FM News Fall 2007

FM News Fall 2007
BROWN UNIVERSITY
FACILITIES
MANAGEMENT
FALL 2007
FAC I L I TI E S
N E W S
A NOTE OF THANKS
INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
■EMERGING
PARKING PLANS
2
■BEHIND THE
EVENT ~ PARENTS’ WEEKEND
2007
■FURNITURE
RECYCLING
WORKS!
3
■NEW CAMPUS
MAP AT FAUNCE
ARCH
■KUDOS~ FRIEDMAN STUDY CENTER
■ON CALL MECHANICS STEP
UP TO THE
CHALLENGE
4
■REMARKS
FROM ALAN
BLIEK
■CONTINUOUS
IMPROVEMENT
UPDATE
5
■ENERGY EFFICENCY AWARD
■COMMON ADA
ERRORS AND
OMISSIONS
6
■EMAIL MIGRATION PROJECT
■A PUZZLE OF
FACILITIES
TERMS
7
■COMINGS &
GOINGS
8
Fall has arrived and with the
holidays just around the corner,
it was great to see so many of
you for our Holiday Pie gathering.
While Facilities’ efforts continue
to revolve around the Plan for
Academic Enrichment (PAE),
our day-to-day work takes us in
many directions, all in support
of the PAE initiatives. This edition of Facilities News highlights
some of the many projects,
activities, and efforts that involve Facilities’ staff from parking to Parents’ Weekend and
gives a glimpse at the awards
bestowed upon the University
for the Susan P. & Richard A.
Friedman Study Center project
and the University’s efforts to
conserve energy.
As your work takes you from
one corner of the campus to
another most days, many of you
notice things that should be
repaired, replaced, and/or even
questioned, as was the case
shortly after school opening
with Custodian Frank Almeida.
Frank noticed what could have
become a serious issue with
steel corroding on the underside of the ramp at the Graduate Center. With the safety of
others in mind, he not only reported the issue but he supported his claim that there was
an issue with photographs.
Remember, if something stands
out as not being right to you,
take the time to question it and
report it.
As always, I thank you for all
your dedication and hard work.
I wish you and your families a
safe, happy and healthy holiday
season. Remember, don’t forget to join me for our Annual
Holiday Breakfast on December
14th!
Sincerely,
Vice President
Facilities Management
THE TEMPORARY POOL HAS LANDED
You may have noticed the large
white “bubble” rise up one rainy
afternoon this fall. It is Brown’s
temporary training pool. Built
to accommodate activities from
Smith Swim Center during the
construction of the new pool,
the temporary pool will be open
to not only Brown’s aquatic
athletes but all students, faculty, and staff.
There are three components
that have come together to
make the facility. First, the airinflated structure. Provided by
a single vendor, Yeadon Fabric
Domes, the air-inflated structure shelters roughly 17,000
square feet of space.
The second component is the
pool, which, like the bubble,
was a package provided by one
vendor, Astral Products. The
pool, made of interlocking
metal panels, will hold
420,814 gallons of water.
The last component is the sitebuilt foundation. Built by Shawmut, it includes roughly 900
yards of concrete. The role of
the foundation is to provide an
“anchor” to the air-inflated
structure above.
Interior view looking at the side
of the pool.
FACILITIES NEWS
Page 2
EMERGING PARKING PLANS
With the planned loss of
parking spaces in the athletic
center lots off Hope Street
and the increasing size of the
Brown community, we need
to take strategic action to
stay on top of parking and
transportation issues on
campus.
carpooling, biking, Zip car,
the Guaranteed Ride Home,
and rental agreements with
Enterprise.
groups, Thayer Street District
Management Association, the
City and Vanasse Hangen
Brustlin, Inc.
To find out more about the
alternative means of transportation listed above, please
visit the Transportation Office
web site: www.brown.edu/
The emerging parking plan
requires a coordination of
efforts on multiple fronts:
work to reduce parking demand, carefully manage and
maintain off-street parking,
and work to implement appropriate management of onstreet parking.
Administration/Finance_and_Admin/
transportation/.
The preliminary findings of
the Task Force include the
following: first, there is a
fairly close match between
the number of on-street
spaces and the total demand
in the College Hill area. Second, significant traffic is generated by cars searching for
parking spaces, in part
caused by the mismatch
between parking regulations
and demand. Third, free onstreet parking is counter to
efforts to reduce demand. Recommendations
are in the process of being
finalized for a presentation to
the City.
Although most of us are accustomed to commuting to
campus in our cars, decreasing the number of people
who drive to campus is an
essential component of our
strategy. Brown has been
working hard to develop and
encourage alternative means
of transportation including:
safeRIDE, the RIPTA UPass,
Strategies under consideration for management of offstreet parking lots include: a
modest increase to parking
rates for faculty, students
and staff; elimination of parking permits for freshman and
sophomores; and off campus
bussing for construction
workers.
In November 2006, the College Hill Parking Task Force
was formed, in part, to develop recommendations to
the City for On-Street Parking.
The group includes representatives from the College Hill
institutions, neighborhood
By refining and following
through on the strategies
outlined above, we can better
manage parking and transportation issues on campus.
Athletic center parking lot
Bike rack at Sciences Library
Zip car ~ hourly car rental
BEHIND THE EVENT - PARENTS’ WEEKEND 2007
It’s October and that can only
mean one thing at Brown:
Parents’ Weekend. The
Events team, lead by Deb
Lister, Manager of Events
Support, has been in full
swing over the past few
months preparing for this
year’s event, which was held
October 25-27. With over
3,000 people on campus, 50
dedicated Facilities Management staff worked around the
clock to ensure the event
was a success.
Most visitors to Parents’
Weekend only see the flawless finish but there are so
many little planning details
that often go unnoticed. With
over 110 events on campus
in over 25 buildings, the
team was on call all weekend
making sure every customer
was happy. “The staff scheduled all setups and breakdowns including sound equipment, tables, chairs, and
tents” said Lister. “They
were also a visible presence
on campus to ensure that the
entire weekend ran smoothly.
The trades and custodial
staff make Parents’ Weekend
happen. They do an amazing
job.”
Now that the weekend is
over, can the events team
breathe a sigh of relief?
“We’re looking forward to
Commencement,” says
Lister. “And we’ve already
started planning next year’s
Parents’ Weekend.” Mark
your calendars.
“The trades and
custodial staff
make Parents’
Weekend
happen. They do
an amazing job.”
FALL 2007
Page 3
FROM TRASH TO TREASURE- FURNITURE RECYCLING WORKS!
Looking for a new mahogany
desk or maybe a slightly used
USPS mail box? The Surplus
Program at Brown has become a great success story
for the University. Since the
program began in the fall of
2006, over 1,400 items have
been donated to the City of
Providence, the school department and affiliated nonprofit organizations. Internally, there have been requests from over sixty depart-
ments, resulting in fulfilling
half of these requests.
Recent department moves
from Butler to South Main
Street resulted in eight trailer
trucks of furniture being donated to the City of Providence.
Should you be interested in
furnishing your project with
recycled furniture, go to Park
Lane, select items, arrange
for delivery, and you own it.
Or, as some of our thrifty
Project Managers have done,
place furniture with new owners before it ever leaves campus. This saves on a delivery
charge.
As for the mail box, you are
too late; the Theatre Department is now using it as a
prop.
“Since the
program began in
the fall of 2006,
over 1,400 items
have been
donated to the
City of Providence,
the school
department and
affiliated nonprofit
organizations.”
NEW CAMPUS MAP AT FAUNCE ARCH
The axonometric campus
map that has hung in Faunce
arch is being replaced. With
all the recent changes to the
face of our campus, the map
was no longer an accurate
guide.
This summer, Facilities’ CAD
team designed an up-to-date
replacement. The graphics
and directory listing are
meant to harmonize with new
building signage hung this
fall.
At the end of summer, a temporary map was installed for
feedback. All comments
have been incorporated and
after final color samples are
approved, the final map will
be produced. In addition to
the Faunce Arch map, there
will be a smaller one installed
in Wayland Arch.
The CAD team is working with
the University’s Graphics
Services department to use
this map as the University
“welcome map”, a tri-fold
hand-out given to new and
prospective members of the
Brown community. This will
reinforce the idea of continuity in our graphic language
around campus.
Temporary campus map
installed in the Faunce Arch
KUDOS - FRIEDMAN STUDY CENTER
On Friday, October 26th
Rhode Island Monthly recognized Brown University for the
renovation of the Susan P. &
Richard A. Friedman Study
Center in the Sciences Library with High Marks Gold in
the commercial construction/
renovation category and
Trend Setter Gold in the commercial interior design category. The judges were
“bowled over” by the
“intensity of thought.”
The project scope included
moving approximately
100,000 books from the
Sciences Library to the Library Annex at 10 Park Lane
to allow the bottom three
levels to be captured as a
student study center. Level A
was dedicated almost entirely to collaborative and
individual study spaces with
gateway services. The
ground floor has a new café
extending out onto the south
terrace with the mezzanine
remaining as additional quiet
study space. New finishes,
furniture, and technology
transformed the appearance
and functionality of the
space. In addition to the new
fire alarm system installed
throughout the building and
command center, fire protection was installed within the
Study Center, and the project
incorporated a facility renewal upgrade to the HVAC
system and waterproofing
repair at the south terrace.
Rhode Island Monthly
Magazine Article
FACILITIES NEWS
Page 4
ON CALL MECHANICS STEP UP TO THE CHALLENGE
Although most of us go home
by 5:00 PM, the University is
very much a “24/7”, 365
days/year operation. For
many in Facilities Management Operations, workload
volume is directly related to
the presence of our student
population.
There is another aspect to
Facilities Management that
often goes unnoticed, until
there is a problem. Operating 24 hours/day, 365 days/
year are mechanical systems
critical to research, animal
care, libraries and data centers. Should a problem occur
after normal working hours
with any of these 100+ systems, immediate action must
be taken.
For the past three years, a
dedicated group of (9) highly
skilled mechanics from Divisions 8, (HVAC), 9 (Controls)
and 10 (Second Shift), have
served on-call after midnight
on a rotating basis. The oncall service begins after midnight since we have a second
shift to cover the campus
until then. Each individual
“rotation” lasts (5) days,
which includes all weekends
and holidays.
Critical alarms are sent automatically via computer to the
Johnson Controls Remote
Operations Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin with a backup alarm sent to the Brown
Central Heat Plant. The oncall mechanic is contacted
via a designated phone line
and the mechanic is on campus within one hour. They
are often awakened in the
very early morning hours but
are required to quickly solve
highly technical problems
with complex mechanical
systems.
The dedication and skill of
these mechanics has served
the Brown community well.
With the size and technical
complexity of the campus
continuously increasing, their
responsibility and value to
the community will continue
to increase as well.
In addition to the on call mechanics, many other Facilities’ staff members contribute to campus operations
beyond their typical work day.
This includes custodians,
trades, and grounds employees who work overtime and
respond to call back requests
to ensure seamless continuity of service.
LOOKING BACK - REMARKS FROM ALAN BLIEK ON HIS RETIREMENT FROM BROWN
As I approach my retirement
from the University, I look
back to when I started working here as a draftsman in
the Office of Physical Planning, nearly thirty years ago.
At that time it was easy to
describe Brown’s main campus as covering an area of
about thirty-five city blocks.
Although in general terms
this is quite a large area, we
certainly did not own all of
the property within those
blocks, and still don’t today.
And of course, there were
also those properties which
did not fit within that 35block area such as the Aldrich-Dexter Field, Ladd Observatory or the stadium and
Marvel Gym or the land down
off Butler Avenue.
Since 1978, Brown has
bought and sold, and in some
cases bought back again,
many more parcels of land;
now the main campus
stretches across nearly 60
city blocks, not to mention
properties recently acquired
in the Jewelry District.
During my tenure, the number of buildings operated by
Brown has always tended to
hover around the magic number of 250. Although from
one minute to the next, one
was never exactly sure and it
depended upon which buildings may or may not be considered eligible to be included in that count such as
rental units or sheds and
garages.
Shortly before my coming to
Brown, several properties
that had once been Bryant
College’s campus on the east
side had been purchased,
and those buildings were still
in the phase-in process. Orwig Music building (then
called South Hall) was in the
process of a complete makeover. As I walked through the
building for the first time, I
wondered how all of the
demolition would be put back
together again. I’d never witnessed such a gutting process of an old structure.
The John Hay Library was
also undergoing renovation,
and it was on a tour of this
building that I first discovered
a new found fear of heights
as I peered down the new
elevator shaft from the top
floor. Since then, I’ve managed to stay off of most
sloped roofs and flat roofs
without parapets.
FALL 2007
Page 5
CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PLAN UPDATE
Since the update this summer on the Continuous Improvement Plan, progress
has been made in addressing
the recommendations of the
consultant’s positioning
study. Many projects have
been completed and others
are now underway.
First, the recommendation
that suggestion boxes be
installed for our employees in
key locations throughout the
campus has been completed.
Nearly 50 suggestions have
been received and many
were acted upon. For example, at the request of several
employees, a new shower
bench was installed in the
first floor shower room. Also,
a process has begun to provide nameplates outside all
cubicles. Many other suggestions will be implemented
over the next few months.
Notable progress has been
made in staffing the teams
that are addressing key issues and major recommen-
dations resulting from the
positioning study.
Client Service: A working
group and a focus group
have been selected. Regular
meetings are underway with
the objective being the establishment of a close partnership with University departments to improve services
and achieve greater satisfaction among customers.
FAMIS: A FAMIS team has
been meeting to review inventory control, key control,
capital projects and utility
management programs. In
January, FAMIS representatives will be on site to provide
project management services.
Sold Service: The Sold Service team has been holding
regular meetings to identify
core issues relating to providing accurate and firm estimates to customers and reviewing the facility service fee
questions.
Zone Maintenance: The concept of providing zone maintenance coverage to University departments is being
reviewed by a working group
of five and a focus group of
four selected from our operations divisions. The principal
goals include promoting more
person-to-person interaction
and an improved personalized approach.
Training: The Facilities’ HR
office is identifying job competencies for every position.
Supervisors, managers and
directions will be contacted
by the Training Team to provide feedback on the qualifications required for each
position. Many job descriptions will require editing and
updating.
Events: Separate teams will
be formed to address three
key event priorities: interdepartmental functions; awards
and recognition programs
based on performance; and
social activities.
Forming concrete benches at
the south end of The Walk
Grading Pembroke Field
Renovating Pembroke Hall
Rebuilding brick piers on
the Main Green
UNIVERSITY RECEIVES EXCELLENCE IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY
AWARD
University Receives Excellence in Energy Efficiency
Award as National Grid Celebrates 20 Years Of Success
In Energy Efficiency, Environmental Protection.
The University was honored
for participation in National
Grid’s demand side management energy-efficiency programs and acknowledged for
its excellence in energy efficiency achievements over the
past fifteen years. The event,
held on October 16h at the
Rhode Island Statehouse,
marked the 20th anniversary
of National Grid’s nationally
recognized, award-winning
energy-efficiency programs.
It was noted that the University’s efforts have saved the
University approximately $1.5
million annually in energy
costs. That’s a savings of
14.4 million kilowatt hours
each year; while reducing
emissions by nearly 8 tons
annually. “Today we are honoring customers who have
demonstrated a leadership
role in energy efficiency and
have raised awareness of
greenhouse gas emissions
and the threat they pose to
our environment. With them,
we have been able to prove
that energy efficiency works
and should be a priority for
all of our customers,” said
Michael F. Ryan,
president for National Grid Distribution in Rhode
Island.
New service building at
Berylson Field, the masonry
will be similar to 295 Lloyd.
Painting Peter Green
FACILITIES NEWS
Page 6
COMMON ADA ERRORS AND OMISSIONS - PART 1
Brown University is committed to making its facilities
accessible and usable to the
mobility, visually and hearing
impaired. It is Facilities’ responsibility to ensure all new
construction and renovations
are designed and executed in
compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA). The ADA is a federal
law and local building officials do not have the ability
to offer a variance on ADA
matters.
When we do not meet the
minimum requirements of
the ADA, it makes it difficult
or potentially dangerous for a
person with physical disabilities to negotiate their environment. It may also exclude
them from activities.
The Department of Justice
has identified some of the
most common errors and
omissions made in reference
to the ADA.
Error/Omission: Adequate
maneuvering clearance is not
provided at doors, including
doors to accessible toilet
stalls.
Result: A person using a
wheelchair cannot open the
door without a clear level
area in front of and adjacent
to the door that provides a
place to maneuver.
Requirement: 4.13.6 Maneuvering Clearances at Doors.
Minimum maneuvering clearances at doors that are not
automatic or power-assisted
shall be as shown in Fig. 25.
The floor or ground area
within the required clearances shall be level and
clear.
4.17.5* Doors. Toilet stall
doors, including door hardware, shall comply with 4.13.
If toilet stall approach is from
the latch side of the stall
door, clearance between the
door side of the stall and any
obstruction may be reduced
to a minimum of 42 in (1065
mm) (Fig. 30).
Requirement: 4.13.9* Door
Hardware. Handles, pulls,
latches, locks, and other
operating devices on accessible doors shall have a shape
that is easy to grasp with one
hand and does not require
tight grasping, tight pinching,
or twisting of the wrist to
operate. Lever-operated
mechanisms, push-type
mechanisms, and U-shaped
handles are acceptable designs. When sliding doors are
fully open, operating hardware shall be exposed and
usable from both sides. Hardware required for accessible
door passage shall be
mounted no higher than 48
in (1220 mm) above finished
floor.
Inadequate maneuvering
clearance
Adequate maneuvering
clearance
Lever operated hardware
Tech Tip
Error/Omission: The shape of
the door hardware requires
tight grasping, pinching, and
twisting of the wrist to use.
To reduce the size of your
files, make sure to use the
“Compress Pictures” button
on your Picture tool bar.
Result: The door cannot be
opened if the user cannot
operate the latch or handle.
1. Select the picture.
2. On the Picture toolbar,
select the Compress Picture
button.
EMAIL MIGRATION PROJECT
The Systems & Services
group is working on a project
to migrate Facilities Management email services to the
central Computing & Information Services (CIS) group. The
project planning has already
begun and notices will be
sent out soon indicating the
dates of the transition. Migrating our email services to
CIS will enable shared contact lists and calendaring
with the rest of the Brown
community. In addition, all of
our bargaining unit staff will
have access to email accounts. Everyone in Facilities
3. Apply to “All pictures in
document.”
Management will benefit by
having Web access to email
from anywhere.
4. Choose resolution: screen
for PowerPoint (96dpi) or
print (200dpi).
FALL 2007
Page 7
A PUZZLE OF FACILITIES TERMS
The first team (5
people maximum)
to return a correct
and complete
puzzle to Trish
Duff will win a free
cup of coffee for
each member
from Blue Sate
Coffee.
On Friday, November 16th,
the department gathered to
celebrate the season and
share pie and coffee. Yum!
Across
Down
1 A fixed seat enclosed wholly or partially at the back and
sides
3 A connection to a water supply main
5 A vertical member separating windows, doors, or panels
6 A continuous recess built into a wall to receive pipes, ducts
9 A horizontal structural member, such as a beam, over an
opening which carries the weight above it
10 Having three wings or three rows of columns
13 A passage or lane designated for pedestrian traffic
15 A hexagonal structure or pattern
16 Any small projecting member or part of a piece or structure, either decorative or structural
18 A plant fiber; forms a cheap, strong, durable yarn
21 An open space where several road or paths meet
22 A price quoted by a contractor, subcontractor or vendor
24 A device with two or more coupled windings, used to convert a supply of electric power at one voltage to another
27 An instrument for measuring high temperatures
29 A place where plants, shrubs, and small trees are grown,
usually for transplanting elsewhere
31 Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, abbr.
32 Section of pipe which provides mechanical protection for
an electrical cable
33 In an air-conditioning or heating system, a space served by
the system, whose temperature is regulated by a single control
37 Said of timber which has decayed
38 A small private chapel furnished with an alter and a crucifix
40 A type of trailer for hauling construction equipment
43 The truck or main stem of a tree
1 Any thick hand-split shingle or clapboard
2 American National Standards Institute, abbr.
4 The inner curve or face of an arch or vault forming the concave underside
7 A service way providing a secondary public means of access
8 A small tool with a pointed screw at one end; used to bore
small holes in wood by turning it
11 An instrument which responds to changes in temperature
12 A waterspout projecting from the roof gutter of a building,
often carved grotesquely
14 An ornamental treatment, used over an arch, a door, or a
window
16 Plant or tree that retains its verdure through all the seasons
17 One of the most used knots due to its no slip design
19 Point of entry into a building
20 Measurement of surface within specified boundaries
21 A low underground passage
23 A coat of paint applied on new wood, or over a primer
25 Notched on the edges, like a saw
26 The part of a beam projecting beneath a roof slab or floor
27 Any public building or private residence which is impressive
28 The height of a flight of stairs from landing to landing
30 A group of electric conductors which originate at a main
distribution center
34 A portable platform used to facilitate handling by a forklift
35 To bend or warp
36 A crowbar or similar tool
39 To split wood along the grain, as in making shingles
41 The part of a building plot not occupied by the building,
open to the sky
42 A parcel of land that is described on a recorded plant or by
survey
For a larger copy of the crossword, please see
Trish Duff.
Offices:
▪
▪
▪
▪
▪
BROWN UNIVERSITY
FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
▪
▪
▪
▪
▪
Custodial
Engineering
Events Support
Finance
Human Resources and
Labor Relations
Maintenance Services
Planning Design &
Construction
Service Response Center
Stores Operations
Systems and Services
THIS EDITION OF FACILITIES NEWS INCLUDES INFORMATION REGARDING
MANY OF THE EFFORTS UNDERWAY.
IT HAS BEEN WRITTEN
TO PROVIDE ALL FM
EMPLOYEES WITH INFORMATION REGARDING DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES ACROSS THE
VARIOUS OFFICES.
IF YOU HAVE ANY
SUGGESTIONS FOR
ARTICLES OR WOULD
LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE
TO FACILITIES NEWS
PLEASE CONTACT
LICHEN GREWER @
3-9416.
COMINGS & GOINGS
Welcome New Employees!
•
Real Estate
Sustainable Energy & Environmental Initiatives
Custodial Services
•
•
Michael Passerello, Overnight Supervisor
•
Michael O’Keefe, East Campus Supervisor
•
William Roche, Overnight/Dining Supervisor
•
Jana Cram, Administrative Assistant
•
John Luipold, Director of Real Estate
Systems and Services
•
Tom Flood, Systems Administrator
•
Kevin Izzo, Programmer/Analyst
•
Kenneth King, CAD Technician
Amy Morton, Executive Assistant
Ginger Gritzo, Energy & Environmental
Program Coordinator
Facilities Services
•
Deb Dunphy, Director of Facilities Services
Service Response Center
Planning Design & Construction
•
•
Janice Day, Financial Coordinator
Events Support
•
Jeanne Hebert, Executive Assistant,
Project Management
•
Seth Izzi, Assistant Project Manager
Facilities Operations & Engineering
•
•
Kerri King, Coordinator
Dolores Gaulin, Events Assistant
Maintenance Services
•
Antonio Mendes, Manager Structural
Trades and Projects
Stephen Poniatowski, Supervisor of
Preventative Maintenance
Engineering
•
Louis Amadio, Mechanical Engineer
Vice President’s Office
•
Lisa Goulden, Administrative Assistant
Enjoy Retirement!
•
Alan Bliek, Planning Coordinator
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