NonExistantCUG
CC_HC_NonSelectedUserClearing
CC_HC_NormalCallClearing
CC_HC_NormalUnspecified
83
43
57
65
58
7
86
84
21
66
6
31
27
25
29
82
55
88
62
99
81
100
95
28
91
96
101
97
98
5
38
19
85
34
3
2
18
90
26
16
31
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Appendix F
CC_HC_NumberChanged
CC_HC_OnlyRestrictedDigitalBearerInfoCapability
CC_HC_OutgoingCallsBaredWithinCUG
CC_HC_ParameterNonExistantOrNotImplementedPassedOn
CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOperational
CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOutOfService
CC_HC_PrecedenceCallBlocked
CC_HC_Preemption
CC_HC_PreemptionCircuitReservedForReuse
CC_HC_QualityOfServiceNotAvailable
CC_HC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
CC_HC_RedirectionToNewDestination
CC_HC_RequestedCircuitChannelNotAvailable
CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotImplemented
CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotSubscribed
CC_HC_ResourceUnavailable
CC_HC_ResponceToStatusEnquiry
CC_HC_SendSpecialInformationTone
CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionNotImplemented
CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionUnavailable
CC_HC_SubscriberAbsent
CC_HC_SwitchingEquipmentCongestion
CC_HC_TemporaryFailure
CC_HC_UnallocatedNumber
CC_HC_UserBusy
CC_HC_UserNotMemberOfCUG
H.323 Name-to-Cause Value Lookup
22
70
53
103
40
39
46
8
9
49
102
23
44
69
50
47
30
4
79
63
20
42
41
1
17
87
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
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A P P E N D I X
G
H.323 Cause Value-to-Name Lookup
This appendix lists the H.323 cause values and their associated names.
Value
----1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
31
34
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
46
47
49
50
53
55
57
58
62
Name
---CC_HC_UnallocatedNumber
CC_HC_NoRouteToSpecifiedTransitNetwork
CC_HC_NoRouteToDestination
CC_HC_SendSpecialInformationTone
CC_HC_MisdialedTrunkPrefix
CC_HC_ChannelUnacceptable
CC_HC_CallAwardedEstablishedChannel
CC_HC_Preemption
CC_HC_PreemptionCircuitReservedForReuse
CC_HC_NormalCallClearing
CC_HC_UserBusy
CC_HC_NoUserresponding
CC_HC_NoAnswerFromAlertedUser
CC_HC_SubscriberAbsent
CC_HC_CallRejected
CC_HC_NumberChanged
CC_HC_RedirectionToNewDestination
CC_HC_ExchangeRouteError
CC_HC_NonSelectedUserClearing
CC_HC_DestinationOutOfOrder
CC_HC_InvalidNumberFormat
CC_HC_FacilityRejected
CC_HC_ResponceToStatusEnquiry
CC_HC_DEFAULT
CC_HC_NormalUnspecified
CC_HC_NoCircuitChannelAvailable
CC_HC_NetworkOutOfOrder
CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOutOfService
CC_HC_PermanentFrameModeConnectionOperational
CC_HC_TemporaryFailure
CC_HC_SwitchingEquipmentCongestion
CC_HC_AccessInformationDiscarded
CC_HC_RequestedCircuitChannelNotAvailable
CC_HC_PrecedenceCallBlocked
CC_HC_ResourceUnavailable
CC_HC_QualityOfServiceNotAvailable
CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotSubscribed
CC_HC_OutgoingCallsBaredWithinCUG
CC_HC_IncomingCallsBaredWithinCUG
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotAuthorized
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotPresentlyAvailable
CC_HC_InconsistencyAcessInfoSubscriberClass
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
G-1
Appendix G
63
65
66
69
70
79
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
90
91
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
H.323 Cause Value-to-Name Lookup
CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionUnavailable
CC_HC_BearerCapabilityNotImplemented
CC_HC_ChannelTypeNotImplemented
CC_HC_RequestedFacilityNotImplemented
CC_HC_OnlyRestrictedDigitalBearerInfoCapability
CC_HC_ServiceOrOptionNotImplemented
CC_HC_InvalidCallreferenceValue
CC_HC_IdentifiedChannelDoesnotExist
CC_HC_ASuspendedCallExistsThisCallIdDoesNot
CC_HC_CallIdentityInUse
CC_HC_NoCallSuspended
CC_HC_CallHavingTheRequestedCallIdHasBeenCleared
CC_HC_UserNotMemberOfCUG
CC_HC_IncompatibleDestination
CC_HC_NonExistantCUG
CC_HC_InvalidTransitNetworkSelection
CC_HC_InvalidMessage
CC_HC_MandatoryInformationElementIsMissing
CC_HC_MessageTypeNonExistantOrNotImplemented
CC_HC_MessageTypeNotCompatibleWithStateOrNonExistantOrNotImplemented
CC_HC_InformationElementParameterNonExistantOrNotImplemented
CC_HC_InvalidInformationElementContents
CC_HC_MessageNotCompatibleWithCallState
CC_HC_RecoveryOnTimerExpiry
CC_HC_ParameterNonExistantOrNotImplementedPassedOn
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
G-2
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
I N D EX
severity level
A
critical
ack-alm command
A-8
acknowledging alarms
active log file
informational
5-4
4-9
ALARMDEBOUNCETIME parameter
5-1
major
5-2, 5-4
minor
5-2, 5-4
SNMP manager
alarm messages
5-3
noncontinuous mode
trap types
5-3
VSC_FAILURE
acknowledging
clearing
5-4
5-4
5-4
array index
3-10
Asymmetric
1-4
B
5-7
batch files
ENDPOINT_CALL_CONTROL_INTERFACE_FAILU
RE 5-12
ENDPOINT_CHANNEL_INTERFACE_FAILURE
12
GAPPED_CALL_NORMAL
GENERAL_PROCESS_FAILURE
5-8
description
A-3
logging to
A-4
A-4
C
5-8
call control subsystem
5-6
1-3
call processing
5-8
starting
5-5
LOW_DISK_SPACE
A-4
5-13
GATEKEEPER_INTERFACE_FAILURE
H323_STACK_FAILURE
5-
creating
starting
5-13
GAPPED_CALL_PRIORITY
IP_LINK_FAILURE
3-16
5-6
5-1
EISUP_PATH_FAILURE
stopping
5-9
5-14
OVERLOAD_LEVEL2
5-11
starting
OVERLOAD_LEVEL3
5-9
stopping
PROVISIONING_INACTIVITY_TIMEOUT
4-2
4-1
call processing application
OVERLOAD_LEVEL1
5-3
5-10
5-11
CONFIGURATION_FAILURE
debounce period
5-15
5-6
asymmetric codec treatment
CONFIG_CHANGE
retrieving
5-2
5-2
troubleshooting
alarms
cleared state
5-2, 5-4
STOP_CALL_PROCESSING
continous mode
list
5-2, 5-4
5-14
4-2
4-2
call-related measurements
checksum
4-3
3-1
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
IN-3
Index
CIAgent
set-dest-state
4-2
CIAGENTSCANPERIOD parameter
4-2
Cisco HSI
4-11, 4-12, A-32
4-8, 4-10, A-32
set-overload
clearing alarms
5-4, A-8
clr-meas command
codec parameters
A-33
sta-callproc
5-4
clr-alm command
4-6, A-9
sta-softw
sta-trc
4-2, A-34
4-2, A-35
A-35
stp-call
3-14
commands
A-37
stp-callproc
ack-alm
stp-softw
A-8
clr-alm
stp-trc
5-4, A-8
clr-meas
4-6, A-9
diaglog
A-4, A-10
4-1, A-37
4-2, A-38
A-38
CONFIG_CHANGE alarm
5-11
configuration
commands parameter
A-10
help
set-gapping
set-log
See HSI
h
A-31
3-2
data
A-6, A-11
MML configuration
3-2
constant
3-1
3-1
prov-add
3-3, 3-5, 3-9, A-12
dynamic
prov-cpy
A-13
static
3-1
prov-dlt
3-3, 3-5, 3-9, A-14
CONFIGURATION_FAILURE alarm
prov-ed
3-3, 3-5, 3-9, A-15
configuring
prov-exp
A-16
Cisco HSI
prov-rtrv
A-17
group and user names
2-10
prov-sta
A-4, A-19
H.323 stack
prov-stp
A-4, A-20
MML sessions
quit
radlog
4-11, A-22
restart-softw
rtrv-alms
rtrv-ctr
conventions
5-2, 5-3, A-24
document
4-12, A-26
H.245
5-3
A-2
4-3
4-3
counters, retrieving
critical severity level
A-27
rtrv-mml
3-1
xiii
MML commands
RAS
A-25
rtrv-log
A-1
counter groups
4-6, A-25
rtrv-gapping
rtrv-ne
5-2, 5-3
A-24
rtrv-dest
3-8
continous mode alarm messages
4-1, A-23
rtrv-alms:cont
rtrv-calls
2-2
constant configuration data
A-6, A-21
5-6
4-6
5-2, 5-4
A-28
A-28
rtrv-ne-health
A-29
rtrv-overload
4-8, A-29
rtrv-softw
4-2, A-30
D
data
configurable
B-1
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
IN-4
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Index
constant
B-1
dynamic
B-1
setting
GATEKEEPER_INTERFACE_FAILURE alarm
provisionable
static
GENERAL_PROCESS_FAILURE alarm
B-1
group names, configuring
B-1
debounce
4-11
5-8
5-8
2-2
5-1
default active log file
detailed logging
4-9
H
5-16
diaglog command
A-4, A-10
H.225 protocol
documentation
related
1-4
H.245
xiv
codec parameters
document conventions
dual Cisco HSI
xiii
counter groups
2-9
parameters
dynamic
3-14
4-3
3-13
H.323
configuration data
3-1
system data parameters
IP network
3-5
network
1-2
1-1
stack
configuration
E
3-8
system parameters
E-ISUP
H.323 Hairpin
overview
protocol
3-9
1-4, 3-16
H.323 Signaling Interface
1-4
See HSI
1-4
EISUP_PATH_FAILURE alarm
empty capability set
H323_STACK_FAILURE alarm
5-7
hardware requirements
1-4, 3-16
ENDPOINT_CALL_CONTROL_INTERFACE_FAILUR
E alarm 5-12
ENDPOINT_CHANNEL_INTERFACE_FAILURE
alarm 5-12
h command
1-5
A-10
help command
A-6, A-11
HSI
asymmetric codec treatment
Enhanced ISDN User Part
base directory path
See E-ISUP
5-6
3-16
2-3
configuration
data
G
file
GAPPED_CALL_NORMAL alarm
GAPPED_CALL_PRIORITY alarm
gapping
call type
4-11
4-11
retrieving data
5-13
5-13
3-1
overview
configuring
3-1
2-10
default
base directory path
4-11
description
level
3-1
4-12
gatekeeper port
group name
user name
dual
2-5
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-9
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
IN-5
Index
empty capability set
H.323 Hairpin
1-4, 3-16
L
1-4, 3-16
hardware requirements
1-5, 2-1
LOGDIRECTORY parameter
LOGFILEROTATEINTERVAL parameter
installing
previous version
procedures
LOGFILEROTATESIZE parameter
2-11
subdirectories
active
2-3
A-1
4-9
location
4-9
naming convention
1-1
performance and sizing
preinstallation tasks
recovery
rotating
1-5
4-8
batch files
A-4
4-8
removing
2-11
description
restarting
4-1
detailed
1-5
services
1-1
status
1-5, 2-1
4-9
packages
4-10
LOW_DISK_SPACE alarm
2-10
5-9
1-2
system limitations
T.38 Fax
4-10
log messages
format
4-2
subsystems
4-11
log levels, setting
2-10
stopping
5-16
RADVision
software requirements
4-9
logging
2-2
1-5
security
4-8
4-9
format
2-4
MML sessions, configuring
overview
4-8
log files
2-2
required information
starting
4-9
1-5
M
1-5, 3-17
uninstalling
upgrading
major severity level
2-11
5-2, 5-4
man-machine language
2-10
See MML
measurements
I
call-related
resetting
informational
events
severity level
messages, log
5-2, 5-4
4-9
5-2, 5-4
MML commands
2-2
Solaris 8 operating system
IP_LINK_FAILURE alarm
2-1
5-8
case sensitivity
conventions
syntax
IP network
H.323 network
4-2
minor severity level
installation procedures
PSTN
4-6
system-related
5-2
Cisco HSI
4-3
1-2
A-2
A-2
MML configuration commands
component
1-2
A-3
3-2
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
IN-6
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Index
export
OVLDLEVEL2PERCENT parameter
3-2
session
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWERCALLS parameter
3-2
MML response messages
error
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWERCPU parameter
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPERCPU parameter
A-5
MML sessions
OVLDLEVEL3PERCENT parameter
configuring
help
4-7
4-7
4-7
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHLOWERCPU parameter
A-1
4-7
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPERCALLS parameter
A-6
quitting
A-6
starting
A-3
4-7
4-7
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPERCALLS parameter
A-5
status
4-7
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPERCPU parameter
4-7
4-7
P
N
parameters
noncontinuous mode alarm messages
nonprovisionable data parameters
ALARMDEBOUNCETIME
5-3
CIAGENTSCANPERIOD
3-8
codec
H.245
OAM subsystem
overlappedSending parameter
3-9
LOGDIRECTORY
3-11
3-5
3-13
H.323 system
1-3
4-2
3-14
dynamic system data
O
5-1
4-9
LOGFILEROTATEINTERVAL
overload
LOGFILEROTATESIZE
data
retrieving
setting
nonprovisionable data
4-8
overlappedSending
4-7
description
4-8
3-8
3-11
OVLDLEVEL1FILTER
4-6
4-8
4-7
level 1
4-7
OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT
level 2
4-7
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWERCALLS
level 3
4-7
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWERCPU
4-7
4-7
OVERLOAD_LEVEL1 alarm
5-14
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPERCALLS
OVERLOAD_LEVEL2 alarm
5-11
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPERCPU
OVERLOAD_LEVEL3 alarm
5-9
OVLDLEVEL2FILTER
OVLDLEVEL1FILTER parameter
OVLDLEVEL1PERCENT parameter
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWERCALLS parameter
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHLOWERCPU parameter
4-7
4-7
4-7
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPERCALLS parameter
OVLDLEVEL2FILTER parameter
4-7
4-7
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWERCALLS
4-7
OVLDLEVEL1THRESHUPPERCPU parameter
4-7
4-7
OVLDLEVEL2PERCENT
4-7
4-7
4-7
4-7
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHLOWERCPU
4-7
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPERCALLS
OVLDLEVEL2THRESHUPPERCPU
OVLDLEVEL3PERCENT
4-7
4-7
4-7
4-7
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHLOWERCPU
4-7
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPERCALLS
4-7
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
IN-7
Index
OVLDLEVEL3THRESHUPPERCPU
Q.931
redundant PGW 2200 configuration
4-7
related documentation
3-9
RAS
xiv
Reliable User Datagram Protocol
3-10
PGW 2200
See RUDP
description
1-2
redundant configuration
PKINST file
2-9
resetting measurements
4-6
restarting the Cisco HSI
4-1
restart-softw command
2-9, 2-11
protocols
4-1, A-23
retrieving
E-ISUP
counters
1-4
4-6
H.225
1-4
gapping data
4-12
Q.931
1-4
overload data
4-8
RUDP
1-4
rotating log files
4-8
prov-add command
3-3, 3-5, 3-9, A-12
rtrv-alms:cont command
prov-cpy command
A-13
rtrv-alms command
5-2, 5-3, A-24
A-24
prov-dlt command
3-3, 3-5, 3-9, A-14
rtrv-calls command
prov-ed command
3-3, 3-5, 3-9, A-15
rtrv-ctr command
prov-exp command
prov-rtrv command
A-17
5-14
A-25
rtrv-gapping command
rtrv-log command
A-4, A-19
rtrv-mml command
prov-stp command
A-4, A-20
rtrv-ne command
A-28
A-28
rtrv-ne-health command
A-29
rtrv-overload command
4-8, A-29
rtrv-softw command
4-2, A-30
RUDP
4-3
parameters
protocol
4-12, A-26
A-27
prov-sta command
Q
5-2, 5-3
4-6, A-25
rtrv-dest command
A-16
PROVISIONING_INACTIVITY_TIMEOUT alarm
Q.931
2-9
overview
3-9
protocol
1-4
quit command
1-4
1-4
A-6, A-21
S
R
security features
radlog command
4-11, A-22
set-dest-state command
set-gapping command
RADVision
H.323 overview
logging
1-5
1-4
4-11, 4-12, A-32
4-8, 4-10, A-32
set-overload command
4-11
A-33
setting
RAS
counter groups
parameters
set-log command
A-31
4-3
3-10
gapping
4-11
overload data
4-7
signaling interface
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
IN-8
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
Index
See HSI
T
Simple Network Management Protocol
T.38 Fax
See SNMP
skeleton configuration file
trap types
3-2
5-2
troubleshooting alarms
SNMP
manager
MIB
1-5, 3-17
5-2
4-3
subagent
U
2-10, 4-2
trap types
uninstalling Cisco HSI
5-2
software requirements
update types
1-5
Solaris 8 operating system
installation
sta-callproc command
3-9, 3-10, 3-13
user names, configuring
2-1
2-2
V
4-2, A-34
starting
VSC_FAILURE alarm
5-10
A-4
call processing
4-2
call processing application
Cisco HSI
2-11
2-1
platform requirements
batch files
5-6
4-2
2-10
MML sessions
A-3
sta-softw command
4-2, A-35
static
configuration data
sta-trc command
3-1
A-35
STOP_CALL_PROCESSING alarms
5-15
stopping
call processing
4-1
call processing application
Cisco HSI
4-2
2-10
stp-call command
A-37
stp-callproc command
stp-softw command
stp-trc command
4-1, A-37
4-2, A-38
A-38
system configuration data
dynamic
static
3-5
3-3
system-related measurements
4-2
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
IN-9
Index
Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface User Guide
IN-10
OL-2156-04 Rev. A1
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