Summer 2014 (May)

Summer 2014 (May)
University College
2014 Catalog
WELCOME
Welcome
2014
The University College catalog is a map for your education future. As you read through the pages of course descriptions,
policies, and programs, you will soon discover the opportunities available to you for learning at UC. Each session will move
you closer to your academic goals while challenging your faith and personal development. From the moment you begin
until the day you graduate, you will know that we are a university aligned with our purpose and vision and our core values:
Exemplary, Caring, and Learning.
We take our purpose and mission seriously. As a community we put forth all of our efforts to ensure that we deliver a
quality and accessible, Christ-centered education to learners everywhere. To support this mission, we seek to be a
community that is exemplary by honoring God in our actions, attitudes, and aspirations. We believe that each learner will,
in the course of his or her journey with us, be exposed to a Christian worldview—a worldview that holds the value of each
person in light of the value that God has placed on him or her, a worldview that places human history in the context of
God’s eternal plan.
We are a caring community that seeks to serve with grace the needs of our colleagues and learners. Serving others can
be one of the most enriching experiences in life—for the giver and the receiver. While not an easy value to manifest in an
online environment, we are committed to the value of caring and the reflection of opportunities to serve others as a core
dimension of your UC learning experience.
We are a learning community, seeking to continually nurture new thinking that generates and contributes to ongoing
learning for all. We are dedicated to academic excellence. Our faculty is comprised of distinguished men and women—
gifted teachers with a commitment to our core value of learning and high academic standards. We believe that education
should prepare you to think and reason as you become a lifelong learner.
I welcome you to this journey of faith and scholarship. There are great challenges and opportunities waiting for you both as
a learner and as a Kingdom citizen. I pray that you will take advantage of all that God has given you to do and to become.
John C. Reynolds, Ph.D.
Chancellor and Chief Executive Officer
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Table of Contents
1. GENERAL INFORMATION................................................................1
The University’s Christian Worldview.................................................2
Statement of Faith............................................................................2
Daily Living Expectations..................................................................2
Statements of Vision and Purpose....................................................2
Principles..........................................................................................2
Core Values......................................................................................3
University Learning Outcomes..........................................................3
Commitment to Program Learning Outcomes..................................3
Diversity Statement...........................................................................3
Statement of Academic Freedom.....................................................3
Accreditation....................................................................................4
History ............................................................................................4
Location...........................................................................................5
Statements of Compliance...............................................................5
Harassment Policy............................................................................5
2. ACADEMIC AND SUPPORT SERVICES.............................................6
University Libraries............................................................................7
Tutoring Services..............................................................................7
Accommodations for Individuals with Disabilities..............................7
Student Support Services.................................................................7
Career and Vocation Center.............................................................7
Bookstore.........................................................................................8
Counseling Services.........................................................................8
Learning Management System.........................................................8
3. ADMISSIONS POLICIES...................................................................9
Admission to the University.............................................................10
Admissions Petitions......................................................................10
Policy Regarding False Information.................................................10
Transcripts......................................................................................10
Evidence of Proficiency...................................................................10
Transfer Applicants.........................................................................10
General Education Information for Transfer Students......................11
Admission of Homeschooled Students...........................................11
International Admission...................................................................11
Re-admission and Re-enrollment....................................................11
Admission Status...........................................................................11
Notification of Admission................................................................11
Veterans’ Education Benefits..........................................................11
High School Concurrent Enrollment Program.................................11
Credit by Examination.....................................................................12
4. FINANCIAL AID.............................................................................16
Student Financial Services..............................................................17
Cost of Attendance for 2014..........................................................17
Payment.........................................................................................17
Refund Policy.................................................................................17
Financial Agreement.......................................................................17
How to Apply for Financial Aid........................................................17
Types of Financial Aid.....................................................................17
Federal Student Aid........................................................................18
State Aid........................................................................................19
Outside Aid....................................................................................21
Financial Aid Policies......................................................................22
Stacking Financial Aid.....................................................................24
Verification......................................................................................24
5. ACADEMIC POLICIES....................................................................25
Reservation of Rights......................................................................26
Academic Integrity..........................................................................26
Course Numbering System............................................................27
Academic Calendar........................................................................27
Registering for Classes...................................................................27
Late Registration............................................................................27
Administrative Withdrawal Policy....................................................27
Adds/Drops....................................................................................27
Credit Hours...................................................................................28
Study Load.....................................................................................28
Concurrent Enrollment Policy..........................................................28
Grading..........................................................................................28
Incomplete Grades.........................................................................28
Learner Participation.......................................................................28
Late Work Policy............................................................................28
Make-up Provisions........................................................................29
Repeated Courses.........................................................................29
Transfer Work.................................................................................29
Petition Process.............................................................................29
Normal Progress Toward a Degree.................................................30
Classification of Students...............................................................30
Dean’s List Criteria..........................................................................30
Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal................................30
Re-application after Academic Dismissal........................................30
Withdrawal from Courses...............................................................30
Withdrawal from the University.......................................................30
Leave of Absence...........................................................................30
Student Records Policy..................................................................31
Release of Transcripts....................................................................31
Right of Access..............................................................................31
Disclosure of Student Records.......................................................31
Notification of Rights under FERPA.................................................31
Expectations for Student Behavior in the Learning Environment.....32
Grievance Policy.............................................................................33
Correspondence Course Credit......................................................35
Requirements for Graduation..........................................................35
Time Limit for Completing Degrees.................................................35
Changes in Degree Requirements..................................................35
Minimum Grade-point Average.......................................................35
Security Interest in Student Records...............................................35
Residency Requirements................................................................35
Application for Graduation..............................................................36
Latin Honors Criteria.......................................................................36
Commencement............................................................................36
Degree/Certificate Posting Dates....................................................36
6. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS................................................................37
Certificates.....................................................................................38
Certificate of Advanced Management.........................................38
Purpose, Certificate Proficiencies, and Requirements.............38
Certificate of Business Principles................................................38
Purpose, Certificate Proficiencies, and Requirements.............38
Pre-Nursing Health Science Certificate.......................................39
Purpose, Certificate Proficiencies, and Requirements.............39
Associate’s Degrees.......................................................................40
Associate of Arts........................................................................40
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes............................40
Requirements.........................................................................40
Associate of Science in Health Sciences....................................41
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes............................42
Requirements........................................................................42
Liberal Arts Core.............................................................................43
Bachelor’s Degrees........................................................................44
Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology......................................44
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes............................44
Requirements.........................................................................44
Bachelor of Arts in Leadership....................................................47
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes............................47
Requirements.........................................................................47
Bachelor of Arts in Management................................................48
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes............................48
Requirements for the B.A. in Management.............................49
Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences......................................51
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes............................51
Requirements.........................................................................52
Course Descriptions.......................................................................53
7. ACADEMIC CALENDAR.................................................................61
8. INDEX............................................................................................64
The information and policies included in this catalog are accurate as of May 5, 2014. The university reserves the right to make changes of any kind whenever these are
deemed necessary or desirable.
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1
General Information
2014 CATALOG
The University’s Christian Worldview................................ 2
Diversity Statement............................................................. 3
Daily Living Expectations................................................... 2
Accreditation........................................................................ 4
Statement of Faith............................................................... 2
Statements of Vision and Purpose.................................... 2
Principles.............................................................................. 2
Core Values.......................................................................... 3
University Learning Outcomes........................................... 3
Commitment to Program Learning Outcomes................. 3
Statement of Academic Freedom...................................... 3
History ................................................................................. 4
Location................................................................................ 5
Statements of Compliance................................................. 5
Harassment Policy.............................................................. 5
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The documents have been part of the growing history
and serve as a cohesive core. Each evolves from the
other, providing consistency and natural coordination that
demonstrates the university’s worldview as thoroughly Christian.
Daily Living Expectations
The following are fundamentals held to be essential and the
university expects faculty and staff not only to believe in them,
but to practice them in daily living:
A caring, effective love both to God and humanity
A Christ-like unity and acceptance among believers
A lifestyle dedicated to God’s will in society
A growing, victorious state of mind because of the indwelling
Christ
A daily affirmation of Christ as Lord
A willingness to serve the Lord, even when it involves sacrifice
1.The Statement of Faith is the central statement of the
university in matters of identity and nature. It provides a
Christian declaration of the theological underpinnings on
which the university is built. It contains a clear description
of faith and living as a reflection of the institution’s heritage
of integration of right belief and right living.
A desire to be sensitive to the personal work of the Holy Spirit
2.The Statements of Vision and Purpose provides the
direction and task to which the university applies its resources
and effort, with the understanding that the integrative nature
of faith cannot be fulfilled apart from a mission of transformation
consistent with a Christian commitment.
Statements of Vision and Purpose
3.The Principles describe the nature of the university in living
out core values in the pursuit of its mission.
4.The Core Values serve as a strategic guide to focus the
efforts needed to fulfill the university’s mission. They reflect
the strategic emphases of implementation.
Statement of Faith
We believe the Bible to be the inspired, the only infallible,
authoritative Word of God.
We believe that there is one God, creator of heaven and
earth, eternally existent in three persons—Father, Son, and
Holy Spirit.
We believe in the deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, in His
virgin birth, in His sinless life, in His miracles, in His vicarious
and atoning death through His shed blood, in His bodily
resurrection, in His ascension to the right hand of the Father,
and in His personal return to power and glory.
We believe in the fall and consequent total moral depravity
of humanity, resulting in our exceeding sinfulness and lost
estate, and necessitating our regeneration by the Holy Spirit.
We believe in the present and continuing ministry of
sanctification by the Holy Spirit by whose infilling the
believing Christian is cleansed and empowered for a life of
holiness and service.
We believe in the resurrection of both the saved and the lost;
those who are saved to the resurrection of life and those
who are lost to the resurrection of damnation.
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A working faith in God’s promises for all needs and daily life
situations
A witness for Christ without hypocrisy
A firm, committed desire to be God’s person
Vision: University College (UC) exists to serve people around
the world who desire education delivered in the context
of faith, excellence, and flexibility, removing the barriers of
affordability and accessibility.
Purpose: We exist to deliver quality and accessible Christcentered education to learners everywhere.
Principles
Christ Centered
We are believers who teach and serve from a Christian
worldview.
Academic Excellence
We are committed to educational excellence and quality
certificates for professional skills and continuing education.
Affordability and Accessibility
We are committed to economic affordability, global delivery,
and wherever feasible, open admission.
Market Relevance
We are responsive to market demand, employer needs, and
profession occupations.
Organizationally Sustainable
We are economically viable and scalable, valuing the gifts,
talents, and resources of the university.
2014
The Statement of Faith, Vision and Purpose Statements,
Principles, and Core Values of University College provide a
solid foundation on which to build positional statements of
the institution as a Christian university. These documents
evidence a strong Christian commitment and form the core
of the increasingly far-reaching nature and scope of the Azusa
Pacific community. They give expression to a strong, clear,
unswervingly Christian worldview that permeates the university
and guides its activity. As its guiding center, the university is
able to grow more effectively in the confidence that its Christian
nature will flourish.
We believe in the spiritual unity of believers in our Lord Jesus
Christ.
GENERAL INFORMATION
The University’s Christian Worldview
Exemplary—to honor God in our actions, attitudes, and
aspirations.
Caring—to serve with grace the needs of our colleagues and
learners.
Learning—to continually nurture new thinking that generates
and contributes to ongoing learning opportunities for all.
The following learning outcomes reflect the university’s
mission and priorities. These broad learning outcomes form
the foundation for specific program learning outcomes.
Learners who complete degrees at University College shall:
Christ
• Explain the relevance of Jesus Christ and His teachings
to their major discipline, personal and professional values,
ethics, and commitments.
• Explain how Scripture, tradition, experience, and reason
contribute to the learner’s understanding of God’s purposes
in their personal, social, and professional choices.
Scholarship
• Demonstrate effective written communication and online
interaction skills.
• Critically evaluate, integrate, and apply knowledge.
• Achieve quantitative, technical, linguistic, and
information literacy.
• Demonstrate competence in the content and methods of
their chosen field of study.
Service
• Apply acquired competencies through contributions to
personal, academic and professional settings.
Community
• Evidence an understanding of human behavior that
recognizes the influence of diverse worldviews and
experiences on societal or interpersonal relationships.
UC anticipates its learners will continue to develop and use
their knowledge, abilities, attitudes, and faith throughout
their lives to benefit society, the Church, and themselves.
Commitment to Program
Learning Outcomes
University College is committed to university-wide
assessment processes. Each program has identified specific
program learning outcomes, which are available in the
catalog description of each degree program.
University College is deeply committed to God-honoring
diversity as reflected in its mission, academic vision, and
positional statements. As part of UC’s commitment to
God-honoring diversity, each individual should expect to
be treated with respect regardless of personal background
and abilities.
Statement of Academic Freedom
At University College, we believe that all truth is God’s
truth, and that God has made it possible for humankind to
access, discover, and understand truth. We also affirm that
the knowledge of truth will always be incomplete and that
people, including those with educational credentials, are fallible
and may interpret data and ideas imperfectly. Therefore,
academic freedom from a Christ-centered perspective
must be carried out with civility, mature judgment, and the
awareness of the broad representation of Christian faith
that exists within this institution. Accordingly, University
College affirms its commitment to freedom of inquiry and
expression in academic endeavors.
The university recognizes that academic freedom has
historically been defined both by broadly accepted academic
standards and by the mission and character of the institution
in which it is practiced. University College seeks to maintain
an academic community in which faculty are free to
engage in rigorous scholarly inquiry and expression within
an intellectual context shaped by the evangelical Christian
tradition. In addition to this freedom, University College
seeks to pursue scholarly inquiry and expression in a way
that extends and enriches the academic disciplines from the
unique resources provided by the institution’s identity.
Thus, at University College, academic freedom is defined
both by the commonly accepted standards of the
academy and by those commitments articulated in the
documents that are central to the university’s identity as a
Christian university. These documents articulate the central
commitments which shape the academic community,
and thus the practice of academic freedom, at University
College: a belief in God as the Creator of all things, in Jesus
Christ as Savior and Lord, in the Holy Spirit as teacher
and guide, in Scripture as God’s authoritative and infallible
revelation, and in the Christian community as an
expression and vehicle of God’s redemptive work in this world.
The university follows these principles in its practice of
academic freedom:
• Faculty are entitled to the rights and privileges, and bear
the obligations, of academic freedom in the performance
of their duties. Specifically, faculty are free to pursue truth
and knowledge within their disciplines in the classroom, in
their research and writings, and in other public statements
in their field of professional competence. At all times faculty
should strive for accuracy, exercise appropriate restraint,
and show respect for the opinions of others.
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2012–13
University Learning Outcomes
Diversity Statement
GENERAL INFORMATION
Core Values
• Faculty are entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing
their subject. Faculty should be careful not to introduce into
their teaching controversial matter which has no relation to
the subject.
• While faculty are members of the global community, as
scholars and members of the University College community,
faculty should remain cognizant that the public will form
perceptions of their profession and their institution by their
utterances.
• In the practice of the academic vocation, complaints against
faculty may be generated. Faculty shall be protected from
any request to retract or modify their research, publication,
or teaching merely because a complaint has been received.
Only complaints alleging faculty violations of professional
standards of the discipline or of advocating positions
incompatible with the central commitments of UC as a
Christian university shall be considered, and then only
when the evidence supporting the allegation is more
substantial than rumor, inference, or hearsay.
• In the event that a faculty member believes his or her
academic freedom has been unduly restricted, he or she
may pursue resolution of this issue through the existing
faculty grievance procedure as articulated in the Faculty
Handbook.
Accreditation
University College offers programs approved by the Western
Association of Schools and Colleges through Azusa Pacific
University, which is accredited by the Western Association
of Schools and Colleges. Accreditation documents and
information are available from the Director of Academic Affairs.
Azusa Pacific University is approved for the training of veterans
under the Veterans’ Bill of Rights. The university is listed with
the United States Department of Justice for the training of
learners from foreign countries.
History
Azusa Pacific University began in 1899 as the Training School
for Christian Workers, the first Bible college on the West Coast
geared toward training learners for ministry and service. After
mergers with three Southern California colleges, the university
has resided in the city of Azusa since 1949.
Cornelius P. Haggard, Th.D., emerged as the right choice to
lead the school in 1939. Haggard’s early years as president
were fraught with adversity—enrollment was down and
donations from the prior year totaled only $27. Among his
many accomplishments, Haggard launched a variety of
innovative fundraising efforts, including the annual Dinner
Rally that continues today. He traveled around the United
States to raise resources for the school, always trusting
God would provide a miracle to meet the university’s needs.
Haggard served for the next 36 years, achieving many
significant milestones along the way.
Haggard’s death in 1975 brought Paul E. Sago, Ph.D., to the
helm. During his tenure, Sago encouraged the development
of off-site regional centers throughout Southern California,
and presided over the addition of master’s degree programs
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and the development of schools within the university.
Richard E. Felix, Ph.D., became president in 1990. Felix
played an instrumental role in initiating the university’s first
doctoral programs. He also reframed the university’s values
as Four Cornerstones—Christ, Scholarship, Community,
and Service—and oversaw the construction of seven
new buildings, a doubling of learner enrollment, and the
quadrupling of graduate programs.
In November 2000, Jon R. Wallace, DBA, an Azusa Pacific
alumnus and former student body president, assumed the
role of university president. Known for his entrepreneurial
approach to management, program development, and
transformational scholarship, Wallace has overseen completion
of the Duke Academic Complex, Trinity Hall, and the $54 million
Segerstrom Science Center, the most fiscally significant project
ever undertaken by the university.
Under Wallace’s leadership, study abroad programs have
grown, including the South Africa Semester and more than
40 other national and international study opportunities. New
programs under his tenure include the Master of Fine Arts,
Master of Social Work, and Ph.D. in Nursing. He also
commissioned Vision 2014, the blueprint for a 10-year path
for academic accomplishment.
Today, APU offers 53 undergraduate majors, 37 master’s
degrees, 21 credentials, 7 doctoral programs, and 5 certificates
to a total enrollment of more than 9,200 learners. The university
is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and
Colleges, and receives 14 other specialized accreditations.
Currently, Azusa Pacific’s award-winning intercollegiate
athletic program consists of 17 teams. Beginning in 2005,
the athletics program has won an unprecedented six
consecutive National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
(NAIA) Directors’ Cup awards. APU also belongs to the
Golden State Athletic Conference (GSAC).
More than a century after its founding, APU still serves as an
evangelical Christian university dedicated to God-honoring
excellence in higher education and equipping disciples and
scholars to advance the work of God in the world. To learn
more, visit www.apu.edu/about/.
In September 2010, the Azusa Pacific University Board of
Trustees approved the establishment of Azusa Pacific Online
University—a new entity—to provide fully online education
programs with the goals of increasing affordability and
accessibility to a Christ-centered higher education.
In April 2014, Azusa Pacific Online University (APOU) and
APU’s School of Adult and Professional Studies merged to
become University College.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Location
University College is headquartered in the San Gabriel
Valley community of Glendora, 26 miles northeast of Los
Angeles. Learners may contact University College at:
511 West Citrus Edge St., Glendora, CA 91740
Phone: 1-855-276-8669
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.apu.edu/universitycollege/
2014
2012–13
Statements of Compliance
University College, in accordance with applicable federal and
state laws and university policies, does not discriminate
on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender,
age, disability, medical status, or status as a veteran.
The university also prohibits sexual harassment. This
nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access, and
operation of university programs and activities. This policy
is in accordance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights
Act of 1964, as amended; Title IX of the Educational
Amendments of 1972; the Americans with Disabilities Act;
and Title III and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
The Director of Academic Affairs is the compliance
officer. For inquiries concerning learner issues related to
discrimination, call 1-855-276-8669.
Harassment Policy
Employees of the university work to assist learners in the
several facets of university life. At no time is it acceptable
to engage in a discussion that is less than courteous and
professional. It is the university’s policy that if at any time
an employee or learner believes that he or she is being
harassed by anyone in a public contact or an inquiry situation,
he or she should immediately end the conversation and report
the matter to his or her supervisor or Discipline Chair.
5
2
Academic and Support Services
University Libraries............................................................. 7
Career and Vocation Center............................................... 7
Accommodations for Individuals with Disabilities........... 7
Counseling Services............................................................ 8
Tutoring Services................................................................. 7
Student Support Services................................................... 7
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2014 CATALOG
Bookstore............................................................................. 8
Learning Management System.......................................... 8
University College learners have access to more than 140
online databases, including 46,000 electronic journals,
60,600 ebooks, a 24/7 reference service, and online tutorial
guides. As a courtesy patron ($20/year), UC learners can
check out books from Azusa Pacific University’s libraries
(the William V. Marshburn Memorial Library, the Hugh and
Hazel Darling Library, and the James L. Stamps Theological
Library). UC learners can access additional resources or
Interlibrary Loan services by contacting a local area library
(subject to that library’s policies).
University College learners have access to professional
tutors who assist with writing projects, papers and other
assignments. Tutoring takes place in an online classroom with
real-time interactive feedback between the tutor and learner.
A limited number of these sessions are available at no cost.
Accommodations for Individuals
with Disabilities
University College partners with the Learning Enrichment
Center (LEC) at Azusa Pacific University to coordinate
accommodations for undergraduate learners with specific
disabilities. Accommodations are individualized based on the
learning needs of each learner and upon the documented
verification of disability. UC’s Office of the Registrar is the
designated office for:
• Verification of disability
• Disability documentation archive
• Coordination of direct services for UC learners with
specific disabilities
Procedure to Request Disability Accommodation
1. Complete a UC Accessibility Support form.
2. Complete a UC Academic Accommodations
Application. (Please submit form at least eight weeks
prior to the intended session of attendance.)
3. Provide certification and documentation from a medical
professional of the disability. (Documentation must be
current within three years.)
4. Learner is contacted by telephone and/or email to
discuss academic accommodations available based on
the specific disability(ies) and what UC can offer, after
the application is reviewed.
The Academic Accommodations Application and
documentation should be returned directly to the Office of
the Registrar via email attachment to [email protected]
or via fax at 626-857-2449.
Note that academic accommodations at UC do not include:
• Diagnostic testing or evaluation
• Special program for learning disabled learners
With the goal of increasing academic success and learner
persistence, University College offers a variety of support
staff to assist learners in their academic goals. Students can
access Student Support Central (SSC), a one-stop support
office at UC. Navigating college can be challenging, but SSC
is here to help. SSC serves as a primary resource “hub” at
UC, guiding learners to their desired destination. Student
Service Advisors provide primary support for certificate and
non-degree seeking students, directing learners through
orientation, assisting with course selection and registration,
and helping with the basics of financial aid. Student Service
Advisors help learners navigate any obstacles they may
encounter on the way to their educational goals.
Success Coaches offer a highly personal and responsive
support system to the UC learner. Every degree-seeking
learner is assigned a Success Coach upon entering the
program. Success Coaches support and participate in
intentional engagement activities from the first class through
the completion of lower-division requirements. The Success
Coach provides support services in six primary areas—
academic advising toward the completion of the general
studies requirements, financial aid, spiritual formation,
motivation/general support, career counseling, and strengths
counseling—through weekly phone, email, or in-person
interactions.
The Success Coach monitors successful completion of
degree requirements and promotes learner development
through personal interaction and support. In addition to
assisting with academic planning and course selection, the
Success Coach also provides support services that facilitate
spiritual growth, vocational exploration, and educational goal
attainment. While final responsibility for meeting academic
requirements rests with the learner, the Success Coach
provides support toward completion of lower-division general
studies requirements.
Program Completion Advisors offer support for upperdivision class selection, designing of academic plans, and
strategies for achieving program completion. In addition,
Program Completion Advisors are knowledgeable in financial
aid guidance and planning, as well as preparing students for
life after graduation. In collaboration with Program Directors
and Discipline Chairs, Program Completions Advisors initiate
program-specific activities that help students get the most
out of their chosen major. Program Completion Advisors
help students cross the finish line, providing support to help
students graduate.
Career and Vocation Center
Learners can access resources and support as they consider
career and vocation choices through UC’s Career and
Vocation Center at career.uc.apu.edu. This online resource
is available to all UC learners in addition to basic support
from the Success Coach.
• Separate or special tutorial programs
• Reduced standards of academic performance
• Waiver of academic courses or requirements
7
2014
Tutoring Services
Student Support Services
GENERAL INFORMATION
ACADEMIC
AND SUPPORT SERVICES
2012–13
University Libraries
Bookstore
Learners can order books, digital textbooks and class
materials online from the Azusa Pacific University Bookstore
at www.bookstore.apu.edu/ by selecting “buy” and the
appropriate term and course.
Counseling Services
Student support staff are available to provide a personal and
responsive support system to every UC learner. However,
student support services are unable to provide psychological
counseling services. UC learners have access to a limited
number of crisis counseling sessions provided by a thirdparty aligned with UC at no cost to the learner. With respect
to psychological, emotional, social, and spiritual wellness,
UC learners are encouraged to connect with their primary
care physician, health service provider, local church and/or
Christian counseling and outreach services.
Learning Management System
University College uses Moodle as the virtual learning
environment and content management system for its
programs. Enrolled learners can find a comprehensive list
of academic and support services within UC’s Moodle
environment.
8
3
Admissions Policies
Admission to the University.............................................. 10
International Admission.................................................... 11
Policy Regarding False Information................................ 10
Admission Status............................................................... 11
Admissions Petitions........................................................ 10
Transcripts......................................................................... 10
Evidence of Proficiency.................................................... 10
Transfer Applicants........................................................... 10
General Education Information for Transfer Students... 11
Admission of Homeschooled Students........................... 11
9
2014 CATALOG
Re-admission and Re-enrollment.................................... 11
Notification of Admission................................................. 11
Veterans’ Education Benefits........................................... 11
High School Concurrent Enrollment Program................ 11
Credit by Examination....................................................... 12
University College is committed to the principle of lifelong
learning and accessibility to higher education. UC invites
applications from learners who have a passion to learn and
to make a difference in the world. Applicants must abide by
the policies, standards, and regulations at UC and respect
the ideals, principles, and traditions it upholds as a Christian
institution of higher learning.
In addition, high-performing high school students have
the opportunity to enroll in college-level courses through
the High School Concurrent Enrollment Program. Please
see section entitled “High School Concurrent Enrollment
Program” for more information.
For all programs, admission is not guaranteed, and UC
reserves the right to deny admission.
UC does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, gender, age, disability, or status as a veteran.
Admissions Petitions
There are two circumstances that require applicants to
submit an admissions petition: applicants with a felony
record, and applicants dismissed from other academic
institutions.
Applicants with a felony record may be admitted to
University College. A written statement in the form of an
Admissions Petition is required if the violation occurred
fewer than 10 years ago, or was categorized as a violent
offense, regardless of time frame. Applicants dismissed
from other academic institutions are also required to submit
an Admissions Petition addressing the dismissal(s). The
Admissions Committee will review the petition and will
either approve with full admissions status, or may ask for
additional documentation before reaching a final decision.
Please contact your program representative for specific
instructions.
Policy Regarding False Information
Learners are advised that admission is contingent upon the
truthfulness of the information contained in the application.
Discovery of false information subsequent to admission is,
at the university’s discretion, grounds for immediate dismissal
at any point in the learner’s course of study. Such dismissal
shall result in forfeiture of all charges paid and academic
credits earned. The full fraudulent records policy may be
obtained from the Office of the UC Registrar.
10
Applicants are responsible for submitting transcripts from
either the high school from which they graduated, or each
regionally accredited college or university they attended,
or both. An official transcript is one that University College
receives through the authorized electronic transcript
submission process or unopened in an envelope sealed by
the issuing institution(s) that bears the official seal of that
high school, college, or university. University College reserves
the right to request that the transcript be sent directly from the
issuing institution(s). High school learners applying for regular
admission should submit a preliminary transcript showing
courses and marks for freshman through junior year, or through
the first semester of the senior year if the application is made
after the completion of that semester. A final transcript must be
sent following graduation. The transcript and other documents
submitted as part of the application become the property of the
university and cannot be returned to the learner or forwarded in
any form to another college or university.
Evidence of Proficiency
There are no required pre-admission tests for applicants
to UC. However, all learners must present evidence of
a math placement score in preparation for the college
algebra course. Such evidence may include an official
college transcript verifying successful completion of the
prerequisite course (Intermediate Algebra), an American
College Testing (ACT) math score of at least 23, a Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT I) math score of at least 540, or a
COMPASS standardized test score of 66 or above on
the algebra exam. Official proof must be received by the
Office of the UC Registrar before registering for MATH
125 (College Algebra).
Learners with proficiency scores indicating placement at a
level below college algebra are encouraged to begin
preparation immediately to meet prerequisites for that course.
Applicants can find online beginning and intermediate algebra
courses at many institutions through the California Virtual
Campus (www.cvc.edu).
Transfer Applicants
University College welcomes applications from transfer
learners.
Transfer learners must submit official transcripts from any
regionally accredited colleges and universities attended,
whether or not credit was given. An official transcript is
one that University College receives through the authorized
electronic transcript submission process or unopened in an
envelope sealed by the issuing institution(s) which bears the
official seal of that college or university. University College
reserves the right to request that the transcript be sent
directly from the issuing institution(s).
College credit earned by a learner still in high school may be
transferred to University College provided that the course
was taken at a regionally accredited college. An official
college transcript must be submitted via an authorized
electronic transcript submission process or unopened in
an envelope sealed by the issuing institution to University
2014
There are two pathways for admission to the university:
regular admission, and admission to our Concurrent
Enrollment Program for high school students. Regular
admission to the university requires applicants to possess
an official high school diploma, GED, or homeschool
certification/transcript. Applicants are required to submit a
completed application along with applicable documentation.
Required documentation varies by applicant, but may
include official high school transcripts or other secondary
school certifications (GED, homeschool certification, etc.);
official transcripts from each regionally accredited college or
university attended; or all of the above. Please discuss with
your program representative for further clarification.
Transcripts
ADMISSIONS POLICIES
Admission to the University
College in order for such coursework to be evaluated for
transfer of credit.
The registrar will evaluate previous college work to determine
its relationship to the requirements of University College. A
credit summary will be sent to the learner showing those
courses that have been accepted on transfer and those
courses that still need to be taken to fulfill the university’s
general studies requirements. Only courses where a grade of
C- or above has been earned can be considered for transfer
of credit.
University College accepts the California State University
General Education Breadth Certificate to satisfy the basic
General Education requirements for bachelor’s degrees,
although learners must still fulfill UC’s religion requirements.
The IGETC (Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum) is accepted by University College provided
that the College Algebra requirement is satisfied. Transfer
learners choosing to follow the IGETC must complete it before
they enroll at University College and present the IGETC
certificate at the time of enrollment.
Learners who do not receive certification of completion
will follow the UC General Education program.
General Education Information
for Transfer Students
Learners transferring into University College may have some
of their requirements met by classes taken at their previous
institution(s). The evaluation of a learner’s transfer work
is conducted by the registrar. Each degree has several
courses that must be taken at UC and cannot be met by
transfer units. These courses are marked with an asterisk
(*) in each program’s section. Request for exceptions (e.g.,
substitution of an equivalent APU course) may be directed to
the registrar.
Admission of Homeschooled Students
Applicants who are homeschooled and do not have an
official high school transcript to submit to the university with
their application are not required to take the General
Education Development (GED) Test or the California High
School Proficiency Examination. If the learner does not have
access to an official transcript or does not subscribe to a
transcript service, the learner will be asked to submit a
transcript created by the primary teacher that will be
evaluated by the registrar.
International Admission
Currently, University College does not accept international
learners. An international learner is defined as any individual
not holding U.S. residency or citizenship.
Re-admission and Re-enrollment
In the event that a learner leaves University College
for any reason for more than one academic year (6
sessions), that learner must complete an Application for
Re-enrollment. All applications for re-enrollment must be
approved by the Office of the UC Registrar, the Office of
Student Financial Services, and the Office of Admissions
before re-enrollment will be considered, unless an approved
leave of absence has been previously granted.
Any learner re-enrolling in University College after an absence
of more than one academic year (6 sessions) will be subject
to new catalog requirements. In addition, all applicants’
previously completed work will be reviewed by the Discipline
Chair to determine which, if any, major courses and supporting
nonmajor courses must be repeated or added to complete
the major. The reviewing chair may take into consideration
any relevant work experience for major requirement
equivalence, but such work experience may not count for
unit credit.
Admission Status
Applicants who are granted admission to the university
without restriction are considered to be in regular standing.
They are permitted to continue in this classification as long
as they maintain a satisfactory grade-point average and
continue to meet the general standards established by the
university for admission and graduation.
Notification of Admission
University College follows a procedure of rolling admission,
which means that a prospective learner may submit
a completed application at any time. The program
representative maintains regular contact with all applicants
regarding the status of their application file. In addition, each
prospective learner can access his or her admissions status
through an online portal to Jenzabar, UC’s system of record.
Veterans’ Education Benefits
University College is an approved degree-granting institution
recognized by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Eligible
veterans and their dependents seeking educational training
may qualify to use Title 38, chapters 30, 31, 33, 35, and
1606/1607. Refer to the Department of Veterans Affairs for
eligibility criteria.
High School Concurrent
Enrollment Program
University College offers high-performing high school
students the opportunity to enroll in college-level courses
(100-level only) through its Concurrent Enrollment Program.
These courses may articulate to meet high school credits,
and may be transferable to a student’s future postsecondary program. To participate in the Concurrent
Enrollment Program, 10th-12th grade students must have a
minimum 3.0 GPA at their school and complete the program
criteria (Please visit www.apu.edu/universitycollege/ for more
information.).
11
College credit may be earned through competency examinations. There are three examinations recognized by the university:
Advanced Placement (AP) Tests, the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), and the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program.
Credit is granted to learners who score a three or higher on an AP Test and to those who meet the cut-off level in CLEP
subject area tests, or on the IB higher-level exams (see details below). Learners may earn a maximum of 30 units toward
a UC degree from these tests. Credit received by examination is tuition-free and applies toward the total requirement for
graduation from the university. No CLEP credit will be allowed in a learner’s final semester.
COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP)
Score
Units
Course Equivalent
BUSINESS
Financial Accounting
Business Law, Introductory
Information Systems and Computer Applications
Management, Principles of
Marketing, Principles of
Macroeconomics, Principles of
Microeconomics, Principles of
COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE
American Literature
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature*
College Composition (with or without essay)
English Literature*
College Composition Modular*
MODERN LANGUAGE
French Language
German Language
Spanish Language
HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
American Government
Educational Psychology, Introduction to
History of U.S. I: Early Colonization to 1877
History of U.S. II: 1865 to the Present
Human Growth and Development
Humanities
Psychology, Introductory
Social Sciences and History
Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648
Western Civilization II: 1648 to the Present
SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Calculus
College Algebra
College Mathematics
General Biology
General Chemistry
Natural Sciences
Precalculus
50
—
50
50
50
50
50
4
—
3
3
3
3
3
ACC 210 (Financial Accounting)
Elective, Not acceptable for BUS 270
CS 200 (Basic Software Tools)
Elective
Elective
ECO 204 (Principles of Macroeconomics)
ECO 203 (Principles of Microeconomics)
50
50
—
50
50
3
3
—
3
3
Elective
ENG 115* (Introduction to Literature)
No Credit Awarded
Elective
ENG 105 (Composition)
50
50
50
6
6
6
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
—
50
50
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
—
3
3
Fulfills History Requirement
Elective
Fulfills History Requirement
Fulfills History Requirement
APSY 295
Elective
APSY 105 (General Psychology)
No Credit Awarded
Fulfills History Requirement
Fulfills History Requirement
50
50
54
—
50
50
—
50
5
3
3
—
4
4
—
3
Fulfills Math Requirement
MATH 125 (College Algebra)
MATH 125, Required for BAM learners
No Credit Awarded
Fulfills Science Requirement (non-nursing)
Fulfills Science Requirement (non-nursing)
No Credit Awarded
Fulfills Math Requirement
*Essay is required to receive UC course equivalency. Note that essays are evaluated after a passing score on the multiple-choice section of the CLEP is achieved.
12
2014
Subject
ADMISSIONS POLICIES
Credit by Examination
The Advanced Placement Program (AP) sponsored by the College Board and administered by Educational Testing Service
(ETS) offers secondary school learners the opportunity to participate in challenging college-level coursework while still in high
school. The exams are two or three hours long and cover one or two semesters of college-level work.
If a learner takes a college course for which he or she has already received AP or IB credit, the learner forfeits the AP/IB credit.
Subject
Art, Studio Art, Drawing
Art, Studio Art, 2D Design
Art, Studio Art, 3D Design
Art, History
Biology
Calculus AB
Calculus BC
Chemistry
Chinese Language and Culture
Computer Science A
English Language and Composition
English Literature and Composition
French Language
French Literature
German Language
Human Geography
Government/Politics/Comparative
Government/Politics/U.S.
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics
Latin: Vergil
Latin Literature
Italian Language/Culture
Japanese Language/Culture
Music Theory
Physics B
Physics C: Mechanics
Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism
Psychology
Spanish Language
Spanish Literature
Statistics
U.S. History
World History
ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAM
AP Score
Units
Course Equivalent Awarded
3, 4, 5
3
Elective
3, 4, 5
3
Elective
3, 4, 5
3
Elective
Fulfills Art Requirement
3, 4, 5
3
Fulfills Science Requirement
3, 4, 5
4
3, 4, 5
5
Fulfills Math Requirement
3, 4, 5
5
Fulfills Math Requirement
Fulfills Science Requirement
3, 4, 5
4
3, 4, 5
3
Elective
3, 4, 5
3
Elective
3, 4
3
ENG 105 (Composition)
5
6
ENG 105 (Composition) and Elective
If score is a 5 in both English Language and English Literature,
learner receives 9 units – ENG 105, ENG 115, and 3 units elective.
3, 4
5
3
6
ENG 115 (Intro to Literature)
ENG 105 and ENG 115
3
4, 5
3, 4, 5
3
4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3
4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3
4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4, 5
3, 4
5
3, 4, 5
4
6
3
4
6
3
3
3
3
3
4
6
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
3
4
6
3
3
3
6
3
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Elective
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Elective
Elective
Fulfills History Requirement
ECO 204 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECO 203 Principles of Microeconomics
Elective
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Elective
Elective
Elective
Fulfills Art Requirement
Fulfills Science Requirement
Fulfills Science Requirement
Elective
APSY 105 (General Psychology)
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Elective
STAT 280
HIS 201 (U.S. History)
HIS 201 and Elective
HIS 202 (World Civilization)
If score is a 5 in both English Language and English Literature,
learner receives 9 units – ENG 105, ENG 115, and 3 units elective.
13
2014
14
ADMISSIONS POLICIES
CREDIT FOR INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM
Examination Title
*Level
Score
Units
Credit Awarded
Biology
HL
5, 6, 7
4
Fulfills Science Requirement (non-nursing)
Business and Organization
—
—
No Credit Awarded
Chemistry
HL
5, 6, 7
4
Fulfills Science Requirement (non-nursing)
Classical Languages
—
—
No Credit Awarded
Computer Science
HL
5, 6, 7
3
Elective
Economics
HL
5, 6, 7
3
ECO 204 (Principles of Macroeconomics)
English 1A (English)
HL
5, 6, 7
3
ENG 115 (Intro to Literature)
Environmental Systems
—
—
No Credit Awarded
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
French (Language B)
SL
5, 6, 7
6
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
French (Language B)
HL
5, 6, 7
6
Geography
HL
5, 6, 7
3
Elective
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
German (Language B)
SL
5, 6, 7
6
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
German (Language B)
HL
5, 6, 7
6
Fulfills History Requirement
History
HL
5, 6, 7
3
History of the Islamic World
HL
5, 6, 7
3
Elective
Information Technology
—
—
No Credit Awarded
Mathematics
SL
5, 6, 7
3
MATH 125 (College Algebra)
Fulfills Math Requirement
Mathematics
HL
5, 6, 7
3
Fulfills Math Requirement
Mathematical Studies
SL
5, 6, 7
3
Fulfills Math Requirement
Further Mathematics
SL
5, 6, 7
3
Fulfills Art Requirement
Music
HL
5, 6, 7
3
Philosophy
HL
6, 7
3
Fulfills Philosophy Requirement
Physics
SL
5, 6, 7
3
Elective
Fulfills Science Requirement
Physics
HL
5, 6, 7
4
Psychology
HL
5, 6, 7
3
APSY 105 (General Psychology)
Social Anthropology
HL
5, 6, 7
3
Elective
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Spanish (Language B)
SL
5, 6, 7
6
Fulfills Foreign Language Requirement
Spanish (Language B)
HL
5, 6, 7
6
Theater Arts
HL
5, 6, 7
3
Elective
Visual Arts
HL
5, 6, 7
6
ART 110 (Introduction to Art)
*Legend SL = Standard Level HL = Higher Level
If your SAT math
score is...
GENERAL INFORMATION
Students seeking an A.A. degree from UC need to pass College Algebra.
MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENTS: TESTING AND PREREQUISITES
If your Compass
score is...
If your CLEP
score is...
Placement
620 or higher
28 or higher
61 or higher
54 or higher
Math requirement met for
B.A. in Management majors
600 or higher
26 or higher
46 or higher
50 or higher
Math requirement met for A.A. degree
students (MATH 125 is waived)
540-590
23-25
0-45
NA
Register for College Algebra
(MATH 125)
500-530
21-22
NA
NA
Register for Intermediate Algebra
(MATH 099)
430-490
18-20
NA
NA
Register for Elementary Algebra2
(prerequisite to Intermediate Algebra
MATH 099)
420 or lower
17 or lower
NA
NA
Register for Pre-Algebra2 (prerequisite to
Elementary Algebra)
(Approximate fees)
Complete Test: $49.00
Subject Test: $22.00
(Approximate fees)
$34.00 w/o writing
$49.00 w/ writing
Proctoring Fee:
$20 - 45.00
(may vary by test
site)
Test: $77.00
Proctor Fee:
$15-25.00 (may
vary by test site)
Notes:
1
This is the Compass Standardized Test in the College Algebra placement domain (not the multi-modular test, and not the Algebra or Pre-Algebra placement domain).
2
Not offered at UC.
To Take the Compass Placement Test
Students are directed to any local college for these services; there may be a fee. UC accepts the Compass Standardized Test
in the College Algebra placement domain (not the multi-modular test, and not the Algebra or Pre-Algebra placement domain).
The Compass Test website contains sample test questions (www.act.org/compass).
Taking Mathematics Prerequisites
• UC does not offer Elementary Algebra or Pre-Algebra.
• UC offers Intermediate Algebra (MATH 099).
C- (70%) or better must be earned in order to place into MATH 125 (College Algebra). MATH 099 does not
count toward degree credit. See below for course description.
• Please take the necessary prerequisites to College Algebra as indicated in the chart above. Following are resources likely to
offer the needed prerequisites to College Algebra:
‐ Your local community college
‐ California Virtual Campus: www.cvc.edu/ which lists online courses at California colleges and universities
15
2012–13
If your ACT math
score is...
4
Financial Information Student Financial Services............................................... 17
Federal Student Aid........................................................... 18
Payment............................................................................. 17
Outside Aid......................................................................... 21
Cost of Attendance for 2014............................................. 17
Refund Policy..................................................................... 17
Financial Agreement......................................................... 17
How to Apply for Financial Aid......................................... 17
Types of Financial Aid....................................................... 17
16
2014 CATALOG
State Aid............................................................................. 19
Financial Aid Policies........................................................ 22
Stacking Financial Aid...................................................... 24
Verification......................................................................... 24
16
Higher education is one of the most important investments
an individual can make. Cost should not be the only determining
factor in selecting the appropriate university. However, having a
clear understanding of the expense involved is an integral part
of making a well-informed choice.
Cost of Attendance for 2014
Tuition
100–200 level class = $400 per unit
300–400 level class = $425 per unit
Military*
= $275 per unit (100–200 level)
and $325 per unit (300–400)
Pre-Nursing Health
Science Certificate = $425 per unit
* See military discount section for details of eligibility.
Special Fees
Late Registration Fee* $120 per course
Return Check Fee (UC = $30)
Transcripts Fee (UC = $5/copy)
Rush Transcript Fee (UC = $20)
Transcript Overnight Postage Fee
Standard Overnight Express within U.S.
(excluding Alaska and Hawaii) 1–2 days $15
Global Express outside of continental U.S.
and International (3–4 days) $25
Refund Policy Exceptions
Any exception to the stated policy must be requested in
writing (using a General Petition Form obtained upon request
from the Office of Student Financial Services) and approved
by the Office of Student Financial Services. Learners receiving
federal aid are subject to federal proration refund policies.
Learners Making Class Changes
Learners may add and/or drop classes until the last day to
change registration, which is listed in the Academic Calendar,
but is generally the first Wednesday of the term before
11:50 p.m. PST. Such changes are subject to the Refund
Policy stated above.
Financial Agreement
A learner may not participate in graduation ceremonies, register
for further sessions, or receive any diploma, certificates, or
transcripts until all financial obligations have been satisfied
in accordance with UC financial policies. Any diploma,
verifications, certificates, or transcripts shall be retained by
the university as a security interest until all such obligations
are satisfied. Release of any such security interest prior to,
or subsequent to, any default by the debtors shall not be
considered a binding precedent or modification of this policy.
The university reserves the right to make any changes in
institutional refund policies, fees, and expenses without notice.
How to Apply for Financial Aid
*Registration is considered late between midnight Sunday PST a week before
the first day of class and the end of the add/drop period.
Step 1:
Complete a FAFSA online at www.fafsa.ed.gov (Free Application
for Federal Student Aid). APU’s school code is 001117.
Charges subject to change without notice.
Deadline: March 2 for Cal Grant
Payment
Tuition and fees are due in full before the start of each
semester.
Refund Policy
• 100% tuition refund for learner withdrawing from classes
before first day of class midnight Sunday PST
• 90% tuition refund if the learner withdraws in the first
week of class between midnight Sunday PST and
midnight Wednesday PST
Suggested deadline: As soon as possible after January 1
Step 2:
Admission to UC. Shortly after admission, learners are
reviewed for financial aid eligibility.
Step 3:
Return all documents requested. To finalize eligibility, the
learner’s financial aid files must be complete.*
*If the learner’s financial aid file is still incomplete when school begins, all financial
aid may be removed, and the learner may no longer be eligible to receive any aid
for that semester.
• 50% tuition refund if the learner withdraws in the first
week of class between 12:01 a.m. Thursday PST and
midnight Sunday PST
Types of Financial Aid
• No tuition refund is given after 12:01 a.m. Monday PST
of the second full week of class
2. State (provided by the state of California)
All learners are subject to federal proration refund regulations
for all federal aid.
The following types (or sources) of financial aid are available:
1. Federal Student Aid (provided by the U.S. government)
3. O
utside scholarships (provided by organizations,
businesses, etc.)
4. Alternative/private loans
17
2012–13
The Office of Student Financial Services assists learners in
answering questions related to financial aid and student
accounts. Contact 1-855-276-8669 or
[email protected] with any questions.
Any learner dismissed by the university will receive refunds at
the administration’s discretion. If a learner feels that individual
circumstances warrant exceptions, a petition may be submitted
to the Office of Student Financial Services.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Student Financial Services
To apply for federal student aid, learners must complete the
FAFSA. Federal aid is categorized as:
1. Grants (funds that do not require repayment) including
Federal Pell Grant
2. Loans through the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan
Program (funds that require repayment)
To be eligible for and continue receiving federal aid, learners
must meet the eligibility requirements set forth by the U.S.
Department of Education. The information provided below
is a general overview of the programs provided. For further
information on federal student aid programs, amounts,
qualifications and restrictions, please refer to the Department
of Education’s website, studentaid.ed.gov.
Pell Grant
The Pell Grant is awarded to eligible learners who demonstrate
financial need based on Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
through the FAFSA application process.
Qualifications
1. Financial need as determined by the FAFSA with EFC not
to exceed $4,995
• Direct Subsidized Loans are available to undergraduate
students with financial need. SFS will determine the amount
the learner can borrow, and the amount may not exceed
financial need. The U.S. Department of Education pays the
interest on Subsidized Stafford loan while enrolled in school
at least half-time.
2014
Federal Student Aid
Loans
Direct Stafford Loan–Students
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Important Note
Please be advised that funding from all of the sources listed
is not guaranteed. Budget limitations may reduce or eliminate
any of the awards described without notice. Also, on rare
occasions the amount of financial aid originally offered may
end up reduced or eliminated due to federal, state, and/or
institutional policies. See the “Stacking Financial Aid”
policy in the following section for more information on
possible restrictions.
Subsidized and unsubsidized loans are low-interest (6.8% or
less) federal student loans for eligible students to help cover
the cost of higher education at a four-year college or university,
community college, or trade, career, or technical school. The
U.S. Department of Education offers eligible students at
participating schools Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct
Unsubsidized Loans.
• Direct Unsubsidized Loans are available to undergraduate
and graduate students; there is no requirement to
demonstrate financial need. SFS will determine the amount
the learner may borrow based on cost of attendance and
other financial aid received. For an unsubsidized loan, the
learner is responsible for paying the interest during all
periods. If the learner chooses to pay interest while
in school and during grace periods and deferment or
forbearance periods, interest will accrue (accumulate) and
be capitalized (that is, your interest will be added to the
principal amount of the loan).
Yearly Amounts
• Freshmen: (0–27 units) $5,500 (up to $3,500 of which may
be subsidized)
• Sophomores: (28–59 units) $6,500 (up to $4,500 of which
may be subsidized)
2. Has not previously earned a bachelor’s or professional
degree
• Juniors and seniors: (60+ units) $7,500 (up to $5,500 of
which may be subsidized)
3. Enrolled at least part time in first undergraduate degree
program
4. Has not met the Federal Pell Grant Lifetime Eligibility Limit
of 600%
If the learner is independent or the parent is denied a
PLUS Loan, the learner can take out an additional Stafford
unsubsidized loan (freshmen and sophomores, $4,000;
juniors and seniors, $5,000).
Pell Grant Yearly Award Amounts
1. Varies from $564–$5,645 for the 2013–14 school year
• Preparatory coursework (not to exceed 12 consecutive
months) $8,625 (up to $2,625 of which may be subsidized).
2. Award amount is based on EFC up to $4,995, enrollment,
(award amount is prorated if enrolled less than full time),
and cost of attendance
Disbursement
Once the learner’s admitted into an eligible program and
financial aid files are complete, financial aid usually disburses
into the learner’s UC account during the first six weeks of
the semester or later depending on when documentation is
received.
To Retain Eligibility
The learner must be enrolled at least part time (6 units per
semester). The learner must also maintain Federal Satisfactory
Academic Progress (SAP) including 67% completion ratio and
2.0 GPA at all times.
18
How to Apply (all learners)
1. Complete the 2013-14 FAFSA at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
2. Financial Aid is awarded under UC Passive Acceptance
policy, financial aid awards will be accepted in full at the
time of awarding. If a learner does not wish to accept all or
a portion of financial aid awards, the learner must notify
Student Financial Services.
New borrowers must also:
3. C
omplete Direct Stafford Loan entrance counseling online
at www.studentloans.gov.
4. C
omplete a Direct Stafford Loan Master Promissory Note
(MPN) online at studentloans.gov.
Repayment
Repayment usually begins 6 months after the learner either
drops below half time (6 units is half time), withdraws, or
graduates from college.
William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program
Direct Parent PLUS Loan
The Direct PLUS Loan is a low-interest loan (fixed 7.9%)
borrowed directly from the U.S. government, that parents
can apply for to help their dependent learner pay for college.
Yearly Amounts
The parent can borrow any amount up to the learner’s cost
of attendance, minus any other aid the learner is receiving.
If the parent is denied a PLUS Loan, the learner is eligible to
borrow an additional Unsubsidized Stafford Loan (freshmen
and sophomores, $4,000; juniors and seniors, $5,000) up to
cost of attendance.
How to Apply for Parent PLUS loan (all learners)
1. Complete the 2013–14 FAFSA at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
2. Complete the 2013–14 Parent PLUS Loan Worksheet
(dependent students).
New borrowers must also:
3. Complete a Direct Parent PLUS Loan Master Promissory
Note (MPN) online at www.studentaid.gov.
Disbursement
Once the learner’s admitted into an eligible program and
financial aid files are complete, financial aid usually disburses
into the learner’s UC account during the first six weeks of
the semester or later depending on when documentation is
received.
To Retain Eligibility
The learner must be enrolled at least half time (6 units per
semester). The learner must also maintain Satisfactory
Academic Progress (SAP).
Repayment
There is no grace period for a Direct PLUS Loan, the
repayment period begins 60 days after your school makes
the last disbursement of the loan. However, if you’re a
parent PLUS borrower who is also a student, you can defer
repayment while you’re enrolled in school at least half time
and (for Direct PLUS Loans first disbursed on or after July 1,
2008) for an additional 6 months after you graduate or drop
below half-time enrollment.
Loan Exit Requirements
2012–13
To Retain Eligibility
The learner must be enrolled at least half time (6 units) per
semester. The learner must also maintain Satisfactory
Academic Progress (SAP).
If you’re a parent PLUS borrower, you can defer repayment
of Direct PLUS Loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2008,
while the student for whom you obtained the loan is enrolled
at least half time, and for an additional 6 months after the
student graduates or drops below half-time enrollment (halftime enrollment status is determined by your child’s school).
You must separately request each deferment period. Please
visit direct.ed.gov for repayment options and details of the
William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Disbursement
Once the learner’s admitted into an eligible program and
financial aid files are complete, financial aid usually disburses
into the learner’s UC account during the first six weeks of
the semester or later depending on when documentation is
received.
The federal government requires all federal loan borrowers
to complete loan exit counseling for Federal Stafford Loans.
One must complete a loan exit when withdrawing from
school, dropping below half time, or graduating. Transcripts
will be held until the online exit counseling is completed.
State Aid
Each year, the state of California invests millions of dollars in
helping the state’s residents achieve their higher education
goals. Of the programs offered, the most common are the
Cal Grant A, Cal Grant B and Chafee Grant. These funds
are not guaranteed. The state reserves the right to reduce
or eliminate any of the programs described below based on
budget limitations.
State Aid is available in three categories:
1. Cal Grant A
2. Cal Grant B
3. Chafee Grant for Foster Youth
The following information is a general guideline. For more
information, and for any changes or revisions, please visit
http://calgrants.org and http://csac.ca.gov.
Important Note
Please be advised that funding from all of the sources listed
is not guaranteed. Budget limitations may reduce or eliminate
any of the awards described without notice. Also, on rare
occasions the amount of financial aid originally offered
may end up reduced or eliminated due to federal, state,
and/or institutional policies. See the “Stacking Financial
Aid” policy in the following section for more information
on possible restrictions.
Cal Grant A
First-time recipients: Contact the California Student Aid
Commission, CSAC, for the specific details.
Qualifications
1. California resident
2. Graduated from a California high school
3. 3.0 high school GPA
4. F
amily’s income and assets are under the ceilings
established for that year.
5. Enrolled at least half time
6. L
earner is not already receiving a scholarship/grant that
covers the price of tuition.
19
How to Apply
1. Complete the FAFSA (for the appropriate school year) by
the March 2 deadline.
Disbursement
Once the learner’s admitted into an eligible program and
financial aid files are complete, financial aid usually disburses
into the learner’s UC account during the first six weeks of
the semester or later depending on when documentation is
received.
To Retain Eligibility
1. Must be enrolled at least half time (6 units) per semester.
2. Must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress.
Disbursement
Once the learner’s admitted into an eligible program and
financial aid files are complete, financial aid usually disburses
into the learner’s UC account during the first six weeks of
the semester or later depending on when documentation is
received.
4. Must meet the state’s financial eligibility requirements.
To Retain Eligibility
1. Must be enrolled at least half time (6 units) per semester.
2. Must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress.
3. Must have remaining eligibility per the state.
4. In conjunction with other scholarships/grants received,
must have sufficient financial need, per the information
reported on the FAFSA. “Need” is defined as Cost of
Attendance minus EFC. Per the state’s requirements,
some of the other scholarships or grants originally offered
to the learner may be reduced if there is not sufficient need.
Renewal recipients: Contact the California Student Aid
Commission, CSAC, for the specific details.
Qualifications
1. Must have met the qualifications to receive the grant in a
previous school year.
2. Must be enrolled at least half time (6 units) per semester.
3. Must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress.
4. Must have remaining eligibility per the state.
5. Must meet the state’s financial eligibility requirements.
6. In conjunction with other scholarships/grants received,
must have sufficient financial need, per the information
reported on the FAFSA. “Need” is defined as Cost of
Attendance minus EFC. Per the state’s requirements,
some of the other scholarships or grants originally offered
to the learner may be reduced if there is not sufficient need.
7. Learner is not already receiving a scholarship/grant that
covers the price of tuition.
Yearly Amount
Full award amount offered is determined by the state. Award
amount is prorated if enrolled less than full time (9–11 at
75%, 6–8 units at 50%). The amount also may be reduced
or eliminated if any of the above qualifications are not met.
How to Apply
Complete the FAFSA for the appropriate school year (prior
to fall enrollment) at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
20
3. Must have remaining eligibility per the state.
5. In conjunction with other scholarships/grants received,
must have sufficient financial need, per the information
reported on the FAFSA. “Need” is defined as Cost of
Attendance minus EFC. Per the state’s requirements,
some of the other scholarships or grants originally offered
to the learner may be reduced if there is not sufficient need.
Cal Grant B
First-time recipients: Contact the California Student Aid
Commission, CSAC, for the specific details.
Qualifications
1. California resident
2. Graduated from a California high school
3. L
earner’s high school GPA meets the requirement set by
the state.
4. F
amily’s income and assets are under the ceilings
established by CSAC for that school year.
5. E
nrolled at least half time (6 units) per semester.
6. L
earner is not already receiving a scholarship/grant that
covers the price of tuition.
Yearly Amount
Learners in their first year of college typically are only offered
the Cal Grant B Access/Subsistence award of $1,473 for
the 2013–14 award year ($735 for fall, $736 for spring).
Award amount is prorated if enrolled less than full time (9–11
at 75%, 6–8 units at 50%).
How to Apply
1. C
omplete the FAFSA (for the appropriate school year) by
the March 2 deadline.
2. C
omplete the GPA Verification Form (for the appropriate
school year) by the March 2 deadline.
Disbursement
Once the learner’s admitted into an eligible program and
financial aid files are complete, financial aid usually disburses
into the learner’s UC account during the first six weeks of
the semester or later depending on when documentation is
received.
To Retain Eligibility
1. Must be enrolled at least half time (6 units) per semester.
2. Must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress.
3. Must have remaining eligibility per the state.
2014
2. Complete the GPA Verification Form (for the appropriate
school year) by the March 2 deadline.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Yearly Amount
At UC, the estimated amount is $9,223 for the 2013–14
award year ($4,611 for fall semester and $4,612 for spring
semester). Award amount is prorated if enrolled less than full
time (9–11 at 75%, 6–8 units at 50%).
5. In conjunction with other scholarships/grants received,
must have sufficient financial need, per the information
reported on the FAFSA. “Need” is defined as Cost of
Attendance minus EFC. Per the state’s requirements,
some of the other scholarships or grants originally offered
to the learner may be reduced if there is not sufficient need.
Qualifications
1. Must have met the qualifications to receive the grant in a
previous school year.
2. Must be enrolled at least half time (6 units) per semester.
3. Must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress.
4. Must have remaining eligibility per the state.
5. Must meet the state’s financial eligibility requirements.
6. In conjunction with other scholarships/grants received,
must have sufficient financial need, per the information
reported on the FAFSA. “Need” is defined as Cost of
Attendance minus EFC. Per the state’s requirements,
some of the other scholarships or grants originally offered
to the learner may be reduced if there is not sufficient need.
7. Learner is not already receiving a scholarship/grant that
covers the price of tuition.
The learner has the right to request, in writing, a direct
refund of the access grant and that it be excluded from
paying the outstanding balance on the student account. If the
written request is received after the access grant has already
been applied to the student account, any future access
grants will be awarded directly to the learner. Please note:
This may cause an outstanding balance on the student’s
account. An outstanding balance will prevent class registration.
Chafee Grant for Foster Youth
Please contact the California Student Aid Commission
(CSAC) for more information on the qualifications needed,
how to apply, yearly amounts, and disbursement information.
For more information, please visit http://csac.ca.gov.
Military Discount
The military tuition discount is available to military service
members, veterans, and spouses of active or reserve
military service members. For the purposes of this
tuition discount, military service members are defined as:
Yearly Amount
After the initial year, Cal Grant B recipients are generally
eligible to receive the full Cal Grant B award, estimated to
be $9,223 for the 2013–14 award year ($4,612 for fall and
$4,611 for spring), in addition to the Cal Grant B Access/
Subsistence award of $1,473 ($737 for fall and $736 for
spring). Award amounts are prorated if enrolled less than full
time (9–11 at 75%, 6–8 units at 50%).
• U.S. Air Force—active duty, reserve, veteran
How to Apply
Complete the FAFSA for the appropriate school year
(prior to fall enrollment).
“Active” is defined as after basic training is complete. Veterans must have an
honorable/general discharge.
Disbursement
Once the learner’s admitted into an eligible program and
financial aid files are complete, financial aid usually disburses
into the learner’s UC account during the first six weeks of
the semester or later depending on when documentation is
received.
All learners are required to report all resources known or
expected to be available to them during the period for which
they seek financial assistance. These resources include, but
are not limited to: scholarships, fellowships, stipends,
unemployment earnings (including spouse’s, where applicable),
and tuition reimbursement. Failure to report these resources
can result in delays in receiving aid funds for which the learner
may be eligible, cancellation of the award, or even the return of
funds already received.
To Retain Eligibility
1. Must be enrolled at least half time (6 units) per semester.
2. Must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress.
3. Must have remaining eligibility per the state.
4. Must meet the state’s financial eligibility requirements.
5. In conjunction with other scholarships/grants received,
must have sufficient financial need, per the information
reported on the FAFSA. “Need” is defined as Cost of
Attendance minus EFC. Per the state’s requirements,
some of the other scholarships or grants originally offered
to the learner may be reduced if there is not sufficient need.
• U.S. Army—active duty, Army National Guard on
active duty, Army Reserve, veteran
• U.S. Navy—active duty, Naval Reserve in active duty status, veteran
• U.S. Marines—active duty, veteran
• U.S. Coast Guard—active duty, reserve, veteran
Outside Aid
Should any new resources become available, the learner is
required to report this information to the Office of Student
Financial Services. Withholding or concealing information
about these resources may constitute fraud, as the learner
may be receiving financial aid to which he or she is not entitled.
Important Note
Please be advised that funding from all of the sources listed
is not guaranteed. Budget limitations may reduce or eliminate
any of the awards described without notice. Also, on rare
21
2012–13
Renewal recipients: Contact the California Student Aid
Commission, CSAC, for the specific details.
How the Cal Grant B Access/Subsistence Award is Processed
at UC
The access grant is designated for costs including living
expenses, transportation, supplies, and books. University
College policy states that all access grants will be transferred
directly to the learner’s institutional account and applied
toward any owing balance.
GENERAL INFORMATION
4. Must meet the state’s financial eligibility requirements.
Post-9/11 GI Bill
Alternative/Private Loans–Students
The Office of Student Financial Services (SFS) strongly
recommends applying for all federal aid/loans first and
foremost. Federal loans offer much better interest rates
and repayment terms.
Learners who wish to apply for alternative loans must complete
a separate online application, have eligibility remaining in their
school budget, and be approved by the lending agency. It
is the learner’s responsibility to notify the Office of Student
Financial Services of the approved alternative loan. Alternative
loans require that tuition must be paid in full before any refund
will be given. Contact the Office of Student Financial Services
for more information. It is the learner’s responsibility to be in
constant contact with his or her lender, to make sure every
piece of the application process has been taken care of in
a timely manner. Should the alternative loan not process in
time, the learner will be responsible for any owing balance that
remains on his or her UC account.
Disbursement
Once the learner’s admitted into an eligible program and
financial aid files are complete, financial aid usually disburses
into the learner’s UC account during the first six weeks of
the semester or later depending on when documentation is
received.
Repayment
The chosen lender establishes all terms of the loan, including
interest rate, repayment, etc.
Financial Aid Policies
All financial aid is subject to the continued availability of
federal, state, institutional, and private funding. Budget
limitations may reduce or eliminate any of the awards
described without notice.
Deadlines
Apply early and return all requested/required paperwork
well before the session begins. Completing the application
process early helps ensure a learner’s eligibility for the most
financial aid possible. The Office of Student Financial Services
(SFS) will always do its best to quickly and accurately process
a learner’s application for financial aid. However, the ultimate
responsibility for accurately completing the FAFSA, submitting
completed documents, and finalizing the loan application
process in a timely manner is up to the learner. Please do not
put it off. Should a learner’s financial aid (including loans) not
process by the last date of enrollment in that semester, the
learner will be responsible for any owing balance that remains
on his or her UC account.
22
To be eligible for financial aid within a given semester, the
learner must be fully admitted to the university. A learner
who does not complete his or her admissions file by the learner’s
last date of enrollment will not be eligible for financial aid for
that semester.
FAFSA
To be eligible for federal, state, and institutional need-based
financial aid within a given semester, the appropriate FAFSA
year(s) must be accurately completed (including necessary
signatures/e-signatures) and electronically received from
the federal government by the Office of Student Financial
Services in enough time to process prior to the learner’s
last date of enrollment. For most learners, this is at least
two weeks prior to the learner’s last date of enrollment.
Completing the FAFSA is the first step in applying for federal,
state, and institutional need-based aid. Please also review
the “Loans” and “Financial Aid File/Paperwork” deadlines
below to ensure that all necessary steps are completed to
be eligible for aid in a given semester.
Financial Aid File/Paperwork
To be eligible for financial aid within a given semester, all
requested paperwork (tax forms, financial aid forms, etc.)
must be accurately completed and received by the Office
of SFS by the learner’s last date of enrollment. For most
learners who attend the entire school year, this is the last
day of the spring semester. If the learner ceases attendance,
the deadline to submit all completed paperwork is the last
day of the semester he or she did attend.
Loans
To be eligible for loans in a given semester, a learner must
complete the application process by the learner’s last date
of enrollment—specifically, but not limited to, “accepting”
the student loan(s). Similarly, for a learner to be eligible
for a Parent PLUS loan, the PLUS loan application steps
must be completed by the learner’s last date of enrollment.
Although a majority of the loan process can be completed
online, please do not wait until the last moment. Should the
student’s loans not process by the last date of enrollment,
the learner will be responsible for any owing balance on his
or her UC account.
What happens if a learner’s admissions file and/or
financial aid file are not complete by the first day
of the semester?
UC reserves the right to cancel all financial aid for a
learner who has not completed his or her admissions file
and/or financial aid file by the first day of the semester.
Should the learner later submit the necessary documents by
the deadlines listed above, the learner may be re-evaluated
for financial aid eligibility (dependent on budgetary funding
still available at that time). UC does not guarantee any of the
aid previously offered will still be available.
Financial Aid Packaging
University College offers financial aid in the
form grants and loans. In order to serve the large number
2014
For up-to-date information regarding eligibility requirements,
award amounts offered by the government, and specific
details, please contact the VA or visit www.gibill.va.gov.
Admissions File
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
occasions the amount of financial aid originally offered may
end up reduced or eliminated due to federal, state, and/
or institutional policies. See the “Stacking Financial Aid”
policy in the following section for more information on
possible restrictions.
Keeping in Touch
Unit completion is reviewed at the end of each academic
semester. Only passing grades (A, B, C, D, and Credit)
count as successful completions. Incomplete or other
grades (F, In-Progress, No Credit, and Withdrawal) that do
not result in earned credits will not count as completions,
but will count as attempted in the federal SAP calculation to
determine completion ratio.
Minimum Enrollment
C. Quantity of Progress–“Maximum Time Frame”
• Learners requesting aid are expected to complete their
academic program within a reasonable time frame
(including transfer units) as follows:
• Learners carrying between 9–11 units will have grants
prorated at three-quarter rate.
• Certificate program–Learners will not be eligible to
receive aid after completing their 24th unit
• Learners carrying between 6–8 units will have grants
prorated at half-time rate.
• A.A./A.S. program–Learners will not be eligible to
receive aid after completing their 90th unit
• Learners with fewer than 6 units will not qualify for
federal loans.
• B.A./B.S. program–Learners will not be eligible to
receive aid after completing their 180th unit
Nondiscrimination
SAP Cancel–When the status is SAP CANCEL (ineligible), the
student will no longer qualify for financial aid
Award amounts are based on an academic load of 12 units
per semester at UC.
Student Financial Services does not discriminate on the
basis of race, color, national origin, gender, age, disability,
or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices,
or procedures.
Release of Records
It is understood that by applying for financial aid, the learner
grants the Office of Student Financial Services the right to
release the learner’s grades and enrollment records to
scholarship, state, federal, and loan agencies as needed.
Satisfactory Academic Progress
Learners who wish to receive financial assistance must be in
good academic standing and make satisfactory academic
progress toward their degree or certificate program, in
addition to meeting other eligibility criteria.
A. Quality of Progress–“Good Academic Standing”
• Learners requesting aid must maintain a minimum
cumulative 2.0 grade-point average.
• Grade-point averages are reviewed at the end of
each semester.
• Learners who fail to maintain the minimum grade-point
average will be given one semester of “Aid Warning” in
which they must earn a 2.0 cumulative grade-point
average, or they will be suspended from aid programs.
B. Quantity of Progress–“Unit Completion Requirement”
• Learners requesting aid must make progress toward their
degrees as follows:
• If the learner has not reached the required 67%
completion ratio after Warning period.
• If the learner has not met the 2.0 GPA requirement after
Warning period.
• When the learner reaches maximum time frame of
150% of published program requirements.
How do you regain eligibility?
• Appeal–If extenuating circumstances during specific
terms of enrollment caused the student to not earn all
attempted credit hours, or maintain the minimum GPA,
the student may file a SAP Appeal.
• Examples of extenuating circumstances include, but
are not limited to: unexpected death or major
hospitalization of an immediate family member,
extended hospitalization or medical condition of
student, house fire, or a victim of a violent crime.
Unexpected employment or work issues beyond the
student’s control may be considered on a case by
case basis. The appeal should address and document
these extenuating circumstances and describe how the
circumstances have changed so that the student is in
a better position to be academically successful.
D. Appeal Process
• To make an appeal, submit the SAP Appeal Form and
required documents to Student Financial Services
23
2012–13
The university will attempt to inform learners about deadlines
and procedures, but the final responsibility for the timely filing
of the FAFSA and related documents is the learner’s. The
learner must notify the Office of Student Financial Services
regarding changes in financial situation, marriage, loss of a
job, change in class load, withdrawal from school, or change
of address. In order to contact the Office of Student Financial
Services, a learner may write, call, or come in person.
Learners must complete at least two-thirds (67%) of all units
in which they originally enroll from the time of first online
participation in their program at UC. Thus, a first-term UC
learner who originally enrolls in 12 units, withdraws from 3
units, and successfully completes the remaining 9 units, would
be meeting the quantitative measure requirement since the
learner passed at least two-thirds (67%) of the units in which he
or she originally enrolled.
GENERAL INFORMATION
of learners needing financial assistance, the university
coordinates various elements of each learner’s financial
aid program. This “packaging” approach may include
assistance from two or more sources of financial aid. The
university’s goal is to award all applicants the maximum
grant and loan for which they qualify within the restrictions of
federal and state guidelines and institutional policies.
Federal, state, and institutional regulations (or policies)
sometimes restrict how much financial aid a learner can
receive. The following policies are provided in an effort to
help prevent any confusion or frustration that may result
from an award being reduced or eliminated.
Step 1–Cost of Attendance (COA)
Answer: No.
In what order will aid be reduced? Institutional aid will be
reduced first, then either outside, state, and/or federal.
Step 2–Cal Grant
Question: What if a learner has a Cal Grant as part of his or
her award?
Answer: Per California Student Aid Commission policy: “Total
grant aid along with the Cal Grant cannot exceed NEED.”
Definitions: Grant aid is any free money. NEED = COA
minus EFC.
In what order will aid be reduced? Institutional aid will be
reduced first, then either outside, state, and/or federal.
Step 3–Institutional aid for APU faculty/staff
or tuition exchange award recipients is limited
to $6,750.
Question: What is the maximum amount to which recipients
of APU faculty/staff tuition benefit or tuition exchange can
stack their institutional aid?
Answer: Up to $6,750.
Order of stacking: Academic, faculty/staff or tuition exchange
Definitions: Faculty/Staff Tuition Benefit and Tuition Exchange
Award are considered institutional aid.
Restrictions which may limit the amount to under $6,750:
See steps 1 and 2.
Step 4–Institutional aid can stack up to cost of
attendance.
Question: What is the maximum amount to which I can stack
institutional aid?
Answer: $25,000. Generally, institutional aid can only be
stacked up to $25,000. These amounts will vary depending
on enrollment status and other factors.
Restrictions which may limit the amount to under $25,000:
See steps 1, 2, and 3.
24
Each year, the federal government randomly chooses
about 30% of all FAFSA applications for a process called
verification. The law requires colleges to obtain information
from the family that confirms the accuracy of the information
that was reported on the FAFSA (e.g., signed tax forms,
verification worksheets, etc.) Beyond those applications
selected for verification, the law requires colleges to also
request further documentation when a FAFSA application
and/or subsequent paperwork appears incomplete or
inaccurate. A learner is not eligible to receive federal,
state, and/or institutional need-based aid until all required
paperwork has been submitted.
2014
Question: Can a learner’s aid exceed his or her Cost of
Attendance (COA)?
Verification
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Stacking Financial Aid
3
5
School of Education
Academic
Policies
2012–13
2014 CATALOG
Reservation of Rights........................................................ 26
Re-application after Academic Dismissal....................... 30
Course Numbering System.............................................. 27
Withdrawal from the University........................................ 30
Academic Integrity............................................................ 26
Academic Calendar........................................................... 27
Registering for Classes.................................................... 27
Late Registration............................................................... 27
Administrative Withdrawal Policy.................................... 27
Adds/Drops........................................................................ 27
Instructor Drop Policy.......................................................
Campuses..........................................................................
6727
Credit
Hours.
.
.....................................................................
Support Services............................................................... 6728
The
Community
Counseling Center.................................. 6728
Study
Load.........................................................................
Concurrent
Pediatric Neurodevelopment
Institute........................... 6728
Enrollment Policy..........................................
Department
of Leadership and
Grading...............................................................................
28
College Student Development..................................... 68
Incomplete Grades............................................................ 28
Master’s in:
Learner Participation........................................................ 28
College Counseling and Student Development (M.S.). 68
Work Policy.
...............................................................
Late
Leadership
(M.A.)...........................................................
7128
Provisions..........................................................
Make-up
Global Leadership
(M.A.)................................................ 7229
Repeated of
Courses.
............................................................
Department
Doctoral
Higher Education .................... 7529
Transfer
Work.
.
...................................................................
29
Doctorate in:
Petition
Higher Education
(Ph.D.)................................................ 7729
Process................................................................
Higher
(Ed.D.)............................
7930
NormalEducation
Progress Leadership
Toward a Degree.
.................................
Certificate
in: of Students................................................ 30
Classification
Strengths-Oriented Higher Education........................... 81
Dean’s List Criteria............................................................ 30
Withdrawal from Courses................................................. 30
Leave of Absence.............................................................. 31
Student Records Policy.................................................... 31
Release of Transcripts...................................................... 31
Right of Access................................................................. 31
Disclosure of Student Records........................................ 31
Notification
Rights under
FERPA..............................
................................
Department
of of
Graduate
Psychology
8431
Expectations
Master’s in: for Student Behavior
Clinical
Marriage
in thePsychology:
Learning Environment........................................
32
Grievance
and Family
Therapy
(M.A.)......................................... 8633
Policy................................................................
Doctorate
in:
Correspondence
Course Credit....................................... 35
Clinical Psychology: Family Psychology (Psy.D.)......... 89
Requirements for Graduation........................................... 35
Department of Physical Therapy .................................. 107
Time Limit for Completing Degrees................................. 35
Master of Science in Human Physiology.................... 107
DegreeTherapy.........................................
Requirements...................................
Changes
Doctor of in
Physical
10835
Grade-point
Average........................................
Minimum
Transitional
Doctor of Physical
Therapy..................... 11035
Security Interest
in Student
Records..............................
Department
of Social
Work ...........................................
11535
Master
of
Social
Work.
.
................................................
11535
Residency Requirements..................................................
Latin Honors Criteria......................................................... 36
Application for Graduation............................................... 36
Commencement................................................................ 36
Degree/Certificate Posting Dates.................................... 36
Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal............... 30
25
25
This catalog supersedes all previous catalogs. The policies
expressed in this catalog and each subsequent catalog will
be controlling regardless of any policies stated in a previous
catalog received by the learner upon his or her admission.
This catalog and each subsequent catalog are supplemented
by the rules and regulations stated on the University College
website and information/resource areas in the learning
management system. Where conflict exists between any of
these sources, the most recent rule, regulation, or policy will
be controlling.
Academic Integrity
The mission of University College includes cultivating in each
learner not only the academic skills that are required for a
university degree, but also the characteristics of academic
integrity that are integral to a sound Christian education. It
is, therefore, part of the mission of the university to nurture
in each learner a sense of moral responsibility consistent
with the biblical teachings of honesty and accountability.
Furthermore, a breach of academic integrity is viewed
not merely as a private matter between the learner and
a professor, but rather as an act that is fundamentally
inconsistent with the purpose and mission of the entire
university.
The maintenance of academic integrity is the responsibility
of each learner at University College and each learner is
responsible for understanding and upholding the Academic
Integrity Policy. Learners should familiarize themselves with
the expectations specified by the professor in each class
concerning what is and is not permitted, especially in
matters of group projects, reports, and the attribution
of research to sources (citations). Academic dishonesty
includes, but is not limited to:
Plagiarism: UC has adopted the Publication Manual of the
American Psychological Association (APA) as the primary
guiding for all coursework submitted unless otherwise
communicated in writing by a course instructor. The
APA manual provides a full description of plagiarism and
self-plagiarism. Learners are responsible for compliance
with the ethical code, but simply stated, plagiarism is
the intentional or unintentional presentation in writing or
orally of another person’s work to include words, ideas,
or any other information as one’s own original work
without providing proper credit as specified by the ethical
code. UC upholds research excellence and strongly
encourages learners to provide ample support for claims
in the research or academic process. Providing support
and credit to others signifies the breadth and depth of
26
Self-Plagiarism: Another form of plagiarism occurs when a
student uses information from a paper previously written
and resubmits it in another assignment or course without
acknowledgement. In reality a student is academically
‘double-dipping’—seeking to receive credit for work
already submitted. Such unauthorized and uncited
reuse of a student’s academic work is considered selfplagiarism and carries the same consequences as other
forms of plagiarism. Therefore, before reusing material
from previous papers for assignments, learners must:
1. Receive prior written permission from the instructor to
reuse information from previous work. Instructors may ask
to view the material to be reused and have the authority
to decide whether or not to accept this work in fulfillment
of their course requirements. Permission is inferred when
the assignment instructions specifically articulate the use
of previous work, such as when an assignment builds on
previous work within the same class.
2. If permission is received, limit the reuse of previously
submitted work to no more than 20% of the new
assignment (i.e., a paper must include at least 80% new
material). In special cases, learners may exceed the 20%
limit with written permission by the instructor.
3. Cite the material previously used in the paper in
accordance with APA format. Learners must cite
themselves as the previous author and include a reference
entry even though it is information that the general reader
may not be able to access. Learners should use this
format when referencing their work:
Author, A. B. (Year). Title of paper. Unpublished paper, Course prefix/Number—Title of course, University Name, City, State.
Cheating: Using or attempting to use unauthorized
material, information, or study aids in any academic
exercise including unauthorized collaboration
Fabrication: Falsification or invention of any information or
citation in an academic exercise
Facilitating academic dishonesty: Intentionally or knowingly
helping or attempting to help another commit an act
of academic dishonesty, or allowing someone else to
represent your work
By virtue of their registration at University College, learners
agree to uphold the following pledge: “As a learner at this
Christ-centered university, I will uphold the highest standards
of academic integrity. I will not lie, cheat, or steal in my
academic endeavors, nor will I accept the actions of those
who do. I will conduct myself responsibly and honorably in
all my academic activities as a University College learner.”
Sanctions for first violations are determined by the instructor
of record in consultation with the Discipline Chair, if the
violation is not flagrant, and may include an F in the class,
an F on the assignment, or a less-severe action based upon
the nature of the violation.
2014
University College reserves the right to change any of its
policies without prior notice, including, but not limited to:
tuition, fees, unit-value per course, course offerings, curricula,
grading policies, graduation and degree requirements, and
admissions standards and policies. The university further
reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant and to
disqualify, discontinue, or exclude any learner.
a learner’s accumulated knowledge base and therefore
learners should strive for excellence in their research and
all academic coursework.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Reservation of Rights
Course Numbering System
Learners must be admitted to the university, meet payment
deadlines, and participate in advising prior to registering for
classes. Registration must be completed one week before
the start of each session to avoid a late registration fee.
Courses are identified by a disciplinary abbreviation, followed
by a three-digit course number. The course number indicates:
001–099, remedial (no credit toward any degree); 100–299,
lower division; 300–499, upper division.
The course abbreviations are as follows:
ACC
Accounting
APBL
Applied Bible
APHS
Applied Health Science
APSY
Applied Psychology
ART
Art
BIBL
Biblical Studies
BIO
Biology
BUS
Business
CHEM
Chemistry
COMM
Communication Studies
CS
Computer Science
DMK
Digital Marketing
ECO
Economics
ENG
English
ENT
Entrepreneurship
GLM
Global Logistics Management
HCM
Healthcare Management
HIS
History
HLTH
Health
HRM
Human Resources Management
HSCI Health Sciences
ISM
Information Systems Management
LEAD
Leadership
MATH
Mathematics
MGT
Business and Management
PHIL
Philosophy
PHYS
Physics
REL
Religion
SPAN
Spanish
STATStatistics
UC University College Foundations Course
The academic year consists of three 16-week semesters,
each of which includes two 8-week sessions. All courses will
be 8 weeks in length and most will carry 3 units of credit.
The academic calendar can be accessed on the University
College’s Course Portal website.
Registering for Classes
Late Registration
Learners who are unable to register during the regular
registration period may register late. Late registrants may
be limited in class selection because many classes may be
closed. A late registration fee of $120 per course will be
charged after the regular registration period has ended. The
last day to register late each session is midnight on Friday
before classes begin.
Administrative Withdrawal Policy
Learners are expected to complete the following two steps
in order to stay enrolled in their courses through the first
week of the class:
1.Log in to each course by midnight on Wednesday during the
first week of class. Those who fail to log in by this time will
be administratively dropped unless other arrangements are
made with the instructor prior to the first day of class.
2.Submit a homework assignment. In addition to logging into
their courses, learners must also submit an assignment,
activity or forum for grading by 8 a.m., Monday, beginning
week two, in each class. Failure to do so will result in an
administrative withdrawal from the course.
Note: For information related to financial aid, please see
“Refund Policy” in section 4, “Financial Aid,” of the catalog.
Adds/Drops
The add/drop period allows learners to make changes to
their class schedules.
1. T
he add/drop period begins after the regular registration
period and continues through the end of the third day of
class (Wednesday at midnight PST).
2. L
earners may change their class enrollment without
penalty during the add/drop period if appropriate
alternate classes are available and if their unit total does
not decrease.
3. L
earners may make changes to their schedules by
emailing student support services.
4. E
ach learner is responsible to verify the accuracy of his or
her schedule before the end of the add/drop period.
5. L
earners are responsible for dropping their classes if they
either stop attending or never attend, or they will receive a
failing grade.
27
2012–13
Academic Calendar
GENERAL INFORMATION
The standard sanction for a repeated offense or for a
flagrant violation (e.g., submitting a purchased paper
or allowing someone else to represent you online) is
suspension or dismissal from the university. All flagrant
violations will be referred to the Discipline Chair. Learners
may appeal a sanction they believe to be unfair or unjust to
the Discipline Chair and finally to the university’s Director of
Academic Affairs.
Study Load
The maximum study load for UC students is 18 units per
semester, provided they are on good academic standing
and have maintained a 3.0 or higher cumulative grade-point
average. Students with less than a 3.0 cumulative GPA
requesting approval to register for more than 12 units per
semester must petition the Director of Academic Affairs.
Students on academic probation are not able to register for
more than 12 units per semester. (For further information,
see Academic Probation section.)
Concurrent Enrollment Policy
Learners wishing to take courses at another institution
while enrolled at UC should obtain prior approval from the
registrar. UC is developing articulation agreements with
several colleges. Learners can check with the registrar for
an updated list of pre-approved classes. All other classes
must be approved. Without prior written approval from the
registrar, transfer credits may be denied.
Grading
Grades are based on daily work, classroom projects, and
examinations. In all courses, except those designated as
credit/no credit, scholarship is ranked as follows: A,
exceptional; B, superior; C, average; D, poor; F, failure;
I, incomplete; and W, withdrawal. Grade type (A–F versus
credit/no credit) cannot change unless official course change
has been approved by the appropriate council prior to the
course being offered for a particular session. Unit values
for a course cannot be changed from the published values.
For each credit in which the learner is enrolled, points are
awarded according to the grade earned as follows:
Grade A
4.0 points
3.7 points
3.3 points
3.0 points
2.7 points
2.3 points
2.0 points
1.7 points
1.3 points
1.0 point
0.7 points
0 points
0 points
0 points
0 points
0 points
0 points
28
Grade A-
Grade B+
Grade B
Grade B-
Grade C+
Grade C
Grade C-
Grade D+
Grade D
Grade D-
Grade F
Grade W
Grade I
Grade NC
Grade CR
Grade IP
The grade Incomplete (I) is given only under special
circumstances such as a verifiable serious illness. An I grade
may be given upon recommendation of the instructor with
the permission of the appropriate Discipline Chair. To obtain
an incomplete, the learner must fill out an official incomplete
form available from the Office of the Registrar. An incomplete
may be granted for up to four weeks from the final date of
the course. Incomplete coursework not made up within the
allotted period will not be counted toward the final grade.
Learner Participation
University College sees active participation in the course as
a means to build an effective learning community within an
online environment. Learner engagement with other learners
and the facilitating instructor is foundational to a
successful academic experience.
Adult learners who dialog with their classmates and instructor
on a regular basis (and in a meaningful fashion) typically do
well in class. Relationship building can occur in many ways,
including (but not limited to) participation in discussion forums,
through group assignments, and in course chat rooms.
Instructors are available for more personal discussions as
well. Academic growth and development is achieved not only
through the completion of scholastic work but also through
participating in the academic community.
Late Work Policy
Assignments are considered late if they are not posted by
either the stated time for any given assignment or by
11:59 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST) on the day they are
due. Late assignments receive a 20% deduction for each
day they are late, beginning one minute after the assignment
is due, with no work accepted after 48 hours of the original
due date with the exception of the final week, which ends
on Friday at 11:59 p.m. PST. No late work is accepted after
Friday of week 8. Late work will not be accepted for online
discussions after the close of the week.
Technological issues are not considered acceptable excuses
for late work. Always back up your work and have a plan
for submitting assignments even in the case of computer
problems or lost Internet access.
Graded assignments are due on the days listed in the
Course Calendar. All deadlines refer to Pacific Standard
Time. The UC course week begin on 8:00 a.m. PST Monday
and ends at 7:59 a.m. PST the following Monday, with the
exception of the final week, which ends on Friday at
11:59 p.m. PST. Therefore, no late work is accepted after
Friday of week 8.
Withdrawal
Incomplete
No Credit
Credit
In progress
2014
In accordance with U.S. Department of Education regulations,
a University College undergraduate unit will represent a
minimum of 37.5 clock hours devoted to online activities.
Accordingly, the average learner enrolled in one 8-week,
3-unit course will spend about 14 hours per week engaged
in active learning (37.5 hours x 3 units ÷ 8 weeks = 14 hours
per week). Taking two courses simultaneously will require
approximately 28 hours per week.
Incomplete Grades
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Credit Hours
Beyond merely logging into the course, learners must
actively participate in threaded discussions and complete
online learning activities by the assigned deadlines in order
to earn a passing grade. If learners miss assignments due to
serious illness or other crises, they may submit most
assignments late with a grade penalty. Learners may not
make up threaded discussions, which are time sensitive.
Learners may repeat courses at University College. All
grades will remain on record but only the most recent will
be calculated into the learner’s grade-point average. The
units will be counted for credit only once, which may impact
financial aid. Learners may not repeat a course more than
twice at UC. If a repeated class is taken at another institution,
both the grade and the units of the repeated class will be
transferred (providing the class meets the guidelines for
transfer). The original grade in the UC class will remain on the
record and remain as part of the GPA calculation. However,
the units for the class taken at UC will remain on the record but
will not be counted towards the units needed for graduation.
Learners who choose to repeat courses at other institutions
may be required to complete more than the minimum required
units to earn their degree.
Transfer Work
University College accepts academic credits transferred
from other colleges or universities according to the following
criteria:
• The college or university must be an institution of higher
education accredited by a regional accrediting body
recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and
the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).
These accrediting bodies mandate assessment and
other quality control systems that give UC a high level of
confidence in their programs.
• Learners must have completed the transferred courses
earning a minimum grade of C- (or P if the courses were
offered on a pass/fail basis).
• UC can give credit for no more than 70 units of junior or
two-year college work, and there is a maximum of 90
units that may be accepted from a four-year institution.
No upper-division credit can be allowed for courses
taken at a junior or two-year college.
• The transferred courses must apply to a University
College degree program as the equivalents of required
courses (i.e., providing a similar knowledge base and/or
competencies) or as appropriate electives.
• UC will accept no more than 15 units toward general
elective requirements for learners pursuing an A.A. or A.S.
degree, and no more than 30 units toward general elective
requirements for learners pursuing the bachelor’s degree.
• Enrolled UC learners who would like to transfer
coursework into UC must submit a Transfer Inquiry Form
to the Office of the UC Registrar and receive approval
before registering for a class at another institution.
• University College does not grant university credit for
remedial coursework, college orientation, high school
level courses (apart from the Advanced Placement
program described below), or General Education
Development (GED) tests.
2012–13
Repeated Courses
• Learners who transfer credits from non-English-speaking
countries must provide UC with a certified translation of
transcripts and course descriptions, as well as a detailed
and comprehensive evaluation of the transcripts performed
by Global Credential Evaluators (www.gcevaluators.com)
or some other service approved by UC. A copy of the
transcript in the native language must accompany the
certified translation.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Make-up Provisions
• UC does not grant credit for duplicated courses
(e.g., Beginning Composition completed at one college
and Freshman English completed at another).
• UC awards transfer credit on a 4.0 grading scale.
Quarter units will be converted into semester units.
• If a course has been repeated for credit, the last grade
earned will be used in the evaluation of the acceptance
of credit.
• Credits earned at vocational or technical institutions, which
are equivalent in content to college-level coursework, may
be transferred to the university according to the policies
stated above. A maximum of 6 such credits may be
applied to UC degree programs as general electives.
If learners have completed vocational programs based
on clock hours, rather than academic units, transfer credit
will be computed on the basis of 50 clock hours equaling
1 semester academic unit and is limited to 12 units of
general elective credit.
• UC will evaluate courses and service completed
through the Armed Services and may grant credit for such
courses. Credit is typically based on the recommendations
from the American Council on Education (ACE) and is
limited to 12 semester units of general elective credit.
In order to secure transfer credit, applicants must submit to
the registrar official transcripts from the institutions attended.
An official transcript is one that University College receives
unopened in an envelope sealed by the issuing institution(s)
and that bears the official seal of that institution. UC reserves
the right to request that the transcript be sent directly from
the issuing institution(s). See also the “Transfer Applicants”
and “General Education Information for Transfer Students”
sections of the Admissions Policies for additional
information.
Petition Process
A petition process exists for learners who seek an exception
to stated academic policies, procedures, and regulations.
Academic General Petition forms are available online or
from the Office of the UC Registrar. Approval for petitions
will be granted only in unusual cases where extenuating
circumstances are evident and can be substantiated.
29
Classification of Students
The following system for student classification is used by the
university:
Freshman
0–27 units
Sophomore
at least 28 units
Junior
at least 60 units
Senior
at least 90 units
Senior classification does not ensure graduation. All
requirements for a degree must be satisfactorily met in order
to graduate. Freshmen and sophomores have lower-division
standing. Juniors and seniors have upper-division standing.
Dean’s List Criteria
Learner must be registered for a degree program, be
enrolled full time in the semester, and achieve a 3.5 or
higher GPA for the current semester.
Academic Probation
and Academic Dismissal
Learners will be placed on academic probation if their
cumulative local GPA falls below 2.0 after one semester.
After the end of the second consecutive semester with a
cumulative local GPA under 2.0, students will be dismissed
and are eligible to reapply via academic petition after two
semesters.
Learners placed on academic probation will be allowed to
register for 12 units per semester (6 units per session) while
on probation.
Learners who receive all W grades for one semester will be
issued an unsatisfactory progress warning. Learners who
receive all W grades for a second subsequent semester will
be administratively withdrawn from the university.
Learners must petition to return to the university. The
petition must include an explanation of past lack of progress
and a plan for future success.
Re-application after Academic Dismissal
A learner who has been dismissed for academic reasons
may petition to return to University College for the following
semester. The petition must state:
1. Intentions to maintain acceptable academic standing.
2. Strategies for probable success.
30
Withdrawal from Courses
A learner may withdraw from class without grade penalty
at any time after the add/drop period throughout the end
of the 5th week of the session. The learner must submit
a Course Withdrawal Form using their university email
credentials. Learners are advised to contact student support
services prior to withdrawing to discuss potential withdrawal
penalties. The learner will then receive a W (withdrawal)
grade in that course. A learner who never attends or stops
attending a course for which he or she is officially registered
without following the accepted procedures may receive a
failing grade in that course. See also “Refund Policy” under
Financial Information.
Withdrawal from the University
A learn who, for any reason, finds it necessary to withdrawal
from the university during the course of the session must
complete the University Withdrawal Form and must notify a
student support staff member to complete the exit review
profess. Failure to comply with these regulations will mean
that failing grades will be entered on the student’s record
and dismissal will be recorded as dishonorable. See “Refund
Policy” under Financial Information.
In matters of disciplinary action resulting in suspension or
dismissal from the university, a written statement will be
sent from the Director of Student Success or the Director
of Academic Affairs informing the learner of the action.
That administrator will also notify the registrar regarding the
learner’s status and authorize proper withdrawal from classes.
Dismissed learners will not receive tuition refunds except by
administrative action.
Leave of Absence
Undergraduate learners may request to take a leave of
absence from enrollment in classes for up to three semesters.
Requests for a leave should be initially made to the learner’s
designated student support staff member. Such a leave
requires university approval. Forms are available online and
must be completed prior to the learner’s absence from the
university. Failure to complete the required form, or to register
at the end of the approved leave, will result in the learner
having to re-apply to the university and comply with any
applicable changes in admissions, financial aid, and degree
requirements as stated in the Re-enrollment Policy located in
the Admissions section of this catalog.
2014
The minimum number of credits for an Associate of Arts
(A.A.) or Associate of Science (A.S.) is 60; and for a Bachelor
of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.), 120. Twelve (12)
units per semester constitute a minimum, full-time load and
normal progress toward a degree. If an A.A. or A.S. learner
successfully completes two courses per 8-week session, he
or she would complete the associate’s degree in 20 months.
Learners could attain a bachelor’s degree in 40 months
taking an average of 12 units per semester.
If the petition to return is approved, the learner’s probationary
status will be monitored regularly thereafter to ensure that the
learner is making satisfactory progress in remedying grade
deficiencies. Failure to maintain a 2.0 grade-point average
with any grades of D, F, or W at this point will result in
disqualification from further study at UC. A second academic
dismissal may not be appealed and the learner must proceed
through the re-admission and re-enrollment process for
consideration of further study at University College. Such
consideration can be granted after the learner demonstrates
academic success at another institution for a minimum of
two semesters of core academic classes of 6 units each.
Re-enrollment is not guaranteed.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Normal Progress Toward a Degree
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974,
known as the Buckley Amendment or FERPA, provides that
students shall have the right of access to their educational
records; and with limited exceptions, educational institutions
shall not release educational records to nonschool employees
without consent of the student unless specifically permitted by
law. “Students” as used in this notice includes former students.
Transcripts of University College coursework are available
by request approximately two weeks after the completion
of courses. A form is available on the website. Transcripts,
diplomas, and/or verification of degrees will not be released
until all financial obligations to the university are met.
Right of Access
With a few exceptions provided by law, learners at University
College may see any of their educational records upon
request. In general, access will be granted immediately
upon request to the record custodian, but if delay is
necessary, access must be granted no later than 45
days after request. Learners further have the right, under
established procedures, to challenge the factual accuracy
of the records and to enter their viewpoints in the records.
Learners may waive their right of access to recommendations
and evaluations in the cases of admissions, application for
employment, and nomination for awards. University College
may not require learners to sign a waiver of their right of
access to their records, but learners should be aware that
recommendations and evaluations may not be very helpful
or candid without a signed waiver.
Disclosure of Student Records
With certain exceptions provided by law, University College
cannot release information concerning learners, other than
directory information, from their education records to anyone
other than university officials without the written consent of
the learner. Learners and alumni applying for jobs, credit,
graduate school, etc., can expedite their applications by
providing the university with written permission to release
specific records and to which parties the releases should be
made. The learner’s written consent is not required for the
disclosure of grades, disciplinary action, or other information to
parents of learners who are dependents for federal income tax
purposes. Parents requesting information regarding dependent
learners must demonstrate federal income dependency by
submitting their most recent federal income tax return.
The university has designated the following categories as
directory information, which may, at the university’s discretion,
be released to the public without consent of the learner:
learner’s name and maiden name, address, email address,
telephone number, fax number, date and place of birth, major
field of study and courses taken, participation in officially
recognized activities, dates of attendance, degrees and
awards received, all previous educational agencies or
institutions attended, current class schedule, employer,
church membership, photographs, and parents’ names,
This notice is not intended to fully explain learners’ rights
under FERPA. The Office of the UC Registrar maintains
copies of the official University College Student Records
Policy, which contain detailed information and procedures
with regard to these rights. Learners may obtain a copy
of the written policy upon request to the Office of the UC
Registrar. Any learner alleging failure of the university to
comply with FERPA may file a complaint with the Family
Education Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), United
States Department of Education, 4511 Switzer Building,
330 C St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20201.
Notification of Rights under FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
affords learners certain rights with respect to their education
records. These rights include:
1. The right to inspect and review the learner’s education
records within 45 days of the day the university receives a
request for access. Learners should submit to the registrar,
Director of Academic Affairs, or other appropriate official,
written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to
inspect. The university official will make arrangements for
access and notify the learner of the time and place where
the records may be inspected. If the records are not
maintained by the university official to whom the request
was submitted, that official shall advise the learner of the
correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
2. T
he right to request the amendment of the learner’s
education records that the learner believes is inaccurate,
misleading, or in violation of privacy rights. Learners may
ask the university to amend a record they believe is
inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of privacy rights. They
should write the university official responsible for the record,
clearly identify the part of the record they want changed,
and specify why it is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation
of privacy rights. If the university decides not to amend the
record as requested by the learner, the university will notify
the learner of the decision and advise the learner of his or
her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.
Additional information regarding the hearing procedures
will be provided to the learner when notified of the right to
a hearing.
3. T
he right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable
information contained in the learner’s education records,
except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure
without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure
without consent is disclosure to school officials with
31
2012–13
Release of Transcripts
addresses, and telephone listings. It is the general policy of
the university not to release directory information regarding
its learners unless, in the judgment of the appropriate record
custodian or other officials with record access, such release
either serves a legitimate educational purpose or is not
adverse to the interests and privacy of the learner. However,
the learner may request that certain categories of directory
information not be released to the public without his or
her written consent. Such requests shall be submitted in
accordance with the learner records policy of the university.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Student Records Policy
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-4605
Expectations for Student Behavior
in the Learning Environment
Faculty Expectations, Rights, and Procedures
The learning environment is under the domain of the instructor
who is responsible for maintaining a safe learning environment
for all learners in his or her classes. The learning environment
is not limited to the virtual classroom, but also includes any
other communication related to the academic enterprise.
In an effort to create an environment conducive to learning,
learners may challenge the faculty member’s position or
approach, as long as this inquiry is done with civility, respect,
and professionalism. It is never appropriate for a learner to
personally attack, threaten, intimidate, or abuse the professor
or classmates, either in public classroom discourse or in
private communications. Conversely, University College (UC)
faculty may not attack or verbally abuse learners, although
instructors are expected to critique learner work (as long as
it is conducted in a professional and civil manner) within the
context of the coursework.
Guidelines for Student Behavior
Learner behavior that includes making threats against
instructors or other learners, or endangers the safety of
others, may result in immediate dismissal from the university
and the university contacting local law enforcement.
32
• Be Courteous: Since your emails, texts, and posts are the
only means of communicating in an online environment,
be aware of what you write. Could your message
be interpreted as rude, disrespectful, insulting, or
discriminating? How would you view the message
if you were to receive it? Extend to others the same
courtesy you would want extended to you.
• Be Encouraging: The amount of online experience in
an online classroom varies from person to person.
Some learners may spend more time observing and
reading than posting. Craft your posts in such a way
that they provide encouragement for positive and
critical conversation.
• Be Helpful: Even a well-presented course may not be
clear. Sometimes it is easy to get lost among links and
other sites. When learners lose their way, offer guidance
in the right online direction so they can gain confidence
in navigating a course site.
• Be Patient: UC works in an asynchronous environment,
which means the instructor or other learners may not be
online when you are. Be aware instructors have up to 24
hours to respond to an email. If you require immediate
attention, it may be helpful to pick up the phone and give
the instructor a call. Please do not assume instructors
or other learners are ignoring you or are being negligent.
Give others the benefit of the doubt you would want
others to give to you.
• Be Respectful: Treat each other with respect. Read and
respond to others in a way that cultivates a positive
learning environment. As a member of the learning
community, be aware that others learn from your
posts and emails. Respectful communication is a
foundation for rich learning.
Behaviors that should be avoided include:
• “Shouting”: Shouting is when a message is written in
all capital letters, and is considered a rude method of
communicating. Avoid using all capital letters in your
online communications.
Behaviors that are not tolerated include:
• “Flaming”: Flaming or cyberbullying is a term of general
disrespect. This behavior occurs when a writer “shouts,”
curses, bullies, threatens, intimidates, humiliates, or
discriminates against other members of the online
community. Flaming or cyberbullying will not be tolerated.
2014
4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of
Education concerning alleged failures by state university
to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name
and address of the office that administers FERPA is:
Guidelines for Online Communication
Free discussion, inquiry, and expression are encouraged
in every class. The ability to communicate effectively and
professionally is especially critical in an online educational
environment where other cues such as verbal tone and
facial expression are absent. Communication guidelines for
members of the online learning community are critical for
creating an environment conducive to learning. These
guidelines, commonly called “netiquette,” include the
following for both learners and instructors:
ACADEMIC POLICIES
legitimate educational interests. A “school official” is (1) a
person employed by the university in an administrative,
supervisory, academic research, or support staff position
(including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff);
(2) a person serving on the Board of Trustees; (3) a learner
serving on an official commitment, such as a disciplinary
or grievance committee, or assisting another school official
in performing his or her tasks; or (4) a person employed by
or under contract to the university to perform an assigned
task on behalf of the university. A school official has a
“legitimate educational interest” if the official needs to review
an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional
responsibility whenever he or she is (1) performing a task
that is specified in his or her job description or contract
agreement; (2) performing a task related to a learner’s
education; (3) performing a task related to the discipline of
a learner; (4) providing a service or benefit relating to the
learner or learner’s family (such as health care, counseling,
job placement, or financial aid); or (5) disclosing information
in response to a judicial order or legally issued subpoena.
Another exception is that the university discloses education
records without consent to officials of another school in
which a learner seeks enrollment or intends to enroll, upon
request of officials of that other school.
Violations to these guidelines could result in the following
disciplinary action:
Step 2: Institutional Action
If the instructor feels that a “good faith” attempt was made
to the learner, and the learner either did not respond in a
timely manner or continued to display disruptive behavior
toward the faculty and or the class, the faculty member will
notify the Director of Academic Affairs within 72 hours of
notifying the learner of the inappropriate behavior. The
director will in turn notify the UC Executive Leadership Team.
Depending on the severity of the infraction, the Office of
Academic Affairs may choose to respond accordingly:
• Have learners initiate reparations with involved parties as
requested by the Office of Academic Affairs.
• Immediate removal from class, with the learner being
allowed to complete the class in absentia. A substitute
instructor will be designated, and that instructor’s grade
will be non-negotiable and binding to the learner.
• Immediate removal from class, without monetary refund
and without any chance to complete the coursework.
A letter from the university will be sent to the learner
via email and Certified Mail reiterating the findings of
the Director of Student Success and the Director of
Academic Affairs. The Certified Mail document will be
sent to the learner under both signatures.
• If the learner is enrolled in any other course at UC with
a different professor, that professor will be notified of
the situation with the disruptive learner. It will then be
decided by the Director of Academic Affairs whether to
allow the learner to enroll in any additional courses in the
university, and a write-up of the occurrence will be put in
the learner’s file.
• Immediate dismissal from the university. A letter from
the university will be sent to the learner via email and
Certified Mail reiterating the findings of the Student
Success Director and the Director of Academic
Affairs. The Certified Mail document will be sent to
the learner under both signatures. The learner may
petition to re-enroll no sooner than two semesters after
the dismissal.
The Associate Registrar will be notified by the Director of
Academic Affairs for dismissal processing.
Step 3: Appeal
See the “Grievance Policy” below.
2012–13
Step 1: Notification to Learner
The instructor is to notify the learner within 72 hours of the
initial post of the inappropriate behavior in writing. A private
email identifying the behavior and explaining why it is
inappropriate will be sent to the learner. The email will
instruct the learner to reply within 72 hours. The instructor
should “cc” the Discipline Chair and the Director of Academic
Affairs, who will in turn notify the UC Executive Leadership
Team.
• If the disruptive learner has made overt or covert threats
to anyone in the classroom, all learners will be notified, as
well as the UC Executive Leadership Team. In addition, the
Glendora Police Department and the disruptive learner’s
local police authorities will also be alerted.
GENERAL INFORMATION
• Discriminatory language: Inappropriate and derogatory
statements about race, color, national or ethnic origin,
religion, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, and
veterans will not be tolerated.
Grievance Policy
Overview
University College provides a means by which learners
may file a grievance for academic and learner life
issues. The process described below should be used
after all informal means have been exhausted. In the
area of academics, protocol requires that learner
concerns or grievances about course content, grading,
teaching style, and the like, be taken up first with the
professor of the given class. Failure to resolve the
matter at that point may require a meeting with the
appropriate Discipline Chair.
In the event that the informal procedures including a
meeting with the Discipline Chair fails to resolve the
problem, the learner may file a formal grievance if a
justifiable cause exists. Justifiable cause for grievance
shall be defined as any act that, in the opinion of the
learner, adversely affects the learner and is perceived as
prejudicial or capricious action on the part of any
university faculty or staff member or an arbitrary or
unfair imposition of sanctions.
To file a grievance, the learner will indicate in writing
the nature of the grievance, the evidence upon which
it is based, and the redress sought, and submit
the document(s) to the Office of Academic Affairs.
Guidelines for this document are listed in section III, B,
i-vii. At that time, a Grievance Committee will be formed
and proceed according to the guidelines stated below.
The grievance procedure shall act as a vehicle for
communication and decision making between learners,
staff, and faculty, and provide, through prescribed
procedures, a process through which a learner-initiated
grievance can be resolved internally.
Organization
A. Membership:
Director of Academic Affairs or other individual
designated by that person
One faculty member
One upper-division learner
Director of Student Success or designee
B. Chair: For academic grievances, the Director of
Academic Affairs or designee shall preside. For
nonacademic grievances, the Director of Student
Success or designee shall preside.
33
D. Meeting Time: The meeting will be scheduled within
seven working days following the filing of a written
petition.
B. The grievance process is initiated by submission of
a written petition to the chair of the Grievance
Committee. The petition must include:
1. Names of the parties involved
2. A clear statement of the nature of the grievance
3. A narrative of the incident including
• What occurred
• When it occurred
• Where it occurred
• Who was present
4. The evidence on which the grievance is based
•W
hy this constitutes capricious or arbitrary
action on behalf of a staff or faculty member
•W
hat has been done to resolve the grievance
• The desired outcome/outcomes
• Any supporting documentation
C. The chair of the Grievance Committee will submit a
copy of the grievance to each person who will serve
on the Grievance Committee for this incident, as well
as to the faculty or staff members involved.
D. A meeting of the Grievance Committee will be
scheduled to consider the matter within seven
working days of the date on which the petition was
filed. The involved learner and faculty or community
member may testify in person at the committee
meetings. The meetings shall be held at times when
both parties are available to testify, including by Skype
or conference call.
34
F. E
ither party may seek an advisor who must be a
faculty member or learner in that program. The
function of the advisor shall not include that of
advocacy and the advisor will not have a role in the
committee’s meetings. The learner may not bring
legal counsel, nor have a learner represent him/her
as counsel. The Grievance Committee may not have
legal counsel present.
G. Accurate minutes of the grievance procedure shall
be written and kept in a confidential file of the
committee’s proceedings. Such minutes shall
include the committee’s findings and decision.
No other printed materials or notes may be taken
from the meeting. At the option of the grievance
committee chair, the proceedings may be recorded.
H. Except for communications with the faculty member(s)
and learner(s) involved advising them of the Grievance
Committee’s final decision, the parties and committee
members may not discuss the case outside
the meeting.
I. If a committee member is approached prior to a
meeting by a learner whose case is to be heard, the
member should refuse to discuss the issue and
should disclose, at the time of the meeting, that he
or she has been approached.
J. Any committee member who has a potential conflict
of interest, or who holds a bias or preconceived
notion as to the facts of the case and has formed an
opinion about them, or who may hold ill will toward
a particular learner, must disclose to the chair the
nature of such feelings, bias, or potential conflict.
He or she may be excused from participation upon
request by such member, or in the discretion of the
chair, and replaced by the chair with a substitute
committee member of comparable station to the
extent possible under the circumstances.
K. In cases of conflicting information and/or when
additional information is desired, the committee may
request testimony from additional witnesses having
information pertinent to the grievance.
L. T
he committee will decide on the matter by vote.
Both parties will be notified, in writing, within one
week of the decision. The committee’s decision
shall be final.
2014
Committee Guidelines and Meeting Format
A. The formal grievance procedure shall be initiated only
after other attempts to resolve the matter have been
exhausted (i.e., conferring with individual instructor,
Discipline Chair, or staff member as appropriate).
Except for grade appeals, the learner has no more
than 10 working days after meeting with the individual
they believe has given them cause for grievance or
15 working days after the incident that occasioned
the grievance in which to file his or her written petition.
In the case of grade appeals, a written petition must
be filed within 30 calendar days after the end of the
session in which the grade is received. The formal
procedure must be initiated within these time limits.
However, the time limit may be extended by the
Director of Academic Affairs, at his or her sole
discretion, upon presentation of good cause.
E. Meetings of the Grievance Committee shall be
attended only by the parties named in the grievance,
members of the Grievance Committee, and witnesses
invited by the Grievance Committee. Witnesses may
only be present during the time they are presenting
their testimony. No one other than members
of the Grievance Committee may be present
during deliberations.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
C. Voting: All members have equal vote and there shall
be no alternates or substitutes unless one member
must disqualify him/herself due to conflict of interest.
Senior learners may complete only 3 units by correspondence,
none of which may apply to the required religion courses. If a
learner wishes to receive correspondence course credit
toward the requirements for his or her major, prior written
consent from the Director of Academic Affairs must be
obtained. All correspondence work must be completed and
an official transcript received by the Office of the UC
Registrar prior to a learner’s final semester. No correspondence
work will be allowed in the final semester.
Requirements for Graduation
To earn a degree from University College, learners must
complete all required coursework, within the specified time
limit while maintaining a sufficient grade-point average
and fulfilling the university’s residency requirements (see
“Residency Requirements”). Learners must meet all financial
obligations in order to receive their diplomas.
Time Limit for Completing Degrees
When University College awards a degree, it is certifying
that the learner’s knowledge and professional skills
are reasonably up-to-date as of the time of graduation.
Accordingly, University College requires learners to complete
all degree requirements within eight years of initial enrollment,
inclusive of any Leaves of Absence (LOAs). They must
complete the final 24 units of degree requirements during the
five years immediately preceding the granting of the degree.
Changes in Degree Requirements
This catalog is not to be considered a contract between
University College and its learners. Although the university
fully intends to offer all the programs and courses
described, it retains the right to alter or cancel programs
or course offerings. The university reserves the right to
make substitutions if courses required under a given
degree program are significantly altered or removed from
the curriculum.
Minimum Grade-point Average
To earn an associate’s or bachelor’s degree, learners must
earn a minimum, cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of
2.0 in all in coursework completed at University College.
Learners must also earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0
in all university coursework applied to the degree, including
transfer courses.
Security Interest in Student Records
A learner may neither graduate nor receive any diploma,
grades, certificates, or transcripts until all financial obligations
(including student loans wherein collections are administered
by the university) have been satisfied in accordance with
policies described under “Financial Information.” Any diploma,
grades, or transcripts shall be retained by the university as a
security interest until all such obligations are satisfied. Release
of any such security interest prior to or subsequent to any
default by the debtor shall not be considered a binding
precedent or modification of this policy.
Residency Requirements
To fulfill residency requirements, learners must complete
a specified number of units at University College. The
minimum requirements are 18 units for an associate’s
degree and 30 units for a bachelor’s degree. In addition,
at least 18 of the last 24 units in the major field must be
completed at University College for the bachelor’s degree, and
all 18 of the final 18 units must be completed at UC for the
associate’s degree. At least 15 upper-division units must be
completed in the major field. Neither transfer credit (including
correspondence courses) nor credit by examination
(CLEP, AP, IB) may be used to fulfill the above residency
requirement.
Candidates enrolling in a degree program enter under the
catalog requirements in effect at the time they enter the
program. Learners are responsible for arranging their
schedules so as to complete those courses when they
become available.
35
2012–13
A maximum of 9 semester units of correspondence credit may
be applied toward a University College bachelor’s degree. A
maximum of 6 semester units of such credit may be applied
toward an associate’s degree. Learners must earn a grade of
C- or higher in eligible courses and receive prior approval from
the Office of the UC Registrar. Correspondence courses must
be offered by a regionally accredited college or university or
the Accrediting Association of Bible Colleges.
University College recognizes that not all learners will be able
to complete their degree requirements within the normal time
frame (two years for an A.A./A.S. degree, and four years for a
B.A./B.S. degree). When the university announces changes in
existing degree programs, learners working under the current
degree requirements must complete their degrees within the
normal time frame plus one year (three years for an A.A./A.S.,
or five years for a B.A./B.S.). If degrees are not completed
within the allotted time frame, learners must fulfill the new
degree requirements. University College learners who do not
enroll in courses for a full year return under the requirements
in force at the time of re-enrollment.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Correspondence Course Credit
Application for Graduation
ACADEMIC POLICIES
A degree is granted based on the completion of all
requirements. In the event that a learner does not complete
all requirements for the degree as indicated on the Intent to
Graduate form, he or she must complete those requirements
within two years of the filing date. If the remaining requirements
for the degree, as stated on the Intent to Graduate form, are
not completed, the learner will be subject to policies governing
re-entering learners.
2014
Graduation is not automatic upon completion of all coursework.
Learners who intend to graduate must complete an Intent to
Graduate form and file it with the Office of the UC Registrar at
least six weeks prior to the start of the last session of their
enrollment. The Intent to Graduate Form due date is listed in
the academic calendar.
Latin Honors Criteria
Summa Cum Laude: 3.9 and above
Magna Cum Laude: 3.75 to 3.89
Cum Laude: 3.5 to 3.74
A student with high academic achievement throughout
his or her college baccalaureate career may graduate
with Latin Honors. To be eligible, the student must be
in good standing and have a cumulative grade point
average, to include all UC courses and transfer work, at
or above the specific honors category. Latin Honors do
not apply to certificates, associate’s-level degrees, or
master’s degrees.
Commencement
UC hosts one commencement ceremony per year. The date
will be announced and published yearly on the academic
calendar. The university chancellor, by the authority of the
board of directors and on recommendation of the faculty,
awards the degrees. Details regarding possible participation
in commencement are made available to graduates four to
six weeks prior to commencement.
Degree/Certificate Posting Dates
The university posts Associate of Arts/Science and Bachelor
of Arts/Science degrees and certificates six times each year,
regardless of the specific date all work is completed. All
degree requirements must be met prior to the posting date.
The degree/certificate posting dates are at the end of each
session, approximately early March, late April, late June,
late August, late October, and late December.
36
6
Academic Programs
Certificates......................................................................... 38
Liberal Arts Core............................................................... 43
Purpose, Certificate Proficiencies, and Requirements
for Certificate.......................................................... 38
Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology...................... 44
Certificate of Advanced Management......................... 38
Certificate Business Principles.................................... 38
Purpose, Certificate Proficiencies, and Requirements
for Certificate.......................................................... 38
Pre-Nursing Health Science Certificate...................... 39
Purpose, Certificate Proficiencies, and Requirements
for Certificate.......................................................... 39
Associate’s Degrees.......................................................... 40
Associate of Arts........................................................... 40
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
for Associate of Arts............................................. 40
Requirements for the A.A......................................... 40
Associate of Science in Health Sciences.................... 41
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
for the ASHS.......................................................... 42
Requirements for the ASHS..................................... 42
37
2014 CATALOG
Bachelor’s Degrees........................................................... 44
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
for the B.A. in Applied Psychology...................... 44
Requirements for the B.A. in Applied Psychology. 44
Bachelor of Arts in Leadership.................................... 47
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
for the B.A. in Leadership..................................... 47
Requirements for the B.A. in Leadership................ 47
Bachelor of Arts in Management................................. 48
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
for the B.A. in Management.................................. 48
Requirements for the B.A. in Management............. 49
Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences..................... 51
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
for the B.S. in Health Sciences............................ 51
Requirements........................................................ 52
Course Descriptions......................................................... 53
University College offers a Certificate of Advanced Management, Certificate of Business Principles, and Pre-Nursing Health Science
Certificate.
Please see page 53 for course descriptions.
Purpose
The Certificate of Advanced Management provides
managers with advanced strategic and leadership skills
and competencies to lead their organizations into the 21st
century and beyond. The CAM is designed for experienced
business professionals tasked with setting the strategic
vision for their firm, implementing organization wide change,
and growing the business domestically and into international
markets. The Certificate of Advanced Management courses
are taught by senior faculty and executives with years of
industry experience, and time-tested knowledge of global
business practices. The CAM sets a path for strategic
leaders to expand and grow global enterprises.
Certificate Proficiencies
• Prepares executives to create and implement strategic
management initiatives
• Provides advanced knowledge of leadership and
management competencies
• Integrates biblical concepts and principles
• Enables leaders to identify and implement opportunities
for continuous improvement
• Prepares executives to expand and grow enterprises
into global markets
Requirements
Learners are expected to finish all 18 units to earn the
Certificate of Advanced Management. The certificate includes
the following courses.
Choose six:
MGT 350 Marketing and E-Commerce (3)
MGT 370 Cross-Cultural Communication and Negotiations (3)
MGT 380 Information Systems Management (3)
MGT 390 Project and Change Management (3)
Purpose
The Certificate of Business Principles provides non-business
professionals with the essential knowledge, and skills
required for entry-level business positions in a wide variety of
fields such as banking, finance, retail, accounting, marketing,
business administration, and health care. In addition, the CBP
offers the foundational quantitative, accounting, finance and
economics courses that often serve as prerequisites for MBA
or management programs. CBP graduates are positioned to
enter the exciting and fast-paced careers and industries of
business and management.
Certificate Proficiencies
• Prepares non-business professionals for entry-level
business positions
• Provides essential knowledge and skills in finance,
accounting, and economics
• Integrates biblical concepts and principles
• Meets academic prerequisites for MBA and graduate
business programs
• Enables business professionals to expand their
management knowledge base
Requirements
Learners are expected to finish all 18 units to earn the
Certificate of Business Principles. The certificate includes the
following courses.
ACC 210 Financial Accounting (3)
ACC 211 Managerial Accounting (3)
ECO 204 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 203 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
MATH 125 College Algebra (3)**
STAT 280 Applied Statistics (3)
MGT 460 Leadership and People (3)
**If learners have completed MATH 125 or an equivalent
course, they may select one of the following courses to fulfill
the 6-course requirement:
MGT 480 Strategic Management and Policy (3)
BUS 270 Business Law and Ethics (3)
MGT 450 International Business (3)
MGT 485 Management and Organizational Behavior (3)
MGT 490 Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3)
MGT 310 Statistical Analysis for Business Decisions (3)
MGT 320 Financial Management and Markets (3)
MGT 350 Marketing and E-Commerce (3)
38
2014
Certificate of
Certificate of
Advanced Management Business Principles
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Certificates
Pre-Nursing Health
Science Certificate
Purpose
The Pre-Science Nursing Health Science Certificate provides
aspiring pre-medical, pre-nursing, and other health science
learners the opportunity to take biology and chemistry
science lab courses through an online environment. Lecture
portions of courses are delivered online, and the lab portions
utilize commercial lab kits delivered to one’s residence to
provide a hands-on lab experience.
Certificate Proficiencies
• Demonstrate an introductory understanding of biology
and chemistry knowledge
• Apply theories and problem-solving analyses to
laboratory applications and procedures
• Integrate a Christian worldview with representative
science courses
Requirements
Learners are expected to finish all 16 units of coursework
(lecture and lab) to earn the certificate. Learners may
transfer one course into the Pre-Nursing Health Science
Certificate.
BIO 225 General Microbiology/Lab (4)
BIO 235 Human Anatomy/Lab (4)
BIO 245 Human Physiology/Lab (4)
CHEM 115 Chemistry for Health Sciences/Lab (4)
39
University College offers an Associate of Arts and Associate of Science in Health Sciences. For further details on
UC’s program offerings, please visit www.apu.edu/universitycollege/.
Please see page 53 for course descriptions.
The Associate of Arts (A.A.) equips learners with biblical and
philosophical resources for developing a Christian worldview
and lifestyle, a working knowledge of liberal arts and sciences,
written and oral communication skills, critical thinking abilities,
information and computer literacy, and other skills necessary
for lifelong learning and for more advanced studies at the
bachelor’s level.
Serving as a stepping stone into UC’s bachelor’s degree
programs, the 60-unit Associate of Arts program offers
learners a broad foundation in the liberal arts. Incorporating
faith and knowledge, the curriculum lays the foundation for
responsible citizenship, historical and cultural literacy, and
respect for God-honoring diversity.
Program Learning Outcomes (PLO)
for Associate of Arts
Graduates of the Associate of Arts program will:
PLO 1: Critically evaluate historical, political, social, economic,
and cultural issues; drawing lessons from the past to enable
them to become knowledgeable global citizens.
PLO 2: Analyze and appreciate cultural diversity as expressed
in literature, the fine arts, religious traditions, and language.
PLO 3: Demonstrate a foundational understanding of human
psychological and social development as a means for
cultivating meaningful and healthy relationships.
PLO 4: Develop skills in scientific methods; exploring the
complexity and diversity of the created world.
PLO 5: Cultivate skills in critical-thinking through training in
quantitative and analytical reasoning.
PLO 6: Demonstrate competency in written and oral
communication as well as skills in using technology in the
communication process.
PLO 7: Develop skills in research methodology and information
utilization through the effective use of technology.
PLO 8: Demonstrate the ability to interpret biblical texts
intelligently and faithfully–understanding how history,
culture, and the church influence the understanding and use
of Scripture.
PLO 9: Articulate the key elements of a Christian worldview:
integrating these elements within their personal lives and all
areas of learning.
Requirements for the A.A.
The 60-unit A.A. curriculum includes the following categories
of coursework:
• 22–24 units of Skills and University Requirements serve
as a foundation for university studies and for lifelong
learning. This includes information technology,
mathematical skills, foreign language, public speaking,
English composition, and a university orientation providing
tools, insights, and strategies for personal growth.
• 31 units of Integrative Liberal Arts Requirements
introduce learners to a broad range of arts and sciences.
This includes components centering on Heritage and
Institutions, God’s Word and the Christian Response,
Philosophy/Critical Thinking, Language and Literature,
Aesthetics and Creative Arts, Identity and Relationships,
and Nature/Science.
• 5–7 units of General Electives offer learners the
opportunity to explore areas of interest beyond the
required coursework.
Skills and University Requirements (22–24 units)
Introduction to UC (3 units)
UC 101 Momentum: Success in the University (3)*
English Composition Component (6 units)
ENG 101 Expository Writing (3)
ENG 105 Composition: Argument and Analysis (3)
Public Speaking Component (3 units)
COMM 105 Public Communication (3)
Foreign Language (4–6 units)
Either one intensive language course, SPAN 123 (4) or
A sequence of two 3-unit language courses, SPAN 121
and SPAN 122 (6)
Mathematics (3 units)
MATH 125 College Algebra (3)
Information Technology (3 units)
CS 200 Basic Software Tools (3)
Integrative Liberal Arts (31 units)
Heritage and Institutions Component (3 units)
HIS 201 U.S. History or HIS 202 World Civilizations (3)
God’s Word and the Christian Response (12 units)
BIBL 100 Exodus/Deuteronomy (3)*
BIBL 230 Luke/Acts (3)*
REL 100 Introduction to Global Religious Studies (3)*
REL 105 Christian Life, Faith, and Ministry (3)*
40
2014
Associate of Arts
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Associate’s Degrees
Philosophy/Critical Thinking Component (3 units)
PHIL 105 Introduction to Critical Thinking (3)
Literature Component (3 units)
ENG 115 Introduction to Literature (3)
Aesthetics and Creative Arts Component (3 units)
ART 110 Introduction to Art (3)
Identity and Relationships (3 units)
APSY 105 General Psychology (3)
or ECO 203 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
Nature/Science with Lab (4 units)
PHYS 150 Introduction to Astronomy (4)
General Electives (5–7 units)
Learners may fulfill General Elective requirements using
any 100+ level college or university course. The elective
requirement provides learners an opportunity to pursue
interests beyond program requirements.
Total: 60 units
Note: All courses marked with an asterisk (*) must be taken at UC.
Associate of Science
in Health Sciences
Preparation for a successful health sciences career requires
a broad knowledge base for the major elements of health
sciences. The Associate of Science in Health Sciences
(ASHS) degree equips learners with professional knowledge
and practical skills in the health sciences in accordance with
the university’s Christian heritage and mission. The program
promotes personal and spiritual growth by emphasizing
Christian values, ethical principles, and effective interpersonal
relationships in diverse settings.
The ASHS is unique in that it not only provides a broad liberal
arts foundation for lifelong learning, but incorporates health
sciences training and development that is experiential,
applicable, and practical. The program utilizes theoretical
constructs from researchers in the field and innovative
laboratory practices in a distance-education format. In
addition, written and oral communication skills, critical
thinking abilities, information and computer literacy, and
other skills necessary for lifelong learning are provided in
preparation for advanced studies if desired.
The ASHS program fulfills many of the basic requirements for
those learners desiring to enter health professions such as
dental hygiene, medical assistance, health information careers,
etc., as well as learners who wish to enroll in preparatory
health courses for nursing, science, and health education.
The adult learner may complete the ASHS in order to gain
promotions, develop health sciences skills, and/or prepare for
bachelor’s-level studies. Graduates may apply for employment
in such health care facilities as medical and dental clinics,
hospitals, and gerontology agencies.
ASHS Program Options
(General and Nursing Emphases)
ASHS General Emphasis: University College offers two
program options for the ASHS degree program. A general
60-unit program prepares learners for a wide-range of
career options in the health-sciences field.
ASHS Nursing Emphasis: University College offers learners
wishing to pursue further education in nursing the option
to complete the ASHS with an Emphasis in Nursing. The
emphasis is a 70-unit program and follows a specific
curriculum identified by Azusa Pacific University (APU),
enabling graduates of UC’s ASHS with an Emphasis in
Nursing to apply to APU’s Two-Plus-Two (High Desert) B.S.
in Nursing (BSN) program. (See requirements under A.S. in
Heath Sciences, Nursing Emphasis)
Both ASHS program options (60-unit and 70-unit) are outlined
in subsequent sections.
41
Health Sciences Fundamentals (16 units)
Graduates of the Associate of Science in Health Sciences will:
BIO 235 Human Anatomy/Lab (4)
PLO 1: Demonstrate a foundational understanding of
integrating Christian principles and practices within the
health Sciences profession.
BIO 245 Human Physiology/Lab (4)
CHEM 115 Chemistry for Health Sciences/Lab (4)
BIO 225 General Microbiology/Lab (4)
Total: 60 units
PLO 3: Create and deliver engaging oral presentations.
Requirements for the A.S. in
Health Sciences, Nursing Emphasis
PLO 4: Demonstrate a basic working knowledge of ethics in
health science theory and practice.
PLO 5: Analyze a Christological worldview within the health
science profession, and determine a personal ethic for their
own professional development.
PLO 6: Display understanding of the utilization of research
data for decision-making utilizing health science criteria.
PLO 7: Demonstrate the ability to conduct primary article
research through electronic databases, books, websites and
other information resources useful to health science
professionals.
Note: All courses marked with an asterisk (*) must be taken at UC.
UC also offers learners wishing to pursue further education
in nursing the option to complete the ASHS with an
Emphasis in Nursing. The emphasis is a 70-unit program
and follows a specific curriculum identified by Azusa Pacific
University (APU), enabling graduates of UC’s ASHS with an
Emphasis in Nursing to apply to APU’s Two-Plus-Two (High
Desert) B.S. in Nursing (BSN) program.
The 70-unit ASHS nursing emphasis curricula
consists of the following coursework:
UC 101 Momentum: Success in the University (3)*
PLO 8: Explore the integration of interpersonal techniques
with various stakeholders from diverse ethnic, gender,
generational, and socioeconomic backgrounds.
APSY 105 General Psychology (3)
PLO 9: Develop fundamental lab skills in the areas of anatomy,
physiology, microbiology, and chemistry in the health sciences.
ART 110 Introduction to Art (3)
Requirements for the A.S. in
Health Sciences, General Emphasis
The general emphasis 60-unit ASHS curriculum includes the
following coursework:
Skills and University Requirements (24 units)
UC 101 Momentum: Success in the University (3)*
ENG 101 Expository Writing (3)
ENG 105 Composition: Argument and Analysis (3)
COMM 105 Public Communication (3)
CS 200 Basic Software Tools (3)
SPAN 121 Beginning Spanish I (3)
SPAN 122 Beginning Spanish II (3)
STAT 280 Applied Statistics (3)
Integrative Liberal Arts (20 units)
APBL 100 Old Testament Survey (3)*
APBL 105 New Testament Survey (3)*
ART 110 Introduction to Art (3)
APSY 295 Human Growth and Development (3)
APSY 430 Cultural Psychology (3)
BIBL 100 Exodus/Deuteronomy (3)*
BIBL 230 Luke/Acts (3)*
BIO 225 General Microbiology/Lab (4)
BIO 235 Human Anatomy/Lab (4)
BIO 245 Human Physiology/Lab (4)
CHEM 115 Chemistry for Health Sciences/Lab (4)
COMM 105 Public Communication (3)
CS 200 Basic Software Tools (3)
ENG 101 Expository Writing (3)
ENG 105 Composition: Argument and Analysis (3)
ENG 115 Introduction to Literature (3)
HIS 201 U.S. History (3) or HIS 202 World History (3)
MATH 125 College Algebra (3)
PHIL 205 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
SPAN 121 Beginning Spanish I (3)
SPAN 122 Beginning Spanish II (3)
STAT 280 Applied Statistics (3)
HIS 202 World Civilizations (3)
Total: 70 units
HLTH 101 Health Education (2)
Note: All courses marked with an asterisk (*) must be taken at UC.
PHIL 105 Introduction to Critical Thinking (3)
REL 105 Christian Life, Faith, and Ministry (3)*
42
2014
PLO 2: Produce clear and effective written papers utilizing
APA 6th Edition formatting.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Program Learning Outcomes (PLO)
for A.S. in Health Sciences
Liberal Arts Core
University College’s undergraduate degree programs
are built on a Liberal Arts Core. Incorporating faith
and knowledge, the curriculum lays the foundation for
responsible citizenship, historical and cultural literacy,
and respect for God-honoring diversity, while engaging
students in written and oral communications, history and
humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences,
mathematics, and information technology.
Learners pursuing any of UC’s four-year degrees are advised
to complete the Liberal Arts Core before starting their major
requirements. These units may be satisfied by completing
the classes below or may be transferred in from a regionally
accredited community college or university. Articulated
transfer units may be applied toward major requirements,
subject to all UC policies and guidelines. Learners must
attain at least a 2.0 (C) grade point average in the major. All
required courses must be taken for a letter grade where the
option exists.
Please note that learners who intend to pursue graduate
school are advised to maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 for
entrance into most universities, with an expectation of
3.8 or higher and significant work experience for the elite
universities.
All degree-seeking UC students are required to begin with
the following Core courses:
Skills and University Requirements (24 units)
UC 101 Momentum: Success in the University (3)
COMM 105 Public Communication (3)
CS 200 Basic Software Tools (3)
ENG 101 Expository Writing (3)
ENG 105 Composition: Argument and Analysis (3)
SPAN 121 Beginning Spanish I (3)
SPAN 122 Beginning Spanish II (3)
STAT 280 Applied Statistics (3)
Integrative Liberal Arts (27 units)
APBL 100 Old Testament Survey (3)
APBL 105 New Testament Survey (3)
ART 110 Introduction to Art (3)
ECO 203 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
HIS 202 World Civilizations (3)
HLTH 101 Health Education (2)
PHIL 105 Introduction to Critical Thinking (3)
PHYS 150 Introduction to Astronomy (4)
REL 105 Christian Life, Faith, and Ministry (3)
Total: 51 units
43
University College offers a Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology, Bachelor of Arts in Leadership, Bachelor of Arts in Management,
and Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences. There are currently no provisions for a minor or for double majors. For further details on
UC’s program offerings, please visit www.apu.edu/universitycollege/.
Please see page 53 for course descriptions.
Preparation for a successful applied psychology career
requires a broad knowledge base for the major elements
of psychological sciences. Thus the Bachelor of Arts in
Applied Psychology (BAAP) equips learners with professional
knowledge and practical skills in general psychology (36 units
with a faith integration of Christian theology in each course),
emphases areas (18 units), and upper division electives
(6 units centering on ethics, ministry, psychological assessment,
etc.). The program promotes personal and spiritual growth by
emphasizing Christian values, ethical principles, and effective
interpersonal relationships in diverse settings. The BAAP is
unique in that it not only provides a broad liberal arts foundation
for lifelong learning, but incorporates applied psychological
training and development approaches that are experiential,
applicable, and practical, utilizing theoretical constructs from
researchers in the field. The Bachelor of Arts in Applied
Psychology (BAAP) provides learners the experience of
exploring applied psychology from accomplished faculty,
successful practitioners, and cooperating institutions.
The B.A. in Applied Psychology offers learners career
opportunities in industries such as social services,
government agencies, justice department, nonprofit, and a
variety of areas of ministry, along with the ability to advance
to graduate education. The job possibilities range from child
welfare liaison, probation officer, adolescent residential care
counselor, Christian camp counselor, corrections officer, etc.
Each emphasis area gives learners the opportunity to stand
out among others in their field of interest, increasing their
marketability for jobs and graduate education. Their emphasis
area may also provide opportunities to transfer credits and
reduce coursework requirements for certain graduate school
programs.
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
(PLO) for the B.A. in Applied Psychology
Purpose: The UC applied psychology degree equips
learners with a theoretical framework, practical skills, and
ethical values essential for success in the Christian applied
psychology profession.
Graduates of the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology will:
PLO 1: Demonstrate the ability to integrate principles of
applied psychology and Christian faith.
PLO 2: Demonstrate knowledge of ethical decision-making
within the applied psychology disciplines.
PLO 3: Identify and use theoretical frameworks and practical
skills for effective critical inquiry and information literacy.
PLO 4: Develop professional competencies in applied
psychology.
PLO 5: Analyze the critical role that multicultural awareness
plays in understanding psychological processes and behavior.
PLO 6: Demonstrate effective communication skills.
Requirements for the
B.A. in Applied Psychology
To earn the Bachelor of Arts degree with an applied
psychology major, learners must complete the following
degree components:
Liberal Arts Core Program Requisites
Major Requirements Emphasis Area Total: 51 units
9 units
45 units
15 units
120 units
In order to earn the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology
degree, learners must complete the following required
courses while achieving a minimum cumulative grade point
average (GPA) of 2.0 in their major courses.
Please reference page 43 to view the coursework for the
Liberal Arts Core.
44
2014
Bachelor of Arts in
Applied Psychology
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Bachelor’s Degrees
Program Requisites (9 units)
APSY 105 Introduction to Psychology (3)
APSY 285 Abnormal Psychology (3)
APSY 295 Human Growth and Development (3)
Major Requirements (45 units)
APSY 300 Research Methods in Psychology (3)
APSY 315 Integration of Psychology and Christianity (3)
APSY 320 Personality Theory (3)
APSY 325 Learning Theory (3)
APSY 330 Cognition (3)
APSY 335 Fundamentals of Testing and Assessment (3)
APSY 340 Interviewing and Counseling Techniques (3)
APSY 350 Social Psychology (3)
APSY 370 Psychopharmacology (3)
APSY 405 Physiological Psychology (3)
APSY 410 Psychology of Emotions (3)
APSY 430 Cultural Psychology (3)
APSY 475 Ethics (3)
APSY 490 Practicum (3)
APSY 495 Special Topics in Psychology (3)
Emphasis areas:
Note: Learners are encouraged to pursue graduate education
in lieu of additional emphasis areas. If a learner wishes to have
more than one emphasis area, s/he may do so with the
permission of the appropriate Discipline Chair. Learners may
have a maximum of two emphasis areas. The learner must
meet all course requirements for both emphasis areas, in
addition to all other graduation requirements for the degree.
If the emphasis areas share courses, a learner must take a
minimum of four more distinct courses to obtain the additional
emphasis. When courses are not articulated in the emphasis,
the additional courses are chosen by the Discipline Chair of that
degree.
General Psychology (15 units)
The General Psychology emphasis is designed for those
who want a broad, general degree that can allow them
versatility in the job market. The coursework in this
emphasis provides learners with a comprehensive study of
psychological approaches. For those still uncertain of their
future aspirations, this emphasis provides adaptability for
various related positions.
APSY 400 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3)
Applied Pastoral Counseling (15 units)
The Applied Pastoral Counseling emphasis provides the
fundamentals to obtain ministry-related positions in the
helping industry. Additionally, this is a progressive step
for those who are considering achieving their master’s in
counseling or psychology to obtain counseling licensure,
but desire a more Christian emphasis. This emphasis also
is progressive for those seeking a master’s in divinity or
interested in chaplaincy. Potential employment opportunities
may be found in lay counseling ministries and Christian
service organizations.
APSY 425 Crisis Counseling and Intervention (3)
APSY 450 Family Systems (3)
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
APSY 460 Motivation (3)
APSY 470 Positive Psychology (3)
Business Psychology (15 units)
The Business Psychology emphasis instills a foundation for
motivating, understanding organizational behavior, conflict
management, and gender issues. This foundation equips
learners to engage in careers in human resources, employee
support and training, and positions where customer relations
are needed such as with insurance, benefits, sales, and
customer service. This emphasis lays a solid foundation prior
to entry into master’s program in business.
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
APSY 460 Motivation (3)
APSY 470 Positive Psychology (3)
APSY 480 Group Processes (3)
MGT 485 Management and Organizational Behavior (3)
Child and Adolescent Psychology (15 units)
The Child and Adolescent Psychology emphasis prepares
learners for working with children and adolescents, rather than
a general Human Service emphasis or Clinical Psychology
focus. With this emphasis area, learners may find employment
working with children and adolescents in schools, social welfare,
ministry, etc.
APSY 425 Crisis Counseling and Intervention (3)
APSY 440 Child Psychology (3)
APSY 445 Adolescent Psychology (3)
APSY 450 Family Systems (3)
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
APSY 450 Family Systems (3)
APSY 460 Motivation (3)
APSY 470 Positive Psychology (3)
APSY 480 Group Processes (3)
45
APSY 400 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3)
APSY 425 Crisis Counseling and Intervention (3)
APSY 450 Family Systems (3)
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
APSY 480 Group Processes (3)
Criminal Behavior (15 units)
The Criminal Behavior emphasis creates opportunities for
positions within the justice system. Due to the emphasis
content, learners may also choose to use this area as the
groundwork for further education in law or higher level
government positions.
APSY 345 Criminal Behavior (3)
APSY 415 Forensic Psychology (3)
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
APSY 460 Motivation (3)
APSY 480 Group Processes (3)
Cultural Psychology (15 units)
The Cultural Psychology emphasis provides a foundation for
employment associated with human services working with
diverse populations. In the world’s rapidly changing culture,
positions requiring psychological cultural sensitivity and
training may be found in employment working with children
and family services, shelters, inner-city programs, as well as
college campuses.
APSY 435 Gender Issues in Psychology (3)
APSY 450 Family Systems (3)
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
APSY 480 Group Processes (3)
MGT 485 Management and Organizational Behavior (3)
46
Educational Psychology (15 units)
The Educational Psychology emphasis provides the learner
with specific knowledge related to special needs and
educational advocacy, in addition to child, adolescent, and
family needs. Providing a solid foundation for those who
want to pursue a master’s degree in teaching education, this
emphasis also creates diversity for those who are interested
in having specializations degrees in two fields, rather than
simply an undergraduate education degree. Potential positions
include social service positions in the school system, child
welfare, and educational aides.
APSY 360 Special Education and Rehabilitation Services (3)
APSY 440 Child Psychology (3)
APSY 445 Adolescent Psychology (3)
APSY 450 Family Systems (3)
APSY 460 Motivation (3)
Human Services (15 units)
The Human Services emphasis is more general and creates
opportunities for all jobs related to the helping profession,
such as social welfare, health care field, ministry, justice,
and businesses. Rather than focusing on a particular people
group such as child/adolescent or cultural, or a particular
area of employment such as ministry/criminal/ business/
education, this allows the learner to have all these
opportunities while still having the edge above others with a
clear set of skills for helping others.
APSY 425 Crisis Counseling and Intervention (3)
APSY 435 Gender Issues in Psychology (3)
APSY 450 Family System (3)
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
APSY 460 Motivation (3)
TOTAL: 120 units
2014
The Clinical Psychology emphasis targets those desiring to
be a mental health professional. Equipping the learner for
graduate education, this emphasis also provides the
necessary foundation for future licensure as a counselor
through a master’s in counseling or psychology. An alternative
option engages work in the social service or mental health
industries where the role requires counseling or assessment
skills, such as residential counselors, intake specialists, etc.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Clinical Psychology (15 units)
Bachelor of Arts
in Leadership
The Bachelor of Arts in Leadership (BAL) builds upon
core management knowledge and seeks to synthesize
leadership practice with organizational science theory,
melding “best practices” with sound contemporary research.
The curriculum challenges adult learners to analyze
organizational leadership paradigms, and evaluate historical
and current models and theories of leadership while working
to develop a personal leadership approach for use in their
career and organizations. The underlying assumption of
the program rests on the premise that leadership is never
static, but must be transformative, innovative, and dynamic.
Leadership is evolutionary and revolutionary, bringing
change to organizations. The leadership program provides
leaders with the knowledge, skills, and competencies
necessary to advance their careers and bring innovative
change to their industry and organizations.
The BAL program prepares learners for service in a wide
variety of public-and private-sector organizations to include
mid-level management, governmental organizations,
international institutions, ministry organization, churches or
firms seeking strong leadership skills and competencies.
Learners complete the leadership major to gain promotions,
change careers, or prepare for master’s-level studies.
Graduates may also begin new ventures, operate small
companies, develop new products, or become consultants.
Purpose and Program Learning
Outcomes (PLO) for the
B.A. in Leadership
Requirements for the B.A. in Leadership
To earn the Bachelor of Arts in Leadership, learners must
complete the following degree components:
Liberal Arts Core Program Requisites
Major Requirements Emphasis Area Total: 51 units
9 units
45 units
15 units
120 units
In order to earn the Bachelor of Arts in Leadership, learners
must complete the following required courses while
achieving a minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA)
of 2.5 in their major courses.
Please reference page 43 to view the coursework for the
Liberal Arts Core.
Program Requisites (9 units)
BUS 250 Business Communication (3)
BUS 270 Business Law and Ethics (3)
MGT 105 Introduction to Business (3)
Major Requirements (45 units)
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
LEAD 300 Leadership Communication (3)
LEAD 320 Theory and Practice of Leadership (3)
LEAD 330 Managerial Finance (3)
LEAD 350 International Management (3)
LEAD 360 Leadership Ethics (3)
LEAD 370 Cross-Cultural Communication (3)
Purpose: The UC leadership major equips learners with a
theoretical framework, practical skills, and ethical values
essential for success as a Christian leadership professional.
LEAD 400 Organizational Development and Innovation (3)
Graduates of the B.A. in Leadership program will:
MGT 450 International Business (3)
PLO 1: Demonstrate the ability to integrate biblical concepts
and principles within the field and practice of leadership.
MGT 480 Strategic Management and Policy (3)
PLO 2: Demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate
leadership concepts through oral and written methods.
MGT 490 Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3)*
PLO 3: Identify and evaluate personal and organizational
ethics and compare to a biblical worldview.
PLO 4: Apply quantitative methods, innovative technology
and diverse information in developing strategic plans.
PLO 5: Identify and implement culturally diverse leadership
strategies within a global context.
PLO 6: Critique the success of leadership initiatives within an
organization and apply leadership theory and principles in
developing a process of continuous improvement.
LEAD 420 Human Resource Strategy (3)
LEAD 440 Emotional Intelligence and Leaders (3)*
MGT 485 Management and Organizational Behavior (3)
MGT 495 International Study (3)
Emphasis area:
Note: Learners are encouraged to pursue graduate education
in lieu of additional emphasis areas. If a learner wishes to have
more than one emphasis area, s/he may do so with the
permission of the appropriate Discipline Chair. Learners may
have a maximum of two emphasis areas. The learner must
meet all course requirements for both emphasis areas, in
addition to all other graduation requirements for the degree.
If the emphasis areas share courses, a learner must take a
minimum of four more distinct courses to obtain the additional
emphasis. When courses are not articulated in the emphasis,
the additional courses are chosen by the Discipline Chair of that
degree.
47
APSY 460 Motivation (3)
LEAD 365 Organizational Analysis (3)
MGT 350 Marketing and E-Commerce (3)
MGT 380 Information Systems Management (3)
MGT 390 Project and Change Management (3)
TOTAL: 120 units
Note: All courses marked with an asterisk (*) must be taken at UC.
The B.A. in Leadership includes two upper-division courses:
LEAD 440 Emotional Intelligence and Leaders, and MGT
490 Entrepreneurship and Innovation. These two courses
marked with an (*) must be completed at UC due to their
distinctive nature.
Transition to a Master’s Degree Program
UC strives to encourage and prepare learners to seek
graduate degrees. The Bachelor of Arts in Leadership (BAL)
curriculum is designed to meet the general admissions
requirements of regionally accredited graduate level
programs. Learners should seek advisement regarding
additional admissions requirements from the selected
graduate programs.
Bachelor of Arts
in Management
Preparation for a successful business career requires a
broad appreciation for the major elements of the business
enterprise and how they relate to one another. Thus, the
Bachelor of Arts in Management (BAM) equips entrepreneurs
with professional knowledge and practical skills in strategic
leadership, management, production, marketing, finance,
technology, human relations, and business law. The program
promotes personal and spiritual growth by emphasizing
Christian values, ethical principles, and effective interpersonal
relationships in diverse settings. The BAM also provides a
broad liberal arts foundation for lifelong learning. UC offers its
BAM program completely online, which enables learners to
apply their learning immediately in the workplace.
The BAM program prepares learners for service in a variety
of public- and private-sector organizations, including first-line
management, retail and sales, commercial banking, savings and
loan associations, marketing, data processing, human resources,
life care administration, government service, and nonprofits.
Learners complete the management major to gain promotions,
change careers, or prepare for master’s-level studies. Some
graduates may begin new ventures, operate small companies,
develop new products, or return to the family business.
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
(PLO) for the B.A. in Management
Purpose: The UC management major equips learners with
a theoretical framework, practical skills, and ethical values
essential for success as a Christian business professional.
Graduates of the B.A. in Management program will:
PLO 1: Demonstrate the ability to apply management and
leadership theory and principles to the global business
environment.
PLO 2: Demonstrate the ability to integrate biblical concepts
and principles in the management and leadership decisionmaking process.
PLO 3: Utilize quantitative methods and critical analysis in the
business planning and decision-making process.
PLO 4: Demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate
business concepts through oral and written forms utilizing
technological innovations and current presentation skills.
PLO 5: Identify, evaluate, and utilize culturally diverse
management concepts, knowledge and information in
business operations.
PLO 6: Demonstrate the technical skills and competencies
required to effectively manage the functional areas of global
business operations.
PLO 7: Demonstrate the ability to evaluate and implement
ethically sound and legal decisions while accounting for
cultural diversity.
48
2014
The emphasis in Organizational Dynamics builds upon the
core leadership competencies and prepares learners to
specialize in designing and implementing innovative and
strategic corporate-wide change initiatives designed to
advance the organization’s sustainability and long-term
viability. Learners develop the key organizational skills
necessary to analyze an industry and implement change
initiatives to ensure a competitive advantage for the longterm viability of their firm or organization.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Organizational Dynamics (15 units)
Requirements for the B.A. in Management
To earn the Bachelor of Arts in Management, learners must
complete the following degree components:
Liberal Arts Core Program Requisites
Major Requirements Emphasis Area Total: 51 units
9 units
45 units
15 units
120 units
In order to earn the Bachelor of Arts in Management, learners
must complete the following required courses while achieving
a minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.5 in
their major courses:
Please reference page 43 to view the coursework for the
Liberal Arts Core.
Program Requisites (9 units)
ACC 210 Financial Accounting (3)
ACC 211 Managerial Accounting (3)
ECO 204 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
Major Requirements (45 units)
BUS 270 Business Law and Ethics (3)
ECO 440 International Economics and Trade (3)
MGT 310 Statistical Analysis for Business Decisions (3)
MGT 320 Financial Management and Markets (3)
MGT 350 Marketing and E-Commerce (3)
MGT 370 Cross-Cultural Communication and Negotiations (3)
MGT 380 Information Systems Management (3)
MGT 390 Project and Change Management (3)
MGT 415 Operations Management (3)
MGT 450 International Business (3)
MGT 460 Leadership and People (3)*
MGT 480 Strategic Management and Policy (3)
MGT 485 Management and Organizational Behavior (3)
MGT 490 Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3)* [Capstone]
MGT 495 International Study (3)
Emphasis areas:
Note: Learners are encouraged to pursue graduate
education in lieu of additional emphasis areas. If a learner
wishes to have more than one emphasis area, s/he may
do so with the permission of the appropriate discipline
chair. Learners may have a maximum of two emphasis
areas. The learner must meet all course requirements for
both emphasis areas, in addition to all other graduation
requirements for the degree. If the emphasis areas share
courses, a learner must take a minimum of four more
distinct courses to obtain the additional emphasis. When
courses are not articulated in the emphasis, the additional
courses are chosen by the discipline chair of that degree.
Organizational Leadership (15 units)
The Organizational Leadership emphasis capitalizes on the
core management courses and provides learners with the
essential skills, knowledge, and competencies essential
for serving in a leadership role in a for-profit, nonprofit
or governmental institution. Domestic and multi-national
enterprises required leaders who possess the acumen to
move their organizations forward in a globally competitive
marketplace. Learners study the theories of leadership
and implement strategies designed to produce long-term
sustainability with integrity and authenticity. The coursework
prepares learners to implement organizational wide change
and position a firm to build competitive advantage with its
people.
LEAD 320 Leadership Theory and Practice (3)
LEAD 360 Leadership Ethics (3)
LEAD 400 Organizational Development and Innovation (3)
LEAD 420 Human Resources Strategy (3)
LEAD 440 Emotional Intelligence and Leaders (3)*
Accounting (15 units)
The emphasis in Accounting provides learners with a
survey of the principles, theories, and concepts of the
accounting profession while presenting an intense review
of the economic, quantitative, and managerial aspects of
business. The combination of classroom theory, coupled
with the coverage of key skills and practical knowledge
prepares candidates for professions within the industry. The
coursework initiates the process of preparing learners for the
CPA Examination administered by the various state boards of
accountancy in the United States.
ACC 300 Intermediate Accounting I (3)
ACC 320 Intermediate Accounting II (3)
ACC 340 Cost Accounting, Analysis and Budgeting (3)
ACC 410 Tax Accounting (3)
ACC 430 Auditing (3)
49
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3)
APSY 460 Motivation (3)
APSY 470 Positive Psychology (3)
APSY 480 Group Processes (3)
MGT 485 Management and Organizational Behavior (3)
Digital Marketing (15 units)
Globalization and technological advancements have
fundamentally changed the methods and means of
advertising and marketing. In order to compete on a global
scale firms must develop, implement, and analyze the
results of their marketing strategy. Firms that intend to
remain successful and survive in the 21st century must
implement a robust and comprehensive digital marketing
strategy. The Digital Marketing emphasis builds upon the
core management body of knowledge and provides learners
with the key skills, knowledge, and practice to design and
implement a successful digital marketing global strategy. The
emphasis provides learners with the tools and competencies
required to add value to their firms marketing and digital
marketing endeavors.
DMK 300 Digital Marketing (3)
DMK 310 Analyzing and Optimization of Digital Media (3)
DMK 350 Digital Consumer Behavior (3)
DMK 420 Global Viral Marketing (3)
ISM 400 Web Development (3)
Entrepreneurship (15 units)
Global Logistics Management (15 units)
The emphasis in Global Logistics builds upon the core
management courses and provides learners with the keys
skills and knowledge required to effectively and efficiently
manage a global logistics and supply chain management
network. Globalization and information technology have
significantly changed the scope, speed and practices
associated with the transportation and delivery of products
and services. The emphasis in Global Logistics prepares
learners to excel and succeed in this fast-paced and
growing industry. Learners are exposed to cutting-edge
practices and advanced information systems that enable
global supply chain networks to function efficiently and add
value and competitive advantage to firms.
GLM 300 Logistics Management (3)
GLM 320 Freight Transportation and Security (3)
GLM 340 Supply Chain Economics and Finance (3)
GLM 400 Integrated Logistical Systems (3)
LEAD 420 Human Resource Strategy (3)
Healthcare Management (15 units)
The Healthcare Management emphasis builds upon the
core management curriculum and is designed specifically
to prepare graduates for the rapidly expanding health care
industry. Learners gain the key skills, competencies, and
knowledge required to effectively serve in the field of health
care management. The courses are designed and taught by
industry experts bringing years of practical experience to the
learning environment.
HCM 300 Healthcare Laws and Regulations (3)
HCM 310 Healthcare Delivery Systems (3)
HCM 320 Healthcare Financial Management (3)
HCM 410 Healthcare Ethics and Quality Control (3)
HCM 420 Healthcare Organizational Management (3)
Human Resource Management (15 units)
The emphasis in Entrepreneurship provides learners with
the fundamental principles associated with new venture
and entrepreneurial development. An emphasis is based
upon innovative, critical thinking, and action-oriented
skills that allow for the identification, evaluation, and
successful execution of new and sustainable business
opportunities. Learners will be prepared to create
successful entrepreneurial ventures, become a part of an
entrepreneurial team, or develop and execute new business
models within established organizations.
The Human Resource Management emphasis capitalizes
on the core management courses and provides learners
with the essential skills, knowledge and competencies
required to effectively succeed in the ever-increasing field
of human resource management. Human capital is quickly
becoming an essential component of every organization
on a global scale. The HRM emphasis enables learners to
effectively manage the human resources of domestic and
global firms. The courses utilize cutting-edge technology
and practices to prepare learners for the exciting field of
human resource management in the 21st century.
ENT 310 Principles of Entrepreneurship (3)
HRM 300 Compensation and Benefits (3)
ENT 320 Venture Capital (3)
HRM 310 Legal Issues in Human Resources (3)
ENT 330 Marketing Research (3)
HRM 440 Workplace Planning and Employment (3)
ENT 420 New Product Development (3)
HRM 460 Performance Optimization (3)
ENT 440 Entrepreneurship Action Learning Project (3)
LEAD 420 Human Resource Strategy (3)
50
2014
The Business Psychology emphasis instills a foundation for
motivating, understanding organizational behavior, conflict
management, and gender issues. This foundation equips
learners to engage in careers in human resources, employee
support and training, and positions where customer
relations are needed such as with insurance, benefits, sales,
and customer service. This emphasis lays a solid foundation
prior to entry into master’s program in business.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Business Psychology (15 units)
Information Systems Management (15 units)
The emphasis in Information Systems Management (ISM)
prepares learners to specialize and advance in a critical
functional area of business operations, foreign or domestic.
The ISM provides learners with the key skills, and
competencies required to add value and technological
expertise to their chosen profession. The ISM in combination
with the B.A. in Management core courses provides learners
with a comprehensive foundation for business management
that firms require in the current global business environment.
ISM 310 Programming and Database Management (3)
ISM 320 Hardware and Database Management (3)
ISM 330 Networking and Security (3)
ISM 400 Web Development (3)
LEAD 400 Organizational Development and Innovation (3)
TOTAL: 120 units
Note: All courses marked with an asterisk (*) must be taken at UC.
The B.A. in Management includes several upper-division
courses: LEAD 440 Emotional Intelligence and Leaders,
MGT 460 Leadership and People, and MGT 490
Entrepreneurship and Innovation. These three courses
marked with an (*) must be completed at UC due to their
distinctive nature.
Transition to a Master’s Degree Program
UC strives to encourage and prepare learners to seek
graduate degrees. The Bachelor of Arts in Management
(BAM) curriculum is designed to meet the general admissions
requirements of regionally accredited graduate level programs,
including the graduate business programs offered through
Azusa Pacific University. Learners should seek advisement
regarding additional admissions requirements from the
selected graduate programs.
Bachelor of Science
in Health Sciences
The Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (BSHS) is a
foundational degree for those adult learners desiring to
enter the health care industry in the areas of health care
management and health care advocacy. This degree, with
emphases in management and health psychology allow
the graduate the competencies to advance their personal
careers and overall practices of the medical industry by
understanding and applying current policies and regulations,
patient care initiatives, risk management, and the like.
This program is based in both lab science courses and
emphasis courses that provide the learner with a rigorous
scientific background applicable to the allied health
profession. The emphasis in human biology further expands
on that knowledge base, providing advanced coursework
cellular biology, molecular genetics, immunology, and
neuroanatomy/neurophysiology.
The BSHS is built upon the Associate of Science in Health
Sciences (ASHS) degree, which promotes Christian values,
ethical principles, a Liberal Arts Core, and scientific laboratory
courses which are transferable to private and public clinical
settings. This 120-unit Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences
degree will also serve as a “stepping stone” into various
master’s degrees.
The BSHS program prepares learners for service in a variety
of health care organizations, including hospitals, clinics, and
public health institutions. Learners complete the BSHS in
order to gain promotions, develop management/leadership
skills, and/or prepare for graduate-level studies.
Purpose and Program Learning Outcomes
(PLO) in B.S. in Health Sciences
Purpose: The UC BSHS degree equips learners with a
foundational framework, practical skills, and ethical values
essential for success in the Christian health sciences
professions.
Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences will:
PLO 1: Integrate God’s Word within the health science
industry and society.
PLO 2: Demonstrate effective oral and written communication.
PLO 3: Identify and evaluate key personal and organizational
ethics affecting health care professionals.
PLO 4: Utilize technology in statistical analysis and data
management.
PLO 5: Examine cultural and diversity issues within
interpersonal health care.
PLO 6: Implement specific organizational functions and
processes within the health sciences field.
51
Liberal Arts Core Program Requisites
Major Requirements Emphasis Area Total: 51 units
9 units
45 units
15 units
120 units
In order to earn the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences
degree, students must complete the following required
courses while achieving a minimum cumulative grade point
average (GPA) of 2.0 in their major courses:
Please reference page 43 to view the coursework for the
Liberal Arts Core.
APSY 470 Positive Psychology (3)
2014
To earn the BSHS degree, students must complete the
following degree components:
Healthcare Leadership (15 units)
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Requirements for the
B.S. in Health Sciences
This emphasis in Healthcare Leadership uses an
interdisciplinary approach to prepare learners for careers in
leadership in a variety of health care settings. This emphasis
brings together psychology as well as leadership theories
to create a foundation for learners planning careers in
health care delivery, public health, health care management,
patient advocacy, and related leadership positions.
HCM 420 Healthcare Organizational Management (3)
LEAD 320 Theory and Practice of Leadership (3)
LEAD 440 Emotional Intelligence in Leaders (3)*
MGT 390 Project and Change Management (3)
Healthcare Management (15 units)
Health Sciences Core Requirements (45 units)
The emphasis in Healthcare Management (HCM) prepares
learners to specialize and advance in the health care
industry. The HCM provides learners with the key skills and
competencies required to add value and expertise to their
chosen profession. The HCM in combination with the
B.S. in Health Sciences core courses provides learners with
a comprehensive foundation for healthcare management
that is required in the current health care environment.
APSY 295 Human Growth and Development (3)
HCM 300 Healthcare Laws and Regulations (3)
APSY 300 Research Methods in Psychology (3)
HCM 310 Healthcare Delivery Systems (3)
APSY 430 Cultural Psychology (3)
HCM 320 Healthcare Financial Management (3)
BIO 225 General Microbiology/Lab (4)
HCM 410 Healthcare Ethics and Quality Control (3)
BIO 235 Human Anatomy/Lab (4)
HCM 420 Healthcare Organizational Management (3)
BIO 245 Human Physiology/Lab (4)
Psychology in the Healthcare Profession (15 units)
Program Requisites (9 Units)
HSCI 100 Introduction to Health and Disease (3)
HSCI 105 Nutrition and Wellness (3)
HSCI 110 U.S. Healthcare Systems (3)
CHEM 115 Chemistry for Health Sciences/Lab (4)
HSCI 300 Bioethics (3)
HSCI 305 Introduction to Genetics (4)
HSCI 310 Healthcare Professions (1)
HSCI 320 Medical Sociology (3)
HSCI 491 Senior Seminar: Health Sciences Capstone (3)
HSCI 497 Fieldwork (2)
PHYS 100 General Physics for Health Sciences/Lab (4)
Emphasis areas:
Note: Learners are encouraged to pursue graduate education
in lieu of additional emphasis areas. If a learner wishes to have
more than one emphasis area, s/he may do so with the
permission of the appropriate Discipline Chair. Learners may
have a maximum of two emphasis areas. The learner must
meet all course requirements for both emphasis areas, in
addition to all other graduation requirements for the degree.
If the emphasis areas share courses, a learner must take a
minimum of four more distinct courses to obtain the additional
emphasis. When courses are not articulated in the emphasis,
the additional courses are chosen by the Discipline Chair of
that degree.
52
This emphasis in Psychology in the Healthcare Profession
allows learners to specialize in the aspect of the health care
industry concerned with how people react and cope with
illness, as well as how people make decisions around health
and wellness. The emphasis brings together biology,
psychology, and behavior and social factors to determine
how they influence patients and providers in health care
professions.
APSY 285 Abnormal Psychology (3)
APSY 350 Social Psychology (3)
APSY 425 Crisis Counseling and Intervention (3)
APSY 435 Gender Issues in Psychology (3)
APSY 470 Positive Psychology (3)
TOTAL: 120 units
Note: All courses marked with an asterisk (*) must be taken at UC.
Transition to a Master’s Degree Program
UC strives to encourage and prepare learners to seek
graduate degrees. The Bachelor of Science in Health
Sciences (BSHS) curriculum is designed to meet the general
admissions requirements of regionally accredited graduate
level programs. Learners should seek advisement regarding
additional admissions requirements from the selected
graduate programs.
Course Descriptions
ACC 210 Financial Accounting (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course introduces the basic financial accounting model and prepares
learners to explore the application of fundamental accounting principles to
business entities. The course focuses on a user perspective and covers
the vital steps in the accounting cycle from journalizing transactions to the
preparation and interpretation of financial statements. Learners will also
demonstrate an understanding of the importance of ethics in accounting.
ACC 211 Managerial Accounting (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course focuses on managerial accounting and emphasizes the
use of accounting data in decision-making. Topics covered include cost
accumulation models, cost behavior, break-even analysis, budgeting,
short- and long-run decision analysis, capital expenditure analysis, and
financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 210 Financial Accounting
ACC 300 Intermediate Accounting I (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides an intensive study of accounting theory and
principles underlying financial accounting. An emphasis is placed on
the theoretical and conceptual framework of the financial reporting
process including the role and authority of official financial accounting
pronouncements and the responsibilities of professional accountants.
Coverage begins with a review of the accounting model and focuses on
accounting theory as it relates to revenue recognition and current assets
including cash, accounts receivables, inventories, and operational
assets. Prerequisite: ACC 211 Managerial Accounting
ACC 320 Intermediate Accounting II (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course continues the study begun in ACC 300, covering intangible
assets, investments, short- and long-term liabilities, leases, income
taxes, corporate capital transactions, and statement of cash flows. An
emphasis is placed on the theoretical and conceptual framework of the
financial reporting process including the role and authority of official
accounting pronouncements and the responsibilities of professional
accountants. Prerequisite: ACC 300 Intermediate Accounting I
ACC 340 Cost Accounting, Analysis and Budgeting (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course explores fundamental and advanced managerial accounting
concepts used in planning and controlling operations, determining costs
of production, inventory control and evaluation, budgeting, and long-range
planning. An emphasis is placed on cost determination, cost accumulation,
cost-volume-profit relationships, standard costs, variances analysis and
reporting, and the relationship between controlling costs and controlling
operations. Prerequisite: ACC 320 Intermediate Accounting I
ACC 410 Tax Accounting (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides learners with an intensive study of the theory and
principles of federal income tax law as it applies to business entities
including corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Emphasis is
placed on the theoretical framework and philosophy of the federal tax
system as well as practical application and planning. The basics
concepts of taxation associated with corporate, partnership, and
S-corporation formation and operation are covered, as well as the
fundamentals of estate, gift, and trust taxation. The course also covers
the tax audit process and professional tax preparer responsibilities.
Prerequisite: ACC 320 Intermediate Accounting II
ACC 430 Auditing (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides an overview of auditing concepts with special
attention to auditing standards, professional ethics, the legal ability
inherent in the attest function, the study and evaluation of internal
control, the nature of evidence, statistical sampling, and the impact of
electronic data processing. The basic approach to planning an audit is
addressed as are the audit objectives and procedures applied to the
elements in a financial statement. Learners will demonstrate the
application of audit theory and will be exposed to the planning, control,
and review procedures used by many public accounting firms.
Prerequisite: ACC 320 Intermediate Accounting II
APBL 100 Old Testament Survey (3 units, 8 weeks)
An overview of the Old Testament focusing on the biblical writers, book
outlines, major themes, key individuals, and events in biblical history, along
with personal application for learners today. Subject matter includes
creation, revelation, sin, redemption, and the Messianic promises.
APBL 105 New Testament Survey (3 units, 8 weeks)
An overview of the New Testament focusing on the political, cultural,
religious, literary, and historical perspectives during the life of Jesus
and during the early Church. Authorship, book outlines, key themes,
persons, and events in pre- and early church history are examined,
along with personal applications for learners today.
APBL 110 Christian Ethics (3 units, 8 weeks)
Develops a theological and philosophical framework for Christian ethics,
compares a Christian view of ethics to other alternatives, and applies
Christian ethical principles to current social issues including; capital
punishment, euthanasia, genetic technologies and human cloning,
reproductive technologies, sexual ethics, and the morality of war.
The course will introduce learners to ethical discussions common in
business; such as those related to global capitalism, corporate social
responsibility, and care of the environment. Learners will also become
familiar with a seven-step process for making ethical decisions.
APHS 100 Introduction to Medical Ethics (3 units, 8 weeks)
This introductory course examines the dilemmas and ethical issues facing
the health services professional, with an emphasis on medical situations.
Topics include ethics of care, civility, medical malpractice, codes of
conduct, etc., from a Christian perspective.
APSY 105 General Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
This general survey course explores the field of psychology. It includes
human development, social psychology, learning, perception, cognition,
motivation, personality, psychological testing, and nervous system
functioning. Learners enrolled in this course may be required to share
information regarding their personal life, family, or relationships.
(Course formerly PSYC 110)
APSY 285 Abnormal Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
A systematic overview of the classification, explanation, and treatment
of disorders described in the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Historical and modern trends in
etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are examined.
APSY 295 Human Growth and Development (3 units, 8 weeks)
An extensive study of psychological development from conception
through death. This multidisciplinary approach examines the effects of
psychosocial, cognitive, biological, moral, and related factors that impact
human development.
APSY 300 Research Methods in Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
A comprehensive theoretical and practical introduction to planning,
conducting, reporting, and evaluating psychological research. Topics
include experimental design, quantitative and qualitative procedures,
ethical considerations, as well as, critical analysis and scrutiny of
published research. Learners will plan, conduct, and present research
using APA guidelines and writing standards. Prerequisite: STAT 280
Applied Statistics
APSY 315 Integration of Psychology and Christianity (3 units, 8 weeks)
A constructive integration of psychology and the Christian faith. Critically
analyzes psychological theories, treatments, and perspectives through
a Christian worldview, while also developing an understanding of how
psychology informs theology and faith.
53
APSY 325 Learning Theory (3 units, 8 weeks)
Foundations of human learning are examined, with an emphasis on
experimental research and their underlying assumptions. Both historical
and contemporary concepts are discussed with particular focus on
application to individuals, organizations, and institutions.
APSY 425 Crisis Counseling and Intervention (3 units, 8 weeks)
An examination of the knowledge, skills, and practices specific to crisis
counseling and intervention. Focuses on applying appropriate methods
to crisis situations, while considering cultural and ethical issues.
APSY 330 Cognition (3 units, 8 weeks)
An in-depth exploration of human cognition, focusing on both classic
and current theories, problems, paradigms, methods and measurement.
APSY 335 Fundamentals of Testing and Assessment (3 units, 8 weeks)
An appraisal of the construction, administration, interpretation, and
evaluation of psychological tests and measurements. Evaluates the
validity, reliability, applicability, cultural and ethical uses. Learners will be
involved in the administration and interpretation of select instruments.
APSY 340 Interviewing and Counseling Techniques (3 units, 8 weeks)
An overview of basic clinical interviewing and counseling techniques
from both the didactic and experiential perspectives. Topics include
methods and theories in counseling, roles in the counseling relationship,
legal considerations, dealing with resistance, cultural awareness and
ethical issues related to counseling.
APSY 345 Criminal Behavior (3 units, 8 weeks)
An exploration of theories and research that provide cognitive, behavioral,
and psychological explanations of criminal behavior, including how
individual criminal behavior is acquired, evoked, maintained and modified.
Also addresses cultural and social aspects related to criminal behavior
along with effective intervention strategies.
APSY 350 Social Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
A comprehensive overview of social psychology that examines how the
thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals are influenced by actual,
imagined, or implied social interactions. Includes pertinent research,
ethical and cultural aspects to social psychology.
APSY 360 Special Education and Rehabilitation Services
(3 units, 8 weeks)
Survey of theories, research, and practice of effective interventions for
individuals with mild/moderate and moderate/severe disabilities. Legal
rights, responsibilities, ethical issues, advocacy, and pertinent services
are addressed.
APSY 370 Psychopharmacology (3 units, 8 weeks)
An introduction to the behavioral, psychological, and physiological
effects of chemicals used in the treatment of psychological disorders.
Addresses therapeutic and recreational uses coupled with prevention
and treatment of abuse and alternatives to medication.
APSY 400 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Survey of the science and practice of clinical psychology, including
diagnoses and evaluations, interventions and prevention strategies for
use with clinical populations, cultural applications, and ethical issues in
the clinical profession.
APSY 405 Physiological Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Comprehensive study of the physiological and neurological correlates of
human behavior. Potential topics include physiological mechanisms in
perception, learning, emotion and motivation.
APSY 410 Psychology of Emotions (3 units, 8 weeks)
Analysis of theoretical and empirical issues in the domain of emotions,
incorporating current approaches and interactions between emotion
and cognition.
54
APSY 430 Cultural Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Reviews research and perspectives on the psychology of culture.
Examines diversity including age, race, religion, nationality, disability,
language, and gender. Explores the relationship between cultural factors
and prejudice, discrimination and oppression. Applies knowledge and
principles to effectively interact and serve in a multicultural society.
APSY 435 Gender Issues in Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Critically examines research and perspectives on gender and sexual
socialization and development, along with physiological and cultural
contributions to gender differences, sexual orientation, sexual adjustment
and related areas of influence. Prerequisites: APSY 105 General Psychology,
APSY 295 Human Growth and Development, or consent of instructor
APSY 440 Child Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Explores different aspects of psychological issues in children emphasizing
symptomatology, assessment, etiological factors, and various treatment
modalities. Examines cultural, ethical, and legal issues related to the
treatment of children.
APSY 445 Adolescent Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Explores different aspects of psychological issues in adolescents
emphasizing symptomatology, assessment, etiological factors, and
various treatment modalities. Examines cultural, ethical, and legal
issues related to the treatment of adolescents.
APSY 450 Family Systems (3 units, 8 weeks)
An overview of the development of the family system, including functional
and dysfunctional family relationships, cultural and spiritual implications.
Introduces psychological interventions and techniques which further
development and change.
APSY 455 Conflict Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course examines the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of
conflict between individuals and in organizations. It also discusses the
application of different types of negotiation strategies based on rational
and emotional elements in approaching negotiation, cultural contexts,
and individual differences.
APSY 460 Motivation (3 units, 8 weeks)
Explores research and perspectives on experimental and applied analysis
of behavior that impact motivation. Addresses the application of methods
for effective motivation in a variety of settings.
APSY 470 Positive Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Investigates methods, research, and assessment in Positive Psychology.
Incorporates applications and techniques to this strength based approach
both didactically and experientially.
APSY 475 Ethics (3 units, 8 weeks)
An in-depth assessment of the values, ideas, and laws that guide the
helping professions, including professional codes of conduct, philosophical
ethical principles, and the Christian worldview.
APSY 480 Group Processes (3 units, 8 weeks)
Study of research and perspectives regarding human interaction in
groups. Examines the impact of various individual, social, and cultural
dynamics and how to successfully influence and interact in group settings.
2014
APSY 415 Forensic Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Investigates the application of the science and profession of psychology
to issues relating to law and the legal system. Addresses related
psychological research, legal issues and processes, as well as cultural
and ethical issues in forensic psychology.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
APSY 320 Personality Theory (3 units, 8 weeks)
An evaluative review of the methods and content utilized in the study
personality. Covers varied approaches and theories to understanding
the dynamics of personality and instruments measuring personality
along with their validity and ethical considerations.
APSY 495 Special Topics in Psychology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Current or relevant topics are presented, with the focus on new practices,
theories, or research interests in the field. This course may be repeated
for up to 6 units.
BUS 270 Business Law and Ethics (3 units, 8 weeks)
Examines the legal, regulatory, ethical and moral principle and guidelines
that impact domestic and global business transactions. The course
provides an in-depth study of business and sales contacts, international
trade law, intellectual property, real estate, product and service liability,
organizational structure, insurance and political structures. The course
discusses how ethical and moral principles guide the decision making
process and business operations.
ART 110 Introduction to Art (3 units, 8 weeks)
This combination lecture/studio course introduces learners to fine art
history and processes. Learners develop a deeper understanding of
the history, forms, and styles of architecture, painting, printmaking, and
sculpture. The studio experiences expand learners’ personal awareness
of art and themselves. (Course formerly ART 150)
BIBL 100 Introduction to Biblical Literature: Exodus/Deuteronomy
(3 units, 8 weeks)
This course introduces Old Testament biblical literature, hermeneutics, and
literary critical methodologies with a primary focus on the books of Exodus
and Deuteronomy. Learners study to observe the overall structure of these
books, their historical settings, and modern approaches to their literary
analysis. Learners study to interpret individual texts within each book and
study how Deuteronomy uses the material of Exodus to communicate
God’s Word to a new generation.
BIBL 230 Introduction to Biblical Literature: Luke/Acts
(3 units, 8 weeks)
This course introduces New Testament biblical literature, hermeneutics, and
literary critical methodologies with a primary focus on the Gospel of Luke
and the Acts of the Apostles. Special attention is given to the meaning of the
texts with regard to their political, cultural, religious, and geographical
settings; the literary structures and genres employed; and how those texts
are relevant for faithful Christian living. Prerequisite: BIBL 100
CHEM 115 Chemistry for the Health Sciences (4 units, 8 weeks)
Lecture, 3 units; Lab 1 units
This course covers organic and biochemistry topics related to the health
sciences. Emphasis is placed on organic nomenclature, functional
groups, selected organic reactions, and biochemical pathways. Lab
activities will focus on the application of organic and biochemistry
with respect to the health sciences.
COMM 105 Public Communication (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course offers practical instruction on how to speak effectively and
introduces the basic principles underlying effective communication.
Topics range from the study of theoretical models of interpersonal and
public communication to the fundamental skills of research, organization,
and delivery of informative and persuasive discourse. (Course formerly
COMM 111)
CS 200 Basic Software Tools (3 units, 8 weeks)
This PC-based course covers the basics of MS Windows and the use
of applications software as problem-solving tools. In-depth coverage
of popular word processing, database, and spreadsheet packages is
included. (Course formerly CS 205)
BIO 225 General Microbiology (4 units, 8 weeks)
Lecture, 3 units; Lab 1 unit
The focus is on fundamental microbiological principles and laboratory
techniques with an emphasis on disease-causing microorganisms, new
and old methods of disease treatment and prevention, and host immune
responses. Prerequisite: BIO 235 or BIO 245, or their equivalents
(Course formerly BIOL 220)
DMK 300 Digital Marketing (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides an overview of traditional marketing concepts and
methods and lays the foundation for the transition to digital marketing.
Learners are exposed to digital marketing tools, concepts, theories and
practices. The course enables learners to evaluate digital marketing
strategies and develop digital marketing plans designed to produce
effective results. Prerequisite: MGT 350 Marketing and E-Commerce
BIO 235 Human Anatomy (4 units, 8 weeks)
Lecture, 3 units; Lab, 1 unit
This course is designed to introduce the principles of human anatomy
to pre-nursing learners. It is taught from a systems perspective. Material
covered in this course includes basic anatomical terminology, cell, tissue
and organ structure and function, and examination of the integumentary,
skeletal, muscular, nervous systems, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory,
urinary, and reproductive systems. (Course formerly BIOL 250)
DMK 310 Analyzing and Optimization of Digital Media
(3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides an in-depth study of how to analyze digital marketing
strategies to increase web traffic flows, enhance visibility, and increase
consumer satisfaction and response rates. In addition, the course includes
cost-benefit analysis and effective methods, website design and search
engine optimization. Prerequisite: DMK 300 Digital Marketing
BIO 245 Human Physiology (4 units, 8 weeks)
Lecture, 3 units; Lab, 1 unit
Introduction to the principles of human physiology and how function relates
to anatomical structure. Fundamental principles of cellular metabolism,
transport mechanisms, cell signaling, fluid and electrolyte balance are
covered to lay the foundation for organ system physiology. The course
emphasizes homeostatic mechanisms and reciprocal communication
of the body’s organ systems and how malfunction can lead to disease.
(Course formerly BIOL 251)
DMK 350 Digital Consumer Behavior (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies the reactions and behaviors of consumers to digital media and
marketing. The course examines consumer behavior and motivating
factors that influence buying behaviors. In addition, the course evaluates
consumer demographics and ties those factors to buying behaviors
and attempts to forecast future buying decisions in the digital marketing
platform.
DMK 420 Global Viral Marketing (3 units, 8 weeks)
Explores the social media phenomenon and its impact on brand awareness, product adaptation and social perceptions of products and/or
services. The course explores ethical and cross-cultural implications of
viral marketing and the related risks and potential rewards of a viral
marketing campaign. Learners develop a plan to implement a viral
marketing strategy. Prerequisite: ISM 400 Web Development
55
2012–13
BUS 250 Business Communications (3 units, 8 weeks)
Examines the communication process and how managers utilize written
and oral communications to successfully interact in a multi-cultural setting
and manage business operations. The course outlines the process of oral
communication, defines listening skills, describes the factors of a quality
presentations and use of graphics, presents how to conduct formal
meetings and the use of virtual teams.
GENERAL INFORMATION
APSY 490 Practicum (3 units, 8 weeks)
Learners participate in field or research experience along with completing
related discussions, readings, and other required coursework. All learners
serving in research positions will serve as apprentices on survey, laboratory,
clinical, and/or field research projects. Practicum proposals must be
approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Completion of all BAAP core
courses and 9 units in emphasis area or consent of instructor
ECO 440 International Economics and Trade (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course examines the theories and principles of international economics
and how trade flows and policies impact global business operations.
Learners evaluate macroeconomic international policies and institutions,
tariff rates, customs duties, currency valuations, trade agreements,
intellectual property rights, immigration and balance of payments.
Prerequisites: ECO 203 Microeconomics, ECO 204 Macroeconomics
ENG 101 Expository Writing (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course focuses on the literacy skills essential to effective writing,
including reading comprehension, audience awareness, genre knowledge,
grammatical efficacy, syntactic fluency, and rhetorical sufficiency. Course is
limited to 15 learners. (Course formerly ENGL 101)
ENG 105 Composition: Argument and Analysis (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course promotes the intellectual and rhetorical skills necessary to
write persuasive and argumentative prose. Specific areas addressed to
include logic, grammar, and rhetoric. Clarity of purpose and perspicuity
of argument are examined through attention to critical thinking, logical
fallacies, and textual analysis. Prerequisite: ENG 101 (Course formerly
ENG 105)
ENG 115 Introduction to Literature (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course introduces learners to the varying genres of literature—
fiction, poetry, drama, and cinema—while examining and exploring the
historical, critical, and social significance of literary expression.
Prerequisite: ENG 105 (Course formerly ENGL 111)
ENT 310 Principles of Entrepreneurship (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course explores all aspects of entrepreneurship including a focus
on the identification and selection of a sustainable business model, the
initiation of new ventures, and financing options. An emphasis is placed
on how ventures are started, start-up components are derived, and new
venture proposals are evaluated. Learners will be provided with a deeper
insight into the research and analysis of entrepreneurial operations, and
explore business plan development, legal, and tax considerations.
ENT 320 Venture Capital (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides learners with coverage of the funding requirements
and issues associated with entrepreneurial ventures, and explores the
basics of attracting start-up and growth capital. Learners will obtain a
practical understanding of the planning and financial activities required
during initial and ongoing operations. Practical knowledge will be
acquired related to the selection of a business cost concept, determination of financial and human resources needed, and decisions required
to transform the business vision into reality. Prerequisite: ENT 310
Principles of Entrepreneurship
ENT 330 Marketing Research (3 units, 8 weeks)
Introduces the tools and techniques of marketing research as a component of marketing decision making with an emphasis on the application of these strategies within an entrepreneurial venture. This course
explores the definitions of research problems and methodologies, design
of research projects, and interpretation of research results. The practical
aspects of conducting and analyzing market research studies will be
covered.
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ENT 440 Entrepreneurship Action Learning Project (3 units, 8 weeks)
This capstone entrepreneurship course focuses on new venture and
business plan development with an emphasis on strategic planning, risk
management, marketing, and operations. Learners will obtain an in-depth
practical understanding of the entrepreneurial development process
required to successfully select and launch a new business venture,
execute a business plan, and secure venture financing. Learners will also
utilize knowledge and skills gained from previous courses in completing
their project. Prerequisites: ENT 310, ENT 320, ENT 330, ENT 420
GLM 300 Logistics Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides a comprehensive overview of the global logistics
and supply chain management processes, methods and planning. The
course provides a description and explanation for each of the key
functional components of the logistical management process, to include
the following: transportation warehousing, inventory, cost analysis,
information technology and systems, third-party logistics and metrics.
GLM 320 Freight Transportation and Security (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course examines the key issues, concepts, methods and practices
associated with the transportation and delivery of freight. The course
focuses and provides an in-depth study of the modes of transportation and
the tactical requirements for the various modes with a focus on multimodal
transportation. In addition, the course addresses key security issues and
governmental policies and regulations that impact the transportation and
delivery of goods and services. Prerequisite: GLM 300 Logistics Management
GLM 340 Supply Chain Economics and Finance (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies the impact supply chain costs have on the organization and
how to most efficiently deliver goods while remaining cost competitive.
The course examines capital costs, cash flows, financing and economic
indicators. Global economic factors are also taken into consideration
in planning and financing globally logistics and supply chain networks.
Prerequisites: MGT 320 Financial Management and Markets, ECO 204
Principles of Macroeconomics
GLM 400 Integrated Logistical Systems (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies the information technology and systems that drive global
logistics and supply chain management networks. The course focuses
on capacity planning, productivity, inventory management, throughput,
forecasting and problem solving decision-making. Learners are exposed
to a variety of logistical systems designed specifically to enhance the
efficiency of supply chain management systems. Prerequisite: MGT 380
Information Systems Management
HCM 300 Healthcare Laws and Regulations (3 units, 8 weeks)
The course examines the principles and practical applications of the laws
that affect the operational decisions of health care providers, payers, and
managers. The course examines the social, moral, and ethical issues
associated with health care policy decisions and regulations, such as
corporate liability, medical malpractice, admission, and discharge process,
informed consent, nursing practice, patients’ rights, medical records, and
governmental regulation of personnel and health facilities.
HCM 310 Healthcare Delivery Systems (3 units, 8 weeks)
The course studies the various components of the U.S. health care
system over the entire continuum of care, with a focus on private and
public governmental regulation, and the impact of health policy on key
stakeholders. The course provides a comparison of U.S. delivery systems
with those provided in other countries. The course presents a broad range
of opportunities for learners to explore as health care career options.
2014
ECO 204 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of economic
analysis for macroeconomics. Learners study national income and
economic growth, interest rates, unemployment, and government fiscal
and monetary policies.
ENT 420 New Product Development (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides a study of the development of new products within
the context of an entrepreneurial venture, and focuses on the development
process from idea conception to commercial introduction using best
practices tools and technology. The product life cycle, ranging from
introduction to deletion, will be explored. Learners will understand the major
problems businesses encounter in the direction and management of product
development and marketing activities. Prerequisites: ENT 310 Principles of
Entrepreneurship
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
ECO 203 Principles of Microeconomics (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of economic
analysis for microeconomics. Learners study the interactions of firms
and consumers: consumer demands, firm costs, price determination
under various market structures, and the role of government in a market
economy. Prerequisite for those pursuing an A.A. degree:
MATH 125 with a minimum grade of B. Prerequisite for all other
programs: MATH 125 or STAT 280 (Course formerly ECON 203)
HCM 400 Healthcare Information Systems Management
(3 units, 8 weeks)
The course studies the mission-supporting role, organization, and
technological applications of health information management systems.
The course reviews best practices and issues of planning, privacy,
electronic health records, information security, e-health, community
health networks and emergent technologies. Learners analyze how
health care organizations utilize information to improve clinical and
managerial decision-making. Prerequisite: MGT 380 Information
Systems Management
HRM 440 Workplace Planning and Employment (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course analyzes the requirements of an organization and utilizes
a needs analysis to match employee skills and competencies with the
organizations needs and strategic plans. Learners are exposed to career
planning in light of the organizational structure and path to sustainability.
HCM 410 Healthcare Ethics and Quality Control (3 units, 8 weeks)
The course examines ethical principles, and presents decisionmaking models related to the health care industry. Learners identify
and analysis ethical issues, apply and implement ethics theories and
principles to specific problems, and evaluate personal characteristics,
and organizational structures for delivering health care services across
cultures.
HCM 420 Healthcare Organizational Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
The course examines the day-to-day operations and management of
health care organizations including hospitals, private practice, ambulatory
setting, and specialty services. Learners focusing on key issues that
influence the administration of today’s health care organizations.
HIS 201 U.S. History (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course acquaints the learner with the major developments of U.S.
history from pre-contact to post-modern eras. Emphasis is given to the
foundational political experiences of the American people and how political
developments have been influenced and affected by social developments.
Learners study to apply analytical skills to the reading of primary texts
representing the whole sweep of American history. Prerequisite: ENG 105
(Course formerly HIST 201)
HIS 202 World Civilizations (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides an in-depth analysis of global historical trends which
have transformed world civilization, such as the emergence of world
system(s); formation of ethnic, racial, and national identities; capitalism,
colonialism, and development; ecological imperialism; religious movements;
industrialization; and modernization. Prerequisite: ENG 105 (Course formerly
HIST 202)
HLTH 101 Health Education (2 units, 8 weeks)
This course focuses on physical, mental, social and emotional
health and wellness. The whole-person view of health and wellness is
approached from both the personal and community levels. Emphases
include stress management, physical fitness, nutrition, and the
promotion of healthy lifestyle choices.
HRM 300 Compensation and Benefits (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides a comprehensive overview of the philosophies
of compensation with a focus on alternative compensation, rewards
and benefits. The course discusses compensation fundamentals,
documentation, employee motivation and the development of
performance appraisals. Learners are exposed to standard benefits
packages through the process of benefits analysis with an emphasis
on cost containment.
HRM 460 Performance Optimization (3 units, 8 weeks)
Examines the role of politics, social and psychological systems as they
impact employee performance. Learners are exposed to the theories
and practices of motivation and best practices that enhance employee
performance and long-term career employee development and training.
HSCI 100 Introduction to Health and Disease (3 units, 8 weeks)
This introductory course examines the causes and consequences of
disease and the promotion of individual, family and community health.
Public health, social science, and behavioral science findings are studied.
Examples of topics covered include major chronic and infectious diseases,
mental health, reproductive health, and drug and alcohol use and misuse.
Identifying healthy personal behaviors that promote wellness and minimize
unhealthy lifestyle will be emphasized.
HSCI 105 Nutrition and Wellness (3 units, 8 weeks)
Nutrition—and its specific impact on wellness and health risks—will be
the focus of this course. Topics explored are (1) dietary-related disease
(e.g., coronary heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, gluten allergies,
etc.); (2) obesity in the U.S.; (3) Malnutrition among the youth and the
elderly; (4) Nutrition-based interventions, and others.
HSCI 110 U.S. Healthcare Systems (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course takes a broad overview of the health care system in the
United States. Topics include a historic examination of the health care
system in America; universal, primary, private, and managed care;
advances in medical technology; health care providers; informatics;
gerontology and long term care; and health care reform and policy.
HSCI 300 Bioethics (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course focuses on human choices and actions that typically occur
in medical practice. This course begins with a brief overview of ethics,
and then moves to develop and consider the moral values and principles
relevant to medical practice and bioethics.
HSCI 305 Introduction to Genetics (4 units, 8 weeks)
This course focuses on the principles of genetics with application at the
level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans.
The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and
genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation,
and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze
protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.
HSCI 310 Healthcare Professions (1 unit, 8 weeks)
This course examines careers and opportunities in the health care
professions, including educational, vocational, and legal requirements of
health care jobs.
HSCI 320 Medical Sociology (3 units, 8 weeks)
Examination of culture and social interactions in mediating the health
and illness effects as they impact individuals and groups. Topics include
the social impact of illness, the relationships between patients and health
professionals, advertising and pharmaceutical use/abuse, unhealthy
lifestyle choices in families and communities, and healthful practices of
social groups.
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2012–13
HRM 310 Legal Issues in Human Resources (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies the conceptual and legal frameworks that guide employment
laws and regulations. The course describes the legal requirements of
employers as they pertain to state, federal and global laws and statutes.
Topics include discrimination, national origin, religion, gender, age,
disability, the hiring process, termination procedures and liability
protection. Prerequisite: BUS 270 Business Law and Ethics
GENERAL INFORMATION
HCM 320 Healthcare Financial Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
The course examines the complexities of reimbursement including
changes in Medicare payment and other third party payers, the evolution
and shape of managed care, related public programs, and public policy.
Topics addressed include financial management, financial statement
analysis, working capital management, present value analysis, capital
budgeting, cost of capital, variance analysis, and financing techniques.
ISM 310 Programming and Database Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides learners with basic concepts of computer
programming, and programming concepts, and constructs. In addition,
the course includes an introduction to the design and use of database
systems, while familiarizing learners in concepts such as data modeling,
file management, database programming and management.
Prerequisite: MGT 380 Information Systems Management
ISM 320 Hardware and Database Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides learners with the knowledge and skills necessary
for computer configuration, maintenance, repair and administration. The
course covers hardware and software installation, diagnoses troubleshooting, and integrating peripherals. Learners will also explore
methodologies for installing system enhancements and upgrades. The
course focuses on preparing the learner to take the CompTIA A+
Certification exam. Prerequisite: MGT 380 Information Systems
Management
ISM 330 Networking and Security (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course is an introduction to basic concepts in the application, design,
and implementation of computer and telecommunication networks. It
includes an overview of various network topics including network architecture
and protocols, network management, routing, security, hardware, and basic
programming principles. Learners will analyze common problems in network
implementation, maintenance, and repair and management of network
systems. Prerequisite: MGT 380 Information Systems Management
ISM 400 Web Development (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies website design, methods, principles, concepts, standards, and
programming applications in conjunction with business practices and
operations. Learners gain practical web-design, implementation,
maintenance, and analysis skills. Learners evaluate websites and
develop processes to improve business efficiency and effectiveness.
Prerequisite: MGT 380 Information Systems Management
LEAD 300 Leadership Communication (3 units, 8 weeks)
Presents a practical overview of effective oral and written communication
in the organizational leadership setting. Research and technical writing
are addressed, as are marketing and public relations writing styles.
Electronic communication (emails, Twitter, and blogging) is represented
and illustrated. Oral presentations are presented, with special emphasis
on delivering inspirational talks that influence organizational change.
LEAD 320 Theory and Practice of Leadership (3 units, 8 weeks)
Provides an evaluative review of the major theories and practices of
leadership studies, which include leaders in various sectors. The history,
structure, behavior, development, and dynamics of successful and
aberrant leaders are explored.
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LEAD 350 International Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course examines the process of international business
management and evaluates political, legal, and governmental risks.
Leaders study the role of culture in managing people across cultures
and analyze the impact of strategic alliances and partnerships on the
organization.
LEAD 360 Leadership Ethics (3 units, 8 weeks)
Examines ethical frameworks and their application to organizational
leadership situations, as well as to personal leadership decisions.
Topics such as servant leadership, utilitarianism, Kant’s categorical
imperative, and other theories are discussed, as well as corporate social
responsibility, employer-employee relations, product safety, etc.
LEAD 365 Organizational Analysis (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course analyzes the organization in relation to competitors in the
global industry. Leaders evaluate the driving forces of the industry and
develop key strategies to provide the organization with a competitive
advantage. Leaders forecast technological and environmental changes
and implement initiates enabling organizations to positively leverage the
changes.
LEAD 370 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course examines the theories and practices of cross-cultural
communication and how leaders motivate individuals, teams, and the
organization as a whole to accomplish the mission and vision of the
organization. Leaders design and implement corporate wide strategic
communications initiates taking into account the various cultural
distinctions.
LEAD 400 Organizational Development and Innovation
(3 units, 8 weeks)
An introduction and analysis of organizational development and change
factors. Restructuring organizations, human resource management
interventions, diagnostics, interpersonal and group processes, and
transformational change are explicated.
LEAD 410 Social Media Marketing (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course examines the role and impact social media sites and
marketing have on the organization of the 21st century. Leaders study
the theory and practice of social media marketing and develop social
media marketing campaigns designed to increase the exposure of the
firm and to communication with customer on a global scale.
LEAD 420 Human Resource Strategy (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course introduces adult learners to many of the key components
of human resources (HR) in organizations, such as workforce planning,
recruitment, selection, staffing, performance evaluation, training,
compensation, and other issues. The leader’s perspective in relation to
HR functions is the primary focus in this course.
LEAD 440 Emotional Intelligence and Leaders (3 units, 8 weeks)
Social interaction processes and human behavior is studied from the
concept of emotional intelligence, as it focuses on intrapersonal and
interpersonal attributes of the leader. The positive juxtaposition of
authentic leadership, emotional intelligence, and emotional contagion
are explored as well.
2014
HSCI 497 Fieldwork (2 units, 8 weeks)
Supervised experience in an approved health care setting where the
learner experiences a wide range of health care practices or procedures.
The learner will develop a field experience contract with an onsite
supervisor and a healthcare faculty member. The learners will then
present their findings with other colleagues in the course, and upload
their experiences on the HSCI 497 webpage. Prerequisites: Completion
of all core courses and senior standing, or permission from the Director
of Academic Affairs
LEAD 330 Managerial Finance (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides leaders with essential financial knowledge to aid
in the strategic decision-making process. Leaders develop the skills
necessary to set long and short-term financial goals and metrics to
measure the financial success and health of an organization. Leaders
learn how to utilize standard financial ratios and financial statement
analysis to set the financial course for an organization.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
HSCI 491 Senior Seminar: Health Sciences Capstone
(3 units, 8 weeks)
This capstone course completes the BSHS program. Drawing on the
health sciences core and emphasis, adult learners conceive and design
a health care project in collaboration with project sponsors.
Prerequisites: Completion of all core courses and senior standing
MGT 105 Introduction to Business (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course introduces learners to the role of business in society and
the impact of the social environment on the business organization. The
course provides an overview of the primary functional areas of business,
including management, human resources, marketing, finance, accounting,
production, communications, information technology, legal responsibilities,
ethics and the global environment of business.
MGT 310 Statistical Analysis for Business Decisions (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies statistical methods and techniques designed to increase the
efficiency and productivity of a firm and decision-making process. The
course requires learners to utilize a statistical software program to
produce efficiency gains and present the findings through a formal
business report. Prerequisite: STAT 280 Applied Statistics or equivalent
MGT 320 Financial Management and Markets (3 units, 8 weeks)
Learners explore principles and practices of financial management.
Sources and methods of raising capital, allocation of funds within the
firm, cash flow, financial statement analysis, financial markets, and capital
budgeting techniques are addressed. Additional concepts covered include
present-value analysis, long-term financial planning, risk and return, and
basic derivatives. Prerequisite: ACC 210 Financial Accounting
MGT 350 Marketing and E-Commerce (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course examines the theories and practices of marketing products
domestically and globally. The course offers an in-depth study of the
primary concepts of marketing and the transition to E-Commerce and
how social media has changed advertising and the distribution of
products and services. Learners examine the concept of global
homogenization and consumer behavior.
MGT 370 Cross-Cultural Communication and Negotiations
(3 units, 8 weeks)
This course examines the theories and practices of cross-cultural
communication and the process of negotiating with members and teams
from another culture. The course prepares learner to; lead a negotiations
process, address conflicts, view diverse ethical paradigms, problem solve,
creation of innovative alternatives, summarization, clarify points, gain
consensus and to view their interactions from another’s perspective.
MGT 380 Information Systems Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course provides an introduction to the functions of information
systems and how systems aid firms on creating value while maximizing
efficiency and increasing competitiveness. Learners evaluate systems
design, database management, networking communications, security,
privacy, policy, legal and ethics issues associated with technology.
MGT 415 Operations Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course focuses on decision-making and controlling the allocations
of personnel, materials, and machine utilization in a manufacturing
environment. It addresses issues related to the handling and control
of materials, inventory, purchasing, and quality control. Learners study
about setting standards and developing skills in estimating, forecasting,
and scheduling.
MGT 450 International Business (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course presents a survey of issues in international business. The
focus is on managing and engaging in ethical business practices in an
international environment, understanding the global monetary system, and
developing an international perspective. The course evaluates production,
marketing, competition, trade, global institutions, political structures,
supply chain, finance, human resources and cross-cultural interactions.
MGT 460 Leadership and People (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies the primary theories and principles of leadership and how to
apply the principles across a multinational organization. Learners come
to realize that people, their abilities and talents serve as the most valuable
organizational asset. Learners work to develop; a personal philosophy of
leadership, evaluate how to motivate employees, develop the ability
to inspire leadership qualities in others and the process of creating a
shared vision.
MGT 480 Strategic Management and Policy (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies the executive management decision, planning and implementation
process. Learners examine how strategic initiatives and structural changes
impact and drive the success of a firm. The course exposes learners to
the theories and concept of strategy, creation of mission, vision and values
statements, strategy implementation, assessment and how to create a
success, authentic, stable and positive corporate culture that thrives on
innovation and leadership.
MGT 485 Management and Organizational Behavior (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course introduces the managerial skills of planning, organizing,
leading, and control. It gives particular emphasis to organizing and
actuating responsibility and authority, delegation, decentralization, the
role of staff, line-staff relationship committees, boards of directors,
organization charting, formal and informal organization, communication
in multicultural settings, and reaction to change. Learners develop
a personal philosophy of management to guide their careers as
business professionals.
MGT 490 Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 units, 8 weeks)
[Capstone Course]
This course serves as the capstone for the BAM curriculum. Learners are
first exposed to the theories, concepts and practices of entrepreneurship
and innovation and then create, develop, analyze and implement
an innovative/entrepreneurial project with their current employer or
develop a distinct business plan. Learners utilize knowledge and
skills gained from prior course in completing their project or plan.
MGT 495 International Study (1-3 units, 7-14 days)
Learners have two options for completing MGT 495. Option one;
learners complete the course as a 7-14 day travel abroad course in
conjunction with ECO 440 International Economics and Trade or MGT
450 International Business. Option two; learners complete an in-depth
regional study and analysis. The course offers learners the opportunity to
experience another culture and business practices. Learners complete
assigned readings and a project on the selected country.
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2012–13
MATH 125 College Algebra (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course is a study of basic college algebra, including polynomial and
rational functions, inverse functions, the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra,
exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, advanced graphical
procedures and interpretations, linear and nonlinear systems of equations,
matrix representations of systems of equations, and introductory concepts
in sequence, series, and probability. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on
placement test, or SAT 540/ACT 23 math score, or successful completion
of MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra (Course formerly MATH 110)
MGT 390 Project and Change Management (3 units, 8 weeks)
Studies the process and practice of project and change management of
information systems and software applications. Learners work through
the process of defining, planning, implementing and delivering a change
project. Learners develop cost estimates, time requirements, quality
controls, team assignments, training schedules, documentation and
potential risks associated with the change.
GENERAL INFORMATION
MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course presents intermediate-level algebra. Topics include linear
graphs, mathematical models, systems of equations in two and three
variables, multiplying and factoring polynomial functions, rational
and radical expressions and functions, complex numbers, quadratic
equations and functions. As this course is completely online, our focus
is to provide students with extraordinary online tutorials, individualized
support that ensures student progress, continuous assessment and
feedback, and valuable engagement and interaction among all students
in the course. (Course formerly MATH 095)
PHIL 105 Introduction to Critical Thinking (3 units, 8 weeks)
Learners study principles of deductive and nondeductive logic. Principles
are used to evaluate arguments in a variety of contexts, including the
popular media and the professional practices of philosophy, theology,
science, or law. Learners are also expected to assess and improve the
logical rigor and clarity of their own reasoning. (Course formerly PHIL 110)
UC 101 Momentum: Success in the University (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course lays a strong foundation for a successful transition to
college by increasing critical thinking, curiosity, goal orientation, and
motivation. It provides an orientation to University College, the Moodle
Online Learning System, digital library services, and other support
services. Learners are introduced to the idea of a Christian liberal arts
education, a strengths approach to learning, and opportunities to
develop practical skills and strategies for addressing the challenges of
college. This course is a prerequisite for all other UC courses.
(Course formerly APOU 101)
PHIL 205 Introduction to Philosophy (3 units, 8 weeks)
An introduction to the main areas of philosophy, including epistemology,
ethics, metaphysics, and philosophy of religion. The course will introduce
learners to the major philosophers and their writings. In addition,
learners will become familiar with worldview-thinking; a conceptual
framework from which to examine, understand, and converse on the
various topics in philosophy. In particular, learners will learn to articulate a
comprehensive Christian worldview, and communicate their perspectives
with clarity and relevancy. (Course formerly PHL 220)
PHYS 100 General Physics for Health Sciences/Lab (4 units, 8 weeks)
Lecture, 3 units; Lab, 1 unit
This introductory course explores mechanics, waves, fluids,
thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, and assorted topics in
modern physics.
PHYS 150 Introduction to Astronomy (4 units, 8 weeks)
Lecture, 3 units; Lab, 1 unit
This course introduces the history of astronomy, the solar system, the
stellar systems, galactic systems, and cosmology. This course requires
basic skills developed in a college algebra environment including solving
equations, scientific notation, roots, exponents and unit conversions.
Students uncomfortable with these requirements may wish to complete
College Algebra before taking Astronomy. (Course formerly PHYC 140)
REL 100 Introduction to Global Religious Studies (3 units, 8 weeks)
This course offers a study of global religious traditions in their cultural
and historical contexts. Learners critically examine various definitions and
methodologies of global religious studies from a confessional Christian
perspective. Traditions examined include Judaism, Islam, Eastern Christianity,
East Asian, African, South American, and other Indigenous traditions.
(Course formerly RELG 100)
REL 105 Christian Life, Faith, and Ministry (3 units, 8 weeks)
The theological, educational, and social bases for ministry and service are
examined. An analysis of the church’s responsibility and methods
for carrying out the ministry mandate of Jesus is emphasized.
Field experience is required. (Course formerly MIN 108)
SPAN 121 Beginning Spanish I (3 units, 8 weeks)
This two-course sequence emphasizes practical Spanish communication
in real-life situations for beginners. The course addresses the pronunciation,
intonation, and structure of Spanish within an online framework designed to
develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special cultural
presentations supplement language study.
SPAN 122 Beginning Spanish II (3 units, 8 weeks)
This is a continuation of SPAN 121. Prerequisite: SPAN 121, passing
Spanish CLEP Exam
SPAN 123 Intensive Beginning Spanish (4 units, 8 weeks)
This is an intensive accelerated course that emphasizes practical Spanish
communication in real-life situations for beginners. The course addresses
the pronunciation, intonation, and structure of Spanish within an online
framework designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and
writing skills. Special cultural presentations supplement language study.
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2014
STAT 280 Applied Statistics (3 units, 8 weeks)
This is an elementary course in basic statistical concepts. Learners
are introduced to the understanding and use of necessary computational
procedures to attain the basic skills in the following: frequency distributions,
graphs, central tendency, variability, normal curve, probabilities, correlation,
hypothesis testing, and chi square. Understanding and use of the above
statistics are stressed over mathematical development.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
MGT 499 Directed Study (1-3 units, 8 weeks)
In response to an organizational case study problem, learners prepare
an applied research project in which they review the pertinent literature,
analyze the ethical issues, evaluate possible approaches to solving the
problem, formulate recommendations, present an implementation plan,
summarize their findings, and apply them to their personal and professional
lives. Prerequisite: Senior standing
3
7
School of Education
Academic
Calendar 2012–13
2014 CATALOG
Campuses..........................................................................
Academic Calendar...........................................................
6761
Department of Graduate Psychology ............................. 84
Master’s in:
Clinical Psychology: Marriage
and Family Therapy (M.A.)......................................... 86
Department of Leadership and
College Student Development..................................... 68
Doctorate in:
Clinical Psychology: Family Psychology (Psy.D.)......... 89
Support Services............................................................... 67
The Community Counseling Center.................................. 67
Pediatric Neurodevelopment Institute........................... 67
Master’s in:
College Counseling and Student Development (M.S.). 68
Leadership (M.A.)........................................................... 71
Global Leadership (M.A.)................................................ 72
Department of Doctoral Higher Education .................... 75
Doctorate in:
Higher Education (Ph.D.)................................................ 77
Higher Education Leadership (Ed.D.)............................ 79
Department of Physical Therapy .................................. 107
Master of Science in Human Physiology.................... 107
Doctor of Physical Therapy......................................... 108
Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy..................... 110
Department of Social Work ........................................... 115
Master of Social Work.................................................. 115
Certificate in:
Strengths-Oriented Higher Education........................... 81
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2014 Summer I
Monday, May 05, 2014.................................................................................................................. Session starts; classes begin
Wednesday, May 07, 2014.................................................................................. Last day to add/drop 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time
Monday, May 19, 2014...............“Intent to Graduate” forms due for those intending to have a degree posted after next session
Tuesday, May 27, 2014...................................................................................................................................... Classes resume
Sunday, June 08, 2014.................................................................................................. Last day to withdraw with a grade of W
Friday, June 27, 2014..............................................................................................................................................Classes end
Wednesday, July 2, 2014.....................................................................................................Final grades due, noon Pacific Time
2014 Summer II
Monday, June 30, 2014................................................................................................................. Session starts; classes begin
Wednesday, July 02, 2014................................................................................... Last day to add/drop 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time
Friday, July 04, 2014.............................................................................. UC offices closed in observance of Independence Day
Monday, July 07, 2014...................................................................................................................................... Classes resume
Sunday, August 03, 2014 ............................................................................................. Last day to withdraw with a grade of W
Friday, August 22, 2014...........................................................................................................................................Classes end
Wednesday, August 27, 2014..............................................................................................Final grades due, noon Pacific Time
2014 Fall I
Monday, September 01, 2014....................................................................................................... Session starts; classes begin
Wednesday, September 03, 2014....................................................................... Last day to add/drop 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time
Monday, September 15, 2014....“Intent to Graduate” forms due for those intending to have a degree posted after next session
Sunday, October 05, 2014............................................................................................ Last day to withdraw with a grade of W
Saturday, October 24, 2015....................................................................................................................................Classes end
Wednesday, October 29, 2014............................................................................................Final grades due, noon Pacific Time
2014 Fall II
Monday, October 27, 2014............................................................................................................ Session starts; classes begin
Wednesday, October 29, 2014............................................................................ Last day to add/drop 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time
Thursday, November 27, 2014........................................................................UC offices closed in observance of Thanksgiving
Friday, November 28, 2014.............................................................................UC offices closed in observance of Thanksgiving
Monday, November 28, 2014............................................................................................................................ Classes resume
Sunday, November 30, 2014......................................................................................... Last day to withdraw with a grade of W
Friday, December 19, 2014.....................................................................................................................................Classes end
Thursday, December 25, 2014............................................................................ UC offices closed in observance of Christmas
Friday, December 26, 2014.................................................................................................Final grades due, noon Pacific Time
62
2014
Monday, May 26, 2014...................................................................................UC offices closed in observance of Memorial Day
ACADEMIC CALENDAR
Academic Calendar
Monday, January 05, 2015............................................................................................................ Session starts; classes begin
Wednesday, January 07, 2015............................................................................ Last day to add/drop 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time
Monday, January 19, 2015.........“Intent to Graduate” forms due for those intending to have a degree posted after next session
Sunday, February 08, 2015............................................................................................ Last day to withdraw with a grade of W
Friday, February 27, 2015........................................................................................................................................Classes end
2015 Spring II
Monday, March 02, 2015............................................................................................................... Session starts; classes begin
Wednesday, March 04, 2015............................................................................... Last day to add/drop 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time
Friday, April 03, 2015........................................................................................ UC offices closed in observance of Good Friday
Sunday, April 05, 2015.................................................................................................. Last day to withdraw with a grade of W
Friday, April 24, 2015...............................................................................................................................................Classes end
Wednesday, April 29, 2015..................................................................................................Final grades due, noon Pacific Time
63
2012–13
Wednesday, March 04, 2015...............................................................................................Final grades due, noon Pacific Time
GENERAL INFORMATION
2015 Spring I
Thursday, January 01, 2015........................................................................ UC offices closed in observance of New Year’s Day
8
Index
2014 CATALOG
Index ................................................................................ 64
64
64
65
2012–13
Academic Calendar..................................................... 27, 62
Academic and Support Services.......................................... 6
Academic Freedom............................................................. 3
Academic Integrity............................................................. 26
Academic Policies............................................................. 25
Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal................... 30
Academic Programs.......................................................... 37
Accreditation....................................................................... 4
Adds/Drops....................................................................... 27
Administrative Withdrawal Policy....................................... 27
Admission......................................................................... 10
Admission Status............................................................... 11
Admission Petitions........................................................... 10
Admissions Policies............................................................. 9
Application for Graduation................................................. 36
Associate of Arts............................................................... 40
Associate of Science in Health Sciences............................ 41
Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology.............................. 44
Bachelor of Arts in Leadership........................................... 47
Bachelor of Arts in Management........................................ 48
Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences............................. 51
Bookstore............................................................................ 8
Career and Vocation Center................................................. 7
Certificate of Advanced Management................................ 38
Certificate of Business Principles....................................... 38
Certificate Proficiencies................................................ 38, 39
Changes in Degree Requirements..................................... 35
Classification of Students.................................................. 30
Commencement................................................................ 36
Concurrent Enrollment Policy............................................. 28
Core Values......................................................................... 3
Cost of Attendance........................................................... 17
Counseling Services............................................................ 8
Course Credit.................................................................... 34
Course Descriptions.......................................................... 53
Course Numbering System................................................ 27
Credit by Examination........................................................ 12
Credit Hours...................................................................... 28
Dean’s List Criteria............................................................. 30
Degree/Certificate Posting Dates....................................... 36
Disabilities (Accommodations for Individuals with)................ 7
Disclosure.......................................................................... 31
Diversity Statement.............................................................. 3
Evidence of Proficiency...................................................... 10
FAFSA............................................................................... 22
False Information (Policy Regarding).................................. 10
Federal Student Aid........................................................... 18
FERPA (Notification of Rights under).................................. 31
Financial Agreement.......................................................... 17
Financial Aid...................................................................... 16
Financial Aid Policies......................................................... 22
Grading............................................................................. 28
Grievance Policy................................................................ 33
Harassment Policy............................................................... 5
High School Concurrent Enrollment Program..................... 11
History................................................................................. 4
Homeschooled Students................................................... 11
Incomplete Grades............................................................ 28
International Admission...................................................... 11
Late Registration............................................................... 27
Late Work Policy................................................................ 28
Latin Honors Criteria.......................................................... 36
Learner Participation.......................................................... 28
Learning Management System............................................ 8
Leave of Absence.............................................................. 30
Liberal Arts Core................................................................ 43
Libraries.............................................................................. 7
Loans................................................................................ 18
Location.............................................................................. 5
Make-up Provisions........................................................... 29
Military Discount................................................................ 21
Minimum Grade-point Average.......................................... 35
Normal Progress Toward a Degree.................................... 30
Notification of Admission................................................... 11
Outside Aid........................................................................ 21
Payment............................................................................ 17
Petition Process................................................................ 29
Pre-Nursing Health Science Certificate.............................. 39
Principles............................................................................. 2
Program Learning Outcomes........... 3, 40, 42, 44, 47, 48, 51
Re-admission and Re-enrollment....................................... 11
Refund Policy.................................................................... 17
Repeated Courses............................................................. 29
Registering for Classes...................................................... 27
Requirements for Graduation............................................. 35
Reservation of Rights......................................................... 26
Residency Requirements................................................... 35
Right of Access................................................................. 31
Stacking Financial Aid........................................................ 24
State Aid........................................................................... 19
Statements of Compliance.................................................. 5
Statement of Faith............................................................... 2
Statements of Vision and Purpose/Mission.......................... 2
Student Behavior............................................................... 32
Student Financial Services................................................. 17
Student Records Policy............................................... 31, 35
Student Support Services.................................................... 7
Study Load........................................................................ 28
Time Limit for Completing Degrees.................................... 35
Transcripts................................................................... 10, 31
Transfer Applicants............................................................ 10
Transfer Students (General Education Information)............. 11
Transfer Work.................................................................... 29
Tutoring Services................................................................. 7
University’s Christian Worldview........................................... 2
Verification......................................................................... 24
Veterans’ Education Benefits............................................. 11
Withdrawal........................................................................ 30
GENERAL2014
INDEX
INFORMATION
Index
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