B.Ed 1 Autumn Semester 2015

B.Ed 1 Autumn Semester 2015

Bachelor of Education

Year One, Semester One

Course Handbook

Autumn 2015

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Welcome from the Dean of Education/ Fáilte ó Déan an Oideachais

Dear Student,

On behalf of my colleagues I extend a warm welcome to you to the Faculty of

Education at Mary Immaculate College. As the largest Education Faculty in Ireland, educating almost forty per cent of all the state-funded primary teachers, we are particularly aware of the significance of the BEd programme in developing, promoting and sustaining a high quality Irish primary education experience for all children. We are also cognisant of our special responsibility to educate teachers for the twenty-first century who share a professional belief in, and moral commitment to, working towards excellence, equity, diversity and social justice within the nation’s schools and communities.

As a student within the Faculty of Education you are part of a vibrant and innovative community which continues to design and develop new programmes. The BEd degree programme is an attractive and exciting four-year programme which reflects the College's well-established reputation for excellence in teacher education. During Year 1 of the programme you will follow a core programme which focuses on ‘the Student as Learner’. If you have any feedback in relation to this academic year, please engage with your academic co-ordinator Dr.Deirdre Ní Chróinín.

The Faculty is also involved in the provision of many other programmes. This year sees the second cohort of students beginning the Professional Master of Education which is a two year teaching qualification for graduates who already possess a Level 8 degree and who wish to pursue primary school teaching.

The Faculty contributes to an extensive range of postgraduate programmes in SEN, ICT, Mentoring and

Teacher Development, Early Childhood Studies, Adult and Continuing Education, Masters in Education (by

Research and Thesis) and Structured PhD in Education. We have also an Education Preparatory Programme for Mature Learners, which is aimed at adult learners who wish to gain access to the BEd programme.

Táthar ag leanúint ar aghaidh i mbliana lenár gclár iarchéime nuálaíoch, M. Oid. san Oideachas Lán-

Ghaeilge. Is é seo an chéad chlár iarchéime i bPoblacht na hÉireann le freastal go sonrach ar oideoirí tumoideachais agus ar ghairmithe eile a bhíonn ag obair i réimse an oideachais lán-Ghaeilge. Our

Professional Diploma in Education (Further Education, Level 8) has been accredited by the Teaching Council, and our revised Certificate in Religious Education has been approved by the Council for Catechetics.

Our lecturers are very approachable and are dedicated to providing you with a top quality educational experience. Please engage with them and with your fellow students to enrich your own learning and to broaden your understanding of what it means to be a teacher. Participate in the life of the College, join clubs and societies, and enjoy the many sporting, social, cultural, and personal development opportunities available to you. In closing, I wish you well in your studies and I hope that your time at

Mary Immaculate College will prove both enjoyable and rewarding.

Guím gach rath ort i rith na bliana,

Professor Teresa O’Doherty, Dean of Education

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INDEX

Introduction from the Dean

Index

Faculty of Education – A Brief Overview

Mission Statement of the Faculty of Education

Study Abroad/International Placement

Elective Specialisms and Multidisciplinary Route

Undergraduate Dissertation Option

Progression within the Programme

Programme Specific Regulations

Academic Integrity Policy

Lecture and Tutorial Attendance

Module Assessment Guidelines

Key Faculty of Education Contacts

Staff of the Faculty of Education

Module Menu – Bachelor of Education 1

B.Ed. Programme Schedule for Semester 1

Bachelor of Education 1 Autumn Semester Modules

Certificate in Religious Education

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13

15

24

5

6

9

12

25

26

68

5

5

4

5

2

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PAGE NUMBER

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FACULTY OF EDUCATION – A BRIEF OVERVIEW

The academic work of the College is divided into two faculties: the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of Arts, both of which contribute to the BEd Programme. The Faculty of Education at Mary Immaculate

College is proud of its tradition of teacher education and of the high standards achieved by graduates since its establishment in 1898. The Faculty is one of the largest education faculties in Ireland, with a staff of more than 65 full-time academic staff and a further 50 associate members. The Faculty is strongly student-centred and is committed to excellence in its teaching and research.

The Faculty offers programmes at certificate, diploma, undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Our flagship undergraduate honours programmes include the following:

BEd , which is a full-time four-year programme and is the professional qualification required for teachers in primary schools.

BEd in Education and Psychology , this four-year full-time programme prepares graduates to be recognised primary school teachers while also holding a degree in Psychology, which is recognised by the Psychological Society of Ireland.

BA in Early Childhood Care and Education , which focuses on the development of educarers, professional leaders in the provision of care and education for children from birth to six years in a variety of educational settings.

The Faculty also offers a number of postgraduate programmes. The academic year 2015/16 heralds the introduction of the Professional Master of Education (Primary Teaching) which is a new two year teaching qualification for graduates who already possess a Level 8 degree and who wish to pursue primary school teaching. In addition, a suite of postgraduate and masters programmes is available.

The Faculty also provides a range of postgraduate research options and the numbers of students engaging in masters and doctoral studies by research and thesis within the Faculty continue to grow.

The research work of the Centre for Research in Education and Teacher Education (CREaTE), Centre for

Early-Childhood Research at Mary Immaculate College (Ceramic), the Curriculum Development Unit and the Centre for

Transforming Education through Dialogue reflect the commitment of Faculty to researching aspects of curricular interest, but also issues of equity and justice within education on local, national and international levels.

Faculty members cover a wide range of expertise and professional interests. Many are qualified primary teachers and bring to their students a wealth of professional knowledge and experience. An internationally recognised standard of excellence has been achieved in the areas of professional development, curriculum design and educational research. The Faculty of Education has close links with many of the primary schools in Limerick city and the wider mid-west region. These connections facilitate an on-going professional relationship between the Faculty and the schools. The Faculty is greatly facilitated by the schools and teachers who make their classes available to student teachers for school placements, a crucial aspect of Mary Immaculate College’s BEd programme.

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MISSION STATEMENT OF THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION

To foster the social, emotional and intellectual development of our students; to promote and enhance their well-being during their time in college, and to provide opportunities for them to access a range of cultural activities.

To encourage students to aspire to standards of excellence in their professional lives compatible with their individual potential.

To promote reflective, creative, open-minded, sensitive, competent and committed practice among teachers in the national primary schools system. To empower such teachers to deal not alone with pupils and in-school colleagues but with parents, local communities, colleagues generally, other professionals.

To engender in our graduates a commitment to the full, social, emotional, intellectual development, and cultural diversity of the children they teach so that as citizens of the future they are competent, assured and caring members of society.

To promote and develop educational research and the application of existing research for the benefit of schools and of the community.

To promote among our graduates an openness to research and methodological innovation and to help them to foster a sense of ongoing professional and personal development.

To engender in students and graduates a positive, critical attitude to change in their professional lives and the capacity to develop skills and competences to deal with changing needs and demands.

To promote and develop educational thought and practice for the benefit of the community, both local and national.

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Study Abroad/International Placement

The B.Ed programme offers students the opportunity to study abroad in Semester 5. The College has established partnerships with a number of premier Colleges and Universities worldwide and strongly encourages student mobility. Student mobility offers opportunities for significant academic, social and personal development. Exchanges are open to all students who have attained a QCA of 2.8 or above by the end of Semester 4. Students who have applied to study abroad during Semester 5 will be graded on a pass/fail basis for all selected modules in their host College/University. This means that upon successfully passing all modules, their QCA at the end of Semester 4 will be carried forward to

Semester 6. Please contact: Richard Bowles, Co-ordinator of international placements, if you have any queries in relation to the Study Abroad/International Placement.

Elective Specialisms and Multidisciplinary Route

Students begin their first Education Elective and second Liberal Arts Elective in Semester 5. Students have been allocated and informed of their first Education Elective and must attend and complete this

Elective. Should you register incorrectly for an elective that has not been allocated to you or to an oversubscribed elective, your name will be removed from that list and you will be registered for your allocated elective by the College. Failure to register for the correct elective may result in disciplinary action.

Student may choose to exit their chosen Education Elective specialism after Semester 5 and may then follow the Multidisciplinary route.

Undergraduate Dissertation Option

Students undertaking particular Elective Specialisms in either Education or Liberal Arts or who are taking the Multidisciplinary route may be offered the opportunity to undertake an Undergraduate

Dissertation (completed and graded in Semester 8). The Undergraduate Dissertation option is equivalent to two taught modules. Students must indicate their preference to undertake the

Undergraduate Dissertation by Week 7 (Semester 5). It is important to note that students choosing this option must also successfully complete the Research Methods Module. Students who do not achieve C3 or higher in the Research Method Module will be subject to critical review. If you have any queries in relation to the Undergraduate Dissertation, please contact: Des Carswell, Co-ordinator of and tutor on the research methods and undergraduate dissertation modules for the B.Ed programme.

Progression within the Programme

In developing the programme, a focus has been maintained on ensuring progression within the programme in terms of students’ learning and self-development and the understanding, knowledge and skills required to meet the learning and teaching needs of children in today’s schools. Clear links are maintained between theoretical input and student teachers’ school placements. Students must successfully complete all modules in order to progress to the next academic year of the programme.

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Programme Specific Regulations

3.9 Mary Immaculate College

3.9.1 Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Education in Education and Psychology

3.9.1.1 A student who fails a school placement module shall be awarded an F grade or, in the case of Pass/Fail registration, an N grade.

3.9.1.2

3.9.1.3.1

3.9.1.3.2

The compensating fail grades D1 and D2 shall not be awarded for school placement modules.

Save in exceptional circumstances, where a student fails a school placement, s/he shall be afforded only one further opportunity to repeat that placement.

A student who fails a school placement module (i.e. who fails the first attempt and also fails the repeat attempt) will normally have their enrolment on their current programme of study terminated.

3.9.1.3.3 A student who fails a school placement module (i.e. who fails the first attempt and also fails the repeat attempt) in years 1, 2, 3 or 4 will be eligible for consideration, at the discretion of the relevant Examination Board, for an exit award or transfer to an appropriate exit programme, as listed below. The award type will depend on the number of credits accumulated by the student.

• Certificate in Education Studies (Minor Award (Level 7) [≥60 + <120 ECTS])

• Diploma in Education Studies (Minor Award (Level 7) [≥120 + <180 ECTS])

3.9.1.3.4

3.9.1.4

3.9.1.5.1

• BA Education Studies (Major Award (Level 7) [≥180 + <240 ECTS])

• BA Hons. Education Studies (Major Award (Level 8) [≥240 ECTS. The ECTS requirements for students registered on the three-year Level 8 Bachelor of Education programme is ≥180 ECTS.])

A student who is eligible for an exit award may take the appropriate award based on accumulated credits or may link in to approved modules in an attempt to fulfil the requirements for the next higher award. The approved modules will be determined following consultation between the student, the relevant Dean(s) and the Vice

President Academic Affairs.

Students who are due to start professional placement in the Spring semester of years

1, 2 and 3 of the programmes are subject to critical review. A student who has failed more than four modules or whose residual QCA following the Autumn semester is less than 2.00 will not be allowed to progress to the Spring semester and will be required to repeat the Autumn semester prior to progressing to the Spring semester.

Students who receive an F grade in the oral Irish component of the following modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

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3.9.1.5.2

3.9.1.5.3

3.9.1.6.1

3.9.1.6.2

3.9.1.7.1

3.9.1.7.2

3.9.1.8.1

3.9.1.8.2

3.9.1.9.1

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 2

• Language and Literacy 5

Where the student has passed the other elements of the module, s/he repeats the oral

Irish component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

The compensating fail grades D1 and D2 shall not be awarded for the oral Irish component of the module.

Students who receive an F grade in the Scríobh na Gaeilge component of the following modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 2

• Language and Literacy 5

Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the

Scríobh na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

Students who receive an F grade in the Múineadh na Gaeilge component of the following modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3

• Language and Literacy 4

Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the

Múineadh na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

Students who receive an F grade in the Teanga Scríofa na Gaeilge component of the following module shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3

Where the student has passed the other elements of the module, s/he repeats the

Teanga Scríofa na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

Students who receive an F grade in the English component of the following modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

• Language and Literacy 4

• Language and Literacy 5

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3.9.1.9.2

3.9.1.10.1

3.9.1.10.2

3.9.1.10.3

3.9.1.11.1

3.9.1.11.2

Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the

English component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade

C3.

To progress into the final year of their programme, students are required by the end of

Year 3 of the programme to obtain an average quality point value (QPV) of at least 2.00 in the areas of English, Gaeilge and Mathematics in each of the three module groupings listed below:

1. Language and Literacy 1; Language and Literacy 2; Language and Literacy 3;

Language and Literacy 4; Language and Literacy 5

2. An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na Gaeilge 1; An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na

Gaeilge 2; An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na Gaeilge 3; Language and Literacy 4;

Language and Literacy 5

STEM 1; STEM 2; STEM 4; STEM 5 3.

A student who does not obtain the minimum average QPV required in Mathematics following annual repeats in Year 2 but who is otherwise eligible to progress may do so and may link in on a capped basis to relevant modules in the following academic year to obtain the average minimum QPV of 2.00 in that module grouping.

A student who is not eligible to progress following the annual repeats in Year 3 on account of not having attained the minimum average QPV required in one or more of the English, Gaeilge or

Mathematics groupings but who otherwise satisfies the general progression regulations may link in to relevant module/s in the following academic year subject to the current academic regulations whereby a maximum of two modules can be taken on a link-in basis in each semester.

The award and award classification shall be made on the basis of performance of candidates in part 2 only, commencing with Semester 3. For the BEd programme only, semesters 3 to 5 shall be assigned a relative weighting of 1 and semesters 6 to 8 shall be assigned a relative weighting of 2.

An absolute QPV of 2.60 across school placement modules SP4, SP5, SP6 and SP7 is required for the award of a first or second class honours degree.

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Mary Immaculate College Academic Integrity Policy

Preamble

Academic Integrity refers to honesty and responsibility in academic practice and scholarship. It values ethical academic behaviour and the avoidance of plagiarism, cheating, fraudulent representation of academic work and other dishonesty in academic endeavours.

1.0 Academic Dishonesty

1.1 Academic dishonesty includes:

- falsely representing the work of others as one’s own in an assignment.

- copying of ideas or work of fellow students.

- copying from published works, in assignments, without proper acknowledgement, i.e.

plagiarism.

- using co-authoring assistance in individual academic work, including the commissioning or purchasing of essay writing services, i.e syndication.

- using technical assistance in assignments where it has not been authorised, e.g. using translation software in a translation assignment.

- signing attendance records on behalf of a classmate.

- fabricating results or research findings in an assignment.

- using false information to gain extensions to deadlines or i-grades.

- cheating in examinations by copying or using unauthorised materials.

- misrepresenting achievements on application forms.

2.0 Plagiarism

2.1 Plagiarism is defined as the use of either published or unpublished writing, ideas or works without proper acknowledgement.

2.2 Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty where, either intentionally or unintentionally, ideas or works are falsely presented as being those of the author for her/his benefit. It can include:

- the use of a part of a text without quotation marks and citation.

- the use of a part of a text, with minor paraphrase, without citation.

- the use of an image without citation or permission.

- the use of music without citation or permission.

- the use of computer code, mathematical work, research results, spreadsheets without citation or permission.

- the re-use of one’s own work from a previous assignment without citation.

2.3 All writing, ideas or works quoted or paraphrased in an academic assignment in MIC must be attributed and acknowledged to the original source through proper citation.

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2.4 To avoid plagiarism when quoting or paraphrasing, ideas or works must be referenced using the referencing system appropriate to the module under assessment or disciplinary area

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.

2.5 Module and Programme Coordinators will provide guidance to students regarding the required referencing system for a given module or programme.

2.6 Written assignments will normally be submitted to the MIC plagiarism detection software and will be checked against and stored in the standard repository of the software. Students may submit only once to the plagiarism detection software for any one assignment.

3.0 Acceptable use of MIC teaching and assessment materials

3.1 Assignments are the property of MIC and may not be made publicly available (e.g. online) without consent.

3.2 Recording of lectures on personal devices is not permitted, unless by special arrangement.

3.3 Lectures captured on livestreaming facilities, which are password protected, cannot be shared with anyone who is not registered for a given module.

3.4 Teaching materials made available for download in electronic format by MIC lecturers may not be shared with anyone who is not registered for a given module.

4.0 Acceptable use of ICT and digital identities

4.1 When using MIC computers or network, films, music, books and other published works subject to copyright must not be downloaded.

4.2 Software licensed to MIC must not be downloaded to private devices or shared outside of MIC network, unless by prior agreement.

4.3 Digital identities should be respected and identity credentials should never be shared. Using the email or VLE identity of another (e.g. if not logged out on a device) is considered a theft of digital identity.

4.4 MIC’s Policy for Responsible Computing must be adhered to at all times.

5.0 Data protection

5.1 Assignments that involve the gathering and storing of personal data, including images, must adhere to the MIC data protection policy.

6.0 Sanction

6.1 In accordance with MIC’s Code of Conduct, it is a serious disciplinary offence to engage in academic cheating in any form whatsoever.

6.2 Section 4.2 of the MIC Code of Conduct states that “The College Discipline Committee shall be entitled to impose penalties including suspension or expulsion where, in its view, the gravity of the complaint or offence or the College disciplinary record of the offender shall so warrant”.

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Harvard, APA and numeric footnote systems are used in MIC, depending on the module or programme.

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Normally, the penalty for cheating is suspension for 12 months. A repeat of such conduct shall warrant expulsion.

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Lecture and Tutorial Attendance

Attendance at lectures and tutorials is mandatory. Lecturers reserve the right to administer attendance checks at all/some lectures and tutorials. Except in exceptional circumstances and with the prior approval of both the academic year co-ordinator and lecturer, students must attend their assigned group lecture or tutorial. Lecturers reserve the right to refuse admittance to lectures/tutorials and/or mark a student absent if they do not attend their designated lecture/tutorial.

Up to 10% of marks in a module may be deducted for poor attendance at lectures. In the case of tutorials (except in exceptional circumstances), 10% of marks will be deducted for poor attendance.

Important: Students are required to familiarise themselves with the Code of Conduct and to adhere to same (see http://www.mic.ul.ie/adminservices/studentservices/Pages/StudentHandbook.aspx for further information).

Please Note: In the case of EDU100 (SP1), attendance will be taken at all tutorials and two or more uncertified absences will result in an F grade being awarded for the module.

Module Assessment Guidelines

Students are responsible for familiarising themselves with the assessment arrangements for each module. Where modules are assessed by examination, it is the responsibility of the student to register and present for the examination (see http://www.mic.ul.ie/adminservices/studentservices/Pages/StudentHandbook.aspx for further information).

In the case of coursework, students are responsible for ensuring that coursework adheres to the module assessment guidelines, that it is completed on time, and submitted on the designated date.

Students are strongly advised to keep an electronic copy of all coursework. Except in exceptional circumstances, extensions will not be granted for coursework submission deadlines.

Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework: Except in exceptional circumstances, 10% of marks in a module will be deducted for late submission of coursework.

Repeat Assessment Procedures: Where Coursework is the repeat assessment (including both F and I -

Grades) students will be notified of the repeat assessment and the repeat assessment guidelines by email. It is the responsibility of the individual student to comply with the repeat assessment guidelines which includes submission deadlines.

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KEY FACULTY OF EDUCATION CONTACTS

Dean of Education

Professor Teresa O Doherty

Contact: [email protected]

Office: 304a

(061) 204995

BEd 1 Co-Ordinator

Dr Déirdre Ní Chróinín

Contact: [email protected]

Office: 311

(061) 204553

Director of School Placement

Neil Ó Conaill

Contact: [email protected]

Office: 306

(061) 204519

BEd Course Leader

Dr. John O’Shea

Contact: [email protected]

Office: R224

(061) 774713

Fintan Breen

Education Office Manager

Education Office

Contact: [email protected]

Office: (061) 204906

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Faculty of Education Office

Room 307 (Foundation Building)

Phone: 061-204906

Counter service to students is available:

Monday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.00 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. – 4.00 p.m

Tuesday – Friday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.30 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. – 4.00 p.m

Whom should I contact?

If you have a general query please email the Education Office at [email protected]

. You may also go to the Education Office, Third Floor, Main Building, if you have a general query.

If you have a concern or query in relation to general academic issues, please contact Dr Angela Canny.

You can make an appointment to see her by email or via the Education Office.

If your concern specifically refers to School Placement, please contact the SP Office and/or Director of

SP (061 204358/061 204924).

If you have a concern relating to examinations / repeats / link-ins etc. please contact the Assistant

Dean, Dr Angela Canny.

Please give your mobile phone number to the Education Office or other members of staff when communicating with them, as if a matter is urgent, this will enable them to contact you directly.

Contacting Lecturers

You can find contact details for all academic staff on the College website http://www.mic.ul.ie/welcome/Pages/staffdirectory.aspx.

Initial contact with a lecturer should be made by email and if required, the lecturer will arrange a meeting with you. Please remember that lecturers are very often in schools or engaged in other work, so it is important that you contact them by telephone or email. You are reminded that all communication should be conducted in a courteous manner.

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Dean of Education

Teresa O'Doherty, B.Ed.,

M.Ed.(NUI), Dip. Religious

Studies(MIC), Ph.D.(UL)

Assistant Dean of Education

Angela Canny, B.Soc.Sc.,

M.Soc.Sc.(UCD),

Ph.D.(Warwick)

Director of Continuing

Professional Development

Cathal de Paor, B.A.(NUI),

Grad.Dip.in Ed.(UL),

M.Ed.(UL), M.A. in Classical

Irish(NUI), Ph.D.

STAFF OF THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Director of the Curriculum

Development Unit

Eucharia McCarthy,

B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)

Director of School

Placement

Neil Ó Conaill, B.Ed.(NUI),

M.Ed.(Nottingham) [email protected]

[email protected]

There are five academic departments within the Faculty of Education:

Department of Arts Education and Physical Education

Department of Reflective Pedagogy and Early Childhood Studies

Department of Learning, Society, and Religious Education

Department of Language, Literacy and Mathematics Education

Department of Special Education

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(061)204995

(061)204598

(061)204950

(061)204508

(061)204519

Department of Arts Education and Physical Education

Acting Head of Department

Déirdre Ní Chróinín, B.A., Ph.D.(UL) M.A. in

Academic Practice(UL)

Drama

Michael Finneran, B.Ed.(DCU), M.A, [email protected]

[email protected]

Ph.D.(Warwick)*

Dorothy Morrissey, B.Ed., M.A.(NUI), Grad Dip in

Drama in Education(Thomond), Grad Dip in

Dance(UL), Cert in Community Dance

Leadership(Laban Guild), Ph.D (Univ. of Bristol)

Margaret O'Keeffe, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(DCU), LLSM*

Co-ordinator of the access programme

Music Education

Gwen Moore, B.Mus.Ed.(TCD), M.A. in Music

Ed.(UL), GRIAM, ALCM, Ph.D.(Univ. of London) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Ailbhe Kenny, B.Ed., M.Ed.(DCU), Ph.D.(Cambridge)

Visual Arts Education

Tanya Power, NDD, M.A.(NUI)

Anne-Marie Morrin, B.A., H.Dip. Art and Design

Education (NCEA), M.A.(UL)

Sinead Dinneen, Dip.in Fine Art Sculpture(LSAD),

H.Dip.(Art and Design Education), B.A.(WIT), M.A. in

Interactive Media(UL) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Niall Quinn, Visual Arts Technician, Dip. in Fine

Arts(NCEA)

Physical Education

Deirdre Ní Chróinín, B.A., Ph.D.(UL), M.A. in

Academic Practice(UL)

Richard Bowles, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Sc.(Leicester) PhD.

(UL) [email protected]

[email protected]

Co-ordinator of international placements and AEE

Elaine Murtagh, B.A., PGCE, Ph.D.(Univ. of Ulster)* [email protected]

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(061)204553

(061)204976

(061)204521

(061)204526

(061)204945

(061)774721

(061)204388

(061)204552

(061)204936

(061)204350

(061)204553

(061)204912

(061)204569

Department of Reflective Pedagogy and Early Childhood Studies

Head of Department

[email protected]

Emer Ring, B.Ed.(Carysfort College of Ed.), PG Dip. in Special Ed.(DCU), BL, (Univ. of London),

M.Ed.(DCU), PG Cert. in Autism (Children)(DCU),

M.Ed.(Autism)(Univ. of Birmingham), Diploma in

Irish(NUIG), Ph.D.(DCU)

Early Childhood Care and Education

Deirdre Breathnach, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)

Jennifer Pope, B.A. Early Childhood Studies,

Ph.D.(UCC)

Lisha O'Sullivan, B.A. Early Childhood Studies(UCC),

M.A. Non-directive Play Therapy (Univ. of York)*

Des Carswell, B.Sc.(UCD and Vrije Univ.

Amsterdam), Masters in European Social Policy

Analysis (UCD) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Co-ordinator of and tutor on the research methods and undergraduate dissertation modules for the

B.Ed. programme

Mary Moloney, Cert. in Psychology(NUIM),

Diploma in Nursery Management(UCD), M.Ed. in

Early Childhood Care and Education(MIC),

Ph.D.(MIC)

Educational Methodology

Teresa McElhinney, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

ICT in Education

Brendan Barry, B.A.(TCD), Grad.Dip.Ed.(MIC),

M.Sc.(DCU)

Rory McGann, B.Ed, M.Ed. ICT(UL), Grad. Dip. Ed.

Lead. (NUIM), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL)

Edward Corry, B.A. (NUIG), Higher Diploma in

Education (NUIG); Higher Diploma in Systems

Analysis and Design (NUIG); B.E. (NUIG); Ph.D.

(NUIG)

Microteaching

Kathleen Horgan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(TCD), [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204571

(061)204565

(061)204581

(061)204566

(061)204961

(061) 204316

(061) 204542

(061)204941

(061)204520

(061)204986

(061)204328

17

Ph.D.(NUI)

School Placement

Eamonn Mitchell, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL) [email protected]

Department of Learning, Society, and Religious Education

[email protected]

Head of Department

Carol O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), M.A.(NUI),

Ed.D.(DCU)

Psychology of Education

Suzanne Parkinson, B.Ed., B.Sc., M.SC. in

Developmental and Educational Psychology, Ed.D.(Ed.

Psych).

(061)204518

(061)204928 [email protected]

(061)204958

Marie Ryan, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),

MAEP (UCD)

Claire Griffin, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),

MAEP (UCD)

History of Education and Policy of Education

Teresa O'Doherty, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), Dip. Religious

Studies(MIC), Ph.D.(UL) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204372

(061)204701

(061)204995

Eilís O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.A.(UL), Ph.D.(UL)

Co-ordinator of M.Ed in Educational Leadership and

Management

Margaret Nohilly, B.Ed, M.St., D.Ed (DCU)

Philosophy of Education

Tony Bonfield, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), TEFL Cert.(MIC),

Ed.D. (Univ. Of Sheffield)

Aislinn O Donnell, B.A.(TCD), M.A.(UCD),

Ph.D.(Warwick)

Sociology of Education

Angela Canny, B.Soc.Sc., M.Soc.Sc.(UCD),

Ph.D.(Warwick)

Sandra Ryan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Western [email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204384

(061)774744

(061)204970

(061)204354

(061) 204598

(061) 204984

18

Michigan)

Religious Education

Patricia Kieran, B.Rel.Sc.(Mater Dei), M.Th.,

Ph.D.(London)

Daniel O’Connell, Dip.Phil., B.D.(NUIM), Grad.Dip. in

Holistic Dev.(All Hallows), M.Ed., Ph.D.(Boston College) [email protected]

Maurice Harmon, Dip. Phil, B.D., H.Dip. in Pastoral

Studies, (Maynooth), M.A.(Fordham University) [email protected]

(061)204965

(061)204966 [email protected]

(061)204720 [email protected]

(061)204984

Educational Disadvantage

Sandra Ryan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Western

Michigan)

Transforming Education Through Dialogue

Ann Higgins, B.Ed., Dip. Remedial Ed., Ph.D.(UL)

Ruth Bourke, B.A.(UL), M.Ed.(Adult Ed)(UL)

Social, Environmental and Scientific Education

Anne Dolan, B.Ed., M.A., Dip.Adult Comm.Ed.(NUI),

Ed.D.(Sheffield Hallam)

(Pedagogy of Geography)

Eileen O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UCC), Ph.D.(UCC)

(Pedagogy of History)

Maeve Liston, B.Sc., Ph.D.(UL) [email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204979

(061)774715

(061)204983

(061)204975

(061)204726

(Science Education)

Anne O’Dwyer B.Sc (UL), Phd, UL

(Science Education)

Miriam Hamilton, B.A., Post-Grad Dip in Co-operative

Learning, (TCD), M.Ed (MIC), PhD (MIC)

(Science Education)

Development and Intercultural Education

Brighid Golden B.Ed., M.Ed (Birmingham)

Social, Personal and Health Education

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061) 204346

(061) 774754

(061)204991

19

Carol O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL) M.A.(NUI),

Ed.D.(DCU) [email protected]

(061)204928

MA in Educational Psychology

Siobhán O’Sullivan, B.Sc in Ed. (UL), H.Dip.Psych.(NUI),

M.Sc.(Univ.Coll.London)

Programme Leader

Claire Griffin, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),

MAEP (UCD

Department Administrator

Josephine Frahill [email protected]

(061)204536 [email protected]

[email protected]

(061)774701

(061)204366

Department of Language, Literacy and Mathematics Education

Head of Department

Seán de Brún, N.T., B.A., HDE, M.Ed., Dip.Cat.(NUI) [email protected]

Gaeilge

Seán de Brún, N.T., B.A., HDE, M.Ed., Dip.Cat.(NUI) [email protected]

(061)204329

(061)204329

Roibeárd Ó Cathasaigh, B.A., M.A., HDE(NUI)

Eilís Ní Dheá, B.A., M.A., HDE, Ph.D.(NUI)

Martina Ní Fhatharta, B.Oid., M.Oid.(UL)

English

Áine Cregan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), Ed.D.(Harvard)

Martin Gleeson, N.T., B.A.(NUI), M.Ed.(TCD), Ph.D.(UL)

Fiodhna Gardiner-Hyland B.Ed. (MIC); MA in Ed., (MIC);

PhD, (Univ. of Leicester)

Mathematics Education

Aisling Leavy, B.Sc.(NUI), Grad.Dip.Ed.(DCU), M.A.in

Ed.(Calif. State), Ph.D.(Ariz. State)

Mairéad Hourigan, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(UL)

John O’Shea, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), Ph.D.(UL)

Noreen O’Loughlin, B.Ed., M.Ed., Grad. Dip. Comp, Dip.

Bus. St., Grad. Dip. Mant St., Ph.D. (University of Bristol) [email protected]

(061)204342 [email protected]

(061)204359 [email protected]

(061)204555 [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204902

(061)204971

061204766 [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204978

(061)204504

(061)774713

(061)204357

20

Modhanna Múinte na Gaeilge

Seán Ó Cathalláin, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(OU), Ph.D.(Stirling) [email protected]

TJ Ó Ceallaigh, B.Oid.(UL), M.Oid. (UCC) Dioplóma

Iarchéime san Oideachas Gairmiúil(NUIG), Ph.D.(UCC) [email protected]

(061)204371

(061)204325

Siobhán Ní Mhurchú, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A.(Ed)(UWE, Bristol) [email protected]

(061)204973

Department of Special Education

Head of Department

Patricia Daly, B.A., HDE (NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Ohio State) [email protected]

Margaret Egan, B.Ed.(TCD), M.Ed.(UL), Ph.D.(UCC) [email protected]

Stella Long, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), Dip.Soc.Studies(NUI)

Eucharia McCarthy, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)* [email protected]

(061)204309

(061)204337

(061)204580 [email protected]

(061)204508

Johanna Fitzgerald, M.A.(IOE, London) [email protected]

(061)204517

Trevor O’Brien, B.Ed.(DCU), M.Ed., Advanced Diploma in Applied Educational Studies(Hull), Dip Social

Studies(UCC) [email protected]

(061)774780

Professional Services Staff

Education Office Manager

Fintan Breen [email protected]

(061)204906

Education Office

Marie Quaid

Caroline Ní Chadhain*

Zeta Penny

Helen Heffernan

Nora O’Donoghue

Paula Treacy

Perry Meskell

Rose Higgins [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204310

(061)204358

(061)204924

(061)204923

(061)204923

(061)204925

(061)204551

(061)204551

21

Deirdre Cussen* [email protected]

(061)204545

Hellen Gallagher [email protected]

(061)774725

Sheila O'Callaghan

Mairead Horan

Josephine Frahill [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

* Indicates that the Faculty Member is currently on leave

(061)204549

(061)204563

(061)204366

22

23

Module

Code

EDU102

Title

MODULE MENU – BACHELOR OF EDUCATION 1

AUTUMN SEMESTER

EDU100 School Placement 1

EDU101 Language and Literacy 1

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 1

EDU103 STeM 1 Introduction to Mathematics and its Teaching

EDU104 Becoming a Student Teacher

EDU105

EDU106

Supporting the Child as Learner 1: Developmental Psychology and Educational

Psychology

Schools and Society 1: Developing criticality around recent and contemporary issues in education

Credits Semester

6

3

3

3

3

1

1

1

1

1

6

6

1

1

Certificate in Religious Education

24

BED 1 PROGRAMME SCHEDULE FOR SEMESTER 1

Week 8

Week 9

Week 10

Week 11

Week 12

Weeks 1-6

Week 7

Lectures Monday - Friday inclusive

Lectures Monday – Thursday inclusive

Conferring Friday 23 rd

October

Monday 26 th

October Bank Holiday

Lectures Tuesday – Friday inclusive

Monday 2 nd

November School Placement 1 (Classes sourced by College)

Lectures Tuesday – Friday inclusive

Monday 9 th

November School Placement 1 (Classes sourced by College)

Lectures Tuesday – Friday inclusive

Monday 16 th

November School Placement 1 (Classes sourced by College)

Lectures Tuesday – Friday inclusive

Monday 23 rd

November School Placement 1 (Classes sourced by College)

Week 13

Lectures Tuesday – Friday inclusive

Monday 30 th

November – 1 st

December School Placement (SP1 Make-up days)

Wednesday – Friday Study Days

Week 14-15 Examinations

25

Module EDU100

School Placement 1

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education 1; Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 1

INTRODUCTION:

There are two elements in this module: firstly, the School Placement Lectures and Tutorials, which run from weeks 1 - 12, and secondly, the School Placement, which runs each Monday from week 9-12. The placement, the first school placement on both 4 year programmes, is a non-teaching observationbased placement, focused on the ‘student as a learner’ - learning about primary pupils and their school learning environment; their rates of learning; what they learn and how they learn; where and from whom they learn. To engage in this module, students will be paired in Middle Classes (1 st

– 4 th

) on

Mondays throughout the semester, starting in week 9 (November 2 nd

) and continuing on each Monday thereafter until week 12 (November 23 rd

).

The School Placement Lectures and Tutorials initially prepare students for their classroom-based

School Placement. The module also facilitates the linking of theoretical models of developmental psychology, educational methodology and contemporary educational issues as delivered and exampled in other Semester 1 modules. When the classroom-based School Placement begins in week 9, students will begin to engage in a series of observation tasks designed to develop their understanding of pupils as learners. A range of options will be provided and students select tasks in accordance with their school context and guidance from the class teacher. Students will engage with both their college tutor and the class teacher in analysis and discussion of their learning.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Relate theories of learning to classroom practice

Recognise children’s different learning styles and rates of learning

Discuss teaching and learning approaches and classroom management approaches with the class teacher

Identify appropriate teaching and learning strategies for engaging children in middle classes with the Primary School Curriculum.

Appreciate the complexity and dynamics of the primary school as a learning environment

Appreciate the significance of engaging with the School Placement in a professional manner

Relate appropriately to all school and school placement personnel

Discuss their observations and experiences with placement peers, tutor, class teacher and school personnel

Document the development of their teacher identity

MODULE CONTENT:

26

Before the School Placement begins, lectures and tutorials (weeks 1 – 8) will prepare the student for their placement and will address many issues as outlined in the table below:

Week 1

SP1 Lecture

Week 2

SP1 Lecture

Week 3

SP1 Lecture

Week 4

SP1 Lecture

Week 5

SP1 Lecture

Week 6

SP1 Lecture

Course Outline, Introduction to Moodle, School

Placement 1 Requirements, the School Placement

Database (Outreach/Local Placements)

The 4 year School Placement Continuum for the undergraduate B.Ed and B.Ed Psy degrees

Documentation for SP - Introducing the School

Placement Handbook, Code of Professional Practice for Student Teachers on Placement, File-keeping,

Cúntas Tinrimh, School Acceptance forms and

Attendance Forms, Teaching Schedules, etc,

Importance of Deadlines

School Partnership relationships – (teacher, student, principal, parents, peers, tutor...etc), classroom life, school day, school/classroom routines, teacher as ‘in loco parentis’, Lortie’s Theory of Apprenticeship of

Observation, conceptualising biographical memory of classrooms vs actual contemporary classrooms, active participation in the classroom, engaging with the cooperating teacher, centrality of discussion

Observing in the classroom – how/why/when to observe, priorities regarding the child as learner and the student as learner, child protection issues, ethics of classroom observation, online ethics for SP, recording data, ethics and anonymity

Assessment Guidelines for EDU100 - Learning logs and

Summative Reflections for School Placement, guided reflective writing, how to keep an active learning log, importance of reflections and record keeping

Week 7

Tutorial Venues

Week 8

Tutorial Venues

Week 9

School setting AND

Tutorial Venues

Week 10

School setting AND

Tutorial Venues

Week 11

School setting AND

Tutorial Venues

Introductions with Tutor; Review of School Placement

1 requirements, health and safety on school placements

Preparing for Entering the Classroom –

Professionalism and first impressions, dress code, active participation, students’ expectations and perspectives for upcoming classroom placement experience, responsibility

Tutorial Discussion on School Placement experiences and learning 1- School /Classroom environment

Tutorial Discussion on School Placement experiences and learning 2– Classroom Management

Tutorial Discussion on School Placement experiences and learning 3 - Strategies for Teaching and Learning

27

Week 12

School setting AND

Tutorial Venues

Tutorial Discussion on School Placement experiences and learning 4 – Small group interaction

Once the Placement begins (from week 9) the tutorials’ focus will change. Tutorial discussion will then be about the student’s week by week classroom experiences. The School Placement module has specific observation tasks designed for the students which are complementary to the tasks set by

Educational Methodology. Also, observation tasks and engagements will be designed by presenters of other semester 1 modules. All observation and engagement tasks may be discussed at the tutorials, and these tasks form the content of the tutorial discussions. Engaging with the class teacher is an essential element of this module and students are required to discuss the planned observation tasks and their observations prior to completing the weekly learning log with the class teacher.

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

This module is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis. The assessment comprises of a compulsory attendance component at tutorials, briefings and school placement. Also, students must ensure assessment and attendance forms are completed. Students must complete and bring to tutorials (section a) Learning

Logs for discussion and reflection purposes, whilst (section b) Summative Reflections must be completed after School Placement 1 concludes. These forms are located on Moodle, and all relevant sections must be completed during the School Placement from weeks 9-12. Together they will form

Part 1 of each student’s School Placement Reflective Practice Portfolio. See Moodle course for assessment criteria and grade descriptors.

No uncertified absence is permitted for the School Placement of weeks 9-12, and any such incompletion of the School Placement will result in an F or NG grade. Attendance will be taken at all tutorials and two or more uncertified absences will result in an F grade being awarded for the module.

Normally, students may repeat a School Placement module once.

Coursework Submission Date:

School Placement Attendance Form (to be submitted in signed hardcopy format to your tutor during your week 12 tutorial session (if student is completing a make-up day on Monday 30 th

November 2015, students must submit this form directly to the Education Office in hardcopy format FAO [For Attention Of] their SP1 Tutor by Wednesday

2 nd

December at 5pm).

School Placement Reflective Practice Portfolio (section b) Summative

Reflections: to be submitted directly to Moodle (via Turnitin) in week

13. The online submission opens from 9am Monday 30 th

November

2015 until 5pm Wednesday 2 nd

December 2015.

Coursework Submission Times: As above

Repeat Assessment:

28

Repeat placement in a block week in January 2016 or May/June 2016, completion of Reflective Portfolio Part 1 (sections a & b) and an Essay on lecture/tutorial work content.

All assignments must be submitted with the appropriate cover sheet (see Moodle)

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

FEEDBACK:

On-going feedback occurs throughout the semester on an informal basis in tutorials. Further feedback may be requested on an individual basis.

STAFF:

Name

Eamonn

Mitchell

Neil Ó Conaill

Title

Lecturer in

School

Placement

Co-ordinator of

School

Placement 1

Director of

School

Placement

Office

Office Hour/s

G46 (meeting requests should be emailed in advance)

306 (meeting requests should be emailed in advance)

Telephone

061 204 518

061 204 519

Email

[email protected]

[email protected]

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

1. Cohen, L. Manion, L., Morrison, K. & Wyse, D. (2010) A Guide to Teaching Practice 5 th

Edition,

London: Routledge.

2. Government of Ireland (1999) Primary School Curriculum, Dublin: Stationary Office.

3. Mary Immaculate College (2015) School Placement Handbook 2015/2016: Handbook for

Students and Tutors, Limerick: Mary Immaculate College

Supplementary Readings

1. Bolton, G. (2010, 3 rd

ed.) Reflective Practice: Writing and Professional Development, London:

Sage.

2. Borich, G. (2011) Observation Skills for Effective Teaching, 6th edition, London: Pearson, pp. 8-

20.

29

3. Denby, N. ed. (2012) Training to Teach: A Guide for Students, London: Sage.

4. Hopkins, D. (2008) A Teacher’s Guide to Classroom Research, Maidenhead: Open University

Press.

30

Module EDU101

Language and Literacy 1

Autumn Semester 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education 1; Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 1

This module will introduce students to the foundational competences required for the effective teaching of English Language and Literacy at primary level. The professional English component will focus on the development of the student teacher as a language user.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Identify and understand the essential characteristics and components of language as a means of communication

Understand the stages of language acquisition and development

Become familiar with the theories of how language is acquired and developed

Recognise the developmental trajectory of children’s early reading and writing development

Develop and apply a basic understanding of the principles and theory underpinning children’s development as writers

Reflect on and expand their own knowledge and use of language as a means of expression and communication

MODULE CONTENT

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

8

9

10

11

12

4

5

6

7

WEEK

1

2

3

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

Introduction to Language Development

Characteristics and Components of Language

Oral Language: A Rationale

Oral Language: Stages of Acquisition and Development (1)

Oral Language: Stages of Acquisition and Development (2)

Oral Language: Theories of Language Acquisition

Reading: The Reading Process

Reading: Understanding and Supporting Children’s Phonological Development

Reading: The Reading Comprehension Process

Reading: Effective Comprehension Instruction

Writing: The Writing Process

Writing: Teaching Writing Effectively: Research-based instructional approaches

31

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

Feedback on student work is given as appropriate during tutorial sessions.

Any student who wishes to consult a lecturer/tutor in relation to work submitted is encouraged to make an appointment with the lecturer/tutor.

Office Hours: lecturers and tutors are available by appointment to meet with students.

STAFF: Lecturers

NAME

Dr Martin Gleeson

Dr Áine Cregan

Dr Fiodhna Gardiner-

Hyland

OFFICE CONTACT DETAILS

G47, Foundation Building 204971 / [email protected]

C109, Foundation Building 204902 / [email protected]

R206, Foundation Building 204766/[email protected]

STAFF: Tutors

NAME CONTACT DETAILS

Ms. Sara Fitzgerald [email protected]

Ms. Kate Lynch [email protected]

Ms. Karen Ward [email protected]

ASSESSMENT

Form of Assessment: The assessment for EDU101 is an end-of-semester exam. The exam will comprise two questions. Each question is worth 50% of the marks. Each question must be answered. Each question will have multiple parts. The duration of the exam is two hours. The exam will be based on the content of the course.

Form of Repeat Assessment: The repeat assessment for EDU 101 is an exam. The exam will comprise two essay style questions. Each question is worth 50% of the marks. Each question must be answered.

The duration of the Repeat exam is two hours. The repeat exam will be based on the content of the course.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

32

N.B. Attendance at and participation in lectures and tutorials is a requirement of the course.

Attendance will be recorded weekly. Email notification of absences is not accepted. 10% of marks in

the module will be deducted for poor attendance.

Student work will be examined using the following assessment criteria:

Knowledge and understanding of key concepts (60%)

Evidence of engagement with assigned readings (25%)

Clarity and quality of presentation (15%)

Marking Scheme

A1 96-100

A2 90-95

B1 80-89

B2 70-79

B3 60-69

C1 55-59

C2 50-54

C3 40-49

D1 35-39

D2 30-34

F <30

READING LIST

(

Please Note: Mandatory readings will be assigned on a weekly basis. All readings will be available on

Moodle and on the LAN). Indicative readings include:

Armbruster, B. et al. (2005). Put Reading First. Kindergarten through Grade 3. The Research

Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read. (3 rd

Edition). National Institute for Literacy. pp.11-17.

Byrnes, J.P.& Wasik, B.A. (2009) Language and Literacy Development: What Educators Need to

Know. New York: The Guilford Press.

Dalton, B. & Grisham, D.L. (2011). eVoc Strategies: 10 Ways to use technology to build vocabulary. The Reading Teacher 64(5). pp. 306-317

Dean, D. (2010). What Works in Writing Instruction: Research and Practices. USA: National

Council of Teachers of English.

Dickinson, D.K. & Neuman, S.B. (Eds.) (2011) Handbook of Early Literacy Research Volume 3. New

York: The Guildford Press

33

Fromkin, V., Rodman, R. & Hyams, N. (2011). An Introduction to Language, Ninth Edition,

Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Graham, S., MacArthur, C.A., and Fitzgerald, J. (Eds.) (2013). Best Practices in Writing Instruction.

New York: The Guildford Press.

Hampton, S. and Resnick, L.B. (2009). Reading and Writing with Understanding. Washington,

USA: International Reading Association.

Hoff, E. and Shatz, M. (2009) The Blackwell Handbook of Language Development, Wiley-

Blackwell.

Honig, A. S. (2007) 'Oral language development', Early Child Development and Care, 177(6-7),

581-613.

Kennedy, E. et al. (2012). Literacy in Early Childhood and Primary Education (3-8 years). Research

Report No. 15. NCCA: Dublin

MacArthur, C. A., Graham, S., & Fitzgerald, J. (Eds.) (2006). Handbook of Writing Research. New

York: Guilford.

Mandel Morrow, L. & L. B. Gambrell (2011). Best Practices in Literacy Instruction. NY: Guildford

Press.

Mukherji, P. & P. O’Dea (2000). Understanding Children’s Language and Literacy. Stanley

Thornes Pub.

Owens, R. E. J. (2012) Language Development. An Introduction, 8th edition ed., New Jersey,

Pearson.

Resnick, L.E. & Snow. C. E. (2009) 'Speaking and Listening' in Speaking and Listening for Pre-

School through 3rd Grade (Revised Edition), International Reading Association.

Saxton, M. (2010). Child Language Acquisition and Development. Sage Publishing.

Staab, C. (1992). Oral Language for Today’s Classroom. Pippin Publishing Ltd.

Tracey, D.H. & Mandel Morrow, S. Reading: An Introduction to Theories and Models. (2 nd

Ed.)

Parallel Distributed Processing Model (Adams, 1990). pp. 166-171.

Troia, G.A., Shankland, R.K., and Heintz, A. (Eds.) (2010). Putting Writing Research into Practice.

New York: The Guildford Press.

Zumbrunn, S. & Krause, K. 92012). Conversations with Leaders. Principles of Effective Writing

Instruction. The Reading Teacher 65(5). pp. 346-353

34

Modúl EDU102 – An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 1

Seimeastar an Fhómhair, 2015 -2016

An Teanga agus Múineadh na Gaeilge

Baitsiléir an Oideachais 1

Sa mhodúl seo leagtar na bunclocha chun cumas labhartha agus scríofa Gaeilge na mac léinn a fheabhsú chun iad a ullmhú dá ról gairmiúil mar bhunmhúinteoirí le tuiscint agus eolas ar na modhanna múinte cuí chun an Ghaeilge a mhúineadh sa bhunscoil i suíomhanna éagsúla. Cuirtear béim ar chruinneas na teanga, labhairt agus scríobh, i gcomhthéacs na scileanna teanga atá riachtanach chun an Ghaeilge a mhúineadh go héifeachtach agus go taitneamhach sa bhunscoil.

Forbraítear tuiscint na mac léinn ar ról an mhúinteora i dteagasc na Gaeilge, ar fhoghlaim agus ar shealbhú teanga, ar mhodhanna múinte agus straitéisí do mhúineadh na Gaeilge, agus ar an nGaeilge mar mheán cumarsáide. Tugtar tuiscint do na mic léinn ar an nGaeilge mar theanga bheo.

Is í príomhaidhm an mhodúil seo dearcadh dearfach a chothú i leith mhúineadh agus fhoghlaim na

Gaeilge.

Torthaí Foghlama:

Ar chríochnú an mhodúil seo go rathúil ba chóir go mbeadh ar chumas an mhic léinn eolas agus tuiscint a léiriú ar

Fhoghlaim agus ar theagasc na Gaeilge mar dhara teanga

Straitéisí éifeachtacha chun cumas cumarsáide an pháiste a fhorbairt sa Ghaeilge

Ar chríochnú an mhodúil seo go rathúil ba chóir go gcuirfí ar chumas an mhic léinn:

35

Líofacht agus cruinneas teanga le foclóir leordhóthaineach a léiriú i scríobh agus i labhairt na Gaeilge

Tuiscint a léiriú ar úsáid fhoclóirí agus áiseanna foghlama idirlín don Ghaeilge

ÁBHAR AN MHODÚIL

Múineadh na Gaeilge i Scoileanna T2 (Ranganna 1-4)

o Foramharc ar an gCuraclam Gaeilge agus na Treoirlínte do Mhúinteoirí o Modhanna múinte: Modhanna éagsúla chun teanga a mhúineadh o Struchtúr do cheacht Gaeilge o Straitéisí chun cumas cumarsáide an pháiste a fhorbairt

 Gaeilge neamhfhoirmiúil

 Tascanna éisteachta

 Filíocht

 Cluichí teanga

 Tascanna agus Obair bheirte

An Ghaeilge - Teanga

 Ranna Cainte

 Briathra sa chéad agus sa dara réimniú

 An tAinmfhocal - sainmhíniú an ainmfhocail, saghsanna ainmfhocal, uimhir uatha agus iolra den

ainmfhocal, inscne an ainmfhocail, an tAinmfhocal agus an Aidiacht san uimhir uatha agus san

uimhir iolra

 Abairtí a aistriú ó Bhéarla go Gaeilge

 Bunfhuaimeanna na Gaeilge a aithint agus a rá

 Foclóirí, áiseanna idirlín agus leabhair Ghramadaí a úsáid

 Forainmneacha Pearsanta

 Réamhfhocail – ag, as, chuig, dar, le, go

 Labhairt na Gaeilge: Téamaí Churaclam na Bunscoile, Mé Féin, An Scoil, Ócáidí

Speisialta

MEASÚNÚ AN MHODÚIL:

Múineadh na Gaeilge – 40%

Scrúdú scríofa cheannchúrsa le seasamh ag deireadh an tseimeastair: Sraith ceisteanna gearra

(SSQ) (agus don atriail freisin).

Beidh na ceisteanna bunaithe ar ábhar an chúrsa agus ar an ábhar léitheoireachta.

Is i nGaeilge amháin a ghlacfar le freagraí scrúduithe.

AISEOLAS

36

Más mian leat aon ghné den chlár i Múineadh na Gaeilge a phlé déan teagmháil leis an léachtóir cuí ar an ríomhphost.

UAIREANTA OIFIGE

Más mian leat coinne a dhéanamh le léachtóir i Múineadh na Gaeilge déan teagmháil leis/léi ar an ríomhphost.

Teanga – 60%

Scrúdú scríofa ag deireadh an tseimeastair. Dhá cheist le codanna éagsula don teanga.

Atriail: Scrúdú scríofa. Dhá cheist le codanna éagsula don teanga.

Is i nGaeilge amháin a ghlacfar le freagraí scrúduithe.

Tógfar tinreamh ranga i rith an tseimeastair don teanga.

LIOSTA LÉITHEOIREACHTA

Múineadh na Gaeilge

LIOSTA LÉITHEOIREACHTA

An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta (1999) Curaclam na Bunscoile Gaeilge – Teanga. Baile

Átha Cliath: Oifig an tSoláthair.

Lgh.2-15: Leagan amach agus struchtúr an churaclaim

Lgh.36-43: Éisteacht & Labhairt (Ranganna 1 & 2)

Lgh.48-56: Éisteacht & Labhairt (Ranganna 3 & 4)

An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta (1999) Curaclam na Bunscoile Gaeilge – Teanga

Treoirlínte do Mhúinteoirí. Baile Átha Cliath: Oifig an tSoláthair.

Lgh.20-21: Gaeilge neamhfhoirmiúil, an Ghaeilge mar theanga teagaisc, an Ghaeilge sa timpeallacht

Lgh.58-63: Struchtúr do chur chuige cumarsáideach (Struchtúr do cheacht Gaeilge)

Lgh.64-67: Modhanna múinte

Lgh.67-87: Straitéisí éagsúla chun cumas cumarsáide an pháiste a fhorbairt -

Agallamh mar ionchur

Cluichí teanga & Tascanna

Lgh.105-112: Filíocht agus amhráin

37

Lgh.116-121: Éisteacht

Lgh.122-124: Labhairt

Scott, W. A. & Ytreberg L. H. (1990) Teaching English to Children – Caibidlí 1-4. (372.6521/LIT)

Slattery, M. & Willis, J. (2001) English for Primary Teachers – Caibidlí 1-5.

(Oversize 372.6/SLA)

ACMHAINNÍ BREISE

1. Cameron, L. (2001) Teaching Languages to Young Learners (Caibidlí 1-4). Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press.

2.

Carless, D. (2002) ‘Implementing task-based learning with young learners’, ELT, 56(4),

389-396.

Implementing task-based learning with young learners. (ar fáil ar Moodle)

3. de Bhaldraithe, B., Ó Braonáin, D., Ní Dhoibhlin, S. agus Ní Ghormáin, M. (2004) Mo

Cheol Thú! BÁC: An Comhlacht Oideachais.

4. Folens (gan dáta) Dánta Bunscoile 1 Rang 3-4. BÁC: Folens Teo.

5.Gael-Linn (gan dáta) Gaeilge Bheo! Baile Átha Cliath: Gael-Linn Teo.

6.Ó Cathasaigh, R. (1998) Rabhlaí Rabhlaí, Rogha Rannta Traidisiúnta don Aos Óg.

Luimneach: An tAonad Forbartha Curaclaim, Coláiste Mhuire gan Smál / Baile an

Fheirtéaraigh: Oidhreacht Chorca Dhuibhne.

7. Tiobraid Árann ag Labhairt (gan dáta) Gaeilge Gach Lá. Tiobraid Árann ag Labhairt:

An tAonach. (Tá an cháipéis seo ar fáil ar Moodle.)

Teanga

1. De Bhaldraithe, T. (1998). English - Irish Dictionary. An Gúm, Baile Átha Cliath.

2. Mac Giolla Phádraig, B. (1987). Gearrchúrsa Gramadaí. Longman, Brún agus ó

Nualláin Teo.

3. Ó Dónaill, N. (1998). Foclóir Gaeilge - Béarla. An Gúm, Baile Átha Cliath. WinGléacht

4. Ó Murchú, D. & Ó Murchú, P. (2005). Briathra na Gaeilge. Folens, Baile Átha Cliath.

5. Mac Aogáin, Leon (1990) Irish Grammar Glance Card.

Acmhainní Breise

Mac Murchaidh, C. (2002). Cruinnscríobh na Gaeilge. Cois Life. Baile Átha Cliath.

Mac Suibhne, A. agus Whelton, M. (2009). Sruth na Maoile, Coláiste Mhuire, Institiúid

Oideachais, Marino, Baile Átha Cliath: Brunswick Press.

Ó Murchú, S. (1985). Cúrsa Tosaigh Foghraíochta. An Gúm, Baile Átha Cliath.

www.acmhainn.ie

An Foclóir Beag

www.focloir beag

Focal.ie

www.focal.ie

38

GaelSpell

www.gaelspell.com

www.seomraranga.ie

www.tobar.ie

www.teachnet.ie

www.teagascnagaeilge.ie

AISEOLAS

Más mian leat aon ghné den chlár sa teanga a phlé déan teagmháil leis an léachtóir cuí ar an ríomhphost.

UAIREANTA OIFIGE

Más mian leat coinne a dhéanamh le teagascóir sa teanga déan teagmháil leis/léi ar an ríomhphost.

Foireann:

Ainm agus sloinne Teideal Oifig Uimhir

Ghutháin

Ríomhphost

Seán de Brún

Ceann Roinne

Léachtóir

Gaeilge

C101 061 (20)4329 [email protected]

R116 061 (20)4371 [email protected]

An Dr Seán Ó Cathalláin Léachtóir i

Múineadh na

Gaeilge

Siobhán Ní Mhurchú

G61 061 (20)4973 [email protected]

Niamh de Búrca

(Páirtaimseartha)

Léachtóir i

Múineadh na

Gaeilge

Teagascóir

Teanga

G71 [email protected]

Sailí Ní Dhroighneáin

(Páirtaimseartha)

Teagascóir

Teanga

G71 [email protected]

Emily-Anne Rennison

(Páirtaimseartha)

Teagascóir

Teanga

G71 [email protected]

39

Lisa Ní Chearnaigh

(Páirtaimseartha)

Tomás Ó Céilleachair

(Páirtaimseartha)

Teagascóir

Teanga

Teagascóir

Teanga

G71

G71 [email protected] [email protected]

40

Module EDU103 – STeM 1: Introduction to Mathematics and its

Teaching

Autumn Semester, 2015

Bachelor of Education 1

Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 1

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT:

This course provides a foundation for subsequent STeM mathematics education courses as it facilitates reflection on personal experiences of mathematics as learners. STeM represents recent efforts to focus on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education. Importantly it challenges beliefs and attitudes in relation to mathematics and its teaching in order to break the well-documented cycle of teaching-as-taught. Opportunities will also be given to students to examine the development of number concepts across the primary school curriculum.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Arising from participation in this module, students will:

Appreciate the value and utilisation of mathematics learning in everyday life

Have confidence in personal mathematics subject matter knowledge and refine and develop the ability to teach mathematics effectively.

Reflect on and deconstruct previous mathematics experiences to examine and address misconceptions or ‘thin’ understanding

Participate in sessions to experience best practice in mathematics teaching i.e. constructivist approach, use of materials etc.

Investigate the teaching progressions for primary level number concepts/procedures and explore and demonstrate suitable manipulative usage to support children’s understanding.

Demonstrate understanding of primary level number concepts and procedures in addition to connections between their mathematical knowledge and its use in pedagogical contexts.

MODULE CONTENT:

The content of this module will enable students to develop an understanding of learning mathematics, particularly number, from a primary pupil’s perspective. The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

5

6

7

8

1

2

3

4

Introduction to the Teaching of Primary Mathematics

Early Number

Early Number

Place Value

Number Operations: Addition

Number Operations: Subtraction

Number Operations: Multiplication

Number Operations: Division

41

9

10

11

12

Fractions, Decimals, Percentages

Fractions, Decimals, Percentages

Estimation in context of Number

Seeing the connections and links across the Primary Maths Curriculum

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Attendance and participation in lectures and workshops is a requirement of the course. Lecture attendance is required due to the emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences in working with models and manipulatives. Attendance will be recorded weekly. Up to 10% of marks may be deducted for poor attendance.

The examination will take place during weeks 14/15 (worth 100%). Students must answer four essaytype questions from a choice of five (4Q/5). Questions will be set from lecture material/notes, available handouts, lecture-based activities, and required readings from the Van De Walle textbook in addition to other readings identified in the course of the module.

In the event that a student fails the module, the repeat assessment procedure for the module is examination (worth 100%). In the repeat examination, students must answer four essay-type questions from a choice of five (4Q/5).

FEEDBACK:

Feedback on exam will be given during Semester 2.

STAFF:

Name Title Office

Office Hour/s

Dr. John O’Shea Lecturer

Dr. Noreen

O’Loughlin

Claire Carroll

Lecturer

R224 Foundation Building

Please email to arrange

appointment.

G17 Foundation Building

Please email to arrange

appointment.

Please email to arrange

appointment.

Telephone

061 (77)4713

061 (20)4357

Email

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

READING LIST:

42

Lecturers may make notes available relating to weekly lectures in both components of the course.

These notes are intended as a brief overview of the content covered during the session. They are not intended as a summary of the lecture nor are they intended as a substitute for attendance at lectures

(attendance is a requirement). Hence, you are advised to take detailed notes during all lectures. These notes are available to all students via moodle.

URL:

Access Key:

Moodle.mic.ul.ie

polya

Core Required Texts:

Government of Ireland (1999). Mathematics: Primary School Curriculum. The Stationery

Office.

Government of Ireland (1999). Mathematics: Teacher Guidelines. The Stationery Office. p. 30-

65.

Van De Walle , J., Karp, K.S. & Bay-Williams, J. (2010). Elementary and Middle School

Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. Seventh/Eighth Edition. Boston: Pearson

/Allyn and Bacon

.

Required readings from the Van De Walle textbook will be assigned by the lecturer at the relevant lecture and/or listed in the relevant lecture notes. Other readings and references may be suggested by individual lecturers for the purpose of informing your school placement preparation and for general reading around topics. It is important to note that the readings supplement the course content and provide background on the mathematical topics. However, the readings are not a substitute for attendance at lectures.

Building Assessment into Instruction

Developing Early Number Sense

Teaching Through Problem Solving

Van De Walle, J. (2010) Chapter 5

Van De Walle, J. (2010) Chapter 8

Van De Walle, J. (2010) Chapter 3

Developing Meanings for the Operations

Helping Children Master the Basic Facts

Developing Whole-Number Place-Value Concepts

Van De Walle, J. (2010) Chapter 9

Van De Walle, J. (2010) Chapter 10

Van De Walle, J. (2010) Chapter 11

Developing Fraction Concepts Van De Walle, J. (2010) Chapter 15

Developing Strategies for Addition and Subtraction Computation

Van De Walle, J. (2010) Chapter 12

Journals

Teaching Children Mathematics (Official K-4 journal of the NCTM)

Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School (Official 5-8 journal of the NCTM)

Journal for Research in Mathematics Education

43

Module EDU104

Title: Becoming a Student Teacher

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (1): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (1)

INTRODUCTION:

This module will focus on the personal and professional development of the student teacher, to support their transition from second-level to third-level education, and to develop and consolidate essential skills and competences needed over the course of the B.Ed programme.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

• achieve a smooth transition between second and third level education

• become aware of and consolidate particular competencies (self-awareness, problem solving, decision making, resilience, self-reliance) in the context of their personal and professional development

• recognise the importance of the individual, of positive relationships and of effective communication and see the relevance of these issues to the school context

• identify challenges to their own empowerment and decision-making capacities

• develop the necessary skills to overcome such challenges.

• recognise the importance of appropriate academic writing;

• assess the connection between academic writing and the forms of thinking of the academic world;

• review their own writing process;

• reference the work of others appropriately;

• use contemporary research in academic writing to inform their own writing;

• use word processing software with confidence, particularly in tasks relevant to the needs of a student teacher

• navigate the college network efficiently and achieve competence and confidence in basic computer file management skills

• use the Internet effectively for research, communication and productivity

• use the interactive whiteboard and other classroom presentation tools with confidence to effectively support communication and teaching

MODULE CONTENT:

44

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

WEEK

1

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS: Life Skills

Self-Identity, Transitions and Relationships

2

3

4

5

WEEK

1

2

Effective Communication and Assertiveness

Decision Making

Motivation to Study: Time management, organisational skills, study skills

Stress Management

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS: ICT

Word Processing for the Student Teacher

Computer and Network Management

1

2

3

4

3

4

5

WEEK

Interactive Whiteboards and Presentations Skills 1

Interactive Whiteboards and Presentations Skills 2

Internet Literacy

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS: Academic Writing

Introduction to academic writing

Academic writing style and giving opinions

Referencing and Citation

Writing introductions and main body

5 Writing conclusions and proof-reading

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

Feedback on the module will be provided upon request

ASSESSMENT:

Students will be asked to keep a reflective journal for the duration of the module. They will identify and critically reflect upon the key learning experiences of the module using their journals as a reference point (600 words). They will also be asked to write a brief overall comment on the module noting the positive and negative aspects of it with reference to its particular value in their lives

(400 words). Particular emphasis will be placed on use of ICT and academic writing skills in the presentation of this assessment.

The module will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis

Assessment Criteria:

Structure/Clarity

Summary of overall content of programme

Application/Relevance to students’ lives

Critical Reflection

Academic Writing Skills

Competence in ICT in presentation of essay

Overall Result

P/F

P/F

P/F

P/F

P/F

P/F

P/F

Attendance and participation in class will also form part of the Assessment process. Any

unexplained absences will be reported to the course co-ordinator.

45

STAFF:

Name

Carol

O’Sullivan

(Module

Coordinator)

Margaret

Nohilly

Title

Dr.

Dr.

Contact

Please email for appointment

Office

305

Telephone Email

061 204928 [email protected]

Brighid

Golden

Tim

Moloney

Sharon

Moynihan

Brendan

Barry

Rory

McGann

James

Binchy

Ms.

Mr.

Ms.

Mr.

Mr.

Dr.

Please email for appointment

Please email for appointment

Please email for appointment

Please email for appointment

Please email for appointment

Please email for appointment

Please email for appointment

N101

222

L104

R201a

C4

061 204744

061 204991

061 204941

061 204520

061 204717

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

READING LIST:

Optional Reading List:

(All available in General Lending section of Library except where marked*)

1. Mannix McNamara, P. & Geary, T. (2011). Social and Personal Learning (Lifeskills) in Higher

Education. London: Lambert Academic Publishing.

2. Mental Health Ireland (2004). Mental Health Matters. Dublin: MHI.

3. Dáil na nÓg (2010). Lifeskills matter – not just points. Dublin: Government Publications.

(www.dailnanog.ie) (download)*

4. ECO-UNESCO (2007). Eco-Choices Resource Pack: An Environmental Youth Programme for Drugs

Prevention. Dublin: ECO-UNESCO, (www.ecounesco.ie)*

5. O’Reilly, K. (2005). Voice Our Concern: A Human Rights Educational Module for Transition Year.

Dublin: Amnesty International Irish Section. (www.amnesty.ie)*

46

6. Gaffney, M. (2011) Flourishing. Dublin: Penguin Ireland.

7. Langer, E. (1989) Mindfulness. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press.

8. Hyland, K. (2002) Teaching and Researching Writing, Harlow: Longman.

9. Ravelli, L.J. and Ellis, R.A., eds. (2004) Analysing Academic Writing, Cornwall: Continuum.

10. Devitt, A. J. (2004) Writing Genres, Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press

11. Johns, A. M. (1997) Text, Role and Context: Developing Academic Literacies, Cambridge: Cambridge

University Press

12. Grabe, W. (1996) Theory and Practice of Writing: An Applied Linguistic Perspective, London:

Longman.

13. Bjork, L., Brauer, G., Rienecker, L. and Jorgensen, P.S., eds. (2003) Teaching Academic Writing in

European Higher Education, London: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

14. Murray, R. and Moore, S. (2006) The Handbook of Academic Writing. Maidenhead : Open

University Press.

15. Moran, A. P. (1997) Managing Your Own Learning at University. Dublin: University College Dublin

Press.

16. Lillis, T.M. (2001) Student Writing: Access, Regulation, Desire, London: Routledge.

17. Creme, P. and Lea, M.R. (1997) Writing at University: A Guide for Students. Buckingham: Open

University Press.

18. Roblyer, M.D. & Doering A.H. (2010). Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching Fifth

Edition. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

19. Wheeler, S. (Ed.) (2005) Transforming Primary ICT. Exeter. Learning Matters.

47

Module EDU 105

Supporting the Child as Learner 1

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (2015)

INTRODUCTION:

This course will enable students to challenge their previous experiences of learning and conceptions of teaching through examining student teachers’ understanding of child development, with an emphasis on the child as learner. This course aims to explore the cognitive, social and emotional development of children from early childhood to early adolescence. It will explore theories of learning and development, as well as the role of the teacher in understanding and promoting positive child development, learning and behaviour. Students will observe, examine, analyse and reflect upon aspects of effective teaching practice for student learning, with a focus on the Middle Classes.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

Examine the link between theoretical principles of child development and their practical application in the classroom

Describe children’s development from birth to early adolescence across the domains of cognitive, emotional and social development

Examine the ecological context of development

Understand and critique current theories of child development

Relate their understanding of child development to their classroom practice and to the development of positive relationships with children and families

Reflect upon experiences as learners and discuss potential impact on developing teaching styles

Observe, examine, analyse and reflect upon aspects of effective teaching practice for student learning in Middle Classes

Design developmentally appropriate learning experiences for pupils in Middle Classes

Display a developing ability to discuss pedagogical issues and evaluate a range of methodologies and approaches for effective learning, with a focus on the Middle Classes

MODULE CONTENT:

The specific content of this module will provide opportunities for students to develop an understanding of two areas: Educational Methodology and Developmental Psychology. The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

48

6

7

8

9

3

4

5

EDUCATIONAL METHODOLOGY

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

1

2

Course Introduction; Key Principles of the Primary School Curriculum

Interaction Patterns in the Primary Classroom: Learning to interact,

interacting to learn:

Classroom Management: An Introduction (Lecture 1)

Classroom Management: An Introduction (Lecture 2)

Positive Approaches to Behaviour Management (Lecture 1)

Positive Approaches to Behaviour Management (Lecture 2)

Observing in Middle Classes

Classroom Ecology

Collaborative Learning (Lecture 1)

10

11

12

Collaborative Learning (Lecture 2)

Questioning and Explaining (Lecture 1)

Questioning and Explaining (Lecture 2); Course Synthesis: Key Learnings

FEEDBACK:

7

8

9

10

11

12

2

3

4

5

6

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

WEEK

1

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

Introductory Lecture: History, Theory, Research & Strategies in Child

Development & Developmental Psychology.

Developmental Theories: Behavioural Learning Theories

Developmental Theories: Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development

Developmental Theories: Vygotsky’s Socio-Cultural Theory

Developmental Theories: Kohlberg’s Moral Theory

Review, Critique & Application of Theories to Practice: Birth, Infancy and

Toddlerhood

Review, Critique & Application of Theories to Practice: Early Childhood

Bank Holiday (No Lecture): Assigned Readings

Review, Critique & Application of Theories to Practice: Middle Childhood

Emotional & Social Development in Early Childhood

Emotional & Social Development in Middle Childhood

Supporting The Child as Learner: A Review of Key Theoretical &

Developmental Principles.

Any student who wishes to consult a lecturer in relation to the course is encouraged to make an appointment with the lecturer.

Office Hours: Lecturers are available by appointment to meet with students.

49

ASSESSMENT:

The assessment procedure for the module is terminal written examination for Developmental

Psychology and for Educational Methodology (see below).

Assessment Components

Percentage allocated

Examination (SSQ)

{Developmental Psychology}

67%

Examination (SSQ)

{Educational Methodology}

33%

Attendance at and participation in lectures are essential. Lecture attendance is required due to the emphasis on problem-based learning and hands-on practical experiences in working through the module. Please note that up to 10% of marks in the module can be deducted for poor attendance.

The repeat assessment procedure for the module is a written examination for Developmental

Psychology and for Educational Methodology {total weighting of 100%}.

STAFF:

Name

Dr. Suzanne

Parkinson

(Module Co

ordinator)

Title

Lecturer &

Developmental

& Educational

Psychologist,

Department of

Learning,

Society &

Religious

Education

Contact

Please e mail to arrange appointment

Office

SG12

Telephone

061-

204958

Email [email protected]

Teresa

McElhinney

Lecturer,

Educational

Methodology,

Department of

Reflective

Pedagogy and

Please email to arrange appointment

R103 061-

204542 [email protected]

Early

Childhood

Studies

50

READING LIST:

You are advised to take detailed notes during all lectures. Although lecturers may make available on

Moodle outline notes relating to weekly lectures in both components of the course for the duration of this teaching semester, these are not lecture summaries and do not cover all material presented during lectures.

Readings are aligned with course topics, supplement the course content and provide background on topics covered. Required and recommended readings will be indicated during lectures and additional readings provided on Moodle.

REQUIRED READING – DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Berk, L. (2012). Infants, Children & Adolescents (7

th

ed). New Jersey: Pearson Education.

Further journal articles will be posted on Moodle during the course of the module .

REQUIRED READING – EDUCATIONAL METHODOLOGY

Required readings aligned with course topics will be posted on Moodle during the course of the module.

RECOMMENDED PROFESSIONAL RESOURCES

Effective teachers use high quality resources to stay current with research into Educational Methodology and Developmental Psychology. Effective teachers also use high quality resources to aid them in the instructional decisions they make. It is recommended that you learn about and start to use such resources this semester. Many of the resources below can be found in the library and online and on professional education websites.

Arends, R. (2007) Learning to Teach (7th Ed), NY: McGraw Hill.

Berk, L. (2010). Development through the lifespan. New Jersey: Pearson Education.

Berk, L. (2013). Child development (9th ed). London: Pearson Education.

Bonfield, T. and K. Horgan (1999) Learning to Teach Reflectively, Limerick: Mary

Immaculate College.

Boyd, D. & Bee, H. (2012). The Developing Child (13th Ed). New Jersey: Pearson.

Brown, S., Earlem, C. and Race, P. (1995). 500 Tips for Teachers, London: Kogan Page.

Cook, G. & Cook, J.L. (2010). The World of Children (2nd Ed). New Jersey: Pearson.

Cowley, S. (2006) Getting the buggers to behave: Third Edition. London: Continuum.

Croll, P. and Hastings, N. (1996) Effective Primary teaching. London: Fulton.

Dean, J. (1998) Improving the Primary School. London: Routledge.

Dean, J. (2001) Organising Learning in the Primary School Classroom. London: Routledge.

Doherty, J. & Hughes, M. (2009). Child Development: Theory and Practice 0-11. Essex:

Pearson.

Fisher, R. (1995) Teaching Children to Learn. Cheltenham: Stanley Thomas Ltd.

Growing up in Ireland. www.growingup.ie

Hayes, D. (1996) Foundations of Primary Teaching. London: David Fulton.

INTO (2002) Discipline in the Primary School.

Kyriacou, C. (1998) Essential Teaching Skills, Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes.

Kyriacou, C. (1986) Effective Teaching in Schools, Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes.

Lemlech, J.K. (1988) Classroom Management. Longman: London and New York.

Medwell, J. (2015) Training to Teach in Primary Schools (3 rd

Ed). London: Sage.

Mortimore, P. (1995) School matters: the junior years. London: Paul Chapman.

Mosley, J. (1996) Quality Circle Time in the Primary Classroom. Cambridge: George Solomonides.

O’Flynn, S. and Kennedy, H. (2000) Conflict and Confrontation in the Classroom.

Proctar, A. (1994) Learning to Teach in the Primary Classroom. London: Routledge.

Rogers, B. (2006) Classroom behaviour : a practical guide to effective teaching, behaviour management and colleague support. London Routledge.

Rogers, B. (2006) Cracking the Hard Class: Strategies for Managing the Harder than Average Class

(2 nd

Ed). London: Paul Chapman.

Rogers, B. (2002) Teacher Leadership and Behaviour Management. London: Paul Chapman.

Rogers, B. (2000) Behaviour Management: A Whole School Approach. London: Paul

Chapman.

Santrock, J. W. (2011). Child development: An introduction (13th Ed). New York: McGraw- Hill.

Scrivener, J. (2005) Learning Teaching, Oxford: Macmillan Education.

Smith, C. and Laslett, R. (1993) Effective Classroom Management. London: Routledge.

Thody, A. (2001) Teacher’s Survival Guide. UK: Whitaker.

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Tilstone, C. and Layton, L. (2004) Child Development and Teaching Children with Special

Educational Needs. London: Routledge

Wong, K. and Wong, T. (1995) First Days of School: How to be an Effective Teacher. Bowker, US:

Hwong Publications.

Woolfolk, A. (2013) Educational Psychology (12th Ed). London: Pearson.

Wragg, E.C. (1993) Primary Teaching Skills. London: Routledge.

Zeichner, K.M. and P. Liston (1996) Reflective Teaching: An Introduction, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

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School and Society 1 Semester 1, Autumn 2015

Module EDU106

Bachelor of Education 1

IDENTITY, SELF AND CRITICALITY. OUTLINE.

The primary themes of the course are: Identity, Self and Criticality.

Course Structure and Outline

This course provides an opportunity for students to reflect on beliefs, values, assumptions and ideas about identity, criticality and education, as well as to examine more broadly some philosophical, sociological and historical questions about what it means to be human. It aims to provide a setting in which students can encounter the writings of key philosophers, sociologists and historians, explore those ideas collaboratively, develop a critical (i.e. questioning) approach and begin to evaluate the different ideas that people hold about the self, identity and society.

The course is structured as follows:

A variety of teaching approaches will be experienced throughout the semester. These will include the descriptive lecture, seminars, group work, film viewing and review, in-class writing, peer discussion, pair work, collaborative work, etc. In order for students to benefit from this course structure, and to connect it with their experiences of education and other lived experience, students will need to be open to participating in the sessions with tutors. In all sessions, we will consider questions that relate to the texts, films, extracts, etc. and try to develop a concrete understanding of why these ideas matter. It is important that all students attend all the sessions for assessment purposes (see below). 10% of marks will be dedicated to attendance and participation at tutorials. Tutorials will commence in Week 2 (see attached schedule and please note the topic for each week and prepare accordingly).

In this course you will be asked to reflect in a critical manner on ideas. This does not mean simply stating your opinion. It involves a willingness to engage with different perspectives and to offer reasons for your views and readiness to re-examine your position. We will attempt to make connections with your own experience of education, schooling and your lived experiences, and we will encourage you to develop your distinct perspective on these issues. It will require you to read the texts and engage with tutorials, films, etc. with considerable care and rigour. N.B. The aim of the course is to find a space in

which you can engage creatively and critically with these ideas, rather than simply summarising

the central ideas of key thinkers.

The final two weeks of tutorials are dedicated to DICE (Development and Intercultural Education).

These will address key themes that will be encountered through the B.ED Programme, including

Schools and Society Modules.

Philosophy of Education

The reason that we chose the common theme of identity is so that you can see how people working in different disciplines approach thinking about the same concept, idea or question in different ways. In the section on philosophy we focus on the question of identity in the work of a range of authors including bell hooks and Plato, and we will learn what it means to do philosophy by drawing upon practices and methodologies from philosophy with/for children. In order to engage in higher order questioning with children and support their lines of enquiry, it is important that we ask those questions of ourselves.

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How we understand ourselves and how we understand what it is to be human shapes both our education system, our relationship with children in the classroom and our understanding of ourselves as teachers. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing the skills of reading, and interpreting philosophical texts and students will develop their capacity to engage in critical evaluation of ideas. We will also look at the approach to questioning and exploration of ideas in philosophy with children, which will support your reflections on creating a space for critical thinking, questioning and reflection in the primary school classrom.

Critical thinking in philosophy is about asking good questions, identifying faulty arguments and unwarranted claims to evidence, developing attentiveness to the way that language is used, offering reasons, and examining presuppositions and prejudices. We ask you to look at a question from multiple different angles and you will be then in a better position to make your own judgement and to make an argument for your position. This will help you write and will also help you to read materials with a more critical eye. In this course you will look at films, tv, music, media, and images as well and begin to develop critical literacy in terms of how language is used, including the visual language of image and film.

In our tutorials, we will begin to explore the practice of thinking critically and doing philosophy and we will also examine some of the barriers you may experience when trying to think critically. Three tutorials are dedicated to philosophy, all of which require preparation before the tutorial and active engagement in the tutorial.

Sociology of Education.

In the section on sociology we focus primarily on the question of identity and will develop a critical understanding of the way in which education, teaching and learning is influenced by the society in which we live. Sociology has a significant part to play in helping us to understand the project of education and the social elements underpinning education. Critical thinking in sociology is about reflecting, questioning, debating, and critically evaluating change (and continuity) in society and how it impacts upon children, families, schools, communities and education. We will examine how sociological inquiry is an important dimension in any discussion on education and will focus on topics such as family, school, community, race, social class and educational disadvantage. While pedagogical and methodological knowledge are undoubtedly critical components of becoming a teacher, competence in teaching cannot be acheved without a deep understanding and appreciation of children, their lives and the society in which they live.

In our tutorials, we will facilitate discussion and critical engagement around the themes of identity, race, equality, intercultural awareness, and educational disadvantage. We will discuss how education is not just about the delivery of ‘neutral’ knowledge and will pose such questions as: How has social and cultural diversity affected education? Are Irish children racist? How do they compare to children from other countries? Does education offer equal opportunity to all, regardless of social and cultural background and can education eliminate inequality or does it really just reflect and reproduce inequality?

History and Policy of Education

The study of the History and Policy of Education helps us to develop a deeper understanding of education, of teaching and learning, of teachers and learners, of systems, of policy, of curricula and of institutions. It enables us to see how the past affects and forms the present. Working as an historian develops a range of skills especially the habit of critical thought, as explored in other sections of this module. Working as an historian also allows us to critically compare the experience of teaching and learning in the present with that of the past.

In History and Policy of Education, we will look the beginnings of the national school system in Ireland and examine how that system has evolved. Using some key texts along with some literary sources, we

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will consider briefly some policies, curricula and institutions. Focussing on the theme of identity, we will concentrate in particular on the teachers who worked in national schools – exploring pre-service education, qualifications, working conditions and trade-union involvement.

Historical enquiry or research requires a range of skills and concepts. During tutorials, there will be opportunities to develop these skills by working as historians. We will do this by critically considering written, oral and visual/pictorial sources. This work will include peer discussion and pair collaboration.

We will focus on the question of teacher identity considering what was expected of primary teachers in

Ireland, how they were viewed by society in general and how teachers viewed themselves.

Learning Outcomes

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Understand and appraise critical discourses in education in respect of key concepts such as: diversity, class, critical thinking, gender, history, and identity.

Identify and critically evaluate the presuppositions and normative commitments of different philosophical, sociological and critical positions as they relate to education

Comprehend and critically evaluate key sociological themes relating to children’s voice, identity, equality, diversity, class.

Evaluate critically the relative contributions of the social, cultural, economic and political factors to educational change and the current educational system from the perspective of the history of education.

Understand and employ a high degree of critical analysis with respect to Irish educational policy

2. Affective: Attitude and Values

Cultivate the student’s ability to reflect upon beliefs, values, attitudes in light of those of others

Develop the students’ capacity for genuine engagement with and reflection on philosophical ideas and questions and to engage in philosophical dialogue

Appreciate the relevance of a critical historical sensibility

Appreciate the challenges engendered by changes in education

Appreciate, value and promote equality and empathise with those experiencing inequality

Understand the complexity of questions of identity in education.

Appreciate and value the role of the teacher in establishing, nurturing and maintaining positive relationships within education

This is an integrated course with strands from Sociology of Education, Philosophy of Education and History and Policy of Education.

Resources: Please check Moodle. Tasks and Resources for Tutorials will be on Moodle.

The text and task for each week is available on Moodle. Students must prepare for the tutorials by doing assigned tasks and texts before the tutorial. When readings are allocated, please bring a hard copy of the relevant text when asked to do so.

Lecture 1 (Morning) Lecture 2 (Afternoon) Tutorials

Week 1

Sociology of Education

Primary theme: Course Overview. The

Uses of Sociology for Teachers. Critical

Thinking and Sociology.

Philosophy of Education

Primary theme: Education and Critical

Thinking.

Critical Thinking and Philosophy.

No Tutorial

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Week 2

Sociology of Education

Primary theme: Children’s Lives: Family

- Change and Continuity

Week 3

History and Policy of Education

Primary theme: Education in Ireland today

History and Policy of Education

Primary theme: Introduction to History and Policy of Education. Education in

Ireland Today.

Philosophy of Education:

Primary theme: How to Analyse

Arguments and Think Critically

Week 4

Sociology of Education

Primary theme: Children’s Lives:

Growing up in 21 st

Century Ireland

Week 5 History and Policy of Education

Primary theme: The beginning of the national school system, 1831.

Week 6

Sociology of Education

Primary theme: Children’s Lives:

Cultural Identity and Social Diversity

Week 7 Sociology of Education

Primary theme: Children’s Lives:

Cultural Identity and Social Diversity

History and Policy of Education

Primary theme: Mary Immaculate College, the early years

Philosophy of Education

Critical Thinking in Practice 1:

Primary theme: Thinking with children.

Doing Philosophy with Children and

Socratic Dialogue.

Philosophy of Education

Critical Thinking in Practice 2:

Primary theme: Storytelling, identity, ideas and art.

History and Policy of Education

Primary theme: The beginning of the national school system, 1831. Continued.

Tutorial 1: Introduction and Overview

Tutorial 2: Sociology of

Education

Tutorial 6: Sociology of

Education

Tutorial 3: History and

Policy of Education

Tutorial 4: Philosophy

of Education.

Tutorial 5 : History and

Policy of Education

Week 8 History and Policy of Education

Primary theme: Reactions to the national school system

Week 9

Week

10

Sociology of Education

Primary theme: Children’s Lives: Social

Class

Sociology of Education:

Primary Theme: Children’s Lives :

Inequality in Education 1

Philosophy of Education

Primary theme: “The unexamined life is not worth living” (Socrates).What does

Socrates mean by this? Why would he prefer to die than to give up thinking critically.

Philosophy of Education

Primary theme: “The unexamined life is not worth living” Continued. The Socratic

Dialogue and Doing Philosophy.

Philosophy of Education

Primary theme: Which Curriculum and

Why? Philosophies of Education and the

Purpose and Aims of Education

Tutorial 7: Philosophy

of Education:

Tutorial 8: Philosophy of Education:

Tutorial 9: Sociology of

Education

Week

11

History and Policy of Education

Primary theme: The national school system into the twentieth century

Week Sociology of Education

Primary theme: Children’s lives:

Philosophy of Education.

Critical Thinking in Practice 3

Primary theme: Who am I? Different ideas of the self.

History and Policy of Education

Primary theme: The national school

DICE in Tutorial Groups

DICE in Tutorial Groups

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12

Inequality in Education 2 system into the twentieth century.

Continued.

ASSESSMENT

Process based: This course is a process based course. Consequently, students will be encouraged to write regularly throughout the semester, and to do so in response to lecture and tutorial topics, discussions and readings. Students will be penalised up to 10% for non-attendance at tutorials.

Philosophy of Education.

BED1: 1000-1200 words

Sociology of Education.

BED1: 1000-1200 words

33.3%

33.3%

Topics distributed in Week 7 for submission on

Friday November 27th Week 12.

Topics distributed in Week 7 for submission on

Friday November 27th Week 12.

History of Education.

BED1: 1000-1200 words

33.3% Topics distributed in Week 7 for submission on

Friday November 27th Week 12.

Students MUST indicate clearly on the cover sheet the subject for which they are submitting, i.e.,

Philosophy, Sociology or History. You MUST also submit to TURNITIN

1. You should hand your assignment with separate cover sheets for each area into the

Education Office in Week 12. See above.

2. Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework: Except in exceptional circumstances, 10% should be deducted for late submission of coursework.

In all reflective exercises, an evolution and progression of ideas should be evident. The important matter to remember is that the emphasis is on your processes of thinking and your engagement with the ideas. You are not being asked for a summary of the ideas of key ideas as presented in lectures. You are being asked to read the designated readings of primary material and are advised to work from these and not internet sources. Plagiarism will be severely sanctioned. All reflective assessments must be processed through turnitin and evidence of same provided. You do not have to cover all the ideas that you encounter in the lecture and tutorial sessions but can choose certain readings to consider in more detail for each reflective exercise. We suggest using a journal to allow yourselves to consider ideas and then work from this when writing your reflective pieces over the course of the semester. These should be typed, edited and proofed.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT

*The repeat assessment for B.Ed. 1 will be of the same format and word count

Tutorials: Please note your tutorial group and its time and location. Students are not permitted to switch tutorials. Up to 10% of marks will be deducted for non-attendance at tutorials.

Students will be required to read, view and engage with a variety of selected readings and recordings IN

PREPARATION FOR the tutorials. These will be available on Moodle. These readings, recordings and materials will provide for an on-going development in educational ideas.

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

This module will be assessed through one reflective assignment based on three sections (maximum

1000-1200 words per section). Each section (Philosophy, Sociology, History) should have INDIVIDUAL coversheets. Please do NOT staple the three sections together. Students will be encouraged to engage with their processes of thinking and engagement with the educational ideas/questions/texts that they have encountered. An evolution and progression of ideas should be evident in the assignment.

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Students are expected to provide an historical, philosophical and sociological lens, as appropriate, to the different sections of the assignment. Key requirements for the assignments include:

1. Critical reflection on these ideas and be prepared to relate them to your experience and knowledge.

2. Show evidence of close reading, knowledge and critical interpretation of course material

3. Serious, rigorous and thoughtful consideration of the texts and ideas.

4. Provide reasons for your position and explain where you have difficulties, counter-arguments questions or criticisms.

5. Write a clear, well structured essay with minimal to no presentation errors that references correctly.

A separate document will be made available to students in respect of all assessment requirements and activities for this module. (See Moodle for more detailed guidelines).

Regarding the assignment please adhere to the following:

The assignment must be typed and submitted with the appropriate cover sheet for each subject area (Philosophy, Sociology, History).

All students must adhere to the assignment guidelines outlined in the assignment document.

The assignment must be submitted through Turnitin prior to submission.

The assignment must be submitted to the Education Office on the designated date.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework

Guidelines) of the Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework: Except in exceptional circumstances, 10% should be deducted for late submission of coursework.

Grade

A1

A2

B1

B2

Criteria

Outstanding/Excellent: A thorough, well-structured, focused and comprehensive response to the assessment task, consistently demonstrating

-

Evidence of detailed and deep understanding and mastery of of subject matter, and critical interpretation and evaluation of reading material and other subject matter.

-

Ability to respond to questions in novel and relevant manner

-

An exceptional ability to organise, analyse and present arguments supported by evidence, citation or quotation.

-

Excellent capacity to structure essay with clarity and with clear line of enquiry and coherent argument.

-

Consistent demonstration of critical, creative, analytical and logical thinking

-

Evidence of critical insight.

-

Excellent presentation (grammar, spelling) with minimal to no errors

-

Appropriate referencing for all sources.

Very Good/Good: A thorough, well-organised response to the assessment task, demonstrating

-

A comprehensive knowledge of subject matter

-

Evidence of substantial reading and research for the assessment task and the ability to apply that reading to the task

-

Very good ability to structure essay and provide a clear

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B3

C1

C2

C3

D1

D2 line of enquiry and coherent argument

-

Effective grasp of ideas

-

Consistent demonstration of critical, creative, analytical and logical thinking.

-

Some evidence of critical insight

-

Very good presentation (grammar, spelling) with minimal to no errors.

-

Appropriate referencing for all sources

Competent/Satisfactory: An adequate and competent response to the assessment task demonstrating

-

Good understanding of the subject matter

-

Evidence of reading and familiarity with key ideas and literature

-

Ability to apply knowledge in response to the question, albeit with some errors or omissions

-

Ability to present arguments, albeit with tendency to make statements and limited capacity to critically appraise material, and insufficiently supported by evidence, quotation or citation

-

Some capacity to express ideas and to engage in critical thought

-

Clear and focused structure

-

Good presentation with limited errors

-

Appropriate referencing with minimal errors

Acceptable/Minimally Acceptable: An acceptable response to the assessment task demonstrating

-

A basic understanding of subject matter and some familiarity with the relevant literature.

-

Some ability to respond to the question but showing limited or basic capacity in this regard

-

Limited critical awareness or interpretation of material.

-

Limited ability to present argument with tendency to make statements.

-

Limited use of quotation, citation or evidence.

-

Some capacity to structure the essay but with problems with presentation of clear line of enquiry or focus.

-

Minor errors and some major errors in presentation though broadly satisfactory

Weak/Poor: A response that fails to meet minimal acceptable standards although it demonstrates

-

Limited engagement with subject matter and very minimal familiarity with literature

-

Some effort to respond to the question

-

Ability to address only certain elements of the task and lacking coherent and focused response

-

Considerable difficulties with structuring essay, keeping focus and a clear line of enquiry, and showing comprehension of the assessment task.

-

Tendency to make statements rather than provide arguments

-

Problematic and poor presentation with minor and major errors (spelling, grammar) in presentation, use of paragraphs, and difficulty in referencing correctly.

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F Fail: A response that fails to meet the most minimal standards required in the assessment, showing

-

Little to no understanding of subject matter or evidence of reading

-

Little evidence of thought, evaluation or critique.

-

Disorganised and muddled presentation of ideas, that is incoherent and contains multiple errors.

-

Little to no capacity to use citation, evidence or quotation

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

The repeat assessment will be based on one assignment comprising of three sections: Section 1:

History and Policy of Education, Section 2: Philosophy of Education and Section 3: Sociology of

Education. Please contact the relevant lecturer for specific details.

FEEDBACK:

Students will be advised on specific times when they can meet with the relevant lecturer individually regarding assignment feedback.

STAFF:

Individual appointments can be made by email to meet with your lecturer.

Name Title Office Telephone Email

Dr Tony Bonfield

Lecturer in

Philosophy of

Education

Dr Aislinn O’

Donnell

Lecturer

Education in

Philosophy of

Dr Eilís O’Sullivan Lecturer in

History and

Policy of

Education

N33

R202

R119

061-(20)4970

061-(20)4354

061-(20)4384

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Dr Sandra Ryan

Lecturer in

Sociology of

Education

Dr Margaret

Nohilly

Lecturer

Policy

Education in of

M111

N101

061-(20)4984

061-(20)4744

[email protected]

[email protected]

In addition to this information a more detailed course descriptor will be available on moodle. This will include a comprehensive bibliography. The following works are a selection from that bibliography.

Bibliography: (See course descriptor for complete bibliography)

Reading List

NOTE: Lecturers reserve the right to make changes to the above course

History of Education:

Akenson, D.H. (1970) The Irish Education Experiment, London, Toronto: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

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Coolahan, J. (1981) Irish Education: History and Structure, Dublin: IP.

Hill, M. and Pollack, V. (1993) Image and Experience Photographs of Irish Women c. 1880-1920, Belfast:

The Black Staff Press.

Hyland, A. & Milne, K. (1987) Irish Educational Documents, Volume 1 Dublin: Church of Ireland College of

Education.

Hyland, A. & Milne, K. (1987) Irish Educational Documents, Volume 2, Dublin: Church of Ireland College of Education.

Walsh, B. ed. (2011) Education studies in Ireland: key disciplines, Dublin: Gill & Macmillan.

Walsh, T. ( 2012) Primary Education in Ireland, 1897-1990: Curriculum and Context, London: Peter Lang.

Philosophy of Education Readings

Brookfield, S. (2011). Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question

Their Assumptions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. http://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/49/04708893/0470889349-182.pdf

De Beavoir, S. (2010). The Second Sex. London: Vintage.

Dewey, J. (1910). ‘What is Thought?’ in How We Think. Lexington, Mass: D.C. Heath, pp1-13. http://www.brocku.ca/MeadProject/Dewey/Dewey_1910a/Dewey_1910_a.html

Fanon, F. (1986). Black Skin, White Masks. London: Pluto.

Greene, M. (1994). Releasing the Imagination: Essays on Education, the Arts and Social Change. San

Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Haynes, J. (2008). Children as Philosophers. London: Routledge hooks, b. (2010). Teaching Critical Thinking. London: Routledge.

Plato, (1993). ‘The Apology’ in The Last Days of Socrates. London: Penguin

-- (2007). The Republic. London: Penguin

Sartre, J-P. (1989 [1946]). ‘Existentialism is a Humanism’. in Existentialism from Dostoyevsky to Sartre.

New York: Meridian.

Films and audio:

(1999). The Matrix. Dirs. Lana (previously Larry) Wachowski and Andrew Wachowski

Philosophy and the Matrix.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgkBE4Kgq5Q

The Trap

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFjCJFsbS0U&feature=relmfu

Sociology of Education Readings

Alexander, R.J., ed. (2010) Children, their World, their Education. Final report and recommendations of the Cambridge Primary Review, London: Routledge.

Knowles G. and Holmstrom, R. (2013) Understanding Family Diversity and Home-School Relations: A

guide for students and practitioners in early years and primary settings, London: Routledge.

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Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (2009). Growing Up in Ireland, National

Longitudinal Study of Children. Dublin.

Sadovnik, A.R., Cookson Jr., P.W. and Semel, S.F. (2013) Exploring Education: An Introduction to the

Foundations of Education, 4 th

ed., London: Routledge.

Share, P., Corcoran, M.P., and Conway, B. (2012). Sociology of Ireland, 4 th

ed., Dublin: Gill & Macmillan.

Films and Audio:

Green, S. (2009) New Boy WindMillLane: Irish Film Board/RTÉ/Zanzibar Films.

Irish Traveller Movement/UCC. (2004). Moving On: Travellers and Third Level Education. Dublin: ITM.

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Certificate in Religious Education

Module 1 Christian Revelation

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education 1 and Bachelor of Education & Psychology 1

INTRODUCTION:

This module will explore the nature and purpose of Revelation in the Judeo-Christian tradition. They will examine how people have experienced God in their own lives, through the use of such metaphors as: liberator, companion, creator, father/mother and love. Particular attention will be given to the identity of

God as Trinity – Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Students will investigate the meanings behind the idea of God as a life giving relationship of mutual self-gift. Such an understanding will be explored through reflection on the Creed, and examining the different beliefs which are contained in it. Finally, students will explore the meaning and function of faith in the Christian tradition.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Identify different ways God is experienced by people in the Christian religious tradition

Differentiate between concepts such as atheism, faith, belief, religion and revelation

Explore understandings of God as revealed in the Creed

Understand Revelation as God’s self-communication in Judaism and Christianity

Recognize different images of God at work in the lives of Christians, especially children Communicate the personal and public significance of Christian faith

Affective: Attitude and Values

Question their own assumptions, orientations and subjective understandings of the place and relevance of religious belief in the world today

Acknowledge the important role that belief in God plays in the lives of many people today

Demonstrate the value of reflecting on images of God for Christians

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

WEEK

1

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

The Restless Heart

2

3

4

Where the hell is God?

What does God want?

Is God a she?

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9

10

11

12

5

6

7

8

God as agape

God as Trinity

Graduation

Sacramental Imagination

What is the point of the creed?

Christian revelation

Pointers to faith

Is faith blind?

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

If you wish, you may submit a draft of your written answer to any question asked to the lecturer. The first

15 of these will be answered on an individual basis. The lecturer will then give feedback to the whole class about the answers to the question in light of the drafts received. This will be done without breaking confidentiality.

ASSESSMENT:

Grade Marking Criteria

A1 – A2 Excellence shown in: interpreting the question; grasping and analysing the material critically; developing the argument and points made; organising and structuring the material; clarity and appropriate use of readings. Evidence of a critical mind at work capable of original/independent thought.

B1 – B2

Comprehensiveness shown with regard to the above points. Clearly superior work.

B3 Very good regarding many of the above points but some important aspect(s) missing e.g content affected by structure, needing more clarity.

C1 – C2 Good with regard to the above points. Research/reading was adequate but not extensive and there was room for more analysis as well as greater evidence of critical skills. Only minor grammatical/format and presentation errors.

C3 Acceptable. Minimal research. Argument not as clear or well-developed as it could have been.

Insufficient evidence of reflection and/or understanding of key issues. Possibly poor presentation of the work. Limited application/integration, clarity or cohesion.

D1 - D2 Fails to demonstrate a satisfactory grasp of relevant basic material; inadequate argument. Does not express ideas clearly. Excessive dependency on undigested material from other sources.

Serious grammatical and style errors.

F

Very weak; completely inadequate sentence construction/fluency; hardly any understanding of the subject; no argument; no evidence of serious attempt to engage with basic material.

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Students need to answer three questions that will be given out through the semester. These questions will be given out during class. Each answer will be worth 25% of your overall grade. They are to be submitted to the Education Office 26 th

November.

Each answer is to be between 400 to 500 words, no more than 500 words. In your answer:

1 Make use of at least one reading from that section, use footnotes

2 Make use the pertinent lectures

Ensure clarity of expression and thought.

The repeats will be course work.

Attendance at class is a requirement – up to 10% of your overall mark can be lost due to poor attendance.

All assignments must be submitted with the appropriate cover sheet

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

STAFF:

Name

Dr. Daniel

O’Connell

Title

Co-ordinator of the

Certificate in

Religious

Education

Contact Office

R117

Telephone Email

061 204966 [email protected]

READING LIST:

The required readings for the class will be made available on Moodle

Core Texts:

1. Himes, M. J. & McNeill, D. P. (1995) Doing the Truth in Love: Conversations about God, Relationships,

and Service, New York: Paulist Press.

2. Himes, M. J. (2004) The Mystery of Faith: an Introduction to Catholicism, Cincinnati, Ohio: St.

Anthony Messenger Press.

3. Johnson, E. A. (2007) Quest for the Living God: Mapping Frontiers in the Theology of God, New York:

Continuum.

Recommended Texts:

1. Catholic Church. (1997) Catechism of the Catholic Church: revised in accordance with the official

Latin text promulgated by Pope John Paul II, Vatican City, Washington, DC, Libreria Editrice Vaticana;

United States Catholic Conference.

2. Craig, William Lane. 2010. On Guard: Defending Your Faith with Reason and Precision. Colorado

Springs: David C. Cook.

3. Downey, M. (2000) Altogether Gift: a Trinitarian Spirituality, Maryknoll, N.Y., Orbis Books.

4. Dulles, A. 1983. Models of Revelation, Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.

5. Fiorenza, F. S. & Galvin, J. P. (2011) Systematic Theology: Roman Catholic Perspectives, Minneapolis:

Fortress Press.

F a c u l t y o f E d u c a t i o n , M I C – B . E d . 1 H a n d b o o k Page 15

6. Hession, A. & P Kieran (2007) Exploring Theology: Making Sense of the Catholic Tradition. Dublin:

Veritas.

7. LaCugna, C. M. (1991) God for Us: The Trinity and Christian Life, San Francisco: Harper.

8. Lash, N. (1993) Believing Three Ways in One God: a Reading of the Apostles' Creed, Notre Dame:

University of Notre Dame Press.

9. Leonard, R. (2011) Where the Hell is God?, New York: Paulist Press.

10. Lennox, J.C. (2011) Gunning for God: Why the New Atheists Are Missing the Target, Oxford: Lion.

11. Marmion, D. & VanNieuwehove, R. (2011) An Introduction to the Trinity, Cambridge, New York:

Cambridge University Press.

12. McGrath, A. (2011) Mere Apologetics: How to Help Seekers and Skeptics Find Faith, Grand Rapids,

MI: Baker Books.

13. McGrath, A. (2008) The Christian Vision of God, London: SPCK.

14. Power, D. & Downey M. (2012) Living the Justice of the Triune God. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical

Press.

15. Tilley, T. W. (2010) Faith: What it is and What it isn't, Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books.

All works cited should follow the Harvard Standard. You can find ‘Cite it Right’ available here: http://www3.ul.ie/referencing/Cite_it_Right_Nov_2005.pdf

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4

Certificate in Religious Education

In order to complete the Certificate in Religious Education, the student needs to pass all four modules:

Christian Revelation

Scripture and Spirituality or Introduction to the Bible (Scripture) as an Arts Elective

Christology and Social Justice or Christology as an Arts Elective

Church, Sacraments and Inter-faith Dialogue

The student may take up to two electives in Arts that will count towards their Certificate in Religious

Education. In Year 2, they may take Introduction to the Bible (Scripture) as their Arts Elective in place of

Scripture and Spirituality. In Year 3 they may take Christology as an Arts Elective in place of Christology and

Social Justice.

Year

1

Autumn Spring

2

3

Christian Revelation

Scripture and Spirituality

Or

Introduction to the Bible (Scripture)

RS4733 as an Arts Elective

Christology and Social Justice

Or

Christology as an Arts Elective

Church, Sacraments and Inter-faith Dialogue

F a c u l t y o f E d u c a t i o n , M I C – B . E d . 1 H a n d b o o k Page 17

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