v2r1bootmonitor

v2r1bootmonitor
Configuring the IBM Network Station
Using the Boot Monitor
Network Station Education
IBM Network Computer Division
August 1999
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Objectives
Understand the parameters required by the Network Station
Configuration Methods - Network vs NVRAM
The differences with the V1R3 boot monitor
Understand how to use the NVRAM SETUP utility
Network Parameters
Boot Server Parameters
Configuration Server Parameters
Authentication Server Parameters
Service Aids Menu
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Notes
The objective of this presentation is to understand the configuration parameters that a
Network Station needs in order to be able to initiate and complete its boot process.
There are two ways of specifying these parameters, one of which is to use the graphical
interface of the boot monitor to enter the parameters into the station's NVRAM, which is
the subject of this discussion.
We take a look therefore at a few of the boot monitor panels, concentrating only on the
main ones. We also take a look at the Service Menu and at the differences with the V1R3
boot monitor.
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Selection of Firmware Support
Earlier Version
Select Operating System
1. WSOD
2. Other
3. Auto
MENU00
IBM Network Station
Change Firmware Support
BIOS for WorkSpace on Demand
NS Boot for Network Station Manager
Automatic Selection
Default to automatic selection after 10 seconds
Use cursor keys to select firmware support.
Later Version
Enter=Continue
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Notes
If you unpack a brand new Network Station, and power it on, the first panel that appears
will likely be one of these two panels. If you have an early model, you might see the panel
at the top left hand corner; for a later model, you might see the one at the bottom right
hand corner.
In the first (earlier model) case, select number 2. Other, and in the second case, select NS
Boot for Network Station Manager and press Enter. From that point on, you will not be
presented with this panel anymore.
If you do not take action within 10 seconds, it will first try to use DHCP/BOOTP. If that fails,
it will try BIOS. The operation that completes without error is the one that is selected.
If nothing succeeds, and you have trouble with the firmware selection that was done, press
either the ESC key when the IBM logo displays in the top left hand corner or the F1 key
when the IBM logo displays in the top right hand corner. If you get an administrator
password prompt, use IBMNCD as the password, which should get you into the setup
menu where you can access the Change firmware support menu entry and select the NS
Boot for Network Station Manager as the default.
For more detailed information, see the Appendix C in the Using Network Station Manager
product publication (SC41-0690).
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Change Language Menu
IBM Network Station
Change Language setting
MENU01
English
French
German
Italian
Japanese
Spanish
Language defaults to English after 1 minute.
Use cursor keys to select language.
Enter=Continue
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Notes
This might be the first panel that gets displayed if you did not get a firmware selection
panel.
A reminder that the ESC key stops the boot process and gets you back to the main boot
monitor menu and that F9 toggles between verbose and no-verbose mode.
Verbose mode displays text messages as the boot process takes place whereas
non-verbose mode only displays a picture showing that activity is taking place.
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Configuration Data Required
What data in needed by the boot monitor?
The station's own IP address (mandatory)
A network station is an IP host and needs an IP address to operate
The boot server IP address (mandatory)
Where to go to get its operating system
The kernel file name and path
Where (on the boot server) is the kernel located and its name
The boot protocol
to use when contacting the boot server
The configuration server
What server to contact for configuration files
The configuration file path
Where (on the configuration server) are the configuration files
located
The configuration protocol
to use to retrieve the configuration files
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Network Computer Division
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Notes
Before we look at any other panels, it might be good to review the type of configuration
information that is required by the boot monitor in order to initiate its boot process.
The basic data that a station needs is first IP configuration data, the most important of
which is an IP address. There is also a subnet mask and a default gateway which we have
not indicated here for simplicity.
Then there is the address of a boot server, the name and location of a kernel (operating
system file) and the protocol to use to download the kernel file, which is the essential first
process to be performed by the boot monitor.
Finally, there are other optional (because they can default to the boot server values)
parameters such as the address of a configuration server, and path to the files and
protocol to use, and others than we will discuss in a moment.
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How is Data Configured?
DHCP Server
IP Network
Administrator enters cfg
data on the DHCP server
and the boot monitor
obtains the data from the
server
MAC=0000E568BFAD
Boot Monitor
DHCP Client
Boot Monitor
SETUP Utility
SCRN05
IBM Network Station
Set Network Parameters
IP Addresses from ............................. Network
NVRAM
Network Station IP Address ............... 9.24.104.189
Boot Host IP Address:
First Boot Host IP Addess .............. 9.24.104.240
Second Boot Host IP Address ........ 0.0.0.0
Third Boot Host IP Address ............ 0.0.0.0
Configuration Host IP Address:
First host............................................0.0.0.0
Second Host.......................................0.0.0.0
Gateway IP Address.............................. 9.24.104.1
Subnet Mask ........................................ 255.255.255.0
Broadcast IP Address ......................... 255.255.255.255
NVRAM
my ip address=?
boot server address=?
kernel filename=?
path to kernel=?
cfg server address=?
etc.
Use cursor keys to select option
Enter = Save F12=Cancel
...OR...
F11=Restore Parameter
cbechard-10/98
Network Station
Administrator enters cfg
data via the SETUP
Utility on the Network
Station
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Notes
There are two ways that the boot monitor can get this configuration data:
Represented at the bottom of the chart, it is either entered manually by the administrator in
the stations's NVRAM using the keyboard of the station and the SETUP utility of the boot
monitor. When the boot monitor initiates, it then reads its configuration values from NVRAM
where they were stored by the administrator
Or, as represented at the top of the chart, the administrator enters the (same) configuration
values in a DHCP server's configuration files. The boot monitor is then triggered to contact
a DHCP server on the network instead of reading from NVRAM and these same values are
obtained from the DHCP server and stored in NVRAM.
The DHCP method is the recommended method because it allows centralized
management of the configuration values and avoids having to have a physical presence at
the station's site in order to enter the configuration values in NVRAM.
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V2R1 Boot Monitor - Differences with R3
More extensive menus
No command prompt
Service aids functions selectable in a menu
More service LAN trace functions
Better protection against update failures
Supports newer level of DDC type monitors
Does not upload dump files (done by the kernel)
Has DNS capability during boot
Removed from memory after kernel is operational
DHCP client accepts only valid responses
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Notes
From a base function perspective, the V1R3 and V2R1 boot monitors are similar since
they carry out the same functions. However, there are quite a lot of differences in many
aspects. For example:
The menus are more extensive
There is no command prompt
The Service aids functions are selectable in a menu and there are a lot more service LAN
trace functions provided
There is a better protection against update failures
the V2R1 boot monitor supports the newer level of DDC type monitors
Dump files are now uploaded by the kernel
The boot code has DNS capability during the boot phase
It removes itself from memory after the kernel is operational
The DHCP client in the boot monitor now accepts only valid responses from a DHCP
server (meaning that if options 66 and 67 are not present in the offer for example, the offer
is rejected).
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Main Setup Utility Panel (V1R3 vs V2R1)
SCRN02
IBM Network Station
Setup Utility
F2 = View Hardware Configuration
F3 = Set Network Parameters
F4 = Set Boot Parameters
F5 = Set Configuration Parameters
F6 = Set Monitor Parameters
F7 = Set Language Parameters
V2R1 Menu
F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic Messages Enabled
Enter = Reboot
V1R3 Menu
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Notes
These two panels illustrates the visual difference between the main menus in V1R3 and
V2R1.
The V2R1 panel is easier to use. Cursors keys are used to select entries instead of PF
keys and the menus are better structured.
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Main Setup Utility Panel
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Notes
This is the main menu.
The first three entries at the top are for the language, keyboard and display settings.
Settings done here become the default values for this station but they can be overridden
by settings in NSM.
The next 4 entries are the most important:
The Network Settings is where the IP configuration data is entered
Then come the three main servers, that is boot, configuration and authentication. The
authentication server entry is new and did not exist in V1R3; it was configured through a
configuration file parameter.
Note that these three servers settings menus disappear if in the network setting, you
specify that DHCP is to be the boot method used and NVRAM is not indicated and a
second and third choice.
The hardware information displays a list of all the hardware characteristics.
The boot logs contains the last 20 messages that took place during the boot process and
can be very useful when doing problem determination.
Fianlly the service aids entry provides a series of additional menus to perform many types
of tests and traces.
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Network Settings
Toggled on and
off by
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Notes
This is the configure network settings panel.
Entries on these panels are selected by using the cursor keys, and the values of the
selected entries changed by using the Page Up and Page Down keys to select possible
values like in a drop down list.
When values need to be entered, such as an IP address for example, it is no longer
necessary to use the backspace to erase the entry first, as was done in V1R3.
This panel specifies two primary settings:
The first three entries specifies whether the boot monitor should use values from a BOOTP
server, DHCP server or NVRAM when it initiates.
If NVRAM is selected, as is done in this example by setting the value to first, the entries
below indicated by a bracket then appear and must be specified by the administrator
Note that you can specify to try DHCP first, then BOOTP then NVRAM, or any order you
wish.
Notice that the network data includes a DNS server, which was not present in V1R3.
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Boot File Server Settings
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Notes
This is where the boot server settings are done.
This panel is automatically presented after you have entered values in the Network
Settings.
As in the previous release, up to three servers can be specified that will be tried in
sequence in the case where the first one specified is not available.
The boot file directory and file name does not have to be entered manually but can be
selected by using the Page Up/Down keys. However, the choices presented are the
standard paths and filename. If a custom value is required, select the blank entry and type
in the custom path and file name.
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Configuration Server Settings
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Notes
These are the configuration sever settings and this panel is also automatically presented
after you hit enter on the previous boot server settings panel.
The parameters are similar and function the same way.
If no values are entered here, these values default to the boot server. IOn other words, it is
assumed that the boot server is also the configuration server.
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Authentication Server Settings
RAP
RAP
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Notes
This panel for the authentication server is new in V2R1.
The protocol is Remote Access Protocol and cannot be changed.
Here also, entering nothing defaults to the boot server also being configured as the
authentication server.
When you press enter after entering the data, you are taken back to the main boot monitor
panel.
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Display Hardware Information
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Notes
This is to illustrate the type of hardware information that can de displayed from the main
menu, as we indicated earlier.
Notice that you can find out the level of the boot monitor, the serial number of the station,
the memory size, the processor speed, the display resolution and color palette setting, and
so on.
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Service Aids Menu
Menu70
IBM Network
Station
Service Aids
Change firmware support
Change local MAC address
Change fast boot setting
Change retry settings
Change NS boot themes
setting
Load factory defaults
Use cursor keys to select
task.
Enter=Continue F10=Reboot IBM Network Station
F12=Cancel
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Notes
When the boot monitor is started on the Network Station and the ESC key is used, the
main menu of the boot monitor is displayed.
On the main menu is an entry called Service Aids. Choosing this entry displays the panel
shown in this chart.
Actually, this is only a small portion of the real Service Aid menu because the bulk of it is
hidden. To gain access to the rest of the Service Aids, use Ctrl-F9 from this panel.
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Service Aids Main Hidden Menu (CTRL-F9)
Main Menu
1. Memory Test
2. Dump PCI Configuration Registers to serial
port
3. Cache Control
4. Video test
5. Test all
6. I/O (serial and parallel)
7. Toggle auto test
8. Configuration menu
9. Misc menu
0. Exit
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Notes
This is the main menu that you get when using Crtl-F9 from the main Service Aids menu.
This is only a partial menu as nearly each item on this menu expands into further menus.
There are too many items for us to describe here, so we suggest that you explore this on
your own.
We do want to point out however that the way to get to the network items is to choose the
9. Misc option, and on the next panel that appears, choose the Network entry.
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Service Aids Network Menus
MENU 1
1.Print ARP cache
2.Print routing table
3.Print boot configuration
4.Print card statistics
5.Print network statistics
6.Packet log
7.Bootp vendor specific/DHCP options
8.DHCP responses
9.More network menus=>MENU 2
0.Exit
MENU 2
1.Print Ethernet EEPROM data
2.Display/set EThernet Auto
Negotiate/Speed/duplex
3.Ping command
4.Duplicate network packets
5.Host command
6.Display/set TRN auto selection/speed
selection
7.Display subnet broadcast information
8.Display subnet broadcast bitmap
9.More network menus=>MENU 3
0.Exit
MENU 3
1.RPL Server discover
2.Display/set boot protocol
3.TFTP subnet boot protocol retry count
4.TFTP retry and delay values
5.NFS retry and delay values
6.Menu interruption (Alt PF9)
0.Exit
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Notes
These are the three network menus available from the first Network option.
There are a lot more tools and facilities here than were available in the V1R3 boot monitor.
Those are probably the main items that you would use to do problem determination if there
is a problem for the station to connect over the network to a boot server.
Notice in particular the items we highlighted in red:
The packet logs allows to see the last 20 or so packets that were issued or received so that
one can see the latest activity
The Ping command can be used to see if a destination can be successfully reached
The DHCP responses can display the DHCP frame activity when attempting to use a
DHCP server
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Service Aids Menu Functions
Alter Ethernet line speed, duplex
and auto negotiate mode
Testing
Memory test
Video test
Serial wrap port test
Parallel wrap port test
Audio testing
Alter Token Ring speed and Auto
detection mode
LAN Trace/Test Functions
Dumping PCI configuration
registers
Display network adapter
information
ARP Cache Display
IP Routing Table Display
Packet Log
Remote Third Party Debug
Display DHCP responses
Ping
Alter MAC address
Alter transfer block size
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Host command (convert from
name to IP and vise versa)
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Notes
This is a summary of the main functions that are available from the Service Aids menu of
the V2R1 boot monitor.
The only way to get familiar with these is to explore yourself by trying each of these
utilities.
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Where to Go for More Information
Main Web Site
www.ibm.com/nc
Current Network Station Redbook
SG24-5844 Network Station Manager V2R1
Previous Network Station Redbooks
SG24-5187 AS/400 - Techniques for Deployment in a WAN
SG24-5221 Windows NT - NSM Release 3
SG24-5212 Printing
SG24-2127 Windows NT/WinCenter
SG24-4954 S/390, SG24-2016 RS/6000, SG24-2153 AS/400
Product Publications
SC41-0684 Installing NSM for AS/400
SC41-0685 Installing NSM for RS/6000
SC41-0688 Installing NSM for Windows NT
SC41-0690 Using NSM
IBM Network Station Advanced Information (On the Web Site)
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Notes
These are some of the publications and documents where you can find more information.
There isn't a specific document that we know of, at this time, on the boot monitor, but we
will try to bring you additional information in the redbooks as we get more familiar with
these new tools.
Thank you.
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