Biennial Report 2009

Biennial Report 2009
Department of Archaeology
Simon Fraser University
Biennial Report
2009 / 2010
B i e n n i a l R e p ort
2009/2010
Edited by Catherine D’Andrea & Laura Nielson
Designed by April Ruttle
The Biennnial Report is a departmental publication available as a downloadable PDF
from the Department of Archaeology website: http://www.sfu.ca/archaeology.
© 2011 Department of Archaeology, SFU
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGY
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY
Table Of Contents
Chair’s Report..................................................................................................................................4
In Memoriam.....................................................................................................................................6
Department Organization.....................................................................................................8
Faculty and Staff.............................................................................................................................8
Staff Profiles...................................................................................................................................9
Faculty Retirements......................................................................................................................10
Graduate Students.......................................................................................................................11
Sessional Instructors.....................................................................................................................12
Committees and Other Appointments........................................................................................13
Graduate programme...............................................................................................................15
Graduate Programme Committee Report..................................................................................15
Graduate Degrees Awarded........................................................................................................16
Graduate Departmental and External Awards.............................................................................17
Archaeology Graduate Student Caucus Report..........................................................................19
Undergraduate programme................................................................................................20
Undergraduate Programme Committee Report.........................................................................20
Honours Theses Completed........................................................................................................21
Undergraduate Awards and Prizes...............................................................................................21
Archaeology Student Society Report...........................................................................................22
Undergraduate Courses Offered.................................................................................................23
First Nations Studies programme...................................................................................26
Field Schools................................................................................................................................27
2009/2010 Sunshine Coast Field School......................................................................................27
2010 South Pacific Field School in Fiji..........................................................................................29
2009/2010 Kefalonia, Greece Field School...................................................................................30
2 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Faculty Research.........................................................................................................................31
David Burley.................................................................................................................................31
Roy L. Carlson..............................................................................................................................32
Mark Collard................................................................................................................................32
Catherine D’Andrea.....................................................................................................................33
Jon Driver.....................................................................................................................................34
Brian Hayden................................................................................................................................34
Ross Jamieson...............................................................................................................................35
Dana Lepofsky..............................................................................................................................36
Robert J. Muir..............................................................................................................................37
George Nicholas..........................................................................................................................38
Rudy Reimer................................................................................................................................39
Mark Skinner................................................................................................................................39
John R.Welch...............................................................................................................................40
Dongya Yang................................................................................................................................41
EldonYellowhorn..........................................................................................................................42
Post-Doctoral Research
and Sessional Instructor Profiles................................................................................43
Ana Maria Boza-Arlotti................................................................................................................43
Briggs Buchanan...........................................................................................................................44
Alvaro Higueras............................................................................................................................45
Natasha Lyons..............................................................................................................................45
David Maxwell..............................................................................................................................46
Deborah C. Merrett.....................................................................................................................46
Douglas Ross...............................................................................................................................47
Dennis Sandgathe.........................................................................................................................48
Camilla Speller..............................................................................................................................48
SarahWalshaw.............................................................................................................................49
Archaeology Laboratories Report.................................................................................50
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology..................................................................52
Centre for Forensic Research...........................................................................................53
Research Grants .......................................................................................................................54
Publications & Serials Housed in the Department of Archaeology
in 2009/2010.................................................................................................................................55
Department Publications......................................................................................................56
Table of Contents • 3
Chair’s Report
T
he Archaeology Department has emerged from
the financially dismal period that descended upon
us in 2008 a stronger and leaner organization.
Leaner in a number of ways, but in particular in terms
of our faculty complement. Add into this mix increasing
enrolments and the downloading of administrative tasks to
staff and faculty, and one wonders how Archaeology and
other departments have survived. Part of the answer for
Archaeology is that we are fortunate to have preserved
our complement of office and technical support staff who
do much of the critical work that keeps the department
going. Thanks to the creativity of our office manager, Chris
Papaianni, who works miracles with limited instructional
budgets, we have managed to maintain the integrity of
our teaching programmes while at the same time enabling
faculty to take the study leave they richly deserve. We have
relied heavily on Sessional Instructors to carry us through
this period and luckily we have been blessed with excellent
instructors who have stepped in to fill in the instructional
gaps. I would like to extend a special thanks to our staff
members, Chris Papaianni, Shannon Wood, Barbara Winter,
Merrill Farmer, Laura Nielson, and Peter Locher. I couldn’t
have hoped for a finer group of individuals to have as coworkers.
The Archaeology Department had several reasons
to celebrate in 2010. The first archaeology course was
taught at SFU in September 1970, making the 2010-11
academic year the 40th anniversary of our department. In
4 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
celebration of this milestone in our history we launched
a special seminar series highlighting topics that reflected
the traditional strengths of our department. Speakers were
introduced by Prof. Emeritus Roy Carlson and included:
Indigenous Archaeology (Prof. T.J. Ferguson, University of
Arizona); Archaeological Science (Prof. Michael Richards,
UBC); Bioanthropology (Prof. Paul Vasey, University of
Lethbridge); and Archaeology of the Pacific Rim (Prof.
David Burley, SFU).
The year 2010 marked yet another major milestone in
the history of our department. After an amazing 40 years
in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, our department
made the decision to transfer to the new Faculty of the
Environment, effective 1 April 2011. Consultation began in
2008 and it has been a long process to ensure a smooth
transition for our students, staff, and faculty. I am very grateful
for the support of faculty and staff members during the
transition, especially Dana Lepofsky, Mark Collard, David
Burley, Chris Papaianni, and Shannon Wood who attended
several meetings. Also, during this transitional period,
David Burley spearheaded significant modifications to our
undergraduate major programme, and we completed a
new three-year plan. Both sets of changes will guide our
future development in the context of our new faculty.
Since the completion of our previous biennial report in
2006, we have witnessed significant changes in Archaeology
Department faculty and staff personnel. Mark Collard joined
our faculty as a Tier 2 CRC Chair in July 2007. He brought
to our department a dynamic research programme in
human evolutionary studies. Robyn Bannerjee, who served
as Chair’s Assistant/Graduate Programme Assistant retired
in January 2007 after ten years of dedicated and friendly
service to our department. In her place we welcomed
Merrill Farmer who enthusiastically administers our
Graduate Programme and has been a great supporter of
our graduate students. We were pleased to have Heather
Robertson as our Lab Technician in 2007-2008. Prof. Knut
Fladmark retired in 2008 after an awe-inspiring 35 year
career. He was followed by Prof. Erle Nelson in 2009,
whose distinguished accomplishments included his election
as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
Continued on page 5
Continued from page 4
We were very fortunate to welcome Rudy Reimer to
our faculty as an Instructor in May 2009. Rudy was a joint
appointment between the Department of Archaeology
and the First Nations Studies Programme and his expertise
in geoarchaeology and Indigenous archaeology makes
him a superb addition to our faculty. The positions held
by Shannon Wood (Lab Manager) and Peter Locher (Lab
Technician) were formalised in 2010 with the departure of
long-time staff member Andrew Barton, who transferred
to the Office of the VP Research. We are grateful to
Andrew for his years of service and look forward to
working with Shannon and Peter. The closure of the
Kamloops campus took effect in 2010 and meant the end
of a well-established archaeology programme at Kamloops,
which in recent years was taught by Nadine Gray. We are
sorry to lose such a wonderful instructor in Nadine. Also
leaving Archaeology was Dr. Annie Ross who began a fulltime appointment in the First Nations Studies Programme
and Ian Gregson who vacated his position as receptionist.
Shortly thereafter, our receptionist position was revised to
Undergraduate Programme Assistant/Budget Clerk and
was very capably filled by Laura Nielson.
We were deeply saddened by the loss of two exceptional
individuals. Prof. Richard Shutler passed away in June 2007.
Despite being retired for 20 years, Richard could be found
in his office on a regular basis, happily working away on
various projects. In August 2009 we received the additional
sad news that Ann Sullivan had passed away. Ann served as
our Department Manager for 13 years (1992-2005). Both
Richard and Ann were wonderful colleagues who have
been sadly missed.
Our Archaeology and Ethnology Museum Curator
Dr. Barbara Winter was very active in 2009/10. In 2009,
Barbara and her collaborators (LIDC and Xay:tem First
Nation) launched an international award-winning website, “A Journey into Time Immemorial”. This was followed
closely in 2010 by successful funding applications to
create two additional interactive websites: one on forensic
sciences and another focussing on the Komagata Maru
incident. Another important development for the museum
was the installation of a magnificent cedar carving by Haida
artist Jim Hart. It was placed in the Saywell Hall atrium, just
outside the newly renovated entrance to our museum.
Other highlights of 2009-10 included several events
organised by an incredibly energetic A.S.S. (Archaeology
Students Association), including field trips to local points of
archaeological interest, meetings with faculty, and numerous
departmental social events. Also, a defunct undergraduate
newsletter (The Debitage) was revived and revitalised and
undergrads published a wonderful archaeological calendar,
the proceeds of which were donated to charities. Our
graduate students were extremely successful in obtaining
external scholarships and awards, and especially worthy
of note was Ph.D. student Camilla Speller’s receipt of
the Governor General’s Gold Medal. In December 2009,
our socially-conscious graduate students collected more
foodstuffs than any other SFU Graduate Caucus in a food
drive organized to support the SFU food bank.
Overall Archaeology has risen to the challenge to do
more with less and we have defined the directions in which
we need to grow. We have remained a top-rated researchoriented department with an impressive array of laboratory
classes, and field schools, with active field research taking
place in Alberta, coastal and interior British Columbia,
China, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Greece, the South Pacific, and
Southwestern USA. We are very much looking forward to
growing in new directions as we become integrated into
the new Faculty of the Environment beginning on 1 April
2011.
Catherine D’Andrea
Department Chair
Chair’s report • 5
In Memoriam
Richard Shutler, Jr.
F
aculty, staff and students in the Department of
Archaeology were deeply saddened with the passing
of Professor Richard Shutler Jr on June 28, 2007.
Richard had a long and rich career in archaeology with
positive impacts on students, colleagues and friends. He
joined the Department of Archaeology in 1979 as its
Chair, ultimately retiring in
1987, but continuing to be
engaged and on campus
as Professor Emeritus until
his death. His smile, stories,
collegiality and friendship are
sincerely missed.
Born in Longmount,
Colorado, Richard did his
first undergraduate degree
at Salinas Junior College
in California. Immediately
thereafter he enlisted in
the army (1941-1946),
volunteering to serve as
an ambulance driver on
the Burma Road, but being
posted as a radio operator
and diesel mechanic on the
Aleutian Islands.
Following the war, he
earned AB (1949) and
MA (1950) degrees in
Anthropology from the
University of California,
Berkeley. As a Berkeley
student, he studied with,
or as Richard would say,
did service under such
luminaries as Robert Lowie (MA supervisor), Alfred Louis
Kroeber, Robert Heizer and Edward Winslow Gifford.
Between 1952 and 1958, Richard relocated to Tucson
as Director of the University of Arizona Radiocarbon
Laboratory. He also earned his PhD (1961) there under
Emil Haury, his dissertation being a definitive study of Lost
City, Pueblo Grande de Nevada.This volume was published
in 1961, republished in 1984 and continues to be in print.
From 1950 to 1965, Richard was Curator of
6 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Anthropology at the Nevada State Museum in Carson City.
Professor Shutler, the university teacher and administrator,
thus, did not begin until well into mid-life when he held his
first appointment at the University of Hawaii (1965-1966).
He subsequently taught at San Diego State College (1967),
University of Victoria (1968-1972) and University of Iowa
Richard Shutler, Jr.
1921 - 2007
(1972-1979). At Iowa he was hired as Department Chair,
providing him the requisite experiences for his final move
to Simon Fraser in 1979.
Trying to summarize the accomplishments of
an archaeological career as long and productive
as Richard’s is all but an impossible task. Above
all else, he was a field archaeologist, working on
his first project, a burial mound excavation in the
Sacramento Valley of California in 1947. He was
Continued on page 7
Richard Shutler, Jr.
Continued from page 6
involved in his last fieldwork in 2001 with David Burley, an
excavation project on the first Lapita settlement sites on
the island of Tongatapu, Kingdom of Tonga.
In the 54 years intervening, his research ranged widely
to the Great Basin, California, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, the
Loyalty Islands, Philipines,
Gilbert Islands, Fefan
Island, Rotuma, Hong
Richard had
Kong, Austral Islands,
a long, rich
Ha’apai Islands of Tonga
as well as China.
career in
Richard’s field proarchaeology
grams were often lengthy
engagements, not the
with positive
least including a seven
month long stint in New
impacts on
Caledonia in 1951/1952
students,
with Edward Winslow
Gifford and a nine month
colleagues
excursion in 1963/1964
and friends.
to Vanuatu. The New
Caledonia project proved
His smile,
critical to archaeology as
stories,
it is known today in the
Pacific; he and Gifford
collegiality
discovered and excavatand friendship ed the type site for the
Lapita cultural complex,
are sincerely
a complex associated
with exploration and first
missed.
settlement across a large
swath of Oceania. On
the 50th anniversary of
that project, Richard was publicly honoured by the New
Caledonian government and feted by a hundred of his colleagues in celebratory symposium at Koné and Noumea,
New Caledonia.
From the pages of Asian Perspectives to Science,
Richard’s fieldwork and other insights are incorporated
in well over 100 publications. His eye for the innovative
is attested to in many areas from his early compilation
and interpretations of Pacific radiocarbon dates, to his
integrated use of linguistics and archaeology to track
Austronesian speaking horticulturalists across the Pacific,
to his long-standing collaborations with geologist William
Dickinson in ceramic petrography.
This innovation was clearly present in his use of heavy
machinery to expose stratigraphy in over 3 km of trenches
at Tule Springs, a controversial paleo-Indian site in Nevada
claimed to be 28,000 years old. Under Richard’s direction,
the project convincingly illustrated only ephemeral human
presence, and none outside of the accepted chronology for
peopling of the Americas. The Great Basin Archaeological
Society awarded Richard its highest honours for this and
other “pioneering” research on occasion of his retirement
in 1986.
Richard Shutler’s concern for scholarship went beyond
the strict rubric of science. With Mary Elizabeth Shutler, his
first wife, he published one of the first popular books on
Pacific archaeology, reviewing and making readable what
was then known of Southeast Asia, Australia and Oceania.
This book was not only well received but is considered
today one of the classics in Pacific Archaeology.
Richard Shutler Jr was aptly described as “the warm
hearted” in a 2002 festschrift volume in his honour. When
all is said and done, there is no better way to describe the
man’s demeanor and treatment of others. To his students,
he was a champion. To his colleagues he always had kind
words. And in his life outside of the academy, especially
in his more than quarter century long marriage to Jamie
Evrard, he could speak only of the positives.
Richard enjoyed and lived his life to the fullest, and all
who have met him are richer for their engagement. We
salute Professor Richard Shutler Jr for what he has been,
and what he has given in his 28 year association with the
Department of Archaeology at Simon Fraser University.
Well done!
In Memoriam •7
Department Organisation
faculty
Adjunct faculty
Dr. David Burley • Professor
Dr. Roy Carlson • Professor Emeritus
Dr. Mark Collard • Associate Professor
Dr. Catherine D’Andrea • Department Chair, Professor
Dr. Jon Driver • V. P., Academic & Provost, SFU, Professor
Dr. Knut Fladmark • Professor Emeritus
Dr. Birute Galdikas • Professor
Dr. Brian Hayden • Professor
Dr. Ross Jamieson • Associate Professor
Dr. Dana Lepofsky • Associate Professor
Dr. Robert J. Muir • Senior Lecturer
Dr. Erle Nelson • Professor
Dr. George Nicholas • Professor
Rudy Reimer • Instructor
Dr. Annie Ross • Assistant Professor
Dr. Mark Skinner • Professor
Dr. John Welch • Associate Professor
Dr. Dongya Yang • Associate Professor
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn • Director of First Nations Studies,
Associate Professor
Dr. Ron Adams
Dr. Jerome Cybulski
Dr. James Delgado
Dr. Richard Lazenby
Dr. Alan McMillan
Dr. Deborah C. Merrett
Dr. Mike Richards
Dr. Michael Wilson
Dr. Harald Yurk
Associate faculty
Merrill Farmer, BA
Chair's Assistant & Graduate Programme Assistant
Dr. John Clague • Professor, Earth Sciences
Dr. Rolf Matthews • Professor, Biology
Dr. George MacDonald • Bill Reid Foundation
Dr. Pablo Nepomnaschy • Assistant Professor, Health
Sciences
Laura Nielson, BA
Undergraduate Programme
Assistant & Budget Clerk
8 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Post-Doctoral Fellows
Dr. Briggs Buchanan
Dr. Natasha Lyons
Dr. Douglas Ross
Dr. Camilla Speller
Department Staff
Chris Papaianni, BA
Manager, Academic and
Administrative Services
Peter Locher, MA
Laboratory Technician
Barbara Winter, PhD
Shannon Wood, MA
Museum Curator
Laboratory Manager
Staff Profiles
Merrill Farmer (BA, SFU)
Chair Secretary & Graduate Programme Assistant
Merrill Farmer joined the department in 2007 after
graduating from Simon Fraser University with a Bachelors
degree in Political Science. Her main interests included
international war and peace studies. Merrill’s main roles as
Graduate Programme Assistant & Assistant to the Chair
include graduate admissions, awards and advising, as well as
assisting with tenures, promotions and faculty liaising. Merrill
takes pride in working in the University environment and
aiding in the success of students.
Laura Nielson (BA, SFU)
Back row (from left): Laura Nielson, Barbara Winter, Zack the dog,
Christina Papaianni Front row: Peter Locher, Merrill Farmer
Laura graduated from Simon Fraser University in 2005 with
a BA in Archaeology and has worked at SFU since 2006.
Some of her duties as the Undergraduate Programme
Assistant/Budget Clerk include: ordering textbooks;
collecting and disseminating course outlines; processing
financial paperwork; account reconciliation; and various
other tasks to assist undergraduate students and the
Department of Archaeology team.
Undergraduate enrollment increased since 2008, in part
due to course offerings at the Surrey campus. Capacity
building in previous years has also resulted in an increase
in the number of students registered in undergraduate
archaeology courses and programmes.
Peter Locher (MA, SFU)
Barbara earned a BA in Classics from UBC in 1974, an
MA in Anthropology from Carleton in 1983, and a PhD
in Archaeology from SFU in 1996. In addition, she has
completed certificates in Museum Technology and OnLine Design Processes.
Barbara has extensive experience working with
archaeological and ethnological collections, with
particular research interests in artifact conservation,
visual archaeology, and new media. Her ongoing efforts to
enhance the museum experience, both on-site and online, have benefited SFU students and the public. In 2009,
Barbara’s digital projects for the SFU virtual museum won
the World Summit Award (UNESCO/UN) in the e-Culture
and Heritage category, and the Advertising & Design Club
of Canada Award in the Educational Website category.
Undergraduate Programme Assistant & Budget Clerk
Laboratory Technician
In the position of Laboratory Technician, Peter is
responsible for all technical aspects of the Department’s
teaching/research laboratories and collections, computing
operations, and the maintenance of laboratory and field
equipment. Peter received an MA from SFU in 2006;
his specialization is Geoarchaeology and BC prehistoric
archaeology.
Christina Papaianni (BA, SFU)
Manager, Academic & Administrative Services
The budgetary side of my position involves managing the
departmental operating budgets, providing administrative
support for research and specific purpose budgets, and
assisting in the development, planning, and execution of
instructional and teaching assistant budgets. While fiscal
constraints on the temporary instructional and teaching
assistant budgets over the past two years have severely
taxed our budgets, we have managed to maintain the
integrity of our undergraduate programs.
I also provide academic advice and administrative
support to prospective and registered undergraduate
students, participate as a member of the undergraduate
curriculum committee, prepare the undergraduate
semester course schedule, participate in long range course
planning, and monitor undergraduate registration activity.
Barbara Winter (PhD, SFU)
Curator, SFU Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
Shannon Wood (MA, SFU)
Manager, Archaeology Laboratories and Curator, Research
Collections
Shannon earned a BA, High Honours, in Anthropology from
the University of Saskatchewan in 1984, and completed
her MA in Archaeology at SFU in 1992. Her thesis was
entitled: Tooth wear and the sexual division of labour in an
Inuit population.
DEpartment Organisation • 9
Archaeology Department
Retirees
Knut Fladmark
Erle Nelson
P
P
rofessor Knut Fladmark decided to take early
retirement in September 2007 following a 36-year
career of cramming undergraduate minds full of detail
and insights into geoarchaeology, the prehistory of Canada,
ethnographic cultures of North America, archaeological
field techniques and a spate of other topics. Over the same
time he achieved the rank of Professor, published widely,
supervised 15 successful graduate students, and became
a central figure in the debate over the peopling of the
New World. Indeed, his pioneering hypothesis of a coastal
migration route is the one now dominant in New World
archaeology. Knut also authored a manual on field methods
which, for 30 years has been used to train not only SFU
students but many others throughout North America. The
student who honestly professed on a course evaluation to
never having “a teacher so knowledgeable and prepared”
typically characterizes Knut’s dedication to archaeology
throughout his career and his approach to the classroom.
David Burley
rof.essor Erle Nelson arrived at SFU in 1974 as a postdoctoral fellow, after completing his Ph.D. in Nuclear
Physics at McMaster University. He was hired as a
faculty member in the Archaeology Department in 1975.
Once might ask, what could a nuclear physicist possibly
do as a faculty member in an archaeology department?
Well, as it turns out...a lot! Over the course of his 34 plusyear career Erle’s work has strongly influenced what we
do as archaeologists. The main highlights of his career are
his contributions to carbon-14 dating and stable isotopic
analysis in archaeology. His work has been reported in over
150 scientific publications. Early in his career Erle helped to
develop a new method of radiocarbon dating that is now
used by archaeologists everywhere. Based on this work
he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada in 2006.
In addition Erle’s work in stable isotopes has profoundly
influenced our understanding of diet and subsistence in
the prehistoric Pacific Northwest and other parts of the
world. We hear a lot these days from universities about
the benefits of “interdisciplinarity”. Clearly Erle’s career
has been a testament to what can be achieved in an
interdisciplinary setting.
Catherine D’Andrea
10 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Graduate Students
PhD Students
Supervisor
Masters Students
Supervisor
Ursula Arndt
Sarah Carr-Locke Diane Cockle
Derek Congram
Sean P. Connaughton Alan Cross Mana Dembo Marina Elliott Andrew W. Hickok
Maria Hillier Jennifer Jones
Stephen Kasstan Michael Klassen Jennifer Lewis Luseadra McKerracher
Gina Michaels
Amy Mundorff
Craig Rust
Audrey Scott
Camilla Speller
Chris Springer
Hua Grace Zhang
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Lynne Bell
Dr. Mark Skinner
Dr. David Burley
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Roy Carlson
Dr. Mark Skinner
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. John R. Welch
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
Dr. John R. Welch
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Mark Skinner
Dr. John R. Welch
Dr. Mark Skinner
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Dongya Yang
Daniela Balanzetegui Mairi Capper
Nyra Chalmer Ryan Dickie
Sandie Dielissen
Guy Duke
Dennis Evans Robyn Ewing
Annique-Elise Goode
Jenifer Gustavsen Jon Hall
Joanne Hammond
Kristina Hannis
James Herbert
Julia Jackley Sarah Johnson Heather Kendall Darryl Kirsch
Alexandra Kruse Kathleen LeBlanc
Michelle Lynch Bethany Mathews Krista McGrath
Luseadra McKerracher
Jason Moore Greg Morrissey
Celia Nord
Alana Peters Nova Pierson Melissa Roth Antonia Rodrigues April Ruttle Kathleen Schepers Ian Sellers Jon Sheppard
Simon Solomon Lia Tarle Beth Velliky Pamela Wadge
Louise Williams Jessi Witt
Kathleen Young
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Catherine D’Andrea
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. David Burley
Dr. John R. Welch
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Knut Fladmark
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
Dr. Brian Hayden
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Brian Hayden
Dr. Roy Carlson
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Dave Burley ­
Dr. Dave Burley
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. Knut Fladmark
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
& Dr. Bob Muir
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Dana Lepofsky ­
Dr. Catherine D’Andrea
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Dave Burley
Dr. Brian Hayden
Ethnoarchaeology: Masters student Katie LeBlanc in Fiji
Department Organisation •11
Sessional Instructors
Spring 2009
Dr. Clement Apaak Dr. Rob Commisso
Derek Congram Dr. Jennifer Ramsay
Dr. Doug Ross
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe Fall 2009
ARCH 100 D300
ARCH 201 D100
ARCH 332 D100
ARCH 100 D200
ARCH 334 D100
ARCH 131 H100
Spring 2010
Dr. Alvaro Higueras
Dr. David Maxwell
Dr. Doug Ross Dr. Jane Roy
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
Dr. Kevan Edinborough Dr. Doug Ross
Derek Congram Dr. Jennifer Ramsay
Dr. Doug Ross
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe ARCH 272 D100
ARCH 100 D200
ARCH 332 D100
ARCH 100 D200
ARCH 334 D100
ARCH 131 H100
Fall 2010
ARCH 333 D100
ARCH 340 D100
ARCH 223 E100
ARCH 332 E100
ARCH 131 C100
ARCH 131 D100
ARCH 131 D900
Field students aboard the “Archaeonaut”
12 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Dr. Ana Maria Boza-Arlotti Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
ARCH 442 E100
ARCH 485 D100
Flotation: Masters student Pam Wadge in Ethiopia
Committees and Other Appointments
Department Tenure Committee
Undergraduate Executive Committee
2009
2009
Catherine D’Andrea: Chair
Mark Skinner
George Nicholas
Ross Jamieson
Mark Collard
Dana Lepofsky
Paul Kingsbury (Geography)
Dongya Yang: Chair
Dana Lepofsky
Bob Muir
Chris Papaianni
2010
Catherine D’Andrea: Chair
Dave Burley
George Nicholas
John Welch
Dongya Yang
Ross Jamieson
Eldon Yellowhorn
Graduate Executive Committee
2009
Ross Jamieson: Chair
Mark Collard
Dana Lepofsky
Annie Ross
Derek Congram: Grad Representative
Merrill Farmer
2010
Ross Jamieson: Chair
George Nicholas
John Welch
Marina Elliott & Sandie Dielissen: Grad Representatives
Merrill Farmer
2010
Dave Burley: Chair
Dongya Yang
Chris Papaianni
Chelsey Armstrong: Undergraduate Representative
Archaeology Student Society
2009 • Spring
Meredith Douglas-Moore: President
Megan Wong: Vice President
Anna Shoemaker: Secretary
Morgan Bartlett: Faculty Liaison
Aviva Finkelstein: Treasurer
Todd Tregilges: Forum Representative
2009 • Fall
Megan Wong: Rhory Gillies: Anna Shoemaker: Morgan Bartlett: Aviva Finkelstein: Todd Tregilges: Alisha Gauvreau: President
Vice President
Secretary
Faculty Liaison
Treasurer
Forum Representative
Debitage Editor
2010 • Spring
Rhory Gillies: Alisha Gauvreau: Anna Shoemaker: Morgan Bartlett: Aviva Finkelstein: Todd Tregilges: Alisha Gauvreau: President
Vice President
Secretary
Faculty Liaison
Treasurer
Forum Representative
Debitage Editor
Department Organisation • 13
Archaeology Student Society
2010 • Summer
Rhory Gillies: Sean Matthews: Anna Shoemaker: Nicholas Chesworth: Kody Huard: Alisha Gauvreau: President
Vice President
Secretary
Faculty Liaison
Treasurer
Forum Representative
2010 • Fall
Rhory Gillies: Sean Matthews: Nicole Slade: Chelsey Armstrong: Kody Huard: Anna Shoemaker: Katie Hausch: Nikki Lloyd-Gervais: Tori Miller: President
Vice President
Secretary
Faculty Liaison
Treasurer
Forum Representative
Debitage Editor
Debitage Editor
Debitage Editor
Master’s Student Jon Sheppard at the Keatley Creek Site
Seminar Series Organizing Committee
20092010
Archaeology
Graduate Student Society
2009
Luseadra McKerracher:
Guy Duke: Molly Capper: Pam Wadge: Kristina Hannis: Pam Wadge: Derek Congram:
Chair
Co-Chair
Treasurer
Secretary
GSS Representative
TSSU Representative
Department Representative
Beth Mathews Graduate Student Social Committee
20092010
Craig Rust
Jon Sheppard
Jenny Lewis
Library Committee Representative
2010
Luseadra McKerracher:
Lia Tarle: Molly Capper: Katie LeBlanc: Kristina Hannis: Pam Wadge: Sandie Dielissen:
Katie Young Mike Klassen Merrill Farmer Chair
Co-Chair
Treasurer
Secretary
GSS Representative
TSSU Representative
Department Representative
2009
2010
Dongya Yang
Dana Lepofsky
Faculty of Arts Research Liaison
2009/2010
Brian Hayden
14 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Graduate Programme
Graduate Programme Committee Report
A
s one of the largest graduate programmes
in Canada with a focus on Archaeology and
Bioanthropology, our programme continues to
produce a wonderful diversity of research, with four PhD
and ten MA degrees awarded over the last two years. We
currently have 48 students in the program, working in areas
such as paleoethnobotany, the archaeology of convicts,
hominin thermoregulation, residential school archaeology,
lithic sourcing, GIS, acorn leaching, Neandertal clothing,
and a host of other topics. Their research occurs in British
Columbia and Alberta, and also in places as widespread
as Ethiopia, Tonga, Ecuador and China. We were able to
garner nine national SSHRC MA or PhD scholarships in
2009/10.
I would also point out Audrey Scott’s Joint POW/MIA
Accounting Command Fellowship for work in forensics,
and Molly Capper’s award for best poster at a recent
Society for Ethnobiology conference. Camilla Speller’s
research on ancient turkey DNA led to receipt of the
Governor-General’s Gold Medal on graduation, as well as
publication in the journal PNAS, and an appearance on
CBC Quirks and Quarks. These are all testaments to the
quality of our students’ work nationally and internationally.
As I approach the end of my stint as graduate chair, I’m
struck by what a pleasure it has been working with such
a variety of excellent emerging scholars in our discipline.
Ross W. Jamieson
Graduate Programme Committee Chair
Graduate Degrees awarded
2009 Doctor of Philosophy
Michaels, Gina Claire
Poverty, Chastity and Obedience: Monastic Masculinities in Spanish Colonial Riobamba
Mundorff, Amy
Human Identification Following the World Trade Center Disaster: Assessing Management
Practices for Highly Fragmented and Commingled Remains
Speller, Camilla
Investigating Turkey Domestication in the Southwest United States Through Ancient DNA
Analysis
2010 Doctor of Philosophy
Congram, Derek
Spatial Analysis and Predictive Modeling of Clandestine Graves From Rearguard Repression of the Spanish Civil War
2009 Master of Arts
Hall, Jonathan B. Pointing it Out: Fluted Projectile Point Distributions and Early Human Populations in
Saskatchewan
Hammond, Joanne
Archaeology Without Reserve: Indigenous Heritage Stewardship in British Columbia
McKerracher, Luseadra
An Assessment of the Impact of Population History and Risk on Human Weaning Behaviour
Morrissey, Greg Tools and Change: The Shift from Atltatl to Bow on the British Columbia Interior Plateau
Springer, Chris
Tracking Identity in a Harrison Valley Pithouse
Graduate Programme • 15
2010 Master of Arts
Duke, Guy Acequia Maria Mayancela: The San Andrés Canal System, Chimborazo, Ecuador
Ewing, Robyn Finding Middle Ground: Case Studies in Negotiated Repatriation
Johnson, Sarah
Combining Traditional Knowledge With Archaeological Investigation in Grace Harbour, Desolation Sound, B.C.
McGrath, Krista M. The Effects of High Temperature on the Quantity and Quality of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA in Non-Human Skeletal Remains
Ritchie, Morgan From House to Watershed: The Cultural Landscape of the Sts’ailes People
The Bell Site
16• SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Graduate Departmental and External Awards
External Awards
Pacific Century Graduate Scholarship
Marina Elliott PhD
Luseadra McKerracher PhD
Louise Williams MA
Lia Tarle MA
Chris Springer PhD
Marvin Stark Graduate Fellowship
Simon Solomon MA
Community Trust Endowment Funds (CTEF)
Doctoral Graduate Fellowship in Humanities
Jennifer Lewis PhD
Audrey Scott PhD
CGS Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement (SSHRC)
Kathleen LeBlanc MA
National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarship for
Archaeological Training for Native Americans and Native
Hawaiians
Simon Solomon MA
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
of Canada (SSHRC) Graduate Scholarship Doctoral
Awards
Marina Elliott
Jennifer Jones
Chris Springer
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of
Canada (SSHRC) Graduate Scholarship Masters Awards
Kathleen Young
Kathleen LeBlanc
Nyra Chalmer
Jason Moore
April Ruttle
Louise Williams
SFU Administered Awards
C.D. Nelson Memorial Graduate Scholarship
Louise Williams MA (2)
Alexandra Kruse MA
Dr. J.V. Christensen Graduate Scholarship
Guy Duke MA
Bethany Mathews MA
President’s Ph.D. Research Stipend
Mana Dembo PhD
Andrew Hickok PhD
Michael Klassen PhD
Alan G. Cross PhD
Jennifer Jones PhD
Craig Rust PhD
Audrey Scott PhD
Hua Zhang PhD
Special Graduate Entrance Scholarship (Targeted)
Bethany Mathews MA
Luseadra McKerracher PhD
Special Graduate Entrance Scholarship (General)
Marina Elliott PhD
Luseadra McKerracher PhD
Kathleen LeBlanc MA
Michelle Lynch MA
Provost’s Prize of Distinction
Nyra Chalmer MA
Graduate International Research Travel Award
Daniela Balanzategui MA
Mairi Capper MA
Guy Duke MA
Pamela Wadge MA
Graduate programme • 17
Department of Archaeology Administered awards
SFU Graduate Fellowship
Ursula Arndt MA
Daniela Balanzategui MA (2)
Mairi Capper MA
Alan Cross PhD
Ryan Dickie MA
Sandie Dielissen MA
Guy Duke PhD
Annique-Elise Goode MA
Kristina Hannis MA
Julia Jackley MA (2)
Sarah Johnson MA
Darryl Kirsch MA
Michael Klassen PhD
Kathleen LeBlanc MA
Krista McGrath MA (2)
Luseadra McKerracher PhD
Bethany Mathews MA
Jason Moore MA
Nova Pierson MA
Craig Rust PhD
April Ruttle MA (2)
Jon Sheppard MA
Camilla Speller PhD
Simon Solomon working at the Jubilee School site, Piikani First Nation, Alberta
Pamela Wadge MA
Louise Williams MA
Kathleen Young MA
Dr. Jack Nance Memorial Graduate Scholarship in Archaeology
Derek Congram PhD
Simon Solomon MA
Roy L. Carlson Graduate Scholarship in Prehistoric British Columbia Archaeology
Ryan Dickie MA
Jon Sheppard MA
Other Awards and Distinctions
JPAC-CIL Forensic Science Academy Fellowship
Audrey Scott PhD
IPinCH Graduate Student Fellowship
Michael Klassen PhD
Heritage Fellowship from the American Schools of Oriental Research
Molly Capper MA
Best Poster Award at the Society of Ethnobiology Annual Meeting
Molly Capper MA
18 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Archaeology Graduate Student Caucus Report
T
he Archaeology Graduate Student Caucus
(AGSC) is an organizational body composed of all
current graduate students in the Department of
Archaeology. Our core mandate is to administer revenue
generated through graduate student fees and through
weekly fundraising raffles to our caucus members.
The AGSC comprises an executive, several
representatives that liaise with other administrative bodies,
and assorted committees that organize events for and
allocate space to our membership.
During the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 academic years,
we fulfilled our mandate with regard to the administration
of our available funds. The AGSC provided cold, filtered
water to students with desk space in the Grad Lab. We
also reimbursed more than a dozen students for costs
associated with conference and/or research-related travel.
Additionally, AGSC members organized two successful
spring seminar series and a 2009-2010 AGSC social. Lastly,
we contributed financially to the organization of the 20102011 undergraduate Archaeology Student Society social.
We look forward to the upcoming academic year. I
am optimistic that the 2011-2012 cohort of graduate
students will bring fresh enthusiasm and integrity to the
AGSC community here in our new home in the Faculty of
Environment.
Alberta, Piikani First Nation: Masters student Kristina
Hannis excavating the Royal Jubilee School site
Luseadra McKerracher
Chair
Alberta, Piikani First Nation: Masters student Sandie
Dielissen and Kristina Hannis excavating the Royal Jubilee
School site
Viti Levu, Fiji: Masters student Kathleen LeBlanc in the field
Graduate Programme • 19
Undergraduate programme
Undergraduate Programme Committee report
A
rchaeology department majors and minors as well
as overall enrollments have substantially risen in the
past two years. By the spring 2010 semester, the
department had 126 honors/majors/joint majors as well as
24 minors/extended minors; at the end of 2010 there were
148 honors/majors/joint majors and 23 minors/extended
minors. As for general enrollments, archaeology classes
are literally stuffed with class sizes of over 300 students in
multiple offerings of Arch 100 and Arch 131 on a semesterto-semester basis. From the 2008/2009 teaching year to
present (2010/2011), FTEs (full time equivalent students)
have risen from 320.9 to 369.8 for an enrollment increase
of 15.2%.
Two major undergraduate committee initiatives
were implemented between 2009 and present. The
first was Senate approval for, and 2009 initiation of, an
undergraduate Certificate Program in Archaeological
Resource Management.This certificate requires completion
of archaeology courses with benefit to employers in the
private consulting and government sectors of heritage
20 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
resource management. The certificate program has
proven popular with 20 students now enrolled and six
certificates awarded since fall 2009. A fall 2010 review
and recommended restructuring of the department
undergraduate program is the second undergraduate
committee initiative. These recommendations were
presented to a Department Retreat on 29 October and
are now being acted upon for Senate approval in April
2011. Also presented at the retreat were proposals for
upper division certificate programs in Environmental
Archaeology and Biological Anthropology.
David Burley
Undergraduate Committee Chair
Chris Papaianni
Manager & Academic Advisor
Honours Theses Completed
2009 • Spring
Lisa Dojack
Invertebrate Fauna of a Death Site
2009 • Fall
Jesse Wentzloff
Inka Roads as Made Work
2010 • Spring
Tabatha Donaldson
Images of Archaeology in Popular Film
2010 • Fall
Frederick Foster
A Reassessment of the Application of Bergmann’s Rule to Humans
Undergraduate Awards and Prizes
Ingrid Nystrom Archaeology Award
2008/2009
2009/2010
Lisa Dojack
Aaron Racicot
Brian Williamson Memorial Award in Archaeology
2008/2009
2009/2010
Morgan Bartlett
Vanessa Medland
Jack Nance Memorial Essay Prize
2008/2009
2009/2010
Not awarded
Anna Shoemaker
A Critical Examination of Archaeologists and the Actions in Mexico
Chair’s Essay Prize
2008/2009
2009/2010
Not awarded
Maria Titova
Osteology Report: Case # 82-7
Vice President Research Undergraduate Student Research Award (VPR USRA)
2010
Nyra Chalmer
Nicholas Chesworth
Andrea Unrau
Undergraduate Programme • 21
Archaeology Student Society report
D
uring the years 2009/2010 the Archaeology
Student Society was quite active in getting
archaeology students more involved with the
society. Our main goal has been to encourage a rapport
between students as well as all archaeology departmental
members.
During the 2009 year we planned many movie nights
and socials that encouraged students both new and old
to come out and become acquainted with each other.
Additionally, we held our annual A.S.S. Meet and Greet
which was well attended by all departmental members.
In the spring semester we had faculty members come
to our general meeting to give presentations about life
as a professional archaeologist once you graduate and
possibilities of furthering your education. Moreover, we
planned a field trip to Seattle, Washington where we
attended a presentation by Don Johanson and visited the
Lucy exhibit at the Pacific Science Center. Lastly, during the
fall semester we restarted the Debitage which is the A.S.S
archaeological newsletter.
Rudy Reimer/Yumks guides A.S.S. students on a field trip of
archaeological sites in the lower mainland
A.S.S. tour of lower mainland archaeological sites
During the 2010 year we continued to run the
society as previously done including movie nights, socials,
presentations and our annual A.S.S. Meet and Greet. Our
spring semester field trip involved attending the Shipwreck
Conference in Victoria, BC which was held by the UASBC. In
addition to our typical activities we started our first faculty
member led field trip with Rudy Reimer in the fall semester.
This field trip included a tour of archaeological sites around
the Greater Vancouver area with discussions about how
they have been managed by consulting archaeologists, the
city and the province of British Columbia. As well, the
fall semester was the first time that the A.S.S. created a
2011 archaeological calendar which have been sold with
the purpose of donating all proceeds to charity. Finally,
the Debitage newsletter has continued to become more
popular and has seen more contributions from both
students and faculty members.
The Archaeology Student Society is looking forward
to the 2011 year where we hope to continue to see
archaeology students getting more involved with the
society as well as continuing to work closely and develop a
stronger relationship with all departmental members.
Rhory S. H. Gillies
A.S.S President
22 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Undergraduate Courses Offered
Fall 2010
100-3
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places
Ancient Peoples and Places
Ross Jamieson
Catherine D’Andrea
100-3
131-3
131-3
Ancient Peoples and Places (Distance Education)
Human Origins
Human Origins (Distance Education)
131-3
131-3
201-3
226-3
272-3
332-3
339-3
344-3
372-5
373-5
377-5
383-3
386-3
435-6
442-5
471W-5
485-5
Human Origins (Harbour Centre)
Human Origins (Surrey)
Introduction to Archaeology
Prehistory of Religion: Shamans, Sorcerers and Saints (Distance Education)
Archaeology of the Old World
Special Topics: Aboriginal Australians in Archaeological and Ethnographic Perspective
Lab Practicum – Culture of Greece (Field School - Greece)
Primate Behaviour (Evening)
Material Culture Analysis
Human Osteology
Historical Archaeology
Molecular Bioarchaeology
Archaeological Resource Management
Field Work Practicum (Field School - Greece)
Forensic Anthropology
Archaeological Theory
Lithic Technology
Brian Hayden
Biruté Galdikas
Dennis Sandgathe
Sarah Walshaw
Sarah Walshaw
David Burley
Brian Hayden
Brian Hayden
George Nicholas
Geoffrey Schmalz
Biruté Galdikas
Brian Hayden
Dongya Yang
Ross Jamieson
Dongya Yang
John Welch
Geoffrey Schmalz
Ana Maria Boza-Arlotti
George Nicholas
Dennis Sandgathe
Summer 2010
100-3
131-3
Ancient Peoples and Places (Distance Education)
Human Origins (Distance Education)
226-3
332-3
433-6
434-3
434-3
435-6
Prehistory of Religion: Shamans, Sorcerers and Saints (Distance Education)
Special Topics: Fiji Culture and Heritage (Field School – Fiji)
Background to Fieldwork (Field School – Sunshine Coast)
Exercises in Mapping and Recording (Field School – Sunshine Coast)
Exercises in Mapping and Recording (Field School – Fiji)
Field Work Practicum (Field School – Fiji)
Brian Hayden
Dennis Sandgathe
Brian Hayden
David Burley
Dana Lepofsky
Dana Lepofsky
David Burley
David Burley
Undergraduate Programme • 23
Spring 2010
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places
131-3
Human Origins
Dennis Sandgathe
Dana Lepofsky
131-3
Human Origins (Distance Education)
Dennis Sandgathe
131-3
Human Origins (Surrey)
Dennis Sandgathe
201-3
Introduction to Archaeology
223-3
Prehistory of Canada (Evening)
252-3
Ancient Egypt and Africa (Evening)
273-3
Archaeology of the New World
301-3
Prehistoric and Indigenous Art
332-3
Special Topics: Near East Archaeology (Evening)
333-3
Special Topics: Cultural Heritage Management in Latin America
334-3
Special Topics: Aztec and Inca: Archaeology of Empires
340-5
Zooarchaeology
David Maxwell
348-5
Archaeological Conservation
Barbara Winter
365-3
Ecological Archaeology
Dana Lepofsky
372-5
Material Culture Analysis
Robert Muir
373-5
Human Osteology
Mark Skinner
376-5
Quantitative Methods
Robert Muir
452-5
Introduction to Paleopathology
Mark Skinner
471W-5
Archaeological Theory
Robert Muir
Douglas Ross
Catherine D’Andrea
Rudolf Reimer
Annie Ross
Jane Roy
Alvaro Higueras
Ross Jamieson
George Nicholas
Fall 2009
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places
Ross Jamieson
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places
Douglas Ross
131-3
Human Origins
Mark Skinner
201-3
Introduction to Archaeology
Robert Muir
272-3
Archaeology of the Old World
332-3
Special Topics: Aboriginal Australians in Archaeological and Ethnographic Perspective
333-3
Special Topics: Great Ape Societies (Evening)
339-3
Lab Practicum - Culture of Greece (Field School - Greece
344-3
Primate Behaviour (Evening)
372-5
Material Culture Analysis
Robert Muir
373-5
Human Osteology
Dongya Yang
379-3
American Southwest (Evening/Harbour Centre)
383-3
Molecular Bioarchaeology
Dongya Yang
385-5
Paleoanthropology
Mark Skinner
386-3
Archaeological Resource Management
Robert Muir
390-5
Archaeobotany
435-6
Field Work Practicum (Field School - Greece)
Geoffrey Schmalz
471W-5
Archaeological Theory
George Nicholas
24 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Kevan Edinborough
George Nicholas
Biruté Galdikas
Geoffrey Schmalz
Biruté Galdikas
John Welch
Catherine D’Andrea
Summer 2009
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places
Brian Hayden
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places (Distance Education)
Brian Hayden
226-3
Prehistory of Religion: Shamans, Sorcerers and Saints
Brian Hayden
433-6
Background to Field Work (Field School – Sunshine Coast)
Dana Lepofsky
434-3
Exercises in Mapping and Recording (Field School – Sunshine Coast)
Dana Lepofsky
435-6
Field Work Practicum (Field School – Sunshine Coast)
Dana Lepofsky
Spring 2009
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places
Ross Jamieson
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places
Jennifer Ramsay
100-3
Ancient Peoples and Places (Harbour Centre)
Clement Apaak
131-3
Human Origins
200-3
Special Topics: The Vikings (Evening)
201-3
Introduction to Archaeology
252-3
Ancient Egypt and Africa (Evening)
273-3
Archaeology of the New World
311-5
Archaeological Dating
332-3
Special Topics: Funerary Archaeology
334-3
Special Topics: Aztec and Inca: Archaeology of Empires
349-5
Management of Archaeological Collections (Evening)
372-5
Material Culture Analysis
Robert Muir
373-5
Human Osteology
Dongya Yang
376-5
Quantitative Methods in Archaeology
Robert Muir
378-3
Pacific Northwest North America
Dana Lepofsky
438-5
Geoarchaeology
Paul Goldberg
442-5
Forensic Anthropology
Mark Skinner
471W-5
Archaeological Theory
George Nicholas
Mark Skinner
Erle Nelson
Rob Commisso
Catherine D’Andrea
Eldon Yellowhorn
Erle Nelson
Derek Congram
Douglas Ross
Barbara Winter
Undergraduate Programme • 25
First Nations Studies programme
A
rchaeology is the host department for First
Nations Studies (FNST) on the Burnaby campus.
FNST is an interdisciplinary subject dedicated to
examining the experience of Aboriginal People in Canada
and introduces students to the ongoing dialogue between
the Aboriginal minority and Canadian society. Students may
apply courses toward a major in First Nations Studies, or
toward a minor that complements their major area of study.
The programme is evolving and now includes joint majors
in Archaeology and First Nations Studies and Linguistics
and First Nations Studies. Four faculty, Eldon Yellowhorn,
Deanna Reder, Rudy Reimer and Annie Ross, teach FNST
courses on the Burnaby campus. Sessional instructors are
contracted each semester to teach some courses, such as
FNST 332-3 Ethnobotany of British Columbia First Nations.
Eldon Yellowhorn
Director, First Nations Studies Programme
Students may obtain credits from the core programme,
which lists seventeen courses that have FNST designation.
Two courses, FNST 101-3 The Cultures, Languages
and Origins of Canada’s First Peoples and FNST 201-3
Canadian Aboriginal Peoples’ Perspectives on History,
are offered through distance education. New courses
are being developed that will augment those currently
listed, and which reflect the expertise of the faculty. FNST
322-3, Special Topics course that explores issues such
First Nations Heritage Stewardship, Métis and Indigenous
Expressive Arts. FNST 442-3 pairs students to faculty for
directed reading designed to target specific interests that
are not offered as regular courses. Cognate disciplines such
as sociology/anthropology, linguistics, history, criminology
and archaeology offer courses with significant Aboriginal
issues content that are cross-listed for credit in First
Nations Studies.
Eldon Yellowhorn (standing) speaks at a book launch and First Nations Studies Research
Celebration at SFU October 2010
26 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Field Schools
2009 and 2010 Field School on the Sunshine Coast
Students excavating the largest ancient structure (800 years old) at the Cochrane Bay site
I
n the summers of 2009 and 2010, the Simon Fraser
University Archaeology Field School was conducted
in the context of the larger collaborative research
project between Simon Fraser University and Tla’amin First
Nation:The Tla’amin First Nation – Simon Fraser University
Archaeology and Heritage Stewardship Program. This is a
five-year research programme co-lead by Drs. John Welch
and Dana Lepofsky. The field school components in 2009
and 2010 were directed by Dana Lepofsky. In 2009, Masters
student Julia Jackley was the TA; in 2010 then Masters and
now PhD student Chris Springer TA’ed the course. Julia’s
Masters thesis research and Chris’ PhD research are based
on the data collected in the context of these field schools.
The overall goal of the research programme is to conduct
archaeological and heritage research that is meaningful to
and driven by Tla’amin community needs and desires. For
archaeology, this translates to research on understanding
ancient human interactions with the land and sea.We use
these data to both educate about the past and also to
apply this knowledge to current management of marine
and terrestrial resources.
In 2009, we focused our efforts on excavating the
settlement of KleKwaNum on the Tla’amin Reserve and
on archaeological survey of terrestrial and intertidal sites
in Desolation Sound. KleKwaNum has been occupied
continuously by the Tla’amin people for the last 2000
years. In 2010, we focused our efforts on the excavation
and mapping of the large settlement at Cochrane Bay in
Desolation Sound as well as survey and mapping terrestrial
and inter-tidal sites in Desolation Sound. The excavation of
the site at Cochrane Bay will be the basis of Nyra Chalmer’s
Master’s thesis. The study of intertidal sites (e.g., fish traps)
is the focus of Megan Caldwell’s PhD thesis.
Continued on page 28
Field Schools • 27
Continued from page 27
As is typical of other archaeology field classes at SFU,
the 2009 and 2010, students were exposed to a range of
experiences. They excavated using a variety of techniques,
made high precision maps of archaeological sites, and
conducted archaeology survey, looking for and mapping
diverse site types. An on-going teaching philosophy of our
local field schools is that we treat field school students as
junior research collaborators. Thus, we involve them daily in
a variety of decisions related to both the day to day running
of a field camp, and larger decisions about how best to reach
project goals.
Intertidal rock wall on Harwood Island. One of 60 intertidal
features we recorded in Desolation Sound
Excavations at the site of KlehKwaNum on the Tla’amin Reserve
(2000 years old)
Students worked closely with community members in a
variety of settings. Our project strategy is to have a portion of
the crew at any given time live on the Tla’amin Reserve and
excavate highly visible and accessible sites while a portion
of the crew camps and works in the more remote regions
of Tla’amin tradition territory–within stunning Desolation
Sound. Community engagement involved working alongside
community representatives on our field crew, giving tours
to visiting community members, organizing community days,
and talking to various representatives from the media
In 2009, the students’ outreach efforts were compiled in a
project web site.This web site was awarded an “Honourable
Mention” for the Canadian Archaeological Association 2010
Public Communications Award for “its blend of traditional
knowledge and modern First Nations information together
with archaeological discoveries that serve to support,
strengthen and preserve history and native heritage”.
Dana Lepofsky
28 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
2010 South Pacific Field School in Fiji
T
ropical climate, beachside accommodations and
excavation of a 500-700 AD village site on the
Coral Coast of Viti Levu in the Republic of Fiji was
the lot for 23 undergraduate students enrolled in the 2010
South Pacific Archaeology Field School. The field school is
offered on a biennial basis as a joint undertaking between
the Department of Archaeology and SFU International
Programmes. Course offerings included Arch 332-3 (Fiji
Culture, History and archaeology), Arch 434-3 (Mapping
and Recording) and Arch 435-6 (Field Work Practicum)
with lectures spread between SFU Burnaby, University of
South Pacific in Suva, and Levuka, the former colonial capital
of Fiji on the island of Ovalau.The fieldwork practicum was
conducted on the shoreline slopes of the Sigatoka Sand
Dunes National Park as a collaborative undertaking with
the Fiji Museum and the National Trust for Fiji.
The South Pacific field school is guided by two objectives,
the first being the training of students in archaeological
field methods. The Sigatoka Sand Dunes is an exceptional
venue in this respect with abundant archaeological
materials actively eroding from its coastal margin, not the
least including three burials excavated in 2010 by students
at the request of the Fiji Museum.
Nakabuta Village, Viti Levu, 2010
The dominant focus of field school efforts, however, was
the excavation of superimposed village occupation floors,
each including house features and distinctive ceramic
assemblages numbering in the tens of thousands of sherds.
The second objective is equally important – the provision
of students with a cultural understanding and appreciation
for the peoples of Fiji. In part accomplished by living and
working in Fiji for a seven and a half week period, students
also participated in village visits, had guest lectures from
diverse faculty at the University of South Pacific, were given
tours of historic and archaeological sites and had active
engagement with staff of the Fiji Museum as well as local
Fijian field assistants at Sigatoka.
David Burley
South Pacific 2010 field school with Fiji Museum staff and
local field assistants at the Sigatoka Sand Dunes, Viti Levu
Field Schools • 29
2009 and 2010 Field School in Kefalonia, Greece
T
he 2009 and 2010 seasons of the Pronnoi NW
Necropolis project represented the second and
third year of excavation as conducted by SFU’s
Semester Abroad Program in Greece in cooperation with
the Greek Archaeological Service of Kefalonia.The NW
Necropolis represents one of several cemeteries dating
to the Archaic and Classical periods that existed around
the western slopes of the acropolis of the ancient polis
of Pronnoi, which was one of the four city-states (the
tetrapolis) of Kefalonia.
During the course of these two seasons fifty square
meters of the ancient cemetery were excavated within
ten new trenches. A total of thirteen burials were found,
all inhumations, as well as an unusual cenotaph (Figure 1).
Most of these burials were of the storage-jar (pithos) type
typical of the Archaic and Early Classical periods (see the
type as drawn in Figure 2 ), many of which were reused
for at least one subsequent burial. One tile-covered
burial was discovered, belonging to ca. 430-420 B.C. (see
grave-goods pictured in Figure 3); while a plain grave of
hasty appearance was also investigated, with its occupant
identified as a likely war casualty. At least seventeen
skeletons in all were recovered, covering the age-range
of infants, children, young and older adults; initial sexing
has proven difficult with many of the skeletons that were
disturbed by grave reuse.
The 2009 and 2010 seasons of excavation succeeded in
establishing the general parameters of the NW Necropolis
as used in the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., in a surface area
of ca. 1000 m2.
The chronology of the cemetery was also expanded by
more than fifty years, with the earliest graves now dating
to ca. 550 B.C. and the latest to ca. 400 B.C. As thus far
investigated the cemetery consists of several ‘family plots’
as well as a scatter of individual burials, especially for the
infant and child graves. In the 5th c. B.C. several phases of
terrace-structures were built, one of which (Terrace A1, in
Area AII) revealed a significant amount of discarded household pottery, small-finds, and terracotta roof-tile (both local and imported), all of which must have been taken from
a nearby ‘town-dump’.
Field-drawing of the pithos-type burial A10 (Area AI,
Trench E)
Cenotaph Burial A16, of ca. 490-480 B.C. with Attic RedFigured lekythos oil-flask of that period
The small-finds from Burial A10 (adult male)
Geoffrey Schmalz
30 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Faculty Research
David Burley
T
wo field research programs were initiated in 2009
in the Republic of Fiji and the Kingdom of Tonga. In
June/July archaeological site survey was carried out
on Vanua Levu and Kadavu, respectively the second and
fourth largest islands in Fiji. Of particular concern was the
recording of early ceramic period sites relating to initial
Lapita settlement ca. 3000-2800 BP as well as post Lapita
transition in the following half millennium.
Both surveys were part of a SSHRC funded project
(2009-2012) on the pre-Polynesian homeland, and both
were conducted successfully with assistance of Fiji Museum
archaeological staff.
Less successful in 2009 was a rock art survey in the
Kingdom of Tonga undertaken with Shane Egan, a Tongan
resident. In 2008, we had recorded a 14th to 16th century
AD Hawaiian style petroglyph panel on Foa Island in
northern Ha’apai. With Tonga 5000 km to the southwest
of Hawaii, this site was provocative relative to interactions
and voyaging capabilities in late prehistoric Polynesia.
A similar site was reported in the 1920s on the island
of Telekivava’u in southern Ha’apai. We were unable to
relocate it, but survey of Telekivava’u and four other nearby
islands provides first insight into the prehistory of this
extremely remote part of Tonga.
Research efforts in 2010 were in part centred on South
Pacific field school excavations at the Sigatoka Sand Dunes
in Fiji. Focus here was upon the excavation of 1400 to 1500
year old superimposed occupation floors that, previously,
had been investigated in 2000, 2002 and 2008. Major
architectural features were exposed, including a central
support post for a residence.
Lapita pottery, Vorovoro Island 2009
Excavation was also conducted at an early Lapita
colonizing site on Vorovoro Island off the north central
coast of Vanua Levu. Discovered in the 2009 survey, the
2010 project was intended to document basic site data as
well as recover representative Lapita and other ceramic
assemblages. Radiocarbon dates place the age of this site at
ca 3000 years ago, making it the second earliest settlement
locale recorded in Fiji thus far.
Faculty Research • 31
Roy Carlson
M
y research over the last two years has
concentrated on analysis of the artifacts and
description of the excavations that I directed in
the Republic of the Sudan as part of the Aswan Reservoir
project in 1965-66. Two Paleolithic sites, Khor Abu Anga
and Magendohli, and four younger ceramic period sites
were excavated. Analysis of the Paleolithic material and
completion of a monograph is expected to take another
two years.
I have also been working with Ripan Mahli of the
University of Illinois on analysis of the DNA from the
skeletal remains from Namu from excavations I directed in
1977 and 1978.These remains are slated for reburial in the
Spring of 2011 and the Heiltsuk agreed that DNA work be
done before this occurs.
The samples have been taken, and obtaining samples
from contemporary Heiltsuk for comparison is now
under discussion with the Heiltsuk Tribal Council. I am
also working with Mike Richards and Brian Chisholm of
UBC on analysis of isotopic samples, which is also under
discussion with the Heiltsuk Tribal Council.
I also presented the following paper at the Valcamonica
Symposium in Italy - Ideological Content of Prehistoric
Northwest Coast Art - that has now been published.
MARK COLLARD
I
n
2009-2010
I
published papers on
a number of different
topics,
including
the
transition to farming in
Europe (Weninger et al.,
2009; Collard et al., 2010a),
the early prehistory of
North America (Buchanan
et al., 2009, 2010; Collard
et al., 2010b), the processes
involved in the evolution of cultural diversity (Tehrani and
Collard, 2009a, 2009b; Tehrani et al., 2010), the existence
or otherwise of culture in chimpanzees (Lycett et al., 2009,
2010) and the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships
from cranial remains (Collard and Lycett, 2009; Elliott and
Collard, 2009).
I also gave an invited lecture at a conference on molecular
anthropology in Rome, Italy, and presented seminars at
McMaster University’s Origins Institute, SFU’s IRMACS
Centre, the Department of Anthropology, University of
Toronto, and the Department of Anthropology, University
of Washington.
32 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
In addition, I gave oral or poster presentations at the
Second Conference on Early Economic Developments,
and the annual meetings of the American Association
of Physical Anthropologists, the Canadian Association
for Physical Anthropology, and the Society for American
Archaeology.
Lastly, in 2009-2010 I was heavily involved in the
organization of academic events. In 2009, I was a member
of the five-person organizing committee of the Vancouver
Evolution Festival, which was held to celebrate the 150th
anniversary of the publication of Darwin’s On the Origin
of Species. I was also chair of the organizing committee of
the 2009 annual meeting of the Canadian Association for
Physical Anthropology meeting, which was held at SFU’s
Harbour Centre campus in October 2009.
In 2010, I co-chaired two Canadian Institute for
Advanced Research workshops on human-environment
interaction in the long term.
Catherine D’Andrea
Mezber excavation team, 2009
F
ield research in 2009-10 was undertaken in northern
Ethiopia by the Eastern Tigrai Archaeological Project
(ETAP).We are an international team with participants
from Canada (SFU, University of Toronto), Ethiopia (Addis
Ababa University, Mekelle University), USA (Washington
University St. Louis, University of Florida), and Italy
(University of Naples). Current SFU ETAP team members
include Shannon Wood, Pam Wadge, Stefanie Jones, and
Barbara Winter. We are examining the dynamics of early
state formation in northern Ethiopia, concentrating on the
pre-Aksumite period (ca. 800-400 BC). Our objectives are
to: examine the role of indigenous and exogenous cultural
elements in the development of pre-Aksumite polity or
polities of the early-mid first millennium BC; document
pre-Aksumite internal political and economic organisation;
and study ancient trade/exchange patterns through the
analysis of ceramic and obsidian artefacts.
In order to accomplish this set of goals, we are
completing regional surveys as well as excavation of two
archaeological sites in Eastern Tigrai: the rural village of
Mezber, and Sobea, which is a large town site with the
remains of elite groups visible in the form of large-scale
architecture. Excavation of these sites will provide data
from a cross-section of pre-Aksumite society. It will enable
us to test the idea that only elite groups were affected by
imported South Arabian cultural elements, and determine
the contribution of indigenous African elements to preAksumite cultural development. Excavations will provide a
framework for interpreting cultural and economic changes
through time through the study of ceramics, stone tools,
and preserved plant and animal remains. We are examining
issues of trading relationships and routes, as well as cultural
influences emanating from South Arabia through the study
of obsidian, ceramics, and other artefacts. In 2010, ETAP
embarked on a new direction, with the completion of a
study to assess the potential to develop archaeological
sites in our study area for tourism. The work will involve
the development of museum exhibits and treks/tours
which will be completed in partnership with local village
authorities, three levels of governmental agencies, various
NGOs, and university partners. We hope that these
initiatives will contribute to the development of a fledgling
tourism industry in Eastern Tigrai.
Pre-Aksumite architecture at Mezber
Faculty Research • 33
Jon Driver
I
am currently in my third year as Vice-President,
Academic of Simon Fraser University, and the demands
of this position leave me relatively little time for teaching,
although I have given some guest lectures in undergraduate
and graduate classes.
My current SSHRC grant (“Sustainability of Hunting”
$115,000) reflects a growing trend to integrate conservation
biology and zooarchaeological research. I am collaborating
with Dr. Karen Schollmeyer (Arizona State University) on
research that covers two general areas: (a) investigating
whether archaeological records of human impact on animal
populations can help conservation biologists understand
long-term human/environment relationships; (b) applying
models from conservation biology to investigate human/
environment relationships in the American Southwest.
We have completed a study of the prehistory of small
mammals as a dietary resource, presented a summary at
the Society for Ethnobiology annual meeting (2010), and
submitted a chapter to a book that is under review by
University of Arizona Press. Much of this work forms a
background for our current project. This is a very detailed
analysis of archaeological animal bone assemblages
dated with a high degree of accuracy from the northern
Southwest, with the intention of tracking short-term
changes in human/environment interactions over relatively
long time periods.
This project will take most of our time for the next year.
It will involve reanalysis of existing zooarchaeological data,
integration of information on excavations and dating, and
the development and testing of hypotheses derived from
ecological theory.
A smaller concurrent project is to investigate why there
is so much variation in the use of large game animals
in Southwestern pre-colonial villages. We described
preliminary results at the International Conference of
Archaeozoology (2010), and we have been asked to
present a more complete analysis at the Fryxell Symposium
(Society for American Archaeology annual meeting, 2011).
This work relates to the concept of “resource depression”
that has featured extensively in recent archaeological
literature; it also provides a case study for historical ecology,
demonstrating the importance of contingency in the
development of explanations of human behavior.
My recent publications reflect collaboration with former
M.A. student Tyr Fothergill and former Ph.D. students
Carmen Tarcan, Tiffany Rawlings and Shaw Badenhorst.
Brian Hayden
I
n 2009 and 2010, I completed a sabbatical year
of research and resumed teaching. I succeeded in
obtaining the largest SSHRC Standard Research Grant
awarded at SFU in 2010 for continuing research into the
origins and evolution of the large prehistoric winter village
at Keatley Creek. This research is being undertaken with
Suzanne Villeneuve.
I was invited to, and participated in, an international
symposium on feasting in Granada, Spain, and was invited to
give a series of lectures and public talks at the Universidad
Autonoma de Barcelona and Washington State University.
During this period my publications included a number
of important articles such as “Funeral Feasts: Why Are
They So Important?” (Cambridge Archaeological Journal);
“The Proof is in the Pudding: Feasting and the Origins of
Domestication” (Current Anthropology); “Sex, Symmetry,
and Silliness in the Bifacial World” (with S. Villeneuve in:
Antiquity); “Who Benefits?
34 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
The View from Futuna” (with S. Villeneuve) in: Pathways to
Power ); and “The Rise and Fall of Complex Large Villages
on the British Columbia Plateau” (with Rolf Mathewes:
Canadian Journal of Archaeology). A humorous article was
also published in The Debitage.
Articles accepted for publication, include an
ethnoarchaeological study on corporate groups in
Vietnam (Asian Perspectives), and a book chapter on the
domestication of rice. Several papers are under review
including an article on feasting for Annual Reviews of
Anthropology, and I am currently working on a book on
feasting and a chapter on Neanderthal social organization.
Ross Jamieson
M
y research in 2009-2010 continued our collaboration with the community of Sicalpa, Ecuador, in
researching the colonial period archaeology of
the Ecuadorian province of Chimborazo. Previous research
had been focused on urban excavations in the 16th-18th
century city of Riobamba, occupied by the Spanish, devastated by a massive earthquake in 1797, and subsequently
abandoned. Analysis continues on materials from these excavations, but at the same time, we are moving toward a
more landscape-centred vision of what was going on in the
colonial period outside of the city core.
In summer 2009 I was able to carry out archaeological
survey in the zone surrounding the city, with an interest
in the formation and material remains of rural agricultural
haciendas, the role of religious ritual in local relationships to
landscape, and long-term changes in landscape use in the
region. This field season also involved collaboration with
Laurie Beckwith, of Douglas College, on archaeological survey for ancient sites in the region, and thesis work by Guy
Duke on a local canal system, and Daniela Balanzategui on
ceramics from Riobamba.
Over this period I have also branched out into the supervision of a variety of graduate student theses on the
historical archaeology of other parts of the world, including
Alana Peter’s work on prostitution in the BC Interior, Doug
Ross’ work on Asian salmon-cannery workers in the Fraser
River, and Jennifer Jones’ research on convict tourism in
Tasmania.
Quinoa planted around a hacienda house ruin, Colta
A neighbourhood cross, Conogpugio, Colta, Ecuador
Efrain Cargua has a look at an old hacienda aquaduct
Faculty Research • 35
Dana lepofsky
Dana Lepofsky on ancient agricultural terrace in ‘Oponohu
Valley, Society Islands
s
ince 2008 I have been co-directing a collaborative
project with John Welch and members of Tla’amin
First Nation: The Tla’amin First Nation – Simon Fraser
University Archaeology and Heritage Stewardship Program.
My research is focused on documenting ancient intertidal
resource management practices using a combination of
local knowledge and archaeological evidence.
This research is an outgrowth of my on-going interest
in documenting resource management practices in the
archaeological and paleoecological records. It involves
several researchers from different disciplines and
institutions and incorporates the theses of several of my
graduate students. Our research has been supported by
John Welch’s Aboriginal SSHRC grant, two small grants
(Jacobs, SSHRC) and two National Geographic Research
Grants on which I am the Principal Investigator. A SSRHC
Research grant is pending.
36 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
This Fall, I was appointed as a lead researcher in the
newly created “Hakai Network for Coastal People,
Ecosystems and Management”. With significant funding
from the Tula Foundation (up to $8,000,000 over 8 years),
our multi-disciplinary team is working collaboratively with
First Nations partners and other collaborators on projects
that focus on the sustainability, resilience, and well being of
the people and ecosystems of British Columbia’s Central
Coast.
In my position as Hakai Professor, I am responsible for
pursuing the cultural and heritage components of the
larger initiative on coastal sustainability. My first project
involves coordinating a multi-disciplinary team researching
the cultural and ecological importance of herring on the
west coast broadly, and with a focus on Heiltsuk territory,
specifically. A SSHRC Partnership Grant and a SSHRC
Outreach Grant to support this project are pending.
I recently returned to working in the Society Islands,
where I conducted my PhD research. I joined forces with
Dr. Jenny Kahn (Bishop Museum), who is a leading expert in
Society Island archaeology. Jenny and I are now working on
these book manuscripts together. Our first paper together
is forthcoming in American Anthropologist.
Robert Muir
O
ver the last two years I have been involved in
a variety of projects, largely related to graduate
student research activities and my own course
preparations.
Notably, in 2009, Dr. Jon Driver and I were contacted
by Dr. Stephen Lekson and Brenda Kaye Todd (PhD
Candidate, University of Colorado), and asked to conduct
analyses of faunal remains from Chimney Rock Pueblo.
Chimney Rock is a one-thousand year old Ancient Pueblo
site in southwestern Colorado and is a designated National
Historic Monument. Under my direction the faunal analysis
was conducted by SFU undergraduate student, Brigit
Burbank; funding was provided through a SSHRC grant to
Dr. Driver.
Also in 2009, SFU graduate student Jon Sheppard and
I initiated a study of pithouse settlement patterns in the
mid-Fraser River region of southern British Columbia.
This research forms the basis of Jon Sheppard’s MA thesis,
preliminary results of which he presented in 2010 at the
annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology
(SAA 2010, St. Louis) and Northwest Anthropology
Conference (NWAC 2010, Ellensburg).
Jon and I also published an article in The Midden in the
fall of 2010 related to this research. Throughout 2010 I
have been working on two books related to my course
offerings. These include a photo reference for Arch
340: Zooarchaeology and a workbook for Arch 376:
Quantitative Methods. Both of these will be available in
the fall of 2011.
Zooarchaeology text, authored by Robert Muir
Faculty Research • 37
Community-based Heritage Workshop Participants outside the Chief Joe Mathias Community Centre, October 16, 2010
George Nicholas
S
ince 2008, I have directed an international research
initiative, “Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural
Heritage (IPinCH): Theory, Practice, Policy, Ethics,”
which addresses issues relating to the appropriation and
commodification of rock art, artifacts, and sites, as well as
data access and ownership — all of which are of increasing
concern to archaeologists, Indigenous peoples, and other
stakeholders.
This 7-year, $2.5 Million project brings together scholars,
communities, and organizations from eight countries in
this first-of-its-kind project to understand the nature
of conflicts over intellectual property, to develop good
practices, to theorize about the nature of the issues, and to
generate recommendations for better policies.
In fifteen case studies spanning the globe, the initiative’s
community-based approach engages communities in all
aspects of the research process—from development of
research topics and research design to conducting the
research, designing outputs, and disseminating results. Case
study research goals are prioritized to meet community
needs and to effect direct community benefits.
In November 2009, Inuvialuit elders and youth from the
Western Arctic flew to the Smithsonian Institution to view
ancestral artifacts collected 150 years ago by Hudson’s Bay
Company trader Roderick MacFarlane for a case study codeveloped by SFU Post-doctoral Fellow Natasha Lyons.
Natasha and Kate Hennessy, a former IPinCH Graduate
Student Associate and current faculty member of SFU’s
SIAT, are working together with partner organizations
Parks Canada, the Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre,
the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, and the
Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center to disseminate the
knowledge repatriated from the Smithsonian Institution
through community meetings, a Plain Language booklet,
a website, and development of school curricula in the
Western Arctic.
38 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
In October 2010, an IPinCH Community-based
Heritage Research Workshop on Squamish Nation
Territory was seamlessly organized by Project Manager
Kelly Fox. The workshop’s flexible agenda gave community
members, academics, and students the opportunity to
delve into the needs of communities and the researchers
working with them. Participating case study teams included
the Penobscot Nation of Maine, Anishinabe of Michigan,
Inuvialuit, Avataq Cultural Institute of Nunavik, Blood Tribe,
Stó:lo, Yukon First Nations Heritage Group, and Ainu of
Japan. Coast Salish artist lessLIE, designer of the IPinCH
logo Perpetuation, discussed his art, and more generally
the challenges around appropriation and commodification
of First Nations art.
In addition to case studies, the IPinCH research project
has two more key components, Working Groups focusing
on eight key topics, and our Knowledge Base, an online
archive and repository of scholarly and popular articles,
global case studies, research protocols and legislation, in
addition to research data, reports, and resources generated
during the IPinCH project. See the website for more
information on IPinCH: www.sfu.ca/ipinch
I am also continuing my research on the results of
survey and excavation of the early and middle Holoceneaged sites that were the focus of 12 field schools held on
the Kamloops Indian Reserve, and on the role of wetlands
on landscapes occupied by hunter-gatherer societies
worldwide, supervising students studying these areas.
Since 2005, I have been the co-editor of the World
Archaeological Congress Handbooks in Archaeology
series, which is designed to publish comprehensive reviews
of key topics in archaeology.
I also hold adjunct faculty positions in the Archaeology
Department at Flinders University in Australia, and
the Department of Anthropology at the University of
Massachusetts-Amherst.
Rudy Reimer
Mark Skinner
I
S
ince beginning my appointment at Simon Fraser
University in the Spring of 2009 in Archaeology and
First Nations Studies, I have started to implement
my Indigenous Perspective of Landscape into my ongoing
research along the Northwest Coast and within the
classroom.
Publications that focus on this topic include a chapter
in Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists (edited
by George Nicholas) and a co-authored paper in the
journal Heritage Management: Managing Heritage Within
Indigenous Communities.
Current and future research will draw upon intangible
aspects of cultural knowledge and tangible archaeological
data. I am constructing a number of projects that will link
lithic technology, rock art and XRF geochemistry with
Indigenous oral history and place names. These research
endeavors will be explored with the purchase of a portable
XRF instrument that I played a key role in obtaining for
the Archaeology Department and in the future, the
establishment of a functional geoarchaeology lab.
Other endeavors related to Archaeology here at
SFU that I have played a role in include the first public
repatriation of cultural materials from a private individual
to the Stó:lo First Nation and becoming the President of
the Archaeological Society of British Columbia. In this role,
I am establishing links between academics, consultants,
museums, First Nations communities and the public.
An example of this took place recently when current
and former SFU students played a prominent role in the
cataloging, photography, analysis and curation of Squamish
Nation and other Coast Salish First Nations cultural
materials at the Sunshine Coast Museum and Archives.
n 2009 I took a continuing education course in forensic
histology at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology
in Washington, D.C. I supervised the research of UBC
graduate student Lisa Dojack entitled: Invertebrate Fauna
of a Death Site. Another of my graduate students, Amy
Mundorff, completed her PhD entitled: Human Identification
in the World Trade Center Disaster: Assessing Identification
Processes of Highly Fragmented and Commingled Human
Remains. Amy is now in a tenure track position at the
University of Tennessee at Knoxville.
I also organized a symposium at the Canadian
Association for Physical Anthropology meeting, entitled:
Forensic Anthropology Symposium: Standards and Service. My
activities in 2010 included the development and teaching
of a new lab course, Introduction to Paleopathology. In
addition, I supervised Derek Congram, who completed his
PhD entitled: Predictive Modeling of Mass Burial Location of
Victims from the Spanish Civil War. Derek is now employed
as a forensic archaeologist with Central Identification Lab
Hawaii for the US Army.
Faculty Research • 39
John Welch
O
ver the last two years I have been involved in
a variety of projects, largely related to graduate
student research activities and my own course
preparations..
Research questions centre on, What good can
archaeology do?
How shall archaeological sites,
perspectives and data be employed in land and place
histories, in revitalizing customary stewardship, and in
intercultural reconciliation? Another focal question—What
conditions promote Indigenous control over heritage and
destiny?—reflects my persistent interests in ethical and
policy issues and in government-to-government relations.
Working on the basis of community advice and consent,
I have in 2009 and 2010 led teaching, stewardship, museum
and economic development initiatives, including:
•
Launched a three-year field school, funded by the
National Science Foundation Research Experience
for Undergraduates program, dedicated to the
community-based production of an Ndee (Western
Apache) cultural and historical atlas.
•
Worked with Prof. Lepofsky and others to expand
the Tla’amin–SFU field school in archaeology and
heritage stewardship through consultations, site
tours, workshops and other community events that
have engaged over 600 children and adults.
•
Worked with Tanja Hoffmann, doctoral candidate
in the SFU School of Resource and Environmental
Management, to develop with Katzie First Nation
an Indigenous social and environmental impact
assessment model based on Katzie experience with
bridge construction in their Fraser Valley homeland.
40 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
•
Developed in conjunction with the Stó:lo Research
and Resource Management Centre a project to
integrate and “virtually repatriate” the diverse
artifacts, documentary records, and knowledge
linked to the Scowlitz site near the mouth of the
Harrison River.
•
Unveiled the first database of unauthorized heritage
site alterations and invited archaeologists across BC
to submit cases and assist in planning to use these
data to curb undocumented site losses.
Consultation at Kleh Kwa Num: (from left) Randy Timothy,
Terry Clark, Michelle Washington, and Laura Walz
The overarching goal of these efforts is to harmonize
local community, academic and public policy interests in
the respectful use and protection of landscapes, cultural
items and intangible associations that provide people with
orientation, identity and vitality, as well as food and shelter.
Dongya yang
Members of the Yang Lab group
T
he main research interests of the Yang lab can
be split into two core areas: ancient DNA-based
archaeology and ancient DNA-based forensics.
These two subfields share the same methodology, which
is to use dedicated laboratories to recover and analyze
trace amounts of DNA from archaeological human, animal
and plant remains and degraded forensic materials. Both
subfields are also highly dependent upon an interdisciplinary
approach to interpret DNA results to exclude potential
impacts of contamination and to enhance the analytical
power of DNA evidence.
Completed and on-going major ancient DNA-based
archaeology projects include: 1) ancient DNA investigation
of the origin and history of domesticated animals such
as water buffalo, cattle, sheep and horse in ancient China
(in collaboration with Drs. Liu, Chen, Yuan, Zhao, Zhou
and others); 2) ancient DNA research of prehistoric
salmon fishery and whale hunting on the NW Coast (in
collaboration with Drs. Cannon, Butler, and McMillan); 3)
ancient DNA study of turkey domestication in SW US
(Speller’s Ph.D. thesis project, in collaboration with Drs.
Kemp and Driver); 4) ancient DNA analysis of herring
genetic diversity (in collaboration with Drs. Lepofsky,
Speller, Lorenz, Cannon, Moss and others); and 5) ancient
DNA analysis of Baikal faunal remains (in collaboration
with Drs. Losey and Weber).
In 2009-2010, two graduate students successfully
defended their theses and completed their degree studies:
Camilla Speller was awarded the Governor General’s
Gold Medal for her Ph.D. research and Krista McGrath
was awarded an MA. Dr. Speller subsequently worked as a
postdoctoral fellow in the lab (Nov 2009-May 2010) and
has continued on as a research associate. Two on-going
Ph.D. students, Ursula Arndt and Grace Zhang, started
to concentrate on their data analysis and thesis-writing,
while three new graduate students, Jason Moore (2009),
Antonia Rodrigues (2010) and Melissa Roth (2010) joined
the lab. During this time, five undergraduate students
conducted DNA-based honours thesis research under my
supervision through the SFU’s archaeology (C. Armstrong),
biological sciences (A. Rodrigues and M. Tinney), molecular
biology and biochemistry (J. Mead) programs, as well as
SFU’s university exchange program (K. Stagg of Uppsala
University).
In 2009-2010, the Yang lab also hosted two visiting
scholars from China: Dr. Q. Zhang as a visiting faculty
member from Jilin University and D. Wang as a visiting
graduate student from Shandong University.
FAculty Research • 41
Eldon Yellowhorn
I
n the summer of 2009, I completed the initial phase of
my historic archaeology project with the Piikani First
Nation. Currently the graduate students who worked
with me are preparing their theses for defence.
In 2009 I was elected president of the Canadian
Archeological Association, and I began in my official role in
April 2010 at the annual meeting in Calgary, Alberta.
In September 2010, after completing my first sabbatical,
I returned to teaching and took on the role of Director for
the First Nations Studies Program.
During my study leave I became active with the Truth
and Reconciliation Commission on Residential Schools
in Canada, which is currently holding public hearings. My
archaeological background proved to be a good match for
the Missing Children Project as much of the research on
this topic involves archival data and cemeteries.
Excavating at the Royal Jubilee School site, Piikiani First Nation. From left: Eldon Yellowhorn, Kristina Hannis,
and Simon Solomon.
42 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Post-Doctoral Research
&
Sessional Instructor Profiles
Ana Maria Boza-Arlotti
sessional instructor
I
In 2009 I began my work with the British Columbia
Coroners Service as a forensic anthropologist
consultant working from the Centre of Forensic
Research located at Simon Fraser University. As such I
had the responsibility to apply my skills in forensics and
osteology on the analysis of skeletonized human remains.
Many are the proveniences of these remains, but the most
common reason why they require a forensic anthropologist
is to assist in their identification and to support the forensic
pathologist in finding cause and manner of death if possible.
As a forensic anthropologist consultant for the British
Columbia Coroners Service I have to develop biological
profiles were I assess, among other things: age, sex, bio
affinity, stature, pre-existing pathological conditions, trauma
and its timing in the individual’s life. Another area of my
work as a forensic anthropology consultant is to assess
the skeletal remains as relevant to forensic interest or as
part of the archaeological repertoire. The identification
of human remains vs. other vertebrate species is also an
important part of my every day work.
My training as an archaeologist has allowed me to help
the police in surface collection and/or exhumation of
skeletal remains from clandestine and some times legal
interments. The careful and scientific collection of evidence
is vital for a successful forensic case. Here is where my
skills as a physical anthropologist and an archaeologist are
applied in a very successful symbiosis of sciences.
In 2010 I taught my first course as a sessional instructor
at SFU. The course I taught was Forensic Anthropology.
I was able to teach (and present) my students with
many of the cases I have been involved here in Canada
and internationally. For many years I worked as a senior
forensic anthropologist and archaeologist in Bosnia and
Kosovo. My work involved the exhumation, analysis;
identification of the unidentified remains exhumed from
mass graves and interviewing the families in the final step
of the identification process where all the ante mortem
information was compared to the post mortem data with
the help of the family members.
I have also been a sessional instructor at Kwantlen
Polytechnic University where I taught a special topic course
on Mass Graves through history. In this course I was able to
analyze mass graves pertaining to different time periods in
history and interpret the evidence in order to understand
the meaning of the skeletal remains found in these mass
graves. As part of the course we studied the skills and
methods required for the analysis of skeletal remains and
the interpretation of the evidence found associated with
those remains.
Osteology students learning how to identify human
skeletal remains
Post-Doctoral Research & Sessional Instructor Profiles • 43
Briggs Buchanan
post-doctoral fellow
I
n 2009 I finished my postdoctoral fellowship with
SSHRC under the supervision of Mark Collard and
in 2010 I began a postdoctoral fellowship under the
combined supervision of Mark Collard and Michael J.
O’Brien (University of Missouri). During this time we
continued our efforts to address key questions regarding
Paleoindian origins and adaptations in North America.
In several studies we employed radiocarbon dates
to refute the predictions of the recently proposed
extraterrestrial impact hypothesis.The ET impact is claimed
to have caused a continent-wide environmental collapse,
which in turn resulted in the extinction of the megafauna,
and severe population decline among the Paleoindians. In
2010 I received the George C. Frison Institute Paleoindian
Grant to travel to the University of Wyoming and
document Folsom lithic assemblages from the Northern
Plains.This research was used to further test the ET impact
hypothesis and will also be used to investigate Folsom
cultural transmission of projectile point manufacturing.
In addition to this work, my colleague Marcus Hamilton
(University of New Mexico and the Santa Fe Institute)
and I published studies that examined Clovis cultural
transmission and adaptation as well as modeled the
Paleolithic population expansion across Eurasia and
Beringia. The results of the latter study supported a late
terrestrial colonization of the Americas.
In other research Mark Collard and I continued to
conduct research that draws upon the dual-inheritance or
gene-culture co-evolution approach to the evolutionary
analysis of human behavior using the ethnohistoric record.
We have pursued two primary avenues of research with
regard to this approach. The first investigates the factors
involved in the production of cultural diversity using the
comprehensive Western Indians cultural-trait database.
The second investigates the evolution of hunter-gatherer
toolkits using Oswalt’s classification scheme to quantify
toolkits recorded in contact era ethnographies. The goal
of both of these projects is to use ethnohistoric data to
better understand evolutionary processes that affect
material culture in the archaeological record.
Shannon Wood mapping a site in Ethiopia
44 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Alvaro Higueras
sessional instructor
Natasha Lyons
post-doctoral fellow
I
M
started as a sessional instructor at SFU after more
than a decade of archaeological and cultural heritage
experience in Eritrea, Italy, Andean South America and
the Balkans, and experience as a United Nations consultant
in cultural heritage in Kosovo. I am currently exploring
cultural heritage rights in Peru, where historical and cultural
factors have created status differences between Indigenous
highland groups and those in the Amazon forest.
In Spring 2010 I taught a course in the department on
Cultural Heritage in Latin America. This was a course that
presented to a broad set of students in the humanities
the issues relating to the preservation and management
of artifacts, traditions and monuments pertaining to the
heritage of a region, nation or peoples. While the course
was mostly focused on the Latin American experience, the
examples and tenets presented made reference to worldwide cases, so that the students would perceive the global
reach of the strategies on managing the remains of the past.
The course was informed by my experiences in Bosnia,
Kosovo, and Italy, with examples of various cultural heritage
issues. This course expanded substantially on previous
short courses I have presented, underlining the usefulness
of the issues of heritage in academic programs such as
archaeology, history, and anthropology. The Department of
Archaeology at SFU shows certainly an excellent example
of this trend, as the very important working forum of
IPinCH leads a line of thought and research not common
in academic settings. The teaching of this course, combined
with the teaching of introduction to prehistory, is leading
me to the conception of a textbook that combines both
issues, prehistory and heritage so to provide a more
current, purposeful, and dynamic learning experience for
undergraduate students as they explore the past and its
material remains, as they were laid in the past and as they
survive today.
Mortuary temple of Ramesses III, Medinet Habu, Egypt
y post-doctoral research has focused on
examining theoretical and methodological
approaches to community-based research, and
developing these approaches through my participation in a
number of community-defined heritage research projects.
These projects include the Inuvialuit Smithsonian Project,
funded by IPinCH, the Museums Assistance Program,
and the International Polar Year; the Scowlitz Reciprocal
Research Network Project, supported by SSHRC and
Stó:lo Research and Resource Management Centre, and;
Katzie Development Corporation’s investigations and
analysis of DhRp-52, in Pitt Meadows, BC.
Each of these projects seeks to build capacity for
heritage research in respective communities, at the same
time as cultivating positive, equitable, and high-functioning
working relationships among partners.
The Inuvialuit and Stó:lo projects are specifically focussed
on issues related to intellectual property, knowledge
repatriation, and the development of useful digital tools.
My primary task for the DhRp-52 analysis has been to
train community members to collect, quantify, interpret
and report on the palaeoethnobotanical remains from this
remarkable Charles period site, which has yielded evidence
of wapato cultivation. Many of these results have been
presented and published in collaboration with respective
project teams.
I have recently presented papers at meetings of the
World Archaeological Congress, Society for American
Archaeology, and Canadian Archaeological Association. I
have recently published single-authored papers in Arctic
Anthropology, Alaska Journal of Anthropology, and Inuit
Studies, and multi-authored papers in Canadian Journal of
Archaeology, Wisconsin International Law Journal, and Journal
of Social Archaeology.
Ross Jamieson preparing to excavate in Ecuador
Post-Doctoral Research & Sessional Instructor Profiles • 45
David Maxwell
sessional instructor
Deborah C. Merrett
adjunct faculty
S
D
avid Maxwell started his academic career as a
student at SFU, receiving BA and MA degrees
in archaeology. He completed his doctorate
in anthropology at the University of Arizona, studying
things as diverse as ancient Maya ritual behaviours (his
dissertation), paleoanthropology, the analysis of animal
bones from archaeological sites, and even historic artifacts
like beer cans. Since graduate school he has worked as
an instructor in Arizona and in BC, and as a professional
consulting archaeologist. He has conducted field work or
analysed materials from field projects throughout western
North America, including sites in British Columbia, Oregon,
California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Guatemala. Dr.
Maxwell taught ARCH 340, Zooarchaeology, in the spring
semester of 2010.
46 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
ince joining the
Department of
Archaeology in
May 2010 as adjunct
faculty, I have analysed
human skeletal remains
from forensic contexts,
in Manitoba where
most of my forensic
experience has been
gained, and also in
Yukon. During this time my lab space has been set up for
bone macro- and microphotography and for preparation
of bone and tooth sectioning.
I presented a department seminar in September and
a microscopy lab for ARCH 442 Forensic Anthropology
which have increased student awareness of facilities available
for research within the department. Tooth microstructure
analysis has provided infant age for remains from a Syrian
site for Dr. Peter Akkermans, Leiden University and from
an Antiguan site for Dr. Tamara Varney, Lakehead University.
Final revisions of a research paper, in collaboration with
Dr. Chris Meiklejohn, University of Winnipeg, have been
submitted for publication in a refereed volume stemming
from the conference Climate and Ancient Societies,
Copenhagen 2009. A book tentatively titled People of the
Treasure Mound. Ganj Dareh: Final Site Report is in the
planning stage.
Encouraging student awareness of photography in
analysis of human skeletal remains was in progress in Spring
2010, before my official arrival. Comparative reference
photos of human infant femora were taken for an SFU
undergraduate project for ARCH 452 Palaeopathology
offered Spring 2010.
My introduction to human skeletal remains from British
Columbia and BC archaeology has begun with analysis of
remains from the Pavilion Site in central BC.
Douglas Ross
post-doctoral fellow/sessional instructor
I
defended my Ph.D. in Archaeology at SFU in December
2008 and graduated in June of 2009. Since then I have
been teaching courses at SFU and UBC on a sessional
basis and preparing papers based on my dissertation for
publication. I have articles published, in press, or under
review in the Journal of Social Archaeology, Historical
Archaeology, Technical Briefs in Historical Archaeology,
Ceramics in America, and the Journal of Anthropological
Archaeology, along with a chapter in a forthcoming volume
on historical archaeology in the American West edited by
Margaret Purser and Mark Warner.
I am currently involved as co-director in a new research
project at the site of Kooskia, a World War II Japanese
internment camp in northern Idaho, in collaboration with
Dr. Stacey Camp at the University of Idaho. The site was
occupied between 1943 and 1945 by over 200 Japanese
immigrant men, who were voluntarily transferred to the
site in exchange for paid work on a road construction
crew. We completed our first field season in the summer
of 2010 as a UI undergraduate field school, for which I
served as the principal instructor.
Our goals are to explore relationships between
institutional confinement and the construction and
expression of Japanese masculine identities among the
internees. Although our initial field season was brief, we
have already relocated intact remains of one of the camp
buildings, as well as the principal dump adjacent to the
site’s only surviving structure – the incinerator. Artifacts
recovered so far include a range of domestic items like
ceramic tablewares and glass bottles, plus more unique
items like denture molds and broken fragments of internee
art made of pebbles and cement.
Doug Ross, (centre, front) with students in the field
In the fall of 2010 I was awarded a one-year WennerGren Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship to transform my
Ph.D. dissertation into a book, which I will complete as
a postdoctoral fellow in Archaeology at SFU between
January and December 2011. The focus of this book will
be an exploration and comparison of patterns of cultural
transformation and everyday consumer practices of
Chinese and Japanese immigrants at an early twentieth
century Fraser River salmon cannery, from a theoretical
perspective rooted in transnationalism and diaspora. Since
September 2010, I have also served as book reviews
editor for the Archaeological Society of British Columbia’s
quarterly publication, The Midden.
Post-Doctoral Research & Sessional Instructor Profiles • 47
Dennis sandgathe
sessional instructor
Camilla Speller
post-doctoral fellow
n 2009-2010 I supervised each offering of the online
version of the Human Origins course (Arch 131) that
I developed in 2008. I also regularly taught the in-class
version of Human Origins
I continued excavating at several Palaeolithic cave
sites in SW France (Pech de l’Azé IV, Roc de Marsal, and
La Ferrassie) in collaboration with H. Dibble (UPenn),
P. Goldberg (Boston U), S. McPherron (Max Planck
Institute) and A. Turq (Musée National de Préhistoire,
France). I also continued work with H. Dibble at Grotte
des Contrebandiers in Morocco. Over 2009 and 2010 I
participated in the following conferences:
• De Combe Grenal à Pech de l’Aze IV : l’évolution des
méthodes de fouilles de François Bordes. J. P. McPherron,
first author. Presented at a Congress in Honour of
François Bordes in Bordeaux, France.
• New Evidence on Neandertal Use of Fire: Examples
from Roc de Marsal and Pech IV, France. Presented by P.
Goldberg at Quaternary International conference ‘The
Neandertal Home: Spatial and Social Behaviors’ held at
Tarragona, Spain, October 2009.
• Symposium: Results of New Excavations at the Middle
Palaeolithic Site of Roc de Marsal, France. 2010 Society
for American Archaeologists meeting in St. Louis. This
included 6 papers presented by my colleagues and me.
M
I
.
48 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
y research interests focus on the use of ancient
DNA techniques to study past human behaviour
and its relationship to the natural environment.
My postdoctoral research is currently focused on two
major research areas: animal domestication and ‘Molecular
Environmental Archaeology’.
Working with Dr. Dongya Yang at the Ancient DNA
laboratory in the Department of Archaeology, my main
postdoctoral research at SFU is investigating the origin
and history of domestic sheep in China (funded through
the Henry Luce Foundation/American Council of Learned
Societies).
This research is part of an extensive, long-term project
examining the origin and spread of major domesticated
species in China, and is being conducted in collaboration
with researchers from the Institute of Archaeology, Chinese
Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing. I am also continuing
my ancient DNA research on the origins and processes
of North American turkey domestication (funded through
SSHRC).
In addition to animal domestication, I am also interested
in the application of ancient DNA techniques to
environmental issues and human-environment interaction.
As part of a larger multi-disciplinary project, I have also
been working with Dana Lepofsky and Dongya Yang to
examine the past biodiversity of herring stocks on the
Northwest Coast of North America. My portion of the
project involves the DNA analysis of archaeological herring
remains along the coast to reconstruct the ancient genetic
diversity of this species prior to industrial over-fishing in
the last century.
Over the last years, I have also had an opportunity to
work on both human and wildlife forensic cases in the DNA
laboratory at SFU’s Centre for Forensic Research. I have
been involved in three now-resolved ‘cold cases’ involving
the personal identification of forensic human remains, as
well as a number of projects involving the development of
new species identification techniques for wildlife forensic
applications.
Sarah Walshaw
post-doctoral fellow/instructor
Also in 2009, SFU graduate student Jon Sheppard and
I initiated a study of pithouse settlement patterns in the
mid-Fraser River region of southern British Columbia. This
research forms the basis of Jon Sheppard’s MA thesis, the
preliminary results of which he presented in 2010 at the
annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology
(SAA 2010, St. Louis) and Northwest Anthropology
Conference (NWAC 2010, Ellensburg).
In 2010 I presented a paper with Dominic Pistor at
the 20th Biennial meeting of the Society for Africanist
Archaeologists, Dakar, Senegal entitled Plant Remains from
Songo Mnara. In addition, I presented a poster at the 12th
International Congress of Ethnobiology, Tofino, BC. entitled
Traditional crop processing and sustainable storage on Pemba
Island, Tanzania.
Sarah Walshaw in Bagamoyo, Tanzania
I
n 2009 I used the remainder of my Wenner-Gren and
SSHRC post-doctoral funds to hire laboratory and field
research assistants. This helped finish the laboratory
portion of the post-doctoral study and provided key data
for forthcoming projects. MA (Archaeology) student
Mairi Capper assisted with the sorting, identifying, and
weighing of botanical residues collected from my 2007
ethnoarchaeological field season. These results were then
presented at the International Congress of Ethnobiology
(see below). MA (History) Student Dominic Pistor
accompanied the Songo Mnara, Tz field school (Rice
University; PIs Jeff Fleisher and Stephanie Wynne-Jones)
and collected flotation samples as a pilot study for a
subsequent NSF/Leverhulme grant application. My postdoctoral fellowship officially closed in February of 2010,
with all paperwork completed.
In the fall of 2010 I was hired by SFU as a senior instructor
with teaching duties shared between the Departments of
History and Archaeology. The Department of Archaeology
kindly supplied me with a work-study student, who
helped sort the flotation samples from Songo Mnara.
This permitted me to present the preliminary findings
from Songo Mnara at the joint meeting of the Society for
Africanist Archaeologists/PANAF. Large-scale excavations
at Songo Mnara are expected to proceed between June
03 – July 17, 2011.
Student Amanda Logan conducting ethnoarchaeological
interviews on traditional food processing in Sudan
Post-Doctoral Research & Sessional Instructor Profiles • 49
Archaeology Laboratories Report
T
he Archaeology Laboratories support laboratory
classes, field and research projects; acquire and
maintain laboratory and field equipment; act
as local network administrators; maintain department
laboratories; and curate the department’s teaching and
research collections. Currently the Laboratories are staffed
by Shannon Wood, Manager, and Peter Locher, Technician.
Peter was hired in 2008 when Heather Robertson, who
had worked in the Laboratories in many and varied
capacities since 2000, moved on to a new position at UBC.
In 2007 laboratory space in Saywell Hall was completed.
The Archaeobotany, Chemistry and Zooarchaeology
Laboratories were moved and set up in their new
locations. New Processing, Flotation, and Geoarchaeology
Laboratories were also set up and equipped, as was a 14seat Instructional Computer Laboratory.
Teaching collections for many of the department’s
laboratory courses were moved to the new Collections
Room adjoining the new Material Culture Teaching
Laboratory. The x-ray machine, which had become
stationary in EDB 8609, was re-wired for renewed
portability to allow for its use in both EDB 8609 and the
new Radiography Laboratory in the Centre for Forensic
Research. The x-ray film dark room continues to be
maintained and used on an ongoing basis.
The shifting of laboratories to Saywell Hall allowed for
the creation of an Equipment Room and a new Historical
Archaeology Laboratory in the Education Building. Smaller
projects during this time involved setting up laboratory and
office spaces for new faculty/researchers.
Security upgrades during this period include the
installation of Abloy deadbolts on all doors on the 9000
level of the Education Building. The new teaching rooms
in Saywell Hall are also equipped with Honeywell intrusion
alarm systems.
In the last three years, the Archaeology Laboratories
have supported 42 laboratory classes, five field schools and
27 field and laboratory projects led by faculty, graduate and
undergraduate students and visiting researchers. Seventeen
work-study students have been employed for a variety of
projects involving the analysis and/or curation of research
and teaching collections. The lithic source, lithic teaching,
50 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
map collection, historic archaeology, palaeoethnobotany,
zooarchaeology, paleoanthropology and forensic osteology
collections have been ground-truthed against databases
and, when necessary, reorganized.
The reposited archaeology collections stored in Strand
Hall and the hallways on the 8000 level of the Department
have also been re-inventoried and reorganized. Field
equipment, large and small, was sorted and either discarded
or properly stored in the new Equipment Room. In 2008,
Arch Press became a self-sufficient unit. As a result,
laboratory staff transferred inventory responsibilities and
set up a new storage room for the stock.
In 2008, laboratory staff assisted in the disposition of
Phil Hobler’s notes and collections. In 2009, collections
excavated from Barkerville were transferred back to
Barkerville Historic Town. Also in 2009, the Ewen Cannery
collection was organized and prepared for long-term
storage. In 2010, the Mt. Edziza and Tahltan collections
were re-inventoried and transferred to the Royal British
Columbia Museum. The Archaeology Laboratories are
also involved in three repatriations: Namu, Bliss Landing
and Dionisio Point.
In 2007, the department’s webpage content provider
moved to SmartTemplates, to better conform to universitywide ‘look and feel’ standards. In 2008-2009 staff oversaw
the transition from fixed ip ethernet connections to dhcp
and helped facilitate the move of the university email system
to SFU Connect. The new teaching areas in Saywell Hall:
the Seminar Room; Material Culture Teaching Laboratory;
and the Instructional Computing Laboratory, as well as the
Physical Anthropology Teaching Laboratory, were all fitted
with audio-visual systems now maintained by laboratory
staff. Computers in the Instructional Computing Laboratory
are frequently updated, have specific programs installed for
different users and, in 2010, were moved from the FASS
server to Active Directory. Staff have also developed and
implemented a reliable backup system for office staff. Staff
continue to attend the regular meetings of the universitywide Local Area Network (LAN) administrator group.
Continued on page 51
Continued from page 50
Equipment renewals include the purchase of a
polarizing microscope, an oven/incubator, a muffle furnace,
a photo microscopy system for the Leica microscope, a
total station, a Geiger counter, a freezer and the ongoing
replenishment of general field school and small laboratory
equipment. In 2008, the university deemed all 15-seat
vans unsafe and the 2002 GMC Savana was auctioned
off. Equipment purchasing for the Tier I Chair in Cultural
Resource Management, begun in 2006, was completed in
2009. Equipment is serviced on an annual or biennial basis.
A number of policies have been written or revised,
including policies for the Teaching Computer Laboratory,
Vehicles and Radiation Safety. The door signage system,
indicating the chemical hazards present in departmental
laboratories, was implemented in 2007 and chemical
inventories and updated MSDS sheets for the laboratories
are revised annually. A more regular use of the chemical
disposal system has ensued. Other safety policies and
procedures include a general laboratory safety policy, and
protocols for defleshing birds and combing through fecal
material.The purchase of the landing craft the Archaeonaut
in 2009 necessitated a safety inspection and certification
and the creation of boat-specific safety policies and
operating procedures.
The Archaeology Laboratories loaned materials to the
Vancouver Police Museum to aid in a presentation of forensic
methods and to the BCAPA, for human/faunal workshops
held by Brian Pegg and Sara Yoshida, both faculty members
in the Anthropology Department at Kwantlen Polytechnic
University. The Archaeology Laboratories participate in
semesterly radiation training sessions by giving a brief tour
of the radiography laboratory, outlining safety policy and
procedures. In 2009, the laboratory staff took part in the
Science Alive program. Laboratory tours are also given for
university courses, ESL students and other visitors. Staff
also attend safety, transport of dangerous goods and first
aid courses and act as fire wardens for the southeast wing
of the Education building.
Shannon Wood
Lab Manager
Peter Locher
Lab Technician
Preparing an ethafoam block to hold a zoological specimen
Laboratories Report • 51
Museum of Archaeology
and Ethnography
In 2010 the permanent exhibits were completely
refurbished. Chris Springer and Rudy Reimer’s
exhibit, Continuity and Change; Transformations in BC
Archaeology, focuses on transforming the landscape,
transforming the world materially and spiritually,
and transformations in the practice of archaeology
over the past 40 years. It was opened as part of the
Department’s 40th Anniversary celebration.
O
ur Department’s complement of outstanding
research, training and outreach facilities
includes the SFU Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology. The Museum plays essential outreach, research,
and training roles at SFU and serves as the repository
for diverse collections, with substantial concentrations of
materials from Latin America, North America’s Northwest
Coast, and the Pacific Rim more generally.
The Museum has attracted significant support from the
Virtual Museums of Canada and Canadian Culture Online
to build award-winning web-based galleries for public
outreach and education. In 2009 the Museum completed
and launched A Journey into Time Immemorial, a web
recreation of a Stó:lo village. The project was done in
collaboration with the Xay:tem Interpretive Longhouse in
Mission BC and was well received, with over a million hits
during the first three months after the launch.The site won
the prestigious Grand Prix from FIAMP/AVICOM. In 2010
the Museum was successful in two funding applications,
receiving over $344,000 to create a multidisciplinary
interactive website on forensic science in conjunction with
the Centre for Forensic Research, and $25,000 to assist the
SFU Library in creating a web site on the Komagata Maru
52 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
incident. The forensics site will be launched in May 2011 at
www.sfu.museum/forensics. Both projects have contributed
to strong community partnerships for the museum.
The museum received donations totalling over $800,000
in 2009 and over $100,000 in 2010. 2009 central donation
was Constellation of Frogs a massive cedar carving done
by Haida artist Jim Hart, now installed in the atrium at
the front entrance to the museum. With construction
of the atrium space completed, the museum now has a
striking new entrance, with a carved cedar surround and
glass etched in a design borrowed from a basket in the
collection. The most important in 2010 was a donation of
over 15,000 35 mm slides from Dr. Basil Cooke. The topics
covered by these images are mostly to do with Hominin
evolution in Africa, and cover a period from the 1940s to
2000. These images are in the process of being inventoried,
catalogued and digitized for use in the classroom and on
the web site.
Barbara Winter
Museum Curator
Centre for Forensic Research
T
he Centre for Forensic Research (CFR) is an
interdisciplinary research programme at SFU that
was formed in 2007 with a mandate to create
new knowledge in the forensic sciences for the purposes
of solving crimes, identifying human remains, determining
elapsed time since death and in investigating circumstances
of death on local and global scales. The Centre serves the
research and day-to-day needs of law enforcement and
death investigation agencies nationally and provincially. The
Centre is housed in the north wing of the Saywell Hall
Building with the state-of-the-art laboratories, providing an
excellent environment for research and graduate student
training.
The Centre is currently composed of five core faculty
members: Dr. Mark Skinner and Dr. Dongya Yang from the
Department of Archaeology, Dr. Gail Anderson and Dr.
Lynne Bell from the School of Criminology, and Dr. Rolf
Mathewes from the Department of Biological Sciences.
Andrew Barton currently serves as the operations
manager of the Centre. This report focuses on activities by
Drs. Skinner and Yang who specialize in methods in physical
anthropology and DNA research.
The Centre has provided forensic anthropology,
forensic archaeology and forensic DNA services to both
BC Coroner’s Service and the RCMP. Dr. Skinner, research
associate Dr. Ana Boza-Arlotti and senior graduate
students have been involved with the recovery and
osteological analysis of human remains relating to homicide
and missing persons for over 30 cases in 2009-2010. Dr.
Yang and research associate Dr. Speller were involved in
individual identifications of four cold cases using ancient
DNA methods.
Research programmes in forensic anthropology and
forensic archaeology have been diverse and have included
predictive modeling of mass burial location of victims from
the Spanish Civil War, assessment of identification processes
of highly fragmented and commingled human remains
from the World Trade Center Disaster, anthropological
and radiographic comparison of ante-mortem surgical
records for identification of skeletal remains, and an
analysis of the taxonomic diversity of farm animal bone
from the Dominion Farm Collection. With Dr. Skinner’s
retirement planned for 2011, the Department appointed
Dr. Ana Maria Boza-Arlotti and Dr. Deborah Merrett as
adjunct faculty members to sustain the Centre’s forensic
anthropology and paleopathology studies.
Forensic DNA research in the Centre has used animals
as proxies in controlled experiments to study molecular
taphonomy and DNA degradation. Dr. Yang’s group is
focused on DNA identification of human skeletal remains,
animal and plant materials for forensic and wildlife
investigations with on-going and completed DNA projects
to develop optimal techniques for the recovery of DNA
from avian feather barbs, dry corals, and soils.
The CFR has started to develop a wildlife forensics
programme in collaboration with WWF Canada
and TRAFFIC. The programme aims to incorporate
morphology-based and DNA-based methods for species
identification of endangered and threatened species from
modified and processed animal and plant materials to stop
illegal trading of protected species. The programme will
draw on the expertise of Archaeology Department faculty
that specialize in zooarchaeology and archaeobotany and
the Department’s zooarchaeology and archaeobotany
comparative collections
The Centre has provided opportunities for graduate
and undergraduate students to get involved in forensic
research. Students that have been involved in physical
anthropology based forensic research with Dr. Skinner
include Derek Congram (Ph.D. student), Amy Mundorff
(Ph.D. student), and Audrey Scott (Ph.D. student). Students
that have been involved in DNA-based forensic research
with Dr. Yang include Camilla Speller (Ph.D. student and
then postdoctoral fellow), Ursula Arndt (Ph.D. student),
Grace Zhang (Ph.D. student), Krista McGrath (M.A.
student), Jason Moore (M.A. student), Antonia Rodrigues
(B.Sc. and M.A. student), Melissa Roth (M.A. student) and
Jen Mead (BSc student).
Centre for Forensic Research • 53
Research Grants
Burley, D.
2010-2011 Ha’apai Island Petroglyph Survey, Kingdom
of Tonga. Simon Fraser University/Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council of Canada Small Project
Grant ($4,735)
2009 - 2012 Polynesian origins and the pre-Polynesian
homeland. Social Sciences and Humanities Research
Council of Canada Standard Research Grant
($110, 000).
2008 - 2009 Archaeology at Sevilla Nueva; the First Spanish
Capital of Jamaica. National Geographic Research and
Scientific Committee ($22,180).
Collard, M.
2010 The Emerging Science of Culture. Interdisciplinary
Initiatives Grant, Green College, University of British
Columbia, Canada. To support a seminar series during
the 2010-2011 academic year. ($10, 000)
D’Andrea, A.C.
2010 Publication of Proceedings of the 6th International
Conference for African Archaeobotany. Simon Fraser
University/University Publications Fund Single Event
Publication ($2000).
2010 Archaeological Research in Northern Ethiopia.
VP Research Social Sciences and Humanities Research
Council of Canada 4A Grant ($9992).
2010 Studies of Ancient Cattle DNA at Mezber, Northern
Ethiopia. Simon Fraser University University/Social
Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
Small Grant ($6950).
2007-2010 Early State Development in Northern Ethiopia.
Principal Investigator, Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council of Canada Standard Research Grant
No. 410-2007-2472 ($183,000).
2007-2010 Tel Tayinat Archaeological Project, Turkey.
Collaborator (Palaeoethnobotanist).
T. Harrison, University of Toronto, Principal Investigator.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of
Canada, Standard Research Grant.
Hayden, B.
2010 Continuing research into the origins and evolution
of the large prehistoric winter village at Keatley Creek.
Principal Investigator with Suzanne Villeneuve. Simon
Fraser University/Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council of Canada Standard Research Grant
($199, 892).
54• SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Jamieson, R. W.
2009 Colonial Landscapes of Sicalpa, Ecuador. Principal
Investigator. Simon Fraser University/Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council of Canada Institutional
Small Grant ($6066).
Lepofsky, D.
2010-2018 Creation of Hakai Research Network. Tula
Foundation Major Funding ($8,000,000) for the
Network as a whole.
2009-2010 Documenting Ancient Management of Marine
Resources Among the Tla’Amin of SW BC: Integrating
Archaeological, Ecological, and Traditional Knowledge.
Principal Investigator, National Geographic Research
Grant. ($21,060).
2009-2010 Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Intertidal
Resource Management in Tla’amin Territory, British
Columbia. Jacobs Fund (with Megan Caldwell) ($6,600).
Speller, C.
2010 Ancient DNA-based investigation of the origins
and history of domesticated sheep in China. Henry Luce
Foundation/American Council of Learned Societies
Postdoctoral Fellowship in East and Southeast Asian
Archaeology and Early History ($36,000).
2010-2011 Exploring Turkey Domestication in North
America: An Integrated Approach. Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral
Fellowship ($81,000).
Winter, B.
2009-2011 Investigating Forensics, Web site research,
design and development Virtual Museums of Canada.
($344, 000)
Yang, D.
2009-2010 Reconstructing Past Abundance, Diversity, and
use of Herring in the Pacific Northwest: A Multi-disciplinary
Approach to Cultural and Biological Conservation. Principal
Investigator with Dana Lepofsky. National Geographic
Research Grant (USD $17,000)
2008-2010 Biomolecular Forensic Archaeology. Principal
Investigator with Mark Skinner. Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council of Canada - Research
Development Initiatives. National Geographic Research
Grant ($29,600).
2010-2013 DNA-based Interdisciplinary Investigation
of the Origin and History of Domesticated Cattle in
Ancient China. Principal Investigator. Social Sciences
and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Standard
Grant ($162,168).
Publications & Serials Housed in the
Department of Archaeology in 2009/2010
SFU Archaeology Press
R
oy Carlson has continued as Managing Editor with
Brian Hayden, Alan McMillan, and George Nicholas
as members of the Editorial Board.
No additional volumes were published in 20092010. Titles and chapter outlines for two new volumes.
Archaeology of the Fraser Valley and Quarry Sites in
the Pacific Northwest - have been submitted and given
preliminary approval subject to peer review and receipt
of complete manuscripts. Two additional monographs have
been suggested by SFU graduate students. The Fladmark
Field Manual has been under revision for several years, but
the new draft is not yet complete.
Sales have been such that it has been necessary to hire
a part-time person for one day (7 hours) a week. April
Ruttle currently occupies this position. All other work is
done by volunteers. Maureen Carlson handled sales at
the Northwest Anthropological Conference in Newport
Oregon in 2009 and at the BC Archaeology Forum at UBC
in 2010.
Some 489 volumes were sold in 2009-10. Full price to
individuals and 20% discount for book stores are charged
for sales over the net or ordered by mail or phone. Authors
receive a 40% discount. All volumes are discounted when
sold at professional meetings where discounts vary but are
generally about 20%. Older volumes are discounted even
more.
Research Handbooks in Archaeology World Archaeological
Congress
G
eorge Nicholas is the series co-editor of the
World Archaeological Congress Handbooks in
Archaeology series, which is publishing major
comprehensive reviews of key topics in archaeology. The
Handbook of Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology
was published in 2009, and the Handbook of Postcolonial
Archaeology in 2010.
Publications and Serials • 55
Department Publications
Badenhorst, S. and J.C. Driver
2009 Faunal Changes in Farming Communities From
Basketmaker II to Pueblo III (A.D.1-1300) in the San
Juan Basin of the American Southwest. Journal of
Archaeological Science 36: 1832-1841.
Carlson, R.
2009 Early Sites of the Northwest Coast and Alaska. In
Archaeology in America, an Encyclopedia: Vol. 4 West Coast
and Arctic/Subarctic,F. P. McManamon, (ed.), pp. 174-176.
Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut.
Buchanan, B. and M. J. Hamilton
2009 A Formal Test of the Origin of Variation in North
American Early Paleoindian Projectile Points. American
Antiquity 74(2): 279-298.
2009 Ideological Content of Prehistoric Northwest
Coast Art. In Making History of Prehistory: The Role of
Rock Art, Centro Camuno di Studi Prehistorici. Preproceedings of the XXIII Valcamonica Symposium, Capo
di Ponti, Italy, pp. 88-93.
Buchanan, B. and M. Collard
2010 An Assessment of the Impact of Resharpening
on Paleoindian Projectile Point Blade Shape Using
Geometric Morphometric Techniques. In: New
Perspectives on Old Stones: Analytical Approaches to
Paleolithic Technologies, S. J. Lycett and P. R. Chauhan
(eds.), pp. 255-273. Springer Press: New York.
2010 A Geometric Morphometrics-Based Assessment
of Blade Shape Differences Among Paleoindian
Projectile Point Types From Western North America.
Journal of Archaeological Science 37(2): 350-359.
Collard, M. and S. J.Lycett
2009 An assessment of the likely impact of phenotypic
plasticity on hominin fossil species identification using
extant hominoid craniometric data. South African Journal
of Science 105: 312-316.
Collard, M. and B. Buchanan
2010 Comment on V.T. Holliday and D.J. Meltzer’s The
12.9ka ET Impact Hypothesis and North American
Paleoindians. Current Anthropology 51(5): 587-588.
Burley, D.V.
2010 Review of The Early Prehistory of Fiji, G. Clark and
A. Anderson (eds.), Archaeology in Oceania 45: 111.
Collard, M., B. Buchanan, M. Hamilton, and M. J. O’Brien
2010 Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Causes of the
Clovis-Folsom Transition. Journal of Archaeological Science
37: 2513-2519.
Burley, D.V., Barton, A., Dickinson, W. R.,
S. P. Connaughton and K.Taché
2010 Nukuleka as a Founder Colony for West Polynesian
Settlement: New Insights from Recent Excavations.
Journal of Pacific Archaeology 1(2): 128-144.
Collard, M., K. Edinborough, S. Shennan, and M. G.Thomas
2010 Radiocarbon Evidence Indicates That Migrants
Introduced Farming to Britain. Journal of Archaeological
Science 37: 866-870.
Burley, D.V. and Dickinson, W. R.
2010 Among Polynesia’s First Pots. Journal
Archaeological Science 37: 1020-1026.
Congram, D. and J. Sterenberg
2009 Grave Challenges in Iraq. In Handbook of Forensic
Anthropology and Archaeology, S. Blau and D. Ubelaker
(eds.), chapter 36. Left Coast Press: Walnut Creek,
California.
of
Burley, D.V. and Witt, J.
2010- Completing The Story: A Late Dentate Stamped
Lapita Pot from Sigatoka, Fiji. Archaeology in Oceania 45:
130-132.
Cai, D., Z. Tang, L. Han, C.F. Speller, D. Y. Yang, X. Ma, J. Cao,
H. Zhu, and H. Zhou
2009 Ancient DNA Provides New Insights Into the
Origin of the Chinese Domestic Horse. Journal of
Archaeological Science 36: 835–842.
56 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Congram, D. and A. Fernández
2010 Uncovering Trauma: The Exhumation and
Repatriation of Spanish Civil War Dead. Anthropology
News March 2010: 23-24.
Connaughton, S., K. Taché, and D.V. Burley
2010 Taupita: A 3000 Year Old Shell Game in the
Kingdom of Tonga. Journal of Social Archaeology 10(1):
118-137.
D’Andrea, A. C., M. Richards, L. A. Pavlish, S. Wood,
A. Manzo, and H.S. Wolde-Kiros
2010 Stable Isotopic Analysis of Human and Animal
Diets from Two Pre-/Proto-Aksumite sites in Northern
Ethiopia. Journal of Archaeological Science 38: 367-374.
Driver, J. C.
2009 Quantification of Vertebrate Assemblages.
Review of R. L. Lyman’s Quantitative Paleozoology. Journal
of Mammalian Evolution 16: 145-146.
Driver, J. C., C. Tarcan, and B. Fothergill
2009 Faunal Remains from Bluff Great House. In Chaco
and After in the Northern San Juan: Excavations at the
Bluff Great House, C. Cameron (ed.), Appendix 5 (CD
format; 15pp, 8 tables). Tucson: University of Arizona
Press.
Elliott, M. and M. Collard
2009 FORDISC and the Determination of Ancestry
from Cranial Measurements. Biology Letters 5: 849-852.
Ewing, R., T. J. Ferguson, and J. R. Welch
2009 Repatriation and Reburial Bibliography,
http://tinyurl.com/cput3r, RefShare. Simon
University: Burnaby, BC.
Fraser
Egan, S. and D.V. Burley
2009 Triangular Men On A Very Long Journey: The
Context and Implications of a Hawaiian-Style Petroglyph
site in the Polynesian Kingdom of Tonga. Journal of the
Polynesian Society 118(3): 209-232.
Gao, X., X. Zhang, D.Yang, C. Shen, and X. Wu.
2010 Revisiting the Origin of Modern Humans in China
and its Implications for Global Human Evolution. Science
China Earth Sciences 53: 1927-1940.
Hamilton, M. J. and B. Buchanan
2009 The Accumulation of Stochastic Copying Errors
Causes Drift in Culturally Transmitted Technologies:
Quantifying Clovis Evolutionary Dynamics. Journal of
Anthropological Archaeology 28(1): 55-69.
Harrower, M. J., J. McCorriston, and A. C. D’Andrea
2010 General/Specific, Local/Global: Comparing
the Beginnings of Agriculture in the Horn of Africa
(Ethiopia/Eritrea) and Southwest Arabia (Yemen).
American Antiquity 75(3): 452-472.
Hayden, B.
2009 Funerals as Feasts: Why Are They So Important?
Cambridge Archaeological Journal 19(1): 29-52.
2009 The Proof Is In The Pudding: Feasting and the
Origins of Domestication. Current Anthropology 50(5):
597-601.
Hayden, B. and R. Mathewes
2009 The Rise and Fall of Complex Large Villages on
the British Columbian Plateau: A Geoarchaeological
Controversy. Canadian Journal of Archaeology 33(2):
281-296.
Hayden, B. and S. Villeneuve
2009 Sex, Symmetry and Silliness in the Bifacial World.
Antiquity 83: 1163-1170.
2010 Who Benefits From Complexity? A View from
Futuna. In Pathways to Power: New Perspectives On The
Emergence of Social Inequality, P. T. Douglas and G. M.
Feinman (eds.), pp., 95-146.
Jamieson, R. W. and M. B. Sayre
2010 Barley and Identity in the Spanish Colonial
Audiencia of Quito: Archaeobotany of the 18th
Century San Blas Neighborhood in Riobamba. Journal of
Anthropological Archaeology 29(2): 208-218.
Klassen, M. A., R. Budhwa, and R. Reimer/Yumks
2009 First Nations, Forestry, and the Transformation
of Archaeological Practice in British Columbia, Canada.
Heritage Management 2(2):199-238.
Koutouki, K. and N. Lyons
2009 Canadian Inuit Speak to Climate Change: Inuit
Perceptions on the Adaptability of Land Claims
Agreements to Accommodate Environmental Change.
Wisconsin International Law Journal 27(3): 516-542.
2010 Archaeological Support for the Three-Stage
Expansion of Modern Humans Across Northeastern
Eurasia and Into the Americas. PLoS One 5(8):1-9
SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report • 57
Lepofsky, D. (ed.)
2009 Indigenous Resource Management: Past, Present,
and Future. Journal of Ethnobiology, special issue 29
2009 Traditional Resource Management: Past, Present,
and Future, In. Traditional Resource Management: Past,
Present, and Future, edited by D. Lepofsky. Journal of
Ethnobiology 29:184-212
Lepofsky, D., D. Schaepe, A. Graesch, M. Lenert, P. Ormerod,
K. Carlson, J. Arnold, M. Blake, P. Moore, and J.Clague
2009 Exploring Stó:lo-Coast Salish Interaction and
Identity in Ancient Houses and Settlements in the Fraser
Valley, British Columbia. American Antiquity 74: 595-626.
Loreille, O. R. Parr, K. A. McGregor, C. M. Fitzpatrick, C. Lyon,
D. Y. Yang, C. F. Speller, M. R. Grimm, M. J. Grimm, J. A. Irwin,
and E. M. Robinson
2010 Identification of 60 Year-Old Mummified Human
Remains Discovered in an Alaskan Glacier. Journal of
Forensic Science 55(3):813–818.
Lycett, S. J., M. Collard, and W. C. McGrew
2009 Phylogenetic Analysis of Chimpanzee Behavioral
Variation: Towards an Integrated Approach to Ape,
Fossil Hominin, and Modern Human Culture. Journal of
Human Evolution 57: 337-349.
2010 Are Behavioral Differences Among Wild
Chimpanzee Communities Genetic or Cultural? An
Assessment Using Tool Use Data and Phylogenetic
Methods.American Journal of Physical Anthropology 142:
461-467.
Lyons, N.
2009 Inuvialuit Rising:The Evolution of Inuvialuit Identity
in the Modern Era. Alaska Journal of Anthropology 7(2):
63-80.
2010 The Wisdom of Elders: Inuvialuit Social Memories
of Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century.
Arctic Anthropology 47: 22-38.
Lyons, N., P. Dawson, M. Walls, D. Uluadluak, L. Angalik, M.
Kalluak, P. Kigusiutuak, L. Kiniksi, J. Karetak, and L. Suluk
2010 Person, Place, Memory, Thing: How Inuit Elders
are informing archaeological practice in the Canadian
North. Canadian Journal of Archaeology 34(1):1-31.
58 • SFU Archaeology 2009/2010 Biennial Report
Mathews, B. K.
2009 Acorns and Acorn-Leaching Pits. In Sunken Village,
Sauvie Island, Oregon USA: A Report on the 2006-2007
Investigations of National Historic Landmark Wet Site
35MU4. D. R. Croes, J. L. Fagan, and M. N. Zehendner
(eds.), pp., 85-94. Journal of Wetland Archaeology 9.
Oxbow Books:University of Exeter, England.
2010 Balanophagy in the Pacific Northwest:The AcornLeaching Pits at the Sunken Village Wetsite. Journal of
Northwest Anthropology 43: 125-140.
Monsalve, M.V., D.Y.Yang, and E.G. Langemann
2009 Molecular Analysis of Ancient Cervid Remains
from Two Archaeological Sites: Banff National Park and
Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site, Alberta.
In Tools of the Trade: Methods, Techniques, and Innovative
Approaches in Archaeology, J. Wilkins and K. Anderson
(eds.), pp. 167-181. University of Calgary Press, Calgary.
Nicholas, G. and J. Hollowell (series eds.)
2009 Handbook for Forensic Anthropology and
Archaeology. World Archaeological Congress’s Research
Handbooks in Archaeology. Left Coast Press: Walnut
Creek, California.
Nicholas, G. (ed.)
2010 Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists. Left
Coast Press: Walnut Creek, California.
Nicholas, G. and J. Hollowell (series eds.)
2010 Handbook of Postcolonial Archaeology. World
Archaeological Congress’ Research Handbooks in
Archaeology. Left Coast Press: Walnut Creek, California.
Nicholas, G., C. Bell, R. Coombe, J. R. Welch,
B. Noble, J. Anderson, K. Bannister, and J. Watkins
2010 Intellectual Property Issues in Heritage
Management, Part 2: Legal Dimensions, Ethical
Considerations, and Collaborative Research Practices.
Heritage Management 3(1):117-147.
Rawlings, T.A. and J.C. Driver
2010 Paleodiet of Domestic Turkey, Shields Pueblo (5MT3807),
Colorado: Isotope Analysis and its Implications For Care of a
Household Domesticate. Journal of Archaeological Science 37:
2433-2441.
Ruttle, A. F.
2010 Neither Seen nor Heard: Looking for Children in
Northwest Coast Archaeology. Canadian Journal of
Archaeology 34: 64-88.
Walshaw, S. C.
2010 Converting to Rice: Urbanization, Islamization and Crops
on Pemba Island, Tanzania AD 700-1500. World Archaeology 42(1):
137-153.
Weiser, A. and D. Lepofsky
2009 Ancient Land Use and Management of Ebey’s Prairie,
Whidbey Island, Washington. Journal of Ethnobiology 29:161166.
Scott, A., D. Congram, S. Fonseca, D. Sweet, and M. Skinner
2010 Anthropological Comparison of Ante-Mortem Surgical
Records for Identification of Found Skeletal Remains. Journal of
Forensic Sciences 55(1): 241-244.
Welch, J.R.
2009 Reconstructing the Ndee (Western Apache) Homeland.
In The Archaeology of Meaningful Places, B. Bowser and M.
Nieves Zedeño (eds.), pp. 149-162. University of Utah Press,
Salt Lake City
Sheppard, J. and R. J. Muir
2010 “Oh, I’ve Seen One Way Bigger Than That!”: Current
Research on Pithouse Settlement Patterns in the Mid-Fraser
Region of BC. The Midden 42 (3): 3-8
Welch, J. R., M. K. Altaha, K. A. Hoerig, and R. Riley
2009 Best Cultural Heritage Stewardship Practices by and
for the White Mountain Apache Tribe. Conservation and
Management of Archaeological Sites 11(2):148-160.
Skinner, M.F., D. Alempijevic and A. Stanojevic
2010 In the absense of dental records, do we need forensic
odontologists at mass grave sites? Forensic Science International
201:22-26.
Welch, J. R., R. Riley, and M. V. Nixon
2009 Discretionary Desecration: American Indian Sacred
Sites, Dzil Nchaa Si An (Mount Graham, Arizona), and Federal
Agency Decision Making. American Indian Culture and Research
Journal 33(4): 29-68.
Skinner, M.F., L. Clegg, D. Congram, A. Katzenberg, R.A. Lazenby, A.
Mundorff, T. Peckmann, M. Spence, S. Stratton, and K. Waterhouse
2010 Taking the pulse of forensic anthropology in Canada.
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal 43(4):191-203.
Skinner, M. and K. Bowie
2009 Forensic Anthropology: Canadian Content and
Contributions. In S. Blau and D. H. Ubelaker (eds.) Handbook
of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology, pp 87-103. World
Archaeological Congress. California: Left Coast Press.
Speller, C., B. Kemp, S. Wyatt, C. Monroe, W. Lipe, U. Arndt, and
D.Yang
2010 Ancient Mitochondrial DNA Analysis Reveals
Complexity of Indigenous North American Turkey
Domestication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
107(7): 2807-2812.
Tehrani, J.J. and M. Collard
2009 An Integrated Analysis of Inter-Individual and InterGroup Cultural Transmission in Iranian Tribal Populations.
Evolution and Human Behavior 30, 286-300.
2009 The evolution of material culture diversity among Iranian
tribal populations. In S.J. Shennan (ed.) Pattern and Process
in Cultural Evolution, pp. 99-111. Berkeley, CA: University of
California Press.
Welch, J.R., F. Foster, R. Gillies, M. Klassen, E. McLay, and R. Muir
2010 The Heritage Conservation Act Contravention Data
Base. BC Association of Professional Archaeologists Fall/
Winter Bulletin 2010(2):2-3.
Welch, J.R. and R. C. Brauchli
2010 “Subject to the Right of the Secretary of the Interior”:
The White Mountain Apache Reclamation of the Fort Apache
and Theodore Roosevelt School Historic District, Wicazo Sa
Review 25(1): 47-73.
Weninger, B., K. Edinborough, M. Bradtmöller, M. Collard, P.
Crombé, U. Danzeglocke, D. Holst, O. Jöris, M. Niekus, S. J. Shennan, and R. Schulting
2009 A Radiocarbon Database for the Mesolithic and Early
Neolithic in Northwest Europe. In Chronology and Evolution
within the Mesolithic of North-West Europe. P. Van Crombé, M.
Strydonck J. Sergant M. Boudin and M. Bats (eds.), pp. 143-176.
Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Yang, D.
2010 DNA Studies of Ancient Human Remains: Some
Methodological Considerations. In Bones, Teeth and Genes,
Current Research in Physical Anthropology, Y. Chen and M. Hsu
(eds.), pp.103-123. Tzu Chi University Press, Taiwan.
2010 The cophylogeny of populations and cultures:
reconstructing the evolution of Iranian tribal craft traditions
using trees and jungles. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal
Society of London Biological Sciences 365, 3865-3874.
Department Publications • 59
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